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Sample records for individual cloned mouse

  1. Random cloning of genes from mouse chromosome 17.

    PubMed Central

    Kasahara, M; Figueroa, F; Klein, J

    1987-01-01

    We describe a method for isolating cosmid clones randomly from mouse chromosome 17. A cosmid library was constructed from the mouse-Chinese hamster cell line R4 4-1 that contains a limited amount of mouse DNA (chromosomes 17 and 18 and some other unidentified material) on a Chinese hamster background. The library was screened with the murine repetitive sequence probe pMBA14, which selectively hybridizes with mouse DNA. The mouse-derived cosmid clones thus identified were individually hybridized with DNA from the mouse-Syrian hamster cell line JS17 containing all mouse chromosomes except chromosome 17 on a Syrian hamster background. We deduced that the cosmid clones that contained sequences absent in JS17 were derived from mouse chromosome 17. One of the chromosome 17-derived cosmid clones, 3-4-1 (located proximal to the T122/T66C segment) was found to be highly polymorphic among European wild-mouse populations and may be a useful probe to elucidate the evolution and migration of Mus species. The randomly isolated mouse-derived cosmid clones can also be screened for the presence of functional genes. Using testicular cDNA as a probe, a testis-specific gene was cloned from mouse chromosome 17. Images PMID:3472212

  2. Cloning and expression of mouse legumain, a lysosomal endopeptidase.

    PubMed

    Chen, J M; Dando, P M; Stevens, R A; Fortunato, M; Barrett, A J

    1998-10-01

    Legumain, a recently discovered mammalian cysteine endopeptidase, was found in all mouse tissues examined, but was particularly abundant in kidney and placenta. The distribution in subcellular fractions of mouse and rat kidney showed a lysosomal localization, and activity was detectable only after the organelles were disrupted. Nevertheless, ratios of legumain activity to that of cathepsin B differed considerably between mouse tissues. cDNA encoding mouse legumain was cloned and sequenced, the deduced amino acid sequence proving to be 83% identical to that of the human protein [Chen, Dando, Rawlings, Brown, Young, Stevens, Hewitt, Watts and Barrett (1997) J. Biol. Chem. 272, 8090-8098]. Recombinant mouse legumain was expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells by use of a vector containing a cytomegalovirus promoter. The recombinant enzyme was partially purified and found to be an asparagine-specific endopeptidase closely similar to naturally occurring pig kidney legumain.

  3. Cloning and expression of mouse legumain, a lysosomal endopeptidase.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, J M; Dando, P M; Stevens, R A; Fortunato, M; Barrett, A J

    1998-01-01

    Legumain, a recently discovered mammalian cysteine endopeptidase, was found in all mouse tissues examined, but was particularly abundant in kidney and placenta. The distribution in subcellular fractions of mouse and rat kidney showed a lysosomal localization, and activity was detectable only after the organelles were disrupted. Nevertheless, ratios of legumain activity to that of cathepsin B differed considerably between mouse tissues. cDNA encoding mouse legumain was cloned and sequenced, the deduced amino acid sequence proving to be 83% identical to that of the human protein [Chen, Dando, Rawlings, Brown, Young, Stevens, Hewitt, Watts and Barrett (1997) J. Biol. Chem. 272, 8090-8098]. Recombinant mouse legumain was expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells by use of a vector containing a cytomegalovirus promoter. The recombinant enzyme was partially purified and found to be an asparagine-specific endopeptidase closely similar to naturally occurring pig kidney legumain. PMID:9742219

  4. Sex-reversed somatic cell cloning in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Kimiko; Ogonuki, Narumi; Mekada, Kazuyuki; Yoshiki, Atsushi; Sado, Takashi; Ogura, Atsuo

    2009-10-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer has many potential applications in the fields of basic and applied sciences. However, it has a disadvantage that can never be overcome technically-the inflexibility of the sex of the offspring. Here, we report an accidental birth of a female mouse following nuclear transfer using an immature Sertoli cell. We produced a batch of 27 clones in a nuclear transfer experiment using Sertoli cells collected from neonatal male mice. Among them, one pup was female. This "male-derived female" clone grew into a normal adult and produced offspring by natural mating with a littermate. Chromosomal analysis revealed that the female clone had a 39,X karyotype, indicating that the Y chromosome had been deleted in the donor cell or at some early step during nuclear transfer. This finding suggests the possibility of resuming sexual reproduction after a single male is cloned, which should be especially useful for reviving extinct or endangered species.

  5. Characterization and cloning of lgp110, a lysosomal membrane glycoprotein from mouse and rat cells.

    PubMed

    Granger, B L; Green, S A; Gabel, C A; Howe, C L; Mellman, I; Helenius, A

    1990-07-15

    lgp110 is a heavily glycosylated intrinsic protein of lysosomal membranes. Initially defined by monoclonal antibodies against mouse liver lysosomes, it consists of a 45-kilodalton core polypeptide with O-linked and 17 asparagine-linked oligosaccharide side chains in mouse cells. Sialic acid residues make the mature protein extremely acidic, with an isoelectric point of between 2 and 4 in both normal tissues and most cultured cell lines. Partial sequencing of mouse lgp110 allowed oligonucleotide probes to be constructed for the screening of several mouse cDNA libraries. A partial cDNA clone for mouse lgp110 was found and used for additional library screening, generating a cDNA clone covering all of the coding sequence of mature rat lgp110 as well as genomic clones covering most of the mouse gene. These new clones bring to seven the number of lysosomal membrane proteins whose amino acid sequences can be deduced, and two distinct but highly similar groups (designated lgp-A and lgp-B) can now be defined. Sequence comparisons suggest that differences within each group reflect species variations of the same protein and that lgp-A and lgp-B probably diverged from a common ancestor prior to the evolup4f1ary divergence of birds and mammals. Individual cells and individual lysosomes possess both lgp-A and lgp-B, suggesting that these two proteins have different functions. Mouse lgp110 is encoded by at least seven exons; intron positions suggest that the two homologous ectodomains of each lgp arose through gene duplication.

  6. Cloning, characterization, and localization of mouse and human SPO11.

    PubMed

    Romanienko, P J; Camerini-Otero, R D

    1999-10-15

    Spo11 is a meiosis-specific protein in yeast that has been found covalently bound to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) during the early stages of meiosis. These DSBs initiate homologous recombination, which is required for proper segregation of chromosomes and the generation of genetic diversity during meiosis. Here we report the cloning, characterization, tissue expression, and chromosomal localization of both mouse and human homologues of Spo11. The putative mouse and human proteins are 82% identical and share approximately 25% identity with other family members. Northern blot analysis revealed testis-specific expression for both genes, but RT-PCR results showed ubiquitous expression of at least a portion of Spo11 in mouse. Human SPO11 was also detected in several somatic tissues. Mouse Spo11 was localized to chromosome 2H4, and human SPO11 was localized to chromosome 20q13.2-q13.3, a region amplified in some breast and ovarian tumors.

  7. Mouse cloning and somatic cell reprogramming using electrofused blastomeres.

    PubMed

    Riaz, Amjad; Zhao, Xiaoyang; Dai, Xiangpeng; Li, Wei; Liu, Lei; Wan, Haifeng; Yu, Yang; Wang, Liu; Zhou, Qi

    2011-05-01

    Mouse cloning from fertilized eggs can assist development of approaches for the production of "genetically tailored" human embryonic stem (ES) cell lines that are not constrained by the limitations of oocyte availability. However, to date only zygotes have been successfully used as recipients of nuclei from terminally differentiated somatic cell donors leading to ES cell lines. In fertility clinics, embryos of advanced embryonic stages are usually stored for future use, but their ability to support the derivation of ES cell lines via somatic nuclear transfer has not yet been proved. Here, we report that two-cell stage electrofused mouse embryos, arrested in mitosis, can support developmental reprogramming of nuclei from donor cells ranging from blastomeres to somatic cells. Live, full-term cloned pups from embryonic donors, as well as pluripotent ES cell lines from embryonic or somatic donors, were successfully generated from these reconstructed embryos. Advanced stage pre-implantation embryos were unable to develop normally to term after electrofusion and transfer of a somatic cell nucleus, indicating that discarded pre-implantation human embryos could be an important resource for research that minimizes the ethical concerns for human therapeutic cloning. Our approach provides an attractive and practical alternative to therapeutic cloning using donated oocytes for the generation of patient-specific human ES cell lines.

  8. Cloning, characterization and targeting of the mouse HEXA gene

    SciTech Connect

    Wakamatsu, N.; Trasler, J.M.; Gravel, R.A.

    1994-09-01

    The HEXA gene, encoding the {alpha} subunit of {beta}-hexosaminidase A, is essential for the metabolism of ganglioside G{sub M2}, and defects in this gene cause Tay-Sachs disease in humans. To elucidate the role of the gene in the nervous system of the mouse and to establish a mouse model of Tay-Sachs disease, we have cloned and characterized the HEXA gene and targeted a disruption of the gene in mouse ES cells. The mouse HEXA gene spans {approximately}26 kb and consists of 14 exons, similar to the human gene. A heterogeneous transcription initiation site was identified 21-42 bp 5{prime} of the initiator ATG, with two of the sites fitting the consensus CTCA (A = start) as seen for some weak initiator systems. Promoter analysis showed that the first 150 bp 5{prime} of the ATG contained 85% of promoter activity observed in constructs containing up to 1050 bp of 5{prime} sequence. The active region contained a sequence matching that of the adenovirus major late promoter upstream element factor. A survey of mouse tissues showed that the highest mRNA levels were in (max to min): testis (5.5 x brain cortex), adrenal, epididymis, heart, brain, lung, kidney, and liver (0.3 x brain cortex). A 12 kb BstI/SalI fragment containing nine exons was disrupted with the insertion of the bacterial neo{sup r} gene in exon 11 and was targeted into 129/Sv ES cells by homologous recombination. Nine of 153 G418 resistant clones were correctly targeted as confirmed by Southern blotting. The heterozygous ES cells were microinjected into mouse blastocysts and implanted into pseudo-pregnant mice. Nine male chimeric mice, showing that 40-95% chimerism for the 129/Sv agouti coat color marker, are being bred in an effort to generate germline transmission of the disrupted HEXA gene.

  9. Characterization of individual mouse cerebrospinal fluid proteomes

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Jeffrey S.; Angel, Thomas E.; Chavkin, Charles; Orton, Daniel J.; Moore, Ronald J.; Smith, Richard D.

    2014-03-20

    Analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) offers key insight into the status of the central nervous system. Characterization of murine CSF proteomes can provide a valuable resource for studying central nervous system injury and disease in animal models. However, the small volume of CSF in mice has thus far limited individual mouse proteome characterization. Through non-terminal CSF extractions in C57Bl/6 mice and high-resolution liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of individual murine samples, we report the most comprehensive proteome characterization of individual murine CSF to date. Utilizing stringent protein inclusion criteria that required the identification of at least two unique peptides (1% false discovery rate at the peptide level) we identified a total of 566 unique proteins, including 128 proteins from three individual CSF samples that have been previously identified in brain tissue. Our methods and analysis provide a mechanism for individual murine CSF proteome analysis.

  10. Genetic heterogeneity of induced pluripotent stem cells: results from 24 clones derived from a single C57BL/6 mouse.

    PubMed

    Li, Cheng; Klco, Jeffery M; Helton, Nichole M; George, Daniel R; Mudd, Jacqueline L; Miller, Christopher A; Lu, Charles; Fulton, Robert; O'Laughlin, Michelle; Fronick, Catrina; Wilson, Richard K; Ley, Timothy J

    2015-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have tremendous potential as a tool for disease modeling, drug testing, and other applications. Since the generation of iPSCs "captures" the genetic history of the individual cell that was reprogrammed, iPSC clones (even those derived from the same individual) would be expected to demonstrate genetic heterogeneity. To assess the degree of genetic heterogeneity, and to determine whether some cells are more genetically "fit" for reprogramming, we performed exome sequencing on 24 mouse iPSC clones derived from skin fibroblasts obtained from two different sites of the same 8-week-old C57BL/6J male mouse. While no differences in the coding regions were detected in the two parental fibroblast pools, each clone had a unique genetic signature with a wide range of heterogeneity observed among the individual clones: a total of 383 iPSC variants were validated for the 24 clones (mean 16.0/clone, range 0-45). Since these variants were all present in the vast majority of the cells in each clone (variant allele frequencies of 40-60% for heterozygous variants), they most likely preexisted in the individual cells that were reprogrammed, rather than being acquired during reprogramming or cell passaging. We then tested whether this genetic heterogeneity had functional consequences for hematopoietic development by generating hematopoietic progenitors in vitro and enumerating colony forming units (CFUs). While there was a range of hematopoietic potentials among the 24 clones, only one clone failed to differentiate into hematopoietic cells; however, it was able to form a teratoma, proving its pluripotent nature. Further, no specific association was found between the mutational spectrum and the hematopoietic potential of each iPSC clone. These data clearly highlight the genetic heterogeneity present within individual fibroblasts that is captured by iPSC generation, and suggest that most of the changes are random, and functionally benign.

  11. Genetic Heterogeneity of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells: Results from 24 Clones Derived from a Single C57BL/6 Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cheng; Klco, Jeffery M.; Helton, Nichole M.; George, Daniel R.; Mudd, Jacqueline L.; Miller, Christopher A.; Lu, Charles; Fulton, Robert; O'Laughlin, Michelle; Fronick, Catrina; Wilson, Richard K.; Ley, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have tremendous potential as a tool for disease modeling, drug testing, and other applications. Since the generation of iPSCs “captures” the genetic history of the individual cell that was reprogrammed, iPSC clones (even those derived from the same individual) would be expected to demonstrate genetic heterogeneity. To assess the degree of genetic heterogeneity, and to determine whether some cells are more genetically “fit” for reprogramming, we performed exome sequencing on 24 mouse iPSC clones derived from skin fibroblasts obtained from two different sites of the same 8-week-old C57BL/6J male mouse. While no differences in the coding regions were detected in the two parental fibroblast pools, each clone had a unique genetic signature with a wide range of heterogeneity observed among the individual clones: a total of 383 iPSC variants were validated for the 24 clones (mean 16.0/clone, range 0–45). Since these variants were all present in the vast majority of the cells in each clone (variant allele frequencies of 40–60% for heterozygous variants), they most likely preexisted in the individual cells that were reprogrammed, rather than being acquired during reprogramming or cell passaging. We then tested whether this genetic heterogeneity had functional consequences for hematopoietic development by generating hematopoietic progenitors in vitro and enumerating colony forming units (CFUs). While there was a range of hematopoietic potentials among the 24 clones, only one clone failed to differentiate into hematopoietic cells; however, it was able to form a teratoma, proving its pluripotent nature. Further, no specific association was found between the mutational spectrum and the hematopoietic potential of each iPSC clone. These data clearly highlight the genetic heterogeneity present within individual fibroblasts that is captured by iPSC generation, and suggest that most of the changes are random, and functionally benign

  12. Molecular cloning and expression of the mouse ornithine decarboxylase gene.

    PubMed Central

    McConlogue, L; Gupta, M; Wu, L; Coffino, P

    1984-01-01

    We used mRNA from a mutant S49 mouse lymphoma cell line that produces ornithine decarboxylase (OrnDCase) as its major protein product to synthesize and clone cDNA. Plasmids containing OrnDCase cDNA were identified by hybrid selection of OrnDCase mRNA and in vitro translation. The two of these with the largest inserts together span 2.05 kilobases of cDNA. Southern blot analysis of DNA from wild-type or mutant S49 cells, cleaved with EcoRI or with BamHI, revealed multiple bands homologous to OrnD-Case cDNA, only one of which was amplified in the mutant cells. RNA transfer blot analysis showed that the major OrnD-Case mRNA in the mouse lymphoma cells is 2.0 kilobases long. A similar size mRNA was found in mouse kidney and was more abundant in the kidneys of mice treated with testosterone, an inducer of OrnDCase activity in that tissue. Images PMID:6582509

  13. In vitro transcription of a cloned mouse ribosomal RNA gene.

    PubMed Central

    Mishima, Y; Yamamoto, O; Kominami, R; Muramatsu, M

    1981-01-01

    An in vitro transcription system which utilizes cloned mouse ribosomal RNA gene (rDNA) fragments and a mouse cell extract has been developed. RNA polymerases I is apparently responsible for this transcription as evidenced by the complete resistance to a high concentration (200 micrograms/ml) of alpha-amanitin. Run-off products obtained with three different truncated rDNA fragments indicated that RNA was transcribed from a unique site of rDNA. The S1 nuclease protection mapping of the in vitro product and of in vivo 45S RNA confirmed this site, indicating that, in this in vitro system, transcription of rDNA started from the same site as in vivo. This site is located at several hundred nucleotides upstream from the putative initiation site reported by us (1) and by others (2). Some sequence homology surrounding this region was noted among mouse, Xenopus laevis and Drosophila melanogaster. The data also suggest that some processing of the primary transcript occurs in this in vitro system. Images PMID:6278446

  14. Measurement of background translocation frequencies in individuals with clones

    SciTech Connect

    Wade, Marcelle J.

    1996-08-01

    In the leukemia case the unseparated B and T lymphocytes had a high translocation frequency even after 0.0014, respectively. After purging all clones from the data, the translocation frequencies for Bio 8 and Bio 23 were 0.00750.0014 and 0.0073 metaphases were scored for chromosomal aberrations,, specifically reciprocal translocations, using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Metaphase spreads were used from two healthy, unexposed individuals (not exposed to radiation, chemotherapy or radiotherapy) and one early B- precursor acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) patient (metaphase spreads from both separated T lymphocytes and unseparated B and T lymphocytes were scored). All three individuals had an abnormally high translocation frequency. The high translocation frequencies resulted from clonal expansion of specific translocated chromosomes. I show in this thesis that by purging (discounting or removing) clones from the data of unexposed individuals, one can obtain true background translocation frequencies. In two cases, Bio 8 and Bio 23, the measured translocation frequency for chromosomes 1, 2 and 4 was 0.0124 purging all of the clones from the data. This high translocation frequency may be due to a low frequency of some clones and may not be recognized. The separated T lymphocytes had a higher translocation frequency than expected.

  15. Mouse ornithine decarboxylase gene: cloning, structure, and expression.

    PubMed Central

    Brabant, M; McConlogue, L; van Daalen Wetters, T; Coffino, P

    1988-01-01

    We used molecular cloning to isolate a functional gene for mouse ornithine decarboxylase (OrnDCase; L-ornithine carboxy-lyase, EC 4.1.1.17) from a cell line in which that gene had been selectively amplified. The position of the 5' terminus of the mRNA was identified, and the coding sequence was shown to be preceded by a 312- or 313-nucleotide (nt) untranslated leader. The latter is highly G + C rich, particularly in its 5'-most portion. The leader can be anticipated to have extensive and stable secondary structure. The transcription unit of the gene is of relatively small size, approximately equal to 6.2 kilobases (kb) from the start site to the proximal site of polyadenylylation. Sequence analysis of DNA near the transcription start position demonstrated the presence of a "TATA" box, but no "CAAT" box. Functional properties of the cloned gene were tested by transfecting it into cultured cells. Expression of the putative full-length gene efficiently conferred ornithine decarboxylase activity on recipient mutant cells deficient in that activity. To assess the function and strength of the OrnDCase promoter region and to delimit its boundaries, we used a transient expression assay. Upstream of a bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene was placed a portion of the OrnDCase gene, including the presumed promoter region, spanning a region from approximately equal to 3.0 kb 5' of the site of transcription initiation to the first 250 nt of the transcript. When expressed in mouse NIH 3T3 cells, this OrnDCase genomic element was comparable in strength to the Rous sarcoma virus long terminal repeat promoter. A similar construct, truncated so as to retain only 264 base pairs of the OrnDCase gene 5' to the site of transcription start, yielded undiminished levels of expression. Images PMID:3353375

  16. Expression of cloned immunoglobulin genes introduced into mouse L cells.

    PubMed Central

    Gilles, S D; Tonegawa, S

    1983-01-01

    Functionally rearranged immunoglobulin heavy-chain (gamma 2b) and light-chain (lambda 1 and kappa) genes were introduced into mouse L tk- cells by co-transformation with the Herpes virus tk gene. Cloned cell lines were selected in HAT medium and tested for the presence of transfected immunoglobulin gene sequences by Southern blotting analysis. It was found that the gamma 2b gene was accurately transcribed at a low level in transfected mouse L cells and cytoplasmic gamma 2b, heavy-chain protein was detected by immunoprecipitation of cell extracts. Light-chain genes, on the other hand, were not accurately transcribed. Instead, lambda 1 or kappa RNA species were detected which were approximately 200 to 300 bases longer than the authentic mRNAs. These results suggest that the expression of rearranged heavy-chain and light-chain genes are controlled differently and that these differences can be seen in transfected, non-lymphoid cells. Images PMID:6316279

  17. Cloned mouse cells with natural killer function and cloned suppressor T cells express ultrastructural and biochemical features not shared by cloned inducer T cells

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    We have examined the morphology, cytochemistry, and biochemistry of mouse leukocyte subsets by analyzing cloned leukocyte populations specialized to perform different immunologic functions. Cloned cells expressing high-affinity plasma membrane receptors for IgE and mediating natural killer (NK) lysis and cloned antigen-specific suppressor T cells contained prominent osmiophilic cytoplasmic granules similar by ultrastructure to those of mouse basophils. Both clones also incorporated 35SO4 into granule-associated sulfated glycosaminoglycans, expressed a characteristic ultrastructural pattern of nonspecific esterase activity, incorporated exogenous [3H]5-hydroxytryptamine, and contained cytoplasmic deposits of particulate glycogen. By contrast, cloned inducer T cells lacked cytoplasmic granules and glycogen, incorporated neither 35SO4 nor [3H]5-hydroxytryptamine, and differed from the other clones in pattern of nonspecific esterase activity. These findings establish that certain cloned cells with NK activity and cloned suppressor T cells express morphologic and biochemical characteristics heretofore associated with basophilic granulocytes. However, these clones differ in surface glycoprotein expression and immunologic function, and the full extent of the similarities and differences among these populations and basophils remains to be determined. PMID:6220105

  18. Cloning the mouse homologue of the human lysosomal acid {alpha}-glucosidase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, J.H.; Yang, B.Z.; Liu, H.M.

    1994-09-01

    Pompe disease (GSD II) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by a deficiency of lysosomal acid {alpha}-glucosidase (GAA). In an attempt to create a mouse model for Pompe disease, we isolated and characterized the gene encoding the mouse homologue of the human GAA. Twenty clones that extend from exon 2 to the poly(A) tail were isolated from a mouse liver cDNA library, but the remainder of the mRNA proved difficult to obtain by conventional cDNA library screening. Sequences spanning exons 1-2 were cloned by RACE from mouse liver RNA. The full-length liver GAA cDNA contains 3365 nucleotides with a coding region of 2859 nucleotides and a 394 base pair 3{prime}-nontranslated region. The deduced amino acid sequence of the mouse GAA shows 84% identity to the human GAA. Southern blot analysis demonstrated that the mouse GAA was encoded by a single copy gene. Then six bacteriophages containing DNA from the GAA gene were isolated by screening 10{sup 6} phage plaques of a mouse 129 genomic library using a mouse GAA cDNA as a probe. From one of these bacteriophages, an 11-kilobase EcoRI fragment containing exons 3 to 15 was subcloned and sequenced. Work is in progress using this genomic clone to disrupt the GAA gene in murine embryonic stem cells in order to create GSD II mice.

  19. Cloning and sequence analysis of a cDNA clone coding for the mouse GM2 activator protein.

    PubMed Central

    Bellachioma, G; Stirling, J L; Orlacchio, A; Beccari, T

    1993-01-01

    A cDNA (1.1 kb) containing the complete coding sequence for the mouse GM2 activator protein was isolated from a mouse macrophage library using a cDNA for the human protein as a probe. There was a single ATG located 12 bp from the 5' end of the cDNA clone followed by an open reading frame of 579 bp. Northern blot analysis of mouse macrophage RNA showed that there was a single band with a mobility corresponding to a size of 2.3 kb. We deduce from this that the mouse mRNA, in common with the mRNA for the human GM2 activator protein, has a long 3' untranslated sequence of approx. 1.7 kb. Alignment of the mouse and human deduced amino acid sequences showed 68% identity overall and 75% identity for the sequence on the C-terminal side of the first 31 residues, which in the human GM2 activator protein contains the signal peptide. Hydropathicity plots showed great similarity between the mouse and human sequences even in regions of low sequence similarity. There is a single N-glycosylation site in the mouse GM2 activator protein sequence (Asn151-Phe-Thr) which differs in its location from the single site reported in the human GM2 activator protein sequence (Asn63-Val-Thr). Images Figure 1 PMID:7689829

  20. Defective Chromatin Structure in Somatic Cell Cloned Mouse Embryos*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Miao; Wang, Fengchao; Kou, Zhaohui; Zhang, Yu; Gao, Shaorong

    2009-01-01

    Epigenetic reprogramming plays a central role in the development of cloned embryos generated by somatic cell nuclear transfer, and it is believed that aberrant reprogramming leads to the abnormal development of most cloned embryos. Recent studies show that trimethylation of H3K27 (H3K27me3) contributes to the maintenance of embryonic stem cell pluripotency because the differentiation genes are always occupied by nucleosomes trimethylated at H3K27, which represses gene expression. Here, we provide evidence that differential H3K27me3 modification exists between normal fertilization-produced blastocysts and somatic cell nuclear transfer cloned blastocysts; H3K27me3 was specifically found in cells of the inner cell mass (ICM) of normal blastocysts, whereas there was no modification of H3K27me3 in the ICM of cloned blastocysts. Subsequently, we demonstrated that the differentiation-related genes, which are marked by H3K27me3 in embryonic stem cells, were expressed at significantly higher levels in cloned embryos than in normal embryos. The polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) component genes (Eed, Ezh2, and Suz12), which are responsible for the generation of H3K27me3, were expressed at lower levels in the cloned embryos. Our results suggest that reduced expression of PRC2 component genes in cloned embryos results in defective modification of H3K27me3 to the differentiation-related genes in pluripotent ICM cells. This results in premature expression of developmental genes and death of somatic cloned embryos shortly after implantation. Taken together, these studies suggest that H3K27me3 might be an important epigenetic marker with which to evaluate the developmental potential of cloned embryos. PMID:19602512

  1. How to improve the success rate of mouse cloning technology.

    PubMed

    Thuan, Nguyen Van; Kishigami, Satoshi; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    2010-02-01

    It has now been 13 years since the first cloned mammal Dolly the sheep was generated from somatic cells using nuclear transfer (SCNT). Since then, this technique has been considered an important tool not only for animal reproduction but also for regenerative medicine. However, the success rate is still very low and the mechanisms involved in genomic reprogramming are not yet clear. Moreover, the NT technique requires donated fresh oocyte, which raises ethical problems for production of human cloned embryo. For this reason, the use of induced pluripotent stem cells for genomic reprogramming and for regenerative medicine is currently a hot topic in this field. However, we believe that the NT approach remains the only valid way for the study of reproduction and basic biology. For example, only the NT approach can reveal dynamic and global modifications in the epigenome without using genetic modification, and it can generate offspring from a single cell or even a frozen dead body. Thanks to much hard work by many groups, cloning success rates are increasing slightly year by year, and NT cloning is now becoming a more applicable method. This review describes how to improve the efficiency of cloning, the establishment of clone-derived embryonic stem cells and further applications.

  2. Significant improvement of mouse cloning technique by treatment with trichostatin A after somatic nuclear transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Kishigami, Satoshi . E-mail: kishigami@cdb.riken.jp; Mizutani, Eiji; Ohta, Hiroshi; Hikichi, Takafusa; Thuan, Nguyen Van; Wakayama, Sayaka; Bui, Hong-Thuy; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    2006-02-03

    The low success rate of animal cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is believed to be associated with epigenetic errors including abnormal DNA hypermethylation. Recently, we elucidated by using round spermatids that, after nuclear transfer, treatment of zygotes with trichostatin A (TSA), an inhibitor of histone deacetylase, can remarkably reduce abnormal DNA hypermethylation depending on the origins of transferred nuclei and their genomic regions [S. Kishigami, N. Van Thuan, T. Hikichi, H. Ohta, S. Wakayama. E. Mizutani, T. Wakayama, Epigenetic abnormalities of the mouse paternal zygotic genome associated with microinsemination of round spermatids, Dev. Biol. (2005) in press]. Here, we found that 5-50 nM TSA-treatment for 10 h following oocyte activation resulted in more efficient in vitro development of somatic cloned embryos to the blastocyst stage from 2- to 5-fold depending on the donor cells including tail tip cells, spleen cells, neural stem cells, and cumulus cells. This TSA-treatment also led to more than 5-fold increase in success rate of mouse cloning from cumulus cells without obvious abnormality but failed to improve ES cloning success. Further, we succeeded in establishment of nuclear transfer-embryonic stem (NT-ES) cells from TSA-treated cloned blastocyst at a rate three times higher than those from untreated cloned blastocysts. Thus, our data indicate that TSA-treatment after SCNT in mice can dramatically improve the practical application of current cloning techniques.

  3. Cloning

    MedlinePlus

    Cloning describes the processes used to create an exact genetic replica of another cell, tissue or organism. ... named Dolly. There are three different types of cloning: Gene cloning, which creates copies of genes or ...

  4. Cloning and expression of the mouse histamine H3 receptor: evidence for multiple isoforms.

    PubMed

    Rouleau, Agnès; Héron, Anne; Cochois, Véronique; Pillot, Catherine; Schwartz, Jean-Charles; Arrang, Jean-Michel

    2004-09-01

    The existence of mouse H3-receptor isoforms was investigated by PCR analysis and cDNA cloning. Splicing mechanisms previously reported in various species are conserved in the mouse. The retention/deletion of a fragment in the third intracellular loop of the mouse receptor leads to the existence of three isoforms designated mH(3(445)), mH(3(413)) and mH(3(397)) according to the length of their deduced amino acid sequence. PCR analysis showed that mouse H3-receptor isoforms display different expression patterns in the brain. Following expression in Cos-1 cells, [125I]iodoproxyfan binding indicated similar pharmacological profiles of the mH(3(445)), mH(3(413)) and mH(3(397)) isoforms. The pharmacological profile of the mouse H3 receptor is more similar to the rat receptor than to the human receptor, although some differences were also observed between the mouse and rat receptors. For example, the potency of thioperamide and ciproxifan is slightly higher at the mouse receptor than at the rat receptor but 40-100-fold higher than at the human receptor. In situ hybridization histochemistry showed that the distribution of H3-receptor mRNAs in the mouse brain is rather similar to that previously reported in the rat brain. However, the autoradiographic and cellular expression patterns observed in several brain areas such as the thalamus or hippocampus reveal important differences between the two species.

  5. The neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor {alpha}7 subunit gene: Cloning, mapping, structure, and targeting in mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Orr-Urtreger, A.; Baldini, A.; Beaudet, A.L.

    1994-09-01

    The neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor {alpha}7 subunit is a member of a family of ligand-gated ion channels, and is the only subunit know to bind {alpha}-bungarotoxin in mammalian brain. {alpha}-Bungarotoxin binding sites are known to be more abundant in the hippocampus of mouse strains that are particularly sensitive to nicotine-induced seizures. The {alpha}7 receptor is highly permeable to calcium, which could suggest a role in synaptic plasticity in the nervous system. Auditory gating deficiency, an abnormal response to a second auditory stimulus, is characteristic of schizophrenia. Mouse strains that exhibit a similar gating deficit have reduced hippocampal expression of the {alpha}7 subunit. We have cloned and sequenced the full length cDNA for the mouse {alpha}7 gene (Acra-7) and characterized its gene structure. The murine {alpha}7 shares amino acid identity of 99% and 93% with the rat and human {alpha}7 subunits, respectively. Using an interspecies backcross panel, the murine gene was mapped to chromosome 7 near the p locus, a region syntenic with human chromosome 15; the human gene (CHRNA7) was confirmed to map to 15q13-q14 by FISH. To generate a mouse {alpha}7 mutant by homologous recombination, we have constructed a replacement vector which will delete transmembrane domains II-IV and the cytoplasmic domain from the gene product. Recombinant embryonic stem (ES) cell clones were selected and used to develop mouse chimeras that are currently being bred to obtain germline transmission.

  6. Cloning and determination of the transcription termination site of ribosomal RNA gene of the mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Kominami, R; Mishima, Y; Urano, Y; Sakai, M; Muramatsu, M

    1982-01-01

    A Eco RI 6.6 kb DNA fragment containing the 3'-end of 28S ribosomal RNA gene of the mouse was detected by Southern blot hybridization, and cloned in a lambda-phage vector. The site of transcription termination and the processed 3'-end of 28S RNA were determined on the cloned fragment and the surrounding nucleotide sequence determined. The 3'-terminal nucleotides of mouse 28S RNA are similar to those of yeast, Drosophila and Xenopus although the homology was lost drastically beyond the 3'-end of 28S RNA. 45S precursor RNA terminated at 30 nucleotides downstream from the 3'-end of 28S RNA gene. A structure of a dyad symmetry with a loop was found immediately prior to the termination site of 45S RNA. The rDNA termination site thus shares some common features with termination sites recognized by other RNA polymerases. Images PMID:6281727

  7. Molecular cloning, genomic organization and cell‐binding characteristics of mouse Spα

    PubMed Central

    Gebe, J A; Llewellyn, M‐B C; Hoggatt, H; Aruffo, A

    2000-01-01

    Several group B scavenger receptor cysteine‐rich (SRCR) proteins have been shown to function as modulators in the immune response. Recently, we reported the cloning of a new member of this family, human Spα (hSpα). Herein we report the cloning and characterization of the mouse homologue of hSpα. Like its human counterpart, mouse Spα (mSpα), is a secreted protein containing three SRCR domains. Most lymphoid tissues express RNA transcripts encoding mSpα. Characterization of a genomic clone encoding the mature mSpα protein showed that each of the SRCR domains of mSpα is encoded by a single exon. Comparison of the sequence of mSPα with those of other published proteins indicates that it is the same as the recently reported protein named AIM (apoptosis inhibitor expressed by macrophages). Cell‐binding studies with a mSpα immunoglobulin (mSpα‐Rγ) fusion protein indicated that mSpα is capable of binding to spleen‐derived CD19+ B cells and minimally to peritoneal cavity‐derived CD19+ B cells but not to peripheral blood‐derived B cells. Spleen‐derived CD3+ T cells also bound mSpα‐Rγ; however, no binding was observed to either peripheral blood mononuclear cells or peritoneal cavity‐derived CD3+ T cells. The mSpα‐Rγ fusion protein was also shown to bind to the mouse cell lines WEHI3 (monocytic) and EL‐4 (thymoma, T cell). The cloning of cDNA and genomic clones encoding mSpα and the identification of cells expressing a putative mSpα receptor(s) should facilitate in vivo studies designed to investigate the function of Spα in the immune compartment. PMID:10651944

  8. Molecular cloning, genomic organization and cell-binding characteristics of mouse Spalpha.

    PubMed

    Gebe, J A; Llewellyn, M; Hoggatt, H; Aruffo, A

    2000-01-01

    Several group B scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR) proteins have been shown to function as modulators in the immune response. Recently, we reported the cloning of a new member of this family, human Spalpha (hSpalpha). Herein we report the cloning and characterization of the mouse homologue of hSpalpha. Like its human counterpart, mouse Spalpha (mSpalpha), is a secreted protein containing three SRCR domains. Most lymphoid tissues express RNA transcripts encoding mSpalpha. Characterization of a genomic clone encoding the mature mSpalpha protein showed that each of the SRCR domains of mSpalpha is encoded by a single exon. Comparison of the sequence of mSPalpha with those of other published proteins indicates that it is the same as the recently reported protein named AIM (apoptosis inhibitor expressed by macrophages). Cell-binding studies with a mSpalpha immunoglobulin (mSpalpha-Rgamma) fusion protein indicated that mSpalpha is capable of binding to spleen-derived CD19+ B cells and minimally to peritoneal cavity-derived CD19+ B cells but not to peripheral blood-derived B cells. Spleen-derived CD3+ T cells also bound mSpalpha-Rgamma; however, no binding was observed to either peripheral blood mononuclear cells or peritoneal cavity-derived CD3+ T cells. The mSpalpha-Rgamma fusion protein was also shown to bind to the mouse cell lines WEHI3 (monocytic) and EL-4 (thymoma, T cell). The cloning of cDNA and genomic clones encoding mSpalpha and the identification of cells expressing a putative mSpalpha receptor(s) should facilitate in vivo studies designed to investigate the function of Spalpha in the immune compartment.

  9. Microinjection of cloned DNA fragments into fertilized one-cell mouse eggs: I. Manual injection.

    PubMed

    Murphy, D

    1993-01-01

    Central to the process of making transgenic mice is the physical introduction of cloned DNA fragments into fertilized one-cell mouse eggs. First described 10 years ago by a number of investigators, microinjection remains the most popular and successful of the methods currently available for generating transgenic animals. Microinjection continues to be the method of choice, because the advantages of speed and reliability far outweigh the demands placed on the investigator for precise technical skill and expensive equipment.

  10. Aberrant epigenetic reprogramming of imprinted microRNA-127 and Rtl1 in cloned mouse embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Cui Xiangshun; Zhang Dingxiao; Ko, Yoeung-Gyu; Kim, Nam-Hyung

    2009-02-06

    The microRNA (miRNA) genes mir-127 and mir-136 are located near two CpG islands in the imprinted mouse retrotransposon-like gene Rtl1, a key gene involved in placenta formation. These miRNAs appear to be involved in regulating the imprinting of Rtl1. To obtain insights into the epigenetic reprogramming of cloned embryos, we compared the expression levels of mir-127 and mir-136 in fertilized mouse embryos, parthenotes, androgenotes and cloned embryos developing in vitro. We also examined the DNA methylation status of the promoter regions of Rtl1 and mir-127 in these embryos. Our data showed that mir-127 and mir-136 were highly expressed in parthenotes, but rarely expressed in androgenotes. Interestingly, the expression levels of mir-127 and mir-136 in parthenotes were almost twice that seen in the fertilized embryos, but were much lower in the cloned embryos. The Rtl1 promoter region was hyper-methylated in blastocyst stage parthenotes (75.0%), moderately methylated (32.4%) in the fertilized embryos and methylated to a much lower extent ({approx}10%) in the cloned embryos. Conversely, the promoter region of mir-127 was hypo-methylated in parthenogenetically activated embryos (0.4%), moderately methylated (30.0%) in fertilized embryos and heavily methylated in cloned blastocysts (63-70%). These data support a role for mir-127 and mir-136 in the epigenetic reprogramming of the Rtl1 imprinting process. Analysis of the aberrant epigenetic reprogramming of mir-127 and Rtl1 in cloned embryos may help to explain the nuclear reprogramming procedures that occur in donor cells following somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT)

  11. The mouse prostaglandin E receptor EP2 subtype: cloning, expression, and northern blot analysis.

    PubMed

    Katsuyama, M; Nishigaki, N; Sugimoto, Y; Morimoto, K; Negishi, M; Narumiya, S; Ichikawa, A

    1995-09-25

    A functional cDNA clone for the mouse prostaglandin (PG) E receptor EP2 subtype was isolated from a mouse cDNA library. The mouse EP2 receptor consists of 362 amino acid residues with seven putative transmembrane domains. [3H]PGE2 bound specifically to the membrane of Chinese hamster ovary cells stably expressing the cloned receptor. This binding was displaced by unlabeled prostanoids in the order of PGE2 = PGE1 > iloprost, a stable PGI2 agonist > PGF2 alpha > PGD2. Binding was also inhibited by butaprost (an EP2 agonist) and to a lesser extent by M&B 28767 (an EP3 agonist), but not by sulprostone (an EP1 and EP3 agonist) or SC-19220 (an EP1 antagonist). PGE2 and butaprost increased the cAMP level in the Chinese hamster ovary cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Northern blot analysis revealed that EP2 mRNA is expressed most abundantly in the uterus, followed by the spleen, lung, thymus, ileum, liver, and stomach.

  12. Transgenic Mouse Models Enabling Photolabeling of Individual Neurons In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Peter, Manuel; Bathellier, Brice; Fontinha, Bruno; Pliota, Pinelopi; Haubensak, Wulf; Rumpel, Simon

    2013-01-01

    One of the biggest tasks in neuroscience is to explain activity patterns of individual neurons during behavior by their cellular characteristics and their connectivity within the neuronal network. To greatly facilitate linking in vivo experiments with a more detailed molecular or physiological analysis in vitro, we have generated and characterized genetically modified mice expressing photoactivatable GFP (PA-GFP) that allow conditional photolabeling of individual neurons. Repeated photolabeling at the soma reveals basic morphological features due to diffusion of activated PA-GFP into the dendrites. Neurons photolabeled in vivo can be re-identified in acute brain slices and targeted for electrophysiological recordings. We demonstrate the advantages of PA-GFP expressing mice by the correlation of in vivo firing rates of individual neurons with their expression levels of the immediate early gene c-fos. Generally, the mouse models described in this study enable the combination of various analytical approaches to characterize living cells, also beyond the neurosciences. PMID:23626779

  13. Construction of a cDNA clone corresponding to mouse alpha 1(IV) procollagen.

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, C L; Villa, L L; Sonohara, S; Brentani, R R

    1984-01-01

    A new procedure for the synthesis of double stranded cDNA, based upon release of mRNA by "in vitro" translation, was used to clone type IV collagen. Collagen synthesizing polysomes selectively isolated from a mouse parietal yolk sac carcinoma (PYS-2) were used for translation in an heterologous cell-free system. Translation products were collagenase-sensitive and displayed an electrophoretic mobility correspondent to type IV collagen. Translation released mRNA was employed to construct a 100 base pairs long cDNA clone which hybridized to a 7,800 nucleotides long mRNA. Peptides synthesized by "in vitro" translation of hybrid selected mRNA displayed an electrophoretic mobility compatible with that of alpha 1 (IV) collagen, were sensitive to collagenase and were immunoprecipitated by anti-type IV collagen antibody. Images PMID:6546618

  14. Cloning and expression of a cDNA for mouse prostaglandin E receptor EP2 subtype.

    PubMed

    Honda, A; Sugimoto, Y; Namba, T; Watabe, A; Irie, A; Negishi, M; Narumiya, S; Ichikawa, A

    1993-04-15

    A functional cDNA clone encoding mouse EP2 subtype of prostaglandin (PG) E receptor was isolated from a mouse cDNA library by cross-hybridization with the mouse EP3 subtype PGE receptor cDNA. The mouse EP2 receptor consists of 513 amino acid residues with putative seven-transmembrane domains. In contrast to EP3 receptor, this receptor possesses long third intracellular loop and carboxyl-terminal tail. [3H] PGE2 specifically bound to the membrane of mammalian COS cells transfected with the cDNA. The binding to the membrane was displaced with unlabeled PG in the order of PGE2 = PGE1 > iloprost > or = PGF2 alpha > or = PGD2. The binding was also inhibited by misoprostol, an EP2 and EP3 agonist, but not by sulprostone, an EP1 and EP3 agonist, and SC-19220, an EP1 antagonist. PGE2 markedly increased cAMP level in COS cells transfected with the cDNA. These results suggest that this receptor is EP2 subtype. Northern blot analysis demonstrated that the EP2 mRNA is widely expressed in various tissues, the abundant expression being observed in ileum, thymus, and mastocytoma P-815 cells.

  15. Genomic cloning of mouse MIF (macrophage inhibitory factor) and genetic mapping of the human and mouse expressed gene and nine mouse pseudogenes

    SciTech Connect

    Kozak, C.A.; Adamson, M.C.; Buckler, C.E.

    1995-06-10

    The single functional mouse gene for MIF (macrophage migration inhibitory factor) has been cloned from a P1 library, and its exon/intron structure determined and shown to resemble that of the human gene. The gene was mapped to chromosome 10 using two multilocus crosses between laboratory strains and either Mus musculus or Mus spretus. Nine additional loci containing related sequences, apparently all processed pseudogenes, were also mapped to chromosomes 1, 2, 3, 7, 8, 9, 12, 17, and 19. While most of these pseudogenes were also found in inbred mice and M. spretus, some are species specific. This suggests that there have been active phases of pseudogene formation in Mus both before and after the separation of musculus and spretus. The human gene contains no pseudogene; we assigned the human gene to chromosome 19, consistent with the location of mouse and human functional genes for MIF in a region of conserved linkage. 43 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  16. DNA Methylation Errors in Cloned Mouse Sperm by Germ Line Barrier Evasion.

    PubMed

    Koike, Tasuku; Wakai, Takuya; Jincho, Yuko; Sakashita, Akihiko; Kobayashi, Hisato; Mizutani, Eiji; Wakayama, Sayaka; Miura, Fumihito; Ito, Takashi; Kono, Tomohiro

    2016-06-01

    The germ line reprogramming barrier resets parental epigenetic modifications according to sex, conferring totipotency to mammalian embryos upon fertilization. However, it is not known whether epigenetic errors are committed during germ line reprogramming that are then transmitted to germ cells, and consequently to offspring. We addressed this question in the present study by performing a genome-wide DNA methylation analysis using a target postbisulfite sequencing method in order to identify DNA methylation errors in cloned mouse sperm. The sperm genomes of two somatic cell-cloned mice (CL1 and CL7) contained significantly higher numbers of differentially methylated CpG sites (P = 0.0045 and P = 0.0116). As a result, they had higher numbers of differentially methylated CpG islands. However, there was no evidence that these sites were transmitted to the sperm genome of offspring. These results suggest that DNA methylation errors resulting from embryo cloning are transmitted to the sperm genome by evading the germ line reprogramming barrier.

  17. Cloning

    MedlinePlus

    ... that have been cloned from somatic cells include: cat, deer, dog, horse, mule, ox, rabbit and rat. ... with cell division. In other mammals, such as cats, rabbits and mice, the two spindle proteins are ...

  18. Improved Development of Somatic Cell Cloned Mouse Embryos by Vitamin C and Latrunculin A

    PubMed Central

    Mallol, Anna; Santaló, Josep; Ibáñez, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Impaired development of embryos produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is mostly associated with faulty reprogramming of the somatic nucleus to a totipotent state and can be improved by treatment with epigenetic modifiers. Here we report that addition of 100 μM vitamin C (VitC) to embryo culture medium for at least 16 h post-activation significantly increases mouse blastocyst formation and, when combined with the use of latrunculin A (LatA) during micromanipulation and activation procedures, also development to term. In spite of this, no significant effects on pluripotency (OCT4 and NANOG) or nuclear reprogramming markers (H3K14 acetylation, H3K9 methylation and DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation) could be detected. The use of LatA alone significantly improved in vitro development, but not full-term development. On the other hand, the simultaneous treatment of cloned embryos with VitC and the histone deacetylase inhibitor psammaplin A (PsA), in combination with the use of LatA, resulted in cloning efficiencies equivalent to those of VitC or PsA treatments alone, and the effects on pluripotency and nuclear reprogramming markers were less evident than when only the PsA treatment was applied. These results suggest that although both epigenetic modifiers improve cloning efficiencies, possibly through different mechanisms, they do not show an additive effect when combined. Improvement of SCNT efficiency is essential for its applications in reproductive and therapeutic cloning, and identification of molecules which increase this efficiency should facilitate studies on the mechanism of nuclear reprogramming and acquisition of totipotency. PMID:25749170

  19. Molecular cloning, expression, and characterization of mouse amine N-sulfotransferases

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Saki |; Sakakibara, Yoichi | Mishiro, Emi |; Kouriki, Haruna; Nobe, Rika |; Kurogi, Katsuhisa; Yasuda, Shin |; Liu, M.-C.; Suiko, Masahito |

    2008-10-31

    By searching the GenBank database, we recently identified a novel mouse cytosolic sulfotransferase (SULT) cDNA (IMAGE Clone ID 679629) and a novel mouse SULT gene (LOC 215895). Sequence analysis revealed that both mouse SULTs belong to the cytosolic SULT3 gene family. The recombinant form of these two newly identified SULTs, designated SULT3A1 and SULT3A2, were expressed using the pGEX-4T-1 glutathione S-transferase fusion system and purified from transformed BL21 Escherichia coli cells. Both purified SULT3A1 and SULT3A2 exhibited strong amine N-sulfonating activities toward 1-naphthylamine among a variety of endogenous and xenobiotic compounds tested as substrates. Kinetic constants of the sulfation of 1-naphthylamine and 1-naphthol by these two enzymes were determined. Collectively, these results imply that these two amine-sulfonating SULT3s may play essential roles in the metabolism and detoxification of aromatic amine compounds in the body.

  20. Cloning and mapping of the mouse {alpha}7-neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Orr-Urtreger, A.; Baldini, A.; Beaudet, A.L.

    1995-03-20

    We report the isolation of cDNA clones for the mouse {alpha}7 neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit (gene symbol Acra7), the only nicotinic receptor subunit known to bind a-bungarotoxin in mammalian brain. This gene may have relevance to nicotine sensitivity and to some electrophysiologic findings in schizophrenia. The mouse {alpha}7 subunit gene encodes a protein of 502 amino acids with substantial identity to the rat (99.6%), human (92.8%), and chicken (87.5%) amino acid sequences. The {alpha}7 gene was mapped to mouse chromosome 7 near the p locus with the following gene order from proximal to distal: Myod1-3.5 {+-}1.7 cM-Gas2-0.9 cM {+-} 0.9 cM-D7Mit70-1.8 {+-} 1.2 cM- Acra7-4.4 {+-}1.0 cM-Hras1-ps11/Igf1r/Snrp2a. The human gene was confirmed to map to the homologous region of human chromosome 15q13-q14. 26 refs., 3 figs.

  1. Cloning and characterization of the gene for mouse macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF)

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, R.; Bacher, M.; Bernhagen, J.

    1995-04-15

    An emerging body of data indicates that the protein mediator described originally as macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) exerts a central and wide ranging role in host inflammatory responses. MIF is a major constituent of corticotrophic cells within the anterior pituitary gland and is secreted into the circulation in a hormone-like fashion. MIF also exists preformed in monocytes/macrophages and is a pivotal mediator in the host response to endotoxic shock. To gain further insight into the biologic expression of this protein that encompasses components of both the immune and the endocrine systems, we have cloned the mouse MIF gene and identified potential regulatory sequences present within the 5{prime}-proximal promoter region. The gene for mouse MIF is located on chromosome 10, spans approximately 1 kb, and shares a high degree of structural homology with its human counterpart. Of note, the consensus enhancer/promoter motifs identified include both inflammatory/growth factor-related elements and sites associated with the genes for certain peptide hormones. We also report the structures of two MIF pseudogenes that account for early observations suggesting that mouse MIF is encoded by a highly homologous multigene family. 38 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Cloning and optimal Gaussian individual attacks for a continuous-variable quantum key distribution using coherent states and reverse reconciliation

    SciTech Connect

    Namiki, Ryo; Koashi, Masato; Imoto, Nobuyuki

    2006-03-15

    We investigate the security of continuous-variable quantum key distribution using coherent states and reverse reconciliation against Gaussian individual attacks based on an optimal Gaussian 1{yields}2 cloning machine. We provide an implementation of the optimal Gaussian individual attack. We also find a Bell-measurement attack which works without delayed choice of measurements and has better performance than the cloning attack.

  3. Cloning and characterization of a cdc25 phosphatase from mouse lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Nargi, J L; Woodford-Thomas, T A

    1994-01-01

    Members of the cdc25 phosphatase family are proposed to function as important regulators of the eukaryotic cell cycle, particularly in the induction of mitotic events. A new cdc25 tyrosine phosphatase, cdc25M1, has been cloned from a mouse pre-B cell cDNA library and characterized. The cdc25M1 protein consists of 465 amino acids with a predicted relative molecular mass (M(r)) of 51,750. Over the highly conserved carboxyl terminal region, the amino acid sequence similarity to the human cdc25 C or Hs1 isoform is 89%, while the overall similarity is 67%. The phosphatase active site is located within residues 367-374. Tissue expression of the cdc25M1 was highest in mouse spleen and thymus by northern blot analysis. The cdc25M1 mRNA was detected in a number of cloned mouse lymphocyte cell lines including both CD8+ and CD4+ cells. cdc25M1 mRNA was shown to be cell cycle-regulated in T cells following interleukin-2 (IL-2)-stimulation. Accumulation of cdc25M1 mRNA occurred at 48 h after IL-2 stimulation, when lymphocytes were progressing from S phase to G2/M phase of the cell cycle. This pattern of expression is in contrast to that observed for other protein tyrosine phosphatases expressed in T lymphocytes including CD45, LRP, SHP, and PEP. The elevation in cdc25M1 mRNA level occurred concomittant to the appearance of the hyperphosphorylated form of p34cdc2 protein kinase. A purified, bacterial-expressed recombinant cdc25M1 phosphatase domain catalyzed the dephosphorylation of p-nitrophenol phosphate, as well as [32P-Tyr] and [32P-Ser/Thr]-containing substrates. Preincubation of p34cdc2 kinase with cdc25M1 activated its histone H1 kinase activity in vitro. These results suggest that cdc25M1 may be involved in regulating the proliferation of mouse T lymphocytes following cytokine stimulation, through its action on p34cdc2 kinase.

  4. Cloning and Characterization of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase from Mouse Macrophages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Qiao-Wen; Cho, Hearn J.; Calaycay, Jimmy; Mumford, Richard A.; Swiderek, Kristine M.; Lee, Terry D.; Ding, Aihao; Troso, Tiffany; Nathan, Carl

    1992-04-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) conveys a variety of messages between cells, including signals for vasorelaxation, neurotransmission, and cytotoxicity. In some endothelial cells and neurons, a constitutive NO synthase is activated transiently by agonists that elevate intracellular calcium concentrations and promote the binding of calmodulin. In contrast, in macrophages, NO synthase activity appears slowly after exposure of the cells to cytokines and bacterial products, is sustained, and functions independently of calcium and calmodulin. A monospecific antibody was used to clone complementary DNA that encoded two isoforms of NO synthase from immunologically activated mouse macrophages. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry was used to confirm most of the amino acid sequence. Macrophage NO synthase differs extensively from cerebellar NO synthase. The macrophage enzyme is immunologically induced at the transcriptional level and closely resembles the enzyme in cytokine-treated tumor cells and inflammatory neutrophils.

  5. Cloning of the mouse GABA-benzodiazepine receptor. alpha. 1 subunit in a study of alcohol neurosensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Keir, W.J.; Deitrich, R.A.; Sikela, J.M. )

    1989-02-09

    The inhibitory action of gamma amino butyric acid (GABA) is mediated by its binding to the benzodiazepine (BDZ) receptor and opening of a chloride channel. This receptor contains a variety of binding sites for several behavorially active drugs. Recent studies with SS and LS mice which were selected for differential neurosensitivity to ethanol, suggest that the GABAergic system plays a role in this differential sensitivity. Thus genes controlling the GABAergic system may also influence the acute hypnotic actions of ethanol. As a fist step towards verifying this hypothesis we have cloned and partially sequenced the mouse GABA-BDZ {alpha}1 subunit cDNA using a 40 bp oligonucleotide derived from the N terminus of a published bovine {alpha} subunit cDNA. A positive clone from a mouse brain cDNA library was identified and contains an insert of approximately 2.5 Kb. Partial sequence analysis indicates that this clone corresponds to the mouse homolog of the {alpha}1 subunit of the GABA-BDZ receptor. This clone is being used as a probe to identify restriction fragment length polymorphisms in several mouse genotypes which differ in their neurosensitivity to ethanol in an attempt to identify molecular genetic changes in the GABA-BDZ receptor that are related to differential ethanol neurosensitivity.

  6. Cloning of the genes encoding mouse cardiac and skeletal calsequestrins: expression pattern during embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Park, K W; Goo, J H; Chung, H S; Kim, H; Kim, D H; Park, W J

    1998-09-14

    Calsequestrin is a low-affinity and high-capacity calcium-binding protein in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). In the present study, we have cloned and sequenced mouse cardiac and skeletal calsequestrin cDNAs. The deduced amino acid sequences are highly homologous to those of other mammalian calsequestrins. As expected, the cardiac and skeletal calsequestrins are expressed specifically and exclusively in adult heart and skeletal muscles, respectively. In-situ hybridization was performed to examine the expression pattern of the calsequestrins in the developing mouse and rat embryos. During early organogenesis, the cardiac and skeletal calsequestrin transcripts were detected exclusively in the heart primordium and the myotome of somites, respectively. The cardiac calsequestrin transcripts were later detected in fetal heart and skeletal muscles, whereas the skeletal calsequestrin transcripts were only found in fetal skeletal muscles. These data suggest that the cardiac calsequestrin plays a role in the differentiation and function of heart, and in the function of fetal skeletal muscles in conjunction with the skeletal calsequestrin, but not in the early differentiation of the myotome of somites. The expression of the skeletal calsequestrin in the myotome is regulated probably by myogenin, a myogenic regulatory gene.

  7. Toxoplasma gondii sexual cross in a single naturally infected feline host: Generation of highly mouse-virulent and avirulent clones, genotypically different from clonal types I, II and III

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Tachyzoite clones obtained from a single Toxoplasma gondii oocyst field sample were genotyped and characterized regarding mouse virulence. PCR-RFLP genotyping of tachyzoites initially isolated from interferon-γ-knockout (GKO) mice, BALB/c mice and VERO cell culture using the nine independent, unlinked genetic markers nSAG2, SAG3, BTUB, GRA6, c22-8, c29-2, L358, PK1 and Apico revealed mixed T. gondii infections showing combinations of type II and type III alleles at different loci. Forty-five individual clones were obtained from all mixed T. gondii tachyzoite cell cultures by limiting dilution. Sixteen T. gondii clones showed type III alleles at all loci and 29 clones displayed a combination of type II and type III alleles at different loci. Five clone groups were identified in total, four of which include T. gondii clones that showed a non-canonical allele pattern and have never been described in natural infections before. All tested clones, except two, were highly virulent in BALB/c mice. The isolation of different non-canonical T. gondii clones originating from an oocyst sample of a single naturally infected cat demonstrate that sexual recombination as well as re-assortment of chromosomes via a sexual cross of T. gondii occur under natural conditions and result in the emergence of clones with increased virulence in mice. PMID:22546040

  8. Molecular cloning of a mouse DNA repair gene that complements the defect of group-A xeroderma pigmentosum

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, K.; Satokata, I.; Ogita, Z.; Uchida, T.; Okada, Y.

    1989-07-01

    For isolation of the gene responsible for xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) complementation group A, plasmid pSV2gpt and genomic DNA from a mouse embryo were cotransfected into XP2OSSV cells, a group-A XP cell line. Two primary UV-resistant XP transfectants were isolated from about 1.6 X 10(5) pSV2gpt-transformed XP colonies. pSV2gpt and genomic DNA from the primary transfectants were again cotransfected into XP2OSSV cells and a secondary UV-resistant XP transfectant was obtained by screening about 4.8 X 10(5) pSV2gpt-transformed XP colonies. The secondary transfectant retained fewer mouse repetitive sequences. A mouse gene that complements the defect of XP2OSSV cells was cloned into an EMBL3 vector from the genome of a secondary transfectant. Transfections of the cloned DNA also conferred UV resistance on another group-A XP cell line but not on XP cell lines of group C, D, F, or G. Northern blot analysis of poly(A)+ RNA with a subfragment of cloned mouse DNA repair gene as the probe revealed that an approximately 1.0 kilobase mRNA was transcribed in the donor mouse embryo and secondary transfectant, and approximately 1.0- and approximately 1.3-kilobase mRNAs were transcribed in normal human cells, but none of these mRNAs was detected in three strains of group-A XP cells. These results suggest that the cloned DNA repair gene is specific for group-A XP and may be the mouse homologue of the group-A XP human gene.

  9. Molecular cloning of a mouse DNA repair gene that complements the defect of group-A xeroderma pigmentosum.

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, K; Satokata, I; Ogita, Z; Uchida, T; Okada, Y

    1989-01-01

    For isolation of the gene responsible for xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) complementation group A, plasmid pSV2gpt and genomic DNA from a mouse embryo were cotransfected into XP2OSSV cells, a group-A XP cell line. Two primary UV-resistant XP transfectants were isolated from about 1.6 X 10(5) pSV2gpt-transformed XP colonies. pSV2gpt and genomic DNA from the primary transfectants were again cotransfected into XP2OSSV cells and a secondary UV-resistant XP transfectant was obtained by screening about 4.8 X 10(5) pSV2gpt-transformed XP colonies. The secondary transfectant retained fewer mouse repetitive sequences. A mouse gene that complements the defect of XP2OSSV cells was cloned into an EMBL3 vector from the genome of a secondary transfectant. Transfections of the cloned DNA also conferred UV resistance on another group-A XP cell line but not on XP cell lines of group C, D, F, or G. Northern blot analysis of poly(A)+ RNA with a subfragment of cloned mouse DNA repair gene as the probe revealed that an approximately 1.0 kilobase mRNA was transcribed in the donor mouse embryo and secondary transfectant, and approximately 1.0- and approximately 1.3-kilobase mRNAs were transcribed in normal human cells, but none of these mRNAs was detected in three strains of group-A XP cells. These results suggest that the cloned DNA repair gene is specific for group-A XP and may be the mouse homologue of the group-A XP human gene. Images PMID:2748601

  10. CLoNe is a new method to target single progenitors and study their progeny in mouse and chick.

    PubMed

    García-Moreno, Fernando; Vasistha, Navneet A; Begbie, Jo; Molnár, Zoltán

    2014-04-01

    Cell lineage analysis enables us to address pivotal questions relating to: the embryonic origin of cells and sibling cell relationships in the adult body; the contribution of progenitors activated after trauma or disease; and the comparison across species in evolutionary biology. To address such fundamental questions, several techniques for clonal labelling have been developed, each with its shortcomings. Here, we report a novel method, CLoNe that is designed to work in all vertebrate species and tissues. CLoNe uses a cocktail of labelling, targeting and transposition vectors that enables targeting of specific subpopulations of progenitor types with a combination of fluorophores resulting in multifluorescence that describes multiple clones per specimen. Furthermore, transposition into the genome ensures the longevity of cell labelling. We demonstrate the robustness of this technique in mouse and chick forebrain development, and show evidence that CLoNe will be broadly applicable to study clonal relationships in different tissues and species.

  11. Cloning and characterization of mouse growth hormone-releasing hormone (GRH) complementary DNA: increased GRH messenger RNA levels in the growth hormone-deficient lit/lit mouse.

    PubMed

    Frohman, M A; Downs, T R; Chomczynski, P; Frohman, L A

    1989-10-01

    We have isolated and cloned the full length cDNA for mouse GH-releasing hormone (mGRH) from mouse hypothalamus using a recently described strategy involving the polymerase chain reaction technique (PCR). Degenerate oligonucleotide primers were selected based on short (six amino acids) conserved regions in the human and rat GRH peptides that would recognize DNA sequences encoding similar amino acids regardless of codon usage. Primer-extended cDNA was amplified by PCR on cDNA templates prepared by reverse transcribing total mouse hypothalamic RNA. After cloning and sequencing the initial product, the 3' and 5' ends of mGRH were generated using a separate PCR strategy (RACE protocol). The mGRH cDNA encodes a 103-amino acid reading frame, structurally similar to the human and rat GRH genes, containing a signal sequence, a 42-residue GRH peptide, and a 31-residue C-terminal region. Although the structures of mouse and rat GRH are highly conserved in the signal peptide and C-terminal region, there is considerable diversity in the GRH region, which exhibits nearly comparable homology with the rat (68%) and human (62%) structures. Differences between mouse and rat GRH were also found in the amino acid cleavage sites at the 5' and 3' ends of the mature peptide and at the polyadenylation signal.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Mouse microsomal triglyceride transfer protein large subunit: cDNA cloning, tissue-specific expression, and chromosomal localization

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamuta, Makoto; Chang, Benny Hung-Junn; Hoogeveen, R.

    1996-04-15

    Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) catalyzes the transfer of triglyceride, cholesteryl ester, and phospholipid between membranes. It is essential for the secretion of apolipoprotein B from the cell. Mutations in MTP are a major cause of abetalipoproteinemia. The mouse is a popular animal model for lipoprotein metabolism. We have cloned and sequenced mouse MTP cDNA. The DNA-deduced amino acid sequence indicates that mouse protein shows 93, 86, and 83% sequence indicates that mouse MTP contains 894 amino acids; the mouse protein shows 93, 86, and 83% sequence identity to the hamster, human, and bovine sequences, respectively. Northern blot analysis indicates that mouse MTP mRNA is expressed at high levels in the small intestine and at substantially lower levels in the liver and that it is not detectable in six other tissues examined. The mouse MTP gene has been localized to the distal region of chromosome 3 by Southern blots of interspecific backcross panels using progeny derived from matings of (C57BL/6J x SPRET/Ei)F1 x SPRET/Ei. Comparison of MTP sequences from human, bovine, hamster, and mouse indicates that the C-terminal region of MTP is better conserved than its N-terminal region. 21 refs., 2 figs.

  13. Immortalization and Characterization of Mouse Temporomandibular Joint Disc Cell Clones with Capacity for Multi-lineage Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Park, Young; Hosomichi, Jun; Ge, Chunxi; Xu, Jinping; Franceschi, Renny; Kapila, Sunil

    2015-01-01

    Objective Despite the importance of TMJ disc in normal function and disease, studying the responses of its cells has been complicated by the lack of adequate characterization of the cell subtypes. The purpose of our investigation was to immortalize, clone, characterize and determine the multi-lineage potential of mouse TMJ disc cells. Design Cells from 12-week-old female mice were cultured and immortalized by stable transfection with human telomerase reverse transcriptase. The immortalized cell clones were phenotyped for fibroblast- or chondrocyte-like characteristics and ability to undergo adipocytic, osteoblastic and chondrocytic differentiation. Results Of 36 isolated clones, four demonstrated successful immortalization and maintenance of stable protein expression for up to 50 passages. Two clones each were initially characterized as fibroblast-like and chondrocyte-like on the basis of cell morphology and growth rate. Further the chondrocyte-like clones had higher mRNA expression levels of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (>3.5-fold), collagen × (>11-fold), collagen II expression (2-fold) and collagen II:I ratio than the fibroblast-like clones. In contrast, the fibroblast-like clones had higher mRNA expression level of vimentin (>1.5-fold), and fibroblastic specific protein 1 (>2.5-fold) than he chondrocyte-like clones. Both cell types retained multi-lineage potential as demonstrated by their capacity to undergo robust adipogenic, osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation. Conclusions These studies are the first to immortalize TMJ disc cells and characterize chondrocyte-like and fibroblast-like clones with retained multi-differentiation potential that would be a valuable resource in studies to dissect the behavior of specific cell types in health and disease and for tissue engineering. PMID:25887369

  14. Uroporphyrinogen-III synthase: Molecular cloning, nucleotide sequence, expression of a mouse full-length cDNA, and its localization on mouse chromosome 7

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, W.; Desnick, R.J.; Kozak, C.A.

    1995-04-10

    Uroporphyrinogen-III synthase, the fourth enzyme in the heme biosynthetic pathway, is responsible for the conversion of hydroxymethylbilane to the cyclic tetrapyrrole, uroporphyrinogen III. The deficient activity of URO-S is the enzymatic defect in congenital erythropoietic porphyria (CEP), an autosomal recessive disorder. For the generation of a mouse model of CEP, the human URO-S cDNA was used to screen 2 X 10{sup 6} recombinants from a mouse adult liver cDNA library. Ten positive clones were isolated, and dideoxy sequencing of the entire 1.6-kb insert of clone pmUROS-1 revealed 5{prime} and 3{prime} untranslated sequences of 144 and 623 bp, respectively, and an open reading frame of 798 bp encoding a 265-amino-acid polypeptide with a predicted molecular mass of 28,501 Da. The mouse and human coding sequences had 80.5 and 77.8% nucleotide and amino acid identity, respectively. The authenticity of the mouse cDNA was established by expression of the active monomeric enzyme in Escherichia coli. In addition, the analysis of two multilocus genetic crosses localized the mouse gene on chromosome 7, consistent with the mapping of the human gene to a position of conserved synteny on chromosome 10. The isolation, expression, and chromosomal mapping of this full-length cDNA should facilitate studies of the structure and organization of the mouse genomic sequence and the development of a mouse model of CEP for characterization of the disease pathogenesis and evaluation of gene therapy. 38 refs., 1 tab.

  15. Functional properties of a cloned 5-hydroxytryptamine ionotropic receptor subunit: comparison with native mouse receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Hussy, N; Lukas, W; Jones, K A

    1994-01-01

    1. A comparative study of the whole-cell and single-channel properties of cloned and native mouse 5-hydroxytryptamine ionotropic receptors (5-HT3) was undertaken using mammalian cell lines expressing the cloned 5-HT3 receptor subunit A (5-HT3R-A), superior cervical ganglia (SCG) neurones and N1E-115 cells. 2. No pharmacological difference was found in the sensitivity to the agonists 5-HT and 2-methyl-5-HT, or to the antagonists d-tubocurare and 3-tropanyl-3,5-dichlorobenzoate (MDL-72222). 3. Current-voltage (I-V) relationships of whole-cell currents showed inward rectification in the three preparations. Rectification was stronger both in cells expressing the 5-HT3R-A subunit and in N1E-115 cells when compared with SCG neurones. 4. No clear openings could be resolved in 5-HT-activated currents in patches excised from cells expressing the 5-HT3R-A subunit or N1E-115 cells. Current fluctuation analysis of whole-cell and excised-patch records revealed a slope conductance of 0.4-0.6 pS in both preparations. Current-voltage relationships of these channels showed strong rectification that fully accounted for the whole-cell voltage dependence. 5. In contrast, single channels of about 10 pS were activated by 5-HT in patches excised from SCG neurones. The weak voltage dependence of their conductance did not account completely for the rectification of whole-cell currents. A lower unitary conductance (3.4 pS) was inferred from whole-cell noise analysis. 6. We conclude that the receptor expressed from the cloned cDNA is indistinguishable from the 5-HT3 receptor of N1E-115 cells, suggesting an identical structure for these two receptors. The higher conductance and different voltage dependence of the 5-HT3 receptor in SCG neurones might indicate the participation of an additional subunit in the structure of native ganglionic 5-HT3 receptors. Homo-oligomeric 5-HT3R-A channels may also be present as suggested by the lower conductance estimated by whole-cell noise analysis. PMID

  16. Cloning of two adenosine receptor subtypes from mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells.

    PubMed

    Marquardt, D L; Walker, L L; Heinemann, S

    1994-05-01

    Adenosine potentiates the stimulated release of mast cell mediators. Pharmacologic studies suggest the presence of two adenosine receptors, one positively coupled to adenylate cyclase and the other coupled to phospholipase C activation. To identify mast cell adenosine receptor subtypes, cDNAs for the A1 and A2a adenosine receptors were obtained by screening a mouse brain cDNA library with the use of PCR-derived probes. Mouse bone marrow-derived mast cell cDNA libraries were constructed and screened with the use of A1 and A2a cDNA probes, which revealed the presence of A2a, but not A1, receptor clones. A putative A2b receptor was identified by using low stringency mast cell library screening. Northern blotting of mast cell poly(A)+ RNA with the use of receptor subtype probes labeled single mRNA bands of 2.4 kb and 1.8 kb for the A2a and A2b receptors, respectively. In situ cells. An A2a receptor-specific agonist failed to enhance mast cell mediator release, which suggests that the secretory process is modulated through the A2b and/or another receptor subtype. By using RNase protection assays, we found that mast cells that had been cultured in the presence of N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine for 24 h exhibited a decrease in both A2a and A2b receptor RNA levels. Cells that had been cultured for 1 to 2 days in the presence of dexamethasone demonstrated increased amounts of A2a receptor mRNA, but no identifiable change in A2b receptor mRNA. Mast cells possess at least two adenosine receptor subtypes that may be differentially regulated.

  17. Transgenic mouse model of hemifacial microsomia: Cloning and characterization of insertional mutation region on chromosome 10

    SciTech Connect

    Naora, Hiroyuki; Otani, Hiroki; Tanaka, Osamu

    1994-10-01

    The 643 transgenic mouse line carries an autosomal dominant insertional mutation that results in hemifacial microsomia (HFM), including microtia and/or abnormal biting. In this paper, we characterize the transgene integration site in transgenic mice and preintegration site of wildtype mice. The locus, designated Hfm (hemifacial microsomia-associated locus), was mapped to chromosome 10, B1-3, by chromosome in situ hybridization. We cloned the transgene insertion site from the transgenic DNA library. By using the 5{prime} and 3{prime} flanking sequences, the preintegration region was isolated. The analysis of these regions showed that a deletion of at least 23 kb DNA occurred in association with the transgene integration. Evolutionarily conserved regions were detected within and beside the deleted region. The result of mating between hemizygotes suggests that the phenotype of the homozygote is lethality in the prenatal period. These results suggests that the Hfm locus is necessary for prenatal development and that this strain is a useful animal model for investigating the genetic predisposition to HFM in humans.

  18. Isolation of cDNA clones specifying the fourth component of mouse complement and its isotype, sex-limited protein.

    PubMed Central

    Nonaka, M; Takahashi, M; Natsuume-Sakai, S; Nonaka, M; Tanaka, S; Shimizu, A; Honjo, T

    1984-01-01

    cDNA clones specific for the fourth component of mouse complement (C4) and its hormonally regulated isotype, sex-linked protein (Slp), were isolated using as a probe a 20-mer synthetic oligonucleotide corresponding to a known sequence of human C4 cDNA. Two types of clones, one specific for C4 (pFC4/10, with a 3.7 kilobase insert) and one specific for Slp (pFSlp/1, with a 4.7 kilobase insert), were isolated from liver cDNA libraries constructed from the Slp-producing FM mouse strain. The cDNA inserts of these clones shared 70% of the restriction sites determined. Only one type of clone was isolated from the Slp-negative DBA/1 strain; this type showed restriction maps indistinguishable from that of pFC4/10. pFC4/10 and pFSlp/1 displayed extensive homology: 94% nucleotide homology and 89% derived amino acid homology in the C4a region and 92% nucleotide homology and 89% derived amino acid homology in the thiol-ester region. An Arg-Gln-Lys-Arg sequence in the beta-alpha junction and a Cys-Ala-Glu-Gln sequence in the thiol-ester site were identified for both proteins. A remarkable divergency between C4 and Slp sequences was recognized in the region immediately following the C4a sequence. PMID:6208559

  19. The nucleotide sequence of the putative transcription initiation site of a cloned ribosomal RNA gene of the mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Urano, Y; Kominami, R; Mishima, Y; Muramatsu, M

    1980-01-01

    Approximately one kilobase pairs surrounding and upstream the transcription initiation site of a cloned ribosomal DNA (rDNA) of the mouse were sequenced. The putative transcription initiation site was determined by two independent methods: one nuclease S1 protection and the other reverse transcriptase elongation mapping using isolated 45S ribosomal RNA precursor (45S RNA) and appropriate restriction fragments of rDNA. Both methods gave an identical result; 45S RNA had a structure starting from ACTCTTAG---. Characteristically, mouse rDNA had many T clusters (greater than or equal to 5) upstream the initiation site, the longest being 21 consecutive T's. A pentadecanucleotide, TGCCTCCCGAGTGCA, appeared twice within 260 nucleotides upstream the putative initiation site. No such characteristic sequences were found downstream this site. Little similarity was found in the upstream of the transcription initiation site between the mouse, Xenopus laevis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae rDNA. Images PMID:6162156

  20. Establishment of mouse-immortalized hybrid clones expressing characteristics of differentiated neurons derived from the cerebellar and brain stem regions.

    PubMed

    Satoh, J; Gallyas, F; Endoh, M; Yamamura, T; Kunishita, T; Kobayashi, T; Tabira, T

    1992-09-01

    Two clonal immortalized neurons designated CL8c4.7 and CL8a5.2 were established by somatic cell fusion between a hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase-(HPRT-) deficient neuroblastoma N18TG2 and newborn mouse cerebellar/brain stem neurons. In the serum-containing medium without extra differentiating agents, both clones exhibited a morphology of differentiated neurons. They contained high levels of glutamate but no gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). The CL8a5.2 clone synthesized choline acetyltransferase and serotonin. In immunocytochemical studies, both clones expressed 200 kD neurofilament protein, neuron-specific enolase, microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2), tau protein, neuronal cell adhesion molecule (N-CAM), HNK-1, Thy-1.2, saxitoxin-binding sodium channel protein, and glutamate. Synaptophysin immunoreactivity was identified in the neuritic terminals of CL8c4.7 cells. Most of these antigens were barely detectable on N18TG2 cells. Electrophysiologically, both clones generated action potentials in response to electrical stimuli. The hybrid clones that express characteristics of differentiated neurons derived from the cerebellar and brain stem regions might be invaluable for the study of the molecular basis of neuronal differentiation and degeneration in these regions.

  1. Molecular cloning of mouse erythrocyte protein 4.2: a membrane protein with strong homology with the transglutaminase supergene family.

    PubMed

    Rybicki, A C; Schwartz, R S; Qiu, J J; Gilman, J G

    1994-07-01

    We report the molecular cloning and characterization of mouse erythrocyte protein 4.2 (P4.2). Mouse erythrocyte P4.2 is a 691-amino-acid protein with a predicted MW of 77 kDa. Northern blot analysis detected a 2.2-kb transcript in mouse reticulocytes, compared with a 2.4- to 2.5-kb transcript in human reticulocytes, which is consistent with the absence of the 30-amino-acid splicing insert in mouse erythrocyte P4.2 that is found in the human protein (isoform I). Like the human erythrocyte P4.2, mouse erythrocyte P4.2 contains regions strikingly homologous with the transglutaminase (TGase) proteins although it too most likely lacks TGase crosslinking activity. Mouse P4.2 is on average 73% identical with human erythrocyte P4.2, although regional variations exist, with greatest conservation in the regions of the molecule that contain the TGase active site, the TGase calcium-binding site, and a band 3 binding site. Hydropathy analysis reveals a protein containing a series of hydrophobic domains, similar to the situation for human P4.2 and consistent with its tight binding to the membrane, although the mouse P4.2 is missing both the strongly hydrophilic region and adjacent highly charged region that are present in the human protein, suggesting that the two proteins could differ in their physical characteristics, binding associations, or functional properties. The availability of the complete mouse erythrocyte P4.2 cDNA should help in the design of P4.2-deficient animal models (for example, ribozyme or homologous recombinant "knockout" models) that should accelerate the understanding of P4.2 function in both erythroid and non-erythroid cells.

  2. Cloning and characterization of the mouse homolog (D12H14S564E) of a novel human cochlear gene (D14S564E)

    SciTech Connect

    Kovatch, K.A.; Robertson, N.G.; Brody, T.H.

    1994-09-01

    We have isolated mouse cDNA clones homologous to a novel human cochlear cDNA (D14S564E) identified by subtractive hybridization of a human fetal cochlear cDNA library with human fetal brain RNA. The human gene is preferentially expressed in cochlea, with low level expression in brain and eye, and has three transcripts of 2.0, 2.3, and 2.9 kb. To investigate the structure and function of the human cochlear gene and its role in the biology of hearing and deafness, we have cloned the mouse homolog (D12H14S564E). Mouse cDNAs, ranging from 2.0 to 3.5 kb, were identified with a mouse brain cDNA library screened by hybridization with the human cDNA. Analysis of mouse clones by DNA sequencing revealed significant homology with the human cochlear gene; in one region analyzed, the mouse clone possessed 88% homology over 525 bases with the human clone. In the area of homology, there is an open reading frame of approximately 125 amino acids. Comparison of the homologous sequence with those entered in GenBank identifies similarity with a von Willebrand factor type A-like domain in the area of sequence conservation, a feature consistent with the human clone. Known proteins containing the von Willebrand type A-like domain have diverse functions including extracellular matrix assembly, hemostasis, cellular adhesion and defense mechanisms. Further homology of mouse and human clones is supported by hybridization of the mouse clone to a Northern blot of human fetal cochlea and brain RNA; results show that the mouse clone hybridizes with the same three messages in the human cochlea RNA as does the novel human cochlear gene. D12H14S564E maps to mouse chromosome 12 in a region to which asp-1 (audiogenic seizure prone) is assigned. Further sequencing and expression studies are in progress to fully characterize the mouse gene and its homology with the novel human cochlear gene.

  3. One Mouse per Child: Interpersonal Computer for Individual Arithmetic Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alcoholado, C.; Nussbaum, M.; Tagle, A.; Gomez, F.; Denardin, F.; Susaeta, H.; Villalta, M.; Toyama, K.

    2012-01-01

    Single Display Groupware (SDG) allows multiple people in the same physical space to interact simultaneously over a single communal display through individual input devices that work on the same machine. The aim of this paper is to show how SDG can be used to improve the way resources are used in schools, allowing students to work simultaneously on…

  4. Molecular Cloning and Analysis of a DNA Repetitive Element from the Mouse Genome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geisinger, Adriana; Cossio, Gabriela; Wettstein, Rodolfo

    2006-01-01

    We report the development of a 3-week laboratory activity for an undergraduate molecular biology course. This activity introduces students to the practice of basic molecular techniques such as restriction enzyme digestion, agarose gel electrophoresis, cloning, plasmid DNA purification, Southern blotting, and sequencing. Students learn how to carry…

  5. Cloning, comparative mapping, and RNA expression of the mouse homologues of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae nucleotide excision repair gene RAD23

    SciTech Connect

    Spek, P.J. van der; Visser, C.E.; Bootsma, D.

    1996-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD23 gene is involved in nucleotide excision repair (NER). Two human homologs of RAD23, HHR23A and HHR23B (HGMW-approved symbols RAD23A and RAD23B), were previously isolated. The HHR23B protein is complexed with the protein defective in the cancer-prone repair syndrome xeroderma pigmentosum, complementation group C, and is specifically involved in the global genome NER subpathway. The cloning of both mouse homologs (designated MHR23A and MHR23B) and detailed sequence comparison permitted the deduction of the following overall structure for all RAD23 homologs: an ubiquitin-like N-terminus followed by a strongly conserved 50-amino-acid domain that is repeated at the C-terminus. We also found this domain as a specific C-terminal extension of one of the ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes, providing a second link with the ubiquitin pathway. By means of in situ hybridization, MHR23A was assigned to mouse chromosome 8C3 and MHR23B to 4B3. Because of the close chromosomal proximity of human XPC and HHR23B, the mouse XPC chromosomal location was determined (6D). Physical disconnection of the genes in mouse argues against a functional significance of the colocalization of these genes in human. Northern blot analysis revealed constitutive expression of both MHR23 genes in all tissues examined. Elevated RNA expression of both MHR23 genes was observed in testis. Although the RAD23 equivalents are well conserved during evolution, the mammalian genes did not express the UV-inducible phenotype of their yeast counterpart. This may point to a fundamental difference between the UV responses of yeast and human. No stage-specific mRNA expression during the cell cycle was observed for the mammalian RAD23 homologs. 38 refs., 5 figs.

  6. High-level expression of a cloned HLA heavy chain gene introduced into mouse cells on a bovine papillomavirus vector.

    PubMed

    DiMaio, D; Corbin, V; Sibley, E; Maniatis, T

    1984-02-01

    A gene encoding the heavy chain of an HLA human histocompatibility antigen was isolated from a library of human DNA by recombination and selection in vivo. After insertion into a bovine papillomavirus (BPV) DNA expression vector, the gene was introduced into cultured mouse cells. Cells transformed with the HLA-BPV plasmids did not appear to contain extrachromosomal viral DNA, whereas BPV recombinants usually replicated as plasmids in transformed cell lines. Large amounts of HLA RNA were produced by the transformed cells, and the rate of synthesis of human heavy chain was several-fold higher than in the JY cell line, a well-characterized human lymphoblastoid cell line which expresses high levels of surface HLA antigen. Substantial amounts of human heavy chain accumulated in the transformed cells, and HLA antigen was present at the cell surface. These observations establish the feasibility of using BPV vectors to study the structure and function of HLA antigens and the expression of cloned HLA genes.

  7. MicroRNA (miRNA) cloning analysis reveals sex differences in miRNA expression profiles between adult mouse testis and ovary.

    PubMed

    Mishima, Takuya; Takizawa, Takami; Luo, Shan-Shun; Ishibashi, Osamu; Kawahigashi, Yutaka; Mizuguchi, Yoshiaki; Ishikawa, Tomoko; Mori, Miki; Kanda, Tomohiro; Goto, Tadashi; Takizawa, Toshihiro

    2008-12-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous non-coding small RNAs that can regulate the expression of complementary mRNA targets. Identifying tissue-specific miRNAs is the first step toward understanding the biological functions of miRNAs, which include the regulation of tissue differentiation and the maintenance of tissue identity. In this study, we performed small RNA library sequencing in adult mouse testis and ovary to reveal their characteristic organ- and gender-specific profiles and to elucidate the characteristics of the miRNAs expressed in the reproductive system. We obtained 10,852 and 11 744 small RNA clones from mouse testis and ovary respectively (greater than 10,000 clones per organ), which included 6630 (159 genes) and 10,192 (154 genes) known miRNAs. A high level of efficiency of miRNA library sequencing was achieved: 61% (6630 miRNA clones/10,852 small RNA clones) and 87% (10,192/11,744) for adult mouse testis and ovary respectively. We obtained characteristic miRNA signatures in testis and ovary; 55 miRNAs were detected highly, exclusively, or predominantly in adult mouse testis and ovary, and discovered two novel miRNAs. Male-biased expression of miRNAs occurred on the X-chromosome. Our data provide important information on sex differences in miRNA expression that should facilitate studies of the reproductive organ-specific roles of miRNAs.

  8. Molecular cloning, expression and purification of recombinant soluble mouse endostatin as an anti-angiogenic protein in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Yari, Kheirollah; Afzali, Saboor; Mozafari, Hadi; Mansouri, Kamran; Mostafaie, Ali

    2013-02-01

    Inhibition of angiogenesis has become a particular interest for treatment of solid tumors. Endostatin, a C-terminal fragment of collagen XVIII, has been reported to exhibit potent inhibitory effect on endothelial cells proliferation, migration and tube formation. In this research, the cDNA library of endostatin was synthesized from mouse liver and inserted into the SacI and SalI enzyme-cutting sites of pUC18 cloning vector. The recombinant vector was transferred into Escherichia coli DH5a and the recombinant clone was selected on LB agar plate plus ampicillin. PCR analysis and DNA sequencing proved the presence of intact endostatin gene in pUC18. The endostatin gene subcloned into pET32a expression vector and the competent bacterial cells of E. coli BL21 were transformed by the vector harboring endostatin gene. In the optimum conditions, expression plasmid was induced with IPTG and recombinant soluble endostatin as a fusion with thioredoxin was purified with Ni-NTA (Ni(2+)-nitrilotriacetate) resin. The results showed that soluble recombinant endostatin as a fusion protein with thioredoxin is a homogenous polypeptide that inhibits angiogenesis (capillary tube formation) in human umbilical vein endothelial cells by 200 ng/ml.

  9. Nucleotide sequence of polypyrimidines from cloned mouse DNA as determined by base-specific blockage of exonuclease action

    SciTech Connect

    Deugau, K.V.; Mitchel, R.E.J.; Birnboim, H.C.

    1983-01-01

    Cloned fragments of mouse DNA have been screened for the presence of long polypyrimidine/polypurine segments. The polypyrimidine portion of one such segment (about 2000 nucleotides in length) has been isolated by acidic depurination of the entire cloned fragment and plasmid vector followed by selective precipitation and 5'-/sup 32/P labeling. This polypyrimidine has been used to demonstrate a new procedure for sequencing. Covalent modification of thymine with a water-soluble carbodiimide, or cytosine with glutaric anhydride, at low levels blocked in the action of snake venom exonuclease. After deblocking, separation of the products of digestion by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis yields a sequence ladder which can be used to determine the position of C and T residues as in other sequencing methods. A sequence of 72 residues adjacent to the 5' end had been established, consisting principally of the repeating tetranucleotide (CCTT)n. A low ratio of endonuclease to exonuclease is essential for application of this method to sequences of this size. Accordingly, a very sensitive modification of a fluorometric endonuclease assay was developed and used to optimize pH and Mg/sup 2 +/ conditions to favor exonuclease activity over the accompanying endonuclease activity. The results clearly indicate that long polypyrimidine tracts can be efficiently prepared and their sequences determined with this method using commercially available exonuclease preparations without additional purification. 26 references, 5 figures.

  10. Individual variability in finger-to-finger transmission efficiency of Enterococcus faecium clones

    PubMed Central

    del Campo, Rosa; Sánchez-Díaz, Ana María; Zamora, Javier; Torres, Carmen; Cintas, Luis María; Franco, Elvira; Cantón, Rafael; Baquero, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    A fingertip-to-fingertip intraindividual transmission experiment was carried out in 30 healthy volunteers, using four MLST-typed Enterococcus faecium clones. Overall results showed an adequate fit goodness to a theoretical exponential model, whereas four volunteers (13%) exhibited a significantly higher finger-to-finger bacterial transmission efficiency. This observation might have deep consequences in nosocomial epidemiology. PMID:24382843

  11. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of a mouse gene upregulated by lipopolysaccharide treatment reveals alternative splicing

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Kejun; Chen, Yaoming; Dai, Zongming; Bi, Yuan; Cai, Tongjian; Hou, Lichao; Chai, Yubo; Song, Qinghe; Chen, Sumin; Luo, Wenjing; Chen, Jingyuan

    2010-01-01

    Treatment of mouse cells with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) potently initiates an inflammatory response, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. We therefore sought to characterize cDNA sequences of a new mouse LPS-responsive gene, and to evaluate the effects of MLrg. Full-length cDNAs were obtained from LPS-treated NIH3T3 cells. We report that the MLrg gene produces two alternative splice products (GenBank Accession Nos. (DQ316984) and (DQ320011)), respectively, encoding MLrgW and MLrgS polypeptides. Both proteins contain zinc finger and leucine zipper domains and are thus potential regulators of transcription. Expression of MLrgW and MLrgS were robustly upregulated following LPS treatment, and the proteins were localized predominantly in the nuclear membrane and cytoplasm. In stable transfectants over-expressing MLrgW the proportion of cells in G1 phase was significantly reduced, while in cells over-expressing MLrgS the proportion of cells in G2 was significantly increased; both proteins are thus potential regulators of cell cycle progression. Upregulation of MLrgW and MLrgS may be an important component of the LPS inflammatory pathway and of the host response to infection with GNB.

  12. Cytoplasmic asters are required for progression past the first cell cycle in cloned mouse embryos.

    PubMed

    Miki, Hiromi; Inoue, Kimiko; Ogonuki, Narumi; Mochida, Keiji; Nagashima, Hiroshi; Baba, Tadashi; Ogura, Atsuo

    2004-12-01

    Unlike the oocytes of most other animal species, unfertilized murine oocytes contain cytoplasmic asters, which act as microtubule-organizing centers following fertilization. This study examined the role of asters during the first cell cycle of mouse nuclear transfer (NT) embryos. NT was performed by intracytoplasmic injection of cumulus cells. Cytoplasmic asters were localized by staining with an anti-alpha-tubulin antibody. Enucleation of MII oocytes caused no significant change in the number of cytoplasmic asters. The number of asters decreased after transfer of the donor nuclei into these enucleated oocytes, probably because some of the asters participated in the formation of the spindle that anchors the donor chromosomes. The cytoplasmic asters became undetectable within 2 h of oocyte activation, irrespective of the presence or absence of the donor chromosomes. After the standard NT protocol, a spindle-like structure persisted between the pseudopronuclei of these oocytes throughout the pronuclear stage. The asters reappeared shortly before the first mitosis and formed the mitotic spindle. When the donor nucleus was transferred into preactivated oocytes (delayed NT) that were devoid of free asters, the microtubules and microfilaments were distributed irregularly in the ooplasm and formed dense bundles within the cytoplasm. Thereafter, all of the delayed NT oocytes underwent fragmentation and arrested development. Treatment of these delayed NT oocytes with Taxol, which is a microtubule-assembling agent, resulted in the formation of several aster-like structures and reduced fragmentation. Some Taxol-treated oocytes completed the first cell cycle and developed further. This study demonstrates that cytoplasmic asters play a crucial role during the first cell cycle of murine NT embryos. Therefore, in mouse NT, the use of MII oocytes as recipients is essential, not only for chromatin reprogramming as previously reported, but also for normal cytoskeletal organization

  13. Extreme individual flexibility of heterothermy in free-ranging Malagasy mouse lemurs (Microcebus griseorufus).

    PubMed

    Kobbe, Susanne; Ganzhorn, Jörg U; Dausmann, Kathrin H

    2011-01-01

    Flexibility in physiological processes is essential to adequately respond to changes in environmental conditions. Madagascar is a particularly challenging environment because climatic conditions seem less predictable than in comparative ecosystems in other parts of the world. We used the reddish-gray mouse lemur (Microcebus griseorufus) from the most unpredictable environment in Madagascar as a model to investigate the flexibility of energy saving strategies to cope with the unpredictability of their habitat. For this we measured T (sk) of free-ranging mouse lemurs throughout the year using temperature data loggers. M. griseorufus showed a very strong seasonal as well as an individual flexibility in thermoregulation. During the rainy season all M. griseorufus remained normothermic. At the beginning of the dry season individuals started to exhibit different energy saving strategies: irregular short torpor bouts, regular daily torpor, prolonged torpor of a few days, and hibernation over several weeks. The accumulation of sufficient seasonal body fat was the crucial factor determining the thermal behavior of individuals. The observed intraspecific and sex independent variation in thermoregulatory patterns within one population inhabiting the same small geographical area is exceptional and gives M. griseorufus the ability to respond to current environmental as well as individual conditions. This thermal plasticity might be seen as a key to success and survival for M. griseorufus in an extremely unpredictable environment.

  14. Individual and combined effects of deoxynivalenol and zearalenone on mouse kidney.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zhen; Ren, Zhihua; Gao, Shuang; Chen, Yun; Yang, Yanyi; Yang, Dan; Deng, Junliang; Zuo, Zhicai; Wang, Ya; Shen, Liuhong

    2015-11-01

    This study was performed to investigate the individual and combined toxic effects of deoxynivalenol (DON) and zearalenone (ZEA) on mouse kidney. A total of 360 female mice were divided into nine groups. Each group received intraperitoneal injection of solvent (control), DON, ZEA, or DON+ZEA four times for 12d. Results showed that ZEA and/or DON increased the apoptosis rate in the kidney, as well as the levels of serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen. DON and/or ZEA also induced renal oxidative stress as indicated by increased malondialdehyde concentration and nitric oxide level and reduced superoxide dismutase enzyme activity and hydroxyl radical inhibiting capacity. The observed changes were dose and time dependent. This study reports that DON and/or ZEA induced apoptosis, dysfunction, and oxidative stress in mouse kidney. Furthermore, the combination of DON+ZEA exhibited a sub-additive nephrotoxic effect.

  15. Cloning and expression of odorant-binding proteins Ia and Ib from mouse nasal tissue.

    PubMed

    Pes, D; Mameli, M; Andreini, I; Krieger, J; Weber, M; Breer, H; Pelosi, P

    1998-05-28

    We had previously reported the purification and partial characterisation of four distinct odorant-binding proteins from male mouse nasal epithelium. One of these, named OBP-I appeared to be a heterodimer, whose subunits, Ia and Ib showed significant similarity in their N-terminal amino acid sequences with hamster aphrodisin. In this paper, we report the complete amino acid sequences of these two polypeptide chains, as deduced from nucleotide sequences of their relative cDNA. These data confirm the high similarity of both proteins with hamster aphrodisin. A comparison with the sequences of other known OBPs indicate that they are more closely related to members of class I, including bovine OBP, rat OBP-I and pig OBP-I. A putative odorant-binding site is indicated by the presence of amino acid residues conserved with respect to the bovine protein, whose three-dimensional structure has been recently resolved. In-situ hybridisation has revealed identical expression patterns for the two proteins, further supporting the heterodimeric structure of these proteins in the nasal mucus.

  16. Isolation of cDNA clones for the catalytic gamma subunit of mouse muscle phosphorylase kinase: expression of mRNA in normal and mutant Phk mice.

    PubMed Central

    Chamberlain, J S; VanTuinen, P; Reeves, A A; Philip, B A; Caskey, C T

    1987-01-01

    We have isolated and characterized cDNA clones for the gamma subunit of mouse muscle phosphorylase kinase (gamma-Phk). These clones were isolated from a lambda gt11 mouse muscle cDNA library via screening with a synthetic oligonucleotide probe corresponding to a portion of the rabbit gamma-Phk amino acid sequence. The gamma-Phk cDNA clones code for a 387-amino acid protein that shares 93% amino acid sequence identity with the corresponding rabbit amino acid sequence. RNA gel blot analysis reveals that the muscle gamma-Phk probe hybridizes to two mRNA species (2.4 and 1.6 kilobases) in skeletal muscle, cardiac muscle, and brain, but does not hybridize to liver RNA. Phk-deficient I-strain (Phk) mouse muscle contains reduced levels of gamma-Phk mRNA as compared with control mice. Although the Phk defect is an X-linked recessive trait, hybridization to a human-rodent somatic cell hybrid mapping panel shows that the gamma-Phk gene is not located on the X chromosome. Rather, the gamma-Phk cross-hybridizing human restriction fragments map to human chromosomes 7 (multiple) and 11 (single). Reduced gamma-Phk mRNA in I-strain mice, therefore, appears to be a consequence of the Phk-mutant trait and does not stem from a mutant gamma-subunit gene. Images PMID:3472241

  17. Combined effects of individual culture and atmospheric oxygen on preimplantation mouse embryos in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Rebecca L; Gardner, David K

    2016-11-01

    Embryos are routinely cultured individually, although this can reduce blastocyst development. Culture in atmospheric (20%) oxygen is also common, despite multiple detrimental effects on embryos. Although frequently occurring together, the consequences of this combination are unknown. Mouse embryos were cultured individually or grouped, under physiological (5%) or atmospheric (20%) oxygen. Embryos were assessed by time-lapse and blastocyst cell allocation. Compared with the control group (5% oxygen group culture), 5-cell cleavage (t5) was delayed in 5% oxygen individual culture and 20% oxygen group culture (59.91 ± 0.23, 60.70 ± 0.29, 63.06 ± 0.32 h post-HCG respectively, P < 0.05). Embryos in 20% oxygen individual culture were delayed earlier (3-cell cleavage), and at t5 cleaved later than embryos in other treatments (66.01 ± 0.40 h, P < 0.001), this delay persisting to blastocyst hatching. Compared with controls, hatching rate and cells per blastocyst were reduced in 5% oxygen single culture and 20% oxygen group culture (134.1 ± 3.4, 104.5 ± 3.2, 73.4 ± 2.2 cells, P < 0.001), and were further reduced in 20% oxygen individual culture (57.0 ± 2.8 cells, P < 0.001), as was percentage inner cell mass. These data indicate combining individual culture and 20% oxygen is detrimental to embryo development.

  18. Absence of MHC gene expression in lens and cloning of dbpB/YB-1, a DNA-binding protein expressed in mouse lens.

    PubMed

    Shaughnessy, M; Wistow, G

    1992-02-01

    The status of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II gene expression in the normal mouse lens was examined. No mRNA for either class I or II genes was detectable in mouse lens, while the expression of MHC genes in other tissues generally matched immunohistochemical data from human tissues. However it was observed that MHC class I mRNA is present in the mouse lens-derived cell line alpha TN4-1. From a new-born mouse lens cDNA library a clone was obtained for the murine homologue of the DNA-binding protein dbpB/YB-1, a protein originally identified in human lymphocytes and proposed to be a negative regulator of MHC class II gene expression. Northern blots detect dbpB/YB-1 mRNA in all mouse tissues and cells examined, including both mouse lens and alpha TN4-1 cells, suggesting that dbpB/YB-1 has a general and widespread role.

  19. Individual strains of Lactobacillus paracasei differentially inhibit human basophil and mouse mast cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Cassard, Lydie; Lalanne, Ana Inés; Garault, Peggy; Cotillard, Aurélie; Chervaux, Christian; Wels, Michiel; Smokvina, Tamara

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction The microbiota controls a variety of biological functions, including immunity, and alterations of the microbiota in early life are associated with a higher risk of developing allergies later in life. Several probiotic bacteria, and particularly lactic acid bacteria, were described to reduce both the induction of allergic responses and allergic manifestations. Although specific probiotic strains were used in these studies, their protective effects on allergic responses also might be common for all lactobacilli. Methods To determine whether allergic effector cells inhibition is a common feature of lactobacilli or whether it varies among lactobacilli strains, we compared the ability of 40 strains of the same Lactobacillus paracasei species to inhibit IgE‐dependent mouse mast cell and human basophil activation. Results We uncovered a marked heterogeneity in the inhibitory properties of the 40 Lactobacillus strains tested. These segregated into three to four clusters depending on the intensity of inhibition. Some strains inhibited both mouse mast cell and human basophil activation, others strains inhibited only one cell type and another group induced no inhibition of activation for either cell type. Conclusions Individual Lactobacillus strains of the same species differentially inhibit IgE‐dependent activation of mouse mast cells and human basophils, two cell types that are critical in the onset of allergic manifestations. Although we failed to identify specific bacterial genes associated with inhibition by gene‐trait matching analysis, our findings demonstrate the complexity of the interactions between the microbiota and the host. These results suggest that some L. paracasei strains might be more beneficial in allergies than others strains and provide the bases for a rational screening of lactic acid bacteria strains as next‐generation probiotics in the field of allergy. PMID:27621812

  20. Sex-dependent expression of mouse testosterone 16 alpha-hydroxylase (cytochrome P-450(16) alpha): cDNA cloning and pretranslational regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Harada, N; Negishi, M

    1985-01-01

    By using both double-colony hybridization and an in situ immunostaining assay for transformants, 39 cDNA clones (clone p-16 alpha) encoding mouse liver microsomal testosterone 16 alpha-hydroxylase (cytochrome P-450(16) alpha) were isolated from a cDNA library constructed in the cloning vector pUC-9 with poly(A)+ RNA immunoenriched from total liver polysomes of male 129/J mice. mRNA selected by hybridization with clone p-16 alpha translated the P-450(16) alpha apoprotein in vitro. Total cellular proteins, which were prepared from immunopositive transformant Escherichia coli cells, were conjugated with Sepharose 4B. Antibody purified with the Sepharose 4B conjugate from mixed antiserum to P-450(16) alpha and P-450(15) alpha specifically inhibited testosterone 16 alpha-hydroxylase activity in microsomes. The cDNA insert of one recombinant plasmid (clone P-16 alpha-1) was 1.75 kilobases in size and contained one or more internal restriction sites for HindIII, BamHI, Bgl I, Pst I, Alu I, HinpI, and Rsa I. 32P-labeled clone p-16 alpha-1 hybridized with a single mRNA (2000 bases) that was 10 times more concentrated in liver cells from male 129/J mice than in female mice. This result was consistent with the finding that poly(A)+ RNA from male mice translated 10 times as much P-450(16) alpha in vitro as did the poly(A)+ RNA from females. Thus, the predominant expression of testosterone 16 alpha-hydroxylase in male 129/J mice is regulated pretranslationally, presumably at the transcriptional level of the P-450(16) alpha gene. Images PMID:3856880

  1. Cloning, analysis, and chromosomal localization of myoxin (MYH12), the human homologue to the mouse dilute gene

    SciTech Connect

    Engle, L.J.; Kennett, R.H. )

    1994-02-01

    The mouse dilute gene encodes a novel type of non-muscle myosin that structurally combines elements from both nonmuscle myosin type I and nonmuscle myosin type II. Phenotypically, mutations in the mouse dilute gene result not only in the lightening of coat color, but also in the onset of severe neurological defects shortly after birth. This may indicate that the mouse dilute gene is important in maintaining the normal neuronal function in the mouse. The authors report the isolation and sequencing of [open quotes]myoxin[close quotes] (MYH12), the human homologue of the mouse dilute gene, and its assignment to human chromosome 15. 35 refs., 6 figs.

  2. cDNA cloning reveals two mouse beta5 integrin transcripts distinct in cytoplasmic domains as a result of alternative splicing.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, H; Tan, S M; Lu, J

    1998-01-01

    The integrin beta5 subunit has only been found to form a heterodimer with subunit alphav which acts as a vitronectin receptor. Integrin alphavbeta5 has been implicated in cell migration and growth factor-induced angiogenesis. In the present study, a mouse liver cDNA library was screened using a human beta5 cDNA fragment obtained by reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR). Three of the clones (MB5, MB15 and MB17) overlapped to give an open reading frame, called beta5A, which is homologous to the human beta5 subunit. The sequence of another clone (MB26), called beta5B, was identical with beta5A, except for a deletion of 29 bp near the 3' end of the open reading frame. The 29 bp deletion resulted in an open-reading-frame shift and a completely different C-terminal sequence in beta5B. beta5A and beta5B were shown, by RT-PCR, to be co-expressed in most mouse tissues tested, although beta5B mRNA was detected at much lower levels than beta5A. beta5A and beta5B mRNAs were also detected in the mouse monocytic cell line, J774, and in isolated mouse peritoneal macrophages. Adhesion of peritoneal macrophages has been shown to up-regulate the expression of both beta5A and beta5B mRNAs. The 29 bp sequence begins with a putative intron-splicing donor site (GTGAT...). A 3' fragment of the mouse integrin beta5 gene was cloned by PCR and sequenced showing that the 29 bp sequence was also immediately followed by an intron. Therefore, the 29 bp sequence was apparently expressed as part of the beta5A mRNA but was spliced out as part of the downstream intron in beta5B. Since the cytoplasmic domains of the integrin beta subunits are important in cytoskeleton attachment and signalling, the two alternatively spliced beta5 isoforms may have distinct roles in cell adhesion and other cellular functions. PMID:9531507

  3. A novel mouse running wheel that senses individual limb forces: biomechanical validation and in vivo testing.

    PubMed

    Roach, Grahm C; Edke, Mangesh; Griffin, Timothy M

    2012-08-15

    Biomechanical data provide fundamental information about changes in musculoskeletal function during development, adaptation, and disease. To facilitate the study of mouse locomotor biomechanics, we modified a standard mouse running wheel to include a force-sensitive rung capable of measuring the normal and tangential forces applied by individual paws. Force data were collected throughout the night using an automated threshold trigger algorithm that synchronized force data with wheel-angle data and a high-speed infrared video file. During the first night of wheel running, mice reached consistent running speeds within the first 40 force events, indicating a rapid habituation to wheel running, given that mice generated >2,000 force-event files/night. Average running speeds and peak normal and tangential forces were consistent throughout the first four nights of running, indicating that one night of running is sufficient to characterize the locomotor biomechanics of healthy mice. Twelve weeks of wheel running significantly increased spontaneous wheel-running speeds (16 vs. 37 m/min), lowered duty factors (ratio of foot-ground contact time to stride time; 0.71 vs. 0.58), and raised hindlimb peak normal forces (93 vs. 115% body wt) compared with inexperienced mice. Peak normal hindlimb-force magnitudes were the primary force component, which were nearly tenfold greater than peak tangential forces. Peak normal hindlimb forces exceed the vertical forces generated during overground running (50-60% body wt), suggesting that wheel running shifts weight support toward the hindlimbs. This force-instrumented running-wheel system provides a comprehensive, noninvasive screening method for monitoring gait biomechanics in mice during spontaneous locomotion.

  4. 3T3 fibroblasts induce cloned interleukin 3-dependent mouse mast cells to resemble connective tissue mast cells in granular constituency

    SciTech Connect

    Dayton, E.T.; Pharr, P.; Ogawa, M.; Serafin, W.E.; Austen, K.F.; Levi-Schaffer, F.; Stevens, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    As assessed by ultrastructure, histochemical staining, and T-cell dependency, in vitro-differentiated interleukin 3-dependent mouse mast cells are comparable to the mast cells that reside in the gastrointestinal mucosa but not in the skin or the serosal cavity of the mouse. The authors now demonstrate that when cloned interleukin 3-dependent mast cells are cocultured with mouse skin-derived 3T3 fibroblasts in the presence of WEHI-3 conditioned medium for 28 days, the mast cells acquire the ability to stain with safranin, increase their histamine content approx. 50-fold and their carboxypeptidase. A content approx. 100-fold, and augment approx. their biosynthesis of proteoglycans bearing /sup 35/S-labeled haparin relative to /sup 35/S-labeled chondroitin sulfate glycosaminoglycans. Thus, fibroblasts induce interleukin 3-dependent mouse mast cells to change phenotype from mucosal-like to connective tissue-like, indicating that the biochemical and functional characteristics of this mast cell type are strongly influenced by the connective tissue microenvironment.

  5. Molecular cloning, gene structure, expression profile and functional characterization of the mouse glutamate transporter (EAAT3) interacting protein GTRAP3-18.

    PubMed

    Butchbach, Matthew E R; Lai, Liching; Lin, Chien-liang Glenn

    2002-06-12

    Glutamate is an important amino acid implicated in energy metabolism, protein biosynthesis and neurotransmission. The Na(+)-dependent high-affinity excitatory amino acid transporter EAAT3 (EAAC1) facilitates glutamate uptake into most cells. Recently, a novel rat EAAT3-interacting protein called GTRAP3-18 has been identified by a yeast two-hybrid screening. GTRAP3-18 functions as a negative modulator of EAAT3-mediated glutamate transport. In order to further understand the function and regulation of GTRAP3-18, we cloned the mouse orthologue to GTRAP3-18 and determined its gene structure and its expression pattern. GTRAP3-18 encodes a 188-residue hydrophobic protein whose sequence is highly conserved amongst vertebrates. Mouse and human GTRAP3-18 genes contain three exons separated by two introns. The GTRAP3-18 gene is found on mouse chromosome 6D3 and on human chromosome 3p14, a susceptibility locus for cancer and epilepsy. GTRAP3-18 protein and RNA were found both in neuronal rich regions of the brain and in non-neuronal tissues such as the kidney, heart and skeletal muscle. Mouse GTRAP3-18 inhibited EAAT3-mediated glutamate transport in a dose-dependent manner. These studies show that GTRAP3-18 is a ubiquitously expressed protein that functions as a negative regulator of EAAT3 function.

  6. [Cloning and characterization of a novel mouse short-chain dehydrogenase/reductases cDNA mHsdl2#, encoding a protein with a SDR domaid and a SCP2 domain].

    PubMed

    Dai, J; Li, P; Ji, Ch; Feng, C; Gui, M; Sun, Y; Zhang, J; Zhu, J; Dou, Ch; Gu, Sh

    2005-01-01

    The short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDRs) play important roles in body's metabolism. We cloned a novel mouse SDR cDNA which encodes a deduced HSD-like protein with a conserved SDR domain and a SCP2 domain. The 1.8 kb cDNA consists of 11 exons and is mapped to mouse chromosome 4B3. The corresponding gene is widely expressed in normal mouse tissues and its expression level in liver increases after inducement with cholesterol food. The predicted mouse HSDL2 protein, which has a peroxisomal target signal, is localized in the cytoplasm of NIH 3T3 cells.

  7. A partial genomic DNA clone for the alpha subunit of the mouse complement receptor type 3 and cellular adhesion molecule Mac-1.

    PubMed Central

    Sastre, L; Roman, J M; Teplow, D B; Dreyer, W J; Gee, C E; Larson, R S; Roberts, T M; Springer, T A

    1986-01-01

    A genomic clone coding for the alpha subunit of the mouse complement receptor type 3 and the cellular adhesion molecule Mac-1 has been isolated directly from a genomic library using synthetic oligonucleotide probes based on the amino-terminal amino acid sequence of the protein. The identity of the clone has been established by DNA sequencing and in vitro translation of hybrid-selected mRNA. The gene is present in a single copy in the murine genome. The region containing the amino-terminal exon has been sequenced. RNA gel blotting shows that the Mac-1 alpha-subunit mRNA is 6 kilobases in length. Mac-1 alpha-subunit mRNA is present in macrophages but not T lymphoma or L cells. During gamma interferon-stimulated maturation of the mouse premyelocytic cell line M1, Mac-1 alpha-subunit mRNA is induced. This corresponds with the tissue distribution of the Mac-1 alpha subunit, showing expression is regulated at least partially at the message level. Images PMID:2942940

  8. Russell body inducing threshold depends on the variable domain sequences of individual human IgG clones and the cellular protein homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Stoops, Janelle; Byrd, Samantha; Hasegawa, Haruki

    2012-10-01

    Russell bodies are intracellular aggregates of immunoglobulins. Although the mechanism of Russell body biogenesis has been extensively studied by using truncated mutant heavy chains, the importance of the variable domain sequences in this process and in immunoglobulin biosynthesis remains largely unknown. Using a panel of structurally and functionally normal human immunoglobulin Gs, we show that individual immunoglobulin G clones possess distinctive Russell body inducing propensities that can surface differently under normal and abnormal cellular conditions. Russell body inducing predisposition unique to each immunoglobulin G clone was corroborated by the intrinsic physicochemical properties encoded in the heavy chain variable domain/light chain variable domain sequence combinations that define each immunoglobulin G clone. While the sequence based intrinsic factors predispose certain immunoglobulin G clones to be more prone to induce Russell bodies, extrinsic factors such as stressful cell culture conditions also play roles in unmasking Russell body propensity from immunoglobulin G clones that are normally refractory to developing Russell bodies. By taking advantage of heterologous expression systems, we dissected the roles of individual subunit chains in Russell body formation and examined the effect of non-cognate subunit chain pair co-expression on Russell body forming propensity. The results suggest that the properties embedded in the variable domain of individual light chain clones and their compatibility with the partnering heavy chain variable domain sequences underscore the efficiency of immunoglobulin G biosynthesis, the threshold for Russell body induction, and the level of immunoglobulin G secretion. We propose that an interplay between the unique properties encoded in variable domain sequences and the state of protein homeostasis determines whether an immunoglobulin G expressing cell will develop the Russell body phenotype in a dynamic cellular setting.

  9. Cloning and characterization of mouse UBPy, a deubiquitinating enzyme that interacts with the ras guanine nucleotide exchange factor CDC25(Mm)/Ras-GRF1.

    PubMed

    Gnesutta, N; Ceriani, M; Innocenti, M; Mauri, I; Zippel, R; Sturani, E; Borgonovo, B; Berruti, G; Martegani, E

    2001-10-19

    We used yeast "two-hybrid" screening to isolate cDNA-encoding proteins interacting with the N-terminal domain of the Ras nucleotide exchange factor CDC25(Mm). Three independent overlapping clones were isolated from a mouse embryo cDNA library. The full-length cDNA was cloned by RACE-polymerase chain reaction. It encodes a large protein (1080 amino acids) highly homologous to the human deubiquitinating enzyme hUBPy and contains a well conserved domain typical of ubiquitin isopeptidases. Therefore we called this new protein mouse UBPy (mUBPy). Northern blot analysis revealed a 4-kilobase mRNA present in several mouse tissues and highly expressed in testis; a good level of expression was also found in brain, where CDC25(Mm) is exclusively expressed. Using a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein, we demonstrated an "in vitro" interaction between mUBPy and the N-terminal half (amino acids 1-625) of CDC25(Mm). In addition "in vivo" interaction was demonstrated after cotransfection in mammalian cells. We also showed that CDC25(Mm), expressed in HEK293 cells, is ubiquitinated and that the coexpression of mUBPy decreases its ubiquitination. In addition the half-life of CDC25Mm protein was considerably increased in the presence of mUBPy. The specific function of the human homolog hUBPy is not defined, although its expression was correlated with cell proliferation. Our results suggest that mUBPy may play a role in controlling degradation of CDC25(Mm), thus regulating the level of this Ras-guanine nucleotide exchange factor.

  10. Differences in susceptibility among mouse strains to infection with Plasmodium berghei (ANKA clone) sporozoites and its relationship to protection by gamma-irradiated sporozoites

    SciTech Connect

    Jaffe, R.I.; Lowell, G.H.; Gordon, D.M. )

    1990-04-01

    Three inbred mouse strains, C57BL/6 (H-2b), A/J (H-2a), and BALB/c (H-2d), and 1 outbred strain, CD-1, demonstrated differences in susceptibility to iv challenge with the ANKA clone of Plasmodium berghei. Mice were challenged with 100, 1,000, or 10,000 sporozoites, then evaluated daily beginning on day 4 for patency. CD-1 mice were further evaluated at challenge doses of 12,500, 25,000, and 50,000 sporozoites. C57BL/6 mice were the easiest to infect, with 90% becoming infected with 100 sporozoites. The outbred strain CD-1 was the most difficult to infect, requiring a challenge dose of 25,000 sporozoites/mouse in order to achieve a 100% infection rate. Mouse strains also demonstrated differences in their ability to be protected by intravenous immunization with gamma-irradiated sporozoites. A/J mice needed a minimum of 3 doses of irradiated sporozoites for protection against a challenge with 10,000 sporozoites. In contrast, BALB/c mice immunized with a single dose of 1,000 irradiated sporozoites are protected against a 10,000 sporozoite challenge. These data suggest that both infectivity and protection are genetically restricted and that susceptibility to infection may be inversely related to protection.

  11. Improvement of mouse cloning using nuclear transfer-derived embryonic stem cells and/or histone deacetylase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Wakayama, Sayaka; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear transfer-derived ES (ntES) cell lines can be established from somatic cell nuclei with a relatively high success rate. Although ntES cells have been shown to be equivalent to ES cells, there are ethical objections concerning human cells, such as the use of fresh oocyte donation from young healthy woman. In contrast, the use of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells for cloning poses few ethical problems and is a relatively easy technique compared with nuclear transfer. Therefore, although there are several reports proposing the use of ntES cells as a model of regenerative medicine, the use of these cells in preliminary medical research is waning. However, in theory, 5 to 10 donor cells can establish one ntES cell line and, once established, these cells will propagate indefinitely. These cells can be used to generate cloned animals from ntES cell lines using a second round of NT. Even in infertile and "unclonable" strains of mice, we can generate offspring from somatic cells by combining cloning with ntES technology. Moreover, cloned offspring can be generated potentially even from the nuclei of dead bodies or freeze-dried cells via ntES cells, such as from an extinct frozen animal. Currently, only the ntES technology is available for this purpose, because all other techniques, including iPS cell derivation, require significant numbers of living donor cells. This review describes how to improve the efficiency of cloning, the establishment of clone-derived embryonic stem cells and further applications.

  12. Relationship between individual neuron and network spontaneous activity in developing mouse cortex

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, Heather M.; Gjorgjieva, Julijana; Weir, Keiko; Comfort, Cara; Fairhall, Adrienne L.

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous synchronous activity (SSA) that propagates as electrical waves is found in numerous central nervous system structures and is critical for normal development, but the mechanisms of generation of such activity are not clear. In previous work, we showed that the ventrolateral piriform cortex is uniquely able to initiate SSA in contrast to the dorsal neocortex, which participates in, but does not initiate, SSA (Lischalk JW, Easton CR, Moody WJ. Dev Neurobiol 69: 407–414, 2009). In this study, we used Ca2+ imaging of cultured embryonic day 18 to postnatal day 2 coronal slices (embryonic day 17 + 1–4 days in culture) of the mouse cortex to investigate the different activity patterns of individual neurons in these regions. In the piriform cortex where SSA is initiated, a higher proportion of neurons was active asynchronously between waves, and a larger number of groups of coactive cells was present compared with the dorsal cortex. When we applied GABA and glutamate synaptic antagonists, asynchronous activity and cellular clusters remained, while synchronous activity was eliminated, indicating that asynchronous activity is a result of cell-intrinsic properties that differ between these regions. To test the hypothesis that higher levels of cell-autonomous activity in the piriform cortex underlie its ability to initiate waves, we constructed a conductance-based network model in which three layers differed only in the proportion of neurons able to intrinsically generate bursting behavior. Simulations using this model demonstrated that a gradient of intrinsic excitability was sufficient to produce directionally propagating waves that replicated key experimental features, indicating that the higher level of cell-intrinsic activity in the piriform cortex may provide a substrate for SSA generation. PMID:25185811

  13. Relationship between individual neuron and network spontaneous activity in developing mouse cortex.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Heather M; Gjorgjieva, Julijana; Weir, Keiko; Comfort, Cara; Fairhall, Adrienne L; Moody, William J

    2014-12-15

    Spontaneous synchronous activity (SSA) that propagates as electrical waves is found in numerous central nervous system structures and is critical for normal development, but the mechanisms of generation of such activity are not clear. In previous work, we showed that the ventrolateral piriform cortex is uniquely able to initiate SSA in contrast to the dorsal neocortex, which participates in, but does not initiate, SSA (Lischalk JW, Easton CR, Moody WJ. Dev Neurobiol 69: 407-414, 2009). In this study, we used Ca(2+) imaging of cultured embryonic day 18 to postnatal day 2 coronal slices (embryonic day 17 + 1-4 days in culture) of the mouse cortex to investigate the different activity patterns of individual neurons in these regions. In the piriform cortex where SSA is initiated, a higher proportion of neurons was active asynchronously between waves, and a larger number of groups of coactive cells was present compared with the dorsal cortex. When we applied GABA and glutamate synaptic antagonists, asynchronous activity and cellular clusters remained, while synchronous activity was eliminated, indicating that asynchronous activity is a result of cell-intrinsic properties that differ between these regions. To test the hypothesis that higher levels of cell-autonomous activity in the piriform cortex underlie its ability to initiate waves, we constructed a conductance-based network model in which three layers differed only in the proportion of neurons able to intrinsically generate bursting behavior. Simulations using this model demonstrated that a gradient of intrinsic excitability was sufficient to produce directionally propagating waves that replicated key experimental features, indicating that the higher level of cell-intrinsic activity in the piriform cortex may provide a substrate for SSA generation.

  14. RNAi-mediated knockdown of Xist does not rescue the impaired development of female cloned mouse embryos.

    PubMed

    Oikawa, Mami; Matoba, Shogo; Inoue, Kimiko; Kamimura, Satoshi; Hirose, Michiko; Ogonuki, Narumi; Shiura, Hirosuke; Sugimoto, Michihiko; Abe, Kuniya; Ishino, Fumitoshi; Ogura, Atsuo

    2013-01-01

    In mice, one of the major epigenetic errors associated with somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is ectopic expression of Xist during the preimplantation period in both sexes. We found that this aberrant Xist expression could be impeded by deletion of Xist from the putative active X chromosome in donor cells. In male clones, it was also found that prior injection of Xist-specific siRNA could significantly improve the postimplantation development of cloned embryos as a result of a significant repression of Xist at the morula stage. In this study, we examined whether the same knockdown strategy could work as well in female SCNT-derived embryos. Embryos were reconstructed with cumulus cell nuclei and injected with Xist-specific siRNA at 6-7 h after oocyte activation. RNA FISH analysis revealed that siRNA treatment successfully repressed Xist RNA at the morula stage, as shown by the significant decrease in the number of cloud-type Xist signals in the blastomere nuclei. However, blastomeres with different sizes (from "pinpoint" to "cloud") and numbers of Xist RNA signals remained within single embryos. After implantation, the dysregulated Xist expression was normalized autonomously, as in male clones, to a state of monoallelic expression in both embryonic and extraembryonic tissues. However, at term there was no significant improvement in the survival of the siRNA-injected cloned embryos. Thus, siRNA injection was largely effective in repressing the Xist overexpression in female cloned embryos but failed to rescue them, probably because of an inability to mimic consistent monoallelic Xist expression in these embryos. This could only be achieved in female embryos by applying a gene knockout strategy rather than an siRNA approach.

  15. Functional correction of renal defects in a mouse model for ARPKD through expression of the cloned wild-type Tg737 cDNA.

    PubMed

    Yoder, B K; Richards, W G; Sommardahl, C; Sweeney, W E; Michaud, E J; Wilkinson, J E; Avner, E D; Woychik, R P

    1996-10-01

    Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) is characterized by the formation of large collecting tubule and ductular cysts that often result in renal insufficiency within the first decade of life. Understanding the process leading to cyst formation will require the identification and characterization of genes involved in the etiology of this disease. In this regard, we previously described the generation of a mouse model (TgN737Rpw) for ARPKD and the cloning of a candidate gene. Here we show direct involvement of the Tg737 gene in collecting duct cyst formation by expressing the wild-type Tg737 cDNA as a transgene in TgN737Rpw mutants. In contrast to TgN737Rpw mutants, the "rescued" animals survive longer, have normal renal function and normal localization of the EGFr to the basolateral surfaces of collecting duct epithelium.

  16. Recapitulation of the ovum mutant (Om) phenotype and loss of Om locus polarity in cloned mouse embryos.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shaorong; Wu, Guangming; Han, Zhiming; de la Casa-Esperón, Elena; Sapienza, Carmen; Latham, Keith E

    2005-02-01

    The ovum mutant (Om) locus in mice affects early interactions between sperm and egg that in turn affect viability of embryos beyond the morula stage. Crosses of DDK females to males of many other inbred strains are 95% lethal around the morula stage, whereas reciprocal crosses are fully viable. Available data indicate that the early lethality is the result of an interaction between a factor in the ooplasm and the paternal genome. In this study, we examined whether this lethal interaction would likewise occur in cloned embryos produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer. We find that the Om effect is recapitulated but that the parental origin effect at the Om locus is no longer evident in cloned embryos.

  17. Positional cloning of the nude locus: Genetic, physical, and transcription maps of the region and mutations in the mouse and rat

    SciTech Connect

    Segre, J.A.; Lander, E.S. |; Taylor, B.A.

    1995-08-10

    Mutations in the nude locus in mice and rats produce the pleiotropic phenotype of hairlessness and athymia, resulting in severely compromised immune system. To identify the causative gene, we utilized modern tools and techniques of positional cloning. Specifically, spanning the region in which the nude locus resides, we constructed a genetic map of polymorphic markers, a physical map of yeast artificial chromosomes and bacteriophage P1 clones, and a transcription map of genes obtained by direct cDNA selection and exon trapping. We identified seven novel transcripts with similarity to genes from Drosophila, Caenorhabditis elegans, rat or human and three previously identified mouse genes. Based on our transcription mapping results, we present a novel approach to estimate that the nude locus resides in a region approximately threefold enriched for genes. We confirm a recently published report that the nude phenotype is caused by mutations in a gene encoding a novel winged helix or fork head domain transcription factor, whn. We report as well as the mutations in the rat rnu allele and the complete coding sequence of the rat whn mRNA. 42 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Molecular cloning and expression of a cDNA encoding an olfactory-specific mouse phenol sulphotransferase.

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, H O; Harada, Y; Miyawaki, A; Mikoshiba, K; Matsui, M

    1998-01-01

    Previously we demonstrated the presence of phenol sulphotransferase (P-ST) in mouse nasal cytosols and identified its zonal location in mouse nasal cavity by staining with an antiserum raised against a rat liver P-ST isoenzyme, PSTg. In the present study a cDNA was isolated from a mouse olfactory cDNA library by immunological screening with the antiserum. The isolated cDNA consisted of 1347 bp with a 912 bp open reading frame encoding a 304-residue polypeptide. Both the nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences of the cDNA were 94% identical with those of a rat liver P-ST isoenzyme, ST1C1. The expressed enzyme in Escherichia coli displayed high P-ST activity towards phenolic odorants such as eugenol and guaiacol, and it showed a high N-hydroxy-2-acetylaminofluorene sulphation activity in comparison with the rat ST1C1 enzyme. These results indicate that the olfactory P-ST encoded by the cDNA is a mouse orthologue of rat ST1C1; however, expression of the olfactory P-ST mRNA is specific for nasal tissues as revealed by reverse transcriptase-mediated PCR (RT-PCR). PMID:9560327

  19. The Memory Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte (CTL) Response to Human Cytomegalovirus Infection Contains Individual Peptide-Specific CTL Clones That Have Undergone Extensive Expansion In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Weekes, Michael P.; Wills, Mark R.; Mynard, Kim; Carmichael, Andrew J.; Sissons, J. G. Patrick

    1999-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) appear to play an important role in the control of virus replication and in protection against HCMV-related disease. We have previously reported high frequencies of memory CTL precursors (CTLp) specific to the HCMV tegument protein pp65 in the peripheral blood of healthy virus carriers. In some individuals, the CTL response to this protein is focused on only a single epitope, whereas in other virus carriers CTL recognized multiple epitopes which we identified by using synthetic peptides. We have analyzed the clonal composition of the memory CTL response to four of these pp65 epitopes by sequencing the T-cell receptors (TCR) of multiple independently derived epitope-specific CTL clones, which were derived by formal single-cell cloning or from clonal CTL microcultures. In all cases, we have observed a high degree of clonal focusing: the majority of CTL clones specific to a defined pp65 peptide from any one virus carrier use only one or two different TCRs at the level of the nucleotide sequence. Among virus carriers who have the same major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I allele, we observed that CTL from different donors that recognize the same peptide-MHC complex often used the same Vβ segment, although other TCR gene segments and CDR3 length were not in general conserved. We have also examined the clonal composition of CTL specific to pp65 peptides in asymptomatic human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals. We have observed a similarly focused peptide-specific CTL response. Thus, the large population of circulating HCMV peptide-specific memory CTLp in virus carriers in fact contains individual CTL clones that have undergone extensive clonal expansion in vivo. PMID:9971792

  20. Molecular cloning and characterization of the mouse carboxyl ester lipase gene and evidence for expression in the lactating mammary gland

    SciTech Connect

    Lidmer, A.S.; Lundberg, L.; Kannius, M.; Bjursell, G.

    1995-09-01

    DNA hybridization was used to isolate a 2.04-kb cDNA encoding carboxyl ester lipase (CEL) from a mouse lactating mammary gland, {lambda}gt10 cDNA library. The cDNA sequence translated into a protein of 599 amino acids, including 20 amino acids of a putative signal peptide. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence of the mouse CEL with CEL from five other species revealed that there is a high degree of a homology between the different species. The mouse CEL gene was also isolated and found to span approximately 7.2 kb and to include 11 exons. This organization is similar to those of the recently reported human and rat CEL genes. We have also analyzed expression of the CEL gene in the mammary glands from other species by performing a Northern blot analysis with RNA from goat and cow. The results show that the gene is expressed in both species. 36 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Epigenetic regulation of genetic integrity is reprogrammed during cloning.

    PubMed

    Murphey, Patricia; Yamazaki, Yukiko; McMahan, C Alex; Walter, Christi A; Yanagimachi, Ryuzo; McCarrey, John R

    2009-03-24

    Cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) circumvents processes that normally function during gametogenesis to prepare the gamete genomes to support development of new progeny following fertilization. One such process is enhanced maintenance of genetic integrity in germ cells, such that germ cells typically carry fewer spontaneously acquired mutations than somatic cells in the same individual. Thus, embryos produced from somatic cells by SCNT could directly inherit more mutations than naturally conceived embryos. Alternatively, they could inherit epigenetic programming that predisposes more rapid accumulation of de novo mutations during development. We used a transgenic mouse system to test these possibilities by producing cloned midgestation mouse fetuses from three different donor somatic cell types carrying significantly different initial frequencies of spontaneous mutations. We found that on an individual locus basis, mutations acquired spontaneously in a population of donor somatic cells are not likely to be propagated to cloned embryos by SCNT. In addition, we found that the rate of accumulation of spontaneous mutations was similar in fetuses produced by either natural conception or cloning, indicating that cloned fetuses do not acquire mutations more rapidly than naturally conceived fetuses. These results represent the first direct demonstration that the process of cloning by SCNT does not lead to an increase in the frequency of point mutations. These results also demonstrate that epigenetic mechanisms normally contribute to the regulation of genetic integrity in a tissue-specific manner, and that these mechanisms are subject to reprogramming during cloning.

  2. 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA lyase (HL): Mouse and human HL gene (HMGCL) cloning and detection of large gene deletions in two unrelated HL-deficient patients

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S.P.; Robert, M.F.; Mitchell, G.A.

    1996-04-01

    3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA lyase (HL, EC 4.1.3.4) catalyzes the cleavage of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA to acetoacetic acid and acetyl CoA, the final reaction of both ketogenesis and leucine catabolism. Autosomal-recessive HL deficiency in humans results in episodes of hypoketotic hypoglycemia and coma. Using a mouse HL cDNA as a probe, we isolated a clone containing the full-length mouse HL gene that spans about 15 kb of mouse chromosome 4 and contains nine exons. The promoter region of the mouse HL gene contains elements characteristic of a housekeeping gene: a CpG island containing multiple Sp1 binding sites surrounds exon 1, and neither a TATA nor a CAAT box are present. We identified multiple transcription start sites in the mouse HL gene, 35 to 9 bases upstream of the translation start codon. We also isolated two human HL genomic clones that include HL exons 2 to 9 within 18 kb. The mouse and human HL genes (HGMW-approved symbol HMGCL) are highly homologous, with identical locations of intron-exon junctions. By genomic Southern blot analysis and exonic PCR, was found 2 of 33 HL-deficient probands to be homozygous for large deletions in the HL gene. 26 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Stable yeast transformants that secrete functional. cap alpha. -amylase encoded by cloned mouse pancreatic cDNA

    SciTech Connect

    Filho, S.A.; Galembeck, E.V.; Faria, J.B.; Frascino, A.C.S.

    1986-04-01

    Mouse pancreatic ..cap alpha..-amylase complementary DNA was inserted into a yeast shuttle vector after the Saccharomyces cerevisiae MF..cap alpha..1 promoter and secretion signals coding sequences. When transformed with the recombinant plasmid, S. cerevisiae cells were able to synthesize and secrete functional ..cap alpha..-amylase, efficiently hydrolyzing starch present in the culture medium. Stable amylolytic cells were obtained from different yeast strains. This work represents a significant step towards producing yeast that can convert starchy materials directly to ethanol.

  4. The voice of bats: how greater mouse-eared bats recognize individuals based on their echolocation calls.

    PubMed

    Yovel, Yossi; Melcon, Mariana Laura; Franz, Matthias O; Denzinger, Annette; Schnitzler, Hans-Ulrich

    2009-06-01

    Echolocating bats use the echoes from their echolocation calls to perceive their surroundings. The ability to use these continuously emitted calls, whose main function is not communication, for recognition of individual conspecifics might facilitate many of the social behaviours observed in bats. Several studies of individual-specific information in echolocation calls found some evidence for its existence but did not quantify or explain it. We used a direct paradigm to show that greater mouse-eared bats (Myotis myotis) can easily discriminate between individuals based on their echolocation calls and that they can generalize their knowledge to discriminate new individuals that they were not trained to recognize. We conclude that, despite their high variability, broadband bat-echolocation calls contain individual-specific information that is sufficient for recognition. An analysis of the call spectra showed that formant-related features are suitable cues for individual recognition. As a model for the bat's decision strategy, we trained nonlinear statistical classifiers to reproduce the behaviour of the bats, namely to repeat correct and incorrect decisions of the bats. The comparison of the bats with the model strongly implies that the bats are using a prototype classification approach: they learn the average call characteristics of individuals and use them as a reference for classification.

  5. The Voice of Bats: How Greater Mouse-eared Bats Recognize Individuals Based on Their Echolocation Calls

    PubMed Central

    Franz, Matthias O.; Denzinger, Annette; Schnitzler, Hans-Ulrich

    2009-01-01

    Echolocating bats use the echoes from their echolocation calls to perceive their surroundings. The ability to use these continuously emitted calls, whose main function is not communication, for recognition of individual conspecifics might facilitate many of the social behaviours observed in bats. Several studies of individual-specific information in echolocation calls found some evidence for its existence but did not quantify or explain it. We used a direct paradigm to show that greater mouse-eared bats (Myotis myotis) can easily discriminate between individuals based on their echolocation calls and that they can generalize their knowledge to discriminate new individuals that they were not trained to recognize. We conclude that, despite their high variability, broadband bat-echolocation calls contain individual-specific information that is sufficient for recognition. An analysis of the call spectra showed that formant-related features are suitable cues for individual recognition. As a model for the bat's decision strategy, we trained nonlinear statistical classifiers to reproduce the behaviour of the bats, namely to repeat correct and incorrect decisions of the bats. The comparison of the bats with the model strongly implies that the bats are using a prototype classification approach: they learn the average call characteristics of individuals and use them as a reference for classification. PMID:19503606

  6. [Molecular cloning, prokaryotic expression and double-antibody sandwich ELISA development of 17β-hsd10 in mouse].

    PubMed

    Liu, Chuanzhi; Niu, Yingying; Chen, Yuan'an; Wu, Cheng; Yu, Yuanhua

    2014-11-01

    We expressed 17-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase10 (17β-hsd10) recombinant protein, prepared anti-17β- hsd10 polyclonal antibodies and established sandwich enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) test for detection of 17β-hsd10. RT-PCR was used to get the gene of 17β-hsd10 of mouse liver, and a prokaryotic protein expression system pET 15b-17β-hsd10/Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) which induced with isopropyl-1-thio-β-galactopyranoside (IPTG) for recombinant protein expression was constructed subsequently. The target protein purified using His-Binding-resin column was used to immunize BALB/c mice and rabbits, serum total IgGs from immunized animals were purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation method. We established a Double-antibody Sandwich enzyme linked immunosorbent assay about 17β-hsd10 using the two antibodies we prepared. We got the concentration of 1.5 mg/mL of 17β-hsd10 protein with molecular weight of 29.5 kDa, and polyclonal antibodies from mouse and rabbit with the tite 1.25 x 10(4) and 2.5 x 10(4) respectively. The concentration of 0.1 g/mL of 17β-hsd10 can be detected by the Double-antibody Sandwich ELISA we established, and the assay was sensitive and specific. It can be widely used in clinical and experimental study.

  7. Isolation and characterization of expressible cDNA clones encoding the M1 and M2 subunits of mouse ribonucleotide reductase.

    PubMed Central

    Thelander, L; Berg, P

    1986-01-01

    Mammalian ribonucleotide reductase consists of two nonidentical subunits, proteins M1 and M2, which are differentially regulated during the cell cycle. We have isolated expressible cDNA clones of both subunits from an Okayama-Berg cDNA library made with mRNA from hydroxyurea-resistant, M2 protein-overproducing mouse TA3 cells. Expression of M2 protein could be demonstrated by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy after transfection of COS-7 monkey cells with the plasmid. Electrophoresis and blot analyses of the parent and hydroxyurea-resistant TA3 mRNA revealed two M2 transcripts, a major one of 2.1 kilobases and a minor one of about 1.6 kilobases. Restriction endonuclease mapping of the corresponding cDNAs indicated that the two mRNAs differed only in the length of the 3' untranslated ends. By contrast, there was only one mRNA corresponding to the M1 protein, and its mobility corresponded to about 3.1 kilobases. The hydroxyurea-resistant TA3 cells contained a 50- to 100-fold excess of the M2 mRNAs over that of the parent cells and a 10-fold excess of the M1 mRNA. However, a Southern blot analysis of the corresponding genomic DNA sequences showed that the M2 gene was amplified fivefold but the M1 gene was still single copy. The complete nucleotide sequence of the 2,111-base-pair-long M2 cDNA revealed an open reading frame coding for 390 amino acids, which corresponds to a molecular weight of 45,100. The mouse M2 protein sequence was quite homologous to the equivalent protein in the clam Spisula solidissima, while the homology to the smaller subunits of Epstein-Barr virus, herpes simplex virus type 2, and Escherichia coli ribonucleotide reductases were less pronounced. Images PMID:3025593

  8. Dual bidirectional promoters at the mouse dhfr locus: cloning and characterization of two mRNA classes of the divergently transcribed Rep-1 gene.

    PubMed Central

    Linton, J P; Yen, J Y; Selby, E; Chen, Z; Chinsky, J M; Liu, K; Kellems, R E; Crouse, G F

    1989-01-01

    The mouse dihydrofolate reductase gene (dhfr) is a housekeeping gene expressed under the control of a promoter region embedded in a CpG island--a region rich in unmethylated CpG dinucleotides. A divergent transcription unit exists immediately upstream of the dhfr gene which is coamplified with dhfr in some but not all methotrexate-resistant cell lines. We show that the promoter region for this gene pair consists of two bidirectional promoters, a major and minor promoter, which are situated within a 660-base-pair region upstream of the dhfr ATG translation initiation codon. The major promoter controls over 90% of dhfr transcription, while the minor promoter directs the transcription of the remaining dhfr mRNAs. The major promoter functions bidirectionally, transcribing a divergent 4.0-kilobase poly(A) mRNA (class A) in the direction opposite that of dhfr transcription. The predicted protein product of this mRNA is 105 kilodaltons. The minor promoter also functions bidirectionally, directing the transcription of at least two divergent RNAs (class B). These RNAs, present in quantities approximately 1/10 to 1/50 that of the class A mRNAs, are 4.4- and 1.6-kilobase poly(A) mRNAs. cDNAs representing both class A and class B mRNAs have been cloned from a mouse fibroblast cell line which has amplified the dhfr locus (3T3R500). DNA sequence analysis of these cDNAs reveals that the class A and class B mRNAs share, for the most part, the same exons. On the basis of S1 nuclease protection analysis of RNA preparations from several mouse tissues, both dhfr and divergent genes showed similar levels of expression but did show some specificity in start site utilization. Computer homology searches have revealed sequence similarity of the divergent transcripts with bacterial genes involved in DNA mismatch repair, and we therefore have named the divergently transcribed gene Rep-1. Images PMID:2674679

  9. Molecular cloning and mapping of the ecotropic leukemia provirus Emv-23 provides molecular access to the albino-deletion complex in mouse chromosome 7.

    PubMed

    Rinchik, E M; Machanoff, R; Cummings, C C; Johnson, D K

    1989-04-01

    Genetic analysis of radiation-induced deletion mutations involving the chromosome 7 albino (c) locus has expanded the functional map of this 6 to 11-cM region of the mouse genome. To generate one of many points of molecular access necessary for intensifying the analysis of the genes and phenotypes associated with this particular complex of deletions, we have cloned an endogenous ecotropic leukemia provirus (Emv-23), known to be closely linked to c, along with its flanking chromosome 7 sequences. A unique-sequence probe (23.3), derived from a region immediately 5' to the proviral integration site, was found to map less than 0.5 cM from c in a standard backcross analysis. Southern blot analysis of DNAs from animals carrying homozygous or overlapping albino deletions demonstrated that the 23.3 probe was deleted in several relatively small c-region deletions. The deletion mapping of the 23.3 probe places the Emv-23 locus between c and Mod-2, just proximal to a region important for male fertility and juvenile fitness. Mapping of this locus also provides a refinement of the genetic/deletion map for several mutations within this deletion complex.

  10. Cloning of wrinkle-free, a previously uncharacterized mouse mutation, reveals crucial roles for fatty acid transport protein 4 in skin and hair development.

    PubMed

    Moulson, Casey L; Martin, Daniel R; Lugus, Jesse J; Schaffer, Jean E; Lind, Anne C; Miner, Jeffrey H

    2003-04-29

    Wrinkle-free (wrfr) is a previously uncharacterized, spontaneous, autosomal recessive mouse mutation resulting in very tight, thick skin. wrfr mutant mice exhibit severe breathing difficulties secondary to their tight skin and die shortly after birth. This phenotype is strikingly similar to a very rare human genetic disorder, restrictive dermopathy. wrfr mutant mice display a defective skin barrier, which is normally imparted by the cornified envelope, a composite of protein and lipid that prevents loss of water from within and entry of potentially harmful substances from without. In addition, hair growth from grafted wrfr skin is impaired. Positional cloning of the wrfr mutation revealed a retrotransposon insertion into a coding exon of Slc27a4, the gene encoding fatty acid transport protein (FATP)4. FATP4 is the primary intestinal FATP and is thought to play a major role in dietary fatty acid uptake; it therefore is viewed as a target to prevent or reverse obesity. However, its function in vivo had not been determined. Our results demonstrate an unexpected yet critical role for FATP4 in skin and hair development and suggest Slc27a4 to be a candidate gene for restrictive dermopathy.

  11. Interspecies diversity of the occludin sequence: cDNA cloning of human, mouse, dog, and rat-kangaroo homologues.

    PubMed

    Ando-Akatsuka, Y; Saitou, M; Hirase, T; Kishi, M; Sakakibara, A; Itoh, M; Yonemura, S; Furuse, M; Tsukita, S

    1996-04-01

    Occludin has been identified from chick liver as a novel integral membrane protein localizing at tight junctions (Furuse, M., T. Hirase, M. Itoh, A. Nagafuchi, S. Yonemura, Sa. Tsukita, and Sh. Tsukita. 1993. J. Cell Biol. 123:1777-1788). To analyze and modulate the functions of tight junctions, it would be advantageous to know the mammalian homologues of occludin and their genes. Here we describe the nucleotide sequences of full length cDNAs encoding occludin of rat-kangaroo (potoroo), human, mouse, and dog. Rat-kangaroo occludin cDNA was prepared from RNA isolated from PtK2 cell culture, using a mAb against chicken occludin, whereas the others were amplified by polymerase chain reaction based on the sequence found around the human neuronal apoptosis inhibitory protein gene. The amino acid sequences of the three mammalian (human, murine, and canine) occludins were very closely related to each other (approximately 90% identity), whereas they diverged considerably from those of chicken and rat-kangaroo (approximately 50% identity). Implications of these data and novel experimental options in cell biological research are discussed.

  12. Gastrointestinal microbiota of wild and inbred individuals of two house mouse subspecies assessed using high-throughput parallel pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Kreisinger, Jakub; Cížková, Dagmar; Vohánka, Jaroslav; Piálek, Jaroslav

    2014-10-01

    The effects of gastrointestinal tract microbiota (GTM) on host physiology and health have been the subject of considerable interest in recent years. While a variety of captive bred species have been used in experiments, the extent to which GTM of captive and/or inbred individuals resembles natural composition and variation in wild populations is poorly understood. Using 454 pyrosequencing, we performed 16S rDNA GTM barcoding for 30 wild house mice (Mus musculus) and wild-derived inbred strain mice belonging to two subspecies (M. m. musculus and M. m. domesticus). Sequenced individuals were selected according to a 2 × 2 experimental design: wild (14) vs. inbred origin (16) and M. m. musculus (15) vs. M. m. domesticus (15). We compared alpha diversity (i.e. number of operational taxonomic units - OTUs), beta diversity (i.e. interindividual variability) and microbiota composition across the four groups. We found no difference between M. m. musculus and M. m. domesticus subspecies, suggesting low effect of genetic differentiation between these two subspecies on GTM structure. Both inbred and wild populations showed the same level of microbial alpha and beta diversity; however, we found strong differentiation in microbiota composition between wild and inbred populations. Relative abundance of ~ 16% of OTUs differed significantly between wild and inbred individuals. As laboratory mice represent the most abundant model for studying the effects of gut microbiota on host metabolism, immunity and neurology, we suggest that the distinctness of laboratory-kept mouse microbiota, which differs from wild mouse microbiota, needs to be considered in future biomedical research.

  13. Ammonia Levels and Urine-Spot Characteristics as Cage-Change Indicators for High-Density Individually Ventilated Mouse Cages

    PubMed Central

    Washington, Ida M; Payton, Mark E

    2016-01-01

    Mouse cage and bedding changes are potentially stressful to mice and are also labor- and resource-intensive. These changes are often performed on a calendar-based schedule to maintain a clean microenvironment and limit the concentrations of ammonia to which mice and workers are exposed. The current study sought to establish a performance-based approach to mouse cage-changing that uses urine spot characteristics as visual indicators of intracage ammonia levels. Colorimetric ammonia indicators were used to measure ammonia levels in individually-ventilated cages (IVC) housing male or female mice (n =5 per cage) of various strains at 1 to 16 d after cage change. Urine spot characteristics were correlated with ammonia levels to create a visual indicator of the cage-change criterion of 25 ppm ammonia. Results demonstrated a consistent increase in ammonia levels with days since cage change, with cages reaching the cage-change criterion at approximately 10 d for IVC containing male mice and 16 d for those with female mice. Ammonia levels were higher for male than female mice but were not correlated with mouse age. However, urine spot diameter, color, and edge characteristics were strongly correlated with ammonia levels. Husbandry practices based on using urine spot characteristics as indicators of ammonia levels led to fewer weekly cage changes and concomitant savings in labor and resources. Therefore, urine spot characteristics can be used as visual indicators of intracage ammonia levels for use of a performance (urine spot)-based approach to cage-changing frequency that maintains animal health and wellbeing. PMID:27177558

  14. Developmental phases of individual mouse preimplantation embryos characterized by lipid signatures using desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Christina R; Pirro, Valentina; Eberlin, Livia S; Hallett, Judy E; Cooks, R Graham

    2012-12-01

    Knowledge of the lipids present in individual preimplantation embryos is of interest in fundamental studies of embryology, in attempts to understand cellular pluripotency and in optimization of in vitro culture conditions necessary for the application and development of biotechnologies such as in vitro fertilization and transgenesis. In this work, the profiles of fatty acids and phospholipids (PL) in individual mouse preimplantation embryos and oocytes were acquired using an analytical strategy based on desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS). The methodology avoids sample preparation and provides information on the lipids present in these microscopic structures. Differences in the lipid profiles observed for unfertilized oocytes, two- and four-cell embryos, and blastocysts were characterized. For a representative set of embryos (N = 114) using multivariate analysis (specifically principal component analysis) unfertilized oocytes showed a narrower range of PL species than did blastocysts. Two- and four-cell embryos showed a wide range of PLs compared with unfertilized oocytes and high abundances of fatty acids, indicating pronounced synthetic activity. The data suggest that the lipid changes observed in mouse preimplantation development reflect acquisition of a degree of cellular membrane functional and structural specialization by the blastocyst stage. It is also noteworthy that embryos cultured in vitro from the two-cell through the blastocyst stage have a more homogeneous lipid profile as compared with their in vivo-derived counterparts, which is ascribed to the restricted diversity of nutrients present in synthetic culture media. The DESI-MS data are interpreted from lipid biochemistry and previous reports on gene expression of diverse lipids known to be vital to early embryonic development.

  15. Visualizing the Distribution of Synapses from Individual Neurons in the Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ling; Tasic, Bosiljka; Micheva, Kristina D.; Ivanov, Vsevolod M.; Spletter, Maria L.; Smith, Stephen J.; Luo, Liqun

    2010-01-01

    Background Proper function of the mammalian brain relies on the establishment of highly specific synaptic connections among billions of neurons. To understand how complex neural circuits function, it is crucial to precisely describe neuronal connectivity and the distributions of synapses to and from individual neurons. Methods and Findings In this study, we present a new genetic synaptic labeling method that relies on expression of a presynaptic marker, synaptophysin-GFP (Syp-GFP) in individual neurons in vivo. We assess the reliability of this method and use it to analyze the spatial patterning of synapses in developing and mature cerebellar granule cells (GCs). In immature GCs, Syp-GFP is distributed in both axonal and dendritic regions. Upon maturation, it becomes strongly enriched in axons. In mature GCs, we analyzed synapses along their ascending segments and parallel fibers. We observe no differences in presynaptic distribution between GCs born at different developmental time points and thus having varied depths of projections in the molecular layer. We found that the mean densities of synapses along the parallel fiber and the ascending segment above the Purkinje cell (PC) layer are statistically indistinguishable, and higher than previous estimates. Interestingly, presynaptic terminals were also found in the ascending segments of GCs below and within the PC layer, with the mean densities two-fold lower than that above the PC layer. The difference in the density of synapses in these parts of the ascending segment likely reflects the regional differences in postsynaptic target cells of GCs. Conclusions The ability to visualize synapses of single neurons in vivo is valuable for studying synaptogenesis and synaptic plasticity within individual neurons as well as information flow in neural circuits. PMID:20634890

  16. Molecular cloning of the mouse grb2 gene: differential interaction of the Grb2 adaptor protein with epidermal growth factor and nerve growth factor receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Suen, K L; Bustelo, X R; Pawson, T; Barbacid, M

    1993-01-01

    We report the isolation and molecular characterization of the mouse grb2 gene. The product of this gene, the Grb2 protein, is highly related to the Caenorhabditis elegans sem-5 gene product and the human GRB2 protein and displays the same SH3-SH2-SH3 structural motifs. In situ hybridization studies revealed that the mouse grb2 gene is widely expressed throughout embryonic development (E9.5 to P0). However, grb2 transcripts are not uniformly distributed, and in certain tissues (e.g., thymus) they appear to be regulated during development. Recent genetic and biochemical evidence has implicated the Grb2 protein in the signaling pathways that link cell surface tyrosine kinase receptors with Ras. We have investigated the association of the Grb2 protein with epidermal growth factor (EGF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) receptors in PC12 pheochromocytoma cells. EGF treatment of PC12 cells results in the rapid association of Grb2 with the activated EGF receptors, an interaction mediated by the Grb2 SH2 domain. However, Grb2 does not bind to NGF-activated Trk receptors. Mitogenic signaling of NGF in NIH 3T3 cells ectopically expressing Trk receptors also takes place without detectable association between Grb2 and Trk. These results suggest that whereas EGF and NGF can activate the Ras signaling pathway in PC12 cells, only the EGF receptor is likely to do so through a direct interaction with Grb2. Finally, binding studies with glutathione S-transferase fusion proteins indicate that Grb2 binds two distinct subsets of proteins which are individually recognized by its SH2 and SH3 domains. These observations add further support to the concept that Grb2 is a modular adaptor protein. Images PMID:7689150

  17. Individual USH2 proteins make distinct contributions to the ankle link complex during development of the mouse cochlear stereociliary bundle

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Junhuang; Mathur, Pranav D.; Zheng, Tihua; Wang, Yong; Almishaal, Ali; Park, Albert H.; Yang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Usher syndrome (USH) is the leading cause of inherited deaf-blindness, with type 2 (USH2) being the most common clinical form. Studies suggest that proteins encoded by USH2 causative genes assemble into the ankle link complex (ALC) at the hair cell stereociliary bundle; however, little is known about the in vivo assembly and function of this complex. Using various USH2 mutant mice, we showed by immunofluorescence that USH2 proteins play different roles in cochlear ALC assembly, with G protein-coupled receptor 98 being the most important protein. Complex assembly likely occurs at the stereociliary bundle but not along the protein transport route in the cell body. Stereociliary morphological defects in USH2 mutant mice suggest roles for the ALC in regulating inner hair cell stereociliary growth and differentiation as well as outer hair cell stereociliary rigidity and organization during development. These roles are unique from the bundle cohesion role of Usher syndrome type 1 protein complexes. Loss of individual USH2 gene expressions leads to variable morphological and functional consequences, correlating with the severity of ALC disruption. This finding suggests a potential genotype–phenotype correlation in USH2 patients. In summary, this study provides novel insights into the molecular mechanism underlying cochlear stereociliary bundle development and hearing loss pathogenesis of various USH2 subtypes. Our thorough phenotypical characterization of USH2 mouse models is essential for future use of these animal models in therapeutic development. PMID:26401052

  18. Population dynamics of natural antibodies in normal and autoimmune individuals.

    PubMed Central

    Varela, F; Andersson, A; Dietrich, G; Sundblad, A; Holmberg, D; Kazatchkine, M; Coutinho, A

    1991-01-01

    We have measured the quantities of naturally occurring autoantibodies in the serum of normal, unmanipulated individuals. These changes over time following broad-band complex dynamical patterns that are similar in mouse and man. The patterns more likely reflect the network architecture of the natural antibody repertoire, regulating the activation and decay of individual clones. The temporal changes of both disease-specific and nonspecific autoantibodies are consistently modified in autoimmune individuals. PMID:2062870

  19. Complementation of a defect in the asparagine-linked glycosylation of a mouse FM3A mutant G258 cell line by spheroplast fusion of a human mega YAC clone 923f5.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Takahisa; Moriya, Masayuki; Kataoka, Kensuke; Nishikawa, Yoshihisa

    2012-01-01

    Mouse G258 mutant stopped both cell growth and the synthesis of lipid-linked oligosaccharide at the Man(3)GlcNAc(2)-P-P-Dolichol at a restricted temperature with a single gene mutation. To clarify the lesion in the G258 mutant, we isolated human genomic DNA transformants of the G258 mutant, which recovered from both defects by way of cell hybridization with X-ray irradiated HeLa cells. We detected a common 1.3-kb product by inter-human specific sequence in the L1 (L1Hs) PCR in the transformants (Kataoka et al., Somat. Cell Mol. Genet., 24, 235-243 (1998)). In the present study, we screened a human mega yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) library by PCR with primers designed according to the 1.3-kb DNA, and selected YAC clone 923f5. Moreover, we found by spheroplast fusion that YAC clone 923f5 complemented both defects of the G258 mutant. Since the human counterpart of the yeast ALG11 gene is localized in the region, the G258 mutant might have a defect in the mouse ALG11 gene.

  20. Why Clone?

    MedlinePlus

    ... for tens of millions of years to clone dinosaurs. They run into trouble, however, when they realize ... and fiercer than expected. Could we really clone dinosaurs? In theory? Yes. You would need: A well- ...

  1. [Cloning - controversies].

    PubMed

    Twardowski, T; Michalska, A

    2001-01-01

    Cloning of the human being is not only highly controversial; in the opinion of the authors it is impossible - we are not able to reproduce human behaviour and character traits. Reproduction through cloning is limited to personal genome resources. The more important is protection of genomic characteristics as private property and taking advantage of cloning for production of the human organs directly or through xenotransplants. In this paper we present the legislation related to cloning in Poland, in the European Union and other countries. We also indicate who and why is interested in cloning.

  2. Isolation and sequence of a cDNA clone for human tyrosinase that maps at the mouse c-albino locus

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, B.S.; Haq, A.K.; Pomerantz, S.H.; Halaban, R.

    1987-11-01

    Screening of a lambdagt11 human melanocyte cDNA library with antibodies against hamster tyrosinase resulted in the isolation of 16 clones. The cDNA inserts from 13 of the 16 clones cross-hybridized with each other, indicating that they were form related mRNA species. One of the cDNA clones, Pmel34, detected one mRNA species with an approximate length of 2.4 kilobases that was expressed preferentially in normal and malignant melanocytes but not in other cell types. The amino acid sequence deduced from the nucleotide sequence showed that the putative human tyrosinase is composed of 548 amino acids with a molecular weight of 62,610. The deduced protein contains glycosylation sites and histidine-rich sites that could be used for copper binding. Southern blot analysis of DNA derived from newborn mice carrying lethal albino deletion mutations revealed that Pmel34 maps near or at the c-albino locus, the position of the structural gene for tyrosinase.

  3. Twins: A cloning experience.

    PubMed

    Prainsack, Barbara; Spector, Tim D

    2006-11-01

    Drawing upon qualitative interviews with monozygotic (identical) twins sharing 100% of their genes, and with dizygotic (fraternal) twins and singletons as control groups, this paper explores what it means to be genetically identical. (The twins interviewed were from the TwinsUK register in London.) In the context of the ongoing debate on human reproductive cloning, it examines questions such as: To what extent do identical twins perceive their emotional and physical bond to be a result of their genetic makeup? What would they think if they had been deliberately created genetically identical? How would they feel about being genetically identical to a person who was born a few years earlier or later? First, our respondents ascribed no great significance to the role of genes in their understanding of what it means to be identical twins. Second, the opinion that human reproductive cloning would "interfere with nature", or "contradict God's will", was expressed by our respondents exclusively on the abstract level. The more our respondents were able to relate a particular invented cloning scenario to their own life-worlds, the lower the prevalence of the argument. Third, for all three groups of respondents, the scenario of having been born in one of the other groups was perceived as strange. Fourth, the aspect that our respondents disliked about cloning scenarios was the potential motives of the cloners. Without equating monozygotic twins directly with "clones", these results from "naturally" genetically identical individuals add a new dimension to what a future cloning situation could entail: The cloned person might possibly (a) perceive a close physical and emotional connection to the progenitor as a blessing; (b) suffer from preconceptions of people who regard physical likeness as a sign of incomplete individuality; and (c) perceive the idea of not having been born a clone of a particular person as unpleasant.

  4. Academic Cloning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sikula, John P.; Sikula, Andrew F.

    1980-01-01

    The authors define "cloning" as an integral feature of all educational systems, citing teaching practices which reward students for closely reproducing the teacher's thoughts and/or behaviors and administrative systems which tend to promote like-minded subordinates. They insist, however, that "academic cloning" is not a totally…

  5. Cloning of cDNAs that encode human mast cell carboxypeptidase A, and comparison of the protein with mouse mast cell carboxypeptidase A and rat pancreatic carboxypeptidases

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, D.S.; Gurley, D.S.; Stevens, R.L.; Austen, K.F.; Serafin, W.E. Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA ); Sugarbaker, D.J. )

    1989-12-01

    Human skin and lung mast cells and rodent peritoneal cells contain a carboxypeptidase in their secretory granules. The authors have screened human lung cDNA libraries with a mouse mast cell carboxypeptidase A (MC-CPA) cDNA probe to isolate a near-full-length cDNA that encodes human MC-CPA. The 5{prime} end of the human MC-CPA transcript was defined by direct mRNA sequencing and by isolation and partial sequencing of the human MC-CPA gene. Human MC-CPA is predicted to be translated as a 417 amino acid preproenzyme which includes a 15 amino acid signal peptide and a 94-amino acid activation peptide. The mature human MC-CPA enzyme has a predicted size of 36.1 kDa, a net positive charge of 16 at neutral pH, and 86% amino acid sequence identity with mouse MC-CPA. DNA blot analyses showed that human MC-CPA mRNA is transcribed from a single locus in the human genome. Comparison of the human MC-CPA with mouse MC-CPA and with three rat pancreatic carboxypeptidases shows that these enzymes are encoded by distinct but homologous genes.

  6. Stable isotopes complement focal individual observations and confirm dietary variability in reddish-gray mouse lemurs (Microcebus griseorufus) from southwestern Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Crowley, Brooke E; Rasoazanabary, Emilienne; Godfrey, Laurie R

    2014-09-01

    We examine the ecology of reddish-gray mouse lemurs from three habitats at Beza Mahafaly Special Reserve using focal follows and stable carbon and nitrogen isotope data. Focal observations indicate dietary differences among habitats as well as sexes and seasons. Both sexes consume more arthropods during the rainy season but overall, females consume more sugar-rich exudates and fruit than males, and individuals from riparian forest consume fewer arthropods and more fruit than those in xeric or dry forest. We ask whether these observations are isotopically detectable. Isotope data support differences between seasons and sexes. Nitrogen isotope values are higher during the rainy season when lemurs consume more arthropods, and higher in males than females, particularly during the dry season. However, differences among populations inferred from focal observations are not fully supported. Lemurs from riparian forest have lower isotope values than those in xeric scrub, but isotope data suggest that lemurs from the dry forest eat the least animal matter and that focal observations overestimated dry forest arthropod consumption. Overall, our results suggest that observational and isotopic data are complementary. Isotope data can be obtained from a larger number of individuals and can quantify ingestion of animal matter, but they apparently cannot quantify the relative consumption of different sugar-rich foods. Combined focal and isotope data provide valuable insight into the dietary constraints of reddish-grey mouse lemurs, with implications for their vulnerability to future habitat change.

  7. The mouse glucocorticoid receptor: mapping of functional domains by cloning, sequencing and expression of wild-type and mutant receptor proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Danielsen, M; Northrop, J P; Ringold, G M

    1986-01-01

    We have isolated mouse glucocorticoid receptor (GR) cDNAs which, when expressed in transfected mammalian cells, produce a fully functional GR protein. Sequence analysis reveals an open reading frame of 2349 bp which could encode a protein of approximately 86,000 daltons. We have also isolated two receptor cDNAs from mouse S49 nuclear transfer-deficient (nt-) cells which encode mutant forms of the receptor protein. One cDNA encodes a protein that is unable to bind hormone and represents the endogenous hormone binding deficient receptor recently discovered in S49 cells. The lesion in this receptor is due to a single amino acid substitution (Glu-546 to Gly). The second cDNA from nt- cells produces a receptor protein that is able to bind hormone but has reduced nuclear binding. This cDNA, therefore, encodes for the S49 nt- receptor which has been shown to have reduced affinity for DNA. The lesion maps to a single amino acid substitution (Arg-484 to His) located in a highly Cys, Lys, Arg-rich region of the protein previously implicated in DNA binding. Our studies provide unambiguous identification of receptor domains and specific amino acids critical for the hormone and DNA binding properties of this transcriptional regulatory protein. Contained within the first 106 amino acids of the mouse GR is a stretch of nine glutamines with two prolines which are related to the family of transcribed repetitive elements, opa, found in Drosophila melanogaster. A truncated receptor lacking these 106 amino acids is functionally indistinguishable from the wild-type receptor. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:3780669

  8. Lessons learned from cloning dogs.

    PubMed

    Kim, M J; Oh, H J; Kim, G A; Park, J E; Park, E J; Jang, G; Ra, J C; Kang, S K; Lee, B C

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this article is to review dog cloning research and to suggest its applications based on a discussion about the normality of cloned dogs. Somatic cell nuclear transfer was successfully used for production of viable cloned puppies despite limited understanding of in vitro dog embryo production. Cloned dogs have similar growth characteristics to those born from natural fertilization, with no evidence of serious adverse effects. The offspring of cloned dogs also have similar growth performance and health to those of naturally bred puppies. Therefore, cloning in domestic dogs can be applied as an assisted reproductive technique to conserve endangered species, to treat sterile canids or aged dogs, to improve reproductive performance of valuable individuals and to generate disease model animals.

  9. Cloning and partial nucleotide sequence of human immunoglobulin mu chain cDNA from B cells and mouse-human hybridomas.

    PubMed Central

    Dolby, T W; Devuono, J; Croce, C M

    1980-01-01

    Purified mRNAs coding for mu and kappa human immunoglobulin polypeptides were translated in vitro and their products were characterized. The mu-specific mRNAs, derived from both human lymphoblastoid cells (GM607) and from a mouse-human somatic cell hybrid secreting human mu chains (alpha D5-H11-BC11), were copied into cDNAs and inserted into the plasmid pBR322. Several recombinant cDNAs that were obtained were identified by a combination of colony hybridization with labeled probes, in vitro translation of plasmid-selected mu mRNAs, and DNA nucleotide sequence determination. One recombinant DNA, for which the sequence has been partially determined, contains the codons for part of the C3 constant region domain through the carboxy-terminal piece (155 amino acids total) as well as the entire 3' noncoding sequence up to the poly(A) site of the human mu mRNA. The sequence A-A-U-A-A occurs 12 nucleotides prior to the poly(A) addition site in the human mu mRNA. Considerable sequence homology is observed in the mouse and human mu mRNA 3' coding and noncoding sequences. Images PMID:6777778

  10. Mouse Curve Biometrics

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, Douglas A.

    2007-10-08

    A biometric system suitable for validating user identity using only mouse movements and no specialized equipment is presented. Mouse curves (mouse movements with little or no pause between them) are individually classied and used to develop classication histograms, which are representative of an individual's typical mouse use. These classication histograms can then be compared to validate identity. This classication approach is suitable for providing continuous identity validation during an entire user session.

  11. Chorioallantoic placenta defects in cloned mice

    SciTech Connect

    Wakisaka-Saito, Noriko; Kohda, Takashi . E-mail: tkhoda.epgn@tmd.ac.jp; Inoue, Kimiko; Ogonuki, Narumi; Miki, Hiromi; Hikichi, Takafusa; Mizutani, Eiji; Wakayama, Teruhiko; Kaneko-Ishino, Tomoko; Ogura, Atsuo; Ishino, Fumitoshi

    2006-10-13

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer technology has been applied to produce live clones successfully in several mammalian species, but the success rates are very low. In mice, about half of the nuclear transfer embryos undergo implantation, but very few survive to term. We undertook detailed histological analyses of placentas from cloned mouse embryos generated from cumulus cells at 10.5 dpc of pregnancy, by which stage most clones have terminated their development. At 10.5 dpc, the extraembryonic tissues displayed several defined histological patterns, each reflecting their stage of developmental arrest. The most notable abnormality was the poor development of the spongiotrophoblast layer of diploid cells. This is in contrast to the placental hyperplasia frequently observed in somatic clones at 12.5 dpc or later stages. A variety of structural abnormalities were also observed in the embryos. Both placental and embryonic defects likely contribute to the low success rate of the mouse clones.

  12. Development of dry skin in the NOA mouse under individual housing conditions: a potentially useful animal model for evaluating moisturizing effects.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Taizo; Ohno, Hitoshi; Kondo, Toshio; Shiomoto, Yasuhisa; Momii, Akira

    2005-10-01

    In a previous study, we reported the development of grossly observable dry skin in all of the Naruto Research Institute Otsuka Atrichia (NOA) mice that were housed individually. In the present study, dermal physiological function tests were conducted and the usefulness of this dry skin model for evaluating the efficacy of topical moisturizers was assessed. As a result, we have confirmed a marked reduction in the water content of the stratum corneum in these animals. Therefore, the development of dry skin in the NOA mouse strain under individual housing conditions may be expected to serve as a useful animal model for evaluating topical moisturizers. Specifically, the water content of the stratum corneum was restored in proportion to the oil content of the ointment base used to treat the animals, and the moisturizing effects of urea were confirmed in animals treated with urea-containing ointment. In addition, when the animals that had been housed individually were returned to group housing conditions, the water content of the stratum corneum was restored, with a corresponding improvement in dry skin. This finding suggests that socio-psychological factors are involved in the etiology of dry skin in individually housed NOA mice.

  13. Positional cloning of zinc finger domain transcription factor Zfp69, a candidate gene for obesity-associated diabetes contributed by mouse locus Nidd/SJL.

    PubMed

    Scherneck, Stephan; Nestler, Matthias; Vogel, Heike; Blüher, Matthias; Block, Marcel-Dominique; Berriel Diaz, Mauricio; Herzig, Stephan; Schulz, Nadja; Teichert, Marko; Tischer, Sina; Al-Hasani, Hadi; Kluge, Reinhart; Schürmann, Annette; Joost, Hans-Georg

    2009-07-01

    Polygenic type 2 diabetes in mouse models is associated with obesity and results from a combination of adipogenic and diabetogenic alleles. Here we report the identification of a candidate gene for the diabetogenic effect of a QTL (Nidd/SJL, Nidd1) contributed by the SJL, NON, and NZB strains in outcross populations with New Zealand Obese (NZO) mice. A critical interval of distal chromosome 4 (2.1 Mbp) conferring the diabetic phenotype was identified by interval-specific congenic introgression of SJL into diabetes-resistant C57BL/6J, and subsequent reporter cross with NZO. Analysis of the 10 genes in the critical interval by sequencing, qRT-PCR, and RACE-PCR revealed a striking allelic variance of Zfp69 encoding zinc finger domain transcription factor 69. In NZO and C57BL/6J, a retrotransposon (IAPLTR1a) in intron 3 disrupted the gene by formation of a truncated mRNA that lacked the coding sequence for the KRAB (Krüppel-associated box) and Znf-C2H2 domains of Zfp69, whereas the diabetogenic SJL, NON, and NZB alleles generated a normal mRNA. When combined with the B6.V-Lep(ob) background, the diabetogenic Zfp69(SJL) allele produced hyperglycaemia, reduced gonadal fat, and increased plasma and liver triglycerides. mRNA levels of the human orthologue of Zfp69, ZNF642, were significantly increased in adipose tissue from patients with type 2 diabetes. We conclude that Zfp69 is the most likely candidate for the diabetogenic effect of Nidd/SJL, and that retrotransposon IAPLTR1a contributes substantially to the genetic heterogeneity of mouse strains. Expression of the transcription factor in adipose tissue may play a role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes.

  14. Definition of the tumor protein D52 (TPD52) gene family through cloning of D52 homologues in human (hD53) and mouse (mD52)

    SciTech Connect

    Byrne, J.A.; Basset, P.; Mattei, M.G.

    1996-08-01

    Cloning is reported of a cDNA homologue to the breast carcinoma-associated D52 cDNA, termed D53, and of a mouse D52 cDNA (HGMW-approved symbols TPD52L1 and TPD52). Human D53 and mouse D52 proteins are predicted to be 52 and 86% identical to human D52, respectively. Analysis of the three protein sequences identified a coiled-coil domain and N- and C-terminally located PEST domains in each. The conservation of homology between the D52 and the D53 sequences, combined with a lack of homology between these and known proteins, defines a new mammalian gene/protein family, the D52 family. The human D52 locus has been previously mapped to chromosome 8q21, and using in situ mapping in the present study, a human D53 locus was mapped to chromosome 6q22-q23. We observed coexpression of the human D52 and D53 genes in some breast tumors and derivative cell lines and found that maintenance of D52 and D53 transcript levels in estrogen receptor-positive MCF7 breast carcinoma cells depends upon estradiol. However, D52 and D53 genes were specifically expressed in HL-60 and K-562 leukemia cells, respectively, with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate treatment decreasing D52 and D53 transcript levels in these cell lines. The presence of a coiled-coil domain, combined with observed codependent or independent expression of the D52 and D53 genes, suggests that D52 and D53 proteins may be capable of hetero- and/or homodimer formation. 41 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Low incidence of off-target mutations in individual CRISPR-Cas9 and TALEN targeted human stem cell clones detected by whole-genome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Veres, Adrian; Gosis, Bridget S; Ding, Qiurong; Collins, Ryan; Ragavendran, Ashok; Brand, Harrison; Erdin, Serkan; Cowan, Chad A; Talkowski, Michael E; Musunuru, Kiran

    2014-07-03

    Genome editing has attracted wide interest for the generation of cellular models of disease using human pluripotent stem cells and other cell types. CRISPR-Cas systems and TALENs can target desired genomic sites with high efficiency in human cells, but recent publications have led to concern about the extent to which these tools may cause off-target mutagenic effects that could potentially confound disease-modeling studies. Using CRISPR-Cas9 and TALEN targeted human pluripotent stem cell clones, we performed whole-genome sequencing at high coverage in order to assess the degree of mutagenesis across the entire genome. In both types of clones, we found that off-target mutations attributable to the nucleases were very rare. From this analysis, we suggest that, although some cell types may be at risk for off-target mutations, the incidence of such effects in human pluripotent stem cells may be sufficiently low and thus not a significant concern for disease modeling and other applications.

  16. Alloreactive T cell clones.

    PubMed

    Fitch, F W

    1984-01-01

    T cell clones are useful models for studying lymphocyte function both at the level of the individual cell and in interacting systems. Murine cytolytic and non- cytolyic T cell clones have been obtained with relative ease, and the particular procedure used to derive and maintain T cell clones may influence profoundly the characteristics of the resulting cells. The method of choice depends on the specific question to be asked. Although some clones have characteristics that would have been expected on the basis of results observed with bulk cell populations, other clones have rather unexpected properties. Although most T cell clones appear to be either cytolytic or non-cytolytic, this distinction is not always absolute. A high proportion of both cytolytic and non-cytolytic T cell clones have dual reactivity. This is true for cells which by other criteria appear to be true clones. The frequency of such cells is high enough to suggest that most if not all T cells may have reactivity for more than one antigenic determinant or that antigenic determinants recognized by T cells are shared widely and unexpectedly. It is not clear whether one or two different antigen receptors account for such dual reactivity. The nature of the T cell receptor for antigen remains obscure. T cell clones, because of their homogeneous nature, should make it easier to answer these important immunological questions. Although it remains to be determined how many distinct molecules account for the numerous biological activities found in the culture supernatants from antigen-stimulated T cell clones, it is clear that these factors influence several different types of cells that are involved directly and indirectly in immune responses. IL-2 stimulates both cytolytic and non-cytolytic T cells to proliferate. BCSF causes polyclonal activation of B cells, and there may be other factors which influence B cell responses to antigenic stimulation. IL-3 apparently stimulates maturation of immature T cells

  17. Mouse reproductive fitness is maintained up to an ambient temperature of 28℃ when housed in individually-ventilated cages.

    PubMed

    Helppi, J; Schreier, D; Naumann, R; Zierau, O

    2016-08-01

    Production of genetically-modified mice is strongly dependent on environmental conditions. Mice are commonly housed at 22℃, which is significantly lower than their thermoneutral zone. But, when given a choice, mice often seem to prefer higher ambient temperatures. In the current study we investigated the effect of higher ambient temperature on the production of transgenic mice, with emphasis on embryo and sperm yield and quality. Mice (C57BL/6JOlaHsd) were housed under four different ambient temperatures (22, 25, 28 and 30℃). Female mice were superovulated, and mated with males. As indicators for reproductive fitness, the success of the mating was observed, including embryo yield and quality, as well as sperm count, motility and progressivity. Female mice were found to produce high amounts of high quality embryos from 22 to 28℃. Sperm count dropped continuously from 22 to 30℃, but sperm motility and progressivity remained high from 22 to 28℃. We conclude that mice can be housed at significantly higher temperatures than is commonly recommended without compromising embryo production and quality, or sperm quality. These results could lead to fundamental changes in how mouse facilities are built and operated - especially in warmer climates whereby energy consumption and therefore costs could be significantly reduced.

  18. Structure of cloned delta-globin genes from a normal subject and a patient with delta-thalassemia; sequence polymorphisms found in the delta-globin gene region of Japanese individuals.

    PubMed

    Kimura, A; Matsunaga, E; Ohta, Y; Fujiyoshi, T; Matsuo, T; Nakamura, T; Imamura, T; Yanase, T; Takagi, Y

    1982-10-11

    The delta-globin genes of a normal Japanese and a Japanese patient with homozygous delta-thalassemia were cloned, and the nucleotide sequence of a region including the gene was determined. Comparison of the nucleotide sequences of these two individuals with that of pH delta 1, delta-globin clone from the gene library constructed by Maniatis et al., showed differences in the large intervening sequence (IVS 2), at positions 137, 151, 186, 188, 291, 292 and 540 as one base substitutions, at 339 and 823 as one base additions, at 548 as a one base deletion, and a 9 bp duplication between positions 651 and 659, and differences in the 3'-flanking sequence at 51 and 98 nucleotides 3' to the AATAAA sequence. However, in the region studied, no differences was observed in the nucleotide sequences of the normal subject and the patient with delta-thalassemia. Therefore, these differences may represent polymorphisms of the delta-globin gene present in Japanese individuals. These data suggest that IVS 2 is more divergent than other regions, and that a DNA region(s) other than the globin gene may affect expression of the gene.

  19. Group and Individual Regulation of Physiology and Behavior: A Behavioral, Thermographic, and Acoustic Study of Mouse Development

    PubMed Central

    Harshaw, Christopher; Alberts, Jeffrey R.

    2012-01-01

    The traditional approach to the study of thermoregulation in young animals focuses on the regulatory capacities of individuals, which, for multiparous species, risks ignoring critical aspects of the early developmental niche. Here, we examined the ontogeny of regulatory behavior in C57BL/6 mice, employing simultaneous behavioral, thermographic, and acoustic measures of groups and individual pups. Litters of mice were placed in a chamber on Postnatal Day (PND) 2, 4, or 8, in which the ambient temperature (Ta) gradually cycled (over 50 min) from warm (36.5°C) to cool (20°C) and back (to 36.5°C). Litters of all three ages displayed “group regulatory behavior,” whereby group size varied with changes in Ta. This coupling, moreover, improved with age. Infrared thermography was used to monitor skin temperature of pups’ interscapular (TIS) and rump (Trump) areas, and to estimate brown adipose tissue (BAT) thermogenesis (TIS − Trump) in PND4 and PND8 individuals and huddles. Huddling was found to significantly reduce heat loss in pups subject to thermal challenge as groups, compared to pups challenged as individuals. Additionally, females were found to display significantly warmer TIS and Trump values than male huddlemates. Huddling did not have a consistent effect on emissions of ultrasonic vocalizations, which were generally correlated with ambient temperature and BAT activation. Our results indicate that simultaneous measures of behavioral and physiological response to cooling may prove useful for a variety of applications, including the phenotyping of social dysfunction. PMID:22580514

  20. Context-Dependent Sensitivity to Mutations Disrupting the Structural Integrity of Individual EGF Repeats in the Mouse Notch Ligand DLL1.

    PubMed

    Schuster-Gossler, Karin; Cordes, Ralf; Müller, Julia; Geffers, Insa; Delany-Heiken, Patricia; Taft, Manuel; Preller, Matthias; Gossler, Achim

    2016-03-01

    The highly conserved Notch-signaling pathway mediates cell-to-cell communication and is pivotal for multiple developmental processes and tissue homeostasis in adult organisms. Notch receptors and their ligands are transmembrane proteins with multiple epidermal-growth-factor-like (EGF) repeats in their extracellular domains. In vitro the EGF repeats of mammalian ligands that are essential for Notch activation have been defined. However, in vivo the significance of the structural integrity of each EGF repeat in the ligand ectodomain for ligand function is still unclear. Here, we analyzed the mouse Notch ligand DLL1. We expressed DLL1 proteins with mutations disrupting disulfide bridges in each individual EGF repeat from single-copy transgenes in the HPRT locus of embryonic stem cells. In Notch transactivation assays all mutations impinged on DLL1 function and affected both NOTCH1 and NOTCH2 receptors similarly. An allelic series in mice that carried the same point mutations in endogenous Dll1, generated using a mini-gene strategy, showed that early developmental processes depending on DLL1-mediated NOTCH activation were differently sensitive to mutation of individual EGF repeats in DLL1. Notably, some mutations affected only somite patterning and resulted in vertebral column defects resembling spondylocostal dysostosis. In conclusion, the structural integrity of each individual EGF repeat in the extracellular domain of DLL1 is necessary for full DLL1 activity, and certain mutations in Dll1 might contribute to spondylocostal dysostosis in humans.

  1. Analysis of Individual Mouse Activity in Group Housed Animals of Different Inbred Strains using a Novel Automated Home Cage Analysis System

    PubMed Central

    Bains, Rasneer S.; Cater, Heather L.; Sillito, Rowland R.; Chartsias, Agisilaos; Sneddon, Duncan; Concas, Danilo; Keskivali-Bond, Piia; Lukins, Timothy C.; Wells, Sara; Acevedo Arozena, Abraham; Nolan, Patrick M.; Armstrong, J. Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Central nervous system disorders such as autism as well as the range of neurodegenerative diseases such as Huntington's disease are commonly investigated using genetically altered mouse models. The current system for characterizing these mice usually involves removing the animals from their home-cage environment and placing them into novel environments where they undergo a battery of tests measuring a range of behavioral and physical phenotypes. These tests are often only conducted for short periods of times in social isolation. However, human manifestations of such disorders are often characterized by multiple phenotypes, presented over long periods of time and leading to significant social impacts. Here, we have developed a system which will allow the automated monitoring of individual mice housed socially in the cage they are reared and housed in, within established social groups and over long periods of time. We demonstrate that the system accurately reports individual locomotor behavior within the group and that the measurements taken can provide unique insights into the effects of genetic background on individual and group behavior not previously recognized. PMID:27375446

  2. Context-Dependent Sensitivity to Mutations Disrupting the Structural Integrity of Individual EGF Repeats in the Mouse Notch Ligand DLL1

    PubMed Central

    Schuster-Gossler, Karin; Cordes, Ralf; Müller, Julia; Geffers, Insa; Delany-Heiken, Patricia; Taft, Manuel; Preller, Matthias; Gossler, Achim

    2016-01-01

    The highly conserved Notch-signaling pathway mediates cell-to-cell communication and is pivotal for multiple developmental processes and tissue homeostasis in adult organisms. Notch receptors and their ligands are transmembrane proteins with multiple epidermal-growth-factor-like (EGF) repeats in their extracellular domains. In vitro the EGF repeats of mammalian ligands that are essential for Notch activation have been defined. However, in vivo the significance of the structural integrity of each EGF repeat in the ligand ectodomain for ligand function is still unclear. Here, we analyzed the mouse Notch ligand DLL1. We expressed DLL1 proteins with mutations disrupting disulfide bridges in each individual EGF repeat from single-copy transgenes in the HPRT locus of embryonic stem cells. In Notch transactivation assays all mutations impinged on DLL1 function and affected both NOTCH1 and NOTCH2 receptors similarly. An allelic series in mice that carried the same point mutations in endogenous Dll1, generated using a mini-gene strategy, showed that early developmental processes depending on DLL1-mediated NOTCH activation were differently sensitive to mutation of individual EGF repeats in DLL1. Notably, some mutations affected only somite patterning and resulted in vertebral column defects resembling spondylocostal dysostosis. In conclusion, the structural integrity of each individual EGF repeat in the extracellular domain of DLL1 is necessary for full DLL1 activity, and certain mutations in Dll1 might contribute to spondylocostal dysostosis in humans. PMID:26801181

  3. Cloning and molecular characterization of cDNA encoding a mouse male-enhanced antigen-2 (Mea-2): a putative family of the Golgi autoantigen.

    PubMed

    Kondo, M; Sutou, S

    1997-01-01

    The male-enhanced antigen-2 (Mea-2) gene was originally identified with a monoclonal histocompatibility Y (H-Y) antibody (mAb4VII). There is no report of the full length cDNA encode for Mea-2 product until this report. In this study, we isolated the full length mouse Mea-2 cDNA by screening a testis cDNA library with a PCR-amplified Mea-2 product, and direct PCR amplification of its upstream sequences from the cDNA library. The primary structure of the Mea-2 peptide, deduced from this nucleotide sequence, shows that it encode a 150 kDa protein, of 1325 amino acid residues, which contained five putative N-glycosylation sites and four leucine zipper motifs. A data bank search indicated that it has high homology with a human Golgi autoantigen (golgin-160) both in its nucleotides (78%) and amino acids sequence (83%). This suggests that Mea-2 gene product may encode a golgi structural protein. In situ hybridization analysis suggested that the Mea-2 gene is expressed in spermatids during spermatogenesis as already shown by Mea-1, suggesting that Mea-2 gene product as well as Mea-1 have also some role for spermatogenesis.

  4. Molecular cloning.

    PubMed

    Lessard, Juliane C

    2013-01-01

    This protocol describes the basic steps involved in conventional plasmid-based cloning. The goals are to insert a DNA fragment of interest into a receiving vector plasmid, transform the plasmid into E. coli, recover the plasmid DNA, and check for correct insertion events.

  5. Artificial cloning of domestic animals.

    PubMed

    Keefer, Carol L

    2015-07-21

    Domestic animals can be cloned using techniques such as embryo splitting and nuclear transfer to produce genetically identical individuals. Although embryo splitting is limited to the production of only a few identical individuals, nuclear transfer of donor nuclei into recipient oocytes, whose own nuclear DNA has been removed, can result in large numbers of identical individuals. Moreover, clones can be produced using donor cells from sterile animals, such as steers and geldings, and, unlike their genetic source, these clones are fertile. In reality, due to low efficiencies and the high costs of cloning domestic species, only a limited number of identical individuals are generally produced, and these clones are primarily used as breed stock. In addition to providing a means of rescuing and propagating valuable genetics, somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) research has contributed knowledge that has led to the direct reprogramming of cells (e.g., to induce pluripotent stem cells) and a better understanding of epigenetic regulation during embryonic development. In this review, I provide a broad overview of the historical development of cloning in domestic animals, of its application to the propagation of livestock and transgenic animal production, and of its scientific promise for advancing basic research.

  6. Human reproductive cloning: a conflict of liberties.

    PubMed

    Havstad, Joyce C

    2010-02-01

    Proponents of human reproductive cloning do not dispute that cloning may lead to violations of clones' right to self-determination, or that these violations could cause psychological harms. But they proceed with their endorsement of human reproductive cloning by dismissing these psychological harms, mainly in two ways. The first tactic is to point out that to commit the genetic fallacy is indeed a mistake; the second is to invoke Parfit's non-identity problem. The argument of this paper is that neither approach succeeds in removing our moral responsibility to consider and to prevent psychological harms to cloned individuals. In fact, the same commitment to personal liberty that generates the right to reproduce by means of cloning also creates the need to limit that right appropriately. Discussion of human reproductive cloning ought to involve a careful and balanced consideration of both the relevant aspects of personal liberty - the parents' right to reproductive freedom and the cloned child's right to self-determination.

  7. Cloning of rat homeobox genes

    SciTech Connect

    Sakoyama, Yasuhiko; Mizuta, Ikuko; Ogasawara, Naotake

    1994-10-01

    We report the isolation of nine rat cognates of mouse homeoboxes within the four Hox gene clusters and a rat homologue of mouse IPF1 homeobox, RHbox No. 13A. The sequences of nine cloned homeoboxes are highly similar to those of the mouse and human homeoboxes in the Hox clusters. The restriction enzyme sites and map distances between each of the homeoboxes on the rat genome are nearly identical to those of mouse and human. Thus, we conclude that the isolated homeoboxes are the rat homologues of mouse homeoboxes within the four Hox clusters. A novel homeobox RHbox No. 13A is different from the Drosophila Antennapedia (Antp) sequence but is highly similar to the XlHbox8 (Xenopus laevis) and HtrA2 (Helobdella triserialis) homeoboxes. Forty-two amino acids of the last two-thirds of the RHbox No. 13A, XlHbox8, and mouse IPF1 homeodomains completely matched. In addition, these four homeodomains contain a unique His residue in the recognition helix of a helix-turn-helix DNA-binding motif. This His residue is not found in any of the previously published mammalian homeodomain sequences except mouse IPF1. 24 refs., 4 figs.

  8. Sham Surgery and Inter-Individual Heterogeneity Are Major Determinants of Monocyte Subset Kinetics in a Mouse Model of Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Jedrzej; Ospelt, Manuel; Troidl, Christian; Voss, Sandra; Liebetrau, Christoph; Kim, Won-Keun; Rolf, Andreas; Wietelmann, Astrid; Braun, Thomas; Troidl, Kerstin; Sadayappan, Sakthivel; Barefield, David; Hamm, Christian; Nef, Holger; Möllmann, Helge

    2014-01-01

    Aims Mouse models of myocardial infarction (MI) are commonly used to explore the pathophysiological role of the monocytic response in myocardial injury and to develop translational strategies. However, no study thus far has examined the potential impact of inter-individual variability and sham surgical procedures on monocyte subset kinetics after experimental MI in mice. Our goal was to investigate determinants of systemic myeloid cell subset shifts in C57BL/6 mice following MI by developing a protocol for sequential extensive flow cytometry (FCM). Methods and Results Following cross-sectional multiplex FCM analysis we provide for the first time a detailed description of absolute quantities, relative subset composition, and biological variability of circulating classical, intermediate, and non-classical monocyte subsets in C57BL/6 mice. By using intra-individual longitudinal measurements after MI induction, a time course of classical and non-classical monocytosis was recorded. This approach disclosed a significant reduction of monocyte subset dispersion across all investigated time points following MI. We found that in the current invasive model of chronic MI the global pattern of systemic monocyte kinetics is mainly determined by a nonspecific inflammatory response to sham surgery and not by the extent of myocardial injury. Conclusions Application of sequential multiplexed FCM may help to reduce the impact of biological variability in C57BL/6 mice. Furthermore, the confounding influence of sham surgical procedures should always be considered when measuring monocyte subset kinetics in a murine model of MI. PMID:24893162

  9. Biomimetic Cloning of Quantum Observables

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Rodriguez, U.; Sanz, M.; Lamata, L.; Solano, E.

    2014-01-01

    We propose a bio-inspired sequential quantum protocol for the cloning and preservation of the statistics associated to quantum observables of a given system. It combines the cloning of a set of commuting observables, permitted by the no-cloning and no-broadcasting theorems, with a controllable propagation of the initial state coherences to the subsequent generations. The protocol mimics the scenario in which an individual in an unknown quantum state copies and propagates its quantum information into an environment of blank qubits. Finally, we propose a realistic experimental implementation of this protocol in trapped ions. PMID:24809937

  10. Biomimetic Cloning of Quantum Observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Rodriguez, U.; Sanz, M.; Lamata, L.; Solano, E.

    2014-05-01

    We propose a bio-inspired sequential quantum protocol for the cloning and preservation of the statistics associated to quantum observables of a given system. It combines the cloning of a set of commuting observables, permitted by the no-cloning and no-broadcasting theorems, with a controllable propagation of the initial state coherences to the subsequent generations. The protocol mimics the scenario in which an individual in an unknown quantum state copies and propagates its quantum information into an environment of blank qubits. Finally, we propose a realistic experimental implementation of this protocol in trapped ions.

  11. Systemic lupus erythematosus: molecular cloning and analysis of 22 individual recombinant monoclonal kappa light chains specifically hydrolyzing human myelin basic protein.

    PubMed

    Timofeeva, Anna M; Buneva, Valentina N; Nevinsky, Georgy A

    2015-10-01

    Antibodies hydrolyzing myelin basic protein (MBP) can play an important role in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). An immunoglobulin light chain phagemid library derived from peripheral blood lymphocytes of patients with SLE was used. Small pools of phage particles displaying light chains with different affinities for MBP were isolated by affinity chromatography on MBP-Sepharose, and the fraction eluted with 0.5 M NaCl was used for preparation of individual monoclonal light chains (MLChs, 26-27 kDa). Seventy-two of 440 individual colonies were randomly chosen, expressed in Escherichia coli in a soluble form, and MLChs were purified by metal chelating chromatography. Twenty-two of 72 MLChs have high affinity and efficiently hydrolyze only MBP (not other control proteins) demonstrating various pH optima in a 5.7-9.0 range and different substrate specificity in the hydrolysis of four different MBP oligopeptides. Four MLChs demonstrated serine protease-like and three thiol protease-like activities, while 11 MLChs were metalloproteases. The activity of three MLChs was inhibited by both phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF) and Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), two other by EDTA and iodoacetamide, and one by PMSF, EDTA, and iodoacetamide. The ratio of relative activity in the presence of Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Mn(2+), Ni(2+), Zn(2+), Cu(2+), and Co(2+) was individual for each of 22 MLCh preparations. It is the first examples of human MLChs, which probably can possess two or even three different proteolytic activities. These observations suggest an extreme diversity of anti-MBP abzymes in SLE patients. The immune systems of individual SLE patients can generate a variety of anti-MBP abzymes, which can attack MBP of myelin-proteolipid sheath of axons and play an important role in MS and SLE pathogenesis.

  12. Tissue-specific methylation of individual CpG dinucleotides in the 5{prime} upstream region of the mouse catalase gene (Cas-1)

    SciTech Connect

    Pillay, I.L.; Singh, S.M.

    1994-09-01

    The intracellular antioxidant enzyme, catalase, is encoded by a gene whose level of expression in different organisms, including humans, varies with tissue-type. The {open_quotes}TATA-less{close_quotes} 5{prime} upstream region of the catalase gene, in mice and humans, contains a CpG island. Such CG-rich regions are target sites for cytosine methylation and have been implicated in tissue-specific gene expression. However, the methylation status of individual CpG dinucleotides and their significance in gene expression has not been established. A 275 bp fragment within the 5{prime} region of Cas-1 was evaluated for CpG methylation. HpaII digestion of genomic DNA, followed by polymerase chain reaction amplification (HpaII-PCR), suggests that at least one of three CCGG is not methylated in nine different somatic tissues that express this enzyme at various levels. In contrast, all three CCGG sites are methylated in DNA from sperm and spleen. Further examination of the methylation specificity of individual CCGG sites was conducted using sodium bisulfite modification of genomic DNA followed by HPaII-PCR. Sodium bisulfite modifies non-methylated cytosines to uracils, changing a CG to a TG dinucleotide. This nucleotide substitution eliminates HpaII sites and allows the methylation status of each of the CCGG sites to be assessed. The ability to discern the number and combination of methylated sites within the 5{prime} region of a gene permits the determination of a possible correlation between differential methylation patterns and temporal/spatial gene regulation. Analysis of differential methylation, using the mouse catalase gene as a model, provides further insight into CpG methylation as one mechanism of mammalian gene regulation.

  13. Identifying Differentiation Stage of Individual Primary Hematopoietic Cells from Mouse Bone Marrow by Multivariate Analysis of TOF-Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry Data

    PubMed Central

    Frisz, Jessica F.; Choi, Ji Sun; Wilson, Robert L.; Harley, Brendan A. C.; Kraft, Mary L.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to self-renew and differentiate into multiple types of blood and immune cells renders hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) valuable for clinical treatment of hematopoietic pathologies and as models of stem cell differentiation for tissue engineering applications. To study directed HSC differentiation and identify the conditions that recreate the native bone marrow environment, combinatorial biomaterials that exhibit lateral variations in chemical and mechanical properties are employed. New experimental approaches are needed to facilitate correlating cell differentiation stage with location in the culture system. We demonstrate that multivariate analysis of time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) data can be used to identify the differentiation state of individual hematopoietic cells (HCs) isolated from mouse bone marrow. Here, we identify primary HCs from three distinct stages of B cell lymphopoiesis at the single cell level: HSPCs, common lymphoid progenitors, and mature B cells. The differentiation state of individual HCs in a test set could be identified with a partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) model that was constructed with calibration spectra from HCs of known differentiation status. The lowest error of identification was obtained when the intra-population spectral variation between the cells in the calibration and test sets was minimized. This approach complements the traditional methods that are used to identify HC differentiation stage. Further, the ability to gather mass spectrometry data from single HSCs cultured on graded biomaterial substrates may provide significant new insight into how HSPCs respond to extrinsic cues as well as the molecular changes that occur during cell differentiation. PMID:22507202

  14. Developing a framework for predicting upper extremity muscle activities, postures, velocities, and accelerations during computer use: the effect of keyboard use, mouse use, and individual factors on physical exposures.

    PubMed

    Bruno Garza, Jennifer L; Catalano, Paul J; Katz, Jeffrey N; Huysmans, Maaike A; Dennerlein, Jack T

    2012-01-01

    Prediction models were developed based on keyboard and mouse use in combination with individual factors that could be used to predict median upper extremity muscle activities, postures, velocities, and accelerations experienced during computer use. In the laboratory, 25 participants performed five simulated computer trials with different amounts of keyboard and mouse use ranging from a highly keyboard-intensive trial to a highly mouse-intensive trial. During each trial, muscle activity and postures of the shoulder and wrist and velocities and accelerations of the wrists, along with percentage keyboard and mouse use, were measured. Four individual factors (hand length, shoulder width, age, and gender) were also measured on the day of data collection. Percentage keyboard and mouse use explained a large amount of the variability in wrist velocities and accelerations. Although hand length, shoulder width, and age were each significant predictors of at least one median muscle activity, posture, velocity, or acceleration exposure, these individual factors explained very little variability in addition to percentage keyboard and mouse use in any of the physical exposures investigated. The amounts of variability explained for models predicting median wrist velocities and accelerations ranged from 75 to 84% but were much lower for median muscle activities and postures (0-50%). RMS errors ranged between 8 to 13% of the range observed. While the predictions for wrist velocities and accelerations may be able to be used to improve exposure assessment for future epidemiologic studies, more research is needed to identify other factors that may improve the predictions for muscle activities and postures.

  15. Wildlife conservation and reproductive cloning.

    PubMed

    Holt, William V; Pickard, Amanda R; Prather, Randall S

    2004-03-01

    Reproductive cloning, or the production of offspring by nuclear transfer, is often regarded as having potential for conserving endangered species of wildlife. Currently, however, low success rates for reproductive cloning limit the practical application of this technique to experimental use and proof of principle investigations. In this review, we consider how cloning may contribute to wildlife conservation strategies. The cloning of endangered mammals presents practical problems, many of which stem from the paucity of knowledge about their basic reproductive biology. However, situations may arise where resources could be targeted at recovering lost or under-represented genetic lines; these could then contribute to the future fitness of the population. Approaches of this type would be preferable to the indiscriminate generation of large numbers of identical individuals. Applying cloning technology to non-mammalian vertebrates may be more practical than attempting to use conventional reproductive technologies. As the scientific background to cloning technology was pioneered using amphibians, it may be possible to breed imminently threatened amphibians, or even restore extinct amphibian species, by the use of cloning. In this respect species with external embryonic development may have an advantage over mammals as developmental abnormalities associated with inappropriate embryonic reprogramming would not be relevant.

  16. [Eugenics and human cloning].

    PubMed

    Boloz, W

    2001-01-01

    Because of legislative bans there are still no reports of human cloning. However eager public debate is currently running, concerning medical, legal, social and ethical aspects of human cloning. Arguments for and against human cloning are presented. An important argument against cloning is the danger of eugenic tendencies connected with cloning, which could lead to genetic discrimination.

  17. RIKEN mouse genome encyclopedia.

    PubMed

    Hayashizaki, Yoshihide

    2003-01-01

    We have been working to establish the comprehensive mouse full-length cDNA collection and sequence database to cover as many genes as we can, named Riken mouse genome encyclopedia. Recently we are constructing higher-level annotation (Functional ANnoTation Of Mouse cDNA; FANTOM) not only with homology search based annotation but also with expression data profile, mapping information and protein-protein database. More than 1,000,000 clones prepared from 163 tissues were end-sequenced to classify into 159,789 clusters and 60,770 representative clones were fully sequenced. As a conclusion, the 60,770 sequences contained 33,409 unique. The next generation of life science is clearly based on all of the genome information and resources. Based on our cDNA clones we developed the additional system to explore gene function. We developed cDNA microarray system to print all of these cDNA clones, protein-protein interaction screening system, protein-DNA interaction screening system and so on. The integrated database of all the information is very useful not only for analysis of gene transcriptional network and for the connection of gene to phenotype to facilitate positional candidate approach. In this talk, the prospect of the application of these genome resourced should be discussed. More information is available at the web page: http://genome.gsc.riken.go.jp/.

  18. Differential regulation by agonist and phorbol ester of cloned m1 and m2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in mouse Y1 adrenal cells and in Y1 cells deficient in cAMP-dependent protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Scherer, N.M.; Nathanson, N.M. )

    1990-09-11

    Cloned muscarinic acetylcholine m1 and m2 receptors were expressed in stably transfected mouse Y1 adrenal cells and in a variant Y1 line, Kin-8, which is deficient in cAMP-dependent protein kinase activity (PKA{sup {minus}}). m1 and m2 receptors were rapidly internalized following exposure of transfected PKA{sup +} or PKA{sup {minus}} cells to the muscarinic agonist carbachol. Thus, agonist-dependent internalization of m1 and m2 did not require PKA activity. A differential effect of PKA on regulation by agonist of the m2 receptor, but not the m1 receptor, was unmasked in PKA{sup {minus}} cells. These data indicate that the basal activity of PKA may modulate the agonist-dependent internalization of the m2 receptor, but not the m1 receptor. The internalization of the m1 and m2 receptors in both PKA{sup +} and PKA{sup {minus}} cells was accompanied by desensitization of functional responses. Exposure of PKA{sup +} cells to 10{sup {minus}7} M phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), an activator of protein kinase C, resulted in a 30 {plus minus} 9% decrease in the number of m1 receptors on the cell surface. The m2 receptor was not internalized following treatment of either PKA{sup +} or PKA{sup {minus}} cells with PMA. Thus, the m1 and m2 receptors show differential sensitivity to internalization by PMA. Agonist-dependent internalization of the m1 receptor appeared to be independent of activation of PKC because (1) agonist-dependent internalization of m1 was not attenuated in PKA{sup {minus}} cells, (2) the rate and extent of internalization of m1 in cells exposed to PMA were less than those in cells exposed to agonist, and (3) treatment of cells with concanavalin A selectivity blocked internalization of m1 in cells exposed to PMA, but not to agonist. The effects of agonist and PMA on receptor internalization were not additive. Exposure of PKA{sup +} or PKA{sup {minus}} cells to PMA reduced the magnitude of pilocarpine-stimulated PI hydrolysis by about 25%.

  19. The effect of superovulation on the contributions of individual blastomeres from 2-cell stage CF1 mouse embryos to the blastocyst.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Mika; Roberts, R Michael

    2010-01-01

    It remains controversial whether blastomeres of 2-cell stage mouse embryos show bias in their contribution to the blastocyst and whether there is any effect of superovulation. Two-cell stage embryos from CF1 mice were derived by either natural breeding (N) or superovulation (S) and cultured in vitro. At blastocyst, inner cell mass and trophectoderm were distinguished by Cdx2 and Oct4 immunostaining. A fluorescent dye (CM-Dil) was also used to tag individual blastomeres at the 2-cell stage, and the descendant cells identified by their red fluorescence. S and N embryos developed to blastocyst at the same rate and contained a similar number of cells. However, with S embryos, the descendants of the blastomere labeled with CM-DiI contributed predominantly to either the embryonic or abembryonic pole about 70% of the time, whereas most N embryos displayed random patterning, with no restriction to one or other of the poles. In S-embryos, but not N-embryos, the leading blastomere at second cleavage contributed preferentially to the embryonic pole of the blastocyst and the lagging blastomere to the abembryonic pole and hence mural trophectoderm. In addition, a tetrahedral rather than a flat morphology at the 4-cell stage of S-embryos was strongly biased to displaying the embryonic/abembryonic pattern at blastocyst. In contrast, S-embryos lacking a zona pellucida resembled N embryos in their patterning. In CF1 mice, superovulation has little effect on development to blastocyst, but enforces a greater degree of lineage restriction than natural breeding, most likely through constraints imposed by the zona pellucida.

  20. The effect of two different Individually Ventilated Cage systems on anxiety-related behaviour and welfare in two strains of laboratory mouse.

    PubMed

    Burman, O; Buccarello, L; Redaelli, V; Cervo, L

    2014-01-30

    The environment in which a laboratory animal is housed can significantly influence its behaviour and welfare, acting as a potential confounding factor for those studies in which it is utilised. This study investigated the impact of two Individually Ventilated Cage (IVC) housing systems on anxiety-related behaviour and welfare indicators in two common strains of laboratory mice. Subjects were juvenile female C57BL/6J and BALB/c mice (N=128) housed in groups of four in two different IVC systems for 7weeks. System One had air delivery at the cage 'cover' level at 75 ACH (Air Changes/Hour) and System Two had air delivery at the 'animal' level at 50 ACH. Mice were assessed twice a week (e.g. bodyweight) or at the end of the study (e.g. anxiety tests). Our results showed significant differences in anxiety-related behaviour between strains and housing systems. Mice in System Two, regardless of strain, defecated more in the Elevated Plus Maze (EPM), spent less time in the open arms of the EPM, and less time in the central zone of the Open Field (OF). Strain differences in anxiety-like behaviour were seen in the increased defecation by BALB/c mice in the OF and EPM and less time spent in the open arms of the EPM compared to C57BL/6J mice. These results suggest that different IVC housing systems can influence mouse behaviour in different ways, with mice of both strains studied exhibiting more anxiety-related behaviour when housed in System Two (air entry at the 'animal' level at 50 ACH), which could impact upon experimental data.

  1. Cloning mice and ES cells by nuclear transfer from somatic stem cells and fully differentiated cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhongde

    2011-01-01

    Cloning animals by nuclear transfer (NT) has been successful in several mammalian species. In addition to cloning live animals (reproductive cloning), this technique has also been used in several species to establish cloned embryonic stem (ntES) cell lines from somatic cells. It is the latter application of this technique that has been heralded as being the potential means to produce isogenic embryonic stem cells from patients for cell therapy (therapeutic cloning). These two types of cloning differ only in the steps after cloned embryos are produced: for reproductive cloning the cloned embryos are transferred to surrogate mothers to allow them to develop to full term and for therapeutic cloning the cloned embryos are used to derive ntES cells. In this chapter, a detailed NT protocol in mouse by using somatic stem cells (neuron and skin stem cells) and fully differentiated somatic cells (cumulus cells and fibroblast cells) as nuclear donors is described.

  2. A physical map of the mouse genome.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Simon G; Sekhon, Mandeep; Schein, Jacqueline; Zhao, Shaying; Osoegawa, Kazutoyo; Scott, Carol E; Evans, Richard S; Burridge, Paul W; Cox, Tony V; Fox, Christopher A; Hutton, Richard D; Mullenger, Ian R; Phillips, Kimbly J; Smith, James; Stalker, Jim; Threadgold, Glen J; Birney, Ewan; Wylie, Kristine; Chinwalla, Asif; Wallis, John; Hillier, LaDeana; Carter, Jason; Gaige, Tony; Jaeger, Sara; Kremitzki, Colin; Layman, Dan; Maas, Jason; McGrane, Rebecca; Mead, Kelly; Walker, Rebecca; Jones, Steven; Smith, Michael; Asano, Jennifer; Bosdet, Ian; Chan, Susanna; Chittaranjan, Suganthi; Chiu, Readman; Fjell, Chris; Fuhrmann, Dan; Girn, Noreen; Gray, Catharine; Guin, Ran; Hsiao, Letticia; Krzywinski, Martin; Kutsche, Reta; Lee, Soo Sen; Mathewson, Carrie; McLeavy, Candice; Messervier, Steve; Ness, Steven; Pandoh, Pawan; Prabhu, Anna-Liisa; Saeedi, Parvaneh; Smailus, Duane; Spence, Lorraine; Stott, Jeff; Taylor, Sheryl; Terpstra, Wesley; Tsai, Miranda; Vardy, Jill; Wye, Natasja; Yang, George; Shatsman, Sofiya; Ayodeji, Bola; Geer, Keita; Tsegaye, Getahun; Shvartsbeyn, Alla; Gebregeorgis, Elizabeth; Krol, Margaret; Russell, Daniel; Overton, Larry; Malek, Joel A; Holmes, Mike; Heaney, Michael; Shetty, Jyoti; Feldblyum, Tamara; Nierman, William C; Catanese, Joseph J; Hubbard, Tim; Waterston, Robert H; Rogers, Jane; de Jong, Pieter J; Fraser, Claire M; Marra, Marco; McPherson, John D; Bentley, David R

    2002-08-15

    A physical map of a genome is an essential guide for navigation, allowing the location of any gene or other landmark in the chromosomal DNA. We have constructed a physical map of the mouse genome that contains 296 contigs of overlapping bacterial clones and 16,992 unique markers. The mouse contigs were aligned to the human genome sequence on the basis of 51,486 homology matches, thus enabling use of the conserved synteny (correspondence between chromosome blocks) of the two genomes to accelerate construction of the mouse map. The map provides a framework for assembly of whole-genome shotgun sequence data, and a tile path of clones for generation of the reference sequence. Definition of the human-mouse alignment at this level of resolution enables identification of a mouse clone that corresponds to almost any position in the human genome. The human sequence may be used to facilitate construction of other mammalian genome maps using the same strategy.

  3. The Clone Factory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoddard, Beryl

    2005-01-01

    Have humans been cloned? Is it possible? Immediate interest is sparked when students are asked these questions. In response to their curiosity, the clone factory activity was developed to help them understand the process of cloning. In this activity, students reenact the cloning process, in a very simplified simulation. After completing the…

  4. Analysis of neural crest–derived clones reveals novel aspects of facial development

    PubMed Central

    Kaucka, Marketa; Ivashkin, Evgeny; Gyllborg, Daniel; Zikmund, Tomas; Tesarova, Marketa; Kaiser, Jozef; Xie, Meng; Petersen, Julian; Pachnis, Vassilis; Nicolis, Silvia K.; Yu, Tian; Sharpe, Paul; Arenas, Ernest; Brismar, Hjalmar; Blom, Hans; Clevers, Hans; Suter, Ueli; Chagin, Andrei S.; Fried, Kaj; Hellander, Andreas; Adameyko, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Cranial neural crest cells populate the future facial region and produce ectomesenchyme-derived tissues, such as cartilage, bone, dermis, smooth muscle, adipocytes, and many others. However, the contribution of individual neural crest cells to certain facial locations and the general spatial clonal organization of the ectomesenchyme have not been determined. We investigated how neural crest cells give rise to clonally organized ectomesenchyme and how this early ectomesenchyme behaves during the developmental processes that shape the face. Using a combination of mouse and zebrafish models, we analyzed individual migration, cell crowd movement, oriented cell division, clonal spatial overlapping, and multilineage differentiation. The early face appears to be built from multiple spatially defined overlapping ectomesenchymal clones. During early face development, these clones remain oligopotent and generate various tissues in a given location. By combining clonal analysis, computer simulations, mouse mutants, and live imaging, we show that facial shaping results from an array of local cellular activities in the ectomesenchyme. These activities mostly involve oriented divisions and crowd movements of cells during morphogenetic events. Cellular behavior that can be recognized as individual cell migration is very limited and short-ranged and likely results from cellular mixing due to the proliferation activity of the tissue. These cellular mechanisms resemble the strategy behind limb bud morphogenesis, suggesting the possibility of common principles and deep homology between facial and limb outgrowth. PMID:27493992

  5. The Riken mouse genome encyclopedia project.

    PubMed

    Hayashizaki, Yoshihide

    2003-01-01

    The Riken mouse genome encyclopedia a comprehensive full-length cDNA collection and sequence database. High-level functional annotation is based on sequence homology search, expression profiling, mapping and protein-protein interactions. More than 1000000 clones prepared from 163 tissues were end-sequenced and classified into 128000 clusters, and 60000 representative clones were fully sequenced representing 24000 clear protein-encoding genes. The application of the mouse genome database for positional cloning and gene network regulation analysis is reported.

  6. [Cloning and law in Hungary].

    PubMed

    Julesz, Máté

    2015-03-01

    Reproductive human cloning is prohibited in Hungary, as in many other countries. Therapeutic human cloning is not prohibited, just like in many other countries. Stem cell therapy is also allowed. Article III, paragraph (3) of the Hungarian basic law (constitution) strictly forbids total human cloning. Article 1 of the Additional Protocol to the Oviedo Convention, on the Prohibition of Cloning Human Beings (1998) stipulates that any intervention seeking to create a human being genetically identical to another human being, whether living or dead, is prohibited. In Hungary, according to Article 174 of the Criminal Code, total human cloning constitutes a crime. Article 180, paragraph (3) of the Hungarian Act on Health declares that embryos shall not be brought about for research purposes; research shall be conducted only on embryos brought about for reproductive purposes when this is authorized by the persons entitled to decide upon its disposal, or when the embryo is damaged. Article 180, paragraph (5) of the Hungarian Act on Health stipulates that multiple individuals who genetically conform to one another shall not be brought about. According to Article 181, paragraph (1) of the Hungarian Act on Health, an embryo used for research shall be kept alive for not longer than 14 days, not counting the time it was frozen for storage and the time period of research.

  7. Mapping individual cosmid DNAs by direct AFM imaging.

    PubMed

    Allison, D P; Kerper, P S; Doktycz, M J; Thundat, T; Modrich, P; Larimer, F W; Johnson, D K; Hoyt, P R; Mucenski, M L; Warmack, R J

    1997-05-01

    Individual cosmid clones have been restriction mapped by directly imaging, with the atomic force microscope (AFM), a mutant EcoRI endonuclease site-specifically bound to DNA. Images and data are presented that locate six restriction sites, predicted from gel electrophoresis, on a 35-kb cosmid isolated from mouse chromosome 7. Measured distances between endonuclease molecules bound to lambda DNA, when compared to known values, demonstrate the accuracy of AFM mapping to better than 1%. These results may be extended to identify other important site-specific protein-DNA interactions, such as transcription factor and mismatch repair enzyme binding, difficult to resolve by current techniques.

  8. Emergence and spread of O16-ST131 and O25b-ST131 clones among faecal CTX-M-producing Escherichia coli in healthy individuals in Hunan Province, China

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Yi-Ming; Liu, Wen-En; Liang, Xiang-Hui; Li, Yan-Ming; Jian, Zi-Juan; Hawkey, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The objectives of this study were to determine CTX-M-producing Escherichia coli ST131 strain prevalence in stool specimens from healthy subjects in central China and to molecularly characterize clonal groups. Methods From November 2013 to January 2014, stool specimens from healthy individuals in Hunan Province were screened for ESBL-producing E. coli using chromogenic medium and CTX-M genotypes and phylogenetic groups were determined. ST131 clonal groups were detected by PCR and characterized for antibiotic resistance, fimH, gyrA and parC alleles, plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinants, virulence genotypes and PFGE patterns. Results Among 563 subjects, 287 (51.0%) exhibited the presence of faecal ESBL-producing E. coli, all of which produced CTX-M enzymes. The most common CTX-M genotypes were CTX-M-14 (48.4%), CTX-M-15 (27.5%) and CTX-M-27 (15.0%). Of the 287 CTX-M-producing isolates, 32 (11.1%) belonged to the ST131 clone. O16-ST131 isolates were dominant (75%) and contained the fimH41 allele. The remaining eight (25%) ST131 isolates were of the O25b subgroup and contained fimH30 or fimH41. Ciprofloxacin resistance was found in 100% of the O25b-ST131 isolates, whereas only 8% of the O16-ST131 isolates were resistant. All of the O25b-ST131 isolates except one showed gyrA1AB and parC1aAB mutations; most of the O16-ST131 isolates had gyrA1A and parC1b mutations. The virulence genotypes of O16-ST131 resembled those of the O25b-ST131 isolates. The 32 ST131 isolates formed one large group at the 64% similarity level. They comprised 15 PFGE groups (defined at ≥85% similarity). Conclusions O16-ST131 isolates have emerged as the predominant type of ST131 isolate in faecal CTX-M-producing E. coli in healthy individuals in China. PMID:25957581

  9. Inhibition of class IIb histone deacetylase significantly improves cloning efficiency in mice.

    PubMed

    Ono, Tetsuo; Li, Chong; Mizutani, Eiji; Terashita, Yukari; Yamagata, Kazuo; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    2010-12-01

    Since the first mouse clone was produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer, the success rate of cloning in mice has been extremely low. Some histone deacetylase inhibitors, such as trichostatin A and scriptaid, have improved the full-term development of mouse clones significantly, but the mechanisms allowing for this are unclear. Here, we found that two other specific inhibitors, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid and oxamflatin, could also reduce the rate of apoptosis in blastocysts, improve the full-term development of cloned mice, and increase establishment of nuclear transfer-generated embryonic stem cell lines significantly without leading to obvious abnormalities. However, another inhibitor, valproic acid, could not improve cloning efficiency. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid, oxamflatin, trichostatin A, and scriptaid are inhibitors for classes I and IIa/b histone deacetylase, whereas valproic acid is an inhibitor for classes I and IIa, suggesting that inhibiting class IIb histone deacetylase is an important step for reprogramming mouse cloning efficiency.

  10. Multipartite asymmetric quantum cloning

    SciTech Connect

    Iblisdir, S.; Gisin, N.; Acin, A.; Cerf, N.J.; Filip, R.; Fiurasek, J.

    2005-10-15

    We investigate the optimal distribution of quantum information over multipartite systems in asymmetric settings. We introduce cloning transformations that take N identical replicas of a pure state in any dimension as input and yield a collection of clones with nonidentical fidelities. As an example, if the clones are partitioned into a set of M{sub A} clones with fidelity F{sup A} and another set of M{sub B} clones with fidelity F{sup B}, the trade-off between these fidelities is analyzed, and particular cases of optimal N{yields}M{sub A}+M{sub B} cloning machines are exhibited. We also present an optimal 1{yields}1+1+1 cloning machine, which is an example of a tripartite fully asymmetric cloner. Finally, it is shown how these cloning machines can be optically realized.

  11. Aristotle and headless clones.

    PubMed

    Mosteller, Timothy

    2005-01-01

    Cloned organisms can be genetically altered so that they do not exhibit higher brain functioning. This form of therapeutic cloning allows for genetically identical organs and tissues to be harvested from the clone for the use of the organism that is cloned. "Spare parts" cloning promises many opportunities for future medical advances. What is the ontological and ethical status of spare parts, headless clones? This paper attempts to answer this question from the perspective of Aristotle's view of the soul. Aristotle's metaphysics as applied to his view of biological essences generates an ethic that can contribute to moral reasoning regarding the use of headless spare parts clones. The task of this paper is to show the implications that Aristotle's view of the soul, if it is true, would have on the ethics of headless, spare parts cloning.

  12. Animal Cloning and Food Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... milk from clones of cattle, swine (pigs), and goats, and the offspring of clones from any species ... composition of food products from cattle, swine, and goat clones, or the offspring of any animal clones, ...

  13. Molecular cloning and functional expression in heterologous mammalian cells of the cDNAs encoding lactate dehydrogenase isozymes A (muscle), B (heart), and C (testis) from man and mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, I.; Hou, E.W.; Sharief, F.S.; Hiraoka, B.Y.; Takano, T.; Li, S.S.L.

    1987-05-01

    The full-length cDNAs encoding human LHD-A (muscle), human and mouse LDH-B (heart), and mouse LDH-C (testis) isozymes have been isolated and their nucleotide sequences determined. The cDNAs for human LDH-A and mouse LDH-C isozymes were inserted into mammalian expression vectors and were shown to direct the synthesis of functional LDH isozymes in Chinese hamster ovary cells. The exogeneous LDH-A and LDH-C subunits were found to form hybrid LDH tetrameric isozymes with endogeneous LDH-A subunit of CHO cells. The genomic DNA containing LDH cDNA insert and the levels of mRNA expression are being characterized.

  14. Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer in the Mouse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishigami, Satoshi; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has become a unique and powerful tool for epigenetic reprogramming research and gene manipulation in animals since “Dolly,” the first animal cloned from an adult cell was reported in 1997. Although the success rates of somatic cloning have been inefficient and the mechanism of reprogramming is still largely unknown, this technique has been proven to work in more than 10 mammalian species. Among them, the mouse provides the best model for both basic and applied research of somatic cloning because of its abounding genetic resources, rapid sexual maturity and propagation, minimal requirements for housing, etc. This chapter describes a basic protocol for mouse cloning using cumulus cells, the most popular cell type for NT, in which donor nuclei are directly injected into the oocyte using a piezo-actuated micromanipulator. In particular, we focus on a new, more efficient mouse cloning protocol using trichostatin A (TSA), a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, which increases both in vitro and in vivo developmental rates from twofold to fivefold. This new method including TSA will be helpful to establish mouse cloning in many laboratories.

  15. Targeted Genomic Disruption of H-ras and N-ras, Individually or in Combination, Reveals the Dispensability of Both Loci for Mouse Growth and Development

    PubMed Central

    Esteban, Luis M.; Vicario-Abejón, Carlos; Fernández-Salguero, Pedro; Fernández-Medarde, Alberto; Swaminathan, Nalini; Yienger, Kate; Lopez, Eva; Malumbres, Marcos; McKay, Ron; Ward, Jerrold M.; Pellicer, Angel; Santos, Eugenio

    2001-01-01

    Mammalian cells harbor three highly homologous and widely expressed members of the ras family (H-ras, N-ras, and K-ras), but it remains unclear whether they play specific or overlapping cellular roles. To gain insight into such functional roles, here we generated and analyzed H-ras null mutant mice, which were then also bred with N-ras knockout animals to ascertain the viability and properties of potential double null mutations in both loci. Mating among heterozygous H-ras+/− mice produced H-ras−/− offspring with a normal Mendelian pattern of inheritance, indicating that the loss of H-ras did not interfere with embryonic and fetal viability in the uterus. Homozygous mutant H-ras−/− mice reached sexual maturity at the same age as their littermates, and both males and females were fertile. Characterization of lymphocyte subsets in the spleen and thymus showed no significant differences between wild-type and H-ras−/− mice. Analysis of neuronal markers in the brains of knockout and wild-type H-ras mice showed that disruption of this locus did not impair or alter neuronal development. Breeding between our H-ras mutant animals and previously available N-ras null mutants gave rise to viable double knockout (H-ras−/−/N-ras−/−) offspring expressing only K-ras genes which grew normally, were fertile, and did not show any obvious phenotype. Interestingly, however, lower-than-expected numbers of adult, double knockout animals were consistently obtained in Mendelian crosses between heterozygous N-ras/H-ras mice. Our results indicate that, as for N-ras, H-ras gene function is dispensable for normal mouse development, growth, fertility, and neuronal development. Additionally, of the three ras genes, K-ras appears to be not only essential but also sufficient for normal mouse development. PMID:11238881

  16. Cloning of ES cells and mice by nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Wakayama, Sayaka; Kishigami, Satoshi; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    2009-01-01

    We have been able to develop a stable nuclear transfer (NT) method in the mouse, in which donor nuclei are directly injected into the oocyte using a piezo-actuated micromanipulator. Although the piezo unit is a complex tool, once mastered it is of great help not only in NT experiments, but also in almost all other forms of micromanipulation. Using this technique, embryonic stem (ntES) cell lines established from somatic cell nuclei can be generated relatively easily from a variety of mouse genotypes and cell types. Such ntES cells can be used not only for experimental models of human therapeutic cloning but also as a means of preserving mouse genomes instead of preserving germ cells. Here, we describe our most recent protocols for mouse cloning.

  17. When larger brains do not have more neurons: increased numbers of cells are compensated by decreased average cell size across mouse individuals

    PubMed Central

    Herculano-Houzel, Suzana; Messeder, Débora J.; Fonseca-Azevedo, Karina; Pantoja, Nilma A.

    2015-01-01

    There is a strong trend toward increased brain size in mammalian evolution, with larger brains composed of more and larger neurons than smaller brains across species within each mammalian order. Does the evolution of increased numbers of brain neurons, and thus larger brain size, occur simply through the selection of individuals with more and larger neurons, and thus larger brains, within a population? That is, do individuals with larger brains also have more, and larger, neurons than individuals with smaller brains, such that allometric relationships across species are simply an extension of intraspecific scaling? Here we show that this is not the case across adult male mice of a similar age. Rather, increased numbers of neurons across individuals are accompanied by increased numbers of other cells and smaller average cell size of both types, in a trade-off that explains how increased brain mass does not necessarily ensue. Fundamental regulatory mechanisms thus must exist that tie numbers of neurons to numbers of other cells and to average cell size within individual brains. Finally, our results indicate that changes in brain size in evolution are not an extension of individual variation in numbers of neurons, but rather occur through step changes that must simultaneously increase numbers of neurons and cause cell size to increase, rather than decrease. PMID:26082686

  18. [Worldviews and philosophical basis of human cloning].

    PubMed

    Lukowska, A T

    2001-01-01

    The article presents three standpoints on the question of moral permissibility of human cloning and shows the philosophical principles of it. 1. The moral consent to human cloning with the purposes of reproduction and therapy. The followers of human cloning refer to materialistic anthropology also to subjectivistic, relativistic and utilitarian ethics. 2. Those, who are adverse to human cloning with the purpose of reproduction, but they acquiesce to the so-called therapeutic cloning. They reject that human embryos and foetuses are individuals who come under protection of law. 3. Those, who reject human cloning for the purposes of reproduction and therapy alike. They assent to a personalistic anthropology and Christian ethics. A human being was created by God and human life begins at the moment of insemination. All three groups use various argumentation. The arguments for and against cloning are extracted from biology as well as psychology, philosophy, law and religion. The author of the article takes the last standpoint, but she does not see such arguments, that might convince the opposite parties to a suit.

  19. [On the problem of human cloning].

    PubMed

    Smorag, Z

    2001-01-01

    Somatic cell cloning technique in mammals is still not very efficient, but intensive efforts have been made to improve it. Considering the great biological affinity of humans and animals, the cloning technique can in the not too distant future be applied in human cloning and improved to the point of becoming safe. Even when we make such an assumption, I consider it irrational and dangerous to clone the human in order to make their copies (with human cloning for therapeutic purposes being another problem). Life, which is generated by the union of egg cell and spermatozoon is an unforeseeable combination of genetic possibilities, but at the same time it offers a unique chance for the human being, both as an individual and a species. The creation of life by genetic duplication of an already formed individual means a great reduction not only in the biological sense. Action like this is evidence of extreme egocentrism and totalitarian thinking, and its proponents should first answer the question whether they would consider cloning themselves. An answer in the affirmative would help to establish the underlying reasons for their approval.

  20. A Combinatory Antibody–Antigen Microarray Assay for High-Content Screening of Single-Chain Fragment Variable Clones from Recombinant Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Jansson, Bo; Stuhr-Hansen, Nicolai; Kovács, András; Welinder, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a combinatory antibody–antigen microarray for direct screening of multiple single-chain fragment variable (scFv) clones with no need for pre-purification or enrichment before screening. The straightforward workflow allows for early selection of binders to predefined peptide and glycopeptide targets. A capture antibody is contact printed on microarray slides, side by side with the antigens of interest. A large number of scFv clones, in supernatants, are printed on top of the capture antibody and the antigen in a “spot-on-spot” print. The printed scFv clones, which bind to the capture antibody, are detected using biotinylated antigen, while the binding of scFv clones to the printed antigen is detected through a mouse anti-tag antibody. Two different analyses are thus performed on the same slide, generating two kinds of information: one on the ability of an individual scFv clone to bind to the soluble form of the antigen, which may favour selection for higher affinity rather than avidity, while the other allows the identification of large numbers of clones, simultaneously, due to the binding of scFv clones to densely presented antigens, thus providing an overall increased hit rate. The functionality of the new screening approach was illustrated through the generation of antibodies against peptides from the chaperone complex Ku70/Ku80 and the GalNAcα-serine/threonine epitope on the IgA1 alpha chain hinge region. In total, 659 scFv clones were screened with a hit rate of approximately 20%. This approach allowed the identification of functional antibodies in both cases, illustrating the usefulness and capacity of this combinatory microarray screening technique for efficient analysis and validation of antibodies at an early stage of antibody generation. PMID:28002485

  1. Genome Clone Libraries and Data from the Integrated Molecular Analysis of Genomes and their Expression (I.M.A.G.E.) Consortium

    DOE Data Explorer

    The I.M.A.G.E. Consortium was initiated in 1993 by four academic groups on a collaborative basis after informal discussions led to a common vision of how to achieve an important goal in the study of the human genome: the Integrated Molecular Analysis of Genomes and their Expression Consortium's primary goal is to create arrayed cDNA libraries and associated bioinformatics tools, and make them publicly available to the research community. The primary organisms of interest include intensively studied mammalian species, including human, mouse, rat and non-human primate species. The Consortium has also focused on several commonly studied model organisms; as part of this effort it has arrayed cDNAs from zebrafish, and Fugu (pufferfish) as well as Xenopus laevis and X. tropicalis (frog). Utilizing high speed robotics, over nine million individual cDNA clones have been arrayed into 384-well microtiter plates, and sufficient replicas have been created to distribute copies both to sequencing centers and to a network of five distributors located worldwide. The I.M.A.G.E. Consortium represents the world's largest public cDNA collection, and works closely with the National Institutes of Health's Mammalian Gene Collection(MGC) to help it achieve its goal of creating a full-length cDNA clone for every human and mouse gene. I.M.A.G.E. is also a member of the ORFeome Collaboration, working to generate a complete set of expression-ready open reading frame clones representing each human gene. Custom informatics tools have been developed in support of these projects to better allow the research community to select clones of interest and track and collect all data deposited into public databases about those clones and their related sequences. I.M.A.G.E. clones are publicly available, free of any royalties, and may be used by anyone agreeing with the Consortium's guidelines.

  2. Vitamin D for combination photodynamic therapy of skin cancer in individuals with vitamin D deficiency: Insights from a preclinical study in a mouse model of squamous cell carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, Sanjay; Thomas, Erik; Hasan, Tayyaba; Maytin, Edward V.

    2016-03-01

    Combination photodynamic therapy (cPDT) in which vitamin D (VD) is given prior to aminolevulinate, a precursor (pro-drug) for protoporphyrin IX (PpIX), is an approach developed in our laboratory. We previously showed that 1α,25- dihydroxyvitamin D3 (calcitriol), given prior to PDT, enhances accumulation of PpIX and improves cell death post-PDT in a mouse skin cancer model. However, since calcitriol poses a risk for hypercalcemia, we replaced systemic calcitriol with oral cholecalciferol (D3), administered as a high (tenfold, "10K") diet over a ten-day period. Here, we ask whether VD deficiency might alter the response to cPDT. Nude mice were fed a VD-deficient diet for at least 4 weeks ("deficient"); controls were fed a normal 1,000 IU/kg diet ("1K"). Human A431 cells were implanted subcutaneously and mice were switched to the 10K diet or continued on their baseline diets (controls). In other experiments, mice received a human equivalent dose of 50,000 IU D3 by oral gavage, to simulate administration of a single, high-dose VD pill. At various times, tumors were harvested and serum was collected to measure levels of VD metabolic intermediates. A significant increase in PpIX levels and in the expression of differentiation and proliferation markers in tumor tissue was observed after VD supplementation of both the deficient and 1K mice. Further results describing mechanistic details of PpIX enhancement through alteration of heme- and VD-metabolic enzyme levels will be presented. Based on these results, a clinical study using oral vitamin D prior to PDT for human skin cancer should be performed.

  3. Networks of protein kinases and phosphatases in the individual phases of contextual fear conditioning in the C57BL/6J mouse.

    PubMed

    Mucic, Goran; Sase, Sunetra; Stork, Oliver; Lubec, Gert; Li, Lin

    2015-03-01

    Although protein kinases and phosphatases have been reported to be involved in fear memory, information about these signalling molecules in the individual phases of contextual fear conditioning (cFC) is limited. C57BL/6J mice were tested in cFC, sacrificed and hippocampi were used for screening of approximately 800 protein kinases and phosphatases by protein microarrays with subsequent Western blot confirmation of threefold higher or lower hippocampal levels as compared to foot shock controls. Immunoblotting of the protein kinases and phosphatases screened out was carried out by Western blotting. A network of protein kinases and phosphatases was generated (STRING 9.1). Animals learned the task in the paradigm and protein kinase and phosphatase levels were determined in the individual phases acquisition, consolidation and retrieval and compared to foot shock controls. Protein kinases discoidin containing receptor 2 (DDR2), mitogen activated protein kinase kinase kinase 7 (TAK1), protein phosphatases dual specificity protein phosphatase (PTEN) and protein phosphatase 2a (PP2A) were modulated in the individual phases of cFC. Phosphatidyl-inositol-3,4,5-triphosphate 3-phosphatase and phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) that is interacting with PTEN were modulated as well. Freezing time was correlating with PP2A levels in the retrieval phase of cFC. The abovementioned protein kinases, phosphatases and inositol-signalling enzymes were not reported so far in cFC and the results are relevant for interpretation of previous and design of future studies in cFC or fear memory. Protein phosphatase PP2A was, however, the only signalling compound tested that was directly linked to retrieval in the cFC.

  4. Murine T-cell clones against Entamoeba histolytica: in vivo and in vitro characterization.

    PubMed Central

    Denis, M; Chadee, K

    1989-01-01

    Eleven T-cell clones were raised from the spleens of BALB/c mice hyperimmunized against a crude soluble extract of Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites. Seven clones were of the Lyt-1+, and four of the Lyt-23+ phenotype. All clones proliferated in the presence of E. histolytica antigens but not to a purified protein derivative; five clones proliferated to a crude extract of the E. histolytica-like Laredo amoebae. Ten clones secreted T-cell growth factors in response to E. histolytica antigens. Two clones (Lyt-23+) mediated direct lymphocytotoxicity (73% and 86%) against amoebic trophozoites that was inhibited with rabbit anti-mouse TNF-alpha. Supernatants of five of the clones (all Lyt-1+) activated mouse peritoneal macrophages (Mphi) to kill E. histolytica trophozoites in vitro, seemingly independent of secreted reactive oxygen intermediates (O2- and H2O2) in the case of three clones supernatants. All of the clones that were activating Mphi to kill amoeba in vitro also mediated a local DTH reaction in mouse footpad. Our results demonstrate direct lymphocyte cytotoxicity via a cytolytic molecule antigenically related to TNF-alpha and lymphokines activating Mphi for amoebic killing by oxidative and non-oxidative mechanisms, the latter process mediated by a macrophage-activating factor (MAF) distinct from interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma). PMID:15493266

  5. Quantitative proteomics reveals protein kinases and phosphatases in the individual phases of contextual fear conditioning in the C57BL/6J mouse.

    PubMed

    Šmidák, Roman; Mayer, Rupert Laurenz; Bileck, Andrea; Gerner, Christopher; Mechtcheriakova, Diana; Stork, Oliver; Lubec, Gert; Li, Lin

    2016-04-15

    A series of protein kinases and phosphatases (PKPs) have been linked to contextual fear conditioning (cFC) but information is mainly derived from immunochemical studies. It was therefore decided to use an explorative label-free quantitative proteomics approach to concomitantly determine PKPs in hippocampi of mice in the individual phases of cFC. C57BL/6J mice were divided into four groups: three training groups representing the acquisition, consolidation and retrieval phases of cFC and a foot shock control group. Using this approach we identified 32 protein kinases or phosphatases/phosphatase subunits with significantly changed protein levels in one or more training groups as compared to foot shock control. These include members of PKP signalling modules of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP3K10, RAF1, KSR2), Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMKIIα, DAPK1), protein kinase C (PRKCD) and protein phosphatases 1, 2A, 2B(3) previously implicated in various learning paradigms. In addition, our analysis showed protein kinases WNK1, LYN, VRK1, ABL1, CDK4, CDKL3, SgK223 and ADCK1, and protein phosphatases PTPRF, ACP1, DNAJC6, SSH2 and UBASH3B that have not been directly linked to fear memory processes so far. Determination of PKPs in the individual cFC phases represents a valuable resource for interpretation of previous and design of future studies on PKPs in memory mechanisms.

  6. [Human cloning or cannibalism].

    PubMed

    Sokolowski, L M

    2001-01-01

    In this article I develop the idea presented in my previous work that human cloning would be of little practical use since almost any aim that one would like to attain by multiple cloning of a concrete man or a group of people, are unattainable or it might be achieved by easier, cheaper and more efficient traditional methods. For this reason cloning of a man is unlikely to occur on a larger scale and only few people will decide to clone themselves. In this sense no social effects of human cloning will be disastrous for the human population. Yet investigations in human genetics are very important since they may provide medical applications far more important than human cloning. It is argued that the main trend of modern medicine: organ transplantation from an alien donor, will become socially dangerous in near future since the number of donors will be drastically smaller than the number of potential patients waiting for transplantations. This in turn may cause social conflicts and a form of medical cannibalism may arise. These problems and conflicts will be avoided if organ transplantation from an alien donor is replaced by organ cloning, i.e. by transplanting an organ developed from the patient.

  7. On cloning human beings.

    PubMed

    de Melo-Martin, Inmaculada

    2002-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to show that arguments for and against cloning fail to make their case because of one or both of the following reasons: 1) they take for granted customary beliefs and assumptions that are far from being unquestionable; 2) they tend to ignore the context in which human cloning is developed. I will analyze some of the assumptions underlying the main arguments that have been offered for and against cloning. Once these assumptions are critically analyzed, arguments both rejecting and supporting human cloning seem to lose weight. I will first briefly present the main arguments that have been proposed against cloning and I will argue that they fail to establish their case. In the next section I will evaluate some of the positive arguments that have been offered supporting such technology. This analysis will show that the case for cloning also fails. Finally, I will maintain that because critics and especially supporters of this technology neglect the context in which human cloning is developed and might be implemented, their arguments are far from compelling.

  8. Effects of donor fibroblast cell type and transferred cloned embryo number on the efficiency of pig cloning.

    PubMed

    Li, Zicong; Shi, Junsong; Liu, Dewu; Zhou, Rong; Zeng, Haiyu; Zhou, Xiu; Mai, Ranbiao; Zeng, Shaofen; Luo, Lvhua; Yu, Wanxian; Zhang, Shouquan; Wu, Zhenfang

    2013-02-01

    Currently, cloning efficiency in pigs is very low. Donor cell type and number of cloned embryos transferred to an individual surrogate are two major factors that affect the successful rate of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) in pigs. This study aimed to compare the influence of different donor fibroblast cell types and different transferred embryo numbers on recipients' pregnancy rate and delivery rate, the average number of total clones born, clones born alive and clones born healthy per litter, and the birth rate of healthy clones (=total number of healthy cloned piglets born /total number of transferred cloned embryos). Three types of donor fibroblasts were tested in large-scale production of cloned pigs, including fetal fibroblasts (FFBs) from four genetically similar Western swine breeds of Pietrain (P), Duroc (D), Landrace (L), and Yorkshire (Y), which are referred to as P,D,LY-FFBs, adult fibroblasts (AFBs) from the same four breeds, which are designated P,D,L,Y-AFBs, and AFBs from a Chinese pig breed of Laiwu (LW), which is referred to as LW-AFBs. Within each donor fibroblast cell type group, five transferred cloned embryo number groups were tested. In each embryo number group, 150-199, 200-249, 250-299, 300-349, or 350-450 cloned embryos were transferred to each individual recipient sow. For the entire experiment, 92,005 cloned embryos were generated from nearly 115,000 matured oocytes and transferred to 328 recipients; in total, 488 cloned piglets were produced. The results showed that the mean clones born healthy per litter resulted from transfer of embryos cloned from LW-AFBs (2.53 ± 0.34) was similar with that associated with P,D,L,Y-FFBs (2.72 ± 0.29), but was significantly higher than that resulted from P,D,L,Y-AFBs (1.47 ± 0.18). Use of LW-AFBs as donor cells for SCNT resulted in a significantly higher pregnancy rate (72.00% vs. 59.30% and 48.11%) and delivery rate (60.00% vs. 45.93% and 35.85%) for cloned embryo recipients, and a

  9. Cloning the human SUMO1 promoter.

    PubMed

    Nanos-Webb, Angela; Deyrieux, Adeline; Bian, Xue-lin; Rosas-Acosta, Germán; Wilson, Van G

    2010-03-01

    Regulation of the sumoylation system at the level of gene expression has not yet been explored. To begin to define transcriptional regulatory features, the promoter region for the SUMO1 gene was cloned from human genomic DNA and characterized. Initially, a 532 base pair fragment upstream of and including the predicted SUMO1 transcription start site (TSS) was cloned and shown to possess promoter activity. Subsequent deletion analysis showed that a smaller fragment containing 158 bp upstream of the TSS region exhibited basal promoter activity in both human and rodent cell lines. Within this basal promoter fragment, there were predicted binding sites for numerous transcription factors, including the nude mouse gene product, Whn (FoxN1). Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that Whn could bind to an ACGC motif adjacent to the TSR, and in transfection studies Whn stimulated a 3-fold increase in transcription from this cloned promoter in keratinocytes (HaCaT cells). Mutation of the ACGC motif abrogated both Whn binding and transcriptional activation, indicating that the Whn effect is likely due to direct interaction with this promoter element. Consistent with these observations on the cloned promoter region, Whn also modestly stimulated transcription from the endogenous, genomic SUMO1 promoter in HaCaT cells, consistent with Whn potentially playing a regulatory role for SUMO1 transcription in keratinocytes.

  10. Much ado about cloning in the public square.

    PubMed

    McLean, M R

    2001-01-01

    The dawnings of the age of human cloning and genetics is shaping lives, ideologies, and social structures. How will we--as individuals and as communities--respond to the possibilities, challenges, and changes of the clone age? This essay invites engagement in communal moral deliberation through broadening conversations about serious matters, including human cloning. A framework that includes important moral markers for significant "kitchen table talk" is offered. Clone age justice is also discussed. Attention is paid to the renewed role of religious voices in the public square.

  11. Statement on Human Cloning

    MedlinePlus

    ... form Search American Association for the Advancement of Science Statement on Human Cloning Tweet The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) recognizes the intense debates within our society ...

  12. Do Managers Clone Themselves?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baron, Alma S.

    1981-01-01

    A recent questionnaire survey provides statistics on male managers' views of female managers. The author recommends that male managers break out of their cloning behavior and that the goal ought to be a plurality in management. (Author/WD)

  13. Development of an in vitro cloning method for Cowdria ruminantium.

    PubMed Central

    Perez, J M; Martinez, D; Debus, A; Sheikboudou, C; Bensaid, A

    1997-01-01

    Cowdria ruminantium is a tick-borne rickettsia which causes severe disease in ruminants. All studies with C. ruminantium reported so far were carried out with stocks consisting of infective blood collected from reacting animals or from the same stocks propagated in vitro. Cloned isolates are needed to conduct studies on immune response of the host, on genetic diversity of the parasite, and on mechanisms of attenuation and the development of vaccines. A method of cloning based on the particular chlamydia life cycle of Cowdria was developed. Instead of cloning extracellular elementary bodies, it appeared more convenient to clone endothelial cells infected by one morula resulting from the infection of the cell by one elementary body of Cowdria. Two hundred and sixteen clones were obtained by limiting dilution of infected cells. The method was experimentally validated by comparing randomly amplified polymorphic DNA fingerprints from individual clones obtained from endothelial cell cultures coinfected with two different stocks of C. ruminantium. PMID:9302217

  14. Stability of the JP2 clone of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Haubek, D; Ennibi, O-K; Vaeth, M; Poulsen, S; Poulsen, K

    2009-09-01

    The JP2 clone of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is strongly associated with aggressive periodontitis. To obtain information about colonization dynamics of the JP2 clone, we used PCR to examine its presence in 365 Moroccan juveniles from whom periodontal plaque samples were collected at baseline and after one and two years. Periodontal attachment loss was measured at baseline and at the two-year follow-up. At baseline, 43 (12%) carriers of the JP2 clone were found. Nearly half (44 %) of these were persistently colonized with the clone. The relative risk for the development of aggressive periodontitis, adjusted for the concomitant presence of other genotypes of A. actinomycetemcomitans, was highest for individuals continuously infected by the JP2 clone (RR = 13.9; 95% CI, 9.0 to 21.4), indicating a relationship between infectious dose and disease, which further substantiates the evidence for the JP2 clone as a causal factor in aggressive periodontitis.

  15. Specific sequence deletions in two classes of murine leukemia virus-related proviruses in the mouse genome.

    PubMed

    Ch'ang, L Y; Yang, W K; Myer, F E; Koh, C K; Boone, L R

    1989-02-01

    Characteristic long terminal repeats (LTR) of approximately 700 and 750 bp were found, respectively, in the two classes (polytropic and modified polytropic) of murine leukemia virus (MuLV)-related nonecotropic nonxenotropic proviral sequences in eight individual molecular clones of RFM/Un mouse chromosomal DNA fragments. Three proviral clones, two polytropic and one modified polytropic, contained sequence deletions in the viral structural genes. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed that 7-bp direct repeats occur at both ends of deleted sequences in intact structures and one of the repeats remains in genomes with the deletion. Specifically, the deleted sequences were a 1487-bp gag-pol sequence with ACTGCCC repeat, a 113-bp mid-pol sequence with CAGGCAA repeat, and a 1811-bp env sequence with GGTCCAG repeat. The same specific sequence deletions were found in both classes of MuLV-related proviral structures. Examination of chromosomal DNA from eight inbred laboratory mouse strains and six wild mouse species showed that a minor population of proviruses with these specific deletions were present in Mus musculus and Mus spretus, all of which contain prominent 700-bp LTR polytropic proviral structures. The 750-bp LTR modified polytropic proviral structures were phylogenetically more restricted, being equally predominant in Mus musculus domesticus mice, but minor to undetectable in Mus spretus subspecies, and absent in other wild mouse populations.

  16. Recent advancements in cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer

    PubMed Central

    Ogura, Atsuo; Inoue, Kimiko; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    2013-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) cloning is the sole reproductive engineering technology that endows the somatic cell genome with totipotency. Since the first report on the birth of a cloned sheep from adult somatic cells in 1997, many technical improvements in SCNT have been made by using different epigenetic approaches, including enhancement of the levels of histone acetylation in the chromatin of the reconstructed embryos. Although it will take a considerable time before we fully understand the nature of genomic programming and totipotency, we may expect that somatic cell cloning technology will soon become broadly applicable to practical purposes, including medicine, pharmaceutical manufacturing and agriculture. Here we review recent progress in somatic cell cloning, with a special emphasis on epigenetic studies using the laboratory mouse as a model. PMID:23166393

  17. Recent advancements in cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Atsuo; Inoue, Kimiko; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    2013-01-05

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) cloning is the sole reproductive engineering technology that endows the somatic cell genome with totipotency. Since the first report on the birth of a cloned sheep from adult somatic cells in 1997, many technical improvements in SCNT have been made by using different epigenetic approaches, including enhancement of the levels of histone acetylation in the chromatin of the reconstructed embryos. Although it will take a considerable time before we fully understand the nature of genomic programming and totipotency, we may expect that somatic cell cloning technology will soon become broadly applicable to practical purposes, including medicine, pharmaceutical manufacturing and agriculture. Here we review recent progress in somatic cell cloning, with a special emphasis on epigenetic studies using the laboratory mouse as a model.

  18. Consumers' attitudes toward consumption of cloned beef. The impact of exposure to technological information about animal cloning.

    PubMed

    Aizaki, Hideo; Sawada, Manabu; Sato, Kazuo

    2011-10-01

    Novel food technologies, such as cloning, have been introduced into the meat production sector; however, their use is not widely supported by many consumers. This study was designed to assess whether Japanese consumers' attitudes toward consumption of cloned beef (specifically, beef derived from bovine embryo and somatic cell-cloned cattle) would change after they were provided with technological information on animal cloning through a web-based survey. The results revealed that most respondents did not discriminate between their attitudes toward the consumption of the two types of cloned beef, and that most respondents did not change their attitudes toward cloned beef after receiving the technological information. The respondents' individual characteristics, including their knowledge about the food safety of cloned beef and their basic knowledge about animal cloning, influenced the likelihood of a change in their attitudes after they received the information. In conclusion, some consumers might become less uncomfortable about the consumption of cloned beef by the straightforward provision of technological information about animal cloning; however, most consumers are likely to maintain their attitudes.

  19. A comparative analysis of shotgun-cloning and tagged-random amplification-cloning of chromatin immunoprecipitation-isolated genome fragments.

    PubMed

    White, Robert B; Ziman, Melanie R

    2006-07-28

    The cloning of transcription factor antibody-immunoprecipitated genomic fragments from chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) experiments is a technically challenging procedure, especially when the input genomic DNA is isolated from whole tissues (in vivo) rather than cultured cells. Here we adapt a technique known as Tagged-Random PCR (T-PCR) to amplify ChIP-immunoprecipitated DNA from mouse embryonic tissue prior to cloning. Importantly, we then compare this technique with tandem shotgun-cloning experiments in terms of its capacity to identify target genes. We find that T-PCR dramatically increases the efficiency of cloning ChIP fragments without distortion of the relative location of cloned fragments to putative target genes. Thus, T-PCR is a simple procedure which greatly enhances the efficiency of cloning tissue-derived ChIP fragments.

  20. Cloning of the complete Mycoplasma pneumoniae genome.

    PubMed Central

    Wenzel, R; Herrmann, R

    1989-01-01

    The complete genome of Mycoplasma pneumoniae was cloned in an ordered library consisting of 34 overlapping or adjacent cosmids, one plasmid and two lambda phages. The genome size was determined by adding up the sizes of either the individual unique EcoRI restriction fragments of the gene bank or of the XhoI fragments of genomic M. pneumoniae DNA. The values from these calculations, 835 and 849 kbp, are in good agreement. An XhoI restriction map was constructed by identifying adjacent DNA fragments by probing with selected cosmid clones. Images PMID:2506532

  1. Use of BAC clones as standardized reagents for Marek’s disease virus research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cloning of the Marek’s disease virus (MDV) genome as an infectious bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clone have led to major advances through our ability to study individual gene function by making precise insertions and deletions in the viral genome. We believe that MDV BAC clones will repl...

  2. Evidence for a human-specific Escherichia coli clone.

    PubMed

    Clermont, Olivier; Lescat, Mathilde; O'Brien, Claire L; Gordon, David M; Tenaillon, Olivier; Denamur, Erick

    2008-04-01

    Escherichia coli is a widespread commensal of the vertebrate intestinal tract. Until recently, no strong association between a particular clone and a given host species has been found. However, members of the B2 subgroup VIII clone with an O81 serotype appear to be human host specific. To determine the degree of host specificity exhibited by this clone, a PCR-based assay was used to screen 723 faecal and clinical isolates from humans, and 904 faecal isolates from animals. This clone was not detected among the animal isolates, but was discovered in people living in Africa, Europe and South America. The clone is rarely isolated from people suffering from intestinal or extraintestinal disease and is avirulent in a mouse model of extraintestinal infection. Fine-scale epidemiological analysis suggests that this clone is competitively dominant relative to other members of the B2 phylogenetic group and that it has increased in frequency over the past 20 years. This clone appears to be a good candidate for use as a probiotic, and may be suitable as an indicator of human faecal contamination in microbial source tracking studies.

  3. Molecular cloning and in vitro expression of a cDNA clone for human cellular tumor antigen p53.

    PubMed Central

    Harlow, E; Williamson, N M; Ralston, R; Helfman, D M; Adams, T E

    1985-01-01

    Three clones for the human tumor antigen p53 were isolated from a cDNA library prepared from A431 cells. One of these clones, pR4-2, contains the entire coding region for human p53. This clone directs the synthesis of a polypeptide with the correct molecular weight and immunological epitopes of an authentic p53 molecule in an in vitro transcription-translation reaction. Although the pR4-2 clone contains the coding region for p53, it is not a full-length copy of the human p53 mRNA. Northern analysis showed that the p53 mRNA is approximately 2,500 nucleotides long, whereas the pR4-2 insert is only 1,760 base pairs in length. Analysis of the DNA sequence of this clone suggests that the human p53 polypeptide has 393 amino acids. We compared the predicted amino acid sequence of the pR4-2 clone with similar clones for the mouse p53 and found long regions of amino acid homology between these two molecules. Images PMID:3894933

  4. Extremal quantum cloning machines

    SciTech Connect

    Chiribella, G.; D'Ariano, G. M.; Perinotti, P.; Cerf, N.J.

    2005-10-15

    We investigate the problem of cloning a set of states that is invariant under the action of an irreducible group representation. We then characterize the cloners that are extremal in the convex set of group covariant cloning machines, among which one can restrict the search for optimal cloners. For a set of states that is invariant under the discrete Weyl-Heisenberg group, we show that all extremal cloners can be unitarily realized using the so-called double-Bell states, whence providing a general proof of the popular ansatz used in the literature for finding optimal cloners in a variety of settings. Our result can also be generalized to continuous-variable optimal cloning in infinite dimensions, where the covariance group is the customary Weyl-Heisenberg group of displacement000.

  5. To clone alone: the United Nations' Human Cloning Declaration.

    PubMed

    Isasi, Rosario M; Annas, George J

    2006-01-01

    The United Nations labored for almost four years to create a treaty governing human cloning. In 2005 that effort was abandoned, and instead the United Nations' General Assembly adopted a "Declaration on Human Cloning".

  6. Clone history shapes Populus drought responses.

    PubMed

    Raj, Sherosha; Bräutigam, Katharina; Hamanishi, Erin T; Wilkins, Olivia; Thomas, Barb R; Schroeder, William; Mansfield, Shawn D; Plant, Aine L; Campbell, Malcolm M

    2011-07-26

    Just as animal monozygotic twins can experience different environmental conditions by being reared apart, individual genetically identical trees of the genus Populus can also be exposed to contrasting environmental conditions by being grown in different locations. As such, clonally propagated Populus trees provide an opportunity to interrogate the impact of individual environmental history on current response to environmental stimuli. To test the hypothesis that current responses to an environmental stimulus, drought, are contingent on environmental history, the transcriptome- level drought responses of three economically important hybrid genotypes-DN34 (Populus deltoides × Populus nigra), Walker [P. deltoides var. occidentalis × (Populus laurifolia × P. nigra)], and Okanese [Walker × (P. laurifolia × P. nigra)]-derived from two different locations were compared. Strikingly, differences in transcript abundance patterns in response to drought were based on differences in geographic origin of clones for two of the three genotypes. This observation was most pronounced for the genotypes with the longest time since establishment and last common propagation. Differences in genome-wide DNA methylation paralleled the transcriptome level trends, whereby the clones with the most divergent transcriptomes and clone history had the most marked differences in the extent of total DNA methylation, suggesting an epigenomic basis for the clone history-dependent transcriptome divergence. The data provide insights into the interplay between genotype and environment in the ecologically and economically important Populus genus, with implications for the industrial application of Populus trees and the evolution and persistence of these important tree species and their associated hybrids.

  7. Systematic Expression Profiling of the Mouse Transcriptome Using RIKEN cDNA Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Bono, Hidemasa; Yagi, Ken; Kasukawa, Takeya; Nikaido, Itoshi; Tominaga, Naoko; Miki, Rika; Mizuno, Yosuke; Tomaru, Yasuhiro; Goto, Hitoshi; Nitanda, Hiroyuki; Shimizu, Daisuke; Makino, Hirochika; Morita, Tomoyuki; Fujiyama, Junshin; Sakai, Takehito; Shimoji, Takashi; Hume, David A.; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Okazaki, Yasushi

    2003-01-01

    The number of known mRNA transcripts in the mouse has been greatly expanded by the RIKEN Mouse Gene Encyclopedia project. Validation of their reproducible expression in a tissue is an important contribution to the study of functional genomics. In this report, we determine the expression profile of 57,931 clones on 20 mouse tissues using cDNA microarrays. Of these 57,931 clones, 22,928 clones correspond to the FANTOM2 clone set. The set represents 20,234 transcriptional units (TUs) out of 33,409 TUs in the FANTOM2 set. We identified 7206 separate clones that satisfied stringent criteria for tissue-specific expression. Gene Ontology terms were assigned for these 7206 clones, and the proportion of `molecular function' ontology for each tissue-specific clone was examined. These data will provide insights into the function of each tissue. Tissue-specific gene expression profiles obtained using our cDNA microarrays were also compared with the data extracted from the GNF Expression Atlas based on Affymetrix microarrays. One major outcome of the RIKEN transcriptome analysis is the identification of numerous nonprotein-coding mRNAs. The expression profile was also used to obtain evidence of expression for putative noncoding RNAs. In addition, 1926 clones (70%) of 2768 clones that were categorized as “unknown EST,” and 1969 (58%) clones of 3388 clones that were categorized as “unclassifiable” were also shown to be reproducibly expressed. PMID:12819129

  8. To Clone or Not To Clone: Method Analysis for Retrieving Consensus Sequences In Ancient DNA Samples

    PubMed Central

    Winters, Misa; Barta, Jodi Lynn; Monroe, Cara; Kemp, Brian M.

    2011-01-01

    The challenges associated with the retrieval and authentication of ancient DNA (aDNA) evidence are principally due to post-mortem damage which makes ancient samples particularly prone to contamination from “modern” DNA sources. The necessity for authentication of results has led many aDNA researchers to adopt methods considered to be “gold standards” in the field, including cloning aDNA amplicons as opposed to directly sequencing them. However, no standardized protocol has emerged regarding the necessary number of clones to sequence, how a consensus sequence is most appropriately derived, or how results should be reported in the literature. In addition, there has been no systematic demonstration of the degree to which direct sequences are affected by damage or whether direct sequencing would provide disparate results from a consensus of clones. To address this issue, a comparative study was designed to examine both cloned and direct sequences amplified from ∼3,500 year-old ancient northern fur seal DNA extracts. Majority rules and the Consensus Confidence Program were used to generate consensus sequences for each individual from the cloned sequences, which exhibited damage at 31 of 139 base pairs across all clones. In no instance did the consensus of clones differ from the direct sequence. This study demonstrates that, when appropriate, cloning need not be the default method, but instead, should be used as a measure of authentication on a case-by-case basis, especially when this practice adds time and cost to studies where it may be superfluous. PMID:21738625

  9. Secure the Clones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Thomas; Kirchner, Florent; Pichardie, David

    Exchanging mutable data objects with untrusted code is a delicate matter because of the risk of creating a data space that is accessible by an attacker. Consequently, secure programming guidelines for Java stress the importance of using defensive copying before accepting or handing out references to an internal mutable object. However, implementation of a copy method (like clone()) is entirely left to the programmer. It may not provide a sufficiently deep copy of an object and is subject to overriding by a malicious sub-class. Currently no language-based mechanism supports secure object cloning. This paper proposes a type-based annotation system for defining modular copy policies for class-based object-oriented programs. A copy policy specifies the maximally allowed sharing between an object and its clone. We present a static enforcement mechanism that will guarantee that all classes fulfill their copy policy, even in the presence of overriding of copy methods, and establish the semantic correctness of the overall approach in Coq. The mechanism has been implemented and experimentally evaluated on clone methods from several Java libraries.

  10. Applications of quantum cloning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomarico, E.; Sanguinetti, B.; Sekatski, P.; Zbinden, H.; Gisin, N.

    2011-10-01

    Quantum Cloning Machines (QCMs) allow for the copying of information, within the limits imposed by quantum mechanics. These devices are particularly interesting in the high-gain regime, i.e., when one input qubit generates a state of many output qubits. In this regime, they allow for the study of certain aspects of the quantum to classical transition. The understanding of these aspects is the root of the two recent applications that we will review in this paper: the first one is the Quantum Cloning Radiometer, a device which is able to produce an absolute measure of spectral radiance. This device exploits the fact that in the quantum regime information can be copied with only finite fidelity, whereas when a state becomes macroscopic, this fidelity gradually increases to 1. Measuring the fidelity of the cloning operation then allows to precisely determine the absolute spectral radiance of the input optical source. We will then discuss whether a Quantum Cloning Machine could be used to produce a state visible by the naked human eye, and the possibility of a Bell Experiment with humans playing the role of detectors.

  11. The Cloning of America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobson, Judith E.; Dobson, Russell L.

    1981-01-01

    Proposes that the U.S. school system purports to prize human variability, but many educators are engaged in activities that seek to homogenize students. Describes these activities, including diagnosis, labeling, ability grouping, and positive reinforcement. Presents suggestions for counselors to combat sources of cloning and self-validation. (RC)

  12. The First Human Cloned Embryo.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cibelli, Jose B.; Lanza, Robert P.; West, Michael D.; Ezzell, Carol

    2002-01-01

    Describes a process known as parthenogenesis which produces cloned, early-stage embryos and human embryos generated only from eggs. Speculates that this technology puts therapeutic cloning within reach. (DDR)

  13. [Nuclear transfer and therapeutic cloning].

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiao-Ming; Lei, An-Min; Hua, Jin-Lian; Dou, Zhong-Ying

    2005-03-01

    Nuclear transfer and therapeutic cloning have widespread and attractive prospects in animal agriculture and biomedical applications. We reviewed that the quality of oocytes and nuclear reprogramming of somatic donor cells were the main reasons of the common abnormalities in cloned animals and the low efficiency of cloning and showed the problems and outlets in therapeutic cloning, such as some basic problems in nuclear transfer affected clinical applications of therapeutic cloning. Study on isolation and culture of nuclear transfer embryonic stem (ntES) cells and specific differentiation of ntES cells into important functional cells should be emphasized and could enhance the efficiency. Adult stem cells could help to cure some great diseases, but could not replace therapeutic cloning. Ethics also impeded the development of therapeutic cloning. It is necessary to improve many techniques and reinforce the research of some basic theories, then somatic nuclear transfer and therapeutic cloning may apply to agriculture reproduction and benefit to human life better.

  14. Sequential cloning of chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Lacks, S.A.

    1991-12-31

    A method for sequential cloning of chromosomal DNA and chromosomal DNA cloned by this method are disclosed. The method includes the selection of a target organism having a segment of chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned. A first DNA segment, having a first restriction enzyme site on either side. homologous to the chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned is isolated. A first vector product is formed by ligating the homologous segment into a suitably designed vector. The first vector product is circularly integrated into the target organism`s chromosomal DNA. The resulting integrated chromosomal DNA segment includes the homologous DNA segment at either end of the integrated vector segment. The integrated chromosomal DNA is cleaved with a second restriction enzyme and ligated to form a vector-containing plasmid, which is replicated in a host organism. The replicated plasmid is then cleaved with the first restriction enzyme. Next, a DNA segment containing the vector and a segment of DNA homologous to a distal portion of the previously isolated DNA segment is isolated. This segment is then ligated to form a plasmid which is replicated within a suitable host. This plasmid is then circularly integrated into the target chromosomal DNA. The chromosomal DNA containing the circularly integrated vector is treated with a third, retrorestriction enzyme. The cleaved DNA is ligated to give a plasmid that is used to transform a host permissive for replication of its vector. The sequential cloning process continues by repeated cycles of circular integration and excision. The excision is carried out alternately with the second and third enzymes.

  15. Cloning of Plasmodium falciparum by single-cell sorting.

    PubMed

    Miao, Jun; Li, Xiaolian; Cui, Liwang

    2010-10-01

    Malaria parasite cloning is traditionally carried out mainly by using the limiting dilution method, which is laborious, imprecise, and unable to distinguish multiply-infected RBCs. In this study, we used a parasite engineered to express green fluorescent protein (GFP) to evaluate a single-cell sorting method for rapidly cloning Plasmodium falciparum. By dividing a two-dimensional scattergram from a cell sorter into 17 gates, we determined the parameters for isolating singly-infected erythrocytes and sorted them into individual cultures. Pre-gating of the engineered parasites for GFP allowed the isolation of almost 100% GFP-positive clones. Compared with the limiting dilution method, the number of parasite clones obtained by single-cell sorting was much higher. Molecular analyses showed that parasite isolates obtained by single-cell sorting were highly homogenous. This highly efficient single-cell sorting method should prove very useful for cloning both P. falciparum laboratory populations from genetic manipulation experiments and clinical samples.

  16. Water relations of populus clones

    SciTech Connect

    Pallardy, S.G.; Kozlowski, T.T.

    1981-02-01

    Stomatal aperture and water balance in the field of eight Populus clones varying in growth rate were closely related to environmental factors and clonal differences were clearly expressed. Leaf water potential (psi) was influenced by solar radiation, leaf conductance, evaporative demand, and soil moisture content. The effects of soil moisture on psi were greatly modified by atmospheric conditions and stomatal conductance. Several slow-growing clones exhibited extended periods of psi below that of rapidly growing clones, despite high evaporative demand and the much greater transpiring surfaces of the fast-growing clones. Stomata of all clones responded to changes in light intensity and vapor pressure gradient (VPG). Pronounced stomatal sensitivity to VPG of two rapidly growing clones of common parentage, and the resultant capacity of these clones to moderate water deficits under high evaporative demand, were associated with drought resistance in one of the parents. Seasonal maximum leaf conductance was positively related to growth in several clones, suggesting that rapidly growing clones possess the capacity to carry on higher rates of gas exchange under favorable conditions. Analysis of changes in psi with changes in transpirational flux density (TFD) showed that for four clones, psi change per unit change in TFD decreased as TFD increased, indicating plant adaptation for prevention of damaging psi even at high TFD. More rapidly growing clones exhibited a larger initial rate of decline in psi with TFD, but reduced the rate of decline more than slow-growing clones as TFD increased. (Refs. 41).

  17. Cloning Components of Human Telomerase.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-07-01

    nuclear factor NF90 homolog. (5 clones). RNA binding protein. Poorly understood. 3. FRG1 . Poorly understood. 4. DEK. Weak homology to Tetrahymena p95...least some of the clones for poorly understood genes (e.g. Hax-1, FRG1 , NF90, NF45, KIAA0098, KIAA0026, BAC397c4). Aim II. Functional Cloning of the

  18. Three concepts of cloning in human beings.

    PubMed

    Cui, Ke-Hui

    2005-07-01

    Human cloning, organ cloning and tissue cloning are various types of cloning that occur at different levels with different methodologies. According to three standards of terminology for an embryo (fertilization through germ cells, development in the uterus and having the potential to produce a human life), tissue cloning and type I organ cloning will not produce an embryo. In contrast, human cloning and type II organ cloning will produce an embryo. Thus, only non-germinal tissue cloning and type I organ cloning are beyond the ethical question and will not change human beings as a species. Using cloned tissues to make new tissues or organs is promising for the future of medicine.

  19. Clonal diversity and clone formation in the parthenogenetic Caucasian rock Lizard Darevskia dahli [corrected].

    PubMed

    Vergun, Andrey A; Martirosyan, Irena A; Semyenova, Seraphima K; Omelchenko, Andrey V; Petrosyan, Varos G; Lazebny, Oleg E; Tokarskaya, Olga N; Korchagin, Vitaly I; Ryskov, Alexey P

    2014-01-01

    The all-female Caucasian rock lizard species Darevskia dahli and other parthenogenetic species of this genus reproduce normally via true parthenogenesis. Previously, the genetic diversity of this species was analyzed using allozymes, mitochondrial DNA, and DNA fingerprint markers. In the present study, variation at three microsatellite loci was studied in 111 specimens of D. dahli from five populations from Armenia, and new information regarding clonal diversity and clone formation in D. dahli was obtained that suggests a multiple hybridization origin. All individuals but one were heterozygous at the loci studied. Based on specific allele combinations, 11 genotypes were identified among the individuals studied. Individuals with the same genotypes formed distinct clonal lineages: one major clone was represented by 72 individuals, an intermediate clone was represented by 21 individuals, and nine other clones were rare and represented by one or several individuals. A new approach based on the detection and comparison of genotype-specific markers formed by combinations of parental-specific markers was developed and used to identify at least three hybridization founder events that resulted in the initial formation of one major and two rare clones. All other clones, including the intermediate and seven rare clones, probably arose through postformation microsatellite mutations of the major clone. This approach can be used to identify hybridization founder events and to study clone formation in other unisexual taxa.

  20. Clonal Diversity and Clone Formation in the Parthenogenetic Caucasian Rock Lizard Darevskia dahli

    PubMed Central

    Vergun, Andrey A.; Martirosyan, Irena A.; Semyenova, Seraphima K.; Omelchenko, Andrey V.; Petrosyan, Varos G.; Lazebny, Oleg E.; Tokarskaya, Olga N.; Korchagin, Vitaly I.; Ryskov, Alexey P.

    2014-01-01

    The all-female Caucasian rock lizard species Darevskia dahli and other parthenogenetic species of this genus reproduce normally via true parthenogenesis. Previously, the genetic diversity of this species was analyzed using allozymes, mitochondrial DNA, and DNA fingerprint markers. In the present study, variation at three microsatellite loci was studied in 111 specimens of D. dahli from five populations from Armenia, and new information regarding clonal diversity and clone formation in D. dahli was obtained that suggests a multiple hybridization origin. All individuals but one were heterozygous at the loci studied. Based on specific allele combinations, 11 genotypes were identified among the individuals studied. Individuals with the same genotypes formed distinct clonal lineages: one major clone was represented by 72 individuals, an intermediate clone was represented by 21 individuals, and nine other clones were rare and represented by one or several individuals. A new approach based on the detection and comparison of genotype-specific markers formed by combinations of parental-specific markers was developed and used to identify at least three hybridization founder events that resulted in the initial formation of one major and two rare clones. All other clones, including the intermediate and seven rare clones, probably arose through postformation microsatellite mutations of the major clone. This approach can be used to identify hybridization founder events and to study clone formation in other unisexual taxa. PMID:24618670

  1. Platelet-mediated transformation of mtDNA-less human cells: Analysis of phenotypic variability among clones from normal individuals-and complementation behavior of the tRNA[sup Lys] mutation causing myoclonic epilepsy and ragged red fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Chomyn, A.; Lai, S.T.; Shakeley, R.; Attardi, G. ); Bresolin, N.; Scarlato, G. )

    1994-06-01

    In the present work, the authors demonstrate the possibility of using human blood platelets as mitochondrial donors for the repopulation of mtDNA-less ([rho][sup o]) cells. The noninvasive nature of platelet isolation, combined with the prolonged viability of platelet mitochondria and the simplicity and efficiency of the mitochondria-transfer procedure, has substantially increased the applicability of the [rho][sup o] cell transformation approach for mitochondrial genetic analysis and for the study of mtDNA-linked diseases. This approach has been applied to platelets from several normal human individuals and one individual affected by the myoclonic-epilepsy-and-ragged-red-fibers (MERRF) encephalomyopathy. A certain variability in respiratory capacity was observed among the platelet-derived [rho][sup o] cell transformants from a given normal subject, and it was shown to be unrelated to their mtDNA content. The results of sequential transfer of mitochondria from selected transformants into a [rho][sup o] cell line different from the first [rho][sup o] acceptor strongly suggest that this variability reflected, at least in part, differences in nuclear gene content and/or activity among the original recipient cells. A much greater variability in respiratory capacity was observed among the transformants derived from the MERRF patient and was found to be related to the presence and amount of the mitochondrial tRNA[sup Lys] mutation associated with the MERRF syndrome. An analysis of the relationship between proportion of mtDNA carrying the MERRF mutation and degree of respiratory activity in various transformations derived from the MERRF patient revealed an unusual complementation behavior of the tRNA[sup Lys] mutation, possibly reflecting the distribution of mutant mtDNA among the platelet mitochondria. 29 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Probabilistic cloning of equidistant states

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez, O.; Roa, Luis; Delgado, A.

    2010-08-15

    We study the probabilistic cloning of equidistant states. These states are such that the inner product between them is a complex constant or its conjugate. Thereby, it is possible to study their cloning in a simple way. In particular, we are interested in the behavior of the cloning probability as a function of the phase of the overlap among the involved states. We show that for certain families of equidistant states Duan and Guo's cloning machine leads to cloning probabilities lower than the optimal unambiguous discrimination probability of equidistant states. We propose an alternative cloning machine whose cloning probability is higher than or equal to the optimal unambiguous discrimination probability for any family of equidistant states. Both machines achieve the same probability for equidistant states whose inner product is a positive real number.

  3. Sequential cloning of chromosomes

    DOEpatents

    Lacks, Sanford A.

    1995-07-18

    A method for sequential cloning of chromosomal DNA of a target organism is disclosed. A first DNA segment homologous to the chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned is isolated. The first segment has a first restriction enzyme site on either side. A first vector product is formed by ligating the homologous segment into a suitably designed vector. The first vector product is circularly integrated into the target organism's chromosomal DNA. The resulting integrated chromosomal DNA segment includes the homologous DNA segment at either end of the integrated vector segment. The integrated chromosomal DNA is cleaved with a second restriction enzyme and ligated to form a vector-containing plasmid, which is replicated in a host organism. The replicated plasmid is then cleaved with the first restriction enzyme. Next, a DNA segment containing the vector and a segment of DNA homologous to a distal portion of the previously isolated DNA segment is isolated. This segment is then ligated to form a plasmid which is replicated within a suitable host. This plasmid is then circularly integrated into the target chromosomal DNA. The chromosomal DNA containing the circularly integrated vector is treated with a third, retrorestriction (class IIS) enzyme. The cleaved DNA is ligated to give a plasmid that is used to transform a host permissive for replication of its vector. The sequential cloning process continues by repeated cycles of circular integration and excision. The excision is carried out alternately with the second and third enzymes.

  4. Sequential cloning of chromosomes

    DOEpatents

    Lacks, S.A.

    1995-07-18

    A method for sequential cloning of chromosomal DNA of a target organism is disclosed. A first DNA segment homologous to the chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned is isolated. The first segment has a first restriction enzyme site on either side. A first vector product is formed by ligating the homologous segment into a suitably designed vector. The first vector product is circularly integrated into the target organism`s chromosomal DNA. The resulting integrated chromosomal DNA segment includes the homologous DNA segment at either end of the integrated vector segment. The integrated chromosomal DNA is cleaved with a second restriction enzyme and ligated to form a vector-containing plasmid, which is replicated in a host organism. The replicated plasmid is then cleaved with the first restriction enzyme. Next, a DNA segment containing the vector and a segment of DNA homologous to a distal portion of the previously isolated DNA segment is isolated. This segment is then ligated to form a plasmid which is replicated within a suitable host. This plasmid is then circularly integrated into the target chromosomal DNA. The chromosomal DNA containing the circularly integrated vector is treated with a third, retrorestriction (class IIS) enzyme. The cleaved DNA is ligated to give a plasmid that is used to transform a host permissive for replication of its vector. The sequential cloning process continues by repeated cycles of circular integration and excision. The excision is carried out alternately with the second and third enzymes. 9 figs.

  5. Cloning and cryptography with quantum continuous variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerf, N. J.; Iblisdir, S.; van Assche, G.

    2002-02-01

    The cloning of quantum variables with continuous spectra is investigated. We define a Gaussian 1-to-2 cloning machine that copies equally well two conjugate variables such as position and momentum or the two quadrature components of a light mode. The resulting cloning fidelity for coherent states, namely F=2/3, is shown to be optimal. An asymmetric version of this Gaussian cloner is then used to assess the security of a continuous-variable quantum key distribution scheme that allows two remote parties to share a Gaussian key. The information versus disturbance tradeoff underlying this continuous quantum cryptographic scheme is then analyzed for the optimal individual attack. Methods to convert the resulting Gaussian keys into secret key bits are also studied. Finally, the extension of the Gaussian cloner to optimal N-to-M continuous cloners is discussed, and it is shown how to implement these cloners for light modes using a phase-insensitive optical amplifier and beam splitters. In addition, a phase-conjugate input cloner is defined, yielding M clones and M' anticlones from N replicas of a coherent state and N' replicas of its phase-conjugate (with M'-M=N'-N). This novel kind of cloners is shown to outperform the standard N-to-M cloners in some cases.

  6. Experimental Eavesdropping Based on Optimal Quantum Cloning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartkiewicz, Karol; Lemr, Karel; Černoch, Antonín; Soubusta, Jan; Miranowicz, Adam

    2013-04-01

    The security of quantum cryptography is guaranteed by the no-cloning theorem, which implies that an eavesdropper copying transmitted qubits in unknown states causes their disturbance. Nevertheless, in real cryptographic systems some level of disturbance has to be allowed to cover, e.g., transmission losses. An eavesdropper can attack such systems by replacing a noisy channel by a better one and by performing approximate cloning of transmitted qubits which disturb them but below the noise level assumed by legitimate users. We experimentally demonstrate such symmetric individual eavesdropping on the quantum key distribution protocols of Bennett and Brassard (BB84) and the trine-state spherical code of Renes (R04) with two-level probes prepared using a recently developed photonic multifunctional quantum cloner [Lemr et al., Phys. Rev. A 85, 050307(R) (2012)PLRAAN1050-2947]. We demonstrated that our optimal cloning device with high-success rate makes the eavesdropping possible by hiding it in usual transmission losses. We believe that this experiment can stimulate the quest for other operational applications of quantum cloning.

  7. Divergent ecology of sympatric clones of the asexual gecko, Lepidodactylus lugubris.

    PubMed

    Bolger, Douglas T; Case, Ted J

    1994-12-01

    We report differences in the thermal biology, elevational, temporal and geographic distributions of sympatric clones of the widespread asexual house gecko, Lepidodactylus lugubris. The two most common L. lugubris clones in Fiji, clones 2NA and 2NB, differ significantly in preferred temperature as measured in a laboratory heat gradient, but were similar in critical thermal maximum and minimum. Significant differences were found in the relative frequency of clones 2NA, 2NB, and a third Fijian clone, clone 3NB, at seven sites along an elevational gradient in Fiji. Clone 2NB was not collected at sites above 235 m, consistent with its higher preferred temperature, whereas clone 2NA was captured as high as 835 m. Clone 3NB was extremely rare at sealevel (1% of all individuals at three sites below 100 m), but predominated at the two highest-elevation sites (42% and 100%). Clones 2NA and 2NB did not differ significantly in their activity time or ambient activity temperature at low-elevation sites. Clone 3NB however, was active on significantly cooler nights at two of those sites. These significant inter-clonal differences in spatial and temporal distribution should allow a more complete utilization of resources by the assemblage of clones than by any single clonal genotype, and may promote coexistence of clones at a within-island and within-site scale. Clone 2NA, which is the most common clone in Fiji and has the broadest elevational distribution, also has the widest geographic distribution. It was the predominant clone at 27 of 34 sites surveyed in nine Pacific archipelagoes. This suggests that the ecological attributes that favor this clone in Fiji also favor it elsewhere in the Pacific despite differing environmental conditions and clonal composition in those areas.

  8. To clone or not to clone--a Jewish perspective.

    PubMed Central

    Lipschutz, J H

    1999-01-01

    Many new reproductive methods such as artificial insemination, in vitro fertilisation, freezing of human embryos, and surrogate motherhood were at first widely condemned but are now seen in Western society as not just ethically and morally acceptable, but beneficial in that they allow otherwise infertile couples to have children. The idea of human cloning was also quickly condemned but debate is now emerging. This article examines cloning from a Jewish perspective and finds evidence to support the view that there is nothing inherently wrong with the idea of human cloning. A hypothesis is also advanced suggesting that even if a body was cloned, the brain, which is the essence of humanity, would remain unique. This author suggests that the debate should be changed from "Is cloning wrong?" to "When is cloning wrong?". PMID:10226913

  9. Ethical issues in animal cloning.

    PubMed

    Fiester, Autumn

    2005-01-01

    The issue of human reproductive cloning has recently received a great deal attention in public discourse. Bioethicists, policy makers, and the media have been quick to identify the key ethical issues involved in human reproductive cloning and to argue, almost unanimously, for an international ban on such attempts. Meanwhile, scientists have proceeded with extensive research agendas in the cloning of animals. Despite this research, there has been little public discussion of the ethical issues raised by animal cloning projects. Polling data show that the public is decidedly against the cloning of animals. To understand the public's reaction and fill the void of reasoned debate about the issue, we need to review the possible objections to animal cloning and assess the merits of the anti-animal cloning stance. Some objections to animal cloning (e.g., the impact of cloning on the population of unwanted animals) can be easily addressed, while others (e.g., the health of cloned animals) require more serious attention by the public and policy makers.

  10. To clone or not to clone--whither the law?

    PubMed

    Lupton, M L

    1999-01-01

    The cloning of Dolly the lamb from adult cells by scientists at the Roslin Laboratories near Edinburgh in February 1997 has startled the world because it now opens the way to clone adult human beings. The reaction to Ian Wilmut's breakthrough has been instant and largely negative. Bills were rushed into both the US Senate and House of Representatives aimed at banning the cloning of human beings. Human cloning is premature at this stage, but there are many positive spin-offs of cloning in the field of genetic engineering, such as the production of human proteins such as blood clotting factors which aid in healing wounds. Progress by means of cloning can also be made into devising a cure for Parkinson's Disease amongst others. No lesser ethicist than John C. Fletcher of the University of Virginia foresees circumstances in which human cloning is acceptable e.g. to enable a couple to replace a dying child, to enable a couple, one of whom is infertile, to clone a child from either partner. Extensive regulation of cloning by the law is inevitable but, in doing so, the legislation should be careful not to outlaw research in this area which could be beneficial to mankind.

  11. Evaluation of a Pooled Strategy for High-Throughput Sequencing of Cosmid Clones from Metagenomic Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Kathy N.; Hall, Michael W.; Engel, Katja; Vey, Gregory; Cheng, Jiujun; Neufeld, Josh D.; Charles, Trevor C.

    2014-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing methods have been instrumental in the growing field of metagenomics, with technological improvements enabling greater throughput at decreased costs. Nonetheless, the economy of high-throughput sequencing cannot be fully leveraged in the subdiscipline of functional metagenomics. In this area of research, environmental DNA is typically cloned to generate large-insert libraries from which individual clones are isolated, based on specific activities of interest. Sequence data are required for complete characterization of such clones, but the sequencing of a large set of clones requires individual barcode-based sample preparation; this can become costly, as the cost of clone barcoding scales linearly with the number of clones processed, and thus sequencing a large number of metagenomic clones often remains cost-prohibitive. We investigated a hybrid Sanger/Illumina pooled sequencing strategy that omits barcoding altogether, and we evaluated this strategy by comparing the pooled sequencing results to reference sequence data obtained from traditional barcode-based sequencing of the same set of clones. Using identity and coverage metrics in our evaluation, we show that pooled sequencing can generate high-quality sequence data, without producing problematic chimeras. Though caveats of a pooled strategy exist and further optimization of the method is required to improve recovery of complete clone sequences and to avoid circumstances that generate unrecoverable clone sequences, our results demonstrate that pooled sequencing represents an effective and low-cost alternative for sequencing large sets of metagenomic clones. PMID:24911009

  12. Evaluation of a pooled strategy for high-throughput sequencing of cosmid clones from metagenomic libraries.

    PubMed

    Lam, Kathy N; Hall, Michael W; Engel, Katja; Vey, Gregory; Cheng, Jiujun; Neufeld, Josh D; Charles, Trevor C

    2014-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing methods have been instrumental in the growing field of metagenomics, with technological improvements enabling greater throughput at decreased costs. Nonetheless, the economy of high-throughput sequencing cannot be fully leveraged in the subdiscipline of functional metagenomics. In this area of research, environmental DNA is typically cloned to generate large-insert libraries from which individual clones are isolated, based on specific activities of interest. Sequence data are required for complete characterization of such clones, but the sequencing of a large set of clones requires individual barcode-based sample preparation; this can become costly, as the cost of clone barcoding scales linearly with the number of clones processed, and thus sequencing a large number of metagenomic clones often remains cost-prohibitive. We investigated a hybrid Sanger/Illumina pooled sequencing strategy that omits barcoding altogether, and we evaluated this strategy by comparing the pooled sequencing results to reference sequence data obtained from traditional barcode-based sequencing of the same set of clones. Using identity and coverage metrics in our evaluation, we show that pooled sequencing can generate high-quality sequence data, without producing problematic chimeras. Though caveats of a pooled strategy exist and further optimization of the method is required to improve recovery of complete clone sequences and to avoid circumstances that generate unrecoverable clone sequences, our results demonstrate that pooled sequencing represents an effective and low-cost alternative for sequencing large sets of metagenomic clones.

  13. Induction of autophagy improves embryo viability in cloned mouse embryos

    PubMed Central

    Shen, XingHui; Zhang, Na; Wang, ZhenDong; Bai, GuangYu; Zheng, Zhong; Gu, YanLi; Wu, YanShuang; Liu, Hui; Zhou, DongJie; Lei, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is an essential cellular mechanism that degrades cytoplasmic proteins and organelles to recycle their components. Moreover, autophagy is essential for preimplantation development in mammals. Here we show that autophagy is also important for reprogramming in somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Our data indicate that unlike fertilized oocytes, autophagy is not triggered in SCNT embryos during 6 hours of activation. Mechanistically, the inhibited autophagic induction during SCNT activation is due to the cytochalasin B (CB) caused depolymerization of actin filaments. In this study, we induced autophagy during SCNT activation by rapamycin and pp242, which could restore the expected level of autophagy and significantly enhance the development of SCNT embryos to the blastocyst stage when compared with the control (68.5% and 68.7% vs. 41.5%, P < 0.05). Furthermore, the treatment of rapamycin and pp242 accelerates active DNA demethylation indicated by the conversion of 5 mC to 5 hmC, and treatment of rapamycin improves degradation of maternal mRNA as well. Thus, our findings reveal that autophagy is important for development of SCNT embryos and inhibited autophagic induction during SCNT activation might be one of the serious causes of low efficiency of SCNT. PMID:26643778

  14. Cloning and Characterization of the Mouse Hepatitis Virus Receptor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-02-11

    Alexis Basile and Kathy Wilson for their technical assistance and for creating a nice enviroment to work in, and Dr. Michael Pensiero for his...Schreyer, S. Carrel and J. P. Mach. (1984). "Monodonal antibodies Identify a CEA crossreacting antigen of 95 kD (NCA-95) distinct in antigenicity and

  15. The NEUROD gene maps to human chromosome 2q32 and mouse chromosome 2

    SciTech Connect

    Tamimi, R.; Dyer-Montgomery, K.; Hernandez, R.; Tapscott, S.J.

    1996-06-15

    The Neurod gene is a basic-helix-loop-helix gene that regulates neurogenesis and is identical to the hamster beta2 gene that was cloned as a regulator of insulin transcription. Here we report the cloning of human NEUROD and mapping of the gene to human chromosome 2q32 and to mouse chromosome 2. 12 refs., 1 fig.

  16. Cloning humans? Biological, ethical, and social considerations.

    PubMed

    Ayala, Francisco J

    2015-07-21

    There are, in mankind, two kinds of heredity: biological and cultural. Cultural inheritance makes possible for humans what no other organism can accomplish: the cumulative transmission of experience from generation to generation. In turn, cultural inheritance leads to cultural evolution, the prevailing mode of human adaptation. For the last few millennia, humans have been adapting the environments to their genes more often than their genes to the environments. Nevertheless, natural selection persists in modern humans, both as differential mortality and as differential fertility, although its intensity may decrease in the future. More than 2,000 human diseases and abnormalities have a genetic causation. Health care and the increasing feasibility of genetic therapy will, although slowly, augment the future incidence of hereditary ailments. Germ-line gene therapy could halt this increase, but at present, it is not technically feasible. The proposal to enhance the human genetic endowment by genetic cloning of eminent individuals is not warranted. Genomes can be cloned; individuals cannot. In the future, therapeutic cloning will bring enhanced possibilities for organ transplantation, nerve cells and tissue healing, and other health benefits.

  17. Cloning humans? Biological, ethical, and social considerations

    PubMed Central

    Ayala, Francisco J.

    2015-01-01

    There are, in mankind, two kinds of heredity: biological and cultural. Cultural inheritance makes possible for humans what no other organism can accomplish: the cumulative transmission of experience from generation to generation. In turn, cultural inheritance leads to cultural evolution, the prevailing mode of human adaptation. For the last few millennia, humans have been adapting the environments to their genes more often than their genes to the environments. Nevertheless, natural selection persists in modern humans, both as differential mortality and as differential fertility, although its intensity may decrease in the future. More than 2,000 human diseases and abnormalities have a genetic causation. Health care and the increasing feasibility of genetic therapy will, although slowly, augment the future incidence of hereditary ailments. Germ-line gene therapy could halt this increase, but at present, it is not technically feasible. The proposal to enhance the human genetic endowment by genetic cloning of eminent individuals is not warranted. Genomes can be cloned; individuals cannot. In the future, therapeutic cloning will bring enhanced possibilities for organ transplantation, nerve cells and tissue healing, and other health benefits. PMID:26195738

  18. Therapeutic cloning and reproductive liberty.

    PubMed

    Sparrow, Robert

    2009-04-01

    Concern for "reproductive liberty" suggests that decisions about embryos should normally be made by the persons who would be the genetic parents of the child that would be brought into existence if the embryo were brought to term. Therapeutic cloning would involve creating and destroying an embryo, which, if brought to term, would be the offspring of the genetic parents of the person undergoing therapy. I argue that central arguments in debates about parenthood and genetics therefore suggest that therapeutic cloning would be prima facie unethical unless it occurred with the consent of the parents of the person being cloned. Alternatively, if therapeutic cloning is thought to be legitimate, this undermines the case for some uses of reproductive cloning by implying that the genetic relation it establishes between clones and DNA donors does not carry the same moral weight as it does in cases of normal reproduction.

  19. Chromosomal localization of mouse bullous pemphigoid antigens, BPAG1 and BPAG2: Identification of a new region of homology between mouse and human chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, N.G.; Gilbert, D.J.; Jenkins, N.A. ); Li, K.; Sawamura, D.; Chu, Monli; Uitto, J. ); Giudice, G.J. )

    1993-01-01

    Two bullous pemphigoid antigens, BPAG1 and BPAG2, have been recently cloned and mapped to human chromosomes 6p12-p11 and 10q24.3, respectively. In this study, we localized the corresponding mouse genes by interspecific backcross analysis. Bpag-1 mapped to the proximal region of mouse chromosome 1, identifying a new region of homology between human chromosome 6 and mouse chromosome 1. Bpag-2 mapped to the distal end of mouse chromosome 19 in a region of homology to human chromosome 10q. These assignments confirm and extend the relationships between the human and the mouse chromosomes. 13 refs., 1 fig.

  20. Cloning an expressed gene shared by the human sex chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Darling, S.M.; Banting, G.S.; Pym, B.; Wolfe, J.; Goodfellow, P.N.

    1986-01-01

    The existence of genes shared by mammalian sex chromosomes has been predicted on both evolutionary and functional grounds. However, the only experimental evidence for such genes in humans is the cell-surface antigen encoded by loci on the X and Y chromosomes (MIC2X and MIC2Y, respectively), which is recognized by the monoclonal antibody 12E7. Using the bacteriophage lambdagt11 expression system in Escherichia coli and immunoscreening techniques, the authors have isolated a cDNA clone whose primary product is recognized by 12E7. Southern blot analysis using somatic cell hybrids containing only the human X or Y chromosomes shows that the sequences reacting with the cDNA clone are localized to the sex chromosomes. In addition, the clone hybridizes to DNAs isolated from mouse cells that have been transfected with human DNA and selected for 12E7 expression on the fluorescence-activated cell sorter. The authors conclude that the cDNA clone encodes the 12E7 antigen, which is the primary product of the MIC2 loci. The clone was used to explore sequence homology between MIC2X and MIC2Y; these loci are closely related, if not identical.

  1. Molecular Cloning of Adenosinediphosphoribosyl Transferase.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-08

    ACCESSION NO.D,. 03261102F 2312 A~5 11. TITLE (include Securqt Classification) 0 Molecular Cloning of Adenosinediphosphoribosyl Transferase 12. PERSONAL...I’:- AFOSR.Tlt. 8 7 - 0 9 8,2 0IL * pi AFOSR- 85 -0377 PROGRESS REPORT Molecular Cloning of Adenosinediphosphoribosyl Transferase 5." Period of...Pharmacology and the Cardiovascular Research Institute September 8, 1987 .’, 5.’- "’S ". -f, AFOSR - 85 -0377 PROGRESS REPORT Molecular Cloning of

  2. Frequent occurrence of highly expanded but unrelated B-cell clones in patients with multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Kriangkum, Jitra; Motz, Sarah N; Debes Marun, Carina S; Lafarge, Sandrine T; Gibson, Spencer B; Venner, Christopher P; Johnston, James B; Belch, Andrew R; Pilarski, Linda M

    2013-01-01

    Clonal diversity in multiple myeloma (MM) includes both MM-related and MM-unrelated clonal expansions which are subject to dominance exerted by the MM clone. Here we show evidence for the existence of minor but highly expanded unrelated B-cell clones in patients with MM defined by their complementary determining region 3 (CDR3) peak. We further characterize these clones over the disease and subsequent treatment. Second clones were identified by their specific IgH-VDJ sequences that are distinct from those of dominant MM clones. Clonal frequencies were determined through semi-quantitative PCR, quantitative PCR and single-cell polymerase chain reaction of the clone-specific sequence. In 13/74 MM patients, more than one dominant CDR3 peak was identified with 12 patients (16%) being truly biclonal. Second clones had different frequencies, were found in different locations and were found in different cell types from the dominant MM clone. Where analysis was possible, they were shown to have chromosomal characteristic distinct from those of the MM clone. The frequency of the second clone also changed over the course of the disease and often persisted despite treatment. Molecularly-defined second clones are infrequent in monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS, 1/43 individuals or 2%), suggesting that they may arise at relatively late stages of myelomagenesis. In further support of our findings, biclonal gammopathy and concomitant MM and CLL (chronic lymphocytic leukemia) were confirmed to originate from two unrelated clones. Our data supports the idea that the clone giving rise to symptomatic myeloma exerts clonal dominance to prevent expansion of other clones. MM and second clones may arise from an underlying niche permissive of clonal expansion. The clinical significance of these highly expanded but unrelated clones remains to be confirmed. Overall, our findings add new dimensions to evaluating related and unrelated clonal expansions in MM and the

  3. Reproductive cloning and arguments from potential.

    PubMed

    Oakley, Justin

    2006-01-01

    The possibility of human reproductive cloning has led some bioethicists to suggest that potentiality-based arguments for fetal moral status become untenable, as such arguments would be committed to making the implausible claim that any adult somatic cell is itself a potential person. In this article I defend potentiality-based arguments for fetal moral status against such a reductio. Starting from the widely-held claim that the maintenance of numerical identity throughout successive changes places constraints on what a given entity can plausibly be said to have the potential to become, I argue that the cell reprogramming that takes place in reproductive cloning is such that it produces a new individual, and so adult somatic cells cannot be potential persons.

  4. Recent progress and problems in animal cloning.

    PubMed

    Tsunoda, Y; Kato, Y

    2002-01-01

    It is remarkable that mammalian somatic cell nuclei can form whole individuals if they are transferred to enucleated oocytes. Advancements in nuclear transfer technology can now be applied for genetic improvement and increase of farm animals, rescue of endangered species, and assisted reproduction and tissue engineering in humans. Since July 1998, more than 200 calves have been produced by nuclear transfer of somatic cell nuclei in Japan, but half of them were stillborn or died within several months of parturition. Morphologic abnormalities have also been observed in cloned calves and embryonic stem cell-derived mice. In this review, we discuss the present situation and problems with animal cloning and the possibility for its application to human medicine.

  5. Therapeutic cloning: The ethical limits

    SciTech Connect

    Whittaker, Peter A. . E-mail: p.whittaker@lancaster.ac.uk

    2005-09-01

    A brief outline of stem cells, stem cell therapy and therapeutic cloning is given. The position of therapeutic cloning with regard to other embryonic manipulations - IVF-based reproduction, embryonic stem formation from IVF embryos and reproductive cloning - is indicated. The main ethically challenging stages in therapeutic cloning are considered to be the nuclear transfer process including the source of eggs for this and the destruction of an embryo to provide stem cells for therapeutic use. The extremely polarised nature of the debate regarding the status of an early human embryo is noted, and some potential alternative strategies for preparing immunocompatible pluripotent stem cells are indicated.

  6. End Sequencing and Finger Printing of Human & Mouse BAC Libraries

    SciTech Connect

    Fraser, C

    2005-09-27

    This project provided for continued end sequencing of existing and new BAC libraries constructed to support human sequencing as well as to initiate BAC end sequencing from the mouse BAC libraries constructed to support mouse sequencing. The clones, the sequences, and the fingerprints are now an available resource for the community at large. Research and development of new metaodologies for BAC end sequencing have reduced costs and increase throughput.

  7. Aberrant DNA methylation imprints in aborted bovine clones.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing-He; Yin, Shen; Xiong, Bo; Hou, Yi; Chen, Da-Yuan; Sun, Qing-Yuan

    2008-04-01

    Genomic imprinting plays a very important role during development and its abnormality may heavily undermine the developmental potential of bovine embryos. Because of limited resources of the cow genome, bovine genomic imprinting, both in normal development and in somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) cloning, is not well documented. DNA methylation is thought to be a major factor for the establishment of genomic imprinting. In our study, we determined the methylation status of differential methylated regions (DMRs) of four imprinted genes in four spontaneously aborted SCNT-cloned fetuses (AF). Firstly, abnormal methylation imprints were observed in each individual to different extents. In particular, Peg3 and MAOA were either seriously demethylated or showed aberrant methylation patterns in four aborted clones we tested, but Xist and Peg10 exhibited relatively better maintained methylation status in AF1 and AF4. Secondly, two aborted fetuses, AF2 and AF3 exhibited severe aberrant methylation imprints of four imprinted genes. Finally, MAOA showed strong heterogeneous methylation patterns of its DMR in normal somatic adult tissue, but largely variable methylation levels and relatively homogeneous methylation patterns in aborted cloned fetuses. Our data indicate that the aborted cloned fetuses exhibited abnormal methylation imprints, to different extent, in aborted clones, which partially account for the higher abortion and developmental abnormalities during bovine cloning.

  8. Clone history shapes Populus drought responses

    PubMed Central

    Raj, Sherosha; Bräutigam, Katharina; Hamanishi, Erin T.; Wilkins, Olivia; Thomas, Barb R.; Schroeder, William; Mansfield, Shawn D.; Plant, Aine L.; Campbell, Malcolm M.

    2011-01-01

    Just as animal monozygotic twins can experience different environmental conditions by being reared apart, individual genetically identical trees of the genus Populus can also be exposed to contrasting environmental conditions by being grown in different locations. As such, clonally propagated Populus trees provide an opportunity to interrogate the impact of individual environmental history on current response to environmental stimuli. To test the hypothesis that current responses to an environmental stimulus, drought, are contingent on environmental history, the transcriptome- level drought responses of three economically important hybrid genotypes—DN34 (Populus deltoides × Populus nigra), Walker [P. deltoides var. occidentalis × (Populus laurifolia × P. nigra)], and Okanese [Walker × (P. laurifolia × P. nigra)]—derived from two different locations were compared. Strikingly, differences in transcript abundance patterns in response to drought were based on differences in geographic origin of clones for two of the three genotypes. This observation was most pronounced for the genotypes with the longest time since establishment and last common propagation. Differences in genome-wide DNA methylation paralleled the transcriptome level trends, whereby the clones with the most divergent transcriptomes and clone history had the most marked differences in the extent of total DNA methylation, suggesting an epigenomic basis for the clone history-dependent transcriptome divergence. The data provide insights into the interplay between genotype and environment in the ecologically and economically important Populus genus, with implications for the industrial application of Populus trees and the evolution and persistence of these important tree species and their associated hybrids. PMID:21746919

  9. Phospholipid epitopes for mouse antibodies against bromelain-treated mouse erythrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Kawaguchi, S

    1987-01-01

    The reactivity of mouse antibodies against bromelain-treated mouse erythrocytes (BrMRBC) with phospholipid epitopes was assessed by ELISA, using four clones of monoclonal anti-BrMRBC antibodies that had idiotypes distinct from one another. The four antibodies could bind to low-density lipoproteins (LDL) from human and chicken, but not to LDL from mouse and rat. As to liposomes of natural phospholipids, all the clones reacted with liposomes of phosphatidylcholine, and some of them could react with liposomes of sphingomyelin, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylic acid or cardiolipin. For liposomes of synthetic phosphatidylcholine with different fatty acids, the length of carbon chains and the number of unsaturated carbon chains of the fatty acids markedly affected the binding of each monoclonal antibody to the liposomes. The addition of dicetyl phosphate or stearylamine to phosphatidylcholine liposomes changed the reactivity of the liposomes. These results support the view that mouse anti-BrMRBC antibodies can recognize appropriately spaced phosphorylcholine residues on the surface of phospholipid liposomes, LDL and cells. The four clones had similar capacities for binding to LDL as well as to BrMRBC, but they had obviously different capacities for binding to phospholipid liposomes; the epitopes on phospholipid liposomes used in the present study were not so perfect as to react well with every anti-BrMRBC antibody. PMID:2443446

  10. Learning, memory and exploratory similarities in genetically identical cloned dogs

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Chi Won; Kim, Geon A; Park, Won Jun; Park, Kwan Yong; Jeon, Jeong Min; Oh, Hyun Ju; Kim, Min Jung

    2016-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer allows generation of genetically identical animals using donor cells derived from animals with particular traits. To date, few studies have investigated whether or not these cloned dogs will show identical behavior patterns. To address this question, learning, memory and exploratory patterns were examined using six cloned dogs with identical nuclear genomes. The variance of total incorrect choice number in the Y-maze test among cloned dogs was significantly lower than that of the control dogs. There was also a significant decrease in variance in the level of exploratory activity in the open fields test compared to age-matched control dogs. These results indicate that cloned dogs show similar cognitive and exploratory patterns, suggesting that these behavioral phenotypes are related to the genotypes of the individuals. PMID:27030191

  11. Learning, memory and exploratory similarities in genetically identical cloned dogs.

    PubMed

    Shin, Chi Won; Kim, Geon A; Park, Won Jun; Park, Kwan Yong; Jeon, Jeong Min; Oh, Hyun Ju; Kim, Min Jung; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2016-12-30

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer allows generation of genetically identical animals using donor cells derived from animals with particular traits. To date, few studies have investigated whether or not these cloned dogs will show identical behavior patterns. To address this question, learning, memory and exploratory patterns were examined using six cloned dogs with identical nuclear genomes. The variance of total incorrect choice number in the Y-maze test among cloned dogs was significantly lower than that of the control dogs. There was also a significant decrease in variance in the level of exploratory activity in the open fields test compared to age-matched control dogs. These results indicate that cloned dogs show similar cognitive and exploratory patterns, suggesting that these behavioral phenotypes are related to the genotypes of the individuals.

  12. Genetic identification of a novel hantavirus of the harvest mouse Reithrodontomys megalotis.

    PubMed Central

    Hjelle, B; Chavez-Giles, F; Torrez-Martinez, N; Yates, T; Sarisky, J; Webb, J; Ascher, M

    1994-01-01

    We have cloned the S genomic segment of a novel hantavirus of the harvest mouse Reithrodontomys megalotis. The virus is phylogenetically distinct from other hantaviruses. The new hantavirus was identified in harvest mice separated by approximately 1,000 km. A wood rat (Neotoma mexicana) was found to be infected with the harvest mouse hantavirus. PMID:8084007

  13. Current Protocols in Mouse Biology Tissue-specific regulation of oncogene expression using Cre-inducible ROSA26 knock-in transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Carofino, Brandi L.; Justice, Monica J.

    2015-01-01

    Cre-inducible mouse models are often utilized for the spatial and temporal expression of oncogenes. With the wide number of Cre recombinase lines available, inducible transgenesis represents a tractable approach to achieve discrete oncogene expression. Here, we describe a protocol for targeting Cre-inducible genes using a loxP-STOP-loxP approach to the ubiquitously expressed ROSA26 locus. Gene targeting provides several advantages over standard transgenic techniques, including a known site of integration and previously characterized pattern of expression. Historically, an inherent instability of ROSA26 targeting vectors has hampered the efficiency of developing ROSA26 knock-in lines. In this protocol, we provide individual steps for utilizing Gateway recombination for cloning, and detailed instructions for screening targeted ES cell clones. By following this protocol, one can achieve germline transmission of a ROSA26 knock-in line within several months. PMID:26069083

  14. Ultraviolet survival and sensitizing effect of caffeine in mouse hybrid cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zampetti-Bosseler, F.; Delhaise, P.; Limbosch, S.

    1980-10-01

    In a previous paper it was reported that three hybrid cell lines between mouse lymphoma cells (L5178YS) and mouse fibroblasts (A9) were more resistant to x rays than either of the parental cells. In this work, these hybrids displayed a degree of resistance to uv light either higher than (hybrid clone 3) or similar to (hybrid clones 1 and 2) that of the more resistant parent (A9). The enhanced resistance of hybrid clone 3 to uv was related neither to changes in cell shape, ploidy, and growth rate nor to an increase in a caffeine-sensitive recovery process after uv irradiation.

  15. Genotoxic effects of 1 GeV/amu Fe ions in mouse kidney epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kronenberg, A.; Gauny, S. S.; Connolly, L.; Turker, M.

    Human exploration of space places individuals in environments where they are exposed to charged particle radiation. The goal of our studies is to assess the genotoxic and mutagenic effects of high energy Fe ions (1 GeV/amu) in kidney epithelial cells of the mouse irradiated either in vitro or in vivo. The initial study focused on establishing the toxicity of these heavy ions (LET=159 keV/micron) in two Aprt heterozygous kidney epithelial cell lines: K06 cells derived from a C57BL6/129Sv animal, and clone 4a cells derived from a C57BL6/DBA2 animal. Cells were exposed in vitro to graded doses of Fe ions (0-300 cGy) and the toxicity of the treatment was established using colony forming assays. Experiments were performed in triplicate at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The results indicate that Fe ions are toxic to mouse kidney epithelial cells and that no shoulder is observed on the survival curve for cells from either genetic background. The clone 4a cells were more sensitive to Fe ion exposures than the K06 cells. The D(37) for clone 4a cells was 92 cGy and the D(10) was 212 cGy. The more resistant K06 cells had a D(37) of 192 cGy and an estimated D(10) of 388 cGy. Parallel experiments are underway to establish the RBE's for cell killing for these two cell lines. Supported by NASA grant T-403X to A. Kronenberg

  16. CATO: The Clone Alignment Tool.

    PubMed

    Henstock, Peter V; LaPan, Peter

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput cloning efforts produce large numbers of sequences that need to be aligned, edited, compared with reference sequences, and organized as files and selected clones. Different pieces of software are typically required to perform each of these tasks. We have designed a single piece of software, CATO, the Clone Alignment Tool, that allows a user to align, evaluate, edit, and select clone sequences based on comparisons to reference sequences. The input and output are designed to be compatible with standard data formats, and thus suitable for integration into a clone processing pipeline. CATO provides both sequence alignment and visualizations to facilitate the analysis of cloning experiments. The alignment algorithm matches each of the relevant candidate sequences against each reference sequence. The visualization portion displays three levels of matching: 1) a top-level summary of the top candidate sequences aligned to each reference sequence, 2) a focused alignment view with the nucleotides of matched sequences displayed against one reference sequence, and 3) a pair-wise alignment of a single reference and candidate sequence pair. Users can select the minimum matching criteria for valid clones, edit or swap reference sequences, and export the results to a summary file as part of the high-throughput cloning workflow.

  17. [The discrete horror of cloning].

    PubMed

    Guibourg, Ricardo A

    2009-01-01

    The author raises the topic of cloning after the decision of the Argentine government, which concerned for the "dignity of the human person", passed a decree of need and urgency, No. 200/97 (Annex), prohibiting cloning experiments with human beings. Therefore, considering that the topic is so terribly urgent and necessary, the author feels it is timely to consider it.

  18. [Scientific ethics of human cloning].

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, Carlos Y

    2005-01-01

    True cloning is fission, budding or other types of asexual reproduction. In humans it occurs in monozygote twinning. This type of cloning is ethically and religiously good. Human cloning can be performed by twinning (TWClo) or nuclear transfer (NTClo). Both methods need a zygote or a nuclear transferred cell, obtained in vitro (IVTec). They are under the IVTec ethics. IVTecs use humans (zygotes, embryos) as drugs or things; increase the risk of malformations; increase development and size of abnormalities and may cause long-term changes. Cloning for preserving extinct (or almost extinct) animals or humans when sexual reproduction is not possible is ethically valid. The previous selection of a phenotype in human cloning violates some ethical principles. NTClo for reproductive or therapeutic purposes is dangerous since it increases the risk for nucleotide or chromosome mutations, de-programming or re-programming errors, aging or malignancy of the embryo cells thus obtained.

  19. Isolation of the mouse homologue of BRCA1 and genetic mapping to mouse chromosome 11

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, L.M.; Haugen-Strano, A.; Cochran, C.

    1995-10-10

    The BRCA1 gene is in large part responsible for hereditary human breast and ovarian cancer. Here we report the isolation of the murine Brca1 homologue cDNA clones. In addition, we identified genomic P1 clones that contain most, if not all, of the mouse Brca1 locus. DNA sequence analysis revealed that the mouse and human coding regions are 75% identical at the nucleotide level while the predicted amino acid identity is only 58%. A DNA sequence variant in the Brcal locus was identified and used to map this gene on a (Mus m. musculus Czech II x C57BL/KsJ)F1 x C57BL/KsJ intersubspecific backcross to distal mouse chromosome 11. The mapping of this gene to a region highly syntenic with human chromosome 17, coupled with Southern and Northern analyses, confirms that we isolated the murine Brcal homologue rather than a related RING finger gene. The isolation of the mouse Brca1 homologue will facilitate the creation of mouse models for germline BRCA1 defects. 12 refs., 3 figs.

  20. Cloning Sequencing and Structural Manipulation of the Enterotoxin D and E Genes from Staphylococcus aureus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-05-30

    sign in mice injected with toxin samples from these clones. Only the mouse injected with whole cells from KS1866 showed flaking and peeling of the... epidermis . Even the E. coli strains containing pJJ825 (KSI825 and 15 KSI858) did not show exfoliation. It is possible that the E. coli strains do not

  1. Human cloning: can it be made safe?

    PubMed

    Rhind, Susan M; Taylor, Jane E; De Sousa, Paul A; King, Tim J; McGarry, Michelle; Wilmut, Ian

    2003-11-01

    There are continued claims of attempts to clone humans using nuclear transfer, despite the serious problems that have been encountered in cloning other mammals. It is known that epigenetic and genetic mechanisms are involved in clone failure, but we still do not know exactly how. Human reproductive cloning is unethical, but the production of cells from cloned embryos could offer many potential benefits. So, can human cloning be made safe?

  2. Brain-specific expression of MAP2 detected using a cloned cDNA probe

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    We describe the isolation of a set of overlapping cDNAs encoding mouse microtubule associated protein 2 (MAP2), using an anti-MAP antiserum to screen a mouse brain cDNA expression library cloned in bacteriophage lambda gt11. The authenticity of these clones was established by the following criteria: (a) three non-identical clones each expressing a MAP2 immunoreactive fusion protein were independently isolated from the expression library; each of these clones cross-hybridized at the nucleic acid level; (b) anti-MAP antiserum was affinity purified using nitrocellulose-bound fusion protein; these antibodies detected only MAP2 in an immunoblot experiment of whole brain microtubule protein; (c) a series of cDNA "walking" experiments was done so as to obtain a non-overlapping cloned fragment corresponding to a different part of the same mRNA molecule. Upon subcloning this non-overlapping fragment into plasmid expression vectors, a fusion protein was synthesized that was immunoreactive with an anti-MAP2 specific antiserum. Thus, a single contiguous cloned mRNA molecule encodes at least two MAP2-specific epitopes; (d) the cloned cDNA probes detect an mRNA species in mouse brain that is of a size (approximately 9 kb) consistent with the coding capacity required by a 250,000-D protein. The MAP2-specific cloned cDNA probes were used in RNA blot transfer experiments to assay for the presence of MAP2 mRNA in a variety of mouse tissues. Though brain contained abundant quantities of MAP2 mRNA, no corresponding sequences were detectable in RNA prepared from liver, kidney, spleen, stomach, or thymus. We conclude that the expression of MAP2 is brain-specific. Use of the MAP2 specific cDNA probes in genomic Southern blot transfer experiments showed the presence of a single gene encoding MAP2 in mouse. The microheterogeneity of MAP2 is therefore ascribable either to alternative splicing within a single gene, or to posttranslational modification(s), or both. Under conditions of low

  3. Seamless Ligation Cloning Extract (SLiCE) cloning method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongwei; Werling, Uwe; Edelmann, Winfried

    2014-01-01

    SLiCE (Seamless Ligation Cloning Extract) is a novel cloning method that utilizes easy to generate bacterial cell extracts to assemble multiple DNA fragments into recombinant DNA molecules in a single in vitro recombination reaction. SLiCE overcomes the sequence limitations of traditional cloning methods, facilitates seamless cloning by recombining short end homologies (15-52 bp) with or without flanking heterologous sequences and provides an effective strategy for directional subcloning of DNA fragments from bacterial artificial chromosomes or other sources. SLiCE is highly cost-effective and demonstrates the versatility as a number of standard laboratory bacterial strains can serve as sources for SLiCE extract. We established a DH10B-derived E. coli strain expressing an optimized λ prophage Red recombination system, termed PPY, which facilitates SLiCE with very high efficiencies.

  4. DNA cloning: A personal view after 40 years

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Stanley N.

    2013-01-01

    In November 1973, my colleagues A. C. Y. Chang, H. W. Boyer, R. B. Helling, and I reported in PNAS that individual genes can be cloned and isolated by enzymatically cleaving DNA molecules into fragments, linking the fragments to an autonomously replicating plasmid, and introducing the resulting recombinant DNA molecules into bacteria. A few months later, Chang and I reported that genes from unrelated bacterial species can be combined and propagated using the same approach and that interspecies recombinant DNA molecules can produce a biologically functional protein in a foreign host. Soon afterward, Boyer’s laboratory and mine published our collaborative discovery that even genes from animal cells can be cloned in bacteria. These three PNAS papers quickly led to the use of DNA cloning methods in multiple areas of the biological and chemical sciences. They also resulted in a highly public controversy about the potential hazards of laboratory manipulation of genetic material, a decision by Stanford University and the University of California to seek patents on the technology that Boyer and I had invented, and the application of DNA cloning methods for commercial purposes. In the 40 years that have passed since publication of our findings, use of DNA cloning has produced insights about the workings of genes and cells in health and disease and has altered the nature of the biotechnology and biopharmaceutical industries. Here, I provide a personal perspective of the events that led to, and followed, our report of DNA cloning. PMID:24043817

  5. Human therapeutic cloning (NTSC): applying research from mammalian reproductive cloning.

    PubMed

    French, Andrew J; Wood, Samuel H; Trounson, Alan O

    2006-01-01

    Human therapeutic cloning or nuclear transfer stem cells (NTSC) to produce patient-specific stem cells, holds considerable promise in the field of regenerative medicine. The recent withdrawal of the only scientific publications claiming the successful generation of NTSC lines afford an opportunity to review the available research in mammalian reproductive somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) with the goal of progressing human NTSC. The process of SCNT is prone to epigenetic abnormalities that contribute to very low success rates. Although there are high mortality rates in some species of cloned animals, most surviving clones have been shown to have normal phenotypic and physiological characteristics and to produce healthy offspring. This technology has been applied to an increasing number of mammals for utility in research, agriculture, conservation, and biomedicine. In contrast, attempts at SCNT to produce human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) have been disappointing. Only one group has published reliable evidence of success in deriving a cloned human blastocyst, using an undifferentiated hESC donor cell, and it failed to develop into a hESC line. When optimal conditions are present, it appears that in vitro development of cloned and parthenogenetic embryos, both of which may be utilized to produce hESCs, may be similar to in vitro fertilized embryos. The derivation of ESC lines from cloned embryos is substantially more efficient than the production of viable offspring. This review summarizes developments in mammalian reproductive cloning, cell-to-cell fusion alternatives, and strategies for oocyte procurement that may provide important clues facilitating progress in human therapeutic cloning leading to the successful application of cell-based therapies utilizing autologous hESC lines.

  6. Methylotroph cloning vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, Richard S.; Allen, Larry N.

    1989-04-25

    A cloning vehicle comprising: a replication determinant effective for replicating the vehicle in a non-C.sub.1 -utilizing host and in a C.sub.1 -utilizing host; DNA effective to allow the vehicle to be mobilized from the non-C.sub.1 -utilizing host to the C.sub.1 -utilizing host; DNA providing resistance to two antibiotics to which the wild-type C.sub.1 -utilizing host is susceptible, each of the antibiotic resistance markers having a recognition site for a restriction endonuclease; a cos site; and a means for preventing replication in the C.sub.1 -utilizing host. The vehicle is used for complementation mapping as follows. DNA comprising a gene from the C.sub.1 -utilizing organism is inserted at the restriction nuclease recognition site, inactivating the antibiotic resistance marker at that site. The vehicle can then be used to form a cosmid structure to infect the non-C.sub.1 -utilizing (e.g., E. coli) host, and then conjugated with a selected C.sub.1 -utilizing mutant. Resistance to the other antibiotic by the mutant is a marker of the conjugation. Other phenotypical changes in the mutant, e.g., loss of an auxotrophic trait, is attributed to the C.sub.1 gene. The vector is also used to inactivate genes whose protein products catalyze side reactions that divert compounds from a biosynthetic pathway to a desired product, thereby producing an organism that makes the desired product in higher yields.

  7. Cloning changes the response to obesity of innate immune factors in blood, liver, and adipose tissues in domestic pigs.

    PubMed

    Rødgaard, Tina; Skovgaard, Kerstin; Stagsted, Jan; Heegaard, Peter M H

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of cloned pigs as porcine obesity models reflecting obesity-associated changes in innate immune factor gene expression profiles. Liver and adipose tissue expression of 43 innate immune genes as well as serum concentrations of six immune factors were analyzed in lean and diet-induced obese cloned domestic pigs and compared to normal domestic pigs (obese and lean). The number of genes affected by obesity was lower in cloned animals than in control animals. All genes affected by obesity in adipose tissues of clones were downregulated; both upregulation and downregulation were observed in the controls. Cloning resulted in a less differentiated adipose tissue expression pattern. Finally, the serum concentrations of two acute-phase proteins (APPs), haptoglobin (HP) and orosomucoid (ORM), were increased in obese clones as compared to obese controls as well as lean clones and controls. Generally, the variation in phenotype between individual pigs was not reduced in cloned siblings as compared to normal siblings. Therefore, we conclude that cloning limits both the number of genes responding to obesity as well as the degree of tissue-differentiated gene expression, concomitantly with an increase in APP serum concentrations only seen in cloned, obese pigs. This may suggest that the APP response seen in obese, cloned pigs is a consequence of the characteristic skewed gene response to obesity in cloned pigs, as described in this work. This should be taken into consideration when using cloned animals as models for innate responses to obesity.

  8. Gene Transfer and Molecular Cloning of the Human NGF Receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Moses V.; Bothwell, Mark A.; Ross, Alonzo H.; Koprowski, Hilary; Lanahan, Anthony A.; Buck, C. Randall; Sehgal, Amita

    1986-04-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) and its receptor are important in the development of cells derived from the neural crest. Mouse L cell transformants have been generated that stably express the human NGF receptor gene transfer with total human DNA. Affinity cross-linking, metabolic labeling and immunoprecipitation, and equilibrium binding with 125I-labeled NGF revealed that this NGF receptor had the same size and binding characteristics as the receptor from human melanoma cells and rat PC12 cells. The sequences encoding the NGF receptor were molecularly cloned using the human Alu repetitive sequence as a probe. A cosmid clone that contained the human NGF receptor gene allowed efficient transfection and expression of the receptor.

  9. Cloning of a quantum measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Bisio, Alessandro; D'Ariano, Giacomo Mauro; Perinotti, Paolo; Sedlak, Michal

    2011-10-15

    We analyze quantum algorithms for cloning of a quantum measurement. Our aim is to mimic two uses of a device performing an unknown von Neumann measurement with a single use of the device. When the unknown device has to be used before the bipartite state to be measured is available we talk about 1{yields}2 learning of the measurement, otherwise the task is called 1{yields}2 cloning of a measurement. We perform the optimization for both learning and cloning for arbitrary dimension d of the Hilbert space. For 1{yields}2 cloning we also propose a simple quantum network that achieves the optimal fidelity. The optimal fidelity for 1{yields}2 learning just slightly outperforms the estimate and prepare strategy in which one first estimates the unknown measurement and depending on the result suitably prepares the duplicate.

  10. A Clone of Your Own.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bilodeau, Kirsten

    1997-01-01

    Describes an activity used at the Washington Park Arboretum that helps students understand cloning through plant propagation. Students also learn how to make a pot from recycled newspapers and how to make soil that is appropriate for the plants. (DDR)

  11. Human Cloning: Let's Discuss It.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taras, Loretta; Stavroulakis, Anthea M.; Ortiz, Mary T.

    1999-01-01

    Describes experiences with holding discussions on cloning at a variety of levels in undergraduate biology courses. Discusses teaching methods used and student reactions to the discussions. Contains 12 references. (WRM)

  12. Human cloning and 'posthuman' society.

    PubMed

    Blackford, Russell

    2005-01-01

    Since early 1997, when the creation of Dolly the sheep by somatic cell nuclear transfer was announced in Nature, numerous government reports, essays, articles and books have considered the ethical problems and policy issues surrounding human reproductive cloning. In this article, I consider what response a modern liberal society should give to the prospect of human cloning, if it became safe and practical. Some opponents of human cloning have argued that permitting it would place us on a slippery slope to a repugnant future society, comparable to that portrayed in Aldous Huxley's novel, Brave New World. I conclude that, leaving aside concerns about safety, none of the psychological or social considerations discussed in this article provides an adequate policy justification for invoking the state's coercive powers to prevent human cloning.

  13. [Cloning of four members of giant panda Dmrt genes].

    PubMed

    Shui, Yi; Yu, Hong-Shi; Xia, Lai-Xin; Guo, Yi-Qing; Cheng, Han-Hua; Zhou, Rong-Jia

    2004-05-01

    Sex determining genes Mab-3 of C. elegans and Doublesex of Drosophila contain a common DNA binding motif called DM (Doublesex and Mab-3) domain, both of which regulate similar aspects of sexual development. Human Doublesex-related gene DMRT1 has been identified, which also contains the conserved DM-related DNA-binding domain and plays an essential role in gonadal differentiation. We amplified genomic DNA of the giant panda using the DM degenerate primers and detected two bands, approximately 140 bp and 250 bp. After cloned into T-easy vector and sequenced, four sequences showed high homology with the DM domain. Amino acid sequence of the first clone is 100% identical with the Dmrt1 of human, mouse and pig, hence we named it as pDmrt1. The second clone is 96% identical with human DMRTB1, and the third one 100% with the Dmrt3 of mouse and medaka, which were named as pDmrtb1 and pDmrt3 respectively. The last sequence contains an intron of 116 bp within the DM domain, which encodes an amino acid sequence 100% identical with human DMRTC2, accordingly we named it as pDmrtc2. Based on similarities of amino acid sequences of the DM domain, Dmrt protein sequences from human, mouse and giant panda were included in a phylogenetic tree. They revealed seven distinct subgroups: Dmrt1, Dmrt2, Dmrt3, Dmrt4 (DMRTA1), Dmrt5 (DMRTA2), Dmrt6 (DMRTB1) and Dmrt7 (DMRTC2). Our results further reveal the unexpected complexity and the evolutionary conservation of the DM domain gene family in both invertebrates and vertebrates.

  14. Individual differences and evidence-based psychopharmacology.

    PubMed

    Belmaker, Rh; Bersudsky, Yuly; Agam, Galila

    2012-09-27

    Individual differences in response to pharmacologic treatment limits the usefulness of mean data obtained from randomized controlled trials. These individual differences exist even in genetically uniform inbred mouse strains. While stratification can be of value in large studies, the individual patient history is the most effective currently available guide for personalized medicine in psychopharmacology.

  15. Psychological aspects of human cloning and genetic manipulation: the identity and uniqueness of human beings.

    PubMed

    Morales, N M

    2009-01-01

    Human cloning has become one of the most controversial debates about reproduction in Western civilization. Human cloning represents asexual reproduction, but the critics of human cloning argue that the result of cloning is not a new individual who is genetically unique. There is also awareness in the scientific community, including the medical community, that human cloning and the creation of clones are inevitable. Psychology and other social sciences, together with the natural sciences, will need to find ways to help the healthcare system, to be prepared to face the new challenges introduced by the techniques of human cloning. One of those challenges is to help the healthcare system to find specific standards of behaviour that could be used to help potential parents to interact properly with cloned babies or children created through genetic manipulation. In this paper, the concepts of personality, identity and uniqueness are discussed in relationship to the contribution of twin studies in these areas. The author argues that an individual created by human cloning techniques or any other type of genetic manipulation will not show the donor's characteristics to the extent of compromising uniqueness. Therefore, claims to such an effect are needlessly alarmist.

  16. Images of cloning and stem cell research in editorial cartoons in the United States.

    PubMed

    Giarelli, Ellen

    2006-01-01

    Through semiotic analysis of manifest and latent meanings in editorial cartoons, the author uncovers how cloning and stem cell research are represented in a popular mass medium. She identified 86 editorial cartoons published in the United States between 2001 and 2004 that referred to cloning and 20 that referred to stem cell research. Cartoonists portrayed people individually 224 times and 4 times in groups of more than 10. Men were portrayed in 64% of cartoons. Stem cell research was depicted as having a potential positive value, and cloning was depicted negatively. Some major messages are that cloning will lead to the mass production of evil, cloning creates monsters, and politics will influence who or what will be cloned. Analyzing popular images can allow access to public understanding about genetic technology and evaluation of public beliefs, preconceptions, and expectations as the public is educated on the use and value of services.

  17. Cloning goes to the movies.

    PubMed

    Cormick, Craig

    2006-10-01

    Public attitude research conducted by Biotechnology Australia shows that one of the major sources of information on human reproductive cloning is movies. Traditionally, understanding of new and emerging technologies has come through the mass media but human cloning, being so widely addressed through the popular culture of movies, is more effectively defined by Hollywood than the news media or science media. But how well are the science and social issues of cloning portrayed in box office hits such as The Island, Multiplicity, Star Wars: Attack of the Clones and Jurassic Park? These movies have enormous reach and undoubted influence, and are therefore worth analyzing in some detail. This study looks at 33 movies made between 1971 and 2005 that address human reproductive cloning, and it categorizes the films based on their genre and potential influence. Yet rather than simply rating the quality of the science portrayed, the study compares the key messages in these movies with public attitudes towards cloning, to examine the correlations.

  18. Islamic perspectives on human cloning.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Mahmoud

    2007-01-01

    The present paper seeks to assess various views from Islamic jurists relating to human cloning, which is one of the controversial topics in the recent past. Taking Islamic jurisprudence principles, such as the rule of necessity for self preservation and respect for human beings, the rule of la darar wa la dirar ('the necessity to refrain from causing harm to oneself and others') and the rule of usr wa haraj, one may indicate that if human cloning could not be prohibited, as such, it could still be opposed because it gives way to various harmful consequences, which include family disorder, chaos in the clone's family relationships, physical and mental diseases for clones and suffering of egg donors and surrogate mothers. However with due attention to the fact that the reasons behind the prohibition of abortion only restrict the destruction of human embryos in their post-implantation stages, human cloning for biomedical research and exploitation of stem cells from cloned embryos at the blastocyst stage for therapeutic purposes would be acceptable.

  19. Growth and hematologic characteristics of cloned dogs derived from adult somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung Eun; Kim, Min Kyu; Kang, Jung Taek; Oh, Hyun Ju; Hong, So Gun; Kim, Dae Young; Jang, Goo; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2010-04-01

    Three viable female dogs, which have the same genotype, have been successfully produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT); however, data on the growth pattern of cloned dogs are lacking. Thus, the aim of this study was (1) to assess growth parameters among those cloned dogs with measurement of body weight, height, and radiographic analysis of skull size and bone plate, and (2) to compare hematologic characteristics among the donor dog, cloned dogs, and age-matched control dogs. The cloned dogs were kept in the same environmental conditions. The body weight increased from 0.52, 0.46, and 0.52 kg at birth to 21.9, 22.9, and 20.4 kg at 68 weeks of age for individual cloned dogs, respectively. The withers height increased from 34.5, 32.6, and 35.2 cm at 8 weeks of age to 67.1 cm at 68 weeks of age in the three clones. The radiographic data demonstrated that patterns of bone growth were similar among cloned dogs, and all measured parameters of matured cloned dogs were similar with that of the fully grown donor dog. An age-specific pattern was identified on hematologic and serum biochemical measurements in both cloned dogs and age-matched controls. The parameters examined were within the normal reference ranges for healthy dogs. In conclusion, three genetically identical cloned dogs showed similar growth characteristics and had normal hematological and serum biochemical parameters.

  20. DNA methylation errors in cloned mice disappear with advancement of aging.

    PubMed

    Senda, Sho; Wakayama, Teruhiko; Arai, Yoshikazu; Yamazaki, Yukiko; Ohgane, Jun; Tanaka, Satoshi; Hattori, Naka; Yanagimachi, Ryuzo; Shiota, Kunio

    2007-01-01

    Cloned animals have various health problems. Aberrant DNA methylation is a possible cause of the problems. Restriction landmark genomic scanning (RLGS) that enabled us to analyze more than 1,000 CpG islands simultaneously demonstrated that all cloned newborns had aberrant DNA methylation. To study whether this aberration persists throughout the life of cloned individuals, we examined genome-wide DNA methylation status of newborn (19.5 dpc, n=2), adult (8-11 months old, n=3), and aged (23-27 months old, n=4) cloned mice using kidney cells as representatives. In the adult and aged groups, cloning was repeated using cumulus cells of the adult founder clone of each group as nucleus donor. Two newborn clones had three with aberrantly methylated loci, which is consistent with previous reports that all cloned newborns had DNA methylation aberrations. Interestingly, we could detect only one aberrantly methylated locus in two of the three adult clones in mid-age and none of four senescent clones, indicating that errors in DNA methylation disappear with advancement of animals' aging.

  1. Methylotroph cloning vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, R.S.; Allen, L.N.

    1989-04-25

    A cloning vehicle comprising: a replication determinant effective for replicating the vehicle in a non-C[sub 1]-utilizing host and in a C[sub 1]-utilizing host; DNA effective to allow the vehicle to be mobilized from the non-C[sub 1]-utilizing host to the C[sub 1]-utilizing host; DNA providing resistance to two antibiotics to which the wild-type C[sub 1]-utilizing host is susceptible, each of the antibiotic resistance markers having a recognition site for a restriction endonuclease; a cos site; and a means for preventing replication in the C[sub 1]-utilizing host. The vehicle is used for complementation mapping as follows. DNA comprising a gene from the C[sub 1]-utilizing organism is inserted at the restriction nuclease recognition site, inactivating the antibiotic resistance marker at that site. The vehicle can then be used to form a cosmid structure to infect the non-C[sub 1]-utilizing (e.g., E. coli) host, and then conjugated with a selected C[sub 1]-utilizing mutant. Resistance to the other antibiotic by the mutant is a marker of the conjugation. Other phenotypical changes in the mutant, e.g., loss of an auxotrophic trait, is attributed to the C[sub 1] gene. The vector is also used to inactivate genes whose protein products catalyze side reactions that divert compounds from a biosynthetic pathway to a desired product, thereby producing an organism that makes the desired product in higher yields. 3 figs.

  2. The rise and fall of horror autotoxicus and forbidden clones.

    PubMed

    Jennette, J Charles; Falk, Ronald J

    2010-09-01

    Cui and associates show that healthy individuals have natural autoantibodies (NAAs) specific for myeloperoxidase, proteinase 3, and glomerular basement membrane (GBM) with the same specificity as anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies and anti-GBM antibodies that are pathogenic. Although Ehrlich proposed horror autotoxicus and Burnet envisioned elimination of forbidden clones, NAAs are present in all healthy individuals and play beneficial homeostatic roles. Pathogenic autoimmunity is dysregulation of natural homeostatic autoimmunity rather than onset of a previously absent self-recognition.

  3. Molecular cloning of human terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase.

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, R C; Cheung, L C; Mattaliano, R J; Chang, L M; Bollum, F J

    1984-01-01

    A cDNA of the human terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase (TdT; "terminal transferase," EC 2.7.7.31) was isolated from a human lymphoblastoid cell cDNA library in lambda gt 11 by using immunological procedures. Four inserts containing 723 to 939 base pairs were recloned in pBR322 for hybridization and preliminary sequence studies. mRNA selected by hybridization to recombinant DNA was translated to a 58-kDa peptide that specifically immunoprecipitated with rabbit antibodies to calf terminal transferase and mouse monoclonal antibody to human terminal transferase. Blot hybridization of total poly(A)+ RNA from KM3 (TdT+) cells with nick-translated pBR322 recombinant DNA detected a message of about 2000 nucleotides, sufficient to code for the 580 amino acids in the protein. mRNA from terminal transferase- cells gave no signal in hybrid selection or RNA blot hybridization. The complete sequence of the 939-base-pair insert sequence was obtained from deletions cloned in pUC8. The DNA sequence contains an open reading frame coding for 238 amino acids, about 40% of the protein. Three peptides isolated by HPLC from tryptic digests of succinylated 58-kDa calf thymus terminal transferase were sequenced, providing 20, 18, and 22 residues of peptide sequence. A search of the translated sequence of the 939-base-pair insert shows three regions beginning after arginine that have greater than 90% homology with the sequence determined from the calf thymus terminal transferase peptides. These results provide unambiguous evidence that the human terminal transferase sequence has been cloned. Images PMID:6087320

  4. Aberrant Expression of TIMP-2 and PBEF Genes in the Placentae of Cloned Mice Due to Epigenetic Reprogramming Error

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hong Rye; Lee, Jae Eun; Oqani, Reza Kheirkhahi; Kim, So Yeon; Wakayama, Teruhiko; Li, Chong; Sa, Su Jin; Woo, Je Seok; Jin, Dong Il

    2016-01-01

    Cloned mice derived from somatic or ES cells show placental overgrowth (placentomegaly) at term. We had previously analyzed cloned and normal mouse placentae by using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry to identify differential protein expression patterns. Cloned placentae showed upregulation of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2), which is involved in extracellular matrix degradation and tissue remodeling, and downregulation of pre-B cell colony enhancing factor 1 (PBEF), which inhibits apoptosis and induces spontaneous labor. Here, we used Western blotting to further analyze the protein expression levels of TIMP-2 and PBEF in cloned placentae derived from cumulus cells, TSA-treated cumulus cells, intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), and natural mating (NM control). Cloned and TSA-treated cloned placentae had higher expression levels of TIMP-2 compared with NM control and ICSI-derived placentae, and there was a positive association between TIMP-2 expression and the placental weight of cloned mouse concepti. Conversely, PBEF protein expression was significantly lower in cloned and ICSI placentae compared to NM controls. To examine whether the observed differences were due to abnormal gene expression caused by faulty epigenetic reprogramming in clones, we investigated DNA methylation and histone modification in the promoter regions of the genes encoding TIMP-2 and PBEF. Sodium bisulfite sequencing did not reveal any difference in DNA methylation between cloned and NM control placentae. However, ChIP assays revealed that the level of H3-K9/K14 acetylation at the TIMP-2 locus was higher in cloned placentae than in NM controls, whereas acetylation of the PBEF promoter was lower in cloned and ICSI placenta versus NM controls. These results suggest that cloned placentae appear to suffer from failure of histone modification-based reprogramming in these (and potentially other) developmentally important genes, leading to aberrant

  5. Local cloning of two product states

    SciTech Connect

    Ji Zhengfeng; Feng Yuan; Ying Mingsheng

    2005-09-15

    Local quantum operations and classical communication (LOCC) put considerable constraints on many quantum information processing tasks such as cloning and discrimination. Surprisingly, however, discrimination of any two pure states survives such constraints in some sense. We show that cloning is not that lucky; namely, probabilistic LOCC cloning of two product states is strictly less efficient than global cloning. We prove our result by giving explicitly the efficiency formula of local cloning of any two product states.

  6. Isolation and expression of human cytokine synthesis inhibitory factor cDNA clones: Homology to Epstein-Barr virus open reading frame BCRFI

    SciTech Connect

    Vieira, P.; De Waal-Malefyt, R.; Dang, M.N.; Johnson, K.E.; Kastelein, R.; Fiorentino, D.F.; DeVries, J.E.; Roncarolo, M.G.; Mosmann, T.R.; Moore, K.W. )

    1991-02-15

    The authors demonstrated the existence of human cytokine synthesis inhibitory factor (DSIF) (interleukin 10 (IL-10)). cDNA clones encoding human IL-10 (hIL-10) were isolated from a tetanus toxin-specific human T-cell clone. Like mouse IL-10, hIL-10 exhibits strong DNA and amino acid sequence homology to an open reading frame in the Epstein-Barr virus, BDRFL. hIL-10 and the BCRFI product inhibit cytokine synthesis by activated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and by a mouse Th1 clone. Both hIL-10 and mouse IL-10 sustain the viability of a mouse mast cell line in culture, but BCRFI lacks comparable activity in this way, suggesting that BCRFI may have conserved only a subset of hIL-10 activities.

  7. Local cloning of entangled states

    SciTech Connect

    Gheorghiu, Vlad; Yu Li; Cohen, Scott M.

    2010-08-15

    We investigate the conditions under which a set S of pure bipartite quantum states on a DxD system can be locally cloned deterministically by separable operations, when at least one of the states is full Schmidt rank. We allow for the possibility of cloning using a resource state that is less than maximally entangled. Our results include that: (i) all states in S must be full Schmidt rank and equally entangled under the G-concurrence measure, and (ii) the set S can be extended to a larger clonable set generated by a finite group G of order |G|=N, the number of states in the larger set. It is then shown that any local cloning apparatus is capable of cloning a number of states that divides D exactly. We provide a complete solution for two central problems in local cloning, giving necessary and sufficient conditions for (i) when a set of maximally entangled states can be locally cloned, valid for all D; and (ii) local cloning of entangled qubit states with nonvanishing entanglement. In both of these cases, we show that a maximally entangled resource is necessary and sufficient, and the states must be related to each other by local unitary 'shift' operations. These shifts are determined by the group structure, so need not be simple cyclic permutations. Assuming this shifted form and partially entangled states, then in D=3 we show that a maximally entangled resource is again necessary and sufficient, while for higher-dimensional systems, we find that the resource state must be strictly more entangled than the states in S. All of our necessary conditions for separable operations are also necessary conditions for local operations and classical communication (LOCC), since the latter is a proper subset of the former. In fact, all our results hold for LOCC, as our sufficient conditions are demonstrated for LOCC, directly.

  8. Generation of cloned mice and nuclear transfer embryonic stem cell lines from urine-derived cells

    PubMed Central

    Mizutani, Eiji; Torikai, Kohei; Wakayama, Sayaka; Nagatomo, Hiroaki; Ohinata, Yasuhide; Kishigami, Satoshi; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    2016-01-01

    Cloning animals by nuclear transfer provides the opportunity to preserve endangered mammalian species. However, there are risks associated with the collection of donor cells from the body such as accidental injury to or death of the animal. Here, we report the production of cloned mice from urine-derived cells collected noninvasively. Most of the urine-derived cells survived and were available as donors for nuclear transfer without any pretreatment. After nuclear transfer, 38–77% of the reconstructed embryos developed to the morula/blastocyst, in which the cell numbers in the inner cell mass and trophectoderm were similar to those of controls. Male and female cloned mice were delivered from cloned embryos transferred to recipient females, and these cloned animals grew to adulthood and delivered pups naturally when mated with each other. The results suggest that these cloned mice had normal fertility. In additional experiments, 26 nuclear transfer embryonic stem cell lines were established from 108 cloned blastocysts derived from four mouse strains including inbreds and F1 hybrids with relatively high success rates. Thus, cells derived from urine, which can be collected noninvasively, may be used in the rescue of endangered mammalian species by using nuclear transfer without causing injury to the animal. PMID:27033801

  9. [Mystery and problems of cloning].

    PubMed

    Nikitin, V A

    2010-01-01

    The attention of investigators is attracted to the fact that, in spite of great efforts in mammalian cloning, advances that have been made in this area of research are not great, and cloned animals have developmental pathologies often incompatible with life and/or reproduction ability. It is yet not clear what technical or biological factors underlie this, and how they are connected or interact with each other, which is more realistic strategically. There is a great number of articles dealing with the influence of cloning with the nuclear transfer on genetic and epigenetic reprogramming of donor cells. At the same time we can see the practical absence of analytical investigations concerning the technology of cloning as such, its weak points, and possible sources of cellular trauma in the course of microsurgery of nuclear transfer or twinning. This article discusses step by step several nuclear transfer techniques and the methods of dividing early preimplanted embryos for twinning with the aim to reveal possible sources of cell damage during micromanipulation that may have negative influence on the development of cloned organisms. Several new author's technologies based on the study of cell biophysical characteristics are described, which allow one to avoid cellular trauma during manipulation and minimize the possibility of cell damage at any rate.

  10. The topsy-turvy cloning law.

    PubMed

    Brassington, Iain; Oultram, Stuart

    2011-03-01

    In debates about human cloning, a distinction is frequently drawn between therapeutic and reproductive uses of the technology. Naturally enough, this distinction influences the way that the law is framed. The general consensus is that therapeutic cloning is less morally problematic than reproductive cloning--one can hold this position while holding that both are morally unacceptable--and the law frequently leaves the way open for some cloning for the sake of research into new therapeutic techniques while banning it for reproductive purposes. We claim that the position adopted by the law has things the wrong way around: if we accept a moral distinction between therapeutic and reproductive cloning, there are actually more reasons to be morally worried about therapeutic cloning than about reproductive cloning. If cloning is the proper object of legal scrutiny, then, we ought to make sure that we are scrutinising the right kind of clone.

  11. Human cloning and human dignity.

    PubMed

    Birnbacher, Dieter

    2005-03-01

    Judging from the official documents dealing with the moral and legal aspects of human reproductive cloning there seems to be a nearly worldwide consensus that reproductive cloning is incompatible with human dignity. The certainty of this judgement is, however, not matched by corresponding arguments. Is the incompatibility of reproductive with human dignity an ultimate moral intuition closed to further argument? The paper considers several ways by which the intuition might be connected with more familiar applications of the concept of human dignity, and argues that there is no such connection. It concludes that the central objections to human reproductive cloning are not objections relating to dignity but objections relating to risk, especially the risks imposed on children born in the course of testing the method's safety.

  12. The Molecular Basis of Muscular Dystrophy in the mdx Mouse: A Point Mutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sicinski, Piotr; Geng, Yan; Ryder-Cook, Allan S.; Barnard, Eric A.; Darlison, Mark G.; Barnard, Pene J.

    1989-06-01

    The mdx mouse is an X-linked myopathic mutant, an animal model for human Duchenne muscular dystrophy. In both mouse and man the mutations lie within the dystrophin gene, but the phenotypic differences of the disease in the two species confer much interest on the molecular basis of the mdx mutation. The complementary DNA for mouse dystrophin has been cloned, and the sequence has been used in the polymerase chain reaction to amplify normal and mdx dystrophin transcripts in the area of the mdx mutation. Sequence analysis of the amplification products showed that the mdx mouse has a single base substitution within an exon, which causes premature termination of the polypeptide chain.

  13. Cloning and expression of a novel neuropeptide Y receptor.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, D H; Sirinathsinghji, D J; Tan, C P; Shiao, L L; Morin, N; Rigby, M R; Heavens, R H; Rapoport, D R; Bayne, M L; Cascieri, M A; Strader, C D; Linemeyer, D L; MacNeil, D J

    1996-07-12

    The neuropeptide Y family of peptides, which includes neuropeptide Y (NPY), peptide YY (PYY), and pancreatic polypeptide (PP), are found in the central and peripheral nervous system and display a wide array of biological activities. These actions are believed to be mediated through pharmacologically distinct G protein-coupled receptors, and, to date, three members of the NPY receptor family have been cloned. In this study we describe the cloning and expression of a novel NPY receptor from mouse genomic DNA. This receptor, designated NPY Y5, shares 60% amino acid identity to the murine NPY Y1 receptor. The pharmacology of this novel receptor resembles that of the NPY Y1 receptor and is distinct from that described for the NPY Y2, Y3, and Y4 receptors. In situ hybridization of mouse brain sections reveals expression of this receptor within discrete regions of the hypothalamus including the suprachiasmatic nucleus, anterior hypothalamus, bed nucleus stria terminalis, and the ventromedial nucleus with no localization apparent elsewhere in the brain.

  14. Cytochrome P450 1b1 in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-induced skin carcinogenesis: Tumorigenicity of individual PAHs and coal-tar extract, DNA adduction and expression of select genes in the Cyp1b1 knockout mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Siddens, Lisbeth K.; Bunde, Kristi L.; Harper, Tod A.; McQuistan, Tammie J.; Löhr, Christiane V.; Bramer, Lisa M.; Waters, Katrina M.; Tilton, Susan C.; Krueger, Sharon K.; and others

    2015-09-01

    FVB/N mice wild-type, heterozygous or null for Cyp 1b1 were used in a two-stage skin tumor study comparing PAH, benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), dibenzo[def,p]chrysene (DBC), and coal tar extract (CTE, SRM 1597a). Following 20 weeks of promotion with TPA the Cyp 1b1 null mice, initiated with DBC, exhibited reductions in incidence, multiplicity, and progression. None of these effects were observed with BaP or CTE. The mechanism of Cyp 1b1-dependent alteration of DBC skin carcinogenesis was further investigated by determining expression of select genes in skin from DBC-treated mice 2, 4 and 8 h post-initiation. A significant reduction in levels of Cyp 1a1, Nqo1 at 8 h and Akr 1c14 mRNA was observed in Cyp 1b1 null (but not wt or het) mice, whereas no impact was observed in Gst a1, Nqo 1 at 2 and 4 h or Akr 1c19 at any time point. Cyp 1b1 mRNA was not elevated by DBC. The major covalent DNA adducts, dibenzo[def,p]chrysene-(±)-11,12-dihydrodiol-cis and trans-13,14-epoxide-deoxyadenosine (DBCDE-dA) were quantified by UHPLC-MS/MS 8 h post-initiation. Loss of Cyp1 b1 expression reduced DBCDE-dA adducts in the skin but not to a statistically significant degree. The ratio of cis- to trans-DBCDE-dA adducts was higher in the skin than other target tissues such as the spleen, lung and liver (oral dosing). These results document that Cyp 1b1 plays a significant role in bioactivation and carcinogenesis of DBC in a two-stage mouse skin tumor model and that loss of Cyp 1b1 has little impact on tumor response with BaP or CTE as initiators. - Highlights: • Cyp1b1 null mice exhibit lower skin cancer sensitivity to DBC but not BaP or CTE. • Cyp1b1 expression impacts expression of other PAH metabolizing enzymes. • cis/trans-DBCDE-dA ratio significantly higher in the skin than the spleen, lung or liver • Potency of DBC and CTE in mouse skin is higher than predicted by RPFs.

  15. [Cloning: necessary reflections on the imaginary].

    PubMed

    Minahim, María Auxiliadora

    2009-01-01

    The article covers the innumerable reasons given for using cloning for therapeutic and reproductive purposes. The most commonly used argument in favour of the procedure has been that of preserving human dignity, which would include the wide exercising of personal autonomy without restrictions of an ethical nature. This view is countered by questions relating to the use of the technique, namely self-determination and the loss of the integrity of the species, which would include the transformation of a generation through the production of human beings and tissues. It must also be made clear that therapeutic cloning (which is carried out through the use of stem cells) is not yet a reality in the scientific world, with the result that the procedure that is supposedly necessary, which argues in favour of the destruction of the young embryo is misleading, as are also certain discourses used to refer to the theme and the science. Criminal law, on prohibiting this practice is anticipating it becoming a reality, protecting legal rights that affect supra-individual interests, such as the destruction of the young embryo, one of the issues of concern to ADIN (Acción Directa de Inconstitucionalidad en Brasil - Direct Action on Unconstitutionality in Brazil) 3510-0.

  16. Individual Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corsini, Raymond

    1981-01-01

    Paper presented at the 66th Convention of the International Association of Pupil Personnel Workers, October 20, 1980, Baltimore, Maryland, describes individual education based on the principles of Alfred Adler. Defines six advantages of individual education, emphasizing student responsibility, mutual respect, and allowing students to progress at…

  17. Characteristics of the mouse genomic histamine H1 receptor gene

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Isao; Taniuchi, Ichiro; Kitamura, Daisuke

    1996-08-15

    We report here the molecular cloning of a mouse histamine H1 receptor gene. The protein deduced from the nucleotide sequence is composed of 488 amino acid residues with characteristic properties of GTP binding protein-coupled receptors. Our results suggest that the mouse histamine H1 receptor gene is a single locus, and no related sequences were detected. Interspecific backcross analysis indicated that the mouse histamine H1 receptor gene (Hrh1) is located in the central region of mouse Chromosome 6 linked to microphthalmia (Mitfmi), ras-related fibrosarcoma oncogene 1 (Raf1), and ret proto-oncogene (Ret) in a region of homology with human chromosome 3p. 12 refs., 3 figs.

  18. Life-history consequences of adaptation to pollution. "Daphnia longispina clones historically exposed to copper".

    PubMed

    Agra, Ana Raquel; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Barata, Carlos

    2011-05-01

    The present study was conducted to assess life history effects of adaptation to pollution in Daphnia longispina clones historically exposed to an acid mine drainage from an abandoned pyrite mine. Four sensitive and resistant clones from reference and impacted populations were exposed to a range of copper exposure levels and their life history and physiological responses in terms of survival, reproduction, respiration and feeding rates compared. The most resistant clone was from 16 to 48 fold more tolerant to copper in terms of LC(50) and population growth rates than sensitive ones, respectively. The genetic differences between the resistant and sensitive clones were that in the polluted environment individuals of the resistant clone survived 50% better, reproduced 3 days earlier, grew 20% better, produced three more offspring per day and had population growth rates 45% greater. In the unpolluted environment, however, individuals from the resistant clone had the lowest reproduction and somatic growth rates but equivalent population growth rates, than sensitive daphnids. Thus, these life history changes did not translate into lower fitness in unpolluted environments in terms of population growth rates. Observed higher respiration rates of the most resistant clone support in part the energy cost hypothesis of tolerance, whereas increase feeding, reproduction and growth rates across copper exposure levels may also, indicate that resistant individuals need copper to fulfil they physiological demands thus supporting the metal deficiency hypothesis as well.

  19. Healthy ageing of cloned sheep

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, K. D.; Corr, S. A.; Gutierrez, C. G.; Fisher, P. A.; Lee, J.-H.; Rathbone, A. J.; Choi, I.; Campbell, K. H. S.; Gardner, D. S.

    2016-01-01

    The health of cloned animals generated by somatic-cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has been of concern since its inception; however, there are no detailed assessments of late-onset, non-communicable diseases. Here we report that SCNT has no obvious detrimental long-term health effects in a cohort of 13 cloned sheep. We perform musculoskeletal assessments, metabolic tests and blood pressure measurements in 13 aged (7–9 years old) cloned sheep, including four derived from the cell line that gave rise to Dolly. We also perform radiological examinations of all main joints, including the knees, the joint most affected by osteoarthritis in Dolly, and compare all health parameters to groups of 5-and 6-year-old sheep, and published reference ranges. Despite their advanced age, these clones are euglycaemic, insulin sensitive and normotensive. Importantly, we observe no clinical signs of degenerative joint disease apart from mild, or in one case moderate, osteoarthritis in some animals. Our study is the first to assess the long-term health outcomes of SCNT in large animals. PMID:27459299

  20. Clone Poems and the Microcomputer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irizarry, Estelle

    1989-01-01

    Describes how students can use the computer to study and create clone poems (altering original Spanish-language poems by substituting words and expressions), and how students can gain a deeper appreciation of the original poem's poetic structure and semantics. (CB)

  1. Computational analysis of small RNA cloning data.

    PubMed

    Berninger, Philipp; Gaidatzis, Dimos; van Nimwegen, Erik; Zavolan, Mihaela

    2008-01-01

    Cloning and sequencing is the method of choice for small regulatory RNA identification. Using deep sequencing technologies one can now obtain up to a billion nucleotides--and tens of millions of small RNAs--from a single library. Careful computational analyses of such libraries enabled the discovery of miRNAs, rasiRNAs, piRNAs, and 21U RNAs. Given the large number of sequences that can be obtained from each individual sample, deep sequencing may soon become an alternative to oligonucleotide microarray technology for mRNA expression profiling. In this report we present the methods that we developed for the annotation and expression profiling of small RNAs obtained through large-scale sequencing. These include a fast algorithm for finding nearly perfect matches of small RNAs in sequence databases, a web-accessible software system for the annotation of small RNA libraries, and a Bayesian method for comparing small RNA expression across samples.

  2. Building a Brainier Mouse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsien, Joe Z.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a genetic engineering project to build an intelligent mouse. Cites understanding the molecular basis of learning and memory as a very important step. Concludes that while science will never create a genius mouse that plays the stock market, it can turn a mouse into a quick learner with a better memory. (YDS)

  3. Cloning, chromosomal mapping and characterization of the human metal-regulatory transcription factor MTF-1.

    PubMed Central

    Brugnera, E; Georgiev, O; Radtke, F; Heuchel, R; Baker, E; Sutherland, G R; Schaffner, W

    1994-01-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are small cysteine-rich proteins that bind heavy metal ions such as zinc, cadmium and copper with high affinity, and have been functionally implicated in heavy metal detoxification and radical scavenging. Transcription of metallothioneins genes is induced by exposure of cells to heavy metals. This induction is mediated by metal-responsive promoter elements (MREs). We have previously cloned the cDNA of an MRE-binding transcription factor (MTF-1) from the mouse. Here we present the human cDNA equivalent of this metal-regulatory factor. Human MTF-1 is a protein of 753 amino acids with 93% amino acid sequence identity to mouse MTF-1 and has an extension of 78 amino acids at the C-terminus without counterpart in the mouse. The factors of both species have the same overall structure including six zinc fingers in the DNA binding domain. We have physically mapped the human MTF-1 gene to human chromosome 1 where it localizes to the short arm in the region 1p32-34, most likely 1p33. Both human and mouse MTF-1 when produced in transfected mammalian cells strongly bind to a consensus MRE of metallothionein promoters. However, human MTF-1 is more effective than the mouse MTF-1 clone in mediating zinc-induced transcription. Images PMID:8065932

  4. A precise termination site in the mouse beta major-globin transcription unit.

    PubMed Central

    Salditt-Georgieff, M; Darnell, J E

    1983-01-01

    Nascent labeled RNA from induced, globin-producing mouse erythroleukemia cells was hybridized to cloned regions of the beta major-globin gene. Transcription ceases about 1,000 bases downstream from the poly(A) site as indicated by protection from nuclease digestion of a discrete-sized RNA fragment that it shorter than the protecting cloned DNA fragment. This defines an apparently unique termination site for a protein-coding gene that is transcribed by RNA polymerase II. Images PMID:6192441

  5. Probabilistic cloning of three symmetric states

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez, O.; Bergou, J.; Delgado, A.

    2010-12-15

    We study the probabilistic cloning of three symmetric states. These states are defined by a single complex quantity, the inner product among them. We show that three different probabilistic cloning machines are necessary to optimally clone all possible families of three symmetric states. We also show that the optimal cloning probability of generating M copies out of one original can be cast as the quotient between the success probability of unambiguously discriminating one and M copies of symmetric states.

  6. Phase-covariant quantum cloning of qudits

    SciTech Connect

    Fan Heng; Imai, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Keiji; Wang, Xiang-Bin

    2003-02-01

    We study the phase-covariant quantum cloning machine for qudits, i.e., the input states in a d-level quantum system have complex coefficients with arbitrary phase but constant module. A cloning unitary transformation is proposed. After optimizing the fidelity between input state and single qudit reduced density operator of output state, we obtain the optimal fidelity for 1 to 2 phase-covariant quantum cloning of qudits and the corresponding cloning transformation.

  7. In vitro and in vivo genotoxic effects of somatic cell nuclear transfer cloned cattle meat.

    PubMed

    Lee, Nam-Jin; Yang, Byoung-Chul; Jung, Yu-Ri; Lee, Jung-Won; Im, Gi-Sun; Seong, Hwan-Hoo; Park, Jin-Ki; Kang, Jong-Koo; Hwang, Seongsoo

    2011-09-01

    Although the nutritional composition and health status after consumption of the meat and milk derived from both conventionally bred (normal) and somatic cell nuclear transferred (cloned) animals and their progeny are not different, little is known about their food safeties like genetic toxicity. This study is performed to examine both in vitro (bacterial mutation and chromosome aberration) and in vivo (micronucleus) genotoxicity studies of cloned cattle meat. The concentrations of both normal and cloned cattle meat extracts (0-10×) were tested to five strains of bacteria (Salmonella typhimurium: TA98, TA100, TA1535, and TA1537; Escherichia coli: WP2uvrA) for bacterial mutation and to Chinese hamster lung (CHL/IU) cells for chromosome aberration, respectively. For micronucleus test, ICR mice were divided into five dietary groups: commercial pellets (control), pellets containing 5% (N-5) and 10% (N-10) normal cattle meat, and pellets containing 5% (C-5) and 10% (C-10) cloned cattle meat. No test substance-related genotoxicity was noted in the five bacterial strains, CHL/IU cells, or mouse bone marrow cells, suggesting that the cloned cattle meat potentially may be safe in terms of mutagenic hazards. Thus, it can be postulated that the cloned cattle meat do not induce any harmful genotoxic effects in vitro and in vivo.

  8. Economical phase-covariant cloning of qudits

    SciTech Connect

    Buscemi, Francesco; D'Ariano, Giacomo Mauro; Macchiavello, Chiara

    2005-04-01

    We derive the optimal N{yields}M phase-covariant quantum cloning for equatorial states in dimension d with M=kd+N, k integer. The cloning maps are optimal for both global and single-qudit fidelity. The map is achieved by an 'economical' cloning machine, which works without ancilla.

  9. Local cloning of arbitrarily entangled multipartite states

    SciTech Connect

    Kay, Alastair; Ericsson, Marie

    2006-01-15

    We examine the perfect cloning of nonlocal, orthogonal states using only local operations and classical communication. We provide a complete characterisation of the states that can be cloned under these restrictions, and their relation to distinguishability. We also consider the case of catalytic cloning, which we show provides no enhancement to the set of clonable states.

  10. Integration of Mouse Phenome Data Resources

    SciTech Connect

    Hancock, John M; Adams, Neils; Aidinis, Vassilis; Blake, Judith A; Bogue, Molly; Brown, Steve D M; Chesler, Elissa J; Davidson, Duncan; Duran, Christopher; Eppig, Janan T; Gailus-Durner, Valerie; Gkoutos, Georgios V; Greenaway, Simon; Angelis, Martin Hrabe de; Kollias, George; Leblanc, Sophie; Lee, Kirsty; Lengger, Christoph; Maier, Holger; Mallon, Ann-Marie; Masuya, Hiroshi; Melvin, David; Muller, Werner; Parkinson, Helen; Proctor, Glenn; Reuveni, Eli; Schofield, Paul; Shukla, Aadya; Smith, Cynthia; Toyoda, Tetsuro; Vasseur, Laurent; Wakana, Shigeharu; Walling, Alison; White, Jacqui; Wood, Joe; Zouberakis, Michalis

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the functions encoded in the mouse genome will be central to an understanding of the genetic basis of human disease. To achieve this it will be essential to be able to characterise the phenotypic consequences of variation and alterations in individual genes. Data on the phenotypes of mouse strains are currently held in a number of different forms (detailed descriptions of mouse lines, first line phenotyping data on novel mutations, data on the normal features of inbred lines, etc.) at many sites worldwide. For the most efficient use of these data sets, we have set in train a process to develop standards for the description of phenotypes (using ontologies), and file formats for the description of phenotyping protocols and phenotype data sets. This process is ongoing, and needs to be supported by the wider mouse genetics and phenotyping communities to succeed. We invite interested parties to contact us as we develop this process further.

  11. Effects of RNAi-mediated knockdown of Xist on the developmental efficiency of cloned male porcine embryos

    PubMed Central

    ZENG, Fang; HUANG, Zhihua; YUAN, Yujuan; SHI, Junsong; CAI, Gengyuan; LIU, Dewu; WU, Zhenfang; LI, Zicong

    2016-01-01

    Xist is an X-linked gene responsible for cis induction of X chromosome inactivation. Studies have indicated that Xist is abnormally activated in the active X chromosome in cloned mouse embryos due to loss of the maternal Xist-repressing imprint following enucleation during somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Inhibition of Xist expression by injecting small interfering RNA (siRNA) has been shown to enhance the in vivo developmental efficiency of cloned male mouse embryos by more than 10-fold. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether a similar procedure can be applied to improve the cloning efficiency in pigs. We first found that Xist mRNA levels at the morula stage were aberrantly higher in pig SCNT embryos than in in vivo fertilization-derived pig embryos. Injection of a preselected effective anti-Xist siRNA into 1-cell-stage male pig SCNT embryos resulted in significant inhibition of Xist expression through the 16-cell stage. This siRNA-mediated inhibition of Xist significantly increased the total cell number per cloned blastocyst and significantly improved the birth rate of cloned healthy piglets. The present study contributes useful information on the action of Xist in the development of pig SCNT embryos and proposes a new method for enhancing the efficiency of pig cloning. PMID:27569767

  12. Individualizing Medicare.

    PubMed

    Chollet, D J

    1999-05-01

    Despite the enactment of significant changes to the Medicare program in 1997, Medicare's Hospital Insurance trust fund is projected to be exhausted just as the baby boom enters retirement. To address Medicare's financial difficulties, a number of reform proposals have been offered, including several to individualize Medicare financing and benefits. These proposals would attempt to increase Medicare revenues and reduce Medicare expenditures by having individuals bear risk--investment market risk before retirement and insurance market risk after retirement. Many fundamental aspects of these proposals have yet to be worked out, including how to guarantee a baseline level of saving for health insurance after retirement, how retirees might finance unanticipated health insurance price increases after retirement, the potential implications for Medicaid of inadequate individual saving, and whether the administrative cost of making the system fair and adequate ultimately would eliminate any rate-of-return advantages from allowing workers to invest their Medicare contributions in corporate stocks and bonds.

  13. Predators induce cloning in echinoderm larvae.

    PubMed

    Vaughn, Dawn; Strathmann, Richard R

    2008-03-14

    Asexual propagation (cloning) is a widespread reproductive strategy of plants and animals. Although larval cloning is well documented in echinoderms, identified stimuli for cloning are limited to those associated with conditions favorable for growth and reproduction. Our research shows that larvae of the sand dollar Dendraster excentricus also clone in response to cues from predators. Predator-induced clones were smaller than uncloned larvae, suggesting an advantage against visual predators. Our results offer another ecological context for asexual reproduction: rapid size reduction as a defense.

  14. Optimal quantum cloning via spin networks

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Qing; Cheng Jianhua; Wang Kelin; Du Jiangfeng

    2006-09-15

    In this paper we demonstrate that optimal 1{yields}M phase-covariant cloning quantum cloning is available via free dynamical evolution of spin networks. By properly designing the network and the couplings between spins, we show that optimal 1{yields}M phase-covariant cloning can be achieved if the initial state is prepared as a specific symmetric state. Especially, when M is an odd number, the optimal phase-covariant cloning can be achieved without ancillas. Moreover, we demonstrate that the same framework is capable for optimal 1{yields}2 universal cloning.

  15. No-cloning theorem on quantum logics

    SciTech Connect

    Miyadera, Takayuki; Imai, Hideki

    2009-10-15

    This paper discusses the no-cloning theorem in a logicoalgebraic approach. In this approach, an orthoalgebra is considered as a general structure for propositions in a physical theory. We proved that an orthoalgebra admits cloning operation if and only if it is a Boolean algebra. That is, only classical theory admits the cloning of states. If unsharp propositions are to be included in the theory, then a notion of effect algebra is considered. We proved that an atomic Archimedean effect algebra admitting cloning operation is a Boolean algebra. This paper also presents a partial result, indicating a relation between the cloning on effect algebras and hidden variables.

  16. Therapeutic and reproductive cloning: a critique.

    PubMed

    Bowring, Finn

    2004-01-01

    This article is a critical examination of the science and ethics of human cloning. It summarises the key scientific milestones in the development of nuclear transplantation, explains the importance of cloning to research into the medical potential of embryonic stem cells, and discusses the well-worn distinction between 'therapeutic' and 'reproductive' cloning. Suggesting that this distinction will be impossible to police, it goes on to consider the ethics of full human cloning. It is concluded that it represents an unacceptable form of parental despotism, and that the genetic engineering and cloning of future human beings will fracture the foundations of modern humanism.

  17. Comparative evaluation of prokaryotic 16S rDNA clone libraries and SSCP in groundwater samples.

    PubMed

    Larentis, Michael; Alfreider, Albin

    2011-06-01

    A comparison of ribosomal RNA sequence analysis methods based on clone libraries and single-strand conformational polymorphism technique (SSCP) was performed with groundwater samples obtained between 523-555 meters below surface. The coverage of analyzed clones by phylotype-richness estimates was between 88-100%, confirming that the clone libraries were adequately examined. Analysis of individual bands retrieved from SSCP gels identified 1-6 different taxonomic units per band, suggesting that a single SSCP band does often represent more than one single prokaryotic species. The prokaryotic diversity obtained by both methods showed an overall difference of 42-80%. In comparison to SSCP, clone libraries underestimated the phylogenetic diversity and only 36-66% of the phylotypes observed with SSCP were also detected with the clone libraries. An exception was a sample where the SSCP analysis of Archaea identified only half of the phylotypes retrieved by the clone library. Overall, this study suggests that the clone library and the SSCP approach do not provide an identical picture of the prokaryotic diversity in groundwater samples. The results clearly show that the SSCP method, although this approach is prone to generate methodological artifacts, was able to detect significantly more phylotypes than microbial community analysis based on clone libraries.

  18. Establishment of clones of Trypanosoma cruzi and their characterization in vitro and in vivo*

    PubMed Central

    Pan, S. Chia-tung

    1982-01-01

    An efficient technique for isolating clones of Trypanosoma cruzi from cultures and from animals has been developed. It is based on the inoculation of one organism, obtained by serial dilutions of cultured epimastigotes or isolated blood stream trypomastigotes, into enriched NNN medium (NNN-F:93). The cloning efficiency (percentage of positive cultures over the number inoculated) was 70% for cultured epimastigotes and 30-40% for blood-stream trypomastigotes. In vitro cultural characteristics of 14 secondary clones of an avirulent strain indicated that 12 clones grew in the F-94 medium primarily as epimastigotes at 27 °C and exclusively as amastigotes at 37 °C; 2 clones grew in F-94 medium primarily as amastigotes regardless of incubation temperature (27 °C or 37 °C). In vivo characterization of 7 clones from 2 virulent strains indicated that the virulence of individual clones was low immediately after isolation in NNN-F:93 medium, but the virulence of some clones returned to the level of the parent strain after more than 8 serial passages in CD-1 mice. PMID:7044587

  19. Clone DB: an integrated NCBI resource for clone-associated data.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Valerie A; Chen, Hsiu-Chuan; Clausen, Cliff; Meric, Peter A; Zhou, Zhigang; Bouk, Nathan; Husain, Nora; Maglott, Donna R; Church, Deanna M

    2013-01-01

    The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) Clone DB (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/clone/) is an integrated resource providing information about and facilitating access to clones, which serve as valuable research reagents in many fields, including genome sequencing and variation analysis. Clone DB represents an expansion and replacement of the former NCBI Clone Registry and has records for genomic and cell-based libraries and clones representing more than 100 different eukaryotic taxa. Records provide details of library construction, associated sequences, map positions and information about resource distribution. Clone DB is indexed in the NCBI Entrez system and can be queried by fields that include organism, clone name, gene name and sequence identifier. Whenever possible, genomic clones are mapped to reference assemblies and their map positions provided in clone records. Clones mapping to specific genomic regions can also be searched for using the NCBI Clone Finder tool, which accepts queries based on sequence coordinates or features such as gene or transcript names. Clone DB makes reports of library, clone and placement data on its FTP site available for download. With Clone DB, users now have available to them a centralized resource that provides them with the tools they will need to make use of these important research reagents.

  20. Particle infectivity of HIV-1 full-length genome infectious molecular clones in a subtype C heterosexual transmission pair following high fidelity amplification and unbiased cloning

    SciTech Connect

    Deymier, Martin J.; Claiborne, Daniel T.; Ende, Zachary; Ratner, Hannah K.; Kilembe, William; Hunter, Eric

    2014-11-15

    The high genetic diversity of HIV-1 impedes high throughput, large-scale sequencing and full-length genome cloning by common restriction enzyme based methods. Applying novel methods that employ a high-fidelity polymerase for amplification and an unbiased fusion-based cloning strategy, we have generated several HIV-1 full-length genome infectious molecular clones from an epidemiologically linked transmission pair. These clones represent the transmitted/founder virus and phylogenetically diverse non-transmitted variants from the chronically infected individual's diverse quasispecies near the time of transmission. We demonstrate that, using this approach, PCR-induced mutations in full-length clones derived from their cognate single genome amplicons are rare. Furthermore, all eight non-transmitted genomes tested produced functional virus with a range of infectivities, belying the previous assumption that a majority of circulating viruses in chronic HIV-1 infection are defective. Thus, these methods provide important tools to update protocols in molecular biology that can be universally applied to the study of human viral pathogens. - Highlights: • Our novel methodology demonstrates accurate amplification and cloning of full-length HIV-1 genomes. • A majority of plasma derived HIV variants from a chronically infected individual are infectious. • The transmitted/founder was more infectious than the majority of the variants from the chronically infected donor.

  1. Molecular analysis of heritable mouse mutations.

    PubMed

    Rinchik, E M

    1987-10-01

    Germ-line mutations of the mouse have for years comprised one class of biological markers for mammalian reproductive and developmental toxicology. Understanding the molecular nature of mutations and the mechanisms by which mutations are translated into specific (and often complex) phenotypes, however, still looms as a major goal of mammalian biology. Molecular genetic analysis of heritable mouse mutations constitutes a significant, experimentally malleable strategy for relating genomic DNA structure to genic expression and function in mammals. The integrated use of recombinant DNA technology, which allows both the identification and analysis of expression of single genes, and classical genetic and cytogenetic analysis, which allow the important correlation between basic DNA defects and the organismic consequences of such defects, has been crucial to this strategy. Some of the approaches (e.g., specific-gene cloning, random-clone analysis of genomic regions, insertional mutagenesis) for studying the nature and effect of both mutations and their wild-type counterparts that have resulted from this integration of genetic analysis and molecular biology have been applied to many loci within the murine genome. Studies of the nature and effects of a complex set of radiation-induced mutations at the dilute-short ear (d-se) region of chromosome 9, a specific example of this type of integrated analysis, are discussed.

  2. Method for cloning lymphoblastoid cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hammerling, U.; Kosinski, S.

    1989-02-14

    A method is described for increasing cloning frequency of human lymphocyte or lumphoblastoid cells which have been transformed with Epstein Barr virus comprising growing the transformed cells in a semi-solid agarose medium. A lower and an upper layer of agarose are used, the lower layer comprising fibroblasts suspended in the agarose layer and the upper layer comprising irradiated fibroblasts and the transformed cells suspended in the agarose layer wherein the upper agarose layer is added after the lower layer has gelled.

  3. Cloning expeditions: risky but rewarding.

    PubMed

    Lodish, Harvey

    2013-12-01

    In the 1980s, a good part of my laboratory was using the then-new recombinant DNA techniques to clone and characterize many important cell surface membrane proteins: GLUT1 (the red cell glucose transporter) and then GLUT2 and GLUT4, the red cell anion exchange protein (Band 3), asialoglycoprotein receptor subunits, sucrase-isomaltase, the erythropoietin receptor, and two of the subunits of the transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) receptor. These cloned genes opened many new fields of basic research, including membrane insertion and trafficking of transmembrane proteins, signal transduction by many members of the cytokine and TGF-β families of receptors, and the cellular physiology of glucose and anion transport. They also led to many insights into the molecular biology of several cancers, hematopoietic disorders, and diabetes. This work was done by an exceptional group of postdocs and students who took exceptionally large risks in developing and using novel cloning technologies. Unsurprisingly, all have gone on to become leaders in the fields of molecular cell biology and molecular medicine.

  4. [Individualizing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horrigan, William J.

    The individually guided education (IGE) program developed by the Kettering Foundation was implemented in September of 1973 at the John F. Kennedy Memorial Junior High School in Woburn, Massachusetts. The components of the program described in this speech include pupil and teacher scheduling, physical layout, pupil selection and adjustment,…

  5. Development of a highly efficient expression cDNA cloning system: application to oncogene isolation.

    PubMed Central

    Miki, T; Fleming, T P; Crescenzi, M; Molloy, C J; Blam, S B; Reynolds, S H; Aaronson, S A

    1991-01-01

    We developed an expression cDNA cloning system capable of generating high-complexity libraries with unidirectionally inserted cDNA fragments and allowing efficient plasmid rescue. As an application of this system, a cDNA library was constructed from an NIH 3T3 transformant induced by mouse hepatocellular carcinoma DNA. Transfection of NIH 3T3 cells by the library DNA led to the detection of several transformed foci from which identical plasmids with transforming ability could be rescued. Structure and sequence analysis of the cDNA clones revealed that the oncogene was created by recombinational events involving an unknown gene and the mouse homologue of the B-raf protooncogene. Detection of the same genetic rearrangement in independent primary transformants implied that generation of the oncogene occurred within the tumor rather than during DNA transfection or cDNA library construction. The high frequency at which clones were identified and the large sizes of some of the transforming cDNA inserts isolated suggest wide applicability of this mammalian expression cloning system for isolating cDNAs of biologic interest. Images PMID:2052597

  6. Molecular cloning of the 8000-base thyroglobulin structural gene.

    PubMed

    Christophe, D; Mercken, L; Brocas, H; Pohl, V; Vassart, G

    1982-03-01

    Bovine thyroglobulin mRNA was reverse-transcribed into full-length double-stranded cDNA. The existence of three HindIII restriction endonuclease sites in the 8000-base thyroglobulin structural gene had allowed the easy cloning of the two internal HindIII fragments [Christophe et al. (1980) Eur. J. Biochem. 111, 419-423]. In the present study, the central portion of the structural gene was cloned in Escherichia coli as two individual recombinant plasmids containing 2000-base-pair and 4700-base-pair segments located respectively 5' and 3' relative to the unique BamHI site of the cDNA. BamHI linkers were added to the double-stranded cDNA and, following restriction with HindIII, selective cloning of the 5' (2600-base-pair) and 3' (1000-base-pair) terminal HindIII fragments was achieved by inserting them between the HindIII and BamHI sites of the plasmid pBR322. Partial sequencing of the 1000-base-pair 3'-terminal fragment demonstrated the presence of an A-A-U-A-A-A sequence in the mRNA 14 bases upstream from a poly(A) tract corresponding to the 3' end of the mRNA. Together, the four clones represent about 99% of the thyroglobulin structural gene and provide the starting material for the determination of thyroglobulin primary structure.

  7. Molecular mapping within the mouse albino-deletion complex.

    PubMed

    Johnson, D K; Hand, R E; Rinchik, E M

    1989-11-01

    Induced germ-line deletion mutations in the mouse provide a malleable experimental system for in-depth molecular and functional analysis of large segments of the mammalian genome. To obtain an initial bank of molecular probes for the region of mouse chromosome 7 associated with the albino-deletion complex, random anonymous DNA clones, derived from a library constructed from flow-sorted chromosomes, were screened on DNAs from Mus musculus-Mus spretus F1 hybrids carrying large, multilocus, lethal albino deletions. Clones falling within a given deletion interval can easily be recognized because hybridization bands that represent restriction fragment length polymorphisms specific for the mutant (deleted) chromosome inherited from the M. musculus parent will be absent. Among 72 informative clones used as probes, one, which defines the locus D7OR1, mapped within two deletions that are 6-11 centimorgans in length. Submapping of this anonymous clone across a panel of 27 smaller deletions localized D7OR1 distal to a chromosomal subregion important for survival of the preimplantation embryo, proximal to globin [beta-chain (Hbb)], and near the shaker-1 (sh-1) locus. The results of these deletion-mapping experiments were also confirmed by standard three-point linkage analysis. This strategy for selection and rapid mapping of anonymous DNA probes to chromosomal segments corresponding to germ-line deletion mutations should contribute to the generation of more detailed physical and functional maps of genomic regions associated with mutant developmental phenotypes.

  8. Production of individualized V gene databases reveals high levels of immunoglobulin genetic diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corcoran, Martin M.; Phad, Ganesh E.; Bernat, Néstor Vázquez; Stahl-Hennig, Christiane; Sumida, Noriyuki; Persson, Mats A. A.; Martin, Marcel; Hedestam, Gunilla B. Karlsson

    2016-12-01

    Comprehensive knowledge of immunoglobulin genetics is required to advance our understanding of B cell biology. Validated immunoglobulin variable (V) gene databases are close to completion only for human and mouse. We present a novel computational approach, IgDiscover, that identifies germline V genes from expressed repertoires to a specificity of 100%. IgDiscover uses a cluster identification process to produce candidate sequences that, once filtered, results in individualized germline V gene databases. IgDiscover was tested in multiple species, validated by genomic cloning and cross library comparisons and produces comprehensive gene databases even where limited genomic sequence is available. IgDiscover analysis of the allelic content of the Indian and Chinese-origin rhesus macaques reveals high levels of immunoglobulin gene diversity in this species. Further, we describe a novel human IGHV3-21 allele and confirm significant gene differences between Balb/c and C57BL6 mouse strains, demonstrating the power of IgDiscover as a germline V gene discovery tool.

  9. Production of individualized V gene databases reveals high levels of immunoglobulin genetic diversity

    PubMed Central

    Corcoran, Martin M.; Phad, Ganesh E.; Bernat, Néstor Vázquez; Stahl-Hennig, Christiane; Sumida, Noriyuki; Persson, Mats A.A.; Martin, Marcel; Hedestam, Gunilla B. Karlsson

    2016-01-01

    Comprehensive knowledge of immunoglobulin genetics is required to advance our understanding of B cell biology. Validated immunoglobulin variable (V) gene databases are close to completion only for human and mouse. We present a novel computational approach, IgDiscover, that identifies germline V genes from expressed repertoires to a specificity of 100%. IgDiscover uses a cluster identification process to produce candidate sequences that, once filtered, results in individualized germline V gene databases. IgDiscover was tested in multiple species, validated by genomic cloning and cross library comparisons and produces comprehensive gene databases even where limited genomic sequence is available. IgDiscover analysis of the allelic content of the Indian and Chinese-origin rhesus macaques reveals high levels of immunoglobulin gene diversity in this species. Further, we describe a novel human IGHV3-21 allele and confirm significant gene differences between Balb/c and C57BL6 mouse strains, demonstrating the power of IgDiscover as a germline V gene discovery tool. PMID:27995928

  10. Individualized Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    IntelliWeb and IntelliPrint, products from MicroMass Communications, utilize C Language Integrated Production System (CLIPS), a development and delivery expert systems tool developed at Johnson Space Center. IntelliWeb delivers personalized messages by dynamically creating single web pages or entire web sites based on information provided by each website visitor. IntelliPrint is a product designed to create tailored, individualized messages via printed media. The software uses proprietary technology to generate printed messages that are personally relevant and tailored to meet each individual's needs. Intelliprint is in use in many operations including Brystol-Myers Squibb's personalized newsletter, "Living at Your Best," geared to each recipient based on a health and lifestyle survey taken earlier; and SmithKline Beecham's "Nicorette Committed Quitters Program," in which customized motivational materials support participants in their attempt to quit smoking.

  11. Mouse neurovirulence determinants of poliovirus type 1 strain LS-a map to the coding regions of capsid protein VP1 and proteinase 2Apro.

    PubMed Central

    Lu, H H; Yang, C F; Murdin, A D; Klein, M H; Harber, J J; Kew, O M; Wimmer, E

    1994-01-01

    Poliovirus type 1 strain LS-a [PV1(LS-a)] is a OV variant adapted to mice by multiple passages through mouse and monkey tissues. To investigate the molecular basis underlying mouse neurovirulence of PV1(LS-a), a cDNA of the viral genome containing nucleotides 112 to 7441 was cloned, and the nucleotide sequence was determined. Compared with that of the mouse avirulent progenitor PV1(Mahoney), 54 nucleotide changes were found in the genome of the PV1(LS-a) virus, resulting in 20 amino acid substitutions in the virus polyprotein. Whereas the nucleotide changes were scattered throughout the genome, the amino acid substitutions were largely clustered in the capsid proteins and, to a certain extent, in the virus proteinase 2Apro. By in vitro mutagenesis, PV1(LS-a)-specific capsid mutations were introduced into a cDNA clone of PV1(Mahoney). We show that neither the individual amino acid mutations nor combinations of mutations in the region encoding VP1 conferred to PV1(Mahoney) the mouse-adapted phenotype of PV1(LS-a). Chimeric cDNA studies demonstrated that a recombinant type 1 virus containing the PV1(LS-a) sequence from nucleotide 2470 to nucleotide 3625 displayed a neurovirulent phenotype in mice. Further dissection of this region revealed that mouse neurovirulence of PV1(LS-a) was determined by multiple mutations in regions encoding both viral proteinase 2Apro and capsid protein VP1. The mouse neurovirulent viruses, PV1(LS-a), W1-M/LS-Pf [nucleotides 496 to 3625 from PV1(LS-a)], and W1-M/LS-NP [nucleotides 2470 to 3625 from PV1(LS-a)], showed increased sensitivity to heat treatment at 45 degrees C for 1 h. Surprisingly, the thermolabile phenotype was also displayed by a recombinant of PV1(Mahoney) carrying a PV1(LS-a) DNA fragment encoding the N-terminal portion of 2Apro. This suggests that base substitutions in the region encoding 2Apro affected capsid stability, thereby contributing to the neurovirulence of the virus in mice. Images PMID:7933134

  12. From deep sequencing to actual clones.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, Sara; Kumar, Sandeep; Naranjo, Leslie; Ferrara, Fortunato; Kiss, Csaba; Bradbury, Andrew R M

    2014-10-01

    The application of deep sequencing to in vitro display technologies has been invaluable for the straightforward analysis of enriched clones. After sequencing in vitro selected populations, clones are binned into identical or similar groups and ordered by abundance, allowing identification of those that are most enriched. However, the greatest strength of deep sequencing is also its greatest weakness: clones are easily identified by their DNA sequences, but are not physically available for testing without a laborious multistep process involving several rounds of polymerization chain reaction (PCR), assembly and cloning. Here, using the isolation of antibody genes from a phage and yeast display selection as an example, we show the power of a rapid and simple inverse PCR-based method to easily isolate clones identified by deep sequencing. Once primers have been received, clone isolation can be carried out in a single day, rather than two days. Furthermore the reduced number of PCRs required will reduce PCR mutations correspondingly. We have observed a 100% success rate in amplifying clones with an abundance as low as 0.5% in a polyclonal population. This approach allows us to obtain full-length clones even when an incomplete sequence is available, and greatly simplifies the subcloning process. Moreover, rarer, but functional clones missed by traditional screening can be easily isolated using this method, and the approach can be extended to any selected library (scFv, cDNA, libraries based on scaffold proteins) where a unique sequence signature for the desired clones of interest is available.

  13. Agro-economic impact of cattle cloning.

    PubMed

    Faber, D C; Ferre, L B; Metzger, J; Robl, J M; Kasinathan, P

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review the economic and social implications of cloned cattle, their products, and their offspring as related to production agriculture. Cloning technology in cattle has several applications outside of traditional production agriculture. These applications can include bio-medical applications, such as the production of pharmaceuticals in the blood or milk of transgenic cattle. Cloning may also be useful in the production of research models. These models may or may not include genetic modifications. Uses in agriculture include many applications of the technology. These include making genetic copies of elite seed stock and prize winning show cattle. Other purposes may range from "insurance" to making copies of cattle that have sentimental value, similar to cloning of pets. Increased selection opportunities available with cloning may provide for improvement in genetic gain. The ultimate goal of cloning has often been envisioned as a system for producing quantity and uniformity of the perfect dairy cow. However, only if heritability were 100%, would clone mates have complete uniformity. Changes in the environment may have significant impact on the productivity and longevity of the resulting clones. Changes in consumer preferences and economic input costs may all change the definition of the perfect cow. The cost of producing such animals via cloning must be economically feasible to meet the intended applications. Present inefficiencies limit cloning opportunities to highly valued animals. Improvements are necessary to move the applications toward commercial application. Cloning has additional obstacles to conquer. Social and regulatory acceptance of cloning is paramount to its utilization in production agriculture. Regulatory acceptance will need to address the animal, its products, and its offspring. In summary, cloning is another tool in the animal biotechnology toolbox, which includes artificial insemination, sexing of semen, embryo

  14. Microevolution and Patterns of Dissemination of the JP2 Clone of Aggregatibacter (Actinobacillus) actinomycetemcomitans▿

    PubMed Central

    Haubek, Dorte; Poulsen, Knud; Kilian, Mogens

    2007-01-01

    The natural history, microevolution, and patterns of interindividual transmission and global dissemination of the JP2 clone of Aggregatibacter (Actinobacillus) actinomycetemcomitans were studied by population genetic analysis. The JP2 clone is strongly associated with aggressive periodontitis in adolescents of African descent and differs from other clones of the species by several genetic peculiarities, including a 530-bp deletion in the promoter region of the leukotoxin gene operon, which results in increased leukotoxic activity. Multilocus sequence analysis of 82 A. actinomycetemcomitans strains, 66 of which were JP2 clone strains collected over a period of more than 20 years, confirmed that there is a clonal population structure with evolutionary lineages corresponding to serotypes. Although genetically highly conserved, as shown by alignment of sequences of eight housekeeping genes, strains belonging to the JP2 clone had a number of point mutations, particularly in the pseudogenes hbpA and tbpA. Characteristic mutations allowed isolates from individuals from the Mediterranean area and from West Africa, including the Cape Verde Islands, to be distinguished. The patterns of mutations indicate that the JP2 clone initially emerged as a distinct genotype in the Mediterranean part of Africa approximately 2,400 years ago and subsequently spread to West Africa, from which it was transferred to the American continents during the transatlantic slave trade. The sustained exclusive colonization of individuals of African descent despite geographical separation for centuries suggests that the JP2 clone has a distinct host tropism. The colonization of family members by JP2 clone strains with unique point mutations provides strong evidence that there is intrafamilial transmission and suggests that dissemination of the JP2 clone is restricted to close contacts. PMID:17353281

  15. An encyclopedia of mouse DNA elements (Mouse ENCODE).

    PubMed

    Stamatoyannopoulos, John A; Snyder, Michael; Hardison, Ross; Ren, Bing; Gingeras, Thomas; Gilbert, David M; Groudine, Mark; Bender, Michael; Kaul, Rajinder; Canfield, Theresa; Giste, Erica; Johnson, Audra; Zhang, Mia; Balasundaram, Gayathri; Byron, Rachel; Roach, Vaughan; Sabo, Peter J; Sandstrom, Richard; Stehling, A Sandra; Thurman, Robert E; Weissman, Sherman M; Cayting, Philip; Hariharan, Manoj; Lian, Jin; Cheng, Yong; Landt, Stephen G; Ma, Zhihai; Wold, Barbara J; Dekker, Job; Crawford, Gregory E; Keller, Cheryl A; Wu, Weisheng; Morrissey, Christopher; Kumar, Swathi A; Mishra, Tejaswini; Jain, Deepti; Byrska-Bishop, Marta; Blankenberg, Daniel; Lajoie, Bryan R; Jain, Gaurav; Sanyal, Amartya; Chen, Kaun-Bei; Denas, Olgert; Taylor, James; Blobel, Gerd A; Weiss, Mitchell J; Pimkin, Max; Deng, Wulan; Marinov, Georgi K; Williams, Brian A; Fisher-Aylor, Katherine I; Desalvo, Gilberto; Kiralusha, Anthony; Trout, Diane; Amrhein, Henry; Mortazavi, Ali; Edsall, Lee; McCleary, David; Kuan, Samantha; Shen, Yin; Yue, Feng; Ye, Zhen; Davis, Carrie A; Zaleski, Chris; Jha, Sonali; Xue, Chenghai; Dobin, Alex; Lin, Wei; Fastuca, Meagan; Wang, Huaien; Guigo, Roderic; Djebali, Sarah; Lagarde, Julien; Ryba, Tyrone; Sasaki, Takayo; Malladi, Venkat S; Cline, Melissa S; Kirkup, Vanessa M; Learned, Katrina; Rosenbloom, Kate R; Kent, W James; Feingold, Elise A; Good, Peter J; Pazin, Michael; Lowdon, Rebecca F; Adams, Leslie B

    2012-08-13

    To complement the human Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project and to enable a broad range of mouse genomics efforts, the Mouse ENCODE Consortium is applying the same experimental pipelines developed for human ENCODE to annotate the mouse genome.

  16. A whole-genome mouse BAC microarray with 1-Mb resolution for analysis of DNA copy number changes by array comparative genomic hybridization.

    PubMed

    Chung, Yeun-Jun; Jonkers, Jos; Kitson, Hannah; Fiegler, Heike; Humphray, Sean; Scott, Carol; Hunt, Sarah; Yu, Yuejin; Nishijima, Ichiko; Velds, Arno; Holstege, Henne; Carter, Nigel; Bradley, Allan

    2004-01-01

    Microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) has become a powerful method for the genome-wide detection of chromosomal imbalances. Although BAC microarrays have been used for mouse CGH studies, the resolving power of these analyses was limited because high-density whole-genome mouse BAC microarrays were not available. We therefore developed a mouse BAC microarray containing 2803 unique BAC clones from mouse genomic libraries at 1-Mb intervals. For the general amplification of BAC clone DNA prior to spotting, we designed a set of three novel degenerate oligonucleotide-primed (DOP) PCR primers that preferentially amplify mouse genomic sequences while minimizing unwanted amplification of contaminating Escherichia coli DNA. The resulting 3K mouse BAC microarrays reproducibly identified DNA copy number alterations in cell lines and primary tumors, such as single-copy deletions, regional amplifications, and aneuploidy.

  17. Sequence, molecular properties, and chromosomal mapping of mouse lumican

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funderburgh, J. L.; Funderburgh, M. L.; Hevelone, N. D.; Stech, M. E.; Justice, M. J.; Liu, C. Y.; Kao, W. W.; Conrad, G. W.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    PURPOSE. Lumican is a major proteoglycan of vertebrate cornea. This study characterizes mouse lumican, its molecular form, cDNA sequence, and chromosomal localization. METHODS. Lumican sequence was determined from cDNA clones selected from a mouse corneal cDNA expression library using a bovine lumican cDNA probe. Tissue expression and size of lumican mRNA were determined using Northern hybridization. Glycosidase digestion followed by Western blot analysis provided characterization of molecular properties of purified mouse corneal lumican. Chromosomal mapping of the lumican gene (Lcn) used Southern hybridization of a panel of genomic DNAs from an interspecific murine backcross. RESULTS. Mouse lumican is a 338-amino acid protein with high-sequence identity to bovine and chicken lumican proteins. The N-terminus of the lumican protein contains consensus sequences for tyrosine sulfation. A 1.9-kb lumican mRNA is present in cornea and several other tissues. Antibody against bovine lumican reacted with recombinant mouse lumican expressed in Escherichia coli and also detected high molecular weight proteoglycans in extracts of mouse cornea. Keratanase digestion of corneal proteoglycans released lumican protein, demonstrating the presence of sulfated keratan sulfate chains on mouse corneal lumican in vivo. The lumican gene (Lcn) was mapped to the distal region of mouse chromosome 10. The Lcn map site is in the region of a previously identified developmental mutant, eye blebs, affecting corneal morphology. CONCLUSIONS. This study demonstrates sulfated keratan sulfate proteoglycan in mouse cornea and describes the tools (antibodies and cDNA) necessary to investigate the functional role of this important corneal molecule using naturally occurring and induced mutants of the murine lumican gene.

  18. The cloning of T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, R H

    1982-02-01

    A new era of cellular immunology is clearly at hand. It is now possible, with a little bit of effort, to isolate monoclonal populations of T cells specific for any given antigen. The implications o f this technological advance are enormous in terms of applications to basic research and clinical medicine. In this article the two basic approaches that have been used to clone T lymphocytes are outlined, the pros and cons of each technique discussed and examples are given of recent experiments which have exploited this technology to gain new insights into T-cell specificity.

  19. Cloning cattle: the methods in the madness.

    PubMed

    Oback, Björn; Wells, David N

    2007-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is much more widely and efficiently practiced in cattle than in any other species, making this arguably the most important mammal cloned to date. While the initial objective behind cattle cloning was commercially driven--in particular to multiply genetically superior animals with desired phenotypic traits and to produce genetically modified animals-researchers have now started to use bovine SCNT as a tool to address diverse questions in developmental and cell biology. In this paper, we review current cattle cloning methodologies and their potential technical or biological pitfalls at any step of the procedure. In doing so, we focus on one methodological parameter, namely donor cell selection. We emphasize the impact of epigenetic and genetic differences between embryonic, germ, and somatic donor cell types on cloning efficiency. Lastly, we discuss adult phenotypes and fitness of cloned cattle and their offspring and illustrate some of the more imminent commercial cattle cloning applications.

  20. Unified universal quantum cloning machine and fidelities

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Yinan; Shi Handuo; Xiong Zhaoxi; Jing Li; Mu Liangzhu; Ren Xijun; Fan Heng

    2011-09-15

    We present a unified universal quantum cloning machine, which combines several different existing universal cloning machines together, including the asymmetric case. In this unified framework, the identical pure states are projected equally into each copy initially constituted by input and one half of the maximally entangled states. We show explicitly that the output states of those universal cloning machines are the same. One importance of this unified cloning machine is that the cloning procession is always the symmetric projection, which reduces dramatically the difficulties for implementation. Also, it is found that this unified cloning machine can be directly modified to the general asymmetric case. Besides the global fidelity and the single-copy fidelity, we also present all possible arbitrary-copy fidelities.

  1. Clones of ectopic stem cells in the regeneration of muscle defects in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rujing; Chen, Mo; Lee, Chang Hun; Yoon, Richard; Lal, Shan; Mao, Jeremy J

    2010-10-20

    Little is known about whether clones of ectopic, non-muscle stem cells contribute to muscle regeneration. Stem/progenitor cells that are isolated for experimental research or therapeutics are typically heterogeneous. Non-myogenic lineages in a heterogeneous population conceptually may compromise tissue repair. In this study, we discovered that clones of mononucleated stem cells of human tooth pulp fused into multinucleated myotubes that robustly expressed myosin heavy chain in vitro with or without co-culture with mouse skeletal myoblasts (C2C12 cells). Cloned cells were sustainably Oct4+, Nanog+ and Stro1+. The fusion indices of myogenic clones were approximately 16-17 folds greater than their parent, heterogeneous stem cells. Upon infusion into cardio-toxin induced tibialis anterior muscle defects, undifferentiated clonal progenies not only engrafted and colonized host muscle, but also expressed human dystrophin and myosin heavy chain more efficaciously than their parent heterogeneous stem cell populations. Strikingly, clonal progenies yielded ∼9 times more human myosin heavy chain mRNA in regenerating muscles than those infused with their parent, heterogeneous stem cells. The number of human dystrophin positive cells in regenerating muscles infused with clonal progenies was more than ∼3 times greater than muscles infused with heterogeneous stem cells from which clonal progenies were derived. These findings suggest the therapeutic potential of ectopic myogenic clones in muscle regeneration.

  2. Biocompatibility studies of natural rubber latex from different tree clones and collection methods.

    PubMed

    Floriano, Juliana Ferreira; da Mota, Lígia Souza Lima Silveira; Furtado, Edson Luiz; Rossetto, Victor José Vieira; Graeff, Carlos F O

    2014-02-01

    Natural rubber latex (NRL) has several features that make it an excellent biomaterial to promote the growth and repair of tissues, skin and bones. Most of the research with NRL membranes uses a mixture of different clones and chemical preservatives in the collection process. In this study, we compared five clones that produce NRL, seeking to identify their differences in biocompatibility. The clones studied were RRIM 600, PB 235, GT1, PR 255 and IAN 873 commonly found in plantations in Brazil. We did also study the effect of ammonia used during latex collection. NRL membranes were prepared aseptically and sterilized. In the in vitro tests, the membranes remained in direct contact with mouse fibroblasts cells for three periods, 24, 48 and 72 h. In the in vivo tests, the membranes were implanted subcutaneously in rabbits. The results indicated the biocompatibility of the membranes obtained from all clones. Membranes from the clones RRIM 600 and IAN 873 induced greater cell proliferation, suggesting greater bioactivity. It was found that the membranes made from latex that was in contact with ammonia during collection, showed cytotoxic and genotoxic effects in cultures, as well as necrosis, and increased inflammatory cells in the rabbit's tissues close to the implant.

  3. Cloning and expression of Ca2+-activated chloride channel from rat brain.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Sang Min; Park, Hye-Kyung; Yoon, In-Soo; Lee, Jun-Ho; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Jang, Choon-Gon; Lee, C Justin; Nah, Seung-Yeol

    2005-08-26

    To clone the gene product responsible for the calcium-activated chloride channel (CLCA) in rat brain cerebrum, we performed a reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) with gene-specific primers of a rat EST clone. We successfully cloned a rat brain CLCA (rbCLCA). The full-length cDNA is 2895 bp long and codes for a 902 amino acid protein. The clone consists of four transmembrane domains and shows a 79.1% of significant homology with previously reported mouse smooth muscle chloride channel sequence. We also performed RT-PCR using single neuron and glia, and various tissues to determine the tissue expression of rbCLCA. We found that rbCLCA was expressed in both neuron and glia. In peripheral organs, rbCLCA showed the predominant expressions in cerebrum, cerebellum, kidney, small intestine, and stomach but not in heart, large intestine, liver, lung, and spleen. Whole-cell patch clamp studies in HEK293 cells transfected with the clone identified a niflumic acid (a CLCA channel blocker)-sensitive and voltage-dependent chloride current but we could not observe this chloride current in mock-transfected cells. The identification of genes belonging to the CLCA family from rat brain and its functional expression will help to evaluate its physiological role in brain as anion channel.

  4. Telomeres and the ethics of human cloning.

    PubMed

    Allhoff, Fritz

    2004-01-01

    In search of a potential problem with cloning, I investigate the phenomenon of telomere shortening which is caused by cell replication; clones created from somatic cells will have shortened telomeres and therefore reach a state of senescence more rapidly. While genetic intervention might fix this problem at some point in the future, I ask whether, absent technological advances, this biological phenomenon undermines the moral permissibility of cloning.

  5. ACAT-2, a second mammalian acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase. Its cloning, expression, and characterization.

    PubMed

    Cases, S; Novak, S; Zheng, Y W; Myers, H M; Lear, S R; Sande, E; Welch, C B; Lusis, A J; Spencer, T A; Krause, B R; Erickson, S K; Farese, R V

    1998-10-09

    The synthesis of cholesterol esters by acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT, EC 2.3.1.26) is an important component of cellular cholesterol homeostasis. Cholesterol ester formation also is hypothesized to be important in several physiologic processes, including intestinal cholesterol absorption, hepatic lipoprotein production, and macrophage foam cell formation in atherosclerotic lesions. Mouse tissue expression studies and the disruption of the mouse ACAT gene (Acact) have indicated that more than one ACAT exists in mammals and specifically that another enzyme is important in mouse liver and intestine. We now describe a second mammalian ACAT enzyme, designated ACAT-2, that is 44% identical to the first cloned mouse ACAT (henceforth designated ACAT-1). Infection of H5 insect cells with an ACAT-2 recombinant baculovirus resulted in expression of a approximately 46-kDa protein in cell membranes that was associated with high levels of cholesterol esterification activity. Both ACAT-1 and ACAT-2 also catalyzed the esterification of the 3beta-hydroxyl group of a variety of oxysterols. Cholesterol esterification activities for ACAT-1 and ACAT-2 exhibited different IC50 values when assayed in the presence of several ACAT-specific inhibitors, demonstrating that ACAT inhibitors can selectively target specific forms of ACAT. ACAT-2 was expressed primarily in mouse liver and small intestine, supporting the hypothesis that ACAT-2 contributes to cholesterol esterification in these tissues. The mouse ACAT-2 gene (Acact2) maps to chromosome 15 in a region containing a quantitative trait locus influencing plasma cholesterol levels. The identification and cloning of ACAT-2 will facilitate molecular approaches to understanding the role of ACAT enzymes in mammalian biology.

  6. No end in sight to cloning debate.

    PubMed

    Graumann, Sigrid; Poltermann, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    Since last August, Great Britain has allowed the cloning for research purposes. This fact has re-generated an existing debate, taking into account the prohibition of cloning of the UN, the States are debating whether cloning should be prohibited or in the contrary, it should also be admitted for reproductive purposes. This situation has generated an international uneasiness due to the lack of a universal consensus. This article analyses this situation, bringing the reader closer to the very controversial texts, such as the European Constitution and the UN Convention on Cloning.

  7. Quantum cloning disturbed by thermal Davies environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dajka, Jerzy; Łuczka, Jerzy

    2016-06-01

    A network of quantum gates designed to implement universal quantum cloning machine is studied. We analyze how thermal environment coupled to auxiliary qubits, `blank paper' and `toner' required at the preparation stage of copying, modifies an output fidelity of the cloner. Thermal environment is described in terms of the Markovian Davies theory. We show that such a cloning machine is not universal any more but its output is independent of at least a part of parameters of the environment. As a case study, we consider cloning of states in a six-state cryptography's protocol. We also briefly discuss cloning of arbitrary input states.

  8. Species-specific challenges in dog cloning.

    PubMed

    Kim, G A; Oh, H J; Park, J E; Kim, M J; Park, E J; Jo, Y K; Jang, G; Kim, M K; Kim, H J; Lee, B C

    2012-12-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is now an established procedure used in cloning of several species. SCNT in dogs involves multiple steps including the removal of the nuclear material, injection of a donor cell, fusion, activation of the reconstructed oocytes and finally transfer to a synchronized female recipient. There are therefore many factors that contribute to cloning efficiency. By performing a retrospective analysis of 2005-2012 published papers regarding dog cloning, we define the optimum procedure and summarize the specific feature for dog cloning.

  9. Human cloning: Eastern Mediterranean Region perspective.

    PubMed

    Abdur Rab, M; Khayat, M H

    2006-01-01

    Recent advances in genomics and biotechnology have ushered in a new era in health development. Therapeutic cloning possesses enormous potential for revolutionizing medical and therapeutic techniques. Cloning technology, however, is perceived as having the potential for reproductive cloning, which raises serious ethical and moral concerns. It is important that the Islamic countries come to a consensus on this vital issue. Developing science and technology for better health is a religious and moral obligation. There is an urgent need for Muslim scholars to discuss the issue of stem cell research and cloning rationally; such dialogue will not only consider the scientific merits but also the moral, ethical and legal implications.

  10. Haplotype mapping and sequence analysis of the mouse Nramp gene predict susceptibility to infection with intracellular parasites

    SciTech Connect

    Malo, D.; Hu, Jinxin; Schurr, E.

    1994-09-01

    The mouse chromosome 1 locus Bcg (Ity, Lsh) controls the capacity of the tissue macrophage to restrict the replication of antigenically unrelated intracellular parasites and therefore determines the natural resistance (BCG-R, dominant) or susceptibility (BCG-S, recessive) of inbred mouse strains to infection with diverse pathogens. We have used a positional cloning strategy based on genetic and physical mapping, YAC cloning, and exon trapping to isolate a candidate gene for Beg (Nramp) that encodes a predicted macrophage-specific transport protein. We have analyzed a total of 27 inbred mouse strains of BCG-R and BCG-S phenotypes for the presence of nucleotide sequence variations within the coding portion of Nramp and have carried out haplotype typing of the corresponding chromosome 1 region in these mice, using 11 additional polymorphic markers mapping in the immediate vicinity of Nramp. cDNA cloning and nucleotide sequencing identified 5 nucleotide sequence variations within Nramp in the inbred strains.

  11. Expression of structurally diverse Qa-2-encoded molecules on the surface of cloned cytotoxic T lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    Extracts of 125I-labeled cloned murine cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) were immunoprecipitated with alloantisera to the cloned CTL and rabbit antisera to beta-2 microglobulin. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) of the specific precipitates revealed, as expected, 125I-labeled components that corresponded to products of class I genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). However, additional class I gene products of relatively low apparent molecular weight (Mr) were also observed. Similar analyses of spleen cells from a variety of MHC- congenic mouse strains suggested that the class I molecules of relatively low Mr are encoded in the Qa-2 region of the MHC, and this was confirmed by immunoprecipitation with a monoclonal antibody to Qa- 2. Surprisingly, however, the cell surface Qa-2 molecules of different CTL clones differed in Mr, in isoelectric focusing (IEF) pattern, and in the number of distinguishable molecules expressed per clone: some clones seemed to express only a single Qa-2-encoded molecule while others expressed two distinct ones. Treatment of the immunoprecipitated Qa-2 with endoglycosidase F (Endo F) resulted in a decrease in Mr of approximately 5,000-6,000, corresponding to the expected loss of N- linked oligosaccharides, but the decrease did not eliminate structural variability among the clones. Structural diversity of the Qa-2-encoded molecules expressed on CTL could arise because CTL clones differ (a) in the particular Qa-2 genes they express, (b) in the way they splice Qa-2 gene transcripts or, perhaps, (c) in Endo F-resistant oligosaccharides on their Qa-2 molecules. PMID:6333483

  12. Mouse genome database 2016

    PubMed Central

    Bult, Carol J.; Eppig, Janan T.; Blake, Judith A.; Kadin, James A.; Richardson, Joel E.

    2016-01-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD; http://www.informatics.jax.org) is the primary community model organism database for the laboratory mouse and serves as the source for key biological reference data related to mouse genes, gene functions, phenotypes and disease models with a strong emphasis on the relationship of these data to human biology and disease. As the cost of genome-scale sequencing continues to decrease and new technologies for genome editing become widely adopted, the laboratory mouse is more important than ever as a model system for understanding the biological significance of human genetic variation and for advancing the basic research needed to support the emergence of genome-guided precision medicine. Recent enhancements to MGD include new graphical summaries of biological annotations for mouse genes, support for mobile access to the database, tools to support the annotation and analysis of sets of genes, and expanded support for comparative biology through the expansion of homology data. PMID:26578600

  13. Mouse genome database 2016.

    PubMed

    Bult, Carol J; Eppig, Janan T; Blake, Judith A; Kadin, James A; Richardson, Joel E

    2016-01-04

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD; http://www.informatics.jax.org) is the primary community model organism database for the laboratory mouse and serves as the source for key biological reference data related to mouse genes, gene functions, phenotypes and disease models with a strong emphasis on the relationship of these data to human biology and disease. As the cost of genome-scale sequencing continues to decrease and new technologies for genome editing become widely adopted, the laboratory mouse is more important than ever as a model system for understanding the biological significance of human genetic variation and for advancing the basic research needed to support the emergence of genome-guided precision medicine. Recent enhancements to MGD include new graphical summaries of biological annotations for mouse genes, support for mobile access to the database, tools to support the annotation and analysis of sets of genes, and expanded support for comparative biology through the expansion of homology data.

  14. Microsatellite DNA fingerprinting, differentiation, and genetic relationships of clones, cultivars, and varieties of six poplar species from three sections of the genus Populus.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Muhammad H; Rajora, Om P

    2002-12-01

    Accurate identification of Populus clones and cultivars is essential for effective selection, breeding, and genetic resource management programs. The unit of cultivation and breeding in poplars is a clone, and individual cultivars are normally represented by a single clone. Microsatellite DNA markers of 10 simple sequence repeat loci were used for genetic fingerprinting and differentiation of 96 clones/cultivars and varieties belonging to six Populus species (P. deltoides, P. nigra, P. balsamifera, P. trichocarpa, P. grandidentata, and P maximowiczii) from three sections of the genus. All 96 clones/cultivars could be uniquely fingerprinted based on their single- or multilocus microsatellite genotypes. The five P. grandidentata clones could be differentiated based on their single-locus genotypes, while six clones of P. trichocarpa and 11 clones of P. maximowiczii could be identified by their two-locus genotypes. Twenty clones of P. deltoides and 25 clones of P. nigra could be differentiated by their multilocus genotypes employing three loci, and 29 clones of P. balsamifera required the use of multilocus genotypes at five loci for their genetic fingerprinting and differentiation. The loci PTR3, PTR5, and PTR7 were found to be the most informative for genetic fingerprinting and differentiation of the clones. The mean number of alleles per locus ranged from 2.9 in P. trichocarpa or P. grandidentata to 6.0 in P. balsamifera and 11.2 in 96 clones of the six species. The mean number of observed genotypes per locus ranged from 2.4 in P. grandidentata to 7.4 in P. balsamifera and 19.6 in 96 clones of the six species. The mean number of unique genotypes per locus ranged from 1.3 in P. grandidentata to 3.9 in P. deltoides and 8.8 in 96 clones of the six species. The power of discrimination of the microsatellite DNA markers in the 96 clones ranged from 0.726 for PTR4 to 0.939 for PTR7, with a mean of 0.832 over the 10 simple sequence repeat loci. Clones/cultivars from the same

  15. Intraspecific variation among clones of a naïve rare grass affects competition with a nonnative, invasive forb.

    PubMed

    Gibson, David J; Dewey, Justin; Goossens, Hélène; Dodd, Misty M

    2014-01-01

    Intraspecific variation can have a major impact on plant community composition yet there is little information available on the extent that such variation by an already established species affects interspecific interactions of an invading species. The current research examined the competitiveness of clones of a globally rare but locally common native grass, Calamagrostis porteri ssp. insperata to invasion by Alliaria petiolata, a non-native invasive species. A greenhouse experiment was conducted twice over consecutive years in which 15 clones from three populations of Calamagrostis were paired with rosettes of Alliaria in pots containing native forest soil previously uninvaded by Alliaria. Both species showed a negative response to the presence of the other species, although Alliaria more so than Calamagrostis. Moreover, the effect of Calamagrostis depended upon population, and, to a lesser extent, the individual clone paired with Alliaria. Competitive effects were stronger in the first experiment compared with when the experiment was repeated in the second year. The influence of Calamagrostis clones on the outcome of the experiment varied among populations and among clones, but also between years. Clones from one of the three populations were more influential than clones from the other two populations. Only one of 15 clones, both from the same population, was influential in both experiments. This research supports a growing literature indicating that intraspecific variability among clones of a dominant species can affect interspecific interactions and that such variability in a native species can affect performance of an invading species.

  16. Intraspecific variation among clones of a naïve rare grass affects competition with a nonnative, invasive forb

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, David J; Dewey, Justin; Goossens, Hélène; Dodd, Misty M

    2014-01-01

    Intraspecific variation can have a major impact on plant community composition yet there is little information available on the extent that such variation by an already established species affects interspecific interactions of an invading species. The current research examined the competitiveness of clones of a globally rare but locally common native grass, Calamagrostis porteri ssp. insperata to invasion by Alliaria petiolata, a non-native invasive species. A greenhouse experiment was conducted twice over consecutive years in which 15 clones from three populations of Calamagrostis were paired with rosettes of Alliaria in pots containing native forest soil previously uninvaded by Alliaria. Both species showed a negative response to the presence of the other species, although Alliaria more so than Calamagrostis. Moreover, the effect of Calamagrostis depended upon population, and, to a lesser extent, the individual clone paired with Alliaria. Competitive effects were stronger in the first experiment compared with when the experiment was repeated in the second year. The influence of Calamagrostis clones on the outcome of the experiment varied among populations and among clones, but also between years. Clones from one of the three populations were more influential than clones from the other two populations. Only one of 15 clones, both from the same population, was influential in both experiments. This research supports a growing literature indicating that intraspecific variability among clones of a dominant species can affect interspecific interactions and that such variability in a native species can affect performance of an invading species. PMID:24558574

  17. Bad copies. How popular media represent cloning as an ethical problem.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, P D

    1998-01-01

    The media, perhaps more than any other slice of culture, influence what we think and talk about, what we take to be important, what we worry about. And this was especially true when news of Dolly hit the airwaves and newstands. Most Americans received training in the ethics of cloning before they knew what cloning was. Media coverage fixed the content and outline of the public moral debate, both revealing and creating the dominant public worries about cloning humans. The primary characterization of cloning as an ethical issue centers around three connected concerns: the loss of human uniqueness and individuality, the pathological motivations of a cloner, and the fear of out-of-control scientists.

  18. Synthesis and cell-free cloning of DNA libraries using programmable microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Yehezkel, Tuval Ben; Rival, Arnaud; Raz, Ofir; Cohen, Rafael; Marx, Zipora; Camara, Miguel; Dubern, Jean-Frédéric; Koch, Birgit; Heeb, Stephan; Krasnogor, Natalio; Delattre, Cyril; Shapiro, Ehud

    2016-01-01

    Microfluidics may revolutionize our ability to write synthetic DNA by addressing several fundamental limitations associated with generating novel genetic constructs. Here we report the first de novo synthesis and cell-free cloning of custom DNA libraries in sub-microliter reaction droplets using programmable digital microfluidics. Specifically, we developed Programmable Order Polymerization (POP), Microfluidic Combinatorial Assembly of DNA (M-CAD) and Microfluidic In-vitro Cloning (MIC) and applied them to de novo synthesis, combinatorial assembly and cell-free cloning of genes, respectively. Proof-of-concept for these methods was demonstrated by programming an autonomous microfluidic system to construct and clone libraries of yeast ribosome binding sites and bacterial Azurine, which were then retrieved in individual droplets and validated. The ability to rapidly and robustly generate designer DNA molecules in an autonomous manner should have wide application in biological research and development. PMID:26481354

  19. Synthesis and cell-free cloning of DNA libraries using programmable microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Ben Yehezkel, Tuval; Rival, Arnaud; Raz, Ofir; Cohen, Rafael; Marx, Zipora; Camara, Miguel; Dubern, Jean-Frédéric; Koch, Birgit; Heeb, Stephan; Krasnogor, Natalio; Delattre, Cyril; Shapiro, Ehud

    2016-02-29

    Microfluidics may revolutionize our ability to write synthetic DNA by addressing several fundamental limitations associated with generating novel genetic constructs. Here we report the first de novo synthesis and cell-free cloning of custom DNA libraries in sub-microliter reaction droplets using programmable digital microfluidics. Specifically, we developed Programmable Order Polymerization (POP), Microfluidic Combinatorial Assembly of DNA (M-CAD) and Microfluidic In-vitro Cloning (MIC) and applied them to de novo synthesis, combinatorial assembly and cell-free cloning of genes, respectively. Proof-of-concept for these methods was demonstrated by programming an autonomous microfluidic system to construct and clone libraries of yeast ribosome binding sites and bacterial Azurine, which were then retrieved in individual droplets and validated. The ability to rapidly and robustly generate designer DNA molecules in an autonomous manner should have wide application in biological research and development.

  20. Particle infectivity of HIV-1 full-length genome infectious molecular clones in a subtype C heterosexual transmission pair following high fidelity amplification and unbiased cloning.

    PubMed

    Deymier, Martin J; Claiborne, Daniel T; Ende, Zachary; Ratner, Hannah K; Kilembe, William; Allen, Susan; Hunter, Eric

    2014-11-01

    The high genetic diversity of HIV-1 impedes high throughput, large-scale sequencing and full-length genome cloning by common restriction enzyme based methods. Applying novel methods that employ a high-fidelity polymerase for amplification and an unbiased fusion-based cloning strategy, we have generated several HIV-1 full-length genome infectious molecular clones from an epidemiologically linked transmission pair. These clones represent the transmitted/founder virus and phylogenetically diverse non-transmitted variants from the chronically infected individual׳s diverse quasispecies near the time of transmission. We demonstrate that, using this approach, PCR-induced mutations in full-length clones derived from their cognate single genome amplicons are rare. Furthermore, all eight non-transmitted genomes tested produced functional virus with a range of infectivities, belying the previous assumption that a majority of circulating viruses in chronic HIV-1 infection are defective. Thus, these methods provide important tools to update protocols in molecular biology that can be universally applied to the study of human viral pathogens.

  1. Mitochondrial DNA heteroplasmy in ovine fetuses and sheep cloned by somatic cell nuclear transfer

    PubMed Central

    Burgstaller, Jörg P; Schinogl, Pamela; Dinnyes, Andras; Müller, Mathias; Steinborn, Ralf

    2007-01-01

    Background The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of the cloned sheep "Dolly" and nine other ovine clones produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) was reported to consist only of recipient oocyte mtDNA without any detectable mtDNA contribution from the nucleus donor cell. In cattle, mouse and pig several or most of the clones showed transmission of nuclear donor mtDNA resulting in mitochondrial heteroplasmy. To clarify the discrepant transmission pattern of donor mtDNA in sheep clones we analysed the mtDNA composition of seven fetuses and five lambs cloned from fetal fibroblasts. Results The three fetal fibroblast donor cells used for SCNT harboured low mtDNA copy numbers per cell (A: 753 ± 54, B: 292 ± 33 and C: 561 ± 88). The ratio of donor to recipient oocyte mtDNAs was determined using a quantitative amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS) PCR (i.e. ARMS-qPCR). For quantification of SNP variants with frequencies below 0.1% we developed a restriction endonuclease-mediated selective quantitative PCR (REMS-qPCR). We report the first cases (n = 4 fetuses, n = 3 lambs) of recipient oocyte/nuclear donor mtDNA heteroplasmy in SCNT-derived ovine clones demonstrating that there is no species-effect hindering ovine nucleus-donor mtDNA from being transmitted to the somatic clonal offspring. Most of the heteroplasmic clones exhibited low-level heteroplasmy (0.1% to 0.9%, n = 6) indicating neutral transmission of parental mtDNAs. High-level heteroplasmy (6.8% to 46.5%) was observed in one case. This clone possessed a divergent recipient oocyte-derived mtDNA genotype with three rare amino acid changes compared to the donor including one substitution at an evolutionary conserved site. Conclusion Our study using state-of-the-art techniques for mtDNA quantification, like ARMS-qPCR and the novel REMS-qPCR, documents for the first time the transmission of donor mtDNA into somatic sheep clones. MtDNA heteroplasmy was detected in seven of 12 clones tested, whereby all but

  2. [Individual consciousness].

    PubMed

    Chaĭlakhian, L M

    2009-01-01

    The main modern concepts on the consciousness nature are considered. Together with the dualistic concepts, there exist concepts the adherents of which find it possible to get to know the origin of consciousness on the basis of natural science. A critical analysis of those concepts brings the author to the conclusion that they do not solve the main problem of individual consciousness: how subjective elements of consciousness arise in the brain as a result of objectively registered processes. The main reason of failures to solve said problem is considered by the author in the fact that the subjective categories of consciousness are not really subject to science. Nevertheless, it does not mean the dualism is to be inevitably accepted. In fact, the subjective categories arise in the limits of a life the area of which is substantially wider than that of science. An original information and physical hypothesis is being set up that provides for necessary premises and conditions enabling the origination of subjective categories of consciousness during the progressive natural evolution of living systems.

  3. Positional cloning by linkage disequilibrium.

    PubMed

    Maniatis, Nikolas; Collins, Andrew; Gibson, Jane; Zhang, Weihua; Tapper, William; Morton, Newton E

    2004-05-01

    Recently, metric linkage disequilibrium (LD) maps that assign an LD unit (LDU) location for each marker have been developed (Maniatis et al. 2002). Here we present a multiple pairwise method for positional cloning by LD within a composite likelihood framework and investigate the operating characteristics of maps in physical units (kb) and LDU for two bodies of data (Daly et al. 2001; Jeffreys et al. 2001) on which current ideas of blocks are based. False-negative indications of a disease locus (type II error) were examined by selecting one single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) at a time as causal and taking its allelic count (0, 1, or 2, for the three genotypes) as a pseudophenotype, Y. By use of regression and correlation, association between every pseudophenotype and the allelic count of each SNP locus (X) was based on an adaptation of the Malecot model, which includes a parameter for location of the putative gene. By expressing locations in kb or LDU, greater power for localization was observed when the LDU map was fitted. The efficiency of the kb map, relative to the LDU map, to describe LD varied from a maximum of 0.87 to a minimum of 0.36, with a mean of 0.62. False-positive indications of a disease locus (type I error) were examined by simulating an unlinked causal SNP and the allele count was used as a pseudophenotype. The type I error was in good agreement with Wald's likelihood theorem for both metrics and all models that were tested. Unlike tests that select only the most significant marker, haplotype, or haploset, these methods are robust to large numbers of markers in a candidate region. Contrary to predictions from tagging SNPs that retain haplotype diversity, the sample with smaller size but greater SNP density gave less error. The locations of causal SNPs were estimated with the same precision in blocks and steps, suggesting that block definition may be less useful than anticipated for mapping a causal SNP. These results provide a guide to efficient

  4. Aup1, a novel gene on mouse Chromosome 6 and human Chromosome 2p13

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Wonhee; Weber, J.S.; Meisler, M.H.

    1996-09-01

    We have cloned a novel mouse cDNA, Aup1, encoding a predicted protein of 410 amino acid residues. The 1.5-kb Aup1 transcript is ubiquitously expressed in mouse tissues. An evolutionary relationship to the Caenorhabditis elegans predicted protein F44b9.5 is indicated by the 35% identity and 53% conservation of the amino acid sequences. Nineteen related human ESTs spanning 80% of the protein have also been identified, with a predicted amino acid sequence identity of 86% between the human and the mouse proteins. The gene has been mapped to a conserved linkage group on human chromosome 2p13 and mouse Chromosome 6. Aup1 was eliminated as a candidate gene for two closely linked disorders, human LGMD2B and mouse mnd2. 15 refs., 2 figs.

  5. What's so bad about human cloning?

    PubMed

    Breitowitz, Yitzchok

    2002-12-01

    There appears to be a consensus in the general community that reproductive cloning is an immoral technology that should be banned. It may, however, be argued, at least from the perspective of the Jewish tradition, that reproductive cloning has many positive benefits. It is thus essential that one carefully weigh the costs and the benefits before deciding on a definitive course of action.

  6. Cloning of endangered mammalian species: any progress?

    PubMed

    Loi, Pasqualino; Galli, Cesare; Ptak, Grazyna

    2007-05-01

    Attempts through somatic cell nuclear transfer to expand wild populations that have shrunk to critical numbers is a logical extension of the successful cloning of mammals. However, although the first mammal was cloned 10 years ago, nuclear reprogramming remains phenomenological, with abnormal gene expression and epigenetic deregulation being associated with the cloning process. In addition, although cloning of wild animals using host oocytes from different species has been successful, little is known about the implication of partial or total mitochondrial DNA heteroplasmy in cloned embryos, fetuses and offspring. Finally, there is a need for suitable foster mothers for inter-intra specific cloned embryos. Considering these issues, the limited success achieved in cloning endangered animals is not surprising. However, optimism comes from the rapid gain in the understanding of the molecular clues underlying nuclear reprogramming. If it is possible to achieve a controlled reversal of the differentiated state of a cell then it is probable that other issues that impair the cloning of endangered animals, such as the inter-intra species oocyte or womb donor, will be overcome in the medium term.

  7. The ethics of human reproductive cloning.

    PubMed

    Strong, Carson

    2005-03-01

    This article addresses the question of whether human reproductive cloning could be ethically justifiable in at least some cases involving infertile couples who would choose cloning as a way to have a genetically related child. At present, the risk of congenital anomalies constitutes a compelling argument against human reproductive cloning. The article explores whether reproductive cloning could be ethically justifiable if, at some future time, cloning becomes possible without an elevated risk of anomalies. It is argued that freedom to use cloning is a form of procreative freedom and, as such, deserves respect. All of the objections that have been raised against human reproductive cloning fall under three main categories: those that appeal to the interests of the child, those based on consequences for society, and those arising from teleological views. Objections that appeal to the child's interests are, in turn, of two main kinds: consequentialist and deontological. All of these types of objections are examined, and it is found that each involves serious problems that prevent it from being a reasonable objection in the context of the infertility cases considered. It is concluded that human reproductive cloning would be ethically justifiable in at least some cases involving infertile couples, provided that it could be performed without an elevated risk of anomalies.

  8. Meat and milk compositions of bovine clones

    PubMed Central

    Tian, X. Cindy; Kubota, Chikara; Sakashita, Kunihito; Izaike, Yoshiaki; Okano, Ryoichi; Tabara, Norio; Curchoe, Carol; Jacob, Lavina; Zhang, Yuqin; Smith, Sadie; Bormann, Charles; Xu, Jie; Sato, Masumi; Andrew, Sheila; Yang, Xiangzhong

    2005-01-01

    The technology is now available for commercial cloning of farm animals for food production, but is the food safe for consumers? Here, we provide data on >100 parameters that compare the composition of meat and milk from beef and dairy cattle derived from cloning to those of genetic- and breed-matched control animals from conventional reproduction. The cloned animals and the comparators were managed under the same conditions and received the same diet. The composition of the meat and milk from the clones were largely not statistically different from those of matched comparators, and all parameters examined were within the normal industry standards or previously reported values. The data generated from our match-controlled experiments provide science-based information desired by regulatory agencies to address public concerns about the safety of meat and milk from somatic animal clones. PMID:15829585

  9. "Goodbye Dolly?" The ethics of human cloning.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, J

    1997-01-01

    The ethical implications of human clones have been much alluded to, but have seldom been examined with any rigour. This paper examines the possible uses and abuses of human cloning and draws out the principal ethical dimensions, both of what might be done and its meaning. The paper examines some of the major public and official responses to cloning by authorities such as President Clinton, the World Health Organisation, the European parliament, UNESCO, and others and reveals their inadequacies as foundations for a coherent public policy on human cloning. The paper ends by defending a conception of reproductive rights of "procreative autonomy" which shows human cloning to be not inconsistent with human rights and dignity. PMID:9451604

  10. [Human cloning in Muslim and Arab law].

    PubMed

    Aldeeb Abu-Sahlieh, Sami A

    2009-01-01

    Cloning is a modern medical procedure that Muslim religious authorities treat en resorting to the general principles established by classical Muslim law based on the Koran and the Sunnah of Muhhamad as the messenger of God. In this regard, human beings are not capable of deciding what is or what is not lawful without resorting to divine norms. Cloning clashes with several principles. Firstly, the principle of the respect for life in relation to surpernumeraries, but Muslim authors are not in unanimous agreement on the determination of the moment at which life begins. Secondly, is the respect of progeny: cloning could only take place between a married couple. But even if these two principles are respected, cloning poses two major problems: the diversity of species expounded by the Koran and the Sunnah and a lack of interest. Which explains the quasi-unanimous opposition of Muslim writings regarding cloning.

  11. Human pyridoxal phosphatase. Molecular cloning, functional expression, and tissue distribution.

    PubMed

    Jang, Young Min; Kim, Dae Won; Kang, Tae-Cheon; Won, Moo Ho; Baek, Nam-In; Moon, Byung Jo; Choi, Soo Young; Kwon, Oh-Shin

    2003-12-12

    Pyridoxal phosphatase catalyzes the dephosphorylation of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) and pyridoxine 5'-phosphate. A human brain cDNA clone was identified to the PLP phosphatase on the basis of peptide sequences obtained previously. The cDNA predicts a 296-amino acid protein with a calculated Mr of 31698. The open reading frame is encoded by two exons located on human chromosome 22q12.3, and the exon-intron junction contains the GT/AG consensus splice site. In addition, a full-length mouse PLP phosphatase cDNA of 1978 bp was also isolated. Mouse enzyme encodes a protein of 292 amino acids with Mr of 31512, and it is localized on chromosome 15.E1. Human and mouse PLP phosphatase share 93% identity in protein sequence. A BLAST search revealed the existence of putative proteins in organism ranging from bacteria to mammals. Catalytically active human PLP phosphatase was expressed in Escherichia coli, and characteristics of the recombinant enzyme were similar to those of erythrocyte enzyme. The recombinant enzyme displayed Km and kcat values for pyridoxal of 2.5 microM and 1.52 s(-1), respectively. Human PLP phosphatase mRNA is differentially expressed in a tissue-specific manner. A single mRNA transcript of 2.1 kb was detected in all human tissues examined and was highly abundant in the brain. Obtaining the molecular properties for the human PLP phosphatase may provide new direction for investigating metabolic pathway involving vitamin B6.

  12. Suppressing P16(Ink4a) and P14(ARF) pathways overcomes apoptosis in individualized human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenqian; Zhu, Yanling; Huang, Ke; Shan, Yongli; Du, Juan; Dong, Xiaoya; Ma, Ping; Wu, Penafei; Zhang, Jian; Huang, Wenhao; Zhang, Tian; Liao, Baojian; Yao, Deyang; Pan, Guangjin; Liu, Jiajun

    2017-03-01

    Dissociation-induced apoptosis is a striking phenomenon in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), but not in naive mouse ESCs. Rho-associated kinase-dependent actin-myosin hyperactivation is an underlying mechanism that triggers apoptosis in dissociated hESCs; however, in this study, we show that the Ink4A-ARF-mediated senescence pathway is another mechanism to cause apoptosis in individualized hESCs. We show that P16(INK4A) and P14(ARF) are immediately induced in hESCs upon dissociation, but not in mouse ESCs. Overexpression of BMI1, a suppressor for Ink4A-ARF, greatly promotes survival and cloning efficiency of individualized hESCs mechanistically via direct binding the H3K27me3-marked Ink4A-ARF locus. Forced expression of BMI1 in hESCs does not reduce the actin-myosin activation that is triggered by dissociation, which indicates it is an independent pathway for hESC survival. Furthermore, dual inhibition of both Ink4A-ARF and actin-myosin hyperactivation enables successful passaging of hESCs via gelatin, a nonbioactive matrix. In sum, we provide an additional mechanism that underlies cell death in individualized hESCs that might help to fully understand the differential cell characteristics between naive and primed ESCs.-Wang, W., Zhu, Y., Huang, K., Shan, Y., Du, J., Dong, X., Ma, P., Wu, P., Zhang, J., Huang, W., Zhang, T., Liao, B., Yao, D., Pan, G., Liu, J. Suppressing P16(Ink4a) and P14(ARF) pathways overcomes apoptosis in individualized human embryonic stem cells.

  13. Cloning single-chain antibody fragments (ScFv) from hyrbidoma cells.

    PubMed

    Toleikis, Lars; Frenzel, André

    2012-01-01

    Despite the rising impact of the generation of antibodies by phage display and other technologies, hybridoma technology still provides a valuable tool for the generation of high-affinity binders against different targets. But there exist several limitations of using hybridoma-derived antibodies. The source of the hybridoma clones are mostly rat or mouse B-lymphocytes. Therefore a human-anti-mouse or human-anti-rat antibody response may result in immunogenicity of these antibodies. This leads to the necessity of humanization of these antibodies where the knowledge of the amino acid sequence of the proteins is inalienable. Furthermore, additional in vitro modifications, e.g., affinity maturation or fusion to other proteins, are dependent on cloning of the antigen-binding domains.Here we describe the isolation of RNA from hybridoma cells and the primers that can be used for the amplification of VL and VH as well as the cloning of the antibody in scFv format and its expression in Escherichia coli.

  14. Large scale screen for transposon insertions into cloned genes.

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, B A; Palazzolo, M J; Chang, J H; VijayRaghavan, K; Mayeda, C A; Whitney, M A; Meyerowitz, E M

    1991-01-01

    We describe a method of screening for transposon insertions in or near Drosophila loci that correspond to cloned DNA sequences. We mobilize a modified P element transposon that carries a bacterial plasmid origin of replication and a drug-resistance marker. The genomic sequences flanking each transposon insertion site can then be rescued as a plasmid in Escherichia coli. Libraries of such plasmids, representing pools of transposon-mutagenized individuals, are used as hybridization probes against cloned sequences to determine whether a transposon has inserted next to a particular site in the genome. The number of loci that can be screened simultaneously by this procedure is quite large. We have screened an array of cDNA clones representing almost 700 distinct loci against libraries representing 760 mutagenized flies, and we obtained hybridization signals to 7 different cDNAs. Three of these events have been analyzed in detail and represent genuine insertions near genomic sequences that correspond to the cDNAs. Images PMID:1849274

  15. The ethics of human reproductive cloning: when world views collide.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Cynthia B

    2004-01-01

    Two camps in bioethics with seemingly opposing world views have staked out conflicting positions regarding the ethics of human reproductive cloning. These camps do not appear to share common concepts or ways of reasoning through which to exchange views and come to a meeting of minds about uses of this technology. Yet analysis of their respective approaches to several issues surrounding reproductive cloning, such as where the ethical limits of individual reproductive choice lie, whether the use of this technology would violate human dignity, whether it would create risks to the resulting fetuses and children that would make its use intolerable, and whether it would challenge certain core social values, reveals that they are not wholly opposed to one another. Indeed, it displays that they hold certain beliefs, values, and concerns in common. Moreover, it indicates that the different world views that they each presuppose, while flawed in certain respects, do not collide in every respect, but can be reconciled in significant ways that provide fertile ground for agreement about several issues related to human reproductive cloning.

  16. A brain-specific gene cluster isolated from the region of the mouse obesity locus is expressed in the adult hypothalamus and during mouse development

    SciTech Connect

    Laig-Webster, M.; Lim, M.E.; Chehab, F.F.

    1994-09-01

    The molecular defect underlying an autosomal recessive form of genetic obesity in a classical mouse model C57 BL/6J-ob/ob has not yet been elucidated. Whereas metabolic and physiological disturbances such as diabetes and hypertension are associated with obesity, the site of expression and the nature of the primary lesion responsible for this cascade of events remains elusive. Our efforts aimed at the positional cloning of the ob gene by YAC contig mapping and gene identification have resulted in the cloning of a brain-specific gene cluster from the ob critical region. The expression of this gene cluster is remarkably complex owing to the multitude of brain-specific mRNA transcripts detected on Northern blots. cDNA cloning of these transcripts suggests that they are expressed from different genes as well as by alternate splicing mechanisms. Furthermore, the genomic organization of the cluster appears to consist of at least two identical promoters displaying CpG islands characteristic of housekeeping genes, yet clearly involving tissue-specific expression. Sense and anti-sense synthetic RNA probes were derived from a common DNA sequence on 3 cDNA clones and hybridized to 8-16 days mouse embryonic stages and mouse adult brain sections. Expression in development was noticeable as of the 11th day of gestation and confined to the central nervous system mainly in the telencephalon and spinal cord. Coronal and sagittal sections of the adult mouse brain showed expression only in 3 different regions of the brain stem. In situ hybridization to mouse hypothalamus sections revealed the presence of a localized and specialized group of cells expressing high levels of mRNA, suggesting that this gene cluster may also be involved in the regulation of hypothalamic activities. The hypothalamus has long been hypothesized as a primary candidate tissue for the expression of the obesity gene mainly because of its well-established role in the regulation of energy metabolism and food intake.

  17. [Echocardiography in mouse].

    PubMed

    Fayssoil, A

    2008-06-01

    Assessing cardiac phenotype requires invasive or noninvasive techniques in mouse. Echocardiography is a noninvasive technique for evaluating cardiac function. The purpose of this paper is to underline echocardiography modalities and new tools Doppler applications like tissue Doppler imaging.

  18. Mouse Cleaning Apparatus and Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Glenn L. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The method of using the mouse pad cleaning apparatus is disclosed and claimed. The method comprises the steps of uncovering the mouse cleaning surface, applying the mouse and ball of the mouse to the cleaning surface, moving the mouse in a rotational pattern on the mouse cleaning surface, removing the mouse form the mouse cleaning surface, washing the cleaning surface, and covering the mouse cleaning surface. A mouse pad cleaning apparatus comprising a plurality of substrates, each said substrate having adhesive thereon, said plurality of substrates residing in and affixed to a receptacle. A single substrate having adhesive, which may be washable or non-washable, thereon may be employed. The washable adhesive may be an organopolysiloxane or gelatinous elastomer.

  19. Sources of Blood Meals of Sylvatic Triatoma guasayana near Zurima, Bolivia, Assayed with qPCR and 12S Cloning

    PubMed Central

    Lucero, David E.; Ribera, Wilma; Pizarro, Juan Carlos; Plaza, Carlos; Gordon, Levi W.; Peña, Reynaldo; Morrissey, Leslie A.; Rizzo, Donna M.; Stevens, Lori

    2014-01-01

    Background In this study we compared the utility of two molecular biology techniques, cloning of the mitochondrial 12S ribosomal RNA gene and hydrolysis probe-based qPCR, to identify blood meal sources of sylvatic Chagas disease insect vectors collected with live-bait mouse traps (also known as Noireau traps). Fourteen T. guasayana were collected from six georeferenced trap locations in the Andean highlands of the department of Chuquisaca, Bolivia. Methodology/Principal Findings We detected four blood meals sources with the cloning assay: seven samples were positive for human (Homo sapiens), five for chicken (Gallus gallus) and unicolored blackbird (Agelasticus cyanopus), and one for opossum (Monodelphis domestica). Using the qPCR assay we detected chicken (13 vectors), and human (14 vectors) blood meals as well as an additional blood meal source, Canis sp. (4 vectors). Conclusions/Significance We show that cloning of 12S PCR products, which avoids bias associated with developing primers based on a priori knowledge, detected blood meal sources not previously considered and that species-specific qPCR is more sensitive. All samples identified as positive for a specific blood meal source by the cloning assay were also positive by qPCR. However, not all samples positive by qPCR were positive by cloning. We show the power of combining the cloning assay with the highly sensitive hydrolysis probe-based qPCR assay provides a more complete picture of blood meal sources for insect disease vectors. PMID:25474154

  20. Controlled secret sharing protocol using a quantum cloning circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Satyabrata; Roy, Sovik; Chakraborty, Shantanav; Jagadish, Vinayak; Haris, M. K.; Kumar, Atul

    2014-09-01

    We demonstrate the possibility of controlling the success probability of a secret sharing protocol using a quantum cloning circuit. The cloning circuit is used to clone the qubits containing the encoded information and en route to the intended recipients. The success probability of the protocol depends on the cloning parameters used to clone the qubits. We also establish a relation between the concurrence of initially prepared state, entanglement of the mixed state received by the receivers after cloning scheme and the cloning parameters of cloning machine.

  1. Cloning and characterization of two members of the vertebrate Dlx gene family.

    PubMed Central

    Simeone, A; Acampora, D; Pannese, M; D'Esposito, M; Stornaiuolo, A; Gulisano, M; Mallamaci, A; Kastury, K; Druck, T; Huebner, K

    1994-01-01

    A number of vertebrate genes of the Dlx gene family have been cloned in mouse, frog, and zebrafish. These genes contain a homeobox related to that of Distalless, a gene expressed in the developing head and limbs of Drosophila embryos. We cloned and studied the expression of two members of this family, which we named Dlx5 and Dlx6, in human and mouse. The two human genes, DLX5 and DLX6, are closely linked in an inverted convergent configuration in a region of chromosome 7, at 7q22. Similarly, the two human genes DLX1 and DLX2 are closely linked in a convergent configuration at 2q32, near the HOXD (previously HOX4) locus. In situ hybridization experiments in mouse embryos revealed expression of Dlx5 and Dlx6 mRNA in restricted regions of ventral diencephalon and basal telencephalon, with a distribution very similar to that reported for Dlx1 and Dlx2 mRNA. A surprising feature of Dlx5 and Dlx6 is that they are also expressed in all skeletal structures of midgestation embryos after the first cartilage formation. The expression pattern of these genes, together with their chromosome localization, may provide useful cues for the study of congenital disorders in which there is a combination of craniofacial and limb defects. Images PMID:7907794

  2. Human embryo cloning prohibited in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Liu, Athena

    2005-12-01

    Since the birth of Dolly (the cloned sheep) in 1997, debates have arisen on the ethical and legal questions of cloning-for-biomedical-research (more commonly termed "therapeutic cloning") and of reproductive cloning using human gametes. Hong Kong enacted the Human Reproductive Technology Ordinance (Cap 561) in 2000. Section 15(1)(e) of this Ordinance prohibits the "replacing of the nucleus of a cell of an embryo with a nucleus taken from any other cell," i.e., nucleus substitution. Section 15(1)(f) prohibits the cloning of any embryo. The scope of the latter, therefore, is arguably the widest, prohibiting all cloning techniques such as cell nucleus replacement, embryo splitting, parthenogenesis, and cloning using stem cell lines. Although the Human Reproductive Technology Ordinance is not yet fully operative, this article examines how these prohibitions may adversely impact on basic research and the vision of the Hong Kong scientific community. It concludes that in light of recent scientific developments, it is time to review if the law offers a coherent set of policies in this area.

  3. Economical quantum cloning in any dimension

    SciTech Connect

    Durt, Thomas; Fiurasek, Jaromir; Cerf, Nicolas J.

    2005-11-15

    The possibility of cloning a d-dimensional quantum system without an ancilla is explored, extending on the economical phase-covariant cloning machine for qubits found in Phys. Rev. A 60, 2764 (1999). We prove the impossibility of constructing an economical version of the optimal universal 1{yields}2 cloning machine in any dimension. We also show, using an ansatz on the generic form of cloning machines, that the d-dimensional 1{yields}2 phase-covariant cloner, which optimally clones all balanced superpositions with arbitrary phases, can be realized economically only in dimension d=2. The used ansatz is supported by numerical evidence up to d=7. An economical phase-covariant cloner can nevertheless be constructed for d>2, albeit with a slightly lower fidelity than that of the optimal cloner requiring an ancilla. Finally, using again an ansatz on cloning machines, we show that an economical version of the 1{yields}2 Fourier-covariant cloner, which optimally clones the computational basis and its Fourier transform, is also possible only in dimension d=2.

  4. Molecular and cytogenetic characterization of expanded B-cell clones from multiclonal versus monoclonal B-cell chronic lymphoproliferative disorders

    PubMed Central

    Henriques, Ana; Rodríguez-Caballero, Arancha; Criado, Ignacio; Langerak, Anton W.; Nieto, Wendy G.; Lécrevisse, Quentin; González, Marcos; Cortesão, Emília; Paiva, Artur; Almeida, Julia; Orfao, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Chronic antigen-stimulation has been recurrently involved in the earlier stages of monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis, chronic lymphocytic leukemia and other B-cell chronic lymphoproliferative disorders. The expansion of two or more B-cell clones has frequently been reported in individuals with these conditions; potentially, such coexisting clones have a greater probability of interaction with common immunological determinants. Here, we analyzed the B-cell receptor repertoire and molecular profile, as well as the phenotypic, cytogenetic and hematologic features, of 228 chronic lymphocytic leukemia-like and non-chronic lymphocytic leukemia-like clones comparing multiclonal (n=85 clones from 41 cases) versus monoclonal (n=143 clones) monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis, chronic lymphocytic leukemia and other B-cell chronic lymphoproliferative disorders. The B-cell receptor of B-cell clones from multiclonal cases showed a slightly higher degree of HCDR3 homology than B-cell clones from mono clonal cases, in association with unique hematologic (e.g. lower B-lymphocyte counts) and cytogenetic (e.g. lower frequency of cytogenetically altered clones) features usually related to earlier stages of the disease. Moreover, a subgroup of coexisting B-cell clones from individual multiclonal cases which were found to be phylogenetically related showed unique molecular and cytogenetic features: they more frequently shared IGHV3 gene usage, shorter HCDR3 sequences with a greater proportion of IGHV mutations and del(13q14.3), than other unrelated B-cell clones. These results would support the antigen-driven nature of such multiclonal B-cell expansions, with potential involvement of multiple antigens/epitopes. PMID:24488564

  5. Cloning and Expression of Soluble Recombinant HIV-1 CRF35 Protease-HP Thioredoxin Fusion Protein

    PubMed Central

    Azarnezhad, Asaad; Sharifi, Zohreh; Seyedabadi, Rahmatollah; Hosseini, Arshad; Johari, Behrooz; Sobhani Fard, Mahsa

    2016-01-01

    Background: As a drug target and an antigenic agent, HIV-1 protease (HIV-1 PR) is at the center of attention for designing anti-AIDS inhibitors and diagnostic tests. In previous studies, the production of the recombinant protease has been faced with several difficulties; therefore, the aims of this study were the easy production, purification of the soluble form of protease in E. coli and investigation of its immunoreactivity. Methods: Protease coding region was isolated from the serum of an infected individual, amplified by RT-PCR and cloned into PTZ57R using TA-cloning. Protease coding frame was isolated by PCR and cloned in pET102/D. TOPO expression vector and cloned protease was expressed in Escherichia coli (E. coli) BL21. Produced recombinant protein was purified by affinity Ni-NTA column and protein concentration was checked by BCA protein assay kit. Subsequently, immunoreactivity of recombinant protease (rPR) was assayed by Western blotting and ELISA. Results: Cloning of the HIV protease by TOPO cloning system in pET102/D.TOPO was confirmed with PCR and sequencing. The concentration range of purified recombinant protein was 85 to 100 μg/ml. Immunogenicity of rPR was confirmed by Western blotting and ELISA. Conclusion: Soluble production of recombinant HIV-1 protease (HIV-1 rPR) was performed successfully. This recombinant protein disclosed 86% specificity and 90% sensitivity in immunoassay tests. PMID:27920885

  6. An anchored framework BAC map of mouse chromosome 11 assembled using multiplex oligonucleotide hybridization.

    PubMed

    Cai, W W; Reneker, J; Chow, C W; Vaishnav, M; Bradley, A

    1998-12-15

    Despite abundant library resources for many organisms, physical mapping of these organisms has been seriously limited due to lack of efficient library screening techniques. We have developed a highly efficient strategy for large-scale screening of genomic libraries based on multiplex oligonucleotide hybridization on high-density genomic filters. We have applied this strategy to generate a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) anchored map of mouse chromosome 11. Using the MIT mouse SSLP data, 320 pairs of oligonucleotide probes were designed with an "overgo" computer program that selects new primer sequences that avoid the microsatellite repeat. BACs identified by these probes are automatically anchored to the chromosome. Ninety-two percent of the probes identified positive clones from a 5.9-fold coverage mouse BAC library with an average of 7 positive clones per marker. An average of 4.2 clones was confirmed for 204 markers by PCR. Our data show that a large number of clones can be efficiently isolated from a large genomic library using this strategy with minimal effort. This strategy will have wide application for large-scale mapping and sequencing of human and other large genomes.

  7. Isolation of cDNA clones for differentially expressed genes of the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, A H; Blanton, R; Rottman, F; Maurer, R; Mahmoud, A

    1986-01-01

    Little is known about the mechanisms that control transformations during the life cycle of Schistosoma mansoni. To enable isolation of DNA sequences encoding developmentally regulated antigens a cDNA expression library in the vector lambda gt11 amp3 was constructed from adult mRNA and immunologically screened with sera from infected individuals. We report here on the properties of three recombinant clones that derive from developmentally regulated genes. Clone 10-3 encoded a beta-galactosidase fusion protein present in high abundance in infected Escherichia coli. Clones 7-2 and 8-2 also produced immunologically recognized proteins; however, the peptides did not appear to be beta-galactosidase fusion proteins. The expression of mRNAs hybridizing to these cDNAs was examined in the different stages of the parasite life cycle. Messenger RNA corresponding to clone 10-3, approximately equal to 1000 bases in length, was present in higher abundance in male worms than in females but was not detected in schistosome eggs. A 900-base mRNA hybridizing to clone 7-2 was observed in adult worms and eggs. Both clone 10-3 and clone 7-2 hybridized to smaller mRNAs in cercariae and freshly transformed schistosomula than in adult worms. Clone 8-2 contained tandem cDNA inserts. One cDNA hybridized to a 1700-base mRNA present in all stages, while the second hybridized to an 800-base mRNA specific to adult female worms. Images PMID:3461448

  8. The human SOX11 gene: Cloning, chromosomal assignment and tissue expression

    SciTech Connect

    Jay, P.; Goze, C.; Marsollier, C.; Taviaux, S.

    1995-09-20

    The mammalian testis determining gene SRY contains an HMG box-related DNA binding motif. By analogy a family of genes related to SRY in the HMG domain have been called SOX (SRY box-related genes). We have cloned and characterized the human SOX11 gene using the partial cloning of both human and mouse SOX11 genes and mapped it to chromosome 2p25. The SOX11 sequence is strongly conserved with the chicken homologue and is related to SOX4. It contains several putative transcriptional either activator or repressor domains. SOX11 expression pattern is consistent with the hypothesis that this gene is important in the developing nervous system. 20 refs., 5 figs.

  9. Measuring Process Dynamics and Nuclear Migration for Clones of Neural Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    De La Hoz, Edgar Cardenas; Winter, Mark R.; Apostolopoulou, Maria; Temple, Sally

    2016-01-01

    Neural stem and progenitor cells (NPCs) generate processes that extend from the cell body in a dynamic manner. The NPC nucleus migrates along these processes with patterns believed to be tightly coupled to mechanisms of cell cycle regulation and cell fate determination. Here, we describe a new segmentation and tracking approach that allows NPC processes and nuclei to be reliably tracked across multiple rounds of cell division in phase-contrast microscopy images. Results are presented for mouse adult and embryonic NPCs from hundreds of clones, or lineage trees, containing tens of thousands of cells and millions of segmentations. New visualization approaches allow the NPC nuclear and process features to be effectively visualized for an entire clone. Significant differences in process and nuclear dynamics were found among type A and type C adult NPCs, and also between embryonic NPCs cultured from the anterior and posterior cerebral cortex. PMID:27878138

  10. Targeted disruption of the murine Facc gene: Towards the establishment of a mouse model for Fanconi anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, M.; Auerbach, W.; Buchwald, M.

    1994-09-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by bone marrow failure, congenital malformations and predisposition to malignancies. The gene responsible for the defect in FA group C has been cloned and designated the Fanconi Anemia Complementation Group C gene (FACC). A murine cDNA for this gene (Facc) was also cloned. Here we report our progress in the establishment of a mouse model for FA. The mouse Facc cDNA was used as probe to screen a genomic library of mouse strain 129. More than twenty positive clones were isolated. Three of them were mapped and found to be overlapping clones, encompassing the genomic region from exon 8 to the end of the 3{prime} UTR of the mouse cDNA. A targeting vector was constructed using the most 5{prime} mouse genomic sequence available. The end result of the homologous recombination is that exon 8 is deleted and the neo gene is inserted. The last exon, exon 14, is essential for the complementing function of the FACC gene product; the disruption in the middle of the murine Facc gene should render this locus biologically inactive. This targeting vector was linearized and electroporated into R1 embryonic stem (ES) cells which were derived from the 129 mouse. Of 102 clones screened, 19 positive cell lines were identified. Four targeted cell lines have been used to produce chimeric mice. 129-derived ES cells were aggregated ex vivo into the morulas derived from CD1 mice and then implanted into foster mothers. 22 chimeras have been obtained. Moderately and strongly chimeric mice have been bred to test for germline transmission. Progeny with the expected coat color derived from 2 chimeras are currently being examined to confirm transmission of the targeted allele.

  11. Principles and application of LIMS in mouse clinics.

    PubMed

    Maier, Holger; Schütt, Christine; Steinkamp, Ralph; Hurt, Anja; Schneltzer, Elida; Gormanns, Philipp; Lengger, Christoph; Griffiths, Mark; Melvin, David; Agrawal, Neha; Alcantara, Rafael; Evans, Arthur; Gannon, David; Holroyd, Simon; Kipp, Christian; Raj, Navis Pretheeba; Richardson, David; LeBlanc, Sophie; Vasseur, Laurent; Masuya, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Kimio; Suzuki, Tomohiro; Tanaka, Nobuhiko; Wakana, Shigeharu; Walling, Alison; Clary, David; Gallegos, Juan; Fuchs, Helmut; de Angelis, Martin Hrabě; Gailus-Durner, Valerie

    2015-10-01

    Large-scale systemic mouse phenotyping, as performed by mouse clinics for more than a decade, requires thousands of mice from a multitude of different mutant lines to be bred, individually tracked and subjected to phenotyping procedures according to a standardised schedule. All these efforts are typically organised in overlapping projects, running in parallel. In terms of logistics, data capture, data analysis, result visualisation and reporting, new challenges have emerged from such projects. These challenges could hardly be met with traditional methods such as pen & paper colony management, spreadsheet-based data management and manual data analysis. Hence, different Laboratory Information Management Systems (LIMS) have been developed in mouse clinics to facilitate or even enable mouse and data management in the described order of magnitude. This review shows that general principles of LIMS can be empirically deduced from LIMS used by different mouse clinics, although these have evolved differently. Supported by LIMS descriptions and lessons learned from seven mouse clinics, this review also shows that the unique LIMS environment in a particular facility strongly influences strategic LIMS decisions and LIMS development. As a major conclusion, this review states that there is no universal LIMS for the mouse research domain that fits all requirements. Still, empirically deduced general LIMS principles can serve as a master decision support template, which is provided as a hands-on tool for mouse research facilities looking for a LIMS.

  12. [Therapeutic cloning. Biology, perspectives and alternatives].

    PubMed

    Maddox-Hyttel, Poul

    2003-02-24

    Certain diseases are caused by or cause irreversible loss of cells and may in the future be treated by cell-based therapies where spare cells are introduced into the body. Therapeutic cloning constitutes a scientifically and ethically challenging route to the generation of autologous patient specific spare cells: Stem cells for subsequent differentiation and transplantation are isolated from one week old embryos, which are produced by cloning by nuclear transfer from normal cells retrieved from a patient. Research in therapeutic cloning should be pursued in line with alternative strategies for obtaining stem cells. Finally, the molecular biology of cloning by nuclear transfer may hold the key to understanding trans-differentiation, which ultimately may allow for de-differentiation and subsequent re-differentiation of adult somatic cells for therapeutic purposes.

  13. Optimal cloning of mixed Gaussian states

    SciTech Connect

    Guta, Madalin; Matsumoto, Keiji

    2006-09-15

    We construct the optimal one to two cloning transformation for the family of displaced thermal equilibrium states of a harmonic oscillator, with a fixed and known temperature. The transformation is Gaussian and it is optimal with respect to the figure of merit based on the joint output state and norm distance. The proof of the result is based on the equivalence between the optimal cloning problem and that of optimal amplification of Gaussian states which is then reduced to an optimization problem for diagonal states of a quantum oscillator. A key concept in finding the optimum is that of stochastic ordering which plays a similar role in the purely classical problem of Gaussian cloning. The result is then extended to the case of n to m cloning of mixed Gaussian states.

  14. Establishment of functional clonal lines of neurons from mouse neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Augusti-Tocco, G; Sato, G

    1969-09-01

    Clonal lines of neurons were obtained in culture from a mouse neuroblastoma. The neuroblastoma cells were adapted to culture growth by the animal-culture alternate passage technique and cloned after single-cell plating. The clonal lines retained the ability to form tumors when injected back into mice. A striking morphological change was observed in the cells adapted to culture growth; they appeared as mature neurons, while the cells of the tumor appeared as immature neuroblasts. Acetylcholinesterase and the enzymes for the synthesis of neurotransmitters, cholineacetylase and tyrosine hydroxylase were assayed in the tumor and compared with brain levels; tyrosine hydroxylase was found to be particularly high, as described previously in human neuroblastomas. The three enzymes were found in the clonal cultures at levels comparable to those found in the tumors. Similarly, there were no remarkable differences between the three clones examined.

  15. The genetics of Fraser syndrome and the blebs mouse mutants.

    PubMed

    Smyth, Ian; Scambler, Peter

    2005-10-15

    Fraser syndrome is a recessive multisystem disorder characterized by embryonic epidermal blistering, cryptophthalmos, syndactyly, renal defects and a range of other developmental abnormalities. More than 17 years ago, the family of four mapped mouse blebs mutants was proposed as models of this disorder, given their striking phenotypic overlaps. In the last few years, these loci have been cloned, uncovering a family of three large extracellular matrix proteins and an intracellular adapter protein which are required for normal epidermal adhesion early in development. The proteins have also been shown to play a crucial role in the development and homeostasis of the kidney. We review the cloning and characterization of these genes and explore the consequences of their loss.

  16. Knockout mouse production assisted by Blm knockdown

    PubMed Central

    FUKUDA, Mikiko; INOUE, Mayuko; MURAMATSU, Daisuke; MIYACHI, Hitoshi; SHINKAI, Yoichi

    2015-01-01

    Production of knockout mice using targeted embryonic stem cells (ESCs) is a powerful approach for investigating the function of specific genes in vivo. Although the protocol for gene targeting via homologous recombination (HR) in ESCs is already well established, the targeting efficiency varies at different target loci and is sometimes too low. It is known that knockdown of the Bloom syndrome gene, BLM, enhances HR-mediated gene targeting efficiencies in various cell lines. However, it has not yet been investigated whether this approach in ESCs is applicable for successful knockout mouse production. Therefore, we attempted to answer this question. Consistent with previous reports, Blm knockdown enhanced gene targeting efficiencies for three gene loci that we examined by 2.3–4.1-fold. Furthermore, the targeted ESC clones generated good chimeras and were successful in germline transmission. These data suggest that Blm knockdown provides a general benefit for efficient ESC-based and HR-mediated knockout mouse production. PMID:26598326

  17. Molecular cloning and structural analysis of the porcine homologue to CD97 antigen.

    PubMed

    de la Lastra, José M Pérez; Shahein, Yasser E A; Garrido, Juan J; Llanes, Diego

    2003-06-20

    CD97 is a member of a novel subfamily of leukocyte proteins that are characterized by the presence of tandemly repeated extracellular epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like domains and a seven-span transmembrane region, known as EGF-TM7. We here report the cloning of cDNA encoding the pig homologue of CD97. A pig CD97 specific probe was generated by PCR amplification of pig leukocyte cDNA, using primers based on consensus regions among the known sequences of mouse and human CD97. Screening of a pig aorta smooth muscle cDNA library identified one clone containing an open reading frame (ORF) that encoded an 18 amino acid putative signal peptide, a 141 amino acid sequence consisting of three EGF domains, a mucin-like spacer region of 276 amino acid, containing a G-protein coupling motif of 52 amino acids, followed by a 250 amino acid region containing seven membrane spanning domains and a 47 amino acid cytoplasmic tail. The amino acid sequence of the clone was 75, 67 and 59% homologous to cattle, human and mouse CD97 antigen, respectively. Therefore, it was termed pig CD97. Pig CD97 antigen shares many structural features with human, cattle and mouse CD97. RT-PCR analysis of cDNA from different pig cells and tissues showed that CD97 was highly expressed in leukocytes and lymph node cells. This is the first report describing the identification of a member of the EGF-TM7 family in the pig.

  18. Mouse Cytoplasmic Dynein Intermediate Chains: Identification of New Isoforms, Alternative Splicing and Tissue Distribution of Transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Kuta, Anna; Deng, Wenhan; Morsi El-Kadi, Ali; Banks, Gareth T.; Hafezparast, Majid; Pfister, K. Kevin; Fisher, Elizabeth M. C.

    2010-01-01

    Background Intracellular transport of cargoes including organelles, vesicles, signalling molecules, protein complexes, and RNAs, is essential for normal function of eukaryotic cells. The cytoplasmic dynein complex is an important motor that moves cargos along microtubule tracks within the cell. In mammals this multiprotein complex includes dynein intermediate chains 1 and 2 which are encoded by two genes, Dync1i1 and Dync1i2. These proteins are involved in dynein cargo binding and dynein complexes with different intermediate chains bind to specific cargoes, although the mechanisms to achieve this are not known. The DYNC1I1 and DYNC1I2 proteins are translated from different splice isoforms, and specific forms of each protein are essential for the function of different dynein complexes in neurons. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we have undertaken a systematic survey of the dynein intermediate chain splice isoforms in mouse, basing our study on mRNA expression patterns in a range of tissues, and on bioinformatics analysis of mouse, rat and human genomic and cDNA sequences. We found a complex pattern of alternative splicing of both dynein intermediate chain genes, with maximum complexity in the embryonic and adult nervous system. We have found novel transcripts, including some with orthologues in human and rat, and a new promoter and alternative non-coding exon 1 for Dync1i2. Conclusions/Significance These data, including the cloned isoforms will be essential for understanding the role of intermediate chains in the cytoplasmic dynein complex, particularly their role in cargo binding within individual tissues including different brain regions. PMID:20657784

  19. Endangered wolves cloned from adult somatic cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Kyu; Jang, Goo; Oh, Hyun Ju; Yuda, Fibrianto; Kim, Hye Jin; Hwang, Woo Suk; Hossein, Mohammad Shamim; Kim, Joung Joo; Shin, Nam Shik; Kang, Sung Keun; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2007-01-01

    Over the world, canine species, including the gray wolf, have been gradually endangered or extinct. Many efforts have been made to recover and conserve these canids. The aim of this study was to produce the endangered gray wolf with somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) for conservation. Adult ear fibroblasts from a female gray wolf (Canis lupus) were isolated and cultured in vitro as donor cells. Because of limitations in obtaining gray wolf matured oocytes, in vivo matured canine oocytes obtained by flushing the oviducts from the isthmus to the infundibulum were used. After removing the cumulus cells, the oocyte was enucleated, microinjected, fused with a donor cell, and activated. The reconstructed cloned wolf embryos were transferred into the oviducts of the naturally synchronized surrogate mothers. Two pregnancies were detected by ultrasonography at 23 days of gestation in recipient dogs. In each surrogate dog, two fetal sacs were confirmed by early pregnancy diagnosis at 23 days, but only two cloned wolves were delivered. The first cloned wolf was delivered by cesarean section on October 18, 2005, 60 days after embryo transfer. The second cloned wolf was delivered on October 26, 2005, at 61 days postembryo transfer. Microsatellite analysis was performed with genomic DNA from the donor wolf, the two cloned wolves, and the two surrogate female recipients to confirm the genetic identity of the cloned wolves. Analysis of 19 microsatellite loci confirmed that the cloned wolves were genetically identical to the donor wolf. In conclusion, we demonstrated live birth of two cloned gray wolves by nuclear transfer of wolf somatic cells into enucleated canine oocyte, indicating that SCNT is a practical approach for conserving endangered canids.

  20. A mouse model for the cystic fibrosis delta F508 mutation.

    PubMed Central

    van Doorninck, J H; French, P J; Verbeek, E; Peters, R H; Morreau, H; Bijman, J; Scholte, B J

    1995-01-01

    Most cystic fibrosis (CF) patients produce a mutant form (delta F508) of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), which is not properly processed in normal cells but is active as a chloride channel in several experimental systems. We used a double homologous recombination ('Hit and Run') procedure to generate a mouse model for the delta F508 mutation. Targeted embryonic stem (ES) cells (Hit clones) were found; of these either 80 or 20% of the clones had lost the delta F508 mutation, depending on the distance between the linearization site in the targeting construct and the delta F508 mutation. Correctly targeted clones underwent a second selection step resulting in ES cell clones (Run clones) heterozygous for the delta F508 mutation with an efficiency of 2-7%. Chimeric mice were generated and offspring homozygous for the delta F508 mutation showed electrophysiological abnormalities in nasal epithelium, gallbladder and in the intestine, and histological abnormalities in the intestine, typical of CF. Our data suggest that the delta F508 mice have residual delta F508 CFTR activity which would explain the mild pathology of the delta F508 mice. The delta F508 mouse may provide a useful model for the study of the processing defect of delta F508 CFTR and for the development of novel therapeutic approaches based on circumvention of the processing block. Images PMID:7556083

  1. Population structure, genetic diversity, and clone formation in Quercus chrysolepis (Fagaceae).

    PubMed

    Montalvo, A; Conard, S; Conkle, M; Hodgskiss, P

    1997-11-01

    Stands of canyon live oak (Quercus chrysolepis, Fagaceae) are maintained for fuelwood, fire management, recreation, and as habitat for wildlife. Information about the link between the oak's reproductive ecology and its extent of genetic diversity is important in developing land management policies that will maintain the long-term viability of populations. Basal sprouting is the primary means of reproduction following fire or cutting, and stands frequently include groups of visibly connected trees in a clustered distribution that suggests cloning. We determined the extent to which clusters of trees were clonal and defined the spatial pattern and diversity of genotypes for six populations across nearly the entire east-west extent of the San Bernardino Mountains in southern California. We mapped over 100 trees at each of five sites and genotyped each tree for allozymes at seven polymorphic loci. We identified clones using these multilocus genotypes and detected an average of 34.4 ± 7.3 (SD) clones per site, most of which had unique genotypes. In general, clustered trees belong to single clones and most clones consist of few trees (mean = 3.4 ± 0.6 trees per clone). However, clone size increased significantly with increased individual heterozygosity, suggesting that selection may favor highly heterozygous clones. Clonal diversity and evenness were high relative to reports for most other clonal species; an average of 97% of clones had distinct genotypes, and Simpson's index of diversity averaged 0.95 ± 0.02. Population genetic analyses of 319 clones from six sites revealed high genetic diversity within sites (mean HS = 0.443). Only a small proportion of the total genetic diversity was explained by variation among sites (mean GST = 0.018), which is consistent with high gene flow among sites (Nm = 9.5). We found no significant substructure among plots within sites, and fixation indices within sites were generally small, suggesting that either little inbreeding occurs

  2. A modified version of the digestion-ligation cloning method for more efficient molecular cloning.

    PubMed

    Gao, Song; Li, Yanling; Zhang, Jiannan; Chen, Hongman; Ren, Daming; Zhang, Lijun; An, Yingfeng

    2014-05-15

    Here we describe a modified version of the digestion-ligation approach for efficient molecular cloning. In comparison with the original method, the modified method has the additional steps of gel purification and a second ligation after the first ligation of the linearized vector and DNA insert. During this process, the efficiency and reproducibility could be significantly improved for both stick-end cloning and blunt-end cloning. As an improvement of the very important molecular cloning technique, this method may find a wide range of applications in bioscience and biotechnology.

  3. Reproductive cloning combined with genetic modification.

    PubMed

    Strong, C

    2005-11-01

    Although there is widespread opposition to reproductive cloning, some have argued that its use by infertile couples to have genetically related children would be ethically justifiable. Others have suggested that lesbian or gay couples might wish to use cloning to have genetically related children. Most of the main objections to human reproductive cloning are based on the child's lack of unique nuclear DNA. In the future, it may be possible safely to create children using cloning combined with genetic modifications, so that they have unique nuclear DNA. The genetic modifications could be aimed at giving such children genetic characteristics of both members of the couple concerned. Thus, cloning combined with genetic modification could be appealing to infertile, lesbian, or gay couples who seek genetically related children who have genetic characteristics of both members. In such scenarios, the various objections to human reproductive cloning that are based on the lack of genetic uniqueness would no longer be applicable. The author argues that it would be ethically justifiable for such couples to create children in this manner, assuming these techniques could be used safely.

  4. Cloning: Past, Present, and the Exciting Future. Breakthroughs in Bioscience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Di Berardino, Marie A.

    This document explores the history of cloning by focusing on Dolly the Sheep, one of the first large animal clonings. The disadvantages and advantages of transgenic clones are discussed as well as the future implications of cloning from the perspective of human health. (Contains 10 resources.) (YDS)

  5. Mouse bladder wall injection.

    PubMed

    Fu, Chi-Ling; Apelo, Charity A; Torres, Baldemar; Thai, Kim H; Hsieh, Michael H

    2011-07-12

    Mouse bladder wall injection is a useful technique to orthotopically study bladder phenomena, including stem cell, smooth muscle, and cancer biology. Before starting injections, the surgical area must be cleaned with soap and water and antiseptic solution. Surgical equipment must be sterilized before use and between each animal. Each mouse is placed under inhaled isoflurane anesthesia (2-5% for induction, 1-3% for maintenance) and its bladder exposed by making a midline abdominal incision with scissors. If the bladder is full, it is partially decompressed by gentle squeezing between two fingers. The cell suspension of interest is intramurally injected into the wall of the bladder dome using a 29 or 30 gauge needle and 1 cc or smaller syringe. The wound is then closed using wound clips and the mouse allowed to recover on a warming pad. Bladder wall injection is a delicate microsurgical technique that can be mastered with practice.

  6. Cloning and expression of bovine glucose transporter GLUT12.

    PubMed

    Miller, Peter J; Finucane, Kiera A; Hughes, Megan; Zhao, Feng-Qi

    2005-11-01

    GLUT12 is a new member of facilitative glucose transporters. It was originally cloned from a human breast cancer cell line and its expression has been detected in rat mammary gland. Glucose transport across the plasma membrane of mammary epithelial cells is a rate-limiting factor in milk production. To examine GLUT12's expression and facilitate the study of GLUT12's potential role in supporting milk synthesis in lactating bovine mammary gland, we cloned bovine GLUT12 and examined its distribution of mRNA expression in bovine tissues. The full-length mRNA of bGLUT12 is 2,423 base pairs long and is predicted to encode a protein of 621 amino acids with a molecular weight of approximately 67 kDa. The deduced amino acid sequence of bovine GLUT12 is 87% and 82% identical to the sequences of human and mouse GLUT12. The sequence of bGLUT12 contains several characteristically conserved sugar transporter family signatures. Analysis of current bovine genomic data indicates that bovine GLUT12 gene consists of five exons. The major in vitro transcription and translation product of bovine GLUT12 cDNA migrated at an apparent molecular weight of 41 kDa. In the presence of canine microsomal membranes, the translation product increased to 43 kDa, suggesting glycosylation. GLUT12 mRNA was found in all bovine tissues examined, but most abundant in bovine spleen and skeletal muscle, at intermediate levels in bovine kidney, testes, and mammary gland, and at lower levels in bovine liver, lung and intestine. Immunofluorescence staining showed that, in the presence of insulin, bGLUT12 is mainly distributed in the cytoplasm of the transiently transfected MAC-T bovine mammary epithelial cells.

  7. Phylogenetic conservation of immunoglobulin heavy chains: direct comparison of hamster and mouse Cmu genes.

    PubMed

    McGuire, K L; Duncan, W R; Tucker, P W

    1985-08-12

    We have analyzed the JH-Cmu locus of the Syrian hamster by DNA cloning and sequencing. The single Cmu gene is highly homologous to that of the mouse. The hamster equivalents of the JH and switch (S) recombination regions are arranged as in the mouse, but surprisingly are not highly conserved. Also unlike its close murine relative, the Smu regions among inbred hamster strains are not polymorphic. The complete nucleotide sequence of hamster and mouse Cmu genes have been compared to partial Cmu sequences of other species. Conservation within a portion of the 3' untranslated region may signify functional requirements for 3' end processing. Mutational frequencies within exons and introns of hamster and mouse do not support the theory that the rate of DNA transitions to transversions decreases with evolutionary distance.

  8. Researchers Create Artificial Mouse 'Embryo'

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_163881.html Researchers Create Artificial Mouse 'Embryo' Experiment used two types of gene-modified stem ... they've created a kind of artificial mouse embryo using stem cells, which can be coaxed to ...

  9. Cloning and functional characterization of the rabbit C-C chemokine receptor 2

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Deshun; Yuan, Xiu-juan; Evans, Robert J; Pappas, Amy T; Wang, He; Su, Eric W; Hamdouchi, Chafiq; Venkataraman, Chandrasekar

    2005-01-01

    Background CC-family chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) is implicated in the trafficking of blood-borne monocytes to sites of inflammation and is implicated in the pathogenesis of several inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis and atherosclerosis. The major challenge in the development of small molecule chemokine receptor antagonists is the lack of cross-species activity to the receptor in the preclinical species. Rabbit models have been widely used to study the role of various inflammatory molecules in the development of inflammatory processes. Therefore, in this study, we report the cloning and characterization of rabbit CCR2. Data regarding the activity of the CCR2 antagonist will provide valuable tools to perform toxicology and efficacy studies in the rabbit model. Results Sequence alignment indicated that rabbit CCR2 shares 80 % identity to human CCR2b. Tissue distribution indicated that rabbit CCR2 is abundantly expressed in spleen and lung. Recombinant rabbit CCR2 expressed as stable transfectants in U-937 cells binds radiolabeled 125I-mouse JE (murine MCP-1) with a calculated Kd of 0.1 nM. In competition binding assays, binding of radiolabeled mouse JE to rabbit CCR2 is differentially competed by human MCP-1, -2, -3 and -4, but not by RANTES, MIP-1α or MIP-1β. U-937/rabbit CCR2 stable transfectants undergo chemotaxis in response to both human MCP-1 and mouse JE with potencies comparable to those reported for human CCR2b. Finally, TAK-779, a dual CCR2/CCR5 antagonist effectively inhibits the binding of 125I-mouse JE (IC50 = 2.3 nM) to rabbit CCR2 and effectively blocks CCR2-mediated chemotaxis. Conclusion In this study, we report the cloning of rabbit CCR2 and demonstrate that this receptor is a functional chemotactic receptor for MCP-1. PMID:16001983

  10. mouseTube – a database to collaboratively unravel mouse ultrasonic communication

    PubMed Central

    Torquet, Nicolas; de Chaumont, Fabrice; Faure, Philippe; Bourgeron, Thomas; Ey, Elodie

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasonic vocalisation is a broadly used proxy to evaluate social communication in mouse models of neuropsychiatric disorders. The efficacy and robustness of testing these models suffer from limited knowledge of the structure and functions of these vocalisations as well as of the way to analyse the data. We created mouseTube, an open database with a web interface, to facilitate sharing and comparison of ultrasonic vocalisations data and metadata attached to a recording file. Metadata describe 1) the acquisition procedure, e.g., hardware, software, sampling frequency, bit depth; 2) the biological protocol used to elicit ultrasonic vocalisations; 3) the characteristics of the individual emitting ultrasonic vocalisations ( e.g., strain, sex, age). To promote open science and enable reproducibility, data are made freely available. The website provides searching functions to facilitate the retrieval of recording files of interest. It is designed to enable comparisons of ultrasonic vocalisation emission between strains, protocols or laboratories, as well as to test different analysis algorithms and to search for protocols established to elicit mouse ultrasonic vocalisations. Over the long term, users will be able to download and compare different analysis results for each data file. Such application will boost the knowledge on mouse ultrasonic communication and stimulate sharing and comparison of automatic analysis methods to refine phenotyping techniques in mouse models of neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:27830061

  11. Towards high-throughput single cell/clone cultivation and analysis.

    PubMed

    Lindström, Sara; Larsson, Rolf; Svahn, Helene Andersson

    2008-03-01

    In order to better understand cellular processes and behavior, a controlled way of studying high numbers of single cells and their clone formation is greatly needed. Numerous ways of ordering single cells into arrays have previously been described, but platforms in which each cell/clone can be addressed to an exact position in the microplate, cultivated for weeks and treated separately in a high-throughput manner have until now been missing. Here, a novel microplate developed for high-throughput single cell/clone cultivation and analysis is presented. Rapid single cell seeding into microwells, using conventional flow cytometry, allows several thousands of single cells to be cultivated, short-term (72 h) or long-term (10-14 days), and analyzed individually. By controlled sorting of individual cells to predefined locations in the microplate, analysis of single cell heterogeneity and clonogenic properties related to drug sensitivity can be accomplished. Additionally, the platform requires remarkably low number of cells, a major advantage when screening limited amounts of patient cell samples. By seeding single cells into the microplate it is possible to analyze the cells for over 14 generations, ending up with more than 10 000 cells in each well. Described here is a proof-of-concept on compartmentalization and cultivation of thousands of individual cells enabling heterogeneity analysis of various cells/clones and their response to different drugs.

  12. Cloning of the canine glucose-6-phosphatase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Kishnani, P.; Bao, Y.; Brix, A.E.

    1994-09-01

    Two Maltese puppies with massive hepatomegaly and failure to thrive were found to have a markedly reduced Glucose-6-phosphatase (G-6-Pase) activity in the liver and kidney. Deficiency of G-6-Pase activity causes type 1a glycogen storage disease in humans. To further study the mutation responsible for the disease in dog, we cloned G-6-Pase canine cDNA from normal mixed breed dog liver RNA using reverse transcriptase and PCR amplification using primers derived from the published murine G-6-Pase gene sequence. Sequencing revealed an open reading frame of 1071 nucleotides that encodes a predicted 357 amino acid polypeptide in the canine G-6-Pase gene, same as mouse and human. We found more than 90% sequence homology between dog and human G-6-Pase sequence. Hydropathy analysis of the deduced canine G-6-Pase polypeptide shows six transmembrane-spanning segments similar to those seen in human and mouse. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) localization is similarly predicted by the presence of the ER protein retention signal KK positioned 3 and 4 amino acids from the carboxy terminal. Potential asparagine-linked glycosylation sites are identified at positions 96, 203, and 276. Northern blot analysis revealed increased G-6-Pase mRNA in the deficient dog liver compared to control. This could possibly reflect upregulation of transcription due to the persistent hypoglycemic state. Further studies are directed at the identification of the mutation involved in this deficient dog strain. Characterization of the G-6-Pase gene and protein in the deficient dog model can pave the way for new understanding in the pathophysiology of this disease and for the trials of novel therapeutic approaches including gene therapy.

  13. Cloning and chromosomal localization of the three human syntrophin genes

    SciTech Connect

    Feener, C.A.; Anderson, M.D.S.; Selig, S.

    1994-09-01

    Dystrophin, the protein product the Duchenne muscular dystrophy locus, is normally found to be associated with a complex of proteins. Among these dystrophin-associated proteins are the syntrophins, a group of 59 kDa membrane-associated proteins. When the syntrophins are purified based upon their association with dystrophin, they have been shown previously to form two distinct groups, the acidic ({alpha}) and basic ({beta}) forms. Based on peptide and rodent cDNA sequences, three separate syntrophin genes have been cloned and characterized from human tissues. The predicted amino acid sequences from these cDNA reveal that these proteins are related but are distinct with respect to charge, as predicted from their biochemistry. The family consists of one acidic ({alpha}-syntrophin, analogous to mouse syntrophin-1) and two basic ({beta}{sub 1}-syntrophin; and {beta}{sub 2}-syntrophin, analogous to mouse syntrophin-2) genes. Each of the three genes are widely expressed in a variety of human tissues, but the relative abundance of the three are unique with respect to each other. {alpha}-syntrophin is expressed primarily in skeletal muscle and heart as a single transcript. {beta}{sub 1}-syntrophin is expressed widely in up to five distinct transcript sizes, and is most abundant in brain. The human chromosomal locations of the three syntrophins are currently being mapped. {beta}{sub 1}-syntrophin maps to chromosome 8q23-24 and {beta}{sub 2}-syntrophin to chromosome 16. The {alpha}-syntrophin gene will be mapped accordingly. Although all three genes are candidates for neuromuscular diseases, the predominant expression of {alpha}-syntrophin in skeletal muscle and heart makes it a strong candidate to be involved in a neuromuscular disease.

  14. Reverse genetics in high throughput: rapid generation of complete negative strand RNA virus cDNA clones and recombinant viruses thereof

    PubMed Central

    Nolden, T.; Pfaff, F.; Nemitz, S.; Freuling, C. M.; Höper, D.; Müller, T.; Finke, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Reverse genetics approaches are indispensable tools for proof of concepts in virus replication and pathogenesis. For negative strand RNA viruses (NSVs) the limited number of infectious cDNA clones represents a bottleneck as clones are often generated from cell culture adapted or attenuated viruses, with limited potential for pathogenesis research. We developed a system in which cDNA copies of complete NSV genomes were directly cloned into reverse genetics vectors by linear-to-linear RedE/T recombination. Rapid cloning of multiple rabies virus (RABV) full length genomes and identification of clones identical to field virus consensus sequence confirmed the approache’s reliability. Recombinant viruses were recovered from field virus cDNA clones. Similar growth kinetics of parental and recombinant viruses, preservation of field virus characters in cell type specific replication and virulence in the mouse model were confirmed. Reduced titers after reporter gene insertion indicated that the low level of field virus replication is affected by gene insertions. The flexibility of the strategy was demonstrated by cloning multiple copies of an orthobunyavirus L genome segment. This important step in reverse genetics technology development opens novel avenues for the analysis of virus variability combined with phenotypical characterization of recombinant viruses at a clonal level. PMID:27046474

  15. Reverse genetics in high throughput: rapid generation of complete negative strand RNA virus cDNA clones and recombinant viruses thereof.

    PubMed

    Nolden, T; Pfaff, F; Nemitz, S; Freuling, C M; Höper, D; Müller, T; Finke, Stefan

    2016-04-05

    Reverse genetics approaches are indispensable tools for proof of concepts in virus replication and pathogenesis. For negative strand RNA viruses (NSVs) the limited number of infectious cDNA clones represents a bottleneck as clones are often generated from cell culture adapted or attenuated viruses, with limited potential for pathogenesis research. We developed a system in which cDNA copies of complete NSV genomes were directly cloned into reverse genetics vectors by linear-to-linear RedE/T recombination. Rapid cloning of multiple rabies virus (RABV) full length genomes and identification of clones identical to field virus consensus sequence confirmed the approache's reliability. Recombinant viruses were recovered from field virus cDNA clones. Similar growth kinetics of parental and recombinant viruses, preservation of field virus characters in cell type specific replication and virulence in the mouse model were confirmed. Reduced titers after reporter gene insertion indicated that the low level of field virus replication is affected by gene insertions. The flexibility of the strategy was demonstrated by cloning multiple copies of an orthobunyavirus L genome segment. This important step in reverse genetics technology development opens novel avenues for the analysis of virus variability combined with phenotypical characterization of recombinant viruses at a clonal level.

  16. The mouse and human genes encoding the recognition component of the N-end rule pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Yong Tae; Reiss, Yuval; Fried, Victor A.; Hershko, Avram; Yoon, Jeong Kyo; Gonda, David K.; Sangan, Pitchai; Copeland, Neal G.; Jenkins, Nancy A.; Varshavsky, Alexander

    1998-01-01

    The N-end rule relates the in vivo half-life of a protein to the identity of its N-terminal residue. The N-end rule pathway is one proteolytic pathway of the ubiquitin system. The recognition component of this pathway, called N-recognin or E3, binds to a destabilizing N-terminal residue of a substrate protein and participates in the formation of a substrate-linked multiubiquitin chain. We report the cloning of the mouse and human Ubr1 cDNAs and genes that encode a mammalian N-recognin called E3α. Mouse UBR1p (E3α) is a 1,757-residue (200-kDa) protein that contains regions of sequence similarity to the 225-kDa Ubr1p of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Mouse and human UBR1p have apparent homologs in other eukaryotes as well, thus defining a distinct family of proteins, the UBR family. The residues essential for substrate recognition by the yeast Ubr1p are conserved in the mouse UBR1p. The regions of similarity among the UBR family members include a putative zinc finger and RING-H2 finger, another zinc-binding domain. Ubr1 is located in the middle of mouse chromosome 2 and in the syntenic 15q15-q21.1 region of human chromosome 15. Mouse Ubr1 spans ≈120 kilobases of genomic DNA and contains ≈50 exons. Ubr1 is ubiquitously expressed in adults, with skeletal muscle and heart being the sites of highest expression. In mouse embryos, the Ubr1 expression is highest in the branchial arches and in the tail and limb buds. The cloning of Ubr1 makes possible the construction of Ubr1-lacking mouse strains, a prerequisite for the functional understanding of the mammalian N-end rule pathway. PMID:9653112

  17. The murine ufo receptor: molecular cloning, chromosomal localization and in situ expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Faust, M; Ebensperger, C; Schulz, A S; Schleithoff, L; Hameister, H; Bartram, C R; Janssen, J W

    1992-07-01

    We have cloned the mouse homologue of the ufo oncogene. It encodes a novel tyrosine kinase receptor characterized by a unique extracellular domain containing two immunoglobulin-like and two fibronectin type III repeats. Comparison of the predicted ufo amino acid sequences of mouse and man revealed an overall identity of 87.6%. The ufo locus maps to mouse chromosome 7A3-B1 and thereby extends the known conserved linkage group between mouse chromosome 7 and human chromosome 19. RNA in situ hybridization analysis established the onset of specific ufo expression in the late embryogenesis at day 12.5 post coitum (p.c.) and localized ufo transcription to distinct substructures of a broad spectrum of developing tissues (e.g. subepidermal cells of the skin, mesenchymal cells of the periosteum). In adult animals ufo is expressed in cells forming organ capsules as well as in connective tissue structures. ufo may function as a signal transducer between specific cell types of mesodermal origin.

  18. Cloning Mice and Men: Prohibiting the Use of iPS Cells for Human Reproductive Cloning

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Bernard; Parham, Lindsay; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo; Cedars, Marcelle; Conklin, Bruce; Fisher, Susan; Gates, Elena; Giudice, Linda; Halme, Dina Gould; Hershon, William; Kriegstein, Arnold; Kwok, Pui-Yan; Wagner, Richard

    2014-01-01

    The use of iPSCs and tetraploid complementation for human reproductive cloning would raise profound ethical objections. Professional standards and laws that ban human reproductive cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer should be revised to also forbid it by other methods, such as iPSCs via tetraploid complementation. PMID:20085739

  19. Cloning mice and men: prohibiting the use of iPS cells for human reproductive cloning.

    PubMed

    Lo, Bernard; Parham, Lindsay; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo; Cedars, Marcelle; Conklin, Bruce; Fisher, Susan; Gates, Elena; Giudice, Linda; Halme, Dina Gould; Hershon, William; Kriegstein, Arnold; Kwok, Pui-Yan; Wagner, Richard

    2010-01-08

    The use of iPSCs and tetraploid complementation for human reproductive cloning would raise profound ethical objections. Professional standards and laws that ban human reproductive cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer should be revised to also forbid it by other methods, such as iPSCs via tetraploid complementation.

  20. Update on the First Cloned Dog and Outlook for Canine Cloning.

    PubMed

    Jang, Goo; Lee, ByeongChun

    2015-10-01

    As man's best friend, dogs have an important position in human society. Ten years ago, we reported the first cloned dog, and his birth has raised various scientific issues, such as those related to health, reproduction, and life span. He has developed without any unique health issues. In this article, we summarize and present perspectives on canine cloning.

  1. BIX-01294 increases pig cloning efficiency by improving epigenetic reprogramming of somatic cell nuclei.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jiaojiao; Zhang, Hongyong; Yao, Jing; Qin, Guosong; Wang, Feng; Wang, Xianlong; Luo, Ailing; Zheng, Qiantao; Cao, Chunwei; Zhao, Jianguo

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that faulty epigenetic reprogramming leads to the abnormal development of cloned embryos and results in the low success rates observed in all mammals produced through somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). The aberrant methylation status of H3K9me and H3K9me2 has been reported in cloned mouse embryos. To explore the role of H3K9me2 and H3K9me in the porcine somatic cell nuclear reprogramming, BIX-01294, known as a specific inhibitor of G9A (histone-lysine methyltransferase of H3K9), was used to treat the nuclear-transferred (NT) oocytes for 14-16 h after activation. The results showed that the developmental competence of porcine SCNT embryos was significantly enhanced both in vitro (blastocyst rate 16.4% vs 23.2%, P<0.05) and in vivo (cloning rate 1.59% vs 2.96%) after 50 nm BIX-01294 treatment. BIX-01294 treatment significantly decreased the levels of H3K9me2 and H3K9me at the 2- and 4-cell stages, which are associated with embryo genetic activation, and increased the transcriptional expression of the pluripotency genes SOX2, NANOG and OCT4 in cloned blastocysts. Furthermore, the histone acetylation levels of H3K9, H4K8 and H4K12 in cloned embryos were decreased after BIX-01294 treatment. However, co-treatment of activated NT oocytes with BIX-01294 and Scriptaid rescued donor nuclear chromatin from decreased histone acetylation of H4K8 that resulted from exposure to BIX-01294 only and consequently improved the preimplantation development of SCNT embryos (blastocyst formation rates of 23.7% vs 21.5%). These results indicated that treatment with BIX-01294 enhanced the developmental competence of porcine SCNT embryos through improvements in epigenetic reprogramming and gene expression.

  2. The Ah receptor nuclear translocator gene (ARNT) is located on q21 of human chromosome 1 and on mouse chromosome 3 near Cf-3

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, B.; Brooks, B.A.; Heinzmann, C. ); Mohandas, T. )

    1993-09-01

    The authors have mapped the Ah (aryl hydrocarbon) receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT) gene to a conserved linkage group located on mouse chromosome 3 and human chromosome 1. EcoRi-digested DNA from a panel of 17 human x mouse somatic cell hybrids was probed with a cDNA fragment of the human ARNT gene. Six of the 17 independent mouse x human hybrids were positive for human bands. Human chromosome 1 showed complete cosegregation with the gene, whereas discordant segregation was observed for all other human chromosomes. The human gene was localized to 1q21 by using DNA from mouse x human hybrid clones that retain translocations involving human chromosome 1, by segregation analysis in nine informative CEPH families, and by in situ hybridization. The mouse homologue was mapped to mouse chromosome 3 using a panel of 16 hamster x mouse somatic cell hybrids. Six of 16 mouse x hamster hybrids were positive for mouse bands, showing complete concordance with mouse chromosome 3. The mouse Arnt gene was regionally mapped on chromosome 3, using linkage analysis in an interspecific backcross. The results indicate that the mouse gene resides about 40 cM from the centromere and about 10 cM proximal to Cf-3, the gene for tissue factor. 41 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. High-throughput cloning, expression and purification of glycoside hydrolases using Ligation-Independent Cloning (LIC).

    PubMed

    Camilo, Cesar M; Polikarpov, Igor

    2014-07-01

    Recent advances in DNA sequencing techniques have led to an explosion in the amount of available genome sequencing data and this provided an inexhaustible source of uncharacterized glycoside hydrolases (GH) to be studied both structurally and enzymatically. Ligation-Independent Cloning (LIC), an interesting alternative to traditional, restriction enzyme-based cloning, and commercial recombinatorial cloning, was adopted and optimized successfully for a high throughput cloning, expression and purification pipeline. Using this platform, 130 genes encoding mainly uncharacterized glycoside hydrolases from 13 different organisms were cloned and submitted to a semi-automated protein expression and solubility screening in Escherichia coli, resulting in 73 soluble targets. The high throughput approach proved to be a powerful tool for production of recombinant glycoside hydrolases for further structural and biochemical characterization and confirmed that thioredoxin fusion tag (TRX) is a better choice to increase solubility of recombinant glycoside hydrolases expressed in E. coli, when compared to His-tag alone.

  4. Characterization of the mouse lymphotoxin-beta gene.

    PubMed

    Lawton, P; Nelson, J; Tizard, R; Browning, J L

    1995-01-01

    Lymphotoxin-beta (LT-beta) is a member of the TNF family of ligands which when expressed with lymphotoxin-alpha (LT-alpha, i.e., the original LT or TNF-beta) forms a heteromeric complex with LT-alpha on the cell surface. The mouse gene structure was determined by both cDNA cloning and analysis of a genomic DNA fragment encompassing the TNF/LT locus in the H-2 region of chromosome 17. The mouse and human genomic structures were found to be similar in terms of location in the class III region of the MHC; however, the mouse gene lacks one intron found in most members of the family. Both the cDNA and the genomic sequences revealed an altered splice donor in the conventional intron 2 position, rendering it nonfunctional. The altered gene retains an open reading frame such that an additional 66 amino acids are inserted into the stalk region connecting the transmembrane domain with the receptor binding domain encoded by exon 4 in this type II membrane protein. Northern analysis showed that this gene is expressed predominantly in lymphoid organs. The outlining of the complete mouse TNF locus will further studies of the relationship between these genes and immune function.

  5. Benefits and problems with cloning animals.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, L C; Bordignon, V; Babkine, M; Fecteau, G; Keefer, C

    2000-01-01

    Animal cloning is becoming a useful technique for producing transgenic farm animals and is likely to be used to produce clones from valuable adults. Other applications will also undoubtedly be discovered in the near future, such as for preserving endangered breeds and species. Although cloning promises great advantages for commerce and research alike, its outcome is not always certain due to high pregnancy losses and high morbidity and mortality during the neonatal period. Research into the mechanisms involved in the reprogramming of the nucleus is being conducted throughout the world in an attempt to better understand the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in correcting these problems. Although the cause of these anomalies remains mostly unknown, similar phenotypes have been observed in calves derived through in vitro fertilization, suggesting that culture conditions are involved in these phenomena. In the meantime, veterinarians and theriogenologists have an important role to play in improving the efficiency of cloning by finding treatments to assure normal gestation to term and to develop preventative and curative care for cloned neonates. Images Figure 1. PMID:11143925

  6. Model-based estimation of individual fitness

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Link, W.A.; Cooch, E.G.; Cam, E.

    2002-01-01

    Fitness is the currency of natural selection, a measure of the propagation rate of genotypes into future generations. Its various definitions have the common feature that they are functions of survival and fertility rates. At the individual level, the operative level for natural selection, these rates must be understood as latent features, genetically determined propensities existing at birth. This conception of rates requires that individual fitness be defined and estimated by consideration of the individual in a modelled relation to a group of similar individuals; the only alternative is to consider a sample of size one, unless a clone of identical individuals is available. We present hierarchical models describing individual heterogeneity in survival and fertility rates and allowing for associations between these rates at the individual level. We apply these models to an analysis of life histories of Kittiwakes (Rissa tridactyla) observed at several colonies on the Brittany coast of France. We compare Bayesian estimation of the population distribution of individual fitness with estimation based on treating individual life histories in isolation, as samples of size one (e.g. McGraw and Caswell, 1996).

  7. Model-based estimation of individual fitness

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Link, W.A.; Cooch, E.G.; Cam, E.

    2002-01-01

    Fitness is the currency of natural selection, a measure of the propagation rate of genotypes into future generations. Its various definitions have the common feature that they are functions of survival and fertility rates. At the individual level, the operative level for natural selection, these rates must be understood as latent features, genetically determined propensities existing at birth. This conception of rates requires that individual fitness be defined and estimated by consideration of the individual in a modelled relation to a group of similar individuals; the only alternative is to consider a sample of size one, unless a clone of identical individuals is available. We present hierarchical models describing individual heterogeneity in survival and fertility rates and allowing for associations between these rates at the individual level. We apply these models to an analysis of life histories of Kittiwakes (Rissa tridactyla ) observed at several colonies on the Brittany coast of France. We compare Bayesian estimation of the population distribution of individual fitness with estimation based on treating individual life histories in isolation, as samples of size one (e.g. McGraw & Caswell, 1996).

  8. Evaluation of the protective immunity of the Legionella pneumophila recombinant protein FlaA/MompS/PilE in an A/J mouse model.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ying; Guan, Wang; Xu, Jia-nan; Cao, De-ping; Yang, Bin-bin; Chen, Da-li; Chen, Jian-ping

    2011-05-23

    To investigate the protect effects of the recombinant protein FlaA/MompS/PilE against Legionella pneumophila (L. pneumophila), the coding sequences of the three proteins were optimized by DNA Star software firstly, cloned, expressed by Escherichia coli BL21, and purified. To give an enhanced the immunological response, the proteins were linked together with (Linker) or without a linker insert (NLinker) and were purified from E. coli BL21. The A/J mouse model was used to determine the level of the induction of protective immunity from the purified proteins. Our results showed that the IgG titer, which was measured by ELISA, was increased after the administration of the five proteins. Compared to the administration of the individual proteins, the chimeric Linker and NLinker proteins displayed lasting immunity to a lethal dose of L. pneumophila challenge. The Linker protein protected the A/J mouse against a higher dose of L. pneumonia compared to the other proteins used in this study, as it contained a more effective immunogen. The work presented here demonstrates that the bioinformatics software, DNA Star, is a valid tool to analyse the epitopes of proteins and was useful in the optimization of proteins that could induce the protective immune response to L. pneumophila. The cross-immunity of recombinant proteins, such as the Linker and the NLinker chimera, have higher generates a greater immune than the single proteins.

  9. Mapping of the Tuple1 gene to mouse chromosome 16A-B1

    SciTech Connect

    Mattei, M.G.; Halford, S.; Scambler, P.J.

    1994-10-01

    The human TUPLE1 gene encodes a putative transcriptional regulator and maps to chromosome 22, and therefore may play a role in Di-George syndrome (DGS), relo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS), or a related pathology. The murine TUPLE1 gene has also been cloned and shows strong sequence similarity to TUPLE1. Comparative mapping is useful in the study of chromosome evolution and is sometimes able to indicate possible mouse mutations that are potential models of human genetic disorders. As TIPLE1 is a candidate gene for the haploinsufficient phenotype in DGS, we mapped TUPLE1 to mouse chromosome 16A-B1. 6 refs., 1 fig.

  10. The mouse Eb meiotic recombination hotspot contains a tissue-specific transcriptional enhancer.

    PubMed

    Ling, X; Shenkar, R; Sakai, D; Arnheim, N

    1993-01-01

    A meiotic recombination hotspot exists within the second intron of the mouse major histocompatibility complex (MHC) gene, Eb. In the present study, a small fragment from the intron which contains two potential transcriptional regulatory elements was cloned into an expression vector and its effect on transcription was tested. This fragment was found to contain tissue-specific transcriptional enhancer activity. An octamer-like sequence and a B motif may contribute to this enhancer activity. Similar regulatory sequences with the same orientation and distance from one another are found in another mouse MHC recombination hotspot.

  11. A novel approach to the identification of T-cell epitopes in Mycobacterium tuberculosis using human T-lymphocyte clones.

    PubMed Central

    Lamb, J R; Young, D B

    1987-01-01

    Current approaches to the analysis of antigens involved in the cellular immune response to mycobacterial infection rely on the initial identification and isolation of molecular components using monoclonal antibodies. In order to overcome the constraints of this approach, we have utilized a procedure involving T-cell recognition of antigens fractionated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and added to proliferation assays after blotting onto nitrocellulose membranes. Analysis of human T-cell responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis BCG by this procedure revealed distinctive patterns of reactivity to different molecular weight components indicative of the selective recognition of immunodominant and species-specific determinants. Human T-cell clones were subsequently derived, and SDS-PAGE immunoblotting was used to identify the antigen recognized by each clone. Three epitopes defined by individual T-cell clones were identified on separate polypeptides with molecular weights 16,000-18,000 (clone P53), 18,000-20,000 (clone P57) and 52,000-55,000 (clone P35). This study demonstrates the potential application of T-cell cloning in conjunction with SDS-PAGE immunoblotting for the dissection and analysis of the cellular immune response to pathogenic agents during human infection. Images Figure 1 PMID:2434413

  12. Autonomous replicating sequences from mouse cells which can replicate in mouse cells in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Ariga, H; Itani, T; Iguchi-Ariga, S M

    1987-01-01

    We have already reported that the cloned mouse DNA fragment (pMU65) could replicate in a simian virus 40 T antigen-dependent system in vivo and in vitro (H. Ariga, Z. Tsuchihashi, M. Naruto, and M. Yamada, Mol. Cell. Biol. 5:563-568, 1985). The plasmid p65-tk, containing the thymidine kinase (tk) gene of herpes simplex virus and the BglII-EcoRI region of pMU65 homologous to the simian virus 40 origin of DNA replication, was constructed. The p65-tk persisted episomally in tk+ transformants after the transfection of p65-tk into mouse FM3Atk- cells. The copy numbers of p65-tk in FM3Atk+ cells were 100 to 200 copies per cell. Furthermore, the p65-tk replicated semiconservatively, and the initiation of DNA replication started from the mouse DNA sequences when the replicating activity of p65-tk was tested in the in vitro DNA replication system developed from the FM3A cells. These results show that a 2.5-kilobase fragment of mouse DNA contains the autonomously replicating sequences. Images PMID:3031448

  13. Isolation and characterization of three class II MHC genomic clones from the chicken.

    PubMed

    Xu, Y X; Pitcovski, J; Peterson, L; Auffray, C; Bourlet, Y; Gerndt, B M; Nordskog, A W; Lamont, S J; Warner, C M

    1989-03-15

    A genomic library was constructed from sperm DNA from an individual of the inbred chicken line G-B2, MHC haplotype B6. The library was screened with a chicken class II probe (beta 2 exon specific) and three MHC class II beta chain genomic clones were isolated. The restriction maps of the three clones showed that each of the three clones was unique. The position of the beta chain sequence was located in each of the three genomic clones by Southern blot hybridization. Subclones containing the beta chain gene were produced from each of the genomic clones and the orientation of the leader peptide, beta 1, beta 2, transmembrane, and cytoplasmic exons was determined by Southern blot hybridization and nucleotide sequencing. The complete nucleotide sequence of two of the three subclones was determined. Comparison of the nucleotide and predicted amino acid sequences of the two subclones with other class II beta chain sequences showed that the B6 chicken beta chain genes are evolutionarily related to the class II beta chain genes from chickens of other MHC haplotypes, and to class II beta chain genes from other species. Analysis of Southern blots of B6 chicken DNA, as well as the isolation of the three beta chain genes, suggests that chickens of the B6 haplotype possess at least three MHC class II beta chain genes.

  14. Human cloning: three mistakes and an alternative.

    PubMed

    Baylis, Françoise

    2002-06-01

    The current debate on the ethics of cloning humans is both uninspired and uninspiring. In large measure this is because of mistakes that permeate the discourse, including the mistake of thinking that cloning technology is strictly a reproductive technology when it is used to create whole beings. As a result, the challenge this technology represents regarding our understanding of ourselves and the species to which we belong typically is inappropriately downplayed or exaggerated. This has meant that important (albeit disquieting) societal issues and species-type concerns have not been fully explored. This paper, intended as a corrective, suggests that we take an alternate view of human cloning as both an enhancement and a reproductive technology. This proposed shift in the framework for analysis counters the current narrow framing of the issues and introduces new questions about the prospect of modifying the species.

  15. Scientific hazards of human reproductive 'cloning'.

    PubMed

    Young, Lorraine E

    2003-05-01

    The scientific and clinical professional societies and associations covering the remit of Human Fertility are unanimously opposed to human reproductive 'cloning'. This article describes the main scientific objections to human reproductive 'cloning'. Data collected from numerous studies in a range of animal species indicate a high incidence of fetal defects, a stillbirth rate typically of more than 90% and a lack of adequate information on postnatal development. These concerns are exacerbated by misconceptions about the current ability to screen preimplantation embryos for 'cloning-induced' defects. Scientists and clinicians are sometimes treated with mistrust in the eyes of the public and media over such issues, perhaps because scientific information is not as well communicated as it might be. The duty of reproductive specialists is to convey the limits of their knowledge on this issue to the public and policymakers.

  16. Bac clones generated from sheared dna

    SciTech Connect

    Osoegawa, Kazutoyo; Vessere, Gery M.; Shu, Chung Li; Hoskins,Roger A.; Abad, Jose P.; de Pablos, Beatriz; Villasante, Alfredo; deJong, Pieter J.

    2006-08-09

    BAC libraries generated from restriction-digested genomic DNA display representational bias and lack some sequences. To facilitate completion of genome projects, procedures have been developed to create BACs from DNA physically sheared to create fragments extending up to 200kb. The DNA fragments were repaired to create blunt ends and ligated to a new BAC vector. This approach has been tested by generating BAC libraries from Drosophila DNA, with insert lengths of 50 kb to 150 kb. The libraries lack chimeric clone problems as determined by mapping paired BAC-end sequences of one library to the D. melanogaster genome sequence. The utility of ''sheared'' libraries was demonstrated by closure of a previous clone gap and by isolation of clones from telomeric regions, which were notably absent from previous Drosophila BAC libraries.

  17. Dogs cloned from adult somatic cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byeong Chun; Kim, Min Kyu; Jang, Goo; Oh, Hyun Ju; Yuda, Fibrianto; Kim, Hye Jin; Hossein, M Shamim; Shamim, M Hossein; Kim, Jung Ju; Kang, Sung Keun; Schatten, Gerald; Hwang, Woo Suk

    2005-08-04

    Several mammals--including sheep, mice, cows, goats, pigs, rabbits, cats, a mule, a horse and a litter of three rats--have been cloned by transfer of a nucleus from a somatic cell into an egg cell (oocyte) that has had its nucleus removed. This technology has not so far been successful in dogs because of the difficulty of maturing canine oocytes in vitro. Here we describe the cloning of two Afghan hounds by nuclear transfer from adult skin cells into oocytes that had matured in vivo. Together with detailed sequence information generated by the canine-genome project, the ability to clone dogs by somatic-cell nuclear transfer should help to determine genetic and environmental contributions to the diverse biological and behavioural traits associated with the many different canine breeds.

  18. Human reproductive cloning and reasons for deprivation.

    PubMed

    Jensen, D A

    2008-08-01

    Human reproductive cloning provides the possibility of genetically related children for persons for whom present technologies are ineffective. I argue that the desire for genetically related children is not, by itself, a sufficient reason to engage in human reproductive cloning. I show this by arguing that the value underlying the desire for genetically related children implies a tension between the parent and the future child. This tension stems from an instance of a deprivation and violates a general principle of reasons for deprivation. Alternative considerations, such as a right to procreative autonomy, do not appear helpful in making the case for human reproductive cloning merely on the basis of the desire for genetically related children.

  19. [SPREADING OF NCTC CLONE 929 CELLS AFTER RESEEDING].

    PubMed

    Petrov, Yu P; Negulyaev, Yu A; Tsupkina, N V

    2015-01-01

    The period (1 h after reseeding) of behaviour of mouse NCTC clone 929 cells to the conditions of artificial cultivation was studied. The time-lapse imaging followed the processing of the cells with ImageJ program was applied. To characterize the parametres cell status we used the cell area (projection of the cell on substrate) and Rp/Ra ratio introduced earlier as a spreading coefficient (Kuz'minykh, Petrov, 2004). After attaching a substratum, cells have a form of sphere (the phase "sphere") as the daughter cells after a mitosis. We revealed however that after this phase the reseeded cells do not start usual spreading and migration along substratum. They pass a phase of equally spreading in all directions and shaping their area as a circle (phase "circle"). This phase is absent of the daughter cells spreading after mitosis. We assume that the phase "circle" is a result of adaptation of the cells to reseedings at artificial cultivation. It is necessary for formation of a substrate composed of own extracellular matrix components (ECM) of the cells. Own ECM facilitates transition of the cells to their usual spreading and migration along substratum.

  20. Efficient introduction of specific TP53 mutations into mouse embryonic fibroblasts and embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wei, Quan-Xiang; van der Hoeven, Franciscus; Hollstein, Monica; Odell, Adam F

    2012-05-17

    This protocol describes a rapid, precise method for generating sets of embryonic stem (ES) cells or mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) harboring point mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor gene (officially known as Trp53). The strategy uses cells from the Trp53 (p53-null) 'platform' mouse, which allows site-specific integration of plasmid DNA into the Trp53 locus. Simple PCR protocols identify correctly targeted clones and immunoblots verify re-expression of the protein. We also present protocol modifications needed for efficient recovery of MEF clones expressing p53 constructs that retain wild-type function, including growth at low (3%) oxygen and transient downregulation of p53 regulators to forestall cell senescence of primary MEFs. A library of cell lines expressing various p53 mutants derived from the same population of primary fibroblasts or platform ES cells can be acquired and screened in less than 1 month.

  1. Androgen regulated expression of a spermine binding protein gene in mouse ventral prostate.

    PubMed Central

    Mills, J S; Needham, M; Parker, M G

    1987-01-01

    A full length cDNA (MP25) encoding the major mouse prostatic secretory glycoprotein (p25), whose expression is androgen dependent, has been cloned and characterised. Steady-state levels of mRNA are decreased approximately 100-fold after 3 days castration but are restored progressively over 4 days with testosterone treatment. The secreted glycoprotein appears to be a spermine binding protein since the nucleotide and predicted amino acid sequence of MP25 shares extensive homology with a spermine binding protein (SBP) found in rat ventral prostate. Genomic clones indicate that there is a single gene for SBP which consists of 4 exons, the first of which is only 11bp in length. The second exon encodes the signal peptide, the third contains a portion of the spermine binding protein unique to the mouse and the largest exon encodes the bulk of the secreted protein. Images PMID:3502715

  2. Photonic Programmable Tele-Cloning Network

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Chen, Ming-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    The concept of quantum teleportation allows an unknown quantum states to be broadcasted and processed in a distributed quantum network. The quantum information injected into the network can be diluted to distant multi-copies by quantum cloning and processed by arbitrary quantum logic gates which were programed in advance in the network quantum state. A quantum network combines simultaneously these fundamental quantum functions could lead to new intriguing applications. Here we propose a photonic programmable telecloning network based on a four-photon interferometer. The photonic network serves as quantum gate, quantum cloning and quantum teleportation and features experimental advantage of high brightness by photon recycling. PMID:27353838

  3. Photonic Programmable Tele-Cloning Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Chen, Ming-Cheng

    2016-06-01

    The concept of quantum teleportation allows an unknown quantum states to be broadcasted and processed in a distributed quantum network. The quantum information injected into the network can be diluted to distant multi-copies by quantum cloning and processed by arbitrary quantum logic gates which were programed in advance in the network quantum state. A quantum network combines simultaneously these fundamental quantum functions could lead to new intriguing applications. Here we propose a photonic programmable telecloning network based on a four-photon interferometer. The photonic network serves as quantum gate, quantum cloning and quantum teleportation and features experimental advantage of high brightness by photon recycling.

  4. Photonic Programmable Tele-Cloning Network.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Chen, Ming-Cheng

    2016-06-29

    The concept of quantum teleportation allows an unknown quantum states to be broadcasted and processed in a distributed quantum network. The quantum information injected into the network can be diluted to distant multi-copies by quantum cloning and processed by arbitrary quantum logic gates which were programed in advance in the network quantum state. A quantum network combines simultaneously these fundamental quantum functions could lead to new intriguing applications. Here we propose a photonic programmable telecloning network based on a four-photon interferometer. The photonic network serves as quantum gate, quantum cloning and quantum teleportation and features experimental advantage of high brightness by photon recycling.

  5. Murine muscle-specific enolase: cDNA cloning, sequence, and developmental expression.

    PubMed Central

    Lamandé, N; Mazo, A M; Lucas, M; Montarras, D; Pinset, C; Gros, F; Legault-Demare, L; Lazar, M

    1989-01-01

    In vertebrates, the glycolytic enzyme enolase (EC 4.2.1.11) is present as homodimers and heterodimers formed from three distinct subunits of identical molecular weight, alpha, beta, and gamma. We report the cloning and sequencing of a cDNA encoding the beta subunit of murine muscle-specific enolase. The corresponding amino acid sequence shows greater than 80% homology with the beta subunit from chicken obtained by protein sequencing and with alpha and gamma subunits from rat and mouse deduced from cloned cDNAs. In contrast, there is no homology between the 3' untranslated regions of mouse alpha, beta, and gamma enolase mRNAs, which also differ greatly in length. The short 3' untranslated region of beta enolase mRNA accounts for its distinct length, 1600 bases. It is known that a progressive transition from alpha alpha to beta beta enolase occurs in developing skeletal muscle. We show that this transition mainly results from a differential regulation of alpha and beta mRNA levels. Analysis of myogenic cell lines shows that beta enolase gene is expressed at the myoblast stage. Moreover, transfection of premyogenic C3H10T1/2 cells with MyoD1 cDNA shows that the initial expression of beta transcripts occurs during the very first steps of the myogenic pathway, suggesting that it could be a marker event of myogenic lineage determination. Images PMID:2734297

  6. Cloning of SEZ-12 encoding seizure-related and membrane-bound adhesion protein.

    PubMed

    Kajiwara, K; Nagasawa, H; Shimizu-Nishikawa, K; Ookura, T; Kimura, M; Sugaya, E

    1996-05-06

    SEZ-12 is one of the seizure-related cDNAs which was isolated by differential hybridization from primary cultured neurons from the mouse cerebral cortex with or without pentylenetetrazol (PTZ). SEZ-12 expression is transiently down-regulated in the mouse brain by injection of PTZ. To characterize SEZ-12, isolation of full-length cDNA and nucleotide sequence analysis were performed. The deduced amino acid sequence of SEZ-12 revealed that it encodes membrane-bound C-type lectin and has a significant homology to that of human cDNA, DGCR2 and IDD, which were cloned from a balanced translocation breakpoint associated with the DiGeorge syndrome. The isolated cDNA was about 4 kb in length and the message was expressed ubiquitously in various organs with low-abundance. Previously, we also cloned a transmembrane protein which is probably involved in cell-cell interaction by the differential hybridization technique. These findings suggest that transmembrane signaling in neuronal cells may have an important role in PTZ-induced seizure.

  7. The Mouse That Soared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-09-01

    Astronomers have used an X-ray image to make the first detailed study of the behavior of high-energy particles around a fast moving pulsar. The image, from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, shows the shock wave created as a pulsar plows supersonically through interstellar space. These results will provide insight into theories for the production of powerful winds of matter and antimatter by pulsars. Chandra's image of the glowing cloud, known as the Mouse, shows a stubby bright column of high-energy particles, about four light years in length, swept back by the pulsar's interaction with interstellar gas. The intense source at the head of the X-ray column is the pulsar, estimated to be moving through space at about 1.3 million miles per hour. VLA Radio Image of the Mouse, Full Field VLA Radio Image of the Mouse, Full Field A cone-shaped cloud of radio-wave-emitting particles envelopes the X-ray column. The Mouse, a.k.a. G359.23-0.82, was discovered in 1987 by radio astronomers using the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array in New Mexico. It gets its name from its appearance in radio images that show a compact snout, a bulbous body, and a remarkable long, narrow, tail that extends for about 55 light years. "A few dozen pulsar wind nebulae are known, including the spectacular Crab Nebula, but none have the Mouse's combination of relatively young age and incredibly rapid motion through interstellar space," said Bryan Gaensler of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics and lead author of a paper on the Mouse that will appear in an upcoming issue of The Astrophysical Journal. "We effectively are seeing a supersonic cosmic wind tunnel, in which we can study the effects of a pulsar's motion on its pulsar wind nebula, and test current theories." Illustration of the Mouse System Illustration of the Mouse System Pulsars are known to be rapidly spinning, highly magnetized neutron stars -- objects so dense that a mass equal to that of the Sun is packed into a

  8. Identification and Applications of Repetitive Probes for Gene Mapping in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Siracusa, L. D.; Jenkins, N. A.; Copeland, N. G.

    1991-01-01

    Interspecific mouse hybrids that are viable and fertile provide a wealth of genetic variation that is useful for gene mapping. We are using this genetic variation to develop multilocus linkage maps of the mouse genome. As an outgrowth of this work, we have identified three repetitive probes that collectively identify 28 loci dispersed on 16 of the 19 mouse autosomes and the X chromosome. These loci establish a skeleton linkage map that can be used to detect linkage over much of the mouse genome. The molecular probes are derived from the mouse mammary tumor virus envelope gene, the ornithine decarboxylase gene, and the triose phosphate isomerase gene. The ability to scan the mouse genome quickly and efficiently in an interspecific cross using these three repetitive probes makes this system a powerful tool for identifying the chromosomal location of mutations that have yet to be cloned, mapping multigenic traits, and identifying recessive protooncogene loci associated with murine neoplastic disease. Ultimately, interspecific hybrids in conjunction with repetitive and single-copy probes will provide a rapid means to access virtually any gene of interest in the mouse genome at the molecular level. PMID:1673105

  9. Diversity of trematode genetic clones within amphipods and the timing of same-clone infections.

    PubMed

    Keeney, Devon B; Waters, Jonathan M; Poulin, Robert

    2007-03-01

    The genetic diversity of trematodes within second intermediate hosts has important implications for the evolution of trematode populations as these hosts are utilized after the parasites reproduce asexually within first intermediate hosts and before sexual reproduction within definitive hosts. We characterised the genetic clonal diversity of the marine trematode Maritrema novaezealandensis within amphipod (Paracalliope novizealandiae) second intermediate hosts using four to six microsatellite loci to determine if multiple copies of identical trematode clones existed within naturally infected amphipods. To determine the relative timing of infections by identical clones within hosts, trematode metacercariae were assigned to six developmental stages and the stages of identical clones were compared. The genotypes of 306 trematodes were determined from 44 amphipods each containing more than one trematode. Six pairs of identical trematode clones were recovered in total (representing five amphipods: 11% of amphipods with greater than one trematode) and all pairs of clones belonged to the same developmental stage. This suggests that identical clone infections are effectively synchronous. A general decrease in the number of metacercariae recovered, prevalence, and mean intensity of infection for each subsequent developmental stage coupled with large numbers of metacercariae (>9) only being recovered from recent infections, supports the occurrence of post-infection amphipod mortality and/or within-host trematode mortality. Taken together, our results indicate that natural infections are characterised by high genetic diversity, but that amphipods also periodically encounter "batches" of genetically identical clones, potentially setting the stage for interactions within and between clonal groups inside the host.

  10. Whole genome comparison of donor and cloned dogs.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hak-Min; Cho, Yun Sung; Kim, Hyunmin; Jho, Sungwoong; Son, Bongjun; Choi, Joung Yoon; Kim, Sangsoo; Lee, Byeong Chun; Bhak, Jong; Jang, Goo

    2013-10-21

    Cloning is a process that produces genetically identical organisms. However, the genomic degree of genetic resemblance in clones needs to be determined. In this report, the genomes of a cloned dog and its donor were compared. Compared with a human monozygotic twin, the genome of the cloned dog showed little difference from the genome of the nuclear donor dog in terms of single nucleotide variations, chromosomal instability, and telomere lengths. These findings suggest that cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer produced an almost identical genome. The whole genome sequence data of donor and cloned dogs can provide a resource for further investigations on epigenetic contributions in phenotypic differences.

  11. Ab initio multiple cloning algorithm for quantum nonadiabatic molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Makhov, Dmitry V; Glover, William J; Martinez, Todd J; Shalashilin, Dmitrii V

    2014-08-07

    We present a new algorithm for ab initio quantum nonadiabatic molecular dynamics that combines the best features of ab initio Multiple Spawning (AIMS) and Multiconfigurational Ehrenfest (MCE) methods. In this new method, ab initio multiple cloning (AIMC), the individual trajectory basis functions (TBFs) follow Ehrenfest equations of motion (as in MCE). However, the basis set is expanded (as in AIMS) when these TBFs become sufficiently mixed, preventing prolonged evolution on an averaged potential energy surface. We refer to the expansion of the basis set as "cloning," in analogy to the "spawning" procedure in AIMS. This synthesis of AIMS and MCE allows us to leverage the benefits of mean-field evolution during periods of strong nonadiabatic coupling while simultaneously avoiding mean-field artifacts in Ehrenfest dynamics. We explore the use of time-displaced basis sets, "trains," as a means of expanding the basis set for little cost. We also introduce a new bra-ket averaged Taylor expansion (BAT) to approximate the necessary potential energy and nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements. The BAT approximation avoids the necessity of computing electronic structure information at intermediate points between TBFs, as is usually done in saddle-point approximations used in AIMS. The efficiency of AIMC is demonstrated on the nonradiative decay of the first excited state of ethylene. The AIMC method has been implemented within the AIMS-MOLPRO package, which was extended to include Ehrenfest basis functions.

  12. Ab initio multiple cloning algorithm for quantum nonadiabatic molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Makhov, Dmitry V.; Shalashilin, Dmitrii V.; Glover, William J.; Martinez, Todd J.

    2014-08-07

    We present a new algorithm for ab initio quantum nonadiabatic molecular dynamics that combines the best features of ab initio Multiple Spawning (AIMS) and Multiconfigurational Ehrenfest (MCE) methods. In this new method, ab initio multiple cloning (AIMC), the individual trajectory basis functions (TBFs) follow Ehrenfest equations of motion (as in MCE). However, the basis set is expanded (as in AIMS) when these TBFs become sufficiently mixed, preventing prolonged evolution on an averaged potential energy surface. We refer to the expansion of the basis set as “cloning,” in analogy to the “spawning” procedure in AIMS. This synthesis of AIMS and MCE allows us to leverage the benefits of mean-field evolution during periods of strong nonadiabatic coupling while simultaneously avoiding mean-field artifacts in Ehrenfest dynamics. We explore the use of time-displaced basis sets, “trains,” as a means of expanding the basis set for little cost. We also introduce a new bra-ket averaged Taylor expansion (BAT) to approximate the necessary potential energy and nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements. The BAT approximation avoids the necessity of computing electronic structure information at intermediate points between TBFs, as is usually done in saddle-point approximations used in AIMS. The efficiency of AIMC is demonstrated on the nonradiative decay of the first excited state of ethylene. The AIMC method has been implemented within the AIMS-MOLPRO package, which was extended to include Ehrenfest basis functions.

  13. OEPR Cloning: an Efficient and Seamless Cloning Strategy for Large- and Multi-Fragments

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chang-Jun; Jiang, Hui; Wu, Lei; Zhu, Ling-Yun; Meng, Er; Zhang, Dong-Yi

    2017-01-01

    Here, an efficient cloning strategy for large DNA fragments and for simultaneous assembly of multiple DNA fragments assembly is presented. This strategy is named OEPR (based on Overlap Extension PCR and Recombination in vivo). OEPR cloning is a seamless, restriction- and ligation-independent method. The method takes advantage of both homologous recombination enzymes in E. coli and overlap PCR. Using OEPR cloning, a long fragment (1–6 kb) or multiple fragments (2–4 fragments) can be easily constructed and simultaneously assembled into a target vector. PMID:28300166

  14. Cloning and expression of Ole e I, the major allergen from olive tree pollen. Polymorphism analysis and tissue specificity.

    PubMed

    Villalba, M; Batanero, E; Monsalve, R I; González de la Peña, M A; Lahoz, C; Rodríguez, R

    1994-05-27

    Ole e I, the major allergen from the olive tree (Olea europaea), is one of the main causes of allergy in Mediterranean countries and some areas of North America. The cloning and sequencing of several cDNAs coding for the olive allergen have been achieved. cDNA has been synthesized from total pollen RNA and amplified by using the polymerase chain reaction. The nucleotide sequence data demonstrate the existence of microheterogeneities in at least 37 positions out of the 145 amino acids of Ole e I, thus explaining the high degree of polymorphism exhibited by the natural protein. One of the sequenced cDNAs encoding a full-length isoform was inserted into the plasmid vector pGEX-2T and overexpressed. The recombinant Ole e I has been produced in Escherichia coli as a fusion protein with glutathione S-transferase of Schistosoma japonicum. This chimeric protein was purified by affinity chromatography on a glutathione-Sepharose 4B column and digested with thrombin to release the recombinant allergen. Both the fusion protein and the recombinant Ole e I were recognized in Western blot analysis by rabbit polyclonal and mouse monoclonal antisera raised against native Ole e I as well as by the IgE of olive pollen-sensitive human sera. This indicates that the recombinant production of individual isoforms may be useful for the improvement of reagents to be used in diagnosis and therapy of IgE-mediated disorders. In addition, Ole e I mRNA has been observed to be pollen-specific as shown in a Northern blot analysis.

  15. Mouse models in oncoimmunology.

    PubMed

    Zitvogel, Laurence; Pitt, Jonathan M; Daillère, Romain; Smyth, Mark J; Kroemer, Guido

    2016-12-01

    Fundamental cancer research and the development of efficacious antineoplastic treatments both rely on experimental systems in which the relationship between malignant cells and immune cells can be studied. Mouse models of transplantable, carcinogen-induced or genetically engineered malignancies - each with their specific advantages and difficulties - have laid the foundations of oncoimmunology. These models have guided the immunosurveillance theory that postulates that evasion from immune control is an essential feature of cancer, the concept that the long-term effects of conventional cancer treatments mostly rely on the reinstatement of anticancer immune responses and the preclinical development of immunotherapies, including currently approved immune checkpoint blockers. Specific aspects of pharmacological development, as well as attempts to personalize cancer treatments using patient-derived xenografts, require the development of mouse models in which murine genes and cells are replaced with their human equivalents. Such 'humanized' mouse models are being progressively refined to characterize the leukocyte subpopulations that belong to the innate and acquired arms of the immune system as they infiltrate human cancers that are subjected to experimental therapies. We surmise that the ever-advancing refinement of murine preclinical models will accelerate the pace of therapeutic optimization in patients.

  16. New mammary epithelial and fibroblastic cell clones in coculture form structures competent to differentiate functionally

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    We have established and characterized a spontaneously immortalized, nontumorigenic mouse mammary cell line, designated IM-2. IM-2 cells synthesize large amounts of the milk protein beta-casein upon addition of lactogenic hormones. The induction of beta-casein occurs rapidly and does not require any exogenous extracellular matrix components. The IM- 2 cell line is morphologically heterogeneous and could be separated into cell clones with epithelial and fibroblastic characteristics. In monoculture, none of the epithelial clones could be induced to synthesize caseins. Coculture of epithelial and fibroblastic clones, however, rendered the epithelial cells competent to differentiate functionally; the addition of lactogenic hormones to these cocultures resulted in the synthesis of beta-casein in amounts comparable to that seen with the original IM-2 line. Using this unique cell system, we have investigated the interrelationships between different steps in differentiation leading to hormone-induced casein production. Independent of hormones, epithelial-fibroblastic cell contacts led to the formation of characteristic structures showing the deposition of laminin. We found that the epithelial cells located in these structures also exhibited significantly increased levels of cytokeratin intermediate filament polypeptides. Double immunofluorescence revealed that the cells inducible by hormones to synthesize casein, colocalized exactly with the areas of laminin deposition and with the cells showing greatly intensified cytokeratin expression. These results suggest that hormone-independent differentiation events take place in response to intercellular epithelial-mesenchymal contacts. These events in turn bring about a state of competence for functional differentiation after lactogenic hormonal stimulation. PMID:2466037

  17. Expression Cloning and Production of Human Heavy-Chain-Only Antibodies from Murine Transgenic Plasma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Drabek, Dubravka; Janssens, Rick; de Boer, Ernie; Rademaker, Rik; Kloess, Johannes; Skehel, John; Grosveld, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Several technologies have been developed to isolate human antibodies against different target antigens as a source of potential therapeutics, including hybridoma technology, phage and yeast display systems. For conventional antibodies, this involves either random pairing of VH and variable light (VL) domains in combinatorial display libraries or isolation of cognate pairs of VH and VL domains from human B cells or from transgenic mice carrying human immunoglobulin loci followed by single-cell sorting, single-cell RT-PCR, and bulk cloning of isolated natural VH–VL pairs. Heavy-chain-only antibodies (HCAbs) that naturally occur in camelids require only heavy immunoglobulin chain cloning. Here, we present an automatable novel, high-throughput technology for rapid direct cloning and production of fully human HCAbs from sorted population of transgenic mouse plasma cells carrying a human HCAb locus. Utility of the technique is demonstrated by isolation of diverse sets of sequence unique, soluble, high-affinity influenza A strain X-31 hemagglutinin-specific HCAbs. PMID:28066429

  18. The ABCG2 efflux transporter from rabbit placenta: Cloning and functional characterization.

    PubMed

    Halwachs, Sandra; Kneuer, Carsten; Gohlsch, Katrin; Müller, Marian; Ritz, Vera; Honscha, Walther

    2016-02-01

    In human placenta, the ATP-binding cassette efflux transporter ABCG2 is highly expressed in syncytiotrophoblast cells and mediates cellular excretion of various drugs and toxins. Hence, physiological ABCG2 activity substantially contributes to the fetoprotective placenta barrier function during gestation. Developmental toxicity studies are often performed in rabbit. However, despite its toxicological relevance, there is no data so far on functional ABCG2 expression in this species. Therefore, we cloned ABCG2 from placenta tissues of chinchilla rabbit. Sequencing showed 84-86% amino acid sequence identity to the orthologues from man, rat and mouse. We transduced the rabbit ABCG2 clone (rbABCG2) in MDCKII cells and stable rbABCG2 gene and protein expression was shown by RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. The rbABCG2 efflux activity was demonstrated with the Hoechst H33342 assay using the specific ABCG2 inhibitor Ko143. We further tested the effect of established human ABCG2 (hABCG2) drug substrates including the antibiotic danofloxacin or the histamine H2-receptor antagonist cimetidine on H33342 accumulation in MDCKII-rbABCG2 or -hABCG2 cells. Human therapeutic plasma concentrations of all tested drugs caused a comparable competitive inhibition of H33342 excretion in both ABCG2 clones. Altogether, we first showed functional expression of the ABCG2 efflux transporter in rabbit placenta. Moreover, our data suggest a similar drug substrate spectrum of the rabbit and the human ABCG2 efflux transporter.

  19. Histone deacetylase inhibitor significantly improved the cloning efficiency of porcine somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yongye; Tang, Xiaochun; Xie, Wanhua; Zhou, Yan; Li, Dong; Yao, Chaogang; Zhou, Yang; Zhu, Jianguo; Lai, Liangxue; Ouyang, Hongsheng; Pang, Daxin

    2011-12-01

    Valproic acid (VPA), a histone deacetylase inbibitor, has been shown to generate inducible pluripotent stem (iPS) cells from mouse and human fibroblasts with a significant higher efficiency. Because successful cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) undergoes a full reprogramming process in which the epigenetic state of a differentiated donor nuclear is converted into an embryonic totipotent state, we speculated that VPA would be useful in promoting cloning efficiency. Therefore, in the present study, we examined whether VPA can promote the developmental competence of SCNT embryos by improving the reprogramming state of donor nucleus. Here we report that 1 mM VPA for 14 to 16 h following activation significantly increased the rate of blastocyst formation of porcine SCNT embryos constructed from Landrace fetal fibroblast cells compared to the control (31.8 vs. 11.4%). However, we found that the acetylation level of Histone H3 lysine 14 and Histone H4 lysine 5 and expression level of Oct4, Sox2, and Klf4 was not significantly changed between VPA-treated and -untreated groups at the blastocyst stage. The SCNT embryos were transferred to 38 surrogates, and the cloning efficiency in the treated group was significantly improved compared with the control group. Taken together, we have demonstrated that VPA can improve both in vitro and in vivo development competence of porcine SCNT embryos.

  20. [Cloning of mMR-1 gene and expression in Pichia pastoris systems].

    PubMed

    Li, Tian-Bo; Hu, Yang; Wang, Yi-Guang; Xia, Huan-Zhang

    2005-01-01

    hMR-1 (Homo Myofibrillogenesis Regulator 1, AF417001) is a novel homo gene, which was firstly cloned in our laboratory. The former studies revealed that hMR-1 is a transmembrane protein which shows protein interaction with sarcomeric proteins like myomesin I, myosin regulatory light chain, alpha-enolase and some cell regulator proteins such as eukaryotic translation initiation factor3 subunit 5 (eIF3S5) and etc. In this work, we focused on cloning the homologous gene of hMR-1 from mouse C57BL/6J and exploring its expression using Pichia pastoris yeast system. Two pairs of primers were synthesized according to the hMR-1 gene homologous sequence on mouse genome chromosome 1. The mouse MR-1 gene (mMR-1) was cloned by PCR following the first round RT-PCR from mouse C57BL/6J spleen total RNA. Sequence analysis verified that mMR-1 gene and amino acids sequence showed 90.4% and 90.1% identity with hMR-1, respectively. The prediction of hydrophobic transmembrane structure of mMR-1 suggested it is also a transmembrane protein. The mMR-1 Pichia pastoris expression vector pPIC9-mMR-1 was constructed by fusion of the flanking mMR-1 ORF in the pPIC9 plasmid. After linearization of pPIC9-mMR-1 with Sal I, the 8.5kb DNA fragment was transformed into Pichia pastoris GS115 strain by electroporation. GS115/Mut+ pPIC9-mMR-1 transformants were selected on minimal methanol medium. Integration of mMR-1 gene into the yeast genome in the recombinants was verified by PCR from the transformants total DNA. The mMR-1 protein was expressed by induction under the concentration of 0.5 % methanol. The specific induced protein of 25 kD molecular mass in SDS-PAGE was confirmed to be the mMR-1 protein by Western blot rsing hMR-1 polyclonal antibody. The expression level of this recombinant mMR-1 protein was about 50 mg/L. The successful expression of mMR-1 in the Pichia pastoris GS115 will facilitate the further functional analysis of the novel gene MR-1 in animal model.

  1. A pair of mouse KRAB zinc finger proteins modulates multiple indicators of female reproduction.

    PubMed

    Krebs, Christopher J; Robins, Diane M

    2010-04-01

    Krüppel-associated box-zinc finger proteins (KRAB-ZFPs) are the largest class of transcriptional regulators in mammals, yet few have been assigned biological roles. Cloning the genes underlying the regulator of sex-limitation (rsl) phenotype, in which the normally male-specific sex-limited protein (SLP) is expressed in female mice, identified two KRAB-ZFPs, Rsl1 and Rsl2, as influencing sexually dimorphic liver gene expression. Combined absence of both repressors in rsl mice leads to increased expression in female liver of major urinary proteins (MUPs) and certain enzymes of steroid metabolism, as well as SLP. We hypothesized that this altered gene expression might affect reproductive physiology in rsl females. Urinary MUP (uMUP) concentration varied with the estrous cycle in both wt and rsl females but was consistently higher in rsl urine. A behavioral odor test revealed that wild-type (wt) males preferred rsl to wt females, possibly due to elevated uMUPs providing greater pheromone presentation. To ascribe activity to Rsl1, Rsl2, or both, the genes were individually expressed as liver-specific transgenes. RSL2 overexpression accentuated uMUP fluctuations across the estrous cycle, whereas RSL1 overexpression did not. In addition, puberty onset, as indicated by vaginal opening (VO), occurred 2 days earlier in rsl females, and excess RSL2, but not RSL1, restored VO timing to wt. Hence, transcriptional repression by RSL in liver modifies female mouse reproduction via targets that likely impact both hormonal and pheromonal cues. The large and rapidly diversifying KRAB-ZFP family may modulate biological processes, including reproduction, to confer individual differences that may isolate populations and ultimately lead to speciation.

  2. Ethical dimensions of therapeutic human cloning.

    PubMed

    Reiss, Michael J

    2002-09-11

    Therapeutic human cloning has the potential significantly to reduce human suffering and enhance human happiness. This is the main ethical argument in its favour. The main ethical arguments against it centre on questions to do with the moral status of the human embryo. A subsidiary set of arguments arises from the connections between therapeutic human cloning and reproductive cloning. Most of the ethical questions concerning the status of the human embryo have long been examined in the context of abortion, though they are being re-examined in the context of genetic screening and embryo research. A consensus on such matters seems extremely unlikely to result in the near future. The current role of ethicists may not, therefore, be so much to attempt to produce a definitive answer to the question of the status of the human embryo at the very early developmental stages at which therapeutic human cloning would take place, but more to help clarify arguments and indicate the implications of particular approaches. That is what this paper seeks to do.

  3. Genetic crossing vs cloning by computer simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Dasgupta, S.

    1997-06-01

    We perform Monte Carlo simulation using Penna`s bit string model, and compare the process of asexual reproduction by cloning with that by genetic crossover. We find them to be comparable as regards survival of a species, and also if a natural disaster is simulated.

  4. Computerized Adaptive Testing with Item Cloning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glas, Cees A. W.; van der Linden, Wim J.

    2003-01-01

    Developed a multilevel item response (IRT) model that allows for differences between the distributions of item parameters of families of item clones. Results from simulation studies based on an item pool from the Law School Admission Test illustrate the accuracy of the item pool calibration and adaptive testing procedures based on the model. (SLD)

  5. No-cloning of quantum steering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Ching-Yi; Lambert, Neill; Liao, Teh-Lu; Nori, Franco; Li, Che-Ming

    2016-06-01

    Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) steering allows two parties to verify their entanglement, even if one party’s measurements are untrusted. This concept has not only provided new insights into the nature of non-local spatial correlations in quantum mechanics, but also serves as a resource for one-sided device-independent quantum information tasks. Here, we investigate how EPR steering behaves when one-half of a maximally entangled pair of qudits (multidimensional quantum systems) is cloned by a universal cloning machine. We find that EPR steering, as verified by a criterion based on the mutual information between qudits, can only be found in one of the copy subsystems but not both. We prove that this is also true for the single-system analogue of EPR steering. We find that this restriction, which we term ‘no-cloning of quantum steering’, elucidates the physical reason why steering can be used to secure sources and channels against cloning-based attacks when implementing quantum communication and quantum computation protocols.

  6. Cloning: Learning to Replay the Genetic Tape.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holden, David J.

    1979-01-01

    Describes how plants can be produced by cloning by using tissue culture methods to mass-produce rare native prairie plants and trying to transfer some of the genetic characteristics of native grasses into cultivated cereals. The experiment was conducted at South Dakota State University. (HM)

  7. Murine monoclonal antibodies generated against mouse/rat hemokinin-1.

    PubMed

    Jin, Liang; Jin, Bo-quan; Song, Chao-jun; Zhang, Yu

    2009-08-01

    The mouse/rat hemokinin-1 (m/rHK-1) was discovered nearly 9 years ago. This molecule is a peptide comprising 11 amino acids. The m/rHK-1 was found to be mainly expressed in central immune organs like bone marrow, and was proven to have lymphopoietic roles in B and T lymphocyte development. m/rHK-1was also reported to have analgesic roles in rat spinal cord, in addition to other functions such as relaxing activity on coronary artery. Unlike its analogues SP, NKA, and NKB, m/rHK-1 does not express in the nervous system. To further study the distribution and function of m/rHK-1, we carried out conventional immunization and cell fusion procedures to acquire the hybridomas secreting specific monoclonal antibodies to m/rHK-1. In the 17 positive clones obtained, three antibodies named 1B12, 2B4, and 4G5 were shown representative in cross-reactivity against m/rHK-1 and its analogues by indirect ELISA, competitive indirect ELISA, and immunofluorescence assays. Among the three clones, the 2B4 monoclonal antibody appeared to be the high-titered and specific clone to m/rHK-1. Monoclonal antibodies to m/rHK-1 will function as good tools in the physiological study of m/rHK-1 in the near future.

  8. Isolation and characterization of recombinant DNAs containing repeated elements of barley genome: identification of individual actively transcribed families of repeats

    SciTech Connect

    Prosnyak, M.I.; Kartel', N.A.; Ryskov, A.P.

    1986-05-01

    A bank of Escherichia coli clones containing fragments of barley nuclear DNA was obtained using plasmid pBR 322. Clones carrying repeated sequences of the plant genome were selected by means of colony and blot hybridization. Clones with actively transcribed sequences were selected by hybridization to complementary DNA synthesized by means of reverse transcription on a template of total barley poly(A)-containing RNA. Individual families of repeats, two of which contained transcriptionally active sequences of the barley genome, were identified by blot hybridization of recombinant plasmids containing labeled DNA fragments of the inserts of three different clones.

  9. Manipulation of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells for Knockout Mouse Production

    PubMed Central

    Limaye, Advait; Hall, Bradford; Kulkarni, Ashok B

    2009-01-01

    The establishment of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cell liness has allowed for the generation of the knockout mouse. ES cells that are genetically altered in culture can then be manipulated to derive a whole mouse containing the desired mutation. To successfully generate a knockout mouse, however, the ES cells must be carefully cultivated in a pluripotent state throughout the gene targeting experiment. This unit describes detailed step-by-step protocols, reagents, equipment, and strategies needed for the successful generation of gene knockout embryonic stem cells using homologous recombination technologies. PMID:19731225

  10. Psammaplin A Improves Development and Quality of Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer Mouse Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Mallol, Anna; Santaló, Josep

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Faulty reprogramming of the donor somatic nucleus to a totipotent embryonic state by the recipient oocyte is a major obstacle for cloning success. Accordingly, treatment of cloned embryos with epigenetic modifiers, such as histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi), enhances cloning efficiency. The purpose of our study was to further explore the potential effect of valproic acid (VPA), used in previous studies, and to investigate the effect of psammaplin A (PsA), a novel HDACi, on the development and quality of cloned mouse embryos. To this aim, cloned embryos were treated with 5, 10, and 20 μM PsA or 2 and 4 mM VPA for 8–9 h (before and during activation) or 16 h or 24 h (during and after activation), and their in vitro developmental potential and blastocyst quality were evaluated. Treatments with 10 μM PsA and 2 mM VPA for 16 h were selected as the most optimal, showing higher blastocyst rates and quality. These treatments had no significant effects on the expression of Nanog, Oct4, and Cdx2 or on global histone and DNA methylation levels at the blastocyst stage, but both increased global levels of histone acetylation at early developmental stages. This was correlated with a two-fold (for VPA) and four-fold (for PsA) increase in full-term development, and a 11.5-fold increase when PsA was combined with the use of latrunculin A instead of cytochalasin B. In conclusion, PsA improves mouse cloning efficiency to a higher extent than VPA. PMID:25068567

  11. Genomic clone encoding the. cap alpha. chain of the OKM1, LFA-1, and platelet glycoprotein IIb-IIIa molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Cosgrove, L.J.; Sandrin, M.S.; Rajasekariah, P.; McKenzie, I.F.C.

    1986-02-01

    LFA-1, an antigen involved in cytolytic T lymphocyte-mediated killing, and Mac-1, the receptor for complement component C3bi, constitute a family of structurally and functionally related cell surface glycoproteins involved in cellular interactions. In both mouse and man, Mac-1 (OKM1) and LFA-1 share a common 95-kDa ..beta.. subunit but are distinguished by their ..cap alpha.. chains, which have different cellular distributions, apparent molecular masses (165 and 177 kDa, respectively), and peptide maps. The authors report the isolation of a genomic clone from a human genomic library that on transfection into mouse fibroblasts produced a molecule(s) reactive with monoclonal antibodies to OKM1, to LFA-1, and to platelet glycoprotein IIb-IIIa. This gene was cloned by several cycles of transfection of L cells with a human genomic library cloned in lambda phase Charon 4A and subsequent rescue of the lambda phage. Transfection with the purified recombinant lambda DNA yielded a transfectant that expressed the three human ..cap alpha.. chains of OKM1, LFA-1, and glycoprotein IIb-IIIa, presumably in association with the murine ..beta.. chain.

  12. Universal CG cloning of polymerase chain reaction products.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Julian; Brown, Andrew J

    2015-02-15

    Single-insert cloning of DNA fragments without restriction enzymes has traditionally been achieved using TA cloning, with annealing of a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) fragment containing a single overhanging 3' A to a plasmid vector containing a 3' T. In this article, we show that the analogous "CG cloning" is faster and far more efficient, using AhdI to generate a C-vector. For an afternoon ligation, CG cloning achieved double the cloning efficiency and more than 4-fold the number of transformants compared with TA cloning. However, blunt-end ligation was markedly more efficient than both. CG cloning could prove to be extremely useful for single-copy high-throughput cloning.

  13. Mouse genetics: catalogue and scissors.

    PubMed

    Sung, Young Hoon; Baek, In-Jeoung; Seong, Je Kyung; Kim, Jin Soo; Lee, Han-Woong

    2012-12-01

    Phenotypic analysis of gene-specific knockout (KO) mice has revolutionized our understanding of in vivo gene functions. As the use of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells is inevitable for conventional gene targeting, the generation of knockout mice remains a very time-consuming and expensive process. To accelerate the large-scale production and phenotype analyses of KO mice, international efforts have organized global consortia such as the International Knockout Mouse Consortium (IKMC) and International Mouse Phenotype Consortium (IMPC), and they are persistently expanding the KO mouse catalogue that is publicly available for the researches studying specific genes of interests in vivo. However, new technologies, adopting zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) or Transcription Activator-Like Effector (TALE) Nucleases (TALENs) to edit the mouse genome, are now emerging as valuable and effective shortcuts alternative for the conventional gene targeting using ES cells. Here, we introduce the recent achievement of IKMC, and evaluate the significance of ZFN/TALEN technology in mouse genetics.

  14. SF1 polymorphisms in the mouse and steroidogenic potential.

    PubMed

    Schimmer, Bernard P; Cordova, Martha; Tsao, Jennivine; Frigeri, Claudia

    2002-11-01

    ACTH-resistance in four mutant derivatives of a mouse adrenocortical tumor cell line results from a defect that reduces the activity of steroidogenic factor-1 (SF1) thereby preventing expression of the ACTH receptor and other SF1-dependent genes. The SF1 genes from these mutants contain a sequence difference that changes an Ala to Ser at codon 172. Steroidogenic factor-1(S172) represents a polymorphism rather than a spontaneous mutation since the two forms of SF1, SF1(A172), and SF1(S172), can be traced to the hybrid mouse strain (C57L/J x A/HeJ) from which the original adrenal tumor was derived. The SF1(S172) allele is amplified in three of the four mutant clones together with the neighboring genes germ cell nuclear factor and LIM homeobox2. The two forms of SF1 had only modest differences in transcriptional activity in reporter gene assays, suggesting that the SF1 polymorphism per se is not directly responsible for the loss of mc2r expression. Rather, ACTH resistance in this family of adrenocortical tumor cell mutants may be due to a closely linked gene on the SF1(S172) allele. Mouse strains with reportedly high steroidogenic capacity (C57Bl/6J, C57Bl/10J) also have the SF1(A172) allele while mouse strains with low steroidogenic capacity (C3H/HeJ, DBA/2J) have the SF1(S172) allele. These latter observations suggest that the two SF1 alleles also may be markers of steroidogenic potential among mouse strains.

  15. TracMouse: A computer aided movement analysis script for the mouse inverted horizontal grid test

    PubMed Central

    Niewiadomski, W.; Palasz, E.; Skupinska, M.; Zylinski, M.; Steczkowska, M.; Gasiorowska, A.; Niewiadomska, G.; Riedel, G.

    2016-01-01

    In rodents, detection and quantification of motor impairments is difficult. The traction test (inverted grid with mice clinging to the underside) currently has no objective rating system. We here developed and validated the semi-automatic MATLAB script TracMouse for unbiased detection of video-recorded movement patterns. High precision videos were analyzed by: (i) principal identification of anatomical paw details frame-by-frame by an experimentally blinded rater; (ii) automatic retrieval of proxies by TracMouse for individual paws. The basic states of Hold and Step were discriminated as duration and frequency, and these principle parameters were converted into static and dynamic endpoints and their discriminating power assessed in a dopaminergic lesion model. Relative to hind paws, forepaws performed ~4 times more steps, they were ~20% longer, and Hold duration was ~5 times shorter in normal C57Bl/6 mice. Thus, forepaw steps were classified as exploratory, hind paw movement as locomotive. Multiple novel features pertaining to paw sequence, step lengths and exploratory touches were accessible through TracMouse and revealed subtle Parkinsonian phenotypes. Novel proxies using TracMouse revealed previously unidentified features of movement and may aid the understanding of (i) brain circuits related to motor planning and execution, and (ii) phenotype detection in experimental models of movement disorders. PMID:27982134

  16. TracMouse: A computer aided movement analysis script for the mouse inverted horizontal grid test.

    PubMed

    Niewiadomski, W; Palasz, E; Skupinska, M; Zylinski, M; Steczkowska, M; Gasiorowska, A; Niewiadomska, G; Riedel, G

    2016-12-16

    In rodents, detection and quantification of motor impairments is difficult. The traction test (inverted grid with mice clinging to the underside) currently has no objective rating system. We here developed and validated the semi-automatic MATLAB script TracMouse for unbiased detection of video-recorded movement patterns. High precision videos were analyzed by: (i) principal identification of anatomical paw details frame-by-frame by an experimentally blinded rater; (ii) automatic retrieval of proxies by TracMouse for individual paws. The basic states of Hold and Step were discriminated as duration and frequency, and these principle parameters were converted into static and dynamic endpoints and their discriminating power assessed in a dopaminergic lesion model. Relative to hind paws, forepaws performed ~4 times more steps, they were ~20% longer, and Hold duration was ~5 times shorter in normal C57Bl/6 mice. Thus, forepaw steps were classified as exploratory, hind paw movement as locomotive. Multiple novel features pertaining to paw sequence, step lengths and exploratory touches were accessible through TracMouse and revealed subtle Parkinsonian phenotypes. Novel proxies using TracMouse revealed previously unidentified features of movement and may aid the understanding of (i) brain circuits related to motor planning and execution, and (ii) phenotype detection in experimental models of movement disorders.

  17. Molecular cloning and expression analysis of a novel gene DGCR8 located in the DiGeorge syndrome chromosomal region.

    PubMed

    Shiohama, Aiko; Sasaki, Takashi; Noda, Setsuko; Minoshima, Shinsei; Shimizu, Nobuyoshi

    2003-04-25

    We have identified and cloned a novel gene (DGCR8) from the human chromosome 22q11.2. This gene is located in the DiGeorge syndrome chromosomal region (DGCR). It consists of 14 exons spanning over 35kb and produces transcripts with ORF of 2322bp, encoding a protein of 773 amino acids. We also isolated a mouse ortholog Dgcr8 and found it has 95.3% identity with human DGCR8 at the amino acid sequence level. Northern blot analysis of human and mouse tissues from adult and fetus showed rather ubiquitous expression. However, the in situ hybridization of mouse embryos revealed that mouse Dgcr8 transcripts are localized in neuroepithelium of primary brain, limb bud, vessels, thymus, and around the palate during the developmental stages of embryos. The expression profile of Dgcr8 in developing mouse embryos is consistent with the clinical phenotypes including congenital heart defects and palate clefts associated with DiGeorge syndrome (DGS)/conotruncal anomaly face syndrome (CAFS)/velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS), which are caused by monoallelic microdeletion of chromosome 22q11.2.

  18. IVA cloning: A single-tube universal cloning system exploiting bacterial In Vivo Assembly.

    PubMed

    García-Nafría, Javier; Watson, Jake F; Greger, Ingo H

    2016-06-06

    In vivo homologous recombination holds the potential for optimal molecular cloning, however, current strategies require specialised bacterial strains or laborious protocols. Here, we exploit a recA-independent recombination pathway, present in widespread laboratory E.coli strains, to develop IVA (In Vivo Assembly) cloning. This system eliminates the need for enzymatic assembly and reduces all molecular cloning procedures to a single-tube, single-step PCR, performed in <2 hours from setup to transformation. Unlike other methods, IVA is a complete system, and offers significant advantages over alternative methods for all cloning procedures (insertions, deletions, site-directed mutagenesis and sub-cloning). Significantly, IVA allows unprecedented simplification of complex cloning procedures: five simultaneous modifications of any kind, multi-fragment assembly and library construction are performed in approximately half the time of current protocols, still in a single-step fashion. This system is efficient, seamless and sequence-independent, and requires no special kits, enzymes or proprietary bacteria, which will allow its immediate adoption by the academic and industrial molecular biology community.

  19. IVA cloning: A single-tube universal cloning system exploiting bacterial In Vivo Assembly

    PubMed Central

    García-Nafría, Javier; Watson, Jake F.; Greger, Ingo H.

    2016-01-01

    In vivo homologous recombination holds the potential for optimal molecular cloning, however, current strategies require specialised bacterial strains or laborious protocols. Here, we exploit a recA-independent recombination pathway, present in widespread laboratory E.coli strains, to develop IVA (In Vivo Assembly) cloning. This system eliminates the need for enzymatic assembly and reduces all molecular cloning procedures to a single-tube, single-step PCR, performed in <2 hours from setup to transformation. Unlike other methods, IVA is a complete system, and offers significant advantages over alternative methods for all cloning procedures (insertions, deletions, site-directed mutagenesis and sub-cloning). Significantly, IVA allows unprecedented simplification of complex cloning procedures: five simultaneous modifications of any kind, multi-fragment assembly and library construction are performed in approximately half the time of current protocols, still in a single-step fashion. This system is efficient, seamless and sequence-independent, and requires no special kits, enzymes or proprietary bacteria, which will allow its immediate adoption by the academic and industrial molecular biology community. PMID:27264908

  20. A comprehensive list of cloned human DNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Schmidtke, Jörg; Cooper, David N.

    1987-01-01

    A list of DNA sequences cloned from the human genome is presented. Intended as a guide to clone availability, this list includes published reports of cDNA, genomic and synthetic clones comprising gene and pseudogene sequences, uncharacterised DNA segments and repetitive DNA elements. PMID:3575113

  1. A comprehensive list of cloned human DNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Schmidtke, Jörg; Cooper, David N.

    1989-01-01

    A list of DNA sequences cloned from the human genome is presented. Intended as a guide to clone availability, this list includes published reports of cDNA, genomic and synthetic clones comprising gene and pseudogene sequences, uncharacterised DNA segments and repetitive DNA elements. PMID:2654889

  2. A comprehensive list of cloned human DNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Schmidtke, Jörg; Cooper, David N.

    1988-01-01

    A list of DNA sequences cloned from the human genome is presented. Intended as a guide to clone availability, this list includes published reports of cDNA, genomic and synthetic clones comprising gene and pseudogene sequences, uncharacterised DNA segments and repetitive DNA elements. PMID:3368330

  3. A comprehensive list of cloned human DNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Schmidtke, Jörg; Cooper, David N.

    1990-01-01

    A list of DNA sequences cloned from the human genome is presented. Intended as a guide to clone availability, this list includes published reports of cDNA, genomic and synthetic clones comprising gene and pseudogene sequences, uncharacterised DNA segments and repetitive DNA elements. PMID:2333227

  4. A Gateway MultiSite Recombination Cloning Toolkit

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Lena K.; Stowers, R. Steven

    2011-01-01

    The generation of DNA constructs is often a rate-limiting step in conducting biological experiments. Recombination cloning of single DNA fragments using the Gateway system provided an advance over traditional restriction enzyme cloning due to increases in efficiency and reliability. Here we introduce a series of entry clones and a destination vector for use in two, three, and four fragment Gateway MultiSite recombination cloning whose advantages include increased flexibility and versatility. In contrast to Gateway single-fragment cloning approaches where variations are typically incorporated into model system-specific destination vectors, our Gateway MultiSite cloning strategy incorporates variations in easily generated entry clones that are model system-independent. In particular, we present entry clones containing insertions of GAL4, QF, UAS, QUAS, eGFP, and mCherry, among others, and demonstrate their in vivo functionality in Drosophila by using them to generate expression clones including GAL4 and QF drivers for various trp ion channel family members, UAS and QUAS excitatory and inhibitory light-gated ion channels, and QUAS red and green fluorescent synaptic vesicle markers. We thus establish a starter toolkit of modular Gateway MultiSite entry clones potentially adaptable to any model system. An inventory of entry clones and destination vectors for Gateway MultiSite cloning has also been established (www.gatewaymultisite.org). PMID:21931740

  5. Distribution of quantum Fisher information in asymmetric cloning machines

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Xing; Yao, Yao; Zhou, Lei-Ming; Wang, Xiaoguang

    2014-01-01

    An unknown quantum state cannot be copied and broadcast freely due to the no-cloning theorem. Approximate cloning schemes have been proposed to achieve the optimal cloning characterized by the maximal fidelity between the original and its copies. Here, from the perspective of quantum Fisher information (QFI), we investigate the distribution of QFI in asymmetric cloning machines which produce two nonidentical copies. As one might expect, improving the QFI of one copy results in decreasing the QFI of the other copy. It is perhaps also unsurprising that asymmetric phase-covariant cloning outperforms universal cloning in distributing QFI since a priori information of the input state has been utilized. However, interesting results appear when we compare the distributabilities of fidelity (which quantifies the full information of quantum states), and QFI (which only captures the information of relevant parameters) in asymmetric cloning machines. Unlike the results of fidelity, where the distributability of symmetric cloning is always optimal for any d-dimensional cloning, we find that any asymmetric cloning outperforms symmetric cloning on the distribution of QFI for d ≤ 18, whereas some but not all asymmetric cloning strategies could be worse than symmetric ones when d > 18. PMID:25484234

  6. Optimal cloning for finite distributions of coherent states

    SciTech Connect

    Cochrane, P.T.; Ralph, T.C.; Dolinska, A.

    2004-04-01

    We derive optimal cloning limits for finite Gaussian distributions of coherent states and describe techniques for achieving them. We discuss the relation of these limits to state estimation and the no-cloning limit in teleportation. A qualitatively different cloning limit is derived for a single-quadrature Gaussian quantum cloner.

  7. Technological Literacy and Human Cloning. Resources in Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baird, Steven L.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses how technology educators can deal with advances in human genetics, specifically, cloning. Includes a definition and history of cloning, discusses its benefits, and looks at social concerns and arguments for and against human cloning. Includes classroom activities and websites. (Contains 10 references.) (JOW)

  8. Human research cloning, embryos, and embryo-like artifacts.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Insoo; Jung, Kyu Won

    2006-01-01

    Research suggests that cloning is incapable of producing a viable embryo when it is used on primate eggs. In fact, the entity created may not qualify as an embryo at all. If the results stand, cloning avoids the moral objections typically lodged against it, and cloning is itself an "alternative source" of stem cells.

  9. Comparative analysis by polymerase chain reaction amplified minicircles of kinetoplast DNA of a stable strain of Trypanosoma cruzi from São Felipe, Bahia, its clones and subclones: possibility of predominance of a principal clone in this area.

    PubMed

    Campos, R F; Gonçalves, M S; dos Reis, E A; dos Reis, M G; Andrade, S G

    1999-01-01

    Molecular characterization of one stable strain of Trypanosoma cruzi, the 21 SF, representative of the pattern of strains isolated from the endemic area of São Felipe, State of Bahia, Brazil, maintained for 15 years in laboratory by serial passages in mice and classified as biodeme Type II and zymodeme 2 has been investigated. The kinetoplast DNA (kDNA) of parental strain, 5 clones and 14 subclones were analyzed. Schizodeme was established by comparative study of the fragments obtained from digestion of the 330-bp fragments amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from the variable regions of the minicircles, and digested by restriction endonucleases Rsa I and Hinf I. Our results show a high percentual of similarity between the restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) for the parental strain and its clones and among these individual clones and their subclones at a level of 80 to 100%. This homology indicates a predominance of the same "principal clone" in the 21SF strain and confirms the homogeneity previously observed at biological and isozymic analysis. These results suggest the possibility that the T. cruzi strains with similar biological and isoenzymic patterns, circulating in this endemic area, are representative of one dominant clone. The presence of "principal clones" could be responsible for a predominant tropism of the parasites for specific organs and tissues and this could contribute to the pattern of clinico-pathological manifestations of Chagas's disease in one geographical area.

  10. HSPC117 deficiency in cloned embryos causes placental abnormality and fetal death

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yingying; Hai, Tang; Liu, Zichuan; Zhou, Shuya; Lv, Zhuo; Ding, Chenhui; Liu, Lei; Niu, Yuyu; Zhao, Xiaoyang; Tong, Man; Wang, Liu; Jouneau, Alice; Zhang, Xun; Ji, Weizhi; Zhou, Qi

    2010-07-02

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has been successfully used in many species to produce live cloned offspring, albeit with low efficiency. The low frequency of successful development has usually been ascribed to incomplete or inappropriate reprogramming of the transferred nuclear genome. Elucidating the genetic differences between normal fertilized and cloned embryos is key to understand the low efficiency of SCNT. Here, we show that expression of HSPC117, which encodes a hypothetical protein of unknown function, was absent or very low in cloned mouse blastocysts. To investigate the role of HSPC117 in embryo development, we knocked-down this gene in normal fertilized embryos using RNA interference. We assessed the post-implantation survival of HSPC117 knock-down embryos at 3 stages: E9 (prior to placenta formation); E12 (after the placenta was fully functional) and E19 (post-natal). Our results show that, although siRNA-treated in vivo fertilized/produced (IVP) embryos could develop to the blastocyst stage and implanted without any difference from control embryos, the knock-down embryos showed substantial fetal death, accompanied by placental blood clotting, at E12. Furthermore, comparison of HSPC117 expression in placentas of nuclear transfer (NT), intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) and IVP embryos confirmed that HSPC117 deficiency correlates well with failures in embryo development: all NT embryos with a fetus, as well as IVP and ICSI embryos, had normal placental HSPC117 expression while those NT embryos showing reduced or no expression of HSPC117 failed to form a fetus. In conclusion, we show that HSPC117 is an important gene for post-implantation development of embryos, and that HSPC117 deficiency leads to fetal abnormalities after implantation, especially following placental formation. We suggest that defects in HSPC117 expression may be an important contributing factor to loss of cloned NT embryos in vivo.

  11. Cloning and expression of an A1 adenosine receptor from rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Mahan, L.C.; McVittie, L.D.; Smyk-Randall, E.M.; Nakata, H.; Monsma, F.J. Jr.; Gerfen, C.R.; Sibley, D.R. )

    1991-07-01

    The authors have used the polymerase chain reaction technique to selectively amplify guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein (G protein)-coupled receptor cDNA sequences from rat striatal mRNA, using sets of highly degenerate primers derived from transmembrane sequences of previously cloned G protein-coupled receptors. A novel cDNA fragment was identified, which exhibits considerable homology to various members of the G protein-coupled receptor family. This fragment was used to isolate a full-length cDNA from a rat striatal library. A 2.2-kilobase clone was obtained that encodes a protein of 326 amino acids with seven transmembrane domains, as predicted by hydropathy analysis. Stably transfected mouse A9-L cells and Chinese hamster ovary cells that expressed mRNA for this clone were screened with putative receptor ligands. Saturable and specific binding sites for the A1 adenosine antagonist (3H)-1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine were identified on membranes from transfected cells. The rank order of potency and affinities of various adenosine agonist and antagonist ligands confirmed the identity of this cDNA clone as an A1 adenosine receptor. The high affinity binding of A1 adenosine agonists was shown to be sensitive to the nonhydrolyzable GTP analog guanylyl-5{prime}-imidodiphosphate. In adenylyl cyclase assays, adenosine agonists inhibited forskolin-stimulated cAMP production by greater than 50%, in a pharmacologically specific fashion. Northern blot and in situ hybridization analyses of receptor mRNA in brain tissues revealed two transcripts of 5.6 and 3.1 kilobases, both of which were abundant in cortex, cerebellum, hippocampus, and thalamus, with lower levels in olfactory bulb, striatum, mesencephalon, and retina. These regional distribution data are in good agreement with previous receptor autoradiographic studies involving the A1 adenosine receptor.

  12. Cloning, pharmacological characterization, and chromosome assignment of the human dopamine transporter.

    PubMed

    Giros, B; el Mestikawy, S; Godinot, N; Zheng, K; Han, H; Yang-Feng, T; Caron, M G

    1992-09-01

    We have screened a human substantia nigra cDNA library with probes derived from the rat dopamine transporter. A 3.5-kilobase cDNA clone was isolated and its corresponding gene was located on the distal end of chromosome 5 (5p15.3). This human clone codes for a 620-amino acid protein with a calculated molecular weight of 68,517. Hydropathicity analysis suggests the presence of 12 putative transmembrane domains, a characteristic feature of sodium-dependent neurotransmitter carriers. The rat and the human dopamine transporters are 92% homologous. When permanently expressed in mouse fibroblast Ltk- cells, the human clone is able to induce a saturable, time- and sodium-dependent, dopamine uptake. This transport is blocked by psychostimulant drugs (cocaine, l- and d-amphetamine, and phenyclidine), neurotoxins (6-hydroxydopamine and N-methyl-4-phenylpyridine (MPP))+), neurotransmitters (epinephrine, norepinephrine, gamma-aminobutyric acid, and serotonin), antidepressants (amitriptyline, bupropion, desipramine, mazindol, nomifensine, and nortriptyline), and various uptake inhibitors (mazindol, GBR 12783, GBR 12909, and amfonelic acid). The rank orders of the Ki values of these substances at the human and the rat dopamine transporters are highly correlated (r = 0.998). The cloning of DNA human dopamine transporter gene has allowed establishment of a cell line stably expressing the human dopamine transporter and, for the first time, an extensive characterization of its pharmacology. Furthermore, these newly developed tools will help in the study of the regulation of dopamine transport in humans and in the clarification of the potential role of the dopamine transporter in a variety of disease states.

  13. Cloning and expression of the rat homologue of the Huntington disease gene

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, I.; Epplen, J.T.; Riess, O.

    1994-09-01

    Huntington`s disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder which is manifested usually in adult life. The age of onset is variable and leads to progressive symptoms including involuntary choreatic movements and various cognitive and psychiatric disturbances. Recently, a gene (IT15) was cloned containing a (CAG){sub n} repeat which is elongated and unstable in HD patients. IT15 is widely expressed in human tissues but unrelated to any known deduced protein sequence. To further investigate the HD gene, 15 rat cDNA libraries were screened. 24 clones have been identified covering the Huntingtin gene. Comparison of the Huntingtin gene between human and rat revealed homologies between 80% and 87% at the DNA level and about 90% at the protein level. These analyses will help to define biologically important sequence regions, e.g., via evolutionary conservation. One clone contains the (CAG){sub n} repeat which consists of eight triplets compared to seven triplets in the mouse and a median of 17 in human. As in humans there are two transcripts arising from differential 3{prime}-polyadenylation. In the 3{prime}UTR a stretch of about 280 bp is exchanged for a 250 bp fragment with no homology in rodents and man. The cDNA clones are currently used to study Huntingtin gene expression during development in rodent tissues. RNA in situ hybridization of embryonic sections shows predominant signals in all neuronal tissues. In contrast to previously published data Huntingtin mRNA expression in testis is increased in spermatocytes vs. spermatogonia.

  14. Microinjection of cloned DNA fragments into fertilized one-cell mouse eggs: II. Automatic injection.

    PubMed

    Murphy, D

    1993-01-01

    In recent years, a number of automatic microinjection systems have appeared on the market. These systems replace the simple manual syringe system for forcing the DNA solution out of the microinjection pipet and into the pronucleus of a fertilized one-cell egg. The advantages of such automatic systems are twofold: (1) Because injection is triggered by a foot-operated peddle, the hands are left free to operate the joy-stick controls of the micromanipulators. Since the hands are not constantly moving from one piece of apparatus to another, the process of microinjection is speeded up considerably. (2) Through the application of a low, constant (balance) pressure, DNA solution is flowing out of the holding pipet throughout the injection session. This prevents back-flow of M2 medium into the injection pipet, which would otherwise considerably dilute the DNA solution, and it also prevents blockage of the pipet. Using an automatic injection system, it is found that pipets need not be changed as often as required when using a manually operated system. This chapter describes the operation of an economical injection system supplied by the Narishige company (Tokyo).

  15. Cloning and characterization of a second member of the mouse mdr gene family.

    PubMed Central

    Gros, P; Raymond, M; Bell, J; Housman, D

    1988-01-01

    The mammalian mdr gene family comprises a small number of closely related genes. Previously, we have shown that one member, mdr1, has the capacity to convey multidrug resistance to drug-sensitive recipient cells in a gene transfer protocol. However, the functional characteristics of other members of this gene family have not been examined. In this report, we characterize a second member of the mdr gene family which we designated mdr2. We determined the nucleotide sequence corresponding to the complete coding region of this mdr2 transcript. The predicted amino acid sequence of this protein (1,276 amino acids) showed that it is a membrane glycoprotein highly homologous to mdr1 (85%), strongly suggesting that both genes originate from a common ancestor. Regions of divergence between mdr1 and mdr2 proteins are concentrated in two discrete segments of the predicted polypeptides, each approximately 100 residues in length. The mdr2 protein appears to be formed by the duplication of a structural unit which encodes three putative transmembrane loops and a predicted nucleotide-binding fold and is highly homologous to bacterial transport proteins such as hlyB. This strong homology suggests that mdr2 also participates in an energy-dependent membrane transport process. However, the direct relationship, if any, of this new member of the mdr family to multidrug resistance remains to be established. Knowledge of the complete nucleotide sequence and predicted amino acid sequence of the mdr2 gene product will enable the preparation of gene-specific probes and antibodies necessary to study the functional role of this gene in multidrug resistance and normal physiological processes. PMID:3405218

  16. A Mouse Model for the Cloning of a Tumor Suppressor Gene Mutated in Sporadic Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-07-01

    INVESTIGATION: Henry Skinner, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Baylor College of Medicine Houston, Texas 77030-3498 REPORT DATE: July 31997 TYPE OF REPORT... Henry Skinner, Ph.D. 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION Baylor College of Medicine REPORT NUMBER Houston...Microbiological and Biomedical Laboratories. 3 Dr. Henry B. Skinner Table of Contents Front Cover 1 Standard Form (SF) 298 2 Foreword 3 Table of Contents 4

  17. Individualized Training and the Training of Individuals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClelland, William A.

    Two current instructional research efforts relating to the problem of an individual student's learning and personal needs are reported. Characteristics of individualized instruction (e.g., terminal course objectives, remedial materials, measurement procedures), administrative constraints (e.g., fixed time, cost of equipment, lack of skilled…

  18. Promising genomic transfectant into Xeroderma pigmentosum group A with highly amplified mouse DNA and intermediate UV resistance turns revertant

    SciTech Connect

    Blum, M.; Baumann, I.; Lohrer, H.; Rahmsdorf, H.J.; Herrlich, P.

    1989-04-28

    Following transfection of genomic mouse DNA into an SV40 transformed fibroblast cell line from a patient with Xeroderma pigmentosum (complementation group A, XPA), a single UV resistant cell clone was isolated out of a total of 10(4) independent transfectants. The recipient XPA cell line has as yet not produced spontaneous revertants among 2.2 x 10(8) cells. The isolated cell clone contains 50-70 kb of mouse sequences which are heavily amplified (500-fold), and has acquired both intermediate resistance to UV killing and intermediate unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) capacity. By continued passage without selective pressure, cells were generated, which had lost both the dominant marker gene and repetitive mouse sequences. Single colonies of these cells were still intermediately resistant to UV suggesting that either undetected unique mouse DNA had segregated from the bulk of repetitive DNA, or, more likely, that the initially isolated transfectant was a spontaneous revertant. This documents that a persuasive clone isolated can still be a false positive (spontaneous revertant) and that an extremely laborious approach may lead into a dead end.

  19. Cloning and characterization of SOX5, a new member of the human SOX gene family

    SciTech Connect

    Wunderle, V.M.; Critcher, R.; Goodfellow, P.N.; Ashworth, A.

    1996-09-01

    The mammalian Y-linked testis determining gene, SRY, encodes a protein with a DNA binding motif known as the HMG box. A large family of genes sharing a high similarity with the SRY HMG box and named Sox (Sry-related HMG box) in mouse and SOX in human has been identified from various organisms. We have cloned SOX5, a new member of the human SOX gene family. SOX5 cDNAs isolated from a human adult testis cDNA library show a high similarity with the mouse Sox5 transcript over a large region identical in all the human cDNAs. However, comparison of the 5{prime} unique sequences of the cDNAs suggests that the SOX5 gene is subject to alternative splicing. Genomic analysis identified a SOX5 pseudogene located on 8q21.1, whereas the SOX5 gene itself, which contains a minimum of five introns, maps to 12p12.1. In contrast to the mouse gene, the human SOX5 gene is expressed in a variety of human tissues, and different size transcripts are observed in adult testis and fetal brain. 19 refs., 5 figs.

  20. Molecular cloning and characterization of CD4 in an aquatic mammal, the white whale Delphinapterus leucas.

    PubMed

    Romano, T A; Ridgway, S H; Felten, D L; Quaranta, V

    1999-05-01

    Given the importance of the cell surface recognition protein, CD4, in immune function, the cloning and characterization of CD4 at the molecular level from an odontocete cetacean, the white whale (Delphinapterus leucas), was carried out. Whale CD4 cDNA contains 2662 base pairs and translates into a protein containing 455 amino acids. Whale CD4 shares 64% and 51% identity with the human and mouse CD4 protein, respectively, and is organized in a similar manner. Unlike human and mouse, however, the cytoplasmic domain, which is highly conserved, contains amino acid substitutions unique to whale. Moreover, only one of the seven potential N-linked glycosylation sites present in whale is shared with human and mouse. Evolutionarily, the whale CD4 sequence is most similar to pig and structurally similar to dog and cat, in that all lack the cysteine pair in the V2 domain. These differences suggest that CD4 may have a different secondary structure in these species, which may affect binding of class II and subsequent T-cell activation, as well as binding of viral pathogens. Interestingly, as a group, species with these CD4 characteristics all have high constitutive expression of class II molecules on T lymphocytes, suggesting potential uniqueness in the interaction of CD4, class II molecules, and the immune response. Molecular characterization of CD4 in an aquatic mammal provides information on the CD4 molecule itself and may provide insight into adaptive evolutionary changes of the immune system.