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Sample records for independently firing retinal

  1. Independence of Foveal Retinal Locus and Visual Detection Paradigm.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-09

    F O-AO.. 17 ILLINOIS UNIV AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN HUMAN ATTENTION RES -ETC F/A 5/10 INDEPENDENCE OF FOVEAL RETINAL LOCUS AND VISUAL DETECTION PARAD -ETC...variably mapped, and frame time of 100 or 200 msec for the consistent or variably mapped conditions, respectively. The main effects of experimental paradigm...Foveal Retinal Locus and Visual Detection Paradigm Walter Schneider and Arthur D. Fisk Report 8001 Human Attention Research Laboratory University of

  2. Modeling the variability of firing rate of retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Levine, M W

    1992-12-01

    Impulse trains simulating the maintained discharges of retinal ganglion cells were generated by digital realizations of the integrate-and-fire model. If the mean rate were set by a "bias" level added to "noise," the variability of firing would be related to the mean firing rate as an inverse square root law; the maintained discharges of retinal ganglion cells deviate systematically from such a relationship. A more realistic relationship can be obtained if the integrate-and-fire mechanism is "leaky"; with this refinement, the integrate-and-fire model captures the essential features of the data. However, the model shows that the distribution of intervals is insensitive to that of the underlying variability. The leakage time constant, threshold, and distribution of the noise are confounded, rendering the model unspecifiable. Another aspect of variability is presented by the variance of responses to repeated discrete stimuli. The variance of response rate increases with the mean response amplitude; the nature of that relationship depends on the duration of the periods in which the response is sampled. These results have defied explanation. But if it is assumed that variability depends on mean rate in the way observed for maintained discharges, the variability of responses to abrupt changes in lighting can be predicted from the observed mean responses. The parameters that provide the best fits for the variability of responses also provide a reasonable fit to the variability of maintained discharges.

  3. Synchronized Firing among Retinal Ganglion Cells Signals Motion Reversal

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Greg; Taylor, Sam; Fisher, Clark; Harris, Rob; Berry, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY We show that when a moving object suddenly reverses direction, there is a brief, synchronous burst of firing within a population of retinal ganglion cells. This burst can be driven by either the leading or trailing edge of the object. The latency is constant for movement at different speeds, objects of different size, and bright versus dark contrasts. The same ganglion cells that signal a motion reversal also respond to smooth motion. We show that the brain can build a pure reversal detector using only a linear filter that reads out synchrony from a group of ganglion cells. These results indicate that not only can the retina anticipate the location of a smoothly moving object, but that it can also signal violations in its own prediction. We show that the reversal response cannot be explained by models of the classical receptive field and suggest that nonlinear receptive field subunits may be responsible. PMID:17880898

  4. Can climate change increase fire severity independent of fire intensity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Mantgem, P.; Nesmith, J.; Keifer, M.; Knapp, E.; Flint, A. L.; Flint, L. E.

    2013-12-01

    There is a growing realization that regional warming may be linked to increasing fire size and frequency in forests of the western US, a trend occurring in concert with increased fuel loads in forests that historically experienced frequent surface fires. Recent studies have also suggested that warming temperatures are correlated with increased fire severity (post-fire tree mortality). The mechanism whereby fire severity might increase in response to warming is presumed to be increasing probabilities of hazardous fire weather (higher air temperature, lower relative humidity and fuel moisture). While likely true, this view does not consider the biological context of the fire event. Here we present evidence that trees subject to environmental stress are more sensitive to subsequent fire damage. Tree growth records, used as an index of health for individuals, show that for two tree species (Abies concolor and Pinus lambertiana) in the Sierra Nevada of California poor growth leads to increased probabilities of mortality following fire. Plot-based fire monitoring databases from over 300 sites across the western US demonstrate that indices of drought stress are strongly predictive of post-fire tree survivorship. In sum, these results suggest that recent climatic trends may lead to a de facto increase in fire severity, even when there is no change in fire intensity.

  5. Abrupt climate-independent fire regime changes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pausas, Juli G.; Keeley, Jon E.

    2014-01-01

    Wildfires have played a determining role in distribution, composition and structure of many ecosystems worldwide and climatic changes are widely considered to be a major driver of future fire regime changes. However, forecasting future climatic change induced impacts on fire regimes will require a clearer understanding of other drivers of abrupt fire regime changes. Here, we focus on evidence from different environmental and temporal settings of fire regimes changes that are not directly attributed to climatic changes. We review key cases of these abrupt fire regime changes at different spatial and temporal scales, including those directly driven (i) by fauna, (ii) by invasive plant species, and (iii) by socio-economic and policy changes. All these drivers might generate non-linear effects of landscape changes in fuel structure; that is, they generate fuel changes that can cross thresholds of landscape continuity, and thus drastically change fire activity. Although climatic changes might contribute to some of these changes, there are also many instances that are not primarily linked to climatic shifts. Understanding the mechanism driving fire regime changes should contribute to our ability to better assess future fire regimes.

  6. Retinal Information is Independently Associated with Cardiovascular Disease in Patients with Type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Guo, Vivian Yawei; Chan, Juliana Chung Ngor; Chung, Harriet; Ozaki, Risa; So, Wingyee; Luk, Andrea; Lam, Augustine; Lee, Jack; Zee, Benny Chung-Ying

    2016-01-12

    To evaluate the association between a series of retinal information and cardiovascular disease (CVD) and to evaluate whether this association is independent of traditional CVD risk factors in type 2 diabetes patients, we undertook an age-sex matched case-control study with 79 CVD cases and 150 non-CVD controls. All the participants underwent standardized physical examinations and retinal imaging. Retinal information was extracted from the retinal images using a semi-automatic computer program. Three stepwise logistic regression models were evaluated: model 1 with cardiovascular risk factors only; model 2 with retinal information only and model 3 with both cardiovascular risk factors and retinal information. The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUCs) were used to compare the performances of different models. Results showed that the AUCs were 0.692 (95%CI: 0.622-0.761) and 0.661 (95%CI: 0.588-0.735) for model 1 and model 2, respectively. In addition, model 3 had an AUC of 0.775 (95%CI: 0.716-0.834). Compared to the previous two models, the AUC of model 3 increased significantly (p < 0.05 in both comparisons). In conclusion, retinal information is independently associated with CVD in type 2 diabetes. Further work is needed to validate the translational value of applying retinal imaging analysis into clinical practice.

  7. Retinal Information is Independently Associated with Cardiovascular Disease in Patients with Type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Vivian Yawei; Chan, Juliana Chung Ngor; Chung, Harriet; Ozaki, Risa; So, Wingyee; Luk, Andrea; Lam, Augustine; Lee, Jack; Zee, Benny Chung-Ying

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the association between a series of retinal information and cardiovascular disease (CVD) and to evaluate whether this association is independent of traditional CVD risk factors in type 2 diabetes patients, we undertook an age-sex matched case-control study with 79 CVD cases and 150 non-CVD controls. All the participants underwent standardized physical examinations and retinal imaging. Retinal information was extracted from the retinal images using a semi-automatic computer program. Three stepwise logistic regression models were evaluated: model 1 with cardiovascular risk factors only; model 2 with retinal information only and model 3 with both cardiovascular risk factors and retinal information. The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUCs) were used to compare the performances of different models. Results showed that the AUCs were 0.692 (95%CI: 0.622−0.761) and 0.661 (95%CI: 0.588−0.735) for model 1 and model 2, respectively. In addition, model 3 had an AUC of 0.775 (95%CI: 0.716−0.834). Compared to the previous two models, the AUC of model 3 increased significantly (p < 0.05 in both comparisons). In conclusion, retinal information is independently associated with CVD in type 2 diabetes. Further work is needed to validate the translational value of applying retinal imaging analysis into clinical practice. PMID:26754623

  8. Uniformity detector retinal ganglion cells fire complex spikes and receive only light-evoked inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Sivyer, Benjamin; Taylor, W. Rowland; Vaney, David I.

    2010-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cells convey information by increasing their firing in response to an optimal visual stimulus or “trigger feature.” However, one class of ganglion cell responds to changes in the visual scene by decreasing its firing. These cells, termed uniformity detectors in the rabbit retina, are encountered only rarely and the synaptic mechanisms underlying their unusual responses have not been investigated. In this study, patch-clamp recordings of uniformity detectors show that the action potentials underlying the maintained firing arise within “complex spikes.” Both ON and OFF visual stimuli elicit only inhibitory synaptic input, the immediate effect of which is to suppress the maintained firing. However, this inhibition also alters the properties of the “renascent” spiking by increasing the amplitude of the spikes within each burst, suggesting that the effect may increase the efficacy of spike propagation and transmission. PMID:20212117

  9. Uniformity detector retinal ganglion cells fire complex spikes and receive only light-evoked inhibition.

    PubMed

    Sivyer, Benjamin; Taylor, W Rowland; Vaney, David I

    2010-03-23

    Retinal ganglion cells convey information by increasing their firing in response to an optimal visual stimulus or "trigger feature." However, one class of ganglion cell responds to changes in the visual scene by decreasing its firing. These cells, termed uniformity detectors in the rabbit retina, are encountered only rarely and the synaptic mechanisms underlying their unusual responses have not been investigated. In this study, patch-clamp recordings of uniformity detectors show that the action potentials underlying the maintained firing arise within "complex spikes." Both ON and OFF visual stimuli elicit only inhibitory synaptic input, the immediate effect of which is to suppress the maintained firing. However, this inhibition also alters the properties of the "renascent" spiking by increasing the amplitude of the spikes within each burst, suggesting that the effect may increase the efficacy of spike propagation and transmission.

  10. Mitochondria mediates caspase-dependent and independent retinal cell death in Staphylococcus aureus endophthalmitis

    PubMed Central

    Singh, P K; Kumar, A

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial endophthalmitis, a vision-threatening complication of ocular surgery or trauma, is characterized by increased intraocular inflammation and retinal tissue damage. Although significant vision loss in endophthalmitis has been linked to retinal cell death, the underlying mechanisms of cell death remain elusive. In this study, using a mouse model of Staphylococcus aureus endophthalmitis and cultured human retinal Müller glia (MIO-M1 cell line), we demonstrate that S. aureus caused significant apoptotic cell death in the mouse retina and Müller glia, as evidenced by increased number of terminal dUTP nick end labeling and Annexin V and propidium iodide-positive cells. Immunohistochemistry and western blot studies revealed the reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential (JC-1 staining), release of cytochrome c into the cytosol, translocation of Bax to the mitochondria and the activation of caspase-9 and -3 in S. aureus-infected retina/retinal cells. In addition, the activation of PARP-1 and the release of apoptosis inducing factor from mitochondria was also observed in S. aureus-infected retinal cells. Inhibition studies using pan-caspase (Q-VD-OPH) and PARP-1 (DPQ) inhibitors showed significant reduction in S. aureus-induced retinal cell death both in vivo and in vitro. Together, our findings demonstrate that in bacterial endophthalmitis, retinal cells undergo apoptosis in the both caspase-dependent and independent manners, and mitochondria have a central role in this process. Hence, targeting the identified signaling pathways may provide the rationale to design therapeutic interventions to prevent bystander retinal tissue damage in bacterial endophthalmitis. PMID:27551524

  11. Synchronized Firings in Retinal Ganglion Cells in Response to Natural Stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ying-Ying; Xiao, Lei; Liu, Wen-Zhong; Gong, Hai-Qing; Liang, Pei-Ji

    2011-02-01

    The response of synchronously firing groups of population retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) to natural movies (NMs) and pseudo-random white-noise checker-board flickering (CB, as control) are investigated using an information-theoretic algorithm. The main results are: (1) the population RGCs tend to fire in synchrony far more frequently than expected by chance during both NM and CB stimulation; (2) more synchronous groups could be formed and each group contains more neurons under NM than CB stimulation; (3) the individual neurons also participate in more groups and have more distinct partners in NM than CB stimulation. All these results suggest that the synchronized firings in RGCs are more extensive and diverse, which may account for more effective information processing in representing the natural visual environment.

  12. Neuronal Transcriptional Repressor REST Suppresses an Atoh7-Independent Program for Initiating Retinal Ganglion Cell Development

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Chai-An; Tsai, Wen-Wei; Cho, Jang-Hyeon; Pan, Ping; Barton, Michelle Craig; Klein, William H.

    2010-01-01

    As neuronal progenitors differentiate into neurons, they acquire a unique set of transcription factors. The transcriptional repressor REST prevents progenitors from undergoing differentiation. Notably, REST binding sites are often associated with retinal ganglion cell (RGC) genes whose expression in the retina is positively controlled by Atoh7, a factor essential for RGC formation. The key regulators that enable a retinal progenitor cell (RPC) to commit to an RGC fate have not been identified. We show here that REST suppresses RGC gene expression in RPCs. REST inactivation causes aberrant expression of RGC transcription factors in proliferating RPCs, independent of Atoh7, resulting in increased RGC formation. Strikingly, inactivating REST in Atoh7-null retinas restores transcription factor expression, which partially activates downstream RGC genes but is insufficient to prevent RGC loss. Our results demonstrate an Atoh7-independent program for initial activation of RGC genes and suggest a novel role for REST in preventing premature expression in RPCs. PMID:20969844

  13. Development and Degeneration of Cone Bipolar Cells Are Independent of Cone Photoreceptors in a Mouse Model of Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Miao; Wang, Ke; Lin, Bin

    2012-01-01

    Retinal photoreceptors die during retinal synaptogenesis in a portion of retinal degeneration. Whether cone bipolar cells establish regular retinal mosaics and mature morphologies, and resist degeneration are not completely understood. To explore these issues, we backcrossed a transgenic mouse expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) in one subset of cone bipolar cells (type 7) into rd1 mice, a classic mouse model of retinal degeneration, to examine the development and survival of cone bipolar cells in a background of retinal degeneration. Our data revealed that both the development and degeneration of cone bipolar cells are independent of the normal activity of cone photoreceptors. We found that type 7 cone bipolar cells achieved a uniform tiling of the retinal surface and developed normal dendritic and axonal arbors without the influence of cone photoreceptor innervation. On the other hand, degeneration of type 7 cone bipolar cells, contrary to our belief of central-to-peripheral progression, was spatially uniform across the retina independent of the spatiotemporal pattern of cone degeneration. The results have important implications for the design of more effective therapies to restore vision in retinal degeneration. PMID:22952865

  14. Transgenic Mice Overexpressing Serum Retinol-Binding Protein Develop Progressive Retinal Degeneration through a Retinoid-Independent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Du, Mei; Otalora, Laura; Martin, Ashley A.; Moiseyev, Gennadiy; Vanlandingham, Phillip; Wang, Qilong; Farjo, Rafal; Yeganeh, Alexander; Quiambao, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Serum retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) is the sole specific transport protein for retinol in the blood, but it is also an adipokine with retinol-independent, proinflammatory activity associated with obesity, insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Moreover, two separate studies reported that patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy have increased serum RBP4 levels compared to patients with mild or no retinopathy, yet the effect of increased levels of RBP4 on the retina has not been studied. Here we show that transgenic mice overexpressing RBP4 (RBP4-Tg mice) develop progressive retinal degeneration, characterized by photoreceptor ribbon synapse deficiency and subsequent bipolar cell loss. Ocular retinoid and bisretinoid levels are normal in RBP4-Tg mice, demonstrating that a retinoid-independent mechanism underlies retinal degeneration. Increased expression of pro-interleukin-18 (pro-IL-18) mRNA and activated IL-18 protein and early-onset microglia activation in the retina suggest that retinal degeneration is driven by a proinflammatory mechanism. Neither chronic systemic metabolic disease nor other retinal insults are required for RBP4 elevation to promote retinal neurodegeneration, since RBP4-Tg mice do not have coincident retinal vascular pathology, obesity, dyslipidemia, or hyperglycemia. These findings suggest that elevation of serum RBP4 levels could be a risk factor for retinal damage and vision loss in nondiabetic as well as diabetic patients. PMID:26055327

  15. Independent degeneration of photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelium in conditional knockout mouse models of choroideremia

    PubMed Central

    Tolmachova, Tanya; Anders, Ross; Abrink, Magnus; Bugeon, Laurence; Dallman, Margaret J.; Futter, Clare E.; Ramalho, José S.; Tonagel, Felix; Tanimoto, Naoyuki; Seeliger, Mathias W.; Huxley, Clare; Seabra, Miguel C.

    2006-01-01

    Choroideremia (CHM) is an X-linked degeneration of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), photoreceptors, and choroid, caused by loss of function of the CHM/REP1 gene. REP1 is involved in lipid modification (prenylation) of Rab GTPases, key regulators of intracellular vesicular transport and organelle dynamics. To study the pathogenesis of CHM and to develop a model for assessing gene therapy, we have created a conditional mouse knockout of the Chm gene. Heterozygous-null females exhibit characteristic hallmarks of CHM: progressive degeneration of the photoreceptors, patchy depigmentation of the RPE, and Rab prenylation defects. Using tamoxifen-inducible and tissue-specific Cre expression in combination with floxed Chm alleles, we show that CHM pathogenesis involves independently triggered degeneration of photoreceptors and the RPE, associated with different subsets of defective Rabs. PMID:16410831

  16. The Association of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus with Cerebral Gray Matter Volume Is Independent of Retinal Vascular Architecture and Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Moran, C.; Tapp, R. J.; Hughes, A. D.; Magnussen, C. G.; Blizzard, L.; Phan, T. G.; Beare, R.; Witt, N.; Venn, A.; Münch, G.; Amaratunge, B. C.; Srikanth, V.

    2016-01-01

    It is uncertain whether small vessel disease underlies the relationship between Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) and brain atrophy. We aimed to study whether retinal vascular architecture, as a proxy for cerebral small vessel disease, may modify or mediate the associations of T2DM with brain volumes. In this cross-sectional study using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scans and retinal photographs in 451 people with and without T2DM, we measured brain volumes, geometric measures of retinal vascular architecture, clinical retinopathy, and MRI cerebrovascular lesions. There were 270 people with (mean age 67.3 years) and 181 without T2DM (mean age 72.9 years). T2DM was associated with lower gray matter volume (p = 0.008). T2DM was associated with greater arteriolar diameter (p = 0.03) and optimality ratio (p = 0.04), but these associations were attenuated by adjustments for age and sex. Only optimality ratio was associated with lower gray matter volume (p = 0.03). The inclusion of retinal measures in regression models did not attenuate the association of T2DM with gray matter volume. The association of T2DM with lower gray matter volume was independent of retinal vascular architecture and clinical retinopathy. Retinal vascular measures or retinopathy may not be sufficiently sensitive to confirm a microvascular basis for T2DM-related brain atrophy. PMID:27314049

  17. Hop/STI1 modulates retinal proliferation and cell death independent of PrPC.

    PubMed

    Arruda-Carvalho, Maithe; Njaine, Brian; Silveira, Mariana S; Linden, Rafael; Chiarini, Luciana B

    2007-09-21

    Hop/STI1 is a co-chaperone adaptor protein for Hsp70/Hsp90 complexes. Hop/STI1 is found extracellularly and modulates cell death and differentiation through interaction with the prion protein (PrP(C)). Here, we investigated the expression of hop/STI1 and its role upon cell proliferation and cell death in the developing retina. Hop/STI1 is more expressed in developing rat retina than in the mature tissue. Hop/STI1 blocks retinal cell death in the neuroblastic layer (NBL) in a PrP(C) dependent manner, but failed to protect ganglion cells against axotomy-induced cell death. An antibody raised against hop/STI1 (alpha-STI1) blocked both ganglion cell and NBL cell death independent of PrP(C). cAMP/PKA, ERK, PI3K and PKC signaling pathways were not involved in these effects. Hop/STI1 treatment reduced proliferation, while alpha-STI1 increased proliferation in the developing retina, both independent of PrP(C). We conclude that hop/STI1 can modulate both proliferation and cell death in the developing retina independent of PrP(C).

  18. Connexin 36 and Rod Bipolar Cell Independent Rod Pathways Drive Retinal Ganglion Cells and Optokinetic Reflexes

    PubMed Central

    Cowan, Cameron S.; Abd-El-Barr, Muhammad; van der Heijden, Meike; Lo, Eric M.; Paul, David; Bramblett, Debra E.; Lem, Janis; Simons, David L.; Wu, Samuel M.

    2016-01-01

    Rod pathways are a parallel set of synaptic connections which enable night vision by relaying and processing rod photoreceptor light responses. We use dim light stimuli to isolate rod pathway contributions to downstream light responses then characterize these contributions in knockout mice lacking rod transducin-α (Trα), or certain pathway components associated with subsets of rod pathways. These comparisons reveal that rod pathway driven light sensitivity in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) is entirely dependent on Trα, but partially independent of connexin 36 (Cx36) and rod bipolar cells. Pharmacological experiments show that rod pathway-driven and Cx36-independent RGC ON responses are also metabotropic glutamate receptor 6-dependent. To validate the RGC findings in awake, behaving animals we measured optokinetic reflexes (OKRs), which are sensitive to changes in ON pathways. Scotopic OKR contrast sensitivity was lost in Trα−/− mice, but indistinguishable from controls in Cx36−/− and rod bipolar cell knockout mice. Mesopic OKRs were also altered in mutant mice: Trα−/− mice had decreased spatial acuity, rod BC knockouts had decreased sensitivity, and Cx36−/− mice had increased sensitivity. These results provide compelling evidence against the complete Cx36 or rod BC dependence of night vision's ON component. Further, the findings suggest the parallel nature of rod pathways provides considerable redundancy to scotopic light sensitivity but distinct contributions to mesopic responses through complicated interactions with cone pathways. PMID:26718442

  19. Retinal ganglion cell topography and spatial resolving power in the oriental fire-bellied toad Bombina orientalis.

    PubMed

    Pushchin, Igor I; Zyumchenko, Nataliya E

    2015-12-01

    The vertebrate visual system is determined by two main factors, a species' lifestyle and phylogenetic legacy. Studying the visual system in outgroup lineages may shed some light on the balance of these factors within a certain radiation. We studied the topography of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in the retina of the oriental fire-bellied toad Bombina orientalis. These toads belong to the ancient superfamily Discoglossoidea, a sister group to all extant Anura except for two small families. RGCs were retrogradely labeled with tetramethylrhodamine- dextran amine (TMR-DA) and examined in retinal wholemounts. RGCs occurred all over the retina except for the far periphery. Their total number was [Formula: see text] ([Formula: see text], [Formula: see text]). They comprised 73-77% of all cells in the ganglion cell layer. The spatial density of GCs increased gradually from the dorsal and ventral retinal periphery toward the equator to form a weak visual streak and a moderately pronounced area centralis. The minimum density was [Formula: see text], and the maximum, [Formula: see text]. The maximum density gradient was [Formula: see text]. The spatial resolution was minimum in the dorsal and ventral periphery ([Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] cycles per degree in water and air, respectively). Intermediate values of spatial resolving power were found within the visual streak ([Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] cycles per degree) and reached a peak in area centralis ([Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] cycles per degree). This is sufficient for efficient prey location and capture. The relatively high RGC density and the presence of specialized retinal regions in oriental fire-bellied toads are consistent with their highly visual behavior. A brief review comparing the phylogeny and ecology of this with other anuran species suggests that the main factor shaping the RGC distribution in Anura is phylogenetic legacy; the environmental pressure results

  20. Kv3 channels modulate calcium signals induced by fast firing patterns in the rat retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, Kirill I; Grygorov, Oleksii O; Maslov, Vitaly Yu; Veselovsky, Nikolay S; Fedulova, Svetlana A

    2012-11-01

    Expression of non-inactivating Kv3.1/Kv3.2 potassium channels determines fast-spiking phenotype of many types of neurones including retinal ganglion cells (RGCs); furthermore Kv3 channels regulate neurotransmitter release from presynaptic terminals. In the present study we investigated how inhibition of Kv3 channel by low TEA concentrations modifies firing properties and Ca2+ influx in the rat RGCs. Experiments were performed on the whole-mount retinal preparations from 4 to 6 weeks old Wistar rats using simultaneous whole cell patch clamp and intracellular Ca2+ measurements in combination with single-cell RT-PCR. In response to 500-ms depolarization step the RGCs demonstrated fast firing tonic behaviour with a mean frequency of spiking 61±5 Hz (n=28). All of the tonic cells tested (n=9) expressed specific mRNA for either Kv3.1 or Kv3.2 or for both channels. Bath applications of TEA (250 μM, 500 μM and 1 mM) modified firing patterns dose-dependently as follows: firing frequency was decreased, mean action potential (AP) half-width increased and mean amplitude of after hyperpolarization was reduced. The amplitude of the Ca2+ signals induced by the cells firing was linearly dependent on number of APs with a mean slope of 7.3±0.9 nM per one AP (n=8). APs widening by TEA increased the slope of the amplitude vs. AP number plots in a dose-dependent manner: 250 μM of TEA increased the mean slope value to 9.5±1.2 nM/AP, 500 μM to 12.4±2.4 nM/AP and 1 mM to 13.2±2.9 nM/AP (n=6). All these parameters, as well as the cells firing properties, were significantly different from controls and from each other except between 500 μM and 1 mM. This is consistent with the pharmacological properties of Kv3.1/Kv3.2 channels: the TEA IC50 is in the range 150-300 μM with almost complete block at 1 mM. This suggests that Kv3.1/Kv3.2 channels underlie the fast firing of the rat RGCs and provide at a given firing frequency 1.8-fold restriction Ca2+ influx, thus protecting the cells

  1. Mechanisms by which cell geometry controls repetitive impulse firing in retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Fohlmeister, J F; Miller, R F

    1997-10-01

    impulse initiation varies greatly and depends on the stimulus magnitude. Models that conform to physiological constraints also show irregular firing, particularly for near threshold stimulation of the soma, due to multiple sites of impulse initiation. Such behavior could represent an asset to the cells for conveying information under conditions of low contrast stimulation. Multiple spike initiation zones also can provide retinal ganglion cells with a variety of response characteristics, including spike doublets, depending on the level of cell activation. Increasing the diameter of the dendritic equivalent cylinder reduces the impulse frequency (F/I) response. Over a restricted range of ion channel densities in the dendritic tree, phase locking between dendritic membrane oscillations and somatic spiking can occur with dendritic stimulation, and mathematical chaos can be demonstrated when sufficiently thin dendritic processes are present. We conclude that cell morphology is the primary factor in determining firing patterns and the impulse frequency response of a given cell and that differences in channel density distribution across a population of cells plays, at most, a secondary role in this function. This conclusion applies to both synaptic activation and electrode stimulation of the soma.

  2. mTORC1-independent reduction of retinal protein synthesis in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Fort, Patrice E; Losiewicz, Mandy K; Pennathur, Subramaniam; Jefferson, Leonard S; Kimball, Scot R; Abcouwer, Steven F; Gardner, Thomas W

    2014-09-01

    Poorly controlled diabetes has long been known as a catabolic disorder with profound loss of muscle and fat body mass resulting from a simultaneous reduction in protein synthesis and enhanced protein degradation. By contrast, retinal structure is largely maintained during diabetes despite reduced Akt activity and increased rate of cell death. Therefore, we hypothesized that retinal protein turnover is regulated differently than in other insulin-sensitive tissues, such as skeletal muscle. Ins2(Akita) diabetic mice and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats exhibited marked reductions in retinal protein synthesis matched by a concomitant reduction in retinal protein degradation associated with preserved retinal mass and protein content. The reduction in protein synthesis depended on both hyperglycemia and insulin deficiency, but protein degradation was only reversed by normalization of hyperglycemia. The reduction in protein synthesis was associated with diminished protein translation efficiency but, surprisingly, not with reduced activity of the mTORC1/S6K1/4E-BP1 pathway. Instead, diabetes induced a specific reduction of mTORC2 complex activity. These findings reveal distinctive responses of diabetes-induced retinal protein turnover compared with muscle and liver that may provide a new means to ameliorate diabetic retinopathy. © 2014 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  3. Hartwell brings gas-fired independent power to Georgia

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    This exempt wholesale generator is the first major independent power producer in the state, and its power purchase agreement is one of the first signed with a Rural Electrification Administration utility. Fuel access made siting here a natural. In its first 22 months of operation, the Hartwell Energy Project, Hart County, Ga, has already put its advanced, high-temperature gas turbines through a vigorous workout: the strenuous dispatch regimen calls for multiple starts per day, and for on-line time that varies anywhere from 20 minutes to 18 hours at a stretch. And once on the grid, the turbines haven`t sauntered along at low power levels--97% of the operating time has been at full load. In spite of the demanding dispatch schedule, Hartwell has achieved a 98% availability factor since commercial startup. Being located at the interaction of major gas and oil pipelines, the 300-MW peaking facility`s fuel picture is one of inherent flexibility. Its two simple-cycle 7FA gas turbine/generators, supplied by General Electric Co (GE), Schenectady, NY, are dual-fuel capable, although to date, fuel oil has been burned only for testing purposes.

  4. Early nuclear exclusion of the transcription factor max is associated with retinal ganglion cell death independent of caspase activity.

    PubMed

    Petrs-Silva, Hilda; de Freitas, Fabíola G; Linden, Rafael; Chiarini, Luciana B

    2004-02-01

    We examined the behavior of the transcription factor Max during retrograde neuronal degeneration of retinal ganglion cells. Using immunohistochemistry, we found a progressive redistribution of full-length Max from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and dendrites of the ganglion cells following axon damage. Then, the axotomized cells lose all their content of Max, while undergoing nuclear pyknosis and apoptotic cell death. After treatment of retinal explants with either anisomycin or thapsigargin, the rate of nuclear exclusion of Max accompanied the rate of cell death as modulated by either drug. Treatment with a pan-caspase inhibitor abolished both TUNEL staining and immunoreactivity for activated caspase-3, but did not affect the subcellular redistribution of Max immunoreactivity after axotomy. The data show that nuclear exclusion of the transcription factor Max is an early event, which precedes and is independent of the activation of caspases, during apoptotic cell death in the central nervous system.

  5. Effect of correlated lateral geniculate nucleus firing rates on predictions for monocular eye closure versus monocular retinal inactivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blais, Brian S.; Cooper, Leon N.; Shouval, Harel Z.

    2009-12-01

    Monocular deprivation experiments can be used to distinguish between different ideas concerning properties of cortical synaptic plasticity. Monocular deprivation by lid suture causes a rapid disconnection of the deprived eye connected to cortical neurons whereas total inactivation of the deprived eye produces much less of an ocular dominance shift. In order to understand these results one needs to know how lid suture and retinal inactivation affect neurons in the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) that provide the cortical input. Recent experimental results by Linden showed that monocular lid suture and monocular inactivation do not change the mean firing rates of LGN neurons but that lid suture reduces correlations between adjacent neurons whereas monocular inactivation leads to correlated firing. These, somewhat surprising, results contradict assumptions that have been made to explain the outcomes of different monocular deprivation protocols. Based on these experimental results we modify our assumptions about inputs to cortex during different deprivation protocols and show their implications when combined with different cortical plasticity rules. Using theoretical analysis, random matrix theory and simulations we show that high levels of correlations reduce the ocular dominance shift in learning rules that depend on homosynaptic depression (i.e., Bienenstock-Cooper-Munro type rules), consistent with experimental results, but have the opposite effect in rules that depend on heterosynaptic depression (i.e., Hebbian/principal component analysis type rules).

  6. Independent component analysis for the detection of in vivo intrinsic signals from an optical imager of retinal function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barriga, Eduardo S.; Pattichis, Marios; Abramoff, Michael; T'so, Dan; Kwon, Young; Kardon, Randy; Soliz, Peter

    2007-02-01

    To overcome the difficulty in detection of loss of retinal activity, a functional-Retinal Imaging Device (f-RID) was developed. The device, which is based on a modified fundus camera, seeks to detect changes in optical signals that reflect functional changes in the retina. Measured changes in reflectance in response to the visual stimulus are on the order of 0.1% to 1% of the total reflected intensity level, which makes the functional signal difficult to detect by standard methods because it is masked by other physiological signals and by noise. In this paper, we present a new Independent Component Analysis (ICA) algorithm used to analyze the video sequences from a set of experiments with different patterned stimuli from cats and humans. The ICA algorithm with priors (ICA-P) uses information about the stimulation paradigms to increase the signal detection thresholds when compared to traditional ICA algorithms. The results of the analysis show that we can detect signal levels as low as 0.01% of the total reflected intensity. Also, improvement of up to 30dB in signal detection over traditional ICA algorithms is achieved. The study found that in more than 80% of the in-vivo experiments the patterned stimuli effects on the retina can be detected and extracted.

  7. Programmed cell death of retinal cone bipolar cells is independent of afferent or target control.

    PubMed

    Keeley, Patrick W; Madsen, Nils R; St John, Ace J; Reese, Benjamin E

    2014-10-15

    Programmed cell death contributes to the histogenesis of the nervous system, and is believed to be modulated through the sustaining effects of afferents and targets during the period of synaptogenesis. Cone bipolar cells undergo programmed cell death during development, and we confirm that the numbers of three different types are increased when the pro-apoptotic Bax gene is knocked out. When their cone afferents are selectively eliminated, or when the population of retinal ganglion cells is increased, however, cone bipolar cell number remains unchanged. Programmed cell death of the cone bipolar cell populations, therefore, may be modulated cell-intrinsically rather than via interactions with these synaptic partners. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Divisive suppression explains high-precision firing and contrast adaptation in retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yuwei; Wang, Yanbin V; Park, Silvia J H; Demb, Jonathan B; Butts, Daniel A

    2016-11-14

    Visual processing depends on specific computations implemented by complex neural circuits. Here, we present a circuit-inspired model of retinal ganglion cell computation, targeted to explain their temporal dynamics and adaptation to contrast. To localize the sources of such processing, we used recordings at the levels of synaptic input and spiking output in the in vitro mouse retina. We found that an ON-Alpha ganglion cell's excitatory synaptic inputs were described by a divisive interaction between excitation and delayed suppression, which explained nonlinear processing that was already present in ganglion cell inputs. Ganglion cell output was further shaped by spike generation mechanisms. The full model accurately predicted spike responses with unprecedented millisecond precision, and accurately described contrast adaptation of the spike train. These results demonstrate how circuit and cell-intrinsic mechanisms interact for ganglion cell function and, more generally, illustrate the power of circuit-inspired modeling of sensory processing.

  9. Noise promotes independent control of gamma oscillations and grid firing within recurrent attractor networks

    PubMed Central

    Solanka, Lukas; van Rossum, Mark CW; Nolan, Matthew F

    2015-01-01

    Neural computations underlying cognitive functions require calibration of the strength of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic connections and are associated with modulation of gamma frequency oscillations in network activity. However, principles relating gamma oscillations, synaptic strength and circuit computations are unclear. We address this in attractor network models that account for grid firing and theta-nested gamma oscillations in the medial entorhinal cortex. We show that moderate intrinsic noise massively increases the range of synaptic strengths supporting gamma oscillations and grid computation. With moderate noise, variation in excitatory or inhibitory synaptic strength tunes the amplitude and frequency of gamma activity without disrupting grid firing. This beneficial role for noise results from disruption of epileptic-like network states. Thus, moderate noise promotes independent control of multiplexed firing rate- and gamma-based computational mechanisms. Our results have implications for tuning of normal circuit function and for disorders associated with changes in gamma oscillations and synaptic strength. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06444.001 PMID:26146940

  10. Hop/STI1 modulates retinal proliferation and cell death independent of PrP{sup C}

    SciTech Connect

    Arruda-Carvalho, Maithe; Njaine, Brian; Silveira, Mariana S.; Linden, Rafael; Chiarini, Luciana B. . E-mail: chiarini@biof.ufrj.br

    2007-09-21

    Hop/STI1 is a co-chaperone adaptor protein for Hsp70/Hsp90 complexes. Hop/STI1 is found extracellularly and modulates cell death and differentiation through interaction with the prion protein (PrP{sup C}). Here, we investigated the expression of hop/STI1 and its role upon cell proliferation and cell death in the developing retina. Hop/STI1 is more expressed in developing rat retina than in the mature tissue. Hop/STI1 blocks retinal cell death in the neuroblastic layer (NBL) in a PrP{sup C} dependent manner, but failed to protect ganglion cells against axotomy-induced cell death. An antibody raised against hop/STI1 ({alpha}-STI1) blocked both ganglion cell and NBL cell death independent of PrP{sup C}. cAMP/PKA, ERK, PI3K and PKC signaling pathways were not involved in these effects. Hop/STI1 treatment reduced proliferation, while {alpha}-STI1 increased proliferation in the developing retina, both independent of PrP{sup C}. We conclude that hop/STI1 can modulate both proliferation and cell death in the developing retina independent of PrP{sup C}.

  11. Divisive suppression explains high-precision firing and contrast adaptation in retinal ganglion cells

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yuwei; Wang, Yanbin V; Park, Silvia J H; Demb, Jonathan B; Butts, Daniel A

    2016-01-01

    Visual processing depends on specific computations implemented by complex neural circuits. Here, we present a circuit-inspired model of retinal ganglion cell computation, targeted to explain their temporal dynamics and adaptation to contrast. To localize the sources of such processing, we used recordings at the levels of synaptic input and spiking output in the in vitro mouse retina. We found that an ON-Alpha ganglion cell's excitatory synaptic inputs were described by a divisive interaction between excitation and delayed suppression, which explained nonlinear processing that was already present in ganglion cell inputs. Ganglion cell output was further shaped by spike generation mechanisms. The full model accurately predicted spike responses with unprecedented millisecond precision, and accurately described contrast adaptation of the spike train. These results demonstrate how circuit and cell-intrinsic mechanisms interact for ganglion cell function and, more generally, illustrate the power of circuit-inspired modeling of sensory processing. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19460.001 PMID:27841746

  12. Fire!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Rebecca

    1996-01-01

    The number of school fires is up nationwide. This article describes unsafe school conditions, problems with new fire codes, and the factors that contribute to school fires. Installation of sprinkler systems is recommended. A fire-safety checklist is included. (LMI)

  13. Independent control of reciprocal and lateral inhibition at the axon terminal of retinal bipolar cells

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Masashi; Tachibana, Masao

    2013-01-01

    Bipolar cells (BCs), the second order neurons in the vertebrate retina, receive two types of GABAergic feedback inhibition at their axon terminal: reciprocal and lateral inhibition. It has been suggested that two types of inhibition may be mediated by different pathways. However, how each inhibition is controlled by excitatory BC output remains to be clarified. Here, we applied single/dual whole cell recording techniques to the axon terminal of electrically coupled BCs in slice preparation of the goldfish retina, and found that each inhibition was regulated independently. Activation voltage of each inhibition was different: strong output from a single BC activated reciprocal inhibition, but could not activate lateral inhibition. Outputs from multiple BCs were essential for activation of lateral inhibition. Pharmacological examinations revealed that composition of transmitter receptors and localization of Na+ channels were different between two inhibitory pathways, suggesting that different amacrine cells may mediate each inhibition. Depending on visual inputs, each inhibition could be driven independently. Model simulation showed that reciprocal and lateral inhibition cooperatively reduced BC outputs as well as background noise, thereby preserving high signal-to-noise ratio. Therefore, we conclude that excitatory BC output is efficiently regulated by the dual operating mechanisms of feedback inhibition without deteriorating the quality of visual signals. PMID:23690563

  14. Fire

    Treesearch

    John R. Jones; Norbert V. DeByle

    1985-01-01

    In some areas, many aspen stands are all the same age, dating from a single great fire or a year of widespread fires (fig. 1). The 1879 fire in the Jackson Hole region of Wyoming (Loope and Gruell 1973) and the 1904 fires in Arizona's White Mountains (Kallander 1969) are examples. Choate (1966) found that almost all aspen stands in New Mexico were even-aged, many...

  15. FIRE

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2017-03-16

    Projects:  FIRE Definition/Description:  The F irst I SCCP R egional E xperiments (FIRE) have been designed to improve data products and cloud/radiation ... circulation models (GCMs). Specifically, the goals of FIRE are (1) to improve basic understanding of the interaction of physical ...

  16. Human Brain Expansion during Evolution Is Independent of Fire Control and Cooking

    PubMed Central

    Cornélio, Alianda M.; de Bittencourt-Navarrete, Ruben E.; de Bittencourt Brum, Ricardo; Queiroz, Claudio M.; Costa, Marcos R.

    2016-01-01

    What makes humans unique? This question has fascinated scientists and philosophers for centuries and it is still a matter of intense debate. Nowadays, human brain expansion during evolution has been acknowledged to explain our empowered cognitive capabilities. The drivers for such accelerated expansion remain, however, largely unknown. In this sense, studies have suggested that the cooking of food could be a pre-requisite for the expansion of brain size in early hominins. However, this appealing hypothesis is only supported by a mathematical model suggesting that the increasing number of neurons in the brain would constrain body size among primates due to a limited amount of calories obtained from diets. Here, we show, by using a similar mathematical model, that a tradeoff between body mass and the number of brain neurons imposed by dietary constraints during hominin evolution is unlikely. Instead, the predictable number of neurons in the hominin brain varies much more in function of foraging efficiency than body mass. We also review archeological data to show that the expansion of the brain volume in the hominin lineage is described by a linear function independent of evidence of fire control, and therefore, thermal processing of food does not account for this phenomenon. Finally, we report experiments in mice showing that thermal processing of meat does not increase its caloric availability in mice. Altogether, our data indicate that cooking is neither sufficient nor necessary to explain hominin brain expansion. PMID:27199631

  17. Human Brain Expansion during Evolution Is Independent of Fire Control and Cooking.

    PubMed

    Cornélio, Alianda M; de Bittencourt-Navarrete, Ruben E; de Bittencourt Brum, Ricardo; Queiroz, Claudio M; Costa, Marcos R

    2016-01-01

    What makes humans unique? This question has fascinated scientists and philosophers for centuries and it is still a matter of intense debate. Nowadays, human brain expansion during evolution has been acknowledged to explain our empowered cognitive capabilities. The drivers for such accelerated expansion remain, however, largely unknown. In this sense, studies have suggested that the cooking of food could be a pre-requisite for the expansion of brain size in early hominins. However, this appealing hypothesis is only supported by a mathematical model suggesting that the increasing number of neurons in the brain would constrain body size among primates due to a limited amount of calories obtained from diets. Here, we show, by using a similar mathematical model, that a tradeoff between body mass and the number of brain neurons imposed by dietary constraints during hominin evolution is unlikely. Instead, the predictable number of neurons in the hominin brain varies much more in function of foraging efficiency than body mass. We also review archeological data to show that the expansion of the brain volume in the hominin lineage is described by a linear function independent of evidence of fire control, and therefore, thermal processing of food does not account for this phenomenon. Finally, we report experiments in mice showing that thermal processing of meat does not increase its caloric availability in mice. Altogether, our data indicate that cooking is neither sufficient nor necessary to explain hominin brain expansion.

  18. Retinitis Pigmentosa

    MedlinePlus

    ... Action You are here Home › Retinal Diseases Listen Retinitis Pigmentosa What is retinitis pigmentosa? What are the symptoms? ... is available? What treatment is available? What is retinitis pigmentosa? Retinitis pigmentosa, also known as RP, refers to ...

  19. Phylogeography of the fire-bellied toads Bombina: independent Pleistocene histories inferred from mitochondrial genomes.

    PubMed

    Hofman, Sebastian; Spolsky, Christina; Uzzell, Thomas; Cogălniceanu, Dan; Babik, Wiesław; Szymura, Jacek M

    2007-06-01

    The fire-bellied toads Bombina bombina and Bombina variegata, interbreed in a long, narrow zone maintained by a balance between selection and dispersal. Hybridization takes place between local, genetically differentiated groups. To quantify divergence between these groups and reconstruct their history and demography, we analysed nucleotide variation at the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene (1096 bp) in 364 individuals from 156 sites representing the entire range of both species. Three distinct clades with high sequence divergence (K2P = 8-11%) were distinguished. One clade grouped B. bombina haplotypes; the two other clades grouped B. variegata haplotypes. One B. variegata clade included only Carpathian individuals; the other represented B. variegata from the southwestern parts of its distribution: Southern and Western Europe (Balkano-Western lineage), Apennines, and the Rhodope Mountains. Differentiation between the Carpathian and Balkano-Western lineages, K2P approximately 8%, approached interspecific divergence. Deep divergence among European Bombina lineages suggests their preglacial origin, and implies long and largely independent evolutionary histories of the species. Multiple glacial refugia were identified in the lowlands adjoining the Black Sea, in the Carpathians, in the Balkans, and in the Apennines. The results of the nested clade and demographic analyses suggest drastic reductions of population sizes during the last glacial period, and significant demographic growth related to postglacial colonization. Inferred history, supported by fossil evidence, demonstrates that Bombina ranges underwent repeated contractions and expansions. Geographical concordance between morphology, allozymes, and mtDNA shows that previous episodes of interspecific hybridization have left no detectable mtDNA introgression. Either the admixed populations went extinct, or selection against hybrids hindered mtDNA gene flow in ancient hybrid zones.

  20. Ethanol inhibits retinal and CNS differentiation due to failure of cell cycle exit via an apoptosis-independent pathway.

    PubMed

    Chung, Hsin-Yu; Chang, Chin-Teng; Young, Huay-Win; Hu, Shing P; Tzou, Wen-Shyong; Hu, Chin-Hwa

    2013-01-01

    Alcohol exposure during embryogenesis results in a variety of developmental disorders. Here, we demonstrate that continuous exposure to 1.5% ethanol causes substantial apoptosis and abrogated retinal and CNS development in zebrafish embryos. Chronic exposure to ethanol for 24h before hatching also induces apoptosis and retinal disorder. After the 2-day post-fertilization (dpf) stage, chronic exposure to ethanol continued to induce apoptosis, but did not block retinal differentiation. Although continuous ethanol exposure induces substantial accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and increases p53 expression, depletion of p53 did not eliminate ethanol-induced apoptosis. On the other hand, sequestering ROS with the antioxidant reagent N-acetylcysteine (NAC) successfully inhibited ethanol-associated apoptosis, suggesting that the ethanol-induced cell death primarily results from ROS accumulation. Continuous ethanol treatment of embryos reduced expression of the mature neural and photoreceptor markers elavl3/huC, rho, and crx; in addition, expression of the neural and retinal progenitor markers ascl1b and pax6b was maintained at the undifferentiated stage, indicating that retinal and CNS neural progenitor cells failed to undergo further differentiation. Moreover, ethanol treatment enhanced BrdU incorporation, histone H3 phosphorylation, and pcna expression in neural progenitor cells, thereby maintaining a high rate of proliferation. Ethanol treatment also resulted in sustained transcription of ccnd1/cyclin D1 and ccne/cyclin E throughout development in neural progenitor cells, without an appropriate increase of cdkn1b/p27 and cdkn1c/p57 expression, suggesting that these cells failed to exit from the cell cycle. Although NAC was able to mitigate ethanol-mediated apoptosis, it was unable to ameliorate the defects in visual and CNS neural differentiation, suggesting that abrogated neural development in ethanol-exposed embryos is unlikely to arise from excessive

  1. Fire

    Treesearch

    John A. Stanturf; Scott L. Goodrick

    2013-01-01

    Key FindingsClimate forecasts indicate that the South’s spring and fall wildfire seasons will be extended.Prescribed fires, currently conducted on roughly a 3 to 5 year rotation across much of the South, would need to become more frequent if conditions become drier.Major wildfire events, such as the 2007...

  2. Glutamate receptors modulate sodium-dependent and calcium-independent vitamin C bidirectional transport in cultured avian retinal cells.

    PubMed

    Portugal, Camila Cabral; Miya, Vivian Sayuri; Calaza, Karin da Costa; Santos, Rochelle Alberto Martins; Paes-de-Carvalho, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    Vitamin C is transported in the brain by sodium vitamin C co-transporter 2 (SVCT-2) for ascorbate and glucose transporters for dehydroascorbate. Here we have studied the expression of SVCT-2 and the uptake and release of [(14)C] ascorbate in chick retinal cells. SVCT-2 immunoreactivity was detected in rat and chick retina, specially in amacrine cells and in cells in the ganglion cell layer. Accordingly, SVCT-2 was expressed in cultured retinal neurons, but not in glial cells. [(14)C] ascorbate uptake was saturable and inhibited by sulfinpyrazone or sodium-free medium, but not by treatments that inhibit dehydroascorbate transport. Glutamate-stimulated vitamin C release was not inhibited by the glutamate transport inhibitor l-beta-threo-benzylaspartate, indicating that vitamin C release was not mediated by glutamate uptake. Also, ascorbate had no effect on [(3)H] D-aspartate release, ruling out a glutamate/ascorbate exchange mechanism. 2-Carboxy-3-carboxymethyl-4-isopropenylpyrrolidine (Kainate) or NMDA stimulated the release, effects blocked by their respective antagonists 6,7-initroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (DNQX) or (5R,2S)-(1)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imine hydrogen maleate (MK-801). However, DNQX, but not MK-801 or 2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (APV), blocked the stimulation by glutamate. Interestingly, DNQX prevented the stimulation by NMDA, suggesting that the effect of NMDA was mediated by glutamate release and stimulation of non-NMDA receptors. The effect of glutamate was neither dependent on external calcium nor inhibited by 1,2-bis (2-aminophenoxy) ethane-N',N',N',N',-tetraacetic acid tetrakis (acetoxy-methyl ester) (BAPTA-AM), an internal calcium chelator, but was inhibited by sulfinpyrazone or by the absence of sodium. In conclusion, retinal cells take up and release vitamin C, probably through SVCT-2, and the release can be stimulated by NMDA or non-NMDA glutamate receptors.

  3. Independence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephenson, Margaret E.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the four planes of development and the periods of creation and crystallization within each plane. Identifies the type of independence that should be achieved by the end of the first two planes of development. Maintains that it is through individual work on the environment that one achieves independence. (KB)

  4. Cilio-retinal arterial circulation in central retinal vein occlusion.

    PubMed Central

    McLeod, D

    1975-01-01

    The hypothesis that an occlusion of the central retinal artery is an essential prerequisite for haemorrhage formation after central retinal vein obstruction has been investigated by examining the fundus changes in patients with a cilio-retinal arterial circulation; the findings are at variance with the 'combined occlusion hypothesis'. Comparisons were made between the pathological features in two retinal capillary beds with independent sources of arterial supply--namely, the central retinal and cilio-retinal arteries--but with an obstructed venous drainage channel common to both--namely, the central retinal vein. The importance of intraluminal pressure changes (as distinct from perfusion changes) in the causation of haemorrhages and oedema after venous occlusion is stressed, and the role of arterial disease in the pathogenesis of venous occlusions is distinguished from its role in determining the sequelae of such occlusions. Images PMID:1203235

  5. Whole Genome Sequencing Revealed Mutations in Two Independent Genes as the Underlying Cause of Retinal Degeneration in an Ashkenazi Jewish Pedigree.

    PubMed

    Gustafson, Kevin; Duncan, Jacque L; Biswas, Pooja; Soto-Hermida, Angel; Matsui, Hiroko; Jakubosky, David; Suk, John; Telenti, Amalio; Frazer, Kelly A; Ayyagari, Radha

    2017-08-24

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) causes progressive photoreceptor loss resulting from mutations in over 80 genes. This study identified the genetic cause of RP in three members of a non-consanguineous pedigree. Detailed ophthalmic evaluation was performed in the three affected family members. Whole exome sequencing (WES) and whole genome sequencing (WGS) were performed in the three affected and the two unaffected family members and variants were filtered to detect rare, potentially deleterious variants segregating with disease. WES and WGS did not identify potentially pathogenic variants shared by all three affected members. However, WES identified a previously reported homozygous nonsense mutation in KIZ (c.226C>T, p.Arg76*) in two affected sisters, but not in their affected second cousin. WGS revealed a novel 1.135 kb homozygous deletion in a retina transcript of C21orf2 and a novel 30.651 kb heterozygous deletion in CACNA2D4 in the affected second cousin. The sisters with the KIZ mutation carried no copies of the C21orf2 or CACNA2D4 deletions, while the second cousin with the C21orf2 and CACNA2D4 deletions carried no copies of the KIZ mutation. This study identified two independent, homozygous mutations in genes previously reported in autosomal recessive RP in a non-consanguineous family, and demonstrated the value of WGS when WES fails to identify likely disease-causing mutations.

  6. Retinitis pigmentosa

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001029.htm Retinitis pigmentosa To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Retinitis pigmentosa is an eye disease in which there is ...

  7. Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Ronald E.

    1979-01-01

    The author describes the etiology of retinitis pigmentosa, a visual dysfunction which results from progressive loss of the retinal photoreceptors. Sections address signs and symptoms, ancillary findings, heredity, clinical diagnosis, therapy, and research. (SBH)

  8. Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Ronald E.

    1979-01-01

    The author describes the etiology of retinitis pigmentosa, a visual dysfunction which results from progressive loss of the retinal photoreceptors. Sections address signs and symptoms, ancillary findings, heredity, clinical diagnosis, therapy, and research. (SBH)

  9. Progress toward the determination of correct classification rates in fire debris analysis II: utilizing soft independent modeling of class analogy (SIMCA).

    PubMed

    Waddell, Erin E; Williams, Mary R; Sigman, Michael E

    2014-07-01

    A multistep classification scheme was used to detect and classify ignitable liquid residues in fire debris into the classes defined by the ASTM E1618-10 standard method. The total ion spectra (TIS) of the samples were classified by soft independent modeling of class analogy (SIMCA) with cross-validation and tested on fire debris. For detection of ignitable liquid residue, the true-positive rate was 94.2% for cross-validation and 79.1% for fire debris, with false-positive rates of 5.1% and 8.9%, respectively. Evaluation of SIMCA classifications for fire debris relative to a reviewer's examination led to an increase in the true-positive rate to 95.1%; however, the false-positive rate also increased to 15.0%. The correct classification rates for assigning ignitable liquid residues into ASTM E1618-10 classes were generally in the range of 80-90%, with the exception of gasoline samples, which were incorrectly classified as aromatic solvents following evaporative weathering in fire debris.

  10. Retinal detachment.

    PubMed

    Cavallerano, A A

    1992-01-01

    Retinal detachment is a separation of the neurosensory retina from the retinal pigment epithelium. Most retinal detachments are rhegmatogenous, and identification of risk factors and predisposing lesions are important aspects of patient management. Retinal detachment is relatively rare, but can pose a significant threat to vision if there is macular involvement. Prompt diagnosis combined with patient education and appropriate intervention often can avert irrevocable visual impairment. This paper presents an overview of the categories of retinal detachment, discusses the pathogenesis of the various types of detachment, and provides recommendations for primary care of patients with predisposing factors and high-risk characteristics.

  11. Retinal Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbaum, James T.; Sibley, Cailin H.; Lin, Phoebe

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Ophthalmologists and rheumatologists frequently miscommunicate in consulting on patients with retinal vasculitis. This report seeks to establish a common understanding of the term, retinal vasculitis, and to review recent papers on this diagnosis. Recent findings 1) The genetic basis of some rare forms of retinal vascular disease have recently been described. Identified genes include CAPN5, TREX1, and TNFAIP3; 2) Behçet’s disease is a systemic illness that is very commonly associated with occlusive retinal vasculitis; 3) retinal imaging including fluorescein angiography and other newer imaging modalities has proven crucial to the identification and characterization of retinal vasculitis and its complications; 4) although monoclonal antibodies to IL-17A or IL-1 beta failed in trials for Behçet’s disease, antibodies to TNF alpha, either infliximab or adalimumab, have demonstrated consistent benefit in managing this disease. Interferon treatment and B cell depletion therapy via rituximab may be beneficial in certain types of retinal vasculitis. Summary Retinal vasculitis is an important entity for rheumatologists to understand. Retinal vasculitis associated with Behçet’s disease responds to monoclonal antibodies that neutralize TNF, but the many other forms of non-infectious retinal vasculitis may require alternate therapeutic management. PMID:26945335

  12. Retinal detachment

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD) is the most common form of retinal detachment, where a retinal "break" allows the ingress of fluid from the vitreous cavity to the subretinal space, resulting in retinal separation. It occurs in about 1 in 10,000 people a year. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of interventions to prevent progression from retinal breaks or lattice degeneration to retinal detachment? What are the effects of different surgical interventions in people with rhegmatogenous retinal detachment? What are the effects of interventions to treat proliferative vitreoretinopathy occurring as a complication of retinal detachment or previous treatment for retinal detachment? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to June 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 21 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: corticosteroids, cryotherapy, daunorubicin, fluorouracil plus low molecular weight heparin, laser photocoagulation, pneumatic retinopexy, scleral buckling, short-acting or long-acting gas tamponade, silicone oil tamponade, and vitrectomy. PMID:21406128

  13. Retinal detachment

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD) is the most common form of retinal detachment, where a retinal "break" allows the ingress of fluid from the vitreous cavity to the subretinal space, resulting in retinal separation. It occurs in about 1 in 10,000 people a year. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of interventions to prevent progression from retinal breaks or lattice degeneration to retinal detachment? What are the effects of different surgical interventions in people with rhegmatogenous retinal detachment? What are the effects of interventions to treat proliferative vitreoretinopathy occurring as a complication of retinal detachment or previous treatment for retinal detachment? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to March 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 20 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: corticosteroids; cryotherapy; daunorubicin; fluorouracil plus low-molecular-weight heparin; laser photocoagulation; pneumatic retinopexy; scleral buckling; short-acting or long-acting gas tamponade; silicone oil tamponade; and vitrectomy. PMID:19450333

  14. Retinal meteor.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, Ramesh; Gurav, Prachi; Dave, Prachi Abhishek; Roy, Sankhadeep

    2017-09-01

    We describe a case of a 65-year old man diagnosed with retinal vasoproliferative tumour secondary to posterior uveitis. The fluorescein angiography shows an interesting meteor-like leak emanating from the tumour and rising towards the superior retina in the later frames of the angiogram. Pictorially, we call it the "Retinal Meteor" and also describe the possible mechanism for this pattern of leakage.

  15. Retinal remodeling.

    PubMed

    Jones, B W; Kondo, M; Terasaki, H; Lin, Y; McCall, M; Marc, R E

    2012-07-01

    Retinal photoreceptor degeneration takes many forms. Mutations in rhodopsin genes or disorders of the retinal pigment epithelium, defects in the adenosine triphosphate binding cassette transporter, ABCR gene defects, receptor tyrosine kinase defects, ciliopathies and transport defects, defects in both transducin and arrestin, defects in rod cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate phosphodiesterase, peripherin defects, defects in metabotropic glutamate receptors, synthetic enzymatic defects, defects in genes associated with signaling, and many more can all result in retinal degenerative disease like retinitis pigmentosa (RP) or RP-like disorders. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and AMD-like disorders are possibly due to a constellation of potential gene targets and gene/gene interactions, while other defects result in diabetic retinopathy or glaucoma. However, all of these insults as well as traumatic insults to the retina result in retinal remodeling. Retinal remodeling is a universal finding subsequent to retinal degenerative disease that results in deafferentation of the neural retina from photoreceptor input as downstream neuronal elements respond to loss of input with negative plasticity. This negative plasticity is not passive in the face of photoreceptor degeneration, with a phased revision of retinal structure and function found at the molecular, synaptic, cell, and tissue levels involving all cell classes in the retina, including neurons and glia. Retinal remodeling has direct implications for the rescue of vision loss through bionic or biological approaches, as circuit revision in the retina corrupts any potential surrogate photoreceptor input to a remnant neural retina. However, there are a number of potential opportunities for intervention that are revealed through the study of retinal remodeling, including therapies that are designed to slow down photoreceptor loss, interventions that are designed to limit or arrest remodeling events, and

  16. Gain-of-function nature of Cav1.4 L-type calcium channels alters firing properties of mouse retinal ganglion cells

    PubMed Central

    Knoflach, Dagmar; Schicker, Klaus; Glösmann, Martin; Koschak, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    Proper function of Cav1.4 L-type calcium channels is crucial for neurotransmitter release in the retina. Our understanding about how different levels of Cav1.4 channel activity affect retinal function is still limited. In the gain-of-function mouse model Cav1.4-IT we expected a reduction in the photoreceptor dynamic range but still transmission toward retinal ganglion cells. A fraction of Cav1.4-IT ganglion cells responded to light stimulation in multielectrode array recordings from whole-mounted retinas, but showed a significantly delayed response onset. Another significant number of cells showed higher activity in darkness. In addition to structural remodeling observed at the first retinal synapse of Cav1.4-IT mice the functional data suggested a loss of contrast enhancement, a fundamental feature of our visual system. In fact, Cav1.4-IT mouse retinas showed a decline in spatial response and changes in their contrast sensitivity profile. Photoreceptor degeneration was obvious from the nodular structure of cone axons and enlarged pedicles which partly moved toward the outer nuclear layer. Loss of photoreceptors was also expressed as reduced expression of proteins involved in chemical and electrical transmission, as such metabotropic glutamate receptor mGluR6 and the gap junction protein Connexin 36. Such gross changes in retinal structure and function could also explain the diminished visual performance of CSNB2 patients. The expression pattern of the plasma-membrane calcium ATPase 1 which participates in the maintenance of the intracellular calcium homeostasis in photoreceptors was changed in Cav1.4-IT mice. This might be part of a protection mechanism against increased calcium influx, as this is suggested for Cav1.4-IT channels. PMID:26274509

  17. Retinal detachment

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD) is the most common form of retinal detachment, where a retinal 'break' allows the ingress of fluid from the vitreous cavity to the subretinal space, resulting in retinal separation. It occurs in about 1 in 10,000 people a year. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of different surgical interventions in people with rhegmatogenous retinal detachment? What are the effects of interventions to treat proliferative vitreoretinopathy occurring as a complication of retinal detachment or previous treatment for retinal detachment? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to September 2013 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 14 studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: corticosteroids, daunorubicin, fluorouracil plus low molecular weight heparin, pneumatic retinopexy, scleral buckling, short-acting or long-acting gas tamponade, silicone oil tamponade, and vitrectomy. PMID:24807890

  18. Retinal Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Weiland, James D.; Humayun, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    Retinal prosthesis have been translated from the laboratory to the clinical over the past two decades. Currently, two devices have regulatory approval for the treatment of retinitis pigmentosa. These devices provide partial sight restoration and patients use this improved vision in their everyday lives. Improved mobility and object detection are some of the more notable findings from the clinical trials. However, significant vision restoration will require both better technology and improved understanding of the interaction between electrical stimulation and the retina. This paper reviews the recent clinical trials, highlights technology breakthroughs that will contribute to next generation of retinal prostheses. PMID:24710817

  19. Foveomacular retinitis.

    PubMed

    Kuming, B S

    1986-11-01

    A group of patients is described who developed the clinical features of foveomacular retinitis. No causative factors were isolated, and all patients strongly denied any type of sun gazing. It is possible that there is a group of patients who have the features of foveomacular retinitis but have not had any direct exposure to the sun. These patients would then constitute a primary type of foveomacular retinitis, as opposed to a secondary type which has a known cause and is synonymous with solar retinopathy.

  20. Foveomacular retinitis.

    PubMed Central

    Kuming, B S

    1986-01-01

    A group of patients is described who developed the clinical features of foveomacular retinitis. No causative factors were isolated, and all patients strongly denied any type of sun gazing. It is possible that there is a group of patients who have the features of foveomacular retinitis but have not had any direct exposure to the sun. These patients would then constitute a primary type of foveomacular retinitis, as opposed to a secondary type which has a known cause and is synonymous with solar retinopathy. Images PMID:3790482

  1. High resolution optoelectronic retinal prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loudin, Jim; Dinyari, Rostam; Huie, Phil; Butterwick, Alex; Peumans, Peter; Palanker, Daniel

    2009-02-01

    Electronic retinal prostheses seek to restore sight in patients with retinal degeneration by delivering pulsed electric currents to retinal neurons via an array of microelectrodes. Most implants use inductive or optical transmission of information and power to an intraocular receiver, with decoded signals subsequently distributed to retinal electrodes through an intraocular cable. Surgical complexity could be minimized by an "integrated" prosthesis, in which both power and data are delivered directly to the stimulating array without any discrete components or cables. We present here an integrated retinal prosthesis system based on a photodiode array implant. Video frames are processed and imaged onto the retinal implant by a video goggle projection system operating at near-infrared wavelengths (~ 900 nm). Photodiodes convert light into pulsed electric current, with charge injection maximized by specially optimized series photodiode circuits. Prostheses of three different pixel densities (16 pix/mm2, 64 pix/mm2, and 256 pix/mm2) have been designed, simulated, and prototyped. Retinal tissue response to subretinal implants made of various materials has been investigated in RCS rats. The resulting prosthesis can provide sufficient charge injection for high resolution retinal stimulation without the need for implantation of any bulky discrete elements such as coils or tethers. In addition, since every pixel functions independently, pixel arrays may be placed separately in the subretinal space, providing visual stimulation to a larger field of view.

  2. Retinal Detachment

    MedlinePlus

    ... immediately. Treatment How is retinal detachment treated? Small holes and tears are treated with laser surgery or ... laser surgery tiny burns are made around the hole to “weld” the retina back into place. Cryopexy ...

  3. Retinal Detachment

    MedlinePlus

    The retina is a layer of tissue in the back of your eye that senses light and sends images ... for reading, driving, and seeing fine detail. A retinal detachment lifts or pulls the retina from its ...

  4. Retinal Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... be serious enough to cause blindness. Examples are Macular degeneration - a disease that destroys your sharp, central vision Diabetic eye disease Retinal detachment - a medical emergency, when the retina is ... children. Macular pucker - scar tissue on the macula Macular hole - ...

  5. Computing Complex Visual Features with Retinal Spike Times

    PubMed Central

    Sompolinsky, Haim; Meister, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Neurons in sensory systems can represent information not only by their firing rate, but also by the precise timing of individual spikes. For example, certain retinal ganglion cells, first identified in the salamander, encode the spatial structure of a new image by their first-spike latencies. Here we explore how this temporal code can be used by downstream neural circuits for computing complex features of the image that are not available from the signals of individual ganglion cells. To this end, we feed the experimentally observed spike trains from a population of retinal ganglion cells to an integrate-and-fire model of post-synaptic integration. The synaptic weights of this integration are tuned according to the recently introduced tempotron learning rule. We find that this model neuron can perform complex visual detection tasks in a single synaptic stage that would require multiple stages for neurons operating instead on neural spike counts. Furthermore, the model computes rapidly, using only a single spike per afferent, and can signal its decision in turn by just a single spike. Extending these analyses to large ensembles of simulated retinal signals, we show that the model can detect the orientation of a visual pattern independent of its phase, an operation thought to be one of the primitives in early visual processing. We analyze how these computations work and compare the performance of this model to other schemes for reading out spike-timing information. These results demonstrate that the retina formats spatial information into temporal spike sequences in a way that favors computation in the time domain. Moreover, complex image analysis can be achieved already by a simple integrate-and-fire model neuron, emphasizing the power and plausibility of rapid neural computing with spike times. PMID:23301021

  6. Solar retinitis.

    PubMed

    SHIRLEY, S Y

    1963-07-20

    Retinal burns can be produced by direct gazing at the sun. This lesion is caused by the thermal effects of the visible and near infrared rays focused on the pigment structure behind the retina. It is rarely seen, as the normal eye will tolerate only fleeting glances at the sun, but is fairly common during a solar eclipse. A case of solar retinitis is presented in which treatment with corticosteroids lessened the retinal edema but the patient suffered a bilateral central scotoma and vision reduced to the 20/40 level. In viewing a solar eclipse a No. 4 density filter is recommended; as a rough test this filter will abolish the readability of print on a 60-watt incandescent frosted electric light bulb.

  7. Solar Retinitis

    PubMed Central

    Shirley, S. Y.

    1963-01-01

    Retinal burns can be produced by direct gazing at the sun. This lesion is caused by the thermal effects of the visible and near infrared rays focused on the pigment structure behind the retina. It is rarely seen, as the normal eye will tolerate only fleeting glances at the sun, but is fairly common during a solar eclipse. A case of solar retinitis is presented in which treatment with corticosteroids lessened the retinal edema but the patient suffered a bilateral central scotoma and vision reduced to the 20/40 level. In viewing a solar eclipse a No. 4 density filter is recommended; as a rough test this filter will abolish the readability of print on a 60-watt incandescent frosted electric light bulb. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2 PMID:13977409

  8. Retine revisited.

    PubMed

    Douglas, D E

    2002-10-01

    Retine, so named by Albert Szent-Györgyi, an inhibitor of the growth of transplanted malignant tumours in animals, is present in all mammalian tissues and in urine. Its inhibitory activity was extensively investigated by Szent-Györgyi, but its exact chemical identity was not determined. Details of the reported physical and chemical properties of retine and its ubiquitous occurrence identify it as being identical to a complex mixture of lipid 2,4-diketones of similar ubiquitous occurrence. This lipid mixture has been extensively studied, and individual members have been synthesized.

  9. Directional summation in non-direction selective retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Syed Y; Hamade, Khaldoun C; Yang, Ellen J; Nawy, Scott; Smith, Robert G; Pettit, Diana L

    2013-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cells receive inputs from multiple bipolar cells which must be integrated before a decision to fire is made. Theoretical studies have provided clues about how this integration is accomplished but have not directly determined the rules regulating summation of closely timed inputs along single or multiple dendrites. Here we have examined dendritic summation of multiple inputs along On ganglion cell dendrites in whole mount rat retina. We activated inputs at targeted locations by uncaging glutamate sequentially to generate apparent motion along On ganglion cell dendrites in whole mount retina. Summation was directional and dependent13 on input sequence. Input moving away from the soma (centrifugal) resulted in supralinear summation, while activation sequences moving toward the soma (centripetal) were linear. Enhanced summation for centrifugal activation was robust as it was also observed in cultured retinal ganglion cells. This directional summation was dependent on hyperpolarization activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels as blockade with ZD7288 eliminated directionality. A computational model confirms that activation of HCN channels can override a preference for centripetal summation expected from cell anatomy. This type of direction selectivity could play a role in coding movement similar to the axial selectivity seen in locust ganglion cells which detect looming stimuli. More generally, these results suggest that non-directional retinal ganglion cells can discriminate between input sequences independent of the retina network.

  10. Directional Summation in Non-direction Selective Retinal Ganglion Cells

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, Syed Y.; Hamade, Khaldoun C.; Yang, Ellen J.; Nawy, Scott; Smith, Robert G.; Pettit, Diana L.

    2013-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cells receive inputs from multiple bipolar cells which must be integrated before a decision to fire is made. Theoretical studies have provided clues about how this integration is accomplished but have not directly determined the rules regulating summation of closely timed inputs along single or multiple dendrites. Here we have examined dendritic summation of multiple inputs along On ganglion cell dendrites in whole mount rat retina. We activated inputs at targeted locations by uncaging glutamate sequentially to generate apparent motion along On ganglion cell dendrites in whole mount retina. Summation was directional and dependent13 on input sequence. Input moving away from the soma (centrifugal) resulted in supralinear summation, while activation sequences moving toward the soma (centripetal) were linear. Enhanced summation for centrifugal activation was robust as it was also observed in cultured retinal ganglion cells. This directional summation was dependent on hyperpolarization activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels as blockade with ZD7288 eliminated directionality. A computational model confirms that activation of HCN channels can override a preference for centripetal summation expected from cell anatomy. This type of direction selectivity could play a role in coding movement similar to the axial selectivity seen in locust ganglion cells which detect looming stimuli. More generally, these results suggest that non-directional retinal ganglion cells can discriminate between input sequences independent of the retina network. PMID:23516351

  11. Human fetal retinal pigment epithelium induces apoptosis in human T-cell line Jurkat which is independent from its expression of TRAIL.

    PubMed

    Farrokh-Siar, Lili; Rezai, Kourous A; Palmer, Ellen M; van Seventer, Jean; Hamann, Kimm J; Rajadurai, Henrietta; Patel, Samir C; Ernest, J Terry; van Seventer, Gijs A

    2002-03-01

    To evaluate whether human fetal retinal pigment epithelial (HFRPE) cells express TRAIL (tumor necrosis factor related apoptosis inducing ligand). The role of TRAIL in HFRPE induced apoptosis was evaluated. Pure cultures of HFRPE cells were isolated. The expression of TRAIL protein and mRNA in non-activated and IFN-gamma activated HFRPE cells was evaluated with RT-PCR. The role of TRAIL in HFRPE induced apoptosis was assessed by incubating HFRPE cells with human T-cell leukemia line Jurkat (Jkt) in the presence or absence of neutralizing TRAIL antibodies. Cultures were pulsed with [(3)H]-thymidine to measure Jkt cell proliferation. The role of TRAIL was further examined by western blott evaluating the cleavage of caspases 8 and 10 in Jkt cells after their incubation with HFRPE cells. HFRPE cells expressed TRAIL mRNA. The expression of TRAIL mRNA and protein was up-regulated by IFN-gamma activation. However, anti-TRAIL antibodies were not able to prevent the HFRPE induced suppression of Jkt cell proliferation. The caspases 8 and 10 were also not cleaved in Jkt cells after their incubation with IFN-gamma activated HFRPE cells. Although HFRPE cells express TRAIL and its expression is upregulated by IFN-gamma activation, TRAIL is not involved in HFRPE induced apoptosis in Jkt cells. Currently the role of TRAIL in HFRPE cells is under investigation.

  12. [Aging and retinal vascular diseases].

    PubMed

    Takagi, Hitoshi

    2007-03-01

    recognized as a predominant factor to induce the ischemic retinal neovascularization. We found that retinal vascular cells have a characteristic pattern in VEGF receptor expression, which causes vascular pathology more frequently in the retina than in other organs. Neuropilin 1 (NRP 1), which enhances VEGF receptor function, is abundantly expressed in the retinal endothelial cells and is upregulated by VEGF itself and by hypoxia to regulate a positive feedback mechanism in retinal neovascularization. This receptor could be a unique target for retina-specific therapy. Lifestyle-related diseases increase along with aging and have further increased due to changes in Japanese lifestyle imitating that of Western countries. We found that the renin-angiotensin system which regulates hypertension and cardiovascular diseases, and adipocytokines which are abnormally secreted in obesity, act as proangiogenic factors. Regulation of such lifestyle-related disease factors is important for the treatment of retinal vascular diseases. Finally, we found that erythropoietin is an ischemia-induced angiogenic factor that acts independently and as potently as VEGF in proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR). Our study utilizing human vitreous samples demonstrates that the VEGF level is particularly high and strongly associated with angiogenic activity in PDR patients. The potential of VEGF inhibitors has recently been recognized in clinical applications. The manipulation of each angiogenic factor and adipocytokine that we report here could become potential therapy in the near future.

  13. Retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Hamel, Christian

    2006-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is an inherited retinal dystrophy caused by the loss of photoreceptors and characterized by retinal pigment deposits visible on fundus examination. Prevalence of non syndromic RP is approximately 1/4,000. The most common form of RP is a rod-cone dystrophy, in which the first symptom is night blindness, followed by the progressive loss in the peripheral visual field in daylight, and eventually leading to blindness after several decades. Some extreme cases may have a rapid evolution over two decades or a slow progression that never leads to blindness. In some cases, the clinical presentation is a cone-rod dystrophy, in which the decrease in visual acuity predominates over the visual field loss. RP is usually non syndromic but there are also many syndromic forms, the most frequent being Usher syndrome. To date, 45 causative genes/loci have been identified in non syndromic RP (for the autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, X-linked, and digenic forms). Clinical diagnosis is based on the presence of night blindness and peripheral visual field defects, lesions in the fundus, hypovolted electroretinogram traces, and progressive worsening of these signs. Molecular diagnosis can be made for some genes, but is not usually performed due to the tremendous genetic heterogeneity of the disease. Genetic counseling is always advised. Currently, there is no therapy that stops the evolution of the disease or restores the vision, so the visual prognosis is poor. The therapeutic approach is restricted to slowing down the degenerative process by sunlight protection and vitaminotherapy, treating the complications (cataract and macular edema), and helping patients to cope with the social and psychological impact of blindness. However, new therapeutic strategies are emerging from intensive research (gene therapy, neuroprotection, retinal prosthesis). PMID:17032466

  14. Annual review of retinal research.

    PubMed

    Cohen, J

    1976-09-01

    This paper reviews recent ophthalmological manuscripts pertaining to wasting retinal nerve fibers, retinopathy related to systemic lymphomas, hypertensive retinopathy, diabetic retinopathy, retinal oxalosis, macular and foveal anomalies, retinal pigment epithelium, retinitis pigmentosa, retinoblastoma, histoplasmosis, toxoplasmosis, and retinal tears and detachments.

  15. Independent Validation and Verification of Process Design and Optimization Technology Diagnostic and Control of Natural Gas Fired Furnaces via Flame Image Analysis Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, Daryl

    2009-05-01

    The United States Department of Energy, Industrial Technologies Program has invested in emerging Process Design and Optimizations Technologies (PDOT) to encourage the development of new initiatives that might result in energy savings in industrial processes. Gas fired furnaces present a harsh environment, often making accurate determination of correct air/fuel ratios a challenge. Operation with the correct air/fuel ratio and especially with balanced burners in multi-burner combustion equipment can result in improved system efficiency, yielding lower operating costs and reduced emissions. Flame Image Analysis offers a way to improve individual burner performance by identifying and correcting fuel-rich burners. The anticipated benefit of this technology is improved furnace thermal efficiency, and lower NOx emissions. Independent validation and verification (V&V) testing of the FIA technology was performed at Missouri Forge, Inc., in Doniphan, Missouri by Environ International Corporation (V&V contractor) and Enterprise Energy and Research (EE&R), the developer of the technology. The test site was selected by the technology developer and accepted by Environ after a meeting held at Missouri Forge. As stated in the solicitation for the V&V contractor, 'The objective of this activity is to provide independent verification and validation of the performance of this new technology when demonstrated in industrial applications. A primary goal for the V&V process will be to independently evaluate if this technology, when demonstrated in an industrial application, can be utilized to save a significant amount of the operating energy cost. The Seller will also independently evaluate the other benefits of the demonstrated technology that were previously identified by the developer, including those related to product quality, productivity, environmental impact, etc'. A test plan was provided by the technology developer and is included as an appendix to the summary report submitted

  16. East bay fire chiefs' consortium

    Treesearch

    Michael Bradley

    1995-01-01

    The traditional approach to planning for public fire protection has been based on independent actions by each fire department or district. The county fire chiefs’ associations, while providing interagency communication, were not adequate to deal with the regional nature of the wildland urban interface problem. The formation of the East Bay Fire Chiefs’ Consortium grew...

  17. Missed retinal breaks in rhegmatogenous retinal detachment.

    PubMed

    Takkar, Brijesh; Azad, Shorya; Shashni, Adarsh; Pujari, Amar; Bhatia, Indrish; Azad, Rajvardhan

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the causes and associations of missed retinal breaks (MRBs) and posterior vitreous detachment (PVD) in patients with rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD). Case sheets of patients undergoing vitreo retinal surgery for RRD at a tertiary eye care centre were evaluated retrospectively. Out of the 378 records screened, 253 were included for analysis of MRBs and 191 patients were included for analysis of PVD, depending on the inclusion criteria. Features of RRD and retinal breaks noted on examination were compared to the status of MRBs and PVD detected during surgery for possible associations. Overall, 27% patients had MRBs. Retinal holes were commonly missed in patients with lattice degeneration while missed retinal tears were associated with presence of complete PVD. Patients operated for cataract surgery were significantly associated with MRBs (P=0.033) with the odds of missing a retinal break being 1.91 as compared to patients with natural lens. Advanced proliferative vitreo retinopathy (PVR) and retinal bullae were the most common reasons for missing a retinal break during examination. PVD was present in 52% of the cases and was wrongly assessed in 16%. Retinal bullae, pseudophakia/aphakia, myopia, and horse shoe retinal tears were strongly associated with presence of PVD. Traumatic RRDs were rarely associated with PVD. Pseudophakic patients, and patients with retinal bullae or advanced PVR should be carefully screened for MRBs. Though Weiss ring is a good indicator of PVD, it may still be over diagnosed in some cases. PVD is associated with retinal bullae and pseudophakia, and inversely with traumatic RRD.

  18. Missed retinal breaks in rhegmatogenous retinal detachment

    PubMed Central

    Takkar, Brijesh; Azad, Shorya; Shashni, Adarsh; Pujari, Amar; Bhatia, Indrish; Azad, Rajvardhan

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the causes and associations of missed retinal breaks (MRBs) and posterior vitreous detachment (PVD) in patients with rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD). METHODS Case sheets of patients undergoing vitreo retinal surgery for RRD at a tertiary eye care centre were evaluated retrospectively. Out of the 378 records screened, 253 were included for analysis of MRBs and 191 patients were included for analysis of PVD, depending on the inclusion criteria. Features of RRD and retinal breaks noted on examination were compared to the status of MRBs and PVD detected during surgery for possible associations. RESULTS Overall, 27% patients had MRBs. Retinal holes were commonly missed in patients with lattice degeneration while missed retinal tears were associated with presence of complete PVD. Patients operated for cataract surgery were significantly associated with MRBs (P=0.033) with the odds of missing a retinal break being 1.91 as compared to patients with natural lens. Advanced proliferative vitreo retinopathy (PVR) and retinal bullae were the most common reasons for missing a retinal break during examination. PVD was present in 52% of the cases and was wrongly assessed in 16%. Retinal bullae, pseudophakia/aphakia, myopia, and horse shoe retinal tears were strongly associated with presence of PVD. Traumatic RRDs were rarely associated with PVD. CONCLUSION Pseudophakic patients, and patients with retinal bullae or advanced PVR should be carefully screened for MRBs. Though Weiss ring is a good indicator of PVD, it may still be over diagnosed in some cases. PVD is associated with retinal bullae and pseudophakia, and inversely with traumatic RRD. PMID:27990367

  19. The Structure and Precision of Retinal Spike Trains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, Michael J.; Warland, David K.; Meister, Markus

    1997-05-01

    Assessing the reliability of neuronal spike trains is fundamental to an understanding of the neural code. We measured the reproducibility of retinal responses to repeated visual stimuli. In both tiger salamander and rabbit, the retinal ganglion cells responded to random flicker with discrete, brief periods of firing. For any given cell, these firing events covered only a small fraction of the total stimulus time, often less than 5%. Firing events were very reproducible from trial to trial: the timing jitter of individual spikes was as low as 1 msec, and the standard deviation in spike count was often less than 0.5 spikes. Comparing the precision of spike timing to that of the spike count showed that the timing of a firing event conveyed several times more visual information than its spike count. This sparseness and precision were general characteristics of ganglion cell responses, maintained over the broad ensemble of stimulus waveforms produced by random flicker, and over a range of contrasts. Thus, the responses of retinal ganglion cells are not properly described by a firing probability that varies continuously with the stimulus. Instead, these neurons elicit discrete firing events that may be the fundamental coding symbols in retinal spike trains.

  20. A Method for Combined Retinal Vascular and Tissue Oxygen Tension Imaging.

    PubMed

    Felder, Anthony E; Wanek, Justin; Tan, Michael R; Blair, Norman P; Shahidi, Mahnaz

    2017-09-06

    The retina requires adequate oxygenation to maintain cellular metabolism and visual function. Inner retinal oxygen metabolism is directly related to retinal vascular oxygen tension (PO2) and inner retinal oxygen extraction fraction (OEF), whereas outer retinal oxygen consumption (QO2) relies on oxygen availability by the choroid and is contingent upon retinal tissue oxygen tension (tPO2) gradients across the retinal depth. Thus far, these oxygenation and metabolic parameters have been measured independently by different techniques in separate animals, precluding a comprehensive and correlative assessment of retinal oxygenation and metabolism dynamics. The purpose of the current study is to report an innovative optical system for dual oxyphor phosphorescence lifetime imaging to near-simultaneously measure retinal vascular PO2 and tPO2 in rats. The use of a new oxyphor with different spectral characteristics allowed differentiation of phosphorescence signals from the retinal vasculature and tissue. Concurrent measurements of retinal arterial and venous PO 2 , tPO2 through the retinal depth, inner retinal OEF, and outer retinal QO 2 were demonstrated, permitting a correlative assessment of retinal oxygenation and metabolism. Future application of this method can be used to investigate the relations among retinal oxygen content, extraction and metabolism under pathologic conditions and thus advance knowledge of retinal hypoxia pathophysiology.

  1. Airborne forest fire research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattingly, G. S.

    1974-01-01

    The research relating to airborne fire fighting systems is reviewed to provide NASA/Langley Research Center with current information on the use of aircraft in forest fire operations, and to identify research requirements for future operations. A literature survey, interview of forest fire service personnel, analysis and synthesis of data from research reports and independent conclusions, and recommendations for future NASA-LRC programs are included.

  2. Fire behavior, fuel treatments, and fire suppression on the Hayman Fire - Part 5: Fire suppression activities

    Treesearch

    Charles W. McHugh; Paul Gleason

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the suppression actions taken during the Hayman Fire. The long duration of suppression activities (June 8 through July 18), and multiple incident management teams assigned to the fire, makes this a challenging task. Original records and reports produced independently by the various teams assigned to different portions of the...

  3. Automatic temperature controlled retinal photocoagulation.

    PubMed

    Schlott, Kerstin; Koinzer, Stefan; Ptaszynski, Lars; Bever, Marco; Baade, Alex; Roider, Johann; Birngruber, Reginald; Brinkmann, Ralf

    2012-06-01

    Laser coagulation is a treatment method for many retinal diseases. Due to variations in fundus pigmentation and light scattering inside the eye globe, different lesion strengths are often achieved. The aim of this work is to realize an automatic feedback algorithm to generate desired lesion strengths by controlling the retinal temperature increase with the irradiation time. Optoacoustics afford non-invasive retinal temperature monitoring during laser treatment. A 75 ns/523 nm Q-switched Nd:YLF laser was used to excite the temperature-dependent pressure amplitudes, which were detected at the cornea by an ultrasonic transducer embedded in a contact lens. A 532 nm continuous wave Nd:YAG laser served for photocoagulation. The ED50 temperatures, for which the probability of ophthalmoscopically visible lesions after one hour in vivo in rabbits was 50%, varied from 63°C for 20 ms to 49°C for 400 ms. Arrhenius parameters were extracted as ΔE=273 J mol(-1) and A=3 x 10(44) s(-1). Control algorithms for mild and strong lesions were developed, which led to average lesion diameters of 162 ± 34 μm and 189 ± 34 μm, respectively. It could be demonstrated that the sizes of the automatically controlled lesions were widely independent of the treatment laser power and the retinal pigmentation.

  4. Automatic temperature controlled retinal photocoagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlott, Kerstin; Koinzer, Stefan; Ptaszynski, Lars; Bever, Marco; Baade, Alex; Roider, Johann; Birngruber, Reginald; Brinkmann, Ralf

    2012-06-01

    Laser coagulation is a treatment method for many retinal diseases. Due to variations in fundus pigmentation and light scattering inside the eye globe, different lesion strengths are often achieved. The aim of this work is to realize an automatic feedback algorithm to generate desired lesion strengths by controlling the retinal temperature increase with the irradiation time. Optoacoustics afford non-invasive retinal temperature monitoring during laser treatment. A 75 ns/523 nm Q-switched Nd:YLF laser was used to excite the temperature-dependent pressure amplitudes, which were detected at the cornea by an ultrasonic transducer embedded in a contact lens. A 532 nm continuous wave Nd:YAG laser served for photocoagulation. The ED50 temperatures, for which the probability of ophthalmoscopically visible lesions after one hour in vivo in rabbits was 50%, varied from 63°C for 20 ms to 49°C for 400 ms. Arrhenius parameters were extracted as ΔE=273 J mol-1 and A=3.1044 s-1. Control algorithms for mild and strong lesions were developed, which led to average lesion diameters of 162+/-34 μm and 189+/-34 μm, respectively. It could be demonstrated that the sizes of the automatically controlled lesions were widely independent of the treatment laser power and the retinal pigmentation.

  5. Concerted Signaling by Retinal Ganglion Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meister, Markus; Lagnado, Leon; Baylor, Denis A.

    1995-11-01

    To analyze the rules that govern communication between eye and brain, visual responses were recorded from an intact salamander retina. Parallel observation of many retinal ganglion cells with a microelectrode array showed that nearby neurons often fired synchronously, with spike delays of less than 10 milliseconds. The frequency of such synchronous spikes exceeded the correlation expected from a shared visual stimulus up to 20-fold. Synchronous firing persisted under a variety of visual stimuli and accounted for the majority of action potentials recorded. Analysis of receptive fields showed that concerted spikes encoded information not carried by individual cells; they may represent symbols in a multineuronal code for vision.

  6. Flexible retinal electrode array

    DOEpatents

    Okandan, Murat; Wessendorf, Kurt O.; Christenson, Todd R.

    2006-10-24

    An electrode array which has applications for neural stimulation and sensing. The electrode array can include a large number of electrodes each of which is flexibly attached to a common substrate using a plurality of springs to allow the electrodes to move independently. The electrode array can be formed from a combination of bulk and surface micromachining, with electrode tips that can include an electroplated metal (e.g. platinum, iridium, gold or titanium) or a metal oxide (e.g. iridium oxide) for biocompatibility. The electrode array can be used to form a part of a neural prosthesis, and is particularly well adapted for use in an implantable retinal prosthesis where the electrodes can be tailored to provide a uniform gentle contact pressure with optional sensing of this contact pressure at one or more of the electrodes.

  7. 46 CFR 108.415 - Fire pump: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fire pump: General. 108.415 Section 108.415 Shipping... EQUIPMENT Fire Extinguishing Systems Fire Main System § 108.415 Fire pump: General. A fire main system must have at least two independently driven fire pumps that can each deliver water at a continuous...

  8. 46 CFR 108.415 - Fire pump: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... EQUIPMENT Fire Extinguishing Systems Fire Main System § 108.415 Fire pump: General. A fire main system must have at least two independently driven fire pumps that can each deliver water at a continuous pitot... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Fire pump: General. 108.415 Section 108.415...

  9. 46 CFR 108.415 - Fire pump: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... EQUIPMENT Fire Extinguishing Systems Fire Main System § 108.415 Fire pump: General. A fire main system must have at least two independently driven fire pumps that can each deliver water at a continuous pitot... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Fire pump: General. 108.415 Section 108.415...

  10. 46 CFR 108.415 - Fire pump: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... EQUIPMENT Fire Extinguishing Systems Fire Main System § 108.415 Fire pump: General. A fire main system must have at least two independently driven fire pumps that can each deliver water at a continuous pitot... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fire pump: General. 108.415 Section 108.415...

  11. 46 CFR 108.415 - Fire pump: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... EQUIPMENT Fire Extinguishing Systems Fire Main System § 108.415 Fire pump: General. A fire main system must have at least two independently driven fire pumps that can each deliver water at a continuous pitot... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Fire pump: General. 108.415 Section 108.415...

  12. Retinal fractals and acute lacunar stroke.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Ning; Liew, Gerald; Lindley, Richard I; Liu, Erica Y; Wang, Jie Jin; Hand, Peter; Baker, Michelle; Mitchell, Paul; Wong, Tien Y

    2010-07-01

    This study aimed to determine whether retinal fractal dimension, a quantitative measure of microvascular branching complexity and density, is associated with lacunar stroke. A total of 392 patients presenting with acute ischemic stroke had retinal fractal dimension measured from digital photographs, and lacunar infarct ascertained from brain imaging. After adjusting for age, gender, and vascular risk factors, higher retinal fractal dimension (highest vs lowest quartile and per standard deviation increase) was independently and positively associated with lacunar stroke (odds ratio [OR], 4.27; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.49-12.17 and OR, 1.85; 95% CI, 1.20-2.84, respectively). Increased retinal microvascular complexity and density is associated with lacunar stroke.

  13. Retinal vessel caliber and peripheral neuropathy in diabetic participants.

    PubMed

    Sabanayagam, Charumathi; Tai, E Shyong; Lee, Jeannette; Lim, Su Chi; Wong, Tien Yin

    2010-05-01

    Retinal vascular caliber changes predict diabetic microvascular complications such as retinopathy, and nephropathy. However, the association between retinal vasculature and peripheral neuropathy is not well studied. We evaluated the association between retinal vascular caliber and peripheral neuropathy in a multi-ethnic Asian population with diabetes (n = 423) in Singapore. Retinal arteriolar and venular caliber was measured from digital retinal photographs and summarized as central retinal arteriolar equivalent (CRAE) and central retinal venular equivalent. Peripheral neuropathy was defined from neurothesiometer or monofilament sensory testing. Larger CRAE was positively associated with peripheral neuropathy independent of age, sex, ethnicity, current smoking, alcohol consumption, body mass index, total cholesterol, systolic blood pressure, and duration of diabetes. The multivariable odds ratio (OR) [95% confidence interval (CI)] of peripheral neuropathy was 2.81 (1.38-5.73) comparing highest vs. lower three quartiles of CRAE. This association was consistently present in analyses stratified by age, sex and ethnicity. Retinal venular caliber was not associated with peripheral neuropathy. These data suggest that larger retinal arteriolar diameters are associated with peripheral neuropathy independent of major risk factors.

  14. The association between retinal vasculature changes and stroke: a literature review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hui-Qun; Wu, Huan; Shi, Li-Li; Yu, Li-Yuan; Wang, Li-Yuan; Chen, Ya-Lan; Geng, Jin-Song; Shi, Jian; Jiang, Kui; Dong, Jian-Cheng

    2017-01-01

    AIM To determine the association between retinal vasculature changes and stroke. METHODS MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched for relevant human studies to September 2015 that investigated the association between retinal vasculature changes and the prevalence or incidence of stroke; the studies were independently examined for their qualities. Data on clinical characteristics and calculated summary odds ratios (ORs) were extracted for associations between retinal microvascular abnormalities and stroke, including stroke subtypes where possible, and adjusted for key variables. RESULTS Nine cases were included in the study comprising 20 659 patients, 1178 of whom were stroke patients. The retinal microvascular morphological markers used were hemorrhage, microaneurysm, vessel caliber, arteriovenous nicking, and fractal dimension. OR of retinal arteriole narrowing and retinal arteriovenous nicking and stroke was 1.42 and 1.91, respectively, indicating that a small-caliber retinal arteriole and retinal arteriovenous nicking were associated with stroke. OR of retinal hemorrhage and retinal microaneurysm and stroke was 3.21 and 3.83, respectively, indicating that retinal microvascular lesions were highly associated with stroke. Results also showed that retinal fractal dimension reduction was associated with stroke (OR: 2.28 for arteriole network, OR: 1.80 for venular network). CONCLUSION Retinal vasculature changes have a specific relationship to stroke, which is promising evidence for the prediction of stroke using computerized retinal vessel analysis. PMID:28149786

  15. Retinal waves are likely to instruct the formation of eye-specific retinogeniculate projections.

    PubMed

    Feller, Marla B

    2009-07-06

    Prior to eye-opening and the development of visual responses, the retina exhibits highly correlated spontaneous firing pattens termed retinal waves. Disruption of the normal spontaneous firing pattern either genetically or pharmacologically prevents the eye-specific refinement of retinogeniculate afferents. Here I provide the evidence that retinal waves play an instructive role in this process. In addition, I argue that a full understanding requires an identification of the features of retinal activity that drive the refinement as well as an understanding of mechanisms that transform these signals into axonal rearrangements.

  16. Retinal remodeling triggered by photoreceptor degenerations.

    PubMed

    Jones, Bryan W; Watt, Carl B; Frederick, Jeanne M; Baehr, Wolfgang; Chen, Ching-Kang; Levine, Edward M; Milam, Ann H; Lavail, Matthew M; Marc, Robert E

    2003-09-08

    Many photoreceptor degenerations initially affect rods, secondarily leading to cone death. It has long been assumed that the surviving neural retina is largely resistant to this sensory deafferentation. New evidence from fast retinal degenerations reveals that subtle plasticities in neuronal form and connectivity emerge early in disease. By screening mature natural, transgenic, and knockout retinal degeneration models with computational molecular phenotyping, we have found an extended late phase of negative remodeling that radically changes retinal structure. Three major transformations emerge: 1) Müller cell hypertrophy and elaboration of a distal glial seal between retina and the choroid/retinal pigmented epithelium; 2) apparent neuronal migration along glial surfaces to ectopic sites; and 3) rewiring through evolution of complex neurite fascicles, new synaptic foci in the remnant inner nuclear layer, and new connections throughout the retina. Although some neurons die, survivors express molecular signatures characteristic of normal bipolar, amacrine, and ganglion cells. Remodeling in human and rodent retinas is independent of the initial molecular targets of retinal degenerations, including defects in the retinal pigmented epithelium, rhodopsin, or downstream phototransduction elements. Although remodeling may constrain therapeutic intervals for molecular, cellular, or bionic rescue, it suggests that the neural retina may be more plastic than previously believed.

  17. Retinal Remodeling in Human Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Jones, B.W.; Pfeiffer, R.L.; Ferrell, W. D.; Watt, C.B.; Marmor, M.; Marc, R.E.

    2016-01-01

    Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP) in the human is a progressive, currently irreversible neural degenerative disease usually caused by gene defects that disrupt the function or architecture of the photoreceptors. While RP can initially be a disease of photoreceptors, there is increasing evidence that the inner retina becomes progressively disorganized as the outer retina degenerates. These alterations have been extensively described in animal models, but remodeling in humans has not been as well characterized. This study, using computational molecular phenotyping (CMP) seeks to advance our understanding of the retinal remodeling process in humans. We describe cone mediated preservation of overall topology, retinal reprogramming in the earliest stages of the disease in retinal bipolar cells, and alterations in both small molecule and protein signatures of neurons and glia. Furthermore, while Müller glia appear to be some of the last cells left in the degenerate retina, they are also one of the first cell classes in the neural retina to respond to stress which may reveal mechanisms related to remodeling and cell death in other retinal cell classes. Also fundamentally important is the finding that retinal network topologies are altered. Our results suggest interventions that presume substantial preservation of the neural retina will likely fail in late stages of the disease. Even early intervention offers no guarantee that the interventions will be immune to progressive remodeling. Fundamental work in the biology and mechanisms of disease progression are needed to support vision rescue strategies. PMID:27020758

  18. Retinal remodeling in human retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Jones, B W; Pfeiffer, R L; Ferrell, W D; Watt, C B; Marmor, M; Marc, R E

    2016-09-01

    Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP) in the human is a progressive, currently irreversible neural degenerative disease usually caused by gene defects that disrupt the function or architecture of the photoreceptors. While RP can initially be a disease of photoreceptors, there is increasing evidence that the inner retina becomes progressively disorganized as the outer retina degenerates. These alterations have been extensively described in animal models, but remodeling in humans has not been as well characterized. This study, using computational molecular phenotyping (CMP) seeks to advance our understanding of the retinal remodeling process in humans. We describe cone mediated preservation of overall topology, retinal reprogramming in the earliest stages of the disease in retinal bipolar cells, and alterations in both small molecule and protein signatures of neurons and glia. Furthermore, while Müller glia appear to be some of the last cells left in the degenerate retina, they are also one of the first cell classes in the neural retina to respond to stress which may reveal mechanisms related to remodeling and cell death in other retinal cell classes. Also fundamentally important is the finding that retinal network topologies are altered. Our results suggest interventions that presume substantial preservation of the neural retina will likely fail in late stages of the disease. Even early intervention offers no guarantee that the interventions will be immune to progressive remodeling. Fundamental work in the biology and mechanisms of disease progression are needed to support vision rescue strategies.

  19. Stimulation of a Suprachoroidal Retinal Prosthesis Drives Cortical Responses in a Feline Model of Retinal Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Aplin, Felix P; Fletcher, Erica L; Luu, Chi D; Vessey, Kirstan A; Allen, Penelope J; Guymer, Robyn H; Shepherd, Robert K; Shivdasani, Mohit N

    2016-10-01

    Retinal prostheses have emerged as a promising technology to restore vision in patients with severe photoreceptor degeneration. To better understand how neural degeneration affects the efficacy of electronic implants, we investigated the function of a suprachoroidal retinal implant in a feline model. Unilateral retinal degeneration was induced in four adult felines by intravitreal injection of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Twelve weeks post injection, animals received suprachoroidal electrode array implants in each eye, and responses to electrical stimulation were obtained using multiunit recordings from the visual cortex. Histologic measurements of neural and glial changes in the retina at the implant site were correlated with cortical thresholds from individual stimulating electrodes. Adenosine triphosphate-injected eyes displayed changes consistent with mid-to-late stage retinal degeneration and remodeling. A significant increase in electrical charge was required to induce a cortical response from stimulation of the degenerated retina compared to that in the fellow control eye. Spatial and temporal characteristics of the electrically evoked cortical responses were no different between eyes. Individual electrode thresholds varied in both the control and the ATP-injected eyes and were correlated with ganglion cell density. In ATP-injected eyes, cortical threshold was also independently correlated with an increase in the extent of retinal gliosis. These data suggest that even when ganglion cell density remains unaffected, glial changes in the retina following degeneration can influence the efficacy of suprachoroidal electrical stimulation. A better understanding of how glial change impacts retinal prosthesis function may help to further the optimization of retinal implants.

  20. Genetics Home Reference: retinitis pigmentosa

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions retinitis pigmentosa retinitis pigmentosa Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Retinitis pigmentosa is a group of related eye disorders that ...

  1. Retinal detachment repair

    MedlinePlus

    Scleral buckling; Vitrectomy; Pneumatic retinopexy; Laser retinopexy; Rhegmatogenous retinal detachment repair ... it meets the hole in the retina. Scleral buckling can be done using numbing medicine while you ...

  2. Retinal vessel caliber and lifelong neuropsychological functioning: retinal imaging as an investigative tool for cognitive epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Shalev, Idan; Moffitt, Terrie E; Wong, Tien Y; Meier, Madeline H; Houts, Renate M; Ding, Jie; Cheung, Carol Y; Ikram, M Kamran; Caspi, Avshalom; Poulton, Richie

    2013-07-01

    Why do more intelligent people live healthier and longer lives? One possibility is that intelligence tests assess health of the brain, but psychological science has lacked technology to evaluate this hypothesis. Digital retinal imaging, a new, noninvasive method to visualize microcirculation in the eye, may reflect vascular conditions in the brain. We studied the association between retinal vessel caliber and neuropsychological functioning in the representative Dunedin birth cohort. Wider venular caliber was associated with poorer neuropsychological functioning at midlife, independently of potentially confounding factors. This association was not limited to any specific test domain and extended to informants' reports of cohort members' cognitive difficulties in everyday life. Moreover, wider venular caliber was associated with lower childhood IQ tested 25 years earlier. The findings indicate that retinal venular caliber may be an indicator of neuropsychological health years before the onset of dementing diseases and suggest that digital retinal imaging may be a useful investigative tool for psychological science.

  3. Fire Behavior System for the Full Range of Fire Management Needs

    Treesearch

    Richard C. Rothermel; Patricia L. Andrews

    1987-01-01

    An "integrated fire behavior/fire danger rating system" should be "seamless" to avoid requiring choices among alternate, independent systems. Descriptions of fuel moisture, fuels, and fire behavior should be standardized, permitting information to flow easily through the spectrum of fire management needs. The level of resolution depends on the...

  4. Fire safety

    Treesearch

    Robert H. White; Mark A. Dietenberger

    1999-01-01

    Fire safety is an important concern in all types of construction. The high level of national concern for fire safety is reflected in limitations and design requirements in building codes. These code requirements are discussed in the context of fire safety design and evaluation in the initial section of this chapter. Since basic data on fire behavior of wood products...

  5. Role of Bax in death of uninfected retinal cells during murine cytomegalovirus retinitis.

    PubMed

    Mo, Juan; Marshall, Brendan; Covar, Jason; Zhang, Nancy Y; Smith, Sylvia B; Atherton, Sally S; Zhang, Ming

    2014-10-08

    Extensive death of uninfected bystander neuronal cells is an important component of the pathogenesis of cytomegalovirus retinitis. Our previous results have shown that caspase 3-dependent and -independent pathways are involved in death of uninfected bystander cells during murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) retinitis and also that Bcl-2, an important inhibitor of apoptosis via the Bax-mediated mitochondrial pathway, is downregulated during this process. The purpose of this study was to determine whether Bax-mediated mitochondrial damage has a significant role in the death of uninfected retinal cells. BALB/c mice, Bax(-/-) mice, or Bax(+/+) mice were immunosuppressed with methylprednisolone and infected with 5 × 10(3) plaque-forming units (PFU) of the K181 strain of MCMV via the supraciliary route. Injected eyes were analyzed by plaque assay, electron microscopy, hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining, TUNEL assay, Western blot (for caspase 3, caspase 12, Bax, receptor interacting protein-1 [RIP1] and receptor interacting protein-3 [RIP3]), as well as immunohistochemical staining for MCMV early antigen and cleaved caspase 3. Significantly more Bax was detected in mitochondrial fractions of MCMV-infected eyes than in mitochondrial fractions of mock-infected control eyes. Furthermore, the level of cleaved caspase 3 was significantly lower in MCMV-infected Bax(-/-) eyes than in MCMV-infected Bax(+/+) eyes. However, more caspase 3-independent cell death of uninfected bystander retinal cells and more cleaved RIP1 were observed in Bax(-/-) than in Bax(+/+) eyes. During MCMV retinitis, Bax is activated and has an important role in death of uninfected bystander retinal cells by caspase 3-dependent apoptosis. Although the exact mechanism remains to be deciphered, active Bax might also prevent death of some types of uninfected retinal cells by a caspase 3-independent pathway. Copyright 2014 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  6. Pharmacotherapies for Retinal Detachment.

    PubMed

    Wubben, Thomas J; Besirli, Cagri G; Zacks, David N

    2016-07-01

    Retinal detachment is an important cause of visual loss. Currently, surgical techniques, including vitrectomy, scleral buckle, and pneumatic retinopexy, are the only means to repair retinal detachment and restore vision. However, surgical failure rates may be as high as 20%, and visual outcomes continue to vary secondary to multiple processes, including postoperative cystoid macular edema, epiretinal membrane formation, macular folds, and, ultimately, photoreceptor death. Therefore, pharmacotherapies are being sought to aid the success rates of modern surgical techniques and reduce or slow the degeneration of photoreceptors during retinal detachment. This review discusses potential therapeutic avenues that aid in retinal reattachment, reduce the rate of retinal redetachment by limiting proliferative vitreoretinopathy, and protect against photoreceptor cell death.

  7. Modern retinal laser therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kozak, Igor; Luttrull, Jeffrey K.

    2014-01-01

    Medicinal lasers are a standard source of light to produce retinal tissue photocoagulation to treat retinovascular disease. The Diabetic Retinopathy Study and the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study were large randomized clinical trials that have shown beneficial effect of retinal laser photocoagulation in diabetic retinopathy and have dictated the standard of care for decades. However, current treatment protocols undergo modifications. Types of lasers used in treatment of retinal diseases include argon, diode, dye and multicolor lasers, micropulse lasers and lasers for photodynamic therapy. Delivery systems include contact lens slit-lamp laser delivery, indirect ophthalmocope based laser photocoagulation and camera based navigated retinal photocoagulation with retinal eye-tracking. Selective targeted photocoagulation could be a future alternative to panretinal photocoagulation. PMID:25892934

  8. Temperature controlled retinal photocoagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlott, Kerstin; Koinzer, Stefan; Baade, Alexander; Birngruber, Reginald; Roider, Johann; Brinkmann, Ralf

    2013-06-01

    Retinal photocoagulation lacks objective dosage in clinical use, thus the commonly applied lesions are too deep and strong, associated with pain reception and the risk of visual field defects and induction of choroidal neovascularisations. Optoacoustics allows real-time non-invasive temperature measurement in the fundus during photocoagulation by applying short probe laser pulses additionally to the treatment radiation, which excite the emission of ultrasonic waves. Due to the temperature dependence of the Grüneisen parameter, the amplitudes of the ultrasonic waves can be used to derive the temperature of the absorbing tissue. By measuring the temperatures in real-time and automatically controlling the irradiation by feedback to the treatment laser, the strength of the lesions can be defined. Different characteristic functions for the time and temperature dependent lesion sizes were used as rating curves for the treatment laser, stopping the irradiation automatically after a desired lesion size is achieved. The automatically produced lesion sizes are widely independent of the adjusted treatment laser power and individual absorption. This study was performed on anaesthetized rabbits and is a step towards a clinical trial with automatically controlled photocoagulation.

  9. AAV Mediated GDNF Secretion From Retinal Glia Slows Down Retinal Degeneration in a Rat Model of Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Dalkara, Deniz; Kolstad, Kathleen D; Guerin, Karen I; Hoffmann, Natalie V; Visel, Meike; Klimczak, Ryan R; Schaffer, David V; Flannery, John G

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in over 80 identified genes can induce apoptosis in photoreceptors, resulting in blindness with a prevalence of 1 in 3,000 individuals. This broad genetic heterogeneity of disease impacting a wide range of photoreceptor functions renders the design of gene-specific therapies for photoreceptor degeneration impractical and necessitates the development of mutation-independent treatments to slow photoreceptor cell death. One promising strategy for photoreceptor neuroprotection is neurotrophin secretion from Müller cells, the primary retinal glia. Müller glia are excellent targets for secreting neurotrophins as they span the entire tissue, ensheath all neuronal populations, are numerous, and persist through retinal degeneration. We previously engineered an adeno-associated virus (AAV) variant (ShH10) capable of efficient and selective glial cell transduction through intravitreal injection. ShH10-mediated glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) secretion from glia, generates high GDNF levels in treated retinas, leading to sustained functional rescue for over 5 months. This GDNF secretion from glia following intravitreal vector administration is a safe and effective means to slow the progression of retinal degeneration in a rat model of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and shows significant promise as a gene therapy to treat human retinal degenerations. These findings also demonstrate for the first time that glia-mediated secretion of neurotrophins is a promising treatment that may be applicable to other neurodegenerative conditions. PMID:21522134

  10. Fighting Fire with Fire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spoor, Dana L.

    1996-01-01

    School districts are integrating security and life-safety systems into school buildings to protect students and property. This proactive approach includes sprinkler systems, fire alarms, and security systems that monitor door movement. Some school districts that are incorporating the latest life-safety technology are in Missouri, Ohio, California,…

  11. Fighting Fire with Fire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spoor, Dana L.

    1996-01-01

    School districts are integrating security and life-safety systems into school buildings to protect students and property. This proactive approach includes sprinkler systems, fire alarms, and security systems that monitor door movement. Some school districts that are incorporating the latest life-safety technology are in Missouri, Ohio, California,…

  12. Retinal Oximetry Discovers Novel Biomarkers in Retinal and Brain Diseases.

    PubMed

    Stefánsson, Einar; Olafsdottir, Olof Birna; Einarsdottir, Anna Bryndis; Eliasdottir, Thorunn Scheving; Eysteinsson, Thor; Vehmeijer, Wouter; Vandewalle, Evelien; Bek, Toke; Hardarson, Sveinn Hakon

    2017-05-01

    Biomarkers for several eye and brain diseases are reviewed, where retinal oximetry may help confirm diagnosis or measure severity of disease. These include diabetic retinopathy, central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO), retinitis pigmentosa, glaucoma, and Alzheimer's disease. Retinal oximetry is based on spectrophotometric fundus imaging and measures oxygen saturation in retinal arterioles and venules in a noninvasive, quick, safe manner. Retinal oximetry detects changes in oxygen metabolism, including those that result from ischemia or atrophy. In diabetic retinopathy, venous oxygen saturation increases and arteriovenous difference decreases. Both correlate with diabetic retinopathy severity as conventionally classified on fundus photographs. In CRVO, vein occlusion causes hypoxia, which is measured directly by retinal oximetry to confirm the diagnosis and measure severity. In both diseases, the change in oxygen levels is a consequence of disturbed blood flow with resulting tissue hypoxia and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production. In atrophic diseases, such as retinitis pigmentosa and glaucoma, retinal oxygen consumption is reduced and this is detected by retinal oximetry. Retinal oximetry correlates with visual field damage and retinal atrophy. It is an objective metabolic measure of the degree of retinal atrophy. Finally, the retina is part of the central nervous system tissue and reflects central nervous system diseases. In Alzheimer's disease, a change in retinal oxygen metabolism has been discovered. Retinal oximetry is a novel, noninvasive technology that opens the field of metabolic imaging of the retina. Biomarkers in metabolic, ischemic, and atrophic diseases of the retina and central nervous system have been discovered.

  13. Retinal topography maps in R: New tools for the analysis and visualization of spatial retinal data

    PubMed Central

    Cohn, Brian A.; Collin, Shaun P.; Wainwright, Peter C.; Schmitz, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Retinal topography maps are a widely used tool in vision science, neuroscience, and visual ecology, providing an informative visualization of the spatial distribution of cell densities across the retinal hemisphere. Here, we introduce Retina, an R package for computational mapping, inspection of topographic model fits, and generation of average maps. Functions in Retina take cell count data obtained from retinal wholemounts using stereology software. Accurate visualizations and comparisons between different eyes have been difficult in the past, because of deformation and incisions of retinal wholemounts. We account for these issues by incorporation of the R package Retistruct, which results in a retrodeformation of the wholemount into a hemispherical shape, similar to the original eyecup. The maps are generated by thin plate splines, after the data were transformed into a two-dimensional space with an azimuthal equidistant plot projection. Retina users can compute retinal topography maps independent of stereology software choice and assess model fits with a variety of diagnostic plots. Functionality of Retina also includes species average maps, an essential feature for interspecific analyses. The Retina package will facilitate rigorous comparative studies in visual ecology by providing a robust quantitative approach to generate retinal topography maps. PMID:26230981

  14. Visual Acuity is Related to Parafoveal Retinal Thickness in Patients with Retinitis Pigmentosa and Macular Cysts

    PubMed Central

    Brockhurst, Robert J.; Gaudio, Alexander R.; Berson, Eliot L.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To quantify the prevalence and effect on visual acuity of macular cysts in a large cohort of patients with retinitis pigmentosa. Methods In 316 patients with typical forms of retinitis pigmentosa, we measured visual acuities with Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) charts, detected macular cysts with optical coherence tomography (OCT), and quantified retinal thicknesses by OCT. We used the FREQ, LOGISTIC, and GENMOD procedures of SAS to evaluate possible risk factors for cyst prevalence and the MIXED procedure to quantify the relationships of visual acuity to retinal thickness measured at different locations within the macula. Results We found macular cysts in 28% of the patients, 40% of whom had cysts in only one eye. Macular cysts were seen most often in patients with dominant disease and not at all in patients with X-linked disease (p = 0.006). In eyes with macular cysts, multiple regression analysis revealed that visual acuity was inversely and independently related to retinal thickness at the foveal center (p = 0.038) and within a ring spanning an eccentricity of 5° to 10° from the foveal center (p = 0.004). Conclusions Macular cysts are a common occurrence in retinitis pigmentosa, especially among patients with dominantly-inherited disease. Visual acuity is influenced by edema in the parafovea, as well as in the fovea. PMID:18552390

  15. Retinal vascular regeneration.

    PubMed

    Otani, Atsushi; Friedlander, Martin

    2005-01-01

    We discuss the potential use of stem cells for therapeutic angiogenesis in the treatment of retinal diseases. We demonstrate that the clinical utility of these EPC may be not limited in the treatment of ischemic retinal diseases but may also have application for the treatment of retinal degenerative disorders and for a form of cell-based gene therapy. One of the greatest potential benefits of bone marrow derived EPC therapy is the possible use of autologous grafts. Nonetheless, potential toxicities and unregulated cell growth will need to be carefully evaluated before this approach is brought to the clinics.

  16. Retinal injury by industrial laser burn.

    PubMed

    Scollo, P; Herath, G; Lobo, A

    2014-04-01

    The following case study describes an injury sustained to the fovea of the right eye of a senior en gineer engaged in the repair of a neodymium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet (Nd:YAG) laser. Our patient presented with sudden loss of vision in his right eye following accidental exposure to an intense beam of light after the laser's xenon flash-lamp fired unexpectedly. This accident occurred while the patient was aligning the optical coupler mirror parallel to Nd:YAG laser rod ends using an L-CAT alignment aid. We describe the mechanism of retinal injury, outcome and important issues regarding the safe use of lasers.

  17. Fire investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomberg, A.

    There was considerable progress made on several fronts of fire investigation in the United States in recent years. Progress was made in increasing the quantity of fire investigation and reporting, through efforts to develop the National Fire Incident Reporting System. Improving overall quality of fire investigation is the objective of efforts such as the Fire Investigation Handbook, which was developed and published by the National Bureau of Standards, and the upgrading and expanding of the ""dictionary'' of fire investigation and reporting, the NFPA 901, Uniform Coding for Fire Protection, system. The science of fire investigation as furthered also by new approaches to post fire interviews being developed at the University of Washington, and by in-depth research into factors involved in several large loss fires, including the MGM Grand Hotel in Las Vegas. Finally, the use of special study fire investigations - in-depth investigations concentrating on specific fire problems - is producing new glimpses into the nature of the national fire problem. A brief description of the status of efforts in each of these areas is discussed.

  18. Retinal oximetry in patients with ischaemic retinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Rilvén, Sandra; Torp, Thomas Lee; Grauslund, Jakob

    2017-03-01

    The retinal oximeter is a new tool for non-invasive measurement of retinal oxygen saturation in humans. Several studies have investigated the associations between retinal oxygen saturation and retinal diseases. In the present systematic review, we examine whether there are associations between retinal oxygen saturation and retinal ischaemic diseases. We used PubMed and Embase to search for retinal oxygen saturation and retinal ischaemic diseases. Three separate searches identified a total of 79 publications. After two levels of manual screening, 10 studies were included: six about diabetic retinopathy (DR) and four about retinal vein occlusion. No studies about retinal artery occlusion were included. In diabetes, all studies found that increases in retinal venous oxygen saturation (rvSatO2 ) were associated with present as well as increasing levels of DR. Four of six studies also found increased retinal arterial oxygen saturation (raSatO2 ) in patients with DR. In patients with central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO), all studies found that rvSatO2 was reduced, but raSatO2 remained unchanged. Branch retinal vein occlusion was not associated with changes in retinal oxygen saturation, but this was based on a single study. In conclusion, DR is associated with increased rvSatO2 and might also be related to increased raSatO2 . Central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) is correlated with increased rvSatO2 but unrelated to raSatO2 . Prospective studies are needed to expand these findings. These would tell whether retinal oximetry could be a potential tool for screening or a biomarker of treatment outcome in patients with ischaemic retinal diseases.

  19. Retinal detachment repair - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100132.htm Retinal detachment repair - series—Normal anatomy To use the ... to slide 6 out of 6 Overview The retina is the internal layer of the eye that ...

  20. Unilateral retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Bhattarai, D; Paudel, N; Adhikari, P; Gnyawali, S; Joshi, S N

    2015-01-01

    To report a rare case of unilateral retinitis pigmentosa and to present the clinical features, and findings of multifocal ERG and visual field of this case. A 70-year-old-female diagnosed as Retinitis Pigmentosa in right eye 7 years back, presented with further gradual painless diminution of vision in the very eye and without any similar symptoms in left eye. On examination, the findings (including multifocal ERG and visual field) suggested the features of retinitis pigmentosa in her right eye, while the other eye being unaffected. In this rare case, the distinct features of retinitis pigmentosa are seen only in one eye, and this can be further confirmed from multifocal ERG and visual field. © NEPjOPH.

  1. Understory Fires

    NASA Image and Video Library

    The flames of understory fires in the southern Amazon reach on average only a few feet tall, but the fire type can claim anywhere from 10 to 50 percent of a burn area's trees. Credit: NASA/Doug Morton

  2. Retinal dysplasia of holoprosencephaly.

    PubMed

    Gorovoy, Ian R; Layer, Noelle; de Alba Campomanes, Alejandra G

    2014-03-04

    Retinal dysplasia occurs in the setting of sporadic and syndromic holoprosencephaly, which often has associated ocular malformations. The pathology of this dysplasia, which includes rosettes, has been previously described. However, its funduscopic findings have not been well documented. The authors present the fundus images of a patient with severe holoprosencephaly with retinal dysplasia and bilateral optic nerve colobomas that resulted in death 2 weeks after birth.

  3. Retinal detachment in pseudophakia.

    PubMed

    Galin, M A; Poole, T A; Obstbaum, S A

    1979-07-01

    In a series of cataract patients excluding myopic individuals, under age 60 years, and cases in which vitreous loss occurred, retinal detachment was no less frequent after intracapsular cataract extraction and Sputnik iris supported lenses than in controls. Both groups were followed up for a minimum of two years. The detachments predominantly occurred from retinal breaks in areas of the retina that looked normal preoperatively.

  4. Therapy for acute retinal necrosis.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Tatsushi; Spencer, Doran B; Mochizuki, Manabu

    2008-01-01

    Acute retinal necrosis is a progressive necrotizing retinopathy caused by herpes simplex virus (HSV) or varicella zoster virus (VZV). The mainstay of its treatment is antiviral therapy against these pathogenic organisms, such as intravenous acyclovir or oral valacyclovir. Systemic and topical corticosteroids together with antiviral therapy are used as an anti-inflammatory treatment to minimize damages to the optic nerve and retinal blood vessels. Because the majority of severe cases of the disease show occlusive retinal vasculitis, a low dosage of aspirin is used as anti-thrombotic treatment. Vitreo-retinal surgery is useful to repair rhegmatogenous retinal detachment, one of the main late-stage complications. Moreover, recent articles have reported some encouraging results of prophylactic vitrectomy before rhegmatogenous retinal detachment occurs. The efficacy of laser photocoagulation to prevent the development or extension of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment is controversial. Despite these treatments, the visual prognosis of acute retinal necrosis is still poor, in particular VZV-induced acute retinal necrosis.

  5. Fire Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    An early warning fire detection sensor developed for NASA's Space Shuttle Orbiter is being evaluated as a possible hazard prevention system for mining operations. The incipient Fire Detector represents an advancement over commercially available smoke detectors in that it senses and signals the presence of a fire condition before the appearance of flame and smoke, offering an extra margin of safety.

  6. Progressive outer retinal necrosis-like retinitis in immunocompetent hosts.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Rohan; Tripathy, Koushik; Gogia, Varun; Venkatesh, Pradeep

    2016-08-10

    We describe two young immunocompetent women presenting with bilateral retinitis with outer retinal necrosis involving posterior pole with centrifugal spread and multifocal lesions simulating progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) like retinitis. Serology was negative for HIV and CD4 counts were normal; however, both women were on oral steroids at presentation for suspected autoimmune chorioretinitis. The retinitis in both eyes responded well to oral valaciclovir therapy. However, the eye with the more fulminant involvement developed retinal detachment with a loss of vision. Retinal atrophy was seen in the less involved eye with preservation of vision. Through these cases, we aim to describe a unique evolution of PORN-like retinitis in immunocompetent women, which was probably aggravated by a short-term immunosuppression secondary to oral steroids.

  7. Photovoltaic retinal prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loudin, James; Mathieson, Keith; Kamins, Ted; Wang, Lele; Galambos, Ludwig; Huie, Philip; Sher, Alexander; Harris, James; Palanker, Daniel

    2011-03-01

    Electronic retinal prostheses seek to restore sight to patients suffering from retinal degenerative disorders. Implanted electrode arrays apply patterned electrical stimulation to surviving retinal neurons, producing visual sensations. All current designs employ inductively coupled coils to transmit power and/or data to the implant. We present here the design and initial testing of a photovoltaic retinal prosthesis fabricated with a pixel density of up to 177 pixels/mm2. Photodiodes within each pixel of the subretinal array directly convert light to stimulation current, avoiding the use of bulky coil implants, decoding electronics, and wiring, and thereby reducing surgical complexity. A goggles-mounted camera captures the visual scene and transmits the data stream to a pocket processor. The resulting images are projected into the eyes by video goggles using pulsed, near infrared (~900 nm) light. Prostheses with three pixel densities (15, 55, and 177 pix/mm2) are being fabricated, and tests indicate a charge injection limit of 1.62 mC/cm2 at 25Hz. In vitro tests of the photovoltaic retinal stimulation using a 512-element microelectrode array have recorded stimulated spikes from the ganglion cells, with latencies in the 1-100ms range, and with peak irradiance stimulation thresholds varying from 0.1 to 1 mW/mm2. With 1ms pulses at 25Hz the average irradiance is more than 100 times below the IR retinal safety limit. Elicited retinal response disappeared upon the addition of synaptic blockers, indicating that the inner retina is stimulated rather than the ganglion cells directly, and raising hopes that the prosthesis will preserve some of the retina's natural signal processing.

  8. Forest fires in Pennsylvania.

    Treesearch

    Donald A. Haines; William A. Main; Eugene F. McNamara

    1978-01-01

    Describes factors that contribute to forest fires in Pennsylvania. Includes an analysis of basic statistics; distribution of fires during normal, drought, and wet years; fire cause, fire activity by day-of-week; multiple-fire day; and fire climatology.

  9. Retinal vessel oxygen saturation and vessel diameter in retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Eysteinsson, Thor; Hardarson, Sveinn H; Bragason, David; Stefánsson, Einar

    2014-08-01

    To assess retinal vessel oxygen saturation and retinal vessel diameter in retinitis pigmentosa. A retinal oximeter (Oxymap ehf., Reykjavik, Iceland) was used to measure retinal vessel oxygen saturation and vessel diameter in ten patients with retinitis pigmentosa (RP) (mean age 49 years, range 23-71 years). Results were compared with age- and gender-matched healthy individuals. All patients had advanced stage of the disease with visual fields restricted to the macular region. Oxygen saturation in retinal venules was 58.0 ± 6.2% in patients with RP and 53.4 ± 4.8% in healthy subjects (p = 0.017). Oxygen saturation in retinal arterioles was not significantly different between groups (p = 0.65). The mean diameter of retinal arterioles was 8.9 ± 1.6 pixels in patients with RP and 11.4 ± 1.2 in healthy controls (p < 0.0001). The corresponding diameters for venules were 10.1 ± 1.2 (RP) and 15.3 ± 1.7 (healthy, p < 0.0001). Increased venous saturation and decreased retinal vessel diameter suggest decreased oxygen delivery from the retinal circulation in retinitis pigmentosa. This is probably secondary to tissue atrophy and reduced oxygen consumption. © 2014 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Getting fire risk assessment right.

    PubMed

    Charters, David

    2012-06-01

    The NHS has one of the world's largest and most varied estates, which at any time accommodates many of the most dependent people in society. With around 6,000 fires occurring in NHS premises each year, its duty of care--and that of other healthcare providers--demands very close attention to fire safety. Here Dr David Charters BSc, PhD, CEng, FIFireE, MIMechE, MSFPE, director of Fire Engineering at BRE Global, an independent third party approvals body offering certification of fire, security, and sustainability products and services, examines the critical role of fire risk assessment, and explains why the process should provide the 'foundation' for effective fire safety measures.

  11. Quantitative analysis of retinal OCT.

    PubMed

    Sonka, Milan; Abràmoff, Michael D

    2016-10-01

    Clinical acceptance of 3-D OCT retinal imaging brought rapid development of quantitative 3-D analysis of retinal layers, vasculature, retinal lesions as well as facilitated new research in retinal diseases. One of the cornerstones of many such analyses is segmentation and thickness quantification of retinal layers and the choroid, with an inherently 3-D simultaneous multi-layer LOGISMOS (Layered Optimal Graph Image Segmentation for Multiple Objects and Surfaces) segmentation approach being extremely well suited for the task. Once retinal layers are segmented, regional thickness, brightness, or texture-based indices of individual layers can be easily determined and thus contribute to our understanding of retinal or optic nerve head (ONH) disease processes and can be employed for determination of disease status, treatment responses, visual function, etc. Out of many applications, examples provided in this paper focus on image-guided therapy and outcome prediction in age-related macular degeneration and on assessing visual function from retinal layer structure in glaucoma.

  12. Peripheral retinal non-perfusion and treatment response in branch retinal vein occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Abri Aghdam, Kaveh; Reznicek, Lukas; Soltan Sanjari, Mostafa; Framme, Carsten; Bajor, Anna; Klingenstein, Annemarie; Kernt, Marcus; Seidensticker, Florian

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the association between the size of peripheral retinal non-perfusion and the number of intravitreal ranibizumab injections in patients with treatment-naive branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO) and macular edema. METHODS A total of 53 patients with treatment-naive BRVO and macular edema were included. Each patient underwent a full ophthalmologic examination including optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging and ultra wide-field fluorescein angiography (UWFA). Monthly intravitreal ranibizumab injections were applied according to the recommendations of the German Ophthalmological Society. Two independent, masked graders quantified the areas of peripheral retinal non-perfusion. RESULTS Intravitreal injections improved best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) significantly from 22.23±16.33 Early Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) letters to 36.23±15.19 letters (P<0.001), and mean central subfield thickness significantly reduced from 387±115 µm to 321±115 µm (P=0.01). Mean number of intravitreal ranibizumab injections was 3.61±1.56. The size of retinal non-perfusion correlated significantly with the number of intravitreal ranibizumab injections (R=0.724, P<0.001). CONCLUSION Peripheral retinal non-perfusion in patients with BRVO associates significantly with intravitreal ranibizumab injections in patients with BRVO and macular edema. PMID:27366688

  13. Electronic retinal implant surgery.

    PubMed

    MacLaren, R E

    2017-02-01

    Blindness due to outer retinal degeneration still remains largely untreatable. Photoreceptor loss removes light sensitivity, but the remaining inner retinal layers, the optic nerve, and indeed the physical structure of the eye itself may be unaffected by the degenerative processes. This provides the opportunity to restore some degree of vision with an electronic device in the subretinal space. In this lecture I will provide an overview of our experiences with the first-generation retinal implant Alpha IMS, developed by Retina Implant AG and based on the technology developed by Eberhart Zrenner as part of a multicentre clinical trial (NCT01024803). We are currently in the process of running a second NIHR-funded clinical trial to assess the next-generation device. The positive results from both studies to date indicate that the retinal implant should be included as a potential treatment for patients who are completely blind from retinitis pigmentosa. Evolution of the technology in future may provide further opportunities for earlier intervention or for other diseases.

  14. Intracellular Signalling in Retinal Ischemia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-07-01

    36) However, vascularization of the RPE is not known to occur in human diseases of photoreceptor degeneration, such as retinitis pigmentosa ...A.C. (1986) Retinitis pigmentosa and retinal neovascularization. Ophthalmology 91, 1599- 1603. Figure la: Control rat retina, 8 weeks of age, central...TITLE (Include Security Classification) Intracellular Signalling in Retinal Ischemia 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Burns, Margaret Sue; Bellhorn, Roy William

  15. Genetic loci for retinal arteriolar microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Sim, Xueling; Jensen, Richard A; Ikram, M Kamran; Cotch, Mary Frances; Li, Xiaohui; MacGregor, Stuart; Xie, Jing; Smith, Albert Vernon; Boerwinkle, Eric; Mitchell, Paul; Klein, Ronald; Klein, Barbara E K; Glazer, Nicole L; Lumley, Thomas; McKnight, Barbara; Psaty, Bruce M; de Jong, Paulus T V M; Hofman, Albert; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, Andre G; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Aspelund, Thor; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Harris, Tamara B; Jonasson, Fridbert; Launer, Lenore J; Attia, John; Baird, Paul N; Harrap, Stephen; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Inouye, Michael; Rochtchina, Elena; Scott, Rodney J; Viswanathan, Ananth; Li, Guo; Smith, Nicholas L; Wiggins, Kerri L; Kuo, Jane Z; Taylor, Kent D; Hewitt, Alex W; Martin, Nicholas G; Montgomery, Grant W; Sun, Cong; Young, Terri L; Mackey, David A; van Zuydam, Natalie R; Doney, Alex S F; Palmer, Colin N A; Morris, Andrew D; Rotter, Jerome I; Tai, E Shyong; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Vingerling, Johannes R; Siscovick, David S; Wang, Jie Jin; Wong, Tien Y

    2013-01-01

    Narrow arterioles in the retina have been shown to predict hypertension as well as other vascular diseases, likely through an increase in the peripheral resistance of the microcirculatory flow. In this study, we performed a genome-wide association study in 18,722 unrelated individuals of European ancestry from the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology consortium and the Blue Mountain Eye Study, to identify genetic determinants associated with variations in retinal arteriolar caliber. Retinal vascular calibers were measured on digitized retinal photographs using a standardized protocol. One variant (rs2194025 on chromosome 5q14 near the myocyte enhancer factor 2C MEF2C gene) was associated with retinal arteriolar caliber in the meta-analysis of the discovery cohorts at genome-wide significance of P-value <5×10(-8). This variant was replicated in an additional 3,939 individuals of European ancestry from the Australian Twins Study and Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (rs2194025, P-value = 2.11×10(-12) in combined meta-analysis of discovery and replication cohorts). In independent studies of modest sample sizes, no significant association was found between this variant and clinical outcomes including coronary artery disease, stroke, myocardial infarction or hypertension. In conclusion, we found one novel loci which underlie genetic variation in microvasculature which may be relevant to vascular disease. The relevance of these findings to clinical outcomes remains to be determined.

  16. Genetic Loci for Retinal Arteriolar Microcirculation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaohui; MacGregor, Stuart; Xie, Jing; Smith, Albert Vernon; Boerwinkle, Eric; Mitchell, Paul; Klein, Ronald; Klein, Barbara E. K.; Glazer, Nicole L.; Lumley, Thomas; McKnight, Barbara; Psaty, Bruce M.; de Jong, Paulus T. V. M.; Hofman, Albert; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Aspelund, Thor; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Harris, Tamara B.; Jonasson, Fridbert; Launer, Lenore J.; Attia, John; Baird, Paul N.; Harrap, Stephen; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Inouye, Michael; Rochtchina, Elena; Scott, Rodney J.; Viswanathan, Ananth; Li, Guo; Smith, Nicholas L.; Wiggins, Kerri L.; Kuo, Jane Z.; Taylor, Kent D.; Hewitt, Alex W.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Sun, Cong; Young, Terri L.; Mackey, David A.; van Zuydam, Natalie R.; Doney, Alex S. F.; Palmer, Colin N. A.; Morris, Andrew D.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Tai, E. Shyong; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Vingerling, Johannes R.; Siscovick, David S.; Wang, Jie Jin; Wong, Tien Y.

    2013-01-01

    Narrow arterioles in the retina have been shown to predict hypertension as well as other vascular diseases, likely through an increase in the peripheral resistance of the microcirculatory flow. In this study, we performed a genome-wide association study in 18,722 unrelated individuals of European ancestry from the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology consortium and the Blue Mountain Eye Study, to identify genetic determinants associated with variations in retinal arteriolar caliber. Retinal vascular calibers were measured on digitized retinal photographs using a standardized protocol. One variant (rs2194025 on chromosome 5q14 near the myocyte enhancer factor 2C MEF2C gene) was associated with retinal arteriolar caliber in the meta-analysis of the discovery cohorts at genome-wide significance of P-value <5×10−8. This variant was replicated in an additional 3,939 individuals of European ancestry from the Australian Twins Study and Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (rs2194025, P-value = 2.11×10−12 in combined meta-analysis of discovery and replication cohorts). In independent studies of modest sample sizes, no significant association was found between this variant and clinical outcomes including coronary artery disease, stroke, myocardial infarction or hypertension. In conclusion, we found one novel loci which underlie genetic variation in microvasculature which may be relevant to vascular disease. The relevance of these findings to clinical outcomes remains to be determined. PMID:23776548

  17. Wildland fire limits subsequent fire occurrence

    Treesearch

    Sean A. Parks; Carol Miller; Lisa M. Holsinger; Scott Baggett; Benjamin J. Bird

    2016-01-01

    Several aspects of wildland fire are moderated by site- and landscape-level vegetation changes caused by previous fire, thereby creating a dynamic where one fire exerts a regulatory control on subsequent fire. For example, wildland fire has been shown to regulate the size and severity of subsequent fire. However, wildland fire has the potential to influence...

  18. Fire regime in Mediterranean ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biondi, Guido; Casula, Paolo; D'Andrea, Mirko; Fiorucci, Paolo

    2010-05-01

    Liguria and is limited in Sardinia. What is common in the two regions is the widespread presence of shrub species frequently spread by fire. The analysis in the two regions thus allows in a rather limited area to study almost all the species that characterize the Mediterranean region. This work shows that the fire regime in Mediterranean area is strongly related with vegetation patterns, is almost totally independent by the cause of ignition, and only partially dependent by fire extinguishing actions.

  19. Retinoids and Retinal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kiser, Philip D.; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Recent progress in molecular understanding of the retinoid cycle in mammalian retina stems from painstaking biochemical reconstitution studies supported by natural or engineered animal models with known genetic lesions and studies of humans with specific genetic blinding diseases. Structural and membrane biology have been used to detect critical retinal enzymes and proteins and their substrates and ligands, placing them in a cellular context. These studies have been supplemented by analytical chemistry methods that have identified small molecules by their spectral characteristics, often in conjunction with the evaluation of models of animal retinal disease. It is from this background that rational therapeutic interventions to correct genetic defects or environmental insults are identified. Thus, most presently accepted modulators of the retinoid cycle already have demonstrated promising results in animal models of retinal degeneration. These encouraging signs indicate that some human blinding diseases can be alleviated by pharmacological interventions. PMID:27917399

  20. Probabilistic retinal vessel segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chang-Hua; Agam, Gady

    2007-03-01

    Optic fundus assessment is widely used for diagnosing vascular and non-vascular pathology. Inspection of the retinal vasculature may reveal hypertension, diabetes, arteriosclerosis, cardiovascular disease and stroke. Due to various imaging conditions retinal images may be degraded. Consequently, the enhancement of such images and vessels in them is an important task with direct clinical applications. We propose a novel technique for vessel enhancement in retinal images that is capable of enhancing vessel junctions in addition to linear vessel segments. This is an extension of vessel filters we have previously developed for vessel enhancement in thoracic CT scans. The proposed approach is based on probabilistic models which can discern vessels and junctions. Evaluation shows the proposed filter is better than several known techniques and is comparable to the state of the art when evaluated on a standard dataset. A ridge-based vessel tracking process is applied on the enhanced image to demonstrate the effectiveness of the enhancement filter.

  1. Bioelectronic retinal prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiland, James D.

    2016-05-01

    Retinal prosthesis have been translated to clinical use over the past two decades. Currently, two devices have regulatory approval for the treatment of retinitis pigmentosa and one device is in clinical trials for treatment of age-related macular degeneration. These devices provide partial sight restoration and patients use this improved vision in their everyday lives to navigate and to detect large objects. However, significant vision restoration will require both better technology and improved understanding of the interaction between electrical stimulation and the retina. In particular, current retinal prostheses do not provide peripheral visions due to technical and surgical limitations, thus limiting the effectiveness of the treatment. This paper reviews recent results from human implant patients and presents technical approaches for peripheral vision.

  2. Automatic Retinal Oximetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halldorsson, G. H.; Karlsson, R. A.; Hardarson, S. H.; Mura, M. Dalla; Eysteinsson, T.; Beach, J. M.; Stefansson, E.; Benediktsson, J. A.

    2007-10-01

    This paper presents a method for automating the evaluation of hemoglobin oxygen saturation in the retina. This method should prove useful for monitoring ischemic retinal diseases and the effect of treatment. In order to obtain saturation values automatically, spectral images must be registered in pairs, the vessels of the retina located and measurement points must be selected. The registration algorithm is based on a data driven approach that circumvents many of the problems that have plagued previous methods. The vessels are extracted using an algorithm based on morphological profiles and supervised classifiers. Measurement points on retinal arterioles and venules as well as reference points on the adjacent fundus are automatically selected. Oxygen saturation values along vessels are averaged to arrive at a more accurate estimate of the retinal vessel oxygen saturation. The system yields reproducible results as well as being sensitive to changes in oxygen saturation.

  3. Retinal Failure in Diabetes: a Feature of Retinal Sensory Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Gray, Ellyn J; Gardner, Thomas W

    2015-12-01

    Physiologic adaptations mediate normal responses to short-term and long-term stresses to ensure organ function. Organ failure results if adaptive responses fail to resolve persistent stresses or maladaptive reactions develop. The retinal neurovascular unit likewise undergoes adaptive responses to diabetes resulting in a retinal sensory neuropathy analogous to other sensory neuropathies. Vision-threatening diabetic retinal neuropathy results from unremitting metabolic and inflammatory stresses, leading to macular edema and proliferative diabetic retinopathy, states of "retinal failure." Current regulatory strategies focus primarily on the retinal failure stages, but new diagnostic modalities and understanding of the pathophysiology of diabetic retinopathy may facilitate earlier treatment to maintain vision in persons with diabetes.

  4. Fire clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2011-01-01

    The article discusses the latest developments in the fire clay industry, particularly in the U.S., as of June 2011. It claims that the leading fire clay producer in the U.S. is the state of Missouri. The other major producers include California, Texas and Washington. It reports that the use of heavy clay products made of fire clay like brick, cement and lightweight aggregate has increased slightly in 2010.

  5. Fire clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, six companies mined fire clay in Missouri, Ohio and South Carolina. Production was estimate to be 300 kt with a value of $8.3 million. Missouri was the leading producer state followed by Ohio and South Carolina. For the third consecutive year, sales and use of fire clays have been relatively unchanged. For the next few years, sales of fire clay is forecasted to remain around 300 kt/a.

  6. Pathway to Retinal Oximetry

    PubMed Central

    Beach, James

    2014-01-01

    Events and discoveries in oxygen monitoring over the past two centuries are presented as the background from which oximetry of the human retina evolved. Achievements and the people behind them are discussed, showing parallels between the work in tissue measurements and later in the eye. Developments in the two-wavelength technique for oxygen saturation measurements in retinal vessels are shown to exploit the forms of imaging technology available over time. The last section provides a short summary of the recent research in retinal diseases using vessel oximetry. PMID:25237591

  7. Hereditary Retinal Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Hohman, Thomas C

    2016-12-30

    As our understanding of the genetic basis for inherited retinal disease has expanded, gene therapy has advanced into clinical development. When the gene mutations associated with inherited retinal dystrophies were identified, it became possible to create animal models in which individual gene were altered to match the human mutations. The retina of these animals were then characterized to assess whether the mutated genes produced retinal phenotypes characteristic of disease-affected patients. Following the identification of a subpopulation of patients with the affected gene and the development of techniques for the viral gene transduction of retinal cells, it has become possible to deliver a copy of the normal gene into the retinal sites of the mutated genes. When this was performed in animal models of monogenic diseases, at an early stage of retinal degeneration when the affected cells remained viable, successful gene augmentation corrected the structural and functional lesions characteristic of the specific diseases in the areas of the retina that were successfully transduced. These studies provided the essential proof-of-concept needed to advance monogenic gene therapies into clinic development; these therapies include treatments for: Leber's congenital amaurosis type 2, caused by mutations to RPE65, retinoid isomerohydrolase; choroideremia, caused by mutations to REP1, Rab escort protein 1; autosomal recessive Stargardt disease, caused by mutations to ABCA4, the photoreceptor-specific ATP-binding transporter; Usher 1B disease caused by mutations to MYO7A, myosin heavy chain 7; X-linked juvenile retinoschisis caused by mutations to RS1, retinoschisin; autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa caused by mutations to MERTK, the proto-oncogene tyrosine-protein kinase MER; Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy caused by mutations to ND4, mitochondrial nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) subunit 4 and achromatopsia, caused by

  8. Pathway to Retinal Oximetry.

    PubMed

    Beach, James

    2014-09-01

    Events and discoveries in oxygen monitoring over the past two centuries are presented as the background from which oximetry of the human retina evolved. Achievements and the people behind them are discussed, showing parallels between the work in tissue measurements and later in the eye. Developments in the two-wavelength technique for oxygen saturation measurements in retinal vessels are shown to exploit the forms of imaging technology available over time. The last section provides a short summary of the recent research in retinal diseases using vessel oximetry.

  9. Gene Therapy Approaches For The Treatment Of Retinal Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Petit, Lolita; Punzo, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    There is an impelling need to develop effective therapeutic strategies for patients with retinal disorders. Gleaning from the large quantity of information gathered over the past two decades on the mechanisms governing degeneration of the retina, it is now possible to devise innovative therapies based on retinal gene transfer. Different gene-based approaches are under active investigation. They include strategies to correct the specific genetic defect in inherited retinal diseases, strategies to delay the onset of blindness independently of the disease-causing mutations and strategies to reactivate residual cells at late stages of the diseases. In this review, we discuss the status of application of these technologies, outlining the future therapeutic potential for many forms of retinal blinding diseases. PMID:27875674

  10. [Retinal pneumopexy in the treatment of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment].

    PubMed

    Levai, L; Gavriş, Monica; Gábor, Radó; Bagosi, P

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the efficiency of retinal pneumopexy in patients with rhegmatogenous retinal detachment. This clinical prospective study unrolled between november 2010-june 2012 in the Ophthalmology Department of the Military Hospital in Cluj-Napoca and Satu Mare Emergency Hospital included 20 patients (20 eyes) with rhegmatogenous retinal detachment. Patients were treated with retinal pneumopexy followed by laser photocoagulation. Anatomical and functional results were evaluated 1, 3, 6, 12 and 19 months after treatment. In 17 eyes out of 20, we achieved retinal reattachment and visual recovery. Three cases yelded no success, these being further treated with posterior vitrectomy. Retinal pneumopexy is a minimally invasive treatment method of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment with very good results in well selected cases.

  11. Fire clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2013-01-01

    Four companies mined fire clay in three states in 2012. Production, based on a preliminary survey of the fire clay industry, was estimated to be 230 kt (254,000 st) valued at $6.98 million, an increase from 215 kt (237,000 st) valued at $6.15 million in 2011. Missouri was the leading producing state, followed by Colorado and Texas, in decreasing order by quantity. The number of companies mining fire clay declined in 2012 because several common clay producers that occasionally mine fire clay indicated that they did not do so in 2012.

  12. Early Retinal Arteriolar Changes and Peripheral Neuropathy in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Jie; Cheung, Carol Y.; Ikram, M. Kamran; Zheng, Ying-Feng; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Lamoureux, Ecosse L.; Tai, E. Shyong; Subramaniam, Tavintharan; Wong, Tien Yin

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine the association between early retinal arteriolar abnormalities and diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Data from 608 people (aged 40–80 years) with diabetes from the population-based Singapore Malay Eye Study were analyzed. Participants underwent binocular two-field digital retinal photography and quantitative sensory testing. DPN was defined as an abnormal response to a monofilament or neurothesiometer test. Quantitative changes of retinal vascular caliber and arteriolar bifurcation geometry were measured using a computer-based program. Qualitative retinal signs of retinopathy and retinal arteriolar wall signs were graded by standardized methods. RESULTS DPN was present in 155 people (25.5%). After adjusting for age, sex, diabetes duration, HbA1c, cardiovascular risk factors, antihypertensive medication use, and peripheral arterial disease, people with suboptimal arteriolar caliber (odds ratio 1.94 [95% CI 1.22–3.10]), larger arteriolar branching coefficient (1.58 [1.03–2.42]), diabetic retinopathy (1.82 [1.20–2.75]), and focal arteriolar narrowing (2.92 [1.48–5.76]) were more likely to have DPN. Participants with a greater number of retinal microvascular signs were more likely to have DPN than those without retinal changes (6.11 [2.11–17.71] for two or more signs and 3.47 [1.18–10.21] for one sign compared with none). CONCLUSIONS Individuals with diabetes with early retinal arteriolar abnormalities are more likely to have DPN, independent of hyperglycemia and major vascular risk factors. These data support the hypothesis that early microvascular dysfunction, evident in the retina, is an independent risk factor for DPN. PMID:22374638

  13. Early retinal arteriolar changes and peripheral neuropathy in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jie; Cheung, Carol Y; Ikram, M Kamran; Zheng, Ying-Feng; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Lamoureux, Ecosse L; Tai, E Shyong; Subramaniam, Tavintharan; Wong, Tien Yin

    2012-05-01

    To examine the association between early retinal arteriolar abnormalities and diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). Data from 608 people (aged 40-80 years) with diabetes from the population-based Singapore Malay Eye Study were analyzed. Participants underwent binocular two-field digital retinal photography and quantitative sensory testing. DPN was defined as an abnormal response to a monofilament or neurothesiometer test. Quantitative changes of retinal vascular caliber and arteriolar bifurcation geometry were measured using a computer-based program. Qualitative retinal signs of retinopathy and retinal arteriolar wall signs were graded by standardized methods. DPN was present in 155 people (25.5%). After adjusting for age, sex, diabetes duration, HbA(1c), cardiovascular risk factors, antihypertensive medication use, and peripheral arterial disease, people with suboptimal arteriolar caliber (odds ratio 1.94 [95% CI 1.22-3.10]), larger arteriolar branching coefficient (1.58 [1.03-2.42]), diabetic retinopathy (1.82 [1.20-2.75]), and focal arteriolar narrowing (2.92 [1.48-5.76]) were more likely to have DPN. Participants with a greater number of retinal microvascular signs were more likely to have DPN than those without retinal changes (6.11 [2.11-17.71] for two or more signs and 3.47 [1.18-10.21] for one sign compared with none). Individuals with diabetes with early retinal arteriolar abnormalities are more likely to have DPN, independent of hyperglycemia and major vascular risk factors. These data support the hypothesis that early microvascular dysfunction, evident in the retina, is an independent risk factor for DPN.

  14. Retinal locus for scanning text.

    PubMed

    Timberlake, George T; Sharma, Manoj K; Grose, Susan A; Maino, Joseph H

    2006-01-01

    A method of mapping the retinal location of text during reading is described in which text position is plotted cumulatively on scanning laser ophthalmoscope retinal images. Retinal locations that contain text most often are the brightest in the cumulative plot, and locations that contain text least often are the darkest. In this way, the retinal area that most often contains text is determined. Text maps were plotted for eight control subjects without vision loss and eight subjects with central scotomas from macular degeneration. Control subjects' text maps showed that the fovea contained text most often. Text maps of five of the subjects with scotomas showed that they used the same peripheral retinal area to scan text and fixate. Text maps of the other three subjects with scotomas showed that they used separate areas to scan text and fixate. Retinal text maps may help evaluate rehabilitative strategies for training individuals with central scotomas to use a particular retinal area to scan text.

  15. Nanomaterials and Retinal Toxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    The neuroretina should be considered as a potential site of nanomaterial toxicity. Engineered nanomaterials may reach the retina through three potential routes of exposure including; intra­ vitreal injection of therapeutics; blood-borne delivery in the retinal vasculature an...

  16. Nanomaterials and Retinal Toxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    The neuroretina should be considered as a potential site of nanomaterial toxicity. Engineered nanomaterials may reach the retina through three potential routes of exposure including; intra­ vitreal injection of therapeutics; blood-borne delivery in the retinal vasculature an...

  17. Retinal imaging with smartphone.

    PubMed

    Ademola-Popoola, D S; Olatunji, V A

    2017-03-01

    The use of smartphones for various purposes among health professionals is increasing, especially with the availability of different applications. On account of cost, fundus cameras are not readily available in ophthalmic practice in developing countries. Since smartphones are readily available, easy to use and portable, they may present a cheap alternative in a resource-limited economy. to explore the use of smartphone (Blackberry Z-10) for retinal imaging in a resource-limited economy. A smartphone (Blackberry Z-10) was used to acquire retinal images with the use of +20D lens in patients with dilated pupils by activating the video mode of the camera. Clear retinal images were obtained in different clinical conditions in adults and children including branch retinal vein occlusion with fibrovascular proliferation, chorioretinal scarring from laser photocoagulation, presumed ocular toxoplasmosis, diabetic retinopathy, retinoblastoma, ocular albinism with fundus hypopigmentation. The ability to have low cost fundus imaging from readily available smartphones in an eye clinic in Nigeria presents a major boost to patient care and also offers an innovative role in research, education, and information sharing.

  18. Oregon Fires

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... title:  Smoke Plumes from the B&B Complex Fires, Oregon     View Larger Image ... of smoke originating from the B&B Complex Fires in central Oregon are captured in these September 4, 2003 views from the Multi-angle ...

  19. Fire Power

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denker, Deb; West, Lee

    2009-01-01

    For education administrators, campus fires are not only a distressing loss, but also a stark reminder that a campus faces risks that require special vigilance. In many ways, campuses resemble small communities, with areas for living, working and relaxing. A residence hall fire may raise the specter of careless youth, often with the complication of…

  20. California Fires

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  Smoke Blankets Northern California     View Larger Image ... strikes sparked more than a thousand fires in northern California. This image was captured by the Multi-angle Imaging ... June 27, 2008 - Smoke from fires in northern California. project:  MISR category:  gallery ...

  1. Colorado Fires

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... Hayman fire and from the Ponil Complex fires south of the New Mexico-Colorado border are portrayed in these views from the Multi-angle ... x 565 kilometers. They use data from blocks 58 to 61 within World Reference System-2 path 32. MISR was built and is managed by NASA's ...

  2. Returning Fire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, Jon B.

    2007-01-01

    Last December saw another predictable report from the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE), a self-described watchdog group, highlighting how higher education is supposedly under siege from a politically correct plague of so-called hate-speech codes. In that report, FIRE declared that as many as 96 percent of top-ranked colleges…

  3. Fire Power

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denker, Deb; West, Lee

    2009-01-01

    For education administrators, campus fires are not only a distressing loss, but also a stark reminder that a campus faces risks that require special vigilance. In many ways, campuses resemble small communities, with areas for living, working and relaxing. A residence hall fire may raise the specter of careless youth, often with the complication of…

  4. Returning Fire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, Jon B.

    2007-01-01

    Last December saw another predictable report from the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE), a self-described watchdog group, highlighting how higher education is supposedly under siege from a politically correct plague of so-called hate-speech codes. In that report, FIRE declared that as many as 96 percent of top-ranked colleges…

  5. 46 CFR 28.315 - Fire pumps, fire mains, fire hydrants, and fire hoses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Fire pumps, fire mains, fire hydrants, and fire hoses... After September 15, 1991, and That Operate With More Than 16 Individuals on Board § 28.315 Fire pumps, fire mains, fire hydrants, and fire hoses. (a) Each vessel 36 feet (11.8 meters) or more in length...

  6. 46 CFR 28.315 - Fire pumps, fire mains, fire hydrants, and fire hoses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Fire pumps, fire mains, fire hydrants, and fire hoses... After September 15, 1991, and That Operate With More Than 16 Individuals on Board § 28.315 Fire pumps, fire mains, fire hydrants, and fire hoses. (a) Each vessel 36 feet (11.8 meters) or more in length...

  7. 46 CFR 28.315 - Fire pumps, fire mains, fire hydrants, and fire hoses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fire pumps, fire mains, fire hydrants, and fire hoses..., fire mains, fire hydrants, and fire hoses. (a) Each vessel 36 feet (11.8 meters) or more in length must... fire pump on a vessel 79 feet (24 meters) or more in length must be capable of delivering water...

  8. Forest-fire models

    Treesearch

    Haiganoush Preisler; Alan Ager

    2013-01-01

    For applied mathematicians forest fire models refer mainly to a non-linear dynamic system often used to simulate spread of fire. For forest managers forest fire models may pertain to any of the three phases of fire management: prefire planning (fire risk models), fire suppression (fire behavior models), and postfire evaluation (fire effects and economic models). In...

  9. Protection of retinal function by sulforaphane following retinal ischemic injury.

    PubMed

    Ambrecht, Lindsay A; Perlman, Jay I; McDonnell, James F; Zhai, Yougang; Qiao, Liang; Bu, Ping

    2015-09-01

    Sulforaphane, a precursor of glucosinolate in cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli and cauliflower, has been shown to protect brain ischemic injury. In this study, we examined the effect of systemic administration of sulforaphane on retinal ischemic reperfusion injury. Intraocular pressure was elevated in two groups of C57BL/6 mice (n = 8 per group) for 45 min to induce retinal ischemic reperfusion injury. Following retinal ischemic reperfusion injury, vehicle (1% DMSO saline) or sulforaphane (25 mg/kg/day) was administered intraperitoneally daily for 5 days. Scotopic electroretinography (ERG) was used to quantify retinal function prior to and one-week after retinal ischemic insult. Retinal morphology was examined one week after ischemic insult. Following ischemic reperfusion injury, ERG a- and b-wave amplitudes were significantly reduced in the control mice. Sulforaphane treatment significantly attenuated ischemic-induced loss of retinal function as compared to vehicle treated mice. In vehicle treated mice, ischemic reperfusion injury produced marked thinning of the inner retinal layers, but the thinning of the inner retinal layers appeared significantly less with sulforaphane treatment. Thus, sulforaphane may be beneficial in the treatment of retinal disorders with ischemic reperfusion injury. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. [The characteristics of retinitis pigmentosa with retinal vascular occlusion].

    PubMed

    Wang, Guang-lu; Lu, Ning; Zhang, Feng; Peng, Xiao-yan; Li, Yang; Wang, Ming-yang

    2005-05-01

    To observe clinical features of Retinitis pigmentosa with retinal vascular occlusion and its prognosis. To analyze the clinical Data in 18 cases retrospectively using fundus examination, fundus fluorescein angiography, indocyanine green angiography, electroretinogram, visually evoked potential etc. Gene screening was performed in 3 cases. the major clinical manifestations of the disease were optic atrophy, vascular attenuation to obliteration, widespread retinal pigment epithelium atrophy with depigmentation and/or fine pigment spots, total or nearly total a and b wave were extinct in the examination of electroretinogram. All this manifestations were compatible with that of typical Retinitis Pigmentosa (tapeto-retinal dystrophy). It also had its unique features, such as total or nearly total vascular obliteration, marked optic atrophy in later stage, and choroidal vessels abnormal. Gene mutation was not found in gene encoding area of RHO gene of No: 3 chromosome and of RLBPI gene of No: 15 chromosome. vision loss in this kind retinitis pigmentosa is much faster than that of typical retinitis pigmentosa. Retinitis pigmentosa with retinal vascular occlusion may belonged to a kind of tapeto-retinal dystrophy, vascular progressive obliteration was probably its associated disease.

  11. Progressive retinal nonperfusion in ischemic central retinal vein occlusion.

    PubMed

    Wykoff, Charles C; Brown, David M; Croft, Daniel E; Major, James C; Wong, Tien P

    2015-01-01

    Serial wide-field fluorescein angiography was performed on eyes with preproliferative (ischemic) central retinal vein occlusion to evaluate retinal perfusion. Serial wide-field fluorescein angiography was performed on 12 preproliferative central retinal vein occlusion eyes in the 3-year Rubeosis Anti-VEGF (RAVE) trial using the Staurenghi lens (Ocular Staurenghi 230SLO Retina Lens) with a scanning laser ophthalmoscope (Heidelberg HRA Spectralis). "Disk area" was defined anatomically for each eye. Mean total field of gradable retina was 290 disk areas (range, 178-452). All eyes demonstrated extensive areas of retinal nonperfusion; at baseline, mean area of retinal perfusion was 106 disk areas (range, 37-129), correlating with a mean of 46.5% perfused retinal area (range, 19.1-56.4%). The area of retinal nonperfusion increased in all eyes with a mean loss of approximately 8.1% of perfused retinal area per year (range, 4.3-12.4%), which corresponded to a mean 15-disk areas (range, 12-35) of retina evolving from perfused to nonperfused annually. The extent of baseline and final nonperfusion was not significantly different between eyes that developed neovascularization and eyes that did not. In this population of severe central retinal vein occlusion eyes, profound retinal nonperfusion was observed with wide-field fluorescein angiography at baseline and the extent of nonperfusion progressed while undergoing anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapy.

  12. Hemoglobin is associated with retinal vascular fractals in type 1 diabetes patients.

    PubMed

    Nybo, Mads; Hodgson, Lauren A B; Kawasaki, Ryo; Wong, Tien Yin; Grauslund, Jakob

    2014-10-01

    Retinal vascular fractal dimension, a measure of the density of the retinal vasculature, has been suggested as a marker of systemic microvascular disorders in diabetes. As hemoglobin concentration is tightly related to vascular physiology and hypoxia, the hypothesis was that hemoglobin concentration would be associated with retinal vascular fractals in a relevant population. In a cross-sectional study of 204 long-term type 1 diabetes patients from a population-based cohort, retinal digital photos were captured and graded for fractal dimension (Df) by International Retinal Imaging Software - Fractal (IRIS-Fractal). Df was calculated from a disc-centered retinal photo from the right eye. Hemoglobin concentrations were measured using routine equipment. Of 175 patients with gradable images, median age was 57.7 years and median duration of diabetes was 42 years. Median retinal Df was 1.4606 (inter-quartile range 0.0264). A positive correlation was found between hemoglobin concentration and retinal vascular Df (r = 0.23, p = 0.0018). In a multiple linear regression model, Df was associated with hemoglobin (coefficient 0.0054 per 1.0 mmol/L increase in hemoglobin, p = 0.01) and age (coefficient -0.0046 for each 10-year increase in age, p = 0.04). Hemoglobin correlated independently with retinal vascular fractals indicating a relationship between hemoglobin availability and retinal vascular structure.

  13. Spacecraft Fire Safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margle, Janice M. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    Fire detection, fire standards and testing, fire extinguishment, inerting and atmospheres, fire-related medical science, aircraft fire safety, Space Station safety concerns, microgravity combustion, spacecraft material flammability testing, and metal combustion are among the topics considered.

  14. The circadian response of intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Zele, Andrew J; Feigl, Beatrix; Smith, Simon S; Markwell, Emma L

    2011-03-14

    Intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGC) signal environmental light level to the central circadian clock and contribute to the pupil light reflex. It is unknown if ipRGC activity is subject to extrinsic (central) or intrinsic (retinal) network-mediated circadian modulation during light entrainment and phase shifting. Eleven younger persons (18-30 years) with no ophthalmological, medical or sleep disorders participated. The activity of the inner (ipRGC) and outer retina (cone photoreceptors) was assessed hourly using the pupil light reflex during a 24 h period of constant environmental illumination (10 lux). Exogenous circadian cues of activity, sleep, posture, caffeine, ambient temperature, caloric intake and ambient illumination were controlled. Dim-light melatonin onset (DLMO) was determined from salivary melatonin assay at hourly intervals, and participant melatonin onset values were set to 14 h to adjust clock time to circadian time. Here we demonstrate in humans that the ipRGC controlled post-illumination pupil response has a circadian rhythm independent of external light cues. This circadian variation precedes melatonin onset and the minimum ipRGC driven pupil response occurs post melatonin onset. Outer retinal photoreceptor contributions to the inner retinal ipRGC driven post-illumination pupil response also show circadian variation whereas direct outer retinal cone inputs to the pupil light reflex do not, indicating that intrinsically photosensitive (melanopsin) retinal ganglion cells mediate this circadian variation.

  15. Spatial and temporal corroboration of a fire-scar-based fire history in a frequently burned ponderosa pine forest.

    PubMed

    Farris, Calvin A; Baisan, Christopher H; Falk, Donald A; Yool, Stephen R; Swetnam, Thomas W

    2010-09-01

    Fire scars are used widely to reconstruct historical fire regime parameters in forests around the world. Because fire scars provide incomplete records of past fire occurrence at discrete points in space, inferences must be made to reconstruct fire frequency and extent across landscapes using spatial networks of fire-scar samples. Assessing the relative accuracy of fire-scar fire history reconstructions has been hampered due to a lack of empirical comparisons with independent fire history data sources. We carried out such a comparison in a 2780-ha ponderosa pine forest on Mica Mountain in southern Arizona (USA) for the time period 1937-2000. Using documentary records of fire perimeter maps and ignition locations, we compared reconstructions of key spatial and temporal fire regime parameters developed from documentary fire maps and independently collected fire-scar data (n = 60 plots). We found that fire-scar data provided spatially representative and complete inventories of all major fire years (> 100 ha) in the study area but failed to detect most small fires. There was a strong linear relationship between the percentage of samples recording fire scars in a given year (i.e., fire-scar synchrony) and total area burned for that year (y = 0.0003x + 0.0087, r2 = 0.96). There was also strong spatial coherence between cumulative fire frequency maps interpolated from fire-scar data and ground-mapped fire perimeters. Widely reported fire frequency summary statistics varied little between fire history data sets: fire-scar natural fire rotations (NFR) differed by < 3 yr from documentary records (29.6 yr); mean fire return intervals (MFI) for large-fire years (i.e., > or = 25% of study area burned) were identical between data sets (25.5 yr); fire-scar MFIs for all fire years differed by 1.2 yr from documentary records. The known seasonal timing of past fires based on documentary records was furthermore reconstructed accurately by observing intra-annual ring position of fire

  16. Quantitative and qualitative retinal microvascular characteristics and blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Carol Y; Tay, Wan T; Mitchell, Paul; Wang, Jie J; Hsu, Wynne; Lee, Mong L; Lau, Qiangfeng P; Zhu, Ai L; Klein, Ronald; Saw, Seang M; Wong, Tien Y

    2011-07-01

    The present study examined the effects of blood pressure on a spectrum of quantitative and qualitative retinal microvascular signs. Retinal photographs from the Singapore Malay Eye Study, a population-based cross-sectional study of 3280 (78.7% response) persons aged 40-80 years, were analyzed. Quantitative changes in the retinal vasculature (branching angle, vascular tortuosity, fractal dimension, and vascular caliber) were measured using a semi-automated computer-based program. Qualitative signs, including focal arteriolar narrowing (FAN), arteriovenous nicking (AVN), opacification of the arteriolar wall (OAW), and retinopathy (e.g., microaneurysms, retinal hemorrhages), were assessed from photographs by trained technicians. After excluding persons with diabetes and ungradable photographs, 1913 persons provided data for this analysis. In multivariable linear regression models controlling for age, sex, BMI, use of antihypertensive medication, and other factors, retinal arteriolar branching asymmetry ratio, arteriolar tortuosity, venular tortuosity, fractal dimension, arteriolar caliber, venular caliber, FAN, AVN, and retinopathy were independently associated with mean arterial blood pressure. In contrast, arteriolar/venular branching angle, venular branching asymmetry ratio and OAW were not related to blood pressure. Retinal arteriolar caliber (sβ = -0.277) and FAN (sβ = 0.170) had the strongest associations with mean arterial blood pressure, and higher blood pressure levels were associated with increasing number of both quantitative and qualitative retinal vascular signs (P trend <0.001). Elevated blood pressure is associated with a spectrum of quantitative and qualitative retinal vascular signs, with the number of signs increasing with higher blood pressure levels.

  17. Retinal angiomatous proliferation.

    PubMed

    Marticorena, J; Di Leva, V; Cennamo, G L; de Crecchio, G

    2011-02-01

    Retinal angiomatous proliferation (RAP) is a distinct form of choroidal neovascularization which may complicate a wet age related macular degeneration (AMD). This exudative-AMD has a peculiar clinical history and prognosis. RAP accounts from 8% to 22% of newly diagnosed cases among patients previously diagnosed as exudative AMD, and up to 25% of the occult or minimally classic CNV. The disease is more prevalent in women (90% of cases) and in elderly patients (around 75 years), and is characterized by a very poor prognosis. The neovascular process, whose retinal or choroidal origin is still object of discussion, often hesitates in the formation of a disciform scar, that evolves into a severe loss of central vision. Treatment for RAP is not yet well established; herein are described the most used therapeutic strategies, starting from laser photocoagulation until the nearest anti VEGF. The opportunity of combination among various treatments to obtain a better effectiveness and a lower frequency of recurrence is also discussed.

  18. Small Animal Retinal Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, WooJhon; Drexler, Wolfgang; Fujimoto, James G.

    Developing and validating new techniques and methods for small animal imaging is an important research area because there are many small animal models of retinal diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration, and glaucoma [1-6]. Because the retina is a multilayered structure with distinct abnormalities occurring in different intraretinal layers at different stages of disease progression, there is a need for imaging techniques that enable visualization of these layers individually at different time points. Although postmortem histology and ultrastructural analysis can be performed for investigating microscopic changes in the retina in small animal models, this requires sacrificing animals, which makes repeated assessment of the same animal at different time points impossible and increases the number of animals required. Furthermore, some retinal processes such as neurovascular coupling cannot be fully characterized postmortem.

  19. The peripheral retinal 'map'.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, D. H.

    1975-01-01

    The condition of the periphery of the retinal field of the human eye is of considerable significance, it is suggested, to those participating in various sporting activities. Its boundaries shrink and expand depending upon the physiological conditions imposed both upon the eye and upon the organism as a whole. Consequently its message to the brain may be impaired under stress with resulting danger owing to delayed response. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:1148574

  20. Inherited Retinal Degenerative Disease Registry

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-21

    Eye Diseases Hereditary; Retinal Disease; Achromatopsia; Bardet-Biedl Syndrome; Bassen-Kornzweig Syndrome; Batten Disease; Best Disease; Choroidal Dystrophy; Choroideremia; Cone Dystrophy; Cone-Rod Dystrophy; Congenital Stationary Night Blindness; Enhanced S-Cone Syndrome; Fundus Albipunctatus; Goldmann-Favre Syndrome; Gyrate Atrophy; Juvenile Macular Degeneration; Kearns-Sayre Syndrome; Leber Congenital Amaurosis; Refsum Syndrome; Retinitis Pigmentosa; Retinitis Punctata Albescens; Retinoschisis; Rod-Cone Dystrophy; Rod Dystrophy; Rod Monochromacy; Stargardt Disease; Usher Syndrome

  1. California Fires

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... title:  Smoke from Station Fire Blankets Southern California     View Larger Image ... that had not burned in decades, and years of extended drought contributed to the explosive growth of wildfires throughout southern ...

  2. Glutamatergic Retinal Waves

    PubMed Central

    Kerschensteiner, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous activity patterns propagate through many parts of the developing nervous system and shape the wiring of emerging circuits. Prior to vision, waves of activity originating in the retina propagate through the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) of the thalamus to primary visual cortex (V1). Retinal waves have been shown to instruct the wiring of ganglion cell axons in LGN and of thalamocortical axons in V1 via correlation-based plasticity rules. Across species, retinal waves mature in three stereotypic stages (I–III), in which distinct circuit mechanisms give rise to unique activity patterns that serve specific functions in visual system refinement. Here, I review insights into the patterns, mechanisms, and functions of stage III retinal waves, which rely on glutamatergic signaling. As glutamatergic waves spread across the retina, neighboring ganglion cells with opposite light responses (ON vs. OFF) are activated sequentially. Recent studies identified lateral excitatory networks in the inner retina that generate and propagate glutamatergic waves, and vertical inhibitory networks that desynchronize the activity of ON and OFF cells in the wavefront. Stage III wave activity patterns may help segregate axons of ON and OFF ganglion cells in the LGN, and could contribute to the emergence of orientation selectivity in V1. PMID:27242446

  3. Intersecting circuits generate precisely patterned retinal waves.

    PubMed

    Akrouh, Alejandro; Kerschensteiner, Daniel

    2013-07-24

    The developing retina generates spontaneous glutamatergic (stage III) waves of activity that sequentially recruit neighboring ganglion cells with opposite light responses (ON and OFF RGCs). This activity pattern is thought to help establish parallel ON and OFF pathways in downstream visual areas. The circuits that produce stage III waves and desynchronize ON and OFF RGC firing remain obscure. Using dual patch-clamp recordings, we find that ON and OFF RGCs receive sequential excitatory input from ON and OFF cone bipolar cells (CBCs), respectively. This input sequence is generated by crossover circuits, in which ON CBCs control glutamate release from OFF CBCs via diffusely stratified inhibitory amacrine cells. In addition, neighboring ON CBCs communicate directly and indirectly through lateral glutamatergic transmission and gap junctions, both of which are required for wave initiation and propagation. Thus, intersecting lateral excitatory and vertical inhibitory circuits give rise to precisely patterned stage III retinal waves.

  4. Fire clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2012-01-01

    Five companies mined fire clay in four states in 2011. Production, based on a preliminary survey of the fire clay industry, was estimated to be 240 kt (265,000 st), valued at $7.68 million, an increase from 216 kt (238,000 st), valued at $6.12 million in 2010. Missouri was the leading producing state, followed by Texas, Washington and Ohio, in decreasing order by quantity.

  5. Acute Retinal Ischemia Inhibits Endothelium-Dependent Nitric Oxide–Mediated Dilation of Retinal Arterioles via Enhanced Superoxide Production

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Yi; Potts, Luke B.; Yuan, Zhaoxu; Kuo, Enoch; Rosa, Robert H.; Kuo, Lih

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Because retinal vascular disease is associated with ischemia and increased oxidative stress, the vasodilator function of retinal arterioles was examined after retinal ischemia induced by elevated intraocular pressure (IOP). The role of superoxide anions in the development of vascular dysfunction was assessed. Methods. IOP was increased and maintained at 80 to 90 mm Hg for 30, 60, or 90 minutes by infusing saline into the anterior chamber of a porcine eye. The fellow eye with normal IOP (10–20 mm Hg) served as control. In some pigs, superoxide dismutase mimetic TEMPOL (1 mM) or vehicle (saline) was injected intravitreally before IOP elevation. After enucleation, retinal arterioles were isolated and pressurized without flow for functional analysis by recording diameter changes using videomicroscopic techniques. Dihydroethidium (DHE) was used to detect superoxide production in isolated retinal arterioles. Results. Isolated retinal arterioles developed stable basal tone and the vasodilations to endothelium-dependent nitric oxide (NO)-mediated agonists bradykinin and L-lactate were significantly reduced only by 90 minutes of ischemia. However, vasodilation to endothelium-independent NO donor sodium nitroprusside was unaffected after all time periods of ischemia. DHE staining showed that 90 minutes of ischemia significantly increased superoxide levels in retinal arterioles. Intravitreal injection of membrane-permeable radical scavenger but not vehicle before ischemia prevented elevation of vascular superoxide and preserved bradykinin-induced dilation. Conclusions. Endothelium-dependent NO-mediated dilation of retinal arterioles is impaired by 90 minutes of ischemia induced by elevated IOP. The inhibitory effect appears to be mediated by the alteration of NO signaling via vascular superoxide. PMID:22110081

  6. Retinal Thickening and Photoreceptor Loss in HIV Eyes without Retinitis

    PubMed Central

    Arcinue, Cheryl A.; Bartsch, Dirk-Uwe; El-Emam, Sharif Y.; Ma, Feiyan; Doede, Aubrey; Sharpsten, Lucie; Gomez, Maria Laura; Freeman, William R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the presence of structural changes in HIV retinae (i.e., photoreceptor density and retinal thickness in the macula) compared with age-matched HIV-negative controls. Methods Cohort of patients with known HIV under CART (combination Antiretroviral Therapy) treatment were examined with a flood-illuminated retinal AO camera to assess the cone photoreceptor mosaic and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) to assess retinal layers and retinal thickness. Results Twenty-four eyes of 12 patients (n = 6 HIV-positive and 6 HIV-negative) were imaged with the adaptive optics camera. In each of the regions of interest studied (nasal, temporal, superior, inferior), the HIV group had significantly less mean cone photoreceptor density compared with age-matched controls (difference range, 4,308–6,872 cones/mm2). A different subset of forty eyes of 20 patients (n = 10 HIV-positive and 10 HIV-negative) was included in the retinal thickness measurements and retinal layer segmentation with the SD-OCT. We observed significant thickening in HIV positive eyes in the total retinal thickness at the foveal center, and in each of the three horizontal B-scans (through the macular center, superior, and inferior to the fovea). We also noted that the inner retina (combined thickness from ILM through RNFL to GCL layer) was also significantly thickened in all the different locations scanned compared with HIV-negative controls. Conclusion Our present study shows that the cone photoreceptor density is significantly reduced in HIV retinae compared with age-matched controls. HIV retinae also have increased macular retinal thickness that may be caused by inner retinal edema secondary to retinovascular disease in HIV. The interaction of photoreceptors with the aging RPE, as well as possible low-grade ocular inflammation causing diffuse inner retinal edema, may be the key to the progressive vision changes in HIV-positive patients without overt retinitis. PMID:26244973

  7. Prolonged Inner Retinal Photoreception Depends on the Visual Retinoid Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiwu; Pack, Weston; Khan, Naheed W.

    2016-01-01

    vitamin A derivative) and light isomerizes it to all-trans-retinal, which activates the photopigment. To make this photopigment excitable again, all-trans-retinal must be reisomerized to 11-cis-retinal. For rods and to some extent cones, this reisomerization occurs in the adjacent retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), but because ipRGCs are far from the RPE, they are thought to regenerate excitable melanopsin exclusively through RPE-independent means. Here, we present electrophysiological and behavioral evidence that ipRGCs depend on the RPE to continuously regenerate melanopsin during intense prolonged photostimulation. PMID:27076420

  8. Prolonged Inner Retinal Photoreception Depends on the Visual Retinoid Cycle.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiwu; Pack, Weston; Khan, Naheed W; Wong, Kwoon Y

    2016-04-13

    ) and light isomerizes it to all-trans-retinal, which activates the photopigment. To make this photopigment excitable again,all-trans-retinal must be reisomerized to 11-cis-retinal. For rods and to some extent cones, this reisomerization occurs in the adjacent retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), but because ipRGCs are far from the RPE, they are thought to regenerate excitable melanopsin exclusively through RPE-independent means. Here, we present electrophysiological and behavioral evidence that ipRGCs depend on the RPE to continuously regenerate melanopsin during intense prolonged photostimulation. Copyright © 2016 the authors 0270-6474/16/364209-09$15.00/0.

  9. Retinal image quality assessment using generic features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasih, Mahnaz; Langlois, J. M. Pierre; Ben Tahar, Houssem; Cheriet, Farida

    2014-03-01

    Retinal image quality assessment is an important step in automated eye disease diagnosis. Diagnosis accuracy is highly dependent on the quality of retinal images, because poor image quality might prevent the observation of significant eye features and disease manifestations. A robust algorithm is therefore required in order to evaluate the quality of images in a large database. We developed an algorithm for retinal image quality assessment based on generic features that is independent from segmentation methods. It exploits the local sharpness and texture features by applying the cumulative probability of blur detection metric and run-length encoding algorithm, respectively. The quality features are combined to evaluate the image's suitability for diagnosis purposes. Based on the recommendations of medical experts and our experience, we compared a global and a local approach. A support vector machine with radial basis functions was used as a nonlinear classifier in order to classify images to gradable and ungradable groups. We applied our methodology to 65 images of size 2592×1944 pixels that had been graded by a medical expert. The expert evaluated 38 images as gradable and 27 as ungradable. The results indicate very good agreement between the proposed algorithm's predictions and the medical expert's judgment: the sensitivity and specificity for the local approach are respectively 92% and 94%. The algorithm demonstrates sufficient robustness to identify relevant images for automated diagnosis.

  10. Optimal retinal cyst segmentation from OCT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oguz, Ipek; Zhang, Li; Abramoff, Michael D.; Sonka, Milan

    2016-03-01

    Accurate and reproducible segmentation of cysts and fluid-filled regions from retinal OCT images is an important step allowing quantification of the disease status, longitudinal disease progression, and response to therapy in wet-pathology retinal diseases. However, segmentation of fluid-filled regions from OCT images is a challenging task due to their inhomogeneous appearance, the unpredictability of their number, size and location, as well as the intensity profile similarity between such regions and certain healthy tissue types. While machine learning techniques can be beneficial for this task, they require large training datasets and are often over-fitted to the appearance models of specific scanner vendors. We propose a knowledge-based approach that leverages a carefully designed cost function and graph-based segmentation techniques to provide a vendor-independent solution to this problem. We illustrate the results of this approach on two publicly available datasets with a variety of scanner vendors and retinal disease status. Compared to a previous machine-learning based approach, the volume similarity error was dramatically reduced from 81:3+/-56:4% to 22:2+/-21:3% (paired t-test, p << 0:001).

  11. [Application of retinal oximeter in ophthalmology].

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Ma, Jianmin; Wang, Ningli

    2015-11-01

    Retinal oximeter is a new machine which has been used in the diagnose, treatment and research of several ophthalmic diseases for recent years. It allows ophthalmologists to gain retinal oxygen saturation directly. Therefore, retinal oximeter might be useful for ophthalmologists to understand ophthalmic diseases more deeper and clarify the impact of ischemia on retinal function. It has been reported in the literatures that retinal oximeter has potentially useful diagnostic and therapeutic indications in various eye diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, central retinal vein and artery occlusion, retinitis pigmentosa, glaucomatous optic neuropathy, et al. In this thesis, the application of retinal oximeter in ophthalmology is reviewed.

  12. Intraocular retinal prosthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Humayun, M S

    2001-01-01

    PURPOSE: An electronic implant that can bypass the damaged photoreceptors and electrically stimulate the remaining retinal neurons to restore useful vision has been proposed. A number of key questions remain to make this approach feasible. The goal of this thesis is to address the following 2 specific null hypotheses: (1) Stimulus parameters make no difference in the electrically elicited retinal responses. (2) Just as we have millions of photoreceptors, so it will take a device that can generate millions of pixels/light points to create useful vision. METHODS: For electrophysiologic experiments, 2 different setups were used. In the first setup, charge-balanced pulses were delivered to the retinal surface via electrodes inserted through an open sky approach in normal or blind retinal degenerate (rd) mice. In the second setup, the rabbit retina was removed under red light conditions from an enucleated eye and then maintained in a chamber while being superfused with oxygenated, heated Ames media. In both setups, stimulating electrodes and recording electrodes were positioned on the retinal surface to evaluate the effect of varying stimulation parameters on the orthodromic retinal responses (i.e., recording electrode placed between stimulating electrodes and optic nerve head). For psychophysical experiments, visual images were divided into pixels of light that could be projected in a pattern on the retina in up to 8 sighted volunteers. Subjects were asked to perform various tasks ranging from reading and face recognition to various activities of daily living. RESULTS: Electrophysiologic experiments: In a normal mouse, a single cycle of a 1-kHz sine wave was significantly more efficient than a 1-kHz square wave (P < .05), but no such difference was noted in either of the 8- or 16-week-old rd mouse groups (8-week-old, P = .426; 16-week-old, P = .078). Charge threshold was significantly higher in 16-week-old rd mouse versus both 8-week-old rd and normal mouse for every

  13. Bim is Responsible for the Inherent Sensitivity of the Developing Retinal Vasculature to Hyperoxia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shoujian; Park, SunYoung; Fei, Ping; Sorenson, Christine M.

    2010-01-01

    Apoptosis plays an important role in development and remodeling of vasculature during organogenesis. Coordinated branching and remodeling of the retinal vascular tree is essential for normal retinal function. Bcl-2 family members, such as bim can not only influence apoptosis, but also cell adhesive and migratory properties essential during vascular development. Here we examined the impact of bim deficiency on postnatal retinal vascularization, as well as retinal neovascularization during oxygen-induced ischemic retinopathy (OIR) and laser-induced choroidal neovascularization. Loss of bim expression was associated with increased retinal vascular density in mature animals. This was mainly attributed to increased numbers of pericytes and endothelial cells. However, the initial spread of the superficial layer of retinal vasculature and, the appearance and density of the tip cells were similar in bim +/+ and bim -/- mice. In addition, hyaloid vessel regression was attenuated in the absence of bim. Furthermore, in the absence of bim retinal vessel obliteration and neovascularization did not occur during OIR. Instead, normal inner retinal vascularization proceeded independent of changes in oxygen levels. In contrast, choroidal neovascularization occurred equally well in bim +/+ and bim -/- mice. Together our data suggest bim expression may be responsible for the inherent sensitivity of the developing retinal vasculature to changes in oxygen levels, and promotes vessel obliteration in response to hyperoxia. PMID:21047504

  14. Retinal photodamage mediated by all-trans-retinal.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Tadao; Golczak, Marcin; Maeda, Akiko

    2012-01-01

    Accumulation of all-trans-retinal (all-trans-RAL), reactive vitamin A aldehyde, is one of the key factors in initiating retinal photodamage. This photodamage is characterized by progressive retinal cell death evoked by light exposure in both an acute and chronic fashion. Photoactivated rhodopsin releases all-trans-RAL, which is subsequently transported by ATP-binding cassette transporter 4 and reduced to all-trans-retinol by all-trans-retinol dehydrogenases located in photoreceptor cells. Any interruptions in the clearing of all-trans-RAL in the photoreceptors can cause an accumulation of this reactive aldehyde and its toxic condensation products. This accumulation may result in the manifestation of retinal dystrophy including human retinal degenerative diseases such as Stargardt's disease and age-related macular degeneration. Herein, we discuss the mechanisms of all-trans-RAL clearance in photoreceptor cells by sequential enzymatic reactions, the visual (retinoid) cycle, and potential molecular pathways of retinal photodamage. We also review recent imaging technologies to monitor retinal health status as well as novel therapeutic strategies preventing all-trans-RAL-associated retinal photodamage. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Photochemistry and Photobiology © 2012 The American Society of Photobiology.

  15. Retinal changes in visceral leishmaniasis by retinal photography.

    PubMed

    Maude, Richard James; Ahmed, B U M Wahid; Rahman, Abu Hayat Md Waliur; Rahman, Ridwanur; Majumder, Mohammed Ishaque; Menezes, Darryl Braganza; Abu Sayeed, Abdullah; Hughes, Laura; MacGillivray, Thomas J; Borooah, Shyamanga; Dhillon, Baljean; Dondorp, Arjen M; Faiz, Mohammad Abul

    2014-09-30

    In visceral leishmaniasis (VL), retinal changes have previously been noted but not described in detail and their clinical and pathological significance are unknown. A prospective observational study was undertaken in Mymensingh, Bangladesh aiming to describe in detail visible changes in the retina in unselected patients with VL. Patients underwent assessment of visual function, indirect and direct ophthalmoscopy and portable retinal photography. The photographs were assessed by masked observers including assessment for vessel tortuosity using a semi-automated system. 30 patients with VL were enrolled, of whom 6 (20%) had abnormalities. These included 5 with focal retinal whitening, 2 with cotton wool spots, 2 with haemorrhages, as well as increased vessel tortuosity. Visual function was preserved. These changes suggest a previously unrecognized retinal vasculopathy. An inflammatory aetiology is plausible such as a subclinical retinal vasculitis, possibly with altered local microvascular autoregulation, and warrants further investigation.

  16. Degeneration stage-specific response pattern of retinal ganglion cell spikes in rd10 mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Park, D J; Senok, S S; Goo, Y S

    2015-01-01

    It is known that with retinal degeneration there is rewiring of retinal networks. Consequently, electrical stimulation of the degenerating retina produces responses that differ according to the stage of retinal degeneration. We sought to delineate a degeneration stage-specific parameter for the response pattern of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) spikes as a strategy for stage-specific electrical stimulation for perceptual efficiency of prosthetic vision devices. Electrically-evoked RGC spikes were recorded at different degeneration stages in the rd10 mouse model for human retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Retinal explants mounted on an 8×8 multi-electrode array were stimulated by applying 1 Hz cathodic-phase first biphasic current pulses. RGC firing rate during the first 100 ms post-stimulus was compared to that during the 100-1000 ms period and a response ratio of 100 ms (RR100 ms) was calculated through the different postnatal weeks. Our results show that during post-stimulus 100-1000 ms, the degree of correlation between pulse amplitude and evoked RGC spikes drastically decreases at PNW 4.5. This pattern was closely matched by the RR100 ms curve at this stage. We conclude that the RR100 ms might be a good indicator of the therapeutic potential of a retinal electrical prosthesis.

  17. A freely available semi-automated method for quantifying retinal ganglion cells in entire retinal flatmounts.

    PubMed

    Geeraerts, E; Dekeyster, E; Gaublomme, D; Salinas-Navarro, M; De Groef, L; Moons, L

    2016-06-01

    Glaucomatous optic neuropathies are characterized by progressive loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), the neurons that connect the eye to the brain. Quantification of these RGCs is a cornerstone in experimental optic neuropathy research and commonly performed via manually quantifying parts of the retina. However, this is a time-consuming process subject to inter- and intra-observer variability. Here we present a freely available ImageJ script to semi-automatically quantify RGCs in entire retinal flatmounts after immunostaining for the RGC-specific transcription factor Brn3a. The blob-like signal of Brn3a-immunopositive RGCs is enhanced via eigenvalues of the Hessian matrix and the resulting local maxima are counted as RGCs. After the user has outlined the retinal flatmount area, the total RGC number and retinal area are reported and an isodensity map, showing the RGC density distribution across the retina, is created. The semi-automated quantification shows a very strong correlation (Pearson's r ≥ 0.99) with manual counts for both widefield and confocal images, thereby validating the data generated via the developed script. Moreover, application of this method in established glaucomatous optic neuropathy models such as N-methyl-D-aspartate-induced excitotoxicity, optic nerve crush and laser-induced ocular hypertension revealed RGC loss conform with literature. Compared to manual counting, the described automated quantification method is faster and shows user-independent consistency. Furthermore, as the script detects the RGC number in entire retinal flatmounts, the method allows detection of regional differences in RGC density. As such, it can help advance research investigating the degenerative mechanisms of glaucomatous optic neuropathies and the effectiveness of new neuroprotective treatments. Because the script is flexible and easy to optimize due to a low number of critical parameters, it can potentially be applied in combination with other tissues or

  18. Low Level Laser Retinal Damage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-03-01

    18 Related Projects ........................ . . ....... 20 References . . . . .......................... 22 2 INTRODUCTION The objectives of...fluorescein is a potent phototoxic agent in the retina.26 The damage threshold for blue light retinal damage is lowered by a factor of ten after an... Related to the Probiem of Retinal Light Damage 1. Corneal Holography 2. Hematoporphyrin Studies 3. Fluorescein Fluorescence Measurements 7 EQUIPMENT

  19. Retinal Imaging and Image Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Abràmoff, Michael D.; Garvin, Mona K.; Sonka, Milan

    2011-01-01

    Many important eye diseases as well as systemic diseases manifest themselves in the retina. While a number of other anatomical structures contribute to the process of vision, this review focuses on retinal imaging and image analysis. Following a brief overview of the most prevalent causes of blindness in the industrialized world that includes age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and glaucoma, the review is devoted to retinal imaging and image analysis methods and their clinical implications. Methods for 2-D fundus imaging and techniques for 3-D optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging are reviewed. Special attention is given to quantitative techniques for analysis of fundus photographs with a focus on clinically relevant assessment of retinal vasculature, identification of retinal lesions, assessment of optic nerve head (ONH) shape, building retinal atlases, and to automated methods for population screening for retinal diseases. A separate section is devoted to 3-D analysis of OCT images, describing methods for segmentation and analysis of retinal layers, retinal vasculature, and 2-D/3-D detection of symptomatic exudate-associated derangements, as well as to OCT-based analysis of ONH morphology and shape. Throughout the paper, aspects of image acquisition, image analysis, and clinical relevance are treated together considering their mutually interlinked relationships. PMID:21743764

  20. Perceptual Fading without Retinal Adaptation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsieh, Po-Jang; Colas, Jaron T.

    2012-01-01

    A retinally stabilized object readily undergoes perceptual fading and disappears from consciousness. This startling phenomenon is commonly believed to arise from local bottom-up sensory adaptation to edge information that occurs early in the visual pathway, such as in the lateral geniculate nucleus of the thalamus or retinal ganglion cells. Here…

  1. Will Retinal Implants Restore Vision?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zrenner, Eberhart

    2002-02-01

    A number of research groups are developing electrical implants that can be attached directly to the retina in an attempt to restore vision to patients suffering from retinal degeneration. However, despite promising results in animal experiments, there are still several major obstacles to overcome before retinal prostheses can be used clinically.

  2. Perceptual Fading without Retinal Adaptation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsieh, Po-Jang; Colas, Jaron T.

    2012-01-01

    A retinally stabilized object readily undergoes perceptual fading and disappears from consciousness. This startling phenomenon is commonly believed to arise from local bottom-up sensory adaptation to edge information that occurs early in the visual pathway, such as in the lateral geniculate nucleus of the thalamus or retinal ganglion cells. Here…

  3. Bilateral retinitis following typhoid fever.

    PubMed

    Prabhushanker, M; Topiwalla, Tasneem T; Ganesan, Geetha; Appandaraj, Sripal

    2017-01-01

    Post typhoid fever immune related reactions affecting the eye is a rare finding which can have various presentations in which typhoid retinopathy is not a well recognized sequelae. Here we present a case of 59 year old male who presented with right eye sudden painless loss of vision 4 weeks after typhoid fever which was diagnosed and treated successfully. His BCVA was 2/60 in right eye and 6/6 in left eye. Fundus examination showed retinitis along with macular serous detachment in right eye and retinitis in left eye. Significant improvement in BCVA in right eye was observed after treatment with oral steroid with resolving retinitis lesions. Diagnosis of post typhoid immune mediated retinitis was made with good resolution following treatment. Immune mediated retinitis is a rare sequelae to typhoid infection which can be successfully treated with systemic steroids with good resolution of the lesions.

  4. Intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Do, Michael Tri Hoang; Yau, King-Wai

    2010-10-01

    Life on earth is subject to alternating cycles of day and night imposed by the rotation of the earth. Consequently, living things have evolved photodetective systems to synchronize their physiology and behavior with the external light-dark cycle. This form of photodetection is unlike the familiar "image vision," in that the basic information is light or darkness over time, independent of spatial patterns. "Nonimage" vision is probably far more ancient than image vision and is widespread in living species. For mammals, it has long been assumed that the photoreceptors for nonimage vision are also the textbook rods and cones. However, recent years have witnessed the discovery of a small population of retinal ganglion cells in the mammalian eye that express a unique visual pigment called melanopsin. These ganglion cells are intrinsically photosensitive and drive a variety of nonimage visual functions. In addition to being photoreceptors themselves, they also constitute the major conduit for rod and cone signals to the brain for nonimage visual functions such as circadian photoentrainment and the pupillary light reflex. Here we review what is known about these novel mammalian photoreceptors.

  5. 46 CFR 132.120 - Fire pumps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... with one self-priming power-driven fire pump capable of delivering a single stream of water from the... paragraph (a) of this section may be driven by one of the engines. If only one propulsion engine is installed, the pump must be driven by a source of power independent of the engine. (e) If two fire pumps are...

  6. Clinical variables associated with failure of retinal detachment repair: the European vitreo-retinal society retinal detachment study report number 4.

    PubMed

    Adelman, Ron A; Parnes, Aaron J; Michalewska, Zofia; Ducournau, Didier

    2014-09-01

    To identify risk factors associated with failure of anatomic reattachment in primary rhegmatogenous retinal detachment repair. Nonrandomized, multicenter, collaborative study. Primary procedures for 7678 rhegmatogenous retinal detachments reported by 176 surgeons from 48 countries. We recorded specific preoperative clinical findings, repair method, and outcome after intervention. We performed univariate, bivariate, and multivariate analyses to identify variables associated with surgical failure. Final failure of retinal detachment repair (level 1), remaining silicone oil at study conclusion (level 2), and need for additional procedures to repair the detachment (level 3). We analyzed 7678 cases of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment repair. Presence of choroidal detachment or significant hypotony was associated with significantly higher level 1 failure rates when grade 0 or B proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) was present and higher level 2 failure rates, regardless of PVR status (P<0.05). Excluding cases with choroidal detachment or hypotony, increasing PVR was associated with increasing level 1 failure rates. The difference between grade B and C-1 PVR was significant (P = 2 × 10(-6)). No difference was observed in level 1 failure rates when operated eyes were phakic versus pseudophakic. Level 1 failure was significantly higher when all 4 quadrants of retina (4.4%) were detached than when only 1 quadrant (0.8%) had subretinal fluid. With grade B or C-1 PVR, cases with large or giant tears had significantly higher level 1 failure rates. No association was observed between number of retinal breaks and failure rates. Multivariate analysis showed grade C-1 PVR, 4 detached quadrants, and presence of choroidal detachment or significant hypotony were independently linked with a greater level 1 failure rate; the presence of a smaller retinal break was associated with a lesser level 1 failure rate. Choroidal detachment, significant hypotony, grade C-1 PVR, 4 detached

  7. Retinal Detachment Associated With Basketball-Related Eye Trauma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tsung-Han; Chen, Yi-Hao; Kuo, Hsi-Kung; Chen, Yung-Jen; Chen, Chih-Hsin; Lee, Jong-Jer; Wu, Pei-Chang

    2017-08-01

    Basketball is a popular sport involving significant body contact, which may frequently result in ocular trauma. The aim of this study was to evaluate the characteristics and visual outcomes of retinal detachment associated with basketball-related injury. Retrospective, interventional case series. We reviewed the course of patients who sustained traumatic retinal detachment from basketball-related ocular trauma between 2003 and 2015. Thirteen patients were evaluated for basketball-related traumatic retinal detachment. Twelve (92%) were male and 1 (8%) female, with an average age of 18.2 years. The majority (9 of 13, 70%) of patients had moderate-to-high myopia, and none were using protective eyewear when they sustained the eye trauma. Rhegmatogenous retinal detachment was observed in all eyes. The preoperative mean visual acuity was 20/625 (range, hand motions to 20/20). Initial surgery using scleral buckling alone was performed in most (8 of 13, 62%) of the patients. Retinal reattachment was achieved in 10 (76%) eyes after the first operation and in 12 (92%) at the end of the intervention. The mean follow-up was 3.9 years (range, 4 months to 12 years). The visual acuity during last follow-up was 20/231 (range, light perception to 20/20). In the multivariable analysis, initial visual acuity was an independent factor affecting the final visual outcome (P = .006). Retinal detachment associated with basketball-related injury may cause severe visual loss. In the current study, all retinal detachments were of rhegmatogenous type and commonly occurred in young individuals with myopia. Initial visual acuity was associated with the prognosis. Risk awareness for early detection and intervention are important in these traumas. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Local signaling from a retinal prosthetic in a rodent retinitis pigmentosa model in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fransen, James W.; Pangeni, Gobinda; Pardue, Machelle T.; McCall, Maureen A.

    2014-08-01

    Objective. In clinical trials, retinitis pigmentosa patients implanted with a retinal prosthetic device show enhanced spatial vision, including the ability to read large text and navigate. New prosthetics aim to increase spatial resolution by decreasing pixel/electrode size and limiting current spread. To examine spatial resolution of a new prosthetic design, we characterized and compared two photovoltaic array (PVA) designs and their interaction with the retina after subretinal implantation in transgenic S334ter line 3 rats (Tg S334ter-3). Approach. PVAs were implanted subretinally at two stages of degeneration and assessed in vivo using extracellular recordings in the superior colliculus (SC). Several aspects of this interaction were evaluated by varying duration, irradiance and position of a near infrared laser focused on the PVA. These characteristics included: activation threshold, response linearity, SC signal topography and spatial localization. The major design difference between the two PVA designs is the inclusion of local current returns in the newer design. Main results. When tested in vivo, PVA-evoked response thresholds were independent of pixel/electrode size, but differ between the new and old PVA designs. Response thresholds were independent of implantation age and duration (⩽7.5 months). For both prosthesis designs, threshold intensities were within established safety limits. PVA-evoked responses require inner retina synaptic transmission and do not directly activate retinal ganglion cells. The new PVA design evokes local retinal activation, which is not found with the older PVA design that lacks local current returns. Significance. Our study provides in vivo evidence that prosthetics make functional contacts with the inner nuclear layer at several stages of degeneration. The new PVA design enhances local activation within the retina and SC. Together these results predict that the new design can potentially harness the inherent processing within

  9. LOCAL SIGNALING FROM A RETINAL PROSTHETIC IN A RODENT RETINITIS PIGMENTOSA MODEL IN VIVO

    PubMed Central

    Fransen, James W.; Pangeni, Gobinda; Pardue, Machelle T.; McCall, Maureen A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective In clinical trials, retinitis pigmentosa (RP) patients implanted with a retinal prosthetic device show enhanced spatial vision, including the ability to read large text and navigate. New prosthetics aim to increase spatial resolution by decreasing pixel/electrode size and limiting current spread. To examine spatial resolution of a new prosthetic design, we characterized and compared two photovoltaic array (PVA) designs and their interaction with the retina after subretinal implantation in transgenic S334ter line 3 rats (Tg S334ter-3). Approach PVAs were implanted subretinally at two stages of degeneration and assessed in vivo using extracellular recordings in the superior colliculus (SC). Several aspects of this interaction were evaluated by varying duration, irradiance and position of a near infrared (NIR) laser focused on the PVA. These characteristics included: activation threshold, response linearity, SC signal topography and spatial localization. The major design difference between the two PVA designs is the inclusion of local current returns in the newer design. Main Results When tested in vivo, PVA-evoked response thresholds were independent of pixel/electrode size, but differ between the new and old PVA designs. Response thresholds were independent of implantation age and duration (≤ 7.5 months). For both prosthesis designs, threshold intensities were within established safety limits. PVA-evoked responses require inner retina synaptic transmission and do not directly activate retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). The new PVA design evokes local retinal activation, which is not found with the older PVA design that lacks local current returns. Significance Our study provides in vivo evidence that prosthetics make functional contacts with the inner nuclear layer at several stages of degeneration. The new PVA design enhances local activation within the retina and SC. Together these results predict that the new design can potentially harness the inherent

  10. Stem cells for investigation and treatment of inherited retinal disease

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Budd A.; Mullins, Robert F.; Stone, Edwin M.

    2014-01-01

    Vision is the most important human sense. It facilitates every major activity of daily living ranging from basic communication, mobility and independence to an appreciation of art and nature. Heritable diseases of the retina, such as age-related macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa, are the leading cause of blindness in the developed world, collectively affecting as many as one-third of all people over the age of 75, to some degree. For decades, scientists have dreamed of preventing vision loss or of restoring the vision of patients affected with retinal degeneration through some type of drug, gene or cell-based transplantation approach. In this review, we will discuss the current literature pertaining to retinal transplantation. We will focus on the use of induced pluripotent stem cells for interrogation of disease pathophysiology, analysis of drug and gene therapeutics and as a source of autologous cells for cell replacement. PMID:24647603

  11. Stem cells for investigation and treatment of inherited retinal disease.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Budd A; Mullins, Robert F; Stone, Edwin M

    2014-09-15

    Vision is the most important human sense. It facilitates every major activity of daily living ranging from basic communication, mobility and independence to an appreciation of art and nature. Heritable diseases of the retina, such as age-related macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa, are the leading cause of blindness in the developed world, collectively affecting as many as one-third of all people over the age of 75, to some degree. For decades, scientists have dreamed of preventing vision loss or of restoring the vision of patients affected with retinal degeneration through some type of drug, gene or cell-based transplantation approach. In this review, we will discuss the current literature pertaining to retinal transplantation. We will focus on the use of induced pluripotent stem cells for interrogation of disease pathophysiology, analysis of drug and gene therapeutics and as a source of autologous cells for cell replacement.

  12. 46 CFR 28.820 - Fire pumps, fire mains, fire hydrants, and fire hoses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fire pumps, fire mains, fire hydrants, and fire hoses... REQUIREMENTS FOR COMMERCIAL FISHING INDUSTRY VESSELS Aleutian Trade Act Vessels § 28.820 Fire pumps, fire mains... pump connected to a fixed piping system. This pump must be capable of delivering an effective stream...

  13. 46 CFR 28.315 - Fire pumps, fire mains, fire hydrants, and fire hoses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fire pumps, fire mains, fire hydrants, and fire hoses... After September 15, 1991, and That Operate With More Than 16 Individuals on Board § 28.315 Fire pumps... be equipped with a self-priming, power driven fire pump connected to a fixed piping system. (1)...

  14. Fire in the Shop!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Clifton P.; Buchanan, Joseph P.

    1977-01-01

    Fire emergency preparedness measures to take to prevent school fires and to protect against injury and minimize damage when fire does occur are presented. Includes fire safety practices, extinguishers for different classes of fires and their use, and the need for fire safety training in schools. (MF)

  15. 46 CFR 28.315 - Fire pumps, fire mains, fire hydrants, and fire hoses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... fire pump on a vessel 79 feet (24 meters) or more in length must be capable of delivering water... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Fire pumps, fire mains, fire hydrants, and fire hoses... After September 15, 1991, and That Operate With More Than 16 Individuals on Board § 28.315 Fire...

  16. Monte Carlo Investigation of Optical Coherence Tomography Retinal Oximetry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Siyu; Yi, Ji; Liu, Wenzhong; Backman, Vadim; Zhang, Hao F

    2015-09-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) oximetry explores the possibility to measure retinal hemoglobin oxygen saturation level (sO2). We investigated the accuracy of OCT retinal oximetry using Monte Carlo simulation in a commonly used four-layer retinal model. After we determined the appropriate number of simulated photon packets, we studied the effects of blood vessel diameter, signal sampling position, physiological sO2 level, and the blood packing factor on the accuracy of sO2 estimation in OCT retinal oximetry. The simulation results showed that a packing factor between 0.2 and 0.4 yields a reasonably accurate estimation of sO2 within a 5% error tolerance, which is independent of vessel diameter and sampling position, when visible-light illumination is used in OCT. We further explored the optimal optical spectral range for OCT retinal oximetry. The simulation results suggest that visible spectral range around 560 nm is better suited than near-infrared spectral range around 800 nm for OCT oximetry to warrant accurate measurements.

  17. Fire Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... way to the nearest exit. Don't stop. Don't go back . In case of fire, do not try to rescue pets or possessions. Once you are out, do not go back in for any reason. Firefighters have the best chance of rescuing people who are trapped. Let firefighters know right away if anyone is missing. ...

  18. Idaho Fires

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-10-22

    This full-frame ASTER image, acquired August 30, 2000, covers an area of 60 by 60 km in the Salmon River Mountains, Idaho. In this color infrared composite, vegetation is red, clouds are white, and smoke from forest fires is blue. An enlargement (Figure 1) covers an area of 12 x 15 km. A thermal infrared band is displayed in red, a short wave infrared band is displayed in green, and a visible band is displayed in blue. In this combination, fires larger than about 50 m appear yellow because they are bright in both infrared bands. Smaller fires appear green because they are too small to be seen by the 90 m thermal pixels, but large enough to be detected in the 30 m short wave infrared pixels. We are able to see through the smoke in the infrared bands, whereas in the visible bands, the smoke obscures detection of the active fires. This image is located at 44.8 degrees north latitude and 114.8 degrees west longitude. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA11088

  19. Appalachian Fires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This image of smoke from forest fires in Virginia, Kentucky, and West Virginia was taken by the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) on November 15, 2001. Smoke is visible extending over the Chesapeake Bay. Image courtesy the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE

  20. Dalhousie Fire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Fred W.

    1986-01-01

    Describes steps taken by the Weldon Law Library at Dalhousie University in salvaging books damaged in a major fire, including procedures and processes used in packing, sorting, drying, and cleaning the books. The need for a disaster plan for specific libraries is emphasized, and some suggestions are made. (CDD)

  1. Optimization of Electrical Stimulus Pulse Parameter for Low-Power Operation of Retinal Prosthetic Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furumiya, Tetsuo; Yamamoto, Shinya; Kagawa, Keiichiro; Tokuda, Takashi; Nunoshita, Masahiro; Ohta, Jun

    2006-05-01

    In this paper, we describe the investigation of an electrical stimulus pulse parameter for use in a low-power retinal prosthesis. To obtain efficient stimulus pulse parameters, in vitro electrical stimulus experiments with a detached frog retina were performed using a fabricated pulse-frequency modulation (PFM) image sensor as a retinal prosthesis. The evaluated electrical stimulus pulse parameters were pulse duration, pulse amplitude, and the number of pulses. From the experiments, the firing rate of the retinal ganglion cells (retinal ganglion cells; RGCs) was observed to depend on the injection charge in single-pulse stimulation and the injection charge of the first pulse in pulse-train stimulation. In addition, pulse-train stimulation was found to have a RGC firing rate lower than that of single-pulse stimulation at the same injection charge. From power consumption measurements and an in vitro experiment, it was verified that the stimulus pulse of a short-pulse duration is suitable for use in a low-power retinal prosthesis.

  2. Apoptosis in human retinal degenerations.

    PubMed

    Xu, G Z; Li, W W; Tso, M O

    1996-01-01

    This paper examined the role of apoptosis in human retinal degenerations including pathologic myopia, age-related macular degeneration, serous retinal detachment, retinal lattice, and paving stone degenerations. Thirty-seven enucleated human eyes with 1 of the above-mentioned retinal degenerations were studied by histopathology and by TdT-mediated biotin-dUTP nicked-end labelling (TUNEL) technique. Tunnel labelling characteristic DNA fragmentation of apoptosis was observed in photoreceptor cells in 2 of the 4 eyes with pathologic myopia and in 4 of 16 eyes with age-related macular degeneration, 2 of which were exudative and 2 of which were atrophic. However, only a few scattered photoreceptor cells were labelled in 4 of 8 eyes with serous retinal detachment secondary to malignant melanoma of the choroid. Moreover, none of the photoreceptors cells in the 4 eyes with retinal lattice degeneration and 6 eyes with retinal paving stone degeneration were labelled. Apoptosis is 1 of the important pathways of photoreceptor cell degeneration in pathologic myopia and age-related macular degeneration.

  3. Polymodal Sensory Integration in Retinal Ganglion Cells.

    PubMed

    Križaj, David

    2016-01-01

    An animal's ability to perceive the external world is conditioned by its capacity to extract and encode specific features of the visual image. The output of the vertebrate retina is not a simple representation of the 2D visual map generated by photon absorptions in the photoreceptor layer. Rather, spatial, temporal, direction selectivity and color "dimensions" of the original image are distributed in the form of parallel output channels mediated by distinct retinal ganglion cell (RGC) populations. We propose that visual information transmitted to the brain includes additional, light-independent, inputs that reflect the functional states of the retina, anterior eye and the body. These may include the local ion microenvironment, glial metabolism and systemic parameters such as intraocular pressure, temperature and immune activation which act on ion channels that are intrinsic to RGCs. We particularly focus on light-independent mechanical inputs that are associated with physical impact, cell swelling and intraocular pressure as excessive mechanical stimuli lead to the counterintuitive experience of "pressure phosphenes" and/or debilitating blinding disease such as glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy. We point at recently discovered retinal mechanosensitive ion channels as examples through which molecular physiology brings together Greek phenomenology, modern neuroscience and medicine. Thus, RGC output represents a unified picture of the embodied context within which vision takes place.

  4. Fire Detection Organizing Questions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Verified models of fire precursor transport in low and partial gravity: a. Development of models for large-scale transport in reduced gravity. b. Validated CFD simulations of transport of fire precursors. c. Evaluation of the effect of scale on transport and reduced gravity fires. Advanced fire detection system for gaseous and particulate pre-fire and fire signaturesa: a. Quantification of pre-fire pyrolysis products in microgravity. b. Suite of gas and particulate sensors. c. Reduced gravity evaluation of candidate detector technologies. d. Reduced gravity verification of advanced fire detection system. e. Validated database of fire and pre-fire signatures in low and partial gravity.

  5. PIMASERTIB AND SEROUS RETINAL DETACHMENTS

    PubMed Central

    AlAli, Alaa; Bushehri, Ahmad; Park, Jonathan C.; Krema, Hatem

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To report a case of multifocal serous retinal detachments associated with pimasertib. Methods: The authors report a 26-year-old patient who developed bilateral multifocal serous retinal detachments appearing 2 days after starting pimasertib (as part of a clinical trial investigating its use in low-grade metastatic ovarian cancer) and rapidly resolving 3 days after stopping it. Conclusion: The mechanism of MEK inhibitor induced visual toxicity remains unclear. The pathophysiology of multifocal serous retinal detachments as a complication of pimasertib is still poorly understood. PMID:26444523

  6. Misfolded Proteins and Retinal Dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jonathan H.; LaVail, Matthew M.

    2010-01-01

    Many mutations associated with retinal degeneration lead to the production of misfolded proteins by cells of the retina. Emerging evidence suggests that these abnormal proteins cause cell death by activating the Unfolded Protein Response, a set of conserved intracellular signaling pathways that detect protein misfolding within the endoplasmic reticulum and control protective and proapoptotic signal transduction pathways. Here, we review the misfolded proteins associated with select types of retinitis pigmentosa, Stargadt-like macular degeneration, and Doyne Honeycomb Retinal Dystrophy and discuss the role that endoplasmic reticulum stress and UPR signaling play in their pathogenesis. Last, we review new therapies for these diseases based on preventing protein misfolding in the retina. PMID:20238009

  7. Retinal pseudoangiitis after intravitreal triamcinolone

    PubMed Central

    García-Campos, Jose Manuel; García-Basterra, Ignacio; Kamal-Salah, Radua; Baquero-Aranda, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of a 40-year-old woman with a fundus image similar to frosted retinal angiitis after undergoing pars plana vitrectomy and intravitreal triamcinolone injection. The patient with diabetic retinopathy was referred to our hospital with vision loss in her right eye secondary to vitreous haemorrhage. After pars plana vitrectomy and injection of triamcinolone acetonide a funduscopy examination revealed deposits of triamcinolone along the retinal vessels simulating a frosted retinal angiitis. Triamcinolone deposits along blood vessels could be the result of the reabsorption process of these crystals by the perivascular macrophages. Further studies are needed. PMID:25678611

  8. Clinically undetected retinal breaks causing retinal detachment: options for management.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Deepak; Ching, Jared; Tornambe, Paul E

    2017-08-11

    The successful detection of retinal breaks is a critical step in rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD) surgery in order to prevent persistent/recurrent RRDs. Not all retinal breaks causing retinal detachments are obvious. Retinal breaks may be obscured due to opacities that are either anterior-segment related, lens related or posterior-segment related. Rules to identify breaks based on sub-retinal fluid (SRF) configuration are more difficult to apply in pseudophakic, aphakic, encircled eyes, and eyes with repeat detachments and those with proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR). Exudative detachments exhibit characteristic features and must be ruled out. A thorough clinical examination pre-operatively is important even if a vitrectomy is planned. This paper reviews the incidence and causes of undetected breaks along with pre-operative/clinical issues that may hinder break detection. We review the literature with respect to investigative approaches and techniques that are available to the vitreo-retinal surgeon when primary breaks remains clinically undetected during the pre-operative examination. We broadly divide the surgical approaches into ones where the surgeon utilises techniques to actively pursue a search for breaks versus adopting a purely speculative approach. Advantages and disadvantages of various techniques are appraised. Intuitively one might argue that an encircling scleral buckle combined with vitrectomy would give higher single operation success than PPV alone because 'undetected' retinal breaks would be addressed by a 360° plombage. We could not confirm this concept. Newer techniques, such as PPV augmented with dye extrusion or endoscopic-assisted PPV show encouraging results. Technological advances such as intraoperative OCT will also help to broaden the VR surgeon's armamentarium. At this time there is no gold standard in terms of the recommended approach and this is reflected in the many options that are available for management in this

  9. Sundance Fire: an analysis of fire phenomena

    Treesearch

    Hal E. Anderson

    1968-01-01

    The Sundance Fire on September 1, 1967, made a spectacular run of 16 miles in 9 hours and destroyed more than 50,000 acres. This run became the subject of a detailed research analysis of the environmental, topographic, and vegetation variables aimed at reconstructing and describing fire phenomena. This report details the fire's progress; discusses the fire's...

  10. Correlation in the Discharges of Neighboring Rat Retinal Ganglion Cells During Prenatal Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maffei, Lamberto; Galli-Resta, Lucia

    1990-04-01

    The spontaneous discharges of neighboring retinal ganglion cells were recorded simultaneously in anesthetized prenatal rats between embryonic days 18 and 21. We report here that in the majority of cases the firings of neighboring retinal ganglion cells are strongly correlated during prenatal life. Correlation in the discharges of neighboring cells during development has long been suggested as a way to consolidate synaptic connections with a target cell onto which they converge, a model first proposed by Hebb. Correlation in the activities of neighboring neurons in the retina could be the basis of developmental processes such as refinement of retinotopic maps in the brain and segregation of the inputs from the two eyes.

  11. Bilateral patching in retinal detachment: fluid mechanics and retinal "settling".

    PubMed

    Foster, William J

    2011-07-20

    When a patient suffers a retinal detachment and surgery is delayed, it is known clinically that bilaterally patching the patient may allow the retina to partially reattach or "settle." Although this procedure has been performed since the 1860s, there is still debate as to how such a maneuver facilitates the reattachment of the retina. Finite element calculations using commercially available analysis software are used to elucidate the influence of reduction in eye movement caused by bilateral patching on the flow of subretinal fluid in a physical model of retinal detachment. It was found that by coupling fluid mechanics with structural mechanics, a physically consistent explanation of increased retinal detachment with eye movements can be found in the case of traction on the retinal hole. Large eye movements increase vitreous traction and detachment forces on the edge of the retinal hole, creating a subretinal vacuum and facilitating increased subretinal fluid. Alternative models, in which intraocular fluid flow is redirected into the subretinal space, are not consistent with these simulations. The results of these simulations explain the physical principles behind bilateral patching and provide insight that can be used clinically. In particular, as is known clinically, bilateral patching may facilitate a decrease in the height of a retinal detachment. The results described here provide a description of a physical mechanism underlying this technique. The findings of this study may aid in deciding whether to bilaterally patch patients and in counseling patients on pre- and postoperative care.

  12. Genetically Identified Suppressed-by-Contrast Retinal Ganglion Cells Reliably Signal Self-Generated Visual Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Tien, Nai-Wen; Pearson, James T.; Heller, Charles R.; Demas, Jay

    2015-01-01

    Spike trains of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) are the sole source of visual information to the brain; and understanding how the ∼20 RGC types in mammalian retinae respond to diverse visual features and events is fundamental to understanding vision. Suppressed-by-contrast (SbC) RGCs stand apart from all other RGC types in that they reduce rather than increase firing rates in response to light increments (ON) and decrements (OFF). Here, we genetically identify and morphologically characterize SbC-RGCs in mice, and target them for patch-clamp recordings under two-photon guidance. We find that strong ON inhibition (glycine > GABA) outweighs weak ON excitation, and that inhibition (glycine > GABA) coincides with decreases in excitation at light OFF. These input patterns explain the suppressive spike responses of SbC-RGCs, which are observed in dim and bright light conditions. Inhibition to SbC-RGC is driven by rectified receptive field subunits, leading us to hypothesize that SbC-RGCs could signal pattern-independent changes in the retinal image. Indeed, we find that shifts of random textures matching saccade-like eye movements in mice elicit robust inhibitory inputs and suppress spiking of SbC-RGCs over a wide range of texture contrasts and spatial frequencies. Similarly, stimuli based on kinematic analyses of mouse blinking consistently suppress SbC-RGC spiking. Receiver operating characteristics show that SbC-RGCs are reliable indicators of self-generated visual stimuli that may contribute to central processing of blinks and saccades. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT This study genetically identifies and morphologically characterizes suppressed-by-contrast retinal ganglion cells (SbC-RGCs) in mice. Targeted patch-clamp recordings from SbC-RGCs under two-photon guidance elucidate the synaptic mechanisms mediating spike suppression to contrast steps, and reveal that SbC-RGCs respond reliably to stimuli mimicking saccade-like eye movements and blinks. The similarity of

  13. Development of retinal layers.

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Ba-Charvet, Kim Tuyen; Chédotal, Alain

    2014-03-01

    A noticeable characteristic of nervous systems is the arrangement of synapses into distinct layers. Such laminae are fundamental for the spatial organisation of synaptic connections transmitting different kinds of information. A major example of this is the inner plexiform layer (IPL) of the vertebrate retina, which is subdivided into at least ten sublayers. Another noticeable characteristic of these retina layers is that neurons are displayed in the horizontal plane in a non-random array termed as mosaic patterning. Recent studies of vertebrate and invertebrate systems have identified molecules that mediate these interactions. Here, we review the last mechanisms and molecules mediating retinal layering. Copyright © 2013 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. The Relationship of Macular Pigment Optical Density to Serum Lutein in Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Elizabeth J.; Berson, Eliot L.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. To determine whether macular pigment optical density (MPOD) is related to serum lutein or serum zeaxanthin in patients with retinitis pigmentosa. Methods. The authors measured MPOD with heterochromatic flicker photometry, serum lutein and serum zeaxanthin by high performance liquid chromatography, and central foveal retinal thickness by optical coherence tomography (OCT) in 176 patients (age range, 18–68 years) with typical forms of retinitis pigmentosa; 37 (21%) of these patients had cystoid macular edema (CME) by OCT. The authors performed multiple regression analysis with MPOD as the dependent variable and with loge serum lutein and loge serum zeaxanthin as independent variables adjusting for age, sex, iris color, central foveal retinal thickness, and, in some analyses, serum total cholesterol. Results. MPOD increased with increasing serum lutein (P = 0.0017) and decreased with increasing serum total cholesterol (P = 0.0025) but was unrelated to serum zeaxanthin. MPOD was higher in patients with brown irides than in patients with lighter irides (P = 0.014) and was nonmonotonically related to central foveal retinal thickness (P < 0.0001), being lower in eyes with more photoreceptor cell loss and in eyes with moderate to marked CME. Conclusions. MPOD is independently related to serum lutein, serum total cholesterol, iris color, and central foveal retinal thickness in patients with retinitis pigmentosa. PMID:19797209

  15. 46 CFR 193.10-5 - Fire pumps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fire pumps. 193.10-5 Section 193.10-5 Shipping COAST... EQUIPMENT Fire Main System, Details § 193.10-5 Fire pumps. (a) Vessels shall be equipped with independently driven fire pumps in accordance with Table 193.10-5(a). Table 193.10-5(a) Gross tons Over Not...

  16. Fire Behavior (FB)

    Treesearch

    Robert E. Keane

    2006-01-01

    The Fire Behavior (FB) method is used to describe the behavior of the fire and the ambient weather and fuel conditions that influence the fire behavior. Fire behavior methods are not plot based and are collected by fire event and time-date. In general, the fire behavior data are used to interpret the fire effects documented in the plot-level sampling. Unlike the other...

  17. Protein Misfolding and Retinal Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Tzekov, Radouil; Stein, Linda; Kaushal, Shalesh

    2011-01-01

    The retina is a highly complex and specialized organ that performs preliminary analysis of visual information. Composed of highly metabolically active tissue, the retina requires a precise and well-balanced means of maintaining its functional activity during extended periods of time. Maintenance and regulation of a vast array of different structural and functional proteins is required for normal function of the retina. This process is referred to as protein homeostasis and involves a variety of activities, including protein synthesis, folding, transport, degradation, elimination, and recycling. Deregulation of any of these activities can lead to malfunctioning of the retina, from subtle subclinical signs to severe retinal degenerative diseases leading to blindness. Examples of retinal degenerative diseases caused by disruption of protein homeostasis include retinitis pigmentosa and Stargardt’s disease. A detailed discussion of the role of disruption in protein homeostasis in these and other retinal diseases is presented, followed by examples of some existing and potential treatments. PMID:21825021

  18. Retinal Flip in Rhodopsin Activation?

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Jun; Brown, Michael F.; Mertz, Blake

    2015-01-01

    Rhodopsin is a well-characterized structural model of a G protein-coupled receptor. Photoisomerization of the covalently bound retinal triggers activation. Surprisingly, the x-ray crystal structure of the active Meta-II state has a 180° rotation about the long-axis of the retinal polyene chain. Unbiased microsecond-timescale all-atom molecular dynamics simulations show that the retinal cofactor can flip back to the orientation observed in the inactive state of rhodopsin under conditions favoring the Meta-I state. Our results provide, to our knowledge, the first evidence from molecular dynamics simulations showing how rotation of the retinal ligand within its binding pocket can occur in the activation mechanism of rhodopsin. PMID:26083914

  19. Fire Maintenance and Logistics Analysis (Fire Main)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-07-01

    medical evacuation, (2) supply transportation, (3) fire / water bucket support, (4) troop movement, and (&) miscei~areojs. Tabi .1-1. shows the...operation. On average, for the 4-12 September fierce fire fighting period, 44 percent of the helicopters were used for fire / water bucket operations, 2P...the operation. As expected the largest percentage of the helicopters were used for fire / water bucket operations during both the fierce fire fighting

  20. Are Independent Probes Truly Independent?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camp, Gino; Pecher, Diane; Schmidt, Henk G.; Zeelenberg, Rene

    2009-01-01

    The independent cue technique has been developed to test traditional interference theories against inhibition theories of forgetting. In the present study, the authors tested the critical criterion for the independence of independent cues: Studied cues not presented during test (and unrelated to test cues) should not contribute to the retrieval…

  1. Are Independent Probes Truly Independent?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camp, Gino; Pecher, Diane; Schmidt, Henk G.; Zeelenberg, Rene

    2009-01-01

    The independent cue technique has been developed to test traditional interference theories against inhibition theories of forgetting. In the present study, the authors tested the critical criterion for the independence of independent cues: Studied cues not presented during test (and unrelated to test cues) should not contribute to the retrieval…

  2. Microsystems Technology for Retinal Implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiland, James

    2005-03-01

    The retinal prosthesis is targeted to treat age-related macular degeneration, retinitis pigmentosa, and other outer retinal degenerations. Simulations of artificial vision have predicted that 600-1000 individual pixels will be needed if a retinal prosthesis is to restore function such as reading large print and face recognition. An implantable device with this many electrode contacts will require microsystems technology as part of its design. An implantable retinal prosthesis will consist of several subsystems including an electrode array and hermetic packaging. Microsystems and microtechnology approaches are being investigated as possible solutions for these design problems. Flexible polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate electrode arrays and silicon micromachined electrode arrays are under development. Inactive PDMS electrodes have been implanted in 3 dogs to assess mechanical biocompatibility. 3 dogs were followed for 6 months. The implanted was securely fastened to the retina with a single retinal tack. No post-operative complications were evident. The array remained within 100 microns of the retinal surface. Histological evaluation showed a well preserved retina underneath the electrode array. A silicon device with electrodes suspended on micromachined springs has been implanted in 4 dogs (2 acute implants, 2 chronic implants). The device, though large, could be inserted into the eye and positioned on the retina. Histological analysis of the retina from the spring electrode implants showed that spring mounted posts penetrated the retina, thus the device will be redesigned to reduce the strength of the springs. These initial implants will provide information for the designers to make the next generation silicon device. We conclude that microsystems technology has the potential to make possible a retinal prosthesis with 1000 individual contacts in close proximity to the retina.

  3. Retinal manifestations in fibromuscular dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Meire, F M; De Laey, J J; Van Thienen, M N; Schuddinck, L

    1991-01-01

    Fibromuscular dysplasia of the arteries (FMD) is a segmental angiopathy which may produce obstruction of the carotid, cerebral, renal, mesenteric, coronary or iliac arteries. Except for lesions related to arterial hypertension, retinal manifestations have not yet been reported. This paper describes the case of a 10-year-old boy with progressive deafness, a history of an unexplained stroke and progressive occlusions of the retinal arterioles in the fundus periphery. This resulted in retinal neovascularization and recurrent retinal and vitreous hemorrhages. Despite repeated photo- and cryocoagulation the eyes progressed to a tractional retinal detachment which was successfully treated by vitrectomy and scleral buckling. The diagnosis of FMD was made on the basis of a histopathological examination of a temporal artery biopsy. The child also presented an asymptomatic but severe aneurysmal dilatation of the aorta and CT scan and MRI showed dilated cerebral arteries. The father of our patient had died at the age of 27 years either from myocardial infarction or rupture of a dissecting aortic aneurysm. He was highly myopic and had lost one eye from retinal detachment. The younger brother of our patient also presents aneurysmal dilatation of the aorta and tortuous cerebral vessels. Ocular examination is still normal. The findings in this family are compatible with an autosomal dominant inheritance with variable expression.

  4. The mechanics of retinal detachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Tom; Siegel, Michael

    2013-03-01

    We present a model of the mechanical and fluid forces associated with exudative retinal detachments where the retinal photoreceptor cells separate typically from the underlying retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). By computing the total fluid volume flow arising from transretinal, vascular, and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) pump currents, we determine the conditions under which the subretinal fluid pressure exceeds the maximum yield stress holding the retina and RPE together, giving rise to an irreversible, extended retinal delamination. We also investigate localized, blister-like retinal detachments by balancing mechanical tension in the retina with both the retina-RPE adhesion energy and the hydraulic pressure jump across the retina. For detachments induced by traction forces, we find a critical radius beyond which the blister is unstable to growth. Growth of a detached blister can also be driven by inflamed tissue within which e.g., the hydraulic conductivities of the retina or choroid increase, the RPE pumps fail, or the adhesion properties change. We determine the parameter regimes in which the blister either becomes unstable to growth, remains stable and finite-sized, or shrinks, allowing possible healing. This work supported by the Army Research Office through grant 58386MA

  5. Retinal implants: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Alice T; Margo, Curtis E; Greenberg, Paul B

    2014-07-01

    Retinal implants present an innovative way of restoring sight in degenerative retinal diseases. Previous reviews of research progress were written by groups developing their own devices. This systematic review objectively compares selected models by examining publications describing five representative retinal prostheses: Argus II, Boston Retinal Implant Project, Epi-Ret 3, Intelligent Medical Implants (IMI) and Alpha-IMS (Retina Implant AG). Publications were analysed using three criteria for interim success: clinical availability, vision restoration potential and long-term biocompatibility. Clinical availability: Argus II is the only device with FDA approval. Argus II and Alpha-IMS have both received the European CE Marking. All others are in clinical trials, except the Boston Retinal Implant, which is in animal studies. Vision restoration: resolution theoretically correlates with electrode number. Among devices with external cameras, the Boston Retinal Implant leads with 100 electrodes, followed by Argus II with 60 electrodes and visual acuity of 20/1262. Instead of an external camera, Alpha-IMS uses a photodiode system dependent on natural eye movements and can deliver visual acuity up to 20/546. Long-term compatibility: IMI offers iterative learning; Epi-Ret 3 is a fully intraocular device; Alpha-IMS uses intraocular photosensitive elements. Merging the results of these three criteria, Alpha-IMS is the most likely to achieve long-term success decades later, beyond current clinical availability.

  6. General Pathophysiology in Retinal Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Wert, Katherine J.; Lin, Jonathan H.; Tsang, Stephen H.

    2015-01-01

    Retinal degeneration, including that seen in age-related macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa (RP), is the most common form of neural degenerative disease in the world. There is great genetic and allelic heterogeneity of the various retinal dystrophies. Classifications of these diseases can be ambiguous, as there are similar clinical presentations in retinal degenerations arising from different genetic mechanisms. As would be expected, alterations in the activity of the phototransduction cascade, such as changes affecting the renewal and shedding of the photoreceptor OS, visual transduction, and/ or retinol metabolism have a great impact on the health of the retina. Mutations within any of the molecules responsible for these visual processes cause several types of retinal and retinal pigment epithelium degenerative diseases. Apoptosis has been implicated in the rod cell loss seen in a mouse model of RP, but the precise mechanisms that connect the activation of these pathways to the loss of phosphodiesterase (PDE6β) function has yet to be defined. Additionally, the activation of apoptosis by CCAAT/-enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP), after activation of the unfolded protein response pathway, may be responsible for cell death, although the mechanism remains unknown. However, the mechanisms of cell death after loss of function of PDE6, which is a commonly studied mammalian model in research, may be generalizable to loss of function of different key proteins involved in the phototransduction cascade. PMID:24732759

  7. Filling in the retinal image

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larimer, James; Piantanida, Thomas

    1990-01-01

    The optics of the eye form an image on a surface at the back of the eyeball called the retina. The retina contains the photoreceptors that sample the image and convert it into a neural signal. The spacing of the photoreceptors in the retina is not uniform and varies with retinal locus. The central retinal field, called the macula, is densely packed with photoreceptors. The packing density falls off rapidly as a function of retinal eccentricity with respect to the macular region and there are regions in which there are no photoreceptors at all. The retinal regions without photoreceptors are called blind spots or scotomas. The neural transformations which convert retinal image signals into percepts fills in the gaps and regularizes the inhomogeneities of the retinal photoreceptor sampling mosaic. The filling-in mechamism plays an important role in understanding visual performance. The filling-in mechanism is not well understood. A systematic collaborative research program at the Ames Research Center and SRI in Menlo Park, California, was designed to explore this mechanism. It was shown that the perceived fields which are in fact different from the image on the retina due to filling-in, control some aspects of performance and not others. Researchers have linked these mechanisms to putative mechanisms of color coding and color constancy.

  8. Retinal prosthesis for the blind.

    PubMed

    Margalit, Eyal; Maia, Mauricio; Weiland, James D; Greenberg, Robert J; Fujii, Gildo Y; Torres, Gustavo; Piyathaisere, Duke V; O'Hearn, Thomas M; Liu, Wentai; Lazzi, Gianluca; Dagnelie, Gislin; Scribner, Dean A; de Juan, Eugene; Humayun, Mark S

    2002-01-01

    Most of current concepts for a visual prosthesis are based on neuronal electrical stimulation at different locations along the visual pathways within the central nervous system. The different designs of visual prostheses are named according to their locations (i.e., cortical, optic nerve, subretinal, and epiretinal). Visual loss caused by outer retinal degeneration in diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa or age-related macular degeneration can be reversed by electrical stimulation of the retina or the optic nerve (retinal or optic nerve prostheses, respectively). On the other hand, visual loss caused by inner or whole thickness retinal diseases, eye loss, optic nerve diseases (tumors, ischemia, inflammatory processes etc.), or diseases of the central nervous system (not including diseases of the primary and secondary visual cortices) can be reversed by a cortical visual prosthesis. The intent of this article is to provide an overview of current and future concepts of retinal and optic nerve prostheses. This article will begin with general considerations that are related to all or most of visual prostheses and then concentrate on the retinal and optic nerve designs. The authors believe that the field has grown beyond the scope of a single article so cortical prostheses will be described only because of their direct effect on the concept and technical development of the other prostheses, and this will be done in a more general and historic perspective.

  9. Retinal oxygen extraction in humans

    PubMed Central

    Werkmeister, René M.; Schmidl, Doreen; Aschinger, Gerold; Doblhoff-Dier, Veronika; Palkovits, Stefan; Wirth, Magdalena; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Linsenmeier, Robert A.; Leitgeb, Rainer A.; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2015-01-01

    Adequate function of the retina is dependent on proper oxygen supply. In humans, the inner retina is oxygenated via the retinal circulation. We present a method to calculate total retinal oxygen extraction based on measurement of total retinal blood flow using dual-beam bidirectional Doppler optical coherence tomography and measurement of oxygen saturation by spectrophotometry. These measurements were done on 8 healthy subjects while breathing ambient room air and 100% oxygen. Total retinal blood flow was 44.3 ± 9.0 μl/min during baseline and decreased to 18.7 ± 4.2 μl/min during 100% oxygen breathing (P < 0.001) resulting in a pronounced decrease in retinal oxygen extraction from 2.33 ± 0.51 μl(O2)/min to 0.88 ± 0.14 μl(O2)/min during breathing of 100% oxygen. The method presented in this paper may have significant potential to study oxygen metabolism in hypoxic retinal diseases such as diabetic retinopathy. PMID:26503332

  10. Retinal oxygen extraction in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werkmeister, René M.; Schmidl, Doreen; Aschinger, Gerold; Doblhoff-Dier, Veronika; Palkovits, Stefan; Wirth, Magdalena; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Linsenmeier, Robert A.; Leitgeb, Rainer A.; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2015-10-01

    Adequate function of the retina is dependent on proper oxygen supply. In humans, the inner retina is oxygenated via the retinal circulation. We present a method to calculate total retinal oxygen extraction based on measurement of total retinal blood flow using dual-beam bidirectional Doppler optical coherence tomography and measurement of oxygen saturation by spectrophotometry. These measurements were done on 8 healthy subjects while breathing ambient room air and 100% oxygen. Total retinal blood flow was 44.3 ± 9.0 μl/min during baseline and decreased to 18.7 ± 4.2 μl/min during 100% oxygen breathing (P < 0.001) resulting in a pronounced decrease in retinal oxygen extraction from 2.33 ± 0.51 μl(O2)/min to 0.88 ± 0.14 μl(O2)/min during breathing of 100% oxygen. The method presented in this paper may have significant potential to study oxygen metabolism in hypoxic retinal diseases such as diabetic retinopathy.

  11. Zaca Fire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    On August 7, 2007, the Zaca fire continued to burn in the Los Padres National Forest near Santa Barbara, California. The fire started more than a month ago, on July 4, and has burned 69,800 acres. The fire remains in steep, rocky terrain with poor access. The continued poor access makes containment difficult in the wilderness area on the eastern flank. So far only one outbuilding has been destroyed; but over 450 homes are currently threatened. Over 2300 fire personnel, aided by four air tankers and 15 helicopters, are working to contain this massive fire. Full containment is expected on September 1.

    The image covers 45.2 x 46.1 km, and is centered near 34.6 degrees north latitude, 119.7 degrees west longitude.

    With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra spacecraft. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission

  12. Zaca Fire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    On August 7, 2007, the Zaca fire continued to burn in the Los Padres National Forest near Santa Barbara, California. The fire started more than a month ago, on July 4, and has burned 69,800 acres. The fire remains in steep, rocky terrain with poor access. The continued poor access makes containment difficult in the wilderness area on the eastern flank. So far only one outbuilding has been destroyed; but over 450 homes are currently threatened. Over 2300 fire personnel, aided by four air tankers and 15 helicopters, are working to contain this massive fire. Full containment is expected on September 1.

    The image covers 45.2 x 46.1 km, and is centered near 34.6 degrees north latitude, 119.7 degrees west longitude.

    With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra spacecraft. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission

  13. 46 CFR 34.10-5 - Fire pumps-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fire pumps-T/ALL. 34.10-5 Section 34.10-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS FIREFIGHTING EQUIPMENT Fire Main System, Details § 34.10-5 Fire pumps—T/ALL. (a) Tankships shall be equipped with independently driven fire pumps...

  14. Where's the Fire?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Needham, Dorothy

    1977-01-01

    National Fire Protection Week is a perfect time for launching a fire safety learning center. The activities described here are intended to help children recognize fire hazards in their homes, play areas and public buildings; learn how to act intelligently in fire emergencies; be able to share their knowledge of fire safety with others and…

  15. Where's the Fire?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Needham, Dorothy

    1977-01-01

    National Fire Protection Week is a perfect time for launching a fire safety learning center. The activities described here are intended to help children recognize fire hazards in their homes, play areas and public buildings; learn how to act intelligently in fire emergencies; be able to share their knowledge of fire safety with others and…

  16. FIRE ALARM SYSTEM OUTDATED.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CHANDLER, L.T.

    AN EFFICIENT FIRE ALARM SYSTEM SHOULD--(1) PROVIDE WARNING OF FIRES THAT START IN HIDDEN OR UNOCCUPIED LOCATIONS, (2) INDICATE WHERE THE FIRE IS, (3) GIVE ADVANCE WARNING TO FACULTY AND ADMINISTRATION SO THAT PANIC AND CONFUSION CAN BE AVOIDED AND ORDERLY EVACUATION OCCUR, (4) AUTOMATICALLY NOTIFY CITY FIRE HEADQUARTERS OF THE FIRE, (5) OPERATE BY…

  17. FIRE ALARM SYSTEM OUTDATED.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CHANDLER, L.T.

    AN EFFICIENT FIRE ALARM SYSTEM SHOULD--(1) PROVIDE WARNING OF FIRES THAT START IN HIDDEN OR UNOCCUPIED LOCATIONS, (2) INDICATE WHERE THE FIRE IS, (3) GIVE ADVANCE WARNING TO FACULTY AND ADMINISTRATION SO THAT PANIC AND CONFUSION CAN BE AVOIDED AND ORDERLY EVACUATION OCCUR, (4) AUTOMATICALLY NOTIFY CITY FIRE HEADQUARTERS OF THE FIRE, (5) OPERATE BY…

  18. Fire Safety Training Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery County Dept. of Fire and Rescue Services, Rockville, MD. Div. of Fire Prevention.

    Designed for a community fire education effort, particularly in which local volunteers present general information on fire safety to their fellow citizens, this workbook contains nine lessons. Included are an overview of the household fire problem; instruction in basic chemistry and physics of fire, flammable liquids, portable fire extinguishers,…

  19. 46 CFR 28.820 - Fire pumps, fire mains, fire hydrants, and fire hoses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... water from a hose connected to the highest outlet. The minimum capacity of the power fire pump shall be 50 gallons per minute at a pressure of not less than 60 pounds per square inch at the pump outlet. (1... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fire pumps, fire mains, fire hydrants, and fire...

  20. 46 CFR 28.820 - Fire pumps, fire mains, fire hydrants, and fire hoses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... water from a hose connected to the highest outlet. The minimum capacity of the power fire pump shall be 50 gallons per minute at a pressure of not less than 60 pounds per square inch at the pump outlet. (1... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Fire pumps, fire mains, fire hydrants, and fire...

  1. 46 CFR 28.820 - Fire pumps, fire mains, fire hydrants, and fire hoses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... water from a hose connected to the highest outlet. The minimum capacity of the power fire pump shall be 50 gallons per minute at a pressure of not less than 60 pounds per square inch at the pump outlet. (1... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Fire pumps, fire mains, fire hydrants, and fire...

  2. 46 CFR 28.820 - Fire pumps, fire mains, fire hydrants, and fire hoses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... water from a hose connected to the highest outlet. The minimum capacity of the power fire pump shall be 50 gallons per minute at a pressure of not less than 60 pounds per square inch at the pump outlet. (1... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Fire pumps, fire mains, fire hydrants, and fire...

  3. Fire Protection for Buildings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmunds, Jane

    1972-01-01

    Reviews attack on fire safety in high rise buildings made by a group of experts representing the iron and steel industry at a recent conference. According to one expert, fire problems are people oriented, which calls for emphasis on fire prevention rather than reliance on fire suppression and for fire pretection to be built into a structure.…

  4. Ruptured retinal arterial macroaneurysm: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Speilburg, Ashley M; Klemencic, Stephanie A

    2014-01-01

    Retinal arterial macroaneurysm is an acquired, focal dilation of a retinal artery, typically occurring within the first three bifurcations of the central retinal artery. The clinical presentation of a retinal arterial macroaneurysm is highly variable, making initial diagnosis difficult and differentials many. Identification of retinal arterial macroaneurysms is crucial to appropriately co-manage with the primary care physician for hypertension control. Prognosis is generally good and observation is often an adequate treatment. However, in cases of macular threat or involvement, some treatment options are available and referral to a retinal specialist is indicated.

  5. Fire suppressing apparatus. [sodium fires

    DOEpatents

    Buttrey, K.E.

    1980-12-19

    Apparatus for smothering a liquid sodium fire comprises a pan, a perforated cover on the pan, and tubed depending from the cover and providing communication between the interior of the pan and the ambient atmosphere through the perforations in the cover. Liquid caught in the pan rises above the lower ends of the tubes and thus serves as a barrier which limits the amount of air entering the pan.

  6. Hypertension is associated with narrower retinal arteriolar calibre in persons with and without coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, S B; Mitchell, P; Plant, A J H; Chiha, J; Phan, K; Liew, G; Thiagalingam, A; Kovoor, P; Burlutsky, G; Gopinath, B

    2016-12-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate independent associations between hypertension and retinal vessel calibre in a high cardiovascular risk cohort and to determine whether these associations also exist in patients without coronary artery disease (CAD). The Australian Heart Eye Study is an observational study that surveyed 1680 participants presenting to a tertiary referral hospital for the evaluation of potential CAD by coronary angiography. Hypertension was defined as systolic >140 mm Hg, diastolic >90 mm Hg or treated (use of antihypertensive medications). Retinal arteriolar and venular calibres were measured from retinal photographs. CAD was quantified using severity (Gensini) and extent scores. Subanalyses were performed for people with and without CAD and for men and women. A total of 1114 participants had complete data on hypertension, coronary vessel evaluation and retinal vessel measurements and were included in cross-sectional analyses. Among persons with CAD, those with hypertension (compared with without) had narrower retinal arteriolar calibre (mean arteriolar calibre difference 2.1 μm, P=0.02), adjusting for age, sex, ethnicity, body mass index, smoking status and fellow vessel calibre. This association was also present among persons without CAD (mean difference 5.0 μm, P=0.04). Stratification by sex indicated that women with hypertension had marginally narrower retinal arterioles compared with normotensive women (multivariable-adjusted P=0.04). No significant association between hypertension and retinal arteriolar calibre was observed in men (P=0.13). No significant differences in retinal venular calibre were observed (P>0.05). In conclusion, in both subjects with and without CAD, hypertension was independently associated with narrower retinal arterioles.

  7. Fire weather and fire behavior in the 1966 loop fire

    Treesearch

    C.M. Countryman; M.A. Fosberg; R.C. Rothermel; M.J. Schroeder

    1968-01-01

    Southern California regularly experiences a wind condition known as the Santa Ana winds. This paper describes the phenomenon and the effects it had on fire behavior during the 1966 Loop Fire in the Angeles National Forest, which claimed the lives of 12 fire fighters.

  8. Temporal trends in mammal responses to fire reveals the complex effects of fire regime attributes.

    PubMed

    Lindenmayer, David B; Blanchard, Wade; MacGregor, Christopher; Barton, Philip; Banks, Sam C; Crane, Mason; Michael, Damian; Okada, Sachiko; Berry, Laurence; Florance, Daniel; Gill, Malcolm

    2016-03-01

    Fire is a major ecological process in many ecosystems worldwide. We sought to identify which attributes of fire regimes affect temporal change in the presence and abundance of Australian native mammals. Our detailed study was underpinned by time series data on 11 mammal species at 97 long-term sites in southeastern Australia between 2003 and 2013. We explored how temporal aspects of fire regimes influenced the presence and conditional abundance of species. The key fire regime components examined were: (1) severity of a major fire in 2003, (2) interval between the last major fire (2003) and the fire prior to that, and (3) number of past fires. Our long-term data set enabled quantification of the interactions between survey year and each fire regime variable: an ecological relationship missing from temporally restricted studies. We found no evidence of any appreciable departures from the assumption of independence of the sites. Multiple aspects of fire regimes influenced temporal variation in the presence and abundance of mammals. The best models indicated that six of the 11 species responded to two or more fire regime variables, with two species influenced by all three fire regime attributes. Almost all species responded to time since fire, either as an interaction with survey year or as a main effect. Fire severity or its interaction with survey year was important for most terrestrial rodents. The number of fires at a site was significant for terrestrial rodents and several other species. Our findings contain evidence of the effects on native mammals of heterogeneity in fire regimes. Temporal response patterns of mammal species were influenced by multiple fire regime attributes, often in conjunction with survey year. This underscores the critical importance of long-term studies of biota that are coupled with data sets characterized by carefully documented fire history, severity, and frequency. Long-term studies are essential to predict animal responses to fires and

  9. Genetic Networks in Mouse Retinal Ganglion Cells

    PubMed Central

    Struebing, Felix L.; Lee, Richard K.; Williams, Robert W.; Geisert, Eldon E.

    2016-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) are the output neuron of the eye, transmitting visual information from the retina through the optic nerve to the brain. The importance of RGCs for vision is demonstrated in blinding diseases where RGCs are lost, such as in glaucoma or after optic nerve injury. In the present study, we hypothesize that normal RGC function is transcriptionally regulated. To test our hypothesis, we examine large retinal expression microarray datasets from recombinant inbred mouse strains in GeneNetwork and define transcriptional networks of RGCs and their subtypes. Two major and functionally distinct transcriptional networks centering around Thy1 and Tubb3 (Class III beta-tubulin) were identified. Each network is independently regulated and modulated by unique genomic loci. Meta-analysis of publically available data confirms that RGC subtypes are differentially susceptible to death, with alpha-RGCs and intrinsically photosensitive RGCs (ipRGCs) being less sensitive to cell death than other RGC subtypes in a mouse model of glaucoma. PMID:27733864

  10. Fellow eyes of giant retinal breaks.

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, H M

    1978-01-01

    INCIDENCE OF RETINAL BREAKS AND DETACHMENT IN FELLOW EYES. The fellow eyes of 226 giant retinal breaks were followed in order to determine the incidence and natural course of chorioretinal and vitreous pathology. During the period of observation which ranged from 18 months to 16 years, the incidence of retinal breaks and retinal detachment increased from 36.1 percent to 51.3 percent. By the end of the follow-up period, the incidence of bilateral giant retinal breaks was 12.8 percent; retinal tears 11.9 percent, retinal holes 10.2 percent, retinal dialysis 0.4 percent, and retinal detachment 15.9 percent. The average duration of follow-up was 3.7 years, therefore, the incidence of retinal breaks in fellow eyes is probably significantly higher. VITREORETINAL CHANGES PRECEDING THE DEVELOPMENT OF RETINAL BREAKS. Syneresis, liquefaction, and condensation of the vitreous base were observed in the majority fellow eyes that developed retinal tears or giant retinal breaks. Follow-up of fellow eyes revealed that the development of a giant retinal break is often preceded by increasing white with pressure associated with increasing condensation of the vitreous base. MANAGEMENT OF FELLOW EYES. Bcause of the high incidence of retinal breaks developing in the fellow eye, regular and thorough examination of the vitreous and retinal breaks even though the fundus may appear normal at the initial examination. PROPHYLACTIC TREATMENT. This study suggests that prophylactic treatment is beneficial in the management of fellow eyes of giant retinal breaks. During this study, retinal breaks developed in 27.3 percent of untreated eyes and in 2.4 percent of eyes treated prophylactically. PROPHYLACTIC TREATMENT OF FELLOW EYES OF GIANT RETINAL BREAKS. Its seems prudent to prophylactically treat retinal holes or dialyses in eyes without retinal detachment with cryotherapy. Scleral bucking seems justified in the prophylactic treatment of eyes with retinal tears of lattice-like degeneration with

  11. Climatic stress increases forest fire severity across the western United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    van Mantgem, Philip J.; Nesmith, Jonathan C. B.; Keifer, MaryBeth; Knapp, Eric E.; Flint, Alan; Flint, Lorriane

    2013-01-01

    Pervasive warming can lead to chronic stress on forest trees, which may contribute to mortality resulting from fire-caused injuries. Longitudinal analyses of forest plots from across the western US show that high pre-fire climatic water deficit was related to increased post-fire tree mortality probabilities. This relationship between climate and fire was present after accounting for fire defences and injuries, and appeared to influence the effects of crown and stem injuries. Climate and fire interactions did not vary substantially across geographical regions, major genera and tree sizes. Our findings support recent physiological evidence showing that both drought and heating from fire can impair xylem conductivity. Warming trends have been linked to increasing probabilities of severe fire weather and fire spread; our results suggest that warming may also increase forest fire severity (the number of trees killed) independent of fire intensity (the amount of heat released during a fire).

  12. Climatic stress increases forest fire severity across the western United States.

    PubMed

    van Mantgem, Phillip J; Nesmith, Jonathan C B; Keifer, MaryBeth; Knapp, Eric E; Flint, Alan; Flint, Lorriane

    2013-09-01

    Pervasive warming can lead to chronic stress on forest trees, which may contribute to mortality resulting from fire-caused injuries. Longitudinal analyses of forest plots from across the western US show that high pre-fire climatic water deficit was related to increased post-fire tree mortality probabilities. This relationship between climate and fire was present after accounting for fire defences and injuries, and appeared to influence the effects of crown and stem injuries. Climate and fire interactions did not vary substantially across geographical regions, major genera and tree sizes. Our findings support recent physiological evidence showing that both drought and heating from fire can impair xylem conductivity. Warming trends have been linked to increasing probabilities of severe fire weather and fire spread; our results suggest that warming may also increase forest fire severity (the number of trees killed) independent of fire intensity (the amount of heat released during a fire).

  13. Haemoglobin and vascular function in the human retinal vascular bed.

    PubMed

    Ritt, Martin; Harazny, Joanna M; Schmidt, Stephanie; Raff, Ulrike; Ott, Christian; Michelson, Georg; Schmieder, Roland E

    2013-04-01

    Haemoglobin is a potential nitric oxide (NO) scavenger. Haemoglobin is associated with blood viscosity and the red blood cell free layer width of microvessels that impact on shear stress in the microcirculation. We hypothesized that haemoglobin modulates retinal vascular function. In 139 nondiabetic male patients with haemoglobin levels within the normal range, the vasodilatatory response of retinal capillary blood flow (RCF) to flicker light exposure and the vasoconstrictor response of RCF to infusion of NO synthase inhibitor N-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA) were assessed. The latter, because of the selective nature of L-NMMA, reflects a parameter of basal NO activity of retinal vasculature. Examinations of retinal parameters were performed noninvasively and in vivo using scanning laser Doppler flowmetry. Patients with haemoglobin greater or equal the median revealed reduced increase of RCF to flicker light exposure (2.83 ± 12 vs. 9.52 ± 14 (%), P adjusted = 0.002), and greater decrease of RCF to L-NMMA infusion (-7.35 ± 13 vs. -0.92 ± 14 (%), P adjusted = 0.008), compared with patients with haemoglobin below the median. Haemoglobin was negatively related to the percentage change of RCF to flicker light exposure (r = -0.249, P = 0.004) and to L-NMMA infusion (r = -0.201, P = 0.018). In multiple linear regression analysis haemoglobin was an independent determinant of the percentage change of RCF to flicker light exposure (model 1: ß = -0.278, P = 0.003 and model 2: ß = -0.283, P = 0.002) and to L-NMMA infusion (model 1: ß = -0.256, P = 0.005 and model 2: ß = -0.269, P = 0.004). Haemoglobin emerged as an independent determinant of vascular function in the human retinal vascular bed.

  14. FIRE Data and Information

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-11-13

    ... a series of field missions which have collected cirrus and marine stratocumulus cloud parameters from aircraft, satellite and ... FIRE I - Cirrus Home Page FIRE I - Marine Stratocumulus Home Page FIRE I - Extended Time Observations ...

  15. Retinal AO OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawadzki, Robert J.; Miller, Donald T.

    The last two decades have witnessed extraordinary advances in optical technology to image noninvasively and at high resolution the posterior segment of the eye. Two of the most impactful technological advancements over this period have arguably been optical coherence tomography (OCT) and adaptive optics (AO). The strengths of these technologies complement each other and when combined have been shown to provide unprecedented, micron-scale resolution (<3 μm) in all three dimensions and sensitivity to image the cellular retina in the living eye. This powerful extension of OCT, that is AO-OCT, is the focus of this chapter. It presents key aspects of designing and implementing AO-OCT systems. Particular attention is devoted to the relevant optical properties of the eye that ultimately define these systems, AO componentry and operation tailored for ophthalmic use, and of course use of the latest technologies and methods in OCT for ocular imaging. It surveys the wide range of AO-OCT designs that have been developed for retinal imaging, with AO integrated into every major OCT design configuration. Finally, it reviews the scientific and clinical studies reported to date that show the exciting potential of AO-OCT to image the microscopic retina and fundus in ways not previously possible with other noninvasive methods and a look to future developments in this rapidly growing field.

  16. Cell Swelling Contributes to Thickening of Low-Dose N-methyl-D-Aspartate–Induced Retinal Edema

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Junjie; Chiang, Chia-Wen; Zhang, Huiying; Song, Sheng-Kwei

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. The contribution of cell swelling versus vascular leakage in retinal edema remains largely undefined. The objective of this study was to use in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to assess retinal cell swelling in the edematous mouse retina. Methods. Inner retinal edema was induced by intravitreal injection of 2.5 nmol N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA). To assess retinal cell swelling, diffusion MRI was performed at baseline, 3-hours, 1 day, 3 days, and 7 days (n ≥ 5 at each time point) after NMDA injection. To detect retinal vascular leakage, gadolinium diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) enhanced MRI was performed at baseline, 3 hours and 1 day (n = 5 for each group) after NMDA injection. Upon the completion of MRI, mouse eyes were enucleated, cryosectioned, and stained for assessing retinal layer thickness and cell death. Results. Inner retinal cell swelling was hyperintense on diffusion-weighted images at 3 hours and 1 day after NMDA injection. The thickened inner retina was also seen in anatomic MRI and histology. Quantitatively, inner retinal apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) decreased approximately 20% at 3 hours and 1 day after NMDA injection (P < 0.05 compared with baseline), suggesting cell swelling. Systematic injection of paramagnetic Gd-DTPA did not alter vitreous longitudinal relaxation time (T1) at baseline or at 3 hours after NMDA injection. In contrast, vitreous T1 in mice decreased 16 ± 6% (P < 0.05), reflecting retinal vascular leakage at 1 day after NMDA injection. Conclusions. Noninvasive diffusion MRI was performed to detect retinal cell swelling in vivo. Our results demonstrated that retinal cell swelling could directly lead to retinal thickening independent of vascular leakage. PMID:22467578

  17. Retinal toxicity of indocyanine green.

    PubMed

    Querques, Giuseppe; Prascina, Francesco; Iaculli, Cristiana; Noci, Nicola Delle

    2008-04-01

    To describe a case of scattered toxicity of indocyanine green on the outer retina and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) after indocyanine green (ICG) assisted membrane peeling for macular pucker. A 61-year-old woman was examined by slit-lamp biomicroscopy, fluorescein angiography (FA), indocyanine green angiography (ICGA) and optical coherence tomography (OCT), 1 month and 1 year after ICG assisted membrane peeling for macular pucker. In the absence of significant fundoscopic changes, we have noted on FA and ICGA an occurrence of scattered unusual outer retinal and pigment epithelial changes at the 1- and the 12-month follow-up, probably due to the enhanced phototoxicity associated with the use of ICG at a high concentration (0.5%). Retinal toxicity of ICG in macular surgery depends on many factors. In our patient, the retinal changes seem to have been caused by a combination of all the toxic factors. This is the first reported case describing both the angiographic and OCT patterns of diffuse scattered toxicity of ICG on outer retinal layers and pigment epithelium after ICG assisted membrane peeling for macular pucker.

  18. Rhegmatogenous retinal detachment treatment guidelines.

    PubMed

    García-Arumí, J; Martínez-Castillo, V; Boixadera, A; Blasco, H; Marticorena, J; Zapata, M Á; Macià, C; Badal, J; Distéfano, L; Rafart, J M; Berrocal, M; Zambrano, A; Ruíz-Moreno, J M; Figueroa, M S

    2013-01-01

    This paper outlines general guidelines following the initial diagnosis of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment. These include preoperative evaluation, treatment, possible intra- and post-operative complications, retinal re-detachment, and all therapeutic options available for each case. Treatment of the traumatic retinal detachment is also described, due to its importance and peculiarities. Treatment or prophylactic guidelines are suggested for the different types of retinal detachment described. These are based on both the experience of the ophthalmologists that have participated in preparing the guidelines, and also on evidence-based grading linked to bibliographical sources. However, these guidelines should not be interpreted as being mandatory. Given that there is a wide spectrum of options for treatment of retinal detachment, the surgeons' experience with one or other surgical technique will be of utmost importance in obtaining the best surgical result. As guidelines, they are intended as an additional aid to the surgeon during the decision-making process, with the expectation that the final choice will still be left to the surgeon's judgment and past experience.

  19. People, El Niño southern oscillation and fire in Australia: fire regimes and climate controls in hummock grasslands.

    PubMed

    Bliege Bird, Rebecca; Bird, Douglas W; Codding, Brian F

    2016-06-05

    While evidence mounts that indigenous burning has a significant role in shaping pyrodiversity, the processes explaining its variation across local and external biophysical systems remain limited. This is especially the case with studies of climate-fire interactions, which only recognize an effect of humans on the fire regime when they act independently of climate. In this paper, we test the hypothesis that an anthropogenic fire regime (fire incidence, size and extent) does not covary with climate. In the lightning regime, positive El Niño southern oscillation (ENSO) values increase lightning fire incidence, whereas La Niña (and associated increases in prior rainfall) increase fire size. ENSO has the opposite effect in the Martu regime, decreasing ignitions in El Niño conditions without affecting fire size. Anthropogenic ignition rates covary positively with high antecedent rainfall, whereas fire size varies only with high temperatures and unpredictable winds, which may reduce control over fire spread. However, total area burned is similarly predicted by antecedent rainfall in both regimes, but is driven by increases in fire size in the lightning regime, and fire number in the anthropogenic regime. We conclude that anthropogenic regimes covary with climatic variation, but detecting the human-climate-fire interaction requires multiple measures of both fire regime and climate.This article is part of the themed issue 'The interaction of fire and mankind'.

  20. People, El Niño southern oscillation and fire in Australia: fire regimes and climate controls in hummock grasslands

    PubMed Central

    Bird, Douglas W.; Codding, Brian F.

    2016-01-01

    While evidence mounts that indigenous burning has a significant role in shaping pyrodiversity, the processes explaining its variation across local and external biophysical systems remain limited. This is especially the case with studies of climate–fire interactions, which only recognize an effect of humans on the fire regime when they act independently of climate. In this paper, we test the hypothesis that an anthropogenic fire regime (fire incidence, size and extent) does not covary with climate. In the lightning regime, positive El Niño southern oscillation (ENSO) values increase lightning fire incidence, whereas La Niña (and associated increases in prior rainfall) increase fire size. ENSO has the opposite effect in the Martu regime, decreasing ignitions in El Niño conditions without affecting fire size. Anthropogenic ignition rates covary positively with high antecedent rainfall, whereas fire size varies only with high temperatures and unpredictable winds, which may reduce control over fire spread. However, total area burned is similarly predicted by antecedent rainfall in both regimes, but is driven by increases in fire size in the lightning regime, and fire number in the anthropogenic regime. We conclude that anthropogenic regimes covary with climatic variation, but detecting the human–climate–fire interaction requires multiple measures of both fire regime and climate. This article is part of the themed issue ‘The interaction of fire and mankind’. PMID:27216513

  1. Inherited Retinal Degenerative Disease Clinical Trial Network

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    the total number of individuals affected by retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and other forms of rare inherited retinal degenerative diseases is estimated at...for autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa ). As new interventions become available for clinical evaluation, the creation of such a network will...dominant retinitis pigmentosa at six sites- the CTEC site at University of Utah and five recruitment sites- the Retina Foundation of the Southwest

  2. [Congenital retinal folds in different clinical cases].

    PubMed

    Munteanu, M

    2005-01-01

    We present 12 clinical cases of congenital retinal folds with different etiologies: posterior primitive vitreous persistency and hyperplasia (7 cases),retinocytoma (1 case). retinopathy of prematurity (1 case), astrocytoma of the retina (1 case), retinal vasculitis (1 case), Goldmann-Favre syndrome (1 case). Etiopathogenic and nosological aspects are discussed; the congenital retinal folds are interpreted as a symptom in a context of a congenital or acquired vitreo-retinal pathology.

  3. [Unusual retinal abnormality: retinal hemorrhages related to scurvy].

    PubMed

    Errera, M-H; Dupas, B; Man, H; Gualino, V; Gaudric, A; Massin, P

    2011-03-01

    A diet restricted to rice and boiled fruit and vegetables leads to vitamin C deficiency. We describe the third case, to our knowledge, of retinal hemorrhages related to scurvy. Reduced bilateral visual acuity in a 50-year-old patient was associated with macrocytic anemia, denutrition, and cutaneous ecchymoses. Oral vitamin C treatment provided subjective clinical improvement and regression of the retinal hemorrhages on fundus examination, with no side effects. Vitamin C plays an important role in collagen stability in vascular and bone walls. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Salam's independence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, Gordon

    2009-01-01

    In his kind review of my biography of the Nobel laureate Abdus Salam (December 2008 pp45-46), John W Moffat wrongly claims that Salam had "independently thought of the idea of parity violation in weak interactions".

  5. Computational fire modeling for aircraft fire research

    SciTech Connect

    Nicolette, V.F.

    1996-11-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Sandia National Laboratories for the Federal Aviation Administration. The technical issues involved in fire modeling for aircraft fire research are identified, as well as computational fire tools for addressing those issues, and the research which is needed to advance those tools in order to address long-range needs. Fire field models are briefly reviewed, and the VULCAN model is selected for further evaluation. Calculations are performed with VULCAN to demonstrate its applicability to aircraft fire problems, and also to gain insight into the complex problem of fires involving aircraft. Simulations are conducted to investigate the influence of fire on an aircraft in a cross-wind. The interaction of the fuselage, wind, fire, and ground plane is investigated. Calculations are also performed utilizing a large eddy simulation (LES) capability to describe the large- scale turbulence instead of the more common k-{epsilon} turbulence model. Additional simulations are performed to investigate the static pressure and velocity distributions around a fuselage in a cross-wind, with and without fire. The results of these simulations provide qualitative insight into the complex interaction of a fuselage, fire, wind, and ground plane. Reasonable quantitative agreement is obtained in the few cases for which data or other modeling results exist Finally, VULCAN is used to quantify the impact of simplifying assumptions inherent in a risk assessment compatible fire model developed for open pool fire environments. The assumptions are seen to be of minor importance for the particular problem analyzed. This work demonstrates the utility of using a fire field model for assessing the limitations of simplified fire models. In conclusion, the application of computational fire modeling tools herein provides both qualitative and quantitative insights into the complex problem of aircraft in fires.

  6. Retinal ganglion cell adaptation to small luminance fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Daniel K; Graña, Gilberto; Passaglia, Christopher L

    2010-08-01

    To accommodate the wide input range over which the visual system operates within the narrow output range of spiking neurons, the retina adjusts its sensitivity to the mean light level so that retinal ganglion cells can faithfully signal contrast, or relative deviations from the mean luminance. Given the large operating range of the visual system, the majority of work on luminance adaptation has involved logarithmic changes in light level. We report that luminance gain controls are recruited for remarkably small fluctuations in luminance as well. Using spike recordings from the rat optic tract, we show that ganglion cell responses to a brief flash of light are modulated in amplitude by local background fluctuations as little as 15% contrast. The time scale of the gain control is rapid (<125 ms), at least for on cells. The retinal locus of adaptation precedes the ganglion cell spike generator because response gain changes of on cells were uncorrelated with firing rate. The mechanism seems to reside within the inner retinal network and not in the photoreceptors, because the adaptation profiles of on and off cells differed markedly. The response gain changes follow Weber's law, suggesting that network mechanisms of luminance adaptation described in previous work modulates retinal ganglion cell sensitivity, not just when we move between different lighting environments, but also as our eyes scan a visual scene. Finally, we show that response amplitude is uniformly reduced for flashes on a modulated background that has spatial contrast, indicating that another gain control that integrates luminance signals nonlinearly over space operates within the receptive field center of rat ganglion cells.

  7. Smoking and Home Fire Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... Media Fire Protection Technology Smoking fire safety outreach materials As a member of the fire service, you ... t tip over and start a fire. Outreach materials from the U.S. Fire Administration Public service announcement: ...

  8. Photovoltaic Retinal Prosthesis for Restoring Sight to Patients Blinded by Retinal Injury or Degeneration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-01

    and various motor prostheses [6][7][8] are constantly improving. Degenerative retinal diseases, such as retinitis pigmentosa and age related macular...AD_______________ Award Number: W81XWH-15-1-0009 TITLE: Photovoltaic Retinal Prosthesis for Restoring Sight to Patients Blinded by Retinal ...DATES COVERED 1 Feb 2015 - 31 Jan 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Photovoltaic Retinal Prosthesis for Restoring Sight to Patients

  9. Regulation of Irregular Neuronal Firing by Autaptic Transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Daqing; Wu, Shengdun; Chen, Mingming; Perc, Matjaž; Zhang, Yangsong; Ma, Jingling; Cui, Yan; Xu, Peng; Xia, Yang; Yao, Dezhong

    2016-05-01

    The importance of self-feedback autaptic transmission in modulating spike-time irregularity is still poorly understood. By using a biophysical model that incorporates autaptic coupling, we here show that self-innervation of neurons participates in the modulation of irregular neuronal firing, primarily by regulating the occurrence frequency of burst firing. In particular, we find that both excitatory and electrical autapses increase the occurrence of burst firing, thus reducing neuronal firing regularity. In contrast, inhibitory autapses suppress burst firing and therefore tend to improve the regularity of neuronal firing. Importantly, we show that these findings are independent of the firing properties of individual neurons, and as such can be observed for neurons operating in different modes. Our results provide an insightful mechanistic understanding of how different types of autapses shape irregular firing at the single-neuron level, and they highlight the functional importance of autaptic self-innervation in taming and modulating neurodynamics.

  10. Forest fire spatial pattern analysis in Galicia (NW Spain).

    PubMed

    Fuentes-Santos, I; Marey-Pérez, M F; González-Manteiga, W

    2013-10-15

    Knowledge of fire behaviour is of key importance in forest management. In the present study, we analysed the spatial structure of forest fire with spatial point pattern analysis and inference techniques recently developed in the Spatstat package of R. Wildfires have been the primary threat to Galician forests in recent years. The district of Fonsagrada-Ancares is one of the most seriously affected by fire in the region and, therefore, the central focus of the study. Our main goal was to determine the spatial distribution of ignition points to model and predict fire occurrence. These data are of great value in establishing enhanced fire prevention and fire fighting plans. We found that the spatial distribution of wildfires is not random and that fire occurrence may depend on ownership conflicts. We also found positive interaction between small and large fires and spatial independence between wildfires in consecutive years.

  11. Regulation of Irregular Neuronal Firing by Autaptic Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Daqing; Wu, Shengdun; Chen, Mingming; Perc, Matjaž; Zhang, Yangsong; Ma, Jingling; Cui, Yan; Xu, Peng; Xia, Yang; Yao, Dezhong

    2016-01-01

    The importance of self-feedback autaptic transmission in modulating spike-time irregularity is still poorly understood. By using a biophysical model that incorporates autaptic coupling, we here show that self-innervation of neurons participates in the modulation of irregular neuronal firing, primarily by regulating the occurrence frequency of burst firing. In particular, we find that both excitatory and electrical autapses increase the occurrence of burst firing, thus reducing neuronal firing regularity. In contrast, inhibitory autapses suppress burst firing and therefore tend to improve the regularity of neuronal firing. Importantly, we show that these findings are independent of the firing properties of individual neurons, and as such can be observed for neurons operating in different modes. Our results provide an insightful mechanistic understanding of how different types of autapses shape irregular firing at the single-neuron level, and they highlight the functional importance of autaptic self-innervation in taming and modulating neurodynamics. PMID:27185280

  12. The neural circuit mechanisms underlying the retinal response to motion reversal.

    PubMed

    Chen, Eric Y; Chou, Janice; Park, Jeongsook; Schwartz, Greg; Berry, Michael J

    2014-11-19

    To make up for delays in visual processing, retinal circuitry effectively predicts that a moving object will continue moving in a straight line, allowing retinal ganglion cells to anticipate the object's position. However, a sudden reversal of motion triggers a synchronous burst of firing from a large group of ganglion cells, possibly signaling a violation of the retina's motion prediction. To investigate the neural circuitry underlying this response, we used a combination of multielectrode array and whole-cell patch recordings to measure the responses of individual retinal ganglion cells in the tiger salamander to reversing stimuli. We found that different populations of ganglion cells were responsible for responding to the reversal of different kinds of objects, such as bright versus dark objects. Using pharmacology and designed stimuli, we concluded that ON and OFF bipolar cells both contributed to the reversal response, but that amacrine cells had, at best, a minor role. This allowed us to formulate an adaptive cascade model (ACM), similar to the one previously used to describe ganglion cell responses to motion onset. By incorporating the ON pathway into the ACM, we were able to reproduce the time-varying firing rate of fast OFF ganglion cells for all experimentally tested stimuli. Analysis of the ACM demonstrates that bipolar cell gain control is primarily responsible for generating the synchronized retinal response, as individual bipolar cells require a constant time delay before recovering from gain control. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3415557-19$15.00/0.

  13. The Neural Circuit Mechanisms Underlying the Retinal Response to Motion Reversal

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Eric Y.; Chou, Janice; Park, Jeongsook; Schwartz, Greg

    2014-01-01

    To make up for delays in visual processing, retinal circuitry effectively predicts that a moving object will continue moving in a straight line, allowing retinal ganglion cells to anticipate the object's position. However, a sudden reversal of motion triggers a synchronous burst of firing from a large group of ganglion cells, possibly signaling a violation of the retina's motion prediction. To investigate the neural circuitry underlying this response, we used a combination of multielectrode array and whole-cell patch recordings to measure the responses of individual retinal ganglion cells in the tiger salamander to reversing stimuli. We found that different populations of ganglion cells were responsible for responding to the reversal of different kinds of objects, such as bright versus dark objects. Using pharmacology and designed stimuli, we concluded that ON and OFF bipolar cells both contributed to the reversal response, but that amacrine cells had, at best, a minor role. This allowed us to formulate an adaptive cascade model (ACM), similar to the one previously used to describe ganglion cell responses to motion onset. By incorporating the ON pathway into the ACM, we were able to reproduce the time-varying firing rate of fast OFF ganglion cells for all experimentally tested stimuli. Analysis of the ACM demonstrates that bipolar cell gain control is primarily responsible for generating the synchronized retinal response, as individual bipolar cells require a constant time delay before recovering from gain control. PMID:25411485

  14. Inherited Retinal Degenerative Clinical Trial Network

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    ending in blindness. In the United States, the total number of individuals affected by retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and other forms of rare inherited...AD_________________ AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-07-1-0720 TITLE: Inherited Retinal Degenerative...Final 3. DATES COVERED 27 Sep 2007 – 29 Sep 2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Inherited Retinal Degenerative Clinical Trial Network

  15. Choroidal melanoma clinically simulating a retinal angioma.

    PubMed

    Shields, J A; Joffe, L; Guibor, P

    1978-01-01

    An amelanotic fundus lesion in a 35-year-old man was associated with a dilated retinal vessel, thus suggesting the diagnosis of retinal angioma. Fluorescein angiography and B-scan ultrasonography were not diagnostic, but a radioactive phosphorus uptake test suggested the lesion was malignant. The enucleated globe showed a malignant choroidal melanoma drained by a large retinal vein.

  16. Transcorneal Electrical Stimulation Therapy for Retinal Disease

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-05-03

    Retinitis Pigmentosa; Macula Off; Primary Open Angle Glaucoma; Hereditary Macular Degeneration; Treated Retina Detachment; Retinal Artery Occlusion; Retinal Vein Occlusion; Non-Arthritic-Anterior-Ischemic Optic-Neuropathy; Hereditary Autosomal Dominant Optic Atrophy; Dry Age Related Macular Degeneration; Ischemic Macula Edema

  17. Fire and fire ecology: Concepts and principles

    Treesearch

    Mark A. Cochrane; Kevin C. Ryan

    2009-01-01

    Fire has been central to terrestrial life ever since early anaerobic microorganisms poisoned the atmosphere with oxygen and multicellular plant life moved onto land. The combination of fuels, oxygen, and heat gave birth to fire on Earth. Fire is not just another evolutionary challenge that life needed to overcome, it is, in fact, a core ecological process across much...

  18. Exploring the retinal connectome

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, James R.; Jones, Bryan W.; Watt, Carl B.; Shaw, Margaret V.; Yang, Jia-Hui; DeMill, David; Lauritzen, James S.; Lin, Yanhua; Rapp, Kevin D.; Mastronarde, David; Koshevoy, Pavel; Grimm, Bradley; Tasdizen, Tolga; Whitaker, Ross

    2011-01-01

    Purpose A connectome is a comprehensive description of synaptic connectivity for a neural domain. Our goal was to produce a connectome data set for the inner plexiform layer of the mammalian retina. This paper describes our first retinal connectome, validates the method, and provides key initial findings. Methods We acquired and assembled a 16.5 terabyte connectome data set RC1 for the rabbit retina at ≈2 nm resolution using automated transmission electron microscope imaging, automated mosaicking, and automated volume registration. RC1 represents a column of tissue 0.25 mm in diameter, spanning the inner nuclear, inner plexiform, and ganglion cell layers. To enhance ultrastructural tracing, we included molecular markers for 4-aminobutyrate (GABA), glutamate, glycine, taurine, glutamine, and the in vivo activity marker, 1-amino-4-guanidobutane. This enabled us to distinguish GABAergic and glycinergic amacrine cells; to identify ON bipolar cells coupled to glycinergic cells; and to discriminate different kinds of bipolar, amacrine, and ganglion cells based on their molecular signatures and activity. The data set was explored and annotated with Viking, our multiuser navigation tool. Annotations were exported to additional applications to render cells, visualize network graphs, and query the database. Results Exploration of RC1 showed that the 2 nm resolution readily recapitulated well known connections and revealed several new features of retinal organization: (1) The well known AII amacrine cell pathway displayed more complexity than previously reported, with no less than 17 distinct signaling modes, including ribbon synapse inputs from OFF bipolar cells, wide-field ON cone bipolar cells and rod bipolar cells, and extensive input from cone-pathway amacrine cells. (2) The axons of most cone bipolar cells formed a distinct signal integration compartment, with ON cone bipolar cell axonal synapses targeting diverse cell types. Both ON and OFF bipolar cells receive

  19. Fire Suppression and Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruff, Gary A.

    2004-01-01

    This report is concerned with the following topics regarding fire suppression:What is the relative effectiveness of candidate suppressants to extinguish a representative fire in reduced gravity, including high-O2 mole fraction, low -pressure environments? What are the relative advantages and disadvantages of physically acting and chemically-acting agents in spacecraft fire suppression? What are the O2 mole fraction and absolute pressure below which a fire cannot exist? What effect does gas-phase radiation play in the overall fire and post-fire environments? Are the candidate suppressants effective to extinguish fires on practical solid fuels? What is required to suppress non-flaming fires (smoldering and deep seated fires) in reduced gravity? How can idealized space experiment results be applied to a practical fire scenario? What is the optimal agent deployment strategy for space fire suppression?

  20. Retinal changes in Himalayan climbers.

    PubMed

    Rennie, D; Morrissey, J

    1975-06-01

    Changes in the fundus of the eye were studied in 15 members of a mountaineering expedition to Dhaulagiri, Nepal (elevation, 8,167 meters [26,795 ft]). Retinal photographs were taken at sea level and at 5,883 meters (19,300) after each climber had descended from his highest point. Five Nepali Sherpas and an additional American climber who came to the base camp late in the climb were also studied. Vascular engorgement with tortuosity, a 24% increase in arterial diameter, and a 23% increase in venous diameter were observed. Retinal hemorrhages were seen in five American climbers (33%), but in none of the Sherpas. The high incidence is striking, but the cause is unknown. We suggest that the hypoxic vasodilatation makes retinal vessels more vulnerable to sudden rises in intravascular pressure.

  1. Clinical Trials in Retinal Dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Grob, Seanna R.; Finn, Avni; Papakostas, Thanos D.; Eliott, Dean

    2016-01-01

    Research development is burgeoning for genetic and cellular therapy for retinal dystrophies. These dystrophies are the focus of many research efforts due to the unique biology and accessibility of the eye, the transformative advances in ocular imaging technology that allows for in vivo monitoring, and the potential benefit people would gain from success in the field – the gift of renewed sight. Progress in the field has revealed the immense complexity of retinal dystrophies and the challenges faced by researchers in the development of this technology. This study reviews the current trials and advancements in genetic and cellular therapy in the treatment of retinal dystrophies and also discusses the current and potential future challenges. PMID:26957839

  2. Rat retinal transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Kozhevnikova, Oyuna S.; Korbolina, Elena E.; Ershov, Nikita I.; Kolosova, Natalia G.

    2013-01-01

    Pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of vision loss in the elderly, remains poorly understood due to the paucity of animal models that fully replicate the human disease. Recently, we showed that senescence-accelerated OXYS rats develop a retinopathy similar to human AMD. To identify alterations in response to normal aging and progression of AMD-like retinopathy, we compared gene expression profiles of retina from 3- and 18-mo-old OXYS and control Wistar rats by means of high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). We identified 160 and 146 age-regulated genes in Wistar and OXYS retinas, respectively. The majority of them are related to the immune system and extracellular matrix turnover. Only 24 age-regulated genes were common for the two strains, suggestive of different rates and mechanisms of aging. Over 600 genes showed significant differences in expression between the two strains. These genes are involved in disease-associated pathways such as immune response, inflammation, apoptosis, Ca2+ homeostasis and oxidative stress. The altered expression for selected genes was confirmed by qRT-PCR analysis. To our knowledge, this study represents the first analysis of retinal transcriptome from young and old rats with biologic replicates generated by RNA-Seq technology. We can conclude that the development of AMD-like retinopathy in OXYS rats is associated with an imbalance in immune and inflammatory responses. Aging alters the expression profile of numerous genes in the retina, and the genetic background of OXYS rats has a profound impact on the development of AMD-like retinopathy. PMID:23656783

  3. Mechanical Dissociation of Retinal Neurons with Vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motomura, Tamami; Hayashida, Yuki; Murayama, Nobuki

    The neuromorphic device, which implements the functions of biological neural circuits by means of VLSI technology, has been collecting much attention in the engineering fields in the last decade. Concurrently, progress in neuroscience research has revealed the nonlinear computation in single neuron levels, suggesting that individual neurons are not merely the circuit elements but computational units. Thus, elucidating the properties of neuronal signal processing is thought to be an essential step for developing the next generation of neuromorphic devices. In the present study, we developed a method for dissociating single neurons from specific sublayers of mammalian retinas with using no proteolytic enzymes but rather combining tissue incubation in a low-Ca2+ medium and the vibro-dissociation technique developed for the slices of brains and spinal cords previously. Our method took shorter time of the procedure, and required less elaborated skill, than the conventional enzymatic method did; nevertheless it yielded enough number of the cells available for acute electrophysiological experiments. The isolated retinal neurons were useful for measuring the nonlinear membrane conductances as well as the spike firing properties under the perforated-patch whole-cell configuration. These neurons also enabled us to examine the effects of proteolytic enzymes on the membrane excitability in those cells.

  4. The Frequency and Fate of Understory Forest Fires in Amazonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, D. C.; le page, Y.; Wang, D.; Chen, Y.; Randerson, J. T.; Collatz, G. J.; Giglio, L.; Hurtt, G. C.; DeFries, R. S.

    2012-12-01

    Fires for deforestation or agricultural management frequently escape their intended boundaries and burn standing Amazon forests. The extent and frequency of understory forest fires are critical to assess forest carbon emissions and the long-term legacy of understory fires in Amazonia. Patterns of understory fire activity under current climate conditions also offer a blueprint for potential changes in Amazon forests under scenarios of future climate and land use. Here, we estimated of the extent and frequency of understory forest fires for the entire arc of deforestation in southern Amazonia using a time series of annual Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data. Understory forest fires burned more than 80,000 km2 during 1999-2010. Fires were widespread along the southern and eastern extents of Amazon forests during the four years with highest fire activity (1999, 2005, 2007, 2010). The interannual variability in understory fires offered new insights into fire-climate dynamics in Amazonia over a range of temporal scales, based on the combination of burned area, MODIS active fire detections, and reanalysis climate data. Initial fire exposure reduces aboveground carbon stocks, and frequent fires are one possible mechanism for long-term changes the structure of Amazon forests. Repeated burning was concentrated in southeastern Amazonia, and >95% of all repeated fires occurred in the Brazilian states of Mato Grosso and Pará. Forests that burned two or more times during this period accounted for 16% of understory fire activity. Finally, deforestation of burned forests was rare, suggesting that forest degradation from understory fires was an independent source of carbon emissions during this period. Modeling the time scales of carbon loss and recovery in burned forests is therefore critical to estimate the net carbon emissions from these fires. The results of this study suggest that understory fires operate as a large-scale edge effect in Amazonia, as

  5. Retinal Optical Coherence Tomography Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drexler, Wolfgang; Fujimoto, James G.

    The eye is essentially transparent, transmitting light with only minimal optical attenuation and scattering providing easy optical access to the anterior segment as well as the retina. For this reason, ophthalmic and especially retinal imaging has been not only the first but also most successful clinical application for optical coherence tomography (OCT). This chapter focuses on the development of OCT technology for retinal imaging. OCT has significantly improved the potential for early diagnosis, understanding of retinal disease pathogenesis, as well as monitoring disease progression and response to therapy. Development of ultrabroad bandwidth light sources and high-speed detection techniques has enabled significant improvements in ophthalmic OCT imaging performance, demonstrating the potential of three-dimensional, ultrahigh-resolution OCT (UHR OCT) to perform noninvasive optical biopsy of the living human retina, i.e., the in vivo visualization of microstructural, intraretinal morphology in situ approaching the resolution of conventional histopathology. Significant improvements in axial resolution and speed not only enable three-dimensional rendering of retinal volumes but also high-definition, two-dimensional tomograms, topographic thickness maps of all major intraretinal layers, as well as volumetric quantification of pathologic intraretinal changes. These advances in OCT technology have also been successfully applied in several animal models of retinal pathologies. The development of light sources emitting at alternative wavelengths, e.g., around #1,060 nm, not only enabled three-dimensional OCT imaging with enhanced choroidal visualization but also improved OCT performance in cataract patients due to reduced scattering losses in this wavelength region. Adaptive optics using deformable mirror technology, with unique high stroke to correct higher-order ocular aberrations, with specially designed optics to compensate chromatic aberration of the human eye, in

  6. Retinal Image Quality During Accommodation

    PubMed Central

    López-Gil, N.; Martin, J.; Liu, T.; Bradley, A.; Díaz-Muñoz, D.; Thibos, L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We asked if retinal image quality is maximum during accommodation, or sub-optimal due to accommodative error, when subjects perform an acuity task. Methods Subjects viewed a monochromatic (552nm), high-contrast letter target placed at various viewing distances. Wavefront aberrations of the accommodating eye were measured near the endpoint of an acuity staircase paradigm. Refractive state, defined as the optimum target vergence for maximising retinal image quality, was computed by through-focus wavefront analysis to find the power of the virtual correcting lens that maximizes visual Strehl ratio. Results Despite changes in ocular aberrations and pupil size during binocular viewing, retinal image quality and visual acuity typically remain high for all target vergences. When accommodative errors lead to sub-optimal retinal image quality, acuity and measured image quality both decline. However, the effect of accommodation errors of on visual acuity are mitigated by pupillary constriction associated with accommodation and binocular convergence and also to binocular summation of dissimilar retinal image blur. Under monocular viewing conditions some subjects displayed significant accommodative lag that reduced visual performance, an effect that was exacerbated by pharmacological dilation of the pupil. Conclusions Spurious measurement of accommodative error can be avoided when the image quality metric used to determine refractive state is compatible with the focusing criteria used by the visual system to control accommodation. Real focusing errors of the accommodating eye do not necessarily produce a reliably measurable loss of image quality or clinically significant loss of visual performance, probably because of increased depth-of-focus due to pupil constriction. When retinal image quality is close to maximum achievable (given the eye’s higher-order aberrations), acuity is also near maximum. A combination of accommodative lag, reduced image quality, and reduced

  7. Fire clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2004-01-01

    Seven companies mined fire clay in four states during 2003. From 1984 to 1992, production declined to 383 kt (422,000 st) from a high of 1.04 Mt (1.14 million st) as markets for clay-based refractories declined. Since 1992, production levels have been erratic, ranging from 383 kt (422,000 st) in 1992 and 2001 to 583 kt (642,000 st) in 1995. Production in 2003, based on preliminary data, was estimated to be around 450 kt (496,000 st) with a value of about $10.5 million. This was about the same as in 2002. Missouri remained the leading producer state, followed by South Carolina, Ohio and California.

  8. Retinitis pigmentosa in southern Africa.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, J; Bartmann, L; Ramesar, R; Beighton, P

    1993-11-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a heterogeneous group of inherited retinal disorders which are a common cause of genetic blindness. The relative frequencies of the different forms of RP in South Africa, as determined from the register at the DNA banking centre for RP at the Department of Human Genetics, University of Cape Town, are presented and discussed. Of the 125 families analysed, 29 (23%) showed autosomal dominant, 33 (27%) autosomal recessive and 3 (3%) X-linked inheritance. In 10 families the pedigree data were insufficient to allow accurate genetic subtyping and a further 50 patients were sporadic without a family history of RP or other syndromic features which would allow categorization.

  9. [Study on preferred retinal locus].

    PubMed

    Dai, Bing-Fa; Hu, Jian-Min; Xu, Duan-Lian

    2012-03-01

    Preferred retinal locus (PRL) is always found in the age-related macular degeneration and other macular damages in patients with low vision, and it is a very important anatomic position in patients with central vision impairment to achieve the rehabilitation. In recent years, the training of preferred retinal locus (PRL) has become a research hotspot of low vision rehabilitation, it can clearly improve functional vision and quality of life. The authors reviewed relevant literatures, and summarized the definition, position, characteristics, training and clinical implications of the PRL.

  10. Determination of retinal surface area.

    PubMed

    Nagra, Manbir; Gilmartin, Bernard; Thai, Ngoc Jade; Logan, Nicola S

    2017-09-01

    Previous attempts at determining retinal surface area and surface area of the whole eye have been based upon mathematical calculations derived from retinal photographs, schematic eyes and retinal biopsies of donor eyes. 3-dimensional (3-D) ocular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allows a more direct measurement, it can be used to image the eye in vivo, and there is no risk of tissue shrinkage. The primary purpose of this study is to compare, using T2-weighted 3D MRI, retinal surface areas for superior-temporal (ST), inferior-temporal (IT), superior-nasal (SN) and inferior-nasal (IN) retinal quadrants. An ancillary aim is to examine whether inter-quadrant variations in area are concordant with reported inter-quadrant patterns of susceptibility to retinal breaks associated with posterior vitreous detachment (PVD). Seventy-three adult participants presenting without retinal pathology (mean age 26.25 ± 6.06 years) were scanned using a Siemens 3-Tesla MRI scanner to provide T2-weighted MR images that demarcate fluid-filled internal structures for the whole eye and provide high-contrast delineation of the vitreous-retina interface. Integrated MRI software generated total internal ocular surface area (TSA). The second nodal point was used to demarcate the origin of the peripheral retina in order to calculate total retinal surface area (RSA) and quadrant retinal surface areas (QRSA) for ST, IT, SN, and IN quadrants. Mean spherical error (MSE) was -2.50 ± 4.03D and mean axial length (AL) 24.51 ± 1.57 mm. Mean TSA and RSA for the RE were 2058 ± 189 and 1363 ± 160 mm(2) , respectively. Repeated measures anova for QRSA data indicated a significant difference within-quadrants (P < 0.01) which, contrasted with ST (365 ± 43 mm(2) ), was significant for IT (340 ± 40 mm(2) P < 0.01), SN (337 ± 40 mm(2) P < 0.01) and IN (321 ± 39 mm(2) P < 0.01) quadrants. For all quadrants, QRSA was significantly correlated with AL (P < 0.01) and

  11. ACUTE RETINAL ARTERIAL OCCLUSIVE DISORDERS

    PubMed Central

    Hayreh, Sohan Singh

    2011-01-01

    The initial section deals with basic sciences; among the various topics briefly discussed are the anatomical features of ophthalmic, central retinal and cilioretinal arteries which may play a role in acute retinal arterial ischemic disorders. Crucial information required in the management of central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO) is the length of time the retina can survive following that. An experimental study shows that CRAO for 97 minutes produces no detectable permanent retinal damage but there is a progressive ischemic damage thereafter, and by 4 hours the retina has suffered irreversible damage. In the clinical section, I discuss at length various controversies on acute retinal arterial ischemic disorders. Classification of acute retinal arterial ischemic disorders These are of 4 types: CRAO, branch retinal artery occlusion (BRAO), cotton wools spots and amaurosis fugax. Both CRAO and BRAO further comprise multiple clinical entities. Contrary to the universal belief, pathogenetically, clinically and for management, CRAO is not one clinical entity but 4 distinct clinical entities – non-arteritic CRAO, non-arteritic CRAO with cilioretinal artery sparing, arteritic CRAO associated with giant cell arteritis (GCA) and transient non-arteritic CRAO. Similarly, BRAO comprises permanent BRAO, transient BRAO and cilioretinal artery occlusion (CLRAO), and the latter further consists of 3 distinct clinical entities - non-arteritic CLRAO alone, non-arteritic CLRAO associated with central retinal vein occlusion and arteritic CLRAO associated with GCA. Understanding these classifications is essential to comprehend fully various aspects of these disorders. Central retinal artery occlusion The pathogeneses, clinical features and management of the various types of CRAO are discussed in detail. Contrary to the prevalent belief, spontaneous improvement in both visual acuity and visual fields does occur, mainly during the first 7 days. The incidence of spontaneous visual

  12. Fires, ecological effects of

    Treesearch

    W. J. Bond; Robert Keane

    2017-01-01

    Fire is both a natural and anthropogenic disturbance influencing the distribution, structure, and functioning of terrestrial ecosystems around the world. Many plants and animals depend on fire for their continued existence. Others species, such as rainforest plants species, are extremely intolerant of burning and need protection from fire. The properties of a fire...

  13. Fire Safety Technician

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Pam

    2007-01-01

    Fire protection is one of the most important considerations in the construction and operation of industrial plants and commercial buildings. Fire insurance rates are determined by fire probability factors, such as the type of construction, ease of transporting personnel, and the quality and quantity of fire protection equipment available. Because…

  14. Children and Home Fires

    MedlinePlus

    CHILDREN AND HOME FIRES Fast Facts Children under the age of five are twice as likely to die in a home fire than the rest of the population, and child-playing fires are the leading cause of fire deaths among ...

  15. Fire Safety Technician

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Pam

    2007-01-01

    Fire protection is one of the most important considerations in the construction and operation of industrial plants and commercial buildings. Fire insurance rates are determined by fire probability factors, such as the type of construction, ease of transporting personnel, and the quality and quantity of fire protection equipment available. Because…

  16. FIRE SERVICE TRAINING.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BERNDT, WILLIAM M.; AND OTHERS

    STUDENTS MAY USE THIS REVISED MANUAL IN FIRE STATION OR TRAINING CENTER EXTENSION PROGRAMS FOR IMPROVING THE COMPETENCIES AND SKILLS OF LOCAL FIRE PERSONNEL IN THE SPECIALIZED FIELD OF FIRE SERVICE. IT WAS DEVELOPED BY A STATEWIDE COMMITTEE OF FIRE-FIGHTING CONSULTANTS AND ADVISORY GROUPS. THE 26 CHAPTERS PROVIDE BOTH BASIC AND ADVANCED TECHNICAL…

  17. Inaja Fire - 1956, Pine Hills Fire - 1967...similar, yet different

    Treesearch

    Mark J. Schroeder; Bernadine B. Taylor

    1968-01-01

    Two fires burned in the same area in southern California under nearly similar weather conditions, 11 years apart. Yet the Inaja fire of 1956 was much more disastrous than the Pine Hills fire of 1967. The earlier fire claimed 11 lives, and covered an area five times larger than the 1967 fire. Differences in fuels, topography, fire behavior, fire-control action, and...

  18. Operating Room Fire Safety

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Stuart R.; Yajnik, Amit; Ashford, Jeffrey; Springer, Randy; Harvey, Sherry

    2011-01-01

    Operating room fires are a rare but preventable danger in modern healthcare operating rooms. Optimal outcomes depend on all operating room personnel being familiar with their roles in fire prevention and fire management. Despite the recommendations of major safety institutes, this familiarity is not the current practice in many healthcare facilities. Members of the anesthesiology and the surgery departments are commonly not actively involved in fire safety programs, fire drills, and fire simulations that could lead to potential delays in prevention and management of intraoperative fires. PMID:21603334

  19. Retinal ganglion cell axonal compression by retinal vessels in light-induced retinal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    García-Ayuso, Diego; Salinas-Navarro, Manuel; Agudo-Barriuso, Marta; Alarcón-Martínez, Luis; Vidal-Sanz, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To analyze the damage produced by light in mydriatic and miotic albino retinas under two different sources of light. Methods Albino Sprague Dawley female rats were exposed to 3,000 lx during 48 h under two different light sources: linear and circular bulbs. Before exposure, their left pupils were dilated. Before and at different times after light exposure (ALE), electroretinographic signals were recorded. One week before processing, retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) were traced by applying fluorogold on the superior colliculi. Just before processing, some animals were intravenously injected with horseradish peroxidase to analyze retinal vascular leakage. At different times ALE, animals were sacrificed and their retinas dissected as whole mounts or cross-sections. Cross-sections were used to study the retinal degeneration and to detect apoptotic nuclei by the transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) technique. Whole mounts were used to analyze vascular leakage; investigate the nerve fiber layer, identified by immunodetection of neurofilaments; and quantify the whole population of RGCs identified by fluorogold tracing and Brn3a immunodetection. With the quantitative data, detailed isodensity maps were generated to study the spatial loss of RGCs. Results Phototoxicity causes an immediate and permanent abolishment of the electroretinographic response. Early ALE, photoreceptors degenerate by apoptosis and this death is more severe in mydriatic conditions and under circular bulbs. Photoreceptor loss starts in an arciform dorsomedial retinal area, but at 3 months ALE has spread to the whole retina and there are no differences related to either pupil dilation or light source. Three months ALE, RGC axons show distorted trajectories and abnormal expression of neurofilaments. Six months or more ALE, there is significant death of RGCs caused by axonal strangulation by displaced inner retinal vessels. Topography of the surviving RGCs shows that their loss is not uniform

  20. Familial correlation of retinal vascular caliber in Singapore Chinese.

    PubMed

    Li, Ling-Jun; Liao, Jiemin; Fan, Qiao; Cheung, Carol Yim-Lui; Ikram, M Kamran; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Saw, Seang-Mei; Wong, Tien-Yin

    2013-08-19

    Our study aimed to explore the heritability of retinal vascular caliber among Singapore Chinese families. In the Strabismus, Amblyopia, and Refractive Error Study in Singaporean Chinese Preschoolers (STARS) family study conducted from 2008 to 2010, a total of 727 participants (304 parent-child pairs, 83 sibling pairs, and 87 spouse pairs) were included in the analysis. According to standardized protocols, retinal photography, blood pressure measurements, anthropometric measurements, and interviews were performed at clinic. Retinal vascular caliber was assessed by a computer-assisted imaging program (IVAN). Familial correlation of retinal vascular caliber among family pairs was calculated by the FCOR procedure with S.A.G.E. computer software program package and heritability was double the value of the familial correlation. Mean age was 8.59 years in 304 children and 39.90 years in 423 parents. Mean CRAE and CRVE were 157.09 and 220.80 μm in children, and 150.29 and 220.70 μm in parents, respectively. In multivariate analysis, familial correlation of CRVE was 0.36 (P < 0.001) among parent-child pairs and 0.28 (P < 0.05) among sibling pairs, respectively. Heritability of CRVE was 0.72 and 0.56 among parent-child pairs and sibling pairs, respectively. Family correlation and heritability of CRAE were not significant. This familial correlation study showed a strong correlation of retinal venular caliber in Singapore Chinese families among parent-child pairs and sibling pairs, independent of age, sex, blood pressure, and BMI. Our findings provide further evidence on substantial heritability of the microvasculature.

  1. Digital tracking and control of retinal images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Steven F.; Jerath, Maya R.; Rylander, Henry G.; Welch, Ashley J.

    1994-01-01

    Laser-induced retinal lesions are used to treat a variety of eye disorders such as diabetic retinopathy and retinal tears. An instrumentation system has been developed to track a specific lesion coordinate on the retinal surface and provide corrective signals to maintain laser position on the coordinate. High-resolution retinal images are acquired via a CCD camera coupled to a fundus camera and video frame grabber. Optical filtering and histogram modification are used to enhance the retinal vessel network against the lighter retinal background. Six distinct retinal landmarks are tracked on the high contrast image obtained from the frame grabber using 2D blood vessel templates. An overview of the robotic laser system design is followed by implementation and testing of a development system for proof of concept and, finally, specifications for a real-time system are provided.

  2. Independent Living.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nathanson, Jeanne H., Ed.

    1994-01-01

    This issue of "OSERS" addresses the subject of independent living of individuals with disabilities. The issue includes a message from Judith E. Heumann, the Assistant Secretary of the Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services (OSERS), and 10 papers. Papers have the following titles and authors: "Changes in the…

  3. Mass Fire Model Concept

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-05-31

    ignitions to have approximated mass fire conditions. Observer reports and ex post facto reconstructions of these events establish some qualitative and...fire behavior. A model of urban mass fire behavior, thus, cannot be totally based upon the results of full scale empirical observations . The data are...previous research and observations . From the standpoint of urban mass fires, all detailed tests have been small fires. Leaving aside, for the moment, the

  4. Fire-Walking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willey, David

    2010-01-01

    This article gives a brief history of fire-walking and then deals with the physics behind fire-walking. The author has performed approximately 50 fire-walks, took the data for the world's hottest fire-walk and was, at one time, a world record holder for the longest fire-walk (www.dwilley.com/HDATLTW/Record_Making_Firewalks.html). He currently…

  5. Fire-Walking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willey, David

    2010-01-01

    This article gives a brief history of fire-walking and then deals with the physics behind fire-walking. The author has performed approximately 50 fire-walks, took the data for the world's hottest fire-walk and was, at one time, a world record holder for the longest fire-walk (www.dwilley.com/HDATLTW/Record_Making_Firewalks.html). He currently…

  6. Retinitis Pigmentosa and Education Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Thomas J.

    2005-01-01

    Retinitis Pigmentosa includes a number of inherited diseases which usually result in blindness. The disease is progressive in nature and begins with the deterioration of cells in the eye responsible for peripheral vision. As the condition worsens there is a gradual loss of peripheral vision and night blindness. Proper educational planning requires…

  7. [Surgical managment of retinal detachment].

    PubMed

    Haritoglou, C; Wolf, A

    2015-05-01

    The detachment of the neurosensory retina from the underlying retinal pigment epithelium can be related to breaks of the retina allowing vitreous fluid to gain access to the subretinal space, to exudative changes of the choroid such as tumours or inflammatory diseases or to excessive tractional forces exerted by interactions of the collagenous vitreous and the retina. Tractional retinal detachment is usually treated by vitrectomy and exudative detachment can be addressed by treatment of the underlying condition in many cases. In rhegmatogenous retinal detachment two different surgical procedures, vitrectomy and scleral buckling, can be applied for functional and anatomic rehabilitation of our patients. The choice of the surgical procedure is not really standardised and often depends on the experience of the surgeon and other more ocular factors including lens status, the number of retinal breaks, the extent of the detachment and the amount of preexisting PVR. Using both techniques, anatomic success rates of over 90 % can be achieved. Especially in young phakic patients scleral buckling offers the true advantage to prevent the progression of cataract formation requiring cataract extraction and intraocular lens implantation. Therefore, scleral buckling should be considered in selected cases as an alternative surgical option in spite of the very important technical refinements in modern vitrectomy techniques. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Identification of genes and pathways involved in retinal neovascularization by microarray analysis of two animal models of retinal angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Recchia, Franco M; Xu, Lili; Penn, John S; Boone, Braden; Dexheimer, Phillip J

    2010-02-01

    Comparative retinal gene expression analysis in two rodent models of oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) was performed to identify the genes and pathways involved in retinal neovascularization. Three independent experimental runs were conducted for each species, according to standard protocols for induction of OIR. Total retinal RNA was isolated at two time points, corresponding to the early response to relative hypoxia (P13 in mouse, P15 in rat) and to the later phase of maximum retinal neovascularization (P18 in mouse, P20 in rat) and was used to prepare labeled probes for hybridization. Gene expression was compared between normal and experimental conditions for each species at each time point. Probesets with a false-discovery rate of retinal neovascularization and identification of potential rational targets for antiangiogenic therapy.

  9. Identification of Genes and Pathways Involved in Retinal Neovascularization by Microarray Analysis of Two Animal Models of Retinal Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lili; Penn, John S.; Boone, Braden; Dexheimer, Phillip J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. Comparative retinal gene expression analysis in two rodent models of oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) was performed to identify the genes and pathways involved in retinal neovascularization. Methods. Three independent experimental runs were conducted for each species, according to standard protocols for induction of OIR. Total retinal RNA was isolated at two time points, corresponding to the early response to relative hypoxia (P13 in mouse, P15 in rat) and to the later phase of maximum retinal neovascularization (P18 in mouse, P20 in rat) and was used to prepare labeled probes for hybridization. Gene expression was compared between normal and experimental conditions for each species at each time point. Probesets with a false-discovery rate of ≤0.05 were considered significantly different and were classified as cellular functions or biological pathways. Changes in expression of selected genes were confirmed by quantitative rtPCR. Results. At the early time point, there were changes in 43 genes in each species, with two in common. Increased expression of members of the VEGF and ephrin receptor signaling pathways were identified in both models. At the later time point, there were changes in 26 genes in the rat and in 1622 in the mouse, with 13 in common. Four pathways were identified in both models. Conclusions. Genes and pathways known to be involved in angiogenesis, as well as other biologically plausible genes and pathways, were identified. This work serves as a comprehensive resource for the study of retinal neovascularization and identification of potential rational targets for antiangiogenic therapy. PMID:19834031

  10. Fire fatality study: demographics of fire victims.

    PubMed

    Barillo, D J; Goode, R

    1996-03-01

    Injury or death caused by fire is frequent and largely preventable. This study was undertaken to define the populations, locations, times and behaviours associated with fatal fires. Seven hundred and twenty-seven fatalities occurring within the State of New Jersey, between the years 1985 and 1991, were examined retrospectively. Most deaths were attributed to a combination of smoke inhalation and burn injury. Five hundred and seventy-four fatalities occurred in residential fires. Smoking materials were the most common source of ignition for residential fires. More than half of the fatal residential fires started between the hours of 11 p.m. and 7 a.m. Children and the elderly represented a disproportionate percentage of fire victims. Victims under the age of 11 years or over the age of 70 years constituted 22.1 per cent of the state population but 39.5 per cent of all fire fatalities. Fire-prevention efforts should target home fire safety, and should concentrate on children and the elderly. The development of fire-safe smoking materials should be encouraged.

  11. Retinal detachment in a patient with extensive myelinated retinal nerve fibers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Muh-Shy; Ho, Tzyy-Chang; Chang, Ching-Chung; Hou, Ping-Kang

    2007-01-01

    We report extensive myelinated retinal nerve fibers in a 42-year-old patient with retinal detachment. Fundus examination revealed a horseshoe-shaped tear near the temporal edge. Pars plana vitrectomy was performed and firm vitreo-retinal adhesion was noticed in the area of extensive myelinated retinal nerve fibers. Following vitrectomy with silicone oil tamponade, the retina was reattached successfully. In conclusion, retinal detachment may develop in patients with extensive myelinated retinal nerve fibers. Vitrectomy may be performed to treat this condition.

  12. Pre-fire and post-fire surface fuel and cover measurements collected in the southeastern United States for model evaluation and development - RxCADRE 2008, 2011 and 2012

    Treesearch

    Roger D. Ottmar; Andrew T. Hudak; Susan J. Prichard; Clinton S. Wright; Joseph C. Restaino; Maureen C. Kennedy; Robert E. Vihnanek

    2016-01-01

    A lack of independent, quality-assured data prevents scientists from effectively evaluating predictions and uncertainties in fire models used by land managers. This paper presents a summary of pre-fire and post-fire fuel, fuel moisture and surface cover fraction data that can be used for fire model evaluation and development. The data were collected in the...

  13. 3-D segmentation of retinal blood vessels in spectral-domain OCT volumes of the optic nerve head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyungmoo; Abràmoff, Michael D.; Niemeijer, Meindert; Garvin, Mona K.; Sonka, Milan

    2010-03-01

    Segmentation of retinal blood vessels can provide important information for detecting and tracking retinal vascular diseases including diabetic retinopathy, arterial hypertension, arteriosclerosis and retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). Many studies on 2-D segmentation of retinal blood vessels from a variety of medical images have been performed. However, 3-D segmentation of retinal blood vessels from spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) volumes, which is capable of providing geometrically accurate vessel models, to the best of our knowledge, has not been previously studied. The purpose of this study is to develop and evaluate a method that can automatically detect 3-D retinal blood vessels from spectral-domain OCT scans centered on the optic nerve head (ONH). The proposed method utilized a fast multiscale 3-D graph search to segment retinal surfaces as well as a triangular mesh-based 3-D graph search to detect retinal blood vessels. An experiment on 30 ONH-centered OCT scans (15 right eye scans and 15 left eye scans) from 15 subjects was performed, and the mean unsigned error in 3-D of the computer segmentations compared with the independent standard obtained from a retinal specialist was 3.4 +/- 2.5 voxels (0.10 +/- 0.07 mm).

  14. Complex temporal response patterns with a simple retinal circuit.

    PubMed

    Werner, Birgit; Cook, Paul B; Passaglia, Christopher L

    2008-08-01

    The retina can respond to a wide array of features in the visual input. It was recently reported that the retina can even recognize complicated temporal input patterns and signal violations in the patterns. When a sequence of flashes was presented, ganglion cells exhibited a variety of firing profiles and many cells showed an "omitted stimulus response" (OSR), in which they fired strongly if a flash in the sequence was omitted. We examined the synaptic origins of the OSR by recording excitatory synaptic currents from ganglion cells in the salamander retina in response to periodic flash sequences. Consistent with previous spike recordings, ganglion cells exhibited an OSR in their current response and the OSR shifted in time with a change in flash frequency such that it could predict when the next flash should have occurred. Although the behavior may seem sophisticated, we show that a simple linear-nonlinear model with a spike threshold can account for the OSR in on ganglion cells and that the variety of complex firing profiles seen in other ganglion cells can be explained by adding contributions from the off pathway. We discuss the physiological and simulation results and their implications for understanding retinal mechanisms of visual information processing.

  15. Understanding independence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annan, James; Hargreaves, Julia

    2016-04-01

    In order to perform any Bayesian processing of a model ensemble, we need a prior over the ensemble members. In the case of multimodel ensembles such as CMIP, the historical approach of ``model democracy'' (i.e. equal weight for all models in the sample) is no longer credible (if it ever was) due to model duplication and inbreeding. The question of ``model independence'' is central to the question of prior weights. However, although this question has been repeatedly raised, it has not yet been satisfactorily addressed. Here I will discuss the issue of independence and present a theoretical foundation for understanding and analysing the ensemble in this context. I will also present some simple examples showing how these ideas may be applied and developed.

  16. Southwestern Oregon's Biscuit Fire: An Analysis of Forest Resources, Fire Severity, and Fire Hazard

    Treesearch

    David L. Azuma; Glenn A. Christensen

    2005-01-01

    This study compares pre-fire field inventory data (collected from 1993 to 1997) in relation to post-fire mapped fire severity classes and the Fire and Fuels Extension of the Forest Vegetation Simulator growth and yield model measures of fire hazard for the portion of the Siskiyou National Forest in the 2002 Biscuit fire perimeter of southwestern Oregon. Post-fire...

  17. FIRES: Fire Information Retrieval and Evaluation System - A program for fire danger rating analysis

    Treesearch

    Patricia L. Andrews; Larry S. Bradshaw

    1997-01-01

    A computer program, FIRES: Fire Information Retrieval and Evaluation System, provides methods for evaluating the performance of fire danger rating indexes. The relationship between fire danger indexes and historical fire occurrence and size is examined through logistic regression and percentiles. Historical seasonal trends of fire danger and fire occurrence can be...

  18. Davis Fire: Fire behavior and fire effects analysis

    Treesearch

    LaWen T. Hollingsworth

    2010-01-01

    The Davis Fire presents an interesting example of fire behavior in subalpine fir, partially dead lodgepole pine with multiple age classes, and moist site Douglas-fir vegetation types. This has been summer of moderate temperatures and intermittent moisture that has kept live herbaceous and live woody moistures fairly high and dead fuel moistures at a moderate level....

  19. Associations Between Outer Retinal Structures and Focal Macular Electroretinograms in Patients With Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Kominami, Taro; Ueno, Shinji; Kominami, Azusa; Nakanishi, Ayami; Yasuda, Shunsuke; Piao, Chang-Hua; Okado, Satoshi; Terasaki, Hiroko

    2017-10-01

    Our earlier study showed that the width of the intact ellipsoid zone (EZ) of the photoreceptors was significantly but weakly correlated with the amplitudes of the focal macular ERGs (FMERGs). The aim of this study was to determine a microstructure of the photoreceptors in the spectral-domain optical coherence tomographic (SD-OCT) images that was more strongly correlated with the FMERG parameters in eyes with retinitis pigmentosa (RP). This was a retrospective, observational study. The medical records of 65 patients with RP were reviewed. FMERGs were elicited by a 15-degree stimulus spot. The width of the EZ and the outer segment (OS) area surrounded by EZ and retinal pigment epithelium in the SD-OCT images within 15 degrees of the fovea were evaluated. Spearman correlation tests and multiple stepwise regression analyses were performed. There was a strong correlation between the amplitudes of FMERGs and the EZ width (r = 0.68 for a-wave amplitude; r = 0.64 for b-wave amplitude), and also between the amplitudes of the FMERGs and the OS area (r = 0.69 for a-wave amplitude; r = 0.67 for b-wave amplitude). However, some patients had long EZ widths but had severely reduced FMERGs. Multiple stepwise regression analyses showed that the OS area was the only significant independent predictor of the amplitudes of FMERGs (P < 0.001). The OS area might be a better morphological structure to use to predict the physiological function of the macula.

  20. Retinal vasculature classification using novel multifractal features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Y.; Ward, W. O. C.; Duan, Jinming; Auer, D. P.; Gowland, Penny; Bai, L.

    2015-11-01

    Retinal blood vessels have been implicated in a large number of diseases including diabetic retinopathy and cardiovascular diseases, which cause damages to retinal blood vessels. The availability of retinal vessel imaging provides an excellent opportunity for monitoring and diagnosis of retinal diseases, and automatic analysis of retinal vessels will help with the processes. However, state of the art vascular analysis methods such as counting the number of branches or measuring the curvature and diameter of individual vessels are unsuitable for the microvasculature. There has been published research using fractal analysis to calculate fractal dimensions of retinal blood vessels, but so far there has been no systematic research extracting discriminant features from retinal vessels for classifications. This paper introduces new methods for feature extraction from multifractal spectra of retinal vessels for classification. Two publicly available retinal vascular image databases are used for the experiments, and the proposed methods have produced accuracies of 85.5% and 77% for classification of healthy and diabetic retinal vasculatures. Experiments show that classification with multiple fractal features produces better rates compared with methods using a single fractal dimension value. In addition to this, experiments also show that classification accuracy can be affected by the accuracy of vessel segmentation algorithms.

  1. Cytomegalovirus retinitis associated with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Geng, Shuang; Ye, Jun-jie; Zhao, Jia-liang; Li, Tai-sheng; Han, Yang

    2011-04-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis is the most severe intraocular complication that results in total retinal destruction and loss of visual acuity in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). This study aimed to investigate the fundus characteristics, systemic manifestations and therapeutic outcomes of CMV retinitis associated with AIDS. It was a retrospective case series. CMV retinitis was present in 39 eyes (25 patients). Best corrected visual acuities, anterior segment, fundus features, fundus fluorescence angiography (FFA) and CD4(+) T-lymphocyte counts of the patients with CMV retinitis associated with AIDS were analyzed. Intravitreal injections of ganciclovir (400 µg) were performed in 4 eyes (2 patients). Retinal vasculitis, dense, full-thickness, yellow-white lesions along vascular distribution with irregular granules at the border, and hemorrhage on the retinal surface were present in 28 eyes. The vitreous was clear or mildly opaque. Late stage of the retinopathy was demonstrated in 8 eyes characterized as atrophic retina, sclerotic and attenuated vessels, retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) atrophy, and optic nerve atrophy. Retinal detachment was found in 3 eyes. The average CD4(+) T-lymphocyte count in peripheral blood of the patients with CMV retinitis was (30.6 ± 25.3) × 10(6)/L (range, (0 - 85) × 10(6)/L). After intravitreal injections of ganciclovir, visual acuity was improved and fundus lesions regressed. CMV retinitis is the most severe and the most common intraocular complication in patients with AIDS. For the patients with yellow-white retinal lesions, hemorrhage and retinal vasculitis without clear cause, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) serology should be performed. Routine eye examination is also indicated in HIV positive patients.

  2. Retinal degeneration mutants in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Chang, B; Hawes, N L; Hurd, R E; Davisson, M T; Nusinowitz, S; Heckenlively, J R

    2002-02-01

    The Jackson Laboratory, having the world's largest collection of mouse mutant stocks and genetically diverse inbred strains, is an ideal place to look for genetically determined eye variations and disorders. Through ophthalmoscopy, electroretinography and histology, we have discovered disorders affecting all aspects of the eye including the lid, cornea, iris, lens and retina, resulting in corneal disorders, cataracts, glaucoma and retinal degenerations. Mouse models of retinal degeneration have been investigated for many years in the hope of understanding the causes of photoreceptor cell death. Sixteen naturally occurring mouse mutants that manifest degeneration of photoreceptors in the retina with preservation of all other retinal cell types have been found: retinal degeneration (formerly rd, identical with rodless retina, r, now Pde6b(rd1)); Purkinje cell degeneration (pcd); nervous (nr); retinal degeneration slow (rds, now Prph(Rd2)); retinal degeneration 3 (rd3); motor neuron degeneration (mnd); retinal degeneration 4 (Rd4); retinal degeneration 5 (rd5, now tub); vitiligo (vit, now Mitf(mi-vit)); retinal degeneration 6 (rd6); retinal degeneration 7 (rd7, now Nr2e3(rd7)); neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (nclf); retinal degeneration 8 (rd8); retinal degeneration 9 (Rd9); retinal degeneration 10 (rd10, now Pde6b(rd10)); and cone photoreceptor function loss (cpfl1). In this report, we first review the genotypes and phenotypes of these mutants and second, list the mouse strains that carry each mutation. We will also provide detailed information about the cpfl1 mutation. The phenotypic characteristics of cpfl1 mice are similar to those observed in patients with complete achromatopsia (ACHM2, OMIM 216900) and the cpfl1 mutation is the first naturally-arising mutation in mice to cause cone-specific photoreceptor function loss. cpfl1 mice may provide a model for congenital achromatopsia in humans.

  3. Activation of retinal tyrosine hydroxylase: tolerance induced by chronic treatment with haloperidol does not modify response to light

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, J.; Neff, N.H.

    1982-05-01

    A single dose of haloperidol administered to rats in the dark increases the activity of retinal tyrosine hydroxylase. The ability of haloperidol to activate the enzyme is diminished 24 hr after terminating 22 to 30 days of treatment with haloperidol. The retinal enzyme is also tolerant to activation by treatment with chlorpromazine. In contrast, exposure of the animals to light activates the enzyme to the same extent in chronic haloperidol-treated and control animals. Thus, chronic haloperidol treatment does not modify the ability of the retinal enzyme system to respond to the physiological stimulus, light. Apparently, activation of retinol tyrosine hydroxylase by haloperidol and light occurs by independent mechanisms.

  4. Fire safety in the firing line.

    PubMed

    Baillie, Jonathan

    2008-03-01

    Broadcast on 29 January, the File on 4 programme, titled: How safe are hospitals from fires?, was aired in the wake of the fire at London's Royal Marsden Hospital on 2 January. While 79 patients and 200 staff were safely evacuated, the program me's presenter Allan Urry said that, over a month later, all five of the hospital's operating theatres and its critical care unit remained out of action; the fire's cause is still being investigated.

  5. Laser Induced Retinal Damage Thresholds for Annular Retinal Beam Profiles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-01-01

    Thompson-Gerstman granular model of laser-induced thermal damage to the retina ."°20 The study documented in this paper is a continuation of our earlier...Retinal Beam Profiles DISTRIBUTION: Approved for public release, distribution unlimited This paper is part of the following report: TITLE: Laser Interaction...mrad of visual field; which correspond to outer beam diameters of roughly 70, 160, and 300 tin, respectively, on the primate retina . Annular beam

  6. The human dimension of fire regimes on Earth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bowman, David M.J.S.; Balch, Jennifer; Artaxo, Paulo; Bond, William J.; Cochrane, Mark A.; D'Antonio, Carla M.; DeFries, Ruth; Johnston, Fay H.; Keeley, Jon E.; Krawchuk, Meg A.; Kull, Christian A.; Michelle, Mack; Moritz, Max A.; Pyne, Stephen; Roos, Christopher I.; Scott, Andrew C.; Sodhi, Navjot S.; Swetnam, Thomas W.

    2011-01-01

    Humans and their ancestors are unique in being a fire-making species, but 'natural' (i.e. independent of humans) fires have an ancient, geological history on Earth. Natural fires have influenced biological evolution and global biogeochemical cycles, making fire integral to the functioning of some biomes. Globally, debate rages about the impact on ecosystems of prehistoric human-set fires, with views ranging from catastrophic to negligible. Understanding of the diversity of human fire regimes on Earth in the past, present and future remains rudimentary. It remains uncertain how humans have caused a departure from 'natural' background levels that vary with climate change. Available evidence shows that modern humans can increase or decrease background levels of natural fire activity by clearing forests, promoting grazing, dispersing plants, altering ignition patterns and actively suppressing fires, thereby causing substantial ecosystem changes and loss of biodiversity. Some of these contemporary fire regimes cause substantial economic disruptions owing to the destruction of infrastructure, degradation of ecosystem services, loss of life, and smoke-related health effects. These episodic disasters help frame negative public attitudes towards landscape fires, despite the need for burning to sustain some ecosystems. Greenhouse gas-induced warming and changes in the hydrological cycle may increase the occurrence of large, severe fires, with potentially significant feedbacks to the Earth system. Improved understanding of human fire regimes demands: (1) better data on past and current human influences on fire regimes to enable global comparative analyses, (2) a greater understanding of different cultural traditions of landscape burning and their positive and negative social, economic and ecological effects, and (3) more realistic representations of anthropogenic fire in global vegetation and climate change models. We provide an historical framework to promote understanding

  7. The human dimension of fire regimes on Earth.

    PubMed

    Bowman, David M J S; Balch, Jennifer; Artaxo, Paulo; Bond, William J; Cochrane, Mark A; D'Antonio, Carla M; Defries, Ruth; Johnston, Fay H; Keeley, Jon E; Krawchuk, Meg A; Kull, Christian A; Mack, Michelle; Moritz, Max A; Pyne, Stephen; Roos, Christopher I; Scott, Andrew C; Sodhi, Navjot S; Swetnam, Thomas W; Whittaker, Robert

    2011-12-01

    Humans and their ancestors are unique in being a fire-making species, but 'natural' (i.e. independent of humans) fires have an ancient, geological history on Earth. Natural fires have influenced biological evolution and global biogeochemical cycles, making fire integral to the functioning of some biomes. Globally, debate rages about the impact on ecosystems of prehistoric human-set fires, with views ranging from catastrophic to negligible. Understanding of the diversity of human fire regimes on Earth in the past, present and future remains rudimentary. It remains uncertain how humans have caused a departure from 'natural' background levels that vary with climate change. Available evidence shows that modern humans can increase or decrease background levels of natural fire activity by clearing forests, promoting grazing, dispersing plants, altering ignition patterns and actively suppressing fires, thereby causing substantial ecosystem changes and loss of biodiversity. Some of these contemporary fire regimes cause substantial economic disruptions owing to the destruction of infrastructure, degradation of ecosystem services, loss of life, and smoke-related health effects. These episodic disasters help frame negative public attitudes towards landscape fires, despite the need for burning to sustain some ecosystems. Greenhouse gas-induced warming and changes in the hydrological cycle may increase the occurrence of large, severe fires, with potentially significant feedbacks to the Earth system. Improved understanding of human fire regimes demands: (1) better data on past and current human influences on fire regimes to enable global comparative analyses, (2) a greater understanding of different cultural traditions of landscape burning and their positive and negative social, economic and ecological effects, and (3) more realistic representations of anthropogenic fire in global vegetation and climate change models. We provide an historical framework to promote understanding

  8. Retinitis Pigmentosa and Other Dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Mrejen, Sarah; Audo, Isabelle; Bonnel, Sébastien; Sahel, José-Alain

    2017-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a heterogeneous group of inherited retinal degenerations characterized by progressive degeneration of rod and cone cells that affects predominantly peripheral visual fields. Macular edema may cause additional central visual acuity decrease. Cystoid macular edema (CME) is one of the few treatable causes of visual loss in RP. The prevalence of CME in RP has been found to be between 10 and 20% on fluorescein angiography-based studies, and as high as 49% on reports based on optical coherence tomography. Macular edema can manifest at any stage of the disease and may be unilateral or bilateral. It can be found in any genetic form, but is more often associated with RP caused by CRB1 mutations. The origin of macular edema in RP patients still remains poorly understood. Some mechanisms have been suggested, including antiretinal antibodies (retinal, carbonic anhydrase, and enolase antibodies), vitreous traction, retinal pigment epithelium dysfunction, and Müller cell edema. There is no gold standard therapeutic strategy. Drug therapy is the primary treatment. Systemic carbonic anhydrase inhibitors, such as oral acetazolamide or topical dorzolamide, are still the mainstays of initial therapy. If CME is refractory to acetazolamide, intravitreal corticosteroid injections may be a therapeutic option. However, antivascular endothelium growth factor injections have limited effect and should be avoided. Vitrectomy has also been evaluated, but its exact role remains to be determined. The benefits of these therapies are variable among patients. The establishment of therapeutic approaches is limited by our poor understanding of the pathophysiology of CME in patients with RP. Autoimmune retinopathies (AIRs) are a group of rare diseases characterized by acute or subacute progressive vision loss and are thought to be mediated by autoantibodies specific to retinal antigens. The AIRs encompass paraneoplastic syndromes, such as cancer-associated retinopathy and

  9. [Vitreo-retinal surgery for complicated retinal detachment].

    PubMed

    Wang, J Z

    1993-07-01

    93 eyes (93 patients) of complicated retinal detachment were treated with vitreo-retinal surgery. Among the series, 75 eyes were rhegmatogenous with PVR C3-D3 in 66 eyes (88.0%), while the remaining 18 eyes were traction induced. None of the cases had giant tears or complicating diabetes. On discharge from the hospital, the operation was effective in 62 cases (66.7%), in whom the retina was totally reattached or only a small amount of subretinal fluid remained. In a group of 40 eyes where the inert gas SF6 was used, the operation was effective in 30 cases (75.0%). 41 cases were followed up postoperatively for over 3 months, averaging 13.7 months, to find the operative results stable in 33 eyes (80.5%), with the visual acuity improved in 22 cases (66.7%), unchanged in 9 cases (27.3%), and decreased in 2 cases (6.0%). The operative procedures, the peeling of pre-retinal membrane, the effect of PVR severity on the operative results, and the promotion of operative efficacy by application of wide encircling buckle and inert gas tamponade were discussed.

  10. Role of retinal metabolism in methanol-induced retinal toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Garner, C.D. |; Lee, E.W.; Terzo, T.S.; Louis-Ferdinand, R.T.

    1995-08-01

    Methanol is a toxicant that causes systemic and ocular toxicity after acute exposure. The folate-reduced (FR) rat is an excellent animal model that mimics characteristic human methanol toxic responses. The present study examines the role of the methanol metabolites formaldehyde and formate in the initiation of methanol-induced retinal toxicity. After a single oral dose of 3.0 g/kg methanol, blood methanol concentrations were not significantly different in FR rats compared with folate-sufficient (FS) (control) rats. However, FR rats treated with 3.0 g/kg methanol displayed elevated blood (14.6 mM) and vitreous humor (19.5 mM) formate levels and abnormal electroretinograms (loss of b-wave) 48 h postdose. FR rats pretreated with disulfiram (DSF) prior to 3.0 g/kg methanol treatment failed to display these symptoms. Formaldehyde was not detected in blood or vitreous humor with or without DSF treatment, suggesting that formate is the toxic metabolite in methanol-induced retinal toxicity. Additionally, creating a blood formate profile (14.2 mM at 48 h) similar to that observed in methanol-treated rats by iv infusion of pH-buffered formate does not alter the electroretinogram as is observed with methanol treatment. These data suggest that intraretinal metabolism of methanol is necessary for the formate-mediated initiation of methanol-induced retinal toxicity. 31 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Decreased Ocular Pulse Amplitude and Retinal Nerve Fibre Layer in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Cetin, Ebru N.; Erdogan, Cagdas; Acer, Semra; Sarac, Gülden; Yıldırım, Cem; Bir, Levent S.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract This study was conducted to assess ocular pulse amplitude and retinal nerve fibre layer in patients with multiple sclerosis and their correlation with disease duration and with severity. Retinal nerve fibre layer thickness was measured by Heidelberg Retinal Tomography II (HRT-II; Heidelberg Engineering, Dossenheim, Germany) and ocular pulse amplitude was measured by dynamic contour tonometry (Ziemer Ophthalmic Systems, Port, Switzerland) in 37 multiple sclerosis patients and 72 age- and gender-matched controls. Ocular pulse amplitude was significantly reduced and retinal nerve fibre layer was significantly thinner in temporal, superotemporal, and nasal sectors in patients with multiple sclerosis regardless of having an optic neuritis attack. The retinal nerve fibre layer was thinner in eyes with a previous optic neuritis attack compared with the eyes without an attack, but the difference was not significant. Ocular pulse amplitude showed a positive correlation with visual evoked potential amplitude and a negative correlation with visual evoked potential latency. Retinal nerve fibre layer thickness showed a significant negative correlation with the disease duration but not with visually evoked potential, disease severity, nor previous optic neuritis. These findings indicate that the process of degeneration starts in the early period of the disease, as our study group is composed of early–middle-stage multiple sclerosis patients, and is independent of relapses. PMID:28163762

  12. Differential effects of adiposity and childhood growth trajectories on retinal microvascular architecture.

    PubMed

    Tapp, Robyn J; Ness, Andrew; Williams, Cathy; Howe, Laura D; Tilling, Kate; Witt, Nicholas; Chaturvedi, Nish; McG Thom, Simon A; Hughes, Alun D

    2013-10-01

    We hypothesized that trajectories of adiposity across childhood would be associated with retinal microcirculatory diameters at age 12 years, independent of BP. The ALSPAC followed a cohort of children born in 1991-1992. The current study includes all children with retinal images acquired at the 12 years clinic and individual trajectories of PI from 0 to 2 years and BMI from 2 to 10 years. Retinal microvascular measures included retinal arteriolar and venular diameters. Children in this analysis had a birth weight of 3.5 ± 0.4 kg, a PI of 26.2 ± 2.4 kg/m(3) and a gestational age of 39.7 ± 1.4 weeks (mean ± SD). Analysis of growth trajectories showed that lower PI at birth was associated with narrower retinal arterioles. Higher PI at birth was associated with wider venular diameter, and a stronger positive association was evident between BMI change at 5-5.5 and 8.5-10 years with wider venular diameters. Current fat mass was also associated with wider venular diameters. Retinal arterioles and venules are differentially associated with growth in early life and childhood adiposity. Early adiposity may adversely affect the microcirculation, with important implications for cardiovascular risk in adulthood. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Adaptive optics imaging of the outer retinal tubules in Bietti's crystalline dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Battu, R; Akkali, M C; Bhanushali, D; Srinivasan, P; Shetty, R; Berendschot, T T J M; Schouten, J S A G; Webers, C A

    2016-05-01

    PurposeTo study the outer retinal tubules using spectral domain optical coherence tomography and adaptive optics and in patients with Bietti's crystalline dystrophy.MethodsTen eyes of five subjects from five independent families with Bietti's crystalline Dystrophy (BCD) were characterized with best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), full-field electroretinography, and fundus autofluorescence (FAF). High-resolution images were obtained with the spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) and adaptive optics (AO).ResultsSD-OCT showed prominent outer retinal layer loss and outer retinal tubulations at the margin of outer retinal loss. AO images displayed prominent macrotubules and microtubules with characteristic features in eight out of the 10 eyes. Crystals were present in all ten eyes. There was a reduction in the cone count in all eyes in the area outside the outer retinal tubules (ORT).ConclusionsThis study describes the morphology of the outer retinal tubules when imaged enface on the adaptive optics in patients with BCD. These findings provide insight into the macular structure of these patients. This may have prognostic implications and refine the study on the pathogenesis of BCD.

  14. cGMP-Phosphodiesterase Inhibition Prevents Hypoxia-Induced Cell Death Activation in Porcine Retinal Explants

    PubMed Central

    Olivares-González, Lorena; Martínez-Fernández de la Cámara, Cristina; Hervás, David; Marín, María Pilar; Lahoz, Agustin; Millán, José María

    2016-01-01

    Retinal hypoxia and oxidative stress are involved in several retinal degenerations including diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, central retinal artery occlusion, or retinopathy of prematurity. The second messenger cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) has been reported to be protective for neuronal cells under several pathological conditions including ischemia/hypoxia. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether the accumulation of cGMP through the pharmacological inhibition of phosphodiesterase (PDE) with Zaprinast prevented retinal degeneration induced by mild hypoxia in cultures of porcine retina. Exposure to mild hypoxia (5% O2) for 24h reduced cGMP content and induced retinal degeneration by caspase dependent and independent (PARP activation) mechanisms. Hypoxia also produced a redox imbalance reducing antioxidant response (superoxide dismutase and catalase activities) and increasing superoxide free radical release. Zaprinast reduced mild hypoxia-induced cell death through inhibition of caspase-3 or PARP activation depending on the cell layer. PDE inhibition also ameliorated the effects of mild hypoxia on antioxidant response and the release of superoxide radical in the photoreceptor layer. The use of a PKG inhibitor, KT5823, suggested that cGMP-PKG pathway is involved in cell survival and antioxidant response. The inhibition of PDE, therefore, could be useful for reducing retinal degeneration under hypoxic/ischemic conditions. PMID:27861632

  15. cGMP-Phosphodiesterase Inhibition Prevents Hypoxia-Induced Cell Death Activation in Porcine Retinal Explants.

    PubMed

    Olivares-González, Lorena; Martínez-Fernández de la Cámara, Cristina; Hervás, David; Marín, María Pilar; Lahoz, Agustin; Millán, José María; Rodrigo, Regina

    2016-01-01

    Retinal hypoxia and oxidative stress are involved in several retinal degenerations including diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, central retinal artery occlusion, or retinopathy of prematurity. The second messenger cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) has been reported to be protective for neuronal cells under several pathological conditions including ischemia/hypoxia. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether the accumulation of cGMP through the pharmacological inhibition of phosphodiesterase (PDE) with Zaprinast prevented retinal degeneration induced by mild hypoxia in cultures of porcine retina. Exposure to mild hypoxia (5% O2) for 24h reduced cGMP content and induced retinal degeneration by caspase dependent and independent (PARP activation) mechanisms. Hypoxia also produced a redox imbalance reducing antioxidant response (superoxide dismutase and catalase activities) and increasing superoxide free radical release. Zaprinast reduced mild hypoxia-induced cell death through inhibition of caspase-3 or PARP activation depending on the cell layer. PDE inhibition also ameliorated the effects of mild hypoxia on antioxidant response and the release of superoxide radical in the photoreceptor layer. The use of a PKG inhibitor, KT5823, suggested that cGMP-PKG pathway is involved in cell survival and antioxidant response. The inhibition of PDE, therefore, could be useful for reducing retinal degeneration under hypoxic/ischemic conditions.

  16. Automated detection of the retinal from OCT spectral domain images of healthy eyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovinco, Gaspare; Savastano, Maria Cristina; Ventre, Salvatore; Tamburrino, Antonello

    2015-06-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has become one of the most relevant diagnostic tools for retinal diseases. Besides being a non-invasive technique, one distinguished feature is its unique capability of providing (in vivo) cross-sectional view of the retinal. Specifically, OCT images show the retinal layers. From the clinical point of view, the identification of the retinal layers opens new perspectives to study the correlation between morphological and functional aspects of the retinal tissue. The main contribution of this paper is a new method/algorithm for the automated segmentation of cross-sectional images of the retina of healthy eyes, obtained by means of spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Specifically, the proposed segmentation algorithm provides the automated detection of different retinal layers. Tests on experimental SD-OCT scans performed by three different instruments/manufacturers have been successfully carried out and compared to a manual segmentation made by an independent ophthalmologist, showing the generality and the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  17. Retinal abnormalities in β-thalassemia major.

    PubMed

    Bhoiwala, Devang L; Dunaief, Joshua L

    2016-01-01

    Patients with beta (β)-thalassemia (β-TM: β-thalassemia major, β-TI: β-thalassemia intermedia) have a variety of complications that may affect all organs, including the eye. Ocular abnormalities include retinal pigment epithelial degeneration, angioid streaks, venous tortuosity, night blindness, visual field defects, decreased visual acuity, color vision abnormalities, and acute visual loss. Patients with β-thalassemia major are transfusion dependent and require iron chelation therapy to survive. Retinal degeneration may result from either retinal iron accumulation from transfusion-induced iron overload or retinal toxicity induced by iron chelation therapy. Some who were never treated with iron chelation therapy exhibited retinopathy, and others receiving iron chelation therapy had chelator-induced retinopathy. We will focus on retinal abnormalities present in individuals with β-thalassemia major viewed in light of new findings on the mechanisms and manifestations of retinal iron toxicity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Retinal abnormalities in β-thalassemia major

    PubMed Central

    Bhoiwala, Devang L.; Dunaief, Joshua L.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with beta (β)-thalassemia (β-TM: thalassemia major, β-TI: thalassemia intermedia) have a variety of complications that may affect all organs, including the eye. Ocular abnormalities include retinal pigment epithelium degeneration, angioid streaks, venous tortuosity, night blindness, visual field defects, decreased visual acuity, color vision abnormalities, and acute visual loss. Patients with β-TM are transfusion dependent and require iron chelation therapy (ICT) in order to survive. Retinal degeneration may result from either retinal iron accumulation from transfusion-induced iron overload or retinal toxicity induced by ICT. Some who were never treated with ICT exhibited retinopathy, and others receiving ICT had chelator-induced retinopathy. We will focus on retinal abnormalities present in individuals with β-TM viewed in light of new findings on the mechanisms and manifestations of retinal iron toxicity. PMID:26325202

  19. Primitive retinal vascular abnormalities: tumors and telangiectasias.

    PubMed

    Knutsson, Karl Anders; De Benedetto, Umberto; Querques, Giuseppe; Del Turco, Claudia; Bandello, Francesco; Lattanzio, Rosangela

    2012-01-01

    Primitive retinal vascular abnormalities are benign conditions of the retinal circulation that comprise vascular tumors and telangiectasias. The principal vascular tumors of the retina include retinal capillary hemangioma, cavernous hemangioma of the retina, racemose hemangiomatosis of the retina and retinal vasoproliferative tumor, while primary retinal telangiectasias include Coats' disease, Leber's miliary aneurysms and idiopathic juxtafoveal telangiectasias. In most cases, these alterations result in significant visual impairment due to exudation determined by the structural abnormalities of the retinal vasculature. The aim of this review is to assess the different clinical and diagnostic features of the single pathological entities and to discuss the available treatment modalities including the onset of intravitreal antivascular endothelial growth factor therapy. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Retinal blood vessels extraction using probabilistic modelling.

    PubMed

    Kaba, Djibril; Wang, Chuang; Li, Yongmin; Salazar-Gonzalez, Ana; Liu, Xiaohui; Serag, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of retinal blood vessels plays an important role in detecting and treating retinal diseases. In this review, we present an automated method to segment blood vessels of fundus retinal image. The proposed method could be used to support a non-intrusive diagnosis in modern ophthalmology for early detection of retinal diseases, treatment evaluation or clinical study. This study combines the bias correction and an adaptive histogram equalisation to enhance the appearance of the blood vessels. Then the blood vessels are extracted using probabilistic modelling that is optimised by the expectation maximisation algorithm. The method is evaluated on fundus retinal images of STARE and DRIVE datasets. The experimental results are compared with some recently published methods of retinal blood vessels segmentation. The experimental results show that our method achieved the best overall performance and it is comparable to the performance of human experts.

  1. Acute hyperglycemia-induced endothelial dysfunction in retinal arterioles in cats.

    PubMed

    Sogawa, Kenji; Nagaoka, Taiji; Izumi, Naohiro; Nakabayashi, Seigo; Yoshida, Akitoshi

    2010-05-01

    To investigate the effects of acute hyperglycemia on retinal microcirculation and endothelial function in cats and removal of superoxide to prevent retinal endothelial dysfunction from hyperglycemia. Hyperglycemia was induced by intravenous injection of 25% glucose to maintain the plasma glucose concentration at 30 mM. Laser Doppler velocimetry was used to measure the vessel diameter (D) and blood velocity (V) simultaneously and calculated retinal blood flow (RBF) in second-order retinal arterioles in cats. Intravitreous, endothelial-dependent vasodilator bradykinin (BK) and endothelium-independent vasodilator sodium nitroprusside (SNP) were administered into the vitreous cavity to evaluate endothelial function in the retinal arterioles. To control osmolality, 25% mannitol was administered the same way. Systemic hyperoxia was induced to noninvasively examine endothelial function during hyperglycemia. To determine the effect of the superoxide on the hyperglycemia-induced changes in the retinal circulation, 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPOL) was administered in drinking water for 14 days before the experiment. The D, V, and RBF increased with acute hyperglycemia and mannitol compared with baseline. BK-induced increases in D, V, and RBF significantly declined, whereas SNP-induced increases were unattenuated during acute hyperglycemia. Return of the decreased RBF to baseline after cessation of systemic hyperoxia was significantly (P < 0.05) inhibited by acute hyperglycemia. TEMPOL significantly (P < 0.05) prevented a decrease in the BK-induced increase in RBF during hyperglycemia. The results suggest that acute hyperglycemia increases RBF via increased osmolality and may cause retinal endothelial dysfunction partially via increased oxidative stress. Systemic hyperoxia can be used to noninvasively evaluate retinal endothelial function during hyperglycemia.

  2. Impact of anatomical parameters on optical coherence tomography retinal nerve fiber layer thickness abnormality patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baniasadi, Neda; Wang, Mengyu; Wang, Hui; Jin, Qingying; Mahd, Mufeed; Elze, Tobias

    2017-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effects of four anatomical parameters (angle between superior and inferior temporal retinal arteries [inter-artery angle, IAA], optic disc [OD] rotation, retinal curvature, and central retinal vessel trunk entry point location [CRVTL]) on retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT) abnormality marks by OCT machines. Methods: Cirrus OCT circumpapillary RNFLT measurements and Humphrey visual fields (HVF 24-2) of 421 patients from a large glaucoma clinic were included. Ellipses were fitted to the OD borders. Ellipse rotation relative to the vertical axis defined OD rotation. CRVTL was manually marked on the horizontal axis of the ellipse on the OCT fundus image. IAA was calculated between manually marked retinal artery locations at the 1.73mm radius around OD. Retinal curvature was determined by the inner limiting membrane on the horizontal B-scan closest to the OD center. For each location on the circumpapillary scanning area, logistic regression was used to determine if each of the four parameters had a significant impact on RNFLT abnormality marks independent of disease severity. The results are presented on spatial maps of the entire scanning area. Results: Variations in IAA significantly influenced abnormality marks on 38.8% of the total scanning area, followed by CRVTL (19.2%) and retinal curvature (18.7%). The effect of OD rotation was negligible (<1%). Conclusions: A natural variation in IAA, retinal curvature, and CRVTL can affect OCT abnormality ratings, which may bias clinical diagnosis. Our spatial maps may help OCT manufacturers to introduce location specific norms to ensure that abnormality marks indicate ocular disease instead of variations in eye anatomy.

  3. Fire regimes of quaking aspen in the Mountain West

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shinneman, Douglas J.; Baker, William L.; Rogers, Paul C.; Kulakowski, Dominik

    2013-01-01

    settings and correlated aspen functional types. We propose the following aspen fire regime types: (1) fire-independent, stable aspen; (2) fire-influenced, stable aspen; (3) fire-dependent, seral, conifer-aspen mix; (4) fire-dependent, seral, montane aspen-conifer; and (5) fire-dependent, seral, subalpine aspen-conifer. Closing research gaps and validating our proposed aspen fire regime classification will likely require additional site-specific research, enhanced dendrochronology techniques, charcoal and pollen record analysis, spatially-explicit modeling, and other techniques. We hope to encourage development of site-appropriate disturbance ecology characterizations, in order to aid efforts to manage and restore aspen communities and to diagnose key factors contributing to changes in aspen.

  4. Retinal complications after bungee jumping.

    PubMed

    Filipe, J A; Pinto, A M; Rosas, V; Castro-Correia, J

    Bungee jumping is becoming a popular sport in the Western world with some cases of ophthalmic complications being reported in recent literature. The authors reported a case of a 23-year-old healthy female who presented retinal complications following a bungee jumping. Her fundi showed superficial retinal hemorrhages in the right eye and a sub-internal limiting membrane hemorrhage affecting the left eye. A general examination, including a full neurological examination, was normal and laboratorial investigations were all within normal values. More studies are necessary to identify risk factors and the true incidence of related ocular lesions, but until then, we think this sport activity should be desencouraged, especially to those that are not psychological and physically fit.

  5. Delayed rectifier K channels contribute to contrast adaptation in mammalian retinal ganglion cells

    PubMed Central

    Weick, Michael; Demb, Jonathan B.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Retinal ganglion cells adapt by reducing their sensitivity during periods of high contrast. Contrast adaptation in the firing response depends on both presynaptic and intrinsic mechanisms. Here, we investigated intrinsic mechanisms for contrast adaptation in OFF Alpha ganglion cells in the in vitro guinea pig retina. Using either visual stimulation or current injection, we show that brief depolarization evoked spiking and suppressed firing during subsequent depolarization. The suppression could be explained by Na channel inactivation, as shown in salamander cells. However, brief hyperpolarization in the physiological range (5–10 mV) also suppressed firing during subsequent depolarization. This suppression was sensitive selectively to blockers of delayed-rectifier K channels (KDR). Somatic membrane patches showed TEA-sensitive KDR currents with activation near −25 mV and removal of inactivation at voltages negative to Vrest. Brief periods of hyperpolarization apparently remove KDR inactivation and thereby increase the channel pool available to suppress excitability during subsequent depolarization. PMID:21745646

  6. School Fires. Topical Fire Research Series. Volume 8, Issue 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Homeland Security, 2007

    2007-01-01

    Using the past 3 years of data, for 2003 to 2005, from the National Fire Incident Reporting System (NFIRS) database, the yearly national fire loss for fires on nonadult school properties is estimated at $85 million. Such losses are the result of an estimated annual average of 14,700 fires that required a fire department response. Fires on school…

  7. A review of fire interactions and mass fires

    Treesearch

    Mark A. Finney; Sara S. McAllister

    2011-01-01

    The character of a wildland fire can change dramatically in the presence of another nearby fire. Understanding and predicting the changes in behavior due to fire-fire interactions cannot only be life-saving to those on the ground, but also be used to better control a prescribed fire to meet objectives. In discontinuous fuel types, such interactions may elicit fire...

  8. 46 CFR 162.028-5 - Independent laboratories: Listing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL ENGINEERING EQUIPMENT Extinguishers, Fire, Portable, Marine Type... for listing as an independent laboratory to perform or supervise approval or productions inspections or tests of portable fire extinguishers: (a) For dry chemical, CO2, water and foam type portable...

  9. 46 CFR 162.028-5 - Independent laboratories: Listing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL ENGINEERING EQUIPMENT Extinguishers, Fire, Portable, Marine Type... for listing as an independent laboratory to perform or supervise approval or productions inspections or tests of portable fire extinguishers: (a) For dry chemical, CO2, water and foam type portable...

  10. 46 CFR 162.028-5 - Independent laboratories: Listing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL ENGINEERING EQUIPMENT Extinguishers, Fire, Portable, Marine Type... for listing as an independent laboratory to perform or supervise approval or productions inspections or tests of portable fire extinguishers: (a) For dry chemical, CO2, water and foam type portable...

  11. Angiographic results of retinal-retinal anastomosis and retinal-choroidal anastomosis after treatments in eyes with retinal angiomatous proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Masaaki; Iida, Tomohiro; Kano, Mariko; Itagaki, Kanako

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the angiographic results of retinal-retinal anastomosis (RRA) and retinal-choroidal anastomosis (RCA) for eyes with retinal angiomatous proliferation (RAP) after treatment with intravitreal bevacizumab injections as monotherapy or intravitreal bevacizumab combined with photodynamic therapy. Methods In this interventional, consecutive case series, we retrospectively reviewed five naïve eyes from four patients (mean age 80 years) treated with three consecutive monthly intravitreal bevacizumab (1.25 mg/0.05 mL) injections as initial treatment, and followed up for at least 3 months. In cases with over 3 months of follow-up and having recurrence of RAP or leakage by fluorescein angiography, retreatment was performed with a single intravitreal bevacizumab injection and photodynamic therapy. Results Indocyanine green angiography showed RRA in three eyes with subretinal neovascularization and RCA in two eyes with choroidal neovascularization at baseline. At 3 months after baseline (month 3), neither the RRA nor RCA was occluded in any eye on indocyanine green angiography. Retreatment with intravitreal bevacizumab plus photodynamic therapy was performed in three eyes at months 3 (persistent leakage on fluorescein angiography), 6, and 7 (recurrence of RAP lesion), which achieved obvious occlusion of the RRA and RCA. Mean best-corrected visual acuity improved from 0.13 to 0.21 at month 3 (P = 0.066). No complications or systemic adverse events were noted. Conclusion Although intravitreal bevacizumab for RAP was effective in improving visual acuity during short-term follow-up, intravitreal bevacizumab could not achieve complete occlusion of RRA and RCA, which could lead to recurrence of a RAP lesion and exudation. Retreatment with intravitreal bevacizumab plus photodynamic therapy ultimately achieved complete occlusion of the RRA and RCA. PMID:22969283

  12. [Retinal ischemia and nitric oxide].

    PubMed

    Neroev, V V; Arkhipova, M M

    2003-01-01

    Retinal ischemia is the main chain in the pathogenesis of vascular diseases of the eye. It was established that nitric oxide (NO) plays the key role in the development of ischemia. Recent understanding of the NO role, as a universal regulator of the cellular and tissue metabolism, is presented. The authors' and published data were used to design a scheme of pathogenesis of retinal ischemia with regard for the NO role. NO can produce both positive and negative effects depending on a stage of the process, NO concentration and on a number of other factors if they are present. Initial stages of hypoxia/ischemia are accompanied by an activation of all forms of NO-synthases (NOS) caused by the influence of biologically active substances (cytokines, prostaglandins, serotonin, bradykinin, glycolisis suboxide products etc.). The activation of inducible NOS, which synthesize a bigger quantity of NO possessing a direct cytotoxic action and contributing to the production of highly toxic radical of peroxinitrit, is in the focus of attention. The damage of cellular structures due to free-radical processes leads to the development of endothelial, macrophage and thrombocyte malfunctions, which manifest itself through a reduced activity of endothelial NOS and through disruption of NO-dependent processes (vasospasm, an increased aggregation of platelets and a reduced fibrinolytic activity). A sharp reduction of NO synthesis substrate (L-arginine) is observed in patients with retinal ischemia. The aggravation of ischemia causes a decrease of NO synthesis due to an exhaustion of L-arginine and its intensified consumption in the course of free-radical processes. The use of NO-inhibitors and of NO-donors at different stages of retinal ischemia prevents the development of neovascularization and proliferation.

  13. Inherited Retinal Degenerative Clinical Trial Network. Addendum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    visual impairment usually ending in blindness. In the United States, the total number of individuals affected by retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and other...linica l trial in the NEER network for autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa , and the ProgSTAR studies for Stargardt disease) . As new interventions b... retinitis pigmentosa continues at six sites- the CTEC site at University of Utah and five additional recruitment sites- the Retina Foundation of the

  14. Microelectronic Array for Stimulation of Retinal Tissue

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    from diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa and age-related macular degeneration are the leading causes of blindness in the developing world...53featured research 2005 NRL Review Microelectronic Array for Stimulation of Retinal Tissue D. Scribner,1 L. Johnson,4 P. Skeath,4 R. Klein,4...GOALS The development of a high-resolution retinal prosthesis device at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) was first discussed in the late 1990s

  15. Aberrant protein trafficking in retinal degeneration: The initial phase of retinal remodelling

    PubMed Central

    Bales, Katie L.; Gross, Alecia K.

    2016-01-01

    Retinal trafficking proteins are involved in molecular assemblies that govern protein transport, orchestrate cellular events involved in cilia formation, regulate signal transduction, autophagy and endocytic trafficking, all of which if not properly controlled initiate retinal degeneration. Improper function and or trafficking of these proteins and molecular networks they are involved in cause a detrimental cascade of neural retinal remodeling due to cell death, resulting as devastating blinding diseases. A universal finding in retinal degenerative diseases is the profound detection of retinal remodeling, occurring as a phased modification of neural retinal function and structure, which begins at the molecular level. Retinal remodeling instigated by aberrant trafficking of proteins encompasses many forms of retinal degenerations, such as the diverse forms of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and disorders that resemble RP through mutations in the rhodopsin gene, retinal ciliopathies, and some forms of glaucoma and age-related macular degeneration (AMD). As a large majority of genes associated with these different retinopathies are overlapping, it is imperative to understand their underlying molecular mechanisms. This review will discuss some of the most recent discoveries in vertebrate retinal remodeling and retinal degenerations caused by protein mistrafficking. PMID:26632497

  16. Physical Activity, Sedentary Behaviors, and Retinal Vascular Caliber in Children and Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Keel, Stuart; Itsiopoulos, Catherine; Koklanis, Konstandina; Vukicevic, Meri; Cameron, Fergus; Brazionis, Laima

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate associations of physical activity and sedentary behaviors with retinal vascular caliber in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes. This was a hospital-based cross-sectional study. A study of 122 children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes was conducted over an 8-month period. Self-reported physical activity time and time spent watching TV or playing computer or video games were obtained using interviewer-administered questionnaires. Retinal vascular caliber was measured by a trained grader using a standardized protocol and later summarized as central retinal artery equivalent (CRAE) and central retinal vein equivalent (CRVE) using a semiautomated computer program. After adjusting for confounders (age, sex, ethnicity, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, HbA1c, maternal smoking status, age at which cow's milk was introduced, and CRVE/CRAE, respectively), narrower CRAE was independently related to more time spent playing computer/video games [ExpB = -3.85; 95% confidence interval (CI), -6.41 to -1.29; P = 0.004], whereas wider CRVE was independently related to lower physical activity level (ExpB = -1.08; 95% CI, -2.01 to -0.15; P = 0.03) and more time spent playing computer/video games (ExpB = 4.72; 95% CI, 0.52-8.92; P = 0.02). Television viewing time was not associated with retinal vascular caliber after adjustment. The results of this study suggest that physical activity and sedentary behaviors in the form of "screen viewing time" are associated with retinal vessel caliber early in life. These results suggest that retinal vascular caliber may provide prognostic information beyond current traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Future longitudinal and interventional studies are warranted to evaluate the relevance of these observations.

  17. Determinants of Retinal Venular Diameter: the Beaver Dam Eye Study

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Chelsea E.; Klein, Ronald; Knudtson, Michael D.; Lee, Kristine E.; Gangnon, Ronald; Wong, Tien Y.; Klein, Barbara E. K.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To describe how retinal venular diameter changes over time for an individual and to examine differences in these changes among people with different risk profiles. Design Population-based cohort study. Participants 4600 persons aged 43–86 years from the Beaver Dam Eye Study who participated in at least 1 examination and had venular diameter measured in the right eye. Methods Data from 4 examinations over 15 years were analyzed. Retinal venular diameter was measured from photographs at each examination by computer-assisted methods and summarized as the central retinal venular equivalent (CRVE). Associations of risk factors to concurrent CRVE measurements and changes in CRVE over time were determined using multivariate analyses. Main Outcome Measure CRVE. Results CRVE tended to narrow with age. Mean CRVE was about 5 µm smaller (225 vs. 230 µm) for the average 70-year-old compared to the average 50-year-old, and was about 13 µm smaller (217 vs. 230 µm) for the average 85-year-old compared to the average 50-year-old. Male sex (beta estimate [β]=5.34; 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.58, 6.90), current smoking (β=9.38; 95% CI 8.26, 10.49), and higher white blood cell count (per 1000/µL: β=0.95; 95% CI 0.74, 1.16) were independently associated with larger concurrent CRVE while higher mean arterial blood pressure (per 5 mmHg: β=−0.36; 95% CI −0.50, −0.23) and higher high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (per 10 mg/dL: β=−0.89; 95% CI −1.15, −0.63) were independently associated with smaller concurrent CRVE. History of cardiovascular disease (β=−0.16; 95% CI −0.26, −0.06) and presence of chronic kidney disease (β=−0.20; 95% CI −0.34, −0.05) were associated with a greater decrease in CRVE over time. Conclusions These data show that retinal venular diameter tended to narrow with age, and that concurrent venular diameter is independently associated with sex, blood pressure, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, white blood cell

  18. Retinal pathways influence temporal niche

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Susan E.; Yoshikawa, Tomoko; Hillson, Holly; Menaker, Michael

    2008-01-01

    In mammals, light input from the retina entrains central circadian oscillators located in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN). The phase of circadian activity rhythms with respect to the external light:dark cycle is reversed in diurnal and nocturnal species, although the phase of SCN rhythms relative to the light cycle remains unchanged. Neural mechanisms downstream from the SCN are therefore believed to determine diurnality or nocturnality. Here, we report a switch from nocturnal to diurnal entrainment of circadian activity rhythms in double-knockout mice lacking the inner-retinal photopigment melanopsin (OPN4) and RPE65, a key protein used in retinal chromophore recycling. These mice retained only a small amount of rod function. The change in entrainment phase of Rpe65−/−;Opn4−/− mice was accompanied by a reversal of the rhythm of clock gene expression in the SCN and a reversal in acute masking effects of both light and darkness on activity, suggesting that the nocturnal to diurnal switch is due to a change in the neural response to light upstream from the SCN. A switch from nocturnal to diurnal activity rhythms was also found in wild-type mice transferred from standard intensity light:dark cycles to light:dark cycles in which the intensity of the light phase was reduced to scotopic levels. These results reveal a novel mechanism by which changes in retinal input can mediate acute temporal-niche switching. PMID:18695249

  19. Retinitis pigmentosa in Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Tous, Horacio M; Izquierdo, Natalio J

    2006-12-01

    Previous studies have reported that the prevalence of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) varies between one per 3,000 to one in per 5,000 in the general population. To study the incidence and ocular findings of RP in a sub-urban community in Puerto Rico. We conducted a non-concurrent prospective study of 10,100 patients in a sub-urban San Juan community. 44 out of the 10,100 patients had RP (0.44%). Eight out of the 44 patients (18%) had nystagmus, twenty-eight (31.8%) had microcornea, 3 patients (6.8%) had sluggish papillary reaction. Six patients (13.6%) had mild cataracts, 27 (65.9%)had attenuated retinal vessels and thirty five patients (81.4%) had bony spicules. Fifteen patients (34.1%) out of the 44 had retinitis pigmentosa as part of the Bardet-Biedl syndrome. Incidence of RP in Puerto Rico is higher when compared to Maine and Spain (p < 0.001). Autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance is the most common in Puerto Rico. These findings could be due to the island's geographic isolation, and inbreeding.

  20. The role of neuronal connexins 36 and 45 in shaping spontaneous firing patterns in the developing retina

    PubMed Central

    Blankenship, Aaron G.; Hamby, Aaron M.; Firl, Alana; Vyas, Shri; Maxeiner, Stephan; Willecke, Klaus; Feller, Marla B.

    2011-01-01

    Gap junction coupling synchronizes activity among neurons in adult neural circuits, but its role in coordinating activity during development is less known. The developing retina exhibits retinal waves - spontaneous depolarizations that propagate among retinal interneurons and drive retinal ganglion cells to fire correlated bursts of action potentials. During development, two connexin isoforms, connexin36 (Cx36) and Cx45, are expressed in bipolar cells and retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), and therefore provide a potential substrate for coordinating network activity. To determine whether gap junctions contribute to retinal waves, we compared spontaneous activity patterns using calcium imaging, whole-cell recording and multielectrode array recording in control, single knockout (ko) mice lacking Cx45 and double knockout (dko) mice lacking both isoforms. Wave frequency, propagation speed and bias in propagation direction were similar in Ctr, Cx36ko, Cx45ko and Cx36/45dko retinas. However, the spontaneous firing rate of individual retinal ganglion cells was elevated in Cx45ko retinas, similar to Cx36ko retinas (Hansen et al., 2005; Torborg and Feller, 2005), a phenotype that was more pronounced in Cx36/45dko retinas. As a result, spatial correlations, as assayed by nearest neighbor correlation and functional connectivity maps, were significantly altered. In addition, Cx36/45dko mice had reduced eye-specific segregation of retinogeniculate afferents. Together, these findings suggest that although Cx36 and Cx45 do not play a role in gross spatial and temporal propagation properties of retinal waves, they strongly modulate the firing pattern of individual RGCs, ensuring strongly correlated firing between nearby RGCs and normal patterning of retinogeniculate projections. PMID:21734291

  1. Seerley Road Fire Site

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A barn caught fire at on Seerley Road, Indianapolis. Five storage drums believed to contain metallic potassium were involved in the fire. EPA will perform additional sampling as part of removal operations and safe offsite transportation.

  2. Campus Fire Safety Today.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Mike

    2001-01-01

    Reviews information on recent college and university dormitory fire fatalities, and highlights five examples of building features reported to be major contributing factors in residence-hall fires. Explains how public awareness and expectations are affecting school dormitory safety. (GR)

  3. FIRE II Cirrus Info

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-03-18

    ... Page:  FIRE II Main Grouping:  Cirrus Description:  First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE) ... stratocumulus systems, the radiative properties of these clouds and their interactions. Data Products:  Cirrus ...

  4. South America Fire Observations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    From space, we can understand fires in ways that are impossible from the ground. NASA research has contributed to much improved detection of fire for scientific purposes using satellite remote sens...

  5. Fire Ant Allergy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Serious Reaction For people with fire ant allergy, stings may cause a life-threatening reaction called anaphylaxis ( ... Fire ants bite with their jaws while they sting. This allows them to pull the stinger out, ...

  6. The role of early neural activity in the maturation of turtle retinal function

    PubMed Central

    SERNAGOR, EVELYNE; MEHTA, VANDANA

    2001-01-01

    In the developing vertebrate retina, ganglion cells fire spontaneous bursts of action potentials long before the eye becomes exposed to sensory experience at birth. These early bursts are synchronised between neighbouring retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), yielding unique spatiotemporal patterns: ‘waves’ of activity sweep across large retinal areas every few minutes. Both at retinal and extraretinal levels, these embryonic retinal waves are believed to guide the wiring of the visual system using hebbian mechanisms of synaptic strengthening. In the first part of this review, we recapitulate the evidence for a role of these embryonic spontaneous bursts of activity in shaping developing complex receptive field properties of RGCs in the turtle embryonic retina. We also discuss the role of visual experience in establishing RGC visual functions, and how spontaneous activity and visual experience interact to bring developing receptive fields to maturation. We have hypothesised that the physiological changes associated with development reflect modifications in the dendritic arbours of RGCs, the anatomical substrate of their receptive fields. We demonstrate that there is a temporal correlation between the period of receptive field expansion and that of dendritic growth. Moreover, the immature spontaneous activity contributes to dendritic growth in developing RGCs. Intracellular staining of RGCs reveals, however, that immature receptive fields only rarely show direct correlation with the layout of the corresponding dendritic tree. To investigate the possibility that not only the presence of the spontaneous activity, but even the precise spatiotemporal patterns encoded in retinal waves might contribute to the refinement of retinal neural circuitry, first we must clarify the mechanisms mediating the generation and propagation of these waves across development. In the second part of this review, we present evidence that turtle retinal waves, visualised using calcium imaging

  7. 'Independence' Panorama

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for 'Independence' Panorama (QTVR)

    This is the Spirit 'Independence' panorama, acquired on martian days, or sols, 536 to 543 (July 6 to 13, 2005), from a position in the 'Columbia Hills' near the summit of 'Husband Hill.' The summit of 'Husband Hill' is the peak near the right side of this panorama and is about 100 meters (328 feet) away from the rover and about 30 meters (98 feet) higher in elevation. The rocky outcrops downhill and on the left side of this mosaic include 'Larry's Lookout' and 'Cumberland Ridge,' which Spirit explored in April, May, and June of 2005.

    The panorama spans 360 degrees and consists of 108 individual images, each acquired with five filters of the rover's panoramic camera. The approximate true color of the mosaic was generated using the camera's 750-, 530-, and 480-nanometer filters. During the 8 martian days, or sols, that it took to acquire this image, the lighting varied considerably, partly because of imaging at different times of sol, and partly because of small sol-to-sol variations in the dustiness of the atmosphere. These slight changes produced some image seams and rock shadows. These seams have been eliminated from the sky portion of the mosaic to better simulate the vista a person standing on Mars would see. However, it is often not possible or practical to smooth out such seams for regions of rock, soil, rover tracks or solar panels. Such is the nature of acquiring and assembling large panoramas from the rovers.

  8. Fire Service Training. Fire Apparatus Practices. (Revised).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Community Colleges, Raleigh.

    One of a set of fourteen instructional outlines for use in a course to train novice firemen, this guide covers the topic of motorized fire apparatus. The fire fighter is instructed on the maintenance, maneuvering, and operation of equipment such as pumps, aerial ladders, and elevating platforms. Designed to be used with the Robert J. Brady…

  9. Fire Service Training. Fire Stream Practices. (Revised).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Community Colleges, Raleigh.

    One of a set of fourteen instructional outlines for use in a course to train novice firemen, this guide covers the topic of fire streams. The various types of fire streams are identified as well as the methods used to produce them, emphasizing the operation of nozzles and the different kinds of friction loss. Designed to be used with the Robert J.…

  10. Fire weather technology for fire agrometeorology operations

    Treesearch

    Francis Fujioka

    2008-01-01

    Even as the magnitude of wildfire problems increases globally, United Nations agencies are acting to mitigate the risk of wildfire disasters to members. Fire management organizations worldwide may vary considerably in operational scope, depending on the number and type of resources an organization manages. In any case, good fire weather information is vital. This paper...

  11. Mitochondrial dysfunction underlying outer retinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Lefevere, Evy; Toft-Kehler, Anne Katrine; Vohra, Rupali; Kolko, Miriam; Moons, Lieve; Van Hove, Inge

    2017-03-29

    Dysfunction of photoreceptors, retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) or both contribute to the initiation and progression of several outer retinal disorders. Disrupted Müller glia function might additionally subsidize to these diseases. Mitochondrial malfunctioning is importantly associated with outer retina pathologies, which can be classified as primary and secondary mitochondrial disorders. This review highlights the importance of oxidative stress and mitochondrial DNA damage, underlying outer retinal disorders. Indeed, the metabolically active photoreceptors/RPE are highly prone to these hallmarks of mitochondrial dysfunction, indicating that mitochondria represent a weak link in the antioxidant defenses of outer retinal cells.

  12. Retinal Cell Degeneration in Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Niwa, Masayuki; Aoki, Hitomi; Hirata, Akihiro; Tomita, Hiroyuki; Green, Paul G.; Hara, Akira

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to provide an overview of various retinal cell degeneration models in animal induced by chemicals (N-methyl-d-aspartate- and CoCl2-induced), autoimmune (experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis), mechanical stress (optic nerve crush-induced, light-induced) and ischemia (transient retinal ischemia-induced). The target regions, pathology and proposed mechanism of each model are described in a comparative fashion. Animal models of retinal cell degeneration provide insight into the underlying mechanisms of the disease, and will facilitate the development of novel effective therapeutic drugs to treat retinal cell damage. PMID:26784179

  13. RETINAL VASCULITIS ASSOCIATED WITH NEUROMYELITIS OPTICA.

    PubMed

    Mikhail, Mikel; Khan, Ayesha

    2017-01-01

    To report a case of retinal vasculitis in a patient with neuromyelitis optica. Clinical case report, imaging was obtained with photographs, fluorescein angiography, spectral domain optical coherence tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. The aforementioned patient presented with urinary incontinence and spastic paraparesis. She was found to have a transverse myelitis on magnetic resonance imaging and positive anti-aquaporin-4 (AQP4-Ab) testing. She had no associated visual symptoms. Examination revealed a retinal vasculitis. There have been no previous reports of retinal vasculitis associated with neuromyelitis optica or neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder. Retinal vasculitis can be associated with neuromyelitis optica.

  14. Retinal Macroglial Responses in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    de Hoz, Rosa; Rojas, Blanca; Ramírez, Ana I.; Salazar, Juan J.; Gallego, Beatriz I.; Triviño, Alberto; Ramírez, José M.

    2016-01-01

    Due to their permanent and close proximity to neurons, glial cells perform essential tasks for the normal physiology of the retina. Astrocytes and Müller cells (retinal macroglia) provide physical support to neurons and supplement them with several metabolites and growth factors. Macroglia are involved in maintaining the homeostasis of extracellular ions and neurotransmitters, are essential for information processing in neural circuits, participate in retinal glucose metabolism and in removing metabolic waste products, regulate local blood flow, induce the blood-retinal barrier (BRB), play fundamental roles in local immune response, and protect neurons from oxidative damage. In response to polyetiological insults, glia cells react with a process called reactive gliosis, seeking to maintain retinal homeostasis. When malfunctioning, macroglial cells can become primary pathogenic elements. A reactive gliosis has been described in different retinal pathologies, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD), diabetes, glaucoma, retinal detachment, or retinitis pigmentosa. A better understanding of the dual, neuroprotective, or cytotoxic effect of macroglial involvement in retinal pathologies would help in treating the physiopathology of these diseases. The extensive participation of the macroglia in retinal diseases points to these cells as innovative targets for new drug therapies. PMID:27294114

  15. Retinal detachment following cataract surgery with capsulorhexis.

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, J S; Doxanas, M T

    1995-01-01

    PURPOSE: To estimate the incidence of retinal detachment after cataract surgery with capsulorhexis. METHODS: A consecutive series of 2,150 cataract operations were followed for incidence of retinal detachment. A series of 1,000 patients from this group were analyzed for high risk factors: myopia, age, sex, operative complications and capsulotomy. RESULTS: With minimum one year follow up in 90% of patients the incidence of retinal detachment was 0.25% (5 cases). CONCLUSION: The true incidence of retinal detachment after cataract surgery remains elusive. There is probably a trend toward lower incidence compared to previous reports. PMID:8719688

  16. [Retinal pigment epithelial detachment in hyperviscosity syndrome].

    PubMed

    Müller, V C; Mihailovic, N; Clemens, C R; Alten, F; Eter, N

    2017-05-15

    We present a case of a 57-year-old woman who reported bilateral visual impairment since 2 weeks. She had a medical history of congenital, cyanotic heart failure. Funduscopic examination revealed serous retinal detachment on the left side, central subneurosensory detachment on the right side, retinal vessel tortuosity and multiple retinal haemorrhages in the periphery. As blood analysis showed a distinct increase in haemoglobin and haematocrit, hyperviscosity syndrome was suspected to have caused bilateral serous retinal detachment. Isovolemic haemodilution was performed in close cooperation with the cardiology department with repeated phlebotomy, which resulted in a significant reduction of subretinal fluid and, concurrently, an increase in visual acuity.

  17. Paravascular inner retinal abnormalities in healthy eyes.

    PubMed

    Osaka, Rie; Manabe, Saki; Miyoshi, Yukiko; Nakano, Yuki; Yamashita, Ayana; Shiragami, Chieko; Hirooka, Kazuyuki; Muraoka, Yuki; Tsujikawa, Akitaka

    2017-07-02

    To investigate the prevalence and characteristics of paravascular inner retinal abnormalities in healthy eyes. In this prospective observational case series, we included 178 healthy eyes (178 patients) with no ocular diseases. Eyes with co-existing ocular diseases, e.g., epiretinal membrane, glaucoma, or high myopia, were excluded from the current study. The posterior pole and paravascular areas of the temporal arcade vessels were comprehensively examined by dense radial scanning of optical coherence tomography (OCT) with the extended field imaging technique. On fundus photography, no inner retinal abnormalities were detected along the temporal arcade vessels. On OCT sections, paravascular inner retinal abnormalities were seen in 77 (43.3%) eyes. In 71 (39.9%) eyes, inner retinal cystoid or fissure-like spaces that had no connection to the vitreous cavity were seen adjacent to the temporal arcade vessels. Most of these lesions were detected only on several consecutive OCT sections. In four (2.2%) eyes, inner retinal cleavages with openings to the vitreous cavity were seen adjacent to the temporal arcade vessels. These lesions were more frequently detected in the inferior hemisphere and along the major retinal veins. No eyes showed typical broad defects of the inner retinal tissue. There were no significant differences in age, gender, visual acuity, refractive error, or axial length between eyes with or without paravascular inner retinal abnormalities. Paravascular cystoid or fissure-like spaces were frequently seen in the inner retina of healthy eyes. However, we detected no typical paravascular inner retinal defects in healthy eyes.

  18. Retinal Macroglial Responses in Health and Disease.

    PubMed

    de Hoz, Rosa; Rojas, Blanca; Ramírez, Ana I; Salazar, Juan J; Gallego, Beatriz I; Triviño, Alberto; Ramírez, José M

    2016-01-01

    Due to their permanent and close proximity to neurons, glial cells perform essential tasks for the normal physiology of the retina. Astrocytes and Müller cells (retinal macroglia) provide physical support to neurons and supplement them with several metabolites and growth factors. Macroglia are involved in maintaining the homeostasis of extracellular ions and neurotransmitters, are essential for information processing in neural circuits, participate in retinal glucose metabolism and in removing metabolic waste products, regulate local blood flow, induce the blood-retinal barrier (BRB), play fundamental roles in local immune response, and protect neurons from oxidative damage. In response to polyetiological insults, glia cells react with a process called reactive gliosis, seeking to maintain retinal homeostasis. When malfunctioning, macroglial cells can become primary pathogenic elements. A reactive gliosis has been described in different retinal pathologies, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD), diabetes, glaucoma, retinal detachment, or retinitis pigmentosa. A better understanding of the dual, neuroprotective, or cytotoxic effect of macroglial involvement in retinal pathologies would help in treating the physiopathology of these diseases. The extensive participation of the macroglia in retinal diseases points to these cells as innovative targets for new drug therapies.

  19. Hydrogen Fire Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Through NASA's Technology Transfer Office at Stennis Space Center, two SSC engineers were able to market their hand-held fire imager. Called FIRESCAPE, the device allows firefighters to 'see' the invisible flames of hydrogen and alcohol fires in the daylight, as well as to find victims and burning embers in dense smoke and fog. SafetySCAN, which specializes in fire safety electronic products, will make the device the first affordable commercial product for fire imaging.

  20. Interagency wilderness fire management

    Treesearch

    Jim Desmond

    1995-01-01

    Wilderness fire managers are often confronted with natural fire ignitions that start and/or burn near an adjoining agency’s wilderness area boundary. Management strategies for prescribed natural fires (PNF) are often developed using the adjoining agency’s wilderness boundary as the maximum allowable perimeter (control line) for the PNF. When this occurs, fire’s natural...

  1. A world on fire

    Treesearch

    Robert L. Olson; David N. Bengston

    2015-01-01

    We live in a world on fire. In just the past few years, major wildland fires have struck at least 13 U.S. states, as well as Indonesia, Australia, China, southern Europe, Russia, Canada, Bolivia, and other parts of the world. Wildland fires are increasing in number, size, and intensity. In particular, there has been an increase in large fire events—megafires—that...

  2. Fire-resistant pits: Reducing the probability of accidental plutonium dispersal from fuel fires

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, D.R.

    1992-03-01

    Reductions in risk of Pu dispersal from hydrocarbon fuel fires were estimated using pool and spill fire data. Improvements in FRP temperature capabilities, on a system-independent basis, lead to the following estimated reductions in risk, using three probabilistic temperature distributions normalized to a temperature capability of 640[degree]C (the melting point of plutonium): 1OOO[degree]C - factor of 3 to 5; 11OO[degree]C - factor of 10 to 13; and 1200[degree]C - factor of 120 to 300. The above values would, of course, vary for a different normalization temperature. These values were derived to be as system-independent as possible. Incorporation of fuel fire durations or of longer time-averaging (than the two minutes employed in this study) would tend to increase these FRP improvement factors. Incorporation of propellant fires, burning metal or of combined impact/fire accidents would tend to decrease them. Further studies of fuel fire durations, particularly of a fuel fire duration model, is recommended, as is an uncertainty analysis of the temperature distributions.

  3. A Reaction-Diffusion Model of Cholinergic Retinal Waves

    PubMed Central

    Lansdell, Benjamin; Ford, Kevin; Kutz, J. Nathan

    2014-01-01

    Prior to receiving visual stimuli, spontaneous, correlated activity in the retina, called retinal waves, drives activity-dependent developmental programs. Early-stage waves mediated by acetylcholine (ACh) manifest as slow, spreading bursts of action potentials. They are believed to be initiated by the spontaneous firing of Starburst Amacrine Cells (SACs), whose dense, recurrent connectivity then propagates this activity laterally. Their inter-wave interval and shifting wave boundaries are the result of the slow after-hyperpolarization of the SACs creating an evolving mosaic of recruitable and refractory cells, which can and cannot participate in waves, respectively. Recent evidence suggests that cholinergic waves may be modulated by the extracellular concentration of ACh. Here, we construct a simplified, biophysically consistent, reaction-diffusion model of cholinergic retinal waves capable of recapitulating wave dynamics observed in mice retina recordings. The dense, recurrent connectivity of SACs is modeled through local, excitatory coupling occurring via the volume release and diffusion of ACh. In addition to simulation, we are thus able to use non-linear wave theory to connect wave features to underlying physiological parameters, making the model useful in determining appropriate pharmacological manipulations to experimentally produce waves of a prescribed spatiotemporal character. The model is used to determine how ACh mediated connectivity may modulate wave activity, and how parameters such as the spontaneous activation rate and sAHP refractory period contribute to critical wave size variability. PMID:25474327

  4. Blockade of pathological retinal ganglion cell hyperactivity improves optogenetically evoked light responses in rd1 mice

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, John M.; Degenaar, Patrick; Sernagor, Evelyne

    2015-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a progressive retinal dystrophy that causes visual impairment and eventual blindness. Retinal prostheses are the best currently available vision-restoring treatment for RP, but only restore crude vision. One possible contributing factor to the poor quality of vision achieved with prosthetic devices is the pathological retinal ganglion cell (RGC) hyperactivity that occurs in photoreceptor dystrophic disorders. Gap junction blockade with meclofenamic acid (MFA) was recently shown to diminish RGC hyperactivity and improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of RGC responses to light flashes and electrical stimulation in the rd10 mouse model of RP. We sought to extend these results to spatiotemporally patterned optogenetic stimulation in the faster-degenerating rd1 model and compare the effectiveness of a number of drugs known to disrupt rd1 hyperactivity. We crossed rd1 mice with a transgenic mouse line expressing the light-sensitive cation channel channelrhodopsin2 (ChR2) in RGCs, allowing them to be stimulated directly using high-intensity blue light. We used 60-channel ITO multielectrode arrays to record ChR2-mediated RGC responses from wholemount, ex-vivo retinas to full-field and patterned stimuli before and after application of MFA, 18-β-glycyrrhetinic acid (18BGA, another gap junction blocker) or flupirtine (Flu, a Kv7 potassium channel opener). All three drugs decreased spontaneous RGC firing, but 18BGA and Flu also decreased the sensitivity of RGCs to optogenetic stimulation. Nevertheless, all three drugs improved the SNR of ChR2-mediated responses. MFA also made it easier to discern motion direction of a moving bar from RGC population responses. Our results support the hypothesis that reduction of pathological RGC spontaneous activity characteristic in retinal degenerative disorders may improve the quality of visual responses in retinal prostheses and they provide insights into how best to achieve this for optogenetic prostheses

  5. Glucocorticoids induce retinal toxicity through mechanisms mainly associated with paraptosis.

    PubMed

    Valamanesh, Fatemeh; Torriglia, Alicia; Savoldelli, Michéle; Gandolphe, Christelle; Jeanny, Jean-Claude; BenEzra, David; Behar-Cohen, Francine

    2007-09-19

    Corticosteroids have recorded beneficial clinical effects and are widely used in medicine. In ophthalmology, besides their treatment benefits, side effects, including ocular toxicity have been observed especially when intraocular delivery is used. The mechanism of these toxic events remains, however, poorly understood. In our present study, we investigated the mechanisms and potential pathways of corticosteroid-induced retinal cell death. Rats were sacrificed 24 h and 8 days after an intravitreous injection of 1 microl (40 microg) of Kenacort Retard. The eyes were processed for ultra structure analysis and detection of activated caspase-3, cytochrome-C, apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF), LEI-L-Dnase II, terminal transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL), and microtubule-associated protein 1-light chain 3 (MAP-LC3). In vitro, rat retinal pigment epithelial cells (RPE), retinal Müller glial cells (RMG) and human ARPE-19 cells were treated with triamcinolone acetonide (TA) or other glucocorticoids. Cell viability was quantified by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5 phenyltetrazolium bromide test (MTT) assay and cell counts. Nuclei staining, TUNEL assay, annexin-V binding, activated caspase-3 and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) production characterized cell death. Localization of cytochrome-C, AIF, LEI-and L-Dnase II, and staining with MAP-LC3 or monodansylcadaverine were also carried out. Finally, ARPE-19 cells transfected with AIP-1/Alix were exposed to TA. In vitro incubation of retinal cell in the presence of corticosteroids induced a specific and dose-dependent reduction of cell viability. These toxic events were not associated with the anti-inflammatory activity of these compounds but depended on the hydro solubility of their formulation. Before cell death, extensive cytoplasmic vacuolization was observed in the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells in vivo and in vitro. The cells however, did not show known caspase-dependent or caspase-independent apoptotic reactions

  6. Fire and forest meteorology

    Treesearch

    SA Ferguson; T.J. Brown; M. Flannigan

    2005-01-01

    The American Meteorological Society symposia series on Fire and Forest Meteorology provides biennial forums for atmospheric and fire scientists to introduce and discuss the latest and most relevant research on weather, climate and fire. This special issue highlights significant work that was presented at the Fifth Symposium in Orlando, Florida during 16-20 November...

  7. Occupancy Fire Record: Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Fire Protection Association, Boston, MA.

    The considerations of human safety and preservation of facilities are examined in relation to school fires. Various aspects of planning which would decrease the probability of fires and thereby save life and property are reviewed and include--(1) causes, (2) automatic protection devices, (3) evacuation and fire drills, and (4) construction…

  8. Fire Department Emergency Response

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchard, A.; Bell, K.; Kelly, J.; Hudson, J.

    1997-09-01

    In 1995 the SRS Fire Department published the initial Operations Basis Document (OBD). This document was one of the first of its kind in the DOE complex and was widely distributed and reviewed. This plan described a multi-mission Fire Department which provided fire, emergency medical, hazardous material spill, and technical rescue services.

  9. Fire Safety Fundamentals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Ken

    2004-01-01

    Planning and prevention is the best defense against fires in school. This is particularly true in the science laboratory due to the presence of flammable gases, liquids, combustibles, and other potential sources of fire. Teachers can prevent fires from starting by maintaining prudent lab practices when dealing with combustible and flammable…

  10. Fire as Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudolph, Robert N.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a project that deals with fire production as an aspect of technology. The project challenges students to be survivors in a five-day classroom activity. Students research various materials and methods to produce fire without the use of matches or other modern combustion devices, then must create "fire" to keep…

  11. Equipping tomorrow's fire manager

    Treesearch

    Christopher A. Dicus

    2008-01-01

    Fire managers are challenged with an ever-increasing array of both responsibilities and critics. As in the past, fire managers must master the elements of fire behavior and ecology using the latest technologies. In addition, today’s managers must be equipped with the skills necessary to understand and liaise with a burgeoning group of vocal stakeholders while also...

  12. An Ozark fire history

    Treesearch

    Richard Guyette; Mavis Dey; Dan Dey

    1999-01-01

    Missouri's natural communities have been shaped by humans and wildland fires for thousands of years. In many ways, the history of fire in Missouri also is a history of human population, culture and migration. Fires caused by natural ignition, like lightning, are rare. Despite as many as 50 to 70 thunderstorm days per year, Conservation Department studies indicate...

  13. Fire as Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudolph, Robert N.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a project that deals with fire production as an aspect of technology. The project challenges students to be survivors in a five-day classroom activity. Students research various materials and methods to produce fire without the use of matches or other modern combustion devices, then must create "fire" to keep…

  14. Fire Safety Fundamentals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Ken

    2004-01-01

    Planning and prevention is the best defense against fires in school. This is particularly true in the science laboratory due to the presence of flammable gases, liquids, combustibles, and other potential sources of fire. Teachers can prevent fires from starting by maintaining prudent lab practices when dealing with combustible and flammable…

  15. Fire Prevention Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehmann, Jeanne; Claus, William C.

    The fire prevention education bulletin helps schools continue their work to make the home, school, and community safe places in which to live and to help children and young people live in safe ways without developing undue fears. Briefly discussed are the goals of a fire prevention program, who should be concerned with fire prevention education,…

  16. Fire Prevention Inspection Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pribyl, Paul F.

    Lesson plans are provided for a fire prevention inspection course of the Wisconsin Fire Service Training program. Objectives for the course are to enable students to describe and conduct fire prevention inspections, to identify and correct hazards common to most occupancies, to understand the types of building construction and occupancy, and to…

  17. Fire Prevention Inspection Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pribyl, Paul F.

    Lesson plans are provided for a fire prevention inspection course of the Wisconsin Fire Service Training program. Objectives for the course are to enable students to describe and conduct fire prevention inspections, to identify and correct hazards common to most occupancies, to understand the types of building construction and occupancy, and to…

  18. Whither wildlife without fire?

    Treesearch

    L.A. Brennan; R.T. Engstrom; W.E. Palmer

    1998-01-01

    Fire is a major ecosystem process that has been pervasive across the southern forest landscape on an evolutionary time scale. Wildlife evolved in response to frequent lightning-ignited burns that shaped the biota of the Southeast. Despite the dominant role that fire has played on an evolutionary scale, the use of prescribed fire as a forest wildlife management tool...

  19. Fire performance issues

    Treesearch

    S. M. Cramer; R. H. White

    1997-01-01

    The worldwide movement toward performance-based building codes is prompting the need for new computational methods to predict fire endurance of wood assemblies. Progress in the past twenty years in understanding fire endurance of individual solid wood components has been achieved in many different countries. The greatest opportunity for major advance in fire research...

  20. Fourmile Canyon Fire Findings

    Treesearch

    Russell Graham; Mark Finney; Chuck McHugh; Jack Cohen; Dave Calkin; Rick Stratton; Larry Bradshaw; Ned Nikolov

    2012-01-01

    The Fourmile Canyon Fire burned in the fall of 2010 in the Rocky Mountain Front Range adjacent to Boulder, Colorado. The fire occurred in steep, rugged terrain, primarily on privately owned mixed ponderosa pine and Douglas-fir forests. The fire started on September 6 when the humidity of the air was very dry (¡Ö

  1. Income, housing, and fire injuries: a census tract analysis.

    PubMed

    Shai, Donna

    2006-01-01

    This study investigates the social and demographic correlates of nonfatal structural fire injury rates for the civilian population for Philadelphia census tracts during 1993-2001. The author analyzed 1,563 fire injuries by census tract using the 1990 census (STF 3) and unpublished data from the Office of the Fire Marshal of the Philadelphia Fire Department. Injury rates were calculated per 1,000 residents of a given census tract. Multiple regression was used to determine significant variables in predicting fire injuries in a given census tract over a nine-year period and interaction effects between two of these variables-age of housing and income. Multiple regression analysis indicates that older housing (prior to 1940), low income, the prevalence of vacant houses, and the ability to speak English have significant independent effects on fire injury rates in Philadelphia. In addition, the results show a significant interaction between older housing and low income. Given the finding of very high rates of fire injuries in census tracts that are both low income and have older housing, fire prevention units can take preventative measures. Fire protection devices, especially smoke alarms, should be distributed in the neighborhoods most at risk. Multiple occupancy dwellings should have sprinkler systems and fire extinguishers. Laws concerning the maintenance of older rental housing need to be strictly enforced. Vacant houses should be effectively boarded up or renovated for residential use. Fire prevention material should be distributed in a number of languages to meet local needs.

  2. Lesion strength control by automatic temperature guided retinal photocoagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlott, Kerstin; Koinzer, Stefan; Baade, Alexander; Birngruber, Reginald; Roider, Johann; Brinkmann, Ralf

    2016-09-01

    Laser photocoagulation is an established treatment for a variety of retinal diseases. However, when using the same irradiation parameter, the size and strength of the lesions are unpredictable due to unknown inter- and intraindividual optical properties of the fundus layers. The aim of this work is to investigate a feedback system to generate desired lesions of preselectable strengths by automatically controlling the irradiation time. Optoacoustics were used for retinal temperature monitoring. A 532-nm continuous wave Nd:YAG laser was used for photocoagulation. A 75-ns/523-nm Q-switched Nd:YLF laser simultaneously excited temperature-dependent pressure transients, which were detected at the cornea by an ultrasonic transducer embedded in a contact lens. The temperature data were analyzed during the irradiation by a LabVIEW routine. The treatment laser was switched off automatically when the required lesion strength was achieved. Five different feedback control algorithms for different lesion sizes were developed and tested on rabbits in vivo. With a laser spot diameter of 133 μm, five different lesion types with ophthalmoscopically visible diameters ranging mostly between 100 and 200 μm, and different appearances were achieved by automatic exposure time control. The automatically controlled lesions were widely independent of the treatment laser power and the retinal pigmentation.

  3. An Ocular Protein Triad Can Classify Four Complex Retinal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kuiper, J. J. W.; Beretta, L.; Nierkens, S.; van Leeuwen, R.; ten Dam-van Loon, N. H.; Ossewaarde-van Norel, J.; Bartels, M. C.; de Groot-Mijnes, J. D. F.; Schellekens, P.; de Boer, J. H.; Radstake, T. R. D. J.

    2017-01-01

    Retinal diseases generally are vision-threatening conditions that warrant appropriate clinical decision-making which currently solely dependents upon extensive clinical screening by specialized ophthalmologists. In the era where molecular assessment has improved dramatically, we aimed at the identification of biomarkers in 175 ocular fluids to classify four archetypical ocular conditions affecting the retina (age-related macular degeneration, idiopathic non-infectious uveitis, primary vitreoretinal lymphoma, and rhegmatogenous retinal detachment) with one single test. Unsupervised clustering of ocular proteins revealed a classification strikingly similar to the clinical phenotypes of each disease group studied. We developed and independently validated a parsimonious model based merely on three proteins; interleukin (IL)-10, IL-21, and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) that could correctly classify patients with an overall accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of respectively, 86.7%, 79.4% and 92.5%. Here, we provide proof-of-concept for molecular profiling as a diagnostic aid for ophthalmologists in the care for patients with retinal conditions. PMID:28128370

  4. Angiogenic gene therapy does not cause retinal pathology.

    PubMed

    Prokosch, Verena; Stupp, Tobias; Spaniol, Kristina; Pham, Emmanuel; Nikol, Sigrid

    2014-01-01

    The potential negative influence of angiogenic gene therapy on the development or progression of retinal pathologies such as diabetic retinopathy (DR) or age-related macular degeneration (AMD) has led to the systematic exclusion of affected patients from trials. We investigated the role of nonviral fibroblast factor 1 (NV1FGF) in two phase II, multinational, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, gene therapy trials (TALISMAN 201 and 211). One hundred and fifty-two subjects with critical limb ischemia or claudication were randomized to receive eight intramuscular injections of 2.5 ml of NV1FGF at 0.2 mg/ml or 0.4 mg/dl or placebo. One hundred and fifty-two patients received a plasmid dose of NV1FGF of up to 32 mg or placebo. All patients underwent a systematic ophthalmologic examination at baseline and at 3, 6 or 12 months following gene therapy. Twenty-six of these patients (Münster subgroup) received a retinal fluorescence angiography at baseline and at final examination. Among those 26 patients, four of nine patients with diabetes suffered from nonproliferative DR. Three patients showed non-exsudative AMD. No change of retinal morphology or function was observed in Münster subgroup of both TALISMAN trials independent of the intramuscular NV1FGF dosage applied. Angiogenic gene therapy using NV1FGF is safe even in diabetics. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Retinal damage induced by commercial light emitting diodes (LEDs).

    PubMed

    Jaadane, Imene; Boulenguez, Pierre; Chahory, Sabine; Carré, Samuel; Savoldelli, Michèle; Jonet, Laurent; Behar-Cohen, Francine; Martinsons, Christophe; Torriglia, Alicia

    2015-07-01

    Spectra of "white LEDs" are characterized by an intense emission in the blue region of the visible spectrum, absent in daylight spectra. This blue component and the high intensity of emission are the main sources of concern about the health risks of LEDs with respect to their toxicity to the eye and the retina. The aim of our study was to elucidate the role of blue light from LEDs in retinal damage. Commercially available white LEDs and four different blue LEDs (507, 473, 467, and 449nm) were used for exposure experiments on Wistar rats. Immunohistochemical stain, transmission electron microscopy, and Western blot were used to exam the retinas. We evaluated LED-induced retinal cell damage by studying oxidative stress, stress response pathways, and the identification of cell death pathways. LED light caused a state of suffering of the retina with oxidative damage and retinal injury. We observed a loss of photoreceptors and the activation of caspase-independent apoptosis, necroptosis, and necrosis. A wavelength dependence of the effects was observed. Phototoxicity of LEDs on the retina is characterized by a strong damage of photoreceptors and by the induction of necrosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. An Ocular Protein Triad Can Classify Four Complex Retinal Diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuiper, J. J. W.; Beretta, L.; Nierkens, S.; van Leeuwen, R.; Ten Dam-van Loon, N. H.; Ossewaarde-van Norel, J.; Bartels, M. C.; de Groot-Mijnes, J. D. F.; Schellekens, P.; de Boer, J. H.; Radstake, T. R. D. J.

    2017-01-01

    Retinal diseases generally are vision-threatening conditions that warrant appropriate clinical decision-making which currently solely dependents upon extensive clinical screening by specialized ophthalmologists. In the era where molecular assessment has improved dramatically, we aimed at the identification of biomarkers in 175 ocular fluids to classify four archetypical ocular conditions affecting the retina (age-related macular degeneration, idiopathic non-infectious uveitis, primary vitreoretinal lymphoma, and rhegmatogenous retinal detachment) with one single test. Unsupervised clustering of ocular proteins revealed a classification strikingly similar to the clinical phenotypes of each disease group studied. We developed and independently validated a parsimonious model based merely on three proteins; interleukin (IL)-10, IL-21, and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) that could correctly classify patients with an overall accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of respectively, 86.7%, 79.4% and 92.5%. Here, we provide proof-of-concept for molecular profiling as a diagnostic aid for ophthalmologists in the care for patients with retinal conditions.

  7. Crewmembers in the middeck with the Retinal Photography experiment.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Mission Pilot Robert Cabana conducting the Retinal Photography life sciences experiment on test subject Mission Specialist Michael Clifford. The Retinal Photography experiment is Detailed Supplementary Objective # 474.

  8. 18. DETAIL VIEW OF FIRE ALARM SYSTEM BOARD THAT LISTS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. DETAIL VIEW OF FIRE ALARM SYSTEM BOARD THAT LISTS AREAS IN SHOPS COMPLEX. - Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, Mount Clare Shops, South side of Pratt Street between Carey & Poppleton Streets, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  9. Development of Two Courses-of-Fire: Night Fire with Aiming Lights and Combat Field Fire

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-01

    Research Report 1992 Development of Two Courses-of-Fire: Night Fire with Aiming Lights and Combat Field Fire Jean...January 2008 – December 2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Development of Two Courses-of-Fire: Night Fire with Aiming Lights and Combat Field Fire...qualification or record fire course developed for using aiming lights /pointers/illuminators with night vision goggles. Research on the night fire

  10. Eye-specific retinogeniculate segregation proceeds normally following disruption of patterned spontaneous retinal activity.

    PubMed

    Speer, Colenso M; Sun, Chao; Liets, Lauren C; Stafford, Ben K; Chapman, Barbara; Cheng, Hwai-Jong

    2014-11-07

    Spontaneous retinal activity (SRA) is important during eye-specific segregation within the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN), but the feature(s) of activity critical for retinogeniculate refinement are controversial. Pharmacologically or genetically manipulating cholinergic signaling during SRA perturbs correlated retinal ganglion cell (RGC) spiking and disrupts eye-specific retinofugal refinement in vivo, consistent with an instructive role for SRA during visual system development. Paradoxically, ablating the starburst amacrine cells (SACs) that generate cholinergic spontaneous activity disrupts correlated RGC firing without impacting retinal activity levels or eye-specific segregation in the dLGN. Such experiments suggest that patterned SRA during retinal waves is not critical for eye-specific refinement and instead, normal activity levels are permissive for retinogeniculate development. Here we revisit the effects of ablating the cholinergic network during eye-specific segregation and show that SAC ablation disrupts, but does not eliminate, retinal waves with no concomitant impact on normal eye-specific segregation in the dLGN. We induced SAC ablation in postnatal ferret pups beginning at birth by intraocular injection of a novel immunotoxin selective for the ferret vesicular acetylcholine transporter (Ferret VAChT-Sap). Through dual-patch whole-cell and multi-electrode array recording we found that SAC ablation altered SRA patterns and led to significantly smaller retinal waves compared with controls. Despite these defects, eye-specific segregation was normal. Further, interocular competition for target territory in the dLGN proceeded in cases where SAC ablation was asymmetric in the two eyes. Our data demonstrate normal eye-specific retinogeniculate development despite significant abnormalities in patterned SRA. Comparing our current results with earlier studies suggests that defects in retinal wave size, absolute levels of SRA, correlations between RGC

  11. Validation of Smartphone Based Retinal Photography for Diabetic Retinopathy Screening.

    PubMed

    Rajalakshmi, Ramachandran; Arulmalar, Subramanian; Usha, Manoharan; Prathiba, Vijayaraghavan; Kareemuddin, Khaji Syed; Anjana, Ranjit Mohan; Mohan, Viswanathan

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of "fundus on phone' (FOP) camera, a smartphone based retinal imaging system, as a screening tool for diabetic retinopathy (DR) detection and DR severity in comparison with 7-standard field digital retinal photography. Single-site, prospective, comparative, instrument validation study. 301 patients (602 eyes) with type 2 diabetes underwent standard seven-field digital fundus photography with both Carl Zeiss fundus camera and indigenous FOP at a tertiary care diabetes centre in South India. Grading of DR was performed by two independent retina specialists using modified Early Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy Study grading system. Sight threatening DR (STDR) was defined by the presence of proliferative DR(PDR) or diabetic macular edema. The sensitivity, specificity and image quality were assessed. The mean age of the participants was 53.5 ±9.6 years and mean duration of diabetes 12.5±7.3 years. The Zeiss camera showed that 43.9% had non-proliferative DR(NPDR) and 15.3% had PDR while the FOP camera showed that 40.2% had NPDR and 15.3% had PDR. The sensitivity and specificity for detecting any DR by FOP was 92.7% (95%CI 87.8-96.1) and 98.4% (95%CI 94.3-99.8) respectively and the kappa (ĸ) agreement was 0.90 (95%CI-0.85-0.95 p<0.001) while for STDR, the sensitivity was 87.9% (95%CI 83.2-92.9), specificity 94.9% (95%CI 89.7-98.2) and ĸ agreement was 0.80 (95%CI 0.71-0.89 p<0.001), compared to conventional photography. Retinal photography using FOP camera is effective for screening and diagnosis of DR and STDR with high sensitivity and specificity and has substantial agreement with conventional retinal photography.

  12. Risk factors of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment associated with choroidal detachment in Chinese patients

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yong-Hao; Ke, Gen-Jie; Wang, Lin; Gu, Qi-Hong; Zhou, En-Liang; Pan, Hong-Biao; Wang, Shi-Ying

    2016-01-01

    AIM To comprehensively analyze the risk factors of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD) associated with choroidal detachment (CD). METHODS A total of 265 eyes of 265 consecutive cases of RRD were retrospectively analyzed. All patients had systemic and ophthalmologic examination. CD was diagnosed by indirect ophthalmoscopy, B-scan ultrasonography, and ultrasound biomicroscope (UBM). Each parameter was compared between patients of RRD and rhegmatogenous retinal detachment associated with choroidal detachment (RRDCD). Logistic regression analysis was used to determine the independent risk factors of CD. RESULTS There were 52 eyes (19.62%) with CD. Pseudophakia was more commonly seen in RRDCD (21.15% vs 6.10%, P=0.002). Intraocular pressure (IOP) was lower (8.60±3.62 vs 12.96±3.55, P<0.001), best-corrected visual acuity was worse [3.00 (2.00 to 3.00) vs 1.92 (1.22 to 3.00), P=0.001], and refractive error was more myopic [-4 (-9 to -2) vs -2 (-6 to 0), P=0.007] in RRDCD. Eyes with RRDCD had larger extent of retinal detachment (P=0.007). In RRDCD, 34.62% of eyes presented with multiple holes (P=0.044) and 25.00% with macular holes (P=0.012), compared with 20.66% and 14.08% in RRD. High myopia (P=0.039), low IOP (P=0.017), and larger extent of retinal detachment (P<0.001) were significant and independent risk factors for developing CD. CONCLUSION For CD in RRD, related factors include BCVA, IOP, lens status, refractive error, extent of retinal detachment, number of holes, and macular hole. Larger extent of retinal detachment, high myopia, and low IOP are significant and independent risk factors. PMID:27500106

  13. Site fire protection projects review board engineering evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Fayfich, R.R.

    1992-12-31

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) has been safely operated since its beginning in the early 1950`s with an effective, highly successful program of fire prevention. However, in the mid 1980`s the Department of Energy directed the site to identify and install fire protection measure in addition to the reliance on prevention. To address the site needs, independent fire protection surveys were conducted by Factory Mutual Research Corporation and Professional Loss Control, Inc. in 1986 and 1987. The results of these surveys identified 1400 fire protection improvements needed in existing facilities to comply with DOE Orders and NFPA Codes and Standards.

  14. Activated adult microglia influence retinal progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation toward recoverin-expressing neuron-like cells in a co-culture model.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yunhe; Balasubramaniam, Balini; Copland, David A; Liu, Jian; Armitage, M John; Dick, Andrew D

    2015-07-01

    Microglia contribute to immune homeostasis of the retina, and thus act as a potential regulator determining successful repair or retinal stem cell transplantation. We investigated the interaction between human microglia and retinal progenitor cells in cell co-culture to further our exploration on developing a new therapeutic strategy for retinal degeneration. Microglia and retinal progenitor cultures were developed using CD11b(+) and CD133(+), respectively, from adult donor retina. Microglia activation was developed using interferon-gamma and lipopolysaccharide. Retinal progenitor differentiation was analysed in co-culture with or without microglial activation. Retinal progenitor proliferation was analysed in presence of conditioned medium from activated microglia. Phenotype and function of adult human retinal cell cultures were examined using cell morphology, immunohistochemistry and real-time PCR. By morphology, neuron-like cells generated in co-culture expressed photoreceptor marker recoverin. Neurospheres derived from retinal progenitor cells showed reduced growth in the presence of conditioned medium from activated microglia. Delayed retinal progenitor cell migration and reduced cellular differentiation was observed in co-cultures with activated microglia. In independent experiments, activated microglia showed enhanced mRNA expression of CXCL10, IL-27, IL-6, and TNF-alpha compared to controls. Adult human retina retains retinal progenitors or potential to reprogram cells to then proliferate and differentiate into neuron-like cells in vitro. Human microglia support retinal progenitor differentiation into neuron-like cells, but such capacity is altered following microglial activation. Modulating microglia activity is a potential approach to promote retinal repair and facilitate success of stem-cell transplantation.

  15. Fighting Forest Fires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Firefly is an airborne system for imaging forest fires. It uses satellite-based navigation for greater positioning accuracy and offers timeliness in fire location data delivery with on board data processing and a direct aircraft-to-fire camp communications link. Developed by Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the USFS, it has an infrared line scanner to identify fire boundaries and an infrared sensor system that can penetrate smoke to image the ground. Firefly is an outgrowth of a previous collaboration that produced FLAME, an airborne fire mapping instrument. Further refinements are anticipated by NASA and the United States Forest Service (USFS).

  16. Fire Protection Program Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Sharry, J A

    2012-05-18

    This manual documents the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Fire Protection Program. Department of Energy (DOE) Orders 420.1B, Facility Safety, requires LLNL to have a comprehensive and effective fire protection program that protects LLNL personnel and property, the public and the environment. The manual provides LLNL and its facilities with general information and guidance for meeting DOE 420.1B requirements. The recommended readers for this manual are: fire protection officers, fire protection engineers, fire fighters, facility managers, directorage assurance managers, facility coordinators, and ES and H team members.

  17. Retinal imaging with adaptive optics full-field OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Peng; Fink, Mathias; Boccara, A. Claude

    2017-02-01

    Adaptive optics full-filed OCT (FFOCT) with a transmissive liquid crystal spatial light modulator (LCSLM) as wavefront corrector is used without strict plane conjugation for low order aberrations corrections. We validated experimentally that FFOCT resolution is independent of aberrations and only reduce the signal level. A signal based sensorless algorithm was thus applied for wavefront distortion compensation. Image quality improvements by the wavefront sensorless control of the LCSLM were evaluated on in vitro samples. By replacing the FFOCT sample arm objective with an artificial eye used to train ophthalmologists, adaptive optics retinal imaging was achieved. In vivo experiments using a liquid lens to correct focus and astigmatism are underway.

  18. Retinal fundus imaging in mouse models of retinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Alex, Anne F; Heiduschka, Peter; Eter, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    The development of in vivo retinal fundus imaging in mice has opened a new research horizon, not only in ophthalmic research. The ability to monitor the dynamics of vascular and cellular changes in pathological conditions, such as neovascularization or degeneration, longitudinally without the need to sacrifice the mouse, permits longer observation periods in the same animal. With the application of the high-resolution confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy in experimental mouse models, access to a large spectrum of imaging modalities in vivo is provided.

  19. Retinal vessel tortuosity associated with central retinal vein occlusion: an optical coherence tomography study.

    PubMed

    Muraoka, Yuki; Tsujikawa, Akitaka; Kumagai, Kyoko; Akagi-Kurashige, Yumiko; Ogino, Ken; Murakami, Tomoaki; Miyamoto, Kazuaki; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2014-01-07

    We studied morphologic changes of the retinal vasculature in eyes with central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) through the use of optical coherence tomography (OCT). Major retinal vessels in 35 eyes from 35 consecutive patients with acute CRVO were examined prospectively and longitudinally with sequential thin sectioning and circumpapillary scanning. Anteroposterior venous tortuosity associated with CRVO was quantified on longitudinal OCT images of a randomly selected major temporal vein. On OCT sections of a given vein, we identified the innermost and outermost points of the vessel wall. The degree of anteroposterior venous tortuosity was defined as the difference between the vertical distances from the retinal pigment epithelium to the center of the venous lumen at these two points. The OCT images revealed that the major retinal veins traveled tortuously through the swollen neurosensory retina from the inner retinal surface to the retinal pigment epithelium. The degree of anteroposterior venous tortuosity was correlated with poor visual acuity (r = 0.457, P = 0.017), increased mean foveal thickness (r = 0.671, P < 0.001), and the height of foveal detachment (r = 0.414, P = 0.032). In 4 (11%) eyes, a localized retinal detachment was detected around the optic disc, which correlated with anteroposterior venous tortuosity. In 14 (40%) eyes, elongated major retinal veins disrupted the boundary between retinal vessels and parenchyma, which resulted in juxtavenous splitting of the neurosensory retina. In eyes with CRVO, OCT can be used to visualize anteroposterior venous tortuosity and associated structural changes to the retinal parenchyma.

  20. The bacterial toxin CNF1 as a tool to induce retinal degeneration reminiscent of retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Guadagni, Viviana; Cerri, Chiara; Piano, Ilaria; Novelli, Elena; Gargini, Claudia; Fiorentini, Carla; Caleo, Matteo; Strettoi, Enrica

    2016-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) comprises a group of inherited pathologies characterized by progressive photoreceptor degeneration. In rodent models of RP, expression of defective genes and retinal degeneration usually manifest during the first weeks of postnatal life, making it difficult to distinguish consequences of primary genetic defects from abnormalities in retinal development. Moreover, mouse eyes are small and not always adequate to test pharmacological and surgical treatments. An inducible paradigm of retinal degeneration potentially extensible to large animals is therefore desirable. Starting from the serendipitous observation that intraocular injections of a Rho GTPase activator, the bacterial toxin Cytotoxic Necrotizing Factor 1 (CNF1), lead to retinal degeneration, we implemented an inducible model recapitulating most of the key features of Retinitis Pigmentosa. The model also unmasks an intrinsic vulnerability of photoreceptors to the mechanism of CNF1 action, indicating still unexplored molecular pathways potentially leading to the death of these cells in inherited forms of retinal degeneration. PMID:27775019

  1. 46 CFR 132.120 - Fire pumps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... vessel must be equipped with one self-priming power-driven fire pump capable of delivering a single... installed, the pump required by paragraph (a) of this section may be driven by one of the engines. If only one propulsion engine is installed, the pump must be driven by a source of power independent of the...

  2. 46 CFR 132.120 - Fire pumps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... vessel must be equipped with one self-priming power-driven fire pump capable of delivering a single... installed, the pump required by paragraph (a) of this section may be driven by one of the engines. If only one propulsion engine is installed, the pump must be driven by a source of power independent of the...

  3. 46 CFR 132.120 - Fire pumps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... vessel must be equipped with one self-priming power-driven fire pump capable of delivering a single... installed, the pump required by paragraph (a) of this section may be driven by one of the engines. If only one propulsion engine is installed, the pump must be driven by a source of power independent of the...

  4. Fire frequency in the Interior Columbia River Basin: Building regional models from fire history data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKenzie, D.; Peterson, D.L.; Agee, James K.

    2000-01-01

    qualitative and quantitative methods when requisite data for fully quantitative models are unavailable. They can be tested by comparing new, independent fire history reconstructions against their predictions and can be continually updated, as better fire history data become available.

  5. Imaging of retinal and choroidal vascular tumours

    PubMed Central

    Heimann, H; Jmor, F; Damato, B

    2013-01-01

    The most common intraocular vascular tumours are choroidal haemangiomas, vasoproliferative tumours, and retinal haemangioblastomas. Rarer conditions include cavernous retinal angioma and arteriovenous malformations. Options for ablating the tumour include photodynamic therapy, argon laser photocoagulation, trans-scleral diathermy, cryotherapy, anti-angiogenic agents, plaque radiotherapy, and proton beam radiotherapy. Secondary effects are common and include retinal exudates, macular oedema, epiretinal membranes, retinal fibrosis, as well as serous and tractional retinal detachment, which are treated using standard methods (ie, intravitreal anti-angiogenic agents or steroids as well as vitreoretinal procedures, such as epiretinal membrane peeling and release of retinal traction). The detection, diagnosis, and monitoring of vascular tumours and their complications have improved considerably thanks to advances in imaging. These include spectral domain and enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT and EDI-OCT, respectively), wide-angle photography and angiography as well as wide-angle fundus autofluorescence. Such novel imaging has provided new diagnostic clues and has profoundly influenced therapeutic strategies so that vascular tumours and secondary effects are now treated concurrently instead of sequentially, enhancing any opportunities for conserving vision and the eye. In this review, we describe how SD-OCT, EDI-OCT, autofluorescence, wide-angle photography and wide-angle angiography have facilitated the evaluation of eyes with the more common vascular tumours, that is, choroidal haemangioma, retinal vasoproliferative tumours, and retinal haemangioblastoma. PMID:23196648

  6. Anatomy of the retinal nerve fiber layer.

    PubMed

    Radius, R L; de Bruin, J

    1981-11-01

    Anatomy of the retinal nerve fiber layer in rabbit eyes is studied by light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. It is demonstrated that retinal striations noted ophthalmoscopically in these eyes represent individual fiber bundles, Axon bundles are compartmentalized within tissue tunnels comprised of elongated processes of glial cell origin.

  7. Argus II retinal prosthesis system: An update.

    PubMed

    Rachitskaya, Aleksandra V; Yuan, Alex

    2016-09-01

    This review focuses on a description of the Argus II retinal prosthesis system (Argus II; Second Sight Medical Products, Sylmar, CA) that was approved for humanitarian use by the FDA in 2013 in patients with retinitis pigmentosa with bare or no light perception vision. The article describes the components of Argus II, the studies on the implant, and future directions.

  8. Fundus autofluorescence applications in retinal imaging.

    PubMed

    Gabai, Andrea; Veritti, Daniele; Lanzetta, Paolo

    2015-05-01

    Fundus autofluorescence (FAF) is a relatively new imaging technique that can be used to study retinal diseases. It provides information on retinal metabolism and health. Several different pathologies can be detected. Peculiar AF alterations can help the clinician to monitor disease progression and to better understand its pathogenesis. In the present article, we review FAF principles and clinical applications.

  9. Fundus autofluorescence applications in retinal imaging

    PubMed Central

    Gabai, Andrea; Veritti, Daniele; Lanzetta, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Fundus autofluorescence (FAF) is a relatively new imaging technique that can be used to study retinal diseases. It provides information on retinal metabolism and health. Several different pathologies can be detected. Peculiar AF alterations can help the clinician to monitor disease progression and to better understand its pathogenesis. In the present article, we review FAF principles and clinical applications. PMID:26139802

  10. Fire risk in California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Seth Howard

    Fire is an integral part of ecosystems in the western United States. Decades of fire suppression have led to (unnaturally) large accumulations of fuel in some forest communities, such as the lower elevation forests of the Sierra Nevada. Urban sprawl into fire prone chaparral vegetation in southern California has put human lives at risk and the decreased fire return intervals have put the vegetation community at risk of type conversion. This research examines the factors affecting fire risk in two of the dominant landscapes in the state of California, chaparral and inland coniferous forests. Live fuel moisture (LFM) is important for fire ignition, spread rate, and intensity in chaparral. LFM maps were generated for Los Angeles County by developing and then inverting robust cross-validated regression equations from time series field data and vegetation indices (VIs) and phenological metrics from MODIS data. Fire fuels, including understory fuels which are not visible to remote sensing instruments, were mapped in Yosemite National Park using the random forests decision tree algorithm and climatic, topographic, remotely sensed, and fire history variables. Combining the disparate data sources served to improve classification accuracies. The models were inverted to produce maps of fuel models and fuel amounts, and these showed that fire fuel amounts are highest in the low elevation forests that have been most affected by fire suppression impacting the natural fire regime. Wildland fires in chaparral commonly burn in late summer or fall when LFM is near its annual low, however, the Jesusita Fire burned in early May of 2009, when LFM was still relatively high. The HFire fire spread model was used to simulate the growth of the Jesusita Fire using LFM maps derived from imagery acquired at the time of the fire and imagery acquired in late August to determine how much different the fire would have been if it had occurred later in the year. Simulated fires were 1.5 times larger

  11. Modeling fire occurrence as a function of landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loboda, T. V.; Carroll, M.; DiMiceli, C.

    2011-12-01

    Wildland fire is a prominent component of ecosystem functioning worldwide. Nearly all ecosystems experience the impact of naturally occurring or anthropogenically driven fire. Here, we present a spatially explicit and regionally parameterized Fire Occurrence Model (FOM) aimed at developing fire occurrence estimates at landscape and regional scales. The model provides spatially explicit scenarios of fire occurrence based on the available records from fire management agencies, satellite observations, and auxiliary geospatial data sets. Fire occurrence is modeled as a function of the risk of ignition, potential fire behavior, and fire weather using internal regression tree-driven algorithms and empirically established, regionally derived relationships between fire occurrence, fire behavior, and fire weather. The FOM presents a flexible modeling structure with a set of internal globally available default geospatial independent and dependent variables. However, the flexible modeling environment adapts to ingest a variable number, resolution, and content of inputs provided by the user to supplement or replace the default parameters to improve the model's predictive capability. A Southern California FOM instance (SC FOM) was developed using satellite assessments of fire activity from a suite of Landsat and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite data, Monitoring Trends in Burn Severity fire perimeters, and auxiliary geospatial information including land use and ownership, utilities, transportation routes, and the Remote Automated Weather Station data records. The model was parameterized based on satellite data acquired between 2001 and 2009 and fire management fire perimeters available prior to 2009. SC FOM predictive capabilities were assessed using observed fire occurrence available from the MODIS active fire product during 2010. The results show that SC FOM provides a realistic estimate of fire occurrence at the landscape level: the fraction of

  12. Independent Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomoto, Hideki; Katahira, Masafumi; Fukatsu, Tsutomu; Okabe, Hideki; Yamanaka, Kohji

    2005-12-01

    This paper describes IV&V (Independent Verification & Validation) methodology applied for the Rendezvous Flight Software (RVFS) of the H-IIA Transfer Vehicle (HTV).HTV is a cargo transportation vehicle to the International Space Station (ISS). RVFS not only controls the HTV's flight sequence autonomously, but also is deployed with two-fault tolerant FDIR (Fault Detection Isolation Recovery) functionality. Since software such as RVFS is very critical for safe and successful HTV operations, exhaustive IV&V is being conducted.RVFS is required to function to avoid HTV's collision to the ISS. The biggest challenge is thoroughness of the verification. Due to its complicated software algorithm to accomplish fully autonomous rendezvous to the ISS, required numbers of test cases can easily go beyond realistic for conventional verification methodologies.IV&V team developed a verification environment on which 1) formal specification model was made from the detailed software design specification and 2) C source code and test sequence were generated/executed from the model automatically.One of the main efforts of this activity was to increase fidelity of the model and the quality of the generated code sufficiently. This will be discussed in the modeling, the model checking and code generation technology sections. The other issue that had to be resolved was the methodology to generate exhaustive test cases for the developed model that takes continuous input values (so called hybrid model). Conventional random test case generation or boundary condition generation does not assure the sufficiency/validity of the test cases because combinations of inputs becomes theoretically infinite for this kind of model [1]. To resolve this problem, IV&V team developed a unique algorithm to generate finite number test cases that satisfies full-scale test requirement. This will be discussed in the testing section.The generated code was put through 550 billion full-path test cases. We succeeded to

  13. Neural reprogramming in retinal degenerations

    PubMed Central

    Marc, Robert E.; Jones, Bryan W.; Anderson, James R.; Kinard, Krista; Marshak, David W.; Wilson, John H.; Wensel, Theodore; Lucas, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Early visual defects in degenerative diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa (RP) may arise from phased remodeling of the neural retina. We sought to explore the functional expression of ionotropic (iGluR) and group III, type 6 metabotropic (mGluR6) glutamate receptors in late-stage photoreceptor degenerations. Methods Excitation mapping with organic cations and computational molecular phenotyping were used to determine whether retinal neurons displayed functional glutamate receptor signaling in rodent models of retinal degenerations and a sample of human RP. Results After photoreceptor loss in rodent models of RP, bipolar cells lose mGluR6 and iGluR glutamate-activated currents, while amacrine and ganglion cells retain iGluR-mediated responsivity. Paradoxically, amacrine and ganglion cells show spontaneous iGluR signals in vivo even though bipolar cells lack glutamate-coupled depolarization mechanisms. Cone survival can rescue iGluR expression by OFF bipolar cells. In a case of human RP with cone sparing, iGluR signaling appeared intact, but the numbers of bipolar cells expressing functional iGluRs was double that of normal retina. Conclusions RP triggers permanent loss of bipolar cell glutamate receptor expression, though spontaneous iGluR-mediated signaling by amacrine and ganglion cells implies that such truncated bipolar cells still release glutamate in response to some non-glutamatergic depolarization. Focal cone-sparing can preserve iGluR display by nearby bipolar cells, which may facilitate late-RP photoreceptor transplant attempts. An instance of human RP provides evidence that rod bipolar cell dendrite switching likely triggers new gene expression patterns and may impair cone pathway function. PMID:17591910

  14. Bestrophin 1 and retinal disease.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Adiv A; Guziewicz, Karina E; Lee, C Justin; Kalathur, Ravi C; Pulido, Jose S; Marmorstein, Lihua Y; Marmorstein, Alan D

    2017-01-30

    Mutations in the gene BEST1 are causally associated with as many as five clinically distinct retinal degenerative diseases, which are collectively referred to as the "bestrophinopathies". These five associated diseases are: Best vitelliform macular dystrophy, autosomal recessive bestrophinopathy, adult-onset vitelliform macular dystrophy, autosomal dominant vitreoretinochoroidopathy, and retinitis pigmentosa. The most common of these is Best vitelliform macular dystrophy. Bestrophin 1 (Best1), the protein encoded by the gene BEST1, has been the subject of a great deal of research since it was first identified nearly two decades ago. Today we know that Best1 functions as both a pentameric anion channel and a regulator of intracellular Ca(2+) signaling. Best1 is an integral membrane protein which, within the eye, is uniquely expressed in the retinal pigment epithelium where it predominantly localizes to the basolateral plasma membrane. Within the brain, Best1 expression has been documented in both glial cells and astrocytes where it functions in both tonic GABA release and glutamate transport. The crystal structure of Best1 has revealed critical information about how Best1 functions as an ion channel and how Ca(2+) regulates that function. Studies using animal models have led to critical insights into the physiological roles of Best1 and advances in stem cell technology have allowed for the development of patient-derived, "disease in a dish" models. In this article we review our knowledge of Best1 and discuss prospects for near-term clinical trials to test therapies for the bestrophinopathies, a currently incurable and untreatable set of diseases.

  15. Constitutively Active Rhodopsin and Retinal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Park, Paul Shin-Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Rhodopsin is the light receptor in rod photoreceptor cells of the retina that initiates scotopic vision. In the dark, rhodopsin is bound to the chromophore 11-cis retinal, which locks the receptor in an inactive state. The maintenance of an inactive rhodopsin in the dark is critical for rod photoreceptor cells to remain highly sensitive. Perturbations by mutation or absence of 11-cis retinal can cause rhodopsin to become constitutively active, which leads to the desensitization of photoreceptor cells and, in some instances, retinal degeneration. Constitutive activity can arise in rhodopsin by various mechanisms and can cause a variety of inherited retinal diseases including Leber congenital amaurosis, congenital night blindness, and retinitis pigmentosa. In this review, the molecular and structural properties of different constitutively active forms of rhodopsin are overviewed and the possibility that constitutive activity can arise from different active-state conformations is discussed. PMID:24931191

  16. Does soccer ball heading cause retinal bleeding?

    PubMed

    Reed, William F; Feldman, Kenneth W; Weiss, Avery H; Tencer, Alan F

    2002-04-01

    To define forces of youth soccer ball heading (headers) and determine whether heading causes retinal hemorrhage. Regional Children's Hospital, youth soccer camp. Male and female soccer players, 13 to 16 years old, who regularly head soccer balls. Dilated retinal examination, after 2-week header diary, and accelerometer measurement of heading a lofted soccer ball. Twenty-one youth soccer players, averaging 79 headers in the prior 2 weeks, and 3 players who did not submit header diaries lacked retinal hemorrhage. Thirty control subjects also lacked retinal hemorrhage. Seven subjects heading the ball experienced linear cranial accelerations of 3.7 +/- 1.3g. Rotational accelerations were negligible. Headers, not associated with globe impact, are unlikely to cause retinal hemorrhage. Correctly executed headers did not cause significant rotational acceleration of the head, but incorrectly executed headers might.

  17. An update on retinal laser therapy.

    PubMed

    Lock, Jane Huan-Jing; Fong, Kenneth Choong Sian

    2011-01-01

    Since its discovery in the 1940s, retinal photocoagulation has evolved immensely. Although the first photocoagulators used incandescent light, it was the invention of the laser that instigated the widespread use of photocoagulation for treatment of retinal diseases. Laser permits selection of electromagnetic wavelength, energy levels, spot size and pulse duration. These variables are crucial for accurate targeting of retinal tissue and prevention of detrimental side-effects such as central blind spots. There is ongoing clinical research dedicated to optimising such parameters and many innovative modes of laser delivery are now being offered. Laser photocoagulation is the mainstay of treatment for various retinal and macular diseases. Considering the escalating prevalence of such conditions and widespread use of photocoagulation, it is important for optometrists to grasp the basic principles and be aware of new developments in retinal laser therapy. © 2010 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Optometry © 2010 Optometrists Association Australia.

  18. New mouse primary retinal degeneration (rd-3)

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, B.; Hawes, N.L.; Roderick, T.H. ); Heckenlively, J.R. )

    1993-04-01

    A new mouse retinal degeneration that appears to be an excellent candidate for modeling human retinitis pigmentosa is reported. In this degeneration, called rd-3, differentiation proceeds postnatally through 2 weeks, and photoreceptor degeneration starts by 3 weeks. The rod photoreceptor loss is essentially complete by 5 weeks, whereas remnant cone cells are seen through 7 weeks. This is the only mouse homozygous retinal degeneration reported to date in which photoreceptors are initially normal. Crosses with known mouse retinal degenerations rd, Rds, nr, and pcd are negative for retinal degeneration in offspring, and linkage analysis places rd-3 on mouse chromosome 1 at 10 [+-]2.5 cM distal to Akp-1. Homology mapping suggests that the homologous human locus should be on chromosome 1q. 32 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. [Viral retinitis following intravitreal triamcinolone injection].

    PubMed

    Zghal, I; Malek, I; Amel, C; Soumaya, O; Bouguila, H; Nacef, L

    2013-09-01

    Necrotizing viral retinitis is associated with infection by the Herpes family of viruses, especially herpes simplex virus (HSV), varicella zoster virus (VZV) and occasionally cytomegalovirus (CMV). When the diagnosis is suspected clinically, antiviral therapy must be instituted immediately. We report the case of a patient presenting with necrotizing viral retinitis 3 months following intravitreal injection of triamcinolone acetonide for diabetic macular edema. Fluorescein angiography demonstrated a superior temporal occlusive vasculitis. A diagnostic anterior chamber paracentesis was performed to obtain deoxyribo-nucleic acid (DNA) for a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test for viral retinitis. PCR was positive for CMV. The patient was placed on intravenous ganciclovir. CMV retinitis is exceedingly rare in immunocompetent patients; however, it remains the most common cause of posterior uveitis in immunocompromised patients. The incidence of this entity remains unknown. Local immunosuppression, the dose and the frequency of injections may explain the occurrence of this severe retinitis.

  20. The cell stress machinery and retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Athanasiou, Dimitra; Aguilà, Monica; Bevilacqua, Dalila; Novoselov, Sergey S; Parfitt, David A; Cheetham, Michael E

    2013-06-27

    Retinal degenerations are a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorders characterised by progressive loss of vision due to neurodegeneration. The retina is a highly specialised tissue with a unique architecture and maintaining homeostasis in all the different retinal cell types is crucial for healthy vision. The retina can be exposed to a variety of environmental insults and stress, including light-induced damage, oxidative stress and inherited mutations that can lead to protein misfolding. Within retinal cells there are different mechanisms to cope with disturbances in proteostasis, such as the heat shock response, the unfolded protein response and autophagy. In this review, we discuss the multiple responses of the retina to different types of stress involved in retinal degenerations, such as retinitis pigmentosa, age-related macular degeneration and glaucoma. Understanding the mechanisms that maintain and re-establish proteostasis in the retina is important for developing new therapeutic approaches to fight blindness.

  1. Oximetry of retinal capillaries by multicomponent analysis.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Hiromitsu; Arimoto, Hidenobu; Shirai, Tomohiro; Ooto, Sotaro; Hangai, Masanori; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2012-08-01

    Retinal oximetry of capillaries was performed for early detection of retinal vascular abnormalities, which are caused predominantly by complications of systemic circulatory diseases. As the conventional method for determining absorbance is not applicable to capillaries, multicomponent analysis was used to estimate the absorbance spectra of the retinal blood vessels. In this analysis, the capillary spectrum was classified as intermediate between those of the retinal arteries and veins, enabling relative estimation of oxygen saturation in the capillaries. This method could be useful for early recognition of disturbances in the peripheral circulation. Furthermore, a spectroscopic ophthalmoscope system based on the proposed method was developed to examine the human retina. A clinical trial of this system demonstrated that oximetry of the retinal capillaries may be an improvement over the present diagnosis for patients of malignant hypertension.

  2. Sildenafil alters retinal function in mouse carriers of retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Nivison-Smith, Lisa; Zhu, Yuan; Whatham, Andrew; Bui, Bang V; Fletcher, Erica L; Acosta, Monica L; Kalloniatis, Michael

    2014-11-01

    Sildenafil, the active ingredient in Viagra, has been reported to cause transient visual disturbance from inhibition of phosphodiesterase 6 (PDE6), a key enzyme in the visual phototransduction pathway. This study investigated the effects of sildenafil on the rd1(+/-) mouse, a model for carriers of Retinitis Pigmentosa which exhibit normal vision but may have a lower threshold for cellular stress caused by sildenafil due to a heterozygous mutation in PDE6. Sildenafil caused a dose-dependent decrease in electroretinogram (ERG) responses of normal mice which mostly recovered two days post administration. In contrast, rd1(+/-) mice exhibited a significantly reduced photoreceptor and a supernormal bipolar cell response to sildenafil within 1 h of treatment. Carrier mice retinae took two weeks to return to baseline levels suggesting sildenafil has direct effects on both the inner and outer retina and these effects differ significantly between normal and carrier mice. Anatomically, an increase in expression of the early apoptotic marker, cytochrome C in rd1(+/-) mice indicated that the effects of sildenafil on visual function may lead to degeneration. The results of this study are significant considering approximately 1 in 50 people are likely to be carriers of recessive traits leading to retinal degeneration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Fire history and climate change in giant sequoia groves.

    PubMed

    Swetnam, T W

    1993-11-05

    Fire scars in giant sequoia [Sequoiadendron giganteum (Lindley) Buchholz] were used to reconstruct the spatial and temporal pattern of surface fires that burned episodically through five groves during the past 2000 years. Comparisons with independent dendroclimatic reconstructions indicate that regionally synchronous fire occurrence was inversely related to yearly fluctuations in precipitation and directly related to decadal-to-centennial variations in temperature. Frequent small fires occurred during a warm period from about A.D. 1000 to 1300, and less frequent but more widespread fires occurred during cooler periods from about A.D. 500 to 1000 and after A.D. 1300. Regionally synchronous fire histories demonstrate the importance of climate in maintaining nonequilibrium conditions.

  4. Fires, storms, and water supplies: a case of compound extremes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheridan, G. J.; Nyman, P.; Langhans, C.; Jones, O.; Lane, P. N.

    2013-12-01

    Intense rainfall events following fire can wash sediment and ash into streams and reservoirs, contaminating water supplies for cities and towns. Post fire flooding and debris flows damage infrastructure and endanger life. These kinds of risks which are associated with a combination of two or more events (which may or may not be extreme when occurring independently) are an example of what the IPCC recently referred to as ';compound extremes'. Detailed models exist for modeling fire and erosion events separately, however there have been few attempts to integrate these models so as to estimate the water quality and infrastructure risks associated with combined fire and rainfall regimes. This presentation will articulate the issues associated with modeling the compound effects of fire and subsequent rainfall events on erosion, debris flows and water quality, and will describe and contrast several new approaches to modeling this problem developed and applied to SE Australian fire prone landscapes under the influence of climate change.

  5. Fire History and Climate Change in Giant Sequoia Groves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swetnam, Thomas W.

    1993-11-01

    Fire scars in giant sequoia [Sequoiadendron giganteum (Lindley) Buchholz] were used to reconstruct the spatial and temporal pattern of surface fires that burned episodically through five groves during the past 2000 years. Comparisons with independent dendroclimatic reconstructions indicate that regionally synchronous fire occurrence was inversely related to yearly fluctuations in precipitation and directly related to decadal-to-centennial variations in temperature. Frequent small fires occurred during a warm period from about A.D. 1000 to 1300, and less frequent but more widespread fires occurred during cooler periods from about A.D. 500 to 1000 and after A.D. 1300. Regionally synchronous fire histories demonstrate the importance of climate in maintaining nonequilibrium conditions.

  6. Reorganization of visual processing in macular degeneration is not specific to the "preferred retinal locus".

    PubMed

    Dilks, Daniel D; Baker, Chris I; Peli, Eli; Kanwisher, Nancy

    2009-03-04

    Recent work has shown that foveal cortex, deprived of its normal bottom-up input as a result of macular degeneration (MD), begins responding to stimuli presented to a peripheral retinal location. However, these studies have only presented stimuli to the "preferred retinal location," or PRL, a spared part of the peripheral retina used by individuals with MD for fixating, face recognition, reading, and other visual tasks. Thus, previous research has not yet answered a question critical for understanding the mechanisms underlying this reorganization: Does formerly foveal cortex respond only to stimuli presented at the PRL, or does it also respond to other peripheral locations of similar eccentricity? If foveal cortex responds to stimuli at PRL because it is the long-term habitual use of this region as a functional fovea that drives the formerly foveal cortex to respond to stimuli presented at the PRL (the "use-dependent reorganization" hypothesis), then foveal cortex will not respond to stimuli presented at other locations. Alternatively, it may be that foveal cortex responds to any peripheral retinal input, independent of whether input at that retinal location has been chronically attended for months or years (the "use-independent reorganization" hypothesis). Using fMRI, we found clear activation of formerly foveal cortex to stimuli presented at either the PRL or an isoeccentric non-PRL location in two individuals with MD, supporting the use-independent reorganization hypothesis. This finding suggests that reorganization is driven by passive, not use-dependent mechanisms.

  7. Multisensor Fire Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boquist, C.

    2004-01-01

    This DVD includes animations of multisensor fire observations from the following satellite sources: Landsat, GOES, TOMS, Terra, QuikSCAT, and TRMM. Some of the animations are included in multiple versions of a short video presentation on the DVD which focuses on the Hayman, Rodeo-Chediski, and Biscuit fires during the 2002 North American fire season. In one version of the presentation, MODIS, TRMM, GOES, and QuikSCAT data are incorporated into the animations of these wildfires. These data products provided rain, wind, cloud, and aerosol data on the fires, and monitored the smoke and destruction created by them. Another presentation on the DVD consists of a panel discussion, in which experts from academia, NASA, and the U.S. Forest Service answer questions on the role of NASA in fighting forest fires, the role of the Terra satellite and its instruments, including the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), in fire fighting decision making, and the role of fire in the Earth's climate. The third section of the DVD features several animations of fires over the years 2001-2003, including animations of global and North American fires, and specific fires from 2003 in California, Washington, Montana, and Arizona.

  8. Multisensor Fire Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boquist, C.

    2004-01-01

    This DVD includes animations of multisensor fire observations from the following satellite sources: Landsat, GOES, TOMS, Terra, QuikSCAT, and TRMM. Some of the animations are included in multiple versions of a short video presentation on the DVD which focuses on the Hayman, Rodeo-Chediski, and Biscuit fires during the 2002 North American fire season. In one version of the presentation, MODIS, TRMM, GOES, and QuikSCAT data are incorporated into the animations of these wildfires. These data products provided rain, wind, cloud, and aerosol data on the fires, and monitored the smoke and destruction created by them. Another presentation on the DVD consists of a panel discussion, in which experts from academia, NASA, and the U.S. Forest Service answer questions on the role of NASA in fighting forest fires, the role of the Terra satellite and its instruments, including the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), in fire fighting decision making, and the role of fire in the Earth's climate. The third section of the DVD features several animations of fires over the years 2001-2003, including animations of global and North American fires, and specific fires from 2003 in California, Washington, Montana, and Arizona.

  9. Fires in Amazonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aragão, Luiz E. O. C.; Anderson, Liana O.; Lima, André; Arai, Egidio

    2016-11-01

    Fire has been used since the first humans arrived in Amazonia; however, it has recently become a widely used instrument for large-scale forest clearance. Patterns of fire incidence in the region have been exacerbated by recent drought events. Understanding temporal and spatial fire patterns as well as their consequences for forest structure, species composition, and the carbon cycle is critical for minimising global change impacts on Amazonian ecosystems and people. In this chapter, we provide an overview of the state of our knowledge on the spatial and temporal patterns of fire incidence in Amazonia, depicting the historical fire usage in the region, their relationship with land use and land cover, and their responses to climate seasonality and droughts. We subsequently focus on the impacts of fire, by quantifying the extent of burnt forests during major droughts and describing the main impacts on forest structure, composition, and carbon stocks. Finally, we present an overview of modelling initiatives for forecasting fire incidence in the region. We conclude by providing a comprehensive view of the processes that influence fire occurrence, potential feedbacks, and impacts in Amazonia. We also highlight how key areas within fire ecology must be improved for a better understanding of the long-term effect of fire on the Amazon forest 'biome'.

  10. Fires in Amazonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aragão, Luiz E. O. C.; Anderson, Liana O.; Lima, André Arai, Egidio

    2016-01-01

    Fire has been used since the first humans arrived in Amazonia; however, it has recently become a widely used instrument for large-scale forest clearance. Patterns of fire incidence in the region have been exacerbated by recent drought events. Understanding temporal and spatial fire patterns as well as their consequences for forest structure, species composition, and the carbon cycle is critical for minimising global change impacts on Amazonian ecosystems and people. In this chapter, we provide an overview of the state of our knowledge on the spatial and temporal patterns of fire incidence in Amazonia, depicting the historical fire usage in the region, their relationship with land use and land cover, and their responses to climate seasonality and droughts. We subsequently focus on the impacts of fire, by quantifying the extent of burnt forests during major droughts and describing the main impacts on forest structure, composition, and carbon stocks. Finally, we present an overview of modelling initiatives for forecasting fire incidence in the region. We conclude by providing a comprehensive view of the processes that influence fire occurrence, potential feedbacks, and impacts in Amazonia. We also highlight how key areas within fire ecology must be improved for a better understanding of the long-term effect of fire on the Amazon forest 'biome'.

  11. Libby South Fire, Washington

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    On July 9, 2001, a fire burned about 15 miles south of Twisp, Washington, that officials believe was caused by human error. NASA's Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer on the Terra satellite observed the fire, indicated with a red dot in this image, on July 10, after the fire had already consumed about 1,240 acres. On July 10, another fire-called the Thirty Mile Fire-trapped 21 firefighters and 2 civilians in a narrow canyon in the Chewuch River Valley, north of Winthrop, WA. (That fire did not erupt until later in the day after this image was acquired and is therefore not visible.) Tragically, four firefighters were killed and six people were injured, including the two civilians. Rolling debris, rugged and steep terrain, and limited access are impeding efforts to contain the now 8,200-acre fire, which according to current fire incident reports, is completely uncontained. Nearly all the areas in the full-size image, including Washington (center), Idaho (right), Oregon (bottom) are in a state of severe drought, which means the region could be in for another devastating fire season. Another fire is visible in Idaho in the full-size image just east of where Idaho borders with Washington and Oregon. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team

  12. Fires in Southern Georgia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Several large fires were burning in southern Georgia on April 29, 2007, when the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead and captured this image. Places where MODIS detected actively burning fires are outlined in red. The Roundabout Fire sprang up on April 27, according to the U.S. Southern Area Coordination Center, and was about 3,500 acres as of April 30. That fire was threatening homes in the community of Kirkland. Meanwhile, south of Waycross, two large blazes were burning next to each other in the northern part of Okefenokee Swamp. The Sweat Farm Road Fire threatened the town of Waycross in previous weeks, but at the end of April, activity had moved to the southeastern perimeter. The fire had affected more than 50,000 acres of timber (including pine tree plantations) and swamps. Scores of residences scattered throughout the rural area are threatened. The Big Turnaround Complex is burning to the east. The 26,000-acre fire was extremely active over the weekend, with flame lengths more than 60 feet (just over 18 meters) in places. The two blazes appeared to overlap in fire perimeter maps available from the U.S. Geospatial Multi-Agency Coordination Team. According to the Southern Area Coordination Center morning report on April 30, the Sweat Farm Road Fire 'will be a long term fire. Containment and control will depend on significant rainfall, due to the inaccessible swamp terrain.' No expected containment date was available for the Big Turnaround Complex Fire, either. Describing that fire, the report stated, 'Heavy fuel loading, high fire danger, and difficulty of access continue to hamper suppression efforts.' The large image provided above has a spatial resolution (level of detail) of 250 meters per pixel. The MODIS Rapid Response Team provides twice-daily images of the region in additional resolutions. They also provide a version of the image that shows smoke plumes stretching out across the Atlantic Ocean.

  13. Fires in Southern Georgia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Several large fires were burning in southern Georgia on April 29, 2007, when the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead and captured this image. Places where MODIS detected actively burning fires are outlined in red. The Roundabout Fire sprang up on April 27, according to the U.S. Southern Area Coordination Center, and was about 3,500 acres as of April 30. That fire was threatening homes in the community of Kirkland. Meanwhile, south of Waycross, two large blazes were burning next to each other in the northern part of Okefenokee Swamp. The Sweat Farm Road Fire threatened the town of Waycross in previous weeks, but at the end of April, activity had moved to the southeastern perimeter. The fire had affected more than 50,000 acres of timber (including pine tree plantations) and swamps. Scores of residences scattered throughout the rural area are threatened. The Big Turnaround Complex is burning to the east. The 26,000-acre fire was extremely active over the weekend, with flame lengths more than 60 feet (just over 18 meters) in places. The two blazes appeared to overlap in fire perimeter maps available from the U.S. Geospatial Multi-Agency Coordination Team. According to the Southern Area Coordination Center morning report on April 30, the Sweat Farm Road Fire 'will be a long term fire. Containment and control will depend on significant rainfall, due to the inaccessible swamp terrain.' No expected containment date was available for the Big Turnaround Complex Fire, either. Describing that fire, the report stated, 'Heavy fuel loading, high fire danger, and difficulty of access continue to hamper suppression efforts.' The large image provided above has a spatial resolution (level of detail) of 250 meters per pixel. The MODIS Rapid Response Team provides twice-daily images of the region in additional resolutions. They also provide a version of the image that shows smoke plumes stretching out across the Atlantic Ocean.

  14. Interventions for asymptomatic retinal breaks and lattice degeneration for preventing retinal detachment

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Charles P

    2016-01-01

    Background Asymptomatic retinal breaks and lattice degeneration are visible lesions that are risk factors for later retinal detachment. Retinal detachments occur when fluid in the vitreous cavity passes through tears or holes in the retina and separates the retina from the underlying retinal pigment epithelium. Creation of an adhesion surrounding retinal breaks and lattice degeneration, with laser photocoagulation or cryotherapy, has been recommended as an effective means of preventing retinal detachment. This therapy is of value in the management of retinal tears associated with the symptoms of flashes and floaters and persistent vitreous traction upon the retina in the region of the retinal break, because such symptomatic retinal tears are associated with a high rate of progression to retinal detachment. Retinal tears and holes unassociated with acute symptoms and lattice degeneration are significantly less likely to be the sites of retinal breaks that are responsible for later retinal detachment. Nevertheless, treatment of these problems is frequently recommended, in spite of the fact that the effectiveness of this therapy is unproven. Objectives The purpose of this review was to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions for asymptomatic retinal breaks and lattice degeneration. Search methods We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (The Cochrane Library 2012, Issue 1), MEDLINE (January 1950 to January 2012), EMBASE (January 1980 to January 2012), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). There were no date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. The electronic databases were last searched on 28 January 2012. Textbooks regarding retinal detachment and the reference lists of relevant reports were reviewed for additional

  15. Managing wildland fires: integrating weather models into fire projections

    Treesearch

    Anne M. Rosenthal; Francis Fujioka

    2004-01-01

    Flames from the Old Fire sweep through lands north of San Bernardino during late fall of 2003. Like many Southern California fires, the Old Fire consumed susceptible forests at the urban-wildland interface and spread to nearby city neighborhoods. By incorporating weather models into fire perimeter projections, scientist Francis Fujioka is improving fire modeling as a...

  16. Wildland fire in ecosystems: effects of fire on air

    Treesearch

    David V. Sandberg; Roger D. Ottmar; Janice L. Peterson

    2002-01-01

    This state-of-knowledge review about the effects of fire on air quality can assist land, fire, and air resource managers with fire and smoke planning, and their efforts to explain to others the science behind fire-related program policies and practices to improve air quality. Chapter topics include air quality regulations and fire; characterization of emissions from...

  17. Fire scars reveal variability and dynamics of eastern fire regimes

    Treesearch

    Richard P. Guyette; Daniel C. Dey; Michael C. Stambaugh; Rose-Marie Muzika

    2006-01-01

    Fire scar evidence in eastern North America is sparse and complex but shows promise in defining the dynamics of these fire regimes and their influence on ecosystems. We review fire scar data, methods, and limitations, and use this information to identify and examine the factors influencing fire regimes. Fire scar data from studies at more than 40 sites in Eastern North...

  18. Effect of birth parameters on retinal vascular caliber: the Twins Eye Study in Tasmania.

    PubMed

    Sun, Cong; Ponsonby, Anne-Louise; Wong, Tien Y; Brown, Shayne A; Kearns, Lisa S; Cochrane, Jenny; MacKinnon, Jane R; Ruddle, Jonathan B; Hewitt, Alex W; Liew, Gerald; Dwyer, Terence; Scurrah, Katrina; Mackey, David A

    2009-03-01

    Recent studies reported an association between smaller birth size and narrower retinal vascular caliber, but it remains unclear whether this association is attributed to confounding by shared environment or genetic factors. At a mean age of 9.3 years, 266 twins (49 monozygotic and 84 dizygotic pairs) in the Twins Eye Study in Tasmania underwent an ophthalmic examination including retinal photography. Retinal vascular caliber was measured using a validated protocol. The majority of these twins were also in the Tasmanian Infant Health Study, which prospectively collected data on birth parameters and antenatal maternal factors. We conducted the main analysis using linear mixed models, accounting for birth set clustering. Both the within-pair (-9.73; 95% CI: -14.68 to -4.77 microm per 5-cm decrease in birth length) and between-pair associations (-7.15; 95% CI: -11.54 to -3.01) with retinal arteriolar caliber were significant and of similar magnitude (difference in effect, P=0.61), after adjusting for age, sex, maternal smoking, mean arterial blood pressure, and other confounders. These associations remained within dizygotic and monozygotic pairs. Analyses of head circumference and retinal arteriolar caliber were similar to those of birth length (within-pair regression coefficient: -2.41; 95% CI: -5.09 to 0.28; between-pair regression coefficient: -2.60; 95% CI: -5.00 to -0.19). For birth weight, only a between-pair association was evident (-7.28; 95% CI: -13.07 to -1.48). This study demonstrates a consistent association between smaller birth size and narrower retinal arterioles in twins. The independent effect of shorter birth length on retinal arteriolar caliber supports a role for twin-specific supply line factors affecting fetal growth on vascular structure.

  19. Evidence of retinal vascular narrowing in glaucomatous eyes in an Asian population.

    PubMed

    Amerasinghe, Nishani; Aung, Tin; Cheung, Ning; Fong, Chee Weng; Wang, Jie Jin; Mitchell, Paul; Saw, Seang-Mei; Wong, Tien Yin

    2008-12-01

    To examine the relationship between retinal vascular caliber and glaucoma in an Asian population. A population-based, cross-sectional study of 3019 persons of Asian Malay ethnicity aged 40 to 80 years residing in Singapore. All participants had dilated digital retinal photographs taken of both eyes. From these, retinal vascular caliber was measured with a computer-based technique according to a standardized protocol. Glaucoma was diagnosed based on the International Society of Geographic and Epidemiologic Ophthalmology classification and included people with glaucomatous optic neuropathy and compatible visual field loss. There were 127 (4.2%) participants with glaucoma. Mean retinal arteriolar and venular calibers were significantly narrower in persons with than in those without glaucoma (136.4 microm vs. 139.7 microm, P = 0.02 and 209.2 microm vs. 219.7 microm, P < 0.001, respectively). After adjusting for age, sex, smoking, IOP, and other vascular risk factors, persons with narrower retinal arteriolar and venular caliber were more likely to have glaucoma (odds ratio [OR], 1.29; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.07-1.56 and OR, 1.49; 95% CI, 1.24-1.79, for each SD reduction in arteriolar and venular caliber, respectively) and a vertical cup-to-disc ratio >or= 0.7 (OR, 1.35; 95% CI, 1.12-1.63 and OR, 1.65; 95% CI, 1.38-1.98, respectively). Retinal vascular caliber was not associated with intraocular pressure. These findings support an association of narrower retinal arteriolar and venular caliber changes with glaucomatous optic neuropathy, independent of intraocular pressure.

  20. pH dependence of the rate and quantum yield of the retinal photoisomerization in bacteriorhodopsin

    SciTech Connect

    Logunov, S.L.; Song, L.; El-Sayed, M.A. )

    1994-10-20

    The quantum yield of the retinal photoisomerization, the primary step in the bacteriorhodopsin (bR) photosynthesis, is determined from the picosecond bleach recovery of the absorption at 560 nm in the pH range 6.8-11.3. From this and the dependence of the observed retinal excited state decay on pH, the effects of pH on both the photoisomerization and internal conversion rates are also determined. The results show that while the quantum yield of photoisomerization is independent of pH, each of the rate constants decreased by more than a factor of 2 at elevated pH. This suggests that the perturbation resulting from the pH changes affects both rate constants similarly. This observation is discussed in terms of the theoretically proposed potential energy surfaces of the ground and excited states of retinal in bR. 16 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  1. The evolutionary diversity of insect retinal mosaics: common design principles and emerging molecular logic.

    PubMed

    Wernet, Mathias F; Perry, Michael W; Desplan, Claude

    2015-06-01

    Independent evolution has resulted in a vast diversity of eyes. Despite the lack of a common Bauplan or ancestral structure, similar developmental strategies are used. For instance, different classes of photoreceptor cells (PRs) are distributed stochastically and/or localized in different regions of the retina. Here, we focus on recent progress made towards understanding the molecular principles behind patterning retinal mosaics of insects, one of the most diverse groups of animals adapted to life on land, in the air, under water, or on the water surface. Morphological, physiological, and behavioral studies from many species provide detailed descriptions of the vast variation in retinal design and function. By integrating this knowledge with recent progress in the characterization of insect Rhodopsins as well as insight from the model organism Drosophila melanogaster, we seek to identify the molecular logic behind the adaptation of retinal mosaics to the habitat and way of life of an animal. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The evolutionary diversity of insect retinal mosaics: Common design principles and emerging molecular logic

    PubMed Central

    Wernet, Mathias F.; Perry, Michael W.; Desplan, Claude

    2015-01-01

    Independent evolution has resulted in a vast diversity of eyes. Despite the lack of a common Bauplan or ancestral structure, similar developmental strategies are used. For instance, different classes of photoreceptor cells (PRs) are distributed stochastically and/or localized in different regions of the retina. Here we focus on recent progress made towards understanding the molecular principles behind patterning retinal mosaics of insects, one of the most diverse groups of animals adapted to life on land, in the air, under water, or on the water surface. Morphological, physiological, and behavioral studies from many species provide detailed descriptions of the vast variation in retinal design and function. By integrating this knowledge with recent progress in the characterization of insect Rhodopsins as well as insight from the model organism Drosophila melanogaster, we seek to identify the molecular logic behind the adaptation of retinal mosaics to an animal’s habitat and way of life. PMID:26025917

  3. ASSOCIATION BETWEEN RETINAL HEMORRHAGIC PATTERNS AND PERFUSION STATUS IN EYES WITH ACUTE CENTRAL RETINAL VEIN OCCLUSION.

    PubMed

    Muraoka, Yuki; Uji, Akihito; Tsujikawa, Akitaka; Murakami, Tomoaki; Ooto, Sotaro; Suzuma, Kiyoshi; Takahashi, Ayako; Iida, Yuto; Miwa, Yuko; Hata, Masayuki; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate peripheral retinal hemorrhagic patterns in eyes with acute central retinal vein occlusion, and to explore their clinical relevance in differentiating for the retinal perfusion status, through a prospective, and cross-sectional study. Fifty eyes with acute central retinal vein occlusion were included. Retinal hemorrhagic patterns at the equator and retinal perfusion status were evaluated by ultra-wide field fundus photography and fluorescein angiography. Retinal perfusion was categorized as nonischemic in 29 eyes, ischemic in 18 eyes, and undeterminable in 3 eyes. None of the examined eyes had flame-shaped retinal hemorrhages in the periphery. All hemorrhages were rounded-dot or blot and were variable in size. Particle analysis was performed to quantify hemorrhage size, and showed higher values in eyes having larger blot hemorrhages, and lower values in eyes having dot or smaller blot hemorrhages. Mean size of maximum peripheral dot or blot hemorrhage was larger in eyes classified as ischemic (10,763.0 ± 5,946.3 pixels) than as nonischemic (2,839.9 ± 1,153.6 pixels, P < 0.001). The authors calculated area under the curve to investigate the ability of continuous variables to discriminate retinal perfusion status, which was 0.963 (P < 0.001) for mean size of maximum peripheral blot hemorrhages. The authors objectively evaluated retinal hemorrhagic patterns at the equator in eyes with acute central retinal vein occlusion using particle analysis. The resulting hemorrhage size measurement was considered to be often useful in determining retinal perfusion status. Because they can be noninvasively evaluated with readily available equipment, peripheral hemorrhagic patterns might be good clinical markers of retinal perfusion.

  4. Measurement of retinal blood velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winchester, Leonard W., Jr.; Chou, Nee-Yin

    2006-02-01

    A fundus camera was modified to illuminate the retina of a rabbit model with low power laser light in order to obtain laser speckle images. A fast-exposure charge-coupled device (CCD) camera was used to capture laser speckle images of the retina. Image acquisition was synchronized with the arterial pulses of the rabbit to ensure that all images are obtained at the same point in the cardiac cycle. The rabbits were sedated and a speculum was inserted to prevent the eyelid from closing. Both albino (New Zealand; pigmented (Dutch belted) rabbits were used in the study. The rabbit retina is almost avascular. The measurements are obtained for choroidal tissue as well as retinal tissue. Because the retina is in a region of high metabolism, blood velocity is strongly affected by blood oxygen saturation. Measurements of blood velocity obtained over a wide range of O II saturations (58%-100%) showed that blood velocity increases with decreasing O II saturation. For most experiments, the left eye of the rabbit was used for laser measurements whereas the right eye served as a control. No observable difference between pre- and post-experimented eye was noted. Histological examinations of retinal tissue subjected to repeated laser measurements showed no indication of tissue damage.

  5. Fixation Strategies For Retinal Immunohistochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Stradleigh, Tyler W.; Ishida, Andrew T.

    2015-01-01

    Immunohistochemical and ex vivo anatomical studies have provided many glimpses of the variety, distribution, and signaling components of vertebrate retinal neurons. The beauty of numerous images published to date, and the qualitative and quantitative information they provide, indicate that these approaches are fundamentally useful. However, obtaining these images entailed tissue handling and exposure to chemical solutions that differ from normal extracellular fluid in composition, temperature, and osmolarity. Because the differences are large enough to alter intercellular and intracellular signaling in neurons, and because retinae are susceptible to crush, shear, and fray, it is natural to wonder if immunohistochemical and anatomical methods disturb or damage the cells they are designed to examine. Tissue fixation is typically incorporated to guard against this damage and is therefore critically important to the quality and significance of the harvested data. Here, we describe mechanisms of fixation; advantages and disadvantages of using formaldehyde and glutaraldehyde as fixatives during immunohistochemistry; and modifications of widely used protocols that have recently been found to improve cell shape preservation and immunostaining patterns, especially in proximal retinal neurons. PMID:25892361

  6. Fixation strategies for retinal immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Stradleigh, Tyler W; Ishida, Andrew T

    2015-09-01

    Immunohistochemical and ex vivo anatomical studies have provided many glimpses of the variety, distribution, and signaling components of vertebrate retinal neurons. The beauty of numerous images published to date, and the qualitative and quantitative information they provide, indicate that these approaches are fundamentally useful. However, obtaining these images entailed tissue handling and exposure to chemical solutions that differ from normal extracellular fluid in composition, temperature, and osmolarity. Because the differences are large enough to alter intercellular and intracellular signaling in neurons, and because retinae are susceptible to crush, shear, and fray, it is natural to wonder if immunohistochemical and anatomical methods disturb or damage the cells they are designed to examine. Tissue fixation is typically incorporated to guard against this damage and is therefore critically important to the quality and significance of the harvested data. Here, we describe mechanisms of fixation; advantages and disadvantages of using formaldehyde and glutaraldehyde as fixatives during immunohistochemistry; and modifications of widely used protocols that have recently been found to improve cell shape preservation and immunostaining patterns, especially in proximal retinal neurons.

  7. Peripheral retinal ischaemia, as evaluated by ultra-widefield fluorescein angiography, is associated with diabetic macular oedema

    PubMed Central

    Wessel, Matthew M; Nair, Nandini; Aaker, Grant D; Ehrlich, Joshua R; D'Amico, Donald J

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To determine the relationship between retinal ischaemia and the presence of macular oedema (DMO) in patients with diabetic retinopathy (DR) using ultra-widefield fluorescein angiography (UWFA) imaging. Methods A retrospective review of 122 eyes of 70 treatment-naïve diabetic patients who underwent diagnostic UWFA using the Optos 200Tx imaging system. Two independent, masked graders quantified the area of retinal ischaemia. Based on clinical examination and optical coherence tomography (OCT), each patient was given a binary classification as either having DMO or no DMO. McNemar's test (with Yates' correction as indicated) and a two-sample test of proportions were used to determine the relationship between DMO and ischaemia for binary and proportional data, respectively. Linear and logistic models were constructed using generalised estimating equations to test relationships between independent variables, covariates and outcomes while controlling for inter-eye correlation, age, gender, haemoglobin A1c, mean arterial pressure and dependence on insulin. Results Seventy-six eyes (62%) exhibited areas of retinal ischaemia. There was a significant direct correlation between DMO and peripheral retinal ischaemia as seen on UWFA (p<0.001). In addition, patients with retinal ischaemia had 3.75 times increased odds of having DMO compared with those without retinal ischaemia (CI 1.26 to 11.13, p<0.02). Conclusion Retinal ischaemia is significantly correlated with DMO in treatment-naïve patients with DR. UWFA is a useful tool for detecting peripheral retinal ischaemia, which may have direct implications in the diagnosis, follow-up and treatment such as targeted peripheral photocoagulation. PMID:22423055

  8. Neural remodeling in retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Marc, Robert E; Jones, Bryan W; Watt, Carl B; Strettoi, Enrica

    2003-09-01

    Mammalian retinal degenerations initiated by gene defects in rods, cones or the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) often trigger loss of the sensory retina, effectively leaving the neural retina deafferented. The neural retina responds to this challenge by remodeling, first by subtle changes in neuronal structure and later by large-scale reorganization. Retinal degenerations in the mammalian retina generally progress through three phases. Phase 1 initiates with expression of a primary insult, followed by phase 2 photoreceptor death that ablates the sensory retina via initial photoreceptor stress, phenotype deconstruction, irreversible stress and cell death, including bystander effects or loss of trophic support. The loss of cones heralds phase 3: a protracted period of global remodeling of the remnant neural retina. Remodeling resembles the responses of many CNS assemblies to deafferentation or trauma, and includes neuronal cell death, neuronal and glial migration, elaboration of new neurites and synapses, rewiring of retinal circuits, glial hypertrophy and the evolution of a fibrotic glial seal that isolates the remnant neural retina from the surviving RPE and choroid. In early phase 2, stressed photoreceptors sprout anomalous neurites that often reach the inner plexiform and ganglion cell layers. As death of rods and cones progresses, bipolar and horizontal cells are deafferented and retract most of their dendrites. Horizontal cells develop anomalous axonal processes and dendritic stalks that enter the inner plexiform layer. Dendrite truncation in rod bipolar cells is accompanied by revision of their macromolecular phenotype, including the loss of functioning mGluR6 transduction. After ablation of the sensory retina, Müller cells increase intermediate filament synthesis, forming a dense fibrotic layer in the remnant subretinal space. This layer invests the remnant retina and seals it from access via the choroidal route. Evidence of bipolar cell death begins in

  9. The angiotensin II receptor antagonist candesartan cilexetil (TCV-116) ameliorates retinal disorders in rats.

    PubMed

    Nagisa, Y; Shintani, A; Nakagawa, S

    2001-07-01

    The results of the EUCLID trial (EURODIAB Controlled Trial of Lisinopril in Insulin-dependent Diabetes Mellitus) highlighted the importance of the renin-angiotensin system in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy. Candesartan cilexetil (TCV-116), a potent angiotensin II (AII) receptor antagonist, has beneficial effects on hypertension as well as on heart, renal and cerebrovascular disease. We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of candesarten cilexetil in ameliorating retinal disorders induced by hyperglycaemia. We compared retinal vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) mRNA expression and the latencies of retinal oscillatory potentials in TCV-116-treated and control groups of stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats with streptozocin (STZ)-induced diabetes. Retinal VEGF mRNA expression was significantly higher and the latencies of oscillatory potentials were significantly elongated in STZ-treated spontaneously hypertensive rats compared with a non-treated spontaneously hypertensive rat group matched for age. These changes were dependent on hyperglycaemia but independent of hypertension. Treatment with TCV-116 (3 mg/kg) significantly diminished retinal VEGF mRNA expression and the latencies of oscillatory potential peaks, but had no effect on plasma glucose concentrations. These results suggest that TCV-116 is effective in preventing the development of diabetic retinopathy already in the early stages.

  10. COMPUTER ASSISTED RETINAL VESSEL TORTUOSITY EVALUATION IN NOVEL MUTATION FABRY DISEASE: Towards New Prognostic Markers.

    PubMed

    San Román, Irene; Rodríguez, María-Elena; Caporossi, Orsola; Zoppetti, Claudia; Sodi, Andrea; Mecocci, Alessandro; López, David; Rodríguez, Beatriz; Gimeno, Juan-Ramón

    2017-03-01

    Fabry disease is a rare lysosomal storage disorder with systemic involvement. The authors report on a large Fabry family with GLA p.M187R mutation and exhaustive ophthalmologic assessment. Comprehensive systemic evaluation and genetic diagnosis were performed. Ophthalmologic evaluation included intraocular pressure/visual acuity measurement, refractometry, slit lamp examination, retinography, and optical coherence tomography. Three parameters quantified retinal vessel tortuosity: sum of angle metrics, product of angle distance, and triangular index. Calculations were semiautomatized using dedicated software. Ten individuals (2 males and 8 females) were described. Seventy-five percent had retinal vessel tortuosity. One hundred percent had cornea verticillata. Perimacular vessels were predominantly involved. The correlation between the right and left eye tortuosity measurements was very tight. A significant correlation between retinal vessel tortuosity and systemic severity measured by general Mainz Severity Score Index (MSSI), renal MSSI, and neurological MSSI but no cardiac MSSI was observed. Right sum of angle metrics value was an independent statistical predictor of the general-MSSI score in presence of age. p.M187R mutation causes a severe systemic and ophthalmologic phenotype, in both male and female patients. Semiautomatic assessment of retinal vessel tortuosity is an objective and reproducible tool. All three parameters of tortuosity are closely associated with Fabry severity scores. Studies of larger series are being awaited to establish the role of retinal vessel tortuosity as a noninvasive marker of disease progression.

  11. [Automatic detection of exudates in retinal images based on threshold moving average models].

    PubMed

    Wisaeng, K; Hiransakolwong, N; Pothiruk, E

    2015-01-01

    Since exudate diagnostic procedures require the attention of an expert ophthalmologist as well as regular monitoring of the disease, the workload of expert ophthalmologists will eventually exceed the current screening capabilities. Retinal imaging technology is a current practice screening capability providing a great potential solution. In this paper, a fast and robust automatic detection of exudates based on moving average histogram models of the fuzzy image was applied, and then the better histogram was derived. After segmentation of the exudate candidates, the true exudates were pruned based on Sobel edge detector and automatic Otsu's thresholding algorithm that resulted in the accurate location of the exudates in digital retinal images. To compare the performance of exudate detection methods we have constructed a large database of digital retinal images. The method was trained on a set of 200 retinal images, and tested on a completely independent set of 1220 retinal images. Results show that the exudate detection method performs overall best sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of 90.42%, 94.60%, and 93.69%, respectively.

  12. Automated detection of retinal layers from OCT spectral-domain images of healthy eyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovinco, Gaspare; Savastano, Maria Cristina; Ventre, Salvatore; Tamburrino, Antonello

    2015-12-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has become one of the most relevant diagnostic tools for retinal diseases. Besides being a non-invasive technique, one distinguished feature is its unique capability of providing (in vivo) cross-sectional view of the retina. Specifically, OCT images show the retinal layers. From the clinical point of view, the identification of the retinal layers opens new perspectives to study the correlation between morphological and functional aspects of the retinal tissue. The main contribution of this paper is a new method/algorithm for the automated segmentation of cross-sectional images of the retina of healthy eyes, obtained by means of spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Specifically, the proposed segmentation algorithm provides the automated detection of different retinal layers. Tests on experimental SD-OCT scans performed by three different instruments/manufacturers have been successfully carried out and compared to a manual segmentation made by an independent ophthalmologist, showing the generality and the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  13. Retinal vessel caliber among people with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: relationships with visual function.

    PubMed

    Kalyani, Partho S; Fawzi, Amani A; Gangaputra, Sapna; van Natta, Mark L; Hubbard, Larry D; Danis, Ronald P; Thorne, Jennifer E; Holland, Gary N

    2012-03-01

    To evaluate relationships between retinal vessel caliber and tests of visual function among people with AIDS. Longitudinal, observational cohort study. We evaluated data for participants without ocular opportunistic infections at initial examination (baseline) in the Longitudinal Studies of the Ocular Complications of AIDS (1998-2008). Visual function was evaluated with best-corrected visual acuity, Goldmann perimetry, automated perimetry (Humphrey Field Analyzer), and contrast sensitivity (CS) testing. Semi-automated grading of fundus photographs (1 eye/participant) determined central retinal artery equivalent (CRAE), central retinal vein equivalent (CRVE), and arteriole-to-venule ratio (AVR) at baseline. Multiple linear regression models, using forward selection, sought independent relationships between indices and visual function variables. Included were 1250 participants. Smaller AVR was associated with reduced visual field by Goldmann perimetry (P = .003) and worse mean deviation (P = .02) on automated perimetry and possibly with worse pattern standard deviation (PSD) on automated perimetry (P = .06). There was a weak association between smaller AVR and worse CS (P = .07). Relationships were independent of antiretroviral therapy and level of immunodeficiency (CD4+ T lymphocyte count, human immunodeficiency virus [HIV] RNA blood level). On longitudinal analysis, retinal vascular indices at baseline did not predict changes in visual function. Variation in retinal vascular indices is associated with abnormal visual function in people with AIDS, manifested by visual field loss and possibly by reduced CS. Relationships are consistent with the hypothesis that HIV-related retinal vasculopathy is a contributing factor to vision dysfunction among HIV-infected individuals. Longitudinal studies are needed to determine whether changes in indices predict change in visual function. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Retinal sensitivity changes associated with diabetic neuropathy in the absence of diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Neriyanuri, Srividya; Pardhan, Shahina; Gella, Laxmi; Pal, Sakshyar Saumya; Ganesan, Suganeswari; Sharma, Tarun; Raman, Rajiv

    2017-09-01

    To explore any relationship between the markers of early retinal neuronal damage and peripheral diabetic neuropathy in subjects with no diabetic retinopathy (DR). A cross-sectional study in which type 2 diabetic subjects (n=743) without DR were studied. Visual functions including visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, colour vision, retinal sensitivity using microperimeter and retinal thicknesses by spectral domain optical coherence tomography were measured. Vibration perception thresholds of greater than or equal to 20 µV, measured by sensitometer using a biothesiometer probe, were defined as having peripheral diabetic neuropathy. Statistical analyses were performed using independent t-test, multivariate logistic regression and Pearson's correlation. Of 743 subjects who had no DR, 24.9% had diabetic neuropathy. Independent comparisons among subjects who had diabetic neuropathy compared with those who did not showed statistically significant retinal nerve fibre layer thinning (p=0.01), reduced contrast sensitivity (p=0.0001), reduced retinal sensitivity (p=0.03), impaired colour vision (p=0.04) and reduced visual acuity (p=0.0001). Multivariate analysis showed significant association between the mean retinal sensitivity (measured using a microperimeter) and diabetic neuropathy (adjusted OR (95% CI): 0.76 (0.60 to 0.95), p=0.01). Significant association of neuroretinal dysfunction with the presence of diabetic neuropathy was noted among subjects with no DR. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  15. RETINAL VESSEL CALIBER AMONG PEOPLE WITH AIDS: RELATIONSHIPS WITH VISUAL FUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Kalyani, Partho S.; Fawzi, Amani A.; Gangaputra, Sapna; Van Natta, Mark L.; Hubbard, Larry D.; Danis, Ronald P.; Thorne, Jennifer E.; Holland, Gary N.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate relationships between retinal vessel caliber and tests of visual function among people with AIDS. Design Longitudinal, observational, cohort study. Methods We evaluated data for participants without ocular opportunistic infections at initial examination (baseline) in the Longitudinal Studies of the Ocular Complications of AIDS (1998-2008). Visual function was evaluated with best corrected visual acuity, Goldmann perimetry, automated perimetry (Humphrey Field Analyzer), and contrast sensitivity (CS) testing. Semi-automated grading of fundus photographs (1 eye/participant) determined central retinal artery equivalent (CRAE), central retinal vein equivalent (CRVE), and arteriole:venule ratio (AVR) at baseline. Multiple linear regression models, using forward selection, sought independent relationships between indices and visual function variables. Results Included were 1250 participants. Smaller AVR was associated with reduced visual field by Goldmann perimetry (p=0.003) and worse mean deviation (p=0.02) on automated perimetry and possibly with worse pattern standard deviation (PSD) on automated perimetry (p=0.06). There was a weak association between smaller AVR and worse CS (p=0.07). Relationships were independent of antiretroviral therapy and level of immunodeficiency (CD4+ T-lymphocyte count, HIV RNA blood level). On longitudinal analysis, retinal vascular indices at baseline did not predict changes in visual function. Conclusions Variation in retinal vascular indices are associated with abnormal visual function in people with AIDS, manifested by visual field loss and possibly by reduced CS. Relationships are consistent with the hypothesis that HIV-related retinal vasculopathy is a contributing factor to vision dysfunction among HIV-infected individuals. Longitudinal studies are needed to determine whether changes in indices predict change in visual function. PMID:22019221

  16. Retinal vessel caliber and its relationship with nocturnal blood pressure dipping status: the SABPA study.

    PubMed

    Smith, Wayne; Malan, Nicolaas T; Schutte, Aletta E; Schutte, Rudolph; Mc Mels, Catharina; Vilser, Walthard; Malan, Leone

    2016-10-01

    Adverse changes in retinal microvasculature caliber are associated with incident hypertension, coronary heart disease and stroke. The absence of a nocturnal dipping in arterial pressure may induce changes throughout the vascular tree, including the retinal microvasculature, but the later link is not sufficiently studied. We explored the relationship between retinal vessel caliber and dipping status in a group of black and white teachers. The study included black (n=68) and white (n=81) men (24-66 years) from the SABPA study. We measured 24 h ambulatory blood pressure and the percentage mean arterial pressure dipping(%MAPdip) was calculated as (diurnal MAP-nocturnal MAP)/diurnal MAP × 100. Retinal images were captured and the central retinal artery equivalent (CRAE) and central retinal vein equivalent (CRVE) calculated. Black men demonstrated higher diurnal and nocturnal MAP (P⩽0.001) and a lesser %MAPdip compared with white men (P=0.047). When stratified by dipping status, black non-dippers (n=33) revealed an increased CRVE (P<0.001) compared with their dipper counterparts (n=35). In black men, CRVE was negatively (R(2)=0.38, β=-0.47, P<0.001) associated with %MAPdip independent of 24 h MAP or nocturnal MAP. CRVE also associated negatively with dipping status as a dichotomized variable (R(2)=0.29, β=-0.32, P=0.006), independent of 24 h MAP. These associations were absent in the white men. In conclusion, in this group of black men, a non-dipping blood pressure profile was associated with a larger CRVE, suggesting microvascular deterioration due to the absence of nocturnal dipping in blood pressure. This may add to our understanding of the stroke risk in black populations.

  17. A transcriptome for the study of early processes of retinal regeneration in the adult newt, Cynops pyrrhogaster.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kenta; Islam, Md Rafiqul; Takayanagi, Miyako; Yasumuro, Hirofumi; Inami, Wataru; Kunahong, Ailidana; Casco-Robles, Roman M; Toyama, Fubito; Chiba, Chikafumi

    2014-01-01

    Retinal regeneration in the adult newt is a useful system to uncover essential mechanisms underlying the regeneration of body parts of this animal as well as to find clues to treat retinal disorders such as proliferative vitreoretinopathy. Here, to facilitate the study of early processes of retinal regeneration, we provide a de novo assembly transcriptome and inferred proteome of the Japanese fire bellied newt (Cynops pyrrhogaster), which was obtained from eyeball samples of day 0-14 after surgical removal of the lens and neural retina. This transcriptome (237,120 in silico transcripts) contains most information of cDNAs/ESTs which has been reported in newts (C. pyrrhogaster, Pleurodeles waltl and Notophthalmus viridescence) thus far. On the other hand, de novo assembly transcriptomes reported lately for N. viridescence only covered 16-31% of this transcriptome, suggesting that most constituents of this transcriptome are specific to the regenerating eye tissues of C. pyrrhogaster. A total of 87,102 in silico transcripts of this transcriptome were functionally annotated. Coding sequence prediction in combination with functional annotation revealed that 76,968 in silico transcripts encode protein/peptides recorded in public databases so far, whereas 17,316 might be unique. qPCR and Sanger sequencing demonstrated that this transcriptome contains much information pertaining to genes that are regulated in association with cell reprogramming, cell-cycle re-entry/proliferation, and tissue patterning in an early phase of retinal regeneration. This data also provides important insight for further investigations addressing cellular mechanisms and molecular networks underlying retinal regeneration as well as differences between retinal regeneration and disorders. This transcriptome can be applied to ensuing comprehensive gene screening steps, providing candidate genes, regardless of whether annotated or unique, to uncover essential mechanisms underlying early processes of

  18. Biscuit Fire, OR

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-08-22

    In southwest Oregon, the Biscuit Fire continues to grow. This image, acquired from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite on August 14, 2002, shows the pillars of smoke arising from the fires. Active fire areas are in red. More than 6,000 fire personnel are assigned to the Biscuit Fire alone, which was 390,276 acres as of Thursday morning, August 15, and only 26 percent contained. Among the resources threatened are thousands of homes, three nationally designated wild and scenic rivers, and habitat for several categories of plants and animals at risk of extinction. Firefighters currently have no estimate as to when the fire might be contained. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA03856

  19. The role of neuronal connexins 36 and 45 in shaping spontaneous firing patterns in the developing retina.

    PubMed

    Blankenship, Aaron G; Hamby, Aaron M; Firl, Alana; Vyas, Shri; Maxeiner, Stephan; Willecke, Klaus; Feller, Marla B

    2011-07-06

    Gap junction coupling synchronizes activity among neurons in adult neural circuits, but its role in coordinating activity during development is less known. The developing retina exhibits retinal waves--spontaneous depolarizations that propagate among retinal interneurons and drive retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) to fire correlated bursts of action potentials. During development, two connexin isoforms, connexin 36 (Cx36) and Cx45, are expressed in bipolar cells and RGCs, and therefore provide a potential substrate for coordinating network activity. To determine whether gap junctions contribute to retinal waves, we compared spontaneous activity patterns using calcium imaging, whole-cell recording, and multielectrode array recording in control, single-knock-out (ko) mice lacking Cx45 and double-knock-out (dko) mice lacking both isoforms. Wave frequency, propagation speed, and bias in propagation direction were similar in control, Cx36ko, Cx45ko, and Cx36/45dko retinas. However, the spontaneous firing rate of individual retinal ganglion cells was elevated in Cx45ko retinas, similar to Cx36ko retinas (Hansen et al., 2005; Torborg and Feller, 2005), a phenotype that was more pronounced in Cx36/45dko retinas. As a result, spatial correlations, as assayed by nearest-neighbor correlation and functional connectivity maps, were significantly altered. In addition, Cx36/45dko mice had reduced eye-specific segregation of retinogeniculate afferents. Together, these findings suggest that although Cx36 and Cx45 do not play a role in gross spatial and temporal propagation properties of retinal waves, they strongly modulate the firing pattern of individual RGCs, ensuring strongly correlated firing between nearby RGCs and normal patterning of retinogeniculate projections.

  20. Fire Simulation and Cardiovascular Health in Firefighters.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Amanda L; Shah, Anoop S V; Langrish, Jeremy P; Raftis, Jennifer B; Lucking, Andrew J; Brittan, Mairi; Venkatasubramanian, Sowmya; Stables, Catherine L; Stelzle, Dominik; Marshall, James; Graveling, Richard; Flapan, Andrew D; Newby, David E; Mills, Nicholas L

    2017-04-04

    Rates of myocardial infarction in firefighters are increased during fire suppression duties, and are likely to reflect a combination of factors including extreme physical exertion and heat exposure. We assessed the effects of simulated fire suppression on measures of cardiovascular health in healthy firefighters. In an open-label randomized crossover study, 19 healthy firefighters (age, 41±7 years; 16 males) performed a standardized training exercise in a fire simulation facility or light duties for 20 minutes. After each exposure, ex vivo thrombus formation, fibrinolysis, platelet activation, and forearm blood flow in response to intra-arterial infusions of endothelial-dependent and -independent vasodilators were measured. After fire simulation training, core temperature increased (1.0±0.1°C) and weight reduced (0.46±0.14 kg, P<0.001 for both). In comparison with control, exposure to fire simulation increased thrombus formation under low-shear (73±14%) and high-shear (66±14%) conditions (P<0.001 for both) and increased platelet-monocyte binding (7±10%, P=0.03). There was a dose-dependent increase in forearm blood flow with all vasodilators (P<0.001), which was attenuated by fire simulation in response to acetylcholine (P=0.01) and sodium nitroprusside (P=0.004). This was associated with a rise in fibrinolytic capacity, asymptomatic myocardial ischemia, and an increase in plasma cardiac troponin I concentrations (1.4 [0.8-2.5] versus 3.0 [1.7-6.4] ng/L, P=0.010). Exposure to extreme heat and physical exertion during fire suppression activates platelets, increases thrombus formation, impairs vascular function, and promotes myocardial ischemia and injury in healthy firefighters. Our findings provide pathogenic mechanisms to explain the association between fire suppression activity and acute myocardial infarction in firefighters. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01812317. © 2017 The Authors.