Science.gov

Sample records for indian white prawn

  1. Effect of high pressure treatment on microbiological quality of Indian white prawn (Fenneropenaeus indicus) during chilled storage.

    PubMed

    Ginson, J; Panda, Satyen Kumar; Bindu, J; Kamalakanth, C K; Srinivasa Gopal, T K

    2015-04-01

    High pressure treatment of 250 MPa for 6 min at 25 °C was applied to headless Indian white prawn (Fenneropenaeus indicus) to evaluate changes in microbiological characteristics of the species during chilled storage. Changes in load of mesophilic bacteria, psychrotrophic bacteria, proteolytic bacteria, Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonas spp., H2S producing bacteria, lactic acid bacteria, Brochothrix thermosphacta and yeast & mold were estimated in pressurized and un-pressurized samples during chilled storage. All microbes were reduced significantly after high pressure treatment and there was significant difference in microbial quality of control and high pressure treated samples in the entire duration of chilled storage (p < 0.05). There was delay in the growth of Enterobacteriaceae and H2S producing bacteria up to 6th and 9th day of storage, respectively in high pressure treated samples. In high pressure treated sample, no lag phase (λ) was observed for psychrotrophic bacteria, H2S producing bacteria, B. thermosphacta, Pseudomonas spp. and lactic acid bacteria; however, other bacteria showed a reduced lag phase during chilled storage. Kinetic parameter such as specific growth rate (μmax) in high pressure treated samples was significantly reduced in most of the bacterial groups except for psychrotrophic bacteria, Enterobacteriaceae and lactic acid bacteria. Mesophilic bacterial count of control samples crossed the marginal limit of acceptability on 12th day and unacceptable limit on 18th day of storage, whereas high pressure treated samples never breached the acceptability limit during entire duration of chilled storage. The present study indicated that application of high pressure processing can be used to improve microbial quality of Indian white prawn and extend the chilled storage life.

  2. White Tail Disease of Freshwater Prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii.

    PubMed

    Sahul Hameed, A S; Bonami, Jean-Robert

    2012-09-01

    Macrobrachium rosenbergii is the most important cultured freshwater prawn in the world and it is now farmed on a large scale in many countries. Generally, freshwater prawn is considered to be tolerant to diseases but a disease of viral origin is responsible for severe mortalities in larval, post-larval and juvenile stages of prawn. This viral infection namely white tail disease (WTD) was reported in the island of Guadeloupe in 1995 and later in Martinique (FrenchWest Indies) in Taiwan, the People's Republic of China, India, Thailand, Australia and Malaysia. Two viruses, Macrobrachium rosenbergii nodavirus (MrNV) and extra small virus-like particle (XSV) have been identified as causative agents of WTD. MrNV is a small icosahedral non-enveloped particle, 26-27 nm in diameter, identified in the cytoplasm of connective cells. XSV is also an icosahedral virus and 15 nm in diameter. Clinical signs observed in the infected animals include lethargy, opaqueness of the abdominal muscle, degeneration of the telson and uropods, and up to 100 % within 4 days. The available diagnostic methods to detect WTD include RT-PCR, dot-blot hybridization, in situ hybridization and ELISA. In experimental infection, these viruses caused 100 % mortality in post-larvae but failed to cause mortality in adult prawns. The reported hosts for these viruses include marine shrimp, Artemia and aquatic insects. Experiments were carried out to determine the possibility of vertical transmission of MrNV and XSV in M. rosenbergii. The results indicate that WTD may be transferred from infected brooders to their offspring during spawning. Replication of MrNV and XSV was investigated in apparently healthy C6/36 Aedes albopictus and SSN-1 cell lines. The results revealed that C6/36 and SSN-1cells were susceptible to these viruses. No work has been carried out on control and prevention of WTD and dsRNA against protein B2 produced RNAi that was able to functionally prevent and reduce mortality in WTD

  3. Pathology Associated with White Spot Virus (WSV) Infection in Wild Broodstock of Tiger Prawns (Penaeus monodon)

    PubMed Central

    Kua, Beng Chu; Rashid, Noraziah Mat

    2012-01-01

    A total of six wild broodstocks of tiger prawns, Penaeus monodon, were found positive for White Spot Virus (WSV) with an IQ2000 detection kit. Using histopathology, the intranuclear inclusion of haemocyte due to WSV infection was observed in the epithelium cells of the antennal gland, stomach and gills. This result confirmed that the wild broodstocks were positive with WSV without showing any white spot. Additionally, histopathological examination also revealed an accumulation of haemocytes around the hepatopancreatic tubules resulting from bacterial infection. Encapsulation and nodule formation, as well as related necrosis, were also observed around the hepatopancreatic tubules infected with a metazoan parasite. Encysted tylocephalum larval cestodes were observed in the hepatopancreas, with haemocytic aggregation being observed around the infected tubules. These findings showed some bacterial and parasitic infections which, in addition to the viral infection itself, could contribute to the 80% mortality rate in wild broodstocks infected with WSV. PMID:24575228

  4. Pathology Associated with White Spot Virus (WSV) Infection in Wild Broodstock of Tiger Prawns (Penaeus monodon).

    PubMed

    Kua, Beng Chu; Rashid, Noraziah Mat

    2012-05-01

    A total of six wild broodstocks of tiger prawns, Penaeus monodon, were found positive for White Spot Virus (WSV) with an IQ2000 detection kit. Using histopathology, the intranuclear inclusion of haemocyte due to WSV infection was observed in the epithelium cells of the antennal gland, stomach and gills. This result confirmed that the wild broodstocks were positive with WSV without showing any white spot. Additionally, histopathological examination also revealed an accumulation of haemocytes around the hepatopancreatic tubules resulting from bacterial infection. Encapsulation and nodule formation, as well as related necrosis, were also observed around the hepatopancreatic tubules infected with a metazoan parasite. Encysted tylocephalum larval cestodes were observed in the hepatopancreas, with haemocytic aggregation being observed around the infected tubules. These findings showed some bacterial and parasitic infections which, in addition to the viral infection itself, could contribute to the 80% mortality rate in wild broodstocks infected with WSV.

  5. Metallothionein-Like Proteins and Energy Reserve Levels after Ni and Pb Exposure in the Pacific White Prawn Penaeus vannamei

    PubMed Central

    Nunez-Nogueira, Gabriel; Mouneyrac, Catherine; Muntz, Alice; Fernandez-Bringas, Laura

    2010-01-01

    This study analyzed the changes in metallothionein-like proteins (MTLPs) and Energy Reserves (ERs) in hepatopancreas and abdominal muscle of the white prawn Penaeus vannamei. Realistic metal concentration exposure for 10 days to Ni and Pb in solution revealed that juvenile prawns partially induce MTLP in hepatopancreas after Pb exposure. Ni was distributed equally between soluble and insoluble fractions, while Pb was present only in the insoluble fraction, suggesting different detoxification strategy. No changes in lipids and glycogen concentration were detected under these experimental conditions in both tissues analyzed. MTLP could not be considered as a suitable indicator for lead exposure in hepatopancreas. PMID:20862200

  6. Metallothionein-Like Proteins and Energy Reserve Levels after Ni and Pb Exposure in the Pacific White Prawn Penaeus vannamei.

    PubMed

    Nunez-Nogueira, Gabriel; Mouneyrac, Catherine; Muntz, Alice; Fernandez-Bringas, Laura

    2010-01-01

    This study analyzed the changes in metallothionein-like proteins (MTLPs) and Energy Reserves (ERs) in hepatopancreas and abdominal muscle of the white prawn Penaeus vannamei. Realistic metal concentration exposure for 10 days to Ni and Pb in solution revealed that juvenile prawns partially induce MTLP in hepatopancreas after Pb exposure. Ni was distributed equally between soluble and insoluble fractions, while Pb was present only in the insoluble fraction, suggesting different detoxification strategy. No changes in lipids and glycogen concentration were detected under these experimental conditions in both tissues analyzed. MTLP could not be considered as a suitable indicator for lead exposure in hepatopancreas.

  7. An Indian in White America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monroe, Mark; Reyer, Carolyn, Ed.

    In his autobiography, Mark Monroe relates his life experiences as a Lakota Sioux Indian in White America. The book begins with Monroe reminiscing about his happy childhood on the Rosebud Reservation in South Dakota. In 1941 his family moved to Alliance, Nebraska, and his father Dakota. In 1941 his family moved to Alliance, Nebraska, and his father…

  8. An Indian in White America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monroe, Mark; Reyer, Carolyn, Ed.

    In his autobiography, Mark Monroe relates his life experiences as a Lakota Sioux Indian in White America. The book begins with Monroe reminiscing about his happy childhood on the Rosebud Reservation in South Dakota. In 1941 his family moved to Alliance, Nebraska, and his father Dakota. In 1941 his family moved to Alliance, Nebraska, and his father…

  9. Toll receptor response to white spot syndrome virus challenge in giant freshwater prawns (Macrobrachium rosenbergii).

    PubMed

    Feng, Jinling; Zhao, Lingling; Jin, Min; Li, Tingting; Wu, Lei; Chen, Yihong; Ren, Qian

    2016-10-01

    Toll receptors are evolutionary ancient families of pattern recognition receptors with crucial roles in invertebrate innate immune response. In this study, we identified a Toll receptor (MrToll) from giant freshwater prawns (Macrobrachium rosenbergii). The full-length cDNA of MrToll is 4257 bp, which encodes a putative protein of 1367 amino acids. MrToll contains 17 LRR domains, a transmembrane domain, and a TIR domain. Phylogenetic analysis showed that MrToll was grouped with Drosophila Toll7 and other arthropod Tolls. The transcripts of MrToll are mainly distributed in the heart, hepatopancreas, gills, stomach, and intestine. A low level of MrToll expression can be detected in hemocytes and the lymphoid organ. MrToll expression in gills was gradually upregulated to the highest level from 24 h to 48 h during the white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) challenge. The expression levels of the crustin (Cru) genes Cru3 and Cru7 in gills were relatively lower than those of Cru2 and Cru4. The expression levels of Cru3 and Cru7 were inhibited after the RNA interference of MrToll in gills during the WSSV challenge. The anti-lipopolysaccharide factor (ALF) genes ALF2, ALF3, ALF4, and ALF5 were also regulated by MrToll in gills during the virus challenge. These findings suggest that MrToll may contribute to the innate immune defense of M. rosenbergii against WSSV.

  10. Antibiotics in South Indian coastal sea and farmed prawns (Penaeus monodon).

    PubMed

    Palaniyappan, Venkatesh; Nagalingam, Arun Kumar; Ranganathan, Hari Prasad; Kandhikuppam, Krishnamoorthy Bharathi; Kothandam, Hari Prasath; Vasu, Soumya

    2013-01-01

    Sulphonamides and chloramphenicol antibiotics were analysed by using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) in sea and farmed prawn (Penaeus monodon) samples obtained from the coastal region of southern India during 2011-2012. Average recoveries were 77-99% and precision was between 1% and 8%. The results revealed that in sea prawn samples neither of the two antibiotics was detected, but in farmed samples from coastal Andhra Pradesh some sulphonamides were detected in a concentration range greater than the maximum residual limit as set by Council Directive 2377/90 EC.

  11. Immune gene discovery by expressed sequence tag (EST) analysis of hemocytes in the ridgetail white prawn Exopalaemon carinicauda

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Yafei; Liu, Ping; Li, Jitao; Li, Jian; Chen, Ping

    2013-01-01

    The ridgetail white prawn Exopalaemon carinicauda is one of the most important commercial species in eastern China. However, little information of immune genes in E. carinicauda has been reported. To identify distinctive genes associated with immunity, an expressed sequence tag (EST) library was constructed from hemocytes of E. carinicauda. A total of 3411 clones were sequenced, yielding 2853 ESTs and the average sequence length is 436 bp. The cluster and assembly analysis yielded 1053 unique sequences including 329 contigs and 724 singletons. Blast analysis identified 593 (56.3%) of the unique sequences as orthologs of genes from other organisms (E-value < 1e-5). Based on the COG and Gene Ontology (GO), 593 unique sequences were classified. Through comparison with previous studies, 153 genes assembled from 367 ESTs have been identified as possibly involved in defense or immune functions. These genes are categorized into seven categories according to their putative functions in shrimp immune system: antimicrobial peptides, prophenoloxidase activating system, antioxidant defense systems, chaperone proteins, clottable proteins, pattern recognition receptors and other immune-related genes. According to EST abundance, the major immune-related genes were thioredoxin (141, 4.94% of all ESTs) and calmodulin (14, 0.49% of all ESTs). The EST sequences of E. carinicauda hemocytes provide important information of the immune system and lay the groundwork for development of molecular markers related to disease resistance in prawn species. PMID:23092732

  12. Antioxidant response of ridgetail white prawn Exopalaemon carinicauda to harmful dinoflagellate Prorocentrum minimum exposure and its histological change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Cuimin; Ren, Xianyun; Ge, Qianqian; Wang, Jiajia; Li, Jian

    2017-04-01

    The dinoflagellate Prorocentrum minimum, one of the most widespread red tide causing species, affects marine aquaculture and ecosystems worldwide. In this study, ridgetail white prawn Exopalaemon carinicauda were exposed to P. minimum cells (5 × 104 cells mL-1) to investigate its harmful effects on the shrimp. Antioxidant activities and histological changes were used as indicators of health status of the shrimp. In 72 hours, the mortality of E. carinicauda was not affected, but its antioxidant response and histology were statistically different from those of control. Elevated superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) activities and depressed catalase (CAT) activity were observed in gill; while increased SOD, glutathione S-transferase (GST), CAT activities and modulated GPX activity were observed in hepatopancreas. Thus, antioxidant activities in gill and hepatopancreas seem to respond differentially to harmful alga exposure. Increased malondialdehyde (MDA) content in early a few hours indicates the damage of the antioxidant defense system. Although MDA content recovered to a low level thereafter, a series of histological abnormalities including accumulation or infiltration of hemocytes, tissue lesions and necrosis were discovered in gill and hepatopancreas. Exposure to P. minimum induced sublethal effects on E. carinicauda, including temporary oxidative damage and histological injury.

  13. Transcriptome analysis of eyestalk and hemocytes in the ridgetail white prawn Exopalaemon carinicauda: assembly, annotation and marker discovery.

    PubMed

    Li, Jitao; Li, Jian; Chen, Ping; Liu, Ping; He, Yuying

    2015-01-01

    The ridgetail white prawn Exopalaemon carinicauda is one of major economic mariculture species in eastern China. The deficiency of genomic and transcriptomic data is becoming the bottleneck of further researches on its good traits. In the present study, 454 pyrosequencing was undertaken to investigate the transcriptome profiles of E. carinicauda. A collection of 1,028,710 sequence reads (459.59 Mb) obtained from cDNA prepared from eyestalk and hemocytes was assembled into 162,056 expressed sequence tags (ESTs). Of these, 29.88 % of 48,428 contigs and 70.12 % of 113,628 singlets possessed high similarities to sequences in the GenBank non-redundant database, with most significant (E value <1e(-10)) unigenes matches occurring with crustacean and insect sequences. KEGG analysis of unigenes identified putative members of biological pathways related to growth and immunity. In addition, we obtained a total of putative 125,112 SNPs and 13,467 microsatellites. These results will contribute to the understanding of the genome makeup and provide useful information for future functional genomic research in E. carinicauda.

  14. An Investigation into Occasional White Spot Syndrome Virus Outbreak in Traditional Paddy Cum Prawn Fields in India

    PubMed Central

    Selvam, Deborah Gnana; Mujeeb Rahiman, K. M.; Mohamed Hatha, A. A.

    2012-01-01

    A yearlong (September 2009–August 2010) study was undertaken to find out possible reasons for occasional occurrence of White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV) outbreak in the traditional prawn farms adjoining Cochin backwaters. Physicochemical and bacteriological parameters of water and sediment from feeder canal and four shrimp farms were monitored on a fortnightly basis. The physicochemical parameters showed variation during the two production cycles and between the farms studied. Dissolved oxygen (DO) content of water from feeder canal showed low oxygen levels (as low as 0.8 mg/L) throughout the study period. There was no disease outbreak in the perennial ponds. Poor water exchange coupled with nutrient loading from adjacent houses resulted in phytoplankton bloom in shallow seasonal ponds which led to hypoxic conditions in early morning and supersaturation of DO in the afternoon besides considerably high alkaline pH. Ammonia levels were found to be very high in these ponds. WSSV outbreak was encountered twice during the study leading to mass mortalities in the seasonal ponds. The hypoxia and high ammonia content in water and abrupt fluctuations in temperature, salinity and pH might lead to considerable stress in the shrimps triggering WSSV infection in these traditional ponds. PMID:22593673

  15. An investigation into occasional White Spot Syndrome Virus outbreak in traditional paddy cum prawn fields in India.

    PubMed

    Selvam, Deborah Gnana; Mujeeb Rahiman, K M; Mohamed Hatha, A A

    2012-01-01

    A yearlong (September 2009-August 2010) study was undertaken to find out possible reasons for occasional occurrence of White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV) outbreak in the traditional prawn farms adjoining Cochin backwaters. Physicochemical and bacteriological parameters of water and sediment from feeder canal and four shrimp farms were monitored on a fortnightly basis. The physicochemical parameters showed variation during the two production cycles and between the farms studied. Dissolved oxygen (DO) content of water from feeder canal showed low oxygen levels (as low as 0.8 mg/L) throughout the study period. There was no disease outbreak in the perennial ponds. Poor water exchange coupled with nutrient loading from adjacent houses resulted in phytoplankton bloom in shallow seasonal ponds which led to hypoxic conditions in early morning and supersaturation of DO in the afternoon besides considerably high alkaline pH. Ammonia levels were found to be very high in these ponds. WSSV outbreak was encountered twice during the study leading to mass mortalities in the seasonal ponds. The hypoxia and high ammonia content in water and abrupt fluctuations in temperature, salinity and pH might lead to considerable stress in the shrimps triggering WSSV infection in these traditional ponds.

  16. Indian-White Relations: Historical Foundations. Wisconsin Woodland Indian Dissemination Project. Bulletin No. 0407.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dion, Susan

    This curriculum unit introduces students to the long and complex history of American Indian-White relations in the area that is now Wisconsin. Five historical narratives cover: (1) a general background to Indian-White relations, initial culture contact, and items of cultural exchange; (2) trade, peaceful relations, and intermarriage between the…

  17. Black-white unions: West Indians and African Americans compared.

    PubMed

    Model, S; Fisher, G

    2001-05-01

    In this research we use 1990 PUMS data to compare the propensity for unions between African Americans and native whites with the propensity for unions between British West Indians and native whites. In addition, we distinguish women and men. Descriptive statistics indicate that West Indians, with the exception of men who arrived as adults, are more likely than African Americans to have white partners. After the introduction of controls for several correlates of intermarriage, however, West Indian men of any generation have lower exogamy rates than African American men, while exogamy rates are higher among West Indian women who arrived as children or who were born in the United States than among African American women. Thus we find no consistent evidence of greater exogamy for British West Indians than for African Americans.

  18. Indian School: Teaching the White Man's Way.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Michael L.

    This book for young people examines the history, purpose, and daily routine of government-operated boarding schools for American Indians and tells the personal stories, often in their own words, of several young students. Chapter 1 describes the journey to Pennsylvania of the first Indian children to attend the Carlisle school in 1879. Chapter 2…

  19. Cardiometabolic Risk Markers in Indian Children: Comparison with UK Indian and White European Children

    PubMed Central

    Nightingale, Claire M.; Krishnaveni, Ghattu V.; Rudnicka, Alicja R.; Owen, Christopher G.; Veena, Sargoor R.; Hill, Jacqueline C.; Cook, Derek G.; Fall, Caroline H. D.; Whincup, Peter H.

    2012-01-01

    Objective UK Indian adults have higher risks of coronary heart disease and type 2 diabetes than Indian and UK European adults. With growing evidence that these diseases originate in early life, we compared cardiometabolic risk markers in Indian, UK Indian and white European children. Methods Comparisons were based on the Mysore Parthenon Birth Cohort Study (MPBCS), India and the Child Heart Health Study in England (CHASE), which studied 9–10 year-old children (538 Indian, 483 UK Indian, 1375 white European) using similar methods. Analyses adjusted for study differences in age and sex. Results Compared with Mysore Indians, UK Indians had markedly higher BMI (% difference 21%, 95%CI 18 to 24%), skinfold thickness (% difference 34%, 95%CI 26 to 42%), LDL-cholesterol (mean difference 0.48, 95%CI 0.38 to 0.57 mmol/L), systolic BP (mean difference 10.3, 95% CI 8.9 to 11.8 mmHg) and fasting insulin (% difference 145%, 95%CI 124 to 168%). These differences (similar in both sexes and little affected by adiposity adjustment) were larger than those between UK Indians and white Europeans. Compared with white Europeans, UK Indians had higher skinfold thickness (% difference 6.0%, 95%CI 1.5 to 10.7%), fasting insulin (% difference 31%, 95%CI 22 to 40%), triglyceride (% difference 13%, 95%CI 8 to 18%) and LDL-cholesterol (mean difference 0.12 mmol/L, 95%CI 0.04 to 0.19 mmol/L). Conclusions UK Indian children have an adverse cardiometabolic risk profile, especially compared to Indian children. These differences, not simply reflecting greater adiposity, emphasize the need for prevention strategies starting in childhood or earlier. PMID:22558399

  20. Prawn landings and their relationship with the extent of mangroves and shallow waters in western peninsular Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loneragan, N. R.; Ahmad Adnan, N.; Connolly, R. M.; Manson, F. J.

    2005-04-01

    This study investigated changes in landings of all prawns, white prawns (mainly Penaeus merguiensis), mangrove extent, rainfall and the area of shallow water in western peninsular Malaysia. The most important state for both the landings of all prawns and white prawns was Perak where about 50% of all prawns and 35% of white prawns were landed. This is also the state with the largest, and most stable, extent of mangrove forest reserve (40 000 ha) and the largest area of shallow water (<5 m deep). Juvenile prawns from Perak may contribute to the landings of the nearby, adjacent states of Penang and Selangor, where the second highest landings for white prawns and total prawns, respectively, were found. The area of shallow water accounted for the greatest proportion of variation in landings of both all prawns and white prawns, and was the most significant variable fitted to multiple regressions of landings and coastal attributes (area of shallow water, mangrove area, length of coastline). Although there was a significant linear relationship between the landings of total prawns and mangrove area in both the 1980s and 1990s, this was not the case for the mangrove-dependent white prawns where a significant relationship was found only for the 1990s. Furthermore, landings of all prawns and white prawns in Selangor and Johor, where large losses of mangrove forest reserve have been recorded, appear to have been maintained or increased in the 1990s. The lack of a clear relationship between mangrove loss and prawn landings may be due to the migration of prawns from adjacent areas or that other attributes of mangroves, such as the length of mangrove-water interface, may be more important for the growth and survival of prawn populations than total area of mangroves.

  1. Responses of three very large inducible GTPases to bacterial and white spot syndrome virus challenges in the giant fresh water prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying; Jin, Min; Yin, Shaowu; Ding, Zhengfeng; Wang, Wen; Ren, Qian

    2016-04-01

    Interferons (IFNs) are cytokines secreted by cells in response to invasion by pathogens, such as viruses, bacteria, parasites, or tumor cells. Very large inducible GTPases (VLIG) are the latest IFN-inducible GTPase family to be discovered and are the largest known GTPases of any species. However, VLIG proteins from invertebrates have yet to be characterized. In this study, three forms of VLIGs designated as MrVLIG1, MrVLIG2, and MrVLIG3 were cloned from the giant fresh water prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii. MrVLIG1 has a 5445 bp open reading frame (ORF) encoding an 1814-amino acid protein. The complete nucleotide sequence of MrVLIG2 cDNA is 7055 bp long consisting of a 5757 bp ORF encoding a protein with 1918 amino acids. The full length of the MrVLIG3 gene consists of 5511 bp with a 3909 bp ORF encoding a peptide with 1302 amino acids. BLASTP and phylogenetic tree analyses showed that the three MrVLIGs are clustered into one subgroup and, together with other vertebrate VLIGs, into a branch. Tissue distribution analysis indicated that the mRNAs of the three MrVLIGs were widely expressed in almost all detected tissues, including the hemocytes, heart, hepatopancreas, gills, stomach, and intestine, with the highest expression in the hepatopancreas. They were also detected in the intestine but with relatively low expression levels. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR analysis showed that the mRNA transcripts of the MrVLIGs in the hepatopancreas were significantly expressed at various time points after infection with Vibrio parahaemolyticus and white spot syndrome virus. In summary, the three isoforms of VLIG genes participate in the innate immune response of the shrimps to bacterial and viral infections.

  2. The roles of Na⁺/K⁺-ATPase α-subunit gene from the ridgetail white prawn Exopalaemon carinicauda in response to salinity stresses.

    PubMed

    Li, Jitao; Ma, Peng; Liu, Ping; Chen, Ping; Li, Jian

    2015-02-01

    Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (NAK) is one important transporter protein and plays a key role in maintaining osmotic homeostasis in low and high salinity acclimation in variety of crustacean species. The ridgetail white prawn Exopalaemon carinicauda is an euryhaline and economic shrimp species in China, but it remains unclear about its mechanism of salinity adaption. In this study, a full-length of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase α-subunit (α-NAK) cDNA was cloned from E. carinicauda by using rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) approaches. The full-length cDNA of α-NAK was of 3680 bp, containing an open reading frame (ORF) of 3030 bp encoding a polypeptide of 1009 amino acids with the predicted molecular weight of 112.27 kDa. Eight transmembrane domains and two sites of phosphorylation and ATP binding were identified in E. carinicauda α-NAK. BLAST analysis revealed that the sequence of α-NAK amino acids of E. carinicauda shared more than 75% homologies with those of other crustacean. Real time quantitative RT-PCR analysis indicated that E. carinicauda α-NAK gene could be detected in all the tested tissues with highest expression level in gill. The expression profiles of E. carinicauda α-NAK transcripts were analyzed in gill and hepatopancreas tissues after salinity stresses. The results showed that the expression level of E. carinicauda α-NAK gene in both gill and hepatopancreas reached peak at different time after low and high salinity stresses, and showed different expression profiles. The expression profiles of proPO transcripts in gills after salinity stresses also indicated α-NAK and proPO played synergistic actions for salinity responses in E. carinicauda. These results indicated that E. carinicauda α-NAK involved in stress responses against salinity.

  3. Identification and characterization of a prawn white spot syndrome virus gene that encodes an envelope protein VP31

    SciTech Connect

    Li Li; Xie Xixian; Yang Feng . E-mail: mbiotech@public.xm.fj.cn

    2005-09-15

    Based on a combination of SDS-PAGE and mass spectrometry, a protein with an apparent molecular mass of 31 kDa (termed as VP31) was identified from purified shrimp white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) envelope fraction. The resulting amino acid (aa) sequence matched an open reading frame (WSV340) of the WSSV genome. This ORF contained 783 nucleotides (nt), encoding 261 aa. A fragment of WSV340 was expressed in Escherichia coli as a glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion protein with a 6His-tag, and then specific antibody was raised. Western blot analysis and the immunoelectron microscope method (IEM) confirmed that VP31 was present exclusively in the viral envelope fraction. The neutralization experiment suggested that VP31 might play an important role in WSSV infectivity.

  4. Accumulation and elimination of enrofloxacin and its metabolite ciprofloxacin in the ridgetail white prawn Exopalaemon carinicauda following medicated feed and bath administration.

    PubMed

    Liang, J P; Li, J; Li, J T; Liu, P; Chang, Z Q; Nie, G X

    2014-10-01

    Accumulation and elimination of enrofloxacin and its metabolite ciprofloxacin were evaluated in Exopalaemon carinicauda following medicated feed at dose of 10 mg/kg weight body per day for five consecutive days and 10 mg/L bath for five consecutive days at 18 °C. At different times, nine ridgetail white prawns were randomly selected from the tank and sampled after the last medicated feed or bath administration. The concentration of enrofloxacin and ciprofloxacin in the main tissues (hepatopancreas, muscle, gill, and ovary) was detected by HPLC. The results showed that the maximum concentrations of enrofloxacin were 3.408 ± 0.245, 0.554 ± 0.088, 0.789 ± 0.074, and 0.714 ± 0.123 μg/g for hepatopancreas, muscle, gill, and ovary, respectively, at 1 day after the last medicated feed treatment. The enrofloxacin concentrations were 2.389 ± 0.484, 0.656 ± 0.012, 0.951 ± 0.144, and 3.107 ± 0.721 μg/g in hepatopancreas, muscle, gill, and ovary, respectively, at 1 day after the last bath administration. Ciprofloxacin could be detected in hepatopancreas, muscle, gill, and ovary. However, the concentrations of ciprofloxacin were much lower in comparison with that of enrofloxacin in various tissues. The concentrations of enrofloxacin plus ciprofloxacin in hepatopancreas, muscle, gill, and ovary followed an eliminating pattern during the sampling time after the two routes of administration. Based on data derived from this study, to avoid the enrofloxacin and ciprofloxacin residue in E. carinicauda, it should take at least 20 and 25 days to wash out the drug from the tissues after the last medicated feed and bath administration with enrofloxacin, respectively. These results helped the Chinese fishery department to lay down the current guidelines on enrofloxacin plus ciprofloxacin withdrawal periods for farmed shrimp. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. [Application of electron spin resonance spectroscopy for the detection of irradiated crustaceans (prawn, shrimp, and crabs)].

    PubMed

    Kameya, Hiromi; Takatsuki, Satoshi; Matsuda, Rieko; Tsutsumi, Tomoaki; Todoriki, Setsuko

    2014-01-01

    Prawn, shrimp and crabs sold in Japan are mostly imported from overseas. Detection of irradiated crustaceans is very important for quality assurance. In this study, we used ESR to detect radiation-induced radicals after irradiation of prawn, shrimp and crabs of major species. No radiation-induced radicals were detected in prawn (black tiger prawn) or shrimp (white leg shrimp). Radiation-induced radicals due to hydroxyapatite were detected in the claws of snow crab, red king crab, and swimming crab. Our results indicate that ESR measurement on the claw parts of these three species of crab can be used to determine their irradiation history.

  6. Sudden unexplained infant deaths among American Indians and whites in North and South Dakota.

    PubMed

    Oyen, N; Bulterys, M; Welty, T K; Kraus, J F

    1990-04-01

    Differences in risk factors for sudden unexplained infant death (SUID) were studied among American Indian and White infants in North and South Dakota. From 1977 to 1984, the incidence of SUID was 3.9 times higher among Indians compared with Whites. Indian SUID cases appeared to die at a slightly younger age than Whites, and the association of male gender and young maternal age with SUID was weak or absent among Indians. Low maternal education and late or no prenatal care were strongly related to SUID in both races. The Indian-White risk ratio was unaltered by adjustment for birthweight and maternal age but declined to 2.5 (95% confidence intervals = 1.9, 3.4) when adjusted for maternal education and trimester prenatal care began.

  7. Red Tape--White Tape: Federal-Indian Funding Relationships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Richard C.; Agar, Michael H.

    1979-01-01

    Historical, structural, cross-cultural, and communication problems within four federally funded Indian drug abuse treatment programs caused conflict between federal agencies and Indians and within the Indian communities themselves. Many of the problems duplicated those encountered in dealing with alcohol abuse among Indians. (SB)

  8. Red Tape--White Tape: Federal-Indian Funding Relationships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Richard C.; Agar, Michael H.

    1979-01-01

    Historical, structural, cross-cultural, and communication problems within four federally funded Indian drug abuse treatment programs caused conflict between federal agencies and Indians and within the Indian communities themselves. Many of the problems duplicated those encountered in dealing with alcohol abuse among Indians. (SB)

  9. Faecal pH, bile acid and sterol concentrations in premenopausal Indian and white vegetarians compared with white omnivores.

    PubMed

    Reddy, S; Sanders, T A; Owen, R W; Thompson, M H

    1998-06-01

    Faecal bulk, pH, water content, the concentrations of neutral sterols and bile acids and dietary intakes were measured in twenty-two Indian vegetarian, twenty-two white omnivorous and eighteen white vegetarian premenopausal women. Faecal bulk and water content were greater and pH lower in the Indian vegetarians. Total faecal animal sterol and coprostanol concentrations expressed on a dry-weight basis were lower in the vegetarians compared with the omnivores. The faecal sterol concentrations were correlated with dietary cholesterol intake. Primary bile acids were detected in six Indian vegetarians, two white vegetarians and two white omnivores; secondary bile acids were detected in all the white omnivores and vegetarian subjects but not in two of the Indian vegetarians. Total faecal free bile acid and conjugated bile acid concentrations were lower in the white vegetarians compared with the omnivores. Faecal lithocholic acid concentrations were lower in both Indian and white vegetarians. The lithocholic: deoxycholic acid ratio and coprostanol: total animal sterols ratio were significantly lower in the Indian vegetarians compared with the omnivores. Both ratios were positively correlated with faecal pH. Stepwise multiple regression analyses were undertaken in order to identify which nutrients influenced faecal pH, lithocholic and deoxycholic acid concentrations. The intakes of starch and dietary fibre were negatively associated with faecal concentrations of lithocholic and deoxycholic acid. Starch intake alone was negatively associated with faecal pH. The results of this study confirm that diets high in dietary fibre decrease faecal bile acid concentrations and suggest that the complex carbohydrates present in Indian vegetarian diets influence faecal pH and inhibit the degradation of faecal steroids.

  10. Adventure Therapy with American Indian Youth. AEE White Papers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Experiential Education (NJ1), 2011

    2011-01-01

    The American Indian population is a young one; the median age is 28.0, with 34% under 18 years old. In contrast, the median age for the overall U.S. population is 35.3, with 26% younger than 18 (Hawkins, Cummins, & Marlatt, 2004). It is difficult to avoid resorting to statistical hyperbole when describing the problems facing American Indian and…

  11. Psychophysiological responses to anger provocation among Asian Indian and White men.

    PubMed

    Suchday, Sonia; Larkin, Kevin T

    2004-01-01

    To examine cultural differences in response to anger provocation, affective, cognitive, behavioral, and cardiovascular responses to social confrontation, role plays were measured in 20 Indian male immigrants in the United States and 40 White men. Participants engaged in 2 interactions with a nonacquiescent male confederate and were instructed to suppress or express their anger in counterbalanced order. Following each role play, participants state anger, and resentful and reflective cognitions pertaining to anger were assessed. Participants' videotaped behavioral responses were assessed for problem-solving skills and negative and positive verbal and nonverbal behaviors. Blood pressure and heart rate (HR) responses were recorded throughout the session. Results revealed that Indian participants used more introspective strategies comprising of repression and rational coping self-statements to anger provocation than their White counterparts. White participants experienced significantly higher HR responses and showed more awareness of physiological sensation compared to the Indian participants, but only when asked to exhibit their anger. Indian participants had a faster diastolic blood pressure (DBP) recovery when allowed to engage in anger inhibition (which is a culturally determined mode of functioning) compared to when they had to exhibit anger before inhibiting it. White men showed a heightened cardiac response to anger expression, something not seen among Indian men. Indian men, in contrast, exhibited delayed DBP recovery from anger expression and increased introspective cognitive strategies when asked to engage in anger exhibition, a behavior not congruent with their culture of origin.

  12. Characteristics and rates of mental health problems among Indian and White adolescents in two English cities.

    PubMed

    Dogra, Nisha; Svirydzenka, Nadzeya; Dugard, Pat; Singh, Swaran P; Vostanis, Panos

    2013-07-01

    Sampling techniques for national surveys have constrained the statistical power in estimating prevalence rates of child mental health problems in minority ethnic groups. To establish the prevalence rates of mental health problems in ethnic Indian adolescents in England and compare these with matched White adolescents living in the same areas. A cross-sectional survey with oversampling of Indian adolescents aged 13-15 years of age. The sample size was 2900 (71% response rate) with 1087 (37%) Indian and 414 (14%) White adolescents. Ethnically Indian adolescents had lower rates of all types of mental health problems (5% v. 13% and 21% v. 30% for abnormal Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire and Short Mood and Feelings Questionnaire scores, respectively) and substance misuse (18% v. 57%, 5% v.15% and 6% v. 9% for regular alcohol, smoking and drug use, respectively), with the exception of eating disorders, compared with their White counterparts. The odds of an abnormal score on the mental health questionnaires were worse for White compared with Indian children irrespective of sociodemographic variables. Factors relating to how Indian adolescents are parented or their social support networks may be influencing their mental health and may warrant further investigation.

  13. Factors Associated With American Indian and White Adolescent Drug Selling in Rural Communities

    PubMed Central

    Eitle, David; Eitle, Tamela McNulty

    2014-01-01

    Relatively few studies have examined the correlates of adolescent drug selling in America, with most of these studies focusing on urban settings. The present study examines the risk and protective factors associated with drug selling among American Indian and white adolescents residing in a rural Northwestern state in the United States. Using survey data collected in 2010-2012, we conduct logistic regression analyses exploring the correlates of drug selling (n=568). Generally, we found support for prior explanations of drug selling, but identified some important race-specific differences. Specifically, we found that stress exposure was a risk factor for American Indians, but not whites. Conversely, academic achievement served as a protective factor for white adolescents but not American Indians. Our findings suggest that the race gap in rural drug selling can be explained by considering differences in social bonds, stress exposure, and exposure to substance using family and friends. PMID:26120365

  14. Childhood Cancer Incidence in British Indians & Whites in Leicester, 1996–2008

    PubMed Central

    Sayeed, Shameq; Barnes, Isobel; Cairns, Benjamin J.; Finlayson, Alexander; Ali, Raghib

    2013-01-01

    Background South Asians in England have an increased risk of childhood cancer but incidence by their individual ethnicities using self-assigned ethnicity is unknown. Our objective was to compare the incidence of childhood cancer in British Indians and Whites in Leicester, which has virtually complete, self-assigned, ethnicity data and the largest population of Indians in England. Methods We obtained data on all cancer registrations from 1996 to 2008 for Leicester with ethnicity obtained by linkage to the Hospital Episodes Statistics database. Age-standardised incidence rates were calculated for childhood cancers in Indians and Whites as well as rate ratios, adjusted for age. Results There were 33 cancers registered among Indian children and 39 among White children. The incidence rate for Indians was greater compared to Whites for all cancers combined (RR 1.82 (95% CI 1.14 to 2.89); p = 0.01), with some evidence of increased risk of leukaemia (RR 2.20 (0.95 to 5.07); p = 0.07), lymphoma (RR 3.96 (0.99 to 15.84); p = 0.04) and central nervous system tumours (RR 2.70 (1.00 to 7.26); p = 0.05). Rates were also higher in British Indian children compared to children in India. Conclusions British Indian children in Leicester had an increased risk of developing cancer compared to White children, largely due to a higher incidence of central nervous system and haematological malignancies. PMID:23613964

  15. Between Indian and White Worlds: The Cultural Broker.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szasz, Margaret Connell, Ed.

    During the five centuries of contact between Native and non-Native peoples of the Americas, thousands of intermediaries have moved across the continents' cultural frontiers. These cultural brokers have included traders, missionaries, persons of mixed race, diplomats, Indian schoolchildren attending missionary or government boarding schools, White…

  16. Between Indian and White Worlds: The Cultural Broker.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szasz, Margaret Connell, Ed.

    During the five centuries of contact between Native and non-Native peoples of the Americas, thousands of intermediaries have moved across the continents' cultural frontiers. These cultural brokers have included traders, missionaries, persons of mixed race, diplomats, Indian schoolchildren attending missionary or government boarding schools, White…

  17. Our Brother's Keeper: The Indian in White America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cahn, Edgar S., Ed.; Hearne, David W., Ed.

    The text describes the American Indian's frustrations with his closed world, which thwarts and penalizes individual and tribal self-realization, which rewards and perpetrates dependency, and which demands alienation from one's heritage as a price for survival. American society is described as arrogant and as attempting to insure that by systematic…

  18. Mechanisms of colour adaptation in the prawn Penaeus monodon.

    PubMed

    Wade, Nicholas M; Anderson, Mike; Sellars, Melony J; Tume, Ron K; Preston, Nigel P; Glencross, Brett D

    2012-01-15

    Exposure of prawns to dark- or light-coloured substrates is known to trigger a strong colour adaptation response through expansion or contraction of the colouration structures in the prawn hypodermis. Despite the difference in colour triggered by this adaptive response, total levels of the predominant carotenoid pigment, astaxanthin, are not modified, suggesting that another mechanism is regulating this phenomenon. Astaxanthin binds to a specific protein called crustacyanin (CRCN), and it is the interaction between the quantities of each of these compounds that produces the diverse range of colours seen in crustacean shells. In this study, we investigated the protein changes and genetic regulatory processes that occur in prawn hypodermal tissues during adaptation to black or white substrates. The amount of free astaxanthin was higher in animals adapted to dark substrate compared with those adapted to light substrate, and this difference was matched by a strong elevation of CRCN protein. However, there was no difference in the expression of CRCN genes either across the moult cycle or in response to background substrate colour. These results indicate that exposure to a dark-coloured substrate causes an accumulation of CRCN protein, bound with free astaxanthin, in the prawn hypodermis without modification of CRCN gene expression. On light-coloured substrates, levels of CRCN protein in the hypodermis are reduced, but the carotenoid is retained, undispersed in the hypodermal tissue, in an esterified form. Therefore, the abundance of CRCN protein affects the distribution of pigment in prawn hypodermal tissues, and is a crucial regulator of the colour adaptation response in prawns.

  19. Familistic Attitudes and Marriage Role Expectations of American Indian and White Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lind, Robert William

    The major purpose of the research was the exploration of familistic attitudes and marriage role expectations of American Indian and White adolescents as related to grade, age, sex, race, tribal affiliation, place of residence, academic achievement, future educational plans, parents' marital status, and language spoken in the home. Subjects were…

  20. Semen characteristics of the captive Indian white-backed vulture (Gyps bengalensis).

    PubMed

    Umapathy, Govindhaswamy; Sontakke, Sadanand; Reddy, Anuradha; Ahmed, Shakeel; Shivaji, S

    2005-11-01

    The present paper describes, to our knowledge for the first time, the successful collection and evaluation of semen from the Indian white-backed vulture (Gyps bengalensis), a critically endangered bird. Over a period of 2 yr, semen was collected using the manual massage method and evaluated for semen volume, semen pH, sperm concentration, percentage normal/abnormal spermatozoa, and percentage motile spermatozoa. It appears that the concentration of spermatozoa and percentage motile spermatozoa in the Indian white-backed vultures are low compared to those in other birds. Tyrode medium supplemented with albumin, lactate, and pyruvate (TALP) proved to be the best semen extender compared to two others (Beltsville Poultry Semen Extender and Lake diluent). Furthermore, TALP with 20% egg yolk and supplemented with 8% dimethyl sulfoxide maintained 50% of the initial percentage of motile spermatozoa following cryopreservation and thawing. A computer-aided semen analysis indicated that the spermatozoa of the Indian white-backed vulture are extremely active and swim in linear trajectories for up to 5 h following dilution in TALP. The trajectories were linear with time, but we noticed a decrease in the velocity parameters (average path velocity, curvilinear velocity, and progressive velocity). Thus, the present study provides baseline data on semen characteristics of the highly endangered Indian white-backed vulture, and these data could be of immense importance to reproductive and conservation biologists attempting to breed these animals in captivity, which to date has not been achieved.

  1. The White Man's Indian: Stereotypes in Film and Beyond.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vrasidas, Charalambos

    Before the invention of film, a stereotypical perception of Native Americans was embodied in art, fiction, and entertainment. Stereotyping of Native Americans can be categorized under three major themes: (1) the history of Native Americans compressed and portrayed under a single period of time; (2) Native cultures interpreted through white values;…

  2. Moderating Effects of Perceived Social Benefits on Inhalant Initiation Among American Indian and White Youth

    PubMed Central

    Swaim, Randall C.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined whether perceived social benefits moderated the relationship between social influence variables (school attachment, peer inhalant use, perceived family caring, parental monitoring) and stage of inhalant initiation (Study 1), and lifetime inhalant use (Study 2). Participants were 7th–12th grade students attending schools on or near American Indian reservations with comparisons made between American Indian and White students. A total of 3498 American Indian and 1596 White students were surveyed. Differences in mean levels of social influence variables were found across ethnicity and stage of inhalant initiation and lifetime inhalant use. SEM models were evaluated to examine variable relationships for the two studies. For Study 1, social influence variables did not clearly differentiate early versus later inhalant initiators, and perceived social benefits failed to serve as a moderator. More differences were observed between users and non-users across measures of social influence (Study 2). Perceived social benefits generally did not moderate the relationships with two exceptions. Low perceived social benefits provided greater protection against the influence of peers on lifetime inhalant use among White students, while high perceived social benefits increased risk of peer influence among American Indian students. PMID:26962974

  3. Pediatric melanoma in New Mexico American Indians, Hispanics, and non-Hispanic whites, 1981-2009.

    PubMed

    Rajput, Ashwani; Faizi, Syed A; Nir, Itzhak; Morris, Katherine T; Fahy, Bridget; Russell, John; Wiggins, Charles

    2014-03-01

    Pediatric melanoma rates are increasing nationally. Our purpose was to determine the incidence of melanoma in New Mexico's (NM's) American Indian, Hispanic, and non-Hispanic white children. A retrospective review (1981 to 2009) of the NM Tumor Registry was conducted. Melanomas diagnosed in children <19 years of age were identified. Average annual age-adjusted incidence rates per million were calculated. Sixty-four cases were identified. Rates per million were 7.4 for non-Hispanic whites, 2.1 for Hispanics, and 3.3 for American Indians. Fifty-nine percent were women. Fifty-five (86%) cases were localized, 6 (9%) were regional, and 1 (3%) case was metastatic. Majority of cases (49/64; 77%) occurred in children >14 years of age. American Indians presented with thicker melanomas as compared to whites and Hispanics. Incidence rates for pediatric melanoma in NM are highest for non-Hispanic whites. Distant metastasis is uncommon. Melanoma in children is rare, but practitioners must be aware of its occurrence for prompt diagnosis and treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Injury mortality in New Mexico's American Indians, Hispanics, and non-Hispanic whites, 1958 to 1982.

    PubMed Central

    Sewell, C M; Becker, T M; Wiggins, C L; Key, C R; Hull, H F; Samet, J M

    1989-01-01

    New Mexico has extraordinarily high injury mortality rates. To better characterize the injury problem in New Mexico, we calculated proportionate injury mortality and age-adjusted and age-specific injury mortality rates for the state's 3 major ethnic groups--American Indians, Hispanics, and non-Hispanic whites. According to death certificate data collected from 1958 to 1982 and US population census figures, age-adjusted mortality rates for total external causes varied widely between the sexes and among the ethnic groups. Males in each ethnic group consistently had higher average annual age-adjusted external mortality rates than females. Injury mortality rates for American Indians of both sexes were 2 to 3 times higher than those for the other New Mexico ethnic groups. Motor vehicle crashes were the leading cause of death from injury for all 3 groups. Homicide accounted for twice the proportion of injury death in Hispanic compared with non-Hispanic white males (12.5% and 6.1%, respectively), while the proportion of males dying of suicide was highest in non-Hispanic whites. Deaths from excessive cold and exposure were leading causes of injury mortality for American Indians, but these causes were not among the leading causes of injury mortality for Hispanics or non-Hispanic whites. We conclude that the minority populations in New Mexico are at high risk for injury-related death and that the major causes of injury mortality vary substantially in the state's predominant ethnic populations. Images PMID:2750163

  5. Linking 'White Oppression' and HIV/AIDS in American Indian Etiology: Conspiracy Beliefs among AI MSMs and Their Peers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilley, Brian Joseph; Keesee, Marguerite

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the results of a pilot study on the use of conspiracy beliefs by American Indian (AI) men who have sex with men and their peers to explain the origins of HIV/AIDS. We found that one-third (N = 15) of the individuals surveyed believed that HIV/AIDS was intentionally created by "Whites, White Christians, or the Federal…

  6. The normative environment for substance use among American Indian students and white students attending schools on or near reservations.

    PubMed

    Swaim, Randall C; Stanley, Linda R; Beauvais, Fred

    2013-01-01

    American Indian and White students who attended the same schools located on or near reservations were surveyed to determine the comparative normative environment for substance use. Descriptive norms increased and student injunctive norms decreased across grade in school. Female students reported higher levels of descriptive norms compared to male students. For marijuana use, a substantial decrease in student injunctive norms occurred between grades 8 and 10. Adult injunctive norms were perceived by female students to be higher than those perceived by male students, particularly among American Indian females. Somewhat surprisingly, 8th grade White female students reported high descriptive norms for inhalant use compared to 8th grade American Indian students. Overall, however, higher descriptive norms and lower injunctive norms among American Indian youth suggested that their risk for substance use is higher compared to White students because of the normative environment created by peers, family, and other adults.

  7. The Normative Environment for Drug Use: Comparisons among American Indian and White Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Dieterich, Sara E.; Swaim, Randall C.; Beauvais, Fred

    2013-01-01

    The present study examined the influence of descriptive norms, injunctive norms, perceived outcome expectancies, and ethnicity on marijuana and inhalant use among 2334 American Indian and white high school students who lived on or near reservations in the United States. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses were conducted with survey data collected during the 2009-2010 and 2010-2011 school years. Results suggest differences between ethnicities in the influence of the normative environment and outcome expectancies on both marijuana and inhalant use. Study limitations are noted, and future research is suggested. PMID:23768429

  8. Weight status of American Indian and white elementary school students living in the same rural environment, Oklahoma, 2005-2009.

    PubMed

    Janitz, Amanda E; Moore, William E; Stephens, Aietah L; Abbott, Kathryn E; Eichner, June E

    2012-01-01

    Studies have assessed rates of childhood obesity in diverse populations, but few have been able to compare the weight status of American Indian and white children living in the same community and attending the same schools. The objective of this study was to measure and compare the weight status of American Indian and white elementary school students (kindergarten through 5th grade) from 2005 through 2009 in an Oklahoma school district. We assessed height, weight, age, and sex to calculate body mass index, body mass percentile, and categorical weight status of students, based on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 2000 Growth Charts. We used binomial regression to generate risk ratios (RRs) to compare student weight status by race, sex, and age. An average of 753 students was measured in each year; mean age was 8.3 years. From 2005 through 2009, 45.4% of American Indian students and 65.1% of white students were healthy weight or underweight. Greater proportions of American Indian children were very obese (weighted average RR, 2.0); obese (weighted average RR, 1.6), or overweight (weighted average RR, 1.8) compared with white children. The overall prevalence of excess weight changed little during the study period. American Indian children had a greater risk of being overweight, obese, or very obese than white children from the same rural environment.

  9. Role of micronutrients in defense to white rust and Alternaria blight infecting Indian mustard.

    PubMed

    Rathi, A S; Singh, Dhiraj; Avtar, Ram; Kumar, Pawan

    2015-03-01

    Field experiments were carried out at Oilseeds Research Area of CCS Haryana Agricultural University, Hisar during rabi, 2008-09 to 2011-12 to find out the possible role of soil application of different micronutrients alone and in combinations in defense to white rust and Alternaria blight diseases in Indian mustard [Brassica juncea (L.) Czern & Coss.]. Among the sole application of micronutrients, minimum disease severity of both white rust (35.0%) and Alternaria blight (31.8%) was observed when S @ 40 kg ha in the form of Gypsum was applied as basal dose in the soil. When Gypsum was supplemented with Borax @10 kg ha(-1) or with ZnSO4 @15 kg ha(-1) the level of tolerance seems to be improved for both the diseases as compared to the sole treatment of each nutrient, i.e., ZnSO4 @ 15 kg/ha, Borax @ 10 kg ha' and Gypsum @ 250 kg ha(-1). Furthermore, minimum disease severity of both white rust (31.3 %) and Alternaria blight (26.3 %) was observed with soil application of ZnSO4 @ 15 kg ha(-1) + Borax @ 10 kg ha(-1) + Gypsum @250 kg ha(-1) as basal dose as compared to the severity of white rust (43.6%) and Alternaria blight (38.6%) in untreated check. Significant increase in seed yield (1612 kg ha(-1)) was also recorded in above mentioned treatment as compared to the yield (1337 kg ha(-1)) in untreated check. These findings will also be helpful in maintaining soil health and minimizing the losses due to both the fungal diseases for eco-friendly sustainability of Indian mustard.

  10. Crystal methamphetamine use among American Indian and White youth in Appalachia: Social context, masculinity, and desistance.

    PubMed

    Brown, Ryan A

    2010-06-01

    Rural areas and American Indian reservations are hotspots for the use of crystal methamphetamine ("meth") in the United States, yet there is little ethnographic data describing meth use in these areas. This study draws upon three years of ethnographic work conducted with American Indian and White youth in Appalachia during the height of the meth epidemic. It describes how historical, cultural, and socioeconomic processes influence vulnerability to meth use in Appalachia, and highlights the role of social relationships and meaning-making in facilitating desistance and recovery from meth use. The first section shows how crystal meth filled a particular functional niche in the lives of many young men, alleviating boredom and anomie linked to recent socioeconomic changes and labor opportunities in the region, and intersecting with local understandings of masculinity and forms of military identity. Here, ethnographic and interview data converge to illustrate how social role expectations, recent socioeconomic change, and meth's pharmacological properties converge to create vulnerability to meth use in Appalachia. The second section draws upon two American Indian narratives of desistance. These youth described recently severed social relationships and acute feelings of social isolation during the initiation of meth use. Both also described dramatic close calls with death that facilitated their eventual desistance from use, involving repaired social relationships and the establishment of new lives and hope. These interviews illustrate how changes in social relationships were linked with both initiation and desistance from meth use, and how religious interpretations of near-death experiences structured narratives of cessation and redemption.

  11. Risk Factors for HPV Infection among American Indian and White Women in the Northern Plains

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Maria C.; Schmidt-Grimminger, Delf; Jacobsen, Clemma; Chauhan, Subhash C.; Maher, Diane M.; Buchwald, Dedra S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective American Indian (AI) women living in the Northern Plains have high incidence and mortality rates for cervical cancer. We assessed risk factors for human papillomavirus (HPV) infection among AI and White women. Methods We tested cervical samples for HPV infection obtained from women ages 18-65 years attending 2 rural AI reservation clinics in South Dakota (n = 235) and an urban clinic serving predominantly White women (n = 246). Patients self-reported information on HPV risk factors. We used percentages and chi-square tests to compare risk factors, and logistic regression with HPV status as the outcome to quantify the association between HPV and risk factors. Results AI women had more risk factors than White women, including younger age, less education, less vegetable consumption, more sexual partners, younger age at first sexual experience and first pregnancy, and more pregnancies (p values ≤ 0.003). AI women more often endorsed recreational drug use, history of sexually transmitted diseases, and current smoking; White women reported more alcohol consumption (p values < 0.001). In multivariate analysis, younger age and current smoking were associated with higher odds of HPV infection in AI women, whereas a higher number of sexual partners was associated with higher odds of HPV infection in White women. Conclusions AI women have a high burden of risk factors for HPV disease, and associations with HPV infection appear to differ by community. Knowledge of specific risk factors in AI populations may provide targets for public health officials to decrease HPV infection and disease. PMID:21414655

  12. Risk factors for HPV infection among American Indian and white women in the Northern Plains.

    PubMed

    Bell, Maria C; Schmidt-Grimminger, Delf; Jacobsen, Clemma; Chauhan, Subhash C; Maher, Diane M; Buchwald, Dedra S

    2011-06-01

    American Indian (AI) women living in the Northern Plains have high incidence and mortality rates for cervical cancer. We assessed risk factors for human papillomavirus (HPV) infection among AI and White women. We tested cervical samples for HPV infection obtained from women ages 18-65 years attending 2 rural AI reservation clinics in South Dakota (n=235) and an urban clinic serving predominantly White women (n=246). Patients self-reported information on HPV risk factors. We used percentages and chi-square tests to compare risk factors, and logistic regression with HPV status as the outcome to quantify the association between HPV and risk factors. AI women had more risk factors than White women, including younger age, less education, less vegetable consumption, more sexual partners, younger age at first sexual experience and first pregnancy, and more pregnancies (p values≤0.003). AI women more often endorsed recreational drug use, history of sexually transmitted diseases, and current smoking; White women reported more alcohol consumption (p values<0.001). In multivariate analysis, younger age and current smoking were associated with higher odds of HPV infection in AI women, whereas a higher number of sexual partners was associated with higher odds of HPV infection in White women. AI women have a high burden of risk factors for HPV disease, and associations with HPV infection appear to differ by community. Knowledge of specific risk factors in AI populations may provide targets for public health officials to decrease HPV infection and disease. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A comparison of lifestyle and behavioral cardiovascular disease risk factors between Asian Indian and White non-Hispanic men.

    PubMed

    Ghai, Nirupa R; Jacobsen, Steven J; Van Den Eeden, Stephen K; Ahmed, Ameena T; Haque, Reina; Rhoads, George G; Quinn, Virginia P

    2012-01-01

    We compared lifestyle CVD risk factors between Asian Indian and White non-Hispanic men within categories of BMI. Participants included 51,901 White non-Hispanic men and 602 Asian Indian men enrolled in the California Men's Health Study cohort. Men were aged 45-69 years and members of Kaiser Permanente Southern or Northern California at baseline (2001-2002). Lifestyle characteristics including diet, physical activity, alcohol intake and smoking were collected from a survey. Multivariable logistic regression, adjusting for demographics, was performed. Asian Indians more often reported a healthy BMI (18.5-24.9), and consumed < 30% calories from fat within each BMI category (healthy weight and overweight/obese). Among healthy weight men, Asian Indians were less likely to eat -5 fruit and vegetables a day. Overall, Asian Indians were more likely to have never smoked and to abstain from alcohol. Asian Indians were less likely to report moderate/vigorous physical activity > or = 3.5 hours/week. No differences were found in sedentary activity. We identified health behaviors that were protective (lower fat intake, lower levels of smoking and alcohol) and harmful (lower levels of physical activity and fruit and vegetable intake) for cardiovascular health among the Asian Indians in comparison to White non-Hispanics. Results stratified by BMI were similar to those overall. However, the likelihood of consuming a low fat diet was lower among healthy weight men, while fruit and vegetable consumption, physical activity and alcohol intake was greater. These results suggest risk factors other than lifestyle behaviors may be important contributors to CVD in the Asian Indian population.

  14. Food Insecurity and Obesity Among American Indians and Alaska Natives and Whites in California

    PubMed Central

    JERNIGAN, VALARIE BLUE BIRD; GARROUTTE, EVA; KRANTZ, ELIZABETH M.; BUCHWALD, DEDRA

    2015-01-01

    Food insecurity is linked to obesity among some, but not all, racial and ethnic populations. We examined the prevalence of food insecurity and the association between food insecurity and obesity among American Indians (AIs) and Alaska Natives (ANs) and a comparison group of whites. Using the 2009 California Health Interview Survey, we analyzed responses from 592 AIs/ANs and 7371 white adults with household incomes at or below 200% of the federal poverty level. Food insecurity was measured using a standard 6-item scale. Sociodemographics, exercise, and obesity were all obtained using self-reported survey data. Logistic regression was used to estimate associations. The prevalence of food insecurity was similar among AIs/ANs and whites (38.7% vs 39.3%). Food insecurity was not associated with obesity in either group in analyses adjusted for sociodemographics and exercise. The ability to afford high-quality foods is extremely limited for low-income Californians regardless of race. Health policy discussions must include increased attention on healthy food access among the poor, including AIs/ANs, for whom little data exist. PMID:26865900

  15. Comparative Approach to the Study of a White-Indian-Negro Caste System in Robeson County, North Carolina.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temple, Dennis Michael

    Attempting to find empirical evidence to support an hypothesis on the social stratification system in Robeson County, North Carolina, the study theorized that there exists a caste system in which the Lumbee Indians have a status between the dominant whites and subordinate Negro groups. The Lumbees and their relationship to these other groups were…

  16. Welcome to a New World: Experiences of American Indian Tribal College and University Transfer Students at Predominantly White Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makomenaw, Matthew Van Alstine

    2012-01-01

    This study utilizes an Indigenous methodology and phenomenological methods to better understand the experiences of eight American Indian tribal college and university (TCU) students who transferred to four-year Predominantly White Institutions (PWIs). The participants attended TCUs and PWIs located in the Midwest, a geographic area that is…

  17. Welcome to a New World: Experiences of American Indian Tribal College and University Transfer Students at Predominantly White Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makomenaw, Matthew Van Alstine

    2012-01-01

    This study utilizes an Indigenous methodology and phenomenological methods to better understand the experiences of eight American Indian tribal college and university (TCU) students who transferred to four-year Predominantly White Institutions (PWIs). The participants attended TCUs and PWIs located in the Midwest, a geographic area that is…

  18. Experimental infection of twenty species of Indian marine crabs with white spot syndrome virus (WSSV).

    PubMed

    Hameed, A S Sahul; Balasubramanian, G; Musthaq, S Syed; Yoganandhan, K

    2003-12-03

    Twenty species of Indian marine crabs were experimentally infected with white spot syndrome virus (WSSV), via the oral route and intramuscular injection, to determine their viral susceptibility. We determined that 16 species (Calappa philargius, Charybdis annulata, C. lucifera, Doclea hybrida, Grapsus albolineatus, Halimede ochtodes, Liagore rubronaculata, Lithodes maja, Matuta miersi, Paradorippe granulata, Parthenope prensor, Philyra syndactyla, Podophthalmus vigil, Portunus sanquinolentus, Scylla serrata and Thalamita danae) were susceptible and 4 (Atergatis integerrimus, Charybdis natator, Demania splendida or Menippe rumphii) were refractive at 50 d post-infection (p.i.). The presence of WSSV in these crabs was confirmed by PCR tests, histology and bioassay. WSSV was found in the gill, heart, eyestalks, striated muscle and cephalothoraxic tissue. The 4 WSSV-refractive species represent potential reservoirs or carriers of WSSV.

  19. Crystal methamphetamine use among American Indian and White youth in Appalachia: Social context, masculinity, and desistance

    PubMed Central

    BROWN, RYAN A.

    2010-01-01

    Rural areas and American Indian reservations are hotspots for the use of crystal methamphetamine (“meth”) in the United States, yet there is little ethnographic data describing meth use in these areas. This study draws upon three years of ethnographic work conducted with American Indian and White youth in Appalachia during the height of the meth epidemic. It describes how historical, cultural, and socioeconomic processes influence vulnerability to meth use in Appalachia, and highlights the role of social relationships and meaning-making in facilitating desistance and recovery from meth use. The first section shows how crystal meth filled a particular functional niche in the lives of many young men, alleviating boredom and anomie linked to recent socioeconomic changes and labor opportunities in the region, and intersecting with local understandings of masculinity and forms of military identity. Here, ethnographic and interview data converge to illustrate how social role expectations, recent socioeconomic change, and meth’s pharmacological properties converge to create vulnerability to meth use in Appalachia. The second section draws upon two American Indian narratives of desistance. These youth described recently severed social relationships and acute feelings of social isolation during the initiation of meth use. Both also described dramatic close calls with death that facilitated their eventual desistance from use, involving repaired social relationships and the establishment of new lives and hope. These interviews illustrate how changes in social relationships were linked with both initiation and desistance from meth use, and how religious interpretations of near-death experiences structured narratives of cessation and redemption. PMID:21637733

  20. Disparities in Health, Health Care Access, and Life Experience Between American Indian and White Adults in South Dakota.

    PubMed

    Moon, Heehyul; Roh, Soonhee; Lee, Yeon-Shim; Goins, R Turner

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the factors associated with depressive symptoms and chronic illnesses in American Indians compared with White adults born in the post-World War II period, 1946 to 1964, and living in South Dakota. A cross-sectional design of American Indian and White adults aged 50 and older in South Dakota (Brookings, Vermillion, Sioux Falls, and all others areas of South Dakota) between January 2013 and May 2013 was used. American Indian and White adults (born between 1946 and 1964; N = 349). Data included sociodemographic factors and measures of chronic physical health condition, health care access, adverse childhood experiences, body mass index (BMI), Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test, Technology Acceptance Model, and Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support and Depressive Symptoms. American Indian adults reported more chronic diseases and conditions, a lower self-perceived physical health, were more likely to be overweight or obese, had more adverse childhood experience (ACE), and reported a lower level of alcohol intake compared to White adults. BMI was significantly associated with an increased number of chronic conditions for both groups, and American Indians' better perception of their physical health was significantly associated with lower total number of chronic conditions. Self-perceived mental health, a better level of access to health care, and a higher degree of social support were significantly inversely associated with the number of depressive symptoms for American Indian adults, while a greater level of ACE was significantly associated with an increased number of depressive symptoms for this group. The current study not only support previous studies but also contributes to understanding the disparities in and risk factors potentially impacting American Indians' physical and mental health. Our findings highlight the need to investigate the American Indians' perceptions and knowledge about health

  1. You Are Not an Indian without a Roll Number or White Card.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Richard P.; Ross, Pat

    The United States Office of Indian Education is requesting that all children who are served in the Indian Education Program prove their Indian ancestry with a roll number or Certificate Degree of Indian Blood (CDIB) card. This practice is discriminatory because (1) the Native American is the only ethnic group in the United States that must prove…

  2. Psychiatric disorders of convicted DWI offenders: a comparison among Hispanics, American Indians and non-Hispanic whites.

    PubMed

    C'de Baca, Janet; Lapham, Sandra C; Skipper, Betty J; Hunt, William C

    2004-07-01

    Alcohol-impaired offenders have high prevalence rates of psychiatric disorders; however, differences in prevalence rates among ethnic minorities have not been investigated. This study compares lifetime prevalence estimates of DSM-III-R psychiatric disorders (alcohol and drug abuse and dependence, nicotine dependence, major depressive disorder [MDD], dysthymia, generalized anxiety disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder and antisocial personality disorder [ASPD]) among Hispanics, American Indians and non-Hispanic whites convicted of driving while alcohol-impaired. Offenders (758 women, 631 men) previously referred to a screening program in Bernalillo County, NM, were interviewed for this study using a structured diagnostic interview. Adjusting for age, education, income and marital status, Hispanic women had significantly higher rates of alcohol abuse (odds ratio [OR] = 2.2) and lower rates of alcohol dependence (OR = 0.3), drug abuse (OR = 0.4) and nicotine dependence (OR = 0.3) than non-Hispanic white women. American-Indian women showed significantly lower rates of alcohol dependence (OR = 0.5), nicotine dependence (OR = 0.2) and MDD (OR = 0.3) than non-Hispanic white women. Hispanic men had significantly lower rates of alcohol dependence (OR = 0.6), drug dependence (OR = 0.5), nicotine dependence (OR = 0.2), MDD (OR = 0.5) and ASPD (OR = 0.4) than non-Hispanic white men. American-Indian men also reported significantly lower rates of drug dependence (OR = 0.5), nicotine dependence (OR = 0.2) and ASPD (OR = 0.3) than non-Hispanic white men. After statistically adjusting for demographic differences, minority groups were in general less affected by substance abuse problems and had similar or lower rates of other psychiatric disorders when compared with non-Hispanic whites.

  3. Can the Red Man Help the White Man? A Denver Conference with the Indian Elders (1968).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morey, Sylvester M., Ed.

    Edited proceedings of the 1968 Denver Conference of Indian Elders (a joint project sponsored by the Myrin Institute with the coorperation of Arrow Incorporated and the Bureau of Indian Affairs) are presented in book form for purposes of exploring the extent to which American Indian philosophy/religion can be utilized to help solve the complex…

  4. Can the Red Man Help the White Man? A Denver Conference with the Indian Elders (1968).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morey, Sylvester M., Ed.

    Edited proceedings of the 1968 Denver Conference of Indian Elders (a joint project sponsored by the Myrin Institute with the coorperation of Arrow Incorporated and the Bureau of Indian Affairs) are presented in book form for purposes of exploring the extent to which American Indian philosophy/religion can be utilized to help solve the complex…

  5. Nonsuicidal Self-Injury in an American Indian Reservation Community: Results from the White Mountain Apache Surveillance System, 2007-2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cwik, Mary F.; Barlow, Allison; Tingey, Lauren; Larzelere-Hinton, Francene; Goklish, Novalene; Walkup, John T.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To describe characteristics and correlates of nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) among the White Mountain Apache Tribe. NSSI has not been studied before in American Indian samples despite associated risks for suicide, which disproportionately affect American Indian youth. Method: Apache case managers collected data through a tribally…

  6. White House Conference on Indian Education (Washington, D.C., January 22-24, 1992). Final Report. Volumes 1 and 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atencio, Benjamin L.; And Others

    This two-volume document is the final report of the White House Conference on Indian Education, mandated by 1987 amendments to the Indian Education Act. Volume 1 opens with a history of the conference and the act's implementation. It describes planning and preparations for the conference and includes a discussion of its recurring issues. The…

  7. Nonsuicidal Self-Injury in an American Indian Reservation Community: Results from the White Mountain Apache Surveillance System, 2007-2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cwik, Mary F.; Barlow, Allison; Tingey, Lauren; Larzelere-Hinton, Francene; Goklish, Novalene; Walkup, John T.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To describe characteristics and correlates of nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) among the White Mountain Apache Tribe. NSSI has not been studied before in American Indian samples despite associated risks for suicide, which disproportionately affect American Indian youth. Method: Apache case managers collected data through a tribally…

  8. Disparities in Potentially Preventable Hospitalizations Between American Indian and Alaska Native and Non-Hispanic White Medicare Enrollees.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Joan; Rockell, Jennifer; Ouellet, Judith C; LeBeau, Mark

    2017-06-01

    A number of health care initiatives seek to improve health outcomes by increasing access to outpatient services while reducing preventable acute events. We evaluated disparities between American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) and non-Hispanic white (white) Medicare enrollees in access to outpatient preventive, primary, and specialty services by comparing their potentially preventable hospitalizations (PPHs). The study population included 121,311 adult AI/AN Medicare enrollees registered to use services funded by the Indian Health Service and 5,915,011 adult white enrollees living in the same counties. Medicare 2010 data and a nationally recognized algorithm were used to identify PPHs. Among AI/AN Medicare enrollees, 58.6% had either diabetes, cardiovascular disease, or both conditions; the AI/AN age-adjusted prevalence of either or both conditions was 1.2 times that of the white enrollees (P<0.001). The age-adjusted PPH rate for all AI/ANs was 74 admissions per 1000 adults, 1.5 times that of white enrollees (P<0.001). Nearly 90% of AI/AN PPHs were among AI/ANs with diabetes, cardiovascular disease, or both conditions; their PPH rate was 114 admissions per 1000 adults, 1.2 times that of white enrollees (P<0.001) with those conditions. Differences in disease burden and access to outpatient services may partly explain the higher PPH rates for AI/AN Medicare enrollees. The health care quality measure used in this study (PPH) was developed for the US general population. It is important to consider AI/AN socioeconomic and other characteristics when interpreting findings for such measures and enhancing programs and policies to improve AI/AN health outcomes.

  9. Identification of a bacterial pathogen associated with Porites white patch syndrome in the Western Indian Ocean.

    PubMed

    Séré, Mathieu G; Tortosa, Pablo; Chabanet, Pascale; Quod, Jean-Pascal; Sweet, Michael J; Schleyer, Michael H

    2015-09-01

    Porites white patch syndrome (PWPS) is a coral disease recently described in the Western Indian Ocean. This study aimed to isolate and identify potential pathogens associated with PWPS utilizing both culture and nonculture screening techniques and inoculation trials. A total of 14 bacterial strains (those dominant in disease lesions, absent or rare in healthy tissues and considered potential pathogens in a previous study) were cultured and used to experimentally inoculate otherwise healthy individuals in an attempt to fulfil Henle-Koch's postulates. However, only one (P180R), identified as closely related (99-100% sequence identity based on 1.4 kb 16S RNA sequence) to Vibrio tubiashii, elicited signs of disease in tank experiments. Following experimental infection (which resulted in a 90% infection rate), the pathogen was also successfully re-isolated from the diseased tissues and re-inoculated in healthy corals colonies, therefore fulfilling the final stages of Henle-Koch's postulates. Finally, we report that PWPS appears to be a temperature-dependent disease, with significantly higher tissue loss (anova: d.f. = 2, F = 39.77, P < 0.01) occurring at 30 °C [1.45 ± 0.85 cm(2) per day (mean ± SE)] compared to ambient temperatures of 28 and 26 °C (0.73 ± 0.80 cm(2) per day (mean ± SE) and 0.51 ± 0.50 cm(2) per day (mean ± SE), respectively).

  10. A comparison of antenatal classifications of 'overweight' and 'obesity' prevalence between white British, Indian, Pakistani and Bangladeshi pregnant women in England; analysis of retrospective data.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Rebecca; Ali, Nasreen; Guppy, Andy; Griffiths, Malcolm; Randhawa, Gurch

    2017-04-11

    Maternal obesity increases women's risk of poor birth outcomes, and statistics show that Pakistani and Bangladeshi women (who are born or settled) in the UK experience higher rates of perinatal mortality and congenital anomalies than white British or white Other women. This study compares the prevalence of maternal obesity in Indian, Pakistani, Bangladeshi and white British women using standard and Asian-specific BMI metrics. Retrospective cross-sectional analysis using routinely recorded secondary data in Ciconia Maternity information System (CMiS), between 2008 and 2013. Mothers (n = 15,205) whose ethnicity was recorded as white British, Bangladeshi, Pakistani or Indian. Adjusted standardised residuals and Pearson Chi-square. Percentage of mothers stratified by ethnicity (Indian, Pakistani, Bangladeshi and white British) who are classified as overweight or obese using standard and revised World Health Organisation BMI thresholds. Compared to standard BMI thresholds, using the revised BMI threshold resulted in a higher prevalence of obesity: 22.8% of Indian and 24.3% of Bangladeshi and 32.3% of Pakistani women. Pearson Chi-square confirmed that significantly more Pakistani women were classified as 'obese' compared with white British, Indian or Bangladeshi women (χ (2)  = 499,88 df = 9, p < 0.001). There are differences in the prevalence of obese and overweight women stratified by maternal ethnicity of white British, Indian, Pakistani and Bangladeshi. Using revised anthropometric measures in Indian, Pakistani and Bangladeshi women has clinical implications for identifying risks associated with obesity and increased complications in pregnancy.

  11. Report On: Arizona Indian Water Rights Conference (White Mountain Apache Reservation, August 21-23, 1973).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona Commission of Indian Affairs, Phoenix.

    Established by the Arizona Legislature in 1953, the Arizona Commission on American Indian Affairs serves as the official link between the tribal autonomies and the State government, its legislature, and elected officials. Its primary purpose has been to study conditions among Indians residing within the State. Among the commission's goals are: (1)…

  12. Use of prawn blood agar hemolysis to screen for bacteria pathogenic to cultured tiger prawns Penaeus monodon.

    PubMed

    Chang, C I; Liu, W Y; Shyu, C Z

    2000-11-14

    A newly developed prawn blood agar consisting of 1 ml of tiger prawn hemolymph in medium containing 200 ppm Rose Bengal was used to determine the hemolytic activity of 35 isolates of bacteria obtained from cultured tiger prawns Penaeus monodon and their rearing water. For comparison, the hemolytic activity of these isolates was also determined in sheep blood agar. Nine isolates (25.7% of total) showed different hemolytic reactions on prawn blood agar and sheep blood agar. From the 35 isolates, 8 with various hemolytic characteristics were selected and the relationship between the type of hemolytic activity and pathogenicity was determined and compared. Four isolates that showed hemolytic activity in prawn blood agar caused high mortality to cultured tiger prawns. By contrast, a significantly lower mortality rate was observed for tiger prawns injected with 4 isolates that did not exhibit hemolytic activity on prawn blood agar. Results further showed that mortality did not correlate with hemolytic activity determined using sheep blood agar. Prawn blood agar containing P. monodon hemocytes was faster and more accurate for determining prawn hemolytic activity of bacterial isolates.

  13. Initiation of Alcohol, Marijuana, and Inhalant Use by American-Indian and White Youth Living On or Near Reservations

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Linda R.; Swaim, Randall C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Early initiation of drinking, intoxication, marijuana, and inhalant use is associated with negative outcomes and substance use trajectories. Using national datasets, American Indian (AI) youth have been found to initiate substance use earlier than other youth. This study uses a population-based sample of youth living on or near reservations to compare substance use onset for AI and white youth where socioeconomic conditions may be similar for these youth. Methods Student survey data were gathered from 32 schools in 3 regions from 2009-2012. A retrospective person-period data set was constructed using reported age of initiation of intoxication and marijuana and inhalant use. Multi-level modeling and event history analysis were used to estimate initiation as a function of age, gender, ethnicity, and region. Results The results provide further evidence that AI youth living on or near reservations initiate substance use significantly earlier than white youth who attend the same schools and live in the same communities. Differences between the two cultural groups were most evident for marijuana initiation where the odds of initiating marijuana use ranged from seven to 10 times greater for nine vs. eight-year-old AI compared to white youth. Conclusions Prevention efforts targeted to AI youth must begin earlier than for non-AI youth in order to delay or prevent initiation. In addition, better understanding about the differences in the psychosocial environments of AI and white youth living in these communities is of paramount importance in designing prevention efforts. PMID:26347406

  14. Bacterial communities associated with Porites white patch syndrome (PWPS) on three western Indian Ocean (WIO) coral reefs.

    PubMed

    Séré, Mathieu G; Tortosa, Pablo; Chabanet, Pascale; Turquet, Jean; Quod, Jean-Pascal; Schleyer, Michael H

    2013-01-01

    The scleractinian coral Porites lutea, an important reef-building coral on western Indian Ocean reefs (WIO), is affected by a newly-reported white syndrome (WS) the Porites white patch syndrome (PWPS). Histopathology and culture-independent molecular techniques were used to characterise the microbial communities associated with this emerging disease. Microscopy showed extensive tissue fragmentation generally associated with ovoid basophilic bodies resembling bacterial aggregates. Results of 16S rRNA sequence analysis revealed a high variability between bacterial communities associated with PWPS-infected and healthy tissues in P. lutea, a pattern previously reported in other coral diseases such as black band disease (BBD), white band disease (WBD) and white plague diseases (WPD). Furthermore, substantial variations in bacterial communities were observed at the different sampling locations, suggesting that there is no strong bacterial association in Porites lutea on WIO reefs. Several sequences affiliated with potential pathogens belonging to the Vibrionaceae and Rhodobacteraceae were identified, mainly in PWPS-infected coral tissues. Among them, only two ribotypes affiliated to Shimia marina (NR043300.1) and Vibrio hepatarius (NR025575.1) were consistently found in diseased tissues from the three geographically distant sampling localities. The role of these bacterial species in PWPS needs to be tested experimentally.

  15. A Comparison of Colorectal Cancer Screening Uptake Among Average-Risk Insured American Indian/Alaska Native and White Women

    PubMed Central

    Perdue, David G.; Chubak, Jessica; Bogart, Andy; Dillard, Denise A.; Garroutte, Eva Marie; Buchwald, Dedra

    2014-01-01

    Introduction American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) women have among the lowest rates of colorectal cancer (CRC) screening. Whether screening disparities persist with equal access to health care is unknown. Methods Using administrative data from 1996-2007, we compared CRC screening events for 286 AI/AN and 14,042 White women aged 50 years and older from a health maintenance organization in the Pacific Northwest of the U.S. Results The proportion of AI/AN and White women screened for CRC at age 50 was similar (13.3% vs. 14.0%, p =.74). No differences were seen in the type of screening test. Time elapsed to first screening among AI/AN women who were not screened at age 50 did not differ from White women (hazard ratio 1.0, 95% confidence interval 0.8-1.3). Conclusions Uptake for CRC screening was similar among insured AI/AN and White women, suggesting that when access to care is equal, racial disparities in screening diminish. PMID:23974386

  16. Pre-eclampsia in American Indians/Alaska Natives and Whites: The Significance of Body Mass Index.

    PubMed

    Zamora-Kapoor, Anna; Nelson, Lonnie A; Buchwald, Dedra S; Walker, Leslie R; Mueller, Beth A

    2016-11-01

    Introduction The prevalence of pre-eclampsia, a major cause of maternal morbidity, varies by race, being greater in African Americans, and lower in Asians and Hispanics than in White women. Little is known about its prevalence in American Indians/Alaska Natives (AI/ANs). We estimated pre-eclampsia risk in AI/ANs compared to Whites, with consideration of the potential effect of obesity, a major risk factor for pre-eclampsia, and a condition disproportionately affecting AI/AN women. Methods This retrospective cohort study of linked birth-hospital discharge data from Washington State (2003-2013) included all AI/AN women and a sample of White first-time mothers with singleton deliveries. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratio (OR) and 95 % confidence intervals (CI) for pre-eclampsia risk in AI/ANs compared to Whites, first controlling for several important risk factors, and subsequently with additional adjustment for pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI). Results AI/ANs had an increased risk of pre-eclampsia compared to Whites after controlling for all covariates except BMI (OR 1.17, 95 % CI 1.06-1.29). After further adjustment for BMI, the racial disparity in pre-eclampsia risk was greatly attenuated (OR 1.05, 95 % CI 0.95-1.16). Discussion This population-based study suggests that any increased risk in AI/ANs relative to Whites may be at least partly due to differences in BMI.

  17. Effects of temperature and dissolved oxygen content on oxygen consumption rate of Chinese prawn, giant tiger prawn and giant freshwater prawn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Xi-Lin; Zang, Wei-Ling; Wang, Wei-Dong; Shi, Yong-Hai; Liu, Wen-Cui; Xu, Gui-Rong; Li, Shi-Hua

    1999-06-01

    Temperature and the dissolved oxygen content affect the oxygen consumption of juveniles of Chinese prawn ( Penaeus chinensis), giant tiger prawn ( P. monodon) and giant freshwater prawn ( Macrobrachium rosenbergii). There is good correlation between the oxygen consumption rate ( V, mg/g·h) of the above three prawn species and the water temperature, and dissolved oxygen. In the range of test temperature, V increased with water temperature and dissolved oxygen content. The V of the above three prawn species increased 0.085 mg/g·h, 0.093 mg/g·h and 0.08 mg/g·h respectively with each °C of rising temperature. The comatose point and stifling point of the juveniles rose obviously at unsuitable temperature.

  18. The American Indian: A Natural Philosopher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunge, Robert P.

    1978-01-01

    Describes American Indian philosophy, Indian attitudes on man's place in the cosmos, Indian socio-political practice, Indian moral values and community philosophy, and the differences between "white" and Indian culture. (RK)

  19. The American Indian: A Natural Philosopher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunge, Robert P.

    1978-01-01

    Describes American Indian philosophy, Indian attitudes on man's place in the cosmos, Indian socio-political practice, Indian moral values and community philosophy, and the differences between "white" and Indian culture. (RK)

  20. Indian Self-Rule. First-Hand Accounts of Indian-White Relations from Roosevelt to Reagan. Current Issues in the American West, Volume IV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philp, Kenneth R., Ed.

    Keynote addresses and panel sessions at a conference examining Indian history in the 50 years since the passage of the Indian Reorganization Act (IRA) are collected in this volume. Part One discusses the Indian New Deal and federal Indian policy from 1933-1945. Part Two deals with 1945-1960 and the federal policy of terminating tribal status. Part…

  1. Wyoming Indians, Unit II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Terry

    This unit on Wyoming Indians provides concepts, activities, Indian stories, and resources for elementary school students. Indian values and contributions are summarized. Concepts include the incorrectness of the term "Indian," the Indians' democratic society and sophisticated culture, historical events, and conflicts with whites over the…

  2. Wyoming Indians, Unit II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Terry

    This unit on Wyoming Indians provides concepts, activities, Indian stories, and resources for elementary school students. Indian values and contributions are summarized. Concepts include the incorrectness of the term "Indian," the Indians' democratic society and sophisticated culture, historical events, and conflicts with whites over the…

  3. First description of 'Chalky back' phenomenon in banana prawns (Fenneropenaeus merguiensis) and its possible association with Vibrio and Photobacterium species.

    PubMed

    Hatje, Eva; Minniti, Giusi; Stewart, Michael J; Neuman, Christina; Knibb, Wayne; Katouli, Mohammad

    2016-02-01

    Here we report a newly identified 'Chalky back' phenomenon in banana prawns (Fenneropenaeus merguiensis) farmed in North Queensland, Australia. This was characterized by localized white discoloured segmentation of the cervical groove, moreover, after cooking the prawns exploded, making them unfit for commercial sale. Histological examination revealed breakdown of gut and abdominal muscle tissue in some moribund specimens. We selectively isolated Vibrio spp., which are known prawn pathogens, from healthy and Chalky back specimens. Isolated bacteria were identified, typed and tested for the presence of eight virulence genes (VGs), biofilm formation, adherence and cytotoxicity to fish cells. In all, 32 isolates were recovered and identified as Vibrio harveyi, V. owensii, V. sinaloensis-like, V. campbellii, V. shilonii, Vibrio sp. and Photobacterium damselae using 16S rRNA gene sequencing. All V. harveyi carried VGs coding for haemolysin, toxR and flagella; formed biofilm; and adhered to both cell lines. This was similar to the V. sinaloensis-like strains that were only isolated from Chalky back specimens. Our data suggest that Vibrio spp. may play a role in the pathogenesis of Chalky back. This study is the first report of Chalky back phenomenon in farmed banana prawns that needs to be closely monitored by the industry. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. 76 FR 23972 - Certain Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From Brazil, India, the People's Republic of China, Thailand, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-29

    ... (Macrobrachium rosenbergii), giant tiger prawn (Penaeus monodon), redspotted shrimp (Penaeus brasiliensis... (Trachypenaeus curvirostris), southern white shrimp (Penaeus schmitti), blue shrimp (Penaeus stylirostris), western white shrimp (Penaeus occidentalis), and Indian white prawn (Penaeus indicus). Frozen shrimp and...

  5. The effects of different routes of inulin administration on gut microbiota and survival rate of Indian white shrimp post-larvae (Fenneropenaeus indicus)

    PubMed Central

    Hoseinifar, Seyed Hossein; Zare, Parviz; Kolangi Miandare, Hamed

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigates the effects of different routes of inulin administration as prebiotic on gut microbiota and survival rate of Indian white shrimp post-larvae. Four hundred and fifty Indian white shrimp post-larvae (PL1) were stocked in nine tanks. The tanks were assigned into three treatments: feeding with inulin-treated (110 mg L-1) Artemia nauplii (I-T), feeding with inulin-enriched (110 mg L-1) Artemia nauplii (I-E) and control which repeated triplicates. Feeding trial was performed until PL11 stage and then gut microbiota was studied using culture based method. Also, survival rate was calculated at the end of feeding trial. Our results showed that feeding on inulin enriched or treated Artemia nauplii had no significant effect on total viable culturable autochthonous bacteria and Vibrio spp. levels of the gut microbiota (p > 0.05). However, a remarkable increase of lactic acid bacteria levels (LAB) was observed in I-E treatment (p < 0.05). Administration of inulin enriched Artemia nauplii significantly elevated survival rates of Indian white shrimp post-larvae (p < 0.05). These results encourage administration of prebiotic-enriched Artemia nauplii in post larval stage of Indian white shrimp but determination the mode of action of prebiotic on various aspects of shrimp larviculture merit further research. PMID:26973770

  6. Central corneal thickness in Northwestern American Indians/Alaskan Natives and comparison with White and African-American persons.

    PubMed

    Torres, Rodrigo J; Jones, Emily; Edmunds, Beth; Becker, Thomas; Cioffi, George A; Mansberger, Steven L

    2008-11-01

    To determine the demographic factors associated with central corneal thickness (CCT) in Northwestern American Indians/Alaskan Natives (AI/ANs) and to compare these CCT measurements with those of White and African-American persons. Cross-sectional comparative, observational study. We performed ultrasonic pachymetry (DGH-500 Pachette; DGH Technologies, Exton, Pennsylvania, USA) on a random sample of AI/AN subjects from three randomly selected AI/AN tribes in the Northwest United States (n = 429). Pachymetry also was performed on a convenience sample of White (n = 46) and African-American (n = 33) persons. Our main outcome measure was the average of right and left eye CCT. Average AI/AN CCT was 554.8 +/- 33.9 microm. AI/AN CCT was found to be thicker than that of African Americans (528.5 +/- 33.2 microm) but similar to that of White persons (551.9 +/- 28.3 microm). CCT was greater in AI/AN females than in AI/AN males (557.6 +/- 33.3 microm vs 550.1 +/- 34.5 microm; P = .03). We found no difference in CCT based on percent AI/AN heritage, age, and keratometry readings. We found no significant differences in mean CCT between AI/ANs with glaucoma (556.2 microm) and those who did not have glaucoma (556.6 microm). CCT measurements for the Northwest AI/AN population are similar to those of White persons but thicker than those of African-American persons. Although glaucoma is common in AI/ANs, we did not find an association with thin CCT. We need future studies to explore the risk factors for glaucoma in AI/ANs.

  7. Central Corneal Thickness in Northwestern American Indian/Alaskan Natives and Comparison to White and African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Rodrigo J.; Jones, Emily; Edmunds, Beth; Becker, Thomas; Cioffi, George A.; Mansberger, Steven L.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To determine the demographic factors associated with central corneal thickness (CCT) in Northwestern American Indian/Alaskan Natives (AI/AN), and compare these CCT measurements to white and African Americans. Design Cross-sectional comparative observational study. Methods We performed ultrasonic pachymetry (DGH-500 Pachette; DGH Technologies, Exton, PA.) on a random sample of AI/AN subjects from 3 randomly selected AI/AN tribes in the Northwest United States (n=429). Pachymetry was also performed on a convenience sample of white (n=46) and African Americans (n=33). Our main outcome measure was the average of right and left eye CCT. Results Average AI/AN CCT was 554.8 +/- 33.9 microns. AI/AN CCT was found to be thicker than African Americans (528.5 +/- 33.2) but similar to Whites (551.9 +/-28.3). CCT was greater in AI/AN females than males (557.6 +/- 33.3 vs. 550.1 +/- 34.5, p=0.03). We found no difference in CCT based on percent AIAN heritage, age, and keratometry readings. We found no significant differences in mean CCT between AI/AN with glaucoma (556.2 microns) and those who did not have glaucoma (556.6 microns). Conclusion CCT measurements for the Northwest AI/AN population are similar to those of Whites but thicker than those of African Americans. While glaucoma is common in AI/AN, we did not find an association with thin CCT. We need future studies to explore the risk factors for glaucoma in AI/AN. PMID:18672219

  8. Initiation of alcohol, marijuana, and inhalant use by American-Indian and white youth living on or near reservations.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Linda R; Swaim, Randall C

    2015-10-01

    Early initiation of drinking, intoxication, marijuana, and inhalant use is associated with negative outcomes and substance use trajectories. Using national datasets, American Indian (AI) youth have been found to initiate substance use earlier than other youth. This study uses a population-based sample of youth living on or near reservations to compare substance use onset for AI and white youth where socioeconomic conditions may be similar for these youth. Student survey data were gathered from 32 schools in 3 regions from 2009 to 2012. A retrospective person-period data set was constructed using reported age of initiation of intoxication and marijuana and inhalant use. Multi-level modeling and event history analysis were used to estimate initiation as a function of age, gender, ethnicity, and region. The results provide further evidence that AI youth living on or near reservations initiate substance use significantly earlier than white youth who attend the same schools and live in the same communities. Differences between the two cultural groups were most evident for marijuana initiation where the odds of initiating marijuana use ranged from seven to 10 times greater for nine vs. eight-year-old AI compared to white youth. Prevention efforts targeted to AI youth must begin earlier than for non-AI youth in order to delay or prevent initiation. In addition, better understanding about the differences in the psychosocial environments of AI and white youth living in these communities is of paramount importance in designing prevention efforts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Preterm birth among American Indian/Alaskan natives in Washington and Montana: comparison with non-Hispanic Whites.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Melody; Shrestha, Archana; Yazzie, Sheldwin; Jackson, Michael L

    2013-12-01

    Preterm birth is the single most important cause of perinatal mortality in North America. Given that American Indians/Alaskan Natives (AI/ANs) in the United States continue to have adverse birth outcomes, the purpose of this study is to compare the risk of preterm birth among AI/AN mothers to Non-Hispanic White mothers living in Washington and Montana from 2003 to 2009. A population-based retrospective cohort study was conducted examining the association between AI/AN mothers (self-reported) and the risk of preterm birth (gestational age <37 weeks) using birth certificate data from Washington and Montana. All AI/AN singleton lives births (n = 26,648) from residents of Washington and Montana from 2003 to 2009 were identified and included in our study. An identical number of Non-Hispanic White singleton infants (n = 26,648) born to residents of Washington and Montana were randomly selected as a comparison group and logistic regression was used to analyze the data. AI/AN mothers living in Washington and Montana between 2003 and 2009 were 1.34 times (95 % CI 1.25-1.44) as likely to have a preterm birth compared to Non-Hispanic Whites after adjusting for maternal and paternal characteristics as well as pregnancy risk factors. AI/AN mothers residing in Washington and Montana from 2003 to 2009 were at a significantly increased risk of having a preterm birth compared to Non-Hispanic Whites. Identifying etiologic differences in preterm birth experienced by AI/ANs is essential in targeting future interventions.

  10. Food sources and carbon dudget of chinese prawn Penaeus chinensis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Shuang-Lin; Zhang, Shuo; Wang, Fang

    2002-03-01

    This study deals with contribution of artificial food pellet and natural food to Chinese prawn ( Penaeus orientalis) growth in a semi-intensive culture pond. The prawn carbon consumption, budget, and the effects of some factors on the budget were investigated. The results showed that 26.2% of P. orientalis growth carbon came from formulated feed at the initial culture stage (when the prawns were 0.06±0.01 g in wet weight), and was 62.5% when the prawns were 9.56±1.04 g. The remaining part of the growth carbon was derived from organic fertilizer and natural food. The highest growth rate occurred at 20×10-3 salinity. Suitable salinity for culturing Chinese prawn was (20 28)×10-3.

  11. Total and organic mercury concentrations in the white muscles of swordfish (Xiphias gladius) from the Indian and Atlantic oceans.

    PubMed

    Chen, M-H; Chen, C-Y; Chang, S-K; Huang, S-W

    2007-09-01

    A total of 226 swordfish samples collected from Taiwanese fishing vessels in the Indian and Atlantic oceans were examined for total mercury (THg) and organic Hg (OHg). Analysis of 56 pooled white muscle samples showed that THg and OHg concentrations ranged from 0.056 to 3.97 (1.3 +/- 0.97) and from 0.043 to 3.92 (1.01 +/- 0.82) microg g(-1) flesh mass, respectively. These values were similar to those from various previous studies during the past three decades. THg and OHg were significantly linearly correlated with fork length (FL, cm) of the fish from Indian and Atlantic oceans; however, there was no significant OHg%-FL relationship. OHg and THg also were significantly correlated. Fishes with FL < or = 140 cm met the methyl Hg (meHg) regulatory standard set by the European Commission Decision (meHg < or = 1.0); and fish with FL < or = 211 cm met the Taiwanese Food and Hygiene Standard (meHg < or = 2.0). Weekly swordfish consumption rates and amounts are recommended accordingly.

  12. Multilevel Prevention Trial of Alcohol Use Among American Indian and White High School Students in the Cherokee Nation

    PubMed Central

    Livingston, Melvin D.; Wagenaar, Alexander C.; Kominsky, Terrence K.; Pettigrew, Dallas W.; Garrett, Brady A.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate the effectiveness of a multilevel intervention designed to prevent underage alcohol use among youths living in the Cherokee Nation. Methods. We randomly assigned 6 communities to a control, Communities Mobilizing for Change on Alcohol (CMCA; a community-organizing intervention targeting alcohol access) only, CONNECT (a school-based universal screening and brief intervention) only, or a combined condition. We collected quarterly surveys 2012–2015 from students starting in 9th and 10th grades and ending in 11th and 12th grades. Response rates ranged from 83% to 90%; 46% of students were American Indian (of which 80% were Cherokee) and 46% were White only. Results. Students exposed to CMCA, CONNECT, and both showed a significant reduction in the probability over time of 30-day alcohol use (25%, 22%, and 12% reduction, respectively) and heavy episodic drinking (24%, 19%, and 13% reduction) compared with students in the control condition, with variation in magnitude of effects over the 2.5-year intervention period. Conclusions. CMCA and CONNECT are effective interventions for reducing alcohol use among American Indian and other youths living in rural communities. Challenges remain for sustaining intervention effects. PMID:28103073

  13. H-deficient blood groups of Reunion island. II. Differences between Indians (Bombay Phenotype) and whites (Reunion phenotype).

    PubMed

    Le Pendu, J; Gerard, G; Vitrac, D; Juszczak, G; Liberge, G; Rouger, P; Salmon, C; Lambert, F; Dalix, A M; Oriol, R

    1983-05-01

    Two variants of recessive, H-deficient nonsecretor individuals (h/h, se/se) were identified on Reunion Island: (1) H-negative individuals corresponding to the classical Bombay phenotypes (OhO, OhA, OhB, OhAB) who lack completely the H antigen on their red cells; all of them were Indian and had strong anti-H antibodies reacting with normal O and Oh red cells from whites; and (2) H-weak individuals (Oh, Ah, Bh, ABh). This phenotype represented the majority (85%) of the H-deficient phenotypes on Reunion Island, and all of them were white. They had only a weak expression of the H antigen and showed small but detectable amounts of ABH antigens on their red cells. Their anti-H antibodies reacted with normal O erythrocytes, but failed to react with Oh red cells, regardless of the ethnic origin of the donor. They were all from the same geographical area on the Island (Cilaos) and showed homogeneous titers of anti-H antibodies in sera. We propose to call this particular variant of weak H phenotype, belonging to the so-called para-Bombay series, Reunion.

  14. H-deficient blood groups of Reunion island. II. Differences between Indians (Bombay Phenotype) and whites (Reunion phenotype).

    PubMed Central

    Le Pendu, J; Gerard, G; Vitrac, D; Juszczak, G; Liberge, G; Rouger, P; Salmon, C; Lambert, F; Dalix, A M; Oriol, R

    1983-01-01

    Two variants of recessive, H-deficient nonsecretor individuals (h/h, se/se) were identified on Reunion Island: (1) H-negative individuals corresponding to the classical Bombay phenotypes (OhO, OhA, OhB, OhAB) who lack completely the H antigen on their red cells; all of them were Indian and had strong anti-H antibodies reacting with normal O and Oh red cells from whites; and (2) H-weak individuals (Oh, Ah, Bh, ABh). This phenotype represented the majority (85%) of the H-deficient phenotypes on Reunion Island, and all of them were white. They had only a weak expression of the H antigen and showed small but detectable amounts of ABH antigens on their red cells. Their anti-H antibodies reacted with normal O erythrocytes, but failed to react with Oh red cells, regardless of the ethnic origin of the donor. They were all from the same geographical area on the Island (Cilaos) and showed homogeneous titers of anti-H antibodies in sera. We propose to call this particular variant of weak H phenotype, belonging to the so-called para-Bombay series, Reunion. PMID:6859043

  15. HPV infection among rural American Indian women and urban white women in South Dakota: an HPV prevalence study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background High-risk strains of human papillomavirus (HPV) cause cervical cancer. American Indian (AI) women in the Northern Plains of the U.S. have significantly higher incidence and mortality rates for cervical cancer than White women in the same geographical area. We compared HPV prevalence, patterns of HPV types, and infection with multiple HPV types in AI and White women living in South Dakota, U.S. Methods We analyzed the HPV status of cervical samples collected in 2006-2008 from women aged 18-65 years who attended two rural AI reservation clinics (n = 235) or an urban clinic in the same area serving mostly White women (n = 246). Data collection occurred before HPV vaccination was available to study participants. HPV DNA was amplified by using the L1 consensus primer system and an HPV Linear Array detection assay to identify HPV types. We used chi-square tests to compare HPV variables, with percentages standardized by age and lifetime number of sexual partners. Results Compared to White women, AI women were younger (p = 0.01) and reported more sexual partners (p < 0.001). A lower percentage of AI women tested negative for HPV infection compared to Whites (58% [95% CI = 51-65] vs. 77% [95% CI = 71-82]; p < 0.001), and a higher percentage of AI women were infected by oncogenic types (30% [95% CI = 25-36] vs. 16% [95% CI = 11-21]; p = 0.001). Infections among AI women showed a wider variety and very different pattern of HPV types, including a higher prevalence of mixed HPV infections (19% [95% CI = 26-38] vs. 7% [95% CI = 4-11]; p = 0.001). AI women had a higher percentage of HPV infections that were not preventable by HPV vaccination (32% [95% CI = 26-38] vs. 15% [95% CI = 11-21]; p < 0.001). Conclusions A higher HPV burden and a different HPV genotyping profile may contribute to the high rate of cervical cancer among AI women. PMID:21943050

  16. HPV infection among rural American Indian women and urban white women in South Dakota: an HPV prevalence study.

    PubMed

    Schmidt-Grimminger, Delf C; Bell, Maria C; Muller, Clemma J; Maher, Diane M; Chauhan, Subhash C; Buchwald, Dedra S

    2011-09-24

    High-risk strains of human papillomavirus (HPV) cause cervical cancer. American Indian (AI) women in the Northern Plains of the U.S. have significantly higher incidence and mortality rates for cervical cancer than White women in the same geographical area. We compared HPV prevalence, patterns of HPV types, and infection with multiple HPV types in AI and White women living in South Dakota, U.S. We analyzed the HPV status of cervical samples collected in 2006-2008 from women aged 18-65 years who attended two rural AI reservation clinics (n = 235) or an urban clinic in the same area serving mostly White women (n = 246). Data collection occurred before HPV vaccination was available to study participants. HPV DNA was amplified by using the L1 consensus primer system and an HPV Linear Array detection assay to identify HPV types. We used chi-square tests to compare HPV variables, with percentages standardized by age and lifetime number of sexual partners. Compared to White women, AI women were younger (p = 0.01) and reported more sexual partners (p < 0.001). A lower percentage of AI women tested negative for HPV infection compared to Whites (58% [95% CI = 51-65] vs. 77% [95% CI = 71-82]; p < 0.001), and a higher percentage of AI women were infected by oncogenic types (30% [95% CI = 25-36] vs. 16% [95% CI = 11-21]; p = 0.001). Infections among AI women showed a wider variety and very different pattern of HPV types, including a higher prevalence of mixed HPV infections (19% [95% CI = 26-38] vs. 7% [95% CI = 4-11]; p = 0.001). AI women had a higher percentage of HPV infections that were not preventable by HPV vaccination (32% [95% CI = 26-38] vs. 15% [95% CI = 11-21]; p < 0.001). A higher HPV burden and a different HPV genotyping profile may contribute to the high rate of cervical cancer among AI women.

  17. Breastfeeding in Infancy Is Associated with Body Mass Index in Adolescence: A Retrospective Cohort Study Comparing American Indians/Alaska Natives and Non-Hispanic Whites.

    PubMed

    Zamora-Kapoor, Anna; Omidpanah, Adam; Nelson, Lonnie A; Kuo, Alice A; Harris, Raymond; Buchwald, Dedra S

    2017-07-01

    American Indians and Alaska Natives have the highest obesity prevalence in the United States, but the influence of early childhood variables on body mass index (BMI; calculated as kg/m(2)) is not well understood. Previous studies have investigated the association between breastfeeding in infancy and offspring BMI, but rarely included American Indians and Alaska Natives. This study investigated the association between breastfeeding in infancy and BMI in American Indians and Alaska Native and non-Hispanic white adolescents and young adults. Longitudinal analysis based on data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (1994 to 2008). Adolescent respondents who self-identified as American Indians and Alaska Native or non-Hispanic white, and whose parents completed the parental questionnaire, reported their height and weight. The final sample included 655 American Indians and Alaska Native and 10,305 non-Hispanic white respondents. Generalized estimating equations were used to measure the mean differences, 95% CIs, and P values of the association between breastfeeding in infancy and offspring BMI in adolescence, stratifying by race, and adjusting for demographic and socioeconomic variables. The length of breastfeeding was inversely associated with BMI in both populations. American Indians and Alaska Natives that were breastfed for 6 to 12 months or for more than 12 months had a mean BMI of 2.69 (95% CI -3.46 to -1.92; P<0.01) and 1.54 (95% CI -2.75 to -0.33; P<0.05) units lower than those that were never breastfed. Non-Hispanic whites that were breastfed for 3 to 6 months, 6 to 12 months, or more than 12 months had a mean BMI of 0.71 (95% CI -0.93 to -0.50; P<0.01), 0.68 (95% CI -0.87 to -0.50; P<0.01), and 0.85 (95% CI -1.09 to -0.62; P<0.01) units lower than those that were never breastfed. The association between the length of breastfeeding and offspring BMI varied by race (P<0.01). Breastfeeding in infancy is associated with lower

  18. Research on oxygen-releasing agent for prawn culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Keqiang; Jiang, Yuxiang; Yu, Kuijie

    1991-03-01

    A solid powder oxygen-releasing agent was developed and tested in prawn culture. Dissolved oxygen (DO) is a basic necessity for aquatic life and is affected by water temperature, climate, plankton, etc. DO variation in culture ponds strongly and consequently affects prawn growth and production output. In summer, when air temperature is high, pond water is polluted (by prawn feed leftovers) and cannot be changed fully and as frequently as necessary; especially at night, when there is no sunlight for photosynthesis with oxygen as a by-product, the DO in pond water can decrease rapidly. Under the above circumstances, the prawns experience serious lack of oxygen before dawn and die in large number. To solve this problem, we developed an oxygen-releasing agent with excellent performance.

  19. Quantitative and qualitative studies on the bacteriological quality of Indian white shrimp (Penaeus indicus) stored in dry ice.

    PubMed

    Jeyasekaran, G; Ganesan, P; Anandaraj, R; Jeya Shakila, R; Sukumar, D

    2006-09-01

    Indian white shrimp (Penaeus indicus) stored in dry ice at the 1:1 ratio were found to be organoleptically suitable for consumption when they were stored for 24 h without reicing. Shrimp stored in water ice at the 1:1 ratio (as control) were acceptable up to 18 h. Shrimp stored in a combination of dry ice and water ice at the ratio of 1:0.2:0.5 were also found to be acceptable up to 24 h. Total bacterial load ranged from 10(6) to 10(9) cfu g(-1), while total psychrophiles ranged from 10(3) to 10(6) cfu g(-1). Total lactics were found in the levels of 10(2)-10(6) cfu g(-1). H(2)S producers were from 10(3) to 10(5) cfu g(-1). Lowest temperature of -4.8 degrees C was observed in shrimps stored in dry ice at 1:1 ratio. Bacterial flora associated with fresh raw shrimp were Aeromonas, Pseudomonas, Vibrio, Flavobacterium and Serratia. Aeromonas constituted 38% of the flora in raw shrimp. Flavobacterium (43%), Pseudomonas (47%) and Pseudomonas (38%) were the dominant bacterial flora in the shrimp stored in dry ice at 1:1 ratio, in the combination package, and in water ice at 1:1 ratio, respectively.

  20. Molecular cloning, sequence analysis and expression of Fein-Penaeidin from the haemocytes of Indian white shrimp Fenneropenaeus indicus.

    PubMed

    Vaseeharan, Baskaralingam; Shanthi, Sathappan; Chen, Jiann-Chu; Espiñeira, Montserrat

    2012-01-01

    Penaeidins are members of a special family of antimicrobial peptide existing in penaeid shrimp and play an important role in the immunological defense of shrimp. Here, we report a penaeidin sequence cloned from the Indian white shrimp Fenneropenaus indicus (Fein-Penaeidin). The Fein-Penaeidin open reading frame encodes a 77 amino acid peptide including a 19 amino acid signal peptide. The deduced amino acid sequences of Fein-Penaeidin include a proline rich N-terminal domain and a carboxyl-domain that contains six cysteine residues. Structural analysis revealed an alpha-helix in its secondary structure and the predicted 3D structure indicated two-disulphide bridges in the alpha-helix. Phylogenetic analysis and sequence comparison with other known peaneidin suggest the gene shows high similarity to that of penaeidin from Peneaus monodon (95%), F. indicus (80%) and Fenneropenaeus chinensis (74%). Fein-Penaeidin was examined in normal and microbial challenged shrimp and was found to be constitutively expressed in haemocytes, Heart, gills, muscles, intestine, hepatopancreas and eyestalk. Bacterial challenge resulted in mRNA up-regulation, inducing expression at 6 h post injection indicating the penaeidin involved in the innate immunity.

  1. Geothermal aquaculture: a guide to freshwater prawn culture

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, A.; Johnson, W.C.

    1980-05-01

    Biological data of the Malaysian prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii, are summarized. A history on its rearing techniques is given, but through the use of geothermal water or industrial warm water effluent, its range can be expanded. The use of wasted geothermal water at the Oregon Institute of Technology for prawn ponds is noted. Pond management and design; the hatchery design and function for larval culture; and geothermal applications (legal aspects and constraints) are discussed. (MCW)

  2. Molecular importance of prawn large heat shock proteins 60, 70 and 90.

    PubMed

    Chaurasia, Mukesh Kumar; Nizam, Faizal; Ravichandran, Gayathri; Arasu, Mariadhas Valan; Al-Dhabi, Naif Abdullah; Arshad, Aziz; Elumalai, Preetham; Arockiaraj, Jesu

    2016-01-01

    Considering the importance of heat shock proteins (HSPs) in the innate immune system of prawn, a comparative molecular approach was proposed to study the crustacean large HSPs 60, 70 and 90. Three different large HSPs were identified from freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii (Mr) cDNA library during screening. The structural and functional characteristic features of HSPs were studied using various bioinformatics tools. Also, their gene expression and mRNA regulation upon various pathogenic infections was studied by relative quantification using 2(-ΔΔCT) method. MrHSP60 contains a long chaperonin 60 domain at 46-547 which carries a chaperonin 60 signature motif between 427 and 438, whereas MrHSP70 contains a long HSP70 domain at 21-624 and MrHSP90 carries a HSP90 domain at 188-719. The two dimensional analysis showed that MrHSP60 contains more amino acids (52%) in helices, whereas MrHSP70 (40.6%) and MrHSP90 (51.8%) carried more residues in coils. Gene expression results showed significant (P < 0.05) expression of MrHSP60, 70 and 90 in haemocyte, gill and hepatopancreas, respectively. Further, the expression level was up-regulated upon bacterial (Aeromonas hydrophilla and Vibrio harveyi) and viral [white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) and M. rosenbergii nodo virus (MrNV)] infections during various time periods. The gene expression results exhibited the potential involvement of these three HSPs in the immune system of prawn. The study indicated the potentiality of these molecules, thereby protecting cells against pathogens as well as severe cellular and environmental stresses in crustaceans.

  3. Routine Metabolic Rate and Limiting Oxygen Concentration of Freshwater Prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii Larvae

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Malaysian prawns, Macrobrachium rosenbergii, are hatched and raised indoors in small tanks. Prawns may be raised and shipped at high densities which could result in low dissolved oxygen (DO) conditions. Because DO may play an important role in prawn development and survival, we measured routine me...

  4. Expectations of support among White British and Asian-Indian older people in Britain: the interdependence of formal and informal spheres.

    PubMed

    Sin, Chih Hoong

    2006-05-01

    Abstract The discourse surrounding community care characterises informal support being superior to and preferred over formal sources of support, with this distinction buttressed by policy changes. There is a lack of understanding of the interdependence of both spheres of support. This article argues that an individual's experience and expectation of one type of support is often made in relation to his or her understanding, expectation and experience of other sources of support. There is also an urgent need to understand how these associations operate in a cross-cultural context as it is naïve to assume that normative expectations will remain constant when the relationship between family, state and other sources of support are unstable. This article reports on findings emerging from part of a Growing Older study funded by the Economic and Social Research Council of Great Britain to explore the relationship between quality of life and the social networks and support of older people from different ethnic groups. Research involved the use of a questionnaire comprising closed- and open-ended questions. In addition, in-depth qualitative interviews covering the existence and nature of social networks and support, as well as perceptions and expectations of these, were also conducted. This article reports on data relating to a sample comprising seven White British men, 10 White British women, 12 Asian-Indian men, and nine Asian-Indian women aged 55 and over derived from the Family Resources Survey. Findings reveal that the high level of expectation for family support amongst Asian-Indian respondents coexists with a high level of expectation for state support and an acknowledgement that the ideal of family support may not always materialise. Amongst White British respondents, the high level of expectation for state support exists regardless of whether the respondent has satisfactory informal social networks. This expectation is commonly expressed in terms of rights and

  5. Viral diseases of the giant fresh water prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii: a review.

    PubMed

    Bonami, Jean-Robert; Sri Widada, Joannes

    2011-01-01

    The giant freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii is cultivated essentially in Southern and South-eastern Asian countries such as continental China, India, Thailand and Taiwan. To date, only two viral agents have been reported from this prawn. The first (HPV-type virus) was observed by chance 25 years ago in hypertrophied nuclei of hepatopancreatic epithelial cells and is closely related to members of the Parvoviridae family. The second, a nodavirus named MrNV, is always associated with a non-autonomous satellite-like virus (XSV), and is the origin of so-called white tail disease (WTD) responsible for mass mortalities and important economic losses in hatcheries and farms for over a decade. After isolation and purification of these two particles, they were physico-chemically characterized and their genome sequenced. The MrNV genome is formed with two single linear ss-RNA molecules, 3202 and 1250 nucleotides long, respectively. Each RNA segment contains only one ORF, ORF1 coding for the RNA-dependant RNA polymerase located on the long segment and ORF2 coding for the structural protein CP-43 located on the small one. The XSV genome (linear ss-RNA), 796 nucleotides long, contains a single ORF coding for the XSV coat protein CP-17. The XSV does not contain any RdRp gene and consequently needs the MrNV polymerase to replicate.

  6. Ammonia removal from prawn aquaculture water using immobilized nitrifying bacteria.

    PubMed

    Shan, H; Obbard, J P

    2001-12-01

    Intensive prawn aquaculture in tropical regions is associated with high concentrations of total ammoniacal nitrogen (TAN) as a result of high rates of prawn excretion and feed loading. Excessive TAN can adversely effect productivity and result in adverse impacts on coastal waters. Cultures of indigenous nitrifying bacteria were enriched from intensive prawn aquaculture pond water using continuous and batch enrichment techniques. Cultures were capable of TAN removal over a wide range of initial TAN concentrations - up to 200 mg/l. Cultures were immobilized onto porous clay pellets to enhance cell density and applied to culture medium and TAN-augmented pond water under aerobic conditions to determine TAN removal proficiency. Immobilized cultures were able to achieve a high TAN removal proficiency in pond water--even at a low density of 0.1 pellet per liter. A concentration of less than 0.5 mg TAN/l could be maintained under a fed-batch condition of 3.2 mg TAN/l per day, after an initial 2-day lag phase. A simplified and effective culture enrichment process was developed for culture immobilization onto pellets using TAN-augmented pond water. Overall, pellet immobilization of indigenous nitrifying bacteria represents a potentially effective TAN control system for prawn aquaculture in low-cost, but intensive tropical prawn farms.

  7. The prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders among prawn seed collectors of Sunderbans.

    PubMed

    Gangopadhyay, Somnath; Das, Banibrata; Ghoshal, Goutam; Das, Tamal; Ghosh, Tirthankar; Ganguly, Ramjyoti; Samanto, Kshinangsu

    2008-12-01

    In India, particularly in Sunderban of West Bengal, collection of prawn seeds is one of the major earning resources among prawn seed collectors. They are compelled to carry out a considerable amount of hard, manual, rigorous tasks in the river of the Sunderban area for collecting prawn seeds. They have to adopt some undesirable postures that may lead to the development of musculo skeletal disorder (MSD). The main aim of the present study is to investigate the prevalent postures adopted by the prawn seed collectors during individual prawn seed collection and to analyze the causation of discomfort feeling related with those postures. For this study, 21 male and 25 female prawn seed collectors were selected randomly and a detailed posture analysis was performed among them by means of OWAS method. It was observed that these workers worked continuously in awkward postures during certain prawn seed collection activity and consequently they suffered from discomfort feeling (pain) in different parts of the body.

  8. Solar aquaculture: A wintering technique for parent prawns

    SciTech Connect

    Cao Jin Long

    1994-09-01

    A new method of providing the warm water needed for parent prawn wintering using solar energy is described. Using solar energy for prawn wintering involves heat collection, heat storage and temperature maintenance. The system designed provides sufficient energy for the safe wintering of prawns with suitable water temperatures. The temperature control facilities consist of three parts: a salt gradient solar pond, a shallow solar pond and a plastic house. The technique involves use of a shallow solar pond for collection and storage of heat. The average temperature in the wintering pond plastic house was 11 degrees C and the minimum temperature in January was 5.4 degrees C. This system allowed the wintering process to be conducted using solar energy alone and may extend aquaculture to higher latitudes. The ratio of net profit with the solar energy system over investment is 1.5 which makes it economically viable.

  9. ULTRASTRUCTURE OF THE PRAWN NERVE SHEATHS

    PubMed Central

    Doggenweiler, C. F.; Heuser, John E.

    1967-01-01

    The sheaths from freshly teased nerve fibers of the prawn exhibit a positive radial birefringence, consistent with their EM appearance as highly organized laminated structures composed of numerous thin cytoplasmic sheets or laminae bordered by unit membranes and arranged concentrically around the axon. The closely apposed membranes in these sheaths are fragile and often break down into rows of vesicles during fixation. Desmosome-like attachment zones occur in many regions of the sheath. The membranes within these zones resist vesiculation and thereby provide a "control" region for relating the type of vesicles formed in the fragile portions of the sheaths to the specific fixation conditions. It is proposed that during fixation the production of artifactual vesicles is governed by an interplay of three factors: (a) direct chemical action of the fixative on the polar strata of adjacent unit membranes, (b) osmotic forces applied to membranes during fixation, and (c) the pre-existing natural relations between adjacent membranes. It is found that permanganate best preserves the continuity of the membranes but will still produce vesicles if the fixative exerts severe osmotic forces. These results support other reports (19) of the importance of comparing tissues fixed by complementary procedures so that systematic artifacts will not be described as characteristic of the natural state. PMID:4166578

  10. Spring Chinook Salmon Production for Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Little White Salmon National Fish Hatchery, Annual Report 2006.

    SciTech Connect

    Doulas, Speros

    2007-01-01

    This annual report covers the period from January 1, 2006 through December 31, 2006. Work completed supports the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) effort to restore a locally-adapted stock of spring Chinook to the Umatilla River Basin. During the year, staff at the Little White Salmon/Willard National Fish Hatchery Complex have completed the rearing of 218,764 Brood Year 2004 spring Chinook salmon for release into the Umatilla River during spring 2006 and initiated production of approximately 220,000 Brood Year 2005 spring Chinook for transfer and release into the Umatilla River during spring 2007. All work under this contract is performed at the Little White Salmon and Willard National Fish Hatcheries (NFH), Cook, WA.

  11. "The red man and the white plague": rethinking race, tuberculosis, and American Indians, ca. 1890-1950.

    PubMed

    McMillen, Christian W

    2008-01-01

    From the time it emerged as an epidemic in the last decades of the nineteenth century until it had become their number-one health problem in the 1950s, multiple explanations for the etiology of tuberculosis (TB) among American Indians competed for prominence. None was more debated than racial susceptibility-and none held on with such tenacity. Various race-based explanations -Indians' inherent racial susceptibility, virgin soil theory, and degree of Indian blood-had great explanatory power. These explanations faded from view by the 1950s as a result of epidemiological research begun in the 1930s-research that for the first time filled in many of the pieces of the Indian TB puzzle and allowed TB specialists to know the unknown: who and where the disease struck and why. Combining case finding, X rays, sputum tests-all the modern methods of tracking a TB epidemic-the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) was finally able to understand the Indian TB epidemic. But they also wanted to control it. To this end, the BIA and the Phipps Institute, under the direction of Esmond Long and Joseph Aronson, joined together to begin the first controlled trial of the BCG vaccine.

  12. “Culture” in Diabetes-Related Beliefs among Low- and High-Education African American, American Indian, and White Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Arcury, Thomas A.; Ip, Eddie H.; Nguyen, Ha T.; Saldana, Santiago; Reynolds, Teresa; Bell, Ronny A.; Kirk, Julienne K.; Quandt, Sara A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Racial and ethnic disparities in diabetes and subsequent complications are often attributed to culture; however, previous diabetes disparities research is restricted to in-depth ethnic-specific samples or to comparative study designs with limited belief assessment. The goal of this study is to improve understanding of the cultural basis for variation in diabetes beliefs. Design Cross-sectional Setting Rural North Carolina Participants Older adults (aged 60+) with diabetes, equally divided by ethnicity (White, African American, American Indian) and gender (N=593). Interventions Guided by Explanatory Models of Illness and Cultural Consensus research traditions, trained interviewers collected data using 38 items in four diabetes belief domains: causes, symptoms, consequences, and medical management. Items were obtained from the Common Sense Model of Diabetes Inventory (CSMDI). Main Outcome Beliefs about diabetes. Response options for each diabetes belief item were “agree,” “disagree” and “don’t know”. Collected data were analyzed using Anthropac (version 4.98) and Latent Gold (version 4.5) programs. Results There is substantial similarity in diabetes beliefs among African Americans, American Indians, and Whites. Diabetes beliefs were most similar in the “symptoms” and “consequences” domains compared to beliefs pertaining to “causes” and “medical management.” Although some discrete beliefs differed by ethnicity, systematic differences by ethnicity were observed for specific educational groups. Conclusions Socioeconomic conditions influence diabetes beliefs rather than “ethnicity” per se. PMID:23140078

  13. Indians in Indian Fiction: The Shadow of the Trickster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Velie, Alan R.

    1984-01-01

    Studies mythic dimension of protagonists in novels by American Indian authors Scott Momaday and James Welch. Illustrates discrepancies between White readers' beliefs about Indians and Indian myths of the trickster and how mythologies affect interpretation of the novels. Contrasts use of myth by Indian authors Leslie Silko and Gerald Vizenor. (LFL)

  14. Indian Orphanages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, Marilyn Irvin

    With their traditional tribal and kinship ties, Native Americans had lived for centuries without the concept of an unwanted child. But besieged by reservation life and boarding school acculturation, many tribes, with the encouragement of whites, came to accept the need for orphanages. This book tells the story of Indian orphanages within the…

  15. Toxicity of rotenone to giant river freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Aquaculturists have often suffered predation losses in the production of freshwater giant river prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii due to the presence of wild fish species in culture ponds. The piscicide rotenone is widely used to remove undesirable fish species from ponds. Although evidence in the t...

  16. Information About Indians of Iowa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toothman, Maryann; Jensen, Denise

    An intermediate or junior high level unit on Indians indigenous to Iowa focuses on history, culture, and cultural conflict between the Indians and white Americans. Many of the materials can be adapted for use in other states or for a more general unit on American Indians. Twenty lessons cover the location of Iowa; prehistoric Iowa; Indian society…

  17. Information About Indians of Iowa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toothman, Maryann; Jensen, Denise

    An intermediate or junior high level unit on Indians indigenous to Iowa focuses on history, culture, and cultural conflict between the Indians and white Americans. Many of the materials can be adapted for use in other states or for a more general unit on American Indians. Twenty lessons cover the location of Iowa; prehistoric Iowa; Indian society…

  18. Stable isotope and trace metal compositions of Australian prawns as a guide to authenticity and wholesomeness.

    PubMed

    Carter, J F; Tinggi, U; Yang, X; Fry, B

    2015-03-01

    This research has explored the potential of stable isotope and trace metal profiles to distinguish Australian prawns from prawns imported from neighbouring Asian countries. Australian prawns were collected mostly from the Brisbane area. Strong differences in Australian vs. imported prawns were evident from both the isotope and trace element data, with the differences most likely occurring because imported prawns are typically reared in aquaculture facilities and frozen prior to sale in Australia. The aquaculture origins are characterised by comparatively; low δHVSMOW, δ(13)CVPDB values, low concentrations of arsenic, zinc and potassium, and high water contents (>80%). Relatively high arsenic and cadmium contents were found within Australian prawns, but the concentrations did not exceed local human health guidelines.

  19. Attitudes toward HPV Vaccination among Rural American Indian Women and Urban White Women in the Northern Plains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchwald, Dedra; Muller, Clemma; Bell, Maria; Schmidt-Grimminger, Delf

    2013-01-01

    Background: American Indian women in the Northern Plains have a high incidence of cervical cancer. We assessed attitudes on vaccination against human papillomavirus (HPV) in this population. Method: In partnership with two tribal communities, from 2007 to 2009, we surveyed women 18 to 65 years old attending two reservation clinics ("n" =…

  20. Beyond the Violence: Indian Agriculture, White Removal, and the Unlikely Construction of the Northern Cheyenne Reservation, 1876-1900

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allison, James R., III

    2012-01-01

    Eighty-six Cheyenne families followed Little Wolf to his self-imposed exile near Rosebud Creek. To most observers, this blind loyalty to a fallen leader required little explanation. After all, Little Wolf had recently led his people in a costly yet courageous escape from Indian Territory, fighting through the dead of winter back to the Northern…

  1. Beyond the Violence: Indian Agriculture, White Removal, and the Unlikely Construction of the Northern Cheyenne Reservation, 1876-1900

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allison, James R., III

    2012-01-01

    Eighty-six Cheyenne families followed Little Wolf to his self-imposed exile near Rosebud Creek. To most observers, this blind loyalty to a fallen leader required little explanation. After all, Little Wolf had recently led his people in a costly yet courageous escape from Indian Territory, fighting through the dead of winter back to the Northern…

  2. United States History: From Community to Society. Unit One: Indian America Before White Settlement. Grade Six. Project Social Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis. Project Social Studies Curriculum Center.

    Unit I for grade six deals with the American Indian in a cross cultural approach. Pupils use case studies to examine the Aztecs, who were later conquered by the Spanish, and the Iroquois, who came into contact with the French and English, as total cultures and draw comparisons between the two. The main part of each resource unit is set up in a…

  3. American Indian/Alaskan Native Undergraduate Retention at Predominantly White Institutions: An Elaboration of Tinto's Theory of College Student Departure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Junghee; Donlan, William; Brown, Eddie F.

    2011-01-01

    This article reports findings from a major public university sponsored study undertaken with the intention of (a) improving university understanding of factors affecting American Indian/Alaskan Native (AI/AN) undergraduates' persistence at this institution, and (b) identifying in what areas, and in what manner, this institution could improve…

  4. American Indian/Alaskan Native Undergraduate Retention at Predominantly White Institutions: An Elaboration of Tinto's Theory of College Student Departure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Junghee; Donlan, William; Brown, Eddie F.

    2011-01-01

    This article reports findings from a major public university sponsored study undertaken with the intention of (a) improving university understanding of factors affecting American Indian/Alaskan Native (AI/AN) undergraduates' persistence at this institution, and (b) identifying in what areas, and in what manner, this institution could improve…

  5. Attitudes toward HPV Vaccination among Rural American Indian Women and Urban White Women in the Northern Plains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchwald, Dedra; Muller, Clemma; Bell, Maria; Schmidt-Grimminger, Delf

    2013-01-01

    Background: American Indian women in the Northern Plains have a high incidence of cervical cancer. We assessed attitudes on vaccination against human papillomavirus (HPV) in this population. Method: In partnership with two tribal communities, from 2007 to 2009, we surveyed women 18 to 65 years old attending two reservation clinics ("n" =…

  6. A novel prophenoloxidase, hemocyanin encoded copper containing active enzyme from prawn: gene characterization.

    PubMed

    Arockiaraj, Jesu; Gnanam, Annie J; Pothikasalam, Gopi; Milton, James; Pasupuleti, Mukesh; Bhatt, Prasanth; Palanisamy, Rajesh; Kumaresan, Venkatesh; Thirumalai, Muthukumaresan Kuppusamy; Arasu, Abirami; Sathyamoorthi, Akila; Prabha, Nagaram

    2013-07-25

    The copper containing prophenoloxidase enzyme plays a crucial role in the defense system of arthropods, especially crustaceans and insects. In this study, we have reported a full length cDNA of prophenoloxidase identified from the constructed cDNA library of freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii by genome sequence FLX technology. The identified full length M. rosenbergii prophenoloxidase (MrProPO) consists of 3378 base pairs (bp) with an open reading frame (ORF) of 2099 bp. This ORF encoded a polypeptide of 700 amino acids (aa) with an estimated molecular mass of 80 kDa and a predicted isoelectric point (pI) of 6.7. The motif analysis of MrProPO shows two copper binding sites (CuA and CuB) along with hemocyanin signatures and a thiol-ester like motif. MrProPO exhibited the maximum similarity (97%) with ProPO from Macrobrachium nipponense and is closely clustered with other crustacean ProPO in the phylogenetic tree. Bioinformatics analysis suggests that MrProPO is a member of the prophenoloxidase family, due to the conserved domains, motifs and similarity with other known ProPOs. The 3D structural analysis of MrProPO reveals that it has more random coils, moderate α-helices, few extended β-sheets and a very few β-turns. Among the 700 aa of MrProPO, 355 (50.71%), 206 (29.43%), 110 (15.71%) and 29 (4.14%) amino acids are responsible for random coils, α-helices, extended β-sheets and β-turns respectively. The gene expression results indicate MrProPO is widely distributed in all the tissues studied, but significantly (P<0.05) highest expression was observed in hepatopancreas. The relative expression of mRNA was quantified in hepatopancreas after being infected with virus [white spot syndrome baculovirus (WSBV) and M. rosenbergii nodovirus (MrNV)] and bacteria (Aeromonas hydrophila and Vibrio harveyi) using real-time PCR. MrProPO mRNA transcription significantly (P<0.05) increased at 24h post injection (p.i.) with subsequent decrease at 48 h p.i. in both viral

  7. The effects of thermal treatments on protein profiles of Macrobrachium rosenbergii (giant river prawn)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sockalingam, Komathi; Misnan, Rosmilah; Yadzir, Zailatul Hani Mohd

    2017-05-01

    Prawn allergy is certainly the most frequent cause of allergic reactions in countries where this crustacean is a popular dish of seafood. The aim of this study was to determine the protein profiles of giant river prawn which scientifically known as Macrobrachium rosenbergii. Raw and cooked extracts (boiled, steamed and fried) of prawn samples were prepared and then resolved by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). 27 protein bands between 6 to 207 kDa were detected in the SDS-PAGE gel of raw extracts while boiled, steamed and fried extracts revealed fewer protein bands. Steamed and boiled prawns presented higher numbers of protein bands compared to fried prawn. A prominent heat-resistant band between 32 to 38 kDa was seen in all extracts, might hypothesized to be tropomyosin. Other prominent bands between 17 to 20 kDa were also seen in all treated prawn extracts while bands of 24 to 27 kDa were seen in steamed and boiled prawn extracts. These positions are consistent with the known shellfish allergens myosin light chain, sacroplasmic calcium binding protein and troponin C respectively. Several other heat-sensitive protein bands at various molecular weights were also not detected in boiled, steamed and fried extracts of this prawn. This study showed that M. rosenbergii contains numerous heat-sensitive and heat-resistant proteins, which may play an important role in prawn allergy.

  8. Pellino-1 derived cationic antimicrobial prawn peptide: Bactericidal activity, toxicity and mode of action.

    PubMed

    Ravichandran, Gayathri; Kumaresan, Venkatesh; Arasu, Mariadhas Valan; Al-Dhabi, Naif Abdullah; Ganesh, Munuswamy-Ramanujam; Mahesh, Arun; Dhayalan, Arunkumar; Pasupuleti, Mukesh; Arockiaraj, Jesu

    2016-10-01

    The antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are multifunctional molecules which represent significant roles in the innate immune system. These molecules have been well known for decades because of their role as natural antibiotics in both invertebrates and vertebrates. The development of multiple drug resistance against conventional antibiotics brought a greater focus on AMPs in recent years. The cationic peptides, in particular, proven as host defense peptides and are considered as effectors of innate immunity. Among the various innate immune molecules, functions of pellino-1 (Peli-1) have been recently studied for its remarkable role in specific immune functions. In our study, we have identified Peli-1 from the cDNA library of freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii (Mr) and analyzed its features using various in-silico methods. Real time PCR analysis showed an induced expression of MrPeli-1 during white spot syndrome virus (WSSV), bacteria (Vibrio harveyi) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Escherichia coli challenge. Also, a cationic AMP named MrDN was derived from MrPeli-1 protein sequence and its activity was confirmed against various pathogenic bacteria. The mode of action of MrDN was determined to be its membrane permeabilization ability against Bacillus cereus ATCC 2106 as well as its DNA binding ability. Further, scanning electron microscopic (SEM) images showed the membrane disruption and leakage of cellular components of B. cereus cells induced by MrDN. The toxicity of MrDN against normal cells (HEK293 cells) was demonstrated by MTT and hemolysis assays. Overall, the results demonstrated the innate immune function of MrPeli-1 with a potential cationic AMP in prawn. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of brown rice, white rice, and brown rice with legumes on blood glucose and insulin responses in overweight Asian Indians: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Viswanathan; Spiegelman, Donna; Sudha, Vasudevan; Gayathri, Rajagopal; Hong, Biling; Praseena, Kallingal; Anjana, Ranjit Mohan; Wedick, Nicole M; Arumugam, Kokila; Malik, Vasanti; Ramachandran, Sabitha; Bai, Mookambika Ramya; Henry, Jeya Kumar; Hu, Frank B; Willett, Walter; Krishnaswamy, Kamala

    2014-05-01

    Improving the carbohydrate quality of the diet by replacing the common cereal staple white rice (WR) with brown rice (BR) could have beneficial effects on reducing the risk for diabetes and related complications. Hence we aimed to compare the effects of BR, WR, and BR with legumes (BRL) diets on 24-h glycemic and insulinemic responses among overweight Asian Indians. Fifteen overweight (body mass index, ≥23 kg/m(2)) Asian Indians without diabetes who were 25-45 years old participated in a randomized crossover study. Test meals (nonisocaloric, ad libitum) were identical except for the type of rice and the addition of legumes (50 g/day) and were provided for 5 consecutive days. Glucose profiles were assessed using the Medtronic MiniMed (Northridge, CA) iPro™2 continuous glucose monitoring device. The mean positive change from baseline glucose concentration was calculated as the daily incremental area under the curve (IAUC) on each test day for 5 days and averaged. Fasting serum insulin was measured prior to and at the end of each test diet. The percentage difference in 5-day average IAUC was 19.8% lower in the BR group than in the WR group (P=0.004). BRL further decreased the glycemic response (22.9% lower compared with WR (P=0.02). The 5-day percentage change in fasting insulin was 57% lower (P=0.0001) for the BR group and 54% lower for the BRL group compared with the 5-day percentage change observed in the WR group. The glycemic and insulinemic responses to the BR and BRL diets were not significantly different. Consumption of BR in place of WR can help reduce 24-h glucose and fasting insulin responses among overweight Asian Indians.

  10. Nonsuicidal self-injury in an American Indian reservation community: results from the White Mountain Apache surveillance system, 2007-2008.

    PubMed

    Cwik, Mary F; Barlow, Allison; Tingey, Lauren; Larzelere-Hinton, Francene; Goklish, Novalene; Walkup, John T

    2011-09-01

    To describe characteristics and correlates of nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) among the White Mountain Apache Tribe. NSSI has not been studied before in American Indian samples despite associated risks for suicide, which disproportionately affect American Indian youth. Apache case managers collected data through a tribally mandated surveillance system. Data from 2007 and 2008 (N = 182) were examined for rates, methods, precipitants, functions, past history of self-injury and service use, by age and gender. The rate of NSSI among all ages was 600 in 100,000, with individuals 10 to 14 years old disproportionately affected at a rate of 3,000 in 100,000. More females (65%) reported NSSI, and cutting was the preferred method (98%) for both genders combined. Most frequently reported precipitants were peer pressure/copying, conflict with boy/girlfriend and "depression." A substantial proportion (22%) was intoxicated/high at the time. More reported the function of NSSI was to "effect internal state" (45%) than "effect circumstances" (15%). More than one-third (39%) received ED treatment and referrals for aftercare (36%). Of those referred, only 30% followed up with services. Most (79%) reported past NSSI; 30% reported past suicidal ideation and 25% attempts. NSSI is a significant, largely unaddressed mental health problem among the White Mountain Apache Tribe and likely other reservation communities, especially as NSSI could serve as a precursor to suicide in this population. Interestingly, another self-destructive behavior, severe substance use, was reported to the surveillance system by Apaches and described in terms similar to NSSI, an important preliminary finding worth further exploration. Copyright © 2011 American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Ecology of nonnative Siberian prawn (Palaemon modestus) in the lower Snake River, Washington, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erhardt, John M.; Tiffan, Kenneth F.

    2016-01-01

    We assessed the abundance, distribution, and ecology of the nonnative Siberian prawn Palaemon modestus in the lower Snake River, Washington, USA. Analysis of prawn passage abundance at three Snake River dams showed that populations are growing at exponential rates, especially at Little Goose Dam where over 464,000 prawns were collected in 2015. Monthly beam trawling during 2011–2013 provided information on prawn abundance and distribution in Lower Granite and Little Goose Reservoirs. Zero-inflated regression predicted that the probability of prawn presence increased with decreasing water velocity and increasing depth. Negative binomial models predicted higher catch rates of prawns in deeper water and in closer proximity to dams. Temporally, prawn densities decreased slightly in the summer, likely due to the mortality of older individuals, and then increased in autumn and winter with the emergence and recruitment of young of the year. Seasonal length frequencies showed that distinct juvenile and adult size classes exist throughout the year, suggesting prawns live from 1 to 2 years and may be able to reproduce multiple times during their life. Most juvenile prawns become reproductive adults in 1 year, and peak reproduction occurs from late July through October. Mean fecundity (189 eggs) and reproductive output (11.9 %) are similar to that in their native range. The current use of deep habitats by prawns likely makes them unavailable to most predators in the reservoirs. The distribution and role of Siberian prawns in the lower Snake River food web will probably continue to change as the population grows and warrants continued monitoring and investigation.

  12. Ecology of nonnative Siberian prawn (Palaemon modestus) in the lower Snake River, Washington, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erhardt, John M.; Tiffan, Kenneth F.

    2016-01-01

    We assessed the abundance, distribution, and ecology of the nonnative Siberian prawn Palaemon modestus in the lower Snake River, Washington, USA. Analysis of prawn passage abundance at three Snake River dams showed that populations are growing at exponential rates, especially at Little Goose Dam where over 464,000 prawns were collected in 2015. Monthly beam trawling during 2011–2013 provided information on prawn abundance and distribution in Lower Granite and Little Goose Reservoirs. Zero-inflated regression predicted that the probability of prawn presence increased with decreasing water velocity and increasing depth. Negative binomial models predicted higher catch rates of prawns in deeper water and in closer proximity to dams. Temporally, prawn densities decreased slightly in the summer, likely due to the mortality of older individuals, and then increased in autumn and winter with the emergence and recruitment of young of the year. Seasonal length frequencies showed that distinct juvenile and adult size classes exist throughout the year, suggesting prawns live from 1 to 2 years and may be able to reproduce multiple times during their life. Most juvenile prawns become reproductive adults in 1 year, and peak reproduction occurs from late July through October. Mean fecundity (189 eggs) and reproductive output (11.9 %) are similar to that in their native range. The current use of deep habitats by prawns likely makes them unavailable to most predators in the reservoirs. The distribution and role of Siberian prawns in the lower Snake River food web will probably continue to change as the population grows and warrants continued monitoring and investigation.

  13. Microspectrophotometry of photoreceptor organelles from eyes of the prawn Palaemonetes.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, T H; Dizon, A E; Fernandez, H R

    1968-08-02

    Microspectrophotometric measurements of individual dark-adapted rhabdoms of the prawn Palaemonetes vulgaris reveal the presence of two light-sensitive pigments. A pigment with maximum absorbancy at 555 nanometers is converted by light to a long-lived intermediate with wavelength of maximum absorbancy at 496 nanometers. A second pigment with wavelength of maximum absorbancy at 496 nanometers bleaches in the light, seemingly without forming detectable products at wavelengths longer than 375 nanometers. Both pigments occur in each layer of microvilli.

  14. Experimental infection of Gnathostoma spinigerum larvae in prawns and tadpoles.

    PubMed

    Sukontason, K; Sukontason, K L; Muangyimpong, Y; Piangjai, S

    2001-01-01

    Naturally captured Lanchester's freshwater prawns (Macrobrachium lanchesteri) and farm-bred Rana regulosa tadpoles were assessed for their capability of being the first or second intermediate hosts of Gnathostoma spinigerum. Seventy specimens from each animal group were randomized into a control group and investigated for larvae of G. spinigerum by pressing them between two pieces of glass and examination under stereomicroscope. No Gnathostoma larvae were found in the entire control group. Another 120 specimens of each animal were used in two treatment groups; 60 being exposed to the first-stage larvae, G. spinigerum, and 60 exposed to cyclops containing the third-stage larvae for 7 days. No larvae of G. spinigerum were found in the prawns of both treatment groups that resembled tadpoles exposed to the first-stage larvae. In contrast, 18.3% of tadpoles, which were exposed to cyclops containing third-stage larvae, were infected. Lanchester's freshwater prawns cannot serve as intermediate host of G. spinigerum, while R. regulosa can serve as the second intermediate host.

  15. Genetic diversity of the giant tiger prawn Penaeus monodon in relation to trace metal pollution at the Tanzanian coast.

    PubMed

    Rumisha, Cyrus; Leermakers, Martine; Elskens, Marc; Mdegela, Robinson H; Gwakisa, Paul; Kochzius, Marc

    2017-01-30

    The genetic diversity of giant tiger prawns in relation to trace metals (TMs) pollution was analysed using 159 individuals from eight sites at the Tanzanian coast. The seven microsatellites analysed showed high degree of polymorphism (4-44 alleles). The measured genetic diversity (Ho=0.592±0.047) was comparable to that of populations in the Western Indian Ocean. Apart from that, correlation analysis revealed significant negative associations between genetic diversity and TMs pollution (p<0.05), supporting the genetic erosion hypothesis. Limited gene flow was indicated by a significant genetic differentiation (FST=0.059, p<0.05). The Mantel test rejected the isolation-by-distance hypothesis, but revealed that gene flow along the Tanzanian coast is limited by TMs pollution. This suggests that TMs affect larvae settlement and it may account for the measured deficiency of heterozygosity. This calls for strengthened pollution control measures in order to conserve this commercially important species.

  16. The "Prawn-in-the-Tube" Procedure in the Cuttlefish: Habituation or Passive Avoidance Learning?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickel, Ludovic; Chichery, Marie-Paule; Agin, Veronique; Chichery, Raymond

    2006-01-01

    This study examines whether or not habituation contributes to the regulation of the inhibition of predatory behavior observed during the "prawn-in-the-tube" training procedure. When presented with prawns that are visible behind glass but untouchable, cuttlefish promptly learn to inhibit their capture attempts. The first three experiments…

  17. Prawns, barnacles, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: effect modifiers or diagnostic confounders [corrected].

    PubMed

    Vidal, C; Bartolomé, B; González-Quintela, A; Rodríguez, V; Armisén, M

    2007-01-01

    A 42-year-old woman with no history of atopy reported several episodes of generalized urticaria and shortness of breath after eating shellfish (prawns and barnacles) but with good tolerance of the same foods between episodes. Skin prick tests (SPTs), serum enzyme allergosorbent tests (EAST) for specific immunoglobulin (Ig) E, Western blot and inhibition assays, and oral challenge tests with prawns, barnacles, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and alcohol as potential effect modifiers were performed. Specific IgE to both barnacle and prawn were detected by SPTs and EAST. Results from a Western blot of raw prawn revealed an IgE binding band of 37 kDa and IgE binding bands of 143, 83, 38, 32, and 20 kDa appeared in the raw barnacle assay. Oral challenge tests were positive with prawns and prawn extract only if preceded by NSAIDs. Oral challenges with NSAIDs alone, prawns alone, barnacles with or without NSAIDs and alcohol led to no reaction. A synergistic effect of NSAIDs in inducing anaphylaxis after prawn intake was confirmed. No similar effect was achieved with barnacles despite the presence of specific IgE. Additional factors needed to elicit a clinical reaction in food allergy may not be obvious and several oral challenge protocols are mandatory in such cases.

  18. The "Prawn-in-the-Tube" Procedure in the Cuttlefish: Habituation or Passive Avoidance Learning?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickel, Ludovic; Chichery, Marie-Paule; Agin, Veronique; Chichery, Raymond

    2006-01-01

    This study examines whether or not habituation contributes to the regulation of the inhibition of predatory behavior observed during the "prawn-in-the-tube" training procedure. When presented with prawns that are visible behind glass but untouchable, cuttlefish promptly learn to inhibit their capture attempts. The first three experiments…

  19. Money, Semantics, and Indian Leadership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lurie, Nancy O.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses cultural differences between Indian and white people in their perceptions of money and the meanings of certain English words such as greed and jealousy. Identifies possible sticking points in Indian-white communication and political/economic relationships. Relates intratribal disputes and factionalism to impose financial situations and…

  20. Influence of Agathi grandiflora active principles inhibit viral multiplication and stimulate immune system in Indian white shrimp Fenneropenaeus indicus against white spot syndrome virus infection.

    PubMed

    Bindhu, Francis; Velmurugan, Subramanian; Donio, Mariathason Birdilla Selva; Michaelbabu, Mariavincent; Citarasu, Thavasimuthu

    2014-12-01

    Five herbs including Adathoda vasica, Agathi grandiflora, Leucas aspera, Psoralea corylifolia, and Quercus infectoria were selected to screen the antiviral and immunostimulant activity against white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) and Vibrio harveyi respectively using different organic polar and non-polar solvents. Based on the initial screening results, ethyl acetate and methanolic extracts of A. grandiflora had strong antiviral and immunostimulant activities. Those extracts incubated with WSSV injected Fenneropenaeus indicus got only 20% mortality and no PCR positive signals were seen in two step PCR amplification. The methanolic extracts of A. grandiflora were further purified through silica column chromatography and the fractions screened again for antiviral and immunostimulant activity. The secondary screening results revealed that, the fractions of F5 to F7 had effectively controlled the WSSV multiplication and V. harveyi growth. The pooled fractions (F5 to F7) was structurally characterized by gas chromatograph-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis and few compounds were identified including 3,7.11,15-Tetramethyl-2-Hexane-1-ol, pytol and 1,2-Benzenedicarboxylic acid, diisooctyl ester. The pooled fractions were mixed with the basal feed ingredients at the concentration of 100 (D-1), 200 (D-2), 300 (D-3) and 400 (D-4) mg kg(-1) and the diets fed to the F. indicus (9.0 ± 0.5 g) for 30 days. After the completion of feeding trail, they were challenged with virulent WSSV and studied the cumulative mortality, molecular diagnosis by quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR), biochemical, haematological and immunological parameters. The control diet fed F. indicus succumbed to death 100% within 3 days whereas the D-3 and D-4 helped to reduced the cumulative mortality of 60-80% respectively. The qRT-PCR revealed that, the WSSV copy number was gradually decreased when increasing concentration of A. grandiflora extract active fraction in the diets. The diets D-3 and D-4 helped to

  1. Growing Up Indian: Stories from the Life of Louie Gingras, an 82 Year Old Kootenai Indian. Indian Culture Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gingras, Louie

    Eleven short stories from the life of Louie Gingras, an 82-year-old Kootenai Indian, illustrate many aspects of Indian culture. Accompanied by black and white drawings, ths stories describe daily life, mission schools, the Carlisle Indian School, Indian medicine, discipline for children, spiritual powers, beliefs, and several ceremonies. The book…

  2. Metal accumulation in the greentail prawn, Metapenaeus bennettae, in Sydney and Port Hacking estuaries, Australia.

    PubMed

    Lewtas, K L M; Birch, G F; Foster-Thorpe, C

    2014-01-01

    Metal concentrations of the inshore greentail prawn, Metapenaeus bennettae, and surface sediments from locations within Sydney estuary and Port Hacking (Australia) were assessed for bioaccumulation and contamination. The current study aimed to assess metal concentrations in prawn tissue (tail muscle, exoskeleton, hepatopancreas and gills), relate whole body prawn tissue metal concentrations to sediment metal concentrations and animal size, as well as assess prawn consumption as a risk to human health. Metal concentrations were highest in sediment and prawns from contaminated locations (Iron Cove, Hen and Chicken Bay and Lane Cove) in Sydney estuary compared with the reference estuary (Port Hacking). Concentrations in sediments varied considerably between sites and between metals (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn), and although concentrations exceeded Interim Sediment Quality Guideline-Low values, metals (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn) were below Australian National Health and Medical Research Council human consumption guidelines in prawn tail muscle tissue. Metal concentrations in prawn tail muscle tissue were significantly different (p ≤ 0.05) amongst locations for Pb, Zn and Cd, and metal concentrations were generally highest in gills tissue, followed by the hepatopancreas, exoskeleton and tail muscle. The exoskeleton contained the highest Sr concentration; the hepatopancreas contained the highest As, Cu and Mo concentrations; and the gills contained the highest Al, Cr, Fe and Pb concentrations. Concentrations of Pb, As and Sr were significantly different (p ≤ 0.05) between size groups amongst locations.

  3. Comparison of diets of urban American Indian and non-Hispanic whites: populations with a disparity for biliary tract cancer rates.

    PubMed

    Glew, Robert H; Wold, Rosemary S; VanderJagt, Dorothy J

    2012-01-01

    The incidnece of biliary tract cancer (BTC) is many-fold higher for American Indians (AI) relative to non-Hispanic whites (NHW). Neither gallstones nor genetics can account for this difference. There is speculation that certain fatty acids in bile may play a role in preventing BTC. Since diet may influence composition of bile, we compared the dietary intakes of urban AI and NHW adult women in New Mexico. Design, a cross- sectional study of the diets of lactating AI and NHW women was conducted. Setting, the University of New Mexico Hospital. Participants, healthy lactating women 18 to 39 years of age were recruited. Main outcome measures, a three-day diet record for each participant was analyzed. The AI women consumed less calcium (p = 0.04) and significantly less short and intermediate chain-length fatty acids (C4-C12), but nearly twice as much proinflammatory arachidonic acid as the NHWs (p < 0.01). The intake of dairy products by AI women was less than NHW women (p = 0.01) while the intake of processed meat products was higher (p < 0.01). Dietary factors may account for the difference in the risk of BTC between AI and NHW women.

  4. The average Indian female nose.

    PubMed

    Patil, Surendra B; Kale, Satish M; Jaiswal, Sumeet; Khare, Nishant; Math, Mahantesh

    2011-12-01

    This study aimed to delineate the anthropometric measurements of the noses of young women of an Indian population and to compare them with the published ideals and average measurements for white women. This anthropometric survey included a volunteer sample of 100 young Indian women ages 18 to 35 years with Indian parents and no history of previous surgery or trauma to the nose. Standardized frontal, lateral, oblique, and basal photographs of the subjects' noses were taken, and 12 standard anthropometric measurements of the nose were determined. The results were compared with published standards for North American white women. In addition, nine nasal indices were calculated and compared with the standards for North American white women. The nose of Indian women differs significantly from the white nose. All the nasal measurements for the Indian women were found to be significantly different from those for North American white women. Seven of the nine nasal indices also differed significantly. Anthropometric analysis suggests differences between the Indian female nose and the North American white nose. Thus, a single aesthetic ideal is inadequate. Noses of Indian women are smaller and wider, with a less projected and rounded tip than the noses of white women. This study established the nasal anthropometric norms for nasal parameters, which will serve as a guide for cosmetic and reconstructive surgery in Indian women.

  5. Heavy metal contamination of freshwater prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii) and prawn feed in Bangladesh: A market-based study to highlight probable health risks.

    PubMed

    Rabiul Islam, G M; Habib, Mohammad Ruzlan; Waid, Jillian L; Rahman, M Safiur; Kabir, J; Akter, S; Jolly, Y N

    2017-03-01

    An assessment of the dietary risk of heavy metal exposure to humans is important since it is the main source of exposure. This study aimed to estimate the degree of contamination and assess the probable health risk in the prawn food chain. In prawn feed, the concentrations of metals were detected in the following order: Hg > Co > Pb > Cd. The concentrations of heavy metals in prawn were the highest for Co and lowest for Cd. Trace amounts of As and Cr were detected in the analyzed sample. Target hazard quotients for heavy metals for adults were >1 for Pb, Cd, Hg, and Co, and for children, the same were high for Co and Hg, indicating significant health risks upon dietary exposure. All the prawn samples contained nine-fold and fourteen-fold higher concentrations than the maximum acceptable levels for Pb and Hg, respectively (0.5 mg kg(-1); WHO/FAO). Human health risk due to the Co exposure is quite alarming as the level of exposure was found to be very high. In the prawn samples intended for human consumption, the hazard index (HI) was highest in the samples obtained from Bagerhat (3.25 in flesh and 3.26 in skin), followed by the samples obtained from Satkhira (2.84 in flesh and 3.10 in skin) and Dhaka City Corporation (2.81 in flesh and 3.42 in Skin); this indicates a potential risk of prawn consumption obtained from Southeast Bangladesh. This is particularly problematic as this area accounts for the majority of prawn production and export of the country. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Survey of protozoan, helminth and viral infections in shrimp Litopenaeus setiferus and prawn Macrobrachium acanthurus native to the Jamapa River region, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Machín, Magda E; Hernández-Vergara, Martha P; Jiménez-García, Isabel; Simá-Alvarez, Raúl; Rodríguez-Canul, Rossanna

    2011-09-09

    We surveyed protozoan and metazoan parasites as well as white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) and infectious hypodermal hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHHNV) in white shrimp Litopenaeus setiferus and the palaemonid prawn Macrobrachium acanthurus native to the lower Jamapa River region of Veracruz, Mexico. The presence of parasites and the infection parameters were evaluated in 113 palaemonid prawns collected during the northwind (n = 45), rainy (n = 38) and dry seasons (n = 30) between October 2007 and July 2008, and in 91 shrimp collected in the rainy season between May and June 2008. In L. setiferus, ciliates of the subclass Apostomatia (Ascophrys sp.) were evident in gills, and third-stage larvae of the nematode Physocephalus sexalatus were evident in the stomach. Cestodes of the genus Prochristianella were evident in the hepatopancreas, while some gregarines of the genus Nematopsis, as well as unidentified larval cestodes, were observed in the intestine. Histology identified Ascophrys sp. in association with gill necrosis and tissue melanization. Slight inflammation was observed in intestinal epithelium near cestode larvae. In M. acanthurus, epibionts of the protozoans Epistylis sp., Acineta sp. and Lagenophrys sp. were observed under uropods, periopods and pleopods. An unidentified ciliate of the Apostomatia was also found in the gills, and Nematopsis was identified in the intestine. No histopathology was observed in association with these parasites. Moreover, neither WSSV nor IHHNV were detected by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in any of the L. setiferus or M. acanthurus analysed.

  7. The prognostic value of dobutamine stress echocardiography amongst British Indian Asian and Afro-Caribbean patients: a comparison with European white patients.

    PubMed

    O'Driscoll, Jamie M; Rossato, Claire; Gargallo-Fernandez, Paula; Araco, Marco; Giannoglou, Dimitrios; Sharma, Sanjay; Sharma, Rajan

    2015-08-06

    The incidence of cardiovascular disease is considerably disparate among different racial and ethnic populations. While dobutamine stress echocardiography (DSE) has been shown to be useful in Caucasian patients, its role among ethnic minority groups remains unclear. This study aimed to investigate the prognostic importance of DSE in three ethnic groups in the UK. DSE was performed on 6231 consecutive patients. After exclusions, 5329 patients formed the study (2676 [50.2%] Indian Asian, 2219 [41.6%] European white and 434 [8.1%] Afro-Caribbean). Study outcome measures were non-fatal cardiac events (NFCE) and all-cause mortality. There were 849 (15.9%) NFCE and 1365 (25.6%) deaths over a median follow-up period of 4.6 years. In total 1174 (22%) patients had inducible myocardial ischaemia during DSE, 859 (16.1%) had fixed wall motion abnormalities and 3645 (68.4%) patients had a normal study. Ethnicity did not predict events. Among the three ethnic groups, ischaemia on DSE was associated with 2 to 2.5 times the risk of non-fatal cardiac events and 1.2 to 1.4 times the risk of all-cause mortality. Peak wall motion score index was the strongest independent predictor of non-fatal cardiac events and all-cause mortality in all groups. The C statistic for the prediction of NFCE and all-cause mortality were significantly higher when DSE parameters were added to the standard risk factors for all ethnic groups. DSE is a strong predictor of NFCE and all-cause mortality and provides predictive information beyond that provided by standard risk factors in three major racial and ethnic groups. No major differences among racial and ethnic groups in the predictive value of DSE was detected.

  8. Improvement of red color development on the surface of kuruma prawn Marsupenaeus japonicus under various conditions.

    PubMed

    Ando, Masashi; Fukai, Takamitsu; Kawasaki, Ken-Ichi; Itoh, Tomohiro; Tsukamasa, Yasuyuki

    2014-02-01

    The degree of red color development on the surface of prawns by cooking is an important index for food quality. In this study, we tested several factors that are thought to influence the red color development to identify possible correlations with various conditions. Live kuruma prawns, Marsupenaeus japonicus, (15.4 cm, 25.2 g on average) were used in this study. In case of cooking at 100 °C for 1 min after 24 h of storage at 0 °C, 5 °C, and 20 °C, the red color development rate of prawns stored at 5 °C and 20 °C was significantly lower than that of prawns cooked just after killing. In case of cooking at 100 °C, 80 °C, and 60 °C after storage for 24 h at 0 °C, there was no color development at 60 °C and significantly less color development at 80 °C compared to cooking just after killing. Preparation using 1% sodium carbonate before cooking at 80 °C could compensate for the lack of red color development. Short exposure of live kuruma prawns to low-oxygen conditions had no influence on the color development, but putting the prawns in freshwater for 3 h significantly reduced the red color development rate. In conclusion, the storage time has little influence on the red color development when the cooking temperature is sufficiently high. However, in case a large amount of prawns is cooked followed by lowering the cooking temperature and/or prawns are exposed to serious stresses before cooking, an alkaline preparation could compensate for the lack of red color development.

  9. The Flood. Second edition. Indian Culture Series DH-19.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilliland, Hap

    The booklet, illustrated with black and white photographs and drawings, contains 16 one to three page versions of the story of the great flood. Versions of the story as told by representatives of the Skokomish Indians of Western Washington, Apache Indians of New Mexico, Athabascan Indians of Alaska, Shasta Indians of California, Yakima Indians of…

  10. The Flood. Second edition. Indian Culture Series DH-19.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilliland, Hap

    The booklet, illustrated with black and white photographs and drawings, contains 16 one to three page versions of the story of the great flood. Versions of the story as told by representatives of the Skokomish Indians of Western Washington, Apache Indians of New Mexico, Athabascan Indians of Alaska, Shasta Indians of California, Yakima Indians of…

  11. American Indian History and Writing from Home: Constructing an Indian Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fixico, Donald L.

    2009-01-01

    If the typical premise of American Indian history is actually the history of Indian-white relations, then the "other" side of the coin must be turned over for understanding an Indian point of view and what is called "writing from home." Conceptually, "writing from home" is the challenge of historians who are American Indian and who write history…

  12. Reservation School Districts. Report of the Annual Indian Town Hall (6th, White Mountain Apache Reservation, Arizona, December 6-7, 1978).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona Commission of Indian Affairs, Phoenix.

    Forty-four representatives of American Indian tribes and the state of Arizona participated in the 2-day conference on reservation school districts. Terrance Leonard explained the legislative history and workings of Johnson-O'Malley funding, described supplementary Johnson-O'Malley programs, and commented on the Indian Education Act. Dr. Kenneth…

  13. Reservation School Districts. Report of the Annual Indian Town Hall (6th, White Mountain Apache Reservation, Arizona, December 6-7, 1978).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona Commission of Indian Affairs, Phoenix.

    Forty-four representatives of American Indian tribes and the state of Arizona participated in the 2-day conference on reservation school districts. Terrance Leonard explained the legislative history and workings of Johnson-O'Malley funding, described supplementary Johnson-O'Malley programs, and commented on the Indian Education Act. Dr. Kenneth…

  14. State-Tribal Relationships. A Report on the Indian Town Hall (8th, White Mountain Apache Reservation, Arizona, November 13-14, 1980).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona Commission of Indian Affairs, Phoenix.

    Proceedings from the 8th Indian Town Hall include conference activities of 22 representatives of American Indian tribes and the State of Arizona as they participated in the 2-day conference on state-tribal relationships. Eleven keynote speeches in full text are presented along with comments from seven tribal representatives on the conference and…

  15. In-Depth Tanscriptomic Analysis on Giant Freshwater Prawns

    PubMed Central

    Mohd-Shamsudin, Maizatul Izzah; Kang, Yi; Lili, Zhao; Tan, Tian Tian; Kwong, Qi Bin; Liu, Hang; Zhang, Guojie; Othman, Rofina Yasmin; Bhassu, Subha

    2013-01-01

    Gene discovery in the Malaysian giant freshwater prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii) has been limited to small scale data collection, despite great interest in various research fields related to the commercial significance of this species. Next generation sequencing technologies that have been developed recently and enabled whole transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq), have allowed generation of large scale functional genomics data sets in a shorter time than was previously possible. Using this technology, transcriptome sequencing of three tissue types: hepatopancreas, gill and muscle, has been undertaken to generate functional genomics data for M. rosenbergii at a massive scale. De novo assembly of 75-bp paired end Ilumina reads has generated 102,230 unigenes. Sequence homology search and in silico prediction have identified known and novel protein coding candidate genes (∼24%), non-coding RNA, and repetitive elements in the transcriptome. Potential markers consisting of simple sequence repeats associated with known protein coding genes have been successfully identified. Using KEGG pathway enrichment, differentially expressed genes in different tissues were systematically represented. The functions of gill and hepatopancreas in the context of neuroactive regulation, metabolism, reproduction, environmental stress and disease responses are described and support relevant experimental studies conducted previously in M. rosenbergii and other crustaceans. This large scale gene discovery represents the most extensive transcriptome data for freshwater prawn. Comparison with model organisms has paved the path to address the possible conserved biological entities shared between vertebrates and crustaceans. The functional genomics resources generated from this study provide the basis for constructing hypotheses for future molecular research in the freshwater shrimp. PMID:23734171

  16. Endometrial cancer in Asian and American Indian/Alaskan Native women: tumor characteristics, treatment and outcome compared to non-Hispanic white women.

    PubMed

    Mahdi, Haider; Schlick, Cary Jo; Kowk, Li-Lian; Moslemi-Kebria, Mehdi; Michener, Chad

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this study is to compare survival of Asian (AS), American Indian/Alaskan Native (AI/AN) and non-Hispanic white (NHW) women with endometrial adenocarcinoma (EC). Patients with EC were identified from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program from 1988 to 2009. Kaplan-Meier survival methods and Cox proportional hazards regression were performed. Of the 105,083 women, 97,763 (93%) were NHW, 6699 (6.4%) were AS and 621 (0.6%) were AI/AN. AS and AI/AN were younger than NHW with mean age of 57.7 and 56.5 vs. 64.3 years (p < 0.001 and 0.059). Advanced stage and high-risk histology were more prominent in AS than NHW (15.6% vs. 13.3%, p = 0.04, 10.6% vs. 9.6%, p= 0.041). Lymphadenectomy was performed more frequently in AS than NHW (56.7% vs. 48.2%, p < 0.001). Asian immigrants were younger than Asian natives (mean age 57 vs. 60.5 years, p < 0.001). In multivariate analysis, AS had better overall (OS) (HR 0.86, 95% CI 0.81-0.91, p < 0.001) and cancer-specific survival (CSS) (HR 0.92, 95% CI 0.84-1.00, p = 0.05) than NHW. Further, Asian immigrants had better OS (HR 0.83, 95% CI 0.73-0.94, p = 0.002) and CSS (HR 0.66, 95% CI 0.54-0.80, p < 0.001) than Asian natives. In contrast, AI/AN had worse OS (HR 1.35, 95% CI 1.15-1.59, p < 0.001) but no difference in CSS (HR 1.06, 95% CI 0.80-1.40, p = 0.69) than NHW. Asians were younger at presentation, more likely to have lymphadenectomy and had an improved outcome compared to NHW. Interestingly, Asian immigrants had more favorable outcome than Asians born in the US. Further studies are warranted to find possible explanations for such a difference. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Correlates of overweight and obesity among American Indian/Alaska Native and Non-Hispanic White children and adolescents: National Survey of Children's Health, 2007.

    PubMed

    Ness, Maria; Barradas, Danielle T; Irving, Jennifer; Manning, Susan E

    2012-12-01

    Risk factors for overweight and obesity may be different for American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) children compared to children of other racial/ethnic backgrounds, as obesity prevalence among AI/AN children remains much higher. Using data from the 2007 National Survey of Children's Health, behavioral (child's sport team participation, vigorous physical activity, television viewing, and computer use), household (parental physical activity, frequency of family meals, rules limiting television viewing, and television in the child's bedroom), neighborhood (neighborhood support, perceived community and school safety, and presence of parks, sidewalks, and recreation centers in the neighborhood), and sociodemographic (child's age and sex, household structure, and poverty status) correlates of overweight/obesity (body mass index ≥85th percentile for age and sex) were assessed among 10-17 year-old non-Hispanic white (NHW) and AI/AN children residing in Alaska, Arizona, Montana, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oklahoma, and South Dakota (n = 5,372). Prevalence of overweight/obesity was 29.0 % among NHW children and 48.3 % among AI/AN children in this sample. Viewing more than 2 h of television per day (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 2.0; 95 % confidence interval [CI] = 1.5-2.8), a lack of neighborhood support (aOR = 1.9; 95 % CI = 1.1-3.5), and demographic characteristics were significantly associated with overweight/obesity in the pooled sample. Lack of sport team participation was significantly associated with overweight/obesity only among AI/AN children (aOR = 2.7; 95 % CI = 1.3-5.2). Culturally sensitive interventions targeting individual predictors, such as sports team participation and television viewing, in conjunction with neighborhood-level factors, may be effective in addressing childhood overweight/obesity among AI/AN children. Longitudinal studies are needed to confirm these findings.

  18. Association Between Lifetime Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Past Year Alcohol Use Disorder Among American Indians/Alaska Natives and Non-Hispanic Whites.

    PubMed

    Emerson, Marc A; Moore, Roland S; Caetano, Raul

    2017-03-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and alcohol use disorder disproportionately impact certain populations including American Indians/Alaska Natives (AIAN). While PTSD and alcohol use disorder have been studied both separately and in tandem, less is known about the association in AIAN. The objective was to examine the association between lifetime PTSD and past year alcohol use disorder among AIAN and non-Hispanic Whites (NHW). Data come from the 2012 to 2013 U.S. National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions-III. We used logistic regression to estimate odds of AUD among adults with and without PTSD by race. A total of 19,705 participants, of whom 511 were AIAN and 19,194 were NHW, were included in this study. The percentage of PTSD among AIAN was 22.9% (n = 117) compared to 11.7% (n = 2,251) in NHW (p-value <0.0001). The percentage of past year alcohol use disorder among AIAN was 20.2% (n = 103) compared to 14.2% (n = 2,725) in NHW (p-value <0.0001). The percentage of comorbid past year alcohol use disorder with lifetime PTSD among AIAN was 6.5% (n = 33) compared to 2.4% (n = 457) in NHW (p-value <0.0001). Regarding the joint distribution of PTSD and AUD, AIAN men have greater than 3 times the percentage compared to NHW men (9.5% vs. 3.1%). When stratifying by race (after adjusting for age, sex, depression, and education), among AIAN, the odds of past year alcohol use disorder with (vs. without) lifetime PTSD were 1.76 (95% CI 1.07, 2.90) and among NHW, the odds were 1.59 (95% CI 1.41, 1.80). PTSD is significantly associated with alcohol use disorder in the study populations. Despite a lack of pre-PTSD measures of alcohol use disorder, these findings show a trend indicating that AIAN exposed to PTSD are more burdened with alcohol use disorder compared to NHW in the general U.S. Copyright © 2017 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  19. Contrasting patterns of habitat use by prawns and crayfish in a headwater marsh of the St. Johns River, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jordan, Frank; Babbitt, Kimberly J.; McIvor, Carole C.; Miller, Steven J.

    2000-01-01

    We compared seasonal patterns of habitat use by the prawn Palaemonetes paludosus and the crayfish Procambarus alleni in Blue Cypress Marsh Conservation Area, Florida. Prawn densities were similar to those found in other oligotrophic wetlands of southern Florida, whereas crayfish densities were much greater than reported previously for other wetlands in the area. Prawns and crayfish had strikingly different patterns of habitat use. Prawn density and biomass were similar in wet prairies and sloughs, whereas crayfish density and biomass were significantly higher in wet prairies. Within habitats, the abundance of prawns and crayfish generally increased with increasing structural complexity and the abundance of crayfish generally decreased with increasing water depth. Differences in risk of predation, frequency of agonistic encounters, food availability, and other factors likely contributed to observed patterns of habitat use. Because of differences in their ability to burrow and avoid concentration into dry-season refugia, prawns and crayfish responded very differently to seasonal variation in hydrologic conditions. Prawn densities were initially low (following a severe drought) and then increased during much of the study period, whereas crayfish densities were relatively stable throughout the study period. Overall, it appears that prawns are more responsive to antecedent hydrologic conditions and crayfish are more responsive to the availability of suitable habitats such as wet prairies.

  20. Genetic diversity of cultured and wild populations of the freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii based on microsatellite analysis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii culture in the Western Hemisphere is primarily, if not entirely, based on thirty-six individual prawn introduced to Hawaii from Malaysia in 1965 and 1966. Little information is available regarding the genetic background or current population status of cult...

  1. Acute effects of deltamethrin on swimming velocity and biomarkers of the common prawn Palaemon serratus.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Cristiana; Almeida, Joana; Guilhermino, Lúcia; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Gravato, Carlos

    2012-11-15

    The main purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of deltamethrin on biomarkers and behavior of Palaemon serratus (common prawn), since this attempt to link different levels of biological organization will allow determining which biomarkers might be ecologically relevant and will be useful to complement the information about the effects of pesticides by using behavioral parameters. Therefore, parameters of liver antioxidant status, energy metabolism and neurotransmission were determined in different tissues of the common prawn and used to assess the effects at sub-individual level, whereas swimming velocity was used to assess the effects at the individual level. It was also investigated if the swimming velocity can be used as an endpoint in ecotoxicology bioassays and if it can be as sensitive as biomarker endpoints. Swimming velocity was significantly reduced in prawns exposed to deltamethrin, showing a lowest observed effect (LOEC) of 0.6 ng L(-1). Eye acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity was significantly increased in prawns exposed to 0.6, 1.2 and 2.4 ng L(-1) deltamethrin, whereas muscle cholinesterase (ChE) activity was significantly increased in prawns exposed to 19 and 39 ng L(-1). On the other hand, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity was significantly increased in muscle of prawns exposed to 0.6, 1.2, 2.4, 4.9 ng L(-1) deltamethrin, showing that organisms were requiring additional energy, but probably using it for detoxification processes rather than locomotion, since swimming velocity was inhibited. Glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity was significantly increased in the digestive gland of common prawn exposed to 19 and 39 ng L(-1) deltamethrin. Catalase (CAT) activity was significantly increased in digestive gland of prawn exposed to 19 ng L(-1) deltamethrin. However, CAT activity decreased in digestive gland of prawn exposed to 39 ng L(-1), suggesting an antioxidant defense system failure concomitant with high levels of lipid

  2. Nearly 400 million people are at higher risk of schistosomiasis because dams block the migration of snail-eating river prawns.

    PubMed

    Sokolow, Susanne H; Jones, Isabel J; Jocque, Merlijn; La, Diana; Cords, Olivia; Knight, Anika; Lund, Andrea; Wood, Chelsea L; Lafferty, Kevin D; Hoover, Christopher M; Collender, Phillip A; Remais, Justin V; Lopez-Carr, David; Fisk, Jonathan; Kuris, Armand M; De Leo, Giulio A

    2017-06-05

    Dams have long been associated with elevated burdens of human schistosomiasis, but how dams increase disease is not always clear, in part because dams have many ecological and socio-economic effects. A recent hypothesis argues that dams block reproduction of the migratory river prawns that eat the snail hosts of schistosomiasis. In the Senegal River Basin, there is evidence that prawn populations declined and schistosomiasis increased after completion of the Diama Dam. Restoring prawns to a water-access site upstream of the dam reduced snail density and reinfection rates in people. However, whether a similar cascade of effects (from dams to prawns to snails to human schistosomiasis) occurs elsewhere is unknown. Here, we examine large dams worldwide and identify where their catchments intersect with endemic schistosomiasis and the historical habitat ranges of large, migratory Macrobrachium spp. prawns. River prawn habitats are widespread, and we estimate that 277-385 million people live within schistosomiasis-endemic regions where river prawns are or were present (out of the 800 million people who are at risk of schistosomiasis). Using a published repository of schistosomiasis studies in sub-Saharan Africa, we compared infection before and after the construction of 14 large dams for people living in: (i) upstream catchments within historical habitats of native prawns, (ii) comparable undammed watersheds, and (iii) dammed catchments beyond the historical reach of migratory prawns. Damming was followed by greater increases in schistosomiasis within prawn habitats than outside prawn habitats. We estimate that one third to one half of the global population-at-risk of schistosomiasis could benefit from restoration of native prawns. Because dams block prawn migrations, our results suggest that prawn extirpation contributes to the sharp increase of schistosomiasis after damming, and points to prawn restoration as an ecological solution for reducing human disease

  3. Nearly 400 million people are at higher risk of schistosomiasis because dams block the migration of snail-eating river prawns

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sokolow, Susanne H.; Jones, Isabel J.; Jocque, Merlijn M. T.; La, Diana; Cords, Olivia; Knight, Anika; Lund, Andrea; Wood, Chelsea L.; Lafferty, Kevin D.; Hoover, Christopher M.; Collender, Phillip A.; Remais, Justin V.; Lopez-Carr, David; Fisk, Jonathan; Kuris, Armand M.; De Leo, Giulio A.

    2017-01-01

    Dams have long been associated with elevated burdens of human schistosomiasis, but how dams increase disease is not always clear, in part because dams have many ecological and socio-economic effects. A recent hypothesis argues that dams block reproduction of the migratory river prawns that eat the snail hosts of schistosomiasis. In the Senegal River Basin, there is evidence that prawn populations declined and schistosomiasis increased after completion of the Diama Dam. Restoring prawns to a water-access site upstream of the dam reduced snail density and reinfection rates in people. However, whether a similar cascade of effects (from dams to prawns to snails to human schistosomiasis) occurs elsewhere is unknown. Here, we examine large dams worldwide and identify where their catchments intersect with endemic schistosomiasis and the historical habitat ranges of large, migratory Macrobrachium spp. prawns. River prawn habitats are widespread, and we estimate that 277–385 million people live within schistosomiasis-endemic regions where river prawns are or were present (out of the 800 million people who are at risk of schistosomiasis). Using a published repository of schistosomiasis studies in sub-Saharan Africa, we compared infection before and after the construction of 14 large dams for people living in: (i) upstream catchments within historical habitats of native prawns, (ii) comparable undammed watersheds, and (iii) dammed catchments beyond the historical reach of migratory prawns. Damming was followed by greater increases in schistosomiasis within prawn habitats than outside prawn habitats. We estimate that one third to one half of the global population-at-risk of schistosomiasis could benefit from restoration of native prawns. Because dams block prawn migrations, our results suggest that prawn extirpation contributes to the sharp increase of schistosomiasis after damming, and points to prawn restoration as an ecological solution for reducing human disease.

  4. Nearly 400 million people are at higher risk of schistosomiasis because dams block the migration of snail-eating river prawns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolow, S. H.; Jones, I. J.; La, D.; Cords, O.; Knight, A.; Lund, A.; Wood, C. L.; Lafferty, K. D.; Kuris, A. M.; Hoover, C.; Collender, P. A.; Remais, J.; Lopez-Carr, D.; De Leo, G.

    2016-12-01

    Dams have long been associated with elevated burdens of human schistosomiasis, but how dams increase disease is not always clear, in part because dams have many ecological and socioeconomic effects. A recent hypothesis argues that dams block reproduction of the migratory river prawns that eat the snail hosts of schistosomiasis. In the Senegal River Basin, there is evidence that prawn populations declined and schistosomiasis increased after completion of the Diama Dam. Restoring prawns to a water-access site upstream of the dam reduced snail density and reinfection rates in people. However, whether a similar cascade of effects (from dams to prawns to snails to human schistosomiasis) occurs elsewhere is unknown. Here, we examine large dams worldwide and identify where their catchments intersect with endemic schistosomiasis and the historical habitat ranges of large, migratory Macrobrachium spp. prawns. River prawn habitats are widespread, and we estimate that 277 to 385 million people live within schistosomiasis-endemic regions where river prawns are or were present (out of the 800 million people who are at risk of schistosomiasis). Using a published repository of schistosomiasis studies in sub-Saharan Africa, we compared infection before and after the construction of 14 large dams for people living in: (1) upstream catchments within historical habitats of native prawns, (2) comparable undammed watersheds, and (3) dammed catchments beyond the historical reach of migratory prawns. Damming was followed by greater increases in schistosomiasis within prawn habitats than outside prawn habitats. We estimate that one third to one half of the global population-at-risk of schistosomiasis could benefit from restoring native prawns. Because dams block prawn migrations, our results suggest that prawn extirpation contributes to the sharp increase of schistosomiasis after damming, and points to prawn restoration as an ecological solution for reducing human disease.

  5. Nearly 400 million people are at higher risk of schistosomiasis because dams block the migration of snail-eating river prawns

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Isabel J.; Jocque, Merlijn; La, Diana; Cords, Olivia; Knight, Anika; Lund, Andrea; Lafferty, Kevin D.; Hoover, Christopher M.; Collender, Phillip A.; Remais, Justin V.; Lopez-Carr, David; Kuris, Armand M.; De Leo, Giulio A.

    2017-01-01

    Dams have long been associated with elevated burdens of human schistosomiasis, but how dams increase disease is not always clear, in part because dams have many ecological and socio-economic effects. A recent hypothesis argues that dams block reproduction of the migratory river prawns that eat the snail hosts of schistosomiasis. In the Senegal River Basin, there is evidence that prawn populations declined and schistosomiasis increased after completion of the Diama Dam. Restoring prawns to a water-access site upstream of the dam reduced snail density and reinfection rates in people. However, whether a similar cascade of effects (from dams to prawns to snails to human schistosomiasis) occurs elsewhere is unknown. Here, we examine large dams worldwide and identify where their catchments intersect with endemic schistosomiasis and the historical habitat ranges of large, migratory Macrobrachium spp. prawns. River prawn habitats are widespread, and we estimate that 277–385 million people live within schistosomiasis-endemic regions where river prawns are or were present (out of the 800 million people who are at risk of schistosomiasis). Using a published repository of schistosomiasis studies in sub-Saharan Africa, we compared infection before and after the construction of 14 large dams for people living in: (i) upstream catchments within historical habitats of native prawns, (ii) comparable undammed watersheds, and (iii) dammed catchments beyond the historical reach of migratory prawns. Damming was followed by greater increases in schistosomiasis within prawn habitats than outside prawn habitats. We estimate that one third to one half of the global population-at-risk of schistosomiasis could benefit from restoration of native prawns. Because dams block prawn migrations, our results suggest that prawn extirpation contributes to the sharp increase of schistosomiasis after damming, and points to prawn restoration as an ecological solution for reducing human disease. This

  6. A rapid approach to evaluate putative nursery sites for penaeid prawns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Matthew D.; Smith, James A.; Boys, Craig A.; Whitney, Hannah

    2016-08-01

    Identifying nursery habitats for an aquatic species generally requires tracing adult individuals back through time and space to the area or habitat in which they developed as juveniles. We develop and trial a study design and analytical approach to evaluate the suitability of using stable isotopes to trace emigrating prawns to putative nursery sites, and evaluate assumptions inherent in the application of the approach using two penaeid species with Type-II life cycles: Penaeus (Melicertus) plebejus and Metapenaeus macleayi. Prawns were collected in putative nursery sites within the Hunter River, Australia, and analysed as composite samples of 6 individuals to provide habitat-specific isotopic signatures. Prawns emigrating from the mouth of the river were used as a proxy for individuals recruiting to the adult population, and assigned to putative nursery sites using a probabilistic mixing model and a simple, distance-based approach. Bivariate (δ15N and δ13C) isotopic data was sufficient to distinguish prawns from different putative nursery sites, and isotopic composition correlated closely with salinity. Approximately 90% of emigrating prawns collected could be assigned to these sites using bivariate isotopic data, and both analytical approaches gave similar results. The design developed here is broadly applicable to a suite of penaeid species, but its application will be most powerful when sampling is also aimed at understanding nursery function by simultaneous monitoring of size structure/growth, density, and trophic relationships within nursery habitats.

  7. TBT effects on the development of intersex (ovotestis) in female fresh water prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii.

    PubMed

    Peranandam, Revathi; Palanisamy, Iyapparaj; Lourdaraj, Arockia Vasanthi; Natesan, Munuswamy; Vimalananthan, Arun Prasanna; Thangaiyan, Suganya; Perumal, Anantharaman; Muthukalingan, Krishnan

    2014-01-01

    The impact of tributyltin (TBT) on the female gonad and the endocrine system in Macrobrachium rosenbergii was studied. Prawns were exposed to environmentally realistic concentrations of 10, 100, and 1000 ng/L of TBT for 6 months. Dose dependent effects were noticed in TBT exposed prawns. At 1000 ng/L TBT caused ovotestis formation (formation of male germ cells in ovary). Presence immature oocytes, fusion of developing oocytes, increase in interstitial connective tissues, and its modification into tubular like structure and abundance of spermatogonia in the ovary of TBT treated prawns. The control prawn ovary showed normal architecture of cellular organelles such as mature oocytes with type 2 yolk globules, lipid droplets, normal appearance of yolk envelop, and uniformly arranged microvilli. On the other hand, type 1 yolk globules, reduced size of microvilli, spermatogonial cells in ovary, spermatogonia with centrally located nucleus, and chromatin distribution throughout the nucleoplasm were present in the TBT treated group. Immunofluorescence staining indicated a reduction in vitellin content in ovary of TBT treated prawn. Moreover, TBT had inhibited the vitellogenesis by causing hormonal imbalance in M. rosenbergii. Thus, the present investigation demonstrates that TBT substantially affects sexual differentiation and gonadal development in M. rosenbergii.

  8. Prawn biomonitors of nutrient and trace metal pollution along Asia-Pacific coastlines.

    PubMed

    Fry, Brian; Carter, James F; Tinggi, Ujang; Arman, Ali; Kamal, Masud; Metian, Marc; Waduge, Vajira Ariyaratna; Yaccup, Rahman Bin

    2016-12-01

    To assess coastal ecosystem status and pollution baselines, prawns were collected from the commercial catches of eight Asia-Pacific countries (Australia, Bangladesh, Indonesia, Myanmar, Philippines, Pakistan, Sri Lanka and Thailand). Samples collected from 21 sites along regional coastlines were analysed for trace metal and stable isotopic compositions of H, C, N, O and S. A combination of simple averaging and multivariate analyses was used to evaluate the data. Sites could be assigned to easily recognise polluted and unpolluted groups based on the prawn results. Some filter-feeding clams were also collected and analysed together with the benthic-feeding prawns, and the prawns generally had lower trace metal burdens. Climate change effects were not strongly evident at this time, but altered ocean circulation and watershed run-off patterns accompanying future climate change are expected to change chemical patterns recorded by prawns along these and other coastlines. Stable isotopes, especially (15)N, can help to distinguish between relatively polluted and unpolluted sites.

  9. TBT Effects on the Development of Intersex (Ovotestis) in Female Fresh Water Prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii

    PubMed Central

    Peranandam, Revathi; Palanisamy, Iyapparaj; Lourdaraj, Arockia Vasanthi; Natesan, Munuswamy; Vimalananthan, Arun Prasanna; Thangaiyan, Suganya; Perumal, Anantharaman; Muthukalingan, Krishnan

    2014-01-01

    The impact of tributyltin (TBT) on the female gonad and the endocrine system in Macrobrachium rosenbergii was studied. Prawns were exposed to environmentally realistic concentrations of 10, 100, and 1000 ng/L of TBT for 6 months. Dose dependent effects were noticed in TBT exposed prawns. At 1000 ng/L TBT caused ovotestis formation (formation of male germ cells in ovary). Presence immature oocytes, fusion of developing oocytes, increase in interstitial connective tissues, and its modification into tubular like structure and abundance of spermatogonia in the ovary of TBT treated prawns. The control prawn ovary showed normal architecture of cellular organelles such as mature oocytes with type 2 yolk globules, lipid droplets, normal appearance of yolk envelop, and uniformly arranged microvilli. On the other hand, type 1 yolk globules, reduced size of microvilli, spermatogonial cells in ovary, spermatogonia with centrally located nucleus, and chromatin distribution throughout the nucleoplasm were present in the TBT treated group. Immunofluorescence staining indicated a reduction in vitellin content in ovary of TBT treated prawn. Moreover, TBT had inhibited the vitellogenesis by causing hormonal imbalance in M. rosenbergii. Thus, the present investigation demonstrates that TBT substantially affects sexual differentiation and gonadal development in M. rosenbergii. PMID:25121096

  10. History and Acculturation of the Dakota Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Satterlee, James L.; Malan, Vernon D.

    Relating the history of the Dakota Indians from their origins to the present time, this document also examines the effects of acculturation on these Sioux people. Beginning with the Paleo-Indians of North America, it details the structure of the Dakota culture and attempts to acculturate the Indians into white society. Historical and current…

  11. Making Education Work for the American Indian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiago, Robert K.

    1981-01-01

    Education has been used as the primary weapon in the White man's arsenal toward changing Indian tribal cultures. Indians are often treated in the classroom as an almost mythical group of people. Textbooks which contain incorrect or stereotypical information often cause Indian children to develop negative self-perceptions. (JN)

  12. Regulation of essential heavy metals (Cu, Cr, and Zn) by the freshwater prawn macrobrachium malcolmsonii (Milne Edwards)

    SciTech Connect

    Vijayram, K.; Geraldine, P.

    1996-02-01

    Despite the low concentrations of heavy metals in the surrounding medium, aquatic organisms take them up and accumulate them in their soft tissues to concentrations several fold higher than those of ambient levels. Knowledge of accumulation patterns of a particular trace metal is a prerequisite for understanding the significance of an observed metal concentration in a particular animal, especially from the aspect of biomonitoring. Many marine invertebrates accumulate heavy metals without any regulation and the accumulation necessarily being associated with mechanisms to store the metals in a detoxified form. Two detoxification mechanisms have been described, both of which may occur in one specimen. Heavy metals can either be bound up in insoluble metalliferous {open_quote}granules{close_quote}, or are bound to soluble metal-binding ligands, such as metallothioneins. Some marine decapod crustaceans have an innate ability to regulate the internal concentrations of essential but potentially toxic metals within a constant level, presumably to meet their metabolic demands. However, at present, there is no such information relating to freshwater decapod crustaceans, especially shrimps which occupy a totally different environment. Macrobrachium malcolmsonii, a potential aquaculture species for freshwater is found in abundance in one of the major Indian rivers, the Cauvery. In the present study, an attempt was made to determine whether the freshwater prawn, M. malcolmsonlii, is able to regulate the three essential elements, copper, chromium and zinc, over a wide range of dissolved concentrations. These three metals were chosen because the Cauvery River receives pollutants containing these metals.

  13. Production of Cost-Effective Mesoporous Materials from Prawn Shell Hydrocarbonization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Román, S.; Ledesma, B.; Álvarez-Murillo, A.; Sabio, E.; González, J. F.; González, C. M.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, prawn shell was studied as raw material for the production of mesoporous adsorbents via hydrocarbonization, studying the effect of temperature and time on the process reactivity and final characteristics of the hydrochars. By suitable characterization technique analyses (N2 adsorption at 77 K, SEM observation, ultimate analysis, surface composition), the materials were examined. It was found that in both cases mesoporous materials with low values of S BET due to the presence of CaCO3 on the material structure. In order to provide a potential application for these materials, the adsorption behaviour of hydrochars (HCs) as well as that of pristine prawn shells and ashes from prawn shell combustion was studied for the first time with the model compound p-nitrophenol (PNP). The results indicated that HC treatment was beneficial and enhanced adsorption performance, especially at high values of equilibrium concentration, attaining adsorption capacities up to 1.6 mg g-1.

  14. Production of Cost-Effective Mesoporous Materials from Prawn Shell Hydrocarbonization.

    PubMed

    Román, S; Ledesma, B; Álvarez-Murillo, A; Sabio, E; González, J F; González, C M

    2016-12-01

    In this work, prawn shell was studied as raw material for the production of mesoporous adsorbents via hydrocarbonization, studying the effect of temperature and time on the process reactivity and final characteristics of the hydrochars. By suitable characterization technique analyses (N2 adsorption at 77 K, SEM observation, ultimate analysis, surface composition), the materials were examined. It was found that in both cases mesoporous materials with low values of S BET due to the presence of CaCO3 on the material structure. In order to provide a potential application for these materials, the adsorption behaviour of hydrochars (HCs) as well as that of pristine prawn shells and ashes from prawn shell combustion was studied for the first time with the model compound p-nitrophenol (PNP). The results indicated that HC treatment was beneficial and enhanced adsorption performance, especially at high values of equilibrium concentration, attaining adsorption capacities up to 1.6 mg g(-1).

  15. Great Indian Chiefs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pastron, Allen

    Brief biographies and pen and ink portraits of over 40 chiefs and other distinguised American Indians comprise this book. Each page contains a full page portrait and a biography that notes tribal affiliation, important dates, geographical location, major accomplishments, and dealings with other tribes, white settlers, and the United States or…

  16. Sovereignty and Inter-governmental Relations with Arizona Indian Tribes--A Report on the Indian Town Hall (2nd, White Mountain Apache Reservation, August 20-22, 1974).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona Commission of Indian Affairs, Phoenix.

    Established by the Arizona legislature in 1953 and serving as official link between tribal autonomies and State government, the Arizona Commission of Indian Affairs has recently sponsored its second conference, the proceedings of which constituted this report. Conference participants, forming two panel discussion groups, represented the Ak-Chin,…

  17. Development and assays estradiol equivalent concentration from prawn (p-EEQ) in river prawn, Macrobrachium nipponense, in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Yuh-Wen; Yeh, Fang-Ling; Shieh, Bao-Sen; Chen, Chien-Min; Lai, Hong-Thih; Wang, Shu-Yin; Huang, Da-Ji

    2017-03-01

    The present study established a fast and convenient bioassay method for aqueous ecosystems using the prawn estradiol equivalent concentration (p-EEQ) of male Macrobrachium nipponense, which produce vitellogenin (VTG) after exposure to xeno-estrogens. This method was then used to determine the concentrations of xeno-estrogen pollutants in the rivers of Taiwan. To establish the calibration curve for the concentrations based on the p-EEQ, the induced VTG content was determined using the alkali-labile phosphate method after male M. nipponense were exposed to 0, 10, 100, 1,000 and 10,000ng/L of 17β-estradiol for 1, 3, 5, 7, 10 and 14 days, respectively. The results of the experiments showed that the induced VTG content in all of the experimental groups stabilized after 10 days, except for the 10,000ng/L experimental group, in which the induced VTG content decreased after 10 days. A 17β-estradiol-VTG10day response curve was then established based on the induced VTG content in the 0, 10, 100 and 1000ng/L experimental groups at day 10. After establishing the curve, male M. nipponense were captured from the upper, middle and lower reaches of the Chuo-shui River, the Beigang River, the Jishui River, the Agongdian River and the Sichong River in Taiwan, and the VTG content in these prawns was determined. In addition, the p-EEQ in the waters was determined based on the VTG content, and the estradiol equivalent concentration (EEQ) in the waters was also measured immediately after sampling using the solid-phase extraction-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (SPE-ELISA) method. The results showed that the p-EEQ in the middle and lower reaches of the rivers in certain parts of Taiwan ranged from 38 to 400ng/L, and the detection rate was 100%. Moreover, the EEQ ranged from 7.9 to 92.9ng/L, and the detection rate was 42.9%, indicating that most of the middle and lower reaches of the rivers in Taiwan were polluted by xeno-estrogens. The 17β-estradiol concentrations determined based

  18. Qualitative mathematical models to support ecosystem-based management of Australia's Northern Prawn Fishery.

    PubMed

    Dambacher, Jeffrey M; Rothlisberg, Peter C; Loneragan, Neil R

    2015-01-01

    A major decline in the catch of the banana prawn [shrimp], Penaeus (Fenneropenaeus) merguiensis, occurred over a six-year period in the Weipa region of the northeastern Gulf of Carpentaria, Australia. Three main hypotheses have been developed to explain this decline: (1) prawn recruitment collapsed due to overfishing; (2) recruitment collapsed due to a change in the prawn's environment; and (3) adult banana prawns were still present, but fishers could no longer effectively find or catch them. Qualitative mathematical models were used to link population biology, environmental factors, and fishery dynamics to evaluate the alternative hypotheses. This modeling approach provides the means to rapidly integrate knowledge across disciplines and consider alternative hypotheses about how the structure and function of an ecosystem affects its dynamics. Alternative models were constructed to address the different hypotheses and also to encompass a diversity of opinion about the underlying dynamics of the system. Key findings from these analyses are that: instability in the system can arise when discarded fishery bycatch supports relatively high predation pressure; system stability can be enhanced by management of fishing effort or stock catchability; catch per unit effort is not necessarily a reliable indicator of stock abundance; a change in early-season rainfall should affect all stages in the banana prawn's life cycle; and a reduced catch in the Weipa region can create and reinforce a shift in fishing effort away from Weipa. Results from the models informed an approach to test the hypotheses (i.e., an experimental fishing program), and promoted understanding of the system among researchers, management agencies, and industry. The analytical tools developed in this work to address stages of a prawn life cycle and fishery dynamics are generally applicable to any exploited natural. resource.

  19. The Application of Ozone and Chitosan as Microbial Inhibitor Prawn Larvae Rearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pringgenies, Delianis; Nur, Muhammad; Angelia, Rosti

    2017-02-01

    The application of ozon and chitosan solution was found to be effective means in hampering microbial growth since the introduction of ozon can inhibit microbial growth in aquatic environment and the fact that chitosan can act as a coagulant, effectively increasing water quality as prawn breeding medium and increasing the survival rate of prawn larvae. This research aims to measure the efficacy of ozon and chitosan usage in prawn larvae rearing, and to measure the survial rate of prawn larvae during the rearing stage. The study was carried out using experimental method in laboratory, with factorial research design using 3 treatment combinations and 1 control groups. The chitosan dose administered in this research was 25 ml in 25 L of sea water, euating to 10 ppm. The dissolved ozon in this research was measured at the concentration of 8.245 - 13.748 ppm. Weekly measurement of water quality in terms of temperature, pH, salinity, dissolved oxygen and dissolved ozon were carried out throughout the course of the research. Total microbial population in the water was measured by means of Total Plate Count (TPC) methiod in the Institute for Natural Medicines of Diponegoro University. Statistics figure from ”ANOVA” test suggested that the application of ozon and the introduction of chitosan in prawn larvae rearing media gave impact to the microbial population in the media. Results of BNT test showed that there was a significant difference between the measurement results of the 3 treatment combination groups and that of the control group. The highest prawn larvae survival rate was found in the media with combined ozon and chitosan treatment, which was recorded at 100%. The second highest survival rate was recorded in the treatement combination group of ozon and chitosan with 80%, and the lowest survival rate was attributed to the control group with 20% prawn larvae survival rate. It is concluded that treatment combination of 10 ppm chitosan and 8.245 - 13.748 ppm of ozon

  20. Indian Culture and Its Relationship to Child Abuse & Neglect. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Indian Child Abuse and Neglect Resource Center, Tulsa, OK.

    The six-page information sheet addresses the elements in Indian history, culture, psycho-dynamics, and socio-economics that have an impact on Indian child abuse and neglect. Discussion is presented on two myths that Whites have developed in time about Indians: racial superiority which has caused difficulty for the Indian and the necessity for…

  1. Indian Culture and Its Relationship to Child Abuse & Neglect. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Indian Child Abuse and Neglect Resource Center, Tulsa, OK.

    The six-page information sheet addresses the elements in Indian history, culture, psycho-dynamics, and socio-economics that have an impact on Indian child abuse and neglect. Discussion is presented on two myths that Whites have developed in time about Indians: racial superiority which has caused difficulty for the Indian and the necessity for…

  2. Pregnancy complications in Sioux Indians.

    PubMed

    Petersen, L P; Leonardson, G; Wingert, R I; Stanage, W; Gergen, J; Gilmore, H T

    1984-10-01

    The poor health status of Sioux Indians residing on reservations in South Dakota has been recognized for many years. The present report documents evidence of a high incidence of socioeconomic health-related disorders and pregnancy-related complications by comparing 342 pregnant white women and 405 pregnant Sioux Indian women. In collaboration with the Aberdeen Area Indian Health Service, beginning in 1976, a program was initiated to identify, assess risks, and provide patient management for pregnant Sioux Indians. This prenatal consultative program has proved effective in the reduction of fetal and infant mortality.

  3. Reduced transmission of human schistosomiasis after restoration of a native river prawn that preys on the snail intermediate host

    PubMed Central

    Sokolow, Susanne H.; Huttinger, Elizabeth; Jouanard, Nicolas; Hsieh, Michael H.; Lafferty, Kevin D.; Kuris, Armand M.; Riveau, Gilles; Senghor, Simon; Thiam, Cheikh; N’Diaye, Alassane; Faye, Djibril Sarr; De Leo, Giulio A.

    2015-01-01

    Eliminating human parasitic disease often requires interrupting complex transmission pathways. Even when drugs to treat people are available, disease control can be difficult if the parasite can persist in nonhuman hosts. Here, we show that restoration of a natural predator of a parasite’s intermediate hosts may enhance drug-based schistosomiasis control. Our study site was the Senegal River Basin, where villagers suffered a massive outbreak and persistent epidemic after the 1986 completion of the Diama Dam. The dam blocked the annual migration of native river prawns (Macrobrachium vollenhoveni) that are voracious predators of the snail intermediate hosts for schistosomiasis. We tested schistosomiasis control by reintroduced river prawns in a before-after-control-impact field experiment that tracked parasitism in snails and people at two matched villages after prawns were stocked at one village’s river access point. The abundance of infected snails was 80% lower at that village, presumably because prawn predation reduced the abundance and average life span of latently infected snails. As expected from a reduction in infected snails, human schistosomiasis prevalence was 18 ± 5% lower and egg burden was 50 ± 8% lower at the prawn-stocking village compared with the control village. In a mathematical model of the system, stocking prawns, coupled with infrequent mass drug treatment, eliminates schistosomiasis from high-transmission sites. We conclude that restoring river prawns could be a novel contribution to controlling, or eliminating, schistosomiasis. PMID:26195752

  4. Reduced transmission of human schistosomiasis after restoration of a native river prawn that preys on the snail intermediate host

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sokolow, Susanne H.; Huttinger, Elizabeth; Jouanard, Nicolas; Hsieh, Michael H.; Lafferty, Kevin D.; Kuris, Armand M.; Riveau, Gilles; Senghor, Simon; Thiam, Cheikh; D'Diaye, Alassane; Faye, Djibril Sarr; De Leo, Giulio A.

    2015-01-01

    Eliminating human parasitic disease often requires interrupting complex transmission pathways. Even when drugs to treat people are available, disease control can be difficult if the parasite can persist in nonhuman hosts. Here, we show that restoration of a natural predator of a parasite’s intermediate hosts may enhance drug-based schistosomiasis control. Our study site was the Senegal River Basin, where villagers suffered a massive outbreak and persistent epidemic after the 1986 completion of the Diama Dam. The dam blocked the annual migration of native river prawns (Macrobrachium vollenhoveni) that are voracious predators of the snail intermediate hosts for schistosomiasis. We tested schistosomiasis control by reintroduced river prawns in a before-after-control-impact field experiment that tracked parasitism in snails and people at two matched villages after prawns were stocked at one village’s river access point. The abundance of infected snails was 80% lower at that village, presumably because prawn predation reduced the abundance and average life span of latently infected snails. As expected from a reduction in infected snails, human schistosomiasis prevalence was 18 ± 5% lower and egg burden was 50 ± 8% lower at the prawn-stocking village compared with the control village. In a mathematical model of the system, stocking prawns, coupled with infrequent mass drug treatment, eliminates schistosomiasis from high-transmission sites. We conclude that restoring river prawns could be a novel contribution to controlling, or eliminating, schistosomiasis.                            

  5. Reduced transmission of human schistosomiasis after restoration of a native river prawn that preys on the snail intermediate host.

    PubMed

    Sokolow, Susanne H; Huttinger, Elizabeth; Jouanard, Nicolas; Hsieh, Michael H; Lafferty, Kevin D; Kuris, Armand M; Riveau, Gilles; Senghor, Simon; Thiam, Cheikh; N'Diaye, Alassane; Faye, Djibril Sarr; De Leo, Giulio A

    2015-08-04

    Eliminating human parasitic disease often requires interrupting complex transmission pathways. Even when drugs to treat people are available, disease control can be difficult if the parasite can persist in nonhuman hosts. Here, we show that restoration of a natural predator of a parasite's intermediate hosts may enhance drug-based schistosomiasis control. Our study site was the Senegal River Basin, where villagers suffered a massive outbreak and persistent epidemic after the 1986 completion of the Diama Dam. The dam blocked the annual migration of native river prawns (Macrobrachium vollenhoveni) that are voracious predators of the snail intermediate hosts for schistosomiasis. We tested schistosomiasis control by reintroduced river prawns in a before-after-control-impact field experiment that tracked parasitism in snails and people at two matched villages after prawns were stocked at one village's river access point. The abundance of infected snails was 80% lower at that village, presumably because prawn predation reduced the abundance and average life span of latently infected snails. As expected from a reduction in infected snails, human schistosomiasis prevalence was 18 ± 5% lower and egg burden was 50 ± 8% lower at the prawn-stocking village compared with the control village. In a mathematical model of the system, stocking prawns, coupled with infrequent mass drug treatment, eliminates schistosomiasis from high-transmission sites. We conclude that restoring river prawns could be a novel contribution to controlling, or eliminating, schistosomiasis.

  6. Molecular Characterisation of Colour Formation in the Prawn Fenneropenaeus merguiensis

    PubMed Central

    Ertl, Nicole G.; Elizur, Abigail; Brooks, Peter; Kuballa, Anna V.; Anderson, Trevor A.; Knibb, Wayne R.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Body colouration in animals can have a range of functions, with predator protection an important aspect of colour in crustaceans. Colour determination is associated with the carotenoid astaxanthin, which is taken up through the diet and stabilised in the tissues by the protein crustacyanin. As a variety of genes are found to play a role in colour formation in other systems, a holistic approach was employed in this study to determine the factors involved in Fenneropenaeus merguiensis colouration. Results Full length F. merguiensis crustacyanin subunit A and C sequences were isolated. Crustacyanin subunit A and C were found in the F. merguiensis transcriptomes of the muscle/cuticle tissue, hepatopancreas, eye stalk and nervous system, using 454 next generation sequencing technology. Custom microarray analysis of albino, light and dark F. merguiensis cuticle tissue showed genes encoding actin, sarcoplasmic calcium-binding protein and arginine kinase to be 4-fold or greater differentially expressed (p<0.05) and down-regulated in albinos when compared to light and dark samples. QPCR expression analysis of crustacyanin and total astaxanthin pigment extraction revealed significantly (p<0.05) lower crustacyanin subunit A and C gene transcript copy numbers and total astaxanthin levels in albinos than in the light and dark samples. Additionally, crustacyanin subunit A and C expression levels correlated positively with each other. Conclusions This study identified gene products putatively involved in crustacean colouration, such as crustacyanin, sarcoplasmic calcium-binding protein and forms of actin, and investigated differences in gene expression and astaxanthin levels between albino, light and dark coloured prawns. These genes open a path to enhance our understanding of the biology and regulation of colour formation. PMID:23441225

  7. A Simple "in Vitro" Culture of Freshwater Prawn Embryos for Laboratory Investigations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porntrai, Supaporn; Damrongphol, Praneet

    2008-01-01

    Giant freshwater prawn ("Macrobrachium rosenbergii" De Man) embryos can be cultured "in vitro" to hatching in 15% (v/v) artificial seawater (ASW). This technique can be applied as a bioassay for testing toxicity or for the effects of various substances on embryo development and can be used as a simple and low-cost model for…

  8. A Simple "in Vitro" Culture of Freshwater Prawn Embryos for Laboratory Investigations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porntrai, Supaporn; Damrongphol, Praneet

    2008-01-01

    Giant freshwater prawn ("Macrobrachium rosenbergii" De Man) embryos can be cultured "in vitro" to hatching in 15% (v/v) artificial seawater (ASW). This technique can be applied as a bioassay for testing toxicity or for the effects of various substances on embryo development and can be used as a simple and low-cost model for…

  9. Effect of salt treatments on survival and consumer acceptance of freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Post harvest acclimation of live freshwater prawns to a mixture of water and marine salt increases the consumer acceptability of the finished product. However, the high cost of marine salts prohibits their use in commercial practice. Therefore, the identification of successful, cost effective salt a...

  10. Study of biochemical biomarkers in freshwater prawn Macrobrachium borellii (Crustacea: Palaemonidae) exposed to organophosphate fenitrothion.

    PubMed

    Lavarías, S; García, C; Crespo, R; Pedrini, N; Heras, H

    2013-10-01

    Several agrochemicals like organophosphates are extensively used to control pests in agricultural practices but they also adversely affect non-target fauna. The effect of organophosphorous fenitrothion on the prawn Macrobrachium borellii was evaluated. The 96-h LC50 was determined. Activity of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione-S-transferase and lipid oxidation levels, were evaluated in the hepatopancreas from adults exposed to sublethal fenitrothion concentrations for 1, 2, 4 and 7 days. In addition, superoxide dismutase mRNA expression, acetylcholinesterase inhibition and haemocyte DNA damage were determined. The 96-h LC50 was 4.24μg/l of fenitrothion. Prawn exposed to sublethal FS concentrations showed an increase of both catalase and superoxide dismutase activities, mainly after 2 and 4 days exposure and an increase of glutathione-S-transferase activity from day 2 to day 7 while lipid oxidation levels increased mainly on day 1. Superoxide dismutase transcripts were significantly higher in fenitrothion -treated prawns, indicating an induction mechanism. Hemolymph analysis showed that while acetylcholinesterase activity decreased after 2 days, haemocytes displayed most DNA damage after 7-day exposure to fenitrothion. These results indicate that prawn enzymes are highly sensitive to fenitrothion exposure, and these biological responses in M. borellii could be valuable biomarkers to monitor organophosphorous contamination in estuarine environments. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Evaluation of Key Aroma Compounds in Processed Prawns (Whiteleg Shrimp) by Quantitation and Aroma Recombination Experiments.

    PubMed

    Mall, Veronika; Schieberle, Peter

    2017-03-24

    In our previous study on the aroma compounds of heated prawn meat, the main odorants in blanched (BPM) and fried prawn meat (FPM), respectively, were characterized by means of gas chromatography-olfactometry and aroma extract dilution analysis. In this follow-up study, these aroma compounds were quantified by means of stable isotope dilution assays, and odor activity values (OAV; ratio of concentration to odor detection threshold) were calculated. Results revealed 2-acetyl-1-pyrroline and (Z)-1,5-octadien-3-one as the most potent odor-active compounds in both prawn samples. In FPM, as compared to BPM, higher OAVs were determined for 2-acetyl-1-pyrroline, 2-acetyl-2-thiazoline, 3-methylbutanal, 3-(methylthio)propanal, phenylacetaldehyde, 3-hydroxy-4,5-dimethyl-2(5H)-furanone, 4-hydroxy-2,5-dimethyl-3(2H)-furanone, 2,3-diethyl-5-methylpyrazine, and trimethylpyrazine. Aroma recombination experiments corroborated that the overall aroma of the blanched as well as the fried prawn meat, respectively, could well be mimicked by the set of key odorants quantitated in this study.

  12. Desperate Prawns: Drivers of Behavioural Innovation Vary across Social Contexts in Rock Pool Crustaceans.

    PubMed

    Duffield, Callum; Wilson, Alastair J; Thornton, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Innovative behaviour may allow animals to cope with changes in their environment. Innovative propensities are known to vary widely both between and within species, and a growing body of research has begun to examine the factors that drive individuals to innovate. Evidence suggests that individuals are commonly driven to innovate by necessity; for instance by hunger or because they are physically unable to outcompete others for access to resources. However, it is not known whether the factors that drive individuals to innovate are stable across contexts. We examined contextual variation in the drivers of innovation in rock pool prawns (Palaemon spp), invertebrates that face widely fluctuating environments and may, through the actions of tides and waves, find themselves isolated or in groups. Using two novel foraging tasks, we examined the effects of body size and hunger in prawns tested in solitary and group contexts. When tested alone, small prawns were significantly more likely to succeed in a spatial task, and faster to reach the food in a manipulation task, while hunger state had no effect. In contrast, size had no effect when prawns were tested in groups, but food-deprived individuals were disproportionately likely to innovate in both tasks. We suggest that contextual variation in the drivers of innovation is likely to be common in animals living in variable environments, and may best be understood by considering variation in the perception of relative risks and rewards under different conditions.

  13. Desperate Prawns: Drivers of Behavioural Innovation Vary across Social Contexts in Rock Pool Crustaceans

    PubMed Central

    Duffield, Callum; Wilson, Alastair J.; Thornton, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Innovative behaviour may allow animals to cope with changes in their environment. Innovative propensities are known to vary widely both between and within species, and a growing body of research has begun to examine the factors that drive individuals to innovate. Evidence suggests that individuals are commonly driven to innovate by necessity; for instance by hunger or because they are physically unable to outcompete others for access to resources. However, it is not known whether the factors that drive individuals to innovate are stable across contexts. We examined contextual variation in the drivers of innovation in rock pool prawns (Palaemon spp), invertebrates that face widely fluctuating environments and may, through the actions of tides and waves, find themselves isolated or in groups. Using two novel foraging tasks, we examined the effects of body size and hunger in prawns tested in solitary and group contexts. When tested alone, small prawns were significantly more likely to succeed in a spatial task, and faster to reach the food in a manipulation task, while hunger state had no effect. In contrast, size had no effect when prawns were tested in groups, but food-deprived individuals were disproportionately likely to innovate in both tasks. We suggest that contextual variation in the drivers of innovation is likely to be common in animals living in variable environments, and may best be understood by considering variation in the perception of relative risks and rewards under different conditions. PMID:26488728

  14. Indian Government and Indian Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starblanket, Noel V.

    1981-01-01

    Accountability for Indian education must be shared among the chiefs and their councils, the Indian leaders at all levels, parents and students. This may be accomplished by Indian control of Indian education. Available from: Department of Educational Foundations, 5-109 Education North, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada, T6G 2G5. (ERB)

  15. Indian Writers and Indian Lives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stensland, Anna Lee

    1974-01-01

    A discussion of popular Indian stereotypes and counter-stereotypes in literature, based on the thesis that the introduction of the literature of the American Indian, traditional and modern, will help to increase the Indian child's pride in his culture and add to the understanding of the non-Indian child. (EH)

  16. Indian Government and Indian Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starblanket, Noel V.

    1981-01-01

    Accountability for Indian education must be shared among the chiefs and their councils, the Indian leaders at all levels, parents and students. This may be accomplished by Indian control of Indian education. Available from: Department of Educational Foundations, 5-109 Education North, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada, T6G 2G5. (ERB)

  17. cDNA cloning, characterization and expression analysis of a novel antimicrobial peptide gene penaeidin-3 (Fi-Pen3) from the haemocytes of Indian white shrimp Fenneropenaeus indicus.

    PubMed

    Shanthi, S; Vaseeharan, B

    2012-03-20

    A new member of antimicrobial peptide genes of the penaeidin family, penaeidin 3, was cloned from the haemocytes of Indian white shrimp Fenneropeneaus indicus (F. indicus), by reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) and rapid amplification of cDNA end (RACE-PCR) methods. The complete nucleotide sequence of cDNA clone of Indian white shrimp F. indicus Penaeidin 3 (Fi-Pen3) was 243bp long and has an open reading frame which encodes 80 amino acid peptide. The homology analysis of Fi-Pen3 sequence with other Penaeidins 3 shows higher similarity with Penaeus monodon (92%). The theoretical 3D structure generated through ab initio modelling indicated the presence of two-disulphide bridges in the alpha-helix. The signal peptide sequence of Fi-Pen3 is almost entirely homologous to that of other Penaeidin 3 of crustaceans, while differing relatively in the N-terminal domain of the mature peptide. The mature peptide has a predicted molecular weight of 84.9kDa, and a theoretical pI of 9.38. Phylogenetic analysis of Fi-Pen3 shows high resemblance with other Pen-3 from P. monodon, Litopenaeus stylirostris, Litopenaeus vannamei and Litopenaeus setiferus. Fi-Pen3 found to be expressed in haemocytes, heart, hepatopancreas, muscles, gills, intestine, and eyestalk with higher expression in haemocytes. Microbial challenge resulted in mRNA up-regulation, up to 6h post injection of Vibrio parahemolyticus. The Fi-Pen3 mRNA expression of F. indicus in the premolt stage (D(01) and D(02)) was significantly up-regulated than the postmolt (A and B) and intermolt stages (C). The findings of the present paper underline the involvement of Fi-Pen3 in innate immune system of F. indicus.

  18. Bubble reduction after decompression in the prawn Palaemon elegans by pretreatment with hyperbaric oxygen.

    PubMed

    Arieli, Y; Katsenelson, K; Arieli, R

    2007-01-01

    On the theory that bubbles originate from preexisting micronuclei, we previously demonstrated that pretreatment with hyperbaric O2 (HBO2) reduced the number of bubbles in the prawn decompressed from 203 kPa. In the present study, we examined the effect of two HBO2 pretreatment pressures (405 and 709 kPa) on prawns decompressed from a range of pressures between 203-810 kPa. Prawns from the experimental groups were pretreated with O2 at 405 or 709 kPa for 5 min (series A and series B, respectively). Prawns from the control groups were exposed only to air. Following pretreatment, prawns were exposed to air at the desired pressure until saturated with nitrogen, then subjected to rapid decompression and examined under a light microscope. Series A: HBO2 pretreatment at 405 kPa for 5 min significantly reduced the number of bubbles after decompression from 203, 304 and 405 kPa (p < 0.05). The total volume of accumulated gas was not affected by HBO2. Series B: Pretreatment with HBO2 at 709 kPa significantly reduced the number of bubbles after decompression from 203, 304, 507 and 608 kPa (p < 0.05). Total gas volume after decompression from 507 and 608 kPa was reduced as a result of pretreatment with O2. This study demonstrates that HBO2 pretreatment at 405 kPa is sufficient to reduce the number of bubbles that will emerge on decompression from several levels of compression.

  19. Growth and antioxidant status of oriental river prawn Macrobrachium nipponense fed with diets containing vitamin E

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Weihong; Wang, Zisheng; Yu, Yebing; Qi, Zhitao; Lü, Linlan; Zhang, Yuxia; Lü, Fu

    2016-05-01

    A feeding trial was carried out to investigate the dietary vitamin E requirement of the oriental river prawn Macrobrachium nipponense (weight of 0.3-0.4 g) and its effect role on antioxidant activity. Prawns were fed with seven levels of vitamin E (0, 25, 50, 75, 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg diet) for 60 days. The results show that dietary vitamin E supplementation could significantly increased the prawn weight ( P < 0.05). The activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) in the hepatopancreas was significantly higher in prawns fed with diets supplemented with ≤75 mg/kg vitamin E than in those fed with diets supplemented with 100-400 mg/kg vitamin E ( P < 0.05). The activity of catalase (CAT) in the hepatopancreas decreased significantly as dietary vitamin E supplementation increased ( P < 0.05), and no significant difference was detected in glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity between different dietary groups ( P >0.05). The contents of vitamin E in the hepatopancreas and in the muscle increased with increasing dietary vitamin E. There was a linear correlation between the vitamin E level in diet and that in muscle, and between the vitamin E level in diet and that in the hepatopancreas. All the above results indicated that dietary vitamin E can be stored in the hepatopancreas and muscle and lower both the activities of SOD and CAT in the hepatopancreas, suggesting that it is a potential antioxidant in M. nipponense. Broken line analysis conducted on the weight gains of prawns in each diet group showed that the dietary vitamin E requirement for maximum growth is 94.10 mg/kg.

  20. DISTRIBUTION OF THE Rh FACTOR IN AMERICAN INDIANS

    PubMed Central

    Landsteiner, Karl; Wiener, Alexander S.; Matson, G. Albin

    1942-01-01

    Erythrocytes from 120 full blooded American Indians and 155 Indians of mixed ancestry were tested for the Rh agglutinogen. Only a single blood among the full blooded Indians appeared to lack this factor, and in the Indians known not to be full blooded, the distribution of this (and other) blood properties was found to be intermediate between that for whites and pure Indians according to expectation. A variant of Rh demonstrable by a special human serum was more than twice as frequent in full blooded Indians as in white individuals. PMID:19871221

  1. Influence of short term exposure of TBT on the male reproductive activity in freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii (De Man).

    PubMed

    Revathi, Peranandam; Iyapparaj, Palanisamy; Vasanthi, Lourduraj Arockia; Munuswamy, Natesan; Prasanna, Vimalanathan Arun; Pandiyarajan, Jayaraj; Krishnan, Muthukalingan

    2014-10-01

    In the present study, the effect of tributyltin (TBT) on the histopathological and hormonal changes during spermatogenesis in freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii was documented. Three experimental concentrations such as 10, 100 and 1,000 ng/L were selected and exposed to prawns for 45 days. After TBT exposure, the reproductive activities like sperm count and sperm length were decreased when compared with control. Further, abnormal structure of the seminiferous tubule, decrease in spermatozoa concentration, diminution of the seminiferous tubule membrane and the abundance of spermatocytes in the testis were noticed in treated prawns. Interestingly, radioimmunoassay clearly revealed the reduction of testosterone level in TBT exposed groups. Thus, TBT has considerably reduced the level of testosterone and caused the impairment of spermatogenesis in the freshwater male prawn M. rosenbergii.

  2. The fish and prawn communities of a Malaysian coastal mangrove system, with comparisons to adjacent mud flats and inshore waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, V. C.; Sasekumar, A.; Leh, M. U. C.; D'Cruz, R.

    1990-11-01

    The fish and prawn communities of four coastal habitats in Selangor, Malaysia: (1) coastal mangrove swamps; (2) mud flats, including subtidal regions; (3) near inshore waters; and (4) far inshore waters, were examined with respect to species composition, abundance, diversity, similarity and sexual maturity. The number of fish species sampled for these habitats were 119, 70, 58 and 92 species respectively. For prawns, the number of species were 9, 16, 8 and 14 respectively. The mangrove community comprised 63-99% and 100% juvenile fish and prawn respectively. Despite a high species richness, it was low in fish species diversity due to the dominance (70%) of six species of fish of low economic value. In contrast, the prawn community was poor in species, and was dominated by three Penaeus spp. of high economic value. The intertidal mudflat community is largely transient and comprised mainly of species from both the mangrove and subtidal habitats. Fifty-six per cent of the fish population and 62·6% of the prawn population were juveniles. Many of the inshore fish and prawn species were also common species found in mangrove and mudflat habitats. Similarity coefficients indicate that the inshore fish and prawn communities are more similar to those of mud flats than mangroves. However, maturity studies indicate that only five species of fish are true migrants, that the majority of the fish species (juveniles and adults) are ubiquitous with a distribution that extends several nautical miles offshore. Results of this study indicate that tropical coastal mangroves function more importantly as feeding grounds than as nursery grounds for juveniles of commercially important fish species. Mangroves and mud flats are utilized during flood tides by many periodic foragers from the inshore waters. However, this study confirms that coastal mangroves and mud flats are important nursery areas for commercially important prawn species.

  3. A cadmium metallothionein gene of ridgetail white prawn Exopalaemon carinicauda (Holthuis, 1950) and its expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiquan; Wang, Jing; Xiang, Jianhai

    2013-11-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are a group of low molecular weight cysteine-rich proteins capable of binding heavy metal ions. A cadmium metallothionein ( EcMT — Cd) cDNA with a 189 bp open reading frame (ORF) that encoded a 62 amino acid protein was obtained from Exopalaemon carinicauda. Seventeen cysteines were in the deduced amino acid sequence, and the cysteine (Cys)-rich characteristic was revealed in different metallothioneins in other species. In addition, the deduced amino acid sequence did not contain any aromatic amino acid residues, such as tyrosine (Tyr), tryptophan (Trp), and phenylalanine (Phe). EcMT—Cd mRNA was expressed in all tested tissues (the ovary, muscle, stomach, and hepatopancreas), and its expression profiles in the hepatopancreas were very different when shrimps were exposed to seawater containing either 50 μmol/L CuSO4 or 2.5 μmol/L CdCl 2. The expression of EcMT-Cd was significantly up-regulated in shrimp exposed to CuSO4 for 12 h and down-regulated in shrimps exposed to CdCl2 for 12 h. After 24 h exposure to both metals, its expression was down-regulated. By contrast, at 48 h the EcMT-Cd was up-regulated in test shrimps exposed to CdCl2. The transcript of EcMT-Cd was very low or even absent before the zoea stage, and the expression of EcMT-Cd was detected from mysis larvae-I, then its expression began to rise. In conclusion, a cadmium MT exists in E. carinicauda that is expressed in different tissues and during different developmental stages, and responds to the challenge with heavy metal ions, which provides a clue to understanding the function of cadmium MT.

  4. Wisconsin Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lurie, Nancy Oestreich

    Wisconsin encompasses an astonishingly representative illustration of the total historical development of federal Indian policy and Indian reactions to it. Wisconsin's Indian population (at least 25,000 people) is the third largest east of the Mississippi River and offers great diversity (3 major linguistic stocks, 6 broad tribal affiliations, and…

  5. Wisconsin Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lurie, Nancy Oestreich

    Wisconsin encompasses an astonishingly representative illustration of the total historical development of federal Indian policy and Indian reactions to it. Wisconsin's Indian population (at least 25,000 people) is the third largest east of the Mississippi River and offers great diversity (3 major linguistic stocks, 6 broad tribal affiliations, and…

  6. Production of recombinant capsid protein of Macrobrachium rosenbergii nodavirus (r-MCP43) of giant freshwater prawn, M. rosenbergii (de Man) for immunological diagnostic methods.

    PubMed

    Farook, M A; Madan, N; Taju, G; Majeed, S Abdul; Nambi, K S N; Raj, N Sundar; Vimal, S; Hameed, A S Sahul

    2014-08-01

    White tail disease (WTD) caused by Macrobrachium rosenbergii nodavirus (MrNV) and extra small virus (XSV) is a serious problem in prawn hatcheries. The gene for capsid protein of MrNV (MCP43) was cloned into pRSET B expression vector. The MCP43 protein was expressed as a protein with a 6-histidine tag in Escherichia coli GJ1158 with NaCl induction. This recombinant protein, which was used to raise the antiserum in rabbits, recognized capsid protein in different WTD-infected post-larvae and adult prawn. Various immunological methods such as Western blot, dot blot and ELISA techniques were employed to detect MrNV in infected samples using the antiserum raised against recombinant MCP43 of MrNV. The dot blot assay using anti-rMCP43 was found to be capable of detecting MrNV in WTD-infected post-larvae as early as at 24 h post-infection. The antiserum raised against r-MCP43 could detect the MrNV in the infected samples at the level of 100 pg of total protein. The capsid protein of MrNV estimated by ELISA using anti-rMCP43 and pure r-MCP43 as a standard was found to increase gradually during the course of infection from 24 h p.i. to moribund stage. The results of immunological diagnostic methods employed in this study were compared with that of RT-PCR to test the efficiency of antiserum raised against r-MCP43 for the detection of MrNV. The Western blot, dot blot and ELISA detected all MrNV-positive coded samples as detected by RT-PCR.

  7. The effect of astaxanthin on resistance of juvenile prawns Macrobrachium nipponense (Decapoda: Palaemonidae) to physical and chemical stress.

    PubMed

    Tizkar, Babak; Seidavi, Alireza; Ponce-Palafox, Jesús Trinidad; Pourashoori, Parastoo

    2014-12-01

    In recent years, the use of new scientific techniques has effectively improved aquaculture production processes. Astaxanthin has various properties in aquaculture and its antioxidant benefits have been closely related to stress resistance; besides, it is an essential factor for growth in many crustaceans and fish. The objective of this study was to evaluate the resistance of prawn (Macrobrachium nipponense) fed diets containing different amounts of astaxanthin (AX) to the shock and stress of different physicochemical environments. A 70-day trial was conducted to evaluate the effect of supplementation of a source of astaxanthin (Carophyll Pink, 10% astaxanthin, w/w, Hoffman-La Roche, Switzerland) at various levels in the diet of M. nipponense juveniles. Four dry diets were prepared: AX0 without astaxanthin, AX50 with 50 mg/kg, AX100 with 100 mg/kg, and AX150 with 150 mg/kg astaxanthin. The feeding trial was conducted in a recirculation water system consisting of 12 fiberglass tanks (1000L) used for holding prawns. Three replicate aquaria were initially stocked with 36 org/m2 per tank. During the trial, prawns were maintained on a 12:12-h light:dark photoperiod with an ordinary incandescent lamp, and the water quality parameters were maintained as follows: water temperature, 25-26°C; salinity, 1 g/L; pH, 8.5-8.8; dissolved oxygen, 6.0-6.5 mg/L; and ammonia-nitrogen, 0.05 mg/L. Incorporation of AX, production output, and physiological condition were recorded after 10 weeks of feeding. At the end of the growing period, the prawns were exposed to thermal shock (0°C), ammonia (0.75 mg/L), and reduced oxygen (0.5 mg/L). The time to lethargy and the time to complete death of the prawns were recorded. The results showed that control prawns had the shortest time to lethargy and death compared with prawns subjected to the other treatments. The results of this study have shown that the amount of muscle tissue and gill carotenoids in prawn fed with an AX150 diet showed

  8. Feasibility of using hydrothermal resources in Malaysian prawn aquaculture. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, T.I.J.; Rhodes, R.J.; Wannamaker, A.W.

    1982-08-01

    The potential application of geothermal resources in South Carolina for freshwater prawn aquaculture was examined. In coastal S.C. 23 existing geothermal well sites were identified which encompassed an area which ranged from Georgetown to Beaufort. Depth averaged approx. 615 m while temperature averaged approx. 37/sup 0/C. Artesian flow rates varied from 190 to 2650 1/min. Detailed water quality analyses were conducted at 12 sites. In general, major differences from surface waters were in chlorides, fluorides, dissolved solids, ph, alkalinity, and ammonia levels. A detailed replicated laboratory study was conducted to examine the effect of geothermal water on growth and survival of prawns. After 42 days very poor survival was recorded from the various 100% geothermal water treatments. However, 50:50 mixture of shallow well water and geothermal water resulted in a survival rate of 83%, which was similar to the control treatments. Growth was also similar to that observed among the control animals.

  9. Influence of bilateral eyestalk ablation on gonads of fresh water prawn, Macrobrachium dayanum.

    PubMed

    Pervaiz, Pervaiz Ahmed; Sikdar, Malabika

    2014-09-01

    The study was carried out in laboratory for one month to know the effect of bilateral eyestalk ablation on gonads of Macrobrachium dayanum. Healthy specimens of Macrobrachium dayanum in the size group of (4-6 cm in length) were taken for the experiment. The eyestalk ablation was done by cutting away the eyestalks from their bases with sterilized scissor. The results here obtained indicated positive effects of eyestalk ablation on ovary and testes of Macrobrachium dayanum. The histological details of the female prawns which were ablated showed post-vitellogenic oocytes; where as unablated females prawn never developed beyond pre-vitellogenic oocytes. Similarly in males, testes showed pronounced development of different cells as compared to unablated ones. Fully developed spermatozoa were seen in ablated ones. Gonadosomatic studies also showed that ovarian and testicular cells developed better as compared to control and these findings suggest the fact that the eyestalks of M. dayanum contain ovary and testis inhibiting factors.

  10. [Nutrition of juvenile prawn Macrobrachium carcinus (Crustacea: Decapoda) with diets of vegetable and marine residues].

    PubMed

    Casas-Sánchez, R; Vaillard-Nava, Y; Re-Araujo, A D

    1995-01-01

    Juvenile prawn Macrobrachium carcinus were fed two different diets: restaurant by-products (diet I) and fish and vegetable market by-products (diet II). These diets were evaluated by proximal analysis, assimilation efficiency and the factor conversion rate (FCR). Diet I registered a higher efficiency, but there was no difference in the growth rate. The growth mean (G. L.) for three months was 0.254 +/- 0.13 cm (diet I) and 0.191 +/- 0.1 cm (diet II). The conversion rate was good for both, suggesting that 6 to 7 kg of food are needed to obtain 1 kg of prawn. Survival was 76% and 100% for diets I and II, respectively.

  11. Advanced Placement Courses and American Indian Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, George; Slate, John R.

    2010-01-01

    Enrollment in Advanced Placement (AP) courses and performance on Advanced Placement examinations for American Indians in the U.S. for 2007 was analyzed. Scores on AP examinations, overall and then for five AP courses, were compared to the AP examination scores of White students. In every case, American Indians had AP examination scores that were…

  12. Advanced Placement Courses and American Indian Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, George; Slate, John R.

    2010-01-01

    Enrollment in Advanced Placement (AP) courses and performance on Advanced Placement examinations for American Indians in the U.S. for 2007 was analyzed. Scores on AP examinations, overall and then for five AP courses, were compared to the AP examination scores of White students. In every case, American Indians had AP examination scores that were…

  13. Tecumseh. The Story of an American Indian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schraff, Anne

    Tecumseh, famed for his skills as an orator, warrior, military strategist, and leader of his Shawnee people, has been called one of the great American leaders. In 1812 he assembled 3,000 warriors from 32 American Indian tribes in an effort to save the Indian lands from the onslaught of the white soldiers and settlers. It was the largest Indian…

  14. Tecumseh. The Story of an American Indian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schraff, Anne

    Tecumseh, famed for his skills as an orator, warrior, military strategist, and leader of his Shawnee people, has been called one of the great American leaders. In 1812 he assembled 3,000 warriors from 32 American Indian tribes in an effort to save the Indian lands from the onslaught of the white soldiers and settlers. It was the largest Indian…

  15. A Syllabus on Indian History and Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saskatchewan Univ., Saskatoon. Indian and Northern Curriculum Resources Centre.

    Designed to improve the self-image of Canadian Indian secondary students and the cultural awareness of Canadian white urban secondary students, this course syllabus on Canadian Indians and Metis states eight educational objectives and presents three major sections which include specific topics, each with references (books, filmstrips, tapes,…

  16. The American Indian as Miscast Ecologist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Calvin

    1981-01-01

    Refutes the notion of leaders of the 1960s ecology movement that American Indians could teach their land ethic to White Americans. Points to the differences in western cosmology and suggests that the land ethic is a comprehensive way of life to American Indians. (Author/KC)

  17. QTL for white spot syndrome virus resistance and the sex-determining locus in the Indian black tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon).

    PubMed

    Robinson, Nicholas A; Gopikrishna, Gopalapillay; Baranski, Matthew; Katneni, Vinaya Kumar; Shekhar, Mudagandur S; Shanmugakarthik, Jayakani; Jothivel, Sarangapani; Gopal, Chavali; Ravichandran, Pitchaiyappan; Gitterle, Thomas; Ponniah, Alphis G

    2014-08-28

    Shrimp culture is a fast growing aquaculture sector, but in recent years there has been a shift away from tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon to other species. This is largely due to the susceptibility of P. monodon to white spot syndrome virus disease (Whispovirus sp.) which has impacted production around the world. As female penaeid shrimp grow more rapidly than males, mono-sex production would be advantageous, however little is known about genes controlling or markers associated with sex determination in shrimp. In this study, a mapped set of 3959 transcribed single nucleotide polymorphisms were used to scan the P. monodon genome for loci associated with resistance to white-spot syndrome virus and sex in seven full-sibling tiger shrimp families challenged with white spot syndrome virus. Linkage groups 2, 3, 5, 6, 17, 18, 19, 22, 27 and 43 were found to contain quantitative trait loci significantly associated with hours of survival after white spot syndrome virus infection (P < 0.05 after Bonferroni correction). Nine QTL were significantly associated with hours of survival. Of the SNPs mapping to these and other regions with suggestive associations, many were found to occur in transcripts showing homology to genes with putative immune functions of interest, including genes affecting the action of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, lymphocyte-cell function, heat shock proteins, the TOLL pathway, protein kinase signal transduction pathways, mRNA binding proteins, lectins and genes affecting the development and differentiation of the immune system (eg. RUNT protein 1A). Several SNPs significantly associated with sex were mapped to linkage group 30, the strongest associations (P < 0.001 after Bonferroni correction) for 3 SNPs located in a 0.8 cM stretch between positions 43.5 and 44.3 cM where the feminisation gene (FEM-1, affecting sexual differentiation in Caenorhabditis elegans) mapped. The markers for disease resistance and sexual differentiation identified by this study

  18. Involvement of opioid peptides in the regulation of reproduction in the prawn Penaeus indicus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreenivasula Reddy, P.

    The possible involvement of an endogenous opioid system in the regulation of ovarian development in the prawn Penaeus indicus was investigated. Injection of leucine-enkephalin significantly increased the ovarian index and oocyte diameter in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, injection of methionine-enkephalin significantly decreased the ovarian index and oocyte diameters. These results provide evidence to support the hypothesis that an opioid system is involved in the regulation of reproduction in crustaceans.

  19. Subcellular distribution and trophic transfer of Pb from bivalves to the common prawn Palaemon serratus.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Marín, Paula; Beiras, Ricardo

    2017-04-01

    The edible clam Dosinia exoleta has been reported to accumulate high contents of lead (Pb) in soft tissues disregarding the levels of Pb in the environment. This is due to the retention of Pb in the form of metal rich granules (MRG) in their kidneys throughout the mollusc lifespan. The potential for trophic transfer of Pb in this form to predators is expected to be low, since metals in the form of MRG are generally supposed to be trophically unavailable, but this assumption is based on studies with other metals (Ag, Cd, Cu or Zn) and has not been demonstrated with Pb until now. This study was designed to test if the Pb present in D. exoleta in the form of MRG is available to a decapod consumer, the common prawn Palaemon serratus, in comparison with a mussel diet showing a different subcellular distribution of Pb. As hypothesised, despite the high Pb concentrations (15µgg(-1)ww) offered to the prawns as D. exoleta tissues, Pb was almost completely unavailable for trophic transfer, and the prawns fed with this diet during 28 days showed the same Pb accumulation as prawns fed with a control diet with a much lower Pb concentration. On the contrary, individuals fed with mussel tissues containing the same Pb concentrations as the diet based on D. exoleta tissues showed 10 times higher Pb bioaccumulation, corresponding to a trophic transfer factor of 1.1%. Subcellular fractionation experiments revealed that the fraction of Pb in the form of MRG was much lower for the mussel, confirming, as observed for other metals, that MRG-associated Pb is not available for trophic transfer to decapod crustaceans. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A study on pathogens of Chinese prawn ( Penaeus Chinensis) virus diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiu-Qin; Zhang, Jin-Xing

    1995-09-01

    This pathogenic study shows that the viral diseases of Chinese prawns ( Penaeus chinensis, O'sbeck) is due to three kinds of viruses: epithelium envelope baculovirus of Penaeus chinensis (EEBV-PC, detected by the authors in 1993), infections hypodermal and hematopoietic necrosis virus, and hepatopancreatic parvo-like virus, and that the first two viruses seem to be the main pathogens of the epidemic in the northern regions in 1993.

  1. Impact of cyclones and aquatic macrophytes on recruitment and landings of tiger prawns Penaeus esculentus in Exmouth Gulf, Western Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loneragan, N. R.; Kangas, M.; Haywood, M. D. E.; Kenyon, R. A.; Caputi, N.; Sporer, E.

    2013-07-01

    The cover of seagrasses and macroalgae, landings and fishery-independent measures of spawning stock and recruitment for brown tiger prawns, were monitored immediately following a major cyclone in Exmouth Gulf, Western Australia in March 1999. Anecdotal evidence on the extent of seagrass from 1990 to 1998 suggests that the cyclone caused a major, immediate disruption and loss of the seagrass/macroalgal beds (to ≤2% cover), the critical prawn nursery habitat, and mangroves in the shallow inshore waters of the system. Prawn landings and recruitment to the fishery were not affected in the year of the cyclone, but were markedly lower in the two years immediately afterwards and then increased as the cover of macrophytes increased to over 40% in 2003. Tiger prawn landings and catch rates were not affected in Shark Bay, a system 500 km south of Exmouth Gulf that did not experience cyclonic disturbance. Seagrasses in Exmouth Gulf showed a succession of species from small colonising species (Halophila ovalis and Halodule uninervis) to larger, broad-leaved species (Cymodocea serrulata, Syringodium isoetifolium) only two years after the cyclone. The recruitment and landings of tiger prawns were correlated significantly with the total cover of macroalgae and seagrass. The large loss of seagrass and macroalgae reduced the settling habitat for postlarvae and the nursery habitat for juvenile tiger prawns, probably leading to the lower recruitment to the fishery. These findings suggest that the extent of seagrass and macroalgae are some of the factors defining the productivity of the tiger prawn fishery in Exmouth Gulf.

  2. Acute toxicity of organochlorine insecticide endosulfan to the giant freshwater prawn Macrobrochium rosenbergii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Xilin; Xiong, Zhaodi; Xie, Jian; Ding, Fujiang

    2014-01-01

    Endosulfan, an organochlorine pesticide, is highly toxic and effective at controlling pests in agriculture, horticulture, and public health programs. In this study, static bioassays were used to evaluate the toxicity of endosulfan to freshwater prawns ( Macrobrachium rosenbergii) of various lengths (1.5±0.03, 4±0.08, and 7±0.06 cm). Additionally, the activities of peroxidase (POD), acid phosphatase (ACP), alkaline phosphatase, acetylcholinesterase (AChE), and Na+/K+-ATPase were analyzed to reflect the effects of endosulfan exposure. The 96 h LC50 of endosulfan for prawns 1.5, 4, and 7 cm long were 1.86, 4.53, and 6.09 μg/L, respectively, improved tolerance to endosulfan with growth. The POD activities of test organisms exposed to low concentrations of endosulfan were inhibited, indicating the presence of oxygen damaged tissue. Moreover, a notable decrease in AChE activity was observed due to overstimulation of neurotransmission, which might result in abnormal behavior. The effect caused by endosulfan on phosphatase production in the hepatopancreas of prawns 1.5, 4, and 7 cm long was different because the ability of nonspecific immune regulation increased with growth. The 96 h LC50 values obtained in this study could be used in the formulation of water-quality criteria in China. Moreover, the changes in enzymes activities of M. rosenbergii under stress of endosulfan could be applied in the establishment of early warning indicators for bio-safety.

  3. Research To Support Improved Practice in Indian Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swisher, Karen Gayton; Tippeconnic, John W., III

    In recent years, various task forces and studies, including the White House Conference on Indian Education, have established that research on Indian education, history, and culture must consider the Native perspective and involve Native researchers. Improving Indian education depends upon good research. Aspects of Indigenous education and…

  4. Sir William Johnson and the Indians of New York.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Milton W.

    In order to make the vast literature about the history of Indian and white relations in New York readily accessible to teachers, students, and general readers, this booklet brings together the main points of the relationship between the Indians and Sir William Johnson. Johnson is a key figure in the Indian story of New York state during the 1770s.…

  5. Alcohol, Stress, and Violence in American Indian Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bachman, Ronet; Straus, Murray A.

    This study examined the link between alcohol use and domestic violence in the American Indian population. A total of 204 American Indian families and 2,007 non-American Indian Whites were analyzed using the 1985 National Family Violence Resurvey. The rates of family violence were first calculated by ethnicity, and then compared to a sample of…

  6. Cultural Disintegration Perpetuated through Substance Abuse among American Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    French, Laurence Armand

    Alcohol, perhaps more than any other factor, symbolizes the degree of cultural disintegration experienced by American Indians today. It has been recognized as a symptom of the numerous cultural adjustments forced upon American Indians since white contact. Indeed, alcohol among Indian groups was prohibited for a far longer period than the…

  7. Nineteenth Century Women and Reform: The Women's National Indian Association.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathes, Valerie Sherer

    1990-01-01

    Beginning in 1879, the Women's National Indian Association, an organization of educated upper- and middle-class white women, sought to better the lot of American Indians by publicizing their mistreatment and encouraging their assimilation. The organization focused particularly on educating Indian women to the Victorian female role. (SV)

  8. An Historical Overview of Indian Education with Evaluations and Recommendations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brightman, Lehman L.

    Tracing the history of American Indian education from the coming of the white man to the present day, this position paper presents evaluations and recommendations from an Indian point of view. Among the major topic divisions are: (1) Historical Background; (2) Government Support of Early Indian Education; (3) Early Education Falls Short of Its…

  9. Isolation of prawn ( Exopalaemon carinicauda) lipopolysaccharide and β-1, 3-glucan binding protein gene and its expression in responding to bacterial and viral infections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Qianqian; Li, Jian; Duan, Yafei; Li, Jitao; Sun, Ming; Zhao, Fazhen

    2016-04-01

    The pattern recognition proteins (PRPs) play a major role in immune response of crustacean to resist pathogens. In the present study, as one of PRPs, lipopolysaccharide and β-1, 3-glucan binding protein (LGBP) gene in the ridge tail white prawn ( Exopalaemon carinicauda) ( EcLGBP) was isolated. The full-length cDNA of EcLGBP was 1338 bp, encoding a polypeptide of 366 amino acid residules. The deduced amino acid sequence of EcLGBP shared high similarities with LGBP and BGBP from other crustaceans. Some conservative domains were predicted in EcLGBP sequence. EcLGBP constitutively expressed in most tissues at different levels, and the highest expression was observed in hepatopancreas. With infection time, the cumulative mortality increased gradually followed by the proliferation of Vibrio parahaemolyticus and white spot syndrome virus (WSSV). The expression of EcLGBP in response to V. parahaemolyticus infection was up-regulated in hemocytes and hepatopancreas, and the up-regulation in hepatopancreas was earlier than that in hemocytes. EcLGBP expression after WSSV infection increased at 3 h, then significantly decreased in both hemocytes and hepatopancreas. The results indicated that EcLGBP was involved in the immune defense against bacterial and viral infections.

  10. The Indian and Education. Monograph No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahenakew, David

    I am an American Indian, and I believe education to be something totally different from what the white man believes it to be, for he sees education as factories, roads, space travel, degrees, high salaries, and a means to be a good life. I cannot separate the white man's education from the political/military strategies practiced against my race…

  11. The Indian and Education. Monograph No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahenakew, David

    I am an American Indian, and I believe education to be something totally different from what the white man believes it to be, for he sees education as factories, roads, space travel, degrees, high salaries, and a means to be a good life. I cannot separate the white man's education from the political/military strategies practiced against my race…

  12. Indian Legends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurnoe, Katherine J.; Skjervold, Christian, Ed.

    Presenting American Indian legends, this material provides insight into the cultural background of the Dakota, Ojibwa, and Winnebago people. Written in a straightforward manner, each of the eight legends is associated with an Indian group. The legends included here are titled as follows: Minnesota is Minabozho's Land (Ojibwa); How We Got the…

  13. Bio-assembled, piezoelectric prawn shell made self-powered wearable sensor for non-invasive physiological signal monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Sujoy Kumar; Mandal, Dipankar

    2017-03-01

    A human interactive self-powered wearable sensor is designed using waste by-product prawn shells. The structural origin of intrinsic piezoelectric characteristics of bio-assembled chitin nanofibers has been investigated. It allows the prawn shell to make a tactile sensor that performs also as a highly durable mechanical energy harvester/nanogenerator. The feasibility and fundamental physics of self-powered consumer electronics even from human perception is highlighted by prawn shells made nanogenerator (PSNG). High fidelity and non-invasive monitoring of vital signs, such as radial artery pulse wave and coughing actions, may lead to the potential use of PSNG for early intervention. It is presumed that PSNG has enormous future aspects in real-time as well as remote health care assessment.

  14. Tidal fronts and their influence on prawn postlarvae immigration in Albatross Bay, the Gulf of Carpentaria, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-Hua

    1995-06-01

    Studies of dynamics in Albatross Bay, the Gulf of Carpentaria, Australia, show strong tides of which M2 is the dominant constituent in the region. Tidal fronts are present and they can be modelled by a 2-D tidal model. Density currents have also been observed with seasonal variations due to the influence of wet or dry seasons. This paper reviews the effects of these dynamics on the migration of prawn postlarvae in Albatross Bay and its estuaries. It is found that through its vertical movement triggered by change of salinity the prawn postlarvae can be transported from the coast to the estuary by tides within 2.8 weeks. However, this horizontal displacement mechanism may be destroyed by the tidal front in Albatross Bay. Density currents may alter prawn postlarvae positions in Albatross Bay on a seasonal scale.

  15. Morphological and histological studies on freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii (de man) irradiated with (60)Co gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Stalin, A; Broos, K V; Sadiq Bukhari, A; Syed Mohamed, H E; Singhal, R K; Venu-Babu, P

    2013-11-15

    This study was framed to investigate the (60)Co gamma radiation induced morphological and histological variations in freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii. The LD50 value of (60)Co gamma irradiated M. rosenbergii observed (by probit analysis) at 30 Gy. Prawns were irradiated to four different dose levels (3 mGy, 30 mGy, 300 mGy and 3,000 mGy) using Theratron Phoenix TeleCobalt Unit [P-33] and one control group (without irradiation) maintained separately. Irradiated groups exhibited several morphological variations such as discoloration; damaged rostrum; opaque coloration in cephalothorax; black bands and dot formation in abdomen; deformed uropods and telson in tail regions when compared with control group. The Hepato Somatic Index reflected the severity of radiation on hepatopancreas. Histological variations in gills, hepatopancreas and muscles of irradiated groups were observed. In gills, structural changes such as swollen and fused lamellae, abnormal gill tips, hyperplasic, necrotic and clavate-globate lamellae were observed in gamma irradiated prawns. Accumulation of hemocytes in hemocoelic space, interstitial sinuses filled with abnormal infiltrated hemocytes, the tubular epithelium with ruptured basal laminae, abnormal and coagulated lumen, necrotic tubules, thickened basal laminae, tissue debris, necrotic hepatocytes were observed in irradiated prawn hepatopancreas. In muscle, shrinkage of muscular fiber and necrotic musculature were observed in irradiated prawns. These structural alterations of the organs it is felt could affect the vital physiological functions such as respiration, osmotic and ionic regulation in gills and muscles; absorption, storage and secretion of the hepatopancreas which in turn could adversely affect the growth and survival of freshwater prawn M. rosenbergii. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Molecular profiles and pathogen-induced transcriptional responses of prawn B cell lymphoma-2 related ovarian killer protein (BOK).

    PubMed

    Chaurasia, Mukesh Kumar; Palanisamy, Rajesh; Harikrishnan, Ramasamy; Arasu, Mariadhas Valan; Al-Dhabi, Naif Abdullah; Arockiaraj, Jesu

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we have reported a molecular characterization of the first B cell lymphoma-2 (BCL-2) related ovarian killer protein (BOK) from freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii (Mr). BOK is a novel pro-apoptotic protein of the BCL-2 family that entails in mediating apoptosis to remove cancer cells. A cDNA sequence of MrBOK was identified from the prawn cDNA library and its full length was obtained by internal sequencing. The coding region of MrBOK yields a polypeptide of 291 amino acids. The analysis revealed that MrBOK contains a transmembrane helix at V(261)-L(283) and a putative BCL-2 family domain at V(144)-W(245). MrBOK also possessed four putative BCL-2 homology domains including BH1, BH2, BH3 and weak BH4. The BH3 contains 21 binding sites and among them five residues are highly conserved with the aligned BOK proteins. The homology analysis showed that MrBOK shared maximum similarity with the Caligus rogercresseyi BOK A. The topology of the phylogenetic tree was classified into nine sister groups which includes BOK, BAK, BAX, BAD, BCL-2, BCL-XL, NR13 and MCL members. The BOK protein group further sub-grouped into vertebrate and invertebrate BOK, wherein MrBOK located within insect monophyletic clad of invertebrate BOK. The secondary structural analysis showed that MrBOK contains 11 α-helices (52.2%) which are connected over random coils (47.7%). The 3D structure of MrBOK showed three central helices (α6, α7 and α8) which formed the core of the protein and are flanked on one side by α1, α2 and α3, and on the other side by α4, α5 and α11. MrBOK mRNA is expressed most abundantly (P < 0.05) in ovary compared to other tissues taken for analysis. Hence ovary was selected to study the possible roles of MrBOK mRNA regulation upon bacterial (Aeromonas hydrophila and Vibrio harveyi) and viral [white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) and M. rosenbergii nodovirus] infection. During bacterial and viral infection, the highest MrBOK mRNA transcription was varied

  17. Toxicity of cryoprotectants agents in freshwater prawn embryos of Macrobrachium amazonicum.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Arthur Vinícius Lourenço; Castro, Elias José Teles; Barbosa, Mariana Silva Alves; de Sousa, Míriam Luzia Nogueira Martins; de Araújo Neto, Manoel Paiva; Filho, Aldeney Andrade Soares; de Souza Sampaio, Celia Maria

    2015-12-01

    The process of cooling and cryopreservation of prawn embryos is a viable alternative for a continuous supply of larvae for freshwater prawn farming ponds. However, studies involving the application of those techniques as well as on toxicity of cryoprotectants in freshwater prawn embryos are scarce. Thus, this study aims to test the toxicity of methylic alcohol (MET), dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and ethylene glycol (EG) on Macrobrachium amazonicum embryos. For the present experiment, pools of embryos were taken from 15 M. amazonicum females and were divided into three groups and tested in duplicate at concentrations of 10, 5, 3; 1, 0.5 or 0.1%. Toxicity tests were conducted for 24 h in Falcon® pipes to obtain the lethal concentration for 50% of the larvae (LC50). After the set period for testing, random samples of embryos were removed for morphological analysis under stereoscopic microscopes. Results were analysed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's test at a 5% significance level and Trimmed Spearman-Karber Analysis to determine LC50-24 h. DMSO toxicity tests revealed that 5% and 10% concentrations showed the highest toxicity and differed from the control (P ≤ 0.05), 24h-LC50 was 437.4 ± 14.4 µL. MET was less toxic among the tested cryoprotectants and concentrations did not allow the determination of its LC50-24h. For tests with EG, concentrations of 3, 5 or 10% solutions resulted in a 100% mortality to tested embryos; EG was the tested cryoprotectant with the highest toxicity, with an LC50-24h average of 81.91 ± 35.3 µl.

  18. Vibrio spp. from Macrobrachium amazonicum prawn farming are inhibited by Moringa oleifera extracts.

    PubMed

    Brilhante, Raimunda Sâmia Nogueira; Sales, Jamille Alencar; de Souza Sampaio, Celia Maria; Barbosa, Francisco Geraldo; de Araújo Neto Paiva, Manoel; de Melo Guedes, Glaucia Morgana; de Alencar, Lucas Pereira; de Ponte, Yago Brito; de Jesus Pinheiro Gomes Bandeira, Tereza; Moreira, José Luciano Bezerra; de Souza Collares Maia Castelo-Branco, Débora; de Aquino Pereira-Neto, Waldemiro; de Aguiar Cordeiro, Rossana; Sidrim, José Júlio Costa; Rocha, Marcos Fábio Gadelha

    2015-11-01

    To investigate the in vitro antimicrobial potential of extracts of stem, leaves, flowers, pods and seeds of Moringa oleifera (M. oleifera) against Vibrio spp. from hatchery water and the prawn Macrobrachium amazonicum. The ethanol extracts of stem, leaves, pods and seeds and chloroform extract of flowers of M. oleifera were tested against Vibrio cholerae (V. cholerae) serogroups non-O1/non-O139 (n = 4), Vibrio vulnificus (n = 1) and Vibrio mimicus (n = 1). Escherichia coli (E. coli) (ATCC(®) 25922) was used as quality control. Vibrio species were obtained from Macrobrachium amazonicum prawns and from hatchery water from prawn farming. The Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) was determined by broth microdilution method. The best result was obtained with the ethanol extract of pods, which inhibited three strains of the V. cholerae, Vibrio vulnificus, Vibrio mimicus and E. coli (MIC range 0.312-5.000 mg/mL). The chloroform extract of flowers was effective against all V. cholerae strains and E. coli (MIC range 0.625-1.250 mg/mL). However, the ethanol extracts of stem and seeds showed low effectiveness in inhibiting the bacterial growth. The extracts of pods, flowers and leaves of M. oleifera have potential for the control of Vibrio spp. Further studies are necessary to isolate the bioactive compounds responsible for this antimicrobial activity. Copyright © 2015 Hainan Medical College. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Limnology of Kharland (saline) ponds of Ratnagiri, Maharashtra in relation to prawn culture potential.

    PubMed

    Saksena, D N; Gaidhane, D M; Singh, H

    2006-01-01

    The coastal saline soils, Kharlands, have great potential for their use in aquaculture. This study has been taken up to understand the limnology of the ponds in Kharland area for assessing their prawn culture potential. This study was carried out during September, 1999 to August, 2001. Each Kharland pond has an area of 0.045 hectare. During the study, depth of pond water was 47.7 to 120.0 cm, temperature varied from 25.7 to 34.5 degrees C; transparency from nil to 65.0 cm; specific conductivity from 1.78 to 94.5 microS.cm(-1); total dissolved solids from 0.89 to 27.55 ppt; pH 5.42 to 8.25; dissolved oxygen 1.6 to 8 mg.l(-1); free carbon dioxide 10.00 to 44.00 mg.l(-1); total alkalinity 5.00 to 142.00 mg.l(-1); salinity 0.45 to 39.55 ppt; total hardness 245.00 to 5945.00; calcium 56.05 to 1827.6; magnesium 110.74 to 4507.75 mg.l(-1); dissolved organic matter 1.45 to 9.68 mg.l(-1); ammonia 1.00-8.00 microg.l(-1); nitrite nil to 20.00 micro l(-1) and nitrate 7.5 to 17.5 microg.l(-1). These Kharland ponds are unique in physio-chemical characteristics during their seasonal cycle. From July to October, these ponds have nearly freshwater while from November to May pond water becomes saline. Thus, there is a great possibility of taking up monoculture of both the freshwater and brackish water prawns as well as polyculture of prawns and fishes in the Kharland ponds.

  20. Population Structure and Historical Demography of the Oriental River Prawn (Macrobrachium nipponense) in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chen, Po-Cheng; Shih, Chun-Han; Chu, Ta-Jen; Wang, Daryi; Lee, Ying-Chou; Tzeng, Tzong-Der

    2015-01-01

    The oriental river prawn (Macrobrachium nipponense) is a non-obligatory amphidromous prawn, and it has a wide distribution covering almost the entire Taiwan. Mitochondrial DNA fragment sequences of the cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) and 16S rRNA were combined and used to elucidate the population structure and historical demography of oriental river prawn in Taiwan. A total of 202 individuals from six reservoirs and three estuaries were separately collected. Nucleotide diversity (π) of all populations was 0.01217, with values ranging from 0.00188 (Shihmen Reservoir, SMR, northern Taiwan) to 0.01425 (Mingte Reservoir, MTR, west-central Taiwan). All 76 haplotypes were divided into 2 lineages: lineage A included individuals from all sampling areas except SMR, and lineage B included specimens from all sampling locations except Chengching Lake Reservoir (CLR) and Liyu Lake Reservoir (LLR). All FST values among nine populations were significantly different except the one between Jhonggang River Estuary (JGE, west-central Taiwan) and Kaoping River Estuary (KPE, southern Taiwan). UPGMA tree of nine populations showed two main groups: the first group included the SMR and Tamsui River Estuary (TSE) (both located northern Taiwan), and the second one included the other seven populations (west-central, southern and eastern Taiwan). Demographic analyses implied a population expansion occurred during the recent history of the species. The dispersal route of this species might be from China to west-central and west-southern Taiwan, and then the part individuals belonging to lineage A and B dispersed southerly and northerly, respectively. And then part individuals in west-central Taiwan fell back to and stay at estuaries as the sea level rose about 18,000 years ago.

  1. Population Structure and Historical Demography of the Oriental River Prawn (Macrobrachium nipponense) in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Ta-Jen; Wang, Daryi; Lee, Ying-Chou; Tzeng, Tzong-Der

    2015-01-01

    The oriental river prawn (Macrobrachium nipponense) is a non-obligatory amphidromous prawn, and it has a wide distribution covering almost the entire Taiwan. Mitochondrial DNA fragment sequences of the cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) and 16S rRNA were combined and used to elucidate the population structure and historical demography of oriental river prawn in Taiwan. A total of 202 individuals from six reservoirs and three estuaries were separately collected. Nucleotide diversity (π) of all populations was 0.01217, with values ranging from 0.00188 (Shihmen Reservoir, SMR, northern Taiwan) to 0.01425 (Mingte Reservoir, MTR, west-central Taiwan). All 76 haplotypes were divided into 2 lineages: lineage A included individuals from all sampling areas except SMR, and lineage B included specimens from all sampling locations except Chengching Lake Reservoir (CLR) and Liyu Lake Reservoir (LLR). All FST values among nine populations were significantly different except the one between Jhonggang River Estuary (JGE, west-central Taiwan) and Kaoping River Estuary (KPE, southern Taiwan). UPGMA tree of nine populations showed two main groups: the first group included the SMR and Tamsui River Estuary (TSE) (both located northern Taiwan), and the second one included the other seven populations (west-central, southern and eastern Taiwan). Demographic analyses implied a population expansion occurred during the recent history of the species. The dispersal route of this species might be from China to west-central and west-southern Taiwan, and then the part individuals belonging to lineage A and B dispersed southerly and northerly, respectively. And then part individuals in west-central Taiwan fell back to and stay at estuaries as the sea level rose about 18,000 years ago. PMID:26716687

  2. Cyanobacteria and prawn farming in northern New South Wales, Australia--a case study on cyanobacteria diversity and hepatotoxin bioaccumulation

    SciTech Connect

    Kankaanpaeae, Harri T.; Holliday, Jon; Schroeder, Helge; Goddard, Timothy J.; Fister, Richard von; Carmichael, Wayne W

    2005-03-15

    Harmful cyanobacteria pose a hazard to aquatic ecosystems due to toxins (hepatotoxic microcystins, nodularins, and cylindrospermopsin) they produce. The microcystins and nodularins are potent toxins, which are also tumor promoters. The microcystins and nodularins may accumulate into aquatic organisms and be transferred to higher trophic levels, and eventually affect vector animals and consumers. Prawn farming is a rapidly growing industry in Australia. Because information regarding effects of cyanobacteria at prawn farms was lacking, we examined diversity of cyanobacteria and toxin production plus bioaccumulation into black tiger prawns (Penaeus monodon) under both field (northern New South Wales, Australia, December 2001-April 2002) and laboratory conditions. Samples were analyzed for hepatotoxins using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The maximum density of cyanobacteria (1 x 10{sup 6} to 4 x 10{sup 6} cells/l) was reached in April. Cyanobacteria encountered were Oscillatoria sp. (up to 4 x 10{sup 6} cells/l), Pseudanabaena sp. (up to 1.8 x 10{sup 6} cells/l), Microcystis sp. (up to 3.5 x 10{sup 4} cells/l), and Aphanocapsa sp. (up to 2 x 10{sup 4} cells/l). An uncommon cyanobacterium, Romeria sp. (up to 2.2 x 10{sup 6} cells/l), was also observed. Contrasting earlier indications, toxic Nodularia spumigena was absent. Despite that both Oscillatoria sp. and Microcystis sp. are potentially hepatotoxic, hepatotoxin levels in phytoplankton samples remained low (up to 0.5-1.2 mg/kg dw; ELISA) in 2001-2002. ELISA was found suitable not only for phytoplankton but prawn tissues as well. Enzymatic pretreatment improved extractability of hepatotoxin from cyanobacteria (nodularin from N. spumigena as an example), but did not generally increase toxin recovery from prawn hepatopancreas. There were slightly increasing hepatotoxin concentrations in prawn hepatopancreas (from 6-20 to 20-80 {mu}g/kg dw; ELISA) during the

  3. Insights into Sexual Precocity of Female Oriental River Prawn Macrobrachium nipponense through Transcriptome Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hongxia; Li, Xilian; Sun, Yuhang; Hou, Fujun; Zhang, Yufei; Li, Fei; Gu, Zhimin; Liu, Xiaolin

    2016-01-01

    Background The oriental river prawn (Macrobrachium nipponense) is the most prevalent aquaculture species in China. The sexual precocity in this species has received considerable attention in recent years because more and more individuals matured at a small size, which devalues the commercial production. In this study, we developed deep-coverage transcriptomic sequencing data for the ovaries of sexually precocious and normal sexually mature M. nipponense using next-generation RNA sequencing technology and attempted to provide the first insight into the molecular regulatory mechanism of sexual precocity in this species. Results A total of 63,336 unigenes were produced from the ovarian cDNA libraries of sexually precocious and normal sexually mature M. nipponense using Illumina HiSeq 2500 platform. Through BLASTX searches against the NR, STRING, Pfam, Swissprot and KEGG databases, 15,134 unigenes were annotated, accounting for 23.89% of the total unigenes. 5,195 and 3,227 matched unigenes were categorized by GO and COG analysis respectively. 15,908 unigenes were consequently mapped into 332 KEGG pathways, and many reproduction-related pathways and genes were identified. Moreover, 26,008 SSRs were identified from 18,133 unigenes. 80,529 and 80,516 SNPs were yielded from ovarian libraries of sexually precocious and normal sexually mature prawn, respectively, and 29,851 potential SNPs between these two groups were also predicted. After comparing the ovarian libraries of sexually precocious and normal sexually mature prawn, 549 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and 9 key DEGs that may be related to sexual precocity of M. nipponense were identified. 20 DEGs were selected for validation by quantitative real-time PCR (QPCR) and 19 DEGs show consistent expression between QPCR and RNAseq-based differential expression analysis datasets. Conclusion This is the first report on the large-scale RNA sequencing of ovaries of sexually precocious and normal sexually mature M

  4. Molecular characterization of a novel ovary-specific gene fem-1 homolog from the oriental river prawn, Macrobrachium nipponense.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ke-Yi; Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Lin, Jing-Yun; Li, Jia-Le; Qiu, Gao-Feng

    2016-01-10

    The feminization-1 (fem-1) gene is characterized by one of the most common protein-protein interaction motifs, ankyrin repeat motifs, displays many expression patterns in vertebrates and invertebrates, and plays an essential role in the sex-determination/differentiation pathway in Caenorhabditis elegans. In this study, a fem-1 homolog, designated as Mnfem-1, was first cloned from the oriental river prawn Macrobrachium nipponense. The prawn Mnfem-1 gene consists of six exons and five introns. The full-length cDNA (2603bp) of Mnfem-1 contains an open reading frame (ORF) encoding a protein of 622 amino acids. The Mnfem-1 RNA and protein are exclusively expressed in the ovary in adult prawns as revealed by RT-PCR and immunofluorescence analysis, respectively. In situ hybridization results showed that strong positive signals were concentrated at the edge of the previtellogenic and vitellogenic oocyte. During embryogenesis, Mnfem-1 is highly expressed in both unfertilized eggs and embryos at cleavage stage and thereafter dropped to a low level from blastula to zoea, indicating that the Mnfem-1 in early embryos is maternal. After hatching, the Mnfem-1 expression significantly increased in the larvae at length of 2cm, an important stage of sex differentiation. Yeast two hybridization results showed that the Mnfem-1 protein can be potentially interactive with cathepsin L and proteins containing the domains of insulinase, ankyrin or ubiquitin. Our results suggested that Mnfem-1 could have roles in prawn ovarian development and sex determination/differentiation.

  5. Effect of feeding Bacillus sp. as probiotic bacteria on growth of giant freshwater prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii de Man).

    PubMed

    Deeseenthum, Sirirat; Leelavatcharamas, Vichai; Brookes, John D

    2007-05-01

    The effects of feeding two Bacillus spp. isolated from the intestine of the giant freshwater prawn on the growth of Giant Freshwater Prawns (Macrobrachium rosenbergii de Man) was examined. The isolated Bacillus KKU02 and Bacillus KKU03 (approximately 10(7) CFU mL(-1)) were mixed into commercial prawn feed (200 mL kg(-1)). After rearing shrimp with the bacteria in four feed treatments, (Bacillus KKU03, Bacillus KKU02, mixed culture and control groups) for 120 days, body length and weight of the prawns in mixed culture tanks were significantly higher (p = 0.05) than in the control tanks (7.48 cm and 3.32 g, vs 6.6 cm and 2.1 g, respectively). Both isolates were found to produce amylase and protease. The stabilities of the single Bacillus sp., mixed culture and commercial probiotic in the feeds were examined during storage at 4 degrees C and room temperature. The percentage viability of Bacillus KKU02, Bacillus KKU03 and mixed culture stored at room temperature declined dramatically to 2.54, 21.88 and 10.92% within 2 weeks, respectively. At 4 degrees C however, the percentage viability of the tested probiotics reduced slowly. The survival of the commercial probiotics was the same at both temperatures about 50% after 70 days' storage.

  6. Macrobrachium rosenbergii nodavirus disease (white tail disease) in Australia.

    PubMed

    Owens, Leigh; La Fauce, Kathy; Juntunen, Karen; Hayakijkosol, Orachun; Zeng, Chaoshu

    2009-07-23

    The index case of white tail disease (WTD) is presented in adult broodstock prawns Macrobrachium rosenbergii from the Flinders River in western Queensland, Australia, in mid-2007. Histological examination revealed extensive myonecrosis with massive infiltration of myonuclei and some haemocytes. Juveniles from the same broodstock but not from 3 other families displayed white muscle lesions. Low-grade chronic mortalities approaching 100% over 1 yr occurred. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCR) were attempted for both M. rosenbergii nodavirus (MrNV) with 2 sets of primers and for the satellite virus, extrasmall virus (XSV). All 3 PCRs generated amplicons of the expected sizes. Basic local alignment search tool (BLAST) analyses of the 3 consensus sequences identified a 91% match with MrNV viral capsid protein gene, 96% match with MrNV RNA-directed RNA polymerase gene, and a 99% match with M. rosenbergii XSV capsid protein gene. The clinical signs, histopathological lesions and RT-PCR amplicons could be reproduced in M. rosenbergii inoculated with cell-free extracts fulfilling River's postulates. We conclude that this is an endemic strain of MrNV as the sequences are dissimilar to strains of MrNV circulating around Asia and the Americas. This case only poorly meets the Office International des Epizooties (OIE) case definition for WTD due to the age of the prawns involved and the nature of the inclusion bodies. Perhaps the OIE case definition needs broadening.

  7. Deepwater Chondrichthyan Bycatch of the Eastern King Prawn Fishery in the Southern Great Barrier Reef, Australia.

    PubMed

    Rigby, Cassandra L; White, William T; Simpfendorfer, Colin A

    2016-01-01

    The deepwater chondrichthyan fauna of the Great Barrier Reef is poorly known and life history information is required to enable their effective management as they are inherently vulnerable to exploitation. The chondrichthyan bycatch from the deepwater eastern king prawn fishery at the Swain Reefs in the southern Great Barrier Reef was examined to determine the species present and provide information on their life histories. In all, 1533 individuals were collected from 11 deepwater chondrichthyan species, with the Argus skate Dipturus polyommata, piked spurdog Squalus megalops and pale spotted catshark Asymbolus pallidus the most commonly caught. All but one species is endemic to Australia with five species restricted to waters offshore from Queensland. The extent of life history information available for each species varied but the life history traits across all species were characteristic of deep water chondrichthyans with relatively large length at maturity, small litters and low ovarian fecundity; all indicative of low biological productivity. However, variability among these traits and spatial and bathymetric distributions of the species suggests differing degrees of resilience to fishing pressure. To ensure the sustainability of these bycatch species, monitoring of their catches in the deepwater eastern king prawn fishery is recommended.

  8. The "prawn-in-the-tube" procedure: what do cuttlefish learn and memorize?

    PubMed

    Cartron, Lelia; Darmaillacq, Anne-Sophie; Dickel, Ludovic

    2013-03-01

    For several decades the "prawn-in-the-tube" procedure has been extensively used in the exploration of behavioral plasticity and its neural correlates in cuttlefish. Although the nature of the task has been characterized, the effect of reinforcement and the extent of different cues cuttlefish can use to solve and memorize the task remain unclear. To determine whether cuttlefish learned to inhibit predatory behavior because of pain incurred when the tentacles hit the glass tube, the shrimp prey (typically attacked with a tentacle strike) was replaced by crabs (normally caught by a jumping strategy, using all eight arms together, which is thought less likely to be painful). We showed that the cuttlefish is still capable of learning inhibition of predatory behavior when it adopts another catching strategy, which suggests that pain from the tentacles hitting the tube has little effect on the learning process. The two latest experiments have shown that cuttlefish do not learn to inhibit predatory behavior towards a specific type of prey, but rather learn and memorize visual (light polarization) and tactile information from the glass tube. The "prawn-in-the-tube" procedure is a powerful and user-friendly tool in the investigation of the processing and retention of multisensory information in invertebrates. Our recent findings now open up new areas of investigation into the neural correlates of learning and memory processes in cuttlefish. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Deepwater Chondrichthyan Bycatch of the Eastern King Prawn Fishery in the Southern Great Barrier Reef, Australia

    PubMed Central

    Rigby, Cassandra L.; White, William T.; Simpfendorfer, Colin A.

    2016-01-01

    The deepwater chondrichthyan fauna of the Great Barrier Reef is poorly known and life history information is required to enable their effective management as they are inherently vulnerable to exploitation. The chondrichthyan bycatch from the deepwater eastern king prawn fishery at the Swain Reefs in the southern Great Barrier Reef was examined to determine the species present and provide information on their life histories. In all, 1533 individuals were collected from 11 deepwater chondrichthyan species, with the Argus skate Dipturus polyommata, piked spurdog Squalus megalops and pale spotted catshark Asymbolus pallidus the most commonly caught. All but one species is endemic to Australia with five species restricted to waters offshore from Queensland. The extent of life history information available for each species varied but the life history traits across all species were characteristic of deep water chondrichthyans with relatively large length at maturity, small litters and low ovarian fecundity; all indicative of low biological productivity. However, variability among these traits and spatial and bathymetric distributions of the species suggests differing degrees of resilience to fishing pressure. To ensure the sustainability of these bycatch species, monitoring of their catches in the deepwater eastern king prawn fishery is recommended. PMID:27218654

  10. Bopyrid isopods parasitizing on the cultured fresh water prawn, Macrobrachiummalcolmsonii in South India.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishnan, A; Raja, K; Trilles, J P; Rajkumar, M; Rahman, M M; Saravanakumar, A

    2017-03-01

    The bopyrid isopods are common in wild Macrobrachium spp. but not common in aquaculture condition. This is the first study that reports the parasitizing of bopyrid isopods on the cultured M. malcolmsonii. Bopyrid isopod (Probopyrus buitendijki) was identified in the branchial cavities of the fresh water prawn, M. malcolmsonii from grow-out culture pond at Kuriyamangalam, India. Macrobrachium malcolmsonii is a new host for P. buitendijki. A total of 1323 M. malcolmsonii were checked for this study. The overall prevalence of the parasitic infestation was reached 46.2 %. The parasitic infection was higher in female (83 %) than in male (3.4 %). Highest prevalence of infestation was found in the median size group (7-8 cm) (58.7 %). Infected females were not berried unlike uninfected prawns. The parasites cause infertility and does not found any organ deformities due to the infestation. The parasite was inversely attached in the gill chamber with no lesion on the gill but the infected branchial chamber became bulged.

  11. Steroids and genes related to steroid biosynthesis in the female giant freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii.

    PubMed

    Thongbuakaew, Tipsuda; Siangcham, Tanapan; Suwansa-ard, Saowaros; Elizur, Abigail; Cummins, Scott F; Sobhon, Prasert; Sretarugsa, Prapee

    2016-03-01

    The giant freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii, is important to many Asian countries due to its high economic value as an aquaculture product. With demand increasing, there is requirement for a better understanding of the biosynthetic components that regulate its growth and reproduction, including steroids, in order to help increase production. Vertebrate-type steroids and their receptors were identified in crustaceans and implicated in reproduction. In this study, we presented the sex steroids estradiol and progesterone by LC-MS/MS in female M. rosenbergii, and reveal steroidogenic-related genes by in silico analysis of de novo assembled transcriptomes. Comparative analysis with other species was performed to confirm their putative role, as well as tissue-specific and quantitative gene expression. We reveal 29 transcripts that encode for steroidogenic-related proteins, including steroidogenic enzymes, a nuclear steroid hormone receptors, and a steroidogenic factor. Moreover, we identified for the first time the presence of steroidogenic factor 1, StAR-related lipid transfer protein, estradiol receptor- and progesterone-like protein in M. rosenbergii. Those targeted for gene expression analysis (3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, 17 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, estrogen sulfotransferase and progesterone receptor-like) showed widespread expression within many tissues, and at relatively high levels in the central nervous system (CNS) during ovarian maturation. In summary, we provide further evidence for the existence of steroidogenic pathways in crustaceans, which may be useful for advancing prawn aquaculture.

  12. Biomolecular changes that occur in the antennal gland of the giant freshwater prawn (Machrobrachium rosenbergii)

    PubMed Central

    Kruangkum, Thanapong; Wang, Tianfang; Zhao, Min; Ventura, Tomer; Mitu, Shahida Akter; Hodson, Mark P.; Shaw, Paul N.; Sobhon, Prasert

    2017-01-01

    In decapod crustaceans, the antennal gland (AnG) is a major primary source of externally secreted biomolecules, and some may act as pheromones that play a major role in aquatic animal communication. In aquatic crustaceans, sex pheromones regulate reproductive behaviours, yet they remain largely unidentified besides the N-acetylglucosamine-1,5-lactone (NAGL) that stimulates male to female attraction. In this study, we used an AnG transcriptome of the female giant freshwater prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii) to predict the secretion of 226 proteins, including the most abundantly expressed transcripts encoding the Spaetzle protein, a serine protease inhibitor, and an arthropodial cuticle protein AMP 8.1. A quantitative proteome analysis of the female AnG at intermolt, premolt and postmolt, identified numerous proteins of different abundances, such as the hemocyanin subunit 1 that is most abundant at intermolt. We also show that hemocyanin subunit 1 is present within water surrounding females. Of those metabolites identified, we demonstrate that the NAGL and N-acetylglucosamine (NAG) can bind with high affinity to hemocyanin subunit 1. In summary, this study has revealed components of the female giant freshwater prawn AnG that are released and contribute to further research towards understanding crustacean conspecific signalling. PMID:28662025

  13. Impact of TBT on the vitellogenesis and sex hormones in freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii (De Man, 1879)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Tributyltin (TBT) is a ubiquitous persistent xenobiotic that can be found in freshwater, estuarine and marine ecosystem. TBT is a strong endocrine disrupting compound (EDC) that can cause toxic threat to aquatic organisms. Imposex, sexual deformities and endocrine dysfunctions are the causes of TBT to most of the aquatic organisms. Effect of TBT on the vitellogenesis and sex hormonal changes in Macrobrachium rosenbergii has never been reported. Hence, the present investigation was undertaken to find out the impact of TBT on histological changes in the different reproductive tissues, sex hormonal alterations and level of biomarkers like vitellogenin and vitellin in M. rosenbergii. Results The present investigation documents the possible impact of tributyltin (TBT) on the vitellogenesis in freshwater female prawn M. rosenbergii. TBT at 10 ng/l, 100 ng/l and 1000 ng/l concentrations were exposed individually to prawns for a period of three months. At higher concentration of 1000 ng/l, the ovarian development was arrested and ovary remained at spent stage. At lower concentration of TBT (10 ng/l), the development proceeded up to early vitellogenic stage. At intermediate concentration of 100 ng/l TBT, the ovary remained at pre vitellogenic stage and thereafter no development was noticed. Histological results indicated the normal ovarian development with vitellogenic oocytes, filled with yolk globules in control prawn. On the other hand, the TBT treated groups showed reduction in yolk globules, fusion of developing oocytes and abundance of immature oocytes. Immunofluorescence staining denoted the remarkable reduction in vitellin content in ovary of TBT treated prawn. Hence, TBT had conspicuously inhibited the vitellogenesis by causing hormonal imbalance in M. rosenbergii. Conclusion TBT had notably inhibited the vitellogenesis due to hormonal imbalance. This endocrine dysfunction ultimately impaired the oogenesis in the freshwater female prawn M

  14. Indian Summer

    SciTech Connect

    Galindo, E.

    1997-08-01

    This paper focuses on preserving and strengthening two resources culturally and socially important to the Shoshone-Bannock Indian Tribe on the Fort Hall Reservation in Idaho; their young people and the Pacific-Northwest Salmon. After learning that salmon were not returning in significant numbers to ancestral fishing waters at headwater spawning sites, tribal youth wanted to know why. As a result, the Indian Summer project was conceived to give Shoshone-Bannock High School students the opportunity to develop hands-on, workable solutions to improve future Indian fishing and help make the river healthy again. The project goals were to increase the number of fry introduced into the streams, teach the Shoshone-Bannock students how to use scientific methodologies, and get students, parents, community members, and Indian and non-Indian mentors excited about learning. The students chose an egg incubation experiment to help increase self-sustaining, natural production of steelhead trout, and formulated and carried out a three step plan to increase the hatch-rate of steelhead trout in Idaho waters. With the help of local companies, governmental agencies, scientists, and mentors students have been able to meet their project goals, and at the same time, have learned how to use scientific methods to solve real life problems, how to return what they have used to the water and land, and how to have fun and enjoy life while learning.

  15. A Victim of Its Own Success: The Story of the Cheyenne and Arapaho Indian Fair, 1910-13

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clough, Josh

    2006-01-01

    The Indian fair is that rare example of a government program for Indians gone terribly right. Implemented by the Office of Indian Affairs on reservations in the early 1900s, Indian fairs allowed Native people to exhibit their crops, livestock, and domestic handiwork in competition for prizes much the same way whites did at their numerous county…

  16. A Victim of Its Own Success: The Story of the Cheyenne and Arapaho Indian Fair, 1910-13

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clough, Josh

    2006-01-01

    The Indian fair is that rare example of a government program for Indians gone terribly right. Implemented by the Office of Indian Affairs on reservations in the early 1900s, Indian fairs allowed Native people to exhibit their crops, livestock, and domestic handiwork in competition for prizes much the same way whites did at their numerous county…

  17. Indians in the American System: Past and Present, Student Book. The Lavinia and Charles P. Schwartz Citizenship Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westbury, Ian; Westbury, Susan

    The purpose of this curriculum unit on citizenship education is to enrich the way students think about American Indians by presenting the history of American Indians and their relationship with white Americans. The first chapter discusses the kinds of ideas people have about Indians, especially stereotypes of Indians being wild, red-colored, and…

  18. Direct use of low temperature geothermal water by Aquafarms International, Inc. for freshwater aquaculture (prawns and associated species). An operations and maintenance manual

    SciTech Connect

    Broughton, R.; Price, M.; Price, V.; Grajcer, D.

    1984-04-01

    In connection with an ongoing commercial aquaculture project in the Coachella Valley, California; a twelve month prawn growout demonstration project was conducted. This project began in August, 1979 and involved the use of low temperature (85/sup 0/F) geothermal waters to raise freshwater prawns, Macrobrachium rosenbergii (deMan), in earthen ponds. The following publication is an operations and maintenance guide which may by useful for those interested in conducting similar enterprises.

  19. Effects of dietary administration of water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) extracts on the immune responses and disease resistance of giant freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chin-Chyuan; Tan, Hui-Ching; Cheng, Winton

    2013-07-01

    The hot-water extract of Eichhornia crassipes leaves (ECE) was produced and incorporated into the diet of the prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii, as an immunostimulant. Survival rates of prawn against Lactococcus garvieae, and its immune parameters including the total haemocyte count (THC), different haemocyte count (DHC), phenoloxidase (PO) activity, respiratory bursts (RBs), superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity, transglutaminase (TG) activity, haemolymph coagulation time, and phagocytic activity and clearance efficiency against L. garvieae by M. rosenbergii were determined when prawn (23.0 ± 2.8 g) were fed ECE-containing diets at 0, 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0 g kg(-1). Prawn fed a diet containing ECE at 2.0 and 3.0 g kg(-1) for 12 days showed significantly increased THC, HC, GC, PO activity, RBs, SOD activity, GPx activity, and TG activity, and a significantly decreased coagulation time. The phagocytic activity and clearance efficiency against L. garvieae of prawn fed the ECE-containing diets at 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0 g kg(-1) were significantly higher than those of prawn fed the control diet at 3-12 days. Survival rates of M. rosenbergii fed the diet containing ECE at concentrations of 2 and 3 g kg(-1) were significantly higher than those fed the control diet after challenge with L. garvieae for 48-144 h. The relative percentage survival of prawn fed the 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0 g kg(-1) ECE-containing diets for 12 days were 17.5%, 39.1%, and 52.2%. It was concluded that the ECE can be used as an immunostimulant for prawn through dietary administration to enhance immune responses and resistance of M. rosenbergii against L. garvieae.

  20. The Performance of American Indian Children on the Draw-A-Man Test. National Study of American Indian Education, Series III, No. 2, Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levensky, Kay

    As a part of the National Study of American Indian Education, this document reports on 1700 American Indian primary school children (representing 14 tribal groups and 12 states) who were administered the Goodenough Draw-A-Man Test (DAM) as a measure of mental alertness. A comparison is given of the Indian and white children's scores. It appears…

  1. Ultrastructural changes during spermatogenesis, biochemical and hormonal evidences of testicular toxicity caused by TBT in freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii (De Man, 1879).

    PubMed

    Revathi, Peranandam; Iyapparaj, Palanisamy; Vasanthi, Lourduraj Arockia; Munuswamy, Natesan; Krishnan, Muthukalingan

    2014-10-01

    The present investigation documents the impact of tributyltin (TBT) on the ultrastructural variation of spermatogenesis in freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii. The environmentally realistic concentration of TBT can cause damages to the endocrine and reproductive physiology of crustaceans. In this context, three concentrations viz. 10, 100, and 1000 ng/L were selected and exposed to prawns for 90 days. The TBT exposed prawn exhibited decrease the reproductive activity as evidenced by sperm count and sperm length compared to control. Histopathological results revealed the retarded testicular development, abnormal structure of seminiferous tubule, decrease in the concentration of spermatozoa, diminution of seminiferous tubule membrane, abundance of spermatocytes and vacuolation in testis of treated prawns. Ultrastructural study also confirmed the impairment of spermatogenesis in treated prawns. Furthermore, radioimmunoassay (RIA) clearly documented the reduction of testosterone level in TBT exposed groups. Thus, TBT substantially reduced the level of male sex hormone as well as biochemical constituents which ultimately led to impairment of spermatogenesis in the freshwater male prawn M. rosenbergii.

  2. Regulation of laboratory populations of snails (Biomphalaria and Bulinus spp.) by river prawns, Macrobrachium spp. (Decapoda, Palaemonidae): implications for control of schistosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Sokolow, Susanne H; Lafferty, Kevin D; Kuris, Armand M

    2014-04-01

    Human schistosomiasis is a common parasitic disease endemic in many tropical and subtropical countries. One barrier to achieving long-term control of this disease has been re-infection of treated patients when they swim, bathe, or wade in surface fresh water infested with snails that harbor and release larval parasites. Because some snail species are obligate intermediate hosts of schistosome parasites, removing snails may reduce parasitic larvae in the water, reducing re-infection risk. Here, we evaluate the potential for snail control by predatory freshwater prawns, Macrobrachium rosenbergii and M. vollenhovenii, native to Asia and Africa, respectively. Both prawn species are high value, protein-rich human food commodities, suggesting their cultivation may be beneficial in resource-poor settings where few other disease control options exist. In a series of predation trials in laboratory aquaria, we found both species to be voracious predators of schistosome-susceptible snails, hatchlings, and eggs, even in the presence of alternative food, with sustained average consumption rates of 12% of their body weight per day. Prawns showed a weak preference for Bulinus truncatus over Biomphalaria glabrata snails. Consumption rates were highly predictable based on the ratio of prawn: snail body mass, suggesting satiation-limited predation. Even the smallest prawns tested (0.5-2g) caused snail recruitment failure, despite high snail fecundity. With the World Health Organization turning attention toward schistosomiasis elimination, native prawn cultivation may be a viable snail control strategy that offers a win-win for public health and economic development.

  3. Type 2 diabetes in Asian Indians.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Shashank R

    2012-06-01

    India is a global leader in diabetes, currently with second largest pool of diabetes in the world. Asian Indian phenotype is uniquely predisposed to develop type 2 diabetes because of strong familial aggregation as well lifestyle factors of imprudent diet and sedentary physical habit. The typical Asian Indian phenotype is the "thin-fat Indian" which means that Asian Indians have higher body fat composition and lesser muscle mass (sarcopenia) than the white or African counterparts. Aggressive screening and treatment strategies are advocated in this high-risk diabetic race. Prevention is the key for diabetes in Indians, and simple prevention themes like "Eat less, eat on time, eat right, walk more, sleep well, and smile" are needed.

  4. Gamma irradiation-aided chitin/chitosan extraction from prawn shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahlous, M.; Tahtat, D.; Benamer, S.; Nacer Khodja, A.

    2007-12-01

    Chitin and chitosan were extracted from prawn shells. The influence of a 25 kGy irradiation dose on the deproteination process was investigated. The deproteination degree was followed by Lowry-Folin method. The demineralisation degree versus reaction time with 1 N hydrochloric acid solution was followed by atomic absorption spectrometry. Chitin and chitosan obtained were characterised by FTIR spectrometry. The influence of some parameters, such as reaction time, alkaline concentration and temperature on the deacetylation degree was also investigated. The deacetylation degree was evaluated by FTIR spectrometry using the bands at 1320 cm -1 and 1420 cm -1. It was found that the irradiation of the shells at a dose of 25 kGy reduces the time of the deproteination reaction by a factor of three, comparatively to the non-irradiated samples.

  5. Use of ethanol production by-products for producing microalgae, tilapia, and freshwater prawns

    SciTech Connect

    Behrends, L.L.; Kingsley, J.B.; Price, A.H. III

    1983-01-01

    By-products from fermentation of grains to alcohol are highly valued as feed supplements for beef and dairy cattle, swine, and poultry. The quantity of wet distillers by-products (stillage) from fuel alcohol production is expected to increase greatly. Unlike dried distillers by-products, wet distillers by-products have generally been abandoned as feed supplements for livestock because of high water content, cost of handling, and storage problems. Using wet distillers by-products as a fertilizer or feed supplement in aquatic production systems appears promising. Two experiments were conducted to determine relationships between stillage application rates and production of microalgae and yields of tilapia (fish) and freshwater prawns (shrimp). Dissolved oxygen concentrations and several other water quality parameters were also monitored. 19 refs., 3 figs., 17 tabs.

  6. Optimal analytical conditions for catalase in fresh water prawn, Macrobrachium malcolmsonii.

    PubMed

    Arun, S; Thirumurugan, R; Visakan, R; Balamurugan, S; Arunachalam, V; Subramanian, P

    2003-02-01

    The cytosol of hepatopancreas was prepared from the freshwater prawn Macrobrachium malcolmsonii, and optimal assay conditions, ie., concentration of substrate, pH, and temperature, were determined to measure basal activities and kinetic constants of catalase activity. The properties of catalase were examined in M. macolmsonii, because quantitative data on catalase are limited in crustacean species. The optimal pH for catalase was 7.0. The activation energy was 3.55 Kcal/mol and energy inhibition value was 5.16 Kcal/mol. The value of energy inhibition is higher than that of energy activation. This may be due to inhibition of catalase by some substrate other than H2O2. A Km of 66.6 mM was also determined from various concentrations of substrate.

  7. Blueprints for Indian Education: Improving Mainstream Schooling. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butterfield, Robin A.

    The Indian Nations At Risk Task Force and the White House Conference on Indian Education suggested systemic reforms that would improve the education of Native students who attend public schools. These reforms focus on fostering intercultural harmony in schools, improving teacher preparation, developing instructional curricula and strategies that…

  8. Economic Development and Employment Opportunities for American Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandefur, Gary D.

    American Indian unemployment remains high despite efforts by tribes and the federal government to improve employment opportunities. Persistently high unemployment among Indians has resulted in low family incomes and high poverty rates relative to Whites. Particularly serious on reservations, these continuing problems are related in part to low…

  9. The Original Americans: U.S. Indians. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, James

    About 1.5 million people in the United States identify themselves as Indians. Despite great cultural diversity, all Native groups have a common feature: they suffer poverty and related problems stemming from their relationship to White America. For four generations, the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) has exercised an incredible degree of economic…

  10. An Asian Indian Student's Identity: Living in Two Worlds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mittapalli, Kavita

    2009-01-01

    Using narrative inquiry, I tell the story of an Asian Indian student attending a large mid-Atlantic university who approached me in the summer of 2002 for my master's thesis interview. She was an Indian by birth who was adopted by White parents when she was an infant. She had not been to India since. Her story provided me with rich insights into…

  11. Black Identities: West Indian Immigrant Dreams and American Realities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, Mary C.

    This study of the attitudes and status of West Indian immigrants in the United States, based on interviews with 59 West Indian immigrants, 83 adolescent and young adult children of immigrants, 27 African Americans, 25 White Americans, and 6 coworkers of immigrants shows the changes that occur as immigrants confront the realities of U.S. life. West…

  12. An Asian Indian Student's Identity: Living in Two Worlds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mittapalli, Kavita

    2009-01-01

    Using narrative inquiry, I tell the story of an Asian Indian student attending a large mid-Atlantic university who approached me in the summer of 2002 for my master's thesis interview. She was an Indian by birth who was adopted by White parents when she was an infant. She had not been to India since. Her story provided me with rich insights into…

  13. Felix S. Cohen's Handbook of Federal Indian Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Felix S.

    The following is taken from the Publisher's Note: "Long out of print since it was originally published in 1942 by the U.S. Government Printing Office, this classic work on Federal Indian law, and the whole legal history of Indian-white relations, is here republished in a facsimile edition. It is, as Felix Frankfurter observed, the only book that…

  14. Sex Role Attributions of American-Indian Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Portman, Tarrell Awe Agahe

    2001-01-01

    Examines the sex role attributes of American-Indian women as compared to a predominately White normative group using the short form of the Bem Sex Role Inventory. Results indicate a significant difference on the masculine subscale between the two groups with American-Indian women having higher scores. Provides implications for mental health…

  15. News and the "Indian Problem" in the Antebellum Period.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coward, John M.

    American Indian news as reported in urban newspapers and frontier weeklies during the 1820s and 1830s was shaped by the prejudices of the age as well as by the particular historical circumstances which brought Indians into conflict with White Americans. The press portrayed a culture for which it had little abiding sympathy or understanding,…

  16. Black Identities: West Indian Immigrant Dreams and American Realities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, Mary C.

    This study of the attitudes and status of West Indian immigrants in the United States, based on interviews with 59 West Indian immigrants, 83 adolescent and young adult children of immigrants, 27 African Americans, 25 White Americans, and 6 coworkers of immigrants shows the changes that occur as immigrants confront the realities of U.S. life. West…

  17. The Original Americans: U.S. Indians. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, James

    About 1.5 million people in the United States identify themselves as Indians. Despite great cultural diversity, all Native groups have a common feature: they suffer poverty and related problems stemming from their relationship to White America. For four generations, the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) has exercised an incredible degree of economic…

  18. Transcriptomics of a Giant Freshwater Prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii): De Novo Assembly, Annotation and Marker Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hyungtaek; Lyons, Russell E.; Dinh, Hung; Hurwood, David A.; McWilliam, Sean; Mather, Peter B.

    2011-01-01

    Background Giant freshwater prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii or GFP), is the most economically important freshwater crustacean species. However, as little is known about its genome, 454 pyrosequencing of cDNA was undertaken to characterise its transcriptome and identify genes important for growth. Methodology and Principal Findings A collection of 787,731 sequence reads (244.37 Mb) obtained from 454 pyrosequencing analysis of cDNA prepared from muscle, ovary and testis tissues taken from 18 adult prawns was assembled into 123,534 expressed sequence tags (ESTs). Of these, 46% of the 8,411 contigs and 19% of 115,123 singletons possessed high similarity to sequences in the GenBank non-redundant database, with most significant (E value < 1e–5) contig (80%) and singleton (84%) matches occurring with crustacean and insect sequences. KEGG analysis of the contig open reading frames identified putative members of several biological pathways potentially important for growth. The top InterProScan domains detected included RNA recognition motifs, serine/threonine-protein kinase-like domains, actin-like families, and zinc finger domains. Transcripts derived from genes such as actin, myosin heavy and light chain, tropomyosin and troponin with fundamental roles in muscle development and construction were abundant. Amongst the contigs, 834 single nucleotide polymorphisms, 1198 indels and 658 simple sequence repeats motifs were also identified. Conclusions The M. rosenbergii transcriptome data reported here should provide an invaluable resource for improving our understanding of this species' genome structure and biology. The data will also instruct future functional studies to manipulate or select for genes influencing growth that should find practical applications in aquaculture breeding programs. PMID:22174756

  19. Effects of Host Phylogeny and Habitats on Gut Microbiomes of Oriental River Prawn (Macrobrachium nipponense).

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Tzong-Der; Pao, Yueh-Yang; Chen, Po-Cheng; Weng, Francis Cheng-Hsuan; Jean, Wen Dar; Wang, Daryi

    2015-01-01

    The gut microbial community is one of the richest and most complex ecosystems on earth, and the intestinal microbes play an important role in host development and health. Next generation sequencing approaches, which rapidly produce millions of short reads that enable the investigation on a culture independent basis, are now popular for exploring microbial community. Currently, the gut microbiome in fresh water shrimp is unexplored. To explore gut microbiomes of the oriental river prawn (Macrobrachium nipponense) and investigate the effects of host genetics and habitats on the microbial composition, 454 pyrosequencing based on the 16S rRNA gene were performed. We collected six groups of samples, including M. nipponense shrimp from two populations, rivers and lakes, and one sister species (M. asperulum) as an out group. We found that Proteobacteria is the major phylum in oriental river prawn, followed by Firmicutes and Actinobacteria. Compositional analysis showed microbial divergence between the two shrimp species is higher than that between the two populations of one shrimp species collected from river and lake. Hierarchical clustering also showed that host genetics had a greater impact on the divergence of gut microbiome than host habitats. This finding was also congruent with the functional prediction from the metagenomic data implying that the two shrimp species still shared the same type of biological functions, reflecting a similar metabolic profile in their gut environments. In conclusion, this study provides the first investigation of the gut microbiome of fresh water shrimp, and supports the hypothesis of host species-specific signatures of bacterial community composition.

  20. Effects of Host Phylogeny and Habitats on Gut Microbiomes of Oriental River Prawn (Macrobrachium nipponense)

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Po-Cheng; Weng, Francis Cheng-Hsuan; Jean, Wen Dar; Wang, Daryi

    2015-01-01

    The gut microbial community is one of the richest and most complex ecosystems on earth, and the intestinal microbes play an important role in host development and health. Next generation sequencing approaches, which rapidly produce millions of short reads that enable the investigation on a culture independent basis, are now popular for exploring microbial community. Currently, the gut microbiome in fresh water shrimp is unexplored. To explore gut microbiomes of the oriental river prawn (Macrobrachium nipponense) and investigate the effects of host genetics and habitats on the microbial composition, 454 pyrosequencing based on the 16S rRNA gene were performed. We collected six groups of samples, including M. nipponense shrimp from two populations, rivers and lakes, and one sister species (M. asperulum) as an out group. We found that Proteobacteria is the major phylum in oriental river prawn, followed by Firmicutes and Actinobacteria. Compositional analysis showed microbial divergence between the two shrimp species is higher than that between the two populations of one shrimp species collected from river and lake. Hierarchical clustering also showed that host genetics had a greater impact on the divergence of gut microbiome than host habitats. This finding was also congruent with the functional prediction from the metagenomic data implying that the two shrimp species still shared the same type of biological functions, reflecting a similar metabolic profile in their gut environments. In conclusion, this study provides the first investigation of the gut microbiome of fresh water shrimp, and supports the hypothesis of host species-specific signatures of bacterial community composition. PMID:26168244

  1. A Brief History of Adult Basic Education for Indian Adults as Administered by the Indian Education Section.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1979

    It has been recognized for many years that the educational levels of adult American Indians are low (2/3 have not advanced beyond elementary school) and the illiteracy rates are high (1/4 are functionally illiterate). Traditional adult programs have not met the needs of adult Indians who are uncomfortable in "white" classes and who will…

  2. Blueprints for Indian Education: Research and Development Needs for the 1990s. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cahape, Patricia

    Two landmark efforts to describe the condition of American Indian and Alaska Native education nationwide and to call for specific solutions took place in the early 1990s. These efforts were the Indian Nations At Risk Task Force and the White House Conference on Indian Education. This digest summarizes Task Force and Conference recommendations…

  3. Gendered racial exclusion among White internet daters.

    PubMed

    Feliciano, Cynthia; Robnett, Belinda; Komaie, Golnaz

    2009-03-01

    Acceptance by the dominant group reveals the current standing of racial groups in the U.S. hierarchy, as well as the possibility for assimilation. However, few researchers have addressed the gendered nature of racial preferences by whites. We examine whites' exclusion of blacks, Latinos, Asians, Middle Easterners, East Indians and Native Americans as possible dates, using a sample of profiles collected from an internet dating website. We find that white men are more willing than white women to date non-whites in general, yet, with the exception of their top two preferences for dates, whites and Latinos, the racial hierarchies of males and females differ. Among daters with stated racial preferences, white men are more likely to exclude blacks as possible dates, while white women are more likely to exclude Asians. We argue that exclusion relates to racialized images of masculinity and femininity, and shapes dating and marriage outcomes, and thus minority groups' possibilities for full social incorporation.

  4. Cancer Incidence, Survival, and Mortality among American Indians and Alaska Natives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horm, John W.; Burhansstipanov, Linda

    1992-01-01

    Overall cancer incidence among southwestern American Indians is less than half that of U.S. whites; Alaska Native and white rates are similar. However, both native groups have elevated rates for specific cancers (stomach, liver, and gallbladder), and Indians have low five-year survival rates. Data tables outline incidence, mortality, and survival…

  5. Dharma and Interest-Occupation Congruence in Asian Indian College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gupta, Saurabh; Tracey, Terence J. G.

    2005-01-01

    Interest-occupation congruence and career exploration behaviors were examined in a sample of 107 White and 83 Asian Indian American college students. It was hypothesized that there would be both intergroup differences and intragroup differences. Asian Indians were expected to evidence less congruence and career exploration than Whites. The…

  6. Cancer Incidence, Survival, and Mortality among American Indians and Alaska Natives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horm, John W.; Burhansstipanov, Linda

    1992-01-01

    Overall cancer incidence among southwestern American Indians is less than half that of U.S. whites; Alaska Native and white rates are similar. However, both native groups have elevated rates for specific cancers (stomach, liver, and gallbladder), and Indians have low five-year survival rates. Data tables outline incidence, mortality, and survival…

  7. Screening of parasitic and IHHNV infections in wild giant freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii from Rejang River at Kuching, Sarawak.

    PubMed

    Kua, Beng Chu; Choong, F C; Hazreen Nita, M K; Muhd Faizul H, A H; Bhassu, S; Imelda, R R; Mohammed, M

    2011-04-01

    A preliminary survey of parasitic and infectious hypodermal and haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHHNV) infections in giant freshwater prawn from the Damak Sea of Rejang River, Kuching, Sarawak was conducted. Symptoms of black spots/patches on the rostrum, carapace, pleopods or telson were observed in most of the 107 samples collected. Parasitic examination revealed sessiline peritrichs such as (Zoothamnium sp.), nematode larvae, gregarine stage and cocoon of leech with prevalences of 1.2%, 1.2%, 5% and 17% respectively. Under histopathological examination, changes like accumulation of hemocytes around hepatopancreatic tubules due to vibriosis, basophilic intranuclear inclusions in the epithelium and E-cell of hepatopancreatic tubules as a result of HPV were seen through the section. No positive infection of IHHNV was detected in 78 samples. As such, the wild giant freshwater prawns in Damak Sea of Rejang River in Kuching are IHHNV-free though infections of parvo-like virus and bacteria were seen in histopathology.

  8. The hot-water extract of leaves of noni, Morinda citrifolia, promotes the immunocompetence of giant freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii.

    PubMed

    Marisa Halim, Atika; Lee, Pai-Po; Chang, Zhong-Wen; Chang, Chin-Chyuan

    2017-05-01

    The hot-water Morinda citrifolia leaf extract (HMLE) was prepared for in vitro assessment on phenoloxidase (PO) activity, respiratory bursts (RBs), and phagocytic activity (PA). Furthermore, the HMLE was administrated in the diet at 0.6, 3, and 6 g (kg diet)(-1) for Macrobrachium rosenbergii, and the potential effects on the immunocompetence of prawns were evaluated. PO activity, RBs, and PA in hemocytes incubated with the HMLE at 140, 20, 20, and 140 mg l(-1) significantly increased. The immune parameters of the total hemocyte count (THC), differential hemocyte count (DHC), RBs, PO activity, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, PA, transglutaminase (TG) activity and hemolymph clotting time were evaluated before and after 1, 3, 5, 7, and 9 weeks of the feeding trial. During 9 weeks of the feeding trial, higher THCs, DHCs, RBs, PO, and TG as well as accelerated clotting times were observed in prawns fed HMLE-containing diets at 0.6 g kg(-1). The mRNA expressions of prophenoloxidase, TG, crustin, and lysozyme of prawns fed HMLE-containing diets at 0.6 g kg(-1) for 9 weeks of the feeding trial significantly increased. The susceptibility of prawns fed the HMLE at 0.6 g kg(-1) to Lactococcus garvieae infection significantly decreased, and the relative survival percentage was 23.1%. We therefore found that HMLE administrated through the diet at 0.6 g kg(-1) was capable of enhancing the immunity and resistance against L. garvieae in M. rosenbergii. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The Prawn Macrobrachium vollenhovenii in the Senegal River Basin: Towards Sustainable Restocking of All-Male Populations for Biological Control of Schistosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Savaya Alkalay, Amit; Rosen, Ohad; Sokolow, Susanne H.; Faye, Yacinthe P. W.; Faye, Djibril S.; Aflalo, Eliahu D.; Jouanard, Nicolas; Zilberg, Dina; Huttinger, Elizabeth; Sagi, Amir

    2014-01-01

    Early malacological literature suggests that the outbreak of schistosomiasis, a parasitic disease transmitted by aquatic snails, in the Senegal River basin occurred due to ecological changes resulting from the construction of the Diama dam. The common treatment, the drug praziquantel, does not protect from the high risk of re-infection due to human contact with infested water on a daily basis. The construction of the dam interfered with the life cycle of the prawn Macrobrachium vollenhovenii by blocking its access to breeding grounds in the estuary. These prawns were demonstrated to be potential biological control agents, being effective predators of Schistosoma-susceptible snails. Here, we propose a responsible restocking strategy using all-male prawn populations which could provide sustainable disease control. Male prawns reach a larger size and have a lower tendency to migrate than females. We, therefore, expect that periodic restocking of all-male juveniles will decrease the prevalence of schistosomiasis and increase villagers' welfare. In this interdisciplinary study, we examined current prawn abundance along the river basin, complemented with a retrospective questionnaire completed by local fishermen. We revealed the current absence of prawns upriver and thus demonstrated the need for restocking. Since male prawns are suggested to be preferable for bio-control, we laid the molecular foundation for production of all-male M. vollenhovenii through a complete sequencing of the insulin-like androgenic gland-encoding gene (IAG), which is responsible for sexual differentiation in crustaceans. We also conducted bioinformatics and immunohistochemistry analyses to demonstrate the similarity of this sequence to the IAG of another Macrobrachium species in which neo-females are produced and their progeny are 100% males. At least 100 million people at risk of schistosomiasis are residents of areas that experienced water management manipulations. Our suggested non

  10. The prawn Macrobrachium vollenhovenii in the Senegal River basin: towards sustainable restocking of all-male populations for biological control of schistosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Savaya Alkalay, Amit; Rosen, Ohad; Sokolow, Susanne H; Faye, Yacinthe P W; Faye, Djibril S; Aflalo, Eliahu D; Jouanard, Nicolas; Zilberg, Dina; Huttinger, Elizabeth; Sagi, Amir

    2014-08-01

    Early malacological literature suggests that the outbreak of schistosomiasis, a parasitic disease transmitted by aquatic snails, in the Senegal River basin occurred due to ecological changes resulting from the construction of the Diama dam. The common treatment, the drug praziquantel, does not protect from the high risk of re-infection due to human contact with infested water on a daily basis. The construction of the dam interfered with the life cycle of the prawn Macrobrachium vollenhovenii by blocking its access to breeding grounds in the estuary. These prawns were demonstrated to be potential biological control agents, being effective predators of Schistosoma-susceptible snails. Here, we propose a responsible restocking strategy using all-male prawn populations which could provide sustainable disease control. Male prawns reach a larger size and have a lower tendency to migrate than females. We, therefore, expect that periodic restocking of all-male juveniles will decrease the prevalence of schistosomiasis and increase villagers' welfare. In this interdisciplinary study, we examined current prawn abundance along the river basin, complemented with a retrospective questionnaire completed by local fishermen. We revealed the current absence of prawns upriver and thus demonstrated the need for restocking. Since male prawns are suggested to be preferable for bio-control, we laid the molecular foundation for production of all-male M. vollenhovenii through a complete sequencing of the insulin-like androgenic gland-encoding gene (IAG), which is responsible for sexual differentiation in crustaceans. We also conducted bioinformatics and immunohistochemistry analyses to demonstrate the similarity of this sequence to the IAG of another Macrobrachium species in which neo-females are produced and their progeny are 100% males. At least 100 million people at risk of schistosomiasis are residents of areas that experienced water management manipulations. Our suggested non

  11. Immunoaffinity column cleanup with LC/MS/MS for the determination of chloramphenicol in honey and prawns: single-laboratory validation.

    PubMed

    Mackie, Jennifer; Marley, Elaine; Donnelly, Carol

    2013-01-01

    A single-laboratory validation was conducted to establish the effectiveness of an immunoaffinity column (IAC) cleanup procedure followed by LC/MS/MS for the determination of chloramphenicol (CAP) in honey and prawns. Honey is dissolved in buffer solution and centrifuged, and an aliquot applied to an IAC. For prawns, a portion of the homogenized sample is shaken with buffer and centrifuged, and an aliquot similarly applied to an IAC. For both matrix extracts, CAP is removed from the IAC with neat methanol, then directly analyzed by electrospray LC/MS/MS in the negative ionization mode using m/z 321 as a precursor ion and m/z 257 and 152 as qualifier and quantifier ions, respectively. Test portions of blank honey and prawns were fortified with CAP to give levels of 0.3, 1.0, and 5.0 microg/kg. Recoveries of CAP on 3 consecutive days ranged from 83-103% for honey and 84-108% for prawns. Based on results for fortified blank matrixes (triplicate at three levels), the RSD for repeatability (RSDr) averaged 8.4% for honey and 4.8% for prawns. The method LOD was 0.05 for prawns and 0.16 microg/kg for honey, both well below the minimum required method performance limit for CAP. The accuracy of the method was demonstrated by participation in proficiency testing, where satisfactory Z-scores were obtained for CAP in incurred samples of both honey and prawns. The method was shown to be applicable to a wide range of other matrixes, including milk, egg, royal jelly, meat, and seafood products.

  12. Toxic effects of blooms of marine species of Oscillatoriales on farmed prawns (Penaeus monodon, Penaeus japonicus) and brine shrimp (Artemia salina).

    PubMed

    Smith, P T

    1996-08-01

    Benthic and planktonic blooms of species of Oscillatoriales coincided with mortalities of Penaeus monodon during four episodes at Australian prawn farms. Oscillatoria corakiana was the dominant planktonic species at 65-90,000 cells/ml, but Spirulina sp., Lyngbya sp., Oscillatoria sp. and Nodularia sp. were also identified from the water column, benthic layers or surface mats. The levels and variety of Vibrionaceae in prawn tissue, suggest that mortalities were caused by secondary infections of bacteria. However, experimental results indicate that toxicity of the blooms of Oscillatoriales was the primary cause of disease. Pond water and extracts from a tank culture of benthic Oscillatoriales caused mortalities when injected into P. monodon and P. japonicus. Immersion of artemia in extracts from the tank culture also caused mortalities, with L.D50 values for the supernatant extract of 70 mg/litre for artemia cysts and 50 mg/litre for adult artemia, and LD50 values for the pellet extract of 110 mg/litre for artemia cysts and 200 mg/litre for adult artemia. Experiments with artemia suggested the blooms of Oscillatoriales produced water-soluble, heat-labile toxin/s. Mortalities may have been caused by a neurotoxin because: (a) there was a lack of histopathological evidence of damage to the digestive tracts of prawns during each episode; and (b) artemia cysts immersed in extracts of Oscillatoriales died before they developed digestive tracts. PSP toxin, anatoxin-a, homoanatoxin-a and microcystins were not detected when pond water from a diseased pond was tested. It is proposed that sub-lethal levels of toxin weakened the prawns, causing reduced feeding behaviour and an impaired immune system. As a result, prawns were prone to secondary infection by pathogenic bacteria. Because Oscillatoriales are ubiquitous in prawn farms, the findings have significant implications for the assessment of disease in the prawn farming industry.

  13. Oklahoma Tobacco Helpline utilization and cessation among American Indians.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Sydney A; Beebe, Laura A; Campbell, Janis E

    2015-01-01

    American Indians in Oklahoma have higher rates of tobacco use (29.2%) than any other racial group in the state. The Oklahoma Tobacco Helpline provides free cessation services to all Oklahomans and implements strategies specifically aimed at increasing the utilization and effectiveness of cessation services for American Indians. To explore Helpline utilization patterns as well as outcomes, such as participant satisfaction and success in quitting, for American Indians. The utilization patterns and outcomes for American Indians were compared to that of the white population from July 1, 2010, to June 30, 2013, to determine whether the Helpline is equally effective among American Indians compared to whites. Helpline utilization data from July 1, 2010, to June 30, 2013, were analyzed in the fall of 2013 to identify patterns and compare differences between American Indian and white Helpline registrants. Four- and 7-month follow-up survey data were used to compare outcomes related to satisfaction with services and quit rates. During the 3-year study period, 10.6% of registrants who enrolled in an intervention were American Indian (11,075) and 71.2% were white (74,493). At the 7-month follow-up survey, 31.7% of American Indians reported having used no tobacco in the past 30 days compared to 36.5% of whites, but the differences were not statistically significant between racial groups. The Oklahoma Tobacco Helpline is equally effective for American Indian and white tobacco users who register for Helpline services. Copyright © 2015 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Oklahoma Tobacco Helpline Utilization and Cessation Among American Indians

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Sydney A.; Beebe, Laura A.; Campbell, Janis E.

    2016-01-01

    Background American Indians in Oklahoma have higher rates of tobacco use (29.2%) than any other racial group in the state. The Oklahoma Tobacco Helpline provides free cessation services to all Oklahomans and implements strategies specifically aimed at increasing the utilization and effectiveness of cessation services for American Indians. Purpose To explore Helpline utilization patterns as well as outcomes, such as participant satisfaction and success in quitting, for American Indians. The utilization patterns and outcomes for American Indians were compared to that of the white population from July 1, 2010, to June 30, 2013, to determine whether the Helpline is equally effective among American Indians compared to whites. Methods Helpline utilization data from July 1, 2010, to June 30, 2013, were analyzed in the fall of 2013 to identify patterns and compare differences between American Indian and white Helpline registrants. Four- and 7-month follow-up survey data were used to compare outcomes related to satisfaction with services and quit rates. Results During the 3-year study period, 10.6% of registrants who enrolled in an intervention were American Indian (11,075) and 71.2% were white (74,493). At the 7-month follow-up survey, 31.7% of American Indians reported having used no tobacco in the past 30 days compared to 36.5% of whites, but the differences were not statistically significant between racial groups. Conclusions The Oklahoma Tobacco Helpline is equally effective for American Indian and white tobacco users who register for Helpline services. PMID:25528707

  15. Acute Toxicity of Nitrite to Various Life Stages of the Amazon River Prawn, Macrobrachium amazonicum, Heller, 1862.

    PubMed

    Dutra, Fabrício Martins; Freire, Carolina Arruda; Vaz Dos Santos, André Martins; Forneck, Sandra Carla; Brazão, Claudia Caramelo; Ballester, Eduardo Luis Cupertino

    2016-11-01

    This study determined the effects of nitrite on different life stages of the Amazon river prawn Macrobrachium amazonicum. Prawns of each life stage (postlarvae, juveniles and adults) were stocked in 24 experimental units (n = 10 prawns), under a complete randomized design. Individuals were exposed to nitrite (0, 1, 2, 4, 8 and 16 mg L(-1)). The median lethal concentration after 96 h (96 h LC50) was calculated through the Weibull I. The mortality results showed that M. amazonicum is slightly less tolerant to nitrite than other species of Macrobrachium. The 96 h LC50 for postlarvae, juveniles and adults of M. amazonicum were of 1.49, 2.36 and 2.34 mg nitrite/L, respectively. Nitrite intoxication risk quotient suggest moderated risk to low risk to the species. Usually in production systems nitrite values are lower than safe levels suggested in this study (0.1 mg L(-1) to postlarvae and 0.2 mg L(-1) nitrite to juvenile and adults), which makes our results appropriate for the production of this species.

  16. Identification of differentially expressed genes in hepatopancreas of oriental river prawn, Macrobrachium nipponense exposed to environmental hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shengming; Xuan, Fujun; Ge, Xianping; Fu, Hongtuo; Zhu, Jian; Zhang, Shiyong

    2013-10-25

    Hypoxia represents a major physiological challenge for prawn culture, and the hepatopancreas plays an important role in these processes. Here, we applied high-throughput sequencing technology to detect the gene expression profile of the hepatopancreas in M. nipponense in response to hypoxia for 3h and hypoxia for 24h. Gene expression profiling identified 1925 genes that were significantly up- or down-regulated by dissolved oxygen availability. Functional categorization of the differentially expressed genes revealed that oxygen transport, electron transport chain, reactive oxygen species generation/scavenging, and immune response were the differentially regulated processes occurring during environmental hypoxia. Finally, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction using six genes independently verified the tag-mapped results. Immunohistochemistry analysis revealed, for the first time, hemocyanin protein expression as significant hypoxia-specific signatures in prawns, which opens the way for in depth molecular studies of hypoxia exposure. The analysis of changes in hepatic gene expression in oriental river prawn provides a preliminary basis for a better understanding of the molecular response to hypoxia exposures. Crown Copyright © 2013. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of (60)Co gamma irradiation on behavior and gill histoarchitecture of giant fresh water prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii (DE MAN).

    PubMed

    Stalin, A; Broos, K V; Sadiq Bukhari, A; Syed Mohamed, H E; Singhal, R K; Venu-babu, P

    2013-06-01

    Present study was designed to observe the effects of (60)Co gamma radiation in behavioral and histological changes in the gills of giant fresh water prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii. The adult prawns were irradiated with four different dose levels (3mGy, 30mGy, 300mGy and 3000mGy) and the control group (without irradiation) was maintained separately. Behavioral changes like hyperactivity, loss of balance, reduced swimming rate, slower rate of food intake and convulsions were observed in higher dose levels of 300mGy and 3000mGy. The histological alterations such as accumulated haemocytes in haemocoelic spaces, abnormal gill tips, lifted lamellar epithelium, swollen and fused lamellae, hyperplasic, necrotic, clavate-globate and complete disorganization of lamellae were observed in (60)Co gamma irradiated prawns. Significantly more considerable histological alterations were observed in the highest dose level of 3000mGy, but no mortality was evidenced. This study serves as biomonitoring tool to assess the radiation pollution in the aquatic environment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Disparities in hospice utilization among American Indian Medicare beneficiaries dying of cancer.

    PubMed

    Guadagnolo, B Ashleigh; Huo, Jinhai; Buchholz, Thomas A; Petereit, Daniel G

    2014-01-01

    We sought to compare hospice utilization for American Indian and White Medicare beneficiaries dying of cancer. We used the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare linked databases to analyze claims for 181,316 White and 690 American Indian patients dying of breast, cervix, colorectal, kidney, lung, pancreas, prostate cancer, or stomach cancer from 2003 to 2009. A lower proportion of American Indians enrolled in hospice compared to White patients (54% vs 65%, respectively; P < .0001). While the proportion of White patients who used hospice services in the last 6 months of life increased from 61% in 2003 to 68% in 2009 (P < .0001), the proportion of American Indian patients using hospice care remained unchanged (P = .57) and remained below that of their White counterparts throughout the years of study. Continued efforts should be made to improve access to culturally relevant hospice care for American Indian patients with terminal cancer.

  19. American Indian and Alaska native aboriginal use of alcohol in the United States.

    PubMed

    Abbott, P J

    1996-01-01

    Alcohol beverages prior to White contact originated with the Mayan and the Aztec Nations and spread to the American Indians of the Southwest. Surprisingly, there are a number of accounts of alcohol use among other American Indians and Alaska Natives. Beverages were limited to wine and beer, and included: balche, pulque, and "haren a pitahaya" wines, tulpi beer and other beverages. White contact brought dramatic shifts in the use and function of alcoholic beverages in American Indian and Alaska Native societies.

  20. Definitely Not Your Average Hollywood Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodside, Jane Harris

    1994-01-01

    Describes multitribal American Indian pow wows, their proliferation over the past 20 years, and typical dances featured. Examines the evolution of one pow wow that takes place during a three-day Appalachian festival in Tennessee. Discusses the role of Appalachian pow wows in bringing together scattered Native communities and educating whites about…

  1. Indians: An Introduction to Canada's Native People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacLean, Hope

    An introduction to Canada Natives briefly identifies the seven different culture areas which existed in Canada before the white man came, and the Indian tribes who lived in those areas. The booklet then gives more extensive description of the history and culture of the Huron (farmers of the Eastern Woodlands), the Blackfoot (Plains), the Ojibwa…

  2. Definitely Not Your Average Hollywood Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodside, Jane Harris

    1994-01-01

    Describes multitribal American Indian pow wows, their proliferation over the past 20 years, and typical dances featured. Examines the evolution of one pow wow that takes place during a three-day Appalachian festival in Tennessee. Discusses the role of Appalachian pow wows in bringing together scattered Native communities and educating whites about…

  3. A Bibliographic Essay Pertaining to Navajo Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Scott

    Introduced by a discussion of the fact that most of the works cited describe Navajos as they "used to be" and an admonition against the common practice of placing all Navajos, or all Indians, under one stereotype, this bibliographic essay traces the history of Navajo contact with the white man and emphasizes efforts at educational…

  4. Dorsal transcription factor is involved in regulating expression of crustin genes during white spot syndrome virus infection.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xin; Wang, Wen; Ren, Qian

    2016-10-01

    Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) pathways play important roles in innate immune responses. In this study, we identified a dorsal homolog (MrDorsal) from freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii. The full-length cDNA of MrDorsal comprised 2533 bp with an open reading frame of 1986 bp, which encoded a peptide of 661 amino acid residues. Amino acid sequence analysis showed that MrDorsal contains a Rel homolog domain and an IPT/TIG (i.e., Ig-like, plexin, and transcription factors) domain. The signature sequence of dorsal protein FRYMCEG existed in the deduced amino acid sequence. Sequence analysis showed that MrDorsal shared high similarities with Dorsal from invertebrate species. MrDorsal was abundant in the hemocytes and gills of healthy prawns but minute levels were detected in other tissues. The expression of MrDorsal was significantly upregulated 48 h after the white spot syndrome virus (WSSV-) challenge. Knockdown of MrDorsal using double-stranded RNA could suppress the transcription of crustin genes (MrCrustin2 and MrCrustin4) in gills of prawns after 48 h of the WSSV challenge. Results indicated that MrDorsal was involved to regulate the expression of crustin genes and it might play potential important roles during WSSV infection.

  5. Impacts of trawling on benthic macro-fauna and -flora of the Spencer Gulf prawn fishing grounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svane, Ib; Hammett, Zoe; Lauer, Peter

    2009-05-01

    The overall effects of trawling on benthic habitats and their assemblages are dependent on the distribution and intensity of trawl effort. The benthic habitats of the Spencer Gulf prawn trawling grounds are subjected to known variable levels of trawling disturbance recorded from fisher's logbooks. These habitats have not been quantitatively investigated. The aim of the study was firstly to characterise the macro-faunal and -floral assemblages and secondly, to comparatively assess trawl impact by testing the null hypothesis of no differences between five sites exposed to different intensity of trawl effort. The distribution and abundance of benthic macro-fauna and -flora were studied at two sampling resolutions by using beam trawl sampling (˜10,000 m 2) and underwater stereophotography (˜4.5 m 2) at five sites with different levels of trawl disturbance (effort). The results showed that the Spencer Gulf prawn trawling grounds are characterised by sandy sediments with a low content of silt and clay, with the exception of one site with very fine gravel. Biomass, abundance and cover of macro-fauna and -flora were generally low throughout, but with large differences among sites. Biomass, abundance and cover were found to be negatively correlated to both trawl hours from 1994-1998 and during the period of study. ANOSIM and SIMPER analyses using biomass, abundance and percentage cover as variables showed significant differences between sites with eight species or taxonomic groups contributing more than 10% to the observed similarity within sites. The two northern sites were dominated by sponges and the bearded mussel, Trichomya hirsutus, and the southern hammer oyster, Malleus meridianus. Other species that contributed to the similarity within sites were the ascidian, Polycarpa viridis, mobile epifauna (the blue swimmer crab, Portunus pelagicus, and the western king prawn, Penaeus (Melicertus) latisulcatus) and demersal fish species (Degens leatherjacket, Thamnaconus

  6. Proteomic analysis of differentially expressed protein in hemocytes of wild giant freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii infected with infectious hypodermal and hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHHNV)

    PubMed Central

    Alinejad, T.; Bin, Kwong Q.; Vejayan, J.; Othman, R.Y.; Bhassu, S.

    2015-01-01

    Epizootic diseases cause huge mortality and economical loses at post larvae stages in freshwater prawn aquaculture industry. These prawns seem less susceptible to viral diseases except for infectious hypodermal and hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHHNV). During viral infection in prawns, hemocytes are the primary organ that shows immunological response within the early stages of infection. We applied proteomic approaches to understand differential expression of the proteins in hemocytes during the viral disease outbreak. To aid the goal, we collected Macrobrachium rosenbergii broodstocks from the local grow out hatchery which reported the first incidence of IHHNV viral outbreak during larvae stage. Primarily, application of the OIE primer targeting 389 bp fragments of IHHNV virus was used in identification of the infected and non-infected samples of the prawn breeding line. Analysis of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis showed specific down-regulation of Arginine kinase and Sarcoplasmic calcium-binding protein and up/down-regulation of Prophenoloxidase1 and hemocyanin isoforms. These proteins were validated using semi quantitative RT-PCR and gene transcripts at mRNA level. These identified proteins can be used as biomarkers, providing a powerful approach to better understanding of the immunity pathway of viral disease with applications in analytic and observational epidemiology diagnosis. Proteomic profiling allows deep insight into the pathogenesis of IHHNV molecular regulation and mechanism of hemocyte in freshwater prawns. PMID:26106581

  7. Indian Studies Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peck, Cy, Sr.; And Others

    A product of the Indian Studies Curriculum Committee and the Indian Studies Staff, this manual on the Indians of Southeast Alaska constitutes a useable classroom tool designed for the cross-cultural program in the Juneau School District. Objectives of this Indian Studies Program are identified as: to increase knowledge, awareness, and positive…

  8. Indian Studies Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peck, Cy, Sr.; And Others

    A product of the Indian Studies Curriculum Committee and the Indian Studies Staff, this manual on the Indians of Southeast Alaska constitutes a useable classroom tool designed for the cross-cultural program in the Juneau School District. Objectives of this Indian Studies Program are identified as: to increase knowledge, awareness, and positive…

  9. American Indians Today.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snipp, C. Matthew

    This paper reviews American Indian demography and the political and economic conditions on Indian reservations. After collapsing during the 19th century, the American Indian population grew gradually during the early 20th century, approaching 2 million in 1990. American Indians are heavily concentrated in the West, northern Midwest, and Oklahoma;…

  10. Jim Crow, Indian Style.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svingen, Orlan J.

    1987-01-01

    Reviews history of voting rights for Indians and discusses a 1986 decision calling for election reform in Big Horn County, Montana, to eliminate violations of the voting rights of the county's Indian citizens. Notes that positive effects--such as election of the county's first Indian commissioner--co-exist with enduring anti-Indian sentiment. (JHZ)

  11. American Indian Education Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Malley, Edward, Ed.

    Written for teachers instructing both Indian and non-Indian students, the handbook provides information on American Indians in California. The handbook is presented in six chapters. Chapter 1 is devoted to terminoloy (e.g., American Indian, Native American, tribe, band, rancheria, and chief). Chapter 2 details historic and cultural changes related…

  12. Indians of the Dakotas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    A brief history of Indian tribes in the States of North and South Dakota is presented. Discussion centers around individual Indian tribes, such as Chippewas and Sioux, which are representative of early and modern Indian life in these States. A section devoted to Indians in these states today offers an indication of the present condition of the…

  13. American Indian Sports Heritage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oxendine, Joseph B.

    This book chronicles the story of sports among American Indians. Part 1 examines the nature and role of games in traditional Indian life, with five chapters on: Indian concepts of sport; ball games; foot racing; other sports; children's play; and games of chance. Part 2 looks at the emergence of Indians in modern sport, with five chapters on:…

  14. Regulation of laboratory populations of snails (Biomphalaria and Bulinus spp.) by river prawns, Macrobrachium spp. (Decapoda, Palaemonidae): implications for control of schistosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Lafferty, Kevin D.; Kuris, Armand M.

    2014-01-01

    Human schistosomiasis is a common parasitic disease endemic in many tropical and subtropical countries. One barrier to achieving long-term control of this disease has been re-infection of treated patients when they swim, bathe, or wade in surface fresh water infested with snails that harbor and release larval parasites. Because some snail species are obligate intermediate hosts of schistosome parasites, removing snails may reduce parasitic larvae in the water, reducing re-infection risk. Here, we evaluate the potential for snail control by predatory freshwater prawns, Macrobrachium rosenbergii and M. vollenhovenii, native to Asia and Africa, respectively. Both prawn species are high value, protein-rich human food commodities, suggesting their cultivation may be beneficial in resource-poor settings where few other disease control options exist. In a series of predation trials in laboratory aquaria, we found both species to be voracious predators of schistosome-susceptible snails, hatchlings, and eggs, even in the presence of alternative food, with sustained average consumption rates of 12% of their body weight per day. Prawns showed a weak preference for Bulinus truncatus over Biomphalaria glabrata snails. Consumption rates were highly predictable based on the ratio of prawn: snail body mass, suggesting satiation-limited predation. Even the smallest prawns tested (0.5–2g) caused snail recruitment failure, despite high snail fecundity. With the World Health Organization turning attention toward schistosomiasis elimination, native prawn cultivation may be a viable snail control strategy that offers a win-win for public health and economic development. PMID:24388955

  15. Dietary effects of Azolla pinnata combined with exogenous digestive enzyme (Digestin™) on growth and nutrients utilization of freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii (de Man 1879)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goda, Ashraf; Saad, Amal; Hanafy, Mohamed; Sharawy, Zaki; El-Haroun, Ehab

    2017-07-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the effect of either individual or combined wheat bran (WB) replacement with Azolla pinnata supplemented with Digestin™ in the diet of freshwater prawn,Macrobrachium rosenbergii Postlarvae (PL) on growth performance, nutrient utilization, chemical body composition and survival (%). Experimental diets were a wheat bran-soybean based diet with no Azolla and Digestin TM (control, T1), and diets containing 17% Azolla supplemented with Digestin TM 0% (T2), 1% (T3), 2% (T4) and 3% (T5). Each experimental diet was allocated into three tanks (6m3/tank) fed for 12 wks. Each tank was subdivided into three equal pens by nets (2m3) and stoked with 84 PL/m2. The experimental diets were readily consumed by prawns PLs where both high growth and good feed efficiency were achieved for all diets. The results showed that the diets containing A. pinnata supplemented with Digestin™ at the level up to 3% have the higher growth and better nutrient utilization than the control diet. No differences were observed for moisture and protein content among the experimental diets. However, the highest protein content was observed on prawns fed on diets T1 and T5 respectively, while the lowest value was recorded for T 4 diet. The results also show that prawn PLs fed the diets contain A. pinnata and supplemented with Digestin TM recorded the highest values of body lipid content compared to the control diet. Feed efficiency and economic conversion rate (ECR) values show that economic performance and the cost-effectiveness of the A. pinnata supplemented with up to 3% Digestin TM recorded the highest net return, and therefore it is recommended for prawn, M. rosenbergii PL's. These results are clearly indicating that A. pinnata have a good potential for use in prawn diets at reasonable levels than other conventional diets.

  16. Prawn Shell Derived Chitin Nanofiber Membranes as Advanced Sustainable Separators for Li/Na-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tian-Wen; Shen, Bao; Yao, Hong-Bin; Ma, Tao; Lu, Lei-Lei; Zhou, Fei; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2017-08-09

    Separators, necessary components to isolate cathodes and anodes in Li/Na-ion batteries, are consumed in large amounts per year; thus, their sustainability is a concerning issue for renewable energy storage systems. However, the eco-efficient and environmentally friendly fabrication of separators with a high mechanical strength, excellent thermal stability, and good electrolyte wettability is still challenging. Herein, we reported the fabrication of a new type of separators for Li/Na-ion batteries through the self-assembly of eco-friendly chitin nanofibers derived from prawn shells. We demonstrated that the pore size in the chitin nanofiber membrane (CNM) separator can be tuned by adjusting the amount of pore generation agent (sodium dihydrogen citrate) in the self-assembly process of chitin nanofibers. By optimizing the pore size in CNM separators, the electrochemical performance of the LiFePO4/Li half-cell with a CNM separator is comparable to that with a commercialized polypropylene (PP) separator. More attractively, the CNM separator showed a much better performance in the LiFePO4/Li cell at 120 °C and Na3V2(PO4)3/Na cell than the PP separator. The proposed fabrication of separators by using natural raw materials will play a significant contribution to the sustainable development of renewable energy storage systems.

  17. Treatment efficiency of effluent prawn culture by wetland with floating aquatic macrophytes arranged in series.

    PubMed

    Henares, M N P; Camargo, A F M

    2014-11-01

    The efficiency of a series of wetland colonized with Eichhornia crassipes and Salvinia molesta to treat the effluent of a giant river prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii) broodstock pond was evaluated in this study. The experimental design was completely randomized and was performed in 9 rectangular tanks (1.6 m3) with three treatments (constructed wetlands) and three replicates. The treatment types included: a wetland colonized with E. crassipes and S. molesta (EcSm) arranged sequentially, a wetland with E. crassipes only (Ec) and a wetland with S. molesta only (Sm). The means of suspended particulate material (SPM), total inorganic nitrogen (TIN), total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN), P-orthophosphate (PO4-P) and total phosphorus (TP) of the treated effluents were compared using ANOVA followed by Tukey's test (P<0.05). The effluent treated in Ec and EcSm wetlands exhibited lower SPM concentrations. The Ec wetland reduced TIN, TKN, PO4-P and TP by 46.0, 43.7, 44.4 and 43.6%, respectively. In the EcSm wetland, the reduction of TIN (23.0%), TKN (33.7%) and PO4-P (26.7%) was similar to the Sm wetland (19.8% TIN, 30.9% TKN and 23.8% PO4-P). The Ec wetland was more efficient in treating pond effluent due likely to the higher root surface of E. crassipes, which forms an extensive area favorable to retention and adsorption of debris and absorption of nutrients.

  18. Parvo-like virus in the hepatopancreas of freshwater prawns Macrobrachium rosenbergii cultivated in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Gangnonngiw, Warachin; Kiatpathomchai, Wansika; Sriurairatana, Siriporn; Laisutisan, Kesinee; Chuchird, Niti; Limsuwan, Chalor; Flegel, Timothy W

    2009-07-23

    A survey of cultivated giant freshwater prawns Macrobrachium rosenbergii from Thailand revealed the presence of unusual spherical to ovoid inclusions in nuclei of hepatopancreas tubule epithelial cells. These began as small eosinophilic inclusions that became more basophilic as they increased in size. They were present in both R-cells and E-cells but were largest and deeply basophilic only in the E-cells. Confocal laser microscopy revealed that stained nucleic acid fluorescence from the inclusions was lost by treatment with DNase I specific for double- and single-stranded DNA and also lost or reduced by treatment with mungbean nuclease specific for single-stranded nucleic acids. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that the inclusions contained tightly packed, unenveloped, viral-like particles of approximately 25 to 30 nm diameter, resembling those produced by shrimp parvoviruses. However, PCR, in situ hybridization and immunohistochemical tests for shrimp parvoviruses previously reported from Thailand were all negative. These results suggested that the inclusions contained a parvo-like virus, not previously reported from M. rosenbergii in Thailand.

  19. Food authentication of commercially-relevant shrimp and prawn species: from classical methods to Foodomics.

    PubMed

    Ortea, Ignacio; Pascoal, Ananías; Cañas, Benito; Gallardo, José M; Barros-Velázquez, Jorge; Calo-Mata, Pilar

    2012-08-01

    Although seafood species identification has traditionally relied on morphological analysis, sometimes this is difficult to apply for the differentiation among penaeid shrimps owing to their phenotypic similarities and to the frequent removal of external carapace during processing. The objective of this review is to provide an updated and extensive overview on the molecular methods for shrimp and prawn species authentication, in which several omics approaches based on protein and DNA analysis are described. DNA-based methods include the amplification by PCR of different genes, commonly the mitochondrial 16S ribosomal RNA and cytochrome oxidase I genes. A recently described method based on RFLP coupled to PCR turned out to be particularly interesting for species differentiation and origin identification. Protein analysis methods for the characterization and detection of species-specific peptides are also summarized, emphasizing some novel proteomics-based approaches, such as phyloproteomics, peptide fragmentation, and species-specific peptide detection by HPLC coupled to multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) MS, the latter representing the fastest method described to date for species authentication in food.

  20. Sensitivity of the freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium lanchesteri (Crustacea: Decapoda), to heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Shuhaimi-Othman, Mohammad; Yakub, Nadzifah; Ramle, Nur-Amalina; Abas, Ahmad

    2011-07-01

    Adult Macrobrachium lanchesteri were exposed for a 4-day period in laboratory conditions to a range of copper (Cu), cadmium (Cd), zinc (Zn) and lead (Pb) concentrations. Mortality was assessed and median lethal times (LT₅₀) and concentrations (LC₅₀) were calculated. At the end of the 4-day period, live prawns were used to determine bioconcentration of the metals. LT₅₀ and LC₅₀ increased with the decrease in mean exposure concentrations and times, respectively, for all metals. LC₅₀s for 96 hours for Cu, Cd, Zn and Pb were 32.3, 7.0, 525.1 and 35.0 µg/L, respectively. Cu, Cd, Zn and Pb bioconcentration in M. lanchesteri increases with exposure to increasing concentrations and Cd was the most toxic to M. lanchesteri, followed by Pb, Cu and Zn. Comparison of LC₅₀ values for metals for this species with those for other freshwater crustacean organisms reveals that M. lanchesteri is equally or more sensitive to heavy metals than most other tested crustaceans.

  1. Molecular cloning and characterization of FGLamide allatostatin gene from the prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii.

    PubMed

    Yin, Guo-Li; Yang, Jin-Shu; Cao, Jun-Xia; Yang, Wei-Jun

    2006-06-01

    Allatostatins are important regulatory neuropeptides that inhibit juvenile hormone (JH) biosynthesis by the corpora allata (CA) in insects. However, to date, the structure and expression of the gene encoding allatostatins have not been reported in any species other than insects. In this study, we used a combination of a semi-nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and screening of a central nervous system cDNA library of Macrobrachium rosenbergii to isolate and sequence a cDNA clone (2885 bp) encoding a 701 amino acid FGLamide allatostatin precursor polypeptide. This is the first reported allatostatin gene in crustacean. The deduced precursor was conceptually split into at least 35 FGLamide allatostatins at dibasic cleavage sites (Lys and Lys/Arg), far more than reported for any other known FGLamide allatostatin precursors from insects (13-14 allatostatins). Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis demonstrated that the gene was expressed in the brain, gut, thoracic and abdominal ganglia, but not in the heart, muscle, ovary, gill, or hepatopancreas. Furthermore, developmentally-dependent expression of the gene was observed in the brain and thoracic ganglia of the prawn by using semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis.

  2. Molecular cloning and expression pattern of oriental river prawn (Macrobrachium nipponense) nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Rahman, N M A; Fu, H T; Sun, S M; Qiao, H; Jin, S; Bai, H K; Zhang, W Y; Liang, G X; Gong, Y S; Xiong, Y W; Wu, Y

    2016-08-29

    Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) produces nitric oxide (NO) by catalyzing the conversion of l-arginine to l-citrulline, with the concomitant oxidation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate. Recently, various studies have verified the importance of NOS invertebrates and invertebrates. However, the NOS gene family in the oriental river prawn Macrobrachium nipponense is poorly understood. In this study, we cloned the full-length NOS complementary DNA from M. nipponense (MnNOS) and characterized its expression pattern in different tissues and at different developmental stages. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) showed the MnNOS gene to be expressed in all investigated tissues, with the highest levels observed in the androgenic gland (P < 0.05). Our results revealed that the MnNOS gene may play a key role in M. nipponense male sexual differentiation. Moreover, RT-qPCR revealed that MnNOS mRNA expression was significantly increased in post-larvae 10 days after metamorphosis (P < 0.05). The expression of this gene in various tissues indicates that it may perform versatile biological functions in M. nipponense.

  3. Dietary supplementation of green synthesized manganese-oxide nanoparticles and its effect on growth performance, muscle composition and digestive enzyme activities of the giant freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii.

    PubMed

    Asaikkutti, Annamalai; Bhavan, Periyakali Saravana; Vimala, Karuppaiya; Karthik, Madhayan; Cheruparambath, Praseeja

    2016-05-01

    The green synthesized Mn3O4 nanoparticles (manganese-oxide nanoparticles) using Ananas comosus (L.) peel extract was characterized by various techniques. HR-SEM photograph showed that manganese-oxide nanoparticles (Mn-oxide NPs) were spherical in shape, with an average size of 40-50 nm. The Zeta potential revealed the surface charge of Mn-oxide NPs to be negative. Further, the Mn-oxide NPs were dietary supplemented for freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii. The experimental basal diets were supplemented with Mn-oxide NPs at the rates of 0 (control), 3.0, 6.0, 9.0, 12, 15 and 18 mg/kg dry feed weight. The as-supplemented Mn-oxide NPs were fed in M. rosenbergii for a period of 90 days. The experimental study demonstrated that prawns fed with diet supplemented with 3-18 mg Mn-oxide NPs/kg shows enhanced (P<0.05) growth performance, including final weight and weight gain (WG). Significant differences (P<0.05) in feed conversion ratio (FCR) were observed in prawn fed with different diets. Additionally, prawns fed with 3.0-18 mg/kg Mn-oxide NPs supplemented diets achieved significant (P<0.05) improvement in growth performance, digestive enzyme activities and muscle biochemical compositions, while, the prawns fed with 16 mg/kg of Mn-oxide NPs showed enhanced performance. Prawns fed on diet supplemented with 16 mg/kg Mn-oxide NPs showed significantly (P<0.05) higher total protein level. The antioxidants enzymatic activity (SOD and CAT) metabolic enzymes status in muscle and hepatopancreas showed no significant (P>0.05) alterations in prawns fed with 3.0-18 mg/kg of Mn-oxide NPs supplemented diets. Consequently, the present work proposed that 16 mg/kg of Mn-oxide NPs could be supplemented for flexible enhanced survival, growth and production of M. rosenbergii. Therefore, the data of the present study recommend the addition of 16 mg/kg of Mn-oxide NPs diet to developed prawn growth and antioxidant defense system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  4. Indian Country: A History of Native People in America and Indian Country: Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Karen D.; Harjo, Lisa D.

    Appropriate for the middle grades through junior high school, this book and accompanying teacher's guide provide a curriculum for teaching American Indian history. Following an overview of the European encounter and the early years of White penetration into North America, the book focuses on five distinct periods of U.S. government policy toward…

  5. Cowboys and Indians: Perceptions of Western Films among American Indians and Anglos.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shively, JoEllen

    1992-01-01

    Presents the results of a study of how minorities participate in and rework the central myths of the dominant culture. The responses of 20 Anglo White males versus 20 American Indian males to a western film showed that the meaning imputed to cultural works varies over social space. (JB)

  6. Indian Country: A History of Native People in America and Indian Country: Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Karen D.; Harjo, Lisa D.

    Appropriate for the middle grades through junior high school, this book and accompanying teacher's guide provide a curriculum for teaching American Indian history. Following an overview of the European encounter and the early years of White penetration into North America, the book focuses on five distinct periods of U.S. government policy toward…

  7. The Extent of Bilingualism Among the Crow and the Northern Cheyenne Indian School Populations, Grades One Through Twelve. A Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dracon, John

    The research was conducted in the schools on or near the Crow and the Northern Cheyenne Indian reservations in Montana during October of 1969. All the students, both Indian and white, grades 1 through 12, were involved in the study. Some 2020 Indian students, out of a combined student enrollment of 3626, were assessed as to their bilingual…

  8. No Turning Back: A Hopi Indian Woman's Struggle to Live in Two Worlds. As Told to Vada F. Carlson.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qoyawayma, Polingaysi

    For high school and adult readers this autobiography of Polingaysi Qoyawayma (Elizabeth Q. White) relates a Hopi Indian woman's struggle to adjust to an alien culture and to develop teaching methods to bridge the gap between Indians and the white world. Information on Hopi legends and ceremonies introduce the reader to the Hopi way of life. Born…

  9. The Successful Educational Journeys of American Indian Women: Forming Aspirations for Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrade, Maureen Snow

    2014-01-01

    American Indians (AIs) have lower higher education enrollment and completion rates than Whites and most minority groups. AI women, however, participate at higher rates than AI men, White women, and White men. Research has not examined what contributes to their higher education aspirations. This study explored the middle and high school experiences…

  10. Toxic impact of aldrin on acid and alkaline phosphatase activity of penaeid prawn, Metapenaeus monoceros: In vitro study

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, M.S.; Jayaprada, P.; Rao, K.V.R. )

    1991-03-01

    The increasing contamination of the aquatic environment by the indiscriminate and widespread use of different kinds of pesticides is a serious problem for environmental biologists. Organochlorine insecticides are more hazardous since they are not only more toxic but also leave residues in nature. The deleterious effects of aldrin on several crustaceans have been studied. But studies concerning the impact of aldrin on biochemical aspects of crustaceans are very much limited. The present study is aimed at probing the in vitro effects of aldrin on the acid and alkaline phosphatase activity levels in selected tissues of penaeid prawn, Metapenaeus monoceros (Fabricius).

  11. Pulmonary thromboembolism in American Indians and Alaskan Natives.

    PubMed

    Stein, Paul D; Kayali, Fadi; Olson, Ronald E; Milford, Creagh E

    2004-09-13

    The rate of diagnosis of deep venous thrombosis and/or pulmonary embolism (collectively, venous thromboembolism: VTE) among patients discharged from Indian Health Service hospital care from 1980 through 1996 was considerably lower than rates reported in African Americans or whites. Expansion of the national census in 1990 to include American Indians and Alaskan Natives permits a more in-depth examination of this issue. Combined data from the National Hospital Discharge Survey (nonfederal hospitals) and the Indian Health Service (federal hospitals) from 1996 through 2001 were used to evaluate the rate of diagnosis of VTE in American Indians and Alaskan Natives. The diagnosis of VTE in American Indians and Alaskan Natives, based on combined data from the National Hospital Discharge Survey and the Indian Health Service was 71 per 100,000 per year compared with 155 per 100,000 per year in African Americans (P<.001) and 131 per 100,000 per year in whites (P<.001). The rate ratio comparing the rate of diagnosis of VTE in American Indians and Alaskan Natives with African Americans was 0.46 (95% confidence interval, 0.45-0.47) and comparing American Indians and Alaskan Natives with whites it was 0.54 (95% confidence interval, 0.53-0.55). The observed relatively low incidence of VTE in American Indians and Alaskan Natives would seem to be due to as yet undetermined genetic factors. The possibility that American Indians and Alaskan Natives have different lifestyles that affect the rate of diagnosis of VTE cannot be excluded.

  12. Creepy White Gaze: Rethinking the Diorama as a Pedagogical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sterzuk, Andrea; Mulholland, Valerie

    2011-01-01

    Drawing on gaze and postcolonial theory, this article provides a theoretical discussion of a problematic photograph published in a provincial teachers' newsletter. The photo consists of a White settler child and two White settler educators gathered around his heritage fair entry diorama entitled "Great Plains Indians." This article…

  13. Creepy White Gaze: Rethinking the Diorama as a Pedagogical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sterzuk, Andrea; Mulholland, Valerie

    2011-01-01

    Drawing on gaze and postcolonial theory, this article provides a theoretical discussion of a problematic photograph published in a provincial teachers' newsletter. The photo consists of a White settler child and two White settler educators gathered around his heritage fair entry diorama entitled "Great Plains Indians." This article…

  14. Eastern Bolivia: The White Promised Land. IWGIA Document 31.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Norman

    The Indians of Bolivia, already exploited by a military dictatorship, will have to take up more of the white man's burden if South Africans and Rhodesians accept an invitation to colonize the country. White South Africans, accustomed to the excesses of their own police, will find much that is familiar in Bolivia. Bolivia is a poor country, its per…

  15. Eastern Bolivia: The White Promised Land. IWGIA Document 31.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Norman

    The Indians of Bolivia, already exploited by a military dictatorship, will have to take up more of the white man's burden if South Africans and Rhodesians accept an invitation to colonize the country. White South Africans, accustomed to the excesses of their own police, will find much that is familiar in Bolivia. Bolivia is a poor country, its per…

  16. Effect of feeding frequency on growth, body composition, antioxidant status and mRNA expression of immunodependent genes before or after ammonia-N stress in juvenile oriental river prawn, Macrobrachium nipponense.

    PubMed

    Ding, Zhili; Kong, Youqin; Zhang, Yixiang; Li, Jingfen; Cao, Fang; Zhou, Junbo; Ye, Jinyun

    2017-09-01

    Feeding frequency is important for the improvement of growth performance and immunity of aquatic animals. In this study, the effect of feeding frequency on growth, body composition, antioxidant status and mRNA expression of immunodependent genes before or after ammonia-N stress was examined in Macrobrachium nipponense. Prawns were randomly assigned to one of five feeding frequencies (1, 2, 3, 4 and 6 times/day) following the same ration size over an 8-week growth trial. After the feeding trial, prawns were challenged by ammonia-N. The weight gain of prawns fed with 3-6 times/day was significantly higher than that of prawns fed with 1 time/day. The best feed conversion ratio was obtained from prawns fed with 3-6 times/day. Body crude lipid with feeding frequency of 3, 4 or 6 times/day was quite lower than that with 1 time/day. High feeding frequency (6 times/day) induced significantly elevated hepatopancreas super oxide dismutase and catalase activities. The malondialdehyde level in prawns fed with 6 times/day was also significantly increased, which was higher than that of prawns fed with other feeding frequency. mRNA expression of toll like receptor 3 and myeloid differentiation primary response protein MyD88 was promoted by feeding frequency from 3 to 4 time/day but inhibited by high or low feeding frequency. Similar mRNA expression variation trends of the two genes were observed in prawns after ammonia-N stress. After ammonia-N challenge, the highest cumulative mortality was observed in prawns fed with 6 times/day, which was significantly higher than that of prawns fed with 2-4 times/day. These findings demonstrate that (1) too high feeding frequency induced oxidative stress and malondialdehyde accumulation, negatively affecting the health status of prawns and reduced its resistance to ammonia-N stress; (2) the optimal feeding frequency to improve growth and immune response of this species at juvenile stage is 3-4 times/day; (3) considering costs of labour, a

  17. Effects of hot-water extract of banana (Musa acuminata) fruit's peel on the antibacterial activity, and anti-hypothermal stress, immune responses and disease resistance of the giant freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbegii.

    PubMed

    Rattanavichai, Wutti; Cheng, Winton

    2014-08-01

    The hot-extracts isolated from fruit's peel of banana, Musa acuminata, was evaluated on the antibacterial activity to pathogens from aquatic animals, and immunostimulating potential, disease resistance and anti-hypothermal stress in giant freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii through injection administration. The banana peel extract (BPE) showed good activity against 1 Gram-positive and 3 Gram-negative pathogens, including Lactococcus garvieae, Photobacteria damsella, Vibrio alginolyticus and Vibrio parahemolyticus especially in prawn pathogen of L. garvieae strain, which were carried out by a disk diffusion method. Prawn received BPE via injection administration at 1-6 μg (g prawn)(-1) significantly increased total haemocyte count (THC), hyaline cell (HC), granular cell (GC), phenoloxidase (PO) activity and phagocytic activity against L. garvieae from 3 to 6 days, and significantly increased clearance efficiency against L. garvieae and a significantly decreased coagulation time of prawn from 1 to 6 days. Prawn injected with BPE at 6.0 μg (g prawn)(-1) for 6 days showed significantly increased superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, but significantly decreased respiratory bursts (RBs) of per haemocyte. Survival rates of M. rosenbergii injected with BPE at concentrations of 1, 3 and 6 μg (g prawn)(-1) were significantly higher than those injected with saline control after challenge with L. garvieae for 4-6 days, and the respective relative survival percentages of prawn were 28.6%, 38.1%, and 47.8%, respectively at 6 days. The sublethal time of prawns that had received saline and BPE at 1, 3 and 6 μg (g prawn)(-1) for 6 days and then were transferred from 28 °C to 14 °C were 69.4, 79.8, 83.6, and 90.2 h, respectively. It was concluded that the BPE can be used as the bacteriostat, and immunostimulant and physiological regulator for prawn through injection administration to enhance immunity, physiological responses, and resistance against L. garvieae

  18. Improvising on an Indian Flute.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giles, Martha Mead

    1984-01-01

    The Indian flute can be used by teachers to supplement classroom study of Indian culture. Indians used it as a personal instrument. Describes how an Indian flute can be made, and suggests improvising bird calls and melodies on it. (CS)

  19. Improvising on an Indian Flute.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giles, Martha Mead

    1984-01-01

    The Indian flute can be used by teachers to supplement classroom study of Indian culture. Indians used it as a personal instrument. Describes how an Indian flute can be made, and suggests improvising bird calls and melodies on it. (CS)

  20. Reproductive biology of the prawn Melicertus kerathurus (Decapoda: Penaeidae) in Thermaikos Gulf (N. Aegean Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kevrekidis, Kosmas; Thessalou-Legaki, Maria

    2013-03-01

    The reproductive biology including insemination frequency, ovarian maturation, gonadosomatic index (GSI), size at first maturity, and fecundity of Melicertus kerathurus were investigated using monthly samples from Thermaikos Gulf. Insemination was recorded by the presence of a spermatophore in the thelycum, and ovarian development was based on macroscopic ovarian staging (ST1-ST5). Inseminated females were found throughout the year with high percentages recorded from April to July. Although all ovarian stages were represented in mated females, insemination increased with size and ovarian maturation. High percentages of vitellogenic or mature ovarian stages were observed from May to July, while immature and developing ovaries were predominant mainly in winter. Spawned ovaries occurred from May to October. Carapace length at first maturity based on the presence of a spermatophore (CL50sp) was estimated at 39.20 mm, while that based on the presence of vitellogenic and mature ovaries (CL50ov) at 40.70 mm. The seasonal peak in the proportion of mature females (ST4) varied with size. Inseminated females at ST4 and GSI peaked in June-July. GSI varied in relation to insemination status and ovarian stage. In large females (>50 mm CL), the decline in mature ovaries and GSI increment with size indicates a relative reduction in the reproductive output. The number of oocytes ranged from 62,742 to 602,947 (mean ± SD: 268,000 ± 113,000). As the prawns are targeted during the spawning season, mainly by the artisanal fishery, and female size at first maturity is selected by artisanal net size, managerial measures toward artisanal fishery should be implemented.

  1. Genetic Inheritance of Female and Male Morphotypes in Giant Freshwater Prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Giant freshwater prawn (GFP) Macrobrachium rosenbergii is unique with males categorized in five different morphotypes (small claw, orange claw, blue claw, old blue claw and no claw males) and females in three reproductive statuses (mature ovary, berried and spawned females). In the present study we examined genetic inheritance of female and male morphotypes, their body weights and genetic associations between morphotypes and body traits. Restricted maximum likelihood fitting a multi-trait animal model was performed on a total of 21,459 body records collected over five generations in a GFP population selected for high growth rate. The estimates of variance components showed that there were substantial differences in additive genetic variance in body weight between male morphotypes. The low and significantly different from one genetic correlations between the expressions of body weight in male morphotypes also suggest that these traits should be treated as genetically different traits in selective breeding programs. By contrast, body weights of female types are essentially the same characters as indicated by the high genetic correlations between homologous trait expressions. In addition to body weight, male morphotypes and female reproductive statuses were treated as traits in themselves and were analysed as binary observations using animal and sire linear mixed models, and logit and probit threshold models. The estimates of heritability back-transformed from the liability scale were in good agreement with those obtained from linear mixed models, ranging from 0.02 to 0.43 for male morphotypes and 0.06 to 0.10 for female types. The genetic correlations among male morphoptypes were generally favourable. Body weight showed negative genetic associations with SM (−0.96), whereas those of body weight with other male morphotypes were positive (0.25 to 0.76). Our results showed that there is existence of heritable (additive genetic) component for male morphotypes, giving

  2. Abundance and diversity of zooplankton in semi intensive prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii) farm.

    PubMed

    Shil, Jadobendro; Ghosh, Alokesh Kumar; Rahaman, S M Bazlur

    2013-12-01

    The present study was carried out on the seasonal abundance and diversity of zooplankton in a semi- intensive prawn farm of Bagerhat district from July to December, 2008. Plankton samples were collected by conical shaped monofilament nylon net (Plankton net) and Lugol's solution was used for preservation. The zooplankton abundance was influenced by physico-chemical factors. During the study period 11 genera of zooplankton under 5 orders were recorded from the study ponds namely Copepoda, Rotifera, Cladocera, Ostracoda and Crustacean Larvae. Among all groups copepod was the dominant order. The percentages of Copepoda, Rotifera, Cladocera, Ostracoda and Crustacean Larvae in semi-intensive culture system were 54%, 28%, 12%, 4% and 2% respectively. But the genera Brachionus under the order of Rotifer was dominant among all other genera. Cyclops and Helidiaptomus under the order of Copepod were the 2nd dominant genera. Numbers of zooplankton species were recorded to be the highest in summer season and minimum at early winter season. Highest number of zooplankton found at the month of October. Total zooplankton shows significant positive relationship with water temperature ((r = +0.384), Dissolve Oxygen(r = +0.113), pH(r = +0.320), Free CO2 (r = +0.319), Alkalinity(r = +0.269), Hardness (r = +0.402) and negative relationship with Salinity(r = -0.486), Transparency(r = -0.693). The findings of the present study will help to improve the management strategies of shrimp culture system.

  3. Genetic inheritance of female and male morphotypes in giant freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii.

    PubMed

    Dinh, Hung; Nguyen, Nguyen Hong

    2014-01-01

    Giant freshwater prawn (GFP) Macrobrachium rosenbergii is unique with males categorized in five different morphotypes (small claw, orange claw, blue claw, old blue claw and no claw males) and females in three reproductive statuses (mature ovary, berried and spawned females). In the present study we examined genetic inheritance of female and male morphotypes, their body weights and genetic associations between morphotypes and body traits. Restricted maximum likelihood fitting a multi-trait animal model was performed on a total of 21,459 body records collected over five generations in a GFP population selected for high growth rate. The estimates of variance components showed that there were substantial differences in additive genetic variance in body weight between male morphotypes. The low and significantly different from one genetic correlations between the expressions of body weight in male morphotypes also suggest that these traits should be treated as genetically different traits in selective breeding programs. By contrast, body weights of female types are essentially the same characters as indicated by the high genetic correlations between homologous trait expressions. In addition to body weight, male morphotypes and female reproductive statuses were treated as traits in themselves and were analysed as binary observations using animal and sire linear mixed models, and logit and probit threshold models. The estimates of heritability back-transformed from the liability scale were in good agreement with those obtained from linear mixed models, ranging from 0.02 to 0.43 for male morphotypes and 0.06 to 0.10 for female types. The genetic correlations among male morphoptypes were generally favourable. Body weight showed negative genetic associations with SM (-0.96), whereas those of body weight with other male morphotypes were positive (0.25 to 0.76). Our results showed that there is existence of heritable (additive genetic) component for male morphotypes, giving

  4. Female-only sex-linked amplified fragment length polymorphism markers support ZW/ZZ sex determination in the giant freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xue-Hui; Qiu, Gao-Feng

    2013-12-01

    Sex determination mechanisms in many crustacean species are complex and poorly documented. In the giant freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii, a ZW/ZZ sex determination system was previously proposed based on sex ratio data obtained by crosses of sex-reversed females (neomales). To provide molecular evidence for the proposed system, novel sex-linked molecular markers were isolated in this species. Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) using 64 primer combinations was employed to screen prawn genomes for DNA markers linked with sex loci. Approximately 8400 legible fragments were produced, 13 of which were uniquely identified in female prawns with no indication of corresponding male-specific markers. These AFLP fragments were reamplified, cloned and sequenced, producing two reliable female-specific sequence characterized amplified region (SCAR) markers. Additional individuals from two unrelated geographic populations were used to verify these findings, confirming female-specific amplification of single bands. Detection of internal polymorphic sites was conducted by designing new primer pairs based on these internal fragments. The internal SCAR fragments also displayed specificity in females, indicating high levels of variation between female and male specimens. The distinctive feature of female-linked SCAR markers can be applied for rapid detection of prawn gender. These sex-specific SCAR markers and sex-associated AFLP candidates unique to female specimens support a sex determination system consistent with female heterogamety (ZW) and male homogamety (ZZ).

  5. Characterization of Key Aroma Compounds in Raw and Thermally Processed Prawns and Thermally Processed Lobsters by Application of Aroma Extract Dilution Analysis.

    PubMed

    Mall, Veronika; Schieberle, Peter

    2016-08-24

    Application of aroma extract dilution analysis (AEDA) to an aroma distillate of blanched prawn meat (Litopenaeus vannamei) (BPM) revealed 40 odorants in the flavor dilution (FD) factor range from 4 to 1024. The highest FD factors were assigned to 2-acetyl-1-pyrroline, 3-(methylthio)propanal, (Z)-1,5-octadien-3-one, trans-4,5-epoxy-(E)-2-decenal, (E)-3-heptenoic acid, and 2-aminoacetophenone. To understand the influence of different processing conditions on odorant formation, fried prawn meat was investigated by means of AEDA in the same way, revealing 31 odorants with FD factors between 4 and 2048. Also, the highest FD factors were determined for 2-acetyl-1-pyrroline, 3-(methylthio)propanal, and (Z)-1,5-octadien-3-one, followed by 4-hydroxy-2,5-dimethyl-3(2H)-furanone, (E)-3-heptenoic acid, and 2-aminoacetophenone. As a source of the typical marine, sea breeze-like odor attribute of the seafood, 2,4,6-tribromoanisole was identified in raw prawn meat as one of the contributors. Additionally, the aroma of blanched prawn meat was compared to that of blanched Norway and American lobster meat, respectively (Nephrops norvegicus and Homarus americanus). Identification experiments revealed the same set of odorants, however, with differing FD factors. In particular, 3-hydroxy-4,5-dimethyl-2(5H)-furanone was found as the key aroma compound in blanched Norway lobster, whereas American lobster contained 3-methylindole with a high FD factor.

  6. Attenuation coefficients and absorbed gamma radiation energy of different varieties of potato, mango and prawn at different storage time and physiological condition.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sayanti; Das, M K

    2014-02-15

    Attenuation coefficients of different varieties of gamma irradiated potato (Kufri Chandramukhi, Kufri Jyoti, and Kufri Sindhuri), mango (Himsagar, Langra, Dashehri and Fazli) and prawn (Tiger prawn and Fresh water prawn) of different storage time and physiological stages were determined. After six months storage attenuation coefficient of Kufri Chandramukhi was decreased by 30.8% with decrease of density and moisture content. Decreasing trend of attenuation coefficient during storage was more prominent (almost 50%) in other two varieties of potato. On the other hand in all four varieties, unripe mango consisted of significantly less (p ≤ 0.05) attenuation coefficient (around 11-14%) than the ripe one due to changes in physiological properties and density. Different varieties of prawn had different attenuation coefficients due to subtle differences in their proximate composition. Due to having different attenuation coefficients, different food components, even different varieties of same food component absorbed different gamma radiation energy though exposed to same radiation dose. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. White Rock

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-05-21

    White Rock is the unofficial name for this unusual landform which was first observed during NASA Mariner 9 mission in the early 1970 and is now shown here in an image from NASA Mars Odyssey spacecraft.

  8. Making Education Relevant for Contemporary Indian Youth: A Handbook for Cultural Curriculum Developers Focusing on American Indian Tribes and Canadian First Nations. 1991 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chisholm, Anita; And Others

    This guide was developed to assist American Indian and Canadian Native educators in developing cultural curriculum materials for use in the classroom. The purpose of developing authentic cultural materials is to enhance the educational experience of Indian students and White students. The guide covers the following topics: (1) cultural curriculum…

  9. The impact of US versus Indian BMD reference standards on the diagnosis of osteoporosis among South Asian Indians living in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Melamed, Alexander; Vittinghoff, Eric; Sriram, Usha; Schwartz, Ann V.; Kanaya, Alka M.

    2010-01-01

    The relationship between bone mineral density (BMD) and fracture risk is not well-established for non-white populations. There is no established BMD reference standard for South Asians. Dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) was used to measure BMD at total hip and lumbar spine in 150 US-based South Asian Indians. For each subject T-scores were calculated using BMD reference values based on US white, North Indian and South Indian populations, and the resulting WHO BMD category assignments were compared. Reference standards derived from Indian populations classified a larger proportion of US-based Indians as normal than did US white-based standards. The percentage of individuals reclassified when changing between reference standards varied by skeletal site and reference population origin, ranging from 13% (95% CI, 7–18%), when switching from US-white- to North Indian-based standard for total hip, to 40% (95% CI, 32–48%), when switching from US white to South Indian reference values for lumbar spine. These finding illustrate that choice of reference standard has a significant effect on the diagnosis of osteoporosis in South Asians, and underscore the importance of future research to quantify the relationship between BMD and fracture risk in this population. PMID:20663699

  10. 75 FR 1384 - Indian Health Professions Preparatory, Indian Health Professions Pregraduate and Indian Health...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Indian Health Service Indian Health Professions Preparatory, Indian Health Professions Pregraduate and Indian Health Professions Scholarship Programs Announcement Type: Initial. CFDA Numbers: 93...

  11. Modern Indian Psychology. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryde, John F.

    Written on the basis of senior Indian verbal relatings collected over a 23-year span, this revised edition on modern Indian psychology incorporates suggestions from Indian students and their teachers, Indian and non-Indian social studies experts, and other Indian people. The book contains 6 major divisions: (1) "Culture and Indian…

  12. Modern Indian Psychology. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryde, John F.

    Written on the basis of senior Indian verbal relatings collected over a 23-year span, this revised edition on modern Indian psychology incorporates suggestions from Indian students and their teachers, Indian and non-Indian social studies experts, and other Indian people. The book contains 6 major divisions: (1) "Culture and Indian…

  13. Indian Graphic Symbols.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stump, Sarain

    1979-01-01

    Noting Indian tribes had invented ways to record facts and ideas, with graphic symbols that sometimes reached the complexity of hieroglyphs, this article illustrates and describes Indian symbols. (Author/RTS)

  14. The Indian Languages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strong, Augusta

    1969-01-01

    Appraisal of Boas'"Introduction to Handbook of American Indian Languages (1911), and Powell's "Indian Linguistic Famlies of America North of Mexico (1891), as reissued by University of Nebraska, Lincoln. (AF)

  15. The Indian Languages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strong, Augusta

    1969-01-01

    Appraisal of Boas'"Introduction to Handbook of American Indian Languages (1911), and Powell's "Indian Linguistic Famlies of America North of Mexico (1891), as reissued by University of Nebraska, Lincoln. (AF)

  16. Transciptomic and histological analysis of hepatopancreas, muscle and gill tissues of oriental river prawn (Macrobrachium nipponense) in response to chronic hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shengming; Xuan, Fujun; Fu, Hongtuo; Zhu, Jian; Ge, Xianping; Gu, Zhimin

    2015-07-03

    Oriental river prawn, Macrobrachium nipponense, is a commercially important species found in brackish and fresh waters throughout China. Chronic hypoxia is a major physiological challenge for prawns in culture, and the hepatopancreas, muscle and gill tissues play important roles in adaptive processes. However, the effects of dissolved oxygen availability on gene expression and physiological functions of those tissues of prawns are unknown. Adaptation to hypoxia is a complex process, to help us understand stress-sensing mechanism and ultimately permit selection for hypoxia- tolerant prawns, we performed transcriptomic analysis of juvenile M. nipponense hepatopancreas, gill and muscle tissues by RNA-Seq. Approximately 46,472,741; 52,773,612 and 58,195,908 raw sequence reads were generated from hepatopancreas, muscle and gill tissues, respectively. A total of 62,722 unigenes were generated, of the assembled unigenes, we identified 8,892 genes that were significantly up-regulated, while 5,760 genes were significantly down-regulated in response to chronic hypoxia. Genes from well known functional categories and signaling pathways associated with stress responses and adaptation to extreme environments were significantly enriched, including genes in the functional categories "response to stimulus", "transferase activity" and "oxidoreductase activity", and the signaling pathways "oxidative phosphorylation", "glycolysis/gluconeogenesis" and "MAPK signaling". The expression patterns of 18 DEGs involved in hypoxic regulation of M. nipponense were validated by quantitative real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reactions (qRT-PCR; average correlation coefficient = 0.94). In addition, the hepatopancreas and gills exhibited histological differences between hypoxia and normoxia groups. These structural alterations could affect the vital physiological functions of prawns in response to chronic hypoxia, which could adversely affect growth and survival of M. nipponense

  17. Extension of the shelf life of prawns (Penaeus japonicus) by vacuum packaging and high-pressure treatment.

    PubMed

    López-Caballero, M E; Pérez-Mateos, M; Borderías, J A; Montero, P

    2000-10-01

    The present study has investigated the application of high pressures (200 and 400 MPa) in chilled prawn tails, both conventionally stored (air) and vacuum packaged. Vacuum packaging and high-pressure treatment did extend the shelf life of the prawn samples, although it did affect muscle color very slightly, giving it a whiter appearance. The viable shelf life of 1 week for the air-stored samples was extended to 21 days in the vacuum-packed samples, 28 days in the samples treated at 200 MPa, and 35 days in the samples pressurized at 400 MPa. Vacuum packaging checked the onset of blackening, whereas high-pressure treatment aggravated the problem. From a microbiological point of view, batches conventionally stored reached about 6 log CFU/g or even higher at 14 days. Similar figures were reached in total number of bacteria in vacuum-packed samples and in pressurized at 200-MPa samples at 21 days. When samples were pressurized at 400 MPa, total numbers of bacteria were below 5.5 log CFU/g at 35 days of storage. Consequently, a combination of vacuum packaging and high-pressure treatment would appear to be beneficial in prolonging freshness and preventing spotting.

  18. Three-dimensional reconstruction of black tiger prawn (Penaeus monodon) spermatozoa using serial block-face scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Feng, Tianyi; Paterson, Brian D; Webb, Robyn; Johnston, Stephen D

    2016-05-01

    Serial Block-Face Scanning Electron Microscopy (SBF-SEM) was used in this study to examine the ultrastructural morphology of Penaeus monodon spermatozoa. SBF-SEM provided a large dataset of sequential electron-microscopic-level images that facilitated comprehensive ultrastructural observations and three-dimensional reconstructions of the sperm cell. Reconstruction divulged a nuclear region of the spermatophoral spermatozoon filled with decondensed chromatin but with two apparent levels of packaging density. In addition, the nuclear region contained, not only numerous filamentous chromatin elements with dense microregions, but also large centrally gathered granular masses. Analysis of the sperm cytoplasm revealed the presence of degenerated mitochondria and membrane-less dense granules. A large electron-lucent vesicle and "arch-like" structures were apparent in the subacrosomal area, and an acrosomal core was found in the acrosomal vesicle. The spermatozoal spike arose from the inner membrane of the acrosomal vesicle, which was slightly bulbous in the middle region of the acrosomal vesicle, but then extended distally into a broad dense plate and to a sharp point proximally. This study has demonstrated that SBF-SEM is a powerful technique for the 3D ultrastructural reconstruction of prawn spermatozoa, that will no doubt be informative for further studies of sperm assessment, reproductive pathology and the spermiocladistics of penaeid prawns, and other decapod crustaceans.

  19. Infection with schistosome parasites in snails leads to increased predation by prawns: implications for human schistosomiasis control.

    PubMed

    Swartz, Scott J; De Leo, Giulio A; Wood, Chelsea L; Sokolow, Susanne H

    2015-12-01

    Schistosomiasis - a parasitic disease that affects over 200 million people across the globe - is primarily transmitted between human definitive hosts and snail intermediate hosts. To reduce schistosomiasis transmission, some have advocated disrupting the schistosome life cycle through biological control of snails, achieved by boosting the abundance of snails' natural predators. But little is known about the effect of parasitic infection on predator-prey interactions, especially in the case of schistosomiasis. Here, we present the results of laboratory experiments performed on Bulinus truncatus and Biomphalaria glabrata snails to investigate: (i) rates of predation on schistosome-infected versus uninfected snails by a sympatric native river prawn, Macrobrachium vollenhovenii, and (ii) differences in snail behavior (including movement, refuge-seeking and anti-predator behavior) between infected and uninfected snails. In predation trials, prawns showed a preference for consuming snails infected with schistosome larvae. In behavioral trials, infected snails moved less quickly and less often than uninfected snails, and were less likely to avoid predation by exiting the water or hiding under substrate. Although the mechanism by which the parasite alters snail behavior remains unknown, these results provide insight into the effects of parasitic infection on predator-prey dynamics and suggest that boosting natural rates of predation on snails may be a useful strategy for reducing transmission in schistosomiasis hotspots. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  20. Charles Eastman: The Story of an American Indian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Betsy

    Dr. Charles Alexander Eastman was a product of two worlds--the Indian and the White. A member of the Santee Sioux Tribe, he was respected and admired in both of these worlds for the work he did on behalf of American Indians, first as a young doctor caring for the sick on the Reservation, and later as a writer and speaker, showing the richness of…

  1. Atherosclerosis risk factors in American Indians with Alzheimer disease: preliminary findings.

    PubMed

    Weiner, Myron F; Rosenberg, Roger N; Womack, Kyle B; Svetlik, Doris A; Fuller, Carey; Fields, Julie; Hynan, Linda S

    2008-01-01

    Factors predisposing to and associated with atherosclerosis may impact the onset and progression of Alzheimer disease (AD). The high prevalence of atherosclerosis and associated risk factors in American Indians makes them ideal subjects to test this association. We compared frequency of history of hypertension, myocardial infarction, stroke, diabetes, and high cholesterol in 34 American Indians with AD with 34 age-matched American Indian controls, and 34 age-matched whites with probable AD. We also measured waist size, height, and weight, and acquired blood for determination of plasma homocysteine and apolipoprotein E genotype. The 3 groups did not differ significantly in age or sex. History of hypertension and diabetes was significantly more common among American Indian AD patients than Indian controls or whites with AD. The 3 groups did not differ in history of stroke or myocardial infarction. Body mass index was significantly greater in both Indian groups than the white AD group. Plasma homocysteine levels were greater, but not significantly so, in the Indian AD than the Indian control group. Thus, there is preliminary evidence of a modest association between history of hypertension and diabetes and AD in a small sample of American Indians. This suggests that changes in lifestyle factors could influence the expression of AD in American Indians.

  2. Indians in Minneapolis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Richard G.

    The League of Women Voters of Minneapolis decided in May of 1967 to examine public and private agencies in the city of Minneapolis to determine agency perception of Indian problems, and to assess how well the various agencies were dealing with problems related to the Indian population of the city. In addition, 100 Indians were randomly selected…

  3. National Indian Education Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Karen Kay

    2006-01-01

    This report includes information from the National Indian Education Study of American Indian/Alaska Native students in grades 4 and 8 on the 2005 National Assessment of Education Progress (NAEP) in reading and mathematics. The national sample includes both public and private schools (i.e. Bureau of Indian Affairs, Department of Defense Education…

  4. Indians of North Carolina.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    A brief historical review of the Cherokee Indians from the mid-sixteenth century to modern day depicts an industrious tribe adversely affected by the settlement movement only to make exceptional economic advancements with the aid of the Bureau of Indian Affairs. Civic pride and self-leadership among the Cherokee Indians in North Carolina has…

  5. Indian Law Enforcement History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Etheridge, David

    Written as a tribute to American Indian law enforcement officers and the Indian Criminal Justice System, this monographh details the history of the legislative, judicial, financial, and cultural problems associated with the development of Indian law enforcement. Citing numerous court cases, pieces of legislation, and individual and organizational…

  6. INDIANS OF SOUTH DAKOTA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ARTICHOKER, JOHN, JR.

    USING A QUESTION AND ANSWER FORMAT, THIS DOCUMENT ATTEMPTS TO EXPLAIN MANY FACETS OF THE PROBLEMS FACING THE SOUTH DAKOTA INDIANS, PARTICULARLY THOSE SIOUX INDIANS WHO HAVE RETAINED THEIR CUSTOMS AND CULTURE WHETHER LIVING ON OR OFF THE RESERVATIONS. A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE DACOTAH INDIANS AND THEIR EVENTUAL RESTRICTION TO RESERVATIONS PROVIDES THE…

  7. Indians into Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beiswenger, James N.

    Located at the University of North Dakota School of Medicine, Indians Into Medicine (INMED) is a multi-faceted program providing academic, financial, and personal support for Indian students preparing for health careers. The program has the following goals: (1) increase awareness and motivation among Indian students with the potential for health…

  8. Canada's Indians. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, James

    Over a half million people in Canada today are identifiably of Native ancestry, legally categorized as Inuit (Eskimos), status Indians, or nonstatus Indians. Status Indians comprise 573 bands with total membership of about 300,000 people, most of whom live on 2,242 reserves. They are the direct responsibility of the federal government and have…

  9. Canada's Indians. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, James

    Over a half million people in Canada today are identifiably of Native ancestry, legally categorized as Inuit (Eskimos), status Indians, or nonstatus Indians. Status Indians comprise 573 bands with total membership of about 300,000 people, most of whom live on 2,242 reserves. They are the direct responsibility of the federal government and have…

  10. Determination and kinetics of enrofloxacin and ciprofloxacin in Tra catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus) and giant freshwater prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii) using a liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry method.

    PubMed

    Danyi, S; Widart, J; Douny, C; Dang, P K; Baiwir, D; Wang, N; Tu, H T; Tung, V T; Phuong, N-T; Kestemont, P; Scippo, M-L

    2011-04-01

    Determination and kinetics of enrofloxacin and ciprofloxacin in Tra catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus) and giant freshwater prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii) using a liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry method. J. vet. Pharmacol. Therap. 34, 142-152. The fluoroquinolones enrofloxacin (EF) and ciprofloxacin (CF) residues were investigated in the edible tissues of two important Asian aquacultured species such as Tra catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus) and giant freshwater prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii) using a sensitive liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry method. Fish and prawn were treated with medicated feed with multiple doses of EF, in field conditions. A validation study of the analytical method was realized in terms of linearity, specificity, precision (repeatability and within-laboratory reproducibility), recovery and decision limit (CCα). The time needed before the antibiotic disappears from animal tissues or reach the maximum residue limit (MRL, 100μg/kg) was assessed. The concentration values of EF detected in Tra catfish tissue were between the MRL and 2×MRL concentrations, according to the fish density, 7days following the end of the enrofloxacin treatment (20mg/kg body weight per day, for seven consecutive days). The concentration value of ER in prawn tissue was lower than the MRL and the limit of quantification (LOQ, 14μg/kg) 5 and 7days after the stop of the EF treatment (50mg/kg body weight per day, for five consecutive days), respectively. The mean detected levels of CF was much lower in comparison with that of EF, indicating that only a small part of EF is metabolized into CF (<5%) in both Tra catfish and prawn. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. A prawn core histone 4: derivation of N- and C-terminal peptides and their antimicrobial properties, molecular characterization and mRNA transcription.

    PubMed

    Chaurasia, Mukesh Kumar; Palanisamy, Rajesh; Bhatt, Prasanth; Kumaresan, Venkatesh; Gnanam, Annie J; Pasupuleti, Mukesh; Kasi, Marimuthu; Harikrishnan, Ramaswamy; Arockiaraj, Jesu

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the complete molecular characterization including bioinformatics characterization, gene expression, synthesis of N and C terminal peptides and their antimicrobial activity of the core histone 4 (H4) from freshwater giant prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii (Mr). A cDNA encoding MrH4 was identified from the constructed cDNA library of M. rosenbergii during screening and the sequence was obtained using internal sequencing primers. The MrH4 coding region possesses a polypeptide of 103 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight of 11kDa and an isoelectric point of 11.5. The bioinformatics analysis showed that the MrH4 polypeptide contains a H4 signature at (15)GAKRH(19). Multiple sequence alignment of MrH4 showed that the N-terminal (21-42) and C-terminal (87-101) antimicrobial peptide regions and the pentapeptide or H4 signature (15-19) are highly conserved including in humans. The phylogenetic tree formed two separate clades of vertebrate and invertebrate H4, wherein MrH4 was located within the arthropod monophyletic clade of invertebrate H4 groups. Three-dimensional model of MrH4 was established using I-TASSER program and the model was validated using Ramachandran plot analysis. Schiffer-Edmundson helical wheel modeling was used to predict the helix propensity of N (21-42) and C (87-101) terminal derived Mr peptides. The highest gene expression was observed in gills and is induced by viral [white spot syndrome baculovirus (WSBV) and M. rosenbergii nodovirus (MrNV)] and bacterial (Aeromonas hydrophila and Vibrio harveyi) infections. The N and C terminal peptides were synthesized and their antimicrobial and hemolytic properties were examined. Both peptides showed activity against the tested Gram negative and Gram positive bacteria; however, the highest activity was noticed against Gram negative bacteria. Among the two peptides used in this study, C-terminal peptide yielded better results than the N-terminal peptide. Therefore, C terminal

  12. Within the Law: The Establishment of Filipino Leasing Rights on the Yakima Indian Reservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nomura, Gail M.

    1987-01-01

    Analyzes how Filipinos, working under a stratified polyethnic system which treated Whites, Native American Indians, Japanese, and Filipinos differently, were able to establish a permanent agricultural community in the Yakima Valley before World War II. (LHW)

  13. Longitudinal study of urban American Indian 12-step attendance, attrition, and outcome.

    PubMed

    Tonigan, J Scott; Martinez-Papponi, Brenda; Hagler, Kylee J; Greenfield, Brenna L; Venner, Kamilla L

    2013-07-01

    Strong opinions have been voiced about the "fit" between 12-step treatment, community-based 12-step practices, and American Indian beliefs and values. Little is known, however, about the relative benefit of 12-step programs for urban American Indians, although they are the most widely accessed type of treatment by American Indians. This study investigated rates of 12-step attendance, attrition, and substance use outcomes for American Indians for 9 months relative to non-Hispanic White participants. This study compared urban American Indian (n = 63) and non-Hispanic White (n = 133) 12-step attendance, attrition, and substance use over 9 months. The sample was formed by merging data from two prospective single-group longitudinal studies investigating behavior change in community-based 12-step programs. Participants were interviewed at baseline and at 3-, 6-, and 9-month follow-ups. No intervention was provided. Participants were recruited from Alcoholics Anonymous meetings in the community and as they presented for outpatient substance use disorder treatment. Substance use and patterns of 12-step attendance were measured using the Form 90 calendar-based interview, and the General Alcoholics Anonymous Tools of Recovery was administered to assess the adoption of prescribed 12-step practices and beliefs. Trajectories in 12-step meeting attendance over 9 months did not differ between American Indian and non-Hispanic White participants. However, American Indian participants discontinued 12-step attendance significantly less often than non-Hispanic White participants. Higher rates of 12-step attendance predicted increased alcohol abstinence and decreased drinking intensity for both American Indian and non-Hispanic White participants. Twelve-step attendance was unrelated to later illicit drug use for both American Indian and non-Hispanic White participants. Community-based 12-step program attendance is associated with drinking reductions among urban American Indians.

  14. White Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 19 April 2002) The Science 'White Rock' is the unofficial name for this unusual landform which was first observed during the Mariner 9 mission in the early 1970's. As later analysis of additional data sets would show, White Rock is neither white nor dense rock. Its apparent brightness arises from the fact that the material surrounding it is so dark. Images from the Mars Global Surveyor MOC camera revealed dark sand dunes surrounding White Rock and on the floor of the troughs within it. Some of these dunes are just apparent in the THEMIS image. Although there was speculation that the material composing White Rock could be salts from an ancient dry lakebed, spectral data from the MGS TES instrument did not support this claim. Instead, the White Rock deposit may be the erosional remnant of a previously more continuous occurrence of air fall sediments, either volcanic ash or windblown dust. The THEMIS image offers new evidence for the idea that the original deposit covered a larger area. Approximately 10 kilometers to the southeast of the main deposit are some tiny knobs of similarly bright material preserved on the floor of a small crater. Given that the eolian erosion of the main White Rock deposit has produced isolated knobs at its edges, it is reasonable to suspect that the more distant outliers are the remnants of a once continuous deposit that stretched at least to this location. The fact that so little remains of the larger deposit suggests that the material is very easily eroded and simply blows away. The Story Fingers of hard, white rock seem to jut out like icy daggers across a moody Martian surface, but appearances can be deceiving. These bright, jagged features are neither white, nor icy, nor even hard and rocky! So what are they, and why are they so different from the surrounding terrain? Scientists know that you can't always trust what your eyes see alone. You have to use other kinds of science instruments to measure things that our eyes can

  15. White Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 19 April 2002) The Science 'White Rock' is the unofficial name for this unusual landform which was first observed during the Mariner 9 mission in the early 1970's. As later analysis of additional data sets would show, White Rock is neither white nor dense rock. Its apparent brightness arises from the fact that the material surrounding it is so dark. Images from the Mars Global Surveyor MOC camera revealed dark sand dunes surrounding White Rock and on the floor of the troughs within it. Some of these dunes are just apparent in the THEMIS image. Although there was speculation that the material composing White Rock could be salts from an ancient dry lakebed, spectral data from the MGS TES instrument did not support this claim. Instead, the White Rock deposit may be the erosional remnant of a previously more continuous occurrence of air fall sediments, either volcanic ash or windblown dust. The THEMIS image offers new evidence for the idea that the original deposit covered a larger area. Approximately 10 kilometers to the southeast of the main deposit are some tiny knobs of similarly bright material preserved on the floor of a small crater. Given that the eolian erosion of the main White Rock deposit has produced isolated knobs at its edges, it is reasonable to suspect that the more distant outliers are the remnants of a once continuous deposit that stretched at least to this location. The fact that so little remains of the larger deposit suggests that the material is very easily eroded and simply blows away. The Story Fingers of hard, white rock seem to jut out like icy daggers across a moody Martian surface, but appearances can be deceiving. These bright, jagged features are neither white, nor icy, nor even hard and rocky! So what are they, and why are they so different from the surrounding terrain? Scientists know that you can't always trust what your eyes see alone. You have to use other kinds of science instruments to measure things that our eyes can

  16. An unconventional antimicrobial protein histone from freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii: analysis of immune properties.

    PubMed

    Arockiaraj, Jesu; Gnanam, Annie J; Kumaresan, Venkatesh; Palanisamy, Rajesh; Bhatt, Prasanth; Thirumalai, Muthukumaresan Kuppusamy; Roy, Arpita; Pasupuleti, Mukesh; Kasi, Marimuthu

    2013-11-01

    In this study, we have reported the first histone characterized at molecular level from freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii (MrHis). A full length cDNA of MrHis (751 base pairs) was identified from an established M. rosenbergii cDNA library using GS-FLX technique. It encodes 137 amino acid residues with a calculated molecular mass of 15 kDa and an isoelectric point of 10.5. MrHis peptide contains a histone H2A signature between 21 and 27 amino acids. Homologous analysis showed that MrHis had a significant sequence identity (99%) with other known histone H2A groups especially from Penaeus monodon. Phylogenetic analysis of MrHis showed a strong relationship with other amino acid sequences from histone H2A arthropod groups. Further phylogenetic analysis showed that the MrHis belongs to histone H2A superfamily and H2A1A sub-family. Secondary structure of MrHis showed that the protein contains 50.36% α-helical region and 49.64% coils. The 3D model of MrHis was predicted by I-Tasser program and the model was evaluated for quality analysis including C-score analysis, Ramachandran plot analysis and RMSD analysis. The surface view analysis of MrHis showed the active domain at the N terminal. The antimicrobial property of MrHis protein was confirmed by the helical structure and the total hydrophobic surface along with its net charge. The MFE of the predicted RNA structure of MrHis is -128.62 kcal/mol, shows its mRNA stability. Schiffer-Edmundson helical wheel analysis of the N-terminal of MrHis showed a perfect amphipathic nature of the peptide. Significantly (P < 0.05) highest gene expression was noticed in the hemocyte and is induced with viral (WSBV and MrNV) and bacteria (A eromonas hydrophila and Vibrio harveyi) infections. The coding sequence of recombinant MrHis protein was expressed in a pMAL vector and purified to study the antimicrobial properties. The recombinant product showed antimicrobial activity against both Gram negative and Gram positive bacteria

  17. 77 FR 2079 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Minnesota Indian Affairs Council, Bemidji, MN

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-13

    ... below may occur if no additional requestors come forward. DATES: Representatives of any Indian tribe... Earth Band of Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota. History and Description of the Remains At an unknown... Indian tribe. The geographical location of site 21-CE-4 is on the tribal land of the White Earth Band of...

  18. The experience of repeated and traumatic loss among Crow Indian children: response patterns and intervention strategies.

    PubMed

    Long, K A

    1983-01-01

    Crow Indian children residing on the Montana Reservation appear to experience traumatic losses of family members and friends with much greater frequency than children in the population at large. Responses to these losses include interpersonal distancing, and sadness without apparent anger. Assessment and clinical intervention are considered within the sociocultural context of Indian child client and white, middle-class clinician.

  19. Earth, Animals, and Academics: Plateau Indian Communities, Culture, and the Walla Walla Council of 1855.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trafzer, Clifford E.

    1993-01-01

    Scholars analyzing events in American Indian history have the responsibility to consider not only the White political and social milieu but also American Indian world views, kinship ties, and political and spiritual influences. The Walla Walla Council of 1855, involving U.S. officials and Northwest Plateau tribes, illustrates the importance of…

  20. Why Do British Indian Children Have an Apparent Mental Health Advantage?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Anna; Patel, Vikram; Leon, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Previous studies document a mental health advantage in British Indian children, particularly for externalising problems. The causes of this advantage are unknown. Methods: Subjects were 13,836 White children and 361 Indian children aged 5-16 years from the English subsample of the British Child and Adolescent Mental Health Surveys. The…

  1. SUMMARY AND OBSERVATIONS IN THE DAKOTAS AND MINNESOTA. INDIAN COMMUNITIES AND PROJECT HEAD START.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    WAX, MURRAY L.; WAX, ROSALIE H.

    THE PROBLEMS OF GAINING COMMUNITY PARTICIPATION IS A MAJOR ONE IN MANY OF THE PROGRAMS AIMED AT ASSISTING THE AMERICAN INDIAN. THIS PROBLEM IS USUALLY INTENSIFIED WHEN WHITE PERSONS, ASSUMING THAT THEY CAN DO MORE THAN THE COMMUNITY ITSELF, INTERVENE TO THE PARTIAL EXCLUSION OF THE INDIANS. IN SPITE OF THIS PROBLEM, THE HEAD START PROGRAMS FOR…

  2. Promises of the Past: A History of Indian Education in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeJong, David H.

    This book presents a historical overview of American Indian education and includes excerpts of government documents, court decisions, letters from commissioners of Indian affairs, and personal accounts. The book depicts the continuous efforts of White society to educate and assimilate Native Americans into the Euro-American culture. Chapters 1 and…

  3. Identifying Gifted and Talented American Indian Students: An Overview. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florey, Janice; Tafoya, Nancy

    A 1982 study revealed that American Indians comprise .8% of public school students, but only .3% of those participating in gifted programs, whereas respective White figures are 73.3% and 82%. Factors contributing to the inappropriateness of standardized assessment tools for identification of gifted American Indian students are neglect of…

  4. A novel effect of imidazole derivative KK-42 on increasing survival of Aeromonas hydrophila challenged prawn Macrobrachium nipponense.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Feng; Yang, Hong; Liu, Fang; Chen, Xiang-Li; Lv, Yan-Jie; Ning, Qian-Ji

    2013-01-01

    Imidazole derivative KK-42 is well known as the insect growth regulator. Here we find that KK-42 pretreatment could promote the survival of Macrobrachium nipponense infected with Aeromonas hydrophila, which is considered to be possibly related to the prophenoloxidase (proPO), a conserved copper-containing enzyme that plays an important role in defense against pathogens. In this study, a full-length of proPO gene from M. nipponense haemocytes, designated as MnproPO, was firstly cloned and characterized. The full-length cDNA contained 2428 bp with a 2013 bp open reading frame encoding a putative proPO protein of 671 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 76.5 kDa and pI of 7.31. It was predicted to possess all the expected features of proPO members, including two putative copper-binding sites with six histidine residues and a thiol ester-like motif. Sequence analysis showed that MnproPO exhibited the highest amino acid sequence similarity (93%) to a proPO of Macrobrachium rosenbergii. The gene was expressed highly in haemocytes and weakly in hepatopancreas. Real-time PCR analysis revealed that the MnproPO expression increased significantly at 3, 12 and 24 h after KK-42 treatment, the PO activity also importantly rose from 6 to 48 h in KK-42-treated prawns and reached the maximum at 24 h with a 2.3-fold higher than that in control group. Injection of A. hydrophila could stimulate the MnproPO transcription and PO activity whether or not the prawns were pretreated by KK-42, the mRNA level increased obviously only at 3 h and 6 h after the bacterium injection (challenged control), but increased constantly during the phase of experiment except at 6 h under the condition of KK-42 pretreatment (challenged treatment group). The change trend of PO activity was basically similar to that of MnproPO expression. Our present results demonstrate that the MnproPO expression as well as PO activity may be induced by KK-42, which is likely one of the molecular mechanisms of KK

  5. Species specific isotope dilution for the accurate and SI traceable determination of arsenobetaine and methylmercury in cuttlefish and prawn.

    PubMed

    Kumkrong, Paramee; Thiensong, Benjaporn; Le, Phuong Mai; McRae, Garnet; Windust, Anthony; Deawtong, Suladda; Meija, Juris; Maxwell, Paulette; Yang, Lu; Mester, Zoltán

    2016-11-02

    Methods based on species specific isotope dilution were developed for the accurate and SI traceable determination of arsenobetaine (AsBet) and methylmercury (MeHg) in prawn and cuttlefish tissues by LC-MS/MS and SPME GC-ICPMS. Quantitation of AsBet and MeHg were achieved by using a (13)C-enriched AsBet spike (NRC CRM CBET-1) and an enriched spike of Me(198)Hg (NRC CRM EMMS-1), respectively, wherein analyte mass fractions in enriched spikes were determined by reverse isotope dilution using natural abundance AsBet and MeHg primary standards. Purity of these primary standards were characterized by quantitative (1)H-NMR with the use of NIST SRM 350b benzoic acid as a primary calibrator, ensuring the final measurement results traceable to SI. Validation of employed methods of ID LC-MS/MS and ID SPME GC-ICPMS was demonstrated by analysis of several biological CRMs (DORM-4, TORT-3, DOLT-5, BCR-627 and BCR-463) with satisfying results. The developed methods were applied for the determination of AsBet and MeHg in two new certified reference materials (CRMs) prawn (PRON-1) and cuttlefish (SQID-1) produced jointly by Thailand Institute of Scientific and Technological Research (TISTR) and National Research Council Canada (NRC). With additional measurements of AsBet using LC-ICPMS with standard additions calibration and external calibration at NRC and TISTR, respectively, certified values of 1.206 ± 0.058 and 13.96 ± 0.54 mg kg(-1) for AsBet as As (expanded uncertainty, k = 2) were obtained for the new CRMs PRON-1 and SQID-1, respectively. The reference value of 0.324 ± 0.028 mg kg(-1) as Hg (expanded uncertainty, k = 2) for MeHg was obtained for the SQID-1 based on the results obtained by ID SPME GC-ICPMS method only, whereas MeHg in PRON-1 was found to be < 0.015 mg kg(-1). It was found that AsBet comprised 69.7% and 99.0% of total As in the prawn and cuttlefish, respectively, whereas MeHg comprised 94.5% of total Hg in cuttlefish. Crown Copyright © 2016

  6. White phosphorus

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    White phosphorus ; CASRN 7723 - 14 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  7. White Toenails

    MedlinePlus

    ... This would cause a black toenail. If the trauma does not cause broken blood vessels, a white spot may appear under the nail. The spot will slowly grow out with the normal growth of the ... may be caused by recurring trauma, such as when a runner wears shoes that ...

  8. White Flight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Christine

    1975-01-01

    Focuses on the issue of whether the implementation of school desegregation significantly increases the decline in percentage of resident white. Presents data from a study conducted in 86 Northern school districts from a 91-city study. Data were obtained from statistics published by the Department of Health, Education and Welfare beginning in 1967.…

  9. Indianization of psychiatry utilizing Indian mental concepts.

    PubMed

    Avasthi, Ajit; Kate, Natasha; Grover, Sandeep

    2013-01-01

    Most of the psychiatry practice in India is guided by the western concepts of mental health and illness, which have largely ignored the role of religion, family, eastern philosophy, and medicine in understanding and managing the psychiatric disorders. India comprises of diverse cultures, languages, ethnicities, and religious affiliations. However, besides these diversities, there are certain commonalities, which include Hinduism as a religion which is spread across the country, the traditional family system, ancient Indian system of medicine and emphasis on use of traditional methods like Yoga and Meditation for controlling mind. This article discusses as to how mind and mental health are understood from the point of view of Hinduism, Indian traditions and Indian systems of medicine. Further, the article focuses on as to how these Indian concepts can be incorporated in the practice of contemporary psychiatry.

  10. Indianization of psychiatry utilizing Indian mental concepts

    PubMed Central

    Avasthi, Ajit; Kate, Natasha; Grover, Sandeep

    2013-01-01

    Most of the psychiatry practice in India is guided by the western concepts of mental health and illness, which have largely ignored the role of religion, family, eastern philosophy, and medicine in understanding and managing the psychiatric disorders. India comprises of diverse cultures, languages, ethnicities, and religious affiliations. However, besides these diversities, there are certain commonalities, which include Hinduism as a religion which is spread across the country, the traditional family system, ancient Indian system of medicine and emphasis on use of traditional methods like Yoga and Meditation for controlling mind. This article discusses as to how mind and mental health are understood from the point of view of Hinduism, Indian traditions and Indian systems of medicine. Further, the article focuses on as to how these Indian concepts can be incorporated in the practice of contemporary psychiatry. PMID:23858244

  11. 76 FR 165 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-03

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of... the Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin (``Tribe'') and the State of Wisconsin Gaming Compact of 1992... CONTACT: Paula L. Hart, Director, Office of Indian Gaming, Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary...

  12. 76 FR 42722 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-19

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Paula L. Hart, Director, Office of Indian Gaming, Office of the Assistant... of the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act of 1988 (IGRA), Public Law 100-497, 25 U.S.C. 2710, the Secretary...

  13. 75 FR 61511 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-05

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of... CONTACT: Paula L. Hart, Director, Office of Indian Gaming, Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary... section 11 of the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act of 1988 (IGRA), Public Law 100-497, 25 U.S.C. 2710, the...

  14. The Indian Child Welfare Act.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steward, Katy Jo

    The Indian Child Welfare Act of 1978 (I.C.W.A.) is federal legislation which preempts state law whenever Indian children may be removed from their families. The I.C.W.A. permits Indian tribal courts to decide the future of Indian children, establishes minimum federal standards for removal of Indian children from their families, requires that…

  15. Marine biogeographic boundaries and human introduction along the European coast revealed by phylogeography of the prawn Palaemon elegans.

    PubMed

    Reuschel, Silke; Cuesta, José A; Schubart, Christoph D

    2010-06-01

    A phylogeographic analysis is carried out for the widely distributed European littoral prawn Palaemon elegans in order to test for potential genetic differentiation and geographic structure. Mitochondrial sequences were obtained from 283 specimens from the northeastern Atlantic, the Baltic, Mediterranean, Black and Caspian Seas. Our study revealed a surprisingly complex population structure. Three main haplogroups can be separated: one from the Atlantic (Type I) and two from the Mediterranean (Types II and III). While the Mediterranean types occur in sympatry, a clear phylogeographic break was observed along the Almería-Oran Front separating Type I and giving evidence for a genetic isolation of Atlantic and Mediterranean populations. Type III represents the most distinct haplogroup with high levels of nucleotide divergence, indicating the occurrence of a cryptic species with a Messinian origin. The colonization of the southeastern Baltic Sea is most likely due to human introduction.

  16. Isolation of a bacterium resembling Pirellula species from primary tissue culture of the giant tiger prawn (Penaeus monodon).

    PubMed Central

    Fuerst, J A; Sambhi, S K; Paynter, J L; Hawkins, J A; Atherton, J G

    1991-01-01

    During attempts to establish tissue cultures from hepatopancreas, heart, and hemolymph of the giant tiger prawn (Penaeus monodon), using a medium including penicillin, streptomycin, and amphotericin B, bacterial contamination in the form of a sheet of growth attached to the tissue culture vessel was a persistent problem. Contaminant bacteria were teardrop-shaped cells arranged in rosettes, and electron microscopy revealed buds, crateriform structures, and the absence of a peptidoglycan layer in the cell wall, features characteristic of bacteria in the Planctomyces-Pirellula group, a phylogenetically distinct group of eubacteria. Two strains of contaminant bacteria were isolated in pure culture. Both exhibited morphology and antibiotic resistance consistent with their membership in the Planctomyces-Pirellula group (order Planctomycetales) of eubacteria. Tissue culture media for marine invertebrates may select for such bacteria if high concentrations of cell wall synthesis-inhibiting antibiotics are included. Images PMID:1781677

  17. Transcriptome Analysis of the Oriental River Prawn, Macrobrachium nipponense Using 454 Pyrosequencing for Discovery of Genes and Markers

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Keyi; Qiu, Gaofeng; Feng, Jianbin; Li, Jiale

    2012-01-01

    Background The oriental river prawn, Macrobrachium nipponense, is an economically and nutritionally important species of the Palaemonidae family of decapod crustaceans. To date, the sequencing of its whole genome is unavailable as a non-model organism. Transcriptomic information is also scarce for this species. In this study, we performed de novo transcriptome sequencing to produce the first comprehensive expressed sequence tag (EST) dataset for M. nipponense using high-throughput sequencing technologies. Methodology and Principal Findings Total RNA was isolated from eyestalk, gill, heart, ovary, testis, hepatopancreas, muscle, and embryos at the cleavage, gastrula, nauplius and zoea stages. Equal quantities of RNA from each tissue and stage were pooled to construct a cDNA library. Using 454 pyrosequencing technology, we generated a total of 984,204 high quality reads (338.59Mb) with an average length of 344 bp. Clustering and assembly of these reads produced a non-redundant set of 81,411 unique sequences, comprising 42,551 contigs and 38,860 singletons. All of the unique sequences were involved in the molecular function (30,425), cellular component (44,112) and biological process (67,679) categories by GO analysis. Potential genes and their functions were predicted by KEGG pathway mapping and COG analysis. Based on our sequence analysis and published literature, many putative genes involved in sex determination, including DMRT1, FTZ-F1, FOXL2, FEM1 and other potentially important candidate genes, were identified for the first time in this prawn. Furthermore, 6,689 SSRs and 18,107 high-confidence SNPs were identified in this EST dataset. Conclusions The transcriptome provides an invaluable new data for a functional genomics resource and future biological research in M. nipponense. The molecular markers identified in this study will provide a material basis for future genetic linkage and quantitative trait loci analyses, and will be essential for accelerating

  18. Prawn Shell Chitosan Has Anti-Obesogenic Properties, Influencing Both Nutrient Digestibility and Microbial Populations in a Pig Model.

    PubMed

    Egan, Áine M; Sweeney, Torres; Hayes, Maria; O'Doherty, John V

    2015-01-01

    The potential of natural products to prevent obesity have been investigated, with evidence to suggest that chitosan has anti-obesity effects. The current experiment investigated the anti-obesity potential of prawn shell derived chitosan on a range of variables relevant to obesity in a pig model. The two dietary treatment groups included in this 63 day study were: T1) basal diet and T2) basal diet plus 1000 ppm chitosan (n = 20 gilts per group (70 ± 0.90 kg). The parameter categories which were assessed included: performance, nutrient digestibility, serum leptin concentrations, nutrient transporter and digestive enzyme gene expression and gut microbial populations. Pigs offered chitosan had reduced feed intake and final body weight (P< 0.001), lower ileal digestibility of dry matter (DM), gross energy (GE) (P< 0.05) and reduced coefficient of apparent total tract digestibility (CATTD) of gross energy and nitrogen (P<0.05) when compared to the basal group. Fatty acid binding protein 2 (FABP2) gene expression was down-regulated in pigs offered chitosan (P = 0.05) relative to the basal diet. Serum leptin concentrations increased (P< 0.05) in animals offered the chitosan diet compared to pigs offered the basal diet. Fatness traits, back-fat depth (mm), fat content (kg), were significantly reduced while lean meat (%) was increased (P<0.05) in chitosan supplemented pigs. Pigs offered chitosan had decreased numbers of Firmicutes in the colon (P <0.05), and Lactobacillus spp. in both the caecum (P <0.05) and colon (P <0.001). Bifidobacteria populations were increased in the caecum of animals offered the chitosan diet (P <0.05). In conclusion, these findings suggest that prawn shell chitosan has potent anti-obesity/body weight control effects which are mediated through multiple biological systems in vivo.

  19. Prawn Shell Chitosan Exhibits Anti-Obesogenic Potential through Alterations to Appetite, Affecting Feeding Behaviour and Satiety Signals In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Egan, Áine M; O'Doherty, John V; Vigors, Stafford; Sweeney, Torres

    2016-01-01

    The crustacean shells-derived polysaccharide chitosan has received much attention for its anti-obesity potential. Dietary supplementation of chitosan has been linked with reductions in feed intake, suggesting a potential link between chitosan and appetite control. Hence the objective of this experiment was to investigate the appetite suppressing potential of prawn shell derived chitosan in a pig model. Pigs (70 ± 0.90 kg, 125 days of age, SD 2.0) were fed either T1) basal diet or T2) basal diet plus 1000 ppm chitosan (n = 20 gilts per group) for 63 days. The parameter categories which were assessed included performance, feeding behaviour, serum leptin concentrations and expression of genes influencing feeding behaviour in the small intestine, hypothalamus and adipose tissue. Pigs offered chitosan visited the feeder less times per day (P<0.001), had lower intake per visit (P<0.001), spent less time eating per day (P<0.001), had a lower eating rate (P<0.01) and had reduced feed intake and final body weight (P< 0.001) compared to animals offered the basal diet. There was a treatment (P<0.05) and time effect (P<0.05) on serum leptin concentrations in animals offered the chitosan diet compared to animals offered the basal diet. Pigs receiving dietary chitosan had an up-regulation in gene expression of growth hormone receptor (P<0.05), Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (P<0.01), neuromedin B (P<0.05), neuropeptide Y receptor 5 (P<0.05) in hypothalamic nuclei and neuropeptide Y (P<0.05) in the jejunum. Animals consuming chitosan had increased leptin expression in adipose tissue compared to pigs offered the basal diet (P<0.05). In conclusion, these data support the hypothesis that dietary prawn shell chitosan exhibits anti-obesogenic potential through alterations to appetite, and feeding behaviour affecting satiety signals in vivo.

  20. Prawn Shell Chitosan Exhibits Anti-Obesogenic Potential through Alterations to Appetite, Affecting Feeding Behaviour and Satiety Signals In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Egan, Áine M.; O’Doherty, John V.; Vigors, Stafford; Sweeney, Torres

    2016-01-01

    The crustacean shells-derived polysaccharide chitosan has received much attention for its anti-obesity potential. Dietary supplementation of chitosan has been linked with reductions in feed intake, suggesting a potential link between chitosan and appetite control. Hence the objective of this experiment was to investigate the appetite suppressing potential of prawn shell derived chitosan in a pig model. Pigs (70 ± 0.90 kg, 125 days of age, SD 2.0) were fed either T1) basal diet or T2) basal diet plus 1000 ppm chitosan (n = 20 gilts per group) for 63 days. The parameter categories which were assessed included performance, feeding behaviour, serum leptin concentrations and expression of genes influencing feeding behaviour in the small intestine, hypothalamus and adipose tissue. Pigs offered chitosan visited the feeder less times per day (P<0.001), had lower intake per visit (P<0.001), spent less time eating per day (P<0.001), had a lower eating rate (P<0.01) and had reduced feed intake and final body weight (P< 0.001) compared to animals offered the basal diet. There was a treatment (P<0.05) and time effect (P<0.05) on serum leptin concentrations in animals offered the chitosan diet compared to animals offered the basal diet. Pigs receiving dietary chitosan had an up-regulation in gene expression of growth hormone receptor (P<0.05), Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (P<0.01), neuromedin B (P<0.05), neuropeptide Y receptor 5 (P<0.05) in hypothalamic nuclei and neuropeptide Y (P<0.05) in the jejunum. Animals consuming chitosan had increased leptin expression in adipose tissue compared to pigs offered the basal diet (P<0.05). In conclusion, these data support the hypothesis that dietary prawn shell chitosan exhibits anti-obesogenic potential through alterations to appetite, and feeding behaviour affecting satiety signals in vivo. PMID:26901760

  1. Prawn Shell Chitosan Has Anti-Obesogenic Properties, Influencing Both Nutrient Digestibility and Microbial Populations in a Pig Model

    PubMed Central

    Egan, Áine M.; Sweeney, Torres; Hayes, Maria; O’Doherty, John V.

    2015-01-01

    The potential of natural products to prevent obesity have been investigated, with evidence to suggest that chitosan has anti-obesity effects. The current experiment investigated the anti-obesity potential of prawn shell derived chitosan on a range of variables relevant to obesity in a pig model. The two dietary treatment groups included in this 63 day study were: T1) basal diet and T2) basal diet plus 1000 ppm chitosan (n = 20 gilts per group (70 ± 0.90 kg). The parameter categories which were assessed included: performance, nutrient digestibility, serum leptin concentrations, nutrient transporter and digestive enzyme gene expression and gut microbial populations. Pigs offered chitosan had reduced feed intake and final body weight (P< 0.001), lower ileal digestibility of dry matter (DM), gross energy (GE) (P< 0.05) and reduced coefficient of apparent total tract digestibility (CATTD) of gross energy and nitrogen (P<0.05) when compared to the basal group. Fatty acid binding protein 2 (FABP2) gene expression was down-regulated in pigs offered chitosan (P = 0.05) relative to the basal diet. Serum leptin concentrations increased (P< 0.05) in animals offered the chitosan diet compared to pigs offered the basal diet. Fatness traits, back-fat depth (mm), fat content (kg), were significantly reduced while lean meat (%) was increased (P<0.05) in chitosan supplemented pigs. Pigs offered chitosan had decreased numbers of Firmicutes in the colon (P <0.05), and Lactobacillus spp. in both the caecum (P <0.05) and colon (P <0.001). Bifidobacteria populations were increased in the caecum of animals offered the chitosan diet (P <0.05). In conclusion, these findings suggest that prawn shell chitosan has potent anti-obesity/body weight control effects which are mediated through multiple biological systems in vivo. PMID:26636332

  2. The Indian Nose.

    PubMed

    Nagarkar, Purushottam; Pezeshk, Ronnie A; Rohrich, Rod J

    2016-11-01

    Despite the growing number of rhinoplasty procedures being performed on Indian patients, there is a very limited body of literature regarding nuances of the Indian rhinoplasty. The authors review the spectrum of nasal phenotypes that fall under the category of the Indian nose; goals of rhinoplasty in these patients; operative techniques that can be used to address them; and, importantly, the specific pitfalls to be avoided in these groups.

  3. White Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    14 November 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a portion of the famous 'White Rock' feature in Pollack Crater in the Sinus Sabaeus region of Mars. The light-toned rock is not really white, but its light tone caught the eye of Mars geologists as far back as 1972, when it was first spotted in images acquired by Mariner 9. The light-toned materials are probably the remains of a suite of layered sediments that once spread completely across the interior of Pollack Crater. Dark materials in this image include sand dunes and large ripples.

    Location near: 8.1oS, 335.1oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Southern Summer

  4. White grubs

    Treesearch

    Albert E. Mayfield

    2012-01-01

    White grubs are soil-dwelling larvae of insects commonly known as “May beetles” or “June beetles” in the family Scarabaeidae. These grubs feed on herbaceous plant roots and other soil organic matter, but will also feed on the roots of woody plants, including all types of coniferous and hardwood seedlings in nursery settings. Numerous genera known to cause damage in...

  5. Fat distribution and insulin resistance in young adult nonobese Asian Indian women.

    PubMed

    Szuszkiewicz-Garcia, Magdalene; Li, Rong; Grundy, Scott M; Abate, Nicola; Chandalia, Manisha

    2012-10-01

    Although Asian Indian (people of Indian subcontinent descent) men are shown to have higher total and truncal body fat as well as greater insulin resistance compared to white men matched for total body fat and age, data in women are not conclusive. The objective of this study was to compare total and regional fat distribution and insulin sensitivity between healthy young premenopausal Asian Indian and white women of similar body mass index (BMI). Twenty Asian Indian women (65% immigrants and 35% first generation living in Dallas) and 31 white women of similar age and BMI [age 24±3 vs. 25±4; BMI 22±4 vs. 23±5; mean±standard deviation (SD) in Asian Indian and white, respectively] without diabetes were evaluated with anthropometric measurements, underwater weighing for percentage of total body fat mass, magnetic resonance imaging of whole abdomen for measurement of abdominal subcutaneous and intraperitoneal fat mass, and euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp study for measurement of insulin sensitivity. There were no differences in waist or hip circumference, total body subcutaneous abdominal or intraperitoneal fat mass, fasting plasma glucose, and insulin levels between Asian Indian women and white women. The peripheral glucose disposal rate (Rd) during hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp was found to be almost identical in the two study groups (median value of 6.9 and 6.8 mg/min per kg of body weight, for Asian Indians and whites, respectively). For similar total or regional fat content, the glucose disposal rate was comparable in the two study groups. In conclusion, we demonstrate that young Asian Indian women do not have excess abdominal or intraperitoneal fat or insulin resistance for similar BMI compared to white women of European descent.

  6. Tribes of Men: John Joseph Mathews and Indian Internationalism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lutenski, Emily

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses John Joseph Mathews and Indian internationalism. As an old man, Osage intellectual, writer, and historian, John Joseph Mathews recalled his expatriation from the United States during the 1920s. After growing up in Pawhuska, Oklahoma, seat of the Osage Nation, where he had been born in 1894 to a white mother…

  7. An Indian Federation in Lowland Ecuador. IWGIA Document 28.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salazar, Ernesto

    Official involvement of the Ecuadorian government with colonization of the southern lowlands, lands traditionally belonging to the Shuar Indians, began in the early 60's when the CREA (Centro de Reconversion Economica del Azuay) was created to provide assistance to white settlers. Until that time, the Shuar lands had been dominated by the Salesian…

  8. Alcoholism: Devastation for Indians. 36 Lessons on Alcoholism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pike, William A.

    In an attempt to educate American Indians about the problems of alcohol abuse, the 36-lesson book presents historical, cultural, legal, medical, social, and personal facts about alcohol and alcohol abuse. Each 3- or 4-page lesson is illustrated in black and white and consists of an introductory narrative, learning activities, and follow-up…

  9. The Indian Wars and National Military Strategy After 1865

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-04-10

    1858 triggered the Pike’s Peak gold rush and led to the founding of Denver. On the eastern flank of the Sierra Nevada, discovery of the Comstock Lode...protect those borders. * Given this, the Black Hi 1 Is gold rush was on and open warfare resulted between whites and Indians, This in turn would

  10. Tribes of Men: John Joseph Mathews and Indian Internationalism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lutenski, Emily

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses John Joseph Mathews and Indian internationalism. As an old man, Osage intellectual, writer, and historian, John Joseph Mathews recalled his expatriation from the United States during the 1920s. After growing up in Pawhuska, Oklahoma, seat of the Osage Nation, where he had been born in 1894 to a white mother…

  11. Proposed Synthetic Minor NSR Permit: Anadarko Uintah Midstream, LLC - White River Compressor Station

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Proposed synthetic minor NSR permit, public notice bulletin, and administrative permit docket for the Anadarko Uintah Midstream, LLC, White River Compressor Station, located on Uintah and Ouray Indian Reservation in Utah.

  12. Toxicity of the organophosphorous insecticide metamidophos (o,s-dimethyl phosphoramidothioate) to larvae of the freshwater prawn and the blue shrimp

    SciTech Connect

    Juarez, L.M.; Sanchez, J. )

    1989-08-01

    The organophosphorous insecticide O,S-dimethyl phosphoramidothioate (Metamidophos, Tamaron, Monitor, Hamidop) is widely used for pest control in tropical crops. If washed down to streams and estuaries its residues could adversely affect populations of commercially important crustaceans, like those of the palaemonid prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii and the penaeid shrimp Penaeus stylirostris. This paper presents information on the toxicity of O,S-dimethyl phosphoramidothioate to larvae of M. rosenbergii and P. stylirostris.

  13. A new record of the giant freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium spinipes (Schenkel, 1902) (Crustacea: Decapoda: Palaemonidae) from Taiwan, with notes on its taxonomy.

    PubMed

    Shy, Jhy-Yun; Wowor, Daisy; Ng, Peter K L

    2013-11-04

    The giant freshwater prawn Macrobrachium spinipes (Schenkel, 1902) is recorded from Taiwan for the first time and extends the distribution of the species to north of the Tropic of Cancer. The Taiwanese specimens differ slightly from material from Indonesian Papua in the density of the spination of the adult second pereipods, the relative length of the ridge of the posterior submedian plate of thoracite sternite 4, and the color of the carapace, abdomen and pleural condyles.

  14. Prediction of total volatile basic nitrogen contents using wavelet features from visible/near-infrared hyperspectral images of prawn (Metapenaeus ensis).

    PubMed

    Dai, Qiong; Cheng, Jun-Hu; Sun, Da-Wen; Zhu, Zhiwei; Pu, Hongbin

    2016-04-15

    A visible/near-infrared hyperspectral imaging (HSI) system (400-1000 nm) coupled with wavelet analysis was used to determine the total volatile basic nitrogen (TVB-N) contents of prawns during cold storage. Spectral information was denoised by conducting wavelet analysis and uninformative variable elimination (UVE) algorithm, and then three wavelet features (energy, entropy and modulus maxima) were extracted. Quantitative models were established between the wavelet features and the reference TVB-N contents by using three regression algorithms. As a result, the LS-SVM model with modulus maxima features was considered as the best model for determining the TVB-N contents of prawns, with an excellent RP(2) of 0.9547, RMSEP=0.7213 mg N/100g and RPD=4.799. Finally, an image processing algorithm was developed for generating a TVB-N distribution map. This study demonstrated the possibility of applying the HSI imaging system in combination with wavelet analysis to the monitoring of TVB-N values in prawns. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Premature mortality patterns among American Indians in South Dakota, 2000-2010.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Mathew; Kightlinger, Lon

    2013-05-01

    American Indians in South Dakota have the highest mortality rates in the nation compared to other racial and ethnic groups and American Indians in other states. Cause-related and age-specific mortality patterns among American Indians in South Dakota are identified to guide prevention planning and policy efforts designed to reduce mortality within this population, in both South Dakota and other parts of the U.S. Death certificate data from South Dakota (2000-2010), on 5738 American Indians and 70,580 whites, were used to calculate age-specific mortality rates and rate ratios. These values were examined in order to identify patterns among the leading causes of death. Analyses were completed in 2011 and 2012. Within the South Dakota population, 70% of American Indians died before reaching age 70 years, compared to 25% of whites. Fatal injuries and chronic diseases were the leading causes of premature mortality. Nine leading causes of death showed consistent patterns of mortality disparity between American Indians and whites, with American Indians having significantly higher rates of mortality at lower ages. Premature mortality among American Indians in South Dakota is a serious public health problem. Unified efforts at the federal, tribal, state, and local levels are needed to reduce premature death within this population. Copyright © 2013 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Logging the Great Lakes Indian Reservations: The Case of the Bad River Band of Ojibwe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steen-Adams, Michelle M.; Langston, Nancy E.; Mladenoff, David J.

    2010-01-01

    The harvest of the Great Lakes primary forest stands (ca. 1860-1925) transformed the region's ecological, cultural, and political landscapes. Although logging affected both Indian and white communities, the Ojibwe experienced the lumber era in ways that differed from many of their white neighbors. When the 125,000-acre Bad River Reservation was…

  17. Logging the Great Lakes Indian Reservations: The Case of the Bad River Band of Ojibwe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steen-Adams, Michelle M.; Langston, Nancy E.; Mladenoff, David J.

    2010-01-01

    The harvest of the Great Lakes primary forest stands (ca. 1860-1925) transformed the region's ecological, cultural, and political landscapes. Although logging affected both Indian and white communities, the Ojibwe experienced the lumber era in ways that differed from many of their white neighbors. When the 125,000-acre Bad River Reservation was…

  18. An American Indian Anthology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tvedten, Benet, Comp.

    The anthology is intended to be a discovery for the many Americans whose superficial knowledge of the American Indians has been derived from history books, Hollywood films, and other stereotyped views of the Indian culture. Understanding and appreciation of a particular culture can be found in the stories and poetry of the people. This small…

  19. Suicide in American Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lester, David

    This book reviews present knowledge about suicidal behavior in American Indians, prevention efforts in Native communities, and recommendations for understanding suicidal behavior and developing suicide prevention efforts. Data from Canadian aboriginal groups is also included. Chapter 1 explains why suicide in American Indians is of concern to…

  20. America's Indian Statues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gridley, Marion E., Comp.

    A comprehensive compilation of facts and photographs of statues honoring or memorializing the American Indians is presented in this paperback. The vignettes accompanying the photographs are the result of extensive research. Examples of the American Indian statues include "The Signal of Peace,""The Protest,"" The Medicine Man,""Appeal to the Great…

  1. An American Indian Anthology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tvedten, Benet, Comp.

    The anthology is intended to be a discovery for the many Americans whose superficial knowledge of the American Indians has been derived from history books, Hollywood films, and other stereotyped views of the Indian culture. Understanding and appreciation of a particular culture can be found in the stories and poetry of the people. This small…

  2. American Indian Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    One Feather, Gerald

    With the emergence of reservation based community colleges (th Navajo Community College and the Dakota Community Colleges), the American Indian people, as decision makers in these institutions, are providing Indians with the technical skills and cultural knowledge necessary for self-determination. Confronted with limited numbers of accredited…

  3. Indians of Arizona.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    Briefly describing each tribe within Arizona's four major American Indian groups, this handbook presents information relative to the cultural background and socioeconomic development of the following tribes: (1) Athapascan Tribes (Navajos and Apaches); (2) Pueblo Indians (Hopis); (3) Desert Rancheria Tribes (Pimas, Yumas, Papagos, Maricopas,…

  4. Yakima Indian Nation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for the Study of Migrant and Indian Education, Toppenish, WA.

    This booklet was prepared by the Yakima Agency, Bureau of Indian Affairs, to provide information to the public on the history and customs of the Yakima Indian Nation, as well as explaining life on the Reservation today. The events mentioned range from 1775 to July 1, 1971. Since this document only skims the surface of Yakima culture and history,…

  5. Indians in Careers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollow, Kitty, Ed.; Heuving, Jeanne, Ed.

    Every student in high school is faced with the question of what to do after graduation. American Indian students, whether on or off reservations, need ideas as to what is available to them. This compilation of interviews with 10 individuals who are maintaining their "Indian identity" and making contributions in the working world provides…

  6. Writing American Indian History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noley, Grayson B.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to critique the manner in which history about American Indians has been written and propose a rationale for the rethinking of what we know about this subject. In particular, histories of education as regards the participation of American Indians is a subject that has been given scant attention over the years and when…

  7. Writing American Indian History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noley, Grayson B.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to critique the manner in which history about American Indians has been written and propose a rationale for the rethinking of what we know about this subject. In particular, histories of education as regards the participation of American Indians is a subject that has been given scant attention over the years and when…

  8. Contemporary American Indian Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Sidner

    2009-01-01

    In his keynote address to the Fifth Annual American Indian Studies Consortium in 2005 David Wilkins began by commenting on earlier attempts to formally organize such a gathering in ways that might help establish and accredit Indian studies programs. He said he had the sense that the thrust of earlier meetings "was really an opportunity for Native…

  9. The American Indian Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, George

    This guide provides a basic source of historical and contemporary Indian information from an American Indian perspective and includes study questions at the end of each section. The primary function of this guide is to be a quick-study reference handbook. Basic questions essential to understanding current problems and issues of American Indians…

  10. Pima Indian Legends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Anna Moore

    The stated purpose of this book is to preserve in writing some of the Pima Indian legends that had been verbally passed from generation to generation in the past. This collection of 23 legends, which were originally used to instruct the young people of the tribe, presents in story form various aspects of American Indian life--including…

  11. Indian Tribes of America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gridley, Marion E.

    The lives and locations of early American Indian tribes are the subject of this book for children of junior high school age. The tribal life patterns which had developed to suit the climates lived in, prior to the arrival of the Europeans, are described. Thus, the livelihood of Indians in 5 different sections of the United States and Canada--the…

  12. The (East) Indian Woman.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naidoo, Josephine

    The focus of this paper is on the social, cultural, and psychological problems women of East Indian origin share with other immigrant women in Canada. Also examined are problems that are unique to the East Indian woman and the ways in which she deals with the challenges, conflicting cultural values, and expectations that confront her. The…

  13. A political history of the Indian Health Service.

    PubMed

    Bergman, A B; Grossman, D C; Erdrich, A M; Todd, J G; Forquera, R

    1999-01-01

    One of the few bright spots to emerge from the history of relations between American Indians and the federal government is the remarkable record of the Indian Health Service (IHS). The IHS has raised the health status of Indians to approximate that of most other Americans, a striking achievement in the light of the poverty and stark living conditions experienced by this population. The gains occurred in spite of chronically low funding and can be attributed to the combination of vision, stubbornness, and political savvy of the agency's physician directors and the support of a handful of tribal leaders and powerful allies in the Congress and the White House. Despite the agency's imperfections and the sizeable health problems that still exist among American Indians and Alaskan Natives, the IHS is an example of one federal program that has worked.

  14. 76 FR 43699 - List of Additional Lands Affected by White Earth Reservation Land Settlement Act of 1985

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-21

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs List of Additional Lands Affected by White Earth Reservation Land Settlement Act... additional allotments or interest therein on the White Earth Chippewa Reservation in Minnesota which have been determined to fall within the scope of sections 4(a), 4(b), or 5(c) of the White Earth...

  15. Cancer among American Indians - Identifying Priority Areas in Oklahoma.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Sydney A; Janitz, Amanda E; Erb-Alvarez, Julie; Mowls, Dana S; Campbell, Janis E; Anderson, Tom

    2016-01-01

    We describe and compare cancer incidence and mortality among American Indians (AI/ANs) and whites in nine Indian Health Service (IHS) Service Units in Oklahoma. Using data from the Oklahoma Central Cancer Registry and the web-based OK2SHARE database, we obtained age-adjusted cancer incidence rates from 1997 to 2012 and cancer mortality rates from 1999 to 2009 for AI/ANs and whites in Oklahoma. We examined differences in primary site, percentage of late stage diagnoses, and trends over time. AI/ANs consistently had higher cancer incidence and mortality compared to whites in Oklahoma. The magnitude of disparity for cancer incidence and mortality varied by IHS Service Unit and by gender. The top three cancer sites were the same for all Service Units. The percentage of late stage diagnosis also varied by region. We identify priority areas where cancer disparity challenges exist among AI/ANs in Oklahoma.

  16. Cancer among American Indians – Identifying Priority Areas in Oklahoma

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Sydney A.; Janitz, Amanda E.; Erb-Alvarez, Julie; Mowls, Dana S.; Campbell, Janis E.; Anderson, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Background We describe and compare cancer incidence and mortality among American Indians (AI/ANs) and whites in nine Indian Health Service (IHS) Service Units in Oklahoma. Methods Using data from the Oklahoma Central Cancer Registry and the web-based OK2SHARE database, we obtained age-adjusted cancer incidence rates from 1997 to 2012 and cancer mortality rates from 1999 to 2009 for AI/ANs and whites in Oklahoma. We examined differences in primary site, percentage of late stage diagnoses, and trends over time. Results AI/ANs consistently had higher cancer incidence and mortality compared to whites in Oklahoma. The magnitude of disparity for cancer incidence and mortality varied by IHS Service Unit and by gender. The top three cancer sites were the same for all Service Units. The percentage of late stage diagnosis also varied by region. Conclusions We identify priority areas where cancer disparity challenges exist among AI/ANs in Oklahoma. PMID:27909347

  17. 75 FR 38834 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-06

    ...: 2010-16214] DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian... Gaming, Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary--Policy and Economic Development, Washington, DC 20240, (202) 219-4066. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Under Section 11 of the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act of 1988...

  18. 75 FR 38833 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-06

    ... Doc No: 2010-16213] DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact..., Office of Indian Gaming, Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary--Policy and Economic Development...

  19. 75 FR 68618 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-08

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of... the Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior Chippewas (``Tribe'') and the State of Wisconsin Gaming Compact of... CONTACT: Paula L. Hart, Director, Office of Indian Gaming, Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary...

  20. Some Resources in Indian Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marken, Jack W.

    This paper discusses some of the resources in the literature by and about the American Indian and lists numerous anthologies and bibliographies in this area. More than 40 publications are listed, including "Reference Encyclopedia of the American Indian,""American Indian Almanac,""Ethnographic Bibliography of North America,""American Indian Prose…

  1. The American Indian Development Bank?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pottinger, Richard

    1992-01-01

    In 1990, the Indian Finance Corporation Act died in committee for lack of Indian support. A model for an American Indian Development Bank is proposed, based on the International Finance Corporation of the World Bank. Two case studies illustrate how this model can meet Indian economic development needs. (SV)

  2. Federal Financing of Indian Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loon, Eric Van

    Since over 200 million Federal dollars are disbursed annually for American Indian education under Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), Elementary Secondary Education Act Title I, Indian Education Act Title IV, and Johnson O'Malley programs, it is difficult to understand the dismal state of Indian education. However, factors contributing to abuse of…

  3. Surrogate nits impregnated with white piedra--a case report.

    PubMed

    Ghorpade, A

    2004-07-01

    White piedral spores packed inside empty pedicular nits were accidentally found on microscopic examination in a 42-year-old Indian woman who presented with hair loss. The diagnosis of piedra was confirmed on culture. She responded to topical 2% miconazole nitrate solution and manual removal of the nits. This is the first case report of pedicular nits found to be impregnated with spores of white piedra.

  4. Indian concepts on sexuality

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Kaustav; Thakurata, Rajarshi Guha

    2013-01-01

    India is a vast country depicting wide social, cultural and sexual variations. Indian concept of sexuality has evolved over time and has been immensely influenced by various rulers and religions. Indian sexuality is manifested in our attire, behavior, recreation, literature, sculptures, scriptures, religion and sports. It has influenced the way we perceive our health, disease and device remedies for the same. In modern era, with rapid globalization the unique Indian sexuality is getting diffused. The time has come to rediscover ourselves in terms of sexuality to attain individual freedom and to reinvest our energy to social issues related to sexuality. PMID:23858263

  5. [Indian workers in Oman].

    PubMed

    Longuenesse, E

    1985-01-01

    Until recently Oman was a country of emigration, but by 1980 an estimated 200,000 foreign workers were in the country due to the petroleum boom. Almost 1/3 of the estimated 300,000 Indian workers in the Gulf states were in Oman, a country whose colonial heritage was closely tied to that of India and many of whose inhabitants still speak Urdu. The number of work permits granted to Indians working in the private sector in Oman increased from 47,928 in 1976 to 80,787 in 1980. An estimated 110,000 Indians were working in Oman in 1982, the great majority in the construction and public works sector. A few hundred Indian women were employed by the government of Oman, as domestics, or in other capacities. No accurate data is available on the qualifications of Indian workers in Oman, but a 1979 survey suggested a relatively low illiteracy rate among them. 60-75% of Indians in Oman are from the state of Kerala, followed by workers from the Punjab and the southern states of Tamil Nadu and Andhra Pradesh and Bombay. Indian workers are recruited by specialized agencies or by friends or relatives already employed in Oman. Employers in Oman prefer to recruit through agencies because the preselection process minimizes hiring of workers unqualified for their posts. Officially, expenses of transportation, visas, and other needs are shared by the worker and the employer, but the demand for jobs is so strong that the workers are obliged to pay commissions which amount to considerable sums for stable and well paying jobs. Wages in Oman are however 2 to 5 times the level in India. Numerous abuses have been reported in recruitment practices and in failure of employers in Oman to pay the promised wages, but Indian workers have little recourse. At the same level of qualifications, Indians are paid less then non-Omani Arabs, who in turn receive less than Oman nationals. Indians who remain in Oman long enough nevertheless are able to support families at home and to accumulate considerable

  6. Indian concepts on sexuality.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Kaustav; Thakurata, Rajarshi Guha

    2013-01-01

    India is a vast country depicting wide social, cultural and sexual variations. Indian concept of sexuality has evolved over time and has been immensely influenced by various rulers and religions. Indian sexuality is manifested in our attire, behavior, recreation, literature, sculptures, scriptures, religion and sports. It has influenced the way we perceive our health, disease and device remedies for the same. In modern era, with rapid globalization the unique Indian sexuality is getting diffused. The time has come to rediscover ourselves in terms of sexuality to attain individual freedom and to reinvest our energy to social issues related to sexuality.

  7. A sensitive and specific hyperbranched rolling circle amplification assay and test strip for white spot syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yu-Ran; Yin, Wei-Li; Yue, Zhi-Qin; Li, Ba-Fang

    2014-01-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is a global threat to the prawn industry, and there is no simple method for field-based testing of this virus. We designed a padlock probe and primers to the capsid protein gene VP28 of WSSV, and established a hyperbranched rolling circle amplification (HRCA) assay and a corresponding strip-based test. The assay and the test strip both had similar high accuracy and specificity, and their sensitivity was about 10 copies/μL, which is 100 times higher than conventional PCR. In this study, 68 batches of prawns were tested for WSSV with the HRCA assay and test strip, and the results were compared with the PCR assay. The results indicated that both the assay and test strip had accuracy similar to each other and to the PCR results. However, the assay and strip were more sensitive and user-friendly than PCR. Establishment of this method will provide a rapid detection of WSSV and also a basis for field-based detection of animal disease.

  8. 25 CFR 502.12 - Indian lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Indian lands. 502.12 Section 502.12 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL PROVISIONS DEFINITIONS OF THIS CHAPTER § 502.12 Indian lands. Indian lands means: (a) Land within the limits of an Indian reservation; or (b) Land...

  9. 25 CFR 502.12 - Indian lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Indian lands. 502.12 Section 502.12 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL PROVISIONS DEFINITIONS OF THIS CHAPTER § 502.12 Indian lands. Indian lands means: (a) Land within the limits of an Indian reservation; or (b) Land...

  10. 25 CFR 502.12 - Indian lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Indian lands. 502.12 Section 502.12 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL PROVISIONS DEFINITIONS OF THIS CHAPTER § 502.12 Indian lands. Indian lands means: (a) Land within the limits of an Indian reservation; or (b) Land...

  11. 25 CFR 502.12 - Indian lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Indian lands. 502.12 Section 502.12 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL PROVISIONS DEFINITIONS OF THIS CHAPTER § 502.12 Indian lands. Indian lands means: (a) Land within the limits of an Indian reservation; or (b) Land...

  12. 25 CFR 502.12 - Indian lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Indian lands. 502.12 Section 502.12 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL PROVISIONS DEFINITIONS OF THIS CHAPTER § 502.12 Indian lands. Indian lands means: (a) Land within the limits of an Indian reservation; or (b) Land...

  13. Farewell, My Nation. The American Indian and the United States, 1820-1890. The American History Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weeks, Philip

    This book examines the formation of U.S. government policy toward the American Indian tribes during the period 1820-1890. Chapter 1 describes the early 19th century debate between the Gradualists, who believed in the peaceful assimilation of the Indians into white society, and the Removalists, who advocated forced removal of the tribes to the…

  14. Manifest Meanings: The Selling (Not Telling) of American Indian History and the Case of "The Black Horse Ledger"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gercken, Becca

    2010-01-01

    What is the value or perceived necessity--for an Indian or for a white man--of changing Northern Cheyenne history? How are a reader's conclusions affected by her perception of the race of the person altering that history? Why is it acceptable to sell but not tell American Indian history? An examination of the visual and discursive rhetoric of "The…

  15. Fur Production as a Specialized Activity in a World System: Indians in the North American Fur Trade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kardulias, P. Nick

    1990-01-01

    Examines the fur trade as critical fulcrum in Indian-White contact, focusing on craft specialization as the Native response to the international market system. Describes effects on Indian dependence on European trade goods, Native territorial boundaries and population distribution, social and family structures, and animal populations. Contains 73…

  16. Manifest Meanings: The Selling (Not Telling) of American Indian History and the Case of "The Black Horse Ledger"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gercken, Becca

    2010-01-01

    What is the value or perceived necessity--for an Indian or for a white man--of changing Northern Cheyenne history? How are a reader's conclusions affected by her perception of the race of the person altering that history? Why is it acceptable to sell but not tell American Indian history? An examination of the visual and discursive rhetoric of "The…

  17. Working the Indian Field Days: The Economy of Authenticity and the Question of Agency in Yosemite Valley

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cothran, Boyd

    2010-01-01

    Originally conceived by National Park Service (NPS) officials as a way to "revive and maintain the interest of Indians in their own games and industries," the Yosemite Indian Field Days were part rodeo, part pageant, and part craft fair. Through its activities, the Field Days offered white tourists the opportunity to encounter…

  18. Fur Production as a Specialized Activity in a World System: Indians in the North American Fur Trade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kardulias, P. Nick

    1990-01-01

    Examines the fur trade as critical fulcrum in Indian-White contact, focusing on craft specialization as the Native response to the international market system. Describes effects on Indian dependence on European trade goods, Native territorial boundaries and population distribution, social and family structures, and animal populations. Contains 73…

  19. Farewell, My Nation. The American Indian and the United States, 1820-1890. The American History Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weeks, Philip

    This book examines the formation of U.S. government policy toward the American Indian tribes during the period 1820-1890. Chapter 1 describes the early 19th century debate between the Gradualists, who believed in the peaceful assimilation of the Indians into white society, and the Removalists, who advocated forced removal of the tribes to the…

  20. Working the Indian Field Days: The Economy of Authenticity and the Question of Agency in Yosemite Valley

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cothran, Boyd

    2010-01-01

    Originally conceived by National Park Service (NPS) officials as a way to "revive and maintain the interest of Indians in their own games and industries," the Yosemite Indian Field Days were part rodeo, part pageant, and part craft fair. Through its activities, the Field Days offered white tourists the opportunity to encounter…

  1. Indian Craniometric Variability and Affinities

    PubMed Central

    Raghavan, Pathmanathan; Bulbeck, David; Pathmanathan, Gayathiri; Rathee, Suresh Kanta

    2013-01-01

    Recently published craniometric and genetic studies indicate a predominantly indigenous ancestry of Indian populations. We address this issue with a fuller coverage of Indian craniometrics than any done before. We analyse metrical variability within Indian series, Indians' sexual dimorphism, differences between northern and southern Indians, index-based differences of Indian males from other series, and Indians' multivariate affinities. The relationship between a variable's magnitude and its variability is log-linear. This relationship is strengthened by excluding cranial fractions and series with a sample size less than 30. Male crania are typically larger than female crania, but there are also shape differences. Northern Indians differ from southern Indians in various features including narrower orbits and less pronounced medial protrusion of the orbits. Indians resemble Veddas in having small crania and similar cranial shape. Indians' wider geographic affinities lie with “Caucasoid” populations to the northwest, particularly affecting northern Indians. The latter finding is confirmed from shape-based Mahalanobis-D distances calculated for the best sampled male and female series. Demonstration of a distinctive South Asian craniometric profile and the intermediate status of northern Indians between southern Indians and populations northwest of India confirm the predominantly indigenous ancestry of northern and especially southern Indians. PMID:24455409

  2. Tourism and Indian Exploitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    French, Lawrence

    1977-01-01

    A cursory review of Federal support to the Eastern Cherokees shows that the Cherokee Historical Association and not the Cherokee Indians are the recipients and beneficiaries of many Federal grants. (JC)

  3. Indians on the Border

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jamail, Milton H.

    1977-01-01

    Although the Kickapoo have actively sought to preserve their culture at Nacimiento in Coahuila, Mexico, evidence of an eroding culture is found at Eagle Pass, Texas where American Indian migrant workers reside temporarily. (JC)

  4. Indian Summer for Wayfarers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaltenbronn, Kyra

    1977-01-01

    A recreational program involving hiking and camping emphasizes teaching young participants through archeology and adventure experiences about American Indians, their technology, and their means of survival in the wilderness. (JD)

  5. Emergency Department Utilization for Mental Health in American Indian Children

    PubMed Central

    Pickner, Wyatt J.; Puumala, Susan E.; Chaudhary, Kaushal R.; Burgess, Katherine M.; Payne, Nathaniel R.; Kharbanda, Anupam B.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To examine emergency department (ED) visits for mental health concerns by American Indian children in a multi-center cohort. To analyze demographic and clinical factors, the types of MH concerns and repeat mental health visits. Study design Cross-sectional study of children 5 to 18 years old who visited one of six EDs in the Upper Midwest from June 2011 to May 2012 and self-identified as White or American Indian. Mental health visits were identified by primary diagnosis and reasons for visit and were categorized into diagnostic groups. We explored racial differences in ED visits for mental health, diagnostic groups, and repeat mental health visits. Analysis involved Chi-squared tests, Cochran–Mantel–Haenszel tests, and regression models including age, triage, timing, and insurance and their interactions with race. Results We identified 26,004 visits with 1545 (5.94%) for mental health. The proportion of visits for mental health differed by race and age. American Indian children had lower odds of a mental health visit for 5–10 year olds (Odds Ratio (OR) =0.40, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) =0.26–0.60), but higher odds for 11–17 year olds (OR=1.62, 95% CI = 1.34–1.95). In the older age group, American Indian children were primarily seen for depression and trauma- and stressor-related disorders, whereas White children were primarily seen for depression and disruptive, impulse-control, and conduct disorders. Repeat visits were not different by race. Conclusion Differences were noted in mental health visits between American Indian and White children and were influenced by age. These findings warrant further investigation into care seeking patterns and treatment for mental health in American Indian children. PMID:27131404

  6. Ishi: A Yahi Indian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2003

    The Yahi Indians were part of a larger tribal group called the Yana. The Yahi way of life, along with the lives of many other California Indian groups, changed when European and U.S. settlers came to California. In 1872 Ishi and his family were the last of the Yahi living in the Deer Creek (California) area. By 1911 Ishi was the last surviving…

  7. 25 CFR 31.3 - Non-Indian pupils in Indian schools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Non-Indian pupils in Indian schools. 31.3 Section 31.3... Non-Indian pupils in Indian schools. Indian and non-Indian children who are not eligible for... of maintenance in the school attended, when their presence will not exclude Indian pupils...

  8. White Blood Cell Count

    MedlinePlus

    ... limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? White Blood Cell Count Share this page: Was this page helpful? ... Count; Leukocyte Count; White Count Formal name: White Blood Cell Count Related tests: Complete Blood Count , Blood Smear , ...

  9. A preliminary study of the algicidal mechanism of bioactive metabolites of Brevibacillus laterosporus on Oscillatoria in prawn ponds.

    PubMed

    Jia, Wen; Huang, Xianghu; Li, Changling

    2014-01-01

    The algae, Oscillatoria, is commonly found in prawn ponds and can lead to reduced productivity. We examined metabolites of the bacteria Brevibacillus laterosporus for algicidal qualities. To determine the possible algicidal mechanisms of these bioactive metabolites, different amounts of sterile filtrate of bacterial suspensions were added to cultures containing Oscillatoria. The dry weight, the concentrations of chlorophyll-a (chl-a), phycobiliprotein (PC, phycocyanin; APC, allophycocyanin; PE, phycoerythrin), and MDA (malondialdehyde) and the activities of SOD (superoxide dismutase), POD (peroxidase), and CAT (catalase) of algae were measured during the algicidal application. The results showed that lower concentrations of the sterile filtrate (addition ≤ 4 mL) accelerated the growth rate of Oscillatoria, but significant inhibition and lysis were observed with higher concentrations (addition ≥ 8 mL). In two trials (the additions were 8 mL and 10 mL, respectively), the algal dry weights were reduced by 26.02% and 45.30%, and the chl-a concentrations were decreased by 46.88% and 63.73%, respectively, after seven days. During the algicidal treatment, the concentrations of PC, APC, PE, and MDA and the activities of SOD, POD, and CAT were significantly increased in the early cultivation and declined quickly at later stages. Finally, the algae-lysing mechanism of the bioactive metabolites of the bacteria Brevibacillus laterosporus on Oscillatoria had been proposed.

  10. A Preliminary Study of the Algicidal Mechanism of Bioactive Metabolites of Brevibacillus laterosporus on Oscillatoria in Prawn Ponds

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Wen; Huang, Xianghu; Li, Changling

    2014-01-01

    The algae, Oscillatoria, is commonly found in prawn ponds and can lead to reduced productivity. We examined metabolites of the bacteria Brevibacillus laterosporus for algicidal qualities. To determine the possible algicidal mechanisms of these bioactive metabolites, different amounts of sterile filtrate of bacterial suspensions were added to cultures containing Oscillatoria. The dry weight, the concentrations of chlorophyll-a (chl-a), phycobiliprotein (PC, phycocyanin; APC, allophycocyanin; PE, phycoerythrin), and MDA (malondialdehyde) and the activities of SOD (superoxide dismutase), POD (peroxidase), and CAT (catalase) of algae were measured during the algicidal application. The results showed that lower concentrations of the sterile filtrate (addition ≤ 4 mL) accelerated the growth rate of Oscillatoria, but significant inhibition and lysis were observed with higher concentrations (addition ≥ 8 mL). In two trials (the additions were 8 mL and 10 mL, respectively), the algal dry weights were reduced by 26.02% and 45.30%, and the chl-a concentrations were decreased by 46.88% and 63.73%, respectively, after seven days. During the algicidal treatment, the concentrations of PC, APC, PE, and MDA and the activities of SOD, POD, and CAT were significantly increased in the early cultivation and declined quickly at later stages. Finally, the algae-lysing mechanism of the bioactive metabolites of the bacteria Brevibacillus laterosporus on Oscillatoria had been proposed. PMID:24744687

  11. Isolation and Characterization of a Novel Dicistrovirus Associated with Moralities of the Great Freshwater Prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiaoyi; Cao, Zheng; Yuan, Junfa; Shi, Zhengli; Yuan, Xuemei; Lin, Lingyun; Xu, Yang; Yao, Jiayun; Hao, Guijie; Shen, Jinyu

    2016-02-02

    The giant freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii, is an economically important crustacean and is farmed in many countries. Since 2009, a larval mortality syndrome of M. rosenbergii has broken out and spread widely in the main breeding area, including Zhejiang, Jiangsu, Guangxi, and Guangdong Provinces in mainland China. A novel virus, named Macrobrachium rosenbergii Taihu virus (MrTV), was isolated from the moribund larvae and was determined to be the causative agent of the M. rosenbergii larval mortality syndrome by experimental infection. Further genomic sequencing suggested that the MrTV genome is monopartite, 10,303 nt in length, and dicistronic with two non-overlapping open reading frames (ORFs) separated by an intergenic region (IGR) and flanked by untranslated regions (UTRs). Phylogenetic analysis using the full-length genomic sequence and the putative amino acid sequences of the capsid protein revealed that MrTV was more closely related to the taura syndrome virus (TSV) than to any other viruses. According to these molecular features, we proposed that MrTV is a new species in the genus Aparavirus, family Dicistroviridae. These results may shed light on controlling larval mortality syndrome in M. rosenbergii.

  12. Isolation and Characterization of a Novel Dicistrovirus Associated with Moralities of the Great Freshwater Prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xiaoyi; Cao, Zheng; Yuan, Junfa; Shi, Zhengli; Yuan, Xuemei; Lin, Lingyun; Xu, Yang; Yao, Jiayun; Hao, Guijie; Shen, Jinyu

    2016-01-01

    The giant freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii, is an economically important crustacean and is farmed in many countries. Since 2009, a larval mortality syndrome of M. rosenbergii has broken out and spread widely in the main breeding area, including Zhejiang, Jiangsu, Guangxi, and Guangdong Provinces in mainland China. A novel virus, named Macrobrachium rosenbergii Taihu virus (MrTV), was isolated from the moribund larvae and was determined to be the causative agent of the M. rosenbergii larval mortality syndrome by experimental infection. Further genomic sequencing suggested that the MrTV genome is monopartite, 10,303 nt in length, and dicistronic with two non-overlapping open reading frames (ORFs) separated by an intergenic region (IGR) and flanked by untranslated regions (UTRs). Phylogenetic analysis using the full-length genomic sequence and the putative amino acid sequences of the capsid protein revealed that MrTV was more closely related to the taura syndrome virus (TSV) than to any other viruses. According to these molecular features, we proposed that MrTV is a new species in the genus Aparavirus, family Dicistroviridae. These results may shed light on controlling larval mortality syndrome in M. rosenbergii. PMID:26848659

  13. The distribution of APGWamide and RFamides in the central nervous system and ovary of the giant freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii.

    PubMed

    Palasoon, Ronnarong; Panasophonkul, Sasiporn; Sretarugsa, Prapee; Hanna, Peter; Sobhon, Prasert; Chavadej, Jittipan

    2011-06-01

    Immunohistochemistry was used to identify the distribution of both APGWamide-like and RFamide-like peptides in the central nervous system (CNS) and ovary of the mature female giant freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii. APGWamide-like immunoreactivity (ALP-ir) was found only within the sinus gland (SG) of the eyestalk, in small- and medium-sized neurons of cluster 4, as well as their varicosed axons. RFamide-like immunoreactivity (RF-ir) was detected in neurons of all neuronal clusters of the eyestalk and CNS, except clusters 1 and 5 of the eyestalk, and dorsal clusters of the subesophageal, thoracic, and abdominal ganglia. The RF-ir was also found in all neuropils of the CNS and SG, except the lamina ganglionaris. These immunohistochemical locations of the APGWamide-like and RF-like peptides in the eyestalk indicate that these neuropeptides could modulate the release of the neurohormones in the sinus gland. The presence of RFamide-like peptides in the thoracic and abdominal ganglia suggests that it may act as a neurotransmitter which controls muscular contractions. In the ovary, RF-ir was found predominantly in late previtellogenic and early vitellogenic oocytes, and to a lesser degree in late vitellogenic oocytes. These RFs may be involved with oocyte development, but may also act with other neurohormones and/or neurotransmitters within the oocyte in an autocrine or paracrine manner.

  14. Effects of Artificial Shelter and Chitosan on Growth Performance of Freshwater Prawn (Macrobrachium lanchesteri de Man, 1911).

    PubMed

    Jongyotha, Suriya; Doolgindachbaporn, Sompong; Suraniranat, Prawit

    2015-04-01

    Two experiments were carried out at the Department of Fisheries, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand during September 2013 to February 2014 aiming to pursue both the better growth performance and survival rate of the freshwater prawns (Macrobrachium lanchesteri) where a Completely Randomized Design (CRD) with three replications was used for each experiment. For experiment 1, different percentages of grass shelter were used, i.e. 0% (Control, T1), 25% (T2), 50% (T3) and 75% (T4). For experiment 2, different percentages of commercial chitosan were used, i.e. 0% (Control, T1), 25% (T2), 50% (T3) and 75% (T4). Both experiments were carried out at the same time and each of them was lasted for 75 days. The results showed that the added grass shelter gave significantly higher Total Weight (TW) and Survival Rate (SR) than the control treatment. However, there were no significant differences found on TW and SR among the added grass shelter treatments (T2 up to T4). Chitosan gave significantly higher TW, AW and Number of Molting (NM) than the control treatment. There were no significant differences on TW, NM and AW found amongst the chitosan treatments. The results of the experiment 1 showed that the best rate of grass shelter for the culturing of the Macrobrachium lanchesteri was at a rate of 25% (T 2) and the best rate of the chitosan was at a rate of 4% (Diet 3) for the Experiment 2.

  15. A molecular approach towards the taxonomy of fresh water prawns Macrobrachium striatum and M. equidens (Decapoda, Palaemonidae) using mitochondrial markers.

    PubMed

    Jose, Deepak; Nidhin, B; Anil Kumar, K P; Pradeep, P J; Harikrishnan, M

    2016-07-01

    Genus Macrobrachium includes freshwater prawns which inhabit most diverse habitats ranging from low saline areas to inland hill streams and impounded water bodies. Being morphologically conserved, this genus has been exposed to severe disputes related to their taxonomy, systematics and phylogeny. Macrobrachium striatum and M. equidens represent two morphologically related congeneric species within this genus. Earlier, M. striatum was considered as a striped form of M. equidens. Though these species are now well-described morphologically and differentiated into two species, no molecular level investigation has been carried out in support of their speciation. We report a study on M. striatum and M. equidens with emphasis to their molecular data through mitochondrial markers (16S ribosomal RNA and cytochrome oxidase subunit I). Results obtained from developed molecular markers of the two species revealed considerable genetic differentiation between them. Phylogram generated using Minimum evolution and Neighbour joining analyses differentiated M. striatum and M. equidens as two independent species. Genetic distance data showed high interspecific divergence (ranging from 3.9% to 17.0% for 16S rRNA sequences and 13.8% to 21.0% for COI sequences) between M. striatum and M. equidens confirming the findings of phylogram. Hence, it could be delineated that M. striatum and M. equidens represent two distinct species within genus Macrobrachium with emphasis to their morphology and genetics.

  16. Feeding and larval growth of an exotic freshwater prawn Macrobrachium equidens (Decapoda: Palaemonidae), from Northeastern Pará, Amazon Region.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Jean N; Abrunhosa, Fernando A; Costa, Anne K; Maciel, Cristiana R

    2014-09-01

    In the present study, we carried out experiments on the diet of the freshwater prawn Macrobrachium equidens. We tested which type of food and which density of food is suitable for larval development. For the experiment on the type of food, eight treatments were carried out: (I) starvation, (AL) microalgae, (RO) rotifers, (AN) Artemia, (RO + AN) rotifers + Artemia, (AL + RO) microalgae + rotifers, (AL + AN) microalgae + Artemia, (AL + RO + AN) microalgae + rotifers + Artemia. For the experiment on the density of food, we used the type of food, which had resulted in a high survival rate in the previous experiment. Three treatments were carried out: 4, 8 and 16 Artemia nauplii /mL. The rate of feeding during larval development was observed. The survival, weight and percentage of juveniles of each feeding experiment were determined. We found that larvae are carnivores; however, they have requirements with respect to the type of food, because larvae completed their cycle from the zoeal to the juvenile stage only when Artemia nauplii were available. We also verified that the larvae feed mainly during the day-time, and are opportunistic with respect to the density of food offered.

  17. Molecular analysis of the freshwater prawn Macrobrachium olfersii (Decapoda, Palaemonidae) supports the existence of a single species throughout its distribution.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Natália; Mantelatto, Fernando Luis

    2013-01-01

    Macrobrachium olfersii is an amphidromous freshwater prawn, widespread along the eastern coasts of the Americas. This species shows great morphological modifications during ontogenesis, and several studies have verified the existence of a wide intraspecific variation. Because of this condition, the species is often misidentified, and several synonyms have been documented. To elucidate these aspects, individuals of M. olfersii from different populations along its range of distribution were investigated. The taxonomic limit was established, and the degree of genetic variability of this species was described. We extracted DNA from 53 specimens of M. olfersii, M. americanum, M. digueti and M. faustinum, which resulted in 84 new sequences (22 of 16S mtDNA, 45 of Cythocrome Oxidase I (COI) mtDNA, and 17 of Histone (H3) nDNA). Sequences of three genes (single and concatenated) from these species were used in the Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian Inference phylogenetic analyses and COI sequences from M. olfersii were used in population analysis. The genetic variation was evaluated through the alignment of 554 bp from the 16S, 638 bp from the COI, and 338 bp from the H3. The rates of genetic divergence among populations were lower at the intraspecific level. This was confirmed by the haplotype net, which showed a continuous gene flow among populations. Although a wide distribution and high morphological intraspecific variation often suggest the existence of more than one species, genetic similarity of Caribbean and Brazilian populations of M. olfersii supported them as a single species.

  18. Molecular Analysis of the Freshwater Prawn Macrobrachium olfersii (Decapoda, Palaemonidae) Supports the Existence of a Single Species throughout Its Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Natália; Mantelatto, Fernando Luis

    2013-01-01

    Macrobrachium olfersii is an amphidromous freshwater prawn, widespread along the eastern coasts of the Americas. This species shows great morphological modifications during ontogenesis, and several studies have verified the existence of a wide intraspecific variation. Because of this condition, the species is often misidentified, and several synonyms have been documented. To elucidate these aspects, individuals of M. olfersii from different populations along its range of distribution were investigated. The taxonomic limit was established, and the degree of genetic variability of this species was described. We extracted DNA from 53 specimens of M. olfersii, M. americanum, M. digueti and M. faustinum, which resulted in 84 new sequences (22 of 16S mtDNA, 45 of Cythocrome Oxidase I (COI) mtDNA, and 17 of Histone (H3) nDNA). Sequences of three genes (single and concatenated) from these species were used in the Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian Inference phylogenetic analyses and COI sequences from M. olfersii were used in population analysis. The genetic variation was evaluated through the alignment of 554 bp from the 16S, 638 bp from the COI, and 338 bp from the H3. The rates of genetic divergence among populations were lower at the intraspecific level. This was confirmed by the haplotype net, which showed a continuous gene flow among populations. Although a wide distribution and high morphological intraspecific variation often suggest the existence of more than one species, genetic similarity of Caribbean and Brazilian populations of M. olfersii supported them as a single species. PMID:23382941

  19. De novo assembly and transcriptome characterization of the freshwater prawn Palaemonetes argentinus: Implications for a detoxification response.

    PubMed

    García, C Fernando; Pedrini, Nicolas; Sánchez-Paz, Arturo; Reyna-Blanco, Carlos S; Lavarias, Sabrina; Muhlia-Almazán, Adriana; Fernández-Giménez, Analía; Laino, Aldana; de-la-Re-Vega, Enrique; Lukaszewicz, German; López-Zavala, Alonso A; Brieba, Luis G; Criscitello, Michael F; Carrasco-Miranda, Jesús S; García-Orozco, Karina D; Ochoa-Leyva, Adrian; Rudiño-Piñera, Enrique; Sanchez-Flores, Alejandro; Sotelo-Mundo, Rogerio R

    2017-09-08

    Palaemonetes argentinus, an abundant freshwater prawn species in the northern and central region of Argentina, has been used as a bioindicator of environmental pollutants as it displays a very high sensitivity to pollutants exposure. Despite their extraordinary ecological relevance, a lack of genomic information has hindered a more thorough understanding of the molecular mechanisms potentially involved in detoxification processes of this species. Thus, transcriptomic profiling studies represent a promising approach to overcome the limitations imposed by the lack of extensive genomic resources for P. argentinus, and may improve the understanding of its physiological and molecular response triggered by pollutants. This work represents the first comprehensive transcriptome-based characterization of the non-model species P. argentinus to generate functional genomic annotations and provides valuable resources for future genetic studies. Trinity de novo assembly consisted of 24,738 transcripts with high representation of detoxification (phase I and II), anti-oxidation, osmoregulation pathways and DNA replication and bioenergetics. This crustacean transcriptome provides valuable molecular information about detoxification and biochemical processes that could be applied as biomarkers in further ecotoxicology studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Increased arterial stiffness in South Dakota American Indian children.

    PubMed

    Litz, Andrew M; Van Guilder, Gary P

    2016-02-01

    Arterial stiffness has been observed in white American obese children, yet there are no data in American Indian youth, who are affected disproportionately by the cardiovascular consequences of childhood obesity and its accompanying risk factors. The purpose of this study was to determine the association of childhood overweight-obesity and cardiometabolic risk factors with arterial stiffness in South Dakota white American and American Indian children. Thirty-six (28 white American and 8 American Indian) children (age, 13 ± 1 years; grades 6-8) from a rural South Dakota elementary and middle school were studied: 18 had a healthy weight (body mass index (BMI), 19.5 ± 1.9 kg/m(2)) and 18 were overweight-obese (BMI, 26.8 ± 3.5 kg/m(2)). Arterial stiffness was assessed using applanation tonometry via pulse wave analysis to determine carotid-radial pulse wave velocity (crPWV) and aortic augmentation index (AIx). There were no differences (P = 0.94) in crPWV between healthy weight (7.1 ± 1.4 m/s) and overweight-obese (7.3 ± 1.0 m/s) children, even after controlling for risk factors. However, crPWV was markedly elevated (P = 0.002) in overweight-obese American Indian children (7.7 ± 1.1 m/s) compared with white American children (6.8 ± 0.5 m/s), and these differences remained after controlling for blood pressure and more severe obesity in the American Indians. An obesity-matched subgroup analysis indicated that crPWV (7.7 ± 1.1 vs 6.8 ± 0.4 m/s) remained significantly greater in the American Indians (P = 0.03). There were no between-group differences in aortic AIx. These findings indicate an adverse influence of American Indian ethnicity on arterial stiffening in children with elevated adiposity. Arterial stiffness in American Indian children may accelerate early adulthood vascular disease.

  1. Whites Trashing Whites: Multiculturalism's Liberal Guilt Trip.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holden, Michael

    1995-01-01

    Presents the opinions of a white, male literature professor who attended a conference of college writing teachers and was distressed because the overwhelmingly white audience listened quietly as speakers used the platform to identify whites as oppressors of minorities and linguistic imperialists. The paper questions the view that Standard English…

  2. Butyrylcholinesterase polymorphisms (BCHE and CHE2 loci) in Brazilian Indian and admixed populations.

    PubMed

    Alcântara, V M; De Lourenço, M A; Salzano, F M; Petzl-Erler, M L; Coimbra, C E; Santos, R V; Chautard-Freire-Maia, E A

    1995-10-01

    The genetic variability of butyrylcholinesterase, determined by the BCHE and CHE2 loci, was examined in nine Brazilian Indian groups. In addition, a search for the presence of the BCHE*F allele was also performed in eight other Brazilian Indian samples and in five admixed (black-Indian-white) rural Amazonian communities previously studied for the CHE2 locus and the BCHE*A allele. In the Indian populations the frequency of the BCHE*F allele varied from 0 to 7.1% +/- 3.4 and the frequency of the CHE2 C5+ phenotype ranged from 1.4% +/- 1.4 to 45.9% +/- 3.8. This study seems to be the first to report the presence of the BCHE*F allele in native Americans. The BCHE*A allele appeared in one Indian group (1.4% +/- 1.0), and we suggest that its existence in this tribe and in other native Americans can be explained by gene flow from white populations. Gene flow may also be the reason for the occurrence of the BCHE*F allele in Brazilian Indians, whereas the CHE2*C5+ allele may have been present in the paleo-Indians. The distributions of both the BCHE*F allele and the CHE2 C5+ phenotype in Brazilian Indians seem to be the result of the action of random genetic drift.

  3. Indian Ocean Triple Junction

    SciTech Connect

    Tapscott, C.R.; Patriat, P.; Fisher, R.L.; Sclater, J.G.; Hoskins, H.; Parsons, B.

    1980-09-10

    The boundaries of three major plates (Africa, India, and Antarctica) meet in a triple junction in the Indian Ocean near 25 /sup 0/S, 70 /sup 0/E. Using observed bathymetry and magnetic anomalies, we locate the junction to within 5 km and show that it is a ridge-ridge-ridge type. Relative plate motion is N60 /sup 0/E at 50 mm/yr (full rate) across the Central Indian Ridge, N47 /sup 0/E at 60 mm/yr across the Southeast Indian Ridge, and N3 /sup 0/W at 15 mm/yr across te Southwest Indian Ridge; the observed velocity triangle is closed. Poles of instantaneous relative plate motion are determined for all plate pairs. The data in the South Atlantic and Indian oceans are consistent with a rigid African plate without significant internal deformation. Two of the ridges at the triple junction are normal midocean spreading centers with well-defined median valleys. The Southwest Indian Ridge, however, has a peculiar morphology near the triple junction, that of an elongate triangular deep, with the triple junction at its apex. The floor of the deep represents crust formed at the Southwest Indian Ridge, and the morphology is a consequence of the evolution of the triple junction and is similar to that at the Galapagos Triple Junction. Though one cannot determine with precision the stability conditions at the triple junction, the development of the junction over the last 10 m.y. can be mapped, and the topographic expressions of the triple junction traces may be detected on the three plates.

  4. Identification and comparative analysis of the oriental river prawn (Macrobrachium nipponense) microRNA expression profile during hypoxia using a deep sequencing approach.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shengming; Fu, Hongtuo; Ge, Xianping; Zhu, Jian; Gu, Zhimin; Xuan, Fujun

    2016-03-01

    Hypoxia refers to a state of oxygen deficiency, which is observed frequently in aquaculture ponds. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that are important effectors in regulating gene expression through posttranscriptional mechanisms. They are key elements in the response to hypoxia. The oriental river prawn (Macrobrachium nipponense) is an important commercial aquaculture species, and is sensitive to hypoxia. To date, there are no reports describing M. nipponense miRNAs. In this study, Solexa deep sequencing technology was used for high-throughput analysis of miRNAs in a small RNA library isolated from four M. nipponense tissues (gill, hepatopancreas, muscle and hemocytes). In total, 9,227,356 reads were obtained, 4,293,155 of which were related to 267 unique miRNAs, including 203 conserved and 64 prawn-specific miRNAs. Furthermore, miRNA features including length distribution and end variations were characterized. Annotation of targets revealed a broad range of biological processes and signal transduction pathways regulated by M. nipponense miRNAs. In addition, 880 co-expressed and 39 specific (25 normoxia-specific and 14 hypoxia-specific) miRNAs that may be involved in the response to hypoxia were confirmed using miRNA microarray analysis from the four prawn tissues combined. Real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) analysis of eight miRNAs in the normoxia and hypoxia groups showed good concordance between the sequencing and qPCR data. This study provides the first large-scale identification and characterization of M. nipponense miRNAs and their potential targets, and represents a foundation for further characterization of their roles in the regulation of the diversity of hypoxia processes.

  5. Optimizing Hybrid de Novo Transcriptome Assembly and Extending Genomic Resources for Giant Freshwater Prawns (Macrobrachium rosenbergii): The Identification of Genes and Markers Associated with Reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hyungtaek; Yoon, Byung-Ha; Kim, Woo-Jin; Kim, Dong-Wook; Hurwood, David A.; Lyons, Russell E.; Salin, Krishna R.; Kim, Heui-Soo; Baek, Ilseon; Chand, Vincent; Mather, Peter B.

    2016-01-01

    The giant freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii, a sexually dimorphic decapod crustacean is currently the world’s most economically important cultured freshwater crustacean species. Despite its economic importance, there is currently a lack of genomic resources available for this species, and this has limited exploration of the molecular mechanisms that control the M. rosenbergii sex-differentiation system more widely in freshwater prawns. Here, we present the first hybrid transcriptome from M. rosenbergii applying RNA-Seq technologies directed at identifying genes that have potential functional roles in reproductive-related traits. A total of 13,733,210 combined raw reads (1720 Mbp) were obtained from Ion-Torrent PGM and 454 FLX. Bioinformatic analyses based on three state-of-the-art assemblers, the CLC Genomic Workbench, Trans-ABySS, and Trinity, that use single and multiple k-mer methods respectively, were used to analyse the data. The influence of multiple k-mers on assembly performance was assessed to gain insight into transcriptome assembly from short reads. After optimisation, de novo assembly resulted in 44,407 contigs with a mean length of 437 bp, and the assembled transcripts were further functionally annotated to detect single nucleotide polymorphisms and simple sequence repeat motifs. Gene expression analysis was also used to compare expression patterns from ovary and testis tissue libraries to identify genes with potential roles in reproduction and sex differentiation. The large transcript set assembled here represents the most comprehensive set of transcriptomic resources ever developed for reproduction traits in M. rosenbergii, and the large number of genetic markers predicted should constitute an invaluable resource for future genetic research studies on M. rosenbergii and can be applied more widely on other freshwater prawn species in the genus Macrobrachium. PMID:27164098

  6. Optimizing Hybrid de Novo Transcriptome Assembly and Extending Genomic Resources for Giant Freshwater Prawns (Macrobrachium rosenbergii): The Identification of Genes and Markers Associated with Reproduction.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hyungtaek; Yoon, Byung-Ha; Kim, Woo-Jin; Kim, Dong-Wook; Hurwood, David A; Lyons, Russell E; Salin, Krishna R; Kim, Heui-Soo; Baek, Ilseon; Chand, Vincent; Mather, Peter B

    2016-05-07

    The giant freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii, a sexually dimorphic decapod crustacean is currently the world's most economically important cultured freshwater crustacean species. Despite its economic importance, there is currently a lack of genomic resources available for this species, and this has limited exploration of the molecular mechanisms that control the M. rosenbergii sex-differentiation system more widely in freshwater prawns. Here, we present the first hybrid transcriptome from M. rosenbergii applying RNA-Seq technologies directed at identifying genes that have potential functional roles in reproductive-related traits. A total of 13,733,210 combined raw reads (1720 Mbp) were obtained from Ion-Torrent PGM and 454 FLX. Bioinformatic analyses based on three state-of-the-art assemblers, the CLC Genomic Workbench, Trans-ABySS, and Trinity, that use single and multiple k-mer methods respectively, were used to analyse the data. The influence of multiple k-mers on assembly performance was assessed to gain insight into transcriptome assembly from short reads. After optimisation, de novo assembly resulted in 44,407 contigs with a mean length of 437 bp, and the assembled transcripts were further functionally annotated to detect single nucleotide polymorphisms and simple sequence repeat motifs. Gene expression analysis was also used to compare expression patterns from ovary and testis tissue libraries to identify genes with potential roles in reproduction and sex differentiation. The large transcript set assembled here represents the most comprehensive set of transcriptomic resources ever developed for reproduction traits in M. rosenbergii, and the large number of genetic markers predicted should constitute an invaluable resource for future genetic research studies on M. rosenbergii and can be applied more widely on other freshwater prawn species in the genus Macrobrachium.

  7. Resources for Teaching About American Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parisi, Lynn

    1987-01-01

    Lists selected resources for teaching about American Indians available from the ERIC database. Topics of resources include Navajo history, Pacific Northwest history, Indians of Oklahoma, Indian traditions, Plains Indian culture, and Pawnee history. (AEM)

  8. Management of obesity in adult Asian Indians.

    PubMed

    Behl, S; Misra, A

    The prevalence of obesity in India is increasing and ranges from 8% to 38% in rural and 13% to 50% in urban areas. Obesity is a risk factor for development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), hypertension, dyslipidemia, coronary heart disease and many cancers. In Asian Indians excess abdominal and hepatic fat is associated with increased risk for T2DM and cardiovascular disease. There is higher risk for development of obesity related non-communicable diseases at lower body mass index levels, compared to white Caucasians. Despite being a commonly encountered medical problem, obesity poses challenges in treatment. Many Indian physicians find themselves to be lacking time and expertise to prepare an appropriate obesity management plan and patients experience continuous weight gain over time despite being under regular medical supervision. In this article, we outline approaches to obesity management in 'real life mode' and in context to Asian Indian patients. Copyright © 2017 Cardiological Society of India. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Affective interactions in medical visits: ethnic differences among American Indian older adults.

    PubMed

    Garroutte, Eva Marie; Sarkisian, Natalia; Karamnov, Sergey

    2012-10-01

    Investigate influence of ethnicity on older American Indian patients' interpretations of providers' affective behaviors. Using data from 115 older American Indian patients, random effects ordered logit models related patient ratings of providers' respect, empathy, and rapport first to separate measures of American Indian and White American ethnicity, then to "ethnic discordance," or difference between providers' and patients' cultural characteristics. In models accounting for patients' ethnicity only, high scores for American Indian ethnicity were linked to reduced evaluations for providers' respect; high scores on White ethnicity were associated with elevated ratings for empathy and rapport. In models accounting for provider-patient ethnic discordance, high discordance on either ethnicity scale was associated with reduced ratings for the same behaviors. Findings support "orthogonal ethnic identity" theory and extend "cultural health capital" theory, suggesting a pathway by which ethnicity becomes relevant to experience of health care among older adults.

  10. Water resources of the White Earth Indian Reservation, northwestern Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruhl, J.F.

    1989-01-01

    Surface water also is a calcium magnesium bicarbonate type. Lake waters are hard and alkaline and are mesotrophic to eutrophic in productivity. Quality of the lake and stream water is suitable for native forms of freshwater biota, although the concentration of total recoverable mercury exceeds the 0.012 micrograms per liter maximum contaminant level; that level, established by USEPA for the organic form of dissolved mercury, is intended to protect against chronic effects on freshwater life. Available information, however, indicates that the amount of mercury in edible tissue from fish in alkaline lakes of northwestern Minnesota is within safe limits. The concentrations of phosphorus and nitrate in the streams are below levels that indicate pollution problems.

  11. Young Once, Indian Forever: Youth Gangs in Indian Country

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, James; Lim, Nicole

    2005-01-01

    Not unlike mainstream society of the United States, Indian Country faces new challenges regarding the values, mores, and behavior of its young people. Since their first encounters with European explorers, American Indians have fought to preserve their culture and traditions. Federal policies that addressed the "Indian problem" by…

  12. Young Once, Indian Forever: Youth Gangs in Indian Country

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, James; Lim, Nicole

    2005-01-01

    Not unlike mainstream society of the United States, Indian Country faces new challenges regarding the values, mores, and behavior of its young people. Since their first encounters with European explorers, American Indians have fought to preserve their culture and traditions. Federal policies that addressed the "Indian problem" by…

  13. The Horse and the Plains Indian. Indian Culture Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuessler, Raymond

    Produced by the Montana Council for Indian Education as part of its Indian Culture Series, the five short articles in the book explain how the Plains Indians got horses in legend and in fact. The stories describe the behavior codes, rules, cultural and social significance, and eventual cessation of horse raids, and the ceremony and tradition…

  14. The Horse and the Plains Indian. Indian Culture Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuessler, Raymond

    Produced by the Montana Council for Indian Education as part of its Indian Culture Series, the five short articles in the book explain how the Plains Indians got horses in legend and in fact. The stories describe the behavior codes, rules, cultural and social significance, and eventual cessation of horse raids, and the ceremony and tradition…

  15. Indian Control of Indian Education: Authority and Responsibility for Progress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkness, Verna J.

    Officially recognized in 1973, the "Indian Control of Indian Education" policy articulated philosophy, goals, principles, and directions designed to create an effective educational climate for Canada Natives. The policy acknowledged the need to improve educational opportunities for Indians as a preparation for total living, as a means of…

  16. White Men's Racial Others

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lensmire, Timothy J.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Context: Increasingly, researchers and educators have argued that alternative conceptions of Whiteness and White racial identity are needed because current conceptions have undermined, rather than strengthened, our critical pedagogies with White people. Grounded in critical Whiteness studies, and drawing especially on the writings of…

  17. White Men's Racial Others

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lensmire, Timothy J.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Context: Increasingly, researchers and educators have argued that alternative conceptions of Whiteness and White racial identity are needed because current conceptions have undermined, rather than strengthened, our critical pedagogies with White people. Grounded in critical Whiteness studies, and drawing especially on the writings of…

  18. Teaching about Indians? Use the Real Stuff!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldkamp-Price, Betsy; Smith, David Lee

    1994-01-01

    Provides suggestions for teaching students about American Indians. Teachers need to learn more about Indians; confront misconceptions and stereotypes; have students make Indian crafts and foods; play Indian games; learn about contemporary Indian culture; be critical of resources; and contact local Indian or cultural groups. (MDM)

  19. 78 FR 10203 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-13

    ... III Tribal- State Gaming Compact between the Chippewa-Cree Tribe of the Rocky Boy's Indian Reservation... Chippewa-Cree Indians of the Rocky Boy's Reservation and the State of Montana submitted a Class III...

  20. 77 FR 30550 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-23

    ... of an extension to the Class III Gaming Compact between the Pyramid Lake Paiute Indian Tribe and the... Pyramid Lake Paiute Indian Tribe and the State of Nevada became effective upon publication of the...