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Sample records for indian ayurvedic medicines

  1. Indian Traditional Ayurvedic System of Medicine and Nutritional Supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, M. M.; Rastogi, Subha; Rawat, A. K. S.

    2013-01-01

    Food is the major source for serving the nutritional needs, but with growing modernization some traditional ways are being given up. Affluence of working population with changing lifestyles and reducing affordability of sick care, in terms of time and money involved, are some of the forces that are presently driving people towards thinking about their wellness. There has been increased global interest in traditional medicine. Efforts to monitor and regulate traditional herbal medicine are underway. Ayurveda, the traditional Indian medicine, remains the most ancient yet living traditions. Although India has been successful in promoting its therapies with more research and science-based approach, it still needs more extensive research and evidence base. Increased side effects, lack of curative treatment for several chronic diseases, high cost of new drugs, microbial resistance and emerging, diseases are some reasons for renewed public interest in complementary and alternative medicines. Numerous nutraceutical combinations have entered the international market through exploration of ethnopharmacological claims made by different traditional practices. This review gives an overview of the Ayurvedic system of medicine and its role in translational medicine in order to overcome malnutrition and related disorders. PMID:23864888

  2. Indian traditional ayurvedic system of medicine and nutritional supplementation.

    PubMed

    Pandey, M M; Rastogi, Subha; Rawat, A K S

    2013-01-01

    Food is the major source for serving the nutritional needs, but with growing modernization some traditional ways are being given up. Affluence of working population with changing lifestyles and reducing affordability of sick care, in terms of time and money involved, are some of the forces that are presently driving people towards thinking about their wellness. There has been increased global interest in traditional medicine. Efforts to monitor and regulate traditional herbal medicine are underway. Ayurveda, the traditional Indian medicine, remains the most ancient yet living traditions. Although India has been successful in promoting its therapies with more research and science-based approach, it still needs more extensive research and evidence base. Increased side effects, lack of curative treatment for several chronic diseases, high cost of new drugs, microbial resistance and emerging, diseases are some reasons for renewed public interest in complementary and alternative medicines. Numerous nutraceutical combinations have entered the international market through exploration of ethnopharmacological claims made by different traditional practices. This review gives an overview of the Ayurvedic system of medicine and its role in translational medicine in order to overcome malnutrition and related disorders.

  3. Lead, Mercury, and Arsenic in US- and Indian-Manufactured Ayurvedic Medicines Sold via the Internet

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lead, mercury, and arsenic have been detected in a subsantial portion of Indian-manufactured traditional Ayurvedic medicines. Metals may be present due to the parctice of rasa shastra (combining herbs with metals, minerals and gems). Whether toxic metals are present in both US-...

  4. Lead, Mercury, and Arsenic in US- and Indian-Manufactured Ayurvedic Medicines Sold via the Internet

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lead, mercury, and arsenic have been detected in a subsantial portion of Indian-manufactured traditional Ayurvedic medicines. Metals may be present due to the parctice of rasa shastra (combining herbs with metals, minerals and gems). Whether toxic metals are present in both US-...

  5. Lead, mercury, and arsenic in US- and Indian-manufactured Ayurvedic medicines sold via the Internet.

    PubMed

    Saper, Robert B; Phillips, Russell S; Sehgal, Anusha; Khouri, Nadia; Davis, Roger B; Paquin, Janet; Thuppil, Venkatesh; Kales, Stefanos N

    2008-08-27

    Lead, mercury, and arsenic have been detected in a substantial proportion of Indian-manufactured traditional Ayurvedic medicines. Metals may be present due to the practice of rasa shastra (combining herbs with metals, minerals, and gems). Whether toxic metals are present in both US- and Indian-manufactured Ayurvedic medicines is unknown. To determine the prevalence of Ayurvedic medicines available via the Internet containing detectable lead, mercury, or arsenic and to compare the prevalence of toxic metals in US- vs Indian-manufactured medicines and between rasa shastra and non-rasa shastra medicines. A search using 5 Internet search engines and the search terms Ayurveda and Ayurvedic medicine identified 25 Web sites offering traditional Ayurvedic herbs, formulas, or ingredients commonly used in Ayurveda, indicated for oral use, and available for sale. From 673 identified products, 230 Ayurvedic medicines were randomly selected for purchase in August-October 2005. Country of manufacturer/Web site supplier, rasa shastra status, and claims of Good Manufacturing Practices were recorded. Metal concentrations were measured using x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. Prevalence of medicines with detectable toxic metals in the entire sample and stratified by country of manufacture and rasa shastra status. One hundred ninety-three of the 230 requested medicines were received and analyzed. The prevalence of metal-containing products was 20.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 15.2%-27.1%). The prevalence of metals in US-manufactured products was 21.7% (95% CI, 14.6%-30.4%) compared with 19.5% (95% CI, 11.3%-30.1%) in Indian products (P = .86). Rasa shastra compared with non-rasa shastra medicines had a greater prevalence of metals (40.6% vs 17.1%; P = .007) and higher median concentrations of lead (11.5 microg/g vs 7.0 microg/g; P = .03) and mercury (20,800 microg/g vs 34.5 microg/g; P = .04). Among the metal-containing products, 95% were sold by US Web sites and 75% claimed Good

  6. Ayurvedic Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... products contained levels of lead, mercury, and/or arsenic that exceeded the standards for acceptable daily intake. ... 2008. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Lead poisoning in pregnant women who used Ayurvedic medications from ...

  7. Interrater reliability of diagnostic methods in traditional Indian ayurvedic medicine.

    PubMed

    Kurande, Vrinda; Bilgrau, Anders Ellern; Waagepetersen, Rasmus; Toft, Egon; Prasad, Ramjee

    2013-01-01

    This study assesses the interrater reliability of Ayurvedic pulse (nadi), tongue (jivha), and body constitution (prakriti) assessments. Fifteen registered Ayurvedic doctors with 3-15 years of experience independently examined twenty healthy subjects. Subjects completed self-assessment questionnaires and software analyses for prakriti assessment. Weighted kappa statistics for all 105 pairs of doctors were computed for the pulse, tongue, and prakriti data sets. According to the Landis-Koch scale, the pairwise kappas ranged from poor to slight, slight to fair, and fair to moderate for pulse, tongue, and prakriti assessments, respectively. The average pairwise kappa for pulse, tongue, and prakriti was 0.07, 0.17, and 0.28, respectively. For each data set and pair of doctors, the null hypothesis of random rating was rejected for just twelve pairs of doctors for prakriti, one pair of doctors for pulse examination, and no pairs of doctors for tongue assessment. Thus, the results demonstrate a low level of reliability for all types of assessment made by doctors. There was significant evidence against random rating by software and questionnaire use and by the diagnosis preferred by the majority of doctors. Prakriti assessment appears reliable when questionnaire and software assessment are used, while other diagnostic methods have room for improvement.

  8. Ayurvedic medicine: An introduction for nurses.

    PubMed

    Narayanasamy, Aru; Narayanasamy, Mani

    Ayurvedic medicine is an ancient Indian form of healing. It is gaining popularity as part of the growing interest in New Age spirituality and in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). In this article the principles and practices of Ayurvedic medicine are outlined. In doing so, the safety of ayurvedic medicine is explored in the context of evidence-based practice and the implications of Ayurvedic medicine for nursing are discussed. It is concluded that an awareness of Ayurvedic medicine may help nurses to be cognisant of its benefits and potential complications if it is used with conventional medicine. Although the therapeutic value of ayurvedic treatment is yet to be fully established through randomized control trials, its potential in terms of health promotion, nutrition and spirituality are acknowledged in the emerging literature.

  9. Potent α-amylase inhibitory activity of Indian Ayurvedic medicinal plants

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Indian medicinal plants used in the Ayurvedic traditional system to treat diabetes are a valuable source of novel anti-diabetic agents. Pancreatic α-amylase inhibitors offer an effective strategy to lower the levels of post-prandial hyperglycemia via control of starch breakdown. In this study, seventeen Indian medicinal plants with known hypoglycemic properties were subjected to sequential solvent extraction and tested for α-amylase inhibition, in order to assess and evaluate their inhibitory potential on PPA (porcine pancreatic α-amylase). Preliminary phytochemical analysis of the lead extracts was performed in order to determine the probable constituents. Methods Analysis of the 126 extracts, obtained from 17 plants (Aloe vera (L.) Burm.f., Adansonia digitata L., Allium sativum L., Casia fistula L., Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don., Cinnamomum verum Persl., Coccinia grandis (L.) Voigt., Linum usitatisumum L., Mangifera indica L., Morus alba L., Nerium oleander L., Ocimum tenuiflorum L., Piper nigrum L., Terminalia chebula Retz., Tinospora cordifolia (Willd.) Miers., Trigonella foenum-graceum L., Zingiber officinale Rosc.) for PPA inhibition was initially performed qualitatively by starch-iodine colour assay. The lead extracts were further quantified with respect to PPA inhibition using the chromogenic DNSA (3, 5-dinitrosalicylic acid) method. Phytochemical constituents of the extracts exhibiting≥ 50% inhibition were analysed qualitatively as well as by GC-MS (Gas chromatography-Mass spectrometry). Results Of the 126 extracts obtained from 17 plants, 17 extracts exhibited PPA inhibitory potential to varying degrees (10%-60.5%) while 4 extracts showed low inhibition (< 10%). However, strong porcine pancreatic amylase inhibitory activity (> 50%) was obtained with 3 isopropanol extracts. All these 3 extracts exhibited concentration dependent inhibition with IC50 values, viz., seeds of Linum usitatisumum (540 μgml-1), leaves of Morus alba (1440

  10. [Computer evaluation of hidden potential of phytochemicals of medicinal plants of the traditional Indian ayurvedic medicine].

    PubMed

    Lagunin, A A; Druzhilovsky, D S; Rudik, A V; Filimonov, D A; Gawande, D; Suresh, K; Goel, R; Poroikov, V V

    2015-01-01

    Applicability of our computer programs PASS and PharmaExpert to prediction of biological activity spectra of rather complex and structurally diverse phytocomponents of medicinal plants, both separately and in combinations has been evaluated. The web-resource on phytochemicals of 50 medicinal plants used in Ayurveda was created for the study of hidden therapeutic potential of Traditional Indian Medicine (TIM) (http://ayurveda.pharmaexpert.ru). It contains information on 50 medicinal plants, their using in TIM and their pharmacology activities, also as 1906 phytocomponents. PASS training set was updated by addition of information about 946 natural compounds; then the training procedure and validation were performed, to estimate the quality of PASS prediction. It was shown that the difference between the average accuracy of prediction obtained in leave-5%-out cross-validation (94,467%) and in leave-one-out cross-validation (94,605%) is very small. These results showed high predictive ability of the program. Results of biological activity spectra prediction for all phytocomponents included in our database are in good correspondence with the experimental data. Additional kinds of biological activity predicted with high probability provide the information about most promising directions of further studies. The analysis of prediction results of sets of phytocomponents in each of 50 medicinal plants was made by PharmaExpert software. Based on this analysis, we found that the combination of phytocomponents from Passiflora incarnata may exhibit nootropic, anticonvulsant and antidepressant effects. Experiments carried out in mice models confirmed the predicted effects of Passiflora incarnata extracts.

  11. The Significance of Ayurvedic Medicinal Plants.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Syal; Dobos, Gustav J; Rampp, Thomas

    2016-10-05

    Traditional Indian medicine (ayurveda) is becoming increasingly popular, with many chronic conditions responding to it well. Most patients begin to take conventional medications as soon as their diagnoses are made, so ayurvedic treatments are usually undergone alongside and/or after conventional medical approaches. A detailed knowledge of the action of food, spices, and medicinal plants is needed in order to understand their potential influence fully. While societal use of ayurvedic plants and Indian spices is commonplace, without ill effect, the use of more concentrated products made from single plants, often in the form of teas or tablets, is of more concern. The mechanisms by which polyherbal drugs and their extracts act differ in many respects from the actions of single substances or synthetic drugs. Despite the fact that ayurvedic medicines are based on natural herbal materials, their safety depends on their method of administration, taking into account individuals' needs and their specific disease conditions. © The Author(s) 2016.

  12. Ayurvedic medicine and the lung.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chiao Yuen; Takano, Angela; Yang, Steve; Lee, Pyng

    2014-01-01

    A middle-aged Indian woman with knee pain had consumed ayurvedic medicine (Ostolief and Arthrella tablets) daily for 6 months. She presented to the respiratory clinic with worsening dyspnea, cough and weight loss of 2 months' duration. She was a homemaker, never-smoker and did not keep birds. Physical examination detected fine end-inspiratory crackles. There was no clubbing of the fingers, joint deformity or swelling, skin lesion or enlarged cervical lymphadenopathy. High-resolution computed tomography showed diffuse centrilobular nodules with ground-glass attenuation. Restrictive ventilatory defect (FVC 44% predicted, FEV1/FVC ratio 93%) was observed on spirometry, and the autoimmune screen was negative. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid revealed lymphocytosis with an increased CD4/CD8 (T helper:T suppressor) ratio. Cultures for bacteria, mycobacteria, fungi, viruses and Pneumocystis carinii were negative. Alveolitis with infiltration of interstitium by lymphocytes and peribronchiolar noncaseating granulomas were observed on bronchoscopic lung biopsy. A diagnosis of hypersensitivity pneumonitis as a result of ayurvedic medicine was made. She was advised to stop the offending medicine; high-dose steroids and bactrim prophylaxis were commenced and tapered over 3 months with good response and radiological resolution. She was followed for 1 year without relapse.

  13. Lead poisoning from Ayurvedic medicines.

    PubMed

    Tsutsui, Rayji S; Van Schalkwyk, Johan; Spriggs, David

    2013-05-10

    A case of lead poisoning with established exposure to Ayurvedic medicines is presented. This patient migrated from India to New Zealand 8 years previously. He regularly visits India where he purchases "herbal remedies" for his wellbeing.

  14. Molecular recognition of curcumin (Indian Ayurvedic medicine) by the supramolecular probe, p-t-butyl calix(8)arene.

    PubMed

    Meenakshi, C; Jayabal, P; Ramakrishnan, V

    2014-06-05

    The thermodynamic property of the host-guest complexes formed between the curcumin, component of Indian Ayurvedic medicine turmeric, a drug molecule, with the supra molecule, p-t-butyl calix(8)arene was studied. p-t-Butyl calix(8)arene has been used as a host molecule and curcumin as a guest molecule. Optical absorption spectral studies were carried out to investigate the molecular recognition properties of p-t-butyl calix(8)arene with curcumin. The stochiometry of the host-guest complexes formed and the binding constant were determined. An interesting 1:1 and 4:1 stochiometric host-guest complexes were formed. Job's continuous method of variation and Benesi-Hildebrand expression were used for the determination of binding constant and the stochiometry of the host-guest complex formed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Molecular recognition of curcumin (Indian Ayurvedic medicine) by the supramolecular probe, p-t-butyl calix(8)arene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meenakshi, C.; Jayabal, P.; Ramakrishnan, V.

    2014-06-01

    The thermodynamic property of the host-guest complexes formed between the curcumin, component of Indian Ayurvedic medicine turmeric, a drug molecule, with the supra molecule, p-t-butyl calix(8)arene was studied. p-t-Butyl calix(8)arene has been used as a host molecule and curcumin as a guest molecule. Optical absorption spectral studies were carried out to investigate the molecular recognition properties of p-t-butyl calix(8)arene with curcumin. The stochiometry of the host-guest complexes formed and the binding constant were determined. An interesting 1:1 and 4:1 stochiometric host-guest complexes were formed. Job's continuous method of variation and Benesi-Hildebrand expression were used for the determination of binding constant and the stochiometry of the host-guest complex formed.

  16. Ayurvedic medicine and anaesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan, Sameer L; Pradhan, Priya S

    2011-01-01

    The use of herbal medicines has increased dramatically over the past few years. The United States alone noted a 380% increase in the consumption of these products. Although the common practice of taking over-the-counter herbal soups, herbal teas and other such prepacked preparations was not associated with adverse events at large, still, some herbs are known to cause problems, especially when large doses are taken. The American Society of Anaesthesiologist (ASA) has taken a conservative stance and recommended that it is prudent to stop these products at least 2–3 weeks prior to anaesthesia and surgery. This advice may be difficult to implement as most preoperative evaluations occur only a few days prior to surgery. Some of the Ayurvedic preparations have shown to improve the patient outcome when taken during the perioperative period. Hence, the conservative stance by ASA may not always benefit the patient. More scientific studies are needed to have more targeted recommendations. This article puts forward the facts that need to be addressed by researchers in the future. PMID:22013247

  17. Ayurvedic medicine for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Basnyat, Shristi; Kolasinski, Sharon L

    2014-08-01

    Ayurvedic medicine is the traditional medicine of India, which originated over 5,000 years ago. Parts of this alternative medical system have become increasingly popular worldwide as patients seek approaches to medical care that they perceive as more holistic and less toxic than those offered by conventional Western medicine. Despite the advent of highly effective pharmacologic therapy, most individuals with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) continue to use alternative therapy at some point in the treatment of their disease. This report discusses some of the in-vitro data that suggest potential mechanisms through which Ayurvedic herbal medicines might have beneficial actions in rheumatoid arthritis, and the available clinical data evaluating the use of Ayurvedic medicine for RA.

  18. Scientific basis for the use of Indian ayurvedic medicinal plants in the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders: ashwagandha.

    PubMed

    Ven Murthy, M R; Ranjekar, Prabhakar K; Ramassamy, Charles; Deshpande, Manasi

    2010-09-01

    normal habitats in different areas of the world, as well as the common synonyms by which they are known, are shown in the Table 1. The scientific investigations concerning the best known and most scientifically investigated of these herbs, Ashwagandha will be discussed in detail in this review. Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera, WS), also commonly known, in different parts of the world, as Indian ginseng, Winter cherry, Ajagandha, Kanaje Hindi and Samm Al Ferakh, is a plant belonging to the Solanaceae family. It is also known in different linguistic areas in India by its local vernacular names [6]. It grows prolifically in dry regions of South Asia, Central Asia and Africa, particularly in India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Afghanistan, South Africa, Egypt, Morocco, Congo and Jordon [7]. In India, it is cultivated, on a commercial scale, in the states of Madhya Pradesh, Uttar Pradesh, Punjab, Gujarat and Rajasthan [6]. In Sanskrit, ashwagandha, the Indian name for WS, means "odor of the horse", probably originating from the odor of its root which resembles that of a sweaty horse. The name"somnifera" in Latin means "sleep-inducer" which probably refers to its extensive use as a remedy against stress from a variety of daily chores. Some herbalists refer to ashwagandha as Indian ginseng, since it is used in India, in a way similar to how ginseng is used in traditional Chinese medicine to treat a large variety of human diseases [8]. Ashwagandha is a shrub whose various parts (berries, leaves and roots) have been used by Ayurvedic practitioners as folk remedies, or as aphrodisiacs and diuretics. The fresh roots are sometimes boiled in milk, in order to leach out undesirable constituents. The berries are sometimes used as a substitute to coagulate milk in cheese making. In Ayurveda, the herbal preparation is referred to as a "rasayana", an elixir that works, in a nonspecific, global fashion, to increase human health and longevity. It is also considered an adaptogen, a

  19. Chronic arsenic toxicity from Ayurvedic medicines.

    PubMed

    Khandpur, Sujay; Malhotra, Amit K; Bhatia, Vidhyut; Gupta, Subandhu; Sharma, Vinod K; Mishra, Rakesh; Arora, Narendra K

    2008-06-01

    Ayurvedic medicines are known to contain arsenic and concentrations up to toxic levels have been reported in certain formulations. However, clinical disease due to arsenic containing ayurvedic medicines has rarely been reported. We seek to highlight the existence of toxic levels of arsenic in certain ayurvedic preparations that can produce serious systemic manifestations. An 11-year-old girl developed manifestations of arsenical keratosis (punctuate palmoplantar keratoderma and leucomelanoderma) and non-cirrhotic portal hypertension, 6 months and 18 months respectively after intake of ayurvedic medications, prescribed for epilepsy. The eight ayurvedic preparations consumed by the patient and her serum levels were analyzed for arsenic content. Arsenic content of ayurvedic medicines ranged from 5 mg/L to 248 mg/L. The serum arsenic level was 202.20 microg/L (normal < 60 microg/L). Skin manifestations improved after the discontinuation of ayurvedic medications. Ayurvedic medications should be consumed under strict guidance and supervision of qualified practitioners to prevent such catastrophies.

  20. Ayurvedic medicine: patients in peril from plumbism.

    PubMed

    van Schalkwyk, Johan; Davidson, James; Palmer, Barry; Hope, Virginia

    2006-05-05

    Heavy metals are commonly incorporated into Ayurvedic preparations as ashes or 'bhasmas'. A widely disseminated belief within Ayurvedic medicine is that these heavy metals can be valuable therapeutic components. Western toxicology refutes this contention. We report eight cases of lead poisoning occurring in or near the Auckland region of New Zealand. In all cases, poisoning was attributable to consumption of Ayurvedic 'herbal medicines'. Whole blood lead levels ranged from 1.5 to 6.9 micromol/L. Six patients had symptomatic lead poisoning, requiring treatment with chelation therapy. A high index of suspicion is required to detect lead poisoning, which should be suspected in people taking Ayurvedic remedies, especially if they have associated anaemia or abdominal symptoms.

  1. Scientific validation of the different purification steps involved in the preparation of an Indian Ayurvedic medicine, Lauha bhasma.

    PubMed

    Krishnamachary, Balaji; Rajendran, Narendran; Pemiah, Brindha; Krishnaswamy, Sridharan; Krishnan, Uma Maheswari; Sethuraman, Swaminathan; Sekar, Rajan K

    2012-06-26

    Lauha bhasma (iron ash) is one of the iron-based herbo-metallic preparations used in Ayurvedic medicine for treating various ailments due to iron deficiency. The preparation of Lauha bhasma (iron ash) requires normal purification (heat treatment in vegetable and animal products), special purification (treatment with herbal constituents) and calcination steps aimed at converting the raw material to a suitable therapeutic form. In this study, we have systematically and scientifically evaluated through a series of qualitative tests and modern analytical tools the importance of the treating media. Our data demonstrates that these steps are necessary to remove the grease and scales in the raw material. While heating, microcracks appeared on the surface of the iron, which improved the reactivity with the herbal constituents in addition to incorporating nanostructured features. Further, the use of plant products facilitated the removal of Fe³⁺ present in the raw material by forming soluble complexes. The Fe²⁺ present in the raw materials also forms an insoluble complex with the herbal constituents in the presence of UV radiation. In conclusion, our data summarily suggest that the purification steps involved in the preparation of Lauha bhasma (iron ash) are critical. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Buyers beware: lead poisoning due to Ayurvedic medicine.

    PubMed

    Pierce, J Matthew R; Estrada, Carlos A; Mathews, Ronnie E

    2012-10-01

    A 29-year-old man, who recently emigrated from India, presented with a 2-week history of abdominal pain, as well as nausea, constipation, and fatigue. He underwent removal of a parathyroid adenoma 6 weeks prior to admission and received a locally made Indian traditional medicine (Ayurveda) for pain control; however, this information was not initially available. He was instructed to take approximately 15 g/day. Initial evaluation revealed a normocytic anemia, but other workup including imaging and endoscopy was unrevealing. Given his recent use of Ayurvedic medicines, we tested for lead poisoning and found a blood lead level of 72 mcg/dl. We sent his medicine for analysis and found it had a high lead concentration of 36,000 mcg/g, which is over 25,000 times the maximum daily dose. He improved with cessation of the medicine and treatment with succimer. Lead poisoning can present with a variety of nonspecific signs and symptoms, including abdominal pain and anemia. Ayurvedic medicines, as well as traditional medicines from other cultures, may be a source of lead or other heavy metals. It is essential for physicians to be aware of adverse effects of Ayurvedic medicines as they are easily available and increasing in popularity.

  3. Bioaccessibility of mercury in selected Ayurvedic medicines.

    PubMed

    Koch, Iris; Moriarty, Maeve; Sui, Jie; Rutter, Allison; Saper, Robert B; Reimer, Kenneth J

    2013-06-01

    Five Ayurvedic medicines with mercury concentrations of 85mg/kg and higher were characterized with respect to their speciation and their bioaccessibility. X-ray absorption spectroscopy revealed that the mercury in the Ayurvedic medicines was inorganic and best matched to cinnabar, even in samples that had been hypothesized to contain mercury through plant sources only. The bioaccessibility (bioaccessible concentrations and percent bioaccessibility) was measured using two methods: a two-phase physiologically based extraction test (PBET gastric, G and gastric+intestinal phase, GI); and the fed organic estimation human simulation test (FOREhST). The percent bioaccessibility of mercury in all Ayurvedic samples was very low (<5%), corresponding to the low solubility of cinnabar, but it increased with increasing dissolved organic carbon content of the bioaccessibility solutions (PBET-GAyurvedic samples. Incorporation of percent relative bioaccessibility of mercury into risk calculations decreased daily intake estimates by 29-900 times, and reduced them to acceptable levels for three of the five medicines. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of Chinese Medicine Danshen and Indian Ayurvedic Medicine Bark of Arjuna Tree on a Relatively New LOCI Digoxin Assay for Application on the Vista 1500 Analyzer.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Amitava; Sengupta, Tamal K; Johnson, Myrtle

    2015-07-01

    Danshen is a traditional Chinese medicine and bark of Arjuna tree is an Ayurvedic medicine both indicated as heart tonic. Interference of Danshen in serum digoxin immunoassays has been reported but potential interference of extract of bark of Arjuna tree has not been reported. We studied potential interferences of Danshen and bark of Arjuna tree on a relatively new LOCI digoxin assay for application on the Vista 1500 analyzer (Siemens Diagnostics). Aliquots of drug-free serum were supplemented with ethyl acetate extract of Danshen (two different brands studied) or aqueous or ethyl alcohol extract of bark of Arjuna tree and apparent digoxin concentrations were measured by the LOCI digoxin assay. In another experiment, aliquots of serum pool containing digoxin were further supplemented with Danshen or bark of Arjuna tree extract and digoxin concentrations were measured again using LOCI digoxin assay. Little apparent digoxin concentration was observed when aliquots of drug-free serum pools were supplemented with Danshen or bark of Arjuna tree extract. When aliquots of serum digoxin pool were further supplemented with these extract, we observed statistically significant negative interference but such differences may not be clinically significant. We conclude that LOCI digoxin assay is virtually free from interferences of Danshen and extract of bark of Arjuna tree. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Pharmacovigilance study of Ayurvedic medicine in Ayurvedic Teaching Hospital: A prospective survey study

    PubMed Central

    Ajanal, Manjunath N.; Nayak, Shradda U.; Kadam, Avinash P.; Prasad, B. S.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Though Ayurveda is practiced in the Indian subcontinent since centuries, there is a paucity of systematic documentation related to the occurrence of adverse drug reactions (ADR) and other issues regarding the safety of Ayurveda medicines. Aim: To monitor and analyze the pattern and frequency of ADR to Ayurvedic medicines in an Ayurvedic hospital setup. Materials and Methods: In this prospective study, ADR monitoring was done in KLE Ayurveda Secondary Care Hospital, Belgaum, Karnataka, India by spontaneous and intensive monitoring technique for a span of 1-year (June 2010 to May 2011). Data pertaining to patient demography, drug and reaction characteristics, organ system involved and reaction outcomes were collected and evaluated. The reaction severity and predisposing factors were also assessed. Results: In a span of one year, 84 adverse drug events were reported out of which 52 confirmed as ADR. The overall incidence of ADR in the patient population was 1.14%, out of which 23 (44.23%) were related to Panchakarma (detoxification process), 13 (25.00%) related to the herbal formulations and 06 (11.53%) were of Rasa Aushadhi (mineral or herbo-mineral formulations). The commonly affected organ systems were gastrointestinal system 24 (46.15%) and skin 15 (28.84%). The majority of the reactions were moderate 30 (57.69%) to mild 20 (38.46%) in severity. Most patients recovered from the incidence. Conclusion: The present work has documented the incidence and characteristic of ADR to Ayurvedic medicine in a typical Ayurveda hospital setup. This will help in developing various strategies for boosting pharmacovigilance in Ayurveda, thereby ensuring safer use of Ayurveda medicines. PMID:27011712

  6. Pharmacovigilance study of Ayurvedic medicine in Ayurvedic Teaching Hospital: A prospective survey study.

    PubMed

    Ajanal, Manjunath N; Nayak, Shradda U; Kadam, Avinash P; Prasad, B S

    2015-01-01

    Though Ayurveda is practiced in the Indian subcontinent since centuries, there is a paucity of systematic documentation related to the occurrence of adverse drug reactions (ADR) and other issues regarding the safety of Ayurveda medicines. To monitor and analyze the pattern and frequency of ADR to Ayurvedic medicines in an Ayurvedic hospital setup. In this prospective study, ADR monitoring was done in KLE Ayurveda Secondary Care Hospital, Belgaum, Karnataka, India by spontaneous and intensive monitoring technique for a span of 1-year (June 2010 to May 2011). Data pertaining to patient demography, drug and reaction characteristics, organ system involved and reaction outcomes were collected and evaluated. The reaction severity and predisposing factors were also assessed. In a span of one year, 84 adverse drug events were reported out of which 52 confirmed as ADR. The overall incidence of ADR in the patient population was 1.14%, out of which 23 (44.23%) were related to Panchakarma (detoxification process), 13 (25.00%) related to the herbal formulations and 06 (11.53%) were of Rasa Aushadhi (mineral or herbo-mineral formulations). The commonly affected organ systems were gastrointestinal system 24 (46.15%) and skin 15 (28.84%). The majority of the reactions were moderate 30 (57.69%) to mild 20 (38.46%) in severity. Most patients recovered from the incidence. The present work has documented the incidence and characteristic of ADR to Ayurvedic medicine in a typical Ayurveda hospital setup. This will help in developing various strategies for boosting pharmacovigilance in Ayurveda, thereby ensuring safer use of Ayurveda medicines.

  7. Effect of Asian ginseng, Siberian ginseng, and Indian ayurvedic medicine Ashwagandha on serum digoxin measurement by Digoxin III, a new digoxin immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Amitava; Tso, Gertie; Wells, Alice

    2008-01-01

    Asian ginseng, Siberian ginseng, and Indian Ayurvedic medicine Ashwagandha demonstrated modest interference with serum digoxin measurements by the fluorescent polarization immunoassay (FPIA). Recently, Abbott Laboratories marketed a new digoxin immunoassay, Digoxin III for application on the AxSYM analyzer. We studied potential interference of these herbal supplements on serum digoxin measurement by Digoxin III assay in vitro and compared our results with the values obtained by Tina-quant assay. Aliquots of drug-free serum pool were supplemented with various amounts of Asian ginseng, Siberian ginseng, or Ashwagandha approximating expected concentrations after recommended doses and overdoses of these herbal supplements in serum. Then digoxin concentrations were measured by the Digoxin III and Tina-quant (Roche Diagnostics) assay. We also supplemented aliquots of a digoxin pool prepared from patients receiving digoxin with various amounts of these herbal supplements and then measured digoxin concentrations again using both digoxin immunoassays. We observed modest apparent digoxin concentrations when aliquots of drug-free serum pool were supplemented with all three herbal supplements using Digoxin III assay (apparent digoxin in the range of 0.31-0.57 ng/ml), but no apparent digoxin concentration (except with the highest concentration of Ashwagandha supplement for both brands) was observed using the Tina-quant assay. When aliquots of digoxin pool were further supplemented with these herbal supplements, digoxin concentrations were falsely elevated when measured by the new Digoxin III assay. For example, we observed 48.2% (1.63 ng/ml digoxin) increase in digoxin concentration when an aliquot of Digoxin pool 1 (1.10 ng/ml digoxin) was supplemented with 50 microl of Asian ginseng extract (Brand 2). Measuring free digoxin does not eliminate the modest interferences of these herbal supplements in serum digoxin measurement by the Digoxin III assay.

  8. Overdose effect of aconite containing Ayurvedic Medicine ('Mahashankha Vati').

    PubMed

    Panda, Ashok Kumar; Debnath, Saroj Kumar

    2010-07-01

    There are chances that the use of larger than recommended dose of Ayurvedic medicines containing aconite can produce drug reactions. Vatsanabha (Aconitum ferox Wall.) is a very well-known ingredient of Ayurvedic formulations and is prescribed as an antipyretic, analgesic, anti-rheumatic, appetizer and digestive. The recommended dose of purified Vatsanabha (A. ferox Wall.) root is 15 mg. We present a case of hypotension and bradycardia due to aconite poisoning caused by overdosing of an Ayurvedic medicine (Mahashankha Vati), which was primarily managed by Ayurvedic treatment.

  9. Ayurvedic medicine in Mauritius: Profile of Ayurvedic outlet, use, sale, distribution, regulation and importation.

    PubMed

    Elaheebocus, Naailah; Mahomoodally, M Fawzi

    2017-02-02

    Ayurvedic medicine (AM) is a legalised alternative traditional medical system in the multicultural tropical island of Mauritius. A panoply of Ayurvedic specialised shops/centres involved in the provision of Ayurvedic services hereafter termed as 'outlets' operates in different regions of the island and is extensively exploited by a significant number of Mauritians. Nonetheless, there is currently no study geared towards studying the status of AM and profile of Ayurvedic outlets in Mauritius and there is undoubtedly a dearth of standardized regulatory framework governing the practice of AM in Mauritius. The present study attempts to study the profile of Ayurvedic outlets, sale, distribution, regulation and importation of AM in Mauritius. To evaluate the characteristics profile of Ayurvedic shops/clinics/pharmacies/centres, to document common Ayurvedic products used in the treatment and management of diseases, and to analyse existing regulatory control of AM in Mauritius. Ayurvedic outlets were identified using a random approach. Once permission granted, outlets were visited where face-to-face interviews with Ayurvedic practitioners/directors/dispensers were undertaken using a semi-structured questionnaire. The characteristics of the outlets with respect to the type of business registration, procurement and dispensing of products, registration and qualification of personnels employed amongst others were studied. The International Classification of Diseases (ICD) 10 was used to classify common AM dispensed to patients. Additionally, information was sought from local authorities pertaining to existing legislation governing the importation and regulation of AM in Mauritius. A total of 16 Ayurvedic outlets ('pharmacies' (n=3), clinics (n=2), shops (n=5) and centres (n=6)) was surveyed. Six outlets dispensed AM strictly on prescription only after consultation with an onsite full-time employed registered Ayurvedic practitioner. Seven outlets offered AM both on prescription

  10. Therapeutic Uses of Triphala in Ayurvedic Medicine.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Christine Tara; Denniston, Kate; Chopra, Deepak

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this article is to review the current literature on the therapeutic uses and efficacy of Triphala. Herbal remedies are among the most ancient medicines used in traditional systems of healthcare such as Ayurveda. Triphala, a well-recognized and highly efficacious polyherbal Ayurvedic medicine consisting of fruits of the plant species Emblica officinalis (Amalaki), Terminalia bellerica (Bibhitaki), and Terminalia chebula (Haritaki), is a cornerstone of gastrointestinal and rejuvenative treatment. A search of the PubMed database was conducted. In addition, numerous additional therapeutic uses described both in the Ayurvedic medical literature and anecdotally are being validated scientifically. In addition to laxative action, Triphala research has found the formula to be potentially effective for several clinical uses such as appetite stimulation, reduction of hyperacidity, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, immunomodulating, antibacterial, antimutagenic, adaptogenic, hypoglycemic, antineoplastic, chemoprotective, and radioprotective effects, and prevention of dental caries. Polyphenols in Triphala modulate the human gut microbiome and thereby promote the growth of beneficial Bifidobacteria and Lactobacillus while inhibiting the growth of undesirable gut microbes. The bioactivity of Triphala is elicited by gut microbiota to generate a variety of anti-inflammatory compounds. This review summarizes recent data on pharmacological properties and clinical effects of Triphala while highlighting areas in need of additional investigation and clinical development.

  11. HEAVY METAL CONTENT OF AYURVEDIC HERBAL MEDICINE PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Case reports of individuals taking Ayurvedic herbal medicine products (HMPs) suggest that they may contain lead, mercury, and/or arsenic. We analyzed the heavy metal content of Ayurvedic HMPs manufactured in India and Pakistan, available in South Asian grocery stores in the Bost...

  12. HEAVY METAL CONTENT OF AYURVEDIC HERBAL MEDICINE PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Case reports of individuals taking Ayurvedic herbal medicine products (HMPs) suggest that they may contain lead, mercury, and/or arsenic. We analyzed the heavy metal content of Ayurvedic HMPs manufactured in India and Pakistan, available in South Asian grocery stores in the Bost...

  13. Three cases of lead toxicity associated with consumption of ayurvedic medicines.

    PubMed

    Raviraja, A; Vishal Babu, G N; Sehgal, Anusha; Saper, Robert B; Jayawardene, Innocent; Amarasiriwardena, Chitra J; Venkatesh, T

    2010-07-01

    Ayurveda is a traditional form of medicine used by majority of the Indians. Here we report three cases of lead toxicity, following intake of Ayurvedic medicines. Three patients presented with blood lead levels (BLLs) of 122.4, 115 and 42.8 μg/dl respectively at the time of hospitalization. The first case was chelated with D- penicillamine, the second with calcium disodium ethylene diamino tetra acetate (EDTA) and the third with environmental intervention and education. Associated Ayurvedic products were collected from patients and analyzed for metallic concentration. Cessation of Ayurvedic medication along with chelation, nutritional intervention and education, reduced the BLL to 27.4 μg/dl in the first case after 1 year, 21.1 μg/dl after 9 months in the second and 18.2 μg/dl after 6 months in the third case.

  14. Effect of Indian Ayurvedic medicine Ashwagandha on measurement of serum digoxin and 11 commonly monitored drugs using immunoassays: study of protein binding and interaction with Digibind.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Amitava; Peterson, Amanda; Wells, Alice; Actor, Jeffrey K

    2007-08-01

    Ashwagandha, a popular Ayurvedic medicine, is now available in the United States. Alkaloids found in this herb have structural similarity with digoxin. To study potential interference of Ashwagandha with serum digoxin measurement by immunoassays. Potential interference was also investigated with immunoassays for 11 other commonly monitored drugs. In addition, interaction of components of Ashwagandha with the Fab fragment of antidigoxin antibody (Digibind) was investigated. Two different brands of liquid extract and 1 dry powdered form of Ashwagandha were used for this investigation. Aliquots of drug-free serum were supplemented with various concentrations of Ashwagandha and apparent digoxin concentrations were measured by 3 digoxin immunoassays. Mice were fed with Ashwagandha and apparent digoxin concentrations were measured 1 and 3 hours after feeding. Potential interference of Ashwagandha with immunoassays of 11 other drugs was also investigated. Interaction of components of Ashwagandha with Digibind was studied in vitro. Significant apparent digoxin concentrations were observed both in vitro and in vivo using the fluorescence polarization immunoassay of digoxin, whereas the Beckman and the microparticle enzyme immunoassay digoxin assay demonstrated minimal interference. Immunoassays of 11 other drugs tested were unaffected. When Ashwagandha extract was added to a serum pool containing digoxin, falsely elevated digoxin value was observed with fluorescence polarization immunoassay, but values were falsely lowered when measured by the microparticle enzyme immunoassay. Digibind neutralized digoxin-like immunoreactive components of Ashwagandha in vitro. Components of Ashwagandha interfered with serum digoxin measurements using immunoassays. Digibind neutralized free digoxin-like immunoreactive components of Ashwagandha.

  15. [Outbreak of lead poisoning associated with Ayurvedic medicine].

    PubMed

    Fernández, Sara; Pollio, Gerónimo-Antonio; Domínguez, Verónica; Nogué, Santiago; Torra, Mercè; Cardellach, Francesc

    2015-02-20

    Lead poisoning is normally caused by repeated occupational inhalation of lead. However, lead may also be absorbed through the digestive route. Some alternative medical treatments, such as Ayurvedic medicine, can also contain lead and may result in poisoning. We collected cases of lead poisoning related to Ayurvedic treatments attended at the Hospital Clinic of Barcelona. Two female patients, aged 45 and 57 years, respectively, who initiated Ayurvedic treatments which involved the ingestion of various medicaments, were included. The first patient presented with anemia and abdominal pain. The lead level was 74μg/dL and free erythrocyte protoporphyrin was 163μg/dL. She was treated with intravenous calcium disodium ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (CaNa2EDTA) and later with oral dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) with a good evolution. The second patient presented with abdominal pain and a Burton's line. The lead level was 52μg/dL and free erythrocyte protoporphyrin was 262μg/dL. She was treated with oral DMSA and evolved favorably. Lead concentrations in some of the tablets supplied to the patients reached 2,003 and 19,650μg/g of tablet. Lead poisoning may result from treatments based on Ayurvedic medicine and may reach epidemic proportions. Health control of alternative medicines is necessary. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. [The stages of development of Ayurvedic medicine].

    PubMed

    Subotialov, M A; Sorokina, T S; Druzhinin, V Iu

    2013-01-01

    The Ayurveda medicine as one the three traditional systems of healing developed during millennia at the Hindustan subcontinent (the ancient India). Nowadays, Ayurveda medicine is widely used in many countries. The present day researchers mark out and analyze several periods in its history.

  17. Determination of elements in ayurvedic medicinal plants by AAS

    SciTech Connect

    Teerthe, Santoshkumar S.; Kerur, B. R.

    2015-08-28

    India has a rich country for the uses of Ayurvedic medicinal plants for treatment and also the north- Karnataka boasts an unparallel diversity of medicinal plants. The present study attempts to estimate and compare the level of trace and heavy metals in some selected leaves and root samples of Ayurvedic medicinal plants such as Mg, Al, K, Cr, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, and Cd. The samples are collected from different places of North-Karnataka regions and sample solutions prepared as the ratio of 1:25:25+950ml=1000ppm.the trace and heavy elemental concentration was estimated using Atomic Absorption Spectrometric (AAS) Method. The average concentrations of Mg, Mn, Fe and Zn, are ranging from 2ppm to 5250.2ppm and potassium (K) has more concentration as compare to all other. The other elements likes Al, Cr, Cu, and Cd were also estimed and presented in the table. Therefore, these medicinal plants are rich in some essential minerals, especially K, Mg, Mn, Fe and Zn which are essential for human health.

  18. The history of the development of Ayurvedic medicine in Russia

    PubMed Central

    Ragozin, Boris Vladimirovich

    2016-01-01

    Ayurveda is one of the world's oldest medical sciences, with a history that goes back more than 5,000 years. The knowledge of Ayurveda has at various times had an impact on a number of branches of medicine: From ancient Greek medicine in the West to the Chinese and Tibetan in the East. Ayurveda continues to retain its prominent position in our modern world, being officially recognised by the World Health Organisation (WHO) and enjoying great popularity in the US, Germany, Italy and the Netherlands. In India, Ayurveda is recognised by conventional medicine on a par with modern medical science. In the Soviet Union a strong interest in Ayurveda arose for the first time after the Chernobyl disaster, and since then Ayurveda has been actively developing in Russia. In this article we present the chronology of the development of Ayurvedic medicine in Russia since 1989, explore academic literature on the subject available in Russian and review the existing Ayurvedic products and services offered on the Russian market. PMID:27143798

  19. The history of the development of Ayurvedic medicine in Russia.

    PubMed

    Ragozin, Boris Vladimirovich

    2016-01-01

    Ayurveda is one of the world's oldest medical sciences, with a history that goes back more than 5,000 years. The knowledge of Ayurveda has at various times had an impact on a number of branches of medicine: From ancient Greek medicine in the West to the Chinese and Tibetan in the East. Ayurveda continues to retain its prominent position in our modern world, being officially recognised by the World Health Organisation (WHO) and enjoying great popularity in the US, Germany, Italy and the Netherlands. In India, Ayurveda is recognised by conventional medicine on a par with modern medical science. In the Soviet Union a strong interest in Ayurveda arose for the first time after the Chernobyl disaster, and since then Ayurveda has been actively developing in Russia. In this article we present the chronology of the development of Ayurvedic medicine in Russia since 1989, explore academic literature on the subject available in Russian and review the existing Ayurvedic products and services offered on the Russian market.

  20. Determination of elements in ayurvedic medicinal plants by AAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teerthe, Santoshkumar S.; Kerur, B. R.

    2015-08-01

    India has a rich country for the uses of Ayurvedic medicinal plants for treatment and also the north- Karnataka boasts an unparallel diversity of medicinal plants. The present study attempts to estimate and compare the level of trace and heavy metals in some selected leaves and root samples of Ayurvedic medicinal plants such as Mg, Al, K, Cr, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, and Cd. The samples are collected from different places of North-Karnataka regions and sample solutions prepared as the ratio of 1:25:25+950ml=1000ppm.the trace and heavy elemental concentration was estimated using Atomic Absorption Spectrometric (AAS) Method. The average concentrations of Mg, Mn, Fe and Zn, are ranging from 2ppm to 5250.2ppm and potassium (K) has more concentration as compare to all other. The other elements likes Al, Cr, Cu, and Cd were also estimed and presented in the table. Therefore, these medicinal plants are rich in some essential minerals, especially K, Mg, Mn, Fe and Zn which are essential for human health

  1. Ayurvedic medicinal plants for Alzheimer's disease: a review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is an age-associated, irreversible, progressive neurodegenerative disease that is characterized by severe memory loss, unusual behavior, personality changes, and a decline in cognitive function. No cure for Alzheimer's exists, and the drugs currently available to treat the disease have limited effectiveness. It is believed that therapeutic intervention that could postpone the onset or progression of Alzheimer's disease would dramatically reduce the number of cases in the next 50 years. Ayurvedic medicinal plants have been the single most productive source of leads for the development of drugs, and over a hundred new products are already in clinical development. Indeed, several scientific studies have described the use of various Ayurvedic medicinal plants and their constituents for treatment of Alzheimer's disease. Although the exact mechanism of their action is still not clear, phytochemical studies of the different parts of the plants have shown the presence of many valuable compounds, such as lignans, flavonoids, tannins, polyphenols, triterpenes, sterols, and alkaloids, that show a wide spectrum of pharmacological activities, including anti-inflammatory, anti-amyloidogenic, anti-cholinesterase, hypolipidemic, and antioxidant effects. This review gathers research on various medicinal plants that have shown promise in reversing the Alzheimer's disease pathology. The report summarizes information concerning the phytochemistry, biological, and cellular activities and clinical applications of these various plants in order to provide sufficient baseline information that could be used in drug discovery campaigns and development process, thereby providing new functional leads for Alzheimer's disease. PMID:22747839

  2. Overdose effect of aconite containing Ayurvedic Medicine (‘Mahashankha Vati’)

    PubMed Central

    Panda, Ashok Kumar; Debnath, Saroj Kumar

    2010-01-01

    There are chances that the use of larger than recommended dose of Ayurvedic medicines containing aconite can produce drug reactions. Vatsanabha (Aconitum ferox Wall.) is a very well-known ingredient of Ayurvedic formulations and is prescribed as an antipyretic, analgesic, anti-rheumatic, appetizer and digestive. The recommended dose of purified Vatsanabha (A. ferox Wall.) root is 15 mg. We present a case of hypotension and bradycardia due to aconite poisoning caused by overdosing of an Ayurvedic medicine (Mahashankha Vati), which was primarily managed by Ayurvedic treatment. PMID:21170213

  3. A single case study of treating hypertrophic lichen planus with Ayurvedic medicine.

    PubMed

    Ratha, Kshirod Kumar; Barik, Laxmidhar; Panda, Ashok Kumar; Hazra, Jayram

    2016-01-01

    Ayurvedic medicines are often considered effective for chronic and lifestyle disorders. Hypertrophic lichen planus (HLP) is a rare inflammatory skin condition and develops into squamous cell carcinoma in few cases. It has resemblance with Charma Kushtha mentioned in Ayurvedic classics. Conventional therapy used in this condition is unsatisfactory and is not free from side effects. A case of long-standing systemic steroid-dependent HLP is presented here which was intervened successfully with Ayurvedic modalities.

  4. A single case study of treating hypertrophic lichen planus with Ayurvedic medicine

    PubMed Central

    Ratha, Kshirod Kumar; Barik, Laxmidhar; Panda, Ashok Kumar; Hazra, Jayram

    2016-01-01

    Ayurvedic medicines are often considered effective for chronic and lifestyle disorders. Hypertrophic lichen planus (HLP) is a rare inflammatory skin condition and develops into squamous cell carcinoma in few cases. It has resemblance with Charma Kushtha mentioned in Ayurvedic classics. Conventional therapy used in this condition is unsatisfactory and is not free from side effects. A case of long-standing systemic steroid-dependent HLP is presented here which was intervened successfully with Ayurvedic modalities. PMID:28827956

  5. Indians into Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beiswenger, James N.

    Located at the University of North Dakota School of Medicine, Indians Into Medicine (INMED) is a multi-faceted program providing academic, financial, and personal support for Indian students preparing for health careers. The program has the following goals: (1) increase awareness and motivation among Indian students with the potential for health…

  6. Occurrence of resveratrol and pterostilbene in age-old darakchasava, an ayurvedic medicine from India.

    PubMed

    Paul, B; Masih, I; Deopujari, J; Charpentier, C

    1999-12-15

    'Darakchasava' is a well known Indian herbal preparation of which the main ingredient is Vitis vinifera L. This 'ayurvedic' medicine is prescribed as a cardiotonic and also given for other disorders. HPLC analysis of this age old formulation revealed the presence of polyphenols like resveratrol and pterostilbene. These phenolic compounds are now known as antioxidants, cancer chemopreventive agents, and also known to reduce mortality from coronary heart disease by increasing high density lipoproteins like cholesterol and inhibiting platelet aggregation (Soleas, J.S., Diamandis, E.P., Goldberg, D.M., 1997. Resveratrol: a molecule whose time has come? and gone? Clin. Biochem. 30 (2), 91-113). The study of darakchasava becomes interesting in the light of these findings. A brief introduction of this medicinal preparation, its formulation, its analysis by HPLC, and some of its properties are discussed in this article.

  7. STUDIES ON SOME SOUTH INDIAN MARKET SAMPLES OF AYURVEDIC DRUGS - V

    PubMed Central

    Nair, K. Vasudevan; Balachandran, Indira; Yoganarasimhan, S. N.; Gopakumar, K.

    1986-01-01

    The South Indian market samples of drugs Chavya, Gajapippali and Hrivera are evaluated. The accepted source, botanical identification of the market samples, ayurvedic synonyms, therapeutic properties, major preparations and diseases along with a short botanical description for the market samples are provided. Suitable photographs of the market samples are also included. PMID:22557545

  8. Taking Traditional Knowledge to the Market: The Commoditization of Indian Medicine.

    PubMed

    Bode, Maarten

    2006-12-01

    Although for over a century Ayurvedic and Unani manufacturers have played a crucial role in the modernization of Indian medicine and influenced the way Indians look upon their medical traditions, this fact has been largely ignored by social scientists and historians working on Indian medicine. By looking through the lens of the industry and focusing on medicines, this study questions the notion that traditional medicine is largely beyond commerce and is highly sensitive to patients as individual subjects. The paper asks how the logic of the market has shaped, constrained and transformed two Indian medical traditions: Ayurvedic and Unani Tibb. What kind of indigenous medicines dominate the Indian market? To whom are these marketed and what are the images used by the industry to promote their products? How do large manufacturers construct the 'Indianness' of their commodities? Based on ethnographic research among large Ayurvedic and Unani manufacturers in India during the period 1996-2002, data for this paper was generated from open-ended interviews, conversations, observations, and company publications such as popular and semi-popular periodicals. Promotional materials and research reports were also used, as well as popular writings on Indian medicine such as articles in general newspapers and magazines. The paper concludes with a discussion of the effects of commoditization of Ayurvedic and Unani medicines for clinical practice and the consequences of this development for the poorer sections of Indian society. The paper highlights Indian medicine as a commercial activity.

  9. Ayurveda–modern medicine interface: A critical appraisal of studies of Ayurvedic medicines to treat osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Arvind; Saluja, Manjit; Tillu, Girish

    2010-01-01

    The potential of Ayurvedic philosophy and medicines needs to be recognized and converted into real life treatment paradigm. This article describes a comprehensive therapeutic approach used in Ayurveda and modern medicine to treat arthritis. We present concise summary of various controlled drug trials carried out by us to validate standardized Ayurvedic drugs using modern medicine protocol to treat Rheumatoid Arthritis and Osteoarthritis knees. Several of the latter are published. The trials consistently demonstrate excellent safety of Ayurvedic medicines but often fail to unequivocally show superior efficacy. Some key findings of a recently unpublished trial in OA knees are also presented to show equivalence between Ayurvedic medicine and celecoxib and glucosamine, and we speculate that equivalence trials may be a way forward. The data from the trials also supports the Ayurvedic ‘Rasayana’ concept of immune-modulation and healing. We need to interpret logic of Ayurveda when, adopting modern science tools in drug development and validation and much research is required. Validation of Ayurvedic medicines using the latter approach may lead to an evidence based Ayurveda – Modern Medicine interface. Also, in pursuit of finding better treatment solutions, we ought to step beyond the realm of only drugs and attempt validation of comprehensive specific treatment package as per classical Ayurveda. Finally, validation of a combined (Ayurveda and modern medicine) therapeutic approach with superior efficacy and safety is likely to be a major leap in overcoming some of the current frustrations to treat difficult disorders like arthritis using only modern medicines. PMID:21547047

  10. Ayurveda-modern medicine interface: A critical appraisal of studies of Ayurvedic medicines to treat osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Arvind; Saluja, Manjit; Tillu, Girish

    2010-07-01

    The potential of Ayurvedic philosophy and medicines needs to be recognized and converted into real life treatment paradigm. This article describes a comprehensive therapeutic approach used in Ayurveda and modern medicine to treat arthritis. We present concise summary of various controlled drug trials carried out by us to validate standardized Ayurvedic drugs using modern medicine protocol to treat Rheumatoid Arthritis and Osteoarthritis knees. Several of the latter are published. The trials consistently demonstrate excellent safety of Ayurvedic medicines but often fail to unequivocally show superior efficacy. Some key findings of a recently unpublished trial in OA knees are also presented to show equivalence between Ayurvedic medicine and celecoxib and glucosamine, and we speculate that equivalence trials may be a way forward. The data from the trials also supports the Ayurvedic 'Rasayana' concept of immune-modulation and healing. We need to interpret logic of Ayurveda when, adopting modern science tools in drug development and validation and much research is required. Validation of Ayurvedic medicines using the latter approach may lead to an evidence based Ayurveda - Modern Medicine interface. Also, in pursuit of finding better treatment solutions, we ought to step beyond the realm of only drugs and attempt validation of comprehensive specific treatment package as per classical Ayurveda. Finally, validation of a combined (Ayurveda and modern medicine) therapeutic approach with superior efficacy and safety is likely to be a major leap in overcoming some of the current frustrations to treat difficult disorders like arthritis using only modern medicines.

  11. Perceptions of Ayurvedic medicine by citizens in Dhaka, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Yoshitoku; Harun-Or-Rashid, Md; Yoshida, Yasuko; Alim, Md Abdul

    2016-02-01

    Bangladesh is now facing the public health problems of deficiency of iron and iodine, especially for women. The Ministry of Health and Family Welfare of Bangladesh has implemented strong countermeasures to enhance the health condition of the nation. On the other hand, based on the concept of the Declaration of Alma-Ata, complementary and alternative medicine should be used more vigorously to enhance public health in the world. The usage of complementary and alternative medicine such as ayurvedic medicine (AM) should be increased in Bangladesh. Therefore we conducted the study on perceptions of AM by citizens in Dhaka, Bangladesh in order to promote and enhance the effective usage of AM, including herbal medicines as medical resources, from December 2010 to January 2011. This study showed younger citizens (61.1%) did not get more benefit from AM than elder citizens (48.0%). On the other hand, younger citizens (76.8%) did not get more harm from AM than elder citizens (70.1%). We think that in terms of effectiveness of AM, the younger generation in Dhaka seems to be more skeptical to AM than the elder generation in Dhaka, even though the younger generation are more satisfied with AM than the elder generation. With viewpoint of enhancement of usage of AM in Dhaka, we think that scientifically sound information on AM should be collected rigorously and brought to the citizens vigorously to remove the skeptical feeling of AM from younger citizen in Dhaka. In terms of the effective utilization of limited medical resources, AM should be used appropriately in Bangladesh, Asia and the world.

  12. Plural medicine in Sri Lanka: do Ayurvedic and Western medical practices differ?

    PubMed

    Waxler-Morrison, N E

    1988-01-01

    In Sri Lanka, as in India, two formally structured systems of medicine exist side by side. While Western-style biomedicine is believed to be useful, Ayurvedic medicine is well established and commonly used. Underlying one explanation for the persistence of such plural medical systems is a functional theory, suggesting that each system is used for different treatments, diseases, or for the ideological, linguistic or social characteristics of the physician. In part, Ayurvedic and Western medicine may persist because their practitioners provide distinctly different services. We tested part of this functional explanation by sending trained 'pseudo-patients' to 764 Ayurvedic and allopathic physicians across Sri Lanka. 'Patients' reported symptoms of common cold, diarrhea or back pain, and recorded after leaving the clinic many aspects of history-taking, diagnostic procedures and physician-patient interaction. Medicines prescribed were later analyzed by a laboratory. We found, basically, no significant differences between the medical practices of sampled Ayurvedic and Western-style physicians, with one exception. While both types spend 3-4 min asking four questions and doing two or three physical examination procedures, and while both prescribe, overwhelmingly, only Western medicines, the allopathic physicians give drugs, that, from the point of view of Western medicine, either 'help' or 'harm' and Ayurvedic physicians prescribe 'neutral' medicines. While we have not directly tested the entire functional explanation we suggest that a structural explanation of the persistence of two systems of medicine may be more valid. Ayurvedic and Western medicine continue in Sri Lanka because they, as institutions, are linked to the social, economic and political structure of the society. Thus, survival is based, not on what a physician does in his practice but upon the power of his medical profession to control medical territory.

  13. An update on Shankhpushpi, a cognition-boosting Ayurvedic medicine.

    PubMed

    Sethiya, Neeraj Kumar; Nahata, Alok; Mishra, Sri Hari; Dixit, Vinod Kumar

    2009-11-01

    Shankhpushpi is an Ayurvedic drug used for its action on the central nervous system, especially for boosting memory and improving intellect. Quantum of information gained from Ayurvedic and other Sanskrit literature revealed the existence of four different plant species under the name of Shankhpushpi, which is used in various Ayurvedic prescriptions described in ancient texts, singly or in combination with other herbs. The sources comprise of entire herbs with following botanicals viz., Convulvulus pluricaulis Choisy. (Convulvulaceae), Evolvulus alsinoides Linn. (Convulvulaceae), Clitoria ternatea Linn. (Papilionaceae) and Canscora decussata Schult. (Gentianaceae). A review on the available scientific information in terms of pharmacognostical characteristics, chemical constituents, pharmacological activities, preclinical and clinical applications of controversial sources of Shankhpushpi is prepared with a view to review scientific work undertaken on Shankhpushpi. It may provide parameters of differentiation and permit appreciation of variability of drug action by use of different botanical sources.

  14. Acute renal failure secondary to ingestion of ayurvedic medicine containing mercury.

    PubMed

    Sathe, K; Ali, U; Ohri, A

    2013-07-01

    Several traditional medicines contain potentially toxic heavy metals. Heavy metal poisoning is not an uncommon cause of renal damage, although the diagnosis can be easily missed. We report a case of chronic ingestion of an ayurvedic medicine containing mercury in a 2-year-old girl, resulting in anuric renal failure due to acute interstitial nephritis.

  15. Ayurvedic medicine zinc bhasma: physicochemical evaluation, anti-diabetic activity and safety assessment.

    PubMed

    Umrani, Rinku D; Paknikar, Kishore M

    2011-02-01

    Bhasmas are unique Ayurvedic metallic preparations used for medicinal purposes since ancient times. With increasing knowledge of risk of nanomaterials, it becomes imperative to assess the safety of nanoparticulate Ayurvedic medicines using toxicity models. In this study, zinc bhasma was characterized using modern physicochemical techniques. In vitro toxicity test revealed no major cytotoxicity at all the dose levels tested. No behavioral abnormality, clinical signs and mortality was seen indicating no adverse effects. SGOT, SGPT and serum urea were also not significantly altered indicating no major organ toxicity. In the current study, zinc bhasma appears safe for human use.

  16. Efficacy and safety of Ayurvedic medicines: Recommending equivalence trial design and proposing safety index.

    PubMed

    Sarmukaddam, Sanjeev; Chopra, Arvind; Tillu, Girish

    2010-07-01

    Ayurvedic drugs have begun to be evaluated in controlled clinical trials. The trials, often placebo controlled, are usually designed to demonstrate superiority. Though the results have been usually reported as encouraging, statistical significance has been elusive. In this melee to show efficacy, several positive results related to safety and other purported advantages with Ayurvedic drugs, including improved quality of life, easy drug availability and less cost, get drowned. Though safety is the prime concern, efficacy ultimately matters in trials. Excellent safety profile offset modest efficacy, especially for long-term management of chronic difficult to treat disorders. There is a trade-off between efficacy and safety but we have no means to put them together in a mathematical evaluation to judge the overall performance of a drug. However, we need more suitable modern science methods/techniques to unravel the true therapeutic role of Ayurvedic drugs. We propose "equivalence trials" using modern medicine benchmark as a comparator and a "safety/tolerability index" on this perspective. We believe that several Ayurvedic drugs are capable of demonstrating equal efficacy but superior safety. Our concept may also be applicable for pragmatic trials that are more suitable for Ayurvedic therapy.

  17. A Pilot Feasibility Study of Whole-systems Ayurvedic Medicine and Yoga Therapy for Weight Loss.

    PubMed

    Rioux, Jennifer; Thomson, Cynthia; Howerter, Amy

    2014-01-01

    To develop and test the feasibility of a whole-systems lifestyle intervention for obesity treatment based on the practices of Ayurvedic medicine/ Yoga therapy. A pre-post weight loss intervention pilot study using conventional and Ayurvedic diagnosis inclusion criteria, tailored treatment within a standardized treatment algorithm, and standardized data collection instruments for collecting Ayurvedic outcomes. A convenience sample of overweight/obese adult community members from Tucson, Arizona interested in a "holistic weight loss program" and meeting predetermined inclusion/exclusion criteria. A comprehensive diet, activity, and lifestyle modification program based on principles of Ayurvedic medicine/yoga therapy with significant self-monitoring of lifestyle behaviors. The 3-month program was designed to change eating and activity patterns and to improve self-efficacy, quality of life, well-being, vitality, and self-awareness around food choices, stress management, and barriers to weight loss. Changes in body weight, body mass index; body fat percentage, fat/lean mass, waist/hip circumference and ratio, and blood pressure. Diet and exercise self-efficacy scales; perceived stress scale; visual analog scales (VAS) of energy, appetite, stress, quality of life, well-being, and program satisfaction at all time points. Twenty-two adults attended an in-person Ayurvedic screening; 17 initiated the intervention, and 12 completed the 3-month intervention. Twelve completed follow-up at 6 months and 11 completed follow-up at 9 months. Mean weight loss at 3 months was 3.54 kg (SD 4.76); 6 months: 4.63 kg, (SD 6.23) and 9 months: 5.9 kg (SD 8.52). Self-report of program satisfaction was more than 90% at all time points. An Ayurveda-/yoga-based lifestyle modification program is an acceptable and feasible approach to weight management. Data collection, including self-monitoring and conventional and Ayurvedic outcomes, did not unduly burden participants, with attrition similar to

  18. Genomic insights into ayurvedic and western approaches to personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Prasher, Bhavana; Gibson, Greg; Mukerji, Mitali

    2016-03-01

    Ayurveda, an ancient Indian system of medicine documented and practised since 1500 B.C., follows a systems approach that has interesting parallels with contemporary personalized genomic medicine approaches to the understanding and management of health and disease. It is based on the trisutra, which are the three aspects of causes, features and therapeutics that are interconnected through a common organizing principle termed 'tridosha'. Tridosha comprise three ascertainable physiological entities; vata (kinetic), pitta (metabolic) and kapha (potential) that are pervasive across systems, work in conjunction with each other, respond to the external environment and maintain homeostasis. Each individual is born with a specific proportion of tridosha that are not only genetically determined but also influenced by the environment during foetal development. Jointly they determine a person's basic constitution, which is termed their 'prakriti'. Development and progressi on of different diseases with their subtypes are thought to depend on the origin and mechanism of perturbation of the doshas, and the aim of therapeutic practice is to ensure that the doshas retain their homeostatic state. Similarly, western systems biology epitomized by translational P4 medicine envisages the integration of multiscalar genetic, cellular, physiological and environmental networks to predict phenotypic outcomes of perturbations. In this perspective article, we aim to outline the shape of a unifying scaffold that may allow the two intellectual traditions to enhance one another. Specifically, we illustrate how a unique integrative 'Ayurgenomics' approach can be used to integrate the trisutra concept of Ayurveda with genomics. We observe biochemical and molecular correlates of prakriti and show how these differ significantly in processes that are linked to intermediate patho-phenotypes, known to take different course in diseases. We also observe a significant enr ichment of the highly connected

  19. A cluster of lead poisoning among consumers of Ayurvedic medicine.

    PubMed

    Breeher, Laura; Mikulski, Marek A; Czeczok, Thomas; Leinenkugel, Kathy; Fuortes, Laurence J

    2015-01-01

    Use of alternative medications and herbal remedies is widespread in the United States and across the globe. These traditional medications can be contaminated with toxic metals. Despite several case reports of poisoning from such contamination, the epidemiological data are still limited. To report on a cluster of lead and mercury toxicity cases in 2011 among a community of adherents of traditional medical practice of Ayurveda. Adherents of Ayurveda were offered heavy metals screening following the identification of the index case. Forty-six of 115 participants (40%) had elevated blood lead levels (BLLs) of 10 μg/dl or above, with 9.6% of BLLs at or above 50 μg/dl. This is the largest cluster of lead and mercury toxicity following use of Ayurvedic supplements described in the literature in the US. Contamination of herbal products is a public health issue of global significance. There are few regulations addressing contamination of "natural" products or supplements.

  20. Rasayana drugs from the Ayurvedic system of medicine as possible radioprotective agents in cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Baliga, Manjeshwar Shrinath; Meera, Sharake; Vaishnav, Lalit Kumar; Rao, Suresh; Palatty, Princy Louis

    2013-11-01

    The use of ionizing radiation, which is the cornerstone of cancer treatment, is compromised by the radiosensitivity of normal tissues. A chemical that can give selective benefit to the normal cells against the deleterious effects of ionizing radiation has been a long-sought goal. However, most of the compounds studied have shown inadequate clinical application owing to their inherent toxicity, undesirable side effects, and high cost. Studies carried out in the past 2 decades have shown that some of the classical Indian Ayurvedic drugs (Amritaprasham, Ashwagandha Rasayana, Brahma Rasayana, Chyavanprasha, Narasimha Rasayana, and Triphala Churna) possess radioprotective effects. In the current review, an attempt is made to summarize the radioprotective observations of these Ayurvedic drugs and the mechanisms responsible for the radioprotective effects.

  1. Of spineless babies and folic acid: evidence and efficacy in biomedicine and ayurvedic medicine.

    PubMed

    Naraindas, Harish

    2006-06-01

    The basic premise of the paper is that Western medicine's co-opting of specific technologies and materials from other (indigenous) medical traditions, stripped of the original theories underlying their use, has problematic consequences for the practitioners and patients of both source and recipient traditions. The paper begins by illustrating the historical continuity of this process by way of an example from India's colonial era. The fact that specific practices or materials are regarded as biomedically useful because they 'work' (are efficacious) does not mean that the 'traditional' theories underlying them are seen as correct. The knowledge contained in these traditions is not counted as legitimate, as the emphasis in biomedicine (the legitimate canon) on an identifiable concrete location in the body for the source of health problems creates difficulties-both for patients when their problems are not provided with a cause that matches their subjective awareness, and for the practitioners of other traditions whose patients have been exposed to biomedicine. The paper goes on to demonstrate, using case examples from extended ethnographic fieldwork in southern India, how this is played out in a setting in which an educated Indian patient population accepts this form of knowledge as legitimate but espouses ayurvedic therapy. Notions of 'evidence' are shown to be central to the interplay between biomedical and other medical traditions, since objective tests and measures in biomedicine are accepted as the only legitimate 'evidence' of cure, but these do not necessarily accord either with the premises of these other traditions or with patients' subjective perceptions of well-being. Returning to an acceptance and practice of other traditions, consequently, requires nothing less than a fundamental cognitive shift in the grounds for what constitutes 'evidence.'

  2. A cluster of lead poisoning among consumers of Ayurvedic medicine

    PubMed Central

    Breeher, Laura; Mikulski, Marek A.; Czeczok, Thomas; Leinenkugel, Kathy

    2015-01-01

    Background Use of alternative medications and herbal remedies is widespread in the United States and across the globe. These traditional medications can be contaminated with toxic metals. Despite several case reports of poisoning from such contamination, the epidemiological data are still limited. Objectives To report on a cluster of lead and mercury toxicity cases in 2011 among a community of adherents of traditional medical practice of Ayurveda. Methods Adherents of Ayurveda were offered heavy metals screening following the identification of the index case. Results Forty-six of 115 participants (40%) had elevated blood lead levels (BLLs) of 10 μg/dl or above, with 9.6% of BLLs at or above 50 μg/dl. Conclusions This is the largest cluster of lead and mercury toxicity following use of Ayurvedic supplements described in the literature in the US. Contamination of herbal products is a public health issue of global significance. There are few regulations addressing contamination of “natural” products or supplements. PMID:25843124

  3. 02A. Design, Methods, and Outcomes for Recent Clinical Trials Utilizing Ayurvedic Medicine, Yoga, and Meditation

    PubMed Central

    Saper, Robert; Vinjamury, Sivarama; Elder, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Focus Area: Integrative Approaches to Care The panel discussants will present on the outcomes of four recent pragmatic trials covering the spectrum of Ayurvedic medicine, yoga, and meditation as therapeutic approaches for both acute and chronic conditions. The presenters will discuss: (1) a pilot study of a whole-systems Ayurveda and Yoga Therapy intervention for obesity; (2) a comparative effectiveness randomized controlled trial of hatha yoga, physical therapy, and education for non-specific chronic low back pain in low-income minority populations; (3) an investigation of the therapeutic usefulness of Shirodhara (Ayurvedic oil dripping therapy) as a treatment for insomnia; and (4) a discussion of the evidence base supporting implementation of meditation interventions in schools and workplace settings. Discussants will present information on study designs, research methodology, and outcome measure selection to highlight special considerations in conducting research on whole medical systems that use multi-target therapies and focus on patient-centered outcomes. Ayurvedic medicine and yoga are characterized by low-cost, noninvasive interventions that can be usefully offered as part of an integrative medicine therapeutic approach.

  4. The Ayurvedic medicine Clitoria ternatea--from traditional use to scientific assessment.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Pulok K; Kumar, Venkatesan; Kumar, N Satheesh; Heinrich, Micheal

    2008-12-08

    Clitoria ternatea L. (CT) (Family: Fabaceae) commonly known as 'Butterfly pea', a traditional Ayurvedic medicine, has been used for centuries as a memory enhancer, nootropic, antistress, anxiolytic, antidepressant, anticonvulsant, tranquilizing and sedative agent. A wide range of secondary metabolites including triterpenoids, flavonol glycosides, anthocyanins and steroids has been isolated from Clitoria ternatea Linn. Its extracts possess a wide range of pharmacological activities including antimicrobial, antipyretic, anti-inflammatory, analgesic, diuretic, local anesthetic, antidiabetic, insecticidal, blood platelet aggregation-inhibiting and for use as a vascular smooth muscle relaxing properties. This plant has a long use in traditional Ayurvedic medicine for several diseases and the scientific studies has reconfirmed those with modern relevance. This review is an effort to explore the chemical constituents, pharmacological and toxicity studies of CT, which have long been in clinical use in Ayurvedic system of medicine along with a critical appraisal of its future ethnopharmacological potential in view of many recent findings of importance on this well known plant species.

  5. A Pilot Feasibility Study of Whole-systems Ayurvedic Medicine and Yoga Therapy for Weight Loss

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Cynthia; Howerter, Amy

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To develop and test the feasibility of a whole-systems lifestyle intervention for obesity treatment based on the practices of Ayurvedic medicine/ Yoga therapy. Design: A pre-post weight loss intervention pilot study using conventional and Ayurvedic diagnosis inclusion criteria, tailored treatment within a standardized treatment algorithm, and standardized data collection instruments for collecting Ayurvedic outcomes. Participants: A convenience sample of overweight/obese adult community members from Tucson, Arizona interested in a “holistic weight loss program” and meeting predetermined inclusion/exclusion criteria. Intervention: A comprehensive diet, activity, and lifestyle modification program based on principles of Ayurvedic medicine/yoga therapy with significant self-monitoring of lifestyle behaviors. The 3-month program was designed to change eating and activity patterns and to improve self-efficacy, quality of life, well-being, vitality, and self-awareness around food choices, stress management, and barriers to weight loss. Primary Outcome Measures: Changes in body weight, body mass index; body fat percentage, fat/lean mass, waist/hip circumference and ratio, and blood pressure. Secondary Outcome Measures: Diet and exercise self-efficacy scales; perceived stress scale; visual analog scales (VAS) of energy, appetite, stress, quality of life, well-being, and program satisfaction at all time points. Results: Twenty-two adults attended an in-person Ayurvedic screening; 17 initiated the intervention, and 12 completed the 3-month intervention. Twelve completed follow-up at 6 months and 11 completed follow-up at 9 months. Mean weight loss at 3 months was 3.54 kg (SD 4.76); 6 months: 4.63 kg, (SD 6.23) and 9 months: 5.9 kg (SD 8.52). Self-report of program satisfaction was more than 90% at all time points. Conclusions: An Ayurveda-/yoga-based lifestyle modification program is an acceptable and feasible approach to weight management. Data collection

  6. Chronic arsenic poisoning following ayurvedic medication.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Benzeeta; Goyal, Palvi; Flora, S J S; Gill, K D; Singh, Surjit

    2014-12-01

    Ayurveda, Indian traditional system of medicine, is practiced commonly in South East Asia and in many parts of the world. Many ayurvedic drugs contain heavy metals and may lead to metal toxicity. Of these, chronic lead poisoning is the most common. Chronic arsenic poisoning following the use of ayurvedic medication, though reported, is rare. We describe three patients who presented with features of chronic arsenic poisoning following prolonged ayurvedic medication use. The diagnosis of chronic arsenic poisoning was confirmed by high arsenic levels in the blood, urine, hair, and nails in all the three patients and in ayurvedic drug in two patients. The ayurvedic medication was discontinued and treatment with D-penicillamine started. At 6 months after treatment, blood arsenic levels returned to normal with clinical recovery in all of them. Arsenic poisoning following ayurvedic medication is much less common than lead poisoning, though mineral ayurvedic medicines may lead to it. We used D-penicillamine as chelator and all of them recovered. Whether withdrawal of medication alone or D-penicillamine also played a role in recovery is unclear and needs to be assessed.

  7. Mass spectrometric evaluation of neurotransmitter levels in IMR 32 cell line in response to Ayurvedic medicines.

    PubMed

    Mamidala, Madhu Poornima; Rajesh, N; Rajesh, Vidya

    2016-06-30

    Ayurvedic herbal medicines are administered as part of disease management for many neurodevelopmental disorders like Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and linked comorbid challenges. The biochemistry of the behavioral abnormalities as observed in comorbid conditions is already reported to involve neurotransmitters like gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), serotonin (5-HT) and dopamine (DA). The aim of our study is to evaluate the effect of ayurvedic medicines on neurotransmitter levels in IMR 32. Such a study will give some insight into the molecular mechanism of the action of these medicines and help us to understand their contributions in neurotransmitter homeostasis. Solutions of Brahmi, Brahmi vati, Brahmi ghrita and Saraswata ghrita, each at 50 μM, were added to differentiated IMR 32 cells and grown for 24 h. The cell secretion was analysed by ultra-fast liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (UFLC/MS) in electrospray ionisation (ESI) mode for the neurotransmitters DA, 5-HT and GABA. The mobile phase selected was 0.1% formic acid with 15 μg/mL Na2 -EDTA (A) and 0.1% formic acid in acetonitrile (B) introduced in the ratio of 92:8. All neurotransmitters under study were eluted within 7 min with GABA eluting at 3.82 min, 5-HT at 4.48 min and DA at 5.47 min, respectively. Linearity was excellent with a correlation coefficient (R(2) ) of 0.999; repeatability and accuracy were also within acceptable range. All herbal drugs evaluated increased the neurotransmitter levels and Brahmi vati increased the neurotransmitter levels to a larger extent. Decreased levels of neurotransmitters were observed in behavioral abnormalities which were also observed in children with ASD. Herbal medicines given as part of ayurvedic medicine increased the neurotransmitter levels in IMR 32. Thus, these ayurvedic medicines when prescribed to children with ASD might alleviate the abnormal behavioral symptoms by maintaining neurotransmitter homeostasis. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons

  8. The use of ayurvedic medicine in the context of health promotion--a mixed methods case study of an ayurvedic centre in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Niemi, Maria; Ståhle, Göran

    2016-02-17

    Ayurveda has its historical roots in India, but has also been internationalised, partly via migration and partly through an increased interest in alternative medicine in the West, where studies point toward increased use. However, there is to date scarce knowledge about the use and experiences of ayurveda in Sweden. We have conducted a case study of a center for ayurvedic healthcare in Sweden. We have collected information on client background data from the center's documentation, and compiled data from all clients who visited the centre for ayurvedic consultation during spring 2014. In total, 55 individuals were included in the study, and 18 of them were chosen for individual semi-structured interviews, to gain a deeper understanding of their motives for seeking, and experiences of ayurvedic health care. The material was analysed and compiled through a mix of qualitative and quantitative methods. Among the 55 clients, 91% were female the mean age was 47 years, and 64% gave a specific illness as a reason for seeking ayurveda. The most common illnesses were respiratory, musculoskeletal, circulatory, tumor, and cutaneous illnesses. The qualitative results showed that ayurveda was being used in combination with other methods, including various diets, other alternative medicine methods and conventional medicine. Some participants recounted having sought ayurveda as a complement to conventional medicine, or in cases when conventional medicine had been experienced as insufficient in terms of diagnosis or treatment. However, some participants experienced it as difficult to follow the ayurvedic life-style advice in the midst of their everyday life. Many participants reported positive experiences of pulse diagnostics, which was the main diagnostic method used in ayurvedic consultation. Some reported concrete, physical improvement of their symptoms. This study points towards important aspects of participant experience of ayurveda, that may be subject to further research. The

  9. Essential Medicines: An Indian Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Maiti, Rituparna; Bhatia, Vikas; Padhy, Biswa Mohan; Hota, Debasish

    2015-01-01

    The concept of defining essential medicines and establishing a list of them was aimed to improve the availability of affordable medicines for the world's poor. Access to essential medicines is a major determinant of health outcomes. Several countries have made substantial progress towards increasing access to essential medicines, but access to essential medicines in developing countries like India is not adequate. In this review we have tried to present the Indian scenario in respect to availability and accessibility of essential medicines over last one decade. To enhance the credibility of Indian healthcare system, procurement and delivery systems of essential medicines have to be strengthened through government commitment, careful selection, adequate public sector financing, efficient distribution systems, control on taxes and duties, and inculcating a culture of rational use of medicines in current and future prescribers. PMID:26435594

  10. From traditional Ayurvedic medicine to modern medicine: identification of therapeutic targets for suppression of inflammation and cancer.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Bharat B; Ichikawa, Haruyo; Garodia, Prachi; Weerasinghe, Priya; Sethi, Gautam; Bhatt, Indra D; Pandey, Manoj K; Shishodia, Shishir; Nair, Muraleedharan G

    2006-02-01

    Cancer is a hyperproliferative disorder that involves transformation, dysregulation of apoptosis, proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis and metastasis. Extensive research during the last 30 years has revealed much about the biology of cancer. Drugs used to treat most cancers are those that can block cell signalling, including growth factor signalling (e.g., epidermal growth factor); prostaglandin production (e.g., COX-2); inflammation (e.g., inflammatory cytokines: NF-kappaB, TNF, IL-1, IL-6, chemokines); drug resistance gene products (e.g., multi-drug resistance); cell cycle proteins (e.g., cyclin D1 and cyclin E); angiogenesis (e.g., vascular endothelial growth factor); invasion (e.g., matrix metalloproteinases); antiapoptosis (e.g., bcl-2, bcl-X(L), XIAP, survivin, FLIP); and cellular proliferation (e.g., c-myc, AP-1, growth factors). Numerous reports have suggested that Ayurvedic plants and their components mediate their effects by modulating several of these recently identified therapeutic targets. However, Ayurvedic medicine requires rediscovery in light of our current knowledge of allopathic (modern) medicine. The focus of this review is to elucidate the Ayurvedic concept of cancer, including its classification, causes, pathogenesis and prevention; surgical removal of tumours; herbal remedies; dietary modifications; and spiritual treatments.

  11. Adjunct therapy of Ayurvedic medicine with anti tubercular drugs on the therapeutic management of pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Debnath, P. K.; Chattopadhyay, Jaydeb; Mitra, Achintya; Adhikari, Anjan; Alam, Mirza Samsur; Bandopadhyay, S. K.; Hazra, Jayram

    2012-01-01

    Background: Pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) is an age old disease described in Vedic Medicine as ‘Yakshma’. Later on, in Ayurveda it earned a prefix and found way into mythology as ‘Rajayakshma’. After the discovery of streptomycin, the therapeutic management of PTB received a major breakthrough. The treatment module changed remarkably with the formulation of newer anti-tubercular drugs (ATD) with appreciable success. Recent resurgence of PTB in developed countries like United States posed a threat to the medical community due to resistant strains. Consequently, WHO looked toward traditional medicine. Literature reveals that Ayurvedic treatment of PTB was in vogue in India before the introduction of ATD with limited success. Records show that 2766 patients of PTB were treated with Ayurvedic drugs in a tertiary care hospital in Kolkata in the year 1933-1947. Objectives: To evaluate the toxicity reduction and early restoration by adjunct therapy of Ayurvedic drugs by increasing the bio-availability of ATDs. Materials and Methods: In the present study, treatment response of 99 patients treated with ATD as an adjunct with Aswagandha (Withania somnifera) and a multi-herbal formulation described in Chikitsa-sthana of Charaka samhita i.e. Chyawanprash were investigated. Hematological profile, sputum bacterial load count, immunoglobulin IgA and IgM, blood sugar, liver function test, serum creatinine were the assessed parameters besides blood isoniazid and pyrazinamide, repeated after 28 days of treatment. Results: The symptoms abated, body weight showed improvement, ESR values were normal, there was appreciable change in IgA and IgM patterns and significantly increased bioavailability of isoniazid and pyrazinamide were recorded. Conclusion: This innovative clinical study coupled with empowered research may turn out to be promising in finding a solution for the treatment of PTB. PMID:23125511

  12. Ayurvedic medicine constituent withaferin a causes G2 and M phase cell cycle arrest in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Stan, Silvia D; Zeng, Yan; Singh, Shivendra V

    2008-01-01

    Withaferin A (WA) is derived from the medicinal plant Withania somnifera that has been safely used for centuries in the Indian Ayurvedic medicine for treatment of various ailments. We now demonstrate that WA treatment causes G2 and mitotic arrest in human breast cancer cells. Treatment of MDA-MB-231 (estrogen-independent) and MCF-7 (estrogen-responsive) cell lines with WA resulted in a concentration- and time-dependent increase in G2-M fraction, which correlated with a decrease in levels of cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1), cell division cycle 25C (Cdc25C) and/or Cdc25B proteins, leading to accumulation of Tyrosine15 phosphorylated (inactive) Cdk1. Ectopic expression of Cdc25C conferred partial yet significant protection against WA-mediated G2-M phase cell cycle arrest in MDA-MB-231 cells. The WA-treated MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells were also arrested in mitosis as judged by fluorescence microscopy and analysis of Ser10 phosphorylated histone H3. Mitotic arrest resulting from exposure to WA was accompanied by an increase in the protein level of anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome substrate securin. In conclusion, the results of this study suggest that G2-M phase cell cycle arrest may be an important mechanism in antiproliferative effect of WA against human breast cancer cells.

  13. Ayurvedic plumbism.

    PubMed

    Sadler, Matthew; Bell, Sarah

    2017-07-01

    Ayurveda is a traditional medicine native to India but is used in many parts of the world as an alternative or adjunct to standard medicine. Preparation can involve incorporation of heavy metals, including lead. We report the case of a 64-year-old man presenting with malaise, abdominal pain, anaemia and very high lead levels. He was found to be taking ayurvedic medicines to help his diabetic control. Analysis of the ayurvedic medications showed several with very high lead content. Following treatment with an oral chelating agent, the patient's symptoms and blood abnormalities resolved. This case highlights the need to be aware of potentially toxic alternative medications patients take and the efficacy of oral treatment choices in lead poisoning. © 2017 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  14. Creation of reference DNA barcode library and authentication of medicinal plant raw drugs used in Ayurvedic medicine.

    PubMed

    Vassou, Sophie Lorraine; Nithaniyal, Stalin; Raju, Balaji; Parani, Madasamy

    2016-07-18

    Ayurveda is a system of traditional medicine that originated in ancient India, and it is still in practice. Medicinal plants are the backbone of Ayurveda, which heavily relies on the plant-derived therapeutics. While Ayurveda is becoming more popular in several countries throughout the World, lack of authenticated medicinal plant raw drugs is a growing concern. Our aim was to DNA barcode the medicinal plants that are listed in the Ayurvedic Pharmacopoeia of India (API) to create a reference DNA barcode library, and to use the same to authenticate the raw drugs that are sold in markets. We have DNA barcoded 347 medicinal plants using rbcL marker, and curated rbcL DNA barcodes for 27 medicinal plants from public databases. These sequences were used to create Ayurvedic Pharmacopoeia of India - Reference DNA Barcode Library (API-RDBL). This library was used to authenticate 100 medicinal plant raw drugs, which were in the form of powders (82) and seeds (18). Ayurvedic Pharmacopoeia of India - Reference DNA Barcode Library (API-RDBL) was created with high quality and authentic rbcL barcodes for 374 out of the 395 medicinal plants that are included in the API. The rbcL DNA barcode differentiated 319 species (85 %) with the pairwise divergence ranging between 0.2 and 29.9 %. PCR amplification and DNA sequencing success rate of rbcL marker was 100 % even for the poorly preserved medicinal plant raw drugs that were collected from local markets. DNA barcoding revealed that only 79 % raw drugs were authentic, and the remaining 21 % samples were adulterated. Further, adulteration was found to be much higher with powders (ca. 25 %) when compared to seeds (ca. 5 %). The present study demonstrated the utility of DNA barcoding in authenticating medicinal plant raw drugs, and found that approximately one fifth of the market samples were adulterated. Powdered raw drugs, which are very difficult to be identified by taxonomists as well as common people, seem to be the easy

  15. Retrospective Investigation of a Lead Poisoning Outbreak from the Consumption of an Ayurvedic Medicine: Durban, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Mathee, Angela; Naicker, Nisha; Teare, June

    2015-07-10

    Ayurvedic medicines have been gaining in popularity around the world in recent decades, but have also been associated with lead contamination and poisoning. In 2012 in Durban, South Africa, a lead poisoning outbreak among adolescents was associated with the consumption of an Ayurvedic medicine for the treatment of skin conditions. In 2014 eight individuals (out of 12 affected) were traced and interviewed. Questionnaires were administered; blood samples were taken for lead content analysis; and medical records were reviewed. Samples of the implicated medicines were analyzed to determine lead levels. Blood lead levels during the acute phase ranged from 34 to 116 µg/dL; and during the current study (two years later) from 13 to 34 µg/dL. The implicated lead capsules had a lead content of 125,235 µg/g. Participants suffered a wide range of non-specific ill health symptoms; and there was a significant delay in the diagnosis of lead poisoning. This study highlights the potential for lead poisoning outbreaks from the consumption of Ayurvedic medicines in African settings. There were weaknesses with regard to the diagnosis of and response to the outbreak, for which measures need to be put in place to ensure greater awareness of the role of Ayurvedic medicine in lead poisoning, and prompt diagnosis and treatment of future cases.

  16. Complementary and alternative medicine in Indian Parkinson's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Pandit, Awadh Kishor; Vibha, Deepti; Srivastava, Achal Kumar; Shukla, Garima; Goyal, Vinay; Behari, Madhuri

    2016-10-01

    Use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM; bǔ chōng yǔ tì dài yī xué) in Parkinson disease (PD) ranged 40-70%. The objective of this study was to determine the frequency, types and factors associated with the use of CAM in Indian PD patients. PD patients, fulfilling UKPD-Society brain-bank diagnostic-criteria, attending Movement-disorders clinic of a tertiary-care teaching hospital in India from 1st May to 15th December 2012 were enrolled. Information on socio-demographic, clinical data and treatment along with factors (source of information, benefits, harms, reason for use and cost) associated with CAM use were recorded. Out of 233 consecutive PD patients, 106 (46%) used CAM. Mean ± SD age of CAM users was 56 ± 11.2 years. Among CAM users, 72% were males, with mean age-onset 49 ± 11.16 years (P = 0.042) and 73% receiving levodopa therapy (p = 0.006). Longer duration PD, higher education (graduates and above), urban residence, and fairly good perceived health were other factors seen among CAM users. Reasons for using CAM were 'feel good factor' (73%), 9% took CAM due to side effects from allopathic-medicines. Commonly used CAM were Ayurvedic, homeopathic medicines, and acupuncture ( zhēn jiǔ) [74/106 (70%)]. Median CAM cost in Indian Rupees (INR) was 1000/month (USD16, range: 0-400USD/month in year 2012). Almost half of PD patients use CAM. Three-quarters of Indian CAM using PD patients believe that CAM is harmless, using it at a substantial cost. CAM-users are educated, young, urban dwellers, longer duration PD and receiving levodopa. Commonly used CAM was Ayurvedic, Homeopathic medicines and acupuncture.

  17. Knowledge, attitude, and practices toward ayurvedic medicine use among allopathic resident doctors: A cross-sectional study at a tertiary care hospital in India.

    PubMed

    Gawde, Suchita R; Shetty, Yashashri C; Pawar, Dattatray B

    2013-07-01

    Ayurveda is most commonly practiced form of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in India. There are very few studies showing the knowledge, attitude, and practices (KAP) of allopathic doctors about Ayurvedic drugs and its use. The study was initiated to assess KAP toward Ayurvedic medicine use among allopathic resident doctors. Cross-sectional and prospective study. After obtaining permission from the Institutional Ethics Committee, allopathic resident doctors from clinical departments were approached personally. They were given pre-formed validated questionnaire to assess KAP toward Ayurvedic medicine use. Descriptive statistics. Allopathic residents had little knowledge about basic concepts of Ayurveda, that is, 'panchakarma' and 'tridosha'. Majority residents (99%) had no opportunity to learn basics of Ayurveda, but 67% residents prescribed Ayurvedic medicines to patients. However, many residents (76%) mentioned that cross practice should not be allowed due to lack of knowledge. One resident knew that cross-practice was not allowed by law. The commonly prescribed proprietary Ayurvedic medicines were Liv-52 (39%), Shatavari (13%), Cystone (12%) and common ailments for which these medicines prescribed were liver disorders (34%), arthritis (18%), cough and cold (13%), kidney stones (11%), and piles (10%). Nearly 76% residents felt incorporation of Ayurveda with modern medicine would attract more patients and at the same time most residents (92%) agreed that Ayurvedic medicines need scientific testing before use. Though 50% of the residents agreed for voluntary training in Ayurveda, 80% denied compulsory training. Nearly 63% residents recommended Ayurveda among all CAMs. Most of residents heard of Ayurveda from their colleagues. This study reveals that allopathic resident doctors had little knowledge about Ayurveda and Ayurvedic medicine use but engaged in prescription of Ayurvedic medicines. So some interventions should be taken to increase the knowledge

  18. Exploring the anti-diabetic potential of Australian Aboriginal and Indian Ayurvedic plant extracts using cell-based assays.

    PubMed

    Gulati, Vandana; Gulati, Pankaj; Harding, Ian H; Palombo, Enzo A

    2015-02-05

    Plant-derived compounds have been used clinically to treat type 2 diabetes for many years as they also exert additional beneficial effects on various other disorders. The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible mechanism of anti-diabetic activity of twelve (seven Australian Aboriginal and five Indian Ayurvedic) plant extracts. The ethanolic plant extracts were investigated for glucose uptake and adipogenesis in murine 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Cytotoxicity studies were also carried out against two cancerous cell lines, HeLa and A549, to investigate the potential anti-cancer activities of the extracts. Of the seven Australian Aboriginal plant extracts tested, only Acacia kempeana and Santalum spicatum stimulated glucose uptake in adipocytes. Among the five Indian Ayurvedic plant extracts, only Curculigo orchioides enhanced glucose uptake. With respect to adipogenesis, the Australian plants Acacia tetragonophylla, Beyeria leshnaultii and Euphorbia drumondii and the Indian plants Pterocarpus marsupium, Andrographis paniculata and Curculigo orchioides reduced lipid accumulation in differentiated adipocytes. Extracts of Acacia kempeana and Acacia tetragonophylla showed potent and specific activity against HeLa cells. The findings suggest that the plant extracts exert their anti-diabetic properties by different mechanisms, including the stimulation of glucose uptake in adipocytes, inhibition of adipogenesis or both. Apart from their anti-diabetic activities, some of the extracts have potential for the development of chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of cervical cancer.

  19. Proposed correlation of modern processing principles for Ayurvedic herbal drug manufacturing: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Jain, Rahi; Venkatasubramanian, Padma

    2014-01-01

    Quality Ayurvedic herbal medicines are potential, low-cost solutions for addressing contemporary healthcare needs of both Indian and global community. Correlating Ayurvedic herbal preparations with modern processing principles (MPPs) can help develop new and use appropriate technology for scaling up production of the medicines, which is necessary to meet the growing demand. Understanding the fundamental Ayurvedic principles behind formulation and processing is also important for improving the dosage forms. Even though Ayurvedic industry has adopted technologies from food, chemical and pharmaceutical industries, there is no systematic study to correlate the traditional and modern processing methods. This study is an attempt to provide a possible correlation between the Ayurvedic processing methods and MPPs. A systematic literature review was performed to identify the Ayurvedic processing methods by collecting information from English editions of classical Ayurveda texts on medicine preparation methods. Correlation between traditional and MPPs was done based on the techniques used in Ayurvedic drug processing. It was observed that in Ayurvedic medicine preparations there were two major types of processes, namely extraction, and separation. Extraction uses membrane rupturing and solute diffusion principles, while separation uses volatility, adsorption, and size-exclusion principles. The study provides systematic documentation of methods used in Ayurveda for herbal drug preparation along with its interpretation in terms of MPPs. This is the first step which can enable improving or replacing traditional techniques. New technologies or use of existing technologies can be used to improve the dosage forms and scaling up while maintaining the Ayurvedic principles similar to traditional techniques.

  20. Proposed correlation of modern processing principles for Ayurvedic herbal drug manufacturing: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Rahi; Venkatasubramanian, Padma

    2014-01-01

    Quality Ayurvedic herbal medicines are potential, low-cost solutions for addressing contemporary healthcare needs of both Indian and global community. Correlating Ayurvedic herbal preparations with modern processing principles (MPPs) can help develop new and use appropriate technology for scaling up production of the medicines, which is necessary to meet the growing demand. Understanding the fundamental Ayurvedic principles behind formulation and processing is also important for improving the dosage forms. Even though Ayurvedic industry has adopted technologies from food, chemical and pharmaceutical industries, there is no systematic study to correlate the traditional and modern processing methods. This study is an attempt to provide a possible correlation between the Ayurvedic processing methods and MPPs. A systematic literature review was performed to identify the Ayurvedic processing methods by collecting information from English editions of classical Ayurveda texts on medicine preparation methods. Correlation between traditional and MPPs was done based on the techniques used in Ayurvedic drug processing. It was observed that in Ayurvedic medicine preparations there were two major types of processes, namely extraction, and separation. Extraction uses membrane rupturing and solute diffusion principles, while separation uses volatility, adsorption, and size-exclusion principles. The study provides systematic documentation of methods used in Ayurveda for herbal drug preparation along with its interpretation in terms of MPPs. This is the first step which can enable improving or replacing traditional techniques. New technologies or use of existing technologies can be used to improve the dosage forms and scaling up while maintaining the Ayurvedic principles similar to traditional techniques. PMID:25737605

  1. Ayurvedic Profiling of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Bredesen, Dale E; Rao, Rammohan V

    2017-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-associated, progressive neurodegenerative disease that is characterized by severe memory loss, personality changes, and an overall decline in cognitive function. The cause of AD is not yet completely defined and efforts to find a cure for it have so far been disappointing. AD is one of the most significant health care problems nationally and globally. Recently, we described a personalized therapeutic approach called metabolic enhancement for neurodegeneration (MEND) that successfully reversed the cognitive decline in patients with early AD. The magnitude of the improvement was exceptional, providing testimony to the fact that a personalized and programmatic approach to cognitive decline is highly effective. Ayurveda is a personalized system of traditional medicine native to India and the Indian subcontinent. Although a direct reference to AD in the ancient Ayurvedic literature is missing, concepts including forgetfulness, memory loss, and brain cell loss have been described. Using the clinical information and the metabolic profiling of AD individuals we recently reported using the MEND program, we now describe in this commentary, 3 subtypes of AD based on the Ayurvedic interpretation. Ayurvedic profiling of patients with AD reveals 3 readily distinguishable subtypes, namely Vata, Pitta, and Krimi, which will prove useful in patients with cognitive decline and those at risk for such decline from the standpoint of specific subtype-based Ayurvedic intervention.

  2. Hematopoietic toxicity from lead-containing Ayurvedic medications

    PubMed Central

    Kales, Stefanos N.; Christophi, Costas A.; Saper, Robert B.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Background Millions worldwide use Ayurvedic (traditional Indian) medicines. These medications are increasingly associated with lead poisoning, often accompanied by anemia. We compared the relative hematopoietic toxicity of Ayurvedic lead poisoning with a common form of occupational lead poisoning. Material/Methods We retrospectively studied 66 adult lead intoxications: 43 published Ayurvedic cases identified in published reports by searching MEDLINE (1966 to November 2005); 4 Ayurvedic patients seen at a referral center; and 19 lead paint intoxications from the same center. We considered patients’ age, gender and blood lead at presentation, and then compared the groups with respect to hematopoietic parameters. Results Ayurvedic lead poisoning was associated with higher blood lead (p<0.001), more basophilic stippling (p<0.001), lower hemoglobin (p<0.001) and higher protoporphyrin (p<0.001). Multiple regression adjusted for blood lead and gender found Ayurvedic lead poisoning associated with a 36.2 g/L (95% CI -48.8, -23.6 g/L) greater decrement in hemoglobin (p<0.001) as compared to paint-removal poisoning. Conclusions Ayurvedic poisoning produces greater hematopoietic toxicity than paint-removal poisoning. Ayurvedic ingestion should be considered in patients with anemia. Ayurveda users should be screened for lead exposure and strongly encouraged to discontinue metal-containing remedies. PMID:17599022

  3. Transient A-V dissociation and severe hypotension due to consumption of Ayurvedic medicine--Vatsanabha (aconitum ferox).

    PubMed

    Laddhad, Deepak; Sancheti, Saurabh R; Dinde, Yogita

    2014-05-01

    A 24 year old married, well educated, female patient presented with complaints of giddiness and blackouts. On evaluation, patient had hypotension and bradycardia. ECG findings were suggestive of complete A-V dissociation. On detailed history patient revealed consumption. of Ayurvedic medicine Vatsanabha for arthritis. This study impresses upon the need for complete history talking and generating awareness regarding the correct and observed use of any drug including alternative medicines.

  4. Plant medicines of Indian origin for wound healing activity: a review.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Tuhin Kanti; Mukherjee, Biswapati

    2003-03-01

    Research on wound healing drugs is a developing area in modern biomedical sciences. Scientists who are trying to develop newer drugs from natural resources are looking toward the Ayurveda, the Indian traditional system of medicine. Several drugs of plant, mineral, and animal origin are described in the Ayurveda for their wound healing properties under the term Vranaropaka. Most of these drugs are derived from plant origin. Some of these plants have been screened scientifically for the evaluation of their wound healing activity in different pharmacological models and patients, but the potential of most remains unexplored. In a few cases, active chemical constituents were identified. Some Ayurvedic medicinal plants, namely, Ficus bengalensis, Cynodon dactylon, Symplocos racemosa, Rubia cordifolia, Pterocarpus santalinus, Ficus racemosa, Glycyrrhiza glabra, Berberis aristata, Curcuma longa, Centella asiatica, Euphorbia nerifolia, and Aloe vera, were found to be effective in experimental models. This paper presents a limited review of plants used in Ayurvedic medicine.

  5. In silico design, synthesis and evaluation of 3'-O-benzylated analogs of salacinol, a potent α-glucosidase inhibitor isolated from an Ayurvedic traditional medicine "Salacia".

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Genzoh; Nakamura, Shinya; Tsutsui, Nozomi; Balakishan, Gorre; Xie, Weijia; Tsuchiya, Satoshi; Akaki, Junji; Morikawa, Toshio; Ninomiya, Kiyofumi; Nakanishi, Isao; Yoshikawa, Masayuki; Muraoka, Osamu

    2012-09-07

    With the aid of an in silico method, α-glucosidase inhibitors with far more potent activities than salacinol (1), a potent natural α-glucosidase inhibitor isolated from an Ayurvedic traditional medicine Salacia reticulata, have been developed.

  6. In Vitro Screening for Anti-Cholinesterase and Antioxidant Activity of Methanolic Extracts of Ayurvedic Medicinal Plants Used for Cognitive Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Maya; Subramanian, Sarada

    2014-01-01

    Inhibition of Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is still considered as the main therapeutic strategy against Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Many plant derived phytochemicals have shown AChE inhibitory activity in addition to the currently approved drugs for AD. In the present study, methanolic extracts of 20 plants used in Indian Ayurvedic system of medicine for improving cognitive function were screened for acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity by Ellman’s microplate colorimetric method. Out of 20 extracts, Emblica officinalis, Nardostachys jatamansi, Nelumbo nucifera, Punica granatum and Raulfia Serpentina showed IC50 values <100 µg/ml for acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity. Antioxidant activities of these plants were assessed by DPPH scavenging assay. Among the extracts used, antioxidant activity was highest for Terminalia chebula and Emblica officinalis with IC50 values <10 µg/ml. Considering the complex multifactorial etiology of AD, these plant extracts will be safer and better candidates for the future disease modifying therapies against this devastating disease. PMID:24466247

  7. Ancient-modern concordance in Ayurvedic plants: some examples.

    PubMed Central

    Dev, S

    1999-01-01

    Ayurveda is the ancient (before 2500 b.c.) Indian system of health care and longevity. It involves a holistic view of man, his health, and illness. Ayurvedic treatment of a disease consists of salubrious use of drugs, diets, and certain practices. Medicinal preparations are invariably complex mixtures, based mostly on plant products. Around 1,250 plants are currently used in various Ayurvedic preparations. Many Indian medicinal plants have come under scientific scrutiny since the middle of the nineteenth century, although in a sporadic fashion. The first significant contribution from Ayurvedic materia medica came with the isolation of the hypertensive alkaloid from the sarpagandha plant (Rouwolfia serpentina), valued in Ayurveda for the treatment of hypertension, insomnia, and insanity. This was the first important ancient-modern concordance in Ayurvedic plants. With the gradual coming of age of chemistry and biology, disciplines central to the study of biologic activities of natural products, many Ayurvedic plants have been reinvestigated. Our work on Commiphora wightti gum-resin, valued in Ayurveda for correcting lipid disorders, has been described in some detail; based on these investigations, a modern antihyperlipoproteinemic drug is on the market in India and some other countries. There has also been concordance for a few other Ayurvedic crude drugs such as Asparagus racemosus, Cedrus deodara, and Psoralea corylifolia. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:10504143

  8. Ancient-modern concordance in Ayurvedic plants: some examples.

    PubMed

    Dev, S

    1999-10-01

    Ayurveda is the ancient (before 2500 b.c.) Indian system of health care and longevity. It involves a holistic view of man, his health, and illness. Ayurvedic treatment of a disease consists of salubrious use of drugs, diets, and certain practices. Medicinal preparations are invariably complex mixtures, based mostly on plant products. Around 1,250 plants are currently used in various Ayurvedic preparations. Many Indian medicinal plants have come under scientific scrutiny since the middle of the nineteenth century, although in a sporadic fashion. The first significant contribution from Ayurvedic materia medica came with the isolation of the hypertensive alkaloid from the sarpagandha plant (Rouwolfia serpentina), valued in Ayurveda for the treatment of hypertension, insomnia, and insanity. This was the first important ancient-modern concordance in Ayurvedic plants. With the gradual coming of age of chemistry and biology, disciplines central to the study of biologic activities of natural products, many Ayurvedic plants have been reinvestigated. Our work on Commiphora wightti gum-resin, valued in Ayurveda for correcting lipid disorders, has been described in some detail; based on these investigations, a modern antihyperlipoproteinemic drug is on the market in India and some other countries. There has also been concordance for a few other Ayurvedic crude drugs such as Asparagus racemosus, Cedrus deodara, and Psoralea corylifolia.

  9. Salacia root, a unique Ayurvedic medicine, meets multiple targets in diabetes and obesity.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuhao; Huang, Tom Hsun-Wei; Yamahara, Johji

    2008-05-23

    In many traditional schools of medicine it is claimed that a balanced modulation of several targets can provide a superior therapeutic effect and decrease in side effect profile compared to a single action from a single selective ligand, especially in the treatment of certain chronic and complex diseases, such as diabetes and obesity. Diabetes and obesity have a multi-factorial basis involving both genetic and environmental risk factors. A wide array of medicinal plants and their active constituents play a role in the prevention and treatment of diabetes. Salacia roots have been used in Ayurvedic medicine for diabetes and obesity since antiquity, and have been extensively consumed in Japan, the United States and other countries as a food supplement for the prevention of obesity and diabetes. Recent pharmacological studies have demonstrated that Salacia roots modulate multiple targets: peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha-mediated lipogenic gene transcription, angiotensin II/angiotensin II type 1 receptor, alpha-glucosidase, aldose reductase and pancreatic lipase. These multi-target actions may mainly contribute to Salacia root-induced improvement of type 2 diabetes and obesity-associated hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia and related cardiovascular complications seen in humans and rodents. The results of bioassay-guided identification indicate that mangiferin, salacinol, kotalanol and kotalagenin 16-acetate are at least in part responsible for these multi-target regulatory activities of Salacia roots. The evidence suggests that this unique traditional medicine fulfills a multiple-target strategy in the prevention and treatment of diabetes and obesity. Although toxicological studies have suggested minimal adverse effects of the herbal medicine in rodents, a clinical trial is crucial to further confirm the safety of Salacia roots. In addition, further mechanistic studies are necessary in order to allow a better understanding of how use of Salacia root may

  10. MEDICINAL PLANTS OF RAJASTHAN IN INDIAN SYSTEM OF MEDICINE

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Y.C.; Prabhu, V.V.; Pal, R.S.; Mishra, R.N.

    1996-01-01

    Medicinal plants used in Indian system of medicine from Rajasthan state have been surveyed and catagorised systematically. The paper deals with 205 medicinal plants, thoroughly indexed along with their important traditional application for the cure of various ailments. PMID:22556743

  11. Perception and attitude of medical doctors in Dhaka, Bangladesh, with regard to Ayurvedic medicine

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Yoshitoku; Alim, Md. Abdul; Alam, Zakia; Asaduzzaman, Mohammad; Yoshida, Yasuko; Manikdrs, Shahabuddin

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The World Health Organization (WHO) Traditional Medicine Strategy (2014–2023) aimed to help member states promote the safe and effective use of traditional medicine. While economic conditions have markedly improved in Bangladesh, the country is experiencing significant public health problems. Because of limited medical resources, there is a strong incentive to enhance complementary and alternative medicine usage in Bangladesh. Therefore, this study aimed to confirm the perceptions and attitudes of medical doctors (MDs) in Dhaka, Bangladesh, with regard to Ayurvedic medicine (AM). A total number of 159 MDs in Dhaka were interviewed by face-to-face between February and June 2015. The study revealed that 62.0% of MDs had treated patients with AM and 55.3% believed that AM should be regarded as its own specialty, whereas 39.7% of MDs believed that AM should be part of the conventional medical curriculum and 32.7% thought that AM did not seem scientific. In terms of gender, 45.3% of male MDs agreed or strongly agreed that AM only had a placebo effect. On the other hand, 65.8% of female MDs disagreed or strongly disagreed it. In terms of age, 77.0% of MDs aged 36 or elder (elder MDs) believed they were more likely to recommend AM use and 80.3% of elder MDs believed that the government should encourage more initiatives to promote AM. To enhance AM use, scientifically robust information on the efficacy, safety and scientific basis of AM should be more effectively conveyed to male MDs. PMID:28303062

  12. Perception and attitude of medical doctors in Dhaka, Bangladesh, with regard to Ayurvedic medicine.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Yoshitoku; Alim, Md Abdul; Alam, Zakia; Asaduzzaman, Mohammad; Yoshida, Yasuko; Manikdrs, Shahabuddin

    2017-02-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) Traditional Medicine Strategy (2014-2023) aimed to help member states promote the safe and effective use of traditional medicine. While economic conditions have markedly improved in Bangladesh, the country is experiencing significant public health problems. Because of limited medical resources, there is a strong incentive to enhance complementary and alternative medicine usage in Bangladesh. Therefore, this study aimed to confirm the perceptions and attitudes of medical doctors (MDs) in Dhaka, Bangladesh, with regard to Ayurvedic medicine (AM). A total number of 159 MDs in Dhaka were interviewed by face-to-face between February and June 2015. The study revealed that 62.0% of MDs had treated patients with AM and 55.3% believed that AM should be regarded as its own specialty, whereas 39.7% of MDs believed that AM should be part of the conventional medical curriculum and 32.7% thought that AM did not seem scientific. In terms of gender, 45.3% of male MDs agreed or strongly agreed that AM only had a placebo effect. On the other hand, 65.8% of female MDs disagreed or strongly disagreed it. In terms of age, 77.0% of MDs aged 36 or elder (elder MDs) believed they were more likely to recommend AM use and 80.3% of elder MDs believed that the government should encourage more initiatives to promote AM. To enhance AM use, scientifically robust information on the efficacy, safety and scientific basis of AM should be more effectively conveyed to male MDs.

  13. Screening of six Ayurvedic medicinal plants for anti-obesity potential: An investigation on bioactive constituents from Oroxylum indicum (L.) Kurz bark.

    PubMed

    Mangal, Priyanka; Khare, Pragyanshu; Jagtap, Sneha; Bishnoi, Mahendra; Kondepudi, Kanthi Kiran; Bhutani, Kamlesh Kumar

    2017-02-02

    As an effort to identify newer anti-obesity lead(s) we have selected 13 plant materials from the six plant species which have been reported in Indian Ayurvedic medicine as remedy against complications affecting glucose and lipid homeostasis. In vitro screening of six Indian Ayurvedic medicinal plants on anti-adipogenic and pancreatic lipase (PL) inhibition potential followed by bioactivity guided isolation from most active plant material. In vitro anti-adipogenic assay using 3T3-L1 preadipocytes and pancreatic lipase (PL) inhibition assay were performed for hexanes, dichloromethane, ethyl acetate and methanolic extracts of all the plant materials. Bioactivity guided isolation approach was used to identify active constituent for anti-adipogenesis and PL inhibition assay. Inhibition of lipid accumulation and adipogenic transcription factor was measured by oil Red 'O' staining and quantitative real-time PCR method respectively. Ethyl acetate extract of Oroxylum indicum bark was found to be most active in screening of anti-adipogenesis (59.12±1.66% lipid accumulation as compared to control at 50μg/mL dose) and PL inhibition (89.12±6.87% PL inhibition at 250μg/mL dose) assays. Further, three bioactive flavonoids were isolated and identified as oroxylin A, chrysin and baicalein from O. indicum bark. Oroxylin A, chrysin, and baicalein were inhibited lipid accumulation in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes (75.00±5.76%, 70.21±4.23% and 77.21±5.49% lipid accumulation respectively in comparison to control at 50μM dose) and PL enzyme (69.86±2.96%, 52.08±2.14% and 45.06±2.42% PL inhibition respectively at 250μg/mL dose). In addition, oroxylin A and chrysin also inhibited PPARγ and C/EBPα, major adipogenic transcription factors, in 3T3L-1 preadipocytes during adipogenesis process at 50μM dose. The present study augurs the anti-obesity potential of well practiced Ayurvedic herb O. indicum and its flavonoids. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The Ayurvedic Pharmacopoeia of India, development and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Vinod Kumar; Joshi, Apurva; Dhiman, Kartar Singh

    2017-02-02

    the Indian Pharmacopoeia started in 20th Century on the recommendation of the Col. R.N. Chopra Committee and in 1978 the first part of the Ayurvedic formulary of India was published. Subsequently, the amendment in the drugs and cosmetics Act 1940 was brought in 1964 for regulation of the drugs in Indian Systems of Medicine (Ayurveda, Unani and Siddha). Later on the Ayurvedic Pharmacopoeia of India (Mono-Monograph) Part-I, Volume I, was published in the year 1989 and the other volumes were published subsequently in different years. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. [Ayurvedics drugs in France. Laboratories polytherapic, a test].

    PubMed

    Raynal, Cécile; Lefebvre, Thierry

    2011-02-01

    In the beginning of the thirties, Dr Jean Saidman, who has already created a rotative solarium at Aix-les-Bains, built another one in Jamnagar (India). When he was there, he discovered ayurvedic therapy. After the Second World War, with his friends Dr Rémus Krainik and the chemist René-Henri Monceaux, he set up a "néo-ayurvedic action committee", and then a pharmaceutical laboratory, "Polythérapic", to export to french colonies patents medicines inspired by indian medicine. The authors tale this experience suddenly stopped by the unexpected death of Jean Saidman, in 1949.

  16. Anti-diabetic activity and safety assessment of Ayurvedic medicine, Jasada bhasma (zinc ash) in rats.

    PubMed

    Umrani, Rinku D; Agrawal, Durgashankar S; Paknikar, Kishore M

    2013-10-01

    Jasada bhasma (zinc ash) is an extensively used Ayurvedic medicine for treating diabetes mellitus. The present communication presents yet unavailable comprehensive scientific data on its physico-chemical nature vis-a-vis anti-diabetic activity and toxicity profile.Zinc ash prepared by traditional method was found to consist of 200-500 nm sized particles, predominantly zinc oxide with hexagonal wurtzite crystal structure. The effective dose range of zinc ash in oral glucose tolerance tests performed using normoglycemic Wistar rats was found to be 3-30 mg/kg. Subsequently anti-diabetic activity was assessed in streptozotocin induced type 1 and type 2 diabetic rats. Four weeks treatment with zinc ash (1, 3, 10 mg/kg) resulted in improved glucose tolerance (16-19%), lowered blood glucose levels (20-33%) and reduced serum insulin levels (27-32%). Systemic absorption was assessed by single dose pharmacokinetic study where serum zinc levels were found to be elevated (3.5 folds) after oral administration of zinc ash. Acute and sub-acute toxicity tests demonstrated safety of zinc ash up to 300 mg/kg doseie. 100 times the efficacy dose in rats. These findings, the first of their kind, provide concrete scientific evidence that justifies usage of zinc ash in diabetes treatment.

  17. Antiviral activity of ancient system of ayurvedic medicinal plant Cissus quadrangularis L. (Vitaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramanian, P.; Jayalakshmi, K.; Vidhya, N.; Prasad, R.; Sheriff, A. Khaleefathullah; Kathiravan, G.; Rajagopal, K.; Sureban, Sripathi M.

    2009-01-01

    Partially purified methanolic extract of Cissus quadrangularis (belonging to Vitaceae member, South Indian medicinal plant) have been explored for antiviral activity and their phytochemical characterisation. In vitro antiviral activity against HSV type1 and 2, and Vero cells at non-cytotoxic concentration were determined. HSV1 and HSV2 showed more sensitivity against the partially purified compound. Phytochemical analysis showed the presence of the Steroids and Terpenoids. PMID:25206252

  18. Antiviral activity of ancient system of ayurvedic medicinal plant Cissus quadrangularis L. (Vitaceae).

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, P; Jayalakshmi, K; Vidhya, N; Prasad, R; Sheriff, A Khaleefathullah; Kathiravan, G; Rajagopal, K; Sureban, Sripathi M

    2009-12-01

    Partially purified methanolic extract of Cissus quadrangularis (belonging to Vitaceae member, South Indian medicinal plant) have been explored for antiviral activity and their phytochemical characterisation. In vitro antiviral activity against HSV type1 and 2, and Vero cells at non-cytotoxic concentration were determined. HSV1 and HSV2 showed more sensitivity against the partially purified compound. Phytochemical analysis showed the presence of the Steroids and Terpenoids.

  19. RAACFDb: Rheumatoid arthritis ayurvedic classical formulations database.

    PubMed

    Mohamed Thoufic Ali, A M; Agrawal, Aakash; Sajitha Lulu, S; Mohana Priya, A; Vino, S

    2017-02-02

    In the past years, the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has undergone remarkable changes in all therapeutic modes. The present newfangled care in clinical research is to determine and to pick a new track for better treatment options for RA. Recent ethnopharmacological investigations revealed that traditional herbal remedies are the most preferred modality of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). However, several ayurvedic modes of treatments and formulations for RA are not much studied and documented from Indian traditional system of medicine. Therefore, this directed us to develop an integrated database, RAACFDb (acronym: Rheumatoid Arthritis Ayurvedic Classical Formulations Database) by consolidating data from the repository of Vedic Samhita - The Ayurveda to retrieve the available formulations information easily. Literature data was gathered using several search engines and from ayurvedic practitioners for loading information in the database. In order to represent the collected information about classical ayurvedic formulations, an integrated database is constructed and implemented on a MySQL and PHP back-end. The database is supported by describing all the ayurvedic classical formulations for the treatment rheumatoid arthritis. It includes composition, usage, plant parts used, active ingredients present in the composition and their structures. The prime objective is to locate ayurvedic formulations proven to be quite successful and highly effective among the patients with reduced side effects. The database (freely available at www.beta.vit.ac.in/raacfdb/index.html) hopefully enables easy access for clinical researchers and students to discover novel leads with reduced side effects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The use and safety of non-allopathic Indian medicines.

    PubMed

    Gogtay, N J; Bhatt, H A; Dalvi, S S; Kshirsagar, N A

    2002-01-01

    Non-allopathic Indian medicines, referred to elsewhere in the world as complementary and alternative medicine have gathered increasing recognition in recent years with regard to both treatment options and health hazards. Ayurveda, Siddha, Unani and homeopathy are practiced in India as non-allopathic systems. These systems comprise a wide range of therapeutic approaches that include diet, herbs, metals, minerals, precious stones and their combinations as well as non-drug therapies. Ayurveda is the oldest system of medicine in the world and by far the most commonly practiced form of non-allopathic medicine in India, particularly in rural India, where 70% of the population lives. The difference between modern medicine and these systems stems from the fact that the knowledge base of many of the above systems, unlike Western medicine, is based on years of experience, observations, empiricism and intuition and has been handed down generations both through word of mouth and treatises. The focus on non-allopathic systems of medicine in India can be attributed to various causes including a need to revive a rich tradition, the dependency of 80% of the country's population on these drugs, their easy availability, increasing worldwide use of these medicines, the lack of focused concerted scientific research and the abuse of these systems by quacks. Elsewhere, the increasing use of herbal products worldwide and the growth of the herbal product industry has led to increasing concern regarding their safety. The challenges in these non-allopathic systems relate to the patient, physician, regulatory authorities, the abuse/misuse of these medicines, quality and purity issues. Safety monitoring is mandated by a changing ecological environment, the use of insecticides, new manufacturing techniques, an as yet unregulated pharmaceutical industry, the availability of combinations of herbs over the counter and not mentioned in ancient Ayurvedic texts, and the need to look at the active

  1. Anethum graveolens: An Indian traditional medicinal herb and spice

    PubMed Central

    Jana, S.; Shekhawat, G. S.

    2010-01-01

    Anethum graveolens L. (dill) has been used in ayurvedic medicines since ancient times and it is a popular herb widely used as a spice and also yields essential oil. It is an aromatic and annual herb of apiaceae family. The Ayurvedic uses of dill seeds are carminative, stomachic and diuretic. There are various volatile components of dill seeds and herb; carvone being the predominant odorant of dill seed and α-phellandrene, limonene, dill ether, myristicin are the most important odorants of dill herb. Other compounds isolated from seeds are coumarins, flavonoids, phenolic acids and steroids. The main purpose of this review is to understand the significance of Anethum graveolens in ayurvedic medicines and non-medicinal purposes and emphasis can also be given to the enhancement of secondary metabolites of this medicinal plant. PMID:22228959

  2. Anethum graveolens: An Indian traditional medicinal herb and spice.

    PubMed

    Jana, S; Shekhawat, G S

    2010-07-01

    Anethum graveolens L. (dill) has been used in ayurvedic medicines since ancient times and it is a popular herb widely used as a spice and also yields essential oil. It is an aromatic and annual herb of apiaceae family. The Ayurvedic uses of dill seeds are carminative, stomachic and diuretic. There are various volatile components of dill seeds and herb; carvone being the predominant odorant of dill seed and α-phellandrene, limonene, dill ether, myristicin are the most important odorants of dill herb. Other compounds isolated from seeds are coumarins, flavonoids, phenolic acids and steroids. The main purpose of this review is to understand the significance of Anethum graveolens in ayurvedic medicines and non-medicinal purposes and emphasis can also be given to the enhancement of secondary metabolites of this medicinal plant.

  3. OA01.04. Management of ankylosing spondylitis through ayurvedic medicine along with agnikarma- A case study

    PubMed Central

    Tamrakar, Anupam; Sonkar, Ramsukh; Chandrakar, Vijaya Lakshmi; Tamrakar, Er. Anuraj

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To specify the role of Ayurvedic medicine along with Agni karma in treatment of Ankylosing spondylitis, a chronic inflammatory arthritis and auto immune disease with a strong genetic predisposition Method: In present case study of AS with +ve HLAB27 and LDH (lactate dehydrogenase) 624.1U/L(normal range 230460U/L)with radiological abnormalities at the sight of L.S. spine AP and Lt. are symptoms of mild lumbar spondylosis with right sacro-iliac arthritis. The patient was having Vata and Kapha dominant symptoms like Amavata so he was subjected to therapy which performs removal of Ama and detoxification of toxins from the body followed by ruksh virechan with swadista virechan churna 5 gm in every 4 days once in night and Nadi sweda with dashmool kwath for 7days there after agni karma in every 15 days periodically along with hypothetical herbomineral combination up to 6 months as patient follows. Result: After 4 months of regular treatment all other typical features related to disease like amajeerna, shoola etc were also improved. In lab reports, HLAB27 became negative and LDH returned to normal range up to 294U/L. In radiological reports the fusion of vertebral column was also reversed as showed in AP view of X-ray imaging. This particular case has proved the importance of Ayurvedic medicine and Agni karma in AS. Conclusion: Ayurvedic intervention was found to be efficacious in management of Ankylosing spondylitis. Further studies are needed to establish efficacy on the basis of rigorous parameters.

  4. Disease Subtype-Independent Biomarkers of Breast Cancer Chemoprevention by the Ayurvedic Medicine Phytochemical Withaferin A.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Suman K; Sehrawat, Anuradha; Kim, Su-Hyeong; Hahm, Eun-Ryeong; Shuai, Yongli; Roy, Ruchi; Pore, Subrata K; Singh, Krishna B; Christner, Susan M; Beumer, Jan H; Davidson, Nancy E; Singh, Shivendra V

    2017-06-01

    A nontoxic chemopreventive intervention efficacious against different subtypes of breast cancer is still a clinically unmet need. The present study was undertaken to determine the efficacy of an Ayurvedic medicine phytochemical (Withaferin A, [WA]) for chemoprevention of breast cancer and to elucidate its mode of action. Chemopreventive efficacy of WA (4 and 8 mg/kg body weight) was determined using a rat model of breast cancer induced by N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU; n = 14 for control group, n = 15 for 4 mg/kg group, and n = 18 for 8 mg/kg group). The mechanisms underlying breast cancer chemoprevention by WA were elucidated by immunoblotting, biochemical assays, immunohistochemistry, and cytokine profiling using plasma and tumors from the MNU-rat (n = 8-12 for control group, n = 7-11 for 4 mg/kg group, and n = 8-12 for 8 mg/kg group) and/or mouse mammary tumor virus-neu (MMTV-neu) models (n = 4-11 for control group and n = 4-21 for 4 mg/kg group). Inhibitory effect of WA on exit from mitosis and leptin-induced oncogenic signaling was determined using MCF-7 and/or MDA-MB-231 cells. All statistical tests were two-sided. Incidence, multiplicity, and burden of breast cancer in rats were decreased by WA administration. For example, the tumor weight in the 8 mg/kg group was lower by about 68% compared with controls (8 mg/kg vs control, mean = 2.76 vs 8.59, difference = -5.83, 95% confidence interval of difference = -9.89 to -1.76, P = .004). Mitotic arrest and apoptosis induction were some common determinants of breast cancer chemoprevention by WA in the MNU-rat and MMTV-neu models. Cytokine profiling showed suppression of plasma leptin levels by WA in rats. WA inhibited leptin-induced oncogenic signaling in cultured breast cancer cells. WA is a promising chemopreventative phytochemical with the ability to inhibit at least two different subtypes of breast cancer. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press

  5. Indian herbal medicines: possible potent therapeutic agents for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Rathore, Brijesh; Ali Mahdi, Abbas; Nath Paul, Bhola; Narayan Saxena, Prabhu; Kumar Das, Siddharth

    2007-07-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease of unknown etiology and is mainly characterized by the progressive erosion of cartilage leading to chronic polyarthritis and joint distortion. Although the exact pathogenesis of the disease has yet not been elucidated, however, studies suggest that cellular proliferation of synoviocytes result in pannus formation which damages the cartilage and bone. Recent reports also support the role of free radicals in its pathogenesis. Apart from the conventional treatment strategies using nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, disease modifying antirheumatic drugs and glucocorticoids, newer and safer drugs are continuously being searched, as long term usage of these drugs have resulted in adverse effects. Alternative medicine provides another approach for treatment of RA and currently a number of medicinal plants are under scientific evaluation to develop a novel drug. There is a dire need to investigate the complete therapeutic potential and adverse effects, if any, of these herbals for providing newer and safer treatment options with minimum side effects. In this review we have tried to explore various Indian ancient Ayurvedic, Unani and Tibbi, as also some Chinese and Korean, herbals for their potential to treat RA.

  6. Indian Herbal Medicines: Possible Potent Therapeutic Agents for Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Rathore, Brijesh; Ali Mahdi, Abbas; Nath Paul, Bhola; Narayan Saxena, Prabhu; Kumar Das, Siddharth

    2007-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease of unknown etiology and is mainly characterized by the progressive erosion of cartilage leading to chronic polyarthritis and joint distortion. Although the exact pathogenesis of the disease has yet not been elucidated, however, studies suggest that cellular proliferation of synoviocytes result in pannus formation which damages the cartilage and bone. Recent reports also support the role of free radicals in its pathogenesis. Apart from the conventional treatment strategies using nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, disease modifying antirheumatic drugs and glucocorticoids, newer and safer drugs are continuously being searched, as long term usage of these drugs have resulted in adverse effects. Alternative medicine provides another approach for treatment of RA and currently a number of medicinal plants are under scientific evaluation to develop a novel drug. There is a dire need to investigate the complete therapeutic potential and adverse effects, if any, of these herbals for providing newer and safer treatment options with minimum side effects. In this review we have tried to explore various Indian ancient Ayurvedic, Unani and Tibbi, as also some Chinese and Korean, herbals for their potential to treat RA. PMID:18392103

  7. Contributions of Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR) in the area of Medicinal plants/Traditional medicine.

    PubMed

    Tandon, Neeraj; Yadav, Satyapal Singh

    2017-02-02

    Medicinal plants belong to the oldest known health care products that have been used by human beings all over the world and are major components of the formulations used in indigenous system of medicine practiced in many countries. Besides, finding place as health supplements, nutraceuticals, cosmetics, herbal tea etc. there has been a global insurgence of interest, including India, leading to enormous research/activities in the area of medicinal plants. The article is aimed to provide the effort and initiatives of ICMR towards research on medicinal plants and its contributions on consolidation of Indian research on medicinal plants that are very relevant and important in the national context. The various initiatives undertaken by ICMR on research on traditional medicines/medicinal plants in the past are reviewed and documented in this article. The multi-disciplinary, multicentric research initiatives of ICMR have resulted in validation of traditional treatment Kshaarasootra (medicated Ayurvedic thread) for anal fistula, Vijayasar (heart wood of Pterocarpus marsupium Roxb.) for diabetes mellitus, encouraging micro- and macrofilaricidal activity of Shakotak (stem bark of Streblus asper Lour.) in experimental studies an iridoid glycosides fraction isolated from root/rhizomes of Picrorhiza kurroa Royle ex Benth. (designated as Picroliv) for viral hepatitis. Other developmental and compilation of research works on Indian medicinal plants have resulted in publications of the thirteen volumes of quality standards, comprising of 449 Indian medicinal plants; three volumes of 90 phytochemical reference standards; fifteen volumes of review monographs on 4167 medicinal plant species; and one publication each on perspectives of Indian medicinal plants for management of liver disorders, lymphatic filariasis and diabetes mellitus (details available at http://www.icmr.nic.in/mpsite). The ICMR efforts assume special significance in the light of multifaceted use of medicinal plants

  8. Safety evaluation of Trikatu, a generic Ayurvedic medicine in Charles Foster rats.

    PubMed

    Chanda, Debabrata; Shanker, Karuna; Pal, Anirban; Luqman, Suaib; Bawankule, Dnyaneshwar Umrao; Mani, Dayanandan; Darokar, Mahendra Pandurang

    2009-02-01

    Chemical characterization and acute and sub-acute toxicity study of Trikatu, a generic herbal formulation of Indian system of medicine, was carried out in Charles Foster (CF) rats for safety profiling. In acute toxicity experiment, Trikatu at 2,000 mg/kg body weight once orally was well tolerated by the experimental animals (both male and female) and no changes were observed in mortality, morbidity, gross pathology, gain in weight, vital organ weight, hematological (total white blood cells (WBC) and red blood cells (RBC) count), biochemical parameters such as serum creatinine, serum glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (SGOT), serum glutamate pyruvate transaminase (SGPT), serum lipid profile and tissue biochemical parameters such as reduced glutathione and malonaldehyde content as oxidative stress markers. In sub-acute experiment, Trikatu was administered at 5, 50 and 300 mg/kg body weight once daily for 28 days in female CF rats, and non-significant changes were found in most of the parameters studied such as acute experiment except significant increase in low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol level at 50 and 300 mg/kg body weight, decrease in high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol level at 300 mg/kg body weight, increase in SGPT activity at 50 mg/kg body weight and decrease in WBC count at 300 mg/kg body weight on 28(th) day post treatment.

  9. The effectiveness of ayurvedic oil-based nasal instillation (Nasya) medicines in the treatment of facial paralysis (Ardita): a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Vivera, Manuel Joseph; Gomersall, Judith Streak

    2016-04-01

    Ardita (facial paralysis) is a medical condition that disfigures or distorts the facial appearance of the sufferer causing facial asymmetry and malfunction. Ardita patients may benefit from considering alternative treatments such as Ayurveda, including Taila Nasya (nasal instillation of medicated oil). To synthesize the best available evidence on the effectiveness of different Nasya oils in the treatment of Ardita. Studies conducted on adult sufferers (18-70 years) of Ardita (chronic or acute) in any setting were considered. Studies including participants who were pregnant or suffered allergic rhinitis, fever, intracranial tumor/hemorrhage and bilateral facial palsy were excluded. Standalone treatment of Nasya (at all dosages and frequencies) compared to Nasya in combination with other Ayurvedic treatments was considered. Comparisons between different interventions including Taila Nasya alone, Taila Nasya in combination with other Ayurvedic interventions and Ayurvedic interventions that did not include Taila Nasya were also considered. Changes in Ardita symptoms, including facial distortion, speech disorders and facial pain, were measured. All quantitative study designs (experimental, quasi-experimental and observational) were considered. Relevant studies were identified following a comprehensive literature search. References provided within these key studies identified additional resources. Indian universities were also contacted for results of Ardita studies undertaken in their institutions.A three-step search strategy aimed to find studies of published and unpublished studies was undertaken. Studies published in the English language were considered for inclusion, irrespective of publication date/year. Following an initial limited search of MEDLINE and CINAHL, the text words contained in the title and abstract, and of the index terms used to describe each articles were analyzed. From the identified keywords and index terms, searches were undertaken across all

  10. The hypolipidemic activity of Ayurvedic medicine, Arogyavardhini vati in Triton WR-1339-induced hyperlipidemic rats: A comparison with fenofibrate

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Gajendra; Srivastava, Amita; Sharma, Surinder Kumar; Gupta, Yogendra Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Background: Hyperlipidemia is a major risk factor of coronary heart disease. Currently available hypolipidemic drugs have been associated with number of side effects. Arogyavardhini vati, an Ayurvedic polyherbal formulation has been used for liver disorders. Therefore, present study was designed to evaluate the effect of Arogyavardhini vati in Triton WR-1339-induced hyperlipidemia in rats. Objectives: Anti-hyperlipidemic activity evaluation of Arogyavardhini vati against Triton WR-1339-induced hyperlipidemia in rats. Materials and Methods: Overnight fasted male Wistar rats (150-200 g) were randomly divided into normal control group [4% Dimethyl Sulfoxide (DMSO), i.p.], positive control group (Triton WR-1339 in 4% DMSO, 400 mg/kg, i.p.), standard drug treated (fenofibrate 65 mg/kg, p.o. for 7 days after inducing hyperlipidemia) and Arogyavardhini vati treated (50, 100, 200 mg/kg, p.o. for 7 days after inducing hyperlipidemia). Rat doses were calculated by extrapolating the equivalent human dose (therapeutic dose, sub-maximum, and maximum dose). Serum total cholesterol, triglyceride, low-density lipoprotein (LDL), high-density lipoprotein HDL, liver malondialdehyde (MDA), and glutathione (GSH) levels were estimated at end of experiments. Results: Arogyavardhini vati significantly decreased serum cholesterol, triglyceride, LDL, and C-reactive protein (CRP) and significantly increased serum HDL in a dose-dependent manner. Decreased MDA and increased GSH levels in liver were observed at all doses of Arogyavardhini vati (50, 100, 200 mg/kg) and fenofibrate-treated groups when compared with Triton-treated group. Atherogenic Index (AI) level was significantly decreased in fenofibrate and Arogyavardhini vati (200 mg/kg) treated rats when compared with normal control. Conclusion: Arogyavardhini vati, a traditionally used Ayurvedic medicine may be a useful therapy for hypercholesterolemia through reducing oxidative stress (decreasing MDA and increasing GSH) and lipid levels

  11. Identification of Novel Anti-inflammatory Agents from Ayurvedic Medicine for Prevention of Chronic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Bharat B.; Prasad, Sahdeo; Reuter, Simone; Kannappan, Ramaswamy; Yadev, Vivek R.; Park, Byoungduck; Kim, Ji Hye; Gupta, Subash C.; Phromnoi, Kanokkarn; Sundaram, Chitra; Prasad, Seema; Chaturvedi, Madan M.; Sung, Bokyung

    2011-01-01

    Inflammation, although first characterized by Cornelius Celsus, a physician in first Century Rome, it was Rudolf Virchow, a German physician in nineteenth century who suggested a link between inflammation and cancer, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, pulmonary diseases, neurological diseases and other chronic diseases. Extensive research within last three decades has confirmed these observations and identified the molecular basis for most chronic diseases and for the associated inflammation. The transcription factor, Nuclear Factor-kappaB (NF-κB) that controls over 500 different gene products, has emerged as major mediator of inflammation. Thus agents that can inhibit NF-κB and diminish chronic inflammation have potential to prevent or delay the onset of the chronic diseases and further even treat them. In an attempt to identify novel anti-inflammatory agents which are safe and effective, in contrast to high throughput screen, we have turned to “reverse pharmacology” or “bed to benchside” approach. We found that Ayurveda, a science of long life, almost 6000 years old, can serve as a “goldmine” for novel anti-inflammatory agents used for centuries to treat chronic diseases. The current review is an attempt to provide description of various Ayurvedic plants currently used for treatment, their active chemical components, and the inflammatory pathways that they inhibit. PMID:21561421

  12. The current acceptance, accessibility and recognition of Chinese and Ayurvedic medicine in the United States in the public, governmental, and industrial sectors.

    PubMed

    Park, Jongbae J; Beckman-Harned, Selena; Cho, Gayoung; Kim, Duckhee; Kim, Hangon

    2012-06-01

    To assess the current level of acceptance in the United States of complementary and alternative medicine, recent research into the prevalence, acceptance, accessibility, and recognition of complementary and alternative therapies were reviewed. Several signs point to an increasing acceptance of complementary and alternative medicine in the United States; the use of complementary and alternative medicine is significantly increasing, many aspects of Chinese medicine and Ayurveda are becoming mainstream, practitioners in the United States are beginning to be licensed, and insurance companies are beginning to cover some complementary and alternative therapies. Remaining challenges to true acceptance include the restrictive Western mindset, the absence of published studies, a lack of consistent manufacturing processes and quality standards, and a fear of adulteration. Although the field still faces many challenges, alternative and complementary medicine, including Chinese medicine and Ayurvedic medicine, is becoming more accepted and accessible in the United States.

  13. Hydrophobic substituents increase the potency of salacinol, a potent α-glucosidase inhibitor from Ayurvedic traditional medicine 'Salacia'.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Genzoh; Xie, Weijia; Balakishan, Gorre; Amer, Mumen F A; Tsutsui, Nozomi; Takemura, Haruka; Nakamura, Shinya; Akaki, Junji; Ninomiya, Kiyofumi; Morikawa, Toshio; Nakanishi, Isao; Muraoka, Osamu

    2016-08-15

    Using an in silico method, seven analogs bearing hydrophobic substituents (8a: Me, 8b: Et, 8c: n-Pent, 8d: n-Hept, 8e: n-Tridec, 8f: isoBu and 8g: neoPent) at the 3'-O-position in salacinol (1), a highly potent natural α-glucosidase inhibitor from Ayurvedic traditional medicine 'Salacia', were designed and synthesized. In order to verify the computational SAR assessments, their α-glucosidase inhibitory activities were evaluated in vitro. All analogs (8a-8g) exhibited an equal or considerably higher level of inhibitory activity against rat small intestinal α-glucosidases compared with the original sulfonate (1), and were as potent as or higher in potency than the clinically used anti-diabetics, voglibose, acarbose or miglitol. Their activities against human maltase exhibited good relationships to the results obtained with enzymes of rat origin. Among the designed compounds, the one with a 3'-O-neopentyl moiety (8g) was most potent, with an approximately ten fold increase in activity against human maltase compared to 1.

  14. Genetic diversity and chemical profiling of different populations of Convolvulus pluricaulis (convolvulaceae): an important herb of ayurvedic medicine.

    PubMed

    Ganie, Showkat Hussain; Ali, Zahid; Das, Sandip; Srivastava, Prem Shankar; Sharma, Maheshwar Prasad

    2015-06-01

    Convolvulus pluricaulis Choisy, commonly known as "Shankhpushpi", is an ayurvedic medicinal plant recommended as a brain tonic to promote intellect and memory, eliminate nervous disorders and to treat hypertension. Because of increasing demand of the drug, this plant species has been over-exploited. As a consequence, many unrelated plants are being sold by the crude drug dealers in India in the name of "Shankhpushpi". Information on its existing gene pool is currently lacking. We developed molecular (Random Amplification of Polymorphic DNA) and chemical (high performance liquid chromatography) markers that could distinguish the genuine plant species from its adulterants. Molecular characterization confirmed higher genetic variation at inter-zonal level as compared to intra-zonal populations. A total of 37 reproducible amplicons were generated of which 22 were polymorphic. The number of amplicons was in the range of 6-11 and genetic distance for the studied primers ranged from 0.07 to 0.34. Fifty nine per cent polymorphism was obtained across different geographical locations. Dendrogram studied through unweighted pair group method of arithmetic analysis differentiated all the genotypes into two major clusters, Cluster I had the single population of Rajasthan and Cluster II was represented by genotypes of Delhi, Haryana, Madhya Pradesh and Rajasthan. The Kaempferol content ranged from 0.07 to 0.49 mg/g and Delhi population was the highest accumulator.

  15. Quality of life and treatment satisfaction observed among Indians with diabetes foot ulcers undergoing ayurvedic adjunct therapy.

    PubMed

    Debnath, Parikshit; Prakash, Abhay; Banerjee, Subhadip; Rao, Prasanna N; Tripathy, Tapas Brata; Adhikari, Anjan; Shivakumar

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the health-related quality of life and treatment satisfaction of diabetes patients (n = 36) with foot ulcers undergoing insulin and ayurvedic adjunct therapy. Retrospective hospital based cross-sectional design considered patients with diabetes foot ulcers undergoing 4-week treatment with insulin and ayurvedic combinatorial therapy. The Audit of Diabetes Dependent Quality of Life Questionnaire and Diabetes Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire were completed for the assessment. The mean duration of diabetes among participants was 9.32 ± 5.3 years. Assessment of Diabetes Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire (total treatment satisfaction) score was found to be 26.0139 ± 5.20369, and Audit of Diabetes Dependent Quality of Life Questionnaire (average weighted impact) score was -3.0819 ± 1.83003. Relationship with diabetes complications showed that Audit of Diabetes Dependent Quality of Life Questionnaire score (P = .383) had no relationship, but Diabetes Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire score (P = .039) showed significance. Integrated approaches for diabetes foot ulcer management with insulin and ayurvedic management have a favorable impact on patient-perceived quality of life. © The Author(s) 2014.

  16. Assembling cyavanaprāsh, Ayurveda's best-selling medicine.

    PubMed

    Bode, Maarten

    2015-04-01

    The paper discusses the many forms and representations of cyavanaprāsh, Ayurveda's best-selling medicine, already mentioned in Caraka's Compendium (c. 200 CE). The medicine's compositions, applications, and meanings, change over time and from locality to locality. Cyavanaprāsh is, for example, a patriotic formula, a booster of the immune system, a modern geriatric drug, and one of the elements in canonical Ayurvedic treatments. In the beginning of the 19th century cyavanaprāsh was a patriotic formula for fortifying Indian bodies and the nascent Indian nation. Nowadays the medicine is a Fast Moving Consumer Good (FMCG) and a money maker for Dabur India Ltd., the world largest Ayurvedic manufacturer. Instead of vitalising the nation its consumption now promises to make urban middle class consumers effectively modern. Branding and modern science must make Dabur Chyawanprash attractive in the eyes of these consumers. Ayurveda and cyavanaprāsh are also part of a global counter culture marked by neo-Orientalism and Ayurvedic medicines as facilitators of spirituality. The marketing of cyavanaprāsh by India's largest Ayurvedic manufacturer is used as a case study for discussing the proliferation of Ayurvedic brands and its critics. The imaging of Ayurvedic brands such as Dabur Chyawanprash threatens to obscure the fact that Ayurveda represents a unique way of looking upon health, disease and the human body. The proliferation of brands also makes Ayurvedic medicines more expensive and puts pressure on the natural environment as the main supplier of Ayurvedic ingredients.

  17. Navajo Indian medicine: implications for healing.

    PubMed

    Coulehan, J L

    1980-01-01

    Traditional medicine men coexist with physicians and hospitals on the 25,000 square mile Navajo Indian Reservation. Most seriously ill Navajos utilize both systems of health care. This natural experiment of coexistence emphasizes several general characteristics of all healing. Traditional ceremonies are successful because they are integrated into Navajo belief systems and meet needs of sick people not dealt with by the available Western medicine. Physicians and other healers simply remove obstacles to the body's restoration of homeostasis or, as the Navajo say, to harmony. Reductionism limits the spectrum of obstacles considered relevant (eg, causes of illness), but an alternate model might include emotional, social, or spiritual phenomena equally as significant to healing as are biochemical phenomena. In that context, nonmedical healers, as well as physicians, can potentially influence factors relevant to getting well.

  18. Analgesic activity of some Indian medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Malairajan, P; Geetha Gopalakrishnan; Narasimhan, S; Jessi Kala Veni, K

    2006-07-19

    In the present study of some of the Indian medicinal plants Sida acuta whole plant (Malvaeae), Stylosanthes fruticosa (whole plant) (Papilionaceae), Toona ciliata (heart wood) (Meliaceao), Bougainvilla spectabilis (leaves) (Nyctaginaceae), Ficus glomerata (bark, leaves) (Moraceae) and Polyalthia longifolia (leaves) (Annonaceae). The different plants were used in folklore medicine in the treatment of toothache and strengthening of gums, anthelmintic, kidney diseases, analgesic, anti-inflammatory, hepatoprotective, antihyperglycaemic, antihyperglycaemic and anticancer. The extract was prepared using powdered material with ethanol, concentrated under vacuo and were evaluated for analgesic activity by analgesiometer at three dose level (100, 300 and 500mg/kg). Analgesic activity was significant with Toona ciliata (heart wood) ethanolic extract when compared with other extracts and its activity was confirmed by tail immersion method.

  19. COMPARATIVE PHARMACOGNOSY OF MEDICINALLY IMPORTANT INDIAN VITEX SPECIES

    PubMed Central

    Rao, R. V Krishna; Satyanarayana, T.; Jena, Ranjit

    1996-01-01

    Vitex genera is reputed for their medicinal properties. Of the 12 species reported to be present in Indian only 8 species are medicinally useful. Of these six species were colled and their pharmacognostic characters were studied and described. PMID:22556769

  20. Saussurea costus: botanical, chemical and pharmacological review of an ayurvedic medicinal plant.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Madan Mohan; Rastogi, Subha; Rawat, Ajay Kumar Singh

    2007-04-04

    Saussurea costus (Falc.) Lipschitz, syn Saussurea lappa C.B. Clarke is a well known and important medicinal plant widely used in several indigenous systems of medicine for the treatment of various ailments, viz. asthma, inflammatory diseases, ulcer and stomach problems. Sesquiterpene lactones have been reported as the major phytoconstituents of this species. Different pharmacological experiments in a number of in vitro and in vivo models have convincingly demonstrated the ability of Saussurea costus to exhibit anti-inflammatory, anti-ulcer, anticancer and hepatoprotective activities, lending support to the rationale behind several of its traditional uses. Costunolide, dehydrocostus lactone and cynaropicrin, isolated from this plant, have been identified to have potential to be developed as bioactive molecules. Due to the remarkable biological activity of Saussurea costus and its constituents it will be appropriate to develop them as a medicine. The present review is an up-to-date and comprehensive analysis of the botany, chemistry, pharmacology and traditional and folkloric uses of Saussurea costus.

  1. A Review on Antiulcer Activity of Few Indian Medicinal Plants

    PubMed Central

    Vimala, G.; Gricilda Shoba, F.

    2014-01-01

    Ulcer is a common gastrointestinal disorder which is seen among many people. It is basically an inflamed break in the skin or the mucus membrane lining the alimentary tract. Ulceration occurs when there is a disturbance of the normal equilibrium caused by either enhanced aggression or diminished mucosal resistance. It may be due to the regular usage of drugs, irregular food habits, stress, and so forth. Peptic ulcers are a broad term that includes ulcers of digestive tract in the stomach or the duodenum. The formation of peptic ulcers depends on the presence of acid and peptic activity in gastric juice plus a breakdown in mucosal defenses. A number of synthetic drugs are available to treat ulcers. But these drugs are expensive and are likely to produce more side effects when compared to herbal medicines. The literature revealed that many medicinal plants and polyherbal formulations are used for the treatment of ulcer by various ayurvedic doctors and traditional medicinal practitioners. The ideal aims of treatment of peptic ulcer disease are to relieve pain, heal the ulcer, and delay ulcer recurrence. In this review attempts have been made to know about some medicinal plants which may be used in ayurvedic as well as modern science for the treatment or prevention of peptic ulcer. PMID:24971094

  2. Ayurvedic management of achalasia.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Sanjeev; Chaudhari, Priyanka

    2015-01-01

    Achalasia is an esophageal motor disorder characterized by sustained lower esophageal sphincter contraction and reduced esophageal peristalsis. This pathology eventually results in symptoms like dysphagia, regurgitation and occasional chest pain related to food intake. This is an uncommon disorder of unexplained etiology; however viral, autoimmune and neurodegenerative causes are often afflicted to its manifestation. As per the current state of knowledge, achalasia is considered to be a chronic incurable condition. The treatment options offered here primarily aim at reducing the tone of lower esophageal sphincter by pharmacologic, endoscopic or surgical means. We are presenting here a case of achalasia with two years of symptomatic history of food regurgitation, dysphagia and heart burn without any noticeable response from allopathic medicines. The patient was subsequently kept under ayurvedic therapy considering the symptoms caused by vata impairment and hence requiring vatanulomana and reduction in esophageal muscle tone as the primary management. The patient was kept under suggested Ayurvedic therapy and followed-up for 3 months. A symptom-free follow-up in this case was noticed after completion of 1 month of Ayurvedic therapy.

  3. Ayurvedic management of achalasia

    PubMed Central

    Rastogi, Sanjeev; Chaudhari, Priyanka

    2015-01-01

    Achalasia is an esophageal motor disorder characterized by sustained lower esophageal sphincter contraction and reduced esophageal peristalsis. This pathology eventually results in symptoms like dysphagia, regurgitation and occasional chest pain related to food intake. This is an uncommon disorder of unexplained etiology; however viral, autoimmune and neurodegenerative causes are often afflicted to its manifestation. As per the current state of knowledge, achalasia is considered to be a chronic incurable condition. The treatment options offered here primarily aim at reducing the tone of lower esophageal sphincter by pharmacologic, endoscopic or surgical means. We are presenting here a case of achalasia with two years of symptomatic history of food regurgitation, dysphagia and heart burn without any noticeable response from allopathic medicines. The patient was subsequently kept under ayurvedic therapy considering the symptoms caused by vata impairment and hence requiring vatanulomana and reduction in esophageal muscle tone as the primary management. The patient was kept under suggested Ayurvedic therapy and followed-up for 3 months. A symptom-free follow-up in this case was noticed after completion of 1 month of Ayurvedic therapy. PMID:25878463

  4. Use of Ayurvedic diagnostic criteria in Ayurvedic clinical trials: a literature review focused on research methods.

    PubMed

    Brar, Bhupinder S; Chhibber, Richa; Srinivasa, Vani Murthy H; Dearing, Bianca A; McGowan, Richard; Katz, Ralph V

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this literature review is to evaluate whether Ayurvedic diagnostic criteria or Western medicine diagnostic criteria have been used in published clinical trials testing an Ayurvedic intervention/treatment. The PubMed, Embase, and Allied and Complementary Medicine databases were searched to identify Ayurvedic clinical trials published from 1980 to 2009. A total of 45 Ayurvedic clinical trials were identified and grouped into two time periods: pre- and post-2000 periods. Each article was independently reviewed by two calibrated reviewers. Analysis revealed that not 1 of these 45 studies, in either time period, reported "only-and-full" use of the 23 available Ayurvedic diagnostic criteria. In fact, 24.4% of these 45 articles never specified any diagnostic criteria at all. While the percentage of articles using Ayurvedic diagnostic criteria (either as "only use" or "combined use with Western Medicine diagnostic criteria") doubled over the two time periods (27.7% to 59%), rarely were more than 2 of the 23 Ayurvedic diagnostic criteria ever used. To improve confidence in their findings, future studies should strive to correct this observed inappropriate and gross underuse of Ayurvedic diagnostic criteria in the designing of clinical studies that aim to rigorously test the effectiveness of Ayurvedic treatments.

  5. [Aspects of traditional Indian medicine (Ayurveda) in urology].

    PubMed

    Mani, J; Kumar, S; Dobos, G J; Haferkamp, A

    2012-12-01

    Ayurveda is from a global viewpoint the oldest and the most employed traditional form of medicine in India. The difference to western medicine is that this form of medicine is based on experience, empirical evidence and intuition accumulated over thousands of years and passed down through generations orally as well as by sketches. Ayurveda is not only concerned with the physical but also with the spiritual aspects of the body and according to this doctrine most diseases result from psychological and pathological alterations in the body. Ultimately, the definition of health according to Ayurveda is an equilibrium between the physical, mental and spiritual components. Ayurvedic medicine is used within the framework of the treatment of urolithiasis for diuresis, for litholysis, as an analgetic for spasms and with an antimicrobial function.

  6. Radio protective effects of the Ayurvedic medicinal plant Ocimum sanctum Linn. (Holy Basil): A memoir.

    PubMed

    Baliga, Manjeshwar Shrinath; Rao, Suresh; Rai, Manoj P; D'souza, Prema

    2016-01-01

    The use of compounds which can selectively protect normal tissues against radiation injury is of immense use because in addition to it protecting the normal tissue, will also permits use of higher doses of radiation to obtain better cancer control and possible cure. However, most of the radio protective compounds investigated possess inadequate clinical application principally due to their inherent systemic toxicity at their optimal protective concentrations. Plants commonly used as medicinal and dietary agents have recently been the focus of attention and studies have shown that Ocimum sanctum Linn. commonly known as the Holy Basil and its water soluble flavonoids, orientin and vicenin protects experimental animals against the radiation-induced sickness and mortality at nontoxic concentrations. Studies with tumor bearing mice have also shown that both Tulsi extract and its flavonoids selectively protect the normal tissues against the tumoricidal effects of radiation. Preclinical studies have also shown that the aqueous extract of the Tulsi leaves; its flavanoids orientin and vicenin, and eugenol, the principal nonpolar constituent present in Tulsi prevent radiation-induced clastogenesis. Mechanistic studies have indicated that free radical scavenging, antioxidant, metal chelating and anti-inflammatory effects may contribute toward the observed protection. In addition, clinical studies with a small number of patients have shown that Tulsi was effective as a radio protective agent. This review summarizes the results related to the radio protective properties of Tulsi and its phytochemicals and also emphasizes the aspects that warrant future research to establish its use as a radio protective agent.

  7. Double-blind, randomized, controlled, pilot study comparing classic ayurvedic medicine, methotrexate, and their combination in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Furst, Daniel E; Venkatraman, Manorama M; McGann, Mary; Manohar, P Ram; Booth-LaForce, Cathryn; Sarin, Reshmi; Sekar, P G; Raveendran, K G; Mahapatra, Anita; Gopinath, Jidesh; Kumar, P R Krishna

    2011-06-01

    To compare classic Ayurveda, methotrexate (MTX), and their combination in a double-blind, randomized, double-dummy, pilot trial in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) for 36 weeks. Forty-three seropositive RA patients by American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria with disease duration of less than 7 years were assigned to the following treatment groups: MTX plus Ayurvedic placebo (n = 14), Ayurveda plus MTX placebo (n = 12), or Ayurveda plus MTX (n = 17). Outcomes included the Disease Activity Score (DAS28-CRP), ACR20/50/70, and Health Assessment Questionnaire--Disability Index. All measures were obtained every 12 weeks for 36 weeks. Analyses included descriptive statistics, analysis of variance, χ², or Student t test. The unique features of this study included the development of placebos for each Ayurvedic pharmacological dosage form and individualization of Ayurvedic therapy. All groups were comparable at baseline in demographics and disease characteristics. There were no statistically significant differences among the 3 groups on the efficacy measures. ACR20 results were MTX 86%, Ayurveda 100%, and combination 82%, and DAS28-CRP response were MTX -2.4, Ayurveda -1.7, and combination -2.4. Differences in adverse events among groups were also not statistically significant, although the MTX groups experienced more adverse event (MTX 174, Ayurveda 112, combination 176). No deaths occurred. In this first-ever, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled pilot study comparing Ayurveda, MTX, and their combination, all 3 treatments were approximately equivalent in efficacy, within the limits of a pilot study. Adverse events were numerically fewer in the Ayurveda-only group. This study demonstrates that double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized studies are possible when testing individualized classic Ayurvedic versus allopathic treatment in ways acceptable to western standards and to Ayurvedic physicians. It also justifies the need for larger studies.

  8. Śodhana: An Ayurvedic process for detoxification and modification of therapeutic activities of poisonous medicinal plants

    PubMed Central

    Maurya, Santosh Kumar; Seth, Ankit; Laloo, Damiki; Singh, Narendra Kumar; Gautam, Dev Nath Singh; Singh, Anil Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Ayurveda involves the use of drugs obtained from plants, animals, and mineral origin. All the three sources of drugs can be divided under poisonous and nonpoisonous category. There are various crude drugs, which generally possess unwanted impurities and toxic substances, which can lead to harmful health problems. Many authors have reported that not all medicinal plants are safe to use since they can bear many toxic and harmful phytoconstituents in them. Śodhana (detoxification/purification) is the process, which involves the conversion of any poisonous drug into beneficial, nonpoisonous/nontoxic ones. Vatsanābha (Aconitum species), Semecarpus anacardium, Strychnos nux-vomica, Acorus calamus, Abrus precatorius etc., are some of the interesting examples of toxic plants, which are still used in the Indian system of medicine. Aconite, bhilawanols, strychnine, β–asarone, abrin are some of the toxic components present in these plants and are relatively toxic in nature. Śodhana process involves the purification as well as reduction in the levels of toxic principles which sometimes results in an enhanced therapeutic efficacy. The present review is designed to extensively discuss and understand the scientific basis of the alternative use of toxic plants as a medicine after their purification process. PMID:26283803

  9. Religion, spirituality, health and medicine: why should Indian physicians care?

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, S

    2007-01-01

    Religion, spirituality, health and medicine have common roots in the conceptual framework of relationship amongst human beings, nature and God. Of late, there has been a surge in interest in understanding the interplay of religion, spirituality, health and medicine, both in popular and scientific literature. A number of published empirical studies suggest that religious involvement is associated with better outcomes in physical and mental health. Despite some methodological limitations, these studies do point towards a positive association between religious involvement and better health. When faced with disease, disability and death, many patients would like physicians to address their emotional and spiritual needs, as well. The renewed interest in the interaction of religion and spirituality with health and medicine has significant implications in the Indian context. Although religion is translated as dharma in major Indian languages, dharma and religion are etymologically different and dharma is closer to spirituality than religion as an organized institution. Religion and spirituality play important roles in the lives of millions of Indians and therefore, Indian physicians need to respectfully acknowledge religious issues and address the spiritual needs of their patients. Incorporating religion and spirituality into health and medicine may also go a long way in making the practice of medicine more holistic, ethical and compassionate. It may also offer new opportunities to learn more about Ayurveda and other traditional systems of medicine and have more enriched understanding and collaborative interaction between different systems of medicine. Indian physicians may also find religion and spirituality significant and fulfilling in their own lives.

  10. Ayurvedic college education, reifying biomedicine and the need for reflexivity.

    PubMed

    Bode, Maarten; Shankar, Prasan

    2017-05-16

    The paper analyses the experiences with government sanctioned Ayurvedic college education of 14 young Ayurvedic doctors working at the Integrative Health Centre in Bangalore, India. Unfamiliarity with Ayurvedic logic and Indian natural philosophies, lack of clinical training and the mixing-up of Ayurvedic and biomedical notions are their main complaints. The 14 young Ayurvedic doctors also missed a convincing perspective on how to integrate Ayurvedic logic, modern scientific knowledge and biomedical diagnostics. Ayurvedic state sanctioned education seems to be caught between Ayurveda's natural philosophy of health and the techno-science of biomedicine. The Ayurvedic doctors under scrutiny face the danger of becoming 'half-baked products' when they do not learn to reflect on the tension between Indian traditional knowledge and biomedical learning. The paper argues that the logic of modern science and biomedicine's claim to value-free knowledge captivates Ayurvedic education and research. This hinders Ayurveda's development as a vibrant alterity to biomedicine. What is needed is a critical social science perspective on the construction of medical knowledge and India's hierarchical medical landscape.

  11. Ayurvedic constitution (prakruti) identifies risk factor of developing Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Manyam, Bala V; Kumar, Abhimanyu

    2013-07-01

    The ancient Indian medical system, Ayurveda, is the oldest scientifically based system of medicine in the world. According to Ayurvedic concepts, there are 3 humors or Doshas: Vata, Pitta, and Kapha. The combination of these Doshas in varying degrees leads to one's constitution, referred to as Prakruti. Prakruti determines one's physical, physiologic, and mental character and disease vulnerability. This clinical study was undertaken to determine the constitutional typing of individuals with known idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD) compared with that of nonparkinsonian controls. This study sought to validate the ancient observation that persons of Vata Prakruti are at risk for nervous system diseases. PD was used as a test case because the exact cause is not known. Patients with established PD (n=75) and closely related controls with no known neurologic disease (n=73) were assessed for their Ayurvedic constitution (Prakruti). An Ayurvedic constitutional assessment form and an independent Ayurvedic clinical assessment were used in the patients and controls. The total mean score (±standard deviation) for Vata was 11.0±3.9 in patients with PD and 6.9±3.0 in controls. This finding was significant (p<0.0001), indicating that the incidence of PD is highest in those with Vata Prakruti. The incidence of PD was higher in men than in women. Knowledge gained from this study may be helpful in identifying the vulnerable population, delaying the onset of symptoms, or slowing disease progression or development of treatment-related complications by keeping Vata in balance through anti-Vata diet and lifestyle changes as prescribed in Ayurveda.

  12. Screening of Indian aphrodisiac ayurvedic/herbal healthcare products for adulteration with sildenafil, tadalafil and/or vardenafil using LC/PDA and extracted ion LC-MS/TOF.

    PubMed

    Savaliya, Akash A; Shah, Ravi P; Prasad, Bhagwat; Singh, Saranjit

    2010-07-08

    Ayurvedic/herbal healthcare products are considered safe under the impression that they are derived from natural products. But recently, there have been several reports worldwide on the adulteration of synthetic PDE-5 inhibitors in aphrodisiac herbal formulations. Therefore, the objective of the present study was to explore the presence of synthetic PDE-5 inhibitors (sildenafil, tadalafil and/or vardenafil) in ayurvedic/herbal healthcare products sold in Indian market for aphrodisiac/related uses. In total, 85 herbal formulations (HFs) were included in the study. The formulations were extracted with methanol and subjected to centrifugation. The supernatant was analysed by HPLC and LC-MS/TOF. Early detection of the presence of sildenafil, tadalafil and vardenafil in the herbal samples was done by the study of extracted ion mass chromatograms at the m/z values of respective parent ions, and two prominent fragments of each. In case of sildenafil and tadalafil, adulteration was also detected by comparing the relative retention times (RR(T)) and UV spectra. Further substantiation was done through comparison of accurate mass spectra with those of the two available standards. Of the 85 HFs tested, only one was eventually found to be adulterated with sildenafil. The extent of adulterant in this sample was determined to the therapeutic dose in the formulation. The study thus indicates emergence of the problem of adulteration of Indian herbal products with PDE-5 inhibitors.

  13. Therapeutic potential of Phyllanthus emblica (amla): the ayurvedic wonder.

    PubMed

    Krishnaveni, Mani; Mirunalini, Sankaran

    2010-01-01

    Medicinal plants are nature's gift to human beings to promote a disease free healthy life. Many medicinal plants are present in a group of herbal preparations of the Indian traditional health care system (Ayurveda) named Rasayana proposed for their interesting antioxidant activities. Phyllanthus emblica Linn. (syn. Emblica officinalis), commonly known as Indian gooseberry or amla, family Euphorbiaceae, is an important herbal drug used in unani (Graceo - arab) and ayurvedic systems of medicine. The plant is used both as a medicine and as a tonic to build up lost vitality and vigor. Phyllanthus emblica is highly nutritious and could be an important dietary source of vitamin C, amino acids, and minerals. The plant also contains phenolic compounds, tannins, phyllembelic acid, phyllembelin, rutin, curcum-inoids, and emblicol. All parts of the plant are used for medicinal purposes, especially the fruit, which has been used in Ayurveda as a potent rasayana and in traditional medicine for the treatment of diarrhea, jaundice, and inflammation. Various plant parts show antidiabetic, hypolipidemic, antibacterial, antioxidant, antiulcerogenic, hepatoprotective, gastroprotective, and chemopreventive properties. Here we discuss its historical, etymological, morphological and pharmacological aspects.

  14. Rational use of medicines - Indian perspective!

    PubMed

    Mohanta, G P; Manna, P K

    2015-01-01

    India, the largest democracy in the world, is with a federal structure of 29 states and 7 union territories. With a population of more than 1.2 billion, resource is always a constraint and so is in the health system too. In the federal structure, providing healthcare is largely the responsibility of state governments. Medicines are important component of health care delivery system and quality care is dependent on the availability and proper use of quality medicines. In spite of being known as pharmacy of the third world, poor access to medicines in the country is always a serious concern. Realizing the need of quality use of medicines, several initiatives have been initiated. As early as 1994, seeds of rational use of medicines were sown in the country with two initiatives: establishment of a civil society, Delhi Society for Promoting Rational Use of Drugs (DSPURD) and establishment of government agency in Tamil Nadu, a southern state, called Tamil Medical Services Corporation Limited (TNMSCL). DSPUD was in official association with World Health Organization Country Office for implementing essential medicine programme in the country for two biennia. In addition to organizing sensitising and training programme for healthcare professionals throughout the country, it looked after the procurement and appropriate use of medicines in Delhi government health facilities. TNMSCL has made innovations in medicine management including procurement directly from manufacturers as a part of pooled procurement, establishing warehouses with modern storage facilities and Information Technology enabled management of whole process. TNMSCL Model is now replicated in almost the entire country and even in some small other countries as it is successful in improving access to medicines.The National Government and the State Governments have developed strategies to promote rational use of medicines as a part of improving access and quality care in public health facilities. National

  15. Phytochemical constituents of some Indian medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Dhandapani, R; Sabna, B

    2008-04-01

    Alkaloids, tannins, saponins, steroid, terpenoid, flavonoids, phlobatannin and cardie glycoside distribution in seven medicinal plants belonging to different families were assessed and compared. The medicinal plants investigated were Aegle marmelos, Cynodon dactylon, Eclipta prostrata, Moringa pterygosperma, Pongamia pinnata, Sida acuta and Tridax procumbens. The significance of the plants in traditional medicine and the importance of the distribution of these chemical constituents were discussed with respect to the role of these plants in ethnomedicine in India.

  16. Phytochemical constituents of some Indian medicinal plants

    PubMed Central

    Dhandapani, R.; Sabna, B.

    2008-01-01

    Alkaloids, tannins, saponins, steroid, terpenoid, flavonoids, phlobatannin and cardie glycoside distribution in seven medicinal plants belonging to different families were assessed and compared. The medicinal plants investigated were Aegle marmelos, Cynodon dactylon, Eclipta prostrata, Moringa pterygosperma, Pongamia pinnata, Sida acuta and Tridax procumbens. The significance of the plants in traditional medicine and the importance of the distribution of these chemical constituents were discussed with respect to the role of these plants in ethnomedicine in India. PMID:22557280

  17. Physicochemical characterization of an Indian traditional medicine, Jasada Bhasma: detection of nanoparticles containing non-stoichiometric zinc oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhowmick, Tridib Kumar; Suresh, Akkihebbal K.; Kane, Shantaram G.; Joshi, Ajit C.; Bellare, Jayesh R.

    2009-04-01

    Herbs and minerals are the integral parts of traditional systems of medicine in many countries. Herbo-Mineral medicinal preparations called Bhasma are unique to the Ayurvedic and Siddha systems of Indian Traditional Medicine. These preparations have been used since long and are claimed to be the very effective and potent dosage form. However, there is dearth of scientific analytical studies carried out on these products, and even the existing ones suffer from incomplete analysis. Jasada Bhasma is a unique preparation of zinc belonging to this class. This particular preparation has been successfully used by traditional practitioners for the treatment of diabetes and age-related eye diseases. This work presents a first comprehensive physicochemical characterization of Jasada Bhasma using modern state-of-the-art techniques such as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), inductively coupled plasma (ICP), elemental analysis with energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Our analysis shows that the Jasada Bhasma particles are in oxygen deficient state and a clearly identifiable fraction of particles are in the nanometer size range. These properties like oxygen deficiency and nanosize particles in Jasada Bhasma might impart the therapeutic property of this particular type of medicine.

  18. Bioaccessibility of lead and arsenic in traditional Indian medicines

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Iris; Moriarty, Maeve; House, Kim; Sui, Jie; Cullen, William R.; Saper, Robert B.; Reimer, Kenneth J.

    2011-01-01

    Arsenic and lead have been found in a number of traditional Ayurvedic medicines, and the practice of Rasa Shastra (combining herbs with metals, minerals and gems), or plant ingredients that contain these elements, may be possible sources. To obtain an estimate of arsenic and lead solubility in the human gastrointestinal tract, bioaccessibility of the two elements was measured in 42 medicines, using a physiologically-based extraction test. The test consisted of a gastric phase at pH 1.8 containing organic acids, pepsin and salt, followed by an intestinal phase, at pH 7 and containing bile and pancreatin. Arsenic speciation was measured in a subset of samples that had sufficiently high arsenic concentrations for the X-ray absorption near edge structure analysis used. Bioaccessible lead was found in 76% of samples, with a large range of bioaccessibility results, but only 29% of samples had bioaccessible arsenic. Lead bioaccessibility was high (close to 100%) in a medicine (Mahayograj Guggulu) that had been compounded with bhasmas (calcined minerals), including naga (lead) bhasma. For the samples in which arsenic speciation was measured, bioaccessible arsenic was correlated with the sum of As(V)–O and As(III)–O and negatively correlated with As–S. These results suggest that the bioaccessible species in the samples had been oxidized from assumed As–S raw medicinal ingredients (realgar, As4S4, added to naga (lead) bhasma and As(III)–S species in plants). Consumption at recommended doses of all medicines with bioaccessibile lead or arsenic would lead to the exceedance of at least one standard for acceptable daily intake of toxic elements. PMID:21864885

  19. Bioaccessibility of lead and arsenic in traditional Indian medicines.

    PubMed

    Koch, Iris; Moriarty, Maeve; House, Kim; Sui, Jie; Cullen, William R; Saper, Robert B; Reimer, Kenneth J

    2011-10-01

    Arsenic and lead have been found in a number of traditional Ayurvedic medicines, and the practice of Rasa Shastra (combining herbs with metals, minerals and gems), or plant ingredients that contain these elements, may be possible sources. To obtain an estimate of arsenic and lead solubility in the human gastrointestinal tract, bioaccessibility of the two elements was measured in 42 medicines, using a physiologically-based extraction test. The test consisted of a gastric phase at pH 1.8 containing organic acids, pepsin and salt, followed by an intestinal phase, at pH 7 and containing bile and pancreatin. Arsenic speciation was measured in a subset of samples that had sufficiently high arsenic concentrations for the X-ray absorption near edge structure analysis used. Bioaccessible lead was found in 76% of samples, with a large range of bioaccessibility results, but only 29% of samples had bioaccessible arsenic. Lead bioaccessibility was high (close to 100%) in a medicine (Mahayograj Guggulu) that had been compounded with bhasmas (calcined minerals), including naga (lead) bhasma. For the samples in which arsenic speciation was measured, bioaccessible arsenic was correlated with the sum of As(V)-O and As(III)-O and negatively correlated with As-S. These results suggest that the bioaccessible species in the samples had been oxidized from assumed As-S raw medicinal ingredients (realgar, As(4)S(4), added to naga (lead) bhasma and As(III)-S species in plants). Consumption at recommended doses of all medicines with bioaccessibile lead or arsenic would lead to the exceedance of at least one standard for acceptable daily intake of toxic elements. Crown Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Reactive oxygen species-dependent apoptosis by gugulipid extract of Ayurvedic medicine plant Commiphora mukul in human prostate cancer cells is regulated by c-Jun N-terminal kinase.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Dong; Zeng, Yan; Prakash, Lakshmi; Badmaev, Vladmir; Majeed, Muhammed; Singh, Shivendra V

    2011-03-01

    Gugulipid (GL), extract of Indian Ayurvedic medicinal plant Commiphora mukul, has been used to treat a variety of ailments. We report an anticancer effect and mechanism of GL against human prostate cancer cells. Treatment with GL significantly inhibited the viability of human prostate cancer cell line LNCaP (androgen-dependent) and its androgen-independent variant (C81) with an IC(50) of ∼1 μM (24-h treatment), at pharmacologically relevant concentrations standardized to its major active constituent z-guggulsterone. The GL-induced growth inhibition correlated with apoptosis induction as evidenced by an increase in cytoplasmic histone-associated DNA fragmentation and sub-G(0)/G(1)-DNA fraction, and cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. The GL-induced apoptosis was associated with reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) activation. The induction of proapoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins Bax and Bak and a decrease of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 protein Bcl-2 were observed in GL-treated cells. SV40 immortalized mouse embryonic fibroblasts derived from Bax-Bak double-knockout mice were significantly more resistant to GL-induced cell killing compared with wild-type cells. It is interesting to note that a representative normal prostate epithelial cell line (PrEC) was relatively more resistant to GL-mediated cellular responses compared with prostate cancer cells. The GL treatment caused the activation of JNK that functioned upstream of Bax activation in apoptosis response. The GL-induced conformational change of Bax and apoptosis were significantly suppressed by genetic suppression of JNK activation. In conclusion, the present study indicates that ROS-dependent apoptosis by GL is regulated by JNK signaling axis.

  1. Certain concepts of "prameha" (diabetes) in ayurveda (Indian system of medicine) with special reference to the relationship between ancient Indian and modern thoughts.

    PubMed

    Rajasekharan, S; Raju, G S

    1982-07-01

    Prameha (Diabetes) which has been a global problem is well described in the ancient Indian classics life the Vedas and the Ayurvedic works which ensued the Vedic period. In the present work, the authors have tried to focus the narrations on pramehas in Vedic literature with special reference to the "Kauchika Soothra" of Atharva Veda. A new hypothesis comparing the actions of pittatejas which is set free by the pitta dharakala with the actions of the hormones like insulin and glucagon is also discussed. The aetiopathogenesis of pramehas as described by the Ayurvedic authors with a glance to the therapeutic measures is also included in the study.

  2. CERTAIN CONCEPTS OF “PRAMEHA” (DIABETES) IN AYURVEDA (INDIAN SYSTEM OF MEDICINE) WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ANCIENT INDIAN AND MODERN THOUGHTS

    PubMed Central

    Rajasekharan, S.; Raju, G.S.

    1982-01-01

    Prameha (Diabetes) which has been a global problem is well described in the ancient Indian classics life the Vedas and the Ayurvedic works which ensued the Vedic period. In the present work, the authors have tried to focus the narrations on pramehas in Vedic literature with special reference to the “Kauchika Soothra” of Atharva Veda. A new hypothesis comparing the actions of pittatejas which is set free by the pitta dharakala with the actions of the hormones like insulin and glucagon is also discussed. The aetiopathogenesis of pramehas as described by the Ayurvedic authors with a glance to the therapeutic measures is also included in the study PMID:22556947

  3. ROLE OF GEMS IN INDIAN MEDICINE

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, S.R.N.

    1991-01-01

    This paper is the first attempt in introducing the medicinal importance of gems as found in the Sanskrit text ‘Rasaratnasamuccaya’, which has been rendered an English translation here. The modern physicians and gemologists will find this study quite useful in continuing research and, thus, develop a new field of gem medicine. PMID:22556526

  4. AISOM (The American Indian School of Medicine), March 1977.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Indian School of Medicine, Shiprock, NM.

    A compilation of descriptive, factual, and technical information re: the development of the American Indian School of Medicine (AISOM), this document describes the history and current status of AISOM and presents the 1977 projected calendar. AISOM is described as: established by the Navajo Tribal Council in 1977; developing an academic affiliation…

  5. A Community Medicine Clerkship on the Navajo Indian Reservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Kenneth D.; Coulehan, John L.

    1984-01-01

    An important part of a clerkship in community medicine on the Navajo Indian reservation is a project in which students select a health problem which they investigate using epidemiological methods of assessment and for which they seek a solution. (Author/MLW)

  6. A brief history of Indian alchemy covering pre-Vedic to Vedic and Ayurvedic period (circa 400 B.C.-800 A.D.).

    PubMed

    Ali, M

    1993-07-01

    History of Indian alchemy can be traced to pre-Vedic period. The archaeological excavations at Mohenjodaro and Harappa in the Indus valley have brought to light that, the people in ancient India were possessing chemical knowledge as early as in the pre-historic period. In Vedic period single herbs were prescribed. Minerals and animal substances were also prescribed but no compound preparations were in use. Alchemy in India, was started for the preparation of an elixir of life for imparting immortality and later for the transmutation process for converting base metals into gold. Indian alchemy derived its colour and flavour to a large extent from the Tantric cult. Then, during the iatro-chemical period all the previous accumulated alchemical ideas were put into something more practical and tangible. a number of preparations of mercury and other metals were evolved as helpful accessories in medicine. Here a bried history of this Indian alchemy is presented which will give an idea about the development of chemical knowledge in India in its multiple aspects.

  7. A Review and Analysis of the Ayurvedic Institute's Ayurvedic Studies Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Curtis R.

    The Ayurvedic Institute, which has been licensed as a private institution of higher education in New Mexico since 1994, offers training in the traditional therapy of East Indian Ayurveda, which includes the use of herbs, nutrition, panchakarma cleansing, and accupressure massage. The institute also offers training in the related disciplines of…

  8. SOME AYURVEDIC IMPORTANT PLANTS FROM DISTRICT KAMRUP (ASSAM)

    PubMed Central

    Deka, L.; Majumdar, R.; Dutta, A. M.

    1983-01-01

    The authors while on ethnobotanical study tour to the district of Kamrup (Assam) collected the following medicinal plants from Ayurvedic point of view and studied other economic values which is presented in this paper. PMID:22557391

  9. Ayurvedic bhasma: nanomedicine of ancient India--its global contemporary perspective.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Anand

    2011-02-01

    Ayurveda is one of the oldest systems of medicine, practiced in Indian sub continent. We are working to calibrate classical parameters of good manufacturing practices of Ayurvedic bhasma on parameters and language of contemporary science. Bhasma in accordance of classical expectation are Swarna bhasma, Makshika bhasma, Abhrak bhasma, Tamra bhasma and Louha bhasma. X-ray diffraction, TEM and particle size analysis revealed that these bhasma are in nanometer dimension. These bhasma may be considered as nanomedicine and are free from toxicity in therapeutic doses.

  10. MALE SEXUAL DISORDERS IN INDIAN TRADITIONAL MEDICINE- A HISTORICAL REVIEW

    PubMed Central

    Padhi, M.M.

    1989-01-01

    The description of male sexual disorders by ancient authors of Indian medicine is praiseworthy. Effort has been made to describe the standard of approach with reference to certain books on Ayurveda and astrology. The development of administration of mineral medicines has added a new aspect in their treatment, but the description regarding their forms, etiopathogenesis, prognosis and the principle of treatment has remained unchanged. The opinions of various authors have been presented historically from vedic age up to the modern era. The present status of treatment and the role of Ayurveda in the treatment of sexual dysfunctions have been highlighted here. PMID:22557682

  11. Male sexual disorders in Indian traditional medicine- a historical review.

    PubMed

    Padhi, M M

    1989-10-01

    The description of male sexual disorders by ancient authors of Indian medicine is praiseworthy. Effort has been made to describe the standard of approach with reference to certain books on Ayurveda and astrology. The development of administration of mineral medicines has added a new aspect in their treatment, but the description regarding their forms, etiopathogenesis, prognosis and the principle of treatment has remained unchanged. The opinions of various authors have been presented historically from vedic age up to the modern era. The present status of treatment and the role of Ayurveda in the treatment of sexual dysfunctions have been highlighted here.

  12. Simple Spectrophotometric Methods for Standardizing Ayurvedic Formulation

    PubMed Central

    Vador, N.; Vador, B.; Hole, Rupali

    2012-01-01

    Traditional medicines are effective but the standardization of Ayurvedic formulations is essential in order to assess the quality of drugs, based on the concentration of their active principles. Department of AYUSH has given preliminary guidelines for standardizing these conventional formulations, for uniformity of batches in production of Ayurvedic formulation and it is necessary to develop methods for evaluation. The present work is an attempt to standardize asav-arishta, the traditional Ayurvedic formulation using simple, non-expensive spectrophotometric methods. The various parameters performed included total phenolics, total flavonoids, total alkaloids and total saponins, also included pH, sugar %, alcohol content and specific gravity. The results obtained may be considered as tools for assistance to the regulatory authorities, scientific organizations and manufacturers for developing standards. PMID:23325998

  13. Evaluation of Traditional Indian Antidiabetic Medicinal Plants for Human Pancreatic Amylase Inhibitory Effect In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Ponnusamy, Sudha; Ravindran, Remya; Zinjarde, Smita; Bhargava, Shobha; Ravi Kumar, Ameeta

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic α-amylase inhibitors offer an effective strategy to lower the levels of post prandial hyperglycemia via control of starch breakdown. Eleven Ayurvedic Indian medicinal plants with known hypoglycemic properties were subjected to sequential solvent extraction and tested for α-amylase inhibition, in order to assess and evaluate their inhibitory potential on pancreatic α-amylase. Analysis of 91 extracts, showed that 10 exhibited strong Human Pancreatic Amylase (HPA) inhibitory potential. Of these, 6 extracts showed concentration dependent inhibition with IC50 values, namely, cold and hot water extracts from Ficus bengalensis bark (4.4 and 125 μgmL−1), Syzygium cumini seeds (42.1 and 4.1 μgmL−1), isopropanol extracts of Cinnamomum verum leaves (1.0 μgmL−1) and Curcuma longa rhizome (0.16 μgmL−1). The other 4 extracts exhibited concentration independent inhibition, namely, methanol extract of Bixa orellana leaves (49 μgmL−1), isopropanol extract from Murraya koenigii leaves (127 μgmL−1), acetone extracts from C. longa rhizome (7.4 μgmL−1) and Tribulus terrestris seeds (511 μgmL−1). Thus, the probable mechanism of action of the above fractions is due to their inhibitory action on HPA, thereby reducing the rate of starch hydrolysis leading to lowered glucose levels. Phytochemical analysis revealed the presence of alkaloids, proteins, tannins, cardiac glycosides, flavonoids, saponins and steroids as probable inhibitory compounds. PMID:20953430

  14. Good Medicine for Our People. A Coloring Book about Indians and Health Careers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gourneau, Linda

    The Indians into Medicine (INMED) program helps Indian students to attend college and earn degrees in health care fields. Developed by INMED, this coloring book for children conveys through pictures and picture captions the message that American Indians can become health professionals, and that health professionals are needed by the Indian people.…

  15. Traditional Indian medicine and homeopathy for HIV/AIDS: a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Fritts, M; Crawford, CC; Quibell, D; Gupta, A; Jonas, WB; Coulter, I; Andrade, SA

    2008-01-01

    Background Allopathic practitioners in India are outnumbered by practitioners of traditional Indian medicine and homeopathy (TIMH), which is used by up to two-thirds of its population to help meet primary health care needs, particularly in rural areas. India has an estimated 2.5 million HIV infected persons. However, little is known about TIMH use, safety or efficacy in HIV/AIDS management in India, which has one of the largest indigenous medical systems in the world. The purpose of this review was to assess the quality of peer-reviewed, published literature on TIMH for HIV/AIDS care and treatment. Results Of 206 original articles reviewed, 21 laboratory studies, 17 clinical studies, and 6 previous reviews of the literature were identified that covered at least one system of TIMH, which includes Ayurveda, Unani medicine, Siddha medicine, homeopathy, yoga and naturopathy. Most studies examined either Ayurvedic or homeopathic treatments. Only 4 of these studies were randomized controlled trials, and only 10 were published in MEDLINE-indexed journals. Overall, the studies reported positive effects and even "cure" and reversal of HIV infection, but frequent methodological flaws call into question their internal and external validity. Common reasons for poor quality included small sample sizes, high drop-out rates, design flaws such as selection of inappropriate or weak outcome measures, flaws in statistical analysis, and reporting flaws such as lack of details on products and their standardization, poor or no description of randomization, and incomplete reporting of study results. Conclusion This review exposes a broad gap between the widespread use of TIMH therapies for HIV/AIDS, and the dearth of high-quality data supporting their effectiveness and safety. In light of the suboptimal effectiveness of vaccines, barrier methods and behavior change strategies for prevention of HIV infection and the cost and side effects of antiretroviral therapy (ART) for its treatment

  16. Correlating traditional Ayurvedic and modern medical perspectives on cancer: results of a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Dhruva, Anand; Hecht, Frederick M; Miaskowski, Christine; Kaptchuk, Ted J; Bodeker, Gerard; Abrams, Donald; Lad, Vasant; Adler, Shelley R

    2014-05-01

    To characterize Ayurvedic perspectives on the etiopathogenesis and supportive treatments for a biomedical diagnosis of cancer. Hour-long, digitally recorded interviews were conducted with 10 experienced Ayurvedic clinicians, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using techniques of qualitative thematic analysis. Four major themes were identified. The Ayurvedic description of the pathophysiology of cancer uses traditional concepts translated into a modern context. Although the biomedical treatment of cancer is considered valuable, from an Ayurvedic perspective it results in degeneration and depletion. In cases where biomedical treatment of cancer is not feasible, an Ayurvedic approach focusing on strengthening digestion, eliminating toxins, reducing tumor growth, and improving tissue metabolism is useful. An Ayurvedic approach to cancer supportive care focuses on restoring equilibrium, building strength, and rejuvenation. Ayurvedic medicine offers a unique perspective on the biomedical diagnosis of cancer that emphasizes restoring wholeness, uses natural remedies, includes a focus on emotional health, and emphasizes prevention strategies.

  17. Correlating Traditional Ayurvedic and Modern Medical Perspectives on Cancer: Results of a Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Hecht, Frederick M.; Miaskowski, Christine; Kaptchuk, Ted J.; Bodeker, Gerard; Abrams, Donald; Lad, Vasant; Adler, Shelley R.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To characterize Ayurvedic perspectives on the etiopathogenesis and supportive treatments for a biomedical diagnosis of cancer. Methods: Hour-long, digitally recorded interviews were conducted with 10 experienced Ayurvedic clinicians, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using techniques of qualitative thematic analysis. Results: Four major themes were identified. The Ayurvedic description of the pathophysiology of cancer uses traditional concepts translated into a modern context. Although the biomedical treatment of cancer is considered valuable, from an Ayurvedic perspective it results in degeneration and depletion. In cases where biomedical treatment of cancer is not feasible, an Ayurvedic approach focusing on strengthening digestion, eliminating toxins, reducing tumor growth, and improving tissue metabolism is useful. An Ayurvedic approach to cancer supportive care focuses on restoring equilibrium, building strength, and rejuvenation. Conclusion: Ayurvedic medicine offers a unique perspective on the biomedical diagnosis of cancer that emphasizes restoring wholeness, uses natural remedies, includes a focus on emotional health, and emphasizes prevention strategies. PMID:24341342

  18. Global challenges of graduate level Ayurvedic education: A survey.

    PubMed

    Patwardhan, Kishor; Gehlot, Sangeeta; Singh, Girish; Rathore, H C S

    2010-01-01

    In the present day scenario, Ayurveda is globally being perceived in several contradictory ways. Poor quality of Ayurveda graduates produced as a result of poorly structured and poorly regulated education system is at least one of the important factors responsible for this scenario. The present study was carried out to evaluate the 'Global challenges of graduate level Ayurvedic education' and is based on the responses of Ayurvedic students and Ayurvedic teachers from various educational institutions of India to a methodically validated questionnaire. As the study indicates, the poor standard of Ayurvedic education in India is definitely a cause of concern. The curriculum of Bachelor of Ayurvedic Medicine and Surgery (BAMS) course of studies is required to be reviewed and restructured. The syllabi are required to be updated with certain relevant topics like laws governing the intellectual property rights, basic procedures of standardization of medicinal products, fundamental methods of evaluating the toxicity of the medicinal products, essentials of healthcare management and the basics of cultivation and marketing of medicinal plants. Furthermore, the study suggests that the Ayurvedic academicians are required to be trained in standard methods of research and documentation skills, and the educational institutions are required to be encouraged to contribute their share in building up the evidence base for Ayurveda in the form of quality education and research.

  19. Triphala, a formulation of traditional Ayurvedic medicine, shows protective effect against X-radiation in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Takauji, Yuki; Miki, Kensuke; Mita, Juma; Hossain, Mohammad Nazir; Yamauchi, Masatake; Kioi, Mitomu; Ayusawa, Dai; Fujii, Michihiko

    2016-12-01

    Ayurveda is a holistic medical system of traditional medicine, and Triphala is one of the most popular formulations in Ayurveda. Triphala is composed of three kinds of herb, Terminalia chebula, Terminalia bellirica, and Emblica officinalis. Since Triphala is shown to exhibit a protective activity against ionizing radiation in mice, we investigated its activity in HeLa cells. We found that Triphala showed the protective effects against X-radiation and bleomycin, both of which generate DNA strand breaks, in HeLa cells. Further, Triphala efficiently eliminated reactive oxygen species (ROS) in HeLa cells. Thus, the antioxidant activity of Triphala would likely play a role in its protective actions against X-radiation and bleomycin because both agents damage DNA through the generation of ROS. These observations suggested that the radioprotective activity of Triphala can be, at least partly, studied with the cells cultured in vitro. The simple bioassay system with human cultured cells would facilitate the understanding of the molecular basis for the beneficial effects of Triphala.

  20. Traditional Indian Medicines Used for the Management of Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Neetu

    2013-01-01

    Plants have always been a source of drugs for humans since time immemorial. The Indian traditional system of medicine is replete with the use of plants for the management of diabetic conditions. According to the World Health Organization, up to 90% of population in developing countries use plants and its products as traditional medicine for primary health care. There are about 800 plants which have been reported to show antidiabetic potential. The present review is aimed at providing in-depth information about the antidiabetic potential and bioactive compounds present in Ficus religiosa, Pterocarpus marsupium, Gymnema sylvestre, Allium sativum, Eugenia jambolana, Momordica charantia, and Trigonella foenum-graecum. The review provides a starting point for future studies aimed at isolation, purification, and characterization of bioactive antidiabetic compounds present in these plants. PMID:23841105

  1. Traditional Indian medicines used for the management of diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Rizvi, Syed Ibrahim; Mishra, Neetu

    2013-01-01

    Plants have always been a source of drugs for humans since time immemorial. The Indian traditional system of medicine is replete with the use of plants for the management of diabetic conditions. According to the World Health Organization, up to 90% of population in developing countries use plants and its products as traditional medicine for primary health care. There are about 800 plants which have been reported to show antidiabetic potential. The present review is aimed at providing in-depth information about the antidiabetic potential and bioactive compounds present in Ficus religiosa, Pterocarpus marsupium, Gymnema sylvestre, Allium sativum, Eugenia jambolana, Momordica charantia, and Trigonella foenum-graecum. The review provides a starting point for future studies aimed at isolation, purification, and characterization of bioactive antidiabetic compounds present in these plants.

  2. Screening of antioxidant activity of three Indian medicinal plants, traditionally used for the management of neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Auddy, B; Ferreira, M; Blasina, F; Lafon, L; Arredondo, F; Dajas, F; Tripathi, P C; Seal, T; Mukherjee, B

    2003-02-01

    A number of Indian medicinal plants have been used for thousands of years in the traditional system of medicine (Ayurveda). Amongst these are plants used for the management of neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, loss of memory, degeneration of nerves and other neuronal disorders by the Ayurvedic practitioners. Though the etiology of neurodegenerative diseases remains enigmatic, there is evidence, which indicates that defective energy metabolism, excitotoxicity and oxidative damage may be crucial factors (Ann. Neurol. 38 (3) (1995) 357). The part of the Ayurvedic system that provides an approach to prevention and treatment of degenerative diseases is known as Rasayana, and plants used for this purpose are classed as rejuvenators. This group of plants generally possesses strong antioxidant activity (Pharmacol. Biochem. Behav. 43 (1992) 1175), but only a few have been investigated in detail. In the present study, three such rasayana plants were tested for the first time for their toxicity and free radical scavenging activity both in vitro and ex vivo. All the three plant infusions (up to 1 mg/ml) showed no toxic effects on the viability of PC12 cell line as judged by MTT-test. Both ethanolic extracts and water infusions of the plants were tested for their antioxidant activity in the 2,2'-azinobis-3-ethyl-benzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS*(+)) radical cation decolorization assay; inhibition of lipid peroxidation by plant infusions was carried out using spontaneous lipid peroxidation of rat brain homogenate, and IC50 values were determined. The results from the ABTS assay showed that the ethanolic extract of Sida cordifolia was found to be most potent (IC50 16.07 microg/ml), followed by Evolvulus alsinoides (IC50 33.39 microg/ml) and Cynodon dactylon (IC50 78.62 microg/ml). The relative antioxidant capacity for the water infusions was observed in the following order: E. alsinoides (IC50 172.25 microg/ml)>C. dactylon (IC50 273.64 microg

  3. Ayurvedic intervention in metastatic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Sanjeev; Rastogi, Ranjana

    2012-07-01

    Ayurvedic medicines are often considered effective for treating chronic and lifestyle-related diseases only and have not been thoroughly evaluated for treating acute or terminal illnesses. A prospective evaluation of Ayurvedic intervention was proposed for a patient who had metastatic liver disease with abnormal liver functions. The reason given for this was that no other conventional therapies were feasible in this case, and the family and caregivers were not willing to opt for any other intervention. A diagnosed patient with metastatic liver disease that included abnormal liver functions and symptomatic presentation was treated with Ayurvedic therapies and was observed for 10 days for any possible changes. A substantial clinical and biochemical improvement was observed in this patient after 10 days of treatment. This improvement was noted to be consistent at a 1-week follow-up after the patient was discharged from the hospital. This case offers an opportunity to reconsider whether or not the toxic potentials of heavy metals used in Ayurvedic agents outweigh the possible benefits for treating patients with well-defined, incurable clinical conditions.

  4. Anti-HIV activity of Indian medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Sabde, Sudeep; Bodiwala, Hardik S; Karmase, Aniket; Deshpande, Preeti J; Kaur, Amandeep; Ahmed, Nafees; Chauthe, Siddheshwar K; Brahmbhatt, Keyur G; Phadke, Rasika U; Mitra, Debashis; Bhutani, Kamlesh Kumar; Singh, Inder Pal

    2011-07-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients face great socio-economic difficulties in obtaining treatment. There is an urgent need for new, safe, and cheap anti-HIV agents. Traditional medicinal plants are a valuable source of novel anti-HIV agents and may offer alternatives to expensive medicines in future. Various medicinal plants or plant-derived natural products have shown strong anti-HIV activity and are under various stages of clinical development in different parts of the world. The present study was directed towards assessment of anti-HIV activity of various extracts prepared from Indian medicinal plants. The plants were chosen on the basis of similarity of chemical constituents with reported anti-HIV compounds or on the basis of their traditional usage as immunomodulators. Different extracts were prepared by Soxhlet extraction and liquid-liquid partitioning. Ninety-two extracts were prepared from 23 plants. Anti-HIV activity was measured in a human CD4+ T-cell line, CEM-GFP cells infected with HIV-1NL4.3. Nine extracts of 8 different plants significantly reduced viral production in CEM-GFP cells infected with HIV-1NL4.3. Aegle marmelos, Argemone mexicana, Asparagus racemosus, Coleus forskohlii, and Rubia cordifolia demonstrated promising anti-HIV potential and were investigated for their active principles.

  5. Plants used in Chinese and Indian traditional medicine for improvement of memory and cognitive function.

    PubMed

    Howes, Melanie-Jayne R; Houghton, Peter J

    2003-06-01

    In traditional practices of Ayurvedic and Chinese medicine, numerous plants have been used to treat cognitive disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). An ethnopharmacological approach has provided leads to identifying potential new drugs from plant sources, including those for cognitive disorders. Many drugs currently available in Western medicine were originally isolated from plants, or are derived from templates of compounds isolated from plants. Some anticholinesterase (anti-ChE) alkaloids isolated from plants have been investigated for their potential in the treatment of AD, and are now in clinical use. Galantamine, isolated from several plants including Lycoris radiata Herb., which was used in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), is licensed in the United Kingdom for the treatment of mild to moderate AD. Various other plant species have shown pharmacological activities relevant to the treatment of cognitive disorders, indicating potential for therapeutic use in disorders such as AD. This article reviews some of the plants and their active constituents that have been used in traditional Ayurvedic medicine and TCM for their reputed cognitive-enhancing or antiageing effects. Plants and their constituents with pharmacological activities that may be relevant for the treatment of cognitive disorders, including enhancement of cholinergic function in the central nervous system (CNS), anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities, are discussed.

  6. An update on Ayurvedic herb Convolvulus pluricaulis Choisy

    PubMed Central

    Agarwa, Parul; Sharma, Bhawna; Fatima, Amreen; Jain, Sanjay Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Convolvulus pluricaulis Choisy (C. pluricaulis) is a perennial herb that seems like morning glory. All parts of the herb are known to possess therapeutic benefits. The plant is used locally in Indian and Chinese medicine to cure various diseases. It is used in Ayurvedic formulation for chronic cough, sleeplessness, epilepsy, hallucinations, anxiety etc. Based on the comprehensive review of plant profile, pharmacognosy, phytochemistry, pharmacological and toxicological data on the C. pluricaulis, there will be more opportunities for the future research and development on the herb C. pluricaulis. Information on the C. pluricaulis was collected via electronic search (using Pub Med, SciFinder, Google Scholar and Web of Science) and library search for articles published in peer-reviewed journals. Furthermore, information also was obtained from some local books on ethnopharmacology. This paper covers the literature, primarily pharmacological, from 1985 to the end of 2012. The C. pluricaulis is an important indigenous medicine, which has a long medicinal application for liver disease, epileptic disease, microbial disease, cytotoxic and viral diseases, central nervous system (CNS) disease in Ayurvedic medicine, traditional Chinese medicine and other indigenous medical systems. The isolated metabolites and crude extract have exhibited a wide of in vitro and in vivo pharmacological effect, including CNS depression, anxiolytic, tranquillizing, antidepressant, antistress, neurodegenerative, antiamnesic, antioxidant, hypolipidemic, immunomodulatory, analgesic, antifungal, antibacterial, antidiabetic, antiulcer, anticatatonic, and cardiovascular activity. A chemical study of this plant was then initiated, which led to the isolation of carbohydrats, proteins, alkaloids, fatty acids, steroids, coumarins, flavanoids, and glycosides as active chemicals that bring about its biological effects. A series of pharmacognostical studies of this plant show that it is a herb, its stem and

  7. Ayurvedic medicine offers a good alternative to glucosamine and celecoxib in the treatment of symptomatic knee osteoarthritis: a randomized, double-blind, controlled equivalence drug trial.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Arvind; Saluja, Manjit; Tillu, Girish; Sarmukkaddam, Sanjeev; Venugopalan, Anuradha; Narsimulu, Gumdal; Handa, Rohini; Sumantran, Venil; Raut, Ashwinikumar; Bichile, Lata; Joshi, Kalpana; Patwardhan, Bhushan

    2013-08-01

    To demonstrate clinical equivalence between two standardized Ayurveda (India) formulations (SGCG and SGC), glucosamine and celecoxib (NSAID). Ayurvedic formulations (extracts of Tinospora cordifolia, Zingiber officinale, Emblica officinalis, Boswellia serrata), glucosamine sulphate (2 g daily) and celecoxib (200 mg daily) were evaluated in a randomized, double-blind, parallel-efficacy, four-arm, multicentre equivalence drug trial of 24 weeks duration. A total of 440 eligible patients suffering from symptomatic knee OA were enrolled and monitored as per protocol. Primary efficacy variables were active body weight-bearing pain (visual analogue scale) and modified WOMAC pain and functional difficulty Likert score (for knee and hip); the corresponding a priori equivalence ranges were ±1.5 cm, ±2.5 and ±8.5. Differences between the intervention arms for mean changes in primary efficacy variables were within the equivalence range by intent-to-treat and per protocol analysis. Twenty-six patients showed asymptomatic increased serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase (SGPT) with otherwise normal liver function; seven patients (Ayurvedic intervention) were withdrawn and SGPT normalized after stopping the drug. Other adverse events were mild and did not differ by intervention. Overall, 28% of patients withdrew from the study. In this 6-month controlled study of knee OA, Ayurvedic formulations (especially SGCG) significantly reduced knee pain and improved knee function and were equivalent to glucosamine and celecoxib. The unexpected SGPT rise requires further safety assessment. Clinical Drug Trial Registry-India, www.ctri.nic.in, CTRI/2008/091/000063.

  8. A community medicine clerkship on the Navajo Indian reservation.

    PubMed

    Rogers, K D; Coulehan, J L

    1984-12-01

    An elective clerkship in community medicine for medical students has been conducted for 16 years on the Navajo Indian reservation. An important part of the clerkship is a project in which most students select a health problem which they investigate using epidemiological methods of assessment and for which they seek a solution. The requisites for the projects are that real health problems are involved, scientifically sound methods are used, usable information is provided, and data collection can be completed within the clerkship tenure. Topics for the projects are selected jointly by the students and the faculty members from several general subject areas; this allows the work of individual students to be carried out as independent subprojects of larger projects, and this, in turn, produces more information about and has more impact on the problems addressed. Other clerkship objectives also are achieved through investigative projects that may involve students in planning, organization, and evaluation of health care and in public health practice.

  9. Ayurvedic management of spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia tarda, a rare hereditary disorder.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sarvesh Kumar; Rajoria, Kshipra

    Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia tarda (SEDT) is a rare genetic disease in which patient suffers from short stature, short trunk and neck with disproportionately long arms, coxa vara, skeletal features such as barrel shaped chest, kyphosis, scoliosis and early arthropathy. Only limited medical and surgical management is available in modern medicine. A 15 years old male suffering from SEDT and diagnosed as Vata vyadhi was treated with Panchakarma therapy and selected Ayurvedic oral medicines. Ayurvedic treatment was directed to ameliorate the orthopaedic clinical conditions in this case. Panchakarma procedures such as Shalishastika pinda svedana for a month and Mustadi yapana basti for 16 days were given along with oral Ayurvedic medicines. Same Panchakarma procedures were repeated after an interval of 2 months. A combination of Ayurvedic oral medicines such as Trayodashanga guggulu-500 mg twice a day, Dashmool kvatha (decoction of roots of 10 herbs) 40 ml twice a day, Eranda paka 10 g twice a day, Shiva gutika-500 mg twice a day and Dashmoolarista-20 ml (with equal water) twice a day were prescribed. Eight scales based Medical outcome study (MOS) - 36 item short form - health surveys was assessed for outcome which shows good improvement. Kyphosis, scoliosis and pain were moderately reduced. Clinical experience of this case indicates that Ayurvedic herbs along with Panchakarma can play a major role in the management of hereditary disorder SEDT. Copyright © 2016 Transdisciplinary University, Bangalore and World Ayurveda Foundation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. AN INDEX OF THE AVAILABLE MEDICINAL PLANTS, USED IN INDIAN SYSTEM OF MEDICINE FROM JAMMU AND KASHMIR STATE

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, T. N.; Rajasekharan, S.; Badola, D. P.; Shah, D. C.

    1986-01-01

    The medicinal plants used in Indian system of medicine and its distribution in Jammu and Kashmir has been categorized systematically here. The paper deals with 246 medicinal plants and has to off-set an index which is not there so far. Out of 246 medicinal plants 12 plants are considered to be controversial. Substitutes, Adulterants of these plants which are being used in various parts of India were also recorded separately in this study. PMID:22557549

  11. AYURVEDIC IDENTIFICATION AND CONCEPTUAL ANALYSIS OF CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Kumaraswamy, B. V.

    1994-01-01

    Modern oncology is a rapidly growing area in medicine. Cancer is a disease diagnosed on the basis of cellular changes hence objectivity takes the lead. Clinical observation, detailed examination and some feasibility studies were conducted in Ayurvedic methods to understand and identify cancer systematically. Abdominal presentation as tumour is discussed since it is one of the major area for clinical diagnosis of cancer. More than 100 cases were followed in each type at all stages to understand the natural history and clinical behaviour. After careful study, the Ayurvedic diagnosis with possible aetiologic association has been arrived at and discussed. Three main classification has been made and presented separately. Visha concept of Ayurveda has been very closely found to be associated in malignancy. PMID:22556650

  12. Indian folklore medicine in managing men's health and wellness.

    PubMed

    Lohiya, N K; Balasubramanian, K; Ansari, A S

    2016-10-01

    India is a home for a large variety of plants with remarkable medicinal and pharmacological value. Traditional medicine in the form of Ayurveda, Siddha and Unani has used many of these plants since ancient days for treating and curing various ailments of the body. When it comes to issues related to reproductive health, people still hesitate to discuss and/or accept it openly and hence look for alternate and natural remedies. The various tribal populations distributed across different parts of the country still use these plant extracts in various formulations for maintenance of good health. The medical utilities of several of these plants have been documented; however, there are many more, whose potential is yet to be explored. This review discusses the role of various plants grown in the Indian subcontinent that have been widely used in maintaining various aspects of reproductive health in men such as infertility, aphrodisiac, contraception, libido, sexually transmitted infections and reproductive tract cancers as well as in treating chronic disorders.

  13. Anti-arthritic activity of a classical Ayurvedic formulation Vatari Guggulu in rats.

    PubMed

    Patel, Madhavi G; Pundarikakshudu, Kilambi

    2016-10-01

    In India, Vatari Guggulu has been traditionally used in the Ayurvedic system of medicine to treat rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The current study was undertaken to evaluate anti-arthritic activity of alcoholic extract of Vatari Guggulu in rats. Arthritis was induced by administration of formaldehyde (2%v/v) or Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA) into the sub-plantar surface of left hind paw of the animals. The extract was administered to the rats by oral gavages in different doses. Joint swelling was measured in formaldehyde induced arthritis. Various physical, biochemical and histopathological parameters were determined in CFA induced arthritis. Vatari Guggulu extract (VGE) produced significant (P < 0.05) inhibition of joint swelling in both formaldehyde and CFA induced arthritis. The treatment also brought to normalcy the increased white blood cell (WBC) count, rheumatoid factor (RF), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), cholesterol, triglycerides and LDL with an enhancement of haemoglobin (Hb) levels and red blood cell (RBC) count. These effects were found to be dose dependent. These effects were comparable with standard drug indomethacin. Histo-pathological studies of the ankles of VGE treated animals exhibited significant improvements. VGE did not show any toxic symptoms even at a dose of 2000 mg/kg in acute toxicity studies on rats. Thus, Vatari Guggulu, a classical Ayurvedic formulation of the Indian System of Medicine, exhibited significant anti-arthritic activity in formaldehyde and CFA induced arthritis in rats. This study corroborates the claims of Ayurveda on Vatari Guggulu.

  14. Ayurvedic management in cervical spondylotic myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sarvesh Kumar; Rajoria, Kshipra

    The age related spondylotic changes may result in direct compressive and ischemic dysfunction of the spinal cord known as cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM). Symptoms often develop insidiously and are characterized by neck stiffness, unilateral or bilateral deep aching neck, arm and shoulder pain, and possibly stiffness or clumsiness while walking. The management available in current mainstream medicine is not satisfactory. Various Ayurvedic treatments have been in use for these manifestations. We present a case of CSM, which was treated with a combination of Panchakarma procedures and Ayurvedic oral drugs. The patient was considered suffering from Greevastambha (neck stiffness) and was treated with Shalishastika pinda svedana (sudation with medicated cooked bolus of rice) for one month and Mustadi yapana basti (enema with medicated milk) for 16 days along with oral Ayurvedic drugs such as Brihatavata chintamani rasa 50 mg, Ekangaveer ras-250 mg, Ardhangavatari rasa-125 mg Amrita satva (dry extract of Tinospora cordifolia Willd)-500 mg, Muktasukti pisti-500 mg, Ashwagandha churna (powder of Withania somnifera Dunal)-500 mg Dashmool kvatha ghana (solid extract of Dashmool kvatha)-500 mg, Trayodashanga guggulu-575 mg, twice a day with honey and Eranda paka-10 g twice a day with milk. Patient's condition which was assessed for symptoms of CSM and Chile's modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association (mJOA) score for cervical spondylotic myelopathy showed substantial improvement. This study shows that the cases of CSM may be successfully managed with Ayurvedic treatment.

  15. Evaluation of the influence of ayurvedic formulation (Ayushman-15) on psychopathology, heart rate variability and stress hormonal level in major depression (Vishada).

    PubMed

    Kishore, Ramakrishna K; Abhishekh, Hulegar A; Udupa, Kaviraja; Thirthalli, Jagadisha; Lavekar, Gandhidas S; Gangadhar, Bangalore N; Raju, Trichur R; Sathyaprabha, Talakad N

    2014-12-01

    Ayurveda (Indian-complimentary and alternative medicine) is still most sought after in India and has promising potential in management of Vishada [major depressive disorder (MDD)]. But, systematic research is lacking. In this study we evaluated of influence of ayurvedic treatment (Panchakarma and Ayushman-15) on psychopathology, heart rate variability (HRV) and endocrinal parameters in patients with major depression. 81 drug naive patients diagnosed as Vishada by ayurvedic physician and MDD according to DSM IV-TR were given ayurvedic Virechana module (therapeutic purgation) and were randomized into two groups. Patients in group A (n=41) received Ayushman-15A while group B (n=40) received Ayushman-15B for two months and Shirodhara (forehead-oil pouring therapy). Patients were assessed with Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS), Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS), Heart Rate Variability (HRV). Cortisol and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) were estimated at baseline and after ayurvedic therapy. HRV and endocrinal parameters were compared with age and gender matched healthy volunteers. HRV parameters showed significant sympathetic dominance in patients compared to healthy volunteers. Two months of ayurvedic treatment significantly decreased psychopathology, showed increase in vagal tone, decrease in sympathetic tone and reduced cortisol levels. However, there was no significant difference between groups receiving Ayushman A and B. This study provides evidence for antidepressant, cardiac (HRV) and beneficial neuroendocrine modulatory influence of Ayurveda therapy in patients of Vishada (MDD). Further studies are needed to confirm these findings. Greater insight into the neurobiology behind this therapy might provide valuable information about newer drug target. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Engaging private providers and Ayurvedic practitioners in Bilaspur, India: did it increase TB case detection?

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, R R; Oeltmann, J E; Ravichandra, C; Chadda, V K; Das, M; Kumar, A M V

    2016-06-21

    To find 'missing' tuberculosis (TB) cases, in November 2014 we trained private practitioners (PPs) and Ayurvedic practitioners (APs; Indian system of medicine) in Bilaspur district, India, to identify patients with presumptive TB and refer them to sputum microscopy centres. To reinforce this training, we sent weekly text message reminders during January-March 2015. All 50 APs and 23 of 29 PPs participated. The number of patients with presumptive TB referred by the PPs and APs increased from 38 (January-March 2014) to 104 (January-March 2015), and the number of smear-positive TB patients diagnosed increased from 5 to 16, a 220% increase. While the intervention increased the number of referrals, it did not impact case detection at district level, due to the short duration of the intervention and the non-dominant private sector.

  17. Insights into Ayurvedic biology-sA conversation with Professor M.S. Valiathan.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Kalpana

    2012-10-01

    Professor Marthanda Varma Sankaran Valiathan, Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons, ex President of the Indian National Science Academy, is a reputed cardiac surgeon who made original contributions to cardiology and the development of medical technology. He is widely recognized for his role in pioneering the joint culture of medicine and technology, and laying the foundations for the medical devices industry in India. He has pioneered several scientific studies in the field of Ayurveda and authored several books on the subject. In this free and frank interview he discusses three important phases in his life, and his passion for the convergence of modern biology and Ayurveda as a new discipline of science "Ayurvedic Biology".

  18. Linking Ayurveda and Western medicine by integrative analysis.

    PubMed

    Fauzi, Fazlin Mohd; Koutsoukas, Alexios; Lowe, Robert; Joshi, Kalpana; Fan, Tai-Ping; Glen, Robert C; Bender, Andreas

    2013-04-01

    In this article, we discuss our recent work in elucidating the mode-of-action of compounds used in traditional medicine including Ayurvedic medicine. Using computational ('in silico') approach, we predict potential targets for Ayurvedic anti-cancer compounds, obtained from the Indian Plant Anticancer Database given its chemical structure. In our analysis, we observed that: (i) the targets predicted can be connected to cancer pathogenesis i.e. steroid-5-alpha reductase 1 and 2 and estrogen receptor-β, and (ii) predominantly hormone-dependent cancer targets were predicted for the anti-cancer compounds. Through the use of our in silico target prediction, we conclude that understanding how traditional medicine such as Ayurveda work through linking with the 'western' understanding of chemistry and protein targets can be a fruitful avenue in addition to bridging the gap between the two different schools of thinking. Given that compounds used in Ayurveda have been tested and used for thousands of years (although not in the same approach as Western medicine), they can potentially be developed into potential new drugs. Hence, to further advance the case of Ayurvedic medicine, we put forward some suggestions namely: (a) employing and integrating novel analytical methods given the advancements of 'omics' and (b) sharing experimental data and clinical results on studies done on Ayurvedic compounds in an easy and accessible way.

  19. Ayurvedic approach for management of ankylosing spondylitis: A case report.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sarvesh Kumar; Rajoria, Kshipra

    2016-03-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a rheumatic disease with various skeletal and extra skeletal manifestations. No satisfactory treatment is available in modern medicine for this disorder. Various Panchakarma procedures and Ayurvedic drugs have been proved useful for these manifestations. We present a case of AS, which was treated for two months with a combination of Panchakarma procedures and Ayurvedic drugs. Ayurvedic treatments, in this case, were directed toward alleviating symptoms and to reduce severe disability. The patient was considered suffering from Asthimajja gata vata (∼Vata disorder involving bone and bone marrow) and was treated with Shalishastika Pinda Svedana (sudation with medicated cooked bolus of rice) for one month and Mustadi Yapana Basti (enema with medicated milk) with Anuvasana (enema with Asvagandha oil) in 30 days schedule along with oral Ayurvedic drugs for two months. Pratimarsha nasya (nasal drops) with Anu Taila (oil) for one month was given after completion of Basti procedure. Patient's condition was assessed for symptoms of Asthimajja gata vata and core sets of Assessment of Spondylo Arthritis International Society showed substantial improvement. This study shows the cases of AS may be successfully managed with Ayurvedic treatment. Copyright © 2016 Transdisciplinary University, Bangalore and World Ayurveda Foundation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Identification of novel anti-inflammatory agents from Ayurvedic medicine for prevention of chronic diseases: "reverse pharmacology" and "bedside to bench" approach.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Bharat B; Prasad, Sahdeo; Reuter, Simone; Kannappan, Ramaswamy; Yadev, Vivek R; Park, Byoungduck; Kim, Ji Hye; Gupta, Subash C; Phromnoi, Kanokkarn; Sundaram, Chitra; Prasad, Seema; Chaturvedi, Madan M; Sung, Bokyung

    2011-10-01

    Inflammation, although first characterized by Cornelius Celsus, a physician in first Century Rome, it was Rudolf Virchow, a German physician in nineteenth century who suggested a link between inflammation and cancer, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, pulmonary diseases, neurological diseases and other chronic diseases. Extensive research within last three decades has confirmed these observations and identified the molecular basis for most chronic diseases and for the associated inflammation. The transcription factor, Nuclear Factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) that controls over 500 different gene products, has emerged as major mediator of inflammation. Thus agents that can inhibit NF-kappaB and diminish chronic inflammation have potential to prevent or delay the onset of the chronic diseases and further even treat them. In an attempt to identify novel anti-inflammatory agents which are safe and effective, in contrast to high throughput screen, we have turned to "reverse pharmacology" or "bed to benchside" approach. We found that Ayurveda, a science of long life, almost 6,000 years old, can serve as a "goldmine" for novel anti-inflammatory agents used for centuries to treat chronic diseases. The current review is an attempt to provide description of various Ayurvedic plants currently used for treatment, their active chemical components, and the inflammatory pathways that they inhibit.

  1. Comparative evaluation of hypoglycaemic activity of some Indian medicinal plants in alloxan diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Kar, Ajit; Choudhary, B K; Bandyopadhyay, N G

    2003-01-01

    In our experiments 30 hypoglycaemic medicinal plants (known and less known) have been selected for thorough studies from indigenous folk medicines, Ayurvedic, Unani and Siddha systems of medicines. In all the experiments with different herbal samples (vacuum dried 95% ethanolic extracts), definite blood glucose lowering effect within 2 weeks have been confirmed in alloxan diabetic albino rats. Blood glucose values are brought down close to normal fasting level using herbal samples at a dose of 250 mg/kg once, twice or thrice daily, as needed. While evaluating comparative hypoglycaemic activity of the experimental herbal samples, significant blood glucose lowering activities are observed in decreasing order in the following 24 samples-Coccinia indica, Tragia involucrata, G. sylvestre, Pterocarpus marsupium, T. foenum-graecum, Moringa oleifera, Eugenia jambolana, Tinospora cordifolia, Swertia chirayita, Momordica charantia, Ficus glomerata, Ficus benghalensis, Vinca rosea, Premna integrifolia, Mucuna prurita, Terminalia bellirica, Sesbenia aegyptiaca, Azadirachta indica, Dendrocalamus hamiltonii, Zingiber officinale, Aegle marmelos, Cinnamomum tamala, Trichosanthes cucumerina and Ocimum sanctum. Present studies besides confirming hypoglycaemic activities of the experimental herbal samples, help identify more potent indigenous hypoglycaemic herbs (in crude ethanolic extract) from the comparative study of the reported experimental results. Copyright 2002 Published by Elsevier Science Ireland Ltd.

  2. Ayurvedic concepts related to psychotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Behere, Prakash B.; Das, Anweshak; Yadav, Richa; Behere, Aniruddh P.

    2013-01-01

    The perfect balance of mind, body and soul is considered as complete health in Ayurveda. Ayurveda has its own identity as most ancient and traditional System of Medicine in India. Even Ayurveda emphasizes its treatment modalities into three parts viz. Satwawajay Chikitsa, Yuktivyapashray and Daivyapashray Chikitsa. Sattvavajaya therapy mentioned in Charakasamhita and it used as new concept of psychotherapy in Ayurveda. The effectiveness of “traditional mental health promoting practices” was identified as health regimens (swasthvrtt), correct behavior (sadvrtt), and yoga. Sattvavajaya as psychotherapy, is the mental restraint, or a “mind control” as referred by Caraka, is achieved through “spiritual knowledge, philosophy, fortitude, remembrance and concentration. Ayurvedic psychotherapy would play a dual role: First, as a revival of authentic medical culture, the exercise of a practice with an assumed primordial dimension, and second as a discovery of authentic subjectivity, the revelation of a self with an assumed interior depth. When we integrate the contemporary art of psychotherapy with the ancient science of Ayurveda, it becomes a powerful combination that is called Psycho Veda. The integration of Psycho and Veda is motivated by the complete integration of the immense but fairly contemporary view of the mind, emotions and psyche and how this performs in our lives. Integrating Psychotherapy and Vedic principles teaches us how to rediscover critical knowledge and awareness of the natural forces and rhythms that compliment and strengthen our human experience, through the understanding of the psyche and what our inner experiences are and also involving practical daily activities with thorough attention to our total environment to bring about radical changes in our mental outlook and in physical health. PMID:23858273

  3. Ayurvedic concepts related to psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Behere, Prakash B; Das, Anweshak; Yadav, Richa; Behere, Aniruddh P

    2013-01-01

    The perfect balance of mind, body and soul is considered as complete health in Ayurveda. Ayurveda has its own identity as most ancient and traditional System of Medicine in India. Even Ayurveda emphasizes its treatment modalities into three parts viz. Satwawajay Chikitsa, Yuktivyapashray and Daivyapashray Chikitsa. Sattvavajaya therapy mentioned in Charakasamhita and it used as new concept of psychotherapy in Ayurveda. The effectiveness of "traditional mental health promoting practices" was identified as health regimens (swasthvrtt), correct behavior (sadvrtt), and yoga. Sattvavajaya as psychotherapy, is the mental restraint, or a "mind control" as referred by Caraka, is achieved through "spiritual knowledge, philosophy, fortitude, remembrance and concentration. Ayurvedic psychotherapy would play a dual role: First, as a revival of authentic medical culture, the exercise of a practice with an assumed primordial dimension, and second as a discovery of authentic subjectivity, the revelation of a self with an assumed interior depth. When we integrate the contemporary art of psychotherapy with the ancient science of Ayurveda, it becomes a powerful combination that is called Psycho Veda. The integration of Psycho and Veda is motivated by the complete integration of the immense but fairly contemporary view of the mind, emotions and psyche and how this performs in our lives. Integrating Psychotherapy and Vedic principles teaches us how to rediscover critical knowledge and awareness of the natural forces and rhythms that compliment and strengthen our human experience, through the understanding of the psyche and what our inner experiences are and also involving practical daily activities with thorough attention to our total environment to bring about radical changes in our mental outlook and in physical health.

  4. Bhasmas: unique ayurvedic metallic-herbal preparations, chemical characterization.

    PubMed

    Kumar, A; Nair, A G C; Reddy, A V R; Garg, A N

    2006-03-01

    Bhasmas are unique Ayurvedic metallic preparations with herbal juices/fruits, known in the Indian subcontinent since the seventh century BC and widely recommended for treatment of a variety of chronic ailments. Twenty bhasmas based on calcium, iron, zinc, mercury, silver, potassium, arsenic, copper, tin, and gemstones were analyzed for up to 18 elements by instrumental neutron activation analysis, including their C, H, N, and S contents. In addition to the major constituent element found at % level, several other essential elements such as Na, K, Ca, Mg, V, Mn, Fe, Cu, and Zn have also been found in microg/g amounts and ultratrace (ng/g) amounts of Au and Co. These seem to remain chelated with organic ligands derived from medicinal herbs. The bhasmas are biologically produced nanoparticles and are taken along with milk, butter, honey, or ghee (a preparation from milk); thus, this makes these elements easily assimilable, eliminating their harmful effects and enhancing their biocompatibility. Siddha Makaradhwaja, a mercury preparation is found to be stoichiometrically HgS without any traces of any other element. Similarly, Swet Parpati is stoichiometrically KNO3 but is found to have Mn, Cu, Zn, Na, P, and Cl as well. An attempt has been made to correlate the metallic contents with their medicinal importance. Na and K, the two electrolytic elements, seem to be well correlated, although K/Na varies in a wide range from 0.06 to 95, with specifically low values for Ca-, Fe-, and Zn-based bhasmas. K/P also varies in a wide range from 0.23 to 12, although for most bhasmas (n = 12), it is 2.3 +/- 1.2. Further, Fe/Mn is linearly correlated (r = 0.96) with Fe in nine noniron bhasmas.

  5. Natosi: Strong Medicine. Indian Culture Series: Stories of the Blackfeet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roop, Peter

    Part of a series of stories about the Blackfeet Indians, the illustrated story details the capture of the first horses by the Blackfeet. In the story, young Running Crane is allowed to join a party of warriors who raid a Crow camp for horses. Running Crane uses gentleness to capture a black horse but is separated from the raiding party and must…

  6. Application of diet-derived taste active components for clinical nutrition: perspectives from ancient Ayurvedic medical science, space medicine, and modern clinical nutrition.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Anil D; Sundaresan, Alamelu; Rashid, Muhammad J; Yamamoto, Shigeru; Karkow, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    The principal objective of this paper is to demonstrate the role of taste and flavor in health from the ancient science of Ayurveda to modern medicine; specifically their mechanisms and roles in space medicine and their clinical relevance in modern heath care. It also describes the brief history of the use of the monosodium glutamate or flavor enhancers ("Umami substance") that improve the quality of food intake by stimulating chemosensory perception. In addition, the dietary nucleotides are known to be the components of "Umami substance" and the benefit of their use has been proposed in various types of patients with cancer, radiation therapy, organ transplantation, and for application in space medicine.

  7. Hepatoprotective Ayurvedic plants - a review.

    PubMed

    Valvi, Anupama R; Mouriya, Neelam; Athawale, Rajani B; Bhatt, Narendra S

    2016-09-01

    The liver plays vital functions in the maintenance and performance of the body. Most of the metabolic and physiological processes of our body as well as the detoxification of various drugs and xenobiotic chemicals occur in the liver. During this detoxification process, the reactive chemical intermediates damage the liver causing hepatotoxicity. Therefore, the maintenance of a healthy liver is vital to overall health. Unfortunately, the liver is often abused by environmental toxins, poor eating habits, alcohol, and prescription and over-the-counter drug use, which lead to liver diseases like hepatitis, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, alcoholic liver disease, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The available synthetic drugs to treat liver disorders in this condition also cause further damage to the liver on long-term use. Hence, Ayurvedic plants have become increasingly popular and their use is widespread. Various Ayurvedic formulations are available in market to treat liver disease. Also there is increase in the export of Ayurvedic plants.

  8. THEORETICAL FOUNDATIONS OF ANCIENT INDIAN MEDICINE PART II: (With special reference to Caraka Samhita)

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, Anuradha

    1988-01-01

    In the second part of the study the author highlights the merits and demerits of the ancient Indian medicine and establishes that the system is more than a physical medicine because of (1) its monumental theoretical generalization reflect a serious preoccupation with life as a process involved in a ceaseless change and; (2) its underlying ideas have permeated both religion and philosophy and created potentials for the later natural sciences. PMID:22557602

  9. Indian Medicinal Mushrooms as a Source of Antioxidant and Antitumor Agents

    PubMed Central

    A. Ajith, Thekkuttuparambil; K. Janardhanan, Kainoor

    2007-01-01

    Medicinal mushrooms occurring in South India namely Ganoderma lucidum, Phellinus rimosus, Pleurotus florida and Pleurotus pulmonaris possessed profound antioxidant and antitumor activities. This indicated that these mushrooms would be valuable sources of antioxidant and antitumor compounds. Investigations also revealed that they had significant antimutagenic and anticarcinogenic activities. Thus, Indian medicinal mushrooms are potential sources of antioxidant and anticancer compounds. However, intensive and extensive investigations are needed to exploit their valuable therapeutic use. PMID:18398492

  10. Health, illness, and immigration. East Indians in the United States.

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishna, J; Weiss, M G

    1992-01-01

    East Indian immigrants to the United States represent the diversity in religion, language, and culture that exists in India, so it is difficult to make unequivocal statements about their health beliefs and behaviors. Despite the diversity, an understanding of Ayurvedic humoral concepts of health and illness provides a key to some pervasive and persistent ideas and practices. India has a pluralistic medical system in which Western medicine, which is increasingly popular for some ailments, is one option among many. Even those who are familiar with the "Western" medical system in India may find American medicine alien. PMID:1413767

  11. AYURVEDIC CONCEPT OF HRIDROGA ITS PRESENT RELEVANCE

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, A.R.V.; Singh, R.H.

    1993-01-01

    Hridroga is among those diseases mentioned in Ayurveda where in the description is quite brief and the Ayurvedic view point needs clarification. In view of the increasing evidence of cardiac disorders in the present times this aspect assumes added importance. Among the five types of Hridroga described, in Vatika variety Ayurveda seems to have conceived the disease entity that comes under Ischemic Heart Disease. None of the other Cardiac afflictions seem to have been described under Hridroga. It seems that a few of the presenting features based on this Acute/important/predominant nature have been described Vatika Sotha and Swasa. It looks as though pain dominating heart disease is conceived as Hridroga. When oedema is found to be the main presenting feature it is kept under Vatika sotha and when Dysponea is the main symptom it is described as Swasa. The present article undertakes to discuss this point in detail, based on Ayurvedic concepts as well as current knowledge on medicine. PMID:22556620

  12. Anticancer activity of an Indian medicinal plant, Alstonia scholaris, on skin carcinogenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Jahan, Swafiya; Chaudhary, Ranu; Goyal, Pradeep Kumar

    2009-09-01

    Alstonia scholaris, commonly known as sapthaparna, has been used for centuries in Ayurvedic medicine for treatment of various disorders. The objective of this study was to investigate the possible chemopreventive and anti-oxidative properties of this medicinal plant on two-stage process of skin carcinogenesis induced by a single application of 7, 12-dimethyabenz(a)anthrecene (100 lg/100 ll acetone), and two weeks later, promoted by repeated application of croton oil (1% in acetone/thrice a week) till the end of the experiment (16 weeks) in Swiss albino mice.The tumor incidence, tumor yield, tumor burden and cumulative number of papillomas were found to be higher in the carcinogen treated control (without ASE treatment) as compared to experimental animals (ASE treated). Furthermore, a significant increase in reduced glutathione, superoxide dismutase and catalase but decrease in lipid peroxidation was measured in ASE administered experimental groups than the carcinogen treated control. The present study demonstrates the chemopreventive potential of Alstonia scholaris bark extract in DMBA-induced skin tumorigenesis in Swiss albino mice.

  13. An overview of Indian novel traditional medicinal plants with anti-diabetic potentials.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rahul; Bajpai, Kumar Gaurav; Johri, Samta; Saxena, A M

    2007-10-27

    Diabetes mellitus is a global metabolic epidemic affecting essential biochemical activities in almost every age group. Indian literatures like Ayurveda have already mentioned herbal remediation for a number of human ailments. Among Indian traditional medicinal plants several potential anti-diabetic plants and herbs are being used as part of our diet since prehistoric time. India has a long list of native medicinal plants with confirmed blood sugar lowering property. Some of these have proved remarkable for cure of diabetes and its complications. The current paper is aimed at providing a review on clinical and experimental studies carried out on the most effective and commonly used hypoglycemic plants and herbs species from traditional Indian flora. This write-up includes hypoglycemic and anti-hyperglycemic activities of plants, active hypoglycemic compounds and constituents along with their available toxicity status.

  14. InDiaMed: A Comprehensive Database of Indian Medicinal plants for Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Tota, Kumudini; Rayabarapu, Nihar; Moosa, Sowmya; Talla, Venu; Bhyravbhatla, Balaji; Rao, Srinivasa

    2013-01-01

    According to International Diabetes Federation (IDF), India has 62.4 million people with diabetes and by 2030 it is predicted that the number will rise to 100 million. Studies claim that there are around 410 experimentally proven Indian medicinal plants which have anti-diabetic activity, of which the mechanism of action of 109 plants has been elucidated or reported. So, the need of the hour is to explore the claims of Indian medicinal flora and open up the facets of many Indian plants which are being examined for their beneficial role in diabetes. So, we created a database (InDiaMed) of Indian medicinal plants that captures their role in anti-diabetic activity. InDiaMed's features include chemical, pharmacological, biochemical and geographical information of the medicinal plant, scientifically relevant information of the plant, and the coherent research done on it in the field of diabetes. The database also includes the list of poly-herbal formulations which are used for treatment of diabetes in India. Availability http://www.indiamed.info PMID:23750084

  15. Ayurveda in critical care: Illustrating Ayurvedic intervention in a case of hepatic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Rastogi, Sanjeev; Srivastav, P. S.

    2011-01-01

    Ayurvedic interventions have largely been considered helpful in chronic debilitating conditions where active management of a clinical condition is not required. It is for this notion; Ayurvedic therapies have never been approached in any critical care condition requiring an active management. A perception that herbo-metallic components of various Ayurvedic drugs may actually harm the patients who are in compromised vital status has further added to this apprehension against use of such medicines in critical care. Contrary to the conventional belief, we observed a case of grade three hepatic encephalopathy with severely compromised liver function that was successfully treated with Ayurvedic therapy containing many heavy metal containing compounds. The liver function got improved in this case following the Ayurvedic intervention. The symptomatic improvements in this case were also identifiable through biochemical tests showing the functional status of liver. This case therefore is worthy of taking a note for possible inclusion of Ayurvedic interventions in critical care where Ayurvedic therapies are discarded without being given a chance of getting evaluated. PMID:22529648

  16. Ayurveda in critical care: Illustrating Ayurvedic intervention in a case of hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Sanjeev; Srivastav, P S

    2011-07-01

    Ayurvedic interventions have largely been considered helpful in chronic debilitating conditions where active management of a clinical condition is not required. It is for this notion; Ayurvedic therapies have never been approached in any critical care condition requiring an active management. A perception that herbo-metallic components of various Ayurvedic drugs may actually harm the patients who are in compromised vital status has further added to this apprehension against use of such medicines in critical care. Contrary to the conventional belief, we observed a case of grade three hepatic encephalopathy with severely compromised liver function that was successfully treated with Ayurvedic therapy containing many heavy metal containing compounds. The liver function got improved in this case following the Ayurvedic intervention. The symptomatic improvements in this case were also identifiable through biochemical tests showing the functional status of liver. This case therefore is worthy of taking a note for possible inclusion of Ayurvedic interventions in critical care where Ayurvedic therapies are discarded without being given a chance of getting evaluated.

  17. Insights on personalized medicine from Ayurveda.

    PubMed

    Sumantran, Venil N; Tillu, Girish

    2013-04-01

    The "omics" era of research has provided vital information on the genetic and biochemical diversity of individuals. This has lead to the emergence of "personalized medicine," wherein one aims to design specific drugs for individual patients or subtypes of patients. Indeed, the ongoing patent wars on this matter, suggest that personalized medicine represents a major goal for today's pharmaceutical industries. Although the concept of personalized medicine is new to modern medicine, it is a well-established concept in Ayurveda, the traditional system of Indian medicine that is still being practiced. Therefore, this article discusses topics that are crucial for the advancement of modern personalized medicine. These topics include disease susceptibility, disease subtypes, and Ayurvedic therapeutics. First, we explain how Ayurveda, Traditional Chinese Medicine, and Traditional Korean medicine or Sasang Constitutional medicine; conceptualize disease susceptibility and disease subtypes. Next, we focus on conceptual similarities between molecular medicine and Ayurvedic concepts of disease susceptibility and disease subtypes. For each topic, we explain the relevant experimental evidence reported in the literature. We also propose new hypotheses and suggest experimental approaches for their testing and validation.

  18. Ayurvedic literature in Urdu.

    PubMed

    Husain, S A; Bhatnagar, V K; Ali, M

    1998-07-01

    Urdu is a distinct literary language began to develop in India during Mughal empire. Lots of people read, write and speak, this language in Indian subcontinent. This brief article will shed light on the seven rare books in Urdu compiled and published in the period from 19th century to the first half of the current century. Some books may not have high value but the struggle of the scholars, is appreciable.

  19. Anti-osteoporotic constituents from Indian medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manmeet; Rawat, Preeti; Dixit, Preeti; Mishra, Devendra; Gautam, Abnish K; Pandey, Rashmi; Singh, Divya; Chattopadhyay, Naibedya; Maurya, Rakesh

    2010-11-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the in vitro osteogenic activities of selected medicinal plants used traditionally in India. The compounds isolated from three plants viz. Allophylus serratus, Cissus quadrangularis and Vitex negundo were evaluated for their in vitro osteogenic activities. Primary cultures of osteoblasts were used to determine the effects of these components on osteoblast functions. Five of the fourteen compounds isolated led to increase in osteoblast differentiation and mineralization. These findings lend support to the use of Allophylus serratus, Cissus quadrangularis and Vitex negundo in traditional medicine. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. Ayurpharmacoepidemiology en Route to Safeguarding Safety and Efficacy of Ayurvedic Drugs in Global Outlook.

    PubMed

    Debnath, Parikshit; Banerjee, Subhadip; Adhikari, Anjan; Debnath, Pratip K

    2015-12-30

    Ayurpharmacoepidemiology is a new field developed by synergy of the fields of clinical pharmacology, epidemiology, and ayurveda. It will use the effects of ayurvedic medicinal products on large populations to describe and analyze the practices, evaluate the safety and efficacy, and carry out medicoeconomic evaluations. Good pharmacoepidemiology practices in ayurveda is projected to assist with issues of ayurpharmacoepidemiologic research. The embraced good pharmacoepidemiology practices guideline in this viewpoint will be able to provide valuable evidence about the health effects of ayurvedic herbs/drugs and consider different fields like pharmacovigilance, pharmacoeconomics, and drug discovery with ayurvedic reverse pharmacology approach, also pass out significant data for further basic sciences study in ayurveda biology, ayurgenomics, ayurnutrigenomics, and systems biology. Several unanswered questions about ayurvedic drug use and informed interventions or policies that can be addressed by informatics database, which will eventually demonstrate the credibility and rationality of ayurceuticals in the future. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. Ayurvedic management of adverse drug reactions with Shvitrahara Varti

    PubMed Central

    Jadav, Hasmukh R.; Ghetiya, Hitesh; Prashanth, B.; Galib; Patgiri, B. J.; Prajapati, P. K.

    2013-01-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADR) are an expression that describes harm associated with the use of medications at therapeutic dose. Traditional medicines also can develop ADRs due to their improper use. Shvitrahara Varti, one of such medicines holds Bakuchi as a component and is to be used judiciously. Furanocoumarins like psoralen present in Bakuchi makes skin hypersensitive and causes phytophotodermatitis in few cases. Hence, one should be careful while using medicines that contain Bakuchi. One such case is observed, where extensive reactions with application of Shvitrahara Varti were noticed and managed with Ayurvedic treatment. PMID:24250129

  2. PIXE-PIGE analysis of some Indian medicinal plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomita Devi, K.; Nandakumar Sarma, H.

    2010-06-01

    The quantitative estimation of various trace element concentrations in medicinal plants is necessary for determining their effectiveness in treating various diseases and for understanding their pharmacological action. Elemental concentrations of some selected medicinal plants of north east India was measured by proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and proton induced γ-ray emission (PIGE) techniques. PIXE measurements were carried out using 2.4 MeV collimated protons from the 3 MV tandetron accelerator of NCCCM, Hyderabad (India) while the PIGE measurements were carried out using 3 MeV protons from the same accelerator in the same laboratory. Accuracy and precision of the techniques were assured by analyzing certified reference materials in the same experimental conditions. Various elements of biological importance in man's metabolism were found to be present in varying concentrations in the studied medicinal plants and no toxic heavy metals were detected. The concentration of the various elements in the medicinal plants and their role in treating various diseases are discussed.

  3. MASS MULTIPLICATION OF THE INDIAN MEDICINAL PLANT Tylophora Indica (Burm.f.) Merr

    PubMed Central

    Dhandapani, R.; Balu, S.

    2002-01-01

    Tylophora indica (Burm.f) Merr. (ASCLEPIDACEAE) is an important Indian medicinal plant. It is called “ASTHMA KODI” OR “NANJARUPPAN” IN Tamil in the Siddha system of medicine. Tamil medical literature reveal that it is an ideal plant medicine for respiratory problems and is also a cardiac tonic. For medicinal purposes it is collected only from the wild. It has not yet been brought under cultivation. Its taxonomy, morphology, ecology and medicinal uses were studied. Since, tissue-culture is a costly technology and requiring a high-tech laboratory a low-cost mass- multiplication technique has been invented through water-culture experiments, in order to make its saplings available to the interested herbal farmers in a larger scale. The results are reported in this paper, which will be of immense help and use to the herbal farmers. PMID:22557081

  4. Physicochemical characterization of an Iron based Indian traditional medicine: Mandura Bhasma

    PubMed Central

    Mulik, Sachin B.; Jha, C. B.

    2011-01-01

    Ayurveda is a unique system of medicine which uses metals and minerals in the form of bhasma (fine powder obtained through calcinations). Mandura is one of such mineral having various therapeutic uses. An effort has been made in the present study to characterize raw and processed Mandura using sophisticated analytical tools as a step forward to standardization. Mandura bhasma was prepared following references of Ayurvedic classics. To assure the quality of the prepared bhasma, Rasa Shastra quality control tests like rekhapurnatvam (particles enter into furrows of human hand), varitara (floating of product particles on water), irreversible etc., were used. Bhasma fulfilling these tests was analyzed using X-ray Diffraction (XRD) analysis. This revealed that raw Mandura contained Fe2Si04, and Mandura bhasma contained Fe2O3 and SiO2. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) studies showed that the grains in Mandura bhasma were uniformly arranged in agglomerates of sizes 200-300 nm as compared to the raw Mandura, which showed a scattered arrangement of grains of sizes 10-2 microns. It may be concluded that this conversion of raw Mandura, a complex compound, into a mixture of simple compounds having nano-sized particles is due to the particular process of calcination employed. PMID:23284206

  5. Physicochemical characterization of an Iron based Indian traditional medicine: Mandura Bhasma.

    PubMed

    Mulik, Sachin B; Jha, C B

    2011-10-01

    Ayurveda is a unique system of medicine which uses metals and minerals in the form of bhasma (fine powder obtained through calcinations). Mandura is one of such mineral having various therapeutic uses. An effort has been made in the present study to characterize raw and processed Mandura using sophisticated analytical tools as a step forward to standardization. Mandura bhasma was prepared following references of Ayurvedic classics. To assure the quality of the prepared bhasma, Rasa Shastra quality control tests like rekhapurnatvam (particles enter into furrows of human hand), varitara (floating of product particles on water), irreversible etc., were used. Bhasma fulfilling these tests was analyzed using X-ray Diffraction (XRD) analysis. This revealed that raw Mandura contained Fe(2)Si0(4), and Mandura bhasma contained Fe(2)O(3) and SiO(2). Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) studies showed that the grains in Mandura bhasma were uniformly arranged in agglomerates of sizes 200-300 nm as compared to the raw Mandura, which showed a scattered arrangement of grains of sizes 10-2 microns. It may be concluded that this conversion of raw Mandura, a complex compound, into a mixture of simple compounds having nano-sized particles is due to the particular process of calcination employed.

  6. FURTHER NOMENCLATURAL CHANGES IN INDIAN HOMOEOPATHIC MEDICINAL PLANTS

    PubMed Central

    Baburaj, D. Suresh; Nain, S.S

    1992-01-01

    Nilgiri District, Tamil Nadu is one of the most botanised areas of Southern India. In spite of it a number of wild plants had been missed by earlier collectors. Moreover, many exotics and ornamentals having importance in alternative systems of medicine have not been collected and preserved. The present paper lists 34 species of plants used in homeopathy belonging to 31 genera under 23 families. PMID:22556573

  7. MANTRA AND YANTRA IN INDIAN MEDICINE AND ALCHEMY

    PubMed Central

    Rosu, Arion

    1988-01-01

    This paper was presented at the International Workshop on mantras and ritual diagrams in Hinduism, held in Paris, 21-22 June1984. The complete text in French, which appeared in the Journal asiatique 1986, p.203, is based upon an analysis of Ayurvedc literature from ancient times down to the present and of numerous Sanskrit sources concerning he specialized sciences: alchemy and latrochemisry, veterinary medicine as well as agricultural and horticulture techniques. PMID:22557624

  8. MACROPROPAGATION OF THE INDIAN MEDICINAL PLANT Premna tomentosa Willd.

    PubMed

    Anbazhakan, S; Balu, S

    2004-01-01

    Premna tomentosa Willd is a moderate sized deciduous tree of apparently more economic and medicinal values. It is not commonly seen to be used by the medicinemen of Tamil Nadu now-a-days. The plant has been located in the plains and hills of Tamil Nadu, with the help of its varied vernacular names. It is in excessive biotic disturbance. It has been found to be in reproductive isolation, Hence, macropropagation of this plant has been contemplated and tried successfully for the first time. The results are reported.

  9. MACROPROPAGATION OF THE INDIAN MEDICINAL PLANT Premna tomentosa Willd

    PubMed Central

    Anbazhakan, S.; Balu, S.

    2004-01-01

    Premna tomentosa Willd is a moderate sized deciduous tree of apparently more economic and medicinal values. It is not commonly seen to be used by the medicinemen of Tamil Nadu now-a–days. The plant has been located in the plains and hills of Tamil Nadu, with the help of its varied vernacular names. It is in excessive biotic disturbance. It has been found to be in reproductive isolation, Hence, macropropagation of this plant has been contemplated and tried successfully for the first time. The results are reported. PMID:22557130

  10. THE AYURVEDIC HERITAGE OF KERALA

    PubMed Central

    Variar, P. R.

    1985-01-01

    Ayurveda has a long history of being enriched by different types of contributions from different stages befitting their geographical, climatic and cultural situations, and based on their thinking and living patterns, especially the practical aspects. Kerala has its own great role in this prcess of enrichment. It is unique and invaluable. The historical aspects the literary contributions by Kerala to the Ayurvedic system, the traditional and special treatments of Kerala etc., are discussed in this paper. PMID:22557501

  11. Keeping the doctor in the loop: Ayurvedic pharmaceuticals in Kerala.

    PubMed

    Kudlu, Chithprabha

    2016-12-01

    Ethnographic inquiry into Ayurvedic commodification in Kerala revealed the prevalence of a distinct regional pharmaceutical market dominated by physician-manufacturers, oriented towards supplying classical medicines to Ayurvedic doctors. This stands in sharp contrast to mainstream Ayurveda that is observed to have undergone biomedicalization and pharmaceuticalization. This paper argues that Kerala's classical-medicine-centric pharmaceutical market constitutes an alternative modernity because it provided Kerala Ayurveda with a different route to modernization impervious to the biomedical regime, as well as endowing it with the institutional power to safeguard its regional identity. Although physician-entrepreneurs are its key architects, it is sustained by value regimes shaped by a unique regional medico-cultural milieu. Even when industrially produced, classical medicines remain embedded within Ayurveda's socio-technical network; unlike proprietary drugs sold as individual product-identities through non-Ayurvedic channels, they travel together as a pharmacopeia, distributed through exclusive doctor-mediated agencies. This clinic-centric distribution format is best conceptualized as an open-source business model as it made low-margin generics viable by packaging them with therapies and services. Besides ensuring better access and affordability, it provided resistance to pharmaceuticalization and intellectual property concentration. By keeping the doctor in the loop, it prevented medicines from degenerating into de-contextualized commodities; the service component of Ayurveda therein preserved went on become the unique selling point in the health-tourism market. The tourism-inspired proliferation of Brand Kerala eventually triggered a paradigm shift in mainstream Ayurveda - shifting focus from 'pharmaceuticals' to 'services' and from 'illness' to 'wellness'. Furthermore, interacting with hybrid Ayurvedas in transnational markets, Kerala Ayurveda co-produces new

  12. A scientometric analysis of Indian research output in medicine during 1999–2008

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, B. M.; Bala, Adarsh

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This study analyzes the research activities of India in medicine during 1999–2008, based on the total publication output, its growth rate, quality of papers published and rank of India in the global context. Patterns of international collaborative research output and the major partner countries of India are also discussed. This study also evaluates the research performance of different types of Indian medical colleges, hospitals, research institutes, universities and research foundations and the characteristics of published literature in Indian and foreign journals. It also analyzes the medical research output by disease and organs. Materials and Methods: The publication data on medicine has been retrieved by using SCOPUS database. Results: India holds 12th rank among the productive countries in medicine research consisting of 65,745 papers with a global publication share of 1.59% and registering a growth rate of 76.68% for the papers published during 1999–2003 to 2004–2008. Conclusion: High quality research in India is grossly inadequate and requires strategic planning, investment and resource support. There is also a need to improve the existing medical education system, which should foster research culture. PMID:22470241

  13. Integrated approaches towards drug development from Ayurveda and other Indian system of medicines.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Pulok K; Wahile, Atul

    2006-01-03

    Biodiversity of natural resources has served not only for the primary human needs but also for health care, since time immemorial. The Indian subcontinent, with the history of one of the oldest civilization, harbors many traditional health care systems. Their development was supported by the diverse biodiversity in flora and fauna due to variations in geographical landscaping. Ayurveda, whose history goes back to 5000 b.c., is one of the ancient health care systems. The Ayurveda was developed through daily life experiences with the mutual relationship between mankind and nature. The ancient text of Ayurveda reports more than 2000 plant species for their therapeutic potentials. Besides Ayurveda, other traditional and folklore systems of health care were developed in the different time periods in Indian subcontinent, where more than 7500 plant species were used. According to a WHO estimate, about 80% of the world population relies on traditional systems of medicines for primary health care, where plants form the dominant component over other natural resources. Renewed interest of developing as well as developed countries in the natural resources has opened new horizons for the exploration of natural sources with the perspectives of safety and efficacy. The development of these traditional systems of medicines with the perspectives of safety, efficacy and quality will help not only to preserve this traditional heritage but also to rationalize the use of natural products in the health care. Until recent past, the nature was considered as a compendium for templates of new chemical entities (NCEs). The plant species mentioned in the ancient texts of these Ayurveda and other Indian systems of medicines may be explored with the modern scientific approaches for better leads in the health care.

  14. Ayurvedic treatments for diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Sridharan, Kalpana; Mohan, Roshni; Ramaratnam, Sridharan; Panneerselvam, Deepak

    2013-01-01

    Background Patients with diabetes frequently use complimentary and alternative medications including Ayurvedic medications and hence it is important to determine their efficacy and safety. Objectives To assess the effects of Ayurvedic treatments for diabetes mellitus. Search methods We searched The Cochrane Library (issue 10, 2011), MEDLINE (until 31 August 2011), EMBASE (until 31 August 2011), AMED (until 14 October 2011), the database of randomised trials from South Asia (until 14 October 2011), the database of the grey literature (OpenSigle, until 14 October 2011) and databases of ongoing trials (until 14 October 2011). In addition we performed hand searches of several journals and reference lists of potentially relevant trials. Selection criteria We included randomized trials of at least two months duration of Ayurvedic interventions for diabetes mellitus. Participants of both genders, all ages and any type of diabetes were included irrespective of duration of diabetes, antidiabetic treatment, comorbidity or diabetes related complications. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently extracted data. Risk of bias of trials was evaluated as indicated in the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Intervention. Main results Results of only a limited number of studies could be combined, in view of different types of interventions and variable quality of data. We found six trials of proprietary herbal mixtures and one of whole system Ayurvedic treatment. These studies enrolled 354 participants ( 172 on treatment, 158 on controls, 24 allocation unknown). The treatment duration ranged from 3 to 6 months. All these studies included adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. With regard to our primary outcomes, significant reductions in glycosylated haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), fasting blood sugar (FBS) or both were observed with Diabecon, Inolter and Cogent DB compared to placebo or no additional treatment, while no significant hypoglycaemic response was found

  15. Ayurvedic treatments for diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Sridharan, Kalpana; Mohan, Roshni; Ramaratnam, Sridharan; Panneerselvam, Deepak

    2011-12-07

    Patients with diabetes frequently use complimentary and alternative medications including Ayurvedic medications and hence it is important to determine their efficacy and safety. To assess the effects of Ayurvedic treatments for diabetes mellitus. We searched The Cochrane Library (issue 10, 2011), MEDLINE (until 31 August 2011), EMBASE (until 31 August 2011), AMED (until 14 October 2011), the database of randomised trials from South Asia (until 14 October 2011), the database of the grey literature (OpenSigle, until 14 October 2011) and databases of ongoing trials (until 14 October 2011). In addition we performed hand searches of several journals and reference lists of potentially relevant trials. We included randomized trials of at least two months duration of Ayurvedic interventions for diabetes mellitus. Participants of both genders, all ages and any type of diabetes were included irrespective of duration of diabetes, antidiabetic treatment, comorbidity or diabetes related complications. Two authors independently extracted data. Risk of bias of trials was evaluated as indicated in the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Intervention. Results of only a limited number of studies could be combined, in view of different types of interventions and variable quality of data. We found six trials of proprietary herbal mixtures and one of whole system Ayurvedic treatment. These studies enrolled 354 participants ( 172 on treatment, 158 on controls, 24 allocation unknown). The treatment duration ranged from 3 to 6 months. All these studies included adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus.With regard to our primary outcomes, significant reductions in glycosylated haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), fasting blood sugar (FBS) or both were observed with Diabecon, Inolter and Cogent DB compared to placebo or no additional treatment, while no significant hypoglycaemic response was found with Pancreas tonic and Hyponidd treatment. The study of whole system Ayurvedic treatment did not

  16. A lifeline to treatment: the role of Indian generic manufacturers in supplying antiretroviral medicines to developing countries.

    PubMed

    Waning, Brenda; Diedrichsen, Ellen; Moon, Suerie

    2010-09-14

    Indian manufacturers of generic antiretroviral (ARV) medicines facilitated the rapid scale up of HIV/AIDS treatment in developing countries though provision of low-priced, quality-assured medicines. The legal framework in India that facilitated such production, however, is changing with implementation of the World Trade Organization Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights, and intellectual property measures being discussed in regional and bilateral free trade agreement negotiations. Reliable quantitative estimates of the Indian role in generic global ARV supply are needed to understand potential impacts of such measures on HIV/AIDS treatment in developing countries. We utilized transactional data containing 17,646 donor-funded purchases of ARV tablets made by 115 low- and middle-income countries from 2003 to 2008 to measure market share, purchase trends and prices of Indian-produced generic ARVs compared with those of non-Indian generic and brand ARVs. Indian generic manufacturers dominate the ARV market, accounting for more than 80% of annual purchase volumes. Among paediatric ARV and adult nucleoside and non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor markets, Indian-produced generics accounted for 91% and 89% of 2008 global purchase volumes, respectively. From 2003 to 2008, the number of Indian generic manufactures supplying ARVs increased from four to 10 while the number of Indian-manufactured generic products increased from 14 to 53. Ninety-six of 100 countries purchased Indian generic ARVs in 2008, including high HIV-burden sub-Saharan African countries. Indian-produced generic ARVs used in first-line regimens were consistently and considerably less expensive than non-Indian generic and innovator ARVs. Key ARVs newly recommended by the World Health Organization are three to four times more expensive than older regimens. Indian generic producers supply the majority of ARVs in developing countries. Future scale up using newly

  17. The efficacy of Ayurvedic treatment for rheumatoid arthritis: Cross-sectional experiential profile of a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Kumar P R

    2011-01-01

    Allopathic and Ayurvedic physicians collaborated on a study of traditional medicine, which was sponsored by the World Health Organization. The aim of the study was to test the efficacy and safety of Ayurvedic treatment for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This study was conducted at the Ayurvedic Trust, Coimbatore, India. In this unique study of classical Ayurvedic treatment for RA, allopathic physicians enrolled a total of 290 patients with a confirmed diagnosis of RA over a 7-year period, and once every 6 weeks evaluated Ayurvedic treatment outcomes on the basis of American Rheumatism Association criteria: grip strength, walking time, number of swollen and painful joints, joint count, functional class, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and rheumatoid factor. Ayurvedic physicians administered individualized treatment, closely adhering to principles set forth in classical Ayurvedic texts. The duration of treatment varied from 1 to 6 months. Due to limitations in computer technology in the 1970s, the data were not computerized. Therefore, data for 12 months at a time were analyzed, using repeated measures t-test. Measures of central tendency (means) and probability values were reported. Results from the patients enrolled and discharged at the end of the first year of the study (N = 33) are presented in this paper. There was statistically significant improvement in all parameters from admission to discharge. The results indicated that classical Ayurvedic treatment was effective in this first cohort of patients who completed treatment. Even patients with severe functional limitations showed significant improvement. Although there was no control group, the results are positive enough to warrant further study of classical Ayurvedic treatment for RA in controlled trials.

  18. The efficacy of Ayurvedic treatment for rheumatoid arthritis: Cross-sectional experiential profile of a longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Krishna, Kumar P. R.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Allopathic and Ayurvedic physicians collaborated on a study of traditional medicine, which was sponsored by the World Health Organization. Aims: The aim of the study was to test the efficacy and safety of Ayurvedic treatment for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Settings and Design: This study was conducted at the Ayurvedic Trust, Coimbatore, India. Materials and Methods: In this unique study of classical Ayurvedic treatment for RA, allopathic physicians enrolled a total of 290 patients with a confirmed diagnosis of RA over a 7-year period, and once every 6 weeks evaluated Ayurvedic treatment outcomes on the basis of American Rheumatism Association criteria: grip strength, walking time, number of swollen and painful joints, joint count, functional class, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and rheumatoid factor. Ayurvedic physicians administered individualized treatment, closely adhering to principles set forth in classical Ayurvedic texts. The duration of treatment varied from 1 to 6 months. Statistical Analysis Used: Due to limitations in computer technology in the 1970s, the data were not computerized. Therefore, data for 12 months at a time were analyzed, using repeated measures t-test. Measures of central tendency (means) and probability values were reported. Results from the patients enrolled and discharged at the end of the first year of the study (N = 33) are presented in this paper. Results: There was statistically significant improvement in all parameters from admission to discharge. Conclusions: The results indicated that classical Ayurvedic treatment was effective in this first cohort of patients who completed treatment. Even patients with severe functional limitations showed significant improvement. Although there was no control group, the results are positive enough to warrant further study of classical Ayurvedic treatment for RA in controlled trials. PMID:21897637

  19. Treating Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus with Traditional Chinese and Indian Medicinal Herbs

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhijun

    2013-01-01

    Type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a fast-growing epidemic affecting people globally. Furthermore, multiple complications and comorbidities are associated with T2DM. Lifestyle modifications along with pharmacotherapy and patient education are the mainstay of therapy for patients afflicted with T2DM. Western medications are frequently associated with severe adverse drug reactions and high costs of treatment. Herbal medications have long been used in the treatment and prevention of T2DM in both traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and traditional Indian medicine (TIM). This review examines in vivo, in vitro, and clinical evidence supporting the use of various herbs used in TCM and TIM. The problems, challenges, and opportunities for the incorporation of herbal frequently used in TCM and TIM into Western therapy are presented and discussed. PMID:23737828

  20. Treating type 2 diabetes mellitus with traditional chinese and Indian medicinal herbs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhijun; Wang, Jeffrey; Chan, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a fast-growing epidemic affecting people globally. Furthermore, multiple complications and comorbidities are associated with T2DM. Lifestyle modifications along with pharmacotherapy and patient education are the mainstay of therapy for patients afflicted with T2DM. Western medications are frequently associated with severe adverse drug reactions and high costs of treatment. Herbal medications have long been used in the treatment and prevention of T2DM in both traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and traditional Indian medicine (TIM). This review examines in vivo, in vitro, and clinical evidence supporting the use of various herbs used in TCM and TIM. The problems, challenges, and opportunities for the incorporation of herbal frequently used in TCM and TIM into Western therapy are presented and discussed.

  1. Supported and unsupported claims in medicinal drug advertisements in Indian medical journals.

    PubMed

    Dhanaraj, Ethiraj; Nigam, Aditi; Bagani, Sanjay; Singh, Himmat; Tiwari, Pramil

    2011-01-01

    The study assessed 292 supported and unsupported claims in 102 medicinal drug advertisements across 15 Indian medical journals published in 2009. WHO ethical criteria for medicinal drug promotion were applied. None of the advertisements satisfied all the WHO criteria. Safe prescribing information on major adverse drug reactions, contraindications and warnings was provided in only 19 advertisements. Of 292 drug claims, only 80 (27%) were supported with reference(s), of which only 7 (9%) claims were unambiguous, or well substantiated with references. 14 references quoted did not substantiate the claim and 15 constituted weak scientific evidence. Superlatives like "tested" "trusted" "guarantees success" and "matchless safety" were used without evidence to substantiate such claims. Stronger enforcement mechanisms are necessary to ensure reliable drug information in pharmaceutical advertisements.

  2. Significance of gingers (Zingiberaceae) in Indian System of Medicine - Ayurveda: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Konickal Mambetta Prabhu; Asish, Gopinathan Ramanikutty; Sabu, Mamiyil; Balachandran, Indira

    2013-01-01

    Background: Family Zingiberaceae consists of the large number of medicinal plants and is well-known for its use in ethnomedicine and play a major role in Indian System of Medicine, Ayurveda. Objective: The aim of this study is the documentation of Zingiberaceous plants used in Ayurveda, adding information to the systematics, vernacular names and chemistry with experimental data. Materials and Methods: The live plants were collected from wild and successfully conserved at Herbal Garden of Arya Vaidya Sala, Kottakkal. The experimental data of each species has been collected from the various sources. The photographs were taken and all relevant data documented. Results and Conclusion: A total of 13 species belonging to 7 genera of Zingiberaceae were documented. The work will be useful to students and researchers as it provides an easy access to Zingiberaceous plants used in Ayurveda. PMID:24991077

  3. Ancient concept of metal pharmacology based on Ayurvedic literature

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Prasanta Kumar; Das, Sanjita; Prajapati, P. K.

    2010-01-01

    Metals have had a long history in Ayurvedic system of medicine. Mercury (Parada), gold (Swarna), silver (Rajata), copper (Tamra), iron (Lauha), tin (Vanga), lead (Naga), and zinc (Yasada) are used in therapeutics in an incinerated (Bhasma) form. The pharmacological actions, therapeutic indications, adverse effects and management of adverse effects of these metals are described and emphasis has been given to the proper preparation, rational dose and duration during clinical practice in the classics of Ayurveda. Most important observation is, there are no contraindications of these Bhasmas, indicating universal applicability to all age levels with suitable adjuvant, proper dose and duration. PMID:22557360

  4. Ancient concept of metal pharmacology based on Ayurvedic literature.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Prasanta Kumar; Das, Sanjita; Prajapati, P K

    2010-04-01

    Metals have had a long history in Ayurvedic system of medicine. Mercury (Parada), gold (Swarna), silver (Rajata), copper (Tamra), iron (Lauha), tin (Vanga), lead (Naga), and zinc (Yasada) are used in therapeutics in an incinerated (Bhasma) form. The pharmacological actions, therapeutic indications, adverse effects and management of adverse effects of these metals are described and emphasis has been given to the proper preparation, rational dose and duration during clinical practice in the classics of Ayurveda. Most important observation is, there are no contraindications of these Bhasmas, indicating universal applicability to all age levels with suitable adjuvant, proper dose and duration.

  5. Use of total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) for the evaluation of heavy metal poisoning due to the improper use of a traditional ayurvedic drug.

    PubMed

    Borgese, L; Zacco, A; Bontempi, E; Pellegatta, M; Vigna, L; Patrini, L; Riboldi, L; Rubino, F M; Depero, L E

    2010-09-05

    An Indian patient referred to Clinica del Lavoro 'L.Devoto' of Milano showed clinical signs of heavy metal poisoning, possibly related to a sustained 6-month use of approx. 3 g/day of a traditional preparation (a whitish powder with a 'mineral' appearance) to treat urological problems. To confirm the causal relationship between the disease and the use of such product, metal testing was performed on the patient's hair and the ayurvedic remedy samples by total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF). For TXRF analysis 1-cm cut of the patient's hair was directly deposited onto the quartz glass sample carrier, then 10 microl of nitric acid 65% were added and dried in air. TXRF showed high versatility, rapid and simultaneous element detection, and short analysis time, thus supporting a wider use in emergency medicine and in forensic analyses. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Expression of pro-inflammatory interleukin-8 is reduced by ayurvedic decoctions.

    PubMed

    Guerrini, Alessandra; Mancini, Irene; Maietti, Silvia; Rossi, Damiano; Poli, Ferruccio; Sacchetti, Gianni; Gambari, Roberto; Borgatti, Monica

    2014-08-01

    Eleven decoctions, obtained from indian plants widely used in ayurvedic medicine, have been investigated as a possible source of molecules exhibiting biological activity on the interaction between DNA and NF-kB, a transcription factor involved in the expression of proinflammatory genes. Cystic fibrosis (CF) cell line stimulated by TNF-α has been used as inflammatory cellular model to determinate interleukin-8 (IL-8), one of the most relevant pro-inflammatory mediator in CF regulated by the NF-kB. The chemical characterization of these 11 decoctions by spectrophotometric analysis and NMR fingerprinting highlighted that sugars and polyphenols seemed to be the main compounds. Our results demonstrated that Azadirachta indica, Terminalia bellerica, Terminalia chebula, Hemidesmus indicus, Emblica officinalis and Swertia chirata are the most active decoctions in inhibiting NF-kB/DNA interactions by EMSA assay and in reducing pro-inflammatory IL- 8 expression in CF cells at IC50 concentrations by Real-Time and Bio-plex analyses. Finally, we observed the increase of all inhibitory activities with the rise of total polyphenols, procyanidins and flavonoids, except for the levels of IL-8 mRNA accumulation, that were as high as flavonoid content grown up by the statistical multivariate analyses. In conclusion, these six decoctions might be interesting to explore new anti-inflammatory treatments for diseases, such as CF.

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF A RURAL COMMUNITY HEALTH CARE MODEL BASED ON INDIAN INDIGENOUS SYSTEM OF MEDICINE

    PubMed Central

    Hyma, B.; Ramesh, A.; Subhadra, N.L.

    1988-01-01

    Based on the principles of primary health care as outlined by WHO at the Alma Ata Conference in 1978, many voluntary organizations in India have been formulating, organizing and experimenting with the comprehensive rural community health Schemes. The goal is to indentify the felt needs at both individual and community levels and facilitate direct participation in decision making, develop suitable alternative, ecologically Sound indigenous models for socioeconomic well-being. In this context the Indian system of medicine has a useful and complementary role to play in the preventive and curative aspects of primary health care programmes. With the above objectives in mind the investigators undertook a brief survey of a “comprehensive rural health” project. The primary aim of this project is to develop a community health care model using innovative alternative methods using Indian indigenous system of medicine and participatory research techniques to improve rural health services of the surrounding under privileged villages. Many gaps exist in the assessment, however, a birds eye-view is presented here. PMID:22557645

  8. Standardization of Rajanyādi cūrṇa: An ayurvedic preparation

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Rupali; Shreedhara, Chandrashekara Shastry; Setty Aswatha Ram, Holavana Hally Nanjundaiah

    2014-01-01

    Background: Rajanyādi cūrṇa (RC) is an ayurvedic classical preparation used in the treatment of digestive disorders, fever, jaundice, anemia, and asthma. We seek to standardize this drug to ensure its quality. Objective: The current investigation was aimed at the preparation of cūrṇa in three batches so as to standardize it. Materials and Methods: The cūrṇa was prepared in-house in three different batches according to directions given in The Ayurvedic Formulary of India. The cūrṇa was evaluated based on organoleptic characters, physical characteristics, and physico-chemical parameters. High performance thin layer chromatography was carried out for the quantification of curcumin. Results: The parameters were found to be comparable and sufficient for the evaluation of the cūrṇa. Conclusion: Ayurvedic medicine, RC has been standardized using the various parameters and can be incorporated while developing the pharmacopoeial standards. PMID:25538348

  9. Maternal care through mainstreaming Ayurvedic approach

    PubMed Central

    Jayashree, K.S.

    2008-01-01

    Reviving and re establishing the practices which were prevalent in India along with some orientation towards Ayurvedic approaches shall be a suitable answer to the burning issues of women’ health. Mainstreaming the Ayurvedic practices in women health care appears to be the most effective remedial measure to lower MMR and promote maternal health. The present paper is a narrative of exemplary practices in the management of the most important phases like puberty, pregnancy and post natal care in accordance with Ayurveda PMID:22557299

  10. Maternal care through mainstreaming Ayurvedic approach.

    PubMed

    Jayashree, K S

    2008-07-01

    Reviving and re establishing the practices which were prevalent in India along with some orientation towards Ayurvedic approaches shall be a suitable answer to the burning issues of women' health. Mainstreaming the Ayurvedic practices in women health care appears to be the most effective remedial measure to lower MMR and promote maternal health. The present paper is a narrative of exemplary practices in the management of the most important phases like puberty, pregnancy and post natal care in accordance with Ayurveda.

  11. A complex, nonlinear dynamic systems perspective on Ayurveda and Ayurvedic research.

    PubMed

    Rioux, Jennifer

    2012-07-01

    The fields of complexity theory and nonlinear dynamic systems (NDS) are relevant for analyzing the theory and practice of Ayurvedic medicine from a Western scientific perspective. Ayurvedic definitions of health map clearly onto the tenets of both systems and complexity theory and focus primarily on the preservation of organismic equanimity. Health care research informed by NDS and complexity theory would prioritize (1) ascertaining patterns reflected in whole systems as opposed to isolating components; (2) relationships and dynamic interaction rather than static end-points; (3) transitions, change and cumulative effects, consistent with delivery of therapeutic packages in the reality of the clinical setting; and (4) simultaneously exploring both local and global levels of healing phenomena. NDS and complexity theory are useful in examining nonlinear transitions between states of health and illness; the qualitative nature of shifts in health status; and looking at emergent properties and behaviors stemming from interactions between organismic and environmental systems. Complexity and NDS theory also demonstrate promise for enhancing the suitability of research strategies applied to Ayurvedic medicine through utilizing core concepts such as initial conditions, emergent properties, fractal patterns, and critical fluctuations. In the Ayurvedic paradigm, multiple scales and their interactions are addressed simultaneously, necessitating data collection on change patterns that occur on continuums of both time and space, and are viewed as complementary rather than isolated and discrete. Serious consideration of Ayurvedic clinical understandings will necessitate new measurement options that can account for the relevance of both context and environmental factors, in terms of local biology and the processual features of the clinical encounter. Relevant research design issues will need to address clinical tailoring strategies and provide mechanisms for mapping patterns of

  12. A Complex, Nonlinear Dynamic Systems Perspective on Ayurveda and Ayurvedic Research

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The fields of complexity theory and nonlinear dynamic systems (NDS) are relevant for analyzing the theory and practice of Ayurvedic medicine from a Western scientific perspective. Ayurvedic definitions of health map clearly onto the tenets of both systems and complexity theory and focus primarily on the preservation of organismic equanimity. Health care research informed by NDS and complexity theory would prioritize (1) ascertaining patterns reflected in whole systems as opposed to isolating components; (2) relationships and dynamic interaction rather than static end-points; (3) transitions, change and cumulative effects, consistent with delivery of therapeutic packages in the reality of the clinical setting; and (4) simultaneously exploring both local and global levels of healing phenomena. NDS and complexity theory are useful in examining nonlinear transitions between states of health and illness; the qualitative nature of shifts in health status; and looking at emergent properties and behaviors stemming from interactions between organismic and environmental systems. Complexity and NDS theory also demonstrate promise for enhancing the suitability of research strategies applied to Ayurvedic medicine through utilizing core concepts such as initial conditions, emergent properties, fractal patterns, and critical fluctuations. In the Ayurvedic paradigm, multiple scales and their interactions are addressed simultaneously, necessitating data collection on change patterns that occur on continuums of both time and space, and are viewed as complementary rather than isolated and discrete. Serious consideration of Ayurvedic clinical understandings will necessitate new measurement options that can account for the relevance of both context and environmental factors, in terms of local biology and the processual features of the clinical encounter. Relevant research design issues will need to address clinical tailoring strategies and provide mechanisms for mapping

  13. A simple and effective method for vegetative propagation of an endangered medicinal plant Salacia oblonga Wall.

    PubMed

    Deepak, K G K; Suneetha, G; Surekha, Ch

    2016-01-01

    Salacia oblonga Wall. is an endangered medicinal plant whose conservation is urgently needed, as it is extensively used in the Indian Ayurvedic system of medicine to treat diabetes mellitus. This study shows an easy, effective and simple method of conserving genetic identity and producing elite clones of S. oblonga through vegetative propagation. Vegetative propagation was achieved using roots (R), stems with leaves (SL) and stems without leaves (S) with different concentrations (0-500 ppm) of indole butyric acid (IBA). Explants S and SL showed maximum shooting response with 300 ppm IBA and explant R showed maximum response with 200 ppm IBA.

  14. Approaches in fostering quality parameters for medicinal botanicals in the Indian context

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Pooja D.; Daswani, Poonam G.; Birdi, Tannaz J.

    2014-01-01

    India is among the important megabiodiversity centers of the world with nearly 45,000 known plant species. This diversity coupled with a rich heritage of traditional knowledge has made India a home to several important time-honored systems of health care such as Ayurveda, Siddha and Unani. Herbal medicines, however, are associated with a number of shortcomings including uniform efficacy and lack of appropriate quality control measures at various stages of product development. The review intends to outline the importance of fostering quality parameters towards standardization and manufacturing of botanicals for India to emerge as a leader in global market of herbal products. Literature survey was carried out on important parameters for processing and manufacturing of botanicals. The review highlights that there have been constant efforts for developing state of the art technologies in the field of herbal research. It also reflects that Government authorities have also taken a number of initiatives to formulate appropriate guidelines from standardization of raw materials to obtaining botanical products. However, in the Indian context, there exist certain lacunae in the current regulatory mechanisms which need to be strengthened and stringently implemented to ensure safety, purity and efficacy of herbal medicines. Towards this the approaches being developed globally can be adopted. Based on the literature reviewed, in our opinion, four areas viz., benefit sharing, investment by industry, standardization and national/international networking structure need immediate attention for strengthening Traditional Systems of Medicine in India. PMID:25097272

  15. Approaches in fostering quality parameters for medicinal botanicals in the Indian context.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Pooja D; Daswani, Poonam G; Birdi, Tannaz J

    2014-01-01

    India is among the important megabiodiversity centers of the world with nearly 45,000 known plant species. This diversity coupled with a rich heritage of traditional knowledge has made India a home to several important time-honored systems of health care such as Ayurveda, Siddha and Unani. Herbal medicines, however, are associated with a number of shortcomings including uniform efficacy and lack of appropriate quality control measures at various stages of product development. The review intends to outline the importance of fostering quality parameters towards standardization and manufacturing of botanicals for India to emerge as a leader in global market of herbal products. Literature survey was carried out on important parameters for processing and manufacturing of botanicals. The review highlights that there have been constant efforts for developing state of the art technologies in the field of herbal research. It also reflects that Government authorities have also taken a number of initiatives to formulate appropriate guidelines from standardization of raw materials to obtaining botanical products. However, in the Indian context, there exist certain lacunae in the current regulatory mechanisms which need to be strengthened and stringently implemented to ensure safety, purity and efficacy of herbal medicines. Towards this the approaches being developed globally can be adopted. Based on the literature reviewed, in our opinion, four areas viz., benefit sharing, investment by industry, standardization and national/international networking structure need immediate attention for strengthening Traditional Systems of Medicine in India.

  16. Evaluation of in vitro and in vivo safety profile of the Indian traditional medicinal plant Grewia tiliaefolia.

    PubMed

    Dicson, Sheeja Malar; Samuthirapandi, Muniasamy; Govindaraju, Archunan; Kasi, Pandima Devi

    2015-10-01

    Grewia tiliaefolia Vahl., is a subtropical tree used in Ayurvedic formulations and also by tribal communities in India for treatment of wounds, urinary infection and skin diseases. Despite of its medicinal use, the plant has not been previously tested for its safety. This study evaluated the toxicological profile of the methanolic extract of G. tiliaefolia leaves (MEGT) through in vitro (cytotoxic, mutagenic, genotoxic) and in vivo (acute and sub-acute) studies. In vitro assays conclude that there is no significant (p<0.05) level of cytotoxicity and genotoxicity at the tested concentrations (250-2000 μg/ml) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Ames assay in the tested Salmonella typhimurium strains revealed no significant (p<0.05) increase in the mutagenic index both in the presence and absence of metabolic activation. Alternatively, no change in mortality, physiological, behavioural, haematological and biochemical parameters were observed under in vivo acute (250, 500, 1000, 2000 mg/kg b.w) and sub-acute (100, 200, 1000 mg/kg b.w) toxicity studies in Wistar rats. Histopathological examinations of the animals did not reveal any treatment related changes and showed normal architecture, even at the highest concentration (1000 mg/kg b.w) following 28 days treatment. Overall, the results show that MEGT is non-toxic at the tested concentrations and is safe to be used as herbal medicine. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A partnership of a Catholic faith-based health system, nursing and traditional American Indian medicine practitioners.

    PubMed

    Hubbert, Ann O

    2008-04-01

    The paper presents a historically unique partnership between an American Southwestern, Catholic faith-based, urban hospital and a program it sponsored on the spirituality of American Indian Traditional Indian Medicine (TIM) by a Comanche medicine man. A discussion is offered on the cultural partnerships, experiences and benefits achieved through the cultural accommodations of these spiritual beliefs and practices within this healthcare system. The theory of Culture Care Diversity and Universality (Culture Care Theory), including the Sunrise Enabler, is applied in discussion of these past experiences to explore the relationships among and between the participating cultures. The intent of the partnerships within this program was not to 'learn Indian healing ceremonies' but to share the philosophy of TIM with all people (clients and professionals) as a means to enhance their own way of living. Examples of actual nursing decisions and actions are provided including outcomes from the program within the healthcare system and globally.

  18. Antimicrobial flavonoids isolated from Indian medicinal plant Scutellaria oblonga inhibit biofilms formed by common food pathogens.

    PubMed

    Rajendran, Narendran; Subramaniam, Shankar; Christena, Lowrence Rene; Muthuraman, Meenakshi Sundaram; Subramanian, Nagarajan Sai; Pemiah, Brindha; Sivasubramanian, Aravind

    2016-09-01

    Scutellaria oblonga Benth., a hitherto phytochemically unexplored Indian medicinal folklore plant was extracted with acetone and subjected to chromatography to yield nine flavonoids, for the first time from this plant. Antimicrobial assays were performed against 11 foodborne pathogens, and three molecules (Techtochrysin, Negletein and Quercitin-3-glucoside) depicted significant activity. These molecules were assessed for their rate of antibacterial action using time-kill curves which depicted complete inhibition of most of the bacteria within 12-16 h. The significant biofilm-reducing capability exhibited by these three molecules formed a significant finding of the current study. In most of the experiments, a 90-95% reduction in biofilms was observed. Thus, flavonoids as natural molecules from S. oblonga could be further researched to be used as potent antimicrobial and antibiofilm agents.

  19. Traditional Chinese and Indian medicine in the treatment of opioid-dependence: a review

    PubMed Central

    Doosti, Fatemeh; Dashti, Saeedeh; Tabatabai, Seyed Meghdad; Hosseinzadeh, Hossein

    2013-01-01

    Objective: In this study, the current literatures on the use of herbs and herbal preparations of Traditional Chinese and Indian Medicine for the treatment of opioid addiction were reviewed. Matherials and Methods: Search was done in databases such as Pub Med, Science Direct, Scopus, Springer Link, and Google Scholar. Results: Among 18 retrieved studies, 3 studies were about asafetida extract, an approved preparation for ameliorating drug abstinence in China. Chinese preparations including Composite Dong Yuan Gao, Qingjunyin and TJ-97 (a water extract of dai-bofu-to) as well as Indian ones, Mentate and Shilajit, were reported to have positive effects against opioid withdrawal, dependence, and tolerance. Moreover, Levo-tetrahydropalmatine and L-Stepholidine, in addition to extracts of Caulis Sinomenii and Sinomenium acutum showed similar effects. Banxia Houpu Decoction, Fu-Yuan pellet, Jinniu capsules, Qingjunyin, Tai-Kang-Ning capsule, and Xuan Xia Qudu Jiaonang (WeiniCom) from Chinese preparations, showed anti-addiction effects in randomized, double-blind and, in some studies, multicenter clinical trials. Conclusion : Traditional herbal preparations of China and India have anti-addiction effects with less adverse effects than alpha2-adrenergic or opioid agonists. PMID:25050276

  20. Comparative effectiveness of a complex Ayurvedic treatment and conventional standard care in osteoarthritis of the knee--study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Witt, Claudia M; Michalsen, Andreas; Roll, Stephanie; Morandi, Antonio; Gupta, Shivnarain; Rosenberg, Mark; Kronpass, Ludwig; Stapelfeldt, Elmar; Hissar, Syed; Müller, Matthias; Kessler, Christian

    2013-05-23

    Traditional Indian Ayurvedic medicine uses complex treatment approaches, including manual therapies, lifestyle and nutritional advice, dietary supplements, medication, yoga, and purification techniques. Ayurvedic strategies are often used to treat osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee; however, no systematic data are available on their effectiveness in comparison with standard care. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of complex Ayurvedic treatment in comparison with conventional methods of treating OA symptoms in patients with knee osteoarthritis. In a prospective, multicenter, randomized controlled trial, 150 patients between 40 and 70 years, diagnosed with osteoarthritis of the knee, following American College of Rheumatology criteria and an average pain intensity of ≥40 mm on a 100 mm visual analog scale in the affected knee at baseline will be randomized into two groups. In the Ayurveda group, treatment will include tailored combinations of manual treatments, massages, dietary and lifestyle advice, consideration of selected foods, nutritional supplements, yoga posture advice, and knee massage. Patients in the conventional group will receive self-care advice, pain medication, weight-loss advice (if overweight), and physiotherapy following current international guidelines. Both groups will receive 15 treatment sessions over 12 weeks. Outcomes will be evaluated after 6 and 12 weeks and 6 and 12 months. The primary endpoint is a change in the score on the Western Ontario and McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) after 12 weeks. Secondary outcome measurements will use WOMAC subscales, a pain disability index, a visual analog scale for pain and sleep quality, a pain experience scale, a quality-of-life index, a profile of mood states, and Likert scales for patient satisfaction, patient diaries, and safety. Using an adapted PRECIS scale, the trial was identified as lying mainly in the middle of the efficacy-effectiveness continuum. This trial

  1. Comparative effectiveness of a complex Ayurvedic treatment and conventional standard care in osteoarthritis of the knee – study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Traditional Indian Ayurvedic medicine uses complex treatment approaches, including manual therapies, lifestyle and nutritional advice, dietary supplements, medication, yoga, and purification techniques. Ayurvedic strategies are often used to treat osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee; however, no systematic data are available on their effectiveness in comparison with standard care. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of complex Ayurvedic treatment in comparison with conventional methods of treating OA symptoms in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Methods and design In a prospective, multicenter, randomized controlled trial, 150 patients between 40 and 70 years, diagnosed with osteoarthritis of the knee, following American College of Rheumatology criteria and an average pain intensity of ≥40 mm on a 100 mm visual analog scale in the affected knee at baseline will be randomized into two groups. In the Ayurveda group, treatment will include tailored combinations of manual treatments, massages, dietary and lifestyle advice, consideration of selected foods, nutritional supplements, yoga posture advice, and knee massage. Patients in the conventional group will receive self-care advice, pain medication, weight-loss advice (if overweight), and physiotherapy following current international guidelines. Both groups will receive 15 treatment sessions over 12 weeks. Outcomes will be evaluated after 6 and 12 weeks and 6 and 12 months. The primary endpoint is a change in the score on the Western Ontario and McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) after 12 weeks. Secondary outcome measurements will use WOMAC subscales, a pain disability index, a visual analog scale for pain and sleep quality, a pain experience scale, a quality-of-life index, a profile of mood states, and Likert scales for patient satisfaction, patient diaries, and safety. Using an adapted PRECIS scale, the trial was identified as lying mainly in the middle of the efficacy

  2. EVALUATION OF TOXIC HEAVY METALS IN AYURVEDIC SYRUPS SOLD IN LOCAL MARKETS OF HAZARA, PAKISTAN.

    PubMed

    Hajra, Bibi; Qayum, Iftikhar; Orakzai, Shaukat; Hussain, Fida; Faryal, Uzma; Aurangzeb

    2015-01-01

    Herbal and Ayurvedic preparations, widely used in Pakistan and the developing world, present serious risk of heavy metal toxicity related to their medicinal content and prolonged use by patients. The objective of this study was to find out the concentration of heavy metals in Herbal & Ayurvedic liquid preparations commonly used for treatment of different diseases, from local markets of Hazara. The cross sectional survey of traditional herbal & Ayurvedic medicine shops included ten liquid preparations selected from local shops of Mansehra and Abbottabad after interviewing the shopkeepers; so as to select the most commonly sold preparations along with their indications. All samples were analysed on standard Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy for qualitative and quantitative study of toxic heavy metals (Mercury, Iron, Zinc, Lead, Manganese and Arsenic). Toxic levels of Mercury were present in seven syrups, i.e., (Kashneeze, Akseer e Pachas, Tankar, Sharbat e folad, Urosinal, Akseer e Jigar and Amrat dhara) while Arsenic was present only in Urosinal. Iron, Zinc, Manganese and Lead were present in permissible limits in all syrups. Mercury and Arsenic are present in local Herbal & Ayurvedic liquid preparations far beyond the permissible limits as proposed by the International Regulatory Authorities for health drugs while the rest of metals, i.e., Zinc, Manganese, and Iron are within the therapeutic limits.

  3. Lead intoxication due to ayurvedic medications as a cause of abdominal pain in adults.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Varun; Midha, Vandana; Mahajan, Ramit; Narang, Vikram; Wander, Praneet; Sood, Ridhi; Sood, Ajit

    2017-02-01

    Though a majority of cases of lead intoxication come from occupational exposures, traditional and folk remedies have also been reported to contain toxic amounts of lead. We present a large series of patients with lead poisoning due to intake of Ayurvedic medicines, all of whom presented with unexplained abdominal pain. This was a retrospective, observational case series from a tertiary care center in India. The charts of patients who underwent blood lead level (BLL) testing as a part of workup for unexplained abdominal pain between 2005 and 2013 were reviewed. The patients with lead intoxication (BLLs >25 μg/dl) were identified and demographics, history, possible risk factors, clinical presentation and investigations were reviewed. Treatment details, duration, time to symptomatic recovery, laboratory follow-up and adverse events during therapy were recorded. BLLs were tested in 786 patients with unexplained abdominal pain and high levels were identified in 75 (9.5%) patients, of which a majority (73 patients, 9.3%) had history of Ayurvedic medication intake and only two had occupational exposure. Five randomly chosen Ayurvedic medications were analyzed and lead levels were impermissibly high (14-34,950 ppm) in all of them. Besides pain in abdomen, other presenting complaints were constipation, hypertension, neurological symptoms and acute kidney injury. Anemia and abnormal liver biochemical tests were observed in all the 73 patients. Discontinuing the Ayurvedic medicines and chelation with d-penicillamine led to improvement in symptoms and reduction in BLLs in all patients within 3-4 months. The patients presenting with severe recurrent abdominal pain, anemia and history of use of Ayurvedic medicines should be evaluated for lead toxicity. Early diagnosis in such cases can prevent unnecessary investigations and interventions, and permits early commencement of the treatment.

  4. Why Ayurvedic Yoga Therapists and Why Now?

    PubMed

    Rioux, Jennifer G

    2015-01-01

    IAYT has paved the way for yoga therapy as a healing profession to grow and develop its mission to deliver optimal therapeutics via individual sessions and tailored group classes. For the past five years, the National Ayurvedic Medical Association (NAMA) has been working behind the scenes to consider the value and definition of an ayurvedic yoga therapist (AYT) professional designation within the yoga therapy discipline. The AYT designation would complement the current standards for yoga therapists that have been published by IAYT. The purpose of this paper is to discuss (1) why the AYT designation is important; (2) how it supports and expands on IAYT's mission; and (3) why now is the appropriate time to develop competencies, standards, and a scope of practice for ayurvedic yoga therapy.

  5. Balancing Two Cultures: American Indian/Alaska Native Medical Students' Perceptions of Academic Medicine Careers.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, John Paul; Poll-Hunter, Norma; Stern, Nicole; Garcia, Andrea N; Brewster, Cheryl

    2016-08-01

    American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/AN) remain underrepresented in the academic medicine workforce and little is known about cultivating AI/AN medical students' interest in academic medicine careers. Five structured focus groups were conducted including 20 medical students and 18 physicians. The discussion guide explored factors influencing AI/AN trainees' academic medicine career interest and recommended approaches to increase their pursuit of academia. Consensual qualitative research was employed to analyze transcripts. Our research revealed six facilitating factors, nine dissuading factors, and five recommendations towards cultivating AI/AN pursuit of academia. Facilitators included the opportunity to teach, serving as a role model/mentor, enhancing the AI/AN medical education pipeline, opportunities to influence institution, collegiality, and financial stability. Dissuading factors included limited information on academic career paths, politics, lack of credit for teaching and community service, isolation, self-doubt, lower salary, lack of positions in rural areas, lack of focus on clinical care for AI/AN communities, and research obligations. Recommendations included heighten career awareness, recognize the challenges in balancing AI/AN and academic cultures, collaborate with IHS on faculty recruitment strategies, identify concordant role models/mentors, and identify loan forgiveness programs. Similar to other diverse medical students', raising awareness of academic career opportunities especially regarding teaching and community scholarship, access to concordant role models/mentors, and supportive institutional climates can also foster AI/AN medical students' pursuit of academia. Unique strategies for AI/AN trainees include learning how to balance AI/AN and academic cultures, collaborating with IHS on faculty recruitment strategies, and increasing faculty opportunities in rural areas.

  6. Case of acute lead toxicity associated with Ayurvedic supplements.

    PubMed

    Breyre, Amelia; Green-McKenzie, Judith

    2016-06-30

    Use of traditional folkloric remedies not disclosed to the physician may be difficult to identify as a source of lead toxicity. This report illustrates the presentation of a 26-year-old man who, during his 1 month vacation in India, was treated for low back pain with Ayurvedic herbal medicine. On his return to the USA, he presented to the emergency department with epigastric pain, weight loss, dark stools, nausea and vomiting. He was admitted and noted to be anaemic with a blood lead level (BLL) of 94.8 µg/dL. Peripheral blood smear demonstrated basophilic stippling. Chelation therapy with succimer was initiated. The patient became asymptomatic within months. Three years later, he remained asymptomatic with BLL <20 µg/dL. Physicians should be cognisant of potential toxicity from these Ayurvedic medications and have a heightened level of suspicion for lead toxicity in the face of anaemia and abdominal pain without obvious cause. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  7. Antihaemolytic and snake venom neutralizing effect of some Indian medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Kumarapppan, Chidambaram; Jaswanth, Albert; Kumarasunderi, Karpagam

    2011-09-01

    To validate traditional claims of usefulness of the Indian plants in management of poisonous snakebite and evaluate the antivenom properties displayed by the alcoholic extracts of Andrographis paniculata (A. paniculata), Crateva magna (C. magna), Gloriosa superba (G. superba) and Hydrocotyle javanica (H. javanica). These plants were collected, identified and the extracts were prepared by using conventional Soxhlet ethanol extraction technique. The venom neutralization activity was accessed in mice (20-25g) and number of mortalities was observed against clinically important snake (Naja nigricollis) venom. Present study also deals with in vitro membrane stabilizing activity of these plants against hyposaline induced human red blood corpuscles (HRBC). Extracts of H. javanica and G. superba gave 80 % and 90 % protection to mice treated with minimum lethal dose of venom (LD(99)). These two plants showed significant neutralization effect against the venoms of Naja nigricollis venom. H. javanica and G. superba (25-100 mg/mL) produced significant changes of membrane stabilization of human red blood cells (HRBC) exposed to hyposaline-induced haemolysis. We conclude that probably due to presence of various phytochemicals plays an important role in the anti-venom potential of these Indian medicinal plants against Naja nigricollis venom. The above observations confirmed that A. paniculata, C. magna, G. superba and H. javanica plant extracts possess potent snake venom neutralizing capacity and could potentially be used as an adjuvants for antivenin therapy in case of snakebite envenomation, especially against the local effects of cobra venoms. Copyright © 2011 Hainan Medical College. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Use of Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy for the Detection of Glycemic Elements in Indian Medicinal Plants

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Prashant Kumar; Srivastava, Amrita Kumari; Sharma, Bechan; Dhar, Preeti; Mishra, Ajay Kumar; Watal, Geeta

    2013-01-01

    The demand for interdisciplinary research is increasing in the new millennium to help us understand complex problems and find solutions by integrating the knowledge from different disciplines. The present review is an excellent example of this and shows how unique combination of physics, chemistry, and biological techniques can be used for the evaluation of Indian medicinal herbs used for treating diabetes mellitus. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is a sensitive optical technique that is widely used for its simplicity and versatility. This review presents the most recent application of LIBS for detection of glycemic elements in medicinal plants. The characteristics of matrices, object analysis, use of laser system, and analytical performances with respect to Indian herbs are discussed. PMID:24228060

  9. Use of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for the detection of glycemic elements in Indian medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Rai, Prashant Kumar; Srivastava, Amrita Kumari; Sharma, Bechan; Dhar, Preeti; Mishra, Ajay Kumar; Watal, Geeta

    2013-01-01

    The demand for interdisciplinary research is increasing in the new millennium to help us understand complex problems and find solutions by integrating the knowledge from different disciplines. The present review is an excellent example of this and shows how unique combination of physics, chemistry, and biological techniques can be used for the evaluation of Indian medicinal herbs used for treating diabetes mellitus. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is a sensitive optical technique that is widely used for its simplicity and versatility. This review presents the most recent application of LIBS for detection of glycemic elements in medicinal plants. The characteristics of matrices, object analysis, use of laser system, and analytical performances with respect to Indian herbs are discussed.

  10. Formulation, characterization and comparative evaluation of Trivanga bhasma: a herbo-mineral Indian traditional medicine.

    PubMed

    Rasheed, Arun; Naik, Madhu; Mohammed-Haneefa, Kotappadath Pillanayil; Arun-Kumar, Raveendran Pillai; Azeem, Abdul Kharim

    2014-07-01

    Bhasmas are unique Ayurvedic-metallic preparations with herbal juices/fruits, widely recommended to treat variety of chronic ailments. Trivanga bhasma, a calcinated preparation, is used to treat Diabetes mellitus and as Diuretic. In the present research an attempt has been made to carry out a comparative standardization of formulated Trivanga bhasma (TB1) prepared as per Ayurvedic formulary and marketed Trivanga bhasma (TB2) integrating conventional and modern analytical tools. The formulations were evaluated for physical properties, chemical characterization using FTIR, AAS, SEM, TGA, XRD and AFM along with anti-diabetic, diuretic and toxicology studies. The X-ray Diffraction analysis of both formulations exhibited crystalline nature and nano-sized particles by Scherrer's equation. In SEM studies, Lead, zinc and tin oxides show well-defined plate like structures while TB1 showed spongy, relatively compact microcrystalline aggregates with loss of grain boundaries. AFM analysis confirmed the spherical morphology of TB1 and TB2 with an average particle size of 500 nm. The present study is the first report of fingerprinting of Trivanga bhasma using sophisticated analytical techniques. In vivo pharmacological screening revealed that both TB1 and TBK2 possess anti-diabetic and diuretic activity and less toxicity, thereby facilitating standardization of Trivanga bhasma.

  11. Medicine Wheels: The Art and Culture of the Plains Indian. An Interdisciplinary Unit for Seventh-Grade Students Involving Art, Social Studies, [and] Mathematics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Britton, Jeanette; And Others

    The interdisciplinary unit for seventh grade students, involving art, social studies, and mathematics, focuses on a study of the forms, symbols, designs, and colors of the traditional art form of the Plains Indians, the Medicine Wheel. Objectives of the unit are for students to gain an understanding of the culture of the Plains Indians; to develop…

  12. Unravelling the genome of Holy basil: an "incomparable" "elixir of life" of traditional Indian medicine.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Shubhra; Kalra, Alok; Gupta, Vikrant; Khan, Feroz; Lal, Raj Kishori; Tripathi, Anil Kumar; Parameswaran, Sriram; Gopalakrishnan, Chellappa; Ramaswamy, Gopalakrishna; Shasany, Ajit Kumar

    2015-05-28

    Ocimum sanctum L. (O. tenuiflorum) family-Lamiaceae is an important component of Indian tradition of medicine as well as culture around the world, and hence is known as "Holy basil" in India. This plant is mentioned in the ancient texts of Ayurveda as an "elixir of life" (life saving) herb and worshipped for over 3000 years due to its healing properties. Although used in various ailments, validation of molecules for differential activities is yet to be fully analyzed, as about 80 % of the patents on this plant are on extracts or the plant parts, and mainly focussed on essential oil components. With a view to understand the full metabolic potential of this plant whole nuclear and chloroplast genomes were sequenced for the first time combining the sequence data from 4 libraries and three NGS platforms. The saturated draft assembly of the genome was about 386 Mb, along with the plastid genome of 142,245 bp, turning out to be the smallest in Lamiaceae. In addition to SSR markers, 136 proteins were identified as homologous to five important plant genomes. Pathway analysis indicated an abundance of phenylpropanoids in O. sanctum. Phylogenetic analysis for chloroplast proteome placed Salvia miltiorrhiza as the nearest neighbor. Comparison of the chemical compounds and genes availability in O. sanctum and S. miltiorrhiza indicated the potential for the discovery of new active molecules. The genome sequence and annotation of O. sanctum provides new insights into the function of genes and the medicinal nature of the metabolites synthesized in this plant. This information is highly beneficial for mining biosynthetic pathways for important metabolites in related species.

  13. Search for antibacterial and antifungal agents from selected Indian medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Kumar, V Prashanth; Chauhan, Neelam S; Padh, Harish; Rajani, M

    2006-09-19

    A series of 61 Indian medicinal plants belonging to 33 different families used in various infectious disorders, were screened for their antimicrobial properties. Screening was carried out at 1000 and 500 microg/ml concentrations by agar dilution method against Bacillus cereus var mycoides, Bacillus pumilus, Bacillus subtilis, Bordetella bronchiseptica, Micrococcus luteus, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Streptococcus faecalis, Candida albicans, Aspergillus niger and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Twenty-eight plant extracts showed activity against at least one of the test organisms used in the screening. On the basis of the results obtained, we conclude that the crude extracts of Dorema ammoniacum, Sphaeranthus indicus, Dracaena cinnabari, Mallotus philippinensis, Jatropha gossypifolia, Aristolochia indica, Lantana camara, Nardostachys jatamansi, Randia dumetorum and Cassia fistula exhibited significant antimicrobial activity and properties that support folkloric use in the treatment of some diseases as broad-spectrum antimicrobial agents. This probably explains the use of these plants by the indigenous people against a number of infections.

  14. Modulation of Cardiac Autonomic Dysfunction in Ischemic Stroke following Ayurveda (Indian System of Medicine) Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Jaideep, Sriranjini Sitaram; Nagaraja, Dindagur; Pal, Pramod Kumar; Sudhakara, D.; Talakad, Sathyaprabha N.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Cardiac autonomic dysfunction in stroke has implications on morbidity and mortality. Ayurveda (Indian system of medicine) describes stroke as pakshaghata. We intended to study the effect of Ayurveda therapies on the cardiac autonomic dysfunction. Methods. Fifty patients of ischemic stroke (middle cerebral artery territory) (mean age 39.26 ± 9.88 years; male 43, female 7) were recruited within one month of ictus. All patients received standard allopathic medications as advised by neurologist. In addition, patients were randomized to receive physiotherapy (Group I) or Ayurveda treatment (Group II) for 14 days. Continuous electrocardiogram and finger arterial pressure were recorded for 15 min before and after treatments and analyzed offline to obtain heart rate and blood pressure variability and baroreflex sensitivity (BRS). Results were analysed by RMANOVA. Results. Patients in Group II showed statistically significant improvement in cardiac autonomic parameters. The standard deviation of normal to normal intervals,and total and low frequency powers were significantly enhanced (F = 8.16, P = 0.007, F = 9.73, P = 0.004, F = 13.51, and P = 0.001, resp.). The BRS too increased following the treatment period (F = 10.129, P = 0.004). Conclusions. The current study is the first to report a positive modulation of cardiac autonomic activity after adjuvant Ayurveda treatment in ischemic stroke. Further long term studies are warranted. PMID:24971149

  15. A Randomized Controlled Exploratory Evaluation of Standardized Ayurvedic Formulations in Symptomatic Osteoarthritis Knees: A Government of India NMITLI Project

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Arvind; Saluja, Manjit; Tillu, Girish; Venugopalan, Anuradha; Sarmukaddam, Sanjeev; Raut, Ashwini Kumar; Bichile, Lata; Narsimulu, Gumdal; Handa, Rohini; Patwardhan, Bhushan

    2011-01-01

    The multidisciplinary “New Millennium Indian Technology Leadership Initiative” Arthritis Project was undertaken to validate Ayurvedic medicines. Herbal formulations in popular use were selected by expert consensus and standardized using modern tools. Our clinical strategy evolved from simple exploratory evaluations to better powered statistically designed drug trials. The results of the first drug trial are presented here. Five oral formulations (coded A, B, C, D and E), with a common base of Zingiber officinale and Tinospora cordifolia with a maximum of four plant extracts, were evaluated; with placebo and glucosamine as controls. 245 patients suffering from symptomatic OA knees were randomized into seven arms (35 patients per arm) of a double blind, parallel efficacy, multicentric trial of sixteen weeks duration. The groups matched well at baseline. There were no differences for patient withdrawals (17.5%) or adverse events (AE) of mild nature. Intention-to-treat efficacy analysis, demonstrated no significant differences (P < .05) for pain (weight bearing) and WOMAC questionnaire (knee function); placebo response was high. Based on better pain relief, significant (P < .05) least analgesic consumption and improved knee status, “C” formulation was selected for further development. Controlled exploratory drug trials with multiple treatment arms may be used to economically evaluate several candidate standardized formulations. PMID:20981160

  16. Ayurvedic concept of Shatkriyakala: a traditional knowledge of cancer pathogenesis and therapy.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Ashutosh; Semwal, Deepak Kumar; Mishra, Satyendra Prasad; Semwal, Ruchi Badoni

    2017-03-01

    The term Kriyakala refers to the recognition of the stage of a disease's progress, which helps to determine appropriate measure to correct the imbalance in Doshas (biological factors). It is a compound expression, comprised of Kriya and Kala, where Kriya means the choice to treatment (medicine, food and daily-routine) used to improve the disturbance in Doshas, and Kala refers to the stage of progress of a disease. Sushruta, an ancient Indian surgeon, has described the concept of Kriyakala in Varnaprashnadhyaya, an ancient Vedic Sanskrit text, which seeks to explain the incidence of Varnas in terms of Doshic disturbances. Varna, in modern parlance, may be described as an inflammatory process that may lead ulceration and chronic inflammation, promoting all stages of carcinogenesis. Abnormal interactions between Prakriti (genotype) and environmental factors vitiate the Doshas and impair immunity, which can lead to aberrant cell growth and cancer. Moreover, the interaction between vitiated Doshas and weak Dhatus (body tissues) manifests as cancers of a specific organ. Shatkriyakala (six stages of progress of a disease), on the other hand, provides a framework to assess the cancer and its pathogenesis in different stages. According to Ayurvedic concepts, all cancer therapies treat the affected tissues indirectly by eliminating vitiated Doshas, rejuvenating Dhatus and restoring immunity in cancer patients. The present review describes the six stages of Shatkriyakala in detail, with an emphasis on research areas to validate the concept of Shatkriyakala. This traditional knowledge can be utilized with modern technologies to detect predisposition for cancer or diagnose cancer in its early stages.

  17. Therapeutic significance and pharmacological activities of antidiarrheal medicinal plants mention in Ayurveda: A review

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Ashish; Seth, Ankit; Maurya, Santosh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Diarrhea is a serious problem affecting 3-5 billion people per year around the world, especially children of below 5 years. 70% of the world population uses traditional and indigenous medicine for their primary health care. The facts of these indigenous remedies are passed verbally and sometimes as documents. Since ancient time, Ayurveda is the main system of healing in South East Asian countries. Indian literature from ayurvedic texts and other books claim the potency of several plants in the treatment of diarrhea. As the global prospective of ayurvedic medicine is increasing, interest regarding the scientific basis of their action is parallely increasing. Researchers are doing experiments to establish the relation between the claimed action and observed pharmacological activities. In the present article, an attempt was made to compile the scientific basis of medicinal plants used to cure diarrhea in Ayurveda. Literature was collected via electronic search (PubMed, ScienceDirect, Medline, and Google Scholar) from published articles that reports antidiarrheal activity of plants that were mentioned in Ayurveda classics. A total of 109 plant species belonging to 58 families were reported for their antidiarrheal activity. Several Indian medicinal plants have demonstrated promising antidiarrheal effects, but the studies on the antidiarrheal potentials of these plants are not taken beyond proof of concept stage. It is hoped that the article would stimulate future clinical studies because of the paucity of knowledge in this area. PMID:27366356

  18. Therapeutic significance and pharmacological activities of antidiarrheal medicinal plants mention in Ayurveda: A review.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Ashish; Seth, Ankit; Maurya, Santosh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Diarrhea is a serious problem affecting 3-5 billion people per year around the world, especially children of below 5 years. 70% of the world population uses traditional and indigenous medicine for their primary health care. The facts of these indigenous remedies are passed verbally and sometimes as documents. Since ancient time, Ayurveda is the main system of healing in South East Asian countries. Indian literature from ayurvedic texts and other books claim the potency of several plants in the treatment of diarrhea. As the global prospective of ayurvedic medicine is increasing, interest regarding the scientific basis of their action is parallely increasing. Researchers are doing experiments to establish the relation between the claimed action and observed pharmacological activities. In the present article, an attempt was made to compile the scientific basis of medicinal plants used to cure diarrhea in Ayurveda. Literature was collected via electronic search (PubMed, ScienceDirect, Medline, and Google Scholar) from published articles that reports antidiarrheal activity of plants that were mentioned in Ayurveda classics. A total of 109 plant species belonging to 58 families were reported for their antidiarrheal activity. Several Indian medicinal plants have demonstrated promising antidiarrheal effects, but the studies on the antidiarrheal potentials of these plants are not taken beyond proof of concept stage. It is hoped that the article would stimulate future clinical studies because of the paucity of knowledge in this area.

  19. Perspectives of Indian traditional and allopathic professionals on religion/spirituality and its role in medicine: basis for developing an integrative medicine program.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, P; Dias, A; Rane, A; Shukla, A; Lakshmi, S; Ansari, B K M; Ramaswamy, R S; Reddy, A R; Tribulato, A; Agarwal, A K; Bhat, J; SatyaPrasad, N; Mushtaq, A; Rao, P H; Murthy, P; Koenig, H G

    2014-08-01

    Allopathic medical professionals in developed nations have started to collaborate with traditional, complementary, and alternative medicine (TCAM) to enquire on the role of religion/spirituality (r/s) in patient care. There is scant evidence of such movement in the Indian medical community. We aim to understand the perspectives of Indian TCAM and allopathic professionals on the influence of r/s in health. Using RSMPP (Religion, Spirituality and Medicine, Physician Perspectives) questionnaire, a cross-sectional survey was conducted at seven (five TCAM and two allopathic) pre-selected tertiary care medical institutes in India. Findings of TCAM and allopathic groups were compared. Majority in both groups (75% of TCAM and 84.6% of allopathic practitioners) believed that patients' spiritual focus increases with illness. Up to 58% of TCAM and allopathic respondents report patients receiving support from their religious communities; 87% of TCAM and 73% of allopaths believed spiritual healing to be beneficial and complementary to allopathic medical care. Only 11% of allopaths, as against 40% of TCAM, had reportedly received 'formal' training in r/s. Both TCAM (81.8%) and allopathic (63.7%) professionals agree that spirituality as an academic subject merits inclusion in health education programs (p = 0.0003). Inclusion of spirituality in the health care system is a need for Indian medical professionals as well as their patients, and it could form the basis for integrating TCAM and allopathic medical systems in India.

  20. In vivo effects of traditional Ayurvedic formulations in Drosophila melanogaster model relate with therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Vibha; Anandan, E M; Mony, Rajesh S; Muraleedharan, T S; Valiathan, M S; Mutsuddi, Mousumi; Lakhotia, Subhash C

    2012-01-01

    Ayurveda represents the traditional medicine system of India. Since mechanistic details of therapy in terms of current biology are not available in Ayurvedic literature, modern scientific studies are necessary to understand its major concepts and procedures. It is necessary to examine effects of the whole Ayurvedic formulations rather than their "active" components as is done in most current studies. We tested two different categories of formulations, a Rasayana (Amalaki Rasayana or AR, an herbal derivative) and a Bhasma (Rasa-Sindoor or RS, an organo-metallic derivative of mercury), for effects on longevity, development, fecundity, stress-tolerance, and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) levels of Drosophila melanogaster using at least 200 larvae or flies for each assay. A 0.5% (weight/volume) supplement of AR or RS affected life-history and other physiological traits in distinct ways. While the size of salivary glands, hnRNP levels in larval tissues, and thermotolerance of larvae/adult flies improved significantly following feeding either of the two formulations, the median life span and starvation resistance improved only with AR. Feeding on AR or RS supplemented food improved fecundity differently. Feeding of larvae and adults with AR increased the fecundity while the same with RS had opposite effect. On the contrary, feeding larvae on normal food and adults on AR supplement had no effect on fecundity but a comparable regime of feeding on RS-supplemented food improved fecundity. RS feeding did not cause heavy metal toxicity. The present study with two Ayurvedic formulations reveals formulation-specific effects on several parameters of the fly's life, which seem to generally agree with their recommended human usages in Ayurvedic practices. Thus, Drosophila, with its very rich genetic tools and well-worked-out developmental pathways promises to be a very good model for examining the cellular and molecular bases of the effects of different Ayurvedic

  1. In Vivo Effects Of Traditional Ayurvedic Formulations in Drosophila melanogaster Model Relate with Therapeutic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Dwivedi, Vibha; Anandan, E. M.; Mony, Rajesh S.; Muraleedharan, T. S.; Valiathan, M. S.; Mutsuddi, Mousumi; Lakhotia, Subhash C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Ayurveda represents the traditional medicine system of India. Since mechanistic details of therapy in terms of current biology are not available in Ayurvedic literature, modern scientific studies are necessary to understand its major concepts and procedures. It is necessary to examine effects of the whole Ayurvedic formulations rather than their “active” components as is done in most current studies. Methods We tested two different categories of formulations, a Rasayana (Amalaki Rasayana or AR, an herbal derivative) and a Bhasma (Rasa-Sindoor or RS, an organo-metallic derivative of mercury), for effects on longevity, development, fecundity, stress-tolerance, and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) levels of Drosophila melanogaster using at least 200 larvae or flies for each assay. Results A 0.5% (weight/volume) supplement of AR or RS affected life-history and other physiological traits in distinct ways. While the size of salivary glands, hnRNP levels in larval tissues, and thermotolerance of larvae/adult flies improved significantly following feeding either of the two formulations, the median life span and starvation resistance improved only with AR. Feeding on AR or RS supplemented food improved fecundity differently. Feeding of larvae and adults with AR increased the fecundity while the same with RS had opposite effect. On the contrary, feeding larvae on normal food and adults on AR supplement had no effect on fecundity but a comparable regime of feeding on RS-supplemented food improved fecundity. RS feeding did not cause heavy metal toxicity. Conclusions The present study with two Ayurvedic formulations reveals formulation-specific effects on several parameters of the fly's life, which seem to generally agree with their recommended human usages in Ayurvedic practices. Thus, Drosophila, with its very rich genetic tools and well-worked-out developmental pathways promises to be a very good model for examining the cellular and molecular

  2. Ayurgenomics for stratified medicine: TRISUTRA consortium initiative across ethnically and geographically diverse Indian populations.

    PubMed

    Prasher, Bhavana; Varma, Binuja; Kumar, Arvind; Khuntia, Bharat Krushna; Pandey, Rajesh; Narang, Ankita; Tiwari, Pradeep; Kutum, Rintu; Guin, Debleena; Kukreti, Ritushree; Dash, Debasis; Mukerji, Mitali

    2017-02-02

    Genetic differences in the target proteins, metabolizing enzymes and transporters that contribute to inter-individual differences in drug response are not integrated in contemporary drug development programs. Ayurveda, that has propelled many drug discovery programs albeit for the search of new chemical entities incorporates inter-individual variability "Prakriti" in development and administration of drug in an individualized manner. Prakriti of an individual largely determines responsiveness to external environment including drugs as well as susceptibility to diseases. Prakriti has also been shown to have molecular and genomic correlates. We highlight how integration of Prakriti concepts can augment the efficiency of drug discovery and development programs through a unique initiative of Ayurgenomics TRISUTRA consortium. Five aspects that have been carried out are (1) analysis of variability in FDA approved pharmacogenomics genes/SNPs in exomes of 72 healthy individuals including predominant Prakriti types and matched controls from a North Indian Indo-European cohort (2) establishment of a consortium network and development of five genetically homogeneous cohorts from diverse ethnic and geo-climatic background (3) identification of parameters and development of uniform standard protocols for objective assessment of Prakriti types (4) development of protocols for Prakriti evaluation and its application in more than 7500 individuals in the five cohorts (5) Development of data and sample repository and integrative omics pipelines for identification of genomic correlates. Highlight of the study are (1) Exome sequencing revealed significant differences between Prakriti types in 28 SNPs of 11 FDA approved genes of pharmacogenomics relevance viz. CYP2C19, CYP2B6, ESR1, F2, PGR, HLA-B, HLA-DQA1, HLA-DRB1, LDLR, CFTR, CPS1. These variations are polymorphic in diverse Indian and world populations included in 1000 genomes project. (2) Based on the phenotypic attributes of

  3. Assessment of in vitro antipsoriatic activity of selected Indian medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sushil K; Chouhan, Hemendra S; Sahu, Alekh N; Narayan, Gopeshwar

    2015-01-01

    Phyllanthus simplex Retz. (Phyllanthaceae), Crotolaria juncea Linn. (Leguminosae), Leucas aspera Linn. (Lamiaceae), and Vitex glabrata R.Br. (Verbenaceae) are well-known Indian medicinal plants. Different parts of these plants are used for healing purposes traditionally in the treatment of psoriasis and various other disorders. This prompted us to assess the antipsoriatic activities of these plants. Petroleum ether and ethanol extracts of the selected plants, i.e., P. simplex (whole plant), C. juncea (seeds), L. aspera (aerial parts), and V. glabrata (leaves) were investigated for their in vitro antipsoriatic activity. Antipsoriatic activity of the extracts was evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, using HaCaT cells. About 200 µl of different concentrations (25, 50, 100, 200, and 400 µg/ml) of test samples were prepared in the cell culture medium and incubated for 24 h before MTT assay to determine the viable cells. The effect of these extracts on nitric oxide (NO) production and lipid peroxidation was also evaluated. Our findings revealed that these plants showed promising skin keratinocyte antiproliferative activity. However, the petroleum ether extract of C. juncea (CJPE) and ethanol extract of L. aspera (LAEE) were found to exhibit significant activity (IC50 value = 45.45 and 55.36 µg/ml, respectively). The inhibitory action against NO production and lipid peroxidation in HaCaT cells suggested that the antipsoriatic activity of the extracts was mediated by an antioxidant mechanism. These findings validate the claims of the use of these plants in the treatment of psoriasis.

  4. Application of EPR spectroscopy to identify irradiated Indian medicinal plant products.

    PubMed

    Sanyal, Bhaskar; Chatterjee, S; Variyar, Prasad S; Sharma, Arun

    2012-06-01

    A study of gamma-irradiated Indian medicinal plant products was carried out using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Improved approaches like high-power measurement, microwave saturation, and thermal behavior of the radicals were explored for detection of irradiation. Aswagandha (Withania somnifera), vairi (Salacia reticulata), amla (Emblica officinalis), haldi (Curcumin longa), and guduchi (Tinospora cordifolia) exhibited a weak singlet at g = 2.005 before irradiation. Aswagandha, immediately after radiation treatment, revealed a complex EPR spectrum characterized by EPR spectrum simulation technique as superposition of 3 paramagnetic centers. One group of signal with organic origin was carbohydrate and cellulose radical and the other was isotropic signal of inorganic origin (g⟂ =2.0044 and g|| = 1.9980). However, other products did not exhibit any radiation-specific signal after irradiation. Power saturation and thermal behavior techniques were not suitable for these products. However, amongst all the 3 approaches, high-power measurement of EPR spectra emerged as a suitable technique in identification of the irradiated aswagandha. Gamma-irradiation confirms hygienic quality and improves shelf life of food and other products. However, there is a lack of international consensus over considering this as a general application and different regulations are being enforced. EPR is one of the most promising techniques to identify irradiated foodstuffs for regulatory requirements but it has many limitations. Improved approaches based on the EPR technique explained in this study may be useful to identify irradiated products and become beneficial to food regulators and food irradiation enterprises to enhance confidence in irradiation technology. © 2012 Institute of Food Technologists®

  5. Conservation genetics of endangered medicinal plant Commiphora wightii in Indian Thar Desert.

    PubMed

    Harish; Gupta, Amit Kumar; Phulwaria, Mahendra; Rai, Manoj Kumar; Shekhawat, Narpat Singh

    2014-02-10

    To ascertain the conservation priorities and strategies for Commiphora wightii, an endangered medicinal plant of Indian Thar Desert, genetic diversity was estimated within and among different populations. The total of 155 amplification products were scored using ten each of RAPD and ISSR primers, exhibiting an overall 86.72% polymorphism across 45 individuals representing eight populations. The cumulative data of two markers were used to compute pair-wise distances. The Neighbor-Joining tree revealed high genetic differentiation among populations except Kiradu population. Nei's gene diversity (h) ranged between 0.082 and 0.193 with total diversity at species level is 0.294. Shannon's information index (I) ranged between 0.118 and 0.275 with an overall diversity of 0.439. Analysis of molecular variance showed more diversity among population level (56.65%) than at within population level (43.35%). The low gene flow value (Nm=0.349) and high coefficient of genetic differentiation (GST=0.589) and high fixation index (FST=0.566) demonstrated elevated genetic differentiation among the population and can be predicted that these populations are not in Hardy-Weinberg proportions. Principal Co-ordinate Analysis confirms that Akal population has become phylogenetically more distinct and less diverse than the rest of the samples. Mantel's test revealed no correlation between genetic and geographical distances of populations (R(2)=0.122). Overall highest diversity was observed in the population of Machiya Safari Park and Kiradu, while lowest in Akal population, later may constitute an evolutionary significant unit, having merit for special management. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Bhaishajya Kalpanaa - the Ayurvedic pharmaceutics - an overview.

    PubMed

    Savrikar, S S; Ravishankar, B

    2010-04-03

    In Ayurvedic therapeutics, drug therapy is given prime importance. There is a very well developed sub-discipline entirely devoted to drug formulations known as "Bhaisajya Kalpanaa". Considering its importance, different aspects of this discipline have been presented in this review to familiarize the readers, especially those who have just started studying Ayurveda, with concept of ayurvedic pharmaceutics. The Ayurvedic drug formulation is based on what is known as "Pancavidha Kasaaya" concept. According to this concept there are five basic forms of formulation known as 1-'Swarasa' the expressed juice, 2-'Kalka', a fine paste obtained by grinding fresh or wet grinding dried plant material 3- 'Kwaatha', the decoction, 4- 'Sheeta' or 'Hima', the cold water infusion and 5- 'Faanta', the hot water infusion. Different aspects of their preparation and use have been discussed. Further from the above basic forms, a number of other formulations are derived; a brief description of each of them has been given along with brief outlines of drug formulations meant for specific routes. The third part of the review is devoted to discussion of influence of different factors on the expression of pharmacological activity.

  7. Ayurvedic herbal drugs with possible cytostatic activity.

    PubMed

    Smit, H F; Woerdenbag, H J; Singh, R H; Meulenbeld, G J; Labadie, R P; Zwaving, J H

    1995-07-07

    Ayurveda is considered to be the traditional science of health in India and is based on the principle of subjectivity. All matter is composed of five basic elements, which can be perceived by the five sense organs. All food and drugs are classified according to their pharmacological properties, which are derived from these five elements. To investigate which Ayurvedic plants might have cytostatic activity, an Ayurvedic model for the pathogenesis of cancer was made. Based on this, selection criteria were formed, that were used to select plants from a list of Ayurvedic herbal drugs. Some of the selected species could be collected in India and Nepal. The dried material of 14 species was submitted to ethanol (70% v/v) extraction and the extracts were tested for cytotoxicity on COLO 320 tumour cells, using the microculture tetrazolium (MTT) assay. The IC50-value, the concentration causing 50% growth inhibition of the tumour cells, was used as a parameter for cytotoxicity. Extracts of the flowers of Calotropis procera (Ait.) R. Br. (Asclepiadaceae) and of the nuts of Semecarpus anacardium L.f. (Anacardiaceae) displayed the strongest cytotoxic effect with IC50-values of 1.4 micrograms/ml and 1.6 micrograms/ml, respectively. The extracts of several other plants did not show a cytotoxic effect up to 100 micrograms/ml, the highest concentration tested.

  8. Antimicrobial thin films based on ayurvedic plants extracts embedded in a bioactive glass matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floroian, L.; Ristoscu, C.; Candiani, G.; Pastori, N.; Moscatelli, M.; Mihailescu, N.; Negut, I.; Badea, M.; Gilca, M.; Chiesa, R.; Mihailescu, I. N.

    2017-09-01

    Ayurvedic medicine is one of the oldest medical systems. It is an example of a coherent traditional system which has a time-tested and precise algorithm for medicinal plant selection, based on several ethnopharmacophore descriptors which knowledge endows the user to adequately choose the optimal plant for the treatment of certain pathology. This work aims for linking traditional knowledge with biomedical science by using traditional ayurvedic plants extracts with antimicrobial effect in form of thin films for implant protection. We report on the transfer of novel composites from bioactive glass mixed with antimicrobial plants extracts and polymer by matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation into uniform thin layers onto stainless steel implant-like surfaces. The comprehensive characterization of the deposited films was performed by complementary analyses: Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, UV-VIS absorption spectroscopy and antimicrobial tests. The results emphasize upon the multifunctionality of these coatings which allow to halt the leakage of metal and metal oxides into the biological fluids and eventually to inner organs (by polymer use), to speed up the osseointegration (due to the bioactive glass use), to exert antimicrobial effects (by ayurvedic plants extracts use) and to decrease the implant price (by cheaper stainless steel use).

  9. Quality standards for Hutabhugādi cūrṇa (Ayurvedic Formulary of India).

    PubMed

    Pushpendra; Sunil Kumar, Koppala Narayana; Priyadarshini; Holla, Bantwal Shivarama; Ravishankar, Basaviah; Yashovarma, Betkeri

    2016-01-01

    In India, herbal medicines are mainly based on the Ayurvedic system. The main drawback of traditional medicines is a lack of standardized products. Standardization of any herbal formulation is essential in order to assess the quality, purity, safety, and efficacy of drugs based on the analysis of their active properties. Testing of Ayurvedic preparations using scientific methodologies will add to quality and authenticity of the product. This article reports standardization parameters for Hutabhugādi cūrṇa (HC) used traditionally in the treatment of Agnimāndya (digestive impairment), Pāndu (anemia), Sopha (edema), and Ārsa (piles). The formulation was prepared as per Ayurvedic Formulary of India, and it was standardized by organoleptic characterization, macro-microscopic evaluation, physicochemical testing, and thin-layer chromatography/high-performance thin-layer chromatography profiling employing a standard methodology. Results of the experiments conducted provided diagnostic characteristics to identify and standardize the formulation prepared using official ingredients of HC. Based on the data obtained, a monograph on quality standards for HC is proposed. The monograph based on the present investigation results would serve as a document to control the quality of HC.

  10. Ayurvedic genomics: establishing a genetic basis for mind-body typologies.

    PubMed

    Patwardhan, Bhushan; Bodeker, Gerard

    2008-06-01

    Ayurveda, India's natural health care tradition, has a unique way of classifying human population based on individual constitution or prakriti. Ayurveda's tridosha theory identifies principles of motion (vata), metabolism (pitta), and structure (kapha) as discrete phenotypic groupings. Patwardhan et al. (2005) hypothesized in a paper published in this journal that there is a genetic connotation to prakriti and as proof of this concept showed a correlation between HLA alleles and prakriti type, establishing a rationale and preliminary experimental support for the concept of an association between HLA alleles and the Ayurvedic tridosha theory of individual prakriti types. This work is both part of and a catalyst for a wider revolution in the scientific investigation of Ayurveda in India, referred to as "Ayurvedic biology" and "AyuGenomics." Subsequently, Chen et al. (2007) reported a similar study in this journal using a classification based on Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) theory. The findings of a genetic basis for both Ayurvedic and TCM classifications indicate a commonality between Asia's great medical traditions in their diagnostic typologies and a genetic basis for Asian traditional medicine's theory of discrete and discernable groupings of psycho-physiologic differences. Accordingly, new horizons have opened for collaborative East-East research and for an individualized approach to disease management and activation of the full range of human potential, as articulated in Ayurveda and TCM.

  11. Assessment of Clinical Profile of the Patients Treated at Ayurvedic Health Facilities in North India

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Dinesh; Quasmi, Nafis Ahmed; Chandel, Jameer Khan; Bhardwaj, Ashok Kumar; Raina, Sunil Kumar; Sharma, Y. K.

    2013-01-01

    Since a very long time, a significant number of patients have been seeking treatment at Complementary and Alternative Medicine health facilities, but the disease burden at these facilities has never been assessed and documented. Present cross-sectional study was carried out at Ayurvedic tertiary care hospital to document and to assess the rationale of disease reporting at Ayurvedic institutions of the northern state of India from January 2011 to October 2011. Almost half of the patients’ morbidities were not classified at all into any of the disease categories. The common reported morbidities at study hospital were: Respiratory (10.5%), neuromuscular (9.5%), digestive (9.2%) and circulatory (9.1%) disorders. As the majority of diseases were unclassified, so mainstreaming of the effective disease surveillance would be required to understand the morbidity pattern and successful treatment practices at health facilities. PMID:24130953

  12. Repeatability of Pulse Diagnosis and Body Constitution Diagnosis in Traditional Indian Ayurveda Medicine.

    PubMed

    Kurande, Vrinda; Waagepetersen, Rasmus; Toft, Egon; Prasad, Ramjee; Raturi, Lokesh

    2012-11-01

    In Ayurveda, pulse diagnosis and body constitution diagnosis have a long historical use; still, there is lack of quantitative measure of the reliability of these diagnostic methods. Reliability means consistency of information. Consistent diagnosis leads to consistent treatment and is important for clinical practice, education, and research. The objective of this study is to study the methodology to evaluate the test-retest reliability (repeatability) of pulse diagnosis and body constitution diagnosis. A double-blinded, controlled, clinical trial was conducted in Copenhagen. The same doctor, an expert in Ayurvedic pulse diagnosis, examined the pulse and body constitution of 17 healthy participants twice, in random order without seeing them. A metric on pulse and body constitution variables was developed. Cohen's weighted kappa statistic was used as a measure of intra-rater reliability. Permutation tests were used to test the hypothesis of homogeneous diagnosis (ie, the doctor's diagnosis does not depend on the subject). The hypothesis of homogeneous classification was rejected on the 5% significance level (P values of .02 and .001, respectively, for pulse and body constitution diagnosis). According to the Landis and Koch scale, values of the weighted kappa for pulse diagnosis (P = .42) and body constitution diagnosis (P = .65) correspond to "moderate" and "substantial" agreement, respectively. There was a reasonable level of consistency between 2 pulse and body constitution diagnoses. Further studies are required to quantify inter-subject and intra-subject agreement for greater understanding of reliability of pulse and body constitution diagnosis.

  13. Repeatability of Pulse Diagnosis and Body Constitution Diagnosis in Traditional Indian Ayurveda Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Waagepetersen, Rasmus; Toft, Egon; Prasad, Ramjee; Raturi, Lokesh

    2012-01-01

    In Ayurveda, pulse diagnosis and body constitution diagnosis have a long historical use; still, there is lack of quantitative measure of the reliability of these diagnostic methods. Reliability means consistency of information. Consistent diagnosis leads to consistent treatment and is important for clinical practice, education, and research. The objective of this study is to study the methodology to evaluate the test-retest reliability (repeatability) of pulse diagnosis and body constitution diagnosis. A double-blinded, controlled, clinical trial was conducted in Copenhagen. The same doctor, an expert in Ayurvedic pulse diagnosis, examined the pulse and body constitution of 17 healthy participants twice, in random order without seeing them. A metric on pulse and body constitution variables was developed. Cohen's weighted kappa statistic was used as a measure of intra-rater reliability. Permutation tests were used to test the hypothesis of homogeneous diagnosis (ie, the doctor's diagnosis does not depend on the subject). The hypothesis of homogeneous classification was rejected on the 5% significance level (P values of .02 and .001, respectively, for pulse and body constitution diagnosis). According to the Landis and Koch scale, values of the weighted kappa for pulse diagnosis (P = .42) and body constitution diagnosis (P = .65) correspond to “moderate” and “substantial” agreement, respectively. There was a reasonable level of consistency between 2 pulse and body constitution diagnoses. Further studies are required to quantify inter-subject and intra-subject agreement for greater understanding of reliability of pulse and body constitution diagnosis. PMID:27257530

  14. Broad Spectrum Anti-Quorum Sensing Activity of Tannin-Rich Crude Extracts of Indian Medicinal Plants.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Varsha; Bhathena, Zarine

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) mechanisms have been demonstrated to have significance in expression of pathogenicity in infectious bacteria. In Gram negative bacteria the autoinducer molecules that mediate QS are acyl homoserine lactones (AHL) and in Gram positive bacteria they are peptides called autoinducing peptides (AIP). A screening of tannin-rich medicinal plants was attempted to identify extracts that could interrupt the QS mechanisms in both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria over a wide range of concentrations and therefore potentially be potent agents that could act as broad spectrum QS inhibitors. Six out of the twelve Indian medicinal plant extracts that were analyzed exhibited anti-QS activity in Chromobacterium violaceum 12472 and in S. aureus strain with agr:blaZ fusion over a broad range of subinhibitory concentrations, indicating that the extracts contain high concentration of molecules that can interfere with the QS mechanisms mediated by AHL as well as AIP.

  15. Broad Spectrum Anti-Quorum Sensing Activity of Tannin-Rich Crude Extracts of Indian Medicinal Plants

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Varsha; Bhathena, Zarine

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) mechanisms have been demonstrated to have significance in expression of pathogenicity in infectious bacteria. In Gram negative bacteria the autoinducer molecules that mediate QS are acyl homoserine lactones (AHL) and in Gram positive bacteria they are peptides called autoinducing peptides (AIP). A screening of tannin-rich medicinal plants was attempted to identify extracts that could interrupt the QS mechanisms in both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria over a wide range of concentrations and therefore potentially be potent agents that could act as broad spectrum QS inhibitors. Six out of the twelve Indian medicinal plant extracts that were analyzed exhibited anti-QS activity in Chromobacterium violaceum 12472 and in S. aureus strain with agr:blaZ fusion over a broad range of subinhibitory concentrations, indicating that the extracts contain high concentration of molecules that can interfere with the QS mechanisms mediated by AHL as well as AIP. PMID:27190686

  16. Antiamnesic Activity of an Ayurvedic Formulation Chyawanprash in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Parle, Milind; Bansal, Nitin

    2011-01-01

    Chyawanprash (Chy) is an ayurvedic formulation commonly consumed in Indian households. Chy is a comprehensive herbal tonic, prepared from around 50 herbs employing anwala (Emblica officinalis) as the basic ingredient. The present study was undertaken to explore the beneficial effects of Chy (at the dose of 1 and 2% w/w of diet) administered daily for 15 successive days in mice with memory deficits. A total of 228 mice divided in 38 groups were employed in this study. Morris water maze, Hebb-Williams maze and elevated plus maze served as exteroceptive memory models, whereas scopolamine (Sco)-induced amnesia and alprazolam (Alp)-induced amnesia served as interoceptive memory models. The brain acetylcholinesterase activity, brain thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and reduced glutathione levels (GSH) were also estimated. The administration of Chy for 15 consecutive days significantly protected the animals from developing memory impairment. Furthermore, there was a significant decrease in brain TBARS and increase in GSH levels after administration of Chy (2% w/w), thereby indicating decreased free radical generation and increased scavenging of free radical, respectively. Thus, Chy may prove to be a useful remedy for the management of Alzheimer's disease owing to its antioxidant effect, pro-cholinergic action and/or antiamnesic potential. PMID:21789046

  17. Antiamnesic activity of an ayurvedic formulation chyawanprash in mice.

    PubMed

    Parle, Milind; Bansal, Nitin

    2011-01-01

    Chyawanprash (Chy) is an ayurvedic formulation commonly consumed in Indian households. Chy is a comprehensive herbal tonic, prepared from around 50 herbs employing anwala (Emblica officinalis) as the basic ingredient. The present study was undertaken to explore the beneficial effects of Chy (at the dose of 1 and 2% w/w of diet) administered daily for 15 successive days in mice with memory deficits. A total of 228 mice divided in 38 groups were employed in this study. Morris water maze, Hebb-Williams maze and elevated plus maze served as exteroceptive memory models, whereas scopolamine (Sco)-induced amnesia and alprazolam (Alp)-induced amnesia served as interoceptive memory models. The brain acetylcholinesterase activity, brain thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and reduced glutathione levels (GSH) were also estimated. The administration of Chy for 15 consecutive days significantly protected the animals from developing memory impairment. Furthermore, there was a significant decrease in brain TBARS and increase in GSH levels after administration of Chy (2% w/w), thereby indicating decreased free radical generation and increased scavenging of free radical, respectively. Thus, Chy may prove to be a useful remedy for the management of Alzheimer's disease owing to its antioxidant effect, pro-cholinergic action and/or antiamnesic potential.

  18. Appropriating depression: biomedicalizing Ayurvedic psychiatry in Kerala, India.

    PubMed

    Lang, Claudia; Jansen, Eva

    2013-01-01

    The appropriation of biopsychiatric concepts such as depression, and their reframing in clinical and academic discussions, are important parts of the revitalization of bhūt vidyā as Ayurvedic psychiatry. Drawing on ethnographic fieldwork conducted in Kerala from 2009 to 2011, in this article we explore the process and the controversies of translating and correlating the biopsychiatric notion of depression, as a discrete and biologic pathological entity, with Ayurvedic notions of body, mind, and mental distress. Depression, conceptualized as a neurochemical imbalance, is, we argue, relatively compatible with Ayurvedic notions of a fluent body and mind, and so is easier to correlate with Ayurvedic concepts of do[Formula: see text]ic imbalances and blockages of channels than the former psychoanalytically dominated model of depression. The appropriation of depression within Ayurvedic discourse challenges the dichotomy of universal and culture-specific disorders, and this has a significant impact on mental health programs in Kerala.

  19. Effects of Ayurvedic Rasayana botanicals on CYP3A4 isoenzyme system.

    PubMed

    Borse, Swapnil P; Kamble, Bhagyashree B

    2015-05-01

    Consuming botanical dietary supplements or herbal drugs along with prescription drugs may lead to potential pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) herb-drug interactions (HDI). The present study focuses on the importance of and novel approach for assessing HDI in integrative medicine with case examples of two frequently-used Ayurvedic Rasayana botanicals. The aqueous extracts of Asparagus racemosus (ARE) and Gymnema sylvester (GSE) were prepared as per Ayurvedic Pharmacopoeia of India. Chemoprofiling of these extracts was done using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Additionally, ARE was characterized for the presence of shatavarins IV and I using HPLC & mass spectroscopy respectively. Effects of ARE and GSE were investigated on rat liver microsome using testosterone probe drug assay. The changes in formation of metabolite (6-β hydroxy testosterone) were monitored on incubation of testosterone alone, testosterone with ketoconazole, ARE and GSE using HPLC. Half inhibitory concentration (IC50) was used to predict plausible HDI. ARE and GSE showed no inhibition with IC50 values >1 000 μg/mL while the standard inhibitor ketoconazole completely abolished CYP3A4-dependent activity at 0.531 μg/mL and IC50 was found to be 0.036 μg/mL. ARE and GSE prepared as per Ayurvedic Pharmacopoeia of India were found to be safe for CYP3A4-mediated inhibitory HDI in rats. Our in vitro study suggests the need of further in vivo investigation for HDI in order to provide clinical relevance.

  20. Historical perspective of Indian neurology

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Shrikant; Trikamji, Bhavesh; Singh, Sandeep; Singh, Parampreet; Nair, Rajasekharan

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To chronicle the history of medicine and neurology in India with a focus on its establishment and evolution. Background: The history of neurology in India is divided into two periods: ancient and modern. The ancient period dates back to the mid-second millennium Before Christ (B.C.) during the creation of the Ayurvedic Indian system of Medicine, which detailed descriptions of neurological disorders called Vata Vyadhi. The early 20th century witnessed the birth of modern Indian medicine with the onset of formal physician training at the nation's first allopathic medical colleges located in Madras (1835), Calcutta (1835) and Mumbai (1848). Prior to India's independence from Britain in 1947, only 25 medical schools existed in the entire country. Today, there are over 355. In 1951, physicians across the field of neurology and neurosurgery united to create the Neurological Society of India (NSI). Four decades later in 1991, neurologists branched out to establish a separate organization called the Indian Academy of Neurology (IAN). Design/Methods: Information was gathered through literature review using PubMed, MD Consult, OVID, primary texts and research at various academic institutions in India. Results: Neurological disorders were first described in ancient India under Ayurveda. The transition to modern medicine occurred more recently through formal training at medical schools beginning in the 1930's. Early pioneers and founders of the NSI (1951) include Dr. Jacob Chandy, Dr. B Ramamurthi, Dr. S. T. Narasimhan and Dr. Baldev Singh. Later, Dr. J. S. Chopra, a prominent neurologist and visionary, recognized the need for primary centers of collaboration and subsequently established the IAN (1991). The future of Neurology in India is growing rapidly. Currently, there are 1100 practicing neurologists and more than 150 post-graduate trainees who join the ranks every year. As the number of neurologists rises across India, there is an increase in the amount of

  1. [Use of medicines in a Guaraní Indian village on the coast of Santa Catarina State, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Diehl, Eliana Elisabeth; Grassi, Francielly

    2010-08-01

    This article analyzes the use of medicines and related perceptions among Guaraní Indians on the coast of Santa Catarina State, Brazil. The ethnographic research included participant observation, open and semi-structured interviews, and household surveys. Analyzing six months of prescriptions from 2008, 458 medicines were prescribed in 236 medical consultations, featuring cough and cold preparations, analgesics, and anti-helminthics, among drugs. In the three household surveys, analgesics and cough and cold preparations were the most frequently found in 2006 and 2007, while drugs for anemia were the most common in 2008. The Guaraní mainly used the primary healthcare services for colds, coughs, and diarrhea, and their practices also included turning to the shaman and self-care with medicines and herbal remedies, recognizing the efficacy of medicines and evaluating the treatment according to their experiences and their conceptions of the health-disease-care process. The study indicates the need for dialogue between professionals and users, linking the various forms of health knowledge.

  2. The Hippocratic oath: a comparative analysis of the ancient text's relevance to American and Indian modern medicine.

    PubMed

    Jhala, Chandrakant I; Jhala, Khushboo N

    2012-01-01

    Hippocrates (460-375 B.C.), an ancient Greek physician considered the "Father of Medicine," constructed the groundwork for the principles of ethics in medicine over 2,500 years ago in his establishment of the Hippocratic Oath. One of the oldest binding documents in history, the text has remained the ethical template for physicians to this day. The changing cultural and social environment of modern society, accompanied by the advancement in scientific knowledge and therapeutic tools, has surfaced the need to reframe ethical perspective in modern medicine. Progress in aspects such as organ transplantation, stem cell technology, and genetic engineering has welcomed a new set of ethical dilemmas. These dilemmas have become intimately intertwined with the impact of commercialization, as seen by the interplay between legislation, health care, and pharmaceutical businesses. This paper seeks to dissect the principles of the original Hippocratic Oath and analyze the template in relation to the ethical dilemmas presented by contemporary medicine. Examination will provide a deeper understanding of the paradigm shift in modern medical ethics. Both the value of the Oath and the level of awareness of modern ethical dilemmas through the lens of American and Indian medical graduates will be assessed.

  3. Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine for Work Related Musculoskeletal Disorders Associated With Job Contentment in Dental Professionals: Indian Outlook

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Devanand; Bhaskar, Dara John; Gupta, Kumar Rajendra; Karim, Bushra; Kanwar, Alpana; Jain, Ankita; Yadav, Ankit; Saini, Priya; Arya, Satya; Sachdeva, Neha

    2014-01-01

    Background High prevalence rates of work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WRMSD) among dentists have been reported. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies can be helpful in managing and preventing work-related musculoskeletal disorders. The purpose of this study was to determine if dental professionals are using CAM for work-related musculoskeletal disorders. Who have greater job satisfaction: dentist who uses Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) or conventional therapy (CT) as a treatment modality for WRMSD Method Dentists who registered in Uttar Pradesh state, India under Indian Dental Council, Uttar Pradesh branch (n=1134) were surveyed. Data were analyzed using univariate and bivariate analyses and logistic regression. Result A response rate of 53% (n=601) was obtained, revealing that 82% (n=487) of the respondents suffered from work-related musculoskeletal disorders. The use of complementary and alternative medicine or conventional therapy was reported among 80% (n=390) of the dentists with work-related musculoskeletal disorders. Complementary and alternative medicine users reported greater overall health compared to conventional therapy users (P<0.001). Of those with work-related musculoskeletal disorders, 35.5% (n=172) considered a career change for once, and 4.0% (n=19) reported having left dentistry. Conclusion Complementary and alternative medicine therapies may improve quality of life, reduce work disruptions and enhance job satisfaction for dentists who suffer from work-related musculoskeletal disorders. It is important that dentists incorporate complementary and alternative medicine strategies into practice to facilitate musculoskeletal health that will enable longer and healthier careers, increase productivity, provide safer workplace and prevent musculoskeletal disorders. PMID:24795512

  4. Use of complementary and alternative medicine for work related musculoskeletal disorders associated with job contentment in dental professionals: Indian outlook.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Devanand; Bhaskar, Dara John; Gupta, Kumar Rajendra; Karim, Bushra; Kanwar, Alpana; Jain, Ankita; Yadav, Ankit; Saini, Priya; Arya, Satya; Sachdeva, Neha

    2014-04-01

    High prevalence rates of work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WRMSD) among dentists have been reported. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies can be helpful in managing and preventing work-related musculoskeletal disorders. The purpose of this study was to determine if dental professionals are using CAM for work-related musculoskeletal disorders. Who have greater job satisfaction: dentist who uses Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) or conventional therapy (CT) as a treatment modality for WRMSD. Dentists who registered in Uttar Pradesh state, India under Indian Dental Council, Uttar Pradesh branch (n=1134) were surveyed. Data were analyzed using univariate and bivariate analyses and logistic regression. A response rate of 53% (n=601) was obtained, revealing that 82% (n=487) of the respondents suffered from work-related musculoskeletal disorders. The use of complementary and alternative medicine or conventional therapy was reported among 80% (n=390) of the dentists with work-related musculoskeletal disorders. Complementary and alternative medicine users reported greater overall health compared to conventional therapy users (P<0.001). Of those with work-related musculoskeletal disorders, 35.5% (n=172) considered a career change for once, and 4.0% (n=19) reported having left dentistry. Complementary and alternative medicine therapies may improve quality of life, reduce work disruptions and enhance job satisfaction for dentists who suffer from work-related musculoskeletal disorders. It is important that dentists incorporate complementary and alternative medicine strategies into practice to facilitate musculoskeletal health that will enable longer and healthier careers, increase productivity, provide safer workplace and prevent musculoskeletal disorders.

  5. Why Family Medicine is a Good Career Choice for Indian Medical Graduates?

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Raman

    2014-01-01

    Internationally family medicine has evolved as an independent academic discipline of medical science and speciality vocational training for community based primary care physicians. India has a long tradition of family practice however due to various regulatory barriers family medicine did not optimally develop in mainstream medical education system for many decades. Recently, there is growing interest in this concept in India and family medicine is emerging as a viable career option for medical graduates in India. PMID:24791226

  6. Morbidity And Mortality Amongst Indian Hajj Pilgrims: A 3-Year Experience Of Indian Hajj Medical Mission In Mass-Gathering Medicine.

    PubMed

    Khan, Inam D; Khan, Shahbaz A; Asima, Bushra; Hussaini, Syed B; Zakiuddin, M; Faisal, F A

    2017-06-28

    The Hajj, a mass-gathering of over 3.5-million pilgrims, faces challenges to global health-security, housing, food, water, transportation, communication, sanitation, crowd-control and security. The Indian Medical Mission extended health-security to approximately 140,000 pilgrims, through outreach medical teams, primary-care clinics, tent-clinics, secondary-care hospitals and evacuation capabilities. Data on medical attendance, bed-occupancy, investigations, referrals, medication usage and deaths was compared. Outpatient attendance was 374,475 in static-clinics, 5135 in tent-clinics and 13,473 through task-forces. 585 (62.90%) in-patients were hospitalized amongst 930 secondary-care referrals. Secondary-care bed-days were 2106 with average bed-occupancy being 77.78%. 495 patients were institutionalized in tertiary-care Saudi-Arabian hospitals. Infectious diseases were most commonly (53.26%) encountered due to overwhelming respiratory-infections, followed by trauma (24.40%). Analgesics (66.38/100 patients) and antibacterials (48.34/100 patients) were frequently prescribed. Crude mortality amongst Indian pilgrims was 11.99/10,000. Risk-factors associated with high morbidity were old-age and pre-existing comorbidities. Overwhelming surge of patients facilitates transmission of communicable infections and leads to stress induced physical, mental and compassion fatigue amongst healthcare personnel. Respiratory infections are highly prevalent and easily transmissible during Hajj leading to significant morbidity, increased burden to existing health facilities, overwhelming costs on health systems and globalization of multiresistant pathogens. Diabetic patients should avoid heat exposure and use protective footwear during Hajj rituals. Mass-gathering medicine at Hajj can be optimized by improving patient knowledge on performing Hajj at a younger age, medicine compliance, avoiding self-medication, self-monitoring of hypertension, blood glucose, and preventive health measures

  7. Tribally Controlled Colleges: Making Good Medicine. American Indian Studies, Volume 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, Wayne J.

    This book traces the development of tribally controlled colleges (TCC), placing them in a historical context within Native American higher education and within the junior and community college movement. It examines the first 10 years of the movement, focusing in particular on six TCC's and the American Indian Higher Education Consortium (AIHEC),…

  8. Tribally Controlled Colleges: Making Good Medicine. American Indian Studies, Volume 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, Wayne J.

    This book traces the development of tribally controlled colleges (TCC), placing them in a historical context within Native American higher education and within the junior and community college movement. It examines the first 10 years of the movement, focusing in particular on six TCC's and the American Indian Higher Education Consortium (AIHEC),…

  9. Alternative treatment strategies for neuropathic pain: Role of Indian medicinal plants and compounds of plant origin-A review.

    PubMed

    Singh, Hasandeep; Bhushan, Sakshi; Arora, Rohit; Singh Buttar, Harpal; Arora, Saroj; Singh, Balbir

    2017-08-01

    Neuropathic pain is a complex, chronic pain state accompanied by tissue injury and nerve damage. This important health issue constitutes a challenge for the modern medicine worldwide. The management of neuropathic pain remains a major clinical challenge, pertaining to an inadequate understanding of pathophysiological mechanisms of neuropathic pain. Various classes of drugs have been reported effective for the management of neuropathic pain viz. opiates, tricyclic antidepressants, and antiepileptic agents. However, association of adverse effects with these drugs hinders their confident prescription in people with neuropathic pain. Recently, various medicinal plants have been reported effective for the management of neuropathic pain. So, it may be prudent to look beyond synthetic drugs pertaining to their unprecedented pharmacotherapeutic effects with lesser adverse effects. The extensive literature review has been carried out from databases such as Science direct, Scifinder, Wiley online library, PubMed, Research gate, Google scholar and Chemical Abstracts. The list of Traditional Indian Medicinal plants (TIMPs) and isolated compounds have been compiled which have been reported effective as an alternative therapy for the management of neuropathic pain. This helps the researchers to discover some novel therapeutic agents against neuropathic pain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Preliminary Screening of a Classical Ayurvedic Formulation for Anticonvulsant Activity.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Arnab; Maurya, Santosh Kumar; Mishra, Ashish; Singh, Gireesh Kumar; Singh, Manoj Kumar; Seth, Ankit

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is a serious and complex central nervous system disorder associated with recurrent episodes of convulsive seizures due to the imbalance between excitatory (glutamatergic) and inhibitory (GABAergic) neurotransmitters level in the brain. The available treatments are neither competent to control the seizures nor prevent progress of disease. Since ages, Herbal medicines have remained important sources of medicines in many parts of world which is evidenced through their uses in traditional systems of medicine i.e. Ayurveda, Siddha, Unani, Homeopathy and Chinese etc. A polyherbal formulation (containing Terminalia chebula Retz., Asparagus racemosus Willd., Embelia ribes Burm. F, Acorus calamus L., Tinospora cordifolia (Willd.) Miers, Convolvulus pluricaulis Choisy, Saussurea lappa C.B.Clarke, Achyranthes aspera L.) is mentioned in Ayurvedic classics Bhaiṣajya Ratnāvali. The aim of the study was to evaluate the anticonvulsant activity of the formulation in Maximum electroshock and Pentylenetetrazole induced convulsions in rats. In the present study, a polyherbal formulation was developed as directed by classical text and evaluated for the anticonvulsant activity using Maximal Electroshock Shock (MES) and Pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) induced convulsions in rats. Statistical comparison was done by one way ANOVA followed by the Tukey's multiple comparison test. The obtained results showed that the PHF had a protective role on epilepsy. Treatment with PHF significantly improves antioxidant enzymes activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione (GSH) levels significantly as compared to controls. PHF also significantly decreased malonaldialdehyde (MDA) levels in the brain. Moreover, it also attenuated the PTZ-induced increase in the activity of GABA-T in the rat brain. These findings suggest that PHF might have possible efficacy in the treatment of epilepsy.

  11. Preliminary Screening of a Classical Ayurvedic Formulation for Anticonvulsant Activity

    PubMed Central

    Dhar, Arnab; Maurya, Santosh Kumar; Mishra, Ashish; Singh, Gireesh Kumar; Singh, Manoj Kumar; Seth, Ankit

    2016-01-01

    Background: Epilepsy is a serious and complex central nervous system disorder associated with recurrent episodes of convulsive seizures due to the imbalance between excitatory (glutamatergic) and inhibitory (GABAergic) neurotransmitters level in the brain. The available treatments are neither competent to control the seizures nor prevent progress of disease. Since ages, Herbal medicines have remained important sources of medicines in many parts of world which is evidenced through their uses in traditional systems of medicine i.e. Ayurveda, Siddha, Unani, Homeopathy and Chinese etc. Aim: A polyherbal formulation (containing Terminalia chebula Retz., Asparagus racemosus Willd., Embelia ribes Burm. F, Acorus calamus L., Tinospora cordifolia (Willd.) Miers, Convolvulus pluricaulis Choisy, Saussurea lappa C.B.Clarke, Achyranthes aspera L.) is mentioned in Ayurvedic classics Bhaiṣajya Ratnāvali. The aim of the study was to evaluate the anticonvulsant activity of the formulation in Maximum electroshock and Pentylenetetrazole induced convulsions in rats. Materials and Methods: In the present study, a polyherbal formulation was developed as directed by classical text and evaluated for the anticonvulsant activity using Maximal Electroshock Shock (MES) and Pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) induced convulsions in rats. Statistical comparison was done by one way ANOVA followed by the Tukey's multiple comparison test. Results: The obtained results showed that the PHF had a protective role on epilepsy. Treatment with PHF significantly improves antioxidant enzymes activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione (GSH) levels significantly as compared to controls. PHF also significantly decreased malonaldialdehyde (MDA) levels in the brain. Moreover, it also attenuated the PTZ-induced increase in the activity of GABA-T in the rat brain. Conclusion: These findings suggest that PHF might have possible efficacy in the treatment of epilepsy. PMID:28182033

  12. Neuronutrient impact of Ayurvedic Rasayana therapy in brain aging.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ram Harsh; Narsimhamurthy, K; Singh, Girish

    2008-12-01

    Ayurveda is the oldest system of Medicine in the world, its antiquity going back to the Vedas. It adapts a unique holistic approach to the entire science of life, health and cure. The areas of special consideration in Ayurveda are geriatrics, rejuvenation, nutrition, immunology, genetics and higher consciousness. The Ayurvedic texts describe a set of rejuvenative measures to impart biological sustenance to the bodily tissues. These remedies are called Rasayana which are claimed to act as micronutrients. Some of these Rasayanas are organ and tissue specific. Those specific to brain tissue are called Medhya Rasayana. Such Rasayanas retard brain aging and help in regeneration of neural tissues besides producing antistress, adaptogenic and memory enhancing effect. In addition to the long tradition of textual and experience-based evidence for their efficacy, certain recent studies conducted on these traditional remedies on scientific parameters have shown promising results which have been reviewed in this paper for providing lead for further studies. The popular Medhya Rasayanas are Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera Dunal), Brahmi (Bacopa monnieri Linn), Mandukaparni (Centella asiatica Linn) and Sankhapuspi (Convolvulus pluricaulis Chois).

  13. Assessment of effect of hydroalcoholic and decoction methods on extraction of antioxidants from selected Indian medicinal plants

    PubMed Central

    Kaneria, Mital; Kanani, Bhavana; Chanda, Sumitra

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess the effects of extraction methods on antioxidant activities of selected Indian medicinal flora. Methods Different parts of plants were extracted by hydroalcoholic and decoction methods using water and various concentrations of methanol (ME) viz. 75%, 50% and 25% ME. The antioxidant activity of all the different extracts was evaluated using two different antioxidant assays viz. 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl hydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging assay and superoxide anion radical scavenging assay. Total phenol and flavonoid content was also estimated. Results The results showed that the extracting solvent significantly altered the antioxidant property estimations of screened plants. High correlations between phenolic compositions and antioxidant activities of extracts were observed. High levels of antioxidant activities were detected in Manilkara zapota (M. zapota) as compared with other screened plants. Conclusions The results obtained appear to confirm the effect of different methods on extraction of antioxidants and antioxidant property of M. zapota. PMID:23569897

  14. Evaluation of implementation status of national policy on Indian systems of medicine and homeopathy 2002: Stakeholders’ perspective

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Balpreet; Kumar, Manoj; Singh, Amarjeet

    2013-01-01

    Background: National Policy on Indian systems of medicine and homoeopathy (ISM and H policy) was formulated in 2002 to encourage the development of Ayurveda, Sidhha, Unani, Yoga, Naturopathy and Homoeopathy in India. This study proposes to assess the views of public health experts on current implementation of ISM and H Policy. Methods: An online questionnaire was designed to ascertain the views of public health experts on ISM and H Policy and mailed to 100 public health experts. The tool was tested for content validity and a pilot study was done. Results were analyzed with the help of SPSS version 16. Results and Conclusion: Response rate was 61%. Majority of experts considered implementation status of ISM and H Policy as poor. Lack of quality education was mentioned as major factor responsible for current scenario of ISM and H Policy by most of experts. Lack of funds and government support were emerged as major bottlenecks in implementation of ISM and H Policy. PMID:25284943

  15. Indian Herbs for the Treatment of Neurodegenerative Disease.

    PubMed

    Mannangatti, Padmanabhan; Naidu, Kamalakkannan Narasimha

    2016-01-01

    Ayurveda, an ancient system of medicine that is indigenous to India, is believed to be the world's oldest comprehensive health-care system and is now one of the most recognized and widely practiced disciplines of alternative medicine in the world. Medicinal herbs have been in use for treating diseases since ancient times in India. Ayurvedic therapies with medicinal herbs and herbomineral products generally provide relief without much adverse effects even after prolonged administration. Neurodegenerative disorders are a major cause of mortality and disability, and increasing life spans represent one of the key challenges of medical research. Ayurvedic medicine describes most neurodegenerative diseases and has defined a number of plants with therapeutic benefits for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases having antioxidant activities. In this chapter, the role of four important Ayurvedic medicinal plants, viz., Withania somnifera (ashwagandha), Bacopa monnieri (brahmi), Centella asiatica (gotu kola), and Mucuna pruriens (velvet bean), on neurodegenerative diseases are discussed.

  16. Bhasma : The ancient Indian nanomedicine.

    PubMed

    Pal, Dilipkumar; Sahu, Chandan Kumar; Haldar, Arindam

    2014-01-01

    Ayurveda and other Indian system of medicine use metals, but their use is also amply described in Chinese and Egyptian civilization in 2500 B.C. Bhasma are unique ayurvedic metallic/minerals preparation, treated with herbal juice or decoction and exposed for Ayurveda, which are known in Indian subcontinent since 7(th) century A.D. and widely recommended for treatment of a variety of chronic ailments. Animal's derivative such as horns, shells, feathers, metallic, nonmetallic and herbals are normally administered as Bhasma. A Bhasma means an ash obtained through incineration; the starter material undergoes an elaborate process of purification and this process is followed by the reaction phase, which involves incorporation of some other minerals and/or herbal extract. There are various importance of Bhasma like maintaining optimum alkalinity for optimum health, neutralizing harmful acids that lead to illness; because Bhasma do not get metabolized so they don't produce any harmful metabolite, rather it breakdowns heavy metals in the body. Methods including for Bhasma preparation are parpati, rasayoga, sindora, etc., Bhasma which contain Fe, Cu, S or other manufacturing process plays a specific role in the final product(s). Particle size (1-2 μ) reduced significantly, which may facilitate absorption and assimilation of the drug into the body system. Standardization of Bhasma is utmost necessary to confirm its identity and to determine its quality, purity safety, effectiveness and acceptability of the product. But the most important challenges faced by these formulations are the lack of complete standardization by physiochemical parameters.

  17. Bhasma : The ancient Indian nanomedicine

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Dilipkumar; Sahu, Chandan Kumar; Haldar, Arindam

    2014-01-01

    Ayurveda and other Indian system of medicine use metals, but their use is also amply described in Chinese and Egyptian civilization in 2500 B.C. Bhasma are unique ayurvedic metallic/minerals preparation, treated with herbal juice or decoction and exposed for Ayurveda, which are known in Indian subcontinent since 7th century A.D. and widely recommended for treatment of a variety of chronic ailments. Animal's derivative such as horns, shells, feathers, metallic, nonmetallic and herbals are normally administered as Bhasma. A Bhasma means an ash obtained through incineration; the starter material undergoes an elaborate process of purification and this process is followed by the reaction phase, which involves incorporation of some other minerals and/or herbal extract. There are various importance of Bhasma like maintaining optimum alkalinity for optimum health, neutralizing harmful acids that lead to illness; because Bhasma do not get metabolized so they don’t produce any harmful metabolite, rather it breakdowns heavy metals in the body. Methods including for Bhasma preparation are parpati, rasayoga, sindora, etc., Bhasma which contain Fe, Cu, S or other manufacturing process plays a specific role in the final product(s). Particle size (1-2 μ) reduced significantly, which may facilitate absorption and assimilation of the drug into the body system. Standardization of Bhasma is utmost necessary to confirm its identity and to determine its quality, purity safety, effectiveness and acceptability of the product. But the most important challenges faced by these formulations are the lack of complete standardization by physiochemical parameters. PMID:24696811

  18. Comparative efficacy of homeopathic and allopathic systems of medicine in the management of clinical mastitis of Indian dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Varshney, J P; Naresh, R

    2005-04-01

    Mastitis is the major problem of dairy animals despite a number of preventive and therapeutic approaches. Treatment is costly and out of reach of farmers of developing countries like India. The treatment cost of bovine mastitis with conventional treatment has been calculated. Good results have been claimed with homeopathic treatment however, treatment costs are not available. This article reports the treatment economics of homeopathic drugs conventional drugs for the management of bovine mastitis. Ninety-six mastitic quarters (non-fibrosed 67 and fibrosed 29) were treated with a homeopathic combination medicine. Another 96 quarters with acute mastitis (non-fibrosed) treated with different antibiotics were included in the study. The animals were selected from dairy farm of the Indian Veterinary Research Institute and from private dairy farms. The overall effectiveness of homeopathic combination medicine in the treatment of acute non-fibrosed mastitis was 86.6% with a mean recovery period of 7.7 days (range 3-28), and total cost of therapy as Indian Rupees 21.4 (0.39 Euros, US$ 0.47). The corresponding cure rate for the antibiotic group was 59.2% with a mean recovery period of 4.5 days (range 2-15) and an average treatment cost of Rs.149.20 (2.69 Euros, US$ 3.28). We conclude that the combination of Phytolacca, Calcarea fluorica., Silica, Belladonna, Bryonia, Arnica, Conium and Ipecacuanha (Healwell VT-6) was effective and economical in the management of mastitis in lactating dairy cows.

  19. Utilizing Ayurvedic literature for the identification of novel phytochemical inhibitors of botulinum neurotoxin A.

    PubMed

    Yalamanchili, Chinni; Manda, Vamshi K; Chittiboyina, Amar G; Guernieri, Rebecca L; Harrell, William A; Webb, Robert P; Smith, Leonard A; Khan, Ikhlas A

    2017-02-02

    Ayurveda, an ancient holistic system of health care practiced on the Indian subcontinent, utilizes a number of multi-plant formulations and is considered by many as a potential source for novel treatments, as well as the identification of new drugs. Our aim is to identify novel phytochemicals for the inhibition of bacterial exotoxin, botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A) based on Ayurvedic literature. BoNT/A is released by Clostridium species, which when ingested, inhibits the release of acetylcholine by concentrating at the neuromuscular junction and causes flaccid paralysis, resulting in a condition termed as botulism, and may also lead to death due to respiratory arrest. Fifteen plants were selected from the book 'Diagnosis and treatment of diseases in Ayurveda' by Vaidya Bhagwan Dash and Lalitesh Kashyap, based on their frequency of use in the formulations used for the treatment of six diseases with neuromuscular symptoms similar to botulism. Phytochemicals from these plants were screened using in silico, and in vitro methods. Structures of 570 reported phytochemicals from 14 plants were docked inside six reported BoNT/A light chain crystal structures using ensemble docking module in Maestro (Schrödinger, LLE). From the docking scores and structural diversity, nine compounds including acoric acid 1, three flavonoids, three coumarins derivatives, one kava lactone were selected and screened using an in vitro HPLC-based protease assay. The bioassay results showed that several compounds possess BoNT/A LC inhibition of 50-60% when compared to positive controls NSC 84094 and CB7967495 (80-95%). Further testing of the active compounds identified from Ayurvedic literature and structure-activity studies of acoric acid 1 using more sensitive bioassays is under way. The identification of acoric acid 1, a novel scaffold against BoNT/A, exemplifies the utility of Ayurvedic literature for the discovery of novel drug leads. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights

  20. Docosahexaenoic acid content is significantly higher in ghrita prepared by traditional Ayurvedic method

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Kalpana S.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Ghee (clarified butter) also known as ghrita, has been utilized for thousands of years in Ayurveda. Ghee is mostly prepared by traditional method in Indian households or by direct cream method at industry level. Ayurvedic classics mention that ghrita made from cow milk is superior. However, there is no scientific comparison available on preparation methods and essential fatty acids content of ghrita. Objective: To investigate fatty acid composition of ghrita prepared by traditional/Ayurvedic method and commercial method (direct cream method). Materials and Methods: Fatty Acid Methyl Esters (FAME) extracted from ghrita samples were analysed on Gas Chromatography (GC) Shimadzu B using capillary column BPX70 (0.32 mm*60 m, ID of 0.25 mm). The fatty acids in the samples were identified by comparing peaks with the external standard 68A (Nu-Chek-Prep, Inc.USA). Significant differences between the experimental groups were assessed by analysis of variance. Results: Distribution of fatty acids was compared in ghrita samples prepared by traditional method and direct cream method which is commercially used. Saturated fatty acids were predominant in both the groups. Mono unsaturated fatty acids and poly unsaturated fatty acids were in the range of 17-18% and 3-6% respectively. DHA content was significantly higher in ghee prepared by traditional method using curd starter fermentation. Conclusion: The findings suggested that ghrita prepared by traditional ayurvedic methods contains higher amount of DHA; Omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, which is a major component of retinal and brain tissues and remains important in prevention of various diseases. PMID:24948858

  1. Ayurvedic doshas as predictors of sleep quality.

    PubMed

    Telles, Shirley; Pathak, Shivangi; Kumar, Ankur; Mishra, Prabhat; Balkrishna, Acharya

    2015-05-17

    The 3 Ayurvedic constitutional types or Doshas--vata, pitta, and kapha--are responsible for homeostasis and health. The doshas determine various functions, including sleep. According to the Ayurvedic texts, sleep is caused by increased kapha and insomnia by increased vata or pitta, which may follow physical or mental exertion, or disease. The present study was carried out to determine whether this relationship could be found using contemporary standardized questionnaires. In this cross-sectional single-group study, 995 persons participated (646 males; group average age ±S.D., 49.1±15.2 years). Participants were attending a 1-week residential yoga program in northern India. Participants were assessed for dosha scores using a Tridosha questionnaire and the quality of sleep in the preceding week was self-rated using a sleep rating questionnaire. Multiple linear regression analyses were used to determine if each dosha acted as a predictor of quality and quantity of sleep. Vata scores significantly predicted the time taken to fall asleep [p<0.01], and the feeling of being rested in the morning [p<0.001]; with higher vata scores being associated with a longer time to fall asleep and a lesser feeling of being rested in the morning. Kapha scores significantly predicted day-time somnolence [p<0.05] and the duration of day-time naps in minutes [p<0.05], with higher kapha scores being associated with longer day-time naps. The results suggest that the doshas can influence the quality and quantity of sleep.

  2. Ayurvedic Doshas as Predictors of Sleep Quality

    PubMed Central

    Telles, Shirley; Pathak, Shivangi; Kumar, Ankur; Mishra, Prabhat; Balkrishna, Acharya

    2015-01-01

    Background The 3 Ayurvedic constitutional types or Doshas – vata, pitta, and kapha – are responsible for homeostasis and health. The doshas determine various functions, including sleep. According to the Ayurvedic texts, sleep is caused by increased kapha and insomnia by increased vata or pitta, which may follow physical or mental exertion, or disease. The present study was carried out to determine whether this relationship could be found using contemporary standardized questionnaires. Material/Methods In this cross-sectional single-group study, 995 persons participated (646 males; group average age ±S.D., 49.1±15.2 years). Participants were attending a 1-week residential yoga program in northern India. Participants were assessed for dosha scores using a Tridosha questionnaire and the quality of sleep in the preceding week was self-rated using a sleep rating questionnaire. Results Multiple linear regression analyses were used to determine if each dosha acted as a predictor of quality and quantity of sleep. Vata scores significantly predicted the time taken to fall asleep [p<0.01], and the feeling of being rested in the morning [p<0.001]; with higher vata scores being associated with a longer time to fall asleep and a lesser feeling of being rested in the morning. Kapha scores significantly predicted day-time somnolence [p<0.05] and the duration of day-time naps in minutes [p<0.05], with higher kapha scores being associated with longer day-time naps. Conclusions The results suggest that the doshas can influence the quality and quantity of sleep. PMID:25982247

  3. A contemporary approach on design, development, and evaluation of Ayurvedic formulation - Triphala Guggulu

    PubMed Central

    Muguli, Ganesh; Gowda, Vishakante D.; Dutta, Vishnu; Jadhav, Atul N.; Mendhe, Bibhilesh B.; Paramesh, Rangesh; Babu, U. V.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Ayurvedic texts describe many formulations for different ailments. Triphala Guggulu (TG) is reputed for treating inflammatory conditions. These formulations have been considered complementary medicine or alternative to conventional medicines across the globe. These complex polyherbal formulations need science-based approach toward manufacturing process and chemical standardization. Aim: To evaluate TG tablets to meet modern pharmaceutical approaches and also standardization processes. Materials and Methods: Shodhana of Guggulu was performed using Triphala Kwatha (decoction) as mentioned in ayurvedic texts. This processed material was dried using spray drying technique, blended with other herbal powders as per formula and using suitable excipients was incorporated for compressing into tablets. Excipients and their concentrations were evaluated for various micromeritic properties and the formula that met the requirements was compressed. Results: The angle of repose was considered fair with a range of 25–30, Carr's index at a range between 17 and 30, and Hausner ratio of 1.21:1.44, which was well within the limits as per the United States Pharmacopeia (USP) and among the three blends tested, blend Triphala Guggulu formulation-3 was found most suitable for tablets compression. Physical properties were well within the limits as per the USP and disintegration time was within 30 min. Conclusion: Modern pharmaceutical processing can very well be adapted for Guggulu preparations. PMID:27313420

  4. A contemporary approach on design, development, and evaluation of Ayurvedic formulation - Triphala Guggulu.

    PubMed

    Muguli, Ganesh; Gowda, Vishakante D; Dutta, Vishnu; Jadhav, Atul N; Mendhe, Bibhilesh B; Paramesh, Rangesh; Babu, U V

    2015-01-01

    Ayurvedic texts describe many formulations for different ailments. Triphala Guggulu (TG) is reputed for treating inflammatory conditions. These formulations have been considered complementary medicine or alternative to conventional medicines across the globe. These complex polyherbal formulations need science-based approach toward manufacturing process and chemical standardization. To evaluate TG tablets to meet modern pharmaceutical approaches and also standardization processes. Shodhana of Guggulu was performed using Triphala Kwatha (decoction) as mentioned in ayurvedic texts. This processed material was dried using spray drying technique, blended with other herbal powders as per formula and using suitable excipients was incorporated for compressing into tablets. Excipients and their concentrations were evaluated for various micromeritic properties and the formula that met the requirements was compressed. The angle of repose was considered fair with a range of 25-30, Carr's index at a range between 17 and 30, and Hausner ratio of 1.21:1.44, which was well within the limits as per the United States Pharmacopeia (USP) and among the three blends tested, blend Triphala Guggulu formulation-3 was found most suitable for tablets compression. Physical properties were well within the limits as per the USP and disintegration time was within 30 min. Modern pharmaceutical processing can very well be adapted for Guggulu preparations.

  5. Speciation and bioavailability of lead in complementary medicines.

    PubMed

    Bolan, S; Naidu, R; Kunhikrishnan, A; Seshadri, B; Ok, Y S; Palanisami, T; Dong, M; Clark, I

    2016-01-01

    Complementary medicines have associated risks which include toxic heavy metal(loid) and pesticide contamination. The objective of this study was to examine the speciation and bioavailability of lead (Pb) in selected complementary medicines. Six herbal and six ayurvedic medicines were analysed for: (i) total heavy metal(loid) contents including arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), Pb and mercury (Hg); (ii) speciation of Pb using sequential fractionation and extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) techniques; and (iii) bioavailability of Pb using a physiologically-based in vitro extraction test (PBET). The daily intake of Pb through the uptake of these medicines was compared with the safety guidelines for Pb. The results indicated that generally ayurvedic medicines contained higher levels of heavy metal(loid)s than herbal medicines with the amount of Pb much higher than the other metal(loid)s. Sequential fractionation indicated that while organic-bound Pb species dominated the herbal medicines, inorganic-bound Pb species dominated the ayurvedic medicines. EXAFS data indicated the presence of various Pb species in ayurvedic medicines. This implies that Pb is derived from plant uptake and inorganic mineral input in herbal and ayurvedic medicines, respectively. Bioavailability of Pb was higher in ayurvedic than herbal medicines, indicating that Pb added as a mineral therapeutic input is more bioavailable than that derived from plant uptake. There was a positive relationship between soluble Pb fraction and bioavailability indicating that solubility is an important factor controlling bioavailability. The daily intake values for Pb as estimated by total and bioavailable metal(loid) contents are likely to exceed the safe threshold level in certain ayurvedic medicines. This research demonstrated that Pb toxicity is likely to result from the regular intake of these medicines which requires further investigation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. A Complex Multiherbal Regimen Based on Ayurveda Medicine for the Management of Hepatic Cirrhosis Complicated by Ascites: Nonrandomized, Uncontrolled, Single Group, Open-Label Observational Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Manish V.; Patel, Kalapi B.; Gupta, Shivenarain; Michalsen, Andreas; Stapelfeldt, Elmar; Kessler, Christian S.

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic cirrhosis is one of the leading causes of death worldwide, especially if complicated by ascites. This chronic condition can be related to the classical disease entity jalodara in Traditional Indian Medicine (Ayurveda). The present paper aims to evaluate the general potential of Ayurvedic therapy for overall clinical outcomes in hepatic cirrhosis complicated by ascites (HCcA). In form of a nonrandomized, uncontrolled, single group, open-label observational clinical study, 56 patients fulfilling standardized diagnostic criteria for HCcA were observed during their treatment at the P. D. Patel Ayurveda Hospital, Nadiad, India. Based on Ayurvedic tradition, a standardized treatment protocol was developed and implemented, consisting of oral administration of single and compound herbal preparations combined with purificatory measures as well as dietary and lifestyle regimens. The outcomes were assessed by measuring liver functions through specific clinical features and laboratory parameters and by evaluating the Child-Pugh prognostic grade score. After 6 weeks of treatment and a follow-up period of 18 weeks, the outcomes showed statistically significant and clinically relevant improvements. Further larger and randomized trials on effectiveness, safety, and quality of the Ayurvedic approach in the treatment of HCcA are warranted to support these preliminary findings. PMID:26339267

  7. Reliability studies of diagnostic methods in Indian traditional Ayurveda medicine: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Kurande, Vrinda Hitendra; Waagepetersen, Rasmus; Toft, Egon; Prasad, Ramjee

    2013-01-01

    Recently, a need to develop supportive new scientific evidence for contemporary Ayurveda has emerged. One of the research objectives is an assessment of the reliability of diagnoses and treatment. Reliability is a quantitative measure of consistency. It is a crucial issue in classification (such as prakriti classification), method development (pulse diagnosis), quality assurance for diagnosis and treatment and in the conduct of clinical studies. Several reliability studies are conducted in western medicine. The investigation of the reliability of traditional Chinese, Japanese and Sasang medicine diagnoses is in the formative stage. However, reliability studies in Ayurveda are in the preliminary stage. In this paper, examples are provided to illustrate relevant concepts of reliability studies of diagnostic methods and their implication in practice, education, and training. An introduction to reliability estimates and different study designs and statistical analysis is given for future studies in Ayurveda. PMID:23930037

  8. The Biological Potentialsof Indian Traditional Medicine, Curcumin for Treating Human Diseases.

    PubMed

    Sumathi, C S

    2017-08-30

    Curcumin is an active compound extracted from the rhizomes of Curcuma longa L. (Turmeric). It possesses a di phenolic structure and there are three important fractions of curcumin namely curcumin, mono-desmethoxycurcumin and bis-desmethoxycurcumin. Curcumin is having high medicinal value. It is widely in Ayurveda, Siddha and Unani medicine formulations to treat various diseases. It is effective against microbial pathogens like bacteria, virus and fungi. It is highly potent and kills cancerous cells. Curcumin exhibits antioxidant activity and reduces lipoperoxidation. Cardioprotective nature of curcumin is also reported. It can protect the brain from neurodegenerative disorders caused by oxidative stress. It is safe to use in humans and animals. In addition to its medicinal value, it is also having numerous commercial applications like dyeing, cooking purposes and antiseptics etc. The cultivation of turmeric by means of inorganic inputs makes it contaminated with heavy metals is reported. Improving the biological use of curcumin provides healthy humankind and increases the economic status of a country. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  9. Hallucinations in the classical Indian system of Ayurveda: A brief overview.

    PubMed

    Balsavar, Anuradha; Deshpande, Smita N

    2014-10-01

    The ancient Indian system of medicine "Ayurveda" is a compendium of various health related theories and practices and explained the abnormal state of mind, i.e., psychopathology in various contexts. Hallucinations were deemed abnormal. In Ayurvedic classics, hallucinations were called false perceptions (mithyajnana), illusions (maya), infatuations (moha), or confusion (bhrama). Hallucinations were not independent but a symptom of mental disorder (manasa roga). Hallucinations of different sensory organs were observed and explained. These symptoms could be observed in patients suffering from any illness of tridosha origin, organic disease or psychiatric disorder. False perceptions observed in patients were used as tools to understand the prognosis of the condition. This article may help provide preliminary insight and encourage interdisciplinary study toward understanding one of the main symptoms of schizophrenia.

  10. Hallucinations in the classical Indian system of Ayurveda: A brief overview

    PubMed Central

    Balsavar, Anuradha; Deshpande, Smita N.

    2014-01-01

    The ancient Indian system of medicine “Ayurveda” is a compendium of various health related theories and practices and explained the abnormal state of mind, i.e., psychopathology in various contexts. Hallucinations were deemed abnormal. In Ayurvedic classics, hallucinations were called false perceptions (mithyajnana), illusions (maya), infatuations (moha), or confusion (bhrama). Hallucinations were not independent but a symptom of mental disorder (manasa roga). Hallucinations of different sensory organs were observed and explained. These symptoms could be observed in patients suffering from any illness of tridosha origin, organic disease or psychiatric disorder. False perceptions observed in patients were used as tools to understand the prognosis of the condition. This article may help provide preliminary insight and encourage interdisciplinary study toward understanding one of the main symptoms of schizophrenia. PMID:25568471

  11. AYURVEDIC APPROACH TO CLINICAL MEDICINE (PART-I)

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, S.K.

    1982-01-01

    The general status of clinical approach regarding the applications of clinical methodology has been reviewed under the spectacles of author's points. Also the subject of MANAHPARIKSANA has been critically analysed through the lenses of CARAKA and CAKRAPANIDATTA and its utility in present day clinical practices has been underlined. An appeal has been projected to the fellow Ayur-dists to shed of prejudices and hypocritical practices with an information and promise from our side to join hands PMID:22556949

  12. Antimutagenic activity of methanolic extracts of four ayurvedic medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Aqil, Farrukh; Zahin, Maryam; Ahmad, Iqbal

    2008-09-01

    Methanolic extracts of Acorus calamus (Rhizome), Hemidesmus indicus (Stem), Holarrhena antidysenterica (Bark) and Plumbago zeylanica (Root), were tested for their antimutagenic potential. These extracts, at tested concentrations, showed no sign of mutagenicity to Salmonella typhimurium tester strains. The extracts of the plants exhibited varying level of antimutagenicity. At a dose of 100 microg/plate, the extracts exhibited the inhibition of His+ revertants from 18.51% to 82.66% against direct acting mutagens, methyl methanesulphonate (MMS) and sodium azide (NaN3) induced mutagenicity in Salmonella tester strains TA 97a, TA 100, TA 102 and TA 104. However, at lower concentrations (25 and 50 mcirog/plate) of the plant extracts, a decrease in antimutagenic activity was recorded. Dose dependent antimutagenic activity of the extracts is also evident from linear regression analysis of the data. The over all antimutagenic potential of above four extracts was found to be in order of A. calamus > H. indicus > H. antidysenterica > P. zeylanica. Further, total phenolic content of these extracts did not correlate with its antimutagenic activity in A. calamus and P. zeylanica.

  13. Adaptogenic properties of six rasayana herbs used in Ayurvedic medicine.

    PubMed

    Rege, N N; Thatte, U M; Dahanukar, S A

    1999-06-01

    Plants from all over the world such as Eleutherococcus senticosus, Panax ginseng, Raponticum carthamoides, Rhodiola rosea, Withania somnifera and Ocimum sanctum have been extensively evaluated for their adaptogenic potential. However, none of them has been successfully introduced as an adaptogen in the clinic. This paper discusses some of the problems in evaluation of adaptogens which have precluded their inclusion as clinically useful drugs. We further discuss our results with six rasayana plants from Ayurveda, which were studied for their adaptogenic potential. The whole, aqueous, standardized extracts of selected plants (Tinospora cordifolia, Asparagus racemosus, Emblica officinalis, Withania somnifera, Piper longum and Terminalia chebula) were administered orally to experimental animals, in a dose extrapolated from the human dose, following which they were exposed to a variety of biological, physical and chemical stressors. These plants were found to offer protection against these stressors, as judged by using markers of stress responses and objective parameters for stress manifestations. Using a model of cisplatin induced alterations in gastrointestinal motility, the ability of these plants to exert a normalizing effect, irrespective of direction of pathological change was tested. All the plants reversed the effects of cisplatin on gastric emptying, while Tinospora cordifolia and Asparagus racemosus also normalized cisplatin induced intestinal hypermotility. Tinospora cordifolia was also tested for its ability to modulate the changes occurring in the phagocytic activity of peritoneal macrophages after exposure of rats to either carbon tetrachloride or horse serum. It was found to normalize the phagocytic function irrespective to the direction of change, complying to the definition of an adaptogen. All the plant drugs were found to be safe in both acute and subacute toxicity studies. Studies on the mechanisms of action of the plants revealed that they all produced immunostimulation. The protection offered by Tinospora cordifolia against stress induced gastric mucosal damage was lost if macrophage activity was blocked. Emblica officinalis strengthened the defence mechanisms against free radical damage induced during stress. The effect of Emblica officinalis appeared to depend on the ability of target tissues to synthesize prostaglandins. Recent data obtained with Tinospora cordifolia suggest that it may induce genotypic adaptation, further opening the arena for more research and experimentation.

  14. A case report of adult lead toxicity following use of Ayurvedic herbal medication

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Ayurvedic medications consist of herbs that may be intentionally combined with metals, such as lead, mercury, iron, and zinc. Ayurvedic practitioners and their patients believe that the toxic properties of the metals are reduced or eliminated during preparation and processing. Case report A 69 year old Caucasian male retired professional with a prior history of stroke presented for evaluation of new onset depression, fatigue, generalized weakness, constipation, anorexia, and weight loss. History revealed that his symptoms were temporally related to initiation of an Ayurvedic herbal medication. The patient had been previously admitted to another hospital for these symptoms and was found to have a severe anemia for which no etiology was found. Laboratory tests revealed an elevated blood lead level and a diagnosis of symptomatic lead toxicity was made. The patient was treated with intramuscular, intravenous, and oral chelation therapy to promote lead excretion. Because of complaints of continued poor mental function, neuropsychological tests were administered before and after one of the chelation treatments and showed improvement in measures of attention and other cognitive domains. In addition, the patient was able to discontinue use of antidepressant medication after chelation. Discussion A high index of suspicion of metal toxicity is necessary among persons with characteristic symptoms and signs in the absence of occupational exposure. Despite limited evidence for chelation in adults and in those with modest blood lead levels, this patient appeared to benefit from repeated chelation therapy. Both allopathic and alternative medicine practitioners and public health specialists need to be aware of the potential for contamination of and side effects from alternative pharmacologic and herbal therapies. PMID:24083830

  15. Geology and ground-water resources of the Two Medicine unit and adjacent areas, Blackfeet Indian Reservation, Montana, with a section on chemical quality of water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paulson, Q.F.; Zimmerman, Tom V.; Langford, Russell H.

    1965-01-01

    The Two Medicine Irrigation Unit, on the Blackfeet Indian Reservation of northern Montana, is irrigated by water diverted from Two Medicine Creek. Waterlogging because of overapplication of water and locally inadequate subsurface drainage is a serious problem. This study was undertaken by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs to evaluate the problem and to suggest remedies. For this study, the geology was mapped, and data concerning 129 wells and test holes were gathered. The water level in 63 wells was measured periodically. Three test holes were drilled and 4 single-well and 1 multiple-well pump tests were made. Nineteen samples of ground water were collected and analyzed chemically, and applied irrigation water was analyzed periodically.

  16. Importance of novel drug delivery systems in herbal medicines

    PubMed Central

    Devi, V. Kusum; Jain, Nimisha; Valli, Kusum S.

    2010-01-01

    Novel drug delivery system is a novel approach to drug delivery that addresses the limitations of the traditional drug delivery systems. Our country has a vast knowledge base of Ayurveda whose potential is only being realized in the recent years. However, the drug delivery system used for administering the herbal medicine to the patient is traditional and out-of-date, resulting in reduced efficacy of the drug. If the novel drug delivery technology is applied in herbal medicine, it may help in increasing the efficacy and reducing the side effects of various herbal compounds and herbs. This is the basic idea behind incorporating novel method of drug delivery in herbal medicines. Thus it is important to integrate novel drug delivery system and Indian Ayurvedic medicines to combat more serious diseases. For a long time herbal medicines were not considered for development as novel formulations owing to lack of scientific justification and processing difficulties, such as standardization, extraction and identification of individual drug components in complex polyherbal systems. However, modern phytopharmaceutical research can solve the scientific needs (such as determination of pharmacokinetics, mechanism of action, site of action, accurate dose required etc.) of herbal medicines to be incorporated in novel drug delivery system, such as nanoparticles, microemulsions, matrix systems, solid dispersions, liposomes, solid lipid nanoparticles and so on. This article summarizes various drug delivery technologies, which can be used for herbal actives together with some examples. PMID:22228938

  17. Importance of novel drug delivery systems in herbal medicines.

    PubMed

    Devi, V Kusum; Jain, Nimisha; Valli, Kusum S

    2010-01-01

    Novel drug delivery system is a novel approach to drug delivery that addresses the limitations of the traditional drug delivery systems. Our country has a vast knowledge base of Ayurveda whose potential is only being realized in the recent years. However, the drug delivery system used for administering the herbal medicine to the patient is traditional and out-of-date, resulting in reduced efficacy of the drug. If the novel drug delivery technology is applied in herbal medicine, it may help in increasing the efficacy and reducing the side effects of various herbal compounds and herbs. This is the basic idea behind incorporating novel method of drug delivery in herbal medicines. Thus it is important to integrate novel drug delivery system and Indian Ayurvedic medicines to combat more serious diseases. For a long time herbal medicines were not considered for development as novel formulations owing to lack of scientific justification and processing difficulties, such as standardization, extraction and identification of individual drug components in complex polyherbal systems. However, modern phytopharmaceutical research can solve the scientific needs (such as determination of pharmacokinetics, mechanism of action, site of action, accurate dose required etc.) of herbal medicines to be incorporated in novel drug delivery system, such as nanoparticles, microemulsions, matrix systems, solid dispersions, liposomes, solid lipid nanoparticles and so on. This article summarizes various drug delivery technologies, which can be used for herbal actives together with some examples.

  18. Gymnema sylvestre R. Br., an Indian medicinal herb: traditional uses, chemical composition, and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Di Fabio, Giovanni; Romanucci, Valeria; Di Marino, Cinzia; Pisanti, Antonio; Zarrelli, Armando

    2015-01-01

    Gymnema sylvestre R. Br. is one of the most important medicinal plants that grows in tropical forests in India and South East Asia. Its active ingredients and extracts of leaves and roots are used in traditional medicine to treat various ailments and they are present in the market for pharmaceutical and parapharmaceutical products. Commercial products based on substances of plant origin that are generally connoted as natural have to be subjected to monitoring and evaluation by health authorities for their potential impacts on public health. The monitoring and evaluation of these products are critical because the boundary between a therapeutic action and a functional or healthy activity has not yet been defined in a clear and unambiguous way. Therefore, these products are considered borderline products, and they require careful and rigorous studies, in order to use them as complement and/or even replacement of synthetic drugs that are characterized by side effects and high economic costs. This review explores the traditional uses, chemical composition and biological activity of G. sylvestre extracts, providing a general framework on the most interesting extracts and what are the necessary studies for a complete definition of the range of activities.

  19. A novel approach to study antibacterial properties of volatile components of selected Indian medicinal herbs.

    PubMed

    Agnihotri, S; Vaidya, A D

    1996-07-01

    The aromatic substances of natural origin are used medicinally in Ayurveda, and can have diverse bio-dynamic actions. The existing methods like agar-cup method or disc diffusion method are not adequate to study the exclusive antibacterial effects of the volatile components of aromatic oils due to lack of ideal diffusion and evaporation from the surface. Hence an attempt is made to develop a novel approach to assess the antibacterial activity of few aromatic herbs like Eugenia caryophyllus, Thymus vulgaris, Cinnamonum zeylanium, Cuminum cyminum; these were extracted with hexane filled in tiny sterile tubes and the volatile components were tested for their antibacterial properties using standard strains of gram +ve and gram -ve bacteria grown on agar slants. The results are expressed as a percent of inhibition of the area on the slants, from the top of the extract tube. Of the four herbs selected, volatile components of Thymus vulgaris were most effective againsts all the seven test organisms.

  20. Extraoral Taste Receptor Discovery: New Light on Ayurvedic Pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Gilca, Marilena; Dragos, Dorin

    2017-01-01

    More and more research studies are revealing unexpectedly important roles of taste for health and pathogenesis of various diseases. Only recently it has been shown that taste receptors have many extraoral locations (e.g., stomach, intestines, liver, pancreas, respiratory system, heart, brain, kidney, urinary bladder, pancreas, adipose tissue, testis, and ovary), being part of a large diffuse chemosensory system. The functional implications of these taste receptors widely dispersed in various organs or tissues shed a new light on several concepts used in ayurvedic pharmacology (dravyaguna vijnana), such as taste (rasa), postdigestive effect (vipaka), qualities (guna), and energetic nature (virya). This review summarizes the significance of extraoral taste receptors and transient receptor potential (TRP) channels for ayurvedic pharmacology, as well as the biological activities of various types of phytochemical tastants from an ayurvedic perspective. The relative importance of taste (rasa), postdigestive effect (vipaka), and energetic nature (virya) as ethnopharmacological descriptors within Ayurveda boundaries will also be discussed.

  1. Extraoral Taste Receptor Discovery: New Light on Ayurvedic Pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    More and more research studies are revealing unexpectedly important roles of taste for health and pathogenesis of various diseases. Only recently it has been shown that taste receptors have many extraoral locations (e.g., stomach, intestines, liver, pancreas, respiratory system, heart, brain, kidney, urinary bladder, pancreas, adipose tissue, testis, and ovary), being part of a large diffuse chemosensory system. The functional implications of these taste receptors widely dispersed in various organs or tissues shed a new light on several concepts used in ayurvedic pharmacology (dravyaguna vijnana), such as taste (rasa), postdigestive effect (vipaka), qualities (guna), and energetic nature (virya). This review summarizes the significance of extraoral taste receptors and transient receptor potential (TRP) channels for ayurvedic pharmacology, as well as the biological activities of various types of phytochemical tastants from an ayurvedic perspective. The relative importance of taste (rasa), postdigestive effect (vipaka), and energetic nature (virya) as ethnopharmacological descriptors within Ayurveda boundaries will also be discussed. PMID:28642799

  2. Ayurvedic interventions for osteoarthritis: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Kessler, Christian S; Pinders, Lea; Michalsen, Andreas; Cramer, Holger

    2015-02-01

    Ayurveda is one of the fastest growing systems within complementary and alternative medicine. However, the evidence for its effectiveness is unsatisfactory. The aim of this work was to review and meta-analyze the effectiveness and safety of different Ayurvedic interventions in patients with osteoarthritis (OA). 138 electronic databases were searched through August 2013. Randomized controlled trials, randomized crossover studies, cluster-randomized trials, and non-randomized controlled clinical trials were eligible. Adults with pre-diagnosed OA were included as participants. Interventions were included as Ayurvedic if they were explicitly labeled as such. Main outcome measures were pain, physical function, and global improvement. Risk of bias was assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. 19 randomized and 14 non-randomized controlled trials on 12 different drugs and 3 non-pharmaceutical interventions with a total of 2,952 patients were included. For the compound preparation, Rumalaya, large and apparently unbiased effects beyond placebo were found for pain (standardized mean difference [SMD] -3.73; 95 % confidence interval [CI] -4.97, -2.50; P < 0.01) and global improvement (risk ratio 12.20; 95 % CI 5.83, 25.54; P < 0.01). There is also some evidence that effects of the herbal compound preparation Shunti-Guduchi are comparable to those of glucosamine for pain (SMD 0.08; 95 % CI -0.20, 0.36; P = 0.56) and function (SMD 0.15; 95 % CI -0.12, 0.36; P = 0.41). Based on single trials, positive effects were found for the compound preparations RA-11, Reosto, and Siriraj Wattana. For Boswellia serrata, Lepidium Sativum, a Boswellia serrata containing multicomponent formulation and the compounds Nirgundi Taila, Panchatikta Ghrita Guggulu, and Rhumayog, and for non-pharmacological interventions like Ayurvedic massage, steam therapy, and enema, no evidence for significant effects against potential methodological bias was found. No severe adverse events were observed in

  3. Report of the Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare on the Need for and Feasibility of Establishing an American Indian School of Medicine, as Required by Title VI of the Indian Health Care Improvement Act (Public Law 94-437). Report to Congress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cresap, McCormick, and Paget, Inc., New York, NY.

    Based on all factors considered during an independently conducted six month long needs assessment and feasibility study in response to the Indian Health Care Improvement Act, Title VI, the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare reports on the need for an American Indian school of medicine (AISOM). A separate innovative educational…

  4. Comparison of Sasang Constitutional Medicine, Traditional Chinese Medicine and Ayurveda

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong Yeol; Pham, Duong Duc; Koh, Byung Hee

    2011-01-01

    Sasang constitutional medicine (SCM), traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and Ayurveda are three different forms of Asian traditional medicine. Although these traditions share a lot in common as holistic medicines, the different philosophical foundations found in each confer distinguishing attributes and unique qualities. SCM is based on a constitution-based approach, and is in this way relatively more similar to the Ayurvedic tradition than to the TCM, although many of the basic SCM theories were originally derived from TCM, a syndrome-based medicine. SCM and TCM use the same botanical materials that are distributed mainly in the East Asian region, but the basic principles of usage and the underlying rationale are completely different from each other. Meanwhile, the principles of the Ayurvedic use of botanical resources are very similar to those seen in SCM, but the medicinal herbs used in Ayurveda generally originate from the West Asian region which displays a different spectrum of flora. PMID:21949669

  5. Toxicological studies of "Chondrokola Rosh", an Ayurvedic preparation on liver function tests of rats.

    PubMed

    Nasrin, S; Bachar, S C; Choudhuri, M S K

    2011-01-01

    Chondrokola Rosh (CKR) is a traditional metallic Ayurvedic preparation widely used by the rural and ethnic people of Bangladesh in dysuria. It is a preparation of various roasted metals (Hg and Cu), non-metal (sulphur and Mica) and medicinal herbs. Considering the controversy over the risk of toxic heavy metals in Ayurvedic herbo-mineral preparations, toxicological parameters on liver functions were investigated. A single dose of 100mg/kg body weight of the preparation was administered orally to the rats of both sexes for ninety days. In this evaluation a statistically significant (p<0.001) increase of serum albumin levels in male (17%) and female (15%) rat groups were observed. On the other hand, the plasma bilirubin level was decreased 50% and 28% respectively in both rats groups. But no remarkable differences were observed in plasma protein, sGPT, sGOT and ALP activities from their corresponding control values. This study showed that CKR had no remarkable toxic effect on liver of the animals despite the presence of traces of transformed heavy metals.

  6. The Effect of a Complex Multi-modality Ayurvedic Treatment in a Case of Unknown Female Infertility.

    PubMed

    Kessler, Christian; Stapelfeldt, Elmar; Michalsen, Andreas; Kowalcek, Ingrid; Kronpaß, Ludwig; Dhruva, Anand

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of female infertility has been growing globally in recent years. In spite of improvements in medical strategies and the improved outcomes for infertile couples, treatment attempts remain largely unsuccessful. A growing number of patients pursue complementary and alternative medicine treatment options like Ayurveda that offers a variety of inpatient and outpatient treatments for infertility. A case of a 38 year-old woman with infertility of unknown origin is presented. She received 18 conventional fertility treatments in 5 different fertility centers and 3 different countries. After several complications, the patient quitted conventional treatment and admitted to an Ayurvedic outpatient clinic where she received a complex Ayurvedic treatment, which included botanicals, dietary and lifestyle advice, manual therapy, yoga, and spiritual elements. The patient then became pregnant and gave birth to a healthy boy in 2012. Ayurveda may be a useful complementary option in the case of futile conventional treatment attempts in female infertility. Nevertheless, the evidence base for Ayurvedic interventions remains weak and requires well-designed clinical trials. This case raises some questions, such as whether the exposure to a large number of assisted reproduction procedures can lead to more health problems than health benefits. The Ayurvedic approach to fertility strives first to improve the health of the patient leading to a higher likelihood of pregnancy. As this is a case report, we are not able to exclude temporal factors stimulating the pregnancy. However, the chronology suggests that this approach might have been an important factor in the eventual pregnancy. © 2015 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  7. Alternative medicine: an ethnographic study of how practitioners of Indian medical systems manage TB in Mumbai.

    PubMed

    McDowell, Andrew; Pai, Madhukar

    2016-03-01

    Mumbai is a hot spot for drug-resistant TB, and private practitioners trained in AYUSH systems (Ayurveda, yoga, Unani, Siddha and homeopathy) are major healthcare providers. It is important to understand how AYUSH practitioners manage patients with TB or presumptive TB. We conducted semi-structured interviews of 175 Mumbai slum-based practitioners holding degrees in Ayurveda, homeopathy and Unani. Most providers gave multiple interviews. We observed 10 providers in clinical interactions, documenting: clinical examinations, symptoms, history taking, prescriptions and diagnostic tests. No practitioners exclusively used his or her system of training. The practice of biomedicine is frequent, with practitioners often using biomedical disease categories and diagnostics. The use of homeopathy was rare (only 4% of consultations with homeopaths resulted in homeopathic remedies) and Ayurveda rarer (3% of consultations). For TB, all mentioned chest x-ray while 31 (17.7%) mentioned sputum smear as a TB test. One hundred and sixty-four practitioners (93.7%) reported referring TB patients to a public hospital or chest physician. Eleven practitioners (6.3%) reported treating patients with TB. Nine (5.1%) reported treating patients with drug-susceptible TB with at least one second-line drug. Important sources of health care in Mumbai's slums, AYUSH physicians frequently use biomedical therapies and most refer patients with TB to chest physicians or the public sector. They are integral to TB care and control. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Evaluation of Anticancer, Antioxidant, and Possible Anti-inflammatory Properties of Selected Medicinal Plants Used in Indian Traditional Medication

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Rafik; Pund, Mahesh; Dawane, Ashwini; Iliyas, Sayyed

    2014-01-01

    The present study was carried out to evaluate the anticancer, antioxidant, and possible anti-inflammatory properties of diverse medicinal plants frequently used in Indian traditional medication. The selected botanicals such as Soymida fembrifuga (Roxb.) A. Juss. (Miliaceae), Tinospora cordifolia (Willd.) Miers. (Menispermaceae), Lavandula bipinnata (L.) O. Ktze. (Lamiaceae), and Helicteres isora L. (Sterculiaceae) extracted in different solvents were evaluated for their in vitro anticancer and antioxidant activities. The results obtained indicate that H. isora has potent cytotoxic activity toward the selected cancer cells such as HeLa-B75 (34.21 ± 0.24%), HL-60 (30.25 ± 1.36%), HEP-3B (25.36 ± 1.78%), and PN-15 (29.21 ± 0.52%). Interestingly, the selected botanicals selectively inhibited cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) more than (COX-1), which are the key enzymes implicated in inflammation. COX-2 inhibition was observed to be in the range of 19.66-49.52% as compared to COX-1 inhibition (3.93-19.61%). The results of the antioxidant study revealed that the selected plants were found to be effective 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), hydroxyl (OH), and superoxide radical (SOR) scavenging agents. High-performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC) fingerprint of flavonoids was used as a measure of quality control of the selected plant samples. The results of the present findings strengthen the potential of the selected plants as a resource for the discovery of novel anticancer, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant agents. PMID:25379467

  9. Evaluation of Anticancer, Antioxidant, and Possible Anti-inflammatory Properties of Selected Medicinal Plants Used in Indian Traditional Medication.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Rafik; Pund, Mahesh; Dawane, Ashwini; Iliyas, Sayyed

    2014-10-01

    The present study was carried out to evaluate the anticancer, antioxidant, and possible anti-inflammatory properties of diverse medicinal plants frequently used in Indian traditional medication. The selected botanicals such as Soymida fembrifuga (Roxb.) A. Juss. (Miliaceae), Tinospora cordifolia (Willd.) Miers. (Menispermaceae), Lavandula bipinnata (L.) O. Ktze. (Lamiaceae), and Helicteres isora L. (Sterculiaceae) extracted in different solvents were evaluated for their in vitro anticancer and antioxidant activities. The results obtained indicate that H. isora has potent cytotoxic activity toward the selected cancer cells such as HeLa-B75 (34.21 ± 0.24%), HL-60 (30.25 ± 1.36%), HEP-3B (25.36 ± 1.78%), and PN-15 (29.21 ± 0.52%). Interestingly, the selected botanicals selectively inhibited cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) more than (COX-1), which are the key enzymes implicated in inflammation. COX-2 inhibition was observed to be in the range of 19.66-49.52% as compared to COX-1 inhibition (3.93-19.61%). The results of the antioxidant study revealed that the selected plants were found to be effective 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), hydroxyl (OH), and superoxide radical (SOR) scavenging agents. High-performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC) fingerprint of flavonoids was used as a measure of quality control of the selected plant samples. The results of the present findings strengthen the potential of the selected plants as a resource for the discovery of novel anticancer, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant agents.

  10. A REVIEW ON THE AYURVEDIC HERB TRIBULUS TERRESTRIS L.

    PubMed Central

    Ukani, M.D.; Nanavati, D.D.; Mehta, N.K.

    1997-01-01

    Gokhshura (Tribulus Linn) of Family Zygophyllaceae is an indigenous plant which has been mentioned in Ayurveda with several clinical properties. The plant finds use in one form or the other in various ayurvedic preparations and this has been made it necessary to review the various studies carried out in its chemistry as well as pharmacology. PMID:22556836

  11. Steven-Johnson syndrome due to ayurvedic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Shivamurthy, Raghu Prasada M.; Kallappa, Ravindra; Reddy, Shashikala G. H.; Rangappa, Druva Kumar B.

    2012-01-01

    Steven–Johnson syndrome may be considered as a cytotoxic immune reaction to drugs, infections etc. This is a case report of Steven–Johnson syndrome due to an ayurvedic preparation which was used in the treatment of mental retardation in a young girl. PMID:22345890

  12. A pilot study on Ayurvedic management of oral submucous fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Patel, Kundan R; Rajagopala, Manjusha; Vaghela, Dharmendrasinh B; Shah, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF) is a chronic debilitating disease and a well-recognized potentially premalignant condition of the oral cavity. Various medical and surgical treatment modalities have been used in modern science, but results are not satisfactory owing to recurrence, adverse effects, and sometimes worsening the condition. On analyzing the disease condition with Ayurvedic approach, it seems to be nearer to Vata-Pitta dominant chronic Sarvasara Mukharoga and needs to be treated at local as well as systemic level. To evaluate the effect of proposed Ayurvedic treatment protocol in the patients of OSMF. It was an open-label nonrandomized clinical trial with black box design comprising of holistic Ayurvedic approach in which 22 patients of OSMF completed the treatment. In all of them after Koshthashuddhi (mild purgation) and Shodhana Nasya (errhine therapy); Pratisarana (external application) with Madhupippalyadi Yoga, Kavala (gargling) with Ksheerabala Taila and internally Rasayana Yoga were given for 2 months and followed for 1 month. It revealed statistically highly significant relief in almost all signs and symptoms as well in inter incisal distance improvement. Furthermore, sustained relief was found in follow-up. Ayurvedic treatment protocol is effective in the management of OSMF.

  13. Post-surgical management of pontine hemorrhage with Ayurvedic treatment.

    PubMed

    Manojkumar, Areekkat; Aramya, A R

    2013-04-01

    A female aged 30 years, consulted the Govt. Ayurveda Hospital, Perinthalmanna with complaints of left side of the body totally paralysed along with severe shivering of the right hand and head and the patient was bedridden for 1½ years. She was diagnosed earlier with spontaneous pontine hematoma (on 10(th) Nov 2007) and had undergone midline sub occipital craniectomy (on 13(th) Nov 2007) as an emergency treatment. She developed neurotrophic ulcer in the right eye with lagophthalmos post-surgery. The patient showed no improvement to treatment but further developed stromal abscess and hence paramedian tarsorraphy (4(th) Jan 2008) was done. The deficits in the right eye led to diminution of vision of that eye after Allopathy treatment. The patient sought Ayurvedic treatment for a better prognosis. The patient was under Ayurvedic treatment from 5(th) Mar 2009 to 24(th) Nov 2009. During that period Ayurvedic treatment such as abhyaṅga (oil massage), patra poṭṭalī sveda (use of poultices) and mṛdu virecana (purgation) was also done. After a period of 8 months of internal medication and treatment, the shivering of the right hand and head resolved. She could move the left leg and left hand and started walking without support. There was gradual loss of vision during the course of Ayurvedic treatment. At present, the patient is able to move around and do household works on her own.

  14. A Review on the Ayurvedic Herb Prosopis cineraria (L) Druce.

    PubMed Central

    Ukani, M.D.; Limbani, N.B; Mehta, N.K

    2000-01-01

    Shami (Prosopis Cinerarea (L) Druce) of family Mimosaceae is an indigenous plant which has been mentioned in Ayurveda with several clinical properties(1). The plant finds use in one form of the other in various ayurvedic preparations and this has been made in necessary to review the various studies carried out in its chemistry as well as pharmacology. PMID:22556999

  15. Conducting literature searches on Ayurveda in PubMed, Indian, and other databases.

    PubMed

    Narahari, Saravu R; Aggithaya, Madhur Guruprasad; Suraj, Kumbla R

    2010-11-01

    Literature searches for articles on Ayurveda provide special challenges, since many of the Indian journals in which such articles appear are not indexed by current medical databases such as PubMed and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. The aim of this study was to develop a comprehensive search strategy on Ayurveda topics and to map the existing databases containing Ayurveda journal publications. We have developed a literature search procedure that can recover the great majority of articles on any given topic associated with Ayurveda. Our system is formulated in an easily reproducible fashion that all researchers can use. Using the keywords related to Ayurveda and vitiligo, we searched 41 databases that may contain complementary and alternative medicine publications. Only 11 databases yielded results; PubMed contained 9 articles. Each of 14 other databases named in our search procedure averaged 23 articles. International Bibliographic Information of Dietary Supplements, for example, gave 22, of which 1 satisfied our eligibility criteria. "Annotated Bibliography of Indian Medicine" gave 47, of which 7 satisfied eligibility criteria. This article proposes guidelines enabling comprehensive searches to locate all types of Ayurvedic articles, not necessarily only randomized controlled trials.

  16. Bridging Ayurveda with evidence-based scientific approaches in medicine.

    PubMed

    Patwardhan, Bhushan

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews contemporary approaches for bridging Ayurveda with evidence-based medicine. In doing so, the author presents a pragmatic assessment of quality, methodology and extent of scientific research in Ayurvedic medicine. The article discusses the meaning of evidence and indicates the need to adopt epistemologically sensitive methods and rigorous experimentation using modern science. The author critically analyzes the status of Ayurvedic medicine based on personal observations, peer interactions and published research. This review article concludes that traditional knowledge systems like Ayurveda and modern scientific evidence-based medicine should be integrated. The author advocates that Ayurvedic researchers should develop strategic collaborations with innovative initiatives like 'Horizon 2020' involving predictive, preventive and personalized medicine (PPPM).

  17. First ayurvedic approach towards green drugs: anti cervical cancer-cell properties of Clerodendrum viscosum root extract.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chong; Nirmalananda, Swami; Jenkins, Charles E; Debnath, Shawon; Balambika, Rema; Fata, Jimmie E; Raja, Krishnaswami S

    2013-12-01

    The concept of Ayurvedic expert guided drug discovery and development is defined and put to test systematically for the first time in literature. Western Science has explored only ~5% of the approximately 25,000 species of higher plants for drug leads. The ancient medical science of Ayurveda has however employed a much larger spectrum of plants for clinical treatment. Clerodendrum viscosum (CV), a commonly growing weed in the Indian subcontinent has been employed by S. Nirmalananda (Ayurvedic expert) for the treatment of cervical cancer. Here we isolate and characterize a water extract fraction (Cv-AP) from the root of CV and evaluate its anticervical cancer cell bioactivity. Our results indicate that Cv-AP possesses pro-apoptotic, anti-proliferative, and anti-migratory activity in a dose-dependent fashion against cervical cancer cell lines. In contrast, primary fibroblasts (control healthy cells), when exposed to similar concentrations of this extract, fail to undergo apoptosis and remain relatively unaffected. These findings suggest that Clerodendrum viscosum (CV) is a readily available source of components with potent anti-cancer activity and selective bioactivity against cervical cancer cells. The major component in CV-AP was identified as a glycoprotein via SDS Page and Concanavalin-A binding studies. This study serves to illustrate that systematic collaboration with Ayurveda is a practical and powerful strategy in drug discovery and development.

  18. Infertility caused by tubal blockage: An ayurvedic appraisal

    PubMed Central

    Shukla (Upadhyaya), Kamayani; Karunagoda, Kaumadi; Dei, L. P.

    2010-01-01

    Tubal blockage is one of the most important factors for female infertility. This condition is not described in Ayurvedic classics, as the fallopian tube itself is not mentioned directly there. The present study is an effort to understand the disease according to Ayurvedic principles. Correlating fallopian tubes with the Artavavaha (Artava-bija-vaha) Srotas, its block is compared with the Sanga Srotodushti of this Srotas. Charak's opinion that the diseases are innumerable and newly discovered ones should be understood in terms of Prakriti, Adhishthana, Linga, and Aayatana, is followed, to describe this disease. An effort has been made to evaluate the role of all the three Doshas in producing blockage, with classification of the disease done as per the Dasha Roganika. PMID:22131704

  19. Antiviral activity of the Indian medicinal plant extract Swertia chirata against herpes simplex viruses: a study by in-vitro and molecular approach.

    PubMed

    Verma, H; Patil, P R; Kolhapure, R M; Gopalkrishna, V

    2008-01-01

    The antiviral activity of Indian Medicinal plant extract Swertia chirata was tested against Herpes simplex virus (HSV) type-1, using multiple approaches both at cellular and molecular level. Cytotoxicity, plaque reduction, virus infectivity, antigen expression and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays were conducted to test the antiviral activity of the plant extract. Swertia plant crude extract (1 gm/mL) at 1:64 dilution inhibited HSV-1, plaque formation at more than 70% level. HSV antigen expression and time kinetics experiments conducted by indirect immunofluorescence (IFA) test, revealed a characteristic pattern of small foci of single fluorescent cells in Swertia extract treated HSV-1 infected cells at 4 hours post infection dose, suggested drug inhibited viral dissemination. Infected cell cultures treated with Swertia extract at various time intervals, tested by PCR, failed to show amplification at 12, 24-72 hours. HSV-1 infected cells treated with Acyclovir (antiviral drug) did not show any amplification by PCR. In this preliminary study, the Indian medicinal plant extract, Swertia chirata showed antiviral properties against Herpes simplex virus type-1.

  20. Indianization of psychiatry utilizing Indian mental concepts.

    PubMed

    Avasthi, Ajit; Kate, Natasha; Grover, Sandeep

    2013-01-01

    Most of the psychiatry practice in India is guided by the western concepts of mental health and illness, which have largely ignored the role of religion, family, eastern philosophy, and medicine in understanding and managing the psychiatric disorders. India comprises of diverse cultures, languages, ethnicities, and religious affiliations. However, besides these diversities, there are certain commonalities, which include Hinduism as a religion which is spread across the country, the traditional family system, ancient Indian system of medicine and emphasis on use of traditional methods like Yoga and Meditation for controlling mind. This article discusses as to how mind and mental health are understood from the point of view of Hinduism, Indian traditions and Indian systems of medicine. Further, the article focuses on as to how these Indian concepts can be incorporated in the practice of contemporary psychiatry.

  1. Indianization of psychiatry utilizing Indian mental concepts

    PubMed Central

    Avasthi, Ajit; Kate, Natasha; Grover, Sandeep

    2013-01-01

    Most of the psychiatry practice in India is guided by the western concepts of mental health and illness, which have largely ignored the role of religion, family, eastern philosophy, and medicine in understanding and managing the psychiatric disorders. India comprises of diverse cultures, languages, ethnicities, and religious affiliations. However, besides these diversities, there are certain commonalities, which include Hinduism as a religion which is spread across the country, the traditional family system, ancient Indian system of medicine and emphasis on use of traditional methods like Yoga and Meditation for controlling mind. This article discusses as to how mind and mental health are understood from the point of view of Hinduism, Indian traditions and Indian systems of medicine. Further, the article focuses on as to how these Indian concepts can be incorporated in the practice of contemporary psychiatry. PMID:23858244

  2. Determination of Quality Standards for Draksharishta, a Polyherbal Ayurvedic Formulation.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Divya; Pandita, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Draksharishta is an ayurvedic polyherbal formulation is prescribed for digestive impairment, respiratory disorders and weakness. Though the formula composition and therapeutic claims of draksharishta are part of the Ayurvedic Formulary of India, the scientific methods for its quality and safety evaluation are yet to be documented. The current work is an attempt to evaluate the quality parameters of draksharishta which has been checked vis a vis herbs used in the formulation by modern scientific control procedures like macroscopic and microscopic study, physico-chemical analysis, preliminary phytochemical analysis, thin layer chromatography and high performance thin layer chromatography to fix the quality standard of this formulation with reference to two marketed formulations i.e. M1 and M2, respectively. The quality control parameters were within the limit as per the Ayurvedic Pharmacopeia of India which signifies good quality and purity of the plant materials. Thin layer chromatography profiles showed the presence of gallic acid, catechin and resveratrol and further it was confirmed by HPTLC fingerprints. The results obtained can be used by pharmaceutical companies as quality control parameters in order to have a proper quality check during processing.

  3. Determination of Quality Standards for Draksharishta, a Polyherbal Ayurvedic Formulation

    PubMed Central

    Pillai, Divya; Pandita, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Draksharishta is an ayurvedic polyherbal formulation is prescribed for digestive impairment, respiratory disorders and weakness. Though the formula composition and therapeutic claims of draksharishta are part of the Ayurvedic Formulary of India, the scientific methods for its quality and safety evaluation are yet to be documented. The current work is an attempt to evaluate the quality parameters of draksharishta which has been checked vis a vis herbs used in the formulation by modern scientific control procedures like macroscopic and microscopic study, physico-chemical analysis, preliminary phytochemical analysis, thin layer chromatography and high performance thin layer chromatography to fix the quality standard of this formulation with reference to two marketed formulations i.e. M1 and M2, respectively. The quality control parameters were within the limit as per the Ayurvedic Pharmacopeia of India which signifies good quality and purity of the plant materials. Thin layer chromatography profiles showed the presence of gallic acid, catechin and resveratrol and further it was confirmed by HPTLC fingerprints. The results obtained can be used by pharmaceutical companies as quality control parameters in order to have a proper quality check during processing. PMID:27168691

  4. Characterization of Tarakeshwara Rasa: An Ayurvedic herbomineral formulation.

    PubMed

    Virupaksha, Gupta K L; Kumar, Neeraj

    2012-07-01

    Tarakeshwara Rasa (TR) is an Ayurvedic herbomineral compound formulation used in the intervention of Prameha vis-à-vis diabetes mellitus. The present study was executed to establish a fingerprint for this unique formulation, which can be adopted by the Ayurvedic pharmacies for drug standardization. TR is a formulation prepared by the trituration of four ingredients Abhraka Bhasma (AB), Loha Bhasma (LB), Vanga Bhasma (VB) and Rasa Sindhura (RS) in equal quantities with honey for one day. Each of the ingredients were prepared according to the norms of Ayurvedic classical texts and by employing Electric Muffle Furnace as heating device for incineration. To ensure the proper preparation of Bhasmas, standard tests (Bhasma Pariksha) were employed. After Bhasma complies these tests, TR was prepared and subjected for qualitative analysis, X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) studies. LB, AB, VB, RS and TR were also studied for free metal presence by employing phosphomolybdic acid. Chemical analysis of TR reveals that it contains Fe, Sn, Hg, Al, Mn, Ca and Mg. XRD study indicates that TR contains Fe2O3 (maghamite) in major phase and SnO2 (cassiterite), HgS, SiO2, HgO in minor phases. SEM study revealed that the compound is an agglomeration of particles. The particle size was in between 0.5 and 2 μ. Free metal detection by phosphomolybdic acid revealed the absence of free metals in the final Bhasmas. This is the first study establishing the characterization of Tarakeshwara Rasa.

  5. Inhibition of imiquimod-induced psoriasis-like dermatitis in mice by herbal extracts from some Indian medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Arora, Neha; Shah, Kavita; Pandey-Rai, Shashi

    2016-03-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic autoimmune human skin disorder that is characterized by excessive proliferation of keratinocytes, scaly plaques, severe inflammation and erythema. The pathophysiology of psoriasis involves interplay between epidermal keratinocytes, T lymphocytes, leukocytes and vascular endothelium. Increased leukocyte recruitment and elevated levels of cytokines, growth factors and genetic factors like interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-17, IL-22, IL-23, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interferon (IFN)-γ, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, toll-like receptor (TLR)-2, signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT-3), 15-lipoxygenase (LOX)-2, coiled-coil alpha-helical rod protein 1 (CCHCR1), steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) and vitamin D receptor (VDR) are the most critical factors governing the exacerbation of psoriasis. In the present study, an attempt was made to elucidate the preventive role of herbal extracts of four dermo-protective Ayurvedic plants, Tinospora cordifolia (TC), Curcuma longa (CL), Celastrus paniculatus (CP) and Aloe vera (AV), against psoriasis-like dermatitis. Parkes (P) strain mice were initially induced with psoriasis-like dermatitis using topical application of imiquimod (IMQ, 5 %), followed by subsequent treatment with the herbal extracts to examine their curative effect on the psoriasis-like dermatitis-induced mice. The extracts were orally/topically administered to mice according to their ED/LD50 doses. Phenotypical observations, histological examinations, and semi-quantitative reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) analyses of the skin and blood samples of the control, IMQ-treated and herbal extract-treated psoriasis-like dermatitis-induced mice lead to the conclusion that the combination extract from all the plants was instrumental in downregulating the overexpressed cytokines, which was followed by the CL extract. Moreover, lesser yet positive response was evident from CP and TC extracts. The results suggest

  6. End-of-life care policy: An integrated care plan for the dying: A Joint Position Statement of the Indian Society of Critical Care Medicine (ISCCM) and the Indian Association of Palliative Care (IAPC).

    PubMed

    Myatra, Sheila Nainan; Salins, Naveen; Iyer, Shivakumar; Macaden, Stanley C; Divatia, Jigeeshu V; Muckaden, Maryann; Kulkarni, Priyadarshini; Simha, Srinagesh; Mani, Raj Kumar

    2014-09-01

    The purpose was to develop an end-of-life care (EOLC) policy for patients who are dying with an advanced life limiting illness and to develop practical procedural guidelines for limiting inappropriate therapeutic medical interventions and improve the quality of care of the dying within an ethical framework and through a professional and family/patient consensus process. The Indian Society of Critical Care Medicine (ISCCM) published its first guidelines on EOLC in 2005 [1] which was later revised in 2012.[2] Since these publications, there has been an exponential increase in empirical information and discussion on the subject. The literature reviewed observational studies, surveys, randomized controlled studies, as well as guidelines and recommendations, for education and quality improvement published across the world. The search terms were: EOLC; do not resuscitate directives; withdrawal and withholding; intensive care; terminal care; medical futility; ethical issues; palliative care; EOLC in India; cultural variations. Indian Association of Palliative Care (IAPC) also recently published its consensus position statement on EOLC policy for the dying.[3]. An expert committee of members of the ISCCM and IAPC was formed to make a joint EOLC policy for the dying patients. Proposals from the chair were discussed, debated, and recommendations were formulated through a consensus process. The members extensively reviewed national and international established ethical principles and current procedural practices. This joint EOLC policy has incorporated the sociocultural, ethical, and legal perspectives, while taking into account the needs and situation unique to India.

  7. America's Indian Statues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gridley, Marion E., Comp.

    A comprehensive compilation of facts and photographs of statues honoring or memorializing the American Indians is presented in this paperback. The vignettes accompanying the photographs are the result of extensive research. Examples of the American Indian statues include "The Signal of Peace,""The Protest,"" The Medicine Man,""Appeal to the Great…

  8. Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... better. In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration is in charge of assuring the safety ... prescription and over-the-counter medicines. Even safe drugs can cause unwanted side effects or interactions with ...

  9. TLC – SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC ANALYSIS OF STRYCHNINE AND BRUCINE FROM THE AYURVEDIC PILLS OF NUX VOMICA

    PubMed Central

    Gaitonde, R. V.; Joshi, Sanjay

    1986-01-01

    Ayurvedic preparations claim on their label only the quantity of crude drugs and not the quantity of active ingredients present therein. So work was taken up to find the percentage of strychnine and brucine from Ayurvedic pills of Nux vomica powder by TLC spectrophotometric analysis, which study has not been reported earlier. However, the literature survey only revealed the following work. PMID:22557548

  10. MEDICO – BOTANY OF ANDAMAN AND NICOBAR ISLANDS – IV (AYURVEDIC DRUGS – 2)

    PubMed Central

    Nair, K. Vasudevan; Gopakumar, K.; Yoganarasimhan, S. N.; Shantha, T. R.; Keshavamurthy, K. R.

    1986-01-01

    Details on 33 plants / drugs belonging to 30 genera and 22 families are provided in this paper; ayurvedic drug name, botanical sources in the island, short description of the species occurring in the islands, chemical constituents, ayurvedic preparations and therapeutic properties are elucidated. PMID:22557524

  11. Inventorization of some ayurvedic plants and their ethnomedicinal use in Kakrajhore forest area of West Bengal.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Soumyajit; Shaw, Rupa; Bala, Sanjay; Mazumdar, Asis

    2017-02-02

    Medicinal Plant resources of forest origin are extensively used in India for various systems of medicine like Ayurveda, Unani, Homeopathy, Allopathy, Siddha and Ethnic etc. The tribal communities around the Kakrajhore forest in West Medinipur district of West Bengal have their own traditional knowledge based system of curing many diseases using the forest based plant resources similar to ayurveda. The forest comprises of one of the unique treasure and rich source of diversified ethno-botanical wealth and therefore extensive studies is required for proper documentation including ethnomedicinal knowledge of local tribes. The present study was initiated with an aim to inventorize the ayurvedic medicinal plant recourses and explore the traditional knowledge of tribal people of Kakrajhore forest to treat several diseases along with the sustainable management and conservation of medicinal plants. The information on the medicinal plant resources were gathered through floristic inventorization with proper sampling method in the study area (N22°42'57.05″, E86°34'58.02″) during the year 2015. For floristic inventorization the study area of 312 ha was delineated by using GPS Receiver. Then total mapped area was divided by virtual grid of 100m apart in both East-West and North-South direction to allocate 60 sample plots by random sampling. In addition to inventorization, the use value (UV) of the species was determined and the informant consensus factor (ICF) was calculated for the medicinal plants found in the study area based on personal interview. Further exploration was carried out to establish linkage with Ayurveda. The present survey has identified 57 numbers of ethno-medicinal plants belonging to 39 families, used for preparing medicinal remedies. The habit of the plants includes 35% trees, 28% shrubs, 23% herbs and 14% climbers. The most frequently utilized plant parts were the Roots & Tuber roots (26%), Stem which includes Bark, Tubers, Bulb, Rhizome, Gum, Wood

  12. Growing Up Indian: Stories from the Life of Louie Gingras, an 82 Year Old Kootenai Indian. Indian Culture Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gingras, Louie

    Eleven short stories from the life of Louie Gingras, an 82-year-old Kootenai Indian, illustrate many aspects of Indian culture. Accompanied by black and white drawings, ths stories describe daily life, mission schools, the Carlisle Indian School, Indian medicine, discipline for children, spiritual powers, beliefs, and several ceremonies. The book…

  13. Efficacy & safety evaluation of Ayurvedic treatment (Ashwagandha powder & Sidh Makardhwaj) in rheumatoid arthritis patients: a pilot prospective study.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Gajendra; Srivastava, Amita; Sharma, Surinder Kumar; Rao, T Divakara; Gupta, Yogendra Kumar

    2015-01-01

    In the traditional system of medicine in India Ashwagandha powder and Sidh Makardhwaj have been used for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. However, safety and efficacy of this treatment have not been evaluated. Therefore, the present study was carried out to evaluate the efficacy and safety of Ayurvedic treatment (Ashwagandha powder and Sidh Makardhwaj) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. One hundred and twenty five patients with joint pain were screened at an Ayurvedic hospital in New Delhi, India. Eighty six patients satisfied inclusion criteria and were included in the study. Detailed medical history and physical examination were recorded. Patients took 5g of Ashwagandha powder twice a day for three weeks with lukewarm water or milk. Sidh Makardhwaj (100 mg) with honey was administered daily for the next four weeks. The follow up of patients was carried out every two weeks. The primary efficacy end point was based on American College of Rheumatology (ACR) 20 response. Secondary end points were ACR50, ACR70 responses, change from baseline in disease activity score (DAS) 28 score and ACR parameters. Safety assessments were hepatic function [alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), bilirubin and ß2 microglobulin], renal function (urea and creatinine and NGAL) tests and urine mercury level. The study was completed by 90.7 per cent (78/86) patients. Patients with moderate and high disease activity were 57.7 per cent (45/78) and 42.3 per cent (33/78), respectively. All patients were tested positive for rheumatoid factor and increased ESR level. Ashwagandha and Sidh Makardhwaj treatment decreased RA factor. A significant change in post-treatment scores of tender joint counts, swollen joint counts, physician global assessment score, patient global assessment score, pain assessment score, patient self assessed disability index score and ESR level were observed as compared to baseline scores. ACR20 response was

  14. Efficacy & safety evaluation of Ayurvedic treatment (Ashwagandha powder & Sidh Makardhwaj) in rheumatoid arthritis patients: a pilot prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Gajendra; Srivastava, Amita; Sharma, Surinder Kumar; Rao, T. Divakara; Gupta, Yogendra Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: In the traditional system of medicine in India Ashwagandha powder and Sidh Makardhwaj have been used for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. However, safety and efficacy of this treatment have not been evaluated. Therefore, the present study was carried out to evaluate the efficacy and safety of Ayurvedic treatment (Ashwagandha powder and Sidh Makardhwaj) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Methods: One hundred and twenty five patients with joint pain were screened at an Ayurvedic hospital in New Delhi, India. Eighty six patients satisfied inclusion criteria and were included in the study. Detailed medical history and physical examination were recorded. Patients took 5g of Ashwagandha powder twice a day for three weeks with lukewarm water or milk. Sidh Makardhwaj (100 mg) with honey was administered daily for the next four weeks. The follow up of patients was carried out every two weeks. The primary efficacy end point was based on American College of Rheumatology (ACR) 20 response. Secondary end points were ACR50, ACR70 responses, change from baseline in disease activity score (DAS) 28 score and ACR parameters. Safety assessments were hepatic function [alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), bilirubin and ß2 microglobulin], renal function (urea and creatinine and NGAL) tests and urine mercury level. Results: The study was completed by 90.7 per cent (78/86) patients. Patients with moderate and high disease activity were 57.7 per cent (45/78) and 42.3 per cent (33/78), respectively. All patients were tested positive for rheumatoid factor and increased ESR level. Ashwagandha and Sidh Makardhwaj treatment decreased RA factor. A significant change in post-treatment scores of tender joint counts, swollen joint counts, physician global assessment score, patient global assessment score, pain assessment score, patient self assessed disability index score and ESR level were observed as

  15. Exploring Ayurvedic Knowledge on Food and Health for Providing Innovative Solutions to Contemporary Healthcare

    PubMed Central

    Payyappallimana, Unnikrishnan; Venkatasubramanian, Padma

    2016-01-01

    Ayurveda, a traditional system of medicine that originated over three millennia ago in the South Asian region, offers extensive insights about food and health based on certain unique conceptual as well as theoretical positions. Health is defined as a state of equilibrium with one’s self (svasthya) but which is inextricably linked to the environment. Ayurvedic principles, such as the tridosa (three humors) theory, provide the relationship between the microcosm and the macrocosm that can be applied in day-to-day practice. Classical Ayurveda texts cover an array of themes on food ranging from diversity of natural sources, their properties in relation to seasons and places and to their specific function both in physiological and pathological states. The epistemic perspective on health and nutrition in Ayurveda is very different from that of biomedicine and modern nutrition. However, contemporary knowledge is reinventing and advancing several of these concepts in an era of systems biology, personalized medicine, and the broader context of a more holistic transition in sciences in general. Trans-disciplinary research could be important not only for pushing the boundaries of food and health sciences but also for providing practical solutions for contemporary health conditions. This article briefly reviews the parallels in Ayurveda and biomedicine and draws attention to the need for a deeper engagement with traditional knowledge systems, such as Ayurveda. It points out that recreation of the methodologies that enabled the holistic view point about health in Ayurveda may unravel some of the complex connections with Nature. PMID:27066472

  16. Exploring Ayurvedic Knowledge on Food and Health for Providing Innovative Solutions to Contemporary Healthcare.

    PubMed

    Payyappallimana, Unnikrishnan; Venkatasubramanian, Padma

    2016-01-01

    Ayurveda, a traditional system of medicine that originated over three millennia ago in the South Asian region, offers extensive insights about food and health based on certain unique conceptual as well as theoretical positions. Health is defined as a state of equilibrium with one's self (svasthya) but which is inextricably linked to the environment. Ayurvedic principles, such as the tridosa (three humors) theory, provide the relationship between the microcosm and the macrocosm that can be applied in day-to-day practice. Classical Ayurveda texts cover an array of themes on food ranging from diversity of natural sources, their properties in relation to seasons and places and to their specific function both in physiological and pathological states. The epistemic perspective on health and nutrition in Ayurveda is very different from that of biomedicine and modern nutrition. However, contemporary knowledge is reinventing and advancing several of these concepts in an era of systems biology, personalized medicine, and the broader context of a more holistic transition in sciences in general. Trans-disciplinary research could be important not only for pushing the boundaries of food and health sciences but also for providing practical solutions for contemporary health conditions. This article briefly reviews the parallels in Ayurveda and biomedicine and draws attention to the need for a deeper engagement with traditional knowledge systems, such as Ayurveda. It points out that recreation of the methodologies that enabled the holistic view point about health in Ayurveda may unravel some of the complex connections with Nature.

  17. Ayurvedic preparation of Zingiber officinale Roscoe: effects on cardiac and on smooth muscle parameters.

    PubMed

    Leoni, Alberto; Budriesi, Roberta; Poli, Ferruccio; Lianza, Mariacaterina; Graziadio, Alessandra; Venturini, Alice; Broccoli, Massimiliano; Micucci, Matteo

    2017-08-28

    The rhizome of the Zingiber officinale Roscoe, a biennial herb growing in South Asia, is commonly known as ginger. Ginger is used in clinical disorders, such as constipation, dyspepsia, diarrhoea, nausea and vomiting and its use is also recommended by the traditional medicine for cardiopathy, high blood pressure, palpitations and as a vasodilator to improve the circulation. The decoction of ginger rhizome is widely used in Ayurvedic medicine. In this papery by high-performance liquid chromatography, we have seen that its main phytomarkers were 6-gingerol, 8-gingerol and 6-shogaol and we report the effects of the decoction of ginger rhizome on cardiovascular parameters and on vascular and intestinal smooth muscle. In our experimental models, the decoction of ginger shows weak negative inotropic and chronotropic intrinsic activities but a significant intrinsic activity on smooth muscle with a potency on ileum is greater than on aorta: EC50 = 0.66 mg/mL versus EC50 = 1.45 mg/mL.

  18. Ayurvedic management of pulmonary tuberculosis: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Samal, Janmejaya

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tuberculosis (TB) is a global public health crisis. 25% of world’s TB cases are found in India. Ayurveda, an ancient medical science may offer some solution to this problem. Hence, a systematic review was carried out to assess the role of Ayurveda for the management of TB. Methodology: A systematic review was carried out using published literature obtained through “PubMed” until April 2015. The key words used for literature search include “Ayurveda, role and TB.” Results and Discussion: It was observed that a couple of single and compound drugs have been used for the management of TB. However, none of the studies could reflect the true anti-TB activities of any drug, both single and compound. Two of the studies revealed in vitro anti-TB properties of some herbs which can potentially be brought into the realm of a clinical trial to test their efficacy in a human subject. Most of these Ayurvedic therapeutic preparations studied in different clinical settings primarily reflected their adjunct properties for the management of TB. These studies revealed that Ayurvedic therapeutics was able to reduce associated symptoms and the adverse drug effects of ATDs (anti-TB drugs). Furthermore, some of the preparations showed potential hepato-protective properties that can be simultaneously administered with ATDs. Conclusion: Distressingly research on the role of Ayurveda in the management of TB is very scanty and mostly limited to adjunct or supportive therapy. Being a global public health crisis, it is highly recommended to carry out clinical trials on TB patients using Ayurvedic drugs and therapeutic regimens. PMID:27069721

  19. Ayurvedic approach in the management of spinocerebellar ataxia-2

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sarvesh Kumar; Rajoria, Kshipra

    2016-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia -2 is a progressive, degenerative genetic disease caused by an expanded (CAG) trinucleotide repetition on the chromosome 12 resulting in production of an abnormal protein called ataxin-2. There is no known effective management or cure in biomedicine for this genetic disease. In the present study a case of SCA2 that was treated with Ayurvedic intervention is reported. Ayurvedic treatments in this case were directed towards alleviating symptoms and to reduce severe disability due to progressive nature of disease. A 42 year old male patient was diagnosed for Vāta vyādhi (group of various neurological disorders) and was- treated with Śālisastika pinda svedana (sudation with bolus of medicated cooked rice) for 30 days-, Śirobasti (sudation of head with the help of a cap on head) with Aśvagandhā taila for 45 days and Balādi ksīra basti (enema with medicated milk) with Aśvagandhā taila anuvāsana (enema with oil) for 30 days in Karma basti krama (30 days regime of purification and oleation enema) along with a combination of Ayurvedic oral drugs which consisted of Brahadvātacintāmanirasa – 125 mg, Vasantāmaltī rasa- 125 mg, Daśamūla kvātha- 40 ml, Aśvagandhā cūrṇa (powder of Withania somnifera DUNAL)- 3g, Amrtā cūrṇa (powder of Tinospora cordifolia Willd.)- 500 mg, Muktāśukti pisti – 500 mg, Yogarāja Guggulu – 500 mg twice a day for 2 months. Patient's condition was assessed on the Scale for Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA). Before treatment, mean SARA score was 35. This reduced to 15 after treatment. Good relief in dysarthria, fasciculation, heaviness in eye, blurred vision, axial tremor; constipation and quality of life were observed in this case. PMID:27143801

  20. Characterization of Tarakeshwara Rasa: An Ayurvedic herbomineral formulation

    PubMed Central

    Virupaksha, Gupta K. L.; Kumar, Neeraj

    2012-01-01

    Tarakeshwara Rasa (TR) is an Ayurvedic herbomineral compound formulation used in the intervention of Prameha vis-à-vis diabetes mellitus. The present study was executed to establish a fingerprint for this unique formulation, which can be adopted by the Ayurvedic pharmacies for drug standardization. TR is a formulation prepared by the trituration of four ingredients Abhraka Bhasma (AB), Loha Bhasma (LB), Vanga Bhasma (VB) and Rasa Sindhura (RS) in equal quantities with honey for one day. Each of the ingredients were prepared according to the norms of Ayurvedic classical texts and by employing Electric Muffle Furnace as heating device for incineration. To ensure the proper preparation of Bhasmas, standard tests (Bhasma Pariksha) were employed. After Bhasma complies these tests, TR was prepared and subjected for qualitative analysis, X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) studies. LB, AB, VB, RS and TR were also studied for free metal presence by employing phosphomolybdic acid. Chemical analysis of TR reveals that it contains Fe, Sn, Hg, Al, Mn, Ca and Mg. XRD study indicates that TR contains Fe2O3 (maghamite) in major phase and SnO2 (cassiterite), HgS, SiO2, HgO in minor phases. SEM study revealed that the compound is an agglomeration of particles. The particle size was in between 0.5 and 2 μ. Free metal detection by phosphomolybdic acid revealed the absence of free metals in the final Bhasmas. This is the first study establishing the characterization of Tarakeshwara Rasa. PMID:23723650

  1. Ayurvedic approach in the management of spinocerebellar ataxia-2.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sarvesh Kumar; Rajoria, Kshipra

    2016-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia -2 is a progressive, degenerative genetic disease caused by an expanded (CAG) trinucleotide repetition on the chromosome 12 resulting in production of an abnormal protein called ataxin-2. There is no known effective management or cure in biomedicine for this genetic disease. In the present study a case of SCA2 that was treated with Ayurvedic intervention is reported. Ayurvedic treatments in this case were directed towards alleviating symptoms and to reduce severe disability due to progressive nature of disease. A 42 year old male patient was diagnosed for Vāta vyādhi (group of various neurological disorders) and was- treated with Śālisastika pinda svedana (sudation with bolus of medicated cooked rice) for 30 days-, Śirobasti (sudation of head with the help of a cap on head) with Aśvagandhā taila for 45 days and Balādi ksīra basti (enema with medicated milk) with Aśvagandhā taila anuvāsana (enema with oil) for 30 days in Karma basti krama (30 days regime of purification and oleation enema) along with a combination of Ayurvedic oral drugs which consisted of Brahadvātacintāmanirasa - 125 mg, Vasantāmaltī rasa- 125 mg, Daśamūla kvātha- 40 ml, Aśvagandhā cūrṇa (powder of Withania somnifera DUNAL)- 3g, Amrtā cūrṇa (powder of Tinospora cordifolia Willd.)- 500 mg, Muktāśukti pisti - 500 mg, Yogarāja Guggulu - 500 mg twice a day for 2 months. Patient's condition was assessed on the Scale for Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA). Before treatment, mean SARA score was 35. This reduced to 15 after treatment. Good relief in dysarthria, fasciculation, heaviness in eye, blurred vision, axial tremor; constipation and quality of life were observed in this case.

  2. Ayurvedic management of pulmonary tuberculosis: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Samal, Janmejaya

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a global public health crisis. 25% of world's TB cases are found in India. Ayurveda, an ancient medical science may offer some solution to this problem. Hence, a systematic review was carried out to assess the role of Ayurveda for the management of TB. A systematic review was carried out using published literature obtained through "PubMed" until April 2015. The key words used for literature search include "Ayurveda, role and TB." It was observed that a couple of single and compound drugs have been used for the management of TB. However, none of the studies could reflect the true anti-TB activities of any drug, both single and compound. Two of the studies revealed in vitro anti-TB properties of some herbs which can potentially be brought into the realm of a clinical trial to test their efficacy in a human subject. Most of these Ayurvedic therapeutic preparations studied in different clinical settings primarily reflected their adjunct properties for the management of TB. These studies revealed that Ayurvedic therapeutics was able to reduce associated symptoms and the adverse drug effects of ATDs (anti-TB drugs). Furthermore, some of the preparations showed potential hepato-protective properties that can be simultaneously administered with ATDs. Distressingly research on the role of Ayurveda in the management of TB is very scanty and mostly limited to adjunct or supportive therapy. Being a global public health crisis, it is highly recommended to carry out clinical trials on TB patients using Ayurvedic drugs and therapeutic regimens.

  3. Cross-sectional studies published in Indian journal of community medicine: evaluation of adherence to strengthening the reporting of observational studies in epidemiology statement.

    PubMed

    Jeelani, A; Malik, Wr; Haq, I; Aleem, S; Mujtaba, M; Syed, N

    2014-11-01

    The Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) statement is a set of recommendations about what should be included in a more accurate and complete description of observational studies. The aim was to assess the quality of reporting of cross-sectional studies by evaluating the extent to which they adhere to the STROBE statement. This study has a cross-sectional design. All the articles published as original articles in Indian Journal of Community Medicine from January 2010 to September 2011 were downloaded from the journal website. A total of 96 articles were downloaded out of which 80 were found to have a cross-sectional design. Variables were: (1) Percentage of STROBE items included in a report and (2) percentage of articles reporting each item in the STROBE checklist. Data analysis was done by descriptive statistics using frequencies and percentages. A total of 80 articles were evaluated. About 46% (37/80) articles reported 12-15 items of the STROBE checklist. Bias, nonparticipants and reasons for nonparticipation, other analyses done, generalizability, and source of funding were reported by < 25% of studies. The most frequently reported items of the checklist were summary of what was done and what was found in the abstract, background/rationale, objectives, setting, outcome data, key results in discussion, interpretation of results. None of the articles reported all items of the STROBE checklist. This study reveals that the quality of reporting cross-sectional studies in Indian Journal of Community Medicine is not satisfactory and there is room for improvement.

  4. Beyond reverse pharmacology: Mechanism-based screening of Ayurvedic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Lele, R. D.

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews the pharmacology of Indian medicinal plants, starting with the historical background of European work on the subject beginning as early as the 17th century, and tracing its history through the work of Sen and Bose in the 1930‘s, and Vakhil’s historic 1949 paper on Sarpaghanda. The often crucial role of patient feedback in early discoveries is highlighted, as is the time lag between proof of pharmacological action and identification of the active principle, and subsequent elucidation of mechanism of action. In the case of Indian plants in the 20th century this process sometimes took almost 50 years. Reserpine and its mechanisms are given in detail, and its current relevance to public health discussed. The foundation of present day methods of pharmacology is briefly presented so the complexity of methods used to identify properties of Ayurveda derived drugs like forskolin and baicalein, and their bioavailability, may be better appreciated. Ayurveda derived anti-oxidants and their levels of action, immuno-modulators, particularly with respect to the NF-kB pathway and its implications for cancer control, are all considered. The example of curcumin derived from turmeric is explained in more detail, because of its role in cancer prevention. Finally, the paper emphasizes the importance of Ayurveda’s concepts of rasayana as a form of dietary chemo-prevention; the significance of ahar, diet, in Ayurveda’s aspiration to prevent disease and restore health thus becomes clear. Understood in this light, Ayurveda may transcend pharmacology as a treatment paradigm. PMID:21731372

  5. Trends in aging and skin care: Ayurvedic concepts

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Hema Sharma; Paramesh, Rangesh

    2010-01-01

    The association between Ayurveda, anti-aging and cosmeceuticals is gaining importance in the beauty, health and wellness sector. Ayurvedic cosmeceuticals date back to the Indus Valley Civilization. Modern research trends mainly revolve around principles of anti-aging activity described in Ayurveda: Vayasthapana (age defying), Varnya (brighten skin-glow), Sandhaniya (cell regeneration), Vranaropana (healing), Tvachya (nurturing), Shothahara (anti-inflammatory), Tvachagnivardhani (strengthening skin metabolism) and Tvagrasayana (retarding aging). Many rasayana plants such as Emblica officinalis (Amla) and Centella asiatica (Gotukola) are extensively used. PMID:21836797

  6. Panchagavya Ghrita, an Ayurvedic formulation attenuates seizures, cognitive impairment and oxidative stress in pentylenetetrazole induced seizures in rats.

    PubMed

    Joshi, R; Reeta, K H; Sharma, S K; Tripathi, M; Gupta, Y K

    2015-07-01

    Panchagavya Ghrita (PG), according to Ayurvedic formulary of India (AFI), is used to treat epilepsy (apasmara), fever (jvara), mania (unmade) and jaundice (kamala). In the present study, we examined its effect on convulsions, oxidative stress and cognitive impairment in pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) induced seizures in rats. PG @ 250, 500, 1000, 2000 and 4000 mg/kg was administered orally for 7 days to male Wistar rats. On day 7, PTZ (60 mg/kg) was injected intraperitoneally 2 h after the last dose of PG. Sodium valproate (300 mg/kg) was used as positive control. Latency to myoclonic jerks, clonus and generalized tonic clonic seizures (GTCS) were recorded for seizure severity. Cognitive impairment was assessed using elevated plus maze and passive avoidance tests. Malondialdehyde and reduced glutathione levels were measured in rat brain. The results have shown that pretreatment with PG @ 500, 1000, 2000 and 4000 mg/kg exhibited 16.6, 33.3, 50 and 100% protection against occurrence of GTCS. The pretreatment with PG has significantly improved cognitive functions and the oxidative stress induced by seizures demonstrating its protective effect against PTZ induced seizures, and further, use of PG as an anticonvulsant in Ayurvedic system of medicine.

  7. Reverse engineering of Ayurvedic lipid based formulation, ghrita by combined column chromatography, normal and reverse phase HPTLC analysis.

    PubMed

    Duraipandi, Selvakumar; Selvakumar, Vijaya; Er, Ng Yun

    2015-03-13

    Ghritas are ayurvedic lipid based preparations in which oil or ghee is boiled with prescribed kasaya (polyherbal decoction) and kalka (fine paste of herbs) until the evaporation of aqueous phase transfers the contents into oily phase. The polyherbal decoction used in the preparation predominantly contains water soluble Active Botanical Ingredients (ABIs). The column chromatography was used to fractionate the ghrita into polar and non-polar fractions on silica gel as adsorbent using petroleum ether and mixture of ethanol, methanol & water as eluents. These fractions were further analysed by normal and reverse phase HPTLC analysis for the presence of the contents and its polarity. The results showed that all the ABIs present in the formulation were polar since the fractionated non-polar fraction did not show the presence of any active botanical ingredients on normal and reverse phase HPTLC analysis. The ayurvedic system of medicine has got its own technique of incorporating the polar contents into a lipid base for enhanced absorption and delivery of the ABIs at targets.

  8. Quality parameters, fatty acid profiling and estimation of umbelliferone in grahaṇimihira tailam: An ayurvedic oil preparation

    PubMed Central

    Deepak, M.; Kumar, Prakash U.; Nitha, B.; Balachandran, Indira; Rema Shree, A B

    2013-01-01

    Background: Grahaṇimihira tailam is an unexplored ayurvedic oil preparation which consists of 34 ingredients. The efficacy of this traditional ayurvedic medicine is undisputable. Proper clinical standardization of this formulation will go a long way in securing greater recognition for it. The main objective of this study was to develop standardization parameters for the formulation in a multidisciplinary way. Materials and Methods: A simple and efficient method for the quantification of umbelliferone by high performance thin layer chromatography was developed and validated. Presence of the major fatty acids and their percentage were assessed by using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Various physio-chemical parameters, microbiological load, aflatoxins and mineral oil were also evaluated. Spread plate method was used for checking microbial contamination. Results: The results were validated as per standard protocols. Quantitative estimation revealed the percentage of umbelliferone to be in the range of 0.88-0.98 (w/w). GC-MS analysis of sample led to the identification of 14 fatty acids, in which linoleic acid was obtained as the major fatty acid. Microbes, aflatoxins and mineral oils were found to be absent in the tailam. Conclusion: The results which give the quantitative estimates of various physico-chemical parameters can be adopted to establish new standards for analysis of batch-to-batch variation and this data will facilitate shelf life studies in the future. PMID:25161324

  9. Evaluation of free-radical quenching properties of standard Ayurvedic formulation Vayasthapana Rasayana

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cellular damage induced by free-radicals like Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species (ROS and RNS) has been implicated in several disorders and diseases, including ageing. Hence naturally occurring anti-oxidant rich-herbs play a vital role in combating these conditions. The present study was carried out to investigate the in vitro free-radical quenching capacity of a known Ayurvedic poly-herbal formulation called Vayasthapana Rasayana. Methods Methanol extracts of Vayasthapana Rasayana formulation (VRF) were studied for in vitro total antioxidant activity along with phenolic content and reducing power. In vitro assays like DPPH, FRAP, ABTS scavenging to evaluate radical quenching potential were performed. Results The formulation has shown 94% at 0.1 mg/ml DPPH free-radical scavenging activity as against 84% at 0.1 mg/ml for standard ascorbic acid (IC50 value 5.51 μg/ml for VRF and 39 μg/ml for standard). It has a significant higher ferric reducing potential also (OD 0.87 at 700 nm & 0.21 at 0.1 mg/ml for VRF and standard, respectively). The total phenolic content (gallic acid equivalent) of the VRF is 8.3 mg per g of dry mass. Total antioxidant capacity of the formulation, estimated by FRAP was 1150 ± 5 μM Fe(II)/g dry mass. ABTS radical scavenging activity of VRF was 69.55 ± 0.21% at 100 μg/ml concentration with a IC50 value of 69.87 μg/ml as against 9% and 95% by ascorbic acid and Trolox (at 70.452 μg/ml and 0.250 μg/ml concentrations, respectively). Conclusion In Indian traditional Ayurvedic system, use of VRF is in regular practice for mainly combating age-related disorders and diseases as many of the components of the Rasayana are known for their free-radical scavenging activity. This study has validated the potential use of VRF as an anti-oxidant to fight age-related problems. PMID:21569386

  10. Paśu Ayurvĕda (veterinary medicine) in Garudapurăņa.

    PubMed

    Varanasi, Subhose; Narayana, A

    2007-01-01

    The history of veterinary medicine is closely tied to the development of human medicine. Evidence of animal medicine has been found in ancient civilizations, such as those of the Hindu, Babylonians, Hebrews, Arabs, Greeks, and Romans. Ancient Indian literature in the form of the holy Vĕda, Purăna, Brăhmaņa, epics, etc. is flooded with information on animal care. The Purăņa are ancient scriptures discuss varied topics like devotion to God and his various aspects, traditional sciences like Ayurvĕda, Jyŏtişa (Astrology), cosmology, concepts like dharma, karma, reincarnation and many others. The treatment of animal diseases using Ayurvedic medicine has been mentioned in Garudapurăna, Agnipurăņa, Atri-samhită, Matsyapurăņa and many other texts. The Garudapurăņa is one of the important Săttvika purăna, the subject matter is divided into two parts, viz. Pŭrvakhaņda (first part) and an Uttarakhaņda (subsequent part). Gavăyurvĕda, Gajăyurvĕda narrated briefly and Aśvăyurvĕda described detailly in Pŭrvakhaņda.

  11. Understanding personality from Ayurvedic perspective for psychological assessment: A case

    PubMed Central

    Shilpa, S; Venkatesha Murthy, C. G.

    2011-01-01

    The study of personality has fascinated psychologists since a long time. Personality as an area of study has grown so much that a wealth of literature is available. On the other hand, the socio-ethnic dynamics of human race in the emerging global village context provoking psychologists to develop a personality theory which can treat certain basic components of personality as invariants, so that irrespective of culture, race, and nativity could still be able to study personality which will have universal applicability and relevance, is still far away. In the above emerging backdrop, “Ayurveda” has perhaps an important role to play as it can enable providing a theoretical and empirical base of personality traits and types. These Ayurvedic concepts are applicable to all human beings irrespective of caste, color, sex or race. Therefore, it is interesting to build on the Ayurvedic knowledge which has already given us so much since time immemorial, and validate some of these issues related to personality from psychological perspective. There are already certain efforts in understanding Sattva, Rajas, and Tamas Gunas. It can be furthered so that a comprehensive personality picture can be generated, which can have implications for health, career, education and many other dimensions of life. The present paper is a theoretical attempt in developing such a personality proposition which can be validated. Thus, the present paper only builds a theoretical framework for their possible empirical validity. PMID:22131752

  12. Estimation of catechin in Ayurvedic oil formulations containing Acacia catechu.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Nidhi; Dubey, Nitin; Mehta, Rajendra; Saluja, Ajay

    2009-01-01

    A sensitive, simple, rapid, and efficient HPTLC method was developed and validated for the analysis of catechin in marketed Ayurvedic oil formulations containing Acacia catechu. Chromatography of methanolic-0.1% formic acid (7:3, v/v) extracts of these formulations was performed on silica gel 60 F254 aluminum-backed TLC plates of 0.2 mm layer thickness. The plate was developed up to 85 mm with the ternary-mobile phase chloroform-acetone-0.1% formic acid (7.7 + 1.5 + 0.8%, v/v/v) at 22 +/- 2 degrees C with 20 min of chamber saturation. The system produced compact spots of catechin at an Rf value of 0.36. The marker, catechin, was quantified at its maximum absorbance of 296 nm. The limit of detection and quantitation values were 6 and 20 ng/spot, respectively. The linear regression analysis data for the calibration plot showed a good linear relationship with a correlation coefficient of 0.9993 in the concentration range of 200-1200 ng/spot for catechin with respect to peak area. Repeatability of the method was 0.88% RSD. Recovery values from 97 to 102% indicate excellent accuracy of the method. The developed HPTLC method is accurate, precise, and cost-effective, and it can be successfully applied for the determination of catechin in marketed Ayurvedic oil formulations containing Acacia catechu.

  13. Critical Evaluation of Ayurvedic Plants for Stimulating Intrinsic Antioxidant Response

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Sunil Dutt; Bhatnagar, Maheep; Khurana, Sukant

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative damage caused by free radicals plays an important role in the causation and progression of many diseases, including aging. Free-radical damage is countered by many mechanisms, including both active antioxidant enzymatic activity in our body and passive antioxidants. Antioxidant response of our body can accommodate increased oxidative damage in diseased states to a level but beyond that level, additional antioxidants are required to combat the increased stress. Apart from the regular dietary sources of antioxidants, many traditional herbal medicines demonstrate a potential to boost antioxidant activity. Rasayana chikitsa that deals with rejuvenation and revitalization is a branch of the Indian traditional medical system of ayurveda. We review some select herbs described in rasayana chikitsa that have been assessed by modern means for stimulating intrinsic antioxidant responses in humans. A critical evaluation of rasayana chikitsa will likely provide urgently needed, actual stimulants of our physiological antioxidant responses and not just more passive antioxidants to add to an already large catalog. PMID:22855669

  14. The University of Oklahoma College of Medicine Department of Surgery: Indian Territory to the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Carter, Donald R; Postier, Russell G

    2010-04-01

    The Surgery Department of the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine is profiled in this article, including history, goals, opportunities, and demographics. Our research programs, clinical resources, teaching hospitals, and faculty diversity are reviewed. The local and national contributions of our faculty members and 212 chief residents who have completed our program are enumerated.

  15. Involvement of Ayurvedic practitioners in oral health care in the United States.

    PubMed

    Brar, Bhupinder S; Norman, Robert G; Dasanayake, Ananda P

    2012-10-01

    Ayurveda, an ancient medical science originating in India, also is practiced in the United States. The authors conducted a study primarily to explore the involvement of Ayurvedic practitioners in treating oral diseases. Eighty-five practitioners participated in this cross-sectional survey. The authors obtained self-reported data on demographics of the practitioners, the general and oral health conditions they treated, and the treatment modalities used. They performed descriptive statistical and logistic regression analyses by using statistical software. Participants predominantly were female and white or non-Hispanic, as well as part-time practitioners. Their educational backgrounds ranged from a 5½-year bachelor's degree in Ayurveda to short-term training. Of the 60 respondents who answered the question about treating oral diseases, 25 (42 percent) reported that they did so. Conditions treated were related to oral malodor, gingival or periodontal disease and toothache. Ayurvedic treatments administered for these conditions primarily were preventive in nature. Ayurvedic practitioners in the United States treat a variety of oral diseases by using predominantly preventive traditional care. Ayurvedic practitioners of Asian origin and those who practiced for a longer duration were more likely to report that they treated oral diseases. Larger, population-based studies are needed to understand more fully the current role of Ayurvedic practitioners in oral health care. Ayurvedic treatment modalities aimed at oral diseases need to be evaluated through rigorous randomized controlled trials for safety and effectiveness. Patients with limited or no access to oral health care might seek Ayurvedic treatment, and those who have access to conventional oral health care might wish to complement it with Ayurvedic treatment. Practitioners can incorporate preventive Ayurvedic treatments, which are based mainly on natural products, into overall preventive care regimens, if proven safe

  16. "Our culture is medicine": perspectives of Native healers on posttrauma recovery among American Indian and Alaska Native patients.

    PubMed

    Bassett, Deborah; Tsosie, Ursula; Nannauck, Sweetwater

    2012-01-01

    American Indian and Alaska Native (Native) people experience more traumatic events and are at higher risk for developing posttraumatic stress disorder compared with the general population. We conducted in-depth interviews with six Native healers about their perspectives on traumatic injury and healing. We analyzed the interviews using an inductive approach to identify common themes. We categorized these themes into four categories: causes and consequences of traumatic injury, risk factors, protective factors, and barriers to care. The implications of our study include a need for improving cultural competence among health care and social services personnel working with Native trauma patients. Additional cumulative analyses of Native healers and trauma patients would contribute to a much-needed body of knowledge on improving recovery and promoting healing among Native trauma patients.

  17. High-performance liquid chromatography as a tool for the chemical standardisation of Triphala--an Ayurvedic formulation.

    PubMed

    Singh, D P; Govindarajan, R; Rawat, A K S

    2008-01-01

    Triphala is an anti-oxidant-rich herbal formulation containing fruits of Emblica officinalis, Terminalia chebula and T. belerica in equal proportions. The preparation is frequently used in Ayurvedic medicine to treat diseases such as anaemia, jaundice, constipation, asthma, fever and chronic ulcers. Anti-mutagenic effects of the polyphenolic fractions isolated from Triphala have been reported, thus indicating that the phenols present in the formulation might be responsible for its therapeutic efficacy. A simple high-performance liquid chromatography method for the separation and quantitative determination of the major antioxidant polyphenols from Triphala has been developed. The use of an RP18 column with an acidic mobile phase enabled the efficient separation of gallic acid, tannic acid, syringic acid and epicatechin along with ascorbic acid within a 20 min analysis. Validation of the method was performed in order to demonstrate its selectivity, linearity, precision, accuracy and robustness. In addition, optimisation of the complete extraction of phenolic compounds was also studied.

  18. Standardization and quality control parameters of Dashanga Kwatha ghana tablet: An Ayurvedic formulation.

    PubMed

    Baragi, Umapati C; Baragi, Pramod C; Vyas, Mahesh K; Shukla, Vinay J

    2011-01-01

    Herbal medicines have a long therapeutic history and are still serving many of the health needs of a large population of the world. However, the quality control and quality assurance still remains a challenge because of the high variability of chemical components involved. Herbal drugs, singularly and in combinations, contain numerous compounds in complex matrices in which no single active constituent is responsible for the overall efficacy. This creates a challenge in establishing quality control standards and standardization of finished herbal drugs. Many preparations have been mentioned in Ayurvedic text books for the treatment of Urdhwaga Amlapitta (non-ulcer dyspepsia). Dashanga Kwatha is one such known formulation. In this study, Dashanga Kwatha was converted into tablet form to increase the shelf life, make it easy to dispense, for dose fixation, etc. The Dashanga Kwatha Ghana tablet was subjected to organoleptic analysis, phytochemical analysis, and qualitative analysis to detect the presence of various functional groups, and to high performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC) examination by optimizing the solvent systems. The investigation revealed the presence of tannins, mucilage, ascorbic acid, alkaloids, saponins, glycosides, flavonoids and carbohydrates mainly.

  19. Comparing Ksharasutra (Ayurvedic Seton) and open fistulotomy in the management of fistula-in-ano.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Gouranga; Bain, Jayanta; Ray, Ajay Kumar; Dey, Soumedhik; Das, Nandini; Das, Biswanath

    2015-01-01

    Most commonly practiced surgical "lay open" technique to treat fistula-in-ano (a common anorectal pathology) has high rate of recurrence and anal incontinence. Alternatively, a nonsurgical cost efficient treatment with Ksharasutra (cotton Seton coated with Ayurvedic medicines) has minimal complications. In our study, we have tried to compare these two techniques. A prospective randomized control study was designed involving patients referred to the Department of General Surgery in RG Kar Medical College, Kolkata, India, from January 2010 to September 2011. Among 50 patients, 26 were in Ksharasutra and 24 were in fistulotomy group. 86% patients were male and 54% of the patients were in the fourth decade. About 74% fistulas are inter-sphincteric and 26% were of trans-sphincteric variety. Severe postoperative pain was more (7.7% vs. 25%) in fistulotomy group, while wound discharge was more associated with Ksharasutra group (15.3% vs. 8.3%). Wound scarring, bleeding, and infection rate were similar in both groups. Ksharasutra group took more time to heal (mean: 53 vs. 35.7 days, P = 0.002) despite reduced disruption to their routine work (2.7 vs. 15.5 days work off, P <0.001). Interestingly, pain experienced was less in Ksharasutra group, there was no open wound in contrast to fistulotomy and it was significantly cost effective (Rupees 166 vs. 464). Treatment of fistula-in-ano with Ksharasutra is a simple with low complications and minimal cost.

  20. Influence of a Maharishi Ayur-vedic herbal preparation on age-related visual discrimination.

    PubMed

    Gelderloos, P; Ahlström, H H; Orme-Johnson, D W; Robinson, D K; Wallace, R K; Glaser, J L

    1990-01-01

    An ancient system of natural medicine--Maharishi Ayur-Vedic--prescribes certain herbal formulas to enhance cognitive functioning, prevent illness, and alleviate the detrimental effects of the aging process. A double-blind study was conducted to test the effect of an Ayurvedic herbal preparation, Maharishi Amrit Kalash (MAK), on an age-related alertness task. Forty-eight men over 35 years of age were randomly assigned to receive MAK tablets or a closely matched placebo twice daily for six weeks. A visual discrimination task consisted of the identification of the exact location of a stimulus "v" within an array of x symbols in tachistoscopic presentations. The MAK group improved significantly more in their performance of this task after three and six weeks of treatment relative to the placebo group. Performance was highly correlated with age, and because successful performance apparently requires an unrestricted flow of homogeneous attention as well as focalized concentration, it is concluded that MAK may enhance attentional capacity or alertness, and thus reverse some of the detrimental cognitive effects of aging.

  1. Toxic metals and organochlorine pesticides residue in single herbal drugs used in important ayurvedic formulation - 'Dashmoola'.

    PubMed

    Rai, Vartika; Kakkar, Poonam; Singh, Jyotsna; Misra, Chetna; Kumar, Santosh; Mehrotra, Shanta

    2008-08-01

    Herbal formulations are getting popularity throughout the world and commercialized extensively for various medicinal properties. WHO has emphasized the need for quality assurance of herbal products, including testing of heavy metals and pesticides residues. 'Dashmoola', a popular herbal formulation, with immunomodulator and febrifugal properties, consists of ten single root drugs. In view of WHO guidelines, single herbal drugs used in 'Dashmoola', were collected from different places of India for testing heavy metals and persistent pesticides residue. Although use of roots in 'Dashmoola' is prescribed in original ayurvedic literature but now many pharmacies use stem in place of roots. Therefore, in the present study both roots and stems were selected for estimation of six heavy metals namely arsenic (As), mercury (Hg), lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr) and nickel (Ni). Apart from these, the organochlorine pesticides residue viz. different metabolites of DDT, DDE, isomers of HCH and alpha-endosulfan were checked in total 40 samples of single crude drugs. Heavy metals except Hg, were present in most of the samples. In few samples Pb and Cd concentration were beyond the WHO permissible limits. Although alpha-HCH and gamma-HCH were present in almost all the samples, but other pesticides were not detected in these samples. DDT and DDE were found only in two samples.

  2. Antihyperglycaemic effect of 'Ilogen-Excel', an ayurvedic herbal formulation in streptozotocin-induced diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Umamaheswari, Selvaraj; Mainzen Prince, Ponnaian Stanely

    2007-01-01

    'Ilogen-Excel', an Ayurvedic herbal formulation is composed of eight medicinal plants (Curcuma longa, Strychnos potatorum, Salacia oblonga, Tinospora cordifolia, Vetivelia zizanioides, Coscinium fenestratum, Andrographis paniculata and Mimosa pudica). The present study evaluates the antihyperglycemic effect of 'Ilogen-Excel' in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats. Rats were rendered diabetic by streptozotocin (STZ) (45 mg/kg body weight). Oral administration of 'Ilogen-Excel' (50 mg/kg and 100 mg/kg) for 60 days resulted in significantly lowered levels of blood glucose and significantly increased levels of plasma insulin, hepatic glycogen and total hemoglobin. 'Ilogen-Excel' administration also decreased the levels of glycosylated hemoglobin, plasma thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, hydroperoxides, ceruloplasmin and vitamin E in diabetic rats. Plasma reduced glutathione and vitamin C were significantly elevated by oral administration of 'Ilogen-Excel'. Administration of insulin normalized all the biochemical parameters studied in diabetic rats. The effect at a dose of 100 mg/kg was more pronounced than 50 mg/kg and brought back all the parameters to near normal levels. Thus, our study shows the antihyperglycemic effects of 'Ilogen-Excel' in STZ-induced diabetic rats. Our study also shows that combined therapy is better than individual therapy.

  3. SURVEY ON MEDICINAL SPICES OF THE NILGIRIS

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, K.

    1995-01-01

    A survey is made on the medicinal spices of the Nilgiris. Totally, there are 25 species available in various parts of the Nilgiris and they belong to 16 different families of angiosperms. Gudalur, Kothagiri, Kookalthorai, Aruvankadu, Coonoor, Burliar, Masinagudi and Ootacamund are some of the important places in the Nilgiris have a variety of medicinal properties that are put to use in homoeopathic and ayurvedic preparations. PMID:22556708

  4. Survey on medicinal spices of the nilgiris.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, K

    1995-04-01

    A survey is made on the medicinal spices of the Nilgiris. Totally, there are 25 species available in various parts of the Nilgiris and they belong to 16 different families of angiosperms. Gudalur, Kothagiri, Kookalthorai, Aruvankadu, Coonoor, Burliar, Masinagudi and Ootacamund are some of the important places in the Nilgiris have a variety of medicinal properties that are put to use in homoeopathic and ayurvedic preparations.

  5. Analytical profile of Brahmi Ghrita: A polyherbal Ayurvedic formulation

    PubMed Central

    Gubbannavar, Jyoti S.; Chandola, Harimohan; Harisha, C. R.; Kalyani, Renuka; Shukla, Vinay J.

    2012-01-01

    Brahmi Ghrita, a polyherbal Ayurvedic formulation is recommended in the management of various psychological disorders like Unmada, Apasmara and Graharogas. The present study deals with the pharmacognostical identification of ingredients of Brahmi Ghrita and its physico-chemical analysis. Pharmacognostical study containing both macroscopic and powder microscopy of raw drug revealed the quality and genuineness of all the constituents of Brahmi Ghrita. Organoleptic features of coarse powder made out of the crude drugs were within the standards prescribed. Acid value was 0.16075, saponification value 184.17, Refractive Index value 1.467 at room temperature, Iodine value 26.715, Specific gravity at room temperature was 0.9133. HPTLC was carried out after organizing appropriate solvent system in which maximum 9 spots were distinguished and most of the Rf values were identical in alcoholic extract which shows the presence of certain definite constituents in Brahmi Ghrita. PMID:23559806

  6. Analytical profile of Brahmi Ghrita: A polyherbal Ayurvedic formulation.

    PubMed

    Gubbannavar, Jyoti S; Chandola, Harimohan; Harisha, C R; Kalyani, Renuka; Shukla, Vinay J

    2012-04-01

    Brahmi Ghrita, a polyherbal Ayurvedic formulation is recommended in the management of various psychological disorders like Unmada, Apasmara and Graharogas. The present study deals with the pharmacognostical identification of ingredients of Brahmi Ghrita and its physico-chemical analysis. Pharmacognostical study containing both macroscopic and powder microscopy of raw drug revealed the quality and genuineness of all the constituents of Brahmi Ghrita. Organoleptic features of coarse powder made out of the crude drugs were within the standards prescribed. Acid value was 0.16075, saponification value 184.17, Refractive Index value 1.467 at room temperature, Iodine value 26.715, Specific gravity at room temperature was 0.9133. HPTLC was carried out after organizing appropriate solvent system in which maximum 9 spots were distinguished and most of the Rf values were identical in alcoholic extract which shows the presence of certain definite constituents in Brahmi Ghrita.

  7. Translation and purification: Ayurvedic psychiatry, allopathic psychiatry, spirits and occult violence in Kerala, South India.

    PubMed

    Lang, Claudia

    2017-05-08

    In this paper, the author traces two parallel movements of institutionalized Ayurvedic psychiatry, an emergent field of specialization in Kerala, India: the 'work of purification' and the 'work of translation' that Latour has described as characteristic of the 'modern constitution.' The author delineates these processes in terms of the relationship of Ayurvedic psychiatry to (1) allopathic psychiatry, (2) bhutavidya, a branch of textual Ayurveda dealing with spirits, and (3) occult violence. The aim is to offer a model of these open and hidden processes and of Ayurvedic psychiatry's positioning within a hierarchical mental health field characterized simultaneously by biopsychiatric hegemony and a persistent vernacular healing tradition. Through these processes, Ayurvedic psychiatry emerges as a relevant actor. It demarcates itself from both allopathic and vernacular epistemologies and ontologies while simultaneously drawing upon aspects of each, and, in this way, shows itself to be both deeply modern and highly pragmatic.

  8. Nootropic efficacy of Satvavajaya Chikitsa and Ayurvedic drug therapy: A comparative clinical exposition.

    PubMed

    Amin, Hetal; Sharma, Rohit

    2015-01-01

    Ayurveda is known for philosophical basis, and its approach to psychological ailments is quite different from conventional system of management. Satvavajaya Chikitsa (Ayurvedic psychotherapy) is a nonpharmacological approach aimed at control of mind and restraining it from unwholesome Artha (objects) or stressors. Withdrawal of the mind from unwholesome objects is known as Sattvavajaya Chikitsa or it is a treatment by Self Control. Charaka defines it as a mind controlling therapy in which a stress has been laid on restraining of mind from unwholesome objects. Thus, it includes all the methods of Manonigraha and Astanga Yoga (Yogic techniques) too. Indian philosophy portrays Astanga Yoga as a primary tool to control mind; hence it can be used as Satvavajaya Chikitsa. To evaluate efficacy of Satvavajaya Chikitsa and Aushadhiya Medhya Chikitsa for improving Smriti in young healthy volunteers. Totally, 102 physically healthy volunteers between age group 16 and 25 years were divided into two groups. In Group A, Satvavajaya Chikitsa was adopted in form of Yogic procedures such as Asana, Pranayama, Chanting etc., with counseling and placebo. Group B was Shankhapushpi tablets made with whole part of Shankhpushpi plant was used as standard control. The Weschler's memory scale (WMS) was adopted to collect data before and after intervention period of 2 months. Paired and Unpaired t-test were used for analysis the data in Sigmastat Software. Group A (Satvavajaya + placebo) with counseling showed statistically highly significant result (P < 0.001) in verbal retention for similar pair, verbal retention for dissimilar pair and visual immediate tests; while Group B (Shankhapushpi tablets) showed significant result (P < 0.01) in auditory delayed, visual delayed, auditory recognition and visual recognition tests. Satvavajaya Chikitsa shows better results in immediate recollection in terms of short-term memory; while Shankhapushpi found much better in long-term memory enhancement on

  9. Nootropic efficacy of Satvavajaya Chikitsa and Ayurvedic drug therapy: A comparative clinical exposition

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Hetal; Sharma, Rohit

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Ayurveda is known for philosophical basis, and its approach to psychological ailments is quite different from conventional system of management. Satvavajaya Chikitsa (Ayurvedic psychotherapy) is a nonpharmacological approach aimed at control of mind and restraining it from unwholesome Artha (objects) or stressors. Withdrawal of the mind from unwholesome objects is known as Sattvavajaya Chikitsa or it is a treatment by Self Control. Charaka defines it as a mind controlling therapy in which a stress has been laid on restraining of mind from unwholesome objects. Thus, it includes all the methods of Manonigraha and Astanga Yoga (Yogic techniques) too. Indian philosophy portrays Astanga Yoga as a primary tool to control mind; hence it can be used as Satvavajaya Chikitsa. Aims and Objectives: To evaluate efficacy of Satvavajaya Chikitsa and Aushadhiya Medhya Chikitsa for improving Smriti in young healthy volunteers. Materials and Methods: Totally, 102 physically healthy volunteers between age group 16 and 25 years were divided into two groups. In Group A, Satvavajaya Chikitsa was adopted in form of Yogic procedures such as Asana, Pranayama, Chanting etc., with counseling and placebo. Group B was Shankhapushpi tablets made with whole part of Shankhpushpi plant was used as standard control. The Weschler's memory scale (WMS) was adopted to collect data before and after intervention period of 2 months. Paired and Unpaired t-test were used for analysis the data in Sigmastat Software. Results: Group A (Satvavajaya + placebo) with counseling showed statistically highly significant result (P < 0.001) in verbal retention for similar pair, verbal retention for dissimilar pair and visual immediate tests; while Group B (Shankhapushpi tablets) showed significant result (P < 0.01) in auditory delayed, visual delayed, auditory recognition and visual recognition tests. Conclusion: Satvavajaya Chikitsa shows better results in immediate recollection in terms of short

  10. A survey of the labeling information provided for ayurvedic drugs marketed in India.

    PubMed

    Bhalerao, Supriya; Munshi, Renuka; Tilve, Prajakta; Kumbhar, Dipti

    2010-10-01

    Ayurvedic drugs fall under the purview of the Drugs and Cosmetics Act, 1940 and labels on Ayurvedic drug containers need to comply with the requirements specified in this Act (Part XVII, 161). The present survey was conducted to evaluate whether Ayurvedic drug labels were in compliance with the Drugs and Cosmetics Act, 1940 with respect to their contents. Ayurvedic drugs container labels at three Ayurvedic pharmacies were selected based on the convenience sampling method. Their contents were checked against a set of quality criteria given in the Act. The results are expressed as percentages. Basic manufacturing details were present on all the 190 labels reviewed (101 classical and 89 proprietary formulations). References from authoritative books as specified in the 1st Schedule of the Act were mentioned on 90% of labels of the 101 classical formulations reviewed. Fifty-five percent (n = 56) labels of classical drugs and 79 (88%) labels of proprietary drugs provided an ingredient list. Although 20 (20%) of classical formulations and 13 (15%) of proprietary formulations labels mentioned the Cautions/Warnings, only one language (either English or Hindi) was used. Ayurvedic drug container labels were not compliant with most of the requirements specified in the Act.

  11. A novel chemopreventive mechanism for a traditional medicine: East Indian sandalwood oil induces autophagy and cell death in proliferating keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Sally E; Olson, Erik R; Levenson, Corey; Janda, Jaroslav; Rusche, Jadrian J; Alberts, David S; Bowden, G Timothy

    2014-09-15

    One of the primary components of the East Indian sandalwood oil (EISO) is α-santalol, a molecule that has been investigated for its potential use as a chemopreventive agent in skin cancer. Although there is some evidence that α-santalol could be an effective chemopreventive agent, to date, purified EISO has not been extensively investigated even though it is widely used in cultures around the world for its health benefits as well as for its fragrance and as a cosmetic. In the current study, we show for the first time that EISO-treatment of HaCaT keratinocytes results in a blockade of cell cycle progression as well as a concentration-dependent inhibition of UV-induced AP-1 activity, two major cellular effects known to drive skin carcinogenesis. Unlike many chemopreventive agents, these effects were not mediated through an inhibition of signaling upstream of AP-1, as EISO treatment did not inhibit UV-induced Akt or MAPK activity. Low concentrations of EISO were found to induce HaCaT cell death, although not through apoptosis as annexin V and PARP cleavage were not found to increase with EISO treatment. However, plasma membrane integrity was severely compromised in EISO-treated cells, which may have led to cleavage of LC3 and the induction of autophagy. These effects were more pronounced in cells stimulated to proliferate with bovine pituitary extract and EGF prior to receiving EISO. Together, these effects suggest that EISO may exert beneficial effects upon skin, reducing the likelihood of promotion of pre-cancerous cells to actinic keratosis (AK) and skin cancer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A novel chemopreventive mechanism for a traditional medicine: East Indian sandalwood oil induces autophagy and cell death in proliferating keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, Sally E.; Olson, Erik R.; Levenson, Corey; Janda, Jaroslav; Rusche, Jadrian J.; Alberts, David S.; Bowden, G. Timothy

    2014-01-01

    One of the primary components of the East Indian sandalwood oil (EISO) is α-santalol, a molecule that has been investigated for its potential use as a chemopreventive agent in skin cancer. Although there is some evidence that α-santalol could be an effective chemopreventive agent, to date, purified EISO has not been extensively investigated even though it is widely used in cultures around the world for its health benefits as well as for its fragrance and as a cosmetic. In the current study, we show for the first time that EISO-treatment of HaCaT keratinocytes results in a blockade of cell cycle progression as well as a concentration-dependent inhibition of UV-induced AP-1 activity, two major cellular effects known to drive skin carcinogenesis. Unlike many chemopreventive agents, these effects were not mediated through an inhibition of signaling upstream of AP-1, as EISO treatment did not inhibit UV-induced Akt, or MAPK activity. Low concentrations of EISO were found to induce HaCaT cell death, although not through apoptosis as annexin V and PARP cleavage were not found to increase with EISO treatment. However, plasma membrane integrity was severely compromised in EISO-treated cells, which may have led to cleavage of LC3 and the induction of autophagy. These effects were more pronounced in cells stimulated to proliferate with bovine pituitary extract and EGF prior to receiving EISO. Together, these effects suggest that EISO may exert beneficial effects upon skin, reducing the likelihood of promotion of pre-cancerous cells to actinic keratosis (AK) and skin cancer. PMID:25004464

  13. Analysis of genetic variability in endemic medicinal plants of genus Chlorophytum from the Indian subcontinent using amplified fragment length polymorphism marker.

    PubMed

    Patil, Swapnil Mahadeo; Chandanshive, Vishal Vinayak; Tamboli, Asif Shabodin; Adsul, Avinash Asraji; Yadav, Shrirang Ramchandra; Govindwar, Sanjay Prabhu

    2015-12-01

    The genus Chlorophytum consists of medicinally important species like Chlorophytum borivilianum, C. tuberosum and C. attenuatum. Uncontrolled harvest of this plant from wild habitat due to its high commercial value made the species of this genus be listed in the Red Data Book of Indian plants as an endangered species. In India, approximately nineteen species of Chlorophytum are found; out of these, only C. borivilianum is cultivated commercially. The objective of this study was to measure genetic diversity, population structure and phylogenetic relationship among the species using Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphisms (AFLP). Fifteen pairs of primer (out of 64 primer pairs screened) were used to analyse the genetic diversity in eighteen species of genus Chlorophytum. Cluster analysis, estimation of the gene flow among the species and of the phylogeographic distribution of this genus were carried out using an AFLP data matrix. A high level of genetic diversity was observed on the basis of the percentage of polymorphic bands (99.91%), Shannon's information index (0.3592) and Nei's gene diversity (0.2085) at species level. Cluster analysis of UPGMA dendrogram, principal component analysis and Bayesian method analysis resolved these species in three different clusters, which was supported by morphological information. The Mantel test (r=0.4432) revealed a significant positive correlation between genetic and geographic distances. The collected data have an important implication in the identification, authentication, and conservation of the species of the genus Chlorophytum.

  14. Physico-Chemical Studies on the Evaluation of the Antioxidant Activity of Herbal Extracts and Active Principles of Some Indian Medicinal Plants

    PubMed Central

    Adhikari, Soumyakanti; Indira Priyadarsini, Kavirayani; Mukherjee, Tulsi

    2007-01-01

    Understanding of the efficacy and mechanism for the reaction of the biologically important radicals with natural and/or synthetic antioxidants is the first step towards the development of future therapeutic agents. The kinetic parameters e.g., formation and decay rate constants predict the efficacy of an antioxidant and its fate after reaction. These parameters also dictate the ease with which competing reactions would occur in a bio-environment. The spectroscopic parameters provide the clue to the site of free radical attack to these antioxidants. Here, in this article an attempt has been made to show the use of physico-chemical methods in the evaluation of antioxidant activity of some important medicinal plants commonly used in India and the subcontinent. The systems chosen here for discussions are herbal extracts as such, curcumin from turmeric, methoxy phenols from Indian spices, dehydrogingerdione from ginger and bakuchiol from Psoralea corylifolia. All the examples shown in this article illustrate the potential of the pulse radiolysis coupled with kinetic spectroscopy and other physicochemical techniques for the study of antioxidants either in the form of mixture as in herbal extract or as an isolated compound. PMID:18398494

  15. Qualitative estimation of sesquiterpenoids and triterpenoids of some Phansomba (Indian Medicinal Phellinus spp.) samples and its adulterant Hymenochaete species.

    PubMed

    Lamrood, Prasad Y; Holliday, John C; Madison, Leah M

    2012-01-01

    In the present investigation 16 species of Phellinus and 6 species of Hymenochaete (collected as an adulterant) were screened for sesquiterpenoids and triterpenoids. A total of 11 spots were detected in both sesquiterpenoids and triterpenoids chromatograms. The terpenoids were not identified. The spots obtained for Phellinus were compared with the spots of Hymenochaete. It was revealed from the SAB and D values that almost half of the species of Phellinus have about 45% to 57% dissimilarity in case of sesquiterpenoids and 50% to 60% dissimilarity with the triterpenoids. However, since both the taxa are from the same family, the spots that were common may be characteristic of the family. Such a study may be used to reveal the adulteration in medicinal Phellinus samples.

  16. The medicinal properties and phytochemistry of plants of the genus Terminalia (Combretaceae).

    PubMed

    Cock, I E

    2015-10-01

    Plants of the genus Terminalia are amongst the most widely used plants for traditional medicinal purposes worldwide. Many species are used for their antibacterial, antifungal, antiprotozoal, antiviral, antidiarrhoeal, analgesic, antimalarial, antioxidant, antiinflammatory and anticancer activities. Wound healing and cardiovascular effects have also been credited to some species. Many Terminalia species have multiple beneficial effects for multiple diseases and ailments. Indeed, the Indian species Terminalia chebula is known as the king of plants in Ayurveda due to its broad range of medicinal uses. However, apart from the reported ethnopharmacological uses of many Terminalia species, surprisingly few studies have rigorously examined this important genus for their medical properties/mechanisms and phytochemistry. This is likely due to the high tannin content common to many Terminalia species and the perception that these tannins may be responsible for much of their beneficial properties. As the complexities of tannins make them poor candidates for drug design, most interest in Terminalia species has been for their pharmacognostic and nutraceutical value and they have often been overlooked as potentials for drug discovery. However, recent reports have identified many other interesting phytochemicals and demonstrated that these may be responsible for several of the reported bioactivities of the Terminalia species used in traditional medicinal systems. The last decade has seen a large increase in the number of studies into the use of Terminalia species as therapeutic agents. Several species used in Ayurvedic medicine (Terminalia arjuna, Terminalia bellerica, Terminalia catappa, T. chebula) in particular have received much recent attention. Similarly, recent reports have also highlighted the medicinal potential of species from Africa, Australia and the Americas. The aim of this report is to summarise the recent research into the medicinal properties, phytochemistry and

  17. Bacoside-A, an Indian Traditional-Medicine Substance, Inhibits β-Amyloid Cytotoxicity, Fibrillation, and Membrane Interactions.

    PubMed

    Malishev, Ravit; Shaham-Niv, Shira; Nandi, Sukhendu; Kolusheva, Sofiya; Gazit, Ehud; Jelinek, Raz

    2017-01-30

    Bacoside-A, a family of compounds extracted from the Bacopa monniera plant, is a folk-medicinal substance believed to exhibit therapeutic properties, particularly enhancing cognitive functions and improving memory. We show that bacoside-A exerted significant inhibitory effects upon cytotoxicity, fibrillation, and particularly membrane interactions of amyloid-beta (1-42) (Aβ42), the peptide playing a prominent role in Alzeheimer's disease progression and toxicity. Specifically, preincubation of bacoside-A with Aβ42 significantly reduced cell toxicity and inhibited fibril formation both in buffer solution and, more significantly, in the presence of membrane vesicles. In parallel, spectroscopic and microscopic analyses reveal that bacoside-A blocked membrane interactions of Aβ42, while formation of Aβ42 oligomers was not disrupted. These interesting phenomena suggest that inhibition of Aβ42 oligomer assembly into mature fibrils, and blocking membrane interactions of the oligomers are likely the underlying factors for ameliorating amyloid toxicity by bacoside-A and its putative physiological benefits.

  18. Efficacy and safety of Ayurvedic herbs in diarrhoea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome: A randomised controlled crossover trial.

    PubMed

    Lauche, Romy; Kumar, Syal; Hallmann, Julia; Lüdtke, Rainer; Rampp, Thomas; Dobos, Gustav; Langhorst, Jost

    2016-06-01

    Herbal medicines have been used widely for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients. The aim of this study is to investigate efficacy and safety of an Ayurvedic herbal compound preparation made from: Murraya koenigii (curry), Punica granatum (pomegranate) and Curcuma longa (turmeric), compared to a placebo in patients with diarrhoea predominant IBS. This trial was conducted as a randomised placebo-controlled crossover trial with randomised sequence of verum and placebo for each patient. Verum and placebo were provided as ground powders and delivered in sealed containers. Patients and outcome assessors were blinded. Patients were advised to ingest the decoction twice daily for 4 weeks. The primary outcome measure was IBS symptom intensity; secondary outcomes included: quality of life, anxiety and depression, compliance and safety. 32 IBS patients were included in the trial (19 females, mean age 50.3±11.9years). Eleven people dropped out during the trial resulting in 37 complete verum and 35 complete placebo phases. No group differences were found between verum and placebo for IBS symptom intensity (difference 24.10; 95% CI: -17.12; 65.32, p=0.26). The same was true for secondary outcomes. Compliance was satisfactory to good and the preparation appeared to be safe, but one third of the patients registered at least one minor adverse event that might be related to the study interventions. An Ayurvedic herbal preparation made from Murraya koenigii, Punica granatum and Curcuma longa appeared to be no more effective in improving diarrhoea predominant irritable bowel symptoms than placebo. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Tinospora cordifolia (Willd.) Hook. f. and Thoms. (Guduchi) – validation of the Ayurvedic pharmacology through experimental and clinical studies

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Avnish K.; Kumar, Kaushal; Kumar, Arvind; Mishra, Hari S.

    2010-01-01

    T. cordifolia (Guduchi) is a large, glabrous, perennial, deciduous, climbing shrub of weak and fleshy stem found throughout India. It is a widely used plant in folk and Ayurvedic systems of medicine. The chemical constituents reported from this shrub belong to different classes, such as alkaloids, diterpenoid lactones, glycosides, steroids, sesquiterpenoid, phenolics, aliphatic compounds and polysaccharides. Various properties of T. cordifolia, described in ancient texts of Ayurveda, like Rasayana, Sangrahi, Balya, Agnideepana, Tridoshshamaka, Dahnashaka, Mehnashaka, Kasa-swasahara, Pandunashaka, Kamla-Kushta-Vataraktanashaka, Jwarhara, Krimihara, Prameha, Arshnashaka, Kricch-Hridroganashak, etc., are acquiring scientific validity through modern research adopting "reverse pharmacological" approach. Potential medicinal properties reported by scientific research include anti-diabetic, antipyretic, antispasmodic, anti-inflammatory, anti-arthritic, antioxidant, anti-allergic, anti-stress, anti-leprotic, antimalarial, hepato-protective, immuno-modulatory and anti-neoplastic activities. This review brings together various properties and medicinal uses of T. cordifolia described in Ayurveda, along with phytochemical and pharmacological reports. PMID:20814526

  20. Screening of Indian Lingzhi or Reishi Medicinal Mushroom, Ganoderma lucidum (Agaricomycetes): A UPC2-SQD-MS Approach.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Anuja; Srivastava, Mousami; Pal, Mamta; Sharma, Yogesh Kumar; Bhattacharya, Saikat; Tulsawani, Rajkumar; Sugadev, Ragumani; Misra, Kshipra

    2016-01-01

    Oriental medicinal mushroom Ganoderma lucidum has been widely used for the promotion of health and longevity owing to its various bioactive constituents. Therefore, comprehending metabolomics of different G. lucidum parts could be of paramount importance for investigating their pharmacological properties. Ultra-performance convergence chromatography (UPC2) along with mass spectrometry (MS) is an emerging technique that has not yet been applied for metabolite profiling of G. lucidum. This study has been undertaken to establish metabolomics of the aqueous extracts of mycelium (GLM), fruiting body (GLF), and their mixture (GLMF) using ultra-performance convergence chromatography single quadrupole mass spectrometry (UPC2-SQD-MS). Aqueous extracts of G. lucidum prepared using an accelerated solvent extraction technique have been characterized for their mycochemical activities in terms of total flavonoid content, 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl scavenging activity, and ferric ion reducing antioxidant power. The UPC2-SQD-MS technique has been used for the first time for metabolite profiling of G. lucidum on a Princeton Diol column (4.6 × 250 mm; 5 µm) using supercritical CO2 (solvent) and 20 mM ammonium acetate in methanol (co-solvent). In the present study, UPC2-SQD-MS was found to be a rapid, efficient, and high-throughput analytical technique, whose coupling to principal component analysis (PCA) and phytochemical evaluation could be used as a powerful tool for elucidating metabolite diversity between mycelium and fruiting body of G. lucidum. PCA showed a clear distinction in the metabolite compositions of the samples. Mycochemical studies revealed that overall GLF possessed better antioxidant properties among the aqueous extracts of G. lucidum.

  1. American Indian Doctors Today. Volume Two.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beiswenger, James N., Ed.

    The Indians Into Medicine Program presents an additional 44 brief biographies of American Indian health professionals (7 women and 37 men) from 29 different tribal groups, to acquaint young Indian people with potential careers in health professions (4 of the biographies appeared in Volume One). The biographical sketches contain information on:…

  2. Phytochemistry, pharmacology and medicinal properties of Phyllanthus emblica Linn.

    PubMed

    Gaire, Bhakta Prasad; Subedi, Lalita

    2014-12-09

    Phyllanthus emblica L. (syn. Emblica officinalis) is commonly known as Indian gooseberry. In Ayurveda, P. emblica has been extensively used, both as edible (tonic) plants and for its therapeutic potentials. P. emblica is highly nutritious and is reported as an important dietary source of vitamin C, minerals and amino acids. All parts of the plant are used for medicinal purposes, especially the fruit, which has been used in Ayurveda as a potent Rasayana (rejuvenator). P. emblica contains phytochemicals including fixed oils, phosphatides, essential oils, tannins, minerals, vitamins, amino acids, fatty acids, glycosides, etc. Various pharmaceutical potential of P. emblica has been reported previously including antimicrobial, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, analgesic and antipyretic, adaptogenic, hepatoprotective, antitumor and antiulcerogenic activities either in combined formulation or P. emblica alone. The various other Ayurvedic potentials of P. emblica are yet to be proven scientifically in order to explore its broad spectrum of therapeutic effects. On this regards we, in this review, tried to explore the complete information of P. emblica including its pharmacognosy, phytochemistry and pharmacology.

  3. In vitro screening and evaluation of some Indian medicinal plants for their potential to inhibit Jack bean and bacterial ureases causing urinary infections.

    PubMed

    Bai, Sheema; Bharti, Pooja; Seasotiya, Leena; Malik, Anupma; Dalal, Sunita

    2015-03-01

    Bacterial ureases play an important role in pathogenesis of urinary infections. Selection of plants was done on the basis of their uses by the local people for the treatment of various bacterial and urinary infections. Our investigation screens and evaluates 15 Indian medicinal plants for their possible urease inhibitory activity as well as their ability to inhibit bacteria causing urinary infections. Plant extracts in three different solvents (methanol, aqueous, and cow urine) were screened for their effect on Jack-bean urease using the phenol-hypochlorite method. Subsequently, seven bacterial strains were screened for their ability to release urease and further antimicrobial-linked urease inhibition activity and minimum inhibitory concentration of the tested extracts were evaluated by the agar well diffusion and microdilution method, respectively. Five plants out of 15 crude extracts revealed good urease inhibitory activity (≥ 20% at 1 mg/ml conc.) and IC50 values for these extracts ranged from 2.77 to 0.70 mg/ml. Further testing of these extracts on urease-producing bacterial strains (Staphylococcus aureus NCDC 109, S. aureus MTCC 3160, Proteus vulgaris MTCC 426, Klebsiella pneumoniae MTCC 4030, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa MTCC 7453) showed good anti-urease potency with an MIC ranging from 500 to 7.3 µg/ml. The results of screening as well as susceptibility assay clearly revealed a strong urease inhibitory effect of Acacia nilotica L. (Fabaceae), Emblica officinalis Gaertn. (Phyllanthaceae), Psidium guajava L. (Myrtaceae), Rosa indica L. (Rosaceae), and Terminalia chebula Retz. (Combretaceae). Our findings may help to explain the beneficial effect of these plants against infections associated with the urease enzyme.

  4. Biological Evaluation of Polyherbal Ayurvedic Cardiotonic Preparation "Mahamrutyunjaya rasa".

    PubMed

    Rai, Pallavi D; Rajput, Sadhana J

    2011-01-01

    Mahamrutyunjaya rasa (MHR), an Ayurvedic formulation, used as cardiotonic, contains potentially toxic compounds like aconitine, which are detoxified during preparation using traditional methods. Comparative toxicological evaluation of laboratory prepared formulation (F1) and two marketed formulations (F2 and F3) were performed based on their effects on viability of H9c2 cells and after single oral dose administration in mice. Cardioprotective effect of formulations at 25 and 50 mg/kg doses were studied in isoproterenol- (ISO-) induced myocardial infarcted rats. F1 and F2 did not affect the cell viability, while F3 decreased the cell viability in concentration and time-dependent manner. Rats administered with ISO showed significant increase in the serum levels of glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase, alkaline phosphotase, creatinine kinase isoenzymes, lactate dehydrogenase, and uric acid, while F1 and F2 treatment showed significant reduction in the same. F3 showed further increase in the serum levels of enzymes and uric acid in ISO-challenged rats. High pressure liquid chromatographic analysis of formulations showed higher concentration of aconitine in F3. Study shows that F1 and F2 possess cardioprotective property with higher safety, while formulation F3 cannot be used as cardioprotective due to its cytotoxic effects. Thus, proper quality assessment methods are required during preparation of traditional formulations.

  5. Estimation of berberine in ayurvedic formulations containing Berberis aristata.

    PubMed

    Rout, Kedar Kumar; Pradhan, Subhalaxmi; Mishra, Sagar Kumar

    2008-01-01

    A sensitive, simple, rapid, and efficient high-performance thin-layer chromatographic (HPTLC) method has been developed and validated for the analysis of berberine in marketed Ayurvedic formulations containing Berberis aristata DC for regulatory purposes. Chromatography of methanolic extracts of these formulations was performed on silica gel 60 F254 aluminum-backed TLC plates of 0.2 mm layer thickness. The plate was developed up to 66 mm with the ternary-mobile phase butanol-acetic acid-water (8 + 1 + 1, v/v/v) at 33 +/- 5 degrees C with 5 min of tank saturation. The marker, berberine, was quantified at its maximum absorbance of 350 nm. The limit of detection and limit of quantitation values were found to be 5 and 10 ng/spot. The linear regression analysis data for the calibration plot showed a good linear relationship with correlation coefficient = 0.9994 in the concentration range of 10 to 50 ng/spot for berberine with respect to peak area. The instrumental precision was found to be 0.49% coefficient of variation (CV), and repeatability of the method was 0.73% CV. Recovery values from 98.27 to 99.11% indicate excellent accuracy of the method. The developed HPTLC method is very accurate, precise, and cost-effective, and it has been successfully applied to the assay of marketed formulations containing B. aristata for determination of berberine.

  6. Breaking Open and into Indian Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenwood, J. Alex

    1995-01-01

    The colleges of medicine and dentistry of the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center have the highest enrollment of Native American students in the country. The Health Sciences Center fosters participation of Indian students in medicine, dentistry, public health, and allied health occupations by actively recruiting Indian students and by…

  7. Feasibility of expanding the medication abortion provider base in India to include ayurvedic physicians and nurses.

    PubMed

    Jejeebhoy, Shireen J; Kalyanwala, Shveta; Mundle, Shuchita; Tank, Jaydeep; Zavier, A J Francis; Kumar, Rajesh; Acharya, Rajib; Jha, Nita

    2012-09-01

    The availability of trained abortion providers is limited in India. Allowing ayurvedic physicians and nurses to perform medication abortions may improve women's access to the procedure, but it is unclear whether these clinicians can provide these services safely and effectively. Allopathic physicians, ayurvedic physicians and nurses (10 of each), none of whom had experience in abortion provision, were trained to perform medication abortions. In 2008-2010, these providers performed medication abortions in five clinics in Bihar and Jharkhand for 1,225 women with a pregnancy of up to eight weeks' gestation. A two-sided equivalence design was used to test whether providers' assessments of client eligibility and completeness of abortion matched those of an experienced physician "verifier," and whether medication abortions performed by nurses and ayurvedic physicians were as safe and effective as those done by allopathic physicians. Failure rates were low (5-6%), and those for nurses and ayurvedic physicians were statistically equivalent to those for allopathic physicians. Provider assessments of client eligibility and completeness of abortion differed from those of the verifier in only a small proportion of cases (3-4% for eligibility and 4-5% for completeness); these proportions, and rates of loss to follow-up, were statistically equivalent among provider types. No serious complications were observed, and services by all three groups of providers were acceptable to women. Findings support amending existing laws to improve women's access to medication abortion by expanding the provider base to include ayurvedic physicians and nurses.

  8. Mashkiki: Old Medicine Nourishing the New. American Indians and Alaska Natives in Biomedical Research Careers--II. Proceedings of the Conference (Duluth, Minnesota, 1988).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haller, Edwin W., Ed.; Aitken, Larry P., Ed.

    This book consists of papers and panel discussions presented at a conference that focused on encouraging American Indian and Alaska Native students to enter the field of biomedical research. Research and treatment of diseases among Native populations can best be carried out by American Indian and Alaska Native researchers who have a background in…

  9. Mashkiki: Old Medicine Nourishing the New. American Indians and Alaska Natives in Biomedical Research Careers--II. Proceedings of the Conference (Duluth, Minnesota, 1988).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haller, Edwin W., Ed.; Aitken, Larry P., Ed.

    This book consists of papers and panel discussions presented at a conference that focused on encouraging American Indian and Alaska Native students to enter the field of biomedical research. Research and treatment of diseases among Native populations can best be carried out by American Indian and Alaska Native researchers who have a background in…

  10. The Ayurvedic drug, Ksheerabala, ameliorates quinolinic acid-induced oxidative stress in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Swathy, S S; Indira, M

    2010-01-01

    One of the mechanisms of neurotoxicity is the induction of oxidative stress. There is hardly any cure for neurotoxicity in modern medicine, whereas many drugs in Ayurveda possess neuroprotective effects; however, there is no scientific validation for these drugs. Ksheerabala is an ayurvedic drug which is used to treat central nervous system disorders, arthritis, and insomnia. The aim of our study was to evaluate the effect of Ksheerabala on quinolinic acid-induced toxicity in rat brain. The optimal dose of Ksheerabala was found from a dose escalation study, wherein it was found that Ksheerabala showed maximum protection against quinolinic acid-induced neurotoxicity at a dose of 15 microL/100 g body weight/day, which was selected for further experiments. Four groups of female albino rats were maintained for 21 days as follows: 1. Control group, 2. Quinolinic acid (55 microg/100 g body weight), 3. Ksheerabala (15 microL/100 g body weight), 4. Ksheerabala (15 microL/100 g body weight) + Quinolinic acid (55 microg/100 g body weight). At the end of the experimental period, levels of lipid peroxidation products, protein carbonyls, and activities of scavenging enzymes were analyzed. The results revealed that quinolinic acid intake caused enhanced lipid and protein peroxidation as evidenced by increased levels of peroxidation products such as malondialdehyde, hydroperoxide, conjugated dienes, and protein carbonyls. On the other hand, the activities of scavenging enzymes such as catalase, superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase as well as the concentration of glutathione were reduced. On coadminstration of Ksheerabala along with quinolinic acid, the levels of all the biochemical parameters were restored to near-normal levels, indicating the protective effect of the drug. These results were reinforced by histopathological studies.

  11. Comparing Ksharasutra (Ayurvedic Seton) and open fistulotomy in the management of fistula-in-ano

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Gouranga; Bain, Jayanta; Ray, Ajay Kumar; Dey, Soumedhik; Das, Nandini; Das, Biswanath

    2015-01-01

    Background: Most commonly practiced surgical “lay open” technique to treat fistula-in-ano (a common anorectal pathology) has high rate of recurrence and anal incontinence. Alternatively, a nonsurgical cost efficient treatment with Ksharasutra (cotton Seton coated with Ayurvedic medicines) has minimal complications. In our study, we have tried to compare these two techniques. Materials and Methods: A prospective randomized control study was designed involving patients referred to the Department of General Surgery in RG Kar Medical College, Kolkata, India, from January 2010 to September 2011. Results: Among 50 patients, 26 were in Ksharasutra and 24 were in fistulotomy group. 86% patients were male and 54% of the patients were in the fourth decade. About 74% fistulas are inter-sphincteric and 26% were of trans-sphincteric variety. Severe postoperative pain was more (7.7% vs. 25%) in fistulotomy group, while wound discharge was more associated with Ksharasutra group (15.3% vs. 8.3%). Wound scarring, bleeding, and infection rate were similar in both groups. Ksharasutra group took more time to heal (mean: 53 vs. 35.7 days, P = 0.002) despite reduced disruption to their routine work (2.7 vs. 15.5 days work off, P <0.001). Interestingly, pain experienced was less in Ksharasutra group, there was no open wound in contrast to fistulotomy and it was significantly cost effective (Rupees 166 vs. 464). Conclusion: Treatment of fistula-in-ano with Ksharasutra is a simple with low complications and minimal cost. PMID:26283840

  12. Indian Government and Indian Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starblanket, Noel V.

    1981-01-01

    Accountability for Indian education must be shared among the chiefs and their councils, the Indian leaders at all levels, parents and students. This may be accomplished by Indian control of Indian education. Available from: Department of Educational Foundations, 5-109 Education North, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada, T6G 2G5. (ERB)

  13. Indian Writers and Indian Lives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stensland, Anna Lee

    1974-01-01

    A discussion of popular Indian stereotypes and counter-stereotypes in literature, based on the thesis that the introduction of the literature of the American Indian, traditional and modern, will help to increase the Indian child's pride in his culture and add to the understanding of the non-Indian child. (EH)

  14. Indian Government and Indian Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starblanket, Noel V.

    1981-01-01

    Accountability for Indian education must be shared among the chiefs and their councils, the Indian leaders at all levels, parents and students. This may be accomplished by Indian control of Indian education. Available from: Department of Educational Foundations, 5-109 Education North, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada, T6G 2G5. (ERB)

  15. Evaluation of sample pretreatment methods for analysis of polonium isotopes in herbal medicines.

    PubMed

    Sreejith, Sathyapriya R; Nair, Madhu G; Rao, D D

    2014-12-01

    Herbal infusions like ayurvedic aristas are widely consumed by Indian population for good health. With increasing awareness about radiological assessment, an effort was made to assess the radioactivity concentration of naturally occurring radionuclides in herbal medicines. (210)Po is an important alpha particle emitter contributing to internal dose to man from ingestion. Though (210)Po can be spontaneously deposited on silver disk for alpha spectrometric measurements with less radiochemical step, great care has to be taken during the sample pretreatment step owing to the high volatility of polonium even at low temperatures. Aim of the study was to evaluate an appropriate sample pretreatment method for estimation of polonium in herbal medicines. (209)Po was used for radiochemical yield calculation. Conventional open vessel wet ashing, physical evaporation, freeze-drying and microwave digestion in a Teflon vessel were examined. The recovery ranged between 9 and 79%. The lowest recovery was obtained for the samples that were processed by open vessel digestion without any volume reduction. The recoveries were comparable for those samples that were freeze dried and subjected to HNO3 + HClO4 + H2O2 + HF acid digestion and microwave digested samples. (210)Po concentration in the samples ranged from 11.3 to 39.6 mBq/L. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. EFFICACY OF AYURVEDIC HEALTH CARE SYSTEM: A STUDY IN A COMMUNITY

    PubMed Central

    Nagaraju, V.; Sriram, P.

    1990-01-01

    This study is aimed at evaluating the efficacy of the Ayurvedic system, especially for chronic diseases. Assessment of the subjective relief feed back was done on the lines as suggested in Caraka Samhita, one of the oldest classical Ayurvedic texts. An inter-disciplinary research work involving ancient medical learning and hi-tech modern electronic data processing unit evaluate the efficacy of the Ayurvedic treatment in a closed community. 80 percent of the respondents were in the relief range of 75% to 100%, while overall relief in terms of regaining positive health in addition to attending complaint relief is over 70% in all diseases groups, as reported by the respondents in this Programme. PMID:22556503

  17. Multimodal Ayurvedic management for Sandhigatavata (Osteoarthritis of knee joints)

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Manisha R.; Mehta, Charmi S.; Shukla, Dipali J.; Patel, Kalapi B.; Patel, Manish V.; Gupta, Shiv Narayan

    2013-01-01

    Vata is the governing factor in the maintenance of equilibrium in the universe as well as in the body. As age advances, the influence of Vata Dosha progresses, resulting in the process of gradual degeneration of the body. Sandhigatavata (osteoarthritis) is one of the consequences of this process, which is common in the elderly people. This is one of the major causes of chronic disability, affecting the quality of life. Prevalence of osteoarthritis in India is more among menopausal women. This study has been conducted to evaluate the efficacy of Ayurvedic multimodal management in Sandhigatavata and to provide better options to Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs). In present clinical trial, 50 patients of Sandhigatavata have been registered and have been given Snehana, Svedana, Mriduvirechana, Matrabasti, and Jalaukavacharana, along with oral medications like Yogaraja Guggulu and Ashvagandha Churna. This multimodal therapy is being used in P.D. Patel Ayurved Hospital, Nadiad, since years, providing good relief to patients with Sandhigatavata. The results have been analyzed statistically by using the Student paired‘t’ test. The therapy showed highly significant (P < 0.001) beneficial effect on the clinical features of Sandhigatavata. On overall effect of therapy, 4% of the patients were relieved completely, while 24% have shown marked improvement, 50% moderate improvement, and 22% mild improvement. Results of follow-up showed that marked improvement decreased, but moderate improvement was steady. Continuing the study on a larger number of patients, with inclusion of more objective parameters to get better conclusions is suggested at the end of the study. PMID:24049405

  18. Ayurvedic Therapy (Shirodhara) for Insomnia: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Vinjamury, Manjusha; der Martirosian, Claudia; Miller, Judith

    2014-01-01

    Background: Insomnia is one of the most common complaints faced by primary care practitioners after pain. Non-pharmacological management of Insomnia that is noninvasive is gaining interest among patients with insomnia. Purpose: To determine the feasibility of recruiting and retaining participants in a clinical trial on shirodhara, Ayurvedic oil dripping therapy, for insomnia in the United States and also to investigate the therapeutic usefulness of Shirodhara for insomnia using standardized outcome measures. Design: Case series. Study Intervention and Data Collection: Shirodhara with Brahmi oil was done for 45 minutes on each participant for 5 consecutive days. Insomnia Severity Index (ISI) was used to evaluate the severity of insomnia as well as to determine the response to Shirodhara therapy. Data were collected at baseline, end of the treatment (day 5) and 1 week after the treatment ended (follow-up). Results: Two males and eight females with a mean age of 40 years (range 23 to 72), SD ± 14.2, were enrolled in the study. One dropped out of the study, but all remaining nine participants experienced improvement at the end of treatment. The percentage of improvement range varied from 3.85% to 69.57%. At follow-up, most participants continued to improve. Comparison of means between baseline and day 5 indicated an overall significant improvement (P < .005), but in a comparison of baseline vs 1 week posttreatment the improvement was not significant (P < .089). No adverse events were reported during the study. Conclusion: Shirodhara with Brahmi oil may be beneficial for moderate to severe insomnia. It is feasible to recruit and retain participants for such therapies in the United States. It is important to validate these findings and investigate the mechanism of action using a larger sample and rigorous research design. PMID:24753997

  19. Multimodal Ayurvedic management for Sandhigatavata (Osteoarthritis of knee joints).

    PubMed

    Sharma, Manisha R; Mehta, Charmi S; Shukla, Dipali J; Patel, Kalapi B; Patel, Manish V; Gupta, Shiv Narayan

    2013-01-01

    Vata is the governing factor in the maintenance of equilibrium in the universe as well as in the body. As age advances, the influence of Vata Dosha progresses, resulting in the process of gradual degeneration of the body. Sandhigatavata (osteoarthritis) is one of the consequences of this process, which is common in the elderly people. This is one of the major causes of chronic disability, affecting the quality of life. Prevalence of osteoarthritis in India is more among menopausal women. This study has been conducted to evaluate the efficacy of Ayurvedic multimodal management in Sandhigatavata and to provide better options to Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs). In present clinical trial, 50 patients of Sandhigatavata have been registered and have been given Snehana, Svedana, Mriduvirechana, Matrabasti, and Jalaukavacharana, along with oral medications like Yogaraja Guggulu and Ashvagandha Churna. This multimodal therapy is being used in P.D. Patel Ayurved Hospital, Nadiad, since years, providing good relief to patients with Sandhigatavata. The results have been analyzed statistically by using the Student paired't' test. The therapy showed highly significant (P < 0.001) beneficial effect on the clinical features of Sandhigatavata. On overall effect of therapy, 4% of the patients were relieved completely, while 24% have shown marked improvement, 50% moderate improvement, and 22% mild improvement. Results of follow-up showed that marked improvement decreased, but moderate improvement was steady. Continuing the study on a larger number of patients, with inclusion of more objective parameters to get better conclusions is suggested at the end of the study.

  20. A CONTEMPORARY SCIENTIFIC SUPPORT ON ROLE OF ANCIENT AYURVEDIC DIET AND CONCEPTS IN DIABETES MELLITUS (MADHUMEHA)

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Goli Penchala; Babu, G.; Swamy, G.K.

    2006-01-01

    Diabetes Mellitus (Madhumeha) is a well-known clinical syndrome since antiquity. First time the role of Diet in the prevention, etiology and treatment of Diabetes was mentioned in Ayurveda under the heading of Prameha and Madumeha. Caraka Samhita, Susruta Samhita and other Ayurvedic classics have appropriate descriptions on the role of diet, habits and life style in Prameha and Madhumeha, which is akin to Diabetes. Recent modern (contemporary) Researches and statistics support these descriptions. Aim of this article is to alarm people regarding role of diet and lifestyle in Diabetes through Ayurvedic approach and contemporary scientific correlation with support of clinical and statistical data. PMID:22557212

  1. The Ayurvedic plant Bacopa monnieri inhibits inflammatory pathways in the brain.

    PubMed

    Nemetchek, Michelle D; Stierle, Andrea A; Stierle, Donald B; Lurie, Diana I

    2017-02-02

    Bacopa monnieri (L) Wettst (common name, bacopa) is a medicinal plant used in Ayurveda, the traditional system of medicine of India, as a nootropic. It is considered to be a "medhya rasayana", an herb that sharpens the mind and the intellect. Bacopa is an important ingredient in many Ayurvedic herbal formulations designed to treat conditions such as memory loss, anxiety, poor cognition and loss of concentration. It has also been used in Ayurveda to treat inflammatory conditions such as arthritis. In modern biomedical studies, bacopa has been shown in animal models to inhibit the release of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-6. However, less is known regarding the anti-inflammatory activity of Bacopa in the brain. The current study examines the ability of Bacopa to inhibit the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines from microglial cells, the immune cells of the brain that participate in inflammation in the CNS. The effect of Bacopa on signaling enzymes associated with CNS inflammatory pathways was also studied. Various extracts of Bacopa were prepared and examined in the N9 microglial cell line in order to determine if they inhibited the release of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-6. Extracts were also tested in cell free assays as inhibitors of caspase-1 and matrix metalloproteinase-3 (enzymes associated with inflammation) and caspase-3, which has been shown to cleave protein Tau, an early event in the development of Alzheimer's disease. The tea, infusion, and alkaloid extracts of bacopa, as well as Bacoside A significantly inhibited the release of TNF-α and IL-6 from activated N9 microglial cells in vitro. In addition, the tea, infusion, and alkaloid extracts of Bacopa effectively inhibited caspase 1 and 3, and matrix metalloproteinase-3 in the cell free assay. Bacopa inhibits the release of inflammatory cytokines from microglial cells and inhibits enzymes associated with inflammation in the brain. Thus, Bacopa can limit inflammation in the

  2. Wisconsin Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lurie, Nancy Oestreich

    Wisconsin encompasses an astonishingly representative illustration of the total historical development of federal Indian policy and Indian reactions to it. Wisconsin's Indian population (at least 25,000 people) is the third largest east of the Mississippi River and offers great diversity (3 major linguistic stocks, 6 broad tribal affiliations, and…

  3. Wisconsin Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lurie, Nancy Oestreich

    Wisconsin encompasses an astonishingly representative illustration of the total historical development of federal Indian policy and Indian reactions to it. Wisconsin's Indian population (at least 25,000 people) is the third largest east of the Mississippi River and offers great diversity (3 major linguistic stocks, 6 broad tribal affiliations, and…

  4. Comparative studies on Indian traditional nanomedicine Yashadha Bhasma and zinc oxide nanoparticles for anti-diabetic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durgalakshmi, D.; Ajay Rakkesh, R.; Bhargavi Ram, T.; Balakumar, S.

    2017-07-01

    Diabetes mellitus is the most common endocrine disorder due to carbohydrate metabolism. Also, zinc and its supplements have been used in Indian traditional medicines for treating urinary tract infections. In this work, an attempt has been made to compare the properties of ‘Yashadha Bhasma’ a traditional ayurvedic ZnO supplement for diabetic treatment with the laboratory-synthesized ZnO nanoparticles. The nano-sized ZnO particles are synthesized using co-precipitation method and calcined at 400 °C for further purification. Confirmation of ZnO and presence of Ca and K elements additional to Zn in Yashadha Bhasma is confirmed from XPS. The morphology of ZnO is found to be spherical with average diameter of 15 nm. TEM results show that ZnO rods of Yashadha Bhasma are porous and non-uniform. Glucose degradation studies revealed good performance with ZnO nanoparticles with 80% degradation occurring within 15 min itself. Antibacterial studies also performed well establishing efficacy of ZnO nanoparticles against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial strains, thereby establishing suitable material for treating diabetes mellitus and also curing bacterial wound infections arising due to diabetes mellitus.

  5. COMMON HERBS USED IN DIFFERENT SKIN DISORDERS AS DESCRIBED IN AYURVEDIC CLASSICS

    PubMed Central

    Singh, O.R; Das, B.; Padhi, M.M.; Tewari, N.S.

    2003-01-01

    Diseases of skin account for a great deal of misery, suffering, incapacity and economic loss, Including the genetic causes the diet, climate, sunlight mental factors and allergy etc. have been proved as aetiological factors beyond doubts. Natural herbs seem to be more promising in the field of dematology as already described in ancient Ayurvedic texts. PMID:22557091

  6. MEDICO-BOTANY OF ANDAMAN AND NICOBAR ISLANDS – III AYURVEDIC DRUGS – I

    PubMed Central

    Nair, K.V.; Yoganarasimhan, S.N.; Murthy, K.R. Kesava; Shantha, T.R.

    1984-01-01

    Ayurveda is not exploited to the maximum extent in the islands. In order to provide a basic data for establishing Ayurvedic and allied pharmaceutical based industries, information of on fortyfour drugs available in the islands are provided in this first paper of the series PMID:22557452

  7. Ayurvedic hydro-alcoholic anti-asthmatic medicine Vasarishta built upon Mritasanjeevani Sura: Development and evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Wele, Asmita A.; Pendse, Nikhil U.; Takle, Shrikant P.; Burase, Raghunath V.; Patil, Sanjay V.; Bhalerao, Supriya; Harsulkar, Abhay M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Vasarishta built upon Mritasanjeevani Sura (MS) is a polyherbal hydro-alcoholic anti-asthmatic formulation which is administered in a dose of 1 ml instead of standard dose 40 ml, generally advocated for any “Asava–Arishta” in Ayurveda. Aim: The present study was aimed at finding out rationale for the peculiar distillation process to manufacture MS followed by Sthapana process to make Vasarishta. It was further aimed to find out difference in Vasarishta samples manufactured by purely fermentation process and the peculiar method mentioned above. Materials and Methods: Three batches of MS and subsequently three batches of Vasarishta were prepared. Basic standardization and development of standard operating procedure for the same were achieved by doing pH, percentage of alcohol and total reducing sugar, specific gravity on both MS and Vasarishta, during and after completion of process. Finally, MS and Vasarishta (built upon MS) made in laboratory were compared with marketed samples of MS and Vasarishta using gas chromatography. Results: The types of alcohols and volatile acids in MS and Vasarishta, prepared in laboratory, are similar but the proportions differ, which is taken as an indicator of process standardization. Values of furfural, ethyl acetate, and 1-butanol in lab samples are within permissible limits as against the values of the market samples. Conclusions: The textual process for the production of Vasarishta proved to produce organoleptically acceptable product which is virtually free of toxic compounds such as furfural. PMID:27313419

  8. CONTRIBUTION OF KAUTILYA ARTHASASHTRA TOWARDS DRAVYAGUNA, RASASASTRA AND BHAISHAJYAKALPANA BRANCHES OF AYURVEDIC MEDICINE

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Goli Penchala; Bhuyan, G. C.; Nagalakshmi, V.; Babu, G.; Swamy, G. K.; Sasty, Uttama Vaidya Shri Pammi Satyanarayana

    2006-01-01

    It is believed Kautilya, whose name was Vishnugupta and is popular as Chanakya (The son of Chanaka) wrote Arthasastra. This article is mainly based on Kautilya's Arthasastra, translated by R. Shamasastry. In the preface of 1st to 5th edition of this text, the translator Dr. R. Shamasastry tried to clarify the uncertainty regarding the name of the author and the time of the text. Kamandaka and Dandi quotation support the time of this treatise somewhere between 321 and 300 B.C. These quotations also support the authorship of Vishnugupta. According to Kadambari, the author of Arthasastra was Kautilya and according to Manu and Dharmasastras, Chanakya had written this Arthasastra. Though there are some controversies regarding the name of the author and time of this text, translator R. Shamasastry tried his level best in providing proper support for naming this text as Kautilya's Arthasastra as the original available manuscript contains the name of Kautilya at the end of each of the hundred and fifty chapters of the work. Still there is controversy regarding the exact time of this text. If views of many scholars is considered, time of the text can be placed between 3rd century B.C. to 3rd century A.D. This translated original text contains 15 books (Basic discussions of the text), 150 chapters, 180 sections and 6000 Slokas (Thirty two syllables are considered as one Sloka). PMID:22557221

  9. [The traditional Ayurvedic medicine about pseudo-doctoring as exemplified by "Charaka Samhita"].

    PubMed

    Subotiyalov, M A; Druhinin, V D; Sorokina, T S

    2014-01-01

    The article considers the findings about pseudo-doctoring represented in one of the most ancient medical sources on our planet--treatise "Charaka Samhita" (Carakasamhitā). This treatise is the most important text of Ayurveda, a traditional medical system developed in the Hindustan sub-continent during millenniums.

  10. The traditional ayurvedic medicine, Eugenia jambolana (Jamun fruit), decreases liver inflammation, injury and fibrosis during cholestasis.

    PubMed

    Donepudi, Ajay C; Aleksunes, Lauren M; Driscoll, Maureen V; Seeram, Navindra P; Slitt, Angela L

    2012-04-01

    Cholestasis is a common disease of the liver. Chronic cholestasis eventually leads to hepatic cirrhosis and fibrosis, and rodent chronic cholestasis models are used to study aspects of fibrosis and cirrhosis. Cholestasis-induced liver injury and fibrosis are associated with increased oxidative stress and inflammation. Few pharmacological therapies exist for treatment of cholestasis or cirrhosis, but it is known that humans with better nutritional intake are less likely to develop certain types of cirrhosis. Eugenia jambolana (Jamun) is a tropical berry fruit rich in antioxidant anthocyanin compounds. As anthocyanins decrease cellular lipid peroxidation and oxidative stress, it was hypothesized that Jamun fruit extract (JFE) administration could protect against cholestatic liver injury and inflammation in mice. Starting 24 h after sham or bile-duct ligation (BDL) surgery, male C57Bl/6 mice were administered vehicle or JFE (100 mg/kg, po) for 10 days. Mice that underwent BDL had elevated serum ALT levels, which were reduced to 60% by JFE treatment. Likewise, BDL caused hepatic inflammation, macrophage infiltration, fibrosis and necrosis, all of which were largely improved by JFE. Interestingly, hepatoprotection was observed in JFE-treated BDL mice, despite suppressed transporter expression and increased hepatic bile acid concentrations. Jamun fruit phytochemicals decreased hepatic inflammation and oxidative stress, and protected against hepatocellular injury in mice. Jamun warrants further investigation as a potential antioxidant/anti-inflammatory therapy not only to treat cholestasis but also other liver diseases with an inflammatory component. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  11. UTILITY OF AYURVEDIC DIETETICS IN THE MODERN WORLD

    PubMed Central

    Javalgekar, R. R.

    1982-01-01

    The aspect of preventive medicine is mainly based upon the intake of competed food stuffs. Ayurveda is the pioneer system to give due place to this branch. The author discusses in this paper the human dietetics from tho view point of physical and social hygiene by deeply thinking of surrounding environmental and social conditions. PMID:22556959

  12. Prehistoric Iroquois Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hosbach, Richard E.; Doyle, Robert E.

    1976-01-01

    Study of pre-1750 medicine reveals that Iroquois diagnosis and treatment of disease was more advanced than the medicine of their European counterparts. The Iroquois developed a cure for scurvy, treated hypertension, and head lice, and even designed sauna baths. Indian psychiatry also included modern day techniques such as dream analysis. (MR)

  13. Prehistoric Iroquois Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hosbach, Richard E.; Doyle, Robert E.

    1976-01-01

    Study of pre-1750 medicine reveals that Iroquois diagnosis and treatment of disease was more advanced than the medicine of their European counterparts. The Iroquois developed a cure for scurvy, treated hypertension, and head lice, and even designed sauna baths. Indian psychiatry also included modern day techniques such as dream analysis. (MR)

  14. Indians of Canada. Jackdaw No. C16.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Edward, Comp.; Irwin, Clarke, Comp.

    The Jackdaw packet contains historical documents dealing with Canadian Indians. The packet may be used for senior high school and college level students. Included are a reproduction of a birchbark scroll owned by an Ojibwa Medicine Society, showing membership symbols known only to the society; a speech (1743) by an Indian chief, as transcribed…

  15. California Indian ethnomycology and associated forest management

    Treesearch

    Kat M. Anderson; Frank K. Lake

    2013-01-01

    Many California Indian tribes utilized mushrooms for food, medicine, and/or technological purposes. This paper summarizes which mushrooms were important to different California Indian tribes in historic and modern times and how they were harvested, prepared, and stored. Oral interviews were conducted and the ethnographic literature reviewed to detail the extent and...

  16. Indians of Canada. Jackdaw No. C16.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Edward, Comp.; Irwin, Clarke, Comp.

    The Jackdaw packet contains historical documents dealing with Canadian Indians. The packet may be used for senior high school and college level students. Included are a reproduction of a birchbark scroll owned by an Ojibwa Medicine Society, showing membership symbols known only to the society; a speech (1743) by an Indian chief, as transcribed…

  17. Indian Legends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurnoe, Katherine J.; Skjervold, Christian, Ed.

    Presenting American Indian legends, this material provides insight into the cultural background of the Dakota, Ojibwa, and Winnebago people. Written in a straightforward manner, each of the eight legends is associated with an Indian group. The legends included here are titled as follows: Minnesota is Minabozho's Land (Ojibwa); How We Got the…

  18. Hemodynamic effects of Sarvanga Swedana (Ayurvedic passive heat therapy): A pilot observational study

    PubMed Central

    Rastogi, Sanjeev; Chiappelli, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Sarvanga Swedana is a common procedure done in Ayurvedic Panchakarma units. Passive body heat therapy, which is akin to Sarvanga Swedana is known to cause systemic hemodynamic changes. Such studies would have been required to find the possible hemodynamic changes following the Sarvanga Swedana sessions also. An observational study was planned to observe hemodynamic changes among patients routinely receiving Sarvanga Swedana in a Panchakarma setting at an Ayurvedic hospital. Significant increase in blood pressure and pulse rate (PR) was observed in all patients immediately after the completion of Sarvanga Swedana therapy. Upon continuation of Sarvanga Swedana in a subgroup; however, a significant reduction in systolic blood pressure and PR was also observed. PMID:24250123

  19. Standardization and bioavailabililty of ayurvedic drug lauha bhasma part-1 physical and chemical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Verma, P R; Prasad

    1995-10-01

    Lauha Bhasma, an ayurvedic drug, is widely used in iron deficiency anaemia, this ancient drug is claimed to be better absorbed gastrointestinally, and is also claimed to be devoid of the usual side effects associated with administration of the allopathic iron preparations, Physical and chemical methods of standardization required for any quality preparation, is not found in the ayurvedic and the modern literatures for Lauha Bhasma. Thus an approach has been made to standardize Lauha Bhasma. For the purpose of analysis, samples of all the three commonly available variants of Lauha Bhasma were considered. Qualitative analysis indicates the presence of iron both in the ferric and the ferrous forms, A simple spectrophotometric method has been used for simultaneous determination of ferric ferrous and the total iron content in a single aliquot.

  20. Posological Considerations of Ocimum sanctum (Tulasi) as per Ayurvedic Science and Pharmaceutical Sciences

    PubMed Central

    Narayana, D.B.A.; Manohar, R.; Mahapatra, Anita; Sujithra, R. M.; Aramya, A. R.

    2014-01-01

    A study in 2010 reported that administration of 2 g of O. sanctum leaves for 30 days to laboratory male albino rabbits showed adverse effect on sperm count and male hormones. The dose and duration at which this testing was reported was commented upon as being high. It is learnt that basis this publication a few European regulators have imposed restrictions on usage of O. sanctum. Recognizing the need for evaluation, a review has been made of the posological considerations related to decision on dose of a drug in pharmaceuticals (drug development stages) and in Ayurvedic science as part of history of use and current usage. Specifically, we report the dose range as per documented tradition, marketed products containing O. sanctum as an ingredient and current clinical practice. Greater consultation is suggested before deciding the studies on Ayurvedic herbs. Regulatory action of banning use of O. sanctum needs a review and may need to be replaced with an advisory. PMID:25035537

  1. American Indian Doctors Today. Volume 1, Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Dakota Univ., Grand Forks. School of Medicine.

    The Indians Into Medicine Program presents 20 brief biographies of American Indian/Alaska Native health professionals (17 men and 3 women) from 14 different tribal groups, to acquaint young Indian people with potential careers in health professions. The biographical sketches contain information on: age; tribal affiliation; family and educational…

  2. American Indian Doctors Today. Volume 1, Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Dakota Univ., Grand Forks. School of Medicine.

    The Indians Into Medicine Program presents 20 brief biographies of American Indian/Alaska Native health professionals (17 men and 3 women) from 14 different tribal groups, to acquaint young Indian people with potential careers in health professions. The biographical sketches contain information on: age; tribal affiliation; family and educational…

  3. Ayurvedic approach in the management of spinal cord injury: A case study.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sarvesh Kumar; Rajoria, Kshipra

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is associated with consequences such as full loss of spinal movements, incontinence of bladder functions, bed sores, etc. There is no satisfactory treatment available in biomedicine with only limited treatments only for enhancement of spinal cord function. These treatments have many limitations. Ayurvedic drugs and Pancakarma procedures have been in use to treat such conditions since a long time. We present a case of SCI with lesion at C4 level which was treated for 2 months with an Ayurvedic combined intervention. The combined treatment plan involved Ayurvedic oral medications (Brhadvātacintāmaṇi rasa - 125 mg, Ardhanāgavātāri rasa - 125 mg, Daśamūla kvātha - 40 ml, Aśvagandhācūrṇa [powder of Withania somnifera DUNAL] - 3 g, Amṛtā [Tinospora cordifolia WILLD] - 500 mg, Muktāśukti piṣṭi - 500 mg and Trayodaśāṅga guggulu - 500 mg) twice daily. Combined procedures involved such as śāliṣaṣṭika piṇḍasvedana (sudation with medicated cooked bolus of rice) every day for 2 months and Mātrā basti (enema) for first 15 days with Aśvagandhā oil. From 16(th) day, Mustādi yāpana basti (MYB, enema with medicated milk) was given for 16 days. After an interval of 7 days, MYB was further repeated for next 16 days. Substantial clinical improvement was reported after 2 months of the Ayurvedic treatment in existing neurological deficits and in quality of life.

  4. Ayurvedic approach in the management of spinal cord injury: A case study

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sarvesh Kumar; Rajoria, Kshipra

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is associated with consequences such as full loss of spinal movements, incontinence of bladder functions, bed sores, etc. There is no satisfactory treatment available in biomedicine with only limited treatments only for enhancement of spinal cord function. These treatments have many limitations. Ayurvedic drugs and Pancakarma procedures have been in use to treat such conditions since a long time. We present a case of SCI with lesion at C4 level which was treated for 2 months with an Ayurvedic combined intervention. The combined treatment plan involved Ayurvedic oral medications (Brhadvātacintāmaṇi rasa - 125 mg, Ardhanāgavātāri rasa - 125 mg, Daśamūla kvātha - 40 ml, Aśvagandhācūrṇa [powder of Withania somnifera DUNAL] - 3 g, Amṛtā [Tinospora cordifolia WILLD] - 500 mg, Muktāśukti piṣṭi - 500 mg and Trayodaśāṅga guggulu - 500 mg) twice daily. Combined procedures involved such as śāliṣaṣṭika piṇḍasvedana (sudation with medicated cooked bolus of rice) every day for 2 months and Mātrā basti (enema) for first 15 days with Aśvagandhā oil. From 16th day, Mustādi yāpana basti (MYB, enema with medicated milk) was given for 16 days. After an interval of 7 days, MYB was further repeated for next 16 days. Substantial clinical improvement was reported after 2 months of the Ayurvedic treatment in existing neurological deficits and in quality of life. PMID:26283809

  5. PA01.60. Concept of Signs of Death / Near Death in Ayurvedic Classics

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Dilip Kr.; Das, Biswajit

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Ayurveda, which is considered as the Panchamaveda, can be counted as the science of life existing since time immemorial. The wise and experienced authors of the Ayurvedic classics have expressed in some references that, they have only given the guidelines on the subjects to the readers. The readers are to expand the same according to their need and intelligence. There is much confusion of the Ayurvedic students and also of the practitioners and Teachers on the availability of the answers of a number of questions. Among many of such questions in the minds the authors raised a question i.e. is there any description of the signs of death/near death in the Ayurvedic classics as in the Modern texts? Methodology: To solve the question the Ayurvedic Samhitas especially Charaka Samhita and Susruta Samhita were searched thoroughly. After the thorough search of the two Samhitas it was observed that, the signs and symptoms mentioned under the heading “Maranalingani” in Charak Samhita Chikitsasthana 23rd chapter and “Asadhya Bisapidita Lakshanani” in Susruta Samhita Kalpasthana 3rd chapter resembles closely with the signs of death/near death mentioned in the modern classics, specially perikh's Textbook of Medical Jurisprudence and Toxicology. Conclusion: From the comparative study of the above mentioned descriptions it was observed that, the signs and symptoms described by Charaka and Susruta are not insufficient for a physician to give death declaration. The mentioned signs and symptoms can be used as a tool to confirm death/near death of an individual.

  6. An ayurvedic approach in the management of Guillain-Barre syndrome: A case study.

    PubMed

    Nakanekar, Amit; Bhople, Sunanda; Gulhane, Harshad; Rathod, Suraj; Gulhane, Jayant; Bonde, Pravin

    2015-01-01

    Guillain-Barre syndrome is an acute, frequently severe and fulminant polyradiculopathy that is autoimmune in nature. Guillain Barre syndrome is a rare disorder that causes immune systems to attack peripheral nervous system (PNS). A 46 year old male patient, presenting with sudden onset, complete paralysis of all four limbs (quadriplegia), unable to walk, stand, sit, difficulty in deglutition (dysphagia) and dysarthia, was having foley's catheter and Ryle's Tube brought by relative to Out Door Patient Department (OPD) of Government Ayurvedic Hospital, Nagpur; He was provisionally diagnosed as subacute sensory motor paraplegia. Previously patient admitted and treated in Government Medical College (GMC) Nagpur but did not show any sign of improvement so patient was admitted and treated with Ayurvedic treatment for about 50 days. As per Ayurvedic classics, this condition can be correlated with sarvāṅ gagatavātavyādhi (~vāta disorder affecting all parts of the body), which is apatarpaṇa in nature (~diseases with deprived nourishment of body tissue) preceded by jvara (~(H/O fever before onset of GBS). Hence, the principle of treatment is santarpaṇa cikitsā (~nourishing treatment). Santarpaṇa (~nourishing treatment) includes bahyopakramas (~nourishing external treatment modalities), such as abhyaṅga (~oleation therapy) and ṣaṣṭikaśālipiṇḍasveda (~sudation using of hot and processed ṣaṣṭika rice), karmabasti (~medicated enema) śirodhārā (gentle pouring of medicated liquid over forehead) and jvaraghna cikitsā (~treatment of fever) using various Ayurvedic herbomineral compounds. Remarkable results were observed in the form of improvement in the muscle power from zero to five of all four limbs with improvement in speech. There was no difficulty post treatment in deglutition, sitting, standing and walking; and now patient has near to normal movements.

  7. An ayurvedic approach in the management of Guillain-Barre syndrome: A case study

    PubMed Central

    Nakanekar, Amit; Bhople, Sunanda; Gulhane, Harshad; Rathod, Suraj; Gulhane, Jayant; Bonde, Pravin

    2015-01-01

    Guillain-Barre syndrome is an acute, frequently severe and fulminant polyradiculopathy that is autoimmune in nature. Guillain Barre syndrome is a rare disorder that causes immune systems to attack peripheral nervous system (PNS). A 46 year old male patient, presenting with sudden onset, complete paralysis of all four limbs (quadriplegia), unable to walk, stand, sit, difficulty in deglutition (dysphagia) and dysarthia, was having foley's catheter and Ryle's Tube brought by relative to Out Door Patient Department (OPD) of Government Ayurvedic Hospital, Nagpur; He was provisionally diagnosed as subacute sensory motor paraplegia. Previously patient admitted and treated in Government Medical College (GMC) Nagpur but did not show any sign of improvement so patient was admitted and treated with Ayurvedic treatment for about 50 days. As per Ayurvedic classics, this condition can be correlated with sarvāṅ gagatavātavyādhi (~vāta disorder affecting all parts of the body), which is apatarpaṇa in nature (~diseases with deprived nourishment of body tissue) preceded by jvara (~(H/O fever before onset of GBS). Hence, the principle of treatment is santarpaṇa cikitsā (~nourishing treatment). Santarpaṇa (~nourishing treatment) includes bahyopakramas (~nourishing external treatment modalities), such as abhyaṅga (~oleation therapy) and ṣaṣṭikaśālipiṇḍasveda (~sudation using of hot and processed ṣaṣṭika rice), karmabasti (~medicated enema) śirodhārā (gentle pouring of medicated liquid over forehead) and jvaraghna cikitsā (~treatment of fever) using various Ayurvedic herbomineral compounds. Remarkable results were observed in the form of improvement in the muscle power from zero to five of all four limbs with improvement in speech. There was no difficulty post treatment in deglutition, sitting, standing and walking; and now patient has near to normal movements. PMID:26600668

  8. Ayurvedic research and methodology: Present status and future strategies

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Ashutosh; Semwal, Deepak Kumar; Mishra, Satyendra Prasad; Semwal, Ruchi Badoni

    2015-01-01

    Ayurveda is a science of life with a holistic approach to health and personalized medicine. It is one of the oldest medical systems, which comprises thousands of medical concepts and hypothesis. Interestingly, Ayurveda has ability to treat many chronic diseases such as cancer, diabetes, arthritis, and asthma, which are untreatable in modern medicine. Unfortunately, due to lack of scientific validation in various concepts, this precious gift from our ancestors is trailing. Hence, evidence-based research is highly needed for global recognition and acceptance of Ayurveda, which needs further advancements in the research methodology. The present review highlights various fields of research including literary, fundamental, drug, pharmaceutical, and clinical research in Ayurveda. The review further focuses to improve the research methodology for Ayurveda with main emphasis on the fundamental research. This attempt will certainly encourage young researchers to work on various areas of research for the development and promotion of Ayurveda. PMID:27833362

  9. Ayurvedic research and methodology: Present status and future strategies.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Ashutosh; Semwal, Deepak Kumar; Mishra, Satyendra Prasad; Semwal, Ruchi Badoni

    2015-01-01

    Ayurveda is a science of life with a holistic approach to health and personalized medicine. It is one of the oldest medical systems, which comprises thousands of medical concepts and hypothesis. Interestingly, Ayurveda has ability to treat many chronic diseases such as cancer, diabetes, arthritis, and asthma, which are untreatable in modern medicine. Unfortunately, due to lack of scientific validation in various concepts, this precious gift from our ancestors is trailing. Hence, evidence-based research is highly needed for global recognition and acceptance of Ayurveda, which needs further advancements in the research methodology. The present review highlights various fields of research including literary, fundamental, drug, pharmaceutical, and clinical research in Ayurveda. The review further focuses to improve the research methodology for Ayurveda with main emphasis on the fundamental research. This attempt will certainly encourage young researchers to work on various areas of research for the development and promotion of Ayurveda.

  10. Ayurvedic approach for improving reaction time of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder affected children

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Harish Kumar; Neetu; Kumar, Abhimanyu; Rai, Moti

    2010-01-01

    Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a behavioral disorder of children. It is the most common neurological disorder of childhood. The present study was conducted to examine the increase in attention span in 43 ADHD-affected children treated with different approaches. The reaction time was measured using a Vernier chronoscope (electronic). Selected children of both sexes in the age-group of 6–16 years were divided into three groups. In group A, 17 patients received syrup Ayurvedic compound I; in group B, 14 patients were treated with syrup Ayurvedic compound I + Shirodhara with milk; and in group C, 12 patients received syrup Ayurvedic compound II (placebo). The dose of the drug was 1.0 ml/kg body weight and the duration of treatment was 3 months. Group B showed highly significant (P<.001) improvement in total reaction time, while in group C the change was statistically nonsignificant P > 0.10. It was found that while the drug and Shirodhara were both effective in improving the reaction time of ADHD-affected children, the drug combined with Shirodhara was superior to the drug used alone. PMID:22131736

  11. Studies on metals and pesticide content in some Ayurvedic formulations containing Bacopa monnieri L.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Amrita; Mishra, Arun K; Tiwari, Om Prakash; Jha, Shivesh

    2016-01-01

    Ayurvedic formulations are preferred over other formulations as well as commercialized on broad level to treat various ailments. The World Health Organization has established certain guidelines for quality control of heavy metals and pesticide residues. Bacopa monnieri, a popular herb with immunomodulator and memory-enhancing properties is the chief constituent of several Ayurvedic formulations, which include Brahmi Vati (BV), Brahmi Ghrita (BG) and Saraswat Churna (SC), etc. In view of the World Health Organization guidelines, two products of each formulation from six different manufacturers were purchased from Ayurvedic Pharmacy, Bulanala-Varanasi, India for testing heavy metal and pesticide residue. In the present study, all the formulations--BV, BG and SC--were selected for estimation of four heavy metals namely lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr) and nickel (Ni) by a plasma emission spectrophotometer. Organochlorine pesticidal residues were estimated for dichlorodiphenyl trichloroethane, isomers of hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) and α-endosulfan, etc. in total 12 samples of test formulations containing Bacopa monnieri L. using gas chromatography technique. Out of 12 samples, Pb, Cd, Cr and Ni were present in all samples but below the permissible limit. Although atrazine, aldrin, dialdrin were in below detection limit, but other pesticides were detected in some samples as oxamyl, hexachlorocyclohexanes (α-HCH, β-HCH and γ-HCH), dichlorodiphenyl trichloroethane and dichlorodiphenyl dichloroethylene. The presence of heavy metals in the formulations was low to cause toxicity. However evaluation of heavy metals and pesticide residue in every batch is necessary.

  12. Assessment of Quality of Life in Patients With Skin Disorders Undergoing Ayurvedic Panchakarma (Biopurification) as Management.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Harish; Shivakumar; Kavita, M B; Tripathy, T B; Chaturvedi, Ashutosh

    2016-07-01

    Chronic skin conditions can have a negative impact on one's quality of life, affecting their physical, functional, and emotional well-being. Whereas biopurifactory measures (panchakarma) of Ayurveda claims to provide better quality of life after treatment. Hence current study is planned to provide evidence in patients with skin disorders, undergoing Ayurvedic treatment. Sixty patients with skin disorder, who underwent purification therapies like therapeutic emesis and therapeutic purgation, were randomly placed in 2 groups to assess quality of life. Quality of life assessment was done with the help of Skindex-29 among the patients before and after Ayurvedic purification therapy. Thereafter, the quality of life assessment was done on the first follow-up. A statistically significant improvement in the quality of life domains-emotions, functioning, and symptoms-after the Ayurvedic management was observed with P value <.001. Study concludes that there is improvement in quality of life among patients with skin disease after undergoing Ayurveda purification therapies. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. INDIGENOUS MEDICINE AND THE STATE IN ANCIENT INDIA

    PubMed Central

    Bala, Poonam

    1985-01-01

    Several arguments have been forwarded for the stagnation of Ayurveda, and most of these focus on the discrimination that Ayurveda faces under Mughal and then under British rule. Even for Ancient India, the halcyon portrait of Ayurveda synergetically related with religion and politics during the period, as has been portrayed in many books of history and in countless lores, is false. This paper then deals with the interaction between the State and Ayurvedic medicine in ancient India. PMID:22557490

  14. The Chilula Indians of California.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lake, Robert, Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The article discusses the sources and preparation of many of the foods and medicines used by California's Chilula Indians. It notes the specific uses of 34 roots, herbs, and vegetables, giving both the Latin and common names for all and illustrations for some. Includes "menus" for Chilula meals. (SB)

  15. Indian Terms of the Americas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Lotsee; Snodgrass, Mary Ellen

    This book defines a variety of terms from Native American history and represents a compendium of vocabulary, people, places, and events. The alphabetized, illustrated text includes names for Indian objects such as pirogues, prayer sticks, kayaks, dumas, and medicine bundles; methods of doing things, such as stone boiling, diapering babies, healing…

  16. The Chilula Indians of California.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lake, Robert, Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The article discusses the sources and preparation of many of the foods and medicines used by California's Chilula Indians. It notes the specific uses of 34 roots, herbs, and vegetables, giving both the Latin and common names for all and illustrations for some. Includes "menus" for Chilula meals. (SB)

  17. Indian Terms of the Americas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Lotsee; Snodgrass, Mary Ellen

    This book defines a variety of terms from Native American history and represents a compendium of vocabulary, people, places, and events. The alphabetized, illustrated text includes names for Indian objects such as pirogues, prayer sticks, kayaks, dumas, and medicine bundles; methods of doing things, such as stone boiling, diapering babies, healing…

  18. Evaluation of anti-leishmanial activity of selected Indian plants known to have antimicrobial properties.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Umakant; Velpandian, Thirumurthy; Sharma, Pawan; Singh, Sarman

    2009-10-01

    The severe toxicity, exorbitant cost and the emerging resistance of Leishmania spp. against most of the currently used drugs led to the urgent need for exploiting our traditional Ayurvedic knowledge to treat visceral leishmaniasis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro anti-leishmanial activity of various extracts from ten traditionally used Indian medicinal plants. The methanolic extract from only two plants, Withania somnifera Dunal (ashwagandha) and Allium sativum Linn. (garlic), showed appreciable activity against Leishmania donovani. Further active compounds from these two plants were isolated and purified based on bioactivity-guided fractionation. HPLC-purified fraction A6 of ashwagandha and G3 of garlic showed consistently high activity with 50% inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) of 12.5 +/- 4 and 18.6 +/- 3 microg/ml against promastigotes whereas IC(50) of 9.5 +/- 3 and 13.5 +/- 2 microg/ml against amastigote form, respectively. The fraction A6 of ashwagandha was identified as withaferin A while fraction G3 of garlic is yet to be identified, and the work is in progress. Cytotoxic effects of the promising fractions and compounds were further evaluated in the murine macrophage (J774G8) model and were found to be safe. These compounds showed negligible cytotoxicity against J774G8 macrophages. The results indicate that fraction A6 of ashwagandha and fraction G3 of garlic might be potential sources of new anti-leishmanial compounds. The in vivo efficacy study and further optimization of these active compounds are in progress.

  19. Allergic Contact Dermatitis (Type IV Hypersensitivity) and Type I Hypersensitivity Following Aromatherapy with Ayurvedic Oils (Dhanwantharam Thailam, Eladi Coconut Oil) Presenting as Generalized Erythema and Pruritus with Flexural Eczema

    PubMed Central

    Lakshmi, Chembolli

    2014-01-01

    Herbal and Ayurvedic medications, believed to be “mild” and “natural” are usually sought as the first line of treatment before resorting to “stronger” allopathic medication. There are very few reports of adverse reactions to either topical and/or systemic Ayurvedic medications. Massage aromatherapy with ayurvedic oils plays an important role in alleviation of pain, but may cause allergic contact dermatitis. This is the second case report of allergic contact dermatitis to ayurvedic oil. PMID:24891661

  20. Allergic Contact Dermatitis (Type IV Hypersensitivity) and Type I Hypersensitivity Following Aromatherapy with Ayurvedic Oils (Dhanwantharam Thailam, Eladi Coconut Oil) Presenting as Generalized Erythema and Pruritus with Flexural Eczema.

    PubMed

    Lakshmi, Chembolli

    2014-05-01

    Herbal and Ayurvedic medications, believed to be "mild" and "natural" are usually sought as the first line of treatment before resorting to "stronger" allopathic medication. There are very few reports of adverse reactions to either topical and/or systemic Ayurvedic medications. Massage aromatherapy with ayurvedic oils plays an important role in alleviation of pain, but may cause allergic contact dermatitis. This is the second case report of allergic contact dermatitis to ayurvedic oil.

  1. Possible similarities between the folk medicine historically used by First Nations and American Indians in North America and the ethnoveterinary knowledge currently used in British Columbia, Canada.

    PubMed

    Lans, Cheryl

    2016-11-04

    This paper compares sixty-four plants used as ethnoveterinary remedies in British Columbia with First Nations folk medicine. In 2003, I conducted semi-structured interviews with 60 participants obtained using a purposive sample. The data was then compared with historical documents on First Nations plant use. Exact parallels between First Nations/native American folk medicine and ethnoveterinary remedies used for farm animals and horses were Acer macrophyllum Pursh, Epilobium angustifolium L. and Lonicera involucrata (Richardson) Banks ex Spreng., used as stimulants and tonics for goats; Achlys tripylla DC. as a fly repellent in barns, Alnus rubra Bong., for rabbits' dental care, Berberis repens Lindl., Rumex crispus L., to treat sores and rashes on horses, Pinus ponderosa Douglas ex C. Lawson for stomach problems and Bovista pila Berk. and M. A. Curtis and Dolichousnea longissima (Ach.) Articus used on wounds. This study revealed the parallel uses between sixty-four plants used as ethnoveterinary medicines in British Columbia and the folk medicines used by the First Nations peoples and by native American groups. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Integrative Oncology in Indian Subcontinent: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Janardhanan, Sunitha; Jeevakarunyam, Sathiyajeeva; Jeddy, Nadheem; Eagappan, Senthil

    2015-01-01

    Integrative oncology is a combination of one where complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) with conventional cancer treatment modalities is used to manage symptoms, control side-effects and improve the state of mental wellbeing. The ancient Indian medicinal approach in cancer treatment and management has a wide array of herbs and practices. There is an increasing demand for traditional and natural medicine by the cancer patients. The conventional oncologic surgeons and physicians should be aware of the role of cCAM that are available in Indian subcontinent and provide a treatment that focuses on the physical and mental state of wellness in combating cancer. PMID:25954692

  3. Indian Summer

    SciTech Connect

    Galindo, E.

    1997-08-01

    This paper focuses on preserving and strengthening two resources culturally and socially important to the Shoshone-Bannock Indian Tribe on the Fort Hall Reservation in Idaho; their young people and the Pacific-Northwest Salmon. After learning that salmon were not returning in significant numbers to ancestral fishing waters at headwater spawning sites, tribal youth wanted to know why. As a result, the Indian Summer project was conceived to give Shoshone-Bannock High School students the opportunity to develop hands-on, workable solutions to improve future Indian fishing and help make the river healthy again. The project goals were to increase the number of fry introduced into the streams, teach the Shoshone-Bannock students how to use scientific methodologies, and get students, parents, community members, and Indian and non-Indian mentors excited about learning. The students chose an egg incubation experiment to help increase self-sustaining, natural production of steelhead trout, and formulated and carried out a three step plan to increase the hatch-rate of steelhead trout in Idaho waters. With the help of local companies, governmental agencies, scientists, and mentors students have been able to meet their project goals, and at the same time, have learned how to use scientific methods to solve real life problems, how to return what they have used to the water and land, and how to have fun and enjoy life while learning.

  4. Standardization and bioavailability of ayurvedic drug lauha bhasma- part -ii comparative bioavailability studies.

    PubMed

    Verma, P R; Prasad, C M

    1995-10-01

    After analyzing the Lauha Bhasma samples qualitatively and quantitatively, in-vivo studies on healthy adult male rabbits were carried out. Randomly selected anaemic rabbits were divided into different groups and three variants of Lauha Bhasma and ferrous sulphate sample were administered to each group. The effect of each formulation was monitored by measuring the haemoglobin (Hb) content spectrophotometrically (cyanomethaemoglobin method). Increase in the haemoglobin content was found to be significant in case of the ayurvedic formulations as compared to the ferrous sulphate sample.

  5. Indian Orphanages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, Marilyn Irvin

    With their traditional tribal and kinship ties, Native Americans had lived for centuries without the concept of an unwanted child. But besieged by reservation life and boarding school acculturation, many tribes, with the encouragement of whites, came to accept the need for orphanages. This book tells the story of Indian orphanages within the…

  6. Ayurvedic intervention in the management of uterine fibroids: A Case series

    PubMed Central

    Dhiman, Kamini

    2014-01-01

    Uterine enlargement is common in reproductive life of a female. Other than pregnancy, it is seen most frequently in the result of leiomyomas. Leiomyomas, are benign smooth muscle neoplasmas that typically originate from the myometrium, due to fibrous consistency and are also called as fibroid. They may be identified in asymptomatic women during routine pelvic examination or may cause symptoms. Typical complaints include pain, pressure sensations, dysmenorrhea or abnormal uterine bleeding. Management of uterine fibroid through surgery is available to meet urgent need of the patient, but challenges remain to establish a satisfactory conservatory medical treatment till date. Hence, it was critically reviewed in the context of Granthi Roga (disease) and treatment protocol befitting the Samprapti Vighatana of Granthi (encapsulated growth) was subjected in patients of uterine fibroids. Seven cases of uterine fibroid were managed by Ayurvedic intervention. Ultrasonography (USG) of the lower abdomen was the main investigative/diagnostic tool in this study. After 7 weeks, patients presented with USG report as absence of uterine fibroid. Ayurvedic formulations Kanchanara Guggulu, Shigru Guggulu, and Haridra Khand are found to be effective treatment modality in uterine fibroid. PMID:26664240

  7. HPLC analysis and standardization of Brahmi vati – An Ayurvedic poly-herbal formulation

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Amrita; Mishra, Arun K.; Tiwari, Om Prakash; Jha, Shivesh

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The aim of the present study was to standardize Brahmi vati (BV) by simultaneous quantitative estimation of Bacoside A3 and Piperine adopting HPLC–UV method. BV very important Ayurvedic polyherbo formulation used to treat epilepsy and mental disorders containing thirty eight ingredients including Bacopa monnieri L. and Piper longum L. Materials and methods An HPLC–UV method was developed for the standardization of BV in light of simultaneous quantitative estimation of Bacoside A3 and Piperine, the major constituents of B. monnieri L. and P. longum L. respectively. The developed method was validated on parameters including linearity, precision, accuracy and robustness. Results The HPLC analysis showed significant increase in amount of Bacoside A3 and Piperine in the in-house sample of BV when compared with all three different marketed samples of the same. Results showed variations in the amount of Bacoside A3 and Piperine in different samples which indicate non-uniformity in their quality which will lead to difference in their therapeutic effects. Conclusion The outcome of the present investigation underlines the importance of standardization of Ayurvedic formulations. The developed method may be further used to standardize other samples of BV or other formulations containing Bacoside A3 and Piperine. PMID:24396246

  8. Ayurvedic management of life-threatening skin emergency erythroderma: A case study

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sarvesh Kumar; Rajoria, Kshipra

    2015-01-01

    Erythroderma or generalized exfoliative dermatitis is a skin disorder that requires attention equivalent to medical emergencies. It is more prevalent in male population. It accounts for 35 cases/100,000 cases in dermatologic outpatient departments. In erythroderma even with proper management there are certain metabolic burdens and complications which make it more critical. The primary aim, in this case, was to treat the patient with Ayurvedic management. A 18-year-old patient, suffering from erythroderma, was treated on the line of Kapala Kushtha and Audumbera Kushtha. The patient had primarily suffered from psoriasis for 8 years. Erythroderma was developed due to abrupt self-medication with an unknown amount of intramuscular methylprednisolone several times in last month. Rasamanikya-125 mg, Arogyavardhini Vati-1 g, Kaishora Guggulu-1 g, Khadirarista-20 ml, and Panchatikta Ghrita-20 ml, all drugs twice a day with 3-4 times local application of Jatyadi Taila were administered. A decoction of Jwarhara Kashaya was also administered in the dose of 40 ml twice a day. The patient had relief from the acute phase after 20 days of treatment and complete remission after 3 months of treatment. This case study demonstrates that Ayurvedic management may be useful in erythroderma like acute and life-threatening condition. PMID:26730142

  9. Ayurvedic management of life-threatening skin emergency erythroderma: A case study.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sarvesh Kumar; Rajoria, Kshipra

    2015-01-01

    Erythroderma or generalized exfoliative dermatitis is a skin disorder that requires attention equivalent to medical emergencies. It is more prevalent in male population. It accounts for 35 cases/100,000 cases in dermatologic outpatient departments. In erythroderma even with proper management there are certain metabolic burdens and complications which make it more critical. The primary aim, in this case, was to treat the patient with Ayurvedic management. A 18-year-old patient, suffering from erythroderma, was treated on the line of Kapala Kushtha and Audumbera Kushtha. The patient had primarily suffered from psoriasis for 8 years. Erythroderma was developed due to abrupt self-medication with an unknown amount of intramuscular methylprednisolone several times in last month. Rasamanikya-125 mg, Arogyavardhini Vati-1 g, Kaishora Guggulu-1 g, Khadirarista-20 ml, and Panchatikta Ghrita-20 ml, all drugs twice a day with 3-4 times local application of Jatyadi Taila were administered. A decoction of Jwarhara Kashaya was also administered in the dose of 40 ml twice a day. The patient had relief from the acute phase after 20 days of treatment and complete remission after 3 months of treatment. This case study demonstrates that Ayurvedic management may be useful in erythroderma like acute and life-threatening condition.

  10. Vajikarana: Treatment of sexual dysfunctions based on Indian concepts

    PubMed Central

    Dalal, P. K.; Tripathi, Adarsh; Gupta, S. K.

    2013-01-01

    Vajikarana or Vrishya chikitsa is a one of eight major specialty of the Ashtanga Ayurveda. This subject is concerned with aphrodisiacs, virility and improving health of progeny. As per Charak Samhita, by proper use of these formulations, one becomes endowed with good physique, potency, strength, and complexion and sexually exhilarated and sexually potent. This in turn is helpful in many common sexual dysfunctions, including Infertility, Premature Ejaculation and Erectile dysfunction. The therapy is preceded by living in strict compliance with the directions mentioned in Ayurvedic classics, various methods of body cleansing and other non-medicinal strategies like sexual health promoting conduct, behavior and diet. Certain individualized herbal and herbo-mineral combinations are administered as per the nature of a person according to the Ayurveda. Many limitations need to be considered before considering the use of theses therapy like lack of scientific studies, possibilities of adulteration in the herbal and herbo-mineral combinations available in market and possibilities of unexpected side-effects etc., The article calls upon initiating research in this area so that claims of ancient Ayurvedic texts could be substantiated and vajikaran therapy may be utilized by modern medicine. PMID:23858267

  11. Pharmacological evaluation and chemical standardization of an ayurvedic formulation for wound healing activity.

    PubMed

    Gangopadhyay, Karuna Sagar; Khan, Madhuchanda; Pandit, Srikanta; Chakrabarti, Shrabana; Mondal, Tapan Kumar; Biswas, Tuhin Kanti

    2014-03-01

    Wound healing is a topic of substantial prominence in Ayurveda, the Indian traditional system of medicine. Test drug Kshatantak Malam (KM), otherwise named as Baharer Nani, is described in Ayurveda since a long time for wound healing activity but necessitates scientific base. The test drug was prepared in the form of natural ointment with the plants like Achyranthes aspera, Allium cepa, and Canabis sativa under the base of butter in a specialized form of preparation. Chemical standardization was made on the basis of the physical character, rancidity test, extractive value, thin-layer chromatography, and gas chromatography. An 8-mm-diameter full-thickness punch was produced in Wistar rats. The test drug was applied topically and compared with standard comparators like framycetin ointment and povidone iodine ointment. Effects were observed on the basis of physical parameters like wound contraction size (mm(2)), wound index, healing period (days), tensile strength (g) and biochemical parameters like tissue DNA (mg/g), RNA (mg/g), total protein (mg/g), hydroxyproline (mg/g), PAGE study, and histopathological observations. Significant results (P < .05) were observed with KM in the punch wound model on the basis of various physical, biochemical, and histopathological parameters. The drug was found to be safe in acute and chronic toxicity models in animals. Chemically it is enriched with fatty substances.

  12. Experiential documentation of Trimad for its anti-obesity potential: A survey of Ayurvedic physicians from Pune city.

    PubMed

    Salunke, Megha; Deshpande, Manasi; Bhalerao, Supriya

    Trimad is an Ayurvedic polyherbal formulation consisting of tubers of Mustaka (Cyperus rotundus), fruits of Vidanga (Embelia ribes) and roots of Chitraka (Plumbago zeylanica). It is recommended in Ayurveda for the management of obesity. However, there is no documented evidence about its safety and efficacy. Hence, as a first step, we carried out a survey to find out its usage by Ayurvedic physicians and their personal clinical experiences while using the formulation. A questionnaire was designed which included questions regarding the usage, dosage, formulation, safety and tolerability of Trimad. After obtaining Ethics Committee permission, the questionnaire was administered to 86 physicians. Out of 86, the data obtained from 70 physicians who filled the complete information, was analyzed. The data are presented as percentages. Sixty seven percentage physicians were found to use Trimad for management of obesity. The commonly used form of Trimad was churna administered along with luke warm water as an adjuvant. The criteria for selection of drug informed by the physicians were Ayurvedic signs & symptoms followed by conventional anthropometry. The average efficacy rating for Trimad on scale of 1-10 was found to be 5. The survey revealed that Trimad is being used by large number of Ayurvedic physicians for the management of obesity. Copyright © 2017 Transdisciplinary University, Bangalore and World Ayurveda Foundation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Botanical origin of Indian celery seed (fruit).

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Takuro; Abbaskhan, Ahmed; Choudhary, Muhammad Iqbal; Tsuda, Yoshisuke; Goda, Yukihiro; Farille, Michel; Reduron, Jean-Pierre

    2009-07-01

    In the course of our study on the traditional medicines and foodstuffs used in Pakistan, we investigated the origin of Indian celery by using the analysis of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequence of nuclear rDNA and a phytochemical approach. We found that the source plant of the Indian celery containing coumarin derivatives such as seselin (1), bergapten (2) and isopimpinellin (3) was not common celery, Apium graveolens. Our results suggest the source plant is Seseli diffusum even though Indian workers reported that A. graveolens seeds contain the aforementioned compounds. In addition, a market survey of the Indian celery in Pakistan and related countries revealed that the Indian celery seeds in Pakistani markets are mainly composed of three species which have been confused in rural markets.

  14. Eskimo Medicine Man.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, Otto

    "Eskimo Medicine Man" is a record of primitive Alaskan life in the 1930's. It records the experiences in Alaska's remote areas of Dr. Otto George, the last "traveling physician" for the Department of Interior's Indian Service, when in all the territory (an area one-fifth that of the contiguous United States) there were fewer…

  15. Eskimo Medicine Man.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, Otto

    "Eskimo Medicine Man" is a record of primitive Alaskan life in the 1930's. It records the experiences in Alaska's remote areas of Dr. Otto George, the last "traveling physician" for the Department of Interior's Indian Service, when in all the territory (an area one-fifth that of the contiguous United States) there were fewer…

  16. The role of alternative medicine in treating postnatal depression.

    PubMed

    Mantle, Fiona

    2002-11-01

    Postnatal depression is a serious and debilitating condition. Due to the perceived stigma of mental illness, the incidence of it is underreported and many mothers refuse psychiatric help either assuming postnatal depression to be normal or because of the potential consequences of having a psychiatric history. Community practitioners who are in contact with new mothers may welcome additional interventions which can enhance the supportive care they give to these women. This article discusses the evidence for a number of these interventions which mothers may find more acceptable than orthodox treatment. The aim of this article is to highlight the possible role of a number of complementary and alternative medicines as adjuncts or alternative treatments for postnatal depression. The interventions discussed in this article include Ayurvedic medicine, herbalism, homeopathy, aromatherapy, massage, hypnosis and traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). With the exception of TCM and Ayurvedic medicine, these interventions have been supported by the House of Lord's Select Committee on Science and Technology (2000) as having an evidence base. Ayurvedic medicine and TCM have been included in this article however, because a number of clients may be using them as their main system of health care--thereby validating the need for information regarding their efficacy. This article is not exhaustive, nor a licence to practice, but is intended as a resource for practitioners with a sound understanding of postnatal depression and conventional treatments whose clients may reject these approaches and be looking for alternative interventions. The final choice of treatment should be the result of discussion between the health visitor and the client and will depend on considerations such as availability, cost and acceptability of the intervention--this article does not, therefore, suggest a 'best option' approach. In addition, it does not address the professional and legal responsibilities of

  17. Wyoming Indians, Unit II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Terry

    This unit on Wyoming Indians provides concepts, activities, Indian stories, and resources for elementary school students. Indian values and contributions are summarized. Concepts include the incorrectness of the term "Indian," the Indians' democratic society and sophisticated culture, historical events, and conflicts with whites over the…

  18. Wyoming Indians, Unit II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Terry

    This unit on Wyoming Indians provides concepts, activities, Indian stories, and resources for elementary school students. Indian values and contributions are summarized. Concepts include the incorrectness of the term "Indian," the Indians' democratic society and sophisticated culture, historical events, and conflicts with whites over the…

  19. ‘Swapna’ in the Indian classics: Mythology or science?

    PubMed Central

    Tendulkar, Sonali S.; Dwivedi, R. R.

    2010-01-01

    There are many concepts in Ayurveda as well as the ancient sciences that are untouched or unexplored. One such concept is that of the Swapna (dreams). Being an abstract phenomenon it makes it difficult to be explained and understood; probably because of this the descriptions related to Swapna in the Indian classics are supported by mythology, to make them acceptable. Variations in these explanations are seen according to the objective of the school of thought; that is, in the ancient texts where dreams are used to delve into the knowledge of the Atman and are related to spirituality, its description in the Ayurvedic texts evolves around the Sharira and Manas. Although all these explanations seem to be shrouded in uncertainty and mythology; there definitely seems to be a logical and rational science behind these quotations. They only need research, investigation, and explanation on the basis of logic, and a laboratory. PMID:22131706

  20. 'Swapna' in the Indian classics: Mythology or science?

    PubMed

    Tendulkar, Sonali S; Dwivedi, R R

    2010-04-01

    There are many concepts in Ayurveda as well as the ancient sciences that are untouched or unexplored. One such concept is that of the Swapna (dreams). Being an abstract phenomenon it makes it difficult to be explained and understood; probably because of this the descriptions related to Swapna in the Indian classics are supported by mythology, to make them acceptable. Variations in these explanations are seen according to the objective of the school of thought; that is, in the ancient texts where dreams are used to delve into the knowledge of the Atman and are related to spirituality, its description in the Ayurvedic texts evolves around the Sharira and Manas. Although all these explanations seem to be shrouded in uncertainty and mythology; there definitely seems to be a logical and rational science behind these quotations. They only need research, investigation, and explanation on the basis of logic, and a laboratory.

  1. Anti-arthritic Activity of Dashanga Ghana (An Ayurvedic Compound Formulation) Against Freund's Adjuvant Induced Arthritis in Charles Foster Albino Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ruknuddin, Galib; Patgiri, B. J.; Prajapati, P. K.; Ashok, B. K.; Ravishankar, B.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Arthritis is the most common cause of disability, limiting the activities of adults throughout the world. Apart from the conventional treatment strategies using non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs, and glucocorticoids, newer and safer drugs are continuously being searched, as long-term usage of these drugs have resulted in adverse effects. Besides this, currently a number of medicinal plants are under scientific evaluation to develop a promising remedy in these cases. There is a need to investigate the complete therapeutic potential of these herbals for providing newer and safer treatment options with minimum side effects. Considering this, a polyherbal Ayurvedic compound formulation (Dashanga Ghana) has been studied in experimental animals to evaluate anti-arthritic activity. Materials and Methods: Dashanga Ghana has been prepared in the laboratory by following standard guidelines. Charles Foster albino rats were used to evaluate the activity through Freund's adjuvant induced arthritis model. Results and Conclusions: Dashanga Ghana is found to possess significant anti-arthritic activity. Further studies are required to identify and characterize exact active phyto-constituents and to elucidate the exact mechanism of action, which is responsible for the observed pharmacological profile. PMID:26862275

  2. Identification of Altered Metabolomic Profiles Following a Panchakarma-based Ayurvedic Intervention in Healthy Subjects: The Self-Directed Biological Transformation Initiative (SBTI)

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Christine Tara; Lucas, Joseph; John-Williams, Lisa St.; Thompson, J. Will; Moseley, M. Arthur; Patel, Sheila; Peterson, Scott N.; Porter, Valencia; Schadt, Eric E.; Mills, Paul J.; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Doraiswamy, P. Murali; Chopra, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    The effects of integrative medicine practices such as meditation and Ayurveda on human physiology are not fully understood. The aim of this study was to identify altered metabolomic profiles following an Ayurveda-based intervention. In the experimental group, 65 healthy male and female subjects participated in a 6-day Panchakarma-based Ayurvedic intervention which included herbs, vegetarian diet, meditation, yoga, and massage. A set of 12 plasma phosphatidylcholines decreased (adjusted p < 0.01) post-intervention in the experimental (n = 65) compared to control group (n = 54) after Bonferroni correction for multiple testing; within these compounds, the phosphatidylcholine with the greatest decrease in abundance was PC ae C36:4 (delta = −0.34). Application of a 10% FDR revealed an additional 57 metabolites that were differentially abundant between groups. Pathway analysis suggests that the intervention results in changes in metabolites across many pathways such as phospholipid biosynthesis, choline metabolism, and lipoprotein metabolism. The observed plasma metabolomic alterations may reflect a Panchakarma-induced modulation of metabotypes. Panchakarma promoted statistically significant changes in plasma levels of phosphatidylcholines, sphingomyelins and others in just 6 days. Forthcoming studies that integrate metabolomics with genomic, microbiome and physiological parameters may facilitate a broader systems-level understanding and mechanistic insights into these integrative practices that are employed to promote health and well-being. PMID:27611967

  3. Identification of Altered Metabolomic Profiles Following a Panchakarma-based Ayurvedic Intervention in Healthy Subjects: The Self-Directed Biological Transformation Initiative (SBTI).

    PubMed

    Peterson, Christine Tara; Lucas, Joseph; John-Williams, Lisa St; Thompson, J Will; Moseley, M Arthur; Patel, Sheila; Peterson, Scott N; Porter, Valencia; Schadt, Eric E; Mills, Paul J; Tanzi, Rudolph E; Doraiswamy, P Murali; Chopra, Deepak

    2016-09-09

    The effects of integrative medicine practices such as meditation and Ayurveda on human physiology are not fully understood. The aim of this study was to identify altered metabolomic profiles following an Ayurveda-based intervention. In the experimental group, 65 healthy male and female subjects participated in a 6-day Panchakarma-based Ayurvedic intervention which included herbs, vegetarian diet, meditation, yoga, and massage. A set of 12 plasma phosphatidylcholines decreased (adjusted p < 0.01) post-intervention in the experimental (n = 65) compared to control group (n = 54) after Bonferroni correction for multiple testing; within these compounds, the phosphatidylcholine with the greatest decrease in abundance was PC ae C36:4 (delta = -0.34). Application of a 10% FDR revealed an additional 57 metabolites that were differentially abundant between groups. Pathway analysis suggests that the intervention results in changes in metabolites across many pathways such as phospholipid biosynthesis, choline metabolism, and lipoprotein metabolism. The observed plasma metabolomic alterations may reflect a Panchakarma-induced modulation of metabotypes. Panchakarma promoted statistically significant changes in plasma levels of phosphatidylcholines, sphingomyelins and others in just 6 days. Forthcoming studies that integrate metabolomics with genomic, microbiome and physiological parameters may facilitate a broader systems-level understanding and mechanistic insights into these integrative practices that are employed to promote health and well-being.

  4. nrDNA ITS sequence based SCAR marker to authenticate Aconitum heterophyllum and Cyperus rotundus in Ayurvedic raw drug source and prepared herbal products.

    PubMed

    Seethapathy, Gopalakrishnan Saroja; Balasubramani, Subramani Paranthaman; Venkatasubramanian, Padma

    2014-02-15

    To authenticate Ayurvedic medicinal plants Ativisha (Aconitum heterophyllum) and Musta (Cyperus rotundus) at the raw drug source and in prepared herbal products, nrDNA ITS sequence based SCAR markers were designed and validated spp.-specific SCAR primers gave amplicon of 415 bp and 134 bp, respectively, in authentic species. The SCAR primers (Cyr-FP and Cyr-RP) could identify tissue sample containing 750 μg to 4.76 mg/100mg of Musta in complex mixtures of DNA extracted from commercial herbal drugs. Ativisha could not be identified through SCAR markers suggesting that authentic species may not been used to prepare herbal drugs despite its being labelled as one of the ingredients in formulations. Analysis of individual tubers of Ativisha and Musta assures the presence of admixtures in raw drug trade of Ativisha, indicates the need to monitor the basic raw material supply and concludes, supplying plant materials through cultivation to manufacturing industries can minimize the risks of adulteration.

  5. Characterization and catalytic activity of gold nanoparticles synthesized using ayurvedic arishtams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aswathy Aromal, S.; Dinesh Babu, K. V.; Philip, Daizy

    2012-10-01

    The development of new synthesis methods for monodispersed nanocrystals using cheap and nontoxic chemicals, environmentally benign solvents and renewable materials remains a challenge to the scientific community. The present work reports a new green method for the synthesis of gold nanoparticles. Four different ayurvedic arishtams are used for the reduction of Au3+ to Au nanoparticles. This method is simple, efficient, economic and nontoxic. Gold nanoparticles having different sizes in the range from 15 to 23 nm could be obtained. The nanoparticles have been characterized by UV-Visible spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and FTIR analysis. The high crystallinity of nanoparticles is evident from bright circular spots in the SAED pattern and peaks in the XRD pattern. The synthesized gold nanoparticles show good catalytic activity for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol by excess NaBH4. The synthesized nanoparticles are found to exhibit size dependent catalytic property, the smaller nanoparticles showing faster activity.

  6. Pharmacognostical and Preliminary physicochemical evaluation of Triphaladi granules – A polyherbal Ayurvedic formulation

    PubMed Central

    Gunjal, Ankush H.; Chandola, Harimohan; Harisha, C. R.; Shukla, Vinay J.; Goyal, Mandip; Pandya, Preeti

    2013-01-01

    Triphaladi Kwatha, a polyherbal Ayurvedic formulation, is recommended by Chakradatta and Yogaratnakara in the management of Prameha which has resemblance with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The present study deals with development of pharmacognostical and preliminary pharmaceutical profile of Triphaladi granules. The pH (5% aqueous extract) was 6.0, water-soluble extract 48.66% w/w, alcohol-soluble extract 33.91% w/w, ash value 5.97% w/w, and loss on drying at 105°C was 6.53% w/w. High performance thin layer chromatography were carried out after organizing appropriate solvent system in which maximum nine spots were distinguished and few of the Rf values were identical in the alcoholic extract. PMID:24501525

  7. Biochemical studies on the antidiarrhoeal effects of Cauvery-100, an ayurvedic formulation, in rats.

    PubMed

    Manonmani, S; William, S; Subramanian, S; Govindasamy, S

    1991-07-01

    Diarrhoea is a common gastrointestinal disorder which is a state of fluid and ion loss from the gut. Cauvery-100, an Ayurvedic formulation has been used in this study for the treatment of diarrhoea. Diarrhoea was induced in experimental rats by oral administration of castor oil. The increased gastrointestinal motility in diarrhoea was brought back to near normal levels on the treatment of Cauvery-100. The activities of the enzymes alkaline phosphatase, total ATPase and Na+,K(+)-ATPase were decreased in the diarrhoeal group and was brought back to near normal levels in the treated group. The serum levels of sodium and potassium were decreased in the diarrhoeal group and brought back to normal levels in the treated group. Prior treatment of the drug Cauvery-100 did not induce diarrhoea on administration of castor oil, suggesting the protective influence of the drug on the gastrointestinal tract.

  8. Effectiveness, safety, and standard of service delivery: A patient-based survey at a pancha karma therapy unit in a secondary care Ayurvedic hospital

    PubMed Central

    Rastogi, Sanjeev

    2011-01-01

    Pancha karma is a modality of treatments commonly used in Ayurvedic hospitals. It has elaborate textual reference of its usage in various clinical conditions forming the basis of its extensive use in Ayurvedic clinical practice. Unfortunately, despite its unquestionable popularity and usage among Ayurvedic physicians and patients, it has not been evaluated rigorously on scientific parameters to identify its effectiveness, safety, and procedural standards. Considering the patient's opinion as an important determinant in this perspective, this study aims at identifying the patient's (actual recipients of pancha karma therapy) perception toward the effectiveness, safety, and standard of service delivery concerning pancha karma through a structured survey at a pre-identified pancha karma therapy unit in a secondary care Ayurvedic hospital. Majority of the survey respondents considered these therapies as safe and effective (88%). Ninety-four percent respondents have expressed their satisfaction to the standard of services provided to them at the pancha karma unit of the hospital concerned. PMID:22253510

  9. Detoxification of Croton tiglium L. seeds by Ayurvedic process of Śodhana

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Prince Kumar; Nandi, Manmath Kumar; Singh, Narendra Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Croton tiglium seeds, known as Jamālgoṭa in Hindi, Marathi, and Urdu is well-known for its toxicity (severe purgative action). In Ayurvedic texts, the plant is known as Kumbhinī and is used for the treatment of constipation after Śodhana (detoxification process) of the seeds with Godugdha (cow milk). Material and Methods: In the present study, C. tiglium seeds were purified with cow milk as reported in Ayurvedic classics. Phorbol esters equivalent to phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) and crotonic acid contents were quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography method in the seeds of C. tiglium before and after the purification process. Results: The content of the phorbol ester equivalent to PMA in unpurified and purified sample was found to be 5.2 mg/100 g and 1.8 mg/100 g of dried seeds of C. tiglium, respectively. The quantity of crotonic acid in unpurified seeds of C. tiglium was found to be 0.102 mg/100 g of dried seeds while it was absent in the purified seed extract of C. tiglium. Conclusion: The toxicity of C. tiglium seeds may be due to the presence of phorbol esters and crotonic acid along with other constituents. These constituents are oil soluble and may be removed by cow milk during the process of Śodhana. Reduction in the level of these constituents after the purification decreases the toxicity of C. tiglium seeds. Reduction in the oily content from the seeds of C. tiglium during the purification process is also supported by the results obtained from the physiochemical parameters. PMID:25538350

  10. Critical review of Ayurvedic Varṇya herbs and their tyrosinase inhibition effect

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Khemchand; Joshi, Namrata; Goyal, Chinky

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The aspiration for light skin (fair complexion) is becoming pronounced in a greater number of people in the present times with natural products being more in demand than their synthetic counterparts. Research in the area of skin-lightening agents is an expanding field with the knowledge being updated regularly. In Ayurveda, varṇya, raktaprasādana, tvacya are few terms specifying skin lightening with respect to its modern counterpart i.e., Tyrosinase inhibition, the most commonly reported method of skin lightening. Aim: The present review is undertaken for screening twenty herbs from Varṇya Mahākaṣāya, Lodhrādi varṇya gaṇa, Elādi varṇa prasādana gaṇa and few varṇya formulations to evaluate their probable modes of action through which the skin lightening is effected as per both Ayurveda and biomedical concepts. Materials and Methods: Critical review of herbs to show varṇya property is compiled from various Ayurvedic texts as well as from multiple articles on the internet to justify their skin lightening property on the basis of data collected. Result and Conclusion: All the twenty herbs reviewed are found to act as varṇya directly (citation as varṇya) or indirectly (alleviation of pitta and rakta) as per Ayurveda and to interfere in melanogenesis pathway through tyrosinase inhibition as per biomedicine. This shows their potential to act as good skin whitening agents. Śuṇṭhi being a part of many varṇya formulations, is the only herb among all reviewed in the present study found to exhibit tyrosinase inhibition without any Ayurvedic citation of varṇya property. PMID:26600663

  11. Enzyme inhibitory and antioxidant activities of traditional medicinal plants: Potential application in the management of hyperglycemia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Traditional Indian and Australian medicinal plant extracts were investigated to determine their therapeutic potential to inhibit key enzymes in carbohydrate metabolism, which has relevance to the management of hyperglycemia and type 2 diabetes. The antioxidant activities were also assessed. Methods The evaluation of enzyme inhibitory activity of seven Australian aboriginal medicinal plants and five Indian Ayurvedic plants was carried out against α-amylase and α-glucosidase. Antioxidant activity was determined by measuring (i) the scavenging effect of plant extracts against 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picryl hydrazyl (DPPH) and 2, 2′-azinobis-3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate (ABTS) and (ii) ferric reducing power. Total phenolic and total flavonoid contents were also determined. Results Of the twelve plant extracts evaluated, the highest inhibitory activity against both α-amylase and α-glucosidase enzymes was exerted by Santalum spicatum and Pterocarpus marsupium with IC50 values of 5.43 μg/ml and 0.9 μg/ml, respectively, and 5.16 μg/ml and 1.06 μg/ml, respectively. However, the extracts of Acacia ligulata (IC50 = 1.01 μg/ml), Beyeria leshnaultii (0.39 μg/ml), Mucuna pruriens (0.8 μg/ml) and Boerhaavia diffusa (1.72 μg/ml) exhibited considerable activity against α-glucosidase enzyme only. The free radical scavenging activity was found to be prominent in extracts of Acacia kempeana, Acacia ligulata followed by Euphorbia drummondii against both DPPH and ABTS. The reducing power was more pronounced in Euphorbia drummondii and Pterocarpus marsupium extracts. The phenolic and flavonoid contents ranged from 0.42 to 30.27 μg/mg equivalent of gallic acid and 0.51 to 32.94 μg/mg equivalent of quercetin, respectively, in all plant extracts. Pearson’s correlation coefficient between total flavonoids and total phenolics was 0.796. Conclusion The results obtained in this study showed that most of the plant extracts have good potential

  12. Searching, Teaching, Healing: American Indians and Alaskan Natives in Biomedical Research Careers. Proceedings of a Conference Sponsored by the National Institutes of Health Held at the School of Medicine, University of Minnesota (Duluth, Minnesota, August 1-3, 1984).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haller, Edwin W., Ed.; Myers, Ruth A., Ed.

    This document contains edited versions of tape-recorded speeches given at a conference titled "American Indians and Alaskan Natives in Biomedical Research." The proceedings is divided into two sections: "Research in the Biomedical Sciences: American Indians Speak Out" that includes presentations on aspects of biomedical careers and their federal…

  13. Searching, Teaching, Healing: American Indians and Alaskan Natives in Biomedical Research Careers. Proceedings of a Conference Sponsored by the National Institutes of Health Held at the School of Medicine, University of Minnesota (Duluth, Minnesota, August 1-3, 1984).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haller, Edwin W., Ed.; Myers, Ruth A., Ed.

    This document contains edited versions of tape-recorded speeches given at a conference titled "American Indians and Alaskan Natives in Biomedical Research." The proceedings is divided into two sections: "Research in the Biomedical Sciences: American Indians Speak Out" that includes presentations on aspects of biomedical careers and their federal…

  14. Effectiveness of Ayurvedic Massage (Sahacharadi Taila) in Patients with Chronic Low Back Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Syal; Rampp, Thomas; Kessler, Christian; Jeitler, Michael; Dobos, Gustav J; Lüdtke, Rainer; Meier, Larissa; Michalsen, Andreas

    2017-02-01

    Ayurveda is one of the oldest comprehensive healthcare systems worldwide. Ayurvedic massage and physical therapy are frequently used to treat patients with chronic pain syndromes and disorders of the musculoskeletal system. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of Ayurvedic massage in nonspecific chronic low back pain by means of a randomized clinical trial. Sixty-four patients (mean age, 54.8 years; 49 women and 15 men) with chronic low back pain who scored >40 mm on a 100-mm visual analogue scale (VAS) were randomly assigned to a 2-week massage group with 6 hours of Ayurvedic massage and external treatment (n = 32) or to a 2-week local thermal therapy group (n = 32). The study observation period was 4 weeks, consisting of a 2-week intervention phase followed by a 2-week follow-up phase. Primary outcome measure was the change of mean pain (VAS) from baseline to week 4. Secondary outcomes included pain-related bothersomeness, the Roland Disability Questionnaire, quality of life (Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form), the Hanover Functional Ability Questionnaire for measuring back pain-related disability, and psychological outcomes. Outcomes were assessed at baseline and after 2 and 4 weeks. Mean back pain (primary outcome) at week 2 was significantly reduced from 53.4 ± 18.5 to 21.6 ± 18.2 in the massage group and from 55.3 ± 12.9 to 41.8 ± 19.8 in the standard thermal therapy group (mean group difference, -18.7; 95% confidence interval, -28.7 to -8.7; p < 0.001). While beneficial effects on pain-related bothersomeness and psychological well-being were also apparent, the Ayurvedic intervention did not improve function or disability in the short-term observation period. Both programs were safe and well tolerated. Ayurvedic external treatment is effective for pain-relief in chronic low back pain in the short term. Further studies with longer observation periods are needed to evaluate the long-term effects of the

  15. Antioxidant, Antimicrobial Activity and Medicinal Properties of Grewia asiatica L.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Ritu; Sharma, Dinesh C; Baig, Mohammad H; Bano, Shabana; Roy, Sudeep; Provazník, Ivo; Kamal, Mohammad A

    2016-01-01

    Since ancient time, India is a well known subcontinent for medicinal plants where diversity of plants is known for the treatment of many human disorders. Grewia asiatica is a dicot shrub belonging to the Grewioideae family and well known for its medicinally important fruit commonly called Falsa. G. asiatica, a seasonal summer plant is distributed in the forest of central India, south India, also available in northern plains and western Himalaya up to the height of 3000 ft. Fruits of G. asiatica are traditionally used as a cooling agent, refreshing drink, anti-inflammatory agent and for the treatment of some urological disorders. Recent advancement of Falsa researches concluded its antimicrobial and anti-diabetic activity. Since ancient time medicinal plants are traditionally used for the treatment of different diseases G. asiatica fruit is the edible and tasty part of the plant, now considered as a valuable source of unique natural product for the development of medicines which are used in different disease conditions like anti-diabetic, anti-inflammatory, anti-cancerous and antimicrobial. Now a days, G. asiatica is being used in different Ayurvedic formulation for the cure of different types of diseases. Different pharmacological investigations reveal the presence of phenols, saponnins, flavonoids and tannins compound in the fruits. Present review highlights the phytopharmacological and different traditional use of G. asiatica which is mentioned in ancient Ayurvedic texts. This review stimulates the researchers and scientists for further research on G. asiatica.

  16. Essential concepts and vocabulary in herbal medicine.

    PubMed

    Tillotson, Alan Keith

    2008-01-01

    Western-trained scientists and physicians can better understand herbal medicine if they learn the basic terminologies and essential concepts used by herbal practitioners around the globe to describe how herbs work on the body. Specific and general chemical actions, pharmacokinetics, and plant constituents (such as carotenoids and flavonoids) can all be used to understand how herbs work. Other important tools for understanding herbal medicine include organoleptic methods (personal sensory based information), such as heating and cooling effects, tastes, and physically felt actions. Tissue affinity is also an important method, one aspect of which is tissue-specific antioxidant effects. In addition, broad concepts from the Oriental traditions--such as the Chinese Yin and Yang, and the Ayurvedic Vata, Pitta, and Kapha--can and have been effectively used to organize and focus understanding and guide treatment.

  17. Indian Studies Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peck, Cy, Sr.; And Others

    A product of the Indian Studies Curriculum Committee and the Indian Studies Staff, this manual on the Indians of Southeast Alaska constitutes a useable classroom tool designed for the cross-cultural program in the Juneau School District. Objectives of this Indian Studies Program are identified as: to increase knowledge, awareness, and positive…

  18. Indian Studies Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peck, Cy, Sr.; And Others

    A product of the Indian Studies Curriculum Committee and the Indian Studies Staff, this manual on the Indians of Southeast Alaska constitutes a useable classroom tool designed for the cross-cultural program in the Juneau School District. Objectives of this Indian Studies Program are identified as: to increase knowledge, awareness, and positive…

  19. American Indians Today.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snipp, C. Matthew

    This paper reviews American Indian demography and the political and economic conditions on Indian reservations. After collapsing during the 19th century, the American Indian population grew gradually during the early 20th century, approaching 2 million in 1990. American Indians are heavily concentrated in the West, northern Midwest, and Oklahoma;…

  20. Jim Crow, Indian Style.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svingen, Orlan J.

    1987-01-01

    Reviews history of voting rights for Indians and discusses a 1986 decision calling for election reform in Big Horn County, Montana, to eliminate violations of the voting rights of the county's Indian citizens. Notes that positive effects--such as election of the county's first Indian commissioner--co-exist with enduring anti-Indian sentiment. (JHZ)