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Sample records for indirect reverse cholesterol

  1. HDL Function, Dysfunction, and Reverse Cholesterol Transport

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Edward A.; Feig, Jonathan E.; Hewing, Bernd; Hazen, Stanley L.; Smith, Jonathan D.

    2012-01-01

    Although high HDL-cholesterol levels are associated with decreased cardiovascular risk in epidemiological studies, recent genetic and pharmacological findings have raised doubts about the beneficial effects of HDL. Raising HDL levels in animal models by infusion or over expression of apolipoprotein A-I has shown clear vascular improvements, such as delayed atherosclerotic lesion progression and accelerated lesion regression, along with increased reverse cholesterol transport. Inflammation and other factors, such as myeloperoxidase mediated oxidation, can impair HDL production and HDL function, in regard to its reverse cholesterol transport, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory activities. Thus, tests of HDL function, which have not yet been developed as routine diagnostic assays, may prove useful and be a better predictor of cardiovascular risk than HDL-cholesterol levels. PMID:23152494

  2. [Role of HDL in Cholesterol Efflux and Reverse Cholesterol Transport].

    PubMed

    Ayaori, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Low plasma levels of HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) have been consistently associated with an increased risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases (CVD), and it is thus considered to be an anti-atherogenic lipoprotein. The development of novel therapies to enhance the atheroprotective properties of HDL may have the potential to further reduce the residual risk. Reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) is believed to be a primary atheroprotective property of HDL and its major protein, apolipoprotein A-I(apoA-I). HDL and apoA-I have been shown to promote the efflux of excess cholesterol from macrophage-derived foam cells via the cholesterol transporters, ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), ABCG1, and scavenger receptor class B, type I (SR-BI), and then transport it back to the liver for excretion into bile and eventually into the feces. In this regard, a validated murine assay that quantifies macrophage RCT may be a better predictor of atherosclerosis than the steady-state plasma concentration of HDL-C. Indeed, a recent clinical study demonstrated that the ability of serum HDL to mediate cholesterol efflux from macrophages was independently and negatively associated with the CVD risk even after adjustment for HDL-C levels, suggesting that HDL functionality is more important than its quantity. Therefore, the future development of HDL-targeted therapy should take both aspects into consideration to further reduce the residual risk.

  3. [Role of HDL in Cholesterol Efflux and Reverse Cholesterol Transport].

    PubMed

    Ayaori, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Low plasma levels of HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) have been consistently associated with an increased risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases (CVD), and it is thus considered to be an anti-atherogenic lipoprotein. The development of novel therapies to enhance the atheroprotective properties of HDL may have the potential to further reduce the residual risk. Reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) is believed to be a primary atheroprotective property of HDL and its major protein, apolipoprotein A-I(apoA-I). HDL and apoA-I have been shown to promote the efflux of excess cholesterol from macrophage-derived foam cells via the cholesterol transporters, ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), ABCG1, and scavenger receptor class B, type I (SR-BI), and then transport it back to the liver for excretion into bile and eventually into the feces. In this regard, a validated murine assay that quantifies macrophage RCT may be a better predictor of atherosclerosis than the steady-state plasma concentration of HDL-C. Indeed, a recent clinical study demonstrated that the ability of serum HDL to mediate cholesterol efflux from macrophages was independently and negatively associated with the CVD risk even after adjustment for HDL-C levels, suggesting that HDL functionality is more important than its quantity. Therefore, the future development of HDL-targeted therapy should take both aspects into consideration to further reduce the residual risk. PMID:27192798

  4. A new framework for reverse cholesterol transport: Non-biliary contributions to reverse cholesterol transport

    PubMed Central

    Temel, Ryan E; Brown, J Mark

    2010-01-01

    Reduction of low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol through statin therapy has only modestly decreased coronary heart disease (CHD)-associated mortality in developed countries, which has prompted the search for alternative therapeutic strategies for CHD. Major efforts are now focused on therapies that augment high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-mediated reverse cholesterol transport (RCT), and ultimately increase the fecal disposal of cholesterol. The process of RCT has long been thought to simply involve HDL-mediated delivery of peripheral cholesterol to the liver for biliary excretion out of the body. However, recent studies have revealed a novel pathway for RCT that does not rely on biliary secretion. This non-biliary pathway rather involves the direct excretion of cholesterol by the proximal small intestine. Compared to RCT therapies that augment biliary sterol loss, modulation of non-biliary fecal sterol loss through the intestine is a much more attractive therapeutic strategy, given that excessive biliary cholesterol secretion can promote gallstone formation. However, we are at an early stage in understanding the molecular mechanisms regulating the non-biliary pathway for RCT, and much additional work is required in order to effectively target this pathway for CHD prevention. The purpose of this review is to discuss our current understanding of biliary and non-biliary contributions to RCT with particular emphasis on the possibility of targeting the intestine as an inducible cholesterol secretory organ. PMID:21157970

  5. A New Model of Reverse Cholesterol Transport: EnTICEing Strategies to Stimulate Intestinal Cholesterol Excretion

    PubMed Central

    Temel, Ryan E.; Brown, J. Mark

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains the largest cause of mortality in most developed countries. Although recent failed clinical trials and Mendelian randomization studies have called into question the high density lipoprotein (HDL) hypothesis, it remains well accepted that stimulating the process of reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) can prevent or even regress atherosclerosis. The prevailing model for RCT is that cholesterol from the artery wall must be delivered to the liver where it is secreted into bile before leaving the body through fecal excretion. However, many studies have demonstrated that RCT can proceed through a non-biliary pathway known as transintestinal cholesterol excretion (TICE). The goal of this review is to discuss the current state of knowledge of the TICE pathway, with emphasis on points of therapeutic intervention. PMID:25930707

  6. The Regulation of Reverse Cholesterol Transport and Cellular Cholesterol Homeostasis by MicroRNAs

    PubMed Central

    DiMarco, Diana M.; Fernandez, Maria Luz

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNAs that have the ability to post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression. Hundreds of miRNAs have been identified in humans and they are involved in the regulation of almost every process, including cholesterol transport, metabolism, and maintenance of cholesterol homeostasis. Because of their small size and their ability to very specifically regulate gene expression, miRNAs are attractive targets for the regulation of dyslipidemias and other lipid-related disorders. However, the complex interactions between miRNAs, transcription factors, and gene expression raise great potential for side effects as a result of miRNA overexpression or inhibition. Many dietary components can also target specific miRNAs, altering the expression of downstream genes. Therefore, much more research is necessary to fully understand the role(s) of each miRNA in the body and how they may be impacted by diet and health. The present review aims to summarize the known roles of miRNAs in the regulation of reverse cholesterol transport and the maintenance of cholesterol homeostasis, as well as the potential clinical consequences of their manipulation. PMID:26226008

  7. Caveolae and Caveolin-1 Integrate Reverse Cholesterol Transport and Inflammation in Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Li; Zhu, Neng; Ao, Bao-Xue; Liu, Chan; Shi, Ya-Ning; Du, Ke; Chen, Jian-Xiong; Zheng, Xi-Long; Liao, Duan-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Lipid disorder and inflammation play critical roles in the development of atherosclerosis. Reverse cholesterol transport is a key event in lipid metabolism. Caveolae and caveolin-1 are in the center stage of cholesterol transportation and inflammation in macrophages. Here, we propose that reverse cholesterol transport and inflammation in atherosclerosis can be integrated by caveolae and caveolin-1. PMID:27011179

  8. Reversible effects of sphingomyelin degradation on cholesterol distribution and metabolism in fibroblasts and transformed neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Pörn, M I; Slotte, J P

    1990-10-01

    Plasma-membrane sphingomyelin appears to be one of the major determinants of the preferential allocation of cell cholesterol into the plasma-membrane compartment, since removal of sphingomyelin leads to a dramatic redistribution of cholesterol within the cell [Slotte & Bierman (1988) Biochem. J. 250, 653-658]. In the present study we examined the long-term effects of sphingomyelin degradation on cholesterol redistribution in cells and determined the reversibility of the process. In a human lung fibroblast-cell line, removal of 80% of the sphingomyelin led to a rapid and transient up-regulation (3-fold) of acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) activity, and also, within 30 h, to the translocation of about 50% of the cell non-esterified cholesterol from a cholesterol oxidase-susceptible compartment (i.e. the cell surface) to oxidase-resistant compartments. At 49 h after the initial sphingomyelin degradation, the cell sphingomyelin level was back to 45% of the control level, and the direction of cell cholesterol flow was toward the cell surface, although the original distribution was not achieved. In a transformed neuroblastoma cell line (SH-SY5Y), the depletion of sphingomyelin led to a similarly rapid and transient up-regulation of ACAT activity, and to the translocation of about 25% of cell-surface cholesterol into internal membranes (within 3 h). The flow of cholesterol back to the cholesterol oxidase-susceptible pool was rapid, and a pretreatment cholesterol distribution was reached within 20-49 h. Also, the resynthesis of sphingomyelin was faster in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells and reached control levels within 24 h. The findings of the present study show that the cellular redistribution of cholesterol, as induced by sphingomyelin degradation, is reversible and suggest that the normalization of cellular cholesterol distribution is linked to the re-synthesis of sphingomyelin.

  9. Clinically used selective estrogen receptor modulators affect different steps of macrophage-specific reverse cholesterol transport

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Suárez, María E.; Escolà-Gil, Joan C.; Pastor, Oscar; Dávalos, Alberto; Blanco-Vaca, Francisco; Lasunción, Miguel A.; Martínez-Botas, Javier; Gómez-Coronado, Diego

    2016-01-01

    Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) are widely prescribed drugs that alter cellular and whole-body cholesterol homeostasis. Here we evaluate the effect of SERMs on the macrophage-specific reverse cholesterol transport (M-RCT) pathway, which is mediated by HDL. Treatment of human and mouse macrophages with tamoxifen, raloxifene or toremifene induced the accumulation of cytoplasmic vesicles of acetyl-LDL-derived free cholesterol. The SERMs impaired cholesterol efflux to apolipoprotein A-I and HDL, and lowered ABCA1 and ABCG1 expression. These effects were not altered by the antiestrogen ICI 182,780 nor were they reproduced by 17β-estradiol. The treatment of mice with tamoxifen or raloxifene accelerated HDL-cholesteryl ester catabolism, thereby reducing HDL-cholesterol concentrations in serum. When [3H]cholesterol-loaded macrophages were injected into mice intraperitoneally, tamoxifen, but not raloxifene, decreased the [3H]cholesterol levels in serum, liver and feces. Both SERMs downregulated liver ABCG5 and ABCG8 protein expression, but tamoxifen reduced the capacity of HDL and plasma to promote macrophage cholesterol efflux to a greater extent than raloxifene. We conclude that SERMs interfere with intracellular cholesterol trafficking and efflux from macrophages. Tamoxifen, but not raloxifene, impair M-RCT in vivo. This effect is primarily attributable to the tamoxifen-mediated reduction of the capacity of HDL to promote cholesterol mobilization from macrophages. PMID:27601313

  10. Clinically used selective estrogen receptor modulators affect different steps of macrophage-specific reverse cholesterol transport.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Suárez, María E; Escolà-Gil, Joan C; Pastor, Oscar; Dávalos, Alberto; Blanco-Vaca, Francisco; Lasunción, Miguel A; Martínez-Botas, Javier; Gómez-Coronado, Diego

    2016-09-07

    Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) are widely prescribed drugs that alter cellular and whole-body cholesterol homeostasis. Here we evaluate the effect of SERMs on the macrophage-specific reverse cholesterol transport (M-RCT) pathway, which is mediated by HDL. Treatment of human and mouse macrophages with tamoxifen, raloxifene or toremifene induced the accumulation of cytoplasmic vesicles of acetyl-LDL-derived free cholesterol. The SERMs impaired cholesterol efflux to apolipoprotein A-I and HDL, and lowered ABCA1 and ABCG1 expression. These effects were not altered by the antiestrogen ICI 182,780 nor were they reproduced by 17β-estradiol. The treatment of mice with tamoxifen or raloxifene accelerated HDL-cholesteryl ester catabolism, thereby reducing HDL-cholesterol concentrations in serum. When [(3)H]cholesterol-loaded macrophages were injected into mice intraperitoneally, tamoxifen, but not raloxifene, decreased the [(3)H]cholesterol levels in serum, liver and feces. Both SERMs downregulated liver ABCG5 and ABCG8 protein expression, but tamoxifen reduced the capacity of HDL and plasma to promote macrophage cholesterol efflux to a greater extent than raloxifene. We conclude that SERMs interfere with intracellular cholesterol trafficking and efflux from macrophages. Tamoxifen, but not raloxifene, impair M-RCT in vivo. This effect is primarily attributable to the tamoxifen-mediated reduction of the capacity of HDL to promote cholesterol mobilization from macrophages.

  11. Clinically used selective estrogen receptor modulators affect different steps of macrophage-specific reverse cholesterol transport.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Suárez, María E; Escolà-Gil, Joan C; Pastor, Oscar; Dávalos, Alberto; Blanco-Vaca, Francisco; Lasunción, Miguel A; Martínez-Botas, Javier; Gómez-Coronado, Diego

    2016-01-01

    Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) are widely prescribed drugs that alter cellular and whole-body cholesterol homeostasis. Here we evaluate the effect of SERMs on the macrophage-specific reverse cholesterol transport (M-RCT) pathway, which is mediated by HDL. Treatment of human and mouse macrophages with tamoxifen, raloxifene or toremifene induced the accumulation of cytoplasmic vesicles of acetyl-LDL-derived free cholesterol. The SERMs impaired cholesterol efflux to apolipoprotein A-I and HDL, and lowered ABCA1 and ABCG1 expression. These effects were not altered by the antiestrogen ICI 182,780 nor were they reproduced by 17β-estradiol. The treatment of mice with tamoxifen or raloxifene accelerated HDL-cholesteryl ester catabolism, thereby reducing HDL-cholesterol concentrations in serum. When [(3)H]cholesterol-loaded macrophages were injected into mice intraperitoneally, tamoxifen, but not raloxifene, decreased the [(3)H]cholesterol levels in serum, liver and feces. Both SERMs downregulated liver ABCG5 and ABCG8 protein expression, but tamoxifen reduced the capacity of HDL and plasma to promote macrophage cholesterol efflux to a greater extent than raloxifene. We conclude that SERMs interfere with intracellular cholesterol trafficking and efflux from macrophages. Tamoxifen, but not raloxifene, impair M-RCT in vivo. This effect is primarily attributable to the tamoxifen-mediated reduction of the capacity of HDL to promote cholesterol mobilization from macrophages. PMID:27601313

  12. Omega 3 fatty acids promote macrophage reverse cholesterol transport in hamster fed high fat diet.

    PubMed

    Kasbi Chadli, Fatima; Nazih, Hassane; Krempf, Michel; Nguyen, Patrick; Ouguerram, Khadija

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate macrophage reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) in hamster, a CETP-expressing species, fed omega 3 fatty acids (ω3PUFA) supplemented high fat diet (HFD). Three groups of hamsters (n = 6/group) were studied for 20 weeks: 1) control diet: Control, 2) HFD group: HF and 3) HFD group supplemented with ω3PUFA (EPA and DHA): HFω3. In vivo macrophage-to-feces RCT was assessed after an intraperitoneal injection of (3)H-cholesterol-labelled hamster primary macrophages. Compared to Control, HF presented significant (p<0.05) increase in body weight, plasma TG (p<0.01) and cholesterol (p<0.001) with an increase in VLDL TG and in VLDL and LDL cholesterol (p<0.001). Compared to HF, HFω3 presented significant decrease in body weight. HFω3 showed less plasma TG (p<0.001) and cholesterol (p<0.001) related to a decrease in VLDL TG and HDL cholesterol respectively and higher LCAT activity (p<0.05) compared to HF. HFω3 showed a higher fecal bile acid excretion (p<0.05) compared to Control and HF groups and higher fecal cholesterol excretion (p<0.05) compared to HF. This increase was related to higher gene expression of ABCG5, ABCA1 and SR-B1 in HFω3 compared to Control and HF groups (<0.05) and in ABCG1 and CYP7A1 compared to HF group (p<0.05). A higher plasma efflux capacity was also measured in HFω3 using (3)H- cholesterol labeled Fu5AH cells. In conclusion, EPA and DHA supplementation improved macrophage to feces reverse cholesterol transport in hamster fed HFD. This change was related to the higher cholesterol and fecal bile acids excretion and to the activation of major genes involved in RCT. PMID:23613796

  13. Reversible encephalopathy associated with cholesterol embolism syndrome: magnetic resonance imaging and pathological findings

    PubMed Central

    Andreux, F; Marro, B; Khoury, N EI; Seilhean, D; Alamowitch, S

    2007-01-01

    We describe a patient found to have acute diffuse and reversible encephalopathy on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) associated with cholesterol emboli syndrome (CES). The initial MRI showed extensive white matter, basal ganglia and cortical damage without evidence of brain infarction. Dramatic clinical and MRI improvement was observed with corticosteroids. Pathologically, cholesterol crystal emboli were found in the lumen of skin and brain arteries and were associated with varying degrees of inflammation of the arteriole wall. This case suggests that CES may be responsible for extensive, acute and reversible encephalopathy underlined by an inflammation of brain arteries. PMID:17229746

  14. Novel technique for generating macrophage foam cells for in vitro reverse cholesterol transport studies[S

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Bhaswati; Narasimhulu, Chandrakala Aluganti; Parthasarathy, Sampath

    2013-01-01

    Generation of foam cells, an essential step for reverse cholesterol transport studies, uses the technique of receptor-dependent macrophage loading with radiolabeled acetylated LDL. In this study, we used the ability of a biologically relevant detergent molecule, lysophosphatidylcholine (lyso-PtdCho), to form mixed micelles with cholesterol or cholesteryl ester (CE) to generate macrophage foam cells. Fluorescent or radiolabeled cholesterol/lyso-PtdCho mixed micelles were prepared and incubated with RAW 264.7 or mouse peritoneal macrophages. Results showed that such micelles were quite stable at 4°C and retained the solubilized cholesterol during one month of storage. Macrophages incubated with cholesterol or CE (unlabeled, fluorescently labeled, or radiolabeled)/lyso-PtdCho mixed micelles accumulated CE as documented by microscopy, lipid staining, labeled oleate incorporation, and by TLC. Such foam cells unloaded cholesterol when incubated with HDL but not with oxidized HDL. We propose that stable cholesterol or CE/lyso-PtdCho micelles would offer advantages over existing methods. PMID:24115226

  15. Dietary cholesterol degrades rabbit long term memory for discrimination learning but facilitates acquisition of discrimination reversal.

    PubMed

    Schreurs, Bernard G; Smith-Bell, Carrie A; Wang, Desheng; Burhans, Lauren B

    2013-11-01

    We have shown previously that feeding dietary cholesterol before learning can improve acquisition whereas feeding cholesterol after learning can degrade long term memory. To examine these different findings within a single paradigm, we fed groups of rabbits 2% cholesterol or normal chow with or without 0.12 ppm copper added to the drinking water following two-tone discrimination learning of the nictitating membrane response in which a 8-kHz tone (conditioned stimulus, CS+) was followed by air puff and a 1-kHz tone (CS-) was not. After eight weeks on the diet, we assessed the rabbits' conditioned responding during testing and retraining. We then reversed the two-tone discrimination and assessed responding to the 1-kHz tone CS+ and the 8-kHz CS-. During testing, rabbits given cholesterol without copper had lower levels of responding to CS+ than rabbits in the other groups suggesting they did not retain the discrimination as well. However, during a brief discrimination retraining session, their response levels to the CS+ returned to the level of the other groups, demonstrating a return of the memory of the original discrimination. At the end of discrimination reversal, these same rabbits exhibited superior discrimination indexed by lower response levels to CS- but similar levels to CS+, suggesting they were better able to acquire the new relationship between the two tones by inhibiting CS- responses. These results add to our previous data by showing cholesterol diet-induced degradation of an old memory and facilitation of a new memory can both be demonstrated within a discrimination reversal paradigm. Given discrimination reversal is a hippocampally-dependent form of learning, the data support the role of cholesterol in modifying hippocampal function as we have shown previously with in vitro brain slice recordings.

  16. Myeloid differentiation primary response protein 88 couples reverse cholesterol transport to inflammation.

    PubMed

    Smoak, Kathleen A; Aloor, Jim J; Madenspacher, Jennifer; Merrick, B Alex; Collins, Jennifer B; Zhu, Xuewei; Cavigiolio, Giorgio; Oda, Michael N; Parks, John S; Fessler, Michael B

    2010-06-01

    Crosstalk exists in mammalian cells between cholesterol trafficking and innate immune signaling. Apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I), a serum apolipoprotein that induces antiatherogenic efflux of macrophage cholesterol, is widely described as anti-inflammatory because it neutralizes bacterial lipopolysaccharide. Conversely, lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation is proatherogenic. However, whether innate immunity plays an endogenous, physiological role in host cholesterol homeostasis in the absence of infection is undetermined. We report that apoA-I signals in the macrophage through Toll-like receptor (TLR)2, TLR4, and CD14, utilizing myeloid differentiation primary response protein 88 (MyD88)-dependent and -independent pathways, to activate nuclear factor-kappaB and induce cytokines. MyD88 plays a critical role in reverse cholesterol transport in vitro and in vivo, in part through promoting ATP-binding cassette A1 transporter upregulation. Taken together, this work identifies apoA-I as an endogenous stimulus of innate immunity that couples cholesterol trafficking to inflammation through MyD88 and identifies innate immunity as a physiologic signal in cholesterol homeostasis.

  17. Chronic Moderate Alcohol Intakes Accelerate SR-B1 Mediated Reverse Cholesterol Transport.

    PubMed

    Li, Menghua; Diao, Yan; Liu, Ying; Huang, Hui; Li, Yanze; Tan, Peizhu; Liang, Huan; He, Qi; Nie, Junhui; Dong, Xingli; Wang, Yang; Zhou, Lingyun; Gao, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol is essential for all animal life. However, a high level of cholesterol in the body is strongly associated with the progression of various severe diseases. In our study, the potential involvement of alcohol in the regulation of high density lipoprotein (HDL) receptor scavenger receptor class B and type I (SR-B1)-mediated reverse cholesterol transport was investigated. We separated male C57BL/6 mice into four diets: control, alcohol, Control + HC and alcohol + HC. The SR-B1 level and 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate- high- density lipoprotein (DiI-HDL) uptake were also measured in AML12 cells and HL7702 cells treated with alcohol. The control + HC diet led to increased hepatic triglyceride and cholesterol levels while alcohol + HC led no significant change. Compared with that of the control group, the SR-B1 mRNA level was elevated by 27.1% (P < 0.05), 123.8% (P < 0.001) and 343.6% (P < 0.001) in the alcohol, control + HC and alcohol + HC groups, respectively. In AML12 and HL7702 cells, SR-B1 level and DiI-HDL uptake were repressed by SR-B1 siRNA or GW9662. However, these effects were reversed through alcohol treatment. These data suggest that a moderate amount of alcohol plays a novel role in reverse cholesterol transport, mainly mediated by PPARγ and SR-B1. PMID:27618957

  18. Chronic Moderate Alcohol Intakes Accelerate SR-B1 Mediated Reverse Cholesterol Transport

    PubMed Central

    Li, Menghua; Diao, Yan; Liu, Ying; Huang, Hui; Li, Yanze; Tan, Peizhu; Liang, Huan; He, Qi; Nie, Junhui; Dong, Xingli; Wang, Yang; Zhou, Lingyun; Gao, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol is essential for all animal life. However, a high level of cholesterol in the body is strongly associated with the progression of various severe diseases. In our study, the potential involvement of alcohol in the regulation of high density lipoprotein (HDL) receptor scavenger receptor class B and type I (SR-B1)-mediated reverse cholesterol transport was investigated. We separated male C57BL/6 mice into four diets: control, alcohol, Control + HC and alcohol + HC. The SR-B1 level and 1,1′-dioctadecyl-3,3,3′,3′-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate- high- density lipoprotein (DiI-HDL) uptake were also measured in AML12 cells and HL7702 cells treated with alcohol. The control + HC diet led to increased hepatic triglyceride and cholesterol levels while alcohol + HC led no significant change. Compared with that of the control group, the SR-B1 mRNA level was elevated by 27.1% (P < 0.05), 123.8% (P < 0.001) and 343.6% (P < 0.001) in the alcohol, control + HC and alcohol + HC groups, respectively. In AML12 and HL7702 cells, SR-B1 level and DiI-HDL uptake were repressed by SR-B1 siRNA or GW9662. However, these effects were reversed through alcohol treatment. These data suggest that a moderate amount of alcohol plays a novel role in reverse cholesterol transport, mainly mediated by PPARγ and SR-B1. PMID:27618957

  19. [Role of the ABC transporters A1 and G1, key reverse cholesterol transport proteins, in atherosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Demina, E P; Miroshnikova, V V; Schwarzman, A L

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is one of the most common causes of death worldwide. Epidemiology studies firmly established an inverse relationship between atherogenesis and distorted lipid metabolism, in particular, higher levels of total cholesterol, an accumulation of CH-laden macrophages (foam cells), and lower plasma levels of antiatherogenic high density lipoprotein (HDL). It is believed that the reverse cholesterol transport, a process that removes excess cholesterol from peripheral tissues/cells including macrophages to circulating HDL, is one of the main mechanisms responsible for anti-atherogenic properties of HDL. The key proteins of reverse cholesterol transport-ATP-binding cassette transporters A1 (ABCA1) and G1 (ABCG1)-mediate the cholesterol efflux from macrophages and prevent their transformation into foam cells. This review focuses on the role of ABC transporters A1 and G1 in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis.

  20. Inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase in mice promotes reverse cholesterol transport and regression of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Li; Peng, Hongchun; Peng, Ran; Fan, Qingsong; Zhao, Shuiping; Xu, Danyan; Morisseau, Christophe; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan; Hammock, Bruce D

    2015-04-01

    Adipose tissue is the body largest free cholesterol reservoir and abundantly expresses ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), which maintains plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels. HDLs have a protective role in atherosclerosis by mediating reverse cholesterol transport (RCT). Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) is a cytosolic enzyme whose inhibition has various beneficial effects on cardiovascular disease. The sEH is highly expressed in adipocytes, and it converts epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) into less bioactive dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids. We previously showed that increasing EETs levels with a sEH inhibitor (sEHI) (t-AUCB) resulted in elevated ABCA1 expression and promoted ABCA1-mediated cholesterol efflux from 3T3-L1 adipocytes. The present study investigates the impacts of t-AUCB in mice deficient for the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor (Ldlr(-/-) mice) with established atherosclerotic plaques. The sEH inhibitor delivered in vivo for 4 weeks decreased the activity of sEH in adipose tissue, enhanced ABCA1 expression and cholesterol efflux from adipose depots, and consequently increased HDL levels. Furthermore, t-AUCB enhanced RCT to the plasma, liver, bile and feces. It also showed the reduction of plasma LDL-C levels. Consistently, t-AUCB-treated mice showed reductions in the size of atherosclerotic plaques. These studies establish that raising adipose ABCA1 expression, cholesterol efflux, and plasma HDL levels with t-AUCB treatment promotes RCT, decreasing LDL-C and atherosclerosis regression, suggesting that sEH inhibition may be a promising strategy to treat atherosclerotic vascular disease.

  1. Chronic intermittent psychological stress promotes macrophage reverse cholesterol transport by impairing bile acid absorption in mice

    PubMed Central

    Silvennoinen, Reija; Quesada, Helena; Kareinen, Ilona; Julve, Josep; Kaipiainen, Leena; Gylling, Helena; Blanco-Vaca, Francisco; Escola-Gil, Joan Carles; Kovanen, Petri T; Lee-Rueckert, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    Psychological stress is a risk factor for atherosclerosis, yet the pathophysiological mechanisms involved remain elusive. The transfer of cholesterol from macrophage foam cells to liver and feces (the macrophage-specific reverse cholesterol transport, m-RCT) is an important antiatherogenic pathway. Because exposure of mice to physical restraint, a model of psychological stress, increases serum levels of corticosterone, and as bile acid homeostasis is disrupted in glucocorticoid-treated animals, we investigated if chronic intermittent restraint stress would modify m-RCT by altering the enterohepatic circulation of bile acids. C57Bl/6J mice exposed to intermittent stress for 5 days exhibited increased transit through the large intestine and enhanced fecal bile acid excretion. Of the transcription factors and transporters that regulate bile acid homeostasis, the mRNA expression levels of the hepatic farnesoid X receptor (FXR), the bile salt export pump (BSEP), and the intestinal fibroblast growth factor 15 (FGF15) were reduced, whereas those of the ileal apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT), responsible for active bile acid absorption, remained unchanged. Neither did the hepatic expression of cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1), the key enzyme regulating bile acid synthesis, change in the stressed mice. Evaluation of the functionality of the m-RCT pathway revealed increased fecal excretion of bile acids that had been synthesized from macrophage-derived cholesterol. Overall, our study reveals that chronic intermittent stress in mice accelerates m-RCT specifically by increasing fecal excretion of bile acids. This novel mechanism of m-RCT induction could have antiatherogenic potential under conditions of chronic stress. PMID:25969465

  2. Plasma proteomic analysis of stable coronary artery disease indicates impairment of reverse cholesterol pathway

    PubMed Central

    Basak, Trayambak; Tanwar, Vinay Singh; Bhardwaj, Gourav; Bhardwaj, Nitin; Ahmad, Shadab; Garg, Gaurav; V, Sreenivas; Karthikeyan, Ganesan; Seth, Sandeep; Sengupta, Shantanu

    2016-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is one of the largest causes of death worldwide yet the traditional risk factors, although useful in identifying people at high risk, lack the desired predictive accuracy. Techniques like quantitative plasma proteomics holds immense potential to identify newer markers and this study (conducted in three phases) was aimed to identify differentially expressed proteins in stable CAD patients. In the first (discovery) phase, plasma from CAD cases (angiographically proven) and controls were subjected to iTRAQ based proteomic analysis. Proteins found to be differentially expressed were then validated in the second and third (verification and validation) phases in larger number of (n = 546) samples. After multivariate logistic regression adjusting for confounding factors (age, diet, etc.), four proteins involved in the reverse cholesterol pathway (Apo A1, ApoA4, Apo C1 and albumin) along with diabetes and hypertension were found to be significantly associated with CAD and could account for approximately 88% of the cases as revealed by ROC analysis. The maximum odds ratio was found to be 6.70 for albumin (p < 0.0001), followed by Apo AI (5.07, p < 0.0001), Apo CI (4.03, p = 0.001), and Apo AIV (2.63, p = 0.003). Down-regulation of apolipoproteins and albumin implicates the impairment of reverse cholesterol pathway in CAD. PMID:27350024

  3. Reverse transport of cholesterol is the reason for resistance to development of atherosclerosis in Prague Hereditary Hypercholesterolemic (PHHC) rat.

    PubMed

    Schmiedtova, M; Heczkova, M; Kovar, J; Kralova Lesna, I; Poledne, R

    2014-01-01

    The Prague Hereditary Hypercholesterolemic (PHHC) rat is a model of hypercholesterolemia. In previous experiments, it was found to be completely resistant to the development of atherosclerosis. It was assumed that the reverse transport of cholesterol (RCT) might be the reason for this resistance. In this study, RCT was measured in vivo by cholesterol efflux from macrophages to plasma, using previously established methods for RCT in mice (Rader 2003), optimized for measurements in rats. Primary cell culture of macrophages was labeled with (14)C-cholesterol and then injected intraperitoneally into rats. Plasma and feces were collected at 24 and 48 h. The plasma (14)C-cholesterol levels at both 24 and 48 h were significantly higher in male PHHC rats compared to control Wistar rats. The PHHC rats excreted less (14)C-cholesterol in feces in 24 and 48 h compared to Wistar rats. The largest pool of (14)C-cholesterol was found in the adipose tissue of PHHC rats and in contrast lower levels of (14)C-cholesterol were measured in the liver and muscle tissues of PHHC rats compared with Wistar rats. Increasing release of (14)C-cholesterol efflux from macrophages demonstrates accelerated RTC and leads to prevention of atherogenesis in PHHC rats.

  4. Indirect Evidence on Sex Reversal of Sinonovacula constricta (Bivalvia: Euheterodonta) and Gomphina veneriformis (Bivalvia: Veneridae)

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Yun Kyung; Park, Jung Jun; Choi, Ji Sung; Lee, Jung Sick

    2014-01-01

    This study attempts to propose the possibility of the sex reversal in Sinonovacula constricta and Gomphina veneriformis by confirming the changes in the sex ratio with the shell length in the same population level. For analysis of sex ratio, 100 individuals of S. constricta (SL 26.5-95.0 mm) and 2385 individuals of G. veneriformis (SL 15.1-60.1 mm) were used. Sex was analyzed histologically. Both species displayed the tendency of increase in the female proportion with increase in shell length. In this study, changes in the sex ratio in accordance with the growth of S. constricta and G. veneriformis are determined to be indirect evidence that signifies their sex reversal. PMID:25949174

  5. Susceptibility to Predation Affects Trait-Mediated Indirect Interactions by Reversing Interspecific Competition

    PubMed Central

    Mowles, Sophie L.; Rundle, Simon D.; Cotton, Peter A.

    2011-01-01

    Numerous studies indicate that the behavioral responses of prey to the presence of predators can have an important role in structuring assemblages through trait-mediated indirect interactions. Few studies, however, have addressed how relative susceptibility to predation influences such interactions. Here we examine the effect of chemical cues from the common shore crab Carcinus maenas on the foraging behavior of two common intertidal gastropod molluscs. Of the two model consumers studied, Littorina littorea is morphologically more vulnerable to crab predation than Gibbula umbilicalis, and it exhibited greater competitive ability in the absence of predation threat. However, Littorina demonstrated a greater anti-predator response when experimentally exposed to predation cues, resulting in a lower level of foraging. This reversed the competitive interaction, allowing Gibbula substantially increased access to shared resources. Our results demonstrate that the susceptibility of consumers to predation can influence species interactions, and suggest that inter-specific differences in trait-mediated indirect interactions are another mechanism through which non-consumptive predator effects may influence trophic interactions. PMID:21857993

  6. Susceptibility to predation affects trait-mediated indirect interactions by reversing interspecific competition.

    PubMed

    Mowles, Sophie L; Rundle, Simon D; Cotton, Peter A

    2011-01-01

    Numerous studies indicate that the behavioral responses of prey to the presence of predators can have an important role in structuring assemblages through trait-mediated indirect interactions. Few studies, however, have addressed how relative susceptibility to predation influences such interactions. Here we examine the effect of chemical cues from the common shore crab Carcinus maenas on the foraging behavior of two common intertidal gastropod molluscs. Of the two model consumers studied, Littorina littorea is morphologically more vulnerable to crab predation than Gibbula umbilicalis, and it exhibited greater competitive ability in the absence of predation threat. However, Littorina demonstrated a greater anti-predator response when experimentally exposed to predation cues, resulting in a lower level of foraging. This reversed the competitive interaction, allowing Gibbula substantially increased access to shared resources. Our results demonstrate that the susceptibility of consumers to predation can influence species interactions, and suggest that inter-specific differences in trait-mediated indirect interactions are another mechanism through which non-consumptive predator effects may influence trophic interactions. PMID:21857993

  7. Soya protein stimulates bile acid excretion by the liver and intestine through direct and indirect pathways influenced by the presence of dietary cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Arellano-Martínez, Gloria Leticia; Granados, Omar; Palacios-González, Berenice; Torres, Nimbe; Medina-Vera, Isabel; Tovar, Armando R

    2014-06-28

    Several studies using different animal models have demonstrated that the consumption of soya protein (SP) reduces serum cholesterol concentrations by increasing the excretion of bile acids (BA). However, the mechanism by which SP enhances BA excretion is not fully understood. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine whether the consumption of SP regulates the expression of key enzymes involved in hepatic BA synthesis and the transporters involved in reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) via fibroblast growth factor 15 (FGF15) and/or small heterodimer protein (SHP) in rats. To achieve this aim, four groups of rats were fed experimental diets containing 20 % casein (C) or SP with or without the addition of 0·2 % cholesterol and the expression of hepatic genes involved in BA synthesis and the ileal and hepatic RCT was measured. Rats fed the SP diet had higher concentrations of ileal FGF15 and hepatic FGF15 receptor (FGFR4) and increased expression of SHP and liver receptor homolog 1 (LRH1) than those fed the C diet; as a result, the excretion of faecal BA was greater. The addition of cholesterol to the diet repressed the protein abundance of FGF15 and FGFR4; however, SP increased the expression of SHP and LRH1 to a lesser extent. Nonetheless, the expression of ABCG5/8 was increased in the intestine of rats fed the SP diet, and the effect was enhanced by the addition of cholesterol to the diet. In conclusion, SP in the presence of cholesterol increases BA synthesis via the repressions of FGF15 and SHP and accelerates BA excretion to prevent cholesterol overload in the enterocytes by increasing RCT.

  8. Exposure to polymers reverses inhibition of pulmonary surfactant by serum, meconium, or cholesterol in the captive bubble surfactometer.

    PubMed

    López-Rodríguez, Elena; Ospina, Olga Lucía; Echaide, Mercedes; Taeusch, H William; Pérez-Gil, Jesús

    2012-10-01

    Dysfunction of pulmonary surfactant in the lungs is associated with respiratory pathologies such as acute respiratory distress syndrome or meconium aspiration syndrome. Serum, cholesterol, and meconium have been described as inhibitory agents of surfactant's interfacial activity once these substances appear in alveolar spaces during lung injury and inflammation. The deleterious action of these agents has been only partly evaluated under physiologically relevant conditions. We have optimized a protocol to assess surfactant inhibition by serum, cholesterol, or meconium in the captive bubble surfactometer. Specific measures of surface activity before and after native surfactant was exposed to inhibitors included i), film formation, ii), readsorption of material from surface-associated reservoirs, and iii), interfacial film dynamics during compression-expansion cycling. Results show that serum creates a steric barrier that impedes surfactant reaching the interface. A mechanical perturbation of this barrier allows native surfactant to compete efficiently with serum to form a highly surface-active film. Exposure of native surfactant to cholesterol or meconium, on the other hand, modifies the compressibility of surfactant films though optimal compressibility properties recover on repetitive compression-expansion cycling. Addition of polymers like dextran or hyaluronic acid to surfactant fully reverses inhibition by serum. These polymers also prevent surfactant inhibition by cholesterol or meconium, suggesting that the protective action of polymers goes beyond the mere enhancement of interfacial adsorption as described by depletion force theories.

  9. Interleukin-10 increases reverse cholesterol transport in macrophages through its bidirectional interaction with liver X receptor α

    SciTech Connect

    Halvorsen, Bente; Holm, Sverre; Yndestad, Arne; Scholz, Hanne; Sagen, Ellen Lund; Nebb, Hilde; Holven, Kirsten B.; Dahl, Tuva B.; Aukrust, Pål

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • IL-10 promotes reverse cholesterol efflux from lipid loaded macrophages. • IL-10 increases the expression of ABCA-1 and ABCG-1. • IL-10 exhibits cross-talk with the nuclear receptor LXRα. - Abstract: Interleukin (IL)-10 is a prototypical anti-inflammatory cytokine that has been shown to attenuate atherosclerosis development. In addition to its anti-inflammatory properties, the anti-atherogenic effect of IL-10 has recently also been suggested to reflect a complex effect of IL-10 on lipid metabolism in macrophages. In the present study we examined the effects of IL-10 on cholesterol efflux mechanism in lipid-loaded THP-1 macrophages. Our main findings were: (i) IL-10 significantly enhanced cholesterol efflux induced by fetal-calf serum, high-density lipoprotein (HDL){sub 2} and apolipoprotein A-1. (ii) The IL-10-mediated effects on cholesterol efflux were accompanied by an increased IL-10-mediated expression of the ATP-binding cassette transporters ABCA1 and ABCG1, that was further enhanced when the cells were co-activated with the liver X receptor (LXR)α agonist (22R)-hydroxycholesterol. (iii) The effect of LXRα activation on the IL-10-mediated effects on the ATP-binding cassette transporters seems to include enhancing effects on the IL-10 receptor 1 (IL10R1) expression and interaction with STAT-3 signaling. (iv) These enhancing effects on ABCA1 and ABCG1 was not seen when the cells were stimulated with the IL-10 family members IL-22 and IL-24. This study suggests that the anti-atherogenic properties of IL-10 may include enhancing effects on cholesterol efflux mechanism that involves cross-talk with LXRα activation.

  10. Intake of grape procyanidins during gestation and lactation impairs reverse cholesterol transport and increases atherogenic risk indexes in adult offspring.

    PubMed

    Del Bas, Josep Maria; Crescenti, Anna; Arola-Arnal, Anna; Oms-Oliu, Gemma; Arola, Lluís; Caimari, Antoni

    2015-12-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is one of the most prevalent noncommunicable diseases in humans. Different studies have identified dietary procyanidins as bioactive compounds with beneficial properties against CVD by improving lipid homeostasis, among other mechanisms. The aim of this work was to assess whether grape seed procyanidin consumption at a physiological dose during the perinatal period could influence the CVD risk of the offspring. Wistar rat dams were treated with a grape seed procyanidin extract (GSPE; 25mg/kg of body weight per day) or vehicle during gestation and lactation. The adult male offspring of GSPE-treated dams presented decreased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels, increased total cholesterol-to-HDL-C ratios and an exacerbated fasting triglyceride-to-HDL-C ratios (atherogenic index of plasma) compared to the control group. Impaired reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) was evidenced by the accumulation of cholesterol in skeletal muscle and by decreased fecal excretion of cholesterol and bile acids, which was consistent with the observed mRNA down-regulation of the rate-limiting enzyme in the hepatic bile acid synthesis pathway Cyp7A1. Conversely, GSPE programming also resulted in up-regulated gene expression of different key components of the RCT process, such as hepatic Npc1, Abcg1, Abca1, Lxra, Srebp2, Lcat, Scarb1 and Pltp, and the repression of microRNA miR-33a expression, a key negative controller of hepatic RCT at the gene expression level. Our results show that maternal intake of grape procyanidins during the perinatal period impacts different components of the RCT process, resulting in increased CVD risk in the adult offspring. PMID:26365577

  11. Lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) catalyzes transacylation of intact cholesteryl esters. Evidence for the partial reversal of the forward LCAT reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Sorci-Thomas, M.; Babiak, J.; Rudel, L.L. )

    1990-02-15

    Lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) catalyzes the intravascular synthesis of lipoprotein cholesteryl esters by converting cholesterol and lecithin to cholesteryl ester and lysolecithin. LCAT is unique in that it catalyzes sequential reactions within a single polypeptide sequence. In this report we find that LCAT mediates a partial reverse reaction, the transacylation of lipoprotein cholesteryl oleate, in whole plasma and in a purified, reconstituted system. As a result of the reverse transacylation reaction, a linear accumulation of (3H)cholesterol occurred during incubations of plasma containing high density lipoprotein labeled with (3H)cholesteryl oleate. When high density lipoprotein labeled with cholesteryl (14C)oleate was also included in the incubation the labeled fatty acyl moiety remained in the cholesteryl (14C)oleate pool showing that the formation of labeled cholesterol did not result from hydrolysis of the doubly labeled cholesteryl esters. The rate of release of (3H)cholesterol was only about 10% of the forward rate of esterification of cholesterol using partially purified human LCAT and was approximately 7% in whole monkey plasma. Therefore, net production of cholesterol via the reverse LCAT reaction would not occur. (3H)Cholesterol production from (3H)cholesteryl oleate was almost completely inhibited by a final concentration of 1.4 mM 5,5'-dithiobis(nitrobenzoic acid) during incubation with either purified LCAT or whole plasma. Addition of excess lysolecithin to the incubation system did not result in the formation of (14C)oleate-labeled lecithin, showing that the reverse reaction found here for LCAT was limited to the last step of the reaction. To explain these results we hypothesize that LCAT forms a (14C)oleate enzyme thioester intermediate after its attack on the cholesteryl oleate molecule.

  12. High-fat and fructose intake induces insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and liver steatosis and alters in vivo macrophage-to-feces reverse cholesterol transport in hamsters.

    PubMed

    Briand, François; Thiéblemont, Quentin; Muzotte, Elodie; Sulpice, Thierry

    2012-04-01

    Reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) promotes the egress of cholesterol from peripheral tissues to the liver for biliary and fecal excretion. Although not demonstrated in vivo, RCT is thought to be impaired in patients with metabolic syndrome, in which liver steatosis prevalence is relatively high. Golden Syrian hamsters were fed a nonpurified (CON) diet and normal drinking water or a high-fat (HF) diet containing 27% fat, 0.5% cholesterol, and 0.25% deoxycholate as well as 10% fructose in drinking water for 4 wk. Compared to CON, the HF diet induced insulin resistance and dyslipidemia, with significantly higher plasma non-HDL-cholesterol concentrations and cholesteryl ester transfer protein activity. The HF diet induced severe liver steatosis, with significantly higher cholesterol and TG levels compared to CON. In vivo RCT was assessed by i.p. injecting ³H-cholesterol labeled macrophages. Compared to CON, HF hamsters had significantly greater ³H-tracer recoveries in plasma, but not HDL. After 72 h, ³H-tracer recovery in HF hamsters was 318% higher in liver and 75% lower in bile (P < 0.01), indicating that the HF diet impaired hepatic cholesterol fluxes. However, macrophage-derived cholesterol fecal excretion was 45% higher in HF hamsters than in CON hamsters. This effect was not related to intestinal cholesterol absorption, which was 89% higher in HF hamsters (P < 0.05), suggesting a possible upregulation of transintestinal cholesterol excretion. Our data indicate a significant increase in macrophage-derived cholesterol fecal excretion in a hamster model of metabolic syndrome, which may not compensate for the diet-induced dyslipidemia and liver steatosis.

  13. Indirect Human Impacts Reverse Centuries of Carbon Sequestration and Salt Marsh Accretion

    PubMed Central

    Coverdale, Tyler C.; Brisson, Caitlin P.; Young, Eric W.; Yin, Stephanie F.; Donnelly, Jeffrey P.; Bertness, Mark D.

    2014-01-01

    Direct and indirect human impacts on coastal ecosystems have increased over the last several centuries, leading to unprecedented degradation of coastal habitats and loss of ecological services. Here we document a two-century temporal disparity between salt marsh accretion and subsequent loss to indirect human impacts. Field surveys, manipulative experiments and GIS analyses reveal that crab burrowing weakens the marsh peat base and facilitates further burrowing, leading to bank calving, disruption of marsh accretion, and a loss of over two centuries of sequestered carbon from the marsh edge in only three decades. Analogous temporal disparities exist in other systems and are a largely unrecognized obstacle in attaining sustainable ecosystem services in an increasingly human impacted world. In light of the growing threat of indirect impacts worldwide and despite uncertainties in the fate of lost carbon, we suggest that estimates of carbon emissions based only on direct human impacts may significantly underestimate total anthropogenic carbon emissions. PMID:24675669

  14. The reverse cholesterol transport pathway improves understanding of genetic networks for fat deposition and muscle growth in beef cattle.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Tyler F; Wu, Xiao-Lin; Pan, Zengxiang; Michal, Jennifer J; Wright, Raymond W; Killinger, Karen M; MacNeil, Michael D; Jiang, Zhihua

    2010-01-01

    In the present study, thirteen genes involved in the reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) pathway were investigated for their associations with three fat depositions, eight fatty acid compositions and two growth-related phenotypes in a Wagyu x Limousin reference population, including 6 F(1) bulls, 113 F(1) dams, and 246 F(2) progeny. A total of 37 amplicons were used to screen single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on 6 F(1) bulls. Among 36 SNPs detected in 11 of these 13 genes, 19 were selected for genotyping by the Sequenom assay design on all F(2) progeny. Single-marker analysis revealed seven SNPs in ATP binding cassette A1, apolipoproteins A1, B and E, phospholipid transfer protein and paraoxinase 1 genes significantly associated with nine phenotypes (P<0.05). Previously, we reported genetic networks associated with 19 complex phenotypes based on a total of 138 genetic polymorphisms derived from 71 known functional genes. Therefore, after Bonferroni correction, these significant (adjusted P<0.05) and suggestive (adjusted P<0.10) associations were then used to identify genetic networks related to the RCT pathway. Multiple-marker analysis suggested possible genetic networks involving the RCT pathway for kidney-pelvic-heart fat percentage, rib-eye area, and subcutaneous fat depth phenotypes with markers derived from paraoxinase 1, apolipoproteins A1 and E, respectively. The present study confirmed that genes involved in cholesterol homeostasis are useful targets for investigating obesity in humans as well as for improving meat quality phenotypes in a livestock production. PMID:21151936

  15. The influence of the incorporation of cholesterol and water on the particle size, bilayer thickness, melting behavior, and relative sucrose ester composition of reversed vesicles.

    PubMed

    Mollee, H M; Steenvoorden, D P; De Vringer, T; Crommelin, D J

    2001-05-01

    The influence of the incorporation of cholesterol and water on the particle size, bilayer thickness, melting behavior, and relative sucrose ester composition of reversed vesicles was studied. Reversed vesicles (RVs) were prepared of sucrose ester in silicon oil by sonication. The RVs were characterized by polarized light microscopy, laser diffraction, high-performance liquid chromatography, small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), and differential scanning calorimetry. The particle size distributions of the studied dispersions were bimodal with peaks at 5 and 0.4 microm. There was no significant difference in the sucrose ester composition of these two size categories of RVs. The incorporation of cholesterol and water had no effect on the size distribution of the RVs. The SAXS results showed that the RVs prepared without cholesterol and water consisted of bilayers with fully interdigitated alkyl chains. The incorporation of high concentrations of cholesterol caused a phase separation within the bilayers. The incorporation of water also resulted in a phase separation within the bilayers but at a lower cholesterol concentration. The presence of two different size classes of RVs in one RVs dispersion and the phase separation within the bilayers of certain compositions can have consequences for the application of RVs.

  16. Contaminants of emerging concern in reverse osmosis brine concentrate from indirect/direct water reuse applications.

    PubMed

    Romeyn, Travis R; Harijanto, Wesley; Sandoval, Sofia; Delagah, Saied; Sharbatmaleki, Mohamadali

    2016-01-01

    Water shortage is becoming more common due to droughts and global population increases resulting in the increasing popularity of water reuse to create new water sources. Reverse osmosis (RO) membrane systems are popular in these applications since they can produce drinking water quality effluent. Unfortunately, RO systems have the drawback of generating concentrate streams that contain contaminants rejected by the membrane including chemicals of emerging concern (CECs). CECs are chemicals such as hormones, steroids, pesticides, pharmaceuticals, and personal care products that are used for their intended purpose and then released into wastewater. CECs are believed to be detrimental to aquatic wildlife health and pose an unknown human health risk. This research gathered the existing knowledge on CEC presence in concentrate, available proven concentrate treatment methods, their CEC removal abilities, and current CEC regulations. It was found that 127 CECs have been measured in RO concentrate with 100 being detected at least once. The most potent treatment process available is UV/H2O2 as it offers the highest removal rates for the widest range of chemicals. The less expensive process of ozone/biologically activated carbon offers slightly lower removal abilities. This comprehensive report will provide the groundwork for better understanding, regulating and treating concentrate stream CECs.

  17. Contaminants of emerging concern in reverse osmosis brine concentrate from indirect/direct water reuse applications.

    PubMed

    Romeyn, Travis R; Harijanto, Wesley; Sandoval, Sofia; Delagah, Saied; Sharbatmaleki, Mohamadali

    2016-01-01

    Water shortage is becoming more common due to droughts and global population increases resulting in the increasing popularity of water reuse to create new water sources. Reverse osmosis (RO) membrane systems are popular in these applications since they can produce drinking water quality effluent. Unfortunately, RO systems have the drawback of generating concentrate streams that contain contaminants rejected by the membrane including chemicals of emerging concern (CECs). CECs are chemicals such as hormones, steroids, pesticides, pharmaceuticals, and personal care products that are used for their intended purpose and then released into wastewater. CECs are believed to be detrimental to aquatic wildlife health and pose an unknown human health risk. This research gathered the existing knowledge on CEC presence in concentrate, available proven concentrate treatment methods, their CEC removal abilities, and current CEC regulations. It was found that 127 CECs have been measured in RO concentrate with 100 being detected at least once. The most potent treatment process available is UV/H2O2 as it offers the highest removal rates for the widest range of chemicals. The less expensive process of ozone/biologically activated carbon offers slightly lower removal abilities. This comprehensive report will provide the groundwork for better understanding, regulating and treating concentrate stream CECs. PMID:26819378

  18. Reverse cholesterol transport is regulated by varying fatty acyl chain saturation and sphingomyelin content in reconstituted high density lipoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Marmillot, Philippe; Patel, Sanket; Lakshman, M. Raj

    2007-01-01

    Because phospholipid composition of HDL plays a vital role in its reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) function, we studied RCT in vitro (uptake and efflux) with reconstituted HDLs (rHDLs) containing phosphatidylcholine with fatty acids of increasing saturation levels (stearic, oleic, linoleic, linolenic), and without or with sphingomyelin. Uptake significantly increased from basal value when phosphatidylcholine component included up to 50% (%mol) of oleic or linolenic acid, but did not change with linoleic acid. Increasing oleic and linoleic acids to 100% (%mol) significantly decreased uptake, but increasing linolenic acid to the same value did not affect it. Sphingomyelin in rHDL significantly decreased uptake, but only with phosphatidylcholine containing unsaturated fatty acids, and not with saturated fatty acid. Efflux was not affected in a dose-dependent manner when oleic or linoleic acid content was increased, but was significantly increased with levels of linolenic acid up to 25% (%mol) in phosphatidylcholine, and was dramatically lowered with higher levels. Sphingomyelin in rHDL (phosphatidylcholine:sphingomyelin, 20:80, mol:mol) significantly increased efflux only with oleic or linoleic acid-containing rHDLs, compared to efflux without sphingomyelin. In conclusion, enrichment of phosphatidylcholine component up to 25% (%mol) as linolenic acid has a beneficial effect on RCT, while a higher percentage of it or other unsaturated fatty acids seems to be detrimental. Also, high sphingomyelin content decreases uptake with rHDL containing unsaturated fatty acids, whereas it increases efflux for rHDL containing oleic or linoleic acid. These results show for the first time the importance of sphingomyelin in RCT in a well-defined in vitro system. PMID:17224341

  19. Electrochemical oxidation of cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Summary Indirect cholesterol electrochemical oxidation in the presence of various mediators leads to electrophilic addition to the double bond, oxidation at the allylic position, oxidation of the hydroxy group, or functionalization of the side chain. Recent studies have proven that direct electrochemical oxidation of cholesterol is also possible and affords different products depending on the reaction conditions. PMID:25977713

  20. Medium-chain triglycerides promote macrophage reverse cholesterol transport and improve atherosclerosis in ApoE-deficient mice fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinsheng; Zhang, Yong; Liu, Yinghua; Wang, Jin; Xu, Qing; Yu, Xiaoming; Yang, Xueyan; Liu, Zhao; Xue, Changyong

    2016-09-01

    We previously observed that medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs) could reduce body fat mass and improve the metabolism of cholesterol. We hypothesized that MCTs can improve atherosclerosis by promoting the reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) process. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the roles of MCTs in macrophage RCT and the progression of atherosclerosis. To test this hypothesis, 30 4-week-old ApoE-deficient (ApoE(-/-)) mice were randomly divided into 2 groups and fed a diet of 2% MCTs or long-chain triglycerides (LCTs) for 16 weeks. Ten age- and sex-matched C57BL/6J mice were fed a diet of 2% LCTs as the control. Macrophage-to-feces RCT was assessed in vivo by intraperitoneal injection of RAW 264.7 macrophages containing (3)H-labeled cholesterol, and atherosclerotic plaques were measured. The mRNA and protein expressions were determined by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analyses, respectively. There was a greater decrease in body fat mass, atherosclerotic plaques, and an improvement in serum lipid profiles. In addition, the MCT mice group showed an increase in (3)H-tracer in the feces and a decrease in the liver. Significantly higher levels of mRNA and protein expression of hepatic ATP-binding cassette transporter A1, ATP-binding cassette transporter G5, cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase, and intestinal ATP-binding cassette transporter G8, as well as lower levels of expression of intestinal Niemann-Pick C1-like 1, were found in the MCT group. These results suggest that MCTs could obviously promote macrophage RCT and improve atherosclerosis in ApoE(-/-) mice, indicating that MCTs have the potential to prevent cardiovascular disease. PMID:27632916

  1. Preclinical Reversal of Atherosclerosis by FDA-Approved Compound that Transforms Cholesterol into an Anti-Inflammatory "Prodrug".

    PubMed

    Mendelsohn, Andrew R; Larrick, James W

    2016-06-01

    Although atherosclerosis is treatable with lipid-lowering drugs, not all patients respond. Hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (CD) is an FDA-approved compound for solubilizing, capturing, and delivering lipophilic drugs in humans. Zimmer et al. report that CD mediates regression of atherosclerotic plaques in two mouse models by solubilizing cholesterol crystals (CCs), and promoting metabolism of CCs into water-soluble 27-hydroxycholesterol, which, in turn, activates anti-inflammatory LXR receptor target genes, promotes active and passive efflux of cholesterol from macrophages, and increases metabolic processing of cholesterol. In effect, CD inverts the role of its cargo, cholesterol, from inflammatory to anti-inflammatory by converting cholesterol into a "prodrug" that when modified to 27-hydroxycholesterol reduces atherosclerosis. This mechanism defines a new class of pharmaceuticals, "inverters": compounds that cause innate biomolecules to act opposite to their normal function. However, chronic CD treatment in animal models damages auditory cells, which must be addressed before CD can be developed as a systemic drug for atherosclerosis. PMID:27241174

  2. Role of phospholipase A2 in cholesterol gallstone formation is associated with biliary phospholipid species selection at the site of hepatic excretion: indirect evidence.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Y; Tazuma, S; Yamashita, G; Ochi, H; Sunami, Y; Nishioka, T; Hyogo, H; Yasumiba, S; Kajihara, T; Nakai, K; Tsuboi, K; Asamoto, Y; Sakomoto, M; Kajiyama, G

    2000-07-01

    Phospholipase A2 plays a role in cholesterol gallstone development by hydrolyzing bile phospholipids into lysolecithin and free fatty acids. Lysolecithin and polyunsaturated free fatty acids are known to stimulate the synthesis and/or secretion of gallbladder mucin via a prostanoid pathway, leading to enhancing cholesterol crystal nucleation and growth, and therefore, the action of phospholipase A2 is associated, in part, with bile phospholipid fatty acid. To clarify this hypothesis, we evaluated the effect on bile lipid metastability in vitro of replacing phospholipids with lysolecithin and various free fatty acids. Supersaturated model biles were created with an identical composition (cholesterol saturation index, 1.8; egg yolk lecithin, 34 mM; taurocholate, 120 mM; cholesterol, 25 mM) except for 5%, 10%, or 20% replacement of egg yolk lecithin with a combination of palmitoyl-lysolecithin and a free fatty acid (palmitate, stearate, oleate, linoleate, or arachidonate), followed by time-sequentially monitoring of vesicles and cholesterol crystals using spectrophotometer and video-enhanced differential contrast microscopy. Replacement with hydrophilic fatty acids (linoleate and arachidonate) reduced vesicle formation and promoted cholesterol crystallization, whereas an enhanced cholesterol-holding capacity was evident after replacement with hydrophobic fatty acids (palmitate and stearate). These results indicate that the effect of phospholipase A2 on bile lithogenecity is modulated by the fatty acid species in bile phospholipids, and therefore, that the role of phospholipase A2 in cholesterol gallstone formation is dependent, in part, on biliary phospholipid species selection at the site of hepatic excretion.

  3. High density- and beta-lipoprotein screening for risk of coronary artery disease in the context of new findings on reverse cholesterol transport.

    PubMed

    Levinson, Stanley S

    2002-01-01

    This article considers how high density lipoproteins (HDL) act as anti-arteriosclerotic agents, examines the usefulness of HDL indexes alone and in conjunction with other markers of coronary artery disease (CAD), and discusses how HDL markers compare with what one might expect from known metabolic mechanisms. This is accomplished by: (i) an overview of mechanisms associated with CAD, especially new findings regarding reverse cholesterol transport; (ii) a brief review of the clinical literature on biochemical markers for automated use; and (iii) analysis of data for persons with or without angiographically documented CAD. Based on these considerations, the ratio of optimized apo A-I/apo B appears superior to lipoprotein lipid markers for predicting the risk of CAD. Yet the ratio shows poor diagnostic accuracy by itself; it yields poorer diagnostic accuracy than would be expected from assessing the metabolic pathways. Discrimination is improved by using the ratio in conjunction with risk factors defined by the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP). Based on receiver-operator characteristic (ROC) curve data, this approach increases the accuracy by 13-14% above that obtained with current lipid markers; it improves discrimination more than the use of inflammatory markers. Apolipoprotein testing is better related to the mechanisms of cholesterol transport, is widely available, and requires only two tests, compared to three, to improve discrimination. However, inclusion of inflammatory markers may need to be considered in the future, when more information is available about their functions and clinical value. PMID:12017193

  4. Anacetrapib and dalcetrapib differentially alters HDL metabolism and macrophage-to-feces reverse cholesterol transport at similar levels of CETP inhibition in hamsters.

    PubMed

    Briand, François; Thieblemont, Quentin; Muzotte, Elodie; Burr, Noémie; Urbain, Isabelle; Sulpice, Thierry; Johns, Douglas G

    2014-10-01

    Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) inhibitors dalcetrapib and anacetrapib differentially alter LDL- and HDL-cholesterol levels, which might be related to the potency of each drug to inhibit CETP activity. We evaluated the effects of both drugs at similar levels of CETP inhibition on macrophage-to-feces reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) in hamsters. In normolipidemic hamsters, both anacetrapib 30 mg/kg QD and dalcetrapib 200 mg/kg BID inhibited CETP activity by ~60%. After injection of 3H-cholesteryl oleate labeled HDL, anacetrapib and dalcetrapib reduced HDL-cholesteryl esters fractional catabolic rate (FCR) by 30% and 26% (both P<0.001 vs. vehicle) respectively, but only dalcetrapib increased HDL-derived 3H-tracer fecal excretion by 30% (P<0.05 vs. vehicle). After 3H-cholesterol labeled macrophage intraperitoneal injection, anacetrapib stimulated 3H-tracer appearance in HDL, but both drugs did not promote macrophage-derived 3H-tracer fecal excretion. In dyslipidemic hamsters, both anacetrapib 1 mg/kg QD and dalcetrapib 200 mg/kg BID inhibited CETP activity by ~65% and reduced HDL-cholesteryl ester FCR by 36% (both P<0.001 vs. vehicle), but only anacetrapib increased HDL-derived 3H-tracer fecal excretion significantly by 39%. After 3H-cholesterol labeled macrophage injection, only anacetrapib 1 mg/kg QD stimulated macrophage-derived 3H-tracer appearance in HDL. These effects remained weaker than those observed with anacetrapib 60 mg/kg QD, which induced a maximal inhibition of CETP and stimulation of macrophage-derived 3H-tracer fecal excretion. In contrast, dalcetrapib 200 mg/kg BID reduced macrophage-derived 3H-tracer fecal excretion by 23% (P<0.05 vs. vehicle). In conclusion, anacetrapib and dalcetrapib differentially alter HDL metabolism and RCT in hamsters. A stronger inhibition of CETP may be required to promote macrophage-to-feces reverse cholesterol transport in dyslipidemic hamsters.

  5. An Agomir of miR-144-3p Accelerates Plaque Formation through Impairing Reverse Cholesterol Transport and Promoting Pro-Inflammatory Cytokine Production

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jia-Yi; Li, Shu-Fen; Ma, Xin; Wu, Shao-Guo; Lu, Jing-Bo; Qiu, Yu-Rong; Sha, Yan-Hua; Wang, Yan-Chao; Gao, Ji-Juan; Zheng, Lei; Wang, Qian

    2014-01-01

    Aims ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) mediates the efflux of cholesterol and phospholipids to lipid-poor apolipoproteins, which then form nascent HDL, a key step in the mechanism of reverse cholesterol transport (RCT). While a series of microRNAs (miRNAs) have been identified as potent post-transcriptional regulators of lipid metabolism, their effects on ABCA1 function and associated mechanisms remain unclear. Methods and Results ABCA1 was identified as a potential target of miR-144-3p, based on the results of bioinformatic analysis and the luciferase reporter assay, and downregulated after transfection of cells with miR-144-3p mimics, as observed with real-time PCR and western blot. Moreover, miR-144-3p mimics (agomir) enhanced the expression of inflammatory factors, including IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α, in vivo and in vitro, inhibited cholesterol efflux in THP-1 macrophage-derived foam cells, decreased HDL-C circulation and impaired RCT in vivo, resulting in accelerated pathological progression of atherosclerosis in apoE−/− mice. Clinical studies additionally revealed a positive correlation of circulating miR-144-3p with serum CK, CK-MB, LDH and AST in subjects with AMI. Conclusions Our findings clearly indicate that miR-144-3p is essential for the regulation of cholesterol homeostasis and inflammatory reactions, supporting its utility as a potential therapeutic target of atherosclerosis and a promising diagnostic biomarker of AMI. PMID:24733347

  6. What's Cholesterol?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Most cholesterol is LDL (low-density lipoprotein) cholesterol. LDL cholesterol is more likely to clog blood vessels because ... Here's a way to remember the difference: the LDL cholesterol is the bad kind, so call it "lousy" ...

  7. MEK1/2 inhibitors activate macrophage ABCG1 expression and reverse cholesterol transport-An anti-atherogenic function of ERK1/2 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Chen, Yuanli; Yang, Xiaoxiao; Yang, Jie; Cao, Xingyue; Li, Xiaoju; Li, Luyuan; Miao, Qing Robert; Hajjar, David P; Duan, Yajun; Han, Jihong

    2016-09-01

    Expression of ATP-binding cassette transporter G1 (ABCG1), a molecule facilitating cholesterol efflux to HDL, is activated by liver X receptor (LXR). In this study, we investigated if inhibition of ERK1/2 can activate macrophage ABCG1 expression and functions. MEK1/2 inhibitors, PD98059 and U0126, increased ABCG1 mRNA and protein expression, and activated the natural ABCG1 promoter but not the promoter with the LXR responsive element (LXRE) deletion. Inhibition of ABCG1 expression by ABCG1 siRNA did enhance the formation of macrophage/foam cells and it attenuated the inhibitory effect of MEK1/2 inhibitors on foam cell formation. MEK1/2 inhibitors activated macrophage cholesterol efflux to HDL in vitro, and they enhanced reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) in vivo. ApoE deficient (apoE(-/-)) mice receiving U0126 treatment had reduced sinus lesions in the aortic root which was associated with activated macrophage ABCG1 expression in the lesion areas. MEK1/2 inhibitors coordinated the RXR agonist, but not the LXR agonist, to induce ABCG1 expression. Furthermore, induction of ABCG1 expression by MEK1/2 inhibitors was associated with activation of SIRT1, a positive regulator of LXR activity, and inactivation of SULT2B1 and RIP140, two negative regulators of LXR activity. Taken together, our study suggests that MEK1/2 inhibitors activate macrophage ABCG1 expression/RCT, and inhibit foam cell formation and lesion development by multiple mechanisms, supporting the concept that ERK1/2 inhibition is anti-atherogenic. PMID:27365310

  8. Co-injection of a targeted, reversibly masked endosomolytic polymer dramatically improves the efficacy of cholesterol-conjugated small interfering RNAs in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wong, So C; Klein, Jason J; Hamilton, Holly L; Chu, Qili; Frey, Christina L; Trubetskoy, Vladimir S; Hegge, Julia; Wakefield, Darren; Rozema, David B; Lewis, David L

    2012-12-01

    Effective in vivo delivery of small interfering (siRNA) has been a major obstacle in the development of RNA interference therapeutics. One of the first attempts to overcome this obstacle utilized intravenous injection of cholesterol-conjugated siRNA (chol-siRNA). Although studies in mice revealed target gene knockdown in the liver, delivery was relatively inefficient, requiring 3 daily injections of 50 mg/kg of chol-siRNA to obtain measurable reduction in gene expression. Here we present a new delivery approach that increases the efficacy of the chol-siRNA over 500-fold and allows over 90% reduction in target gene expression in mice and, for the first time, high levels of gene knockdown in non-human primates. This improved efficacy is achieved by the co-injection of a hepatocyte-targeted and reversibly masked endosomolytic polymer. We show that knockdown is absolutely dependent on the presence of hepatocyte-targeting ligand on the polymer, the cognate hepatocyte receptor, and the cholesterol moiety of the siRNA. Importantly, we provide evidence that this increase in efficacy is not dependent on interactions between the chol-siRNA with the polymer prior to injection or in the bloodstream. The simplicity of the formulation and efficacy of this mode of siRNA delivery should prove beneficial in the use of siRNA as a therapeutic.

  9. Co-Injection of a Targeted, Reversibly Masked Endosomolytic Polymer Dramatically Improves the Efficacy of Cholesterol-Conjugated Small Interfering RNAs In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wong, So C.; Klein, Jason J.; Hamilton, Holly L.; Chu, Qili; Frey, Christina L.; Trubetskoy, Vladimir S.; Hegge, Julia; Wakefield, Darren; Rozema, David B.

    2012-01-01

    Effective in vivo delivery of small interfering (siRNA) has been a major obstacle in the development of RNA interference therapeutics. One of the first attempts to overcome this obstacle utilized intravenous injection of cholesterol-conjugated siRNA (chol-siRNA). Although studies in mice revealed target gene knockdown in the liver, delivery was relatively inefficient, requiring 3 daily injections of 50 mg/kg of chol-siRNA to obtain measurable reduction in gene expression. Here we present a new delivery approach that increases the efficacy of the chol-siRNA over 500-fold and allows over 90% reduction in target gene expression in mice and, for the first time, high levels of gene knockdown in non-human primates. This improved efficacy is achieved by the co-injection of a hepatocyte-targeted and reversibly masked endosomolytic polymer. We show that knockdown is absolutely dependent on the presence of hepatocyte-targeting ligand on the polymer, the cognate hepatocyte receptor, and the cholesterol moiety of the siRNA. Importantly, we provide evidence that this increase in efficacy is not dependent on interactions between the chol-siRNA with the polymer prior to injection or in the bloodstream. The simplicity of the formulation and efficacy of this mode of siRNA delivery should prove beneficial in the use of siRNA as a therapeutic. PMID:23181701

  10. Altered Apical Morphology (Reverse Architecture): Use of Indirect Ultrasonic Technique for Orthograde MTA Placement in Maxillary Premolars

    PubMed Central

    Sonali, Kapoor; Suresh, Agrawal Vineet; Abhishek, Patel; Jenish, Patel

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To report the management and orthograde technique of MTA placement in case of reverse architecture maxillary premolars. Summary. Two cases of 17-year-old and 21-year-old female patients were referred to endodontic speciality for management of maxillary premolar having reverse architecture with wide immature open apex like a bell mouth. In both the cases, after control of intraradicular infection, it was decided to use MTA for apexification and obturation of canals. Orthograde placement of MTA is a challenging procedure in terms of length control and condensation especially in divergent irregular reverse architecture wide open apex. A novel technique with the help of finger plugger, sterilized paper point, and ultrasonic agitation for 3D compaction of MTA at apical reverse architecture was used. Thickening of the canal wall and complete apical closure were confirmed one year after the treatment. PMID:27313910

  11. An in-silico model of lipoprotein metabolism and kinetics for the evaluation of targets and biomarkers in the reverse cholesterol transport pathway.

    PubMed

    Lu, James; Hübner, Katrin; Nanjee, M Nazeem; Brinton, Eliot A; Mazer, Norman A

    2014-03-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) is believed to play an important role in lowering cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk by mediating the process of reverse cholesterol transport (RCT). Via RCT, excess cholesterol from peripheral tissues is carried back to the liver and hence should lead to the reduction of atherosclerotic plaques. The recent failures of HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) raising therapies have initiated a re-examination of the link between CVD risk and the rate of RCT, and have brought into question whether all target modulations that raise HDL-C would be atheroprotective. To help address these issues, a novel in-silico model has been built to incorporate modern concepts of HDL biology, including: the geometric structure of HDL linking the core radius with the number of ApoA-I molecules on it, and the regeneration of lipid-poor ApoA-I from spherical HDL due to remodeling processes. The ODE model has been calibrated using data from the literature and validated by simulating additional experiments not used in the calibration. Using a virtual population, we show that the model provides possible explanations for a number of well-known relationships in cholesterol metabolism, including the epidemiological relationship between HDL-C and CVD risk and the correlations between some HDL-related lipoprotein markers. In particular, the model has been used to explore two HDL-C raising target modulations, Cholesteryl Ester Transfer Protein (CETP) inhibition and ATP-binding cassette transporter member 1 (ABCA1) up-regulation. It predicts that while CETP inhibition would not result in an increased RCT rate, ABCA1 up-regulation should increase both HDL-C and RCT rate. Furthermore, the model predicts the two target modulations result in distinct changes in the lipoprotein measures. Finally, the model also allows for an evaluation of two candidate biomarkers for in-vivo whole-body ABCA1 activity: the absolute concentration and the % lipid-poor ApoA-I. These findings illustrate the

  12. An in-silico model of lipoprotein metabolism and kinetics for the evaluation of targets and biomarkers in the reverse cholesterol transport pathway.

    PubMed

    Lu, James; Hübner, Katrin; Nanjee, M Nazeem; Brinton, Eliot A; Mazer, Norman A

    2014-03-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) is believed to play an important role in lowering cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk by mediating the process of reverse cholesterol transport (RCT). Via RCT, excess cholesterol from peripheral tissues is carried back to the liver and hence should lead to the reduction of atherosclerotic plaques. The recent failures of HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) raising therapies have initiated a re-examination of the link between CVD risk and the rate of RCT, and have brought into question whether all target modulations that raise HDL-C would be atheroprotective. To help address these issues, a novel in-silico model has been built to incorporate modern concepts of HDL biology, including: the geometric structure of HDL linking the core radius with the number of ApoA-I molecules on it, and the regeneration of lipid-poor ApoA-I from spherical HDL due to remodeling processes. The ODE model has been calibrated using data from the literature and validated by simulating additional experiments not used in the calibration. Using a virtual population, we show that the model provides possible explanations for a number of well-known relationships in cholesterol metabolism, including the epidemiological relationship between HDL-C and CVD risk and the correlations between some HDL-related lipoprotein markers. In particular, the model has been used to explore two HDL-C raising target modulations, Cholesteryl Ester Transfer Protein (CETP) inhibition and ATP-binding cassette transporter member 1 (ABCA1) up-regulation. It predicts that while CETP inhibition would not result in an increased RCT rate, ABCA1 up-regulation should increase both HDL-C and RCT rate. Furthermore, the model predicts the two target modulations result in distinct changes in the lipoprotein measures. Finally, the model also allows for an evaluation of two candidate biomarkers for in-vivo whole-body ABCA1 activity: the absolute concentration and the % lipid-poor ApoA-I. These findings illustrate the

  13. About Cholesterol

    MedlinePlus

    ... High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More About Cholesterol Updated:Aug 10,2016 It may surprise you ... our bodies to keep us healthy. What is cholesterol and where does it come from? Cholesterol is ...

  14. Attitudes, personal evaluations, cognitive evaluation and interpersonal attraction: on the direct, indirect and reverse-causal effects.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ramadhar; Ho, Li Jen; Tan, Hui Lynn; Bell, Paul A

    2007-03-01

    The authors hypothesized that (1) attraction toward a stranger based on attitudinal similarity is automatic, but cognitive evaluation of the stranger's quality before the measurement of attraction can make attraction nonautomatic or controlled; (2) personal evaluations from the stranger activate automatic attraction and cognitive evaluation; (3) controlled attraction from attitudes and automatic attraction and cognitive evaluation from personal evaluations engender reverse-causal effects (i.e. they mediate each other); and (4) attraction and cognitive evaluation are distinct constructs. Attitudinal similarity between the participant and the stranger or personal evaluations of the former by the latter were varied in Experiment 1 (N=96), and were crossed with each other in Experiment 2 (N=240). Orders of response measurement were either cognitive evaluation followed by attraction or attraction followed by cognitive evaluation. Results confirmed the hypotheses. Implications of the findings are discussed. PMID:17355717

  15. Attitudes, personal evaluations, cognitive evaluation and interpersonal attraction: on the direct, indirect and reverse-causal effects.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ramadhar; Ho, Li Jen; Tan, Hui Lynn; Bell, Paul A

    2007-03-01

    The authors hypothesized that (1) attraction toward a stranger based on attitudinal similarity is automatic, but cognitive evaluation of the stranger's quality before the measurement of attraction can make attraction nonautomatic or controlled; (2) personal evaluations from the stranger activate automatic attraction and cognitive evaluation; (3) controlled attraction from attitudes and automatic attraction and cognitive evaluation from personal evaluations engender reverse-causal effects (i.e. they mediate each other); and (4) attraction and cognitive evaluation are distinct constructs. Attitudinal similarity between the participant and the stranger or personal evaluations of the former by the latter were varied in Experiment 1 (N=96), and were crossed with each other in Experiment 2 (N=240). Orders of response measurement were either cognitive evaluation followed by attraction or attraction followed by cognitive evaluation. Results confirmed the hypotheses. Implications of the findings are discussed.

  16. Cholesterol (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Cholesterol is a soft, waxy substance that is present in all parts of the body including the ... and obtained from animal products in the diet. Cholesterol is manufactured in the liver and is needed ...

  17. Reversals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center on Educational Media and Materials for the Handicapped, Columbus, OH.

    Selected from the National Instructional Materials Information System (NIMIS)--a computer based on-line interactive retrieval system on special education materials--the bibliography covers nine materials for remediating reversals in handicapped students at the early childhood and elementary levels. Entries are presented in order of NIMIS accession…

  18. Intestinal nuclear receptors in HDL cholesterol metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Degirolamo, Chiara; Sabbà, Carlo; Moschetta, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The intestine plays a pivotal role in cholesterol homeostasis by functioning as an absorptive and secretory organ in the reverse cholesterol transport pathway. Enterocytes control cholesterol absorption, apoAI synthesis, HDL biogenesis, and nonbiliary cholesterol fecal disposal. Thus, intestine-based therapeutic interventions may hold promise in the management of diseases driven by cholesterol overload. Lipid-sensing nuclear receptors (NRs) are highly expressed in the intestinal epithelium and regulate transcriptionally the handling of cholesterol by the enterocytes. Here, we discuss the NR regulation of cholesterol fluxes across the enterocytes with special emphasis on NR exploitation as a bona fide novel HDL-raising strategy. PMID:25070952

  19. Cholesterol binding to ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Levitan, Irena; Singh, Dev K.; Rosenhouse-Dantsker, Avia

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies demonstrated that membrane cholesterol is a major regulator of ion channel function. The goal of this review is to discuss significant advances that have been recently achieved in elucidating the mechanisms responsible for cholesterol regulation of ion channels. The first major insight that comes from growing number of studies that based on the sterol specificity of cholesterol effects, show that several types of ion channels (nAChR, Kir, BK, TRPV) are regulated by specific sterol-protein interactions. This conclusion is supported by demonstrating direct saturable binding of cholesterol to a bacterial Kir channel. The second major advance in the field is the identification of putative cholesterol binding sites in several types of ion channels. These include sites at locations associated with the well-known cholesterol binding motif CRAC and its reversed form CARC in nAChR, BK, and TRPV, as well as novel cholesterol binding regions in Kir channels. Notably, in the majority of these channels, cholesterol is suggested to interact mainly with hydrophobic residues in non-annular regions of the channels being embedded in between transmembrane protein helices. We also discuss how identification of putative cholesterol binding sites is an essential step to understand the mechanistic basis of cholesterol-induced channel regulation. Clearly, however, these are only the first few steps in obtaining a general understanding of cholesterol-ion channels interactions and their roles in cellular and organ functions. PMID:24616704

  20. Effects of Cholesterol-altering Pharmaceuticals on Cholesterol Metabolism, Steroidogenesis, and Gene Expression in the Fathead Minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pharmaceuticals that target cholesterol biosynthesis and uptake are among the most widely prescribed drugs and have been detected in the aquatic environment. Fibrates are a class of pharmaceuticals that indirectly modulate cholesterol biosynthesis through effects on peroxisome pr...

  1. NAMPT knockdown attenuates atherosclerosis and promotes reverse cholesterol transport in ApoE KO mice with high-fat-induced insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Li, Shengbing; Wang, Cong; Li, Ke; Li, Ling; Tian, Mingyuan; Xie, Jing; Yang, Mengliu; Jia, Yanjun; He, Junying; Gao, Lin; Boden, Guenther; Liu, Hua; Yang, Gangyi

    2016-01-01

    NAMPT has been suggested association with atherosclerosis and insulin resistance. However, the impact of NAMPT on atherosclerosis remained unknown. Therefore, the objective of this study was to use a NAMPT loss-of-function approach to investigate the effect of NAMPT on atherosclerosis in hypercholesterolemic mice. We demonstrated that a specific NAMPT knockdown increased plasma HDL-C levels, reduced the plaque area of the total aorta en face and the cross-sectional aortic sinus, decreased macrophage number and apoptosis, and promoted RCT in HFD-fed ApoE KO mice. These changes were accompanied by increased PPARα, LXRα, ABCA1 and ABCG1 expressions in the liver. NAMPT knockdown also facilitated cholesterol efflux in RAW264.7 cells. We further investigated the effect of NAMPT knockdown on the PPARα-LXRα pathway of cholesterol metabolism with MK886 (a selective inhibitor of PPARα) in RAW264.7 macrophages. MK886 abolished the ability of NAMPT knockdown to decrease intracellular cholesterol levels to enhance the rate of (3)H-cholesterol efflux and to increase ABCA1/G1 and LXRα expressions in RAW264.7 macrophages. Our observations demonstrate that NAMPT knockdown exerted antiatherogenic effects by promoting cholesterol efflux and macrophage RCT through the PPARα- LXRα- ABCA1/G1pathway in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27229177

  2. NAMPT knockdown attenuates atherosclerosis and promotes reverse cholesterol transport in ApoE KO mice with high-fat-induced insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shengbing; Wang, Cong; Li, Ke; Li, Ling; Tian, Mingyuan; Xie, Jing; Yang, Mengliu; Jia, Yanjun; He, Junying; Gao, Lin; Boden, Guenther; Liu, Hua; Yang, Gangyi

    2016-01-01

    NAMPT has been suggested association with atherosclerosis and insulin resistance. However, the impact of NAMPT on atherosclerosis remained unknown. Therefore, the objective of this study was to use a NAMPT loss-of-function approach to investigate the effect of NAMPT on atherosclerosis in hypercholesterolemic mice. We demonstrated that a specific NAMPT knockdown increased plasma HDL-C levels, reduced the plaque area of the total aorta en face and the cross-sectional aortic sinus, decreased macrophage number and apoptosis, and promoted RCT in HFD-fed ApoE KO mice. These changes were accompanied by increased PPARα, LXRα, ABCA1 and ABCG1 expressions in the liver. NAMPT knockdown also facilitated cholesterol efflux in RAW264.7 cells. We further investigated the effect of NAMPT knockdown on the PPARα-LXRα pathway of cholesterol metabolism with MK886 (a selective inhibitor of PPARα) in RAW264.7 macrophages. MK886 abolished the ability of NAMPT knockdown to decrease intracellular cholesterol levels to enhance the rate of 3H-cholesterol efflux and to increase ABCA1/G1 and LXRα expressions in RAW264.7 macrophages. Our observations demonstrate that NAMPT knockdown exerted antiatherogenic effects by promoting cholesterol efflux and macrophage RCT through the PPARα- LXRα- ABCA1/G1pathway in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27229177

  3. Cholesterol Absorption and Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Howles, Philip N

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitors of cholesterol absorption have been sought for decades as a means to treat and prevent cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) associated with hypercholesterolemia. Ezetimibe is the one clear success story in this regard, and other compounds with similar efficacy continue to be sought. In the last decade, the laboratory mouse, with all its genetic power, has become the premier experimental model for discovering the mechanisms underlying cholesterol absorption and has become a critical tool for preclinical testing of potential pharmaceutical entities. This chapter briefly reviews the history of cholesterol absorption research and the various gene candidates that have come under consideration as drug targets. The most common and versatile method of measuring cholesterol absorption is described in detail along with important considerations when interpreting results, and an alternative method is also presented. In recent years, reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) has become an area of intense new interest for drug discovery since this process is now considered another key to reducing CVD risk. The ultimate measure of RCT is sterol excretion and a detailed description is given for measuring neutral and acidic fecal sterols and interpreting the results. PMID:27150091

  4. Apolipoprotein A-I Mimetic Peptide D-4F Reduces Cardiac Hypertrophy and Improves Apolipoprotein A-I-Mediated Reverse Cholesterol Transport From Cardiac Tissue in LDL Receptor-null Mice Fed a Western Diet.

    PubMed

    Han, Jie; Zhang, Song; Ye, Ping; Liu, Yong-Xue; Qin, Yan-Wen; Miao, Dong-Mei

    2016-05-01

    Epidemiological studies have suggested that hypercholesterolemia is an independent determinant of increased left ventricular (LV) mass. Because high-density lipoprotein and its major protein apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) mediate reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) and have cardiac protective effects, we hypothesized that the apoA-I mimetic peptide D-4F could promote RCT in cardiac tissue and decrease cardiac hypertrophy induced by hypercholesterolemia. Low-density lipoprotein receptor-null mice were fed by a Western diet for 18 weeks and then randomized to receive water, or D-4F 0.3 mg/mL, or D-4F 0.5 mg/mL added to drinking water for 6 weeks. After D-4F administration, an increase in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and a decrease in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, total cholesterol, and triglyceride in a trend toward dose-responsivity were found in cardiac tissue. Ultrasound biomicroscopy revealed a reduction in LV posterior wall end-diastolic dimension, and an increase in mitral valve E/A ratio and LV ejection fraction. Hematoxylin-eosin staining showed reduced LV wall thickness and myocardial cell diameter. The protein levels of ABCA1 and LXRα were elevated in cardiac tissue of D-4F treated mice compared with the controls (P < 0.05). These results demonstrated that D-4F treatment reduced cardiac hypertrophy, and improved cardiac performance in low-density lipoprotein receptor-null mice fed a Western diet, presumably through the LXRα-ABCA1 pathway associated with enhanced myocardial RCT.

  5. Early steps in steroidogenesis: intracellular cholesterol trafficking.

    PubMed

    Miller, Walter L; Bose, Himangshu S

    2011-12-01

    Steroid hormones are made from cholesterol, primarily derived from lipoproteins that enter cells via receptor-mediated endocytosis. In endo-lysosomes, cholesterol is released from cholesterol esters by lysosomal acid lipase (LAL; disordered in Wolman disease) and exported via Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) proteins (disordered in NPC disease). These diseases are characterized by accumulated cholesterol and cholesterol esters in most cell types. Mechanisms for trans-cytoplasmic cholesterol transport, membrane insertion, and retrieval from membranes are less clear. Cholesterol esters and "free" cholesterol are enzymatically interconverted in lipid droplets. Cholesterol transport to the cholesterol-poor outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) appears to involve cholesterol transport proteins. Cytochrome P450scc (CYP11A1) then initiates steroidogenesis by converting cholesterol to pregnenolone on the inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM). Acute steroidogenic responses are regulated by cholesterol delivery from OMM to IMM, triggered by the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR). Chronic steroidogenic capacity is determined by CYP11A1 gene transcription. StAR mutations cause congenital lipoid adrenal hyperplasia, with absent steroidogenesis, potentially lethal salt loss, and 46,XY sex reversal. StAR mutations initially destroy most, but not all steroidogenesis; low levels of StAR-independent steroidogenesis are lost later due to cellular damage, explaining the clinical findings. Rare P450scc mutations cause a similar syndrome. This review addresses these early steps in steroid biosynthesis. PMID:21976778

  6. Early steps in steroidogenesis: intracellular cholesterol trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Walter L.; Bose, Himangshu S.

    2011-01-01

    Steroid hormones are made from cholesterol, primarily derived from lipoproteins that enter cells via receptor-mediated endocytosis. In endo-lysosomes, cholesterol is released from cholesterol esters by lysosomal acid lipase (LAL; disordered in Wolman disease) and exported via Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) proteins (disordered in NPC disease). These diseases are characterized by accumulated cholesterol and cholesterol esters in most cell types. Mechanisms for trans-cytoplasmic cholesterol transport, membrane insertion, and retrieval from membranes are less clear. Cholesterol esters and “free” cholesterol are enzymatically interconverted in lipid droplets. Cholesterol transport to the cholesterol-poor outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) appears to involve cholesterol transport proteins. Cytochrome P450scc (CYP11A1) then initiates steroidogenesis by converting cholesterol to pregnenolone on the inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM). Acute steroidogenic responses are regulated by cholesterol delivery from OMM to IMM, triggered by the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR). Chronic steroidogenic capacity is determined by CYP11A1 gene transcription. StAR mutations cause congenital lipoid adrenal hyperplasia, with absent steroidogenesis, potentially lethal salt loss, and 46,XY sex reversal. StAR mutations initially destroy most, but not all steroidogenesis; low levels of StAR-independent steroidogenesis are lost later due to cellular damage, explaining the clinical findings. Rare P450scc mutations cause a similar syndrome. This review addresses these early steps in steroid biosynthesis. PMID:21976778

  7. The Effect of Regular Aerobic Exercise on Reverse Cholesterol Transport A1 and Apo Lipoprotein A-I Gene Expression in Inactive Women

    PubMed Central

    Tofighi, Asghar; Rahmani, Fatemeh; Jamali Qarakhanlou, Bahram; Babaei, Solmaz

    2015-01-01

    Background: Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease is currently a cause of mortality in some parts of the world. The ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter (ABCA1) gene prepares instructions to produce the ATP-binding cassette transporter protein whose operation is for export of phospholipids and cholesterol, outside cells where they are limited to Apolipoprotein A1 (apoA1). Increased ABCA1 activity could inhibit atherosclerosis. Objectives: In the present study, the effect of aerobic exercise was investigated on gene expression and biochemical parameters. Patients and Methods: The participants included 36 inactive women, which were randomly assigned to control (CON) and experimental (EX) groups. The EX group performed 12 weeks of aerobic exercise and the CON group remained inactive. Fasting blood samples were collected 24 hours before the first session and 48 hours after completion of the course. The ABCA1 and APOA1 gene expressions were measured using semi-quantitative-RT-PCR. Data were analyzed by the SPSS software (version 18). Results: A significant increase in blood ABCA1 (EX group P < 0.002, t = - 9.876) and Apo A-I (EX group P < 0.05, t = 2.76) gene expression was shown following the 12 weeks of training. Plasma high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) concentration increased (P < 0.001, t = 4.90 respectively) while plasma low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) concentration decreased (P < 0.001, t = 4.27) in the EX group compared with the CON group. Conclusions: Aerobic exercises can increase ABCA1 and APO-A1 gene expression. Induction of these genes can effectively prevent cardiovascular disease. PMID:26023346

  8. Novel apo E-derived ABCA1 agonist peptide (CS-6253) promotes reverse cholesterol transport and induces formation of preβ-1 HDL in vitro

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hafiane, Anouar; Bielicki, John K.; Johansson, Jan O.; Genest, Jacques; Zhu, Xuewei

    2015-07-24

    Apolipoprotein (apo) mimetic peptides replicate some aspects of HDL function. We have previously reported the effects of compound ATI-5261 on its ability to replicate many functions of native apo A-I in the process of HDL biogenesis. ATI-5261 induced muscle toxicity in wild type C57Bl/6 mice, increased CPK, ALT and AST and increase in triglyceride (Tg) levels. Aromatic phenylalanine residues on the non-polar face of ATI-5261, together with positively charged arginine residues at the lipid-water interface were responsible for these effects. This information was used to create a novel analog (CS-6253) that was non-toxic. We evaluated this peptide designed from themore » carboxyl terminus of apo E, in its ability to mimic apo A-I functionality. Our data shows that the lipidated particles generated by incubating cells overexpressing ABCA1 with lipid free CS-6253 enhances the rate of ABCA1 lipid efflux with high affinity interactions with native ABCA1 oligomeric forms and plasma membrane micro-domains. Interaction between ABCA1 and lipid free CS-6253 resulted in formation of nascent HDL-CS-6253 particles that are actively remodeled in plasma. Mature HDL-CS-6253 particles deliver cholesterol to liver cells via SR-BI in-vitro. CS-6253 significantly increases cholesterol efflux in murine macrophages and in human THP-1 macrophage-derived foam cells expressing ABCA1. Addition of CS-6253 to plasma dose-dependently displaced apo A-I from α-HDL particles and led to de novo formation of preβ-1 HDL that stimulates ABCA1 dependent cholesterol efflux efficiently. When incubated with human plasma CS-6253 was also found to bind with HDL and LDL and promoted the transfer of cholesterol from HDL to LDL predominantly. Our data shows that CS-6253 mimics apo A-I in its ability to promote ABCA1-mediated formation of nascent HDL particles, and enhances formation of preβ-1 HDL with increase in the cycling of apo A-I between the preβ and α-HDL particles in-vitro. These mechanisms are

  9. Women and Cholesterol

    MedlinePlus

    ... Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Women and Cholesterol Updated:Apr 1,2016 The female sex hormone ... Glossary Related Sites Nutrition Center My Life Check Cholesterol • Home • About Cholesterol • Why Cholesterol Matters • Understand Your ...

  10. Cholesterol IQ Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Cholesterol IQ Quiz Updated:Feb 2,2015 Begin the quiz Cholesterol • Home • About Cholesterol Introduction Good vs. Bad Cholesterol ...

  11. Quercetin regulates hepatic cholesterol metabolism by promoting cholesterol-to-bile acid conversion and cholesterol efflux in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Xie, Zongkai; Gao, Weina; Pu, Lingling; Wei, Jingyu; Guo, Changjiang

    2016-03-01

    Quercetin, a common member of the flavonoid family, is widely present in plant kingdom. Despite that quercetin is implicated in regulating cholesterol metabolism, the molecular mechanism is poorly understood. We hypothesized that quercetin regulates cholesterol homeostasis through regulating the key enzymes involved in hepatic cholesterol metabolism. To test this hypothesis, we compared the profile of key enzymes and transcription factors involved in the hepatic cholesterol metabolism in rats with or without quercetin supplementation. Twenty male Wistar rats were randomly divided into control and quercetin-supplemented groups. Serum total cholesterol, triglyceride, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and total bile acids in feces and bile were measured. Hepatic enzymatic activities were determined by activity assay kit and high-performance liquid chromatography-based analyses. The messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expressions were determined by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analyses, respectively. The results showed that the activity of hepatic cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase, a critical enzyme in the conversion of cholesterol to bile acids, was significantly elevated by quercetin. The expression of cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase, as well as liver X receptor α, an important transcription factor, was also increased at both mRNA and protein levels by quercetin. However, quercetin exposure had no impact on the activity of hepatic HMG-CoA reductase, a rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of cholesterol. We also found that quercetin treatment significantly increased ATP binding cassette transporter G1 mRNA and protein expression in the liver, suggesting that quercetin may increase hepatic cholesterol efflux. Collectively, the results presented here indicate that quercetin regulates hepatic cholesterol metabolism mainly through the pathways that promote cholesterol-to-bile acid conversion and

  12. All about Cholesterol

    MedlinePlus

    ... are several kinds of fats in your blood. • LDL cholesterol is sometimes called “bad” cholesterol. It can narrow ... medicine to manage blood fats. They help lower LDL cholesterol. They also help lower your risk for a ...

  13. The Oxnard advanced water purification facility: combining indirect potable reuse with reverse osmosis concentrate beneficial use to ensure a California community's water sustainability and provide coastal wetlands restoration.

    PubMed

    Lozier, Jim; Ortega, Ken

    2010-01-01

    The City of Oxnard in California is implementing a strategic water resources program known as the Groundwater Recovery Enhancement and Treatment (GREAT) program, which includes an Advanced Water Purification Facility (AWPF) that will use a major portion of the secondary effluent from the City's existing Water Pollution Control Facility to produce high-quality treated water to be used for irrigation of edible food crops, landscape irrigation, injection into the groundwater basin to form a barrier to seawater intrusion, and other industrial uses. The AWPF, currently under design by CH2M HILL, will employ a multiple-barrier treatment train consisting of microfiltration, reverse osmosis, and ultravioletlightbased advanced oxidation processes to purify the secondary effluent to conform to California Department of Public Health Title 22 Recycled Water Criteria for groundwater recharge. The AWPF, which will have initial and build-out capacities of ca. 24,000 and ca 95,000 m(3)/day, respectively, was limited to a 1.8-hectare site, with 0.4 hectares dedicated to a Visitor's Center and administration building. Further, the depth below grade and height of the AWPF's structures were constrained because of the high groundwater table at the site, the high cost of excavation and dewatering, and local codes. To accommodate these various restrictions, an innovative design approach has been developed. This paper summarizes the design constraints and innovative solutions for the design of the AWPF.

  14. [Basic mechanisms: absorption and excretion of cholesterol and other sterols].

    PubMed

    Cofan Pujol, Montserrat

    2014-01-01

    Cholesterol is of vital importance for vertebrate cell membrane structure and function. It is obvious that adequate regulation of cholesterol homeostasis is essential. Hypercholesterolemia promotes atherosclerosis and thereby represents a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. The liver has been considered the major site of control in maintenance of cholesterol homeostasis. The liver facilitates clearance of (very) low density lipoprotein particles and cholesterol-containing chylomicron remnants, synthesizes cholesterol, synthesizes and secretes (nascent) high density lipoprotein particles, secretes cholesterol and bile salts to bile, and is involved in reverse cholesterol transport. In recent years, however, the importance of the intestine in many aspects of cholesterol physiology is increasingly recognized. It has become apparent that direct secretion of cholesterol from the blood compartment into the intestine, or transintestinal cholesterol excretion, plays a major role in disposal of cholesterol via the feces. This review will discuss current knowledge on the physiology of cholesterol homeostasis, with emphasis on cholesterol absorption, cholesterol synthesis and fecal excretion, and therapeutic options for hypercholesterolemia. PMID:24461630

  15. [Basic mechanisms: absorption and excretion of cholesterol and other sterols].

    PubMed

    Cofan Pujol, Montserrat

    2014-01-01

    Cholesterol is of vital importance for vertebrate cell membrane structure and function. It is obvious that adequate regulation of cholesterol homeostasis is essential. Hypercholesterolemia promotes atherosclerosis and thereby represents a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. The liver has been considered the major site of control in maintenance of cholesterol homeostasis. The liver facilitates clearance of (very) low density lipoprotein particles and cholesterol-containing chylomicron remnants, synthesizes cholesterol, synthesizes and secretes (nascent) high density lipoprotein particles, secretes cholesterol and bile salts to bile, and is involved in reverse cholesterol transport. In recent years, however, the importance of the intestine in many aspects of cholesterol physiology is increasingly recognized. It has become apparent that direct secretion of cholesterol from the blood compartment into the intestine, or transintestinal cholesterol excretion, plays a major role in disposal of cholesterol via the feces. This review will discuss current knowledge on the physiology of cholesterol homeostasis, with emphasis on cholesterol absorption, cholesterol synthesis and fecal excretion, and therapeutic options for hypercholesterolemia.

  16. Membrane cholesterol modulates cochlear electromechanics.

    PubMed

    Brownell, William E; Jacob, Stefan; Hakizimana, Pierre; Ulfendahl, Mats; Fridberger, Anders

    2011-06-01

    Changing the concentration of cholesterol in the plasma membrane of isolated outer hair cells modulates electromotility and prestin-associated charge movement, suggesting that a similar manipulation would alter cochlear mechanics. We examined cochlear function before and after depletion of membrane cholesterol with methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD) in an excised guinea pig temporal bone preparation. The mechanical response of the cochlear partition to acoustic and/or electrical stimulation was monitored using laser interferometry and time-resolved confocal microscopy. The electromechanical response in untreated preparations was asymmetric with greater displacements in response to positive currents. Exposure to MβCD increased the magnitude and asymmetry of the response, without changing the frequency tuning of sound-evoked mechanical responses or cochlear microphonic potentials. Sodium salicylate reversibly blocked the enhanced electromechanical response in cholesterol depleted preparations. The increase of sound-evoked vibrations during positive current injection was enhanced following MβCD in some preparations. Imaging was used to assess cellular integrity which remained unchanged after several hours of exposure to MβCD in several preparations. The enhanced electromechanical response reflects an increase in outer hair cell electromotility and may reveal features of cholesterol distribution and trafficking in outer hair cells. PMID:21373862

  17. Lecithin:Cholesterol Acyltransferase Deficiency Protects against Cholesterol-induced Hepatic Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Mice*

    PubMed Central

    Hager, Lauren; Li, Lixin; Pun, Henry; Liu, Lu; Hossain, Mohammad A.; Maguire, Graham F.; Naples, Mark; Baker, Chris; Magomedova, Lilia; Tam, Jonathan; Adeli, Khosrow; Cummins, Carolyn L.; Connelly, Philip W.; Ng, Dominic S.

    2012-01-01

    We recently reported that lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) knock-out mice, particularly in the LDL receptor knock-out background, are hypersensitive to insulin and resistant to high fat diet-induced insulin resistance (IR) and obesity. We demonstrated that chow-fed Ldlr−/−xLcat+/+ mice have elevated hepatic endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, which promotes IR, compared with wild-type controls, and this effect is normalized in Ldlr−/−xLcat−/− mice. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that hepatic ER cholesterol metabolism differentially regulates ER stress using these models. We observed that the Ldlr−/−xLcat+/+ mice accumulate excess hepatic total and ER cholesterol primarily attributed to increased reuptake of biliary cholesterol as we observed reduced biliary cholesterol in conjunction with decreased hepatic Abcg5/g8 mRNA, increased Npc1l1 mRNA, and decreased Hmgr mRNA and nuclear SREBP2 protein. Intestinal NPC1L1 protein was induced. Expression of these genes was reversed in the Ldlr−/−xLcat−/− mice, accounting for the normalization of total and ER cholesterol and ER stress. Upon feeding a 2% high cholesterol diet (HCD), Ldlr−/−xLcat−/− mice accumulated a similar amount of total hepatic cholesterol compared with the Ldlr−/−xLcat+/+ mice, but the hepatic ER cholesterol levels remained low in conjunction with being protected from HCD-induced ER stress and IR. Hepatic ER stress correlates strongly with hepatic ER free cholesterol but poorly with hepatic tissue free cholesterol. The unexpectedly low ER cholesterol seen in HCD-fed Ldlr−/−xLcat−/− mice was attributable to a coordinated marked up-regulation of ACAT2 and suppressed SREBP2 processing. Thus, factors influencing the accumulation of ER cholesterol may be important for the development of hepatic insulin resistance. PMID:22500017

  18. Cholesterol testing and results

    MedlinePlus

    ... VLDL cholesterol) Lipoproteins are made of fat and protein. They carry cholesterol, triglycerides, and other fats, called ... Pencina MJ, Navar-Boggan AM, D'Agostino RB Sr, Williams K, Neely B, Sniderman AD, Peterson ED. ...

  19. Indirect inversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergienko, Olga

    2013-04-01

    Since Doug MacAyeal's pioneering studies of the ice-stream basal traction optimizations by control methods, inversions for unknown parameters (e.g., basal traction, accumulation patterns, etc) have become a hallmark of the present-day ice-sheet modeling. The common feature of such inversion exercises is a direct relationship between optimized parameters and observations used in the optimization procedure. For instance, in the standard optimization for basal traction by the control method, ice-stream surface velocities constitute the control data. The optimized basal traction parameters explicitly appear in the momentum equations for the ice-stream velocities (compared to the control data). The inversion for basal traction is carried out by minimization of the cost (or objective, misfit) function that includes the momentum equations facilitated by the Lagrange multipliers. Here, we build upon this idea, and demonstrate how to optimize for parameters indirectly related to observed data using a suite of nested constraints (like Russian dolls) with additional sets of Lagrange multipliers in the cost function. This method opens the opportunity to use data from a variety of sources and types (e.g., velocities, radar layers, surface elevation changes, etc.) in the same optimization process.

  20. Cholesterol and Plants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behrman, E. J.; Gopalan, Venkat

    2005-01-01

    There is a widespread belief among the public and even among chemist that plants do not contain cholesterol. This wrong belief is the result of the fact that plants generally contain only small quantities of cholesterol and that analytical methods for the detection of cholesterol in this range were not developed until recently.

  1. Antibodies to cholesterol.

    PubMed Central

    Swartz, G M; Gentry, M K; Amende, L M; Blanchette-Mackie, E J; Alving, C R

    1988-01-01

    Cholesterol-dependent complement activation has been proposed as a factor that might influence the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Although antibodies to cholesterol conjugates have been reported, cholesterol is widely regarded as a poorly immunogenic substance. Monoclonal IgM complement-fixing antibodies to cholesterol were obtained in the present study after immunizing mice with liposomes containing high amounts of cholesterol (71 mol % relative to phosphatidylcholine) and lipid A as an adjuvant. Clones were selected for the ability of secreted antibodies to react with liposomes containing 71% cholesterol but not with liposomes containing 43% cholesterol. The antibodies also reacted with crystalline cholesterol in a solid-phase enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Binding of monoclonal antibodies to the surface of crystalline cholesterol was demonstrated by electron microscopy by utilizing a second antibody (anti-IgM) labeled with colloidal gold. The immunization period required to induce monoclonal antibodies was very short (3 days) and a high fraction of the hybrid cells (at least 70%) were secreting detectable antibodies to cholesterol. The results demonstrate that cholesterol can be a highly immunogenic molecule and that complement-fixing antibodies to cholesterol can be readily obtained. Images PMID:3162316

  2. Avoiding Christmas cholesterol.

    PubMed

    1991-12-01

    Judging from your response to our September feature on cholesterol testing providing dietary advice has become of paramount importance to OHNs. The Flora Project for Heart Disease Prevention offers information on the risk factors of high cholesterol and has become a major noninstitutional authority on coronary heart disease. With Yuletide in sight The Flora Project offers advice on a cholesterol-clear Christmas.

  3. [Trans-intestinal cholesterol excretion (TICE): a new route for cholesterol excretion].

    PubMed

    Blanchard, Claire; Moreau, François; Cariou, Bertrand; Le May, Cédric

    2014-10-01

    The small intestine plays a crucial role in dietary and biliary cholesterol absorption, as well as its lymphatic secretion as chylomicrons (lipoprotein exogenous way). Recently, a new metabolic pathway called TICE (trans-intestinal excretion of cholesterol) that plays a central role in cholesterol metabolism has emerged. TICE is an inducible way, complementary to the hepatobiliary pathway, allowing the elimination of the plasma cholesterol directly into the intestine lumen through the enterocytes. This pathway is poorly characterized but several molecular actors of TICE have been recently identified. Although it is a matter of debate, two independent studies suggest that TICE is involved in the anti-atherogenic reverse cholesterol transport pathway. Thus, TICE is an innovative drug target to reduce -cardiovascular diseases.

  4. The role of the lymphatic system in cholesterol transport

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Li-Hao; Elvington, Andrew; Randolph, Gwendalyn J.

    2015-01-01

    Reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) is the pathway for removal of peripheral tissue cholesterol and involves transport of cholesterol back to liver for excretion, starting from cellular cholesterol efflux facilitated by lipid-free apolipoprotein A1 (ApoA1) or other lipidated high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles within the interstitial space. Extracellular cholesterol then is picked up and transported through the lymphatic vasculature before entering into bloodstream. There is increasing evidence supporting a role for enhanced macrophage cholesterol efflux and RCT in ameliorating atherosclerosis, and recent data suggest that these processes may serve as better diagnostic biomarkers than plasma HDL levels. Hence, it is important to better understand the processes governing ApoA1 and HDL influx into peripheral tissues from the bloodstream, modification and facilitation of cellular cholesterol removal within the interstitial space, and transport through the lymphatic vasculature. New findings will complement therapeutic strategies for the treatment of atherosclerotic vascular disease. PMID:26388772

  5. Topographic heterogeneity in cholesterol biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Lange, Y; Muraski, M F

    1988-07-01

    We have examined the membrane topography of cholesterol biosynthesis in cultured human fibroblasts. We fed the cells with radioacetate and then interrupted the biosynthetic pathway so as to trap labeled intermediates in their subcellular locations. We analyzed homogenates of human fibroblasts labeled biosynthetically from radioacetate by centrifugation to equilibrium on sucrose gradients. The following two methods were used to interrupt cholesterol biosynthesis: incubation at 10 degrees C and treatment with 4,4,10 beta-trimethyl-trans-decal-3 beta-ol, a specific inhibitor of oxidosqualene cyclase. Incubation at 10 degrees C caused the accumulation of radiolanosterol at the expense of cholesterol. The lanosterol appeared predominantly at an unusually buoyant density (20% (w/w) sucrose; d = 1.08 g/cm3) as well as at the density normally labeled at 37 degrees C (30% sucrose; d = 1.13 g/cm3). 4,4,10 beta-Trimethyl-trans-decal-3 beta-ol treatment caused the accumulation of labeled squalene and squalene 2,3-oxide. Reversal of the block permitted the label to progress rapidly as a wave into lanosterol and ultimately into cholesterol. The profiles of the three precursors did not coincide, suggesting that they were mostly in different membranes. Squalene was uniquely confined to a density of 1.18 g/cm3 (40% sucrose) while squalene 2,3-oxide appeared in peaks of density 1.08 g/cm3 and 1.13 g/cm3 (20% and 30% sucrose). Lanosterol was in a peak of density 1.13 g/cm3. Pulse-chase experiments showed that lanosterol synthesized in the membranes at 20% sucrose moved rapidly to the membranes at 30% sucrose where it was converted to cholesterol. The density gradient profiles of the following organelle markers also were monitored: plasma membrane, cholesterol mass; Golgi apparatus, galactosyltransferase; endoplasmic reticulum, RNA, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase and cytochrome c reductase; peroxisomes, catalase. None of these markers appeared at the buoyant density

  6. Home-Use Tests - Cholesterol

    MedlinePlus

    ... this test does: This is a home-use test kit to measure total cholesterol. What cholesterol is: Cholesterol is a fat (lipid) in your blood. High-density lipoprotein (HDL) ("good" cholesterol) helps protect your heart, but low-density lipoprotein (LDL) ("bad" cholesterol) can clog the arteries of your ...

  7. Children and Cholesterol

    MedlinePlus

    ... a coronary artery procedure; or who suffered a heart attack or sudden cardiac death before age 55. Those with a parent who has a history of high total cholesterol levels (240 mg/dL or higher). Talk to your child’s pediatrician ... Risk Calculator Printable Cholesterol Information Sheets Heart360 Health ...

  8. Cholesterol and Affective Morbidity

    PubMed Central

    Fiedorowicz, Jess G.; Palagummi, Narasimha M.; Behrendtsen, Ole; Coryell, William H.

    2009-01-01

    Depression and mania have been linked with low cholesterol though there has been limited prospective study of cholesterol and subsequent course of affective illness. We studied the relationship between fasting total cholesterol and subsequent depressive and manic symptoms. A total of 131 participants from a prospective cohort study were identified as having had a fasting total cholesterol evaluation at intake. Participants were predominantly inpatients at index visit and were followed for a median of 20 and up to 25 years. Cholesterol was modeled with age, gender, and index use of a mood stabilizer in linear regression to assess its influence on subsequent depressive symptom burden in participants with unipolar disorder as well as depressive and manic symptom burden in participants with bipolar disorder. Among bipolar participants (N=65), low cholesterol predicted a higher proportion of follow-up weeks with manic, but not depressive symptoms. Cholesterol did not appear to predict depressive symptom burden among participants with unipolar depression (N=66). Lower cholesterol levels may predispose individuals with bipolar disorder to a greater burden of manic symptomatology and may provide some insight into the underlying neurobiology. PMID:19969372

  9. Cholesterol and Your Child

    MedlinePlus

    ... traveling together are called lipoproteins . Two kinds — low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) — are the ones that most of us have heard about. Low-density lipoproteins , or "bad cholesterol," are the primary cholesterol ...

  10. What Your Cholesterol Levels Mean

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More What Your Cholesterol Levels Mean Updated:Aug 17,2016 How’s your cholesterol? Time to get it checked! Keeping your cholesterol levels healthy is a great way to keep your ...

  11. Cholesterol and Ion Channels

    PubMed Central

    Levitan, Irena; Fang, Yun; Rosenhouse-Dantsker, Avia; Romanenko, Victor

    2010-01-01

    A variety of ion channels, including members of all major ion channel families, have been shown to be regulated by changes in the level of membrane cholesterol and partition into cholesterol-rich membrane domains. In general, several types of cholesterol effects have been described. The most common effect is suppression of channel activity by an increase in membrane cholesterol, an effect that was described for several types of inwardly-rectifying K+ channels, voltage-gated K+ channels, Ca+2 sensitive K+ channels, voltage-gated Na+ channels, N-type voltage-gated Ca+2 channels and volume-regulated anion channels. In contrast, several types of ion channels, such as epithelial amiloride-sensitive Na+ channels and Transient Receptor Potential channels, as well as some of the types of inwardly-rectifying and voltage-gated K+ channels were shown to be inhibited by cholesterol depletion. Cholesterol was also shown to alter the kinetic properties and current-voltage dependence of several voltage-gated channels. Finally, maintaining membrane cholesterol level is required for coupling ion channels to signalling cascades. In terms of the mechanisms, three general mechanisms have been proposed: (i) specific interactions between cholesterol and the channel protein, (ii) changes in the physical properties of the membrane bilayer and (iii) maintaining the scaffolds for protein-protein interactions. The goal of this review is to describe systematically the role of cholesterol in regulation of the major types of ion channels and to discuss these effects in the context of the models proposed. PMID:20213557

  12. Cholesterol depletion increases membrane stiffness of aortic endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Byfield, Fitzroy J; Aranda-Espinoza, Helim; Romanenko, Victor G; Rothblat, George H; Levitan, Irena

    2004-11-01

    This study has investigated the effect of cellular cholesterol on membrane deformability of bovine aortic endothelial cells. Cellular cholesterol content was depleted by exposing the cells to methyl-beta-cyclodextrin or enriched by exposing the cells to methyl-beta-cyclodextrin saturated with cholesterol. Control cells were treated with methyl-beta-cyclodextrin-cholesterol at a molar ratio that had no effect on the level of cellular cholesterol. Mechanical properties of the cells with different cholesterol contents were compared by measuring the degree of membrane deformation in response to a step in negative pressure applied to the membrane by a micropipette. The experiments were performed on substrate-attached cells that maintained normal morphology. The data were analyzed using a standard linear elastic half-space model to calculate Young elastic modulus. Our observations show that, in contrast to the known effect of cholesterol on membrane stiffness of lipid bilayers, cholesterol depletion of bovine aortic endothelial cells resulted in a significant decrease in membrane deformability and a corresponding increase in the value of the elastic coefficient of the membrane, indicating that cholesterol-depleted cells are stiffer than control cells. Repleting the cells with cholesterol reversed the effect. An increase in cellular cholesterol to a level higher than that of normal cells, however, had no effect on the elastic properties of bovine aortic endothelial cells. We also show that although cholesterol depletion had no apparent effect on the intensity of F-actin-specific fluorescence, disrupting F-actin with latrunculin A abrogated the stiffening effect. We suggest that cholesterol depletion increases the stiffness of the membrane by altering the properties of the submembrane F-actin and/or its attachment to the membrane.

  13. Intestinal SR-BI does not impact cholesterol absorption or transintestinal cholesterol efflux in mice.

    PubMed

    Bura, Kanwardeep S; Lord, Caleb; Marshall, Stephanie; McDaniel, Allison; Thomas, Gwyn; Warrier, Manya; Zhang, Jun; Davis, Matthew A; Sawyer, Janet K; Shah, Ramesh; Wilson, Martha D; Dikkers, Arne; Tietge, Uwe J F; Collet, Xavier; Rudel, Lawrence L; Temel, Ryan E; Brown, J Mark

    2013-06-01

    Reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) can proceed through the classic hepatobiliary route or through the nonbiliary transintestinal cholesterol efflux (TICE) pathway. Scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI) plays a critical role in the classic hepatobiliary route of RCT. However, the role of SR-BI in TICE has not been studied. To examine the role of intestinal SR-BI in TICE, sterol balance was measured in control mice and mice transgenically overexpressing SR-BI in the proximal small intestine (SR-BI(hApoCIII-ApoAIV-Tg)). SR-BI(hApoCIII-ApoAIV-Tg) mice had significantly lower plasma cholesterol levels compared with wild-type controls, yet SR-BI(hApoCIII-ApoAIV-Tg) mice had normal fractional cholesterol absorption and fecal neutral sterol excretion. Both in the absence or presence of ezetimibe, intestinal SR-BI overexpression had no impact on the amount of cholesterol excreted in the feces. To specifically study effects of intestinal SR-BI on TICE we crossed SR-BI(hApoCIII-ApoAIV-Tg) mice into a mouse model that preferentially utilized the TICE pathway for RCT (Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 liver transgenic), and likewise found no alterations in cholesterol absorption or fecal sterol excretion. Finally, mice lacking SR-BI in all tissues also exhibited normal cholesterol absorption and fecal cholesterol disposal. Collectively, these results suggest that SR-BI is not rate limiting for intestinal cholesterol absorption or for fecal neutral sterol loss through the TICE pathway.

  14. Dietary Fat and Cholesterol

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gynecology Medical Conditions Nutrition & Fitness Emotional Health Dietary Fat and Cholesterol Posted under Health Guides . Updated 23 ... warm What are the different types of dietary fat? The four main types of fat found in ...

  15. Get Your Cholesterol Checked

    MedlinePlus

    ... is checked with a blood test called a lipid profile. During the test, a nurse will take ... blood tests that can check cholesterol, but a lipid profile gives the most information. Find out more ...

  16. High Blood Cholesterol

    MedlinePlus

    ... of cholesterol is called plaque. Plaque Buildup Can Lead to… Click for more information Artherosclerosis. Over time, ... disease (CHD). Angina. The buildup of plaque can lead to chest pain called angina. Angina is a ...

  17. Common Misconceptions about Cholesterol

    MedlinePlus

    ... most (and preferably all) days; and stressing the importance of avoiding tobacco products. Learn more about cholesterol ... Privacy Policy Popular Articles 1 Understanding Blood Pressure Readings 2 Sodium and Salt 3 Low Blood Pressure ...

  18. Cholesterol and Statins

    MedlinePlus

    ... the liver makes ldl & hdl In the liver, triglycerides, cholesterol, and proteins form together to make LDL ... This is especially important for individuals with high triglyceride and/or low HDL levels who are overweight ...

  19. Compounds affecting cholesterol absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hua, Duy H. (Inventor); Koo, Sung I. (Inventor); Noh, Sang K. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A class of novel compounds is described for use in affecting lymphatic absorption of cholesterol. Compounds of particular interest are defined by Formula I: ##STR1## or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof.

  20. Effects of Gemfibrozil on Cholesterol Metabolism, Steroidogenesis, and Reproduction in the Fathead Minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fibrates are a class of pharmaceuticals that indirectly modulate cholesterol biosynthesis through effects on peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, which are transcriptional cofactors that regulate expression of genes related to lipid metabolism. Gemfibrozil is a fibrate th...

  1. Effects of Gemfibrozil on Cholesterol Metabolism and Steroidogenesis in the Fathead Minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fibrates are a class of pharmaceuticals that indirectly modulate cholesterol biosynthesis through effects on peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR), which are transcriptional cofactors that regulate expression of genes related to lipid metabolism. Gemfibrozil is a fib...

  2. Effects of Gemfibrozil on Cholesterol Metabolism, Steroidogenesis, and Reproduction in the Fathead Minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fibrates are a class of pharmaceuticals that indirectly modulate cholesterol biosynthesis through effects on peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR), which are transcriptional cofactors that regulate expression of genes related to lipid metabolism. Gemfibrozil is a fib...

  3. MD-2 binds cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Choi, Soo-Ho; Kim, Jungsu; Gonen, Ayelet; Viriyakosol, Suganya; Miller, Yury I

    2016-02-19

    Cholesterol is a structural component of cellular membranes, which is transported from liver to peripheral cells in the form of cholesterol esters (CE), residing in the hydrophobic core of low-density lipoprotein. Oxidized CE (OxCE) is often found in plasma and in atherosclerotic lesions of subjects with cardiovascular disease. Our earlier studies have demonstrated that OxCE activates inflammatory responses in macrophages via toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4). Here we demonstrate that cholesterol binds to myeloid differentiation-2 (MD-2), a TLR4 ancillary molecule, which is a binding receptor for bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and is indispensable for LPS-induced TLR4 dimerization and signaling. Cholesterol binding to MD-2 was competed by LPS and by OxCE-modified BSA. Furthermore, soluble MD-2 in human plasma and MD-2 in mouse atherosclerotic lesions carried cholesterol, the finding supporting the biological significance of MD-2 cholesterol binding. These results help understand the molecular basis of TLR4 activation by OxCE and mechanisms of chronic inflammation in atherosclerosis.

  4. Novel apo E-derived ABCA1 agonist peptide (CS-6253) promotes reverse cholesterol transport and induces formation of preβ-1 HDL in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Hafiane, Anouar; Bielicki, John K.; Johansson, Jan O.; Genest, Jacques; Zhu, Xuewei

    2015-07-24

    Apolipoprotein (apo) mimetic peptides replicate some aspects of HDL function. We have previously reported the effects of compound ATI-5261 on its ability to replicate many functions of native apo A-I in the process of HDL biogenesis. ATI-5261 induced muscle toxicity in wild type C57Bl/6 mice, increased CPK, ALT and AST and increase in triglyceride (Tg) levels. Aromatic phenylalanine residues on the non-polar face of ATI-5261, together with positively charged arginine residues at the lipid-water interface were responsible for these effects. This information was used to create a novel analog (CS-6253) that was non-toxic. We evaluated this peptide designed from the carboxyl terminus of apo E, in its ability to mimic apo A-I functionality. Our data shows that the lipidated particles generated by incubating cells overexpressing ABCA1 with lipid free CS-6253 enhances the rate of ABCA1 lipid efflux with high affinity interactions with native ABCA1 oligomeric forms and plasma membrane micro-domains. Interaction between ABCA1 and lipid free CS-6253 resulted in formation of nascent HDL-CS-6253 particles that are actively remodeled in plasma. Mature HDL-CS-6253 particles deliver cholesterol to liver cells via SR-BI in-vitro. CS-6253 significantly increases cholesterol efflux in murine macrophages and in human THP-1 macrophage-derived foam cells expressing ABCA1. Addition of CS-6253 to plasma dose-dependently displaced apo A-I from α-HDL particles and led to de novo formation of preβ-1 HDL that stimulates ABCA1 dependent cholesterol efflux efficiently. When incubated with human plasma CS-6253 was also found to bind with HDL and LDL and promoted the transfer of cholesterol from HDL to LDL predominantly. Our data shows that CS-6253 mimics apo A-I in its ability to promote ABCA1-mediated formation of nascent HDL particles, and enhances formation of preβ-1 HDL with increase in the cycling of apo A-I between the preβ and α-HDL particles in-vitro. These

  5. Cholesterol depletion induces autophagy

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Jinglei; Ohsaki, Yuki; Tauchi-Sato, Kumi; Fujita, Akikazu; Fujimoto, Toyoshi . E-mail: tfujimot@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp

    2006-12-08

    Autophagy is a mechanism to digest cells' own components, and its importance in many physiological and pathological processes is being recognized. But the molecular mechanism that regulates autophagy is not understood in detail. In the present study, we found that cholesterol depletion induces macroautophagy. The cellular cholesterol in human fibroblasts was depleted either acutely using 5 mM methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin or 10-20 {mu}g/ml nystatin for 1 h, or metabolically by 20 {mu}M mevastatin and 200 {mu}M mevalonolactone along with 10% lipoprotein-deficient serum for 2-3 days. By any of these protocols, marked increase of LC3-II was detected by immunoblotting and by immunofluorescence microscopy, and the increase was more extensive than that caused by amino acid starvation, i.e., incubation in Hanks' solution for several hours. The induction of autophagic vacuoles by cholesterol depletion was also observed in other cell types, and the LC3-positive membranes were often seen as long tubules, >50 {mu}m in length. The increase of LC3-II by methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin was suppressed by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitors and was accompanied by dephosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin. By electron microscopy, autophagic vacuoles induced by cholesterol depletion were indistinguishable from those seen after amino acid starvation. These results demonstrate that a decrease in cholesterol activates autophagy by a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent mechanism.

  6. Ezetimibe Promotes Brush Border Membrane-to-Lumen Cholesterol Efflux in the Small Intestine.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Takanari; Inoue, Ikuo; Takenaka, Yasuhiro; Ono, Hiraku; Katayama, Shigehiro; Awata, Takuya; Murakoshi, Takayuki

    2016-01-01

    Ezetimibe inhibits Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 (NPC1L1), an apical membrane cholesterol transporter of enterocytes, thereby reduces intestinal cholesterol absorption. This treatment also increases extrahepatic reverse cholesterol transport via an undefined mechanism. To explore this, we employed a trans-intestinal cholesterol efflux (TICE) assay, which directly detects circulation-to-intestinal lumen 3H-cholesterol transit in a cannulated jejunal segment, and found an increase of TICE by 45%. To examine whether such increase in efflux occurs at the intestinal brush border membrane(BBM)-level, we performed luminal perfusion assays, similar to TICE but the jejunal wall was labelled with orally-given 3H-cholesterol, and determined elevated BBM-to-lumen cholesterol efflux by 3.5-fold with ezetimibe. Such increased efflux probably promotes circulation-to-lumen cholesterol transit eventually; thus increases TICE. Next, we wondered how inhibition of NPC1L1, an influx transporter, resulted in increased efflux. When we traced orally-given 3H-cholesterol in mice, we found that lumen-to-BBM 3H-cholesterol transit was rapid and less sensitive to ezetimibe treatment. Comparison of the efflux and fractional cholesterol absorption revealed an inverse correlation, indicating the efflux as an opposite-regulatory factor for cholesterol absorption efficiency and counteracting to the naturally-occurring rapid cholesterol influx to the BBM. These suggest that the ezetimibe-stimulated increased efflux is crucial in reducing cholesterol absorption. Ezetimibe-induced increase in cholesterol efflux was approximately 2.5-fold greater in mice having endogenous ATP-binding cassette G5/G8 heterodimer, the major sterol efflux transporter of enterocytes, than the knockout counterparts, suggesting that the heterodimer confers additional rapid BBM-to-lumen cholesterol efflux in response to NPC1L1 inhibition. The observed framework for intestinal cholesterol fluxes may provide ways to modulate the flux

  7. Ezetimibe Promotes Brush Border Membrane-to-Lumen Cholesterol Efflux in the Small Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Takanari; Inoue, Ikuo; Takenaka, Yasuhiro; Ono, Hiraku; Katayama, Shigehiro; Awata, Takuya; Murakoshi, Takayuki

    2016-01-01

    Ezetimibe inhibits Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 (NPC1L1), an apical membrane cholesterol transporter of enterocytes, thereby reduces intestinal cholesterol absorption. This treatment also increases extrahepatic reverse cholesterol transport via an undefined mechanism. To explore this, we employed a trans-intestinal cholesterol efflux (TICE) assay, which directly detects circulation-to-intestinal lumen 3H-cholesterol transit in a cannulated jejunal segment, and found an increase of TICE by 45%. To examine whether such increase in efflux occurs at the intestinal brush border membrane(BBM)-level, we performed luminal perfusion assays, similar to TICE but the jejunal wall was labelled with orally-given 3H-cholesterol, and determined elevated BBM-to-lumen cholesterol efflux by 3.5-fold with ezetimibe. Such increased efflux probably promotes circulation-to-lumen cholesterol transit eventually; thus increases TICE. Next, we wondered how inhibition of NPC1L1, an influx transporter, resulted in increased efflux. When we traced orally-given 3H-cholesterol in mice, we found that lumen-to-BBM 3H-cholesterol transit was rapid and less sensitive to ezetimibe treatment. Comparison of the efflux and fractional cholesterol absorption revealed an inverse correlation, indicating the efflux as an opposite-regulatory factor for cholesterol absorption efficiency and counteracting to the naturally-occurring rapid cholesterol influx to the BBM. These suggest that the ezetimibe-stimulated increased efflux is crucial in reducing cholesterol absorption. Ezetimibe-induced increase in cholesterol efflux was approximately 2.5-fold greater in mice having endogenous ATP-binding cassette G5/G8 heterodimer, the major sterol efflux transporter of enterocytes, than the knockout counterparts, suggesting that the heterodimer confers additional rapid BBM-to-lumen cholesterol efflux in response to NPC1L1 inhibition. The observed framework for intestinal cholesterol fluxes may provide ways to modulate the flux

  8. Preparation of intravenous cholesterol tracer using current good manufacturing practices.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiaobo; Ma, Lina; Racette, Susan B; Swaney, William P; Ostlund, Richard E

    2015-12-01

    Studies of human reverse cholesterol transport require intravenous infusion of cholesterol tracers. Because insoluble lipids may pose risk and because it is desirable to have consistent doses of defined composition available over many months, we investigated the manufacture of cholesterol tracer under current good manufacturing practice (CGMP) conditions appropriate for phase 1 investigation. Cholesterol tracer was prepared by sterile admixture of unlabeled cholesterol or cholesterol-d7 in ethanol with 20% Intralipid(®). The resulting material was filtered through a 1.2 micron particulate filter, stored at 4°C, and tested at time 0, 1.5, 3, 6, and 9 months for sterility, pyrogenicity, autoxidation, and particle size and aggregation. The limiting factor for stability was a rise in thiobarbituric acid-reacting substances of 9.6-fold over 9 months (P < 0.01). The emulsion was stable with the Z-average intensity-weighted mean droplet diameter remaining at 60 nm over 23 months. The zeta potential (a measure of negative surface charge protecting from aggregation) was unchanged at -36.2. Rapid cholesterol pool size was 25.3 ± 1.3 g. Intravenous cholesterol tracer was stable at 4°C for 9 months postproduction. CGMP manufacturing methods can be achieved in the academic setting and need to be considered for critical components of future metabolic studies.

  9. Preparation of intravenous cholesterol tracer using current good manufacturing practices.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiaobo; Ma, Lina; Racette, Susan B; Swaney, William P; Ostlund, Richard E

    2015-12-01

    Studies of human reverse cholesterol transport require intravenous infusion of cholesterol tracers. Because insoluble lipids may pose risk and because it is desirable to have consistent doses of defined composition available over many months, we investigated the manufacture of cholesterol tracer under current good manufacturing practice (CGMP) conditions appropriate for phase 1 investigation. Cholesterol tracer was prepared by sterile admixture of unlabeled cholesterol or cholesterol-d7 in ethanol with 20% Intralipid(®). The resulting material was filtered through a 1.2 micron particulate filter, stored at 4°C, and tested at time 0, 1.5, 3, 6, and 9 months for sterility, pyrogenicity, autoxidation, and particle size and aggregation. The limiting factor for stability was a rise in thiobarbituric acid-reacting substances of 9.6-fold over 9 months (P < 0.01). The emulsion was stable with the Z-average intensity-weighted mean droplet diameter remaining at 60 nm over 23 months. The zeta potential (a measure of negative surface charge protecting from aggregation) was unchanged at -36.2. Rapid cholesterol pool size was 25.3 ± 1.3 g. Intravenous cholesterol tracer was stable at 4°C for 9 months postproduction. CGMP manufacturing methods can be achieved in the academic setting and need to be considered for critical components of future metabolic studies. PMID:26416797

  10. CHOLESTEROL AND CHOLESTEROL ESTER CONTENT OF BOVINE COLOSTRUM

    PubMed Central

    Shope, Richard E.; Gowen, John W.

    1928-01-01

    The total amount of cholesterol found in colostrum and milk is comparatively low. The amount of cholesterol found in colostrum declines at an ever decreasing rate as milk secretion develops until at 48 hours the cholesterol is nearly the same as that found in milk 3 months or 7 months after parturition. The morning milk differs from the evening milk in that the cholesterol bound as ester is greater in amount. PMID:19869468

  11. Serum opacity factor enhances HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux, esterification and anti inflammatory effects.

    PubMed

    Tchoua, Urbain; Rosales, Corina; Tang, Daming; Gillard, Baiba K; Vaughan, Ashley; Lin, Hu Yu; Courtney, Harry S; Pownall, Henry J

    2010-12-01

    Serum opacity factor (SOF) is a streptococcal protein that disrupts the structure of human high density lipoproteins (HDL) releasing lipid-free apo A-I while forming a large cholesteryl ester-rich particle and a small neo HDL. Given its low cholesterol and high phospholipid contents, we tested the hypotheses that neo HDL is a better substrate for cholesterol esterification via lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT), better than HDL as an acceptor of THP-1 macrophage cholesterol efflux, and improves reduction of oxidized LDL-induced production of inflammatory markers. We observed that both cholesterol efflux and esterification were improved by recombinant (r)SOF treatment of whole plasma and that the underlying cause of the improved cholesterol esterification in plasma and macrophage cholesterol efflux to rSOF-treated plasma was due to the rSOF-mediated conversion of HDL to neo HDL. Moreover, the reduction of secretion of TNF-α and IL-6 by THP-1 cells by neo HDL was twice that of HDL. Studies in BHK cells overexpressing cholesterol transporters showed that efflux to neo HDL occurred primarily via ABCA1 not ABCG1. Thus, rSOF improves two steps in reverse cholesterol transport with a concomitant reduction in the release of macrophage markers of inflammation. We conclude that rSOF catalyzes a novel reaction that might be developed as a new therapy that prevents or reverses atherosclerosis via improved reverse cholesterol transport.

  12. Cholesterol: Up in Smoke.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raloff, Janet

    1991-01-01

    Discussed is the contribution cooked meat makes to air pollution. The dozens of compounds, including cholesterol, that are released when a hamburger is grilled are described. The potential effects of these emissions on humans and the urban environment are discussed. (KR)

  13. Cholesterol, inflammasomes, and atherogenesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plasma cholesterol levels have been strongly associated with atherogenesis, underscoring the role of lipid metabolism in defining cardiovascular disease risk. However, atherosclerotic plaque is highly dynamic and contains elements of both the innate and adaptive immune system that respond to the abe...

  14. Niacin for cholesterol

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page, please enable JavaScript. Niacin is a B-vitamin. When taken as a prescription in larger doses, ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics B Vitamins Cholesterol Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., ...

  15. Chlamydia trachomatis growth depends on eukaryotic cholesterol esterification and is affected by Acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Jan; Byrne, Gerald I.

    2015-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is auxotrophic for a variety of essential metabolites. Inhibitors that interrupt host cell catabolism may inhibit chlamydial growth and reveal Chlamydia metabolite requirements. We used the known indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO)-inhibitor 4-phenyl imidazole (4-PI) to reverse Interferon (IFN)-γ-induced chlamydial growth inhibition. However, at elevated inhibitor concentrations chlamydial growth was arrested even in the absence of IFN-γ. Since 4-PI is known to interfere with cholesterol metabolism, the effect of cholesterol add-back was tested. Chlamydia growth was restored in the presence of cholesterol in serum-containing, but not serum-free medium suggesting that cholesterol and other serum components are required for growth recovery. When serum factors were tested, either cholesteryl linoleate or the combination of cholesterol and linoleic acid restored chlamydial growth. However, growth was not restored when either cholesterol or linoleic acid were added alone, suggesting that the production of cholesteryl esters from cholesterol and fatty acids was affected by 4-PI treatment. In eukaryotic cells, the enzyme Acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) catalyzes the production of cholesteryl esters. When HeLa cells were treated with the ACAT-specific inhibitor 4-hydroxycinnamicacid amide C. trachomatis growth was interrupted, but was restored by the addition of cholesteryl linoleate, suggesting that ACAT activity is necessary for intracellular Chlamydia growth. PMID:25883118

  16. Indirection and computer security.

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, Michael J.

    2011-09-01

    The discipline of computer science is built on indirection. David Wheeler famously said, 'All problems in computer science can be solved by another layer of indirection. But that usually will create another problem'. We propose that every computer security vulnerability is yet another problem created by the indirections in system designs and that focusing on the indirections involved is a better way to design, evaluate, and compare security solutions. We are not proposing that indirection be avoided when solving problems, but that understanding the relationships between indirections and vulnerabilities is key to securing computer systems. Using this perspective, we analyze common vulnerabilities that plague our computer systems, consider the effectiveness of currently available security solutions, and propose several new security solutions.

  17. Cholesterol transport in model membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, Sumit; Porcar, Lionel; Butler, Paul; Perez-Salas, Ursula

    2010-03-01

    Physiological processes distribute cholesterol unevenly within the cell. The levels of cholesterol are maintained by intracellular transport and a disruption in the cell's ability to keep these normal levels will lead to disease. Exchange rates of cholesterol are generally studied in model systems using labeled lipid vesicles. Initially donor vesicles have all the cholesterol and acceptor vesicles are devoid of it. They are mixed and after some time the vesicles are separated and cholesterol is traced in each vesicle. The studies performed up to date have significant scatter indicating that the methodologies are not consistent. The present work shows in-situ Time-Resolved SANS studies of cholesterol exchange rates in unsaturated PC lipid vesicles. Molecular dynamics simulations were done to investigate the energetic and kinetic behavior of cholesterol in this system. This synergistic approach will provide insight into our efforts to understand cholesterol traffic.

  18. Critical role of cholesterol in bovine herpesvirus type 1 infection of MDBK cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Liqian; Ding, Xiuyan; Tao, Jie; Wang, Jianye; Zhao, Xin; Zhu, Guoqiang

    2010-07-29

    Cholesterol is involved in the life cycle of many viruses. Here, we examined the role of cholesterol for both viral envelope and target cell membrane for bovine herpesvirus type 1 (BoHV-1) infection. Cholesterol depletion by pretreatment of Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cells with a cholesterol-sequestering drug methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MbetaCD), inhibited the production of BoHV-1 in a dose-dependent manner. This inhibitory effect was partially reversed by cholesterol replenishment, indicating that the reduction was caused by cholesterol depletion. Cholesterol depletion at the post-entry stage only had a mild effect on the virus production. However, cell membrane cholesterol depletion did not reduce the virus attachment. In addition, treatment of BoHV-1 particles with MbetaCD also reduced the virus infectivity significantly and the effect was partially reversed by addition of exogenous cholesterol. Taken together, these data implicated that cell membrane cholesterol mainly contributed to BoHV-1 entry into MDBK cells and the viral envelope cholesterol was also essential for the virus infectivity.

  19. Understand Your Risk for High Cholesterol

    MedlinePlus

    ... or trans fats also increases the amount of LDL cholesterol in your blood. If high blood cholesterol runs ... may not be enough to help lower your LDL blood cholesterol. View an animation of cholesterol . More information: Women ...

  20. Overview of Cholesterol and Lipid Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cholesterol and Lipid Disorders Dyslipidemia Hypolipidemia Cholesterol and triglycerides are important fats (lipids) in the blood. Cholesterol ... needs, but it also obtains cholesterol from food. Triglycerides, which are contained in fat cells, can be ...

  1. Cholesterol Metabolism in CKD.

    PubMed

    Reiss, Allison B; Voloshyna, Iryna; De Leon, Joshua; Miyawaki, Nobuyuki; Mattana, Joseph

    2015-12-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have a substantial risk of developing coronary artery disease. Traditional cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors such as hypertension and hyperlipidemia do not adequately explain the high prevalence of CVD in CKD. Both CVD and CKD are inflammatory states and inflammation adversely affects lipid balance. Dyslipidemia in CKD is characterized by elevated triglyceride levels and high-density lipoprotein levels that are both decreased and dysfunctional. This dysfunctional high-density lipoprotein becomes proinflammatory and loses its atheroprotective ability to promote cholesterol efflux from cells, including lipid-overloaded macrophages in the arterial wall. Elevated triglyceride levels result primarily from defective clearance. The weak association between low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level and coronary risk in CKD has led to controversy over the usefulness of statin therapy. This review examines disrupted cholesterol transport in CKD, presenting both clinical and preclinical evidence of the effect of the uremic environment on vascular lipid accumulation. Preventative and treatment strategies are explored. PMID:26337134

  2. Development of a Cell-Based, High-Throughput Screening Assay for Cholesterol Efflux Using a Fluorescent Mimic of Cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jun; Cai, Sutang; Peterson, Blake R.; Kris-Etherton, Penny M.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Reverse cholesterol transport is the process by which extrahepatic cells, including macrophage-derived foam cells in arterial atherosclerotic plaque, transport excessive cholesterol back to the liver for bile acid synthesis and excretion, thus lowering the peripheral lipid burden. Cholesterol efflux from peripheral cells is the first step in this process, and finding drugs and interventions that promote this event is an important endeavor. Radioisotope-labeled cholesterol traditionally has been employed in measuring efflux efficiency, but this reagent has limitations for high-throughput screening. We developed an alternative method to measure cholesterol efflux in macrophage-derived foam cells using a novel fluorescent cholesterol mimic comprising the Pennsylvania Green fluorophore, attached by a linker containing a glutamic acid residue, to a derivative of N-alkyl-3β-cholesterylamine. Compared with the traditional radioisotope-based assay, this fluorescence-based assay gave similar results in the presence of known modulators of cholesterol efflux, such as cyclic AMP, and different cholesterol acceptors. When the fluorescent probe was employed in a high-throughput screening format, a variety of chemicals and bioactive compounds with known and unknown effects on cholesterol efflux could be tested simultaneously by plate-reader in a short period of time. Treatment of THP-1-derived macrophages with inhibitors of the membrane transporter ATP-binding cassette A1, such as glyburide or a specific antibody, significantly reduced the export of this fluorescent compound, indicating that ATP-binding cassette A1 represents the primary mediator of its cellular efflux. This fluorescent mimic of cholesterol provides a safe, sensitive, and reproducible alternative to radioactive assays in efflux experiments and has great potential as a valuable tool when incorporated into a drug discovery program. PMID:21050070

  3. Sphingolipid domains in the plasma membranes of fibroblasts are not enriched with cholesterol

    SciTech Connect

    Frisz, Jessica F.; Klitzing, Haley A.; Lou, Kaiyan; Hutcheon, Ian D.; Weber, Peter K.; Zimmerberg, Joshua; Kraft, Mary L.

    2013-04-22

    The plasma membranes of mammalian cells are widely expected to contain domains that are enriched with cholesterol and sphingolipids. In this work, we have used high-resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry to directly map the distributions of isotope-labeled cholesterol and sphingolipids in the plasma membranes of intact fibroblast cells. Although acute cholesterol depletion reduced sphingolipid domain abundance, cholesterol was evenly distributed throughout the plasma membrane and was not enriched within the sphingolipid domains. As a result, we rule out favorable cholesterol-sphingolipid interactions as dictating plasma membrane organization in fibroblast cells. Because the sphingolipid domains are disrupted by drugs that depolymerize the cells actin cytoskeleton, cholesterol must instead affect the sphingolipid organization via an indirect mechanism that involves the cytoskeleton.

  4. Sphingolipid domains in the plasma membranes of fibroblasts are not enriched with cholesterol

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Frisz, Jessica F.; Klitzing, Haley A.; Lou, Kaiyan; Hutcheon, Ian D.; Weber, Peter K.; Zimmerberg, Joshua; Kraft, Mary L.

    2013-04-22

    The plasma membranes of mammalian cells are widely expected to contain domains that are enriched with cholesterol and sphingolipids. In this work, we have used high-resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry to directly map the distributions of isotope-labeled cholesterol and sphingolipids in the plasma membranes of intact fibroblast cells. Although acute cholesterol depletion reduced sphingolipid domain abundance, cholesterol was evenly distributed throughout the plasma membrane and was not enriched within the sphingolipid domains. As a result, we rule out favorable cholesterol-sphingolipid interactions as dictating plasma membrane organization in fibroblast cells. Because the sphingolipid domains are disrupted by drugs that depolymerize themore » cells actin cytoskeleton, cholesterol must instead affect the sphingolipid organization via an indirect mechanism that involves the cytoskeleton.« less

  5. Sphingolipid Domains in the Plasma Membranes of Fibroblasts Are Not Enriched with Cholesterol*

    PubMed Central

    Frisz, Jessica F.; Klitzing, Haley A.; Lou, Kaiyan; Hutcheon, Ian D.; Weber, Peter K.; Zimmerberg, Joshua; Kraft, Mary L.

    2013-01-01

    The plasma membranes of mammalian cells are widely expected to contain domains that are enriched with cholesterol and sphingolipids. In this work, we have used high-resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry to directly map the distributions of isotope-labeled cholesterol and sphingolipids in the plasma membranes of intact fibroblast cells. Although acute cholesterol depletion reduced sphingolipid domain abundance, cholesterol was evenly distributed throughout the plasma membrane and was not enriched within the sphingolipid domains. Thus, we rule out favorable cholesterol-sphingolipid interactions as dictating plasma membrane organization in fibroblast cells. Because the sphingolipid domains are disrupted by drugs that depolymerize the cells actin cytoskeleton, cholesterol must instead affect the sphingolipid organization via an indirect mechanism that involves the cytoskeleton. PMID:23609440

  6. Cholesterol-dependent Conformational Plasticity in GPCR Dimers

    PubMed Central

    Prasanna, Xavier; Sengupta, Durba; Chattopadhyay, Amitabha

    2016-01-01

    The organization and function of the serotonin1A receptor, an important member of the GPCR family, have been shown to be cholesterol-dependent, although the molecular mechanism is not clear. We performed a comprehensive structural and dynamic analysis of dimerization of the serotonin1A receptor by coarse-grain molecular dynamics simulations totaling 3.6 ms to explore the molecular details of its cholesterol-dependent association. A major finding is that the plasticity and flexibility of the receptor dimers increase with increased cholesterol concentration. In particular, a dimer interface formed by transmembrane helices I-I was found to be sensitive to cholesterol. The modulation of dimer interface appears to arise from a combination of direct cholesterol occupancy and indirect membrane effects. Interestingly, the presence of cholesterol at the dimer interface is correlated with increased dimer plasticity and flexibility. These results represent an important step in characterizing the molecular interactions in GPCR organization with potential relevance to therapeutic interventions. PMID:27535203

  7. Cholesterol-dependent Conformational Plasticity in GPCR Dimers.

    PubMed

    Prasanna, Xavier; Sengupta, Durba; Chattopadhyay, Amitabha

    2016-01-01

    The organization and function of the serotonin1A receptor, an important member of the GPCR family, have been shown to be cholesterol-dependent, although the molecular mechanism is not clear. We performed a comprehensive structural and dynamic analysis of dimerization of the serotonin1A receptor by coarse-grain molecular dynamics simulations totaling 3.6 ms to explore the molecular details of its cholesterol-dependent association. A major finding is that the plasticity and flexibility of the receptor dimers increase with increased cholesterol concentration. In particular, a dimer interface formed by transmembrane helices I-I was found to be sensitive to cholesterol. The modulation of dimer interface appears to arise from a combination of direct cholesterol occupancy and indirect membrane effects. Interestingly, the presence of cholesterol at the dimer interface is correlated with increased dimer plasticity and flexibility. These results represent an important step in characterizing the molecular interactions in GPCR organization with potential relevance to therapeutic interventions. PMID:27535203

  8. Cholesterol-dependent balance between evoked and spontaneous synaptic vesicle recycling

    PubMed Central

    Wasser, Catherine R; Ertunc, Mert; Liu, Xinran; Kavalali, Ege T

    2007-01-01

    Cholesterol is a prominent component of nerve terminals. To examine cholesterol's role in central neurotransmission, we treated hippocampal cultures with methyl-β-cyclodextrin, which reversibly binds cholesterol, or mevastatin, an inhibitor of cholesterol biosynthesis, to deplete cholesterol. We also used hippocampal cultures from Niemann-Pick type C1-deficient mice defective in intracellular cholesterol trafficking. These conditions revealed an augmentation in spontaneous neurotransmission detected electrically and an increase in spontaneous vesicle endocytosis judged by horseradish peroxidase uptake after cholesterol depletion by methyl-β-cyclodextrin. In contrast, responses evoked by action potentials and hypertonicity were severely impaired after the same treatments. The increase in spontaneous vesicle recycling and the decrease in evoked neurotransmission were reversible upon cholesterol addition. Cholesterol removal did not impact on the low level of evoked neurotransmission seen in the absence of synaptic vesicle SNARE protein synaptobrevin-2 whereas the increase in spontaneous fusion remained. These results suggest that synaptic cholesterol balances evoked and spontaneous neurotransmission by hindering spontaneous synaptic vesicle turnover and sustaining evoked exo-endocytosis. PMID:17170046

  9. Indirect posterior composite resins.

    PubMed

    Leinfelder, Karl F

    2005-07-01

    The use of indirect posterior composite restorations has facilitated the generation of ideal anatomic form, marginal adaptation, and appropriate proximal contact and contour. Unfortunately, however, the use of post-cure heat treatments has done little to enhance the overall clinical performance of the restoration. The development of new curing techniques in conjunction with modifications of the formulae have contributed to a substantial improvement in both the mechanical characteristics and long-term clinical performance of indirect posterior composite resins.

  10. The “Mevalonate hypothesis”: a cholesterol-independent alternative for the etiology of atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The “cholesterol hypothesis” is the leading theory to explain the cause of atherosclerosis. The “cholesterol hypothesis” assumes that plasma (LDL) cholesterol is an important causal factor for atherosclerosis. However, data of at least seven placebo controlled randomized prospective trials with various cholesterol lowering drugs show that plasma cholesterol lowering does not necessarily lead to protection against cardiovascular disease. Therefore an alternative hypothesis for the etiology of cardiovascular disease is formulated. This alternative hypothesis, the “mevalonate hypothesis”, assumes that after stimulation of the mevalonate pathway in endothelial cells by inflammatory factors, these cells start producing cholesterol and free radicals. In this hypothesis, only the latter play a role in the etiology of atherosclerosis by contributing to the formation of oxidized cholesterol which is a widely accepted causal factor for atherosclerosis. Regardless of how the mevalonate pathway is activated (by withdrawal of statin drugs, by inflammatory factors or indirectly by reduced intracellular cholesterol levels) in all these cases free radical production is observed as well as cardiovascular disease. Since in the “mevalonate hypothesis” cholesterol is produced at the same time as the free radicals causing atherosclerosis, this hypothesis provides an explanation for the correlation which exists between cardiovascular disease and plasma cholesterol levels. From an evolutionary perspective, concomitant cholesterol production and free radical production in response to inflammatory factors makes sense if one realizes that both activities potentially protect cells and organisms from infection by gram-negative bacteria. In conclusion, data have been collected which suggest that activation of the mevalonate pathway in endothelial cells is likely to be a causal factor for atherosclerosis. This “mevalonate hypothesis” provides a better explanation for results

  11. Cholesterol is required in the exit pathway of Semliki Forest virus

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    The enveloped alphavirus Semliki Forest virus (SFV) infects cells via a membrane fusion reaction triggered by low pH. For fusion to occur cholesterol is required in the target membrane, as demonstrated both in in vitro fusion assays and in vivo for virus infection of a host cell. In this paper we examine the role of cholesterol in postfusion events in the SFV life cycle. Cholesterol-depleted insect cells were transfected with SFV RNA or infected at very high multiplicities to circumvent the fusion block caused by the absence of cholesterol. Under these conditions, the viral spike proteins were synthesized and transported to the site of p62 cleavage with normal kinetics. Surprisingly, the subsequent exit of virus particles was dramatically slowed compared to cholesterol-containing cells. The inhibition of virus production could be reversed by the addition of cholesterol to depleted cells. In contrast to results with SFV, no cholesterol requirement for virus exit was observed for the production of either the unrelated vesicular stomatitis virus or a cholesterol-independent SFV fusion mutant. Thus, cholesterol was only critical in the exit pathway of viruses that also require cholesterol for fusion. These results demonstrate a specific and unexpected lipid requirement in virus exit, and suggest that in addition to its role in fusion, cholesterol is involved in the assembly or budding of SFV. PMID:8408205

  12. Acrolein impairs the cholesterol transport functions of high density lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, Alexandra C; Holme, Rebecca L; Chen, Yiliang; Thomas, Michael J; Sorci-Thomas, Mary G; Silverstein, Roy L; Pritchard, Kirkwood A; Sahoo, Daisy

    2015-01-01

    High density lipoproteins (HDL) are considered athero-protective, primarily due to their role in reverse cholesterol transport, where they transport cholesterol from peripheral tissues to the liver for excretion. The current study was designed to determine the impact of HDL modification by acrolein, a highly reactive aldehyde found in high abundance in cigarette smoke, on the cholesterol transport functions of HDL. HDL was chemically-modified with acrolein and immunoblot and mass spectrometry analyses confirmed apolipoprotein crosslinking, as well as acrolein adducts on apolipoproteins A-I and A-II. The ability of acrolein-modified HDL (acro-HDL) to serve as an acceptor of free cholesterol (FC) from COS-7 cells transiently expressing SR-BI was significantly decreased. Further, in contrast to native HDL, acro-HDL promotes higher neutral lipid accumulation in murine macrophages as judged by Oil Red O staining. The ability of acro-HDL to mediate efficient selective uptake of HDL-cholesteryl esters (CE) into SR-BI-expressing cells was reduced compared to native HDL. Together, the findings from our studies suggest that acrolein modification of HDL produces a dysfunctional particle that may ultimately promote atherogenesis by impairing functions that are critical in the reverse cholesterol transport pathway.

  13. Indirect decentralized learning control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Longman, Richard W.; Lee, Soo C.; Phan, M.

    1992-01-01

    The new field of learning control develops controllers that learn to improve their performance at executing a given task, based on experience performing this specific task. In a previous work, the authors presented a theory of indirect learning control based on use of indirect adaptive control concepts employing simultaneous identification and control. This paper develops improved indirect learning control algorithms, and studies the use of such controllers in decentralized systems. The original motivation of the learning control field was learning in robots doing repetitive tasks such as on an assembly line. This paper starts with decentralized discrete time systems, and progresses to the robot application, modeling the robot as a time varying linear system in the neighborhood of the nominal trajectory, and using the usual robot controllers that are decentralized, treating each link as if it is independent of any coupling with other links. The basic result of the paper is to show that stability of the indirect learning controllers for all subsystems when the coupling between subsystems is turned off, assures convergence to zero tracking error of the decentralized indirect learning control of the coupled system, provided that the sample time in the digital learning controller is sufficiently short.

  14. Indirect airway challenges.

    PubMed

    Joos, G F; O'Connor, B; Anderson, S D; Chung, F; Cockcroft, D W; Dahlén, B; DiMaria, G; Foresi, A; Hargreave, F E; Holgate, S T; Inman, M; Lötvall, J; Magnussen, H; Polosa, R; Postma, D S; Riedler, J

    2003-06-01

    Indirect challenges act by causing the release of endogenous mediators that cause the airway smooth muscle to contract. This is in contrast to the direct challenges where agonists such as methacholine or histamine cause airflow limitation predominantly via a direct effect on airway smooth muscle. Direct airway challenges have been used widely and are well standardised. They are highly sensitive, but not specific to asthma and can be used to exclude current asthma in a clinic population. Indirect bronchial stimuli, in particular exercise, hyperventilation, hypertonic aerosols, as well as adenosine, may reflect more directly the ongoing airway inflammation and are therefore more specific to identify active asthma. They are increasingly used to evaluate the prevalence of bronchial hyperresponsiveness and to assess specific problems in patients with known asthma, e.g. exercise-induced bronchoconstriction, evaluation before scuba diving. Direct bronchial responsiveness is only slowly and to a modest extent, influenced by repeated administration of inhaled steroids. Indirect challenges may reflect more closely acute changes in airway inflammation and a change in responsiveness to an indirect stimulus may be a clinically relevant marker to assess the clinical course of asthma. Moreover, some of the indirect challenges, e.g. hypertonic saline and mannitol, can be combined with the assessment of inflammatory cells by induction of sputum.

  15. Food combinations for cholesterol lowering.

    PubMed

    Harland, Janice I

    2012-12-01

    Reducing elevated LDL-cholesterol is a key public health challenge. There is substantial evidence from randomised controlled trials (RCT) that a number of foods and food components can significantly reduce LDL-cholesterol. Data from RCT have been reviewed to determine whether effects are additive when two or more of these components are consumed together. Typically components, such as plant stanols and sterols, soya protein, β-glucans and tree nuts, when consumed individually at their target rate, reduce LDL-cholesterol by 3-9 %. Improved dietary fat quality, achieved by replacing SFA with unsaturated fat, reduces LDL-cholesterol and can increase HDL-cholesterol, further improving blood lipid profile. It appears that the effect of combining these interventions is largely additive; however, compliance with multiple changes may reduce over time. Food combinations used in ten 'portfolio diet' studies have been reviewed. In clinical efficacy studies of about 1 month where all foods were provided, LDL-cholesterol is reduced by 22-30 %, whereas in community-based studies of >6 months' duration, where dietary advice is the basis of the intervention, reduction in LDL-cholesterol is about 15 %. Inclusion of MUFA into 'portfolio diets' increases HDL-cholesterol, in addition to LDL-cholesterol effects. Compliance with some of these dietary changes can be achieved more easily compared with others. By careful food component selection, appropriate to the individual, the effect of including only two components in the diet with good compliance could be a sustainable 10 % reduction in LDL-cholesterol; this is sufficient to make a substantial impact on cholesterol management and reduce the need for pharmaceutical intervention.

  16. Prenatal Ethanol Exposure Increases Brain Cholesterol Content in Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    Barceló-Coblijn, Gwendolyn; Wold, Loren E.; Ren, Jun; Murphy, Eric J.

    2013-01-01

    Fetal alcohol syndrome is the most severe expression of the fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). Although alterations in fetal and neonate brain fatty acid composition and cholesterol content is known to change in animal models of FASD, the persistence of these alterations into adulthood is unknown. To address this question, we determined the effect of prenatal ethanol exposure on individual phospholipid class fatty acid composition, individual phospholipid class mass, and cholesterol mass in brains from 25-week-old rats that were exposed to ethanol during gestation beginning at gestational day 2. While total phospholipid mass was unaffected, phosphatidylinositol and cardiolipin mass was decreased 14 and 43%, respectively. Exposure to prenatal ethanol modestly altered brain phospholipid fatty acid composition, and the most consistent change was a significant 1.1-fold increase in total PUFA, in the n-3/n-6 ratio, and in the 22:6 n-3 content in ethanolamine glycerophospholipids and in phosphatidylserine. In contrast, prenatal ethanol consumption significantly increased brain cholesterol mass 1.4-fold and the phospholipid to cholesterol ratio was significantly increased 1.3-fold. These results indicate that brain cholesterol mass was significantly increased in adult rats exposed prenatally to ethanol, but changes in phospholipid mass and phospholipid fatty acid composition were extremely limited. Importantly, suppression of post-natal ethanol consumption was not sufficient to reverse the large increase in cholesterol observed in the adult rats. PMID:23996454

  17. Serum cholesterol selectively regulates glucocorticoid sensitivity through activation of JNK.

    PubMed

    Yang, Nan; Caratti, Giorgio; Ince, Louise M; Poolman, Toryn M; Trebble, Peter J; Holt, Cathy M; Ray, David W; Matthews, Laura C

    2014-11-01

    Glucocorticoids (Gc) are potent anti-inflammatory agents with wide clinical application. We have previously shown that increased serum concentration significantly attenuates regulation of a simple Gc-responsive reporter. We now find that glucocorticoid receptor (GR) regulation of some endogenous transactivated but not transrepressed genes is impaired, suggesting template specificity. Serum did not directly affect GR expression, activity or trafficking, implicating GR crosstalk with other signalling pathways. Indeed, a JNK inhibitor completely abolished the serum effect. We identified the Gc modulating serum component as cholesterol. Cholesterol loading mimicked the serum effect, which was readily reversed by JNK inhibition. Chelation of serum cholesterol with methyl-β-cyclodextrin or inhibition of cellular cholesterol synthesis with simvastatin potentiated the Gc response. To explore the effect in vivo we used ApoE(-/-) mice, a model of hypercholesterolaemia. Consistent with our in vitro studies, we find no impact of elevated cholesterol on the expression of GR, or on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, measured by dexamethasone suppression test. Instead we find selective Gc resistance on some hepatic target genes in ApoE(-/-) mice. Therefore, we have discovered an unexpected role for cholesterol as a selective modulator of Gc action in vivo. Taken together these findings reveal a new environmental constraint on Gc action with relevance to both inflammation and cancer.

  18. How cholesterol regulates endothelial biomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Zhongkui; Staiculescu, Marius C.; Hampel, Paul; Levitan, Irena; Forgacs, Gabor

    2012-01-01

    As endothelial cells form the barrier between blood flow and surrounding tissue, many of their functions depend on mechanical integrity, in particular those of the plasma membrane. As component and organizer of the plasma membrane, cholesterol is a regulator of cellular mechanical properties. Disruption of cholesterol balance leads to impairment of endothelial functions and eventually to disease. The mechanical properties of the membrane are strongly affected by the cytoskeleton. As Phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) is a key mediator between the membrane and cytoskeleton, it also affects cellular biomechanical properties. Typically, PIP2 is concentrated in cholesterol-rich microdomains, such as caveolae and lipid rafts, which are particularly abundant in the endothelial plasma membrane. We investigated the connection between cholesterol and PIP2 by extracting membrane tethers from bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) at different cholesterol levels and PIP2 conditions. Our results suggest that in BAEC the role of PIP2, as a mediator of membrane-cytoskeleton adhesion, is regulated by cholesterol. Our findings confirm the specific role of cholesterol in endothelial cells and may have implications for cholesterol-dependent vascular pathologies. PMID:23162471

  19. Indirect decentralized repetitive control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Soo Cheol; Longman, Richard W.

    1993-01-01

    Learning control refers to controllers that learn to improve their performance at executing a given task, based on experience performing this specific task. In a previous work, the authors presented a theory of indirect decentralized learning control based on use of indirect adaptive control concepts employing simultaneous identification and control. This paper extends these results to apply to the indirect repetitive control problem in which a periodic (i.e., repetitive) command is given to a control system. Decentralized indirect repetitive control algorithms are presented that have guaranteed convergence to zero tracking error under very general conditions. The original motivation of the repetitive control and learning control fields was learning in robots doing repetitive tasks such as on an assembly line. This paper starts with decentralized discrete time systems, and progresses to the robot application, modeling the robot as a time varying linear system in the neighborhood of the desired trajectory. Decentralized repetitive control is natural for this application because the feedback control for link rotations is normally implemented in a decentralized manner, treating each link as if it is independent of the other links.

  20. Indirect microbial detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkins, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    Indirect method for detection of microbial growth utilizes flow of charged particles across barrier that physically separated growing cells from electrodes and measures resulting difference in potential between two platinum electrodes. Technique allows simplified noncontact monitoring of all growth in highly infectious cultures or in critical biochemical studies.

  1. Identification of a Cholesterol-Binding Pocket in Inward Rectifier K+ (Kir) Channels

    PubMed Central

    Fürst, Oliver; Nichols, Colin G.; Lamoureux, Guillaume; D’Avanzo, Nazzareno

    2014-01-01

    Cholesterol is the major sterol component of all mammalian plasma membranes. Recent studies have shown that cholesterol inhibits both bacterial (KirBac1.1 and KirBac3.1) and eukaryotic (Kir2.1) inward rectifier K+ (Kir) channels. Lipid-sterol interactions are not enantioselective, and the enantiomer of cholesterol (ent-cholesterol) does not inhibit Kir channel activity, suggesting that inhibition results from direct enantiospecific binding to the channel, and not indirect effects of changes to the bilayer. Furthermore, conservation of the effect of cholesterol among prokaryotic and eukaryotic Kir channels suggests an evolutionary conserved cholesterol-binding pocket, which we aimed to identify. Computational experiments were performed by docking cholesterol to the atomic structures of Kir2.2 (PDB: 3SPI) and KirBac1.1 (PDB: 2WLL) using Autodock 4.2. Poses were assessed to ensure biologically relevant orientation and then clustered according to location and orientation. The stability of cholesterol in each of these poses was then confirmed by molecular dynamics simulations. Finally, mutation of key residues (S95H and I171L) in this putative binding pocket found within the transmembrane domain of Kir2.1 channels were shown to lead to a loss of inhibition by cholesterol. Together, these data provide support for this location as a biologically relevant pocket. PMID:25517146

  2. Cholesterol - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000211.htm Cholesterol - what to ask your doctor To use the ... this page, please enable JavaScript. Your body needs cholesterol to work properly. When you have extra cholesterol ...

  3. What Do My Cholesterol Levels Mean?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tools & Resources Stroke More What Do My Cholesterol Levels Mean? Updated:Mar 22,2016 High cholesterol can ... a fasting “lipoprotein profile” to measure your cholesterol levels. It assesses several types of fat in the ...

  4. How to Get Your Cholesterol Tested

    MedlinePlus

    ... HDL) cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and triglycerides. A small sample of blood will be drawn ... the amount of LDL (bad) cholesterol level and triglycerides can be affected by what you've recently ...

  5. Effects of sphingomyelin and phosphatidylcholine degradation on cyclodextrin-mediated cholesterol efflux in cultured fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Ohvo, H; Olsio, C; Slotte, J P

    1997-11-15

    The hydrolysis of plasma membrane sphingomyelin is known to dramatically alter cellular cholesterol homeostasis in different ways, whereas the degradation of plasma membrane phosphatidylcholine has much less or no effects on cell cholesterol homeostasis [Pörn, Ares, Slotte, J. Lipid Res. 34 (1993) 1385-1392]. In this study, we used an efficient extracellular cholesterol acceptor (cyclodextrin) and determined the extent of cholesterol efflux from cultured fibroblasts in which plasma membrane sphingomyelin or phosphatidylcholine was degraded. Treatment of cells with sphingomyelinase reduced the cell sphingomyelin content by about 76% (about 13 nmol SM degraded), and dramatically increased the desorption of [3H]cholesterol from the plasma membrane to 2-hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin. The corresponding hydrolysis of cell surface phosphatidylcholine (about 12% reduction of the cellular phosphatidylcholine content, corresponding to about 12 nmol degraded PC) had almost no effect on cell [3H]cholesterol efflux. The stimulatory effect of sphingomyelin degradation on cell [3H]cholesterol efflux was reversible, since rates of [3H]cholesterol efflux dropped back to control levels when cells (in this case baby hamster kidney cells) were allowed to restore their sphingomyelin content by re-synthesis in the absence of sphingomyelinase. The findings of this study clearly demonstrate that plasma membrane sphingomyelin markedly affected the rate of cholesterol transfer between cells and an extracellular acceptor (i.e., cyclodextrin), whereas the effect of phosphatidylcholine on cholesterol efflux was much smaller.

  6. Effects of sphingomyelin and phosphatidylcholine degradation on cyclodextrin-mediated cholesterol efflux in cultured fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Ohvo, H; Olsio, C; Slotte, J P

    1997-11-15

    The hydrolysis of plasma membrane sphingomyelin is known to dramatically alter cellular cholesterol homeostasis in different ways, whereas the degradation of plasma membrane phosphatidylcholine has much less or no effects on cell cholesterol homeostasis [Pörn, Ares, Slotte, J. Lipid Res. 34 (1993) 1385-1392]. In this study, we used an efficient extracellular cholesterol acceptor (cyclodextrin) and determined the extent of cholesterol efflux from cultured fibroblasts in which plasma membrane sphingomyelin or phosphatidylcholine was degraded. Treatment of cells with sphingomyelinase reduced the cell sphingomyelin content by about 76% (about 13 nmol SM degraded), and dramatically increased the desorption of [3H]cholesterol from the plasma membrane to 2-hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin. The corresponding hydrolysis of cell surface phosphatidylcholine (about 12% reduction of the cellular phosphatidylcholine content, corresponding to about 12 nmol degraded PC) had almost no effect on cell [3H]cholesterol efflux. The stimulatory effect of sphingomyelin degradation on cell [3H]cholesterol efflux was reversible, since rates of [3H]cholesterol efflux dropped back to control levels when cells (in this case baby hamster kidney cells) were allowed to restore their sphingomyelin content by re-synthesis in the absence of sphingomyelinase. The findings of this study clearly demonstrate that plasma membrane sphingomyelin markedly affected the rate of cholesterol transfer between cells and an extracellular acceptor (i.e., cyclodextrin), whereas the effect of phosphatidylcholine on cholesterol efflux was much smaller. PMID:9421186

  7. Lateral organization of cholesterol molecules in lipid-cholesterol assemblies.

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Rajiv R. P.; Slepoy, Alexander; Sengupta, Pinaki; Cox, Daniel L.

    2005-05-01

    We present results of an off-lattice simulation of a two-component planar system, as a model for lateral organization of cholesterol molecules in lipid-cholesterol assemblies. We explore the existence of 'superlattice' structures even in fluid systems, in the absence of an underlying translational long-range order, and study their coupling to hexatic or bond-orientational order. We discuss our results in context of geometric superlattice theories and 'condensation complexes' in understanding a variety of experiments in artificial lipid-cholesterol assemblies.

  8. Direct interaction between cholesterol and phosphatidylcholines in hydrated membranes revealed by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Arsov, Zoran; Quaroni, Luca

    2007-11-01

    By using attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy and curve fitting we have examined temperature dependence and composition dependence of the shape of the carbonyl band in phosphatidylcholine/cholesterol model membranes. Membranes were hydrated either in excess water or in excess deuterated water. The studied binary mixtures exhibit different lipid phases at appropriate temperature and amount of cholesterol, among them also the so-called liquid-ordered phase. The results confirm that cholesterol has a significant indirect influence on the carbonyl band through conformational and hydration effects. This influence was interpreted in view of the known temperature composition phase diagrams for inspected binary mixtures. In addition, direct interaction was observed, which could point to the presence of hydrogen bond between cholesterol and carbonyl group. This direct interaction, though weak, might play at least a partial role in the stabilization of cholesterol-rich lipid domains in model and biological membranes. PMID:17662974

  9. Think Again About Cholesterol Survey.

    PubMed

    Catapano, Alberico L; Wiklund, Olov

    2015-12-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is still the main cause of death in Europe. Elevated plasma cholesterol, specifically low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), is the main causative risk factor for CVD, most prominently associated with coronary heart disease. A widespread disinformation about cholesterol and CVD is one factor underlying a poor compliance to lipid-lowering therapy. To investigate how cholesterol, CVD and cholesterol reduction is perceived in the population, a survey was commissioned by the European Atherosclerosis Society (EAS). Nearly half of people above 25 years of age are most worried about cancer (45%), compared to just over one in four who are worried about heart disease (27%). A majority believe being overweight (72%), blood pressure (70%) and smoking (67%) most affect heart health, far more than note cholesterol (59%) and family history (39%). The majority of adults recognize that high LDL (or "bad") cholesterol should be a health priority for everyone, including those younger than 40 and those who are not overweight. However, 1 in 4 (25%) incorrectly believe that it does not need to be a concern until someone shows signs or symptoms. Although 89% of adults surveyed agreed it is important for people to know whether or not they have high LDL-C, an overwhelming 92% did not know their LDL-C levels or had never had their cholesterol levels tested. A high 63% had never heard of familial hypercholesterolemia: France had the lowest level of awareness (41%) to Denmark with a high 80%, and the association of the disease with high levels of LDL-C is quite poor (only 36%), with Sweden only at 22% versus a high in Spain of 54%. A large part of the people participating in the survey were quite uncertain about the modality of transmission for familial hypercholesterolemia in the family. All in all, this survey highlights the need for more information among citizens for the role of cholesterol in determining CVD.

  10. Think Again About Cholesterol Survey.

    PubMed

    Catapano, Alberico L; Wiklund, Olov

    2015-12-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is still the main cause of death in Europe. Elevated plasma cholesterol, specifically low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), is the main causative risk factor for CVD, most prominently associated with coronary heart disease. A widespread disinformation about cholesterol and CVD is one factor underlying a poor compliance to lipid-lowering therapy. To investigate how cholesterol, CVD and cholesterol reduction is perceived in the population, a survey was commissioned by the European Atherosclerosis Society (EAS). Nearly half of people above 25 years of age are most worried about cancer (45%), compared to just over one in four who are worried about heart disease (27%). A majority believe being overweight (72%), blood pressure (70%) and smoking (67%) most affect heart health, far more than note cholesterol (59%) and family history (39%). The majority of adults recognize that high LDL (or "bad") cholesterol should be a health priority for everyone, including those younger than 40 and those who are not overweight. However, 1 in 4 (25%) incorrectly believe that it does not need to be a concern until someone shows signs or symptoms. Although 89% of adults surveyed agreed it is important for people to know whether or not they have high LDL-C, an overwhelming 92% did not know their LDL-C levels or had never had their cholesterol levels tested. A high 63% had never heard of familial hypercholesterolemia: France had the lowest level of awareness (41%) to Denmark with a high 80%, and the association of the disease with high levels of LDL-C is quite poor (only 36%), with Sweden only at 22% versus a high in Spain of 54%. A large part of the people participating in the survey were quite uncertain about the modality of transmission for familial hypercholesterolemia in the family. All in all, this survey highlights the need for more information among citizens for the role of cholesterol in determining CVD. PMID:26671304

  11. Cholesterol Perturbs Lipid Bilayers Nonuniversally

    SciTech Connect

    Pan Jianjun; Mills, Thalia T.; Tristram-Nagle, Stephanie; Nagle, John F.

    2008-05-16

    Cholesterol is well known to modulate the physical properties of biomembranes. Using modern x-ray scattering methods, we have studied the effects of cholesterol on the bending modulus K{sub C}, the thickness D{sub HH}, and the orientational order parameter S{sub xray} of lipid bilayers. We find that the effects are different for at least three classes of phospholipids characterized by different numbers of saturated hydrocarbon chains. Most strikingly, cholesterol strongly increases K{sub C} when both chains of the phospholipid are fully saturated but not at all when there are two monounsaturated chains.

  12. Targeting cancer using cholesterol conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Radwan, Awwad A.; Alanazi, Fares K.

    2013-01-01

    Conjugation of cholesterol moiety to active compounds for either cancer treatment or diagnosis is an attractive approach. Cholesterol derivatives are widely studied as cancer diagnostic agents and as anticancer derivatives either in vitro or in vivo using animal models. In largely growing studies, anticancer agents have been chemically conjugated to cholesterol molecules, to enhance their pharmacokinetic behavior, cellular uptake, target specificity, and safety. To efficiently deliver anticancer agents to the target cells and tissues, many different cholesterol–anticancer conjugates were synthesized and characterized, and their anticancer efficiencies were tested in vitro and in vivo. PMID:24493968

  13. Indirect resin composites

    PubMed Central

    Nandini, Suresh

    2010-01-01

    Aesthetic dentistry continues to evolve through innovations in bonding agents, restorative materials, and conservative preparation techniques. The use of direct composite restoration in posterior teeth is limited to relatively small cavities due to polymerization stresses. Indirect composites offer an esthetic alternative to ceramics for posterior teeth. This review article focuses on the material aspect of the newer generation of composites. This review was based on a PubMed database search which we limited to peer-reviewed articles in English that were published between 1990 and 2010 in dental journals. The key words used were ‘indirect resin composites,’ composite inlays,’ and ‘fiber-reinforced composites.’ PMID:21217945

  14. Direct and indirect inversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virieux, Jean; Brossier, Romain; Métivier, Ludovic; Operto, Stéphane; Ribodetti, Alessandra

    2016-06-01

    A bridge is highlighted between the direct inversion and the indirect inversion. They are based on fundamental different approaches: one is looking after a projection from the data space to the model space while the other one is reducing a misfit between observed data and synthetic data obtained from a given model. However, it is possible to obtain similar structures for model perturbation, and we shall focus on P-wave velocity reconstruction. This bridge is built up through the Born approximation linearizing the forward problem with respect to model perturbation and through asymptotic approximations of the Green functions of the wave propagation equation. We first describe the direct inversion and its ingredients and then we focus on a specific misfit function design leading to a indirect inversion. Finally, we shall compare this indirect inversion with more standard least-squares inversion as the FWI, enabling the focus on small weak velocity perturbations on one side and the speed-up of the velocity perturbation reconstruction on the other side. This bridge has been proposed by the group led by Raul Madariaga in the early nineties, emphasizing his leading role in efficient imaging workflows for seismic velocity reconstruction, a drastic requirement at that time.

  15. Cholesterol confusion and statin controversy

    PubMed Central

    DuBroff, Robert; de Lorgeril, Michel

    2015-01-01

    The role of blood cholesterol levels in coronary heart disease (CHD) and the true effect of cholesterol-lowering statin drugs are debatable. In particular, whether statins actually decrease cardiac mortality and increase life expectancy is controversial. Concurrently, the Mediterranean diet model has been shown to prolong life and reduce the risk of diabetes, cancer, and CHD. We herein review current data related to both statins and the Mediterranean diet. We conclude that the expectation that CHD could be prevented or eliminated by simply reducing cholesterol appears unfounded. On the contrary, we should acknowledge the inconsistencies of the cholesterol theory and recognize the proven benefits of a healthy lifestyle incorporating a Mediterranean diet to prevent CHD. PMID:26225201

  16. Cholesterol's location in lipid bilayers

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Marquardt, Drew; Kučerka, Norbert; Wassall, Stephen R.; Harroun, Thad A.; Katsaras, John

    2016-04-04

    It is well known that cholesterol modifies the physical properties of lipid bilayers. For example, the much studied liquid-ordered Lo phase contains rapidly diffusing lipids with their acyl chains in the all trans configuration, similar to gel phase bilayers. Moreover, the Lo phase is commonly associated with cholesterol-enriched lipid rafts, which are thought to serve as platforms for signaling proteins in the plasma membrane. Cholesterol's location in lipid bilayers has been studied extensively, and it has been shown – at least in some bilayers – to align differently from its canonical upright orientation, where its hydroxyl group is in themore » vicinity of the lipid–water interface. In this study we review recent works describing cholesterol's location in different model membrane systems with emphasis on results obtained from scattering, spectroscopic and molecular dynamics studies.« less

  17. Formation of cholesterol bilayer domains precedes formation of cholesterol crystals in cholesterol/dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine membranes: EPR and DSC studies.

    PubMed

    Mainali, Laxman; Raguz, Marija; Subczynski, Witold K

    2013-08-01

    Saturation-recovery EPR along with DSC were used to determine the cholesterol content at which pure cholesterol bilayer domains (CBDs) and cholesterol crystals begin to form in dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) membranes. To preserve compositional homogeneity throughout the membrane suspension, lipid multilamellar dispersions were prepared using a rapid solvent exchange method. The cholesterol content increased from 0 to 75 mol %. With spin-labeled cholesterol analogues, it was shown that the CBDs begin to form at ~50 mol % cholesterol. It was confirmed by DSC that the cholesterol solubility threshold for DMPC membranes is detected at ~66 mol % cholesterol. At levels above this cholesterol content, monohydrate cholesterol crystals start to form. The major finding is that the formation of CBDs precedes formation of cholesterol crystals. The region of the phase diagram for cholesterol contents between 50 and 66 mol % is described as a structured one-phase region in which CBDs have to be supported by the surrounding DMPC bilayer saturated with cholesterol. Thus, the phase boundary located at 66 mol % cholesterol separates the structured one-phase region (liquid-ordered phase of DMPC with CBDs) from the two-phase region where the structured liquid-ordered phase of DMPC coexists with cholesterol crystals. It is likely that CBDs are precursors of monohydrate cholesterol crystals.

  18. High-Density Lipoprotein, Lecithin: Cholesterol Acyltransferase, and Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ossoli, Alice; Pavanello, Chiara; Calabresi, Laura

    2016-06-01

    Epidemiological data clearly show the existence of a strong inverse correlation between plasma high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) concentrations and the incidence of coronary heart disease. This relation is explained by a number of atheroprotective properties of HDL, first of all the ability to promote macrophage cholesterol transport. HDL are highly heterogeneous and are continuously remodeled in plasma thanks to the action of a number of proteins and enzymes. Among them, lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) plays a crucial role, being the only enzyme able to esterify cholesterol within lipoproteins. LCAT is synthetized by the liver and it has been thought to play a major role in reverse cholesterol transport and in atheroprotection. However, data from animal studies, as well as human studies, have shown contradictory results. Increased LCAT concentrations are associated with increased HDL-C levels but not necessarily with atheroprotection. On the other side, decreased LCAT concentration and activity are associated with decreased HDL-C levels but not with increased atherosclerosis. These contradictory results confirm that HDL-C levels per se do not represent the functionality of the HDL system. PMID:27302716

  19. High-Density Lipoprotein, Lecithin: Cholesterol Acyltransferase, and Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ossoli, Alice; Pavanello, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological data clearly show the existence of a strong inverse correlation between plasma high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) concentrations and the incidence of coronary heart disease. This relation is explained by a number of atheroprotective properties of HDL, first of all the ability to promote macrophage cholesterol transport. HDL are highly heterogeneous and are continuously remodeled in plasma thanks to the action of a number of proteins and enzymes. Among them, lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) plays a crucial role, being the only enzyme able to esterify cholesterol within lipoproteins. LCAT is synthetized by the liver and it has been thought to play a major role in reverse cholesterol transport and in atheroprotection. However, data from animal studies, as well as human studies, have shown contradictory results. Increased LCAT concentrations are associated with increased HDL-C levels but not necessarily with atheroprotection. On the other side, decreased LCAT concentration and activity are associated with decreased HDL-C levels but not with increased atherosclerosis. These contradictory results confirm that HDL-C levels per se do not represent the functionality of the HDL system. PMID:27302716

  20. Effect of cellular cholesterol depletion on rabies virus infection.

    PubMed

    Hotta, Kozue; Bazartseren, Boldbarrtar; Kaku, Yoshihiro; Noguchi, Akira; Okutani, Akiko; Inoue, Satoshi; Yamada, Akio

    2009-01-01

    Although there are several reports on candidates for rabies virus (RABV) receptor, possible roles played by these receptor candidates in determination of highly neurotropic nature of RABV have not been well understood. Since these candidate receptors for RABV were reported to be frequently associated with cholesterol-rich microdomains characterized by lipid rafts and caveolae structures, we attempted to determine whether the disturbance of microdomains caused by the cholesterol depletion showed any effects on RABV infection. When the cellular cholesterol was depleted by methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MBCD) treatment, increase in RABV adsorption and infection, but not multiplication rather than suppression was observed in both BHK-21 and HEp-2 cells. These effects exerted by MBCD treatment on RABV infection could be reversed by cholesterol reconstitution. These results suggest that RABV enters BHK-21 or HEp-2 cells through ports of entry other than those located on cholesterol-rich microdomains and raise the possibility that RABV uses different mechanisms to enter the non-neuronal cells. PMID:19010362

  1. Cholesterol-dependent cytolysins.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Robert J C

    2010-01-01

    The cholesterol-dependent cytolysins (CDCs) are part of a large family of pore-forming proteins that include the human proteins perforin and the complement membrane attack complex. The activity of all family members is focused on membranes, but the proteins are themselves involved in a diverse range of phenomena. An overview of some of these phenomena is provided here, along with an historical perspective of CDCs themselves and how our understanding of their mechanism of action has developed over the years. The way in which pore formation depends on specific characteristics of the membrane under attack as well as of the protein doing the attacking is emphasised. The cholesterol-dependent cytolysins (CDCs) have been the focus of a renewed keen research interest for over ten years now. Their importance has been even further enhanced by the homology now identified between them and the membrane attack complex/perforin (MACPF) family of proteins, which includes several components of the complement cascade as well as perforin itself. In this chapter I aim to provide an overview of our understanding of the interaction between CDCs and other members of what is now called the MACPF/CDC superfamily, with their target membranes. CDCs (also in the past known as thiol-activated toxins or cholesterol-binding toxins) were originally identified from four Gram-positive bacterial genera (Clostridium, Listeria, Bacillus and Streptococcus). Well-known examples include listeriolysin, perfringolysin, streptolysin and pneumoysin. Listeriolysin from L. monocytogenes is responsible for the escape of bacteria from the phagosome to colonise the cytoplasm and has been applied as a protein adjuvant in the development of vaccines against cancer and tuberculosis, for example. Perfringolysin from C. perfringens (Fig. 1A) has become perhaps the most studied CDC4 and has an important role in pathology associated with infection (gangrene). Streptolysin from S. pyogenes is another intensely studied

  2. Facts about...Blood Cholesterol. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Heart, Lung, and Blood Inst. (DHHS/NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    This fact sheet on blood cholesterol examines the connection between cholesterol and heart disease, lists risk factors for heart disease that can and cannot be controlled, points out who can benefit from lowering blood cholesterol, distinguishes between blood and dietary cholesterol, describes low density lipoprotein and high density lipoprotein…

  3. Heterogeneity of cholesterol homeostasis in man. Response to changes in dietary fat quality and cholesterol quantity.

    PubMed Central

    McNamara, D J; Kolb, R; Parker, T S; Batwin, H; Samuel, P; Brown, C D; Ahrens, E H

    1987-01-01

    Studies were carried out to examine the effects of dietary fat and cholesterol on cholesterol homeostasis in man. 75 12-wk studies were carried out during intake of 35% of calories as either saturated or polyunsaturated fat, first low and then high in dietary cholesterol. Dietary fat and cholesterol intakes, plasma lipid and lipoprotein levels, cholesterol absorption and sterol synthesis in isolated blood mononuclear leukocytes were measured during each diet period. In 69% of the studies the subjects compensated for the increased cholesterol intake by decreasing cholesterol fractional absorption and/or endogenous cholesterol synthesis. When an increase in plasma cholesterol levels was observed there was a failure to suppress endogenous cholesterol synthesis. Plasma cholesterol levels were more sensitive to dietary fat quality than to cholesterol quantity. The results demonstrate that the responses to dietary cholesterol and fat are highly individualized and that most individuals have effective feedback control mechanisms. PMID:3584466

  4. Phosphatidylcholine: Greasing the Cholesterol Transport Machinery

    PubMed Central

    Lagace, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    Negative feedback regulation of cholesterol metabolism in mammalian cells ensures a proper balance of cholesterol with other membrane lipids, principal among these being the major phospholipid phosphatidylcholine (PC). Processes such as cholesterol biosynthesis and efflux, cholesteryl ester storage in lipid droplets, and uptake of plasma lipoproteins are tuned to the cholesterol/PC ratio. Cholesterol-loaded macrophages in atherosclerotic lesions display increased PC biosynthesis that buffers against elevated cholesterol levels and may also facilitate cholesterol trafficking to enhance cholesterol sensing and efflux. These same mechanisms could play a generic role in homeostatic responses to acute changes in membrane free cholesterol levels. Here, I discuss the established and emerging roles of PC metabolism in promoting intracellular cholesterol trafficking and membrane lipid homeostasis. PMID:27081313

  5. Statins increase hepatic cholesterol synthesis and stimulate fecal cholesterol elimination in mice.

    PubMed

    Schonewille, Marleen; Freark de Boer, Jan; Mele, Laura; Wolters, Henk; Bloks, Vincent W; Wolters, Justina C; Kuivenhoven, Jan A; Tietge, Uwe J F; Brufau, Gemma; Groen, Albert K

    2016-08-01

    Statins are competitive inhibitors of HMG-CoA reductase, the rate-limiting enzyme of cholesterol synthesis. Statins reduce plasma cholesterol levels, but whether this is actually caused by inhibition of de novo cholesterol synthesis has not been clearly established. Using three different statins, we investigated the effects on cholesterol metabolism in mice in detail. Surprisingly, direct measurement of whole body cholesterol synthesis revealed that cholesterol synthesis was robustly increased in statin-treated mice. Measurement of organ-specific cholesterol synthesis demonstrated that the liver is predominantly responsible for the increase in cholesterol synthesis. Excess synthesized cholesterol did not accumulate in the plasma, as plasma cholesterol decreased. However, statin treatment led to an increase in cholesterol removal via the feces. Interestingly, enhanced cholesterol excretion in response to rosuvastatin and lovastatin treatment was mainly mediated via biliary cholesterol secretion, whereas atorvastatin mainly stimulated cholesterol removal via the transintestinal cholesterol excretion pathway. Moreover, we show that plasma cholesterol precursor levels do not reflect cholesterol synthesis rates during statin treatment in mice. In conclusion, cholesterol synthesis is paradoxically increased upon statin treatment in mice. However, statins potently stimulate the excretion of cholesterol from the body, which sheds new light on possible mechanisms underlying the cholesterol-lowering effects of statins.

  6. Statins increase hepatic cholesterol synthesis and stimulate fecal cholesterol elimination in mice.

    PubMed

    Schonewille, Marleen; Freark de Boer, Jan; Mele, Laura; Wolters, Henk; Bloks, Vincent W; Wolters, Justina C; Kuivenhoven, Jan A; Tietge, Uwe J F; Brufau, Gemma; Groen, Albert K

    2016-08-01

    Statins are competitive inhibitors of HMG-CoA reductase, the rate-limiting enzyme of cholesterol synthesis. Statins reduce plasma cholesterol levels, but whether this is actually caused by inhibition of de novo cholesterol synthesis has not been clearly established. Using three different statins, we investigated the effects on cholesterol metabolism in mice in detail. Surprisingly, direct measurement of whole body cholesterol synthesis revealed that cholesterol synthesis was robustly increased in statin-treated mice. Measurement of organ-specific cholesterol synthesis demonstrated that the liver is predominantly responsible for the increase in cholesterol synthesis. Excess synthesized cholesterol did not accumulate in the plasma, as plasma cholesterol decreased. However, statin treatment led to an increase in cholesterol removal via the feces. Interestingly, enhanced cholesterol excretion in response to rosuvastatin and lovastatin treatment was mainly mediated via biliary cholesterol secretion, whereas atorvastatin mainly stimulated cholesterol removal via the transintestinal cholesterol excretion pathway. Moreover, we show that plasma cholesterol precursor levels do not reflect cholesterol synthesis rates during statin treatment in mice. In conclusion, cholesterol synthesis is paradoxically increased upon statin treatment in mice. However, statins potently stimulate the excretion of cholesterol from the body, which sheds new light on possible mechanisms underlying the cholesterol-lowering effects of statins. PMID:27313057

  7. Sterol carrier protein 2 participates in hypersecretion of biliary cholesterol during gallstone formation in genetically gallstone-susceptible mice.

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, M; Lammert, F; Wang, D Q; Paigen, B; Carey, M C; Cohen, D E

    1998-01-01

    In inbred mice, susceptibility to cholesterol gallstone disease is conferred by Lith genes, which in part promote hypersecretion of cholesterol into bile in response to a high-fat/cholesterol/cholic acid (lithogenic) diet. Because cytosolic sterol carrier protein 2 (SCP2) is believed to participate in cellular cholesterol trafficking and is elevated in the liver cytosol of cholesterol gallstone patients, we defined the hepatic expression of SCP2 during cholesterol gallstone formation in gallstone-susceptible C57L and gallstone-resistant AKR mice fed the lithogenic diet. Steady-state cytosolic SCP2 levels in C57L, but not AKR mice increased as a function of time and were correlated positively with biliary cholesterol hypersecretion, cholesterol saturation indices of gall-bladder biles and the appearance of liquid and solid cholesterol crystals leading to gallstone formation. Steady-state mRNA levels increased co-ordinately, consistent with regulation of SCP2 expression at the transcriptional level. Our results suggest that overexpression of SCP2 contributes to biliary cholesterol hypersecretion and the pathogenesis of gallstones in genetically susceptible mice. Because of the different chromosomal localizations of the Lith and Scp2 genes, we postulate that Lith genes control SCP2 expression indirectly. PMID:9806881

  8. RADIOAUTOGRAPHY OF CHOLESTEROL IN LUNG

    PubMed Central

    Darrah, Hilary K.; Hedley-Whyte, John; Hedley-Whyte, E. Tessa

    1971-01-01

    30 Swiss albino mice aged 8 days were injected intraperitoneally with 0.2 ml of a solution of 4% N,N-dimethyl-formamide in 5% dextrose in water containing cholesterol-1,2-3H (∼1 mCi/ml). Lung tissue was embedded in an Epon mixture after either acetone and propylene oxide dehydration, partial ethanol and Epon 812 dehydration, or the precipitation of cholesterol by digitonin succeeded by partial dehydration. The distribution of cholesterol-1,2-3H in lung parenchyma in 1µ Epon section radioautograms was compared with that in frozen section radioautograms and was found to be independent of the manner of tissue processing. Grain distribution in the tissue was essentially the same whether 16, 63, 93, or 100% radioactivity was retained in the lung. However, grain distribution in the alveolar spaces differed, presumably due to displacement of pulmonary surfactant, which contains cholesterol. Intracellular distribution of cholesterol, in electron microscope radioautograms, was the same with either 51% or 93% retention of radioactivity in the lung. Loss of radioactivity into the various processing solutions was monitored. The various processing techniques have different drawbacks. PMID:19866763

  9. Indirect traumatic optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Singman, Eric L; Daphalapurkar, Nitin; White, Helen; Nguyen, Thao D; Panghat, Lijo; Chang, Jessica; McCulley, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Indirect traumatic optic neuropathy (ITON) refers to optic nerve injury resulting from impact remote to the optic nerve. The mechanism of injury is not understood, and there are no confirmed protocols for prevention, mitigation or treatment. Most data concerning this condition comes from case series of civilian patients suffering blunt injury, such as from sports- or motor vehicle-related concussion, rather than military-related ballistic or blast damage. Research in this field will likely require the development of robust databases to identify patients with ITON and follow related outcomes, in addition to both in-vivo animal and virtual human models to study the mechanisms of damage and potential therapies. PMID:26759722

  10. Polarizable multipolar electrostatics for cholesterol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Timothy L.; Popelier, Paul L. A.

    2016-08-01

    FFLUX is a novel force field under development for biomolecular modelling, and is based on topological atoms and the machine learning method kriging. Successful kriging models have been obtained for realistic electrostatics of amino acids, small peptides, and some carbohydrates but here, for the first time, we construct kriging models for a sizeable ligand of great importance, which is cholesterol. Cholesterol's mean total (internal) electrostatic energy prediction error amounts to 3.9 kJ mol-1, which pleasingly falls below the threshold of 1 kcal mol-1 often cited for accurate biomolecular modelling. We present a detailed analysis of the error distributions.

  11. Effect of ezetimibe on plasma cholesterol levels, cholesterol absorption, and secretion of biliary cholesterol in laboratory opossums with high and low responses to dietary cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Chan, Jeannie; Kushwaha, Rampratap S; Vandeberg, Jane F; Vandeberg, John L

    2008-12-01

    Partially inbred lines of laboratory opossums differ in plasma low-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration and cholesterol absorption on a high-cholesterol diet. The aim of the present studies was to determine whether ezetimibe inhibits cholesterol absorption and eliminates the differences in plasma cholesterol and hepatic cholesterol metabolism between high and low responders on a high-cholesterol diet. Initially, we determined that the optimum dose of ezetimibe was 5 mg/(kg d) and treated 6 high- and 6 low-responding opossums with this dose (with equal numbers of controls) for 3 weeks while the opossums consumed a high-cholesterol and low-fat diet. Plasma and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations decreased significantly (P < .05) in treated but not in untreated high-responding opossums. Plasma cholesterol concentrations increased slightly (P < .05) in untreated low responders but not in treated low responders. The percentage of cholesterol absorption was significantly higher in untreated high responders than in other groups. Livers from high responders with or without treatment were significantly (P < .01) heavier than livers from low responders with or without treatment. Hepatic cholesterol concentrations in untreated high responders were significantly (P < .05) higher than those in low responders with or without treatment (P < .001). The gall bladder bile cholesterol concentrations in untreated high responders were significantly (P < .05) lower than those in other groups. A decrease in biliary cholesterol in low responders treated with ezetimibe was associated with a decrease in hepatic expression of ABCG5 and ABCG8. These studies suggest that ezetimibe decreases plasma cholesterol levels in high responders mainly by decreasing cholesterol absorption and increasing biliary cholesterol concentrations. Because ezetimibe's target is NPC1L1 and NPC1L1 is expressed in the intestine of opossums, its effect on cholesterol absorption may be mediated

  12. Amperometric cholesterol biosensor based on the direct electrochemistry of cholesterol oxidase and catalase on a graphene/ionic liquid-modified glassy carbon electrode.

    PubMed

    Gholivand, Mohammad Bagher; Khodadadian, Mehdi

    2014-03-15

    Cholesterol oxidase (ChOx) and catalase (CAT) were co-immobilized on a graphene/ionic liquid-modified glassy carbon electrode (GR-IL/GCE) to develop a highly sensitive amperometric cholesterol biosensor. The H2O2 generated during the enzymatic reaction of ChOx with cholesterol could be reduced electrocatalytically by immobilized CAT to obtain a sensitive amperometric response to cholesterol. The direct electron transfer between enzymes and electrode surface was investigated by cyclic voltammetry. Both enzymes showed well-defined redox peaks with quasi-reversible behaviors. An excellent sensitivity of 4.163 mA mM(-1)cm(-2), a response time less than 6s, and a linear range of 0.25-215 μM (R(2)>0.99) have been observed for cholesterol determination using the proposed biosensor. The apparent Michaelis-Menten constant (KM(app)) was calculated to be 2.32 mM. The bienzymatic cholesterol biosensor showed good reproducibility (RSDs<5%) with minimal interference from the coexisting electroactive compounds such as ascorbic acid and uric acid. The CAT/ChOx/GR-IL/GCE showed excellent analytical performance for the determination of free cholesterol in human serum samples.

  13. Membrane Cholesterol Modulates Superwarfarin Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Marangoni, M Natalia; Martynowycz, Michael W; Kuzmenko, Ivan; Braun, David; Polak, Paul E; Weinberg, Guy; Rubinstein, Israel; Gidalevitz, David; Feinstein, Douglas L

    2016-04-26

    Superwarfarins are modified analogs of warfarin with additional lipophilic aromatic rings, up to 100-fold greater potency, and longer biological half-lives. We hypothesized that increased hydrophobicity allowed interactions with amphiphilic membranes and modulation of biological responses. We find that superwarfarins brodifacoum and difenacoum increase lactate production and cell death in neuroblastoma cells. In contrast, neither causes changes in glioma cells that have higher cholesterol content. After choleterol depletion, lactate production was increased and cell viability was reduced. Drug-membrane interactions were examined by surface X-ray scattering using Langmuir monolayers of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine and/or cholesterol. Specular X-ray reflectivity data revealed that superwarfarins, but not warfarin, intercalate between dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine molecules, whereas grazing incidence X-ray diffraction demonstrated changes in lateral crystalline order of the film. Neither agent showed significant interactions with monolayers containing >20% cholesterol. These findings demonstrate an affinity of superwarfarins to biomembranes and suggest that cellular responses to these agents are regulated by cholesterol content. PMID:27119638

  14. Cholesterol autoxidation in phospholipid membrane bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Sevanian, A.; McLeod, L.L.

    1987-09-01

    Lipid peroxidation in unilamellar liposomes of known cholesterol-phospholipid composition was monitored under conditions of autoxidation or as induced by a superoxide radical generating system, gamma-irradiation or cumene hydroperoxide. Formation of cholesterol oxidation products was indexed to the level of lipid peroxidation. The major cholesterol oxidation products identified were 7-keto-cholesterol, isomeric cholesterol 5,6-epoxides, isomeric 7-hydroperoxides and isomeric 3,7-cholestane diols. Other commonly encountered products included 3,5-cholestadiene-7-one and cholestane-3 beta, 5 alpha, 6 beta-triol. Superoxide-dependent peroxidation required iron and produced a gradual increase in 7-keto-cholesterol and cholesterol epoxides. Cholesterol oxidation was greatest in liposomes containing high proportions of unsaturated phospholipid to cholesterol (4:1 molar ratio), intermediate with low phospholipid to cholesterol ratios (2:1) and least in liposomes prepared with dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine and cholesterol. This relationship held regardless of the oxidizing conditions used. Cumene hydroperoxide-dependent lipid peroxidation and/or more prolonged oxidations with other oxidizing systems yielded a variety of products where cholesterol-5 beta,6 beta-epoxide, 7-ketocholesterol and the 7-hydroperoxides were most consistently elevated. Oxyradical initiation of lipid peroxidation produced a pattern of cholesterol oxidation products distinguishable from the pattern derived by cumene hydroperoxide-dependent peroxidation.

  15. Inherited Cholesterol Disorder Significantly Boosts Heart Risks

    MedlinePlus

    ... genetic disorder that causes high levels of "bad" LDL cholesterol have an increased risk for heart disease and ... in previous studies. Compared to people with average LDL cholesterol levels (less than 130 mg/dL), those with ...

  16. High Cholesterol: Medicines to Help You

    MedlinePlus

    ... Consumer Information by Audience For Women High Cholesterol--Medicines To Help You Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it ... Test to check your cholesterol (LDL-C) Combination Medicines Brand Name Generic Name Advicor Niacin and Lovastatin ...

  17. Do You Know Your Cholesterol Levels?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Information Center Do You Know Your Cholesterol Levels? Print-friendly Version (PDF, 6.1 MB) Spanish ... Syndrome? My Family Plan To Lower Blood Cholesterol Levels My Heart Health Card Play It Smart, Take ...

  18. Active membrane cholesterol as a physiological effector.

    PubMed

    Lange, Yvonne; Steck, Theodore L

    2016-09-01

    Sterols associate preferentially with plasma membrane sphingolipids and saturated phospholipids to form stoichiometric complexes. Cholesterol in molar excess of the capacity of these polar bilayer lipids has a high accessibility and fugacity; we call this fraction active cholesterol. This review first considers how active cholesterol serves as an upstream regulator of cellular sterol homeostasis. The mechanism appears to utilize the redistribution of active cholesterol down its diffusional gradient to the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria, where it binds multiple effectors and directs their feedback activity. We have also reviewed a broad literature in search of a role for active cholesterol (as opposed to bulk cholesterol or lipid domains such as rafts) in the activity of diverse membrane proteins. Several systems provide such evidence, implicating, in particular, caveolin-1, various kinds of ABC-type cholesterol transporters, solute transporters, receptors and ion channels. We suggest that this larger role for active cholesterol warrants close attention and can be tested easily.

  19. Detergent-Mediated Phospholipidation of Plasma Lipoproteins Increases HDL Cholesterophilicity and Cholesterol Efflux Via SR-BI†

    PubMed Central

    Pownall, Henry J.

    2008-01-01

    Cellular cholesterol efflux is an early, obligatory step in reverse cholesterol transport, the putative antiatherogenic mechanism by which human plasma high density lipoproteins (HDL) transport cholesterol from peripheral tissue to the liver for recycling or disposal. HDL-phospholipid content is the essential cholesterol-binding component of lipoproteins and therefore a major determinant of cholesterol efflux. Thus, increased phospholipidation of lipoproteins, particularly HDL, is one strategy for increasing cholesterol efflux. This study validates a simple, new detergent perturbation method for the phospholipidation of plasma lipoproteins; we have quantified the cholesterophilicity of human plasma lipoproteins and the effects of lipoprotein phospholipidation on cholesterophilicity and cellular cholesterol efflux mediated by the class B type I scavenger receptor (SR-BI). We determined that low density lipoproteins (LDL) are more cholesterophilic than HDL and that LDL has a higher affinity for phospholipids than HDL whereas HDL has a higher phospholipid capacity than LDL. Phospholipidation of total human plasma lipoproteins enhances cholesterol efflux, an effect that occurs largely through the preferential phospholipidation of HDL. We conclude that increasing HDL phospholipid increases its cholesterophilicity thereby making it a better acceptor of cellular cholesterol efflux. Phospholipidation of lipoproteins by detergent perturbation is a simple way to increase HDL cholesterophilicity and cholesterol efflux in a way that may be clinically useful. PMID:16981711

  20. Structure of N-Terminal Domain of NPC1 Reveals Distinct Subdomains for Binding and Transfer of Cholesterol

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Hyock Joo; Abi-Mosleh, Lina; Wang, Michael L.; Deisenhofer, Johann; Goldstein, Joseph L.; Brown, Michael S.; Infante, Rodney E.

    2010-09-21

    LDL delivers cholesterol to lysosomes by receptor-mediated endocytosis. Exit of cholesterol from lysosomes requires two proteins, membrane-bound Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1) and soluble NPC2. NPC2 binds cholesterol with its isooctyl side chain buried and its 3{beta}-hydroxyl exposed. Here, we describe high-resolution structures of the N-terminal domain (NTD) of NPC1 and complexes with cholesterol and 25-hydroxycholesterol. NPC1(NTD) binds cholesterol in an orientation opposite to NPC2: 3{beta}-hydroxyl buried and isooctyl side chain exposed. Cholesterol transfer from NPC2 to NPC1(NTD) requires reorientation of a helical subdomain in NPC1(NTD), enlarging the opening for cholesterol entry. NPC1 with point mutations in this subdomain (distinct from the binding subdomain) cannot accept cholesterol from NPC2 and cannot restore cholesterol exit from lysosomes in NPC1-deficient cells. We propose a working model wherein after lysosomal hydrolysis of LDL-cholesteryl esters, cholesterol binds NPC2, which transfers it to NPC1(NTD), reversing its orientation and allowing insertion of its isooctyl side chain into the outer lysosomal membranes.

  1. Isolation of Cholesterol from an Egg Yolk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taber, Douglass F.; Li, Rui; Anson, Cory M.

    2011-01-01

    A simple procedure for the isolation of the cholesterol, by hydrolysis and extraction followed by column chromatography, is described. The cholesterol can be further purified by complexation with oxalic acid. It can also be oxidized and conjugated to cholestenone. The source of the cholesterol is one egg yolk, which contains about 200 mg of…

  2. Cholesterol Screening: A Practical Guide to Implementation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kingery, Paul M.

    1995-01-01

    Dry-chemistry cholesterol analysis has made screening feasible in a variety of settings. The article provides practical tips for the implementation of mass cholesterol screening using a portable dry-chemistry analyzer and discusses issues involved in conducting effective cholesterol screening programs from start to finish. (SM)

  3. Non-cholesterol sterols and cholesterol metabolism in sitosterolemia.

    PubMed

    Othman, Rgia A; Myrie, Semone B; Jones, Peter J H

    2013-12-01

    Sitosterolemia (STSL) is a rare autosomal recessive disease, manifested by extremely elevated plant sterols (PS) in plasma and tissue, leading to xanthoma and premature atherosclerotic disease. Therapeutic approaches include limiting PS intake, interrupting enterohepatic circulation of bile acid using bile acid binding resins such as cholestyramine, and/or ileal bypass, and inhibiting intestinal sterol absorption by ezetimibe (EZE). The objective of this review is to evaluate sterol metabolism in STSL and the impact of the currently available treatments on sterol trafficking in this disease. The role of PS in initiation of xanthomas and premature atherosclerosis is also discussed. Blocking sterols absorption with EZE has revolutionized STSL patient treatment as it reduces circulating levels of non-cholesterol sterols in STSL. However, none of the available treatments including EZE have normalized plasma PS concentrations. Future studies are needed to: (i) explore where cholesterol and non-cholesterol sterols accumulate, (ii) assess to what extent these sterols in tissues can be mobilized after blocking their absorption, and (iii) define the factors governing sterol flux.

  4. A sensitive assay for ABCA1-mediated cholesterol efflux using BODIPY -cholesterol

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies have shown a negative association between cellular cholesterol efflux and coronary artery disease (CAD). Standard protocol for quantifying cholesterol efflux involves labeling cells with [(3)H]cholesterol and measuring release of the labeled sterol. Using [(3)H]cholesterol is not ideal for...

  5. Percentage of Adults with High Cholesterol Whose LDL Cholesterol Levels Are Adequately Controlled

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Adults with High Cholesterol Whose LDL Cholesterol Levels are Adequately Controlled High cholesterol can double a ... with High Cholesterol that is Controlled by Education Level 8k4c-k22f Download these data » Click on legends ...

  6. Approach to the Patient with Extremely Low HDL-Cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    deGoma, Emil M.

    2012-01-01

    Patients with extremely low high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) pose distinct challenges to clinical diagnosis and management. Confirmation of HDL-C levels below 20 mg/dl in the absence of severe hypertriglyceridemia should be followed by evaluation for secondary causes, such as androgen use, malignancy, and primary monogenic disorders, namely, apolipoprotein A-I mutations, Tangier disease, and lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase deficiency. Global cardiovascular risk assessment is a critical component of comprehensive evaluation, although the association between extremely low HDL-C levels and atherosclerosis remains unclear. Therapeutic interventions address reversible causes of low HDL-C, multiorgan abnormalities that may accompany primary disorders and cardiovascular risk modification when appropriate. Uncommon encounters with patients exhibiting extremely low HDL-C provide an opportunity to directly observe the role of HDL metabolism in atherosclerosis and beyond the vascular system. PMID:23043194

  7. New targets in and potential treatments for cholesterol gallstone disease.

    PubMed

    Doggrell, Sheila A

    2006-04-01

    Gallstone disease is very common among American Indians and Hispanics, and approximately 20 million patients are treated for this disease annually in the US. Bile acid receptor (nuclear farnesoid X receptor; FXR) knockout mice fed a lithogenic diet are more susceptible to gallstone disease than wild-type mice. The C57L mouse is also susceptible to gallstone formation when fed a lithogenic diet, and in this model, the small-molecule FXR agonist GW-4064 prevents the precipitation of cholesterol. Bile acids (eg, P-muricholic acid) and their derivatives are also being developed as FXR agonists. Fatty acid bile acid conjugates have the potential to prevent and reverse cholesterol crystallization. Furthermore, agents that increase the expression of selected hepatocyte bile acid transporters may also be useful in the treatment of gall bladder disease.

  8. Reversible dementias

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Manjari; Vibha, Deepti

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, more attention has been given to the early diagnostic evaluation of patients with dementia which is essential to identify patients with cognitive symptoms who may have treatable conditions. Guidelines suggest that all patients presenting with dementia or cognitive symptoms should be evaluated with a range of laboratory tests, and with structural brain imaging with computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). While many of the disorders reported as ‘reversible dementias’ are conditions that may well be associated with cognitive or behavioral symptoms, these symptoms are not always sufficiently severe to fulfill the clinical criteria for dementia. Thus, while the etiology of a condition may be treatable it should not be assumed that the associated dementia is fully reversible. Potentially reversible dementias should be identified and treatment considered, even if the symptoms are not sufficiently severe to meet the clinical criteria for dementia, and even if partial or full reversal of the cognitive symptoms cannot be guaranteed. In the literature, the most frequently observed potentially reversible conditions identified in patients with cognitive impairment or dementia are depression, adverse effects of drugs, drug or alcohol abuse, space-occupying lesions, normal pressure hydrocephalus, and metabolic conditions land endocrinal conditions like hypothyroidism and nutritional conditions like vitamin B-12 deficiency. Depression is by far the most common of the potentially reversible conditions. The review, hence addresses the common causes of reversible dementia and the studies published so far. PMID:21416018

  9. D38-cholesterol as a Raman active probe for imaging intracellular cholesterol storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfonso-García, Alba; Pfisterer, Simon G.; Riezman, Howard; Ikonen, Elina; Potma, Eric O.

    2016-06-01

    We generated a highly deuterated cholesterol analog (D38-cholesterol) and demonstrated its use for selective vibrational imaging of cholesterol storage in mammalian cells. D38-cholesterol produces detectable signals in stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) imaging, is rapidly taken up by cells, and is efficiently metabolized by acyl-CoA cholesterol acyltransferase to form cholesteryl esters. Using hyperspectral SRS imaging of D38-cholesterol, we visualized cholesterol storage in lipid droplets. We found that some lipid droplets accumulated preferentially unesterified D38-cholesterol, whereas others stored D38-cholesteryl esters. In steroidogenic cells, D38-cholesteryl esters and triacylglycerols were partitioned into distinct sets of lipid droplets. Thus, hyperspectral SRS imaging of D38-cholesterol demonstrates a heterogeneous incorporation of neutral lipid species, i.e., free cholesterol, cholesteryl esters, and triacylglycerols, between individual lipid droplets in a cell.

  10. D38-cholesterol as a Raman active probe for imaging intracellular cholesterol storage.

    PubMed

    Alfonso-García, Alba; Pfisterer, Simon G; Riezman, Howard; Ikonen, Elina; Potma, Eric O

    2016-06-01

    We generated a highly deuterated cholesterol analog (D38-cholesterol) and demonstrated its use for selective vibrational imaging of cholesterol storage in mammalian cells. D38-cholesterol produces detectable signals in stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) imaging, is rapidly taken up by cells, and is efficiently metabolized by acyl-CoA cholesterol acyltransferase to form cholesteryl esters. Using hyperspectral SRS imaging of D38-cholesterol, we visualized cholesterol storage in lipid droplets. We found that some lipid droplets accumulated preferentially unesterified D38-cholesterol, whereas others stored D38-cholesteryl esters. In steroidogenic cells, D38-cholesteryl esters and triacylglycerols were partitioned into distinct sets of lipid droplets. Thus, hyperspectral SRS imaging of D38-cholesterol demonstrates a heterogeneous incorporation of neutral lipid species, i.e., free cholesterol, cholesteryl esters, and triacylglycerols, between individual lipid droplets in a cell.

  11. Cholesterol Depletion from a Ceramide/Cholesterol Mixed Monolayer: A Brewster Angle Microscope Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Pritam; Noutsi, Pakiza; Chaieb, Sahraoui

    2016-06-01

    Cholesterol is crucial to the mechanical properties of cell membranes that are important to cells’ behavior. Its depletion from the cell membranes could be dramatic. Among cyclodextrins (CDs), methyl beta cyclodextrin (MβCD) is the most efficient to deplete cholesterol (Chol) from biomembranes. Here, we focus on the depletion of cholesterol from a C16 ceramide/cholesterol (C16-Cer/Chol) mixed monolayer using MβCD. While the removal of cholesterol by MβCD depends on the cholesterol concentration in most mixed lipid monolayers, it does not depend very much on the concentration of cholesterol in C16-Cer/Chol monolayers. The surface pressure decay during depletion were described by a stretched exponential that suggested that the cholesterol molecules are unable to diffuse laterally and behave like static traps for the MβCD molecules. Cholesterol depletion causes morphology changes of domains but these disrupted monolayers domains seem to reform even when cholesterol level was low.

  12. Relationship between plasma cholesterol levels and cholesterol esterification in isolated human mononuclear cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dallongeville, J.; Davignon, J.; Lussier-Cacan, S. )

    1990-01-01

    The authors studied the relationship between plasma lipoprotein concentrations and cholesterol esterification in freshly isolated human mononuclear cells from 27 normolipidemic and 32 hyperlipidemic individuals. Cells were either incubated for 5 hours with radiolabeled oleate immediately after isolation or were preincubated for 18 hours in the presence of exogenous cholesterol, and then incubated with ({sup 14}C)sodium-oleate-albumin complex. In the absence of exogenous cholesterol, control and hypercholesterolemic subjects had similarly low values of intracellular cholesterol esterification. In the presence of exogenous cholesterol, both hypertriglyceridemic and hypercholesterolemic subjects had higher cholesterol esterification than controls. There was a significant correlation between the rate of cholesterol esterification and plasma total cholesterol. These results suggest that plasma cholesterol levels may regulate mononuclear cell intra-cellular cholesterol esterification in humans.

  13. Fish protein hydrolysates affect cholesterol metabolism in rats fed non-cholesterol and high-cholesterol diets.

    PubMed

    Hosomi, Ryota; Fukunaga, Kenji; Arai, Hirofumi; Kanda, Seiji; Nishiyama, Toshimasa; Yoshida, Munehiro

    2012-03-01

    Fish consumption is well known to provide health benefits in both experimental animals and human subjects. Numerous studies have demonstrated the beneficial effects of various protein hydrolysates on lipid metabolism. In this context, this study examined the effect of fish protein hydrolysates (FPH) on cholesterol metabolism compared with the effect of casein. FPHs were prepared from Alaska pollock meat using papain as a protease. Male Wistar rats were divided into the following four dietary groups of seven rats each: either casein (20%) or FPH (10%) + casein (10%), with or without 0.5% cholesterol and 0.1% sodium cholate. Serum and liver lipid levels, fecal cholesterol and bile acid excretions, and the hepatic expression of genes encoding proteins involved in cholesterol homeostasis were examined. In rats fed the FPH diets compared with casein diets with or without cholesterol and sodium cholate, the indexes of cholesterol metabolism-namely, serum cholesterol, triglyceride, and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels-were significantly lower, whereas fecal cholesterol and bile acid excretions were higher. Rats fed the FPH diets compared with casein with cholesterol exhibited a lower liver cholesterol level via an increased liver cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) expression level. This study demonstrates that the intake of FPH has hypocholesterolemic effects through the enhancement of fecal cholesterol and bile acid excretions and CYP7A1 expression levels. Therefore, fish peptides prepared by papain digestion might provide health benefits by decreasing the cholesterol content in the blood, which would contribute to the prevention of circulatory system diseases such as arteriosclerosis. PMID:22181072

  14. Peptide mediators of cholesterol efflux

    DOEpatents

    Bielicki, John K.; Johansson, Jan

    2013-04-09

    The present invention provides a family of non-naturally occurring polypeptides having cholesterol efflux activity that parallels that of full-length apolipoproteins (e.g., Apo AI and Apo E), and having high selectivity for ABAC1 that parallels that of full-length apolipoproteins. The invention also provides compositions comprising such polypeptides, methods of identifying, screening and synthesizing such polypeptides, and methods of treating, preventing or diagnosing diseases and disorders associated with dyslipidemia, hypercholesterolemia and inflammation.

  15. Does cholesterol lowering prevent stroke?

    PubMed

    Henry, R Y; Kendall, M J

    1998-10-01

    The importance of lowering plasma cholesterol to reduce the incidence of coronary events is well established. However, in the prevention of stroke disease, control of hypertension has been the main aim of treatment and lipid lowering therapy has not hitherto been considered to be desirable or necessary. In this review, the evidence from large multicentre trials, imaging studies and meta-analyses is presented. It shows convincingly that HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (Statins) reduce stroke risk. PMID:9875681

  16. Reversible Sterilization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Largey, Gale

    1977-01-01

    Notes that difficult questions arise concerning the use of sterilization for alleged eugenic and euthenic purposes. Thus, how reversible sterilization will be used with relation to the poor, mentally ill, mentally retarded, criminals, and minors, is questioned. (Author/AM)

  17. Reversible Cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Harsh; Madanieh, Raef; Kosmas, Constantine E; Vatti, Satya K; Vittorio, Timothy J

    2015-01-01

    Cardiomyopathies (CMs) have many etiological factors that can result in severe structural and functional dysregulation. Fortunately, there are several potentially reversible CMs that are known to improve when the root etiological factor is addressed. In this article, we discuss several of these reversible CMs, including tachycardia-induced, peripartum, inflammatory, hyperthyroidism, Takotsubo, and chronic illness–induced CMs. Our discussion also includes a review on their respective pathophysiology, as well as possible management solutions. PMID:26052233

  18. AIBP: A Novel Molecule at the Interface of Cholesterol Transport, Angiogenesis, and Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Laurence; Fang, Longhou

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease, which is often driven by hypercholesterolemia and subsequent coronary atherosclerosis, is the number-one cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Based on long-term epidemiological studies, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels are inversely correlated with risk for coronary artery disease (CAD). HDL-mediated reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) is responsible for cholesterol removal from the peripheral tissues and return to the liver for final elimination.1 In atherosclerosis, intraplaque angiogenesis promotes plaque growth and increases plaque vulnerability. Conceivably, the acceleration of RCT and disruption of intraplaque angiogenesis would inhibit atherosclerosis and reduce CAD. We have identified a protein called apoA-I binding protein (AIBP) that augments HDL functionality by accelerating cholesterol efflux. Furthermore, AIBP inhibits vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 activation in endothelial cells and limits angiogenesis.2 The following discusses the prospect of using AIBP as a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of CAD. PMID:26634023

  19. BacMam production of active recombinant lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase: Expression, purification and characterization.

    PubMed

    Romanow, William G; Piper, Derek E; Fordstrom, Preston; Thibault, Stephen; Zhou, Mingyue; Walker, Nigel P C

    2016-09-01

    Lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) is a key enzyme in the esterification of cholesterol and its subsequent incorporation into the core of high density lipoprotein (HDL) particles. It is also involved in reverse cholesterol transport (RCT), the mechanism by which cholesterol is removed from peripheral cells and transported to the liver for excretion. These processes are involved in the development of atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease (CHD) and may have therapeutic implications. This work describes the use of baculovirus as a transducing vector to express LCAT in mammalian cells, expression of the recombinant protein as a high-mannose glycoform suitable for deglycosylation by Endo H and its purification to homogeneity and characterization. The importance of producing underglycosylated forms of secreted glycoproteins to obtain high-resolution crystal structures is discussed. PMID:26363122

  20. Salicylate improves macrophage cholesterol homeostasis via activation of Ampk[S

    PubMed Central

    Fullerton, Morgan D.; Ford, Rebecca J.; McGregor, Chelsea P.; LeBlond, Nicholas D.; Snider, Shayne A.; Stypa, Stephanie A.; Day, Emily A.; Lhoták, Šárka; Schertzer, Jonathan D.; Austin, Richard C.; Kemp, Bruce E.; Steinberg, Gregory R.

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis stems from imbalances in lipid metabolism and leads to maladaptive inflammatory responses. The AMP-activated protein kinase (Ampk) is a highly conserved serine/threonine kinase that regulates many aspects of lipid and energy metabolism, although its specific role in controlling macrophage cholesterol homeostasis remains unclear. We sought to address this question by testing the effects of direct Ampk activators in primary bone marrow-derived macrophages from Ampk β1-deficient (β1−/−) mice. Macrophages from Ampk β1−/− mice had enhanced lipogenic capacity and diminished cholesterol efflux, although cholesterol uptake was unaffected. Direct activation of Ampk β1 via salicylate (the unacetylated form of aspirin) or A-769662 (a small molecule activator), decreased the synthesis of FAs and sterols in WT but not Ampk β1−/− macrophages. In lipid-laden macrophages, Ampk activation decreased cholesterol content (foam cell formation) and increased cholesterol efflux to HDL and apoA-I, effects that occurred in an Ampk β1-dependent manner. Increased cholesterol efflux was also associated with increased gene expression of the ATP binding cassette transporters, Abcg1 and Abca1. Moreover, in vivo reverse cholesterol transport was suppressed in mice that received Ampk β1−/− macrophages compared with the WT control. Our data highlight the therapeutic potential of targeting macrophage Ampk with new or existing drugs for the possible reduction in foam cell formation during the early stages of atherosclerosis. PMID:25773887

  1. Cholesterol-loaded nanoparticles ameliorate synaptic and cognitive function in Huntington's disease mice.

    PubMed

    Valenza, Marta; Chen, Jane Y; Di Paolo, Eleonora; Ruozi, Barbara; Belletti, Daniela; Ferrari Bardile, Costanza; Leoni, Valerio; Caccia, Claudio; Brilli, Elisa; Di Donato, Stefano; Boido, Marina M; Vercelli, Alessandro; Vandelli, Maria A; Forni, Flavio; Cepeda, Carlos; Levine, Michael S; Tosi, Giovanni; Cattaneo, Elena

    2015-12-01

    Brain cholesterol biosynthesis and cholesterol levels are reduced in mouse models of Huntington's disease (HD), suggesting that locally synthesized, newly formed cholesterol is less available to neurons. This may be detrimental for neuronal function, especially given that locally synthesized cholesterol is implicated in synapse integrity and remodeling. Here, we used biodegradable and biocompatible polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) modified with glycopeptides (g7) and loaded with cholesterol (g7-NPs-Chol), which per se is not blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeable, to obtain high-rate cholesterol delivery into the brain after intraperitoneal injection in HD mice. We report that g7-NPs, in contrast to unmodified NPs, efficiently crossed the BBB and localized in glial and neuronal cells in different brain regions. We also found that repeated systemic delivery of g7-NPs-Chol rescued synaptic and cognitive dysfunction and partially improved global activity in HD mice. These results demonstrate that cholesterol supplementation to the HD brain reverses functional alterations associated with HD and highlight the potential of this new drug-administration route to the diseased brain.

  2. Matrix metalloproteinase 8 degrades apolipoprotein A-I and reduces its cholesterol efflux capacity.

    PubMed

    Salminen, Aino; Åström, Pirjo; Metso, Jari; Soliymani, Rabah; Salo, Tuula; Jauhiainen, Matti; Pussinen, Pirkko J; Sorsa, Timo

    2015-04-01

    Various cell types in atherosclerotic lesions express matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-8. We investigated whether MMP-8 affects the structure and antiatherogenic function of apolipoprotein (apo) A-I, the main protein component of HDL particles. Furthermore, we studied serum lipid profiles and cholesterol efflux capacity in MMP-8-deficient mouse model. Incubation of apoA-I (28 kDa) with activated MMP-8 yielded 22 kDa and 25 kDa apoA-I fragments. Mass spectrometric analyses revealed that apoA-I was cleaved at its carboxyl-terminal part. Treatment of apoA-I and HDL with MMP-8 resulted in significant reduction (up to 84%, P < 0.001) in their ability to facilitate cholesterol efflux from cholesterol-loaded THP-1 macrophages. The cleavage of apoA-I by MMP-8 and the reduction in its cholesterol efflux capacity was inhibited by doxycycline. MMP-8-deficient mice had significantly lower serum triglyceride (TG) levels (P = 0.003) and larger HDL particles compared with wild-type (WT) mice. However, no differences were observed in the apoA-I levels or serum cholesterol efflux capacities between the mouse groups. Proteolytic modification of apoA-I by MMP-8 may impair the first steps of reverse cholesterol transport, leading to increased accumulation of cholesterol in the vessel walls. Eventually, inhibition of MMPs by doxycycline may reduce the risk for atherosclerotic vascular diseases.

  3. A mirror code for protein-cholesterol interactions in the two leaflets of biological membranes

    PubMed Central

    Fantini, Jacques; Di Scala, Coralie; Evans, Luke S.; Williamson, Philip T. F.; Barrantes, Francisco J.

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol controls the activity of a wide range of membrane receptors through specific interactions and identifying cholesterol recognition motifs is therefore critical for understanding signaling receptor function. The membrane-spanning domains of the paradigm neurotransmitter receptor for acetylcholine (AChR) display a series of cholesterol consensus domains (referred to as “CARC”). Here we use a combination of molecular modeling, lipid monolayer/mutational approaches and NMR spectroscopy to study the binding of cholesterol to a synthetic CARC peptide. The CARC-cholesterol interaction is of high affinity, lipid-specific, concentration-dependent, and sensitive to single-point mutations. The CARC motif is generally located in the outer membrane leaflet and its reverse sequence CRAC in the inner one. Their simultaneous presence within the same transmembrane domain obeys a “mirror code” controlling protein-cholesterol interactions in the outer and inner membrane leaflets. Deciphering this code enabled us to elaborate guidelines for the detection of cholesterol-binding motifs in any membrane protein. Several representative examples of neurotransmitter receptors and ABC transporters with the dual CARC/CRAC motifs are presented. The biological significance and potential clinical applications of the mirror code are discussed. PMID:26915987

  4. Regulation of biliary cholesterol secretion in the rat. Role of hepatic cholesterol esterification.

    PubMed Central

    Nervi, F; Bronfman, M; Allalón, W; Depiereux, E; Del Pozo, R

    1984-01-01

    Although the significance of the enterohepatic circulation of bile salts in the solubilization and biliary excretion of cholesterol is well established, little is known about the intrahepatic determinants of biliary cholesterol output. Studies were undertaken to elucidate some of these determinants in the rat. Feeding 1% diosgenin for 1 wk increased biliary cholesterol output and saturation by 400%. Bile flow, biliary bile salt, phospholipid and protein outputs remained in the normal range. When ethynyl estradiol (EE) was injected into these animals, biliary cholesterol output decreased to almost normal levels under circumstances of minor changes in the rates of biliary bile salt and phospholipid outputs. Similarly, when chylomicron cholesterol was intravenously injected into diosgenin-fed animals, biliary cholesterol output significantly decreased as a function of the dose of chylomicron cholesterol administered. Relative rates of hepatic cholesterol synthesis and esterification were measured in isolated hepatocytes. Although hepatic cholesterogenesis increased 300% in diosgenin-fed animals, the contribution of newly synthesized cholesterol to total biliary cholesterol output was only 19 +/- 9%, compared with 12 +/- 6% in control and 15 +/- 5% in diosgenin-fed and EE-injected rats. The rate of oleate incorporation into hepatocytic cholesterol esters was 30% inhibited in diosgenin-fed rats. When EE was injected into these animals, the rate of cholesterol esterification increased to almost 300%. To investigate further the interrelationship between hepatic cholesterol esterification and biliary cholesterol output, we studied 21 diosgenin-fed rats. Six of them received in addition EE and 10 received chylomicron cholesterol. The relationships between biliary cholesterol output as a function of both microsomal acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) activity and hepatic cholesterol ester concentration were significantly correlated in a reciprocal manner. From these

  5. Improved direct and indirect systems of columns for ternary distillation

    SciTech Connect

    Agrawal, R.; Fidkowski, Z.T.

    1998-04-01

    Separation of a ternary mixture into almost pure components is discussed. Systems of distillation columns, with higher thermodynamic efficiency, are developed from a direct sequence (or indirect sequence) of distillation columns by allowing for two interconnecting streams of the same composition and different enthalpy. This increases the reversibility of distillation in the second column, which results in replacing a portion of the high-temperature boiling duty with a lower-temperature heat in the direct split case. For the indirect split case, the improvement allows a portion of the low-temperature condensing duty to be replaced with a higher-temperature condensation.

  6. Cholesterol improves the utilization of parenteral lipid emulsions.

    PubMed

    Druml, Wilfred; Fischer, Margot

    2003-11-28

    Lipid emulsions have become an indispensable component of parenteral nutrition. Commercially available emulsions mostly have an identical composition of triglycerides (from plant oils) and egg-yolk phospholipids as emulsifier. Previous attempts to improve the composition of lipid emulsions have focused mainly on the triglyceride moiety. In the first fundamental modification of a lipid emulsion since their broader introduction into clinical medicine, we included free cholesterol in a lipid emulsion. We evaluated elimination and hydrolysis of triglycerides and lipid oxidation (by indirect calorimetry) in 10 healthy male normolipemic volunteers, comparing a conventional lipid emulsion (20% triglycerides) with an otherwise identical emulsion with the addition of 4 g/l free cholesterol. The rise in plasma triglycerides was mitigated during infusion of the cholesterol-enriched solution (323.8 +/- 27.5 vs. 202.0 +/- 18.9 mg.dL-1, p < 0.001), plasma half-life was reduced (41.6 +/- 5.4 vs. 29.3 +/- 5.1 min, p < 0.05), and total-body clearance was enhanced (0.96 +/- 0.1 vs. 1.52 +/- 0.2 ml.b.w.(.)min-1, p < 0.02). The rise in plasma free fatty acids (400.7 +/- 39.0 vs. 532.2 +/- 64.0 mumol.L-1; p < 0.02) and ketone bodies (beta-hydroxybutyrate) (151.6 +/- 37.0 vs. 226.3 +/- 33.01 mumol.L-1; p < 0.02) was augmented. Increases in plasma insulin and glucagon were less pronounced (p < 0.05). The fall in respiratory quotient was greater and the fraction of lipid oxidation as a percentage of total energy expenditure was increased (66.2% +/- 6.0 vs. 70.9% +/- 6.3, p < 0.05) during infusion of the modified solution. No impairment of gas exchange or other side effects were observed. Taken together these results indicate that the elimination of a cholesterol-supplemented lipid emulsion is accelerated, triglyceride hydrolysis is enhanced, and lipid oxidation is augmented. Thus, addition of cholesterol to a lipid emulsion might not only present a means of providing cholesterol in

  7. Extra Virgin Olive Oil Polyphenols Promote Cholesterol Efflux and Improve HDL Functionality

    PubMed Central

    Berrougui, Hicham; Ikhlef, Souad; Khalil, Abdelouahed

    2015-01-01

    Results of the present work give evidence from the beneficial role of extra virgin olive of oil (EVOO) consumption towards oxidative stress and cardiovascular diseases. Polyphenols contained in EVOO are responsible for inhibiting lipoproteins oxidative damages and promoting reverse cholesterol transport process via ABCA1 pathway. PMID:26495005

  8. Membrane homeostasis: thermotropic behaviour of microsomal membrane lipids isolated from livers of rats fed cholesterol-supplemented diets.

    PubMed

    Garg, M L; McMurchie, E J; Sabine, J R

    1985-11-01

    Differential scanning colorimetry (DSC) has been applied to study the phase transition properties of isolated lipids from liver microsomal membranes of rats fed high cholesterol diets with or without high levels of either saturated (coconut oil) or unsaturated (sunflower seed oil) fat. DSC of aqueous buffer dispersions of liver microsomal lipids exhibited two independent, reversible phase transitions. The dietary cholesterol treatments had their major effect on the temperature at which the lower phase transition (T1) occurred. This transition occurred at a lower temperature when cholesterol was added to the diet, irrespective of the nature of the fatty acid supplement. However the magnitude of decrease was more when cholesterol was fed with sunflower seed oil. Inclusion of cholesterol into the rat diets also lowered the enthalpy values for the lower phase transition (T1). No appreciable effect on the temperature of the higher phase transition (T2) was observed, however the enthalpy values were slightly decreased by cholesterol feeding. These results suggest that certain domains of microsomal lipids, probably containing some relatively higher melting-point lipids, independently undergo solidus or gel formation and this transition (T2) is not greatly affected by dietary cholesterol. On the other hand, domains representing the bulk of the microsomal lipids undergo a phase change (T1) at temperatures which are dependent on cholesterol content and fatty acid profiles of the membrane, which are in turn, modified by dietary cholesterol intake.

  9. Ecology: Dynamics of Indirect Extinction.

    PubMed

    Montoya, Jose M

    2015-12-01

    The experimental identification of the mechanism by which extinctions of predators trigger further predator extinctions emphasizes the role of indirect effects between species in disturbed ecosystems. It also has deep consequences for the hidden magnitude of the current biodiversity crisis.

  10. Direct vs. Indirect Moral Enhancement.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, G Owen

    2015-09-01

    Moral enhancement is an ostensibly laudable project. Who wouldn't want people to become more moral? Still, the project's approach is crucial. We can distinguish between two approaches for moral enhancement: direct and indirect. Direct moral enhancements aim at bringing about particular ideas, motives or behaviors. Indirect moral enhancements, by contrast, aim at making people more reliably produce the morally correct ideas, motives or behaviors without committing to the content of those ideas, motives and/or actions. I will argue, on Millian grounds, that the value of disagreement puts serious pressure on proposals for relatively widespread direct moral enhancement. A more acceptable path would be to focus instead on indirect moral enhancements while staying neutral, for the most part, on a wide range of substantive moral claims. I will outline what such indirect moral enhancement might look like, and why we should expect it to lead to general moral improvement.

  11. Moral assessment in indirect reciprocity.

    PubMed

    Sigmund, Karl

    2012-04-21

    Indirect reciprocity is one of the mechanisms for cooperation, and seems to be of particular interest for the evolution of human societies. A large part is based on assessing reputations and acting accordingly. This paper gives a brief overview of different assessment rules for indirect reciprocity, and studies them by using evolutionary game dynamics. Even the simplest binary assessment rules lead to complex outcomes and require considerable cognitive abilities.

  12. The logic of indirect speech.

    PubMed

    Pinker, Steven; Nowak, Martin A; Lee, James J

    2008-01-22

    When people speak, they often insinuate their intent indirectly rather than stating it as a bald proposition. Examples include sexual come-ons, veiled threats, polite requests, and concealed bribes. We propose a three-part theory of indirect speech, based on the idea that human communication involves a mixture of cooperation and conflict. First, indirect requests allow for plausible deniability, in which a cooperative listener can accept the request, but an uncooperative one cannot react adversarially to it. This intuition is supported by a game-theoretic model that predicts the costs and benefits to a speaker of direct and indirect requests. Second, language has two functions: to convey information and to negotiate the type of relationship holding between speaker and hearer (in particular, dominance, communality, or reciprocity). The emotional costs of a mismatch in the assumed relationship type can create a need for plausible deniability and, thereby, select for indirectness even when there are no tangible costs. Third, people perceive language as a digital medium, which allows a sentence to generate common knowledge, to propagate a message with high fidelity, and to serve as a reference point in coordination games. This feature makes an indirect request qualitatively different from a direct one even when the speaker and listener can infer each other's intentions with high confidence.

  13. Indirect electroanalytical detection of phenols.

    PubMed

    Kolliopoulos, Athanasios V; Kampouris, Dimitrios K; Banks, Craig E

    2015-05-01

    A novel indirect electrochemical protocol for the electroanalytical detection of phenols is presented for the first time. This methodology is demonstrated with the indirect determination of the target analytes phenol, 2-chlorophenol, 4-chlorophenol and 2,4-dichlorophenol through an electrochemically adapted optical protocol. This electrochemical adaptation allows the determination of the above mentioned phenols without the use of any oxidising agents, as is the case in the optical method, where pyrazoline compounds (mediators) chemically react with the target phenols forming a quinoneimine product which is electrochemically active providing an indirect analytical signal to measure the target phenol(s). A range of commercially available pyrazoline substitution products, namely 4-dimethylaminoantipyrine, antipyrine, 3-methyl-1-(2-phenylethyl)-2-pyrazolin-5-one, 3-amino-1-(1-naphthylmethyl)-2-Pyrazolin-5-one, 4-amino-1,2-dimethyl-3-pentadecyl-3-pyrazolin-5-one hydrochloride, 3-amino-1-(2-amino-4-methylsulfonylphenyl)-2-pyrazolin-5-one hydrochloride and 4-aminoantipyrine are evaluated as mediators for the indirect detection of phenols. The indirect electrochemical detection of phenol, 2-chlorophenol, 4-chlorophenol and 2,4-dichlorophenol through the use of 4-aminoantipyrine as a mediator are successfully determined in drinking water samples at analytically useful levels. Finally, the comparison of the direct (no mediator) and the proposed indirect determination (with 4-aminoantipyrine) towards the analytical detection of the target phenols in drinking water is presented. The limitation of the proposed electroanalytical protocol is quantified for all the four target phenols.

  14. The logic of indirect speech

    PubMed Central

    Pinker, Steven; Nowak, Martin A.; Lee, James J.

    2008-01-01

    When people speak, they often insinuate their intent indirectly rather than stating it as a bald proposition. Examples include sexual come-ons, veiled threats, polite requests, and concealed bribes. We propose a three-part theory of indirect speech, based on the idea that human communication involves a mixture of cooperation and conflict. First, indirect requests allow for plausible deniability, in which a cooperative listener can accept the request, but an uncooperative one cannot react adversarially to it. This intuition is supported by a game-theoretic model that predicts the costs and benefits to a speaker of direct and indirect requests. Second, language has two functions: to convey information and to negotiate the type of relationship holding between speaker and hearer (in particular, dominance, communality, or reciprocity). The emotional costs of a mismatch in the assumed relationship type can create a need for plausible deniability and, thereby, select for indirectness even when there are no tangible costs. Third, people perceive language as a digital medium, which allows a sentence to generate common knowledge, to propagate a message with high fidelity, and to serve as a reference point in coordination games. This feature makes an indirect request qualitatively different from a direct one even when the speaker and listener can infer each other's intentions with high confidence. PMID:18199841

  15. Reduction of blood serum cholesterol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winitz, M. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    By feeding a human subject as the sole source of sustenance a defined diet wherein the carbohydrate consists substantially entirely of glucose, maltose or a polysaccharide of glucose, the blood serum cholesterol level of the human subject is substantially reduced. If 25 percent of the carbohydrate is subsequently supplied in the form of sucrose, an immediate increase from the reduced level is observed. The remainder of the defined diet normally includes a source of amino acids, such as protein or a protein hydrolysate, vitamins, minerals and a source of essential fatty acid.

  16. Cooperation under indirect reciprocity and imitative trust.

    PubMed

    Saavedra, Serguei; Smith, David; Reed-Tsochas, Felix

    2010-10-27

    Indirect reciprocity, a key concept in behavioral experiments and evolutionary game theory, provides a mechanism that allows reciprocal altruism to emerge in a population of self-regarding individuals even when repeated interactions between pairs of actors are unlikely. Recent empirical evidence show that humans typically follow complex assessment strategies involving both reciprocity and social imitation when making cooperative decisions. However, currently, we have no systematic understanding of how imitation, a mechanism that may also generate negative effects via a process of cumulative advantage, affects cooperation when repeated interactions are unlikely or information about a recipient's reputation is unavailable. Here we extend existing evolutionary models, which use an image score for reputation to track how individuals cooperate by contributing resources, by introducing a new imitative-trust score, which tracks whether actors have been the recipients of cooperation in the past. We show that imitative trust can co-exist with indirect reciprocity mechanisms up to a threshold and then cooperation reverses -revealing the elusive nature of cooperation. Moreover, we find that when information about a recipient's reputation is limited, trusting the action of third parties towards her (i.e. imitating) does favor a higher collective cooperation compared to random-trusting and share-alike mechanisms. We believe these results shed new light on the factors favoring social imitation as an adaptive mechanism in populations of cooperating social actors.

  17. 9-cis β-Carotene Increased Cholesterol Efflux to HDL in Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Bechor, Sapir; Zolberg Relevy, Noa; Harari, Ayelet; Almog, Tal; Kamari, Yehuda; Ben-Amotz, Ami; Harats, Dror; Shaish, Aviv

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol efflux from macrophages is a key process in reverse cholesterol transport and, therefore, might inhibit atherogenesis. 9-cis-β-carotene (9-cis-βc) is a precursor for 9-cis-retinoic-acid (9-cis-RA), which regulates macrophage cholesterol efflux. Our objective was to assess whether 9-cis-βc increases macrophage cholesterol efflux and induces the expression of cholesterol transporters. Enrichment of a mouse diet with βc from the alga Dunaliella led to βc accumulation in peritoneal macrophages. 9-cis-βc increased the mRNA levels of CYP26B1, an enzyme that regulates RA cellular levels, indicating the formation of RA from βc in RAW264.7 macrophages. Furthermore, 9-cis-βc, as well as all-trans-βc, significantly increased cholesterol efflux to high-density lipoprotein (HDL) by 50% in RAW264.7 macrophages. Likewise, food fortification with 9-cis-βc augmented cholesterol efflux from macrophages ex vivo. 9-cis-βc increased both the mRNA and protein levels of ABCA1 and apolipoprotein E (APOE) and the mRNA level of ABCG1. Our study shows, for the first time, that 9-cis-βc from the diet accumulates in peritoneal macrophages and increases cholesterol efflux to HDL. These effects might be ascribed to transcriptional induction of ABCA1, ABCG1, and APOE. These results highlight the beneficial effect of βc in inhibition of atherosclerosis by improving cholesterol efflux from macrophages. PMID:27447665

  18. 9-cis β-Carotene Increased Cholesterol Efflux to HDL in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Bechor, Sapir; Zolberg Relevy, Noa; Harari, Ayelet; Almog, Tal; Kamari, Yehuda; Ben-Amotz, Ami; Harats, Dror; Shaish, Aviv

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol efflux from macrophages is a key process in reverse cholesterol transport and, therefore, might inhibit atherogenesis. 9-cis-β-carotene (9-cis-βc) is a precursor for 9-cis-retinoic-acid (9-cis-RA), which regulates macrophage cholesterol efflux. Our objective was to assess whether 9-cis-βc increases macrophage cholesterol efflux and induces the expression of cholesterol transporters. Enrichment of a mouse diet with βc from the alga Dunaliella led to βc accumulation in peritoneal macrophages. 9-cis-βc increased the mRNA levels of CYP26B1, an enzyme that regulates RA cellular levels, indicating the formation of RA from βc in RAW264.7 macrophages. Furthermore, 9-cis-βc, as well as all-trans-βc, significantly increased cholesterol efflux to high-density lipoprotein (HDL) by 50% in RAW264.7 macrophages. Likewise, food fortification with 9-cis-βc augmented cholesterol efflux from macrophages ex vivo. 9-cis-βc increased both the mRNA and protein levels of ABCA1 and apolipoprotein E (APOE) and the mRNA level of ABCG1. Our study shows, for the first time, that 9-cis-βc from the diet accumulates in peritoneal macrophages and increases cholesterol efflux to HDL. These effects might be ascribed to transcriptional induction of ABCA1, ABCG1, and APOE. These results highlight the beneficial effect of βc in inhibition of atherosclerosis by improving cholesterol efflux from macrophages. PMID:27447665

  19. Subjects with Low Plasma HDL Cholesterol Levels Are Characterized by an Inflammatory and Oxidative Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Holven, Kirsten B.; Retterstøl, Kjetil; Ueland, Thor; Ulven, Stine M.; Nenseter, Marit S.; Sandvik, Marit; Narverud, Ingunn; Berge, Knut E.; Ose, Leiv; Aukrust, Pål; Halvorsen, Bente

    2013-01-01

    Background Epidemiological studies have shown that low plasma levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease, but the mechanisms for the possible atheroprotective effects of HDL cholesterol have still not been fully clarified, in particular in relation to clinical studies. Objective To examine the inflammatory, anti-oxidative and metabolic phenotype of subjects with low plasma HDL cholesterol levels. Methods and Results Fifteen subjects with low HDL cholesterol levels (eleven males and four females) and 19 subjects with high HDL (three males and 16 females) were recruited. Low HDL cholesterol was defined as ≤10th age/sex specific percentile and high HDL-C was defined as ≥90 age/sex specific percentile. Inflammatory markers in circulation and PBMC gene expression of cholesterol efflux mediators were measured. Our main findings were: (i) subjects with low plasma HDL cholesterol levels were characterized by increased plasma levels of CRP, MMP-9, neopterin, CXCL16 and ICAM-1 as well as low plasma levels of adiponectin, suggesting an inflammatory phenotype; (ii) these individuals also had reduced paraoxonase (PON)1 activity in plasma and PON2 gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) accompanied by increased plasma levels of oxidized LDL suggesting decreased anti-oxidative capacity; and (iii) PBMC from low HDL subjects also had decreased mRNA levels of ABCA1 and ABCG1, suggesting impaired reverse cholesterol transport. Conclusion Subjects with low plasma HDL cholesterol levels are characterized by an inflammatory and oxidative phenotype that could contribute to the increased risk of atherosclerotic disorders in these subjects with low HDL levels. PMID:24244297

  20. Cholesterol Oxidation in Fish and Fish Products.

    PubMed

    Dantas, Natalie Marinho; Sampaio, Geni Rodrigues; Ferreira, Fernanda Silva; Labre, Tatiana da Silva; Torres, Elizabeth Aparecida Ferraz da Silva; Saldanha, Tatiana

    2015-12-01

    Fish and fish products are important from a nutritional point of view due to the presence of high biological value proteins and the high content of polyunsaturated fatty acids, especially those of the n-3 series, and above all eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid. However, these important food products also contain significant amounts of cholesterol. Although cholesterol participates in essential functions in the human body, it is unstable, especially in the presence of light, oxygen, radiation, and high temperatures that can cause the formation of cholesterol oxidation products or cholesterol oxides, which are prejudicial to human health. Fish processing involves high and low temperatures, as well as other methods for microbiological control, which increases shelf life and consequently added value; however, such processes favor the formation of cholesterol oxidation products. This review brings together data on the formation of cholesterol oxides during the preparation and processing of fish into food products which are recognized and recommended for their nutritional properties.

  1. Discriminating direct and indirect connectivities in biological networks.

    PubMed

    Kang, Taek; Moore, Richard; Li, Yi; Sontag, Eduardo; Bleris, Leonidas

    2015-10-13

    Reverse engineering of biological pathways involves an iterative process between experiments, data processing, and theoretical analysis. Despite concurrent advances in quality and quantity of data as well as computing resources and algorithms, difficulties in deciphering direct and indirect network connections are prevalent. Here, we adopt the notions of abstraction, emulation, benchmarking, and validation in the context of discovering features specific to this family of connectivities. After subjecting benchmark synthetic circuits to perturbations, we inferred the network connections using a combination of nonparametric single-cell data resampling and modular response analysis. Intriguingly, we discovered that recovered weights of specific network edges undergo divergent shifts under differential perturbations, and that the particular behavior is markedly different between topologies. Our results point to a conceptual advance for reverse engineering beyond weight inference. Investigating topological changes under differential perturbations may address the longstanding problem of discriminating direct and indirect connectivities in biological networks. PMID:26420864

  2. Indirect comparisons of therapeutic interventions

    PubMed Central

    Schöttker, Ben; Lühmann, Dagmar; Boulkhemair, Dalila; Raspe, Heiner

    2009-01-01

    Health political background The comparison of the effectiveness of health technologies is not only laid down in German law (Social Code Book V, § 139 and § 35b) but also constitutes a central element of clinical guidelines and decision making in health care. Tools supporting decision making (e. g. Health Technology Assessments (HTA)) are therefore in need of a valid methodological repertoire for these comparisons. Scientific background Randomised controlled head-to-head trials which directly compare the effects of different therapies are considered the gold standard methodological approach for the comparison of the efficacy of interventions. Because this type of trial is rarely found, comparisons of efficacy often need to rely on indirect comparisons whose validity is being controversially debated. Research questions Research questions for the current assessment are: Which (statistical) methods for indirect comparisons of therapeutic interventions do exist, how often are they applied and how valid are their results in comparison to the results of head-to-head trials? Methods In a systematic literature research all medical databases of the German Institute of Medical Documentation and Information (DIMDI) are searched for methodological papers as well as applications of indirect comparisons in systematic reviews. Results of the literature analysis are summarized qualitatively for the characterisation of methods and quantitatively for the frequency of their application. The validity of the results from indirect comparisons is checked by comparing them to the results from the gold standard – a direct comparison. Data sets from systematic reviews which use both direct and indirect comparisons are tested for consistency by of the z-statistic. Results 29 methodological papers and 106 applications of indirect methods in systematic reviews are being analysed. Four methods for indirect comparisons can be identified: Unadjusted indirect comparisons include, independent of

  3. Structure of Cholesterol in Lipid Rafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toppozini, Laura; Meinhardt, Sebastian; Armstrong, Clare L.; Yamani, Zahra; Kučerka, Norbert; Schmid, Friederike; Rheinstädter, Maikel C.

    2014-11-01

    Rafts, or functional domains, are transient nano-or mesoscopic structures in the plasma membrane and are thought to be essential for many cellular processes such as signal transduction, adhesion, trafficking, and lipid or protein sorting. Observations of these membrane heterogeneities have proven challenging, as they are thought to be both small and short lived. With a combination of coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations and neutron diffraction using deuterium labeled cholesterol molecules, we observe raftlike structures and determine the ordering of the cholesterol molecules in binary cholesterol-containing lipid membranes. From coarse-grained computer simulations, heterogenous membranes structures were observed and characterized as small, ordered domains. Neutron diffraction was used to study the lateral structure of the cholesterol molecules. We find pairs of strongly bound cholesterol molecules in the liquid-disordered phase, in accordance with the umbrella model. Bragg peaks corresponding to ordering of the cholesterol molecules in the raftlike structures were observed and indexed by two different structures: a monoclinic structure of ordered cholesterol pairs of alternating direction in equilibrium with cholesterol plaques, i.e., triclinic cholesterol bilayers.

  4. Macrophage-mediated cholesterol handling in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A; Bobryshev, Yuri V; Orekhov, Alexander N

    2016-01-01

    Formation of foam cells is a hallmark at the initial stages of atherosclerosis. Monocytes attracted by pro-inflammatory stimuli attach to the inflamed vascular endothelium and penetrate to the arterial intima where they differentiate to macrophages. Intimal macrophages phagocytize oxidized low-density lipoproteins (oxLDL). Several scavenger receptors (SR), including CD36, SR-A1 and lectin-like oxLDL receptor-1 (LOX-1), mediate oxLDL uptake. In late endosomes/lysosomes of macrophages, oxLDL are catabolysed. Lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) hydrolyses cholesterol esters that are enriched in LDL to free cholesterol and free fatty acids. In the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), acyl coenzyme A: cholesterol acyltransferase-1 (ACAT1) in turn catalyses esterification of cholesterol to store cholesterol esters as lipid droplets in the ER of macrophages. Neutral cholesteryl ester hydrolases nCEH and NCEH1 are involved in a secondary hydrolysis of cholesterol esters to liberate free cholesterol that could be then out-flowed from macrophages by cholesterol ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters ABCA1 and ABCG1 and SR-BI. In atherosclerosis, disruption of lipid homoeostasis in macrophages leads to cholesterol accumulation and formation of foam cells. PMID:26493158

  5. Indirect reciprocity under incomplete observation.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Masuda, Naoki

    2011-07-01

    Indirect reciprocity, in which individuals help others with a good reputation but not those with a bad reputation, is a mechanism for cooperation in social dilemma situations when individuals do not repeatedly interact with the same partners. In a relatively large society where indirect reciprocity is relevant, individuals may not know each other's reputation even indirectly. Previous studies investigated the situations where individuals playing the game have to determine the action possibly without knowing others' reputations. Nevertheless, the possibility that observers of the game, who generate the reputation of the interacting players, assign reputations without complete information about them has been neglected. Because an individual acts as an interacting player and as an observer on different occasions if indirect reciprocity is endogenously sustained in a society, the incompleteness of information may affect either role. We examine the game of indirect reciprocity when the reputations of players are not necessarily known to observers and to interacting players. We find that the trustful discriminator, which cooperates with good and unknown players and defects against bad players, realizes cooperative societies under seven social norms. Among the seven social norms, three of the four suspicious norms under which cooperation (defection) to unknown players leads to a good (bad) reputation enable cooperation down to a relatively small observation probability. In contrast, the three trustful norms under which both cooperation and defection to unknown players lead to a good reputation are relatively efficient.

  6. Indirect Reciprocity; A Field Experiment

    PubMed Central

    van Apeldoorn, Jacobien; Schram, Arthur

    2016-01-01

    Indirect reciprocity involves cooperative acts towards strangers, either in response to their kindness to third parties (downstream) or after receiving kindness from others oneself (upstream). It is considered to be important for the evolution of cooperative behavior amongst humans. Though it has been widely studied theoretically, the empirical evidence of indirect reciprocity has thus far been limited and based solely on behavior in laboratory experiments. We provide evidence from an online environment where members can repeatedly ask and offer services to each other, free of charge. For the purpose of this study we created several new member profiles, which differ only in terms of their serving history. We then sent out a large number of service requests to different members from all over the world. We observe that a service request is more likely to be rewarded for those with a profile history of offering the service (to third parties) in the past. This provides clear evidence of (downstream) indirect reciprocity. We find no support for upstream indirect reciprocity (in this case, rewarding the service request after having previously received the service from third parties), however. Our evidence of downstream indirect reciprocity cannot be attributed to reputational effects concerning one’s trustworthiness as a service user. PMID:27043712

  7. Rapid labeling of lipoproteins in plasma with radioactive cholesterol. Application for measurement of plasma cholesterol esterification

    SciTech Connect

    Yen, F.T.; Nishida, T. )

    1990-02-01

    In order to efficiently and rapidly label lipoproteins in plasma with ({sup 3}H)cholesterol, micelles consisting of lysophosphatidylcholine (lysoPC) and ({sup 3}H)cholesterol (molar ratio, 50:1) were prepared. When trace amounts of these micelles were injected into plasma, ({sup 3}H)cholesterol rapidly equilibrated among the plasma lipoproteins, as compared to ({sup 3}H)cholesterol from an albumin-stabilized emulsion. The distributions of both ({sup 3}H)cholesterol and unlabeled free cholesterol in plasma lipoproteins were similar in labeled plasma samples. This method of labeling can be used for the measurement of cholesterol esterification, or lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase activity, in small amounts (20-40 microliters) of plasma samples.

  8. Black pepper and piperine reduce cholesterol uptake and enhance translocation of cholesterol transporter proteins.

    PubMed

    Duangjai, Acharaporn; Ingkaninan, Kornkanok; Praputbut, Sakonwun; Limpeanchob, Nanteetip

    2013-04-01

    Black pepper (Piper nigrum L.) lowers blood lipids in vivo and inhibits cholesterol uptake in vitro, and piperine may mediate these effects. To test this, the present study aimed to compare actions of black pepper extract and piperine on (1) cholesterol uptake and efflux in Caco-2 cells, (2) the membrane/cytosol distribution of cholesterol transport proteins in these cells, and (3) the physicochemical properties of cholesterol micelles. Piperine or black pepper extract (containing the same amount of piperine) dose-dependently reduced cholesterol uptake into Caco-2 cells in a similar manner. Both preparations reduced the membrane levels of NPC1L1 and SR-BI proteins but not their overall cellular expression. Micellar cholesterol solubility of lipid micelles was unaffected except by 1 mg/mL concentration of black pepper extract. These data suggest that piperine is the active compound in black pepper and reduces cholesterol uptake by internalizing the cholesterol transporter proteins.

  9. Pigs fed cholesterol neonatally have increased cerebrum cholesterol as young adults.

    PubMed

    Boleman, S L; Graf, T L; Mersmann, H J; Su, D R; Krook, L P; Savell, J W; Park, Y W; Pond, W G

    1998-12-01

    Sixty-eight female neonatal pigs selected for seven (Experiment 1) or eight (Experiment 2) generations for high (HG) or low (LG) plasma cholesterol were used to test the hypothesis that neonatal dietary cholesterol fed during the first 4 or 8 wk of postnatal life increases the cholesterol content of the cerebrum in young adulthood following free access to a high-fat (15%), high-cholesterol (0.5%) diet from 8 to 20 or 24 wk of age. Pigs were removed from their dams at 1 d of age and given free access to a sow-milk replacer diet containing 9.5% coconut fat and 0 or 0.5 % cholesterol. All pigs (except four HG and four LG pigs in Experiment 2, which were deprived of cholesterol throughout the study) were fed the high-fat, high-cholesterol diet from 8 wk to termination at 20 or 24 wk of age. Cerebrum weight and cholesterol concentration were higher in pigs fed cholesterol neonatally than in those deprived of cholesterol neonatally in both experiments, but weight and cholesterol concentration were unaffected by genetic line. Cholesterol concentrations in longissimus and semitendinosus muscles and in subcutaneous fat were unaffected by diet or genetic line. We conclude that dietary cholesterol deprivation during the first 4 to 8 wk of life in piglets is associated with lower cholesterol concentration and total content in the young adult cerebrum than in pigs supplemented with cholesterol in early life. These data support previous observations and suggest the possibility of a metabolic need for neonatal dietary cholesterol in normal brain development. PMID:9868199

  10. DNA-cholesterol barges as programmable membrane-exploring agents.

    PubMed

    Johnson-Buck, Alexander; Jiang, Shuoxing; Yan, Hao; Walter, Nils G

    2014-06-24

    DNA nanotechnology enables the precise construction of nanoscale devices that mimic aspects of natural biomolecular systems yet exhibit robustly programmable behavior. While many important biological processes involve dynamic interactions between components associated with phospholipid membranes, little progress has been made toward creating synthetic mimics of such interfacial systems. We report the assembly and characterization of cholesterol-labeled DNA origami "barges" capable of reversible association with and lateral diffusion on supported lipid bilayers. Using single-particle fluorescence microscopy, we show that these DNA barges rapidly and stably embed in lipid bilayers and exhibit Brownian diffusion in a manner dependent on both cholesterol labeling and bilayer composition. Tracking of individual barges rapidly generates super-resolution maps of the contiguous regions of a membrane. Addition of appropriate command oligonucleotides enables membrane-associated barges to reversibly exchange fluorescent cargo with bulk solution, dissociate from the membrane, or form oligomers within the membrane, opening up new possibilities for programmable membrane-bound molecular devices. PMID:24833515

  11. Neonatal dietary cholesterol and alleles of cholesterol 7-alpha hydroxylase affect piglet cerebrum weight, cholesterol concentration, and behavior

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This experiment was designed to test the effect of polymorphism in the cholesterol 7-alpha hydroxylase (CYP7) gene locus, and dietary cholesterol (C) on cerebrum C in neonatal pigs fed sow's milk formulas. Thirty-six pigs (18 male and 18 female) genetically selected for high (HG), or low (LG) plasma...

  12. Theoretical and testing performance of an innovative indirect evaporative chiller

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Yi; Xie, Xiaoyun

    2010-12-15

    An indirect evaporative chiller is a device used to produce chilled water at a temperature between the wet bulb temperature and dew point of the outdoor air, which can be used in building HVAC systems. This article presents a theoretical analysis and practical performance of an innovative indirect evaporative chiller. First, the process of the indirect evaporative chiller is introduced; then, the matching characteristics of the process are presented and analyzed. It can be shown that the process that produces cold water by using dry air is a nearly-reversible process, so the ideal produced chilled water temperature of the indirect evaporative chiller can be set close to the dew point temperature of the chiller's inlet air. After the indirect evaporative chiller was designed, simulations were done to analyze the output water temperature, the cooling efficiency relative to the inlet dew point temperature, and the COP that the chiller can performance. The first installation of the indirect evaporative chiller of this kind has been run for 5 years in a building in the city of Shihezi. The tested output water temperature of the chiller is around 14-20 C, which is just in between of the outdoor wet bulb temperature and dew point. The tested COP{sub r,s} of the developed indirect evaporative chiller reaches 9.1. Compared with ordinary air conditioning systems, the indirect evaporative chiller can save more than 40% in energy consumption due to the fact that the only energy consumed is from pumps and fans. An added bonus is that the indirect evaporative chiller uses no CFCs that pollute to the aerosphere. The tested internal parameters, such as the water-air flow rate ratio and heat transfer area for each heat transfer process inside the chiller, were analyzed and compared with designed values. The tested indoor air conditions, with a room temperature of 23-27 C and relative humidity of 50-70%, proved that the developed practical indirect evaporative chiller successfully

  13. Disruption of astrocyte-neuron cholesterol cross talk affects neuronal function in Huntington's disease

    PubMed Central

    Valenza, M; Marullo, M; Di Paolo, E; Cesana, E; Zuccato, C; Biella, G; Cattaneo, E

    2015-01-01

    In the adult brain, neurons require local cholesterol production, which is supplied by astrocytes through apoE-containing lipoproteins. In Huntington's disease (HD), such cholesterol biosynthesis in the brain is severely reduced. Here we show that this defect, occurring in astrocytes, is detrimental for HD neurons. Astrocytes bearing the huntingtin protein containing increasing CAG repeats secreted less apoE-lipoprotein-bound cholesterol in the medium. Conditioned media from HD astrocytes and lipoprotein-depleted conditioned media from wild-type (wt) astrocytes were equally detrimental in a neurite outgrowth assay and did not support synaptic activity in HD neurons, compared with conditions of cholesterol supplementation or conditioned media from wt astrocytes. Molecular perturbation of cholesterol biosynthesis and efflux in astrocytes caused similarly altered astrocyte–neuron cross talk, whereas enhancement of glial SREBP2 and ABCA1 function reversed the aspects of neuronal dysfunction in HD. These findings indicate that astrocyte-mediated cholesterol homeostasis could be a potential therapeutic target to ameliorate neuronal dysfunction in HD. PMID:25301063

  14. HDL-apolipoprotein A-I exchange is independently associated with cholesterol efflux capacity

    PubMed Central

    Borja, Mark S.; Ng, Kit F.; Irwin, Angela; Hong, Jaekyoung; Wu, Xing; Isquith, Daniel; Zhao, Xue-Qiao; Prazen, Bryan; Gildengorin, Virginia; Oda, Michael N.; Vaisar, Tomáš

    2015-01-01

    HDL is the primary mediator of cholesterol mobilization from the periphery to the liver via reverse cholesterol transport (RCT). A critical first step in this process is the uptake of cholesterol from lipid-loaded macrophages by HDL, a function of HDL inversely associated with prevalent and incident cardiovascular disease. We hypothesized that the dynamic ability of HDL to undergo remodeling and exchange of apoA-I is an important and potentially rate-limiting aspect of RCT. In this study, we investigated the relationship between HDL-apoA-I exchange (HAE) and serum HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) efflux capacity. We compared HAE to the total and ABCA1-specific cholesterol efflux capacity of 77 subjects. We found that HAE was highly correlated with both total (r = 0.69, P < 0.0001) and ABCA1-specific (r = 0.47, P < 0.0001) efflux, and this relationship remained significant after adjustment for HDL-C or apoA-I. Multivariate models of sterol efflux capacity indicated that HAE accounted for approximately 25% of the model variance for both total and ABCA1-specific efflux. We conclude that the ability of HDL to exchange apoA-I and remodel, as measured by HAE, is a significant contributor to serum HDL efflux capacity, independent of HDL-C and apoA-I, indicating that HDL dynamics are an important factor in cholesterol efflux capacity and likely RCT. PMID:26254308

  15. HDL-apolipoprotein A-I exchange is independently associated with cholesterol efflux capacity.

    PubMed

    Borja, Mark S; Ng, Kit F; Irwin, Angela; Hong, Jaekyoung; Wu, Xing; Isquith, Daniel; Zhao, Xue-Qiao; Prazen, Bryan; Gildengorin, Virginia; Oda, Michael N; Vaisar, Tomáš

    2015-10-01

    HDL is the primary mediator of cholesterol mobilization from the periphery to the liver via reverse cholesterol transport (RCT). A critical first step in this process is the uptake of cholesterol from lipid-loaded macrophages by HDL, a function of HDL inversely associated with prevalent and incident cardiovascular disease. We hypothesized that the dynamic ability of HDL to undergo remodeling and exchange of apoA-I is an important and potentially rate-limiting aspect of RCT. In this study, we investigated the relationship between HDL-apoA-I exchange (HAE) and serum HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) efflux capacity. We compared HAE to the total and ABCA1-specific cholesterol efflux capacity of 77 subjects. We found that HAE was highly correlated with both total (r = 0.69, P < 0.0001) and ABCA1-specific (r = 0.47, P < 0.0001) efflux, and this relationship remained significant after adjustment for HDL-C or apoA-I. Multivariate models of sterol efflux capacity indicated that HAE accounted for approximately 25% of the model variance for both total and ABCA1-specific efflux. We conclude that the ability of HDL to exchange apoA-I and remodel, as measured by HAE, is a significant contributor to serum HDL efflux capacity, independent of HDL-C and apoA-I, indicating that HDL dynamics are an important factor in cholesterol efflux capacity and likely RCT.

  16. Vasectomy reversal.

    PubMed

    Belker, A M

    1987-02-01

    A vasovasostomy may be performed on an outpatient basis with local anesthesia, but also may be performed on an outpatient basis with epidural or general anesthesia. Local anesthesia is preferred by most of my patients, the majority of whom choose this technique. With proper preoperative and intraoperative sedation, patients sleep lightly through most of the procedure. Because of the length of time often required for bilateral microsurgical vasoepididymostomy, epidural or general anesthesia and overnight hospitalization are usually necessary. Factors influencing the preoperative choice for vasovasostomy or vasoepididymostomy in patients undergoing vasectomy reversal are considered. The preoperative planned choice of vasovasostomy or vasoepididymostomy for patients having vasectomy reversal described herein does not have the support of all urologists who regularly perform these procedures. My present approach has evolved as the data reported in Tables 1 and 2 have become available, but it may change as new information is evaluated. However, it offers a logical method for planning choices of anesthesia and inpatient or outpatient status for patients undergoing vasectomy reversal procedures. PMID:3811050

  17. Vasectomy reversal.

    PubMed

    Belker, A M

    1987-02-01

    A vasovasostomy may be performed on an outpatient basis with local anesthesia, but also may be performed on an outpatient basis with epidural or general anesthesia. Local anesthesia is preferred by most of my patients, the majority of whom choose this technique. With proper preoperative and intraoperative sedation, patients sleep lightly through most of the procedure. Because of the length of time often required for bilateral microsurgical vasoepididymostomy, epidural or general anesthesia and overnight hospitalization are usually necessary. Factors influencing the preoperative choice for vasovasostomy or vasoepididymostomy in patients undergoing vasectomy reversal are considered. The preoperative planned choice of vasovasostomy or vasoepididymostomy for patients having vasectomy reversal described herein does not have the support of all urologists who regularly perform these procedures. My present approach has evolved as the data reported in Tables 1 and 2 have become available, but it may change as new information is evaluated. However, it offers a logical method for planning choices of anesthesia and inpatient or outpatient status for patients undergoing vasectomy reversal procedures.

  18. Dietary fish oil up-regulates cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase mRNA in mouse liver leading to an increase in bile acid and cholesterol excretion.

    PubMed

    Bérard, Annie M; Dumon, Marie-France; Darmon, Michel

    2004-02-13

    To investigate the molecular events controlling reverse cholesterol transport, we compared gene expression of normal mouse liver to that of mice fed a long chain (LC) omega-3 fatty acid-enriched diet. Using cDNA microarrays, we assessed expression levels of 1176 genes, and we found that D-site binding protein (DBP) was three-fold increased in mice on a LC omega-3 fatty acid-rich diet compared to controls. DBP is known to increase transcriptional level of cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase (C7alpha), the rate-limiting enzyme for bile acid production and cholesterol excretion, and we found that C7alpha mRNA was also up-regulated by LC omega-3 fatty acids. Moreover, liver X receptor-alpha, another transcription factor up-regulating C7alpha, was three- to four-fold increased in liver of treated mice. On the other hand, we demonstrated that bile acid and cholesterol excretion were two-fold increased. These results show that LC omega-3 fatty acids control cholesterol metabolism in mice at a new endpoint.

  19. [A history and review of cholesterol ester transfer protein inhibitors and their contribution to the understanding of the physiology and pathophysiology of high density lipoprotein].

    PubMed

    Corral, Pablo; Schreier, Laura

    2014-01-01

    There is irrefutable evidence that statins reduce the risk of cardiovascular events in a magnitude proportional to the intensity of the decrease in cholesterol transport by the low density lipoproteins. Despite this great advance there is still a residual risk of cardiovascular events. For this reason, an increase in the levels of high density lipoprotein is considered in order to boost the main action of this lipoprotein, which is reverse cholesterol transport. Distinct classes of evidence (epidemiological, genetic, and pathophysiological) show that the inhibition and/or modulation of cholesterol ester transfer protein increases plasma high density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels. The main reason for presenting this review is to look at the physiology of cholesterol ester transfer protein, its interrelationship with high density lipoproteins, and to give an update on the development of different cholesterol ester transfer protein inhibitor/modulator molecules. PMID:24094503

  20. [A history and review of cholesterol ester transfer protein inhibitors and their contribution to the understanding of the physiology and pathophysiology of high density lipoprotein].

    PubMed

    Corral, Pablo; Schreier, Laura

    2014-01-01

    There is irrefutable evidence that statins reduce the risk of cardiovascular events in a magnitude proportional to the intensity of the decrease in cholesterol transport by the low density lipoproteins. Despite this great advance there is still a residual risk of cardiovascular events. For this reason, an increase in the levels of high density lipoprotein is considered in order to boost the main action of this lipoprotein, which is reverse cholesterol transport. Distinct classes of evidence (epidemiological, genetic, and pathophysiological) show that the inhibition and/or modulation of cholesterol ester transfer protein increases plasma high density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels. The main reason for presenting this review is to look at the physiology of cholesterol ester transfer protein, its interrelationship with high density lipoproteins, and to give an update on the development of different cholesterol ester transfer protein inhibitor/modulator molecules.

  1. Total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein cholesterol, and high density lipoprotein cholesterol and coronary heart disease in Scotland.

    PubMed Central

    Hargreaves, A D; Logan, R L; Thomson, M; Elton, R A; Oliver, M F; Riemersma, R A

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To investigate long term changes in total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, and low density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations and in measures of other risk factors for coronary heart disease and to assess their importance for the development of coronary heart disease in Scottish men. DESIGN--Longitudinal study entailing follow up in 1988-9 of men investigated during a study in 1976. SETTING--Edinburgh, Scotland. SUBJECTS--107 men from Edinburgh who had taken part in a comparative study of risk factors for heart disease with Swedish men in 1976 when aged 40. INTERVENTION--The men were invited to attend a follow up clinic in 1988-9 for measurement of cholesterol concentrations and other risk factor measurements. Eighty three attended and 24 refused to or could not attend. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Changes in total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, and low density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations, body weight, weight to height index, prevalence of smoking, and alcohol intake; number of coronary artery disease events. RESULTS--Mean serum total cholesterol concentration increased over the 12 years mainly due to an increase in the low density lipoprotein cholesterol fraction (from 3.53 (SD 0.09) to 4.56 (0.11) mmol/l) despite a reduction in high density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration. Body weight and weight to height index increased. Fewer men smoked more than 15 cigarettes/day in 1988-9 than in 1976. Blood pressure remained stable and fasting triglyceride concentrations did not change. The frequency of corneal arcus doubled. Alcohol consumption decreased significantly. Eleven men developed clinical coronary heart disease. High low density lipoprotein and low high density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations in 1976, but not total cholesterol concentration, significantly predicted coronary heart disease (p = 0.05). Almost all of the men who developed coronary heart disease were smokers (91% v 53%, p less than

  2. Prosopis farcta beans increase HDL cholesterol and decrease LDL cholesterol in ostriches (Struthio camelus).

    PubMed

    Omidi, Arash; Ansari nik, Hossein; Ghazaghi, Mahmood

    2013-02-01

    Ten blue-neck male ostriches (Struthio camelus) were fed Prosopis farcta beans throughout a 30-day experiment. Blood samples were collected from ostriches on days 0 and 30 to measure levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, triglyceride, total serum protein, albumin, globulin, cholesterol, calcium, inorganic phosphorus, the activity of aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, and γ-glutamyl transferase (γ-GT). From days 0 to 30, HDL cholesterol, total protein, and globulins levels increased significantly whereas LDL cholesterol, inorganic phosphorus, and γ-GT activity decreased significantly.

  3. Indirect reciprocity with optional interactions.

    PubMed

    Ghang, Whan; Nowak, Martin A

    2015-01-21

    Indirect reciprocity is a mechanism for the evolution of cooperation that is relevant for prosocial behavior among humans. Indirect reciprocity means that my behavior towards you also depends on what you have done to others. Indirect reciprocity is associated with the evolution of social intelligence and human language. Most approaches to indirect reciprocity assume obligatory interactions, but here we explore optional interactions. In any one round a game between two players is offered. A cooperator accepts a game unless the reputation of the other player indicates a defector. For a game to take place, both players must accept. In a game between a cooperator and a defector, the reputation of the defector is revealed to all players with probability Q. After a sufficiently large number of rounds the identity of all defectors is known and cooperators are no longer exploited. The crucial condition for evolution of cooperation can be written as hQB>1, where h is the average number of rounds per person and B=(b/c)-1 specifies the benefit-to-cost ratio. We analyze both stochastic and deterministic evolutionary game dynamics. We study two extensions that deal with uncertainty: hesitation and malicious gossip.

  4. Indirect pulp capping: a survey.

    PubMed

    Kaplowitz, G J

    1992-01-01

    This study addresses the acceptance of the clinical practice of indirect pulp capping. State and regional dental boards and postgraduate dental education programs throughout the United States were surveyed. Results indicate that no clear consensus exists for the acceptance of this clinical procedure.

  5. Ecology: Dynamics of Indirect Extinction.

    PubMed

    Montoya, Jose M

    2015-12-01

    The experimental identification of the mechanism by which extinctions of predators trigger further predator extinctions emphasizes the role of indirect effects between species in disturbed ecosystems. It also has deep consequences for the hidden magnitude of the current biodiversity crisis. PMID:26654371

  6. Water Rockets and Indirect Measurement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inman, Duane

    1997-01-01

    Describes an activity that teaches a number of scientific concepts including indirect measurement, Newton's third law of motion, manipulating and controlling variables, and the scientific method of inquiry. Uses process skills such as observation, inference, prediction, mensuration, and communication as well as problem solving and higher-order…

  7. Indirect methods in nuclear astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertulani, C. A.; Shubhchintak; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Kadyrov, A. S.; Kruppa, A.; Pang, D. Y.

    2016-04-01

    We discuss recent developments in indirect methods used in nuclear astrophysics to determine the capture cross sections and subsequent rates of various stellar burning processes, when it is difficult to perform the corresponding direct measurements. We discuss in brief, the basic concepts of Asymptotic Normalization Coefficients, the Trojan Horse Method, the Coulomb Dissociation Method, (d,p), and charge-exchange reactions.

  8. Feedback control indirect response models.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yaping; D'Argenio, David Z

    2016-08-01

    A general framework is introduced for modeling pharmacodynamic processes that are subject to autoregulation, which combines the indirect response (IDR) model approach with methods from classical feedback control of engineered systems. The canonical IDR models are modified to incorporate linear combinations of feedback control terms related to the time course of the difference (the error signal) between the pharmacodynamic response and its basal value. Following the well-established approach of traditional engineering control theory, the proposed feedback control indirect response models incorporate terms proportional to the error signal itself, the integral of the error signal, the derivative of the error signal or combinations thereof. Simulations are presented to illustrate the types of responses produced by the proposed feedback control indirect response model framework, and to illustrate comparisons with other PK/PD modeling approaches incorporating feedback. In addition, four examples from literature are used to illustrate the implementation and applicability of the proposed feedback control framework. The examples reflect each of the four mechanisms of drug action as modeled by each of the four canonical IDR models and include: selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and extracellular serotonin; histamine H2-receptor antagonists and gastric acid; growth hormone secretagogues and circulating growth hormone; β2-selective adrenergic agonists and potassium. The proposed feedback control indirect response approach may serve as an exploratory modeling tool and may provide a bridge for development of more mechanistic systems pharmacology models. PMID:27394724

  9. Cholesterol synthesis inhibitors protect against platelet-activating factor-induced neuronal damage

    PubMed Central

    Bate, Clive; Rumbold, Louis; Williams, Alun

    2007-01-01

    Background Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is implicated in the neuronal damage that accompanies ischemia, prion disease and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Since some epidemiological studies demonstrate that statins, drugs that reduce cholesterol synthesis, have a beneficial effect on mild AD, we examined the effects of two cholesterol synthesis inhibitors on neuronal responses to PAF. Methods Primary cortical neurons were treated with cholesterol synthesis inhibitors (simvastatin or squalestatin) prior to incubation with different neurotoxins. The effects of these drugs on neuronal cholesterol levels and neuronal survival were measured. Immunoblots were used to determine the effects of simvastatin or squalestatin on the distribution of the PAF receptor and an enzyme linked immunoassay was used to quantify the amounts of PAF receptor. Results PAF killed primary neurons in a dose-dependent manner. Pre-treatment with simvastatin or squalestatin reduced neuronal cholesterol and increased the survival of PAF-treated neurons. Neuronal survival was increased 50% by 100 nM simvastatin, or 20 nM squalestatin. The addition of mevalonate restored cholesterol levels, and reversed the protective effect of simvastatin. Simvastatin or squalestatin did not affect the amounts of the PAF receptor but did cause it to disperse from within lipid rafts. Conclusion Treatment of neurons with cholesterol synthesis inhibitors including simvastatin and squalestatin protected neurons against PAF. Treatment caused a percentage of the PAF receptors to disperse from cholesterol-sensitive domains. These results raise the possibility that the effects of statins on neurodegenerative disease are, at least in part, due to desensitisation of neurons to PAF. PMID:17233902

  10. MUC Expression in Gallbladder Epithelial Tissues in Cholesterol-Associated Gallbladder Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Kyo-Sang; Choi, Ho Soon; Jun, Dae Won; Lee, Hang Lak; Lee, Oh Young; Yoon, Byung Chul; Lee, Kyeong Geun; Paik, Seung Sam; Kim, Yong Seok; Lee, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Gallstone pathogenesis is linked to mucin hypersecretion and bacterial infection. Several mucin genes have been identified in gallbladder epithelial cells (GBECs). We investigated MUC expression in cholesterol-associated gallbladder disease and evaluated the relationship between mucin and bacterial infection. Methods The present study involved 20 patients with cholesterol stones with cholecystitis, five with cholesterol stones with cholesterolosis, six with cholesterol polyps, two with gallbladder cancer, and six controls. Canine GBECs treated with lipopolysaccharide were also studied. MUC3, MUC5AC, MUC5B, and MUC6 antibodies were used for dot/slot immunoblotting and immunohistochemical studies of the gallbladder epithelial tissues, canine GBECs, and bile. Reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction was performed to evaluate MUC3 and MUC5B expression. Results MUC3, MUC5AC, MUC5B, and MUC6 were expressed in the normal gallbladder epithelium, and of those, MUC3 and MUC5B exhibited the highest expression levels. Greatly increased levels of MUC3 and MUC5B expression were observed in the cholesterol stone group, and slightly increased levels were observed in the cholesterol polyp group; MUC3 and MUC5B mRNA was also upregulated in those groups. Canine GBECs treated with lipopolysaccharide also showed upregulation of MUC3 and MUC5B. Conclusions The mucin genes with the highest expression levels in gallbladder tissue in cholesterol-associated diseases were MUC3 and MUC5B. Cholesterol stones and gallbladder infections were associated with increased MUC3 and MUC5B expression. PMID:27563024

  11. 19 CFR 10.816 - Indirect materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Indirect materials. 10.816 Section 10.816 Customs... Rules of Origin § 10.816 Indirect materials. Indirect materials are to be disregarded in determining..., except that the cost of such indirect materials may be included in meeting the value-content...

  12. 19 CFR 10.776 - Indirect materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Indirect materials. 10.776 Section 10.776 Customs... Rules of Origin § 10.776 Indirect materials. Indirect materials are to be disregarded in determining..., except that the cost of such indirect materials may be included in meeting the value-content...

  13. 19 CFR 10.816 - Indirect materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Indirect materials. 10.816 Section 10.816 Customs... Rules of Origin § 10.816 Indirect materials. Indirect materials are to be disregarded in determining..., except that the cost of such indirect materials may be included in meeting the value-content...

  14. 19 CFR 10.776 - Indirect materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Indirect materials. 10.776 Section 10.776 Customs... Rules of Origin § 10.776 Indirect materials. Indirect materials are to be disregarded in determining..., except that the cost of such indirect materials may be included in meeting the value-content...

  15. 19 CFR 10.776 - Indirect materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Indirect materials. 10.776 Section 10.776 Customs... Rules of Origin § 10.776 Indirect materials. Indirect materials are to be disregarded in determining..., except that the cost of such indirect materials may be included in meeting the value-content...

  16. 19 CFR 10.879 - Indirect materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Indirect materials. 10.879 Section 10.879 Customs... of Origin § 10.879 Indirect materials. Indirect materials are to be disregarded in determining..., except that the cost of such indirect materials may be included in meeting the value-content...

  17. 19 CFR 10.816 - Indirect materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Indirect materials. 10.816 Section 10.816 Customs... Rules of Origin § 10.816 Indirect materials. Indirect materials are to be disregarded in determining..., except that the cost of such indirect materials may be included in meeting the value-content...

  18. 19 CFR 10.776 - Indirect materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Indirect materials. 10.776 Section 10.776 Customs... Rules of Origin § 10.776 Indirect materials. Indirect materials are to be disregarded in determining..., except that the cost of such indirect materials may be included in meeting the value-content...

  19. 19 CFR 10.879 - Indirect materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Indirect materials. 10.879 Section 10.879 Customs... of Origin § 10.879 Indirect materials. Indirect materials are to be disregarded in determining..., except that the cost of such indirect materials may be included in meeting the value-content...

  20. 19 CFR 10.879 - Indirect materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Indirect materials. 10.879 Section 10.879 Customs... of Origin § 10.879 Indirect materials. Indirect materials are to be disregarded in determining..., except that the cost of such indirect materials may be included in meeting the value-content...

  1. 19 CFR 10.816 - Indirect materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Indirect materials. 10.816 Section 10.816 Customs... Rules of Origin § 10.816 Indirect materials. Indirect materials are to be disregarded in determining..., except that the cost of such indirect materials may be included in meeting the value-content...

  2. 19 CFR 10.776 - Indirect materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Indirect materials. 10.776 Section 10.776 Customs... Rules of Origin § 10.776 Indirect materials. Indirect materials are to be disregarded in determining..., except that the cost of such indirect materials may be included in meeting the value-content...

  3. Analysis of cholesterol trafficking with fluorescent probes

    PubMed Central

    Maxfield, Frederick R.; Wüstner, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Cholesterol plays an important role in determining the biophysical properties of biological membranes, and its concentration is tightly controlled by homeostatic processes. The intracellular transport of cholesterol among organelles is a key part of the homeostatic mechanism, but sterol transport processes are not well understood. Fluorescence microscopy is a valuable tool for studying intracellular transport processes, but this method can be challenging for lipid molecules because addition of a fluorophore may alter the properties of the molecule greatly. We discuss the use of fluorescent molecules that can bind to cholesterol to reveal its distribution in cells. We also discuss the use of intrinsically fluorescent sterols that closely mimic cholesterol, as well as some minimally modified fluorophore-labeled sterols. Methods for imaging these sterols by conventional fluorescence microscopy and by multiphoton microscopy are described. Some label-free methods for imaging cholesterol itself are also discussed briefly. PMID:22325611

  4. Dysregulation of Plasmalogen Homeostasis Impairs Cholesterol Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Honsho, Masanori; Abe, Yuichi; Fujiki, Yukio

    2015-11-27

    Plasmalogen biosynthesis is regulated by modulating fatty acyl-CoA reductase 1 stability in a manner dependent on cellular plasmalogen level. However, physiological significance of the regulation of plasmalogen biosynthesis remains unknown. Here we show that elevation of the cellular plasmalogen level reduces cholesterol biosynthesis without affecting the isoprenylation of proteins such as Rab and Pex19p. Analysis of intermediate metabolites in cholesterol biosynthesis suggests that the first oxidative step in cholesterol biosynthesis catalyzed by squalene monooxygenase (SQLE), an important regulator downstream HMG-CoA reductase in cholesterol synthesis, is reduced by degradation of SQLE upon elevation of cellular plasmalogen level. By contrast, the defect of plasmalogen synthesis causes elevation of SQLE expression, resulting in the reduction of 2,3-epoxysqualene required for cholesterol synthesis, hence implying a novel physiological consequence of the regulation of plasmalogen biosynthesis.

  5. Cholesterol-lowering effect of plant sterols.

    PubMed

    AbuMweis, Suhad S; Jones, Peter J H

    2008-12-01

    Plant sterols are plant components that have a chemical structure similar to cholesterol except for the addition of an extra methyl or ethyl group; however, plant sterol absorption in humans is considerably less than that of cholesterol. In fact, plant sterols reduce cholesterol absorption and thus reduce circulating levels of cholesterol. Earlier studies that have tested the efficacy of plant sterols as cholesterol-lowering agents incorporated plant sterols into fat spreads. Later on, plant sterols were added to other food matrices, including juices, nonfat beverages, milk and yogurt, cheese, meat, croissants and muffins, and cereal and chocolate bars. The beneficial physiologic effects of plant sterols could be further enhanced by combining them with other beneficial substances, such as olive and fish oils, fibers, and soy proteins, or with exercise. The addition of plant sterols to the diet is suggested by health experts as a safe and effective way to reduce the risk of coronary heart disease. PMID:18937893

  6. Cholesterol granulomas in three meerkats (Suricata suricatta).

    PubMed

    Sladky, K K; Dalldorf, F G; Steinberg, H; Wright, J F; Loomis, M R

    2000-11-01

    Cholesterol granulomas are uncommon pathologic lesions in animals, although they are important intracranial tumors in humans. This report describes cholesterol granulomas associated with multiple organ systems of three captive meerkats. In the most severe case, meerkat No. 1, the pathologic behavior of the cholesterol granuloma was unique in that it appeared to locally invade the cerebrum and calvarium, possibly contributing to neurological deficits observed antemortem. A review of other meerkat necropsies revealed incidental, asymptomatic cholesterol granulomas in organs of two other individuals, meerkat Nos. 2 and 3. Histologically, all lesions were composed of cholesterol clefts admixed with large, foamy macrophages containing hemosiderin, multinucleated giant cells, lymphocytes, plasma cells, and foci of mineralization. Hypercholesterolemia was documented in two of the three meerkats.

  7. Cholesterol in myelin biogenesis and hypomyelinating disorders.

    PubMed

    Saher, Gesine; Stumpf, Sina Kristin

    2015-08-01

    The largest pool of free cholesterol in mammals resides in myelin membranes. Myelin facilitates rapid saltatory impulse propagation by electrical insulation of axons. This function is achieved by ensheathing axons with a tightly compacted stack of membranes. Cholesterol influences myelination at many steps, from the differentiation of myelinating glial cells, over the process of myelin membrane biogenesis, to the functionality of mature myelin. Cholesterol emerged as the only integral myelin component that is essential and rate-limiting for the development of myelin in the central and peripheral nervous system. Moreover, disorders that interfere with sterol synthesis or intracellular trafficking of cholesterol and other lipids cause hypomyelination and neurodegeneration. This review summarizes recent results on the roles of cholesterol in CNS myelin biogenesis in normal development and under different pathological conditions. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Brain Lipids.

  8. Cholesterol granulomas in three meerkats (Suricata suricatta).

    PubMed

    Sladky, K K; Dalldorf, F G; Steinberg, H; Wright, J F; Loomis, M R

    2000-11-01

    Cholesterol granulomas are uncommon pathologic lesions in animals, although they are important intracranial tumors in humans. This report describes cholesterol granulomas associated with multiple organ systems of three captive meerkats. In the most severe case, meerkat No. 1, the pathologic behavior of the cholesterol granuloma was unique in that it appeared to locally invade the cerebrum and calvarium, possibly contributing to neurological deficits observed antemortem. A review of other meerkat necropsies revealed incidental, asymptomatic cholesterol granulomas in organs of two other individuals, meerkat Nos. 2 and 3. Histologically, all lesions were composed of cholesterol clefts admixed with large, foamy macrophages containing hemosiderin, multinucleated giant cells, lymphocytes, plasma cells, and foci of mineralization. Hypercholesterolemia was documented in two of the three meerkats. PMID:11105964

  9. Elevated free cholesterol in a p62 overexpression model of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Yvette; Kessler, Sonja M; Gemperlein, Katja; Bohle, Rainer M; Müller, Rolf; Haybaeck, Johannes; Kiemer, Alexandra K

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To characterize how insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) mRNA binding protein p62/IMP2-2 promotes steatohepatitis in the absence of dietary cholesterol. METHODS: Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) was induced in wild-type mice and in mice overexpressing p62 specifically in the liver by feeding the mice a methionine and choline deficient (MCD) diet for either two or four weeks. As a control, animals were fed a methionine and choline supplemented diet. Serum triglycerides, cholesterol, glucose, aspartate aminotransferase and alanine transaminase were determined by standard analytical techniques. Hepatic gene expression was determined by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Generation of reactive oxygen species in liver tissue was quantified as thiobarbituric acid reactive substances using a photometric assay and malondialdehyde as a standard. Tissue fatty acid profiles and cholesterol levels were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry after hydrolysis. Hepatocellular iron accumulation was determined by Prussian blue staining in paraffin-embedded formalin-fixed tissue. Filipin staining on frozen liver tissue was used to quantify hepatic free cholesterol levels. Additionally, nuclear localization of the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) subunit p65 was examined in frozen tissues. RESULTS: Liver-specific overexpression of the insulin-like growth factor 2 mRNA binding protein 2-2 (IGF2BP2-2/IMP2-2/p62) induces steatosis with regular chow and amplifies NASH-induced fibrosis in the MCD mouse model. Activation of NF-κB and expression of NF-κB target genes suggested an increased inflammatory response in p62 transgenic animals. Analysis of hepatic lipid composition revealed an elevation of monounsaturated fatty acids as well as increased hepatic cholesterol. Moreover, serum cholesterol was significantly elevated in p62 transgenic mice. Dietary cholesterol represents a critical factor for the development of NASH from hepatic steatosis

  10. Physiological and pathological implications of cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Cortes, Victor A; Busso, Dolores; Maiz, Alberto; Arteaga, Antonio; Nervi, Flavio; Rigotti, Attilio

    2014-01-01

    Cholesterol has evolved to fulfill sophisticated biophysical, cell signaling and endocrine requirements of animal systems. At a cellular level, cholesterol is found in membranes, where it increases both bilayer stiffness and impermeability to water and ions. Furthermore, cholesterol is integrated into specialized lipid-protein membrane microdomains with critical topographical and signaling functions. At an organismal level, cholesterol is the precursor for all steroid hormones, including gluco- and mineralo-corticoids, sex hormones and vitamin D, all of which regulate carbohydrate, sodium, reproductive and bone homeostasis, respectively. This sterol is also the precursor for bile acids, which are important for intestinal absorption of dietary lipids as well as energy and glucose metabolic regulation. Importantly, complex mechanisms maintain cholesterol within physiological ranges and the disregulation of these mechanisms results in embryonic or adult diseases, caused by either excessive or reduced tissue cholesterol levels. The causative role of cholesterol in these diseases has been demonstrated by diverse genetic and pharmacologic animal models that are commented in this review. PMID:24389193

  11. Cholesterol Asymmetry in Synaptic Plasma Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Wood, W. Gibson; Igbavboa, Urule; Müller, Walter E.; Eckert, Gunter P.

    2010-01-01

    Lipids are essential for the structural and functional integrity of membranes. Membrane lipids are not randomly distributed but are localized in different domains. A common characteristic of these membrane domains is their association with cholesterol. Lipid rafts and caveolae are examples of cholesterol enriched domains, which have attracted keen interest. However, two other important cholesterol domains are the exofacial and cytofacial leaflets of the plasma membrane. The two leaflets that make up the bilayer differ in their fluidity, electrical charge, lipid distribution, and active sites of certain proteins. The synaptic plasma membrane (SPM) cytofacial leaflet contains over 85% of the total SPM cholesterol as compared with the exofacial leaflet. This asymmetric distribution of cholesterol is not fixed or immobile but can be modified by different conditions in vivo: 1) chronic ethanol consumption; 2) statins; 3) aging; and 4) apoE isoform. Several potential candidates have been proposed as mechanisms involved in regulation of SPM cholesterol asymmetry: apoE, low-density-lipoprotein receptor, sterol carrier protein-2, fatty acid binding proteins, polyunsaturated fatty acids, p-glycoprotein and caveolin-1. This review examines cholesterol asymmetry in SPM, potential mechanisms of regulation and impact on membrane structure and function. PMID:21214553

  12. Perturbed cholesterol homeostasis in aging spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, Gemma M; Dayas, Christopher V; Smith, Doug W

    2016-09-01

    The spinal cord is vital for the processing of sensorimotor information and for its propagation to and from both the brain and the periphery. Spinal cord function is affected by aging, however, the mechanisms involved are not well-understood. To characterize molecular mechanisms of spinal cord aging, microarray analyses of gene expression were performed on cervical spinal cords of aging rats. Of the metabolic and signaling pathways affected, cholesterol-associated pathways were the most comprehensively altered, including significant downregulation of cholesterol synthesis-related genes and upregulation of cholesterol transport and metabolism genes. Paradoxically, a significant increase in total cholesterol content was observed-likely associated with cholesterol ester accumulation. To investigate potential mechanisms for the perturbed cholesterol homeostasis, we quantified the expression of myelin and neuroinflammation-associated genes and proteins. Although there was minimal change in myelin-related expression, there was an increase in phagocytic microglial and astrogliosis markers, particularly in the white matter. Together, these results suggest that perturbed cholesterol homeostasis, possibly as a result of increased inflammatory activation in spinal cord white matter, may contribute to impaired spinal cord function with aging.

  13. Tau pathology induces intraneuronal cholesterol accumulation.

    PubMed

    Glöckner, Frauke; Ohm, Thomas G

    2014-09-01

    Epidemiologic and experimental data suggest the involvement of cholesterol metabolism in the development and progression of Alzheimer disease and Niemann-Pick type C disease, but not of frontotemporal dementias. In these 3 neurodegenerative diseases, however, protein tau hyperphosphorylation and aggregation into neurofibrillary tangles are observed. To elucidate the relationship between cholesterol and tau, we compared sterol levels of neurons burdened with neurofibrillary tangles with those of their unaffected neighbors using semiquantitative filipin fluorescence microscopy in mice expressing P301L mutant human tau (a well-described model of FTDP-17) and in P301L transgenic mice lacking apolipoprotein E (the major cholesterol transporter in the brain). Cellular unesterified cholesterol was higher in neurons affected by tau pathology irrespective of apolipoprotein E deficiency. This argues for an impact of tau pathology on cellular cholesterol homeostasis. We suggest that there is a bidirectional mode of action: Disturbances in cellular cholesterol metabolism may promote tau pathology, but tau pathology may also alter neuronal cholesterol homeostasis; once it is established, a vicious cycle may promote neurofibrillary tangle formation.

  14. Protein kinase activators alter glial cholesterol esterification

    SciTech Connect

    Jeng, I.; Dills, C.; Klemm, N.; Wu, C.

    1986-05-01

    Similar to nonneural tissues, the activity of glial acyl-CoA cholesterol acyltransferase is controlled by a phosphorylation and dephosphorylation mechanism. Manipulation of cyclic AMP content did not alter the cellular cholesterol esterification, suggesting that cyclic AMP is not a bioregulator in this case. Therefore, the authors tested the effect of phorbol-12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) on cellular cholesterol esterification to determine the involvement of protein kinase C. PMA has a potent effect on cellular cholesterol esterification. PMA depresses cholesterol esterification initially, but cells recover from inhibition and the result was higher cholesterol esterification, suggesting dual effects of protein kinase C. Studies of other phorbol analogues and other protein kinase C activators such as merezein indicate the involvement of protein kinase C. Oleoyl-acetyl glycerol duplicates the effect of PMA. This observation is consistent with a diacyl-glycerol-protein kinase-dependent reaction. Calcium ionophore A23187 was ineffective in promoting the effect of PMA. They concluded that a calcium-independent and protein C-dependent pathway regulated glial cholesterol esterification.

  15. Physiological and pathological implications of cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Cortes, Victor A; Busso, Dolores; Maiz, Alberto; Arteaga, Antonio; Nervi, Flavio; Rigotti, Attilio

    2014-01-01

    Cholesterol has evolved to fulfill sophisticated biophysical, cell signaling and endocrine requirements of animal systems. At a cellular level, cholesterol is found in membranes, where it increases both bilayer stiffness and impermeability to water and ions. Furthermore, cholesterol is integrated into specialized lipid-protein membrane microdomains with critical topographical and signaling functions. At an organismal level, cholesterol is the precursor for all steroid hormones, including gluco- and mineralo-corticoids, sex hormones and vitamin D, all of which regulate carbohydrate, sodium, reproductive and bone homeostasis, respectively. This sterol is also the precursor for bile acids, which are important for intestinal absorption of dietary lipids as well as energy and glucose metabolic regulation. Importantly, complex mechanisms maintain cholesterol within physiological ranges and the disregulation of these mechanisms results in embryonic or adult diseases, caused by either excessive or reduced tissue cholesterol levels. The causative role of cholesterol in these diseases has been demonstrated by diverse genetic and pharmacologic animal models that are commented in this review.

  16. Cholesterol-sensitive Modulation of Transcytosis

    PubMed Central

    Leyt, Julieta; Melamed-Book, Naomi; Vaerman, Jean-Pierre; Cohen, Shulamit; Weiss, Aryeh M.

    2007-01-01

    Cholesterol-rich membrane domains (e.g., lipid rafts) are thought to act as molecular sorting machines, capable of coordinating the organization of signal transduction pathways within limited regions of the plasma membrane and organelles. The significance of these domains in polarized postendocytic sorting is currently not understood. We show that dimeric IgA stimulates the incorporation of its receptor into cholesterol-sensitive detergent-resistant membranes confined to the basolateral surface/basolateral endosomes. A fraction of human transferrin receptor was also found in basolateral detergent-resistant membranes. Disrupting these membrane domains by cholesterol depletion (using methyl-β-cyclodextrin) before ligand-receptor internalization caused depolarization of traffic from endosomes, suggesting that cholesterol in basolateral lipid rafts plays a role in polarized sorting after endocytosis. In contrast, cholesterol depletion performed after ligand internalization stimulated cargo transcytosis. It also stimulated caveolin-1 phosphorylation on tyrosine 14 and the appearance of the activated protein in dimeric IgA-containing apical organelles. We propose that cholesterol depletion stimulates the coupling of transcytotic and caveolin-1 signaling pathways, consequently prompting the membranes to shuttle from endosomes to the plasma membrane. This process may represent a unique compensatory mechanism required to maintain cholesterol balance on the cell surface of polarized epithelia. PMID:17392516

  17. Perturbed cholesterol homeostasis in aging spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, Gemma M; Dayas, Christopher V; Smith, Doug W

    2016-09-01

    The spinal cord is vital for the processing of sensorimotor information and for its propagation to and from both the brain and the periphery. Spinal cord function is affected by aging, however, the mechanisms involved are not well-understood. To characterize molecular mechanisms of spinal cord aging, microarray analyses of gene expression were performed on cervical spinal cords of aging rats. Of the metabolic and signaling pathways affected, cholesterol-associated pathways were the most comprehensively altered, including significant downregulation of cholesterol synthesis-related genes and upregulation of cholesterol transport and metabolism genes. Paradoxically, a significant increase in total cholesterol content was observed-likely associated with cholesterol ester accumulation. To investigate potential mechanisms for the perturbed cholesterol homeostasis, we quantified the expression of myelin and neuroinflammation-associated genes and proteins. Although there was minimal change in myelin-related expression, there was an increase in phagocytic microglial and astrogliosis markers, particularly in the white matter. Together, these results suggest that perturbed cholesterol homeostasis, possibly as a result of increased inflammatory activation in spinal cord white matter, may contribute to impaired spinal cord function with aging. PMID:27459933

  18. Recurring exon deletions in the haptoglobin (HP) gene associate with lower blood cholesterol levels

    PubMed Central

    Boettger, Linda M.; Salem, Rany M.; Handsaker, Robert E.; Peloso, Gina; Kathiresan, Sekar; Hirschhorn, Joel; McCarroll, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    Two exons of the human haptoglobin (HP) gene exhibit copy number variation that affects HP multimerization and underlies one of the first protein polymorphisms identified in humans. The evolutionary origins and medical significance of this polymorphism have been uncertain. Here we show that this variation has likely arisen from the recurring reversion of an ancient hominin-specific duplication of these exons. Though this polymorphism has been largely invisible to genome-wide genetic studies to date, we describe a way to analyze it by imputation from SNP haplotypes and find among 22,288 individuals that these HP exonic deletions associate with reduced LDL and total cholesterol levels. We show that these deletions, and a SNP that affects HP expression, are the likely drivers of the strong but complex association of cholesterol levels to SNPs near HP. Recurring exonic deletions in the haptoglobin gene likely enhance human health by lowering cholesterol levels in the blood. PMID:26901066

  19. Measurement of lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase activity with the use of a Peptide-proteoliposome substrate.

    PubMed

    Vaisman, Boris L; Remaley, Alan T

    2013-01-01

    Lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) is the major enzyme responsible for the esterification of free cholesterol on plasma lipoproteins, which is a key step in the reverse cholesterol transport pathway. The measurement of plasma LCAT activity not only is important in the diagnosis of patients with genetic or acquired LCAT deficiency but is also valuable in calculating cardiovascular risk, as well as in research studies of lipoprotein metabolism. In this chapter, we describe a convenient LCAT assay based on the use of an apoA-I mimetic peptide. The proteoliposome substrate used in this assay for LCAT is easily made with the peptide and can be stored by deep freezing without significant loss of activity. PMID:23912995

  20. Cholesterol content in European bovine milk fats.

    PubMed

    Precht, D

    2001-02-01

    Data about the cholesterol content in edible fats like bovine milk fat are important for balancing the cholesterol intake with food. A comparison of 3 different cholesterol determination methods showed that with the direct analysis by a 25 m long TAP steel capillary column the same results could be obtained as with a time-consuming saponification standard method including thin-layer chromatographic cleaning and subsequent silylation. On the other hand with a rapid direct method using a short packed column 21% unsaponifiables as e.g. minor sterols or hydrocarbons could be found in the "cholesterol peak". The analysis of 1142 German milk fats led to a mean cholesterol content of 265.6 +/- 20.0 mg/100 g fat (range: 204.4 to 382.5). For 165 milk fats from other 12 EU-countries, a similar mean cholesterol content of 258.5 +/- 19.9 mg/100 g fat (range: 215.0 to 331.6) was detected. Compared with sufficiently fed cows, underfed cows demonstrated an approx. 10.1% lower mean cholesterol content (238.7 +/- 9.7 mg/100 g fat). On the other hand, during the first 7 days post partum, the colostrum showed a significantly higher mean cholesterol content of 327.2 +/- 99.0 mg/100 g fat (n = 15; range: 213.1 to 583.9). Further, with special conditions as feeding of rape-seed the cholesterol content can be significantly lowered by 8-13%. An extraordinary lowering up to 50% can be reached by dry fractionation of milk fat (stearin "hard" fraction).

  1. Tissue storage and control of cholesterol metabolism in man on high cholesterol diets.

    PubMed

    Quintão, E C; Brumer, S; Stechhahn, K

    1977-03-01

    The possibility of accumulation of tissue cholesterol in human beings submitted to high cholesterol feeding was investigated in liver biopsies and through fecal sterol balance studies. Feeding to 10 individuals 3.1 to 3.4 g/day of cholesterol for 3 weeks raised the mean serum level from 293 to 349 mg/100 ml, namely 19%, whereas the liver cholesterol content was 417 mg/100 g of wet weight. In 10 control cases eating 0.1--0.4 g/day of cholesterol serum cholesterol remained stable throughout the experimental period and the liver cholesterol content was 256 mg/100 g. Difference of liver colesterol level between the two groups was 62%. In 7 patients submitted to two periods of balance investigation on a cholesterol-free synthetic formula diet respectively prior to (PI) and after (PIII) eating the high cholesterol solid food from 4 to 15 weeks (PII), fecal steroid excretion in PIII exceeded PI in 3 patients. Such data are a direct evidence for the existence of an efficient system to release acutely stored cholesterol. In one patient bile acid excretion accounted for the difference between PIII and PI. PMID:849375

  2. Tissue storage and control of cholesterol metabolism in man on high cholesterol diets.

    PubMed

    Quintão, E C; Brumer, S; Stechhahn, K

    1977-03-01

    The possibility of accumulation of tissue cholesterol in human beings submitted to high cholesterol feeding was investigated in liver biopsies and through fecal sterol balance studies. Feeding to 10 individuals 3.1 to 3.4 g/day of cholesterol for 3 weeks raised the mean serum level from 293 to 349 mg/100 ml, namely 19%, whereas the liver cholesterol content was 417 mg/100 g of wet weight. In 10 control cases eating 0.1--0.4 g/day of cholesterol serum cholesterol remained stable throughout the experimental period and the liver cholesterol content was 256 mg/100 g. Difference of liver colesterol level between the two groups was 62%. In 7 patients submitted to two periods of balance investigation on a cholesterol-free synthetic formula diet respectively prior to (PI) and after (PIII) eating the high cholesterol solid food from 4 to 15 weeks (PII), fecal steroid excretion in PIII exceeded PI in 3 patients. Such data are a direct evidence for the existence of an efficient system to release acutely stored cholesterol. In one patient bile acid excretion accounted for the difference between PIII and PI.

  3. Cholesterol Depletion from a Ceramide/Cholesterol Mixed Monolayer: A Brewster Angle Microscope Study

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Pritam; Noutsi, Pakiza; Chaieb, Sahraoui

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol is crucial to the mechanical properties of cell membranes that are important to cells’ behavior. Its depletion from the cell membranes could be dramatic. Among cyclodextrins (CDs), methyl beta cyclodextrin (MβCD) is the most efficient to deplete cholesterol (Chol) from biomembranes. Here, we focus on the depletion of cholesterol from a C16 ceramide/cholesterol (C16-Cer/Chol) mixed monolayer using MβCD. While the removal of cholesterol by MβCD depends on the cholesterol concentration in most mixed lipid monolayers, it does not depend very much on the concentration of cholesterol in C16-Cer/Chol monolayers. The surface pressure decay during depletion were described by a stretched exponential that suggested that the cholesterol molecules are unable to diffuse laterally and behave like static traps for the MβCD molecules. Cholesterol depletion causes morphology changes of domains but these disrupted monolayers domains seem to reform even when cholesterol level was low. PMID:27245215

  4. Cholesterol homeostasis in cardiovascular disease and recent advances in measuring cholesterol signatures.

    PubMed

    Seo, Hong Seog; Choi, Man Ho

    2015-09-01

    Despite the biochemical importance of cholesterol, its abnormal metabolism has serious cellular consequences that lead to endocrine disorders such as cardiovascular disease (CVD). Nevertheless, the impact of blood cholesterol as a CVD risk factor is still debated, and treatment with cholesterol-lowering drugs remains controversial, particularly in older patients. Although, the prevalence of CVD increases with age, the underlying mechanisms for this phenomenon are not well understood, and metabolic changes have not been confirmed as predisposing factors of atherogenesis. The quantification of circulating biomarkers for cholesterol homeostasis is therefore warranted, and reference values for cholesterol absorption and synthesis should be determined in order to establish CVD risk factors. The traditional lipid profile is often derived rather than directly measured and lacks a universal standard to interpret the results. In contrast, mass spectrometry-based cholesterol profiling can accurately measure free cholesterol as a biologically active component. This approach allows to detect alterations in various metabolic pathways that control cholesterol homeostasis, by quantitative analysis of cholesterol and its precursors/metabolites as well as dietary sterols. An overview of the mechanism of cholesterol homeostasis under different physiological conditions may help to identify predictive biomarkers of concomitant atherosclerosis and conventional CVD risk factors.

  5. Raising HDL cholesterol in women

    PubMed Central

    Eapen, Danny J; Kalra, Girish L; Rifai, Luay; Eapen, Christina A; Merchant, Nadya; Khan, Bobby V

    2010-01-01

    High-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) concentration is essential in the determination of coronary heart disease (CHD) risk in women. This is especially true in the postmenopausal state, where lipid profiles and CHD risk mimic that of age-matched men. Thus, interventions designed to reduce CHD risk by raising HDL-C levels may have particular significance during the transition to menopause. This review discusses HDL-C-raising therapies and the role of HDL in the primary prevention of CHD in women. Lifestyle-based interventions such as dietary change, aerobic exercise regimens, and smoking cessation are initial steps that are effective in raising HDL-C, and available data suggest women respond similarly to men with these interventions. When combined with pharmacotherapy, the effects of these lifestyle alterations are further amplified. Though studies demonstrating gender-specific differences in therapy are limited, niacin continues to be the most effective agent in raising HDL-C levels, especially when used in combination with fibrate or statin therapy. Emerging treatments such as HDL mimetic therapy show much promise in further raising HDL-C levels and improving cardiovascular outcomes. PMID:21072287

  6. Genetic therapies to lower cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Khoo, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    This review surveys the state-of-the-art in genetic therapies for familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH), caused most commonly by mutations in the LDL receptor (LDLR) gene. FH manifests as highly elevated low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels and consequently accelerated atherosclerosis. Modern pharmacological therapies for FH are insufficiently efficacious to prevent premature cardiovascular disease, can cause significant adverse effects and can be expensive. Genetic therapies for FH have been mooted since the mid 1990s but gene replacement strategies using viral vectors have so far been unsuccessful. Other strategies involve knocking down the expression of Apolipoprotein B100 (APOB100) and the protease PCSK9 which designates LDLR for degradation. The antisense oligonucleotide mipomersen, which knocks down APOB100, is currently marketed (with restrictions) in the USA, but is not approved in Europe due to its adverse effects. To address this problem, we have devised a novel therapeutic concept, APO-skip, which is based on modulation of APOB splicing, and which has the potential to deliver a cost-effective, efficacious and safe therapy for FH.

  7. Synthetic High-Density Lipoprotein-Like Nanocarrier Improved Cellular Transport of Lysosomal Cholesterol in Human Sterol Carrier Protein-Deficient Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Nam, Da-Eun; Kim, Ok-Kyung; Park, Yoo Kyoung; Lee, Jeongmin

    2016-01-01

    Sterol carrier protein-2 (SCP-2), which is not found in tissues of people with Zellweger syndrome, facilitates the movement of cholesterol within cells, resulting in abnormal accumulation of cholesterol in SCP-2-deficient cells. This study investigated whether synthetic high-density lipoprotein-like nanocarrier (sHDL-NC) improves the cellular transport of lysosomal cholesterol to plasma membrane in SCP-2-deficient fibroblasts. Human SCP-2-deficient fibroblasts were incubated with [(3)H-cholesterol]LDL as a source of cholesterol and sHDL-NC. The cells were fractionated by centrifugation permit tracking of [(3)H]-cholesterol from lysosome into plasma membrane. Furthermore, cellular content of cholesteryl ester as a storage form and mRNA expression of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor were measured to support the cholesterol transport to plasma membrane. Incubation with sHDL-NC for 8 h significantly increased uptake of [(3)H]-cholesterol to lysosome by 53% and further enhanced the transport of [(3)H]-cholesterol to plasma membrane by 32%. Treatment with sHDL-NC significantly reduced cellular content of cholesteryl ester and increased mRNA expression of LDL receptor (LDL-R). In conclusion, sHDL-NC enables increased transport of lysosomal cholesterol to plasma membrane. In addition, these data were indirectly supported by decreased cellular content of cholesteryl ester and increased gene expression of LDL-R. Therefore, sHDL-NC may be a useful vehicle for transporting cholesterol, which may help to prevent accumulation of cholesterol in SCP-2-deficient fibroblasts.

  8. Acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ta-Yuan; Li, Bo-Liang; Chang, Catherine C. Y.; Urano, Yasuomi

    2009-01-01

    The enzymes acyl-coenzyme A (CoA):cholesterol acyltransferases (ACATs) are membrane-bound proteins that utilize long-chain fatty acyl-CoA and cholesterol as substrates to form cholesteryl esters. In mammals, two isoenzymes, ACAT1 and ACAT2, encoded by two different genes, exist. ACATs play important roles in cellular cholesterol homeostasis in various tissues. This chapter summarizes the current knowledge on ACAT-related research in two areas: 1) ACAT genes and proteins and 2) ACAT enzymes as drug targets for atherosclerosis and for Alzheimer's disease. PMID:19141679

  9. Impact of HIV-1 Membrane Cholesterol on Cell-Independent Lytic Inactivation and Cellular Infectivity.

    PubMed

    Kalyana Sundaram, Ramalingam Venkat; Li, Huiyuan; Bailey, Lauren; Rashad, Adel A; Aneja, Rachna; Weiss, Karl; Huynh, James; Bastian, Arangaserry Rosemary; Papazoglou, Elisabeth; Abrams, Cameron; Wrenn, Steven; Chaiken, Irwin

    2016-01-26

    Peptide triazole thiols (PTTs) have been found previously to bind to HIV-1 Env spike gp120 and cause irreversible virus inactivation by shedding gp120 and lytically releasing luminal capsid protein p24. Since the virions remain visually intact, lysis appears to occur via limited membrane destabilization. To better understand the PTT-triggered membrane transformation involved, we investigated the role of envelope cholesterol on p24 release by measuring the effect of cholesterol depletion using methyl beta-cyclodextrin (MβCD). An unexpected bell-shaped response of PTT-induced lysis to [MβCD] was observed, involving lysis enhancement at low [MβCD] vs loss of function at high [MβCD]. The impact of cholesterol depletion on PTT-induced lysis was reversed by adding exogenous cholesterol and other sterols that support membrane rafts, while sterols that do not support rafts induced only limited reversal. Cholesterol depletion appears to cause a reduced energy barrier to lysis as judged by decreased temperature dependence with MβCD. Enhancement/replenishment responses to [MβCD] also were observed for HIV-1 infectivity, consistent with a similar energy barrier effect in the membrane transformation of virus cell fusion. Overall, the results argue that cholesterol in the HIV-1 envelope is important for balancing virus stability and membrane transformation, and that partial depletion, while increasing infectivity, also makes the virus more fragile. The results also reinforce the argument that the lytic inactivation and infectivity processes are mechanistically related and that membrane transformations occurring during lysis can provide an experimental window to investigate membrane and protein factors important for HIV-1 cell entry.

  10. Triglycerides, total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol and low density lipoprotein cholesterol in rats exposed to premium motor spirit fumes

    PubMed Central

    Aberare, Ogbevire L.; Okuonghae, Patrick; Mukoro, Nathaniel; Dirisu, John O.; Osazuwa, Favour; Odigie, Elvis; Omoregie, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Background: Deliberate and regular exposure to premium motor spirit fumes is common and could be a risk factor for liver disease in those who are occupationally exposed. A possible association between premium motor spirit fumes and plasma levels of triglyceride, total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol and low density lipoprotein cholesterol using a rodent model could provide new insights in the pathology of diseases where cellular dysfunction is an established risk factor. Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible effect of premium motor spirit fumes on lipids and lipoproteins in workers occupationally exposed to premium motor spirit fumes using rodent model. Materials and Methods: Twenty-five Wister albino rats (of both sexes) were used for this study between the 4th of August and 7th of September, 2010. The rats were divided into five groups of five rats each. Group 1 rats were not exposed to premium motor spirit fumes (control group), group 2 rats were exposed for 1 hour daily, group 3 for 3 hours daily, group 4 for 5 hours daily and group 5 for 7 hours daily. The experiment lasted for a period of 4 weeks. Blood samples obtained from all the groups after 4 weeks of exposure were used for the estimation of plasma levels of triglyceride, total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein- cholesterol and low density lipoprotein- cholesterol. Result: Results showed significant increase in means of plasma total cholesterol and low density lipoprotein levels (P<0.05). The mean triglyceride and total body weight were significantly lower (P<0.05) in the exposed group when compared with the unexposed. The plasma level of high density lipoprotein, the ratio of low density lipoprotein to high density lipoprotein and the ratio of total cholesterol to high density lipoprotein did not differ significantly in exposed subjects when compared with the control group. Conclusion: These results showed that frequent exposure to petrol fumes may be highly

  11. Where does the interplay between cholesterol absorption and synthesis in the context of statin and/or ezetimibe treatment stand today?

    PubMed

    Descamps, Olivier S; De Sutter, Johan; Guillaume, Michel; Missault, Luc

    2011-08-01

    The evidence of the different concepts underlying the interplay between cholesterol absorption and synthesis in the context of statin and ezetimibe treatment were reviewed in the light of the eight major trials where cholesterol absorption and synthesis were analyzed on a large scale using the plasma levels of precursors of cholesterol and plant sterols. The only concept supported in all studies is a significant and consistent increase of cholesterol absorption with statin (correlated with the inhibition of synthesis) and of cholesterol synthesis with ezetimibe, whereas in combination, statin and ezetimibe reduce both cholesterol synthesis and absorption. In contrast, most of the other concepts failed to be clearly proven. At baseline, the inverse relationship between cholesterol absorption and synthesis (only examined in two studies) was found to be weak. On statin treatment, four studies showed that the changes in cholesterol synthesis and absorption, contributed less than 9% to the variability in cholesterol response to statin therapy. It has not been consistently demonstrated that good absorbers/bad synthesizers are bad responders to statin (6 studies) and good responders for ezetimibe (3 studies). There is also no clear inverse correlation between LDL reduction on statin treatment and that on ezetimibe treatment. Finally, the original idea from the first pioneer study of Miettinen et al. that, the higher the baseline intestinal ability to absorb cholesterol, the lower the benefit on the clinical cardiovascular outcomes was not reproduced in the PROSPER study. In conclusion, with the exception of a reverse effect of statin and ezetimibe on absorption and synthesis, most ideas supporting the interplay between cholesterol absorption and synthesis lacked consistency between studies. At present, the use of the plasma levels of plant sterols and cholesterol precursors as markers of cholesterol absorption and synthesis is far too limited to definitively solve these

  12. Association of lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase activity measured as a serum cholesterol esterification rate and low-density lipoprotein heterogeneity with cardiovascular risk: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Tani, Shigemasa; Takahashi, Atsuhiko; Nagao, Ken; Hirayama, Atsushi

    2016-06-01

    The cholesterol-esterifying enzyme, lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT), is believed to play a key role in reverse cholesterol transport. However, recent investigations have demonstrated that higher LCAT activity levels increase the formation of triglyceride (TG)-rich lipoproteins (TRLs) and atherogenesis. We hypothesized that higher LCAT activity measured as a serum cholesterol esterification rate by the endogenous substrate method might increase the formation of TRLs and thereby alter low-density lipoprotein (LDL) heterogeneity. The estimated LDL particle size [relative LDL migration (LDL-Rm)] was measured by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with the LipoPhor system (Joko, Tokyo, Japan) in 538 consecutive patients with at least risk factor for atherosclerosis. Multivariate regression analysis after adjustments for traditional risk factors identified elevated TRL-related marker (TG, remnant-like particle cholesterol, apolipoprotein C-II, and apolipoprotein C-III) levels as independent predictors of smaller-sized LDL particle size, both in the overall subject population and in the subset of patients with serum LDL cholesterol levels of <100 mg/dL. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of the LCAT activity (0.79; sensitivity 60 %; specificity 84.8 %) was observed for the evaluation of the indicators of an LDL-Rm value of ≥0.40, which suggests the presence of large amounts of small-dense LDL. The results lend support to the hypothesis that increased LCAT activity may be associated with increased formation of TRLs, leading to a reduction in LDL particle size. Therefore, to reduce the risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, it may be of importance to pay attention not only to a quantitative change in the serum LDL-C, but also to the LCAT activity which is possibly associated with LDL heterogeneity. PMID:25894629

  13. A fluorescent cholesterol analogue for observation of free cholesterol in the plasma membrane of live cells.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Yoshikatsu; Tanaka, Mutsuo

    2016-01-01

    Free cholesterol in mammalian cells resides mostly in the plasma membrane, where it plays an important role in cellular homeostasis. We synthesized a new fluorescent cholesterol analogue that retained an intact alkyl chain and the sterane backbone of cholesterol. The hydroxyl group of cholesterol was converted into an amino group that was covalently linked to the fluorophore tetramethylrhodamine to retain the ability to form hydrogen bonds with adjacent molecules. Incubating live MDCK (Madin-Darby canine kidney) cells with our fluorescent cholesterol analogue resulted in the generation of intense signals that were detected by microscopy at the plasma membrane. Incubation with the analogue exerted minimal, if any, influence on cell growth, indicating that it could serve as a useful tool for analyzing free cholesterol at the plasma membrane.

  14. Niacin Reduces Atherosclerosis Development in APOE*3Leiden.CETP Mice Mainly by Reducing NonHDL-Cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Heemskerk, Mattijs M.; Pieterman, Elsbet J.; van Klinken, Jan B.; van den Berg, Sjoerd A. A.; Smit, Johannes W. A.; Havekes, Louis M.; Rensen, Patrick C. N.; van der Hoorn, José W. A.; Princen, Hans M. G.; Jukema, J. Wouter

    2013-01-01

    Objective Niacin potently lowers triglycerides, mildly decreases LDL-cholesterol, and largely increases HDL-cholesterol. Despite evidence for an atheroprotective effect of niacin from previous small clinical studies, the large outcome trials, AIM-HIGH and HPS2-THRIVE did not reveal additional beneficial effects of niacin (alone or in combination with laropiprant) on top of statin treatment. We aimed to address this apparent discrepancy by investigating the effects of niacin without and with simvastatin on atherosclerosis development and determine the underlying mechanisms, in APOE*3Leiden.CETP mice, a model for familial dysbetalipoproteinemia (FD). Approach and Results Mice were fed a western-type diet containing cholesterol without or with niacin (120 mg/kg/day), simvastatin (36 mg/kg/day) or their combination for 18 weeks. Similarly as in FD patients, niacin reduced total cholesterol by -39% and triglycerides by −50%, (both P<0.001). Simvastatin and the combination reduced total cholesterol (−30%; −55%, P<0.001) where the combination revealed a greater reduction compared to simvastatin (−36%, P<0.001). Niacin decreased total cholesterol and triglycerides primarily by increasing VLDL clearance. Niacin increased HDL-cholesterol (+28%, P<0.01) and mildly increased reverse cholesterol transport. All treatments reduced monocyte adhesion to the endothelium (−46%; −47%, P<0.01; −53%, P<0.001), atherosclerotic lesion area (−78%; −49%, P<0.01; −87%, P<0.001) and severity. Compared to simvastatin, the combination increased plaque stability index [(SMC+collagen)/macrophages] (3-fold, P<0.01). Niacin and the combination reduced T cells in the aortic root (−71%, P<0.01; −81%, P<0.001). Lesion area was strongly predicted by nonHDL-cholesterol (R2 = 0.69, P<0.001) and to a much lesser extent by HDL-cholesterol (R2 = 0.20, P<0.001). Conclusion Niacin decreases atherosclerosis development mainly by reducing nonHDL-cholesterol with modest HDL-cholesterol

  15. Drinking deep seawater decreases serum total and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol in hypercholesterolemic subjects.

    PubMed

    Fu, Zhao-Yang; Yang, Feili Lo; Hsu, Hsin-Wen; Lu, Yi-Fa

    2012-06-01

    Drinking deep seawater (DSW) with high levels of magnesium (Mg) decreased serum lipids in animal studies. Therefore the effects of drinking DSW on blood lipids and its antioxidant capacity in hypercholesterolemic subjects were investigated. DSW was first prepared by a process of filtration and reverse osmosis, and then the concentrated DSW with high levels of Mg was diluted as drinking DSW. Forty-two hypercholesterolemic volunteers were randomly divided into three groups: reverse osmotic (RO) water, DSW (Mg: 395 mg/L, hardness 1410 ppm), and magnesium-chloride fortified (MCF) water (Mg: 386 mg/L, hardness 1430 ppm). The subjects drank 1050 mL of water daily for 6 weeks, and blood samples were collected and analyzed on weeks 0, 3, and 6. Drinking DSW caused a decrease in blood total cholesterol levels and this effect was progressively enhanced with time. Serum low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) was also decreased by DSW. Further, total cholesterol levels of subjects in the DSW group were significantly lower than those in the MCF water or RO water groups. Compared with week 0, the DSW group had higher blood Mg level on weeks 3 and 6, but the Mg levels were within the normal range in all three groups. DSW consumption also lowered thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) values in serum. In conclusion, DSW was apparently effective in reducing blood total cholesterol and LDL-C, and also in decreasing lipid peroxidation in hypercholesterolemic subjects.

  16. [Cholesterol and atherosclerosis. Historical considerations and treatment].

    PubMed

    Zárate, Arturo; Manuel-Apolinar, Leticia; Basurto, Lourdes; De la Chesnaye, Elsa; Saldívar, Iván

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol is a precursor of steroid hormones and an essential component of the cell membrane, however, altered regulation of the synthesis, absorption and excretion of cholesterol predispose to cardiovascular diseases of atherosclerotic origin. Despite, the recognition of historical events for 200 years, starting with Michel Chevreul naming «cholesterol»; later on, Lobstein coining the term atherosclerosis and Marchand introducing it, Anichkov identifying cholesterol in atheromatous plaque, and Brown and Goldstein discovering LDL receptor; as well as the emerging of different drugs, such as fibrates, statins and cetrapibs this decade, promising to increase HDL and the most recent ezetimibe and anti-PCSK9 to inhibit the degradation of LDL receptor, however morbidity has not been reduced in cardiovascular disease. PMID:26774359

  17. [Cholesterol and atherosclerosis. Historical considerations and treatment].

    PubMed

    Zárate, Arturo; Manuel-Apolinar, Leticia; Basurto, Lourdes; De la Chesnaye, Elsa; Saldívar, Iván

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol is a precursor of steroid hormones and an essential component of the cell membrane, however, altered regulation of the synthesis, absorption and excretion of cholesterol predispose to cardiovascular diseases of atherosclerotic origin. Despite, the recognition of historical events for 200 years, starting with Michel Chevreul naming «cholesterol»; later on, Lobstein coining the term atherosclerosis and Marchand introducing it, Anichkov identifying cholesterol in atheromatous plaque, and Brown and Goldstein discovering LDL receptor; as well as the emerging of different drugs, such as fibrates, statins and cetrapibs this decade, promising to increase HDL and the most recent ezetimibe and anti-PCSK9 to inhibit the degradation of LDL receptor, however morbidity has not been reduced in cardiovascular disease.

  18. Cholesterol and F-actin are required for clustering of recycling synaptic vesicle proteins in the presynaptic plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Dason, Jeffrey S; Smith, Alex J; Marin, Leo; Charlton, Milton P

    2014-02-15

    Synaptic vesicles (SVs) and their proteins must be recycled for sustained synaptic transmission. We tested the hypothesis that SV cholesterol is required for proper sorting of SV proteins during recycling in live presynaptic terminals. We used the reversible block of endocytosis in the Drosophila temperature-sensitive dynamin mutant shibire-ts1 to trap exocytosed SV proteins, and then examined the effect of experimental treatments on the distribution of these proteins within the presynaptic plasma membrane by confocal microscopy. SV proteins synaptotagmin, vglut and csp were clustered following SV trapping in control experiments but dispersed in samples treated with the cholesterol chelator methyl-β-cyclodextrin to extract SV cholesterol. There was accumulation of phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-bisphosphate (PIP2) in presynaptic terminals following SV trapping and this was reduced following SV cholesterol extraction. Reduced PIP2 accumulation was associated with disrupted accumulation of actin in presynaptic terminals. Similar to vesicular cholesterol extraction, disruption of actin by latrunculin A after SV proteins had been trapped on the plasma membrane resulted in the dispersal of SV proteins and prevented recovery of synaptic transmission due to impaired endocytosis following relief of the endocytic block. Our results demonstrate that vesicular cholesterol is required for aggregation of exocytosed SV proteins in the presynaptic plasma membrane and are consistent with a mechanism involving regulation of PIP2 accumulation and local actin polymerization by cholesterol. Thus, alteration of membrane or SV lipids may affect the ability of synapses to undergo sustained synaptic transmission by compromising the recycling of SV proteins.

  19. Niacin and cholesterol: role in cardiovascular disease (review).

    PubMed

    Ganji, Shobha H; Kamanna, Vaijinath S; Kashyap, Moti L

    2003-06-01

    Niacin has been widely used as a pharmacologic agent to regulate abnormalities in plasma lipid and lipoprotein metabolism and in the treatment of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Although the use of niacin in the treatment of dyslipidemia has been reported as early as 1955, only recent studies have yielded an understanding about the cellular and molecular mechanism of action of niacin on lipid and lipoprotein metabolism. In brief, the beneficial effect of niacin to reduce triglycerides and apolipoprotein-B containing lipoproteins (e.g., VLDL and LDL) are mainly through: a) decreasing fatty acid mobilization from adipose tissue triglyceride stores, and b) inhibiting hepatocyte diacylglycerol acyltransferase and triglyceride synthesis leading to increased intracellular apo B degradation and subsequent decreased secretion of VLDL and LDL particles. The mechanism of action of niacin to raise HDL is by decreasing the fractional catabolic rate of HDL-apo AI without affecting the synthetic rates. Additionally, niacin selectively increases the plasma levels of Lp-AI (HDL subfraction without apo AII), a cardioprotective subfraction of HDL in patients with low HDL. Using human hepatocytes (Hep G2 cells) as an in vitro model system, recent studies indicate that niacin selectively inhibits the uptake/removal of HDL-apo AI (but not HDL-cholesterol ester) by hepatocytes, thereby increasing the capacity of retained HDL-apo AI to augment cholesterol efflux through reverse cholesterol transport pathway. The studies discussed in this review provide evidence to extend the role of niacin as a lipid-lowering drug beyond its role as a vitamin.

  20. High-Density Lipoprotein Function Measurement in Human Studies: Focus on Cholesterol Efflux Capacity.

    PubMed

    Rohatgi, Anand

    2015-01-01

    A low plasma level of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (HDL-C) is a major risk factor for the development of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD). However, several observations have highlighted the shortcomings of using cholesterol content as the sole reflection of HDL metabolism. In particular, several large randomized controlled trials of extended release niacin and cholesteryl-ester transfer protein (CETP) inhibitors on background statin therapy have failed to show improvement in ASCVD outcomes despite significant increases in HDL-C. Reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) is the principal HDL function that impacts macrophage foam cell formation and other functions such as endothelial activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase, monocyte adhesion, and platelet aggregation. Cholesterol efflux from macrophages to plasma/serum reflects the first critical step of RCT and is considered a key anti-atherosclerotic function of HDL. Whether this function is operative in humans remains to be seen, but recent studies assessing cholesterol efflux in humans suggest that the cholesterol efflux capacity (CEC) of human plasma or serum is a potent marker of ASCVD risk. This review describes the methodology of measuring CEC ex vivo from human samples and the findings to date linking CEC to human disease. Studies to date confirm that CEC can be reliably measured using stored human blood samples as cholesterol acceptors and suggest that CEC may be a promising new biomarker for atherosclerotic and metabolic diseases. Further studies are needed to standardize measurements and clarify the role CEC may play in predicting risk of developing disease and response to therapies. PMID:25968932

  1. [Low HDL-cholesterol--an important risk factor for cardiovascular diseases].

    PubMed

    Reiner, Zeljko; Muacević-Katanec, Diana; Katanec, Davor; Tedeschi-Reiner, Eugenia

    2011-01-01

    It has been known for quite a long time that the concentration of HDL-cholesterol correlates inversely with cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk and that low HDL-cholesterol is an independent CVD risk factor. This review aims to highlight evidence on several topics concerning the role of HDL particles and the importance of HDL-cholesterol. The main antiatherogenic functions of HDL particles are presented in details--reverse cholesterol transport, but also their anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-thrombotic and anti-apoptotic properties as well as endothelial stabilizing and repair properties. Lifestyle management of low HDL-cholesterol is explained, particularly physical activity and aerobic exercise, smoking cessation, weight reduction in the overweight individuals and composition of the diet but also moderate alcohol consumption stressing the fact that HDL particles from alcoholics are dysfunctional. This is important since it has been shown that it is not only the quantity of HDL particles, and thus HDL-cholesterol level in plasma, that matters, but their quality and impaired functionality as well. HDL from diabetic subjects also lose some of their antiatherogenic properties but a common feature of patients with diabetes type 2 is atherogenic dyslipidemia which is characterized exactly by low HDL-cholesterol and high triglycerides. Diabetic patients with such dyslipidemia are at particularly high CVD risk and the results of recent studies such as ACCORD-Lipid suggest that in them treatment of these lipid abnormalities may be beneficial. Treatment options with fibrates, particularly fenofibrate, and niacin are discussed based upon published trials, as well as combination therapy with these medicines and other lipid-lowering drugs.

  2. High-Density Lipoprotein Function Measurement in Human Studies: Focus on Cholesterol Efflux Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Rohatgi, Anand

    2015-01-01

    A low plasma level of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (HDL-C) is a major risk factor for the development of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD). However, several observations have highlighted the shortcomings of using cholesterol content as the sole reflection of HDL metabolism. In particular, several large randomized controlled trials of extended release niacin and cholesteryl-ester transfer protein (CETP) inhibitors on background statin therapy have failed to show improvement in ASCVD outcomes despite significant increases in HDL-C. Reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) is the principal HDL function that impacts macrophage foam cell formation and other functions such as endothelial activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase, monocyte adhesion, and platelet aggregation. Cholesterol efflux from macrophages to plasma/serum reflects the first critical step of RCT and is considered a key anti-atherosclerotic function of HDL. Whether this function is operative in humans remains to be seen, but recent studies assessing cholesterol efflux in humans suggest that the cholesterol efflux capacity (CEC) of human plasma or serum is a potent marker of ASCVD risk. This review describes the methodology of measuring CEC ex vivo from human samples and the findings to date linking CEC to human disease. Studies to date confirm that CEC can be reliably measured using stored human blood samples as cholesterol acceptors and suggest that CEC may be a promising new biomarker for atherosclerotic and metabolic diseases. Further studies are needed to standardize measurements and clarify the role CEC may play in predicting risk of developing disease and response to therapies. PMID:25968932

  3. Arctigenin promotes cholesterol efflux from THP-1 macrophages through PPAR-γ/LXR-α signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Xiaolin; Li, Qian; Pang, Liewen; Huang, Guoqian; Huang, Jiechun; Shi, Meng; Sun, Xiaotian; Wang, Yiqing

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: •Arctigenin enhanced cholesterol efflux in oxLDL-loaded THP-1 macrophages. •The expression of ABCA1, ABCG1 and apoE was upregulated in arctigenin-treated cells. •Arctigenin promoted the expression of PPAR-γ and LXR-α. •Inhibition of PPAR-γ or LXR-α reversed arctigenin-mediated biological effects. •Arctigenin promotes cholesterol efflux via activation of PPAR-γ/LXR-α/ABCA1 pathway. -- Abstract: Cholesterol efflux from macrophages is a critical mechanism to prevent the development of atherosclerosis. Here, we sought to investigate the effects of arctigenin, a bioactive component of Arctium lappa, on the cholesterol efflux in oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL)-loaded THP-1 macrophages. Our data showed that arctigenin significantly accelerated apolipoprotein A-I- and high-density lipoprotein-induced cholesterol efflux in both dose- and time-dependent manners. Moreover, arctigenin treatment enhanced the expression of ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), ABCG1, and apoE, all of which are key molecules in the initial step of cholesterol efflux, at both mRNA and protein levels. Arctigenin also caused a concentration-dependent elevation in the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-γ) and liver X receptor-alpha (LXR-α). The arctigenin-mediated induction of ABCA1, ABCG1, and apoE was abolished by specific inhibition of PPAR-γ or LXR-α using small interfering RNA technology. Our results collectively indicate that arctigenin promotes cholesterol efflux in oxLDL-loaded THP-1 macrophages through upregulation of ABCA1, ABCG1 and apoE, which is dependent on the enhanced expression of PPAR-γ and LXR-α.

  4. High-Density Lipoprotein Function Measurement in Human Studies: Focus on Cholesterol Efflux Capacity.

    PubMed

    Rohatgi, Anand

    2015-01-01

    A low plasma level of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (HDL-C) is a major risk factor for the development of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD). However, several observations have highlighted the shortcomings of using cholesterol content as the sole reflection of HDL metabolism. In particular, several large randomized controlled trials of extended release niacin and cholesteryl-ester transfer protein (CETP) inhibitors on background statin therapy have failed to show improvement in ASCVD outcomes despite significant increases in HDL-C. Reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) is the principal HDL function that impacts macrophage foam cell formation and other functions such as endothelial activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase, monocyte adhesion, and platelet aggregation. Cholesterol efflux from macrophages to plasma/serum reflects the first critical step of RCT and is considered a key anti-atherosclerotic function of HDL. Whether this function is operative in humans remains to be seen, but recent studies assessing cholesterol efflux in humans suggest that the cholesterol efflux capacity (CEC) of human plasma or serum is a potent marker of ASCVD risk. This review describes the methodology of measuring CEC ex vivo from human samples and the findings to date linking CEC to human disease. Studies to date confirm that CEC can be reliably measured using stored human blood samples as cholesterol acceptors and suggest that CEC may be a promising new biomarker for atherosclerotic and metabolic diseases. Further studies are needed to standardize measurements and clarify the role CEC may play in predicting risk of developing disease and response to therapies.

  5. The influence of temperature, cholesterol content and pH on liposome stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sułkowski, W. W.; Pentak, D.; Nowak, K.; Sułkowska, A.

    2005-06-01

    The EPR and NMR spectroscopy was used to determine the influence of temperature (297-340 K), cholesterol and pH on liposome membranes obtained by modified reverse-phase method (mREV). For preparation of liposomes, L-α-phosphatidylcholine dipalmitoyl (DPPC) and 5-cholesten-3β-ol (cholesterol), main component of the membrane, were used in the molar ratio DPPC/cholesterol 4, 8 and 16 at pH range 1.9-8.4. The liposomes not containing cholesterol were prepared as reference. 31P NMR spectra point to the bilayer structure of the membrane. Incorporation of the 4-dimethyl-2-(carboxypropyl)-2-tridecyl-3-oxazolidynyloksyl (5-DOXYL) into the liposome membrane allowed for the estimation of the 2 Amax parameter and observation of liposome structural changes. The transition of a membrane structure from tilted gel (L β') via ripple gel phase (P β') to a more fluid liquid-crystalline phase (L α) with temperature increase was observed. The greatest changes in properties of the obtained membrane were found for cholesterol concentration 0.5-1.0 mol. The S order parameter, characteristic for liposome structural changes decreases with temperature increase and decreasing pH. For liposome without cholesterol, the values of this parameter are slightly lower while a distinct change is observed at the temperature range 310 - 315 K and for pH equal to 1.9 and 5.0. This confirms higher membrane fluidity in these conditions. The values 7.4-8.4 of pH only slightly affect the membrane fluidity as well as the cholesterol content higher than 0.5 mole per 4 moles of DPPC. The temperature dependence of 1H NMR resonances allows us to propose the model of orientation of phospholipide in the membrane.

  6. Serum cholesterol concentration and coronary heart disease in population with low cholesterol concentrations.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Z; Peto, R; Collins, R; MacMahon, S; Lu, J; Li, W

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To examine the relation between serum cholesterol concentration and mortality (from coronary heart disease and from other causes) below the range of cholesterol values generally seen in Western populations. DESIGN--Prospective observational study based on 8-13 years of follow up of subjects in a population with low cholesterol concentrations. SETTING--Urban Shanghai, China. SUBJECTS--9021 Chinese men and women aged 35-64 at baseline. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE--Death from coronary heart disease and other causes. RESULTS--The average serum cholesterol concentration was 4.2 mmol/l at baseline examination, and only 43 (7%) of the deaths that occurred during 8-13 years of follow up were attributed to coronary heart disease. There was a strongly positive, and apparently independent, relation between serum cholesterol concentration and death from coronary heart disease (z = 3.47, p less than 0.001), and within the range of usual serum cholesterol concentration studied (3.8-4.7 mmol/l) there was no evidence of any threshold. After appropriate adjustment for the regression dilution bias, a 4 (SD 1)% difference in usual cholesterol concentration was associated with a 21 (SD 6)% (95% confidence interval 9% to 35%) difference in mortality from coronary heart disease. There was no significant relation between serum cholesterol concentration and death from stroke or all types of cancer. The 79 deaths due to liver cancer or other chronic liver disease were inversely related to cholesterol concentration at baseline. CONCLUSION--Blood cholesterol concentration was directly related to mortality from coronary heart disease even in those with what was, by Western standards, a "low" cholesterol concentration. There was no good evidence of an adverse effect of cholesterol on other causes of death. PMID:1888927

  7. Extraction and quantitation of total cholesterol, dolichol and dolichyl phosphate from mammalian liver

    SciTech Connect

    Crick, D.C.; Carroll, K.K.

    1987-12-01

    A procedure is described for the determination of total cholesterol, dolichol and dolichyl phosphate (Dol-P) in mammalian liver. It is based on extraction of these compounds into diethyl ether after alkaline saponification of the tissue. Extractability is affected by the length of saponification and concentration of potassium hydroxide (KOH) in the saponification mixture. After extraction, total cholesterol and dolichol are quantitated directly by reverse-phase high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) on C18. Dol-P requires further purification before quantitation by HPLC, this is accomplished by chromatography on silicic acid. These methods gave recoveries of over 90% for cholesterol and dolichol and about 60% for Dol-P, using (4-/sup 14/C)cholesterol, a polyprenol containing 15 isoprene units, and (1-/sup 14/C)Dol-P as recovery standards. Concentrations of total cholesterol, dolichol and Dol-P in livers from one month-old-CBA mice were found to be 5.7 +/- 0.7 mg/g, 66.3 +/- 1.2 micrograms/g and 3.7 +/- 0.3 micrograms/g, respectively.

  8. Hemagglutinin Spatial Distribution Shifts in Response to Cholesterol in the Influenza Viral Envelope

    PubMed Central

    Domanska, Marta K.; Dunning, Rebecca A.; Dryden, Kelly A.; Zawada, Katarzyna E.; Yeager, Mark; Kasson, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Influenza virus delivers its genome to the host cytoplasm via a process of membrane fusion mediated by the viral hemagglutinin protein. Optimal fusion likely requires multiple hemagglutinin trimers, so the spatial distribution of hemagglutinin on the viral envelope may influence fusion mechanism. We have previously shown that moderate depletion of cholesterol from the influenza viral envelope accelerates fusion kinetics even though it decreases fusion efficiency, both in a reversible manner. Here, we use electron cryo-microscopy to measure how the hemagglutinin lateral density in the viral envelope changes with cholesterol extraction. We extract this information by measuring the radial distribution function of electron density in >4000 viral images per sample, assigning hemagglutinin density by comparing images with and without anti-HA Fab bound. On average, hemagglutinin trimers move closer together: we estimate that the typical trimer-trimer spacing reduces from 94 to 84 Å when ∼90% of cholesterol is removed from the viral membrane. Upon restoration of viral envelope cholesterol, this spacing once again expands. This finding can qualitatively explain the observed changes to fusion kinetics: contemporary models from single-virus microscopy are that fusion requires the engagement of several hemagglutinin trimers in close proximity. If removing cholesterol increases the lateral density of hemagglutinin, this should result in an increase in the rate of fusion. PMID:26536268

  9. [An improved method of cholesterol determination in egg yolk by high performance liquid chromatography].

    PubMed

    Zhang, R; Li, L; Liu, S; Chen, R; Rao, P

    1998-03-01

    An improved method for cholesterol determination in egg yolk is reported in this paper. Egg yolk was first diluted. Cholesterol was then extracted with ethyl ether and petroleum ether, and quantified by reversed phase liquid chromatography on a Zorbax ODS column (0.46 mm x 15 cm, 5-6 microns) using a mobile phase of acetonitrile and 2-propanol (4:1) with a flow rate of 0.6 mL/min. A linear correlation was observed between 0.05-0.40 g/L of cholesterol. The determination limit was 0.02 g/L. This proposed method of HPLC determination of egg yolk without saponification is superior to colorimetric determination on the sample with saponification, and comparable to HPLC determination with saponification of the egg yolk sample in terms of reliability. No difference in final results was observed between egg yolk sample with saponification and the same sample without saponification. Rapid and reproducible quantification of cholesterol in egg yolk can be completed with this new method. Omission of saponification has made this proposed method more convenient than those ever reported, and can be used in yolk cholesterol study with greater ease.

  10. [Reverse genetics and prenatal diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Plauchu, H

    1988-05-01

    "Reverse" genetics is a research process consisting in finding the gene of a disease, then in "descending" toward the final product that it codes. This reasoning is the reverse of the one normally used which "ascends from the protein to the gene" and can be applied to the discovery of the pathogenic mechanism of a disease. There are numerous spin-offs of this new type of approach for prenatal diagnosis (PND). Thus, the discovery of polymorphic tracers surrounding the gene enables an indirect PND in informative families. Reliability is great if we have many probes at our disposal. Then, discovery of the gene itself permits a direct PND with the use of intragenic probes and synthetic oligonucleotides.

  11. Cholesterol tuning of BK ethanol response is enantioselective, and is a function of accompanying lipids.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Chunbo; Chen, Maohui; Covey, Douglas F; Johnston, Linda J; Treistman, Steven N

    2011-01-01

    In the search to uncover ethanol's molecular mechanisms, the calcium and voltage activated, large conductance potassium channel (BK) has emerged as an important molecule. We examine how cholesterol content in bilayers of 1,2-dioleoyl-3-phosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE)/sphingomyelin (SPM) and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylethanolamine (POPE)/1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylserine (POPS) affect the function and ethanol sensitivity of BK. In addition, we examine how manipulation of cholesterol in biological membranes modulates ethanol's actions on BK. We report that cholesterol levels regulate the change in BK channel open probability elicited by 50 mM ethanol. Low levels of cholesterol (<20%, molar ratio) supports ethanol activation, while high levels of cholesterol leads to ethanol inhibition of BK. To determine if cholesterol affects BK and its sensitivity to ethanol through a direct cholesterol-protein interaction or via an indirect action on the lipid bilayer, we used the synthetic enantiomer of cholesterol (ent-CHS). We found that 20% and 40% ent-CHS had little effect on the ethanol sensitivity of BK, when compared with the same concentration of nat-CHS. We accessed the effects of ent-CHS and nat-CHS on the molecular organization of DOPE/SPM monolayers at the air/water interface. The isotherm data showed that ent-CHS condensed DOPE/SPM monolayer equivalently to nat-CHS at a 20% concentration, but slightly less at a 40% concentration. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) images of DOPE/SPM membranes in the presence of ent-CHS or nat-CHS prepared with LB technique or vesicle deposition showed no significant difference in topographies, supporting the interpretation that the differences in actions of nat-CHS and ent-CHS on BK channel are not likely from a generalized action on bilayers. We conclude that membrane cholesterol influences ethanol's modulation of BK in a complex manner, including an interaction with the channel protein. Finally, our

  12. Obesity, cholesterol metabolism, and breast cancer pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    McDonnell, Donald P; Park, Sunghee; Goulet, Matthew T; Jasper, Jeff; Wardell, Suzanne E; Chang, Ching-Yi; Norris, John D; Guyton, John R; Nelson, Erik R

    2014-09-15

    Obesity and altered lipid metabolism are risk factors for breast cancer in pre- and post-menopausal women. These pathologic relationships have been attributed in part to the impact of cholesterol on the biophysical properties of cell membranes and to the influence of these changes on signaling events initiated at the membrane. However, more recent studies have indicated that the oxysterol 27-hydroxycholesterol (27HC), and not cholesterol per se, may be the primary biochemical link between lipid metabolism and cancer. The enzyme responsible for production of 27HC from cholesterol, CYP27A1, is expressed primarily in the liver and in macrophages. In addition, significantly elevated expression of this enzyme within breast tumors has also been observed. It is believed that 27HC, acting through the liver X receptor in macrophages and possibly other cells, is involved in maintaining organismal cholesterol homeostasis. It has also been shown recently that 27HC is an estrogen receptor agonist in breast cancer cells and that it stimulates the growth and metastasis of tumors in several models of breast cancer. These findings provide the rationale for the clinical evaluation of pharmaceutical approaches that interfere with cholesterol/27HC synthesis as a means to mitigate the impact of cholesterol on breast cancer pathogenesis. Cancer Res; 74(18); 4976-82. ©2014 AACR. PMID:25060521

  13. Cholesterol suppresses antimicrobial effect of statins

    PubMed Central

    Haeri, Mohammad Reza; White, Kenneth; Qharebeglou, Mohammad; Ansar, Malek Moein

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Isoprenoid biosynthesis is a key metabolic pathway to produce a wide variety of biomolecules such as cholesterol and carotenoids, which target cell membranes. On the other hand, it has been reported that statins known as inhibitors of isoprenoid biosynthesis and cholesterol lowering agents, may have a direct antimicrobial effect on the some bacteria. The exact action of statins in microbial metabolism is not clearly understood. It is possible that statins inhibit synthesis or utilization of some sterol precursor necessary for bacterial membrane integrity. Accordingly, this study was designed in order to examine if statins inhibit the production of a compound, which can be used in the membrane, and whether cholesterol would replace it and rescue bacteria from toxic effects of statins. Materials and Methods: To examine the possibility we assessed antibacterial effect of statins with different classes; lovastatin, simvastatin, and atorvastatin, alone and in combination with cholesterol on two Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis) and two Gram-negative (Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli) bacteria using gel diffusion assay. Results: Our results showed that all of the statins except for lovastatin had significant antibacterial property in S. aureus, E. coli, and Enter. faecalis. Surprisingly, cholesterol nullified the antimicrobial action of effective statins in statin-sensitive bacteria. Conclusion: It is concluded that statins may deprive bacteria from a metabolite responsible for membrane stability, which is effectively substituted by cholesterol. PMID:26877857

  14. Impaired cholesterol esterification in primary brain cultures of the lysosomal cholesterol storage disorder (LCSD) mouse mutant

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, S.C.; Suresh, S.; Weintroub, H.; Brady, R.O.; Pentchev, P.G.

    1987-02-27

    Esterification of cholesterol was investigated in primary neuroglial cultures obtained from newborn lysosomal cholesterol storage disorder (LCSD) mouse mutants. An impairment in /sup 3/H-oleic acid incorporation into cholesteryl esters was demonstrated in cultures of homozygous LCSD brain. Primary cultures derived from other phenotypically normal pups of the carrier breeders esterified cholesterol at normal levels or at levels which were intermediary between normal and deficient indicating a phenotypic expression of the LCSD heterozygote genotype. These observations on LCSD mutant brain cells indicate that the defect in cholesterol esterification is closely related to the primary genetic defect and is expressed in neuroglial cells in culture.

  15. Stereoselective recognition of monolayers of cholesterol, ent-cholesterol, and epicholesterol by an antibody.

    PubMed

    Geva, M; Izhaky, D; Mickus, D E; Rychnovsky, S D; Addadi, L

    2001-04-01

    The interaction between a monoclonal antibody and four distinct monolayers with varying degrees of structural, chemical, and stereochemical similarity were studied and quantified. The antibody, raised and selected against cholesterol monohydrate crystals, interacts with cholesterol monolayers stereospecifically, but not enantiospecifically. Monolayers of ent-cholesterol molecules, which are chemically identical to cholesterol and whose structure is the exact mirror image of the cholesterol monolayer, interact with the antibody to the same extent as the cholesterol monolayers. The affinity of the antibody for both enantiomeric monolayers is extremely high. However, the antibody does not interact with monolayers of epicholesterol, which is an epimer of cholesterol: The hydroxy group in epicholesterol is in the 3alpha position rather than in the 3beta position, imposing a different angle between the hydroxy group and the rigid steroid backbone, and a different packing of the molecules. Monolayers of triacontanol, a long-chain primary aliphatic alcohol, interact with the antibody to a lesser extent than the cholesterol and ent-cholesterol monolayers, presumably due to the structural flexibility of the triacontanol molecule. The lack of chiral discrimination by the antibody is thus correlated to the level at which the chirality is exposed at the surface of the monolayers.

  16. Antitumor effects of the combination of cholesterol reducing drugs.

    PubMed

    Issat, Tadeusz; Nowis, Dominika; Bil, Jacek; Winiarska, Magdalena; Jakobisiak, Marek; Golab, Jakub

    2011-07-01

    There are a number of potential mechanisms linking cholesterol homeostasis to processes that are tightly linked with carcinogenesis. Statins, which are inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMG-CoAR), the rate-limiting enzyme in the mevalonic acid synthesis pathway, exert cytostatic and cytotoxic effects towards tumor cells. It seems that the cytostatic and cytotoxic effects of statins result from blocking protein prenylation, leading to inhibition of isoprenoid compound synthesis. Another compound which affects cholesterol metabolism is the plant alkaloid berberine. The aim of this study was to investigate potential antitumor effects of lovastatin combined with berberine. Combined with berberine, lovastatin appeared to exert potentiated cytostatic and/or cytotoxic effects against human MDA-MB231 breast cancer and murine Panc 02 pancreatic cancer cells. The obtained results indicated that the effect of berberine is not dependent on blocking protein prenylation in cells, and the toxic effect of lovastatin combined with berberine is reversed by addition of the substrates of this pathway to the level brought out by lovastatin alone. Lovastatin-berberine combination caused cell cycle inhibition in G1 phase after 48 h of incubation with drugs. In a Panc 02 pancreatic cancer model in mice, lovastatin-berberine combination slightly, but significantly, slowed down tumor growth. Taking into account the number of patients treated with the investigated drugs one may suppose that the described interactions may be of clinical value.

  17. Condensed complexes and the calorimetry of cholesterol-phospholipid bilayers.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, T G; McConnell, H M

    2001-01-01

    A recent thermodynamic model describes a reversible reaction between cholesterol (C) and phospholipid (P) to form a condensed complex C(nq)P(np). Here q and p are relatively prime integers used to define the stoichiometric composition, and n is a measure of cooperativity. The present study applies this model to the scanning calorimetry of binary mixtures of cholesterol and saturated phosphatidylcholines, especially work by McElhaney and collaborators. These mixtures generally show two heat capacity peaks, a sharp peak and a broad peak. The sharp heat absorption is largely due to the chain melting transition of pure phospholipid. In the present work the broad heat absorption is attributed to the thermal dissociation of complexes. The best fits of the model to the data require the complex formation to be highly cooperative, with cooperativity n = 12. Detailed comparisons are made between model calculations and calorimetric data. A number of unusual features of the data arise naturally in the model. The principal discrepancy between the calculations and experimental results is a spurious calculated heat absorption peak. This discrepancy is related to the reported relative magnitudes of the integrated broad and sharp heat absorption curves. PMID:11606290

  18. 7 CFR 2903.4 - Indirect costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE BIODIESEL FUEL EDUCATION PROGRAM General Information § 2903.4 Indirect costs. (a) For the Biodiesel Fuel Education Program, applicants should use the current indirect cost rate negotiated with...

  19. The N-terminal Domain of NPC1L1 Protein Binds Cholesterol and Plays Essential Roles in Cholesterol Uptake*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jin-Hui; Ge, Liang; Qi, Wei; Zhang, Liqing; Miao, Hong-Hua; Li, Bo-Liang; Yang, Maojun; Song, Bao-Liang

    2011-01-01

    Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 (NPC1L1) is a multitransmembrane protein playing a crucial role in dietary and biliary cholesterol absorption. Cholesterol promotes the formation and endocytosis of NPC1L1-flotillin-cholesterol membrane microdomains, which is an early step in cholesterol uptake. How cholesterol is sensed in this step is unknown. Here, we find that the N-terminal domain (NTD) of NPC1L1 binds cholesterol. Mutation of residue Leu-216 in NPC1L1-NTD eliminates cholesterol binding, decreases the formation of NPC1L1-flotillin-cholesterol membrane microdomains, and prevents NPC1L1-mediated cholesterol uptake in culture cells and mice livers. NPC1L1-NTD specifically binds cholesterol but not plant sterols, which may account for the selective cholesterol absorption in intestine. Furthermore, 25- or 27-hydroxycholesterol competes with cholesterol to bind NPC1L1-NTD and inhibits the cholesterol induced endocytosis of NPC1L1. Together, these results demonstrate that plasma membrane-localized NPC1L1 binds exogenous cholesterol via its NTD, and facilitates the formation of NPC1L1-flotillin-cholesterol membrane microdomains that are then internalized into cells through the clathrin-AP2 pathway. Our study uncovers the mechanism of cholesterol sensing by NPC1L1 and proposes a mechanism for selective cholesterol absorption. PMID:21602275

  20. The Structural Basis of Cholesterol Activity in Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, Brett N.; Bielska, Agata; Lee, Tiffany; Daily, Michael D.; Covey, Douglas F.; Schlesinger, Paul H.; Baker, Nathan A.; Ory, Daniel S.

    2013-10-15

    Although the majority of free cellular cholesterol is present in the plasma membrane, cholesterol homeostasis is principally regulated through sterol-sensing proteins that reside in the cholesterol-poor endoplasmic reticulum (ER). In response to acute cholesterol loading or depletion, there is rapid equilibration between the ER and plasma membrane cholesterol pools, suggesting a biophysical model in which the availability of plasma membrane cholesterol for trafficking to internal membranes modulates ER membrane behavior. Previous studies have predominantly examined cholesterol availability in terms of binding to extramembrane acceptors, but have provided limited insight into the structural changes underlying cholesterol activation. In this study, we use both molecular dynamics simulations and experimental membrane systems to examine the behavior of cholesterol in membrane bilayers. We find that cholesterol depth within the bilayer provides a reasonable structural metric for cholesterol availability and that this is correlated with cholesterol-acceptor binding. Further, the distribution of cholesterol availability in our simulations is continuous rather than divided into distinct available and unavailable pools. This data provide support for a revised cholesterol activation model in which activation is driven not by saturation of membrane-cholesterol interactions but rather by bulk membrane remodeling that reduces membrane-cholesterol affinity.

  1. The Structural Basis of Cholesterol Accessibility in Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Brett N.; Bielska, Agata A.; Lee, Tiffany; Daily, Michael D.; Covey, Douglas F.; Schlesinger, Paul H.; Baker, Nathan A.; Ory, Daniel S.

    2013-01-01

    Although the majority of free cellular cholesterol is present in the plasma membrane, cholesterol homeostasis is principally regulated through sterol-sensing proteins that reside in the cholesterol-poor endoplasmic reticulum (ER). In response to acute cholesterol loading or depletion, there is rapid equilibration between the ER and plasma membrane cholesterol pools, suggesting a biophysical model in which the availability of plasma membrane cholesterol for trafficking to internal membranes modulates ER membrane behavior. Previous studies have predominantly examined cholesterol availability in terms of binding to extramembrane acceptors, but have provided limited insight into the structural changes underlying cholesterol activation. In this study, we use both molecular dynamics simulations and experimental membrane systems to examine the behavior of cholesterol in membrane bilayers. We find that cholesterol depth within the bilayer provides a reasonable structural metric for cholesterol availability and that this is correlated with cholesterol-acceptor binding. Further, the distribution of cholesterol availability in our simulations is continuous rather than divided into distinct available and unavailable pools. This data provide support for a revised cholesterol activation model in which activation is driven not by saturation of membrane-cholesterol interactions but rather by bulk membrane remodeling that reduces membrane-cholesterol affinity. PMID:24138860

  2. The cross-talk of LDL-cholesterol with cell motility: insights from the Niemann Pick Type C1 mutation and altered integrin trafficking.

    PubMed

    Hoque, Monira; Rentero, Carles; Conway, James R; Murray, Rachael Z; Timpson, Paul; Enrich, Carlos; Grewal, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Cholesterol is considered indispensible for the recruitment and functioning of integrins in focal adhesions for cell migration. However, the physiological cholesterol pools that control integrin trafficking and focal adhesion assembly remain unclear. Using Niemann Pick Type C1 (NPC) mutant cells, which accumulate Low Density lipoprotein (LDL)-derived cholesterol in late endosomes (LE), several recent studies indicate that LDL-cholesterol has multiple roles in regulating focal adhesion dynamics. Firstly, targeting of endocytosed LDL-cholesterol from LE to focal adhesions controls their formation at the leading edge of migrating cells. Other newly emerging literature suggests that this may be coupled to vesicular transport of integrins, Src kinase and metalloproteases from the LE compartment to focal adhesions. Secondly, our recent work identified LDL-cholesterol as a key factor that determines the distribution and ability of several Soluble NSF Attachment Protein (SNAP) Receptor (SNARE) proteins, key players in vesicle transport, to control integrin trafficking to the cell surface and extracellular matrix (ECM) secretion. Collectively, dietary, genetic and pathological changes in cholesterol metabolism may link with efficiency and speed of integrin and ECM cell surface delivery in metastatic cancer cells. This commentary will summarize how direct and indirect pathways enable LDL-cholesterol to modulate cell motility.

  3. 7 CFR 3430.54 - Indirect costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COOPERATIVE STATE RESEARCH, EDUCATION, AND EXTENSION...-GENERAL AWARD ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS Post-Award and Closeout § 3430.54 Indirect costs. Indirect cost... assistance regulations and cost principles, unless superseded by another authority. Use of indirect costs...

  4. 46 CFR 154.1720 - Indirect refrigeration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Indirect refrigeration. 154.1720 Section 154.1720... § 154.1720 Indirect refrigeration. A refrigeration system that is used to cool acetaldehyde, ethylene oxide, or methyl bromide, must be an indirect refrigeration system that does not use vapor compression....

  5. 46 CFR 154.1720 - Indirect refrigeration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Indirect refrigeration. 154.1720 Section 154.1720... § 154.1720 Indirect refrigeration. A refrigeration system that is used to cool acetaldehyde, ethylene oxide, or methyl bromide, must be an indirect refrigeration system that does not use vapor compression....

  6. 46 CFR 154.1720 - Indirect refrigeration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Indirect refrigeration. 154.1720 Section 154.1720... § 154.1720 Indirect refrigeration. A refrigeration system that is used to cool acetaldehyde, ethylene oxide, or methyl bromide, must be an indirect refrigeration system that does not use vapor compression....

  7. 19 CFR 10.603 - Indirect materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Indirect materials. 10.603 Section 10.603 Customs... States Free Trade Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.603 Indirect materials. An indirect material, as defined in § 10.582(m) of this subpart, will be considered to be an originating material without regard...

  8. 19 CFR 10.460 - Indirect materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Indirect materials. 10.460 Section 10.460 Customs... of Origin § 10.460 Indirect materials. An indirect material, as defined in § 10.402(o), will be considered to be an originating material without regard to where it is produced. Example. Chilean Producer...

  9. 7 CFR 3430.54 - Indirect costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Indirect costs. 3430.54 Section 3430.54 Agriculture... Post-Award and Closeout § 3430.54 Indirect costs. Indirect cost rates for grants and cooperative agreements shall be determined in accordance with the applicable assistance regulations and cost...

  10. 7 CFR 2903.4 - Indirect costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Indirect costs. 2903.4 Section 2903.4 Agriculture... AGRICULTURE BIODIESEL FUEL EDUCATION PROGRAM General Information § 2903.4 Indirect costs. (a) For the Biodiesel Fuel Education Program, applicants should use the current indirect cost rate negotiated with...

  11. 19 CFR 10.603 - Indirect materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Indirect materials. 10.603 Section 10.603 Customs... States Free Trade Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.603 Indirect materials. An indirect material, as defined in § 10.582(m) of this subpart, will be considered to be an originating material without regard...

  12. 19 CFR 10.1024 - Indirect materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Indirect materials. 10.1024 Section 10.1024... Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.1024 Indirect materials. An indirect material, as defined in § 10.1002(n) of.... Korean Producer A produces good C using non-originating material B. Producer A imports...

  13. 19 CFR 10.603 - Indirect materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Indirect materials. 10.603 Section 10.603 Customs... States Free Trade Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.603 Indirect materials. An indirect material, as defined in § 10.582(m) of this subpart, will be considered to be an originating material without regard...

  14. 19 CFR 10.460 - Indirect materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Indirect materials. 10.460 Section 10.460 Customs... of Origin § 10.460 Indirect materials. An indirect material, as defined in § 10.402(o), will be considered to be an originating material without regard to where it is produced. Example. Chilean Producer...

  15. 19 CFR 10.1024 - Indirect materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Indirect materials. 10.1024 Section 10.1024... Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.1024 Indirect materials. An indirect material, as defined in § 10.1002(n) of.... Korean Producer A produces good C using non-originating material B. Producer A imports...

  16. 19 CFR 10.924 - Indirect materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Indirect materials. 10.924 Section 10.924 Customs... Rules of Origin § 10.924 Indirect materials. An indirect material, as defined in § 10.902(m) of this subpart, will be considered to be an originating material without regard to where it is produced....

  17. 19 CFR 10.924 - Indirect materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Indirect materials. 10.924 Section 10.924 Customs... Rules of Origin § 10.924 Indirect materials. An indirect material, as defined in § 10.902(m) of this subpart, will be considered to be an originating material without regard to where it is produced....

  18. 19 CFR 10.603 - Indirect materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Indirect materials. 10.603 Section 10.603 Customs... States Free Trade Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.603 Indirect materials. An indirect material, as defined in § 10.582(m) of this subpart, will be considered to be an originating material without regard...

  19. 19 CFR 10.460 - Indirect materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Indirect materials. 10.460 Section 10.460 Customs... of Origin § 10.460 Indirect materials. An indirect material, as defined in § 10.402(o), will be considered to be an originating material without regard to where it is produced. Example. Chilean Producer...

  20. 19 CFR 10.2024 - Indirect materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Indirect materials. 10.2024 Section 10.2024... Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.2024 Indirect materials. An indirect material, as defined in § 10.2013(i), will be considered to be an originating material without regard to where it is produced....

  1. 19 CFR 10.3024 - Indirect materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Indirect materials. 10.3024 Section 10.3024... Promotion Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.3024 Indirect materials. An indirect material, as defined in § 10.3013(h), will be considered to be an originating material without regard to where it is...

  2. 19 CFR 10.460 - Indirect materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Indirect materials. 10.460 Section 10.460 Customs... of Origin § 10.460 Indirect materials. An indirect material, as defined in § 10.402(o), will be considered to be an originating material without regard to where it is produced. Example. Chilean Producer...

  3. 19 CFR 10.603 - Indirect materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Indirect materials. 10.603 Section 10.603 Customs... States Free Trade Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.603 Indirect materials. An indirect material, as defined in § 10.582(m) of this subpart, will be considered to be an originating material without regard...

  4. 19 CFR 10.460 - Indirect materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Indirect materials. 10.460 Section 10.460 Customs... of Origin § 10.460 Indirect materials. An indirect material, as defined in § 10.402(o), will be considered to be an originating material without regard to where it is produced. Example. Chilean Producer...

  5. Indirect reciprocity with trinary reputations.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Shoma; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Masuda, Naoki

    2013-01-21

    Indirect reciprocity is a reputation-based mechanism for cooperation in social dilemma situations when individuals do not repeatedly meet. The conditions under which cooperation based on indirect reciprocity occurs have been examined in great details. Most previous theoretical analysis assumed for mathematical tractability that an individual possesses a binary reputation value, i.e., good or bad, which depends on their past actions and other factors. However, in real situations, reputations of individuals may be multiple valued. Another puzzling discrepancy between the theory and experiments is the status of the so-called image scoring, in which cooperation and defection are judged to be good and bad, respectively, independent of other factors. Such an assessment rule is found in behavioral experiments, whereas it is known to be unstable in theory. In the present study, we fill both gaps by analyzing a trinary reputation model. By an exhaustive search, we identify all the cooperative and stable equilibria composed of a homogeneous population or a heterogeneous population containing two types of players. Some results derived for the trinary reputation model are direct extensions of those for the binary model. However, we find that the trinary model allows cooperation under image scoring under some mild conditions.

  6. Do infants detect indirect reciprocity?

    PubMed

    Meristo, Marek; Surian, Luca

    2013-10-01

    In social interactions involving indirect reciprocity, agent A acts prosocially towards B and this prompts C to act prosocially towards A. This happens because A's actions enhanced its reputation in the eyes of third parties. Indirect reciprocity may have been of central importance in the evolution of morality as one of the major mechanisms leading to the selection of helping and fair attitudes. Here we show that 10-month-old infants expect third parties to act positively towards fair donors who have distributed attractive resources equally between two recipients, rather than toward unfair donors who made unequal distributions. Infants' responses were dependent on the reciprocator's perceptual exposure to previous relevant events: they expected the reciprocator to reward the fair donor only when it had seen the distributive actions performed by the donors. We propose that infants were able to generate evaluations of agents that were based on the fairness of their distributive actions and to generate expectations about the social preferences of informed third parties.

  7. Indirect reciprocity with trinary reputations.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Shoma; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Masuda, Naoki

    2013-01-21

    Indirect reciprocity is a reputation-based mechanism for cooperation in social dilemma situations when individuals do not repeatedly meet. The conditions under which cooperation based on indirect reciprocity occurs have been examined in great details. Most previous theoretical analysis assumed for mathematical tractability that an individual possesses a binary reputation value, i.e., good or bad, which depends on their past actions and other factors. However, in real situations, reputations of individuals may be multiple valued. Another puzzling discrepancy between the theory and experiments is the status of the so-called image scoring, in which cooperation and defection are judged to be good and bad, respectively, independent of other factors. Such an assessment rule is found in behavioral experiments, whereas it is known to be unstable in theory. In the present study, we fill both gaps by analyzing a trinary reputation model. By an exhaustive search, we identify all the cooperative and stable equilibria composed of a homogeneous population or a heterogeneous population containing two types of players. Some results derived for the trinary reputation model are direct extensions of those for the binary model. However, we find that the trinary model allows cooperation under image scoring under some mild conditions. PMID:23123557

  8. Mitochondrial regulation of macrophage cholesterol homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Graham, Annette

    2015-12-01

    This review explores the relationship between mitochondrial structure and function in the regulation of macrophage cholesterol metabolism and proposes that mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to loss of the elegant homeostatic mechanisms which normally maintain cellular sterol levels within defined limits. Mitochondrial sterol 27-hydroxylase (CYP27A1) can generate oxysterol activators of liver X receptors which heterodimerise with retinoid X receptors, enhancing the transcription of ATP binding cassette transporters (ABCA1, ABCG1, and ABCG4), that can remove excess cholesterol via efflux to apolipoproteins A-1, E, and high density lipoprotein, and inhibit inflammation. The activity of CYP27A1 is regulated by the rate of supply of cholesterol substrate to the inner mitochondrial membrane, mediated by a complex of proteins. The precise identity of this dynamic complex remains controversial, even in steroidogenic tissues, but may include steroidogenic acute regulatory protein and the 18 kDa translocator protein, together with voltage-dependent anion channels, ATPase AAA domain containing protein 3A, and optic atrophy type 1 proteins. Certainly, overexpression of StAR and TSPO proteins can enhance macrophage cholesterol efflux to apoA-I and/or HDL, while perturbations in mitochondrial function, or changes in the expression of mitochondrial fusion proteins, alter the efficiency of cholesterol efflux. Molecules which can sustain or improve mitochondrial function or increase the activity of the protein complex involved in cholesterol transfer may have utility in resolving the problem of dysregulated macrophage cholesterol homeostasis, a condition which may contribute to inflammation, atherosclerosis, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, osteoblastic bone resorption, and some disorders of the central nervous system.

  9. The absorption of cholesterol and the sterol balance in the Tarahumara Indians of Mexico fed cholesterol-free and high cholesterol diets.

    PubMed

    McMurry, M P; Connor, W E; Lin, D S; Cerqueira, M T; Connor, S L

    1985-06-01

    The Tarahumara Indians of Mexico are habituated to a very low cholesterol, low fat diet and have lifelong low plasma cholesterol concentrations. To study cholesterol metabolism in these unusual people, 8 Tarahumara men were fed sequentially a cholesterol-free diet and then a diet containing 900 mg cholesterol under controlled conditions. The intestinal absorption of cholesterol, fecal steroid excretion and sterol balance were determined. During the high cholesterol diet period, the plasma cholesterol level increased from 113 +/- 8 mg/dl to 147 +/- 11 mg/dl (means +/- SD). Cholesterol biosynthesis decreased from 14.0 +/- 0.7 to 7.1 +/- 1.0 mg/kg/day (means +/- SE). The intestinal absorption of cholesterol was 27.7 +/- 6.7% (means +/- SE) during both dietary periods. Compared to other cultures, Tarahumaras had a reduced ability to absorb dietary cholesterol and higher total sterol turnover primarily because of an increased bile acid output. The total sterol disposition over three weeks of the high cholesterol diet accounted for all the absorbed dietary cholesterol.

  10. Aspirin Prevention of Cholesterol Gallstone Formation in Prairie Dogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sum P.; Carey, Martin C.; Lamont, J. Thomas

    1981-03-01

    When prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) are fed a diet containing cholesterol, a marked increase in gallbladder mucin secretion parallels the evolution of cholesterol supersaturated bile. Gelation of mucin precedes the precipitation of cholesterol liquid and solid crystals and the development of gallstones. Aspirin given to prairie dogs inhibited mucin hypersecretion and gel accumulation and prevented gallstone formation without influencing the cholesterol content of supersaturated bile. This suggests that gallbladder mucin is a nucleation matrix for cholesterol gallstones.

  11. Normocaloric Low Cholesterol Diet Modulates Th17/Treg Balance in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Maggio, Roberta; Viscomi, Carmela; Andreozzi, Paola; D'Ettorre, Gabriella; Viscogliosi, Giovanni; Barbaro, Barbara; Gori, Manuele; Vullo, Vincenzo; Balsano, Clara

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is associated with hepatic and extrahepatic manifestations, including immunological disorders. Chronic Hepatitis C (CHC) is often characterized by cholesterol and lipid metabolism alterations, leading to hepatic steatosis. Cholesterol metabolism, in fact, is crucial for the viral life cycle. Recent works described that a higher dietary cholesterol intake is associated with the progression of HCV-related liver disease. CHC patients have increased levels of T helper 17 (Th17)-cells, a lymphocytic population involved in the pathogenesis of liver inflammation and autoimmune hepatitis. The balance between Th17 and regulatory T (Treg) cells is crucial for chronic inflammation and autoimmunity. Th17-cell differentiation is deeply influenced by the activation LXRs, nuclear receptors modulating cholesterol homeostasis. Moreover, HCV may affect these nuclear receptors, and cholesterol metabolism, through both direct and indirect mechanisms. On these bases, we hypothesized that modulation of cholesterol levels through Normocaloric Low Cholesterol Diet (NLCD) may represent an innovative strategy to reduce the progression of HCV infection, through the modulation of peripheral Th17/Treg balance. To this end, we performed a pilot study to investigate whether a Normocaloric Low Cholesterol Diet may be able to modulate Th17/Treg balance in patients affected by chronic HCV infection. After 30 days of NLCD CHC patients showed a significant reduction in Th17 cells frequency, which correlated with strong reduction of IL-17 and IL-22 serum levels. At the same time, we appreciated an increase in the percentage of Treg cells, thus improving Treg/Th17balance. Moreover, we observed an increased expression of LXRs and their target genes: SREBP-1c and ABCA-1. In conclusion, NLCD finely regulates Th17/Treg balance, improving immune system response in CHC patients. This study could pave the way for new treatments of CHC patients, suggesting that change in

  12. Prevention of cholesterol gallstones by inhibiting hepatic biosynthesis and intestinal absorption of cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Helen H; Portincasa, Piero; de Bari, Ornella; Liu, Kristina J; Garruti, Gabriella; Neuschwander-Tetri, Brent A; Wang, David Q.-H

    2013-01-01

    Cholesterol cholelithiasis is a multifactorial disease influenced by a complex interaction of genetic and environmental factors, and represents a failure of biliary cholesterol homeostasis in which the physical-chemical balance of cholesterol solubility in bile is disturbed. The primary pathophysiologic event is persistent hepatic hypersecretion of biliary cholesterol, which has both hepatic and small intestinal components. The majority of the environmental factors are probably related to Western-type dietary habits, including excess cholesterol consumption. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy, one of the most commonly performed surgical procedures in the US, is nowadays a major treatment for gallstones. However, it is invasive and can cause surgical complications, and not all patients with symptomatic gallstones are candidates for surgery. The hydrophilic bile acid, ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) has been employed as first-line pharmacological therapy in a subgroup of symptomatic patients with small, radiolucent cholesterol gallstones. Long-term administration of UDCA can promote the dissolution of cholesterol gallstones. However, the optimal use of UDCA is not always achieved in clinical practice because of failure to titrate the dose adequately. Therefore, the development of novel, effective, and noninvasive therapies is crucial for reducing the costs of health care associated with gallstones. In this review, we summarize recent progress in investigating the inhibitory effects of ezetimibe and statins on intestinal absorption and hepatic biosynthesis of cholesterol, respectively, for the treatment of gallstones, as well as in elucidating their molecular mechanisms by which combination therapy could prevent this very common liver disease worldwide. PMID:23419155

  13. Potential of BODIPY-cholesterol for analysis of cholesterol transport and diffusion in living cells.

    PubMed

    Wüstner, Daniel; Lund, Frederik W; Röhrl, Clemens; Stangl, Herbert

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol is an abundant and important lipid component of cellular membranes. Analysis of cholesterol transport and diffusion in living cells is hampered by the technical challenge of designing suitable cholesterol probes which can be detected for example by optical microscopy. One strategy is to use intrinsically fluorescent sterols, as dehydroergosterol (DHE), having minimal chemical alteration compared to cholesterol but giving low fluorescence signals in the UV region of the spectrum. Alternatively, one can use dye-tagged cholesterol analogs and in particular BODIPY-cholesterol (BChol), whose synthesis and initial characterization was pioneered by Robert Bittman. Here, we give a general overview of the properties and applications but also limitations of BODIPY-tagged cholesterol probes for analyzing intracellular cholesterol trafficking. We describe our own experiences and collaborative efforts with Bob Bittman for studying diffusion in the plasma membrane (PM) and uptake of BChol in a quantitative manner. For that purpose, we used a variety of fluorescence approaches including fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and its imaging variants, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) and fluorescence loss in photobleaching (FLIP). We also describe pulse-chase studies from the PM using BChol in direct comparison to DHE. Based on the gathered imaging data, we present a two-step kinetic model for sterol transport between PM and recycling endosomes. In addition, we highlight the suitability of BChol for determining transport of lipoprotein-derived sterol using electron microscopy (EM) and show that this approach ideally complements fluorescence studies.

  14. Phase separation of cholesterol and the interaction of ethanol with phosphatidylserine-cholesterol bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Bach, D; Borochov, N; Wachtel, E

    2002-02-01

    Thermotropic and structural effects of ethanol on phosphatidylserine (PS) membranes containing up to 0.4 mol fraction cholesterol were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction and fluorescence spectroscopy. It was found that in the presence of cholesterol, 10% (v/v) added ethanol depresses the melting temperature of the phospholipid by approximately 2 degrees C, similar to what was observed in the absence of cholesterol. Below the melting temperature the progressive disordering effect of added cholesterol is weakly enhanced by the presence of ethanol. In the liquid crystalline state, the marked decrease in the thickness of the bilayer which ethanol causes in the absence of cholesterol (Chem. Phys. Lipids 92 (1998) 127), is also observed in its presence. We conclude that, in contrast to what has been observed for zwitterionic phospholipids, high concentrations of cholesterol do not diminish the interaction of ethanol with PS membranes. With addition of 10% (v/v) ethanol, crystalline cholesterol diffraction, an indication of phase separation of the sterol, appears at mol fraction cholesterol 0.34, as compared to 0.3 in the absence of ethanol (Chem. Phys. Lipids 92 (1998) 71).

  15. A diet rich in leafy vegetable fiber improves cholesterol metabolism in high-cholesterol fed rats.

    PubMed

    Ezz El-Arab, A M

    2009-10-01

    In the present study, the hypocholesterolemic effect of leaf vegetable (Jew's mallow) was studied in high-cholesterol fed rats. The animals were fed diets supplemented with cholesterol (0.25%) for 4 weeks. Leaf vegetable diet produced an important hypocholesterolemic action: it led to a significant lowering (p<0.05) of cholesterol in the plasma and liver, as well as of the atherogenic index and a significant increase (p<0.05) in cecal short chain fatty acids, with respect to the control group. Concurrently, total fecal neutral sterols in the excretion increased (p<0.05) and apparent absorption of dietary cholesterol was significantly depressed (-58%). The consumption of leaf vegetable (Jew's mallow) with a hypercholesterolemic diet improved the lipidemic profile and increased excretion of the total cholesterol end-products. PMID:20387744

  16. A diet rich in leafy vegetable fiber improves cholesterol metabolism in high-cholesterol fed rats.

    PubMed

    Ezz El-Arab, A M

    2009-10-01

    In the present study, the hypocholesterolemic effect of leaf vegetable (Jew's mallow) was studied in high-cholesterol fed rats. The animals were fed diets supplemented with cholesterol (0.25%) for 4 weeks. Leaf vegetable diet produced an important hypocholesterolemic action: it led to a significant lowering (p<0.05) of cholesterol in the plasma and liver, as well as of the atherogenic index and a significant increase (p<0.05) in cecal short chain fatty acids, with respect to the control group. Concurrently, total fecal neutral sterols in the excretion increased (p<0.05) and apparent absorption of dietary cholesterol was significantly depressed (-58%). The consumption of leaf vegetable (Jew's mallow) with a hypercholesterolemic diet improved the lipidemic profile and increased excretion of the total cholesterol end-products.

  17. Glucagon receptor antagonism induces increased cholesterol absorption.

    PubMed

    Guan, Hong-Ping; Yang, Xiaodong; Lu, Ku; Wang, Sheng-Ping; Castro-Perez, Jose M; Previs, Stephen; Wright, Michael; Shah, Vinit; Herath, Kithsiri; Xie, Dan; Szeto, Daphne; Forrest, Gail; Xiao, Jing Chen; Palyha, Oksana; Sun, Li-Ping; Andryuk, Paula J; Engel, Samuel S; Xiong, Yusheng; Lin, Songnian; Kelley, David E; Erion, Mark D; Davis, Harry R; Wang, Liangsu

    2015-11-01

    Glucagon and insulin have opposing action in governing glucose homeostasis. In type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), plasma glucagon is characteristically elevated, contributing to increased gluconeogenesis and hyperglycemia. Therefore, glucagon receptor (GCGR) antagonism has been proposed as a pharmacologic approach to treat T2DM. In support of this concept, a potent small-molecule GCGR antagonist (GRA), MK-0893, demonstrated dose-dependent efficacy to reduce hyperglycemia, with an HbA1c reduction of 1.5% at the 80 mg dose for 12 weeks in T2DM. However, GRA treatment was associated with dose-dependent elevation of plasma LDL-cholesterol (LDL-c). The current studies investigated the cause for increased LDL-c. We report findings that link MK-0893 with increased glucagon-like peptide 2 and cholesterol absorption. There was not, however, a GRA-related modulation of cholesterol synthesis. These findings were replicated using structurally diverse GRAs. To examine potential pharmacologic mitigation, coadministration of ezetimibe (a potent inhibitor of cholesterol absorption) in mice abrogated the GRA-associated increase of LDL-c. Although the molecular mechanism is unknown, our results provide a novel finding by which glucagon and, hence, GCGR antagonism govern cholesterol metabolism.

  18. Dual roles for cholesterol in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fang; Rychnovsky, Scott D; Belani, Jitendra D; Hobbs, Helen H; Cohen, Jonathan C; Rawson, Robert B

    2005-10-11

    The structural features of sterols required to support mammalian cell growth have not been fully defined. Here, we use mutant CHO cells that synthesize only small amounts of cholesterol to test the capacity of various sterols to support growth. Sterols with minor modifications of the side chain (e.g., campesterol, beta-sitosterol, and desmosterol) supported long-term growth of mutant cells, but sterols with more complex modifications of the side chain, the sterol nucleus, or the 3-hydroxy group did not. After 60 days in culture, the exogenous sterol comprised >90% of cellular sterols. Inactivation of residual endogenous synthesis with the squalene epoxidase inhibitor NB-598 prevented growth in beta-sitosterol and greatly reduced growth in campesterol. Growth of cells cultured in beta-sitosterol and NB-598 was restored by adding small amounts of cholesterol to the medium. Surprisingly, enantiomeric cholesterol also supported cell growth, even in the presence of NB-598. Thus, sterols fulfill two roles in mammalian cells: (i) a bulk membrane requirement in which phytosterols can substitute for cholesterol and (ii) other processes that specifically require small amounts of cholesterol but are not enantioselective. PMID:16199524

  19. LDL cholesterol: controversies and future therapeutic directions.

    PubMed

    Ridker, Paul M

    2014-08-16

    Lifelong exposure to raised concentrations of LDL cholesterol increases cardiovascular event rates, and the use of statin therapy as an adjunct to diet, exercise, and smoking cessation has proven highly effective in reducing the population burden associated with hyperlipidaemia. Yet, despite consistent biological, genetic, and epidemiological data, and evidence from randomised trials, there is controversy among national guidelines and clinical practice with regard to LDL cholesterol, its measurement, the usefulness of population-based screening, the net benefit-to-risk ratio for different LDL-lowering drugs, the benefit of treatment targets, and whether aggressive lowering of LDL is safe. Several novel therapies have been introduced for the treatment of people with genetic defects that result in loss of function within the LDL receptor, a major determinant of inherited hyperlipidaemias. Moreover, the usefulness of monoclonal antibodies that extend the LDL-receptor lifecycle (and thus result in substantial lowering of LDL cholesterol below the levels achieved with statins alone) is being assessed in phase 3 trials that will enrol more than 60,000 at-risk patients worldwide. These trials represent an exceptionally rapid translation of genetic observations into clinical practice and will address core questions of how low LDL cholesterol can be safely reduced, whether the mechanism of LDL-cholesterol lowering matters, and whether ever more aggressive lipid-lowering provides a safe, long-term mechanism to prevent atherothrombotic complications.

  20. Plasma cholesterol transport in anhepatic rats.

    PubMed Central

    Quarfordt, S H; Landis, B; Cucchiaro, G; Yamaguchi, Y; Oswald, B

    1992-01-01

    The plasma appearance of newly synthesized cholesterol in anhepatic laboratory diet-fed rats was 10% of the intact rat. In intact rats this cholesterol was mainly ester in lower density lipoproteins, but for anhepatic rats it was virtually only free in high density lipoprotein. Chylomicron cholesterol ester was removed much more slowly from anhepatic than control plasma and returned primarily as free in high density lipoproteins, with the control return 10 times the anhepatic return. Lower density lipoprotein cholesterol ester transfer to an extravascular pool in anhepatic rats was less than 10% of controls. The liver was responsible for 95% of the extravascular lower density lipoprotein ester pool and only 50% of the for high density lipoprotein ester. Despite decreased anhepatic lipoprotein catabolism, the mass of both plasma low and high density lipoproteins progressively decreased indicating an even greater decrease in influx. The anhepatic fractional catabolic rate of apo A1 was similar to controls, but that of apo E was considerably less. Despite the unchanged catabolism of apo A1 and the reduced catabolism of apo E, plasma apo A1 decreased less than apo E after hepatectomy. The anhepatic data confirm the pivotal role of the liver in maintaining plasma low and high density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations. They suggest that, in addition to its anabolic and catabolic functions, the liver also acts as a reservoir buffering changes in plasma concentration. Images PMID:1569195

  1. Cholesterol transport from plasma membranes to intracellular membranes is inhibited by 3 beta-[2-(diethylamino)ethoxy]androst-5-en-17-one.

    PubMed

    Härmälä, A S; Pörn, M I; Mattjus, P; Slotte, J P

    1994-03-24

    The compound U1866A (3 beta-[2-(diethylamino)ethoxy]androst-5-en-17-one) has been shown to inhibit the cellular transfer of low-density lipoprotein-derived cholesterol from lysosomes to plasma membranes (Liscum and Faust (1989) J. Biol. Chem. 264, 11796-806). We have in this study examined the effects of U18666A on cholesterol translocation from plasma membranes to intracellular membranes. Translocation of plasma membrane cholesterol was induced by degradation of plasma membrane sphingomyelin. The sphingomyelinase-induced activation of the acyl-CoA cholesterol acyl transferase (ACAT) reaction was completely inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by U18666A, both in cultured human skin fibroblasts and baby hamster kidney cells. Half-maximal inhibition (within 60 min) was obtained with 0.5-1 microgram/ml of U18666A. A time-course study indicated that the onset of inhibition was rapid (within 10-15 min), and reversible if U18666A was removed from the incubation mixture. Using a cholesterol oxidase assay, we observed that the extent of plasma membrane cholesterol translocation in sphingomyelinase-treated HSF cells was significantly lowered in the presence of U18666A (at 3 micrograms/ml). The effect of U18666A on cholesterol translocation was also fully reversible when the drug was withdrawn. In mouse Leydig tumor cells, labeled to constant specific activity with [3H]cholesterol, the compound U18666A inhibited in a dose-dependent manner the cyclic AMP-stimulated secretion of [3H]steroid hormones. The effects seen with compound U18666A appeared to be specific for this molecule, since another hydrophobic amine, imipramine, did not in our experiments affect cholesterol translocation or ACAT activation. Since different cell types display sensitivity to U18666A in various intracellular cholesterol transfer processes, they appear to have a common U18666A-sensitive regulatory mechanism.

  2. Cholesterol transport from plasma membranes to intracellular membranes is inhibited by 3 beta-[2-(diethylamino)ethoxy]androst-5-en-17-one.

    PubMed

    Härmälä, A S; Pörn, M I; Mattjus, P; Slotte, J P

    1994-03-24

    The compound U1866A (3 beta-[2-(diethylamino)ethoxy]androst-5-en-17-one) has been shown to inhibit the cellular transfer of low-density lipoprotein-derived cholesterol from lysosomes to plasma membranes (Liscum and Faust (1989) J. Biol. Chem. 264, 11796-806). We have in this study examined the effects of U18666A on cholesterol translocation from plasma membranes to intracellular membranes. Translocation of plasma membrane cholesterol was induced by degradation of plasma membrane sphingomyelin. The sphingomyelinase-induced activation of the acyl-CoA cholesterol acyl transferase (ACAT) reaction was completely inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by U18666A, both in cultured human skin fibroblasts and baby hamster kidney cells. Half-maximal inhibition (within 60 min) was obtained with 0.5-1 microgram/ml of U18666A. A time-course study indicated that the onset of inhibition was rapid (within 10-15 min), and reversible if U18666A was removed from the incubation mixture. Using a cholesterol oxidase assay, we observed that the extent of plasma membrane cholesterol translocation in sphingomyelinase-treated HSF cells was significantly lowered in the presence of U18666A (at 3 micrograms/ml). The effect of U18666A on cholesterol translocation was also fully reversible when the drug was withdrawn. In mouse Leydig tumor cells, labeled to constant specific activity with [3H]cholesterol, the compound U18666A inhibited in a dose-dependent manner the cyclic AMP-stimulated secretion of [3H]steroid hormones. The effects seen with compound U18666A appeared to be specific for this molecule, since another hydrophobic amine, imipramine, did not in our experiments affect cholesterol translocation or ACAT activation. Since different cell types display sensitivity to U18666A in various intracellular cholesterol transfer processes, they appear to have a common U18666A-sensitive regulatory mechanism. PMID:8130265

  3. Localization of cholesterol in sphingomyelinase-treated fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Pörn, M I; Slotte, J P

    1995-01-01

    The distribution of cellular unesterified cholesterol was studied in fibroblasts, which had been depleted of plasma membrane sphingomyelin by exposure to exogenous sphingomyelinase. This treatment has previously been shown to induce an increase in cholesterol esterification, a decrease in the biosynthesis of cholesterol, and a decreased susceptibility of cell cholesterol to oxidation with cholesterol oxidase. When the cellular localization of cholesterol was studied with fluorescent filipin staining, sphingomyelin depletion did not cause any visible changes in the filipin-cholesterol staining pattern, suggesting that the major part of cellular cholesterol was retained in the plasma membrane after sphingomyelinase treatment. After the oxidation of cell-surface cholesterol with cholesterol oxidase, the plasma membrane was no longer stained by filipin, but the plasma membrane cholesterol of sphingomyelin-depleted cells appeared to be resistant to oxidation with cholesterol oxidase when sphingomyelinase was used as an oxidation-promoting agent. However, the use of hypotonic buffer or phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C together with cholesterol oxidase resulted in a complete oxidation of the cell-surface cholesterol in sphingomyelin-depleted cells, as evidenced by the filipin-cholesterol staining pattern. Similar results were obtained when [3H]cholesterol-labelled fibroblasts were used for determination of the susceptibility to cholesterol oxidation. The kinetics of [3H]cholesterol oxidation in sphingomyelin-depleted cells with cholesterol oxidase in hypotonic buffer indicated that approximately 85% of the cellular cholesterol still resided in the plasma membrane after sphingomyelin depletion. These results are contradictory to earlier reports on sphingomyelinase-induced changes in cellular cholesterol distribution and suggest that minor changes in the kinetics of cholesterol transport from the plasma membrane to the endoplasmic reticulum may be responsible

  4. Localization of cholesterol in sphingomyelinase-treated fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Pörn, M I; Slotte, J P

    1995-05-15

    The distribution of cellular unesterified cholesterol was studied in fibroblasts, which had been depleted of plasma membrane sphingomyelin by exposure to exogenous sphingomyelinase. This treatment has previously been shown to induce an increase in cholesterol esterification, a decrease in the biosynthesis of cholesterol, and a decreased susceptibility of cell cholesterol to oxidation with cholesterol oxidase. When the cellular localization of cholesterol was studied with fluorescent filipin staining, sphingomyelin depletion did not cause any visible changes in the filipin-cholesterol staining pattern, suggesting that the major part of cellular cholesterol was retained in the plasma membrane after sphingomyelinase treatment. After the oxidation of cell-surface cholesterol with cholesterol oxidase, the plasma membrane was no longer stained by filipin, but the plasma membrane cholesterol of sphingomyelin-depleted cells appeared to be resistant to oxidation with cholesterol oxidase when sphingomyelinase was used as an oxidation-promoting agent. However, the use of hypotonic buffer or phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C together with cholesterol oxidase resulted in a complete oxidation of the cell-surface cholesterol in sphingomyelin-depleted cells, as evidenced by the filipin-cholesterol staining pattern. Similar results were obtained when [3H]cholesterol-labelled fibroblasts were used for determination of the susceptibility to cholesterol oxidation. The kinetics of [3H]cholesterol oxidation in sphingomyelin-depleted cells with cholesterol oxidase in hypotonic buffer indicated that approximately 85% of the cellular cholesterol still resided in the plasma membrane after sphingomyelin depletion. These results are contradictory to earlier reports on sphingomyelinase-induced changes in cellular cholesterol distribution and suggest that minor changes in the kinetics of cholesterol transport from the plasma membrane to the endoplasmic reticulum may be responsible

  5. Melatonin directly interacts with cholesterol and alleviates cholesterol effects in dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine monolayers.

    PubMed

    Choi, Youngjik; Attwood, Simon J; Hoopes, Matthew I; Drolle, Elizabeth; Karttunen, Mikko; Leonenko, Zoya

    2014-01-01

    Melatonin is a pineal hormone that has been shown to have protective effects in several diseases that are associated with cholesterol dysregulation, including cardiovascular disease, Alzheimer's disease, and certain types of cancers. Cholesterol is a major membrane constituent with both a structural and functional influence. It is also known that melatonin readily partitions into cellular membranes. We investigated the effects of melatonin and cholesterol on the structure and physical properties of a 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) monolayer as a simple membrane model using the Langmuir-Blodgett (L-B) monolayer technique and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We report that melatonin increases the area per lipid and elastic compressibility of the DPPC monolayer in a concentration dependent manner, while cholesterol has the opposite effect. When both melatonin and cholesterol were present in the monolayer, the compression isotherms showed normalization of the area per molecule towards that of the pure DPPC monolayer, thus indicating that melatonin counteracts and alleviates cholesterol's effects. Atomistic MD simulations of melatonin enriched DPPC systems correlate with our experimental findings and illustrate the structural effects of both cholesterol and melatonin. Our results suggest that melatonin is able to lessen the influence of cholesterol through two different mechanisms. Firstly, we have shown that melatonin has a fluidizing effect on monolayers comprising only lipid molecules. Secondly, we also observe that melatonin interacts directly with cholesterol. Our findings suggest a direct nonspecific interaction of melatonin may be a mechanism involved in reducing cholesterol associated membrane effects, thus suggesting the existence of a new mechanism of melatonin's action. This may have important biological relevance in addition to the well-known anti-oxidative and receptor binding effects. PMID:24651707

  6. Enzymatic Quantification of Cholesterol and Cholesterol Esters from Silicone Hydrogel Contact Lenses

    PubMed Central

    Pucker, Andrew D.; Thangavelu, Mirunalni

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this work was to develop an enzymatic method of quantification of cholesterol and cholesterol esters derived from contact lenses, both in vitro and ex vivo. Methods. Lotrafilcon B (O2 Optix; CIBA Vision, Inc., Duluth, GA) and galyfilcon A (Acuvue Advance; Vistakon, Inc., Jacksonville, FL) silicone hydrogel contact lenses were independently incubated in cholesterol oleate solutions varying in concentrations. After incubation, the lenses were removed and underwent two separate 2:1 chloroform-methanol extractions. After in vitro studies, 10 human subjects wore both lotrafilcon B and galyfilcon A contact lenses for 7 days. The lenses also underwent two separate 2:1 chloroform-methanol extractions. All in vitro and ex vivo samples were quantified with a cholesterol esterase enzymatic reaction. Results. Calibration curves from quantifications of in vitro contact lens samples soaked in successively decreasing concentrations of cholesterol oleate yielded coefficients of determination (R2) of 0.99 (lotrafilcon B) and 0.97 (galyfilcon A). For in vitro contact lens samples, galyfilcon A was associated with an average cholesterol oleate extraction of 39.85 ± 48.65 μg/lens, whereas lotrafilcon B was associated with 5.86 ± 3.36 μg/lens (P = 0.05) across both extractions and all incubation concentrations. For ex vivo contact lens samples, there was significantly more cholesterol and cholesterol esters deposited on galyfilcon A (5.77 ± 1.87 μg/lens) than on lotrafilcon B (2.03 ± 1.62 μg/lens; P = 0.0005). Conclusions. This is an efficient and simple method of quantifying total cholesterol extracted from silicone hydrogel contact lenses and, potentially, the meibum and/or tear film. Certain silicone hydrogel materials demonstrate more affinity for cholesterol and its esters than do others. PMID:20089871

  7. Separate spheres and indirect benefits

    PubMed Central

    Brock, Dan W

    2003-01-01

    On any plausible account of the basis for health care resource prioritization, the benefits and costs of different alternative resource uses are relevant considerations in the prioritization process. Consequentialists hold that the maximization of benefits with available resources is the only relevant consideration. Non-consequentialists do not reject the relevance of consequences of benefits and costs, but insist that other considerations, and in particular the distribution of benefits and costs, are morally important as well. Whatever one's particular account of morally justified standards for the prioritization of different health interventions, we must be able to measure those interventions' benefits and costs. There are many theoretical and practical difficulties in that measurement, such as how to weigh extending life against improving health and quality of life as well as how different quality of life improvements should be valued, but they are not my concern here. This paper addresses two related issues in assessing benefits and costs for health resource prioritization. First, should benefits be restricted only to health benefits, or include as well other non health benefits such as economic benefits to employers from reducing the lost work time due to illness of their employees? I shall call this the Separate Spheres problem. Second, should only the direct benefits, such as extending life or reducing disability, and direct costs, such as costs of medical personnel and supplies, of health interventions be counted, or should other indirect benefits and costs be counted as well? I shall call this the Indirect Benefits problem. These two issues can have great importance for a ranking of different health interventions by either a cost/benefit or cost effectiveness analysis (CEA) standard. PMID:12773217

  8. The role of cholesterol in the association of endoplasmic reticulum membranes with mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimoto, Michiko; Hayashi, Teruo; Su, Tsung-Ping

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The endoplasmic reticulum subdomain termed MAM associates with mitochondria. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The biophysical role of lipids in the MAM-mitochondria association is unknown. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The in vitro membrane association assay was used to examine the role of lipids. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cholesterol was found to negatively regulate the association. -- Abstract: The unique endoplasmic reticulum (ER) subdomain termed the mitochondria-associated ER membrane (MAM) engages the physical connection between the ER and the mitochondrial outer membrane and plays a role in regulating IP{sub 3} receptor-mediated Ca{sup 2+} influx and the phospholipid transport between the two organelles. The MAM contains certain signaling and membrane-tethering proteins but also lipids including cholesterol. The biophysical role of lipids at the MAM, specifically in the physical interaction between the MAM of the ER and mitochondria, remains not totally clarified. Here we employed the in vitro membrane association assay to investigate the role of cholesterol in the association between MAMs and mitochondria. The purified MAMs and mitochondria were mixed in vitro in a test tube and then the physical association of the two subcellular organelles was quantified indirectly by measuring the presence of the MAM-specific protein sigma-1 receptors in the mitochondria fraction. Purified MAMs contained free cholesterol approximately 7 times higher than that in microsomes. We found that depletion of cholesterol in MAMs with methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin (M{beta}C) significantly increases the association between MAMs and mitochondria, whereas M{beta}C saturated with cholesterol does not change the association. {sup 14}C-Serine pulse-labeling demonstrated that the treatment of living cells with M{beta}C decreases the level of de novo synthesized {sup 14}C-phosphatidylserine (PtSer) and concomitantly increases greatly the synthesis of

  9. The activation of cultured keratinocytes by cholesterol depletion during reconstruction of a human epidermis is reminiscent of monolayer cultures.

    PubMed

    De Vuyst, Évelyne; Giltaire, Séverine; Lambert de Rouvroit, Catherine; Chrétien, Aline; Salmon, Michel; Poumay, Yves

    2015-05-01

    Transient cholesterol depletion from plasma membranes of human keratinocytes has been shown to reversibly activate signalling pathways in monolayer cultures. Consecutive changes in gene expression have been characterized in such conditions and were interestingly found to be similar to transcriptional changes observed in keratinocytes of atopic dermatitis (AD) patients. As an inflammatory skin disease, AD notably results in altered histology of the epidermis associated with a defective epidermal barrier. To further investigate whether the activation of keratinocytes obtained by cholesterol depletion could be responsible for some epidermal alterations reported in AD, this study was undertaken to analyse cholesterol depletion in stratified cultures of keratinocytes, i.e. a reconstructed human epidermis (RHE). RHE contains heterogeneous populations of keratinocytes, either proliferating or progressively differentiating and stratifying towards the creation of a cornified barrier. Cholesterol depletion induced in this model was found reversible and resulted in activation of signalling pathways similar to those previously identified in monolayers. In addition, selected changes in the expression of several genes suggested that keratinocytes in RHE respond to cholesterol depletion as monolayers. However, preserved histology and barrier function indicate that some additional activation, likely from the immune system, is required to obtain epidermal alterations such as the ones found in AD.

  10. Plasma lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase and carotid intima-media thickness in European individuals at high cardiovascular risk

    PubMed Central

    Calabresi, Laura; Baldassarre, Damiano; Simonelli, Sara; Gomaraschi, Monica; Amato, Mauro; Castelnuovo, Samuela; Frigerio, Beatrice; Ravani, Alessio; Sansaro, Daniela; Kauhanen, Jussi; Rauramaa, Rainer; de Faire, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Smit, Andries J.; Mannarino, Elmo; Humphries, Steve E.; Giral, Philippe; Veglia, Fabrizio; Sirtori, Cesare R.; Franceschini, Guido; Tremoli, Elena

    2011-01-01

    Lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) is the enzyme responsible for cholesterol esterification in plasma. LCAT is a major factor in HDL remodeling and metabolism, and it has long been believed to play a critical role in macrophage reverse cholesterol transport (RCT). The effect of LCAT on human atherogenesis is still controversial. In the present study, the plasma LCAT concentration was measured in all subjects (n = 540) not on drug treatment at the time of enrollment in the multicenter, longitudinal, observational IMPROVE study. Mean and maximum intima-media thickness (IMT) of the whole carotid tree was measured by B-mode ultrasonography in all subjects. In the entire cohort, LCAT quartiles were not associated with carotid mean and maximum IMT (P for trend 0.95 and 0.18, respectively), also after adjustment for age, gender, HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C), and triglycerides. No association between carotid IMT and LCAT quartiles was observed in men (P=0.30 and P=0.99 for mean and maximum IMT, respectively), whereas carotid IMT increased with LCAT quartiles in women (P for trend 0.14 and 0.019 for mean and maximum IMT, respectively). The present findings support the concept that LCAT is not required for an efficient reverse cholesterol transport and that a low plasma LCAT concentration and activity is not associated with increased atherosclerosis. PMID:21596929

  11. CHOBIMALT: A Cholesterol-Based Detergent†

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Stanley C.; Mittal, Ritesh; Huang, Lijun; Travis, Benjamin; Breyer, Richard M.; Sanders, Charles R.

    2010-01-01

    Cholesterol and its hemisuccinate and sulfate derivatives are widely used in studies of purified membrane proteins, but are difficult to solubilize in aqueous solution, even in the presence of detergent micelles. Other cholesterol derivatives do not form conventional micelles and lead to viscous solutions. To address these problems a cholesterol-based detergent, CHOBIMALT, has been synthesized and characterized. At concentrations above 3–4μM, CHOBIMALT forms micelles without the need for elevated temperatures or sonic disruption. Diffusion and fluorescence measurements indicated that CHOBIMALT micelles are large (210 ± 30 kDa). The ability to solubilize a functional membrane protein was explored using a G-protein coupled receptor, the human kappa opioid receptor type 1 (hKOR1). While CHOBIMALT alone was not found to be effective as a surfactant for membrane extraction, when added to classical detergent micelles CHOBIMALT was observed to dramatically enhance the thermal stability of solubilized hKOR1. PMID:20919740

  12. CHOBIMALT: a cholesterol-based detergent.

    PubMed

    Howell, Stanley C; Mittal, Ritesh; Huang, Lijun; Travis, Benjamin; Breyer, Richard M; Sanders, Charles R

    2010-11-01

    Cholesterol and its hemisuccinate and sulfate derivatives are widely used in studies of purified membrane proteins but are difficult to solubilize in aqueous solution, even in the presence of detergent micelles. Other cholesterol derivatives do not form conventional micelles and lead to viscous solutions. To address these problems, a cholesterol-based detergent, CHOBIMALT, has been synthesized and characterized. At concentrations above 3−4 μM, CHOBIMALT forms micelles without the need for elevated temperatures or sonic disruption. Diffusion and fluorescence measurements indicated that CHOBIMALT micelles are large (210±30 kDa). The ability to solubilize a functional membrane protein was explored using a G-protein coupled receptor, the human kappa opioid receptor type 1 (hKOR1). While CHOBIMALT alone was not found to be effective as a surfactant for membrane extraction, when added to classical detergent micelles CHOBIMALT was observed to dramatically enhance the thermal stability of solubilized hKOR1.

  13. Aspirin Increases the Solubility of Cholesterol in Lipid Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsop, Richard; Barrett, Matthew; Zheng, Sonbo; Dies, Hannah; Rheinstadter, Maikel

    2014-03-01

    Aspirin (ASA) is often prescribed for patients with high levels of cholesterol for the secondary prevention of myocardial events, a regimen known as the Low-Dose Aspirin Therapy. We have recently shown that Aspirin partitions in lipid bilayers. However, a direct interplay between ASA and cholesterol has not been investigated. Cholesterol is known to insert itself into the membrane in a dispersed state at moderate concentrations (under ~37.5%) and decrease fluidity of membranes. We prepared model lipid membranes containing varying amounts of both ASA and cholesterol molecules. The structure of the bilayers as a function of ASA and cholesterol concentration was determined using high-resolution X-ray diffraction. At cholesterol levels of more than 40mol%, immiscible cholesterol plaques formed. Adding ASA to the membranes was found to dissolve the cholesterol plaques, leading to a fluid lipid bilayer structure. We present first direct evidence for an interaction between ASA and cholesterol on the level of the cell membrane.

  14. Cholesterol granuloma of the breast mimicking malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Roobina; Narula, Varsha; Jain, Anshu; Maheshwari, Veena

    2013-01-01

    Cholesterol granuloma of the breast is an unusual non-neoplastic condition which frequently resembles malignancy clinically as well as radiologically. We herein report a case of a 28-year-old woman who presented with a lump in the upper outer quadrant of right breast. Physical examination and ultrasonography strongly suggested a carcinomatous lesion, but histopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis to be cholestrol granulomas. This article highlights the perplexing clinical presentation of cholesterol granulomas and affirms the role of histopathological examination in diagnosing these lesions correctly. PMID:23925685

  15. Alpinetin enhances cholesterol efflux and inhibits lipid accumulation in oxidized low-density lipoprotein-loaded human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhengming; Sang, Haiqiang; Fu, Xin; Liang, Ying; Li, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Alpinetin is a natural flavonoid abundantly present in the ginger family. Here, we investigated the effect of alpinetin on cholesterol efflux and lipid accumulation in oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL)-treated THP-1 macrophages and human peripheral blood monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDMs). After exposing THP-1 macrophages to alpinetin, cholesterol efflux was determined by liquid scintillator. The mRNA and protein levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ), liver X receptor alpha (LXR-α), ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), and ABCG1 and scavenger receptor class B member 1 were determined by reverse-transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) and Western blot analysis, respectively. Alpinetin promoted apolipoprotein A-I- and high-density-lipoprotein-mediated cholesterol efflux and elevated PPAR-γ and LXR-α mRNA and protein expression in a dose-dependent fashion in ox-LDL-treated THP-1 macrophages and HMDMs. Small interfering RNA-mediated silencing of PPAR-γ or LXR-α dose dependently reversed alpinetin-increased cholesterol efflux in THP-1 macrophages, indicating the involvement of PPAR-γ and LXR-α in alpinetin-promoted cholesterol efflux. Alpinetin inhibited ox-LDL-induced lipid accumulation and enhanced the expression of ABCA1 and ABCG1 mRNA and protein, which was reversed by specific knockdown of PPAR-γ or LXR-α. Taken together, our results reveal that alpinetin exhibits positive effects on cholesterol efflux and inhibits ox-LDL-induced lipid accumulation, which might be through PPAR-γ/LXR-α/ABCA1/ABCG1 pathway.

  16. Naringin regulates cholesterol homeostasis and inhibits inflammation via modulating NF-κB and ERK signaling pathways in vitro.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jing; Wang, Changyuan; Peng, Jinyong; Li, Wenshuang; Jin, Yue; Liu, Qi; Meng, Qiang; Liu, Kexin; Sun, Huijun

    2016-02-01

    The main purpose of this study was to examine if naringin contributed to the regulation of cholesterol homeostasis and inflammatory cytokine expressions in cholesterol and 25-OH-cholesterol-treated HepG2 cells and TNF-α-treated HUVECs. The gene and protein expressions related to cholesterol homeostasis and inflammation were determined by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting. We obtained the following results: (1) A concentration-dependent increase of LDLR and CYP7A1 expressions was observed, through activating expressions of SREBP2 and PPARy in HepG2 cells after exposure to naringin; (2) EL gene and protein expressions in HUVECs were inhibited by naringin; (3) the expressions of inflammatory factors such as CRP, TNF-α, ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 in HepG2 cells, ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 in HUVECs restrained by naringin were confirmed; (4) NF-κB and ERK1/2 activities were quenched by naringin. In summary, naringin might not only effectively reduce cholesterol levels by stimulating cholesterol metabolism but also inhibit inflammatory response through reducing inflammatory cytokine expressions. The effects of naringin were achieved via modulating NF-κB and ERK signaling pathways.

  17. Synergistic effects of high blood cholesterol and hypertension on leukocyte and platelet recruitment in the cerebral microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Stephen F; Almeida-Paula, Lidiana D; Granger, Daniel N

    2014-04-01

    Hypertension or hypercholesterolemia can induce a proinflammatory and prothrombogenic phenotype in the microcirculation of the brain; however, less is known about how the combination of these risk factors affects the vasculature. We recently reported that a moderate (60%) increase in plasma cholesterol blunts the recruitment of leukocytes and platelets in the cerebral microvessels elicited by hypertension. In this study, we examined whether larger increments in blood cholesterol (4-fold) exerts a similar modulating influence on the vasculature in the presence of hypertension. Apolipoprotein E-knockout mice with deoxycorticosterone acetate salt-induced hypertension were placed on a high-cholesterol diet and exhibited exaggerated leukocyte and platelet adhesion responses in cerebral microvessels. Intermittent feeding (every fourth day) with high-cholesterol diet yielded similar phenotypic changes in the vasculature. Once the mice were placed on high-cholesterol diet, 4 days on normal diet (ND) were needed to revert to a normal vascular phenotype. Angiotensin II type 1 receptors and reactive oxygen species seem to contribute to the vascular responses induced by hypercholesterolemia and hypertension. Our findings indicate that the combination of hypertension and large increases in plasma cholesterol concentration results in a severe, but reversible, inflammatory and thrombogenic phenotype in the cerebral microvasculature.

  18. African Nutmeg (Monodora Myristica) Lowers Cholesterol and Modulates Lipid Peroxidation in Experimentally Induced Hypercholesterolemic Male Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Onyenibe, Nwozo Sarah; Fowokemi, Kasumu Titilayo; Emmanuel, Oyinloye Babatunji

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the cholesterol lowering potential and protective ability of aqueous extract of Monodora myristica experimental hypercholesterolemic rats, a short-term study was conducted. Hypercholesterolemia was induced by administering cholesterol orally at a dose of 40 mg/kg/0.3 ml. Plant extracts 100 or 200 mg/kg body weight and Questran 0.26 g/kg were administered five times a week for eight weeks for amelioration. Hypolipidemic effects were evaluated by measuring total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and triglycerides (TG) in the serum, while the protective ability was measured by the extent of lipid peroxidation (LPO) as well as enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants levels in post mitochondrial fractions (PMF) of the hepatic and cardiac homogenates. Serum aminotransferases activities were also monitored. Results obtained shows that treatment with M. myristica elicited a significant reduction in serum TC, TG and LDL-C levels while there was concomitant increase in HDL-C of hypercholesterolemic rats. Elevations in serum aminotransferases activities and LPO level were reversed and a significant amelioration was noticed in enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants status in the liver and heart of hypercholesterolemic rats. This study suggests that M. myristica possess cholesterol lowering potentials and protective ability in experimental hypercholesterolemia rat model. PMID:26199582

  19. Inhibition of angiogenesis by selective estrogen receptor modulators through blockade of cholesterol trafficking rather than estrogen receptor antagonism.

    PubMed

    Shim, Joong Sup; Li, Ruo-Jing; Lv, Junfang; Head, Sarah A; Yang, Eun Ju; Liu, Jun O

    2015-06-28

    Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERM) including tamoxifen are known to inhibit angiogenesis. However, the underlying mechanism, which is independent of their action on the estrogen receptor (ER), has remained largely unknown. In the present study, we found that tamoxifen and other SERM inhibited cholesterol trafficking in endothelial cells, causing a hyper-accumulation of cholesterol in late endosomes/lysosomes. Inhibition of cholesterol trafficking by tamoxifen was accompanied by abnormal subcellular distribution of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR2) and inhibition of the terminal glycosylation of the receptor. Tamoxifen also caused perinuclear positioning of lysosomes, which in turn trapped the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in the perinuclear region of endothelial cells. Abnormal distribution of VEGFR2 and mTOR and inhibition of VEGFR2 and mTOR activities by tamoxifen were significantly reversed by addition of cholesterol-cyclodextrin complex to the culture media of endothelial cells. Moreover, high concentrations of tamoxifen inhibited endothelial and breast cancer cell proliferation in a cholesterol-dependent, but ER-independent, manner. Together, these results unraveled a previously unrecognized mechanism of angiogenesis inhibition by tamoxifen and other SERM, implicating cholesterol trafficking as an attractive therapeutic target for cancer treatment.

  20. African Nutmeg (Monodora Myristica) Lowers Cholesterol and Modulates Lipid Peroxidation in Experimentally Induced Hypercholesterolemic Male Wistar Rats.

    PubMed

    Onyenibe, Nwozo Sarah; Fowokemi, Kasumu Titilayo; Emmanuel, Oyinloye Babatunji

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the cholesterol lowering potential and protective ability of aqueous extract of Monodora myristica experimental hypercholesterolemic rats, a short-term study was conducted. Hypercholesterolemia was induced by administering cholesterol orally at a dose of 40 mg/kg/0.3 ml. Plant extracts 100 or 200 mg/kg body weight and Questran 0.26 g/kg were administered five times a week for eight weeks for amelioration. Hypolipidemic effects were evaluated by measuring total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and triglycerides (TG) in the serum, while the protective ability was measured by the extent of lipid peroxidation (LPO) as well as enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants levels in post mitochondrial fractions (PMF) of the hepatic and cardiac homogenates. Serum aminotransferases activities were also monitored. Results obtained shows that treatment with M. myristica elicited a significant reduction in serum TC, TG and LDL-C levels while there was concomitant increase in HDL-C of hypercholesterolemic rats. Elevations in serum aminotransferases activities and LPO level were reversed and a significant amelioration was noticed in enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants status in the liver and heart of hypercholesterolemic rats. This study suggests that M. myristica possess cholesterol lowering potentials and protective ability in experimental hypercholesterolemia rat model. PMID:26199582

  1. Implementation of cellulomonas cholesterol oxidase for total serum cholesterol determination by the endpoint method.

    PubMed

    Srisawasdi, Pornpen; Chaichanajarernkul, Upsorn; Teerakranjana, Narumon; Kroll, Martin H

    2008-01-01

    Cellulomonas has been shown to be a good source of cholesterol oxidase in addition to Streptomyces for serum cholesterol determination by the endpoint method, inexpensive in cost, and showing excellent performance. For clinical use, we have assessed the reliability of Cellulomonas reagent for cholesterol determination. We constructed the user-defined endpoint methods on three automated analyzers. The analytical performances (linearity, precision, recovery, interference, stability, and comparison with the standardized method) of Cellulomonas cholesterol reagents were evaluated and compared to those of Streptomyces reagents. Linearity (18.1-23.3 mmol/L) and stability of reagents (6-11 weeks) depended on the analyzers being used. The average within-run and between-day % coefficients of variation (CVs) ranged from 1.44 to 2.45 and 1.98 to 2.99, respectively, and were within National Cholesterol Education Program analytical criteria (cholesterol recovery while lipemia generated a positive interference with all methods. Cellulomonas enzyme is analytically reliable when used for serum cholesterol determination by the endpoint method. Its analytical performance is equivalent to Streptomyces enzymes and meets the analytical goals. It has an advantage over the other enzymes in that it does not ship in the frozen state.

  2. Lysosomal membrane glycoproteins bind cholesterol and contribute to lysosomal cholesterol export

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian; Pfeffer, Suzanne R

    2016-01-01

    LAMP1 and LAMP2 proteins are highly abundant, ubiquitous, mammalian proteins that line the lysosome limiting membrane, and protect it from lysosomal hydrolase action. LAMP2 deficiency causes Danon’s disease, an X-linked hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. LAMP2 is needed for chaperone-mediated autophagy, and its expression improves tissue function in models of aging. We show here that human LAMP1 and LAMP2 bind cholesterol in a manner that buries the cholesterol 3β-hydroxyl group; they also bind tightly to NPC1 and NPC2 proteins that export cholesterol from lysosomes. Quantitation of cellular LAMP2 and NPC1 protein levels suggest that LAMP proteins represent a significant cholesterol binding site at the lysosome limiting membrane, and may signal cholesterol availability. Functional rescue experiments show that the ability of human LAMP2 to facilitate cholesterol export from lysosomes relies on its ability to bind cholesterol directly. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21635.001 PMID:27664420

  3. [In vitro study over statins effects on cellular growth curves and its reversibility with mevalonate].

    PubMed

    Millan Núñez-Cortés, Jesús; Alvarez Rodriguez, Ysmael; Alvarez Novés, Granada; Recarte Garcia-Andrade, Carlos; Alvarez-Sala Walther, Luis

    2014-01-01

    HMG-CoA-Reductase inhibitors, also known as statins, are currently the most powerful cholesterol-lowering drugs available on the market. Clinical trials and experimental evidence suggest that statins have heavy anti-atherosclerotic effects. These are in part consequence of lipid lowering but also result from pleiotropic actions of the drugs. These so-called pleiotropic properties affect various aspects of cell function, inflammation, coagulation, and vasomotor activity. These effects are mediated either indirectly through LDL-c reduction or via a direct effect on cellular functions. Although many of the pleiotropic properties of statins may be a class effect, some may be unique to certain agents and account for differences in their pharmacological activity. So, although statins typically have similar effects on LDL-c levels, differences in chemical structure and pharmacokinetic profile can lead to variations in pleiotropic effects. In this paper we analize the in vitro effects of different statins over different cell lines from cells implicated in atherosclerotic process: endothelial cells, fibroblasts, and vascular muscular cells. In relation with our results we can proof that the effects of different dosis of different statins provides singular effects over growth curves of different cellular lines, a despite of a class-dependent effects. So, pleiotropic effects and its reversibility with mevalonate are different according with the molecule and the dosis. PMID:24126321

  4. Rapid turn-over of plasma membrane sphingomyelin and cholesterol in baby hamster kidney cells after exposure to sphingomyelinase.

    PubMed

    Slotte, J P; Härmälä, A S; Jansson, C; Pörn, M I

    1990-12-14

    reversibly affects the apparent distribution of cholesterol. Changes in the lipid composition of the plasma membrane also appears to selectively affect important metabolic reactions in that compartment.

  5. Rapid turn-over of plasma membrane sphingomyelin and cholesterol in baby hamster kidney cells after exposure to sphingomyelinase.

    PubMed

    Slotte, J P; Härmälä, A S; Jansson, C; Pörn, M I

    1990-12-14

    reversibly affects the apparent distribution of cholesterol. Changes in the lipid composition of the plasma membrane also appears to selectively affect important metabolic reactions in that compartment. PMID:2261487

  6. Indirect Lightning Safety Assessment Methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Ong, M M; Perkins, M P; Brown, C G; Crull, E W; Streit, R D

    2009-04-24

    Lightning is a safety hazard for high-explosives (HE) and their detonators. In the However, the current flowing from the strike point through the rebar of the building The methodology for estimating the risk from indirect lighting effects will be presented. It has two parts: a method to determine the likelihood of a detonation given a lightning strike, and an approach for estimating the likelihood of a strike. The results of these two parts produce an overall probability of a detonation. The probability calculations are complex for five reasons: (1) lightning strikes are stochastic and relatively rare, (2) the quality of the Faraday cage varies from one facility to the next, (3) RF coupling is inherently a complex subject, (4) performance data for abnormally stressed detonators is scarce, and (5) the arc plasma physics is not well understood. Therefore, a rigorous mathematical analysis would be too complex. Instead, our methodology takes a more practical approach combining rigorous mathematical calculations where possible with empirical data when necessary. Where there is uncertainty, we compensate with conservative approximations. The goal is to determine a conservative estimate of the odds of a detonation. In Section 2, the methodology will be explained. This report will discuss topics at a high-level. The reasons for selecting an approach will be justified. For those interested in technical details, references will be provided. In Section 3, a simple hypothetical example will be given to reinforce the concepts. While the methodology will touch on all the items shown in Figure 1, the focus of this report is the indirect effect, i.e., determining the odds of a detonation from given EM fields. Professor Martin Uman from the University of Florida has been characterizing and defining extreme lightning strikes. Using Professor Uman's research, Dr. Kimball Merewether at Sandia National Laboratory in Albuquerque calculated the EM fields inside a Faraday-cage type

  7. cDNA cloning of cholesterol 24-hydroxylase, a mediator of cholesterol homeostasis in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Lund, Erik G.; Guileyardo, Joseph M.; Russell, David W.

    1999-01-01

    The turnover of cholesterol in the brain is thought to occur via conversion of excess cholesterol into 24S-hydroxycholesterol, an oxysterol that is readily secreted from the central nervous system into the plasma. To gain molecular insight into this pathway of cholesterol metabolism, we used expression cloning to isolate cDNAs that encode murine and human cholesterol 24-hydroxylases. DNA sequence analysis indicates that both proteins are localized to the endoplasmic reticulum, share 95% identity, and represent a new cytochrome P450 subfamily (CYP46). When transfected into cultured cells, the cDNAs produce an enzymatic activity that converts cholesterol into 24S-hydroxycholesterol, and to a lesser extent, 25-hydroxycholesterol. The cholesterol 24-hydroxylase gene contains 15 exons and is located on human chromosome 14q32.1. Cholesterol 24-hydroxylase is expressed predominantly in the brain as judged by RNA and protein blotting. In situ mRNA hybridization and immunohistochemistry localize the expression of this P450 to neurons in multiple subregions of the brain. The concentrations of 24S-hydroxycholesterol in serum are low in newborn mice, reach a peak between postnatal days 12 and 15, and thereafter decline to baseline levels. In contrast, cholesterol 24-hydroxylase protein is first detected in the brain of mice at birth and continues to accumulate with age. We conclude that the cloned cDNAs encode cholesterol 24-hydroxylases that synthesize oxysterols in neurons of the brain and that secretion of 24S-hydroxycholesterol from this tissue in the mouse is developmentally regulated. PMID:10377398

  8. An amperometric cholesterol biosensor based on epoxy resin membrane bound cholesterol oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Pundir, C.S.; Narang, Jagriti; Chauhan, Nidhi; Sharma, Preety; Sharma, Renu

    2012-01-01

    Background & objectives: The use of epoxy resin membrane as a support for immobilization of enzyme has resulted into improved sensitivity and stability of biosensors for uric acid, ascorbic acid and polyphenols. The present work was aimed to prepare an improved amperometric biosensor for determination of serum cholesterol required in the diagnostics and management of certain pathological conditions. Methods: Epoxy resin membrane with immobilized cholesterol oxidase was mounted on the cleaned platinum (Pt) electrode with a parafilm to construct a working electrode. This working electrode along with Ag/AgCl as reference and Ag wire as an auxiliary electrode were connected through a three terminal electrometer to construct a cholesterol biosensor. Results: The sensor showed optimum response within 25 sec at pH 7.0 and 45°C. The linear working range of biosensor was 1.0 to 8.0 mM cholesterol. Km and Imax for cholesterol were 5.0 mM and 9.09 μA, respectively. The biosensor measured serum cholesterol. The minimum detection limit of the sensor was 1.0 mM. The mean analytical recoveries of added cholesterol in serum (2.84 and 4.13 mM) were 91.4±2.8 and 92.3±3.1 per cent (n=6), respectively. Within and between assay coefficient of variation (CV) were <2 and <4 per cent, respectively. Biosensor had a storage life of 6 months at 4°C. Interpretation & conclusions: The use of epoxy resin membrane as a support for immobilization of cholesterol oxidase has resulted into an improved amperometric cholesterol biosensor. The present biosensor had an advantage over the existing biosensors as it worked at comparatively lower potential. PMID:23168704

  9. Regulation of biliary cholesterol secretion. Functional relationship between the canalicular and sinusoidal cholesterol secretory pathways in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Nervi, F; Marinović, I; Rigotti, A; Ulloa, N

    1988-01-01

    The functional interrelationship between biliary cholesterol secretion, sinusoidal lipoprotein cholesterol secretion and bile salt synthesis was studied in the rat. Diosgenin, fructose, and colestipol in the diet were used to, respectively, influence biliary cholesterol output, VLDL production and bile salt synthesis. In the acute bile fistula rat, biliary cholesterol output was 700% increased by diosgenin and 50% decreased by fructose. In the rats fed both diosgenin and fructose, biliary cholesterol secretion was increased only by approximately 200%, whereas biliary bile salts and phospholipid outputs were unchanged. In the isolated perfused liver, VLDL-cholesterol output was 50% reduced by diosgenin alone, but was unchanged following feeding of diosgenin plus fructose. However, the livers of rats fed diosgenin plus fructose exhibited a 700% increase in VLDL-triglyceride production and a 200% increase in VLDL-cholesterol output. A significant reciprocal relationship between VLDL-cholesterol secretion and the coupling ratio of cholesterol to bile salts in bile was observed. Colestipol added to the diet maintained both sinusoidal and biliary cholesterol outputs within the normal range. In the chronic bile fistula rat, colestipol increased bile salt synthesis by 100% while diosgenin and fructose diets had no effect. Similarly, the addition of fructose to the colestipol diet did not decrease bile salt synthesis. These data suggest a reciprocal relationship between biliary cholesterol secretion and hepatic secretion of cholesterol as VLDL particles. The free cholesterol pool used for bile salt synthesis seems functionally unrelated to the pool from which VLDL-cholesterol and biliary cholesterol originate. These findings support the idea that metabolic compartmentalization of hepatic cholesterol is a major determinant of the quantity of cholesterol available for recruitment by the bile salt-dependent biliary cholesterol secretory mechanism. PMID:3198756

  10. Indirect Self-Destructiveness and Emotional Intelligence.

    PubMed

    Tsirigotis, Konstantinos

    2016-06-01

    While emotional intelligence may have a favourable influence on the life and psychological and social functioning of the individual, indirect self-destructiveness exerts a rather negative influence. The aim of this study has been to explore possible relations between indirect self-destructiveness and emotional intelligence. A population of 260 individuals (130 females and 130 males) aged 20-30 (mean age of 24.5) was studied by using the Polish version of the chronic self-destructiveness scale and INTE, i.e., the Polish version of the assessing emotions scale. Indirect self-destructiveness has significant correlations with all variables of INTE (overall score, factor I, factor II), and these correlations are negative. The intensity of indirect self-destructiveness differentiates significantly the height of the emotional intelligence and vice versa: the height of the emotional intelligence differentiates significantly the intensity of indirect self-destructiveness. Indirect self-destructiveness has negative correlations with emotional intelligence as well as its components: the ability to recognize emotions and the ability to utilize emotions. The height of emotional intelligence differentiates the intensity of indirect self-destructiveness, and vice versa: the intensity of indirect self-destructiveness differentiates the height of emotional intelligence. It seems advisable to use emotional intelligence in the prophylactic and therapeutic work with persons with various types of disorders, especially with the syndrome of indirect self-destructiveness.

  11. Two stage indirect evaporative cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Bourne, Richard C.; Lee, Brian E.; Callaway, Duncan

    2005-08-23

    A two stage indirect evaporative cooler that moves air from a blower mounted above the unit, vertically downward into dry air passages in an indirect stage and turns the air flow horizontally before leaving the indirect stage. After leaving the dry passages, a major air portion travels into the direct stage and the remainder of the air is induced by a pressure drop in the direct stage to turn 180.degree. and returns horizontally through wet passages in the indirect stage and out of the unit as exhaust air.

  12. Curcumin promotes cholesterol efflux from adipocytes related to PPARgamma-LXRalpha-ABCA1 passway.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shao-zhuang; Zhao, Shui-ping; Wu, Zhi-hong; Yang, Jun; Xie, Xiang-zhu; Yu, Bi-lian; Nie, Sai

    2011-12-01

    Curcumin affects the functions of adipocytes. But it is not known whether curcumin has some effect on the cholesterol efflux process of adipocytes. Rabbit subcutaneous adipocytes were incubated with 5, 10 and 20 μg/ml curcumin for 24 h. The cholesterol efflux onto apoAI was assessed, and the peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor (PPAR) γ, liver X receptor (LXR) α and ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) mRNA expression in adipocytes were quantified by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Curcumin increased the cholesterol efflux from adipocytes in dose-dependent manner. The increased expression of PPARγ, LXRα and ABCA1 caused by curcumin were parallel. When the adipocytes were pre-treated by GW9662, the increased expression of PPARγ induced by curcumin was partially prevented, subsequent to the down-regulation of LXRα and ABCA1. Curcumin can affect the cholesterol efflux from adipocytes by regulating the PPARγ-LXR-ABCA1 passway.

  13. Structural Analysis of Alterations in Zebrafish Muscle Differentiation Induced by Simvastatin and Their Recovery with Cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Laise M.; Rios, Eduardo A.; Midlej, Victor; Atella, Georgia C.; Herculano-Houzel, Suzana; Benchimol, Marlene; Mermelstein, Claudia; Costa, Manoel Luís

    2015-01-01

    In vitro studies show that cholesterol is essential to myogenesis. We have been using zebrafish to overcome the limitations of the in vitro approach and to study the sub-cellular structures and processes involved during myogenesis. We use simvastatin—a drug widely used to prevent high levels of cholesterol and cardiovascular disease—during zebrafish skeletal muscle formation. Simvastatin is an efficient inhibitor of cholesterol synthesis that has various myotoxic consequences. Here, we employed simvastatin concentrations that cause either mild or severe morphological disturbances to observe changes in the cytoskeleton (intermediate filaments and microfilaments), extracellular matrix and adhesion markers by confocal microscopy. With low-dose simvastatin treatment, laminin was almost normal, and alpha-actinin was reduced in the myofibrils. With high simvastatin doses, laminin and vinculin were reduced and appeared discontinuous along the septa, with almost no myofibrils, and small amounts of desmin accumulating close to the septa. We also analyzed sub-cellular alterations in the embryos by electron microscopy, and demonstrate changes in embryo and somite size, septa shape, and in myofibril structure. These effects could be reversed by the addition of exogenous cholesterol. These results contribute to the understanding of the mechanisms of action of simvastatin in muscle cells in particular, and in the study of myogenesis in general. PMID:25786435

  14. Structural analysis of alterations in zebrafish muscle differentiation induced by simvastatin and their recovery with cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Campos, Laise M; Rios, Eduardo A; Midlej, Victor; Atella, Georgia C; Herculano-Houzel, Suzana; Benchimol, Marlene; Mermelstein, Claudia; Costa, Manoel Luís

    2015-06-01

    In vitro studies show that cholesterol is essential to myogenesis. We have been using zebrafish to overcome the limitations of the in vitro approach and to study the sub-cellular structures and processes involved during myogenesis. We use simvastatin--a drug widely used to prevent high levels of cholesterol and cardiovascular disease--during zebrafish skeletal muscle formation. Simvastatin is an efficient inhibitor of cholesterol synthesis that has various myotoxic consequences. Here, we employed simvastatin concentrations that cause either mild or severe morphological disturbances to observe changes in the cytoskeleton (intermediate filaments and microfilaments), extracellular matrix and adhesion markers by confocal microscopy. With low-dose simvastatin treatment, laminin was almost normal, and alpha-actinin was reduced in the myofibrils. With high simvastatin doses, laminin and vinculin were reduced and appeared discontinuous along the septa, with almost no myofibrils, and small amounts of desmin accumulating close to the septa. We also analyzed sub-cellular alterations in the embryos by electron microscopy, and demonstrate changes in embryo and somite size, septa shape, and in myofibril structure. These effects could be reversed by the addition of exogenous cholesterol. These results contribute to the understanding of the mechanisms of action of simvastatin in muscle cells in particular, and in the study of myogenesis in general.

  15. SR-BI: Linking Cholesterol and Lipoprotein Metabolism with Breast and Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez-Pajares, Jorge L.; Ben Hassen, Céline; Chevalier, Stéphan; Frank, Philippe G.

    2016-01-01

    Studies have demonstrated the significant role of cholesterol and lipoprotein metabolism in the progression of cancer. The SCARB1 gene encodes the scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI), which is an 82-kDa glycoprotein with two transmembrane domains separated by a large extracellular loop. SR-BI plays an important role in the regulation of cholesterol exchange between cells and high-density lipoproteins. Accordingly, hepatic SR-BI has been shown to play an essential role in the regulation of the reverse cholesterol transport pathway, which promotes the removal and excretion of excess body cholesterol. In the context of atherosclerosis, SR-BI has been implicated in the regulation of intracellular signaling, lipid accumulation, foam cell formation, and cellular apoptosis. Furthermore, since lipid metabolism is a relevant target for cancer treatment, recent studies have focused on examining the role of SR-BI in this pathology. While signaling pathways have initially been explored in non-tumoral cells, studies with cancer cells have now demonstrated SR-BI's function in tumor progression. In this review, we will discuss the role of SR-BI during tumor development and malignant progression. In addition, we will provide insights into the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of the SCARB1 gene. Overall, studying the role of SR-BI in tumor development and progression should allow us to gain useful information for the development of new therapeutic strategies. PMID:27774064

  16. The Hippo pathway, p53 and cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Aylon, Yael; Oren, Moshe

    2016-09-01

    ASBTRACT Increased rates of cholesterol and lipid synthesis have long been recognized as important aspects of the metabolic rewiring that occurs during cancerous transformation. Many genes encoding enzymes involved in cholesterol and fatty acid biogenesis are transcriptional targets of the sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs). The SREBPs act as a hub for metabolic and proliferation-related signals; their activity is the focus of a tug-of-war between tumor suppressors, who generally inhibit SREBP function, and oncogenes, who often promote, and rely on, SREBP activity. The Hippo pathway plays a central role in coordinating cell proliferation and organ size, whereas p53 is a crucial tumor suppressor that maintains metabolic homeostasis and orchestrates cellular stress responses. Together, the Hippo and p53 signaling pathways cooperate on multiple levels to fine-tune SREPB activity and regulate cholesterol/lipid levels. Cholesterol biosynthesis inhibitors such as statins are appealing conceptually, but have yet to show an indisputable effect on cancer development. Fortunately, the complex regulation surrounding the Hippo-p53-SREBP network potentially provides a broad interface for additional novel cancer-targeting interventions. PMID:27419353

  17. The Success Story of LDL Cholesterol Lowering.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Terje R

    2016-02-19

    We can look back at >100 years of cholesterol research that has brought medicine to a stage where people at risk of severe or fatal coronary heart disease have a much better prognosis than before. This progress has not come about without resistance. Perhaps one of the most debated topics in medicine, the cholesterol controversy, could only be brought to rest through the development of new clinical research methods that were capable of taking advantage of the amazing achievements in basic and pharmacological science after the second World War. It was only after understanding the biochemistry and physiology of cholesterol synthesis, transport and clearance from the blood that medicine could take advantage of drugs and diets to reduce the risk of atherosclerotic diseases. This review points to the highlights of the history of low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol lowering, with the discovery of the low-density lipoprotein receptor and its physiology and not only the development of statins as the stellar moments but also the development of clinical trial methodology as an effective tool to provide scientifically convincing evidence. PMID:26892969

  18. Genetic defects in postsqualene cholesterol biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Moebius, F F; Fitzky, B U; Glossmann, H

    2000-04-01

    In humans and mice, four different genetic defects in the nine biosynthetic steps from lanosterol to cholesterol have been identified. They impair the activity of a putative C3-sterol dehydrogenase (Nshdl, X-linked dominant bare patches/striated mutation in mice), the sterol delta 8-delta 7 isomerase/EBP (Ebp, X-linked dominant tattered mutation in mice; chondrodysplasia punctata (CDPX2) in humans), the delta 24-sterol reductase (autosomal recessive desmosterolosis) and the delta 7-sterol reductase (DHCR7 gene, autosomal recessive Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome in humans). These inborn errors in postsqualene cholesterol metabolism result in dysmorphogenetic syndromes of variable severity. The X-linked dominant mutations result in mosaicism in females, as a result of X-inactivation, and midgestational lethality in males. The mechanisms by which the depletion of cholesterol or the accumulation of intermediates impair morphogenetic programs are unclear. So far, no cellular processes that require an intact cholesterol biosynthetic pathway have been identified, although the morphogenetic hedgehog-patched signaling cascade is a candidate. PMID:10707051

  19. Mitochondria, cholesterol and cancer cell metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ribas, Vicent; García-Ruiz, Carmen; Fernández-Checa, José C

    2016-12-01

    Given the role of mitochondria in oxygen consumption, metabolism and cell death regulation, alterations in mitochondrial function or dysregulation of cell death pathways contribute to the genesis and progression of cancer. Cancer cells exhibit an array of metabolic transformations induced by mutations leading to gain-of-function of oncogenes and loss-of-function of tumor suppressor genes that include increased glucose consumption, reduced mitochondrial respiration, increased reactive oxygen species generation and cell death resistance, all of which ensure cancer progression. Cholesterol metabolism is disturbed in cancer cells and supports uncontrolled cell growth. In particular, the accumulation of cholesterol in mitochondria emerges as a molecular component that orchestrates some of these metabolic alterations in cancer cells by impairing mitochondrial function. As a consequence, mitochondrial cholesterol loading in cancer cells may contribute, in part, to the Warburg effect stimulating aerobic glycolysis to meet the energetic demand of proliferating cells, while protecting cancer cells against mitochondrial apoptosis due to changes in mitochondrial membrane dynamics. Further understanding the complexity in the metabolic alterations of cancer cells, mediated largely through alterations in mitochondrial function, may pave the way to identify more efficient strategies for cancer treatment involving the use of small molecules targeting mitochondria, cholesterol homeostasis/trafficking and specific metabolic pathways. PMID:27455839

  20. Novel inhibitors of cholesterol degradation in Mycobacterium tuberculosis reveal how the bacterium's metabolism is constrained by the intracellular environment.

    PubMed

    VanderVen, Brian C; Fahey, Ruth J; Lee, Wonsik; Liu, Yancheng; Abramovitch, Robert B; Memmott, Christine; Crowe, Adam M; Eltis, Lindsay D; Perola, Emanuele; Deininger, David D; Wang, Tiansheng; Locher, Christopher P; Russell, David G

    2015-02-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) relies on a specialized set of metabolic pathways to support growth in macrophages. By conducting an extensive, unbiased chemical screen to identify small molecules that inhibit Mtb metabolism within macrophages, we identified a significant number of novel compounds that limit Mtb growth in macrophages and in medium containing cholesterol as the principle carbon source. Based on this observation, we developed a chemical-rescue strategy to identify compounds that target metabolic enzymes involved in cholesterol metabolism. This approach identified two compounds that inhibit the HsaAB enzyme complex, which is required for complete degradation of the cholesterol A/B rings. The strategy also identified an inhibitor of PrpC, the 2-methylcitrate synthase, which is required for assimilation of cholesterol-derived propionyl-CoA into the TCA cycle. These chemical probes represent new classes of inhibitors with novel modes of action, and target metabolic pathways required to support growth of Mtb in its host cell. The screen also revealed a structurally-diverse set of compounds that target additional stage(s) of cholesterol utilization. Mutants resistant to this class of compounds are defective in the bacterial adenylate cyclase Rv1625/Cya. These data implicate cyclic-AMP (cAMP) in regulating cholesterol utilization in Mtb, and are consistent with published reports indicating that propionate metabolism is regulated by cAMP levels. Intriguingly, reversal of the cholesterol-dependent growth inhibition caused by this subset of compounds could be achieved by supplementing the media with acetate, but not with glucose, indicating that Mtb is subject to a unique form of metabolic constraint induced by the presence of cholesterol.

  1. Resveratrol mediates anti-atherogenic effects on cholesterol flux in human macrophages and endothelium via PPARγ and adenosine.

    PubMed

    Voloshyna, Iryna; Hai, Ofek; Littlefield, Michael J; Carsons, Steven; Reiss, Allison B

    2013-01-01

    Resveratrol is a bioactive molecule used in dietary supplements and herbal medicines and consumed worldwide. Known cardioprotective and anti-inflammatory properties of resveratrol have spurred investigation of the mechanisms involved. The present study explored potential atheroprotective actions of resveratrol on cholesterol metabolism in cells of the arterial wall, including human macrophages and arterial endothelium. Using QRT-PCR and Western blotting techniques, we measured expression of the proteins involved in reverse cholesterol transport (ABCA1, ABCG1 and SR-B1) and the scavenger receptors responsible for uptake of modified cholesterol (CD36, SR-A1 and LOX-1). We analyzed the effect of resveratrol on apoA-1-and HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux in human THP-1 macrophages. The effect of resveratrol on oxLDL internalization and foam cell formation were evaluated using confocal and light microscopy. Our data indicate that resveratrol regulates expression of major proteins involved in cholesterol transport, promotes apoA-1 and HDL-mediated efflux, downregulates oxLDL uptake and diminishes foam cell formation. Mechanistically, resveratrol effects were dependent upon PPAR-γ and adenosine 2A receptor pathways. For the first time we demonstrate that resveratrol regulates expression of the cholesterol metabolizing enzyme cytochrome P450 27-hydroxylase, providing efficient cholesterol elimination via formation of oxysterols. This study establishes that resveratrol attenuates lipid accumulation in cultured human macrophages via effects on cholesterol transport. Further in vivo studies are needed to determine whether resveratrol may be an additional resource available to reduce lipid deposition and atherosclerosis in humans.

  2. Serum cholesterol concentrations among Navajo Indians.

    PubMed

    Sugarman, J R; Gilbert, T J; Percy, C A; Peter, D G

    1992-01-01

    Navajo Indians have been reported by earlier investigators to have low concentrations of serum lipids and a low prevalence of hyperlipidemia, as well as low rates of ischemic heart disease. However, no data on serum lipid concentrations among Navajos have been reported for more than two decades. The authors conducted a study to determine the distribution of concentrations of serum total cholesterol (TC), high density lipoprotein cholesterol, low density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglyceride among persons 25-74 years old living in a representative community on the Navajo Indian reservation. Data are reported for 255 subjects, 105 men and 150 women, ages 25-74 years. The authors compared these data to those for the general population as determined by the second National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES II). TC concentrations among Navajo men were similar to those from NHANES II. TC concentrations among younger Navajo women were similar to those for women younger than 55 years from NHANES II, but were significantly lower among older Navajo women. While 27.6 percent of men ages 25-74 years studied in NHANES II had TC concentrations greater than 240 milligrams per deciliter, 33.8 percent of Navajo men had similarly elevated TC. However, the prevalence of serum TC concentrations greater than 240 milligrams per deciliter among Navajo women (17.5 percent) was about half that among women studied in NHANES II (32.9 percent). A similar pattern was found for low density lipoprotein cholesterol. The researchers concluded that Navajo Indians are no longer characterized by low serum lipid concentrations, that increased cholesterol concentrations may be a harbinger of increasing rates of atherosclerotic coronary heart disease among Navajos, and that attention should be directed to primary prevention of hyperlipidemia in Navajo Indian communities. PMID:1738814

  3. Role of Cholesterol Pathways in Norovirus Replication▿

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Kyeong-Ok

    2009-01-01

    Norwalk virus (NV) is a prototype strain of the noroviruses (family Caliciviridae) that have emerged as major causes of acute gastroenteritis worldwide. I have developed NV replicon systems using reporter proteins such as a neomycin-resistant protein (NV replicon-bearing cells) and a green fluorescent protein (pNV-GFP) and demonstrated that these systems were excellent tools to study virus replication in cell culture. In the present study, I first performed DNA microarray analysis of the replicon-bearing cells to identify cellular factors associated with NV replication. The analysis demonstrated that genes in lipid (cholesterol) or carbohydrate metabolic pathways were significantly (P < 0.001) changed by the gene ontology analysis. Among genes in the cholesterol pathways, I found that mRNA levels of hydroxymethylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) synthase, squalene epoxidase, and acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT), ACAT2, small heterodimer partner, and low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR)-related proteins were significantly changed in the cells. I also found that the inhibition of cholesterol biosynthesis using statins (an HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor) significantly increased the levels of NV proteins and RNA, whereas inhibitors of ACAT significantly reduced the replication of NV in replicon-bearing cells. Up- or downregulation of virus replication with these agents significantly correlated with the mRNA level of LDLR in replicon-bearing cells. Finally, I found that the expression of LDLR promoted NV replication in trans by transfection study with pNV-GFP. I conclude that the cholesterol pathways such as LDLR expression and ACAT activity may be crucial in the replication of noroviruses in cells, which may provide potential therapeutic targets for viral infection. PMID:19515767

  4. Impaired Cholesterol Efflux Capacity of High-Density Lipoprotein Isolated From Interstitial Fluid in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus—Brief Report

    PubMed Central

    Tietge, Uwe J.F.; Dikkers, Arne; Parini, Paolo; Angelin, Bo; Rudling, Mats

    2016-01-01

    Objective— Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, the mechanism of which is incompletely understood. Their high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles in plasma have been reported to have impaired cholesterol efflux capacity. However, the efflux capacity of HDL from interstitial fluid (IF), the starting point for reverse cholesterol transport, has not been studied. We here investigated the cholesterol efflux capacity of HDL from IF and plasma from T2D patients and healthy controls. Approach and Results— HDL was isolated from IF and peripheral plasma from 35 T2D patients and 35 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Cholesterol efflux to HDL was determined in vitro, normalized for HDL cholesterol, using cholesterol-loaded macrophages. Efflux capacity of plasma HDL was 10% lower in T2D patients than in healthy controls, in line with previous observations. This difference was much more pronounced for HDL from IF, where efflux capacity was reduced by 28% in T2D. Somewhat surprisingly, the efflux capacity of HDL from IF was lower than that of plasma HDL, by 15% and 32% in controls and T2D patients, respectively. Conclusion— These data demonstrate that (1) HDL from IF has a lower cholesterol efflux capacity than plasma HDL and (2) the efflux capacity of HDL from IF is severely impaired in T2D when compared with controls. Because IF comprises the compartment where reverse cholesterol transport is initiated, the marked reduction in cholesterol efflux capacity of IF-HDL from T2D patients may play an important role for their increased risk to develop atherosclerosis. PMID:27034474

  5. To Your Health: NLM update transcript - Cholesterol screening for kids?

    MedlinePlus

    ... transcript102416.html To Your Health: NLM update Transcript Cholesterol screening for kids? : 10/24/2016 To use ... the need for children to be screened for cholesterol levels in their bloodstream, finds a recent article ...

  6. Talk with Your Health Care Provider about High Cholesterol

    MedlinePlus

    ... you do? Always ask your provider what your cholesterol numbers are and write them down. Discuss these ... provider may prescribe medicine to help lower your cholesterol. y y Take your medicine every day, or ...

  7. Biliary cholesterol transport and precipitation: introduction and overview of conference.

    PubMed

    Strasberg, S M; Harvey, P R

    1990-09-01

    Cholesterol is secreted into bile as cholesterol-phospholipid vesicles. The cholesterol and phospholipid are subsequently exposed to the bile salts contained in the bile, which leads to the process of micellation. Two situations may arise depending on whether there is enough bile salt in proportion to cholesterol to complete this "maturation" process. If the cholesterol saturation is low, at equilibrium the bile salts will have completely micellized the vesicles. On the other hand, if bile is saturated with cholesterol, the micellation process is incomplete and vesicles and micelles will be present at equilibrium. The residual vesicle in this latter situation may have a higher cholesterol/phospholipid ratio because of the greater propensity of phospholipid to be micellized. This situation may result in cholesterol nucleation. The mechanism of nucleation from vesicles and the possible role of nucleating and antinucleating proteins in this process have been discussed.

  8. Indirect enantioresolution of (R,S)-mexiletine by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography via diastereomerization with [(S,S)-O,O'-di-p-toluoyl tartaric acid anhydride], (S)-naproxen and nine chiral reagents synthesized as variants of Marfey's reagent.

    PubMed

    Bhushan, R; Tanwar, Shivani; Dixit, Shuchi

    2011-03-01

    Eleven chiral derivatizing reagents (CDRs) were used for preparation of diastereomers of (R,S)-mexiletine containing a primary amino group in close proximity to the stereogenic center. One anhydride, namely [(S,S)-O,O'-di-p-toluoyl tartaric acid anhydride] was synthesized and (S)-naproxen was used as such as the chiral derivatizing reagent. The other nine CDRs were synthesized by substituting one of the fluorine atoms in 1,5-difluoro-2,4-dinitrobenzene with six amino acid amides and three amino acids. The diastereomers were separated by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The method was validated for linearity, accuracy, limit of detection and limit of quantification. The limit of detection was found in the range of 10-30  pmol. PMID:20586109

  9. Direct and indirect ecosystem effects of evolutionary adaptation in the Trinidadian guppy (Poecilia reticulata).

    PubMed

    Bassar, Ronald D; Ferriere, Regis; López-Sepulcre, Andrés; Marshall, Michael C; Travis, Joseph; Pringle, Catherine M; Reznick, David N

    2012-08-01

    Ecological and evolutionary processes may interact on the same timescale, but we are just beginning to understand how. Several studies have examined the net effects of adaptive evolution on ecosystem properties. However, we do not know whether these effects are confined to direct interactions or whether they propagate further through indirect ecological pathways. Even less well understood is how the combination of direct and indirect ecological effects of the phenotype promotes or inhibits evolutionary change. We coupled mesocosm experiments and ecosystem modeling to evaluate the ecological effects of local adaptation in Trinidadian guppies (Poecilia reticulata). The experiments show that guppies adapted to life with and without predators alter the ecosystem directly through differences in diet. The ecosystem model reveals that the small total indirect effect of the phenotype observed in the experiments is likely a combination of several large indirect effects that act in opposing directions. The model further suggests that these indirect effects can reverse the direction of selection that direct effects alone exert back on phenotypic variation. We conclude that phenotypic divergence can have major effects deep in the web of indirect ecological interactions and that even small total indirect effects can radically change the dynamics of adaptation.

  10. Ezetimibe and Simvastatin Reduce Cholesterol Levels in Zebrafish Larvae Fed a High-Cholesterol Diet

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Ji Sun; Fang, Longhou; Li, Andrew C.; Miller, Yury I.

    2012-01-01

    Cholesterol-fed zebrafish is an emerging animal model to study metabolic, oxidative, and inflammatory vascular processes relevant to pathogenesis of human atherosclerosis. Zebrafish fed a high-cholesterol diet (HCD) develop hypercholesterolemia and are characterized by profound lipoprotein oxidation and vascular lipid accumulation. Using optically translucent zebrafish larvae has the advantage of monitoring vascular pathology and assessing the efficacy of drug candidates in live animals. Thus, we investigated whether simvastatin and ezetimibe, the principal drugs used in management of hypercholesterolemia in humans, would also reduce cholesterol levels in HCD-fed zebrafish larvae. We found that ezetimibe was well tolerated by zebrafish and effectively reduced cholesterol levels in HCD-fed larvae. In contrast, simvastatin added to water was poorly tolerated by zebrafish larvae and, when added to food, had little effect on cholesterol levels in HCD-fed larvae. Combination of low doses of ezetimibe and simvastatin had an additive effect in reducing cholesterol levels in zebrafish. These results suggest that ezetimibe exerts in zebrafish a therapeutic effect similar to that in humans and that the hypercholesterolemic zebrafish can be used as a low-cost and informative model for testing new drug candidates and for investigating mechanisms of action for existing drugs targeting dyslipidemia. PMID:22693663

  11. Metabolism of low-density lipoprotein free cholesterol by human plasma lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Fielding, P.E.; Miida, Takashi; Fielding, C.J. )

    1991-09-03

    The metabolism of cholesterol derived from ({sup 3}H) cholesterol-labeled low-density lipoprotein (LDL) was determined in human blood plasma. LDL-derived free cholesterol first appeared in large {alpha}-migrating HDL (HDL{sub 2}) and was then transferred to small {alpha}-HDL (HDL{sub 3}) for esterification. The major part of such esters was retained within HDL of increasing size in the course of lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) activity; the balance was recovered in LDL. Transfer of preformed cholesteryl esters within HDL contributed little to the labeled cholesteryl ester accumulating HDL{sub 2}. When cholesterol for esterification was derived instead from cell membranes, a significantly smaller proportion of this cholesteryl ester was subsequently recovered in LDL. These data suggest compartmentation of cholesteryl esters within plasma that have been formed from cell membrane or LDL free cholesterol, and the role for HDL{sub 2} as a relatively unreactive sink for LCAT-derived cholesteryl esters.

  12. Cholesterol determination using protein-templated fluorescent gold nanocluster probes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Baker, Gary A

    2013-11-12

    We describe the development of a fluorescent biosensor platform for soluble cholesterol based on bovine serum albumin-stabilized gold nanocluster probes co-dissolved with cholesterol oxidase (ChOx) in a surfactant emulsion system. Selective enzymatic oxidation of cholesterol to cholest-4-en-3-one by ChOx produces stoichiometric amounts of H2O2 by-product, generating a quenching response signaling the presence of cholesterol at clinically relevant levels (LOD ∼12 μM).

  13. 27 CFR 6.26 - Indirect interest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

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  14. 27 CFR 6.32 - Indirect interest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Indirect interest. 6.32 Section 6.32 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS âTIED-HOUSEâ Unlawful Inducements Interest in Retail Property § 6.32 Indirect interest. Industry member interest in...

  15. 46 CFR 154.1720 - Indirect refrigeration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Indirect refrigeration. 154.1720 Section 154.1720 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Special Design and Operating Requirements § 154.1720 Indirect refrigeration....

  16. 27 CFR 6.26 - Indirect interest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Indirect interest. 6.26 Section 6.26 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL âTIED-HOUSEâ Unlawful Inducements Interest in Retail License § 6.26 Indirect interest. Industry member interest in...

  17. 27 CFR 6.26 - Indirect interest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Indirect interest. 6.26 Section 6.26 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL âTIED-HOUSEâ Unlawful Inducements Interest in Retail License § 6.26 Indirect interest. Industry member interest in...

  18. 27 CFR 6.32 - Indirect interest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Indirect interest. 6.32 Section 6.32 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL âTIED-HOUSEâ Unlawful Inducements Interest in Retail Property § 6.32 Indirect interest. Industry member interest in...

  19. 27 CFR 6.32 - Indirect interest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Indirect interest. 6.32 Section 6.32 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS âTIED-HOUSEâ Unlawful Inducements Interest in Retail Property § 6.32 Indirect interest. Industry member interest in...

  20. 27 CFR 6.26 - Indirect interest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Indirect interest. 6.26 Section 6.26 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS âTIED-HOUSEâ Unlawful Inducements Interest in Retail License § 6.26 Indirect interest. Industry member interest in...

  1. 27 CFR 6.32 - Indirect interest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Indirect interest. 6.32 Section 6.32 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS âTIED-HOUSEâ Unlawful Inducements Interest in Retail Property § 6.32 Indirect interest. Industry member interest in...

  2. 27 CFR 6.26 - Indirect interest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Indirect interest. 6.26 Section 6.26 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS âTIED-HOUSEâ Unlawful Inducements Interest in Retail License § 6.26 Indirect interest. Industry member interest in...

  3. 27 CFR 6.32 - Indirect interest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Indirect interest. 6.32 Section 6.32 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL âTIED-HOUSEâ Unlawful Inducements Interest in Retail Property § 6.32 Indirect interest. Industry member interest in...

  4. 48 CFR 1631.203 - Indirect costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... HEALTH BENEFITS ACQUISITION REGULATION GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS CONTRACT COST PRINCIPLES AND PROCEDURES Contracts With Commercial Organizations 1631.203 Indirect costs. For the purposes of applying FAR... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Indirect costs....

  5. 48 CFR 1631.203 - Indirect costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... HEALTH BENEFITS ACQUISITION REGULATION GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS CONTRACT COST PRINCIPLES AND PROCEDURES Contracts With Commercial Organizations 1631.203 Indirect costs. For the purposes of applying FAR... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Indirect costs....

  6. 48 CFR 1631.203 - Indirect costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... HEALTH BENEFITS ACQUISITION REGULATION GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS CONTRACT COST PRINCIPLES AND PROCEDURES Contracts With Commercial Organizations 1631.203 Indirect costs. For the purposes of applying FAR... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Indirect costs....

  7. 29 CFR 452.119 - Indirect elections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Indirect elections. 452.119 Section 452.119 Labor... STANDARDS GENERAL STATEMENT CONCERNING THE ELECTION PROVISIONS OF THE LABOR-MANAGEMENT REPORTING AND DISCLOSURE ACT OF 1959 Election Procedures; Rights of Members § 452.119 Indirect elections. National...

  8. 29 CFR 452.119 - Indirect elections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Indirect elections. 452.119 Section 452.119 Labor... STANDARDS GENERAL STATEMENT CONCERNING THE ELECTION PROVISIONS OF THE LABOR-MANAGEMENT REPORTING AND DISCLOSURE ACT OF 1959 Election Procedures; Rights of Members § 452.119 Indirect elections. National...

  9. 29 CFR 452.119 - Indirect elections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Indirect elections. 452.119 Section 452.119 Labor... STANDARDS GENERAL STATEMENT CONCERNING THE ELECTION PROVISIONS OF THE LABOR-MANAGEMENT REPORTING AND DISCLOSURE ACT OF 1959 Election Procedures; Rights of Members § 452.119 Indirect elections. National...

  10. 29 CFR 452.119 - Indirect elections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Indirect elections. 452.119 Section 452.119 Labor... STANDARDS GENERAL STATEMENT CONCERNING THE ELECTION PROVISIONS OF THE LABOR-MANAGEMENT REPORTING AND DISCLOSURE ACT OF 1959 Election Procedures; Rights of Members § 452.119 Indirect elections. National...

  11. 29 CFR 452.119 - Indirect elections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Indirect elections. 452.119 Section 452.119 Labor... STANDARDS GENERAL STATEMENT CONCERNING THE ELECTION PROVISIONS OF THE LABOR-MANAGEMENT REPORTING AND DISCLOSURE ACT OF 1959 Election Procedures; Rights of Members § 452.119 Indirect elections. National...

  12. Indirect Effects and Infants' Reaction to Strangers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feiring, Candice; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Examined whether an infant's reaction to a stranger would be indirectly influenced by the infant observing a stranger-third party interaction. Subjects were 45 15-month-old infants. Results suggest indirect effects influence social interactions and show that significant others can play an important role in mediating these effects. (Author/RH)

  13. Indirect techniques in nuclear astrophysics: a review.

    PubMed

    Tribble, R E; Bertulani, C A; Cognata, M La; Mukhamedzhanov, A M; Spitaleri, C

    2014-10-01

    In this review, we discuss the present status of three indirect techniques that are used to determine reaction rates for stellar burning processes, asymptotic normalization coefficients, the Trojan Horse method and Coulomb dissociation. A comprehensive review of the theory behind each of these techniques is presented. This is followed by an overview of the experiments that have been carried out using these indirect approaches.

  14. 25-Hydroxycholesterol Increases the Availability of Cholesterol in Phospholipid Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, Brett N.; Schlesinger, Paul H.; Ory, Daniel S.; Baker, Nathan A.

    2011-02-01

    Side-chain oxysterols are enzymatically generated oxidation products of cholesterol that serve a central role in mediating cholesterol homeostasis. Recent work has shown that side-chain oxysterols, such as 25-hydroxycholesterol (25-HC), alter membrane structure in very different ways from cholesterol, suggesting a possible mechanism for how these oxysterols regulate cholesterol homeostasis. Here we extend our previous work, using molecular dynamics simulations of 25-HC and cholesterol mixtures in 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (POPC) bilayers to examine interactions between 25-HC and cholesterol in the same bilayer. When added to cholesterol-containing membranes, 25-HC causes larger changes in membrane structure than when added to cholesterol-free membranes, demonstrating interactions between the two sterols. We also find that the presence of 25-HC changes the position, orientation, and solvent accessibility of cholesterol, shifting it into the water interface and therefore its availability to external acceptors. This is consistent with experimental results showing that oxysterols can trigger cholesterol trafficking from the plasma membrane to the endoplasmic reticulum. These interactions provide a potential mechanism for 25-HC-mediated regulation of cholesterol trafficking and homeostasis through direct modulation of cholesterol availability.

  15. Carbon Inverse Opal Rods for Nonenzymatic Cholesterol Detection.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Qifeng; Xie, Zhuoying; Ding, Haibo; Zhu, Cun; Yang, Zixue; Gu, Zhongze

    2015-11-18

    Carbon inverse opal rods made from silica photonic crystal rods are used for nonenzymatic cholesterol sensing. The characteristic reflection peak originating from the physical periodic structure works as sensing signals for quantitatively estimating cholesterol concentrations. Carbon inverse opal rods work both in cholesterol standard solutions and human serum. They are suitable for practical use in clinical diagnose. PMID:26415111

  16. Understanding Lipoproteins as Transporters of Cholesterol and Other Lipids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biggerstaff, Kyle D.; Wooten, Joshua S.

    2004-01-01

    A clear picture of lipoprotein metabolism is essential for understanding the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis. Many students are taught that low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol is "bad" and high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol is "good." This misconception leads to students thinking that lipoproteins are types of cholesterol rather than…

  17. Carbon Inverse Opal Rods for Nonenzymatic Cholesterol Detection.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Qifeng; Xie, Zhuoying; Ding, Haibo; Zhu, Cun; Yang, Zixue; Gu, Zhongze

    2015-11-18

    Carbon inverse opal rods made from silica photonic crystal rods are used for nonenzymatic cholesterol sensing. The characteristic reflection peak originating from the physical periodic structure works as sensing signals for quantitatively estimating cholesterol concentrations. Carbon inverse opal rods work both in cholesterol standard solutions and human serum. They are suitable for practical use in clinical diagnose.

  18. Dietary cholesterol and the plasma lipids and lipoproteins in the Tarahumara Indians: a people habituated to a low cholesterol diet after weaning.

    PubMed

    McMurry, M P; Connor, W E; Cerqueira, M T

    1982-04-01

    Eight Tarahumara Indian men participated in a metabolic study to measure the responsiveness of their plasma cholesterol levels to dietary cholesterol. They were fed isocaloric cholesterol-free and high cholesterol diets containing 20% fat, 15% protein, and 65% carbohydrate calories. On admission to the study, the Tarahumaras had a low mean plasma cholesterol concentration (120 mg/dl), reflecting their habitual low cholesterol diet. After 3 wk of a cholesterol-free diet their cholesterol levels were 113 mg/dl. The men were then fed a high cholesterol diet (1000 mg/day) which increased the mean total plasma cholesterol to 147 mg/dl (p less than 0.01) and also increased the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration. Tarahumaras, habituated to a low cholesterol diet after weaning, had the typical hypercholesterolemic response to a high cholesterol diet that has been previously observed in subjects whose lifelong diet was high in cholesterol content.

  19. Treating low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol: what is the evidence?

    PubMed Central

    Hage, Mirella P.

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown an inverse association between high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. However, genetic and interventional studies have failed to consistently support this relationship. There is an increasing body of evidence that the function of HDL, including its antiatherogenic properties and its reverse cholesterol transport activity, has a greater impact on CVD risk compared with levels of HDL alone. Targeting HDL has become a growing interest. Nevertheless, raising HDL pharmacologically has failed to show a considerable, if any, impact on cardiovascular outcome. Efforts should focus on improving HDL quality in addition to raising HDL levels when developing new therapies. Ongoing and future research will help determine the most safe and effective approach to improve cardiovascular outcome and establish the safety, efficacy and impact on atherosclerosis of the emerging HDL-raising therapies. PMID:24696776

  20. High density lipoprotein cholesterol: an evolving target of therapy in the management of cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Kapur, Navin K; Ashen, Dominique; Blumenthal, Roger S

    2008-01-01

    Since the pioneering work of John Gofman in the 1950s, our understanding of high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and its relationship to coronary heart disease (CHD) has grown substantially. Numerous clinical trials since the Framingham Study in 1977 have demonstrated an inverse relationship between HDL-C and one’s risk of developing CHD. Over the past two decades, preclinical research has gained further insight into the nature of HDL-C metabolism, specifically regarding the ability of HDL-C to promote reverse cholesterol transport (RCT). Recent attempts to harness HDL’s ability to enhance RCT have revealed the complexity of HDL-C metabolism. This review provides a detailed update on HDL-C as an evolving therapeutic target in the management of cardiovascular disease. PMID:18629371

  1. Structure and function of lysosomal phospholipase A2 and lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glukhova, Alisa; Hinkovska-Galcheva, Vania; Kelly, Robert; Abe, Akira; Shayman, James A.; Tesmer, John J. G.

    2015-03-01

    Lysosomal phospholipase A2 (LPLA2) and lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) belong to a structurally uncharacterized family of key lipid-metabolizing enzymes responsible for lung surfactant catabolism and for reverse cholesterol transport, respectively. Whereas LPLA2 is predicted to underlie the development of drug-induced phospholipidosis, somatic mutations in LCAT cause fish eye disease and familial LCAT deficiency. Here we describe several high-resolution crystal structures of human LPLA2 and a low-resolution structure of LCAT that confirms its close structural relationship to LPLA2. Insertions in the α/β hydrolase core of LPLA2 form domains that are responsible for membrane interaction and binding the acyl chains and head groups of phospholipid substrates. The LCAT structure suggests the molecular basis underlying human disease for most of the known LCAT missense mutations, and paves the way for rational development of new therapeutics to treat LCAT deficiency, atherosclerosis and acute coronary syndrome.

  2. Structure and function of lysosomal phospholipase A2 and lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Glukhova, Alisa; Hinkovska-Galcheva, Vania; Kelly, Robert; Abe, Akira; Shayman, James A; Tesmer, John J G

    2015-01-01

    Lysosomal phospholipase A2 (LPLA2) and lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) belong to a structurally uncharacterized family of key lipid-metabolizing enzymes responsible for lung surfactant catabolism and for reverse cholesterol transport, respectively. Whereas LPLA2 is predicted to underlie the development of drug-induced phospholipidosis, somatic mutations in LCAT cause fish eye disease and familial LCAT deficiency. Here we describe several high-resolution crystal structures of human LPLA2 and a low-resolution structure of LCAT that confirms its close structural relationship to LPLA2. Insertions in the α/β hydrolase core of LPLA2 form domains that are responsible for membrane interaction and binding the acyl chains and head groups of phospholipid substrates. The LCAT structure suggests the molecular basis underlying human disease for most of the known LCAT missense mutations, and paves the way for rational development of new therapeutics to treat LCAT deficiency, atherosclerosis and acute coronary syndrome. PMID:25727495

  3. Effect of plant sterol-enriched diets on plasma and egg yolk cholesterol concentrations and cholesterol metabolism in laying hens.

    PubMed

    Liu, X; Zhao, H L; Thiessen, S; House, J D; Jones, P J H

    2010-02-01

    Egg exists as a major dietary source of cholesterol in Western diets. In North America, laying hen diets are usually devoid of cholesterol when diets are formulated to exclude animal-based products. Hence, laying hens meet their physiological cholesterol requirement through de novo synthesis. Plant sterols exert a cholesterol-lowering effect in humans by interfering with intestinal sterol absorption. However, it is unknown whether plant sterol supplementation could be effective in reducing intestinal reabsorption of biliary cholesterol in laying hens, thus modulating whole body cholesterol in favor of lower plasma and yolk cholesterol content. The current study was designed to investigate the effect of diets enriched with 0, 0.5, 1, and 2% plant sterols on cholesterol absorption, synthesis, as well as plasma, liver, and egg yolk cholesterol concentrations in laying hens. After 8 wk of plant sterol intervention (first 2 wk were acclimatization), feed intake, BW, egg weight, egg yolk weight, egg production, Haugh units, liver mass, plasma, and hepatic cholesterol concentrations did not differ as a function of plant sterol supplementation. Egg cholesterol concentrations (mg/g) fluctuated during the 6-wk experimental period. At wk 6, a minor reduction in egg yolk cholesterol concentration (mg per g of yolk, P<0.05, vs. control) was observed in hens fed 1 and 2% cholesterol-enriched diets, respectively. However, such result failed to affect total egg cholesterol content. No statistical difference was observed across treatments over 6 wk. Neither cholesterol absorption rates nor synthesis differed as a function of treatment. Results suggested that overall cholesterol content in egg yolk was not affected by feeding hens plant sterol-enriched diets over 6 wk. PMID:20075279

  4. Lactobacillus acidophilus K301 Inhibits Atherogenesis via Induction of 24 (S), 25-Epoxycholesterol-Mediated ABCA1 and ABCG1 Production and Cholesterol Efflux in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hye Sun; Park, Woo Jung; Kim, Joo-Yun; Chung, Dae Kyun

    2016-01-01

    Lactobacillus acidophilus species are well-known probiotics with the beneficial activity of regulating cholesterol levels. In this study, we showed that L. acidophilus K301 reduced the level of cholesterol through reverse transport in macrophages. L. acidophilus K301 upregulated the mRNA and protein levels of genes such as ATP-binding cassette A1 (ABCA1) and ATP-binding cassette G1 (ABCG1) under the control of liver X receptor (LXR), resulting in increased apoA-I-dependent cholesterol efflux in phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-differentiated THP-1 cells. L. acidophilus K301 induced both ABCA1 and ABCG1 through the endogenous LXR agonist 24(S), 25-epoxcycholesterol, which is synthesized by intracellular cholesterol synthetic pathways. In vivo studies using L. acidophilus K301-treated ApoE-/- mice showed reduced accumulation of lipoproteins in the arterial lumen. The inhibitory effects of L. acidophilus K301 on accumulation of lipoprotein in atherosclerotic plaques were mediated by the induction of squalene reductase (SQLE) and oxidosqualene cyclase (OSC) and resulted in ABCA1-mediated cholesterol efflux. Taken together, our findings revealed that Lactobacillus acidophilus K301 regulates the expression of genes related to cholesterol reverse transport via the induction of endogenous LXR agonist, suggesting the therapeutic potential of Lactobacillus acidophilus K301 as an anti-atherosclerotic agent. PMID:27120199

  5. Understanding Cholesterol and Heart Health | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... cholesterol throughout the body: Low-density lipoproteins (LDL): LDL cholesterol sometimes is called "bad" cholesterol. A high LDL ... or even death. The higher the level of LDL cholesterol in your blood, the GREATER your chance is ...

  6. Effects of statins and cholesterol on memory functions in mice.

    PubMed

    Ghodke, Ravindra M; Tour, Nagesh; Devi, Kshama

    2012-12-01

    Studies on influence of lipid lowering therapies have generated wide controversial results on the role of cholesterol on memory function. However recent studies revealed that cholesterol lowering treatment substantially reduce the risk of dementia. The objectives of this study were to analyze the effect of statins on memory function and to establish the relationship between increase/decrease in cholesterol synthesis, total cholesterol level and memory function in animals. We examined the relationship between biosynthesis of cholesterol and memory function using two statins (lipophilic simvastatin and hydrophilic pravastatin) and high cholesterol diet in mice for 15 days and 4 months. Memory performance was evaluated with two different behavioral tests and various biochemical parameters such as serum cholesterol, whole brain cholesterol, brain 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) activity and brain acetylcholine esterase (AChE) activity. We found that statin treatment for 4 months, but not for 15 days, showed significant improvement in memory function whereas high cholesterol diet showed significant impairment of memory. However long-term statin treatment showed significant decrease in serum cholesterol level as well as brain AChE level. Moreover high cholesterol diet showed significant decrease in memory function with an increase in serum cholesterol level as well as brain AChE level. There is no direct correlation between brain cholesterol level, as well as HMG-CoA activity with memory function regulation. However there is definite link between plasma cholesterol level and AChE level. A long-standing plasma cholesterol alteration may be essential to regulate memory function which in turn might be mediated through AChE modulated pathway.

  7. The Effects of Phellinus linteus Polysaccharide Extracts on Cholesterol Efflux in Oxidized Low-Density Lipoprotein-Loaded THP-1 Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-hui; Li, Yan; Cheng, Zhao-yun; Cai, Xi-guo; Wang, Hong-min

    2015-06-01

    The removal of excess cellular cholesterol is critical for maintaining cellular cholesterol homeostasis. Phellinus linteus polysaccharide extracts (PLPEs) is an immunomudulatory agent with a molecular weight of 153 kd. Here, we analyzed the effects of PLPEs on cholesterol efflux in oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL)-loaded THP-1 (human acute monocytic leukemia cell line) macrophages. Various concentrations of PLPEs (5, 10, 20, and 100 μg/mL) were used to treat cells. Cholesterol efflux analysis was performed to analyze the cholesterol efflux ratio in PLPE-treated cells. Semiquantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis were conducted to assess the expression of target genes. Low dose of PLPEs (5-20 μg/mL) dose dependently enhanced cholesterol efflux to apolipoprotein A-I (ApoA-I), evidenced by promoting the expression of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette A1, ATP-binding cassette G1, and peroxisome proliferation-activated receptor γ, key regulators for cholesterol efflux. Moreover, GW9662, a potent antagonist of peroxisome proliferation-activated receptor γ, inhibited PLPE (20 μg/mL)-promoted cholesterol efflux to ApoA-I in a dose-dependent fashion. However, high dose of PLPEs (100 μg/mL) inhibited cholesterol efflux to ApoA-I from ox-LDL-loaded THP-1 macrophages, enhanced the production of superoxide anion, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP levels, and raised nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide/nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase subunits. Thus, these results indicate that low and high doses of PLPEs exhibit opposite effects on cholesterol efflux from ox-LDL-loaded THP-1 cells.

  8. Multiple mechanisms limit the accumulation of unesterified cholesterol in the small intestine of mice deficient in both ACAT2 and ABCA1.

    PubMed

    Turley, Stephen D; Valasek, Mark A; Repa, Joyce J; Dietschy, John M

    2010-11-01

    Cholesterol homeostasis in the enterocyte is regulated by the interplay of multiple genes that ultimately determines the net amount of cholesterol reaching the circulation from the small intestine. The effect of deleting these genes, particularly acyl CoA:cholesterol acyl transferase 2 (ACAT2), on cholesterol absorption and fecal sterol excretion is well documented. We also know that the intestinal mRNA level for adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) increases in Acat2(-/-) mice. However, none of these studies has specifically addressed how ACAT2 deficiency impacts the relative proportions of esterified and unesterified cholesterol (UC) in the enterocyte and whether the concurrent loss of ABCA1 might result in a marked buildup of UC. Therefore, the present studies measured the expression of numerous genes and related metabolic parameters in the intestine and liver of ACAT2-deficient mice fed diets containing either added cholesterol or ezetimibe, a selective sterol absorption inhibitor. Cholesterol feeding raised the concentration of UC in the small intestine, and this was accompanied by a significant reduction in the relative mRNA level for Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 (NPC1L1) and an increase in the mRNA level for both ABCA1 and ABCG5/8. All these changes were reversed by ezetimibe. When mice deficient in both ACAT2 and ABCA1 were fed a high-cholesterol diet, the increase in intestinal UC levels was no greater than it was in mice lacking only ACAT2. This resulted from a combination of compensatory mechanisms including diminished NPC1L1-mediated cholesterol uptake, increased cholesterol efflux via ABCG5/8, and possibly rapid cell turnover.

  9. Effects of saturated and unsaturated fats given with and without dietary cholesterol on hepatic cholesterol synthesis and hepatic lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Bochenek, W; Rodgers, J B

    1978-01-27

    Hepatic cholesterol synthesis was studied in rats after consuming diets of varying neutral lipid and cholesterol content. Cholesterol synthesis was evaluated by measuring 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase and by determining the rate of 3H-labeled sterol production from [3H]mevalonate. Results were correlated with sterol balance data and hepatic lipid content. Hepatic cholesterol synthesis was relatively great when cholesterol was excluded from the diet. The source of neutral dietary lipids, saturated vs. unsaturated, produced no change in hepatic sterol synthesis. Values for fecal sterol outputs and hepatic cholesterol levels were also similar in rats consuming either saturated or unsaturated fats. When 1% cholesterol was added to the diet, hepatic cholesterol synthesis was suppressed but the degree of suppression was greater in rats consuming unsaturated vs. saturated fats. This was associated with greater accumulation of cholesterol in livers from rats consuming unsaturates and a reduction in fecal neutral sterol output in this group as opposed to results from rats on saturated fats. Cholesterol consumption also altered the fatty acid composition of hepatic phospholipids producing decreases in the percentages of essential polyunsaturated fatty acids. It is concluded that dietary cholesterol alters cholesterol and fatty acid metabolism in the liver and that this effect is enhanced by dietary unsaturated fats.

  10. Walking and serum cholesterol in adults.

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, L A; Friedman, G M

    1990-01-01

    We measured the association between walking for exercise and the ratio of total cholesterol/HDL cholesterol in 3,621 adults. After controlling for age, gender, income, body fat, alcohol use, exercise other than walking, and cigarette smoking, adults in the high, moderate, and low duration walking categories were compared to those in the no walking-no exercise category. The relative risk for total/HDL ratios of 5.0 or more were .46 (95% CI = .27, .80), .48 (95% total/HDL ratios of 5.0 or more were .46 (95% CI = .27, .80), .48 (95% CI = .30, .76), and 1.11 (95% CI = .81, 1.53) respectively. PMID:2382750

  11. Lipid rafts, cholesterol, and the brain

    PubMed Central

    Korade, Zeljka; Kenworthy, Anne K.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Lipid rafts are specialized membrane microdomains that serve as organizing centers for assembly of signaling molecules, influence membrane fluidity and trafficking of membrane proteins, and regulate different cellular processes such as neurotransmission and receptor trafficking. In this article, we provide an overview of current methods for studying lipid rafts and models for how lipid rafts might form and function. Next, we propose a potential mechanism for regulating lipid rafts in the brain via local control of cholesterol biosynthesis by neurotrophins and their receptors. Finally, we discuss evidence that altered cholesterol metabolism and/or lipid rafts play a critical role in the pathophysiology of multiple CNS disorders, including Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome, Huntington, Alzheimer's, and Niemman-Pick Type C diseases. PMID:18402986

  12. Cholesterol efflux capacity: An introduction for clinicians.

    PubMed

    Anastasius, Malcolm; Kockx, Maaike; Jessup, Wendy; Sullivan, David; Rye, Kerry-Anne; Kritharides, Leonard

    2016-10-01

    Epidemiologic studies have shown an inverse correlation between high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (HDL-C) levels and cardiovascular disease outcomes. However, the hypothesis of a causal relationship between HDL-C and cardiovascular disease has been challenged by genetic and clinical studies. Serum cholesterol efflux capacity (CEC) is an important measure of HDL function in humans. Recent large clinical studies have shown a correlation between in vitro CEC and cardiovascular disease prevalence and incidence, which appears to be independent of HDL-C concentration. The present review summarizes recent large clinical studies and introduces important methodological considerations. Further studies are required to standardize and establish the reproducibility of this measure of HDL function and clarify whether modulating CEC will emerge as a useful therapeutic target. PMID:27659883

  13. Rapid cholesterol nucleation time and cholesterol gall stone formation after subtotal or total colectomy in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Makino, I; Chijiiwa, K; Higashijima, H; Nakahara, S; Kishinaka, M; Kuroki, S; Mibu, R

    1994-01-01

    Changes in biliary lipid composition, pH, ionised calcium, total and unconjugated bilirubin, and cholesterol nucleation time of gall bladder bile samples were examined in six patients who had undergone subtotal or total colectomy between five months and seven years previously, and values were compared with those in control patients with no gall stones. The colectomy group mainly comprised patients with ulcerative colitis and familial adenomatosis coli, in whom only a short length of the terminal ileum (mean (SEM) 2.25 (0.57) cm) had been resected. The reconstruction procedures were ileoanal anastomosis in two patients, terminal ileostomy in two, ileorectal anastomosis in one, and J shaped ileal pouch-anal anastomosis in one patient. The distributions of age, sex, and relative body weight were similar in the two groups. The gall bladder bile was lithogenic in the post colectomy group--these patients had a significantly increased cholesterol saturation index (p < 0.01) and rapid cholesterol nucleation time (p < 0.05) compared with the control group. A significant increase in the molar percentage of cholesterol and a decrease in that of total bile acid associated with significantly decreased secondary bile acids (p < 0.05) were observed in the post colectomy group. Gall stones formed in two of six patients after colectomy were cholesterol stones containing more than 80% cholesterol by dry weight. Total and unconjugated bilirubin, pH, and ionised calcium values were similar in the two groups. The results indicate that after total or subtotal colectomy the composition of gall bladder bile increases the risk of cholesterol gall stone formation. PMID:7829016

  14. Effect of unesterified cholesterol on the activity of cholesteryl ester transfer protein.

    PubMed Central

    Rajaram, O V; Chan, R Y; Sawyer, W H

    1994-01-01

    Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) catalyses the transfer of cholesteryl ester from high-density lipoprotein to triacylglycerol-rich lipoproteins and the transfer of triacylglycerols in the reverse direction. The activity of CETP has been studied using a continuous fluorescence assay which measures the excimer fluorescence of cholesteryl 1-pyrene decanoate in a synthetic donor microemulsion as the indicator of cholesteryl ester transfer. Emulsions were composed of cholesteryl oleate and egg phosphatidylcholine and had an average particle size of 14 +/- 1 nm as calculated from the molar volume of the components. The effect of changing the physical state of the emulsion surface was examined by including unesterified cholesterol in the donor and acceptor particles. The rate of CETP-induced transfer of the fluorescent cholesteryl ester between microemulsion particles increased when unesterified cholesterol was present at concentrations up to 17 mol% relative to phospholipid. The presence of cholesterol also changed the exchange kinetics from an apparent single-exponential to a double-exponential phenomenon. Binding of CETP to the emulsion surface was accompanied by an enhancement of fluorescence which was used to measure the binding equilibria. The enhancement of exchange due to the presence of cholesterol did not correlate with any increased binding of CETP to the emulsion surface. The presence of unesterified cholesterol in the donor did not affect the rate of transfer of the fluorescent cholesteryl ester when unlabelled emulsion was replaced by high-density lipoprotein as the acceptor. The studies demonstrate the use of microemulsions of defined size and composition for the study of the mechanism of action of CETP. PMID:7998976

  15. Resveratrol counters systemic lupus erythematosus-associated atherogenicity by normalizing cholesterol efflux.

    PubMed

    Voloshyna, Iryna; Teboul, Isaac; Littlefield, Michael J; Siegart, Nicolle M; Turi, George K; Fazzari, Melissa J; Carsons, Steven E; DeLeon, Joshua; Reiss, Allison B

    2016-08-01

    Resveratrol is a bioactive molecule used in dietary supplements and herbal medicines and consumed worldwide. Numerous investigations by our group and others have indicated cardioprotective and anti-inflammatory properties of resveratrol. The present study explored potential atheroprotective actions of resveratrol on cholesterol efflux in cultured human macrophages exposed to plasma from systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients. These results were confirmed in ApoE(-/-)Fas(-/-) double knockout mice, displaying a lupus profile with accelerated atherosclerosis. Resveratrol treatment attenuated atherosclerosis in these mice. THP-1 human macrophages were exposed to 10% pooled or individual plasma from patients who met diagnostic criteria for SLE. Expression of multiple proteins involved in reverse cholesterol transport (ABCA1, ABCG1, SR-B1, and cytochrome P450 27-hydroxylase) was assessed using QRT-PCR and Western blotting techniques. Ten-week-old ApoE(-/-)Fas(-/-) double knockout mice (n = 30) were randomly divided into two equal groups of 15, one of which received 0.01% resveratrol for 10 consecutive weeks. Atherosclerosis progression was evaluated in murine aortas. Bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) were cultured and expression of cholesterol efflux proteins was analyzed in each group of mice. Our data indicate that inhibition of cholesterol efflux by lupus plasma in THP-1 human macrophages is rescued by resveratrol. Similarly, administration of resveratrol in a lupus-like murine model reduces plaque formation in vivo and augments cholesterol efflux in BMDM. This study presents evidence for a beneficial role of resveratrol in atherosclerosis in the specific setting of SLE. Therefore, resveratrol may merit investigation as an additional resource available to reduce lipid deposition and atherosclerosis in humans, especially in such vulnerable populations as lupus patients. PMID:27190277

  16. Reversible Thermoset Adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mac Murray, Benjamin C. (Inventor); Tong, Tat H. (Inventor); Hreha, Richard D. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Embodiments of a reversible thermoset adhesive formed by incorporating thermally-reversible cross-linking units and a method for making the reversible thermoset adhesive are provided. One approach to formulating reversible thermoset adhesives includes incorporating dienes, such as furans, and dienophiles, such as maleimides, into a polymer network as reversible covalent cross-links using Diels Alder cross-link formation between the diene and dienophile. The chemical components may be selected based on their compatibility with adhesive chemistry as well as their ability to undergo controlled, reversible cross-linking chemistry.

  17. Cholesterol in serum lipoprotein fractions after spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leach, Carolyn S.; Johnson, Philip C., Jr.; Krauhs, Jane M.; Cintron, Nitza M.

    1988-01-01

    Results are reported from blood-lipid measurements obtained from 125 Space Shuttle crew members before and after space flight. The data are presented in tables and discussed in detail. The main differences noted between preflight and postflight values are a 12.8-percent decrease in high-density lipoproteins on postflight day 1 and significant decreases in total cholesterol and both high- and low-density lipoproteins later in the 23-day postflight period.

  18. Potent and selective mediators of cholesterol efflux

    DOEpatents

    Bielicki, John K; Johansson, Jan

    2015-03-24

    The present invention provides a family of non-naturally occurring polypeptides having cholesterol efflux activity that parallels that of full-length apolipoproteins (e.g., Apo AI and Apo E), and having high selectivity for ABAC1 that parallels that of full-length apolipoproteins. The invention also provides compositions comprising such polypeptides, methods of identifying, screening and synthesizing such polypeptides, and methods of treating, preventing or diagnosing diseases and disorders associated with dyslipidemia, hypercholesterolemia and inflammation.

  19. Cholesterol - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... 繁體中文) French (français) Hindi (हिन्दी) Japanese (日本語) Korean (한국어) Portuguese (português) Russian (Русский) Somali (af Soomaali) ... コレステロール - 日本語 (Japanese) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Korean (한국어) Cholesterol 콜레스테롤 - 한국어 (Korean) Bilingual PDF Health ...

  20. Human plasma lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Jauhiainen, M.; Stevenson, K.J.; Dolphin, P.J.

    1988-05-15

    Lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) is a plasma enzyme which catalyzes the transacylation of the fatty acid at the sn-2 position of lecithin to cholesterol forming lysolecithin and cholesteryl ester. The substrates for and products of this reaction are present within the plasma lipoproteins upon which the enzyme acts to form the majority of cholesteryl ester in human plasma. The authors proposed a covalent catalytic mechanism of action for LCAT in which serine and histidine residues mediate lecithin cleavage and two cysteine residues cholesterol esterification. With the aid of sulfhydryl reactive trivalent organoarsenical compounds which are specific for vicinal thiols they have probed the geometry of the catalytic site. They conclude that the two catalytic cysteine residues of LCAT (Cys/sup 31/ and Cys /sup 184/) are vicinal with a calculated distance between their sulfur atoms of 3.50-3.62 A. The additional residue alkylated by teh bifunctional reagent is within the catalytic site and may represent a previously identified catalytic serine or histidine residue.

  1. HDL and cholesterol handling in the brain.

    PubMed

    Vitali, Cecilia; Wellington, Cheryl L; Calabresi, Laura

    2014-08-01

    Cholesterol is an essential component of both the peripheral nervous system and central nervous system (CNS) of mammals. Brain cholesterol is synthesized in situ by astrocytes and oligodendrocytes and is almost completely isolated from other pools of cholesterol in the body, but a small fraction can be taken up from the circulation as 27-hydroxycholesterol, or via the scavenger receptor class B type I. Glial cells synthesize native high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-like particles, which are remodelled by enzymes and lipid transfer proteins, presumably as it occurs in plasma. The major apolipoprotein constituent of HDL in the CNS is apolipoprotein E, which is produced by astrocytes and microglia. Apolipoprotein A-I, the major protein component of plasma HDL, is not synthesized in the CNS, but can enter and become a component of CNS lipoproteins. Low HDL-C levels have been shown to be associated with cognitive impairment and various neurodegenerative diseases. On the contrary, no clear association with brain disorders has been shown in genetic HDL defects, with the exception of Tangier disease. Mutations in a wide variety of lipid handling genes can result in human diseases, often with a neuronal phenotype caused by dysfunctional intracellular lipid trafficking.

  2. Neurosteroids: oligodendrocyte mitochondria convert cholesterol to pregnenolone

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Z.Y.; Bourreau, E.; Jung-Testas, I.; Robel, P.; Baulieu, E.E.

    1987-12-01

    Oligodendrocyte mitochondria from 21-day-old Sprague-Dawley male rats were incubated with 100 nM (/sup 3/H)cholesterol. It yielded (/sup 3/H)pregnenolone at a rate of 2.5 +/- 0.7 and 5-(/sup 3/H)pregnene-3..beta..,20..cap alpha..-diol at a rate of 2.5 +/- 1.1 pmol per mg of protein per hr. Cultures of glial cells from 19- to 21-day-old fetuses (a mixed population of astrocytes and oligodendrocytes) were incubated for 24 hr with (/sup 3/H)mevalonolactone. (/sup 3/H)Cholesterol, (/sup 3/H)pregnenolone, and 5-(/sup 3/H)pregnene-3..beta..,20..cap alpha..-diol were characterized in cellular extracts. The formation of the /sup 3/H-labeled steroids was increased by dibutyryl cAMP (0.2 mM) added to the culture medium. The active cholesterol side-chain cleavage mechanism, recently suggested immunohistochemically and already observed in cultures of C6 glioma cells, reinforces the concept of neurosteroids applied to ..delta../sup 5/-3..beta..-hydroxysteroids previously isolated from brain.

  3. Dietary cholesterol, heart disease risk and cognitive dissonance.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Donald J

    2014-05-01

    In the 1960s, the thesis that dietary cholesterol contributes to blood cholesterol and heart disease risk was a rational conclusion based on the available science at that time. Fifty years later the research evidence no longer supports this hypothesis yet changing the dietary recommendation to limit dietary cholesterol has been a slow and at times contentious process. The preponderance of the clinical and epidemiological data accumulated since the original dietary cholesterol restrictions were formulated indicate that: (1) dietary cholesterol has a small effect on the plasma cholesterol levels with an increase in the cholesterol content of the LDL particle and an increase in HDL cholesterol, with little effect on the LDL:HDL ratio, a significant indicator of heart disease risk, and (2) the lack of a significant relationship between cholesterol intake and heart disease incidence reported from numerous epidemiological surveys. Over the last decade, many countries and health promotion groups have modified their dietary recommendations to reflect the current evidence and to address a now recognised negative consequence of ineffective dietary cholesterol restrictions (such as inadequate choline intake). In contrast, health promotion groups in some countries appear to suffer from cognitive dissonance and continue to promote an outdated and potentially hazardous dietary recommendation based on an invalidated hypothesis. This review evaluates the evidence for and against dietary cholesterol restrictions and the potential consequences of such restrictions.

  4. Effects of Charged Cholesterol Derivatives on Aβ40 Amyloid Formation.

    PubMed

    Elbassal, Esmail A; Liu, Haiyang; Morris, Clifford; Wojcikiewicz, Ewa P; Du, Deguo

    2016-01-14

    Understanding of the mechanistic progess of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) aggregation is critical for elucidating the underlying pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Herein, we report for the first time the effects of two cholesterol derivatives, negatively charged cholesterol sulfate (cholesterol-SO4) and positively charged 3β-[N-(dimethylaminoethane)carbamoyl]-cholesterol (DC-cholesterol), on the fibrillization of Aβ40. Our results demonstrate that both of the nonvesicular forms of cholesterol-SO4 and DC-cholesterol moderately accelerate the aggregation rate of Aβ40. This effect is similar to that observed for unmodified cholesterol, indicating the importance of hydrophobic interactions in binding of Aβ40 to these steroid molecules. Furthermore, we show that the vesicles formed at higher concentrations of anionic cholesterol-SO4 facilitate Aβ40 aggregation rate markedly. In contrast, the cationic DC-cholesterol vesicles show the ability to inhibit Aβ40 fibril formation under appropriate experimental conditions. The results suggest that the electrostatic interactions between Aβ40 and the charged vesicles can be of great importance in regulating Aβ40-vesicle interaction. Our results also indicate that the structural properties of the aggregates of the cholesterol derivatives, including the surface charge and the size of the vesicles, are critical in regulating the effects of these vesicles on Aβ40 aggregation kinetics.

  5. Cholesterol in the retina: the best is yet to come

    PubMed Central

    Pikuleva, Irina A.; Curcio, Christine A.

    2014-01-01

    Historically understudied, cholesterol in the retina is receiving more attention now because of genetic studies showing that several cholesterol-related genes are risk factors for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and because eye pathology studies showing high cholesterol content of drusen, aging Bruch's membrane, and newly found subretinal lesions. The challenge before us is determining how the cholesterol-AMD link is realized. Meeting this challenge will require an excellent understanding these genes’ roles in retinal physiology and how chorioretinal cholesterol is maintained. In the first half of this review, we will succinctly summarize physico-chemical properties of cholesterol, its distribution in the human body, general principles of maintenance and metabolism, and differences in cholesterol handling in human and mouse that impact on experimental approaches. This information will provide a backdrop to the second part of the review focusing on unique aspects of chorioretinal cholesterol homeostasis, aging in Bruch's membrane, cholesterol in AMD lesions, a model for lesion biogenesis, a model for macular vulnerability based on vascular biology, and alignment of AMD-related genes and pathobiology using cholesterol and an atherosclerosis-like progression as unifying features. We conclude with recommendations for the most important research steps we can take towards delineating the cholesterol-AMD link. PMID:24704580

  6. Human FABP1 T94A variant enhances cholesterol uptake.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huan; McIntosh, Avery L; Landrock, Kerstin K; Landrock, Danilo; Storey, Stephen M; Martin, Gregory G; Gupta, Shipra; Atshaves, Barbara P; Kier, Ann B; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2015-07-01

    Although expression of the human liver fatty acid binding protein (FABP1) T94A variant alters serum lipoprotein cholesterol levels in human subjects, nothing is known whereby the variant elicits these effects. This issue was addressed by in vitro cholesterol binding assays using purified recombinant wild-type (WT) FABP1 T94T and T94A variant proteins and in cultured primary human hepatocytes expressing the FABP1 T94T (genotyped as TT) or T94A (genotyped as CC) proteins. The human FABP1 T94A variant protein had 3-fold higher cholesterol-binding affinity than the WT FABP1 T94T as shown by NBD-cholesterol fluorescence binding assays and by cholesterol isothermal titration microcalorimetry (ITC) binding assays. CC variant hepatocytes also exhibited 30% higher total FABP1 protein. HDL- and LDL-mediated NBD-cholesterol uptake was faster in CC variant than TT WT human hepatocytes. VLDL-mediated uptake of NBD-cholesterol did not differ between CC and TT human hepatocytes. The increased HDL- and LDL-mediated NBD-cholesterol uptake was not associated with any significant change in mRNA levels of SCARB1, LDLR, CETP, and LCAT encoding the key proteins in lipoprotein cholesterol uptake. Thus, the increased HDL- and LDL-mediated NBD-cholesterol uptake by CC hepatocytes may be associated with higher affinity of T94A protein for cholesterol and/or increased total T94A protein level. PMID:25732850

  7. Evolution of spite through indirect reciprocity.

    PubMed Central

    Johnstone, Rufus A.; Bshary, Redouan

    2004-01-01

    How can cooperation persist in the face of a temptation to 'cheat'? Several recent papers have suggested that the answer may lie in indirect reciprocity. Altruistic individuals may benefit by eliciting altruism from observers, rather than (as in direct reciprocity) from the recipient of the aid they provide. Here, we point out that indirect reciprocity need not always favour cooperation; by contrast, it may support spiteful behaviour, which is costly for the both actor and recipient. Existing theory suggests spite is unlikely to persist, but we demonstrate that it may do so when spiteful individuals are less likely to incur aggression from observers (a negative form of indirect reciprocity). PMID:15347514

  8. High Cholesterol Deteriorates Bone Health: New Insights into Molecular Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Chandi C.

    2015-01-01

    Many epidemiological studies show a positive connection between cardiovascular diseases and risk of osteoporosis, suggesting a role of hyperlipidemia and/or hypercholesterolemia in regulating osteoporosis. The majority of the studies indicated a correlation between high cholesterol and high LDL-cholesterol level with low bone mineral density, a strong predictor of osteoporosis. Similarly, bone metastasis is a serious complication of cancer for patients. Several epidemiological and basic studies have established that high cholesterol is associated with increased cancer risk. Moreover, osteoporotic bone environment predisposes the cancer cells for metastatic growth in the bone microenvironment. This review focuses on how cholesterol and cholesterol-lowering drugs (statins) regulate the functions of bone residential osteoblast and osteoclast cells to augment or to prevent bone deterioration. Moreover, this study provides an insight into molecular mechanisms of cholesterol-mediated bone deterioration. It also proposes a potential mechanism by which cellular cholesterol boosts cancer-induced bone metastasis. PMID:26557105

  9. Cholesterol and the risk of grade-specific prostate cancer incidence: evidence from two large prospective cohort studies with up to 37 years' follow up

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background High cholesterol may be a modifiable risk factor for prostate cancer but results have been inconsistent and subject to potential "reverse causality" where undetected disease modifies cholesterol prior to diagnosis. Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study of 12,926 men who were enrolled in the Midspan studies between 1970 and 1976 and followed up to 31st December 2007. We used Cox-Proportional Hazards Models to evaluate the association between baseline plasma cholesterol and Gleason grade-specific prostate cancer incidence. We excluded cancers detected within at least 5 years of cholesterol assay. Results 650 men developed prostate cancer in up to 37 years' follow-up. Baseline plasma cholesterol was positively associated with hazard of high grade (Gleason score≥8) prostate cancer incidence (n = 119). The association was greatest among men in the 2nd highest quintile for cholesterol, 6.1 to < 6.69 mmol/l, Hazard Ratio 2.28, 95% CI 1.27 to 4.10, compared with the baseline of < 5.05 mmol/l. This association remained significant after adjustment for body mass index, smoking and socioeconomic status. Conclusions Men with higher cholesterol are at greater risk of developing high-grade prostate cancer but not overall risk of prostate cancer. Interventions to minimise metabolic risk factors may have a role in reducing incidence of aggressive prostate cancer. PMID:22260413

  10. Step by Step: Eating To Lower Your High Blood Cholesterol. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Heart, Lung, and Blood Inst. (DHHS/NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    This booklet offers advice for adults who want to lower their blood cholesterol level. The first section, "What You Need To Know about High Blood Cholesterol," discusses blood cholesterol and why it matters, what cholesterol numbers mean, and what affects blood cholesterol levels. Section 2, "What You Need To Do To Lower Blood Cholesterol,"…

  11. Determination of aminoglycoside antibiotics in pharmaceuticals by capillary zone electrophoresis with indirect UV detection coupled with micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography.

    PubMed

    Ackermans, M T; Everaerts, F M; Beckers, J L

    1992-08-14

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics can be determined by capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) with indirect UV detection in the anionic mode with a reversed electroosmotic flow (EOF) by addition of FC 135 to the background electrolyte. The effective mobilities of thirteen aminoglycoside antibiotics were determined as a function of pH. Applying CZE with indirect UV detection in the anionic mode and reversed EOF coupled with micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography with the cationic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, both neutral and charged antibiotics can be determined in combined pharmaceuticals. As an example, neomycin and hydrocortisone were determined in Otosporin eardrops.

  12. Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 4356 prevents atherosclerosis via inhibition of intestinal cholesterol absorption in apolipoprotein E-knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying; Wang, Jinfeng; Quan, Guihua; Wang, Xiaojun; Yang, Longfei; Zhong, Lili

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 4356 on the development of atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E-knockout (ApoE(-/-)) mice. Eight-week-old ApoE(-/-) mice were fed a Western diet with or without L. acidophilus ATCC 4356 daily for 16 weeks. L. acidophilus ATCC 4356 protected ApoE(-/-) mice from atherosclerosis by reducing their plasma cholesterol levels from 923 ± 44 to 581 ± 18 mg/dl, likely via a marked decrease in cholesterol absorption caused by modulation of Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 (NPC1L1). In addition, suppression of cholesterol absorption induced reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) in macrophages through the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor/liver X receptor (PPAR/LXR) pathway. Fecal lactobacillus and bifidobacterium counts were significantly (P < 0.05) higher in the L. acidophilus ATCC 4356 treatment groups than in the control groups. Furthermore, L. acidophilus ATCC 4356 was detected in the rat small intestine, colon, and feces during the feeding trial. The bacterial levels remained high even after the administration of lactic acid bacteria had been stopped for 2 weeks. These results suggest that administration of L. acidophilus ATCC 4356 can protect against atherosclerosis through the inhibition of intestinal cholesterol absorption. Therefore, L. acidophilus ATCC 4356 may be a potential therapeutic material for preventing the progression of atherosclerosis.

  13. Membrane cholesterol modulates galanin-GalR2 interaction.

    PubMed

    Pang, L; Graziano, M; Wang, S

    1999-09-14

    The neuropeptide galanin mediates a number of diverse physiological and pathophysiological actions via interaction with membrane-bound receptors. The role that membrane cholesterol plays in modulating the interaction between galanin and one of the three cloned galanin receptor subtypes (GalR2) expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells was examined. Reduction of membrane cholesterol by treatment with methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (CD) or by culturing cells in lipoprotein-deficient serum markedly decreased galanin binding to the receptor. Addition of cholesterol back to CD-treated, cholesterol-depleted membranes restored galanin binding to control levels. Hill analysis suggests that the GalR2 binds multiple molecules of cholesterol (n >/= 3) in a positively cooperative manner. This interaction appears to be cholesterol-specific as only cholesterol and a limited number of cholesterol analogues were able to rescue galanin binding. The inability of some of these analogues to rescue the binding activity also suggests that binding of galanin to GalR2 is independent of membrane fluidity as, like cholesterol, cholesterol analogues generally rigidize membranes. In addition, treatment of the membranes with other modulators of membrane fluidity, e.g. ethanol, did not affect galanin binding to the GalR2. In contrast, treatment of membranes, with filipin, a molecule that clusters cholesterol within the membranes, or with cholesterol oxidase resulted in markedly reduced galanin binding. Incubation of membranes with 100 microM GTP-gamma-S did not alter the IC(50) for CD in the prebinding assay treatment suggesting that the effect of cholesterol was independent of G protein interaction. Preincubation of intact cells with CD also drastically impaired the ability of galanin to activate intracellular inositol phosphate accumulation in GalR2-transfected CHO cells. These data detail a new mechanism for the regulation of galanin receptor signaling which may link altered functions of Gal

  14. Nitric oxide, cholesterol oxides and endothelium-dependent vasodilation in plasma of patients with essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Moriel, P; Sevanian, A; Ajzen, S; Zanella, M T; Plavnik, F L; Rubbo, H; Abdalla, D S P

    2002-11-01

    The objective of the present study was to identify disturbances of nitric oxide radical (.NO) metabolism and the formation of cholesterol oxidation products in human essential hypertension. The concentrations of.NO derivatives (nitrite, nitrate, S-nitrosothiols and nitrotyrosine), water and lipid-soluble antioxidants and cholesterol oxides were measured in plasma of 11 patients with mild essential hypertension (H: 57.8 +/- 9.7 years; blood pressure, 148.3 +/- 24.8/90.8 +/- 10.2 mmHg) and in 11 healthy subjects (N: 48.4 +/- 7.0 years; blood pressure, 119.4 +/- 9.4/75.0 +/- 8.0 mmHg). Nitrite, nitrate and S-nitrosothiols were measured by chemiluminescence and nitrotyrosine was determined by ELISA. Antioxidants were determined by reverse-phase HPLC and cholesterol oxides by gas chromatography. Hypertensive patients had reduced endothelium-dependent vasodilation in response to reactive hyperemia (H: 9.3 and N: 15.1% increase of diameter 90 s after hyperemia), and lower levels of ascorbate (H: 29.2 +/- 26.0, N: 54.2 +/- 24.9 micro M), urate (H: 108.5 +/- 18.9, N: 156.4 +/- 26.3 micro M), beta-carotene (H: 1.1 +/- 0.8, N: 2.5 +/- 1.2 nmol/mg cholesterol), and lycopene (H: 0.4 +/- 0.2, N: 0.7 +/- 0.2 nmol/mg cholesterol), in plasma, compared to normotensive subjects. The content of 7-ketocholesterol, 5alpha-cholestane-3beta,5,6beta-triol and 5,6alpha-epoxy-5alpha-cholestan-3alpha-ol in LDL, and the concentration of endothelin-1 (H: 0.9 +/- 0.2, N: 0.7 +/- 0.1 ng/ml) in plasma were increased in hypertensive patients. No differences were found for.NO derivatives between groups. These data suggest that an increase in cholesterol oxidation is associated with endothelium dysfunction in essential hypertension and oxidative stress, although.NO metabolite levels in plasma are not modified in the presence of elevated cholesterol oxides. PMID:12426629

  15. Scavenger receptor BI: a multi-purpose player in cholesterol and steroid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Hoekstra, Menno; Van Berkel, Theo-Jc; Van Eck, Miranda

    2010-12-21

    multi-purpose player in cholesterol and steroid metabolism because it has distinct roles in reverse cholesterol transport, adrenal steroidogenesis, and platelet function.

  16. β-Cyclodextrins Decrease Cholesterol Release and ABC-Associated Transporter Expression in Smooth Muscle Cells and Aortic Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Coisne, Caroline; Hallier-Vanuxeem, Dorothée; Boucau, Marie-Christine; Hachani, Johan; Tilloy, Sébastien; Bricout, Hervé; Monflier, Eric; Wils, Daniel; Serpelloni, Michel; Parissaux, Xavier; Fenart, Laurence; Gosselet, Fabien

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease that leads to an aberrant accumulation of cholesterol in vessel walls forming atherosclerotic plaques. During this process, the mechanism regulating complex cellular cholesterol pools defined as the reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) is altered as well as expression and functionality of transporters involved in this process, namely ABCA1, ABCG1, and SR-BI. Macrophages, arterial endothelial and smooth muscle cells (SMCs) have been involved in the atherosclerotic plaque formation. As macrophages are widely described as the major cell type forming the foam cells by accumulating intracellular cholesterol, RCT alterations have been poorly studied at the arterial endothelial cell and SMC levels. Amongst the therapeutics tested to actively counteract cellular cholesterol accumulation, the methylated β-cyclodextrin, KLEPTOSE® CRYSMEβ, has recently shown promising effects on decreasing the atherosclerotic plaque size in atherosclerotic mouse models. Therefore we investigated in vitro the RCT process occurring in SMCs and in arterial endothelial cells (ABAE) as well as the ability of some modified β-CDs with different methylation degree to modify RCT in these cells. To this aim, cells were incubated in the presence of different methylated β-CDs, including KLEPTOSE® CRYSMEβ. Both cell types were shown to express basal levels of ABCA1 and SR-BI whereas ABCG1 was solely found in ABAE. Upon CD treatments, the percentage of membrane-extracted cholesterol correlated to the methylation degree of the CDs independently of the lipid composition of the cell membranes. Decreasing the cellular cholesterol content with CDs led to reduce the expression levels of ABCA1 and ABCG1. In addition, the cholesterol efflux to ApoA-I and HDL particles was significantly decreased suggesting that cells forming the blood vessel wall are able to counteract the CD-induced loss of cholesterol. Taken together, our observations suggest that methylated

  17. Indirect Ultraviolet-Reactivation of Phage λ

    PubMed Central

    George, Jacqueline; Devoret, Raymond; Radman, Miroslav

    1974-01-01

    When an F- recipient Escherichia coli K12 bacterium receives Hfr or F-lac+ DNA from an ultraviolet-irradiated donor, its capacity to promote DNA repair and mutagenesis of ultraviolet-damaged phage λ is substantially increased. We call this phenomenon indirect ultraviolet-reactivation, since its features are essentially the same as those of ultraviolet-reactivation; this repair process occurs in pyrimidine dimer excision-deficient strains and produces clear plaque mutations of the restored phage. Moreover, this process is similar to indirect ultraviolet-induction of prophage λ, since it is promoted by conjugation. However, contrarily to indirect induction, it is produced by Hfr donors and occurs in recipients restricting the incoming ultraviolet-damaged donor DNA. The occurrence of indirect ultraviolet-reactivation provides evidence for the existence in E. coli of an inducible error-prone mechanism for the repair of DNA. PMID:4589889

  18. Indirect Lighting--a Matter of Economics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Modern Schools, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Recent developments in the field of indirect lighting and the use of high intensity discharge light sources reveal that the most efficient lighting system can also be the most economical. (Author/MLF)

  19. Indirect punishment and generosity toward strangers.

    PubMed

    Ule, Aljaz; Schram, Arthur; Riedl, Arno; Cason, Timothy N

    2009-12-18

    Many people incur costs to reward strangers who have been kind to others. Theoretical and experimental evidence suggests that such "indirect rewarding" sustains cooperation between unrelated humans. Its emergence is surprising, because rewarders incur costs but receive no immediate benefits. It can prevail in the long run only if rewarders earn higher payoffs than "defectors" who ignore strangers' kindness. We provide experimental evidence regarding the payoffs received by individuals who employ these and other strategies, such as "indirect punishment," by imposing costs on unkind strangers. We find that if unkind strangers cannot be punished, defection earns most. If they can be punished, however, then indirect rewarding earns most. Indirect punishment plays this important role, even if it gives a low payoff and is rarely implemented.

  20. Indirect composite resin materials for posterior applications.

    PubMed

    Shellard, E; Duke, E S

    1999-12-01

    Indirect composite resin restorations were introduced a number of years ago as possible alternatives to traditional metallic or ceramic-based indirect restorations. However, the earlier formulations did not provide evidence of improvement in mechanical and physical properties over chairside-placed direct composite resin materials. Because they required more tooth structure removal than direct restorations, their use became unpopular and was abandoned by most clinicians. Over the past few years, a new class of composite resin indirect materials has surfaced in the profession. Various technologies have been suggested as reinforcement mechanisms. Fibers, matrix modifications, and an assortment of innovations have been proposed for enhancing indirect composite resin restorations. Applications are from inlay restorations all the way to multi-unit fixed prostheses. This manuscript summarizes some of the progress made in this area. When available, data is presented to provide clinicians with guidelines and indications for the use of these materials.

  1. Increased hepatic cholesterol esterification with essential fatty acid deficiency (EFAD): relationship to plasma lipoprotein (LP) cholesterol content

    SciTech Connect

    Ney, D.M.; Ziboh, V.A.; Schneeman, B.O.

    1986-03-01

    EFAD in the rat is associated with hepatic accumulation of esterified cholesterol and altered distribution of cholesterol between plasma and hepatic tissue. Little is known regarding the impact of EFAD on LP composition. To determine the relationship between hepatic cholesterol esterification and plasma lP composition in control (C) and EFAD male Wistar rats, the authors induced EFAD with continuous intragastric (IG) infusion of EFA-free solutions containing 3.5% of calories as triolein for 7 and 14 days. C animals received IG infusion of solutions containing 3.5% of calories as linoleic acid. Data in the EFAD groups reveal: (i) marked decreases in hepatic EFAs and increases in monoenoic acids; (ii) progressive increases in hepatic content of triglyceride and esterified cholesterol with 7 and 14 days of feeding; (iii) assay of acyl CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase activity in hepatic tissue using /sup 14/C-cholesterol demonstrates an increase in hepatic cholesterol esterification when compared to C animals. Increased hepatic cholesterol esterification correlates with elevated levels of esterified cholesterol in plasma VLDL and HDL particles. These data indicate that the elevated levels of cholesterol esters in LP particles is due, at least in part, to increased hepatic cholesterol esterification with EFAD.

  2. Anticholesterolemic effect of 3,4-di(OH)-phenylpropionic amides in high-cholesterol fed rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Soon-Ja; Bok, Song-Hae; Lee, Sangku; Kim, Hye-Jin; Lee, Mi-Kyung; Park, Yong Bok; Choi, Myung-Sook . E-mail: mschoi@knu.ac.kr

    2005-10-01

    Two amide synthetic derivatives of 3,4-di(OH)-hydrocinnamate (HC), 3,4-dihydroxyphenylpropionic (L-serine methyl ester) amide (E030) and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylpropionic (L-aspartic acid) amide (E076), were investigated to compare their lipid-lowering efficacy with HC. Male rats were fed a 1 g/100 g high-cholesterol diet for 6 weeks with supplements of either clofibrate (0.02%, w/w), HC (0.025%, w/w), E030 (0.039%, w/w) or E076 (0.041%, w/w). The clofibrate supplement was used as a positive control for the lipid-lowering efficacy. The food intakes and body weight gains were not significantly different among the groups. The plasma and hepatic cholesterol and triglyceride levels were lower in clofibrate, HC, E030, and E076-supplemented groups compared to the control group. The supplementation of HC and its amide derivatives was as effective as clofibrate in increasing the ratio of HDL-cholesterol to total plasma cholesterol and reducing the atherogenic index (AI). The hepatic cholesterol level in the HC and E076 groups was significantly lower than that in the clofibrate group. The hepatic 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA reductase) and acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) activities were significantly lower in the all test groups than in the control group. The excretion of neutral sterol was significantly higher in the HC, E030, and E076-supplemented groups compared to the control group. The plasma AST and ALT activities, indirect indexes of hepatic toxicity, were significantly lower in the HC, E030, and E076-supplemented groups than in the control group. Accordingly, the current results suggest that E030 and E076, two amide synthetic derivatives of HC, are effective in lowering lipid activity.

  3. Indirect techniques in nuclear astrophysics: a review.

    PubMed

    Tribble, R E; Bertulani, C A; Cognata, M La; Mukhamedzhanov, A M; Spitaleri, C

    2014-10-01

    In this review, we discuss the present status of three indirect techniques that are used to determine reaction rates for stellar burning processes, asymptotic normalization coefficients, the Trojan Horse method and Coulomb dissociation. A comprehensive review of the theory behind each of these techniques is presented. This is followed by an overview of the experiments that have been carried out using these indirect approaches. PMID:25313189

  4. Lysosomal Cholesterol Accumulation Sensitizes To Acetaminophen Hepatotoxicity by Impairing Mitophagy

    PubMed Central

    Baulies, Anna; Ribas, Vicent; Núñez, Susana; Torres, Sandra; Alarcón-Vila, Cristina; Martínez, Laura; Suda, Jo; Ybanez, Maria D.; Kaplowitz, Neil; García-Ruiz, Carmen; Fernández-Checa, Jose C.

    2015-01-01

    The role of lysosomes in acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity is poorly understood. Here, we investigated the impact of genetic and drug-induced lysosomal cholesterol (LC) accumulation in APAP hepatotoxicity. Acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase)−/− mice exhibit LC accumulation and higher mortality after APAP overdose compared to ASMase+/+ littermates. ASMase−/− hepatocytes display lower threshold for APAP-induced cell death and defective fusion of mitochondria-containing autophagosomes with lysosomes, which decreased mitochondrial quality control. LC accumulation in ASMase+/+ hepatocytes caused by U18666A reproduces the susceptibility of ASMase−/− hepatocytes to APAP and the impairment in the formation of mitochondria-containing autolysosomes. LC extraction by 25-hydroxycholesterol increased APAP-mediated mitophagy and protected ASMase−/− mice and hepatocytes against APAP hepatotoxicity, effects that were reversed by chloroquine to disrupt autophagy. The regulation of LC by U18666A or 25-hydroxycholesterol did not affect total cellular sphingomyelin content or its lysosomal distribution. Of relevance, amitriptyline-induced ASMase inhibition in human hepatocytes caused LC accumulation, impaired mitophagy and increased susceptibility to APAP. Similar results were observed upon glucocerebrosidase inhibition by conduritol β-epoxide, a cellular model of Gaucher disease. These findings indicate that LC accumulation determines susceptibility to APAP hepatotoxicity by modulating mitophagy, and imply that genetic or drug-mediated ASMase disruption sensitizes to APAP-induced liver injury. PMID:26657973

  5. Lysosomal Cholesterol Accumulation Sensitizes To Acetaminophen Hepatotoxicity by Impairing Mitophagy.

    PubMed

    Baulies, Anna; Ribas, Vicent; Núñez, Susana; Torres, Sandra; Alarcón-Vila, Cristina; Martínez, Laura; Suda, Jo; Ybanez, Maria D; Kaplowitz, Neil; García-Ruiz, Carmen; Fernández-Checa, Jose C

    2015-12-11

    The role of lysosomes in acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity is poorly understood. Here, we investigated the impact of genetic and drug-induced lysosomal cholesterol (LC) accumulation in APAP hepatotoxicity. Acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase)(-/-) mice exhibit LC accumulation and higher mortality after APAP overdose compared to ASMase(+/+) littermates. ASMase(-/-) hepatocytes display lower threshold for APAP-induced cell death and defective fusion of mitochondria-containing autophagosomes with lysosomes, which decreased mitochondrial quality control. LC accumulation in ASMase(+/+) hepatocytes caused by U18666A reproduces the susceptibility of ASMase(-/-) hepatocytes to APAP and the impairment in the formation of mitochondria-containing autolysosomes. LC extraction by 25-hydroxycholesterol increased APAP-mediated mitophagy and protected ASMase(-/-) mice and hepatocytes against APAP hepatotoxicity, effects that were reversed by chloroquine to disrupt autophagy. The regulation of LC by U18666A or 25-hydroxycholesterol did not affect total cellular sphingomyelin content or its lysosomal distribution. Of relevance, amitriptyline-induced ASMase inhibition in human hepatocytes caused LC accumulation, impaired mitophagy and increased susceptibility to APAP. Similar results were observed upon glucocerebrosidase inhibition by conduritol β-epoxide, a cellular model of Gaucher disease. These findings indicate that LC accumulation determines susceptibility to APAP hepatotoxicity by modulating mitophagy, and imply that genetic or drug-mediated ASMase disruption sensitizes to APAP-induced liver injury.

  6. 14 CFR 296.3 - Indirect cargo air carrier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Indirect cargo air carrier. 296.3 Section... PROCEEDINGS) ECONOMIC REGULATIONS INDIRECT AIR TRANSPORTATION OF PROPERTY General § 296.3 Indirect cargo air carrier. An indirect cargo air carrier is any U.S. citizen who undertakes to engage indirectly in...

  7. 14 CFR 296.3 - Indirect cargo air carrier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Indirect cargo air carrier. 296.3 Section... PROCEEDINGS) ECONOMIC REGULATIONS INDIRECT AIR TRANSPORTATION OF PROPERTY General § 296.3 Indirect cargo air carrier. An indirect cargo air carrier is any U.S. citizen who undertakes to engage indirectly in...

  8. 14 CFR 296.3 - Indirect cargo air carrier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Indirect cargo air carrier. 296.3 Section... PROCEEDINGS) ECONOMIC REGULATIONS INDIRECT AIR TRANSPORTATION OF PROPERTY General § 296.3 Indirect cargo air carrier. An indirect cargo air carrier is any U.S. citizen who undertakes to engage indirectly in...

  9. 14 CFR 296.3 - Indirect cargo air carrier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Indirect cargo air carrier. 296.3 Section... PROCEEDINGS) ECONOMIC REGULATIONS INDIRECT AIR TRANSPORTATION OF PROPERTY General § 296.3 Indirect cargo air carrier. An indirect cargo air carrier is any U.S. citizen who undertakes to engage indirectly in...

  10. An Indirect Route for Ethanol Production

    SciTech Connect

    Eggeman, T.; Verser, D.; Weber, E.

    2005-04-29

    The ZeaChem indirect method is a radically new approach to producing fuel ethanol from renewable resources. Sugar and syngas processing platforms are combined in a novel way that allows all fractions of biomass feedstocks (e.g. carbohydrates, lignins, etc.) to contribute their energy directly into the ethanol product via fermentation and hydrogen based chemical process technologies. The goals of this project were: (1) Collect engineering data necessary for scale-up of the indirect route for ethanol production, and (2) Produce process and economic models to guide the development effort. Both goals were successfully accomplished. The projected economics of the Base Case developed in this work are comparable to today's corn based ethanol technology. Sensitivity analysis shows that significant improvements in economics for the indirect route would result if a biomass feedstock rather that starch hydrolyzate were used as the carbohydrate source. The energy ratio, defined as the ratio of green energy produced divided by the amount of fossil energy consumed, is projected to be 3.11 to 12.32 for the indirect route depending upon the details of implementation. Conventional technology has an energy ratio of 1.34, thus the indirect route will have a significant environmental advantage over today's technology. Energy savings of 7.48 trillion Btu/yr will result when 100 MMgal/yr (neat) of ethanol capacity via the indirect route is placed on-line by the year 2010.

  11. Quantum Operation Time Reversal

    SciTech Connect

    Crooks, Gavin E.

    2008-03-25

    The dynamics of an open quantum system can be described by a quantum operation: A linear, complete positive map of operators. Here, I exhibit a compact expression for the time reversal of a quantum operation, which is closely analogous to the time reversal of a classical Markov transition matrix. Since open quantum dynamics are stochastic, and not, in general, deterministic, the time reversal is not, in general, an inversion of the dynamics. Rather, the system relaxes toward equilibrium in both the forward and reverse time directions. The probability of a quantum trajectory and the conjugate, time reversed trajectory are related by the heat exchanged with the environment.

  12. Direct Regulation of Prokaryotic Kir Channel by Cholesterol*

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Dev K.; Rosenhouse-Dantsker, Avia; Nichols, Colin G.; Enkvetchakul, Decha; Levitan, Irena

    2009-01-01

    Our earlier studies have shown that channel activity of Kir2 subfamily of inward rectifiers is strongly suppressed by the elevation of cellular cholesterol. The goal of this study is to determine whether cholesterol suppresses Kir channels directly. To achieve this goal, purified prokaryotic Kir (KirBac1.1) channels were incorporated into liposomes of defined lipid composition, and channel activity was assayed by 86Rb+ uptake. Our results show that 86Rb+ flux through KirBac1.1 is strongly inhibited by cholesterol. Incorporation of 5% (mass cholesterol/phospholipid) cholesterol into the liposome suppresses 86Rb+ flux by >50%, and activity is completely inhibited at 12–15%. However, epicholesterol, a stereoisomer of cholesterol with similar physical properties, has significantly less effect on KirBac-mediated 86Rb+ uptake than cholesterol. Furthermore, analysis of multiple sterols suggests that cholesterol-induced inhibition of KirBac1.1 channels is mediated by specific interactions rather than by changes in the physical properties of the lipid bilayer. In contrast to the inhibition of KirBac1.1 activity, cholesterol had no effect on the activity of reconstituted KscA channels (at up to 250 μg/mg of phospholipid). Taken together, these observations demonstrate that cholesterol suppresses Kir channels in a pure protein-lipid environment and suggest that the interaction is direct and specific. PMID:19740741

  13. Control of Angiogenesis by AIBP-mediated Cholesterol Efflux

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Longhou; Choi, Soo-Ho; Baek, Ji Sun; Liu, Chao; Almazan, Felicidad; Ulrich, Florian; Wiesner, Philipp; Taleb, Adam; Deer, Elena; Pattison, Jennifer; Torres-Vázquez, Jesús; Li, Andrew C.; Miller, Yury I.

    2013-01-01

    Cholesterol is a structural component of the cell, indispensable for normal cellular function, but its excess often leads to abnormal proliferation, migration, inflammatory responses and/or cell death. To prevent cholesterol overload, ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters mediate cholesterol efflux from the cells to apolipoprotein A-I (ApoA-I) and to the ApoA-I-containing high-density lipoprotein (HDL)1-3. Maintaining efficient cholesterol efflux is essential for normal cellular function4-6. However, the role of cholesterol efflux in angiogenesis and the identity of its local regulators are poorly understood. Here we show that ApoA-I binding protein (AIBP) accelerates cholesterol efflux from endothelial cells (EC) to HDL and thereby regulates angiogenesis. AIBP/HDL-mediated cholesterol depletion reduces lipid rafts, interferes with VEGFR2 dimerization and signaling, and inhibits VEGF-induced angiogenesis in vitro and mouse aortic neovascularization ex vivo. Remarkably, Aibp regulates the membrane lipid order in embryonic zebrafish vasculature and functions as a non-cell autonomous regulator of zebrafish angiogenesis. Aibp knockdown results in dysregulated sprouting/branching angiogenesis, while forced Aibp expression inhibits angiogenesis. Dysregulated angiogenesis is phenocopied in Abca1/Abcg1-deficient embryos, and cholesterol levels are increased in Aibp-deficient and Abca1/Abcg1-deficient embryos. Our findings demonstrate that secreted AIBP positively regulates cholesterol efflux from EC and that effective cholesterol efflux is critical for proper angiogenesis. PMID:23719382

  14. Phytosterol ester constituents affect micellar cholesterol solubility in model bile.

    PubMed

    Brown, Andrew W; Hang, Jiliang; Dussault, Patrick H; Carr, Timothy P

    2010-09-01

    Plant sterols and stanols (phytosterols) and their esters are nutraceuticals that lower LDL cholesterol, but the mechanisms of action are not fully understood. We hypothesized that intact esters and simulated hydrolysis products of esters (phytosterols and fatty acids in equal ratios) would differentially affect the solubility of cholesterol in model bile mixed micelles in vitro. Sodium salts of glycine- and taurine-conjugated bile acids were sonicated with phosphatidylcholine and either sterol esters or combinations of sterols and fatty acids to determine the amount of cholesterol solubilized into micelles. Intact sterol esters did not solubilize into micelles, nor did they alter cholesterol solubility. However, free sterols and fatty acids altered cholesterol solubility independently (no interaction effect). Equal contents of cholesterol and either campesterol, stigmasterol, sitosterol, or stigmastanol (sitostanol) decreased cholesterol solubility in micelles by approximately 50% compared to no phytosterol present, with stigmasterol performing slightly better than sitosterol. Phytosterols competed with cholesterol in a dose-dependent manner, demonstrating a 1:1 M substitution of phytosterol for cholesterol in micelle preparations. Unsaturated fatty acids increased the micelle solubility of sterols as compared with saturated or no fatty acids. No differences were detected in the size of the model micelles. Together, these data indicate that stigmasterol combined with saturated fatty acids may be more effective at lowering cholesterol micelle solubility in vivo.

  15. The Effects of Cholesterol on Learning and Memory

    PubMed Central

    Schreurs, Bernard G.

    2010-01-01

    Cholesterol is vital to normal brain function including learning and memory but that involvement is as complex as the synthesis, metabolism and excretion of cholesterol itself. Dietary cholesterol influences learning tasks from water maze to fear conditioning even though cholesterol does not cross the blood brain barrier. Excess cholesterol has many consequences including peripheral pathology that can signal brain via cholesterol metabolites, proinflammatory mediators and antioxidant processes. Manipulations of cholesterol within the central nervous system through genetic, pharmacological, or metabolic means circumvent the blood brain barrier and affect learning and memory but often in animals already otherwise compromised. The human literature is no less complex. Cholesterol reduction using statins improves memory in some cases but not others. There is also controversy over statin use to alleviate memory problems in Alzheimer’s disease. Correlations of cholesterol and cognitive function are mixed and association studies find some genetic polymorphisms are related to cognitive function but others are not. In sum, the field is in flux with a number of seemingly contradictory results and many complexities. Nevertheless, understanding cholesterol effects on learning and memory is too important to ignore. PMID:20470821

  16. Retinal Hypercholesterolemia Triggers Cholesterol Accumulation and Esterification in Photoreceptor Cells.

    PubMed

    Saadane, Aicha; Mast, Natalia; Dao, Tung; Ahmad, Baseer; Pikuleva, Irina A

    2016-09-23

    The process of vision is impossible without the photoreceptor cells, which have a unique structure and specific maintenance of cholesterol. Herein we report on the previously unrecognized cholesterol-related pathway in the retina discovered during follow-up characterizations of Cyp27a1(-/-)Cyp46a1(-/-) mice. These animals have retinal hypercholesterolemia and convert excess retinal cholesterol into cholesterol esters, normally present in the retina in very small amounts. We established that in the Cyp27a1(-/-)Cyp46a1(-/-) retina, cholesterol esters are generated by and accumulate in the photoreceptor outer segments (OS), which is the retinal layer with the lowest cholesterol content. Mouse OS were also found to express the cholesterol-esterifying enzyme acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT1), but not lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT), and to differ from humans in retinal expression of ACAT1. Nevertheless, cholesterol esters were discovered to be abundant in human OS. We suggest a mechanism for cholesterol ester accumulation in the OS and that activity impairment of ACAT1 in humans may underlie the development of subretinal drusenoid deposits, a hallmark of age-related macular degeneration, which is a common blinding disease. We generated Cyp27a1(-/-)Cyp46a1(-/-)Acat1(-/-) mice, characterized their retina by different imaging modalities, and confirmed that unesterified cholesterol does accumulate in their OS and that there is photoreceptor apoptosis and OS degeneration in this line. Our results provide insights into the retinal response to local hypercholesterolemia and the retinal significance of cholesterol esterification, which could be cell-specific and both beneficial and detrimental for retinal structure and function.

  17. Retinal Hypercholesterolemia Triggers Cholesterol Accumulation and Esterification in Photoreceptor Cells.

    PubMed

    Saadane, Aicha; Mast, Natalia; Dao, Tung; Ahmad, Baseer; Pikuleva, Irina A

    2016-09-23

    The process of vision is impossible without the photoreceptor cells, which have a unique structure and specific maintenance of cholesterol. Herein we report on the previously unrecognized cholesterol-related pathway in the retina discovered during follow-up characterizations of Cyp27a1(-/-)Cyp46a1(-/-) mice. These animals have retinal hypercholesterolemia and convert excess retinal cholesterol into cholesterol esters, normally present in the retina in very small amounts. We established that in the Cyp27a1(-/-)Cyp46a1(-/-) retina, cholesterol esters are generated by and accumulate in the photoreceptor outer segments (OS), which is the retinal layer with the lowest cholesterol content. Mouse OS were also found to express the cholesterol-esterifying enzyme acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT1), but not lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT), and to differ from humans in retinal expression of ACAT1. Nevertheless, cholesterol esters were discovered to be abundant in human OS. We suggest a mechanism for cholesterol ester accumulation in the OS and that activity impairment of ACAT1 in humans may underlie the development of subretinal drusenoid deposits, a hallmark of age-related macular degeneration, which is a common blinding disease. We generated Cyp27a1(-/-)Cyp46a1(-/-)Acat1(-/-) mice, characterized their retina by different imaging modalities, and confirmed that unesterified cholesterol does accumulate in their OS and that there is photoreceptor apoptosis and OS degeneration in this line. Our results provide insights into the retinal response to local hypercholesterolemia and the retinal significance of cholesterol esterification, which could be cell-specific and both beneficial and detrimental for retinal structure and function. PMID:27514747

  18. Cholesterol Metabolism and Prostate Cancer Lethality.

    PubMed

    Stopsack, Konrad H; Gerke, Travis A; Sinnott, Jennifer A; Penney, Kathryn L; Tyekucheva, Svitlana; Sesso, Howard D; Andersson, Swen-Olof; Andrén, Ove; Cerhan, James R; Giovannucci, Edward L; Mucci, Lorelei A; Rider, Jennifer R

    2016-08-15

    Cholesterol metabolism has been implicated in prostate cancer pathogenesis. Here, we assessed the association of intratumoral mRNA expression of cholesterol synthesis enzymes, transporters, and regulators in tumor specimen at diagnosis and lethal prostate cancer, defined as mortality or metastases from prostate cancer in contrast to nonlethal disease without evidence of metastases after at least 8 years of follow-up. We analyzed the prospective prostate cancer cohorts within the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (n = 249) and the Physicians' Health Study (n = 153) as well as expectantly managed patients in the Swedish Watchful Waiting Study (n = 338). The expression of squalene monooxygenase (SQLE) was associated with lethal cancer in all three cohorts. Men with high SQLE expression (>1 standard deviation above the mean) were 8.3 times (95% confidence interval, 3.5 to 19.7) more likely to have lethal cancer despite therapy compared with men with the mean level of SQLE expression. Absolute SQLE expression was associated with lethal cancer independently from Gleason grade and stage, as was a SQLE expression ratio in tumor versus surrounding benign prostate tissue. Higher SQLE expression was tightly associated with increased histologic markers of angiogenesis. Collectively, this study establishes the prognostic value of intratumoral cholesterol synthesis as measured via SQLE, its second rate-limiting enzyme. SQLE expression at cancer diagnosis is prognostic for lethal prostate cancer both after curative-intent prostatectomy and in a watchful waiting setting, possibly by facilitating micrometastatic disease. Cancer Res; 76(16); 4785-90. ©2016 AACR.

  19. Cholesterol and family history: when genetics matters.

    PubMed

    Vengoechea, Jaime; McKelvey, Kent D

    2015-02-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is an inherited, autosomal codominant disease that increases the risk for cardiovascular mortality by 100 fold. Patients usually have LDL levels above 300 mg/dl. Although signs such as tendon xanthomas, xanthelasmas and corneal arcus may suggest the diagnosis, genetic testing is the'most accurate way of diagnosing FH. Genetic testing has been shown to be a cost-efficient method to screen individuals and their relatives for FH. Establishing an accurate diagnosis is important: high potency statins are first-choice agents, the treatment goal is at least a 50% reduction in LDL cholesterol, and LDL apheresis may be indicated.

  20. Frontal sinus cholesterol granuloma: Case report

    PubMed Central

    Deep, Nicholas L.; Chaaban, Mohamad R.; Chaudhry, Ajaz L.

    2014-01-01

    A case report of a massive cholesterol granuloma (CG) of the frontal sinus in a 15-year-old male subject treated endoscopically is reported. CGs are slowly expanding, cystic lesions that are rarely observed in the frontal sinus. Frontal sinus CGs characteristically present with proptosis, diplopia, and a unilateral painless expanding mass above the orbit. Patients frequently report a history of chronic nasal obstruction or head trauma. Although the pathogenesis is unclear, it is likely multifactorial in etiology. Surgical resection via endoscopic sinus surgery has been gaining popularity because of the minimally invasive approach and lower rates of recurrence. PMID:24612824