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Sample records for induce aid expression

  1. Regulation of Aicda expression and AID activity.

    PubMed

    Zan, Hong; Casali, Paolo

    2013-03-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is expressed in a B cell differentiation stage-specific fashion and is essential for immunoglobulin (Ig) gene class switch DNA recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM). CSR and SHM play a central role in the maturation of antibody and autoantibody responses. AID displays a mutagenic activity by catalyzing targeted deamination of deoxycytidine (dC) residues in DNA resulting in dU:dG mismatches, which are processed into point-mutations in SHM or double-strand breaks (DSBs) in CSR. Although AID specifically targets the Ig gene loci (IgH, Igκ and Igλ), it can also home into a wide array of non-Ig genes in B-and non-B-cell backgrounds. Aberrant expression of AID is associated with multiple diseases such as allergy, inflammation, autoimmunity and cancer. In autoimmune systemic lupus erythematosus, dysregulated AID expression underpins increased CSR, SHM and autoantibody production. As a potent mutator, AID is under stringent transcriptional, post-transcriptional and post-translational regulation. AID is also regulated in its targeting and enzymatic function. In resting naïve or memory B cells, AID transcripts and protein are undetectable. These, however, are readily and significantly up-regulated in B cells induced to undergo CSR and/or SHM. Transcription factors, such as HoxC4 and NF-κB, which are up-regulated in a B cell lineage-and/or differentiation stage-specific manner, regulate the induction of AID. HoxC4 induces AID expression by directly binding to the AID gene promoter through an evolutionarily conserved 5'-ATTT-3' motif. HoxC4 is induced by the same stimuli that induce AID and CSR. It is further up-regulated by estrogen through three estrogen responsive elements in its promoter region. The targeting of AID to switch (S) regions is mediated by 14-3-3 adaptor proteins, which specifically bind to 5'-AGCT-3' repeats that are exist at high frequency in S region cores. Like HoxC4, 14-3-3 adaptors are induced

  2. Regulation of Activation Induced Deaminase (AID) by Estrogen.

    PubMed

    Pauklin, Siim

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of Activation Induced Deaminase (AID) by the hormone estrogen has important implications for understanding adaptive immune responses as well as the involvement of AID in autoimmune diseases and tumorigenesis. This chapter describes the general laboratory techniques for analyzing AID expression and activity induced by estrogen, focusing on the isolation and preparation of cells for hormone treatment and the subsequent analysis of AID responsiveness to estrogen at the RNA level and for determining the regulation of AID activity via estrogen by analyzing Ig switch circle transcripts and mutations in switch region loci.

  3. Evolution of class switch recombination function in fish activation-induced cytidine deaminase, AID.

    PubMed

    Wakae, Koshou; Magor, Brad G; Saunders, Holly; Nagaoka, Hitoshi; Kawamura, Akemi; Kinoshita, Kazuo; Honjo, Tasuku; Muramatsu, Masamichi

    2006-01-01

    Following activation of mammalian B cells, class switch recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM) of the Ig heavy chain (IgH) gene can improve the functions of the expressed antibodies. Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is the only known B cell-specific protein required for inducing CSR and SHM in mammals. Lower vertebrates have an AID homologue, and there is some evidence of SHM in vivo. However there is no evidence of CSR in the cartilaginous or bony fishes, and this may be due in part to a lack of cis-elements in the IgH gene that are the normal targets of AID-mediated recombination. We have tested whether bony fish (zebrafish and catfish) AID can mediate CSR and SHM in mammalian cells. As expected, ectopic expression of fish AID in mouse fibroblasts resulted in mutations in an introduced SHM reporter gene, indicating that fish AID can mediate SHM. Unexpectedly, expression of fish AID in mouse AID-/- B cells induced surface IgG expression as well as switched transcripts from Ig gene loci, clearly indicating that the fish AID protein can mediate CSR, at least in mouse cells. These results suggest that the AID protein acquired the ability to mediate CSR before the IgH locus evolved the additional exon clusters and switch regions that are the targets of recombination. We discuss how pleiotropic functions of specific domains within the AID protein may have facilitated the early evolution of CSR in lower vertebrates.

  4. Biological function of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID).

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ritu; DiMenna, Lauren J; Chaudhuri, Jayanta; Evans, Todd

    2014-01-01

    Activation-induced Cytidine Deaminase (AID) is an essential regulator of B cell diversification, but its full range of action has until recently been an enigma. Based on homology, it was originally proposed to be an RNA-editing enzyme, but so far, no RNA substrates are known. Rather, it functions by deaminating cytidine, and in this manner, coupled with base-excision repair or mismatch repair machinery, it is a natural mutator. This allows it to play a central role in adaptive immunity, whereby it initiates the processes of class switch recombination and somatic hypermutation to help generate a diverse and high-affinity repertoire of immunoglobulin isotypes. More recently, it has been appreciated that methylated cytidine, already known as a key epigenetic mark on DNA controlling gene expression, can also be a target for AID modification. Coupled with repair machinery, this can facilitate the active removal of methylated DNA. This activity can impact the process of cellular reprogramming, including transition of a somatic cell to pluripotency, which requires major reshuffling of epigenetic memory. Thus, seemingly disparate roles for AID in controlling immune diversity and epigenetic memory have a common mechanistic basis. However, the very activity that is so useful for B cell diversity and cellular reprogramming is dangerous for the integrity of the genome. Thus, AID expression and activity is tightly regulated, and deregulation is associated with diseases including cancer. Here, we review the range of AID functions with a focus on its mechanisms of action and regulation. Major questions remain to be answered concerning how and when AID is targeted to specific loci and how this impacts development and disease.

  5. AID-expressing epithelium is protected from oncogenic transformation by an NKG2D surveillance pathway.

    PubMed

    Pérez-García, Arantxa; Pérez-Durán, Pablo; Wossning, Thomas; Sernandez, Isora V; Mur, Sonia M; Cañamero, Marta; Real, Francisco X; Ramiro, Almudena R

    2015-08-17

    Activation-induced deaminase (AID) initiates secondary antibody diversification in germinal center B cells, giving rise to higher affinity antibodies through somatic hypermutation (SHM) or to isotype-switched antibodies through class switch recombination (CSR). SHM and CSR are triggered by AID-mediated deamination of cytosines in immunoglobulin genes. Importantly, AID activity in B cells is not restricted to Ig loci and can promote mutations and pro-lymphomagenic translocations, establishing a direct oncogenic mechanism for germinal center-derived neoplasias. AID is also expressed in response to inflammatory cues in epithelial cells, raising the possibility that AID mutagenic activity might drive carcinoma development. We directly tested this hypothesis by generating conditional knock-in mouse models for AID overexpression in colon and pancreas epithelium. AID overexpression alone was not sufficient to promote epithelial cell neoplasia in these tissues, in spite of displaying mutagenic and genotoxic activity. Instead, we found that heterologous AID expression in pancreas promotes the expression of NKG2D ligands, the recruitment of CD8(+) T cells, and the induction of epithelial cell death. Our results indicate that AID oncogenic potential in epithelial cells can be neutralized by immunosurveillance protective mechanisms.

  6. AID-expressing epithelium is protected from oncogenic transformation by an NKG2D surveillance pathway

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-García, Arantxa; Pérez-Durán, Pablo; Wossning, Thomas; Sernandez, Isora V; Mur, Sonia M; Cañamero, Marta; Real, Francisco X; Ramiro, Almudena R

    2015-01-01

    Activation-induced deaminase (AID) initiates secondary antibody diversification in germinal center B cells, giving rise to higher affinity antibodies through somatic hypermutation (SHM) or to isotype-switched antibodies through class switch recombination (CSR). SHM and CSR are triggered by AID-mediated deamination of cytosines in immunoglobulin genes. Importantly, AID activity in B cells is not restricted to Ig loci and can promote mutations and pro-lymphomagenic translocations, establishing a direct oncogenic mechanism for germinal center-derived neoplasias. AID is also expressed in response to inflammatory cues in epithelial cells, raising the possibility that AID mutagenic activity might drive carcinoma development. We directly tested this hypothesis by generating conditional knock-in mouse models for AID overexpression in colon and pancreas epithelium. AID overexpression alone was not sufficient to promote epithelial cell neoplasia in these tissues, in spite of displaying mutagenic and genotoxic activity. Instead, we found that heterologous AID expression in pancreas promotes the expression of NKG2D ligands, the recruitment of CD8+ T cells, and the induction of epithelial cell death. Our results indicate that AID oncogenic potential in epithelial cells can be neutralized by immunosurveillance protective mechanisms. PMID:26282919

  7. AID-expressing epithelium is protected from oncogenic transformation by an NKG2D surveillance pathway.

    PubMed

    Pérez-García, Arantxa; Pérez-Durán, Pablo; Wossning, Thomas; Sernandez, Isora V; Mur, Sonia M; Cañamero, Marta; Real, Francisco X; Ramiro, Almudena R

    2015-10-01

    Activation-induced deaminase (AID) initiates secondary antibody diversification in germinal center B cells, giving rise to higher affinity antibodies through somatic hypermutation (SHM) or to isotype-switched antibodies through class switch recombination (CSR). SHM and CSR are triggered by AID-mediated deamination of cytosines in immunoglobulin genes. Importantly, AID activity in B cells is not restricted to Ig loci and can promote mutations and pro-lymphomagenic translocations, establishing a direct oncogenic mechanism for germinal center-derived neoplasias. AID is also expressed in response to inflammatory cues in epithelial cells, raising the possibility that AID mutagenic activity might drive carcinoma development. We directly tested this hypothesis by generating conditional knock-in mouse models for AID overexpression in colon and pancreas epithelium. AID overexpression alone was not sufficient to promote epithelial cell neoplasia in these tissues, in spite of displaying mutagenic and genotoxic activity. Instead, we found that heterologous AID expression in pancreas promotes the expression of NKG2D ligands, the recruitment of CD8(+) T cells, and the induction of epithelial cell death. Our results indicate that AID oncogenic potential in epithelial cells can be neutralized by immunosurveillance protective mechanisms. PMID:26282919

  8. Elevated vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 in AIDS encephalitis induced by simian immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Sasseville, V. G.; Newman, W. A.; Lackner, A. A.; Smith, M. O.; Lausen, N. C.; Beall, D.; Ringler, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    AIDS encephalitis is a common sequela to HIV-1 infection in humans and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIVmac) infection in macaques. Although lentiviral-infected macrophages comprise parenchymal inflammatory infiltrates in affected brain tissue, the mechanisms responsible for leukocyte trafficking to the central nervous system in AIDS are unknown. In this study, we investigated the expression of various endothelial-derived leukocyte adhesion proteins in SIVmac-induced AIDS encephalitis. Encephalitic brains from SIVmac-infected macaques, but not uninflamed brains from other SIVmac-infected animals, were found to express abundant vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) protein on the majority of arteriolar, venular, and capillary endothelial cells. Soluble VCAM-1 concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from encephalitic animals were increased approximately 20-fold above those from animals without AIDS encephalitis. Expression of other endothelial-related adhesion molecules, including E-selectin, P-selectin, and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), was not uniformly associated with AIDS encephalitis. Thus, the presence of VCAM-1 in both brain and CSF was uniformly associated with SIVmac-induced disease of the central nervous system, and this expression may, at least in part, influence monocyte and lymphocyte recruitment to the central nervous system during the development of AIDS encephalitis. Moreover, measurement of soluble VCAM-1 in CSF may assist in the clinical assessment of animals or people with AIDS. Images Figure 1 PMID:1279978

  9. AID induces intraclonal diversity and genomic damage in CD86(+) chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Huemer, Michael; Rebhandl, Stefan; Zaborsky, Nadja; Gassner, Franz J; Hainzl, Stefan; Weiss, Lukas; Hebenstreit, Daniel; Greil, Richard; Geisberger, Roland

    2014-12-01

    The activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) mediates somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination of the Ig genes by directly deaminating cytosines to uracils. As AID causes a substantial amount of off-target mutations, its activity has been associated with lymphomagenesis and clonal evolution of B-cell malignancies. Although it has been shown that AID is expressed in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), a clear analysis of in vivo AID activity in this B-cell malignancy remained elusive. In this study performed on primary human CLL samples, we report that, despite the presence of a dominant VDJ heavy chain region, a substantial intraclonal diversity was observed at VDJ as well as at IgM switch regions (Sμ), showing ongoing AID activity in vivo during disease progression. This AID-mediated heterogeneity was higher in CLL subclones expressing CD86, which we identified as the proliferative CLL fraction. Finally, CD86 expression correlated with shortened time to first treatment and increased γ-H2AX focus formation. Our data demonstrate that AID is active in CLL in vivo and thus, AID likely contributes to clonal evolution of CLL.

  10. AID induces intraclonal diversity and genomic damage in CD86+ chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Huemer, Michael; Rebhandl, Stefan; Zaborsky, Nadja; Gassner, Franz J; Hainzl, Stefan; Weiss, Lukas; Hebenstreit, Daniel; Greil, Richard; Geisberger, Roland

    2014-01-01

    The activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) mediates somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination of the Ig genes by directly deaminating cytosines to uracils. As AID causes a substantial amount of off-target mutations, its activity has been associated with lymphomagenesis and clonal evolution of B-cell malignancies. Although it has been shown that AID is expressed in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), a clear analysis of in vivo AID activity in this B-cell malignancy remained elusive. In this study performed on primary human CLL samples, we report that, despite the presence of a dominant VDJ heavy chain region, a substantial intraclonal diversity was observed at VDJ as well as at IgM switch regions (Sμ), showing ongoing AID activity in vivo during disease progression. This AID-mediated heterogeneity was higher in CLL subclones expressing CD86, which we identified as the proliferative CLL fraction. Finally, CD86 expression correlated with shortened time to first treatment and increased γ-H2AX focus formation. Our data demonstrate that AID is active in CLL in vivo and thus, AID likely contributes to clonal evolution of CLL. PMID:25179679

  11. HIV/AIDS and professional freedom of expression in Japan.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Masami

    2002-07-01

    A senior physician with a government role in Japan made a widely reported and misleading statement about Thailand's policy on HIV/AIDS patients. He claimed that in Thailand the policy is to spend public money on the prevention of HIV infection while allowing AIDS patients to die untreated. The author, a community nursing specialist in Japan with first-hand knowledge of HIV/AIDS policy in Thailand, thought that this statement would influence attitudes negatively in Japan. However, speaking out about this misrepresentation of the facts carried certain risks. Although freedom of expression is valued in Japan, in practice it is not easy to contradict senior medical professionals. The author uses his experience of this difficult professional situation to teach nurses how to approach speaking out in the public interest.

  12. AID, p53 and MLH1 expression in early gastric neoplasms and the correlation with the background mucosa

    PubMed Central

    KAWATA, SOICHIRO; YASHIMA, KAZUO; YAMAMOTO, SOHEI; SASAKI, SHUJI; TAKEDA, YOHEI; HAYASHI, AKIHIRO; MATSUMOTO, KAZUYA; KAWAGUCHI, KOICHIRO; HARADA, KENICHI; MURAWAKI, YOSHIKAZU

    2015-01-01

    A number of tumor-associated genes have been associated with gastric cancer development. The present study evaluated differences in tumor-associated protein expression and phenotype among early gastric neoplasms, and correlated these data with those of the background mucosa. The expression of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), p53 and MLH1 in 151 early gastric neoplasms [22 gastric adenomas, 92 intramucosal carcinomas (MCs), and 37 submucosal carcinomas (SMCs)] was examined immunohistochemically and compared with that of the corresponding background mucosal condition. The cellular phenotypes of the neoplasms and the corresponding background intestinal metaplasia were also determined. Aberrant AID, p53 and MLH1 expression was detected in 36.4, 0 and 0% of the adenomas, in 35.9, 32.6 and 16.3% of the MCs, and in 56.8, 62.2 and 21.6% of the SMCs, respectively. The frequency of aberrant AID and p53 expression in the SMCs was significantly increased compared with that in the MCs (AID, P<0.05; p53, P<0.01). Aberrant AID expression was significantly associated with p53 overexpression in the SMCs (P<0.01), but not in the adenomas or MCs. In addition, AID expression was associated with the severity of mononuclear cell activity in the non-cancerous mucosa adjacent to the tumor (P<0.05), particularly in the SMC cases. The percentage of MCs (34.8%) and SMCs (24.3%) that were of the gastric phenotype was higher compared with the percentage of adenomas (18.2%). These results indicated that p53 and MLH1 expression and a gastric phenotype may be important for carcinogenesis, and that chronic inflammation and AID and p53 expression are associated with submucosal progression. PMID:26622562

  13. Generation and characterization of induced pluripotent stem cells from Aid-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Shimamoto, Ren; Amano, Naoki; Ichisaka, Tomoko; Watanabe, Akira; Yamanaka, Shinya; Okita, Keisuke

    2014-01-01

    It has been shown that DNA demethylation plays a pivotal role in the generation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. However, the underlying mechanism of this action is still unclear. Previous reports indicated that activation-induced cytidine deaminase (Aid, also known as Aicda) is involved in DNA demethylation in several developmental processes, as well as cell fusion-mediated reprogramming. Based on these reports, we hypothesized that Aid may be involved in the DNA demethylation that occurs during the generation of iPS cells. In this study, we examined the function of Aid in iPS cell generation using Aid knockout (Aid⁻/⁻) mice expressing a GFP reporter under the control of a pluripotent stem cell marker, Nanog. By introducing Oct3/4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc, Nanog-GFP-positive iPS cells could be generated from the fibroblasts and primary B cells of Aid⁻/⁻ mice. Their induction efficiency was similar to that of wild-type (Aid⁺/⁺) iPS cells. The Aid⁻/⁻ iPS cells showed normal proliferation and gave rise to chimeras, indicating their capacity for self-renewal and pluripotency. A comprehensive DNA methylation analysis showed only a few differences between Aid⁺/⁺ and Aid⁻/⁻ iPS cells. These data suggest that Aid does not have crucial functions in DNA demethylation during iPS cell generation. PMID:24718089

  14. The auxin-inducible degradation (AID) system enables versatile conditional protein depletion in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liangyu; Ward, Jordan D.; Cheng, Ze; Dernburg, Abby F.

    2015-01-01

    Experimental manipulation of protein abundance in living cells or organisms is an essential strategy for investigation of biological regulatory mechanisms. Whereas powerful techniques for protein expression have been developed in Caenorhabditis elegans, existing tools for conditional disruption of protein function are far more limited. To address this, we have adapted the auxin-inducible degradation (AID) system discovered in plants to enable conditional protein depletion in C. elegans. We report that expression of a modified Arabidopsis TIR1 F-box protein mediates robust auxin-dependent depletion of degron-tagged targets. We document the effectiveness of this system for depletion of nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins in diverse somatic and germline tissues throughout development. Target proteins were depleted in as little as 20-30 min, and their expression could be re-established upon auxin removal. We have engineered strains expressing TIR1 under the control of various promoter and 3′ UTR sequences to drive tissue-specific or temporally regulated expression. The degron tag can be efficiently introduced by CRISPR/Cas9-based genome editing. We have harnessed this system to explore the roles of dynamically expressed nuclear hormone receptors in molting, and to analyze meiosis-specific roles for proteins required for germ line proliferation. Together, our results demonstrate that the AID system provides a powerful new tool for spatiotemporal regulation and analysis of protein function in a metazoan model organism. PMID:26552885

  15. The auxin-inducible degradation (AID) system enables versatile conditional protein depletion in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liangyu; Ward, Jordan D; Cheng, Ze; Dernburg, Abby F

    2015-12-15

    Experimental manipulation of protein abundance in living cells or organisms is an essential strategy for investigation of biological regulatory mechanisms. Whereas powerful techniques for protein expression have been developed in Caenorhabditis elegans, existing tools for conditional disruption of protein function are far more limited. To address this, we have adapted the auxin-inducible degradation (AID) system discovered in plants to enable conditional protein depletion in C. elegans. We report that expression of a modified Arabidopsis TIR1 F-box protein mediates robust auxin-dependent depletion of degron-tagged targets. We document the effectiveness of this system for depletion of nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins in diverse somatic and germline tissues throughout development. Target proteins were depleted in as little as 20-30 min, and their expression could be re-established upon auxin removal. We have engineered strains expressing TIR1 under the control of various promoter and 3' UTR sequences to drive tissue-specific or temporally regulated expression. The degron tag can be efficiently introduced by CRISPR/Cas9-based genome editing. We have harnessed this system to explore the roles of dynamically expressed nuclear hormone receptors in molting, and to analyze meiosis-specific roles for proteins required for germ line proliferation. Together, our results demonstrate that the AID system provides a powerful new tool for spatiotemporal regulation and analysis of protein function in a metazoan model organism.

  16. AID-induced remodeling of immunoglobulin genes and B cell fate.

    PubMed

    Laffleur, Brice; Denis-Lagache, Nicolas; Péron, Sophie; Sirac, Christophe; Moreau, Jeanne; Cogné, Michel

    2014-03-15

    Survival and phenotype of normal and malignant B lymphocytes are critically dependent on constitutive signals by the B cell receptor (BCR) for antigen. In addition, either antigen ligation of the BCR or various mitogenic stimuli result in B cell activation and induction of activation-induced deaminase (AID). AID activity can in turn mediate somatic hypermutation (SHM) of immunoglobulin (Ig) V regions and also deeply remodel the Ig heavy chain locus through class switch recombination (CSR) or locus suicide recombination (LSR). In addition to changes linked to affinity for antigen, modifying the class/isotype (i.e. the structure and function) of the BCR or suddenly deleting BCR expression also modulates the fate of antigen-experienced B cells.

  17. High expression of AID and active class switch recombination might account for a more aggressive disease in unmutated CLL patients: link with an activated microenvironment in CLL disease.

    PubMed

    Palacios, Florencia; Moreno, Pilar; Morande, Pablo; Abreu, Cecilia; Correa, Agustín; Porro, Valentina; Landoni, Ana Ines; Gabus, Raul; Giordano, Mirta; Dighiero, Guillermo; Pritsch, Otto; Oppezzo, Pablo

    2010-06-01

    Interaction of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) B cells with tissue microenvironment has been suggested to favor disease progression by promoting malignant B-cell growth. Previous work has shown expression in peripheral blood (PB) of CLL B cells of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) among CLL patients with an unmutated (UM) profile of immunoglobulin genes and with ongoing class switch recombination (CSR) process. Because AID expression results from interaction with activated tissue microenvironment, we speculated whether the small subset with ongoing CSR is responsible for high levels of AID expression and could be derived from this particular microenvironment. In this work, we quantified AID expression and ongoing CSR in PB of 50 CLL patients and characterized the expression of different molecules related to microenvironment interaction. Our results show that among UM patients (1) high AID expression is restricted to the subpopulation of tumoral cells ongoing CSR; (2) this small subset expresses high levels of proliferation, antiapoptotic and progression markers (Ki-67, c-myc, Bcl-2, CD49d, and CCL3/4 chemokines). Overall, this work outlines the importance of a cellular subset in PB of UM CLL patients with a poor clinical outcome, high AID levels, and ongoing CSR, whose presence might be a hallmark of a recent contact with the microenvironment. PMID:20233972

  18. Inducible gene expression systems for plants.

    PubMed

    Borghi, Lorenzo

    2010-01-01

    Several systems for induction of transgene expression in plants have been described recently. Inducible systems were used mainly in tobacco, rice, Arabidopsis, tomato, and maize. Inducible systems offer researchers the possibility to deregulate gene expression levels at particular stages of plant development and in particular tissues of interest. The more precise temporal and spatial control, obtained by providing the transgenic plant with the appropriate chemical compound or treatment, permits to analyze also the function of those genes required for plant viability. In addition, inducible systems allow promoting local changes in gene expression levels without causing gross alterations to the whole plant development. Here, protocols will be presented to work with five different inducible systems: AlcR/AlcA (ethanol inducible); GR fusions, GVG, and pOp/LhGR (dexamethasone inducible); XVE/OlexA (beta-estradiol inducible); and heat shock induction. PMID:20734254

  19. Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is localized to subnuclear domains enriched in splicing factors

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Yi Ericsson, Ida Doseth, Berit Liabakk, Nina B. Krokan, Hans E. Kavli, Bodil

    2014-03-10

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is the mutator enzyme in adaptive immunity. AID initiates the antibody diversification processes in activated B cells by deaminating cytosine to uracil in immunoglobulin genes. To some extent other genes are also targeted, which may lead to genome instability and B cell malignancy. Thus, it is crucial to understand its targeting and regulation mechanisms. AID is regulated at several levels including subcellular compartmentalization. However, the complex nuclear distribution and trafficking of AID has not been studied in detail previously. In this work, we examined the subnuclear localization of AID and its interaction partner CTNNBL1 and found that they associate with spliceosome-associated structures including Cajal bodies and nuclear speckles. Moreover, protein kinase A (PKA), which activates AID by phosphorylation at Ser38, is present together with AID in nuclear speckles. Importantly, we demonstrate that AID physically associates with the major spliceosome subunits (small nuclear ribonucleoproteins, snRNPs), as well as other essential splicing components, in addition to the transcription machinery. Based on our findings and the literature, we suggest a transcription-coupled splicing-associated model for AID targeting and activation. - Highlights: • AID and its interaction partner CTNNBL1 localize to Cajal bodies and nuclear speckles. • AID associates with its activating kinase PKA in nuclear speckles. • AID is linked to the splicing machinery in switching B-cells. • Our findings suggest a transcription-coupled splicing associated mechanism for AID targeting and activation.

  20. Nonimmunoglobulin target loci of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) share unique features with immunoglobulin genes

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Lucia; Begum, Nasim A.; Burroughs, A. Maxwell; Doi, Tomomitsu; Kawai, Jun; Daub, Carsten O.; Kawaguchi, Takahisa; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Honjo, Tasuku

    2012-01-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is required for both somatic hypermutation and class-switch recombination in activated B cells. AID is also known to target nonimmunoglobulin genes and introduce mutations or chromosomal translocations, eventually causing tumors. To identify as-yet-unknown AID targets, we screened early AID-induced DNA breaks by using two independent genome-wide approaches. Along with known AID targets, this screen identified a set of unique genes (SNHG3, MALAT1, BCL7A, and CUX1) and confirmed that these loci accumulated mutations as frequently as Ig locus after AID activation. Moreover, these genes share three important characteristics with the Ig gene: translocations in tumors, repetitive sequences, and the epigenetic modification of chromatin by H3K4 trimethylation in the vicinity of cleavage sites. PMID:22308462

  1. Nonimmunoglobulin target loci of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) share unique features with immunoglobulin genes.

    PubMed

    Kato, Lucia; Begum, Nasim A; Burroughs, A Maxwell; Doi, Tomomitsu; Kawai, Jun; Daub, Carsten O; Kawaguchi, Takahisa; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Honjo, Tasuku

    2012-02-14

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is required for both somatic hypermutation and class-switch recombination in activated B cells. AID is also known to target nonimmunoglobulin genes and introduce mutations or chromosomal translocations, eventually causing tumors. To identify as-yet-unknown AID targets, we screened early AID-induced DNA breaks by using two independent genome-wide approaches. Along with known AID targets, this screen identified a set of unique genes (SNHG3, MALAT1, BCL7A, and CUX1) and confirmed that these loci accumulated mutations as frequently as Ig locus after AID activation. Moreover, these genes share three important characteristics with the Ig gene: translocations in tumors, repetitive sequences, and the epigenetic modification of chromatin by H3K4 trimethylation in the vicinity of cleavage sites.

  2. Fate Mapping for Activation-Induced Cytidine Deaminase (AID) Marks Non-Lymphoid Cells During Mouse Development

    PubMed Central

    Rommel, Philipp C.; Bosque, David; Gitlin, Alexander D.; Croft, Gist F.; Heintz, Nathaniel; Casellas, Rafael; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Kriaucionis, Skirmantas; Robbiani, Davide F.

    2013-01-01

    The Aicda gene encodes Activation-Induced cytidine Deaminase (AID), an enzyme essential for remodeling antibody genes in mature B lymphocytes. AID is also responsible for DNA damage at oncogenes, leading to their mutation and cancer-associated chromosome translocation in lymphoma. We used fate mapping and AIDGFP reporter mice to determine if AID expression in the mouse extends beyond lymphocytes. We discovered that AIDcre tags a small fraction of non-lymphoid cells starting at 10.5 days post conception (dpc), and that AIDGFP+ cells are detectable at dpc 11.5 and 12.5. Embryonic cells are tagged by AIDcre in the submandibular region, where conditional deletion of the tumor suppressor PTEN causes squamous papillomas. AIDcre also tags non-lymphoid cells in the embryonic central nervous system. Finally, in the adult mouse brain, AIDcre marks a small fraction of diverse neurons and distinct neuronal populations, including pyramidal cells in cortical layer IV. PMID:23861962

  3. Flavin-Induced Oligomerization in Escherichia coli Adaptive Response Protein AidB

    SciTech Connect

    Hamill, Michael J.; Jost, Marco; Wong, Cintyu; Elliott, Sean J.; Drennan, Catherine L.

    2011-11-21

    The process known as 'adaptive response' allows Escherichia coli to respond to small doses of DNA-methylating agents by upregulating the expression of four proteins. While the role of three of these proteins in mitigating DNA damage is well understood, the function of AidB is less clear. Although AidB is a flavoprotein, no catalytic role has been established for the bound cofactor. Here we investigate the possibility that flavin plays a structural role in the assembly of the AidB tetramer. We report the generation and biophysical characterization of deflavinated AidB and of an AidB mutant that has greatly reduced affinity for flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD). Using fluorescence quenching and analytical ultracentrifugation, we find that apo AidB has a high affinity for FAD, as indicated by an apparent dissociation constant of 402.1 {+-} 35.1 nM, and that binding of substoichiometric amounts of FAD triggers a transition in the AidB oligomeric state. In particular, deflavinated AidB is dimeric, whereas the addition of FAD yields a tetramer. We further investigate the dimerization and tetramerization interfaces of AidB by determining a 2.8 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure in space group P3{sub 2} that contains three intact tetramers in the asymmetric unit. Taken together, our findings provide strong evidence that FAD plays a structural role in the formation of tetrameric AidB.

  4. Flavin-Induced Oligomerization in Escherichia coli Adaptive Response Protein AidB

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The process known as “adaptive response” allows Escherichia coli to respond to small doses of DNA-methylating agents by upregulating the expression of four proteins. While the role of three of these proteins in mitigating DNA damage is well understood, the function of AidB is less clear. Although AidB is a flavoprotein, no catalytic role has been established for the bound cofactor. Here we investigate the possibility that flavin plays a structural role in the assembly of the AidB tetramer. We report the generation and biophysical characterization of deflavinated AidB and of an AidB mutant that has greatly reduced affinity for flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD). Using fluorescence quenching and analytical ultracentrifugation, we find that apo AidB has a high affinity for FAD, as indicated by an apparent dissociation constant of 402.1 ± 35.1 nM, and that binding of substoichiometric amounts of FAD triggers a transition in the AidB oligomeric state. In particular, deflavinated AidB is dimeric, whereas the addition of FAD yields a tetramer. We further investigate the dimerization and tetramerization interfaces of AidB by determining a 2.8 Å resolution crystal structure in space group P32 that contains three intact tetramers in the asymmetric unit. Taken together, our findings provide strong evidence that FAD plays a structural role in the formation of tetrameric AidB. PMID:22004173

  5. Nbs1 ChIP-Seq Identifies Off-Target DNA Double-Strand Breaks Induced by AID in Activated Splenic B Cells.

    PubMed

    Khair, Lyne; Baker, Richard E; Linehan, Erin K; Schrader, Carol E; Stavnezer, Janet

    2015-08-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is required for initiation of Ig class switch recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM) of antibody genes during immune responses. AID has also been shown to induce chromosomal translocations, mutations, and DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) involving non-Ig genes in activated B cells. To determine what makes a DNA site a target for AID-induced DSBs, we identify off-target DSBs induced by AID by performing chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) for Nbs1, a protein that binds DSBs, followed by deep sequencing (ChIP-Seq). We detect and characterize hundreds of off-target AID-dependent DSBs. Two types of tandem repeats are highly enriched within the Nbs1-binding sites: long CA repeats, which can form Z-DNA, and tandem pentamers containing the AID target hotspot WGCW. These tandem repeats are not nearly as enriched at AID-independent DSBs, which we also identified. Msh2, a component of the mismatch repair pathway and important for genome stability, increases off-target DSBs, similar to its effect on Ig switch region DSBs, which are required intermediates during CSR. Most of the off-target DSBs are two-ended, consistent with generation during G1 phase, similar to DSBs in Ig switch regions. However, a minority are one-ended, presumably due to conversion of single-strand breaks to DSBs during replication. One-ended DSBs are repaired by processes involving homologous recombination, including break-induced replication repair, which can lead to genome instability. Off-target DSBs, especially those present during S phase, can lead to chromosomal translocations, deletions and gene amplifications, resulting in the high frequency of B cell lymphomas derived from cells that express or have expressed AID.

  6. HIV-induced immunodeficiency and mortality from AIDS-defining and non-AIDS-defining malignancies

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Objective To evaluate deaths from AIDS-defining malignancies (ADM) and non-AIDS-defining malignancies (nADM) in the D:A:D Study and to investigate the relationship between these deaths and immunodeficiency. Design Observational cohort study. Methods Patients (23 437) were followed prospectively for 104 921 person-years. We used Poisson regression models to identify factors independently associated with deaths from ADM and nADM. Analyses of factors associated with mortality due to nADM were repeated after excluding nADM known to be associated with a specific risk factor. Results Three hundred five patients died due to a malignancy, 298 prior to the cutoff for this analysis (ADM: n=110; nADM: n=188). The mortality rate due to ADM decreased from 20.1/1000 person-years of follow-up [95% confidence interval (CI) 14.4, 25.9] when the most recent CD4 cell count was <50 cells/μl to 0.1 (0.03, 0.3)/1000 person-years of follow-up when the CD4 cell count was more than 500 cells/μl; the mortality rate from nADM decreased from 6.0 (95% CI 3.3, 10.1) to 0.6 (0.4, 0.8) per 1000 person-years of follow-up between these two CD4 cell count strata. In multivariable regression analyses, a two-fold higher latest CD4 cell count was associated with a halving of the risk of ADM mortality. Other predictors of an increased risk of ADM mortality were homosexual risk group, older age, a previous (non-malignancy) AIDS diagnosis and earlier calendar years. Predictors of an increased risk of nADM mortality included lower CD4 cell count, older age, current/ex-smoking status, longer cumulative exposure to combination antiretroviral therapy, active hepatitis B infection and earlier calendar year. Conclusion The severity of immunosuppression is predictive of death from both ADM and nADM in HIV-infected populations. PMID:18832878

  7. Inducible gene expression in transgenic Xenopus embryos.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, G N; Hamilton, F S; Hoppler, S

    2000-07-13

    The amphibian Xenopus laevis has been successfully used for many years as a model system for studying vertebrate development. Because of technical limitations, however, molecular investigations have mainly concentrated on early stages. We have developed a straightforward method for stage-specific induction of gene expression in transgenic Xenopus embryos [1] [2]. This method is based on the Xenopus heat shock protein 70 (Xhsp70 [3]) promoter driving the expression of desired gene products. We found that ubiquitous expression of the transgene is induced upon relatively mild heat treatment. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) was used as a marker to monitor successful induction of gene expression in transgenic embryos. We used this method to study the stage specificity of Wnt signalling function. Transient ectopic Wnt-8 expression during early neurulation was sufficient to repress anterior head development and this capacity was restricted to early stages of neurulation. By transient over-expression at different stages of development, we show that frizzled-7 disrupted morphogenesis sequentially from anterior to posterior along the dorsal axis as development proceeds. These results demonstrate that this method for inducible gene expression in transgenic Xenopus embryos will be a very powerful tool for temporal analysis of gene function and for studying molecular mechanisms of vertebrate organogenesis.

  8. Activation-Induced Cytidine Deaminase Expression in Human B Cell Precursors Is Essential for Central B Cell Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Cantaert, Tineke; Schickel, Jean-Nicolas; Bannock, Jason M; Ng, Yen-Shing; Massad, Christopher; Oe, Tyler; Wu, Renee; Lavoie, Aubert; Walter, Jolan E; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Al-Herz, Waleed; Kilic, Sara Sebnem; Ochs, Hans D; Nonoyama, Shigeaki; Durandy, Anne; Meffre, Eric

    2015-11-17

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), the enzyme-mediating class-switch recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM) of immunoglobulin genes, is essential for the removal of developing autoreactive B cells. How AID mediates central B cell tolerance remains unknown. We report that AID enzymes were produced in a discrete population of immature B cells that expressed recombination-activating gene 2 (RAG2), suggesting that they undergo secondary recombination to edit autoreactive antibodies. However, most AID+ immature B cells lacked anti-apoptotic MCL-1 and were deleted by apoptosis. AID inhibition using lentiviral-encoded short hairpin (sh)RNA in B cells developing in humanized mice resulted in a failure to remove autoreactive clones. Hence, B cell intrinsic AID expression mediates central B cell tolerance potentially through its RAG-coupled genotoxic activity in self-reactive immature B cells.

  9. [Acetaminophen-induced hypothermia, an AIDS related side-effect? About 4 cases].

    PubMed

    Denes, Eric; Amaniou, Monique; Rogez, Jean-Philippe; Weinbreck, Pierre; Merle, Louis

    2002-10-01

    Hypothermia is an uncommon side effect of acetaminophen. We report 4 cases of HIV-infected patients who developed hypothermia after intravenous injection of propacetamol (the parenteral formulation of acetaminophen). The mechanism of this hypothermia is unknown. AIDS-induced changes in the metabolism of acetaminophen, could be an explanation. AIDS-associated opportunistic diseases may account for part of the mechanism. These hypothermias occur within 6 hours after the injection, are well tolerated and regress spontaneously. PMID:12486392

  10. Interleukin-1 and tumor necrosis factor-α trigger restriction of hepatitis B virus infection via a cytidine deaminase activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID).

    PubMed

    Watashi, Koichi; Liang, Guoxin; Iwamoto, Masashi; Marusawa, Hiroyuki; Uchida, Nanako; Daito, Takuji; Kitamura, Kouichi; Muramatsu, Masamichi; Ohashi, Hirofumi; Kiyohara, Tomoko; Suzuki, Ryosuke; Li, Jisu; Tong, Shuping; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Murata, Kazumoto; Aizaki, Hideki; Wakita, Takaji

    2013-11-01

    Virus infection is restricted by intracellular immune responses in host cells, and this is typically modulated by stimulation of cytokines. The cytokines and host factors that determine the host cell restriction against hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection are not well understood. We screened 36 cytokines and chemokines to determine which were able to reduce the susceptibility of HepaRG cells to HBV infection. Here, we found that pretreatment with IL-1β and TNFα remarkably reduced the host cell susceptibility to HBV infection. This effect was mediated by activation of the NF-κB signaling pathway. A cytidine deaminase, activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), was up-regulated by both IL-1β and TNFα in a variety of hepatocyte cell lines and primary human hepatocytes. Another deaminase APOBEC3G was not induced by these proinflammatory cytokines. Knockdown of AID expression impaired the anti-HBV effect of IL-1β, and overexpression of AID antagonized HBV infection, suggesting that AID was one of the responsible factors for the anti-HBV activity of IL-1/TNFα. Although AID induced hypermutation of HBV DNA, this activity was dispensable for the anti-HBV activity. The antiviral effect of IL-1/TNFα was also observed on different HBV genotypes but not on hepatitis C virus. These results demonstrate that proinflammatory cytokines IL-1/TNFα trigger a novel antiviral mechanism involving AID to regulate host cell permissiveness to HBV infection.

  11. Interleukin-1 and Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Trigger Restriction of Hepatitis B Virus Infection via a Cytidine Deaminase Activation-induced Cytidine Deaminase (AID)*

    PubMed Central

    Watashi, Koichi; Liang, Guoxin; Iwamoto, Masashi; Marusawa, Hiroyuki; Uchida, Nanako; Daito, Takuji; Kitamura, Kouichi; Muramatsu, Masamichi; Ohashi, Hirofumi; Kiyohara, Tomoko; Suzuki, Ryosuke; Li, Jisu; Tong, Shuping; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Murata, Kazumoto; Aizaki, Hideki; Wakita, Takaji

    2013-01-01

    Virus infection is restricted by intracellular immune responses in host cells, and this is typically modulated by stimulation of cytokines. The cytokines and host factors that determine the host cell restriction against hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection are not well understood. We screened 36 cytokines and chemokines to determine which were able to reduce the susceptibility of HepaRG cells to HBV infection. Here, we found that pretreatment with IL-1β and TNFα remarkably reduced the host cell susceptibility to HBV infection. This effect was mediated by activation of the NF-κB signaling pathway. A cytidine deaminase, activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), was up-regulated by both IL-1β and TNFα in a variety of hepatocyte cell lines and primary human hepatocytes. Another deaminase APOBEC3G was not induced by these proinflammatory cytokines. Knockdown of AID expression impaired the anti-HBV effect of IL-1β, and overexpression of AID antagonized HBV infection, suggesting that AID was one of the responsible factors for the anti-HBV activity of IL-1/TNFα. Although AID induced hypermutation of HBV DNA, this activity was dispensable for the anti-HBV activity. The antiviral effect of IL-1/TNFα was also observed on different HBV genotypes but not on hepatitis C virus. These results demonstrate that proinflammatory cytokines IL-1/TNFα trigger a novel antiviral mechanism involving AID to regulate host cell permissiveness to HBV infection. PMID:24025329

  12. Aberrant activation-induced cytidine deaminase expression in Philadelphia chromosome-positive B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yang; Zhao, Xiaoxian; Durkin, Lisa; Rogers, Heesun Joyce; Hsi, Eric D

    2016-06-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is expressed in germinal center B cells and plays a critical role in somatic hypermutation and class-switch recombination of immunoglobulin genes. Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph+) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) carries a poor prognosis and is specifically treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Interestingly, AID has been shown to be aberrantly expressed and functional in Ph+ ALL and is thought to contribute to genetic instability. We hypothesized that AID might be detectable in routinely processed bone marrow biopsies by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and assist in identifying Ph+ ALL. We found that AID was expressed in 26 (70%) of 37 cases of Ph+ ALL but only 1 (2.9%) of 38 cases of Ph- ALL cases. There was a significant difference in AID expression between these 2 ALL groups (P < .001, Fisher exact test). The expression of AID was confirmed by RT-PCR (reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction) and correlated with IHC scoring. AID protein is expressed in a large proportion of Ph+ ALL cases at levels detectable by IHC in clinical samples and might be useful to rapidly identify cases likely to have a BCR/ABL1 fusion. PMID:26980048

  13. Activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) co-transcriptional scanning at single-molecule resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senavirathne, Gayan; Bertram, Jeffrey G.; Jaszczur, Malgorzata; Chaurasiya, Kathy R.; Pham, Phuong; Mak, Chi H.; Goodman, Myron F.; Rueda, David

    2015-12-01

    Activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) generates antibody diversity in B cells by initiating somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class-switch recombination (CSR) during transcription of immunoglobulin variable (IgV) and switch region (IgS) DNA. Using single-molecule FRET, we show that AID binds to transcribed dsDNA and translocates unidirectionally in concert with RNA polymerase (RNAP) on moving transcription bubbles, while increasing the fraction of stalled bubbles. AID scans randomly when constrained in an 8 nt model bubble. When unconstrained on single-stranded (ss) DNA, AID moves in random bidirectional short slides/hops over the entire molecule while remaining bound for ~5 min. Our analysis distinguishes dynamic scanning from static ssDNA creasing. That AID alone can track along with RNAP during transcription and scan within stalled transcription bubbles suggests a mechanism by which AID can initiate SHM and CSR when properly regulated, yet when unregulated can access non-Ig genes and cause cancer.

  14. Activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) co-transcriptional scanning at single-molecule resolution.

    PubMed

    Senavirathne, Gayan; Bertram, Jeffrey G; Jaszczur, Malgorzata; Chaurasiya, Kathy R; Pham, Phuong; Mak, Chi H; Goodman, Myron F; Rueda, David

    2015-01-01

    Activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) generates antibody diversity in B cells by initiating somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class-switch recombination (CSR) during transcription of immunoglobulin variable (IgV) and switch region (IgS) DNA. Using single-molecule FRET, we show that AID binds to transcribed dsDNA and translocates unidirectionally in concert with RNA polymerase (RNAP) on moving transcription bubbles, while increasing the fraction of stalled bubbles. AID scans randomly when constrained in an 8 nt model bubble. When unconstrained on single-stranded (ss) DNA, AID moves in random bidirectional short slides/hops over the entire molecule while remaining bound for ∼ 5 min. Our analysis distinguishes dynamic scanning from static ssDNA creasing. That AID alone can track along with RNAP during transcription and scan within stalled transcription bubbles suggests a mechanism by which AID can initiate SHM and CSR when properly regulated, yet when unregulated can access non-Ig genes and cause cancer. PMID:26681117

  15. Hyperbaric oxygen treatment induces antioxidant gene expression.

    PubMed

    Godman, Cassandra A; Joshi, Rashmi; Giardina, Charles; Perdrizet, George; Hightower, Lawrence E

    2010-06-01

    Although the underlying molecular causes of aging are not entirely clear, hormetic agents like exercise, heat, and calorie restriction may generate a mild pro-oxidant stress that induces cell protective responses to promote healthy aging. As an individual ages, many cellular and physiological processes decline, including wound healing and reparative angiogenesis. This is particularly critical in patients with chronic non-healing wounds who tend to be older. We are interested in the potential beneficial effects of hyperbaric oxygen as a mild hormetic stress on human microvascular endothelial cells. We analyzed global gene expression changes in human endothelial cells following a hyperbaric exposure comparable to a clinical treatment. Our analysis revealed an upregulation of antioxidant, cytoprotective, and immediate early genes. This increase coincided with an increased resistance to a lethal oxidative stress. Our data indicate that hyperbaric oxygen can induce protection against oxidative insults in endothelial cells and may provide an easily administered hormetic treatment to help promote healthy aging.

  16. 53BP1 alters the landscape of DNA rearrangements and suppresses AID-induced B cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Jankovic, Mila; Feldhahn, Niklas; Oliveira, Thiago Y.; Silva, Israel T.; Kieffer-Kwon, Kyong-rim; Yamane, Arito; Resch, Wolfgang; Klein, Isaac; Robbiani, Davide F.; Casellas, Rafael; Nussenzweig, Michel C.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Deficiencies in factors that regulate the DNA damage response enhance the incidence of malignancy by destabilizing the genome. However, the precise influence of the DNA damage response on regulation of cancer-associated rearrangements is not well defined. Here we examine the genome-wide impact of tumor protein P53-binding protein 1 (53BP1) deficiency in lymphoma and translocation. While both activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) and 53BP1 have been associated with cancer in humans, neither AID over-expression nor loss of 53BP1 is sufficient to produce malignancy. However, the combination of 53BP1 deficiency and AID deregulation results in B cell lymphoma. Deep sequencing of the genome of 53BP1−/− cancer cells, and translocation capture sequencing (TC-Seq) of primary 53BP1−/− B cells revealed that their chromosomal rearrangements differ from those found in wild-type cells in that they show increased DNA end resection. Moreover, loss of 53BP1 alters the translocatome by increasing rearrangements to intergenic regions. PMID:23290917

  17. Expression and Function of the Chemokine, CXCL13, and Its Receptor, CXCR5, in Aids-Associated Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Widney, Daniel P.; Gui, Dorina; Popoviciu, Laura M.; Said, Jonathan W.; Breen, Elizabeth C.; Huang, Xin; Kitchen, Christina M. R.; Alcantar, Juan M.; Smith, Jeffrey B.; Detels, Roger; Martínez-Maza, Otoniel

    2010-01-01

    Background. The homeostatic chemokine, CXCL13 (BLC, BCA-1), helps direct the recirculation of mature, resting B cells, which express its receptor, CXCR5. CXCL13/CXCR5 are expressed, and may play a role, in some non-AIDS-associated B cell tumors. Objective. To determine if CXCL13/CXCR5 are associated with AIDS-related non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (AIDS-NHL). Methods. Serum CXCL13 levels were measured by ELISA in 46 subjects who developed AIDS-NHL in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study and in controls. The expression or function of CXCL13 and CXCR5 was examined on primary AIDS-NHL specimens or AIDS-NHL cell lines. Results. Serum CXCL13 levels were significantly elevated in the AIDS-NHL group compared to controls. All primary AIDS-NHL specimens showed CXCR5 expression and most also showed CXCL13 expression. AIDS-NHL cell lines expressed CXCR5 and showed chemotaxis towards CXCL13. Conclusions. CXCL13/CXCR5 are expressed in AIDS-NHL and could potentially be involved in its biology. CXCL13 may have potential as a biomarker for AIDS-NHL. PMID:21490903

  18. Expression and Function of the Chemokine, CXCL13, and Its Receptor, CXCR5, in Aids-Associated Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Widney, Daniel P; Gui, Dorina; Popoviciu, Laura M; Said, Jonathan W; Breen, Elizabeth C; Huang, Xin; Kitchen, Christina M R; Alcantar, Juan M; Smith, Jeffrey B; Detels, Roger; Martínez-Maza, Otoniel

    2010-01-01

    Background. The homeostatic chemokine, CXCL13 (BLC, BCA-1), helps direct the recirculation of mature, resting B cells, which express its receptor, CXCR5. CXCL13/CXCR5 are expressed, and may play a role, in some non-AIDS-associated B cell tumors. Objective. To determine if CXCL13/CXCR5 are associated with AIDS-related non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (AIDS-NHL). Methods. Serum CXCL13 levels were measured by ELISA in 46 subjects who developed AIDS-NHL in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study and in controls. The expression or function of CXCL13 and CXCR5 was examined on primary AIDS-NHL specimens or AIDS-NHL cell lines. Results. Serum CXCL13 levels were significantly elevated in the AIDS-NHL group compared to controls. All primary AIDS-NHL specimens showed CXCR5 expression and most also showed CXCL13 expression. AIDS-NHL cell lines expressed CXCR5 and showed chemotaxis towards CXCL13. Conclusions. CXCL13/CXCR5 are expressed in AIDS-NHL and could potentially be involved in its biology. CXCL13 may have potential as a biomarker for AIDS-NHL. PMID:21490903

  19. Gravity-Induced Gene Expression in Plants.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sederoff, Heike; Heber, Steffen; Howard, Brian; Myburg-Nichols, Henrietta; Hammond, Rebecca; Salinas-Mondragon, Raul; Brown, Christopher S.

    Plants sense changes in their orientation towards the vector of gravity and respond with directional growth. Several metabolites in the signal transduction cascade have been identified. However, very little is known about the interaction between these sensing and signal transduction events and even less is known about their role in the differential growth response. Gravity induced changes in transcript abundance have been identified in Arabidopsis whole seedlings and root apices (Moseyko et al. 2002; Kimbrough et al. 2004). Gravity induced transcript abundance changes can be observed within less than 1 min after stimulation (Salinas-Mondragon et al. 2005). Gene expression however requires not only transcription but also translation of the mRNA. Translation can only occur when mRNA is associated with ribosomes, even though not all mRNA associated with ribosomes is actively translated. To approximate translational capacity we quantified whole genome transcript abundances in corn stem pulvini during the first hour after gravity stimulation in total and poly-ribosomal fractions. As in Arabidopsis root apices, transcript abundances of several clusters of genes responded to gravity stimulation. The vast majority of these transcripts were also found to associate with polyribosomes in the same temporal and quantitative pattern. These genes are transcriptionally regulated by gravity stimulation, but do not exhibit translational regulation. However, a small group of genes showed increased transcriptional regulation after gravity stimulation, but no association with polysomes. These transcripts likely are translationally repressed. The mechanism of translational repression for these transcripts is unknown. Based on the hypothesis that the genes essential for gravitropic responses should be expressed in most or all species, we compared the temporal gravity induced expression pattern of all orthologs identified between maize and Arabidopsis. A small group of genes showed high

  20. A combined nuclear and nucleolar localization motif in activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) controls immunoglobulin class switching.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yi; Ericsson, Ida; Torseth, Kathrin; Methot, Stephen P; Sundheim, Ottar; Liabakk, Nina B; Slupphaug, Geir; Di Noia, Javier M; Krokan, Hans E; Kavli, Bodil

    2013-01-23

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is a DNA mutator enzyme essential for adaptive immunity. AID initiates somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination (CSR) by deaminating cytosine to uracil in specific immunoglobulin (Ig) gene regions. However, other loci, including cancer-related genes, are also targeted. Thus, tight regulation of AID is crucial to balance immunity versus disease such as cancer. AID is regulated by several mechanisms including nucleocytoplasmic shuttling. Here we have studied nuclear import kinetics and subnuclear trafficking of AID in live cells and characterized in detail its nuclear localization signal. Importantly, we find that the nuclear localization signal motif also directs AID to nucleoli where it colocalizes with its interaction partner, catenin-β-like 1 (CTNNBL1), and physically associates with nucleolin and nucleophosmin. Moreover, we demonstrate that release of AID from nucleoli is dependent on its C-terminal motif. Finally, we find that CSR efficiency correlates strongly with the arithmetic product of AID nuclear import rate and DNA deamination activity. Our findings suggest that directional nucleolar transit is important for the physiological function of AID and demonstrate that nuclear/nucleolar import and DNA cytosine deamination together define the biological activity of AID. This is the first study on subnuclear trafficking of AID and demonstrates a new level in its complex regulation. In addition, our results resolve the problem related to dissociation of deamination activity and CSR activity of AID mutants.

  1. Live Cell MicroRNA Imaging Using Exonuclease III-Aided Recycling Amplification Based on Aggregation-Induced Emission Luminogens.

    PubMed

    Min, Xuehong; Zhang, Mengshi; Huang, Fujian; Lou, Xiaoding; Xia, Fan

    2016-04-13

    Enzyme-assisted detection strategies of microRNAs (miRNAs) in vitro have accomplished both great sensitivity and specificity. However, low expression of miRNAs and a complex environment in cells induces big challenges for monitoring and tracking miRNAs in vivo. The work reports the attempt to carry miRNA imaging into live cells, by enzyme-aided recycling amplification. We utilize facile probes based yellow aggregation-induced emission luminogens (AIEgens) with super photostable property but without quencher, which are applied to monitor miRNAs not only from urine sample extracts (in vitro) but also in live cells (in vivo). The assay could distinguish the cancer patients' urine samples from the healthy urine due to the good specificity. Moreover, the probe showed much higher fluorescence intensity in breast cancer cells (MCF-7) (miR-21 in high expression) than that in cervical cancer cells (HeLa) and human lung fibroblast cells (HLF) (miR-21 in low expression) in more than 60 min, which showed the good performance and super photostability for the probe in vivo. As controls, another two probes with FAM/Cy3 and corresponding quenchers, respectively, could perform miRNAs detections in vitro and parts of in vivo tests but were not suitable for the long-term cell tracking due to the photobleach phenomena, which also demonstrates that the probe with AIEgens is a potential candidate for the accurate identification of cancer biomarkers. PMID:27011025

  2. Live Cell MicroRNA Imaging Using Exonuclease III-Aided Recycling Amplification Based on Aggregation-Induced Emission Luminogens.

    PubMed

    Min, Xuehong; Zhang, Mengshi; Huang, Fujian; Lou, Xiaoding; Xia, Fan

    2016-04-13

    Enzyme-assisted detection strategies of microRNAs (miRNAs) in vitro have accomplished both great sensitivity and specificity. However, low expression of miRNAs and a complex environment in cells induces big challenges for monitoring and tracking miRNAs in vivo. The work reports the attempt to carry miRNA imaging into live cells, by enzyme-aided recycling amplification. We utilize facile probes based yellow aggregation-induced emission luminogens (AIEgens) with super photostable property but without quencher, which are applied to monitor miRNAs not only from urine sample extracts (in vitro) but also in live cells (in vivo). The assay could distinguish the cancer patients' urine samples from the healthy urine due to the good specificity. Moreover, the probe showed much higher fluorescence intensity in breast cancer cells (MCF-7) (miR-21 in high expression) than that in cervical cancer cells (HeLa) and human lung fibroblast cells (HLF) (miR-21 in low expression) in more than 60 min, which showed the good performance and super photostability for the probe in vivo. As controls, another two probes with FAM/Cy3 and corresponding quenchers, respectively, could perform miRNAs detections in vitro and parts of in vivo tests but were not suitable for the long-term cell tracking due to the photobleach phenomena, which also demonstrates that the probe with AIEgens is a potential candidate for the accurate identification of cancer biomarkers.

  3. An inducible expression system for high-level expression of recombinant proteins in slow growing mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Leotta, Lisa; Spratt, Joanne M; Kong, Carlyn U; Triccas, James A

    2015-09-01

    A novel protein expression vector utilising the inducible hspX promoter of Mycobacterium tuberculosis was constructed and evaluated in this study. High-level induction of three mycobacterial antigens, comprising up to 9% of bacterial sonicate, was demonstrated in recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG when grown under low-oxygen tension, which serves to enhance hspX promoter activity. Recombinant proteins were efficiently purified from bacterial lysates in a soluble form by virtue of a C-terminal 6-histidine tag. Purification of the immunodominant M. tuberculosis Ag85B antigen using this system resulted in a recombinant protein that stimulated significant IFN-γ release from Ag85B-reactive T cells generated after vaccination of mice with an Ag85B-expressing vaccine. Further, the M. tuberculosis L-alanine dehydrogenase (Ald) protein purified from recombinant BCG displayed strong enzymatic activity in recombinant form. This study demonstrated that high levels of native-like recombinant mycobacterial proteins can be produced in mycobacterial hosts, and this may aid the analysis of mycobacterial protein function and the development of new treatments. PMID:26021569

  4. Transgenic Mice Expressing Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 in Immune Cells Develop a Severe AIDS-Like Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, Zaher; Kay, Denis G.; Cool, Marc; Jothy, Serge; Rebai, Najet; Jolicoeur, Paul

    1998-01-01

    We have constructed transgenic (Tg) mice expressing the entire human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) coding sequences in cells targeted by HIV-1 infection in humans. These Tg mice developed a severe AIDS-like disease leading to early death (<1 month). They developed muscle wasting, severe atrophy and fibrosis of lymphoid organs, tubulointerstitial nephritis, and lymphoid interstitial pneumonitis. In addition the expression of RANTES was increased in various tissues of these Tg mice relative to that in the normal controls. Disease appearance was correlated with the levels of transgene expression. The numerous pathologies observed in these mice are remarkably similar to those observed in human AIDS and, more specifically, in pediatric AIDS. PMID:9420207

  5. Synthetic riboswitches that induce gene expression in diverse bacterial species.

    PubMed

    Topp, Shana; Reynoso, Colleen M K; Seeliger, Jessica C; Goldlust, Ian S; Desai, Shawn K; Murat, Dorothée; Shen, Aimee; Puri, Aaron W; Komeili, Arash; Bertozzi, Carolyn R; Scott, June R; Gallivan, Justin P

    2010-12-01

    We developed a series of ligand-inducible riboswitches that control gene expression in diverse species of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, including human pathogens that have few or no previously reported inducible expression systems. We anticipate that these riboswitches will be useful tools for genetic studies in a wide range of bacteria. PMID:20935124

  6. Implications of interferon-induced tryptophan catabolism in cancer, auto-immune diseases and AIDS.

    PubMed

    Brown, R R; Ozaki, Y; Datta, S P; Borden, E C; Sondel, P M; Malone, D G

    1991-01-01

    Tryptophan (Trp) is an indispensable amino acid required for biosynthesis of proteins, serotonin and niacin. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is induced by infections, viruses, lipopolysaccharides, or interferons (IFNs) and this results in significant catabolism of Trp along the kynurenine (Kyn) pathway. Intracellular growth of Toxoplasma gondii and Chlamydia psittaci in human fibroblasts in vitro is inhibited by IFN-gamma and this inhibition is negated by extra Trp in the medium. Similarly, growth of a number of human cell lines in vitro is inhibited by IFN-gamma and addition of extra Trp restores growth. Thus, in some in vitro systems, antiproliferative effects of IFN-gamma are mediated by induced depletion of Trp. We find that cancer patients given Type I or Type II IFNs can induce IDO which results in decreased serum Trp levels (20-50% of pretreatment) and increased urinary metabolites of the Kyn pathway (5 to 500 fold of pretreatment). We speculate that in vivo antineoplastic effects of IFNs and clinical side effects are mediated, at least in part, by a general or localized depletion of Trp. In view of reported increases of IFNs in autoimmune diseases and our earlier findings of elevated urinary Trp metabolites in autoimmune diseases, it seems likely that systemic or local depletion of Trp occurs in autoimmune diseases and may relate to degeneration, wasting and other symptoms in such diseases. We find high levels of IDO in cells isolated from synovia of arthritic joints. IFNs are also elevated in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients and increasing IFN levels are associated with a worsening prognosis. We propose that IDO is induced chronically by HIV infection, is further increased by opportunistic infections, and that this chronic loss of Trp initiates mechanisms responsible for the cachexia, dementia, diarrhea and possibly immunosuppression of AIDS patients. In these symptoms, AIDS resembles classical pellagra due to dietary deficiency of Trp and

  7. Histone deacetylase inhibitors upregulate B cell microRNAs that silence AID and Blimp-1 expression for epigenetic modulation of antibody and autoantibody responses.

    PubMed

    White, Clayton A; Pone, Egest J; Lam, Tonika; Tat, Connie; Hayama, Ken L; Li, Guideng; Zan, Hong; Casali, Paolo

    2014-12-15

    Class-switch DNA recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM), which require activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), and plasma cell differentiation, which requires B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein-1 (Blimp-1), are critical for the generation of class-switched and hypermutated (mature) Ab and autoantibody responses. We show that histone deacetylase inhibitors valproic acid and butyrate dampened AICDA/Aicda (AID) and PRDM1/Prdm1 (Blimp-1) mRNAs by upregulating miR-155, miR-181b, and miR-361 to silence AICDA/Aicda, and miR-23b, miR-30a, and miR-125b to silence PRDM1/Prdm1, in human and mouse B cells. This led to downregulation of AID, Blimp-1, and X-box binding protein 1, thereby inhibiting CSR, SHM, and plasma cell differentiation without altering B cell viability or proliferation. The selectivity of histone deacetylase inhibitor-mediated silencing of AICDA/Aicda and PRDM1/Prdm1 was emphasized by unchanged expression of HoxC4 and Irf4 (important inducers/modulators of AICDA/Aicda), Rev1 and Ung (central elements for CSR/SHM), and Bcl6, Bach2, or Pax5 (repressors of PRDM1/Prdm1 expression), as well as unchanged expression of miR-19a/b, miR-20a, and miR-25, which are not known to regulate AICDA/Aicda or PRDM1/Prdm1. Through these B cell-intrinsic epigenetic mechanisms, valproic acid blunted class-switched and hypermutated T-dependent and T-independent Ab responses in C57BL/6 mice. In addition, it decreased class-switched and hypermutated autoantibodies, ameliorated disease, and extended survival in lupus MRL/Fas(lpr/lpr) mice. Our findings outline epigenetic mechanisms that modulate expression of an enzyme (AID) and transcription factors (Blimp-1 and X-box binding protein 1) that are critical to the B cell differentiation processes that underpin Ab and autoantibody responses. They also provide therapeutic proof-of-principle in autoantibody-mediated autoimmunity.

  8. Benzoic Acid-Inducible Gene Expression in Mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Dragset, Marte S.; Barczak, Amy K.; Kannan, Nisha; Mærk, Mali; Flo, Trude H.; Valla, Svein; Rubin, Eric J.; Steigedal, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Conditional expression is a powerful tool to investigate the role of bacterial genes. Here, we adapt the Pseudomonas putida-derived positively regulated XylS/Pm expression system to control inducible gene expression in Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of human tuberculosis. By making simple changes to a Gram-negative broad-host-range XylS/Pm-regulated gene expression vector, we prove that it is possible to adapt this well-studied expression system to non-Gram-negative species. With the benzoic acid-derived inducer m-toluate, we achieve a robust, time- and dose-dependent reversible induction of Pm-mediated expression in mycobacteria, with low background expression levels. XylS/Pm is thus an important addition to existing mycobacterial expression tools, especially when low basal expression is of particular importance. PMID:26348349

  9. Chronic lung injury by constitutive expression of activation-induced cytidine deaminase leads to focal mucous cell metaplasia and cancer.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Jiro; Uemura, Munehiro; Kurozumi, Mafumi; Sonobe, Makoto; Manabe, Toshiaki; Hiai, Hiroshi; Date, Hiroshi; Kinoshita, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is an enzyme required for antibody diversification, and it causes DNA mutations and strand breaks. Constitutive AID expression in mice invariably caused lung lesions morphologically similar to human atypical adenomatous hyperplasia (AAH), which can be a precursor of bronchioloalveolar carcinoma. Similar to AAH, mouse AAH-like lesion (MALL) exhibited signs of alveolar differentiation, judging from the expression of alveolar type II (AT2) cell marker surfactant protein C (SP-C). However, electron microscopy indicated that MALL, which possessed certain features of a mucous cell, is distinct from an AAH or AT2 cell. Although MALL developed in all individuals within 30 weeks after birth, lung tumors occurred in only 10%; this suggests that the vast majority of MALLs fail to grow into visible tumors. MALL expressed several recently described markers of lung alveolar regeneration such as p63, keratin 5, keratin 14, leucine-rich repeat containing G protein-coupled receptor 5 (Lgr5), and Lgr6. Increased cell death was observed in the lungs of AID transgenic mice compared with wild-type mice. Based on these observations, we speculate that MALL is a regenerating tissue compensating for cellular loss caused by AID cytotoxicity. AID expression in such regenerating tissue should predispose cells to malignant transformation via its mutagenic activity. PMID:25659078

  10. Speckled-like Pattern in the Germinal Center (SLIP-GC), a Nuclear GTPase Expressed in Activation-induced Deaminase-expressing Lymphomas and Germinal Center B Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Kathleen; Brar, Sukhdev; Ray, Madhumita; Pisitkun, Prapaporn; Bolland, Silvia; Verkoczy, Laurent; Diaz, Marilyn

    2009-01-01

    We identified a novel GTPase, SLIP-GC, with expression limited to a few tissues, in particular germinal center B cells. It lacks homology to any known proteins, indicating that it may belong to a novel family of GTPases. SLIP-GC is expressed in germinal center B cells and in lymphomas derived from germinal center B cells such as large diffuse B cell lymphomas. In cell lines, SLIP-GC is expressed in lymphomas that express activation-induced deaminase (AID) and that likely undergo somatic hypermutation. SLIP-GC is a nuclear protein, and it localizes to replication factories. Reduction of SLIP-GC levels in the Burkitt lymphoma cell line Raji and in non-Hodgkin lymphoma cell lines resulted in an increase in DNA breaks and apoptosis that was AID-dependent, as simultaneous reduction of AID abrogated the deleterious effects of SLIP-GC reduction. These results strongly suggest that SLIP-GC is a replication-related protein in germinal center B cells whose reduction is toxic to cells through an AID-dependent mechanism. PMID:19734146

  11. Inducing a concurrent motor load reduces categorization precision for facial expressions.

    PubMed

    Ipser, Alberta; Cook, Richard

    2016-05-01

    Motor theories of expression perception posit that observers simulate facial expressions within their own motor system, aiding perception and interpretation. Consistent with this view, reports have suggested that blocking facial mimicry induces expression labeling errors and alters patterns of ratings. Crucially, however, it is unclear whether changes in labeling and rating behavior reflect genuine perceptual phenomena (e.g., greater internal noise associated with expression perception or interpretation) or are products of response bias. In an effort to advance this literature, the present study introduces a new psychophysical paradigm for investigating motor contributions to expression perception that overcomes some of the limitations inherent in simple labeling and rating tasks. Observers were asked to judge whether smiles drawn from a morph continuum were sincere or insincere, in the presence or absence of a motor load induced by the concurrent production of vowel sounds. Having confirmed that smile sincerity judgments depend on cues from both eye and mouth regions (Experiment 1), we demonstrated that vowel production reduces the precision with which smiles are categorized (Experiment 2). In Experiment 3, we replicated this effect when observers were required to produce vowels, but not when they passively listened to the same vowel sounds. In Experiments 4 and 5, we found that gender categorizations, equated for difficulty, were unaffected by vowel production, irrespective of the presence of a smiling expression. These findings greatly advance our understanding of motor contributions to expression perception and represent a timely contribution in light of recent high-profile challenges to the existing evidence base.

  12. Amitriptyline Activates TrkA to Aid Neuronal Growth and Attenuate Anesthesia-Induced Neurodegeneration in Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiaochun; Chen, Feng; Zheng, Ting; Huang, Fengyi; Chen, Jianghu; Tu, Wenshao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Tricyclic antidepressant amitriptyline (AM) has been shown to exert neurotrophic activity on neurons. We thus explored whether AM may aid the neuronal development and protect anesthesia-induced neuro-injury in young spinal cord dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. The DRG explants were prepared from 1-day-old rats. The effect of AM on aiding DRG neural development was examined by immunohistochemistry at dose-dependent manner. AM-induced changes in gene and protein expressions, and also phosphorylation states of tyrosine kinases receptor A (TrkA) and B (TrkB) in DRG, were examined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blot. The effect of AM on attenuating lidocaine-induced DRG neurodegeneration was examined by immunohistochemistry, and small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated TrkA/B down-regulation. Amitriptyline stimulated DRG neuronal development in dose-dependent manner, but exerted toxic effect at concentrations higher than 10 M. AM activated TrkA in DRG through phosphorylation, whereas it had little effect on TrkB-signaling pathway. AM reduced lidocaine-induced DRG neurodegeneration by regenerating neurites and growth cones. Moreover, the neuroprotection of AM on lidocaine-injured neurodegeneration was blocked by siRNA-mediated TrkA down-regulation, but not by TrkB down-regulation. Amitriptyline facilitated neuronal development and had protective effect on lidocaine-induced neurodegeneration, very likely through the activation of TrkA-signaling pathway in DRG. PMID:27149473

  13. Isoprenaline Induces Periostin Expression in Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guo-Xiao; Xi, Hong-Qing; Sun, Xiao-Yan; Geng, Zhi-Jun; Yang, Shao-Wei; Lu, Yan-Jie

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Periostin mediates critical steps in gastric cancer and is involved in various signaling pathways. However, the roles of periostin in promoting gastric cancer metastasis are not clear. The aim of this study was to investigate the relevance between periostin expression and gastric cancer progression and the role of stress-related hormones in the regulation of cancer development and progression. Materials and Methods Normal, cancerous and metastatic gastric tissues were collected from patients diagnosed with advanced gastric cancer. The in vivo expression of periostin was evaluated by in situ hybridization and immunofluorescent staining. Meanwhile, human gastric adenocarcinoma cell lines MKN-45 and BGC-803 were used to detect the in vitro expression of periostin by using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and western blotting. Results Periostin is expressed in the stroma of the primary gastric tumors and metastases, but not in normal gastric tissue. In addition, we observed that periostin is located mainly in pericryptal fibroblasts, but not in the tumor cells, and strongly correlated to the expression of α-smooth muscle actin (SMA). Furthermore, the distribution patterns of periostin were broader as the clinical staging of tumors progressed. We also identified a role of stress-related signaling in promoting cancer development and progression, and found that isoprenaline upregulated expression levels of periostin in gastric cancer cells. Conclusion These findings suggest that the distribution pattern of periostin was broader as the clinical staging of the tumor progressed and found that isoprenaline upregulated expression levels of periostin in gastric cancer cells. PMID:26996552

  14. Identification of Genes Whose Expression Profile Is Associated with Non-Progression towards AIDS Using eQTLs

    PubMed Central

    Le Clerc, Sigrid; van Manen, Daniëlle; Coulonges, Cédric; Ulveling, Damien; Laville, Vincent; Labib, Taoufik; Taing, Lieng; Delaneau, Olivier; Montes, Matthieu; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Zagury, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    Background Many genome-wide association studies have been performed on progression towards the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and they mainly identified associations within the HLA loci. In this study, we demonstrate that the integration of biological information, namely gene expression data, can enhance the sensitivity of genetic studies to unravel new genetic associations relevant to AIDS. Methods We collated the biological information compiled from three databases of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) involved in cells of the immune system. We derived a list of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are functional in that they correlate with differential expression of genes in at least two of the databases. We tested the association of those SNPs with AIDS progression in two cohorts, GRIV and ACS. Tests on permuted phenotypes of the GRIV and ACS cohorts or on randomised sets of equivalent SNPs allowed us to assess the statistical robustness of this method and to estimate the true positive rate. Results Eight genes were identified with high confidence (p = 0.001, rate of true positives 75%). Some of those genes had previously been linked with HIV infection. Notably, ENTPD4 belongs to the same family as CD39, whose expression has already been associated with AIDS progression; while DNAJB12 is part of the HSP90 pathway, which is involved in the control of HIV latency. Our study also drew our attention to lesser-known functions such as mitochondrial ribosomal proteins and a zinc finger protein, ZFP57, which could be central to the effectiveness of HIV infection. Interestingly, for six out of those eight genes, down-regulation is associated with non-progression, which makes them appealing targets to develop drugs against HIV. PMID:26367535

  15. An IPTG Inducible Conditional Expression System for Mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Ravishankar, Sudha; Ambady, Anisha; Ramu, Haripriya; Mudugal, Naina Vinay; Tunduguru, Ragadeepthi; Anbarasu, Anand; Sharma, Umender K.; Sambandamurthy, Vasan K.; Ramaiah, Sudha

    2015-01-01

    Conditional expression strains serve as a valuable tool to study the essentiality and to establish the vulnerability of a target under investigation in a drug discovery program. While essentiality implies an absolute requirement of a target function, vulnerability provides valuable information on the extent to which a target function needs to be depleted to achieve bacterial growth inhibition followed by cell death. The critical feature of an ideal conditional expression system is its ability to tightly regulate gene expression to achieve the full spectrum spanning from a high level of expression in order to support growth and near zero level of expression to mimic conditions of gene knockout. A number of bacterial conditional expression systems have been reported for use in mycobacteria. The utility of an isopropylthiogalactoside (IPTG) inducible system in mycobacteria has been reported for protein overexpression and anti-sense gene expression from a replicating multi-copy plasmid. Herein, we report the development of a versatile set of non-replicating IPTG inducible vectors for mycobacteria which can be used for generation of conditional expression strains through homologous recombination. The role of a single lac operator versus a double lac operator to regulate gene expression was evaluated by monitoring the expression levels of β-galactosidase in Mycobacterium smegmatis. These studies indicated a significant level of leaky expression from the vector with a single lac operator but none from the vector with double lac operator. The significance of the double lac operator vector for target validation was established by monitoring the growth kinetics of an inhA, a rpoB and a ftsZ conditional expression strain grown in the presence of different concentrations of IPTG. The utility of this inducible system in identifying target specific inhibitors was established by screening a focussed library of small molecules using an inhA and a rpoB conditional expression

  16. Interleukin-12-induced adhesion molecule expression in murine liver.

    PubMed Central

    Myers, K. J.; Eppihimer, M. J.; Hall, L.; Wolitzky, B.

    1998-01-01

    Systemically administered interleukin (IL)-12 causes liver inflammation in mice characterized by Kupffer cell proliferation and hypertrophy, hepatocyte necrosis, and multifocal accumulations of leukocytes in the hepatic parenchyma and around portal tracts and central veins. We have used both immunohistochemical staining and radiolabeled antibody quantitation to examine adhesion molecule expression in the livers of mice dosed daily with murine IL-12. Cells infiltrating livers of IL-12-treated mice were primarily mononuclear leukocytes expressing LFA-1, VLA-4, MAC-1, and CD18 adhesion molecules but little L-selectin. Kupffer cells constitutively expressed LFA-1 and smaller amounts of MAC-1, and high levels of ICAM-1 were constitutively expressed by liver sinusoidal lining cells, portal tract, and central vein endothelia. With IL-12 treatment, existing ICAM-1 expression was up-regulated and de novo expression occurred along bile duct epithelia. VCAM-1 levels were dramatically increased, with induced expression occurring along portal tract and central vein endothelia and scattered bile duct epithelial cells and in aggregations of cells in perivascular areas and the liver parenchyma. Although constitutive expression of E- and P-selectin was negligible, Il-12 induced a moderate rise in E-selectin levels. These increases in adhesion molecule expression may have implications for the therapeutic use of IL-12, especially in patients with liver disease or autoimmune conditions where augmented adhesion molecule expression may be critical to disease pathogenesis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9466572

  17. Impact of Residual Inducer on Titratable Expression Systems

    PubMed Central

    Afroz, Taliman; Luo, Michelle L.; Beisel, Chase L.

    2015-01-01

    Inducible expression systems are widely employed for the titratable control of gene expression, yet molecules inadvertently present in the growth medium or synthesized by the host cells can alter the response profile of some of these systems. Here, we explored the quantitative impact of these residual inducers on the apparent response properties of inducible systems. Using a simple mathematical model, we found that the presence of residual inducer shrinks the apparent dynamic range and causes the apparent Hill coefficient to converge to one. We also found that activating systems were more sensitive than repressing systems to the presence of residual inducer and the response parameters were most heavily dependent on the original Hill coefficient. Experimental interrogation of common titratable systems based on an L-arabinose inducible promoter or a thiamine pyrophosphate-repressing riboswitch in Escherichia coli confirmed the predicted trends. We finally found that residual inducer had a distinct effect on “all-or-none” systems, which exhibited increased sensitivity to the added inducer until becoming fully induced. Our findings indicate that residual inducer or repressor alters the quantitative response properties of titratable systems, impacting their utility for scientific discovery and pathway engineering. PMID:26348036

  18. Impact of Residual Inducer on Titratable Expression Systems.

    PubMed

    Afroz, Taliman; Luo, Michelle L; Beisel, Chase L

    2015-01-01

    Inducible expression systems are widely employed for the titratable control of gene expression, yet molecules inadvertently present in the growth medium or synthesized by the host cells can alter the response profile of some of these systems. Here, we explored the quantitative impact of these residual inducers on the apparent response properties of inducible systems. Using a simple mathematical model, we found that the presence of residual inducer shrinks the apparent dynamic range and causes the apparent Hill coefficient to converge to one. We also found that activating systems were more sensitive than repressing systems to the presence of residual inducer and the response parameters were most heavily dependent on the original Hill coefficient. Experimental interrogation of common titratable systems based on an L-arabinose inducible promoter or a thiamine pyrophosphate-repressing riboswitch in Escherichia coli confirmed the predicted trends. We finally found that residual inducer had a distinct effect on "all-or-none" systems, which exhibited increased sensitivity to the added inducer until becoming fully induced. Our findings indicate that residual inducer or repressor alters the quantitative response properties of titratable systems, impacting their utility for scientific discovery and pathway engineering. PMID:26348036

  19. A novel cold-inducible expression system for Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Thuy Le, Ai Thi; Schumann, Wolfgang

    2007-06-01

    Production of recombinant proteins at low temperatures is one strategy to prevent formation of protein aggregates and the use of an expensive inducer such as IPTG. We report on the construction of two expression vectors both containing the cold-inducible des promoter of Bacillus subtilis, where one allows intra- and the other extracellular synthesis of recombinant proteins. Production of recombinant proteins started within the first 30min after temperature downshock to 25 degrees C and continued for about 5h.

  20. Inducing a Concurrent Motor Load Reduces Categorization Precision for Facial Expressions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Motor theories of expression perception posit that observers simulate facial expressions within their own motor system, aiding perception and interpretation. Consistent with this view, reports have suggested that blocking facial mimicry induces expression labeling errors and alters patterns of ratings. Crucially, however, it is unclear whether changes in labeling and rating behavior reflect genuine perceptual phenomena (e.g., greater internal noise associated with expression perception or interpretation) or are products of response bias. In an effort to advance this literature, the present study introduces a new psychophysical paradigm for investigating motor contributions to expression perception that overcomes some of the limitations inherent in simple labeling and rating tasks. Observers were asked to judge whether smiles drawn from a morph continuum were sincere or insincere, in the presence or absence of a motor load induced by the concurrent production of vowel sounds. Having confirmed that smile sincerity judgments depend on cues from both eye and mouth regions (Experiment 1), we demonstrated that vowel production reduces the precision with which smiles are categorized (Experiment 2). In Experiment 3, we replicated this effect when observers were required to produce vowels, but not when they passively listened to the same vowel sounds. In Experiments 4 and 5, we found that gender categorizations, equated for difficulty, were unaffected by vowel production, irrespective of the presence of a smiling expression. These findings greatly advance our understanding of motor contributions to expression perception and represent a timely contribution in light of recent high-profile challenges to the existing evidence base. PMID:26618622

  1. Gene expression profiling of replicative and induced senescence.

    PubMed

    Purcell, Maggie; Kruger, Adele; Tainsky, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    Cellular senescence is a cell cycle arrest accompanied by high expression of cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors which counteract overactive growth signals, which serves as a tumor suppressive mechanism. Senescence can be a result of telomere shortening (natural or replicative senescence) or DNA damage resulting from exogenous stressors (induced senescence). Here, we performed gene expression profiling through RNA-seq of replicative senescence, adriamycin-induced senescence, H2O2-induced senescence, and 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine-induced senescence in order to profile the pathways controlling various types of senescence. Overall, the pathways common to all 4 types of senescence were related to inflammation and the innate immune system. It was also evident that 5-aza-induced senescence mirrors natural replicative senescence due to telomere shortening. We also examined the prevalence of senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) factors in the RNA-seq data, showing that it is a common characteristic of all 4 types of senescence. In addition, we could discriminate changes in gene expression due to quiescence during cellular senescence from those that were specific to senescence. PMID:25483067

  2. Oncogenic Myc Induces Expression of Glutamine Synthetase through Promoter Demethylation.

    PubMed

    Bott, Alex J; Peng, I-Chen; Fan, Yongjun; Faubert, Brandon; Zhao, Lu; Li, Jinyu; Neidler, Sarah; Sun, Yu; Jaber, Nadia; Krokowski, Dawid; Lu, Wenyun; Pan, Ji-An; Powers, Scott; Rabinowitz, Joshua; Hatzoglou, Maria; Murphy, Daniel J; Jones, Russell; Wu, Song; Girnun, Geoffrey; Zong, Wei-Xing

    2015-12-01

    c-Myc is known to promote glutamine usage by upregulating glutaminase (GLS), which converts glutamine to glutamate that is catabolized in the TCA cycle. Here we report that in a number of human and murine cells and cancers, Myc induces elevated expression of glutamate-ammonia ligase (GLUL), also termed glutamine synthetase (GS), which catalyzes the de novo synthesis of glutamine from glutamate and ammonia. This is through upregulation of a Myc transcriptional target thymine DNA glycosylase (TDG), which promotes active demethylation of the GS promoter and its increased expression. Elevated expression of GS promotes cell survival under glutamine limitation, while silencing of GS decreases cell proliferation and xenograft tumor growth. Upon GS overexpression, increased glutamine enhances nucleotide synthesis and amino acid transport. These results demonstrate an unexpected role of Myc in inducing glutamine synthesis and suggest a molecular connection between DNA demethylation and glutamine metabolism in Myc-driven cancers.

  3. Salmonella induces prominent gene expression in the rat colon

    PubMed Central

    Rodenburg, Wendy; Keijer, Jaap; Kramer, Evelien; Roosing, Susanne; Vink, Carolien; Katan, Martijn B; van der Meer, Roelof; Bovee-Oudenhoven, Ingeborg MJ

    2007-01-01

    Background Salmonella enteritidis is suggested to translocate in the small intestine. In vivo it induces gene expression changes in the ileal mucosa and Peyer's patches. Stimulation of Salmonella translocation by dietary prebiotics fermented in colon suggests involvement of the colon as well. However, effects of Salmonella on colonic gene expression in vivo are largely unknown. We aimed to characterize time dependent Salmonella-induced changes of colonic mucosal gene expression in rats using whole genome microarrays. For this, rats were orally infected with Salmonella enteritidis to mimic a foodborne infection and colonic gene expression was determined at days 1, 3 and 6 post-infection (n = 8 rats per time-point). As fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS) affect colonic physiology, we analyzed colonic mucosal gene expression of FOS-fed versus cellulose-fed rats infected with Salmonella in a separate experiment. Colonic mucosal samples were isolated at day 2 post-infection. Results Salmonella affected transport (e.g. Chloride channel calcium activated 6, H+/K+ transporting Atp-ase), antimicrobial defense (e.g. Lipopolysaccharide binding protein, Defensin 5 and phospholipase A2), inflammation (e.g. calprotectin), oxidative stress related genes (e.g. Dual oxidase 2 and Glutathione peroxidase 2) and Proteolysis (e.g. Ubiquitin D and Proteosome subunit beta type 9). Furthermore, Salmonella translocation increased serum IFNγ and many interferon-related genes in colonic mucosa. The gene most strongly induced by Salmonella infection was Pancreatitis Associated Protein (Pap), showing >100-fold induction at day 6 after oral infection. Results were confirmed by Q-PCR in individual rats. Stimulation of Salmonella translocation by dietary FOS was accompanied by enhancement of the Salmonella-induced mucosal processes, not by induction of other processes. Conclusion We conclude that the colon is a target tissue for Salmonella, considering the abundant changes in mucosal gene expression

  4. Lead induces increased water permeability in astrocytes expressing aquaporin 4.

    PubMed

    Gunnarson, E; Axehult, G; Baturina, G; Zelenin, S; Zelenina, M; Aperia, A

    2005-01-01

    The water channel aquaporin 4 (AQP4) is abundantly expressed in astrocytes. There is now compelling evidence that AQP4 may contribute to an unfavorable course in brain edema. Acute lead intoxication is a condition that causes brain damage preceded by brain edema. Here we report that lead increases AQP4 water permeability (P(f)) in astrocytes. A rat astrocyte cell line that does not express aquaporin 4 was transiently transfected with aquaporin 4 tagged with green fluorescent protein (GFP). Using confocal laser scanning microscopy we measured water permeability in these cells and in AQP4-negative cells located on the same plate. AQP4-expressing astrocytes had a three-fold higher water permeability than astrocytes not expressing AQP4. Lead exposure induced a significant, 40%, increase in water permeability in astrocytes expressing AQP4, but had no effect on P(f) in astrocytes not expressing AQP4. The increase in water permeability persisted after lead washout, while treatment with a lead chelator, meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid, abolished the lead-induced increase in P(f). The effect of lead was attenuated in the presence of a calcium (Ca(2+))/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) inhibitor, but not in the presence of a protein kinase C inhibitor. In cells expressing AQP4 where the consensus site for CaMKII phosphorylation was mutated, lead failed to increase water permeability. Lead exposure also increased P(f) in rat astroglial cells in primary culture, which express endogenous AQP4. Lead had no effect on P(f) in astrocytes transfected with aquaporin 3. In situ hybridization studies on rat brain after oral lead intake for three days showed no change in distribution of AQP4 mRNA. It is suggested that lead-triggered stimulation of water transport in AQP4-expressing astrocytes may contribute to the pathology of acute lead intoxication.

  5. An inducible transcription factor activates expression of human immunodeficiency virus in T cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabel, Gary; Baltimore, David

    1987-04-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) production from latently infected T lymphocytes can be induced with compounds that activate the cells to secrete lymphokines1,2. The elements in the HIV genome which control activation are not known but expression might be regulated through a variety of DNA elements. The cis-acting control elements of the viral genome are enhancer and promoter regions. The virus also encodes trans-acting factors specified by the tat-III (refs 3-6) and art genes7. We have examined whether products specific to activated T cells might stimulate viral transcription by binding to regions on viral DNA. Activation of T cells, which increases HIV expression up to 50-fold, correlated with induction of a DNA binding protein indistinguishable from a recognized transcription factor, called NF-κB (ref. 8), with binding sites in the viral enhancer. Mutation of these binding sites abolished inducibility. That NF-κB acts in synergy with the viral tat-III gene product to enhance HIV expression in T cells may have implications for the pathogenesis of AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome).

  6. Fatigue Hardening Behavior of 1.5 GPa Grade Transformation-Induced Plasticity-Aided Martensitic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, Koh-Ichi; Hojo, Tomohiko

    2016-11-01

    Low cycle fatigue hardening/softening behavior of a 0.2 pct C-1.5 pct Si-1.5 pct Mn-1.0 pct Cr-0.2 pct Mo-0.05 pct Nb transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP)-aided steel consisting of a wide lath martensite structure matrix and a narrow lath martensite-metastable retained austenite mixture was investigated. The steel exhibited notable fatigue hardening in the same way as TRIP-aided bainitic ferrite steel, although conventional martensitic steel such as SCM420 steel with the same tensile strength exhibited fatigue softening. The considerable fatigue hardening of this steel is believed to be associated mainly with the compressive internal stress that results from a difference in flow stress between the matrix and the martensite-austenite-like phase, with a small contribution from the strain-induced transformation and dislocation hardenings.

  7. Talk radio as the soundtrack of our lives: Participatory HIV/AIDS communication, public self-expression and Positive Talk.

    PubMed

    Burger, Mariekie

    2015-01-01

    article explores a wider range of participatory principles and the potential workings of these in an internally initiated communication initiative aimed at addressing the epidemic. More specifically, this article investigates ways in which radio listeners experience the reality broadcast genre--the talk radio show, Positive Talk--as participatory communication. Positive Talk is not an externally initiated project, as it is not part of a pre-planned, goal-oriented project that is owned and controlled outside the target community. In contrast, it has been initiated by Criselda Kananda, an individual not linked to any of the existing initiatives outside the community. She started the show to earn a living. She became a well-known person, is fairly knowledgeable in the field and was granted this opportunity as she is HIV-positive. In order to investigate how radio listeners use the show to engage in HIV/AIDS communication, 20 in-depth interviews were held with avid listeners of the show. The respondents indicated that they appreciate ordinary people phoning in. When expressing their opinions about the show, they found Kananda's life story credible, believed her public and private life to be congruent, valued Kananda's personality and respectful manner and could identify with the views expressed. In the article, it is argued that these ideas are largely in line with the principles of participatory communication tied to democracy, the participatory turn, the ordinary, validation of identity and respectful dialogue. Although the findings of this qualitative study cannot be generalised to the whole listening population of the show, they indicate that it is worth investigating the value of communication initiatives that emerge spontaneously from communities (instead of those strategically engineered from outside the general population) as a future direction of HIV/AIDS communication in the country. PMID:26700267

  8. Talk radio as the soundtrack of our lives: Participatory HIV/AIDS communication, public self-expression and Positive Talk.

    PubMed

    Burger, Mariekie

    2015-01-01

    article explores a wider range of participatory principles and the potential workings of these in an internally initiated communication initiative aimed at addressing the epidemic. More specifically, this article investigates ways in which radio listeners experience the reality broadcast genre--the talk radio show, Positive Talk--as participatory communication. Positive Talk is not an externally initiated project, as it is not part of a pre-planned, goal-oriented project that is owned and controlled outside the target community. In contrast, it has been initiated by Criselda Kananda, an individual not linked to any of the existing initiatives outside the community. She started the show to earn a living. She became a well-known person, is fairly knowledgeable in the field and was granted this opportunity as she is HIV-positive. In order to investigate how radio listeners use the show to engage in HIV/AIDS communication, 20 in-depth interviews were held with avid listeners of the show. The respondents indicated that they appreciate ordinary people phoning in. When expressing their opinions about the show, they found Kananda's life story credible, believed her public and private life to be congruent, valued Kananda's personality and respectful manner and could identify with the views expressed. In the article, it is argued that these ideas are largely in line with the principles of participatory communication tied to democracy, the participatory turn, the ordinary, validation of identity and respectful dialogue. Although the findings of this qualitative study cannot be generalised to the whole listening population of the show, they indicate that it is worth investigating the value of communication initiatives that emerge spontaneously from communities (instead of those strategically engineered from outside the general population) as a future direction of HIV/AIDS communication in the country.

  9. Expression of Ley antigen in human immunodeficiency virus-infected human T cell lines and in peripheral lymphocytes of patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and AIDS-related complex (ARC)

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    Ley determinant (Fuc alpha 1----2Gal beta 1----4[Fuc alpha 1---- 3]GlcNAc beta 1----R) defined by mAb BM-1 is highly expressed in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected T cell lines and in CD3+ peripheral mature T cells of patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) or with AIDS-related complex (ARC). Ley expression increased greatly in the CD3+ population in the advanced stage of AIDS when the CD4+ population decreased greatly. Six other carbohydrate antigens tested by their respective mAbs were not detected in these same cells. None of the carbohydrate antigens tested by the seven mAbs used in this study were found in noninfected T cell lines and in normal peripheral blood lymphocytes. PMID:3258005

  10. Oviposition-Induced Changes in Arabidopsis Genome Expression

    PubMed Central

    Bruessow, Friederike

    2007-01-01

    Plants have evolved exquisite ways to detect their enemies and are able to induce defenses responses tailored to their specific aggressors. Insect eggs deposited on a leaf represent a future threat as larvae hatching from the egg will ultimately feed on the plant. Although direct and indirect defenses towards oviposition have been documented, our knowledge of the molecular changes triggered by egg deposition is limited. Using a whole-genome microarray, we recently analyzed the expression profile of Arabidopsis thaliana leaves after oviposition by two pierid butterflies. Eggs laid by the large white Pieris brassicae modified the expression of hundreds of genes. The transcript signature included defense and stress-related genes that were also induced in plants experiencing localized cell death. Further analyses revealed that cellular changes associated with a hypersensitive response occur at the site of egg deposition and that they are triggered by egg-derived elicitors. Our study brings molecular evidence for previous observations of oviposition-induced necrosis in other plant species and might illustrate a direct defense of the plant against the egg. In this addendum, we discuss the relevance of the oviposition-induced gene expression changes and the possibility that plants use eggs as cues to anticipate their enemies. PMID:19704745

  11. Does expressed acceptance reflect genuine attitudes? A bogus pipeline study of the effects of mortality salience on acceptance of a person with AIDS.

    PubMed

    Grover, Kristin W; Miller, Carol T

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined whether expressed acceptance of a person with AIDS reflects genuine acceptance or a desire to appear to be accepting. Theory and research on the effects of mortality salience on acceptance of stigmatized people provided the framework for investigating this question. After writing about death or another aversive topic, participants indicated their acceptance of a target with AIDS while connected to physiological equipment that they believed could detect lies (bogus pipeline) or was simply measuring physiological responses to participation in the study. As predicted, participants in the mortality salience/bogus pipeline condition indicated significantly less acceptance of the target with AIDS than participants in the other three conditions, suggesting that acceptance of a person with AIDS is at least partially a result of wanting to appear to be accepting, without necessarily genuinely accepting someone with AIDS.

  12. iAID: an improved auxin-inducible degron system for the construction of a 'tight' conditional mutant in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Seiji; Miyazawa-Onami, Mayumi; Iida, Tetsushi; Araki, Hiroyuki

    2015-08-01

    Isolation of a 'tight' conditional mutant of a gene of interest is an effective way of studying the functions of essential genes. Strategies that use ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation to eliminate the product of a gene of interest, such as heat-inducible degron (td) and auxin-inducible degron (AID), are powerful methods for constructing conditional mutants. However, these methods do not work with some genes. Here, we describe an improved AID system (iAID) for isolating tight conditional mutants in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this method, transcriptional repression by the 'Tet-OFF' promoter is combined with proteolytic elimination of the target protein by the AID system. To provide examples, we describe the construction of tight mutants of the replication factors Dpb11 and Mcm10, dpb11-iAID, and mcm10-iAID. Because Dpb11 and Mcm10 are required for the initiation of DNA replication, their tight mutants are unable to enter S phase. This is the case for dpb11-iAID and mcm10-iAID cells after the addition of tetracycline and auxin. Both the 'Tet-OFF' promoter and the AID system have been shown to work in model eukaryotes other than budding yeast. Therefore, the iAID system is not only useful in budding yeast, but also can be applied to other model systems to isolate tight conditional mutants.

  13. iAID: an improved auxin-inducible degron system for the construction of a 'tight' conditional mutant in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Seiji; Miyazawa-Onami, Mayumi; Iida, Tetsushi; Araki, Hiroyuki

    2015-08-01

    Isolation of a 'tight' conditional mutant of a gene of interest is an effective way of studying the functions of essential genes. Strategies that use ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation to eliminate the product of a gene of interest, such as heat-inducible degron (td) and auxin-inducible degron (AID), are powerful methods for constructing conditional mutants. However, these methods do not work with some genes. Here, we describe an improved AID system (iAID) for isolating tight conditional mutants in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this method, transcriptional repression by the 'Tet-OFF' promoter is combined with proteolytic elimination of the target protein by the AID system. To provide examples, we describe the construction of tight mutants of the replication factors Dpb11 and Mcm10, dpb11-iAID, and mcm10-iAID. Because Dpb11 and Mcm10 are required for the initiation of DNA replication, their tight mutants are unable to enter S phase. This is the case for dpb11-iAID and mcm10-iAID cells after the addition of tetracycline and auxin. Both the 'Tet-OFF' promoter and the AID system have been shown to work in model eukaryotes other than budding yeast. Therefore, the iAID system is not only useful in budding yeast, but also can be applied to other model systems to isolate tight conditional mutants. PMID:26081484

  14. Fibronectin induces MMP2 expression in human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Moroz, Andrei; Delella, Flávia K; Lacorte, Lívia M; Deffune, Elenice; Felisbino, Sérgio L

    2013-01-25

    High-grade prostate cancers express high levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), major enzymes involved in tumor invasion and metastasis. However, the tumor cell lines commonly employed for prostate cancer research express only small amounts of MMPs when cultivated as monolayer cultures, in common culture media. The present study was conducted to ascertain whether culture conditions that include fibronectin can alter MMP2 and MMP9 expression by the human prostatic epithelial cell lines RWPE-1, LNCaP and PC-3. These cells were individually seeded at 2×10(4) cells/cm(2), cultivated until they reached 80% confluence, and then exposed for 4h to fibronectin, after which the conditioned medium was analyzed by gelatin zymography. Untreated cells were given common medium. Only RWPE-1 cells express detectable amounts of MMP9 when cultivated in common medium, whereas the addition of fibronectin induced high expression levels of pro and active forms of MMP2 in all tested cell lines. Our findings demonstrate that normal and tumor prostate cell lines express MMP2 activity when in contact with extracellular matrix components or blood plasma proteins such as fibronectin. Future studies of transcriptomes and proteomes in prostate cancer research using these cell lines should not neglect these important conclusions.

  15. Hypoxic-induced stress protein expression in rat cardiac myocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, G.; Geoghegan, T.E.

    1986-05-01

    Mammalian stress proteins can be induced in cells and tissues exposed to a variety of conditions including hyperthermia and diminished O/sub 2/ supply. The authors have previously shown that the expression of three stress proteins (71, 85, and 95 kDa) was induced in cardiac tissue from mice exposed to hypoxic conditions. The expression of mRNAs coding for the 85 and 95 kDa proteins increase with time of exposure to hypoxia, while the mRNA coding for the 71 kDa protein is transiently induced. The authors extended these studies to investigate the expression of stress proteins in isolated rat cardiac myocytes. Freshly prepared myocytes were exposed to control, hypoxic, anoxic, or heat-shock environments for up to 16 h. The proteins were then labeled for 6 hours with (/sup 35/S)methionine. Analysis of the solubilized proteins by SDS-PAGE and autoradiography showed that there was a 6-fold increase in synthesis of the 85 kDa protein upon exposure to hypoxia but not heat-shock conditions. The 71 kDa protein was present at high levels in both control and treated myocyte protein preparations, and presumably had been induced during the isolation procedure. Total RNA isolated from intact rat heart and isolated myocytes was compared by cell-free translation analysis and showed induction of RNAs coding for several stress proteins in the myocyte preparation. The induced proteins at 85 and 95 kDa have molecular weights similar to reported cell stress and/or glucose-regulated proteins.

  16. Insulin decreases atherosclerosis by inducing endothelin receptor B expression

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyoungmin; Mima, Akira; Li, Qian; Rask-Madsen, Christian; He, Pingnian; Mizutani, Koji; Katagiri, Sayaka; Maeda, Yasutaka; Wu, I-Hsien; Khamaisi, Mogher; Preil, Simone Rordam; Sørensen, Ditte; Huang, Paul L.; King, George L.

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial cell (EC) insulin resistance and dysfunction, caused by diabetes, accelerates atherosclerosis. It is unknown whether specifically enhancing EC-targeted insulin action can decrease atherosclerosis in diabetes. Accordingly, overexpressing insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS1) in the endothelia of Apoe–/– mice (Irs1/Apoe–/–) increased insulin signaling and function in the aorta. Atherosclerosis was significantly reduced in Irs1/ApoE–/– mice on diet-induced hyperinsulinemia and hyperglycemia. The mechanism of insulin’s enhanced antiatherogenic actions in EC was related to remarkable induction of NO action, which increases endothelin receptor B (EDNRB) expression and intracellular [Ca2+]. Using the mice with knockin mutation of eNOS, which had Ser1176 mutated to alanine (AKI), deleting the only known mechanism for insulin to activate eNOS/NO pathway, we observed that IRS1 overexpression in the endothelia of Aki/ApoE–/– mice significantly decreased atherosclerosis. Interestingly, endothelial EDNRB expression was selectively reduced in intima of arteries from diabetic patients and rodents. However, endothelial EDNRB expression was upregulated by insulin via P13K/Akt pathway. Finally EDNRB deletion in EC of Ldlr–/– and Irs1/Ldlr–/– mice decreased NO production and accelerated atherosclerosis, compared with Ldlr–/– mice. Accelerated atherosclerosis in diabetes may be reduced by improving insulin signaling selectively via IRS1/Akt in the EC by inducing EDNRB expression and NO production. PMID:27200419

  17. Insulin decreases atherosclerosis by inducing endothelin receptor B expression

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyoungmin; Mima, Akira; Li, Qian; Rask-Madsen, Christian; He, Pingnian; Mizutani, Koji; Katagiri, Sayaka; Maeda, Yasutaka; Wu, I-Hsien; Khamaisi, Mogher; Preil, Simone Rordam; Maddaloni, Ernesto; Sørensen, Ditte; Rasmussen, Lars Melholt; Huang, Paul L.; King, George L.

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial cell (EC) insulin resistance and dysfunction, caused by diabetes, accelerates atherosclerosis. It is unknown whether specifically enhancing EC-targeted insulin action can decrease atherosclerosis in diabetes. Accordingly, overexpressing insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS1) in the endothelia of Apoe−/− mice (Irs1/Apoe−/−) increased insulin signaling and function in the aorta. Atherosclerosis was significantly reduced in Irs1/ApoE−/− mice on diet-induced hyperinsulinemia and hyperglycemia. The mechanism of insulin’s enhanced antiatherogenic actions in EC was related to remarkable induction of NO action, which increases endothelin receptor B (EDNRB) expression and intracellular [Ca2+]. Using the mice with knockin mutation of eNOS, which had Ser1176 mutated to alanine (AKI), deleting the only known mechanism for insulin to activate eNOS/NO pathway, we observed that IRS1 overexpression in the endothelia of Aki/ApoE−/− mice significantly decreased atherosclerosis. Interestingly, endothelial EDNRB expression was selectively reduced in intima of arteries from diabetic patients and rodents. However, endothelial EDNRB expression was upregulated by insulin via P13K/Akt pathway. Finally EDNRB deletion in EC of Ldlr−/− and Irs1/Ldlr−/− mice decreased NO production and accelerated atherosclerosis, compared with Ldlr−/− mice. Accelerated atherosclerosis in diabetes may be reduced by improving insulin signaling selectively via IRS1/Akt in the EC by inducing EDNRB expression and NO production. PMID:27200419

  18. Expression of hyaluronidase by tumor cells induces angiogenesis in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, D; Pearlman, E; Diaconu, E; Guo, K; Mori, H; Haqqi, T; Markowitz, S; Willson, J; Sy, M S

    1996-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid is a proteoglycan present in the extracellular matrix and is important for the maintenance of tissue architecture. Depolymerization of hyaluronic acid may facilitate tumor invasion. In addition, oligosaccharides of hyaluronic acid have been reported to induce angiogenesis. We report here that a hyaluronidase similar to the one on human sperm is expressed by metastatic human melanoma, colon carcinoma, and glioblastoma cell lines and by tumor biopsies from patients with colorectal carcinomas, but not by tissues from normal colon. Moreover, angiogenesis is induced by hyaluronidase+ tumor cells but not hyaluronidase- tumor cells and can be blocked by an inhibitor of hyaluronidase. Tumor cells thus use hyaluronidase as one of the "molecular saboteurs" to depolymerize hyaluronic acid to facilitate invasion. As a consequence, breakdown products of hyaluronic acid can further promote tumor establishment by inducing angiogenesis. Hyaluronidase on tumor cells may provide a target for anti-neoplastic drugs. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8755562

  19. Hypergravity-induced changes in gene expression in Arabidopsis hypocotyls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshioka, R.; Soga, K.; Wakabayashi, K.; Takeba, G.; Hoson, T.

    2003-05-01

    Under hypergravity conditions, the cell wall of stem organs becomes mechanically rigid and elongation growth is suppressed, which can be recognized as the mechanism for plants to resist gravitational force. The changes in gene expression by hypergravity treatment were analyzed in Arabidopsis hypocotyls by the differential display method, for identifying genes involved in hypergravity-induced growth suppression. Sixty-two cDNA clones were expressed differentially between the control and 300 g conditions: the expression levels of 39 clones increased, whereas those of 23 clones decreased under hypergravity conditions. Sequence analysis and database searching revealed that 12 clones, 9 up-regulated and 3 down-regulated, have homology to known proteins. The expression of these genes was further analyzed using RT-PCR. Finally, six genes were confirmed to be up-regulated by hypergravity. One of such genes encoded 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-Coenzyme A reductase (HMGR), which catalyzes a reaction producing mevalonic acid, a key precursor ofterpenoids such as membrane sterols and several types of hormones. The expression of HMGR gene increased within several hours after hypergravity treatment. Also, compactin, an inhibitor of HMGR, prevented hypergravity-induced growth suppression, suggesting that HMGR is involved in suppression of Arabidopsis hypocotyl growth by hypergravity. In addition, hypergravity increased the expression levels of genes encoding CCR1 and ERD15, which were shown to take part in the signaling pathway of environmental stimuli such as temperature and water, and those of the α-tubulin gene. These genes may be involved in a series of cellular events leading to growth suppression of stem organs under hypergravity conditions.

  20. Calcium oxalate calculi-induced clusterin expression in kidney.

    PubMed

    Li, Jin-Yi; Liu, Junjiang; Jiang, Junyi; Pumill, Chris; Elaiho, Cordelia; Zhang, Yunxia; Li, Shoubin; Zhou, Tie

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate clusterin expression in the kidney and evaluate the urine clusterin level in the kidney stone formers. (1) In vitro, we treated the Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cell line with different concentrations of calcium oxalate (CaOx), and then the clusterin protein expression in the cells was evaluated by Western blotting. (2) Kidney stone patients who received percutaneous nephrolithotomy were enrolled in our study. Urine samples were collected before surgery, the kidney punctured to obtain kidney tissue guided by ultrasound intraoperatively. Clusterin expression in the human kidney tissue was evaluated by immunochemistry. The urine clusterin level was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Non-kidney disease subjects were chosen as controls. In vitro, the clusterin expression was up-regulated in the MDCK cells induced by CaOx. The study included 49 patients and 41 non-kidney disease subjects. All calculi were composed of calcium oxalate monohydrate or calcium oxalate dihydrate and a few also contained protein or uric acid. Mean ± SD urine clusterin level was 17.47 ± 18.61 μg/ml in patients, and 3.31 ± 5.42 μg/ml in non-kidney disease subjects, respectively (p < 0.001). Immunohistochemistry revealed the clusterin was located in the cytoplasm of the renal distal and collecting tubular epithelial cells. Also the tissue clusterin expression increased significantly in the kidney stone formers compared to the control groups (p = 0.001). CaOx could induce clusterin expression in renal tubular cells, and increase clusterin levels in the kidney and urine from the kidney stone formers.

  1. Gemcitabine-induced CXCL8 expression counteracts its actions by inducing tumor neovascularization

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Yao; Baba, Tomohisa; Li, Ying-Yi; Furukawa, Kaoru; Tanabe, Yamato; Matsugo, Seiichi; Sasaki, Soichiro; Mukaida, Naofumi

    2015-03-06

    Patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) are frequently complicated with metastatic disease or locally advanced tumors, and consequently need chemotherapy. Gemcitabine is commonly used for PDAC treatment, but with limited efficacy. The capacity of gemcitabine to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) in human pancreatic cancer cells, prompted us to examine its effects on the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. We observed that gemcitabine enhanced selectively the expression of CXCL8 in human pancreatic cancer cells through ROS generation and NF-κB activation. In vitro blocking of CXCL8 failed to modulate gemcitabine-mediated inhibition of cell proliferation in human pancreatic cancer cells. Gemcitabine also enhanced CXCL8 expression in pancreatic cancer cells in xenografted tumor tissues. Moreover, anti-CXCL8 antibody treatment in vivo attenuated tumor formation as well as intra-tumoral vascularity in nude mice, which were transplanted with Miapaca-2 cells and treated with gemcitabine. Thus, gemcitabine-induced CXCL8 may counteract the drug through inducing neovascularization. - Highlights: • Gemcitabine induced CXCL8 expression in human pancreatic cancer cells. • CXCL8 expression required ROS generation and NF-κB activation. • CXCL8 did not affect in vitro proliferation of human pancreatic cancer cells. • CXCL8 in vivo counteracted gemcitabine by inducing neovascularization.

  2. Facial Expression Recognition: Can Preschoolers with Cochlear Implants and Hearing Aids Catch It?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Yifang; Su, Yanjie; Fang, Ping; Zhou, Qingxia

    2011-01-01

    Tager-Flusberg and Sullivan (2000) presented a cognitive model of theory of mind (ToM), in which they thought ToM included two components--a social-perceptual component and a social-cognitive component. Facial expression recognition (FER) is an ability tapping the social-perceptual component. Previous findings suggested that normal hearing…

  3. Gene expression array analyses predict increased proto-oncogene expression in MMTV induced mammary tumors.

    PubMed

    Popken-Harris, Pamela; Kirchhof, Nicole; Harrison, Ben; Harris, Lester F

    2006-08-01

    Exogenous infection by milk-borne mouse mammary tumor viruses (MMTV) typically induce mouse mammary tumors in genetically susceptible mice at a rate of 90-95% by 1 year of age. In contrast to other transforming retroviruses, MMTV acts as an insertional mutagen and under the influence of steroid hormones induces oncogenic transformation after insertion into the host genome. As these events correspond with increases in adjacent proto-oncogene transcription, we used expression array profiling to determine which commonly associated MMTV insertion site proto-oncogenes were transcriptionally active in MMTV induced mouse mammary tumors. To verify our gene expression array results we developed real-time quantitative RT-PCR assays for the common MMTV insertion site genes found in RIII/Sa mice (int-1/wnt-1, int-2/fgf-3, int-3/Notch 4, and fgf8/AIGF) as well as two genes that were consistently up regulated (CCND1, and MAT-8) and two genes that were consistently down regulated (FN1 and MAT-8) in the MMTV induced tumors as compared to normal mammary gland. Finally, each tumor was also examined histopathologically. Our expression array findings support a model whereby just one or a few common MMTV insertions into the host genome sets up a dominant cascade of events that leave a characteristic molecular signature.

  4. Characterization of Chemically Induced Liver Injuries Using Gene Co-Expression Modules

    PubMed Central

    Tawa, Gregory J.; AbdulHameed, Mohamed Diwan M.; Yu, Xueping; Kumar, Kamal; Ippolito, Danielle L.; Lewis, John A.; Stallings, Jonathan D.; Wallqvist, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Liver injuries due to ingestion or exposure to chemicals and industrial toxicants pose a serious health risk that may be hard to assess due to a lack of non-invasive diagnostic tests. Mapping chemical injuries to organ-specific damage and clinical outcomes via biomarkers or biomarker panels will provide the foundation for highly specific and robust diagnostic tests. Here, we have used DrugMatrix, a toxicogenomics database containing organ-specific gene expression data matched to dose-dependent chemical exposures and adverse clinical pathology assessments in Sprague Dawley rats, to identify groups of co-expressed genes (modules) specific to injury endpoints in the liver. We identified 78 such gene co-expression modules associated with 25 diverse injury endpoints categorized from clinical pathology, organ weight changes, and histopathology. Using gene expression data associated with an injury condition, we showed that these modules exhibited different patterns of activation characteristic of each injury. We further showed that specific module genes mapped to 1) known biochemical pathways associated with liver injuries and 2) clinically used diagnostic tests for liver fibrosis. As such, the gene modules have characteristics of both generalized and specific toxic response pathways. Using these results, we proposed three gene signature sets characteristic of liver fibrosis, steatosis, and general liver injury based on genes from the co-expression modules. Out of all 92 identified genes, 18 (20%) genes have well-documented relationships with liver disease, whereas the rest are novel and have not previously been associated with liver disease. In conclusion, identifying gene co-expression modules associated with chemically induced liver injuries aids in generating testable hypotheses and has the potential to identify putative biomarkers of adverse health effects. PMID:25226513

  5. Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Expression in Human Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cianchi, Fabio; Cortesini, Camillo; Fantappiè, Ornella; Messerini, Luca; Schiavone, Nicola; Vannacci, Alfredo; Nistri, Silvia; Sardi, Iacopo; Baroni, Gianna; Marzocca, Cosimo; Perna, Federico; Mazzanti, Roberto; Bechi, Paolo; Masini, Emanuela

    2003-01-01

    To investigate the potential involvement of the nitric oxide (NO) pathway in colorectal carcinogenesis, we correlated the expression and the activity of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) with the degree of tumor angiogenesis in human colorectal cancer. Tumor samples and adjacent normal mucosa were obtained from 46 surgical specimens. Immunohistochemical expression of iNOS, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and CD31 was analyzed on paraffin-embedded tissue sections. iNOS activity and cyclic GMP levels were assessed by specific biochemical assays. iNOS protein expression was determined by Western blot analysis. iNOS and VEGF mRNA levels were evaluated using Northern blot analysis. Both iNOS and VEGF expressions correlated significantly with intratumor microvessel density (rs = 0.31, P = 0.02 and rs = 0.67, P < 0.0001, respectively). A significant correlation was also found between iNOS and VEGF expression (P = 0.001). iNOS activity and cyclic GMP production were significantly higher in the cancer specimens than in the normal mucosa (P < 0.0001 and P < 0.0001, respectively), as well as in metastatic tumors than in nonmetastatic ones (P = 0.002 and P = 0.04, respectively). Western and Northern blot analyses confirmed the up-regulation of the iNOS protein and gene in the tumor specimens as compared with normal mucosa. NO seems to play a role in colorectal cancer growth by promoting tumor angiogenesis. PMID:12598314

  6. Physiological loading of tendons induces scleraxis expression in epitenon fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Mendias, Christopher L; Gumucio, Jonathan P; Bakhurin, Konstantin I; Lynch, Evan B; Brooks, Susan V

    2012-04-01

    Scleraxis is a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor that plays a central role in promoting fibroblast proliferation and matrix synthesis during the embryonic development of tendons. Mice with a targeted inactivation of scleraxis (Scx(-/-)) fail to properly form limb tendons, but the role that scleraxis has in regulating the growth and adaptation of tendons of adult organisms is unknown. To determine if scleraxis expression changes in response to a physiological growth stimulus to tendons, we subjected adult mice that express green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the control of the scleraxis promoter (ScxGFP) to a 6-week-treadmill training program designed to induce adaptive growth in Achilles tendons. Age matched sedentary ScxGFP mice were used as controls. Scleraxis expression was sparsely observed in the epitenon region of sedentary mice, but in response to treadmill training, scleraxis was robustly expressed in fibroblasts that appeared to be emerging from the epitenon and migrating into the superficial regions of tendon fascicles. Treadmill training also led to an increase in scleraxis, tenomodulin, and type I collagen gene expression as measured by qPCR. These results suggest that in addition to regulating the embryonic formation of limb tendons, scleraxis also appears to play an important role in the adaptation of adult tendons to physiological loading.

  7. Co-expression analysis of differentially expressed genes in hepatitis C virus-induced hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Song, Qingfeng; Zhao, Chang; Ou, Shengqiu; Meng, Zhibin; Kang, Ping; Fan, Liwei; Qi, Feng; Ma, Yilong

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying hepatitis C virus (HCV)-induced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) using the expression profiles of HCV-infected Huh7 cells at different time points. The differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified with the Samr package in R software once the data were normalized. Functional and pathway enrichment analysis of the identified DEGs was also performed. Subsequently, MCODE in Cytoscape software was applied to conduct module analysis of the constructed co-expression networks. A total of 1,100 DEGs were identified between the HCV-infected and control samples at 12, 18, 24 and 48 h post-infection. DEGs at 24 and 48 h were involved in the same signaling pathways and biological processes, including sterol biosynthetic processes and tRNA amino-acylation. There were 22 time series genes which were clustered into 3 expression patterns, and the demarcation point of the 2 expression patterns that 401 overlapping DEGs at 24 and 48 h clustered into was 24 h post-infection. tRNA synthesis-related biological processes emerged at 24 and 48 h. Replication and assembly of HCV in HCV-infected Huh7 cells occurred mainly at 24 h post-infection. In view of this, the screened time series genes have the potential to become candidate target molecules for monitoring, diagnosing and treating HCV-induced HCC. PMID:25339452

  8. Low doses of neutrons induce changes in gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Chang-Liu, C.M. ); Panozzo, J.; Libertin, C.R. )

    1993-01-01

    Studies were designed to identify genes induced following low-dose neutron but not following [gamma]-ray exposure in fibroblasts. Our past work had shown differences in the expression of [beta]-protein kinase C and c-fos genes, both being induced following [gamma]-ray but not neutron exposure. We have identified two genes that are induced following neutron, but not [gamma]-ray, exposure: Rp-8 (a gene induced by apoptosis) and the long terminal repeat (LTR) of the human immunodeficiency (HIV). Rp-8 mRNA induction was demonstrated in Syrian hamster embryo fibroblasts and was found to be induced in cells exposed to neutrons administered at low (0.5 cGy/min) and at high dose rate (12 cGy/min). The induction of transcription from the LTR of HIV was demonstrated in HeLa cells bearing a transfected construct of the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) gene driven by the HIV-LTR promoter. Measures of CAT activity and CAT transcripts following irradiation demonstrated an unresponsiveness to [gamma] rays over a broad range of doses. Twofold induction of the HIV-LTR was detected following neutron exposure (48 cGy) administered at low (0.5 cGy/min) but not high (12 cGy/min) dose rates. Ultraviolet-mediated HIV-LTR induction was inhibited by low-dose-rate neutron exposure.

  9. Low doses of neutrons induce changes in gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Chang-Liu, C.M.; Panozzo, J.; Libertin, C.R.

    1993-06-01

    Studies were designed to identify genes induced following low-dose neutron but not following {gamma}-ray exposure in fibroblasts. Our past work had shown differences in the expression of {beta}-protein kinase C and c-fos genes, both being induced following {gamma}-ray but not neutron exposure. We have identified two genes that are induced following neutron, but not {gamma}-ray, exposure: Rp-8 (a gene induced by apoptosis) and the long terminal repeat (LTR) of the human immunodeficiency (HIV). Rp-8 mRNA induction was demonstrated in Syrian hamster embryo fibroblasts and was found to be induced in cells exposed to neutrons administered at low (0.5 cGy/min) and at high dose rate (12 cGy/min). The induction of transcription from the LTR of HIV was demonstrated in HeLa cells bearing a transfected construct of the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) gene driven by the HIV-LTR promoter. Measures of CAT activity and CAT transcripts following irradiation demonstrated an unresponsiveness to {gamma} rays over a broad range of doses. Twofold induction of the HIV-LTR was detected following neutron exposure (48 cGy) administered at low (0.5 cGy/min) but not high (12 cGy/min) dose rates. Ultraviolet-mediated HIV-LTR induction was inhibited by low-dose-rate neutron exposure.

  10. Expression of GADS enhances FLT3-induced mitogenic signaling

    PubMed Central

    Chougule, Rohit A.; Cordero, Eugenia; Moharram, Sausan A.; Pietras, Kristian; Rönnstrand, Lars; Kazi, Julhash U.

    2016-01-01

    GADS is a member of a family of SH2 and SH3 domain-containing adaptors that functions in tyrosine kinase-mediated signaling cascades. Its expression is largely restricted to hematopoietic tissues and cell lines. Therefore, GADS is mainly involved in leukocyte-specific protein tyrosine kinase signaling. GADS is known to interact with tyrosine-phosphorylated SHC, BCR-ABL and KIT. The SH2 domain of GADS has a similar binding specificity to that of GRB2 but its SH3 domain displays a different binding specificity, and thus it is involved in other downstream signaling pathways than GRB2. In the present study, we examined the role of GADS in FLT3 signaling. FLT3 is a type III receptor tyrosine kinase, which is mutated in more than 30% of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and the most common mutations is the internal tandem duplication (ITD) mutations. We observed that expression of GADS enhanced oncogenic FLT3-ITD-induced cell proliferation and colony formation in vitro. In a mouse xenograft model, GADS accelerated FLT3-ITD-dependent tumor formation. Furthermore, expression of GADS induced a transcriptional program leading to upregulation of MYC and mTORC1 target genes. GADS localizes to the cell membrane and strongly binds to ligand-stimulated wild-type FLT3 or is constitutively associated with the oncogenic mutant FLT3-ITD. We mapped the binding sites in FLT3 to pY955 and pY969 which overlaps with the GRB2 binding sites. Expression of GADS enhanced FLT3-mediated phosphorylation of AKT, ERK1/2, p38 and STAT5. Taken together, our data suggests that GADS is an important downstream component of FLT3 signaling and expression of GADS potentiates FLT3-mediated mitogenic signaling. PMID:26895103

  11. EGR-1 regulates Ho-1 expression induced by cigarette smoke

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Huaqun; Wang, Lijuan; Gong, Tao; Yu, Yang; Zhu, Chunhua; Li, Fen; Wang, Li; Li, Chaojun

    2010-05-28

    As an anti-oxidant molecule, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) has been implicated in the protection of lung injury by cigarette smoke (CS). The mechanisms regulating its expression have not been defined. In this report, the role of early growth response 1 (EGR-1) in the regulation of Ho-1 expression was investigated. In C57BL/6 mice with CS exposure, HO-1 was greatly increased in bronchial epithelial cells and alveolar inflammatory cells. In primary cultured mouse lung fibroblasts and RAW264.7 cells exposed to cigarette smoke water extract (CSE), an increase in HO-1 protein level was detected. In addition, CSE induced HO-1 expression was decreased in Egr-1 deficient mouse embryo fibroblasts (Egr-1{sup -/-} MEFs). Nuclear localization of EGR-1 was examined in mouse lung fibroblasts after exposure to CSE. Luciferase reporter activity assays showed that the enhancer region of the Ho-1 gene containing a proposed EGR-1 binding site was responsible for the induction of HO-1. A higher increase of alveolar mean linear intercept (Lm) was observed in lung tissues, and a larger increase in the number of total cells and monocytes/macrophages from bronchial alveolar lavage fluid was found in CS-exposed mice by loss of function of EGR-1 treatment. In summary, the present data demonstrate that EGR-1 plays a critical role in HO-1 production induced by CS.

  12. AIDS lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Middleton, G W; Lau, R K

    1992-01-01

    Chronically immunosuppressed individuals are susceptible to lymphoreticular tumors. Up to 15% of patients with congenital deficiencies such as ataxia=telangiectasia may develop malignancies, mainly high-grade B cell non=Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHLs). AIDS lymphomas are comprised of NHLs including Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) and primary cerebral lymphomas (PCLs). Almost 3% of all AIDS patients (2824 of 97,258 cases) developed NHL. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) as a co-factor in AIDS lymphomagenesis has been studied: in 12 cases of 24 AIDS lymphomas EBV by DNA in situ hybridization was found. In an analysis of 6 primary cerebral lymphomas, .5 were positive for EBV DNA by Southern blotting. In Burkitt's lymphoma the characteristic genetic alteration affects the c-myc oncogene. In 1/3 of BL p53 mutations were found but none in the 43 NHLs suggesting that p53 mutations and c-myc activation act synergistically in the pathogenesis of these tumors. Cytotoxic agents dideoxyinosine, dideoxycytosine, and zidovudine may cause secondary neoplasia. 8 of 55 AIDS patients under zidovudine treatment developed high-grade lymphoma 23.8 months subsequently; recently doses were reduced. PCL was found in 21 of 90 patients. A 5.2 months survival was associated with combined treatment with cyclophosphamide, Oncovin (vincristine), methotrexate, etoposide, and cytosine arabinoside compared with 11.3 months with chemotherapy. Colony-stimulating factors (CSFs) alleviate drug-induced myelotoxicity and zidovudine-induced neutropenia, however, l8 of 11 patients receiving granulocyte-macrophage CSF developed hematological toxicity. Interleukine-2 produced by T-helper cells enhancing tumor cells cytotoxicity has been used in AIDS-associated cryptosporidial diarrhea and in 4 patients with AIDS lymphoma with modest response, but its stimulation of the HIV-infected substrate may increase viral proliferation.

  13. In a SLE mouse model the production of IgG autoantibody requires expression of activation-induced deaminase in early developing B cells

    PubMed Central

    Umiker, Benjamin R.; McDonald, Gabrielle; Larbi, Amma; Medina, Carlos O.; Reth, Michael; Imanishi-Kari, Thereza

    2014-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by the presence of pathogenic IgG anti-nuclear antibodies. Pathogenic IgG autoantibody production requires B-cell activation, leading to the production of activation-induced deaminase (AID) and class switching of IgM genes to IgG. To understand how and when B cells are activated to produce these IgG autoantibodies, we studied cells from 564Igi, a mouse model of SLE. 564Igi mice develop a disease profile closely resembling that found in human SLE patients, including the presence of IgG anti-nucleic acid antibodies. We have generated 564Igi mice that conditionally express an activation-induced cytidine deaminase transgene (Aicdatg), either in all B cells or only in mature B cells. Here we show that class-switched pathogenic IgG autoantibodies were produced only in 564Igi mice in which AID was functional in early developing B cells, resulting in loss of tolerance. Furthermore, we show that the absence of AID in early developing B cells also results in increased production of self-reactive IgM, indicating that AID, through somatic hypermutation (SHM), contributes to tolerance. Our results suggest that the pathophysiology of clinical SLE might also be dependent on AID expression in early developing B cells. PMID:25044405

  14. Production of IgG autoantibody requires expression of activation-induced deaminase in early-developing B cells in a mouse model of SLE.

    PubMed

    Umiker, Benjamin R; McDonald, Gabrielle; Larbi, Amma; Medina, Carlos O; Hobeika, Elias; Reth, Michael; Imanishi-Kari, Thereza

    2014-10-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by the presence of pathogenic IgG antinuclear antibodies. Pathogenic IgG autoantibody production requires B-cell activation, leading to the production of activation-induced deaminase (AID) and class switching of IgM genes to IgG. To understand how and when B cells are activated to produce these IgG autoantibodies, we studied cells from 564Igi, a mouse model of SLE. 564Igi mice develop a disease profile closely resembling that found in human SLE patients, including the presence of IgG antinucleic acid Abs. We have generated 564Igi mice that conditionally express an activation-induced cytidine deaminase transgene (Aicda(tg) ), either in all B cells or only in mature B cells. Here, we show that class-switched pathogenic IgG autoantibodies were produced only in 564Igi mice in which AID was functional in early-developing B cells, resulting in loss of tolerance. Furthermore, we show that the absence of AID in early-developing B cells also results in increased production of self-reactive IgM, indicating that AID, through somatic hypermutation, contributes to tolerance. Our results suggest that the pathophysiology of clinical SLE might also be dependent on AID expression in early-developing B cells.

  15. Hearing Aid-Induced Plasticity in the Auditory System of Older Adults: Evidence from Speech Perception

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavie, Limor; Banai, Karen; Karni, Avi; Attias, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: We tested whether using hearing aids can improve unaided performance in speech perception tasks in older adults with hearing impairment. Method: Unaided performance was evaluated in dichotic listening and speech-­in-­noise tests in 47 older adults with hearing impairment; 36 participants in 3 study groups were tested before hearing aid…

  16. Insight into HIV of IFN-Induced Myxovirus Resistance 2 (MX2) Expressed by Traditional Chinese Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Tzu-Chieh; Lee, Wen-Yuan; Chen, Kuen-Bao; Chan, Yueh-Chiu

    2014-01-01

    Recently, an important topic of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) had been published in 2013. In this report, the expression of the IFN-induced myxovirus resistance 2 (MX2) had been defined the function to kill the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The screening from the Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) database by simulating molecular docking and molecular dynamics could select candidate compounds, which may express MX2 against HIV. Saussureamine C, Crotalaburnine, and Precatorine are selected based on the highest docking score and other TCM compounds. The data from molecular dynamics are helpful in the analysis and detection of protein-ligand interactions. According to the docking poses, hydrophobic interactions, and hydrogen bond with structure variations, this research could assess the interaction between protein and ligand interaction. In addition to the detection of TCM compound efficacy, we suggest that Saussureamine C is better than the others in protein-ligand interaction and the structural variation to express MX2. PMID:25045710

  17. EHMT1 and EHMT2 inhibition induces fetal hemoglobin expression

    PubMed Central

    Renneville, Aline; Van Galen, Peter; Canver, Matthew C.; McConkey, Marie; Krill-Burger, John M.; Dorfman, David M.; Holson, Edward B.; Bernstein, Bradley E.; Orkin, Stuart H.; Bauer, Daniel E.

    2015-01-01

    Fetal hemoglobin (HbF, α2γ2) induction is a well-validated strategy for sickle cell disease (SCD) treatment. Using a small-molecule screen, we found that UNC0638, a selective inhibitor of EHMT1 and EHMT2 histone methyltransferases, induces γ-globin expression. EHMT1/2 catalyze mono- and dimethylation of lysine 9 on histone 3 (H3K9), raising the possibility that H3K9Me2, a repressive chromatin mark, plays a role in silencing γ-globin expression. In primary human adult erythroid cells, UNC0638 and EHMT1 or EHMT2 short hairpin RNA–mediated knockdown significantly increased γ-globin expression, HbF synthesis, and the percentage of cells expressing HbF. At effective concentrations, UNC0638 did not alter cell morphology, proliferation, or erythroid differentiation of primary human CD34+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells in culture ex vivo. In murine erythroleukemia cells, UNC0638 and Ehmt2 CRISPR/Cas9-mediated knockout both led to a marked increase in expression of embryonic β-globin genes Hbb-εy and Hbb-βh1. In primary human adult erythroblasts, chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing analysis revealed that UNC0638 treatment leads to genome-wide depletion in H3K9Me2 and a concomitant increase in the activating mark H3K9Ac, which was especially pronounced at the γ-globin gene region. In RNA-sequencing analysis of erythroblasts, γ-globin genes were among the most significantly upregulated genes by UNC0638. Further increase in γ-globin expression in primary human adult erythroid cells was achieved by combining EHMT1/2 inhibition with the histone deacetylase inhibitor entinostat or hypomethylating agent decitabine. Our data provide genetic and pharmacologic evidence that EHMT1 and EHMT2 are epigenetic regulators involved in γ-globin repression and represent a novel therapeutic target for SCD. PMID:26320100

  18. Markers for host-induced gene expression in Trichophyton dermatophytosis.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, Gil; Berdicevsky, Israela; Woodfolk, Judith A; Horwitz, Benjamin A

    2005-10-01

    Dermatophytes are adapted to infect keratinized tissues by their ability to utilize keratin as a nutrient source. Although there have been numerous reports that dermatophytes like Trichophyton sp. secrete proteolytic enzymes, virtually nothing is known about the patterns of gene expression in the host or even when the organisms are cultured on protein substrates in the absence of a host. We characterized the expression of an aminopeptidase gene, the Trichophyton mentagrophytes homolog of the Trichophyton rubrum Tri r 4 gene. The T. rubrum gene was originally isolated based on the ability of the protein encoded by it to induce immediate and delayed-type hypersensitivity in skin tests. T. mentagrophytes Tri m 4 is closely related to Tri r 4 (almost 94% identity at the protein level). Tri m 4 resembles other protease-encoding genes thought to be virulence factors (for example, DPP V of Aspergillus fumigatus). The Tri m 4 protein was detected immunochemically both in fungal extracts and in the culture medium. Expression of the Tri m 4 gene was induced severalfold when T. mentagrophytes was grown on keratin and elastin. Ex vivo, strong induction was observed after culture on blood plasma, but the use of homogenized skin did not result in a significant increase in Tri m 4 transcript levels. In order to identify additional genes encoding putative virulence factors, differential cDNA screening was performed. By this method, a fungal thioredoxin and a cellulase homolog were identified, and both genes were found to be strongly induced by skin extracellular matrix proteins. Induction by superficial (keratin) and deep (elastin) skin elements suggests that the products of these genes may be important in both superficial and deep dermatophytosis, and models for their function are proposed. Upregulation of several newly identified T. mentagrophytes genes on protein substrates suggests that these genes encode proteins which are relevant to the dermatophyte-skin interaction.

  19. B cell Rab7 mediates induction of activation-induced cytidine deaminase expression and class-switching in T-dependent and T-independent antibody responses.

    PubMed

    Pone, Egest J; Lam, Tonika; Lou, Zheng; Wang, Rui; Chen, Yuhui; Liu, Dongfang; Edinger, Aimee L; Xu, Zhenming; Casali, Paolo

    2015-04-01

    Class switch DNA recombination (CSR) is central to the maturation of the Ab response because it diversifies Ab effector functions. Like somatic hypermutation, CSR requires activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), whose expression is restricted to B cells, as induced by CD40 engagement or dual TLR-BCR engagement (primary CSR-inducing stimuli). By constructing conditional knockout Igh(+/C)γ(1-cre)Rab7(fl/fl) mice, we identified a B cell-intrinsic role for Rab7, a small GTPase involved in intracellular membrane functions, in mediating AID induction and CSR. Igh(+/C)γ(1-cre)Rab7(fl/fl) mice displayed normal B and T cell development and were deficient in Rab7 only in B cells undergoing Igh(C)γ(1-cre) Iγ1-Sγ1-Cγ1-cre transcription, as induced--like Igh germline Iγ1-Sγ1-Cγ1 and Iε-Sε-Cε transcription--by IL-4 in conjunction with a primary CSR-inducing stimulus. These mice could not mount T-independent or T-dependent class-switched IgG1 or IgE responses while maintaining normal IgM levels. Igh(+/C)γ(1-cre)Rab7(fl/fl) B cells showed, in vivo and in vitro, normal proliferation and survival, normal Blimp-1 expression and plasma cell differentiation, as well as intact activation of the noncanonical NF-κB, p38 kinase, and ERK1/2 kinase pathways. They, however, were defective in AID expression and CSR in vivo and in vitro, as induced by CD40 engagement or dual TLR1/2-, TLR4-, TLR7-, or TLR9-BCR engagement. In Igh(+/C)γ(1-cre)Rab7(fl/fl) B cells, CSR was rescued by enforced AID expression. These findings, together with our demonstration that Rab7-mediated canonical NF-κB activation, as critical to AID induction, outline a novel role of Rab7 in signaling pathways that lead to AID expression and CSR, likely by promoting assembly of signaling complexes along intracellular membranes.

  20. Strong Magnetic Field Induced Changes of Gene Expression in Arabidopsis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, A.-L.; Ferl, R. J.; Klingenberg, B.; Brooks, J. S.; Morgan, A. N.; Yowtak, J.; Meisel, M. W.

    2005-07-01

    We review our studies of the biological impact of magnetic field strengths of up to 30 T on transgenic arabidopsis plants engineered with a stress response gene consisting of the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) gene promoter driving the β-glucuronidase (GUS) gene reporter. Field strengths in excess of 15 T induce expression of the Adh/GUS transgene in the roots and leaves. Microarray analyses indicate that such field strengths have a far reaching effect on the genome. Wide spread induction of stress-related genes and transcription factors, and a depression of genes associated with cell wall metabolism are prominent examples.

  1. High magnetic field induced changes of gene expression in arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Anna-Lisa; Ferl, Robert J; Meisel, Mark W

    2006-01-01

    Background High magnetic fields are becoming increasingly prevalent components of non-invasive, biomedical imaging tools (such as MRI), thus, an understanding of the molecular impacts associated with these field strengths in biological systems is of central importance. The biological impact of magnetic field strengths up to 30 Tesla were investigated in this study through the use of transgenic Arabidopsis plants engineered with a stress response gene consisting of the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) gene promoter driving the β-glucuronidase (GUS) gene reporter. Methods Magnetic field induced Adh/GUS activity was evaluated with histochemical staining to assess tissue specific expression and distribution, and with quantitative, spectrofluometric assays to measure degree of activation. The evaluation of global changes in the Arabidopsis genome in response to exposure to high magnetic fields was facilitated with Affymetrix Gene Chip microarrays. Quantitative analyses of gene expression were performed with quantitative real-time polymerase-chain-reaction (qRT-PCR). Results Field strengths in excess of about 15 Tesla induce expression of the Adh/GUS transgene in the roots and leaves. From the microarray analyses that surveyed 8000 genes, 114 genes were differentially expressed to a degree greater than 2.5 fold over the control. These results were quantitatively corroborated by qRT-PCR examination of 4 of the 114 genes. Conclusion The data suggest that magnetic fields in excess of 15 Tesla have far-reaching effect on the genome. The wide-spread induction of stress-related genes and transcription factors, and a depression of genes associated with cell wall metabolism, are prominent examples. The roles of magnetic field orientation of macromolecules and magnetophoretic effects are discussed as possible factors that contribute to the mounting of this response. PMID:17187667

  2. Decreased inducibility of TNF expression in lipid-loaded macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Ares, Mikko PS; Stollenwerk, Maria; Olsson, Anneli; Kallin, Bengt; Jovinge, Stefan; Nilsson, Jan

    2002-01-01

    Background Inflammation and immune responses are considered to be very important in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Lipid accumulation in macrophages of the arterial intima is a characteristic feature of atherosclerosis which can influence the inflammatory potential of macrophages. We studied the effects of lipid loading on the regulation of TNF expression in human monocyte-derived macrophages. Results In macrophages incubated with acetylated low density lipoprotein (ac-LDL) for 2 days, mRNA expression of TNF in cells stimulated with TNF decreased by 75%. In cell cultures stimulated over night with IL-1β, lipid loading decreased secretion of TNF into culture medium by 48%. These results suggest that lipid accumulation in macrophages makes them less responsive to inflammatory stimuli. Decreased basal activity and inducibility of transcription factor AP-1 was observed in lipid-loaded cells, suggesting a mechanism for the suppression of cytokine expression. NF-κB binding activity and inducibility were only marginally affected by ac-LDL. LDL and ac-LDL did not activate PPARγ. In contrast, oxidized LDL stimulated AP-1 and PPARγ but inhibited NF-κB, indicating that the effects of lipid loading with ac-LDL were not due to oxidation of lipids. Conclusions Accumulation of lipid, mainly cholesterol, results in down-regulation of TNF expression in macrophages. Since monocytes are known to be activated by cell adhesion, these results suggest that foam cells in atherosclerotic plaques may contribute less potently to an inflammatory reaction than newly arrived monocytes/macrophages. PMID:12366867

  3. Changes in leukocyte gene expression profiles induced by antineoplastic chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    GONZÁLEZ-FERNÁNDEZ, REBECA; MORALES, MANUEL; AVILA, JULIO; MARTÍN-VASALLO, PABLO

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, we studied changes in gene expression induced by chemotherapy (CT) on normal peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs), at baseline and following three CT cycles, in order to identify which genes were specifically affected and were potentially useful as biomarkers for a personalised prognosis and follow-up. A PBL subtraction cDNA library was constructed from four patients undergoing CT with paclitaxel and carboplatin (PC). mRNA from the PBLs was isolated prior to the patients receiving the first cycle and following the completion of the third cycle. The library was screened and the expression of the identified genes was studied in PBLs obtained from patients suffering from cancer prior to and following three cycles of PC and a reference group of patients undergoing treatment with Adriamycin-cyclophosphamide (AC). From the 1,200 screened colonies, 65 positive clones showed varied expression intensity and were sequenced; 27 of these were mitochondrial DNA and 38 clones (27 different) were coded for cytosolic and nuclear proteins. The genes that were studied in patients undergoing CT were ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated gene), eIF4B (translation initiation factor 4B), MATR3 (Matrin 3), MORC3 (microrchidia 3), PCMTD2 (protein-L-isoaspartate O-methyltransferase), PDCD10 (programmed cell death gene 10), PSMB1 (proteasome subunit type β), RMND5A (required for meiotic nuclear division 5 homologue A), RUNX2 (runt-related transcription factor 2), SACM1L (suppressor of actin mutations 1-like), TMEM66 (transmembrane protein 66) and ZNF644 (zinc finger protein 644). Certain variations were observed in the expression of the genes that are involved in drug resistance mechanisms, some of which may be secondary to non-desirable effects and others of which may cause the undesired effects of CT. The expression of genes with a dynamic cellular role showed a marked positive correlation, indicating that their upregulation may be involved in a specific pattern of cell

  4. Transgenic expression of green fluorescent protein in caprine embryos produced through electroporation-aided sperm-mediated gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Kumar Pramod, R; Kumar, Rakesh; Mitra, Abhijit

    2016-01-15

    Current methods of transgenic animal production are afflicted by low efficiency and high cost. Recently, the electroporation aided sperm-mediated gene transfer (SMGT) emerges as a promising alternative with variable success rate. Among the domestic animal species, the electroporation-aided SMGT is less investigated in goats, except a few reports in which attempts have been made using the auto-uptake method of SMGT. In this study, we report an optimized electroporation condition for SMGT of caprine sperm cells. Results of this study demonstrated that electroporation of caprine sperm cells at 300 V for 200 mS in TALP medium allowed the maximum uptake of foreign DNA with minimum adverse effects on the vital semen parameters viz., progressive motility, viability, and membrane and acrosome integrity. Further, DNA binding assay revealed DNA uptake by 81.3% sperm cells when 1.0 μg of DNA was used under optimum electroporation conditions as compared to 16.5% on simple incubation. The qPCR analysis showed four-fold more (P<0.05) DNA uptake by sperm cells under electroporation than incubation. A similar cleavage rate was observed after IVF using either electroporated (23.20 ± 1.20) or non-electroporated (25.20 ± 2.41) sperm cells suggesting the absence of adverse effect of electroporation on the fertilizing ability. Out of the 116 embryos produced by electroporated sperm, five (4.31%) embryos showed the expression of the foreign gene. In conclusion, our results confirm that using optimized electroporation conditions, the caprine sperm cells can uptake foreign DNA effectively with minimum negative effect on the semen parameters and could produce transgenic embryos.

  5. Interleukin-4 receptor expression on AIDS-associated Kaposi's sarcoma cells and their targeting by a chimeric protein comprised of circularly permuted interleukin-4 and Pseudomonas exotoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Husain, S. R.; Gill, P.; Kreitman, R. J.; Pastan, I.; Puri, R. K.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: AIDS-associated Kaposi's sarcoma (AIDS-KS) represents one of the most common malignancies associated with human immunodeficiency virus infection. To target effective therapeutic agents to AIDS-KS, we have identified a new target in the form of interleukin-4 receptors (IL-4R). MATERIALS AND METHODS: The expression of IL-4R on AIDS-KS cells and their subunit structure was determined by radioligand receptor binding, cross-linking and Northern and RT-PCR analyses. The in vitro effect of IL-4 and recombinant fusion protein made up of circularly permuted IL-4 and a mutated form of Pseudomonas exotoxin, IL-4(38-37)-PE38KDEL, was examined by clonogenic and protein synthesis inhibition assays. RESULTS: Five AIDS-KS cell lines expressed high-affinity IL-4R with a Kd of 23.5-219 pM. IL-4 appeared to cross-link to one major protein corresponding to 140 kDa and a broad band corresponding to 60-70 kDa. Both cross-linked proteins were immunoprecipitated with an antibody to human IL-4R beta chain. AIDS-KS cells exhibited IL-4R beta-specific mRNA. IL-4 caused a modest inhibition (31-34%) of colony formation in two AIDS-KS cell lines tested. IL-4(38-37)-PE38KDEL was found to be highly effective in inhibiting the protein synthesis in all five AIDS-KS examined. The IC50 ranged from 32 to 1225 pM. The cytotoxic action of IL-4 toxin was blocked by an excess of IL-4, exhibiting the specificity of IL-4(38-37)-PE38KDEL. The cytotoxicity of IL-4 toxin observed by a clonogenic assay corroborated well with the IC50 obtained by protein synthesis inhibition assay. Normal human endothelial cells expressed a negligible number of IL-4R (< 50 sites/cell) and were less sensitive or not sensitive to IL-4(38-37)-PE38KDEL. CONCLUSION: The presence of a new plasma membrane protein in the form of IL-4R on AIDS-KS cells may be targeted by IL-4(38-37)-PE38KDEL for its potential implication in the treatment of AIDS-KS. Images FIG. 3 FIG. 4 FIG. 6 PMID:9205948

  6. Eotaxin Expression in Sephadex-Induced Lung Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ren-Feng; Ward, Peter A.; Jordan, Jacqueline A.; Huber-Lang, Markus; Warner, Roscoe L.; Shi, Michael M.

    1999-01-01

    The CC chemokine eotaxin is a potent and specific eosinophil chemoattractant. Eosinophil-dependent tissue injury has been shown to contribute to airway inflammation such as that in asthma. In the present study, We investigated eotaxin expression in a rat model of pulmonary inflammation (featuring accumulation of eosinophils) induced by intratracheal instillation of cross-linked dextran beads (Sephadex G200). Intratracheal instillation of 5 mg/kg Sephadex caused a time-dependent eosinophil infiltration into the lung, reaching a peak at 24 hours. Eotaxin mRNA in the lung paralleled the eosinophil influx. Eotaxin protein in bronchoalveolar (BAL) fluids and lung homogenates was shown by Western blot and immunostaining to be maximally expressed by 24 hours. Sephadex-induced lung injury, as measured by 125I-labeled albumin leakage from the pulmonary vasculature, developed in a time-dependent manner. Intravenous injection of blocking antibody to eotaxin significantly decreased eosinophil infiltration and lung permeability. These data suggest that, in the Sephadex model of lung inflammation, eotaxin up-regulation mediates intrapulmonary accumulation of eosinophils and the development of lung injury. PMID:10595930

  7. Roles of factorial noise in inducing bimodal gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Peijiang; Yuan, Zhanjiang; Huang, Lifang; Zhou, Tianshou

    2015-06-01

    Some gene regulatory systems can exhibit bimodal distributions of mRNA or protein although the deterministic counterparts are monostable. This noise-induced bimodality is an interesting phenomenon and has important biological implications, but it is unclear how different sources of expression noise (each source creates so-called factorial noise that is defined as a component of the total noise) contribute separately to this stochastic bimodality. Here we consider a minimal model of gene regulation, which is monostable in the deterministic case. Although simple, this system contains factorial noise of two main kinds: promoter noise due to switching between gene states and transcriptional (or translational) noise due to synthesis and degradation of mRNA (or protein). To better trace the roles of factorial noise in inducing bimodality, we also analyze two limit models, continuous and adiabatic approximations, apart from the exact model. We show that in the case of slow gene switching, the continuous model where only promoter noise is considered can exhibit bimodality; in the case of fast switching, the adiabatic model where only transcriptional or translational noise is considered can also exhibit bimodality but the exact model cannot; and in other cases, both promoter noise and transcriptional or translational noise can cooperatively induce bimodality. Since slow gene switching and large protein copy numbers are characteristics of eukaryotic cells, whereas fast gene switching and small protein copy numbers are characteristics of prokaryotic cells, we infer that eukaryotic stochastic bimodality is induced mainly by promoter noise, whereas prokaryotic stochastic bimodality is induced primarily by transcriptional or translational noise.

  8. Expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase in experimental viral myocarditis.

    PubMed

    Glück, B; Merkle, I; Dornberger, G; Stelzner, A

    2000-05-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important bioactive molecule with regulatory, cytotoxic or cytoprotective properties. In virus-induced myocarditis, NO mediates host defense mechanisms against the infection or causes cardiac dysfunctions. NO is synthesized from L-arginine by the enzyme nitric oxide synthase (NOS). The expression of the inducible form of the nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) is regulated by cytokines, involved in the complex myocardial immune response to enterovirus infections. The present study was undertaken to characterize the role of iNOS and NO in the murine model of viral myocarditis induced by coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3). In response to CVB3 infection we investigated the time course of iNOS induction in correlation with cytokine mRNA expression (TNF-alpha, IL-1 alpha, IFN-gamma, TGF-beta) in the heart of NMRI mice by RT-PCR. Positive PCR signals for viral RNA were found in the acute and chronic stage of disease by seminested PCR, indicating the persistence of viral genome. We found distinct expression of iNOS at all time points (1, 2, 3, 4, 7, 14, 28, 56, 98 days post infection [p.i.]). Higher iNOS mRNA levels were identified between days 4 until 28 p.i. in comparison to day 56 and 98 p.i. using densitometric values. The mRNA of the inflammatory cytokines TNF-alpha, IL-1 alpha, IFN-gamma appeared at days 1, 4, and 7 p.i., peaked at day 7 p.i. and persisted until day 98 p.i. Similar like the iNOS mRNA pattern was the expression profile of TGF-beta. Using in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry iNOS was localized in infiltrates, vascular endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, myocytes and throughout the interstitial spaces between myocardial fibers in the heart sections of NMRI mice. Increased levels of NO were measured as total nitrate/nitrite concentration in the sera of mice from day 7 until day 28 p.i.

  9. The relationship between expressed HIV/AIDS-related stigma and beliefs and knowledge about care and support of people living with AIDS in families caring for HIV-infected children in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Hamra, M; Ross, M W; Karuri, K; Orrs, M; D'Agostino, A

    2005-10-01

    At the end of 2001, AIDS-related deaths had left an estimated 900,000 living orphans in Kenya (UNAIDS/WHO Epidemiology fact sheet, Kenya report, 2004). Many of those orphans are also HIV+. In Eastern Kenya, the Lea Toto Kangemi Outreach Program provides support to families caring for HIV+ children, many of whom are orphaned or soon to be orphaned. A major challenge for these families is the stigma attached to the family. In 2003, the Kangemi Program conducted a household survey of client families. We examined markers of expressed stigma and the association between expressed stigma and other demographic and belief/knowledge domains. The focus of the present study was the specific belief/knowledge domain surrounding care/support of HIV+ persons. Our goal was to explore this domain in the Kangemi families and to examine its relationship to expressed stigma. We created an AIDS-related stigma scale from selected items in the household survey and cross-tabulated stigma scores with care/support knowledge items. We found significant associations between less expressed stigma and greater care/support knowledge. Our results have implications for interventions that reduce expressed stigma and/or improve quality of care.

  10. Bitumen fume-induced gene expression profile in rat lung

    SciTech Connect

    Gate, Laurent . E-mail: laurent.gate@inrs.fr; Langlais, Cristina; Micillino, Jean-Claude; Nunge, Herve; Bottin, Marie-Claire; Wrobel, Richard; Binet, Stephane

    2006-08-15

    Exposure to bitumen fumes during paving and roofing activities may represent an occupational health risk. To date, most of the studies performed on the biological effect of asphalt fumes have been done with regard to their content in carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). In order to gain an additional insight into the mechanisms of action of bitumen fumes, we studied their pulmonary effects in rodents following inhalation using the microarray technology. Fisher 344 rats were exposed for 5 days, 6 h/day to bitumen fumes generated at road paving temperature (170 {sup o}C) using a nose-only exposition device. With the intention of studying the early transcriptional events induced by asphalt fumes, lung tissues were collected immediately following exposure and gene expression profiles in control and exposed rats were determined by using oligonucleotide microarrays. Data analysis revealed that genes involved in lung inflammatory response as well as genes associated with PAH metabolization and detoxification were highly expressed in bitumen-exposed animals. In addition, the expression of genes related to elastase activity and its inhibition which are associated with emphysema was also modulated. More interestingly genes coding for monoamine oxidases A and B involved in the metabolism of neurotransmitters and xenobiotics were downregulated in exposed rats. Altogether, these data give additional information concerning the bitumen fumes biological effects and would allow to better review the health effects of occupational asphalt fumes exposure.

  11. Bitumen fume-induced gene expression profile in rat lung.

    PubMed

    Gate, Laurent; Langlais, Cristina; Micillino, Jean-Claude; Nunge, Hervé; Bottin, Marie-Claire; Wrobel, Richard; Binet, Stéphane

    2006-08-15

    Exposure to bitumen fumes during paving and roofing activities may represent an occupational health risk. To date, most of the studies performed on the biological effect of asphalt fumes have been done with regard to their content in carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). In order to gain an additional insight into the mechanisms of action of bitumen fumes, we studied their pulmonary effects in rodents following inhalation using the microarray technology. Fisher 344 rats were exposed for 5 days, 6 h/day to bitumen fumes generated at road paving temperature (170 degrees C) using a nose-only exposition device. With the intention of studying the early transcriptional events induced by asphalt fumes, lung tissues were collected immediately following exposure and gene expression profiles in control and exposed rats were determined by using oligonucleotide microarrays. Data analysis revealed that genes involved in lung inflammatory response as well as genes associated with PAH metabolization and detoxification were highly expressed in bitumen-exposed animals. In addition, the expression of genes related to elastase activity and its inhibition which are associated with emphysema was also modulated. More interestingly genes coding for monoamine oxidases A and B involved in the metabolism of neurotransmitters and xenobiotics were downregulated in exposed rats. Altogether, these data give additional information concerning the bitumen fumes biological effects and would allow to better review the health effects of occupational asphalt fumes exposure.

  12. UV radiation induces CXCL5 expression in human skin.

    PubMed

    Reichert, Olga; Kolbe, Ludger; Terstegen, Lara; Staeb, Franz; Wenck, Horst; Schmelz, Martin; Genth, Harald; Kaever, Volkhard; Roggenkamp, Dennis; Neufang, Gitta

    2015-04-01

    CXCL5 has recently been identified as a mediator of UVB-induced pain in rodents. To compare and to extend previous knowledge of cutaneous CXCL5 regulation, we performed a comprehensive study on the effects of UV radiation on CXCL5 regulation in human skin. Our results show a dose-dependent increase in CXCL5 protein in human skin after UV radiation. CXCL5 can be released by different cell types in the skin. We presumed that, in addition to immune cells, non-immune skin cells also contribute to UV-induced increase in CXCL5 protein. Analysis of monocultured dermal fibroblasts and keratinocytes revealed that only fibroblasts but not keratinocytes displayed up regulated CXCL5 levels after UV stimulation. Whereas UV treatment of human skin equivalents, induced epidermal CXCL5 mRNA and protein expression. Up regulation of epidermal CXCL5 was independent of keratinocyte differentiation and keratinocyte-keratinocyte interactions in epidermal layers. Our findings provide first evidence on the release of CXCL5 in UV-radiated human skin and the essential role of fibroblast-keratinocyte interaction in the regulation of epidermal CXCL5. PMID:25690483

  13. Variation in Protein Intake Induces Variation in Spider Silk Expression

    PubMed Central

    Blamires, Sean J.; Wu, Chun-Lin; Tso, I-Min

    2012-01-01

    Background It is energetically expensive to synthesize certain amino acids. The proteins (spidroins) of spider major ampullate (MA) silk, MaSp1 and MaSp2, differ in amino acid composition. Glutamine and proline are prevalent in MaSp2 and are expensive to synthesize. Since most orb web spiders express high proline silk they might preferentially attain the amino acids needed for silk from food and shift toward expressing more MaSp1 in their MA silk when starved. Methodology/Principal Findings We fed three spiders; Argiope aetherea, Cyrtophora moluccensis and Leucauge blanda, high protein, low protein or no protein solutions. A. aetherea and L. blanda MA silks are high in proline, while C. moluccesnsis MA silks are low in proline. After 10 days of feeding we determined the amino acid compositions and mechanical properties of each species' MA silk and compared them between species and treatments with pre-treatment samples, accounting for ancestry. We found that the proline and glutamine of A. aetherea and L. blanda silks were affected by protein intake; significantly decreasing under the low and no protein intake treatments. Glutmaine composition in C. moluccensis silk was likewise affected by protein intake. However, the composition of proline in their MA silk was not significantly affected by protein intake. Conclusions Our results suggest that protein limitation induces a shift toward different silk proteins with lower glutamine and/or proline content. Contradictions to the MaSp model lie in the findings that C. moluccensis MA silks did not experience a significant reduction in proline and A. aetherea did not experience a significant reduction in serine on low/no protein. The mechanical properties of the silks could not be explained by a MaSp1 expressional shift. Factors other than MaSp expression, such as the expression of spidroin-like orthologues, may impact on silk amino acid composition and spinning and glandular processes may impact mechanics. PMID:22363691

  14. Inducible Expression of CXCL1 within the Central Nervous System Amplifies Viral-Induced Demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Marro, Brett S.; Grist, Jonathan J.

    2016-01-01

    The functional role of the ELR+ chemokine CXCL1 in host defense and disease following infection of the CNS with the neurotropic JHM strain of mouse hepatitis virus (JHMV) was examined. Mice in which expression of CXCL1 is under the control of a tetracycline-inducible promoter active within glial fibrillary acidic protein–positive cells were generated and this allowed for selectively increasing CNS expression of CXCL1 in response to JHMV infection and evaluating the effects on neuroinflammation, control of viral replication, and demyelination. Inducible expression of CNS-derived CXCL1 resulted in increased levels of CXCL1 protein within the serum, brain, and spinal cord that correlated with increased frequency of Ly6G+CD11b+ neutrophils present within the CNS. Elevated levels of CXCL1 did not influence the generation of virus-specific T cells, and there was no difference in control of JHMV replication compared with control mice, indicating that T cell infiltration into the CNS is CXCL1-independent. Sustained CXCL1 expression within the CNS resulted in increased mortality that correlated with elevated neutrophil infiltration, diminished numbers of mature oligodendrocytes, and an increase in the severity of demyelination. Neutrophil ablation in CXCL1-transgenic mice reduced the severity of demyelination in mice, arguing for a role for these cells in white matter damage. Collectively, these findings illustrate that sustained CXCL1 expression amplifies the severity of white matter damage and that neutrophils can contribute to this process in a model of viral-induced neurologic disease. PMID:26773148

  15. CXCL10 expression induced by Mxi1 inactivation induces mesangial cell apoptosis in mouse Habu nephritis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lingling; Chen, Xiaoniao; Mei, Yan; Hong, Quan; Feng, Zhe; Lv, Yang; Wen, Jun; Liu, Xiaoluan; Cai, Guangyan; Chen, Xiangmei

    2015-05-01

    MAX interactor 1 (Mxi1) proteins are c-myc antagonists that primarily exert their biological functions by inhibiting Myc-dependent gene transcription. In this study, Mxi1(-/-) mice were used to generate a model of mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis for the first time. In the present study, we demonstrated that Mxi1(-/-) mice exhibited a more typical and severe pathological phenotype, which was displayed primarily as a noticeable dissolution phenotype with a higher proportion of apoptotic cells and higher chemokine CXCL10 expression during the early days of modeling, compared with wild-type mice. Additionally, we determined that IRF3-mediated TLR4 signaling was likely involved in regulating CXCL10 expression, which might participate in the mesangial dissolution process. We also found increases in CXCL10 expression, caspase 3 activation, and the proportion of apoptotic cells when Mxi1 expression was inhibited in mouse mesangial cells. Furthermore, the proportion of apoptotic cells decreased after inhibiting CXCL10 expression. Therefore, we concluded that the mesangial cell apoptosis observed in this mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis model was related to CXCL10 expression induced by Mxi1 inactivation. This finding provides a new theoretical basis for the mechanism of mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis progression and reveals potential intervention targets for the early treatment of this disease.

  16. The Tat protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1, a growth factor for AIDS Kaposi sarcoma and cytokine-activated vascular cells, induces adhesion of the same cell types by using integrin receptors recognizing the RGD amino acid sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Barillari, G; Gendelman, R; Gallo, R C; Ensoli, B

    1993-01-01

    Spindle-shaped cells of vascular origin are the probable tumor cells of Kaposi sarcoma (KS). These cells, derived from patients with KS and AIDS, proliferate in response to extracellular Tat protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1. Normal vascular cells, believed to be the progenitors of AIDS-KS cells, acquire spindle morphology and become responsive to the mitogenic effect of Tat after culture with inflammatory cytokines. Such cytokines are increased in human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected people, suggesting that immune stimulation (rather than immune deficiency) is a component of AIDS-KS pathogenesis. Here we show that (i) Tat promotes adhesion of AIDS-KS and normal vascular cells; (ii) adhesion of normal vascular cells to Tat is induced by exposure of the cells to the same cytokines; (iii) adhesion is associated with the amino acid sequence RGD of Tat through a specific interaction with the integrin receptors alpha 5 beta 1 and alpha v beta 3, although it is augmented by the basic region; and (iv) the expression of both integrins is increased by the same cytokines that promote these cells to acquire spindle morphology and become responsive to the adhesion and growth effects of Tat. The results also suggest that RGD-recognizing integrins mediate the vascular cell-growth-promoting effect of Tat. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 5 PMID:7690138

  17. Placental ischemia induces changes in gene expression in chorionic tissue

    PubMed Central

    Garrett, Michael R.; Granger, Joey P.

    2014-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a serious and common hypertensive complication of pregnancy, affecting ~5 to 8 % of pregnancies. The underlying cause of preeclampsia is believed to be placental ischemia, which causes secretion of pathogenic factors into the maternal circulation. While a number of these factors have been identified, it is likely that others remain to be elucidated. Here, we have utilized a relevant preclinical rodent model of placental ischemia-induced hypertension, the reduced uterine perfusion pressure (RUPP) model, to determine the effect of chronic placental ischemia on the underlying chorionic tissue and placental villi. Tissue from control and RUPP rats were isolated on gestational day 19 and mRNA from these tissues was subjected to microarray analysis to determine differential gene expression. At a statistical cutoff of p <0.05, some 2,557 genes were differentially regulated between the two groups. Interestingly, only a small subset (22) of these genes exhibited changes of greater than 50 % versus control, a large proportion of which were subsequently confirmed using qRT-PCR analysis. Network analysis indicated a strong effect on inflammatory pathways, including those involving NF-κB and inflammatory cytokines. Of the most differentially expressed genes, the predominant gene classes were extracellular remodeling proteins, pro-inflammatory proteins, and a coordinated upregulation of the prolactin genes. The functional implications of these novel factors are discussed. PMID:24668059

  18. Epithelial Cell Gene Expression Induced by Intracellular Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xianglu; Fusco, William G.; Seo, Keun S.; Bayles, Kenneth W.; Mosley, Erin E.; McGuire, Mark A.; Bohach, Gregory A.

    2009-01-01

    HEp-2 cell monolayers were cocultured with intracellular Staphylococcus aureus, and changes in gene expression were profiled using DNA microarrays. Intracellular S. aureus affected genes involved in cellular stress responses, signal transduction, inflammation, apoptosis, fibrosis, and cholesterol biosynthesis. Transcription of stress response and signal transduction-related genes including atf3, sgk, map2k1, map2k3, arhb, and arhe was increased. In addition, elevated transcription of proinflammatory genes was observed for tnfa, il1b, il6, il8, cxcl1, ccl20, cox2, and pai1. Genes involved in proapoptosis and fibrosis were also affected at transcriptional level by intracellular S. aureus. Notably, intracellular S. aureus induced strong transcriptional down-regulation of several cholesterol biosynthesis genes. These results suggest that epithelial cells respond to intracellular S. aureus by inducing genes affecting immunity and in repairing damage caused by the organism, and are consistent with the possibility that the organism exploits an intracellular environment to subvert host immunity and promote colonization. PMID:20016671

  19. Nonnative proteins induce expression of the Bacillus subtilis CIRCE regulon.

    PubMed

    Mogk, A; Völker, A; Engelmann, S; Hecker, M; Schumann, W; Völker, U

    1998-06-01

    The chaperone-encoding groESL and dnaK operons constitute the CIRCE regulon of Bacillus subtilis. Both operons are under negative control of the repressor protein HrcA, which interacts with the CIRCE operator and whose activity is modulated by the GroESL chaperone machine. In this report, we demonstrate that induction of the CIRCE regulon can also be accomplished by ethanol stress and puromycin. Introduction of the hrcA gene and a transcriptional fusion under the control of the CIRCE operator into Escherichia coli allowed induction of this fusion by heat shock, ethanol stress, and overproduction of GroESL substrates. The expression level of this hrcA-bgaB fusion inversely correlated with the amount of GroE machinery present in the cells. Therefore, all inducing conditions seem to lead to induction via titration of the GroE chaperonins by the increased level of nonnative proteins formed. Puromycin treatment failed to induce the sigmaB-dependent general stress regulon, indicating that nonnative proteins in general do not trigger this response. Reconstitution of HrcA-dependent heat shock regulation of B. subtilis in E. coli and complementation of E. coli groESL mutants by B. subtilis groESL indicate that the GroE chaperonin systems of the two bacterial species are functionally exchangeable. PMID:9603878

  20. Characteristic expression profiles induced by genotoxic carcinogens in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Ellinger-Ziegelbauer, Heidrun; Stuart, Barry; Wahle, Brad; Bomann, Werner; Ahr, Hans-Jurgen

    2004-01-01

    When applied in toxicological studies, the recently developed gene expression profiling techniques using microarrays, which brought forth the new field of toxicogenomics, facilitate the interpretation of a toxic compound's mechanism of action. In this study, we investigated whether genotoxic carcinogens at doses known to induce liver tumors in the 2-year rat bioassay deregulate a common set of genes in a short-term in vivo study and, if so, whether these deregulated genes represent defined biological pathways. Rats were dosed with the four genotoxic hepatocarcinogens dimethylnitrosamine (4 mg/kg/day), 2-nitrofluorene (44 mg/kg/day), aflatoxin B1 (0.24 mg/kg/day), and 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK, 20 mg/kg/day). After treatment for up to 14 days, the expression profiles of the livers were analyzed on Affymetrix RG_U34A microarrays. Among the significantly upregulated genes were a set of target genes of the tumor suppressor protein p53, indicating a DNA damage response. Such a response was expected and, therefore, confirmed the validity of our approach. In addition, the gene expression changes suggest a specific detoxification response, the activation of proliferative and survival signaling pathways, and some cell structural changes. These responses were strong throughout the 14 day time course for 2-nitrofluorene and aflatoxin B1; in the case of dimethylnitrosamine and NNK, the effects were weakly detectable at day 1 and then increased with time. For dimethylnitrosamine and aflatoxin B1, which caused observable inflammation in vivo, we found a corresponding upregulation of inflammatory genes at the same time points. Thus, by the toxicogenomic analysis of short-term in vivo studies, we identified genes and pathways commonly deregulated by genotoxic carcinogens, which may be indicative for the early events in tumorigenesis and, thus, predictive of later tumor development. PMID:14600272

  1. Femtosecond laser induced tunable surface transformations on (111) Si aided by square grids diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Weina; Jiang, Lan; Li, Xiaowei Liu, Yang

    2015-12-21

    We report an extra freedom to modulate the femtosecond laser energy distribution to control the surface ablated structures through a copper-grid mask. Due to the reduced deposited pulse energy by changing the scanning speed or the pulse fluence, a sequential evolution of three distinctly different surface patterns with periodic distributions is formed, namely, striped ripple lines, ripple microdots, and surface modification. By changing the scanning speed, the number of the multiple dots in a lattice can be modulated. Moreover, by exploring the ablation process through the copper grid mask, it shows an abnormal enhanced ablation effect with strong dependence of the diffraction-aided fs laser ablated surface structures on polarization direction. The sensitivity shows a quasi-cosinusoid-function with a periodicity of π/2. Particularly, the connection process of striped ripple lines manifests a preferential formation direction with the laser polarization.

  2. Femtosecond laser induced tunable surface transformations on (111) Si aided by square grids diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Weina; Jiang, Lan; Li, Xiaowei; Liu, Yang; Lu, Yongfeng

    2015-12-01

    We report an extra freedom to modulate the femtosecond laser energy distribution to control the surface ablated structures through a copper-grid mask. Due to the reduced deposited pulse energy by changing the scanning speed or the pulse fluence, a sequential evolution of three distinctly different surface patterns with periodic distributions is formed, namely, striped ripple lines, ripple microdots, and surface modification. By changing the scanning speed, the number of the multiple dots in a lattice can be modulated. Moreover, by exploring the ablation process through the copper grid mask, it shows an abnormal enhanced ablation effect with strong dependence of the diffraction-aided fs laser ablated surface structures on polarization direction. The sensitivity shows a quasi-cosinusoid-function with a periodicity of π/2. Particularly, the connection process of striped ripple lines manifests a preferential formation direction with the laser polarization.

  3. Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy Induces Expression Levels of Breast Cancer Resistance Protein That Predict Disease-Free Survival in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Baek; Fatayer, Hiba; Hanby, Andrew M.; Horgan, Kieran; Perry, Sarah L.; Valleley, Elizabeth M.A.; Verghese, Eldo T.; Williams, Bethany J.; Thorne, James L.; Hughes, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    Three main xenobiotic efflux pumps have been implicated in modulating breast cancer chemotherapy responses. These are P-glycoprotein (Pgp), Multidrug Resistance-associated Protein 1 (MRP1), and Breast Cancer Resistance Protein (BCRP). We investigated expression of these proteins in breast cancers before and after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) to determine whether their levels define response to NAC or subsequent survival. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues were collected representing matched pairs of core biopsy (pre-NAC) and surgical specimen (post-NAC) from 45 patients with invasive ductal carcinomas. NAC regimes were anthracyclines +/− taxanes. Immunohistochemistry was performed for Pgp, MRP1 and BCRP and expression was quantified objectively using computer-aided scoring. Pgp and MRP1 were significantly up-regulated after exposure to NAC (Wilcoxon signed-rank p = 0.0024 and p<0.0001), while BCRP showed more variation in response to NAC, with frequent up- (59% of cases) and down-regulation (41%) contributing to a lack of significant difference overall. Pre-NAC expression of all markers, and post-NAC expression of Pgp and MRP1 did not correlate with NAC response or with disease-free survival (DFS). Post-NAC expression of BCRP did not correlate with NAC response, but correlated significantly with DFS (Log rank p = 0.007), with longer DFS in patients with low post-NAC BCRP expression. In multivariate Cox regression analyses, post-NAC BCRP expression levels proved to predict DFS independently of standard prognostic factors, with high expression associated with a hazard ratio of 4.04 (95% confidence interval 1.3–12.2; p = 0.013). We conclude that NAC-induced expression levels of BCRP predict survival after NAC for breast cancer, while Pgp and MRP1 expression have little predictive value. PMID:23658771

  4. IFN-gamma induces endothelial cells to proliferate and to invade the extracellular matrix in response to the HIV-1 Tat protein: implications for AIDS-Kaposi's sarcoma pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Fiorelli, V; Barillari, G; Toschi, E; Sgadari, C; Monini, P; Stürzl, M; Ensoli, B

    1999-01-15

    Previous studies indicated that the Tat protein of HIV functions as a progression factor in Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), an angioproliferative disease common and aggressive in HIV-1-infected individuals (AIDS-KS). In particular, Tat that is released by infected cells stimulates the growth and invasion of spindle cells of endothelial origin derived from KS lesions (KS cells). Other work suggested that inflammatory cytokines may act as initiating factors in KS since they induce normal endothelial cells to acquire the same phenotype and functional features of KS cells, including the responsiveness to Tat. In this study, we show that among the inflammatory cytokines increased in AIDS-KS lesions, IFN-gamma alone is sufficient to induce endothelial cells to proliferate and to invade the extracellular matrix in response to Tat. This is because IFN-gamma up-regulates the expression and activity of the receptors for Tat identified as the integrins alpha5beta1 and alpha(v)beta3. These results suggest that, by triggering Tat effects, IFN-gamma plays a major role in AIDS-KS pathogenesis.

  5. Virological and Immunological Characterization of Novel NYVAC-Based HIV/AIDS Vaccine Candidates Expressing Clade C Trimeric Soluble gp140(ZM96) and Gag(ZM96)-Pol-Nef(CN54) as Virus-Like Particles

    PubMed Central

    Perdiguero, Beatriz; Gómez, Carmen Elena; Cepeda, Victoria; Sánchez-Sampedro, Lucas; García-Arriaza, Juan; Mejías-Pérez, Ernesto; Jiménez, Victoria; Sánchez, Cristina; Sorzano, Carlos Óscar S.; Oliveros, Juan Carlos; Delaloye, Julie; Roger, Thierry; Calandra, Thierry; Asbach, Benedikt; Wagner, Ralf; Kibler, Karen V.; Jacobs, Bertram L.; Pantaleo, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The generation of vaccines against HIV/AIDS able to induce long-lasting protective immunity remains a major goal in the HIV field. The modest efficacy (31.2%) against HIV infection observed in the RV144 phase III clinical trial highlighted the need for further improvement of HIV vaccine candidates, formulation, and vaccine regimen. In this study, we have generated two novel NYVAC vectors, expressing HIV-1 clade C gp140(ZM96) (NYVAC-gp140) or Gag(ZM96)-Pol-Nef(CN54) (NYVAC-Gag-Pol-Nef), and defined their virological and immunological characteristics in cultured cells and in mice. The insertion of HIV genes does not affect the replication capacity of NYVAC recombinants in primary chicken embryo fibroblast cells, HIV sequences remain stable after multiple passages, and HIV antigens are correctly expressed and released from cells, with Env as a trimer (NYVAC-gp140), while in NYVAC-Gag-Pol-Nef-infected cells Gag-induced virus-like particles (VLPs) are abundant. Electron microscopy revealed that VLPs accumulated with time at the cell surface, with no interference with NYVAC morphogenesis. Both vectors trigger specific innate responses in human cells and show an attenuation profile in immunocompromised adult BALB/c and newborn CD1 mice after intracranial inoculation. Analysis of the immune responses elicited in mice after homologous NYVAC prime/NYVAC boost immunization shows that recombinant viruses induced polyfunctional Env-specific CD4 or Gag-specific CD8 T cell responses. Antibody responses against gp140 and p17/p24 were elicited. Our findings showed important insights into virus-host cell interactions of NYVAC vectors expressing HIV antigens, with the activation of specific immune parameters which will help to unravel potential correlates of protection against HIV in human clinical trials with these vectors. IMPORTANCE We have generated two novel NYVAC-based HIV vaccine candidates expressing HIV-1 clade C trimeric soluble gp140 (ZM96) and Gag(ZM96)-Pol

  6. Computer-aided detection of radiation-induced cerebral microbleeds on susceptibility-weighted MR images☆

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Wei; Hess, Christopher P.; Chang, Susan M.; Nelson, Sarah J.; Lupo, Janine M.

    2013-01-01

    Recent interest in exploring the clinical relevance of cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) has motivated the search for a fast and accurate method to detect them. Visual inspection of CMBs on MR images is a lengthy, arduous task that is highly prone to human error because of their small size and wide distribution throughout the brain. Several computer-aided CMB detection algorithms have recently been proposed in the literature, but their diagnostic accuracy, computation time, and robustness are still in need of improvement. In this study, we developed and tested a semi-automated method for identifying CMBs on minimum intensity projected susceptibility-weighted MR images that are routinely used in clinical practice to visually identify CMBs. The algorithm utilized the 2D fast radial symmetry transform to initially detect putative CMBs. Falsely identified CMBs were then eliminated by examining geometric features measured after performing 3D region growing on the potential CMB candidates. This algorithm was evaluated in 15 patients with brain tumors who exhibited CMBs on susceptibility-weighted images due to prior external beam radiation therapy. Our method achieved heightened sensitivity and acceptable amount of false positives compared to prior methods without compromising computation speed. Its superior performance and simple, accelerated processing make it easily adaptable for detecting CMBs in the clinic and expandable to a wide array of neurological disorders. PMID:24179783

  7. Knockdown of Unconventional Myosin ID Expression Induced Morphological Change in Oligodendrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, Reiji; Ishibashi, Tomoko; Baba, Hiroko

    2016-01-01

    Myelin is a special multilamellar structure involved in various functions in the nervous system. In the central nervous system, the oligodendrocyte (OL) produces myelin and has a unique morphology. OLs have a dynamic membrane sorting system associated with cytoskeletal organization, which aids in the production of myelin. Recently, it was reported that the assembly and disassembly of actin filaments is crucial for myelination. However, the partner myosin molecule which associates with actin filaments during the myelination process has not yet been identified. One candidate myosin is unconventional myosin ID (Myo1d) which is distributed throughout central nervous system myelin; however, its function is still unclear. We report here that Myo1d is expressed during later stages of OL differentiation, together with myelin proteolipid protein (PLP). In addition, Myo1d is distributed at the leading edge of the myelin-like membrane in cultured OL, colocalizing mainly with actin filaments, 2′,3′-cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase and partially with PLP. Myo1d-knockdown with specific siRNA induces significant morphological changes such as the retraction of processes and degeneration of myelin-like membrane, and finally apoptosis. Furthermore, loss of Myo1d by siRNA results in the impairment of intracellular PLP transport. Together, these results suggest that Myo1d may contribute to membrane dynamics either in wrapping or transporting of myelin membrane proteins during formation and maintenance of myelin. PMID:27655972

  8. Activation-induced CD154 expression abrogates tolerance induced by apoptotic cells*

    PubMed Central

    Gurung, Prajwal; Kucaba, Tamara A.; Ferguson, Thomas A.; Griffith, Thomas S.

    2009-01-01

    The decision to generate a productive immune response or tolerance often depends on the context in which T cells first see Ag. Using a classical system of tolerance induction, we examined the immunological consequence of Ag encountered in the presence of naïve or activated apoptotic cells. Naïve apoptotic cells induced tolerance when injected i.v.; however, previously activated apoptotic cells induced immunity. Further analysis revealed a key role for CD154, as tolerance resulted after i.v. injection of either naïve or activated apoptotic CD154−/− T cells, while co-injection of an agonistic anti-CD40 mAb with naïve apoptotic T cells induced robust immunity. DC fed activated apoptotic T cells in vitro produced IL-12p40 in a CD154-dependent manner, and the use of IL-12p40−/− mice or mAb-mediated neutralization of IL-12 revealed a link between CD154, IL-12, and the ability of activated apoptotic T cells to induce immunity rather than tolerance. Collectively these results show that CD154 expression on apoptotic T cells can determine the outcome of an immune response to Ag recognized within the context of the apoptotic cells, and suggest the balance between naïve and activated apoptotic T cells may dictate whether a productive immune response is encouraged. PMID:19841180

  9. Elemental analysis of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy aided by an empirical spectral database

    SciTech Connect

    Rock, Steven; Marcano, Aristides; Markushin, Yuri; Sabanayagam, Chandran; Melikechi, Noureddine

    2008-11-01

    Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is commonly used to identify elemental compositions of various samples. To facilitate this task, we propose the use of an elemental spectral library for single-pulsed, nanosecond LIBS in the spectral range 198-968 nm. This spectroscopic library is generated by measuring optical emissions from plasmas of 40 pure elements. To demonstrate the usefulness of the proposed database, we measure and analyze the LIBS spectra of pure iron and of ethanol and show that we identify these samples with a high degree of certainty.

  10. AID targeting: old mysteries and new challenges.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Vivek; Bortnick, Alexandra; Murre, Cornelis

    2015-09-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) mediates cytosine deamination and underlies two central processes in antibody diversification: somatic hypermutation and class-switch recombination. AID deamination is not exclusive to immunoglobulin loci; it can instigate DNA lesions in non-immunoglobulin genes and thus stringent checks are in place to constrain and restrict its activity. Recent findings have provided new insights into the mechanisms that target AID activity to specific genomic regions, revealing an involvement for noncoding RNAs associated with polymerase pausing and with enhancer transcription as well as genomic architecture. We review these findings and integrate them into a model for multilevel regulation of AID expression and targeting in immunoglobulin and non-immunoglobulin loci. Within this framework we discuss gaps in understanding, and outline important areas of further research. PMID:26254147

  11. Aspergillus parasiticus SU-1 genome sequence, predicted chromosome structure, and comparative gene expression under aflatoxin-inducing conditions: evidence that differential expression contributes to species phenotype.

    PubMed

    Linz, John E; Wee, Josephine; Roze, Ludmila V

    2014-08-01

    The filamentous fungi Aspergillus parasiticus and Aspergillus flavus produce the carcinogenic secondary metabolite aflatoxin on susceptible crops. These species differ in the quantity of aflatoxins B1, B2, G1, and G2 produced in culture, in the ability to produce the mycotoxin cyclopiazonic acid, and in morphology of mycelia and conidiospores. To understand the genetic basis for differences in biochemistry and morphology, we conducted next-generation sequence (NGS) analysis of the A. parasiticus strain SU-1 genome and comparative gene expression (RNA sequence analysis [RNA Seq]) analysis of A. parasiticus SU-1 and A. flavus strain NRRL 3357 (3357) grown under aflatoxin-inducing and -noninducing culture conditions. Although A. parasiticus SU-1 and A. flavus 3357 are highly similar in genome structure and gene organization, we observed differences in the presence of specific mycotoxin gene clusters and differential expression of specific mycotoxin genes and gene clusters that help explain differences in the type and quantity of mycotoxins synthesized. Using computer-aided analysis of secondary metabolite clusters (antiSMASH), we demonstrated that A. parasiticus SU-1 and A. flavus 3357 may carry up to 93 secondary metabolite gene clusters, and surprisingly, up to 10% of the genome appears to be dedicated to secondary metabolite synthesis. The data also suggest that fungus-specific zinc binuclear cluster (C6) transcription factors play an important role in regulation of secondary metabolite cluster expression. Finally, we identified uniquely expressed genes in A. parasiticus SU-1 that encode C6 transcription factors and genes involved in secondary metabolism and stress response/cellular defense. Future work will focus on these differentially expressed A. parasiticus SU-1 loci to reveal their role in determining distinct species characteristics. PMID:24951444

  12. Erythromycin induces expression of the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene cat-86.

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, E J; Lovett, P S

    1990-01-01

    The plasmid gene cat-86 specifies chloramphenicol-inducible chloramphenicol acetyltransferase in Bacillus subtilis. This gene, like the erythromycin-inducible erm genes, is regulated by translational attenuation. Here we show that cat-86 is also inducibly regulated by erythromycin. cat-86 does not confer resistance to erythromycin. PMID:2115875

  13. HIV / AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... Marketing Share this: Main Content Area Understanding HIV/AIDS AIDS was first reported in the United States in ... and has since become a major worldwide epidemic. AIDS is caused by the human immunodeficiency virus, or ...

  14. Therapeutical Neurotargeting via Magnetic Nanocarrier: Implications to Opiate-Induced Neuropathogenesis and NeuroAIDS

    PubMed Central

    Sagar, Vidya; Pilakka-Kanthikeel, Sudheesh; Atluri, Venkata S. R.; Ding, Hong; Arias, Adriana Y.; Jayant, Rahul D.; Kaushik, Ajeet; Nair, Madhavan

    2015-01-01

    Magnetite (Fe3O4) is the most commonly and extensively explored magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) for drug-targeting and imaging in the field of biomedicine. Nevertheless, its potential application as safe and effective drug-carrier for CNS (Central Nervous System) anomalies is very limited. Previous studies have shown an entangled epidemic of opioid use and HIV infection and increased neuropathogenesis. Opiate such as morphine, heroine, etc. are used frequently as recreational drugs. Existing treatments to alleviate the action of opioid are less effective at CNS level due to impermeability of therapeutic molecules across brain barriers. Thus, development of an advanced nanomedicine based approach may pave the way for better treatment strategies. We herein report magnetic nanoformulation of a highly selective and potent morphine antagonist, CTOP (D-Pen-Cys-Tyr-DTrp-Orn-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH2), which is impenetrable to the brain. MNPs, synthesized in size range from 25 to 40 nm, were characterized by Transmission electron microscopy and assembly of MNPs-CTOP nanoformulations were confirmed by FTIR spectroscopy and fluorescent detection. Flow-cytometry analysis showed that biological efficacy of this nanoformulation in prevention of morphine induced apoptosis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells remains equivalent to that of free CTOP. Similarly, confocal microscopy reveals comparable efficacy of free and MNPs bound CTOP in protecting modulation of neuronal dendrite and spine morphology during morphine exposure and morphine-treated HIV infection. Further, typical transmigration assay showed increased translocation of MNPs across in vitro blood-brain barrier upon exposure of external magnetic force where barrier integrity remains unaltered. Thus, the developed nanoformulation could be effective in targeting brain by application of external magnetic force to treat morphine addiction in HIV patients. PMID:26502636

  15. Therapeutical Neurotargeting via Magnetic Nanocarrier: Implications to Opiate-Induced Neuropathogenesis and NeuroAIDS.

    PubMed

    Sagar, Vidya; Pilakka-Kanthikeel, Sudheesh; Atluri, Venkata S R; Ding, Hong; Arias, Adriana Y; Jayant, Rahul D; Kaushik, Ajeet; Nair, Madhavan

    2015-10-01

    Magnetite (Fe3O4) is the most commonly and extensively explored magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) for drug-targeting and imaging in the field of biomedicine. Nevertheless, its potential application as safe and effective drug-carrier for CNS (Central Nervous System) anomalies is very limited. Previous studies have shown an entangled epidemic of opioid use and HIV infection and increased neuropathogenesis. Opiate such as morphine, heroine, etc. are used frequently as recreational drugs. Existing treatments to alleviate the action of opioid are less effective at CNS level due to impermeability of therapeutic molecules across brain barriers. Thus, development of an advanced nanomedicine based approach may pave the way for better treatment strategies. We herein report magnetic nanoformulation of a highly selective and potent morphine antagonist, CTOP (D-Pen-Cys-Tyr-DTrp-Orn-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH2), which is impenetrable to the brain. MNPs, synthesized in size range from 25 to 40 nm, were characterized by Transmission electron microscopy and assembly of MNPs-CTOP nanoformulations were confirmed by FTIR spectroscopy and fluorescent detection. Flow-cytometry analysis showed that biological efficacy of this nanoformulation in prevention of morphine induced apoptosis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells remains equivalent to that of free CTOP. Similarly, confocal microscopy reveals comparable efficacy of free and MNPs bound CTOP in protecting modulation of neuronal dendrite and spine morphology during morphine exposure and morphine-treated HIV infection. Further, typical transmigration assay showed increased translocation of MNPs across in vitro blood-brain barrier upon exposure of external magnetic force where barrier integrity remains unaltered. Thus, the developed nanoformulation could be effective in targeting brain by application of external magnetic force to treat morphine addiction in HIV patients.

  16. Jasmonates induce nonapoptotic death in high-resistance mutant p53-expressing B-lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Fingrut, Orit; Reischer, Dorit; Rotem, Ronit; Goldin, Natalia; Altboum, Irit; Zan-Bar, Israel; Flescher, Eliezer

    2005-11-01

    Mutations in p53, a tumor suppressor gene, occur in more than half of human cancers. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that jasmonates (novel anticancer agents) can induce death in mutated p53-expressing cells. Two clones of B-lymphoma cells were studied, one expressing wild-type (wt) p53 and the other expressing mutated p53. Jasmonic acid and methyl jasmonate (0.25-3 mM) were each equally cytotoxic to both clones, whereas mutant p53-expressing cells were resistant to treatment with the radiomimetic agent neocarzinostatin and the chemotherapeutic agent bleomycin. Neocarzinostatin and bleomycin induced an elevation in the p53 levels in wt p53-expressing cells, whereas methyl jasmonate did not. Methyl jasmonate induced mostly apoptotic death in the wt p53-expressing cells, while no signs of early apoptosis were detected in mutant p53-expressing cells. In contrast, neocarzinostatin and bleomycin induced death only in wt p53-expressing cells, in an apoptotic mode. Methyl jasmonate induced a rapid depletion of ATP in both clones. In both clones, oligomycin (a mitochondrial ATP synthase inhibitor) did not increase ATP depletion induced by methyl jasmonate, whereas inhibition of glycolysis with 2-deoxyglucose did. High glucose levels protected both clones from methyl jasmonate-induced ATP depletion (and reduced methyl jasmonate-induced cytotoxicity), whereas high levels of pyruvate did not. These results suggest that methyl jasmonate induces ATP depletion mostly by compromising oxidative phosphorylation in the mitochondria. In conclusion, jasmonates can circumvent the resistance of mutant p53-expressing cells towards chemotherapy by inducing a nonapoptotic cell death.

  17. Earth's core formation aided by flow channelling instabilities induced by iron diapirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golabek, G. J.; Tackley, P. J.; Schmeling, H.

    2008-09-01

    The core formation process remains poorly known. Isotopic constraints by Hf/W systematics indicate a fast process which was largely completed within 33 Ma for the Earth. An unstable gravitational configuration of dense molten metallic ponds overlying a chondritic protocore is predicted by most studies for the time a planetary embryo reaches Mars-size. This leads to the formation of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. We propose the application of Stevenson's (1989) stress-induced melt channelling mechanism in the regions surrounding incipient iron diapirs. We therefore perform numerical experiments solving the two-phase, two compositions flow equations within a 2D rectangular box or 3D cuboid with symmetrical boundary conditions. We apply the Compaction Boussinesq Approximation (CBA) and include a depth-dependent gravity. For simplicity we use a constant viscosity for the solid phase and melt-fraction dependent rheology for the partially molten region around the diapir. We investigate the development of the channelling instability in cases with and without interaction with surrounding diapirs. In interactive cases we vary the distance between the diapir centres between 1 and 5 diapir radii and apply pseudoplasticity with power law factors between 1 and 6. As a result for single diapirs we observe for sufficiently small retention numbers the development of iron-rich melt channels within a region of approximately twice the diapir's size. This could lead to effective draining of the surrounding region and might initiate cascading daughter diapirs or iron dykes. For small distances between interactive diapirs the channelling mechanism is delayed for several Million years and preferentially develops in directions pointing away from the diapirs or in the area between them, whereas plastic effects seem to have negligible influence on the channel formation. The iron channels propose an effective mechanism to extract iron melt also from deeper parts of the initially chondritic

  18. Earth's core formation aided by flow channelling instabilities induced by iron diapirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golabek, G. J.; Tackley, P. J.; Schmeling, H.

    2008-09-01

    Abstract The core formation process remains poorly known. Isotopic constraints by Hf/W systematics indicate a fast process which was largely completed within 33 Ma for the Earth. An unstable gravitational configuration of dense molten metallic ponds overlying a chondritic protocore is predicted by most studies for the time a planetary embryo reaches Marssize. This leads to the formation of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. We propose the application of Stevenson's (1989) [1] stress-induced melt channelling mechanism in the regions surrounding incipient iron diapirs. We therefore perform numerical experiments solving the two-phase, two compositions flow equations within a 2D rectangular box or 3D cuboid with symmetrical boundary conditions. We apply the Compaction Boussinesq Approximation (CBA) and include a depth-dependent gravity. For simplicity we use a constant viscosity for the solid phase and meltfraction dependent rheology for the partially molten region around the diapir. We investigate the development of the channelling instability in cases with and without interaction with surrounding diapirs. In interactive cases we vary the distance between the diapir centres between 1 and 5 diapir radii and apply pseudoplasticity with power law factors between 1 and 6. As a result for single diapirs we observe for sufficiently small retention numbers the development of iron-rich melt channels within a region of approximately twice the diapir's size. This could lead to effective draining of the surrounding region and might initiate cascading daughter diapirs or iron dykes. For small distances between interactive diapirs the channelling mechanism is delayed for several Million years and preferentially develops in directions pointing away from the diapirs or in the area between them, whereas plastic effects seem to have negligible influence on the channel formation. The iron channels propose an effective mechanism to extract iron melt also from deeper parts of the initially

  19. Carcinogen-induced trans activation of gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinberger, T.; Flint, Y.B.; Blank, M.; Etkin, S.; Lavi, S.

    1988-03-01

    The authors report a new mechanism of carcinogen action by which the expression of several genes was concomitantly enhanced. This mechanism involved the altered activity of cellular factors which modulate the expression of genes under their control. The increased expression was regulated at least in part on the transcriptional level and did not require amplification of the overexpressed genes. This phenomenon was transient; it was apparent as early as 24 h after carcinogen treatment and declined a few days later.

  20. Carcinogen-induced trans activation of gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Kleinberger, T; Flint, Y B; Blank, M; Etkin, S; Lavi, S

    1988-01-01

    We report a new mechanism of carcinogen action by which the expression of several genes was concomitantly enhanced. This mechanism involved the altered activity of cellular factors which modulate the expression of genes under their control. The increased expression was regulated at least in part on the transcriptional level and did not require amplification of the overexpressed genes. This phenomenon was transient; it was apparent as early as 24 h after carcinogen treatment and declined a few days later. Images PMID:2835673

  1. Effect of dexamethasone and ACC on bacteria-induced mucin expression in human airway mucosa.

    PubMed

    Hauber, Hans-Peter; Goldmann, Torsten; Vollmer, Ekkehard; Wollenberg, Barbara; Zabel, Peter

    2007-11-01

    Gram-negative bacteria can stimulate mucin production, but excessive mucus supports bacterial infection and consequently leads to airway obstruction. Therefore, the effect of dexamethasone (DEX) and the antioxidant acetyl-cysteine (ACC) on bacteria-induced mucus expression was investigated. Explanted human airway mucosa and mucoepidermoid cells (Calu-3) were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or PAM3 (a synthetic lipoprotein). DEX or ACC were added to either LPS- or PAM3-stimulated airway mucosa or Calu-3 cells. Mucin mRNA expression (MUC5AC) and total mucus glycoconjugates (mucin protein) were quantified using real-time PCR and periodic acid Schiff staining. LPS and PAM3 significantly increased mucin expression in airway mucosa and Calu-3 cells (P < 0.05). DEX alone had no significant effect on mucin expression in airway mucosa or Calu-3 cells (P > 0.05). In contrast, DEX significantly reduced LPS- and PAM3-induced mucin expression in explanted mucosal tissue and mucin expression in Calu-3 cells (P < 0.05). In explanted human airway mucosa ACC alone significantly increased mucin expression (P < 0.05). In contrast, ACC significantly decreased LPS- and PAM3-induced mucin expression (P < 0.05). In Calu-3 cells ACC alone had no significant effect on mucin expression (P > 0.05). ACC decreased LPS- and PAM3-induced mucin expression, but this effect was not significant (P > 0.05). These data suggest that DEX can effectively reduce bacteria-induced mucin expression in the airways. ACC alone may increase mucin expression in noninfected mucosa, but it decreased bacteria-induced mucin expression. Further studies are warranted to evaluate whether the effect of DEX or ACC is clinically relevant. PMID:17600317

  2. Effect of dexamethasone and ACC on bacteria-induced mucin expression in human airway mucosa.

    PubMed

    Hauber, Hans-Peter; Goldmann, Torsten; Vollmer, Ekkehard; Wollenberg, Barbara; Zabel, Peter

    2007-11-01

    Gram-negative bacteria can stimulate mucin production, but excessive mucus supports bacterial infection and consequently leads to airway obstruction. Therefore, the effect of dexamethasone (DEX) and the antioxidant acetyl-cysteine (ACC) on bacteria-induced mucus expression was investigated. Explanted human airway mucosa and mucoepidermoid cells (Calu-3) were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or PAM3 (a synthetic lipoprotein). DEX or ACC were added to either LPS- or PAM3-stimulated airway mucosa or Calu-3 cells. Mucin mRNA expression (MUC5AC) and total mucus glycoconjugates (mucin protein) were quantified using real-time PCR and periodic acid Schiff staining. LPS and PAM3 significantly increased mucin expression in airway mucosa and Calu-3 cells (P < 0.05). DEX alone had no significant effect on mucin expression in airway mucosa or Calu-3 cells (P > 0.05). In contrast, DEX significantly reduced LPS- and PAM3-induced mucin expression in explanted mucosal tissue and mucin expression in Calu-3 cells (P < 0.05). In explanted human airway mucosa ACC alone significantly increased mucin expression (P < 0.05). In contrast, ACC significantly decreased LPS- and PAM3-induced mucin expression (P < 0.05). In Calu-3 cells ACC alone had no significant effect on mucin expression (P > 0.05). ACC decreased LPS- and PAM3-induced mucin expression, but this effect was not significant (P > 0.05). These data suggest that DEX can effectively reduce bacteria-induced mucin expression in the airways. ACC alone may increase mucin expression in noninfected mucosa, but it decreased bacteria-induced mucin expression. Further studies are warranted to evaluate whether the effect of DEX or ACC is clinically relevant.

  3. Hypoxia‐inducible factor expression in human RPE cells

    PubMed Central

    Forooghian, Farzin; Razavi, Rozita; Timms, Lee

    2007-01-01

    Background Hypoxia‐inducible factor (HIF) is a common transcription factor for many angiogenic proteins. Retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells are an important source of angiogenic factors in the retina. The expression of HIF, its regulation by proline hydroxylase (PHD) enzymes, and its downstream regulation of angiogenic factors like vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and erythropoietin (EPO) was studied in RPE cells in order to determine some of the molecular mechanisms underlying ischaemic retinal disease. Methods ARPE‐19 cells were cultured for various times under hypoxic conditions. Cellular HIF and PHD isoforms were analysed and quantified using western blot and densitometry. VEGF and EPO secreted into the media were assayed using enzyme‐linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Messenger RNA (mRNA) was quantified using real‐time quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). RNA interference was achieved using siRNA techniques. Results HIF‐1α was readily produced by ARPE‐19 cells under hypoxia, but HIF‐2α and HIF‐3α could not be detected even after HIF‐1α silencing. HIF‐1α protein levels showed an increasing trend for the first 24 h while HIF‐1α mRNA levels fluctuated during this time. After 36 h HIF‐1α protein levels declined to baseline levels, a change that was coincident with a rise in both PHD2 and PHD3. Silencing HIF‐1α significantly decreased VEGF secretion. Significant production of EPO could not be detected at the protein or mRNA level. Conclusions HIF‐1α appears to be the main isoform of HIF functioning in ARPE‐19 cells. Under hypoxia, HIF‐1α levels are likely self‐regulated by a feedback loop that involves both transcriptional and post‐translational mechanisms. VEGF production by human RPE cells is regulated by HIF‐1α. EPO was not produced in significant amounts by RPE cells under hypoxic conditions, suggesting that other cells and/or transcription factors in the retina

  4. Na(+)/H (+) exchanger isoform 1 induced osteopontin expression in cardiomyocytes involves NFAT3/Gata4.

    PubMed

    Mlih, Mohamed; Abdulrahman, Nabeel; Gadeau, Alain-Pierre; Mohamed, Iman A; Jaballah, Maiy; Mraiche, Fatima

    2015-06-01

    Osteopontin (OPN), a multifunctional glycophosphoprotein, has been reported to contribute to the development and progression of cardiac remodeling and hypertrophy. Cardiac-specific OPN knockout mice were protected against hypertrophy and fibrosis mediated by Ang II. Recently, transgenic mice expressing the active form of the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger isoform 1 (NHE1) developed spontaneous hypertrophy in association with elevated levels of OPN. The mechanism by which active NHE1 induces OPN expression and contributes to the hypertrophic response remains unclear. To validate whether expression of the active form of NHE1 induces OPN, cardiomyocytes were stimulated with Ang II, a known inducer of both OPN and NHE1. Ang II induced hypertrophy and increased OPN protein expression (151.6 ± 28.19 %, P < 0.01) and NHE1 activity in H9c2 cardiomyoblasts. Ang II-induced hypertrophy and OPN protein expression were regressed in the presence of an NHE1 inhibitor, EMD 87580, or a calcineurin inhibitor, FK506. In addition, our results indicated that activation of NHE1-induced NFAT3 translocation into the nucleus and a significant activation of the transcription factor Gata4 (NHE1: 149 ± 28 % of control, P < 0.05). NHE1-induced activation of Gata4 was inhibited by FK506. In summary, our results suggest that activation of NHE1 induces hypertrophy through the activation of NFAT3/Gata4 and OPN expression. PMID:25758355

  5. Large-scale gene expression profiling data for the model moss Physcomitrella patens aid understanding of developmental progression, culture and stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Hiss, Manuel; Laule, Oliver; Meskauskiene, Rasa M; Arif, Muhammad A; Decker, Eva L; Erxleben, Anika; Frank, Wolfgang; Hanke, Sebastian T; Lang, Daniel; Martin, Anja; Neu, Christina; Reski, Ralf; Richardt, Sandra; Schallenberg-Rüdinger, Mareike; Szövényi, Peter; Tiko, Theodhor; Wiedemann, Gertrud; Wolf, Luise; Zimmermann, Philip; Rensing, Stefan A

    2014-08-01

    The moss Physcomitrella patens is an important model organism for studying plant evolution, development, physiology and biotechnology. Here we have generated microarray gene expression data covering the principal developmental stages, culture forms and some environmental/stress conditions. Example analyses of developmental stages and growth conditions as well as abiotic stress treatments demonstrate that (i) growth stage is dominant over culture conditions, (ii) liquid culture is not stressful for the plant, (iii) low pH might aid protoplastation by reduced expression of cell wall structure genes, (iv) largely the same gene pool mediates response to dehydration and rehydration, and (v) AP2/EREBP transcription factors play important roles in stress response reactions. With regard to the AP2 gene family, phylogenetic analysis and comparison with Arabidopsis thaliana shows commonalities as well as uniquely expressed family members under drought, light perturbations and protoplastation. Gene expression profiles for P. patens are available for the scientific community via the easy-to-use tool at https://www.genevestigator.com. By providing large-scale expression profiles, the usability of this model organism is further enhanced, for example by enabling selection of control genes for quantitative real-time PCR. Now, gene expression levels across a broad range of conditions can be accessed online for P. patens.

  6. Thymoquinone inhibits phorbol ester-induced activation of NF-κB and expression of COX-2, and induces expression of cytoprotective enzymes in mouse skin in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Kundu, Joydeb Kumar; Liu, Lijia; Shin, Jun-Wan; Surh, Young-Joon

    2013-09-06

    Highlights: •Thymoquinone inhibits phorbol ester-induced COX-2 expression in mouse skin. •Thymoquinone attenuates phosphorylation of IκBα and DNA binding of NF-κB in mouse skin. •Thymoquinone inhibits phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinase, JNK and Akt in mouse skin. •Thymoquinone induces the expression of cytoprotective proteins in mouse skin. -- Abstract: Thymoquinone (TQ), the active ingredient of Nigella sativa, has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory and chemopreventive properties. The present study was aimed at elucidating the molecular mechanisms of anti-inflammatory and antioxidative activities of thymoquinone in mouse skin. Pretreatment of female HR-1 hairless mouse skin with TQ attenuated 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). TQ diminished nuclear translocation and the DNA binding of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) via the blockade of phosphorylation and subsequent degradation of IκBα in TPA-treated mouse skin. Pretreatment with TQ attenuated the phosphorylation of Akt, c-Jun-N-terminal kinase and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, but not that of extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1/2. Moreover, topical application of TQ induced the expression of heme oxygenase-1, NAD(P)H-quinoneoxidoreductase-1, glutathione-S-transferase and glutamate cysteine ligase in mouse skin. Taken together, the inhibitory effects of TQ on TPA-induced COX-2 expression and NF-κB activation, and its ability to induce the expression of cytoprotective proteins provide a mechanistic basis of anti-inflammatory and antioxidative effects of TQ in hairless mouse skin.

  7. Inducible transgenic expression in the short-lived fish Nothobranchius furzeri.

    PubMed

    Allard, J B; Kamei, H; Duan, C

    2013-05-01

    This study demonstrates inducible transgenic expression in the exceptionally short-lived turquoise killifish Nothobranchius furzeri, which is a useful vertebrate model for ageing research. Transgenic N. furzeri bearing a green fluorescent protein (Gfp) containing construct under the control of a heat shock protein 70 promoter were generated, heat shock-induced and reversible Gfp expression was demonstrated and germline transmission of the transgene to the F1 and F2 generations was achieved. The availability of this inducible transgenic expression system will make the study of ageing-related antagonistically pleiotropic genes possible using this unique vertebrate model organism.

  8. Inducible transgenic expression in the short-lived fish Nothobranchius furzeri.

    PubMed

    Allard, J B; Kamei, H; Duan, C

    2013-05-01

    This study demonstrates inducible transgenic expression in the exceptionally short-lived turquoise killifish Nothobranchius furzeri, which is a useful vertebrate model for ageing research. Transgenic N. furzeri bearing a green fluorescent protein (Gfp) containing construct under the control of a heat shock protein 70 promoter were generated, heat shock-induced and reversible Gfp expression was demonstrated and germline transmission of the transgene to the F1 and F2 generations was achieved. The availability of this inducible transgenic expression system will make the study of ageing-related antagonistically pleiotropic genes possible using this unique vertebrate model organism. PMID:23639168

  9. Glucose Oxidase Induces Cellular Senescence in Immortal Renal Cells through ILK by Downregulating Klotho Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Troyano-Suárez, Nuria; del Nogal-Avila, María; Mora, Inés; Sosa, Patricia; López-Ongil, Susana; Rodriguez-Puyol, Diego; Olmos, Gemma; Ruíz-Torres, María Piedad

    2015-01-01

    Cellular senescence can be prematurely induced by oxidative stress involved in aging. In this work, we were searching for novel intermediaries in oxidative stress-induced senescence, focusing our interest on integrin-linked kinase (ILK), a scaffold protein at cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) adhesion sites, and on the Klotho gene. Cultured renal cells were treated with glucose oxidase (GOx) for long time periods. GOx induced senescence, increasing senescence associated β-galactosidase activity and the expression of p16. In parallel, GOx increased ILK protein expression and activity. Ectopic overexpression of ILK in cells increased p16 expression, even in the absence of GOx, whereas downregulation of ILK inhibited the increase in p16 due to oxidative stress. Additionally, GOx reduced Klotho gene expression and cells overexpressing Klotho protein did not undergo senescence after GOx addition. We demonstrated a direct link between ILK and Klotho since silencing ILK expression in cells and mice increases Klotho expression and reduces p53 and p16 expression in renal cortex. In conclusion, oxidative stress induces cellular senescence in kidney cells by increasing ILK protein expression and activity, which in turn reduces Klotho expression. We hereby present ILK as a novel downregulator of Klotho gene expression. PMID:26583057

  10. B-cell agonists up-regulate AID and APOBEC3G deaminases, which induce IgA and IgG class antibodies and anti-viral function.

    PubMed

    Seidl, Thomas; Whittall, Trevor; Babaahmady, Kaboutar; Lehner, Thomas

    2012-03-01

    B cells express two critical deaminases in the development of adaptive and innate immunity. Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) functions in class switch recombination, somatic hypermutation and may result in affinity maturation of antibodies. Apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme catalytic polypeptide-like 3G (APOBEC3G; A3G) is an innate anti-retroviral factor that inhibits HIV replication. We have studied a number of B-cell agonists with the aim of identifying the most effective agents that will up-regulate both deaminases and thereby enhance adaptive and innate immunity. CD40 ligand (CD40L) with interleukin-4 or HLA-class II antibodies significantly up-regulated both AID and A3G in isolated human CD19(+) B cells. The functions of these deaminases were demonstrated by enhancement of B-cell surface expression of IgA and IgG and inducing significantly higher IgA and IgG4 antibodies. An enhanced A3G function was then demonstrated by inhibition of HIV-1 replication in co-culture of CD4(+) T cells with autologous B cells, treated with CD40L and CD4 or HLA antibodies, compared with unstimulated human B cells. The dual B-cell-induced deaminase functions may be critical in IgA and IgG antibodies inhibiting pre-entry and A3G that of post-entry HIV-1 transmission and suggests a novel strategy of immunization, especially relevant to mucosal infections.

  11. Mifepristone-inducible transgene expression in neural progenitor cells in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hjelm, BE; Grunseich, C; Gowing, G; Avalos, P; Tian, J; Shelley, BC; Mooney, M; Narwani, K; Shi, Y; Svendsen, CN; Wolfe, JH; Fischbeck, KH; Pierson, TM

    2016-01-01

    Numerous gene and cell therapy strategies are being developed for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders. Many of these strategies use constitutive expression of therapeutic transgenic proteins, and although functional in animal models of disease, this method is less likely to provide adequate flexibility for delivering therapy to humans. Ligand-inducible gene expression systems may be more appropriate for these conditions, especially within the central nervous system (CNS). Mifepristone’s ability to cross the blood–brain barrier makes it an especially attractive ligand for this purpose. We describe the production of a mifepristone-inducible vector system for regulated expression of transgenes within the CNS. Our inducible system used a lentivirus-based vector platform for the ex vivo production of mifepristone-inducible murine neural progenitor cells that express our transgenes of interest. These cells were processed through a series of selection steps to ensure that the cells exhibited appropriate transgene expression in a dose-dependent and temporally controlled manner with minimal background activity. Inducible cells were then transplanted into the brains of rodents, where they exhibited appropriate mifepristone-inducible expression. These studies detail a strategy for regulated expression in the CNS for use in the development of safe and efficient gene therapy for neurological disorders. PMID:26863047

  12. Repeatable, Inducible Micro-RNA-Based Technology Tightly Controls Liver Transgene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Oprea, Iulian I; Viola, Joana R; Moreno, Pedro M D; Simonson, Oscar E; Rodin, Sergey; Teller, Nathalie; Tryggvason, Karl; Lundin, Karin E; Girnita, Leonard; Smith, Carl Inge Edvard

    2014-01-01

    Inducible systems for gene expression emerge as a new class of artificial vectors offering temporal and spatial exogenous control of gene expression. However, most inducible systems are less efficient in vivo and lack the target-organ specificity. In the present study, we have developed and optimized an oligonucleotide-based inducible system for the in vivo control of transgenes in the liver. We generated a set of simple, inducible plasmid-vectors based on the addition of four units of liver-specific miR-122 target sites to the 3′untranslated region of the gene of interest. Once the vector was delivered into hepatocytes this modification induced a dramatic reduction of gene expression that could be restored by the infusion of an antagomir for miR-122. The efficiency of the system was tested in vivo, and displayed low background and strong increase in gene expression upon induction. Moreover, gene expression was repeatedly induced even several months after the first induction showing no toxic effect in vivo. By combining tissue-specific control elements with antagomir treatment we generated, optimized and validated a robust inducible system that could be used successfully for in vivo experimental models requiring tight and cyclic control of gene expression. PMID:24983837

  13. Copper induces the expression of cholesterogenic genes in human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Per Arne; Englund, Mikael C O; Markström, Emilia; Ohlsson, Bertil G; Jernås, Margareta; Billig, Håkan; Torgerson, Jarl S; Wiklund, Olov; Carlsson, Lena M S; Carlsson, Björn

    2003-07-01

    Accumulation of lipids and cholesterol by macrophages and subsequent transformation into foam cells are key features in development of atherosclerosis. Serum copper concentrations have been shown to be associated with cardiovascular disease. However, the mechanism behind the proatherogenic effect of copper is not clear. We used DNA microarrays to define the changes in gene expression profile in response to copper exposure of human macrophages. Expression monitoring by DNA microarray revealed 91 genes that were regulated. Copper increased the expression of seven cholesterogenic genes (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG CoA) synthase, IPP isomerase, squalene synthase, squalene epoxidase, methyl sterol oxidase, H105e3 mRNA and sterol-C5-desaturase) and low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R), and decreased the expression of CD36 and lipid binding proteins. The expression of LDL-R and HMG CoA reductase was also investigated using real time PCR. The expression of both of these genes was increased after copper treatment of macrophages (P<0.01 and P<0.01, respectively). We conclude that copper activates cholesterogenic genes in macrophages, which may provide a mechanism for the association between copper and atherosclerosis. The effect of copper on cholesterogenic genes may also have implications for liver steatosis in early stages of Wilson's disease.

  14. Development and application of an arabinose-inducible expression system by facilitating inducer uptake in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yun; Shang, Xiuling; Lai, Shujuan; Zhang, Guoqiang; Liang, Yong; Wen, Tingyi

    2012-08-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum is currently used for the industrial production of a variety of biological materials. Many available inducible expression systems in this species use lac-derived promoters from Escherichia coli that exhibit much lower levels of inducible expression and leaky basal expression. We developed an arabinose-inducible expression system that contains the L-arabinose regulator AraC, the P(BAD) promoter from the araBAD operon, and the L-arabinose transporter AraE, all of which are derived from E. coli. The level of inducible P(BAD)-based expression could be modulated over a wide concentration range from 0.001 to 0.4% L-arabinose. This system tightly controlled the expression of the uracil phosphoribosyltransferase without leaky expression. When the gene encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) was under the control of P(BAD) promoter, flow cytometry analysis showed that GFP was expressed in a highly homogeneous profile throughout the cell population. In contrast to the case in E. coli, P(BAD) induction was not significantly affected in the presence of different carbon sources in C. glutamicum, which makes it useful in fermentation applications. We used this system to regulate the expression of the odhI gene from C. glutamicum, which encodes an inhibitor of α-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase, resulting in high levels of glutamate production (up to 13.7 mM) under biotin nonlimiting conditions. This system provides an efficient tool available for molecular biology and metabolic engineering of C. glutamicum.

  15. Shigella dysenteriae Modulates BMP Pathway to Induce Mucin Gene Expression In Vivo and In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Gopal, Ashidha; Iyer, Soumya Chidambaram; Gopal, Udhayakumar; Devaraj, Niranjali; Halagowder, Devaraj

    2014-01-01

    Mucosal epithelial cells in the intestine act as the first line of host defense against pathogens by increasing mucin production for clearance. Despite this fact, the underlying molecular mechanisms by which Shigella dysenteriae transduce mucin gene expression remain poorly defined. The goal of this study was to determine the role of Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) pathway in mucin gene expression during S. dysenteriae infection. In this study we demonstrate that S. dysenteriae activates BMP signaling to induce MUC2 and MUC5AC gene expression in rat ileal loop model and in vitro. We also observed that BMP pathway regulates CDX2 expression which plays a critical role in induction of MUC2 gene during S. dysenteriae infection. In SMAD4 silenced cells S. dysenteriae infection did not abrogate MUC2 and MUC5AC gene expression whereas in CDX2 silenced cells it induces differential expression of MUC5AC gene. These results suggest that SMAD4-CDX2 induces MUC2 gene expression whereas SMAD4 directly influences differential expression of MUC5AC gene. Altogether, our results show that during S. dysenteriae infection the BMP pathway modulates inflammatory transcription factors CDX2 and SMAD4 to induce MUC2 and MUC5AC gene expression which plays a key role in the regulation of host mucosal defense thereby paving a cue for therapeutic application. PMID:25365201

  16. Expression of platelet-derived growth factor and its receptor in AIDS-related Kaposi sarcoma in vivo suggests paracrine and autocrine mechanisms of tumor maintenance.

    PubMed Central

    Stürzl, M; Roth, W K; Brockmeyer, N H; Zietz, C; Speiser, B; Hofschneider, P H

    1992-01-01

    As previously described, proliferation of Kaposi sarcoma (KS)-derived cells in vitro is dependent on the presence of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF). To test the hypothesis that PDGF may also be a major growth factor for KS cells in vivo, we performed in situ hybridization and immunohistochemical staining for PDGF and PDGF receptors in tissue sections of AIDS-related KS. The data suggest that KS consists of two types of tumor cells. (i) The main population are spindle-shaped cells with elongated nuclei (KS-s cells). They reveal a strong expression of PDGF beta receptors but do not express the PDGF-A and PDGF-B isoforms. (ii) A minor population of KS cells express PDGF beta receptor as well as PDGF-A and PDGF-B (KS-p cells). These cells are often grouped in whorls and surrounding vascular slits. They reveal spherical nuclei with evenly distributed chromatin and inconspicuous nucleoli. PDGF alpha receptor is not expressed in either form of KS cells. The results suggest that the isoforms of PDGF and the PDGF beta receptor are differentially expressed in two different cell types in KS and that PDGF isoforms may contribute to the pathogenesis of KS. Images PMID:1323124

  17. METHYL METHANESULFONATE-INDUCED GENE EXPRESSION CHANGES IN HUMAN SKIN FIBROBLASTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    METHYL METHANESULFONATE-INDUCED GENE EXPRESSION CHANGES IN HUMAN SKIN FIBROBLASTS. Geremy W. Knapp, Alan Tennant, and Russell D. Owen. Environmental Carcinogenesis Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U. S. Environmental Protection Agency, Re...

  18. AGE-RELATED GENE EXPRESSION CHANGES IN HUMAN SKIN FIBROBLASTS INDUCED BY MMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Age-Related Gene Expression Changes In Human Skin Fibroblasts Induced By methyl methanesulfonate. Geremy W. Knapp, Alan H. Tennant, and Russell D. Owen. Environmental Carcinogenesis Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U. S. Environmental Prote...

  19. C-terminal region of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is required for efficient class switch recombination and gene conversion.

    PubMed

    Sabouri, Somayeh; Kobayashi, Maki; Begum, Nasim A; Xu, Jianliang; Hirota, Kouji; Honjo, Tasuku

    2014-02-11

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) introduces single-strand breaks (SSBs) to initiate class switch recombination (CSR), gene conversion (GC), and somatic hypermutation (SHM). CSR is mediated by double-strand breaks (DSBs) at donor and acceptor switch (S) regions, followed by pairing of DSB ends in two S regions and their joining. Because AID mutations at its C-terminal region drastically impair CSR but retain its DNA cleavage and SHM activity, the C-terminal region of AID likely is required for the recombination step after the DNA cleavage. To test this hypothesis, we analyzed the recombination junctions generated by AID C-terminal mutants and found that 0- to 3-bp microhomology junctions are relatively less abundant, possibly reflecting the defects of the classical nonhomologous end joining (C-NHEJ). Consistently, the accumulation of C-NHEJ factors such as Ku80 and XRCC4 was decreased at the cleaved S region. In contrast, an SSB-binding protein, poly (ADP)-ribose polymerase1, was recruited more abundantly, suggesting a defect in conversion from SSB to DSB. In addition, recruitment of critical DNA synapse factors such as 53BP1, DNA PKcs, and UNG at the S region was reduced during CSR. Furthermore, the chromosome conformation capture assay revealed that DNA synapse formation is impaired drastically in the AID C-terminal mutants. Interestingly, these mutants showed relative reduction in GC compared with SHM in chicken DT40 cells. Collectively, our data indicate that the C-terminal region of AID is required for efficient generation of DSB in CSR and GC and thus for the subsequent pairing of cleaved DNA ends during recombination in CSR.

  20. Thymoquinone inhibits phorbol ester-induced activation of NF-κB and expression of COX-2, and induces expression of cytoprotective enzymes in mouse skin in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Joydeb Kumar; Liu, Lijia; Shin, Jun-Wan; Surh, Young-Joon

    2013-09-01

    Thymoquinone (TQ), the active ingredient of Nigella sativa, has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory and chemopreventive properties. The present study was aimed at elucidating the molecular mechanisms of anti-inflammatory and antioxidative activities of thymoquinone in mouse skin. Pretreatment of female HR-1 hairless mouse skin with TQ attenuated 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). TQ diminished nuclear translocation and the DNA binding of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) via the blockade of phosphorylation and subsequent degradation of IκBα in TPA-treated mouse skin. Pretreatment with TQ attenuated the phosphorylation of Akt, c-Jun-N-terminal kinase and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, but not that of extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1/2. Moreover, topical application of TQ induced the expression of heme oxygenase-1, NAD(P)H-quinoneoxidoreductase-1, glutathione-S-transferase and glutamate cysteine ligase in mouse skin. Taken together, the inhibitory effects of TQ on TPA-induced COX-2 expression and NF-κB activation, and its ability to induce the expression of cytoprotective proteins provide a mechanistic basis of anti-inflammatory and antioxidative effects of TQ in hairless mouse skin.

  1. In vitro Candida albicans biofilm induced proteinase activity and SAP8 expression correlates with in vivo denture stomatitis severity.

    PubMed

    Ramage, Gordon; Coco, Brent; Sherry, Leighann; Bagg, Jeremy; Lappin, David F

    2012-07-01

    Denture stomatitis is a common inflammatory disorder of the palatal mucosa amongst denture wearers. The pathological changes are induced by Candida albicans biofilm on the fitting surface of the upper denture, and different individuals experience different levels of disease. C. albicans is known to produce secreted aspartyl proteinases (SAPs) to aid adhesion, invasion and tissue destruction. We hypothesised that differential expression and activity of SAPs from denture stomatitis isolates results in different levels of disease amongst denture wearers. We selected C. albicans isolates from asymptomatic controls and three different severities of disease [Newton’s type (NT) 0, I, II and III]. We assessed biofilm formation and proteinase activity for each biofilm and investigated the transcriptional profile of SAPs 1, 2, 5, 6 and 8 from early (12 h) and mature (24 h) biofilms. There were no significant differences between isolates with respect to biofilm formation, whereas proteinase activity normalised to biofilm growth was significantly increased in the diseased groups (p < 0.0001). Proteinase activity correlated strongly with SAP expression (p < 0.0001). SAP8 expression was the greatest, followed by SAP5, 6, 2 and 1. The diseased groups showed the greatest levels of SAP expression, with significant differences also observed between the groups (p < 0.005). All SAPs except SAP5 were expressed in greater amounts in the mature biofilms compared to early biofilms. Overall, this study suggests that SAP activity in biofilms determined in vitro may help to explain differences in disease severity. SAP8 has been shown for the first time to play a prominent role in biofilms.

  2. Over-expression of DMRT1 induces the male pathway in embryonic chicken gonads

    PubMed Central

    Lambeth, Luke; Raymond, Christopher S.; Roeszler, Kelly N.; Kuroiwa, Asato; Nakata, Tomohiro; Zarkower, David; Smith, Craig A.

    2014-01-01

    DMRT1 encodes a conserved transcription factor with an essential role in gonadal function. In the chicken, DMRT1 is located on the Z sex chromosome and is currently the best candidate master regulator of avian gonadal sex differentiation. We previously showed that knockdown of DMRT1 expression during the period of sexual differentiation induces feminisation of male embryonic chicken gonads. This gene is therefore necessary for proper testis development in the chicken. However, whether it is sufficient to induce testicular differentiation has remained unresolved. We show here that over-expression of DMRT1 induces male pathway genes and antagonises the female pathway in embryonic chicken gonads. Ectopic DMRT1 expression in female gonads induces localised SOX9 and AMH expression. It also induces expression of the recently identified Z-linked male factor, Hemogen (HEMGN). Masculinised gonads show evidence of cord-like structures and retarded female-type cortical development. Furthermore, expression of the critical feminizing enzyme, aromatase, is reduced in the presence of over-expressed DMRT1. These data indicate that DMRT1 is an essential sex-linked regulator of gonadal differentiation in avians, and that it likely acts via a dosage mechanism established through the lack of global Z dosage compensation in birds. PMID:24576538

  3. Glutathione peroxidase-1 inhibits UVA-induced AP-2{alpha} expression in human keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Lei; Venkataraman, Sujatha; Coleman, Mitchell C.; Spitz, Douglas R.; Wertz, Philip W.; Domann, Frederick E. . E-mail: frederick-domann@uiowa.edu

    2006-12-29

    In this study, we found a role for H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in UVA-induced AP-2{alpha} expression in the HaCaT human keratinocyte cell line. UVA irradiation not only increased AP-2{alpha}, but also caused accumulation of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in the cell culture media, and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} by itself could induce the expression of AP-2{alpha}. By catalyzing the removal of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} from cells through over-expression of GPx-1, induction of AP-2{alpha} expression by UVA was abolished. Induction of transcription factor AP-2{alpha} by UVA had been previously shown to be mediated through the second messenger ceramide. We found that not only UVA irradiation, but also H{sub 2}O{sub 2} by itself caused increases of ceramide in HaCaT cells, and C2-ceramide added to cells induced the AP-2{alpha} signaling pathway. Finally, forced expression of GPx-1 eliminated UVA-induced ceramide accumulation as well as AP-2{alpha} expression. Taken together, these findings suggest that GPx-1 inhibits UVA-induced AP-2{alpha} expression by suppressing the accumulation of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}.

  4. Glutathione peroxidase-1 inhibits UVA-induced AP-2alpha expression in human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lei; Venkataraman, Sujatha; Coleman, Mitchell C; Spitz, Douglas R; Wertz, Philip W; Domann, Frederick E

    2006-12-29

    In this study, we found a role for H(2)O(2) in UVA-induced AP-2alpha expression in the HaCaT human keratinocyte cell line. UVA irradiation not only increased AP-2alpha, but also caused accumulation of H(2)O(2) in the cell culture media, and H(2)O(2) by itself could induce the expression of AP-2alpha. By catalyzing the removal of H(2)O(2) from cells through over-expression of GPx-1, induction of AP-2alpha expression by UVA was abolished. Induction of transcription factor AP-2alpha by UVA had been previously shown to be mediated through the second messenger ceramide. We found that not only UVA irradiation, but also H(2)O(2) by itself caused increases of ceramide in HaCaT cells, and C2-ceramide added to cells induced the AP-2alpha signaling pathway. Finally, forced expression of GPx-1 eliminated UVA-induced ceramide accumulation as well as AP-2alpha expression. Taken together, these findings suggest that GPx-1 inhibits UVA-induced AP-2alpha expression by suppressing the accumulation of H(2)O(2).

  5. Estradiol-induced gene expression in largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bowman, C.J.; Kroll, K.J.; Gross, T.G.; Denslow, N.D.

    2002-01-01

    Vitellogenin (Vtg) and estrogen receptor (ER) gene expression levels were measured in largemouth bass to evaluate the activation of the ER-mediated pathway by estradiol (E2). Single injections of E2 ranging from 0.0005 to 5 mg/kg up-regulated plasma Vtg in a dose-dependent manner. Vtg and ER mRNAs were measured using partial cDNA sequences corresponding to the C-terminal domain for Vtg and the ligand-binding domain of ER?? sequences. After acute E2-exposures (2 mg/kg), Vtg and ER mRNAs and plasma Vtg levels peaked after 2 days. The rate of ER mRNA accumulation peaked 36-42 h earlier than Vtg mRNA. The expression window for ER defines the primary response to E2 in largemouth bass and that for Vtg a delayed primary response. The specific effect of E2 on other estrogen-regulated genes was tested during these same time windows using differential display RT-PCR. Specific up-regulated genes that are expressed in the same time window as Vtg were ERp72 (a membrane-bound disulfide isomerase) and a gene with homology to an expressed gene identified in zebrafish. Genes that were expressed in a pattern that mimics the ER include the gene for zona radiata protein ZP2, and a gene with homology to an expressed gene found in winter flounder. One gene for fibrinogen ?? was down-regulated and an unidentified gene was transiently up-regulated after 12 h of exposure and returned to basal levels by 48 h. Taken together these studies indicate that the acute molecular response to E2 involves a complex network of responses over time. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Trypanosoma cruzi: Oxidative stress induces arginine kinase expression.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Mariana R; Canepa, Gaspar E; Bouvier, Leon A; Pereira, Claudio A

    2006-12-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi arginine kinase is a key enzyme in cell energy management and is also involved in pH and nutritional stress response mechanisms. T. cruzi epimastigotes treated with hydrogen peroxide presented a time-dependent increase in arginine kinase expression, up to 10-fold, when compared with untreated parasites. Among other oxidative stress-generating compounds tested, only nifurtimox produced more than 2-fold increase in arginine kinase expression. Moreover, parasites overexpressing arginine kinase showed significantly increased survival capability during hydrogen peroxide exposure. These findings suggest the participation of arginine kinase in oxidative stress response systems. PMID:16725140

  7. Tert-butylhydroquinone ameliorates doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity by activating Nrf2 and inducing the expression of its target genes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lin-Feng; Su, Su-Wen; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Zhang, Rong; Niu, Yu-Jie; Guo, Yan-Su; Li, Chun-Yan; Jiang, Wen-Bo; Liu, Yi; Guo, Hui-Cai

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in doxorubicin (DOX)-induced cardiotoxicity. Nuclear factor E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) is a transcription factor that orchestrates the antioxidant and cytoprotective responses to oxidative stress. In the present study, we tested whether tert-butylhydroquinone (tBHQ) could protect against DOX-induced cardiotoxicity in vivo and, if so, whether the protection was associated with the up-regulation of the Nrf2 pathway. The results showed that treatment with tBHQ significantly decreased the DOX-induced cardiac injury in wild-type mice. Moreover, tBHQ ameliorated the DOX-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis. Further studies suggested that tBHQ increased the nuclear accumulation of Nrf2 and the Nrf2-regulated gene expression, including heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and NAD(P)H:quinone oxido-reductase-1 (NQO-1) expression. Knocking out Nrf2 in mice abolished the protective effect of tBHQ on the DOX-induced cardiotoxicity. These results indicate that tBHQ has a beneficial effect on DOX-induced cardiotoxicity, and this effect was associated with the enhanced expression of Nrf2 and its downstream antioxidant genes, HO-1 and NQO-1. PMID:26692920

  8. Bioinforrnatics of Gene Expression Profiling Data Provide Mechanistic Understanding of Acute Ozone-Induced Lung injury

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acute ozone-induced pulmonary injury and inflammation are well characterized. A few studies have used gene expression profiling to determine the types of changes induced by ozone; however the mechanisms or the pathways involved are less well understood. We presumed that robust bi...

  9. FORMALDEHYDE-INDUCED GENE EXPRESSION IN F344 RAT NASAL RESPIRATORY EPITHELIUM.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Formaldehyde-induced gene expression in F344 rat nasal respiratory epithelium

    ABSTRACT

    Formaldehyde, an occupational and environmental toxicant used extensively in the manufacturing of many household and personal use products, is known to induce squamous cell carci...

  10. Transposon-induced nuclear mutations that alter chloroplast gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Barkan, A.

    1992-01-01

    The goal of this project is to use mutant phenotypes as a guide to nuclear genes that determine the timing and localization of chloroplast development The immediate goals are to identify nuclear mutants with defects in chloroplast gene expression from maize lines harboring active Mu transposons; characterize their phenotypes to determine the precise defect in gene expression; clone several of the most interesting mutations by exploiting the transposon tag; and use the clones to further define the roles of these genes in modulating chloroplast gene expression. Three mutants were described earlier that had global defects in chloroplast gene expression. We have found that two of these mutations are allelic. Both alleles have global defects in chloroplast translation initiation, as revealed by the failure to assemble chloroplast mRNAs into polysomes. We have isolated and characterized three new mutants from Mu lines that have novel defects in chloroplast RNA metabolism. We are now ready to begin the task of cloning several of these genes, by using the Mu transposon tag.

  11. Salmonella induces PD-L1 expression in B cells.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Medina, Marcela; Perez-Lopez, Araceli; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia; Ortiz-Navarrete, Vianney

    2015-10-01

    Salmonella persists for a long time in B cells; however, the mechanism(s) through which infected B cells avoid effector CD8 T cell responses has not been characterized. In this study, we show that Salmonella infects and survives within all B1 and B2 cell subpopulations. B cells are infected with a Salmonella typhimurium strain expressing an ovalbumin (OVA) peptide (SIINFEKL) to evaluate whether B cells process and present Salmonella antigens in the context of MHC-I molecules. Our data showed that OVA peptides are presented by MHC class I K(b)-restricted molecules and the presented antigen is generated through proteasomal degradation and vacuolar processing. In addition, Salmonella-infected B cells express co-stimulatory molecules such as CD40, CD80, and CD86 as well as inhibitory molecules such as PD-L1. Thus, the cross-presentation of Salmonella antigens and the expression of activation molecules suggest that infected B cells are able to prime and activate specific CD8(+) T cells. However, the Salmonella infection-stimulated expression of PD-L1 suggests that the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway may be involved in turning off the cytotoxic effector response during Salmonella persistent infection, thereby allowing B cells to become a reservoir for the bacteria.

  12. Nanog expression in heart tissues induced by acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Luo, Huanhuan; Li, Qiong; Pramanik, Jogen; Luo, Jiankai; Guo, Zhikun

    2014-10-01

    Nanog is a potential stem cell marker and is considered a regeneration factor during tissue repair. In the present study, we investigated expression patterns of nanog in the rat heart after acute myocardial infarction by semi-quantitative RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry and Western blot analyses. Our results show that nanog at both mRNA and protein levels is positively expressed in myocardial cells, fibroblasts and small round cells in different myocardial zones at different stages after myocardial infarction, showing a spatio-temporal and dynamic change. After myocardial infarction, the nanog expression in fibroblasts and small round cells in the infarcted zone (IZ) is much stronger than that in the margin zone (MZ) and remote infarcted zone (RIZ). From day 7 after myocardial infarction, the fibroblasts and small cells strongly expressed nanog protein in the IZ, and a few myocardial cells in the MZ and the RIZ and the numbers of nanog-positive fibroblasts and small cells reached the highest peak at 21 days after myocardial infarction, but in this period the number of nanog-positive myocardial cells decreased gradually. At 28 days after myocardial infarction, the numbers of all nanog-positive cells decreased into a low level. Therefore, our data suggest that all myocardial cells, fibroblasts and small round cells are involved in myocardial reconstruction after cardiac infarction. The nanog-positive myocardial cells may respond to early myocardial repair, and the nanog-positive fibroblasts and small round cells are the main source for myocardial reconstruction after cardiac infarction.

  13. Constitutively expressed Siglec-9 inhibits LPS-induced CCR7, but enhances IL-4-induced CD200R expression in human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Hiroshi; Shoji, Toru; Iijima, Shinji; Nishijima, Ken-Ichi

    2016-06-01

    Siglecs recognize the sialic acid moiety and regulate various immune responses. In the present study, we compared the expression levels of Siglecs in human monocytes and macrophages using a quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis. The differentiation of monocytes into macrophages by macrophage colony-stimulating factor or granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor enhanced the expression of Siglec-7 and Siglec-9. The differentiated macrophages were stimulated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) plus interferon (IFN)-γ or interleukin (IL)-4. The expression of Siglec-10 was enhanced by IL-4, whereas that of Siglec-7 was reduced by LPS plus IFN-γ. The expression of Siglec-9 was not affected by these stimuli. The knockdown of Siglec-9 enhanced the expression of CCR7 induced by the LPS or the LPS plus IFN-γ stimulation, and decreased the IL-4-induced expression of CD200R. These results suggest that Siglec-9 is one of the main Siglecs in human blood monocytes/macrophages and modulates innate immunity. PMID:26923638

  14. Strong expression of kinase insert domain-containing receptor, a vascular permeability factor/vascular endothelial growth factor receptor in AIDS-associated Kaposi's sarcoma and cutaneous angiosarcoma.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, L. F.; Tognazzi, K.; Dvorak, H. F.; Harrist, T. J.

    1996-01-01

    Vascular permeability factor (VPF), also known as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), plays an important role in the angiogenesis associated with the growth of many human and animal tumors. VPF/VEGF stimulates endothelial cell growth and increases microvascular permeability by interacting with two endothelial cell tyrosine kinase receptors, KDR and flt-1. We studied 16 cases of AIDS-associated Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), 2 cases of cutaneous angiosarcoma, and 6 cases of capillary hemangioma by in situ hybridization for expression of VPF/VEGF, KDR, and flt-1 mRNAs. We also performed immunohistochemical staining for VPF/VEGF protein in 15 cases. Tumor cells in KS and angiosarcoma strongly expressed KDR but not flt-1 mRNA. Endothelial cells in small stromal vessels in and around these tumors strongly expressed both KDR and flt-1 mRNAs. Tumor cells expressed VPF/VEGF mRNA strongly in only one case of KS, adjacent to an area of necrosis. This was also the only case in which the tumor cells stained substantially for VPF/VEGF protein. VPF/VEGF mRNA and protein were, however, strongly expressed by squamous epithelium in areas of hyperplasia and near areas of ulceration overlying tumors. VPF/VEGF mRNA was also expressed focally at lower levels by infiltrating inflammatory cells, probably macrophages. The strong expression of both KDR and flt-1 in small stromal vessels in and around tumors suggests that VPF/VEGF may be an important regulator of the edema and angiogenesis seen in these tumors. The strong expression of KDR by tumor cells in KS and angiosarcoma implies that VPF/VEGF may also have a direct effect on tumor cells. Tumor cells in four of six capillary hemangiomas strongly expressed both KDR and flt-1 mRNAs in contrast to the high level expression of only KDR observed in the malignant vascular tumors studied. Neither VPF/VEGF mRNA or protein were strongly expressed in capillary hemangiomas. VPF/VEGF and its receptors may play an important but as yet incompletely

  15. Nicorandil attenuates endothelial VCAM-1 expression via thioredoxin production in diabetic rats induced by streptozotocin.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lihua; Liu, Yun; Qi, Benling; Wu, Qinqin; Li, Yuanyuan; Wang, Zhaohui

    2014-06-01

    The anti-angina agent nicorandil has been reported to be beneficial even in patients who have angina with diabetes. However, the mechanism underlying the effect of nicorandil in patients with diabetes remains to be elucidated. In this study, the protective effect of nicorandil on thioredoxin (TRX) protein was investigated, as TRX is a multifunctional endogenous redox regulator that protects cells against various types of cellular and tissue stress. This study was conducted to examine whether nicorandil induces the expression of TRX for the protection against diabetic damage in the vascular tissue of rats. Diabetes was induced in rats by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ) (fasting glucose levels in STZ-induced rats were >14 mmol/l). Diabetic rats were divided into a diabetic control and a nicorandil-treated group. Nicorandil was administered at a dosage of 15 mg/kg/day by gavage feeding. After five weeks of nicorandil administration, blood samples were obtained from the angular vein to measure levels of stress markers, serum superoxide dismutase and malondialdehyde, using the ELISA. The expression of TRX in STZ-induced rat vascular tissue was analyzed by immunohistochemistry, quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and western blot analysis. The oral administration of nicorandil induced TRX protein and mRNA expression in the vascular tissue of STZ-induced diabetic rats. In the diabetic control group, the levels of stress were markedly higher than those in the nicorandil-treated group, indicating that nicorandil reduces oxidative stress in serum. In addition to inducing TRX expression, nicorandil attenuated the expression of the vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) in diabetic rat vascular endothelial cells. In conclusion, nicorandil attenuates the formation of reactive oxygen species and induces TRX protein expression, consequently resulting in the suppression of VCAM-1 secretion in the vascular endothelial cells of STZ-induced diabetic

  16. Oncogenic tyrosine kinase NPM-ALK induces expression of the growth-promoting receptor ICOS.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Wang, Hongyi; Kantekure, Kanchan; Paterson, Jennifer C; Liu, Xiaobin; Schaffer, Andras; Paulos, Chrystal; Milone, Michael C; Odum, Niels; Turner, Suzanne; Marafioti, Teresa; Wasik, Mariusz A

    2011-09-15

    Here we report that T-cell lymphoma cells carrying the NPM-ALK fusion protein (ALK(+) TCL) frequently express the cell-stimulatory receptor ICOS. ICOS expression in ALK(+) TCL is moderate and strictly dependent on the expression and enzymatic activity of NPM-ALK. NPM-ALK induces ICOS expression via STAT3, which triggers the transcriptional activity of the ICOS gene promoter. In addition, STAT3 suppresses the expression of miR-219 that, in turn, selectively inhibits ICOS expression. ALK(+) TCL cell lines display extensive DNA methylation of the CpG island located within intron 1, the putative enhancer region, of the ICOS gene, whereas cutaneous T-cell lymphoma cell lines, which strongly express ICOS, show no methylation of the island. Treatment of the ALK(+) TCL cell lines with DNA methyltransferase inhibitor reversed the CpG island methylation and augmented the expression of ICOS mRNA and protein. Stimulation of the ICOS receptor with anti-ICOS antibody or ICOS ligand-expressing B cells markedly enhanced proliferation of the ALK(+) TCL cells. These results demonstrate that NPM-ALK, acting through STAT3 as the gene transcriptional activator, induces the expression of ICOS, a cell growth promoting receptor. These data also show that the DNA methylation status of the intronic CpG island affects transcriptional activity of the ICOS gene and, consequently, modulates the concentration of the expressed ICOS protein.

  17. UV-induced changes in cell cycle and gene expression within rabbit lens epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sidjanin, D.; Grdina, D.; Woloschak, G.E.

    1994-11-01

    Damage to lens epithelial cells is a probable initiation process in cataract formation induced by ultraviolet radiation. These experiments investigated the ability of 254 nm radiation on cell cycle progression and gene expression in rabbit lens epithelial cell line N/N1003A. No changes in expression of c-fos, c-jun, alpha- tubulin, or vimentin was observed following UV exposure. Using flow cytometry, an accumulation of cells in G1/S phase of the cell cycle 1 hr following exposure. The observed changes in gene expression, especially the decreased histone transcripts reported here may play a role in UV induced inhibition of cell cycle progression.

  18. Repression of HIP/RPL29 expression induces differentiation in colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian-Jun; Huang, Bao Hua; Zhang, Jinqiu; Carson, Daniel D; Hooi, Shing Chuan

    2006-05-01

    We had previously shown that the expression of heparin/heparan sulfate interacting protein/ribosomal protein L29 (HIP/RPL29) was upregulated in colon cancer tissues. The present study investigated the role of HIP/RPL29 in differentiation in colon cancer cells. Inducing cellular differentiation in HT-29 cells by both sodium butyrate and glucose deprivation resulted in a significant downregulation of HIP/RPL29 expression. The beta-catenin/Tcf-4 pathway is the most important pathway controlling the switch between cellular differentiation and proliferation in intestinal epithelial cells. Inducing differentiation by dominant-negative inhibition of the beta-catenin/Tcf-4 complexes in LS174T cells also resulted in downregulation of HIP/RPL29. To determine whether a lower expression of HIP/RPL29 could induce differentiation in cancer cells, small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting HIP/RPL29 was transfected into LS174T cells. The resultant knockdown of HIP/RPL29 expression induced cellular differentiation, as shown by the increased expression of two known markers of differentiation in LS174T cells, galectin-4 and mucin-2. In addition, the differentiation process induced by repression of HIP/RPL29 expression was accompanied by the upregulation of p21 and p53. In conclusion, HIP/RPL29 plays a role in the cellular differentiation process in colon cancer cells. The differentiation process is at least partially mediated by the upregulation of p21 and p53 pathways. PMID:16475173

  19. Static Magnetic Field Induced Stochastic Resonance in Gene Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brady, Megan; Frisch, Paul; McLeod, Kenneth; Laramee, Craig

    2012-02-01

    Biological systems are naturally complex, making singular responses difficult to detect. However, when the emergent behavior is investigated, the collective properties may be observed and characterized. These responses to external stimuli at are often evident at the genomic level. When an optimal dose of external noise is used to perturb the system, it may work in synergy with the system's intrinsic noise to produce a change in stable state. This phenomenon, known as stochastic resonance (SR), is responsible for shifts in gene expression. This paper proposes that static magnetic fields (SMFs) elicit a SR genomic response in biological systems under environmentally relevant exposures. Using single reporter biomarkers as well as gene expression microarrays, the responses of three cell model systems (MCF-10A; Rat-1; Caco-2) to SMF exposure were examined. Results show that while responses for a single gene do occur, they are difficult to replicate and are near the detection cutoff limits. However, the system as a whole displays a shift in the pattern of gene expression. The replication of this pattern across different experimental platforms provides evidence that the cells are responding to the noise presented by the SMFs.

  20. Biological therapy induces expression changes in Notch pathway in psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Skarmoutsou, Evangelia; Trovato, Chiara; Granata, Mariagrazia; Rossi, Giulio A; Mosca, Ambra; Longo, Valentina; Gangemi, Pietro; Pettinato, Maurizio; D'Amico, Fabio; Mazzarino, Maria Clorinda

    2015-12-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease, characterized by hyperproliferation of keratinocytes and by skin infiltration of activated T cells. To date, the pathophysiology of psoriasis has not yet been fully elucidated. The Notch pathway plays a determinant role in cell fate determination, proliferation, differentiation, immune cell development and function. Many biological agents, used in the treatment of psoriasis, include TFN-α inhibitors, such as etanercept, adalimumab, and anti IL-12/IL-23 p40 antibody, such as ustekinumab. This study aimed to determine mRNA expression levels by real-time RT-PCR, and protein expression levels, analysed by Western blot and immunohistochemistry, of some components of the Notch pathway, such as NOTCH1, NOTCH2, JAGGED1, and HES1 after biological treatments in psoriatic patients. mRNA and protein levels of NOTCH1, NOTCH2, JAGGED1 and HES1 were upregulated in skin samples from untreated psoriatic patients compared with normal controls. Biological therapy showed to downregulate differently the protein expression levels of the molecules under study. Our study suggests that Notch pathway components might be a potential therapeutic target against psoriasis.

  1. Tobacco smoke as inducer for gas phase-controlled transgene expression in mammalian cells and mice.

    PubMed

    Weber, Wilfried; Spielmann, Manuela; Daoud El-Baba, Marie; Keller, Bettina; Aubel, Dominique; Fussenegger, Martin

    2005-06-30

    Capitalizing on components evolved to metabolize ethanol in Aspergillus nidulans, we previously designed the first molecular gas-gene expression interface using gaseous acetaldehyde as the major inducer. This fungus-derived acetaldehyde-inducible gene regulation (AIR) system operated perfectly and enabled precise and reversible transgene expression dosing in a variety of mammalian cells. We now validate the use of mainstream cigarette smoke typically containing acetaldehyde at regulation-effective nontoxic concentrations as a noninvasive modality to adjust transgene transcription in mammalian cells and mice. Indeed, tobacco smoke-induced expression fine-tuning of AIR-driven transgenes was successful in mammalian cells. Even mice implanted with cells transgenic for AIR-controlled SEAP (human secreted alkaline phosphatase) production showed serum SEAP levels correlating with inhaled tobacco smoke doses. Tobacco smoke-controlled gene expression may foster clinical opportunities as well as advances in understanding smoke-related pathologies.

  2. A self-inducible heterologous protein expression system in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Briand, L.; Marcion, G.; Kriznik, A.; Heydel, J. M.; Artur, Y.; Garrido, C.; Seigneuric, R.; Neiers, F.

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli is an important experimental, medical and industrial cell factory for recombinant protein production. The inducible lac promoter is one of the most commonly used promoters for heterologous protein expression in E. coli. Isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactoside (IPTG) is currently the most efficient molecular inducer for regulating this promoter’s transcriptional activity. However, limitations have been observed in large-scale and microplate production, including toxicity, cost and culture monitoring. Here, we report the novel SILEX (Self-InducibLe Expression) system, which is a convenient, cost-effective alternative that does not require cell density monitoring or IPTG induction. We demonstrate the broad utility of the presented self-inducible method for a panel of diverse proteins produced in large amounts. The SILEX system is compatible with all classical culture media and growth temperatures and allows protein expression modulation. Importantly, the SILEX system is proven to be efficient for protein expression screening on a microplate scale. PMID:27611846

  3. A self-inducible heterologous protein expression system in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Briand, L; Marcion, G; Kriznik, A; Heydel, J M; Artur, Y; Garrido, C; Seigneuric, R; Neiers, F

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli is an important experimental, medical and industrial cell factory for recombinant protein production. The inducible lac promoter is one of the most commonly used promoters for heterologous protein expression in E. coli. Isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactoside (IPTG) is currently the most efficient molecular inducer for regulating this promoter's transcriptional activity. However, limitations have been observed in large-scale and microplate production, including toxicity, cost and culture monitoring. Here, we report the novel SILEX (Self-InducibLe Expression) system, which is a convenient, cost-effective alternative that does not require cell density monitoring or IPTG induction. We demonstrate the broad utility of the presented self-inducible method for a panel of diverse proteins produced in large amounts. The SILEX system is compatible with all classical culture media and growth temperatures and allows protein expression modulation. Importantly, the SILEX system is proven to be efficient for protein expression screening on a microplate scale. PMID:27611846

  4. Drug-loaded nanoparticles induce gene expression in human pluripotent stem cell derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Gajbhiye, Virendra; Escalante, Leah; Chen, Guojun; Laperle, Alex; Zheng, Qifeng; Steyer, Benjamin; Gong, Shaoqin; Saha, Krishanu

    2014-01-01

    Tissue engineering and advanced manufacturing of human stem cells requires a suite of tools to control gene expression spatiotemporally in culture. Inducible gene expression systems offer cell-extrinsic control, typically through addition of small molecules, but small molecule inducers typically contain few functional groups for further chemical modification. Doxycycline (DXC), a potent small molecule inducer of tetracycline (Tet) transgene systems, was conjugated to a hyperbranched dendritic polymer (Boltorn H40) and subsequently reacted with polyethylene glycol (PEG). The resulting PEG-H40-DXC nanoparticle exhibited pH-sensitive drug release behavior and successfully controlled gene expression in stem-cell-derived fibroblasts with a Tet-On system. While free DXC inhibited fibroblast proliferation and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity, PEG-H40-DXC nanoparticles maintained higher fibroblast proliferation levels and MMP activity. The results demonstrate that the PEG-H40-DXC nanoparticle system provides an effective tool to controlling gene expression in human stem cell derivatives. PMID:24232694

  5. AIDS (image)

    MedlinePlus

    AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome) is caused by HIV (human immunodeficiency virus), and is a syndrome that ... life-threatening illnesses. There is no cure for AIDS, but treatment with antiviral medicine can suppress symptoms. ...

  6. Hearing Aids

    MedlinePlus

    ... more in both quiet and noisy situations. Hearing aids help people who have hearing loss from damage ... your doctor. There are different kinds of hearing aids. They differ by size, their placement on or ...

  7. Glucose-induced serum- and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase activation in oncofetal fibronectin expression

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Zia A.; Barbin, Yousef P.; Farhangkhoee, Hana; Beier, Norbert; Scholz, Wolfgang; Chakrabarti, Subrata . E-mail: subrata.chakrabarti@fmd.uwo.ca

    2005-04-01

    Preferential expression of oncofetal extra domain-B fibronectin (EDB{sup +} FN), a proposed angiogenic marker, has been shown in proliferative diabetic retinopathy. High levels of glucose also increase EDB{sup +} FN expression in endothelial cells (ECs) via transforming growth factor-{beta}1 (TGF-{beta}1) and endothelin-1 (ET-1). The present study was aimed at elucidating the role of serum- and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase (SGK-1) in glucose-induced EDB{sup +} FN expression. Using human macro- and microvascular ECs, we show that high levels of glucose, TGF-{beta}1, and ET-1 increase the EDB{sup +} FN expression via SGK-1 alteration at the mRNA, protein, and activity levels. Inhibition of TGF-{beta}1 and ET-1 prevented glucose-induced SGK-1 activation and the EDB{sup +} FN expression. Furthermore, using siRNA-mediated SGK-1 gene silencing, we show that glucose-induced EDB{sup +} FN expression can be completely prevented. These findings provide first evidence of glucose-induced SGK-1 activation in altered EDB{sup +} FN expression and provide novel avenues for therapeutic modalities.

  8. NOTCH3 expression is induced in mural cells through an autoregulatory loop that requires endothelial-expressed JAGGED1.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hua; Kennard, Simone; Lilly, Brenda

    2009-02-27

    Endothelial cells and mural cells (smooth muscle cells, pericytes, or fibroblasts) are known to communicate with one another. Their interactions not only serve to support fully functional blood vessels but also can regulate vessel assembly and differentiation or maturation. In an effort to better understand the molecular components of this heterotypic interaction, we used a 3D model of angiogenesis and screened for genes, which were modulated by coculturing of these 2 different cell types. In doing so, we discovered that NOTCH3 is one gene whose expression is robustly induced in mural cells by coculturing with endothelial cells. Knockdown by small interfering RNA revealed that NOTCH3 is necessary for endothelial-dependent mural cell differentiation, whereas overexpression of NOTCH3 is sufficient to promote smooth muscle gene expression. Moreover, NOTCH3 contributes to the proangiogenic abilities of mural cells cocultured with endothelial cells. Interestingly, we found that the expression of NOTCH3 is dependent on Notch signaling, because the gamma-secretase inhibitor DAPT blocked its upregulation. Furthermore, in mural cells, a dominant-negative Mastermind-like1 construct inhibited NOTCH3 expression, and endothelial-expressed JAGGED1 was required for its induction. Additionally, we demonstrated that NOTCH3 could promote its own expression and that of JAGGED1 in mural cells. Taken together, these data provide a mechanism by which endothelial cells induce the differentiation of mural cells through activation and induction of NOTCH3. These findings also suggest that NOTCH3 has the capacity to maintain a differentiated phenotype through a positive-feedback loop that includes both autoregulation and JAGGED1 expression.

  9. Periostin expression induced by oxidative stress contributes to myocardial fibrosis in a rat model of high salt-induced hypertension

    PubMed Central

    WU, HAN; CHEN, LIANG; XIE, JUN; LI, RAN; LI, GUAN-NAN; CHEN, QIN-HUA; ZHANG, XIN-LIN; KANG, LI-NA; XU, BIAO

    2016-01-01

    Periostin is an extracellular matrix protein involved in fibrosis. The present study investigated the importance of periostin in hypertension-induced myocardial fibrosis. Rats were randomly divided into either the normal group (0.4% NaCl diet; n=8) or hypertension group (8% NaCl diet; n=8). For 36 weeks, the blood pressure and heart rate of the rats were monitored. At week 36, the hearts were extracted for further analysis. Masson's staining and western blotting were performed to determine the levels of periostin protein expression, oxidative stress and fibrosis. In addition, fibroblasts were isolated from adult rats and cultured in vitro, and following treatment with angiotensin II (Ang II) and N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), western blotting, immunofluorescence and 2′,7′ dichlorodihydrofluorescin staining were performed to examine reactive oxygen species production, and periostin and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression levels. The results demonstrated that periostin expression and oxidative stress were increased in hypertensive hearts compared with normal hearts. The in vitro experiments demonstrated that Ang II upregulated the expression levels of periostin and α-SMA compared with the control, whereas, pretreatment with NAC inhibited oxidative stress, periostin and α-SMA expression in fibroblasts. In conclusion, the results of the current study suggested that oxidative stress-induced periostin is involved in myocardial fibrosis and hypertension. The present study demonstrated that periostin inhibition may be a promising approach for the inhibition of hypertension-induced cardiac remodeling. PMID:27220372

  10. Poplar root exudates contain compounds that induce the expression of MiSSP7 in Laccaria bicolor.

    PubMed

    Plett, Jonathan M; Martin, Francis

    2012-01-01

    Communication between organisms is crucial for their survival, especially for sessile organisms such as plants that depend upon interactions with mutualistic organisms to maximize their nutrient acquisition. This communication can take the form of the exchange of volatile compounds, metabolites or effectors - small protein signals secreted from the colonizing cell that change the biology of the host cell.  We recently characterized the first mutualistic effector protein from an ectomycorrhizal fungus, a small secreted protein named MiSSP7 encoded by Laccaria bicolor.  Ectomycorrhizal fungi are soil-borne mutualistic organisms whose hyphae wrap around host roots and grow into the root apoplastic space where the fungus exchanges nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus in return for plant derived sugars.  The MiSSP7 protein is induced by root exudates and is highly expressed throughout the root colonization process.  Its presence was responsible for alterations to the plant transcriptomic profile, a mechanism by which MiSSP7 may aid in the formation of the symbiotic interface. Here we further discuss the implications of these findings and, further, we demonstrate that the production of MiSSP7 is induced by two flavonoids, rutin and quercitrin, a class of compounds normally found within the exudates of plant roots.  We also consider the interesting similarities between the mechanisms of effector induction and action between pathogenic and mutualistic fungi.  

  11. Hearing Aids

    MedlinePlus

    ... type and degree of loss. Are there different styles of hearing aids? Styles of hearing aids Source: NIH/NIDCD Behind-the- ... the ear canal and are available in two styles. The in-the-canal (ITC) hearing aid is ...

  12. Interleukin-13 Inhibits Lipopolysaccharide-Induced BPIFA1 Expression in Nasal Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Tsou, Yung-An; Lin, Chia-Der; Chen, Hui-Chen; Hsu, Hui-Ying; Wu, Lii-Tzu; Chiang-Ni, Chuan; Chen, Chih-Jung; Wu, Tsu-Fang; Kao, Min-Chuan; Chen, Yu-An; Peng, Ming-Te; Tsai, Ming-Hsui; Chen, Chuan-Mu; Lai, Chih-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Short palate, lung, and nasal epithelium clone 1 (SPLUNC1) protein is expressed in human nasopharyngeal and respiratory epithelium and has demonstrated antimicrobial activity. SPLUNC1 is now referred to as bactericidal/permeability-increasing fold containing family A, member 1 (BPIFA1). Reduced BPIFA1 expression is associated with bacterial colonization in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP). Interleukin 13 (IL-13), predominately secreted by T helper 2 (TH2) cells, has been found to contribute to airway allergies and suppress BPIFA1 expression in nasal epithelial cells. However, the molecular mechanism of IL-13 perturbation of bacterial infection and BPIFA1 expression in host airways remains unclear. In this study, we found that lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced BPIFA1 expression in nasal epithelial cells was mediated through the JNK/c-Jun signaling pathway and AP-1 activation. We further demonstrated that IL-13 downregulated the LPS-induced activation of phosphorylated JNK and c-Jun, followed by attenuation of BPIFA1 expression. Moreover, the immunohistochemical analysis showed that IL-13 prominently suppressed BPIFA1 expression in eosinophilic CRSwNP patients with bacterial infection. Taken together, these results suggest that IL-13 plays a critical role in attenuation of bacteria-induced BPIFA1 expression that may result in eosinophilic CRSwNP. PMID:26646664

  13. Interleukin-13 Inhibits Lipopolysaccharide-Induced BPIFA1 Expression in Nasal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hui-Chen; Hsu, Hui-Ying; Wu, Lii-Tzu; Chiang-Ni, Chuan; Chen, Chih-Jung; Wu, Tsu-Fang; Kao, Min-Chuan; Chen, Yu-An; Peng, Ming-Te; Tsai, Ming-Hsui; Chen, Chuan-Mu; Lai, Chih-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Short palate, lung, and nasal epithelium clone 1 (SPLUNC1) protein is expressed in human nasopharyngeal and respiratory epithelium and has demonstrated antimicrobial activity. SPLUNC1 is now referred to as bactericidal/permeability-increasing fold containing family A, member 1 (BPIFA1). Reduced BPIFA1 expression is associated with bacterial colonization in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP). Interleukin 13 (IL-13), predominately secreted by T helper 2 (TH2) cells, has been found to contribute to airway allergies and suppress BPIFA1 expression in nasal epithelial cells. However, the molecular mechanism of IL-13 perturbation of bacterial infection and BPIFA1 expression in host airways remains unclear. In this study, we found that lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced BPIFA1 expression in nasal epithelial cells was mediated through the JNK/c-Jun signaling pathway and AP-1 activation. We further demonstrated that IL-13 downregulated the LPS-induced activation of phosphorylated JNK and c-Jun, followed by attenuation of BPIFA1 expression. Moreover, the immunohistochemical analysis showed that IL-13 prominently suppressed BPIFA1 expression in eosinophilic CRSwNP patients with bacterial infection. Taken together, these results suggest that IL-13 plays a critical role in attenuation of bacteria-induced BPIFA1 expression that may result in eosinophilic CRSwNP. PMID:26646664

  14. Heat-inducible gene expression system by applying alternating magnetic field to magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Masaki; Ito, Akira; Ono, Akihiko; Kawabe, Yoshinori; Kamihira, Masamichi

    2014-05-16

    By combining synthetic biology with nanotechnology, we demonstrate remote controlled gene expression using a magnetic field. Magnetite nanoparticles, which generate heat under an alternating magnetic field, have been developed to label cells. Magnetite nanoparticles and heat-induced therapeutic genes were introduced into tumor xenografts. The magnetically triggered gene expression resulted in tumor growth inhibition. This system shows great potential for controlling target gene expression in a space and time selective manner and may be used for remote control of cell functions via gene expression. PMID:24144205

  15. Ectopic ERK Expression Induces Phenotypic Conversion of C10 Cells and Alters DNA Methyltransferase Expression

    SciTech Connect

    Sontag, Ryan L.; Weber, Thomas J.

    2012-05-04

    In some model systems constitutive extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) activation is sufficient to promote an oncogenic phenotype. Here we investigate whether constitutive ERK expression influences phenotypic conversion in murine C10 type II alveolar epithelial cells. C10 cells were stably transduced with an ERK1-green fluorescent protein (ERK1-GFP) chimera or empty vector and ectopic ERK expression was associated with the acquisition of soft agar focus-forming potential in late passage, but not early passage cells. Late passage ERK1-GFP cells exhibited a significant increase in the expression of DNA methyl transferases (DNMT1 and 3b) and a marked increase in sensitivity to 5-azacytidine (5-azaC)-mediated toxicity, relative to early passage ERK1-GFP cells and vector controls. The expression of xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A (XPA) and DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) were significantly increased in late passage cells, suggesting enhanced DNA damage recognition and repair activity which we interpret as a reflection of genomic instability. Phospho-ERK levels were dramatically decreased in late passage ERK1-GFP cells, relative to early passage and vector controls, and phospho-ERK levels were restored by treatment with sodium orthovanadate, indicating a role for phosphatase activity in this response. Collectively these observations suggest that ectopic ERK expression promotes phenotypic conversion of C10 cells that is associated with latent effects on epigenetic programming and phosphatase activities.

  16. Protective effects of L-selenomethionine on space radiation induced changes in gene expression.

    PubMed

    Stewart, J; Ko, Y-H; Kennedy, A R

    2007-06-01

    Ionizing radiation can produce adverse biological effects in astronauts during space travel. Of particular concern are the types of radiation from highly energetic, heavy, charged particles known as HZE particles. The aims of our studies are to characterize HZE particle radiation induced biological effects and evaluate the effects of L-selenomethionine (SeM) on these adverse biological effects. In this study, microarray technology was used to measure HZE radiation induced changes in gene expression, as well as to evaluate modulation of these changes by SeM. Human thyroid epithelial cells (HTori-3) were irradiated (1 GeV/n iron ions) in the presence or in the absence of 5 microM SeM. At 6 h post-irradiation, all cells were harvested for RNA isolation. Gene Chip U133Av2 from Affymetrix was used for the analysis of gene expression, and ANOVA and EASE were used for a determination of the genes and biological processes whose differential expression is statistically significant. Results of this microarray study indicate that exposure to small doses of radiation from HZE particles, 10 and 20 cGy from iron ions, induces statistically significant differential expression of 196 and 610 genes, respectively. In the presence of SeM, differential expression of 77 out of 196 genes (exposure to 10 cGy) and 336 out of 610 genes (exposure to 20 cGy) is abolished. In the presence or in the absence of SeM, radiation from HZE particles induces differential expression of genes whose products have roles in the induction of G1/S arrest during the mitotic cell cycle, as well as heat shock proteins. Some of the genes, whose expressions were affected by radiation from HZE particles and were unchanged in irradiated cells treated with SeM, have been shown to have altered expression levels in cancer cells. The conclusions of this report are that radiation from HZE particles can induce differential expression of many genes, some of which are known to play roles in the same processes that have

  17. Protective effects of L-selenomethionine on space radiation induced changes in gene expression.

    PubMed

    Stewart, J; Ko, Y-H; Kennedy, A R

    2007-06-01

    Ionizing radiation can produce adverse biological effects in astronauts during space travel. Of particular concern are the types of radiation from highly energetic, heavy, charged particles known as HZE particles. The aims of our studies are to characterize HZE particle radiation induced biological effects and evaluate the effects of L-selenomethionine (SeM) on these adverse biological effects. In this study, microarray technology was used to measure HZE radiation induced changes in gene expression, as well as to evaluate modulation of these changes by SeM. Human thyroid epithelial cells (HTori-3) were irradiated (1 GeV/n iron ions) in the presence or in the absence of 5 microM SeM. At 6 h post-irradiation, all cells were harvested for RNA isolation. Gene Chip U133Av2 from Affymetrix was used for the analysis of gene expression, and ANOVA and EASE were used for a determination of the genes and biological processes whose differential expression is statistically significant. Results of this microarray study indicate that exposure to small doses of radiation from HZE particles, 10 and 20 cGy from iron ions, induces statistically significant differential expression of 196 and 610 genes, respectively. In the presence of SeM, differential expression of 77 out of 196 genes (exposure to 10 cGy) and 336 out of 610 genes (exposure to 20 cGy) is abolished. In the presence or in the absence of SeM, radiation from HZE particles induces differential expression of genes whose products have roles in the induction of G1/S arrest during the mitotic cell cycle, as well as heat shock proteins. Some of the genes, whose expressions were affected by radiation from HZE particles and were unchanged in irradiated cells treated with SeM, have been shown to have altered expression levels in cancer cells. The conclusions of this report are that radiation from HZE particles can induce differential expression of many genes, some of which are known to play roles in the same processes that have

  18. Sugar-inducible expression of a gene for beta-amylase in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed Central

    Mita, S; Suzuki-Fujii, K; Nakamura, K

    1995-01-01

    The levels of beta-amylase activity and of the mRNA for beta-amylase in rosette leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. increased significantly, with the concomitant accumulation of starch, when whole plants or excised mature leaves were supplied with sucrose. A supply of glucose or fructose, but not of mannitol or sorbitol, to plants also induced the expression of the gene for beta-amylase, and the induction occurred not only in rosette leaves but also in roots, stems, and bracts. These results suggest that the gene for beta-amylase of Arabidopsis is subject to regulation by a carbohydrate metabolic signal, and expression of the gene in various tissues may be regulated by the carbon partitioning and sink-source interactions in the whole plant. The sugar-inducible expression of the gene in Arabidopsis was severely repressed in the absence of light. The sugar-inducible expression in the light was not inhibited by 3(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea or by chloramphenicol, but it was inhibited by cycloheximide. These results suggest that a light-induced signal and de novo synthesis of proteins in the cytoplasm are involved in the regulation. A fusion gene composed of the 5' upstream region of the gene for beta-amylase from Arabidopsis and the coding sequence of beta-glucuronidase showed the sugar-inducible expression in a light-dependent manner in rosette leaves of transgenic Arabidopsis. PMID:7716246

  19. Colony-stimulating Factor-1 Receptor Utilizes Multiple Signaling Pathways to Induce Cyclin D2 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Arunangsu; She, Hongyun; Kim, Leopold; Boruch, Allan; Guris, Deborah L.; Carlberg, Kristen; Sebti, Saïd M.; Woodley, David T.; Imamoto, Akira; Li, Wei

    2000-01-01

    Colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1) induces expression of immediate early gene, such as c-myc and c-fos and delayed early genes such as D-type cyclins (D1 and D2), whose products play essential roles in the G1 to S phase transition of the cell cycle. Little is known, however, about the cytoplasmic signal transduction pathways that connect the surface CSF-1 receptor to these genes in the nucleus. We have investigated the signaling mechanism of CSF-1-induced D2 expression. Analyses of CSF-1 receptor autophosphorylation mutants show that, although certain individual mutation has a partial inhibitory effect, only multiple combined mutations completely block induction of D2 in response to CSF-1. We report that at least three parallel pathways, the Src pathway, the MAPK/ERK kinase (MEK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway, and the c-myc pathway, are involved. Induction of D2 is partially inhibited in Src−/− bone marrow-derived macrophages and by Src inhibitor PP1 and is enhanced in v-Src-overexpressing cells. Activation of myc's transactivating activity selectively induces D2 but not D1. Blockade of c-myc expression partially blocks CSF-1-induced D2 expression. Complete inhibition of the MEK/ERK pathway causes 50% decrease of D2 expression. Finally, simultaneous inhibition of Src, MEK activation, and c-myc expression additively blocks CSF-1-induced D2 expression. This study indicates that multiple signaling pathways are involved in full induction of a single gene, and this finding may also apply broadly to other growth factor-inducible genes. PMID:11071910

  20. Receptor-binding cancer antigen expressed on SiSo cells induces apoptosis via ectodomain shedding.

    PubMed

    Sonoda, Kenzo; Miyamoto, Shingo; Nakashima, Manabu; Wake, Norio

    2010-07-01

    Receptor-binding cancer antigen expressed on SiSo cells (RCAS1) is a secreted antigen that induces apoptosis in putative receptor-expressing cells, including peripheral lymphocytes and natural killer (NK) cells. RCAS1 expression is associated with aggressive characteristics and poor overall survival for 15 different human malignancies. The putative RCAS1 receptor has not been isolated and the mechanism of RCAS1 apoptosis induction remains unclear. This study explores how RCAS1 is involved in apoptosis initiation. The cell lines SiSo and MCF-7, human uterine carcinoma and breast adenocarcinoma, respectively, both express RCAS1, but RCAS1 secretion is undetectable in MCF-7 cells. SiSo and MCF-7 cells were stimulated to induce RCAS1 ectodomain shedding followed by assessment of RCAS1 expression and secretion. Additionally, the RCAS1 putative receptor-expressing human chronic myelogenous leukemia cell line K562 was co-cultured with SiSo, MCF-7, or soluble RCAS1 to follow RCAS1 secretion in apoptosis initiation. RCAS1 secretion was strongly suppressed by inhibitors of metalloproteases, protein kinase C (PKC)-delta, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase (MEK), epidermal growth factor (EGF), and G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). K562 apoptosis could be induced only by co-culturing with SiSo or soluble RCAS1. RCAS1 is thus secreted by ectodomain shedding, which may represent a pivotal step in RCAS1-induced apoptosis initiation.

  1. Induced over-expression of AtDREB2A CA improves drought tolerance in sugarcane.

    PubMed

    Reis, Rafaela Ribeiro; da Cunha, Bárbara Andrade Dias Brito; Martins, Polyana Kelly; Martins, Maria Thereza Bazzo; Alekcevetch, Jean Carlos; Chalfun, Antônio; Andrade, Alan Carvalho; Ribeiro, Ana Paula; Qin, Feng; Mizoi, Junya; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko; Nakashima, Kazuo; Carvalho, Josirley de Fátima Corrêa; de Sousa, Carlos Antônio Ferreira; Nepomuceno, Alexandre Lima; Kobayashi, Adilson Kenji; Molinari, Hugo Bruno Correa

    2014-05-01

    Drought is one of the most challenging agricultural issues limiting sustainable sugarcane production and, in some cases, yield losses caused by drought are nearly 50%. DREB proteins play vital regulatory roles in abiotic stress responses in plants. The transcription factor DREB2A interacts with a cis-acting DRE sequence to activate the expression of downstream genes that are involved in drought-, salt- and heat-stress response in Arabidopsis thaliana. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of stress-inducible over-expression of AtDREB2A CA on gene expression, leaf water potential (ΨL), relative water content (RWC), sucrose content and gas exchanges of sugarcane plants submitted to a four-days water deficit treatment in a rhizotron-grown root system. The plants were also phenotyped by scanning the roots and measuring morphological parameters of the shoot. The stress-inducible expression of AtDREB2A CA in transgenic sugarcane led to the up-regulation of genes involved in plant response to drought stress. The transgenic plants maintained higher RWC and ΨL over 4 days after withholding water and had higher photosynthetic rates until the 3rd day of water-deficit. Induced expression of AtDREB2A CA in sugarcane increased sucrose levels and improved bud sprouting of the transgenic plants. Our results indicate that induced expression of AtDREB2A CA in sugarcane enhanced its drought tolerance without biomass penalty.

  2. Endotoxemia induces IκBβ/NFκB dependent ET-1 expression in hepatic macrophages

    PubMed Central

    McKenna, Sarah; Gossling, Megan; Bugarini, Alejandro; Hill, Elizabeth; Anderson, Aimee L.; Rancourt, Raymond C.; Balasubramaniyan, Natarajan; El Kasmi, Karim C.; Wright, Clyde J.

    2015-01-01

    Elevated serum concentrations of the vasoactive protein ET-1 occur in the setting of systemic inflammatory response syndrome and contribute to distal organ hypoperfusion and pulmonary hypertension. Thus, understanding the cellular source and transcriptional regulation of systemic inflammatory stress-induced ET-1 expression may reveal therapeutic targets. Using a murine model of LPS-induced septic shock, we demonstrate that the hepatic macrophage is the primary source of elevated circulating ET-1, rather than the endothelium as previously proposed. Using pharmacologic inhibitors, ET-1 promoter luciferase assays, and by silencing and overexpressing NFκB inhibitory protein IκB expression, we demonstrate that LPS-induced ET-1 expression occurs via an NFκB dependent pathway. Finally, the specific role of the cRel/p65 inhibitory protein IκBβ was evaluated. Although cytoplasmic IκBβ inhibits activity of cRel containing NFκB dimers, nuclear IκBβ stabilizes NFκB/DNA binding and enhances gene expression. Using targeted pharmacologic therapies to specifically prevent IκBβ/NFκB signaling, as well as mice genetically modified to overexpress IκBβ, we show that nuclear IκBβ is both necessary and sufficient to drive LPS-induced ET-1 expression. Together, these results mechanistically link the innate immune response mediated by IκBβ/NFκB to ET-1 expression and potentially reveals therapeutic targets for patients with gram-negative septic shock. PMID:26342031

  3. Involvement of a Stat3 binding site in inflammation-induced enteric apelin expression

    PubMed Central

    Han, Song; Wang, Guiyun; Qi, Xiang; Englander, Ella W.; Greeley, George H.

    2008-01-01

    Apelin is the endogenous ligand for the APJ receptor; both are expressed in the gastrointestinal tract. Experimental colitis in rodents and inflammatory bowel disease in humans are associated with increased intestinal apelin production. Our aim was to use LPS and proinflammatory cytokine-treated (IL-6 and IFN-γ) rodents or enteric cells to identify signaling mechanisms underlying inflammation-induced enteric apelin expression. LPS, IL-6, or IFN-γ treatment of rodents increased enteric apelin expression. Pharmacological blockade of Jak/Stat signaling or IL-6 antibody administration inhibited elevations in enteric apelin expression. Transient transfection experiments showed that LPS, IL-6, or IFN-γ increased apelin expression by stimulation of apelin promoter activity, and blockade of Jak/Stat signaling abolished elevations in apelin promoter activity. A chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that IL-6 induced binding of phospho-Stat3 to a putative Stat3 site in the apelin promoter; mutation of this site abrogated the LPS-induced elevation in apelin promoter activity. Together, our findings indicate that binding of phospho-Stat3 to the apelin promoter is the final step underlying proinflammatory cytokine-induced enteric apelin expression during intestinal inflammation. PMID:18818315

  4. HSP90 inhibitors decrease AID levels and activity in mice and in human cells.

    PubMed

    Montamat-Sicotte, Damien; Litzler, Ludivine C; Abreu, Cecilia; Safavi, Shiva; Zahn, Astrid; Orthwein, Alexandre; Müschen, Markus; Oppezzo, Pablo; Muñoz, Denise P; Di Noia, Javier M

    2015-08-01

    Activation induced deaminase (AID) initiates somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination of the Ig genes in antigen-activated B cells, underpinning antibody affinity maturation and isotype switching. AID can also be pathogenic by contributing to autoimmune diseases and oncogenic mutations. Moreover, AID can exert noncanonical functions when aberrantly expressed in epithelial cells. The lack of specific inhibitors prevents therapeutic applications to modulate AID functions. Here, we have exploited our previous finding that the HSP90 molecular chaperoning pathway stabilizes AID in B cells, to test whether HSP90 inhibitors could target AID in vivo. We demonstrate that chronic administration of HSP90 inhibitors decreases AID protein levels and isotype switching in immunized mice. HSP90 inhibitors also reduce disease severity in a mouse model of acute B-cell lymphoblastic leukemia in which AID accelerates disease progression. We further show that human AID protein levels are sensitive to HSP90 inhibition in normal and leukemic B cells, and that HSP90 inhibition prevents AID-dependent epithelial to mesenchymal transition in a human breast cancer cell line in vitro. Thus, we provide proof-of-concept that HSP90 inhibitors indirectly target AID in vivo and that endogenous human AID is widely sensitive to them, which could have therapeutic applications.

  5. HSP90 inhibitors decrease AID levels and activity in mice and in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Montamat-Sicotte, Damien; Liztler, Ludivine C; Abreu, Cecilia; Safavi, Shiva; Zahn, Astrid; Orthwein, Alexandre; Muschen, Markus; Oppezzo, Pablo; Muñoz, Denise P; Di Noia, Javier M

    2015-01-01

    Activation induced deaminase (AID) initiates somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination of the Ig genes in antigen-activated B cells, underpinning antibody affinity maturation and isotype switching. AID can also be pathogenic by contributing to autoimmune diseases and oncogenic mutations. Moreover, AID can exert non-canonical functions when aberrantly expressed in epithelial cells. The lack of specific inhibitors prevents therapeutic applications to modulate AID functions. Here, we have exploited our previous finding that the HSP90 molecular chaperoning pathway stabilizes AID in B cells, to test whether HSP90 inhibitors could target AID in vivo. We demonstrate that chronic administration of HSP90 inhibitors decreases AID protein levels and isotype switching in immunized mice. HSP90 inhibitors also reduce disease severity in a mouse model of acute B-cell lymphoblastic leukemia in which AID accelerates disease progression. We further show that human AID protein levels are sensitive to HSP90 inhibition in normal and leukemic B cells, and that HSP90 inhibition prevents AID-dependent epithelial to mesenchymal transition in a human breast cancer cell line in vitro. Thus, we provide proof-of-concept that HSP90 inhibitors indirectly target AID in vivo and that endogenous human AID is widely sensitive to them, which could have therapeutic applications. PMID:25912253

  6. Persistence of Gut Mucosal Innate Immune Defenses by Enteric α-Defensin Expression in the Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Model of AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Zaragoza, Melinda M.; Sankaran, Sumathi; Canfield, Don R.; Hung, Jason KS; Martinez, Enrique; Ouellette, André J.; Dandekar, Satya

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal mucosa is an early target of HIV and a site of viral replication and severe CD4+ T-cell depletion. However, effects of HIV infection on gut mucosal innate immune defense have not been fully investigated. Intestinal Paneth cell (PC)-derived α-defensins constitute an integral part of the gut mucosal innate defense against microbial pathogens. Using the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infected rhesus macaque model of AIDS, we examined the level of expression of rhesus enteric α-defensins (REDs) in jejunal mucosa of rhesus macaques during all stages of SIV infection, using real-time PCR, in situ hybridization, and immunohistochemistry. An increased expression of RED mRNAs was found in PC at the base of the crypts in jejunum at all stages of SIV infection as compared to uninfected controls. This increase correlated with active viral replication in gut associated lymphoid tissue (GALT). Loss of RED protein accumulation in PC was seen in animals with simian AIDS (SAIDS). This was associated with the loss of secretory granules in PC, suggesting an increase in degranulation during advanced SIV disease. The α-defensin-mediated innate mucosal immunity was maintained in PC throughout the course of SIV infection despite the mucosal CD4+ T-cell depletion. The loss of RED protein accumulation and secretion was associated with an increased incidence of opportunistic enteric infections and disease progression. Our findings suggest that local innate immune defense exerted by PC derived defensins contributes to the protection of gut mucosa from opportunistic infections during the course of SIV infection. PMID:21178012

  7. Mechanism underlying defective interferon gamma-induced IDO expression in non-obese diabetic mouse fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Hosseini-Tabatabaei, Azadeh; Jalili, Reza Baradar; Li, Yunyuan; Kilani, Ruhangiz T; Moeen Rezakhanlou, Alireza; Ghahary, Aziz

    2012-01-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) can locally suppress T cell-mediated immune responses. It has been shown that defective self-tolerance in early prediabetic female non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice can be attributed to the impaired interferon-gamma (IFN-γ)- induced IDO expression in dendritic cells of these animals. As IFN-γ can induce IDO in both dendritic cells and fibroblasts, we asked the question of whether there exists a similar defect in IFN-γ-induced IDO expression in NOD mice dermal fibroblasts. To this end, we examined the effect of IFN-γ on expression of IDO and its enzymatic activity in NOD dermal fibroblasts. The results showed that fibroblasts from either prediabetic (8 wks of age) female or male, and diabetic female or male (12 and 24 wks of age respectively) NOD mice failed to express IDO in response to IFN-γ treatment. To find underlying mechanisms, we scrutinized the IFN- γ signaling pathway and investigated expression of other IFN-γ-modulated factors including major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) and type I collagen (COL-I). The findings revealed a defect of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) phosphorylation in NOD cells relative to that of controls. Furthermore, we found an increase in MHC-I and suppression of COL-I expression in fibroblasts from both NOD and control mice following IFN-γ treatment; indicating that the impaired response to IFN-γ in NOD fibroblasts is specific to IDO gene. Finally, we showed that an IFN-γ-independent IDO expression pathway i.e. lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated-c-Jun kinase is operative in NOD mice fibroblast. In conclusion, the findings of this study for the first time indicate that IFN-γ fails to induce IDO expression in NOD dermal fibroblasts; this may partially be due to defective STAT1 phosphorylation in IFN-γ-induced-IDO signaling pathway.

  8. Interlaboratory evaluation of rat hepatic gene expression changes induced by methapyrilene.

    PubMed Central

    Waring, Jeffrey F; Ulrich, Roger G; Flint, Nick; Morfitt, David; Kalkuhl, Arno; Staedtler, Frank; Lawton, Michael; Beekman, Johanna M; Suter, Laura

    2004-01-01

    Several studies using microarrays have shown that changes in gene expression provide information about the mechanism of toxicity induced by xenobiotic agents. Nevertheless, the issue of whether gene expression profiles are reproducible across different laboratories remains to be determined. To address this question, several members of the Hepatotoxicity Working Group of the International Life Sciences Institute Health and Environmental Sciences Institute evaluated the liver gene expression profiles of rats treated with methapyrilene (MP). Animals were treated at one facility, and RNA was distributed to five different sites for gene expression analysis. A preliminary evaluation of the number of modulated genes uncovered striking differences between the five different sites. However, additional data analysis demonstrated that these differences had an effect on the absolute gene expression results but not on the outcome of the study. For all users, unsupervised algorithms showed that gene expression allows the distinction of the high dose of MP from controls and low dose. In addition, the use of a supervised analysis method (support vector machines) made it possible to correctly classify samples. In conclusion, the results show that, despite some variability, robust gene expression changes were consistent between sites. In addition, key expression changes related to the mechanism of MP-induced hepatotoxicity were identified. These results provide critical information regarding the consistency of microarray results across different laboratories and shed light on the strengths and limitations of expression profiling in drug safety analysis. PMID:15033593

  9. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 clade B and C Tat differentially induce indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase and serotonin in immature dendritic cells: Implications for neuroAIDS.

    PubMed

    Samikkannu, Thangavel; Rao, Kurapati V K; Gandhi, Nimisha; Saxena, Shailendra K; Nair, Madhavan P N

    2010-07-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is commonly associated with immune dysfunctions and the suppression of antigen-presenting cells. This results in immune alterations, which could lead to impaired neuronal functions, such as neuroAIDS. The neurotoxic factor kynurenine (KYN), the rate-limiting enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), serotonin (5-HT), and serotonin transporter (5-HTT) may play a role in tryptophan deficiency and serotogenic dysfunction in neuroAIDS. HIV-1 transactivator regulatory protein (Tat) is known to play a major role in immune dysfunction. Previous studies suggest that HIV-1 B and C clades differentially manifest neuronal dysfunctions in the infected host. In the present study we examine the effect of HIV-1 B and C clade-derived Tat on IDO and 5-HTT gene and protein expressions by dendritic cells as studied by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and Western blot. In addition, the intracellular IDO expression, IDO enzyme activity, and the levels of 5-HT and KYN were also measured. Results indicate that HIV-1 clade B Tat up-regulates IDO and down-regulates 5-HTT gene and protein expressions. Further, HIV-1 clade B Tat caused a reduction of 5-HT with simultaneous increase in KYN levels as compared to HIV-1 clade C Tat. These studies suggest that HIV-1 clade B and C Tat proteins may play a differential role in the neuropathogenesis of HIV-associated dementia (HAD) or HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND). PMID:20602605

  10. Radiation-induced gene expression in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Gregory A.; Jones, Tamako A.; Chesnut, Aaron; Smith, Anna L.

    2002-01-01

    We used the nematode C. elegans to characterize the genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of ionizing radiation in a simple animal model emphasizing the unique effects of charged particle radiation. Here we demonstrate by RT-PCR differential display and whole genome microarray hybridization experiments that gamma rays, accelerated protons and iron ions at the same physical dose lead to unique transcription profiles. 599 of 17871 genes analyzed (3.4%) showed differential expression 3 hrs after exposure to 3 Gy of radiation. 193 were up-regulated, 406 were down-regulated and 90% were affected only by a single species of radiation. A novel statistical clustering technique identified the regulatory relationships between the radiation-modulated genes and showed that genes affected by each radiation species were associated with unique regulatory clusters. This suggests that independent homeostatic mechanisms are activated in response to radiation exposure as a function of track structure or ionization density.

  11. Titanium With Nanotopography Induces Osteoblast Differentiation by Regulating Endogenous Bone Morphogenetic Protein Expression and Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    M S Castro-Raucci, Larissa; S Francischini, Marcelo; N Teixeira, Lucas; P Ferraz, Emanuela; B Lopes, Helena; T de Oliveira, Paulo; Hassan, Mohammad Q; Losa, Adalberto L; Beloti, Marcio M

    2016-07-01

    We aimed at evaluating the effect of titanium (Ti) with nanotopography (Nano) on the endogenous expression of BMP-2 and BMP-4 and the relevance of this process to the nanotopography-induced osteoblast differentiation. MC3T3-E1 cells were grown on Nano and machined (Machined) Ti surfaces and the endogenous BMP-2/4 expression and the effect of BMP receptor BMPR1A silencing in both osteoblast differentiation and expression of genes related to TGF-β/BMP signaling were evaluated. Nano supported higher BMP-2 gene and protein expression and upregulated the osteoblast differentiation compared with Machined Ti surface. The BMPR1A silencing inhibited the osteogenic potential induced by Nano Ti surface as indicated by reduced alkaline phosphatase (ALP), osteocalcin and RUNX2 gene expression, RUNX2 protein expression and ALP activity. In addition, the expression of genes related to TGF-β/BMP signaling was deeply affected by BMPR1A-silenced cells grown on Nano Ti surface. In conclusion, we have demonstrated for the first time that nanotopography induces osteoblast differentiation, at least in part, by upregulating the endogenous production of BMP-2 and modulating BMP signaling pathway. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1718-1726, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26681207

  12. Hypoxia-induced Bcl-2 expression in endothelial cells via p38 MAPK pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Cui-Li; Song, Fei; Zhang, Jing; Song, Q.H.

    2010-04-16

    Angiogenesis and apoptosis are reciprocal processes in endothelial cells. Bcl-2, an anti-apoptotic protein, has been found to have angiogenic activities. The purpose of this study was to determine the role of Bcl-2 in hypoxia-induced angiogenesis in endothelial cells and to investigate the underlying mechanisms. Human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) were exposed to hypoxia followed by reoxygenation. Myocardial ischemia and reperfusion mouse model was used and Bcl-2 expression was assessed. Bcl-2 expression increased in a time-dependent manner in response to hypoxia from 2 to 72 h. Peak expression occurred at 12 h (3- to 4-fold, p < 0.05). p38 inhibitor (SB203580) blocked hypoxia-induced Bcl-2 expression, whereas PKC, ERK1/2 and PI3K inhibitors did not. Knockdown of Bcl-2 resulted in decreased HAECs' proliferation and migration. Over-expression of Bcl-2 increased HAECs' tubule formation, whereas knockdown of Bcl-2 inhibited this process. In this model of myocardial ischemia and reperfusion, Bcl-2 expression was increased and was associated with increased p38 MAPK activation. Our results showed that hypoxia induces Bcl-2 expression in HAECs via p38 MAPK pathway.

  13. ERα Mediates Estrogen-Induced Expression of the Breast Cancer Metastasis Suppressor Gene BRMS1

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Hongtao; Gollahon, Lauren S.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, estrogen has been reported as putatively inhibiting cancer cell invasion and motility. This information is in direct contrast to the paradigm of estrogen as a tumor promoter. However, data suggests that the effects of estrogen are modulated by the receptor isoform with which it interacts. In order to gain a clearer understanding of the role of estrogen in potentially suppressing breast cancer metastasis, we investigated the regulation of estrogen and its receptor on the downstream target gene, breast cancer metastasis suppressor 1 (BRMS1) in MCF-7, SKBR3, TTU-1 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Our results showed that estrogen increased the transcription and expression of BRMS1 in the ERα positive breast cancer cell line, MCF-7. Additionally, the ERα specific agonist PPT also induced the transcription and expression of BRMS1. However, the two remaining estrogen receptor (ER) subtype agonists had no effect on BRMS1 expression. In order to further examine the influence of ERα on BRMS1 expression, ERα expression was knocked down using siRNA (siERα). Western blot analysis showed that siERα reduced estrogen-induced and PPT-induced BRMS1 expression. In summary, this study demonstrates estrogen, via its α receptor, positively regulates the expression of BRMS1, providing new insight into a potential inhibitory effect of estrogen on metastasis suppression. PMID:26821020

  14. Effect of enhanced expression of connexin 43 on sunitinib-induced cytotoxicity in mesothelioma cells.

    PubMed

    Uzu, Miaki; Sato, Hiromi; Yamada, Ryota; Kashiba, Tatsuro; Shibata, Yukihiro; Yamaura, Katsunori; Ueno, Koichi

    2015-05-01

    Connexin (Cx) makes up a type of intercellular channel called gap junction (GJ). GJ plays a regulatory role in cellular physiology. The Cx expression level is often decreased in cancer cells compared to that in healthy ones, and the restoration of its expression has been shown to exert antiproliferative effects. This work aims to evaluate the effect of the restoration of connexin 43 (Cx43) (the most ubiquitous Cx subtype) expression on sunitinib (SU)-induced cytotoxicity in malignant mesothelioma (MM) cells. Increased Cx43 expression in an MM cell line (H28) improved the ability of SU to inhibit receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling. Moreover, higher Cx43 expression promoted SU-induced apoptosis. The cell viability test revealed that Cx43 enhanced the cytotoxic effect of SU in a GJ-independent manner. The effect of Cx43 on a proapoptotic factor, Bax, was then investigated. The interaction between Cx43 and Bax was confirmed by immunoprecipitation. Furthermore, higher Cx43 expression increased the production of a cleaved (active) form of Bax during SU-induced apoptosis with no alteration in total Bax expression. These findings indicate that Cx43 most likely increases sensitivity to SU in H28 through direct interaction with Bax. In conclusion, we found that Cx43 overcame the chemoresistance of MM cells.

  15. SPARC expression induces cell cycle arrest via STAT3 signaling pathway in medulloblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chetty, Chandramu; Dontula, Ranadheer; Gujrati, Meena; Lakka, Sajani S.

    2012-01-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ectopic expression of SPARC impaired cell proliferation in medulloblastoma cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SPARC expression induces STAT3 mediated cell cycle arrest in medulloblastoma cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SPARC expression significantly inhibited pre-established tumor growth in nude-mice. -- Abstract: Dynamic cell interaction with ECM components has profound influence in cancer progression. SPARC is a component of the ECM, impairs the proliferation of different cell types and modulates tumor cell aggressive features. We previously reported that SPARC expression significantly impairs medulloblastoma tumor growth in vivo. In this study, we demonstrate that expression of SPARC inhibits medulloblastoma cell proliferation. MTT assay indicated a dose-dependent reduction in tumor cell proliferation in adenoviral mediated expression of SPARC full length cDNA (Ad-DsRed-SP) in D425 and UW228 cells. Flow cytometric analysis showed that Ad-DsRed-SP-infected cells accumulate in the G2/M phase of cell cycle. Further, immunoblot and immunoprecipitation analyses revealed that SPARC induced G2/M cell cycle arrest was mediated through inhibition of the Cyclin-B-regulated signaling pathway involving p21 and Cdc2 expression. Additionally, expression of SPARC decreased STAT3 phosphorylation at Tyr-705; constitutively active STAT3 expression reversed SPARC induced G2/M arrest. Ad-DsRed-SP significantly inhibited the pre-established orthotopic tumor growth and tumor volume in nude-mice. Immunohistochemical analysis of tumor sections from mice treated with Ad-DsRed-SP showed decreased immunoreactivity for pSTAT3 and increased immunoreactivity for p21 compared to tumor section from mice treated with mock and Ad-DsRed. Taken together our studies further reveal that STAT3 plays a key role in SPARC induced G2/M arrest in medulloblastoma cells. These new findings provide a molecular basis for the mechanistic understanding of the

  16. High-Density Lipoprotein Prevents Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Induced Downregulation of Liver LOX-1 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Dan; Li, Ling-Fang; Gao, Hai-Chao; Wang, Xiang; Li, Chuan-Chang; Luo, Ying; Bai, Yong-Ping; Zhang, Guo-Gang

    2015-01-01

    Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) is a specific cell-surface receptor for oxidized-low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL). The impact of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) on endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-mediated alteration of the LOX-1 level in hepatocytes remains unclear. We aimed to investigate the impact on LOX-1 expression by tunicamycin (TM)-induced ER stress and to determine the effect of HDL on TM-affected LOX-1 expression in hepatic L02 cells. Overexpression or silencing of related cellular genes was conducted in TM-treated cells. mRNA expression was evaluated using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Protein expression was analyzed by western blot and immunocytochemistry. Lipid uptake was examined by DiI-ox-LDL, followed by flow cytometric analysis. The results showed that TM induced the upregulation of ER chaperone GRP78, downregulation of LOX-1 expression, and lipid uptake. Knock down of IRE1 or XBP-1 effectively restored LOX-1 expression and improved lipid uptake in TM-treated cells. HDL treatment prevented the negative impact on LOX-1 expression and lipid uptake induced by TM. Additionally, 1–10 μg/mL HDL significantly reduced the GRP78, IRE1, and XBP-1 expression levels in TM-treated cells. Our findings reveal that HDL could prevent the TM-induced reduction of LOX-1 expression via inhibiting the IRE1/XBP-1 pathway, suggesting a new mechanism for beneficial roles of HDL in improving lipid metabolism. PMID:25923692

  17. High-Density Lipoprotein Prevents Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Induced Downregulation of Liver LOX-1 Expression.

    PubMed

    Hong, Dan; Li, Ling-Fang; Gao, Hai-Chao; Wang, Xiang; Li, Chuan-Chang; Luo, Ying; Bai, Yong-Ping; Zhang, Guo-Gang

    2015-01-01

    Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) is a specific cell-surface receptor for oxidized-low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL). The impact of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) on endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-mediated alteration of the LOX-1 level in hepatocytes remains unclear. We aimed to investigate the impact on LOX-1 expression by tunicamycin (TM)-induced ER stress and to determine the effect of HDL on TM-affected LOX-1 expression in hepatic L02 cells. Overexpression or silencing of related cellular genes was conducted in TM-treated cells. mRNA expression was evaluated using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Protein expression was analyzed by western blot and immunocytochemistry. Lipid uptake was examined by DiI-ox-LDL, followed by flow cytometric analysis. The results showed that TM induced the upregulation of ER chaperone GRP78, downregulation of LOX-1 expression, and lipid uptake. Knock down of IRE1 or XBP-1 effectively restored LOX-1 expression and improved lipid uptake in TM-treated cells. HDL treatment prevented the negative impact on LOX-1 expression and lipid uptake induced by TM. Additionally, 1-10 μg/mL HDL significantly reduced the GRP78, IRE1, and XBP-1 expression levels in TM-treated cells. Our findings reveal that HDL could prevent the TM-induced reduction of LOX-1 expression via inhibiting the IRE1/XBP-1 pathway, suggesting a new mechanism for beneficial roles of HDL in improving lipid metabolism. PMID:25923692

  18. AMPA-receptors are involved in the expression of amphetamine-induced behavioural sensitisation, but not in the expression of amphetamine-induced conditioned activity in mice.

    PubMed

    Mead, A N; Stephens, D N

    1998-09-01

    We investigated the role of the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionate (AMPA) receptor antagonist 2,3-dihydroxy-6-nitro-7-sulfamoyl-benzo[f]quinoxaline (NBQX) in the expression of amphetamine-induced behavioural sensitisation and amphetamine-induced conditioned activity in mice. Repeated weekly administration of amphetamine (0.375 mg/kg) for 7 weeks led to an increased locomotor response when challenged with amphetamine 1 week later. NBQX attenuated this increased response at doses (3 and 30 mg/kg) which had no effect on the acute locomotor response to amphetamine. In a separate experiment, mice given amphetamine (1 mg/kg) in a distinctive environment, showed an increased locomotor response within this environment following a subsequent saline administration. NBQX (5-20 mg/kg) had no effect on the expression of this conditioned response. These results suggest that AMPA receptors are involved in the expression of amphetamine-induced behavioural sensitisation in mice, and that this involvement is limited to either the neurobiological effects of amphetamine or the effects of amphetamine on conditioned associations, rather than drug environment conditioned associations.

  19. c-myc can induce expression of G0/G1 transition genes.

    PubMed Central

    Schweinfest, C W; Fujiwara, S; Lau, L F; Papas, T S

    1988-01-01

    The human c-myc oncogene was linked to the heat shock-inducible Drosophila hsp70 promoter and used to stably transfect mouse BALB/c 3T3 cells. Heat shock of the transfectants at 42 degrees C followed by recovery at 37 degrees C resulted in the appearance of the human c-myc protein which was appropriately localized to the nuclear fraction. Two-dimensional analysis of the proteins of density-arrested cells which had been heat shock treated revealed the induction of eight protein species and the repression of five protein species. All of the induced and repressed proteins were nonabundant. cDNA clones corresponding to genes induced during the G0/G1 transition were used as probes to assay for c-myc inducibility of these genes. Two anonymous sequences previously identified as serum inducible (3CH77 and 3CH92) were induced when c-myc was expressed. In response to serum stimulation, 3CH77 and 3CH92 were expressed before c-myc mRNA levels increased. However, in response to specific induction of c-myc by heat shock of serum arrested cells, 3CH77 and 3CH92 mRNA levels increased after the rise in c-myc mRNA. Therefore, we hypothesize that abnormal expression of c-myc can induce genes involved in the proliferative response. Images PMID:3211137

  20. A polymethoxyflavone mixture, extracted from orange peels, suppresses the UVB-induced expression of MMP-1.

    PubMed

    Yoshizaki, Norihiro; Fujii, Takahiro; Hashizume, Ron; Masaki, Hitoshi

    2016-08-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) B is the main cause of skin photoageing, which has characteristic features such as deep wrinkles. UVB increases the expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in the skin and can cause wrinkles by disrupting components of the extracellular matrix, such as collagen fibres. We now report that a polymethoxyflavone (PMF) mixture, extracted from orange peels, suppresses the UVB-induced expression of MMP-1 that involves the inhibition of c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activity. Furthermore, the PMF mixture also inhibits the UVB-induced phosphorylation of JNK. Therefore, the results suggest that the PMF mixture suppresses the UVB-induced expression of MMP-1 through the inhibition of JNK phosphorylation and should be useful as an antiphotoageing agent. PMID:27539903

  1. Ecdysone-inducible gene expression in mammalian cells and transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    No, D; Yao, T P; Evans, R M

    1996-01-01

    During metamorphosis of Drosophila melanogaster, a cascade of morphological changes is triggered by the steroid hormone 20-OH ecdysone via the ecdysone receptor, a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily. In this report, we have transferred insect hormone responsiveness to mammalian cells by the stable expression of a modified ecdysone receptor that regulates an optimized ecdysone responsive promoter. Inductions reaching 4 orders of magnitude have been achieved upon treatment with hormone. Transgenic mice expressing the modified ecdysone receptor can activate an integrated ecdysone responsive promoter upon administration of hormone. A comparison of tetracycline-based and ecdysone-based inducible systems reveals the ecdysone regulatory system exhibits lower basal activity and higher inducibility. Since ecdysone administration has no apparent effect on mammals, its use for regulating genes should be excellent for transient inducible expression of any gene in transgenic mice and for gene therapy. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8622939

  2. Arsenite induces aquaglyceroporin 9 expression in murine livers.

    PubMed

    Torres-Avila, Manuel; Leal-Galicia, Perla; Sánchez-Peña, Luz C; Del Razo, Luz M; Gonsebatt, Maria E

    2010-07-01

    Mice exposed to sodium arsenite show a dose-related accumulation of inorganic arsenic (iAs) and its methylated metabolites in the liver. While the accumulation of iAs forms increased linearly with dose in liver cells, a different pattern was observed in other tissues such as the brain and lung, as well as in the peripheral nerves of the rat. As such, trivalent iAs enters the cells, using aquaglyceroporin transporters to modulate cell arsenic accumulation and cytotoxicity. We investigated here if the dose-related accumulation of arsenic in the liver was related to the expression of aquaglyceroporin 9 (AQP9) in the same organ. CD1 male mice were treated with different concentrations (0, 2.5, 5 or 10mg/kg/day) of sodium arsenite during 1, 3 or 9 days. A significant dose-related, up-regulation of AQP9 mRNA and protein was observed and which was verified by immunohistochemistry in liver sections using specific antibodies. The increased transcription of AQP9 has been observed in fasting and diabetic rats, suggesting that this channel could play a role in the diabetogenic effect of arsenic.

  3. HMGA1-pseudogene expression is induced in human pituitary tumors

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Francesco; De Martino, Marco; D'Angelo, Daniela; Mussnich, Paula; Raverot, Gerald; Jaffrain-Rea, Marie-Lise; Fraggetta, Filippo; Trouillas, Jacqueline; Fusco, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies have established that High Mobility Group A (HMGA) proteins play a pivotal role on the onset of human pituitary tumors. They are overexpressed in pituitary tumors, and, consistently, transgenic mice overexpressing either the Hmga1 or the Hmga2 gene develop pituitary tumors. In contrast with HMGA2, HMGA1 overexpression is not related to any rearrangement or amplification of the HMGA1 locus in these tumors. We have recently identified 2 HMGA1 pseudogenes, HMGA1P6 and HMGA1P7, acting as competitive endogenous RNA decoys for HMGA1 and other cancer related genes. Here, we show that HMGA1 pseudogene expression significantly correlates with HMGA1 mRNA levels in growth hormone and nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas likely inhibiting the repression of HMGA1 through microRNAs action. According to our functional studies, these HMGA1 pseudogenes enhance the proliferation and migration of the mouse pituitary tumor cell line, at least in part, through their upregulation. Our results point out that the overexpression of HMGA1P6 and HMGA1P7 could contribute to increase HMGA1 levels in human pituitary tumors, and then to pituitary tumorigenesis. PMID:25894544

  4. Glucocorticoids are required for meal-induced changes in the expression of hypothalamic neuropeptides.

    PubMed

    Uchoa, Ernane Torres; Silva, Lilian Eslaine C M; de Castro, Margaret; Antunes-Rodrigues, Jose; Elias, Lucila L K

    2012-06-01

    Glucocorticoid deficiency is associated with a decrease of food intake. Orexigenic peptides, neuropeptide Y (NPY) and agouti related protein (AgRP), and the anorexigenic peptide proopiomelanocortin (POMC), expressed in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus (ARC), are regulated by meal-induced signals. Orexigenic neuropeptides, melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) and orexin, expressed in the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA), also control food intake. Thus, the present study was designed to test the hypothesis that glucocorticoids are required for changes in the expression of hypothalamic neuropeptides induced by feeding. Male Wistar rats (230-280 g) were subjected to ADX or sham surgery. ADX animals received 0.9% NaCl in the drinking water, and half of them received corticosterone in the drinking water (B: 25 mg/L, ADX+B). Six days after surgery, animals were fasted for 16 h and they were decapitated before or 2 h after refeeding for brain tissue and blood collections. Adrenalectomy decreased NPY/AgRP and POMC expression in the ARC in fasted and refed animals, respectively. Refeeding decreased NPY/AgRP and increased POMC mRNA expression in the ARC of sham and ADX+B groups, with no effects in ADX animals. The expression of MCH and orexin mRNA expression in the LHA was increased in ADX and ADX+B groups in fasted condition, however there was no effect of refeeding on the expression of MCH and orexin in the LHA in the three experimental groups. Refeeding increased plasma leptin and insulin levels in sham and ADX+B animals, with no changes in leptin concentrations in ADX group, and insulin response to feeding was lower in this group. Taken together, these data demonstrated that circulating glucocorticoids are required for meal-induced changes in NPY, AgRP and POMC mRNA expression in the ARC. The lower leptin and insulin responses to feeding may contribute to the altered hypothalamic neuropeptide expression after adrenalectomy.

  5. Biotic and abiotic stress can induce cystatin expression in chestnut.

    PubMed

    Pernas, M; Sánchez-Monge, R; Salcedo, G

    2000-02-11

    A cysteine proteinase inhibitor (cystatin) from chestnut (Castanea sativa) seeds, designated CsC, has been previously characterized. Its antifungal, acaricide and inhibitory activities have allowed to involve CsC in defence mechanisms. The CsC transcription levels decreased during seed maturation and increased throughout germination, an opposite behavior to that shown by most phytocystatins. No inhibition of endogenous proteinase activity by purified CsC was found during the seed maturation or germination processes. CsC message accumulation was induced in chestnut leaves after fungal infection, as well as by wounding and jasmonic acid treatment. Induction in roots was also observed by the last two treatments. Furthermore, CsC transcript levels strongly raised, both in roots and leaves, when chestnut plantlets were subjected to cold- and saline-shocks, and also in roots by heat stress. All together, these data suggest that chestnut cystatin is not only involved in defence responses to pests and pathogen invasion, but also in those related to abiotic stress.

  6. Alarm pheromone induces immediate-early gene expression and slow behavioral response in honey bees.

    PubMed

    Alaux, Cédric; Robinson, Gene E

    2007-07-01

    Primer and releaser pheromones are molecules used for communication that induce species-specific responses. In contrast to primer pheromones, it is not known whether the quicker-acting releaser pheromones can affect brain gene expression. We show here that isopentyl acetate (IPA), a releaser pheromone that communicates alarm in honey bees, not only provokes a quick defensive response but also influences behavior for a longer period of time and affects brain gene expression. Exposure to IPA affected behavioral responsiveness to subsequent exposures to IPA and induced the expression of the immediate early gene and transcription factor c-Jun in the antennal lobes. Our findings blur the long-standing distinction between primer and releaser pheromone and highlight the pervasiveness of environmental regulation of brain gene expression. PMID:17505874

  7. Development of an inducible gene expression system for primary murine keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Nagarajan, Priyadharsini

    2008-01-01

    Background The tetracycline (Tet) responsive system is a valuable tool that is routinely used in a wide variety of mammalian cells for regulatable expression of gene products. However, technical difficulties such as harsh selection conditions and extensive screening processes to identify suitably responsive clones limit the generation of stable cell lines. Hence, application of this system in mammalian cells with relatively slow growth rates and / or the capacity to undergo terminal differentiation such as primary mouse keratinocytes is particularly challenging. Objective To our knowledge, no Tet-responsive stable cell lines have been generated from mouse keratinocytes, presumably due to their sensitivity to selection conditions. Our goal was to utilize a modified and robust Tet-expression system to generate a stable primary mouse keratinocyte cell line. These cells could be then utilized for conditional expression of potentially toxic proteins in an inducible fashion. Methods We utilized a eukaryotic promoter instead of a viral promoter to express a modified reverse tetracycline transactivator in mouse keratinocytes and optimized the selection process for generating stable cell lines. Results Here, we report the generation of a stable mouse keratinocyte cell line for Tet-regulated gene expression with minimal leakiness and high degree of Tet responsivity. This mouse keratinocyte cell line was further engineered for generation of a double stable cell line, which expresses the transcription factor AP-2α in an inducible manner. Importantly, the selected cells retain their inherent keratinocyte morphology, respond to differentiation signals and exhibit a persistent and highly tunable Tet inducibility upon continuous culturing. Conclusion We have generated a tetracycline inducible gene expression model system in mouse epidermal keratinocytes. Such inducible cell lines will serve as valuable in vitro models for future gain-of-function and loss-of-function studies. PMID

  8. Interleukin-induced increase in Ia expression by normal mouse B cells

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    The constitutive culture supernatant (SN) of the macrophage tumor line P388D1 (P388 SN) and the concanavalin A (Con A)-induced culture supernatant of the T cell hybridoma FS6-14.13 (FS6 Con A SN) were shown to contain nonspecific factors capable of inducing increased Ia expression by normal resting B cells in a dose-dependent manner. In six consecutive experiments the relative increase in Ia expression induced by P388 SN was 4.9 +/- 0.9, with FS6 Con A SN 10.7 +/- 1.5, and with a combination of both preparations 13.0 +/- 1.7. This increase in Ia expression was observed to occur in virtually all the B cells, reaching maximum levels within 24 h of culture. The interleukin-induced increase in B cell Ia expression occurred in the absence of ancillary signals provided by ligand-receptor Ig cross-linking and despite the fact that virtually all the control B cells, cultured in the absence of factors, remained in G0. These results suggest that functional receptors for at least some interleukins are expressed on normal resting B cells and their effects can be manifest in the absence of additional activating signals. The increased Ia expression induced by the nonspecific factor preparations was shown to be correlated with enhanced antigen- presenting capacity by the B cells to T cell hybridomas. The nature of the interleukins responsible for these effects remains to be definitively determined, however, the activity of FS6 Con A SN was shown to correlate with B cell growth factor activity and increased B cell Ia expression was not observed using interleukin 2 (IL-2) or interferon-gamma, prepared by recombinant DNA technology. PMID:6432933

  9. CT-2576, an inhibitor of phospholipid signaling, suppresses constitutive and induced expression of human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Leung, D W; Peterson, P K; Weeks, R; Gekker, G; Chao, C C; Kaplan, A H; Balantac, N; Tompkins, C; Underiner, G E; Bursten, S

    1995-01-01

    Viruses such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) require cellular activation for expression. Cellular activation in lymphoid cells is associated with augmented accumulation of certain phosphatidic acid (PA) species derived from the hydrolysis of glycan phosphatidylinositol (GPI). This suggests that activation of a phospholipid pathway may play a role in initiation of viral replication. To test this hypothesis, we examined the effect of tat gene expression on the production of cellular PA species, as the Tat protein is essential for HIV expression and has been implicated in activating the expression of multiple host cellular genes. Expression of tat increased the expression of PA. We then tested whether synthetic inhibitors of PA metabolism would inhibit activation of the HIV long terminal repeat by Tat and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha). CT-2576 suppressed both PA generation induced by Tat and HIV long terminal repeat-directed gene expression in response to Tat or TNF-alpha at a posttranscriptional step. CT-2576 also inhibited constitutive as well as TNF-alpha- and interleukin 6-induced expression of HIV p24 antigen in chronically infected U1 cells and in peripheral blood lymphocytes acutely infected with a clinical isolate of HIV. Pharmacological inhibition of synthesis of selected PA species may therefore provide a therapeutic approach to suppression of HIV replication. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 5 PMID:7761405

  10. FGF8 regulates myogenesis and induces Runx2 expression and osteoblast differentiation in cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Omoteyama, Kazuki; Takagi, Minoru

    2009-03-01

    In the current study, treatment of the rat osteogenic cell line ROB-C26 cells with fibroblast growth factor 8 (FGF8) stimulated alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, and also induced the expression of the Runx2 transcription factor, and increased the activity of a luciferase reporter gene containing the osteocalcin (OCN) promoter and six copies of the osteoblast specific cis-acting element 2 (OSE2) response element. In contrast, FGF8 treatment of the mouse myoblast cell line C2C12 inhibited the expression of desmin and the synthesis of myotubes. The expression of MyoD, Myogenin, Foxc2, and Hand1 was also decreased by FGF8. Transient expression of Foxc2 in C2C12 cells induced the expression of Hand1, and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis indicated that Foxc2 binds to the promoter region of the Hand1 gene. These results indicated that Foxc2 is directly involved in the regulation of Hand1 expression. The results of the current study indicate that FGF8 regulates myoblast differentiation through the regulation of MyoD expression, and that this regulation is independent of Hand1 in cultured cells. Conversely, FGF8 supports bone development and cell differentiation though the induction of Runx2 expression.

  11. Hypoxia induces TFE3 expression in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhi-Jun; Yu, Guang-Tao; Huang, Cong-Fa; Bu, Lin-Lin; Liu, Jian-Feng; Ma, Si-Rui; Zhang, Wen-Feng; Liu, Bing; Zhang, Lu

    2016-01-01

    To assess the role of transcription factor μE3 (TFE3) in the tumorigenesis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), human HNSCC tissue arrays were investigated for TFE3 expression. Human HNSCC tissues with neoadjuvant inductive chemotherapey (docetaxel, cisplatin and fluorouracil, TPF) and mice HNSCC tissues from transgenic mice model were evaluated for TFE3 expression and the hypoxia pathway. The roles of EGF/EGFR mediated hypoxia in TFE3 nuclear expression were analyzed in vitro and in vivo. TFE3 expression was higher in human HNSCC tissues compared with that in normal oral mucosa. Moreover, high TFE3 expression was related to HIF-1α, PAI-1, and EGFR, which demonstrated the activation of the hypoxia pathway in HNSCC tissues. Furthermore, elevated TFE3 expression was observed in HNSCC after cisplatin-based chemotherapy, and high TFE3 expression may indicate poor response to TPF inductive chemotherapy. Furthermore, similar changes with increased TFE3 were observed in HNSCC of the transgenic mouse HNSCC model. Hypoxic culture in the human HNSCC cell line increased TFE3 expression, which promoted cell survival under hypoxia. EGFR inhibiton by cetuximab could attenuate hypoxia-induced TFE3 in the HNSCC cell line and transgenic mouse HNSCC model. These findings indicated that TFE3 was an important hypoxia-induced transcriptional factor in HNSCC. TFE3 could be regarded as a durgable therapeutic oncotarget by EGFR inhibition. PMID:26872381

  12. ox-LDL induces endothelial dysfunction by promoting Arp2/3 complex expression.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yao; Zhao, Jianting; Shen, Liming; Jin, Yiqi; Zhang, Zhixuan; Xu, Guoxiong; Huang, Xianchen

    2016-06-24

    Oxidized low-density lipoproteins (ox-LDL) play a critical role in endothelial injury including cytoskeleton reorganization, which is closely related to actin-related protein 2/3 (Arp2/3) complex. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of Arp2/3 complex in ox-LDL-induced endothelial dysfunction. In this study, we found that Arp2 and Arp3 expression was increased under atherosclerotic conditions both in ApoE-/- mice and in ox-LDL-stimulated human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs). Arp2/3 complex inhibitor CK666 significantly reduced ox-LDL-induced ROS generation and cytoskeleton reorganization, and increased NO release in HCAECs. Pretreatment with LOX-1- but not CD36-blocking antibody markedly decreased ox-LDL-induced Arp2 and Arp3 expression. Moreover, Rac-1 siRNA remarkably suppressed ox-LDL-stimulated Arp2 and Arp3 expression. Additionally, CK666 reduced endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression and atherosclerotic lesions in ApoE-/- mice. Collectively, ox-LDL induces endothelial dysfunction by activating LOX-1/Rac-1 signaling and upregulating Arp2/3 complex expression. PMID:27181356

  13. A small-molecule inducer of PDX1 expression identified by high-throughput screening

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yuan; Hartland, Kate; Boskovic, Zarko; Wang, Yikai; Walpita, Deepika; Lysy, Philippe A.; Zhong, Cheng; Young, Damian W.; Kim, Young-kwon; Tolliday, Nicola J; Sokal, Etienne M.; Schreiber, Stuart L.; Wagner, Bridget K.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Pancreatic and duodenal homeobox 1 (PDX1), a member of the homedomain-containing transcription factor family, is a key transcription factor important for both pancreas development and mature beta-cell function. The ectopic overexpression of Pdx1, Neurog3, and MafA in mice reprograms acinar cells to insulin-producing cells. We developed a qPCR-based gene-expression assay to screen >60,000 compounds for expression of each of these genes in the human PANC-1 ductal carcinoma cell line. We identified BRD7552, which up-regulated PDX expression in both primary human islets and ductal cells, and induced epigenetic changes in the PDX1 promoter consistent with transcriptional activation. Prolonged compound treatment induced insulin mRNA and protein, and enhanced insulin expression induced by the three-gene combination. These results provide a proof of principle for identifying small molecules that induce expression of transcription factors to control cellular reprogramming. PMID:24290880

  14. Opioid-induced chemokine expression requires NF-κB activity: the role of PKCζ.

    PubMed

    Happel, Christine; Kutzler, Michele; Rogers, Thomas J

    2011-02-01

    Opioid receptor agonists induce broad immunomodulatory activity, which substantially alters host defense and the inflammatory response. Previous studies have shown that the MOR selective agonist DAMGO has the capacity to increase the expression of the proinflammatory chemokines CCL2, CCL5, and CXCL10 in human PBMCs. NF-κB is a transcription factor that plays a pivotal role in innate and adaptive immune responses. We report that NF-κB is a vital player in the DAMGO-induced, MOR-mediated regulation of chemokine expression. Results show that NF-κB inhibitors prevent the induction of CCL2 expression in response to DAMGO administration and that the NF-κB subunit, p65, is phosphorylated at serine residues 311 and 536 in response to MOR activation. Furthermore, we demonstrate that PKCζ is phosphorylated following DAMGO-induced MOR activation, and this kinase is essential for NF-κB activation as well as CCL2 expression and transcriptional activity. Finally, ChIP analysis shows that DAMGO administration induces binding of p65 to the enhancer region of the CCL2 promoter. These data are consistent with the notion that MOR activation promotes a proinflammatory response, which involves NF-κB activation. Our results also suggest a significant and novel role for PKCζ as an essential participant in the MOR-mediated regulation of proinflammatory chemokine expression.

  15. Inducible expression of photoacoustic reporter gene tyrosinase in cells using a single plasmid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paproski, Robert J.; Zemp, Roger J.

    2012-02-01

    We have previously demonstrated that tyrosinase is a reporter gene for photoacoustic imaging since tyrosinase is the rate-limiting step in the synthesis of melanin, a pigment capable of producing strong photoacoustic signals. We previously created a cell line capable of inducible tyrosinase expression (important due to toxicity of melanin) by stably transfecting tyrosinase in MCF-7 Tet-OnR cell line (Clontech) which expresses a doxycycline-controlled transactivator. Unfortunately, Clontech provides few Tet-On Advanced cell lines making it difficult to have inducible tyrosinase expression in cell lines not provided by Clontech. In order to simplify the creation of cell lines with inducible expression of tyrosinase, we created a single plasmid that encodes both the transactivator as well as tyrosinase. PCR was used to amplify both the transactivator and tyrosinase from the Tet-OnR Advanced and pTRE-Tight-TYR plasmids, respectively. Both PCR products were cloned into the pEGFP-N1 plasmid and the newly created plasmid was transfected into ZR-75-1, MCF-7, and MIA PaCa-1 cells using lipofectamine. After several days, brown melanin was only observed in cells incubated with doxycycline, suggesting that the newly created single plasmid allowed inducible tyrosinase expression in many different cells lines.

  16. Rat coronaviruses infect rat alveolar type I epithelial cells and induce expression of CXC chemokines

    PubMed Central

    Miura, Tanya A.; Wang, Jieru; Holmes, Kathryn V.; Mason, Robert J.

    2007-01-01

    We analyzed the ability of two rat coronavirus (RCoV) strains, sialodacryoadenitis virus (SDAV) and Parker’s RCoV (RCoV-P), to infect rat alveolar type I cells and induce chemokine expression. Primary rat alveolar type II cells were transdifferentiated into the type I cell phenotype. Type I cells were productively infected with SDAV and RCoV-P, and both live virus and UV-inactivated virus induced mRNA and protein expression of three CXC chemokines: CINC-2, CINC-3, and LIX, which are neutrophil chemoattractants. Dual immunolabeling of type I cells for viral antigen and CXC chemokines showed that chemokines were expressed primarily by uninfected cells. Virus-induced chemokine expression was reduced by the IL-1 receptor antagonist, suggesting that IL-1 produced by infected cells induces uninfected cells to express chemokines. Primary cultures of alveolar epithelial cells are an important model for the early events in viral infection that lead to pulmonary inflammation. PMID:17804032

  17. Expression of novel genes linked to the androgen-induced, proliferative shutoff in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Geck, P; Szelei, J; Jimenez, J; Lin, T M; Sonnenschein, C; Soto, A M

    1997-01-01

    Androgens control cell numbers in the prostate through three separate pathways: (a) inhibition of cell death, (b) induction of cell proliferation (Step-1) and (c) inhibition of cell proliferation (Step-2, proliferative shutoff). The mechanisms underlying these phenomena are incompletely understood. The human prostate carcinoma LNCaP variants express these pathways as follows: LNCaP-FGC express both steps, LNCaP-LNO expresses Step-2, LNCaP-TAC expresses Step-1, and LNCaP-TJA cells express neither step. These cells facilitated the search for mediators of the androgen-induced proliferative shutoff pathway. Androgen exposure for 24 h or longer induced an irreversible proliferative shutoff in LNCaP-FGC cells. The Wang and Brown approach for identifying differentially expressed mRNAs was used to search for mediators of Step-2. Ten unique inserts were identified and from those ten, three genes were further studied. The basal expression of these genes in shutoff-negative variants was not affected by androgen exposure. They were induced by androgens in shutoff-positive LNCaP variants and the androgen receptor-transfected, shutoff-positive, MCF7-AR1 cells. These genes were induced only in the range of androgen concentrations that elicited the shutoff response. Time course analysis showed that their induction precedes the commitment point by 12-18 h. In addition, they were expressed in the normal prostate during proliferative shutoff. These features suggest that the candidate genes have a role in the regulation cascade for proliferative shutoff.

  18. Particle irradiation induces FGF2 expression in normal human lens cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, P. Y.; Bjornstad K, A.; Chang, E.; McNamara, M.; Barcellos-Hoff, M. H.; Lin, S. P.; Aragon, G.; Polansky, J. R.; Lui, G. M.; Blakely, E. A.

    2000-01-01

    Particle Irradiation Induces FGF2 Expression in Normal Human Lens Cells. Particle radiations, including both proton and helium-ion beams, have been used to successfully treat choroidal melanoma, but with the complication of radiation-induced cataract. We have investigated a role for radiation-induced changes in the expression of basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF2) gene expression as part of the mechanism(s) underlying lens cell injury associated with cataract. Normal human lens epithelial (HLE) cells were cultured in vitro on extracellular matrix (ECM) originated from bovine corneal endothelial cells. This study reports evidence for rapid but transient induction of FGF2 transcripts, an increase of between 5- and 8-fold, within 0.5 h after exposure to particle radiation, followed by another wave of increased transcription at 2-3 h postirradiation. Immunofluorescence results confirm the enhanced levels of FGF2 protein rapidly after exposure to protons or helium ions, followed by another wave of increased activity unique to helium at 6 h postirradiation. This second wave of increased immunoreactivity was not observed in the proton-irradiated samples. Total FGF2 protein analysis after helium-ion exposures shows induced expression of three FGF2 isoforms, with an increase of up to 2-fold in the 18-kDa low-molecular-weight species. Studies of the effects of protons on individual FGF2 protein isoforms are in progress. Several mechanisms involving a role for FGF2 in radiation-induced cataract are discussed.

  19. Dux4 induces cell cycle arrest at G1 phase through upregulation of p21 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Hongliang; Wang, Zhaoxia; Jin, Suqin; Hao, Hongjun; Zheng, Lemin; Zhou, Boda; Zhang, Wei; Lv, He; Yuan, Yun

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • Dux4 induced TE671 cell proliferation defect and G1 phase arrest. • Dux4 upregulated p21 expression without activating p53. • Silencing p21 rescued Dux4 mediated proliferation defect and cell cycle arrest. • Sp1 binding site was required for Dux4-induced p21 promoter activation. - Abstract: It has been implicated that Dux4 plays crucial roles in development of facioscapulohumeral dystrophy. But the underlying myopathic mechanisms and related down-stream events of this retrogene were far from clear. Here, we reported that overexpression of Dux4 in a cell model TE671 reduced cell proliferation rate, and increased G1 phase accumulation. We also determined the impact of Dux4 on p53/p21 signal pathway, which controls the checkpoint in cell cycle progression. Overexpression of Dux4 increased p21 mRNA and protein level, while expression of p53, phospho-p53 remained unchanged. Silencing p21 rescued Dux4 mediated proliferation defect and cell cycle arrest. Furthermore, we demonstrated that enhanced Dux4 expression increased p21 promoter activity and elevated expression of Sp1 transcription factor. Mutation of Sp1 binding site decreased dux4 induced p21 promoter activation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays confirmed the Dux4-induced binding of Sp1 to p21 promoter in vivo. These results suggest that Dux4 might induce proliferation inhibition and G1 phase arrest through upregulation of p21.

  20. Rutin inhibits B[a]PDE-induced cyclooxygenase-2 expression by targeting EGFR kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seunghwan; Lim, Tae-Gyu; Hwang, Mun Kyung; Kim, Yoon-A; Kim, Jiyoung; Kang, Nam Joo; Jang, Tae Su; Park, Jun-Seong; Yeom, Myeong Hun; Lee, Ki Won

    2013-11-15

    Rutin is a well-known flavonoid that exists in various natural sources. Accumulative studies have represented the biological effects of rutin, such as anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory effects. However, the underlying mechanisms of rutin and its direct targets are not understood. We investigated whether rutin reduced B[a]PDE-induced-COX-2 expression. The transactivation of AP-1 and NF-κB were inhibited by rutin. Rutin also attenuated B[a]PDE-induced Raf/MEK/ERK and Akt activation, but had no effect on the phosphorylation of EGFR. An in vitro kinase assay revealed rutin suppressed EGFR kinase activity. We also confirmed direct binding between rutin and EGFR, and found that the binding was regressed by ATP. The EGFR inhibitor also inhibited the B[a]PDE-induced MEK/ERK and Akt signaling pathways and subsequently, suppressed COX-2 expression and promoter activity, in addition to suppressing the transactivation of AP-1 and NF-κB. In EGFR(-/-)mouse embryonic fibroblast cells, B[a]PDE-induced COX-2 expression was also diminished. Collectively, rutin inhibits B[a]PDE-induced COX-2 expression by suppressing the Raf/MEK/ERK and Akt signaling pathways. EGFR appeared to be the direct target of rutin.

  1. Glucose deprivation induces chemoresistance in colorectal cancer cells by increasing ATF4 expression

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Ya-Ling; Yin, Yuan; Liu, He-Yong; Feng, Yu-Yang; Bian, Ze-Hua; Zhou, Le-Yuan; Zhang, Ji-Wei; Fei, Bo-Jian; Wang, Yu-Gang; Huang, Zhao-Hui

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) in glucose deprivation (GD) induced colorectal cancer (CRC) drug resistance and the mechanism involved. METHODS: Chemosensitivity and apoptosis were measured under the GD condition. Inhibition of ATF4 using short hairpin RNA in CRC cells under the GD condition and in ATF4-overexpressing CRC cells was performed to identify the role of ATF4 in the GD induced chemoresistance. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR and Western blot were used to detect the mRNA and protein expression of drug resistance gene 1 (MDR1), respectively. RESULTS: GD protected CRC cells from drug-induced apoptosis (oxaliplatin and 5-fluorouracil) and induced the expression of ATF4, a key gene of the unfolded protein response. Depletion of ATF4 in CRC cells under the GD condition can induce apoptosis and drug re-sensitization. Similarly, inhibition of ATF4 in the ATF4-overexpressing CRC cells reintroduced therapeutic sensitivity and apoptosis. In addition, increased MDR1 expression was observed in GD-treated CRC cells. CONCLUSION: These data indicate that GD promotes chemoresistance in CRC cells through up-regulating ATF4 expression. PMID:27468213

  2. Regulation and clinical significance of the hypoxia-induced expression of ANGPTL4 in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    KUBO, HIROSHI; KITAJIMA, YOSHIHIKO; KAI, KEITA; NAKAMURA, JUN; MIYAKE, SHUUSUKE; YANAGIHARA, KAZUYOSHI; MORITO, KIYOTO; TANAKA, TOMOKAZU; SHIDA, MASAAKI; NOSHIRO, HIROKAZU

    2016-01-01

    Solid tumors are often exposed to hypoxia. Hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1α upregulates numerous target genes associated with the malignant behavior of hypoxic cancer cells. A member of the angiopoietin family, angiopoietin-like protein 4 (ANGPTL4) is a hypoxia-inducible gene. The present study aimed to clarify whether ANGPTL4 is regulated by HIF-1α in gastric cancer cells. The study also assessed whether ANGPTL4 expression is associated with clinicopathological factors or HIF-1α expression in gastric cancer tissues. Hypoxia-induced ANGPTL4 expression was quantitatively analyzed using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) in 10 gastric cancer cell lines. RT-qPCR was further employed to investigate the HIF-1α dependency of ANGPTL4 expression using HIF-1α-knockdown transfectant 58As9-KD and control 58As9-SC gastric cancer cells. The HIF-1α and ANGPTL4 expression levels were immunohistochemically analyzed in 170 gastric cancer tissue specimens and were assessed for any correlations with the clinicopathological factors and/or patient survival. Subsequently, hypoxia-induced ANGPTL4 expression was observed in 7 out of 10 gastric cancer cell lines. The hypoxic induction of ANGPTL4 was almost preserved in the 58As9-KD cells compared with that observed in the 58As9-SC cells, while the induction of known HIF-1α target gene, carbonic anhydrase 9, was completely suppressed in the 58As9-KD cells. In the gastric cancer tissues, ANGPTL4 expression was inversely correlated with the tumor depth, whereas HIF-1α expression was positively correlated with venous invasion. A survival analysis revealed that the expression of ANGPTL4 was significantly correlated with a longer survival time, whereas that of HIF-1α was correlated with a shorter survival time. In conclusion, the present findings indicate that hypoxia-induced ANGPTL4 expression is independent of HIF-1α in hypoxic gastric cancer cells. ANGPTL4 may be a favorable marker for predicting

  3. Ethanol-induced changes in poly (ADP ribose) polymerase and neuronal developmental gene expression.

    PubMed

    Gavin, David P; Kusumo, Handojo; Sharma, Rajiv P; Guizzetti, Marina

    2016-11-01

    Prenatal alcohol exposure has profound effects on neuronal growth and development. Poly-ADP Ribose Polymerase (PARP) enzymes are perhaps unique in the field of epigenetics in that they directly participate in histone modifications, transcription factor modifications, DNA methylation/demethylation and are highly inducible by ethanol. It was our hypothesis that ethanol would induce PARP enzymatic activity leading to alterations in neurodevelopmental gene expression. Mouse E18 cortical neurons were treated with ethanol, PARP inhibitors, and nuclear hormone receptor transcription factor PPARγ agonists and antagonists. Subsequently, we measured PARP activity and changes in Bdnf, OKSM (Oct4, Klf4, Sox2, c-Myc), DNA methylating/demethylating factors, and Pparγ mRNA expression, promoter 5-methylcytosine (5MC) and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5HMC), and PPARγ promoter binding. We found that ethanol reduced Bdnf4, 9a, and Klf4 mRNA expression, and increased c-Myc expression. These changes were reversed with a PARP inhibitor. In agreement with its role in DNA demethylation PARP inhibition increased 5MC levels at the c-Myc promoter. In addition, we found that inhibition of PARP enzymatic activity increased PPARγ promoter binding, and this corresponded to increased Bdnf and Klf4 mRNA expression. Our results suggest that PARP participates in DNA demethylation and reduces PPARγ promoter binding. The current study underscores the importance of PARP in ethanol-induced changes to neurodevelopmental gene expression. PMID:27497606

  4. Auxin-induced K+ channel expression represents an essential step in coleoptile growth and gravitropism.

    PubMed

    Philippar, K; Fuchs, I; Luthen, H; Hoth, S; Bauer, C S; Haga, K; Thiel, G; Ljung, K; Sandberg, G; Bottger, M; Becker, D; Hedrich, R

    1999-10-12

    Auxin-induced growth of coleoptiles depends on the presence of potassium and is suppressed by K+ channel blockers. To evaluate the role of K+ channels in auxin-mediated growth, we isolated and functionally expressed ZMK1 and ZMK2 (Zea mays K+ channel 1 and 2), two potassium channels from maize coleoptiles. In growth experiments, the time course of auxin-induced expression of ZMK1 coincided with the kinetics of coleoptile elongation. Upon gravistimulation of maize seedlings, ZMK1 expression followed the gravitropic-induced auxin redistribution. K+ channel expression increased even before a bending of the coleoptile was observed. The transcript level of ZMK2, expressed in vascular tissue, was not affected by auxin. In patch-clamp studies on coleoptile protoplasts, auxin increased K+ channel density while leaving channel properties unaffected. Thus, we conclude that coleoptile growth depends on the transcriptional up-regulation of ZMK1, an inwardly rectifying K+ channel expressed in the nonvascular tissue of this organ. PMID:10518597

  5. Ethanol inducible expression of a mesophilic cellulase avoids adverse effects on plant development

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Plant-produced biomass-degrading enzymes are promising tools for the processing of lignocellulose to fermentable sugars. A major limitation of in planta production is that high-level expression of such enzymes could potentially affect the structure and integrity of the plant cell wall and negatively influence plant growth and development. Results Here, we evaluate the impact on tobacco plant development of constitutive versus alcohol-inducible expression of the endoglucanase TrCel5A from the mesophilic fungus Trichoderma reesei. Using this system, we are able to demonstrate that constitutive expression of the enzyme, controlled by the doubled Cauliflower Mosaic Virus promoter, leads to lower cellulose content of the plant combined with severe effects on plant growth. However, using an alcohol-inducible expression of the endoglucanase in the plant leaves, we achieved similar enzymatic expression levels with no changes in the crystalline cellulose content. Conclusion We were able to produce significant amounts of cellulase in the plant leaves without detrimental effects to plant development. These results demonstrate the potential feasibility of an inducible expression system for producing biomass degrading enzymes in plants. PMID:23587418

  6. Ethanol-induced changes in poly (ADP ribose) polymerase and neuronal developmental gene expression.

    PubMed

    Gavin, David P; Kusumo, Handojo; Sharma, Rajiv P; Guizzetti, Marina

    2016-11-01

    Prenatal alcohol exposure has profound effects on neuronal growth and development. Poly-ADP Ribose Polymerase (PARP) enzymes are perhaps unique in the field of epigenetics in that they directly participate in histone modifications, transcription factor modifications, DNA methylation/demethylation and are highly inducible by ethanol. It was our hypothesis that ethanol would induce PARP enzymatic activity leading to alterations in neurodevelopmental gene expression. Mouse E18 cortical neurons were treated with ethanol, PARP inhibitors, and nuclear hormone receptor transcription factor PPARγ agonists and antagonists. Subsequently, we measured PARP activity and changes in Bdnf, OKSM (Oct4, Klf4, Sox2, c-Myc), DNA methylating/demethylating factors, and Pparγ mRNA expression, promoter 5-methylcytosine (5MC) and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5HMC), and PPARγ promoter binding. We found that ethanol reduced Bdnf4, 9a, and Klf4 mRNA expression, and increased c-Myc expression. These changes were reversed with a PARP inhibitor. In agreement with its role in DNA demethylation PARP inhibition increased 5MC levels at the c-Myc promoter. In addition, we found that inhibition of PARP enzymatic activity increased PPARγ promoter binding, and this corresponded to increased Bdnf and Klf4 mRNA expression. Our results suggest that PARP participates in DNA demethylation and reduces PPARγ promoter binding. The current study underscores the importance of PARP in ethanol-induced changes to neurodevelopmental gene expression.

  7. Exercise-induced differential changes in gene expression among arterioles of skeletal muscles of obese rats

    PubMed Central

    Padilla, Jaume; Jenkins, Nathan T.; Thorne, Pamela K.; Martin, Jeffrey S.; Rector, R. Scott; Akter, Sadia; Davis, J. Wade

    2015-01-01

    Using next-generation, transcriptome-wide RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) technology we assessed the effects of exercise training on transcriptional profiles in skeletal muscle arterioles isolated from the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles of Otsuka Long Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats that underwent an endurance exercise training program (EX; n = 13), interval sprint training program (SPRINT; n = 14), or remained sedentary (Sed; n = 12). We hypothesized that the greatest effects of exercise would be in the gastrocnemius arterioles. Results show that EX caused the largest number of changes in gene expression in the soleus and white gastrocnemius 2a arterioles with little to no changes in the feed arteries. In contrast, SPRINT caused substantial changes in gene expression in the feed arteries. IPA canonical pathway analysis revealed 18 pathways with significant changes in gene expression when analyzed across vessels and revealed that EX induces increased expression of the following genes in all arterioles examined: Shc1, desert hedgehog protein (Dhh), adenylate cyclase 4 (Adcy4), G protein binding protein, alpha (Gnat1), and Bcl2l1 and decreased expression of ubiquitin D (Ubd) and cAMP response element modulator (Crem). EX increased expression of endothelin converting enzyme (Ece1), Hsp90b, Fkbp5, and Cdcl4b in four of five arterioles. SPRINT had effects on expression of Crem, Dhh, Bcl2l1, and Ubd that were similar to EX. SPRINT also increased expression of Nfkbia, Hspa5, Tubb 2a and Tubb 2b, and Fkbp5 in all five arterioles and increased expression of Gnat1 in all but the soleus second-order arterioles. Many contractile and/or structural protein genes were increased by SPRINT in the gastrocnemius feed artery, but the same genes exhibited decreased expression in red gastrocnemius arterioles. We conclude that training-induced changes in arteriolar gene expression patterns differ by muscle fiber type composition and along the arteriolar tree. PMID:26183477

  8. Constitutive and Inducible Expression of the rRNA Methylase Gene erm(B) in Campylobacter

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Fengru; Shen, Jianzhong; Zhang, Maojun; Wu, Congming

    2015-01-01

    Macrolides are the antimicrobials of choice for treating human campylobacteriosis. The recent emergence of erm(B) in Campylobacter bacteria threatens the utility of this class of antibiotics. Here we report the constitutive and inducible expression of erm(B) in Campylobacter isolates derived from diarrheal patients and food-producing animals. Constitutive expression of erm(B) was associated with insertion and deletion in the regulatory region of the gene, providing the first documentation of the differential expression of erm(B) in Campylobacter bacteria. PMID:26259800

  9. The effect of streptozotocin-induced diabetes on phenylalanine hydroxylase expression in rat liver.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, D S; Dahl, H H; Mercer, J F; Green, A K; Fisher, M J

    1989-01-01

    The impact of experimentally induced diabetes on the expression of rat liver phenylalanine hydroxylase has been investigated. A significant elevation in maximal enzymic activity was observed in diabetes. This was associated with significant increases in the amount of enzyme, the phenylalanine hydroxylase-specific translational activity of hepatic RNA and the abundance of phenylalanine hydroxylase-specific mRNA. These changes in phenylalanine hydroxylase expression were not observed when diabetes was controlled by daily injections of insulin. These results are discussed in relation to the hormonal control of phenylalanine hydroxylase gene expression. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. PMID:2532505

  10. Carcinoembryonic Antigen Expression and Resistance to Radiation and 5-Fluorouracil-Induced Apoptosis and Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Eftekhar, Ebrahim; Jaberie, Hajar; Naghibalhossaini, Fakhraddin

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the mechanism of tumor resistance is critical for cancer therapy. In this study, we investigated the effect of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) overexpression on UV-and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-induced apoptosis and autophagy in colorectal cancer cells. We used histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, NaB and DNA demethylating agent, 5-azacytidine (5-AZA) to induce CEA expression in HT29/219 and SW742 colorectal cancer cell lines. MTT assay was used to measure IC50 value of the cells exposed to graded concentrations of 5- FU with either 0.1 mM NaB or 1 μM 5-AZA for 72 h . Using CHO- and SW742-CEA transfectants, we also investigated the effect of CEA expression on UV- and 5-FU-induced apoptosis and autophagy. Treatment of HT29/219 cell line with NaB and 5-AZA increased CEA expression by 29% and 31%, respectively. Compared with control cells, the IC50 value for 5-FU of NaB and 5-AZA-treated cells increased by 40% and 57%, respectively. Treatment of SW742 cells with NaB or 5-AZA increased neither CEA expression nor the IC50 value for 5-FU. In comparison to parental cells, CEA expression also significantly protected transfected cells against UV-induced apoptosis. Decreased proportions of autophagy and apoptosis were also observed in 5-FU treated SW742- and CHO-CEA transfectants. We conclude that CEA expression can effectively protect colorectal cancer cells against radiation and drug-induced apoptosis and autophagy. PMID:27478804

  11. Carcinoembryonic Antigen Expression and Resistance to Radiation and 5-Fluorouracil-Induced Apoptosis and Autophagy.

    PubMed

    Eftekhar, Ebrahim; Jaberie, Hajar; Naghibalhossaini, Fakhraddin

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the mechanism of tumor resistance is critical for cancer therapy. In this study, we investigated the effect of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) overexpression on UV-and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-induced apoptosis and autophagy in colorectal cancer cells. We used histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, NaB and DNA demethylating agent, 5-azacytidine (5-AZA) to induce CEA expression in HT29/219 and SW742 colorectal cancer cell lines. MTT assay was used to measure IC50 value of the cells exposed to graded concentrations of 5- FU with either 0.1 mM NaB or 1 μM 5-AZA for 72 h . Using CHO- and SW742-CEA transfectants, we also investigated the effect of CEA expression on UV- and 5-FU-induced apoptosis and autophagy. Treatment of HT29/219 cell line with NaB and 5-AZA increased CEA expression by 29% and 31%, respectively. Compared with control cells, the IC50 value for 5-FU of NaB and 5-AZA-treated cells increased by 40% and 57%, respectively. Treatment of SW742 cells with NaB or 5-AZA increased neither CEA expression nor the IC50 value for 5-FU. In comparison to parental cells, CEA expression also significantly protected transfected cells against UV-induced apoptosis. Decreased proportions of autophagy and apoptosis were also observed in 5-FU treated SW742- and CHO-CEA transfectants. We conclude that CEA expression can effectively protect colorectal cancer cells against radiation and drug-induced apoptosis and autophagy. PMID:27478804

  12. Stimulated stromal cells induce gamma-globin gene expression in erythroid cells via nitric oxide production

    PubMed Central

    Čokić, Vladan P.; Beleslin-Čokić, Bojana B.; Smith, Reginald D.; Economou, Antaeus P.; Wahl, Larry M.; Noguchi, Constance T.; Schechter, Alan N.

    2009-01-01

    Objective We have previously shown that nitric oxide (NO) is involved in the hydroxyurea-induced increase of gamma-globin gene expression in cultured human erythroid progenitor cells and that hydroxyurea increases NO production in endothelial cells via endothelial NO synthase (NOS). We have now expanded those studies to demonstrate that the stimulation of gamma-globin gene expression is also mediated by NOS induction in stromal cells within the bone marrow microenvironment. Materials and Methods Using NO analyzer, we measured NO production in endothelial and macrophage cell cultures. In co-culture studies of erythroid and stromal cells we measured globin gene expression during stimulation by NO inducers. Results Hydroxyurea (30–100 μM) induced NOS-dependent production of NO in human macrophages (up to 1.2 μM). Co-culture studies of human macrophages with erythroid progenitor cells also resulted in induction of gamma-globin mRNA expression (up to 3 fold) in the presence of hydroxyurea. NOS-dependent stimulation of NO by lipopolysaccharide (up to 0.6 μM) has been observed in human macrophages. We found that lipopolysaccharide and interferon-gamma together increased gamma-globin gene expression (up to 2 fold) in human macrophage/erythroid cell co-cultures. Co-culture of human bone marrow endothelial cells with erythroid progenitor cells also induced gamma-globin mRNA expression (2.4 fold) in the presence of hydroxyurea (40 μM). Conclusion These results demonstrate an arrangement by which NO and fetal hemoglobin inducers may stimulate globin genes in erythroid cells via the common paracrine effect of bone marrow stromal cells. PMID:19576950

  13. β-Cryptoxanthin Alleviates Diet-Induced Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis by Suppressing Inflammatory Gene Expression in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kobori, Masuko; Ni, Yinhua; Takahashi, Yumiko; Watanabe, Natsumi; Sugiura, Minoru; Ogawa, Kazunori; Nagashimada, Mayumi; Kaneko, Shuichi; Naito, Shigehiro; Ota, Tsuguhito

    2014-01-01

    Recent nutritional epidemiological surveys showed that serum β-cryptoxanthin inversely associates with the risks for insulin resistance and liver dysfunction. Consumption of β-cryptoxanthin possibly prevents nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), which is suggested to be caused by insulin resistance and oxidative stress from nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. To evaluate the effect of β-cryptoxanthin on diet-induced NASH, we fed a high-cholesterol and high-fat diet (CL diet) with or without 0.003% β-cryptoxanthin to C56BL/6J mice for 12 weeks. After feeding, β-cryptoxanthin attenuated fat accumulation, increases in Kupffer and activated stellate cells, and fibrosis in CL diet-induced NASH in the mice. Comprehensive gene expression analysis showed that although β-cryptoxanthin histochemically reduced steatosis, it was more effective in inhibiting inflammatory gene expression change in NASH. β-Cryptoxanthin reduced the alteration of expression of genes associated with cell death, inflammatory responses, infiltration and activation of macrophages and other leukocytes, quantity of T cells, and free radical scavenging. However, it showed little effect on the expression of genes related to cholesterol and other lipid metabolism. The expression of markers of M1 and M2 macrophages, T helper cells, and cytotoxic T cells was significantly induced in NASH and reduced by β-cryptoxanthin. β-Cryptoxanthin suppressed the expression of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-inducible and/or TNFα-inducible genes in NASH. Increased levels of the oxidative stress marker thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) were reduced by β-cryptoxanthin in NASH. Thus, β-cryptoxanthin suppresses inflammation and the resulting fibrosis probably by primarily suppressing the increase and activation of macrophages and other immune cells. Reducing oxidative stress is likely to be a major mechanism of inflammation and injury suppression in the livers of mice with NASH. PMID:24858832

  14. Methylphenidate (Ritalin) induces Homer 1a and zif 268 expression in specific corticostriatal circuits.

    PubMed

    Yano, M; Steiner, H

    2005-01-01

    Corticostriatal circuits participate in limbic, attentional, motor and other networks, and are implicated in psychostimulant addiction. The psychostimulant methylphenidate is used in the treatment of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and for recreational purposes. Recent studies indicate that methylphenidate alters gene expression in striatal neurons. We investigated whether methylphenidate affects gene regulation in specific corticostriatal circuits, by comparing drug-induced molecular changes in different functional domains of the striatum with changes in their cortical input regions. In order to assess the potential functional significance of methylphenidate-induced molecular changes, we examined members of two different classes of plasticity-related molecules, the transcription factor zif 268 and the synaptic plasticity factor Homer 1a. Acute methylphenidate administration in adult rats increased the expression of Homer 1a and zif 268 in both cortex and striatum in a dose-dependent and regionally selective manner. These changes in gene expression occurred after doses of 2 mg/kg (i.p.) and higher, and were highly correlated between cortical regions and their striatal targets. In the cortex, increases were maximal in the medial agranular (premotor) and cingulate cortex, followed by motor and somatosensory cortex, and were minimal in the insular cortex. Correspondingly, in the striatum, increases were most robust in sensorimotor sectors that receive medial agranular input, and were weaker or absent in ventral sectors. The methylphenidate-induced increases in cortical Homer 1a and zif 268 expression were also correlated with increases in striatal substance P and dynorphin expression (direct pathway). Overall, the regional distribution of methylphenidate-induced molecular changes in the striatum was similar to that of changes induced by psychostimulants such as cocaine. These findings demonstrate that methylphenidate affects transcription and synaptic

  15. Expression of Streptococcus pneumoniae Bacteriocins Is Induced by Antibiotics via Regulatory Interplay with the Competence System

    PubMed Central

    Slager, Jelle; Lake, Frank B.; Gericke, Oliver; Roberts, Ian S.; Rozen, Daniel E.; Veening, Jan-Willem

    2016-01-01

    Pneumococcal bacteriocins (pneumocins) are antibacterial toxins that mediate intra-species competition within the human host. However, the triggers of pneumocin expression are poorly understood. Using RNA-sequencing, we mapped the regulon of the pneumocin cluster (blp) of Streptococcus pneumoniae D39. Furthermore, by analogy with pneumococcal competence, we show that several antibiotics activate the blp-genes. Using real-time gene expression measurements we show that while the promoter driving expression of the two-component regulatory system blpR/H is constitutive, the remaining blp-promoters that control pneumocin expression, immunity and the inducer peptide BlpC, are pH-dependent and induced in the late exponential phase. Intriguingly, competence for genetic transformation, mediated by the paralogous ComD/E two-component quorum system, is induced by the same environmental cues. To test for interplay between these regulatory systems, we quantified the regulatory response to the addition of synthetic BlpC and competence-stimulating peptide (CSP). Supporting the idea of such interplay, we found that immediately upon addition of CSP, the blp-promoters were activated in a comD/E-dependent manner. After a delay, blp-expression was highly induced and was strictly dependent on blpRH and blpC. This raised the question of the mechanism of BlpC export, since bioinformatic analysis showed that the genes encoding the putative exporter for BlpC, blpAB, are not intact in strain D39 and most other strains. By contrast, all sequenced pneumococcal strains contain intact comAB genes, encoding the transport system for CSP. Consistent with the idea that comAB mediate BlpC export, we finally show that high-level expression of the blp-genes requires comAB. Together, our results demonstrate that regulation of pneumocin expression is intertwined with competence, explaining why certain antibiotics induce blp-expression. Antibiotic-induced pneumocin expression might therefore have

  16. Bile salts induce expression of the afimbrial LDA adhesin of atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Torres, Alfredo G; Tutt, Christopher B; Duval, Lisabeth; Popov, Vsevolod; Nasr, Abdelhakim Ben; Michalski, Jane; Scaletsky, Isabel C A

    2007-04-01

    Atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (aEPEC) strains are frequently implicated in infant diarrhoea in developing countries. Not much is known about the adherence properties of aEPEC; however, it has been shown that these strains can adhere to tissue-cultured cells. A chromosomal region designated the locus for diffuse adherence (LDA) confers aEPEC strain 22 the ability to adhere to culture cells. LDA is an afimbrial adhesin that contains a major subunit, LdaG, whose expression is induced on MacConkey agar at 37 degrees C. We hypothesized that the bile salts found in this culture media induce the expression of LdaG. Strain 22 and the LdaG mutant were grown in Luria-Bertani (LB) media in the presence or absence of bile salts and heat-extracted surface-expressed proteins were separated by SDS-PAGE to determine whether expression of the 25 kDa LdaG protein was induced. Western blot analysis with anti-LdaG confirmed that bile salts enhance LdaG expression at 37 degrees C. Adhesion assays on HeLa cells revealed that adhesion in a diffuse pattern of strain 22 increased in the presence of bile salts. We also confirmed that expression of the localized adherence pattern observed in the ldaG mutant required the presence of a large cryptic plasmid found in strain 22 and that this phenotype was not induced by bile salts. At the transcriptional level, the ldaG-lacZ promoter fusion displayed maximum beta-galactosidase activity when the parent strain was grown in LB supplemented with bile salts. Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting analysis, immunogold labelling electron microscopy and immunofluorescence using anti-LdaG sera confirmed that LDA is a bile salts-inducible surface-expressed afimbrial adhesin. Finally, LdaG expression was induced in presence of individual bile salts but not by other detergents. We concluded that bile salts increase expression of LDA, conferring a diffuse adherence pattern and having an impact on the adhesion properties of this aEPEC strain.

  17. Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling changes C2C12 myoblast proliferation and differentiation by inducing Id3 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Long; Shi, Songting; Zhang, Juan; Zhou, Fangfang; Dijke, Peter ten

    2012-03-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of Id3 but not Id1 is induced by Wnt3a stimulation in C2C12 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wnt3a induces Id3 expression via canonical Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wnt3a-induced Id3 expression does not depend on BMP signaling activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Induction of Id3 expression is critical determinant in Wnt3a-induced cell proliferation and differentiation. -- Abstract: Canonical Wnt signaling plays important roles in regulating cell proliferation and differentiation. In this study, we report that inhibitor of differentiation (Id)3 is a Wnt-inducible gene in mouse C2C12 myoblasts. Wnt3a induced Id3 expression in a {beta}-catenin-dependent manner. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) also potently induced Id3 expression. However, Wnt-induced Id3 expression occurred independent of the BMP/Smad pathway. Functional studies showed that Id3 depletion in C2C12 cells impaired Wnt3a-induced cell proliferation and alkaline phosphatase activity, an early marker of osteoblast cells. Id3 depletion elevated myogenin induction during myogenic differentiation and partially impaired Wnt3a suppressed myogenin expression in C2C12 cells. These results suggest that Id3 is an important Wnt/{beta}-catenin induced gene in myoblast cell fate determination.

  18. Involvement of reactive oxygen intermediates in cyclooxygenase-2 expression induced by interleukin-1, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Feng, L; Xia, Y; Garcia, G E; Hwang, D; Wilson, C B

    1995-01-01

    Reactive oxygen intermediates (ROIs) play an important role in inflammatory processes as mediators of injury and potentially in signal transduction leading to gene expression. Cyclooxygenase (COX) is a rate-limiting enzyme in prostanoid biosynthesis, and its recently cloned inducible form, COX-2, is induced by proinflammatory cytokines. This study linked ROIs to the signaling pathways that induce COX-2 expression. The hydroxyl radical scavengers DMSO (1%), as well as di- and tetramethylthiourea, inhibited IL-1-, TNF alpha-, and LPS-induced COX-2 expression in rat mesangial cells. The suppression of COX-2 mRNA expression correlated with the COX-2 protein level. In comparison with the prolonged induction of the inducible gene encoding protein-tyrosine phosphatase by hydrogen peroxide, the COX-2 gene was only transiently induced. Protein-tyrosine phosphatase is also induced by heat shock and chemical stress, whereas COX-2 is not. Superoxide was a more potent inducer for COX-2 than hydrogen peroxide. In addition, NADPH stimulated COX-2 expression, and an inhibitor of NADPH oxidase blocked COX-2 expression induced by TNF alpha. COX-2 and KC gene expression costimulated by IL-1 were inhibited differentially by the scavengers. These studies demonstrate that oxidant stress is a specific and important inducer of COX-2 gene expression. This induction may contribute to the deleterious amplification of prostanoids in inflammation and compound the direct effects of ROI production. Images PMID:7706475

  19. Nitrogen starvation induces expression of Lg-FLO1 and flocculation in bottom-fermenting yeast.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Tomoo

    2012-11-01

    When exponentially growing cells of bottom-fermenting yeast were starved for nitrogen or were grown on proline (a non-preferred nitrogen source), flocculation was induced. This flocculation was not induced by starvation for either carbon or amino acids. Expression of Lg-FLO1, which is required for flocculation of bottom-fermenting yeast, was also found to be induced by starvation for nitrogen. This suggests that the flocculation of bottom-fermenting yeast is under the control of a nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR)-like mechanism.

  20. Selecting antagonistic antibodies that control differentiation through inducible expression in embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Melidoni, Anna N.; Dyson, Michael R.; Wormald, Sam; McCafferty, John

    2013-01-01

    Antibodies that modulate receptor function have great untapped potential in the control of stem cell differentiation. In contrast to many natural ligands, antibodies are stable, exquisitely specific, and are unaffected by the regulatory mechanisms that act on natural ligands. Here we describe an innovative system for identifying such antibodies by introducing and expressing antibody gene populations in ES cells. Following induced antibody expression and secretion, changes in differentiation outcomes of individual antibody-expressing ES clones are monitored using lineage-specific gene expression to identify clones that encode and express signal-modifying antibodies. This in-cell expression and reporting system was exemplified by generating blocking antibodies to FGF4 and its receptor FGFR1β, identified through delayed onset of ES cell differentiation. Functionality of the selected antibodies was confirmed by addition of exogenous antibodies to three different ES reporter cell lines, where retained expression of pluripotency markers Oct4, Nanog, and Rex1 was observed. This work demonstrates the potential for discovery and utility of functional antibodies in stem cell differentiation. This work is also unique in constituting an example of ES cells carrying an inducible antibody that causes a functional protein “knock-down” and allows temporal control of stable signaling components at the protein level. PMID:24082130

  1. Derepression of hTERT gene expression promotes escape from oncogene-induced cellular senescence.

    PubMed

    Patel, Priyanka L; Suram, Anitha; Mirani, Neena; Bischof, Oliver; Herbig, Utz

    2016-08-23

    Oncogene-induced senescence (OIS) is a critical tumor-suppressing mechanism that restrains cancer progression at premalignant stages, in part by causing telomere dysfunction. Currently it is unknown whether this proliferative arrest presents a stable and therefore irreversible barrier to cancer progression. Here we demonstrate that cells frequently escape OIS induced by oncogenic H-Ras and B-Raf, after a prolonged period in the senescence arrested state. Cells that had escaped senescence displayed high oncogene expression levels, retained functional DNA damage responses, and acquired chromatin changes that promoted c-Myc-dependent expression of the human telomerase reverse transcriptase gene (hTERT). Telomerase was able to resolve existing telomeric DNA damage response foci and suppressed formation of new ones that were generated as a consequence of DNA replication stress and oncogenic signals. Inhibition of MAP kinase signaling, suppressing c-Myc expression, or inhibiting telomerase activity, caused telomere dysfunction and proliferative defects in cells that had escaped senescence, whereas ectopic expression of hTERT facilitated OIS escape. In human early neoplastic skin and breast tissue, hTERT expression was detected in cells that displayed features of senescence, suggesting that reactivation of telomerase expression in senescent cells is an early event during cancer progression in humans. Together, our data demonstrate that cells arrested in OIS retain the potential to escape senescence by mechanisms that involve derepression of hTERT expression. PMID:27503890

  2. Inhibitory PAS domain protein is a negative regulator of hypoxia-inducible gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makino, Yuichi; Cao, Renhai; Svensson, Kristian; Bertilsson, Göran; Asman, Mikael; Tanaka, Hirotoshi; Cao, Yihai; Berkenstam, Anders; Poellinger, Lorenz

    2001-11-01

    Alteration of gene expression is a crucial component of adaptive responses to hypoxia. These responses are mediated by hypoxia-inducible transcription factors (HIFs). Here we describe an inhibitory PAS (Per/Arnt/Sim) domain protein, IPAS, which is a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH)/PAS protein structurally related to HIFs. IPAS contains no endogenous transactivation function but demonstrates dominant negative regulation of HIF-mediated control of gene expression. Ectopic expression of IPAS in hepatoma cells selectively impairs induction of genes involved in adaptation to a hypoxic environment, notably the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) gene, and results in retarded tumour growth and tumour vascular density in vivo. In mice, IPAS was predominantly expressed in Purkinje cells of the cerebellum and in corneal epithelium of the eye. Expression of IPAS in the cornea correlates with low levels of expression of the VEGF gene under hypoxic conditions. Application of an IPAS antisense oligonucleotide to the mouse cornea induced angiogenesis under normal oxygen conditions, and demonstrated hypoxia-dependent induction of VEGF gene expression in hypoxic corneal cells. These results indicate a previously unknown mechanism for negative regulation of angiogenesis and maintenance of an avascular phenotype.

  3. MicroRNA-203 induces apoptosis by upregulating Puma expression in colon and lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Funamizu, Naotake; Lacy, Curtis R; Kamada, Minori; Yanaga, Katsuhiko; Manome, Yoshinobu

    2015-11-01

    The present study investigated the relationship between microRNA-203 (miR-203) and the p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis (Puma) in colon (HCT116) and lung cancer (A549) cells. Colon and lung cancer cell lines were selected for this study since a relationship between p53/miR-203 and p53/Puma has been established in both cancers. In the present study, adriamycin and nutlin-3 were used to activate p53, which induced both miR-203 and Puma expression in HCT116 cells. In contrast, HCT 116 cells with downregulated p53 showed decreased miR-203 and Puma expression. Importantly, we found that overexpressed miR-203 in HCT116 cells resulted in significantly increased Puma expression (P<0.05). Based on these findings, we hypothesized that another limb of the p53/Puma axis depends on miR-203 expression. To further validate this relationship, we used lung cancer cells (A549) and found that activated p53 increased both miR-203 and Puma expression. In addition, we found that Puma expression remained elevated in cells with overexpressed miR-203 in the presence of p53 downregulation. Cumulatively, our data purport that p53 not only increased Puma expression directly, but that it may also do so through miR-203. Additionally, functional studies revealed that miR-203 overexpression induced apoptosis and inhibited cell invasiveness.

  4. Derepression of hTERT gene expression promotes escape from oncogene-induced cellular senescence

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Priyanka L.; Suram, Anitha; Mirani, Neena; Bischof, Oliver; Herbig, Utz

    2016-01-01

    Oncogene-induced senescence (OIS) is a critical tumor-suppressing mechanism that restrains cancer progression at premalignant stages, in part by causing telomere dysfunction. Currently it is unknown whether this proliferative arrest presents a stable and therefore irreversible barrier to cancer progression. Here we demonstrate that cells frequently escape OIS induced by oncogenic H-Ras and B-Raf, after a prolonged period in the senescence arrested state. Cells that had escaped senescence displayed high oncogene expression levels, retained functional DNA damage responses, and acquired chromatin changes that promoted c-Myc–dependent expression of the human telomerase reverse transcriptase gene (hTERT). Telomerase was able to resolve existing telomeric DNA damage response foci and suppressed formation of new ones that were generated as a consequence of DNA replication stress and oncogenic signals. Inhibition of MAP kinase signaling, suppressing c-Myc expression, or inhibiting telomerase activity, caused telomere dysfunction and proliferative defects in cells that had escaped senescence, whereas ectopic expression of hTERT facilitated OIS escape. In human early neoplastic skin and breast tissue, hTERT expression was detected in cells that displayed features of senescence, suggesting that reactivation of telomerase expression in senescent cells is an early event during cancer progression in humans. Together, our data demonstrate that cells arrested in OIS retain the potential to escape senescence by mechanisms that involve derepression of hTERT expression. PMID:27503890

  5. Expression of Sonic hedgehog and retinal opsin genes in experimentally-induced myopic chick eyes.

    PubMed

    Escaño, M F; Fujii, S; Sekiya, Y; Yamamoto, M; Negi, A

    2000-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate changes in the expression of different genes in chick retinal tissues after induction of experimental myopia and to evaluate the roles of these genes in the regulation of postnatal eye growth and myopia. Form-deprivation using occlusive goggles and hyperopic defocus by negative spectacle lenses were used to induce myopia in hatched chicks. Expression levels of Sonic hedgehog, its receptor complex, and other retinal cell genes were evaluated by semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Levels of Sonic hedgehog protein were further evaluated by Western blot analysis. The induction of myopia caused significant increase in expression of Sonic hedgehog mRNA and protein and increased expression of blue and red opsin mRNA. In contrast, the expression of mRNA for Sonic hedgehog receptor complex (Patched-Smoothened), rhodopsin, vimentin, green opsin, violet opsin, and HPC-1 were unaffected by the induction of myopia. The increase in expression of Sonic hedgehog in chick retinas in experimentally-induced myopia suggests involvement in the retina control of postnatal eye growth. Furthermore, Sonic hedgehog may influence the expression of blue and red opsins under myopic conditions.

  6. Insulin inhibits hepatocyte iNOS expression induced by cytokines by an Akt-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Harbrecht, Brian G; Nweze, Ikenna; Smith, Jason W; Zhang, Baochun

    2012-01-01

    Hepatocyte inducible nitric oxide synthese (iNOS) expression is a tightly controlled pathway that mediates hepatic inflammation and hepatocyte injury in a variety of disease states. We have shown that cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) regulates cytokine-induced hepatocyte iNOS expression through mechanisms that involve protein kinase B/Akt. We hypothesized that insulin, which activates Akt signaling in hepatocytes, as well as signaling through p38 and MAPK p42/p44, would regulate iNOS expression during inflammation. In primary rat hepatocytes, insulin inhibited cytokine-stimulated nitrite accumulation and iNOS expression in a dose-dependent manner. Inhibition of MAPK p42/p44 with PD98059 had no effect on iNOS activation, whereas SB203580 to block p38 reversed insulin's inhibitory effect. However, insulin did not increase p38 activation and inhibition of p38 signaling with a dominant negative p38 plasmid had no effect on cytokine- or insulin-mediated effects on iNOS. We found that SB203580 blocked insulin-induced Akt activation. Inhibition of Akt signaling with LY294002 or a dominant negative Akt plasmid increased cytokine-stimulated nitrite production and iNOS protein expression and blocked the inhibitory effects of insulin. NF-κB induces iNOS expression and can be regulated by Akt, but insulin had no effect on cytokine-mediated IκBα levels or NF-κB p65 translocation. Our data demonstrate that insulin inhibits cytokine-stimulated hepatocyte iNOS expression and does so through effects on Akt-mediated signaling. PMID:22038823

  7. Development of a heat-shock inducible gene expression system in the red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae.

    PubMed

    Sumiya, Nobuko; Fujiwara, Takayuki; Kobayashi, Yusuke; Misumi, Osami; Miyagishima, Shin-ya

    2014-01-01

    The cell of the unicellular red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae contains a single chloroplast and mitochondrion, the division of which is tightly synchronized by a light/dark cycle. The genome content is extremely simple, with a low level of genetic redundancy, in photosynthetic eukaryotes. In addition, transient transformation and stable transformation by homologous recombination have been reported. However, for molecular genetic analyses of phenomena that are essential for cellular growth and survival, inducible gene expression/suppression systems are needed. Here, we report the development of a heat-shock inducible gene expression system in C. merolae. CMJ101C, encoding a small heat shock protein, is transcribed only when cells are exposed to an elevated temperature. Using a superfolder GFP as a reporter protein, the 200-bp upstream region of CMJ101C orf was determined to be the optimal promoter for heat-shock induction. The optimal temperature to induce expression is 50°C, at which C. merolae cells are able to proliferate. At least a 30-min heat shock is required for the expression of a protein of interest and a 60-min heat shock yields the maximum level of protein expression. After the heat shock, the mRNA level decreases rapidly. As an example of the system, the expression of a dominant negative form of chloroplast division DRP5B protein, which has a mutation in the GTPase domain, was induced. Expression of the dominant negative DRP5B resulted in the appearance of aberrant-shaped cells in which two daughter chloroplasts and the cells are still connected by a small DRP5B positive tube-like structure. This result suggests that the dominant negative DRP5B inhibited the final scission of the chloroplast division site, but not the earlier stages of division site constriction. It is also suggested that cell cycle progression is not arrested by the impairment of chloroplast division at the final stage. PMID:25337786

  8. Development of a heat-shock inducible gene expression system in the red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae.

    PubMed

    Sumiya, Nobuko; Fujiwara, Takayuki; Kobayashi, Yusuke; Misumi, Osami; Miyagishima, Shin-ya

    2014-01-01

    The cell of the unicellular red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae contains a single chloroplast and mitochondrion, the division of which is tightly synchronized by a light/dark cycle. The genome content is extremely simple, with a low level of genetic redundancy, in photosynthetic eukaryotes. In addition, transient transformation and stable transformation by homologous recombination have been reported. However, for molecular genetic analyses of phenomena that are essential for cellular growth and survival, inducible gene expression/suppression systems are needed. Here, we report the development of a heat-shock inducible gene expression system in C. merolae. CMJ101C, encoding a small heat shock protein, is transcribed only when cells are exposed to an elevated temperature. Using a superfolder GFP as a reporter protein, the 200-bp upstream region of CMJ101C orf was determined to be the optimal promoter for heat-shock induction. The optimal temperature to induce expression is 50°C, at which C. merolae cells are able to proliferate. At least a 30-min heat shock is required for the expression of a protein of interest and a 60-min heat shock yields the maximum level of protein expression. After the heat shock, the mRNA level decreases rapidly. As an example of the system, the expression of a dominant negative form of chloroplast division DRP5B protein, which has a mutation in the GTPase domain, was induced. Expression of the dominant negative DRP5B resulted in the appearance of aberrant-shaped cells in which two daughter chloroplasts and the cells are still connected by a small DRP5B positive tube-like structure. This result suggests that the dominant negative DRP5B inhibited the final scission of the chloroplast division site, but not the earlier stages of division site constriction. It is also suggested that cell cycle progression is not arrested by the impairment of chloroplast division at the final stage.

  9. HLA-D subregion expression by thyroid epithelium in autoimmune thyroid diseases and induced in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Todd, I; Pujol-Borrell, R; Abdul-Karim, B A; Hammond, L J; Feldmann, M; Bottazzo, G F

    1987-01-01

    Human thyroid epithelial cells (thyrocytes) express HLA Class II molecules in autoimmune thyroid diseases (ATD). Normal thyrocytes do not express Class II, but can be induced to do so by culture with interferon-gamma (gamma-IFN). We have examined HLA-D subregion expression in sections and monolayers of thyroid by indirect immunofluorescence using appropriate monoclonal antibodies. The results indicate that, in ATD, the incidence and intensity of Class II subregion expression by thyrocytes varies between patients, and follows the pattern DR greater than DP greater than DQ. The same hierarchy is observed in cultured normal thyrocytes treated with gamma-IFN: strong induction of Class II, and of DP and DQ in particular, requires relatively high concentrations of gamma-IFN or additional factors such as thyroid stimulating hormone. These findings suggest that HLA-D subregion expression by thyrocytes in on-going ATD is determined by the levels of disease related factors in the affected tissue. PMID:3117460

  10. AG490 inhibits NFATc1 expression and STAT3 activation during RANKL induced osteoclastogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Chang-hong; Zhao, Jin-xia; Sun, Lin; Yao, Zhong-qiang; Deng, Xiao-li; Liu, Rui; Liu, Xiang-yuan

    2013-06-14

    Highlights: •AG490 inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in RAW264.7 cells. •AG490 affects cell proliferation and cell cycle distribution. •AG490 reduces NFATc1 expression during RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis. •AG490 disrupts the activation of RANKL-mediated JAK2/STAT3 signaling pathway. •STAT3 depletion partly mimics the effect of AG490 on RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis. -- Abstract: Commonly, JAK/STAT relays cytokine signals for cell activation and proliferation, and recent studies have shown that the elevated expression of JAK/STAT is associated with the immune rejection of allografts and the inflammatory processes of autoimmune disease. However, the role which JAK2/STAT3 signaling plays in the receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)-mediated osteoclastogenesis is unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of AG490, specific JAK2 inhibitor, on osteoclast differentiation in vitro. AG490 significantly inhibited osteoclastogenesis in murine osteoclast precursor cell line RAW264.7 induced by RANKL. AG490 suppressed cell proliferation and delayed the G1 to S cell cycle transition. Furthermore, AG490 also suppressed the expression of nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) c1 but not c-Fos in RAW264.7. Subsequently, we investigated various intracellular signaling components associated with osteoclastogenesis. AG490 had no effects on RANKL-induced activation of Akt, ERK1/2. Interestingly, AG490 partly inhibited RANKL-induced phosphorylation of Ser{sup 727} in STAT3. Additionally, down-regulation of STAT3 using siRNA resulted in suppression of TRAP, RANK and NFATc1 expression. In conclusion, we demonstrated that AG490 inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis by suppressing NFATc1 production and cell proliferation via the STAT3 pathway. These results suggest that inhibition of JAK2 may be useful for the treatment of bone diseases characterized by excessive osteoclastogenesis.

  11. Increasing TRPV4 expression restores flow-induced dilation impaired in mesenteric arteries with aging.

    PubMed

    Du, Juan; Wang, Xia; Li, Jie; Guo, Jizheng; Liu, Limei; Yan, Dejun; Yang, Yunyun; Li, Zhongwen; Zhu, Jinhang; Shen, Bing

    2016-01-01

    The flow-stimulated intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) rise in endothelial cells is an important early event leading to flow-induced blood vessel dilation. Transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 4 (TRPV4), a Ca(2+)-permeable cation channel, facilitates the flow-stimulated [Ca(2+)]i rise. To determine whether TRPV4 is involved in age-related flow-induced blood vessel dilation impairment, we measured blood vessel diameter and nitric oxide (NO) levels and performed Ca(2+) imaging, immunoblotting, and immunostaining assays in rats. We found that the flow-induced and TRPV4 activator 4α-PDD-induced dilation of mesenteric arteries from aged rats were significantly decreased compared with those from young rats. The flow- or 4α-PDD-induced [Ca(2+)]i rise was also markedly reduced in primary cultured mesenteric artery endothelial cells (MAECs) from aged rats. Immunoblotting and immunostaining results showed an age-related decrease of TRPV4 expression levels in MAECs. Additionally, the 4α-PDD-induced NO production was significantly reduced in aged MAECs. Compared with lentiviral GFP-treated aged rats, lentiviral vector delivery of TRPV4 increased TRPV4 expression level in aged MAECs and restored the flow- and 4α-PDD-induced vessel dilation in aged mesenteric arteries. We concluded that impaired TRPV4-mediated Ca(2+) signaling causes endothelial dysfunction and that TRPV4 is a potential target for clinical treatment of age-related vascular system diseases. PMID:26947561

  12. Cellular localization of transforming growth factor-beta expression in bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, K.; Flanders, K. C.; Phan, S. H.

    1995-01-01

    Bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis is associated with increased lung transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) gene expression, but cellular localization of the source of this expression has not been unequivocally established. In this study, lung fibrosis was induced in rats by endotracheal bleomycin injection on day 0 and, on selected days afterwards, lungs were harvested for in situ hybridization, immunohistochemical and histochemical analyses for TGF-beta 1 mRNA and protein expression, and cell identification. The results show that control lungs express essentially no detectable TGF-beta 1 mRNA or protein in the parenchyma. Before day 3 after bleomycin treatment, scattered bronchiolar epithelial cells, mononuclear cells, and eosinophils expressed elevated levels of TGF-beta 1. Between days 3 and 14, there was a major increase in the number of eosinophils, myofibroblasts, and fibroblasts strongly expressing TGF-beta 1 mRNA and protein. TGF-beta 1-producing cells were predominantly localized within areas of injury and active fibrosis. After day 14, the intensity and number of TGF-beta 1-expressing cells significantly declined and were predominantly found in fibroblasts in fibrotic areas. The expression of TGF-beta 1 protein was generally coincident with that for mRNA with the exception of bronchiolar epithelial cells in which strong protein expression was unaccompanied by a commensurate increase in mRNA. The study demonstrates that myofibroblasts, fibroblasts, and eosinophils represent the major sources of increased lung TGF-beta 1 expression in this model of pulmonary fibrosis. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7543734

  13. Wounding induces expression of genes involved in tuber closing layer and wound-periderm development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little is known about the coordinate induction of genes that may be involved in important wound-healing events. In this study, wound-healing events were determined together with wound-induced expression profiles of selected cell cycle, cell wall protein, and pectin methyl esterase genes using tuber...

  14. HIGH GLUCOSE INDUCES TOLL-LIKE RECEPTOR EXPRESSION IN HUMAN MONOCYTES: MECHANISM OF ACTIVATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: Hyperglycemia induced inflammation is central in diabetes complications and monocytes are important in orchestrating these effects. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a key role in innate immune responses as well as inflammation. However, there is a paucity of data examining the expression a...

  15. EFFECTS OF DIETARY FOLATE ON ARSENIC-INDUCED GENE EXPRESSION IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effects of Dietary Folate on Arsenic-induced Gene Expression in Mice

    Arsenic, a drinking water contaminant, is a known carcinogen. Human exposure to inorganic arsenic has been linked to tumors of skin, bladder, lung, and to a lesser extent, kidney and liver. Dietary fola...

  16. Age and vitamin E-induced changes in Gene Expression Profiles of T cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    T cell is vulnerable to age associated changes and vitamin E has been shown to improve T cell functions in the old. We studied the gene expression profile of T cells to better understand the underlying mechanisms of age and vitamin E-induced changes in T cell function. Young and old C57BL mice were ...

  17. Altered Regulation of Aquaporin Gene Expression in Allergen and IL-13-Induced Mouse Models of Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Krane, Carissa M.; Deng, Bijia; Mutyam, Venkateshwar; McDonald, Casey A.; Pazdziorko, Stephen; Mason, Lawrence; Goldman, Samuel; Kasaian, Marion; Chaudhary, Divya; Williams, Cara; Ho, Melisa W.Y.

    2009-01-01

    IL-13 is known to affect many processes that contribute to an asthmatic phenotype, including inflammation, fibrosis, and mucus production. Members of the aquaporin (AQP) family of transmembrane water channels are targets of regulation in models of lung injury and inflammation. Therefore, we examined AQP mRNA and protein expression in allergen and IL-13-induced mouse models of asthma. Lungs from ovalbumin sensitized and ovalbumin challenged (OVA/OVA) and IL-13 treated mice showed airway thickening, increased mucus production, and pulmonary eosinophilia. Pulmonary function tests showed a significant increase in methacholine-induced airway hyperreactivity in OVA/OVA and IL-13-treated mice as compared with controls. Quantitative PCR analysis revealed differential regulation of AQPs in these two models. AQP1 and AQP4 mRNA expression was downregulated in the OVA/OVA model, but not in the IL-13 model. AQP5 mRNA was reduced in both models, whereas AQP3 was upregulated only in the IL-13 model. Western analysis showed that diminished expression of an apically localized aquaporin, (AQP5), and concomitant upregulation of a basolateral aquaporin (AQP3 or AQP4) are characteristic features of both inducible asthma models. These results demonstrate that aquaporins are common targets of gene expression in both allergen and IL-13 induced mouse models of asthma. PMID:19237298

  18. Increased hepatic CD36 expression contributes to dyslipidemia associated with diet-induced obesity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The etiology of type 2 diabetes often involves diet-induced obesity (DIO), which is associated with elevated plasma fatty acids and lipoprotein associated triglycerides. Since aberrant hepatic fatty acid uptake may contribute to this, we investigated whether increased expression of a fatty acid tran...

  19. Insect and wound induced GUS gene expression from a Beta vulgaris proteinase inhibitor gene promoter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inducible gene promoters that are specifically activated by pathogen invasion or insect pest attack are needed for effective expression of resistance genes to control plant diseases. In the present study, a promoter from a serine proteinase inhibitor gene (BvSTI) shown to be up-regulated in resist...

  20. Cadmium Induces Retinoic Acid Signaling by Regulating Retinoic Acid Metabolic Gene Expression*

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yuxia; Freedman, Jonathan H.

    2009-01-01

    The transition metal cadmium is an environmental teratogen. In addition, cadmium and retinoic acid can act synergistically to induce forelimb malformations. The molecular mechanism underlying the teratogenicity of cadmium and the synergistic effect with retinoic acid has not been addressed. An evolutionarily conserved gene, β,β-carotene 15,15′-monooxygenase (BCMO), which is involved in retinoic acid biosynthesis, was studied in both Caenorhabditis elegans and murine Hepa 1–6 cells. In C. elegans, bcmo-1 was expressed in the intestine and was cadmium inducible. Similarly, in Hepa 1–6 cells, Bcmo1 was induced by cadmium. Retinoic acid-mediated signaling increased after 24-h exposures to 5 and 10 μm cadmium in Hepa 1–6 cells. Examination of gene expression demonstrated that the induction of retinoic acid signaling by cadmium may be mediated by overexpression of Bcmo1. Furthermore, cadmium inhibited the expression of Cyp26a1 and Cyp26b1, which are involved in retinoic acid degradation. These results indicate that cadmium-induced teratogenicity may be due to the ability of the metal to increase the levels of retinoic acid by disrupting the expression of retinoic acid-metabolizing genes. PMID:19556237

  1. ZN2+ INDUCES COX-2 EXPRESSION THROUGH DOWNREGULATION OF LIPID PHOSPHATASE PTEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Zn2+ Induces COX-2 Expression through Downregulation of Lipid Phosphatase PTEN
    Weidong Wu*, James M. Samet, Philip A. Bromberg*?, Young E. Whang?, and Lee M. Graves* ?
    *CEMALB, ?Department of Medicine, and ?Department of Pharmacology, UNC-Chapel Hill, NC27599; Human Studie...

  2. MICROARRAY ANALYSIS OF DICHLOROACETIC ACID-INDUCED CHANGES IN GENE EXPRESSION

    EPA Science Inventory


    MICROARRAY ANALYSIS OF DICHLOROACETIC ACID-INDUCED CHANGES IN GENE EXPRESSION

    Dichloroacetic acid (DCA) is a major by-product of water disinfection by chlorination. Several studies have demonstrated the hepatocarcinogenicity of DCA in rodents when administered in dri...

  3. Financial Aid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graves, Mary A.

    This workbook assists college and vocational school bound American Indian students in determining their financial needs and in locating sources of financial aid. A checklist helps students assess the state of their knowledge of financial programs; a glossary defines terms pertinent to the realm of financial aid (i.e., graduate study programs,…

  4. Teaching AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tonks, Douglas

    This book presents a curriculum to educate students about the risk of AIDS and HIV infection. The opening chapters of the book presents a discussion of: how teachers can create an environment of support for an AIDS education program; the political and educational implications of winning principal, district, and parental support for an AIDS…

  5. Multi-wavelength photoacoustic imaging of inducible tyrosinase reporter gene expression in xenograft tumors

    PubMed Central

    Paproski, Robert J.; Heinmiller, Andrew; Wachowicz, Keith; Zemp, Roger J.

    2014-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging is an emerging hybrid imaging technology capable of breaking through resolution limits of pure optical imaging technologies imposed by optical-scattering to provide fine-resolution optical contrast information in deep tissues. We demonstrate the ability of multi-wavelength photoacoustic imaging to estimate relative gene expression distributions using an inducible expression system and co-register images with hemoglobin oxygen saturation estimates and micro-ultrasound data. Tyrosinase, the rate-limiting enzyme in melanin production, is used as a reporter gene owing to its strong optical absorption and enzymatic amplification mechanism. Tetracycline-inducible melanin expression is turned on via doxycycline treatment in vivo. Serial multi-wavelength imaging reveals very low estimated melanin expression in tumors prior to doxycycline treatment or in tumors with no tyrosinase gene present, but strong signals after melanin induction in tumors tagged with the tyrosinase reporter. The combination of new inducible reporters and high-resolution photoacoustic and micro-ultrasound technology is poised to bring a new dimension to the study of gene expression in vivo. PMID:24936769

  6. Epidermal growth factor receptor expression in radiation-induced dog lung tumors by immunocytochemical localization

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, F.L.; Park, J.F.; Dagle, G.E.

    1993-06-01

    In studies to determine the role of growth factors in radiation-induced lung cancer, epidermal growth factor (EGFR) expression was examined by immunocytochemistry in 51 lung tumors from beagle dogs exposed to inhaled plutonium; 21 of 51 (41%) tumors were positive for EGFR. The traction of tumors positive for EGFR and the histological type of EGFR-positive tumors in the plutonium-exposed dogs were not different from spontaneous dog lung tumors, In which 36% were positive for EGFR. EGFR involvement in Pu-induced lung tumors appeared to be similar to that in spontaneous lung tumors. However, EGFR-positive staining was observed in only 1 of 16 tumors at the three lowest Pu exposure levels, compared to 20 of 35 tumors staining positive at the two highest Pu exposure levels. The results in dogs were in good agreement with the expression of EGFR reported in human non-small cell carcinoma of the lung, suggesting that Pu-induced lung tumors in the dog may be a suitable animal model to investigate the role of EGFR expression in lung carcinogenesis. In humans, EGFR expression in lung tumors has been primarily related to histological tumor types. In individual dogs with multiple primary lung tumors, the tumors were either all EGFR positive or EGFR negative, suggesting that EGFR expression may be related to the response of the individual dog as well as to the histological type of tumor.

  7. Ischemia-induced neuronal expression of the microglia attracting chemokine Secondary Lymphoid-tissue Chemokine (SLC).

    PubMed

    Biber, K; Sauter, A; Brouwer, N; Copray, S C; Boddeke, H W

    2001-04-15

    Recently, it has been demonstrated that Secondary Lymphoid-tissue Chemokine (SLC) is constitutively expressed in secondary lymphoid organs and controls the homing of naive T-cells and mature dendritic cells. By screening cDNA isolated from ischemic mouse brain, we found expression of SLC mRNA 6 h up to 4 days after the onset of ischemia. In situ hybridization combined with immunohistochemistry showed neurons expressing SLC mRNA in the ischemic area of the cortex. SLC mRNA expression was also found in cultured neurones after various treatments known to induce neuronal death, but not in cultured glial cells. Stimulation with SLC induced intracellular calcium transients and chemotaxis in cultured microglia. Since mRNA encoding CXCR3, an alternative receptor for SLC, but no CCR7 mRNA was found in microglia, we suggest that the effects of SLC on microglia are mediated by CXCR3. This assumption was corroborated by cross-desensitization experiments using IP-10 as a ligand for CXCR3. The inducible expression of SLC in neurones acting on microglia suggests a new and important role of SLC in the neuroimmune system. We propose that SLC is part of a neurone-microglia signaling system which is related to pathological conditions of the brain like ischemia.

  8. A new and efficient phosphate starvation inducible expression system for Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Sirén, Noora; Salonen, Kalle; Leisola, Matti; Nyyssölä, Antti

    2008-07-01

    A new expression system for Lactococcus lactis was developed. The system is based on a phosphate starvation inducible pstF promoter of L. lactis MG1363. Intracellular beta-galactosidase and secreted alpha-amylase were produced using this tightly regulated system. No evidence of regulatory sites in regions of the 5'-end of the pstF coding sequence was found. High expression levels of the beta-galactosidase gene were obtained using the original pstF RBS in a phosphate-depleted medium. The results suggested that with the phosphate starvation inducible system, it is possible to achieve expression levels comparable to the ones obtained with the widely used nisin-controlled gene expression system (NICE). A specific beta-galactosidase activity of 670 microkat g(-1) using a phosphate-depleted medium and an alpha-amylase activity of 3.6 microkat l(-1) in a bioreactor cultivation were produced. The advantages of the current expression system include that no prior removal of phosphate from the medium in bioreactor scale is required, and no additions of inducing agents are needed. Furthermore, the system can be operated in L. lactis without introduction of regulatory genes into the host.

  9. FosB regulates stretch-induced expression of extracellular matrix proteins in smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Aruna; Gong, Edward M; Pelton, Kristine; Ranpura, Sandeep A; Mulone, Michelle; Seth, Abhishek; Gomez, Pablo; Adam, Rosalyn M

    2011-12-01

    Fibroproliferative remodeling in smooth muscle-rich hollow organs is associated with aberrant extracellular matrix (ECM) production. Although mechanical stimuli regulate ECM protein expression, the transcriptional mediators of this process remain poorly defined. Previously, we implicated AP-1 as a mediator of smooth muscle cell (SMC) mechanotransduction; however, its role in stretch-induced ECM regulation has not been explored. Herein, we identify a novel role for the AP-1 subunit FosB in stretch-induced ECM expression in SMCs. The DNA-binding activity of AP-1 increased after stretch stimulation of SMCs in vitro. In contrast to c-Jun and c-fos, which are also activated by the SMC mitogen platelet-derived growth factor, FosB was only activated by stretch. FosB silencing attenuated the expression of the profibrotic factors tenascin C (TNC) and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), whereas forced expression of Jun~FosB stimulated TNC and CTGF promoter activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed enrichment of AP-1 at the TNC and CTGF promoters. Bladder distension in vivo enhanced nuclear localization of c-jun and FosB. Finally, the distension-induced expression of TNC and CTGF in the detrusor smooth muscle of bladders from wild-type mice was significantly attenuated in FosB-null mice. Together, these findings identify FosB as a mechanosensitive regulator of ECM production in smooth muscle. PMID:21996678

  10. RANTES expression induced by Toll-like receptor 4 ligand in rat airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Okayasu, Kaori; Tamaoka, Meiyo; Takayama, Satoshi; Miyazaki, Yasunari; Sumi, Yuki; Inase, Naohiko; Yoshizawa, Yasuyuki

    2010-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) have been reported to express Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and take part in the pathogenesis of asthma exacerbation. Though TLRs were found to activate epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in airway epithelial cells, little is known about the association of TLR ligands with EGFR signaling pathways in ASMCs. Using primary cultured ASMCs from Brown Norway rats, TLR4, eotaxin, and RANTES mRNA were examined by real-time quantitative RT-PCR after stimulation with the TLR4 ligand, lipopolysaccharides (LPS). The concentration of RANTES protein in culture supernatant was measured by ELISA. The effect of EGFR signaling inhibitors on RANTES expression was examined as well. Phosphorylation of EGFR after stimulation was examined by Western Blotting. Rat ASMCs expressed TLR4 and eotaxin, and LPS upregulated RANTES production. The EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor AG1478, the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor LY294002, and the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitor GM6001 inhibited RANTES expression induced by LPS. LPS phosphorylated EGFR. TLR4 activation can induce RANTES expression via EGFR transactivation and PI3K/Akt pathway in rat ASMCs. MMP-induced EGFR proligand cleavage and ligand binding to EGFR seem to be involved in this pathway. These findings may be critical in the pathogenesis of asthma exacerbation by airway infection. PMID:23896774

  11. A correlation between dexamethasone inducibility and basal expression levels of retroviral vector proviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Duch, M; Paludan, K; Lovmand, J; Pedersen, L; Jørgensen, P; Pedersen, F S

    1993-01-01

    Identical transcription units inserted at different positions of mammalian chromosomes may vary widely in transcriptional activity. We have used a set of ten cell clones with random unselected single integrations of retroviral vectors to study such position effects. The vector used carries a neo gene driven by the Akv murine leukemia virus long terminal repeat that has only a weak promoter-enhancer activity in the target cell, the lymphoid cell line L691. Under transient expression conditions, the strength of the Akv promoter-enhancer in the L691 cells is increased by dexamethasone. In cell clones with single vector integrations, a correlation is observed between the non-induced expression levels and the degree of dexamethasone induction. The strongest relative induction is found for the integrated vectors with the lowest non-induced expression levels and approaches the inducibility under transient expression. These results indicate that expression levels are composed of distinct contributions from the integrated vector and from the site of integration and are best explained in terms of a model in which the sites of chromosomal integration exert variable positive enhancer effects upon vector transcription. Images PMID:8233826

  12. Novel genes differentially expressed between posterior and median silk gland identified by SAGE-aided transcriptome analysis.

    PubMed

    Royer, Corinne; Briolay, Jérôme; Garel, Annie; Brouilly, Patrick; Sasanuma, Shun-ichi; Sasanuma, Motoe; Shimomura, Michihiko; Keime, Céline; Gandrillon, Olivier; Huang, Yongping; Chavancy, Gérard; Mita, Kazuei; Couble, Pierre

    2011-02-01

    Serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) profiles, from posterior and median cells of the silk gland of Bombyx mori, were analyzed and compared, so as to identify their respective distinguishing functions. The annotation of the SAGE libraries was performed with a B. mori reference tag collection, which was extracted from a novel set of Bombyx ESTs, sequenced from the 3' side. Most of the tags appeared at similar relative concentration within the two libraries, and corresponded with region-specific and highly abundant silk proteins. Strikingly, in addition to tags from silk protein mRNAs, 19 abundant tags were found (≥ 0.1%), in the median cell library, which were absent in the posterior cell tag collection. With the exception of tags from SP1 mRNA, no PSG specific tags were found in this subset class. The analysis of some of the MSG-specific transcripts, suggested that middle silk gland cells have diversified functions, in addition to their well characterized role in silk sericins synthesis and secretion.

  13. Drug-loaded nanoparticles induce gene expression in human pluripotent stem cell derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajbhiye, Virendra; Escalante, Leah; Chen, Guojun; Laperle, Alex; Zheng, Qifeng; Steyer, Benjamin; Gong, Shaoqin; Saha, Krishanu

    2013-12-01

    Tissue engineering and advanced manufacturing of human stem cells requires a suite of tools to control gene expression spatiotemporally in culture. Inducible gene expression systems offer cell-extrinsic control, typically through addition of small molecules, but small molecule inducers typically contain few functional groups for further chemical modification. Doxycycline (DXC), a potent small molecule inducer of tetracycline (Tet) transgene systems, was conjugated to a hyperbranched dendritic polymer (Boltorn H40) and subsequently reacted with polyethylene glycol (PEG). The resulting PEG-H40-DXC nanoparticle exhibited pH-sensitive drug release behavior and successfully controlled gene expression in stem-cell-derived fibroblasts with a Tet-On system. While free DXC inhibited fibroblast proliferation and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity, PEG-H40-DXC nanoparticles maintained higher fibroblast proliferation levels and MMP activity. The results demonstrate that the PEG-H40-DXC nanoparticle system provides an effective tool to controlling gene expression in human stem cell derivatives.Tissue engineering and advanced manufacturing of human stem cells requires a suite of tools to control gene expression spatiotemporally in culture. Inducible gene expression systems offer cell-extrinsic control, typically through addition of small molecules, but small molecule inducers typically contain few functional groups for further chemical modification. Doxycycline (DXC), a potent small molecule inducer of tetracycline (Tet) transgene systems, was conjugated to a hyperbranched dendritic polymer (Boltorn H40) and subsequently reacted with polyethylene glycol (PEG). The resulting PEG-H40-DXC nanoparticle exhibited pH-sensitive drug release behavior and successfully controlled gene expression in stem-cell-derived fibroblasts with a Tet-On system. While free DXC inhibited fibroblast proliferation and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity, PEG-H40-DXC nanoparticles maintained

  14. Expression and characterization of genetically engineered human immunodeficiency virus-like particles containing modified envelope glycoproteins: implications for development of a cross-protective AIDS vaccine.

    PubMed

    Rovinski, B; Haynes, J R; Cao, S X; James, O; Sia, C; Zolla-Pazner, S; Matthews, T J; Klein, M H

    1992-07-01

    Noninfectious human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) viruslike particles containing chimeric envelope glycoproteins were expressed in mammalian cells by using inducible promoters. We engineered four expression vectors in which a synthetic oligomer encoding gp120 residues 306 to 328 (amino acids YNKRKRIHIGP GRAFYTTKNIIG) from the V3 loop of the MN viral isolate was inserted at various positions within the endogenous HIV-1LAI env gene. Expression studies revealed that insertion of the heterologous V3(MN) loop segment at two different locations within the conserved region 2 (C2) of gp120, either 173 or 242 residues away from the N terminus of the mature subunit, resulted in the secretion of fully assembled HIV-like particles containing chimeric LAI/MN envelope glycoproteins. Both V3 loop epitopes were recognized by loop-specific neutralizing antibodies. However, insertion of the V3(MN) loop segment into other regions of gp120 led to the production of envelope-deficient viruslike particles. Immunization with HIV-like particles containing chimeric envelope proteins induced specific antibody responses against both the autologous and heterologous V3 loop epitopes, including cross-neutralizing antibodies against the HIV-1LAI and HIV-1MN isolates. This study, therefore, demonstrates the feasibility of genetically engineering optimized HIV-like particles capable of eliciting cross-neutralizing antibodies. PMID:1602531

  15. Expression of FSHD-related DUX4-FL alters proteostasis and induces TDP-43 aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Homma, Sachiko; Beermann, Mary Lou; Boyce, Frederick M; Miller, Jeffrey Boone

    2015-01-01

    Objective Pathogenesis in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) appears to be due to aberrant expression, particularly in skeletal muscle nuclei, of the full-length isoform of DUX4 (DUX4-FL). Expression of DUX4-FL is known to alter gene expression and to be cytotoxic, but cell responses to DUX4-FL are not fully understood. Our study was designed to identify cellular mechanisms of pathogenesis caused by DUX4-FL expression. Methods We used human myogenic cell cultures to analyze the effects of DUX4-FL when it was expressed either from its endogenous promoter in FSHD cells or by exogenous expression using BacMam vectors. We focused on determining the effects of DUX4-FL on protein ubiquitination and turnover and on aggregation of TDP-43. Results Human FSHD myotubes with endogenous DUX4-FL expression showed both altered nuclear and cytoplasmic distributions of ubiquitinated proteins and aggregation of TDP-43 in DUX4-FL-expressing nuclei. Similar changes were found upon exogenous expression of DUX4-FL, but were not seen upon expression of the non-toxic short isoform DUX4-S. DUX4-FL expression also inhibited protein turnover in a model system and increased the amounts of insoluble ubiquitinated proteins and insoluble TDP-43. Finally, inhibition of the ubiquitin–proteasome system with MG132 produced TDP-43 aggregation similar to DUX4-FL expression. Interpretations Our results identify DUX4-FL-induced inhibition of protein turnover and aggregation of TDP-43, which are pathological changes also found in diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and inclusion body myopathy, as potential pathological mechanisms in FSHD. PMID:25750920

  16. An Efficient Light-Inducible P53 Expression System for Inhibiting Proliferation of Bladder Cancer Cell

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Fan; Dong, Liang; Wang, Weiming; Liu, Yuchen; Huang, Weiren; Cai, Zhiming

    2016-01-01

    Optogenetic gene expression systems enable spatial-temporal modulation of gene transcription and cell behavior. Although applications in biomedicine are emerging, the utility of optogenetic gene switches remains elusive in cancer research due to the relative low gene activation efficiency. Here, we present an optimized CRISPR-Cas9-based light-inducible gene expression device that controls gene transcription in a dose-dependent manner. To prove the potential utility of this device, P53 was tested as a functional target in the bladder cancer cell models. It was illustrated that the light-induced P53 inhibited proliferation of 5637 and UMUC-3 cell effectively. The “light-on” gene expression system may demonstrate a novel therapeutic strategy for bladder cancer intervention. PMID:27766041

  17. Nordihydroguaiaretic Acid Attenuates the Oxidative Stress-Induced Decrease of CD33 Expression in Human Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Guzmán-Beltrán, Silvia; Pedraza-Chaverri, José; Gonzalez-Reyes, Susana; Juarez-Figueroa, Ulises E.; Gonzalez, Yolanda

    2013-01-01

    Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) is a natural lignan with recognized antioxidant and beneficial properties that is isolated from Larrea tridentata. In this study, we evaluated the effect of NDGA on the downregulation of oxidant stress-induced CD33 in human monocytes (MNs). Oxidative stress was induced by iodoacetate (IAA) or hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and was evaluated using reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and cell viability. NDGA attenuates toxicity, ROS production and the oxidative stress-induced decrease of CD33 expression secondary to IAA or H2O2 in human MNs. It was also shown that NDGA (20 μM) attenuates cell death in the THP-1 cell line that is caused by treatment with either IAA or H2O2. These results suggest that NDGA has a protective effect on CD33 expression, which is associated with its antioxidant activity in human MNs. PMID:23533689

  18. Selective Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibitor Reversed Zinc Chloride-Induced Spatial Memory Impairment via Increasing Cholinergic Marker Expression.

    PubMed

    Tabrizian, Kaveh; Azami, Kian; Belaran, Maryam; Soodi, Maliheh; Abdi, Khosrou; Fanoudi, Sahar; Sanati, Mehdi; Mottaghi Dastjerdi, Negar; Soltany Rezaee-Rad, Mohammad; Sharifzadeh, Mohammad

    2016-10-01

    Zinc, an essential micronutrient and biochemical element of the human body, plays structural, catalytic, and regulatory roles in numerous physiological functions. In the current study, the effects of a pretraining oral administration of zinc chloride (10, 25, and 50 mg/kg) for 14 consecutive days and post-training bilateral intra-hippocampal infusion of 1400W as a selective inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) inhibitor (10, 50, and 100 μM/side), alone and in combination, on the spatial memory retention in Morris water maze (MWM) were investigated. Animals were trained for 4 days and tested 48 h after completion of training. Also, the molecular effects of these compounds on the expression of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), as a cholinergic marker in the CA1 region of the hippocampus and medial septal area (MSA), were evaluated. Behavioral and molecular findings of this study showed that a 2-week oral administration of zinc chloride (50 mg/kg) impaired spatial memory retention in MWM and decreased ChAT expression. Immunohistochemical analysis of post-training bilateral intra-hippocampal infusion of 1400W revealed a significant increase in ChAT immunoreactivity. Furthermore, post-training bilateral intra-hippocampal infusion of 1400W into the CA1 region of the hippocampus reversed zinc chloride-induced spatial memory impairment in MWM and significantly increased ChAT expression in comparison with zinc chloride-treated animals. Taken together, these results emphasize the role of selective iNOS inhibitors in reversing zinc chloride-induced spatial memory deficits via modulation of cholinergic marker expression.

  19. Hypergravity upregulates renal inducible nitric oxide synthase expression and nitric oxide production

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Gun; Oh, Choong Sik; Kim, Hyun-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to hypergravity severely decreases renal blood flow, potentially causing renal dysfunction. Nitric oxide (NO), which is endogenously synthesized by inducible NO synthase (iNOS), plays an important role in the regulation of renal function. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of hypergravity exposure on the production of NO in kidneys. To determine whether hypergravity induces renal hypoxia and alters renal iNOS expression and NO production, mice were exposed to short-term hypergravity at +3Gz for 1 h. The time course of iNOS mRNA expression, hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α expression, and NO production was examined. Renal HIF-1α levels were significantly elevated immediately after centrifugation, and this increase was sustained for 3 h post-exposure. iNOS mRNA levels were also significantly increased immediately after exposure and were maintained during the reoxygenation period. Immunohistochemical staining for iNOS revealed that the cortical tubular epithelium exhibited moderate to strong cytoplasmic iNOS immunoreactivity immediately after hypergravity exposure and during the reoxygenation period. The time course of NO production was similar to that of iNOS expression. Our results suggest that both hypoxia and reoxygenation might be involved in the upregulation of HIF-1α in the kidneys of mice exposed to hypergravity. Significant increases in renocortical iNOS expression immediately after centrifugation and during the reoxygenation period suggest that iNOS expression induced by hypergravity exposure might play a protective role against hypoxia/reoxygenation injury in the renal cortex. Further investigations are necessary to clarify the role of iNOS and NO in kidneys exposed to hypergravity. PMID:27174912

  20. The ectopic expression of Snail in MDBK cells does not induce epithelial-mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    IZAWA, GENYA; KOBAYASHI, WAKAKO; HARAGUCHI, MISAKO; SUDO, AKIHARU; OZAWA, MASAYUKI

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a key process in the tumor metastatic cascade, is characterized by the loss of cell-cell junctions and cell polarity, as well as by the acquisition of migratory and invasive properties. However, the precise molecular events that initiate this complex EMT process are poorly understood. Snail expression induces EMT in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells and the human epidermoid carcinoma cell line, A431. Snail is a zinc finger transcription factor and triggers EMT by suppressing E-cadherin expression. In the present study, to broaden our knowledge of Snail-induced EMT, we generated stable Snail transfectants using Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cells. Contrary to the MDCK or A431 cells examined in our previous studies, the MDBK cells transfected with the Snail construct maintained an epithelial morphology and showed no sign of reduced cell-cell adhesiveness compared to the control cells. Consistent with these observations, the down-regulation of epithelial marker proteins, e.g. E-cadherin and desmoglein, and the upregulation of mesenchymal marker proteins, e.g., N-cadherin and fibronectin, were not detected. Furthermore, the E-cadherin promoter was not methylated. Therefore, in the MDBK cells, the ectopic expression of Snail failed to induce EMT. As previously demonstrated, in MDCK cells, Snail expression is accompanied by the increased expression of other EMT-inducing transcription factors, e.g., Slug and zinc finger E-box-binding homeobox 1 (ZEB1). However, the MDBK cells transfected with the Snail construct did not exhibit an increased expression of these factors. Thus, it is possible that the failure to upregulate other EMT-related transcription factors may explain the lack of Snail-mediated induction of EMT in MDBK cells. PMID:25998899

  1. The ectopic expression of Snail in MDBK cells does not induce epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Izawa, Genya; Kobayashi, Wakako; Haraguchi, Misako; Sudo, Akiharu; Ozawa, Masayuki

    2015-07-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a key process in the tumor metastatic cascade, is characterized by the loss of cell-cell junctions and cell polarity, as well as by the acquisition of migratory and invasive properties. However, the precise molecular events that initiate this complex EMT process are poorly understood. Snail expression induces EMT in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells and the human epidermoid carcinoma cell line, A431. Snail is a zinc finger transcription factor and triggers EMT by suppressing E-cadherin expression. In the present study, to broaden our knowledge of Snail‑induced EMT, we generated stable Snail transfectants using Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cells. Contrary to the MDCK or A431 cells examined in our previous studies, the MDBK cells transfected with the Snail construct maintained an epithelial morphology and showed no sign of reduced cell-cell adhesiveness compared to the control cells. Consistent with these observations, the downregulation of epithelial marker proteins, e.g. E-cadherin and desmoglein, and the upregulation of mesenchymal marker proteins, e.g., N-cadherin and fibronectin, were not detected. Furthermore, the E-cadherin promoter was not methylated. Therefore, in the MDBK cells, the ectopic expression of Snail failed to induce EMT. As previously demonstrated, in MDCK cells, Snail expression is accompanied by the increased expression of other EMT-inducing transcription factors, e.g., Slug and zinc finger E-box-binding homeobox 1 (ZEB1). However, the MDBK cells transfected with the Snail construct did not exhibit an increased expression of these factors. Thus, it is possible that the failure to upregulate other EMT-related transcription factors may explain the lack of Snail-mediated induction of EMT in MDBK cells.

  2. Intermedilysin induces EGR-1 expression through calcineurin/NFAT pathway in human cholangiocellular carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Susilowati, Heni; Okamura, Hirohiko; Hirota, Katsuhiko; Shono, Masayuki; Yoshida, Kaya; Murakami, Keiji; Tabata, Atsushi; Nagamune, Hideaki; Haneji, Tatsuji; Miyake, Yoichiro

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} ILY leads to the accumulation of [Ca{sup 2+}]i in the nucleus in HuCCT1 cells. {yields} ILY induced activation of NFAT1 through a calcineurin-dependent pathway. {yields} Calcineuri/NFAT pathway is involved in EGR-1 expression in response to ILY treatment. -- Abstract: Intermedilysin (ILY) is a cholesterol-dependent cytolysin produced by Streptococcus intermedius, which is associated with human brain and liver abscesses. Although intrahepatic bile duct cells play a valuable role in the pathogenesis of liver abscess, the molecular mechanism of ILY-treated intrahepatic bile duct cells remains unknown. In this study, we report that ILY induced a nuclear accumulation of intracellular calcium ([Ca{sup 2+}]i) in human cholangiocellular cells HuCCT1. We also demonstrate that 10 ng/ml ILY induced NFAT1 dephosphorylation and its nuclear translocation in HuCCT1 cells. In contrast to the result that ILY induced NF-{kappa}B translocation in human hepatic HepG2 cells, ILY did not affect NF-{kappa}B localization in HuCCT1 cells. Dephosphorylation and nuclear translocation of NFAT1 caused by ILY were prevented by [Ca{sup 2+}]i calcium chelator, BAPTA/AM, and calcineurin inhibitors, cyclosporine A and tacrolimus. ILY induced early growth response-1 (EGR-1) expression and it was inhibited by the pre-treatment with cyclosporine A, indicating that the calcineurin/NFAT pathway was involved in EGR-1 expression in response to ILY. ILY-induced calcineurin/NFAT1 activation and sequential EGR-1 expression might be related to the pathogenesis of S. intermedius in human bile duct cells.

  3. Testosterone persistently dysregulates hepatic expression of Tlr6 and Tlr8 induced by Plasmodium chabaudi malaria.

    PubMed

    Al-Quraishy, Saleh; Dkhil, Mohamed A; Abdel-Baki, Abdel-Azeem S; Araúzo-Bravo, Marcos J; Delic, Denis; Wunderlich, Frank

    2014-10-01

    Testosterone (T) is known to induce persistent susceptibility to Plasmodium chabaudi malaria. Pathogens recognizing Toll-like receptors (TLRs), though potentially important against malaria, have not yet been examined for their T-sensitivity. Here, we investigate effects of T and P. chabaudi on mRNA expression and promoter DNA methylation of Tlr1-9 genes in the liver of female C57BL/6 mice. These are treated with T or vehicle for 3 weeks, and then treatment is discontinued for 12 weeks, before challenging with P. chabaudi for 8 days. Our data reveal that T induces a 9.1-fold downregulation of Tlr6 mRNA and 6.3-fold upregulation of Tlr8 mRNA. Blood-stage infections induce significant increases in mRNA expression of Tlr1, 2, 4, 6, 7, and 8 varying between 2.5-fold and 21-fold in control mice. In T-pretreated mice, these Tlr genes are also significantly responsive to infections. However, the malaria-induced upregulations of the relative mRNA expressions of Tlr6 and Tlr8 are 5.6-fold higher and 6.5-fold lower in T-pretreated mice than in control mice. Infections induce a massive DNA down-methylation of the Tlr6 gene promoter in control mice, which is still more pronounced in T-pretreated mice, while significant changes are not detectable for the DNA methylation status of the Tlr8 promoter. Our data support the view that hepatic expression of Tlr6, but not that of Tlr8 is epigenetically controlled, and that the dysregulations of Tlr6 and Tlr8 critically contribute to T-induced persistent susceptibility to P. chabaudi malaria, possibly by dys-balancing responses of TLR6-mediated pathogen recognition and TLR8-mediated generation of anti-malaria "protective" autoimmunity.

  4. Expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 in pancreatic adenocarcinoma: Correlation with microvessel density

    PubMed Central

    Kasper, Hans U.; Wolf, Hella; Drebber, Uta; Wolf, Helmut K.; Kern, Michael A.

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Cyclooxygenases (COX) are key enzymes for conversion of arachidonic acid to prostaglandins. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) is the enzyme responsible for formation of nitric oxide. Both have constitutive and inducible isoforms. The inducible isoforms (iNOS and COX-2) are of great interest as regulators of tumor angiogenesis, tumorigenesis and inflammatory processes. This study was to clarify their role in pancreatic adenocarcinomas. METHODS: We investigated the immunohistochemical iNOS and COX-2 expression in 40 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas of different grade and stage. The results were compared with microvessel density and clinicopathological data. RESULTS: Twenty-one (52.5%) of the cases showed iNOS expression, 15 (37.5%) of the cases were positive for COX-2. The immunoreaction was heterogeneously distributed within the tumors. Staining intensity was different between the tumors. No correlation between iNOS and COX-2 expression was seen. There was no relationship with microvessel density. However, iNOS positive tumors developed more often distant metastases and the more malignant tumors showed a higher COX-2 expression. There was no correlation with other clinicopathological data. CONCLUSION: Approximately half of the cases expressed iNOS and COX-2. These two enzymes do not seem to be the key step in angiogenesis or carcinogenesis of pancreatic adenocarcinomas. Due to a low prevalence of COX-2 expression, chemoprevention of pancreatic carcinomas by COX-2 inhibitors can only achieve a limited success. PMID:15222037

  5. IDO induces expression of a novel tryptophan transporter in mouse and human tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Silk, Jonathan D; Lakhal, Samira; Laynes, Robert; Vallius, Laura; Karydis, Ioannis; Marcea, Cornelius; Boyd, C A Richard; Cerundolo, Vincenzo

    2011-08-15

    IDO is the rate-limiting enzyme in the kynurenine pathway, catabolizing tryptophan to kynurenine. Tryptophan depletion by IDO-expressing tumors is a common mechanism of immune evasion inducing regulatory T cells and inhibiting effector T cells. Because mammalian cells cannot synthesize tryptophan, it remains unclear how IDO(+) tumor cells overcome the detrimental effects of local tryptophan depletion. We demonstrate that IDO(+) tumor cells express a novel amino acid transporter, which accounts for ∼50% of the tryptophan uptake. The induced transporter is biochemically distinguished from the constitutively expressed tryptophan transporter System L by increased resistance to inhibitors of System L, resistance to inhibition by high concentrations of most amino acids tested, and high substrate specificity for tryptophan. Under conditions of low extracellular tryptophan, expression of this novel transporter significantly increases tryptophan entry into IDO(+) tumors relative to tryptophan uptake through the low-affinity System L alone, and further decreases tryptophan levels in the microenvironment. Targeting this additional tryptophan transporter could be a way of pharmacological inhibition of IDO-mediated tumor escape. These findings highlight the ability of IDO-expressing tumor cells to thrive in a tryptophan-depleted microenvironment by expressing a novel, highly tryptophan-specific transporter, which is resistant to inhibition by most other amino acids. The additional transporter allows tumor cells to strike the ideal balance between supply of tryptophan essential for their own proliferation and survival, and depleting the extracellular milieu of tryptophan to inhibit T cell proliferation.

  6. Among-lake reciprocal transplants induce convergent expression of immune genes in threespine stickleback.

    PubMed

    Stutz, William E; Schmerer, Matthew; Coates, Jessica L; Bolnick, Daniel I

    2015-09-01

    Geographic variation in parasite communities can drive evolutionary divergence in host immune genes. However, biotic and abiotic environmental variation can also induce plastic differences in immune function among populations. At present, there is little information concerning the relative magnitudes of heritable vs. induced immune divergence in natural populations. We examined immune gene expression profiles of threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) from six lakes on Vancouver Island, British Columbia. Parasite community composition differs between lake types (large or small, containing limnetic- or benthic-like stickleback) and between watersheds. We observed corresponding differences in immune gene expression profiles among wild-caught stickleback, using a set of seven immune genes representing distinct branches of the immune system. To evaluate the role of environmental effects on this differentiation, we experimentally transplanted wild-caught fish into cages in their native lake, or into a nearby foreign lake. Transplanted individuals' immune gene expression converged on patterns typical of their destination lake, deviating from their native expression profile. Transplant individuals' source population had a much smaller effect, suggesting relatively weak genetic underpinning of population differences in immunity, as viewed through gene expression. This strong environmental regulation of immune gene expression provides a counterpoint to the large emerging literature documenting microevolution and genetic diversification of immune function. Our findings illustrate the value of studying immunity in natural environmental settings where the immune system has evolved and actively functions. PMID:26118468

  7. Optimizing heat shock protein expression induced by prostate cancer laser therapy through predictive computational models.

    PubMed

    Rylander, Marissa Nichole; Feng, Yusheng; Zhang, Yongjie; Bass, Jon; Jason Stafford, R; Volgin, Andrei; Hazle, John D; Diller, Kenneth R

    2006-01-01

    Thermal therapy efficacy can be diminished due to heat shock protein (HSP) induction in regions of a tumor where temperatures are insufficient to coagulate proteins. HSP expression enhances tumor cell viability and imparts resistance to chemotherapy and radiation treatments, which are generally employed in conjunction with hyperthermia. Therefore, an understanding of the thermally induced HSP expression within the targeted tumor must be incorporated into the treatment plan to optimize the thermal dose delivery and permit prediction of the overall tissue response. A treatment planning computational model capable of predicting the temperature, HSP27 and HSP70 expression, and damage fraction distributions associated with laser heating in healthy prostate tissue and tumors is presented. Measured thermally induced HSP27 and HSP70 expression kinetics and injury data for normal and cancerous prostate cells and prostate tumors are employed to create the first HSP expression predictive model and formulate an Arrhenius damage model. The correlation coefficients between measured and model predicted temperature, HSP27, and HSP70 were 0.98, 0.99, and 0.99, respectively, confirming the accuracy of the model. Utilization of the treatment planning model in the design of prostate cancer thermal therapies can enable optimization of the treatment outcome by controlling HSP expression and injury.

  8. Among-lake reciprocal transplants induce convergent expression of immune genes in threespine stickleback.

    PubMed

    Stutz, William E; Schmerer, Matthew; Coates, Jessica L; Bolnick, Daniel I

    2015-09-01

    Geographic variation in parasite communities can drive evolutionary divergence in host immune genes. However, biotic and abiotic environmental variation can also induce plastic differences in immune function among populations. At present, there is little information concerning the relative magnitudes of heritable vs. induced immune divergence in natural populations. We examined immune gene expression profiles of threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) from six lakes on Vancouver Island, British Columbia. Parasite community composition differs between lake types (large or small, containing limnetic- or benthic-like stickleback) and between watersheds. We observed corresponding differences in immune gene expression profiles among wild-caught stickleback, using a set of seven immune genes representing distinct branches of the immune system. To evaluate the role of environmental effects on this differentiation, we experimentally transplanted wild-caught fish into cages in their native lake, or into a nearby foreign lake. Transplanted individuals' immune gene expression converged on patterns typical of their destination lake, deviating from their native expression profile. Transplant individuals' source population had a much smaller effect, suggesting relatively weak genetic underpinning of population differences in immunity, as viewed through gene expression. This strong environmental regulation of immune gene expression provides a counterpoint to the large emerging literature documenting microevolution and genetic diversification of immune function. Our findings illustrate the value of studying immunity in natural environmental settings where the immune system has evolved and actively functions.

  9. Optimizing heat shock protein expression induced by prostate cancer laser therapy through predictive computational models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rylander, Marissa N.; Feng, Yusheng; Zhang, Yongjie; Bass, Jon; Stafford, Roger J.; Hazle, John D.; Diller, Kenneth R.

    2006-07-01

    Thermal therapy efficacy can be diminished due to heat shock protein (HSP) induction in regions of a tumor where temperatures are insufficient to coagulate proteins. HSP expression enhances tumor cell viability and imparts resistance to chemotherapy and radiation treatments, which are generally employed in conjunction with hyperthermia. Therefore, an understanding of the thermally induced HSP expression within the targeted tumor must be incorporated into the treatment plan to optimize the thermal dose delivery and permit prediction of the overall tissue response. A treatment planning computational model capable of predicting the temperature, HSP27 and HSP70 expression, and damage fraction distributions associated with laser heating in healthy prostate tissue and tumors is presented. Measured thermally induced HSP27 and HSP70 expression kinetics and injury data for normal and cancerous prostate cells and prostate tumors are employed to create the first HSP expression predictive model and formulate an Arrhenius damage model. The correlation coefficients between measured and model predicted temperature, HSP27, and HSP70 were 0.98, 0.99, and 0.99, respectively, confirming the accuracy of the model. Utilization of the treatment planning model in the design of prostate cancer thermal therapies can enable optimization of the treatment outcome by controlling HSP expression and injury.

  10. Matrix Rigidity Induces Osteolytic Gene Expression of Metastatic Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ruppender, Nazanin S.; Merkel, Alyssa R.; Martin, T. John; Sterling, Julie A.; Guelcher, Scott A.

    2010-01-01

    Nearly 70% of breast cancer patients with advanced disease will develop bone metastases. Once established in bone, tumor cells produce factors that cause changes in normal bone remodeling, such as parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP). While enhanced expression of PTHrP is known to stimulate osteoclasts to resorb bone, the environmental factors driving tumor cells to express PTHrP in the early stages of development of metastatic bone disease are unknown. In this study, we have shown that tumor cells known to metastasize to bone respond to 2D substrates with rigidities comparable to that of the bone microenvironment by increasing expression and production of PTHrP. The cellular response is regulated by Rho-dependent actomyosin contractility mediated by TGF-ß signaling. Inhibition of Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) using both pharmacological and genetic approaches decreased PTHrP expression. Furthermore, cells expressing a dominant negative form of the TGF-ß receptor did not respond to substrate rigidity, and inhibition of ROCK decreased PTHrP expression induced by exogenous TGF-ß. These observations suggest a role for the differential rigidity of the mineralized bone microenvironment in early stages of tumor-induced osteolysis, which is especially important in metastatic cancer since many cancers (such as those of the breast and lung) preferentially metastasize to bone. PMID:21085597

  11. Differential expression of gastric MUC5AC in colonic epithelial cells: TFF3-wired IL1 β/Akt crosstalk-induced mucosal immune response against Shigella dysenteriae infection.

    PubMed

    Raja, Subramaniya Bharathi; Murali, Malliga Raman; Devaraj, Halagowder; Devaraj, Sivasithamparam Niranjali

    2012-02-01

    An understanding of the signaling mechanism(s) that regulate the differential expression of gastric mucin MUC5AC in colonic epithelial cells would contribute significantly to investigations of its role in colonic mucosa infected with the bacterial pathogen Shigella dysenteriae. Here we show that S. dysenteriae-Sinduced expression of interleukin-1β upregulates MUC2 expression and the differential expression of MUC5AC. Differential expression of MUC5AC involves crosstalk between interleukin-1β and Akt, whereby the trefoil factor family peptide TFF3 activates Akt by phosphorylation of EGFR. TFF3 also downregulates E-cadherin expression, causing accumulation of β-catenin in the cytosol. Phosphorylation of GSK-3β (inactivated) by activated Akt inhibits ubiquitylation of β-catenin, leading to its nuclear translocation, which then induces the expression of MUC5AC and cyclin D1. Accumulation of cyclin D1 alters the cell cycle, promoting cell survival and proliferation. Human colon HT29MTX cells, which overexpress MUC5AC, were resistant to adherence and invasion of S. dysenteriae when compared with other mucin-secreting HT29 cell types. Thus, during infection with S. dysenteriae, crosstalk between interleukin-1β and Akt wired by TFF3 induces expression of MUC5AC in colonic epithelial cells. Differentially expressed gastric MUC5AC aids in mucosal clearance of S. dysenteriae, inhibiting adherence and invasion of the pathogen to colonic epithelial cells, which protects the host.

  12. Long-term inducible expression in striatal neurons from helper virus-free HSV-1 vectors that contain the tetracycline-inducible promoter system

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Qingshen; Sun, Mei; Wang, Xiaodan; Zhang, Guo-rong; Geller, Alfred I.

    2006-01-01

    Direct gene transfer into neurons in the brain via a virus vector system has potential for both examining neuronal physiology and for developing gene therapy treatments for neurological diseases. Many of these applications require precise control of the levels of recombinant gene expression. The preferred method for controlling the levels of expression is by use of an inducible promoter system, and the tetracycline (tet)-inducible promoter system is the preferred system. Helper virus-free Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV-1) vectors have a number of the advantages, including their large size and efficient gene transfer. Also, we have reported long-term (14 months) expression from HSV-1 vectors that contain a modified neurofilament heavy gene promoter. A number of studies have reported short-term, inducible expression from helper virus-containing HSV-1 vector systems. However, long-term, inducible expression has not been reported using HSV-1 vectors. The goal of this study was to obtain long-term, inducible expression from helper virus-free HSV-1 vectors. We examined two different vector designs for adapting the tet promoter system to HSV-1 vectors. One design was an autoregulatory design; one transcription unit used a tet-regulated promoter to express the tet-regulated transcription factor tet-off, and another transcription unit used a tet-regulated promoter to express the Lac Z gene. In the other vector design, one transcription unit used the modified neurofilament heavy gene promoter to express tet-off, and another transcription unit used a tet-regulated promoter to express the Lac Z gene. The results showed that both vector designs supported inducible expression in cultured fibroblast or neuronal cell lines and for a short time (4 days) in the rat striatum. Of note, only the vector design that used the modified neurofilament promoter to express tet-off supported long-term (2 months) inducible expression in striatal neurons. PMID:16545782

  13. Differentiation inducing factor-1 (DIF-1) induces gene and protein expression of the Dictyostelium nuclear calmodulin-binding protein nucleomorphin.

    PubMed

    O'Day, Danton H; Poloz, Yekaterina; Myre, Michael A

    2009-02-01

    The nucleomorphin gene numA1 from Dictyostelium codes for a multi-domain, calmodulin binding protein that regulates nuclear number. To gain insight into the regulation of numA, we assessed the effects of the stalk cell differentiation inducing factor-1 (DIF-1), an extracellular signalling molecule, on the expression of numA1 RNA and protein. For comparison, the extracellular signalling molecules cAMP (mediates chemotaxis, prestalk and prespore differentiation) and ammonia (NH(3)/NH(4)(+); antagonizes DIF) were also studied. Starvation, which is a signal for multicellular development, results in a greater than 80% decrease in numA1 mRNA expression within 4 h. Treatment with ammonium chloride led to a greater than 90% inhibition of numA1 RNA expression within 2 h. In contrast, the addition of DIF-1 completely blocked the decrease in numA1 gene expression caused by starvation. Treatment of vegetative cells with cAMP led to decreases in numA1 RNA expression that were equivalent to those seen with starvation. Western blotting after various morphogen treatments showed that the maintenance of vegetative levels of numA1 RNA by DIF-1 in starved cells was reflected in significantly increased numA1 protein levels. Treatment with cAMP and/or ammonia led to decreased protein expression and each of these morphogens suppressed the stimulatory effects of DIF-1. Protein expression levels of CBP4a, a calcium-dependent binding partner of numA1, were regulated in the same manner as numA1 suggesting this potential co-regulation may be related to their functional relationship. NumA1 is the first calmodulin binding protein shown to be regulated by developmental morphogens in Dictyostelium being upregulated by DIF-1 and down-regulated by cAMP and ammonia. PMID:19000924

  14. P-Selectin Induces the Expression of Tissue Factor on Monocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celi, Alessandro; Pellegrini, Giuliana; Lorenzet, Roberto; de Blasi, Antonio; Ready, Neal; Ready, Neal; Furie, Barbara C.; Furie, Bruce

    1994-09-01

    P-selectin on activated platelets and stimulated endothelial cells mediates cell adhesion with monocytes and neutrophils. Since activated platelets induce tissue factor on mononuclear leukocytes, we examined the effect of P-selectin on the expression of tissue factor activity in monocytes. Purified P-selectin stimulated tissue factor expression on mononuclear leukocytes in a dose-dependent manner. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells expressing P-selectin stimulated tissue factor procoagulant activity in purified monocytes, whereas untransfected CHO cells and CHO cells expressing E-selectin did not. Anti-P-selectin antibodies inhibited the effects of purified P-selectin and CHO cells expressing P-selectin on monocytes. Incubation of CHO cells expressing P-selectin with monocytes leads to the development of tissue factor mRNA in monocytes and to the expression of tissue factor antigen on the monocyte surface. These results indicate that P-selectin upregulates the expression of tissue factor on monocytes as well as mediates the binding of platelets and endothelial cells with monocytes and neutrophils. The binding of P-selectin to monocytes in the area of vascular injury may be a component of a mechanism that initiates thrombosis.

  15. Oncogenic kinase NPM/ALK induces expression of HIF1α mRNA.

    PubMed

    Marzec, M; Liu, X; Wong, W; Yang, Y; Pasha, T; Kantekure, K; Zhang, P; Woetmann, A; Cheng, M; Odum, N; Wasik, M A

    2011-03-17

    The mechanisms of malignant cell transformation mediated by the oncogenic anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) tyrosine kinase remain only partially understood. In this study, we report that T-cell lymphoma (TCL) cells carrying the nucleophosmin (NPM)/ALK fusion protein (ALK+ TCL) strongly express hypoxia-induced factor 1α (HIF1α) mRNA, even under normoxic conditions, and markedly upregulate HIF1α protein expression under hypoxia. HIF1α expression is strictly dependent on the expression and enzymatic activity of NPM/ALK, as shown in BaF3 cells transfected with wild-type NPM/ALK and kinase-inactive NPM/ALK K210R mutant and by the inhibition of the NPM/ALK function in ALK+ TCL cells by a small-molecule ALK inhibitor. NPM/ALK induces HIF1α expression by upregulating its gene transcription through its key signal transmitter signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), which binds to the HIF1α gene promoter as shown by the chromatin immunoprecipitation assay and is required for HIF1α gene expression as demonstrated by its small interfering RNA-mediated depletion. In turn, depletion of HIF1α increases mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 activation, cell growth and proliferation and decreases vascular endothelial growth factor synthesis. These results identify a novel cell-transforming property of NPM/ALK, namely its ability to induce the expression of HIF1α, a protein with an important role in carcinogenesis. These results also provide another rationale to therapeutically target NPM/ALK and STAT3 in ALK+ TCL.

  16. A reporter mouse line with doxycyclin-inducible expression of β-glucosidase.

    PubMed

    Jay, Freya F; Schneider, Marlon R

    2014-12-01

    Mouse lines allowing the inducible expression of transgenes became essential tools for studying gene function and for developing accurate animal models for human diseases. A key component of this tool is the availability of "reporter" lines, mice expressing transgenes encoding easily detectable enzymes or other proteins normally not associated with eukaryotic tissues. Such lines may be suitable for a number of applications, including lineage tracing, label-retaining experiments, and the identification and monitoring of regulatory elements important for tissue-specific gene expression. However, only a limited number of reporter lines suitable for inducible expression systems are available. Here, we employed pronuclear DNA microinjection to generate a new reporter mouse line that allows the inducible expression of β-glucosidase, a recently reported stable and easily detectable protein, upon administration of doxycyclin to the drinking water. This novel line was established in the widely used inbreed background C57BL/6, and the transgene is transmitted between generations in a Mendelian fashion. When crossed to a K14-rtTA mouse line, activation of β-glucosidase expression in the epidermal basal layer is easily detected in double-transgenic animals receiving doxycyclin, while no expression is seen in double-transgenic mice without doxycyclin treatment or in animals carrying only one transgene. We anticipate that this new mouse line will become a valuable tool for a number of applications in vivo, including label-retaining experiments and testing the appropriate regulation of rtTA cassettes under different promoters in novel transgenic mouse lines. PMID:25091595

  17. IL-27 induces the expression of IDO and PD-L1 in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Carbotti, Grazia; Barisione, Gaia; Airoldi, Irma; Mezzanzanica, Delia; Bagnoli, Marina; Ferrero, Simone; Petretto, Andrea; Fabbi, Marina; Ferrini, Silvano

    2015-12-22

    IL-27 is a member of the IL-12 family that is produced by macrophages and dendritic cells. IL-27 inhibits the growth and invasiveness of different cancers and therefore represents a potential anti-tumor agent. By contrast, it may exert immune-regulatory properties in different biological systems. We reported that IL-27 induces the expression of the IL-18 inhibitor IL-18BP, in human Epithelial Ovarian Cancer (EOC) cells, thus potentially limiting the immune response. Here, we tested whether IL-27 may modulate other immune-regulatory molecules involved in EOC progression, including Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and Programmed Death-Ligand (PD-L)1. IDO and PD-L1 were not constitutively expressed by EOC cells in vitro, but IL-27 increased their expression through STAT1 and STAT3 tyrosine phosphorylation. Differently, cells isolated from EOC ascites showed constitutive activation of STAT1 and STAT3 and IDO expression. These findings, together with the expression of IL-27 in scattered leukocytes in EOC ascites and tissues, suggest a potential role of IL-27 in immune-regulatory networks of EOC. In addition, IL-27 induced IDO or PD-L1 expression in monocytes and in human PC3 prostate and A549 lung cancer cells. A current paradigm in tumor immunology is that tumor cells may escape from immune control due to "adaptive resistance" mediated by T cell-secreted IFN-γ, which induces PD-L1 and IDO expression in tumor cells. Our present data indicate that also IL-27 has similar activities and suggest that the therapeutic use of IL-27 as anti-cancer agent may have dual effects, in some tumors.

  18. Heavy Metal-induced Metallothionein Expression Is Regulated by Specific Protein Phosphatase 2A Complexes*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liping; Ma, Lu; Bai, Qing; Zhu, Xiaonian; Zhang, Jinmiao; Wei, Qing; Li, Daochuan; Gao, Chen; Li, Jie; Zhang, Zhengbao; Liu, Caixia; He, Zhini; Zeng, Xiaowen; Zhang, Aihua; Qu, Weidong; Zhuang, Zhixiong; Chen, Wen; Xiao, Yongmei

    2014-01-01

    Induction of metallothionein (MT) expression is involved in metal homeostasis and detoxification. To identify the key pathways that regulate metal-induced cytotoxicity, we investigate how phosphorylated metal-responsive transcription factor-1 (MTF-1) contributed to induction of MT expression. Immortal human embryonic kidney cells (HEK cells) were treated with seven kinds of metals including cadmium chloride (CdCl2), zinc sulfate (ZnSO4), copper sulfate(CuSO4), lead acetate (PbAc), nickel sulfate (NiSO4), sodium arsenite (NaAsO2), and potassium bichromate (K2Cr2O7). The MT expression was induced in a dose-response and time-dependent manner upon various metal treatments. A cycle of phosphorylation and dephosphorylation was required for translocation of MTF-1 from cytoplasm to nucleus, leading to the up-regulation of MTs expression. Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) participated in regulating MT expression through dephosphorylation of MTF-1. A loss-of-function screen revealed that the specific PP2A complexes containing PR110 were involved in metal-induced MT expression. Suppression of PP2A PR110 in HEK cells resulted in the persistent MTF-1 phosphorylation and the disturbance of MTF-1 nuclear translocation, which was concomitant with a significant decrease of MT expression and enhanced cytotoxicity in HEK cells. Notably, MTF-1 was found in complex with specific PP2A complexes containing the PR110 subunit upon metal exposure. Furthermore, we identify that the dephosphorylation of MTF-1 at residue Thr-254 is directly regulated by PP2A PR110 complexes and responsible for MTF-1 activation. Taken together, these findings delineate a novel pathway that determines cytotoxicity in response to metal treatments and provide new insight into the role of PP2A in cellular stress response. PMID:24962574

  19. 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin-D3 Induces Avian β-Defensin Gene Expression in Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guolong; Ouyang, Linghua; Robinson, Kelsy; Tang, Yanqiang; Zhu, Qing; Li, Diyan; Hu, Yaodong; Liu, Yiping

    2016-01-01

    Host defense peptides (HDPs) play a critical role in innate immunity. Specific modulation of endogenous HDP synthesis by dietary compounds has been regarded as a novel approach to boost immunity and disease resistance in animal production. 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D3 (1,25D3) is well known as a powerful HDP inducer in humans, but limited information about the effect of 1,25D3 on HDPs in poultry is available. Here, we sought to examine whether 1,25D3 could stimulate avian β-defensin (AvBD) expression in chickens. We used chicken embryo intestinal epithelial cells (CEIEPCs) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to study the effect of 1,25D3 on the expression of AvBDs. We observed that 1,25D3 is able to up-regulate the expression of several AvBDs in CEIEPCs and PBMCs, whereas it increased the amounts of AvBD4 mRNA in CEIEPCs only in the presence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). On the other hand, LPS treatment not only inhibited the expression of CYP24A1 but also altered the expression pattern of VDR in CEIEPCs. Furthermore, AvBDs were not directly regulated by 1,25D3, as cycloheximide completely blocked 1,25D3-induced expression of AvBDs. Our observations suggest that 1,25D3 is capable of inducing AvBD gene expression and is a potential antibiotic alternative through augmentation of host innate immunity as well as disease control in chickens. PMID:27135828

  20. A reporter mouse line with doxycyclin-inducible expression of β-glucosidase.

    PubMed

    Jay, Freya F; Schneider, Marlon R

    2014-12-01

    Mouse lines allowing the inducible expression of transgenes became essential tools for studying gene function and for developing accurate animal models for human diseases. A key component of this tool is the availability of "reporter" lines, mice expressing transgenes encoding easily detectable enzymes or other proteins normally not associated with eukaryotic tissues. Such lines may be suitable for a number of applications, including lineage tracing, label-retaining experiments, and the identification and monitoring of regulatory elements important for tissue-specific gene expression. However, only a limited number of reporter lines suitable for inducible expression systems are available. Here, we employed pronuclear DNA microinjection to generate a new reporter mouse line that allows the inducible expression of β-glucosidase, a recently reported stable and easily detectable protein, upon administration of doxycyclin to the drinking water. This novel line was established in the widely used inbreed background C57BL/6, and the transgene is transmitted between generations in a Mendelian fashion. When crossed to a K14-rtTA mouse line, activation of β-glucosidase expression in the epidermal basal layer is easily detected in double-transgenic animals receiving doxycyclin, while no expression is seen in double-transgenic mice without doxycyclin treatment or in animals carrying only one transgene. We anticipate that this new mouse line will become a valuable tool for a number of applications in vivo, including label-retaining experiments and testing the appropriate regulation of rtTA cassettes under different promoters in novel transgenic mouse lines.

  1. Restoration of XAF1 expression induces apoptosis and inhibits tumor growth in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Tu, Shui Ping; Liston, Peter; Cui, Jian Tao; Lin, Marie C M; Jiang, Xiao Hua; Yang, Yi; Gu, Qing; Jiang, Shi Hu; Lum, Ching Tung; Kung, Hsiang Fu; Korneluk, Robert G; Wong, Benjamin Chun-Yu

    2009-08-01

    XAF1 (XIAP-associated factor 1) is a novel XIAP binding protein that can antagonize XIAP and sensitize cells to other cell death triggers. Our previous results have shown that aberrant hypermethylation of the CpG sites in XAF1 promoter is strongly associated with lower expression of XAF1 in gastric cancers. In our study, we investigated the effect of restoration of XAF1 expression on growth of gastric cancers. We found that the restoration of XAF1 expression suppressed anchorage-dependent and -independent growth and increased sensitivity to TRAIL and drug-induced apoptosis. Stable cell clones expressing XAF1 exhibited delayed tumor initiation in nude mice. Restoration of XAF1 expression mediated by adenovirus vector greatly increased apoptosis in gastric cancer cell lines in a time- and dose-dependent manner and sensitized cancer cells to TRAIL and drugs-induced apoptosis. Adeno-XAF1 transduction induced cell cycle G2/M arrest and upregulated the expression of p21 and downregulated the expression of cyclin B1 and cdc2. Notably, adeno-XAF1 treatment significantly inhibited tumor growth, strongly enhanced the antitumor activity of TRAIL in a gastric cancer xenograft model in vivo, and significantly prolonged the survival time of animals bearing tumor xenografts. Complete eradication of established tumors was achieved on combined treatment with adeno-XAF1 and TRAIL. Our results document that the restoration of XAF1 inhibits gastric tumorigenesis and tumor growth and that XAF1 is a promising candidate for cancer gene therapy. PMID:19358264

  2. Genetic inactivation of acrAB or inhibition of efflux induces expression of ramA

    PubMed Central

    Lawler, A. J.; Ricci, V.; Busby, S. J. W.; Piddock, L. J. V.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The transcriptional activator RamA regulates production of the multidrug resistance efflux AcrAB–TolC system in several Enterobacteriaceae. This study investigated factors that lead to increased expression of ramA. Methods In order to monitor changes in ramA expression, the promoter region of ramA was fused to a gfp gene encoding an unstable green fluorescence protein (GFP) on the reporter plasmid, pMW82. The ramA reporter plasmid was transformed into Salmonella Typhimurium SL1344 and a ΔacrB mutant. The response of the reporter to subinhibitory concentrations of antibiotics, dyes, biocides, psychotropic agents and efflux inhibitors was measured during growth over a 5 h time period. Results Our data revealed that the expression of ramA was increased in a ΔacrB mutant and also in the presence of the efflux inhibitors phenylalanine-arginine-β-naphthylamide, carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone and 1-(1-naphthylmethyl)-piperazine. The phenothiazines chlorpromazine and thioridazine also increased ramA expression, triggering the greatest increase in GFP expression. However, inducers of Escherichia coli marA and soxS and 12 of 17 tested antibiotic substrates of AcrAB–TolC did not induce ramA expression. Conclusions This study shows that expression of ramA is not induced by most substrates of the AcrAB–TolC efflux system, but is increased by mutational inactivation of acrB or when efflux is inhibited. PMID:23493314

  3. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester inhibits 3-MC-induced CYP1A1 expression through induction of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyung Gyun; Han, Eun Hee; Im, Ji Hye; Lee, Eun Ji; Jin, Sun Woo; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2015-09-25

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), a natural component of propolis, is reported to have anticarcinogenic properties, although its precise chemopreventive mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we examined the effects of CAPE on 3-methylcholanthrene (3-MC)-induced CYP1A1 expression and activities. CAPE reduced the formation of the benzo[a]pyrene-DNA adduct. Moreover, CAPE inhibited 3-MC-induced CYP1A1 activity, mRNA expression, protein level, and promoter activity. CAPE treatment also decreased 3-MC-inducible xenobiotic-response element (XRE)-linked luciferase, aryl hydrocarbons receptor (AhR) transactivation and nuclear localization. CAPE induced hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) protein level and HIF-1α responsible element (HRE) transcriptional activity. CAPE-mediated HIF-1α reduced 3-MC-inducible CYP1A1 protein expression. Taken together, CAPE decreases 3-MC-mediated CYP1A1 expression, and this inhibitory response is associated with inhibition of AhR and HIF-1α induction. - Highlights: • CAPE reduced the formation of the benzo[a]pyrene-DNA adduct. • CAPE inhibited 3-MC-induced CYP1A1 expression. • CAPE induced HIF-1α induction. • CAPE-mediated HIF-1α reduced 3-MC-inducible CYP1A1 expression.

  4. Influence factors and gene expression patterns during MeJa-induced gummosis in peach.

    PubMed

    Li, Minji; Liu, Meiyan; Peng, Futian; Fang, Long

    2015-06-15

    Jasmonates (JAs) play important roles in gummosis in peach. Mechanical damage, methyl jasmonate (MeJa), and ethylene can induce gummosis on peach shoots in the field. In this study, we used MeJa (2%, w/w) to induce gummosis on current-year shoots in peach on high temperature (35°C). Based on the experimental model, we studied the influence of factors on the development of peach gummosis. Our experimental results showed that high temperature could promote gummosis development induced by MeJa. Exogenous CaCl2 treatment reduced the degree of gummosis by increasing the calcium content in shoots, which is conducive to the synthesis and maintenance of the cell wall. Using digital gene expression (DGE), 3831 differentially expressed genes were identified in the MeJa treatment versus the control. By analyzing changes in gene expression associated with cell wall degradation, genes encoding pectin methylesterase (PME) and endo-polygalacturonase (PG) were found to be significantly induced, suggesting that they are key enzymes in cell wall degradation that occurs during MeJa-induced gummosis. Genes for glycosyltransferase (GT) and cellulose synthase (CS) were also significantly upregulated by MeJa. This result suggests that MeJa treatment not only promotes the degradation of polysaccharides to destroy the cell wall, but also promotes the synthesis of new polysaccharides. We also analyzed changes in gene expression associated with sugar metabolism, senescence, and defense. MeJa treatment affected the expression of genes related to sugar metabolism and promoted plant senescence. Among the defense genes, the expression pattern of phenylalanine ammonium lyase (PAL) suggested that PAL may play an important role in protecting against the effects of MeJa treatment. Our experimental results showed that MeJa treatment can promote the biosynthesis and signal transduction of ethylene in peach shoots; they can induce gummosis on peach shoots respectively, and there are overlaps between

  5. A Stable HeLa Cell Line That Inducibly Expresses Poliovirus 2Apro: Effects on Cellular and Viral Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Barco, Angel; Feduchi, Elena; Carrasco, Luis

    2000-01-01

    A HeLa cell clone (2A7d) that inducibly expresses the gene for poliovirus protease 2A (2Apro) under the control of tetracycline has been obtained. Synthesis of 2Apro induces severe morphological changes in 2A7d cells. One day after tetracycline removal, cells round up and a few hours later die. Poliovirus 2Apro cleaves both forms of initiation factor eIF4G, causing extensive inhibition of capped-mRNA translation a few hours after protease induction. Methoxysuccinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Val-chloromethylketone, a selective inhibitor of 2Apro, prevents both eIF4G cleavage and inhibition of translation but not cellular death. Expression of 2Apro still allows both the replication of poliovirus and the translation of mRNAs containing a picornavirus leader sequence, while vaccinia virus replication is drastically inhibited. Translation of transfected capped mRNA is blocked in 2A7d-On cells, while luciferase synthesis from a mRNA bearing a picornavirus internal ribosome entry site (IRES) sequence is enhanced by the presence of 2Apro. Moreover, synthesis of 2Apro in 2A7d cells complements the translational defect of a poliovirus 2Apro-defective variant. These results show that poliovirus 2Apro expression mimics some phenotypical characteristics of poliovirus-infected cells, such as cell rounding, inhibition of protein synthesis and enhancement of IRES-driven translation. This cell line constitutes a useful tool to further analyze 2Apro functions, to complement poliovirus 2Apro mutants, and to test antiviral compounds. PMID:10666269

  6. Adipokines enhance oleic acid-induced proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells by inducing CD36 expression.

    PubMed

    Schlich, Raphaela; Lamers, Daniela; Eckel, Jürgen; Sell, Henrike

    2015-01-01

    Adipose tissue is not only releasing lipids but also various adipokines that are both dysregulated in the obese state and may contribute to obesity-associated vascular dysfunction and cardiovascular risk. We have previously shown that the combination of adipocyte-conditioned medium (CM) and oleic acid (OA) increases proliferation of human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) in a synergistic way. We identified vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) as a component within CM that is responsible for most of the observed effects. In this study, we investigate novel mechanisms that underlie the combined effects of adipokine and oleic acid-induced proliferation of VSMC. Oleic acid leads to significant lipid accumulation in VSMC that is further enhanced by the combined treatment with CM. Accordingly CM stimulates CD36 expression in VSMC while OA is not affecting CD36. Silencing of CD36 was established and prevents lipid accumulation in all tested conditions. CD36 silencing also abrogates CM- and OA-induced proliferation and considerably reduces proliferation induced by the combination of CM and OA. At the same time, VEGF secretion and VEGF-receptor 1 (VEGF-R1) by VSMC was not affected by CD36 silencing. However, VEGF was not able to induce any proliferation in VSMC after CD36 silencing that also blunted VEGF-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation. Finally, combined silencing of CD36 together with a blocking antibody against VEGF prevented most of CMOA-induced proliferation. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that CD36 is mediating CM-induced proliferation of VSMC. Induction of CD36 by adipokines enhances the response of VSMC towards VEGF and OA.

  7. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 mediates TAZ expression and nuclear localization to induce the breast cancer stem cell phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Lisha; Gilkes, Daniele M.; Hu, Hongxia; Takano, Naoharu; Luo, Weibo; Lu, Haiquan; Bullen, John W.; Samanta, Debangshu; Liang, Houjie; Semenza, Gregg L.

    2014-01-01

    Intratumoral hypoxia, which is associated with breast cancer metastasis and patient mortality, increases the percentage of breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) but the underlying molecular mechanisms have not been delineated. Here we report that hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) triggers the expression and activity of TAZ, a transcriptional co-activator that is required for BCSC maintenance, through two discrete mechanisms. First, HIF-1 binds directly to the WWTR1 gene and activates transcription of TAZ mRNA. Second, HIF-1 activates transcription of the SIAH1 gene, which encodes a ubiquitin protein ligase that is required for the hypoxia-induced ubiquitination and proteasome-dependent degradation of LATS2, a kinase that inhibits the nuclear localization of TAZ. Inhibition of HIF-1α, TAZ, or SIAH1 expression by short hairpin RNA blocked the enrichment of BCSCs in response to hypoxia. Human breast cancer database analysis revealed that increased expression (greater than the median) of both TAZ and HIF-1 target genes, but neither one alone, is associated with significantly increased patient mortality. Taken together, these results establish a molecular mechanism for induction of the BCSC phenotype in response to hypoxia. PMID:25587023

  8. Expression of hypoxia-inducible factor 3α in hepatocellular carcinoma and its association with other hypoxia-inducible factors

    PubMed Central

    LIU, PING; FANG, XIEFAN; SONG, YANG; JIANG, JIAN-XIN; HE, QIAN-JIN; LIU, XIANG-JIE

    2016-01-01

    The functional role of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-3α in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is not yet fully understood. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the association between HIF-3α expression and the clinicopathological features as well as prognosis of HCC patients. In addition, we investigated the association between HIF-3α expression and the expression of HIF-1α and HIF-2α in tumor tissues. The protein levels of HIF-3α were determined using immunohistochemical analysis of paraffin sections of 126 paired HCC and peritumoral tissues. PLC/PRF/5 cells, a human HCC cell line, were transfected with HIF-1α and HIF-2α vectors and HIF-3α mRNA and protein expression was detected using quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis, respectively. The expression of HIF-3α was upregulated in 46.0% (58/126) and downregulated in 42.9% (54/126) of tumor tissues, respectively, when compared to peritumoral tissues. HIF-3α protein expression was not associated with peripheral blood vessel invasion, overall survival, or disease-free survival in HCC patients (P>0.05). In HCC tissues, the levels of HIF-3α protein were positively correlated with HIF-2α, but not with HIF-1α expression in HCC tissues. HIF-3α was upregulated in PLC/PRF/5 and Hep3B cells overexpressed with HIF-1α or HIF-2α. The hypoxic microenvironment of liver cancer did not lead to elevated HIF-3α protein expression, indicating that HIF-3α is regulated differently from HIF-1α in vivo. The correlation between HIF-3α and HIF-2α expression at the cellular and tissue levels indicated that HIF-3α may be a target gene of HIF-2α. The hypoxic microenvironment did not lead to elevation of HIF-3α protein expression in liver cancer; thus, HIF-3α may be a target gene of HIF-2α. PMID:27284334

  9. In vivo Expression of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase in Experimentally Induced Neurologic Diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koprowski, Hilary; Zheng, Yong Mu; Heber-Katz, Ellen; Fraser, Nigel; Rorke, Lucy; Fu, Zhen Fang; Hanlon, Cathleen; Dietzschold, Bernhard

    1993-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA in the brain tissue of rats and mice under the following experimental conditions: in rats infected with borna disease virus and rabies virus, in mice infected with herpes simplex virus, and in rats after the induction of experimental allergic encephalitis. The results showed that iNOS mRNA, normally nondetectable in the brain, was present in animals after viral infection or after induction of experimental allergic encephalitis. The induction of iNOS mRNA coincided with the severity of clinical signs and in some cases with the presence of inflammatory cells in the brain. The results indicate that nitric oxide produced by cells induced by iNOS may be the toxic factor accounting for cell damage and this may open the door to approaches to the study of the pathogenesis of neurological diseases.

  10. Inducible gene expression from the plastid genome by a synthetic riboswitch.

    PubMed

    Verhounig, Andreas; Karcher, Daniel; Bock, Ralph

    2010-04-01

    Riboswitches are natural RNA sensors that regulate gene expression in response to ligand binding. Riboswitches have been identified in prokaryotes and eukaryotes but are unknown in organelles (mitochondria and plastids). Here we have tested the possibility to engineer riboswitches for plastids (chloroplasts), a genetic system that largely relies on translational control of gene expression. To this end, we have used bacterial riboswitches and modified them in silico to meet the requirements of translational regulation in plastids. These engineered switches were then tested for functionality in vivo by stable transformation of the tobacco chloroplast genome. We report the identification of a synthetic riboswitch that functions as an efficient translational regulator of gene expression in plastids in response to its exogenously applied ligand theophylline. This riboswitch provides a novel tool for plastid genome engineering that facilitates the tightly regulated inducible expression of chloroplast genes and transgenes and thus has wide applications in functional genomics and biotechnology. PMID:20308585

  11. Gene expression changes induced by space flight in single-cells of the fern Ceratopteris richardii.

    PubMed

    Salmi, Mari L; Roux, Stanley J

    2008-12-01

    This work describes a rare high-throughput evaluation of gene expression changes induced by space flight in a single plant cell. The cell evaluated is the spore of the fern Ceratopteris richardii, which exhibits both perception and response to gravity. cDNA microarray and Q RT-PCR analysis of spores germinating in microgravity onboard NASA space shuttle flight STS-93 revealed changes in the mRNA expression of roughly 5% of genes analyzed. These gene expression changes were compared with gene expression changes that occur during gravity perception and response in animal cells and multicellular plants. Our data contribute to a better understanding of the impact of space flight conditions, including microgravity, on cellular growth and development, and provide insights into the adaptive strategies of individual cells in response to these conditions.

  12. Signal transduction through the fibronectin receptor induces collagenase and stromelysin gene expression

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of ligation of the fibronectin receptor (FnR) on gene expression in rabbit synovial fibroblasts. Monoclonal antibodies to the FnR that block initial adhesion of fibroblasts to fibronectin induced the expression of genes encoding the secreted extracellular matrix-degrading metalloproteinases collagenase and stromelysin. That induction was a direct consequence of interaction with the FnR was shown by the accumulation of mRNA for stromelysin and collagenase. Monoclonal antibodies to several other membrane glycoprotein receptors had no effect on metalloproteinase gene expression. Less than 2 h of treatment of the fibroblasts with anti-FnR in solution was sufficient to trigger the change in gene expression, and induction was blocked by dexamethasone. Unlike other inducers of metalloproteinase expression, including phorbol diesters and growth factors, addition of the anti-FnR in solution to cells adherent to serum-derived adhesion proteins or collagen produced no detectable change in cell shape or actin microfilament organization. Inductive effects were potentiated by cross-linking of the ligand. Fab fragments of anti-FnR were ineffective unless cross-linked or immobilized on the substrate. Adhesion of fibroblasts to native fibronectin did not induce metallo-proteinases. However, adhesion to covalently immobilized peptides containing the arg-gly-asp sequence that were derived from fibronectin, varying in size from hexapeptides up to 120 kD, induced collagenase and stromelysin gene expression. This suggests that degradation products of fibronectin are the natural inductive ligands for the FnR. These data demonstrate that signals leading to changes in gene expression are transduced by the FnR, a member of the integrin family of extracellular matrix receptors. The signaling of changes in gene expression by the FnR is distinct from signaling involving cell shape and actin cytoarchitecture. At least two distinct signals are generated: the

  13. Inducible expression of beta defensins by human respiratory epithelial cells exposed to Aspergillus fumigatus organisms

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Aspergillus fumigatus, a saprophytic mould, is responsible for life-threatening, invasive pulmonary diseases in immunocompromised hosts. The role of the airway epithelium involves a complex interaction with the inhaled pathogen. Antimicrobial peptides with direct antifungal and chemotactic activities may boost antifungal immune response. Results The inducible expression of defensins by human bronchial epithelial 16HBE cells and A549 pneumocyte cells exposed to A. fumigatus was investigated. Using RT-PCR and real time PCR, we showed an activation of hBD2 and hBD9 defensin genes: the expression was higher in cells exposed to swollen conidia (SC), compared to resting conidia (RC) or hyphal fragments (HF). The kinetics of defensin expression was different for each one, evoking a putative distinct function for each investigated defensin. The decrease of defensin expression in the presence of heat-inactivated serum indicated a possible link between defensins and the proteins of the host complement system. The presence of defensin peptide hBD2 was revealed using immunofluorescence that showed a punctual cytoplasmic and perinuclear staining. Quantification of the cells stained with anti hBD2 antibody demonstrated that SC induced a greater number of cells that synthesized hBD2, compared to RC or HF. Labelling of the cells with anti-hBD-2 antibody showed a positive immunofluorescence signal around RC or SC in contrast to HF. This suggests co-localisation of hBD2 and digested conidia. The HBD2 level was highest in the supernatants of cells exposed to SC, as was determined by sandwich ELISA. Experiments using neutralising anti-interleukine-1β antibody reflect the autocrine mechanism of defensin expression induced by SC. Investigation of defensin expression at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels demonstrated the requirement of transcription as well as new protein synthesis during A. fumigatus defensin induction. Finally, induced defensin expression in

  14. Expression of CD151/Tspan24 and integrin alpha 3 complex in aid of prognostication of HER2-negative high-grade ductal carcinoma in situ

    PubMed Central

    Romanska, Hanna M; Potemski, Piotr; Kusinska, Renata; Kopczynski, Janusz; Sadej, Rafal; Kordek, Radzislaw

    2015-01-01

    The pro-tumorigenic and pro-metastatic functions of the tetraspanin protein CD151 (Tspan24) are thought to be dependent on its ability to form complexes with laminin-binding integrin receptors (i.e. alpha6beta1, alpha3beta1, alpha6beta4). We have previously reported that in invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC), CD151/alpha3beta1 complex was of prognostic value in patients with HER2-negative tumors. Extrapolating these findings to the pre-invasive setting, we aimed to make an assessment of a potential relationship between expression of the CD151/alpha3beta1 complex in DCIS and Van Nuys prognostic index (VNPI) in high-grade ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) in relation to the HER2 status. Protein distributions were analyzed in 49 samples of pure DCIS using immunohistochemistry. For each case immunoreactivity was assessed in at least 5 ducts (325 ducts in total) and an average score was taken for statistical analyses. When analyzed in the whole cohort, there was no statistical association between the VNPI and any of the proteins scored either separately or in combination. When stratified according to the HER2 status, in the HER2-negative subgroup, CD151 assessed in combination with alpha3beta1 was significantly correlated with VNPI (P = 0.044), while neither protein analyzed individually showed any significant link with the prognostic index. Expression of the CD151/alpha3beta1 complex in HER2-negative DCIS might reflect tumor behavior relevant to the patient outcome and thus might aid prognostication of the disease. PMID:26464707

  15. Expression Profile of Cationic Amino Acid Transporters in Rats with Endotoxin-Induced Uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Shu-Wen; Lee, Yi-An; Kao, Tzu-Yun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The transcellular arginine transportation via cationic amino acid transporter (CAT) is the rate-limiting step in nitric oxide (NO) synthesis, which is crucial in intraocular inflammation. In this study, CAT isoforms and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression was investigated in endotoxin-induced uveitis (EIU). Methods. EIU was induced in Lewis rats by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injection. In the treatment group, the rats were injected intraperitoneally with the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib before EIU induction. After 24 hours, leukocyte quantification, NO measurement of the aqueous humor, and histopathological examination were evaluated. The expression of CAT isoforms and iNOS was determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, western blotting, and immunofluorescence staining. Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) binding activity was evaluated by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. The mouse macrophage cell line RAW 264.7 was used to validate the in vivo findings. Results. LPS significantly stimulated iNOS, CAT-2A, and CAT-2B mRNA and protein expression but did not affect CAT-1 in EIU rats and RAW 264.7 cells. Bortezomib attenuated inflammation and inhibited iNOS, CAT-2A, and CAT-2B expression through NF-κB inhibition. Conclusions. CAT-2 and iNOS, but not CAT-1, are specifically involved in EIU. NF-κB is essential in the induction of CAT-2 and iNOS in EIU. PMID:27413255

  16. Calcineurin and Akt expression in hypertrophied bladder in STZ-induced diabetic rat

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guiming; Li, Mei; Daneshgari, Firouz

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes causes significant increases in bladder weight but the natural history and underlying mechanisms are not known. In this study, we observed the temporal changes of detrusor muscle cells (DMC) and the calcineurin (Cn) and Akt expressions in detrusor muscle in the diabetic rat. Male Sprague–Dawley rats were divided into 3 groups: streptozotocin-induced diabetics, 5% sucrose-induced diuretics, and age-matched controls. The bladders were removed 1, 2, or 9 weeks after disease induction and the extent of hypertrophy was examined by bladder weights and cross sectional area of DMC. Cn and Akt expression were evaluated by immunoblotting. Both diabetes and diuresis caused significant increases in bladder weight. The mean cross sectional areas of DMC were increased in both diabetic and diuretic animals 1, 2, or 9 weeks after disease induction. The expression levels of both the catalytic A (CnA) and regulatory B (CnB) subunits of Cn were increased at 1 and 2 weeks, but not at 9 weeks. Expression of Akt was similar among control, diabetic, and diuretic rat bladder at all time points. In conclusion, diabetes and diuresis induce similar hypertrophy of detrusor muscle during the first 9 weeks, indicating that bladder hypertrophy in the early stage of diabetes is in response to the presence of increased urine output in diabetes. Our results suggest that the Cn, but not the Akt signaling pathway may be involved in the development of bladder hypertrophy. PMID:22305959

  17. VCC-1 over-expression inhibits cisplatin-induced apoptosis in HepG2 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Zhitao; Lu, Xiao; Zhu, Ping; Zhu, Wei; Mu, Xia; Qu, Rongmei; Li, Ming

    2012-04-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer VCC-1 is hypothesized to be associated with carcinogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Levels of VCC-1 are increased significantly in HCC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Over-expression of VCC-1 could promotes cellular proliferation rate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Over-expression of VCC-1 inhibit the cisplatin-provoked apoptosis in HepG2 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer VCC-1 plays an important role in control the tumor growth and apoptosis. -- Abstract: Vascular endothelial growth factor-correlated chemokine 1 (VCC-1), a recently described chemokine, is hypothesized to be associated with carcinogenesis. However, the molecular mechanisms by which aberrant VCC-1 expression determines poor outcomes of cancers are unknown. In this study, we found that VCC-1 was highly expressed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tissue. It was also associated with proliferation of HepG2 cells, and inhibition of cisplatin-induced apoptosis of HepG2 cells. Conversely, down-regulation of VCC-1 in HepG2 cells increased cisplatin-induced apoptosis of HepG2 cells. In summary, these results suggest that VCC-1 is involved in cisplatin-induced apoptosis of HepG2 cells, and also provides some evidence for VCC-1 as a potential cellular target for chemotherapy.

  18. Modafinil treatment prevents REM sleep deprivation-induced brain function impairment by increasing MMP-9 expression.

    PubMed

    He, Bin; Peng, Hua; Zhao, Ying; Zhou, Hui; Zhao, Zhongxin

    2011-12-01

    Previous work showed that sleep deprivation (SD) impairs hippocampal-dependent cognitive function and synaptic plasticity, and a novel wake-promoting agent modafinil prevents SD-induced memory impairment in rat. However, the mechanisms by which modafinil prevented REM-SD-induced impairment of brain function remain poorly understood. In the present study, rats were sleep-deprived by using the modified multiple platform method and brain function was detected. The results showed that modafinil treatment prevented REM-SD-induced impairment of cognitive function. Modafinil significantly reduced the number of errors compared to placebo and upregulated synapsin I expression in the dorsal hippocampal CA3 region. A synaptic plasticity-related gene, MMP-9 expression was also upregulated in modafinil-treated rats. Importantly, downregulation of MMP-9 expression by special siRNA decreased synapsin I protein levels and synapse numbers. Therefore, we demonstrated that modafinil increased cognition function and synaptic plasticity, at least in part by increasing MMP-9 expression in REM-SD rats.

  19. Interleukin-13 interferes with activation-induced t-cell apoptosis by repressing p53 expression

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Li; Xu, Ling-Zhi; Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Yang, Gui; Geng, Xiao-Rui; Mo, Li-Hua; Liu, Zhi-Gang; Zheng, Peng-Yuan; Yang, Ping-Chang

    2016-01-01

    The etiology and the underlying mechanism of CD4+ T-cell polarization are unclear. This study sought to investigate the mechanism by which interleukin (IL)-13 prevents the activation-induced apoptosis of CD4+ T cells. Here we report that CD4+ T cells expressed IL-13 receptor α2 in the intestine of sensitized mice. IL-13 suppressed both the activation-induced apoptosis of CD4+ T cells and the expression of p53 and FasL. Exposure to recombinant IL-13 inhibited activation-induced cell death (AICD) along with the expression of p53, caspase 3, and tumor necrosis factor-α in CD4+ T cells. Administration of an anti-IL-13 antibody enhanced the effect of specific immunotherapy on allergic inflammation in the mouse intestine, enforced the expression of p53 in intestinal CD4+ T cells, and enhanced the frequency of CD4+ T-cell apoptosis upon challenge with specific antigens. In summary, blocking IL-13 enhances the therapeutic effect of antigen-specific immunotherapy by regulating apoptosis and thereby enforcing AICD in CD4+ T cells. PMID:26189367

  20. Paeoniflorin inhibits doxorubicin-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis by downregulating microRNA-1 expression

    PubMed Central

    LI, JIAN-ZHE; TANG, XIU-NENG; LI, TING-TING; LIU, LI-JUAN; YU, SHU-YI; ZHOU, GUANG-YU; SHAO, QING-RUI; SUN, HUI-PING; WU, CHENG; YANG, YANG

    2016-01-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is an effective anthracycline anti-tumor antibiotic. Because of its cardiotoxicity, the clinical application of DOX is limited. Paeoniflorin (PEF), a monoterpene glucoside extracted from the dry root of Paeonia, is reported to exert multiple beneficial effects on the cardiovascular system. The present study was designed to explore the protective effect of PEF against DOX-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis and the underlying mechanism. In cultured H9c2 cells, PEF (100 µmol/l) was added for 2 h prior to exposure to DOX (5 µmol/l) for 24 h. Cell viability, creatine kinase activity, cardiomyocyte apoptosis, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, and the expression of microRNA-1 (miR-1) and B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) were measured following treatment with PEF and/or DOX. The results showed that treatment with DOX notably induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis, concomitantly with enhanced ROS generation, upregulated miR-1 expression and downregulated Bcl-2 expression. These effects of DOX were significantly inhibited by pretreatment of the cells with PEF. These results suggest that the inhibitory effect of PEF on DOX-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis may be associated with downregulation of miR-1 expression via a reduction in ROS generation. PMID:27284328

  1. Gene expression for extracellular matrix proteins in shockwave-induced osteogenesis in rats.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kenji; Yamazaki, Masashi; Saisu, Takashi; Nakajima, Arata; Shimizu, Sumito; Mitsuhashi, Shigeru; Moriya, Hideshige

    2004-02-01

    To clarify the mechanisms underlying shockwave-induced osteogenesis, we applied shockwave to rat femoral shafts from the ventral side. We assessed bone mineral content (BMC) and bone mineral density (BMD), and analyzed the spatial and temporal gene expression for pro-alpha1 (I) collagen (COL1A1), pro-alpha1 (II) collagen (COL2A1), pro-alpha1 (X) collagen (COL10A1), osteocalcin (OC) and osteopontin (OPN) using in situ hybridization. On the 21st day post-exposure, BMC and BMD in the exposed femur were elevated by 8.46% and 5.80%, respectively, relative to the unexposed femur. Immediately following exposure, there was evidence of scraping of the cortex and periosteal separation with hemorrhage. On day 4, new periosteal bone formation could be seen on the ventral and dorsal side of the femur. In the newly formed bone, COL1A1, OC and OPN were expressed in osteoblastic cells underlying the periosteum. On day 7, there was progression of periosteal bone and trabeculae formation. COL1A1 and OC were expressed in mature osteoblasts lining the trabeculae, whereas OPN was expressed in immature osteoblastic cells, osteocytes and osteoclasts. On day 14, bone remodeling commenced in the periosteal bone. COL1A1, OC and OPN were still expressed at this stage, however, signals were much weaker. Between 4-7 days, chondrocyte clusters were distributed multi-focally near the exposed site, and there was expression of COL2A1 but not of COL10A1. The results demonstrate that gene expression patterns of shockwave-induced osteogenesis are similar to those of periosteal hard callus formation during fracture healing. Shockwaves can yield dramatic activation of cells in normal long bones, and drive the cells to express genes for osteogenesis.

  2. p53-dependent SIRT6 expression protects Aβ42-induced DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Eun Sun; Choi, Hyunjung; Song, Hyundong; Hwang, Yu Jin; Kim, Ahbin; Ryu, Hoon; Mook-Jung, Inhee

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common type of dementia and age-related neurodegenerative disease. Elucidating the cellular changes that occur during ageing is an important step towards understanding the pathogenesis and progression of neurodegenerative disorders. SIRT6 is a member of the mammalian sirtuin family of anti-aging genes. However, the relationship between SIRT6 and AD has not yet been elucidated. Here, we report that SIRT6 protein expression levels are reduced in the brains of both the 5XFAD AD mouse model and AD patients. Aβ42, a major component of senile plaques, decreases SIRT6 expression, and Aβ42-induced DNA damage is prevented by the overexpression of SIRT6 in HT22 mouse hippocampal neurons. Also, there is a strong negative correlation between Aβ42-induced DNA damage and p53 levels, a protein involved in DNA repair and apoptosis. In addition, upregulation of p53 protein by Nutlin-3 prevents SIRT6 reduction and DNA damage induced by Aβ42. Taken together, this study reveals that p53-dependent SIRT6 expression protects cells from Aβ42-induced DNA damage, making SIRT6 a promising new therapeutic target for the treatment of AD. PMID:27156849

  3. Acute Vhl gene inactivation induces cardiac HIF-dependent erythropoietin gene expression.

    PubMed

    Miró-Murillo, Marta; Elorza, Ainara; Soro-Arnáiz, Inés; Albacete-Albacete, Lucas; Ordoñez, Angel; Balsa, Eduardo; Vara-Vega, Alicia; Vázquez, Silvia; Fuertes, Esther; Fernández-Criado, Carmen; Landázuri, Manuel O; Aragonés, Julián

    2011-01-01

    Von Hippel Lindau (Vhl) gene inactivation results in embryonic lethality. The consequences of its inactivation in adult mice, and of the ensuing activation of the hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs), have been explored mainly in a tissue-specific manner. This mid-gestation lethality can be also circumvented by using a floxed Vhl allele in combination with an ubiquitous tamoxifen-inducible recombinase Cre-ER(T2). Here, we characterize a widespread reduction in Vhl gene expression in Vhl(floxed)-UBC-Cre-ER(T2) adult mice after dietary tamoxifen administration, a convenient route of administration that has yet to be fully characterized for global gene inactivation. Vhl gene inactivation rapidly resulted in a marked splenomegaly and skin erythema, accompanied by renal and hepatic induction of the erythropoietin (Epo) gene, indicative of the in vivo activation of the oxygen sensing HIF pathway. We show that acute Vhl gene inactivation also induced Epo gene expression in the heart, revealing cardiac tissue to be an extra-renal source of EPO. Indeed, primary cardiomyocytes and HL-1 cardiac cells both induce Epo gene expression when exposed to low O(2) tension in a HIF-dependent manner. Thus, as well as demonstrating the potential of dietary tamoxifen administration for gene inactivation studies in UBC-Cre-ER(T2) mouse lines, this data provides evidence of a cardiac oxygen-sensing VHL/HIF/EPO pathway in adult mice.

  4. The Ras-JNK pathway is involved in shear-induced gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Li, Y S; Shyy, J Y; Li, S; Lee, J; Su, B; Karin, M; Chien, S

    1996-01-01

    Hemodynamic forces play a key role in inducing atherosclerosis-implicated gene expression in vascular endothelial cells. To elucidate the signal transduction pathway leading to such gene expression, we studied the effects of fluid shearing on the activities of upstream signaling molecules. Fluid shearing (shear stress, 12 dynes/cm2 [1 dyne = 10(-5)N]) induced a transient and rapid activation of p21ras and preferentially activated c-Jun NH2 terminal kinases (JNK1 and JNK2) over extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK-1 and ERK-2). Cotransfection of RasN17, a dominant negative mutant of Ha-Ras, attenuated the shear-activated JNK and luciferase reporters driven by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate-responsive elements. JNK(K-R) and MEKK(K-M), the respective catalytically inactive mutants of JNK1 and MEKK, also partially inhibited the shear-induced luciferase reporters. In contrast, Raf301, ERK(K71R), and ERK(K52R), the dominant negative mutants of Raf-1, ERK-1, and ERK-2, respectively, had little effect on the activities of these reporters. The activation of JNK was also correlated with increased c-Jun transcriptional activity, which was attenuated by a negative mutant of Son of sevenless. Thus, mechanical stimulation exerted by fluid shearing activates primarily the Ras-MEKK-JNK pathway in inducing endothelial gene expression. PMID:8887624

  5. The proteasome is an integral part of solar ultraviolet a radiation-induced gene expression.

    PubMed

    Catalgol, Betul; Ziaja, Isabella; Breusing, Nicolle; Jung, Tobias; Höhn, Annika; Alpertunga, Buket; Schroeder, Peter; Chondrogianni, Niki; Gonos, Efstathios S; Petropoulos, Isabelle; Friguet, Bertrand; Klotz, Lars-Oliver; Krutmann, Jean; Grune, Tilman

    2009-10-30

    Solar ultraviolet (UV) A radiation is a well known trigger of signaling responses in human skin fibroblasts. One important consequence of this stress response is the increased expression of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1), which causes extracellular protein degradation and thereby contributes to photoaging of human skin. In the present study we identify the proteasome as an integral part of the UVA-induced, intracellular signaling cascade in human dermal fibroblasts. UVA-induced singlet oxygen formation was accompanied by protein oxidation, the cross-linking of oxidized proteins, and an inhibition of the proteasomal system. This proteasomal inhibition subsequently led to an accumulation of c-Jun and phosphorylated c-Jun and activation of activator protein-1, i.e. transcription factors known to control MMP-1 expression. Increased transcription factor activation was also observed if the proteasome was inhibited by cross-linked proteins or lactacystin, indicating a general mechanism. Most importantly, inhibition of the proteasome was of functional relevance for UVA-induced MMP-1 expression, because overexpression of the proteasome or the protein repair enzyme methionine sulfoxide reductase prevented the UVA-induced induction of MMP-1. These studies show that an environmentally relevant stimulus can trigger a signaling pathway, which links intracellular and extracellular protein degradation. They also identify the proteasome as an integral part of the UVA stress response.

  6. Hyperthermia Induces Apoptosis of 786-O Cells through Suppressing Ku80 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Defeng; Hu, Yuan; Li, Jinhui; Peng, Tao; Su, Jialin; He, Yun; Ji, Weidong

    2015-01-01

    Hyperthermia as an anticancer method has been paid increasing attention in recent years. Several studies have shown that hyperthermia can kill tumor cells by inducing apoptosis. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of hyperthermia-induced apoptosis are largely unknown. To investigate the effects and molecular mechanism of hyperthermia on the apoptosis in renal carcinoma 786-O cells, we firstly examined apoptosis and Ku expression in 786-O cell line treated with heat exposure (42°C for 0-4 h). The results showed that hyperthermia induced apoptosis of 786-O cells, and suppressed significantly Ku80 expression, but not Ku70 expression. Next, we knock-down Ku80 in 786-O cells, generating stable cell line 786-O-shKu80, and detected apoptosis, cell survival and cell cycle distribution. Our data showed higher apoptotic rate and lower surviving fraction in the stable cell line 786-O-shKu80 compared with those in control cells, exposed to the same heat stress (42°C for 0-4 h). Moreover, the results also showed suppression of Ku80 led to G2/M phase arrest in the stable cell line 786-O-shKu80 following heat treatment. Together, these findings indicate that Ku80 may play an important role in hyperthermia-induced apoptosis and heat-sensitivity of renal carcinoma cells through influencing the cell cycle distribution. PMID:25902193

  7. AIDS in Africa.

    PubMed

    Wilson, D; Armstrong, M; Lavelle, S

    1991-01-01

    Works on epidemiological, and social and behavioral science aspects of AIDS prevention and support in Africa are reviewed from the 7th Conference on AIDS. Participants were especially concerned with why AIDS spreads at disparate rates in different countries and regions of the world. Research on the casual factors of the spread of HIV generally focused upon patterns of sex behavior, the presence of other STDs, and the effect of circumcision. The roles of certain vaginal tightening agents used by Zairian prostitutes, vaginal bruising and bleeding, sex during menses, and oral contraception were also considered. Further, participants explored the possibility of a more coordinated, integrated approach to research and intervention development between the medical and social disciplines, and expressed the overall need for concurrent mass education interventions. In the face of ever increasing rates of HIV infection, including vertical transmission, making condoms ubiquitous, affordable, and highly publicized should garner higher general acceptance and use rates in these populations. Papers and models on the micro- and macro-socioeconomic impact of AIDS were finally discussed, followed by recommendations for a complete reassessment and reworking of policy for AIDS prevention. AIDS activities should, in fact, be integrated into the daily fabric of society, with prevention measures considered an ultimate necessity for social survival.

  8. Changes in gene expression linked to methamphetamine-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Xie, Tao; Tong, Liqiong; Barrett, Tanya; Yuan, Jie; Hatzidimitriou, George; McCann, Una D; Becker, Kevin G; Donovan, David M; Ricaurte, George A

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of these studies was to examine the role of gene expression in methamphetamine (METH)-induced dopamine (DA) neurotoxicity. First, the effects of the mRNA synthesis inhibitor, actinomycin-D, and the protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide, were examined. Both agents afforded complete protection against METH-induced DA neurotoxicity and did so independently of effects on core temperature, DA transporter function, or METH brain levels, suggesting that gene transcription and mRNA translation play a role in METH neurotoxicity. Next, microarray technology, in combination with an experimental approach designed to facilitate recognition of relevant gene expression patterns, was used to identify gene products linked to METH-induced DA neurotoxicity. This led to the identification of several genes in the ventral midbrain associated with the neurotoxic process, including genes for energy metabolism [cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (COX1), reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide ubiquinone oxidoreductase chain 2, and phosphoglycerate mutase B], ion regulation (members of sodium/hydrogen exchanger and sodium/bile acid cotransporter family), signal transduction (adenylyl cyclase III), and cell differentiation and degeneration (N-myc downstream-regulated gene 3 and tau protein). Of these differentially expressed genes, we elected to further examine the increase in COX1 expression, because of data implicating energy utilization in METH neurotoxicity and the known role of COX1 in energy metabolism. On the basis of time course studies, Northern blot analyses, in situ hybridization results, and temperature studies, we now report that increased COX1 expression in the ventral midbrain is linked to METH-induced DA neuronal injury. The precise role of COX1 and other genes in METH neurotoxicity remains to be elucidated.

  9. MicroRNA-373 induces expression of genes with complementary promoter sequences.

    PubMed

    Place, Robert F; Li, Long-Cheng; Pookot, Deepa; Noonan, Emily J; Dahiya, Rajvir

    2008-02-01

    Recent studies have shown that microRNA (miRNA) regulates gene expression by repressing translation or directing sequence-specific degradation of complementary mRNA. Here, we report new evidence in which miRNA may also function to induce gene expression. By scanning gene promoters in silico for sequences complementary to known miRNAs, we identified a putative miR-373 target site in the promoter of E-cadherin. Transfection of miR-373 and its precursor hairpin RNA (pre-miR-373) into PC-3 cells readily induced E-cadherin expression. Knockdown experiments confirmed that induction of E-cadherin by pre-miR-373 required the miRNA maturation protein Dicer. Further analysis revealed that cold-shock domain-containing protein C2 (CSDC2), which possesses a putative miR-373 target site within its promoter, was also readily induced in response to miR-373 and pre-miR-373. Furthermore, enrichment of RNA polymerase II was detected at both E-cadherin and CSDC2 promoters after miR-373 transfection. Mismatch mutations to miR-373 indicated that gene induction was specific to the miR-373 sequence. Transfection of promoter-specific dsRNAs revealed that the concurrent induction of E-cadherin and CSDC2 by miR-373 required the miRNA target sites in both promoters. In conclusion, we have identified a miRNA that targets promoter sequences and induces gene expression. These findings reveal a new mode by which miRNAs may regulate gene expression.

  10. Inducible Expression of Runx2 Results in Multiorgan Abnormalities in Mice

    PubMed Central

    He, Nan; Xiao, Zhousheng; Yin, Tong; Stubbs, Jason; Li, Linheng; Quarles, L. Darryl

    2016-01-01

    Runx2 is a transcription factor controlling skeletal development, and is also expressed in extraskeletal tissues where its function is not well understood. Existing Runx2 mutant and transgenic mouse models do not allow the necessary control of Runx2 expression to understand its functions in different tissues. We generated conditional, doxycyline-inducible, triple transgenic mice (CMV-Cre;ROSA26-neoflox/+-rtTA;Tet-O-Runx2) to investigate the effects of wide spread overexpression of Runx2. Osteoblasts isolated from CMV-Cre;ROSA26-neoflox/+-rtTA; Tet-O-Runx2 mice demonstrated a dose-dependent effect of doxycycline to stimulate Runx2 transgene expression. Doxycycline administration to CMV-Cre;ROSA26-neoflox/+-rtTA;Tet-O-Runx2 mice induced Runx2 transgene expression in all tissues tested, with the highest levels observed in kidney, ovary, and bone. Runx2 overexpression resulted in deceased body size and reduced viability. With regard to bone, Runx2 overexpressing mice paradoxically displayed profound osteopenia and diminished osteogenesis. Induced expression of Runx2 in extraskeletal tissues resulted in ectopic calcification and induction of the osteogenic program in a limited number of tissues, including lung and muscle. In addition, the triple transgenic mice showed evidence of a myeloproliferative disorder and an apparent inhibition of lymphocyte development. Thus, overexpression of Runx2 both within and outside of the skeleton can have diverse biological effects. Use of tissue specific Cre mice will allow this model to be used to conditionally and inducibly overexpress Runx2 in different tissues and provide a means to study the post-natal tissue- and cell context-dependent functions of Runx2. PMID:21268087

  11. Differential gene expression and lipid metabolism in fatty liver induced by acute ethanol treatment in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Yin Huquan; Kim, Mingoo; Kim, Ju-Han; Kong, Gu; Kang, Kyung-Sun; Kim, Hyung-Lae; Yoon, Byung-IL; Lee, Mi-Ock; Lee, Byung-Hoon

    2007-09-15

    Ethanol induces cumulative liver damage including steatosis, steatohepatitis and cirrhosis. The aim of this study is to investigate the global intrahepatic gene expression profile in the mouse liver treated with ethanol. A single oral dose of 0.5 or 5 g/kg ethanol was administered to male ICR mice, and liver samples were obtained after 6, 24 and 72 h. Histopathological evaluation showed typical fatty livers in the high-dose group at 24 h. Microarray analysis identified 28 genes as being ethanol responsive (two-way ANOVA; p < 0.05), after adjustment by the Benjamini-Hochberg multiple testing correction; these genes displayed {>=} 2-fold induction or repression. The expression of genes that are known to be involved in fatty acid synthesis was examined. The transcript for lipogenic transcription factor, sterol regulatory element (SRE)-binding factor 1 (Srebf1), was upregulated by acute ethanol exposure. Of the genes known to contain SRE or SRE-like sequences and to be regulated by SRE-binding protein 1 (SREBP1), those encoding malic enzyme (Mod1), ATP-citrate lyase (Acly), fatty acid synthase (Fasn) and stearyl-CoA desaturase (Scd1) were induced by ethanol. Quantitative real-time PCR confirmed the changes in the expression levels of the selected genes. The change in the Srebf1 mRNA level correlates well with that of the SREBP1 protein expression as well as its binding to the promoters of the target genes. The present study identifies differentially expressed genes that can be applied to the biomarkers for alcohol-binge-induced fatty liver. These results support the hypothesis by which ethanol-induced steatosis in mice is mediated by the fatty acid synthetic pathway regulated by SREBP1.

  12. Mouse Insulin Cells Expressing an Inducible RIPCre Transgene Are Functionally Impaired

    PubMed Central

    Teitelman, Gladys; Kedees, Mamdouh

    2015-01-01

    We used cre-lox technology to test whether the inducible expression of Cre minimize the deleterious effect of the enzyme on beta cell function. We studied mice in which Cre is linked to a modified estrogen receptor (ER), and its expression is controlled by the rat insulin promoter (RIP). Following the injection of tamoxifen (TM), CreER- migrates to the nucleus and promotes the appearance of a reporter protein, enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP), in cells. Immunocytochemical analysis indicated that 46.6 ± 2.1% insulin cells of adult RIPCreER- EYFP expressed EYFP. RIPCreER-EYFP (+TM) mice were normoglycemic throughout the study, and their glucose tolerance test results were similar to control CD-1 mice. However, an extended exposure to reagents that stimulate insulin synthesis was detrimental to the survival of IN+EYFP+cells. The administration of an inhibitor of the enzyme dipeptidyl-peptidase (DPP4i), which prevents the cleavage of glucagon-like peptide (GLP-1), to adult RIPCreER-EYFP mice lead to a decrease in the percentage of IN+EYFP+ to 17.5 ± 1.73 and a significant increase in apoptotic cells in islets. Similarly, a 2-week administration of the GLP-1 analog exendin 4 (ex-4) induced an almost complete ablation of IN+ expressing a different reporter protein and a significant decrease in the beta cell mass and rate of beta cell proliferation. Since normal beta cells do not die when induced to increase insulin synthesis, our observations indicate that insulin cells expressing an inducible RIPCre transgene are functionally deficient. Studies employing these mice should carefully consider the pitfalls of the Cre-Lox technique. PMID:25533471

  13. Ciprofloxacin inhibits advanced glycation end products-induced adhesion molecule expression on human monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Mori, S; Takahashi, HK; Liu, K; Wake, H; Zhang, J; Liu, R; Yoshino, T; Nishibori, M

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) subtypes, proteins or lipids that become glycated after exposure to sugars, can induce complications in diabetes. Among the various AGE subtypes, glyceraldehyde-derived AGE (AGE-2) and glycolaldehyde-derived AGE (AGE-3) are involved in inflammation in diabetic patients; monocytes are activated by these AGEs. Ciprofloxacin (CIP), a fluorinated 4-quinolone, is often used clinically to treat infections associated with diabetis due to its antibacterial properties. It also modulates immune responses in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) therefore we investigated the involvement of AGEs in these effects. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Expression of intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1, B7.1, B7.2 and CD40 was examined by flow cytometry. The production of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interferon (IFN)-γ, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and cAMP were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 expression was determined by Western blot analysis. Lymphocyte proliferation was determined by [3H]-thymidine uptake. KEY RESULTS CIP induced PGE2 production in monocytes, irrespective of the presence of AGE-2 and AGE-3, by enhancing COX-2 expression; this led to an elevation of intracellular cAMP in monocytes. Non-selective and selective COX-2 inhibitors, indomethacin and NS398, inhibited CIP-induced PGE2 and cAMP production. In addition, CIP inhibited AGE-2- and AGE-3-induced expressions of ICAM-1, B7.1, B7.2 and CD40 in monocytes, the production of TNF-α and IFN-γ and lymphocyte proliferation in PBMC. Indomethacin, NS398 and a protein kinase A inhibitor, H89, inhibited the actions of CIP. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS CIP exerts immunomodulatory activity via PGE2, implying therapeutic potential of CIP for the treatment of AGE-2- and AGE-3-induced inflammatory responses. PMID:20718752

  14. Protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B expression is induced by inflammation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zabolotny, Janice M; Kim, Young-Bum; Welsh, Laura A; Kershaw, Erin E; Neel, Benjamin G; Kahn, Barbara B

    2008-05-23

    Protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is a major negative regulator of insulin and leptin sensitivity. PTP1B overexpression in adipose tissue and skeletal muscle of humans and rodents may contribute to insulin resistance and obesity. The mechanisms mediating PTP1B overexpression in obese and diabetic states have been unclear. We find that adipose tissue inflammation and the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) regulate PTP1B expression in vivo. High fat feeding of mice increased PTP1B expression 1.5- to 7-fold in adipose tissue, liver, skeletal muscle, and arcuate nucleus of hypothalamus. PTP1B overexpression in high fat-fed mice coincided with increased adipose tissue expression of the macrophage marker CD68 and TNFalpha, which is implicated in causing obesity-induced insulin resistance. TNFalpha increased PTP1B mRNA and protein levels by 2- to 5-fold in a dose- and time-dependent manner in adipocyte and hepatocyte cell lines. TNFalpha administration in mice increased PTP1B mRNA 1.4- to 4-fold in adipose tissue, liver, skeletal muscle, and hypothalamic arcuate nucleus and PTP1B protein 2-fold in liver. Actinomycin D treatment blocked, and high dose salicylate treatment inhibited by 80%, TNFalpha-induced PTP1B expression in adipocyte cell lines, suggesting TNFalpha may induce PTP1B transcription via nuclear factor kappaB (NFkappaB) activation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation from adipocyte cell lines and liver of mice demonstrated TNFalpha-induced recruitment of NFkappaB subunit p65 to the PTP1B promoter in vitro and in vivo. In mice with diet-induced obesity, TNFalpha deficiency also partly blocked PTP1B overexpression in adipose tissue. Our data suggest that PTP1B overexpression in multiple tissues in obesity is regulated by inflammation and that PTP1B may be a target of anti-inflammatory therapies. PMID:18281274

  15. Variable severity and Ia antigen expression in streptococcal-cell-wall-induced hepatic granulomas in rats.

    PubMed

    Allen, J B; Wilder, R L

    1987-03-01

    We have previously reported that a single intraperitoneal injection of an aqueous suspension of group A streptococcal cell wall (SCW) fragments induces extensive hepatic granulomas in LEW/N female rats, but not in F344/N female rats. To further understand the mechanisms underlying these differences, we compared granuloma development and class II major histocompatibility complex antigen (Ia) expression in histocompatible LEW/N, F344/N, and CAR/N female rats in response to SCW fragments of four different average molecular sizes. In LEW/N female rats, the smallest fragments (less than 5 megadaltons) induced the most severe hepatic inflammatory disease, with development of widespread granulomas composed of macrophages, lymphocytes, and a peripheral rim of fibroblasts. The largest fragments (greater than 500 megadaltons) induced equivocal disease. Fragments of intermediate size induced granulomas of intermediate severity. The extent of granuloma development, the intensity of Ia antigen expression, and the amount of SCW antigen deposited in the liver qualitatively paralleled each other. In contrast, injection of the most granulomagenic SCW fragments into F344/N and CAR/N rats did not induce granulomas. Although these rat strains are histocompatible with the LEW/N (i.e., RTL.1) strain, hepatic Ia antigen expression in these strains was not increased significantly above basal levels. The amount of SCW antigen in the livers of the resistant rat strains appeared similar to the amount in the susceptible LEW/N strain. These data indicate that granuloma development is dependent on the size of the SCW fragment and host genetic background and that Ia expression directly parallels the severity of the hepatic disease. In addition, the data suggest that non-major histocompatibility complex genetic loci play a major role in regulating the development of the hepatic disease.

  16. Glutathione Transferases Superfamily: Cold-Inducible Expression of Distinct GST Genes in Brassica oleracea

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakumar, Harshavardhanan; Thamilarasan, Senthil Kumar; Shanmugam, Ashokraj; Natarajan, Sathishkumar; Jung, Hee-Jeong; Park, Jong-In; Kim, HyeRan; Chung, Mi-Young; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2016-01-01

    Plants, as sessile organisms, can suffer serious growth and developmental consequences under cold stress conditions. Glutathione transferases (GSTs, EC 2.5.1.18) are ubiquitous and multifunctional conjugating proteins, which play a major role in stress responses by preventing oxidative damage by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Currently, understanding of their function(s) during different biochemical and signaling pathways under cold stress condition remain unclear. In this study, using combined computational strategy, we identified 65 Brassica oleracea glutathione transferases (BoGST) and characterized them based on evolutionary analysis into 11 classes. Inter-species and intra-species duplication was evident between BoGSTs and Arabidopsis GSTs. Based on localization analyses, we propose possible pathways in which GST genes are involved during cold stress. Further, expression analysis of the predicted putative functions for GST genes were investigated in two cold contrasting genotypes (cold tolerance and susceptible) under cold condition, most of these genes were highly expressed at 6 h and 1 h in the cold tolerant (CT) and cold susceptible (CS) lines, respectively. Overall, BoGSTU19, BoGSTU24, BoGSTF10 are candidate genes highly expressed in B. oleracea. Further investigation of GST superfamily in B. oleracea will aid in understanding complex mechanism underlying cold tolerance in plants. PMID:27472324

  17. Glutathione Transferases Superfamily: Cold-Inducible Expression of Distinct GST Genes in Brassica oleracea.

    PubMed

    Vijayakumar, Harshavardhanan; Thamilarasan, Senthil Kumar; Shanmugam, Ashokraj; Natarajan, Sathishkumar; Jung, Hee-Jeong; Park, Jong-In; Kim, HyeRan; Chung, Mi-Young; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2016-01-01

    Plants, as sessile organisms, can suffer serious growth and developmental consequences under cold stress conditions. Glutathione transferases (GSTs, EC 2.5.1.18) are ubiquitous and multifunctional conjugating proteins, which play a major role in stress responses by preventing oxidative damage by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Currently, understanding of their function(s) during different biochemical and signaling pathways under cold stress condition remain unclear. In this study, using combined computational strategy, we identified 65 Brassica oleracea glutathione transferases (BoGST) and characterized them based on evolutionary analysis into 11 classes. Inter-species and intra-species duplication was evident between BoGSTs and Arabidopsis GSTs. Based on localization analyses, we propose possible pathways in which GST genes are involved during cold stress. Further, expression analysis of the predicted putative functions for GST genes were investigated in two cold contrasting genotypes (cold tolerance and susceptible) under cold condition, most of these genes were highly expressed at 6 h and 1 h in the cold tolerant (CT) and cold susceptible (CS) lines, respectively. Overall, BoGSTU19, BoGSTU24, BoGSTF10 are candidate genes highly expressed in B. oleracea. Further investigation of GST superfamily in B. oleracea will aid in understanding complex mechanism underlying cold tolerance in plants. PMID:27472324

  18. Multi-walled carbon nanotube-induced gene expression in vitro: concordance with in vivo studies

    PubMed Central

    Snyder-Talkington, Brandi N.; Dong, Chunlin; Zhao, Xiangyi; Dymacek, Julian; Porter, Dale W.; Wolfarth, Michael G.; Castranova, Vincent; Qian, Yong; Guo, Nancy L.

    2014-01-01

    There is a current interest in reducing the in vivo toxicity testing of nanomaterials in animals by increasing toxicity testing using in vitro cellular assays; however, toxicological results are seldom concordant between in vivo and in vitro models. This study compared global multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)-induced gene expression from human lung epithelial and microvascular endothelial cells in monoculture and coculture with gene expression from mouse lungs exposed to MWCNT. Using a cutoff of 10% false discovery rate and 1.5 fold change, we determined that there were more concordant genes (gene expression both up- or downregulated in vivo and in vitro) expressed in both cell types in coculture than in monoculture. When reduced to only those genes involved in inflammation and fibrosis, known outcomes of in vivo MWCNT exposure, there were more disease-related concordant genes expressed in coculture than monoculture. Additionally, different cellular signaling pathways are activated in response to MWCNT dependent upon culturing conditions. As coculture gene expression better correlated with in vivo gene expression, we suggest that cellular cocultures may offer enhanced in vitro models for nanoparticle risk assessment and the reduction of in vivo toxicological testing. PMID:25511174

  19. Construction of vectors for inducible and constitutive gene expression in Lactobacillus.

    PubMed

    Duong, Tri; Miller, Michael J; Barrangou, Rodolphe; Azcarate-Peril, M Andrea; Klaenhammer, Todd R

    2011-05-01

    Microarray analysis of the genome of Lactobacillus acidophilus identified a number of operons that were differentially expressed in response to carbohydrate source or constitutively expressed regardless of carbohydrate source. These included operons implicated in the transport and catabolism of fructooligosaccharides (FOS), lactose (lac), trehalose (tre) and genes directing glycolysis. Analysis of these operons identified a number of putative promoter and repressor elements, which were used to construct a series of expression vectors for use in lactobacilli, based on the broad host range pWV01 replicon. A β-glucuronidase (GusA3) reporter gene was cloned into each vector to characterize expression from each promoter. GUS reporter assays showed FOS, lac and tre based vectors to be highly inducible by their specific carbohydrate and repressed by glucose. Additionally, a construct based on the phosphoglycerate mutase (pgm) promoter was constitutively highly expressed. To demonstrate the potential utility of these vectors, we constructed a plasmid for the overexpression of the oxalate degradation pathway (Frc and Oxc) of L. acidophilus NCFM. This construct was able to improve oxalate degradation by L. gasseri ATCC 33323 and compliment a L. acidophilus oxalate-deficient mutant. Development of these expression vectors could support several novel applications, including the expression of enzymes, proteins, vaccines and biotherapeutics by intestinal lactobacilli. PMID:21375708

  20. Construction of vectors for inducible and constitutive gene expression in Lactobacillus

    PubMed Central

    Duong, Tri; Miller, Michael J.; Barrangou, Rodolphe; Azcarate‐Peril, M. Andrea; Klaenhammer, Todd R.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Microarray analysis of the genome of Lactobacillus acidophilus identified a number of operons that were differentially expressed in response to carbohydrate source or constitutively expressed regardless of carbohydrate source. These included operons implicated in the transport and catabolism of fructooligosaccharides (FOS), lactose (lac), trehalose (tre) and genes directing glycolysis. Analysis of these operons identified a number of putative promoter and repressor elements, which were used to construct a series of expression vectors for use in lactobacilli, based on the broad host range pWV01 replicon. A β‐glucuronidase (GusA3) reporter gene was cloned into each vector to characterize expression from each promoter. GUS reporter assays showed FOS, lac and tre based vectors to be highly inducible by their specific carbohydrate and repressed by glucose. Additionally, a construct based on the phosphoglycerate mutase (pgm) promoter was constitutively highly expressed. To demonstrate the potential utility of these vectors, we constructed a plasmid for the overexpression of the oxalate degradation pathway (Frc and Oxc) of L. acidophilus NCFM. This construct was able to improve oxalate degradation by L. gasseri ATCC 33323 and compliment a L. acidophilus oxalate‐deficient mutant. Development of these expression vectors could support several novel applications, including the expression of enzymes, proteins, vaccines and biotherapeutics by intestinal lactobacilli. PMID:21375708

  1. Ventilation and oxygenation induce endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene expression in the lungs of fetal lambs.

    PubMed Central

    Black, S M; Johengen, M J; Ma, Z D; Bristow, J; Soifer, S J

    1997-01-01

    At birth, ventilation and oxygenation immediately decrease pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) and increase pulmonary blood flow (PBF); more gradual changes occur over the next several hours. Nitric oxide, produced by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), mediates these gradual changes. To determine how ventilation and oxygenation affect eNOS gene expression, 12 fetal lambs were ventilated for 8 h without changing fetal descending aortic blood gases or pH (rhythmic distension) or with 100% oxygen (O2 ventilation). Vascular pressures and PBF were measured. Total RNA, protein, and tissue sections were prepared from lung tissue for RNase protection assays, Western blotting, and in situ hybridization. O2 ventilation increased PBF and decreased PVR more than rhythmic distension (P < 0.05). Rhythmic distension increased eNOS mRNA expression; O2 ventilation increased eNOS mRNA expression more and increased eNOS protein expression (P < 0.05). To define the mechanisms responsible for these changes, ovine fetal pulmonary arterial endothelial cells were exposed to 1, 21, or 95% O2 or to shear stress. 95% O2 increased eNOS mRNA and protein expression (P < 0.05). Shear stress increased eNOS mRNA and protein expression (P < 0.05). Increased oxygenation but more importantly increased PBF with increased shear stress induce eNOS gene expression and contribute to pulmonary vasodilation after birth. PMID:9294110

  2. T cell receptor transgenic lymphocytes infiltrating murine tumors are not induced to express foxp3

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) that express the transcription factor Foxp3 are enriched within a broad range of murine and human solid tumors. The ontogeny of these Foxp3 Tregs - selective accumulation or proliferation of natural thymus-derived Treg (nTreg) or induced Treg (iTreg) converted in the periphery from naïve T cells - is not known. We used several strains of mice in which Foxp3 and EGFP are coordinately expressed to address this issue. We confirmed that Foxp3-positive CD4 T cells are enriched among tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) and splenocytes (SPL) in B16 murine melanoma-bearing C57BL/6 Foxp3EGFP mice. OT-II Foxp3EGFP mice are essentially devoid of nTreg, having transgenic CD4 T cells that recognize a class II-restricted epitope derived from ovalbumin; Foxp3 expression could not be detected in TIL or SPL in these mice when implanted with ovalbumin-transfected B16 tumor (B16-OVA). Likewise, TIL isolated from B16 tumors implanted in Pmel-1 Foxp3EGFP mice, whose CD8 T cells recognize a class I-restricted gp100 epitope, were not induced to express Foxp3. All of these T cell populations - wild-type CD4, pmel CD8 and OTII CD4 - could be induced in vitro to express Foxp3 by engagement of their T cell receptor (TCR) and exposure to transforming growth factor β (TGFβ). B16 melanoma produces TGFβ and both pmel CD8 and OTII CD4 express TCR that should be engaged within B16 and B16-OVA respectively. Thus, CD8 and CD4 transgenic T cells in these animal models failed to undergo peripheral induction of Foxp3 in a tumor microenvironment. PMID:22112546

  3. Innate Immune Response Induced by Baculovirus Attenuates Transgene Expression in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Chikako; Ninomiya, Akinori; Yamamoto, Satomi; Abe, Takayuki; Wen, Xiauyu; Fukuhara, Takasuke; Sasai, Miwa; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Saitoh, Tatsuya; Satoh, Takashi; Kawai, Taro; Ishii, Ken J.; Akira, Shizuo; Okamoto, Toru

    2014-01-01

    The baculovirus Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcNPV) has been widely used to achieve a high level of foreign gene expression in insect cells, as well as for efficient gene transduction into mammalian cells without any replication. In addition to permitting efficient gene delivery, baculovirus has been shown to induce host innate immune responses in various mammalian cells and in mice. In this study, we examined the effects of the innate immune responses on gene expression by recombinant baculoviruses in cultured cells. The reporter gene expression in IRF3-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) infected with the recombinant baculovirus was shown to be enhanced in accordance with the suppression of beta interferon (IFN-β) production. Furthermore, efficient gene transduction by the recombinant baculovirus was achieved in MEFs deficient for stimulator of interferon genes (STING), TANK binding kinase 1 (TBK1), IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3), or IFN-β promoter stimulator 1 (IPS-1), but not in those deficient for IRF7, MyD88, or Z-DNA binding protein 1 (ZBP1)/DAI. Enhancement of gene expression by the recombinant baculovirus was also observed in human hepatoma cell lines replicating hepatitis C virus (HCV), in which innate immunity was impaired by the cleavage of IPS-1 by the viral protease. In addition, infection with the recombinant baculovirus expressing the BH3-only protein, BIMS, a potent inducer of apoptosis, resulted in a selective cell death in the HCV replicon cells. These results indicate that innate immune responses induced by infection with baculovirus attenuate transgene expression, and this characteristic might be useful for a selective gene transduction into cells with impaired innate immunity arising from infection with various viruses. PMID:24335288

  4. Anti-interleukin-33 Reduces Ovalbumin-Induced Nephrotoxicity and Expression of Kidney Injury Molecule-1

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of anti-interleukin-33 (anti-IL-33) on a mouse model of ovalbumin (OVA)-induced acute kidney injury (AKI). Methods: Twenty-four female BALB/c mice were assigned to 4 groups: group A (control, n=6) was administered sterile saline intraperitoneally (i.p.) and intranasally (i.n.); group B (allergic, n=6) was administered i.p./i.n. OVA challenge; group C (null treatment, n=6) was administered control IgG i.p. before OVA challenge; and group D (anti-IL-33, n=6) was pretreated with 3.6 µg of anti-IL-33 i.p. before every OVA challenge. The following were evaluated after sacrifice: serum blood urea nitrogen and creatinine levels, Kidney injury molecule-1 gene (Kim-1) and protein (KIM-1) expression in renal parenchyma, and expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), phosphorylated endothelial NOS (p-eNOS), and phosphorylated AMP kinase (p-AMPK) proteins in renal parenchyma. Results: After OVA injection and intranasal challenge, mice in groups B and C showed significant increases in the expression of Kim-1 at both the mRNA and protein levels. After anti-IL-33 treatment, mice in group D showed significant Kim-1 down-regulation at the mRNA and protein levels. Group D also showed significantly lower COX-2 protein expression, marginally lesser iNOS expression than groups B and C, and p-eNOS and p-AMPK expression at baseline levels. Conclusions: Kim-1 could be a useful marker for detecting early-stage renal injury in mouse models of OVA-induced AKI. Further, anti-IL-33 might have beneficial effects on these mouse models. PMID:27377943

  5. Association of SIRT1 expression with shear stress induced endothelial progenitor cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Bin-Bin; Yan, Zhi-Qiang; Yao, Qing-Ping; Shen, Bao-Rong; Wang, Ji-Yao; Gao, Li-Zhi; Li, Yu-Qing; Yuan, Hai-Tao; Qi, Ying-Xin; Jiang, Zong-Lai

    2012-12-01

    Shear stress imposed by blood flow is crucial for differentiation of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs). Histone deacetylase SIRT1 has been shown to play a pivotal role in many physiological processes. However, association of SIRT1 expression with shear stress-induced EPC differentiation remains to be elucidated. The present study was designed to determine the effect of SIRT1 on EPC differentiation induced by shear stress, and to seek the underlying mechanisms. Human umbilical cord blood-derived EPCs were exposed to laminar shear stress of 15 dyn/cm(2) by parallel plate flow chamber system. Shear stress enhanced EPC differentiation toward endothelial cells (ECs) while inhibited to smooth muscle cells (SMCs). The expressions of phospho-Akt, SIRT1 and histone H3 acetylation (Ac-H3) in EPCs were detected after exposure to shear stress for 2, 6, 12, and 24 h, respectively. Shear stress significantly activated Akt phosphorylation, augmented SIRT1 expression and downregulated Ac-H3. SIRT1 siRNA in EPCs diminished the expression of EC markers, but increased the expression of SMC markers, and resulted in upregulation of Ac-H3. Whereas, resveratrol, an activator of SIRT1, had the opposite effects on both EPC differentiation and histone H3 acetylation. Wortmannin, an inhibitor of PI3-kinase, suppressed endothelial differentiation of EPCs, decreased SIRT1, and upregulated Ac-H3 expression. In addition, SIRT1 promoted tube formation of EPCs in matrix gels. These results provided a mechanobiological basis of shear stress-induced EPC differentiation into ECs and suggest that PI3k/Akt-SIRT1-Ac-H3 pathway is crucial in such a process.

  6. Interleukin 21-induced granzyme B-expressing B cells infiltrate tumors and regulate T cells.

    PubMed

    Lindner, Stefanie; Dahlke, Karen; Sontheimer, Kai; Hagn, Magdalena; Kaltenmeier, Christof; Barth, Thomas F E; Beyer, Thamara; Reister, Frank; Fabricius, Dorit; Lotfi, Ramin; Lunov, Oleg; Nienhaus, G Ulrich; Simmet, Thomas; Kreienberg, Rolf; Möller, Peter; Schrezenmeier, Hubert; Jahrsdörfer, Bernd

    2013-04-15

    The pathogenic impact of tumor-infiltrating B cells is unresolved at present, however, some studies suggest that they may have immune regulatory potential. Here, we report that the microenvironment of various solid tumors includes B cells that express granzyme B (GrB, GZMB), where these B cells can be found adjacent to interleukin (IL)-21-secreting regulatory T cells (Treg) that contribute to immune tolerance of tumor antigens. Because Tregs and plasmacytoid dendritic cells are known to modulate T-effector cells by a GrB-dependent mechanism, we hypothesized that a similar process may operate to modulate regulatory B cells (Breg). IL-21 induced outgrowth of B cells expressing high levels of GrB, which thereby limited T-cell proliferation by a GrB-dependent degradation of the T-cell receptor ζ-chain. Mechanistic investigations into how IL-21 induced GrB expression in B cells to confer Breg function revealed a CD19(+)CD38(+)CD1d(+)IgM(+)CD147(+) expression signature, along with expression of additional key regulatory molecules including IL-10, CD25, and indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase. Notably, induction of GrB by IL-21 integrated signals mediated by surface immunoglobulin M (B-cell receptor) and Toll-like receptors, each of which were enhanced with expression of the B-cell marker CD5. Our findings show for the first time that IL-21 induces GrB(+) human Bregs. They also establish the existence of human B cells with a regulatory phenotype in solid tumor infiltrates, where they may contribute to the suppression of antitumor immune responses. Together, these findings may stimulate novel diagnostic and cell therapeutic approaches to better manage human cancer as well as autoimmune and graft-versus-host pathologies. PMID:23384943

  7. Hearing Aid

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Food and Drug Administration Staff FDA permits marketing of new laser-based hearing aid with potential ... feeds Follow FDA on Twitter Follow FDA on Facebook View FDA videos on YouTube View FDA photos ...

  8. Laparotomy in mice induces blood cell expression of inflammatory and stress genes.

    PubMed

    Ko, Fred; Isoda, Fumiko; Mobbs, Charles

    2015-04-01

    Surgical trauma induces immune and stress responses although its effects on postsurgical inflammatory and stress gene expression remain poorly characterized. This study sought to improve current scientific knowledge by investigating the effects of laparotomy on mouse blood cell inflammatory and stress gene expression. Three-month-old male C57BL/6J mice were subjected to 2% isoflurane or 2% isoflurane with laparotomy and sacrificed 4 h postintervention. Blood was collected and blood cell expression of 158 genes central to inflammatory and stress responses was assayed using quantitative polymerase chain reaction arrays. Mice subjected to isoflurane with laparotomy, compared with mice receiving isoflurane alone, had >2-fold upregulation of genes in inflammation (Osm, IL1rn, IL1b, and Csf1), oxidative stress (Hmox1), heat shock (Hspa1b), growth arrest (Cdkn1a), and DNA repair (Ugt1a2). These genes demonstrated similar expression patterns by Pearson correlation and cluster analysis. Thus, laparotomy induces coordinated, postsurgical blood cell expression of unique inflammatory and stress genes whose roles in influencing surgical outcomes need further investigation.

  9. Spatial learning-induced egr-1 expression in telencephalon of gold fish Carassius auratus.

    PubMed

    Rajan, K Emmanuvel; Ganesh, A; Dharaneedharan, S; Radhakrishnan, K

    2011-03-01

    The immediate-early gene (egr-1) expression was used to examine the neuron's response in telencephalon of goldfish during spatial learning in small space. Fishes were pre-exposed in the experimental apparatus and trained to pick food from the tray in a rectangular-shaped arena. The apparatus was divided into identical compartments comprising three gates to provide different spatial tasks. After the fish learned to pass through the gate one, two more gates were introduced one by one. Fish made more number of attempts and took longer time (P < 0.05) to pass through the first gate than the gate two or three. This active learning induces the expression of egr-1 in telencephalon as established by western blot analysis. Subsequently, the fish learn quickly to cross the similar type of second and third gate and make fewer errors with a corresponding decline in the level of egr-1 expression. As the fish learned to pass through all the three gates, third gate was replaced by modified gate three. Interestingly, the level of egr-1 expression increased again, when the fish exhibit a high exploratory behavior to cross the modified gate three. The present study shows that egr-1 expression is induced in the telencephalon of goldfish while intensively acquiring geometric spatial information to pass through the gates. PMID:20714804

  10. UVB-induced gene expression in the skin of Xiphophorus maculatus Jp 163 B☆

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kuan; Boswell, Mikki; Walter, Dylan J.; Downs, Kevin P.; Gaston-Pravia, Kimberly; Garcia, Tzintzuni; Shen, Yingjia; Mitchell, David L.; Walter, Ronald B.

    2014-01-01

    Xiphophorus fish and interspecies hybrids represent long-standing models to study the genetics underlying spontaneous and induced tumorigenesis. The recent release of the Xiphophorus maculatus genome sequence will allow global genetic regulation studies of genes involved in the inherited susceptibility to UVB-induced melanoma within select backcross hybrids. As a first step toward this goal, we report results of an RNA-Seq approach to identify genes and pathways showing modulated transcription within the skin of X. maculatus Jp 163 B upon UVB exposure. X. maculatus Jp 163 B were exposed to various doses of UVB followed by RNA-Seq analysis at each dose to investigate overall gene expression in each sample. A total of 357 genes with a minimum expression change of 4-fold (p-adj < 0.05) were identified as responsive to UVB. The molecular genetic response of Xiphophorus skin to UVB exposure permitted assessment of; (1) the basal expression level of each transcript for each skin sample, (2) the changes in expression levels for each gene in the transcriptome upon exposure to increasing doses of UVB, and (3) clusters of genes that exhibit similar patterns of change in expression upon UVB exposure. These data provide a foundation for understanding the molecular genetic response of fish skin to UVB exposure. PMID:24556253

  11. Induced nitric oxide synthetase and peroxiredoxin expression in intramucosal poorly differentiated gastric cancer of young patients.

    PubMed

    Hirahashi, Minako; Koga, Yutaka; Kumagai, Reiko; Aishima, Shinichi; Taguchi, Kenichi; Oda, Yoshinao

    2014-04-01

    To investigate the relationship between oxidative stress and gastric carcinogenesis of poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma in young patients, we analyzed the surgically resected specimens of 22 young patients (21-30 years) and 29 older patients (41-72 years) with intramucosal gastric cancer of the poorly differentiated type. We used immunohistochemical staining to evaluate the expression of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8OHdG), induced nitric oxide synthetase (iNOS), and antioxidant enzymes (thioredoxin [TRX] and peroxiredoxin [PRDX1, 2 and 3]). We assessed these proteins in the cancer, noncancerous gastric foveolar epithelium and noncancerous mucosal neck. In both the young and older patient groups, the 8OHdG and TRX expressions were gradually increased in cancer cells compared with the noncancerous foveolar epithelial cells and the noncancerous mucosal neck cells (P < 0.001). Although the iNOS and PRDXs expressions were increased in the noncancerous mucosal neck cells compared with the noncancerous foveolar epithelial cells, regardless of age (P < 0.001), the iNOS and PRDX2 expression in the cancer cells were significantly reduced in the young patients compared with the older patients (P < 0.001, P < 0.05). In conclusion, the reduced expression of iNOS or PRDX2 may play an important role in the carcinogenesis of gastric cancer associated with Helicobacter pylori-induced chronic active gastritis in young patients.

  12. Laparotomy in Mice Induces Blood Cell Expression of Inflammatory and Stress Genes

    PubMed Central

    Isoda, Fumiko; Mobbs, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Surgical trauma induces immune and stress responses although its effects on postsurgical inflammatory and stress gene expression remain poorly characterized. This study sought to improve current scientific knowledge by investigating the effects of laparotomy on mouse blood cell inflammatory and stress gene expression. Three-month-old male C57BL/6J mice were subjected to 2% isoflurane or 2% isoflurane with laparotomy and sacrificed 4 h postintervention. Blood was collected and blood cell expression of 158 genes central to inflammatory and stress responses was assayed using quantitative polymerase chain reaction arrays. Mice subjected to isoflurane with laparotomy, compared with mice receiving isoflurane alone, had >2-fold upregulation of genes in inflammation (Osm, IL1rn, IL1b, and Csf1), oxidative stress (Hmox1), heat shock (Hspa1b), growth arrest (Cdkn1a), and DNA repair (Ugt1a2). These genes demonstrated similar expression patterns by Pearson correlation and cluster analysis. Thus, laparotomy induces coordinated, postsurgical blood cell expression of unique inflammatory and stress genes whose roles in influencing surgical outcomes need further investigation. PMID:25406893

  13. Autoregulation of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Expression by RNA Interference Provides Neuroprotection in Neonatal Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhi; Feng, Chenzhuo; Zhao, Huijuan; Ren, Xiaoyan; Peng, Shuling; Zuo, Zhiyi

    2015-01-01

    We have shown that autoregulation of gene expression by RNA interference is achievable in cell cultures. To determine whether this novel concept could be used to produce neuroprotection under in vivo condition, postnatal day (PND) 3 rats received intracerebroventricular injection of lentivirus that carried or did not carry code for short hairpin RNA (shRNA) of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). The expression of this shRNA was controlled by an iNOS promoter (piNOS-shRNA) or cytomegalovirus promoter (pCMV-shRNA). The rats were subjected to brain hypoxia-ischemia at PND7. Ischemic brain tissues had increased iNOS expression. This increase was attenuated by virus carrying piNOS-shRNA. Virus carrying pCMV-shRNA reduced iNOS to a level that was lower than control. Brain tissue loss and functional impairment after the hypoxia-ischemia were attenuated by the virus carrying piNOS-shRNA but not by pCMV-shRNA. Our results provide proof-of-concept evidence that autoregulation of iNOS expression by RNA interference induces neuroprotection in vivo and that appropriate regulation of gene expression is important. PMID:25767617

  14. Thermally induced osteocyte damage initiates pro-osteoclastogenic gene expression in vivo.

    PubMed

    Dolan, Eimear B; Tallon, David; Cheung, Wing-Yee; Schaffler, Mitchell B; Kennedy, Oran D; McNamara, Laoise M

    2016-06-01

    Bone is often subject to harsh temperatures during orthopaedic procedures resulting in thermally induced bone damage, which may affect the healing response. Postsurgical healing of bone is essential to the success of surgery, therefore, an understanding of the thermally induced responses of bone cells to clinically relevant temperatures in vivo is required. Osteocytes have been shown to be integrally involved in the bone remodelling cascade, via apoptosis, in micro-damage systems. However, it is unknown whether this relationship is similar following thermal damage. Sprague-Dawley rat tibia were exposed to clinically relevant temperatures (47°C or 60°C) to investigate the role of osteocytes in modulating remodelling related factors. Immunohistochemistry was used to quantify osteocyte thermal damage (activated caspase-3). Thermally induced pro-osteoclastogenic genes (Rankl, Opg and M-csf), in addition to genes known to mediate osteoblast and osteoclast differentiation via prostaglandin production (Cox2), vascularization (Vegf) and inflammatory (Il1a) responses, were investigated using gene expression analysis. The results demonstrate that heat-treatment induced significant bone tissue and cellular damage. Pro-osteoclastogenic genes were upregulated depending on the amount of temperature elevation compared with the control. Taken together, the results of this study demonstrate the in vivo effect of thermally induced osteocyte damage on the gene expression profile.

  15. Thermally induced osteocyte damage initiates pro-osteoclastogenic gene expression in vivo.

    PubMed

    Dolan, Eimear B; Tallon, David; Cheung, Wing-Yee; Schaffler, Mitchell B; Kennedy, Oran D; McNamara, Laoise M

    2016-06-01

    Bone is often subject to harsh temperatures during orthopaedic procedures resulting in thermally induced bone damage, which may affect the healing response. Postsurgical healing of bone is essential to the success of surgery, therefore, an understanding of the thermally induced responses of bone cells to clinically relevant temperatures in vivo is required. Osteocytes have been shown to be integrally involved in the bone remodelling cascade, via apoptosis, in micro-damage systems. However, it is unknown whether this relationship is similar following thermal damage. Sprague-Dawley rat tibia were exposed to clinically relevant temperatures (47°C or 60°C) to investigate the role of osteocytes in modulating remodelling related factors. Immunohistochemistry was used to quantify osteocyte thermal damage (activated caspase-3). Thermally induced pro-osteoclastogenic genes (Rankl, Opg and M-csf), in addition to genes known to mediate osteoblast and osteoclast differentiation via prostaglandin production (Cox2), vascularization (Vegf) and inflammatory (Il1a) responses, were investigated using gene expression analysis. The results demonstrate that heat-treatment induced significant bone tissue and cellular damage. Pro-osteoclastogenic genes were upregulated depending on the amount of temperature elevation compared with the control. Taken together, the results of this study demonstrate the in vivo effect of thermally induced osteocyte damage on the gene expression profile. PMID:27335224

  16. Anti-inflammatory effect of resveratrol on TNF-{alpha}-induced MCP-1 expression in adipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Jian; Yong Wei; Wu Xiaohong; Yu Ying; Lv Jinghuan; Liu Cuiping; Mao Xiaodong; Zhu Yunxia; Xu Kuanfeng; Han Xiao Liu Chao

    2008-05-02

    Chronic low-grade inflammation characterized by adipose tissue macrophage accumulation and abnormal cytokine production is a key feature of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Adipose-tissue-derived monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, induced by cytokines, has been shown to play an essential role in the early events during macrophage infiltration into adipose tissue. In this study we investigated the effects of resveratrol upon both tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha}-induced MCP-1 gene expression and its underlying signaling pathways in 3T3-L1 adipoctyes. Resveratrol was found to inhibit TNF-{alpha}-induced MCP-1 secretion and gene transcription, as well as promoter activity, which based on down-regulation of TNF-{alpha}-induced MCP-1 transcription. Nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B was determined to play a major role in the TNF-{alpha}-induced MCP-1 expression. Further analysis showed that resveratrol inhibited DNA binding activity of the NF-{kappa}B complex and subsequently suppressed NF-{kappa}B transcriptional activity in TNF-{alpha}-stimulated cells. Finally, the inhibition of MCP-1 may represent a novel mechanism of resveratrol in preventing obesity-related pathologies.

  17. RNA splicing regulates the temporal order of TNF-induced gene expression.

    PubMed

    Hao, Shengli; Baltimore, David

    2013-07-16

    When cells are induced to express inflammatory genes by treatment with TNF, the mRNAs for the induced genes appear in three distinct waves, defining gene groups I, II, and III, or early, intermediate, and late genes. To examine the basis for these different kinetic classes, we have developed a PCR-based procedure to distinguish pre-mRNAs from mRNAs. It shows that the three groups initiate transcription virtually simultaneously but that delays in splicing characterize groups II and III. We also examined the elongation times, concluding that pre-mRNA synthesis is coordinate but splicing differences directly regulate the timing of mRNA production.

  18. Jasmonate signal induced expression of cystatin genes for providing resistance against Karnal bunt in wheat.

    PubMed

    Dutt, Shriparna; Pandey, Dinesh; Kumar, Anil

    2011-06-01

    Two wheat varieties HD-29 (resistant, R) and WH-542 (susceptible, S) were pretreated with jasmonic acid (JA) or jasmonate and then artificially inoculated with sporidial suspension of Tilletia indica to study its influence in reducing Karnal bunt (KB) infection by regulating cystatin gene expression. JA was found to improve the plant defense against KB as its exogenous application resulted in decrease in coefficient of infection (CI) in both susceptible and resistant varieties following pathogen inoculation. Transcript profiling of wheat cystatin genes at different days after inoculation (DAI) showed that JA pretreatment positively induced cystatin gene expression in both varieties with greater induction of expression in resistant variety than the susceptible one (P< 0.05). Different temporal expression of three wheat cystatin genes, WC2, WC3 and WCMD was observed with their increased expression at 1DAI in the boot emergence stage which is most susceptible to KB and then slowly declined gradually at 3, 7 and 15 DAI in both the varieties. Except WC2, higher expression of other two cystatins viz. WC3 and WCMD at 1DAI showed higher response (P< 0.05) to KB pathogenesis at the disease-prone boot emergence stage as also evident by decrease of CI in both varieties. The results of determination of specific activity of cystatin by inhibitor assay were found to be consistent with those of transcript profiling. These findings suggest that jasmonic acid (JA) may act as a potential activator of induced resistance against Karnal bunt of wheat by upregulating cystatin gene expression.

  19. Resveratrol and fenofibrate ameliorate fructose-induced nonalcoholic steatohepatitis by modulation of genes expression

    PubMed Central

    Abd El-Haleim, Enas A; Bahgat, Ashraf K; Saleh, Samira

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of resveratrol, alone and in combination with fenofibrate, on fructose-induced metabolic genes abnormalities in rats. METHODS: Giving a fructose-enriched diet (FED) to rats for 12 wk was used as a model for inducing hepatic dyslipidemia and insulin resistance. Adult male albino rats (150-200 g) were divided into a control group and a FED group which was subdivided into 4 groups, a control FED, fenofibrate (FENO) (100 mg/kg), resveratrol (RES) (70 mg/kg) and combined treatment (FENO + RES) (half the doses). All treatments were given orally from the 9th week till the end of experimental period. Body weight, oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), liver index, glucose, insulin, insulin resistance (HOMA), serum and liver triglycerides (TGs), oxidative stress (liver MDA, GSH and SOD), serum AST, ALT, AST/ALT ratio and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were measured. Additionally, hepatic gene expression of suppressor of cytokine signaling-3 (SOCS-3), sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c), fatty acid synthase (FAS), malonyl CoA decarboxylase (MCD), transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and adipose tissue genes expression of leptin and adiponectin were investigated. Liver sections were taken for histopathological examination and steatosis area were determined. RESULTS: Rats fed FED showed damaged liver, impairment of glucose tolerance, insulin resistance, oxidative stress and dyslipidemia. As for gene expression, there was a change in favor of dyslipidemia and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) development. All treatment regimens showed some benefit in reversing the described deviations. Fructose caused deterioration in hepatic gene expression of SOCS-3, SREBP-1c, FAS, MDA and TGF-β1 and in adipose tissue gene expression of leptin and adiponectin. Fructose showed also an increase in body weight, insulin resistance (OGTT, HOMA), serum and liver TGs, hepatic MDA, serum AST, AST/ALT ratio and TNF-α compared to control. All

  20. Hyperosmotic stress induces cisplatin sensitivity in ovarian cancer cells by stimulating aquaporin-5 expression

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, XUEJUN; ZHOU, CHUNXIA; YAN, CHUNXIAO; MA, JIONG; ZHENG, WEI

    2015-01-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are important mediators of water permeability and are closely associated with tumor cell proliferation, migration, angiogenesis and chemoresistance. Moreover, the chemosensitivity of tumor cells to cisplatin (CDDP) is potentially affected by osmotic pressure. The present study was undertaken to determine whether hyperosmosis regulates ovarian cancer cell sensitivity to CDDP in vitro and to explore whether this is associated with AQP expression. The hyperosmotic stress was induced by D-sorbitol. 3AO ovarian cancer cells were treated with different concentrations of hypertonic medium and/or CDDP for various times, followed by measuring the inhibition rate of cell proliferation using an MTT assay. In addition, AQP expression in response to osmotic pressure and/or CDDP was measured by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. Cell proliferation in response to hypertonic stress was also measured when AQP5 was knocked down by small interfering (si)RNA. 3AO cell proliferation was inhibited by hyperosmotic stress, while the expression of AQP5, but not that of AQP1, AQP3 or AQP9, was increased in a dose- and time-dependent manner in hypertonic sorbitol-containing medium. When AQP5 was silenced by siRNA, cells were susceptible to hypertonic stress. MTT analyses showed that the inhibition of cell proliferation by a low dose of CDDP increased significantly with exposure to a hyperosmotic stimulus, and this effect was reduced when a high dose of CDDP was used. AQP5 expression was induced by a low dose of CDDP, but was reduced by a high dose of CDDP. However, hyperosmosis enhanced AQP5 mRNA expression at every dose of CDDP tested, compared with isotonic medium. With prolonged treatment time, AQP5 expression was reduced by CDDP in hypertonic and isotonic culture medium. Thus, the effects of hyperosmosis on cell sensitivity to CDDP were associated with AQP5 expression. These results suggest that AQP5 expression in ovarian

  1. Casticin induces breast cancer cell apoptosis by inhibiting the expression of forkhead box protein M1

    PubMed Central

    LIU, LI-PING; CAO, XIAO-CHENG; LIU, FEI; QUAN, MEI-FANG; SHENG, XI-FENG; REN, KAI-QUN

    2014-01-01

    Casticin is an active ingredient derived from Fructus Viticis, a traditional Chinese medicine. This study aimed to investigate the role of forkhead box O3 (FOXO3a) in breast cancer cells and examine the regulatory mechanisms of FOXO3a in response to casticin treatment of the cells by ELISA, flow cytometry, small interfering RNA (siRNA) transfection and western blot analysis. Casticin treatment induced apoptosis and reduced the expression of the transcription factor forkhead box protein M1 (FOXM1). In addition, FOXM1 repression induced by casticin treatment was associated with the activation of FOXO3a via increased dephosphorylation. Notably, silencing FOXO3a expression by siRNA-mediated gene knockdown attenuated casticin-mediated apoptosis. Collectively, these findings suggest that FOXO3a is a critical mediator of the inhibitory effects of casticin on apoptosis in breast cancer cells. PMID:24765206

  2. Reduced Histone Expression or a Defect in Chromatin Assembly Induces Respiration.

    PubMed

    Galdieri, Luciano; Zhang, Tiantian; Rogerson, Daniella; Vancura, Ales

    2016-01-19

    Regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis and respiration is a complex process that involves several signaling pathways and transcription factors as well as communication between the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. Here we show that decreased expression of histones or a defect in nucleosome assembly in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae results in increased mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy numbers, oxygen consumption, ATP synthesis, and expression of genes encoding enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). The metabolic shift from fermentation to respiration induced by altered chromatin structure is associated with the induction of the retrograde (RTG) pathway and requires the activity of the Hap2/3/4/5p complex as well as the transport and metabolism of pyruvate in mitochondria. Together, our data indicate that altered chromatin structure relieves glucose repression of mitochondrial respiration by inducing transcription of the TCA cycle and OXPHOS genes carried by both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA.

  3. Young adults with head and neck cancer express increased susceptibility to mutagen-induced chromosome damage

    SciTech Connect

    Schantz, S.P.; Hsu, T.C.; Ainslie, N.; Moser, R.P. )

    1989-12-15

    Factors that contribute to an increased prevalence of squamous cell carcinoma of the upper aerodigestive tract among young adults in the United States remain unknown. A potential etiologic factor may relate to a genetically controlled sensitivity to environmental carcinogens. This study, therefore, examined 20 young adult patients who had squamous cell carcinoma for mutagen-induced chromosome sensitivity. Lymphocytes from respective patients were cultured, exposed to the clastogen bleomycin, arrested during metaphase, and examined quantitatively for chromosome breakage. The young adult population with squamous cell carcinoma expressed a significantly increased number of bleomycin-induced chromosome breaks per cell. Furthermore, among the study patients, chromosome sensitivity was most apparent in the non-tobacco users and in patients less than 30 years of age. The expression of such chromosome fragility following mutagen exposure should be considered in epidemiologic studies that intend to define risk factors for development of head and neck cancer.

  4. Cranberries inhibit LDL oxidation and induce LDL receptor expression in hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Chu, Yi-Fang; Liu, Rui Hai

    2005-08-26

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in most industrialized countries. Cranberries were evaluated for their potential roles in dietary prevention of CVD. Cranberry extracts were found to have potent antioxidant capacity preventing in vitro LDL oxidation with increasing delay and suppression of LDL oxidation in a dose-dependent manner. The antioxidant activity of 100 g cranberries against LDL oxidation was equivalent to 1000 mg vitamin C or 3700 mg vitamin E. Cranberry extracts also significantly induced expression of hepatic LDL receptors and increased intracellular uptake of cholesterol in HepG2 cells in vitro in a dose-dependent manner. This suggests that cranberries could enhance clearance of excessive plasma cholesterol in circulation. We propose that additive or synergistic effects of phytochemicals in cranberries are responsible for the inhibition of LDL oxidation, the induced expression of LDL receptors, and the increased uptake of cholesterol in hepatocytes.

  5. Transfected human neuropeptide Y cDNA expression in mouse pituitary cells. Inducible high expression, peptide characterization, and secretion.

    PubMed

    Dickerson, I M; Dixon, J E; Mains, R E

    1987-10-01

    An expression vector was constructed that placed the cDNA for human neuropeptide Y (NPY) under the control of the mouse metallothionein promoter and was used to transfect the AtT-20 mouse anterior pituitary corticotrope cell line. AtT-20 cells normally process the pro-ACTH/endorphin precursor but do not produce detectable levels of NPY. The resulting AtT-20/NPY cell line (Mt.NPY1a) was used to study the ability of the corticotrope cells to synthesize, process, and secrete the foreign proNPY-related peptide products. The stable cell line created contains approximately 40 copies of proNPY cDNA per cell. NPY mRNA levels and proNPY synthesis were increased at least 35-fold when maximally induced with cadmium; proNPY synthesis was also induced by glucocorticoids. Upon induction the NPY secretion rate was equimolar to that of the endogenous peptides. ProNPY, NPY, and the COOH-terminal peptide produced by this cell line had molecular weight and amino acid-labeling pattern predicted from cDNA sequence data and from previous isolation of NPY-related molecules from NPY-producing cells. The structures of secreted proNPY, NPY, and COOH-terminal peptide, as well as determination of the site of proteolytic cleavage between NPY and the COOH-terminal peptide, were determined by tryptic mapping and Edman degradation of secreted biosynthetically labeled peptide products. The proNPY molecule appears to be processed in the same pathway responsible for cleavage of the endogenous pro-ACTH/endorphin precursor. Secretion of proNPY-derived peptides paralleled secretion of endogenous pro-ACTH/endorphin-derived products, under both basal and stimulated conditions. With induction proNPY expression there is a dose-dependent inhibition of both proNPY and pro-ACTH/endorphin proteolytic processing.

  6. Targeting receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) expression induces apoptosis and inhibits prostate tumor growth

    SciTech Connect

    Elangovan, Indira; Thirugnanam, Sivasakthivel; Chen, Aoshuang; Zheng, Guoxing; Bosland, Maarten C.; Kajdacsy-Balla, Andre; Gnanasekar, Munirathinam

    2012-01-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Targeting RAGE by RNAi induces apoptosis in prostate cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silencing RAGE expression abrogates rHMGB1 mediated cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Down regulation of RAGE by RNAi inhibits PSA secretion of prostate cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knock down of RAGE abrogates prostate tumor growth in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Disruption of RAGE expression in prostate tumor activates death receptors. -- Abstract: Expression of receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) plays a key role in the progression of prostate cancer. However, the therapeutic potential of targeting RAGE expression in prostate cancer is not yet evaluated. Therefore in this study, we have investigated the effects of silencing the expression of RAGE by RNAi approach both in vitro and in vivo. The results of this study showed that down regulation of RAGE expression by RNAi inhibited the cell proliferation of androgen-dependent (LNCaP) and androgen-independent (DU-145) prostate cancer cells. Furthermore, targeting RAGE expression resulted in apoptotic elimination of these prostate cancer cells by activation of caspase-8 and caspase-3 death signaling. Of note, the levels of prostate specific antigen (PSA) were also reduced in LNCaP cells transfected with RAGE RNAi constructs. Importantly, the RAGE RNAi constructs when administered in nude mice bearing prostate tumors, inhibited the tumor growth by targeting the expression of RAGE, and its physiological ligand, HMGB1 and by up regulating death receptors DR4 and DR5 expression. Collectively, the results of this study for the first time show that targeting RAGE by RNAi may be a promising alternative therapeutic strategy for treating prostate cancer.

  7. Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer expression in the baboon endometrium: menstrual cycle and endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Braundmeier, A G; Fazleabas, A T; Nowak, R A

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN; BSG) regulates tissue remodeling through matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). In human and non-human primates, endometrial remodeling is important for menstruation and the pathogenesis of endometriosis. We hypothesized that as in humans, BSG and MMPs are expressed in the endometrium of cycling baboons, and their expression is hormonally regulated by ovarian hormones, but endometriosis disrupts this regulation. BSG expression was evaluated in the baboon endometrium by q-PCR and immunohistochemistry. In the endometrium of control cycling animals, BSG mRNA levels were highest in late secretory stage tissue. BSG protein localized to glandular epithelial cells during the proliferative phase; whereas, secretory stage tissues expressed BSG in glandular and luminal epithelia with weak stromal staining. Several MMPs were differentially expressed throughout the menstrual cycle with the highest levels found during menstruation. In ovariectomized animals, BSG endometrial mRNA levels were highest with treatment of both estrogen and progesterone than that with only estrogen. Estrogen alone resulted in BSG protein localization primarily in the endometrial glandular epithelia, while estrogen and progesterone treatment displayed BSG protein localization in both the glandular and stromal cells. Exogenous hormone treatment resulted in differential expression patterns of all MMPs compared with the control cycling animals. In the eutopic endometrium of endometriotic animals, BSG mRNA levels and protein were elevated early but decreased later in disease progression. Endometriosis elevated the expression of all MMPs except MMP7 compared with the control animals. In baboons, BSG and MMP endometrial expression is regulated by both ovarian hormones, and their expression patterns are dysregulated in endometriotic animals. PMID:20841363

  8. Dexamethasone-induced muscular atrophy is mediated by functional expression of connexin-based hemichannels.

    PubMed

    Cea, Luis A; Balboa, Elisa; Puebla, Carlos; Vargas, Aníbal A; Cisterna, Bruno A; Escamilla, Rosalba; Regueira, Tomás; Sáez, Juan C

    2016-10-01

    Long-term treatment with high glucocorticoid doses induces skeletal muscle atrophy. However, the molecular mechanism of such atrophy remains unclear. We evaluated the possible involvement of connexin-based hemichannels (Cx HCs) in muscle atrophy induced by dexamethasone (DEX), a synthetic glucocorticoid, on control (Cx43(fl/fl)Cx45(fl/fl)) and Cx43/Cx45 expression-deficient (Cx43(fl/fl)Cx45(fl/fl):Myo-Cre) skeletal myofibers. Myofibers of Cx43(fl/fl)Cx45(fl/fl) mice treated with DEX (5h) expressed several proteins that form non-selective membrane channels (Cx39, Cx43, Cx45, Panx1, P2X7 receptor and TRPV2). After 5h DEX treatment in vivo, myofibers of Cx43(fl/fl)Cx45(fl/fl) mice showed Evans blue uptake, which was absent in myofibers of Cx43(fl/fl)Cx45(fl/fl):Myo-Cre mice. Similar results were obtained in vitro using ethidium as an HC permeability probe, and DEX-induced dye uptake in control myofibers was blocked by P2X7 receptor inhibitors. DEX also induced a significant increase in basal intracellular Ca(2+) signal and a reduction in resting membrane potential in Cx43(fl/fl)Cx45(fl/fl) myofibers, changes that were not elicited by myofibers deficient in Cx43/Cx45 expression. Moreover, treatment with DEX induced NFκB activation and increased mRNA levels of TNF-α in control but not in Cx43/Cx45 expression-deficient myofibers. Finally, a prolonged DEX treatment (7days) increased atrogin-1 and Murf-1 and reduced the cross sectional area of Cx43(fl/fl)Cx45(fl/fl) myofibers, but these parameters remained unaffected in Cx43(fl/fl)Cx45(fl/fl):Myo-Cre myofibers. Therefore, DEX-induced expression of Cx43 and Cx45 plays a critical role in early sarcolemma changes that lead to atrophy. Consequently, this side effect of chronic glucocorticoid treatment might be avoided by co-administration with a Cx HC blocker.

  9. Striatal dopamine and glutamate receptors modulate methamphetamine-induced cortical Fos expression.

    PubMed

    Gross, N B; Marshall, J F

    2009-07-21

    Methamphetamine (mAMPH) is a psychostimulant drug that increases extracellular levels of monoamines throughout the brain. It has previously been observed that a single injection of mAMPH increases immediate early gene (IEG) expression in both the striatum and cerebral cortex. Moreover, this effect is modulated by dopamine and glutamate receptors since systemic administration of dopamine or glutamate antagonists has been found to alter mAMPH-induced striatal and cortical IEG expression. However, because dopamine and glutamate receptors are found in extra-striatal as well as striatal brain regions, studies employing systemic injection of dopamine or glutamate antagonists fail to localize the effects of mAMPH-induced activation. In the present experiments, the roles of striatal dopamine and glutamate receptors in mAMPH-induced gene expression in the striatum and cerebral cortex were examined. The nuclear expression of Fos, the protein product of the IEG c-fos, was quantified in both the striatum and the cortex of animals receiving intrastriatal dopamine or glutamate antagonist administration. Intrastriatal infusion of dopamine (D1 or D2) or glutamate [N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) or alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)] antagonists affected not only mAMPH-induced striatal, but also cortical, Fos expression. Overall, the effects of the antagonists occurred dose-dependently, in both the infused and non-infused hemispheres, with greater influences occurring in the infused hemisphere. Finally, unilateral intrastriatal infusion of dopamine or glutamate antagonists changed the behavior of the rats from characteristic mAMPH-induced stereotypy to rotation ipsilateral to the infusion. These results demonstrate that mAMPH's actions on striatal dopamine and glutamate receptors modulate the widespread cortical activation induced by mAMPH. It is hypothesized that dopamine release from nigrostriatal terminals modulates activity within striatal efferent

  10. Ribavirin-induced intracellular GTP depletion activates transcription elongation in coagulation factor VII gene expression.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Atsuo; Miyawaki, Yuhri; Okuyama, Eriko; Murata, Moe; Ando, Yumi; Kato, Io; Takagi, Yuki; Takagi, Akira; Murate, Takashi; Saito, Hidehiko; Kojima, Tetsuhito

    2013-01-01

    Coagulation FVII (Factor VII) is a vitamin K-dependent glycoprotein synthesized in hepatocytes. It was reported previously that FVII gene (F7) expression was up-regulated by ribavirin treatment in hepatitis C virus-infected haemophilia patients; however, its precise mechanism is still unknown. In the present study, we investigated the molecular mechanism of ribavirin-induced up-regulation of F7 expression in HepG2 (human hepatoma cell line). We found that intracellular GTP depletion by ribavirin as well as other IMPDH (inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase) inhibitors, such as mycophenolic acid and 6-mercaptopurine, up-regulated F7 expression. FVII mRNA transcription was mainly enhanced by accelerated transcription elongation, which was mediated by the P-TEFb (positive-transcription elongation factor b) complex, rather than by promoter activation. Ribavirin unregulated ELL (eleven-nineteen lysine-rich leukaemia) 3 mRNA expression before F7 up-regulation. We observed that ribavirin enhanced ELL3 recruitment to F7, whereas knockdown of ELL3 diminished ribavirin-induced FVII mRNA up-regulation. Ribavirin also enhanced recruitment of CDK9 (cyclin-dependent kinase 9) and AFF4 to F7. These data suggest that ribavirin-induced intracellular GTP depletion recruits a super elongation complex containing P-TEFb, AFF4 and ELL3, to F7, and modulates FVII mRNA transcription elongation. Collectively, we have elucidated a basal mechanism for ribavirin-induced FVII mRNA up-regulation by acceleration of transcription elongation, which may be crucial in understanding its pleiotropic functions in vivo.

  11. Glial cell-expressed mechanosensitive channel TRPV4 mediates infrasound-induced neuronal impairment.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ming; Du, Fang; Liu, Yang; Li, Li; Cai, Jing; Zhang, Guo-Feng; Xu, Xiao-Fei; Lin, Tian; Cheng, Hao-Ran; Liu, Xue-Dong; Xiong, Li-Ze; Zhao, Gang

    2013-11-01

    Vibroacoustic disease, a progressive and systemic disease, mainly involving the central nervous system, is caused by excessive exposure to low-frequency but high-intensity noise generated by various heavy transportations and machineries. Infrasound is a type of low-frequency noise. Our previous studies demonstrated that infrasound at a certain intensity caused neuronal injury in rats but the underlying mechanism(s) is still largely unknown. Here, we showed that glial cell-expressed TRPV4, a Ca(2+)-permeable mechanosensitive channel, mediated infrasound-induced neuronal injury. Among different frequencies and intensities, infrasound at 16 Hz and 130 dB impaired rat learning and memory abilities most severely after 7-14 days exposure, a time during which a prominent loss of hippocampal CA1 neurons was evident. Infrasound also induced significant astrocytic and microglial activation in hippocampal regions following 1- to 7-day exposure, prior to neuronal apoptosis. Moreover, pharmacological inhibition of glial activation in vivo protected against neuronal apoptosis. In vitro, activated glial cell-released proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and TNF-α were found to be key factors for this neuronal apoptosis. Importantly, infrasound induced an increase in the expression level of TRPV4 both in vivo and in vitro. Knockdown of TRPV4 expression by siRNA or pharmacological inhibition of TRPV4 in cultured glial cells decreased the levels of IL-1β and TNF-α, attenuated neuronal apoptosis, and reduced TRPV4-mediated Ca(2+) influx and NF-κB nuclear translocation. Finally, using various antagonists we revealed that calmodulin and protein kinase C signaling pathways were involved in TRPV4-triggered NF-κB activation. Thus, our results provide the first evidence that glial cell-expressed TRPV4 is a potential key factor responsible for infrasound-induced neuronal impairment. PMID:24002225

  12. Genetic control of antibody responses induced by recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG expressing a foreign antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Lagranderie, M; Lo-Man, R; Dériaud, E; Gicquel, B; Gheorghiu, M; Leclerc, C

    1997-01-01

    Recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG expressing foreign antigens represents a promising candidate for the development of future vaccines and was shown in several experimental models to induce protective immunity against bacterial or parasitic infections. Innate resistance to BCG infection is under genetic control and could modify the immune responses induced against an antigen delivered by such engineered microorganisms. To investigate this question, we analyzed the immune responses of various inbred strains of mice to recombinant BCG expressing beta-galactosidase. These experiments demonstrated that BALB/c mice developed strong antibody responses against BCG expressing beta-galactosidase under the control of two different promoters. In contrast, C57BL/6, C3H, and CBA mice produced high anti-beta-galactosidase antibody titers only when immunized with recombinant BCG expressing beta-galactosidase under the control of the pblaF* promoter, which induced the production of high levels of this antigen. This difference in mouse responsiveness to recombinant BCG was not due to innate resistance to BCG infection, since similar immune responses were induced in Ity(r) and Ity(s) congenic strains of mice. In contrast, the analysis of anti-beta-galactosidase antibody responses of H-2 congenic mice in two different genetic backgrounds demonstrated that H-2 genes are involved in the immune responsiveness to beta-galactosidase delivered by recombinant BCG. Together, these results demonstrate that immune responses to an antigen delivered by recombinant BCG are under complex genetic influences which could play a crucial role in the efficiency of future recombinant BCG vaccines. PMID:9234754

  13. Identification and analysis of the mechanism underlying heat-inducible expression of rice aconitase 1.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Qin, Rui-Ying; Li, Hao; Xu, Rong-Fang; Qiu, Chun-Hong; Sun, Yi-Chen; Ma, Hui; Yang, Ya-Chun; Ni, Da-Hu; Li, Li; Wei, Peng-Cheng; Yang, Jian-Bo

    2015-04-01

    Respiratory metabolism is an important though poorly understood facet of plant adaptation to stress. Posttranslational modification of aconitase, a component of the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA), may be involved in stress tolerance. However, such stress-related transcriptional regulation and its mechanism remain unknown. In this study, we found that expression of the rice Aconitase gene OsACO1 is induced in a time-dependent manner by heat but not other typical abiotic stresses. To analyze the transcriptional regulation mechanism underlying the response to heat, the OsACO1 promoter (POsACO1) was isolated and characterized in transgenic rice. Using qualitative and quantitative analyses, we found that the expression of the GUS reporter gene responded to heat in different tissues and at different stages of development when driven by POsACO1. A series of 5' distal deletions of POsACO1 was generated to delineate the region responsible for heat-induced gene expression. Transient expression analyses in tobacco leaves identified a 322-bp minimal region between -1386 and -1065 as being essential and sufficient for heat-induced expression by POsACO1. We screened for known heat response-related cis-elements in this 322-bp region; however, sequences correlating with heat-induced gene expression were not identified in POsACO1. Therefore, truncations and successive mutagenesis analyses were performed in this 322-bp region. By comparing the activities of promoter fragments and their derivatives, our results indicated that the heat response element resided in a 9-bp region between -1132 and -1124, a sequence that contains a W-box motif. Additional site-directed mutagenesis analyses eliminated the heat response activity of POsACO1 via the W-box element, and an electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) indicated the binding of POsACO1 by factors in the nuclear extracts of heat-stressed rice seedlings in a W-box-dependent manner. Our results illustrate the expression pattern of a

  14. Oleocanthal Modulates Estradiol-Induced Gene Expression Involving Estrogen Receptor α.

    PubMed

    Keiler, Annekathrin Martina; Djiogue, Sefirin; Ehrhardt, Tino; Zierau, Oliver; Skaltsounis, Leandros; Halabalaki, Maria; Vollmer, Günter

    2015-09-01

    Oleocanthal is a bioactive compound from olive oil. It has attracted considerable attention as it is anti-inflammatory, antiproliferative, and has been shown to possess neuroprotective properties in vitro and in vivo. Delineated from its polyphenolic structure, the aim of this study was to characterize oleocanthal towards estrogenic properties. This might contribute to partly explain the beneficial effects described for the Mediterranean diet. Estrogenic properties of oleocanthal were assessed by different methods: a) stimulation of reporter gene activity in MVLN or RNDA cells either expressing estrogen receptor α or β, b) stimulation of luciferase reporter gene activity in U2OS osteosarcoma cells expressing estrogen receptor α or β, and c) elucidation of the impact on estradiol-induced gene expression in U2OS cells transduced with both estrogen receptors. Depending on the cell line origin, oleocanthal inhibited luciferase activity (MVLN, U2OS-estrogen receptor β) or weakly induced reporter gene activity at 10 µM in U2OS-estrogen receptor α cells. However, oleocanthal inhibited stimulation of luciferase activity by estradiol from both estrogen receptors. Oleocanthal, if given alone, did not stimulate gene expression in U2OS cells, but it significantly modulated the response of estradiol. Oleocanthal enhanced the effect of estradiol on the regulation of those genes, which are believed to be regulated through heterodimeric estrogen receptors. As the estrogenic response pattern of oleocanthal is rather unique, we compared the results obtained with oleacein. Oleocanthal binds to both estrogen receptors inducing estradiol-agonistic or antiagonistic effects depending on the cell line. Regarding regulation of gene expression in U2OS-estrogen receptor α/β cells, oleocanthal and oleacein enhanced estradiol-mediated regulation of heterodimer-regulated genes. PMID:26166135

  15. gamma/delta T lymphocytes express CD40 ligand and induce isotype switching in B lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    T cells expressing gamma/delta T cell receptors home to epithelial tissue and may play a role in immunity to infectious agents and foreign antigens. In an effort to understand the role of gamma/delta T cells in directing B cell responses, we investigated the capacity of human gamma/delta T cells to express CD40 ligand (CD40L) and to drive immunoglobulin (Ig) isotype switching in B cells. A multiple step purification procedure resulted in the recovery of highly pure populations of peripheral blood CD4-CD8- gamma/delta T cells. Neither CD40L surface expression nor CD40L mRNA were detected in unstimulated gamma/delta T cells. Stimulation with phorbol ester and ionomycin induced CD40L mRNA and surface CD40L expression by gamma/delta T cells. Both the percentage of CD40L+ cells and the cell surface density of CD40L were significantly lower in gamma/delta T cells compared to unselected T cells. We further demonstrated that in the presence of neutralizing monoclonal antibody to interferon gamma (IFN-gamma), gamma/delta T cells could induce IgE synthesis in B cells, albeit to a lesser extent than unselected T cells. Furthermore, IgE synthesis driven by gamma/delta T cells was inhibited by monoclonal antibody to CD40L. These observations demonstrate that activated gamma/delta T cells express CD40L and can induce isotype switching in B cells. PMID:7869041

  16. Smad, but not MAPK, pathway mediates the expression of type I collagen in radiation induced fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, Hiroyuki; Hamanaka, Ryoji; Nakamura, Miki; Sumiyoshi, Hideaki; Matsuo, Noritaka; Yoshioka, Hidekatsu

    2012-02-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examine how radiation affects the expression level and signal pathway of collagen. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TGF-{beta}1 mRNA is elevated earlier than those of collagen genes after irradiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Smad pathway mediates the expression of collagen in radiation induced fibrosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MAPK pathways are not affected in the expression of collagen after irradiation. -- Abstract: Radiation induced fibrosis occurs following a therapeutic or accidental radiation exposure in normal tissues. Tissue fibrosis is the excessive accumulation of collagen and other extracellular matrix components. This study investigated how ionizing radiation affects the expression level and signal pathway of type I collagen. Real time RT-RCR showed that both {alpha}1and {alpha}2 chain of type I collagen mRNA were elevated from 48 h after irradiation with 10 Gy in NIH3T3 cells. The relative luciferase activities of both genes and type I collagen marker were elevated at 72 h. TGF-{beta}1 mRNA was elevated earlier than those of type I collagen genes. A Western blot analysis showed the elevation of Smad phosphorylation at 72 h. Conversely, treatment with TGF-{beta} receptor inhibitor inhibited the mRNA and relative luciferase activity of type I collagen. The phosphorylation of Smad was repressed with the inhibitor, and the luciferase activity was cancelled using a mutant construct of Smad binding site of {alpha}2(I) collagen gene. However, the MAPK pathways, p38, ERK1/2 and JNK, were not affected with specific inhibitors or siRNA. The data showed that the Smad pathway mediated the expression of type I collagen in radiation induced fibrosis.

  17. Cyclic strain is a weak inducer of prostacyclin synthase expression in bovine aortic endothelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Segurola, R. J. Jr; Oluwole, B.; Mills, I.; Yokoyama, C.; Tanabe, T.; Kito, H.; Nakajima, N.; Sumpio, B. E.

    1997-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that hemodynamic forces such as cyclic strain and shear stress can increase prostacyclin (PGI2) secretion by endothelial cells (EC) but the effect of these forces on prostacyclin synthase (PGIS) gene expression remains unclear and is the focus of this study. Bovine aortic EC were seeded onto type I collagen coated flexible membranes and grown to confluence. The membranes and attached EC were subjected to 10% average strain at 60 cpm (0.5 sec deformation alternating with 0.5 sec relaxation) for up to 5 days. PGIS gene expression was determined by Northern blot analysis and protein level by Western blot analysis. The effect of cyclic strain on the PGIS promoter was determined by the transfection of a 1-kb human PGIS gene promoter construct coupled to a luciferase reporter gene into EC, followed by determination of luciferase activity. PGIS gene expression increased 1.7-fold in EC subjected to cyclic strain for 24 hr. Likewise, EC transfected with a pGL3B-PGIS (-1070/-10) construct showed an approximate 1.3-fold elevation in luciferase activity in EC subjected to cyclic strain for 3, 4, 8, and 12 hr. The weak stimulation of PGIS gene expression by cyclic strain was reflected in an inability to detect alterations in PGIS protein levels in EC subjected to cyclic strain for as long as 5 days. These data suggest that strain-induced stimulation of PGIS gene expression plays only a minor role in the ability of cyclic strain to stimulate PGI2 release in EC. These findings coupled with our earlier demonstration of a requisite addition of exogenous arachidonate in order to observe strain-induced PGI2 release, implicates a mechanism that more likely involves strain-induced stimulation of PGIS activity.

  18. Low oxygen tension induces Krüppel-Like Factor 6 expression in trophoblast cells.

    PubMed

    Racca, A C; Ridano, M E; Bandeira, C L; Bevilacqua, E; Avvad Portari, E; Genti-Raimondi, S; Graham, C H; Panzetta-Dutari, G M

    2016-09-01

    The transcription factor Krüppel-Like Factor 6 (KLF6) has important roles in cell differentiation, angiogenesis, apoptosis, and proliferation. Furthermore, there is evidence that KLF6 is required for proper placental development. While oxygen is a critical mediator of trophoblast differentiation and function, the involvement of oxygen in the regulation of KLF6 expression remains unexplored. In the present study we examined the expression of KLF6 in placental tissue from uncomplicated and preeclamptic pregnancies, the latter often characterized by an inadequately perfused placenta. We also determined the effect of hypoxia and the involvement of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1α (HIF-1α) on the expression of KLF6 in cultured trophoblast cells and placental tissues. Results revealed that villous, interstitial and endovascular extravillous cytotrophoblasts from placentas from normal and preeclamptic pregnancies express KLF6. In addition, KLF6 immunoreactivity was higher in the placental bed of preeclamptic pregnancies than in those of uncomplicated pregnancies. We demonstrated that hypoxia induced an early and transient increase in KLF6 protein levels in HTR8/SVneo extravillous cytotrophoblast cells and in placental explants. Reoxygenation returned KLF6 protein to basal levels. Moreover, hypoxia-induced up-regulation of KLF6 expression was dependent on HIF-1α as revealed by siRNA knockdown in HTR8/SVneo cells. These results indicate that KLF6 may mediate some of the effects of hypoxia in placental development. The regulation of KLF6 protein levels by oxygen has significant implications for understanding its putative role in diseases affected by tissue hypoxia. PMID:27577710

  19. Low oxygen tension induces Krüppel-Like Factor 6 expression in trophoblast cells.

    PubMed

    Racca, A C; Ridano, M E; Bandeira, C L; Bevilacqua, E; Avvad Portari, E; Genti-Raimondi, S; Graham, C H; Panzetta-Dutari, G M

    2016-09-01

    The transcription factor Krüppel-Like Factor 6 (KLF6) has important roles in cell differentiation, angiogenesis, apoptosis, and proliferation. Furthermore, there is evidence that KLF6 is required for proper placental development. While oxygen is a critical mediator of trophoblast differentiation and function, the involvement of oxygen in the regulation of KLF6 expression remains unexplored. In the present study we examined the expression of KLF6 in placental tissue from uncomplicated and preeclamptic pregnancies, the latter often characterized by an inadequately perfused placenta. We also determined the effect of hypoxia and the involvement of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1α (HIF-1α) on the expression of KLF6 in cultured trophoblast cells and placental tissues. Results revealed that villous, interstitial and endovascular extravillous cytotrophoblasts from placentas from normal and preeclamptic pregnancies express KLF6. In addition, KLF6 immunoreactivity was higher in the placental bed of preeclamptic pregnancies than in those of uncomplicated pregnancies. We demonstrated that hypoxia induced an early and transient increase in KLF6 protein levels in HTR8/SVneo extravillous cytotrophoblast cells and in placental explants. Reoxygenation returned KLF6 protein to basal levels. Moreover, hypoxia-induced up-regulation of KLF6 expression was dependent on HIF-1α as revealed by siRNA knockdown in HTR8/SVneo cells. These results indicate that KLF6 may mediate some of the effects of hypoxia in placental development. The regulation of KLF6 protein levels by oxygen has significant implications for understanding its putative role in diseases affected by tissue hypoxia.

  20. Cloning and Expression of TNF Related Apoptosis Inducing Ligand in Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Heidari, Hamid Reza; Bandehpour, Mojgan; Vahidi, Hossein; Barar, Jaleh; Kazemi, Bahram; Naderi-Manesh, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Molecular farming has been considered as a secure and economical approach for production of biopharmaceuticals. Human TNF Related Apoptosis Inducing Ligand (TRAIL) as a promising biopharmaceutical candidate has been produced in different expression hosts. However, little attention has been paid to molecular farming of the TRAIL in spite of numerous advantages of plant expression systems. Therefore, in this study the cytoplasmic production of the TRAIL was tackled in Nicotiana tabacum using Agrobacterium tumefaciens LBA 4404. Initially, the desired coding sequence was obtained using PCR technique on the constructed human cDNA library. Afterward, the necessary requirements for expression of the TRAIL in plant cell system were provided through sub-cloning into 35S-CaMV (Cauliflower Mosaic Virus) helper and final 0179-pGreen expression vectors. Then, the final TRAIL-pGreen expression vector was cloned into A. tumefaciens LBA 4404. Subsequently, the N. tabacum cells were transformed through co-culture method and expression of the TRAIL was confirmed by western blot analysis. Finally, the recombinant TRAIL was extracted through chromatographic technique and biological activity was evaluated through MTT assay (Methylthiazol Tetrazolium Assay). The result of western blot analysis indicated that only monomer and oxidized dimer forms of the TRAIL can be extracted from the N. tabacum cells. Moreover, the lack of trimeric assembly of the extracted TRAIL diminished its biological activity in sensitive A549 cell line. In conclusion, although N. tabacum cells can successfully produce the TRAIL, proper assembly and functionality of the TRAIL were unfavorable.

  1. Development of Virus-Induced Gene Expression and Silencing Vector Derived from Grapevine Algerian Latent Virus

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang-Ho; Choi, Hoseong; Kim, Semin; Cho, Won Kyong; Kim, Kook-Hyung

    2016-01-01

    Grapevine Algerian latent virus (GALV) is a member of the genus Tombusvirus in the Tombusviridae and infects not only woody perennial grapevine plant but also herbaceous Nicotiana benthamiana plant. In this study, we developed GALV-based gene expression and virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) vectors in N. benthamiana. The GALV coat protein deletion vector, pGMG, was applied to express the reporter gene, green fluorescence protein (GFP), but the expression of GFP was not detected due to the necrotic cell death on the infiltrated leaves. The p19 silencing suppressor of GALV was engineered to inactivate its expression and GFP was successfully expressed with unrelated silencing suppressor, HC-Pro, from soybean mosaic virus. The pGMG vector was used to knock down magnesium chelatase (ChlH) gene in N. benthamaina and the silencing phenotype was clearly observed on systemic leaves. Altogether, the GALV-derived vector is expected to be an attractive tool for useful gene expression and VIGS vectors in grapevine as well as N. benthamiana. PMID:27493613

  2. Lead Poisoning Disturbs Oligodendrocytes Differentiation Involved in Decreased Expression of NCX3 Inducing Intracellular Calcium Overload.

    PubMed

    Ma, Teng; Wu, Xiyan; Cai, Qiyan; Wang, Yun; Xiao, Lan; Tian, Yanping; Li, Hongli

    2015-08-13

    Lead (Pb) poisoning has always been a serious health concern, as it permanently damages the central nervous system. Chronic Pb accumulation in the human body disturbs oligodendrocytes (OLs) differentiation, resulting in dysmyelination, but the molecular mechanism remains unknown. In this study, Pb at 1 μM inhibits OLs precursor cells (OPCs) differentiation via decreasing the expression of Olig 2, CNPase proteins in vitro. Moreover, Pb treatment inhibits the sodium/calcium exchanger 3 (NCX3) mRNA expression, one of the major means of calcium (Ca(2+)) extrusion at the plasma membrane during OPCs differentiation. Also addition of KB-R7943, NCX3 inhibitor, to simulate Pb toxicity, resulted in decreased myelin basic protein (MBP) expression and cell branching. Ca(2+) response trace with Pb and KB-R7943 treatment did not drop down in the same recovery time as the control, which elevated intracellular Ca(2+) concentration reducing MBP expression. In contrast, over-expression of NCX3 in Pb exposed OPCs displayed significant increase MBP fluorescence signal in positive regions and CNPase expression, which recovered OPCs differentiation to counterbalance Pb toxicity. In conclusion, Pb exposure disturbs OLs differentiation via affecting the function of NCX3 by inducing intracellular calcium overload.

  3. Adiponectin exacerbates collagen-induced arthritis via enhancing Th17 response and prompting RANKL expression.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoxuan; Feng, Xiaoke; Tan, Wenfeng; Lin, Na; Hua, Minhui; Wei, Yu; Wang, Fang; Li, Ningli; Zhang, Miaojia

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported adiponectin (AD) is highly expressed in the inflamed synovial joint tissue and correlates closely with progressive bone erosion in Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. Here, we investigate the role of adiponectin in regulating Th17 response and the expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL) in mice with CIA mice by intraarticularly injection of adiponectin into knee joints on day 17, day 20 and day 23 post first collagen immunization. The increased adiponectin expression was found in inflamed joint tissue of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mice. Adiponectin injection resulted in an earlier onset of arthritis, an aggravated arthritic progression, more severe synovial hyperplasia, bone erosion and osteoporosis in CIA mice. CD4(+)IL-17(+) Th17 cells, IL-17 mRNA and RANKL mRNA expression were markedly increased in the joint tissue of adiponectin treated CIA mice. Moreover, adiponectin treatment markedly enhanced Th17 cell generation from naive CD4(+) T cells in vitro, which accompanied by the high expression of Th17 transcription factor ROR-γt, and Th17 cytokine genes included IL-22 and IL-23. This study reveals a novel effect of adiponectin in exacerbating CIA progression by enhancing Th17 cell response and RANKL expression. PMID:26063682

  4. Development of Virus-Induced Gene Expression and Silencing Vector Derived from Grapevine Algerian Latent Virus.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang-Ho; Choi, Hoseong; Kim, Semin; Cho, Won Kyong; Kim, Kook-Hyung

    2016-08-01

    Grapevine Algerian latent virus (GALV) is a member of the genus Tombusvirus in the Tombusviridae and infects not only woody perennial grapevine plant but also herbaceous Nicotiana benthamiana plant. In this study, we developed GALV-based gene expression and virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) vectors in N. benthamiana. The GALV coat protein deletion vector, pGMG, was applied to express the reporter gene, green fluorescence protein (GFP), but the expression of GFP was not detected due to the necrotic cell death on the infiltrated leaves. The p19 silencing suppressor of GALV was engineered to inactivate its expression and GFP was successfully expressed with unrelated silencing suppressor, HC-Pro, from soybean mosaic virus. The pGMG vector was used to knock down magnesium chelatase (ChlH) gene in N. benthamaina and the silencing phenotype was clearly observed on systemic leaves. Altogether, the GALV-derived vector is expected to be an attractive tool for useful gene expression and VIGS vectors in grapevine as well as N. benthamiana. PMID:27493613

  5. Gene expression changes in normal human skin fibroblasts induced by HZE-particle radiation.

    PubMed

    Ding, Liang-Hao; Shingyoji, Masato; Chen, Fanqing; Chatterjee, Aloke; Kasai, Kiyomi-Eguchi; Chen, David J

    2005-10-01

    Studies have shown that radiation exposure affects global gene expression in mammalian cells. However, little is known about the effects of HZE particles on gene expression. To study these effects, human skin fibroblasts were irradiated with HZE particles of different energies and LETs. The data obtained from these experiments indicate that changes in gene expression are dependent on the energy of the radiation source. Particles with the highest energy, i.e. iron, induced the biggest expression changes in terms of numbers of genes and magnitudes of changes. Many genes were found to undergo significant expression changes after HZE-particle irradiation, including CDKN1A/p21, MDM2, TNFRSF6/fas, PCNA and RAD52. Unlike X rays, HZE particles expose cells to two types of radiation: primary ions and delta rays. We hypothesized that the biological effects of delta rays, which are secondary electron emissions, should resemble the effects of X rays. To explore this idea, gene expression changes between cells that had been irradiated with HZE particles and X rays were compared. The results support our hypothesis since the number of genes that commonly changed after exposure to both radiations increased as a function of particle energy. PMID:16187761

  6. A BAC-Based Transgenic Mouse Specifically Expresses an Inducible Cre in the Urothelium

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Tian Huai; Gladoun, Nataliya; Castillo-Martin, Mireia; Bonal, Dennis; Domingo-Domenech, Josep; Charytonowicz, Daniel; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Cre-loxp mediated conditional knockout strategy has played critical roles for revealing functions of many genes essential for development, as well as the causal relationships between gene mutations and diseases in the postnatal adult mice. One key factor of this strategy is the availability of mice with tissue- or cell type-specific Cre expression. However, the success of the traditional molecular cloning approach to generate mice with tissue specific Cre expression often depends on luck. Here we provide a better alternative by using bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-based recombineering to insert iCreERT2 cDNA at the ATG start of the Upk2 gene. The BAC-based transgenic mice express the inducible Cre specifically in the urothelium as demonstrated by mRNA expression and staining for LacZ expression after crossing with a Rosa26 reporter mouse. Taking into consideration the size of the gene of interest and neighboring genes included in a BAC, this method should be widely applicable for generation of mice with tissue specific gene expression or deletions in a more specific manner than previously reported. PMID:22496911

  7. Profiling status epilepticus-induced changes in hippocampal RNA expression using high-throughput RNA sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Katelin F.; Sakamoto, Kensuke; Pelz, Carl; Impey, Soren; Obrietan, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Status epilepticus (SE) is a life-threatening condition that can give rise to a number of neurological disorders, including learning deficits, depression, and epilepsy. Many of the effects of SE appear to be mediated by alterations in gene expression. To gain deeper insight into how SE affects the transcriptome, we employed the pilocarpine SE model in mice and Illumina-based high-throughput sequencing to characterize alterations in gene expression from the induction of SE, to the development of spontaneous seizure activity. While some genes were upregulated over the entire course of the pathological progression, each of the three sequenced time points (12-hour, 10-days and 6-weeks post-SE) had a largely unique transcriptional profile. Hence, genes that regulate synaptic physiology and transcription were most prominently altered at 12-hours post-SE; at 10-days post-SE, marked changes in metabolic and homeostatic gene expression were detected; at 6-weeks, substantial changes in the expression of cell excitability and morphogenesis genes were detected. At the level of cell signaling, KEGG analysis revealed dynamic changes within the MAPK pathways, as well as in CREB-associated gene expression. Notably, the inducible expression of several noncoding transcripts was also detected. These findings offer potential new insights into the cellular events that shape SE-evoked pathology. PMID:25373493

  8. Profiling status epilepticus-induced changes in hippocampal RNA expression using high-throughput RNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Katelin F; Sakamoto, Kensuke; Pelz, Carl; Impey, Soren; Obrietan, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Status epilepticus (SE) is a life-threatening condition that can give rise to a number of neurological disorders, including learning deficits, depression, and epilepsy. Many of the effects of SE appear to be mediated by alterations in gene expression. To gain deeper insight into how SE affects the transcriptome, we employed the pilocarpine SE model in mice and Illumina-based high-throughput sequencing to characterize alterations in gene expression from the induction of SE, to the development of spontaneous seizure activity. While some genes were upregulated over the entire course of the pathological progression, each of the three sequenced time points (12-hour, 10-days and 6-weeks post-SE) had a largely unique transcriptional profile. Hence, genes that regulate synaptic physiology and transcription were most prominently altered at 12-hours post-SE; at 10-days post-SE, marked changes in metabolic and homeostatic gene expression were detected; at 6-weeks, substantial changes in the expression of cell excitability and morphogenesis genes were detected. At the level of cell signaling, KEGG analysis revealed dynamic changes within the MAPK pathways, as well as in CREB-associated gene expression. Notably, the inducible expression of several noncoding transcripts was also detected. These findings offer potential new insights into the cellular events that shape SE-evoked pathology. PMID:25373493

  9. Ammonia-induced miRNA expression changes in cultured rat astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Oenarto, Jessica; Karababa, Ayse; Castoldi, Mirco; Bidmon, Hans J; Görg, Boris; Häussinger, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a neuropsychiatric syndrome evolving from cerebral osmotic disturbances and oxidative/nitrosative stress. Ammonia, the main toxin of hepatic encephalopathy, triggers astrocyte senescence in an oxidative stress-dependent way. As miRNAs are critically involved in cell cycle regulation and their expression may be regulated by oxidative stress, we analysed, whether astrocyte senescence is a consequence of ammonia-induced miRNA expression changes. Using a combined miRNA and gene microarray approach, 43 miRNA species which were downregulated and 142 genes which were upregulated by NH4Cl (5 mmol/l, 48 h) in cultured rat astrocytes were found. Ammonia-induced miRNA and gene expression changes were validated by qPCR and 43 potential miRNA target genes, including HO-1, were identified by matching upregulated mRNA species with predicted targets of miRNA species downregulated by ammonia. Inhibition of HO-1 targeting miRNAs which were downregulated by NH4Cl strongly upregulated HO-1 mRNA and protein levels and inhibited astrocyte proliferation in a HO-1-dependent way. Preventing ammonia-induced upregulation of HO-1 by taurine (5 mmol/l) as well as blocking HO-1 activity by tin-protoporphyrine IX fully prevented ammonia-induced proliferation inhibition and senescence. The data suggest that ammonia induces astrocyte senescence through NADPH oxidase-dependent downregulation of HO-1 targeting miRNAs and concomitant upregulation of HO-1 at both mRNA and protein level. PMID:26755400

  10. Mirtazapine prevents induction and expression of cocaine-induced behavioral sensitization in rats.

    PubMed

    Salazar-Juárez, Alberto; Barbosa-Méndez, Susana; Jurado, Noe; Hernández-Miramontes, Ricardo; Leff, Philippe; Antón, Benito

    2016-07-01

    Cocaine abuse is a major health problem worldwide. Treatment based on both 5-HT2A/C and 5-HT3 receptor antagonists attenuate not only the effects of cocaine abuse but also the incentive/motivational effect related to cocaine-paired cues. Mirtazapine, an antagonist of postsynaptic α2-adrenergic, 5-HT2A/C and 5HT3 receptors and inverse agonist of the 5-HT2C receptor, has been shown to effectively modify, at the preclinical and clinical levels, various behavioral alterations induced by drugs abuse. Therefore, it is important to assess whether chronic dosing of mirtazapine alters locomotor effects of cocaine as well as induction and expression of cocaine sensitization. Our results reveal that a daily mirtazapine regimen administered for 30days effectively induces a significant attenuation of cocaine-dependent locomotor activity and as well as the induction and expression of behavioral sensitization. These results suggest that mirtazapine may be used as a potentially effective therapy to attenuate induction and expression of cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization.

  11. Brucella abortus Invasion of Synoviocytes Inhibits Apoptosis and Induces Bone Resorption through RANKL Expression

    PubMed Central

    Scian, Romina; Barrionuevo, Paula; Rodriguez, Ana María; Arriola Benitez, Paula Constanza; García Samartino, Clara; Fossati, Carlos Alberto; Giambartolomei, Guillermo Hernán

    2013-01-01

    Arthritis is one of the most common complications of human active brucellosis, but its pathogenic mechanisms have not been completely elucidated. In this paper, we describe the role of synoviocytes in the pathogenesis of brucellar arthritis. Our results indicate that Brucella abortus infection inhibited synoviocyte apoptosis through the upregulation of antiapoptotic factors (cIAP-2, clusterin, livin, and P21/CIP/CDNK1A). In contrast, infection did not change the expression of proteins that have been involved in apoptosis induction such as Bad, Bax, cleaved procaspase 3, CytC, and TRAIL, among others; or their expression was reduced, as occurs in the case of P-p53(S15). In addition, B. abortus infection induced upregulation of adhesion molecules (CD54 and CD106), and the adhesion of monocytes and neutrophils to infected synoviocytes was significantly higher than to uninfected cells. Despite this increased adhesion, B. abortus-infected synoviocytes were able to inhibit apoptosis induced by supernatants from B. abortus-infected monocytes and neutrophils. Moreover, B. abortus infection increased soluble and membrane RANKL expression in synoviocytes that further induced monocytes to undergo osteoclastogenesis. The results presented here shed light on how the interactions of B. abortus with synovial fibroblasts may have an important role in the pathogenesis of brucellar arthritis. PMID:23509146

  12. Lymphocytes from wasted mice express enhanced spontaneous and {gamma}-ray-induced apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E. |; Chang-Liu, Chin-Mei; Chung, Jen; Libertin, C.R.

    1993-09-01

    Mice bearing the autosomal recessive mutation wasted (wst/wst) display a disease pattern including faulty repair of DNA damage in lymphocytes after radiation exposure, neurologic abnormalities, and immunodeficiency. Many of the features of this mouse model have suggested a premature or increased spontaneous frequency of apoptosis in thymocytes; past work has shown an inability to establish cultured T cell lines, an abnormally high death rate of stimulated T cells in culture, and an increased sensitivity of T cells to the killing effects of ionizing radiations in wst/wst mice relative to controls. The experiments reported here were designed to examine splenic and thymic lymphocytes from wasted and control mice for signs of early apoptosis. Our results revealed enhanced expression of Rp-8 mRNA (associated with apoptosis) in thymic lymphocytes and reduced expression in splenic lymphocytes of wst/wst mice relative to controls; expression of Rp-2 and Td-30 mRNA (induced during apoptosis) were not detectable in spleen or thymus. Higher spontaneous DNA fragmentation was observed in wasted mice than in controls; however, {gamma}-ray-induced DNA fragmentation peaked at a lower dose and occurred to a greater extent in wasted mice relative to controls. These results provide evidence for high spontaneous and {gamma}-ray-induced apoptosis in T cells of wasted mice as a mechanism underlying the observed lymphocyte and DNA repair abnormalities.

  13. Inducible gene and shRNA expression in resident hematopoietic stem cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Laurenti, Elisa; Barde, Isabelle; Verp, Sonia; Offner, Sandra; Wilson, Anne; Quenneville, Simon; Wiznerowicz, Maciej; Macdonald, H Robson; Trono, Didier; Trumpp, Andreas

    2010-08-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) are probably the best understood somatic stem cells and often serve as a paradigm for other stem cells. Nevertheless, most current techniques to genetically manipulate them in vivo are either constitutive and/or induced in settings of hematopoietic stress such as after irradiation. Here, we present a conditional expression system that allows for externally controllable transgenesis and knockdown in resident HSCs, based on a lentiviral vector containing a tet-O sequence and a transgenic mouse line expressing a doxycyclin-regulated tTR-KRAB repressor protein. HSCs harvested from tTR-KRAB mice are transduced with the lentiviral vector containing a cDNA (i.e., Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP)) and/or shRNA (i.e., p53) of interest and then transplanted into lethally irradiated recipients. While the vector is effectively repressed by tTR-KRAB during homing and engraftment, robust GFP/shp53 expression is induced on doxycyclin treatment in HSCs and their progeny. Doxycylin-controllable transcription is maintained on serial transplantation, indicating that repopulating HSCs are stably modified by this approach. In summary, this easy to implement conditional system provides inducible and reversible overexpression or knock down of genes in resident HSCs in vivo using a drug devoid of toxic or activating effects. PMID:20641037

  14. Nitric oxide production and inducible nitric oxide synthase expression in inflammatory arthritides.

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, H; Kohsaka, H; Liu, M F; Higashiyama, H; Hirata, Y; Kanno, K; Saito, I; Miyasaka, N

    1995-01-01

    In this study, we have identified the source of nitric oxide (NO) produced in the human inflammatory joints by analyzing expression of inducible NO synthase. In ex vivo organ cultures, both inflammatory synovium and cartilage from patients with rheumatoid arthritis produced NO. The NO production was suppressed by NG-monomethyl-L-arginine, an inhibitor of NO synthase. The amount of NO produced by the synovium correlated with the proportion of CD14+ cells in the corresponding tissue (r = 0.8, P < 0.05). Immunohistochemical analysis as well as in situ hybridization showed that inducible NO synthase was predominantly expressed in synovial lining cells, endothelial cells, chondrocytes, and to a lesser extent, in infiltrating mononuclear cells and synovial fibroblasts. The synovial lining cells and the infiltrating cells expressing inducible NO synthase were identified where CD14+ cells were located. Together with morphological features, this suggests that they are type A synoviocytes. NO production from freshly isolated synoviocytes and chondrocytes was up-regulated by in vitro stimulation with a combination of IL-TNF-beta, TNF-alpha, and LPS. In summary, the present results suggest that NO is produced primarily by CD14+ synoviocytes, chondrocytes, and endothelial cells in inflammatory joints of arthritides. NO production can be upregulated by cytokines present in inflamed joints. The increased NO production may thus contribute to the pathological features in inflammatory arthritides. Images PMID:7593623

  15. Oxaliplatin-induced cold hypersensitivity is due to remodelling of ion channel expression in nociceptors.

    PubMed

    Descoeur, Juliette; Pereira, Vanessa; Pizzoccaro, Anne; Francois, Amaury; Ling, Bing; Maffre, Violette; Couette, Brigitte; Busserolles, Jérôme; Courteix, Christine; Noel, Jacques; Lazdunski, Michel; Eschalier, Alain; Authier, Nicolas; Bourinet, Emmanuel

    2011-05-01

    Cold hypersensitivity is the hallmark of oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy, which develops in nearly all patients under this chemotherapy. To date, pain management strategies have failed to alleviate these symptoms, hence development of adapted analgesics is needed. Here, we report that oxaliplatin exaggerates cold perception in mice as well as in patients. These symptoms are mediated by primary afferent sensory neurons expressing the thermoreceptor TRPM8. Mechanistically, oxaliplatin promotes over-excitability by drastically lowering the expression of distinct potassium channels (TREK1, TRAAK) and by increasing the expression of pro-excitatory channels such as the hyperpolarization-activated channels (HCNs). These findings are corroborated by the analysis of TREK1-TRAAK null mice and use of the specific HCN inhibitor ivabradine, which abolishes the oxaliplatin-induced cold hypersensibility. These results suggest that oxaliplatin exacerbates cold perception by modulating the transcription of distinct ionic conductances that together shape sensory neuron responses to cold. The translational and clinical implication of these findings would be that ivabradine may represent a tailored treatment for oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy. PMID:21438154

  16. Oxaliplatin-induced cold hypersensitivity is due to remodelling of ion channel expression in nociceptors

    PubMed Central

    Descoeur, Juliette; Pereira, Vanessa; Pizzoccaro, Anne; Francois, Amaury; Ling, Bing; Maffre, Violette; Couette, Brigitte; Busserolles, Jérôme; Courteix, Christine; Noel, Jacques; Lazdunski, Michel; Eschalier, Alain; Authier, Nicolas; Bourinet, Emmanuel

    2011-01-01

    Cold hypersensitivity is the hallmark of oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy, which develops in nearly all patients under this chemotherapy. To date, pain management strategies have failed to alleviate these symptoms, hence development of adapted analgesics is needed. Here, we report that oxaliplatin exaggerates cold perception in mice as well as in patients. These symptoms are mediated by primary afferent sensory neurons expressing the thermoreceptor TRPM8. Mechanistically, oxaliplatin promotes over-excitability by drastically lowering the expression of distinct potassium channels (TREK1, TRAAK) and by increasing the expression of pro-excitatory channels such as the hyperpolarization-activated channels (HCNs). These findings are corroborated by the analysis of TREK1-TRAAK null mice and use of the specific HCN inhibitor ivabradine, which abolishes the oxaliplatin-induced cold hypersensibility. These results suggest that oxaliplatin exacerbates cold perception by modulating the transcription of distinct ionic conductances that together shape sensory neuron responses to cold. The translational and clinical implication of these findings would be that ivabradine may represent a tailored treatment for oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy. PMID:21438154

  17. Ferrous Iron Induces Nrf2 Expression in Mouse Brain Astrocytes to Prevent Neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Cui, Zhenwen; Zhong, Zhihong; Yang, Yong; Wang, Baofeng; Sun, Yuhao; Sun, Qingfang; Yang, Guo-Yuan; Bian, Liuguan

    2016-08-01

    Free radical damage caused by ferrous iron is involved in the pathogenesis of secondary brain injury after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), a major phase II gene regulator that binds to antioxidant response element, represents an important cellular cytoprotective mechanism against oxidative damage. We hypothesized that Nrf2 might protect astrocytes from damage by Fe(2+) . Therefore, we examined cytotoxicity in primary astrocytes induced by iron overload and evaluated the effects of Fe(2+) on Nrf2 expression. The results demonstrated that 24-h Fe(2+) exposure exerted time- and concentration-dependent cytotoxicity in astrocytes. Furthermore, Fe(2+) exposure in astrocytes resulted in time- and concentration-dependent increases in Nrf2 expression, which preceded Fe(2+) toxicity. Nrf2-specific siRNA further knocked down Nrf2 levels, resulting in greater Fe(2+) -induced astrocyte cytotoxicity. These data indicate that induction of Nrf2 expression could serve as an adaptive self-defense mechanism, although it is insufficient to completely protect primary astrocytes from Fe(2+) -induced neurotoxicity. PMID:27037625

  18. Effects of simvastatin on the expression of inducible NOS in acute lung injury in septic rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei-Chao; Zou, Zi-Jun; Zhou, Ming-Gen; Chen, Liang; Zhou, Lin; Zheng, Yu-Kai; He, Zhi-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Background: The available evidence suggests that simvastatin plays a beneficial role in lung injury. In addition, statins have been shown to inhibit the activity of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of simvastatin on iNOS expression based on a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced septic rat model. Methods: Thirty-six rats were randomly divided into 3 groups (control group, sepsis group and simvastatin group). A rat model of sepsis was established with LPS. The simvastatin group was pre-treated with simvastatin, whereas the control and sepsis groups were treated with saline before LPS treatment. LPS was injected into the rats in the simvastatin and sepsis groups, while as a negative control, the control group received saline alone. The oxygenation index, expression levels of iNOS and IL-6, and pathological integral of lung injury were analyzed to evaluate the effect of simvastatin on septic rats. Results: Compared with the septic group, significant decreases in the oxygenation index and expression level of iNOS were observed in the simvastatin group. Furthermore, simvastatin treatment resulted in a significant decrease in iNOS levels and the pathological integral of lung injury score in septic rats. Conclusion: Simvastatin can relieve acute lung injury induced by sepsis in rats. Decreasing iNOS levels may contribute to the protective role of simvastatin in lung injury. PMID:26823851

  19. Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Induces Sustained Lung Oxidative Stress and Protease Expression

    PubMed Central

    King, Paul T.; Sharma, Roleen; O’Sullivan, Kim; Selemidis, Stavros; Lim, Steven; Radhakrishna, Naghmeh; Lo, Camden; Prasad, Jyotika; Callaghan, Judy; McLaughlin, Peter; Farmer, Michael; Steinfort, Daniel; Jennings, Barton; Ngui, James; Broughton, Bradley R. S.; Thomas, Belinda; Essilfie, Ama-Tawiah; Hickey, Michael; Holmes, Peter W.; Hansbro, Philip; Bardin, Philip G.; Holdsworth, Stephen R.

    2015-01-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is a prevalent bacterium found in a variety of chronic respiratory diseases. The role of this bacterium in the pathogenesis of lung inflammation is not well defined. In this study we examined the effect of NTHi on two important lung inflammatory processes 1), oxidative stress and 2), protease expression. Bronchoalveolar macrophages were obtained from 121 human subjects, blood neutrophils from 15 subjects, and human-lung fibroblast and epithelial cell lines from 16 subjects. Cells were stimulated with NTHi to measure the effect on reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and extracellular trap formation. We also measured the production of the oxidant, 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT) in the lungs of mice infected with this bacterium. NTHi induced widespread production of 3-NT in mouse lungs. This bacterium induced significantly increased ROS production in human fibroblasts, epithelial cells, macrophages and neutrophils; with the highest levels in the phagocytic cells. In human macrophages NTHi caused a sustained, extracellular production of ROS that increased over time. The production of ROS was associated with the formation of macrophage extracellular trap-like structures which co-expressed the protease metalloproteinase-12. The formation of the macrophage extracellular trap-like structures was markedly inhibited by the addition of DNase. In this study we have demonstrated that NTHi induces lung oxidative stress with macrophage extracellular trap formation and associated protease expression. DNase inhibited the formation of extracellular traps. PMID:25793977

  20. Inhibition of palmitate-induced GADD34 expression augments apoptosis in mouse insulinoma cells (MIN6).

    PubMed

    Fransson, Liselotte; Sjöholm, Ake; Ortsäter, Henrik

    2014-07-01

    Saturated fatty acids like palmitate induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in pancreatic beta-cells, an event linked to apoptotic loss of β-cells in type 2 diabetes. Sustained activation of the ER stress response leads to expression of growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible protein 34 (GADD34), a regulatory subunit of protein phosphatase 1. In the present study, we have used small interfering RNA in order to knockdown GADD34 expression in insulin-producing MIN6 cells prior to induction of ER stress by palmitate and evaluated its consequences on RNA-activated protein kinase-like ER-localized eIF2alpha kinase (PERK) signalling and apoptosis. Salubrinal, a specific inhibitor of eukaryotic initiation factor 2α (eIF2α) dephosphorylation, was used as a comparison. Salubrinal treatment augmented palmitate-induced ER stress and increased GADD34 levels. Both GADD34 knockdown and salubrinal treatment potentiated the cytotoxic effects of palmitate as evidenced by increased DNA fragmentation and activation of caspase 3, with the fundamental difference that the former did not involve enhanced levels of GADD34. The data from this study suggest that sustained activation of PERK signalling and eIF2α phosphorylation sensitizes insulin-producing MIN6 cells to lipoapoptosis independently of GADD34 expression levels. PMID:24633916

  1. Changes in Gene Expression during G-CSF-Induced Emergency Granulopoiesis in Humans.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Corinna C; Borup, Rehannah; Fischer-Nielsen, Anne; Mora-Jensen, Helena; Fossum, Anna; Cowland, Jack B; Borregaard, Niels

    2016-09-01

    Emergency granulopoiesis refers to the increased production of neutrophils in bone marrow and their release into circulation induced by severe infection. Several studies point to a critical role for G-CSF as the main mediator of emergency granulopoiesis. However, the consequences of G-CSF stimulation on the transcriptome of neutrophils and their precursors have not yet been investigated in humans. In this work, we examine the changes in mRNA expression induced by administration of G-CSF in vivo, as a model of emergency granulopoiesis in humans. Blood samples were collected from healthy individuals after 5 d of G-CSF administration. Neutrophil precursors were sorted into discrete stages of maturation by flow cytometry, and RNA was subjected to microarray analysis. mRNA levels were compared with previously published expression levels in corresponding populations of neutrophil precursors isolated from bone marrow of untreated, healthy individuals. One thousand one hundred and ten mRNAs were differentially expressed >2-fold throughout terminal granulopoiesis. Major changes were seen in pathways involved in apoptosis, cytokine signaling, and TLR pathways. In addition, G-CSF treatment reduced the levels of four of five measured granule proteins in mature neutrophils, including the proantibacterial protein hCAP-18, which was completely deficient in neutrophils from G-CSF-treated donors. These results indicate that multiple biological processes are altered to satisfy the increased demand for neutrophils during G-CSF-induced emergency granulopoiesis in humans. PMID:27481851

  2. Expression of a nitric oxide degrading enzyme induces a senescence programme in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Mishina, Tatiana E; Lamb, Chris; Zeier, Jürgen

    2007-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been proposed to act as a factor delaying leaf senescence and fruit maturation in plants. Here we show that expression of a NO degrading dioxygenase (NOD) in Arabidopsis thaliana initiates a senescence-like phenotype, an effect that proved to be more pronounced in older than in younger leaves. This senescence phenotype was preceded by a massive switch in gene expression in which photosynthetic genes were down-regulated, whereas many senescence-associated genes (SAGs) and the 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) synthase gene ACS6 involved in ethylene synthesis were up-regulated. External fumigation of NOD plants with NO as well as environmental conditions known to stimulate endogenous NO production attenuated the induced senescence programme. For instance, both high light conditions and nitrate feeding reduced the senescence phenotype and attenuated the down-regulation of photosynthetic genes as well as the up-regulation of SAGs. Treatment of plants with the cytokinin 6-benzylaminopurin (BAP) reduced the down-regulation of photosynthesis, although it had no consistent effect on SAG expression. Metabolic changes during NOD-induced senescence comprehended increases in salicylic acid (SA) levels, accumulation of the phytoalexin camalexin and elevation of leaf gamma-tocopherol contents, all of which occurred during natural senescence in Arabidopsis leaves as well. Moreover, NO fumigation delayed the senescence process induced by darkening individual Arabidopsis Columbia-0 (Col-0) leaves. Our data thus support the notion that NO acts as a negative regulator of leaf senescence.

  3. Differential Expression of AMPA Subunits Induced by NMDA Intrahippocampal Injection in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Fachim, Helene A.; Pereira, Adriana C.; Iyomasa-Pilon, Melina M.; Rosa, Maria L. N. M.

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate is involved in excitotoxic mechanisms by interacting with different receptors. Such interactions result in neuronal death associated with several neurodegenerative disorders of the central nervous system (CNS). The aim of this work was to study the time course of changes in the expression of GluR1 and GluR2 subunits of glutamate amino-acid-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazol-4-propionic acid (AMPA) receptors in rat hippocampus induced by NMDA intrahippocampal injection. Rats were submitted to stereotaxic surgery for NMDA or saline (control) microinjection into dorsal hippocampus and the parameters were evaluated 24 h, 1, 2, and 4 weeks after injection. The extension and efficacy of the NMDA-induced injury were evaluated by Morris water maze (MWM) behavioral test and Nissl staining. The expression of GluR1 and GluR2 receptors, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and neuronal marker (NeuN) was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. It was observed the impairment of learning and memory functions, loss of neuronal cells, and glial proliferation in CA1 area of NMDA compared with control groups, confirming the injury efficacy. In addition, NMDA injection induced distinct changes in GluR1 and GluR2 expression over the time. In conclusion, such changes may be related to the complex mechanism triggered in response to NMDA injection resulting in a local injury and in the activation of neuronal plasticity. PMID:26912994

  4. Bifunctional effects of fucoidan on the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Jin Won; Yoon, Se Young; Oh, Soo Jin; Kim, Sang Kyum; Kang, Keon Wook . E-mail: kwkang@chosun.ac.kr

    2006-07-21

    Algal fucoidan is a marine sulfated polysaccharide with a wide variety of biological activities including anti-thrombotic and anti-inflammatory effects. This study evaluated the effect of fucoidan on the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in a macrophage cell line, RAW264.7. Low concentration range of fucoidan (10 {mu}g/ml) increased the basal expression level of iNOS in quiescent macrophages. However, we found for the first time that fucoidan inhibited the release of nitric oxide (NO) in RAW264.7 cells stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Western blot analysis revealed that fucoidan suppressed the LPS-induced expression of the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) gene. Moreover, the activation of both nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) and activator protein 1 (AP-1) are key steps in the transcriptional activation of the iNOS gene. Here, it was revealed that fucoidan selectively suppressed AP-1 activation, and that the activation of AP-1 appears to be essential for the induction of iNOS in activated macrophages. This inhibitory effect on AP-1 activation by fucoidan might be associated with its NO blocking and anti-inflammatory effects.

  5. Mirtazapine prevents induction and expression of cocaine-induced behavioral sensitization in rats.

    PubMed

    Salazar-Juárez, Alberto; Barbosa-Méndez, Susana; Jurado, Noe; Hernández-Miramontes, Ricardo; Leff, Philippe; Antón, Benito

    2016-07-01

    Cocaine abuse is a major health problem worldwide. Treatment based on both 5-HT2A/C and 5-HT3 receptor antagonists attenuate not only the effects of cocaine abuse but also the incentive/motivational effect related to cocaine-paired cues. Mirtazapine, an antagonist of postsynaptic α2-adrenergic, 5-HT2A/C and 5HT3 receptors and inverse agonist of the 5-HT2C receptor, has been shown to effectively modify, at the preclinical and clinical levels, various behavioral alterations induced by drugs abuse. Therefore, it is important to assess whether chronic dosing of mirtazapine alters locomotor effects of cocaine as well as induction and expression of cocaine sensitization. Our results reveal that a daily mirtazapine regimen administered for 30days effectively induces a significant attenuation of cocaine-dependent locomotor activity and as well as the induction and expression of behavioral sensitization. These results suggest that mirtazapine may be used as a potentially effective therapy to attenuate induction and expression of cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization. PMID:26922897

  6. PreBotzinger complex neurokinin-1 receptor-expressing neurons mediate opioid-induced respiratory depression.

    PubMed

    Montandon, Gaspard; Qin, Wuxuan; Liu, Hattie; Ren, Jun; Greer, John J; Horner, Richard L

    2011-01-26

    The analgesic properties of the opium poppy Papever somniferum were first mentioned by Hippocrates around 400 BC, and opioid analgesics remain the mainstay of pain management today. These drugs can cause the serious side-effect of respiratory depression that can be lethal with overdose, however the critical brain sites and neurochemical identity of the neurons mediating this depression are unknown. By locally manipulating neurotransmission in the adult rat, we identify the critical site of the medulla, the preBötzinger complex, that mediates opioid-induced respiratory depression in vivo. Here we show that opioids at the preBötzinger complex cause respiratory depression or fatal apnea, with anesthesia and deep-sleep being particularly vulnerable states for opioid-induced respiratory depression. Importantly, we establish that the preBötzinger complex is fully responsible for respiratory rate suppression following systemic administration of opioid analgesics. The site in the medulla most sensitive to opioids corresponds to a region expressing neurokinin-1 receptors, and we show in rhythmically active brainstem section in vitro that neurokinin-1 receptor-expressing preBötzinger complex neurons are selectively inhibited by opioids. In summary, neurokinin-1 receptor-expressing preBötzinger complex neurons constitute the critical site mediating opioid-induced respiratory rate depression, and the key therapeutic target for its prevention or reversal.

  7. Survival factor NFIL3 restricts FOXO-induced gene expression in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Keniry, Megan; Pires, Maira M.; Mense, Sarah; Lefebvre, Celine; Gan, Boyi; Justiano, Karen; Lau, Ying-Ka Ingar; Hopkins, Ben; Hodakoski, Cindy; Koujak, Susan; Toole, Joseph; Fenton, Franklyn; Calahan, Ashley; Califano, Andrea; DePinho, Ronald A.; Maurer, Matt; Parsons, Ramon

    2013-01-01

    Depending on the circumstance, FOXO (Forkhead O) (FOXO1, FOXO3, and FOXO4) transcription factors activate the expression of markedly different sets of genes to produce different phenotypic effects. For example, distinct FOXO-regulated transcriptional programs stimulate cell death or enhance organism life span. To gain insight into how FOXOs select specific genes for regulation, we performed a screen for genes that modify FOXO activation of TRAIL, a death receptor ligand capable of inducing extrinsic apoptosis. We discovered that the bZIP transcriptional repressor NFIL3 (nuclear factor interleukin 3-regulated) hindered FOXO transcription factor access to chromatin at the TRAIL promoter by binding to nearby DNA and recruiting histone deacetylase-2 (HDAC2) to reduce histone acetylation. In the same manner, NFIL3 repressed expression of certain FOXO targets—e.g., FAS, GADD45α (growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible, α), and GADD45β—but not others. NFIL3, which we found to be overexpressed in different cancers, supported tumor cell survival largely through repression of TRAIL and antagonized hydrogen peroxide-induced cell death. Moreover, its expression in cancer was associated with lower patient survival. Therefore, NFIL3 alters cancer cell behavior and FOXO function by acting on chromatin to restrict the menu of FOXO target genes. Targeting of NFIL3 could be of therapeutic benefit for cancer patients. PMID:23630076

  8. IL-22 inhibits epidermal differentiation and induces proinflammatory gene expression and migration of human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Boniface, Katia; Bernard, François-Xavier; Garcia, Martine; Gurney, Austin L; Lecron, Jean-Claude; Morel, Franck

    2005-03-15

    IL-22 belongs to a family of cytokines structurally related to IL-10, including IL-19, IL-20, IL-24, and IL-26. In contrast to IL-10, IL-22 has proinflammatory activities. IL-22 signals through a class II cytokine receptor composed of an IL-22-binding chain, IL-22RA1, and the IL-10RB subunit, which is shared with the IL-10R. In the present study, we show that short-term cultured human epidermal keratinocytes express a functional IL-22R but no IL-10R. Accordingly, IL-22 but not IL-10 induces STAT3 activation in keratinocytes. Using a cDNA array screening approach, real-time RT-PCR, and Western blot analysis, we demonstrate that IL-22 up-regulates, in a dose-dependent manner, the expression of S100A7, S100A8, S100A9, a group of proinflammatory molecules belonging to the S100 family of calcium-binding proteins, as well as the matrix metalloproteinase 3, the platelet-derived growth factor A, and the CXCL5 chemokine. In addition, IL-22 induces keratinocyte migration in an in vitro injury model and down-regulates the expression of at least seven genes associated with keratinocyte differentiation. Finally, we show that IL-22 strongly induces hyperplasia of reconstituted human epidermis. Taken together, these results suggest that IL-22 plays an important role in skin inflammatory processes and wound healing.

  9. Substrate-induced gene-expression screening of environmental metagenome libraries for isolation of catabolic genes.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Taku; Abe, Takashi; Ikemura, Toshimichi; Watanabe, Kazuya

    2005-01-01

    Recent awareness that most microorganisms in the environment are resistant to cultivation has prompted scientists to directly clone useful genes from environmental metagenomes. Two screening methods are currently available for the metagenome approach, namely, nucleotide sequence-based screening and enzyme activity-based screening. Here we have introduced and optimized a third option for the isolation of novel catabolic operons, that is, substrate-induced gene expression screening (SIGEX). This method is based on the knowledge that catabolic-gene expression is generally induced by relevant substrates and, in many cases, controlled by regulatory elements situated proximate to catabolic genes. For SIGEX to be high throughput, we constructed an operon-trap gfp-expression vector available for shotgun cloning that allows for the selection of positive clones in liquid cultures by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. The utility of SIGEX was demonstrated by the cloning of aromatic hydrocarbon-induced genes from a groundwater metagenome library and subsequent genome-informatics analysis.

  10. Effect of ethylene action inhibitors upon wound-induced gene expression in tomato pericarp

    SciTech Connect

    Henstrand, J.M.; Handa, A.K. )

    1989-09-01

    The contribution of wound-ethylene to wound-induced gene expression was investigated in unripe tomato pericarp using inhibitors of ethylene action. Wounded unripe tomato pericarp was treated with 2,5-norbornadiene or silver thiosulfate to inhibit specifically the induction of ethylene-dependent mRNA species. Poly(A){sup +} RNAs isolated from these tissues after 12 hours of wounding were translated in vitro in a rabbit reticulocyte lysate system and ({sup 35}S)methionine-labeled polypeptides were compared to unwounded controls after separation by one and two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Results show that mechanical wounding induces a dramatic shift in gene expression (over 50 mRNA species) but expression of less than 15% of these genes is affected by the treatment with ethylene action inhibitors. A selective decrease in mRNAs coding for a 37 kilodalton doublet and 75 kilodalton polypeptides is observed in 2,5-norbornadiene and silver thiosulfate treated wounded pericarp. Levels of hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein mRNAs induced in wounded tissue were not influenced by inhibitors of ethylene action.

  11. Oncostatin M is a novel inhibitor of TGF-β1-induced matricellular protein expression.

    PubMed

    Sarközi, Rita; Hauser, Christine; Noppert, Susie-Jane; Kronbichler, Andreas; Pirklbauer, Markus; Haller, Viktoria Maria; Grillari, Johannes; Grillari-Voglauer, Regina; Mayer, Gert; Schramek, Herbert

    2011-11-01

    Matricellular proteins in the kidney have been associated with the development of tubulointerstitial fibrogenesis and the progression of renal disease. This study investigated potential antifibrotic effects of the cytokine oncostatin M (OSM) in human proximal tubule cells (PTC), particularly with regard to inhibition of profibrotic events initiated by TGF-β1. In human PTC, OSM diminished transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1-induced expression of the transcriptional epithelial-mesenchymal transition mediator FoxC2. Furthermore, exposure to OSM attenuated basal and TGF-β1-induced expression of the matricellular proteins SPARC, TSP-1, TNC, and CTGF regardless of the sequence of ligand administration. OSM was shown to result in rapid and sustained phosphorylation of both Stat1 and Stat3 and also in transient phosphorylation of Smad2/3 in contrast to TGF-β1, which demonstrated a gradually building phosphorylation of Smad2/3 and a brief phosphorylation of Smad1/5/8. Utilizing receptor-blocking molecules, we found the inhibitory effect of OSM on TGF-β1-induced CTGF mRNA expression occurs independently of Smad2/3 signaling and present evidence that this effect may be partially driven by OSM receptor-mediated Stat1 and/or Stat3 signaling pathways, thereby providing a mechanism whereby OSM can contribute to tubulointerstitial protection.

  12. Nifedipine induces periostin expression in gingival fibroblasts through TGF-beta.

    PubMed

    Kim, S S; Jackson-Boeters, L; Darling, M R; Rieder, M J; Hamilton, D W

    2013-11-01

    Gingival enlargement is a fibrotic condition that can arise from systemic administration of the dihydropyridine calcium channel blocker nifedipine. Periostin, a transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β)-inducible matricellular protein, has been associated with fibrosis in numerous tissues, but its expression has never been examined in nifedipine-influenced gingival enlargement (NIGE). The objective of this study was to assess if periostin up-regulation is associated with NIGE and whether nifedipine induces periostin expression in gingival fibroblasts. In NIGE tissue (n = 6), periostin is overexpressed in the gingival connective tissue compared with healthy control tissue (n = 6). The transcription factor p-SMAD2/3, which is associated with canonical TGF-β signaling, localizes to the nuclei in both HGFs and oral epithelial cells in NIGE tissues, but not in control healthy tissue. In vitro culture of HGFs with 30 and 100 ng/mL of nifedipine significantly increased periostin mRNA and protein levels, which correlated with increased levels of active TGF-β and increased phosphorylation and nuclear localization of SMAD3. Blocking of canonical TGF-β signaling through inhibition of the TGF-β receptor I with SB431542 significantly reduced nifedipine-induced SMAD3 phosphorylation and periostin expression. Our results demonstrate that nifedipine up-regulates periostin in HGFs in a TGF-β-dependent manner.

  13. Afadin requirement for cytokine expressions in keratinocytes during chemically induced inflammation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Toshiyuki; Iwata, Takanori; Takai, Yoshimi; Birchmeier, Walter; Yamato, Masayuki; Okano, Teruo

    2014-01-01

    Afadin is a filamentous actin-binding protein and a mediator of nectin signaling. Nectins are Ig-like cell adhesion molecules, and the nectin family is composed of four members, nectin-1 to nectin-4. Nectins show homophilic and heterophilic interactions with other nectins or proteins on adjacent cells. Nectin signaling induces formation of cell–cell junctions and is required for the development of epithelial tissues, including skin. This study investigated the role of afadin in epithelial tissue development and established epithelium-specific afadin-deficient (CKO) mice. Although showing no obvious abnormality in the skin development and homeostasis, the mice showed the reduced neutrophil infiltration into the epidermis during chemical-induced inflammation with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA). Immunohistochemical and quantitative real-time PCR analyses showed that the expression levels of cytokines including Cxcl2, Il-1β and Tnf-α were reduced in CKO keratinocytes compared with control keratinocytes during TPA-induced inflammation. Primary-cultured skin keratinocytes from CKO mice also showed reduced expression of these cytokines and weak activation of Rap1 compared with those from control mice after the TPA treatment. These results suggested a remarkable function of afadin, which was able to enhance cytokine expression through Rap1 activation in keratinocytes during inflammation. PMID:25297509

  14. Flexible, AAV-equipped Genetic Modules for Inducible Control of Gene Expression in Mammalian Brain

    PubMed Central

    Dogbevia, Godwin K; Roβmanith, Martin; Sprengel, Rolf; Hasan, Mazahir T

    2016-01-01

    Controlling gene expression in mammalian brain is of utmost importance to causally link the role of gene function to cell circuit dynamics under normal conditions and disease states. We have developed recombinant adeno-associated viruses equipped with tetracycline-controlled genetic switches for inducible and reversible control of gene expression in a cell type specific and brain subregion selective manner. Here, we characterize a two-virus approach to efficiently and reliably switch gene expression on and off, repetitively, both in vitro and in vivo. Our recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV)-Tet approach is highly flexible and it has great potential for application in basic and biomedical neuroscience research and gene therapy. PMID:27070301

  15. Regulation of endogenous human gene expression by ligand-inducible TALE transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Mercer, Andrew C; Gaj, Thomas; Sirk, Shannon J; Lamb, Brian M; Barbas, Carlos F

    2014-10-17

    The construction of increasingly sophisticated synthetic biological circuits is dependent on the development of extensible tools capable of providing specific control of gene expression in eukaryotic cells. Here, we describe a new class of synthetic transcription factors that activate gene expression in response to extracellular chemical stimuli. These inducible activators consist of customizable transcription activator-like effector (TALE) proteins combined with steroid hormone receptor ligand-binding domains. We demonstrate that these ligand-responsive TALE transcription factors allow for tunable and conditional control of gene activation and can be used to regulate the expression of endogenous genes in human cells. Since TALEs can be designed to recognize any contiguous DNA sequence, the conditional gene regulatory system described herein will enable the design of advanced synthetic gene networks.

  16. Hepatic gene expression profiling of 5′-AMP-induced hypometabolism in mice

    PubMed Central

    Miki, Takao; Van Oort-Jansen, Anita; Matsumoto, Tomoko; Loose, David S.; Lee, Cheng Chi

    2011-01-01

    There is currently much interest in clinical applications of therapeutic hypothermia. Hypothermia can be a consequence of hypometabolism. We have recently established a procedure for the induction of a reversible deep hypometabolic state in mice using 5′-adenosine monophosphate (5′-AMP) in conjunction with moderate ambient temperature. The current study aims at investigating the impact of this technology at the gene expression level in a major metabolic organ, the liver. Our findings reveal that expression levels of the majority of genes in liver are not significantly altered by deep hypometabolism. However, among those affected by hypometabolism, more genes are differentially upregulated than downregulated both in a deep hypometabolic state and in the early arousal state. These altered gene expression levels during 5′-AMP induced hypometabolism are largely restored to normal levels within 2 days of the treatment. Our data also suggest that temporal control of circadian genes is largely stalled during deep hypometabolism. PMID:21224422

  17. Differential expression of Ran GTPase during HMBA-induced differentiation in murine erythroleukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Vanegas, N; García-Sacristán, A; López-Fernández, L A; Párraga, M; del Mazo, J; Hernández, P; Schvartzman, J B; Krimer, D B

    2003-07-01

    Murine erythroleukemia (MEL) cells undergo erythroid differentiation in vitro when treated with hexamethylene bisacetamide (HMBA). To identify genes involved in the commitment of MEL cells to differentiate, we screened a cDNA library constructed from HMBA-induced cells by differential hybridization and isolated GTPase Ran as a down-regulated gene. We observed that Ran was expressed in a biphasic mode. Following a decrease in mRNA level during the initial hours of induction, Ran re-expressed at 24-48 h, and gradually declined again. To investigate the role of Ran during MEL differentiation we constructed MEL transfectants capable to express or block Ran mRNA production constitutively. No effects were observed on cell growth and proliferation. Blockage of Ran, however, interfered with MEL cell differentiation resulting in a decrease of cell survival in the committed population.

  18. Human Cementum Protein 1 induces expression of bone and cementum proteins by human gingival fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Carmona-Rodriguez, Bruno; Alvarez-Perez, Marco Antonio; Narayanan, A. Sampath; Zeichner-David, Margarita; Reyes-Gasga, Jose; Molina-Guarneros, Juan; Garcia-Hernandez, Ana Lilia; Suarez-Franco, Jose Luis; Chavarria, Ivet Gil; Villarreal-Ramirez, Eduardo; Arzate, Higinio . E-mail: harzate@servidor.unam.mx

    2007-07-06

    We recently presented evidence showing that a human cementoblastoma-derived protein, named Cementum Protein 1 (CEMP1) may play a role as a local regulator of cementoblast differentiation and cementum-matrix mineralization. This protein was shown to be expressed by cementoblasts and progenitor cells localized in the periodontal ligament. In this study we demonstrate that transfection of CEMP1 into human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) induces mineralization and expression of bone and cementum-matrix proteins. The transfected HGF cells had higher alkaline phosphatase activity and proliferation rate and they expressed genes for alkaline phosphatase, bone sialoprotein, osteocalcin, osteopontin, the transcription factor Runx2/Cbfa1, and cementum attachment protein (CAP). They also produced biological-type hydroxyapatite. These findings indicate that the CEMP1 might participate in differentiation and mineralization of nonosteogenic cells, and that it might have a potential function in cementum and bone formation.

  19. Silencing of Inducible Immunoproteasome Subunit Expression by Chemically Modified siRNA and shRNA.

    PubMed

    Gvozdeva, Olga V; Prassolov, Vladimir S; Zenkova, Marina A; Vlassov, Valentin V; Chernolovskaya, Elena L

    2016-08-01

    Overexpression of inducible subunits of immunoproteasome is related to pathogenesis of some chronic diseases. Specific inhibition of the immunosubunits may be used for the treatment of these diseases and RNA interference is one of the potent methods used in this area. We designed 2'-O-methyl modified siRNAs with selectively protected nuclease-sensitive sites, which efficiently silence LMP2, LMP7, and MECL-1 genes expression. To provide stable long-lasting inhibition of target genes, short-hairpin RNAs (shRNA) expressed by lentiviral vectors were constructed. Our results demonstrated that chemically modified siRNAs inhibited the expression of target genes with similar efficiency or with efficiency exceeding that of corresponding shRNAs and provide silencing effect for 5 days.

  20. Expression of a carbonic anhydrase gene is induced by environmental stresses in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Yu, Song; Zhang, Xinxin; Guan, Qingjie; Takano, Tetsuo; Liu, Shenkui

    2007-01-01

    Expression of the gene (OsCA1) coding for carbonic anhydrase (CA) in leaves and roots of rice was induced by environmental stresses from salts (NaCl, NaHCO(3) and Na(2)CO(3)), and osmotic stress (10%, w/v, PEG 6000). CA activity of rice seedlings more than doubled under some of these stresses. Transgenic Arabidopsis over-expressing OsCA1 had a greater salt tolerance at the seedling stage than wild-type plants in 1/2 MS medium with 5 mM NaHCO(3), 50 mM NaCl, on 100 mM NaCl. Thus CA expression responds to environmental stresses and is related to stress tolerance in rice. PMID:17016673

  1. Induction of p38δ Expression Plays an Essential Role in Oncogenic ras-Induced Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Kwong, Jinny; Chen, Michelle; Lv, Dan; Luo, Na; Su, Weijun; Xiang, Rong

    2013-01-01

    Oncogene-induced senescence is a stable proliferative arrest that serves as a tumor-suppressing defense mechanism. p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) has been implicated in oncogene-induced senescence and tumor suppression. However, the specific role of each of the four p38 isoforms in oncogene-induced senescence is not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that p38δ mediates oncogene-induced senescence through a p53- and p16INK4A-independent mechanism. Instead, evidence suggests a link between p38δ and the DNA damage pathways. Moreover, we have discovered a novel mechanism that enhances the expression of p38δ during senescence. In this mechanism, oncogenic ras induces the Raf-1–MEK–extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway, which, in turn, activates the AP-1 and Ets transcription factors that are bound to the p38δ promoter, leading to increased transcription of p38δ. These findings indicate that induction of the prosenescent function of p38δ by oncogenic ras is achieved through 2 mechanisms, transcriptional activation by the Raf-1–MEK–ERK–AP-1/Ets pathway, which increases the cellular concentration of the p38δ protein, and posttranslational modification by MKK3/6, which stimulates the enzymatic activity of p38δ. In addition, these studies identify the AP-1 and Ets transcription factors as novel signaling components in the senescence-inducing pathway. PMID:23878395

  2. ANGPTL4 expression induced by butyrate and rosiglitazone in human intestinal epithelial cells utilizes independent pathways.

    PubMed

    Korecka, Agata; de Wouters, Tomas; Cultrone, Antonietta; Lapaque, Nicolas; Pettersson, Sven; Doré, Joël; Blottière, Hervé M; Arulampalam, Velmurugesan

    2013-06-01

    Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), such as butyrate and propionate, are metabolic products of carbohydrate fermentation by the microbiota and constitute the main source of energy for host colonocytes. SCFAs are also important for gastrointestinal health, immunity, and host metabolism. Intestinally produced angiopoietin-like protein 4 (ANGPTL4) is a secreted protein with metabolism-altering properties and may offer a route by which microbiota can regulate host metabolism. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ has previously been shown to be involved in microbiota-induced expression of intestinal ANGPTL4, but the role of bacterial metabolites in this process has remained elusive. Here, we show that the SCFA butyrate regulates intestinal ANGPTL4 expression in a PPAR-γ-independent manner. Although PPAR-γ is not required for butyrate-driven intestinal ANGPTL4 expression, costimulating with PPAR-γ ligands and SCFAs leads to additive increases in ANGPTL4 levels. We suggest that PPAR-γ and butyrate rely on two separate regulatory sites, a PPAR-responsive element downstream the transcription start site and a butyrate-responsive element(s) within the promoter region, 0.5 kb upstream of the transcription start site. Furthermore, butyrate gavage and colonization with Clostridium tyrobutyricum, a SCFA producer, can independently induce expression of intestinal ANGPTL4 in germ-free mice. Thus, oral administration of SCFA or use of SCFA-producing bacteria may be additional routes to maintain intestinal ANGPTL4 levels for preventive nutrition or therapeutic purposes.

  3. Nasal Immunization with Lactococcus lactis Expressing the Pneumococcal Protective Protein A Induces Protective Immunity in Mice▿

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Marcela; Villena, Julio; Vintiñi, Elisa; Hebert, Elvira María; Raya, Raúl; Alvarez, Susana

    2008-01-01

    Nisin-controlled gene expression was used to develop a recombinant strain of Lactococcus lactis that is able to express the pneumococcal protective protein A (PppA) on its surface. Immunodetection assays confirmed that after the induction with nisin, the PppA antigen was predictably and efficiently displayed on the cell surface of the recombinant strain, which was termed L. lactis PppA. The production of mucosal and systemically specific antibodies in adult and young mice was evaluated after mice were nasally immunized with L. lactis PppA. Immunoglobulin M (IgM), IgG, and IgA anti-PppA antibodies were detected in the serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of adult and young mice, which showed that PppA expressed in L. lactis was able to induce a strong mucosal and systemic immune response. Challenge survival experiments demonstrated that immunization with L. lactis PppA was able to increase resistance to systemic and respiratory infection with different pneumococcal serotypes, and passive immunization assays of naïve young mice demonstrated a direct correlation between anti-PppA antibodies and protection. The results presented in this study demonstrate three major characteristics of the effectiveness of nasal immunization with PppA expressed as a protein anchored to the cell wall of L. lactis: it elicited cross-protective immunity against different pneumococcal serotypes, it afforded protection against both systemic and respiratory challenges, and it induced protective immunity in mice of different ages. PMID:18390997

  4. Comparison of gene expression changes induced by biguanides in db/db mice liver.

    PubMed

    Heishi, Masayuki; Hayashi, Koji; Ichihara, Junji; Ishikawa, Hironori; Kawamura, Takao; Kanaoka, Masaharu; Taiji, Mutsuo; Kimura, Toru

    2008-08-01

    Large-scale clinical studies have shown that the biguanide drug metformin, widely used for type 2 diabetes, to be very safe. By contrast, another biguanide, phenformin, has been withdrawn from major markets because of a high incidence of serious adverse effects. The difference in mode of action between the two biguanides remains unclear. To gain insight into the different modes of action of the two drugs, we performed global gene expression profiling using the livers of obese diabetic db/db mice after a single administration of phenformin or metformin at levels sufficient to cause a significant reduction in blood glucose level. Metformin induced modest expression changes, including G6pc in the liver as previously reported. By contrast, phenformin caused changes in expression level of many additional genes. We used a knowledge-based bioinformatic analysis to study the effects of phenformin. Differentially expressed genes identified in this study constitute a large gene network, which may be related to cell death, inflammation or wound response. Our results suggest that the two biguanides show a similar hypoglycemic effect in db/db mice, but phenformin induces a greater stress on the liver even a short time after a single administration. These findings provide a novel insight into the cause of the relatively high occurrence of serious adverse effect after phenformin treatment.

  5. Activation of TIM1 induces colon cancer cell apoptosis via modulating Fas ligand expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Zhang, Xueyan; Sun, Wenjing; Hu, Xiaocui; Li, Xiaolin; Fu, Songbin; Liu, Chen

    2016-04-29

    The pathogenesis of colon cancer is unclear. It is proposed that TIM1 has an association with human cancer. The present study aims to investigate the role of TIM1 activation in the inhibition of human colon cancer cells. In this study, human colon cancer cell line, HT29 and T84 cells were cultured. The expression of TIM1 was assessed by real time RT-PCR and Western blotting. The TIM1 on the cancer cells was activated in the culture by adding recombinant TIM4. The chromatin structure at the FasL promoter locus was assessed by chromatin immunoprecipitation. The apoptosis of the cancer cells was assessed by flow cytometry. The results showed that human colon cancer cell lines, HT29 cells and T84 cells, expressed TIM1. Activation of TIM1 by exposing the cells to TIM4 significantly increased the frequency of apoptotic colon cancer cells. The expression of FasL was increased in the cancer cells after treating by TIM4. Blocking Fas or FasL abolished the exposure to TIM4-induced T84 cell apoptosis. In conclusion, HT29 cells and T84 cells express TIM1; activation TIM1 can induce the cancer cell apoptosis. TIM1 may be a novel therapeutic target of colon cancer.

  6. Expression of immediate-early genes in the dorsal cochlear nucleus in salicylate-induced tinnitus.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shou-Sen; Mei, Ling; Chen, Jian-Yong; Huang, Zhi-Wu; Wu, Hao

    2016-02-01

    Spontaneous neuronal activity in dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN) may be involved in the physiological processes underlying salicylate-induced tinnitus. As a neuronal activity marker, immediate-early gene (IEG) expression, especially activity-dependent cytoskeletal protein (Arc/Arg3.1) and the early growth response gene-1 (Egr-1), appears to be highly correlated with sensory-evoked neuronal activity. However, their relationships with tinnitus induced by salicylate have rarely been reported in the DCN. In this study, we assessed the effect of acute and chronic salicylate treatment on the expression of N-methyl D-aspartate receptor subunit 2B (NR2B), Arg3.1, and Egr-1. We also observed ultrastructural alterations in the DCN synapses in an animal model of tinnitus. Levels of mRNA and protein expression of NR2B and Arg3.1 were increased in rats that were chronically administered salicylate (200 mg/kg, twice daily for 3, 7, or 14 days). These levels returned to baseline 14 days after cessation of treatment. However, no significant changes were observed in Egr-1 gene expression in any groups. Furthermore, rats subjected to long-term salicylate administration showed more presynaptic vesicles, thicker and longer postsynaptic densities, and increased synaptic interface curvature. Alterations of Arg3.1 and NR2B may be responsible for the changes in the synaptic ultrastructure. These changes confirm that salicylate can cause neural plasticity changes at the DCN level. PMID:25636249

  7. Effect of inducible expression of HIF-1α on prostate cancer cell in MPPa-PDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Y. Y.; Kong, F.; Tian, X.; Guo, Q.; Cui, F. A.

    2008-10-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising treatment on neoplastic pathologic tissues, which involves the administration of a photosensitizing agent followed by exposure of the tissue to visible non-thermal light. In our previous findings MPPa was showed to be a good photosensitizer candidature, because it can lead PC-3M cell line to death mainly via apoptotic way. In this study, we studied the effect of overexpression of hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) on MPPa-PDT. Over expression of HIF-1α was induced by cobalt chloride (CoCl2) and then the cell viability was tested by MTT assay. After that, HIF-1α siRNA was transfected into PC-3M cells to knock down the expression of HIF-1α and the cell viability was observed. Western blot was used to determine the expression of HIF-1α. Finally, we found that the over expression of HIF-1α would reduce the photodynamic effect of MPPa on PC-3M cells, while the photodynamic effect would be enhanced by HIF