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Sample records for induce donor-specific transplantation

  1. Mixed allogeneic reconstitution (A+B----A) to induce donor-specific transplantation tolerance. Permanent acceptance of a simultaneous donor skin graft

    SciTech Connect

    Ildstad, S.T.; Wren, S.M.; Oh, E.; Hronakes, M.L. )

    1991-06-01

    Mixed allogeneic reconstitution, in which a mixture of T-cell-depleted bone marrow of syngeneic host and allogeneic donor type is transplanted into a lethally irradiated recipient (A+B----A), results in mixed lymphopoietic chimerism with engraftment of a mixture of both host and donor bone marrow elements. Recipients are specifically tolerant to donor both in vitro and in vivo. Donor-specific skin grafts survive indefinitely when they are placed after full bone marrow repopulation at 28 days, while third-party grafts are rapidly rejected. To determine whether a delay of a month or more for full bone marrow repopulation is required before a donor-specific graft can be placed, we have now examined whether tolerance induction can be achieved if a graft is placed at the time of bone marrow transplantation. Permanent acceptance of donor-specific B10.BR skin grafts occurred when mixed allogeneic chimerism (B10+B10.BR----B10) was induced and a simultaneous allogeneic donor graft placed. In vitro, mixed reconstituted recipients were specifically tolerant to the B10.BR donor lymphoid cells but fully reactive to MHC-disparate third-party (BALB/c; H-2dd) when assessed by mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) and cell-mediated lympholysis (CML) assays. These data therefore indicate that a donor-specific graft placed at the time of mixed allogeneic reconstitution is permanently accepted without rejection. To determine whether an allogeneic skin graft alone without allogeneic bone marrow would be sufficient to induce tolerance, syngeneic reconstitution (B10----B10) was carried out, and a simultaneous B10.BR allogeneic skin graft placed. Although skin grafts were prolonged in all recipients, all grafts rejected when full lymphopoietic repopulation occurred at 28 days.

  2. In utero hematopoietic cell transplantation: induction of donor specific immune tolerance and postnatal transplants

    PubMed Central

    Peranteau, William H.

    2014-01-01

    In utero hematopoietic cell transplantation (IUHCT) is a non-myeloablative non-immunosuppressive transplant approach that allows for donor cell engraftment across immunologic barriers. Successful engraftment is associated with donor-specific tolerance. IUHCT has the potential to treat a large number of congenital hematologic, immunologic, and genetic diseases either by achieving high enough engraftment levels following a single IUHCT or by inducing donor specific tolerance to allow for non-toxic same-donor postnatal transplants. This review evaluates donor specific tolerance induction achieved by IUHCT. Specifically it addresses the need to achieve threshold levels of donor cell engraftment following IUHCT to consistently obtain immunologic tolerance. The mechanisms of tolerance induction including partial deletion of donor reactive host T cells by direct and indirect antigen presentation and the role of regulatory T cells in maintaining tolerance are reviewed. Finally, this review highlights the promising clinical potential of in utero tolerance induction to provide a platform on which postnatal cellular and organ transplants can be performed without myeloablative or immunosuppressive conditioning. PMID:25429269

  3. Donor-specific antibodies accelerate arteriosclerosis after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hill, Gary S; Nochy, Dominique; Bruneval, Patrick; Duong van Huyen, J P; Glotz, Denis; Suberbielle, Caroline; Zuber, Julien; Anglicheau, Dany; Empana, Jean-Philippe; Legendre, Christophe; Loupy, Alexandre

    2011-05-01

    In biopsies of renal allografts, arteriosclerosis is often more severe than expected based on the age of the donor, even without a history of rejection vasculitis. To determine whether preformed donor-specific antibodies (DSAs) may contribute to the severity of arteriosclerosis, we examined protocol biopsies from patients with (n=40) or without (n=59) DSA after excluding those with any evidence of vasculitis. Among DSA-positive patients, arteriosclerosis significantly progressed between month 3 and month 12 after transplant (mean Banff cv score 0.65 ± 0.11 to 1.12 ± 0.10, P=0.014); in contrast, among DSA-negative patients, we did not detect a statistically significant progression during the same timeframe (mean Banff cv score 0.65 ± 0.11 to 0.81 ± 0.10, P=not significant). Available biopsies at later time points supported a rate of progression of arteriosclerosis in DSA-negative patients that was approximately one third that in DSA-positive patients. Accelerated arteriosclerosis was significantly associated with peritubular capillary leukocytic infiltration, glomerulitis, subclinical antibody-mediated rejection, and interstitial inflammation. In conclusion, these data support the hypothesis that donor-specific antibodies dramatically accelerate post-transplant progression of arteriosclerosis.

  4. The origins of the identification and isolation of hematopoietic stem cells, and their capability to induce donor-specific transplantation tolerance and treat autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    Shizuru, Judith A.

    2008-01-01

    Advances in the understanding of the cells of the hematopoietic system have provided a rich basis for improving clinical hematopoietic cell transplants; finding and using proteins and molecules to amplify or suppress particular blood cell types; understanding the stepwise progression of preleukemic stages leading first to chronic myeloid disorders, then the emergence of acute blastic leukemias; and treating malignant and nonmalignant diseases with cell subsets. As a result of intense scientific investigation, hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) have been isolated and their key functional characteristics revealed—self-renewal and multilineage differentiation. These characteristics are now found to be present in all tissue/organ stem cell studies, and even in the analysis of pluripotent embryonic, nuclear transfer, and induced pluripotent stem cells. Studies on HSC have identified hematopoiesis as one of the best systems for studying developmental cell lineages and as the best for understanding molecular changes in cell fate decision-making and for finding preclinical and clinical platforms for tissue and organ replacement, regeneration, and oncogenesis. Here we review the steps, from our viewpoint, that led to HSC isolation and its importance in self-nonself immune recognition. PMID:18948588

  5. Donor-specific tolerance induction in organ transplantation via mixed splenocytes chimerism.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, S; Kanamoto, A; Takayama, T

    2013-08-01

    We have shown previously that donor-derived splenocytes can replace recipients' bone marrow and induce donor-specific tolerance (DST). We have also shown the usefulness of the chimeric state for the induction of DST. Further analysis of mixed splenocytes chimera, especially the role of each T cells in mixed splenocytes chimera, is indispensable issue for its clinical use. A chimeric state has been shown to achieve long-term survival in major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-mismatched grafts. The donor-derived splenocytes can replace recipients' bone marrow and induce DST. The long-term survival of allogeneic skin grafts was achieved without immunosuppressants. In this study we show the role of each T cell type in a splenocyte mixed chimera. This review provides a short summary of our original work, adding some supplemental interpretations. Mixed chimerism is thus considered an attractive approach for the induction of DST without the use of immunosuppressants. In this paper, we summarize some of the findings on mixed splenocyte chimeras and review mixed chimerism in recent organ transplantation.

  6. Donor-Specific Anti-HLA Antibodies in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Morin-Zorman, Sarah; Loiseau, Pascale; Taupin, Jean-Luc; Caillat-Zucman, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT) is a curative treatment for a wide variety of hematological diseases. In 30% of the cases, a geno-identical donor is available. Any other situation displays some level of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) incompatibility between donor and recipient. Deleterious effects of anti-HLA immunization have long been recognized in solid organ transplant recipients. More recently, anti-HLA immunization was shown to increase the risk of primary graft failure (PGF), a severe complication of AHSCT that occurs in 3-4% of matched unrelated donor transplantation and up to 15% in cord blood transplantation and T-cell depleted haplo-identical stem cell transplantation. Rates of PGF in patients with DSA were reported to be between 24 and 83% with the highest rates in haplo-identical and cord blood transplantation recipients. This led to the recommendation of anti-HLA antibody screening to detect donor-specific antibodies (DSA) in recipients prior to AHSCT. In this review, we highlight the role of anti-HLA antibodies in AHSCT and the mechanisms that may lead to PGF in patients with DSA, and discuss current issues in the field. PMID:27570526

  7. Donor-Specific Anti-HLA Antibodies in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Morin-Zorman, Sarah; Loiseau, Pascale; Taupin, Jean-Luc; Caillat-Zucman, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT) is a curative treatment for a wide variety of hematological diseases. In 30% of the cases, a geno-identical donor is available. Any other situation displays some level of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) incompatibility between donor and recipient. Deleterious effects of anti-HLA immunization have long been recognized in solid organ transplant recipients. More recently, anti-HLA immunization was shown to increase the risk of primary graft failure (PGF), a severe complication of AHSCT that occurs in 3–4% of matched unrelated donor transplantation and up to 15% in cord blood transplantation and T-cell depleted haplo-identical stem cell transplantation. Rates of PGF in patients with DSA were reported to be between 24 and 83% with the highest rates in haplo-identical and cord blood transplantation recipients. This led to the recommendation of anti-HLA antibody screening to detect donor-specific antibodies (DSA) in recipients prior to AHSCT. In this review, we highlight the role of anti-HLA antibodies in AHSCT and the mechanisms that may lead to PGF in patients with DSA, and discuss current issues in the field. PMID:27570526

  8. Precursor frequency of donor-specific lymphocytes recovered from canine lung transplants.

    PubMed Central

    Kirby, J A; Pepper, J R; Reader, J A; Corbishley, C M; Hudson, L

    1986-01-01

    Dogs receiving left unilateral allo- or auto-grafts were treated with Cyclosporin A (Cy A) for 4 days. Thereafter allografted transplant recipients showed pulmonary pathology consistent with rejection. Blood and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL)-derived lymphocytes were isolated from the recipient animals before and at various times after operation and the frequency of allospecific precursor cytolytic lymphocytes (pCTL) determined by limiting dilution analysis (LDA). Samples from the autografted control animal did not show any post-operative frequency changes; however, both blood and BAL-derived lymphocytes from allografted recipients showed a significant post-operative increase in the proportion of donor-specific pCTL. This increase was consistently greater in samples from the transplanted than the autochthonous lung. The frequency of pCTL determined using targets from an unrelated dog showed no post-operative increase. It is likely that the increase in frequency of donor-specific pCTL recorded during graft-rejection is a specific consequence of an interaction between the graft and recipient's immune system. Images Fig. 1 PMID:3516465

  9. Incidence and Clinical Significance of De Novo Donor Specific Antibodies after Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Panagiotellis, Konstantinos; Iniotaki, Aliki; Boletis, John N.

    2013-01-01

    Kidney transplantation has evolved over more than half a century and remarkable progress has been made in patient and graft outcomes. Despite these advances, chronic allograft dysfunction remains a major problem. Among other reasons, de novo formation of antibodies against donor human leukocyte antigens has been recognized as one of the major risk factors for reduced allograft survival. The type of treatment in the presence of donor specific antibodies (DSA) posttransplantation is largely related to the clinical syndrome the patient presents with at the time of detection. There is no consensus regarding the treatment of stable renal transplant recipients with circulating de novo DSA. On the contrast, in acute or chronic allograft dysfunction transplant centers use various protocols in order to reduce the amount of circulating DSA and achieve long-term graft survival. These protocols include removal of the antibodies by plasmapheresis, intravenous administration of immunoglobulin, or depletion of B cells with anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies along with tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil. This review aims at the comprehension of the clinical correlations of de novo DSA in kidney transplant recipients, assessment of their prognostic value, and providing insights into the management of these patients. PMID:24348683

  10. Non-myeloablative conditioning is sufficient to induce mixed chimerism and subsequent acceptance of donor specific cardiac and skin grafts.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chi; Zhu, Ping; Saito, Taro; Isaka, Yoshitaka; Nagahara, Yukitoshi; Zhuang, Jian; Li, Xiao-Kang

    2013-07-01

    Organ transplant recipients have elevated cancer and viral infection risks due to immunosuppression and long-term results of organ transplantation remain unsatisfactory, mainly because of chronic rejection. The purpose of the current study is to establish a nonmyeloablative perioperative regimen, able to induce mixed chimerism and tolerance of allografts. To establish a nonmyeloablative perioperative regimen, we used Busulfan, an important component of many bone marrow transplantation preparative regimens for a variety of non-neoplastic diseases as an alternative to total body irradiation (TBI), and FTY720, a unique immunosuppression agent, inhibition lymphocyte homing. We found that creating a lymphohematopoietic chimera in which donor and recipient hematopoiesis coexist resulted in prolongation of the donor specific heart and skin allografts. Consistent with graft survival, pathological analysis indicated that the allografts from tolerant recipients were free of myocardial injury and had only a few interstitial infiltrates, and obliterative vasculopathy was not observed. Furthermore, we found that Treg cells were increased in the long-term graft acceptance recipients. Our data revealed that the therapeutic potential for using hematopoietic chimerism in non-myeloablated recipients hope the advances in rodent models described above in the development of minimal, nontoxic host conditioning regimens for mixed chimerism induction and subsequent acceptance of donor specific grafts. PMID:23428909

  11. Donor-specific anti-HLA Abs and graft failure in matched unrelated donor hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Ciurea, Stefan O.; Thall, Peter F.; Wang, Xuemei; Wang, Sa A.; Hu, Ying; Cano, Pedro; Aung, Fleur; Rondon, Gabriela; Molldrem, Jeffrey J.; Korbling, Martin; Shpall, Elizabeth J.; de Lima, Marcos; Champlin, Richard E.

    2011-01-01

    Anti-HLA donor-specific Abs (DSAs) have been reported to be associated with graft failure in mismatched hematopoietic stem cell transplantation; however, their role in the development of graft failure in matched unrelated donor (MUD) transplantation remains unclear. We hypothesize that DSAs against a mismatched HLA-DPB1 locus is associated with graft failure in this setting. The presence of anti-HLA Abs before transplantation was determined prospectively in 592 MUD transplantation recipients using mixed-screen beads in a solid-phase fluorescent assay. DSA identification was performed using single-Ag beads containing the corresponding donor's HLA-mismatched Ags. Anti-HLA Abs were detected in 116 patients (19.6%), including 20 patients (3.4%) with anti-DPB1 Abs. Overall, graft failure occurred in 19 of 592 patients (3.2%), including 16 of 584 (2.7%) patients without anti-HLA Abs compared with 3 of 8 (37.5%) patients with DSA (P = .0014). In multivariate analysis, DSAs were the only factor highly associated with graft failure (P = .0001; odds ratio = 21.3). Anti-HLA allosensitization was higher overall in women than in men (30.8% vs 12.1%; P < .0001) and higher in women with 1 (P = .008) and 2 or more pregnancies (P = .0003) than in men. We conclude that the presence of anti-DPB1 DSAs is associated with graft failure in MUD hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. PMID:21967975

  12. Impact of Early Blood Transfusion After Kidney Transplantation on the Incidence of Donor-Specific Anti-HLA Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ferrandiz, I; Congy-Jolivet, N; Del Bello, A; Debiol, B; Trébern-Launay, K; Esposito, L; Milongo, D; Dörr, G; Rostaing, L; Kamar, N

    2016-09-01

    Little is known about the impact of posttransplant blood transfusion on the sensitization of anti-HLA antibodies and the formation of donor-specific antibodies (DSAs). The aims of our study were to determine the 1-year incidence of DSAs (assessed using a solid-phase assay) and antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) in kidney transplant patients who had or had not received a blood transfusion during the first year after transplantation. Included were 390 non-HLA-sensitized patients who had received an ABO-compatible kidney transplant and had not previously or simultaneously received a nonkidney transplant. Overall, 64% of patients received a red blood cell transfusion within the first year after transplantation, most within the first month. The overall 1-year incidence of DSAs was significantly higher in patients that had undergone transfusion (7.2% vs. 0.7% in patients with no transfusion, p < 0.0001). AMR occurred more often in the transfusion group (n = 15, 6%) compared with the nontransfusion group (n = 2, 1.4%; p = 0.04). Blood transfusion was an independent predictive factor for de novo DSA formation but not for AMR. Patients who had a transfusion and developed DSAs were more often treated with cyclosporin A (n = 10, 55.5%) rather than tacrolimus (n = 45, 19.4%; p = 0.0001). In conclusion, early posttransplant blood transfusion may increase immunological risk, especially in underimmunosuppressed patients.

  13. Monitoring of kidney and simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation rejection by release of donor-specific, soluble HLA class I.

    PubMed

    DeVito-Haynes, L D; Jankowska-Gan, E; Sollinger, H W; Knechtle, S J; Burlingham, W J

    1994-07-01

    Using an HLA-A2-specific ELISA we monitored daily pretransplantation and posttransplantation sera from five kidney and eight simultaneous pancreas-kidney HLA-A2-negative recipients of HLA-A2-positive transplants during hospitalization. We found that, unlike liver transplants, neither kidney nor simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplants continuously secreted donor HLA proteins. However, three of four rejection episodes in kidney recipients and seven of seven rejection episodes in simultaneous pancreas-kidney recipients were accompanied by elevated serum levels of donor sHLA-A2 (> 5 ng/ml). In only one kidney patient was there a release of donor antigen without evidence of rejection, but in the simultaneous pancreas-kidney group most patients had at least one time point of detectable sHLA-A2 without strong evidence of kidney rejection. While total sHLA levels were also elevated during rejection, the rise in donor-specific sHLA was more dramatic when compared to pretransplantation background levels. We hypothesized that the release of donor sHLA class I proteins by transplanted organs might be a systemic indication of rejection in both pancreas and kidney allografts. The detection of donor sHLA in recipient sera could be an important noninvasive monitor of rejection, especially in the pancreas, which is currently difficult to monitor as a single-organ transplant. PMID:7960963

  14. Combined Anti-CD154/CTLA4Ig Costimulation Blockade-Based Therapy Induces Donor-Specific Tolerance to Vascularized Osteomyocutaneous Allografts.

    PubMed

    Lin, C H; Wang, Y L; Anggelia, M R; Chuang, W Y; Cheng, H Y; Mao, Q; Zelken, J A; Lin, C H; Zheng, X X; Lee, W P A; Brandacher, G

    2016-07-01

    Tolerance induction by means of costimulation blockade has been successfully applied in solid organ transplantation; however, its efficacy in vascularized composite allotransplantation, containing a vascularized bone marrow component and thus a constant source of donor-derived stem cells, remains poorly explored. In this study, osteomyocutaneous allografts (alloOMCs) from Balb/c (H2(d) ) mice were transplanted into C57BL/6 (H2(b) ) recipients. Immunosuppression consisted of 1 mg anti-CD154 on day 0, 0.5 mg CTLA4Ig on day 2 and rapamycin (RPM; 3 mg/kg per day from days 0-7, then every other day for 3 weeks). Long-term allograft survival, donor-specific tolerance and donor-recipient cell trafficking were evaluated. Treatment with costimulation blockade plus RPM resulted in long-term graft survival (>120 days) of alloOMC in 12 of 15 recipients compared with untreated controls (median survival time [MST] ≈10.2 ± 0.8 days), RPM alone (MST ≈33 ± 5.5 days) and costimulation blockade alone (MST ≈45.8 ± 7.1 days). Donor-specific hyporesponsiveness in recipients with viable grafts was demonstrated in vitro. Evidence of donor-specific tolerance was further assessed in vivo by secondary donor-specific skin graft survival and third-party graft rejection. A significant increase of Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells was evident in tolerant animals. Donor cells populated peripheral blood, thymus, and both donor and recipient bone marrow. Consequently, combined anti-CD154/CTLA4Ig costimulation blockade-based therapy induces donor-specific tolerance in a stringent murine alloOMC transplant model. PMID:26914847

  15. Donor-specific HLA class I and CREG antibodies in complement-dependent cytotoxicity-negative renal transplants.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yonggoo; Yang, Chul Woo; Moon, In-Sung; Kim, Myungshin; Lim, Jihyang; Park, Yeon-Joon; Han, Kyungja; Oh, Eun-Jee

    2010-01-01

    Development of a solid-phase, single antigen panel reactive antibody test (SA-PRA) permits the analysis of antibody specificities. This study determined the impact of donor-specific antibodies (DSA) against class I HLA private antigens (DS-HLA) or HLA-A and -B cross-reactive group (DS-CREG) in kidney transplantation. Pre- and post-transplant sera of 133 renal allograft patients who had negative pretransplant complement-dependent cytotoxicity were tested for HLA class I antibody specificities by SA-PRA. Clinical relevance of the flow cytometric crossmatch test (FCXM) for the detection of class I DS-HLA or DS-CREG was analyzed. The sensitivity of FCXM to detect SA-PRA-defined class I DSA was 50% (5/10) and the specificity was 98.4% (121/123). Of 133 renal allograft recipients, including 26 patients with biopsy-proven acute antibody-mediated rejection (AMR), pretransplant DS-HLA or DS-CREG were detected in 10 patients. Pretransplant DSA were associated with AMR (p = 0.012) and a low calculated glomerular filtration rate (p = 0.036). In the analysis of post-transplant sera, the presence of either type of HLA antibodies and the de novo development of DSA were correlated with AMR (p <0.001). This study demonstrates that detection of DSA, including DS-HLA and DS-CREG, using the SA-PRA assay is useful to identify the renal allograft recipients with poor transplant outcome.

  16. Donor Specific Anti-HLA Antibody and Risk of Graft Failure in Haploidentical Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kongtim, Piyanuch; Cao, Kai; Ciurea, Stefan O.

    2016-01-01

    Outcomes of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT) using HLA-half matched related donors (haploidentical) have recently improved due to better control of alloreactive reactions in both graft-versus-host and host-versus-graft directions. The recognition of the role of humoral rejection in the development of primary graft failure in this setting has broadened our understanding about causes of engraftment failure in these patients, helped us better select donors for patients in need of AHSCT, and developed rational therapeutic measures for HLA sensitized patients to prevent this unfortunate event, which is usually associated with a very high mortality rate. With these recent advances the rate of graft failure in haploidentical transplantation has decreased to less than 5%. PMID:26904122

  17. Preformed class II donor-specific antibodies are associated with an increased risk of early rejection after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Jacqueline G; Kaneku, Hugo; Jennings, Linda W; Bañuelos, Nubia; Susskind, Brian M; Terasaki, Paul I; Klintmalm, Göran B

    2013-09-01

    Preformed donor-specific human leukocyte antigen antibodies (DSAs) are considered a contraindication to the transplantation of most solid organs other than the liver. Conflicting data currently exist on the importance of preformed DSAs in rejection and patient survival after liver transplantation (LT). To evaluate preformed DSAs in LT, we retrospectively analyzed prospectively collected samples from all adult recipients of primary LT without another organ from January 1, 2000 to May 31, 2009 with a pre-LT sample available (95.8% of the patients). Fourteen percent of the patients had preformed class I and/or II DSAs with a mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) ≥ 5000. Preformed class I DSAs with an MFI ≥ 5000 remained persistent in only 5% of patients and were not associated with rejection. Preformed class II DSAs with an MFI of 5000 to 10,000 remained persistent in 23% of patients, and this rate increased to 33% for patients whose MFI was ≥10,000 (P < 0.001). Preformed class II DSAs in multivariable Cox proportional hazards modeling were associated with an increased risk of early rejection [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.58; p = 0.004]. In addition, multivariate modeling showed that in comparison with no DSAs (MFI < 1000), preformed class I and/or II DSAs with an MFI ≥ 5000 were independently correlated with the risk of death (HR = 1.51; p = 0.02).

  18. Donor-specific indirect pathway analysis reveals a B-cell-independent signature which reflects outcomes in kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Haynes, L D; Jankowska-Gan, E; Sheka, A; Keller, M R; Hernandez-Fuentes, M P; Lechler, R I; Seyfert-Margolis, V; Turka, L A; Newell, K A; Burlingham, W J

    2012-03-01

    To investigate the role of donor-specific indirect pathway T cells in renal transplant tolerance, we analyzed responses in peripheral blood of 45 patients using the trans-vivo delayed-type hypersensitivity assay. Subjects were enrolled into five groups-identical twin, clinically tolerant (TOL), steroid monotherapy (MONO), standard immunosuppression (SI) and chronic rejection (CR)-based on transplant type, posttransplant immunosuppression and graft function. The indirect pathway was active in all groups except twins but distinct intergroup differences were evident, corresponding to clinical status. The antidonor indirect pathway T effector response increased across patient groups (TOL < MONO < SI < CR; p < 0.0001) whereas antidonor indirect pathway T regulatory response decreased (TOL > MONO = SI > CR; p < 0.005). This pattern differed from that seen in circulating naïve B-cell numbers and in a cross-platform biomarker analysis, where patients on monotherapy were not ranked closest to TOL patients, but rather were indistinguishable from chronically rejecting patients. Cross-sectional analysis of the indirect pathway revealed a spectrum in T-regulatory:T-effector balance, ranging from TOL patients having predominantly regulatory responses to CR patients having predominantly effector responses. Therefore, the indirect pathway measurements reflect a distinct aspect of tolerance from the recently reported elevation of circulating naïve B cells, which was apparent only in recipients off immunosuppression. PMID:22151236

  19. Significance of Semiquantitative Assessment of Preformed Donor-Specific Antibody Using Luminex Single Bead Assay in Living Related Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Yoshizawa, Atsushi; Egawa, Hiroto; Yurugi, Kimiko; Hishida, Rie; Tsuji, Hiroaki; Ashihara, Eiji; Miyagawa-Hayashino, Aya; Teramukai, Satoshi; Maekawa, Taira; Haga, Hironori; Uemoto, Sinji

    2013-01-01

    Aim. To analyze the risks of preoperatively produced donor-specific antibody (DSA) in liver transplantation. Methods. DSA was assessed using direct complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) and anti-human globulin- (AHG-) CDC tests, as well as the Luminex Single Antigen assay. Among 616 patients undergoing blood type identical or compatible living donor liver transplantation (LDLT), 21 patients were positive for CDC or AHG-CDC tests, and the preserved serum from 18 patients was examined to determine targeted Class I and II antigens. The relationships between the mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) of DSA and the clinical outcomes were analyzed. Results. Patients were divided into 3 groups according to the MFI of anti-Class I DSA: high (11 patients with MFI > 10,000), low (2 patients with MFI < 10,000), and negative (5 patients) MFI groups. Six of 11 patients with high Class-I DSA showed positive Class-II DSA. Hospital death occurred in 7 patients of the high MFI group. High MFI was a significant risk factor for mortality (P = 0.0155). Univariate analysis showed a significant correlation between MFI strength and C4d deposition (P = 0.0498). Conclusions. HLA Class I DSA with MFI > 10,000 had a significant negative effect on the clinical outcome of patients with preformed DSA in LDLT. PMID:23818917

  20. Successful kidney transplantation after desensitization in a patient with positive flow crossmatching and donor-specific anti-HLA-DP antibody

    PubMed Central

    Song, Seung Hwan; Park, Borae G.; Lee, Juhan; Kim, Myoung Soo; Kim, Yu Seun; Kim, Hyon-Suk

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Traditionally, the presence of antibodies against human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-C and DP was considered to be associated with only a low risk of antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) in kidney transplantation (KT), because the antigenicities of these proteins are weak. However, the clinical effects of HLA-C and -DP donor-specific HLA antibodies (DSHAs) have recently been reevaluated. Methods: Here, we report the case of a retransplant patient with positive flow cytometry crossmatch (FCXM) and high level of HLA-DP DSHA who was desensitized using rituximab, plasmapheresis, and intravenous immunoglobulin. Results: The epitope-based antibody reactivity was identified that the positive B-cell FCXM in our patient was attributable to the specific epitope. The patient underwent a successful retransplantation and has continued to do well for 10 month after KT. Conclusion: If an HLA-DP DSHA is present, it is important to detect any mismatched HLA-DP epitope pretransplantation and to monitor HLA-DP levels carefully. According to previous reports, anti-HLA-DP DSHA can induce ABMR soon after transplantation, but such ABMR can be prevented by pretransplantation desensitization and careful monitoring of DSHA levels. PMID:27512872

  1. Post-transplant donor-specific antibody production and graft outcome in kidney transplantation: results of sixteen-year monitoring by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Piazza, Antonina; Poggi, Elvira; Ozzella, Giuseppina; Borrelli, Laura; Scornajenghi, Alessandra; Iaria, Giuseppe; Tisone, Giuseppe; Adorno, Domenico

    2006-01-01

    Our data show that monitoring by sensitive flow cytometric techniques of the de novo production of anti-HLA antibodies in patients receiving kidney transplantation is a useful and noninvasive tool to identify the onset of an immune response towards the graft before any clinical manifestation of antibody-mediated graft injury. Consequently prospective posttransplant monitoring of anti-HLA donor-directed antibodies may offer the chance to realize an effective clinical intervention in order to prevent graft dysfunction and to prolong graft survival. The long follow-up period of the study allowed us to demonstrate a very low graft survival rate in patients who developed donor-specific HLA antibodies in comparison with patients who did not have antibodies, thus confirming the "humoral theory of transplantation". The posttransplant production of anti-HLA antibodies can predict not only graft failure but also chronic dysfunction of the graft. Moreover, our findings suggest that graft survival is influenced by the epitope- and locus-specificity of anti-HLA donor-directed antibodies. The interval between antibody appearance and loss of graft function was short in some patients but reached several years in others. Moreover, some patients showed consistent production of antibodies for many years and an uneventful clinical status. These findings suggest a mechanism of graft "accommodation" or the production of "harmless" antibodies. Immunosuppressive drug combinations able to inhibit T and B cell activation are useful tools to prevent the humoral immune response against graft and consequently to prolong graft survival.

  2. De Novo Donor-Specific HLA Antibodies Are Associated With Rapid Loss of Graft Function Following Islet Transplantation in Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Brooks, A M S; Carter, V; Liew, A; Marshall, H; Aldibbiat, A; Sheerin, N S; Manas, D M; White, S A; Shaw, J A M

    2015-12-01

    Outcomes after islet transplantation continue to improve but etiology of graft failure remains unclear. De novo donor-specific human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies (DSA) posttransplant are increasingly recognized as a negative prognostic marker. Specific temporal associations between DSA and graft function remain undefined particularly in programs undertaking multiple sequential transplants. Impact of de novo DSA on graft function over 12 months following first islet transplant was determined prospectively in consecutive recipients taking tacrolimus/mycophenolate immunosuppression at a single center. Mixed-meal tolerance test was undertaken in parallel with HLA antibody assessment pretransplant and 1-3 months posttransplant. Sixteen participants received a total of 26 islet transplants. Five (19%) grafts were associated with de novo DSA. Five (31%) recipients were affected: three post-first transplant; two post-second transplant. DSA developed within 4 weeks of all sensitizing grafts and were associated with decreased stimulated C-peptide (median [interquartile range]) at 3 months posttransplant (DSA negative: 613(300-1090); DSA positive 106(34-235) pmol/L [p = 0.004]). De novo DSA directed against most recent islet transplant were absolutely associated with loss of graft function despite maintained immunosuppression at 12 months in the absence of a rescue nonsensitizing transplant. Alemtuzumab induction immunosuppression was associated with reduced incidence of de novo DSA formation (p = 0.03). PMID:26227015

  3. Bioengineering Thymus Organoids to Restore Thymic Function and Induce Donor-Specific Immune Tolerance to Allografts

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yong; Tajima, Asako; Goh, Saik Kia; Geng, Xuehui; Gualtierotti, Giulio; Grupillo, Maria; Coppola, Antonina; Bertera, Suzanne; Rudert, William A; Banerjee, Ipsita; Bottino, Rita; Trucco, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    One of the major obstacles in organ transplantation is to establish immune tolerance of allografts. Although immunosuppressive drugs can prevent graft rejection to a certain degree, their efficacies are limited, transient, and associated with severe side effects. Induction of thymic central tolerance to allografts remains challenging, largely because of the difficulty of maintaining donor thymic epithelial cells in vitro to allow successful bioengineering. Here, the authors show that three-dimensional scaffolds generated from decellularized mouse thymus can support thymic epithelial cell survival in culture and maintain their unique molecular properties. When transplanted into athymic nude mice, the bioengineered thymus organoids effectively promoted homing of lymphocyte progenitors and supported thymopoiesis. Nude mice transplanted with thymus organoids promptly rejected skin allografts and were able to mount antigen-specific humoral responses against ovalbumin on immunization. Notably, tolerance to skin allografts was achieved by transplanting thymus organoids constructed with either thymic epithelial cells coexpressing both syngeneic and allogenic major histocompatibility complexes, or mixtures of donor and recipient thymic epithelial cells. Our results demonstrate the technical feasibility of restoring thymic function with bioengineered thymus organoids and highlight the clinical implications of this thymus reconstruction technique in organ transplantation and regenerative medicine. PMID:25903472

  4. Bioengineering Thymus Organoids to Restore Thymic Function and Induce Donor-Specific Immune Tolerance to Allografts.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yong; Tajima, Asako; Goh, Saik Kia; Geng, Xuehui; Gualtierotti, Giulio; Grupillo, Maria; Coppola, Antonina; Bertera, Suzanne; Rudert, William A; Banerjee, Ipsita; Bottino, Rita; Trucco, Massimo

    2015-07-01

    One of the major obstacles in organ transplantation is to establish immune tolerance of allografts. Although immunosuppressive drugs can prevent graft rejection to a certain degree, their efficacies are limited, transient, and associated with severe side effects. Induction of thymic central tolerance to allografts remains challenging, largely because of the difficulty of maintaining donor thymic epithelial cells in vitro to allow successful bioengineering. Here, the authors show that three-dimensional scaffolds generated from decellularized mouse thymus can support thymic epithelial cell survival in culture and maintain their unique molecular properties. When transplanted into athymic nude mice, the bioengineered thymus organoids effectively promoted homing of lymphocyte progenitors and supported thymopoiesis. Nude mice transplanted with thymus organoids promptly rejected skin allografts and were able to mount antigen-specific humoral responses against ovalbumin on immunization. Notably, tolerance to skin allografts was achieved by transplanting thymus organoids constructed with either thymic epithelial cells coexpressing both syngeneic and allogenic major histocompatibility complexes, or mixtures of donor and recipient thymic epithelial cells. Our results demonstrate the technical feasibility of restoring thymic function with bioengineered thymus organoids and highlight the clinical implications of this thymus reconstruction technique in organ transplantation and regenerative medicine.

  5. Outcome of subclinical antibody-mediated rejection in kidney transplant recipients with preformed donor-specific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Loupy, A; Suberbielle-Boissel, C; Hill, G S; Lefaucheur, C; Anglicheau, D; Zuber, J; Martinez, F; Thervet, E; Méjean, A; Charron, D; Duong van Huyen, J P; Bruneval, P; Legendre, C; Nochy, D

    2009-11-01

    This study describes clinical relevance of subclinical antibody-mediated rejection (SAMR) in a cohort of 54 DSA-positive kidney transplant recipients receiving a deceased donor. In 3 months screening biopsies, 31.1% of patients met the criteria of SAMR. A total of 48.9% had an incomplete form of SAMR (g+/ptc+/C4d-negative) whereas 20% had no humoral lesions. Patients with SAMR at 3 months had at 1 year: a higher C4d score, ptc score, and arteriosclerosis score, higher rate of IFTA (100% vs. 33.3%, p < 0.01) and a higher rate of transplant glomerulopathy (43% vs. 0%, p = 0.02) compared to patients without 3-month SAMR. Patients with SAMR at 3 months exhibited at 1 year a higher class II MFImax-DSA and a lower mGFR compared to patients without SAMR (39.2 +/- 13.9 vs. 61.9 +/- 19.2 mL/min/1.73 m(2) respectively, p < 0.01). The group of patients with C4d-negative SAMR at 3 months developed more ptc and IFTA lesions, and lower GFR at 1 year in comparison to biopsies without humoral lesions. SAMR is a frequent entity in KTR with preexisting DSAs and promotes subsequent GFR impairment and development of chronic AMR. C4d-negative SAMR patients displayed an intermediate course between the no-SAMR group and the C4d+ SAMR group. Screening biopsies may be useful to recognize patients more likely to develop SAMR. PMID:19775320

  6. The Influence of Immunosuppressive Agents on the Risk of De Novo Donor-Specific HLA Antibody Production in Solid Organ Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    OʼLeary, Jacqueline G; Samaniego, Millie; Barrio, Marta Crespo; Potena, Luciano; Zeevi, Adriana; Djamali, Arjang; Cozzi, Emanuele

    2016-01-01

    Production of de novo donor-specific antibodies (dnDSA) is a major risk factor for acute and chronic antibody-mediated rejection and graft loss after all solid organ transplantation. In this article, we review the data available on the risk of individual immunosuppressive agents and their ability to prevent dnDSA production. Induction therapy with rabbit antithymocyte globulin may achieve a short-term decrease in dnDSA production in moderately sensitized patients. Rituximab induction may be beneficial in sensitized patients, and in abrogating rebound antibody response in patients undergoing desensitization or treatment for antibody-mediated rejection. Use of bortezomib for induction therapy in at-risk patients is of interest, but the benefits are unproven. In maintenance regimens, nonadherent and previously sensitized patients are not suitable for aggressive weaning protocols, particularly early calcineurin inhibitor withdrawal without lymphocyte-depleting induction. Early conversion to mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor monotherapy has been reported to increase the risk of dnDSA formation, but a combination of mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor and reduced-exposure calcineurin inhibitor does not appear to alter the risk. Early steroid therapy withdrawal in standard-risk patients after induction has no known dnDSA penalty. The available data do not demonstrate a consistent effect of mycophenolic acid on dnDSA production. Risk minimization for dnDSA requires monitoring of adherence, appropriate risk stratification, risk-based immunosuppression intensity, and prospective DSA surveillance. PMID:26680372

  7. The Influence of Immunosuppressive Agents on the Risk of De Novo Donor-Specific HLA Antibody Production in Solid Organ Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    OʼLeary, Jacqueline G; Samaniego, Millie; Barrio, Marta Crespo; Potena, Luciano; Zeevi, Adriana; Djamali, Arjang; Cozzi, Emanuele

    2016-01-01

    Production of de novo donor-specific antibodies (dnDSA) is a major risk factor for acute and chronic antibody-mediated rejection and graft loss after all solid organ transplantation. In this article, we review the data available on the risk of individual immunosuppressive agents and their ability to prevent dnDSA production. Induction therapy with rabbit antithymocyte globulin may achieve a short-term decrease in dnDSA production in moderately sensitized patients. Rituximab induction may be beneficial in sensitized patients, and in abrogating rebound antibody response in patients undergoing desensitization or treatment for antibody-mediated rejection. Use of bortezomib for induction therapy in at-risk patients is of interest, but the benefits are unproven. In maintenance regimens, nonadherent and previously sensitized patients are not suitable for aggressive weaning protocols, particularly early calcineurin inhibitor withdrawal without lymphocyte-depleting induction. Early conversion to mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor monotherapy has been reported to increase the risk of dnDSA formation, but a combination of mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor and reduced-exposure calcineurin inhibitor does not appear to alter the risk. Early steroid therapy withdrawal in standard-risk patients after induction has no known dnDSA penalty. The available data do not demonstrate a consistent effect of mycophenolic acid on dnDSA production. Risk minimization for dnDSA requires monitoring of adherence, appropriate risk stratification, risk-based immunosuppression intensity, and prospective DSA surveillance.

  8. Impact of de novo donor-specific HLA antibodies detected by Luminex solid-phase assay after transplantation in a group of 88 consecutive living-donor renal transplantations.

    PubMed

    Dieplinger, Georg; Ditt, Vanessa; Arns, Wolfgang; Huppertz, Andrea; Kisner, Tuelay; Hellmich, Martin; Bauerfeind, Ursula; Stippel, Dirk L

    2014-01-01

    De novo donor-specific HLA antibodies (DSA) after renal transplantation are known to be correlated with poor graft outcome and the development of acute and chronic rejection. Currently, data for the influence of de novo DSA in patient cohorts including only living-donor renal transplantations (LDRT) are limited. A consecutive cohort of 88 LDRT was tested for the occurrence of de novo DSA by utilizing the highly sensitive Luminex solid-phase assay for antibody detection. Data were analyzed for risk factors for de novo DSA development and correlated with acute rejection (AR) and graft function. Patients with de novo DSA [31 (35%)] showed a trend for inferior graft function [mean creatinine change (mg/dL/year) after the first year: 0.15 DSA (+) vs. 0.02 DSA (-) (P = 0.10)] and a higher rate of AR episodes, especially in case of de novo DSA of both class I and II [6 (55%), (P = 0.05)]. Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) appeared in five patients and was significantly correlated with de novo DSA (P = 0.05). Monitoring for de novo DSA after LDRT may help to identify patients at risk of declining renal function. Especially patients with simultaneous presence of de novo DSA class I and class II are at a high risk to suffer AR episodes.

  9. CD154 blockade and donor-specific transfusions in DLA-identical marrow transplantation in dogs conditioned with 1-Gy total body irradiation.

    PubMed

    Jochum, Christoph; Beste, Mechthild; Zellmer, Eustacia; Graves, Scott S; Storb, Rainer

    2007-02-01

    Stable mixed donor/host chimerism has been reliably established in dogs given a sublethal dose (2 Gy) of total body irradiation (TBI) before and immunosuppression with mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) or rapamycin combined with cyclosporine (CSP) after marrow transplantation from dog leukocyte antigen (DLA)-identical littermates (hematopoietic cell transplantation [HCT]). When TBI was reduced to 1 Gy, only transient engraftment was observed. Here we investigated whether stable engraftment after 1-Gy TBI could be accomplished by reducing host-versus-donor immune responsiveness through preceding CD154 blockade and infusion of donor peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). We found that the anti-human CD154 antibody, 5c8, cross-reacted with canine lymphocytes and blocked alloimmune responses in vitro. Based on pharmacokinetic studies, 6 dogs received a single intravenous injection of 5 mg/kg anti-CD154 antibody (on day -5), followed 1 day later by donor PBMCs. On day 0, the dogs were given 1 Gy of TBI and underwent DLA-identical marrow grafts. Postgraft immunosuppression consisted of MMF and CSP. All 6 dogs demonstrated initial engraftment; 3 dogs sustained the engraftment for >26 weeks, whereas 3 dogs rejected their grafts, after 9, 22, and 24 weeks, and survived with autologous recovery. Graft survival was significantly improved over that in 11 historical controls conditioned with 1-Gy TBI and given either MMF or rapamycin with CSP after HCT, all of which rejected their grafts between 3 and 12 weeks (P = .03). Preceding donor PBMC infusion and CD154 blockade improved survival of DLA-identical marrow grafts after 1-Gy TBI. PMID:17241922

  10. Pre-treatment of allogeneic bone marrow recipients with the CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100 transiently enhances hematopoietic chimerism without promoting donor-specific skin allograft tolerance.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhanzhuo; Xu, Xin; Weiss, Ido D; Jacobson, Orit; Murphy, Philip M

    2015-10-01

    Hematopoietic chimerism established by allogeneic bone marrow transplantation is known to promote donor-specific organ allograft tolerance; however, clinical application is limited by the need for toxic host conditioning and "megadoses" of donor bone marrow cells. A potential solution to this problem has been suggested by the observation that recipient bone marrow mobilization by the CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100 promotes chimerism in congenic bone marrow transplantation experiments in mice. Here we report that a single subcutaneous dose of 10 mg/kg AMD3100 in recipient C57BL/6 mice was able to enhance hematopoietic chimerism when complete MHC-mismatched BALB/c donor bone marrow cells were transplanted 1h after drug dosing. However, levels of chimerism measured 30 days post-transplantation were not sustained when mice were reexamined on day 90 post-transplantation. Moreover, transient chimerism induced by this protocol did not support robust donor-specific skin allograft tolerance. Using the same transient immunosuppression protocol, we confirmed that "megadoses" of donor bone marrow cells could induce durable chimerism associated with donor-specific skin allograft tolerance without AMD3100 pre-treatment. We conclude that in this protocol AMD3100 pretreatment may empty bone marrow niches that become reoccupied by allogeneic donor hematopoietic progenitor cells but not by true long-lived donor hematopoietic stem cells, resulting in short-lived chimerism and failure to support durable donor-specific allograft tolerance.

  11. De novo membranous nephropathy associated with donor-specific alloantibody.

    PubMed

    El Kossi, M; Harmer, A; Goodwin, J; Wagner, B; Shortland, J; Angel, C; McKane, W

    2008-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that alloantibody may play an aetiological role in the pathogenesis of membranous glomerulopathy in native kidneys. There is an increased awareness of the significance of alloantibody on renal transplant outcome, particularly with the development of more sensitive assays. We describe a kidney transplant patient who developed de novo membranous glomerulopathy (DNMG) with heavy proteinuria in the context of a donor-specific alloantibody (DSA) directed against HLA DQ7. Proteinuria resolved and kidney function stabilized following treatment with mycophenolate mofetil and an angiotensin receptor blocker. The titre of the DSA fell in parallel with resolution of the proteinuria. This is the first reported case of DNMG after kidney transplantation clearly associated with a DSA. We hypothesize that de novo membranous glomerulopathy may be an atypical manifestation of acute antibody-mediated damage. Cases of DNMG should be screened for alloantibody and the presence of alloantibody may influence the choice of therapy. PMID:18217914

  12. Mixed chimerism to induce tolerance for solid organ transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Wren, S.M.; Nalesnik, M.; Hronakes, M.L.; Oh, E.; Ildstad, S.T. )

    1991-04-01

    Chimerism, or the coexistence of tissue elements from more than one genetically different strain or species in an organism, is the only experimental state that results in the induction of donor-specific transplantation tolerance. Transplantation of a mixture of T-cell-depleted syngeneic (host-type) plus T-cell-depleted allogeneic (donor) bone marrow into a normal adult recipient mouse (A + B----A) results in mixed allogeneic chimerism. Recipient mice exhibit donor-specific transplantation tolerance, yet have full immunocompetence to recognize and respond to third-party transplantation antigens. After complete hematolymphopoietic repopulation at 28 days, animals accept a donor-specific skin graft but reject major histocompatibility complex (MHC) locus-disparate third-party grafts. We now report that permanent graft acceptance can also be achieved when the graft is placed at the time of bone marrow transplantation. Histologically, grafts were viable and had only minimal inflammatory changes. This model may have potential future clinical application for the induction of donor-specific transplantation tolerance.

  13. C1Q Assay Results in Complement-Dependent Cytotoxicity Crossmatch Negative Renal Transplant Candidates with Donor-Specific Antibodies: High Specificity but Low Sensitivity When Predicting Flow Crossmatch

    PubMed Central

    Castelán, Natalia; de Santiago, Adrián; Arvizu, Adriana; Gonzalez-Tableros, Norma; López, Mayra; Salcedo, Isaac; Vilatobá, Mario; Granados, Julio

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to describe the association of positive flow cross match (FXM) and C1q-SAB. Methods. In this observational, cross-sectional, and comparative study, patients included had negative AHG-CDC-XM and donor specific antibodies (DSA) and were tested with FXM. All pretransplant sera were tested with C1q-SAB assay. Results. A total of 50 donor/recipient evaluations were conducted; half of them had at least one C1q+ Ab (n = 26, 52%). Ten patients (20.0%) had DSA C1q+ Ab. Twenty-five (50%) FXMs were positive. Factors associated with a positive FXM were the presence of C1q+ Ab (DSA C1q+ Ab: OR 27, 2.80–259.56, P = 0.004, and no DSA C1q+ Ab: OR 5, 1.27–19.68, P = 0.021) and the DSA LABScreen-SAB MFI (OR 1.26, 95% CI 1.06–1.49, P = 0.007). The cutoff point of immunodominant LABScreen SAB DSA-MFI with the greatest sensitivity and specificity to predict FXM was 2,300 (sensitivity: 72% and specificity: 75%). For FXM prediction, DSA C1q+ Ab was the most specific (95.8%, 85–100) and the combination of DSA-MFI > 2,300 and C1q+ Ab was the most sensitive (92.0%, 79.3–100). Conclusions. C1q+ Ab and LABScreen SAB DSA-MFI were significantly associated with FXM. DSA C1q+ Ab was highly specific but with low sensitivity.

  14. C1Q Assay Results in Complement-Dependent Cytotoxicity Crossmatch Negative Renal Transplant Candidates with Donor-Specific Antibodies: High Specificity but Low Sensitivity When Predicting Flow Crossmatch

    PubMed Central

    Castelán, Natalia; de Santiago, Adrián; Arvizu, Adriana; Gonzalez-Tableros, Norma; López, Mayra; Salcedo, Isaac; Vilatobá, Mario; Granados, Julio

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to describe the association of positive flow cross match (FXM) and C1q-SAB. Methods. In this observational, cross-sectional, and comparative study, patients included had negative AHG-CDC-XM and donor specific antibodies (DSA) and were tested with FXM. All pretransplant sera were tested with C1q-SAB assay. Results. A total of 50 donor/recipient evaluations were conducted; half of them had at least one C1q+ Ab (n = 26, 52%). Ten patients (20.0%) had DSA C1q+ Ab. Twenty-five (50%) FXMs were positive. Factors associated with a positive FXM were the presence of C1q+ Ab (DSA C1q+ Ab: OR 27, 2.80–259.56, P = 0.004, and no DSA C1q+ Ab: OR 5, 1.27–19.68, P = 0.021) and the DSA LABScreen-SAB MFI (OR 1.26, 95% CI 1.06–1.49, P = 0.007). The cutoff point of immunodominant LABScreen SAB DSA-MFI with the greatest sensitivity and specificity to predict FXM was 2,300 (sensitivity: 72% and specificity: 75%). For FXM prediction, DSA C1q+ Ab was the most specific (95.8%, 85–100) and the combination of DSA-MFI > 2,300 and C1q+ Ab was the most sensitive (92.0%, 79.3–100). Conclusions. C1q+ Ab and LABScreen SAB DSA-MFI were significantly associated with FXM. DSA C1q+ Ab was highly specific but with low sensitivity. PMID:27688904

  15. C1Q Assay Results in Complement-Dependent Cytotoxicity Crossmatch Negative Renal Transplant Candidates with Donor-Specific Antibodies: High Specificity but Low Sensitivity When Predicting Flow Crossmatch.

    PubMed

    Arreola-Guerra, José M; Castelán, Natalia; de Santiago, Adrián; Arvizu, Adriana; Gonzalez-Tableros, Norma; López, Mayra; Salcedo, Isaac; Vilatobá, Mario; Granados, Julio; Morales-Buenrostro, Luis E; Alberú, Josefina

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to describe the association of positive flow cross match (FXM) and C1q-SAB. Methods. In this observational, cross-sectional, and comparative study, patients included had negative AHG-CDC-XM and donor specific antibodies (DSA) and were tested with FXM. All pretransplant sera were tested with C1q-SAB assay. Results. A total of 50 donor/recipient evaluations were conducted; half of them had at least one C1q+ Ab (n = 26, 52%). Ten patients (20.0%) had DSA C1q+ Ab. Twenty-five (50%) FXMs were positive. Factors associated with a positive FXM were the presence of C1q+ Ab (DSA C1q+ Ab: OR 27, 2.80-259.56, P = 0.004, and no DSA C1q+ Ab: OR 5, 1.27-19.68, P = 0.021) and the DSA LABScreen-SAB MFI (OR 1.26, 95% CI 1.06-1.49, P = 0.007). The cutoff point of immunodominant LABScreen SAB DSA-MFI with the greatest sensitivity and specificity to predict FXM was 2,300 (sensitivity: 72% and specificity: 75%). For FXM prediction, DSA C1q+ Ab was the most specific (95.8%, 85-100) and the combination of DSA-MFI > 2,300 and C1q+ Ab was the most sensitive (92.0%, 79.3-100). Conclusions. C1q+ Ab and LABScreen SAB DSA-MFI were significantly associated with FXM. DSA C1q+ Ab was highly specific but with low sensitivity. PMID:27688904

  16. SPLIT TOLERANCE INDUCED BY ORTHOTOPIC LIVER TRANSPLANTATION IN MICE1

    PubMed Central

    Dahmen, Uta; Qian, Shiguang; Rao, Abdul S.; Demetris, Anthony J.; Fu, Fumin; Sun, Hong; Gao, Lan; Fung, John J.; Starzl, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01

    Spontaneous orthotopic liver allograft acceptance associated with microchimerism in mice induces tolerance to subsequent skin or heart transplants from the donor but not third-party animals. Despite in vivo hyporesponsiveness, in vitro MLC and CTL assays showed continuing antidonor reactivity. Cells isolated from recipients’ spleens and grafted livers, when tested in MLC and CTL assays, were antidonor reactive out to 3 months to the same degree as splenocytes obtained from either naive or presensitized (with skin or heart) mice. Nevertheless, passive transfer of splenocytes or liver lymphocytes from liver tolerant mice, but not naive or sensitized donor strain mice, were able to prolong skin graft survival significantly in naive irradiated recipients. By using a strain combination in which the donor but not the recipient expressed the stimulatory endogenous super-Ag (Mlsf), it was possible to determine whether super-Ag-reactive T cells bearing Vβ5 and Vβ11 were deleted or anergic. Phenotypic analysis of cells isolated from recipients’ spleens and grafted livers (up to 90 days after transplant), when compared with naive animals, showed no significant difference in Vβ5 and Vβ11 TCR expression. Additionally, when these isolated spleen cells were tested for antibody-mediated stimulation, both anti-Vβ5 and Vβ11 TCR mAb led to marked proliferation of cells obtained from naive and liver-transplanted recipients, but as expected, proliferation was very low in cells from naive donors. These results suggest that liver transplantation induces donor-specific tolerance in vivo, which may not be reflected in in vitro proliferative and cytotoxicity assays (split tolerance). Furthermore, this tolerance does not seem to be induced by clonal deletion or anergy of minor-lymphocyte-stimulating-antigen-reactive T cells in the recipients. PMID:8036695

  17. Mixed chimerism and permanent specific transplantation tolerance induced by a nonlethal preparative regimen

    SciTech Connect

    Sharabi, Y.; Sachs, D.H.

    1989-02-01

    The use of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation as a means of inducing donor-specific tolerance across MHC barriers could provide an immunologically specific conditioning regimen for organ transplantation. However, a major limitation to this approach is the toxicity of whole body irradiation as currently used to abrogate host resistance and permit marrow engraftment. The present study describes methodology for abrogating host resistance and permitting marrow engraftment without lethal irradiation. Our preparative protocol involves administration of anti-CD4 and anti-CD8 mAbs in vivo, 300-rad WBI, 700-rad thymic irradiation, and unmanipulated fully MHC-disparate bone marrow. B10 mice prepared by this regimen developed stable mixed lymphohematopoetic chimerism without any clinical evidence of graft-vs.-host disease. Engraftment was accompanied by induction of specific tolerance to donor skin grafts (B10.D2), while third-party skin grafts (B10.BR) were promptly rejected. Mice treated with the complete regimen without bone marrow transplantation appeared healthy and enjoyed long-term survival. This study therefore demonstrates that stable mixed chimerism with donor-specific tolerance can be induced across an MHC barrier after a nonlethal preparative regimen, without clinical GVHD and without the risk of aplasia.

  18. In vitro donor-specific hyporesponsiveness and T cell subsets in renal allograft recipients.

    PubMed

    Bas, J; Mestre, M; Griñó, J M; Massip, E; Castelao, A M; Romeu, A; González, L; Valls, A; Buendía, E

    1993-01-01

    In order to assess the immune mechanisms triggered by an immunosuppressive regimen consisting of prophylactic antilymphocyte globulin plus low-dose cyclosporine A and steroids, we studied the short-term evolution of both, anti donor in vitro alloresponse and peripheral blood T cell subsets in 21 recipients of a cadaveric kidney allograft. Spleen cells from cadaveric donors and peripheral blood lymphocytes from the respective recipients pretransplant (pre-Tx), at three and six months posttransplant (post-Tx) were obtained to perform one-way mixed lymphocyte cultures and flow cytometry analysis of lymphocyte subsets. The results indicated the development of donor-specific mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC) hyporesponsiveness as early as three months post-Tx, paralleled by a decrease in CD4+CD29+ helper-inducer cells and by an increase in CD8+CD45RA+ suppressor lymphocytes in peripheral blood. These changes were reflected in a very good clinical outcome of the patients. The present results further suggest that suppression of the immune system just before transplantation is a suitable method to induce early specific hyporesponsiveness to the allograft.

  19. Evolving approaches of hematopoietic stem cell-based therapies to induce tolerance to organ transplants: the long road to tolerance.

    PubMed

    Leventhal, J; Miller, J; Abecassis, M; Tollerud, D J; Ildstad, S T

    2013-01-01

    The immunoregulatory properties of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) have been recognized for more than 60 years, beginning in 1945, when Owen reported that genetically disparate freemartin cattle sharing a common placenta were red blood cell chimeras. In 1953, Billingham, Brent, and Medawar demonstrated that murine neonatal chimeras prepared by infusion of donor-derived hematopoietic cells exhibited donor-specific tolerance to skin allografts. Various approaches using HSCs in organ transplantation have gradually brought closer to reality the dream of inducing donor-specific tolerance in organ transplant recipients. Several hurdles needed to be overcome, especially the risk of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), the toxicity of ablative conditioning, and the need for close donor-recipient matching. For wide acceptance, HSC therapy must be safe and reproducible in mismatched donor-recipient combinations. Discoveries in other disciplines have often unexpectedly and synergistically contributed to progress in this area. This review presents a historic perspective of the quest for tolerance in organ transplantation, highlighting current clinical approaches.

  20. Kidney paired donation in the presence of donor-specific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Blumberg, Jeremy M; Gritsch, Hans A; Reed, Elaine F; Cecka, J M; Lipshutz, Gerald S; Danovitch, Gabriel M; McGuire, Suzanne; Gjertson, David W; Veale, Jeffrey L

    2013-11-01

    Incompatible donor/recipient pairs with broadly sensitized recipients have difficulty finding a crossmatch-compatible match, despite a large kidney paired donation pool. One approach to this problem is to combine kidney paired donation with lower-risk crossmatch-incompatible transplantation with intravenous immunoglobulin. Whether this strategy is non-inferior compared with transplantation of sensitized patients without donor-specific antibody (DSA) is unknown. Here we used a protocol including a virtual crossmatch to identify acceptable crossmatch-incompatible donors and the administration of intravenous immunoglobulin to transplant 12 HLA-sensitized patients (median calculated panel reactive antibody 98%) with allografts from our kidney paired donation program. This group constituted the DSA(+) kidney paired donation group. We compared rates of rejection and survival between the DSA(+) kidney paired donation group with a similar group of 10 highly sensitized patients (median calculated panel reactive antibody 85%) that underwent DSA(-) kidney paired donation transplantation without intravenous immunoglobulin. At median follow-up of 22 months, the DSA(+) kidney paired donation group had patient and graft survival of 100%. Three patients in the DSA(+) kidney paired donation group experienced antibody-mediated rejection. Patient and graft survival in the DSA(-) kidney paired donation recipients was 100% at median follow-up of 18 months. No rejection occurred in the DSA(-) kidney paired donation group. Thus, our study provides a clinical framework through which kidney paired donation can be performed with acceptable outcomes across a crossmatch-incompatible transplant. PMID:23715120

  1. Role of the liver in determining alloimmune response in vitro following donor-specific spleen cell injection.

    PubMed

    Okuyama, Masaki; Nagano, Hiroaki; Kobayashi, Shogo; He, Li; Ota, Hirofumi; Shimizu, Junzo; Takeda, Yutaka; Masrubashi, Shigeru; Eguchi, Hidetoshi; Tanemuea, Masahiro; Dono, Keizo; Sakon, Masato; Umeshita, Koji; Gotoh, Mitsukazu; Monden, Morito

    2010-02-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate the allogeneic influence inside and outside the liver in vitro following donor-specific cell injection (DSI). DA rats (RT1a) were used as donors and WS rats (RT1k) as recipients. WS were sensitized with DA spleen cells, followed 24h later by total hepatectomy. The liver was transplanted into another WS (sensitized liver-grafted; SL-Grafted). The hepatectomized WS underwent liver transplantation from a naive WS (sensitized liver-removed; SL-Removed). Alloantigens accumulated in the liver in SL-Grafted and in the extrahepatic tissue/organ(s) in SL-Removed. DA hearts were transplanted 10days after antigen administration. To analyze the immune responses, we measured Th1/Th2 cytokine profiles, and perforin mRNA in various organs, allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR), and donor-specific immunoglobulin. Th1 cytokine levels in the liver of SL-Grafted and in spleen of SL-Removed were highly and rapidly upregulated but decreased thereafter. IFN-gamma and perforin mRNAs were significantly higher in SL-Grafted and lower in SL-Removed. MLR was significantly higher in SL-Grafted than SL-Removed and controls. There was no significant difference in the donor-specific immunoglobulin level. Our findings suggest that liver and other organs may behave differently to alloantigen, suggesting the importance of an early Th1 reaction in the liver and spleen.

  2. Progressive graft fibrosis and donor-specific human leukocyte antigen antibodies in pediatric late liver allografts.

    PubMed

    Miyagawa-Hayashino, Aya; Yoshizawa, Atushi; Uchida, Yoichiro; Egawa, Hiroto; Yurugi, Kimiko; Masuda, Satohiro; Minamiguchi, Sachiko; Maekawa, Taira; Uemoto, Shinji; Haga, Hironori

    2012-11-01

    The role of donor-specific anti-human leukocyte antigen antibodies (DSAs) that develop late after living donor liver transplantation is unknown. Seventy-nine pediatric recipients who had good graft function and underwent protocol liver biopsy more than 5 years after transplantation (median = 11 years, range = 5-20 years) were reviewed. DSAs were determined with the Luminex single-antigen bead assay at the time of the last biopsy, and complement component 4d (C4d) immunostaining was assessed at the times of the last biopsy and the previous biopsy. The donor specificity of antibodies could be identified in 67 patients: DSAs were detected in 32 patients (48%), and they were usually against human leukocyte antigen class II (30 cases) but were rarely against class I (2 cases). These patients had a higher frequency of bridging fibrosis or cirrhosis (28/32 or 88%) than DSA-negative patients (6/35 or 17%, P < 0.001). Fibrosis was likely to be centrilobular-based. DSA-positive patients, in comparison with DSA-negative patients, had higher frequencies of diffuse/focal endothelial C4d staining (P < 0.001) and mild/indeterminate acute rejection [15/32 (47%) versus 5/35 (14%), P = 0.004]. Four DSA-negative patients were off immunosuppression, whereas no patients in the DSA-positive group were (P = 0.048). In conclusion, the high prevalence of graft fibrosis and anti-class II DSAs in late protocol biopsy samples suggests that humoral alloreactivity may contribute to the process of unexplained graft fibrosis late after liver transplantation.

  3. Kinetics of Alloantigen-Specific Regulatory CD4 T Cell Development and Tissue Distribution After Donor-Specific Transfusion and Costimulatory Blockade

    PubMed Central

    Tomita, Yusuke; Satomi, Miwa; Baran, William Bracamonte; Gan, Ewa Jankowska; Workman, Andrea Szymczak; Workman, Creg J.; Vignali, Dario Angelo Alberto; Burlingham, William J.

    2016-01-01

    Background The influence of donor-side regulation toward recipient antigens on graft outcome is poorly understood. Methods Because this influence might be due in part to the accumulation of tissue-resident memory T cells in the donor organ, we used a standard murine tolerization model (donor-specific transfusion plus CD40L blockade) to determine the kinetics of development and peripheralization of allospecific regulatory T cell in lymphoid tissues and liver, a secondary lymphoid organ used in transplantation. Results We found that donor-specific transfusion and CD40L blockade leads to a progressive and sustained T regulatory allospecific response. The cytokines IL10, TGFβ, and IL35 all contributed to the regulatory phenomenon as determined by trans vivo delayed hypersensitivity assay. Unexpectedly, an early and transient self-specific regulatory response was found as well. Using double reporter mice (forkhead box p 3 [Foxp3]-yellow fluorescent protein, Epstein-Barr virus-induced gene 3 [Ebi3]-TdTomRed), we found an increase in Foxp3+CD25+ regulatory T (Treg) cells paralleling the regulatory response. The Ebi3+ CD4 T cells (IL35-producing) were mainly classic Treg cells (Foxp3+CD25+), whereas TGFβ+ CD4 T cells are mostly Foxp3-negative, suggesting 2 different CD4 Treg cell subsets. Liver-resident TGFβ+ CD4 T cells appeared more rapidly than Ebi3-producing T cells, whereas at later timepoints, the Ebi3 response predominated both in lymphoid tissues and liver. Conclusions The timing of appearance of donor organ resident Treg cell subsets should be considered in experiments testing the role of bidirectional regulation in transplant tolerance. PMID:27500263

  4. Chimerism and donor-specific nonreactivity 27 to 29 years after kidney allotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Starzl, T E; Demetris, A J; Trucco, M; Zeevi, A; Ramos, H; Terasaki, P; Rudert, W A; Kocova, M; Ricordi, C; Ildstad, S

    1993-06-01

    Chimerism was demonstrated with immunocytochemical and/or polymerase chain reaction techniques in kidney allografts and in the native skin, lymph nodes, or blood of 5 of 5 patients who received continuously functioning renal transplants from 1 or 2 haplotype HLA mismatched consanguineous donors (4 parents, 1 aunt) 27-29 years ago. In the 4 cases where the kidney donor still was alive to provide stimulator lymphocytes for testing, these provoked no (n = 2) or modest (n = 2) MLR in contrast to vigorous MLR to third party lymphocytes. In all 4 cases, the donor cells failed to generate in vitro cytotoxic effector cells (cell-mediated lymphocytotoxicity). These findings are in accord with the hypothesis that cell migration, repopulation, and chimerism are seminal events that define graft acceptance and ultimately can lead to acquired donor-specific nonresponsiveness (tolerance).

  5. The impact of donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies on late kidney allograft failure.

    PubMed

    Loupy, Alexandre; Hill, Gary S; Jordan, Stanley C

    2012-06-01

    Despite improvements in outcomes of renal transplantation, kidney allograft loss remains substantial, and is associated with increased morbidity, mortality and costs. Identifying the pathologic pathways responsible for allograft loss, and the attendant development of therapeutic interventions, will be one of the guiding future objectives of transplant medicine. One of the most important advances of the past decade has been the demonstration of the destructive power of anti-HLA alloantibodies and their association with antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR). Compelling evidence exists to show that donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies (DSAs) are largely responsible for the chronic deterioration of allografts, a condition previously attributed to calcineurin inhibitor toxicity and chronic allograft nephropathy. The emergence of sensitive techniques to detect DSAs, together with advances in the assessment of graft pathology, have expanded the spectrum of what constitutes ABMR. Today, subtler forms of rejection--such as indolent ABMR, C4d-negative ABMR, and transplant arteriopathy--are seen in which DSAs exert a marked pathological effect. In addition, arteriosclerosis, previously thought to be a bystander lesion related to the vicissitudes of aging, is accelerated in ABMR. Advances in our understanding of the pathological significance of DSAs and ABMR show their primacy in the mediation of chronic allograft destruction. Therapies aimed at B cells, plasma cells and antibodies will be important therapeutic options to improve the length and quality of kidney allograft survival.

  6. Reprogramming LCLs to iPSCs Results in Recovery of Donor-Specific Gene Expression Signature.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Samantha M; Kagan, Courtney; Pavlovic, Bryan J; Burnett, Jonathan; Patterson, Kristen; Pritchard, Jonathan K; Gilad, Yoav

    2015-05-01

    Renewable in vitro cell cultures, such as lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs), have facilitated studies that contributed to our understanding of genetic influence on human traits. However, the degree to which cell lines faithfully maintain differences in donor-specific phenotypes is still debated. We have previously reported that standard cell line maintenance practice results in a loss of donor-specific gene expression signatures in LCLs. An alternative to the LCL model is the induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) system, which carries the potential to model tissue-specific physiology through the use of differentiation protocols. Still, existing LCL banks represent an important source of starting material for iPSC generation, and it is possible that the disruptions in gene regulation associated with long-term LCL maintenance could persist through the reprogramming process. To address this concern, we studied the effect of reprogramming mature LCL cultures from six unrelated donors to iPSCs on the ensuing gene expression patterns within and between individuals. We show that the reprogramming process results in a recovery of donor-specific gene regulatory signatures, increasing the number of genes with a detectable donor effect by an order of magnitude. The proportion of variation in gene expression statistically attributed to donor increases from 6.9% in LCLs to 24.5% in iPSCs (P < 10-15). Since environmental contributions are unlikely to be a source of individual variation in our system of highly passaged cultured cell lines, our observations suggest that the effect of genotype on gene regulation is more pronounced in iPSCs than in LCLs. Our findings indicate that iPSCs can be a powerful model system for studies of phenotypic variation across individuals in general, and the genetic association with variation in gene regulation in particular. We further conclude that LCLs are an appropriate starting material for iPSC generation.

  7. Reprogramming LCLs to iPSCs Results in Recovery of Donor-Specific Gene Expression Signature

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Samantha M.; Kagan, Courtney; Pavlovic, Bryan J.; Burnett, Jonathan; Patterson, Kristen; Pritchard, Jonathan K.; Gilad, Yoav

    2015-01-01

    Renewable in vitro cell cultures, such as lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs), have facilitated studies that contributed to our understanding of genetic influence on human traits. However, the degree to which cell lines faithfully maintain differences in donor-specific phenotypes is still debated. We have previously reported that standard cell line maintenance practice results in a loss of donor-specific gene expression signatures in LCLs. An alternative to the LCL model is the induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) system, which carries the potential to model tissue-specific physiology through the use of differentiation protocols. Still, existing LCL banks represent an important source of starting material for iPSC generation, and it is possible that the disruptions in gene regulation associated with long-term LCL maintenance could persist through the reprogramming process. To address this concern, we studied the effect of reprogramming mature LCL cultures from six unrelated donors to iPSCs on the ensuing gene expression patterns within and between individuals. We show that the reprogramming process results in a recovery of donor-specific gene regulatory signatures, increasing the number of genes with a detectable donor effect by an order of magnitude. The proportion of variation in gene expression statistically attributed to donor increases from 6.9% in LCLs to 24.5% in iPSCs (P < 10-15). Since environmental contributions are unlikely to be a source of individual variation in our system of highly passaged cultured cell lines, our observations suggest that the effect of genotype on gene regulation is more pronounced in iPSCs than in LCLs. Our findings indicate that iPSCs can be a powerful model system for studies of phenotypic variation across individuals in general, and the genetic association with variation in gene regulation in particular. We further conclude that LCLs are an appropriate starting material for iPSC generation. PMID:25950834

  8. Transplantation tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Yannick D; Seebach, Jörg D; Bühler, Leo H; Pascual, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    The major challenge in transplantation medicine remains long-term allograft acceptance, with preserved allograft function under minimal chronic immunosuppression. To safely achieve the goal of sustained donor-specific T and B cell non-responsiveness, research efforts are now focusing on therapies based on cell subsets with regulatory properties. In particular the transfusion of human regulatory T cells (Treg) is currently being evaluated in phase I/II clinical trials for the treatment of graft versus host disease following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and is also under consideration for solid organ transplantation. The purpose of this review is to recapitulate current knowledge on naturally occurring as well as induced human Treg, with emphasis on their specific phenotype, suppressive function and how these cells can be manipulated in vitro and/or in vivo for therapeutic purposes in transplantation medicine. We highlight the potential but also possible limitations of Treg-based strategies to promote long-term allograft survival. It is evident that the bench-to-beside translation of these protocols still requires further understanding of Treg biology. Nevertheless, current data already suggest that Treg therapy alone will not be sufficient and needs to be combined with other immunomodulatory approaches in order to induce allograft tolerance. PMID:21776332

  9. [Changes in the proteasome function after induction of donor-specific tolerance in rats with ovarian allograft].

    PubMed

    Karpova, Ia D; Bozhok, G A; Liupina, Iu V; Legach, E I; Astakhova, T M; Stepanova, A A; Bondarenko, T P; Sharova, N P

    2012-01-01

    Induction of donor-specific tolerance in a recipient is one of the methods for enhancing acceptance of the grafts of endocrine glands in the absence of immunodepressants, which interfere with hormone production. This paper describes changes in the proteasome pool in the rat liver, spleen, and graft during the development of donor-specific tolerance after intraportally infusing the recipient with donor splenocytes with subsequent allografting of ovarian tissue into the renal capsule. It has been demonstrated that the shift in the balance in the liver and graft proteasome pools towards the variants with the LMP2 subunit determines the development of immunological tolerance and graft retention. On the contrary, an increase in the forms with the LMP7 subunit induces the immune response and graft rejection.

  10. Antibody-Dependent NK Cell Activation Is Associated with Late Kidney Allograft Dysfunction and the Complement-Independent Alloreactive Potential of Donor-Specific Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Legris, Tristan; Picard, Christophe; Todorova, Dilyana; Lyonnet, Luc; Laporte, Cathy; Dumoulin, Chloé; Nicolino-Brunet, Corinne; Daniel, Laurent; Loundou, Anderson; Morange, Sophie; Bataille, Stanislas; Vacher-Coponat, Henri; Moal, Valérie; Berland, Yvon; Dignat-George, Francoise; Burtey, Stéphane; Paul, Pascale

    2016-01-01

    Although kidney transplantation remains the best treatment for end-stage renal failure, it is limited by chronic humoral aggression of the graft vasculature by donor-specific antibodies (DSAs). The complement-independent mechanisms that lead to the antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) of kidney allografts remain poorly understood. Increasing lines of evidence have revealed the relevance of natural killer (NK) cells as innate immune effectors of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), but few studies have investigated their alloreactive potential in the context of solid organ transplantation. Our study aimed to investigate the potential contribution of the antibody-dependent alloreactive function of NK cells to kidney graft dysfunction. We first conducted an observational study to investigate whether the cytotoxic function of NK cells is associated with chronic allograft dysfunction. The NK-Cellular Humoral Activation Test (NK-CHAT) was designed to evaluate the recipient and antibody-dependent reactivity of NK cells against allogeneic target cells. The release of CD107a/Lamp1(+) cytotoxic granules, resulting from the recognition of rituximab-coated B cells by NK cells, was analyzed in 148 kidney transplant recipients (KTRs, mean graft duration: 6.2 years). Enhanced ADCC responsiveness was associated with reduced graft function and identified as an independent risk factor predicting a decline in the estimated glomerular filtration rate over a 1-year period (hazard ratio: 2.83). In a second approach, we used the NK-CHAT to reveal the cytotoxic potential of circulating alloantibodies in vitro. The level of CD16 engagement resulting from the in vitro recognition of serum-coated allogeneic B cells or splenic cells was further identified as a specific marker of DSA-induced ADCC. The NK-CHAT scoring of sera obtained from 40 patients at the time of transplant biopsy was associated with ABMR diagnosis. Our findings indicate that despite the administration of

  11. Antibody-Dependent NK Cell Activation Is Associated with Late Kidney Allograft Dysfunction and the Complement-Independent Alloreactive Potential of Donor-Specific Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Legris, Tristan; Picard, Christophe; Todorova, Dilyana; Lyonnet, Luc; Laporte, Cathy; Dumoulin, Chloé; Nicolino-Brunet, Corinne; Daniel, Laurent; Loundou, Anderson; Morange, Sophie; Bataille, Stanislas; Vacher-Coponat, Henri; Moal, Valérie; Berland, Yvon; Dignat-George, Francoise; Burtey, Stéphane; Paul, Pascale

    2016-01-01

    Although kidney transplantation remains the best treatment for end-stage renal failure, it is limited by chronic humoral aggression of the graft vasculature by donor-specific antibodies (DSAs). The complement-independent mechanisms that lead to the antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) of kidney allografts remain poorly understood. Increasing lines of evidence have revealed the relevance of natural killer (NK) cells as innate immune effectors of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), but few studies have investigated their alloreactive potential in the context of solid organ transplantation. Our study aimed to investigate the potential contribution of the antibody-dependent alloreactive function of NK cells to kidney graft dysfunction. We first conducted an observational study to investigate whether the cytotoxic function of NK cells is associated with chronic allograft dysfunction. The NK-Cellular Humoral Activation Test (NK-CHAT) was designed to evaluate the recipient and antibody-dependent reactivity of NK cells against allogeneic target cells. The release of CD107a/Lamp1+ cytotoxic granules, resulting from the recognition of rituximab-coated B cells by NK cells, was analyzed in 148 kidney transplant recipients (KTRs, mean graft duration: 6.2 years). Enhanced ADCC responsiveness was associated with reduced graft function and identified as an independent risk factor predicting a decline in the estimated glomerular filtration rate over a 1-year period (hazard ratio: 2.83). In a second approach, we used the NK-CHAT to reveal the cytotoxic potential of circulating alloantibodies in vitro. The level of CD16 engagement resulting from the in vitro recognition of serum-coated allogeneic B cells or splenic cells was further identified as a specific marker of DSA-induced ADCC. The NK-CHAT scoring of sera obtained from 40 patients at the time of transplant biopsy was associated with ABMR diagnosis. Our findings indicate that despite the administration of

  12. Analysis of T cell responses in liver allograft recipients. Evidence for deletion of donor-specific cytotoxic T cells in the peripheral circulation.

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, J M; Marsh, J W; Susskind, B; Mohanakumar, T

    1993-01-01

    Analysis of cell-mediated lympholysis in long-term liver allograft recipients indicated that there was a donor-specific unresponsiveness that could not be reversed by the addition of rIL-2 and/or mixed lymphocyte culture supernatant or by nonspecific stimulation of the cultures with PHA. Stimulation of recipient cells with semisyngeneic cells having both donor and third-party HLA antigens failed to reveal the presence of cytotoxic T cells (CTL) specific to the donor, whereas the CTL response to third-party antigens remained normal. Removal of B lymphocytes from the responding cell population did not influence the responses. Furthermore, limiting dilution analysis showed that the liver transplant recipients did not have detectable levels of CTL precursors (CTLp) reactive to the donor antigens, whereas their CTLp to third-party antigens remained normal. Donor-specific CTLp were present before and during the early post-transplant period; these cells were eliminated from the peripheral circulation by 10 mo after transplantation. Taken together, these results indicate that there is a deletion of CTLp specific to donor MHC antigens in the peripheral circulation of long-term liver allograft recipients that may account in part for the success of liver transplantation across MHC barriers. Images PMID:8450068

  13. Liver Transplantation in Antituberculosis Drugs-Induced Fulminant Hepatic Failure

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoyan; Liu, Yujie; Zhang, Erhong; He, Qiong; Tang, Yong-Bo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The antituberculosis drugs isoniazid (INH), rifampicin (RMP), pyrazinamide (PZA), and ethambutol (EMB) usually expose patients to the risk of fulminant hepatic failure (FHF). This report presents a case of liver transplantation in antituberculosis drugs-induced FHF and reviews the relevant literature. A 39-year-old woman with pelvic and salpinx tuberculosis experienced complex pelvic exenteration. After the operation, she was administrated INH, RMP, PZA, and EMB to prevent tuberculosis. Two months later, examination revealed severe FHF and the antituberculosis therapy regimen was changed to ciprofloxacin and streptomycin. Subsequently, urgent orthotopic liver transplantation was performed. Posttransplantation, her serum transaminases improved gradually, but her total bilirubin level and direct bilirubin level continued to worsen, which may have been related to the rejection. However, irreversible damage from antituberulosis drugs was note excluded. Two liver biopsies and histological examinations were performed. One year after transplantation, she died as a consequence of ischemic cholangitis and pulmonary infection. A literature review revealed 9 other published cases of antituberculosis drugs-associated FHF with liver transplantation. This report suggests that, in most cases of antituberculosis drugs-induced FHF, discontinuation of toxic drugs and orthotopic liver transplantation are always sufficient treatment. PMID:26656321

  14. Local Differentiation of Sugar Donor Specificity of Flavonoid Glycosyltransferase in Lamiales[W

    PubMed Central

    Noguchi, Akio; Horikawa, Manabu; Fukui, Yuko; Fukuchi-Mizutani, Masako; Iuchi-Okada, Asako; Ishiguro, Masaji; Kiso, Yoshinobu; Nakayama, Toru; Ono, Eiichiro

    2009-01-01

    Flavonoids are most commonly conjugated with various sugar moieties by UDP-sugar:glycosyltransferases (UGTs) in a lineage-specific manner. Generally, the phylogenetics and regiospecificity of flavonoid UGTs are correlated, indicating that the regiospecificity of UGT differentiated prior to speciation. By contrast, it is unclear how the sugar donor specificity of UGTs evolved. Here, we report the biochemical, homology-modeled, and phylogenetic characterization of flavonoid 7-O-glucuronosyltransferases (F7GAT), which is responsible for producing specialized metabolites in Lamiales plants. All of the Lamiales F7GATs were found to be members of the UGT88-related cluster and specifically used UDP-glucuronic acid (UDPGA). We identified an Arg residue that is specifically conserved in the PSPG box in the Lamiales F7GATs. Substitution of this Arg with Trp was sufficient to convert the sugar donor specificity of the Lamiales F7GATs from UDPGA to UDP-glucose. Homology modeling of the Lamiales F7GAT suggested that the Arg residue plays a critical role in the specific recognition of anionic carboxylate of the glucuronic acid moiety of UDPGA with its cationic guanidinium moiety. These results support the hypothesis that differentiation of sugar donor specificity of UGTs occurred locally, in specific plant lineages, after establishment of general regiospecificity for the sugar acceptor. Thus, the plasticity of sugar donor specificity explains, in part, the extraordinary structural diversification of phytochemicals. PMID:19454730

  15. Regulatory cells and transplantation tolerance.

    PubMed

    Cobbold, Stephen P; Waldmann, Herman

    2013-06-01

    Transplantation tolerance is a continuing therapeutic goal, and it is now clear that a subpopulation of T cells with regulatory activity (Treg) that express the transcription factor foxp3 are crucial to this aspiration. Although reprogramming of the immune system to donor-specific transplantation tolerance can be readily achieved in adult mouse models, it has yet to be successfully translated in human clinical practice. This requires that we understand the fundamental mechanisms by which donor antigen-specific Treg are induced and function to maintain tolerance, so that we can target therapies to enhance rather than impede these regulatory processes. Our current understanding is that Treg act via numerous molecular mechanisms, and critical underlying components such as mTOR inhibition, are only now emerging. PMID:23732858

  16. Voriconazole-induced periostitis: beyond post-transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Reber, Joshua D; McKenzie, Gavin A; Broski, Stephen M

    2016-06-01

    Voriconazole-induced periostitis (VIP) is a rare but increasingly encountered entity since Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of the second generation antifungal medication in 2002. Literature reports most commonly include transplant recipients on immunosuppressive therapy simultaneously requiring antifungal therapy. Nontransplant patients receiving long-term voriconazole have an equal risk of developing the disease, but may experience a delay in diagnosis due to a lack of familiarity with the process outside of the post-transplant and/or immunosuppressed population. We present a case of VIP in a nontransplant, immunocompetent patient on suppressive antifungal therapy for prior abdominal aortic stent graft fungal infection. Radiologist review of current medications and recognition of periostitis on multiple imaging modalities may hasten the diagnosis and lead to earlier treatment and resolution of symptoms.

  17. Cellular and Molecular Targeting for Nanotherapeutics in Transplantation Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Hlavaty, Kelan A.; Luo, Xunrong; Shea, Lonnie D.; Miller, Stephen D.

    2015-01-01

    The induction of donor-specific tolerance to transplanted cells and organs, while preserving immune function as a whole, remains a highly sought after and elusive strategy for overcoming transplant rejection. Tolerance necessitates modulating a diverse array of cell types that recognize and respond to alloantigens, including antigen presenting cells and T lymphocytes. Nanotherapeutic strategies that employ cellular and biomaterial engineering represent an emerging technology geared towards the goal of inducing transplant tolerance. Nanocarriers offer a platform for delivering antigens of interest to specific cell types in order to achieve tolerogenic antigen presentation. Furthermore, the technologies also provide an opportunity for local immunomodulation at the graft site. Nanocarriers delivering a combination of antigens and immunomodulating agents, such as rapamycin, provide a unique technology platform with the potential to enhance outcomes for the induction of transplant tolerance. PMID:25805659

  18. Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Faro, Albert; Weymann, Alexander

    2016-08-01

    Despite improvement in median life expectancy and overall health, some children with cystic fibrosis (CF) progress to end-stage lung or liver disease and become candidates for transplant. Transplants for children with CF hold the promise to extend and improve the quality of life, but barriers to successful long-term outcomes include shortage of suitable donor organs; potential complications from the surgical procedure and immunosuppressants; risk of rejection and infection; and the need for lifelong, strict adherence to a complex medical regimen. This article reviews the indications and complications of lung and liver transplantation in children with CF. PMID:27469184

  19. Non-Complement-Binding De Novo Donor-Specific Anti-HLA Antibodies and Kidney Allograft Survival.

    PubMed

    Guidicelli, Gwendaline; Guerville, Florent; Lepreux, Sébastien; Wiebe, Chris; Thaunat, Olivier; Dubois, Valérie; Visentin, Jonathan; Bachelet, Thomas; Morelon, Emmanuel; Nickerson, Peter; Merville, Pierre; Taupin, Jean-Luc; Couzi, Lionel

    2016-02-01

    C1q-binding ability may indicate the clinical relevance of de novo donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies (DSA). This study investigated the incidence and risk factors for the appearance of C1q-binding de novo DSA and their long-term impact. Using Luminex Single Antigen Flow Bead assays, 346 pretransplant nonsensitized kidney recipients were screened at 2 and 5 years after transplantation for de novo DSA, which was followed when positive by a C1q Luminex assay. At 2 and 5 years, 12 (3.5%) and eight (2.5%) patients, respectively, had C1q-binding de novo DSA. De novo DSA mean fluorescence intensity >6237 and >10,000 at 2 and 5 years, respectively, predicted C1q binding. HLA mismatches and cyclosporine A were independently associated with increased risk of C1q-binding de novo DSA. When de novo DSA were analyzed at 2 years, the 5-year death-censored graft survival was similar between patients with C1q-nonbinding de novo DSA and those without de novo DSA, but was lower for patients with C1q-binding de novo DSA (P=0.003). When de novo DSA were analyzed at 2 and 5 years, the 10-year death-censored graft survival was lower for patients with C1q-nonbinding de novo DSA detected at both 2 and 5 years (P<0.001) and for patients with C1q-binding de novo DSA (P=0.002) than for patients without de novo DSA. These results were partially confirmed in two validation cohorts. In conclusion, C1q-binding de novo DSA are associated with graft loss occurring quickly after their appearance. However, the long-term persistence of C1q-nonbinding de novo DSA could lead to lower graft survival. PMID:26047793

  20. Rates and determinants of progression to graft failure in kidney allograft recipients with de novo donor-specific antibody.

    PubMed

    Wiebe, C; Gibson, I W; Blydt-Hansen, T D; Pochinco, D; Birk, P E; Ho, J; Karpinski, M; Goldberg, A; Storsley, L; Rush, D N; Nickerson, P W

    2015-11-01

    Understanding rates and determinants of clinical pathologic progression for recipients with de novo donor-specific antibody (dnDSA), especially subclinical dnDSA, may identify surrogate endpoints and inform clinical trial design. A consecutive cohort of 508 renal transplant recipients (n = 64 with dnDSA) was studied. Recipients (n = 388) without dnDSA or dysfunction had an eGFR decline of -0.65 mL/min/1.73 m(2) /year. In recipients with dnDSA, the rate eGFR decline was significantly increased prior to dnDSA onset (-2.89 vs. -0.65 mL/min/1.73 m(2) /year, p < 0.0001) and accelerated post-dnDSA (-3.63 vs. -2.89 mL/min/1.73 m(2) /year, p < 0.0001), suggesting that dnDSA is both a marker and contributor to ongoing alloimmunity. Time to 50% post-dnDSA graft loss was longer in recipients with subclinical versus a clinical dnDSA phenotype (8.3 vs. 3.3 years, p < 0.0001). Analysis of 1091 allograft biopsies found that dnDSA and time independently predicted chronic glomerulopathy (cg), but not interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy (IFTA). Early T cell-mediated rejection, nonadherence, and time were multivariate predictors of IFTA. Independent risk factors for post-dnDSA graft survival available prior to, or at the time of, dnDSA detection were delayed graft function, nonadherence, dnDSA mean fluorescence intensity sum score, tubulitis, and cg. Ultimately, dnDSA is part of a continuum of mixed alloimmune-mediated injury, which requires solutions targeting T and B cells.

  1. Non-Complement-Binding De Novo Donor-Specific Anti-HLA Antibodies and Kidney Allograft Survival.

    PubMed

    Guidicelli, Gwendaline; Guerville, Florent; Lepreux, Sébastien; Wiebe, Chris; Thaunat, Olivier; Dubois, Valérie; Visentin, Jonathan; Bachelet, Thomas; Morelon, Emmanuel; Nickerson, Peter; Merville, Pierre; Taupin, Jean-Luc; Couzi, Lionel

    2016-02-01

    C1q-binding ability may indicate the clinical relevance of de novo donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies (DSA). This study investigated the incidence and risk factors for the appearance of C1q-binding de novo DSA and their long-term impact. Using Luminex Single Antigen Flow Bead assays, 346 pretransplant nonsensitized kidney recipients were screened at 2 and 5 years after transplantation for de novo DSA, which was followed when positive by a C1q Luminex assay. At 2 and 5 years, 12 (3.5%) and eight (2.5%) patients, respectively, had C1q-binding de novo DSA. De novo DSA mean fluorescence intensity >6237 and >10,000 at 2 and 5 years, respectively, predicted C1q binding. HLA mismatches and cyclosporine A were independently associated with increased risk of C1q-binding de novo DSA. When de novo DSA were analyzed at 2 years, the 5-year death-censored graft survival was similar between patients with C1q-nonbinding de novo DSA and those without de novo DSA, but was lower for patients with C1q-binding de novo DSA (P=0.003). When de novo DSA were analyzed at 2 and 5 years, the 10-year death-censored graft survival was lower for patients with C1q-nonbinding de novo DSA detected at both 2 and 5 years (P<0.001) and for patients with C1q-binding de novo DSA (P=0.002) than for patients without de novo DSA. These results were partially confirmed in two validation cohorts. In conclusion, C1q-binding de novo DSA are associated with graft loss occurring quickly after their appearance. However, the long-term persistence of C1q-nonbinding de novo DSA could lead to lower graft survival.

  2. Promiscuous activity of ER glucosidase II discovered through donor specificity analysis of UGGT

    SciTech Connect

    Miyagawa, Atsushi; Totani, Kiichiro; Matsuo, Ichiro; Ito, Yukishige

    2010-12-17

    Research highlights: {yields} UGGT has a narrow donor specificity. {yields} UGGT gave several non-natural high-mannose-type glycans. {yields} G-II has a promiscuous activity as broad specificity hexosidase. -- Abstract: In glycoprotein quality control system in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), UGGT (UDP-glucose:glycoprotein glucosyltransferase) and glucosidase II (G-II) play key roles. UGGT serves as a glycoprotein folding sensor by virtue of its unique specificity to glucosylate glycoproteins at incompletely folded stage. By using various UDP-Glc analogues, we first analyzed donor specificity of UGGT, which was proven to be rather narrow. However, marginal activity was observed with UDP-galactose and UDP-glucuronic acid as well as with 3-, 4- and 6-deoxy glucose analogues to give corresponding transfer products. Intriguingly, G-II smoothly converted all of them back to Man{sub 9}GlcNAc{sub 2}, providing an indication that G-II has a promiscuous activity as a broad specificity hexosidase.

  3. Alloreactive Regulatory T Cells Allow the Generation of Mixed Chimerism and Transplant Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Paulina; Maldonado, Paula; Hidalgo, Yessia; Sauma, Daniela; Rosemblatt, Mario; Bono, Maria Rosa

    2015-01-01

    The induction of donor-specific transplant tolerance is one of the main goals of modern immunology. Establishment of a mixed chimerism state in the transplant recipient has proven to be a suitable strategy for the induction of long-term allograft tolerance; however, current experimental recipient preconditioning protocols have many side effects, and are not feasible for use in future therapies. In order to improve the current mixed chimerism induction protocols, we developed a non-myeloablative bone-marrow transplant (NM-BMT) protocol using retinoic acid (RA)-induced alloantigen-specific Tregs, clinically available immunosuppressive drugs, and lower doses of irradiation. We demonstrate that RA-induced alloantigen-specific Tregs in addition to a NM-BMT protocol generates stable mixed chimerism and induces tolerance to allogeneic secondary skin allografts in mice. Therefore, the establishment of mixed chimerism through the use of donor-specific Tregs rather than non-specific immunosuppression could have a potential use in organ transplantation. PMID:26635810

  4. Restorative potential of cholinergic rich transplants in cholchicine induced lesioned rats: a comparative study of single and multiple micro-transplantation approach.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, A K; Roy, Adip; Seth, K; Raghubir, Ram; Seth, P K

    2003-06-01

    Restorative potential of fetal neural transplantation in colchicine induced neurodegeneration was studied in rats; where colchicine (2.5mg per site) was administered bilaterally into the hippocampus followed by bilateral infusions of fetal neural cell suspension rich in cholinergic neurons as single macro- or multiple micro-transplants in the hippocampal region 3 weeks post-colchicine (2.5mg per site) lesion. Animals were studied for neuro behavioural and neurochemical recovery at 4 and 24 weeks post-transplantation and electrophysiological (single cell recording) and immunohistochemical parameters, choline acetyl transferase (ChAT) expression was studied in hippocampus at 24 weeks post-transplantation. Colchicine lesioned rats receiving single macro- or multiple micro-transplants exhibited significant restoration in cognitive dysfunction caused by colchicine after 4 weeks of transplantation which remain persistent in multiple micro-transplanted group upto 24 weeks post-transplantation, whereas, single macro-transplanted animals did not exhibit any significant recovery. Neurochemical studies revealed significant restoration in acetylcholine esterase activity and cholinergic (muscarinic) receptor binding after 24 weeks post-transplantation as compared to 4 weeks post-transplantation in multiple micro-transplanted group. Single cell recording studied at 24 weeks post-transplantation exhibited significant restoration in firing rates when compared with lesioned group. The viability of cholinergic fibre at transplanted sites has further been confirmed by increase in ChAT immuno positivity in hippocampal region using monoclonal antibody and quantified using image analyser Leica Qwin 500 software. The results suggest that intra-hippocampal multiple site cholinergic rich transplants provide better and long term restoration in the cholinergic deficits induced by colchicine lesion as compared to single site macro-transplantation. PMID:12781786

  5. Pre-transplant gingival hyperplasia predicts severe cyclosporin-induced gingival overgrowth in renal transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Varga, E; Lennon, M A; Mair, L H

    1998-03-01

    The relationship between the pre-transplant periodontal status and the development of post-transplant gingival overgrowth was investigated in a longitudinal study. The periodontal condition of 35 patients was examined on 2 occasions while they were on the transplant waiting list and then at 4-6, 10-12, 16 and 20 weeks post-transplant. At each visit the plaque index, the bleeding index and a pocket index (CPITN) were measured. Dental impressions were taken of the pre- and post-transplant gingival condition and used to make stone models which were used to score the gingival overgrowth index (GOI). The patients divided into 3 distinct groups having severe (n=13), mild (n=16) or no post-transplant gingival overgrowth (n=6). Only 1 of the patients had taken cyclosporin prior to inclusion into the study. All the patients who developed severe overgrowth had evidence of gingival hyperplasia before the transplant. There was no difference in the serum cyclosporin levels between the three groups (chi2<2.28, p>0.319). Furthermore, there was no statistical difference for any of the periodontal indices. This study indicates that the hyperplastic gingival inflammatory response of some individuals appears to be potentiated by cyclosporin resulting in severe post-transplant overgrowth. In other patients the same reaction may allow the fibroblastic activity to occur to an extent where it produces a mild clinically apparent overgrowth.

  6. [Fetal experimentation, transplantations, cosmetics and their connection with induced abortion].

    PubMed

    Redondo Calderón, José Luis

    2012-01-01

    The increase in induced abortion produces large numbers of cells, tissues and organs, which are used in several fields of Medicine, either in research or in treatment. The main uses are in Cardiology, Hematology, Metabolism, Embryology, Neurology, Immunology, Ophthalmology, Dermatology and Transplantations. Flavor enhancers and cosmetics also benefit. Utilitarianism has led to an increase in abortion-originated cell and tissue banks. Abortion is justified through the manipulation of language. Vested interests give rise to complicity in researchers and society as a whole. Abortion and tissue 'donation' cannot be split; since fresh tissues are involved there is a symbiotic relationship between them. Valid consent is not possible. A contradiction emerges, the nasciturus is not desired or valued but fetal organs are. When someone is deprived of his rights it is because another wants to enslave them. Research must have a moral base. Knowledge should not be increased at any price. Something that is legal and well intentioned is not always morally acceptable. The duty of omission is applicable. Means to achieve a goal must be ethical means. Educational efforts to restore respect for the human embryo and fetus must be promoted. Technical advances are not always in accordance with human nature and dignity. Research and treatment that do not resort to cells, tissues and organs obtained from induced abortions should be promoted.

  7. [Fetal experimentation, transplantations, cosmetics and their connection with induced abortion].

    PubMed

    Redondo Calderón, José Luis

    2012-01-01

    The increase in induced abortion produces large numbers of cells, tissues and organs, which are used in several fields of Medicine, either in research or in treatment. The main uses are in Cardiology, Hematology, Metabolism, Embryology, Neurology, Immunology, Ophthalmology, Dermatology and Transplantations. Flavor enhancers and cosmetics also benefit. Utilitarianism has led to an increase in abortion-originated cell and tissue banks. Abortion is justified through the manipulation of language. Vested interests give rise to complicity in researchers and society as a whole. Abortion and tissue 'donation' cannot be split; since fresh tissues are involved there is a symbiotic relationship between them. Valid consent is not possible. A contradiction emerges, the nasciturus is not desired or valued but fetal organs are. When someone is deprived of his rights it is because another wants to enslave them. Research must have a moral base. Knowledge should not be increased at any price. Something that is legal and well intentioned is not always morally acceptable. The duty of omission is applicable. Means to achieve a goal must be ethical means. Educational efforts to restore respect for the human embryo and fetus must be promoted. Technical advances are not always in accordance with human nature and dignity. Research and treatment that do not resort to cells, tissues and organs obtained from induced abortions should be promoted. PMID:23320641

  8. Composite osseomusculocutaneous sternum, ribs, thymus, pectoralis muscles, and skin allotransplantation model of bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bozkurt, Mehmet; Klimczak, Aleksandra; Nasir, Serdar; Zor, Fatih; Krokowicz, Lukasz; Siemionow, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Cellular and vascularized bone marrow cells have been used to induce donor-specific chimerism in various models of composite tissue allotransplantation. Although thymus transplantation has been reported in the literature, the effect of thymus transplantation on chimerism levels in vascularized bone containing composite tissue allotransplantation has not been reported. In this study, a new method for composite vascularized sternal bone marrow transplant model is descried that can be applied to augment chimerism after transplantation. A total of seven composite osseomusculocutaneous sternum, ribs, thymus, pectoralis muscles, and skin transplantations were performed in two groups. The first group (n = 5) was designed as an allotransplantation group and the second group (n = 2) was designed as an isotransplantation group. Composite osseomusculocutaneous sternum, ribs, thymus, and pectoralis muscles allografts were harvested on the common carotid artery and external jugular vein and a heterotopic transplantation was performed to the inguinal region of the recipient rat. Cyclosporine A monotherapy was administered in order to prevent acute and chronic allograft rejection. Animals sacrificed when any sign of rejection occurred. The longest survival was 156 day post-transplant. Assessment of bone marrow cells within sternum bone component and flow cytometry analysis of donor-specific chimerism in the peripheral blood of recipients were evaluated. Our results showed that this composite allograft carried 7.5 × 10(6) of viable hematopoietic cells within the sternum component. At day 7 post-transplant chimerism was developed in T-cell population and mean level was assessed at 2.65% for RT1(n) /CD4 and at 1.0% for RT1(n) /CD8. In this study, a new osseomusculocutaneous sternum, ribs, thymus, pectoralis muscle, and skin allotransplantation model is reported which can be used to augment hematopoietic activity for chimerism induction after transplantation.

  9. Spontaneous restoration of transplantation tolerance after acute rejection.

    PubMed

    Miller, Michelle L; Daniels, Melvin D; Wang, Tongmin; Chen, Jianjun; Young, James; Xu, Jing; Wang, Ying; Yin, Dengping; Vu, Vinh; Husain, Aliya N; Alegre, Maria-Luisa; Chong, Anita S

    2015-01-01

    Transplantation is a cure for end-stage organ failure but, in the absence of pharmacological immunosuppression, allogeneic organs are acutely rejected. Such rejection invariably results in allosensitization and accelerated rejection of secondary donor-matched grafts. Transplantation tolerance can be induced in animals and a subset of humans, and enables long-term acceptance of allografts without maintenance immunosuppression. However, graft rejection can occur long after a state of transplantation tolerance has been acquired. When such an allograft is rejected, it has been assumed that the same rules of allosensitization apply as to non-tolerant hosts and that immunological tolerance is permanently lost. Using a mouse model of cardiac transplantation, we show that when Listeria monocytogenes infection precipitates acute rejection, thus abrogating transplantation tolerance, the donor-specific tolerant state re-emerges, allowing spontaneous acceptance of a donor-matched second transplant. These data demonstrate a setting in which the memory of allograft tolerance dominates over the memory of transplant rejection.

  10. Voriconazole-induced periostitis in two post-transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Bucknor, Matthew D; Gross, Andrew J; Link, Thomas M

    2013-08-01

    While drug-related periostitis has been known of for many years, the specific association of diffuse periostitis with voriconazole (most frequently in transplant patients) has only been recently explicitly addressed in the literature. Recognition of the radiologic and clinical manifestations of voriconazole-related periostitis is important for helping to narrow an otherwise broad differential diagnosis. We present two cases that illustrate different radiologic presentations of this painful cause of diffuse periostitis. Case 1 features a 60 year-old woman with a history of orthotopic heart transplant who was hospitalized for "full body pain" with progressively worsening bone tenderness involving the humeri, knees, femurs, hips, and hands. Case 2 describes a 48 year-old man with a history of acute lymphoblastic leukemia status post stem cell transplant who presented with diffuse arthralgias involving bilateral ankles, knees, wrists, and elbows.

  11. Voriconazole-induced periostitis in two post-transplant patients

    PubMed Central

    Bucknor, Matthew D.; Gross, Andrew J.; Link, Thomas M.

    2013-01-01

    While drug-related periostitis has been known of for many years, the specific association of diffuse periostitis with voriconazole (most frequently in transplant patients) has only been recently explicitly addressed in the literature. Recognition of the radiologic and clinical manifestations of voriconazole-related periostitis is important for helping to narrow an otherwise broad differential diagnosis. We present two cases that illustrate different radiologic presentations of this painful cause of diffuse periostitis. Case 1 features a 60 year-old woman with a history of orthotopic heart transplant who was hospitalized for “full body pain” with progressively worsening bone tenderness involving the humeri, knees, femurs, hips, and hands. Case 2 describes a 48 year-old man with a history of acute lymphoblastic leukemia status post stem cell transplant who presented with diffuse arthralgias involving bilateral ankles, knees, wrists, and elbows. PMID:24421948

  12. Approach to kidney transplant in sensitized potential transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Barbari, Antoine; Abbas, Souodod; Jaafar, Mahassen

    2012-10-01

    More than one-third of patients on waiting lists for kidney transplant are sensitized. Most have previously formed donor-specific and non-donor-specific serum antibodies and/or positive crossmatch by complement-dependent cytotoxity and/or flow cytometry. Two categories of alloantibodies include antibodies against major histocompatibility complex human leukocyte antigen class 1 and class 2 and antibodies against minor histocompatibility complex. A current positive crossmatch is an absolute contraindication for transplant. Positive historical panel reactive antibody and/or donor-specific antibodies (human leukocyte antigen and minor histocompatibility complex), even in the absence of a historical positive crossmatch, are associated with an increased risk for allosensitization, antibodymediated rejection, and accelerated graft failure. Desensitization protocols are numerous, complex, and expensive. It is recommended to perform a systematic determination of historical and current panel reactive antibody, donor-specific antibodies (human leukocyte antigen and minor histocompatibility complex), and crossmatch by the most sensitive assays. The risk of sensitization may be estimated from the combined results of the crossmatch with the donor and those of the recipient's panel reactive antibody and donor-specific antibodies at baseline. The adoption of a scoring system for risk stratification may facilitate the task of organ allocation for sensitized patients. Recipients with an estimated sensitization risk ≥ high may be referred preferably to the national waiting priority list and informed about the financial and the medical risks that may incur with future transplant. Sensitized patients at high risk for antibody-mediated rejection may benefit from a structured monitoring process involving systematic and regular immunologic, histologic, and functional assessments of the graft after transplant. We recommend the adoption and regular updating of these approaches to ensure

  13. A Case Report of Drug-Induced Thrombocytopenia after Living Donor Liver Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Arai, Keisuke; Kuramitsu, Kaori; Fukumoto, Takumi; Kido, Masahiro; Takebe, Atsushi; Tanaka, Motofumi; Kinoshita, Hisoka; Ajiki, Tetsuo; Toyama, Hirochika; Asari, Sadaki; Goto, Tadahiro; Ku, Yonson

    2016-06-16

    There are few descriptions of severe thrombocytopenia during the early postoperative period after liver transplantation, and these have not been fully documented in the literature. Here, we report a case of drug-induced thrombocytopenia requiring transfusion of blood products after living donor liver transplantation. We determined that this was not caused by the interferon-free anti-viral therapy but by tacrolimus A 61-year-old woman with hepatitis C-related cirrhosis and hepatorenal syndrome underwent living donor liver transplantation using a left lobe graft from her son. After transplantation, immunosuppression consisted of tacrolimus and steroid. Seven weeks after transplantation, interferon-free therapy with daclatasvir and asunaprevir was started. Thirteen days thereafter, hepatitis C virus tested negative. However, the platelet count had begun to gradually decrease just before starting anti-viral therapy. Daclatasvir and asunaprevir were stopped because this was suspected to be a side-effect of these drugs, but the patient nonetheless went on to develop severe thrombocytopenia (platelet count 17,000/μL), which needed transfusions. Now suspecting tacrolimus as the inducer of this side effect, we changed to cyclosporin, after which the platelet count gradually recovered. Viral markers were still not detectable up to 2 months after discontinuation of the antiviral drugs. We conclude that when severe thrombocytopenia occurs, possible drug-induced thrombocytopenia as well as other disorders must be investigated.

  14. Vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis promotes transplant arteriosclerosis through inducing the production of SDF-1α.

    PubMed

    Li, J; Liu, S; Li, W; Hu, S; Xiong, J; Shu, X; Hu, Q; Zheng, Q; Song, Z

    2012-08-01

    Transplant arteriosclerosis is a leading cause of late allograft loss. Medial smooth muscle cell (SMC) apoptosis is considered to be an important event in transplant arteriosclerosis. However, the precise contribution of medial SMC apoptosis to transplant arteriosclerosis and the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We transferred wild-type p53 to induce apoptosis of cultured SMCs. We found that apoptosis induces the production of SDF-1α from apoptotic and neighboring viable cells, resulting in increased SDF-1α in the culture media. Conditioned media from Ltv-p53-transferred SMCs activated PI3K/Akt/mTOR and MAPK/Erk signaling in a SDF-1α-dependent manner and thereby promoted mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) migration and proliferation. In a rat aorta transplantation model, lentivirus-mediated BclxL transfer selectively inhibits medial SMC apoptosis in aortic allografts, resulting in a remarkable decrease of SDF-1α both in allograft media and in blood plasma, associated with diminished recruitment of CD90(+)CD105(+) double-positive cells and impaired neointimal formation. Systemic administration of rapamycin or PD98059 also attenuated MSC recruitment and neointimal formation in the aortic allografts. These results suggest that medial SMC apoptosis is critical for the development of transplant arteriosclerosis through inducing SDF-1α production and that MSC recruitment represents a major component of vascular remodeling, constituting a relevant target and mechanism for therapeutic interventions.

  15. The Macrophage-depleting Agent Clodronate Promotes Durable Hematopoietic Chimerism and Donor-specific Skin Allograft Tolerance in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhanzhuo; Xu, Xin; Feng, Xingmin; Murphy, Philip M.

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic chimerism is known to promote donor-specific organ allograft tolerance; however, clinical translation has been impeded by the requirement for toxic immunosuppression and large doses of donor bone marrow (BM) cells. Here, we investigated in mice whether durable chimerism might be enhanced by pre-treatment of the recipient with liposomal clodronate, a macrophage depleting agent, with the goal of vacating BM niches for preferential reoccupation by donor hematopoietic stem cells (HSC). We found that liposomal clodronate pretreatment of C57BL/6 mice permitted establishment of durable hematopoietic chimerism when the mice were given a low dose of donor BM cells and transient immunosuppression. Moreover, clodronate pre-treatment increased durable donor-specific BALB/c skin allograft tolerance. These results provide proof-of-principle that clodronate is effective at sparing the number of donor BM cells required to achieve durable hematopoietic chimerism and donor-specific skin allograft tolerance and justify further development of a tolerance protocol based on this principle. PMID:26917238

  16. Pharmacological modulation of amphetamine-induced dyskinesia in transplanted hemi-parkinsonian rats.

    PubMed

    Smith, Gaynor A; Breger, Ludivine S; Lane, Emma L; Dunnett, Stephen B

    2012-10-01

    Foetal cell transplantation in patients with Parkinson's disease can induce motor complications independent of L-DOPA administration, known as graft-induced dyskinesia. In the 6-OHDA lesioned rat model of Parkinson's disease, post-transplantation abnormal movements can develop in response to an amphetamine challenge, a behaviour which is used to model graft-induced dyskinesia. Although L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia has been well characterised pharmacologically, we lack knowledge on the modulation of post-transplantation amphetamine-induced dyskinesia which may shed light on the mechanisms underlying graft-induced dyskinesia. We assessed a series of drugs effective at reducing L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia against post-transplantation amphetamine-induced dyskinesia. Agents include: dopaminergic antagonists (D₁: CP94253; D₂: SCH-22390; D₃: nafadotride), serotonergic agonists (5-HT(1A): 8-OH-DPAT; 5-HT(1B): CP94253), opioid antagonist (μ: naloxone), cannabinoid agonist (CB₁: WIN55, 212-2), adrenergic antagonist (α₁ and α₂: yohimbine) and glutamatergic antagonists (NMDA: amantadine and MK-801; mGluR5: MTEP; AMPA: IEM1460). Abnormal involuntary movements in response to amphetamine were decreased by SCH-22390, raclopride, CP94253 and 8-OH-DPAT, yet were unaltered by naloxone, WIN55, 212-2, yohimbine, amantadine, MTEP and IEM1460. Unusually, MK-801 increased the appearance of amphetamine-induced dyskinesia. The results suggest that dopaminergic, serotoninergic and glutamatergic systems are likely to have a fundamental role in the development of graft-induced dyskinesias, which are mechanistically distinct from L-DOPA-induced behvaviours. Importantly, the expression of D₁ and D₂ receptors was unrelated to the severity of AIMs.

  17. Waning of vaccine-induced immunity to measles in kidney transplanted children.

    PubMed

    Rocca, Salvatore; Santilli, Veronica; Cotugno, Nicola; Concato, Carlo; Manno, Emma Concetta; Nocentini, Giulia; Macchiarulo, Giulia; Cancrini, Caterina; Finocchi, Andrea; Guzzo, Isabella; Dello Strologo, Luca; Palma, Paolo

    2016-09-01

    Vaccine-preventable diseases are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in solid organ transplant recipients who undergo immunosuppression after transplantation. Data on immune responses and long-term maintenance after vaccinations in such population are still limited.We cross-sectionally evaluated the maintenance of immune response to measles vaccine in kidney transplanted children on immunosuppressive therapy. Measles-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and B-cell enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot were performed in 74 kidney transplant patients (Tps) and in 23 healthy controls (HCs) previously vaccinated and tested for humoral protection against measles. The quality of measles antibody response was measured by avidity test. B-cell phenotype, investigated via flow cytometry, was further correlated to the ability of Tps to maintain protective humoral responses to measles over time.We observed the loss of vaccine-induced immunity against measles in 19% of Tps. Nonseroprotected children showed signs of impaired B-cell distribution as well as immune senescence and lower antibody avidity. We further reported as time elapsed between vaccination and transplantation, as well as the vaccine administration during dialysis are clinical factors affecting the maintenance of the immune memory response against measles.Tps present both quantitative and qualitative alterations in the maintenance of protective immunity to measles vaccine. Prospective studies are needed to optimize the vaccination schedules in kidney transplant recipients in order to increase the immunization coverage over time in this population. PMID:27631222

  18. Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia in solid organ transplant recipients: The current scientific knowledge

    PubMed Central

    Assfalg, Volker; Hüser, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to heparin is associated with a high incidence of immunization against platelet factor 4 (PF4)/heparin complexes. A subgroup of immunized patients is at risk of developing heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT), an immune mediated prothrombotic adverse drug effect. Transplant recipients are frequently exposed to heparin either due to the underlying end-stage disease, which leads to listing and transplantation or during the transplant procedure and the perioperative period. To review the current scientific knowledge on anti-heparin/PF4 antibodies and HIT in transplant recipients a systematic PubMed literature search on articles in English language was performed. The definition of HIT is inconsistent amongst the publications. Overall, six studies and 15 case reports have been published on HIT before or after heart, liver, kidney, and lung transplantation, respectively. The frequency of seroconversion for anti-PF4/heparin antibodies ranged between 1.9% and 57.9%. However, different methods to detect anti-PF4/heparin antibodies were applied. In none of the studies HIT-associated thromboembolic events or fatalities were observed. More importantly, in patients with a history of HIT, reexposure to heparin during transplantation was not associated with thrombotic complications. Taken together, the overall incidence of HIT after solid organ transplantation seems to be very low. However, according to the current knowledge, cardiac transplant recipients may have the highest risk to develop HIT. Different alternative suggestions for heparin-free anticoagulation have been reported for recipients with suspected HIT albeit no official recommendations on management have been published for this special collective so far. PMID:27011914

  19. Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia in solid organ transplant recipients: The current scientific knowledge.

    PubMed

    Assfalg, Volker; Hüser, Norbert

    2016-03-24

    Exposure to heparin is associated with a high incidence of immunization against platelet factor 4 (PF4)/heparin complexes. A subgroup of immunized patients is at risk of developing heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT), an immune mediated prothrombotic adverse drug effect. Transplant recipients are frequently exposed to heparin either due to the underlying end-stage disease, which leads to listing and transplantation or during the transplant procedure and the perioperative period. To review the current scientific knowledge on anti-heparin/PF4 antibodies and HIT in transplant recipients a systematic PubMed literature search on articles in English language was performed. The definition of HIT is inconsistent amongst the publications. Overall, six studies and 15 case reports have been published on HIT before or after heart, liver, kidney, and lung transplantation, respectively. The frequency of seroconversion for anti-PF4/heparin antibodies ranged between 1.9% and 57.9%. However, different methods to detect anti-PF4/heparin antibodies were applied. In none of the studies HIT-associated thromboembolic events or fatalities were observed. More importantly, in patients with a history of HIT, reexposure to heparin during transplantation was not associated with thrombotic complications. Taken together, the overall incidence of HIT after solid organ transplantation seems to be very low. However, according to the current knowledge, cardiac transplant recipients may have the highest risk to develop HIT. Different alternative suggestions for heparin-free anticoagulation have been reported for recipients with suspected HIT albeit no official recommendations on management have been published for this special collective so far. PMID:27011914

  20. Prospective Clinical Testing of Regulatory Dendritic Cells in Organ Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Angus W.; Zahorchak, Alan F.; Ezzelarab, Mohamed B.; Butterfield, Lisa H.; Lakkis, Fadi G.; Metes, Diana M.

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are rare, professional antigen-presenting cells with ability to induce or regulate alloimmune responses. Regulatory DC (DCreg) with potential to down-modulate acute and chronic inflammatory conditions that occur in organ transplantation can be generated in vitro under a variety of conditions. Here, we provide a rationale for evaluation of DCreg therapy in clinical organ transplantation with the goal of promoting sustained, donor-specific hyporesponsiveness, while lowering the incidence and severity of rejection and reducing patients’ dependence on anti-rejection drugs. Generation of donor- or recipient-derived DCreg that suppress T cell responses and prolong transplant survival in rodents or non-human primates has been well-described. Recently, good manufacturing practice (GMP)-grade DCreg have been produced at our Institution for prospective use in human organ transplantation. We briefly review experience of regulatory immune therapy in organ transplantation and describe our experience generating and characterizing human monocyte-derived DCreg. We propose a phase I/II safety study in which the influence of donor-derived DCreg combined with conventional immunosuppression on subclinical and clinical rejection and host alloimmune responses will be examined in detail. PMID:26858719

  1. Liver Transplantation after Exertional Heatstroke-Induced Acute Liver Failure

    PubMed Central

    Virk, Hafeez Ul Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Exertional heatstroke (EHS) is a life-threatening disease characterized clinically by central nervous system dysfunction and severe hyperthermia. It frequently occurs among athletes, soldiers, and laborers. While cardiopulmonary symptoms are common in patients undergoing EHS, irreversible acute liver failure is a rarely described phenomenon. When managing cases of EHS complicated by acute liver failure, it is crucial to act promptly with aggressive total body cooling in order to prevent progression of the clinical syndrome. However, an urgent liver transplantation can be a therapeutic strategy when patients fail to improve with supportive measures. PMID:27738568

  2. Transient forebrain ischemia-induced neuronal degeneration in fascia dentata transplants.

    PubMed

    Tønder, N; Aznar, S; Johansen, F F

    1994-01-01

    Fascia dentata tissue blocks from newborn rats were grafted into one-week-old, ibotenic acid-induced lesions of the fascia dentata, or the normal fascia dentata of adult rats. After at least 2 months survival the recipient rats were subjected to 10 min of forebrain ischemia (4-vessel occlusion), and examined 2 or 4 days later for neuronal degeneration in the host hippocampi and the transplants, by silver staining and immunohistochemistry. Transplants survived well in both normal and lesioned host brains, with easily recognizable subfields and layers and presence of normal types of principal and non-principal neurons. As expected, argyrophilic, degenerating neurons were present in the pyramidal cell layer of CAl and CA3c of the non-grafted contralateral host hippocampus and in the contralateral dentate hilus (CA4). In the hilus the degeneration corresponded to the loss of somatostatin-immunoreactive neurons, while parvalbumin-immunoreactive neurons were spared. In the dentate transplants degenerating neurons were observed in the granule cell layer, the hilus and the adjacent CA3 pyramidal cell layer. There was no obvious loss of either somatostatin- or parvalbumin-immunoreactive neurons. The degeneration varied considerably between transplants, from a few to large groups of silver stained neurons, but this difference did not display any obvious relation to grafting into normal or lesioned hosts, the exact location of the grafts or the general organization and distribution of intrinsic or extrinsic host afferents in the grafts. The results demonstrate that both ischemia-susceptible and -resistant types of neurons grafted to normal and lesioned adult rat brains are susceptible to transient forebrain ischemia after transplantation. In spite of an extensive reorganization of transplant nerve connections, the physiologicalbiochemical mechanisms necessary for the induction of ischemic cell death were accordingly present in the transplants.

  3. Detection of C3d-Binding Donor-Specific Anti-HLA Antibodies at Diagnosis of Humoral Rejection Predicts Renal Graft Loss

    PubMed Central

    Sicard, Antoine; Ducreux, Stéphanie; Rabeyrin, Maud; Couzi, Lionel; McGregor, Brigitte; Badet, Lionel; Scoazec, Jean Yves; Bachelet, Thomas; Lepreux, Sébastien; Visentin, Jonathan; Merville, Pierre; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Véronique; Morelon, Emmanuel; Taupin, Jean-Luc; Dubois, Valérie

    2015-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) is a major cause of kidney graft loss, yet assessment of individual risk at diagnosis is impeded by the lack of a reliable prognosis assay. Here, we tested whether the capacity of anti-HLA antibodies to bind complement components allows accurate risk stratification at the time of AMR diagnosis. Among 938 kidney transplant recipients for whom a graft biopsy was performed between 2004 and 2012 at the Lyon University Hospitals, 69 fulfilled the diagnosis criteria for AMR and were enrolled. Sera banked at the time of the biopsy were screened for the presence of donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies (DSAs) and their ability to bind C1q and C3d using flow bead assays. In contrast with C4d graft deposition, the presence of C3d-binding DSA was associated with a higher risk of graft loss (P<0.001). Despite similar trend, the difference did not reach significance with a C1q-binding assay (P=0.06). The prognostic value of a C3d-binding assay was further confirmed in an independent cohort of 39 patients with AMR (P=0.04). Patients with C3d-binding antibodies had worse eGFR and higher DSA mean fluorescence intensity. In a multivariate analysis, only eGFR<30 ml/min per 1.73 m2 (hazard ratio [HR], 3.56; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.46 to 8.70; P=0.005) and the presence of circulating C3d-binding DSA (HR, 2.80; 95% CI, 1.12 to 6.95; P=0.03) were independent predictors for allograft loss at AMR diagnosis. We conclude that assessment of the C3d-binding capacity of DSA at the time of AMR diagnosis allows for identification of patients at risk for allograft loss. PMID:25125383

  4. Caudal Ganglionic Eminence Precursor Transplants Disperse and Integrate as Lineage-Specific Interneurons but Do Not Induce Cortical Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Larimer, Phillip; Spatazza, Julien; Espinosa, Juan Sebastian; Tang, Yunshuo; Kaneko, Megumi; Hasenstaub, Andrea R; Stryker, Michael P; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo

    2016-08-01

    The maturation of inhibitory GABAergic cortical circuits regulates experience-dependent plasticity. We recently showed that the heterochronic transplantation of parvalbumin (PV) or somatostatin (SST) interneurons from the medial ganglionic eminence (MGE) reactivates ocular dominance plasticity (ODP) in the postnatal mouse visual cortex. Might other types of interneurons similarly induce cortical plasticity? Here, we establish that caudal ganglionic eminence (CGE)-derived interneurons, when transplanted into the visual cortex of neonatal mice, migrate extensively in the host brain and acquire laminar distribution, marker expression, electrophysiological properties, and visual response properties like those of host CGE interneurons. Although transplants from the anatomical CGE do induce ODP, we found that this plasticity reactivation is mediated by a small fraction of MGE-derived cells contained in the transplant. These findings demonstrate that transplanted CGE cells can successfully engraft into the postnatal mouse brain and confirm the unique role of MGE lineage neurons in the induction of ODP. PMID:27425623

  5. Safety and Efficacy of Transplantation with Allogeneic Skin Tumors to Treat Chemically-Induced Skin Tumors in Mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiwei; Sun, Hua; Zhang, Jianhua; Ge, Chunlei; Dong, Suwei; Li, Zhen; Li, Ruilei; Chen, Xiaodan; Li, Mei; Chen, Yun; Zou, Yingying; Qian, Zhongyi; Yang, Lei; Yang, Jinyan; Zhu, Zhitao; Liu, Zhimin; Song, Xin

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Transplantation with allogeneic cells has become a promising modality for cancer therapy, which can induce graft-versus-tumor (GVT) effect. This study was aimed at assessing the safety, efficacy, and tissue type GVT (tGVT) response of transplantation with allogeneic skin tumors to treat chemically-induced skin tumors in mice. MATERIAL AND METHODS FVB/N and ICR mice were exposed topically to chemicals to induce skin tumors. Healthy ICR mice were transplanted with allogeneic skin tumors from FVB/N mice to test the safety. The tumor-bearing ICR mice were transplanted with, or without, allogeneic skin tumors to test the efficacy. The body weights (BW), body condition scores (BCS), tumor volumes in situ, metastasis tumors, overall survival, and serum cytokines were measured longitudinally. RESULTS Transplantation with no more than 0.03 g allogeneic skin tumors from FVB/N mice to healthy ICR mice was safe. After transplantation with allogeneic skin tumors to treat tumor-bearing mice, it inhibited the growth of tumors slightly at early stage, accompanied by fewer metastatic tumors at 24 days after transplantation (21.05% vs. 47.37%), while there were no statistically significant differences in the values of BW, BCS, tumor volumes in situ, metastasis tumors, and overall survival between the transplanted and non-transplanted groups. The levels of serum interleukin (IL)-2 were significantly reduced in the controls (P<0.05), but not in the recipients, which may be associated with the tGVT response. CONCLUSIONS Our results suggest that transplantation with allogeneic skin tumors is a safe treatment in mice, which can induce short-term tGVT response mediated by IL-2. PMID:27587310

  6. Safety and Efficacy of Transplantation with Allogeneic Skin Tumors to Treat Chemically-Induced Skin Tumors in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhiwei; Sun, Hua; Zhang, Jianhua; Ge, Chunlei; Dong, Suwei; Li, Zhen; Li, Ruilei; Chen, Xiaodan; Li, Mei; Chen, Yun; Zou, Yingying; Qian, Zhongyi; Yang, Lei; Yang, Jinyan; Zhu, Zhitao; Liu, Zhimin; Song, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Background Transplantation with allogeneic cells has become a promising modality for cancer therapy, which can induce graft-versus-tumor (GVT) effect. This study was aimed at assessing the safety, efficacy, and tissue type GVT (tGVT) response of transplantation with allogeneic skin tumors to treat chemically-induced skin tumors in mice. Material/Methods FVB/N and ICR mice were exposed topically to chemicals to induce skin tumors. Healthy ICR mice were transplanted with allogeneic skin tumors from FVB/N mice to test the safety. The tumor-bearing ICR mice were transplanted with, or without, allogeneic skin tumors to test the efficacy. The body weights (BW), body condition scores (BCS), tumor volumes in situ, metastasis tumors, overall survival, and serum cytokines were measured longitudinally. Results Transplantation with no more than 0.03 g allogeneic skin tumors from FVB/N mice to healthy ICR mice was safe. After transplantation with allogeneic skin tumors to treat tumor-bearing mice, it inhibited the growth of tumors slightly at early stage, accompanied by fewer metastatic tumors at 24 days after transplantation (21.05% vs. 47.37%), while there were no statistically significant differences in the values of BW, BCS, tumor volumes in situ, metastasis tumors, and overall survival between the transplanted and non-transplanted groups. The levels of serum interleukin (IL)-2 were significantly reduced in the controls (P<0.05), but not in the recipients, which may be associated with the tGVT response. Conclusions Our results suggest that transplantation with allogeneic skin tumors is a safe treatment in mice, which can induce short-term tGVT response mediated by IL-2. PMID:27587310

  7. Regression of Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis in Rats Following Bone Marrow Transplantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Bekkum, Dirk W.; Bohre, Els P. M.; Houben, Paul F. J.; Knaan-Shanzer, Shoshan

    1989-12-01

    Total body irradiation followed by bone marrow transplantation was found to be an effective treatment for adjuvant arthritis induced in rats. This treatment is most effective when applied shortly after the clinical manifestation of arthritis--i.e., 4-7 weeks after administration of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Transplantation of bone marrow at a later stage results in a limited recovery, in that the inflammatory reaction regresses but the newly formed excessive bone is not eliminated. Local irradiation of the affected joints had no effect on the disease. It could also be excluded that the recovery of arthritis following marrow transplantation is due to lack of available antigen. Transplantation of syngeneic bone marrow is as effective as that of allogeneic bone marrow from a rat strain that is not susceptible to induction of adjuvant arthritis. The beneficial effect of this treatment cannot be ascribed to the immunosuppressive effect of total body irradiation, since treatment with the highly immunosuppressive drug Cyclosporin A resulted in a regression of the joint swelling but relapse occurred shortly after discontinuation of the treatment.

  8. Treatment of multiple sclerosis by transplantation of neural stem cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Cao, Jiani; Li, Xiaoyan; Xu, Haoyu; Wang, Weixu; Wang, Libin; Zhao, Xiaoyang; Li, Wei; Jiao, Jianwei; Hu, Baoyang; Zhou, Qi; Zhao, Tongbiao

    2016-09-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system (CNS), with focal T lymphocytic infiltration and damage of myelin and axons. The underlying mechanism of pathogenesis remains unclear and there are currently no effective treatments. The development of neural stem cell (NSC) transplantation provides a promising strategy to treat neurodegenerative disease. However, the limited availability of NSCs prevents their application in neural disease therapy. In this study, we generated NSCs from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and transplanted these cells into mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a model of MS. The results showed that transplantation of iPSC-derived NSCs dramatically reduced T cell infiltration and ameliorated white matter damage in the treated EAE mice. Correspondingly, the disease symptom score was greatly decreased, and motor ability was dramatically rescued in the iPSC-NSC-treated EAE mice, indicating the effectiveness of using iPSC-NSCs to treat MS. Our study provides pre-clinical evidence to support the feasibility of treating MS by transplantation of iPSC-derived NSCs. PMID:27233903

  9. Intrahippocampal cholinergic-rich transplants restore lead-induced deficits: a preliminary study in rats.

    PubMed

    Adhami, V M; Husain, R; Agarwal, A K; Seth, P K

    2000-01-01

    In the present study restorative potential of fetal cholinergic rich cell suspensions in ameliorating cognitive deficits in rats perinatally exposed to lead was studied. Lactating dams with 1-day old litters were given 0.2% (w/v) lead acetate in drinking water throughout lactation from postnatal day (PND) 1 to PND21 at the end of which the treatment was stopped and the animals were weaned. On PND42 lead exposed rats were given bilateral, intrahippocampal, cholinergic rich fetal neural transplants (approximately 60,000 cells per site) and subsequently assessed 3 and 6 months posttransplantation. Control animals (Sham operated and transplanted) were also run in parallel. Lead exposed rats exhibited a decreased learning ability and locomotor activity. A significant decrease in the levels of acetylcholinesterase and sodium potassium ATPase Na+,K+-ATPase activity was observed in hippocampal region of lead exposed rats. The levels of lead were increased by fivefold in the hippocampal region of lead exposed rats. Transplantation showed marginal improvement in the above impairments at 3 months which were more marked at 6 months. Lead levels at 6 months were not significantly higher in lead exposed rats as compared with the control. Results confirm previous findings that fetal neural transplants help in restoring the lost functional deficits and demonstrate their restorative potential in case of lead induced deficits. PMID:10642113

  10. Neural Stem Cell Transplantation Induces Stroke Recovery by Upregulating Glutamate Transporter GLT-1 in Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Gianluca Luigi; Peruzzotti-Jametti, Luca; Rossi, Silvia; Sandrone, Stefano; Butti, Erica; De Ceglia, Roberta; Bergamaschi, Andrea; Motta, Caterina; Gallizioli, Mattia; Studer, Valeria; Colombo, Emanuela; Farina, Cinthia; Comi, Giancarlo; Politi, Letterio Salvatore; Muzio, Luca; Villani, Claudia; Invernizzi, Roberto William; Hermann, Dirk Matthias; Centonze, Diego

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is the leading cause of disability, but effective therapies are currently widely lacking. Recovery from stroke is very much dependent on the possibility to develop treatments able to both halt the neurodegenerative process as well as to foster adaptive tissue plasticity. Here we show that ischemic mice treated with neural precursor cell (NPC) transplantation had on neurophysiological analysis, early after treatment, reduced presynaptic release of glutamate within the ipsilesional corticospinal tract (CST), and an enhanced NMDA-mediated excitatory transmission in the contralesional CST. Concurrently, NPC-treated mice displayed a reduced CST degeneration, increased axonal rewiring, and augmented dendritic arborization, resulting in long-term functional amelioration persisting up to 60 d after ischemia. The enhanced functional and structural plasticity relied on the capacity of transplanted NPCs to localize in the peri-ischemic and ischemic area, to promote the upregulation of the glial glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) on astrocytes and to reduce peri-ischemic extracellular glutamate. The upregulation of GLT-1 induced by transplanted NPCs was found to rely on the secretion of VEGF by NPCs. Blocking VEGF during the first week after stroke reduced GLT-1 upregulation as well as long-term behavioral recovery in NPC-treated mice. Our results show that NPC transplantation, by modulating the excitatory–inhibitory balance and stroke microenvironment, is a promising therapy to ameliorate disability, to promote tissue recovery and plasticity processes after stroke. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Tissue damage and loss of function occurring after stroke can be constrained by fostering plasticity processes of the brain. Over the past years, stem cell transplantation for repair of the CNS has received increasing interest, although underlying mechanism remain elusive. We here show that neural stem/precursor cell transplantation after ischemic stroke is able to foster

  11. Improvement of rat islet viability during transplantation: validation of pharmacological approach to induce VEGF overexpression.

    PubMed

    Langlois, A; Bietiger, W; Seyfritz, E; Maillard, E; Vivot, K; Peronet, C; Meyer, N; Kessler, L; Jeandidier, N; Pinget, M; Sigrist, S

    2011-01-01

    Delayed and insufficient revascularization during islet transplantation deprives islets of oxygen and nutrients, resulting in graft failure. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) could play a critical role in islet revascularization. We aimed to develop pharmacological strategies for VEGF overexpression in pancreatic islets using the iron chelator deferoxamine (DFO), thus avoiding obstacles or safety risks associated with gene therapy. Rat pancreatic islets were infected in vivo using an adenovirus (ADE) encoding human VEGF gene (4.10(8) pfu/pancreas) or were incubated in the presence of DFO (10 μmol/L). In vitro viability, functionality, and the secretion of VEGF were evaluated in islets 1 and 3 days after treatment. Infected islets or islets incubated with DFO were transplanted into the liver of syngenic diabetic rats and the graft efficiency was estimated in vivo by measuring body weight, glycemia, C-peptide secretion, and animal survival over a period of 2 months. DFO induced transient VEGF overexpression over 3 days, whereas infection with ADE resulted in prolonged VEGF overexpression lasting 14 days; however, this was toxic and decreased islet viability and functionality. The in vivo study showed a decrease in rat deaths after the transplantation of islets treated with DFO or ADE compared with the sham and control group. ADE treatment improved body weight and C-peptide levels. Gene therapy and DFO improved metabolic control in diabetic rats after transplantation, but this effect was limited in the presence of DFO. The pharmacological approach is an interesting strategy for improving graft efficiency during transplantation, but this approach needs to be improved with drugs that are more specific. PMID:21294962

  12. Establishment of a New Murine Elastase-Induced Aneurysm Model Combined with Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Merx, Marc W.; Koeppel, Thomas A.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The aim of our study was to develop a reproducible murine model of elastase-induced aneurysm formation combined with aortic transplantation. Methods Adult male mice (n = 6–9 per group) underwent infrarenal, orthotopic transplantation of the aorta treated with elastase or left untreated. Subsequently, both groups of mice were monitored by ultrasound until 7 weeks after grafting. Results Mice receiving an elastase-pretreated aorta developed aneurysms and exhibited a significantly increased diastolic vessel diameter compared to control grafted mice at 7 week after surgery (1.11±0.10 mm vs. 0.75±0.03 mm; p≤0,001). Histopathological examination revealed disruption of medial elastin, an increase in collagen content and smooth muscle cells, and neointima formation in aneurysm grafts. Conclusions We developed a reproducible murine model of elastase-induced aneurysm combined with aortic transplantation. This model may be suitable to investigate aneurysm-specific inflammatory processes and for use in gene-targeted animals. PMID:25068788

  13. Among-lake reciprocal transplants induce convergent expression of immune genes in threespine stickleback.

    PubMed

    Stutz, William E; Schmerer, Matthew; Coates, Jessica L; Bolnick, Daniel I

    2015-09-01

    Geographic variation in parasite communities can drive evolutionary divergence in host immune genes. However, biotic and abiotic environmental variation can also induce plastic differences in immune function among populations. At present, there is little information concerning the relative magnitudes of heritable vs. induced immune divergence in natural populations. We examined immune gene expression profiles of threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) from six lakes on Vancouver Island, British Columbia. Parasite community composition differs between lake types (large or small, containing limnetic- or benthic-like stickleback) and between watersheds. We observed corresponding differences in immune gene expression profiles among wild-caught stickleback, using a set of seven immune genes representing distinct branches of the immune system. To evaluate the role of environmental effects on this differentiation, we experimentally transplanted wild-caught fish into cages in their native lake, or into a nearby foreign lake. Transplanted individuals' immune gene expression converged on patterns typical of their destination lake, deviating from their native expression profile. Transplant individuals' source population had a much smaller effect, suggesting relatively weak genetic underpinning of population differences in immunity, as viewed through gene expression. This strong environmental regulation of immune gene expression provides a counterpoint to the large emerging literature documenting microevolution and genetic diversification of immune function. Our findings illustrate the value of studying immunity in natural environmental settings where the immune system has evolved and actively functions. PMID:26118468

  14. Female qualities in males: vitellogenin synthesis induced by ovary transplants into the male silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Yang, Congwen; Lin, Ying; Shen, Guanwang; Chen, Enxiang; Wang, Yanxia; Luo, Juan; Zhang, Haiyan; Xing, Runmiao; Xia, Qingyou

    2014-10-10

    Female qualities in males are common in vertebrates but have not been extensively reported in insects. Vitellogenin (Vg) is highly expressed in the female fat body and is generally required for the formation of yolk proteins in the insect egg. Vg upregulation is generally regarded as a female quality in female oviparous animals. In this study, we found that Bombyx mori Vg (BmVg) is especially highly expressed in the female pupa. Downregulation of the BmVg gene in the female pupa by RNA interference (RNAi) interfered with egg formation and embryonic development, showing the importance of BmVg in these processes. So, we used BmVg as a biomarker for female qualities in the silkworm. Hematoxylin-eosin staining and immunofluorescence histochemistry showed that ovary transplants induced BmVg synthesis in the male pupa fat body. Ovaries transplanted into male silkworms produced only a few eggs with deformed yolk granules. These results suggested that the amount of BmVg in the male silkworm was insufficient for eggs to undergo complete embryonic development. After 17-beta-estradiol was used to treat male pupae and male pupal fat bodies, BmVg was upregulated in vivo and in vitro. These findings indicated that the male silkworm has innate female qualities that were induced by a transplanted ovary and 17β-estradiol. However, in silkworms, female qualities in males are not as complete as in females.

  15. Among-lake reciprocal transplants induce convergent expression of immune genes in threespine stickleback.

    PubMed

    Stutz, William E; Schmerer, Matthew; Coates, Jessica L; Bolnick, Daniel I

    2015-09-01

    Geographic variation in parasite communities can drive evolutionary divergence in host immune genes. However, biotic and abiotic environmental variation can also induce plastic differences in immune function among populations. At present, there is little information concerning the relative magnitudes of heritable vs. induced immune divergence in natural populations. We examined immune gene expression profiles of threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) from six lakes on Vancouver Island, British Columbia. Parasite community composition differs between lake types (large or small, containing limnetic- or benthic-like stickleback) and between watersheds. We observed corresponding differences in immune gene expression profiles among wild-caught stickleback, using a set of seven immune genes representing distinct branches of the immune system. To evaluate the role of environmental effects on this differentiation, we experimentally transplanted wild-caught fish into cages in their native lake, or into a nearby foreign lake. Transplanted individuals' immune gene expression converged on patterns typical of their destination lake, deviating from their native expression profile. Transplant individuals' source population had a much smaller effect, suggesting relatively weak genetic underpinning of population differences in immunity, as viewed through gene expression. This strong environmental regulation of immune gene expression provides a counterpoint to the large emerging literature documenting microevolution and genetic diversification of immune function. Our findings illustrate the value of studying immunity in natural environmental settings where the immune system has evolved and actively functions.

  16. Mixed chimerism and transplant tolerance are not effectively induced in C3a-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Baśkiewicz-Hałasa, Magdalena; Rogińska, Dorota; Piecyk, Katarzyna; Hałasa, Maciej; Lejkowska, Renata; Pius-Sadowska, Ewa; Machaliński, Bogusław

    2015-01-01

    Mixed chimerism, a phenomenon involved in the development of specific alloantigen tolerance, could be achieved through the transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells into properly prepared recipients. Because the C3a complement component modulates hematopoietic cell trafficking after transplantation, in the present study, we investigated the influence of the C3a deficiency on mixed chimerism and alloantigen tolerance induction. To induce mixed chimerism, C57BL/6J (wild-type strain; H-2K(b); I-E(-)) and B6.129S4-C3(tm1Crr)/J (C3a-deficient) mice were exposed to 3 G total body irradiation (day -1). Subsequently, these mice were treated with CD8-blocking (day -2) and CD40L-blocking (days 0 and 4) antibodies, followed by transplantation with 20 × 10(6) Balb/c (H-2K(d); I-E(+)) bone marrow cells (day 0). The degree of mixed chimerism in peripheral blood leukocytes was measured several times during the 20-week experiment. The tolerance to Balb/c mouse antigens was assessed based on the number of lymphocytes expressing Vβ5 and Vβ11 T-cell receptor and on skin-graft (day 0) acceptance. Applying our experimental model, mixed chimerism and alloantigen tolerance were effectively induced in C57BL/6J (wild-type) mice, but not in C3a(-/-) animals. The present study is, to our knowledge, the first to demonstrate that C3a is vital for achieving stable mixed chimerism and related to this induction of transplant tolerance.

  17. Immune privilege induced by regulatory T cells in transplantation tolerance.

    PubMed

    Cobbold, Stephen P; Adams, Elizabeth; Graca, Luis; Daley, Stephen; Yates, Stephen; Paterson, Alison; Robertson, Nathan J; Nolan, Kathleen F; Fairchild, Paul J; Waldmann, Herman

    2006-10-01

    Immune privilege was originally believed to be associated with particular organs, such as the testes, brain, the anterior chamber of the eye, and the placenta, which need to be protected from any excessive inflammatory activity. It is now becoming clear, however, that immune privilege can be acquired locally in many different tissues in response to inflammation, but particularly due to the action of regulatory T cells (Tregs) induced by the deliberate therapeutic manipulation of the immune system toward tolerance. In this review, we consider the interplay between Tregs, dendritic cells, and the graft itself and the resulting local protective mechanisms that are coordinated to maintain the tolerant state. We discuss how both anti-inflammatory cytokines and negative costimulatory interactions can elicit a number of interrelated mechanisms to regulate both T-cell and antigen-presenting cell activity, for example, by catabolism of the amino acids tryptophan and arginine and the induction of hemoxygenase and carbon monoxide. The induction of local immune privilege has implications for the design of therapeutic regimens and the monitoring of the tolerant status of patients being weaned off immunosuppression. PMID:16972908

  18. Mesenchymal stromal cells in renal transplantation: opportunities and challenges.

    PubMed

    Casiraghi, Federica; Perico, Norberto; Cortinovis, Monica; Remuzzi, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    Lifelong immunosuppressive therapy is essential to prevent allograft rejection in transplant recipients. Long-term, nonspecific immunosuppression can, however, result in life-threatening complications and fail to prevent chronic graft rejection. Bone marrow (BM)-derived multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have emerged as a potential candidate for cell-based therapy to modulate the immune response in organ transplantation. These cells can repair tissue after injury and downregulate many of the effector functions of immune cells that participate in the alloimmune response, converting them into regulatory cells. The findings of preclinical and initial clinical studies support the potential tolerance-inducing effects of MSCs and highlight the unanticipated complexity of MSC therapy in kidney transplantation. In animal models of transplantation MSCs promote donor-specific tolerance through the generation of regulatory T cells and antigen-presenting cells. In some settings, however, MSCs can acquire proinflammatory properties and contribute to allograft dysfunction. The available data from small clinical studies suggest that cell infusion is safe and well tolerated by kidney transplant recipients. Ongoing and future trials will provide evidence regarding the long-term safety of MSC therapy and determine the optimum cell source (either autologous or allogeneic) and infusion protocol to achieve operational tolerance in kidney transplant recipients. These studies will also provide additional evidence regarding the risks and benefits of MSC infusion and will hopefully offer definitive answers to the important questions of when, where, how many and which types of MSCs should be infused to fully exploit their immunomodulatory, pro-tolerogenic and tissue-repairing properties. PMID:26853275

  19. Direct and Indirect Effects of Cytomegalovirus-Induced γδ T Cells after Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Couzi, Lionel; Pitard, Vincent; Moreau, Jean-François; Merville, Pierre; Déchanet-Merville, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Despite effective anti-viral therapies, cytomegalovirus (CMV) is still associated with direct (CMV disease) and indirect effects (rejection and poor graft survival) in kidney transplant recipients. Recently, an unconventional T cell population (collectively designated as Vδ2neg γδ T cells) has been characterized during the anti-CMV immune response in all solid-organ and bone-marrow transplant recipients, neonates, and healthy people. These CMV-induced Vδ2neg γδ T cells undergo a dramatic and stable expansion after CMV infection, in a conventional “adaptive” manner. Similarly, as CMV-specific CD8+ αβ T cells, they exhibit an effector/memory TEMRA phenotype and cytotoxic effector functions. Activation of Vδ2neg γδ T cells by CMV-infected cells involves the γδ T cell receptor (TCR) and still ill-defined co-stimulatory molecules such as LFA-1. A multiple of Vδ2neg γδ TCR ligands are apparently recognized on CMV-infected cells, the first one identified being the major histocompatibility complex-related molecule endothelial protein C receptor. A singularity of CMV-induced Vδ2neg γδ T cells is to acquire CD16 expression and to exert an antibody-dependent cell-mediated inhibition on CMV replication, which is controlled by a specific cytokine microenvironment. Beyond the well-demonstrated direct anti-CMV effect of Vδ2neg γδ T cells, unexpected indirect effects of these cells have been also observed in the context of kidney transplantation. CMV-induced Vδ2neg γδ T cells have been involved in surveillance of malignancy subsequent to long-term immunosuppression. Moreover, CMV-induced CD16+ γδ T cells are cell effectors of antibody-mediated rejection of kidney transplants, and represent a new physiopathological contribution to the well-known association between CMV infection and poor graft survival. All these basic and clinical studies paved the road to the development of a future γδ T cell-based immunotherapy. In the meantime, γδ T cell

  20. Voriconazole-induced periostitis post transplant: an illustrative review of thoracic computed tomography imaging manifestations.

    PubMed

    Rheinboldt, M; Delproposto, Z; Agarwal, R

    2015-12-01

    Voriconazole, first commercially approved in 2002 as a second-generation antifungal agent, is commonly used in the immunocompromised setting as both a therapeutic and prophylactic agent. Since 2009, scattered case reports and small case series have detailed a secondary drug-related hyperfluorosis-induced painful periostitis that can occur in the treated patient population. We present a pictorial review of the thoracic imaging manifestations utilizing 3 illustrative cases in the setting of both solid organ and bone marrow transplantation. Knowledge of the relatively characteristic radiographic appearance and distribution, when coupled with the appropriate clinical context and associated laboratory findings, is important in narrowing an otherwise relatively broad differential diagnosis.

  1. Cutting edge: anti-CD154 therapeutic antibodies induce infectious transplantation tolerance.

    PubMed

    Graca, L; Honey, K; Adams, E; Cobbold, S P; Waldmann, H

    2000-11-01

    Nondepleting anti-CD154 (CD40 ligand) mAbs have proven effective in inducing transplantation tolerance in rodents and primates. In the induction phase, anti-CD154 Ab therapy is known to enhance apoptosis of Ag reactive T cells. However, this may not be the sole explanation for tolerance, as we show in this study that tolerance is maintained through a dominant regulatory mechanism which, like tolerance induced with CD4 Abs, manifests as infectious tolerance. Therefore, tolerance induced with anti-CD154 Abs involves not only the deletion of potentially aggressive T cells, but also a contagious spread of tolerance to new cohorts of graft-reactive T cells as they arise. PMID:11045999

  2. Transplant-mediated enhancement of spinal cord GABAergic inhibition reverses paclitaxel-induced mechanical and heat hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Bráz, João M; Wang, Xidao; Guan, Zhonghui; Rubenstein, John L; Basbaum, Allan I

    2015-06-01

    Decreased spinal cord GABAergic inhibition is a major contributor to the persistent neuropathic pain that can follow peripheral nerve injury. Recently, we reported that restoring spinal cord GABAergic signaling by intraspinal transplantation of cortical precursors of GABAergic interneurons from the embryonic medial ganglionic eminence (MGE) can reverse the mechanical hypersensitivity (allodynia) that characterizes a neuropathic pain model in the mouse. We show that MGE cell transplants are also effective against both the mechanical allodynia and the heat hyperalgesia produced in a paclitaxel-induced chemotherapy model of neuropathic pain. To test the necessity of GABA release by the transplants, we also studied the utility of transplanting MGE cells from mice with a deletion of VGAT, the vesicular GABA transporter. Transplants from these mice, in which GABA is synthesized but cannot be stored or released, had no effect on mechanical hypersensitivity or heat hyperalgesia in the paclitaxel model. Taken together, these results demonstrate the therapeutic potential of GABAergic precursor cell transplantation in diverse neuropathic pain models and support our contention that restoration of inhibitory controls through release of GABA from the transplants is their mode of action. PMID:25760475

  3. Tuning the Phosphoryl Donor Specificity of Dihydroxyacetone Kinase from ATP to Inorganic Polyphosphate. An Insight from Computational Studies

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Moreno, Israel; Bordes, Isabel; Castillo, Raquel; Ruiz-Pernía, José Javier; Moliner, Vicent; García-Junceda, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Dihydroxyacetone (DHA) kinase from Citrobacter freundii provides an easy entry for the preparation of DHA phosphate; a very important C3 building block in nature. To modify the phosphoryl donor specificity of this enzyme from ATP to inorganic polyphosphate (poly-P); a directed evolution program has been initiated. In the first cycle of evolution, the native enzyme was subjected to one round of error-prone PCR (EP-PCR) followed directly (without selection) by a round of DNA shuffling. Although the wild-type DHAK did not show activity with poly-P, after screening, sixteen mutant clones showed an activity with poly-phosphate as phosphoryl donor statistically significant. The most active mutant presented a single mutation (Glu526Lys) located in a flexible loop near of the active center. Interestingly, our theoretical studies, based on molecular dynamics simulations and hybrid Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics (QM/MM) optimizations, suggest that this mutation has an effect on the binding of the poly-P favoring a more adequate position in the active center for the reaction to take place. PMID:26610480

  4. Polyclonal Recipient nTregs Are Superior to Donor or Third-Party Tregs in the Induction of Transplantation Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Pilat, Nina; Klaus, Christoph; Hock, Karin; Baranyi, Ulrike; Unger, Lukas; Mahr, Benedikt; Farkas, Andreas M; Wrba, Fritz; Wekerle, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Induction of donor-specific tolerance is still considered as the "Holy Grail" in transplantation medicine. The mixed chimerism approach is virtually the only tolerance approach that was successfully translated into the clinical setting. We have previously reported successful induction of chimerism and tolerance using cell therapy with recipient T regulatory cells (Tregs) to avoid cytotoxic recipient treatment. Treg therapy is limited by the availability of cells as large-scale expansion is time-consuming and associated with the risk of contamination with effector cells. Using a costimulation-blockade based bone marrow (BM) transplantation (BMT) model with Treg therapy instead of cytoreductive recipient treatment we aimed to determine the most potent Treg population for clinical translation. Here we show that CD4(+)CD25(+) in vitro activated nTregs are superior to TGFβ induced iTregs in promoting the induction of chimerism and tolerance. Therapy with nTregs (but not iTregs) led to multilineage chimerism and donor-specific tolerance in mice receiving as few as 0.5 × 10(6) cells. Moreover, we show that only recipient Tregs, but not donor or third-party Tregs, had a beneficial effect on BM engraftment at the tested doses. Thus, recipient-type nTregs significantly improve chimerism and tolerance and might be the most potent Treg population for translation into the clinical setting.

  5. Polyclonal Recipient nTregs Are Superior to Donor or Third-Party Tregs in the Induction of Transplantation Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Pilat, Nina; Klaus, Christoph; Hock, Karin; Baranyi, Ulrike; Unger, Lukas; Mahr, Benedikt; Farkas, Andreas M.; Wrba, Fritz; Wekerle, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Induction of donor-specific tolerance is still considered as the “Holy Grail” in transplantation medicine. The mixed chimerism approach is virtually the only tolerance approach that was successfully translated into the clinical setting. We have previously reported successful induction of chimerism and tolerance using cell therapy with recipient T regulatory cells (Tregs) to avoid cytotoxic recipient treatment. Treg therapy is limited by the availability of cells as large-scale expansion is time-consuming and associated with the risk of contamination with effector cells. Using a costimulation-blockade based bone marrow (BM) transplantation (BMT) model with Treg therapy instead of cytoreductive recipient treatment we aimed to determine the most potent Treg population for clinical translation. Here we show that CD4+CD25+ in vitro activated nTregs are superior to TGFβ induced iTregs in promoting the induction of chimerism and tolerance. Therapy with nTregs (but not iTregs) led to multilineage chimerism and donor-specific tolerance in mice receiving as few as 0.5 × 106 cells. Moreover, we show that only recipient Tregs, but not donor or third-party Tregs, had a beneficial effect on BM engraftment at the tested doses. Thus, recipient-type nTregs significantly improve chimerism and tolerance and might be the most potent Treg population for translation into the clinical setting. PMID:26273682

  6. Discontinuation of Living Donor Liver Transplantation due to Donor's Intraoperative Latex-Induced Anaphylactic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Shinoda, Masahiro; Tanabe, Minoru; Nagao, Keisuke; Kitago, Minoru; Fujisaki, Hiroto; Odaira, Masanori; Kawachi, Shigeyuki; Itano, Osamu; Obara, Hideaki; Matsubara, Kentaro; Shimojima, Naoki; Fuchimoto, Yasushi; Hoshino, Ken; Amagai, Masayuki; Kuroda, Tatsuo; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2012-01-01

    We report on a 33-year-old female liver donor candidate who developed intraoperative latex-induced anaphylactic shock during surgery for living donor transplantation. She was the mother of the organ recipient, who was a 9-year-old boy with biliary atresia. We planned extended lateral segmentectomy for her. Although we dissected the ligament around the left lobe, the systolic blood pressure suddenly dropped and her body became flushed and warm. We administered transfusion and an ephedrine injection to recover the blood pressure. Because she recovered after the treatment, we restarted the procedure. However, she went into shock again within a few minutes. We decided to discontinue the operation. Postoperative blood tests revealed an increase in IgE-RAST and basophil activation, suggesting that the anaphylactic shock was induced by latex. Because latex allergy has become a public health problem, this allergy should be kept in mind as a potential donor operation risk. PMID:23294079

  7. [Fulminant hepatitis induced by disulfiram in a patient with alcoholic cirrhosis. Survival after liver transplantation].

    PubMed

    Vanjak, D; Samuel, D; Gosset, F; Derrida, S; Moreau, R; Soupison, T; Soulier, A; Bismuth, H; Sicot, C

    1989-12-01

    Fulminant hepatitis was observed in a 44-year-old patient with cirrhosis, 38 days after the beginning of a treatment by disulfiram. Hepatitis was associated with fever and hypereosinophilia. Liver transplantation was performed with success. We reviewed 15 previously published cases of disulfiram-induced hepatitis. They occurred from 10 to 180 days after the beginning of the treatment by disulfiram, aminotransferases were increased whereas alkaline phosphatases were not markedly changed; there was either focal or widespread necrosis. Fulminant hepatitis was observed mainly in patients with alcoholic chronic liver disease or in patients who continued to ingest disulfiram while jaundice was already present. An immunoallergic mechanism is thought to be responsible for disulfiram-induced hepatitis. PMID:2625187

  8. Expression and inducibility of cytochrome P450 isoforms in 1-year-old intrasplenic liver cell transplants in rats.

    PubMed

    Lupp, Amelie; Danz, Manfred; Müller, Dieter; Klinger, Wolfgang

    2002-03-01

    Syngenic fetal liver tissue suspensions were transplanted into the spleens of 60- to 90-day-old male Fischer 344 inbred rats. Transplant recipients were compared with age-matched control rats. One year after surgery, the animals were treated orally with beta-naphthoflavone (BNF), phenobarbital (PB), dexamethasone (DEX) or the respective solvents 24 or 48 h before being killed. Expression of cytochrome P450 (P450) isoforms in spleens and orthotopic livers was assessed by immunohistochemistry and P450-dependent monooxygenase functions by the model reactions ethoxyresorufin O-deethylation (EROD), ethoxycoumarin O-deethylation (ECOD), pentoxyresorufin O-depentylation (PROD) and ethylmorphine N-demethylation (EMND). Spleens of control animals displayed almost no expression of P450 isoforms and P450-mediated monooxygenase functions. Similar to liver, in the transplanted hepatocytes no P450 1A1 but distinct P450 2B1 and 3A2 expression was observed. Furthermore, the transplant-containing spleens displayed significant EROD, ECOD, PROD and EMND activities. Similar to normal liver, BNF treatment enhanced P450 1A1 and 2B1, PB induced P450 2B1 and 3A2, and DEX induced P450 3A2 expression in the transplanted hepatocytes. Correspondingly, in the transplant-containing spleens EROD, ECOD and PROD activities were significantly enhanced following BNF treatment, EROD, ECOD, PROD and EMND activities after PB administration, and EMND activity by DEX treatment. These results demonstrate that hepatocytes originating from fetal liver tissue suspensions can survive in the spleen at least for 1 year. They have differentiated into adult hepatocytes and even 1 year after transplantation express different P450 isoforms which are inducible by BNF, PB and DEX, corresponding to normal adult liver.

  9. Rat Heterotopic Heart Transplantation Model to Investigate Unloading-Induced Myocardial Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xuebin; Segiser, Adrian; Carrel, Thierry P.; Tevaearai Stahel, Hendrik T.; Most, Henriette

    2016-01-01

    Unloading of the failing left ventricle in order to achieve myocardial reverse remodeling and improvement of contractile function has been developed as a strategy with the increasing frequency of implantation of left ventricular assist devices in clinical practice. But, reverse remodeling remains an elusive target, with high variability and exact mechanisms still largely unclear. The small animal model of heterotopic heart transplantation (hHTX) in rodents has been widely implemented to study the effects of complete and partial unloading on cardiac failing and non-failing tissue to better understand the structural and molecular changes that underlie myocardial recovery. We herein review the current knowledge on the effects of volume unloading the left ventricle via different methods of hHTX in rats, differentiating between changes that contribute to functional recovery and adverse effects observed in unloaded myocardium. We focus on methodological aspects of heterotopic transplantation, which increase the correlation between the animal model and the setting of the failing unloaded human heart. Last, but not least, we describe the late use of sophisticated techniques to acquire data, such as small animal MRI and catheterization, as well as ways to assess unloaded hearts under “reloaded” conditions. While giving regard to certain limitations, heterotopic rat heart transplantation certainly represents the crucial model to mimic unloading-induced changes in the heart and as such the intricacies and challenges deserve highest consideration. Careful translational research will further improve our knowledge of the reverse remodeling process and how to potentiate its effect in order to achieve recovery of contractile function in more patients. PMID:27807535

  10. Anti-thymocyte globulin-induced hyperbilirubinemia in patients with myelofibrosis undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ecsedi, Matyas; Schmohl, Jörg; Zeiser, Robert; Drexler, Beatrice; Halter, Jörg; Medinger, Michael; Duyster, Justus; Kanz, Lothar; Passweg, Jakob; Finke, Jürgen; Bethge, Wolfgang; Lengerke, Claudia

    2016-10-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT) remains the only curative treatment option for myelofibrosis (MF) despite the emergence of novel targeted therapies. To reduce graft rejection and graft-versus-host disease (GvHD), current allo-HCT protocols often include in vivo T lymphocyte depletion using polyclonal anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG). Shortly after ATG administration, an immediate inflammatory response with fever, chills, and laboratory alterations such as cytopenias, elevation of serum C-reactive protein, bilirubin, and transaminases can develop. Here, we explore whether MF patients, who commonly exhibit extramedullary hematopoiesis in the liver, might be particularly susceptible to ATG-induced liver toxicity. To test this hypothesis, we analyzed 130 control and 94 MF patients from three transplant centers treated with or without ATG during the allo-HCT conditioning regimen. Indeed, hyperbilirubinemia was found in nearly every MF patient treated with ATG (MF-ATG 54/60 = 90 %) as compared to non-ATG treated MF (MF-noATG 15/34 = 44.1 %, p < 0.001) and respectively ATG-treated non-MF patients of the control group (control-ATG, 43/77 = 56 %, p < 0.001). In contrast, transaminases were only inconsistently elevated. Hyperbilirubinemia was in most cases self-limiting and not predictive of increased incidence of non-relapse mortality, hepatic sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (SOS) or liver GvHD. In sum, awareness of this stereotypic bilirubin elevation in MF patients treated with ATG provides a relatively benign explanation for hyperbilirubinemia occurring in these patients during the early transplant. However, attention to drug levels of biliary excreted drugs is warranted, since altered bile flow may influence their clearance and enhance toxicity (e.g., busulfan, antifungal agents). PMID:27480090

  11. Thoracic organ transplantation: laboratory methods.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jignesh K; Kobashigawa, Jon A

    2013-01-01

    Although great progress has been achieved in thoracic organ transplantation through the development of effective immunosuppression, there is still significant risk of rejection during the early post-transplant period, creating a need for routine monitoring for both acute antibody and cellular mediated rejection. The currently available multiplexed, microbead assays utilizing solubilized HLA antigens afford the capability of sensitive detection and identification of HLA and non-HLA specific antibodies. These assays are being used to assess the relative strength of donor specific antibodies; to permit performance of virtual crossmatches which can reduce the waiting time to transplantation; to monitor antibody levels during desensitization; and for heart transplants to monitor antibodies post-transplant. For cell mediated immune responses, the recent development of gene expression profiling has allowed noninvasive monitoring of heart transplant recipients yielding predictive values for acute cellular rejection. T cell immune monitoring in heart and lung transplant recipients has allowed individual tailoring of immunosuppression, particularly to minimize risk of infection. While the current antibody and cellular laboratory techniques have enhanced the ability to manage thoracic organ transplant recipients, future developments from improved understanding of microchimerism and graft tolerance may allow more refined allograft monitoring techniques. PMID:23775735

  12. Amelioration of Hyperbilirubinemia in Gunn Rats after Transplantation of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yong; Li, Yanfeng; Wang, Xia; Zhang, Wei; Sauer, Vanessa; Chang, Chan-Jung; Han, Bing; Tchaikovskaya, Tatyana; Avsar, Yesim; Tafaleng, Edgar; Madhusudana Girija, Sanal; Tar, Krisztina; Polgar, Zsuzsanna; Strom, Stephen; Bouhassira, Eric E.; Guha, Chandan; Fox, Ira J.; Roy-Chowdhury, Jayanta; Roy-Chowdhury, Namita

    2015-01-01

    Summary Hepatocyte transplantation has the potential to cure inherited liver diseases, but its application is impeded by a scarcity of donor livers. Therefore, we explored whether transplantation of hepatocyte-like cells (iHeps) differentiated from human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) could ameliorate inherited liver diseases. iPSCs reprogrammed from human skin fibroblasts were differentiated to iHeps, which were transplanted into livers of uridinediphosphoglucuronate glucuronosyltransferase-1 (UGT1A1)-deficient Gunn rats, a model of Crigler-Najjar syndrome 1 (CN1), where elevated unconjugated bilirubin causes brain injury and death. To promote iHep proliferation, 30% of the recipient liver was X-irradiated before transplantation, and hepatocyte growth factor was expressed. After transplantation, UGT1A1+ iHep clusters constituted 2.5%–7.5% of the preconditioned liver lobe. A decline of serum bilirubin by 30%–60% and biliary excretion of bilirubin glucuronides indicated that transplanted iHeps expressed UGT1A1 activity, a postnatal function of hepatocytes. Therefore, iHeps warrant further exploration as a renewable source of hepatocytes for treating inherited liver diseases. PMID:26074313

  13. Vascular Endothelium as a Target of Immune Response in Renal Transplant Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Piotti, Giovanni; Palmisano, Alessandra; Maggiore, Umberto; Buzio, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    This review of clinical and experimental studies aims at analyzing the interplay between graft endothelium and host immune system in renal transplantation, and how it affects the survival of the graft. Graft endothelium is indeed the first barrier between self and non-self that is encountered by host lymphocytes upon reperfusion of vascularized solid transplants. Endothelial cells (EC) express all the major sets of antigens (Ag) that elicit host immune response, and therefore represent a preferential target in organ rejection. Some of the Ag expressed by EC are target of the antibody-mediated response, such as the AB0 blood group system, the human leukocyte antigens (HLA), and MHC class I related chain A antigens (MICA) systems, and the endothelial cell-restricted Ag; for each of these systems, the mechanisms of interaction and damage of both preformed and de novo donor-specific antibodies are reviewed along with their impact on renal graft survival. Moreover, the rejection process can force injured EC to expose cryptic self-Ag, toward which an autoimmune response mounts, overlapping to the allo-immune response in the damaging of the graft. Not only are EC a passive target of the host immune response but also an active player in lymphocyte activation; therefore, their interaction with allogenic T-cells is analyzed on the basis of experimental in vitro and in vivo studies, according to the patterns of expression of the HLA class I and II and the co-stimulatory molecules specific for cytotoxic and helper T-cells. Finally, as the response that follows transplantation has proven to be not necessarily destructive, the factors that foster graft endothelium functioning in spite of rejection, and how they could be therapeutically harnessed to promote long-term graft acceptance, are described: accommodation that is resistance of EC to donor-specific antibodies, and endothelial cell ability to induce Foxp3+ regulatory T-cells, that are crucial mediators of tolerance. PMID

  14. Differential migration of passenger leukocytes and rapid deletion of naive alloreactive CD8 T cells after mouse liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Tay, Szun S; Lu, Bo; Sierro, Fred; Benseler, Volker; McGuffog, Claire M; Bishop, G Alex; Cowan, Peter J; McCaughan, Geoffrey W; Dwyer, Karen M; Bowen, David G; Bertolino, Patrick

    2013-11-01

    Donor passenger leukocytes (PLs) from transplanted livers migrate to recipient lymphoid tissues, where they are thought to induce the deletion of donor-specific T cells and tolerance. Difficulties in tracking alloreactive T cells and PLs in rats and in performing this complex surgery in mice have limited progress in identifying the contribution of PL subsets and sites and the kinetics of T cell deletion. Here we developed a mouse liver transplant model in which PLs, recipient cells, and a reporter population of transgenic CD8 T cells specific for the graft could be easily distinguished and quantified in allografts and recipient organs by flow cytometry. All PL subsets circulated rapidly via the blood as soon as 1.5 hours after transplantation. By 24 hours, PLs were distributed differently in the lymph nodes and spleen, whereas donor natural killer and natural killer T cells remained in the liver and blood. Reporter T cells were activated in both liver and lymphoid tissues, but their numbers dramatically decreased within the first 48 hours. These results provide the first unequivocal demonstration of the differential recirculation of liver PL subsets after transplantation, and show that alloreactive CD8 T cells are deleted more rapidly than initially reported. This model will be useful for dissecting early events leading to the spontaneous acceptance of liver transplants.

  15. Clinical strategy for induction of transplantation tolerance through mixed chimerism.

    PubMed

    Cosimi, A Benedict; Sachs, David H; Sykes, Megan; Kawai, Tatsuo

    2013-01-01

    Following the demonstration that transplant tolerance could be induced in non-human primate recipients treated with non-myeloablative conditioning that resulted in only transient chimerism, we began in 1998 to evaluate this approach first in patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD), secondary to multiple myeloma (MM). A total of 10 patients with ESRD and MM have been treated with this initial protocol. Only 2 recipients developed evidence of reversible renal allograft rejection after stopping immunosuppression. Long-term (up to 14 years) operational renal allograft tolerance has been observed in all 10 patients, even in those with transient hematopoietic chimerism. Control of the MM has been less complete, as recurrent disease developed in five of these patients, three of whom expired. Nevertheless, in view of the essentially 100% 3-5 year mortality typically expected with alternative treatments for this challenging population, it has been suggested that combined kidney and donor bone marrow transplantation (CKBMT) following non-myeloablative conditioning should become the standard therapy for patients with ESRD secondary to MM (27). These encouraging results, as well as the acceptable morbidity observed in cancer patients receiving non-myeloablative human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-mismatched bone marrow transplantation in our center, led us to next evaluate CKBMT in 10 patients of HLA-mismatched transplants. All 10 subjects developed transient chimerism and in seven of these, immunosuppression was successfully discontinued. Four subjects continue to be immunosuppression free for periods of 4.5-11 years, while in three, reinstitution of immunosuppression was advised or accomplished after 5-8 years due to recurrence of original disease or chronic antibody mediated rejection. Donor-specific antibodies were frequently detectable in the earlier recipients. In contrast, no donor-specific antibodies were detected after immunosuppression was discontinued in the last

  16. Bone Marrow Transplantation Transfers Age-Related Susceptibility to Neovascular Remodeling in Murine Laser-Induced Choroidal Neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Espinosa-Heidmann, Diego G.; Malek, Goldis; Mettu, Priyatham S.; Caicedo, Alejandro; Saloupis, Peter; Gach, Sarah; Dunnon, Askia K.; Hu, Peng; Spiga, Maria-Grazia; Cousins, Scott W.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Neovascular remodeling (NVR), the progression of small capillaries into large-caliber arterioles with perivascular fibrosis, represents a major therapeutic challenge in neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Neovascular remodeling occurs after laser-induced choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in aged but not young mice. Additionally, bone marrow–derived cells, including macrophages, endothelial precursor cells, and mesenchymal precursor cells, contribute to CNV severity. In this study, we investigated the impact of aged bone marrow transplantation (BMT) on the degree of fibrosis, size, and vascular morphology of CNV lesions in a mouse model of laser-induced CNV. Methods. Young (2 months) and old (16 months) mice were transplanted with green fluorescent protein (GFP)-labeled bone marrow isolated from either young or old donors. Laser CNV was induced 1 month following transplant, and eyes were analyzed via choroidal flat mounts and immunohistochemistry 1 month postlaser. The identity of cells infiltrating CNV lesions was determined using specific markers for the labeled transplanted cells (GFP+), macrophages (F4/80+), perivascular mesenchymal-derived cells (smooth muscle actin, SMA+), and endothelial cells (CD31+). Results. Bone marrow transplantation from aged mice transferred susceptibility to NVR into young recipients. Inversely, transplantation of young marrow into old mice prevented NVR, preserving small size and minimal fibrosis. Mice with NVR demonstrated a greater relative contribution of marrow-derived SMA+ perivascular mesenchymal cells as compared to other cells. Conclusions. Our findings indicate that the status of bone marrow is an important determining factor of neovascular severity. Furthermore, we find that perivascular mesenchymal cells, rather than endothelial cells, derived from aged bone marrow may contribute to increased CNV severity in this murine model of experimental neovascularization. PMID:24135751

  17. Seasonal and pollution-induced variations in biomarkers of transplanted mussels within the Beagle Channel.

    PubMed

    Giarratano, Erica; Gil, Mónica N; Malanga, Gabriela

    2011-06-01

    The occurrence of biomarker variations linked to environmental factors makes it difficult to distinguish the effect of pollution. In an attempt to evaluate spatial and seasonal effects of environmental parameters on biomarker responses, mussels Mytilus edulis chilensis coming from an aquaculture farm were transplanted to several points within Ushuaia Bay (Beagle Channel) for 6 weeks in summer and winter. Activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione-S-transferase and levels of lipid peroxidation were measured in gills and digestive gland. Cu, Zn, Fe, Cd and Pb concentrations were also assessed. Results indicated a significant effect of seasons on biological responses as well as in metal bioaccumulation showing the influence of natural factors such as dissolved oxygen, temperature and food availability. The interdependence of those environmental factors is important for the homeostasis of thermoconformers, especially regarding their oxidative metabolism and should also be taken into consideration to distinguish natural from pollution-induced variations.

  18. Bidirectional homeostatic plasticity induced by interneuron cell death and transplantation in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Howard, MacKenzie Allen; Rubenstein, John L. R.; Baraban, Scott C.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic changes in excitability and activity can induce homeostatic plasticity. These perturbations may be associated with neurological disorders, particularly those involving loss or dysfunction of GABA interneurons. In distal-less homeobox 1 (Dlx1−/−) mice with late-onset interneuron loss and reduced inhibition, we observed both excitatory synaptic silencing and decreased intrinsic neuronal excitability. These homeostatic changes do not fully restore normal circuit function, because synaptic silencing results in enhanced potential for long-term potentiation and abnormal gamma oscillations. Transplanting medial ganglionic eminence interneuron progenitors to introduce new GABAergic interneurons, we demonstrate restoration of hippocampal function. Specifically, miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents, input resistance, hippocampal long-term potentiation, and gamma oscillations are all normalized. Thus, in vivo homeostatic plasticity is a highly dynamic and bidirectional process that responds to changes in inhibition. PMID:24344303

  19. Thiabendazole-induced acute liver failure requiring transplantation and subsequent diagnosis of polyarteritis nodosa.

    PubMed

    Groh, Matthieu; Blanche, Philippe; Calmus, Yvon; Guillevin, Loïc

    2012-01-01

    Polyarteritis nodosa (PAN), a systemic necrotising vasculitis that affects medium- and small-sized arteries, has visceral involvement in 40-60% of the patients. According to the Five-Factor Score (FFS), it is associated with poor outcome. We describe a patient who underwent orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) for severe ductopenia induced by thiabendazole that was empirically prescribed for chronic hypereosinophilia. Eleven years later, despite immunosuppressive treatment to prevent graft rejection, he developed mononeuritis multiplex; PAN was diagnosed. He also had severe recurrent ischaemic cholangitides because of post-OLT hepatic artery ligation to treat a postoperative severe haematemesis. His outcome was favourable after second OLT, under steroids, cyclophosphamide pulses and tacrolimus. In retrospect, his initial symptoms and hypereosinophilia were probably attributable to PAN.

  20. Calpain inhibitor attenuates ER stress-induced apoptosis in injured spinal cord after bone mesenchymal stem cells transplantation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Shi, Dongling; Song, Xinghui; Chen, Yingying; Wang, Linlin; Zhang, Xiaoming

    2016-07-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) therapy for tissue repair is limited by low survival of cells transplanted in the recipient sites after spinal cord injury (SCI). Here, we investigated the effects of a calpain inhibitor (MDL28170) on BMSCs survival by a rat model of spinal cord injury in vitro and in vivo. Conditioned medium from hypoxia injured VSC4.1 motor neurons (Hypoxia-CM) were collected to mimic the micro-environment of injured spinal cord. Tunicamycin was also applied to induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in BMSCs. The CCK-8 assay, LDH leakage assay and flow cytometer assay demonstrated that MDL28170 could enhance BMSCs survival in response to Hypoxia-CM and tunicamycin. Moreover, MDL28170 significantly enhanced GFP-positive BMSCs survival in vivo after transplantation into the contused spinal cord of SCI rats. The protective effects of MDL28170 on BMSCs survival may inhibit the activation of calpain and the downstream ER stress-induced apoptosis. The present results suggested for the first time that MDL28170 with BMSCs transplant helped to rescue cells in injured spinal cord by modulating the ER stress-induced apoptosis. The calpain inhibitor, MDL28170 may have the promising new strategies for promoting the survival of transplanted BMSCs on cell-based regenerative medicine.

  1. Transplantation of human umbilical mesenchymal stem cells attenuates dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yan; Lin, Lianjie; Wang, Qiushi; Jin, Yu; Zhang, Ying; Cao, Yong; Zheng, Changqing

    2015-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis is a major form of inflammatory bowel disease and increases the risk of the development of colorectal carcinoma. The anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) make them promising tools for treating immune-mediated and inflammatory diseases. However, the lack of robust technique for harvesting and expanding of MSC has hampered the use of bone marrow and umbilical cord blood derived MSC in clinical applications. In the present study, we investigated the intestinal protective effects of Wharton's jelly-derived umbilical MSC (UMSC) on dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis in mice. The severity of colitis in mice was assessed using bodyweight loss, stool consistency, rectal bleeding, colon shortening and haematological parameters. Colonic myeloperoxidase and pro-inflammatory cytokines levels were also measured. Furthermore, the expression of cyclooxygenase 2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase in the colon were detected. In addition, intestinal permeability and tight junction proteins expressions in the colon were examined as well. The results showed that Wharton's jelly-derived UMSC significantly diminished the severity of colitis, reduced histolopathological score, and decreased myeloperoxidase activity and cytokines levels. Furthermore, the UMSC markedly decreased the expression of cyclooxygenase 2and inducible nitric oxide synthase in the colon. In addition, transplantation of UMSC reduced intestinal permeability and upregulated the expression of tight junction proteins. These results show that the anti-inflammation and regulation of tight junction proteins by Wharton's jelly-derived UMSC ameliorates colitis.

  2. Transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells recruits trophic macrophages to induce pancreatic beta cell regeneration in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiaocang; Han, Zhi-Bo; Zhao, Hui; Liu, Qiang

    2014-08-01

    Alleviation of hyperglycemia in chemical-induced diabetic mice has been reported after bone marrow transplantation. Nevertheless, the underlying mechanism remains elusive. In the present study, we transplanted genetically labeled primary mouse mesenchymal stem cells into the pancreas of the streptozotocin-treated hyperglycemic isogeneic mice, resulting in a decrease in blood glucose due to a recovery in beta cell mass. Further analysis revealed that the increase in beta cell mass was predominantly attributable to beta cell replication. The grafted mesenchymal stem cells did not transdifferentiate into beta cells themselves but recruited and polarized macrophages in a Stromal cell-derived factor 1-dependent manner, which in turn promoted beta cell replication. Our finding thus suggests that transplantation of autogenic mesenchymal stem cells may increase functional beta cell mass by boosting beta cell replication in diabetes. PMID:24915493

  3. Renal transplantation induces mitochondrial uncoupling, increased kidney oxygen consumption, and decreased kidney oxygen tension.

    PubMed

    Papazova, Diana A; Friederich-Persson, Malou; Joles, Jaap A; Verhaar, Marianne C

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia is an acknowledged pathway to renal injury and ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) and is known to reduce renal oxygen tension (Po2). We hypothesized that renal I/R increases oxidative damage and induces mitochondrial uncoupling, resulting in increased oxygen consumption and hence kidney hypoxia. Lewis rats underwent syngenic renal transplantation (TX) and contralateral nephrectomy. Controls were uninephrectomized (1K-CON) or left untreated (2K-CON). After 7 days, urinary excretion of protein and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances were measured, and after 14 days glomerular filtration rate (GFR), renal blood flow, whole kidney Qo2, cortical Po2, kidney cortex mitochondrial uncoupling, renal oxidative damage, and tubulointerstitial injury were assessed. TX, compared with 1K-CON, resulted in mitochondrial uncoupling mediated via uncoupling protein-2 (16 ± 3.3 vs. 0.9 ± 0.4 pmol O2 · s(-1)· mg protein(-1), P < 0.05) and increased whole kidney Qo2 (55 ± 16 vs. 33 ± 10 μmol O2/min, P < 0.05). Corticomedullary Po2 was lower in TX compared with 1K-CON (30 ± 13 vs. 47 ± 4 μM, P < 0.05) whereas no significant difference was observed between 2K-CON and 1K-CON rats. Proteinuria, oxidative damage, and the tubulointerstitial injury score were not significantly different in 1K-CON and TX. Treatment of donors for 5 days with mito-TEMPO reduced mitochondrial uncoupling but did not affect renal hemodynamics, Qo2, Po2, or injury. Collectively, our results demonstrate increased mitochondrial uncoupling as an early event after experimental renal transplantation associated with increased oxygen consumption and kidney hypoxia in the absence of increases in markers of damage.

  4. Acute Antibody-Mediated Rejection in Renal Transplantation: Current Clinical Management

    PubMed Central

    Schinstock, Carrie; Stegall, Mark D.

    2014-01-01

    Acute antibody mediated rejection (AMR) is recognized as a major cause of graft loss in renal transplant recipients. Early acute AMR in the first few days after transplantation occurs primarily in sensitized renal transplant recipients with donor-specific alloantibody at the time of transplant and is a relatively “pure” form of acute AMR. Late acute AMR occurs months to years after transplantation and is commonly a mixed cellular and humoral rejection. While there is no consensus regarding optimum treatment, we contend that rational therapeutic approaches are emerging and the acute episode can be managed in most instances. However, new therapies are needed to prevent ongoing chronic injury in these patients.

  5. Donor non-specific MICA antibodies in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Sapák, Michal; Chreňová, Silvia; Tirpáková, Jana; Žilinská, Zuzana; Ďurmanová, Vladimíra; Shawkatová, Ivana; Jakuš, Vladimír; Kuba, Daniel; Buc, Milan

    2014-02-01

    Despite recent advances in solid organ transplantations, an antibody mediated rejection caused by donor specific antibodies is still a major problem in kidney graft survival. Besides HLA-induced humoral response, antibodies against MICA antigens have recently attracted attention because of their possible role in graft rejection. The aim of our study was to establish whether renal recipients produce antibodies against MICA molecules due to the transplantation and if they are specific for MICA antigens of the donors. MICA antibody screening was performed in 124 kidney recipient sera. 22 sera, that were found to be MICA antibody positive, were further examined for MICA antibody profiles and compared with donor MICA alleles. The analysis of MICA antibody positive sera showed mostly more complex reactivity patterns. A significant fraction of patient sera (59%) reacted not only with the donor MICA antigens, but also with other MICA patterns. A match between antibody specificities and MICA antigens was observed in 41% of renal recipients only. On the other hand, as much as in 36% of recipient sera were detected antibodies against their own MICA molecules. We did not prove a complete correlation between the recipient MICA antibody specificities and MICA antigens of the donor. We assume that MICA antibody induction occurs not only due to the allogeneic stimulation itself but also due to other factors that need to be elucidated.

  6. Polyomavirus BK Induces Inflammation via Up-regulation of CXCL10 at Translation Levels in Renal Transplant Patients with Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Kariminik, Ashraf; Dabiri, Shahriar; Yaghobi, Ramin

    2016-08-01

    Polyomavirus BK-associated nephropathy (BKAN) is an important mechanism for renal losing after kidney transplantation. It seems that Polyomavirus BK can induce nephropathy by direct cell lysis and stimulation of the immune system and induction of inflammation. CXCL10 is a pro-inflammatory cytokine which stimulates the migration and activation of immune cells to the infected sites. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to evaluate the messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels of CXCL10 in the Polyomavirus BK-infected and Polyomavirus BK-non-infected post renal transplanted nephropathic patients in comparison to healthy controls. In this cross-sectional study, Polyomavirus BK-infected post renal transplanted nephropathic patients, Polyomavirus BK-non-infected post renal transplanted nephropathic patients, and healthy controls were enrolled to evaluate mRNA and protein levels of CXCL10 by real-time PCR and ELISA techniques, respectively. mRNA levels of CXCL10 were not significantly different among participants, while serum levels of CXCL10 were significantly elevated in the Polyomavirus BK-infected patients when compared to non-infected patients as well as controls and in non-infected patients when compared to healthy controls. Due to the results, it seems that Polyomavirus BK may potentially induce renal losing through stimulation of inflammation via increasing translation of CXCL10, as a pro-inflammatory chemokine.

  7. Adipose-derived stromal cell autologous transplantation ameliorates pulmonary arterial hypertension induced by shunt flow in rat models.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kai; Liu, Ruifang; Cao, Guangqing; Sun, Hourong; Wang, Xuping; Wu, Shuming

    2011-06-01

    Hyperkinetic pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) severely influences the success of operation for congenital heart disease and deteriorates the prognosis of disease. Adipose-derived stromal cell (ADSC) is a good alternative multipotent stem cell for regeneration medicine. PAH rat models were established by arteriovenous shunt and ADSCs were isolated, cultured, and labeled in vitro. Twelve weeks after shunt operation, rats received an injection of 5 × 10(7) ADSCs. Two weeks after transplantation, hemodynamic abnormality induced by the shunt flow and the hypertrophy of right ventricle were reversed, which was confirmed by invasive measurement and echocardiography examination. The PAH rats receiving cell transplantation demonstrated decreased remodeling of small arteries in the lung; immunohistochemistry analysis showed augmented expression of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and increased number of pulmonary small arteries. Western blot and real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction indicated that the protein and mRNA levels of HGF and endothelial nitric oxide synthase increased, respectively, in the lung after cell transplantation. Our results suggested that ADSC transplantation can ameliorate PAH induced by shunt flow by enhancing the expression of HGF and subsequently promoting angiogenesis in the injured lung tissue. PMID:20828291

  8. Impairment of glucose-induced insulin secretion in human pancreatic islets transplanted to diabetic nude mice.

    PubMed

    Jansson, L; Eizirik, D L; Pipeleers, D G; Borg, L A; Hellerström, C; Andersson, A

    1995-08-01

    Hyperglycemia-induced beta-cell dysfunction may be an important component in the pathogenesis of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. However, most available data in this field were obtained from rodent islets. To investigate the relevance of this hypothesis for human beta-cells in vivo, human pancreatic islets were transplanted under the renal capsule of nude mice. Experimental groups were chosen so that grafted islets were exposed to either hyper- or normoglycemia or combinations of these for 4 or 6 wk. Grafts of normoglycemic recipients responded with an increased insulin release to a glucose stimulus during perfusion, whereas grafts of hyperglycemic recipients failed to respond to glucose. The insulin content of the grafts in the latter groups was only 10% of those observed in controls. Recipients initially hyperglycemic (4 wk), followed by 2 wk of normoglycemia regained a normal graft insulin content, but a decreased insulin response to glucose remained. No ultrastructural signs of beta-cell damage were observed, with the exception of increased glycogen deposits in animals hyperglycemic at the time of killing. It is concluded that prolonged exposure to a diabetic environment induces a long-term secretory defect in human beta-cells, which is not dependent on the size of the islet insulin stores.

  9. Intestinal Transplant Inflammation: the Third Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Kroemer, Alexander; Cosentino, Christopher; Kaiser, Jason; Matsumoto, Cal S; Fishbein, Thomas M

    2016-11-01

    Intestinal transplantation is the most immunologically complex of all abdominal organ transplants. Understanding the role both humoral and innate and adaptive cellular immunity play in intestinal transplantation is critical to improving outcomes and increasing indications for patients suffering from intestinal failure. Recent findings highlighting the impact of donor-specific antibodies on intestinal allografts, the role of NOD2 as a key regulator of intestinal immunity, the protective effects of innate lymphoid cells, and the role of Th17 in acute cellular rejection are reviewed here. PMID:27645751

  10. Intestinal Transplant Inflammation: the Third Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Kroemer, Alexander; Cosentino, Christopher; Kaiser, Jason; Matsumoto, Cal S; Fishbein, Thomas M

    2016-11-01

    Intestinal transplantation is the most immunologically complex of all abdominal organ transplants. Understanding the role both humoral and innate and adaptive cellular immunity play in intestinal transplantation is critical to improving outcomes and increasing indications for patients suffering from intestinal failure. Recent findings highlighting the impact of donor-specific antibodies on intestinal allografts, the role of NOD2 as a key regulator of intestinal immunity, the protective effects of innate lymphoid cells, and the role of Th17 in acute cellular rejection are reviewed here.

  11. Cord blood transplantation in Japan.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Naoyuki

    2016-05-01

    Cord blood transplantation (CBT) has increasingly been used in Japan and the annual number of CBT now exceeds 1,200. The cumulative number of CBT reached 12,853 in 2015, accounting for almost 1/3 of total CBT performed worldwide. It is true that smaller body size and lower costs, as compared to western countries, have been advantages for Japanese people in using CB as graft alternative. In addition, several novel findings regarding serious issues following CBT have been obtained, which further enhanced the use of CB. First, several mechanisms of engraftment failure following CBT other than cell dose have been reported, such as the presence of donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies or the development of hemophagocytic syndrome. Second, unique profiles of infectious complications following CBT have been reported, such as higher incidences of early bacterial infections and HHV-6 encephalitis, as compared to those following bone marrow (BM)/peripheral blood (PB) transplants. Third, the incidence of disease relapse was comparable to those following BM/PB transplants. Novel pre-transplant conditioning regimens using intravenous busulfan have been investigated with promising results being obtained to date. A recent analysis of Japanese transplant registry data revealed similar survival following CBT to HLA-matched unrelated BM/PB transplants. PMID:27263776

  12. Chimerism and tolerance in transplantation.

    PubMed

    Starzl, Thomas E

    2004-10-01

    Studies in experimental models (1953-1956) demonstrated that acquired donor-specific allotolerance in immunologically immature or irradiated animals is strongly associated with donor leukocyte chimerism. Bone marrow transplantation in immune-deficient or cytoablated human recipients was a logical extension (1968). In contrast, clinical (1959) and then experimental organ transplantation was systematically accomplished in the apparent absence of leukocyte chimerism. Consequently, it was assumed for many years that success with organ and bone marrow transplantation involved fundamentally different mechanisms. With the discovery in 1992 of small numbers of donor leukocytes in the tissues or blood of long-surviving organ recipients (microchimerism), we concluded that organ engraftment was a form of leukocyte chimerism-dependent partial tolerance. In this initially controversial paradigm, alloengraftment after both kinds of transplantation is the product of a double immune reaction in which responses, each to the other, of coexisting donor and recipient immune systems results in variable reciprocal clonal exhaustion, followed by peripheral clonal deletion. It was proposed with Rolf Zinkernagel that the individual alloresponses are the equivalent of the MHC-restricted T cell recognition of, and host response to, intracellular parasites and that the mechanisms of immune responsiveness, or nonresponsiveness, are governed by the migration and localization of the respective antigens. Elucidation of the mechanisms of nonresponsiveness (clonal exhaustion-deletion and immune ignorance) and their regulation removed much of the historical mystique of transplantation. The insight was then applied to improve the timing and dosage of immunosuppression of current human transplant recipients.

  13. Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Co-stimulation Blockade Enhance Bone Marrow Engraftment and Induce Immunological Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Rajeshkumar, B.; Agrawal, P.; Rashighi, M.; Saidi, R. F.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Organ transplantation currently requires long-term immunosuppression. This is associated with multiple complications including infection, malignancy and other toxicities. Immunologic tolerance is considered the optimal solution to these limitations. Objective: To develop a simple and non-toxic regimen to induce mixed chimerism and tolerance using mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) in a murine model. Methods: Wild type C57BL6 (H2Dk) and Bal/C (H2Dd) mice were used as donors and recipients, respectively. We studied to achieve tolerance to skin grafts (SG) through mixed chimerism (MC) by simultaneous skin graft and non-myeloablative donor bone marrow transplantation (DBMT) +/– MSC. All recipients received rapamycin and CTLA-4 Ig without radiation. Results: DBMT+MSC combined with co-stimulation blockage and rapamycin led to stable mixed chimerism, expansion of Tregs population and donor-specific skin graft tolerance. The flow cytometry analysis revealed that recipient mice developed 15%–85% chimerism. The skin allografts survived for a long time. Elimination of MSC failed to induce mixed chimerism and tolerance. Conclusion: Our results demonstrate that donor-specific immune tolerance can be effectively induced by non-myeloablative DBMT-MSC combination without any additional cytoreductive treatment. This approach provides a promising and non-toxic allograft tolerance strategy. PMID:26082829

  14. Transplantation of placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cell-induced neural stem cells to treat spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi; Zhao, Wei; Liu, Wei; Zhou, Ye; Jia, Jingqiao; Yang, Lifeng

    2014-12-15

    Because of their strong proliferative capacity and multi-potency, placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells have gained interest as a cell source in the field of nerve damage repair. In the present study, human placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells were induced to differentiate into neural stem cells, which were then transplanted into the spinal cord after local spinal cord injury in rats. The motor functional recovery and pathological changes in the injured spinal cord were observed for 3 successive weeks. The results showed that human placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells can differentiate into neuron-like cells and that induced neural stem cells contribute to the restoration of injured spinal cord without causing transplant rejection. Thus, these cells promote the recovery of motor and sensory functions in a rat model of spinal cord injury. Therefore, human placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells may be useful as seed cells during the repair of spinal cord injury.

  15. CTLA4Ig prevents alloantibody formation following nonhuman primate islet transplantation using the CD40-specific antibody 3A8.

    PubMed

    Badell, I R; Russell, M C; Cardona, K; Shaffer, V O; Turner, A P; Avila, J G; Cano, J A; Leopardi, F V; Song, M; Strobert, E A; Ford, M L; Pearson, T C; Kirk, A D; Larsen, C P

    2012-07-01

    Islet transplantation to treat type 1 diabetes has been limited in part by toxicities of current immunosuppression and recipient humoral sensitization. Blockade of the CD28/CD80/86 and CD40/CD154 pathways has shown promise to remedy both these limitations, but translation has been hampered by difficulties in translating CD154-directed therapies. Prior CD40-directed regimens have led to prolonged islet survival, but fail to prevent humoral allosensitization. We therefore evaluated the addition of CTLA4Ig to a CD40 blockade-based regimen in nonhuman primate (NHP) alloislet transplantation. Diabetic rhesus macaques were transplanted allogeneic islets using the CD40-specific antibody 3A8, basiliximab induction, and sirolimus with or without CTLA4Ig maintenance therapy. Allograft survival was determined by fasting blood glucose levels and flow cytometric techniques were used to test for donor-specific antibody (DSA) formation. CTLA4Ig plus 3A8, basiliximab and sirolimus was well tolerated and induced long-term islet allograft survival. The addition of CTLA4Ig prevented DSA formation, but did not facilitate withdrawal of the 3A8-based regimen. Thus, CTLA4Ig combines with a CD40-specific regimen to prevent DSA formation in NHPs, and offers a potentially translatable calcineurin inhibitor-free protocol inclusive of a single investigational agent for use in clinical islet transplantation without relying upon CD154 blockade. PMID:22458552

  16. Diet-induced increase in plasma oxidized LDL promotes early fibrosis in a renal porcine auto-transplantation model

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In kidney transplantation, the prevalence of hypercholesterolemia as a co-morbidity factor known to affect graft function, is rising due to the increased number of older donors in response to organ shortage as well as to the hyperlipidemic effects of immunosuppressors in recipient. This study aimed to characterize the effects of hypercholesterolemia on renal graft outcome, investigating the role of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (OxLDL). Methods In vivo, we used a porcine preclinical model of renal auto-transplantation modulated by two experimental diets: a normal (n = 6) or a hyperlipidemic diet (n = 5) maintained during the 3 month follow-up after the surgical procedure. Kidney function and OxLDL levels were monitored as well as fibrosis, LOX-1 and TGF beta signaling pathways. In vitro, we used human artery endothelial cells subjected to OxLDL to investigate the TGF beta profibrotic pathway and the role of the scavenger receptor LOX-1. Results Hyperlipidemic diet-induced increase in plasma OxLDL levels at the time of surgery correlated with an increase in proteinuria 3 months after transplantation, associated with an early graft fibrosis combined with an activation of renal TGF beta signaling. These data suggest a direct involvement of OxLDL in the hyperlipidemic diet-induced activation of the pro-fibrotic TGF beta pathway which seems to be activated by LOX-1 signaling. These results were supported by studies with endothelial cells incubated in culture medium containing OxLDL promoting TGF beta expression inhibited by LOX-1 antibody. Conclusions These results implicate OxLDL in the hyperlipidemic diet-promoted fibrosis in transplanted kidneys, suggesting LOX-1 as a potential therapeutic target and reinforce the need to control cholesterol levels in kidney transplant recipients. PMID:24655356

  17. Combining Exosomes Derived from Immature DCs with Donor Antigen-Specific Treg Cells Induces Tolerance in a Rat Liver Allograft Model.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ben; Yang, Jing-Yue; Song, Wen-Jie; Ding, Rui; Zhang, Zhuo-Chao; Ji, Hong-Chen; Zhang, Xuan; Wang, Jian-Lin; Yang, Xi-Sheng; Tao, Kai-Shan; Dou, Ke-Feng; Li, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Allograft tolerance is the ultimate goal in the field of transplantation immunology. Immature dendritic cells (imDCs) play an important role in establishing tolerance but have limitations, including potential for maturation, short lifespan in vivo and short storage times in vitro. However, exosomes (generally 30-100 nm) from imDCs (imDex) retain many source cell properties and may overcome these limitations. In previous reports, imDex prolonged the survival time of heart or intestine allografts. However, tolerance or long-term survival was not achieved unless immune suppressants were used. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) can protect allografts from immune rejection, and our previous study showed that the effects of imDex were significantly associated with Tregs. Therefore, we incorporated Tregs into the treatment protocol to further reduce or avoid suppressant use. We defined the optimal exosome dose as approximately 20 μg (per treatment before, during and after transplantation) in rat liver transplantation and the antigen-specific role of Tregs in protecting liver allografts. In the co-treatment group, recipients achieved long-term survival, and tolerance was induced. Moreover, imDex amplified Tregs, which required recipient DCs and were enhanced by IL-2. Fortunately, the expanded Tregs retained their regulatory ability and donor-specificity. Thus, imDex and donor-specific Tregs can collaboratively induce graft tolerance. PMID:27640806

  18. Combining Exosomes Derived from Immature DCs with Donor Antigen-Specific Treg Cells Induces Tolerance in a Rat Liver Allograft Model

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ben; Yang, Jing-Yue; Song, Wen-jie; Ding, Rui; Zhang, Zhuo-chao; Ji, Hong-chen; Zhang, Xuan; Wang, Jian-lin; Yang, Xi-sheng; Tao, Kai-shan; Dou, Ke-feng; Li, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Allograft tolerance is the ultimate goal in the field of transplantation immunology. Immature dendritic cells (imDCs) play an important role in establishing tolerance but have limitations, including potential for maturation, short lifespan in vivo and short storage times in vitro. However, exosomes (generally 30–100 nm) from imDCs (imDex) retain many source cell properties and may overcome these limitations. In previous reports, imDex prolonged the survival time of heart or intestine allografts. However, tolerance or long-term survival was not achieved unless immune suppressants were used. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) can protect allografts from immune rejection, and our previous study showed that the effects of imDex were significantly associated with Tregs. Therefore, we incorporated Tregs into the treatment protocol to further reduce or avoid suppressant use. We defined the optimal exosome dose as approximately 20 μg (per treatment before, during and after transplantation) in rat liver transplantation and the antigen-specific role of Tregs in protecting liver allografts. In the co-treatment group, recipients achieved long-term survival, and tolerance was induced. Moreover, imDex amplified Tregs, which required recipient DCs and were enhanced by IL-2. Fortunately, the expanded Tregs retained their regulatory ability and donor-specificity. Thus, imDex and donor-specific Tregs can collaboratively induce graft tolerance. PMID:27640806

  19. Transplantation of Embryonic and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived 3D Retinal Sheets into Retinal Degenerative Mice

    PubMed Central

    Assawachananont, Juthaporn; Mandai, Michiko; Okamoto, Satoshi; Yamada, Chikako; Eiraku, Mototsugu; Yonemura, Shigenobu; Sasai, Yoshiki; Takahashi, Masayo

    2014-01-01

    Summary In this article, we show that mouse embryonic stem cell- or induced pluripotent stem cell-derived 3D retinal tissue developed a structured outer nuclear layer (ONL) with complete inner and outer segments even in an advanced retinal degeneration model (rd1) that lacked ONL. We also observed host-graft synaptic connections by immunohistochemistry. This study provides a “proof of concept” for retinal sheet transplantation therapy for advanced retinal degenerative diseases. PMID:24936453

  20. Unraveling the Role of Allo-Antibodies and Transplant Injury

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Yoshiko; Sarwal, Minnie M.

    2016-01-01

    Alloimmunity driving rejection in the context of solid organ transplantation can be grossly divided into mechanisms predominantly driven by either T cell-mediated rejection (TCMR) and antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR), though the co-existence of both types of rejections can be seen in a variable number of sampled grafts. Acute TCMR can generally be well controlled by the establishment of effective immunosuppression (1, 2). Acute ABMR is a low frequency finding in the current era of blood group and HLA donor/recipient matching and the avoidance of engraftment in the context of high-titer, preformed donor-specific antibodies. However, chronic ABMR remains a major complication resulting in the untimely loss of transplanted organs (3–10). The close relationship between donor-specific antibodies and ABMR has been revealed by the highly sensitive detection of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies (7, 11–15). Injury to transplanted organs by activation of humoral immune reaction in the context of HLA identical transplants and the absence of donor specific antibodies (17–24), strongly suggest the participation of non-HLA (nHLA) antibodies in ABMR (25). In this review, we discuss the genesis of ABMR in the context of HLA and nHLA antibodies and summarize strategies for ABMR management.

  1. Zhichan decoction induces differentiation of dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson's disease rats after neural stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Huifen; Song, Jie; Yang, Xuming

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study was to increase the dopamine content and reduce dopaminergic metabolites in the brain of Parkinson's disease rats. Using high-performance liquid chromatography, we found that dopamine and dopaminergic metabolite (dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and homovanillic acid) content in the midbrain of Parkinson's disease rats was increased after neural stem cell transplantation + Zhichan decoction, compared with neural stem cell transplantation alone. Our genetic algorithm results show that dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and homovanillic acid levels achieve global optimization. Neural stem cell transplantation + Zhichan decoction increased dihydroxyphenylacetic acid levels up to 10-fold, while transplantation alone resulted in a 3-fold increment. Homovanillic acid levels showed no apparent change. Our experimental findings show that after neural stem cell transplantation in Parkinson's disease rats, Zhichan decoction can promote differentiation of neural stem cells into dopaminergic neurons. PMID:25206914

  2. Tolerance induction using nanoparticles bearing HY peptides in bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hlavaty, Kelan A; McCarthy, Derrick P; Saito, Eiji; Yap, Woon Teck; Miller, Stephen D; Shea, Lonnie D

    2016-01-01

    Allogeneic cell therapies have either proven effective or have great potential in numerous applications, though the required systemic, life-long immunosuppression presents significant health risks. Inducing tolerance to allogeneic cells offers the potential to reduce or eliminate chronic immunosuppression. Herein, we investigated antigen-loaded nanoparticles for their ability to promote transplant tolerance in the minor histocompatibility antigen sex-mismatched C57BL/6 model of bone marrow transplantation. In this model, the peptide antigens Dby and Uty mediate rejection of male bone marrow transplants by female CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, respectively, and we investigated the action of nanoparticles on these T cell subsets. Antigens were coupled to or encapsulated within poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLG) nanoparticles with an approximate diameter of 500 nm. Delivery of the CD4-encoded Dby epitope either coupled to or encapsulated within PLG particles prevented transplant rejection, promoted donor-host chimerism, and suppressed proliferative and IFN-γ responses in tolerized recipients. Nanoparticles modified with the Uty peptide did not induce tolerance. The dosing regimen was investigated with Dby coupled particles, and a single dose delivered the day after bone marrow transplant was sufficient for tolerance induction. The engraftment of cells was significantly affected by PD-1/PDL-1 costimluation, as blockade of PD-1 reduced engraftment by ∼50%. In contrast, blockade of regulatory T cells did not impact the level of chimerism. The delivery of antigen on PLG nanoparticles promoted long-term engraftment of bone marrow in a model with a minor antigen mismatch in the absence of immunosuppression, and this represents a promising platform for developing a translatable, donor-specific tolerance strategy.

  3. The antibody crossmatch in liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Robert D.; Fung, John J.; Markus, Bernd; Fox, Ira; Iwatsuki, Shunzaburo; Esquivel, Carlos O.; Tzakis, Andreas; Todo, Satoru; Starzl, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01

    Six hundred sixty-seven first, second, and third orthotopic liver allografts in 520 patients were reviewed to determine the effect of recipient panel-reactive antibody (PRA) and donor-recipient antibody crossmatch on 2-year patient and liver allograft survival rates. Neither a high panel-reactive antibody nor a positive crossmatch for donor-specific preformed antibody was associated with decreased patient or liver allograft survival for primary grafts or retransplants. Two patients have been given kidney transplants immediately after a liver allograft from a donor with whom each patient had an initial strongly positive donor-specific antibody crossmatch. The liver apparently removed or neutralized circulating anti-donor antibody, since the renal allografts functioned promptly and did not experience hyperacute rejection. PMID:3532391

  4. Neonatal testicular cell transplantation restores murine spermatogenesis damaged in the course of herpes simplex virus-induced orchitis.

    PubMed

    Malolina, Ekaterina A; Kulibin, Andrey Yu; Kushch, Alla A

    2016-04-01

    Genital tract infection and inflammation may affect male fertility, causing germ and Sertoli cell loss. We determined if testicular cell transplantation is effective at repairing testicular injury induced by herpes simplex virus (HSV) orchitis. ROSA26 mice were used as donors and the recipients were C57BL/6 mice after HSV testicular inoculation; some of the recipients were treated with the antiviral drug acyclovir (ACV). ACV reduced the amount of HSV antigen in testes on Day 3 after transplantation and enhanced the efficacy of transplantation at Day 30. In recipient testes, donor Sertoli cells formed new seminiferous tubules; significantly more new tubules were observed in the testes of ACV-treated mice compared with mice not treated with ACV (17.8% vs 3.6%). Over half (50.4%) of new tubules in ACV-treated testes contained germ cells and round spermatids were detected in 14.2% of new tubules compared with 15.9% and 5.3% in testes not treated with ACV, respectively. At Day 150 the seminiferous epithelium was completely recovered in some donor tubules and elongated spermatids were observed inside it. Thus, our findings reveal the effectiveness of the combination of antiviral therapy with neonatal testis-cell transplantation for the restoration of spermatogenesis damaged by viral infection.

  5. Interferon-gamma inducible protein 10 (IP10) induced cisplatin resistance of HCC after liver transplantation through ER stress signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Wei; Lo, Chung-Mau; Ng, Kevin T.P.; Ling, Chang-Chun; Qi, Xiang; Li, Chang-Xian; Zhai, Yuan; Liu, Xiao-Bing; Ma, Yuen-Yuen; Man, Kwan

    2015-01-01

    Tumor recurrence remains an obstacle after liver surgery, especially in living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The acute-phase liver graft injury might potentially induce poor response to chemotherapy in recurrent HCC after liver transplantation. We here intended to explore the mechanism and to identify a therapeutic target to overcome such chemoresistance. The associations among graft injury, overexpression of IP10 and multidrug resistant genes were investigated in a rat liver transplantation model, and further validated in clinical cohort. The role of IP10 on HCC cell proliferation and tumor growth under chemotherapy was studied both in vitro and in vivo. The underlying mechanism was revealed by detecting the activation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress signaling pathways. Moreover, the effect of IP10 neutralizing antibody sensitizing cisplatin treatment was further explored. In rat liver transplantation model, significant up-regulation of IP10 associated with multidrug resistant genes was found in small-for-size liver graft. Clinically, high expression of circulating IP10 was significant correlated with tumor recurrence in HCC patients underwent LDLT. Overexpression of IP10 promoted HCC cell proliferation and tumor growth under cisplatin treatment by activation of ATF6/Grp78 signaling. IP10 neutralizing antibody sensitized cisplatin treatment in nude mice. The overexpression of IP10, which induced by liver graft injury, may lead to cisplatin resistance via ATF6/Grp78 ER stress signaling pathway. IP10 neutralizing antibody could be a potential adjuvant therapy to sensitize cisplatin treatment. PMID:26336986

  6. Defining the optimal window for cranial transplantation of human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cells to ameliorate radiation-induced cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Munjal M; Martirosian, Vahan; Christie, Lori-Ann; Riparip, Lara; Strnadel, Jan; Parihar, Vipan K; Limoli, Charles L

    2015-01-01

    Past preclinical studies have demonstrated the capability of using human stem cell transplantation in the irradiated brain to ameliorate radiation-induced cognitive dysfunction. Intrahippocampal transplantation of human embryonic stem cells and human neural stem cells (hNSCs) was found to functionally restore cognition in rats 1 and 4 months after cranial irradiation. To optimize the potential therapeutic benefits of human stem cell transplantation, we have further defined optimal transplantation windows for maximizing cognitive benefits after irradiation and used induced pluripotent stem cell-derived hNSCs (iPSC-hNSCs) that may eventually help minimize graft rejection in the host brain. For these studies, animals given an acute head-only dose of 10 Gy were grafted with iPSC-hNSCs at 2 days, 2 weeks, or 4 weeks following irradiation. Animals receiving stem cell grafts showed improved hippocampal spatial memory and contextual fear-conditioning performance compared with irradiated sham-surgery controls when analyzed 1 month after transplantation surgery. Importantly, superior performance was evident when stem cell grafting was delayed by 4 weeks following irradiation compared with animals grafted at earlier times. Analysis of the 4-week cohort showed that the surviving grafted cells migrated throughout the CA1 and CA3 subfields of the host hippocampus and differentiated into neuronal (∼39%) and astroglial (∼14%) subtypes. Furthermore, radiation-induced inflammation was significantly attenuated across multiple hippocampal subfields in animals receiving iPSC-hNSCs at 4 weeks after irradiation. These studies expand our prior findings to demonstrate that protracted stem cell grafting provides improved cognitive benefits following irradiation that are associated with reduced neuroinflammation.

  7. Early establishment of hematopoietic chimerism following allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation in comparison with allogeneic bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Nakao, S; Zeng, W; Yamazaki, H; Wang, H; Takami, A; Sugimori, N; Miura, Y; Shiobara, S; Matsuda, T; Shinagawa, Y; Harada, M

    1999-04-01

    To characterize the process of the establishment of complete chimerism after allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (allo-PBSCT), we determined the origin of leukocytes in peripheral blood (PB) obtained from 23 patients in the very early period after allo-PBSCT using amplification of mini- or microsatellite regions of genomic DNA. Donor-specific alleles were amplified from the PB obtained at day 8 post-transplant for 19 allo-PBSCT patients. Among the 19 patients, 12 showed only donor-specific alleles (complete chimerism) while 7 did both donor and host-specific alleles (mixed chimerism). Although donor specific alleles were amplified in 10 of 12 patients who received allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (allo-BMT) similarly to allo-PBSCT, all of these ten showed mixed chimerism. When the chimeric state was examined in PB samples obtained serially at 2-3-day intervals post-transplant, host-specific alleles in allo-PBSCT patients were not detectable in the PB much earlier than those in allo-BMT patients. These findings indicate that the appearance of donor-derived cells associated with the disappearance of host-derived cells in the circulation occurs earlier after allo-PBSCT as compared with allo-BMT, leading to the rapid establishment of complete chimerism.

  8. Adefovir- or Lamivudine-Induced Renal Tubular Dysfunction after Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Geun; Lee, Juhan; Lee, Jung Jun; Song, Seung Hwan; Ju, Man Ki; Choi, Gi Hong; Kim, Myoung Soo; Choi, Jin Sub; Kim, Soon Il; Joo, Dong Jin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To reduce hepatitis B virus reinfection after liver transplantation (LT), patients often receive antihepatitis B immunoglobulin (HBIG) alone or combined with antiviral nucleoside/nucleotide analogs (NUCs); however, proximal renal tubular dysfunction (RTD) that was induced by NUCs in liver recipients was rarely reported. Here, we analyzed RTD and renal impairment (RI) following adefovir (ADV) and lamivudine (LAM) treatment in liver recipients. We retrospectively reviewed medical records of patients treated with HBIG alone (group 1, n = 42) or combined with ADV or LAM (group 2, n = 21) after LT. We compared RTD and RI incidence during the 12 months after LT. An RTD diagnosis required manifestation of at least 3 of the following features: hypophosphatemia, RI, hypouricemia, proteinuria, or glucosuria. No significant differences were observed regarding sex, age, donor type, model of end-stage liver score, and estimated glomerular filtration rate at pre-LT between the 2 groups. Hepatitis B virus recurrence within 12 months was 4.8% in both groups (P = 1.000); however, the RTD incidence was 0% in group 1 and 19.0% in group 2 (P = 0.010). RI occurrence did not differ between the groups. The only risk factor for RI was HBIG administration combined with both LAM and ADV (odds ratio 11.27, 95% confidence interval 1.13–112.07, P = 0.039, vs HBIG alone). RTD occurred more frequently in patients treated with HBIG combined with LAM or ADV compared with HBIG alone. Thus, LAM or ADV therapy can induce RTD after LT, and when administered, liver recipients should be monitored. PMID:26402818

  9. Functional clonal deletion versus active suppression in transplantation tolerance induced by total-lymphoid irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Morecki, S.; Leshem, B.; Weigensberg, M.; Bar, S.; Slavin, S.

    1985-08-01

    Transplantation tolerance and stable chimerism were established in adult mice conditioned with a short course of total-lymphoid irradiation (TLI) followed by infusion of 30 X 10(6) allogeneic bone marrow cells. Spleen cells of tolerant mice could not exert a proliferative or cytotoxic response against host-type cells in vitro and were unable to induce graft-versus-host reaction in secondary host-type recipients. The degree of suppression assessed by coculturing tolerant splenocytes in vitro in the one-way mixed lymphocyte reaction was quite variable--and, in some cases, was not at all demonstrable, although tolerance was clearly maintained. Suppression, when apparent, could not be ascribed to T lymphocytes. Suppressor cells were found to bind soybean agglutinin and could be separated from the nonsuppressive cells by means of this lectin. Dissociation of the suppressive population (SBA+ cells) from that which is normally alloreactive (SBA- cells) resulted in a suppressor cell-depleted fraction that was still unable to respond to host-type cells but regained reactivity to unrelated cells. Limiting dilution analysis of chimeric splenocytes revealed markedly reduced frequencies of cytotoxic T lymphocyte precursors (CTL-P) directed against host-type cells, as compared with normal splenocytes reacting against the same target cells. This difference was accentuated when these cells were sensitized to host-type target cells prior to plating in limiting dilution cultures. In 1:1 mixing experiments of normal and chimeric splenocytes, there was no evidence of any in vitro suppressive activity to account for hyporeactivity of chimeric cells against host-type cells. Thus, maintenance of TLI-induced tolerance seemed not to be mediated primarily through an active suppressor cell mechanism.

  10. Editorial: Immune monitoring in solid organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Shipkova, Maria; Wieland, Eberhard

    2016-03-01

    Solid organ transplantation is inevitably associated with the activation of the immune system of the graft recipient. An advanced knowledge of the immunological mechanisms leading to acute and chronic rejection, the advent of powerful immunosuppressive drugs, and refined surgical techniques have made solid organ transplantation a standard therapy to replace irretrievable loss of vital functions. The immune system is a complex network involving immune cells, cytokines, chemokines, antibodies, and the complement system. Monitoring and ideally influencing the allo-response of the organ recipient against the donor antigens may help to personalize the immunosuppressive therapy including the disclosure of those patients who are suitable for weaning or even discontinuation of immunosuppression. Immune monitoring comprises as plethora of candidate biomarkers capable of reflecting the donor specific and non-donor specific net activation state of the immune system in transplant recipients both before and after initiation of the immunosuppressive therapy. This special issue of Clinical Biochemistry on Immune Monitoring addresses the basic effects of immune activation in solid organ transplantation and critically reviews candidate biomarkers for immune monitoring and their analytical as well as clinical performance.

  11. Bone marrow transplant

    MedlinePlus

    Transplant - bone marrow; Stem cell transplant; Hematopoietic stem cell transplant; Reduced intensity nonmyeloablative transplant; Mini transplant; Allogenic bone marrow transplant; Autologous bone marrow transplant; Umbilical ...

  12. Current Issues in Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The state of liver transplantation continues to evolve. This article focuses on 3 separate yet important issues within this field. First, there is a proposal to change the allocation of donor livers in the United States. The fundamental premise of this proposal is to equalize access to donor livers across the country. To accomplish this goal, the proposal is to increase the geographic area of liver allocation. As might be expected, there is a great deal of controversy surrounding the possibility of a major change in liver allocation and distribution. A second area of interest, and perhaps the most important therapeutic breakthrough in the field of hepatology, is the introduction of direct-acting antiviral agents against hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. With cure rates up to 100%, an increasing proportion of liver transplant candidates and recipients are being cured of HCV infection with therapies that have minimal side effects. Consequently, the impact of HCV infection on patient and graft survival will likely improve substantially over the next few years. Finally, this article reviews the role of donor-specific antibodies (DSAs) in antibody-mediated rejection. Long recognized as an important factor in graft survival in renal transplantation, DSAs have recently been shown to be a strong predictor of graft and patient survival in liver transplantation. However, the importance of DSAs in liver transplantation is uncertain, in large part due to the absence of proven therapies. PMID:27231452

  13. Immunoisolated transplantation of purified langerhans islet cells in testis cortex of male rats for treatment of streptozotocin induced diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Farhangi, Ali; Norouzian, Dariush; Mehrabi, Mohammad Reza; Chiani, Mohsen; Saffari, Zahra; Farahnak, Maryam; Akbarzadeh, Azim

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this study is to induce experimental diabetes mellitus by streptozotocin in normal adult Wistar rats via comparison of changes in body weight, consumption of food, volume of water, urine and levels of glucose, insulin and C-peptide in serum, between normal and diabetic rats. Intra-venous injection of 60 mg/kg dose of streptozotocin in 250-300 g (75-90 days) adult Wistar rats makes pancreas swell and causes degeneration in Langerhans islet β-cells and induces experimental diabetes mellitus in 2-4 days. For a microscopic study of degeneration of Langerhans islet β-cells of diabetic rats, biopsy from pancreas tissue of diabetic and normal rats, staining and comparison between them, were done. In this process, after collagenase digestion of pancreas, islets were isolated, dissociated and identified by dithizone method and then with enzymatic procedure by DNase and trypsin, the islet cells changed into single cells and β-cells were identified by immune fluorescence method and then assayed by flow-cytometer. Donor tissue in each step of work was prepared from 38 adult male Wistar rats weighted 250-300 g (75-90 days). Transplantation was performed in rats after 2-4 weeks of diabetes induction. In this study, the levels of insulin, C-peptide and glucose in diabetic rats reached to normal range as compared to un-diabetic rats in 20 days after transplantation of islet cells. Transplantation was performed under the cortex of testis as immunoisolated place for islet cells transplantation. PMID:25298622

  14. Intestinal injury following liver transplantation was mediated by TLR4/NF-κB activation-induced cell apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    YUAN, DONG-DONG; CHI, XIN-JIN; JIN, YI; LI, XI; GE, MIAN; GAO, WAN-LING; GUAN, JIAN-QIANG; ZHANG, AI-LAN; HEI, ZI-QING

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal motility and barriers are often impaired due to intestinal congestion during liver transplantation. Intestinal bacteria and enterogenous endotoxins enter into the blood stream or lymphatic system and translocate to other organs, which can result in postoperative multi-organ dysfunction (MODF) and systemic inflammatory reaction syndrome (SIRS) severely affecting patient survival. However, the mechanisms underlying liver transplantation-induced intestinal injury remain unclear and effective therapies are lacking. Thus, the present study investigated whether these effects were associated with endotoxin-mediated apoptosis. Rat autologous orthotopic liver transplantation (AOLT) models were established to observe dynamic intestinal injuries at different time-points following reperfusion. Changes in the levels of endotoxins and the primary receptor, toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), as well as its downstream signaling molecule, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) were all determined. Finally, immunohistochemistry and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling assays were conducted to detect caspase-3 expression and intestinal cell apoptosis, respectively. AOLT resulted in significant pathological intestinal injury, with the most serious intestine damage apparent four or eight hours following reperfusion. Furthermore, the levels of endotoxins and inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6, peaked during this time period and gradually decreased to the normal level. Notably, TLR4 and downstream NF-κB expression, as well as NF-κB-mediated caspase-3 activation and intestinal cell aapoptosis coincided with the intestinal pathological damage. Thus, the possible mechanism of post-liver transplantation intestinal injury was demonstrated to be associated with NF-κB activation-induced cell apoptosis. PMID:26707779

  15. Insights into cyclosporine A-induced atherosclerotic risk in transplant recipients: macrophage scavenger receptor regulation.

    PubMed

    Jin, Song; Mathis, A Scott; Rosenblatt, Joseph; Minko, Tamara; Friedman, Gary S; Gioia, Kevin; Serur, David S; Knipp, Gregory T

    2004-02-27

    Clinical monitoring of organ-transplant recipients suggests that administration of cyclosporine (CsA) may increase the risk of atherosclerosis when compared with the general population. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate the utility of the in vitro Tamm-Horsfall protein (THP)-1 human monocyte cell culture model for determining drug-related atherosclerotic potential in macrophages. The effect of CsA on the mRNA expression of macrophage scavenger receptor genes including CD36, CD68, scavenger receptor (SR)-A, SR-BII, and lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor (LOX-1); the nuclear hormone receptors, including peroxisome-proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)gamma and liver-X-receptor (LXR)alpha; and the cholesterol efflux pump ABCA1 were investigated as markers of atherosclerotic progression. The THP-1 cells were cultured and differentiated into macrophages. The macrophages were then treated with CsA to assess gene expression. Time- (1, 2, 4, 8, and 24 hours) and dose- (concentrations [mg/L] corresponding to the trough [0.5], peak [1.25] and 4x peak [5]) dependency of CsA was assessed. The treated macrophage mRNA gene expression of CD36, CD68, and PPARgamma were up-regulated in the presence of CsA. Interestingly, SR-A, SR-BII, LOX-1, and LXRalpha expression appeared to be slightly down-regulated, and ABCA1 was relatively unchanged. Immunoblotting studies demonstrated that the protein expression of CD36 was unchanged or increased, PPARgamma was unchanged, and ABCA1 was unchanged or decreased at 4 and 8 hours. The results document CsA-induced mRNA and protein changes in receptors relevant to lipid-laden foam cell formation and demonstrate the utility of THP-1 macrophages for screening of atherosclerotic risk potential. PMID:15084924

  16. Insights into cyclosporine A-induced atherosclerotic risk in transplant recipients: macrophage scavenger receptor regulation.

    PubMed

    Jin, Song; Mathis, A Scott; Rosenblatt, Joseph; Minko, Tamara; Friedman, Gary S; Gioia, Kevin; Serur, David S; Knipp, Gregory T

    2004-02-27

    Clinical monitoring of organ-transplant recipients suggests that administration of cyclosporine (CsA) may increase the risk of atherosclerosis when compared with the general population. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate the utility of the in vitro Tamm-Horsfall protein (THP)-1 human monocyte cell culture model for determining drug-related atherosclerotic potential in macrophages. The effect of CsA on the mRNA expression of macrophage scavenger receptor genes including CD36, CD68, scavenger receptor (SR)-A, SR-BII, and lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor (LOX-1); the nuclear hormone receptors, including peroxisome-proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)gamma and liver-X-receptor (LXR)alpha; and the cholesterol efflux pump ABCA1 were investigated as markers of atherosclerotic progression. The THP-1 cells were cultured and differentiated into macrophages. The macrophages were then treated with CsA to assess gene expression. Time- (1, 2, 4, 8, and 24 hours) and dose- (concentrations [mg/L] corresponding to the trough [0.5], peak [1.25] and 4x peak [5]) dependency of CsA was assessed. The treated macrophage mRNA gene expression of CD36, CD68, and PPARgamma were up-regulated in the presence of CsA. Interestingly, SR-A, SR-BII, LOX-1, and LXRalpha expression appeared to be slightly down-regulated, and ABCA1 was relatively unchanged. Immunoblotting studies demonstrated that the protein expression of CD36 was unchanged or increased, PPARgamma was unchanged, and ABCA1 was unchanged or decreased at 4 and 8 hours. The results document CsA-induced mRNA and protein changes in receptors relevant to lipid-laden foam cell formation and demonstrate the utility of THP-1 macrophages for screening of atherosclerotic risk potential.

  17. Hair Transplants

    MedlinePlus

    ... How to Choose the Best Skin Care Products Hair Transplants What are hair transplants? In punch transplanting, a plug containing hair ... What should first be done before considering a hair transplant? Before the procedure, an ASDS doctor will ...

  18. Deletional and regulatory mechanisms coalesce to drive transplantation tolerance through mixed chimerism.

    PubMed

    Hock, Karin; Mahr, Benedikt; Schwarz, Christoph; Wekerle, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    Establishing donor-specific immunological tolerance could improve long-term outcome by obviating the need for immunosuppressive drug therapy, which is currently required to control alloreactivity after organ transplantation. Mixed chimerism is defined as the engraftment of donor hematopoietic stem cells in the recipient, leading to viable coexistence of both donor and recipient leukocytes. In numerous experimental models, cotransplantation of donor bone marrow (BM) into preconditioned (e.g., through irradiation or cytotoxic drugs) recipients leads to transplantation tolerance through (mixed) chimerism. Mixed chimerism offers immunological advantages for clinical translation; pilot trials have established proof of concept by deliberately inducing tolerance in humans. Widespread clinical application is prevented, however, by the harsh preconditioning currently necessary for permitting BM engraftment. Recently, the immunological mechanisms inducing and maintaining tolerance in experimental mixed chimerism have been defined, revealing a more prominent role for regulation than historically assumed. The evidence from murine models suggests that both deletional and regulatory mechanisms are critical in promoting complete tolerance, encompassing also the minor histocompatibility antigens. Here, we review the current understanding of tolerance through mixed chimerism and provide an outlook on how to realize widespread clinical translation based on mechanistic insights gained from chimerism protocols, including cell therapy with polyclonal regulatory T cells.

  19. Long-term Outcomes of Amniotic Membrane Transplantation in Contact Lens-Induced Pseudomonas Keratitis with Impending Corneal Perforation

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadpour, Mehrdad; Sabet, Fatemeh Alsadat

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To report the anatomical and visual outcomes of double layered amniotic membrane transplantation (AMT) in eyes with advanced Pseudomonas keratitis leading to Descemetocele formation. Methods: This prospective interventional case series included 6 eyes of 6 female patients with pseudomonas keratitis caused by contact lens-induced infection who underwent double layered AMT. Surgery was performed after the ulcers were found to be poorly responsive to antibiotics, and severe thinning or Descemetocele had developed. All patients underwent a complete examination pre- and postoperatively, as well as anterior segment optical coherence tomography (OCT) and pachymetry or Orbscan after the procedure. Results: Mean follow-up period was 24 months. There was neither frank corneal perforation nor a need for emergent corneal transplantation in any of the eyes. All patients had visual acuity of hand motions before the procedure which improved to 20/50 to 20/30 three months after surgery. No surgical or postoperative complication occurred in this series. Conclusion: Double layered AMT may result in acceptable anatomical outcomes in patients with advanced Pseudomonas keratitis with Descemetocele formation and can eliminate the need for emergent corneal transplantation. PMID:27195083

  20. Autologous transplantation of intestine-isolated glia cells improves neuropathology and restores cognitive deficits in β amyloid-induced neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Giuseppe; Sarnelli, Giovanni; Capoccia, Elena; Cirillo, Carla; Pesce, Marcella; Lu, Jie; Calì, Gaetano; Cuomo, Rosario; Steardo, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterized by chronic deposition of β-amyloid (Aβ) in the brain, progressive neurodegeneration and consequent cognitive and behavioral deficits that typify the disease. Astrocytes are pivotal in this process because they are activated in the attempt to digest Aβ which starts a neuroinflammatory response that further contributes to neurodegeneration. The intestine is a good source of astrocytes-like cells-referred to as enteric glial cells (EGCs). Here we show that the autologous transplantation of EGCs into the brain of Aβ-injected rats arrested the development of the disease after their engraftment. Transplanted EGCs showed anti-amyloidogenic activity, embanked Aβ-induced neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration, and released neutrophic factors. The overall result was the amelioration of the pathological hallmarks and the cognitive and behavioral deficits typical of Aβ-associated disease. Our data indicate that autologous EGCs transplantation may provide an efficient alternative for applications in cell-replacement therapies to treat neurodegeneration in AD. PMID:26940982

  1. Building A New Treatment For Heart Failure-Transplantation of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-derived Cells into the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Miyagawa, Shigeru; Fukushima, Satsuki; Imanishi, Yukiko; Kawamura, Takuji; Mochizuki-Oda, Noriko; Masuda, Shigeo; Sawa, Yoshiki

    2016-01-01

    Advanced cardiac failure is a progressive intractable disease and is the main cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Since this pathology is represented by a definite decrease in cardiomyocyte number, supplementation of functional cardiomyocytes into the heart would hypothetically be an ideal therapeutic option. Recently, unlimited in vitro production of human functional cardiomyocytes was established by using induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology, which avoids the use of human embryos. A number of basic studies including ours have shown that transplantation of iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes (iPSC-CMs) into the damaged heart leads to recovery of cardiac function, thereby establishing “proof-of-concept” of this iPSC-transplantation therapy. However, considering clinical application of this therapy, its feasibility, safety, and therapeutic efficacy need to be further investigated in the pre-clinical stage. This review summarizes up-to-date important topics related to safety and efficacy of iPSC-CMs transplantation therapy for cardiac disease and discusses the prospects for this treatment in clinical studies.

  2. Clinical Significance of Pre- and Post-Transplant BAFF Levels in Kidney Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Min, Ji Won; Kim, Kyoung Woon; Kim, Bo-Mi; Doh, Kyoung Chan; Choi, Min Seok; Choi, Bum Soon; Park, Cheol Whee; Yang, Chul Woo; Kim, Yong-Soo

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that pre-transplant B cell activating factor (BAFF) levels are associated with the development of de novo anti-HLA antibodies and antibody mediated rejection post-transplant. However, the clinical significance of BAFF values at allograft rejection has not been determined. In this study, we investigated the clinical significance of pre-transplant BAFF level as well as post-transplant BAFF levels measured when indication biopsy was done. We checked for anti-HLA antibodies in 115 kidney transplant recipients who required allograft biopsy due to an increase in serum creatinine. With the same serum specimen, we measured BAFF levels, and in 78 of these patients, pre-transplant BAFF and anti-HLA antibody levels were detected as well. Patients in each group were divided into tertiles according to BAFF levels. We investigated the relationship between BAFF levels and the occurrence of anti-HLA antibodies. Pre-transplant BAFF levels showed significant association with pre-transplant sensitization, and also with early rejection (Tertile 3, 26.9% vs. Tertile 1, 11.5%; P<0.05). Post-transplant BAFF levels showed significant association with pre-transplant sensitization, but did not show association with anti-HLA antibodies and positive donor-specific antibodies at the time of biopsy. We did not find any association between post-transplant BAFF levels and allograft biopsy results, Banff scores and microvascular inflammation scores. In conclusion, pre-transplant BAFF levels are associated with pre-transplant sensitization and are useful in predicting allograft rejection. But post-transplant BAFF levels measured at the time of indication biopsy are not associated with the appearance of de novo HLA-DSA, allograft rejection, biopsy findings and other allograft outcomes. PMID:27631619

  3. Clinical Significance of Pre- and Post-Transplant BAFF Levels in Kidney Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Min, Ji Won; Kim, Kyoung Woon; Kim, Bo-Mi; Doh, Kyoung Chan; Choi, Min Seok; Choi, Bum Soon; Park, Cheol Whee; Yang, Chul Woo; Kim, Yong-Soo; Oh, Eun-Jee; Chung, Byung Ha

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that pre-transplant B cell activating factor (BAFF) levels are associated with the development of de novo anti-HLA antibodies and antibody mediated rejection post-transplant. However, the clinical significance of BAFF values at allograft rejection has not been determined. In this study, we investigated the clinical significance of pre-transplant BAFF level as well as post-transplant BAFF levels measured when indication biopsy was done. We checked for anti-HLA antibodies in 115 kidney transplant recipients who required allograft biopsy due to an increase in serum creatinine. With the same serum specimen, we measured BAFF levels, and in 78 of these patients, pre-transplant BAFF and anti-HLA antibody levels were detected as well. Patients in each group were divided into tertiles according to BAFF levels. We investigated the relationship between BAFF levels and the occurrence of anti-HLA antibodies. Pre-transplant BAFF levels showed significant association with pre-transplant sensitization, and also with early rejection (Tertile 3, 26.9% vs. Tertile 1, 11.5%; P<0.05). Post-transplant BAFF levels showed significant association with pre-transplant sensitization, but did not show association with anti-HLA antibodies and positive donor-specific antibodies at the time of biopsy. We did not find any association between post-transplant BAFF levels and allograft biopsy results, Banff scores and microvascular inflammation scores. In conclusion, pre-transplant BAFF levels are associated with pre-transplant sensitization and are useful in predicting allograft rejection. But post-transplant BAFF levels measured at the time of indication biopsy are not associated with the appearance of de novo HLA-DSA, allograft rejection, biopsy findings and other allograft outcomes. PMID:27631619

  4. Human Amnion-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation Ameliorates Dextran Sulfate Sodium-Induced Severe Colitis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Onishi, Reizo; Ohnishi, Shunsuke; Higashi, Ryosuke; Watari, Michiko; Yamahara, Kenichi; Okubo, Naoto; Nakagawa, Koji; Katsurada, Takehiko; Suda, Goki; Natsuizaka, Mitsuteru; Takeda, Hiroshi; Sakamoto, Naoya

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a valuable cell source in regenerative medicine. Recently, several studies have shown that MSCs can be easily isolated from human amnion. In this study, we investigated the therapeutic effect of human amnion-derived MSCs (AMSCs) in rats with severe colitis. Colitis was induced by the administration of 8% dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) from day 0 to day 5, and AMSCs (1 × 10(6) cells) were transplanted intravenously on day 1. Rats were sacrificed on day 5, and the colon length and histological colitis score were evaluated. The extent of inflammation was evaluated using quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry. The effect of AMSCs on the inflammatory signals was investigated in vitro. AMSC transplantation significantly ameliorated the disease activity index score, weight loss, colon shortening, and the histological colitis score. mRNA expression levels of proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and migration inhibitory factor (MIF) were significantly decreased in the rectums of AMSC-treated rats. In addition, the infiltration of monocytes/macrophages was significantly decreased in AMSC-treated rats. In vitro experiments demonstrated that activation of proinflammatory signals induced by TNF-α or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in immortalized murine macrophage cells (RAW264.7) was significantly attenuated by coculturing with AMSCs or by culturing with a conditioned medium obtained from AMSCs. Although the phosphorylation of IκB induced by TNF-α or LPS was not inhibited by the conditioned medium, nuclear translocation of NF-κB was significantly inhibited by the conditioned medium. Taken together, AMSC transplantation provided significant improvement in rats with severe colitis, possibly through the inhibition of monocyte/macrophage activity and through inhibition of NF-κB activation. AMSCs could be considered as a new cell source for the

  5. Abate Cytochrome C induced apoptosome to protect donor liver against ischemia reperfusion injury on rat liver transplantation model

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Zhuonan; Lian, Peilong; Wu, Xiaojuan; Shi, Baoxu; Zhuang, Maoyou; Zhou, Ruiling; Zhao, Rui; Zhao, Zhen; Guo, Sen; Ji, Zhipeng; Xu, Kesen

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Aim of this study is to protect donor liver against ischemia-reperfusion injury by abating Cytochrome C induced apoptosome on rat model. Methods: A total of 25 clean SD inbred male rats were used in this research. The rats in ischemia-reperfusion injury group (I/R group, n=5) were under liver transplantation operation; rats in dichloroacetate diisopropylamine group (DADA group, n=5) were treated DADA before liver transplantation; control group (Ctrl group, n=5); other 10 rats were used to offer donor livers. Results: In DADA therapy group, Cytochrome C expression in donor hepatocellular cytoplasm was detected lower than that in I/R group. And the Cytochrome C induced apoptosome was also decreased in according to the lower expressions of Apaf-1 and Caspase3. Low level of cleaved PARP expression revealed less apoptosis in liver tissue. The morphology of donor liver mitochondria in DADA group was observed to be slightly edema but less than I/R group after operation 12 h. The liver function indexes of ALT and AST in serum were tested, and the results in DADA group showed it is significantly lower than I/R group after operation 12 h. The inflammation indexes of IL-6 and TNF-α expressions in DADA group were significantly lower than that in I/R group after operation 24 h. Conclusion: The dichloroacetate diisopropylamine treatment could protect the hepatocellular mitochondria in case of the spillage of Cytochrome C induced apoptosome, and protect the liver against ischemia-reperfusion injury. Thus, it may be a method to promote the recovery of donor liver function after transplantation. PMID:27186297

  6. Cyclosporine-induced alterations in the hypothalamic hypophyseal gonadal axis in transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, G; Narvarte, J; Bittle, P A; Ayers-Chastain, C; Dean, S E

    1991-01-01

    We evaluated the response of 20 male patients, 13 cadaveric kidney and 7 heart transplant recipients, to the administration of 100 micrograms GnRH (gonadotropin-releasing hormone) and 500 micrograms TRH (thyrotropic-releasing hormone). All of the heart transplant recipients and 7 of the kidney transplant patients were receiving a combination of cyclosporine, azathioprine and prednisone; while the 6 remaining kidney transplant patients received azathioprine and prednisone. The patients receiving cyclosporine had decreased plasma levels of prolactin, and manifested a blunted response to TRH administration for prolactin and TSH. The heart transplant patients had a blunted response of LH and FSH to the administration of GnRH. The levels of testosterone were found to be low in all patients regardless of the immunosuppressant therapy. Despite the low testosterone levels, no increment in the concentration of LH or FSH was present. Intramuscular administration of HCG (human chorionic gonadotropin) (Ayerst Laboratories, New York, N.Y.) failed to increase the testosterone concentration in 5 of 6 patients with renal transplants, 3 taking cyclosporine and 3 taking azathioprine. This study suggests that cyclosporine has a selective effect on the hypothalamus and/or hypophysis, resulting in lower baseline levels of plasma prolactin and a pituitary insensitivity to TRH administration. In addition, FSH and LH were low or normal in the presence of low testosterone levels, suggesting that the hypothalamic pituitary gonadal axis is impaired. Furthermore, there may be a direct toxic effect of the immunosuppressant medications on the gonads, manifested as lower testosterone levels and inability to respond to the administration of HCG.

  7. Endothelial Cell Apoptosis Induces TGF-β Signaling-Dependent Host Endothelial-Mesenchymal Transition to Promote Transplant Arteriosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Li, J; Xiong, J; Yang, B; Zhou, Q; Wu, Y; Luo, H; Zhou, H; Liu, N; Li, Y; Song, Z; Zheng, Q

    2015-12-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) apoptosis is an initial event in transplant arteriosclerosis (TA), resulting in allograft function loss. To elucidate the precise mechanisms of ECs apoptosis leading to neointimal smooth muscle cells (SMCs) accumulation during TA. We induced apoptosis in cultured ECs by overexpressing p53 through lentivirus-mediated transfection. ECs apoptosis induced the production of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 in both apoptotic and neighboring viable cells, leading to increased TGF-β1 in the culture media. Conditioned media from Ltv-p53-transfected ECs further promoted transition of cultured ECs to SM-like cells by activating TGF-β/Smad3, PI3K/Akt/mTOR, and MAPK/ERK signaling in a TGF-β-dependent manner. In transgenic rat aorta transplantation models, inhibition of ECs apoptosis in Bcl-xL(+/+) knock-in rat aortic allografts significantly reduced TGF-β1 production both in allograft endothelia and in blood plasma, which in turn decreased accumulation of SM22α+ cells from transgenic recipient ECs originally marked with EGFP knock-in in neointima and alleviated TA. Systemic treatment with SIS3, AP23573, or PD98059 also prevented recipient ECs-originated SM-like cells accumulation and intima hyperplasia in aortic allografts. These data suggest that allograft EC apoptosis induced recipient endothelial-mesenchymal (smooth muscle) transition via TGF-β signaling, resulting in recipient EC-derived SMC accumulation as a major mechanism of vascular remodeling during TA.

  8. Medication-induced periostitis in lung transplant patients: periostitis deformans revisited.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lina; Mulligan, Michael E

    2011-02-01

    We report five cases of diffuse periostitis resembling hypertrophic osteoarthropathy and perostitis deformans in lung transplantation patients on chronic voriconazole, a fluoride-containing compound. Although drug-related periostitis has long been known, the association of lung transplant medication with periostitis was only recently introduced in the literature. To our knowledge, imaging findings have not been fully characterized in the radiology literature. Imaging features along with clinical history help to distinguish this benign condition from other disease entities. In this article, we review the current literature and illustrate the variety of imaging characteristics of this entity so that interpreting radiologists can make accurate diagnoses and avoid unnecessary work up.

  9. Intrahippocampal transplantation of transgenic neural precursor cells overexpressing interleukin-1 receptor antagonist blocks chronic isolation-induced impairment in memory and neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ben Menachem-Zidon, Ofra; Goshen, Inbal; Kreisel, Tirzah; Ben Menahem, Yair; Reinhartz, Etti; Ben Hur, Tamir; Yirmiya, Raz

    2008-08-01

    The proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1 (IL-1) within the brain is critically involved in mediating the memory impairment induced by acute inflammatory challenges and psychological stress. However, the role of IL-1 in memory impairment and suppressed neurogenesis induced by chronic stress exposure has not been investigated before now. We report here that mice that were isolated for 4 weeks displayed a significant elevation in hippocampal IL-1beta levels concomitantly with body weight loss, specific impairment in hippocampal-dependent memory, and decreased hippocampal neurogenesis. To examine the causal role of IL-1 in these effects, we developed a novel approach for long-term delivery of IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) into the brain, using transplantation of neural precursor cells (NPCs), obtained from neonatal mice with transgenic overexpression of IL-1ra (IL-1raTG) under the glial fibrillary acidic protein promoter. Four weeks following intrahippocampal transplantation of IL-1raTG NPCs labeled with PKH-26, the transplanted cells were incorporated within the dentate gyrus and expressed mainly astrocytic markers. IL-1ra levels were markedly elevated in the hippocampus, but not in other brain regions, by 10 days and for at least 4 weeks post-transplantation. Transplantation of IL-1raTG NPCs completely rescued the chronic isolation-induced body weight loss, memory impairment, and suppressed hippocampal neurogenesis, compared with isolated mice transplanted with WT cells or sham operated. The transplantation had no effect in group-housed mice. These findings elucidate the role of IL-1 in the pathophysiology of chronic isolation and suggest that transplantation of IL-1raTG NPCs may provide a useful therapeutic procedure for IL-1-mediated memory disturbances in chronic inflammatory and neurological conditions. PMID:17987063

  10. Cognitive deficits induced by global cerebral ischaemia: prospects for transplant therapy.

    PubMed

    Hodges, H; Nelson, A; Virley, D; Kershaw, T R; Sinden, J D

    1997-04-01

    Global ischaemia induced by interruption of cerebral blood flow results in damage to vulnerable cells, notably in the CA1 and hilar hippocampal fields, and is frequently associated with memory deficits. This review examines cognitive deficits that occur in animal models of global ischaemia in rats and monkeys, the extent to which these deficits are associated with CA1 cell loss, and the evidence for functional recovery following transplants of foetal CA1 cells and grafts of conditionally immortalised precursor cells. In rats, impairments are seen most consistently in tasks of spatial learning and spatial working memory dependent on use of allocentric environmental cues. In monkeys, ischaemic deficits have been shown to a moderate extent in delayed object recognition tasks, but animals with a selective excitotoxic CA1 lesion show a profound impairment in conditional discrimination tasks, suggesting that these may be a more sensitive measure of ischaemic impairments. Several studies have reported correlational links between the extent of CA1 cell loss following two or four vessel occlusion (2 VO, 4 VO) in rats and behavioural impairments, but recent findings indicate that at intermediate levels of damage these relationships are weak and variable, and emerge clearly only when animals with maximal CA1 cell loss are included, suggesting that the deficits involve more than damage to the CA1 field. Nevertheless, ischaemic rats and CA1-lesioned marmosets with grafts of foetal CA1 cells show substantial improvements; in rats these are not found with grafts from other hippocampal fields. Conditionally immortalised cell lines and trophic grafts are currently being assessed for their functional potential in animal models, because clinical use of foetal cells will not be practicable. Recent findings suggest that an expanded population of neuroepithelial cells derived from the conditionally immortalised H-2Kb-tsA58 transgenic mouse improve spatial learning as effectively as CA1

  11. Bone marrow transplant - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Transplant - bone marrow - discharge; Stem cell transplant - discharge; Hematopoietic stem cell transplant - discharge; Reduced intensity; Non-myeloablative transplant - discharge; Mini transplant - discharge; Allogenic bone marrow transplant - ...

  12. BK virus replication and nephropathy after alemtuzumab-induced kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Theodoropoulos, N; Wang, E; Penugonda, S; Ladner, D P; Stosor, V; Leventhal, J; Friedewald, J; Angarone, M P; Ison, M G

    2013-01-01

    BK virus nephropathy (BKVN) is a recognized cause of graft failure in kidney transplant recipients. There are limited data on the epidemiology of BK virus (BKV) infection after alemtuzumab induction. By clinical protocol, the kidney transplant recipients at our center were screened with BKV plasma PCR monthly for the first 4 months posttransplant then every 2-3 months for 2 years. A single center retrospective cohort study of all kidney transplant recipients from January 2008 to August 2010 was conducted to determine incidence and outcomes of BKV infection. Descriptive statistics and Kaplan-Meier analysis was performed. Of 666 recipients, 250 (37.5%) developed viruria, 80 (12%) developed viremia and 31 (4.7%) developed BKVN at a median of 17, 21 and 30 weeks, respectively. Induction with alemtuzumab did not significantly affect incidence of BKVN. Increased recipient age, African American race, acute graft rejection and CMV infection were significantly associated with the development of BKVN in multivariate analysis. The incidence of BK viruria, viremia and nephropathy was not significantly different among kidney transplant recipients who received alemtuzumab induction compared to patients receiving less potent induction.

  13. The costimulatory immunogen LPS induces the B-Cell clones that infiltrate transplanted human kidneys

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Rajesh K.; Cheng, Julong; Peng, Yingjie; Jones, Teresa M.; Ruiz, Diana I.; Ulevitch, Richard J.; Glass, John I.; Dennis, Edward A.; Salomon, Daniel R.; Lerner, Richard A.

    2012-01-01

    The mechanism of chronic rejection of transplanted human kidneys is unknown. An understanding of this process is important because, chronic rejection ultimately leads to loss of the kidney allograft in most transplants. One feature of chronic rejection is the infiltration of ectopic B-cell clusters that are clonal into the transplanted kidney. We now show that the antibodies produced by these B-cells react strongly with the core carbohydrate region of LPS. Since LPS is a costimulatory immunogen that can react with both the B-cell receptor (BCR) and the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), these results suggest a mechanism for the selective pressure that leads to clonality of these B-cell clusters and opens the possibility that infection and the attendant exposure to LPS plays a role in the chronic rejection of human kidney transplants. If confirmed by clinical studies, these results suggest that treating patients with signs of chronic rejection with antibiotics may improve kidney allograft survival. PMID:22492977

  14. Late-Onset Drug-Induced Cholestasis in a Living-Related Liver Transplant Donor With Progressive Familial Intrahepatic Cholestasis.

    PubMed

    Harmancı, Özgür; Ensaroğlu, Fatih; Özçay, Figen; Öcal, Serkan; Korkmaz, Murat; Özdemir, B Handan; Selçuk, Haldun; Moray, Gökhan; Haberal, Mehmet

    2015-11-01

    We present a rare case of progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis within a family. A 34-yearold female became a living-related liver transplant donor for her son, who had the disease. Nine years after the transplant, the mother developed severe intrahepatic cholestasis, for which she was evaluated after using an oral contraceptive drug. She presented with jaundice, pruritus, and increased bilirubin levels, together with elevated gamma glutamyl transferase and alkaline phosphatase levels. A liver biopsy revealed findings consistent with intrahepatic cholestasis. However, despite follow-up management and cessation of the insulting drug, her total bilirubin count continuously increased to 20 mg/dL and was accompanied by intractable pruritus. A total of 9 plasmapheresis sessions were performed, and she was started on a regimen of ursodeoxycholic acid (13 mg/kg/d) and cholestyramine (4 g, 3 times daily). The clinical and laboratory picture dramatically improved following cessation of the oral contraceptive, plasmapheresis sessions, and drug treatment. The patient's cholestasis normalized within 3 months, and she recovered uneventfully. A genetic analysis of the whole family revealed that both parents were heterozygous for the mutation c.124G>A in ABCB11, and the son was homozygous for this mutation. These findings supported varying degrees of bile salt export pump deficiency in the family members. Defective bile salt excretory system function can result in a wide spectrum of clinical presentations, ranging from progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis requiring liver transplant to late-onset drug-induced cholestasis. Our findings suggest that, in a heterozygous carrier of a progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis mutation, drug-induced cholestasis is responsive to treatment, after which the clinical picture can normalize within 3 months.

  15. Reg3α Overexpression Protects Pancreatic β Cells from Cytokine-Induced Damage and Improves Islet Transplant Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Ying; Xu, Yuemei; Shuai, Xuanyu; Shi, Xuhui; Chen, Xiang; Huang, Wenbin; Liu, Yun; Liang, Xiubin; Zhang, Zhihong; Su, Dongming

    2014-01-01

    The process of islet transplantation for treating type 1 diabetes has been limited by the high level of graft failure. This may be overcome by locally delivering trophic factors to enhance engraftment. Regenerating islet-derived protein 3α (Reg3α) is a pancreatic secretory protein which functions as an antimicrobial peptide in control of inflammation and cell proliferation. In this study, to investigate whether Reg3α could improve islet engraftment, a marginal mass of syngeneic islets pretransduced with adenoviruses expressing Reg3α or control EGFP were transplanted under the renal capsule of streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice. Mice receiving islets with elevated Reg3α production exhibited significantly lower blood glucose levels (9.057 ± 0.59 mmol/L versus 13.48 ± 0.35 mmol/L, P < 0.05) and improved glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (1.80 ± 0.17 ng/mL versus 1.16 ± 0.16 ng/mL, P < 0.05) compared with the control group. The decline of apoptotic events (0.57% ± 0.15% versus 1.06% ± 0.07%, P < 0.05) and increased β-cell proliferation (0.70% ± 0.10% versus 0.36% ± 0.14%, P < 0.05) were confirmed in islet grafts overexpressing Reg3α by morphometric analysis. Further experiments showed that Reg3α production dramatically protected cultured islets and pancreatic β cells from cytokine-induced apoptosis and the impairment of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Moreover, exposure to cytokines led to the activation of MAPKs in pancreatic β cells, which was reversed by Reg3α overexpression in contrast to control group. These results strongly suggest that Reg3α could enhance islet engraftments through its cytoprotective effect and advance the therapeutic efficacy of islet transplantation. PMID:25826674

  16. Late-Onset Drug-Induced Cholestasis in a Living-Related Liver Transplant Donor With Progressive Familial Intrahepatic Cholestasis.

    PubMed

    Harmancı, Özgür; Ensaroğlu, Fatih; Özçay, Figen; Öcal, Serkan; Korkmaz, Murat; Özdemir, B Handan; Selçuk, Haldun; Moray, Gökhan; Haberal, Mehmet

    2015-11-01

    We present a rare case of progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis within a family. A 34-yearold female became a living-related liver transplant donor for her son, who had the disease. Nine years after the transplant, the mother developed severe intrahepatic cholestasis, for which she was evaluated after using an oral contraceptive drug. She presented with jaundice, pruritus, and increased bilirubin levels, together with elevated gamma glutamyl transferase and alkaline phosphatase levels. A liver biopsy revealed findings consistent with intrahepatic cholestasis. However, despite follow-up management and cessation of the insulting drug, her total bilirubin count continuously increased to 20 mg/dL and was accompanied by intractable pruritus. A total of 9 plasmapheresis sessions were performed, and she was started on a regimen of ursodeoxycholic acid (13 mg/kg/d) and cholestyramine (4 g, 3 times daily). The clinical and laboratory picture dramatically improved following cessation of the oral contraceptive, plasmapheresis sessions, and drug treatment. The patient's cholestasis normalized within 3 months, and she recovered uneventfully. A genetic analysis of the whole family revealed that both parents were heterozygous for the mutation c.124G>A in ABCB11, and the son was homozygous for this mutation. These findings supported varying degrees of bile salt export pump deficiency in the family members. Defective bile salt excretory system function can result in a wide spectrum of clinical presentations, ranging from progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis requiring liver transplant to late-onset drug-induced cholestasis. Our findings suggest that, in a heterozygous carrier of a progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis mutation, drug-induced cholestasis is responsive to treatment, after which the clinical picture can normalize within 3 months. PMID:26640927

  17. A Mouse Model of Inducible Liver Injury Caused by Tet-On Regulated Urokinase for Studies of Hepatocyte Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xijun; Guo, Yushan; Duo, Shuguang; Che, Jie; Wu, Chen; Ochiya, Takahiro; Ding, Mingxiao; Deng, Hongkui

    2009-01-01

    Mouse models of liver injury provide useful tools for studying hepatocyte engraftment and proliferation. A representative model of liver injury is the albumin-urokinase (Alb-uPA) transgenic model, but neonatal lethality hampers its widespread application. To overcome this problem, we generated a transgenic mouse in which transcription of the reverse tetracycline transactivator was (rtTA) driven by the mouse albumin promoter, and backcrossed the rtTA mice onto severe combined immunodeficient (SCID)/bg mice to generate immunodeficient rtTA/SCID mice. We then produced recombinant adenoviruses Ad.TRE-uPA, in which the urokinase was located downstream of the tetracycline response element (TRE). The rtTA/SCID mouse hepatocytes were then infected with Ad.TRE-uPA to establish an inducible liver injury mouse model. In the presence of doxycycline, uPA was exclusively expressed in endogenous hepatocytes and caused extensive liver injury. Enhanced green fluorescent protein-labeled mouse hepatocytes selectively repopulated the rtTA/SCID mouse liver and replaced over 80% of the recipient liver mass after repeated administration of Ad.TRE-uPA. Compared with the original uPA mice, rtTA/SCID mice did not exhibit problems regarding breeding efficiency, and the time window for transplantation was flexible. In addition, we could control the extent of liver injury to facilitate transplantation surgery by regulating the dose of Ad.TRE-uPA. Our inducible mouse model will be convenient for studies of hepatocyte transplantation and hepatic regeneration, and this system will facilitate screening for potential genetic factors critical for engraftment and proliferation of hepatocytes in vivo. PMID:19808649

  18. Transplantation of fetal liver tissue suspension into the spleens of adult syngenic rats: inducibility of cytochrome P450 dependent monooxygenase functions by beta-naphthoflavone, phenobarbital and dexamethasone.

    PubMed

    Lupp, A; Lau, K; Trautmann, A K; Krausse, T; Klinger, W

    1999-01-01

    EROD and ECOD were significantly increased after BNF or PB treatment at all three time points after surgery, and ECOD after DEX administration, but at 4 and 6 months after transplantation only. END was only induced after DEX treatment at 6 months after transplantation. With the livers of both transplant recipients and control rats EROD and ECOD were increased after BNF induction and EROD, ECOD, and END after PB treatment at all three time points after transplantation. After DEX administration END was significantly enhanced only at 2 and 4 months after transplantation, ECOD was decreased at 2 and 4 months, and EROD was diminished at all three time points after surgery. Transplantation of fetal liver tissue suspensions into the spleens did not influence monooxygenase functions and their inducibility within the respective livers of the animals. These results demonstrate that transplanted liver cells originating from syngenic fetal liver tissue suspensions display P450 dependent monooxygenase functions which are, simi lar to normal adult liver, inducible by BNF, PB and DEX. Both monooxygenase functions and their inducibility within the transplant containing spleens display quantitative and qualitative developmental changes.

  19. Human neonatal hepatocyte transplantation induces long-term rescue of unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia in the Gunn rat.

    PubMed

    Tolosa, Laia; López, Silvia; Pareja, Eugenia; Donato, María Teresa; Myara, Anne; Nguyen, Tuan Huy; Castell, José Vicente; Gómez-Lechón, María José

    2015-06-01

    Crigler-Najjar type 1 disease is a rare inherited metabolic disease characterized by high levels of unconjugated bilirubin due to the complete absence of hepatic uridine diphosphoglucuronate-glucuronosyltransferase activity. Hepatocyte transplantation (HT) has been proposed as an alternative treatment for Crigler-Najjar syndrome, but it is still limited by the quality and the low engraftment and repopulation ability of the cells used. Because of their attachment capability and expression of adhesion molecules as well as the higher proportion of hepatic progenitor cells, neonatal hepatocytes may have an advantage over adult cells. Adult or neonatal hepatocytes were transplanted into Gunn rats, a model for Crigler-Najjar disease. Engraftment and repopulation were studied and compared by immunofluorescence (IF). Additionally, the serum bilirubin levels, the presence of bilirubin conjugates in rat serum, and the expression of uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase 1 family polypeptide A1 (UGT1A1) in rat liver samples were also analyzed. Here we show that neonatal HT results in long-term correction in Gunn rats. In comparison with adult cells, neonatal cells showed better engraftment and repopulation capability 3 days and 6 months after transplantation, respectively. Bilirubinemia decreased in the transplanted animals during the whole experimental follow-up (6 months). Bilirubin conjugates were also present in the serum of the transplanted animals. Western blots and IF confirmed the presence and expression of UGT1A1 in the liver. This work is the first to demonstrate the advantage of using neonatal hepatocytes for the treatment of Crigler-Najjar in vivo. PMID:25821167

  20. Autologous subcutaneous adipose tissue transplants improve adipose tissue metabolism and reduce insulin resistance and fatty liver in diet-induced obesity rats.

    PubMed

    Torres-Villalobos, Gonzalo; Hamdan-Pérez, Nashla; Díaz-Villaseñor, Andrea; Tovar, Armando R; Torre-Villalvazo, Ivan; Ordaz-Nava, Guillermo; Morán-Ramos, Sofía; Noriega, Lilia G; Martínez-Benítez, Braulio; López-Garibay, Alejandro; Torres-Landa, Samuel; Ceballos-Cantú, Juan C; Tovar-Palacio, Claudia; Figueroa-Juárez, Elizabeth; Hiriart, Marcia; Medina-Santillán, Roberto; Castillo-Hernández, Carmen; Torres, Nimbe

    2016-09-01

    Long-term dietary and pharmacological treatments for obesity have been questioned, particularly in individuals with severe obesity, so a new approach may involve adipose tissue transplants, particularly autologous transplants. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the metabolic effects of autologous subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) transplants into two specific intraabdominal cavity sites (omental and retroperitoneal) after 90 days. The study was performed using two different diet-induced obesity (DIO) rat models: one using a high-fat diet (HFD) and the other using a high-carbohydrate diet (HCHD). Autologous SAT transplant reduced hypertrophic adipocytes, improved insulin sensitivity, reduced hepatic lipid content, and fasting serum-free fatty acids (FFAs) concentrations in the two DIO models. In addition, the reductions in FFAs and glycerol were accompanied by a greater reduction in lipolysis, assessed via the phosphorylation status of HSL, in the transplanted adipose tissue localized in the omentum compared with that localized in the retroperitoneal compartment. Therefore, the improvement in hepatic lipid content after autologous SAT transplant may be partially attributed to a reduction in lipolysis in the transplanted adipose tissue in the omentum due to the direct drainage of FFAs into the liver. The HCHD resulted in elevated fasting and postprandial serum insulin levels, which were dramatically reduced by the autologous SAT transplant. In conclusion, the specific intraabdominal localization of the autologous SAT transplant improved the carbohydrate and lipid metabolism of adipose tissue in obese rats and selectively corrected the metabolic parameters that are dependent on the type of diet used to generate the DIO model. PMID:27582062

  1. Autologous subcutaneous adipose tissue transplants improve adipose tissue metabolism and reduce insulin resistance and fatty liver in diet-induced obesity rats.

    PubMed

    Torres-Villalobos, Gonzalo; Hamdan-Pérez, Nashla; Díaz-Villaseñor, Andrea; Tovar, Armando R; Torre-Villalvazo, Ivan; Ordaz-Nava, Guillermo; Morán-Ramos, Sofía; Noriega, Lilia G; Martínez-Benítez, Braulio; López-Garibay, Alejandro; Torres-Landa, Samuel; Ceballos-Cantú, Juan C; Tovar-Palacio, Claudia; Figueroa-Juárez, Elizabeth; Hiriart, Marcia; Medina-Santillán, Roberto; Castillo-Hernández, Carmen; Torres, Nimbe

    2016-09-01

    Long-term dietary and pharmacological treatments for obesity have been questioned, particularly in individuals with severe obesity, so a new approach may involve adipose tissue transplants, particularly autologous transplants. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the metabolic effects of autologous subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) transplants into two specific intraabdominal cavity sites (omental and retroperitoneal) after 90 days. The study was performed using two different diet-induced obesity (DIO) rat models: one using a high-fat diet (HFD) and the other using a high-carbohydrate diet (HCHD). Autologous SAT transplant reduced hypertrophic adipocytes, improved insulin sensitivity, reduced hepatic lipid content, and fasting serum-free fatty acids (FFAs) concentrations in the two DIO models. In addition, the reductions in FFAs and glycerol were accompanied by a greater reduction in lipolysis, assessed via the phosphorylation status of HSL, in the transplanted adipose tissue localized in the omentum compared with that localized in the retroperitoneal compartment. Therefore, the improvement in hepatic lipid content after autologous SAT transplant may be partially attributed to a reduction in lipolysis in the transplanted adipose tissue in the omentum due to the direct drainage of FFAs into the liver. The HCHD resulted in elevated fasting and postprandial serum insulin levels, which were dramatically reduced by the autologous SAT transplant. In conclusion, the specific intraabdominal localization of the autologous SAT transplant improved the carbohydrate and lipid metabolism of adipose tissue in obese rats and selectively corrected the metabolic parameters that are dependent on the type of diet used to generate the DIO model.

  2. T cell tolerance in transplantation: possibilities for therapeutic intervention.

    PubMed

    Cobbold, Stephen P

    2002-10-01

    It is now possible to induce donor-specific transplantation tolerance in adult rodents using a number of therapeutic strategies. These include the use of non-depleting monoclonal antibodies against T cell co-receptor and costimulation molecules, and immunisation with tolerogenic antigen-presenting cells. It is a common finding to all of these models of peripheral tolerance, as well as to various mouse models of autoimmune disease, that regulatory CD4(+) T cells are the principle mediators. There are currently no specific markers for regulatory T cells and their activity has been associated with different T cell subsets defined by the expression of activation markers, such as CD25 and cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4), or anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-10 and TGF-beta. Differential gene expression analyses have been used to identify potential new markers for regulatory T cells and to find novel targets for therapeutic manipulation of the immune system. The challenge now is to understand the biological principles that allow such immune reprogramming so that they can be safely applied to clinical situations. PMID:12387682

  3. The development and specificity of antiidiotypic antibodies in renal transplant recipients receiving single-donor blood transfusions.

    PubMed

    Phelan, D L; Rodey, G E; Anderson, C B

    1989-07-01

    Multiple pretransplant sera obtained from alloimmunized renal transplant recipients were tested for the presence of antiidiotypic-like antibodies (AB2) that inhibit donor-specific HLA antibodies in the microlymphocytotoxicity assay. Fourteen patients received repetitive single-donor blood transfusions (SDT). In this patient group, sera were collected prior to each blood transfusion and prior to transplantation. Three additional patients were studied in whom prior donor-specific HLA antibodies had been lost over a period of 6 months preceding transplantation. Donor-specific AB2-like antibodies were found in the sera of 13/14 SDT patients who did not develop HLA antibodies, and in the 3 patients who had lost donor-specific HLA antibodies. All patients had received prior random blood transfusions in the year preceding the study. Five (38%) of the SDT patients had detectable donor-specific AB2 prior to the initiation of single-donor blood transfusion, presumably related to previous blood transfusions. In the remaining six SDT patients in whom complete serum sets were available, AB2 always appeared after the first blood transfusion. The specificity of HLA antibodies inhibited by AB2 was studied, and antibodies against HLA-A, -B, -C, -DR, and DQw were all identified. Thus, there was no predilection for patients to develop AB2 against locus-specific HLA gene products. This study also confirms the apparent polymorphism of putative crossreactive idiotypes. Approximately 25% of donor-specific HLA antibodies were not inhibited by relevant AB2. This study confirms and extends previous observations that alloimmunization is associated in many patients with the development of antiidiotypic-like antibodies that are capable of inhibiting the binding and cytotoxicity of HLA alloantibodies. PMID:2473550

  4. Regulatory T cells in the induction and maintenance of peripheral transplantation tolerance.

    PubMed

    Cobbold, Stephen P; Graca, Luis; Lin, Chun-Yen; Adams, Elizabeth; Waldmann, Herman

    2003-02-01

    It is now possible to induce donor-specific transplantation tolerance in adult rodents using non-depleting monoclonal antibodies against T cell co-receptor and co-stimulation molecules or by immunisation with tolerogenic antigen-presenting cells. It is a common finding of all these models of peripheral tolerance, as well as of various mouse models of autoimmune disease, that regulatory CD4(+) T cells are the principal mediators. There are currently no specific markers for regulatory T cells, but in some autoimmune models their activity has been associated with the expression of activation markers such as CD25 and CTLA4, or anti-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-10 and TGF-beta. CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells from both naïve and tolerised donors are able to transfer tolerance to grafts in lymphopenic recipients, and this may be directly applicable to bone-marrow transplantation. The challenge is now to understand the biological principles that allow such immune re-programming so that they can be safely applied to clinical organ grafting. PMID:12595967

  5. Inferior vena cava stenosis-induced sinusoidal obstructive syndrome after living donor liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Orgoi, Sergelen; Sandag, Erdene; Namkhai, Ulzii-Orshikh; Badarch, Bat-Ireedui; Batsuuri, Batsaikhan

    2016-01-01

    The sinusoidal obstructive syndrome (SOS) is a complication that usually follows hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. It is also known as veno-occlusive disease, which is a rare complication of living donor liver transplantation (LDLT). Herein, we reported a 34 year-old female patient presenting SOS after LDLT. Its underlying cause was presumed to be associated with liver abscess and subsequent inferior vena cava stenosis. SOS led to graft failure, thus requiring retransplantation with a deceased donor liver graft. The underlying causes of SOS are complex pathologic entity with multifactorial etiology. It is likely that its multifactorial etiology includes a decrease of hepatic venous outflow that is caused by graft liver infection and inferior vena cava stenosis.

  6. Mouse model of alloimmune-induced vascular rejection and transplant arteriosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Enns, Winnie; von Rossum, Anna; Choy, Jonathan

    2015-05-17

    Vascular rejection that leads to transplant arteriosclerosis (TA) is the leading representation of chronic heart transplant failure. In TA, the immune system of the recipient causes damage of the arterial wall and dysfunction of endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells. This triggers a pathological repair response that is characterized by intimal thickening and luminal occlusion. Understanding the mechanisms by which the immune system causes vasculature rejection and TA may inform the development of novel ways to manage graft failure. Here, we describe a mouse aortic interposition model that can be used to study the pathogenic mechanisms of vascular rejection and TA. The model involves grafting of an aortic segment from a donor animal into an allogeneic recipient. Rejection of the artery segment involves alloimmune reactions and results in arterial changes that resemble vascular rejection. The basic technical approach we describe can be used with different mouse strains and targeted interventions to answer specific questions related to vascular rejection and TA.

  7. Inferior vena cava stenosis-induced sinusoidal obstructive syndrome after living donor liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bat-Erdene, Batsaikhan; Orgoi, Sergelen; Sandag, Erdene; Namkhai, Ulzii-Orshikh; Badarch, Bat-Ireedui; Batsuuri, Batsaikhan

    2016-08-01

    The sinusoidal obstructive syndrome (SOS) is a complication that usually follows hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. It is also known as veno-occlusive disease, which is a rare complication of living donor liver transplantation (LDLT). Herein, we reported a 34 year-old female patient presenting SOS after LDLT. Its underlying cause was presumed to be associated with liver abscess and subsequent inferior vena cava stenosis. SOS led to graft failure, thus requiring retransplantation with a deceased donor liver graft. The underlying causes of SOS are complex pathologic entity with multifactorial etiology. It is likely that its multifactorial etiology includes a decrease of hepatic venous outflow that is caused by graft liver infection and inferior vena cava stenosis. PMID:27621751

  8. Inferior vena cava stenosis-induced sinusoidal obstructive syndrome after living donor liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Orgoi, Sergelen; Sandag, Erdene; Namkhai, Ulzii-Orshikh; Badarch, Bat-Ireedui; Batsuuri, Batsaikhan

    2016-01-01

    The sinusoidal obstructive syndrome (SOS) is a complication that usually follows hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. It is also known as veno-occlusive disease, which is a rare complication of living donor liver transplantation (LDLT). Herein, we reported a 34 year-old female patient presenting SOS after LDLT. Its underlying cause was presumed to be associated with liver abscess and subsequent inferior vena cava stenosis. SOS led to graft failure, thus requiring retransplantation with a deceased donor liver graft. The underlying causes of SOS are complex pathologic entity with multifactorial etiology. It is likely that its multifactorial etiology includes a decrease of hepatic venous outflow that is caused by graft liver infection and inferior vena cava stenosis. PMID:27621751

  9. Voriconazole-Induced Periostitis Mimicking Chronic Graft-versus-Host Disease after Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sweiss, Karen; Oh, Annie; Rondelli, Damiano; Patel, Pritesh

    2016-01-01

    Voriconazole is an established first-line agent for treatment of invasive fungal infections in patients undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation (ASCT). It is associated with the uncommon complication of periostitis. We report this complication in a 58-year-old female undergoing HSCT. She was treated with corticosteroids with minimal improvement. The symptoms related to periostitis can mimic chronic graft-versus-host disease in patients undergoing HSCT and clinicians should differentiate this from other diagnoses and promptly discontinue therapy.

  10. Voriconazole-Induced Periostitis Mimicking Chronic Graft-versus-Host Disease after Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Annie; Rondelli, Damiano; Patel, Pritesh

    2016-01-01

    Voriconazole is an established first-line agent for treatment of invasive fungal infections in patients undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation (ASCT). It is associated with the uncommon complication of periostitis. We report this complication in a 58-year-old female undergoing HSCT. She was treated with corticosteroids with minimal improvement. The symptoms related to periostitis can mimic chronic graft-versus-host disease in patients undergoing HSCT and clinicians should differentiate this from other diagnoses and promptly discontinue therapy. PMID:27403356

  11. Transplantation of Simian Mesenchymal Stem Cells to Baboons with Experimentally Induced Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Agrba, V Z; Porkhanov, V A; Karal-Ogly, D D; Leontyuk, A V; Kovalenko, A L; Sholin, I Yu; Gvozdik, T E; Ignatova, I E; Agumava, A A; Chuguev, Yu P; Gvaramiya, I A; Lapin, B A

    2016-02-01

    Culture of mesenchymal stem cells isolated from the bone marrow of primates by their characteristics met the requirements of stem cells. It was shown that transplantation of allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells (2 million cells per 1 kg body weight) immediately after ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery between the middle and upper thirds led to neovascularization and capillarization of the ischemic myocardium. PMID:26906203

  12. Intracranial hemorrhage induced uncontrolled seizure in a deceased donor liver transplant patient: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Seung-Young; Lee, Hannah; Park, Yang-Hyo

    2016-01-01

    Seizure is the second most common neurologic complication after liver transplantation and may be caused by metabolic abnormalities, electrolyte imbalance, infection, and immunosuppressant toxicity. A 61-year-old male patient underwent liver transplantation due to hepatitis B virus-related liver cirrhosis with portal systemic encephalopathy. The immediate postoperative course of the patient was uncomplicated. However, on postoperative day (POD) 6, weakness developed in both lower extremities. No abnormal findings were detected on a brain computed tomography (CT) scan on POD 8, but a generalized tonic clonic seizure developed which was difficult to control even with multiple antiepileptic drugs. A follow-up brain CT scan on POD 15 showed a 2.7 cm sized acute intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) in the left parietal lobe. The patient's mental status improved after 2 months and he was able to communicate through eye blinking or head shaking. Our case reports an acute ICH that manifested into a refractory seizure in a patient who underwent a liver transplant. PMID:27703637

  13. Quiescent interplay between inducible nitric oxide synthase and tumor necrosis factor-alpha: influence on transplant graft vasculopathy in renal allograft dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Elahi, Maqsood M; Matata, Bashir M; Hakim, Nadey S

    2006-06-01

    A healthy endothelium is essential for vascular homeostasis, and preservation of endothelial cell function is critical for maintaining transplant allograft function. Damage to the microvascular endothelial cells is now regarded as a characteristic feature of acute vascular rejection, an important predictor of graft loss. It is also linked with transplant vasculopathy, often associated with chronic allograft nephropathy. Large bursts of nitric oxide in infiltrating monocytes/macrophages modulated by inducible nitric oxide synthase are considered pivotal in driving this mechanism. Indeed, it has been shown recently that increased circulating levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha in the rejecting kidneys are largely responsible for triggering inducible nitric oxide synthase expression. This in turn suggests that several structural and functional features of graft rejection could be mediated by tumor necrosis factor-alpha. Despite the large body of evidence that supports immunologic involvement, knowledge concerning the cellular and biochemical mechanisms for nephritic cell dysfunction and death is incomplete. The role of tumor necrosis factor-alpha in mediating pathophysiological activity of inducible nitric oxide synthase during transplant vasculopathy remains contentious. Here, we discuss the effect of inducible nitric oxide synthase and tumor necrosis factor-alpha interaction on progressive damage to glomerular and vascular structures during renal allograft rejection. Selective inhibition of inducible nitrous oxide synthase and tumor necrosis factor-alpha as a potential therapy for ameliorating endothelial dysfunction and transplant graft vasculopathy is also discussed.

  14. Human amniotic epithelial cells induce localized cell-mediated immune privilege in vitro: implications for pancreatic islet transplantation.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Khalid M; Oliver, Robert J; Paget, Michelle B; Murray, Hilary E; Bailey, Clifford J; Downing, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Chronic systemic immunosuppression in cell replacement therapy restricts its clinical application. This study sought to explore the potential of cell-based immune modulation as an alternative to immunosuppressive drug therapy in the context of pancreatic islet transplantation. Human amniotic epithelial cells (AEC) possess innate anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive properties that were utilized to create localized immune privilege in an in vitro islet cell culture system. Cellular constructs composed of human islets and AEC (islet/AEC) were bioengineered under defined rotational cell culture conditions. Insulin secretory capacity was validated by glucose challenge and immunomodulatory potential characterized using a peripheral blood lymphocyte (PBL) proliferation assay. Results were compared to control constructs composed of islets or AEC cultured alone. Studies employing AEC-conditioned medium examined the role of soluble factors, and fluorescence immunocytochemistry was used to identify putative mediators of the immunosuppressive response in isolated AEC monocultures. Sustained, physiologically appropriate insulin secretion was observed in both islets and islet/AEC constructs. Activation of resting PBL proliferation occurred on exposure to human islets alone but this response was significantly (p < 0.05) attenuated by the presence of AEC and AEC-conditioned medium. Mitogen (phytohaemagglutinin, 5 μg/ml)-induced PBL proliferation was sustained on contact with isolated islets but abrogated by AEC, conditioned medium, and the islet/AEC constructs. Immunocytochemical analysis of AEC monocultures identified a subpopulation of cells that expressed the proapoptosis protein Fas ligand. This study demonstrates that human islet/AEC constructs exhibit localized immunosuppressive properties with no impairment of β-cell function. The data suggest that transplanted islets may benefit from the immune privilege status conferred on them as a consequence of their close

  15. Kidney transplant

    MedlinePlus

    Renal transplant; Transplant - kidney ... Barry JM, Conlin MJ. In: Renal transplantation. Wein AJ, ed. Campbell-Walsh Urology . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap 44. Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes ( ...

  16. On-chip monitoring of skeletal myoblast transplantation for the treatment of hypoxia-induced myocardial injury.

    PubMed

    He, Juan; Ma, Chao; Liu, Wenming; Wang, Jinyi

    2014-09-21

    A comprehensive elucidation of the unexpected adverse events that occur in skeletal myoblast transplantation is fundamental for the optimization of myocardial therapeutic effects. However, a well-defined method to study the interactions between skeletal myoblasts and cardiomyocytes during the healing process is out of reach. Here, we describe a microfluidic method for monitoring the interactions between skeletal myoblasts and hypoxia-injured cardiomyocytes in a spatiotemporally-controlled manner, mimicking the in vivo cell transplantation process. A myocardial hypoxia environment was created using an oxygen consumption blocking reagent, carbonyl cyanide 4-(trifluoromethoxy)phenylhydrazone. Meanwhile, the interactions between the skeletal L6 myoblasts and hypoxia-injured myocardium H9c2 cells were investigated, and the effects of a L6 conditional medium on H9c2 cells were comparatively analyzed by quantitatively measuring the morphological and pathophysiological dynamics of H9c2 cells. The results showed that skeletal myoblasts could repair hypoxia-injured H9c2 cells mainly through direct cell-to-cell interactions. This simple on-chip assay for investigating myocardial repair processes may provide avenues for the in vitro screening of drug-induced cardiotoxicity. PMID:25025637

  17. Maternal alloantibodies induce a postnatal immune response that limits engraftment following in utero hematopoietic cell transplantation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Merianos, Demetri J.; Tiblad, Eleonor; Santore, Matthew T.; Todorow, Carlyn A.; Laje, Pablo; Endo, Masayuki; Zoltick, Philip W.; Flake, Alan W.

    2009-01-01

    The lack of fetal immune responses to foreign antigens, i.e., fetal immunologic tolerance, is the most compelling rationale for prenatal stem cell and gene therapy. However, the frequency of engraftment following in utero hematopoietic cell transplantation (IUHCT) in the murine model is reduced in allogeneic, compared with congenic, recipients. This observation supports the existence of an immune barrier to fetal transplantation and challenges the classic assumptions of fetal tolerance. Here, we present evidence that supports the presence of an adaptive immune response in murine recipients of IUHCT that failed to maintain engraftment. However, when IUHCT recipients were fostered by surrogate mothers, they all maintained long-term chimerism. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that the cells responsible for rejection of the graft were recipient in origin. Our observations suggest a mechanism by which IUHCT-dependent sensitization of the maternal immune system and the subsequent transmission of maternal alloantibodies to pups through breast milk induces a postnatal adaptive immune response in the recipient, which, in turn, results in the ablation of engraftment after IUHCT. Finally, we showed that non-fostered pups that maintained their chimerism had higher levels of Tregs as well as a more suppressive Treg phenotype than their non-chimeric, non-fostered siblings. This study resolves the apparent contradiction of induction of an adaptive immune response in the pre-immune fetus and confirms the potential of actively acquired tolerance to facilitate prenatal therapeutic applications. PMID:19652363

  18. Desensitization protocols for prospective pediatric renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Mamode, Nizam; Marks, Stephen D

    2016-10-01

    Desensitization protocols should be considered for children with positive crossmatches awaiting renal transplantation. Children are sensitized usually due to previous renal (and/or other solid-organ) transplants but can be from administration of blood and/or platelet transfusions, infections, and immunizations (as sensitization from pregnancy is a rare occurrence in pediatric patients). However, the definition of HLA-incompatible (HLAi) renal transplantation in the literature varies and is best considered only when there is a positive cross-match (positive baseline flow cytometric cross-match or positive complement-dependent cytotoxic cross-match). Renal transplantation where the recipient has donor-specific antibodies (DSA) but a negative cross-match should not fall into this category, although they are higher risk. PMID:27270722

  19. Desensitization protocols for prospective pediatric renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Mamode, Nizam; Marks, Stephen D

    2016-10-01

    Desensitization protocols should be considered for children with positive crossmatches awaiting renal transplantation. Children are sensitized usually due to previous renal (and/or other solid-organ) transplants but can be from administration of blood and/or platelet transfusions, infections, and immunizations (as sensitization from pregnancy is a rare occurrence in pediatric patients). However, the definition of HLA-incompatible (HLAi) renal transplantation in the literature varies and is best considered only when there is a positive cross-match (positive baseline flow cytometric cross-match or positive complement-dependent cytotoxic cross-match). Renal transplantation where the recipient has donor-specific antibodies (DSA) but a negative cross-match should not fall into this category, although they are higher risk.

  20. Co-Transplantation of Endothelial Progenitor Cells and Pancreatic Islets to Induce Long-Lasting Normoglycemia in Streptozotocin-Treated Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Spiga, Saturnino; Mazzanti, Benedetta; Curcio, Michele; Mulas, Giovanna; Diana, Marco; Marzola, Pasquina; Mosca, Franco; Longoni, Biancamaria

    2014-01-01

    Graft vascularization is a crucial step to obtain stable normoglycemia in pancreatic islet transplantation. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) contribute to neoangiogenesis and to the revascularization process during ischaemic events and play a key role in the response to pancreatic islet injury. In this work we co-transplanted EPCs and islets in the portal vein of chemically-induced diabetic rats to restore islet vascularization and to improve graft survival. Syngenic islets were transplanted, either alone or with EPCs derived from green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic rats, into the portal vein of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Blood glucose levels were monitored and intraperitoneal glucose tolerance tests were performed. Real time-PCR was carried out to evaluate the gene expression of angiogenic factors. Diabetic-induced rats showed long-lasting (6 months) normoglycemia upon co-transplantation of syngenic islets and EPCs. After 3–5 days from transplantation, hyperglycaemic levels dropped to normal values and lasted unmodified as long as they were checked. Further, glucose tolerance tests revealed the animals' ability to produce insulin on-demand as indexed by a prompt response in blood glucose clearance. Graft neovascularization was evaluated by immunohistochemistry: for the first time the measure of endothelial thickness revealed a donor-EPC-related neovascularization supporting viable islets up to six months after transplant. Our results highlight the importance of a newly formed viable vascular network together with pancreatic islets to provide de novo adequate supply in order to obtain enduring normoglycemia and prevent diabetes-related long-term health hazards. PMID:24733186

  1. Dose-independent confusion induced by voriconazole in a patient with Asian ancestry after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant.

    PubMed

    Hui, John

    2016-02-01

    This is the case of a 71-year-old man with Asian ancestry who had myelodysplastic syndrome admitted for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant. This case suggests that voriconazole-induced confusion is probably dose-independent and reversible with no residual symptoms after discontinuation of voriconazole. Patient can experience confusion even voriconazole is ordered according to package insert and serum voriconazole level is within therapeutic range (1-6 µg/mL). The onset of confusion can be delayed and sudden after seven days of voriconazole therapy. Genotyping of CYP2C19 can be tested for Asian populations since 15-20% of them could be poor metabolizers of voriconazole.

  2. Triple bridge-to-transplant in a case of giant cell myocarditis complicated by human leukocyte antigen sensitization and heparin-induced thrombocytopenia type II.

    PubMed

    Schenk, Soren; Arusoglu, Latif; Morshuis, Michiel; Minami, Kazutomo; Sarnowski, Peter; Koerfer, Reiner; El-Banayosy, Aly

    2006-03-01

    Bridge-to-bridge experience has documented the feasibility of a switch from short-term to long-term mechanical circulatory support until heart transplant. We describe a case of irreversible cardiogenic shock due to giant cell myocarditis treated consecutively with extracorporal membrane oxygenation, bi-ventricular assist device, and total artificial heart. The postoperative course was complicated by human leukocyte antigen sensitization and heparin-induced thrombocytopenia type II. Our patient successfully underwent heart transplant after 10 months of support and was discharged in good condition. This case illustrates suitable device selection for myocarditis and represents two treatable immunological complications.

  3. Bortezomib in ABO-incompatible kidney transplant desensitization: a case report.

    PubMed

    Wong, Nikki L; O'Connell, Philip; Chapman, Jeremy R; Nankivell, Brian; Kable, Kathy; Webster, A C; Wong, Germaine

    2015-03-01

    Positive B cell crossmatch accompanied by high levels of pre-transplant human leukocyte antigen donor-specific antibodies are associated with adverse graft outcomes in kidney transplant recipients. Targeting plasma cells, the main antibody producing cells, with the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib may be a promising desensitization strategy. We report using a combination of bortezomib and plasmapheresis to desensitize a highly sensitized kidney transplant recipient for an ABO-incompatible living donor kidney transplant. The flow cytometric B cell crossmatch was positive on presentation. After treatment, the anti-A titres fell from 1:64 to 1:4, and a negative B flow cytometric crossmatch was achieved prior to transplantation. The combined approach of bortezomib to abrogate antibody production at the plasma cell level, followed by plasmapheresis and low-dose intravenous immunoglobulin to remove in-circulation alloantibodies, has proven to be effective in our case. Bortezomib may play a role in highly sensitized renal transplants.

  4. Transcriptional and biochemical markers in transplanted Perca flavescens to characterize cadmium- and copper-induced oxidative stress in the field.

    PubMed

    Defo, Michel A; Bernatchez, Louis; Campbell, Peter G C; Couture, Patrice

    2015-05-01

    Despite recent progress achieved in elucidating the mechanisms underlying local adaptation to pollution, little is known about the evolutionary change that may be occurring at the molecular level. The goal of this study was to examine patterns of gene transcription and biochemical responses induced by metal accumulation in clean yellow perch (Perca flavescens) and metal depuration in contaminated fish in a mining and smelting region of Canada. Fish were collected from a reference lake (lake Opasatica) and a Cd, Cu and Zn contaminated lake (lake Dufault) located in the Rouyn-Noranda region (Qc, Canada) and caged for one or four weeks in their own lake or transplanted in the other lake. Free-ranging fish from the same lakes were also collected. Kidney Cd and Cu concentrations in clean fish caged in the contaminated lake increased with the time of exposure, but metal depuration did not occur in contaminated fish caged in the clean lake. After 4 weeks, the major retinoid metabolites analysed, the percentage of free dehydroretinol (dROH) and the retinol dehydrogenase-2 (rdh-2) transcription level in liver decreased in clean fish transplanted into the metal-contaminated lake, suggesting that metal exposure negatively impacted retinoid metabolism. However, we observed an increase in almost all of the retinoid parameters analysed in fish from the metal-impacted lake caged in the same lake, which we interpret as an adaptation response to higher ambient metal concentration. In support of this hypothesis, liver transcription levels of microsomal glutathione-S-transferase-3 (mgst-3) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (g6pdh) were enhanced in clean fish transplanted into the metal-contaminated lake and this up-regulation was accompanied by an increase in the activities of corresponding enzymes, involved in antioxidant response. However, although in the same fish the transcription level of Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (Cu/Zn sod) was also increased, this did not lead to a

  5. Total body irradiation of donors can alter the course of tolerance and induce acute rejection in a spontaneous tolerance rat liver transplantation model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, YeWei; Zhao, HeWei; Bo, Lin; Yang, YinXue; Lu, Xiang; Sun, JingFeng; Wen, JianFei; He, Xia; Yin, GuoWen

    2012-09-01

    Liver transplantation is an established therapy for end-stage liver diseases. Graft rejection occurs unless the recipient receives immunosuppression after transplantation. This study aimed to explore the mechanism of acute rejection of liver allografts in rats pre-treated with total body irradiation to eliminate passenger lymphocytes and to define the role of CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells in the induction of immunotolerance in the recipient. Male Lewis rats were used as donors and male DA rats were recipients. Rats were randomly assigned to the following four groups: control group, homogeneity liver transplantation group, idio-immunotolerance group and acute rejection group. After transplantation, the survival time of each group, serum alanine aminotransferase, total bilirubin levels, number of Foxp3(+)CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells, expression of glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor receptor on T cell subgroups, histopathology of the hepatic graft and spleen cytotoxic T lymphocyte lytic activity were measured. In the acute rejection group, where donors were preconditioned with total body irradiation before liver transplantation, all recipients died between day 17 and day 21. On day 14, serum alanine aminotransferase increased significantly to (459.2±76.9) U L(-1), total bilirubin increased to (124.1±33.7) μmol L(-1) (P<0.05) and the ratio of Foxp3(+)CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells decreased significantly to 1.50%±0.50% (P<0.05) compared with the other groups. Analysis of the T cell subpopulations in the acute rejection group varied from the other groups. Histological analysis showed typical changes of acute rejection in the acute rejection group only. Preconditioning of the donors with total body irradiation eliminated passenger lymphocytes of the liver graft, and thus affected the course of tolerance and induced acute rejection after liver transplantation.

  6. Efficacy of induction therapy with ATG and intravenous immunoglobulins in patients with low-level donor-specific HLA-antibodies.

    PubMed

    Bächler, K; Amico, P; Hönger, G; Bielmann, D; Hopfer, H; Mihatsch, M J; Steiger, J; Schaub, S

    2010-05-01

    Low-level donor-specific HLA-antibodies (HLA-DSA) (i.e. detectable by single-antigen flow beads, but negative by complement-dependent cytotoxicity crossmatch) represent a risk factor for early allograft rejection. The short-term efficacy of an induction regimen consisting of polyclonal anti-T-lymphocyte globulin (ATG) and intravenous immunoglobulins (IvIg) in patients with low-level HLA-DSA is unknown. In this study, we compared 67 patients with low-level HLA-DSA not having received ATG/IvIg induction (historic control) with 37 patients, who received ATG/IvIg induction. The two groups were equal regarding retransplants, HLA-matches, number and class of HLA-DSA. The overall incidence of clinical/subclinical antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) was lower in the ATG/IvIg than in the historic control group (38% vs. 55%; p = 0.03). This was driven by a significantly lower rate of clinical AMR (11% vs. 46%; p = 0.0002). Clinical T-cell-mediated rejection (TCR) was significantly lower in the ATG/IvIg than in the historic control group (0% vs. 50%; p < 0.0001). Within the first year, allograft loss due to AMR occurred in 7.5% in the historic control and in 0% in the ATG/IvIg group. We conclude that in patients with low-level HLA-DSA, ATG/IvIg induction significantly reduces TCR and the severity of AMR, but the high rate of subclinical AMR suggests an insufficient control of the humoral immune response.

  7. Prolonging survival in vascularized bone allograft transplantation: developing specific immune unresponsiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Paskert, J.P.; Yaremchuk, M.J.; Randolph, M.A.; Weiland, A.J.

    1987-04-01

    Vascularized bone allografts (VBAs) could be useful adjuncts to the clinical reconstructive surgeon's arsenal. These grafts are known experimentally to be subject to host rejection. One way to control the rejection problem would be to develop specific immune unresponsiveness via host conditioning. Using a proven reliable model in inbred rats for studying heterotopic VBA transplantation, recipient animals were conditioned preoperatively with third-party unrelated blood, donor-specific blood (DSB) alone and with cyclosporine, and ultraviolet irradiated donor-specific blood. The combination of DSB plus cyclosporine delayed rejection of grafts across a strong histocompatibility barrier for three to four weeks. However, rejection was delayed across a weak histocompatibility barrier for five to six weeks using this same host pretreatment. The implications are that specific immunosuppression, although possible, is difficult to achieve in VBA transplantation, and that such techniques will rely on tissue-matching to minimize the genetic disparity between graft and host.

  8. [Chemotherapy with fluoropyrimidines for MOPC-104E plasmacytoma transplanted in mice with CCl4 induced chronic liver dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Tsubono, M; Nio, Y; Imai, S; Shiraishi, T; Morimoto, H; Tseng, C C; Tobe, T

    1990-03-20

    The masked compounds of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) have been widely used for chemotherapy in digestive organ cancer. Among them it has been considered that FT (Tegafur) is metabolized into the active form by the drug-metabolizing enzyme P-450 in the microsomes of hepatocytes, and that their activation and anti-tumor activity may decrease under the condition of chronic liver dysfunction. However, this hypothesis has never been experimentally proved. In the present study the therapeutic effect and metabolism of 5-FU and its masked compounds: FT, UFT (uracil + FT), HCFU (Carmofur), 5'-DFUR (Doxifluridine) were assessed by using MOPC-104E plasmacytoma transplanted subcutaneously in BALB/c mice with CCl4-induced chronic liver dysfunction. Agents were administered daily directly into the stomach with stainless steel canule over days 7 to 13 after tumor transplantation, and the tumor weights, drug concentrations in the liver or the tumor, and serum levels of GOT, GPT and LDH were measured on day 14. In mice with chronic liver dysfunction the tumor-inhibitory effect of 5-FU, FT, UFT and HCFU did not necessarily decrease and serum levels of GOT, GPT and LDH of mice administered with 5-FU, FT, HCFU and 5'-DFUR were higher than in normal animals treated with them. By contrast UFT had no influence on them. The most remarkable difference was observed in uracil concentrations, which were significantly lower in the tumor and the liver of mice with chronic liver dysfunction than in those of normal mice.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Comparison of the Treatment Efficiency of Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation via Tail and Portal Veins in CCl4-Induced Mouse Liver Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Truong, Nhung Hai; Nguyen, Nam Hai; Le, Trinh Van; Vu, Ngoc Bich; Huynh, Nghia; Nguyen, Thanh Van; Le, Huy Minh; Phan, Ngoc Kim; Pham, Phuc Van

    2016-01-01

    Because of self-renewal, strong proliferation in vitro, abundant sources for isolation, and a high differentiation capacity, mesenchymal stem cells are suggested to be potentially therapeutic for liver fibrosis/cirrhosis. In this study, we evaluated the treatment effects of mouse bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) on mouse liver cirrhosis induced by carbon tetrachloride. Portal and tail vein transplantations were examined to evaluate the effects of different injection routes on the liver cirrhosis model at 21 days after transplantation. BM-MSCs transplantation reduced aspartate aminotransferase/alanine aminotransferase levels at 21 days after injection. Furthermore, BM-MSCs induced positive changes in serum bilirubin and albumin and downregulated expression of integrins (600- to 7000-fold), transforming growth factor, and procollagen-α1 compared with the control group. Interestingly, both injection routes ameliorated inflammation and liver cirrhosis scores. All mice in treatment groups had reduced inflammation scores and no cirrhosis. In conclusion, transplantation of BM-MSCs via tail or portal veins ameliorates liver cirrhosis in mice. Notably, there were no differences in treatment effects between tail and portal vein administrations. In consideration of safety, we suggest transfusion of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells via a peripheral vein as a potential method for liver fibrosis treatment. PMID:26839564

  10. Comparison of the Treatment Efficiency of Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation via Tail and Portal Veins in CCl4-Induced Mouse Liver Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Nhung Hai; Nguyen, Nam Hai; Le, Trinh Van; Vu, Ngoc Bich; Huynh, Nghia; Nguyen, Thanh Van; Le, Huy Minh; Phan, Ngoc Kim

    2016-01-01

    Because of self-renewal, strong proliferation in vitro, abundant sources for isolation, and a high differentiation capacity, mesenchymal stem cells are suggested to be potentially therapeutic for liver fibrosis/cirrhosis. In this study, we evaluated the treatment effects of mouse bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) on mouse liver cirrhosis induced by carbon tetrachloride. Portal and tail vein transplantations were examined to evaluate the effects of different injection routes on the liver cirrhosis model at 21 days after transplantation. BM-MSCs transplantation reduced aspartate aminotransferase/alanine aminotransferase levels at 21 days after injection. Furthermore, BM-MSCs induced positive changes in serum bilirubin and albumin and downregulated expression of integrins (600- to 7000-fold), transforming growth factor, and procollagen-α1 compared with the control group. Interestingly, both injection routes ameliorated inflammation and liver cirrhosis scores. All mice in treatment groups had reduced inflammation scores and no cirrhosis. In conclusion, transplantation of BM-MSCs via tail or portal veins ameliorates liver cirrhosis in mice. Notably, there were no differences in treatment effects between tail and portal vein administrations. In consideration of safety, we suggest transfusion of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells via a peripheral vein as a potential method for liver fibrosis treatment. PMID:26839564

  11. Comparison of the Treatment Efficiency of Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation via Tail and Portal Veins in CCl4-Induced Mouse Liver Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Truong, Nhung Hai; Nguyen, Nam Hai; Le, Trinh Van; Vu, Ngoc Bich; Huynh, Nghia; Nguyen, Thanh Van; Le, Huy Minh; Phan, Ngoc Kim; Pham, Phuc Van

    2016-01-01

    Because of self-renewal, strong proliferation in vitro, abundant sources for isolation, and a high differentiation capacity, mesenchymal stem cells are suggested to be potentially therapeutic for liver fibrosis/cirrhosis. In this study, we evaluated the treatment effects of mouse bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) on mouse liver cirrhosis induced by carbon tetrachloride. Portal and tail vein transplantations were examined to evaluate the effects of different injection routes on the liver cirrhosis model at 21 days after transplantation. BM-MSCs transplantation reduced aspartate aminotransferase/alanine aminotransferase levels at 21 days after injection. Furthermore, BM-MSCs induced positive changes in serum bilirubin and albumin and downregulated expression of integrins (600- to 7000-fold), transforming growth factor, and procollagen-α1 compared with the control group. Interestingly, both injection routes ameliorated inflammation and liver cirrhosis scores. All mice in treatment groups had reduced inflammation scores and no cirrhosis. In conclusion, transplantation of BM-MSCs via tail or portal veins ameliorates liver cirrhosis in mice. Notably, there were no differences in treatment effects between tail and portal vein administrations. In consideration of safety, we suggest transfusion of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells via a peripheral vein as a potential method for liver fibrosis treatment.

  12. Fecal Transplantation Treatment of Antibiotic-Induced, Noninfectious Colitis and Long-Term Microbiota Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Mattila, Eero; Jalanka, Jonna; de Vos, Willem M.; Arkkila, Perttu

    2014-01-01

    Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is an effective treatment for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) and is considered as a treatment for other gastrointestinal (GI) diseases. We followed up the relief of symptoms and long-term, over-a-year microbiota stabilization in a 46-year-old man, who underwent FMT for antibiotic-induced, non-CDI colitis nine months after being treated for CDI by FMT. Fecal and mucosal microbiota was analyzed before the second FMT and during 14 months after FMT by using a high-throughput phylogenetic microarray. FMT resolved the symptoms and restored normal GI-function. Microbiota analysis revealed increased bacterial diversity in the rectal mucosa and a stable fecal microbiota up to three months after FMT. A number of mucosa-associated bacteria increased after FMT and some of these bacteria remained increased in feces up to 14 months. Notably, the increased bacteria included Bifidobacterium spp. and various representatives of Clostridium clusters IV and XIVa, such as Clostridium leptum, Oscillospira guillermondii, Sporobacter termitidis, Anaerotruncus colihominis, Ruminococcus callidus, R. bromii, Lachnospira pectinoschiza, and C. colinum, which are presumed to be anti-inflammatory. The presented case suggests a possible role of microbiota in restoring and maintaining normal GI-functionality and improves our knowledge on the etiology of antibiotic-induced, noninfectious colitis. PMID:25548572

  13. Changes in exercise capacity induced by heart transplantation: prognostic and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Grigioni, F; Specchia, S; Maietta, P; Potena, L; Bacchi-Reggiani, M L; Ghetti, G; Boriani, G; Foschi, E; Corazza, I; Ionico, T; Magnani, G; Zannoli, R; Tentoni, C; Branzi, A

    2011-08-01

    Survival and exercise performance are key targets of heart transplantation (HT). We designed this study to help in identifying (1) patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) at risk of poor exercise capacity after HT and (2) HT recipients presenting risk factors modifiable with exercise showing a potential impact on outcome. We enrolled 49 HT recipients (age 52 ± 12 years, 84% males) who underwent a cardiopulmonary exercise test before (9 ± 6 months) and after (20 ± 14 months) HT. In the CHF phase, lower peak oxygen consumption (VO(2) ) (odds ratio 0.69, P=0.017) independently predicted peak VO(2) improvement after HT. In the post-HT phase, body mass index (BMI) [adjusted hazard ratio (HR) 1.16, P=0.034] and VE (ventilation)/VCO(2) (carbon dioxide production) slope (adjusted HR 1.07, P=0.031) independently predicted mortality. In conclusion, CHF patients with only a moderate impairment of peak VO(2) are at a risk of failing to achieve a significant improvement of exercise performance after HT. In the post-HT phase, a BMI≥28 and/or a VE/VCO(2) slope ≥47 represent risk factors for death, which are potentially modifiable with exercise. Prospective randomized studies are needed to analyze the effects of training on functional capacity and outcome in the different subsets of HT recipients.

  14. Physiological relaxation induced by horticultural activity: transplanting work using flowering plants

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite increasing attention and a growing volume of research data, little physiological evidence is available on the benefits of horticultural activity and the different effects on individuals. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the physiological effects of horticultural activity and to examine how differences in personality alter these effects. Results The effects of transplanting real flowers (horticultural activity) and handling artificial flowers (control activity) on human physiological activity were compared. On the first day, eight participants engaged in horticultural activity and another eight in the control activity. On the second day, participants switched roles. Participants’ physiological conditions during each activity were assessed by measuring the heart rate and heart rate variability (HRV). Psychological responses, which were measured using a semantic differential rating scale, showed that the horticultural activity promoted comfortable, soothed, and natural feelings, compared to the control activity. Analysis of physiological responses using two-way repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed that sympathetic nervous activity significantly decreased in the late time period (11 to 15 minutes) of horticultural activity only in the type A group. Conclusions This study supports the fact that the horticultural activity can enhance psychological and physiological relaxation effects, although these physiological effects can differ among individuals with different personalities. PMID:24112302

  15. Hair transplantation.

    PubMed

    Avram, Marc R

    2012-12-01

    Hair transplantation is a purely dermatologic surgical procedure that dermatologists should be able to perform in appropriate candidates with hair loss. Hair transplantation techniques performed in the 1960s through the 1990s utilized large grafts that created an unfortunate public image of unnatural-appearing transplanted hair. Over the last 15 years, hair transplantation has been performed using follicular units to create consistently natural-looking transplanted hair in both men and women. This article provides an overview of candidate selection and state-of-the-art techniques for performing hair transplantation.

  16. Amifostine Induces Antioxidant Enzymatic Activities in Normal Tissues and a Transplantable Tumor That Can Affect Radiation Response

    SciTech Connect

    Grdina, David J. Murley, Jeffrey S.; Kataoka, Yasushi; Baker, Kenneth L.; Kunnavakkam, Rangesh; Coleman, Mitchell C.; Spitz, Douglas R.

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: To determine whether amifostine can induce elevated manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2) in murine tissues and a transplantable SA-NH tumor, resulting in a delayed tumor cell radioprotective effect. Methods and Materials: SA-NH tumor-bearing C3H mice were treated with a single 400 mg/kg or three daily 50 mg/kg doses of amifostine administered intraperitoneally. At selected time intervals after the last injection, the heart, liver, lung, pancreas, small intestine, spleen, and SA-NH tumor were removed and analyzed for SOD2, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) enzymatic activity. The effect of elevated SOD2 enzymatic activity on the radiation response of SA-NH cells was determined. Results: SOD2 activity was significantly elevated in selected tissues and a tumor 24 h after amifostine treatment. Catalase and GPx activities remained unchanged except for significant elevations in the spleen. GPx was also elevated in the pancreas. SA-NH tumor cells exhibited a twofold elevation in SOD2 activity and a 27% elevation in radiation resistance. Amifostine administered in three daily fractions of 50 mg/kg each also resulted in significant elevations of these antioxidant enzymes. Conclusions: Amifostine can induce a delayed radioprotective effect that correlates with elevated levels of SOD2 activity in SA-NH tumor. If limited to normal tissues, this delayed radioprotective effect offers an additional potential for overall radiation protection. However, amifostine-induced elevation of SOD2 activity in tumors could have an unanticipated deleterious effect on tumor responses to fractionated radiation therapy, given that the radioprotector is administered daily just before each 2-Gy fractionated dose.

  17. HLA-Mismatched Renal Transplantation without Maintenance Immunosuppression

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Tatsuo; Cosimi, A. Benedict; Spitzer, Thomas R.; Tolkoff-Rubin, Nina; Suthanthiran, Manikkam; Saidman, Susan L.; Shaffer, Juanita; Preffer, Frederic I.; Ding, Ruchuang; Sharma, Vijay; Fishman, Jay A.; Dey, Bimalangshu; Ko, Dicken S.C.; Hertl, Martin; Goes, Nelson B.; Wong, Waichi; Williams, Winfred W.; Colvin, Robert B.; Sykes, Megan; Sachs, David H.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Five patients with end-stage renal disease received combined bone marrow and kidney transplants from HLA single-haplotype mismatched living related donors, with the use of a nonmyeloablative preparative regimen. Transient chimerism and reversible capillary leak syndrome developed in all recipients. Irreversible humoral rejection occurred in one patient. In the other four recipients, it was possible to discontinue all immunosuppressive therapy 9 to 14 months after the transplantation, and renal function has remained stable for 2.0 to 5.3 years since transplantation. The T cells from these four recipients, tested in vitro, showed donor-specific unresponsiveness and in specimens from allograft biopsies, obtained after withdrawal of immunosuppressive therapy, there were high levels of P3 (FOXP3) messenger RNA (mRNA) but not granzyme B mRNA. PMID:18216355

  18. Autologous bone marrow stromal cell transplantation as a treatment for acute radiation enteritis induced by a moderate dose of radiation in dogs.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenda; Chen, Jiang; Liu, Xu; Li, Hongyu; Qi, Xingshun; Guo, Xiaozhong

    2016-05-01

    Radiation enteritis is one of the most common complications of cancer radiotherapy, and the development of new and effective measures for its prevention and treatment is of great importance. Adult bone marrow stromal stem cells (ABMSCs) are capable of self-renewal and exhibit low immunogenicity. In this study, we investigated ABMSC transplantation as a treatment for acute radiation enteritis. We developed a dog model of acute radiation enteritis using abdominal intensity-modulated radiation therapy in a single X-ray dose of 14 Gy. ABMSCs were cultured in vitro, identified via immunofluorescence and flow cytometry, and double labeled with CM-Dil and superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) before transplantation, which took place 48 hours after abdominal irradiation in a single fraction. The dog model of acute radiation enteritis was transplanted with cultured ABMSCs labeled with CM-Dil and SPIO into the mesenteric artery through the femoral artery. Compared with untreated control groups, dogs treated with ABMSCs exhibited substantially longer survival time and improved relief of clinical symptoms. ABMSC transplantation induced the regeneration of the intestinal epithelium and the recovery of intestinal function. Furthermore, ABMSC transplantation resulted in elevated serum levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-11 (IL10) and intestinal radioprotective factors, such as keratinocyte growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor-2, and platelet-derived growth factor-B while reducing the serum level of the inflammatory cytokine IL17. ABMSCs induced the regeneration of the intestinal epithelium and regulated the secretion of serum cytokines and the expression of radioprotective proteins and thus could be beneficial in the development of novel and effective mitigators of and protectors against acute radiation enteritis. PMID:26763584

  19. Autologous bone marrow stromal cell transplantation as a treatment for acute radiation enteritis induced by a moderate dose of radiation in dogs.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenda; Chen, Jiang; Liu, Xu; Li, Hongyu; Qi, Xingshun; Guo, Xiaozhong

    2016-05-01

    Radiation enteritis is one of the most common complications of cancer radiotherapy, and the development of new and effective measures for its prevention and treatment is of great importance. Adult bone marrow stromal stem cells (ABMSCs) are capable of self-renewal and exhibit low immunogenicity. In this study, we investigated ABMSC transplantation as a treatment for acute radiation enteritis. We developed a dog model of acute radiation enteritis using abdominal intensity-modulated radiation therapy in a single X-ray dose of 14 Gy. ABMSCs were cultured in vitro, identified via immunofluorescence and flow cytometry, and double labeled with CM-Dil and superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) before transplantation, which took place 48 hours after abdominal irradiation in a single fraction. The dog model of acute radiation enteritis was transplanted with cultured ABMSCs labeled with CM-Dil and SPIO into the mesenteric artery through the femoral artery. Compared with untreated control groups, dogs treated with ABMSCs exhibited substantially longer survival time and improved relief of clinical symptoms. ABMSC transplantation induced the regeneration of the intestinal epithelium and the recovery of intestinal function. Furthermore, ABMSC transplantation resulted in elevated serum levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-11 (IL10) and intestinal radioprotective factors, such as keratinocyte growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor-2, and platelet-derived growth factor-B while reducing the serum level of the inflammatory cytokine IL17. ABMSCs induced the regeneration of the intestinal epithelium and regulated the secretion of serum cytokines and the expression of radioprotective proteins and thus could be beneficial in the development of novel and effective mitigators of and protectors against acute radiation enteritis.

  20. Transplant services

    MedlinePlus

    ... diseased body part with a healthy one. SOLID ORGAN TRANSPLANTS Auto islet cell transplant is done after a ... selected experts, including: Surgeons who specialize in performing ... doctors Radiologists and medical imaging technologists Nurses ...

  1. Pancreas Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Text Size: A A A Listen En Español Pancreas Transplantation Some patients with type 1 diabetes have ... weigh the potential benefits and risks. Benefits of Pancreas Transplants You may be able to maintain a ...

  2. The Clinical Impact of Humoral Immunity in Pediatric Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhuri, Abanti; Ozawa, Mikki; Everly, Matthew J.; Ettenger, Robert; Dharnidharka, Vikas; Benfield, Mark; Mathias, Robert; Portale, Anthony; McDonald, Ruth; Harmon, William; Kershaw, David; Vehaskari, V. Matti; Kamil, Elaine; Baluarte, H. Jorge; Warady, Bradley; Li, Li; Sigdel, Tara K.; Hsieh, Szu-chuan; Dai, Hong; Naesens, Maarten; Waskerwitz, Janie; Salvatierra, Oscar; Terasaki, Paul I.

    2013-01-01

    The development of anti-donor humoral responses after transplantation associates with higher risks for acute rejection and 1-year graft survival in adults, but the influence of humoral immunity on transplant outcomes in children is not well understood. Here, we studied the evolution of humoral immunity in low-risk pediatric patients during the first 2 years after renal transplantation. Using data from 130 pediatric renal transplant patients randomized to steroid-free (SF) or steroid-based (SB) immunosuppression in the NIH-SNSO1 trial, we correlated the presence of serum anti-HLA antibodies to donor HLA antigens (donor-specific antibodies) and serum MHC class 1-related chain A (MICA) antibody with both clinical outcomes and histology identified on protocol biopsies at 0, 6, 12, and 24 months. We detected de novo antibodies after transplant in 24% (23% of SF group and 25% of SB group), most often after the first year. Overall, 22% developed anti-HLA antibodies, of which 6% were donor-specific antibodies, and 6% developed anti-MICA antibody. Presence of these antibodies de novo associated with significantly higher risks for acute rejection (P=0.02), chronic graft injury (P=0.02), and decline in graft function (P=0.02). In summary, antibodies to HLA and MICA antigens appear in approximately 25% of unsensitized pediatric patients, placing them at greater risk for acute and chronic rejection with accelerated loss of graft function. Avoiding steroids does not seem to modify this incidence. Whether serial assessments of these antibodies after transplant could guide individual tailoring of immunosuppression requires additional study. PMID:23449533

  3. The clinical impact of humoral immunity in pediatric renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Abanti; Ozawa, Mikki; Everly, Matthew J; Ettenger, Robert; Dharnidharka, Vikas; Benfield, Mark; Mathias, Robert; Portale, Anthony; McDonald, Ruth; Harmon, William; Kershaw, David; Vehaskari, V Matti; Kamil, Elaine; Baluarte, H Jorge; Warady, Bradley; Li, Li; Sigdel, Tara K; Hsieh, Szu-chuan; Dai, Hong; Naesens, Maarten; Waskerwitz, Janie; Salvatierra, Oscar; Terasaki, Paul I; Sarwal, Minnie M

    2013-03-01

    The development of anti-donor humoral responses after transplantation associates with higher risks for acute rejection and 1-year graft survival in adults, but the influence of humoral immunity on transplant outcomes in children is not well understood. Here, we studied the evolution of humoral immunity in low-risk pediatric patients during the first 2 years after renal transplantation. Using data from 130 pediatric renal transplant patients randomized to steroid-free (SF) or steroid-based (SB) immunosuppression in the NIH-SNSO1 trial, we correlated the presence of serum anti-HLA antibodies to donor HLA antigens (donor-specific antibodies) and serum MHC class 1-related chain A (MICA) antibody with both clinical outcomes and histology identified on protocol biopsies at 0, 6, 12, and 24 months. We detected de novo antibodies after transplant in 24% (23% of SF group and 25% of SB group), most often after the first year. Overall, 22% developed anti-HLA antibodies, of which 6% were donor-specific antibodies, and 6% developed anti-MICA antibody. Presence of these antibodies de novo associated with significantly higher risks for acute rejection (P=0.02), chronic graft injury (P=0.02), and decline in graft function (P=0.02). In summary, antibodies to HLA and MICA antigens appear in approximately 25% of unsensitized pediatric patients, placing them at greater risk for acute and chronic rejection with accelerated loss of graft function. Avoiding steroids does not seem to modify this incidence. Whether serial assessments of these antibodies after transplant could guide individual tailoring of immunosuppression requires additional study.

  4. Future of liver transplantation: Non-human primates for patient-specific organs from induced pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Sanal, Madhusudana Girija

    2011-01-01

    Strategies to fill the huge gap in supply versus demand of human organs include bioartificial organs, growing humanized organs in animals, cell therapy, and implantable bioengineered constructs. Reproducing the complex relations between different cell types, generation of adequate vasculature, and immunological complications are road blocks in generation of bioengineered organs, while immunological complications limit the use of humanized organs produced in animals. Recent developments in induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) biology offer a possibility of generating human, patient-specific organs in non-human primates (NHP) using patient-derived iPSC and NHP-derived iPSC lacking the critical developmental genes for the organ of interest complementing a NHP tetraploid embryo. The organ derived in this way will have the same human leukocyte antigen (HLA) profile as the patient. This approach can be curative in genetic disorders as this offers the possibility of gene manipulation and correction of the patient’s genome at the iPSC stage before tetraploid complementation. The process of generation of patient-specific organs such as the liver in this way has the great advantage of making use of the natural signaling cascades in the natural milieu probably resulting in organs of great quality for transplantation. However, the inexorable scientific developments in this direction involve several social issues and hence we need to educate and prepare society in advance to accept the revolutionary consequences, good, bad and ugly. PMID:21990949

  5. Cardiac transplantation.

    PubMed

    Shanewise, Jack

    2004-12-01

    Cardiac transplantation is a proven, accepted mode of therapy for selected patients with end-stage heart failure, but the inadequate number of suitable donor hearts available ultimately limits its application. This chapter reviews adult cardiac transplantation, with an emphasis on the anesthetic considerations of the heart transplant operation itself.

  6. Updates on antibody-mediated rejection in intestinal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Guo-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) has increasingly emerged as an important cause of allograft loss after intestinal transplantation (ITx). Compelling evidence indicates that donor-specific antibodies can mediate and promote acute and chronic rejection after ITx. However, diagnostic criteria for ABMR after ITx have not been established yet and the mechanisms of antibody-mediated graft injury are not well-known. Effective approaches to prevent and treat ABMR are required to improve long-term outcomes of intestine recipients. Clearly, ABMR after ITx has become an important area for research and clinical investigation. PMID:27683635

  7. Updates on antibody-mediated rejection in intestinal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guo-Sheng

    2016-09-24

    Antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) has increasingly emerged as an important cause of allograft loss after intestinal transplantation (ITx). Compelling evidence indicates that donor-specific antibodies can mediate and promote acute and chronic rejection after ITx. However, diagnostic criteria for ABMR after ITx have not been established yet and the mechanisms of antibody-mediated graft injury are not well-known. Effective approaches to prevent and treat ABMR are required to improve long-term outcomes of intestine recipients. Clearly, ABMR after ITx has become an important area for research and clinical investigation. PMID:27683635

  8. Updates on antibody-mediated rejection in intestinal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Guo-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) has increasingly emerged as an important cause of allograft loss after intestinal transplantation (ITx). Compelling evidence indicates that donor-specific antibodies can mediate and promote acute and chronic rejection after ITx. However, diagnostic criteria for ABMR after ITx have not been established yet and the mechanisms of antibody-mediated graft injury are not well-known. Effective approaches to prevent and treat ABMR are required to improve long-term outcomes of intestine recipients. Clearly, ABMR after ITx has become an important area for research and clinical investigation.

  9. Successful kidney transplantation in highly sensitized patients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weijie; Chen, Dong; Chen, Zhishui; Zeng, Fanjun; Ming, Changsheng; Lin, Zhengbin; Zhou, Ping; Chen, Gang; Chen, Xiaoping

    2011-03-01

    Highly sensitized patients experience an increased number of rejection episodes and have poorer graft survival rates; hence, sensitization is a significant barrier to both access to and the success of organ transplantation. This study reports our experience in kidney transplantation in highly sensitized patients. Fourteen patients with sensitization or high levels of panelreactive antibodies (PRA) were studied. All patients were desensitized with pre-transplant intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG)/plasmapheresis (PP) with or without rituximab and thymoglobulin induction therapy, combined with a Prograf/MMF/Pred immunosuppressive regimen. Of 14 patients, 10 showed good graft functions without acute rejection (AR) episodes. Acute cellular rejection in two patients was reversed by methylprednisolone. Two patients underwent antibody-mediated rejection; one was treated with PP/IVIG successfully, whereas the other lost graft functions due to the de novo production of donor-specific antibodies (DSA). Graft functions were stable, and there were no AR episodes in other patients. Conclusively, desensitization using PP/IVIG with or without rituximab increases the likelihood of successful live-donor kidney transplantation in sensitized recipients. PMID:21681679

  10. Intestinal and multivisceral transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Meira, Sérgio Paiva; Guardia, Bianca Della; Evangelista, Andréia Silva; Matielo, Celso Eduardo Lourenço; Neves, Douglas Bastos; Pandullo, Fernando Luis; Felga, Guilherme Eduardo Gonçalves; Alves, Jefferson André da Silva; Curvelo, Lilian Amorim; Diaz, Luiz Gustavo Guedes; Rusi, Marcela Balbo; Viveiros, Marcelo de Melo; de Almeida, Marcio Dias; Epstein, Marina Gabrielle; Pedroso, Pamella Tung; Salvalaggio, Paolo; Meirelles, Roberto Ferreira; Rocco, Rodrigo Andrey; de Almeida, Samira Scalso; de Rezende, Marcelo Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal transplantation has shown exceptional growth over the past 10 years. At the end of the 1990’s, intestinal transplantation moved out of the experimental realm to become a routine practice in treating patients with severe complications related to total parenteral nutrition and intestinal failure. In the last years, several centers reported an increasing improvement in survival outcomes (about 80%), during the first 12 months after surgery, but long-term survival is still a challenge. Several advances led to clinical application of transplants. Immunosuppression involved in intestinal and multivisceral transplantation was the biggest gain for this procedure in the past decade due to tacrolimus, and new inducing drugs, mono- and polyclonal anti-lymphocyte antibodies. Despite the advancement of rigid immunosuppression protocols, rejection is still very frequent in the first 12 months, and can result in long-term graft loss. The future of intestinal transplantation and multivisceral transplantation appears promising. The major challenge is early recognition of acute rejection in order to prevent graft loss, opportunistic infections associated to complications, post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease and graft versus host disease; and consequently, improve results in the long run. PMID:25993080

  11. Understanding exercise-induced hyperemia: central and peripheral hemodynamic responses to passive limb movement in heart transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Hayman, Melissa A.; Nativi, Jose N.; Stehlik, Josef; McDaniel, John; Fjeldstad, Anette S.; Ives, Stephen J.; Walter Wray, D.; Bader, Feras; Gilbert, Edward M.

    2010-01-01

    To better characterize the contribution of both central and peripheral mechanisms to passive limb movement-induced hyperemia, we studied nine recent (<2 yr) heart transplant (HTx) recipients (56 ± 4 yr) and nine healthy controls (58 ± 5 yr). Measurements of heart rate (HR), stroke volume (SV), cardiac output (CO), and femoral artery blood flow were recorded during passive knee extension. Peripheral vascular function was assessed using brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD). During passive limb movement, the HTx recipients lacked an HR response (0 ± 0 beats/min, Δ0%) but displayed a significant increase in CO (0.4 ± 0.1 l/min, Δ5%) although attenuated compared with controls (1.0 ± 0.2 l/min, Δ18%). Therefore, the rise in CO in the HTx recipients was solely dependent on increased SV (5 ± 1 ml, Δ5%) in contrast with the controls who displayed significant increases in both HR (6 ± 2 beats/min, Δ11%) and SV (5 ± 2 ml, Δ7%). The transient increase in femoral blood volume entering the leg during the first 40 s of passive movement was attenuated in the HTx recipients (24 ± 8 ml) compared with controls (93 ± 7 ml), whereas peripheral vascular function (FMD) appeared similar between HTx recipients (8 ± 2%) and controls (6 ± 1%). These data reveal that the absence of an HR increase in HTx recipients significantly impacts the peripheral vascular response to passive movement in this population and supports the concept that an increase in CO is a major contributor to exercise-induced hyperemia. PMID:20833963

  12. Inducible caspase-9 suicide gene controls adverse effects from alloreplete T cells after haploidentical stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaoou; Dotti, Gianpietro; Krance, Robert A; Martinez, Caridad A; Naik, Swati; Kamble, Rammurti T; Durett, April G; Dakhova, Olga; Savoldo, Barbara; Di Stasi, Antonio; Spencer, David M; Lin, Yu-Feng; Liu, Hao; Grilley, Bambi J; Gee, Adrian P; Rooney, Cliona M; Heslop, Helen E; Brenner, Malcolm K

    2015-06-25

    To test the feasibility of a single T-cell manipulation to eliminate alloreactivity while sparing antiviral and antitumor T cells, we infused 12 haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients with increasing numbers of alloreplete haploidentical T cells expressing the inducible caspase 9 suicide gene (iC9-T cells). We determined whether the iC9-T cells produced immune reconstitution and if any resultant graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) could be controlled by administration of a chemical inducer of dimerization (CID; AP1903/Rimiducid). All patients receiving >10(4) alloreplete iC9-T lymphocytes per kilogram achieved rapid reconstitution of immune responses toward 5 major pathogenic viruses and concomitant control of active infections. Four patients received a single AP1903 dose. CID infusion eliminated 85% to 95% of circulating CD3(+)CD19(+) T cells within 30 minutes, with no recurrence of GVHD within 90 days. In one patient, symptoms and signs of GVHD-associated cytokine release syndrome (CRS-hyperpyrexia, high levels of proinflammatory cytokines, and rash) resolved within 2 hours of AP1903 infusion. One patient with varicella zoster virus meningitis and acute GVHD had iC9-T cells present in the cerebrospinal fluid, which were reduced by >90% after CID. Notably, virus-specific T cells recovered even after AP1903 administration and continued to protect against infection. Hence, alloreplete iC9-T cells can reconstitute immunity posttransplant and administration of CID can eliminate them from both peripheral blood and the central nervous system (CNS), leading to rapid resolution of GVHD and CRS. The approach may therefore be useful for the rapid and effective treatment of toxicities associated with infusion of engineered T lymphocytes. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01494103. PMID:25977584

  13. Desensitization for solid organ and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Zachary, Andrea A; Leffell, Mary S

    2014-03-01

    Desensitization protocols are being used worldwide to enable kidney transplantation across immunologic barriers, i.e. antibody to donor HLA or ABO antigens, which were once thought to be absolute contraindications to transplantation. Desensitization protocols are also being applied to permit transplantation of HLA mismatched hematopoietic stem cells to patients with antibody to donor HLA, to enhance the opportunity for transplantation of non-renal organs, and to treat antibody-mediated rejection. Although desensitization for organ transplantation carries an increased risk of antibody-mediated rejection, ultimately these transplants extend and enhance the quality of life for solid organ recipients, and desensitization that permits transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells is life saving for patients with limited donor options. Complex patient factors and variability in treatment protocols have made it difficult to identify, precisely, the mechanisms underlying the downregulation of donor-specific antibodies. The mechanisms underlying desensitization may differ among the various protocols in use, although there are likely to be some common features. However, it is likely that desensitization achieves a sort of immune detente by first reducing the immunologic barrier and then by creating an environment in which an autoregulatory process restricts the immune response to the allograft.

  14. Desensitization for solid organ and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Zachary, Andrea A; Leffell, Mary S

    2014-01-01

    Desensitization protocols are being used worldwide to enable kidney transplantation across immunologic barriers, i.e. antibody to donor HLA or ABO antigens, which were once thought to be absolute contraindications to transplantation. Desensitization protocols are also being applied to permit transplantation of HLA mismatched hematopoietic stem cells to patients with antibody to donor HLA, to enhance the opportunity for transplantation of non-renal organs, and to treat antibody-mediated rejection. Although desensitization for organ transplantation carries an increased risk of antibody-mediated rejection, ultimately these transplants extend and enhance the quality of life for solid organ recipients, and desensitization that permits transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells is life saving for patients with limited donor options. Complex patient factors and variability in treatment protocols have made it difficult to identify, precisely, the mechanisms underlying the downregulation of donor-specific antibodies. The mechanisms underlying desensitization may differ among the various protocols in use, although there are likely to be some common features. However, it is likely that desensitization achieves a sort of immune detente by first reducing the immunologic barrier and then by creating an environment in which an autoregulatory process restricts the immune response to the allograft. PMID:24517434

  15. Hair transplantation.

    PubMed

    Al-Khair, Y M

    2000-09-01

    Hair transplantation is a technique in which hair follicles are harvested from the occipital area and re-transplanted in the frontal bald area. Hair transplantation is the most common cosmetic procedure in the United States nowadays despite the fact that it is expensive. Usually, patients need more than one session to receive a cosmetically acceptable result and patients need to be understanding and have realistic expectations. Although most of our patients are males, females represent about 10-15% of our new patients. This article reviews the basic principals of hair transplantation and describes new and improved techniques of hair transplantation. PMID:11376357

  16. Derivation of transplantable 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene-induced chicken fibrosarcoma lines: differences in metastasizing properties and organ specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Galton, J.E.; Xue, B.; Hochwald, G.M.; Thorbecke, G.J.

    1982-08-01

    Transplantable 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene-induced SC chicken fibrosarcoma (CHCT-NYU) lines were studied for their ability to grow in internal organs after iv injection (artificial metastases) into 1- to 3-week-old chickens. Some tumor lines were recently derived, whereas others were studied after many serial subcutaneous transplantations. Artificial metastases were seen in the stomach, pancreas, lungs, heart, and muscle, and occasionally in the kidneys and liver. Agammaglobulinemic recipients showed more extensive organ involvement than normal recipients of the same age. Whole-body ..gamma..-irradiation enhanced the incidence of artificial metastases, particularly in lungs. Antibody from the serum of a primary tumor-bearing host reduced the growth of the corresponding tumor in many organs. The metastatic pattern of line CHCT-NYU4 was a relatively stable property. However, intravenous transplantation of tumor cells from line CHCT-NYU4 taken from the liver, lungs, and pancreas of a single recipient established sublines with changes in organ specificity. After a few such serial transplants of liver-derived tumor, a line was derived that grew virtually in the liver alone. A subline with preference for growth in lungs was also obtained, but its ability to grow in the pancreas persisted. A pancreas-derived tumor line also grew in the liver and lungs. Subcutaneous transplants of tissue fragments of the lung-derived tumor line caused the appearance of spontaneous metastases in lungs. The incidence of spontaneous metastases with the lung-derived line was much greater than that with the liver-derived line or with the original CHCT-NYU4 line.

  17. Simultaneous transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sala, P

    1993-01-01

    1. Thoracic organ transplantation requires extensive preparation with little advance notice. 2. A single organ transplant requires a team of various staff members, and may include one or two circulating nurses, two scrub technologists or nurses, one perfusionist, one surgeon's assistant, two surgeons, and one anesthesiologist. 3. Timing is important in organ transplantation because thoracic organs ideally should be transplanted within four hours after cross-clamping the aorta of the donor. 4. The dedication, expertise, and thorough follow-up care provided by transplant surgeons, nurse transplant coordinators, organ procurement coordinators, and the CICU and coronary care nurses/departments directly relate to the success of a thoracic organ transplant program. PMID:8493710

  18. Adult thymus transplantation with allogeneic intra-bone marrow–bone marrow transplantation from same donor induces high thymopoiesis, mild graft-versus-host reaction and strong graft-versus-tumour effects

    PubMed Central

    Miyake, Takashi; Hosaka, Naoki; Cui, Wenhao; Nishida, Teruhisa; Takaki, Takashi; Inaba, Muneo; Kamiyama, Yasuo; Ikehara, Susumu

    2009-01-01

    Although allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) plus donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI) is performed for solid tumours to enhance graft-versus-tumour (GVT) effects, a graft-versus-host reaction (GVHR) is also elicited. We carried out intra-bone marrow–bone marrow transplantation (IBM-BMT) plus adult thymus transplantation (ATT) from the same donor to supply alloreactive T cells continually. Normal mice treated with IBM-BMT + ATT survived for a long time with high donor-derived thymopoiesis and mild GVHR. The percentage of CD4+ FoxP3+ regulatory T cells in the spleen of the mice treated with IBM-BMT + ATT was lower than in normal B6 mice or mice treated with IBM-BMT alone, but higher than in mice treated with IBM-BMT + DLI; the mice treated with IBM-BMT + DLI showed severe GVHR. In tumour-bearing mice, tumour growth was more strongly inhibited by IBM-BMT + ATT than by IBM-BMT alone. Mice treated with IBM-BMT + a high dose of DLI also showed tumour regression comparable to that of mice treated with IBM-BMT + ATT but died early of GVHD. By contrast, mice treated with IBM-BMT + a low dose of DLI showed longer survival but less tumour regression than the mice treated with IBM-BMT + ATT. Histologically, significant numbers of CD8+ T cells were found to have infiltrated the tumour in the mice treated with IBM-BMT + ATT. The number of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end-labelling (TUNEL)-positive apoptotic tumour cells also significantly increased in the mice treated with IBM-BMT + ATT. Allogeneic IBM-BMT + ATT thus can induce high thymopoiesis, preserving strong GVT effects without severe GVHR. PMID:18778285

  19. Transplantation of neural stem cells expressing hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha) improves behavioral recovery in a rat stroke model.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wanfu; Chen, Xiu; Hu, Changlin; Li, Jinfang; Yu, Zhen; Cai, Wenqin

    2010-01-01

    We explored the possibility that hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha) might contribute to the therapeutic effect of neural stem cell (NSC) transplantation in cerebral ischemia. The relative efficacy of modified NSC to promote behavioral recovery was investigated in a rat model of stroke induced by a transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). A recombinant adenovirus (Ad-HIF-1alpha) was engineered to express HIF-1alpha. Control NSC infected with control adenovirus (NSC-Ad), recombinant adenovirus Ad-HIF-1alpha, or NSC infected by Ad-HIF-1alpha (NSC-Ad-HIF-1alpha), were used for intraventricular transplantion into rat brain 24 hours after MCAO. Neurological deficits were assessed over 4 weeks using the modified neurological severity scale (NSS) score. Long-term in vivo expression of HIF-1alpha was demonstrated by Western blotting and immunocytochemistry, and derivatives of nestin-positive transplanted cells contributed to both neuronal (neurofilament-positive) and astroglial (glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive) lineages. All animals showed functional improvement. Improvement was accelerated in animals receiving either NSC-Ad or Ad-HIF-1alpha, while improvement at all times between 7 days and 28 days post MCAO was significantly greater in animals transplanted with NSC-Ad-HIF-1alpha than for other treated animals. NSC-Ad-HIF-1alpha cells also increased the number of factor VIII-positive cells in the region of ischemic injury, indicating that HIF-1alpha expression can promote angiogenesis. Gene-modified NSC expressing HIF-1alpha have therapeutic potential in ischemic stroke.

  20. Lung transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Afonso, José Eduardo; Werebe, Eduardo de Campos; Carraro, Rafael Medeiros; Teixeira, Ricardo Henrique de Oliveira Braga; Fernandes, Lucas Matos; Abdalla, Luis Gustavo; Samano, Marcos Naoyuki; Pêgo-Fernandes, Paulo Manuel

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lung transplantation is a globally accepted treatment for some advanced lung diseases, giving the recipients longer survival and better quality of life. Since the first transplant successfully performed in 1983, more than 40 thousand transplants have been performed worldwide. Of these, about seven hundred were in Brazil. However, survival of the transplant is less than desired, with a high mortality rate related to primary graft dysfunction, infection, and chronic graft dysfunction, particularly in the form of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome. New technologies have been developed to improve the various stages of lung transplant. To increase the supply of lungs, ex vivo lung reconditioning has been used in some countries, including Brazil. For advanced life support in the perioperative period, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and hemodynamic support equipment have been used as a bridge to transplant in critically ill patients on the waiting list, and to keep patients alive until resolution of the primary dysfunction after graft transplant. There are patients requiring lung transplant in Brazil who do not even come to the point of being referred to a transplant center because there are only seven such centers active in the country. It is urgent to create new centers capable of performing lung transplantation to provide patients with some advanced forms of lung disease a chance to live longer and with better quality of life. PMID:26154550

  1. HLA Class I Sensitization in Islet Transplant Recipients – Report from the Collaborative Islet Transplant Registry

    PubMed Central

    Naziruddin, Bashoo; Wease, Steve; Stablein, Donald; Barton, Franca B.; Berney, Thierry; Rickels, Michael R.; Alejandro, Rodolfo

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic islet transplantation is a promising treatment option for patients severely affected with type 1 diabetes. This report from CITR presents pre- and post-transplant human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I sensitization rates in islet alone transplantation. Data came from 303 recipients transplanted with islet alone between January 1999 and December 2008. HLA class I sensitization was determined by the presence of anti-HLA class I antibodies. Panel-reactive antibodies (PRA) from prior to islet infusion and at 6 months, and yearly post-transplant was correlated to measures of islet graft failure. The cumulative number of mismatched HLA alleles increased with each additional islet infusion from a median of 3 for one infusion to 9 for three infusions. Pre-transplant PRA was not predictive of islet graft failure. However, development of PRA ≥20% post-transplant was associated with 3.6 fold (p=.001) increased hazard ratio for graft failure. Patients with complete graft loss who had discontinued immunosuppression had significantly higher rate of PRA ≥ 20% compared to those with functioning grafts who remained on immunosuppression. Exposure to repeat HLA class I mismatch at second or third islet infusions resulted in less frequent development of de novo HLA class I antibodies when compared to increased class I mismatch. The development of HLA class I antibodies while on immunosuppression is associated with subsequent islet graft failure. The risk of sensitization may be reduced by minimizing the number of islet donors used per recipient, and in the absence of donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies, repeating HLA class I mismatches with subsequent islet infusions. PMID:22080832

  2. Autologous transplantation of adipose-derived stromal cells ameliorates ventilator-induced lung injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Adipose-derived stromal cells (ADSCs) are a good alternative to multipotent stem cells for regenerative medicine. Low tidal volume (LVT) has proved to be an effective ventilation strategy. However, it is not known if ADSCs and LVT can protect against ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). This study was aimed to determine the potential of ADSCs and LVT to repair following VILI and to elucidate the mechanisms responsible for this section. Methods A total of 72 rats were randomly assigned into group I (sham group, n = 18), group II (1 h of high tidal volume-ventilated (HVT) 40 mL/kg to peak airway pressures of approximately 35 cm H2O and 100% oxygen, n = 18), group III (1 h of HVT followed by 6 h LVT 6 mL/kg to peak airway pressures of approximately 6 cm H2O and 100% oxygen, n = 18) and group IV (1 h of HVT followed by intravenous injection of 5 × 106 ADSCs, n = 18). All animals were sacrificed 7 after the experiments lasted for 7 hours. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was collected and lungs were harvested for analysis. Results High tidal volume-ventilated (HVT) rats exhibited typical VILI features compared with sham rats. Lung edema, histological lung injury index, concentrations of total protein, total cell counts, number of neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-10 and transforming growth factor-β1 in BALF were significantly increased in HVT rats. Additionally, gene and protein levels of Na+ channel subunits, Na-K-ATPase pump activity and alveolar fluid clearance were significantly decreased in HVT rats. All these indices of VILI were significantly improved in rats treated with ADSCs. However, compared with ADSCs treatment, LVT strategy had little therapeutic effect in the present study. Conclusion These results may provide valuable insights into the effects of ADSCs in acute lung injury. PMID:23890086

  3. The Effects of Oral Cryotherapy on Chemotherapy-Induced Oral Mucositis in Patients Undergoing Autologous Transplantation of Blood Stem Cells: A Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Askarifar, Marzieh; Lakdizaji, Sima; Ramzi, Mani; Rahmani, Azad; Jabbarzadeh, Faranak

    2016-01-01

    Background Oral mucositis is one of the irritating side effects of chemotherapy in patients undergoing bone marrow transplantation. However, up until now, the common methods of oral mucositis therapy have failed to show significant effects. Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of local cryotherapy on the intensity of chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis in autologous bone marrow transplantation patients. Patients and Methods In this single, blinded, randomized clinical trial, 29 patients undergoing stem cell transplantation in Iran were selected by convenience sampling, and randomly allocated to control (n = 13) and intervention groups (n = 16). In the intervention group, cryotherapy was applied, while the control group received a normal saline mouthwash. The severity of the mucositis and neutrophil rate were investigated in five periods, based on the world health organization (WHO) scales. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, the Mann-Whitney test, repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA), and linear regression. Results In both groups, the mucositis reached its peak intensity on the 7th day, and the least intensity was obtained on the 21st day. The neutrophil rate reached the minimum value on the 7th day, then increased up to the 21st day. The two groups showed no significant differences between the mucositis severity on the 14th and 21st days (P = 0.164), while the severity of the mucositis in the cryotherapy group was significantly less than that in the saline mouthwash group (1.81 < 2.54 and 0.13 < 0.92, respectively) on the 7th and 14th days (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference in the neutrophil rate between the groups. Conclusions The results showed that cryotherapy is more effective than the saline mouthwash in reducing the severity of mucositis. This method is recommended for the prevention of mucositis in bone marrow transplantation. PMID:27257512

  4. The role of biosimilar granulocyte colony stimulating factor (GCSF) Zarzio for progenitor cell mobilization and the treatment of therapy-induced neutropenia in adult hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Severson, Cherie C

    2015-01-01

    Originator GCSF (Neupogen) has been used to mobilize progenitor stem cells and treat therapy-induced neutropenia in Canadian stem cell transplant settings for years. Although its benefit is not in question, viable alternatives are available. Biosimilar GCSF (Zarzio) is widely in use in Europe since 2009 and was recently approved in the U.S.for the same five indications as Neupogen. Zarzio is reported as safe, equally efficacious, more accessible and cost effective without negatively impacting patient outcomes. This paper summarizes the supporting evidence. PMID:26897866

  5. Organ Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    ... recipients to reduce the risk of transplant rejection. Rejection happens when your immune system attacks the new organ. If you have a transplant, you must take drugs the rest of your life to help keep your body from rejecting the new organ.

  6. Transplant rejection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Wood K, Shankar S, Mittal S. Concepts and challenges in organ transplantation. In: Rich RR, Fleisher TA, Shearer WT, et ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Organ Transplantation Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  7. Intestine Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... intestine segment, most intestine transplants involve a whole organ from a deceased donor. In addition, most intestine transplants are performed in ... blood before surgery. I am looking for ... allocation About UNOS Being a living donor Calculator - CPRA Calculator - KDPI Calculator - LAS Calculator - MELD ...

  8. Prostaglandin E2 potentiates mesenchymal stem cell-induced IL-10+IFN-γ+CD4+ regulatory T cells to control transplant arteriosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Wan-Tseng; Lin, Cheng-Hsin; Chiang, Bor-Luen; Jui, Hsiang-Yiang; Wu, Kenneth Kun-Yu; Lee, Chii-Ming

    2013-03-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are known for their immunomodulatory functions. We previously demonstrated that bone marrow-derived MSCs effectively control transplant arteriosclerosis (TA) by enhancing IL-10(+) and IFN-γ(+) cells. The objective of this study is to elucidate the mechanism by which MSCs induce IL-10(+)IFN-γ(+)CD4(+) regulatory T type 1 (T(R)1)-like cells. In an MLR system using porcine PBMCs, MSC-induced IL-10(+)IFN-γ(+)CD4(+) cells, which confer resistance to allogeneic proliferation in an IL-10-dependent manner, resemble T(R)1-like cells. Both cyclooxygenase-derived PGE(2) and IDO help to induce T(R)1-like cells by MSCs. MSCs constitutively secrete PGE(2), which is augmented in allogeneic reactions. However, T(R)1-like cells were deficient in PGE(2) and 4-fold less potent than were MSCs in suppressing MLR. PGE(2) mimetic supplements can enhance the immunosuppressive potency of T(R)1-like cells. In a porcine model of allogeneic femoral arterial transplantation, MSC-induced T(R)1-like cells combined with PGE(2), but not either alone, significantly reduced TA at the end of 6 wk (percentage of luminal area stenosis: T(R)1-like cells + PGE(2): 11 ± 10%; PGE(2) alone: 93 ± 8.7%; T(R)1-like cells alone: 88 ± 2.4% versus untreated 94 ± 0.9%, p < 0.001). These findings indicate that PGE(2) helps MSC-induced IL-10(+)IFN-γ(+)CD4(+) T(R)1-like cells inhibit TA. PGE(2) combined with MSC-induced T(R)1-like cells represents a new approach for achieving immune tolerance.

  9. History of Clinical Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Starzl, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    The emergence of transplantation has seen the development of increasingly potent immunosuppressive agents, progressively better methods of tissue and organ preservation, refinements in histocompatibility matching, and numerous innovations in surgical techniques. Such efforts in combination ultimately made it possible to successfully engraft all of the organs and bone marrow cells in humans. At a more fundamental level, however, the transplantation enterprise hinged on two seminal turning points. The first was the recognition by Billingham, Brent, and Medawar in 1953 that it was possible to induce chimerism-associated neonatal tolerance deliberately. This discovery escalated over the next 15 years to the first successful bone marrow transplantations in humans in 1968. The second turning point was the demonstration during the early 1960s that canine and human organ allografts could self-induce tolerance with the aid of immunosuppression. By the end of 1962, however, it had been incorrectly concluded that turning points one and two involved different immune mechanisms. The error was not corrected until well into the 1990s. In this historical account, the vast literature that sprang up during the intervening 30 years has been summarized. Although admirably documenting empiric progress in clinical transplantation, its failure to explain organ allograft acceptance predestined organ recipients to lifetime immunosuppression and precluded fundamental changes in the treatment policies. After it was discovered in 1992 that long-surviving organ transplant recipients had persistent microchimerism, it was possible to see the mechanistic commonality of organ and bone marrow transplantation. A clarifying central principle of immunology could then be synthesized with which to guide efforts to induce tolerance systematically to human tissues and perhaps ultimately to xenografts. PMID:10833242

  10. Reminiscences of Sir Peter Medawar: in hope of antigen-specific transplantation tolerance.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Elizabeth

    2004-12-01

    Peter Medawar's career in medical research (he always described himself as a medical research scientist) began as a student of zoology in Oxford. He obtained a first class degree in 1936, aged 21, and undertook postgraduate studies with Florey. His work was anchored in a broad field; he was adept at addressing novel questions in the context of prior ideas and knowledge. His earlier interest in growth, driven as much by mathematics as biology, gave way to transplantation at the beginning of World War II, treatment of burns patients being the driver. He interpreted the results of grafting autologous and allogeneic human skin, observed clinically and microscopically, as immunological; he identified accelerated donor-specific reactions to subsequent grafts as 'second set', and described cell (lymphocyte) mediated infiltration of allo- but not auto-grafts following initial vascularization, both in the patient context and in experimental animals. He became intrigued by the consequences of hematopoietic chimerism, from which his landmark discoveries on the induction of transplantation tolerance derive. These results, his interpretation and dissemination of them, gave hope to transplant surgeons that donor-specific transplant tolerance would be achievable. Many immunosuppressive drugs later, we are now reapproaching this hope, from various angles.

  11. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor-induced mice liver defatting: A novel strategy to enable transplantation of steatotic livers.

    PubMed

    Taba Taba Vakili, Sahar; Kailar, Roshni; Rahman, Khalidur; Nezami, Behtash Ghazi; Mwangi, Simon Musyoka; Anania, Frank A; Srinivasan, Shanthi

    2016-04-01

    Moderate macrovesicular steatosis (>30%), which is present in almost 50% of livers considered for transplantation, increases the risk of primary graft dysfunction. Our previously published data showed that glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is protective against high-fat diet (HFD)-induced hepatic steatosis in mice. Hence, we hypothesized that perfusion of steatotic livers with GDNF may reduce liver fat content before transplantation. Livers from 8 weeks of regular diet (RD) and of HFD-fed mice were perfused ex vivo for 4 hours with either vehicle, GDNF, or a previously described defatting cocktail. The liver's residual fat was quantified colorimetrically using a triglyceride (TG) assay kit and by Oil Red O (ORO) and Nile red/Hoechst staining. Liver tissue injury was assessed by using a lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity assay. In vitro induction of lipolysis in HepG2 cells was assessed by measuring glycerol and free fatty acid release. ORO staining showed significantly more steatosis in livers from HFD-fed mice compared with RD-fed mice (P < 0.001). HFD livers perfused with GDNF had significantly less steatosis than those not perfused (P = 0.001) or perfused with vehicle (P < 0.05). GDNF is equally effective in steatotic liver defatting compared to the defatting cocktail; however, GDNF induces less liver damage than the defatting cocktail. These observations were consistent with data obtained from assessment of liver TG content. Assessment of liver injury revealed significant hepatocyte injury in livers perfused with the control defatting cocktail but no evidence of injury in livers perfused with either GDNF or vehicle. In vitro, GDNF reduced TG accumulation in HepG2 cells and stimulated increased TG lipolysis. In conclusion, GDNF can decrease mice liver fat content to an acceptable range and could be a potential defatting agent before liver transplantation.

  12. Transplantation tolerance.

    PubMed

    Salisbury, Emma M; Game, David S; Lechler, Robert I

    2014-12-01

    Although transplantation has been a standard medical practice for decades, marked morbidity from the use of immunosuppressive drugs and poor long-term graft survival remain important limitations in the field. Since the first solid organ transplant between the Herrick twins in 1954, transplantation immunology has sought to move away from harmful, broad-spectrum immunosuppressive regimens that carry with them the long-term risk of potentially life-threatening opportunistic infections, cardiovascular disease, and malignancy, as well as graft toxicity and loss, towards tolerogenic strategies that promote long-term graft survival. Reports of "transplant tolerance" in kidney and liver allograft recipients whose immunosuppressive drugs were discontinued for medical or non-compliant reasons, together with results from experimental models of transplantation, provide the proof-of-principle that achieving tolerance in organ transplantation is fundamentally possible. However, translating the reconstitution of immune tolerance into the clinical setting is a daunting challenge fraught with the complexities of multiple interacting mechanisms overlaid on a background of variation in disease. In this article, we explore the basic science underlying mechanisms of tolerance and review the latest clinical advances in the quest for transplantation tolerance. PMID:24213880

  13. Neurological complications of transplantation.

    PubMed

    Pustavoitau, Aliaksei; Bhardwaj, Anish; Stevens, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Recipients of solid organ or hematopoietic cell transplants are at risk of life-threatening neurological disorders including encephalopathy, seizures, infections and tumors of the central nervous system, stroke, central pontine myelinolysis, and neuromuscular disorders-often requiring admission to, or occurring in, the intensive care unit (ICU). Many of these complications are linked directly or indirectly to immunosuppressive therapy. However, neurological disorders may also result from graft versus host disease, or be an expression of the underlying disease which prompted transplantation, as well as injury induced during radiation, chemotherapy, surgery, and ICU stay. In rare cases, neuroinfectious pathogens may be transmitted with the transplanted tissue or organ. Diagnosis may be a challenge because clinical symptoms and findings on neuroimaging lack specificity, and a biological specimen or tissue diagnosis is often needed for definitive diagnosis. Management is centered on preventing further neurological injury, etiology-targeted therapy, and balancing the benefits and toxicities of specific immunosuppressive agents. PMID:21764765

  14. Protective effect of a protein-bound polysaccharide, PSK, on CLP-induced sepsis in mice transplanted orthotopically with colon tumor.

    PubMed

    Ohmura, Yoshio; Matsunaga, Kenichi; Suzuki, Tatsuo

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the effects of a protein-bound polysaccharide, PSK, on the resistance of tumor-bearing mice against sepsis induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). (a) In BALB/c mice that had received intracecal transplantation of colon 26 (C26) tumor, CLP with a 21-gauge needle significantly shortened the survival time, compared with that of non-tumor-bearing mice. Oral administration of PSK to such mice resulted in a significant prolongation of the survival time and increase of the survival rates. The effects were dependent on the timing of PSK administration and the dose. (b) CLP significantly increased the IL-10 level in serum, the IL-10 gene expression by spleen cells, the number of IL-10-producing CD4-positive T cells, and the productivity of IL-10 by spleen of tumor-bearing mice compared with that of non-tumor-bearing mice. PSK administration to such mice suppressed the increase. Further, PSK prevented the reduction of gene expression of IFN-gamma and the number of IFN-gamma-producing CD4-positive T cells and IFN-gamma productivity by spleen cells of tumor-bearing CLP-treated mice. (c) Treatment with anti-IFN-gamma monoclonal antibody before CLP significantly reduced the effects of PSK. These findings suggest that the protective effect of PSK on the CLP-induced sepsis in mice transplanted orthotopically with C26 tumor is possibly mediated by suppression of IL-10 and promotion of IFN-gamma. PMID:16369184

  15. Facial Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Russo, Jack E; Genden, Eric M

    2016-08-01

    Reconstruction of severe facial deformities poses a unique surgical challenge: restoring the aesthetic form and function of the face. Facial transplantation has emerged over the last decade as an option for reconstruction of these defects in carefully selected patients. As the world experience with facial transplantation grows, debate remains regarding whether such a highly technical, resource-intensive procedure is warranted, all to improve quality of life but not necessarily prolong it. This article reviews the current state of facial transplantation with focus on the current controversies and challenges, with particular attention to issues of technique, immunology, and ethics. PMID:27400850

  16. Equal overall rejection rate in pre-transplant flow-cytometric cross-match negative and positive adult recipients in liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Matinlauri, Irma H; Höckerstedt, Krister A; Isoniemi, Helena M

    2005-10-01

    T cell IgG flow-cytometric cross-matches (FCXM) using 48 stored pre-transplant patient serum samples and 40 stored serum samples collected 3 wk after liver transplantation and frozen spleen cells of cadaveric donors in 48 consecutive liver transplantations were performed retrospectively. T cell IgG FCXM using pre-transplant serum samples was compared with 46 complement-dependent lymphocytotoxic cross-matches (CDCXM) performed at the time of transplantation. Clinical relevance of these tests was evaluated in relation to acute rejection, 1-, 3- and 5-yr graft and patient survival. The incidence of positive FCXM was 33% (16 of 48) and 13% (six of 46) by CDCXM. The median time of acute rejection was 29 d after transplantation in FCXM positive group (range 13-101 d) and 22 d in FCXM negative group (range 7-157 d, NS). Rejection rate was similar in 16 pre-transplant FCXM positive patients (eight of 16, 50%) compared with six pre-transplant CDCXM positive patients (three of six, 50%; NS). Recipients having graft rejection tended to be more often pre-transplant FCXM positive (eight of 21, 38%) than CDCXM positive (three of 21, 14%), but the difference was not significant (p > 0.1). No difference was found in the positive predictive value in relation to acute rejection between positive FCXM and CDCXM (69% vs. 50%; NS). Furthermore there was no correlation between post-transplant positive FCXM and acute rejection. No difference was found between pre-transplant T cell IgG FCXM positive and negative recipients in relation to graft or patient survival. Our findings are supportive for little risk associated with preformed donor-specific antibodies in liver transplantation.

  17. ABCB1 C3435T and G2677T/A polymorphism decreased the risk for steroid-induced osteonecrosis of the femoral head after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Asano, Takeshi; Takahashi, Kenji A; Fujioka, Mikihiro; Inoue, Shigehiro; Okamoto, Masahiko; Sugioka, Nobuyuki; Nishino, Hoyoku; Tanaka, Takashi; Hirota, Yoshio; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2003-11-01

    Advances in transplantation technology have brought about great benefits to patients suffering from organ failure, but the problem still remains of complications induced by steroids used for post-transplant immunosuppression. Among the side-effects caused by steroids, non-traumatic osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONF) constitutes a serious problem. The same protocol for steroid administration induces ONF in some patients, but not in others, indicating the presence of individual difference in steroid sensitivity. We hypothesized that this difference might be mediated by the drug-transport protein, P-glycoprotein (P-gp), and investigated the relationship between single nucleotide polymorphisms in the multidrug resistance gene 1 (ABCB1, MDR1) encoding P-gp and ONF. Subjects comprised 136 patients receiving kidney transplantation. Thirty patients developed post-transplant ONF. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood, and genotypes of ABCB1 C3435T (exon 26) and G2677T/A (exon 21) were determined by direct sequencing. Multivariate analyses based on clinical information were performed to determine the relationship between ABCB1 genotypes and ONF. The dose/concentration (D/C) ratios of tacrolimus were also determined to estimate the activity of P-gp in patients with different genotypes of ABCB1 C3435T (CC, CT, TT), and in those who did and did not develop ONF. The ABCB1 3435TT genotype showed a significantly lower incidence of ONF (adjusted odds ratio = 0.10, P = 0.034). The D/C ratio in the 3435TT genotype was significantly higher than that in the 3435CC genotype. The D/C ratio in patients developing ONF was significantly higher than in those patients who did not develop ONF. The results suggest increased activity of P-gp in patients with the 3435TT genotype and in those who did not develop ONF. The ABCB1 2677 homozygous variant type also showed a lower incidence of ONF (adjusted odds ratio = 0.26, P = 0.056). The 3435T and 3435C alleles were in linkage

  18. Lung transplant

    MedlinePlus

    Solid organ transplant - lung ... the new lung Have severe disease of other organs Cannot reliably take their medicines Are unable to ... medicines Damage to your kidneys, liver, or other organs from anti-rejection medicines Future risk of certain ...

  19. Corneal transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... transplant are: Bleeding Cataracts Infection of the eye Glaucoma (high pressure in the eye that can cause ... clot (blood thinners) for 10 days before the surgery. Some of these are aspirin, ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), ...

  20. Pancreas Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    The pancreas is a gland behind your stomach and in front of your spine. It produces the juices that ... hormones that help control blood sugar levels. A pancreas transplant is surgery to place a healthy pancreas ...

  1. Liver transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... toxins in the blood Storing sugars, fats, iron, copper, and vitamins The most common reason for a ... cirrhosis or primary sclerosing cholangitis Metabolic disorders of copper or iron ( Wilson's disease and hemochromatosis ) Liver transplant ...

  2. Heart transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap 28. Bernstein D. Pediatric heart and heart-lung transplantation. In: Kliegman RM, Behrman RE, Jenson HB, Stanton BF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 19th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap ...

  3.  Early initiation of MARS® dialysis in Amanita phalloides-induced acute liver injury prevents liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Pillukat, Mike Hendrik; Schomacher, Tina; Baier, Peter; Gabriëls, Gert; Pavenstädt, Hermann; Schmidt, Hartmut H J

    2016-01-01

     Amanita phalloides is the most relevant mushroom intoxication leading to acute liver failure. The two principal groups of toxins, the amatoxins and the phallotoxins, are small oligopeptides highly resistant to chemical and physical influences. The amatoxins inhibit eukaryotic RNA polymerase II causing transcription arrest affecting mainly metabolically highly active cells like hepatocytes and renal cells. The clinically most characteristic symptom is a 6-40 h lag phase before onset of gastrointestinal symptoms and the rapid progression of acute liver failure leading to multi-organ failure and death within a week if left untreated. Extracorporeal albumin dialysis (ECAD) was reported to improve patient's outcome or facilitate bridging to transplantation. In our tertiary center, out of nine intoxicated individuals from five non-related families six patients presented with acute liver injury; all of them were treated with ECAD using the MARS® system. Four of them were listed on admission for high urgency liver transplantation. In addition to standard medical treatment for Amanita intoxication we initiated ECAD once patients were admitted to our center. Overall 16 dialysis sessions were performed. All patients survived with full native liver recovery without the need for transplantation. ECAD was well tolerated; no severe adverse events were reported during treatment. Coagulopathy resolved within days in all patients, and acute kidney injury in all but one individual. In conclusion, ECAD is highly effective in treating intoxication with Amanita phalloides. Based on these experiences we suggest early initiation and repeated sessions depending on response to ECAD with the chance of avoiding liver transplantation. PMID:27493118

  4. Outcome of cataract surgery following simple limbal epithelial transplantation for lime injury-induced limbal stem cell deficiency.

    PubMed

    Nair, Dhanyasree; Mohamed, Ashik; Sangwan, Virender S

    2015-12-23

    A 19-year-old woman presented to us after being diagnosed elsewhere with right eye total limbal stem cell deficiency resulting from a lime burn. She was advised to undergo limbal stem cell transplantation, but failed to immediately do so. Two years later, she underwent cultivated limbal epithelial transplantation (CLET). As she had severe loss of vision with persisting conjunctival nodule and symblepharon 2 years following surgery, an impression of failed CLET was formed. Subsequently, simple limbal epithelial transplantation (SLET) was performed. Nine months later, she developed a cataract in her right eye; the cataract was extracted and posterior chamber intraocular lens implanted. The unaided visual acuity improved from light perception at presentation to 20/60 at 1-week postoperatively. At 5 months follow-up, the patient continued to maintain 20/60 visual acuity in her right eye. This case describes the outcome of cataract surgery following SLET, emphasising the need to perform cataract surgery in complicated cataracts for a better visual prognosis.

  5. Exogenous interleukin-33 targets myeloid-derived suppressor cells and generates periphery-induced Foxp3+ regulatory T cells in skin-transplanted mice

    PubMed Central

    Gajardo, Tania; Morales, Rodrigo A; Campos-Mora, Mauricio; Campos-Acuña, Javier; Pino-Lagos, Karina

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin-33 (IL-33) has been a focus of study because of its variety of functions shaping CD4+ T-cell biology. In the present work, we evaluated the modulatory effect of IL-33 on suppressor cells in an in vivo transplantation model. C57BL/6 wild-type mice were grafted with syngeneic or allogeneic skin transplants and treated with exogenous IL-33 daily. After 10 days of treatment, we analysed draining lymph node cellularity and found in allogeneic animals an increment in myeloid-derived suppressor cells, which co-express MHC-II, and become enriched upon IL-33 treatment. In line with this observation, inducible nitric oxide synthase and arginase 1 expression were also increased in allogeneic animals upon IL-33 administration. In addition, IL-33 treatment up-regulated the number of Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells in the allogeneic group, complementing the healthier integrity of the allografts and the increased allograft survival. Moreover, we demonstrate that IL-33 promotes CD4+ T-cell expansion and conversion of CD4+ Foxp3− T cells into CD4+ Foxp3+ Treg cells in the periphery. Lastly, the cytokine pattern of ex vivo-stimulated draining lymph nodes indicates that IL-33 dampens interferon-γ and IL-17 production, stimulating IL-10 secretion. Altogether, our work complements previous studies on the immune-modulatory activity of IL-33, showing that this cytokine affects myeloid-derived suppressor cells at the cell number and gene expression levels. More importantly, our research demonstrates for the first time that IL-33 allows for in vivo Foxp3+ Treg cell conversion and favours an anti-inflammatory or tolerogenic state by skewing cytokine production. Therefore, our data suggest a potential use of IL-33 to prevent allograft rejection, bringing new therapeutics to the transplantation field. PMID:25988395

  6. Differentiation and transplantation of functional pancreatic beta cells generated from induced pluripotent stem cells derived from a type 1 diabetes mouse model.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Kilsoo; Lim, Hyejin; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Thuan, Nguyen Van; Park, Seung Hwa; Lim, Yu-Mi; Choi, Hye-Yeon; Lee, Eung-Ryoung; Kim, Jin-Hoi; Lee, Myung-Shik; Cho, Ssang-Goo

    2012-09-20

    The nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse is a classical animal model for autoimmune type 1 diabetes (T1D), closely mimicking features of human T1D. Thus, the NOD mouse presents an opportunity to test the effectiveness of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) as a therapeutic modality for T1D. Here, we demonstrate a proof of concept for cellular therapy using NOD mouse-derived iPSCs (NOD-iPSCs). We generated iPSCs from NOD mouse embryonic fibroblasts or NOD mouse pancreas-derived epithelial cells (NPEs), and applied directed differentiation protocols to differentiate the NOD-iPSCs toward functional pancreatic beta cells. Finally, we investigated whether the NPE-iPSC-derived insulin-producing cells could normalize hyperglycemia in transplanted diabetic mice. The NOD-iPSCs showed typical embryonic stem cell-like characteristics such as expression of markers for pluripotency, in vitro differentiation, teratoma formation, and generation of chimeric mice. We developed a method for stepwise differentiation of NOD-iPSCs into insulin-producing cells, and found that NPE-iPSCs differentiate more readily into insulin-producing cells. The differentiated NPE-iPSCs expressed diverse pancreatic beta cell markers and released insulin in response to glucose and KCl stimulation. Transplantation of the differentiated NPE-iPSCs into diabetic mice resulted in kidney engraftment. The engrafted cells responded to glucose by secreting insulin, thereby normalizing blood glucose levels. We propose that NOD-iPSCs will provide a useful tool for investigating genetic susceptibility to autoimmune diseases and generating a cellular interaction model of T1D, paving the way for the potential application of patient-derived iPSCs in autologous beta cell transplantation for treating diabetes. PMID:22512788

  7. Induced regulatory T cells in allograft tolerance via transient mixed chimerism

    PubMed Central

    Hotta, Kiyohiko; Aoyama, Akihiro; Oura, Tetsu; Yamada, Yohei; Tonsho, Makoto; Huh, Kyu Ha; Kawai, Kento; Schoenfeld, David; Allan, James S.; Madsen, Joren C.; Benichou, Gilles; Smith, Rex-Neal; Colvin, Robert B.; Sachs, David H.; Cosimi, A. Benedict

    2016-01-01

    Successful induction of allograft tolerance has been achieved in nonhuman primates (NHPs) and humans via induction of transient hematopoietic chimerism. Since allograft tolerance was achieved in these recipients without durable chimerism, peripheral mechanisms are postulated to play a major role. Here, we report our studies of T cell immunity in NHP recipients that achieved long-term tolerance versus those that rejected the allograft (AR). All kidney, heart, and lung transplant recipients underwent simultaneous or delayed donor bone marrow transplantation (DBMT) following conditioning with a nonmyeloablative regimen. After DBMT, mixed lymphocyte culture with CFSE consistently revealed donor-specific loss of CD8+ T cell responses in tolerant (TOL) recipients, while marked CD4+ T cell proliferation in response to donor antigens was found to persist. Interestingly, a significant proportion of the proliferated CD4+ cells were FOXP3+ in TOL recipients, but not in AR or naive NHPs. In TOL recipients, CD4+FOXP3+ cell proliferation against donor antigens was greater than that observed against third-party antigens. Finally, the expanded Tregs appeared to be induced Tregs (iTregs) that were converted from non-Tregs. These data provide support for the hypothesis that specific induction of iTregs by donor antigens is key to long-term allograft tolerance induced by transient mixed chimerism. PMID:27446989

  8. Cross-species bone marrow transplantation: Evidence for tolerance induction, stem cell engraftment, and maturation of T lymphocytes in a xenogeneic stromal environment (rat----mouse)

    SciTech Connect

    Ildstad, S.T.; Wren, S.M.; Boggs, S.S.; Hronakes, M.L.; Vecchini, F.; Van den Brink, M.R. )

    1991-08-01

    Transplantation of untreated F344 rat bone marrow into irradiated B10 mouse recipients (non-TCD F344----B10) to produce fully xenogeneic chimeras resulted in stable xenogeneic lymphoid chimerism, ranging from 82% to 97% rat. Survival of animals was excellent, without evidence for GVH disease. The specificity of tolerance which resulted was highly donor-specific; MHC disparate third party mouse and rat skin grafts were promptly rejected while donor-specific F344 grafts were significantly prolonged (MST greater than 130 days). Multi-lineage rat stem cell-derived progeny including lymphoid cells (T- and B-lymphocytes), myeloid cells, erythrocytes, platelets, and natural killer (NK) cells were present in the fully xenogenic chimeras up to 7 months after bone marrow transplantation. Immature rat T-lymphocytes matured and acquired the {alpha}/{beta} T-cell receptor in the thymus of chimeras in a pattern similar to normal rat controls, suggesting that immature T-lymphocytes of rat origin could interact with the murine xenogeneic thymic stroma to undergo normal maturation and differentiation. This model may be useful to study the mechanisms responsible for the induction and maintenance of donor-specific transplantation tolerance across a species barrier.

  9. Remission of Collagen-Induced Arthritis through Combination Therapy of Microfracture and Transplantation of Thermogel-Encapsulated Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, He; Ding, Jianxun; Wang, Jincheng; Wang, Yinan; Yang, Modi; Zhang, Yanbo; Chang, Fei; Chen, Xuesi

    2015-01-01

    The persistent inflammation of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) always leads to partial synovial hyperplasia and the destruction of articular cartilage. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) have been proven to possess immunosuppressive effects, and widely explored in the treatment of autoimmune diseases. However, poor inhibitory effect on local inflammatory state and limited capacity of preventing destruction of articular cartilage by systemic BMMSCs transplantation were observed. Herein, toward the classical type II collagen-induced arthritis in rats, the combination treatment of microfracture and in situ transplantation of thermogel-encapsulated BMMSCs was verified to obviously down-regulate the ratio of CD4+ to CD8+ T lymphocytes in peripheral blood. In addition, it resulted in the decreased levels of inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α and anti-collagen type II antibody, in the serum. Simultaneously, the combination therapy also could inhibit the proliferation of antigen specific lymphocytes and local joint inflammatory condition, and prevent the articular cartilage damage. The results indicated that the treatment programs could effectively stimulate the endogenous and exogenous BMMSCs to exhibit the immunosuppression and cartilage protection capability. This study provided a new therapeutic strategy for autoimmune inflammatory diseases, such as RA. PMID:25774788

  10. Transplant nephrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Akoh, Jacob A

    2011-01-01

    About 10% of all renal allografts fail during the first year of transplantation and thereafter approximately 3%-5% yearly. Given that approximately 69 400 renal transplants are performed worldwide annually, the number of patients returning to dialysis following allograft failure is increasing. A failed transplant kidney, whether maintained by low dose immunosuppression or not, elicits an inflammatory response and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The risk for transplant nephrectomy (TN) is increased in patients who experienced multiple acute rejections prior to graft failure, develop chronic graft intolerance, sepsis, vascular complications and early graft failure. TN for late graft failure is associated with greater morbidity and mortality, bleeding being the leading cause of morbidity and infection the main cause of mortality. TN appears to be beneficial for survival on dialysis but detrimental to the outcome of subsequent transplantation by virtue of increased level of antibodies to mismatched antigens, increased rate of primary non function and delayed graft function. Many of the studies are characterized by a retrospective and univariate analysis of small numbers of patients. The lack of randomization in many studies introduced a selection bias and conclusions drawn from such studies should be applied with caution. Pending a randomised controlled trial on the role of TN in the management of transplant failure patients, it is prudent to remove failed symptomatic allografts and all grafts failing within 3 mo of transplantation, monitor inflammatory markers in patients with retained failed allografts and remove the allograft in the event of a significant increase in levels. PMID:24175187

  11. Successful deceased-donor kidney transplantation in crossmatch-positive patients with peritransplant plasma exchange and Rituximab.

    PubMed

    Beimler, Jörg H M; Morath, Christian; Schmidt, Jan; Ovens, Jörg; Opelz, Gerhard; Rahmel, Axel; Zeier, Martin; Süsal, Caner

    2009-03-15

    Sensitized patients awaiting renal transplantation have a markedly reduced probability of receiving a crossmatch (XM)-negative renal allograft, and, even if transplanted with a negative complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC)-XM, they are at an increased risk of antibody-mediated humoral rejection with early graft loss. We report here for the first time on the effectiveness of a single pretransplant plasma exchange session in rendering a positive complement-dependent cytotoxicity-XM negative and, in combination with anti-CD20 therapy, allowing successful renal transplantation in two sensitized deceased-donor kidney allograft recipients. In a third patient with high donor-specific reactivity, the therapy was unsuccessful. Plasma exchange treatments were continued during the posttransplant period until stable allograft function was achieved. Both patients showed good graft outcome at 27 and 21 months after transplantation with serum creatinine values of 1.60 and 1.25 mg/dL, respectively.

  12. General insufficiency of the classical CDC-based crossmatch to detect donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies leading to invalid results under recipients' medical treatment or underlying diseases.

    PubMed

    Schlaf, G; Mauz-Körholz, C; Ott, U; Leike, S; Altermann, W

    2012-01-01

    Antibodies directed against HLA antigens of a given donor represent the most prominent cause for hyper-acute and acute rejections. In order to select recipients without donor-specific antibodies the complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC-) crossmatch as the standard procedure was established. As a functional assay it strongly depends on the availability of isolated donor lymphocytes and in particular on their vitality. However, due to several diseases or pharmacological treatment of a given recipient unexpected "false-positive" results of the CDC-crossmatch may arise. We here present three groups of patients which demonstrate the limits of the conventional crossmatch. 1) Kidney recipients before living donations exhibited positive CDC-reactions due to their conditioning using the therapeutical anti-CD20 mAb Rituximab (n=7), routinely used to deplete B-cells, or the anti-CD25 mAb basiliximab (n=2) to inhibit the proliferation of activated T-cells. 2) Recipients suffering from various leukaemias (n=5) exhibited "positive" CDC-crossmatches using PBL of the donors, although formerly these patients had never shown anti-HLA antibodies. Instead of donor-specific allo-antibodies, cytostatic agents such as 6-mercaptopurine led to an unspecific cell death. 3) Patients projected for post mortem or living kidney donations (n=44) exhibited "positive" CDC-crossmatch results which were not in accordance with their former antibody status and, partially, with high degrees of HLA-matching. These implausible results were due to underlying auto-immune diseases, mainly of the systemic immune complex type III such as lupus erythematosus, mainly leading to false-positive B-cell crossmatches by immune complexes binding to Fcγ-receptors. In all these 58 cases the alternatively performed ELISA-based "Antibody Monitoring System" (AMS-) crossmatch assay was not artifically affected, suggesting that this assay may be comprehensively established at least for the cases described.

  13. Steroid withdrawal in renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Grenda, Ryszard

    2013-11-01

    - Early steroid withdrawal is possible in patients at high immunological risk using a combination of polyclonal antibody induction, tacrolimus, and mycophenolate mofetil- All protocols of steroid minimization showed relevant clinical benefits, however the growth-related benefit was limited to pre-pubertal patients in all but one of the studies- Adverse events of steroid withdrawal occurred in a higher incidence of post-transplant bone marrow suppression Key research points - There is no clear evidence of the impact of steroid withdrawal on the risk of recurrence of primary glomerulonephritis after renal transplantation in children, therefore further evaluation of this important issue should be performed in prospective trials- There is limited pediatric data on the risk of anti-HLA/donor-specific antibody production in steroid-free patients after renal transplantation. It is not clear whether the selection of the type of induction antibody (lymphocyte depleting versus short, two-dose administration of anti-IL2R inhibitor) is important in this term. The production of anti-HLA antibodies should then be monitored on a regular basis and analyzed in prospective trials.

  14. Transplantation tolerance in primates after total lymphoid irradiation and allogeneic bone marrow injection

    SciTech Connect

    Smit, J.A.; Hill, R.R.H.; Myburgh, J.A.; Browde, S.

    1980-08-01

    After total lymphoid irradiation (TLI), allogeneic bone marrow (BM) injection, and organ transplantation in baboons, there is a prolonged period of reduced lymphocyte proliferative responsiveness to polyclonal mitogens and allogeneic lymphocytes. The effect observed is greater with the use of fractionated TLI than after single doses of irradiation. Suppressor cell activity can be demonstrated in vitro in most animals by inhibition of mixed lymphocyte reactivity (MLR) by mitomycin-treated recipient lymphocytes harvested after TLI, with or without allogeneic BM injection, and organ transplantation. Preliminary data suggest the presence of both donor-specific and nondonor-specific suppression, although other interpretations are possible, and suppressor phenomena may not be responsible for the transplantation tolerance observed.

  15. Association of CD14-260 Polymorphisms, Red-complex Periodontopathogens and Gingival Crevicular Fluid Cytokine Levels with Cyclosporine A-induced Gingival Overgrowth in Renal Transplant Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Yiming; Bi, Wei; Cao, Lingfeng; Yang, Yi; Chen, Jake; Yu, Youcheng

    2012-01-01

    Backgroud and Objective Genetic factors may influence the colonization of pathogenic bacteria, therefore increasing the risk for the initiation and development of periodontal disease. The present study was carried out to investigate the association of CD14-260 polymorphisms, subgingival microbiota, and gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) cytokine levels with cyclosporine A (CsA)-induced gingival overgrowth (GO) in renal transplant patients. Material and Methods 204 patients were dichotomized into two groups: 124 with GO and 80 without GO. The CD14-260 polymorphisms were measured using an allele-specific PCR method. The levels of periodontal pathogens were determined by real-time PCR of subgingival samples. GCF levels of IL-1β and sCD14 were detected by ELISA. Results The frequency of CD14-260 genotype CT + TT was found to be similar in both groups. Patients with GO presented increased prevalence of Pg, Td, and Tf (red complex) and significantly higher levels of IL-1β than those without GO. GO patients carrying CT+TT genotypes were found to have higher frequencies of Pg, Td, and Tf than those carrying CC genotype. Furthermore, in the presence of red complex, CT+TT genotypes were associated with higher IL-1β levels and severe GO. Multiple logistic regression analysis demonstrated that the severity of GO is not dependent on age, gender and pharmacological variables, being only associated with CD14-260 genotype and red complex periodontopathogens. Conclusions No association between CD14-260 polymorphisms and the prevalence of GO was revealed in renal transplant patients administered CsA. However, CD14-260 CT+TT genotypes are associated with the prevalence of red complex periodontopathogens in GO patients, and may thus play some role in the development of severe CsA-induced GO. PMID:22934794

  16. Molecular species of phospholipid in rats in primary and transplanted fibrosarcomas induced by soybean oil containing tocopherol acetate.

    PubMed

    Ishinaga, M; Tanimoto, M; Sugiyama, S; Kumamoto, R; Yokoro, K

    1991-09-01

    When soybean oil containing tocopherol acetate was given to rats once a week subcutaneously for 10-12 months, it caused the development of fibrosarcomas at the injection site in 11 of 15 rats. A tumor produced in this manner proved eminently transplantable into other rats. The molecular species of phospholipid subclasses were determined in primary and transplanted tumors. The molecular species composition of the phospholipid subclasses in both types of tumors were similar. The percentages of diacyl and alkylacyl glycerophosphocholine (GPC) were 90-93 and 6-8% of total phosphatidylcholine, respectively. The percentages of diacyl and alkenylacyl glycerophosphoethanolamine (GPE) were 51 and 45%, respectively, of total phosphatidylethanolamine (PE). Diacyl and alkylacyl GPC species containing arachidonic acid (20:4) composed about 15-16 and 37-40% of each subclass, respectively. Diacyl and alkenylacyl GPE species containing 20:4 composed about 38-40 and 56-60% of each subclass, respectively. Disaturated species of diacyl and alkylacyl GPC composed about 22-24 and 13% of each subclass, respectively, whereas these species of PE composed less than 2%. The fatty acid composition of the other tumor phospholipids was analyzed.

  17. Transplantation of ovarian granulosa-like cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells for the treatment of murine premature ovarian failure

    PubMed Central

    LIU, TE; LI, QIONG; WANG, SUWEI; CHEN, CHUAN; ZHENG, JIN

    2016-01-01

    Premature ovarian failure (POF) is a common cause of female infertility, for which there are currently no ideal treatments or medications. Furthermore, apoptosis of ovarian granulosa cells (OGCs) is an important mechanism underlying the decline in ovarian reserve and function. In the present study, several cellular growth factors and hormones were used to induce the differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) into ovarian granulosa-like cells (OGLCs) in vitro. Immunohistochemical staining demonstrated that OGLCs derived from iPSCs strongly expressed granulosa cell markers, including anti-Müllerian hormone, inhibin α, inhibin β and follicle-stimulating hormone receptor, but did not express stem cell markers, including octamer-binding transcription factor 4, SRY (sex determining region Y)-box 2, Nanog and stage-specific embryonic antigen-4 12 days post-induction. In addition, a mouse model of POF was generated by cyclophosphamide treatment. Subsequently, iPSC-derived OGLCs were transplanted into the POF mice (OGLCs-iPSCs-POF group) in vivo. Results indicated that, compared with the control group (POF mice treated with phosphate-buffered saline), the growth state of OGLCs was markedly improved, and mature follicles could be detected in the ovarian tissue of the OGLCs-iPSCs-POF group. Immunohistochemical staining demonstrated that iPSC-derived OGLCs transplanted into POF mice not only exhibited substantial growth in murine ovarian tissues, but also strongly expressed OGC markers. Furthermore, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays indicated that the levels of the hormone estradiol in peripheral blood samples were significantly enhanced following transplantation of iPSC-derived OGLCs into POF mice. Furthermore, ovarian tissue weight was significantly higher in the OGLCs-iPSCs-POF group compared with in the control group, and the number of atretic follicles in OGLCs-iPSCs-POF mice was significantly reduced, as compared with in the control mice. These

  18. [Glaucoma and corneal transplantation].

    PubMed

    Geerling, G; Müller, M; Zierhut, M; Klink, T

    2010-05-01

    Glaucoma and corneal disorders are often associated and are of diagnostic, therapeutic and prognostic relevance for each other. Glaucoma is already present in approximately 15% of eyes prior to keratoplasty, whereas in addition approximately 15% of cases are diagnosed following corneal transplantation. Corneal opacities, surface irregularities and pachymetric deviations from the norm can have a negative impact on tonometry, perimetry and morphological glaucoma diagnosis. Digital and intracameral tonometry as well as flash VEP to determine the visual potential can be helpful in this setting. Increased intraocular pressure (IOP), long-term application of antiglaucomatous medication or the use of antimetabolites in glaucoma surgery can all induce keratopathy. Therefore, intraocular pressure should be regulated prior to corneal transplantation. Risk factors for the evolution of glaucoma following corneal transplantation are the specific indication and surgical technique (e. g. combined corneal and cataract/vitreoretinal surgery), as well as postoperative steroid application and chamber angle synechiae. Unpreserved glaucoma medication without pro-inflammatory effects should be preferred following keratoplasty. In the long term surgery to control IOP is required in approximately 25% of eyes. The wider use of lamellar techniques for corneal transplantation is likely to reduce the incidence of secondary glaucoma.

  19. Survival in sensitized lung transplant recipients with perioperative desensitization.

    PubMed

    Tinckam, K J; Keshavjee, S; Chaparro, C; Barth, D; Azad, S; Binnie, M; Chow, C W; de Perrot, M; Pierre, A F; Waddell, T K; Yasufuku, K; Cypel, M; Singer, L G

    2015-02-01

    Donor-specific HLA antibodies (DSA) have an adverse effect on short-term and long-term lung transplant outcomes. We implemented a perioperative strategy to treat DSA-positive recipients, leading to equivalent rejection and graft survival outcomes. Pretransplant DSA were identified to HLA-A, B, C, DR and DQ antigens. DSA-positive patients were transplanted if panel reactive antibody (PRA) ≥30% or medically urgent and desensitized with perioperative plasma exchange, intravenous immune globulin, antithymocyte globulin (ATG), and mycophenolic acid (MPA). PRA-positive/DSA-negative recipients received MPA. Unsensitized patients received routine cyclosporine, azathioprine and prednisone without ATG. From 2008-2011, 340 lung-only first transplants were performed: 53 DSA-positive, 93 PRA-positive/DSA-negative and 194 unsensitized. Thirty-day survival was 96 %/99%/96% in the three groups, respectively. One-year graft survival was 89%/88%/86% (p = 0.47). DSA-positive and PRA-positive/DSA-negative patients were less likely to experience any ≥ grade 2 acute rejection (9% and 9% vs. 18% unsensitized p = 0.04). Maximum predicted forced expiratory volume (1 s) (81%/74%/76%, p = NS) and predicted forced vital capacity (81%/77%/78%, respectively, p = NS) were equivalent between groups. With the application of this perioperative treatment protocol, lung transplantation can be safely performed in DSA/PRA-positive patients, with similar outcomes to unsensitized recipients. PMID:25612494

  20. The importance of non-HLA antibodies in transplantation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiuheng; Reed, Elaine F

    2016-08-01

    The development of post-transplantation antibodies against non-HLA autoantigens is associated with rejection and decreased long-term graft survival. Although our knowledge of non-HLA antibodies is incomplete, compelling experimental and clinical findings demonstrate that antibodies directed against autoantigens such as angiotensin type 1 receptor, perlecan and collagen, contribute to the process of antibody-mediated acute and chronic rejection. The mechanisms that underlie the production of autoantibodies in the setting of organ transplantation is an important area of ongoing investigation. Ischaemia-reperfusion injury, surgical trauma and/or alloimmune responses can result in the release of organ-derived autoantigens (such as soluble antigens, extracellular vesicles or apoptotic bodies) that are presented to B cells in the context of the transplant recipient's antigen presenting cells and stimulate autoantibody production. Type 17 T helper cells orchestrate autoantibody production by supporting the proliferation and maturation of autoreactive B cells within ectopic tertiary lymphoid tissue. Conversely, autoantibody-mediated graft damage can trigger alloimmunity and the development of donor-specific HLA antibodies that can act in synergy to promote allograft rejection. Identification of the immunologic phenotypes of transplant recipients at risk of non-HLA antibody-mediated rejection, and the development of targeted therapies to treat such rejection, are sorely needed to improve both graft and patient survival. PMID:27345243

  1. Issues in solid-organ transplantation in children: translational research from bench to bedside

    PubMed Central

    Lipshultz, Steven E.; Chandar, Jayanthi J.; Rusconi, Paolo G.; Fornoni, Alessia; Abitbol, Carolyn L.; Burke III, George W.; Zilleruelo, Gaston E.; Pham, Si M.; Perez, Elena E.; Karnik, Ruchika; Hunter, Juanita A.; Dauphin, Danielle D.; Wilkinson, James D.

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we identify important challenges facing physicians responsible for renal and cardiac transplantation in children based on a review of the contemporary medical literature. Regarding pediatric renal transplantation, we discuss the challenge of antibody-mediated rejection, focusing on both acute and chronic antibody-mediated rejection. We review new diagnostic approaches to antibody-mediated rejection, such as panel-reactive antibodies, donor-specific cross-matching, antibody assays, risk assessment and diagnosis of antibody-mediated rejection, the pathology of antibody-mediated rejection, the issue of ABO incompatibility in renal transplantation, new therapies for antibody-mediated rejection, inhibiting of residual antibodies, the suppression or depletion of B-cells, genetic approaches to treating acute antibody-mediated rejection, and identifying future translational research directions in kidney transplantation in children. Regarding pediatric cardiac transplantation, we discuss the mechanisms of cardiac transplant rejection, including the role of endomyocardial biopsy in detecting graft rejection and the role of biomarkers in detecting cardiac graft rejection, including biomarkers of inflammation, cardiomyocyte injury, or stress. We review cardiac allograft vasculopathy. We also address the role of genetic analyses, including genome-wide association studies, gene expression profiling using entities such as AlloMap®, and adenosine triphosphate release as a measure of immune function using the Cylex® ImmuKnow™ cell function assay. Finally, we identify future translational research directions in heart transplantation in children. PMID:24860861

  2. Transplant production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For field pepper (Capsicum spp.) production, plants can be established from direct seed or transplants depending on the location and cultural practices for the specific pepper type grown. Direct seeding can result in slow, variable, and reduced plant stands due to variations in soil temperature, wat...

  3. Heart Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    A heart transplant removes a damaged or diseased heart and replaces it with a healthy one. The healthy heart comes from a donor who has died. It is the last resort for people with heart failure when all other treatments have failed. The ...

  4. Pancreas transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... evidence that the complications of diabetes, such as diabetic retinopathy, may not get worse and may even improve after a pancreas-kidney transplant. More than 95% of people survive ... of the donated pancreas and kidney for the rest of your life.

  5. Oral manifestations in transplant patients

    PubMed Central

    Nappalli, Deepika; Lingappa, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Organ transplantation is a widely undertaken procedure and has become an important alternative for the treatment of different end-stage organ diseases that previously had a poor prognosis. The field of organ transplant and hematopoietic stem cell transplant is developing rapidly. The increase in the number of transplant recipients also has an impact on oral and dental services. Most of the oral problems develop as a direct consequence of drug-induced immunosuppression or the procedure itself. These patients may present with oral complaints due to infections or mucosal lesions. Such lesions should be identified, diagnosed, and treated. New treatment strategies permit continuous adaptation of oral care regimens to the changing scope of oral complications. The aim of this review is to analyze those oral manifestations and to discuss the related literature. PMID:26005458

  6. Migration and Differentiation of GFP-transplanted Bone Marrow-derived Cells into Experimentally Induced Periodontal Polyp in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Saeka; Shoumura, Masahito; Osuga, Naoto; Tsujigiwa, Hidetsugu; Nakano, Keisuke; Okafuji, Norimasa; Ochiai, Takanaga; Hasegawa, Hiromasa; Kawakami, Toshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Perforation of floor of the dental pulp is often encountered during root canal treatment in routine clinical practice of dental caries. If perforation were large, granulation tissue would grow to form periodontal polyp. Granulation tissue consists of proliferating cells however their origin is not clear. It was shown that the cells in granulation tissue are mainly from migration of undifferentiated mesenchymal cells of the bone marrow. Hence, this study utilized GFP bone marrow transplantation mouse model. The floor of the pulp chamber in maxillary first molar was perforated using ½ dental round bur. Morphological assessment was carried out by micro CT and microscopy and GFP cell mechanism was further assessed by immunohistochemistry using double fluorescent staining with GFP-S100A4; GFP-Runx2 and GFP-CD31. Results of micro CT revealed alveolar bone resorption and widening of periodontal ligament. Histopathological examination showed proliferation of fibroblasts with some round cells and blood vessels in the granulation tissue. At 2 weeks, the outermost layer of the granulation tissue was lined by squamous cells with distinct intercellular bridges. At 4 weeks, the granulation tissue became larger than the perforation and the outermost layer was lined by relatively typical stratified squamous epithelium. Double immunofluorescent staining of GFP and Runx2 revealed that both proteins were expressed in spindle-shaped cells. Double immunofluorescent staining of GFP and CD31 revealed that both proteins were expressed in vascular endothelial cells in morphologically distinct vessels. The results suggest that fibroblasts, periodontal ligament fibroblasts and blood vessels in granulation tissue were derived from transplanted-bone marrow cells. Thus, essential growth of granulation tissue in periodontal polyp was caused by the migration of undifferentiated mesenchymal cells derived from bone marrow, which differentiated into fibroblasts and later on differentiated into

  7. Orthotopic Transplantation of Cryopreserved Mouse Ovaries and Gonadotrophin Releasing Hormone Analogues in the Restoration of Function following Chemotherapy-Induced Ovarian Damage

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qing; Szatmary, Peter; Liu, Yanyang; Ding, Zhenyu; Zhou, Jin; Sun, Yi; Luo, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Therapy advances are constantly improving survival rates of cancer patients, however the toxic effects of chemotherapy drugs can seriously affect patients’ quality of life. In women, fertility and premature ovarian endocrine dysfunction are of particular concern. It is urgently we find methods to preserve or reconstruct ovarian function for these women. This study compares GnRHa treatment with ovarian tissue cryopreservation and orthotopic transplantation in a chemotherapy-induced ovarian damage murine model. 56 inbred Lewis rats were divided into 4 treatment groups: Saline control (group I); cyclophosphamide only (group II); cyclophosphamide plus GnRHa (group III); cyclophosphamide and grafting of thawed cryopreserved ovaries (group IV). Body weight, estrous cycle recovery time, ovarian weight, morphology and follicle count, as well as breeding and fertility were compared among groups. Only group IV was able to restore to normal body weight by the end of the observation period and resumed normal estrous cycles in a shorter time compared to other treatment groups. There was a decrease in primordial follicles in all treatment groups, but group III had the greatest reduction. Although, there was no difference in pregnancy, only one animal littered normal pups in group II, none littered in group III and four littered in group IV. Thus, cryopreservation and orthotopic transplantation of ovarian tissue can restore the fertility of rats subjected to chemotherapy in a manner that is superior to GnRHa treatment. We also observed increased rates of hepatic, splenic and pulmonary haemorrhage in group III, suggesting there may be synergistic toxicity of GnRHa and cyclophosphamide. PMID:25811681

  8. [Anti-tumor effect of fluoropyrimidines on human tumor cell lines transplanted in nude mice with CCl4-induced liver dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Nio, Y; Imai, S; Shiraishi, T; Ohgaki, K; Tobe, T

    1989-04-01

    Tegafur (FT) is a masked compound of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and supposed to be activated in the liver. The present study was designed to estimate anti-tumor effect of FT on human tumors transplanted in nude mice with liver dysfunction induced by CCl4. Histologically, cirrhotic changes of liver were observed after injection with 1ml/kg 10% CCl4 twice a week for 8 weeks. Mice were transplanted with human gastric (GC-SF) or colonic cancer (CC-ZK) lines, and daily administered intragastrically with 5-FU (15mg/kg), FT (100mg/kg) or UFT (FT 20mg/kg + Uracil 44.8mg/kg) for 4 weeks. The growth of GC-SF was enhanced by liver dysfunction, but that of CC-ZK was not affected. The mean growth inhibition rates (MGIR) of CC-ZK by 5-FU, FT or UFT were 18.3, 33.1 and 54.2%, respectively, in mice without liver dysfunction, and 14.0, 50.0 and 59.5%, respectively, in mice with liver dysfunction. The MGIRs of GC-SF were 39.0, 63.8 and 48.0%, respectively, in mice without liver dysfunction, and 12.6, 53.6 and 50.0%, respectively, in mice with liver dysfunction. In both lines effect of 5-FU was reduced in liver dysfunction, but those of FT and UFT was not. These results suggest that FT and UFT can be used for cancer patients with liver dysfunction.

  9. Use of serial assessment of disease severity and liver biopsy for indication for liver transplantation in pediatric Epstein-Barr virus-induced fulminant hepatic failure.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Atsuko; Nakano, Natsuko; Fukuda, Akinari; Sakamoto, Seisuke; Imadome, Ken-Ichi; Kudo, Toyoichiro; Matsuoka, Kentaro; Kasahara, Mureo

    2015-03-01

    The decision to perform liver transplantation (LT) in patients with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-induced fulminant hepatic failure (FHF) relies on a precise assessment of laboratory and pathological findings. In this study, we analyzed clinical and laboratory data as well as the pathological features of the liver in order to evaluate the pathogenesis and the need for LT in 5 patients with EBV-induced FHF. According to the King's College criteria, the Acute Liver Failure Early Dynamic (ALFED) model, and the Japanese criteria (from the Acute Liver Failure Study Group of Japan), only 1 patient was considered to be a candidate for LT. However, explanted liver tissues in 3 cases exhibited massive hepatocellular necrosis together with diffuse CD8-positive T cell infiltration in both the portal area and the sinusoid. EBV was detected in the liver, plasma, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNCs). In 2 cases indicated to be at moderate risk by the ALFED model, liver biopsy showed CD8-positive and EBV-encoded RNA signal-positive lymphocytic infiltration predominantly in the portal area, but massive hepatocellular necrosis was not observed. These patients were treated with immunosuppressants and etoposide under the diagnosis of EBV-induced hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis or systemic EBV-positive T cell lymphoproliferative disease of childhood. EBV DNA was detected at a high level in PBMNCs, although it was negative in plasma. On the basis of the pathological analysis of the explanted liver tissues, LT was proposed for the restoration of liver function and the removal of the EBV-infected lymphocytes concentrated in the liver. Detecting EBV DNA by a quantitative polymerase chain reaction in plasma and PBMNCs was informative. An accurate evaluation of the underlying pathogenesis is essential for developing a treatment strategy in patients with EBV-induced FHF.

  10. Results of open and robot-assisted pancreatectomies with autologous islet transplantations: treating chronic pancreatitis and preventing surgically induced diabetes.

    PubMed

    Gruessner, R W G; Cercone, R; Galvani, C; Rana, A; Porubsky, M; Gruessner, A C; Rilo, H

    2014-01-01

    For patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP), standard surgical procedures (eg, partial or total resections, drainage procedures) are inadequate treatment options, because they do not confer pain relief and they leave patients prone to brittle diabetes and hypoglycemia. The combination of total pancreatectomy and islet autotransplantation (TP-IAT), however, can create insulin-independent and pain-free states. At our center, from August 2009 through August 2013, 61 patients with CP underwent either open or robot-assisted TP-IAT. The 30-day mortality rate was 0%. The transplanted islet equivalents per body weight ranged from 10,000 to 17,770. In all, 19% of the patients became insulin independent (after a range of 1-24 months); 27% of patients required <10 units of insulin. Moreover, at 12 months after surgery, 71% of the patients were pain free and no longer required analgesics. Our metabolic outcomes could have been even better if most patients had been referred at an earlier disease stage; instead, ∼80% had already undergone surgical procedures, and 91% had abnormal results on preoperative continuous glucose monitoring tests. Only if patients with CP are referred early for a TP-IAT-rather than being subjected to additional inadequate endoscopic and surgical procedures-can insulin-independent and pain-free states be accomplished in most. PMID:25131087

  11. Hair transplantation in mice: Challenges and solutions.

    PubMed

    Asgari, Azar Z; Rufaut, Nicholas W; Morrison, Wayne A; Dilley, Rodney J; Knudsen, Russle; Jones, Leslie N; Sinclair, Rodney D

    2016-07-01

    Hair follicle cells contribute to wound healing, skin circulation, and skin diseases including skin cancer, and hair transplantation is a useful technique to study the participation of hair follicle cells in skin homeostasis and wound healing. Although hair follicle transplantation is a well-established human hair-restoration procedure, follicular transplantation techniques in animals have a number of shortcomings and have not been well described or optimized. To facilitate the study of follicular stem and progenitor cells and their interaction with surrounding skin, we have established a new murine transplantation model, similar to follicular unit transplantation in humans. Vibrissae from GFP transgenic mice were harvested, flip-side microdissected, and implanted individually into needle hole incisions in the back skin of immune-deficient nude mice. Grafts were evaluated histologically and the growth of transplanted vibrissae was observed. Transplanted follicles cycled spontaneously and newly formed hair shafts emerged from the skin after 2 weeks. Ninety percent of grafted vibrissae produced a hair shaft at 6 weeks. After pluck-induced follicle cycling, growth rates were equivalent to ungrafted vibrissae. Transplanted vibrissae with GFP-positive cells were easily identified in histological sections. We established a follicular vibrissa transplantation method that recapitulates human follicular unit transplantation. This method has several advantages over current protocols for animal hair transplantation. The method requires no suturing and minimizes the damage to donor follicles and recipient skin. Vibrissae are easier to microdissect and transplant than pelage follicles and, once transplanted, are readily distinguished from host pelage hair. This facilitates measurement of hair growth. Flip-side hair follicle microdissection precisely separates donor follicular tissue from interfollicular tissue and donor cells remain confined to hair follicles. This makes it

  12. Meniscal allograft transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    Meniscus transplant; Surgery - knee - meniscus transplant; Surgery - knee - cartilage; Arthroscopy - knee - meniscus transplant ... the lab for any diseases and infection. Other surgeries, such as ligament or cartilage repairs, may be ...

  13. Pancreatic Islet Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    ... allo-transplantation?" For each pancreatic islet allo-transplant infusion, researchers use specialized enzymes to remove islets from ... in a lab. Transplant patients typically receive two infusions with an average of 400,000 to 500, ...

  14. Monitoring of organ transplants through genomic analyses of circulating cell-free DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vlaminck, Iwijn

    Solid-organ transplantation is the preferred treatment for patients with end-stage organ diseases, but complications due to infection and acute rejection undermine its long-term benefits. While clinicians strive to carefully monitor transplant patients, diagnostic options are currently limited. My colleagues and I in the lab of Stephen Quake have found that a combination of next-generation sequencing with a phenomenon called circulating cell-free DNA enables non-invasive diagnosis of both infection and rejection in transplantation. A substantial amount of small fragments of cell-free DNA circulate in blood that are the debris of dead cells. We discovered that donor specific DNA is released in circulation during injury to the transplant organ and we show that the proportion of donor DNA in plasma is predictive of acute rejection in heart and lung transplantation. We profiled viral and bacterial DNA sequences in plasma of transplant patients and discovered that the relative representation of different viruses and bacteria is informative of immunosuppression. This discovery suggested a novel biological measure of a person's immune strength, a finding that we have more recently confirmed via B-cell repertoire sequencing. Lastly, our studies highlight applications of shotgun sequencing of cell-free DNA in the broad, hypothesis free diagnosis of infection.

  15. Allogeneic/xenogeneic transplantation of peptide-labeled mitochondria in Parkinson's disease: restoration of mitochondria functions and attenuation of 6-hydroxydopamine-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jui-Chih; Wu, Shey-Lin; Liu, Ko-Hung; Chen, Ya-Hui; Chuang, Chieh-Sen; Cheng, Fu-Chou; Su, Hong-Lin; Wei, Yau-Huei; Kuo, Shou-Jen; Liu, Chin-San

    2016-04-01

    Although restoration of mitochondrial function in mitochondrial diseases through peptide-mediated allogeneic mitochondrial delivery (PMD) has been demonstrated in vitro, the in vivo therapeutic efficacy of PMD in Parkinson's disease (PD) has yet to be determined. In this study, we compared the functionality of mitochondrial transfer with or without Pep-1 conjugation in neurotoxin (6-hydroxydopamine, 6-OHDA)-induced PC12 cells and PD rat models. We injected mitochondria into the medial forebrain bundle (MFB) of the PD rats after subjecting the nigrostriatal pathway to a unilateral 6-OHDA lesion for 21 days, and we verified the effectiveness of the mitochondrial graft in enhancing mitochondrial function in the soma of the substantia nigra (SN) neuron through mitochondrial transport dynamics in the nigrostriatal circuit. The result demonstrated that only PMD with allogeneic and xenogeneic sources significantly sustained mitochondrial function to resist the neurotoxin-induced oxidative stress and apoptotic death in the rat PC12 cells. The remaining cells exhibited a greater capability of neurite outgrowth. Furthermore, allogeneic and xenogeneic transplantation of peptide-labeled mitochondria after 3 months improved the locomotive activity in the PD rats. This increase was accompanied by a marked decrease in dopaminergic neuron loss in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) and consistent enhancement of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive immunoreaction of dopaminergic neurons in the SNc and striatum. We also observed that in the SN dopaminergic neuron in the treated PD rats, mitochondrial complex I protein and mitochondrial dynamics were restored, thus ameliorating the oxidative DNA damage. Moreover, we determined signal translocation of graft allogeneic mitochondria from the MFB to the calbindin-positive SN neuron, which demonstrated the regulatory role of mitochondrial transport in alleviating 6-OHDA-induced degeneration of dopaminergic neurons. PMID:26730494

  16. Allogeneic/xenogeneic transplantation of peptide-labeled mitochondria in Parkinson's disease: restoration of mitochondria functions and attenuation of 6-hydroxydopamine-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jui-Chih; Wu, Shey-Lin; Liu, Ko-Hung; Chen, Ya-Hui; Chuang, Chieh-Sen; Cheng, Fu-Chou; Su, Hong-Lin; Wei, Yau-Huei; Kuo, Shou-Jen; Liu, Chin-San

    2016-04-01

    Although restoration of mitochondrial function in mitochondrial diseases through peptide-mediated allogeneic mitochondrial delivery (PMD) has been demonstrated in vitro, the in vivo therapeutic efficacy of PMD in Parkinson's disease (PD) has yet to be determined. In this study, we compared the functionality of mitochondrial transfer with or without Pep-1 conjugation in neurotoxin (6-hydroxydopamine, 6-OHDA)-induced PC12 cells and PD rat models. We injected mitochondria into the medial forebrain bundle (MFB) of the PD rats after subjecting the nigrostriatal pathway to a unilateral 6-OHDA lesion for 21 days, and we verified the effectiveness of the mitochondrial graft in enhancing mitochondrial function in the soma of the substantia nigra (SN) neuron through mitochondrial transport dynamics in the nigrostriatal circuit. The result demonstrated that only PMD with allogeneic and xenogeneic sources significantly sustained mitochondrial function to resist the neurotoxin-induced oxidative stress and apoptotic death in the rat PC12 cells. The remaining cells exhibited a greater capability of neurite outgrowth. Furthermore, allogeneic and xenogeneic transplantation of peptide-labeled mitochondria after 3 months improved the locomotive activity in the PD rats. This increase was accompanied by a marked decrease in dopaminergic neuron loss in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) and consistent enhancement of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive immunoreaction of dopaminergic neurons in the SNc and striatum. We also observed that in the SN dopaminergic neuron in the treated PD rats, mitochondrial complex I protein and mitochondrial dynamics were restored, thus ameliorating the oxidative DNA damage. Moreover, we determined signal translocation of graft allogeneic mitochondria from the MFB to the calbindin-positive SN neuron, which demonstrated the regulatory role of mitochondrial transport in alleviating 6-OHDA-induced degeneration of dopaminergic neurons.

  17. Utility of HLA Antibody Testing in Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Konvalinka, Ana

    2015-01-01

    HLA antigens are polymorphic proteins expressed on donor kidney allograft endothelium and are critical targets for recipient immune recognition. HLA antibodies are risk factors for acute and chronic rejection and allograft loss. Solid-phase immunoassays for HLA antibody detection represent a major advance in sensitivity and specificity over cell-based methods and are widely used in organ allocation and pretransplant risk assessment. Post-transplant, development of de novo donor–specific HLA antibodies and/or increase in donor-specific antibodies from pretransplant levels are associated with adverse outcomes. Although single antigen bead assays have allowed sensitive detection of recipient HLA antibodies and their specificities, a number of interpretive considerations must be appreciated to understand test results in clinical and research contexts. This review, which is especially relevant for clinicians caring for transplant patients, discusses the technical aspects of single antigen bead assays, emphasizes their quantitative limitations, and explores the utility of HLA antibody testing in identifying and managing important pre- and post-transplant clinical outcomes. PMID:25804279

  18. Patterns of myocardial cell adhesion molecule expression in human endomyocardial biopsies after cardiac transplantation. Induced ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 related to implantation and rejection.

    PubMed Central

    Herskowitz, A.; Mayne, A. E.; Willoughby, S. B.; Kanter, K.; Ansari, A. A.

    1994-01-01

    Conflicting patterns of myocardial cell adhesion molecule expression associated with cardiac rejection have emerged from numerous studies of randomly selected cardiac biopsies. We designed a prospective, longitudinal study which reports both qualitative and quantitative levels of myocardial ICAM-1, VCAM-1, E-selectin, and P-selectin expression in sequential human cardiac allograft biopsies. Intense ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 staining was found in all biopsies during the first three weeks after transplant and coincided with elevated serum levels of troponin T, a sensitive marker of ischemic myocyte injury. Baseline ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression returned within three to four weeks, as did serum troponin T levels in all patients who did not develop rejection. All 29 rejection episodes encountered were associated with intense ICAM-1 staining, while 24 of the 29 (83%) had intense VCAM-1 staining. Increased ELAM-1 and CD62 staining was only rarely observed. Persistence of increased ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 staining after treated rejection episodes predicted a recurrent rejection episode within two months (75% positive and 100% negative predictive value). Objective quantitative measurements by radioimmunoassay (RIA) confirmed these patterns of induced ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression. Thus, longitudinal monitoring of serial biopsies for myocardial ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression could be useful in the early detection of rejection episodes and monitoring the efficacy of immunosuppressive therapy. Images Figure 2 PMID:7977640

  19. Secondary MGUS following by adenovirus-induced hemorrhagic cystitis after autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation in a patient with multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Hatsuse, Mayumi; Fuchida, Shin-ichi; Okano, Akira; Murakami, Satoshi; Shimazaki, Chihiro

    2014-11-01

    A 61-year-old man with multiple myeloma (IgG-κ) received autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT) after induction of VAD in July 2009, and obtained a very good partial response. In November 2009, he was admitted to our hospital because of adenovirus-induced hemorrhagic cystitis and pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia. The pneumonia resolved with sulfamethoxazole and steroid pulse therapy, and cystitis subsided spontaneously. In December 2009, serum protein electrophoresis showed two abnormal protein bands (APB)(IgG-λ, IgA-λ), different from the original M-protein, and IgG thereafter increased to 2,771 mg/dl with a concomitant increase in anti-adenovirus antibody to 4,096. In October 2010, APB disappeared. To date, he has been in stable complete remission for five years since PBSCT. The emergence of APB is considered to be a surrogate marker for long-term remission. Immune reconstitution syndrome and APB after high dose chemotherapy following PBSCT are discussed herein.

  20. [Chronic rejection: Differences and similarities in various solid organ transplants].

    PubMed

    Suhling, H; Gottlieb, J; Bara, C; Taubert, R; Jäckel, E; Schiffer, M; Bräsen, J H

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, chronic rejections after transplantation of the lungs, heart, liver, and kidney are described. Chronic allograft dysfunction (CAD) plays an important role in all of these transplantations and has a significant influence on patient survival. The pathophysiological reasons for CAD varies greatly in the various organs.Chronic lung allograft dysfunction (CLAD) is the most important determinant of survival and quality of life after lung transplantation. Diagnosis is based on lung function, especially forced expiratory flow in 1 s (FEV1) decline. Prevention, early detection, and rapid treatment are extremely important. Azithromycin and extracorporeal photopheresis are commonly used for treatment because they usually positively influence the progression of lung remodeling.The expression for chronic rejection of the heart is cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV). Immunological and nonimmunological factors are important for its development. Due to limited therapeutic options, prevention is of utmost importance (administration of mTOR inhibitors and minimizing cardiovascular risk factors).The mid- and long-term survival rates after liver transplantation have hardly changed in recent decades, which is an indication of the difficulty in diagnosing chronic graft dysfunction. Chronic ductopenic rejection accounts for a small proportion of late graft dysfunction. Idiopathic posttransplant hepatitis and de novo autoimmune hepatitis are important in addition to recurrence of the underlying disease that led to transplantation.Chronic allograft nephropathy is the result of severe rejection which cumulates in increasing fibrosis with remodeling. The earliest possible diagnosis and therapy is currently the only option. Diagnosis is based on evidence of donor-specific antibodies and histological findings.

  1. Heart transplantation.

    PubMed

    Nakatani, Takeshi

    2009-06-01

    A total of 59 heart transplantations (HTx) have been performed in Japan as of September, 2008, since the Organ Transplantation Law was settled in October 1997. The majority of recipients were suffered from dilated cardiomyopathy and waiting condition of all recipients were status 1. The mean waiting time was 777 day; 50 patients (85%) were supported by several types of left ventricular assist systems (LVAS) and the mean duration of support was 780 days. The majority of patients underwent operation by modified bicaval method with Celsior solution for cardiac preservation, and 64% of recipients were administered triple therapy with cyclosporine, mycophenolate mofetil, and steroid as the initial immunosuppressive regimen. The 9-year survival rate was 94%, which was superior to that of the international registry. HTx in Japan has been very limited by a severe shortage of donors, but the results have been excellent even though the majority of recipients were waiting for long-term with a LVAS as a bridge to HTx.

  2. The effect of insulin treatment and of islet transplantation on the resistance artery function in the STZ-induced diabetic rat.

    PubMed Central

    Heygate, K. M.; Davies, J.; Holmes, M.; James, R. F.; Thurston, H.

    1996-01-01

    1. This study was designed to investigate the influence of insulin treatment and islet transplantation on the smooth muscle contractility and endothelium-dependent and independent relaxation of resistance arteries in the chemically induced streptozotocin (STZ) diabetic rat after 6-8 weeks, and 12-14 weeks of diabetes, compared to non-diabetic age-matched controls. 2. The morphology, and contractile responses to high potassium physiological salt solution (KPSS), KPSS containing 10(-5) M noradrenaline (NAK), and concentration-response curves to noradrenaline (NA) of mesenteric resistance arteries were recorded, along with the endothelium-dependent relaxation responses to acetylcholine (ACh) and bradykinin (BK), and endothelium-independent relaxation to sodium nitroprusside (SNP). Concentration-response curves were then repeated in the presence of a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, NG-nitro-L-arginine (L-NOARG). 3. Insulin-treated diabetic rats in the 12 week study demonstrated enhanced vascular contractility to KPSS, NAK and NA, compared to age-matched non-diabetic controls. 4. Incubation with L-NOARG resulted in both a significant increase in maximum contractile response, and sensitivity (pD2) to NA in the untreated diabetic group (6 weeks). A significant shift in sensitivity was also seen in the insulin-treated diabetic group. In the 12 week study, incubation with L-NOARG resulted in an increased maximum contractile response and sensitivity to NA in the insulin-treated diabetics. An increase in sensitivity was also observed in the untreated diabetic group. 5. Endothelium-dependent relaxation to ACh was significantly augmented in the untreated diabetics (6-weeks), compared to the control group. In the 12-week study, relaxation to both ACh and BK was not significantly different in any of the experimental groups when compared to the sham-operated non-diabetic controls. 6. Incubation with L-NOARG resulted in a significant attenuation of the maximum relaxation response

  3. Redefining Strategies to Introduce Tolerance-Inducing Cellular Therapy in Human beings to Combat Autoimmunity and Transplantation Reactions.

    PubMed

    Ten Brinke, Anja; Joosten, Irma; van Ham, S Marieke; van Kooten, Cees; Prakken, Berent Jan

    2014-01-01

    Clinical translation of tolerance-inducing cell therapies requires a novel approach focused on innovative networks, patient involvement, and, foremost, a fundamental paradigm shift in thinking from both Academia, and Industry and Regulatory Agencies. Tolerance-inducing cell products differ essentially from conventional drugs. They are personalized and target interactive immunological networks to shift the balance toward tolerance. The human cell products are often absent or fundamentally different in animals. This creates important limitations of pre-clinical animal testing for safety and efficacy of these products and calls for novel translational approaches, which require the combined efforts of the different parties involved. Dedicated international and multidisciplinary consortia that focus on clinical translation are of utmost importance. They can help in informing and educating regulatory policy makers on the unique requirements for these cell products, ranging from pre-clinical studies in animals to in vitro human studies. In addition, they can promote reliable immunomonitoring tools. The development of tolerance-inducing cell products requires not only bench-to-bedside but also reverse translation, from bedside back to the bench.

  4. Redefining Strategies to Introduce Tolerance-Inducing Cellular Therapy in Human beings to Combat Autoimmunity and Transplantation Reactions

    PubMed Central

    ten Brinke, Anja; Joosten, Irma; van Ham, S. Marieke; van Kooten, Cees; Prakken, Berent Jan

    2014-01-01

    Clinical translation of tolerance-inducing cell therapies requires a novel approach focused on innovative networks, patient involvement, and, foremost, a fundamental paradigm shift in thinking from both Academia, and Industry and Regulatory Agencies. Tolerance-inducing cell products differ essentially from conventional drugs. They are personalized and target interactive immunological networks to shift the balance toward tolerance. The human cell products are often absent or fundamentally different in animals. This creates important limitations of pre-clinical animal testing for safety and efficacy of these products and calls for novel translational approaches, which require the combined efforts of the different parties involved. Dedicated international and multidisciplinary consortia that focus on clinical translation are of utmost importance. They can help in informing and educating regulatory policy makers on the unique requirements for these cell products, ranging from pre-clinical studies in animals to in vitro human studies. In addition, they can promote reliable immunomonitoring tools. The development of tolerance-inducing cell products requires not only bench-to-bedside but also reverse translation, from bedside back to the bench. PMID:25177323

  5. Rescue of Fructose-Induced Metabolic Syndrome by Antibiotics or Faecal Transplantation in a Rat Model of Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Mazzoli, Arianna; Cigliano, Luisa; Venditti, Paola; Walser, Jean-Claude; Widmer, Alex; Baccigalupi, Loredana; Ricca, Ezio; Iossa, Susanna

    2015-01-01

    A fructose-rich diet can induce metabolic syndrome, a combination of health disorders that increases the risk of diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Diet is also known to alter the microbial composition of the gut, although it is not clear whether such alteration contributes to the development of metabolic syndrome. The aim of this work was to assess the possible link between the gut microbiota and the development of diet-induced metabolic syndrome in a rat model of obesity. Rats were fed either a standard or high-fructose diet. Groups of fructose-fed rats were treated with either antibiotics or faecal samples from control rats by oral gavage. Body composition, plasma metabolic parameters and markers of tissue oxidative stress were measured in all groups. A 16S DNA-sequencing approach was used to evaluate the bacterial composition of the gut of animals under different diets. The fructose-rich diet induced markers of metabolic syndrome, inflammation and oxidative stress, that were all significantly reduced when the animals were treated with antibiotic or faecal samples. The number of members of two bacterial genera, Coprococcus and Ruminococcus, was increased by the fructose-rich diet and reduced by both antibiotic and faecal treatments, pointing to a correlation between their abundance and the development of the metabolic syndrome. Our data indicate that in rats fed a fructose-rich diet the development of metabolic syndrome is directly correlated with variations of the gut content of specific bacterial taxa. PMID:26244577

  6. Rescue of Fructose-Induced Metabolic Syndrome by Antibiotics or Faecal Transplantation in a Rat Model of Obesity.

    PubMed

    Di Luccia, Blanda; Crescenzo, Raffaella; Mazzoli, Arianna; Cigliano, Luisa; Venditti, Paola; Walser, Jean-Claude; Widmer, Alex; Baccigalupi, Loredana; Ricca, Ezio; Iossa, Susanna

    2015-01-01

    A fructose-rich diet can induce metabolic syndrome, a combination of health disorders that increases the risk of diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Diet is also known to alter the microbial composition of the gut, although it is not clear whether such alteration contributes to the development of metabolic syndrome. The aim of this work was to assess the possible link between the gut microbiota and the development of diet-induced metabolic syndrome in a rat model of obesity. Rats were fed either a standard or high-fructose diet. Groups of fructose-fed rats were treated with either antibiotics or faecal samples from control rats by oral gavage. Body composition, plasma metabolic parameters and markers of tissue oxidative stress were measured in all groups. A 16S DNA-sequencing approach was used to evaluate the bacterial composition of the gut of animals under different diets. The fructose-rich diet induced markers of metabolic syndrome, inflammation and oxidative stress, that were all significantly reduced when the animals were treated with antibiotic or faecal samples. The number of members of two bacterial genera, Coprococcus and Ruminococcus, was increased by the fructose-rich diet and reduced by both antibiotic and faecal treatments, pointing to a correlation between their abundance and the development of the metabolic syndrome. Our data indicate that in rats fed a fructose-rich diet the development of metabolic syndrome is directly correlated with variations of the gut content of specific bacterial taxa.

  7. Linezolid Induced Twice Pure Red Cell Aplasia in a Patient with Central Nervous System Infection after Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wenqing; Shi, Bing; Liu, Lihui; He, Shengke; Ye, Liping; Tian, DengMei; Zhang, Yongqing

    2016-01-01

    Linezolid (LZD), severed as the first oxazolidinone antibiotic, was active against multidrug-resistant gram-positive strains. LZD can induce thrombocytopenia, anemia and leukocytopenia. Currently, reports on pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) cases induced by LZD are relatively rare (4-7). In this paper, we reported a patient with PRCA twice induced by LZD. A 37-year-old man was diagnosed with myelodysplatic syndrome (MDS) and underwent allo-HSCT from an unrelated donor with ABO blood type and leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matching. After HSCT for 2 years, the patient suffered from refractory fever and headache. He was first treated with empirical antifungal agent and antibiotics for central nervous system (CNS) infection, but then changed to LZD therapy for little effect. Twenty-eight days after LZD treatment, the symptom improved significantly but the hemoglobin declined to 70 g/L and the reticulocyte level was only 0.23%. The LZD therapy was stopped and the fever and headache symptoms reoccurred 1 week latter. Then, erythropoietin (EPO) and halved dosage of LZD were used for treatment. The CNS infection and the anemia symptom relieved gradually and the level of hemoglobin and reticulocyte declined again. After blood transfusion, the half dose of LZD was sustained without anaemia recovery. In summary, patients with anemia, myelosuppressants history or potential abnormal proliferation of T cells may suffer PRCA with long term LZD treatment. The monitoring of complete blood count and reticulocyte count were necessary during LZD therapy. If the clinical condition permits, LZD dosage reduction and blood transfusion should be considered. PMID:27642338

  8. Linezolid Induced Twice Pure Red Cell Aplasia in a Patient with Central Nervous System Infection after Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wenqing; Shi, Bing; Liu, Lihui; He, Shengke; Ye, Liping; Tian, DengMei; Zhang, Yongqing

    2016-01-01

    Linezolid (LZD), severed as the first oxazolidinone antibiotic, was active against multidrug-resistant gram-positive strains. LZD can induce thrombocytopenia, anemia and leukocytopenia. Currently, reports on pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) cases induced by LZD are relatively rare (4-7). In this paper, we reported a patient with PRCA twice induced by LZD. A 37-year-old man was diagnosed with myelodysplatic syndrome (MDS) and underwent allo-HSCT from an unrelated donor with ABO blood type and leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matching. After HSCT for 2 years, the patient suffered from refractory fever and headache. He was first treated with empirical antifungal agent and antibiotics for central nervous system (CNS) infection, but then changed to LZD therapy for little effect. Twenty-eight days after LZD treatment, the symptom improved significantly but the hemoglobin declined to 70 g/L and the reticulocyte level was only 0.23%. The LZD therapy was stopped and the fever and headache symptoms reoccurred 1 week latter. Then, erythropoietin (EPO) and halved dosage of LZD were used for treatment. The CNS infection and the anemia symptom relieved gradually and the level of hemoglobin and reticulocyte declined again. After blood transfusion, the half dose of LZD was sustained without anaemia recovery. In summary, patients with anemia, myelosuppressants history or potential abnormal proliferation of T cells may suffer PRCA with long term LZD treatment. The monitoring of complete blood count and reticulocyte count were necessary during LZD therapy. If the clinical condition permits, LZD dosage reduction and blood transfusion should be considered. PMID:27642338

  9. The regulatory T cell effector soluble fibrinogen-like protein 2 induces tubular epithelial cell apoptosis in renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zitong; Yang, Cheng; Wang, Lingyan; Li, Long; Zhao, Tian; Hu, Linkun; Rong, Ruiming; Xu, Ming; Zhu, Tongyu

    2014-02-01

    Acute rejection (AR) hinders renal allograft survival. Tubular epithelial cell (TEC) apoptosis contributes to premature graft loss in AR, while the mechanism remains unclear. Soluble fibrinogen-like protein 2 (sFGL2), a novel effector of regulatory T cells (Treg), induces apoptosis to mediate tissue injury. We previously found that serum sFGL2 significantly increased in renal allograft rejection patients. In this study, the role of sFGL2 in AR was further investigated both in vivo and in vitro. The serum level of sFGL2 and the percentage of CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) Treg in the peripheral blood were measured in renal allograft recipients with AR or stable renal function (n = 30 per group). The human TEC was stimulated with sFGL2, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, or phosphate buffered saline and investigated for apoptosis in vitro. Apoptosis-associated genes expression in TEC was further assessed. Approval for this study was obtained from the Ethics Committee of Fudan University. Our results showed that the serum level of sFGL2, correlated with Treg in the peripheral blood, was significantly increased in the AR patients. In vitro, sFGL2 remarkably induced TEC apoptosis, with a significant up-regulation of proapoptotic genes, including CASP-3, CASP-8, CASP-9, CASP-10, TRADD, TNFSF10, FADD, FAS, FASLG, BAK1, BAD, BAX, and NF-KB1. However, no significant changes were observed in the expression of antiapoptotic genes, including CARD-18, NAIP, BCL2, IKBKB, and TBK1. Therefore, sFGL2, an effector of Treg, induces TEC apoptosis. Our study suggests that sFGL2 is a potential mediator in the pathogenesis of allograft rejection and provides novel insights into the role of Treg in AR. PMID:24414480

  10. Cytomegalovirus Immunoglobulin After Thoracic Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Grossi, Paolo; Mohacsi, Paul; Szabolcs, Zoltán; Potena, Luciano

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a highly complex pathogen which, despite modern prophylactic regimens, continues to affect a high proportion of thoracic organ transplant recipients. The symptomatic manifestations of CMV infection are compounded by adverse indirect effects induced by the multiple immunomodulatory actions of CMV. These include a higher risk of acute rejection, cardiac allograft vasculopathy after heart transplantation, and potentially bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome in lung transplant recipients, with a greater propensity for opportunistic secondary infections. Prophylaxis for CMV using antiviral agents (typically oral valganciclovir or intravenous ganciclovir) is now almost universal, at least in high-risk transplants (D+/R−). Even with extended prophylactic regimens, however, challenges remain. The CMV events can still occur despite antiviral prophylaxis, including late-onset infection or recurrent disease, and patients with ganciclovir-resistant CMV infection or who are intolerant to antiviral therapy require alternative strategies. The CMV immunoglobulin (CMVIG) and antiviral agents have complementary modes of action. High-titer CMVIG preparations provide passive CMV-specific immunity but also exert complex immunomodulatory properties which augment the antiviral effect of antiviral agents and offer the potential to suppress the indirect effects of CMV infection. This supplement discusses the available data concerning the immunological and clinical effects of CMVIG after heart or lung transplantation. PMID:26900989

  11. Busulfan and cyclosphamide induce liver inflammation through NLRP3 activation in mice after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Jianlin; Huang, Yujin; Xia, Yuan; Chu, Peipei; Yao, Haina; Xu, Linyan; Qi, Kunming; Liu, Yun; Xu, Kailin; Zeng, Lingyu

    2015-12-04

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of NLRP3 inflammasome on BU/CY-induced liver inflammation in mice after HSCT. HSCT mice model was established through infusion of 5 × 10(6) bone marrow mononuclear cells after conditioned with BU/CY. On day 7, 14, 21 and 28 after HSCT, mice were sacrificed for analysis of liver inflammation, cytokine secretion, NLRP3 expression and caspase-1 activation as well as release of ATP and high-mobility group protein B1 (HMGB1). Furthermore, NLRP3 selective inhibitor (BAY 11-7082) was administrated into mice after HSCT to evaluate its effects on liver inflammation. Severe liver inflammation and damage with elevated secretion of IL-1β and IL-18 were found in mice after HSCT. Meanwhile, elevated expressions of NLRP3 and caspase-1 activation in liver were found. In addition, increased release of ATP and HMGB1 were observed. Selective inhibition of NLRP3 decreased caspase-1 activation and secretion of IL-1β and IL-18. Furthermore, NLRP3 inhibition also reduced infiltration of macrophages and neutrophils and improved liver function. In conclusion, NLRP3 was involved in BU/CY-induced liver inflammation after HSCT and selectively inhibited it ameliorated liver inflammation and improved liver function, suggesting targeting NLRP3 might be a new approach in the prophylaxis of liver inflammation after HSCT.

  12. An Anti-C1s Monoclonal, TNT003, Inhibits Complement Activation Induced by Antibodies Against HLA.

    PubMed

    Thomas, K A; Valenzuela, N M; Gjertson, D; Mulder, A; Fishbein, M C; Parry, G C; Panicker, S; Reed, E F

    2015-08-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) of solid organ transplants (SOT) is characterized by damage triggered by donor-specific antibodies (DSA) binding donor Class I and II HLA (HLA-I and HLA-II) expressed on endothelial cells. While F(ab')2 portions of DSA cause cellular activation and proliferation, Fc regions activate the classical complement cascade, resulting in complement deposition and leukocyte recruitment, both hallmark features of AMR. We characterized the ability of an anti-C1s monoclonal antibody, TNT003, to inhibit HLA antibody (HLA-Ab)-induced complement activation. Complement deposition induced by HLA-Ab was evaluated using novel cell- and bead-based assays. Human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC) were cultured with HLA-Ab and human complement; production of activated complement proteins was measured by flow cytometry. Additionally, C3d deposition was measured on single antigen beads (SAB) mixed with HLA-Ab and human complement. TNT003 inhibited HLA-Ab mediated complement deposition on HAEC in a concentration-dependent manner; C3a, C4a and C5a anaphylatoxin production was also diminished by TNT003. Finally, TNT003 blocked C3d deposition induced by Class I (HLAI-Ab)- and Class II (HLAII-Ab)-specific antibodies on SAB. These data suggest TNT003 may be useful for modulating the effects of DSA, as TNT003 inhibits complement deposition and split product formation generated by HLA-I/II-Ab in vitro. PMID:25904443

  13. An Anti-C1s Monoclonal, TNT003, Inhibits Complement Activation Induced by Antibodies Against HLA

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, K A; Valenzuela, N M; Gjertson, D; Mulder, A; Fishbein, M C; Parry, G C; Panicker, S; Reed, E F

    2015-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) of solid organ transplants (SOT) is characterized by damage triggered by donor-specific antibodies (DSA) binding donor Class I and II HLA (HLA-I and HLA-II) expressed on endothelial cells. While F(ab′)2 portions of DSA cause cellular activation and proliferation, Fc regions activate the classical complement cascade, resulting in complement deposition and leukocyte recruitment, both hallmark features of AMR. We characterized the ability of an anti-C1s monoclonal antibody, TNT003, to inhibit HLA antibody (HLA-Ab)-induced complement activation. Complement deposition induced by HLA-Ab was evaluated using novel cell- and bead-based assays. Human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC) were cultured with HLA-Ab and human complement; production of activated complement proteins was measured by flow cytometry. Additionally, C3d deposition was measured on single antigen beads (SAB) mixed with HLA-Ab and human complement. TNT003 inhibited HLA-Ab mediated complement deposition on HAEC in a concentration-dependent manner; C3a, C4a and C5a anaphylatoxin production was also diminished by TNT003. Finally, TNT003 blocked C3d deposition induced by Class I (HLAI-Ab)- and Class II (HLAII-Ab)-specific antibodies on SAB. These data suggest TNT003 may be useful for modulating the effects of DSA, as TNT003 inhibits complement deposition and split product formation generated by HLA-I/II-Ab in vitro. PMID:25904443

  14. Organ transplantation in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    El Matri, Aziz; Ben Abdallah, Taieb

    2015-04-01

    Kidney transplants were first performed in Tunisia in 1986, and transplants soon extended to other organs including the heart, liver, and pancreas. Live-related donor and deceased-donor kidney transplants were both began in the summer of 1986. An organ procurement and transplant law was passed in March 1991, and the National Centre for Advancement of Organ Transplantation was created in 1995. The number of transplantation units has increased to 7 throughout the country, and the yearly transplant number has progressively increased to 139 in 2010, including 20% from deceased kidney donors. Despite these gains, the need continues to grow. Heart transplants began in January 1993, and Tunisia and Jordan are currently the only Arab countries where it is practiced. However, only 16 patients have received a heart transplant as of 2004, and the number of recipients has decreased in the past 10 years. Liver transplants are rare in other Arab countries, but began in Tunisia in January 1998. Over 10 years, 38 patients benefited from this procedure. After a few years of stagnation, the number of liver transplants is increasing. While all types of transplantation are needed, kidney transplantation is a priority in Tunisia. The target is to perform 400 transplants annually, which would require a long-term strategy to provide full financial coverage using the National Health Insurance Funds in both the public and private sectors.

  15. Transplanted Terminally Differentiated Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Are Accepted By Immune Mechanisms Similar To Self-Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Patricia E.; Meyer, Everett H.; Kooreman, Nigel G.; Diecke, Sebastian; Dey, Devaveena; Sanchez-Freire, Veronica; Hu, Shijun; Ebert, Antje; Odegaard, Justin; Mordwinkin, Nick; Brouwer, Thomas P.; Lo, David; Montoro, Daniel; Longaker, Michael T.; Negrin, Robert S.; Wu, Joseph C.

    2014-01-01

    The exact nature of the immune response elicited by autologous induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) progeny is still not well understood. Here we show in murine models that autologous iPSC-derived endothelial cells (iECs) elicit an immune response that resembles the one against a comparable somatic cell, the aortic endothelial cell (AEC). These cells exhibit long-term survival in vivo and prompt a tolerogenic contexture of intra-graft characterized by elevated IL-10 expression. In contrast, undifferentiated iPSCs elicit a very different immune response with high lymphocytic infiltration and elevated IFN-γ, granzyme-B, and perforin intra-graft. Furthermore, the clonal structure of infiltrating T cells from iEC grafts is statistically indistinguishable from that of AECs, but is different from that of undifferentiated iPSC grafts. Taken together, our results indicate that the differentiation of iPSCs results in a loss of immunogenicity and leads to the induction of tolerance, despite expected antigen expression differences between iPSC-derived versus original somatic cells. PMID:24875164

  16. Transplantation KCNMA1 modified bone marrow-mesenchymal stem cell therapy for diabetes mellitus-induced erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    He, Y; He, W; Qin, G; Luo, J; Xiao, M

    2014-06-01

    This study assessed the effect of KCNMA1 transfected bone marrow-mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) on the improvement of erectile function in diabetic rats. Sixty male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected with streptozotocin (STZ) and screened with apomorphine (APO) to establish diabetes mellitus-induced erectile dysfunction (DMED). DMED rats were randomly divided into four groups: rats in each group underwent intracavernous injection with either phosphate buffer solution (DMED+PBS), nontransfected MSCs (DMED+MSCs), empty vector transfected MSCs (DMED+null-MSCs) or KCNMA1 transfected MSCs (DMED+KCNMA1-MSCs). Before injection, high levels of KCNMA1 expression were confirmed in KCNMA1-MSCs using RT-PCR and Western blotting. The lentivirus transfected MSCs maintained their potential for multidirectional differentiation. Four weeks after injection, erectile function was ascertained by measuring intracavernous pressure (ICP). Penile tissues were collected for immunohistochemical analysis. The expression of KCNMA1 in the corpus cavernosum was increased, and the DMED+KCNMA1-MSCs group displayed a significant improvement of erectile function. We concluded that KCNMA1 was able to enhance the positive effect of MSCs in the treatment of diabetes-associated erectile dysfunction.

  17. Transplantation tolerance: from theory to clinic

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Ephraim J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Tolerance induction and alloreactivity can be applied to the clinic for the transplantation of solid organs and in the treatment of human cancers respectively. Hematopoietic chimerism, the stable coexistence of host and donor blood cells, guarantees that a solid organ from the same donor will be tolerated without a requirement for maintenance immunosuppression, and it also serves as a platform for the adoptive immunotherapy of hematologic malignancies using donor lymphocyte infusions. This review focuses on clinically relevant methods for inducing hematopoietic chimerism and transplantation tolerance, with a special emphasis on reduced intensity transplantation conditioning and high dose, post-transplantation cyclophosphamide to prevent graft rejection and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Reduced intensity transplantation regimens permit a transient cooperation between donor and host immune systems to eradicate malignancy without producing GVHD. Their favorable toxicity profile also enables the application of allogeneic stem cell transplantation to treat non-malignant disorders of hematopoiesis and to induce tolerance for solid organ transplantation. PMID:24517426

  18. Effect of mesenchymal stem cells transplantation on glycaemic profile & their localization in streptozotocin induced diabetic Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Bhansali, Shobhit; Kumar, Vinod; Saikia, Uma Nahar; Medhi, Bikash; Jha, Vivekanand; Bhansali, Anil; Dutta, Pinaki

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: Bone marrow is a rich source of adult stem cells that can differentiate into various cell types. Administration of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in irradiated diabetic rat model has transiently shown to decrease blood glucose level. This study examines the effect of high dose and multiple injections of MSCs on glycemic profile, their localization and regeneration of islet in diabetic Wistar rat. Methods: The study was carried out in male Wistar rats categorized into three groups (n=6, in each group): Group 1 as control, group 2 streptozotocin (STZ) (50 mg/kg) induced diabetic group and group 3 experimental group; 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) labelled allogenic MSCs were injected in the non-irradiated diabetic rat of the experimental group through tail vein. The blood glucose profile was subsequently monitored at regular intervals. Rats were sacrificed on day 45 and pancreas was examined for localization of BrdU labelled stem cells by immunofluorescence and islet-neogenesis by immunohistochemistry. Results: There was a significant reduction in blood glucose level after administration of MSCs in the experimental group (P<0.001). The presence of BrdU labelled MSCs in islet suggested their localization in the pancreas. Co-expression of anti-BrdU and anti-insulin antibody indicated trans-differentiation/fusion into insulin producing cells evidenced by significant increase in total number of islet (P=0.004) and insulin positive cells (P<0.0001) in experimental group. Interpretation & conclusions: Our results showed that the MSCs administration in non-irradiated diabetic Wistar rat reduced hyperglycaemia and was accompanied by increased islet-neogengesis, possibly through trans- differentiation/fusion. PMID:26261168

  19. Who Needs a Lung Transplant?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Who Needs a Lung Transplant? Your doctor may recommend a lung transplant ... lungs to pick up oxygen. Applying to a Lung Transplant Program Lung transplants are done in medical ...

  20. Transplantation: a brief history.

    PubMed

    Dangoor, Joseph Yoav; Hakim, David N; Singh, Rajinder Pal; Hakim, Nadey S

    2015-02-01

    Developments in transplantation have progressed dramatically over the past century. Current research is underway to optimize immune modulation, genetically engineering animals for xenografting, and breakthroughs are occurring in regenerative medicine. However, pioneering live-donor transplantation has transformed transplantation in the organ shortage, and these contribute an increased proportion of transplanted organs. Live-donor transplantation is associated with better long-term outcomes, and techniques to recover organs have become less invasive. We set out to examine the evolution of transplantation from its historic beginnings to the developments that make it successful today.

  1. Pancreas transplantation: review.

    PubMed

    Meirelles Júnior, Roberto Ferreira; Salvalaggio, Paolo; Pacheco-Silva, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    Vascularized pancreas transplantation is the only treatment that establishes normal glucose levels and normalizes glycosylated hemoglobin levels in type 1 diabetic patients. The first vascularized pancreas transplant was performed by William Kelly and Richard Lillehei, to treat a type 1 diabetes patient, in December 1966. In Brazil, Edison Teixeira performed the first isolated segmental pancreas transplant in 1968. Until the 1980s, pancreas transplants were restricted to a few centers of the United States and Europe. The introduction of tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil in 1994, led to a significant outcome improvement and consequently, an increase in pancreas transplants in several countries. According to the International Pancreas Transplant Registry, until December 31st, 2010, more than 35 thousand pancreas transplants had been performed. The one-year survival of patients and pancreatic grafts exceeds 95 and 83%, respectively. The better survival of pancreatic (86%) and renal (93%) grafts in the first year after transplantation is in the simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplant group of patients. Immunological loss in the first year after transplant for simultaneous pancreas-kidney, pancreas after kidney, and pancreas alone are 1.8, 3.7, and 6%, respectively. Pancreas transplant has 10 to 20% surgical complications requiring laparotomy. Besides enhancing quality of life, pancreatic transplant increases survival of uremic diabetic patient as compared to uremic diabetic patients on dialysis or with kidney transplantation alone.

  2. Pancreas transplantation: review

    PubMed Central

    Meirelles, Roberto Ferreira; Salvalaggio, Paolo; Pacheco-Silva, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Vascularized pancreas transplantation is the only treatment that establishes normal glucose levels and normalizes glycosylated hemoglobin levels in type 1 diabetic patients. The first vascularized pancreas transplant was performed by William Kelly and Richard Lillehei, to treat a type 1 diabetes patient, in December 1966. In Brazil, Edison Teixeira performed the first isolated segmental pancreas transplant in 1968. Until the 1980s, pancreas transplants were restricted to a few centers of the United States and Europe. The introduction of tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil in 1994, led to a significant outcome improvement and consequently, an increase in pancreas transplants in several countries. According to the International Pancreas Transplant Registry, until December 31st, 2010, more than 35 thousand pancreas transplants had been performed. The one-year survival of patients and pancreatic grafts exceeds 95 and 83%, respectively. The better survival of pancreatic (86%) and renal (93%) grafts in the first year after transplantation is in the simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplant group of patients. Immunological loss in the first year after transplant for simultaneous pancreas-kidney, pancreas after kidney, and pancreas alone are 1.8, 3.7, and 6%, respectively. Pancreas transplant has 10 to 20% surgical complications requiring laparotomy. Besides enhancing quality of life, pancreatic transplant increases survival of uremic diabetic patient as compared to uremic diabetic patients on dialysis or with kidney transplantation alone. PMID:26154551

  3. Intraparenchymal Striatal Transplants Required for Maintenance of Behavioral Recovery in an Animal Model of Huntington's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sanberg, Paul R.; Giòrdano, Magda; Henault, Mark A.; Nash, David R.; Ragozzino, Michael E.; Hagenmeyer-Houser, Starr H.

    1989-01-01

    Rats which receive injections of kainic acid (KA) into the striatum show many of the anatomical, biochemical and behavioral abnormalities seen in patients with Huntington's disease. Recently, it has been reported that fetal striatal transplants into the lesioned striatum could normalize the neurological and behavioral abnormalities produced by the KA lesion. The present study examined the issue of transplant integration in producing behavioral recovery. In one experiment, lesioned animals with transplants located within the lateral ventricle were compared against parenchymally transplanted rats. It was found that unless the ventricular transplant grew into the lesioned striatum there was no recovery. The second experiment demonstrated that electrolytic destruction of a successful fetal striatal transplant could reverse the transplant-induced behavioral recovery. These results suggest that the integrity of the transplant is important in maintaining behavioral recovery. A continuing functional interaction between the host brain and transplanted tissue may be a vital element in the success of the fetal striatal transplant. PMID:2535266

  4. B cells in transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Dijke, Esme I.; Platt, Jeffrey L.; Blair, Paul; Clatworthy, Menna R.; Patel, Jignesh K.; Kfoury, A.G.; Cascalho, Marilia

    2016-01-01

    B cell responses underlie the most vexing immunological barriers to organ transplantation. Much has been learned about the molecular mechanisms of B cell responses to antigen and new therapeutic agents that specifically target B cells or suppress their functions are available. Yet, despite recent advances, there remains an incomplete understanding about how B cell functions determine the fate of organ transplants and how, whether or when potent new therapeutics should optimally be used. This gap in understanding reflects in part the realization that besides producing antibodies, B cells can also regulate cellular immunity, contribute to the genesis of tolerance and induce accommodation. Whether non-specific depletion of B cells, their progeny or suppression of their functions would undermine these non-cognate functions and whether graft outcome would suffer as a result is unknown. These questions were discussed at a symposium on “B cells in transplantation” at the 2015 ISHLT annual meeting. Those discussions are summarized here and a new perspective is offered. PMID:26996930

  5. Inducible co-stimulator (ICOS) up-regulation on activated T-cells in chronic graft-vs.-host disease following dog-leukocyte-antigen-nonidentical hematopoietic cell transplantation: A potential therapeutic target

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Masahiko; Storb, Rainer; Loretz, Carol; Stone, Diane; Mielcarek, Marco; Sale, George E.; Rezvani, Andrew R.; Graves, Scott S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Inducible co-stimulator (ICOS), a member of the CD28 family of costimulatory molecules, is induced on CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells following their activation. ICOS functions as an essential immune regulator and ICOS blockade is a potential approach to immune modulation in allogeneic transplantation. Here, we describe the expression profile of ICOS in dogs and determine whether ICOS expression is up-regulated during chronic graft versus host disease (GVHD) and host versus graft (HVG) reactions in the canine hematopoietic cell transplantation model. Methods Monoclonal antibodies against cell surface-expressed ICOS were produced and tested in vitro for suppression of canine mixed leukocyte reactions (MLR). Expression of ICOS on CD3+ cells was evaluated by flow cytometry using peripheral blood, lymph nodes and splenocytes obtained from dogs undergoing GVH and HVG reactions. Results Canine ICOS was expressed in an inducible pattern on T-cells activated by Con A, anti-CD3 mAb in combination with anti-CD28 mAb, and alloantigen stimulation. Immunosuppressive effects of ICOS blockade were observed in MLR using peripheral blood mononuclear cells from dog-leukocyte-antigen-nonidentical dogs. Immunosuppressive effects of ICOS blockade were observed in MLR when anti-ICOS was combined with suboptimal concentrations of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4-Ig (CTLA4-Ig) or cyclosporine. ICOS expression was significantly up-regulated on T-cells in dogs undergoing graft rejection or chronic GVHD after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. Conclusion These studies suggest that ICOS plays a role in graft rejection and GVHD in an out-bred animal model, and ICOS blockade may be an approach to prevention and treatment of chronic GVHD. PMID:23694952

  6. Outcome after Desensitization in HLA or ABO-Incompatible Kidney Transplant Recipients: A Single Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Kauke, Teresa; Klimaschewski, Sandra; Schoenermarck, Ulf; Fischereder, Michael; Dick, Andrea; Guba, Markus; Stangl, Manfred; Werner, Jens; Meiser, Bruno; Habicht, Antje

    2016-01-01

    Background The shortage of deceased donors led to an increase of living donor kidney (LDK) transplantations performed in the presence of donor-specific antibodies (DSA) or ABO incompatibility (ABOi) using various desensitization protocols. Methods We herein analyzed 26 ABOi and 8 Luminex positive DSA patients who were successfully desensitized by anti-CD20, antigen-specific immunoadsorption and/or plasmapheresis to receive an LDK transplant. Twenty LDK recipients with non-donor-specific HLA-antibodies (low risk) and 32 without anti-HLA antibodies (no risk) served as control groups. Results 1-year graft survival rate and renal function was similar in all 4 groups (creatinine: 1.63 ± 0.5 vs 1.78 ± 0.6 vs 1.64 ± 0.5 vs 1.6 ± 0.3 mg/dl in ABOi, DSA, low risk and no risk group). The incidence of acute T-cell mediated rejections did not differ between the 4 groups (15% vs 12, 5% vs 15% vs 22% in ABOi, DSA, low risk and no risk), while antibody-mediated rejections were only found in the DSA (25%) and ABOi (7.5%) groups. Incidence of BK nephropathy (BKVN) was significantly more frequent after desensitization as compared to controls (5/34 vs 0/52, p = 0.03). Conclusion We demonstrate favorable short-term allograft outcome in LDK transplant recipients after desensitization. However, the desensitization was associated with an increased risk of BKVN. PMID:26730981

  7. Islet Cell Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    ... the body use glucose for energy. Islet cell transplantation transfers cells from an organ donor into the ... to make and release insulin. Researchers hope islet transplantation will help people with type 1 diabetes live ...

  8. Buyer beware transplantation.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Jeremy R; Delmonico, Francis L

    2016-05-01

    Poor long-term outcomes of commercial transplantation of transplant tourists reinforce the need to prevent this form of human trafficking. The development of an International Convention by the Council of Europe is highlighted and the implications for physicians of the criminalizing of organ trafficking are considered. The causes of poor outcomes from transplant tourism are considered, with the actions needed to provide both equity and sufficiency of access to transplantation as critical deterrent measures. PMID:27083275

  9. [Treatment of periodontitis associated with cyclosporin-induced severe gingival hyperplasia with regular mechanical plaque removal in a patient with renal transplantation (Case report)].

    PubMed

    Keglevich, Tibor; Windisch, Péter; Gera, István

    2002-02-01

    A clinical case of a middle-aged kidney transplanted woman is presented. The woman has been taking Cyclosporin-A for over 13 years and has had advanced periodontitis and severe gingival swellings and gingival inflammation. The kidney transplant patient was treated and followed up for approx. four years. The treatment protocol included very thorough mechanical scaling and root planing, oral hygienic instructions and the regular professional maintenance program resulted in complete remission of the gingival overgrowth and stabilization of the periodontal condition. The gingival and periodontal conditions showed a continuing improvement over the time despite of the continuous CSA administration.

  10. Transplantation of Heterospheroids of Islet Cells and Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Effective Angiogenesis and Antiapoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jung-Youn; Jeong, Jee-Heon; Han, Jin; Bhang, Suk Ho; Jeong, Gun-Jae; Haque, Muhammad R.; Al-Hilal, Taslim A.; Noh, Myungkyung

    2015-01-01

    Although islet transplantation has been suggested as an alternative therapy for type 1 diabetes, there are efficiency concerns that are attributed to poor engraftment of transplanted islets. Hypoxic condition and delayed vasculogenesis induce necrosis and apoptosis of the transplanted islets. To overcome these limitations in islet transplantation, heterospheroids (HSs), which consist of rat islet cells (ICs) and human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs), were transplanted to the kidney and liver. The HSs cultured under the hypoxic condition system exhibited a significant increase in antiapoptotic gene expression in ICs. hMSCs in the HSs secreted angiogenic and antiapoptotic proteins. With the HS system, ICs and hMSCs were successfully located in the same area of the liver after transplantation of HSs through the portal vein, whereas the transplantation of islets and the dissociated hMSCs did not result in localization of transplanted ICs and hMSCs in the same area. HS transplantation resulted in an increase in angiogenesis at the transplantation area and a decrease in the apoptosis of transplanted ICs after transplantation into the kidney subcapsule compared with transplantation of islet cell clusters (ICCs). Insulin production levels of ICs were higher in the HS transplantation group compared with the ICC transplantation group. The HS system may be a more efficient transplantation method than the conventional methods for the treatment of type 1 diabetes. PMID:25344077

  11. Organ Transplants in Kazakhstan.

    PubMed

    Baigenzhin, Abay; Doskaliyev, Zhaksylyk; Tuganbekova, Saltanat; Zharikov, Serik; Altynova, Sholpan; Gaipov, Abduzhappar

    2015-11-01

    The Republic of Kazakhstan is one of the fastest developing countries in the world and has a health care system that is unique in Central Asia. Its organ transplant services are also developing rapidly. We aimed to analyze and briefly report on the current status of organ transplant in the Republic of Kazakhstan. We analyzed organ transplant activities in that country for the period 2012 to 2014. All data were collected from the official database of the National Transplant Coordinating Center of the Republic of Kazakhstan. At the end of 2014, the number of transplant centers had increased to 10, three of which could perform multiorgan transplants; during the same period, the number of deceased-donor organ-donating hospitals increased up to 37. By 2013, the transplant activity rate for all centers had reached 9.22 per million population. During the previous 3 years (2012-2014), there was a 3-fold increase in the number of living donors and an 18-fold increase in the number of kidney transplants. Between 2012 and 2014, the number of living-donor liver transplants increased from 17 to 25, and the number of deceased-donor transplants increased from 3 to 7. During the last 3 years (2012-2014), the number of heart transplants increased to 7 cases. During the last 3 years (2012-2014), Kazakhstan achieved a significant improvement in the organization of its transplant services, and a noticeable upward trend in the system continues.

  12. Survival Benefit with Kidney Transplants from HLA-Incompatible Live Donors

    PubMed Central

    Orandi, B.J.; Luo, X.; Massie, A.B.; Garonzik-Wang, J.M.; Lonze, B.E.; Ahmed, R.; Van Arendonk, K.J.; Stegall, M.D.; Jordan, S.C.; Oberholzer, J.; Dunn, T.B.; Ratner, L.E.; Kapur, S.; Pelletier, R.P.; Roberts, J.P.; Melcher, M.L.; Singh, P.; Sudan, D.L.; Posner, M.P.; El-Amm, J.M.; Shapiro, R.; Cooper, M.; Lipkowitz, G.S.; Rees, M.A.; Marsh, C.L.; Sankari, B.R.; Gerber, D.A.; Nelson, P.W.; Wellen, J.; Bozorgzadeh, A.; Gaber, A.O.; Montgomery, R.A.; Segev, D.L.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND A report from a high-volume single center indicated a survival benefit of receiving a kidney transplant from an HLA-incompatible live donor as compared with remaining on the waiting list, whether or not a kidney from a deceased donor was received. The generalizability of that finding is unclear. METHODS In a 22-center study, we estimated the survival benefit for 1025 recipients of kidney transplants from HLA-incompatible live donors who were matched with controls who remained on the waiting list or received a transplant from a deceased donor (waiting-list-or-transplant control group) and controls who remained on the waiting list but did not receive a transplant (waiting-list-only control group). We analyzed the data with and without patients from the highest-volume center in the study. RESULTS Recipients of kidney transplants from incompatible live donors had a higher survival rate than either control group at 1 year (95.0%, vs. 94.0% for the waiting-list-or-transplant control group and 89.6% for the waiting-list-only control group), 3 years (91.7% vs. 83.6% and 72.7%, respectively), 5 years (86.0% vs. 74.4% and 59.2%), and 8 years (76.5% vs. 62.9% and 43.9%) (P<0.001 for all comparisons with the two control groups). The survival benefit was significant at 8 years across all levels of donor-specific antibody: 89.2% for recipients of kidney transplants from incompatible live donors who had a positive Luminex assay for anti-HLA antibody but a negative flow-cytometric cross-match versus 65.0% for the waiting-list-or-transplant control group and 47.1% for the waiting-list-only control group; 76.3% for recipients with a positive flow-cytometric cross-match but a negative cytotoxic cross-match versus 63.3% and 43.0% in the two control groups, respectively; and 71.0% for recipients with a positive cytotoxic cross-match versus 61.5% and 43.7%, respectively. The findings did not change when patients from the highest-volume center were excluded. CONCLUSIONS This

  13. Radiofrequency and microwave ablation in combination with transarterial chemoembolization induce equivalent histopathologic coagulation necrosis in hepatocellular carcinoma patients bridged to liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Ginsburg, Michael; Ahmed, Osman; Doshi, Taral; Hart, John; Te, Helen; Van Ha, Thuong Gustav

    2016-01-01

    Background Bridging therapy plays an increasingly important role in the management of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) awaiting liver transplantation (LT). Combination therapy with drug-eluting bead transarterial chemoembolization (DEB-TACE) and percutaneous thermal ablation, such as radiofrequency ablation (RFA) or microwave ablation (MWA), has shown success at prolonging survival and bridging patients to LT. However, few studies have evaluated the two combination therapy regimens head-to-head at a single institution, and fewer have compared histopathology. This retrospective study compares tumor coagulation on explanted livers in patients with HCC treated with DEB-TACE sequentially combined with RFA versus MWA. Methods From 2005 to 2015, 42 sequential patients underwent combination therapy prior to LT by Milan criteria, with 11 patients (11 tumors; mean, 2.9 cm; range, 1.8–4.3 cm) in the DEB-TACE/RFA cohort and 31 patients (40 tumors; mean, 2.4 cm; range, 1.1–5.4 cm) in the DEB-TACE/MWA cohort. The mean TACE procedures in the RFA and MWA cohorts were 1.3 (range, 1–2) and 1.3 (range, 1–3), respectively. The mean thermal ablations in the RFA and MWA cohorts were 1.2 (range, 1–2) and 1.3 (range, 1–3), respectively. Tumor coagulation was evaluated on explanted livers. Results Mean tumor coagulation in the RFA and MWA cohorts were 88.9% (range, 0–100%) and 90.5% (range, 30–100%), respectively (P=0.82). Rates of complete tumor coagulation in the RFA and MWA cohorts were 45% and 53%, respectively (P=0.74). No difference in tumor coagulation was found between the cohorts when separating tumors <3 cm (P=0.21) and >3 cm (P=0.09). Among all 51 tumors, the 36 in complete response (CR) on imaging at LT demonstrated mean tumor coagulation of 95.8%. No correlation was found between tumor coagulation and initial tumor size or time interval to LT. No tumor seeding was seen along the ablation tracts. Conclusions RFA and MWA in sequential combination

  14. Antibodies in Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Platt, Jeffrey L.

    2011-01-01

    Transplantation of cells, tissues, and organs from one individual to another can incite the production of antibodies specific for foreign antigens, especially major histocompatibility antigens, in the graft. Antibodies specific for a graft provide an index of immunity and a potential trigger for injury and rejection. However, the index of immunity can sometimes miss antibody-mediated rejection and besides causing injury the antibodies against a graft can also protect a graft from injury by blocking immune recognition, called enhancement, regulating activation of complement, and inducing changes in the graft that resist damage. Reviewed here are potential limitations in the use of antibodies as an index of immunity and the ways antibodies cause and/or prevent injury. PMID:20807473

  15. Post-transplant development of C1q-positive HLA antibodies and kidney graft survival.

    PubMed

    Piazza, Antonina; Poggi, Elvira; Ozzella, Giuseppina; Adorno, Domenico

    2013-01-01

    The development of de novo human leukocyte antigen (HLA) donor specific antibodies (DSA), detected by both cytotoxic or solid phase assays, was considered the major risk factor for allograft failure in kidney transplantation. However, it was shown that not all patients with persistent production of DSA suffered loss of their grafts. Modified Luminex-Single Antigen assays, able to identify C1q-fixing antibodies, represent a new strategy in assessing the clinical relevance of detected DSA. This study demonstrated that C1q-fixing capability of de novo DSA is a clinically relevant marker of worse outcome and inferior graft survival in kidney transplantation. In fact, our findings evidenced a very low graft survival only in the patients who developed DSA able to fix C1q during post-transplant course, while patients producing C1q-negative DSA had good graft survival, which was comparable to that found in our previous study for DSA-negative patients. Moreover, anti-HLA class II antibodies had a higher incidence than anti-HLA class I, and the ability to fix C1q was significantly more frequent among anti-DQ DSA than anti-DR DSA. Monitoring of de novo C1q-DSA production represents a useful, non-invasive tool for risk stratification and prediction of graft outcome in kidney transplantation.

  16. Diffuse parenchymal form of malakoplakia in renal transplant recipient: a case report.

    PubMed

    Keitel, Elizete; Pêgas, Karla Lais; do Nascimento Bittar, Antonio Eduardo; dos Santos, Auri Ferreira; da Cas Porto, Francisco; Cambruzzi, Eduardo

    2014-06-01

    Malakoplakia is an unusual chronic inflammatory disease related to prior urinary tract infection. It is characterized by the presence of macrophages with foamy cytoplasm exhibiting larger PAS positive inclusions that stain for calcium and iron. Malakoplakia affects renal allograft and is associated with severe morbidity. Herein, the authors report a new case of renal graft malakoplakia in a 23-year-old female patient. The patient received a living-related donor renal transplantation with a high immunological risk. Plasmapheresis and intravenous immunoglobulin (i.v. Ig) treatment, pre- and post-transplant, and induction with rabbit anti-thymocyte globulins were used due to presence of donor specific antibodies and positive B cross match by flow cytometry. The patient had an early urinary tract infection with a good outcome. On Day 36 post-transplant (PO), the patient returned to the clinic with fever, graft pain and acute renal dysfunction leading to hemodialysis. Escherichia coli (E. coli) was present in the blood and urine culture. At the time, the renal biopsy revealed numerous sheets of macrophages with foamy, eosinophilic cytoplasm showing several PAS positive granules and large inclusions that stained strongly with hematoxylin, calcium (von Kossa method) and iron (Prussian blue). The patient was diagnosed with malakoplakia related to a kidney transplant. Despite prolonged treatment with antibiotics, determined by a susceptibility test, the patient did not recover renal function and remained on dialysis. PMID:23195831

  17. Complement Interception Across Humoral Incompatibility in Solid Organ Transplantation: A Clinical Perspective.

    PubMed

    Biglarnia, Ali-Reza; Ekdahl, Kristina N; Nilsson, Bo

    2015-01-01

    The humoral barrier in transplant biology is the result of preformed donor-specific antibodies (DSAs), directed either against human leukocyte antigens (HLA) or non-HLA antigens such as blood group (ABO) molecules. The term "sensitization" applies to patients carrying these antibodies. Transplantation is widely accepted as a life-saving opportunity for patients with terminal end-organ disease. However, in sensitized patients, transplant outcome is hampered by antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) as a consequence of DSA exposure. Furthermore, sensitized patients have limited access to "matched" organs from the both living and deceased donor pool.Considering the crucial role of the complement system in the pathophysiology of AMR and the availability of complement intervention therapeutics, there is a growing interest in complement-targeting strategies. This review highlights the emerging importance of monitoring and modulation of the complement system in the context of enabling transplantation across humoral incompatibility in sensitized recipients with preformed anti-HLA or natural anti-ABO antibodies. It also discusses the significance of the complement system in the induction of accommodation and further emphasizes current and future perspectives of novel complement therapeutics.

  18. Optical Coherence Tomography in Kidney Transplantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, Peter M.; Wierwille, Jeremiah; Chen, Yu

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) is associated with both high mortality rates and an enormous economic burden [1]. The preferred treatment option for ESRD that can extend patients' lives and improve their quality of life is kidney transplantation. However, organ shortages continue to pose a major problem in kidney transplantation. Most kidneys for transplantation come from heart-beating cadavers. Although non-heart-beating cadavers represent a potentially large pool of donor kidneys, these kidneys are not often used due to the unknown extent of damage to the renal tubules (i.e., acute tubular necrosis or "ATN") induced by ischemia (i.e., lack of blood flow). Also, ischemic insult suffered by kidneys awaiting transplantation frequently causes ATN that leads to varying degrees of delayed graft function (DGF) after transplantation. Finally, ATN represents a significant risk for eventual graft and patient survival [2, 3] and can be difficult to discern from rejection. In present clinical practice, there is no reliable real-time test to determine the viability of donor kidneys and whether or not donor kidneys might exhibit ATN. Therefore, there is a critical need for an objective and reliable real-time test to predict ATN to use these organs safely and utilize the donor pool optimally. In this review, we provided preliminary data indicating that OCT can be used to predict the post-transplant function of kidneys used in transplantation.

  19. Faecal microbiota transplantation-A clinical view.

    PubMed

    Mattner, J; Schmidt, F; Siegmund, B

    2016-08-01

    Faecal microbiota transplantation has gained increasing attention over the last decade as various phenotypes could be transferred from a donor to a recipient in different animal models. Clinically, however, the sole indication with evidence from a randomized placebo controlled trial is refractory Clostridium difficile infection. Despite revealing successful clinical outcomes, questions concerning regulatory affairs, the identification of the best donor, the optimal mixture of the transplant as well as the preferred route of administration remain to be clarified even for this indication. Initiated by the idea that alterations in the composition of the intestinal microbiota are associated with intestinal inflammation in inflammatory bowel disease, several studies investigated whether faecal microbiota transplantation would be an equally suitable approach for these devastating disorders. Indeed, the available data indicate changes in the microbiota composition following faecal microbial transplantation depending on the degree of intestinal inflammation. Furthermore, first data even provide evidence that the transplantation of an "optimized" microbiota induces clinical remission in ulcerative colitis. However, despite these intriguing results it needs to be considered that not only "a cure of inflammation", but also risk factors and phenotypes including obesity can be transferred via faecal microbiota transplantation. Thus, a deeper understanding of the impact of a distinct microbiota composition is required before "designing" the optimal faecal microbiota transplant.

  20. Acute Antibody-Mediated Rejection in Presence of MICA-DSA and Successful Renal Re-Transplant with Negative-MICA Virtual Crossmatch.

    PubMed

    Ming, Yingzi; Hu, Juan; Luo, Qizhi; Ding, Xiang; Luo, Weiguang; Zhuang, Quan; Zou, Yizhou

    2015-01-01

    The presence of donor-specific alloantibodies (DSAs) against the MICA antigen results in high risk for antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) of a transplanted kidney, especially in patients receiving a re-transplant. We describe the incidence of acute C4d+ AMR in a patient who had received a first kidney transplant with a zero HLA antigen mismatch. Retrospective analysis of post-transplant T and B cell crossmatches were negative, but a high level of MICA alloantibody was detected in sera collected both before and after transplant. The DSA against the first allograft mismatched MICA*018 was in the recipient. Flow cytometry and cytotoxicity tests with five samples of freshly isolated human umbilical vein endothelial cells demonstrated the alloantibody nature of patient's MICA-DSA. Prior to the second transplant, a MICA virtual crossmatch and T and B cell crossmatches were used to identify a suitable donor. The patient received a second kidney transplant, and allograft was functioning well at one-year follow-up. Our study indicates that MICA virtual crossmatch is important in selection of a kidney donor if the recipient has been sensitized with MICA antigens.

  1. Intrahepatic transplantation of CD34+ cord blood stem cells into newborn and adult NOD/SCID mice induce differential organ engraftment.

    PubMed

    Wulf-Goldenberg, Annika; Keil, Marlen; Fichtner, Iduna; Eckert, Klaus

    2012-04-01

    In vivo studies concerning the function of human hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) are limited by relatively low levels of engraftment and the failure of the engrafted HSC preparations to differentiate into functional immune cells after systemic application. In the present paper we describe the effect of intrahepatically transplanted CD34(+) cells from cord blood into the liver of newborn or adult NOD/SCID mice on organ engraftment and differentiation. Analyzing the short and long term time dependency of human cell recruitment into mouse organs after cell transplantation in the liver of newborn and adult NOD/SCID mice by RT-PCR and FACS analysis, a significantly high engraftment was found after transplantation into liver of newborn NOD/SCID mice compared to adult mice, with the highest level of 35% human cells in bone marrow and 4.9% human cells in spleen at day 70. These human cells showed CD19 B-cell, CD34 and CD38 hematopoietic and CD33 myeloid cell differentiation, but lacked any T-cell differentiation. HSC transplantation into liver of adult NOD/SCID mice resulted in minor recruitment of human cells from mouse liver to other mouse organs. The results indicate the usefulness of the intrahepatic application route into the liver of newborn NOD/SCID mice for the investigation of hematopoietic differentiation potential of CD34(+) cord blood stem cell preparations.

  2. Towards a validation of a cellular biomarker suite in native and transplanted zebra mussels: a 2-year integrative field study of seasonal and pollution-induced variations.

    PubMed

    Guerlet, Edwige; Ledy, Karine; Meyer, Antoinette; Giambérini, Laure

    2007-03-30

    Two of the questions raised in the validation process of biomarkers are their relevance in the identification and discrimination of environmental perturbations, and the influence of seasonal factors on these biological endpoints. Determining the advantages and restrictions associated with the use of native or transplanted animals and comparing their responses is also needed. To obtain this information, a 2-year integrative field study was conducted in the vicinity of a nuclear power plant in northeastern France. A station was located in the reservoir receiving the cooling waters of the plant, and two other sites were studied 2 km upstream and 5 km downstream from the reservoir's discharge in the Moselle river. Elevated temperatures, copper contamination and a 1.4-fold-concentration factor of dissolved salts affected water quality of the reservoir. Native and transplanted zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) were collected monthly and their digestive glands were processed for histochemical determinations of the lysosomal and peroxisomal systems and of the lipofuscin and neutral lipid contents. The responses were quantified using automated image analysis and stereology. Apart from neutral lipid contents, there were no systematic seasonal patterns in mussel populations or from 1 year to another. Principal Component Analyses showed a general higher discrimination potential of biological responses in transplanted organisms compared to native ones. They also pointed out the relationships between the cellular and physiological markers and abiotic factors. The present multiple biomarker integrative approach in transplanted D. polymorpha brings promising elements in their validation process as relevant biomonitoring tools.

  3. MiR-152 May Silence Translation of CaMK II and Induce Spontaneous Immune Tolerance in Mouse Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jingcheng; Yan, Sheng; Zhou, Lin; Xie, Haiyang; Chen, Hui; Li, Hui; Zhang, Jinhua; Zhao, Jiacong; Zheng, Shusen

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous immune tolerance in mouse liver transplantation has always been a hotspot in transplantation-immune research. Recent studies revealed that regulatory T cells (Tregs), hepatic satellite cells and Kupffer cells play a potential role in spontaneous immune tolerance, however the precise mechanism of spontaneous immune tolerance is still undefined. By using Microarray Chips, we investigated different immune regulatory factors to decipher critical mechanisms of spontaneous tolerance after mouse liver transplantation. Allogeneic (C57BL/6-C3H) and syngeneic (C3H-C3H) liver transplantation were performed by 6-8 weeks old male C57BL/6 and C3H mice. Graft samples (N = 4 each group) were collected from 8 weeks post-operation mice. 11 differentially expressed miRNAs in allogeneic grafts (Allografts) vs. syngeneic grafts (Syngrafts) were identified using Agilent Mouse miRNA Chips. It was revealed that 185 genes were modified by the 11 miRNAs, furthermore, within the 185 target genes, 11 of them were tightly correlated with immune regulation after Gene Ontology (GO), Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) analysis and Genbank data cross-comparison. Verified by real-time PCR and western blot, our results indicated that mRNA expression levels of IL-6 and TAB2 were respectively down regulated following miR-142-3p and miR-155 augment. In addition, increased miR-152 just silenced mRNA of CaMK II and down-regulated translation of CaMK II in tolerated liver grafts, which may play a critical role in immune regulation and spontaneous tolerance induction of mouse liver transplantation. PMID:25133393

  4. [Transplantation and outcome quality].

    PubMed

    Bechstein, W O; Wullstein, C

    2002-06-01

    Organ transplants are procedures which require intensive personal and material resources. The results of organ transplants have continuously improved during recent decades. International data bases (registries) have documented the continuous evolution of organ transplantation. On the basis of the German Transplant Law guidelines for "Requirements regarding quality control for procedures related to organ procurement and transplantation" have been formulated by the German Medical Chamber. Thus, monitoring of outcome quality will become a requirement for all German transplant centers. In this paper, the guidelines for the different organ transplants (kidney, pancreas, liver, heart, lung) are discussed as well as quality control for living donor transplantation. Studies from the USA and Europe demonstrated volume-outcome relationships in organ transplantation. In addition, in kidney transplantation a centre-effect could be demonstrated which influences outcome more than the immunological match between donor and recipient. The introduction of required quality control may have far reaching consequences for the future structure of organ transplantation in Germany. PMID:12149941

  5. Advances in pancreas transplantation.

    PubMed

    Dholakia, Shamik; Oskrochi, Youssof; Easton, Graham; Papalois, Vassilios

    2016-04-01

    The potential to reverse diabetes has to be balanced against the morbidity of long-term immunosuppression associated with transplantation. For a patient with renal failure, the treatment of choice is often a simultaneous transplant of the pancreas and kidney or pancreas after kidney. For a patient with glycaemic instability, choices between a solid organ or islet transplant have to be weighed against benefits and risks of remaining on insulin. Results of simultaneous transplant of the pancreas and kidney transplantation are comparable to other solid-organ transplants, and there is evidence of improved quality of life and life expectancy. There is some evidence of benefit with respect to the progression of secondary diabetic complications in patients with functioning transplants for several years.

  6. Infection Prevention in Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Pergam, Steven A

    2016-01-01

    The number of patients undergoing hematopoietic cell and solid organ transplantation are increasing every year, as are the number of centers both transplanting and caring for these patients. Improvements in transplant procedures, immunosuppressive regimens, and prevention of transplant-associated complications have led to marked improvements in survival in both populations. Infections remain one of the most important sources of excess morbidity and mortality in transplant, and therefore, infection prevention strategies are a critical element for avoiding these complications in centers caring for high-risk patients. This manuscript aims to provide an update of recent data on prevention of major healthcare-associated infections unique to transplantation, reviews the emergence of antimicrobial resistant infections, and discusses updated strategies to both identify and prevent transmission of these pathogens in transplant recipients.

  7. Diagnosis of early pancreas graft failure via antibody-mediated rejection: single-center experience with 256 pancreas transplantations.

    PubMed

    de Kort, H; Mallat, M J K; van Kooten, C; de Heer, E; Brand-Schaaf, S H; van der Wal, A M; Roufosse, C; Roelen, D L; Bruijn, J A; Claas, F H; de Fijter, J W; Bajema, I M

    2014-04-01

    Early pancreas graft loss is usually attributed to technical failure while the possibility of antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) is generally overlooked. To investigate the role of AMR in early pancreas graft loss, we retrospectively assessed 256 patients with simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation (SPK) between 1985 and 2010 at our institute. We included 33 SPK patients who lost their pancreas graft <1 year after transplantation. AMR was diagnosed based on donor-specific antibodies, C4d and histology in 7 cases, 8 cases were suspicious for AMR and 18 pancreas graft losses were not due to AMR. Acute AMR occurred >1 month after transplantation in 6/7 cases, whereas all other causes typically led to loss <1 month after transplantation. Thrombotic lesions occurred equally among the 33 cases. In 12/18 concurrent kidney specimens, the diagnostic results paralleled those of the pancreas graft. All patients with acute AMR of the pancreas graft lost their renal grafts <1 year after transplantation. In the setting of a thrombotic event, histopathological analysis of early pancreas graft loss is advisable to rule out the possibility of AMR, particularly because a diagnosis of acute AMR has important consequences for renal graft outcomes.

  8. Upper-Extremity Transplantation Using a Cell-Based Protocol to Minimize Immunosuppression

    PubMed Central

    Schneeberger, Stefan; Gorantla, Vijay S.; Brandacher, Gerald; Zeevi, Adriana; Demetris, Anthony J.; Lunz, John G.; Metes, Diana M.; Donnenberg, Albert D.; Shores, Jaimie T.; Dimartini, Andrea F.; Kiss, Joseph E.; Imbriglia, Joseph E.; Azari, Kodi; Goitz, Robert J.; Manders, Ernest K.; Nguyen, Vu T.; Cooney, Damon S.; Wachtman, Galen S.; Keith, Jonathan D.; Fletcher, Derek R.; Macedo, Camila; Planinsic, Raymond; Losee, Joseph E.; Shapiro, Ron; Starzl, Thomas E.; Andrew Lee, W. P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To minimize maintenance immunosuppression in upper-extremity transplantation to favor the risk-benefit balance of this procedure. Background Despite favorable outcomes, broad clinical application of reconstructive transplantation is limited by the risks and side effects of multidrug immunosuppression. We present our experience with upper-extremity transplantation under a novel, donor bone marrow (BM) cell-based treatment protocol (“Pittsburgh protocol”). Methods Between March 2009 and September 2010, 5 patients received a bilateral hand (n = 2), a bilateral hand/forearm (n = 1), or a unilateral (n = 2) hand transplant. Patients were treated with alemtuzumab and methylprednisolone for induction, followed by tacrolimus monotherapy. On day 14, patients received an infusion of donor BM cells isolated from 9 vertebral bodies. Comprehensive follow-up included functional evaluation, imaging, and immunomonitoring. Results All patients are maintained on tacrolimus monotherapy with trough levels ranging between 4 and 12 ng/mL. Skin rejections were infrequent and reversible. Patients demonstrated sustained improvements in motor function and sensory return correlating with time after transplantation and level of amputation. Side effects included transient increase in serum creatinine, hyperglycemia managed with oral hypoglycemics, minor wound infection, and hyperuricemia but no infections. Immunomonitoring revealed transient moderate levels of donor-specific antibodies, adequate immunocompetence, and no peripheral blood chimerism. Imaging demonstrated patent vessels with only mild luminal narrowing/occlusion in 1 case. Protocol skin biopsies showed absent or minimal perivascular cellular infiltrates. Conclusions Our data suggest that this BM cell-based treatment protocol is safe, is well tolerated, and allows upper-extremity transplantation using low-dose tacrolimus monotherapy. PMID:23001085

  9. Clinical factors influencing phenotype of HCMV-specific CD8+ T cells and HCMV-induced interferon-gamma production after allogeneic stem cells transplantation.

    PubMed

    Gayoso, Inmaculada; Cantisán, Sara; Cerrato, Carolina; Sánchez-García, Joaquín; Martin, Carmen; Solana, Rafael; Torres-Gomez, Antonio; Torre-Cisneros, Julian

    2013-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection causes significant morbidity and mortality after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). In this work, we characterized the phenotype and interferon-gamma (INF-γ) production of HCMV-specific T cells using QuantiFERON-HCMV assay in 26 patients 6 months after HSCT. We analysed whether these two parameters were associated with clinical variables. Our results showed that the patients receiving stem cells from donors ≥40 years old were 12 times more likely to have HCMV-specific CD8+ T cells with "differentiated phenotype" (CD45RA+CCR7+ ≤6.7% and CD28+ ≤30%) than patients grafted from donors <40 years old (OR = 12; P = 0.014). In addition, a detectable IFN-γ production in response to HCMV peptides (cutoff 0.2 IU/mL IFN-γ; "reactive" QuantiFERON-HCMV test) was statistically associated with HCMV replication after transplantation (OR = 11; P = 0.026), recipients ≥40 versus <40 years old (OR = 11; P = 0.026), and the use of peripheral blood versus bone marrow as stem cell source (OR = 17.5; P = 0.024). In conclusion, donor age is the only factor significantly associated with the presence of the "differentiated phenotype" in HCMV-specific CD8+ T cells, whereas HCMV replication after transplantation, recipient age, and stem cell source are the factors associated with the production of IFN-γ in response to HCMV epitopes.

  10. Transplantation psychoneuroimmunology: building hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Klapheke, M M

    2000-06-01

    The research findings of psychoneuroimmunology have not yet been fully applied to the field of transplantation psychiatry. Though much study has been devoted to the impact of psychiatric disease on the immunosuppressed state and disease progression in HIV-related illness, little has yet been written on the immunology implications of psychiatric disturbances in the immunosuppressed post-transplant patient. Utilizing Medline literature searches to review relevant research data in psychoneuroimmunology and transplantation immunology, the author formulates and examines four transplantation psychoneuroimmunology hypotheses involving the potential impact of depression on post-transplant organ rejection, cancer, coronary artery disease, and infections. The author concludes that though major questions remain, it appears reasonable to include the impact of depression, and possibly other psychological states, among factors that may affect the net state of immunosuppression in transplant patients.

  11. Lung transplantation at Duke

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Alice L.; Hartwig, Matthew G.

    2016-01-01

    Lung transplantation represents the gold-standard therapy for patients with end-stage lung disease. Utilization of this therapy continues to rise. The Lung Transplant Program at Duke University Medical Center was established in 1992, and since that time has grown to one of the highest volume centers in the world. The program to date has performed over 1,600 lung transplants. This report represents an up-to-date review of the practice and management strategies employed for safe and effective lung transplantation at our center. Specific attention is paid to the evaluation of candidacy for lung transplantation, donor selection, surgical approach, and postoperative management. These evidence-based strategies form the foundation of the clinical transplantation program at Duke. PMID:27076968

  12. Cuba's kidney transplantation program.

    PubMed

    Mármol, Alexander; Pérez, Alexis; Pérez de Prado, Juan C; Fernández-Vega, Silvia; Gutiérrez, Francisco; Arce, Sergio

    2010-10-01

    The first kidney transplant in Cuba was performed on 24 February 1970, using a cadaveric donor. In 1979, living donor kidney transplantation began between first-degree relatives. A total of 2775 patients are enrolled in renal replacement therapy in 47 hospitals across the country, 1440 of whom are awaiting kidney transplantation. Organs for the kidney program are procured in 63 accredited hospitals equipped for multidisciplinary management of brain death. Accordingly, over 90% of transplanted kidneys are from cadaveric donors. Identification of potential recipients is carried out through a national, computerized program that affords all patients the same opportunity regardless of distance from a transplant center, and selection of the most suitable candidate is based primarily on HLA compatibility. KEYWORDS Chronic renal failure, kidney transplantation.

  13. Future of transplantation medicine.

    PubMed

    Rowiński, Wojciech

    2007-01-01

    Organ transplantation has become very successful method of treatment of end stage organ disease. However the waiting lists of patients aiming such treatment are exponentially growing due to insufficient organ supply. Prognosis of the future for transplantation medicine is truly difficult. Prospects from past years, that "soon induction of tolerance will become possible"(1975), wide xenogenic transplant utilization (in 2000), fetal brain cell transplantation to treat some neurologic disease and transplantation of isolated cells instead of whole organs (1998) proved wrong. The research in the nearest future will be focused on tolerance induction, inhibition of alloreaction in blood-group discordant transplants (in immunized patients) and xenografts. In parallel, studies on hybrid and totally artificial, implantable devices (artificial pancreas and liver) will be carried on. 21st century will belong to regeneration medicine, with therapeutic applications of stem cells.

  14. Monitoring Pharmacologically Induced Immunosuppression by Immune Repertoire Sequencing to Detect Acute Allograft Rejection in Heart Transplant Patients: A Proof-of-Concept Diagnostic Accuracy Study

    PubMed Central

    Valantine, Hannah A.; Penland, Lolita; Luikart, Helen; Strehl, Calvin; Cohen, Garrett; Khush, Kiran K.; Quake, Stephen R.

    2015-01-01

    Background It remains difficult to predict and to measure the efficacy of pharmacological immunosuppression. We hypothesized that measuring the B-cell repertoire would enable assessment of the overall level of immunosuppression after heart transplantation. Methods and Findings In this proof-of-concept study, we implemented a molecular-barcode-based immune repertoire sequencing assay that sensitively and accurately measures the isotype and clonal composition of the circulating B cell repertoire. We used this assay to measure the temporal response of the B cell repertoire to immunosuppression after heart transplantation. We selected a subset of 12 participants from a larger prospective cohort study (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01985412) that is ongoing at Stanford Medical Center and for which enrollment started in March 2010. This subset of 12 participants was selected to represent post-heart-transplant events, with and without acute rejection (six participants with moderate-to-severe rejection and six without). We analyzed 130 samples from these patients, with an average follow-up period of 15 mo. Immune repertoire sequencing enables the measurement of a patient’s net state of immunosuppression (correlation with tacrolimus level, r = −0.867, 95% CI −0.968 to −0.523, p = 0.0014), as well as the diagnosis of acute allograft rejection, which is preceded by increased immune activity with a sensitivity of 71.4% (95% CI 30.3% to 94.9%) and a specificity of 82.0% (95% CI 72.1% to 89.1%) (cell-free donor-derived DNA as noninvasive gold standard). To illustrate the potential of immune repertoire sequencing to monitor atypical post-transplant trajectories, we analyzed two more patients, one with chronic infections and one with amyloidosis. A larger, prospective study will be needed to validate the power of immune repertoire sequencing to predict rejection events, as this proof-of-concept study is limited to a small number of patients who were selected based on several

  15. Treatment of Parkinson's disease using cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lindvall, Olle

    2015-01-01

    The clinical trials with intrastriatal transplantation of human fetal mesencephalic tissue, rich in dopaminergic neurons, in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients show that cell replacement can work and in some cases induce major, long-lasting improvement. However, owing to poor tissue availability, this approach can only be applied in very few patients, and standardization is difficult, leading to wide variation in functional outcome. Stem cells and reprogrammed cells could potentially be used to produce dopaminergic neurons for transplantation. Importantly, dopaminergic neurons of the correct substantia nigra phenotype can now be generated from human embryonic stem cells in large numbers and standardized preparations, and will soon be ready for application in patients. Also, human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived dopaminergic neurons are being considered for clinical translation. Available data justify moving forward in a responsible way with these dopaminergic neurons, which should be tested, using optimal patient selection, cell preparation and transplantation procedures, in controlled clinical studies. PMID:26416681

  16. Immunological aspects of liver cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Oldhafer, Felix; Bock, Michael; Falk, Christine S; Vondran, Florian W R

    2016-01-01

    Within the field of regenerative medicine, the liver is of major interest for adoption of regenerative strategies due to its well-known and unique regenerative capacity. Whereas therapeutic strategies such as liver resection and orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) can be considered standards of care for the treatment of a variety of liver diseases, the concept of liver cell transplantation (LCTx) still awaits clinical breakthrough. Success of LCTx is hampered by insufficient engraftment/long-term acceptance of cellular allografts mainly due to rejection of transplanted cells. This is in contrast to the results achieved for OLT where long-term graft survival is observed on a regular basis and, hence, the liver has been deemed an immune-privileged organ. Immune responses induced by isolated hepatocytes apparently differ considerably from those observed following transplantation of solid organs and, thus, LCTx requires refined immunological strategies to improve its clinical outcome. In addition, clinical usage of LCTx but also related basic research efforts are hindered by the limited availability of high quality liver cells, strongly emphasizing the need for alternative cell sources. This review focuses on the various immunological aspects of LCTx summarizing data available not only for hepatocyte transplantation but also for transplantation of non-parenchymal liver cells and liver stem cells. PMID:27011904

  17. Biomarkers for renal transplantation: where are we?

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Fangmin; Dai, Qiaoding; Gong, Weihua

    2013-01-01

    Although surgical techniques, post-transplant care medicine, and immunosuppressants have been greatly improved, permanent acceptance of renal allograft remains a clinical challenge owing to the appearance of various influencing factors. To predict graft dysfunction, development of noninvasive biomarkers is becoming a highlighted research topic in the field of renal transplantation, which provides a possibility for physicians to give preemptive rescue treatment. From the viewpoint of diagnostic techniques, repetitive sampling is prerequisite to identify applicable biomarkers in the clinic. Early biomarkers can be used to dynamically monitor renal graft status and accurately predict transplant outcome independent of various confounders. This review highlights recent studies on the predictive value of biomarkers and methods to quantify biomarkers for monitoring kidney transplant. It is important to analyze and compare different biomarkers for living, and nonliving donors. Analysis of identified clinically relevant biomarkers will advance our understanding of distinct molecular and cellular mechanisms of transplantation and provide insight into developing novel potential approaches to induce transplant tolerance. PMID:24124388

  18. Intestinal transplantation: a review.

    PubMed

    Desai, Chirag Sureshchandra; Khan, Khalid Mahmood; Girlanda, Raffaele; Fishbein, Thomas M

    2012-09-01

    Parenteral nutrition is a life-saving therapy for patients with intestinal failure. Intestinal transplantation is now recognized as a treatment for patients who develop complications of parenteral nutrition and in whom attempts at intestinal rehabilitation have failed. Patients with parenteral nutrition related liver disease will require a liver graft typically part of a multivisceral transplant. Isolated intestinal transplants are more commonly performed in adults while multivisceral transplants are most commonly performed in infants. Isolated intestinal transplants have the best short-term outcome, with over 80 % survival at 1 year. Patients requiring multivisceral transplants have a high rate of attrition with a 1 year survival less than 70 %. Prognostic factors for a poor outcome include patient hospitalization at the time of transplant and donor age greater than 40 years while systemic sepsis and acute rejection are the major determinant of early postoperative outcome. For patients surviving the first year the outcome of transplantation of the liver in addition to intestine affords some survival advantage though long-term outcome does not yet match other abdominal organs. Outcomes for intestinal retransplantation are poor as a result of immunology and patient debility. Overall intestinal transplantation continues to develop and is a clear indication with cost and quality of life advantages in patients with intestinal failure that do not remain stable on parenteral nutrition.

  19. [Infertility and kidney transplantation].

    PubMed

    Atallah, David; Salameh, Charbel; El Kassis, Nadine; Safi, Joelle; Lutfallah, Fouad; Bejjani, Lina; Ghaname, Wadih; Moukarzel, Maroun

    2015-01-01

    Renal failure impairs the endocrine system, especially in women, due to hyperprolactinemia, altering fertility, ovulatory cycles, libido and growth in adolescents. Renal transplantation is considered the best solution to the problems of renal failure and and of dialysis, as evidenced by comparing the rate of hyperprolactinemia (100% in chronic renal failure, 60% in patients on dialysis and 35% in post-transplantation). Kidney transplant is less efficient for restoring perfect function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis due in part to the immunosuppressant regimens prescribed. When these drugs are properly managed, transplantation will restore near normal sexual function.

  20. Split liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Yersiz, H; Cameron, A M; Carmody, I; Zimmerman, M A; Kelly, B S; Ghobrial, R M; Farmer, D G; Busuttil, R W

    2006-03-01

    Seventy-five thousand Americans develop organ failure each year. Fifteen percent of those on the list for transplantation die while waiting. Several possible mechanisms to expand the organ pool are being pursued including the use of extended criteria donors, living donation, and split deceased donor transplants. Cadaveric organ splitting results from improved understanding of the surgical anatomy of the liver derived from Couinaud. Early efforts focused on reduced-liver transplantation (RLT) reported by both Bismuth and Broelsch in the mid-1980s. These techniques were soon modified to create both a left lateral segment graft appropriate for a pediatric recipient and a right trisegment for an appropriately sized adult. Techniques of split liver transplantation (SLT) were also modified to create living donor liver transplantation. Pichlmayr and Bismuth reported successful split liver transplantation in 1989 and Emond reported a larger series of nine split procedures in 1990. Broelsch and Busuttil described a technical modification in which the split was performed in situ at the donor institution with surgical division completed in the heart beating cadaveric donor. In situ splitting reduces cold ischemia, simplifies identification of biliary and vascular structures, and reduces reperfusion hemorrhage. However, in situ splits require specialized skills, prolonged operating room time, and increased logistical coordination at the donor institution. At UCLA over 120 in situ splits have been performed and this technique is the default when an optimal donor is available. Split liver transplantation now accounts for 10% of adult transplantations at UCLA and 40% of pediatric transplantations.

  1. Pancreas preservation for pancreas and islet transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Iwanaga, Yasuhiro; Sutherland, David E.R.; Harmon, James V.; Papas, Klearchos K.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review To summarize advances and limitations in pancreas procurement and preservation for pancreas and islet transplantation, and review advances in islet protection and preservation. Recent findings Pancreases procured after cardiac death, with in-situ regional organ cooling, have been successfully used for islet transplantation. Colloid-free Celsior and histidine-tryptophan-ketoglutarate preservation solutions are comparable to University of Wisconsin solution when used for cold storage before pancreas transplantation. Colloid-free preservation solutions are inferior to University of Wisconsin solution for pancreas preservation prior to islet isolation and transplantation. Clinical reports on pancreas and islet transplants suggest that the two-layer method may not offer significant benefits over cold storage with the University of Wisconsin solution: improved oxygenation may depend on the graft size; benefits in experimental models may not translate to human organs. Improvements in islet yield and quality occurred from pancreases treated with inhibitors of stress-induced apoptosis during procurement, storage, isolation or culture. Pancreas perfusion may be desirable before islet isolation and transplantation and may improve islet yields and quality. Methods for real-time, noninvasive assessment of pancreas quality during preservation have been implemented and objective islet potency assays have been developed and validated. These innovations should contribute to objective evaluation and establishment of improved pancreas preservation and islet isolation strategies. Summary Cold storage may be adequate for preservation before pancreas transplants, but insufficient when pancreases are processed for islets or when expanded donors are used. Supplementation of cold storage solutions with cytoprotective agents and perfusion may improve pancreas and islet transplant outcomes. PMID:18685343

  2. Bone marrow transplant – children - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Transplant - bone marrow - children - discharge; Stem cell transplant - children - discharge; Hematopoietic stem cell transplant -children - discharge; Reduced intensity, non-myeloablative transplant - children - discharge; Mini transplant - children - discharge; Allogenic bone ...

  3. Clinical Factors Influencing Phenotype of HCMV-Specific CD8+ T Cells and HCMV-Induced Interferon-Gamma Production after Allogeneic Stem Cells Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Cantisán, Sara; Cerrato, Carolina; Sánchez-García, Joaquín; Martin, Carmen; Solana, Rafael; Torres-Gomez, Antonio; Torre-Cisneros, Julian

    2013-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection causes significant morbidity and mortality after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). In this work, we characterized the phenotype and interferon-gamma (INF-γ) production of HCMV-specific T cells using QuantiFERON-HCMV assay in 26 patients 6 months after HSCT. We analysed whether these two parameters were associated with clinical variables. Our results showed that the patients receiving stem cells from donors ≥40 years old were 12 times more likely to have HCMV-specific CD8+ T cells with “differentiated phenotype” (CD45RA+CCR7+ ≤6.7% and CD28+ ≤30%) than patients grafted from donors <40 years old (OR = 12; P = 0.014). In addition, a detectable IFN-γ production in response to HCMV peptides (cutoff 0.2 IU/mL IFN-γ; “reactive” QuantiFERON-HCMV test) was statistically associated with HCMV replication after transplantation (OR = 11; P = 0.026), recipients ≥40 versus <40 years old (OR = 11; P = 0.026), and the use of peripheral blood versus bone marrow as stem cell source (OR = 17.5; P = 0.024). In conclusion, donor age is the only factor significantly associated with the presence of the “differentiated phenotype” in HCMV-specific CD8+ T cells, whereas HCMV replication after transplantation, recipient age, and stem cell source are the factors associated with the production of IFN-γ in response to HCMV epitopes. PMID:23424600

  4. Late acute antibody mediated rejection after nine years of renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Halim, Medhat Abdel; Al-Otaibi, Torki; Al-Waheeb, Salah; Tawab, Khaled Abdel; El Kholy, Osama; Nair, Prasad; Said, Tarek; Narayanan Nampoory, M R

    2010-11-01

    Acute antibody mediated rejection (AMR) is rarely reported as a long-term com-plication of renal transplantation, and it can present on top of another chronic pathology affecting the graft. A 45-year-old gentleman with chronic kidney disease due to unknown etiology received renal transplantation from his sister with 4 HLA mismatches. He received antithymocte globulin induction therapy and was maintained on steroids, azathioprine (AZA) and cyclosporine A (CsA). Up to eight years post-transplantation he was clinically and biochemically stable. He lost follow-up for about one year, and then presented with nephritic nephrotic syndrome and rise of serum creatinine (SCr.) to 210 μmol/L. Graft biopsy revealed picture suggestive of acute AMR on top of de novo membranoprolipherative glomerulonephritis (MPGN) with focal crescent formation, diffuse immune complex deposition and peritubular capillaries C4d positivity. Anti-HLA donor specific antibodies were highly positive for B and T cells class I and class II. The patient was treated with intravenous immunoglobulin, plasma exchange and anti-CD20 (rituximab). AZA was changed to mycophenolate mofetil and CsA to tacrolimus. He had partial response, but SCr. continued at 220 μmol/L.

  5. Donor and host photoreceptors engage in material transfer following transplantation of post-mitotic photoreceptor precursors

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, R. A.; Gonzalez-Cordero, A.; West, E. L.; Ribeiro, J. R.; Aghaizu, N.; Goh, D.; Sampson, R. D.; Georgiadis, A.; Waldron, P. V.; Duran, Y.; Naeem, A.; Kloc, M.; Cristante, E.; Kruczek, K.; Warre-Cornish, K.; Sowden, J. C.; Smith, A. J.; Ali, R. R.

    2016-01-01

    Photoreceptor replacement by transplantation is proposed as a treatment for blindness. Transplantation of healthy photoreceptor precursor cells into diseased murine eyes leads to the presence of functional photoreceptors within host retinae that express an array of donor-specific proteins. The resulting improvement in visual function was understood to be due to donor cells integrating within host retinae. Here, however, we show that while integration occurs the majority of donor-reporter-labelled cells in the host arises as a result of material transfer between donor and host photoreceptors. Material transfer does not involve permanent donor–host nuclear or cell–cell fusion, or the uptake of free protein or nucleic acid from the extracellular environment. Instead, RNA and/or protein are exchanged between donor and host cells in vivo. These data require a re-evaluation of the mechanisms underlying rescue by photoreceptor transplantation and raise the possibility of material transfer as a strategy for the treatment of retinal disorders. PMID:27701378

  6. Transplantation activities in Iran.

    PubMed

    Broumand, Behrooz

    2005-06-01

    Iran is a tropical country with a land area of 1,648,000 square kilometers and a population of 68,100,000. Iran has a recorded history that dates back 2553 years. Its earliest medical school was Pasargad. Jondi Chapour University was founded 1753 years ago during the Sassanid dynasty as a center for higher education in medicine, philosophy, and pharmacology. Indeed, the idea of xenotransplantation dates back to days of Achaemenidae (Achaemenian dynasty), as evidenced by engravings of many mythologic chimeras still present in Persepolis. Avicenna (980-1037 AD), the great Iranian physician, performed the first nerve repair. Transplantation progress in Iran follows roughly the same pattern as that of the rest of the world, with some 10-20 years' delay. Modern organ transplantation dates back to 1935, when the first cornea transplant was performed at Farabi Hospital in Tehran, Iran. The first living-related kidney transplantation performed at Shiraz University Hospital dates back to 1968. The first bone marrow transplant was performed at Dr. Shariaati's Hospital in Tehran. The first heart transplant was performed 1993 in Tabriz, Iran. The first liver transplant was performed in 1993 in Shiraz. The first lung transplant was performed in 2001, and the first heart and lung transplants were performed in 2002, both at Tehran. In late 1985, the renal transplantation program was officially started in a major university hospital in Tehran and was poised to carry out 2 to 4 transplantations each week. Soon, another large center initiated a similar program. Both of these centers accepted surgical, medical, and nursing teams from other academic medical centers for training in kidney transplantation. Since 2002, Iran has grown to include 23 active renal, 68 cornea, 2 liver, 4 heart, 2 lung, and 2 bone marrow transplantation centers in different cities. In June 2000, the Organ Transplantation Brain Death Act was approved by the Parliament, followed by the establishment of the

  7. Hepatitis C: liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Metts, Julius; Carmichael, Lesley; Kokor, Winfred; Scharffenberg, Robert

    2014-12-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma account for approximately 40% of the 6,000 adult liver transplantations performed each year in the United States. Survival rates are 76% to 83% at 2 years and 69% to 72% at 5 years. If eligible for surgery and in the absence of contraindications, any patient with HCV infection who develops decompensated liver disease or hepatocellular carcinoma is a candidate for liver transplantation. Most transplantation programs require that a patient with a history of alcohol or drug abuse be abstinent for at least 6 months and active in a substance abuse rehabilitation program. Prioritization for transplantation is based primarily on a patient's model for end-stage liver disease score, though other factors are considered. Complications after liver transplantation include recurrence of HCV infection, rejection of the transplanted liver, and an increased rate of infection because of immunosuppression. Various drugs are used to prevent infection and organ rejection. Liver transplant recipients also develop diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, renal dysfunction, osteopenia, and cancers at high rates, likely because of the effects of immunosuppressive drugs, particularly steroids and calcineurin inhibitors. The family physician's role in caring for liver transplant recipients often involves detection and management of these conditions. PMID:25478647

  8. Organ transplantation and replacement

    SciTech Connect

    Cerilli, G.J.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 49 chapters. Some of the titles are: Molecular, Genetic, and Clinical Aspects of the HLA System; The Normal Immune Response; Significance of the ABO Antigen System; The Role of Dialysis in the Management of End-Stage Renal Disease; Access for Dialysis; Patient Selection for Renal Transplantation; The Living Donor in Kidney Transplantation; and Kidney Preservation by Cold Storage.

  9. Islet cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, P; Huang, G C; Amiel, S A; Heaton, N D

    2007-04-01

    People with type 1 diabetes have normal exocrine pancreatic function, making islet cell rather than whole organ transplantation an attractive option. Achieving insulin independence in type 1 diabetes was the perceived goal of islet cell transplantation. The success of the Edmonton group in achieving this in a selected group of type 1 patients has led to renewed optimism that this treatment could eventually replace whole organ pancreas transplantation. However the long-term results of this treatment indicate that insulin independence is lost with time in a significant proportion of patients, although they may retain glycaemic stability. In this context, the indications for islet cell transplantation, which have evolved over the last 5 years, indicate that the patients who benefit most are those who experience severe hypoglycaemic reactions despite optimal insulin therapy. This review will summarise the history of islet cell transplantation, islet isolation techniques, the transplant procedure, immunosuppressive therapy, indications for islet cell transplantation, current clinical trials, the early UK islet cell transplant experience using the Edmonton protocol, and some of the challenges that lie ahead. PMID:17403947

  10. Vasopressin release during orthostatic hypotension after cardiac transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lord, S W; Brady, S; Baylis, P H; Dark, J H; Kenny, R A; McComb, J M

    1996-12-01

    At the time of cardiac transplantation all nerves from the donor ventricles are cut. These nerves may regrow, but there is no method of measuring any regrowth. Arginine vasopressin (AVP) release was studied during hypotension induced by head-up tilt and lower body negative pressure (LBNP) in transplant recipients and in normal controls. Subjects were tilted to 60 degrees for up to 60 min or until symptomatic. Lower body negative pressure (40 mmHg) was applied for 10 min after 30 min rest. Seven of 17 transplant recipients and 11 of 12 controls became symptomatic during tilt testing, and 9 of 12 controls and 9 of 17 transplant recipients became symptomatic after 10 min of LBNP. Symptoms during tilt did not predict symptoms during LBNP. Resting AVP levels were similar but osmolality was greater in transplant recipients. Resting haematocrit was reduced, and atrial natriuretic peptide increased in transplant recipients, suggesting increased plasma volume. In symptomatic subjects, changes in humoral concentrations were similar when compared between transplant recipients and normals, except that the rise in AVP at the time of symptoms was reduced in transplant recipients, with a comparable drop in blood pressure consistent with persistent cardiac afferent denervation in a subset of transplant recipients.

  11. Increasing access to kidney transplantation for sensitized recipient through three-way kidney paired donation with desensitization: The first Indian report

    PubMed Central

    Kute, Vivek B; Patel, Himanshu V; Shah, Pankaj R; Modi, Pranjal R; Shah, Veena R; Rizvi, Sayyed J; Pal, Bipin C; Modi, Manisha P; Shah, Priya S; Varyani, Umesh T; Wakhare, Pavan S; Shinde, Saiprasad G; Ghodela, Viajay A; Patel, Minaxi H; Trivedi, Varsha B; Trivedi, Hargovind L

    2016-01-01

    The combination of kidney paired donation (KPD) with desensitization represents a promising method of increasing the rate of living donor kidney transplantation (LDKT) in immunologically challenging patients. Patients who are difficult to match and desensitize due to strong donor specific antibody are may be transplanted by a combination of desensitization and KPD protocol with more immunologically favorable donor. We present our experience of combination of desensitization protocol with three-way KPD which contributed to successful LDKT in highly sensitized end stage renal disease patient. All recipients were discharged with normal and stable allograft function at 24 mo follow up. We believe that this is first report from India where three-way KPD exchange was performed with the combination of KPD and desensitization. The combination of desensitization protocol with KPD improves access and outcomes of LDKT. PMID:27803919

  12. Heart transplantation: review

    PubMed Central

    Mangini, Sandrigo; Alves, Bárbara Rubim; Silvestre, Odílson Marcos; Pires, Philippe Vieira; Pires, Lucas José Tachotti; Curiati, Milena Novaes Cardoso; Bacal, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Heart transplantation is currently the definitive gold standard surgical approach in the treatment of refractory heart failure. However, the shortage of donors limits the achievement of a greater number of heart transplants, in which the use of mechanical circulatory support devices is increasing. With well-established indications and contraindications, as well as diagnosis and treatment of rejection through defined protocols of immunosuppression, the outcomes of heart transplantation are very favorable. Among early complications that can impact survival are primary graft failure, right ventricular dysfunction, rejection, and infections, whereas late complications include cardiac allograft vasculopathy and neoplasms. Despite the difficulties for heart transplantation, in particular, the shortage of donors and high mortality while on the waiting list, in Brazil, there is a great potential for both increasing effective donors and using circulatory assist devices, which can positively impact the number and outcomes of heart transplants. PMID:26154552

  13. A novel field transplantation technique reveals intra-specific metal-induced oxidative responses in strains of Ectocarpus siliculosus with different pollution histories.

    PubMed

    Sáez, Claudio A; González, Alberto; Contreras, Rodrigo A; Moody, A John; Moenne, Alejandra; Brown, Murray T

    2015-04-01

    A novel field transplantation technique, in which seaweed material is incorporated into dialysis tubing, was used to investigate intra-specific responses to metals in the model brown alga Ectocarpus siliculosus. Metal accumulation in the two strains was similar, with higher concentrations in material deployed to the metal-contaminated site (Ventanas, Chile) than the pristine site (Quintay, Chile). However, the oxidative responses differed. At Ventanas, strain Es147 (from low-polluted site) underwent oxidative damage whereas Es524 (from highly polluted site) was not affected. Concentrations of reduced ascorbate (ASC) and reduced glutathione (GSH) were significantly higher in Es524. Activities of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), catalase (CAT), and glutathione reductase (GR) all increased in Es524, whereas only SOD increased in Es147. For the first time, employing a field transplantation technique, we provide unambiguous evidence of inter-population variation of metal-tolerance in brown algae and establish that antioxidant defences are, in part, responsible.

  14. Bioethics of Organ Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Caplan, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    As the ability to transplant organs and tissues has grown, the demand for these procedures has increased as well—to the point at which it far exceeds the available supply creating the core ethical challenge for transplantation—rationing. The gap between supply and demand, although large, is worse than it appears to be. There are two key steps to gaining access to a transplant. First, one must gain access to a transplant center. Then, those waiting need to be selected for a transplant. Many potential recipients do not get admitted to a program. They are deemed too old, not of the right nationality, not appropriate for transplant as a result of severe mental impairment, criminal history, drug abuse, or simply because they do not have access to a competent primary care physician who can refer them to a transplant program. There are also financial obstacles to access to transplant waiting lists in the United States and other nations. In many poor nations, those needing transplants simply die because there is no capacity or a very limited capacity to perform transplants. Although the demand for organs now exceeds the supply, resulting in rationing, the size of waiting lists would quickly expand were there to suddenly be an equally large expansion in the number of organs available for transplantation. Still, even with the reality of unavoidable rationing, saving more lives by increasing organ supply is a moral good. Current public policies for obtaining organs from cadavers are not adequate in that they do not produce the number of organs that public polls of persons in the United States indicate people are willing to donate. PMID:24478386

  15. Induction treatment of previously undiagnosed ANCA-associated vasculitis in a renal transplant patient with Rituximab

    PubMed Central

    Graham-Brown, M. P. M.; Aljayyousi, R.; Baines, R. J.; Burton, J. O.; Brunskill, N. J.; Furness, P.; Topham, P.

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 40-year-old female transplant patient with undiagnosed ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) and renal allograft dysfunction who achieved disease remission with restoration of transplant function following induction therapy with rituximab. There are currently no trial data looking at the use of rituximab for induction of remission of renal transplant patients with AAV. Although recurrence of AAV following renal transplantation is rare, such patients have invariably had multiple previous exposures to induction and maintenance immunosuppressive regimens, often limiting treatment options post-transplantation. In this case, rituximab was well tolerated with no side effects, and was successful in salvaging transplant function. Optimal treatment regimens for relapsed AAV in the transplant population are not known, and clinical trials are needed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of rituximab at inducing and maintaining disease remission in relapsed AAV following transplantation. PMID:27699052

  16. Induction treatment of previously undiagnosed ANCA-associated vasculitis in a renal transplant patient with Rituximab

    PubMed Central

    Graham-Brown, M. P. M.; Aljayyousi, R.; Baines, R. J.; Burton, J. O.; Brunskill, N. J.; Furness, P.; Topham, P.

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 40-year-old female transplant patient with undiagnosed ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) and renal allograft dysfunction who achieved disease remission with restoration of transplant function following induction therapy with rituximab. There are currently no trial data looking at the use of rituximab for induction of remission of renal transplant patients with AAV. Although recurrence of AAV following renal transplantation is rare, such patients have invariably had multiple previous exposures to induction and maintenance immunosuppressive regimens, often limiting treatment options post-transplantation. In this case, rituximab was well tolerated with no side effects, and was successful in salvaging transplant function. Optimal treatment regimens for relapsed AAV in the transplant population are not known, and clinical trials are needed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of rituximab at inducing and maintaining disease remission in relapsed AAV following transplantation.

  17. In utero hematopoietic cell transplantation for hemoglobinopathies

    PubMed Central

    Derderian, S. Christopher; Jeanty, Cerine; Walters, Mark C.; Vichinsky, Elliott; MacKenzie, Tippi C.

    2014-01-01

    In utero hematopoietic cell transplantation (IUHCTx) is a promising strategy to circumvent the challenges of postnatal hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation. The goal of IUHCTx is to introduce donor cells into a naïve host prior to immune maturation, thereby inducing donor–specific tolerance. Thus, this technique has the potential of avoiding host myeloablative conditioning with cytotoxic agents. Over the past two decades, several attempts at IUHCTx have been made to cure numerous underlying congenital anomalies with limited success. In this review, we will briefly review the history of IUHCTx and give a perspective on alpha thalassemia major, one target disease for its clinical application. PMID:25628564

  18. Biomarkers of transplantation tolerance: more hopeful than helpful?

    PubMed

    Cobbold, Stephen P; Adams, Elizabeth; Waldmann, Herman

    2011-01-01

    A major limitation to the translation of tolerogenic therapies to clinical transplantation is a lack of biomarkers that can be used as surrogate measures for predicting the successful induction of immune tolerance which would allow for the safe withdrawal of immunosuppression. We have used three different mouse models of donor specific tolerance to skin grafts together with quantitative RT-PCR to search for potential biomarkers of tolerance using criteria based on the presence or activity of regulatory T cells and antigen presenting cells (APCs) within grafts or lymphoid organs. We find that significant differences in gene expression between tolerated and rejecting grafts are observed primarily within the grafted skin and not systemically or in the draining lymph node. The pattern of gene expression within long-term surviving tolerated grafts appear very similar to syngeneic grafts, with both having low levels of T cell and APC infiltration and a bias toward relative over-expression of "regulatory-associated" genes, while allografts destined for rejection show an overall increase in both "regulatory" and "effector" cell associated transcripts. We also, however, find an increase in a large number of regulatory genes, of both innate and T cell origin, even after grafting syngeneic skin. Taken together, these findings suggest that there may be no tissue biomarkers uniquely able to predict donor antigen specific tolerance per se, but that patterns of gene expression within tolerated grafts may be similar to those found in self tissues recovering from an inflammatory insult. PMID:22566800

  19. Influenza vaccination and humoral alloimmunity in solid organ transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Vermeiren, Pieter; Aubert, Vincent; Sugamele, Rocco; Aubert, John-David; Venetz, Jean-Pierre; Meylan, Pascal; Pascual, Manuel; Manuel, Oriol

    2014-09-01

    Annual influenza vaccination is recommended in solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients. However, concerns have been raised about the impact of vaccination on antigraft alloimmunity. We evaluated the humoral alloimmune responses to influenza vaccination in a cohort of SOT recipients between October 2008 and December 2011. Anti-HLA antibodies were measured before and 4-8 weeks after influenza vaccination using a solid-phase assay. Overall, 169 SOT recipients were included (kidney = 136, lung = 26, liver = 3, and combined = 4). Five (2.9%) of 169 patients developed de novo anti-HLA antibodies after vaccination, including one patient who developed donor-specific antibodies (DSA) 8 months after vaccination. In patients with pre-existing anti-HLA antibodies, median MFI was not significantly different before and after vaccination (P = 0.73 for class I and P = 0.20 for class II anti-HLA antibodies) and no development of de novo DSA was observed. Five episodes of rejection (2.9%) were observed within 12 months after vaccination, and only one patient had de novo anti-HLA antibodies. The incidence of development of anti-HLA antibodies after influenza vaccination in our cohort of SOT recipients was very low. Our findings indicate that influenza vaccination is safe and does not trigger humoral alloimmune responses in SOT recipients.

  20. Small Bowel Transplant

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Objective The Medical Advisory Secretariat undertook a review of the evidence on the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of small bowel transplant in the treatment of intestinal failure. Small Bowel Transplantation Intestinal failure is the loss of absorptive capacity of the small intestine that results in an inability to meet the nutrient and fluid requirements of the body via the enteral route. Patients with intestinal failure usually receive nutrients intravenously, a procedure known as parenteral nutrition. However, long-term parenteral nutrition is associated with complications including liver failure and loss of venous access due to recurrent infections. Small bowel transplant is the transplantation of a cadaveric intestinal allograft for the purpose of restoring intestinal function in patients with irreversible intestinal failure. The transplant may involve the small intestine alone (isolated small bowel ISB), the small intestine and the liver (SB-L) when there is irreversible liver failure, or multiple organs including the small bowel (multivisceral MV or cluster). Although living related donor transplant is being investigated at a limited number of centres, cadaveric donors have been used in most small bowel transplants. The actual transplant procedure takes approximately 12-18 hours. After intestinal transplant, the patient is generally placed on prophylactic antibiotic medication and immunosuppressive regimen that, in the majority of cases, would include tacrolimus, corticosteroids and an induction agent. Close monitoring for infection and rejection are essential for early treatment. Medical Advisory Secretariat Review The Medical Advisory Secretariat undertook a review of 35 reports from 9 case series and 1 international registry. Sample size of the individual studies ranged from 9 to 155. As of May 2001, 651 patients had received small bowel transplant procedures worldwide. According to information from the Canadian Organ Replacement

  1. Pediatric heart transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Stiasny, Brian; Dave, Hitendu; Cavigelli-Brunner, Anna; Balmer, Christian; Kretschmar, Oliver; Bürki, Christoph; Klauwer, Dietrich; Hübler, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric heart transplantation (pHTx) represents a small (14%) but very important and particular part in the field of cardiac transplantation. This treatment has lifelong impact on children. To achieve the best short and especially long-term survival with adequate quality of life, which is of crucial importance for this young patient population, one has to realize and understand the differences with adult HTx. Indication for transplantation, waitlist management including ABO incompatible (ABOi) transplantation and immunosuppression differ. Although young transplant recipients are ultimately likely to be considered for re-transplantation. One has to distinguish between myopathy and complex congenital heart disease (CHD). The differences in anatomy and physiology make the surgical procedure much more complex and create unique challenges. These recipients need a well-organized and educated team with pediatric cardiologists and intensivists, including a high skilled surgeon, which is dedicated to pHTx. Therefore, these types of transplants are best concentrated in specialized centers to achieve promising outcome. PMID:25922739

  2. Pediatric heart transplantation.

    PubMed

    Schweiger, Martin; Stiasny, Brian; Dave, Hitendu; Cavigelli-Brunner, Anna; Balmer, Christian; Kretschmar, Oliver; Bürki, Christoph; Klauwer, Dietrich; Hübler, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Pediatric heart transplantation (pHTx) represents a small (14%) but very important and particular part in the field of cardiac transplantation. This treatment has lifelong impact on children. To achieve the best short and especially long-term survival with adequate quality of life, which is of crucial importance for this young patient population, one has to realize and understand the differences with adult HTx. Indication for transplantation, waitlist management including ABO incompatible (ABOi) transplantation and immunosuppression differ. Although young transplant recipients are ultimately likely to be considered for re-transplantation. One has to distinguish between myopathy and complex congenital heart disease (CHD). The differences in anatomy and physiology make the surgical procedure much more complex and create unique challenges. These recipients need a well-organized and educated team with pediatric cardiologists and intensivists, including a high skilled surgeon, which is dedicated to pHTx. Therefore, these types of transplants are best concentrated in specialized centers to achieve promising outcome.

  3. [Surgical techniques of organ transplants].

    PubMed

    Froněk, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    The list of surgical procedures of solid organ transplantations appears very interesting and colorful, even with overlap among techniques. Liver transplantation is a life-saving procedure in a majority of cases, the liver can be transplanted as a full or partial graft. The liver graft can be split for two recipients; it can also be reduced for a small recipient if splitting is not indicated. Kidney transplantation is the most common solid organ transplant procedure, the majority of kidney grafts come from brain-dead donors whereas the number of live donor transplants is increasing, also thanks to paired donation and blood group incompatible transplantation methods. The small bowel and multivisceral transplantation are rare procedures; they serve selected patients with short bowel syndrome, some patients with retroperitoneal tumors or with extensive visceral thrombosis. Solid organ transplants are well established treatment methods with good and proven outcomes. A majority of patients can return to a normal life after their transplants.

  4. Transplant tourism: understanding the risks.

    PubMed

    Babik, Jennifer M; Chin-Hong, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Transplant tourism is commonly defined as travel abroad for the purpose of transplantation, but the term evokes ethical and legal concerns about commercial transplantation. Due to the mismatch in supply and demand for organs, transplant tourism has increased over the last several decades and now accounts for 10 % of transplants worldwide. Patients from the USA who pursue transplantation abroad do so most commonly for renal transplantation, and travel mostly to China, the Philippines, and India. Transplant tourism puts the organ recipient at risk for surgical complications, poor graft outcome, increased mortality, and a variety of infectious complications. Bacterial, viral, fungal, and parasitic infections have all been described, and most concerning are the high rates of blood-borne viral infections and invasive, often fatal, fungal infections. Transplant and infectious diseases physicians should have a high degree of suspicion for infectious complications in patients returning from transplantation abroad.

  5. [Surgical techniques of organ transplants].

    PubMed

    Froněk, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    The list of surgical procedures of solid organ transplantations appears very interesting and colorful, even with overlap among techniques. Liver transplantation is a life-saving procedure in a majority of cases, the liver can be transplanted as a full or partial graft. The liver graft can be split for two recipients; it can also be reduced for a small recipient if splitting is not indicated. Kidney transplantation is the most common solid organ transplant procedure, the majority of kidney grafts come from brain-dead donors whereas the number of live donor transplants is increasing, also thanks to paired donation and blood group incompatible transplantation methods. The small bowel and multivisceral transplantation are rare procedures; they serve selected patients with short bowel syndrome, some patients with retroperitoneal tumors or with extensive visceral thrombosis. Solid organ transplants are well established treatment methods with good and proven outcomes. A majority of patients can return to a normal life after their transplants. PMID:26585110

  6. Epigenomics in hematopoietic transplantation: novel treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Engel, Nicole; Rank, Andreas

    2011-10-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a high risk but curative treatment option for leukemia, myelodysplasia and other hematological malignancies. After high dose radio- or chemo-therapy, recipient's hematopoiesis is replaced by a new immunosystem and residual malignant cells are eliminated by the graft-versus-leukemia reaction. The benefit of this immunological effect is limited by the most frequent complication of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: graft-versus-host disease. In addition to their well-known anti-tumor activity, epigenetic drugs mediate immunotolerance without reducing alloreactivity or even enhance graft-versus-leukemia effect without inducing graft-versus-host disease by regulating cytokine release, increasing the circulating number of regulatory T cells and interacting with natural killer cells. We focus on the use of epigenetic drugs in the allogeneic transplantation setting in relation to their anti-tumor and immunomodulatory potential.

  7. Living related liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Makuuchi, M; Kawarazaki, H; Iwanaka, T; Kamada, N; Takayama, T; Kumon, M

    1992-01-01

    Liver transplantation from a brain death donor has not yet been accepted in Japan. The only alternative method at present is transplantation from a living donor. After the first successful living related liver transplantation was performed by Strong in Brisbane, Australia, Japanese hepatic and transplant surgeons also began to perform such operations. As of February 1991, 16 living related liver transplantations had already been performed in Japan, mainly for children with biliary atresia. Five of these patients subsequently died, however, our patient has survived more than 1 year, and she is presently leading a normal school life. The most important issue regarding living related liver transplantation is to ensure the donor's safety. For this purpose, we conducted a preoperative banking of the donor's own blood and plasma. In addition, a selective vascular occlusion was carried out to reduce blood loss during the resection of the liver. Intraoperative color Doppler ultrasonography was introduced for evaluating the circulation of the graft. By using this modality, the following three points were able to be accurately estimated in order to obtain optimal graft perfusion: 1) The most suitable position for the graft to be fixed to the abdominal wall, 2) whether or not the abdominal wall could be closed and 3) the indication for a ligation of the collateral veins to form a porto-systemic shunt. Thanks to these procedures, living related liver transplantations have now become an acceptable transplant method, however, a transplantation from a cadaver that is brain dead but still has a beating heart is still absolutely necessary for adult recipients. Therefore, in the future, both methods should be performed.

  8. Pediatric transplantation: preventing thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Robertson, J D

    2015-06-01

    Due to progressive advances in surgical techniques, immunosuppressive therapies, and supportive care, outcomes from both solid organ transplantation and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation continue to improve. Thrombosis remains a challenging management issue in this context, with implications for both graft survival and long-term quality of life. Unfortunately, there remains a general paucity of pediatric-specific data regarding thrombosis incidence, risk stratification, and the safety or efficacy of preventative strategies with which to guide treatment algorithms. This review summarizes the available evidence and rationale underlying the spectrum of current practices aimed at preventing thrombosis in the transplant recipient, with a particular focus on risk factors, pathophysiology, and described antithrombotic regimens.

  9. Cytomegalovirus Immunoglobulin After Thoracic Transplantation: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Grossi, Paolo; Mohacsi, Paul; Szabolcs, Zoltán; Potena, Luciano

    2016-03-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a highly complex pathogen which, despite modern prophylactic regimens, continues to affect a high proportion of thoracic organ transplant recipients. The symptomatic manifestations of CMV infection are compounded by adverse indirect effects induced by the multiple immunomodulatory actions of CMV. These include a higher risk of acute rejection, cardiac allograft vasculopathy after heart transplantation, and potentially bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome in lung transplant recipients, with a greater propensity for opportunistic secondary infections. Prophylaxis for CMV using antiviral agents (typically oral valganciclovir or intravenous ganciclovir) is now almost universal, at least in high-risk transplants (D+/R-). Even with extended prophylactic regimens, however, challenges remain. The CMV events can still occur despite antiviral prophylaxis, including late-onset infection or recurrent disease, and patients with ganciclovir-resistant CMV infection or who are intolerant to antiviral therapy require alternative strategies. The CMV immunoglobulin (CMVIG) and antiviral agents have complementary modes of action. High-titer CMVIG preparations provide passive CMV-specific immunity but also exert complex immunomodulatory properties which augment the antiviral effect of antiviral agents and offer the potential to suppress the indirect effects of CMV infection. This supplement discusses the available data concerning the immunological and clinical effects of CMVIG after heart or lung transplantation.

  10. [Function of pancreas transplants in increased metabolic stress].

    PubMed

    Teuscher, A U; Seaquist, E R; Barrou, Z; Kendall, D M; Robertson, R P

    1995-01-01

    Patients undergoing successful pancreas transplantation have normal glucose levels in the fasting and fed states and normal levels of hemoglobin A1c without use of exogenous inulin or any other medications for diabetes. In some of these patients, these measures have remained stable for more than 10 years. Additionally pancreas transplant recipients recover from short-term hypoglycemia produced by an intravenous pulse of insulin. However, metabolic success has been determined by relatively routine, unsophisticated tests such as oral and intravenous glucose tolerance tests or stimulation with intravenous arginine. These tests may not provide measures of the functional reserve of the pancreas, which is called on during periods of maximal stress. Consequently, we designed studies to ascertain beta and alpha cell performance in recipients of whole pancreas transplants and recipients of a segment of a living related donor. All recipients were recruited from the University of Minnesota Transplant Registry, Minneapolis, Minnesota. Successfully transplanted recipients were subjected to prolonged hyperglycemia to assess insulin secretory reserve using the method of glucose potentiation of arginine induced insulin secretion and to prolonged hypoglycemia to assess glucagon responsiveness and hepatic glucose production using the technique of the hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemic clamp. Our studies show that pancreas transplant recipients have markedly diminished insulin secretory reserve, a defect not evident with conventional tests of beta-cell function. No difference was found between the whole graft and segmental graft recipients. Pancreas transplantation restores the defective glucagon secretory response and enhances hepatic glucose production during prolonged hypoglycemia in subjects with type I diabetes. We conclude that pancreas transplantation does not completely restore beta-cell secretory reserve. This defect might be probably caused in part by cyclosporine and by the

  11. Bone Marrow Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    Bone marrow is the spongy tissue inside some of your bones, such as your hip and thigh bones. ... platelets, which help the blood to clot. A bone marrow transplant is a procedure that replaces a person's ...

  12. Liver transplant - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Liver failure causes many problems, including malnutrition, problems with blood clotting, bleeding form the gastrointestinal tract, and jaundice. Frequently, patients who undergo liver transplantation are quite ill, and require ...

  13. Textbooks, Transitions, and Transplants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callahan, Leroy G.; Passi, Sneh Lata

    1972-01-01

    Three popular textbooks were analyzed for level of cognitive processes used, and implications were drawn regarding supplementary activities if the English primary school model is to be transplanted" in America. (MM)

  14. Corneal transplant - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Corneal transplantation is recommended for: severe corneal infection, injury, damage, or scarring corneas that no longer allow light to pass through (opaque), often secondary to lens surgery (see cataract surgery), infections, and inherited diseases ...

  15. Kidney transplant - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Kidney Transplantation A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  16. Talking about Kidney Transplants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, Joan; Swift, Julia

    1990-01-01

    Described is a project in which information about the moral issues surrounding tissue transplants was obtained and videotaped for classroom use. Moral positions and possible educational strategies are discussed. Examples of student statements are presented. (CW)

  17. Role of MICA antibodies in solid organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Luo, Lei; Li, Zhengyu; Wu, Weidong; Luo, Guangheng; Xu, Chuan; Sun, Zhaolin; Mei, Hong

    2014-02-01

    As a potential transplant antigen, major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related gene A (MICA) antigen, has attracted increased attention because of its possible role in solid organ transplantation. There are two MICA forms, and MICA antibodies and soluble MICA (sMICA) have been found in the serum of transplant recipients. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library for original reports of clinical studies involving the effect of MICA on outcomes of renal, heart, lung, and liver transplantation. In addition to the human leukocyte antigen antigens, which elicit a strong immune response, the polymorphic MICA antigens induce production of MICA antibodies and sMICA. A number of clinical studies have shown that MICA antibodies correlate with an increased incidence of rejection and a decreased allograft survival rate following renal or heart transplantation. Although it is clearly associated with chronic rejection of lung allografts, no such correlation was found for liver transplantation. Moreover, sMICA showed a negative association with acute rejection (AR) and may be a good predictor of heart transplant outcomes. These data suggest MICA expression patterns and regulatory function may be tissue specific and that different transplants have different organ-specific outcomes.

  18. Burnout in transplant nurses.

    PubMed

    Jesse, Michelle T; Abouljoud, Marwan S; Hogan, Kathy; Eshelman, Anne

    2015-09-01

    Context-Burnout is a response to chronic strain within the workplace and is common across nursing professions. Little has been published about burnout in organ transplant nurses. Objective-To report the prevalence of the 3 main components of burnout (emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and reduced personal accomplishment) in organ transplant nurses and to examine factors that contribute to the development of burnout in transplant nurses. Design-Cross-sectional survey of transplant nurses (recruited via listservs) on professional and personal demographics, decisional authority, psychological job demands, supervisor and coworker support, frequency and comfort with difficult patient interactions, and burnout. Participants-369 transplant nurses. Results-About half reported high levels of emotional exhaustion, 15.7% reported high levels of depersonalization, and 51.8% reported low levels of personal accomplishment. Working more hours per week, lower decisional authority, greater psychological job demands, lower perceived supervisor support, and greater frequency and discomfort with difficult patient interactions were significant predictors of emotional exhaustion. Greater frequency and discomfort with difficult patient interactions were significant predictors of depersonalization. Younger age, lower decisional authority, and greater discomfort with difficult patient interactions were predictors of low personal accomplishment. Conclusions-The study provides strong evidence of the presence of burnout in transplant nurses and opportunities for focused and potentially very effective interventions aimed at reducing burnout. PMID:26308777

  19. Burnout in transplant nurses.

    PubMed

    Jesse, Michelle T; Abouljoud, Marwan S; Hogan, Kathy; Eshelman, Anne

    2015-09-01

    Context-Burnout is a response to chronic strain within the workplace and is common across nursing professions. Little has been published about burnout in organ transplant nurses. Objective-To report the prevalence of the 3 main components of burnout (emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and reduced personal accomplishment) in organ transplant nurses and to examine factors that contribute to the development of burnout in transplant nurses. Design-Cross-sectional survey of transplant nurses (recruited via listservs) on professional and personal demographics, decisional authority, psychological job demands, supervisor and coworker support, frequency and comfort with difficult patient interactions, and burnout. Participants-369 transplant nurses. Results-About half reported high levels of emotional exhaustion, 15.7% reported high levels of depersonalization, and 51.8% reported low levels of personal accomplishment. Working more hours per week, lower decisional authority, greater psychological job demands, lower perceived supervisor support, and greater frequency and discomfort with difficult patient interactions were significant predictors of emotional exhaustion. Greater frequency and discomfort with difficult patient interactions were significant predictors of depersonalization. Younger age, lower decisional authority, and greater discomfort with difficult patient interactions were predictors of low personal accomplishment. Conclusions-The study provides strong evidence of the presence of burnout in transplant nurses and opportunities for focused and potentially very effective interventions aimed at reducing burnout.

  20. Liver-Regenerative Transplantation: Regrow and Reset

    PubMed Central

    de l’Hortet, A. Collin; Takeishi, K.; Guzman-Lepe, J.; Handa, K.; Matsubara, K.; Fukumitsu, K.; Dorko, K.; Presnell, S. C.; Yagi, H.; Soto-Gutierrez, A.

    2016-01-01

    Liver transplantation, either a partial liver from a living or deceased donor or a whole liver from a deceased donor, is the only curative therapy for severe end-stage liver disease. Only one-third of those on the liver transplant waiting list will be transplanted, and the demand for livers is projected to increase 23% in the next 20 years. Consequently, organ availability is an absolute constraint on the number of liver transplants that can be performed. Regenerative therapies aim to enhance liver tissue repair and regeneration by any means available (cell repopulation, tissue engineering, biomaterials, proteins, small molecules, and genes). Recent experimental work suggests that liver repopulation and engineered liver tissue are best suited to the task if an unlimited availability of functional induced pluripotent stem (iPS)–derived liver cells can be achieved. The derivation of iPS cells by reprogramming cell fate has opened up new lines of investigation, for instance, the generation of iPS-derived xenogeneic organs or the possibility of simply inducing the liver to reprogram its own hepatocyte function after injury. We reviewed current knowledge about liver repopulation, generation of engineered livers and reprogramming of liver function. We also discussed the numerous barriers that have to be overcome for clinical implementation. PMID:26699680

  1. Tregs and kidney: From diabetic nephropathy to renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Dousdampanis, Periklis; Trigka, Kostantina; Mouzaki, Athanasia

    2016-09-24

    Kidney transplantation is recognised as the most effective treatment for patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Kidney transplantation continues to face several challenges including long-term graft and patient survival, and the side effects of immunosuppressive therapy. The tendency in kidney transplantation is to avoid the side effects of immunosuppresants and induce immune tolerance. Regulatory T-cells (Tregs) contribute to self-tolerance, tolerance to alloantigen and transplant tolerance, mainly by suppressing the activation and function of reactive effector T-cells. Additionally, Tregs are implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetes, which is the leading cause of ESRD, suggesting that these cells play a role both in the pathogenesis of chronic kidney disease and the induction of transplant tolerance. Several strategies to achieve immunological tolerance to grafts have been tested experimentally, and include combinations of co-stimulatory blockade pathways, T-cell depletion, in vivo Treg-induction and/or infusion of ex-vivo expanded Tregs. However, a successful regimen that induces transplant tolerance is not yet available for clinical application. This review brings together certain key studies on the role of Tregs in ESRD, diabetes and kidney transplantation, only to emphasize that many more studies are needed to elucidate the clinical significance and the therapeutic applications of Tregs. PMID:27683634

  2. Tregs and kidney: From diabetic nephropathy to renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Dousdampanis, Periklis; Trigka, Kostantina; Mouzaki, Athanasia

    2016-09-24

    Kidney transplantation is recognised as the most effective treatment for patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Kidney transplantation continues to face several challenges including long-term graft and patient survival, and the side effects of immunosuppressive therapy. The tendency in kidney transplantation is to avoid the side effects of immunosuppresants and induce immune tolerance. Regulatory T-cells (Tregs) contribute to self-tolerance, tolerance to alloantigen and transplant tolerance, mainly by suppressing the activation and function of reactive effector T-cells. Additionally, Tregs are implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetes, which is the leading cause of ESRD, suggesting that these cells play a role both in the pathogenesis of chronic kidney disease and the induction of transplant tolerance. Several strategies to achieve immunological tolerance to grafts have been tested experimentally, and include combinations of co-stimulatory blockade pathways, T-cell depletion, in vivo Treg-induction and/or infusion of ex-vivo expanded Tregs. However, a successful regimen that induces transplant tolerance is not yet available for clinical application. This review brings together certain key studies on the role of Tregs in ESRD, diabetes and kidney transplantation, only to emphasize that many more studies are needed to elucidate the clinical significance and the therapeutic applications of Tregs.

  3. Tregs and kidney: From diabetic nephropathy to renal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Dousdampanis, Periklis; Trigka, Kostantina; Mouzaki, Athanasia

    2016-01-01

    Kidney transplantation is recognised as the most effective treatment for patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Kidney transplantation continues to face several challenges including long-term graft and patient survival, and the side effects of immunosuppressive therapy. The tendency in kidney transplantation is to avoid the side effects of immunosuppresants and induce immune tolerance. Regulatory T-cells (Tregs) contribute to self-tolerance, tolerance to alloantigen and transplant tolerance, mainly by suppressing the activation and function of reactive effector T-cells. Additionally, Tregs are implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetes, which is the leading cause of ESRD, suggesting that these cells play a role both in the pathogenesis of chronic kidney disease and the induction of transplant tolerance. Several strategies to achieve immunological tolerance to grafts have been tested experimentally, and include combinations of co-stimulatory blockade pathways, T-cell depletion, in vivo Treg-induction and/or infusion of ex-vivo expanded Tregs. However, a successful regimen that induces transplant tolerance is not yet available for clinical application. This review brings together certain key studies on the role of Tregs in ESRD, diabetes and kidney transplantation, only to emphasize that many more studies are needed to elucidate the clinical significance and the therapeutic applications of Tregs. PMID:27683634

  4. Tregs and kidney: From diabetic nephropathy to renal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Dousdampanis, Periklis; Trigka, Kostantina; Mouzaki, Athanasia

    2016-01-01

    Kidney transplantation is recognised as the most effective treatment for patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Kidney transplantation continues to face several challenges including long-term graft and patient survival, and the side effects of immunosuppressive therapy. The tendency in kidney transplantation is to avoid the side effects of immunosuppresants and induce immune tolerance. Regulatory T-cells (Tregs) contribute to self-tolerance, tolerance to alloantigen and transplant tolerance, mainly by suppressing the activation and function of reactive effector T-cells. Additionally, Tregs are implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetes, which is the leading cause of ESRD, suggesting that these cells play a role both in the pathogenesis of chronic kidney disease and the induction of transplant tolerance. Several strategies to achieve immunological tolerance to grafts have been tested experimentally, and include combinations of co-stimulatory blockade pathways, T-cell depletion, in vivo Treg-induction and/or infusion of ex-vivo expanded Tregs. However, a successful regimen that induces transplant tolerance is not yet available for clinical application. This review brings together certain key studies on the role of Tregs in ESRD, diabetes and kidney transplantation, only to emphasize that many more studies are needed to elucidate the clinical significance and the therapeutic applications of Tregs.

  5. Brown adipose tissue transplantation ameliorates polycystic ovary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xiaoxue; Hu, Tao; Zhao, Han; Huang, Yuanyuan; Ye, Rongcai; Lin, Jun; Zhang, Chuanhai; Zhang, Hanlin; Wei, Gang; Zhou, Huiqiao; Dong, Meng; Zhao, Jun; Wang, Haibin; Liu, Qingsong; Lee, Hyuek Jong; Jin, Wanzhu; Chen, Zi-Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), which is characterized by anovulation, hyperandrogenism, and polycystic ovaries, is a complex endocrinopathy. Because the cause of PCOS at the molecular level is largely unknown, there is no cure or specific treatment for PCOS. Here, we show that transplantation of brown adipose tissue (BAT) reversed anovulation, hyperandrogenism, and polycystic ovaries in a dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA)-induced PCOS rat. BAT transplantation into a PCOS rat significantly stabilized menstrual irregularity and improved systemic insulin sensitivity up to a normal level, which was not shown in a sham-operated or muscle-transplanted PCOS rat. Moreover, BAT transplantation, not sham operation or muscle transplantation, surprisingly improved fertility in PCOS rats. Interestingly, BAT transplantation activated endogenous BAT and thereby increased the circulating level of adiponectin, which plays a prominent role in whole-body energy metabolism and ovarian physiology. Consistent with BAT transplantation, administration of adiponectin protein dramatically rescued DHEA-induced PCOS phenotypes. These results highlight that endogenous BAT activity is closely related to the development of PCOS phenotypes and that BAT activation might be a promising therapeutic option for the treatment of PCOS. PMID:26903641

  6. Perforation of the Right Ventricle Induced by Pulmonary Artery Catheter at Induction of Anesthesia for the Surgery for Liver Transplantation: A Case Report and Reviewed of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Auxiliadora-Martins, Maria; Apinagés dos Santos, Erick; Adans Wenzinger, Daniel; Alkmim-Teixeira, Gil Cezar; Neto, Gerardo Cristino de M.; Sankarankutty, Ajith Kumar; de Castro e Silva, Orlando; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis; Basile-Filho, Anibal

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of a 45-year-old male patient diagnosed with liver cirrhosis by hepatitis C and alcohol, with a Child-Pugh score C and a model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) score of 27, and submitted to liver transplantation. The subject underwent insertion of the pulmonary artery catheter (PAC) in the right internal jugular vein, with technical difficulty concerning catheter advance. There was sudden hypotension, increase in central venous pressure (CVP), and decrease in SvO2 15 minutes after the PAC had been inserted, followed by cardiorespiratory arrest in pulseless electrical activity (PEA), which was promptly assisted with resuscitation. Pericardiocentesis was performed without success, so the individual was subjected to a subxiphoid pericardial window, which led to output of large amounts of blood as well as PEA reversal to sinus rhythm. Sternotomy was performed; rupture of the apex of the right ventricle (RV) was detected, and suture of the site was accomplished. After hemodynamic stabilization, the patient was transferred to the ICU, where he developed septic shock and, despite adequate therapy, died on the eighteenth day after ICU admission. PMID:20066172

  7. Transplant Outcomes (Bone Marrow and Cord Blood)

    MedlinePlus

    ... reports show patient survival and transplant data of bone marrow and umbilical cord blood transplants in the transplant ... Data by Center Report —View the number of bone marrow and cord blood transplants performed at a specific ...

  8. The global alliance for transplantation.

    PubMed

    Groth, C G; Chapman, J R

    2006-03-01

    In 2002, The Transplantation Society proposed the creation of a Global Alliance for Transplantation, with the purpose of reducing the existing disparity regarding transplantation activities across the globe. This alliance should include major international scientific societies, international governmental organizations, and pharmaceutical companies. Consultations with each of these parties have taken place during the past 18 months and three Strategic Programs have been initiated: (1) the collection of information on transplantation; (2) the expansion of education in transplantation; and (3) the development of professional guidelines for organ donation and transplantation. PMID:16549119

  9. Liver transplantation in Germany.

    PubMed

    Tacke, Frank; Kroy, Daniela C; Barreiros, Ana Paula; Neumann, Ulf P

    2016-08-01

    Liver transplantation (LT) is a well-accepted procedure for end-stage liver disease in Germany. In 2015, 1489 patients were admitted to the waiting list (including 1308 new admissions), with the leading etiologies being fibrosis and cirrhosis (n = 349), alcoholic liver disease (n = 302), and hepatobiliary malignancies (n = 220). Organ allocation in Germany is regulated within the Eurotransplant system based on urgency as expressed by the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score. In 2015, only 894 LTs (n = 48 from living donors) were performed at 23 German transplant centers, reflecting a shortage of organs. Several factors may contribute to the low number of organ donations. The German transplant legislation only accepts donation after brain death (not cardiac death), whereas advances in neurosurgery and a more frequently requested "palliative care" approach render fewer patients suitable as potential donors. The legislation further requires the active consent of the donor or first-degree relatives before donation. Ongoing debates within the German transplant field address the optimal management of patients with alcoholic liver cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and cholangiocarcinoma and measures to increase living donor transplantations. As a result of irregularities at mainly 4 German transplant centers that were exposed in 2012, guiding principles updated by the German authorities have since implemented strict rules (including internal and external auditing, the 8-eyes principle, mandatory repeated testing for alcohol consumption) to prohibit any manipulations in organ allocation. In conclusion, we will summarize important aspects on the management of LT in Germany, discuss legal and organizational aspects, and highlight challenges mainly related to the relative lack of organ donations, increasing numbers of extended criteria donors, and the peculiarities of the recipient patients. Liver Transplantation 22 1136-1142 2016 AASLD.

  10. Liver transplantation in Germany.

    PubMed

    Tacke, Frank; Kroy, Daniela C; Barreiros, Ana Paula; Neumann, Ulf P

    2016-08-01

    Liver transplantation (LT) is a well-accepted procedure for end-stage liver disease in Germany. In 2015, 1489 patients were admitted to the waiting list (including 1308 new admissions), with the leading etiologies being fibrosis and cirrhosis (n = 349), alcoholic liver disease (n = 302), and hepatobiliary malignancies (n = 220). Organ allocation in Germany is regulated within the Eurotransplant system based on urgency as expressed by the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score. In 2015, only 894 LTs (n = 48 from living donors) were performed at 23 German transplant centers, reflecting a shortage of organs. Several factors may contribute to the low number of organ donations. The German transplant legislation only accepts donation after brain death (not cardiac death), whereas advances in neurosurgery and a more frequently requested "palliative care" approach render fewer patients suitable as potential donors. The legislation further requires the active consent of the donor or first-degree relatives before donation. Ongoing debates within the German transplant field address the optimal management of patients with alcoholic liver cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and cholangiocarcinoma and measures to increase living donor transplantations. As a result of irregularities at mainly 4 German transplant centers that were exposed in 2012, guiding principles updated by the German authorities have since implemented strict rules (including internal and external auditing, the 8-eyes principle, mandatory repeated testing for alcohol consumption) to prohibit any manipulations in organ allocation. In conclusion, we will summarize important aspects on the management of LT in Germany, discuss legal and organizational aspects, and highlight challenges mainly related to the relative lack of organ donations, increasing numbers of extended criteria donors, and the peculiarities of the recipient patients. Liver Transplantation 22 1136-1142 2016 AASLD. PMID:27082951

  11. Liver transplantation in Spain.

    PubMed

    de la Rosa, Gloria; Fondevila, Constantino; Navasa, Miquel

    2016-09-01

    Liver transplantation (LT) activity started in Spain in 1984 and has exceeded 23,700 interventions, with more than 1000 transplants performed yearly. Every hospital needs official authorization to perform a LT, which implies the obligation to register all patients on the national waiting list. The Spanish National Transplant Organization (ONT) provides essential support for organ procurement, allocation, and management of the waiting list at a national level. Liver allocation is center-oriented as all available organs are referred to the ONT for the whole country. The allocation rules for LT are made according to disease severity after consensus among professionals from every transplant center and ratified by representatives of the regional health authorities. Authorization and location/distribution of transplant centers are regulated by the country (Spain) and by the different regions according to the Real Decreto 1723/2012. For a total population of 47,850,795 inhabitants, there are 24 centers for LT for adults (1 team/2 million people) and 5 for LT for children (1 team/9.5 million people). Nonbiliary cirrhosis, particularly alcohol- and hepatitis C virus-related cirrhosis (60%), and tumors, mainly hepatocellular carcinoma (19%), are the most common indications for LT in Spain. Unusual causes of LT include metabolic diseases like Wilson's disease, familial amyloid polyneuropathy and hyperoxaluria type I, polycystic kidney and liver disease, and some tumors (epithelioid hemangioendothelioma and neuroendocrine tumors). Important efforts are now being undertaken to improve the quality and transplantability of extended criteria livers, in particular those arising from DCD, which represent the greatest opportunity to expand the donor pool. These efforts have to be addressed to adapt the organ preservation procedures, be it through the application of regional perfusion in situ or the use of machine perfusion preservation ex situ. Liver Transplantation 22 1259-1264 2016

  12. European Transplant Registry of Senior Renal Transplant Recipients on Advagraf

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-11

    Graft Failure; Death; Acute Rejection of Renal Transplant; Infections; Bone Disease; Post Transplant Diabetes Mellitus; Quality of Life; HLA Antibody Production; Cardiovascular Risk Factors; Non-HLA Antibody Production

  13. Microrefined microfollicular hair transplant: a new modification in hair transplant.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Amit

    2014-09-01

    : Hair transplant is the most common cosmetic surgery procedure in men; at our center, we perform nearly 40 transplants a month, with nearly 450 procedures in a year. Current techniques of hair transplant are well established and several authors have had remarkable results using the current techniques of microfollicular hair transplant. Orentreich described hair transplant, Shiell has reviewed current techniques in his paper, whereas Rose reviews the latest innovations in hair transplant including Neograft and robotic procedures. We present our modifications to the process based on our experience of more than 1000 cases in the last 3 years.Microrefined microfollicular hair transplant is a procedure with innovations at each step of the standard microfollicular hair transplant procedure to improve results.The steps of the procedure are as follows: PMID:24374401

  14. Undifferentiated Wharton's Jelly Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation Induces Insulin-Producing Cell Differentiation and Suppression of T-Cell-Mediated Autoimmunity in Nonobese Diabetic Mice.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Pei-Jiun; Wang, Hwai-Shi; Lin, Gu-Jiun; Chou, Shu-Cheng; Chu, Tzu-Hui; Chuan, Wen-Ting; Lu, Ying-Jui; Weng, Zen-Chung; Su, Cheng-Hsi; Hsieh, Po-Shiuan; Sytwu, Huey-Kang; Lin, Chi-Hung; Chen, Tien-Hua; Shyu, Jia-Fwu

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus is caused by T-cell-mediated autoimmune destruction of pancreatic β-cells. Systemic administration of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) brings about their incorporation into a variety of tissues with immunosuppressive effects, resulting in regeneration of pancreatic islets. We previously showed that human MSCs isolated from Wharton's jelly (WJ-MSCs) represent a potential cell source to treat diabetes. However, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. The purpose of this study was to discern whether undifferentiated WJ-MSCs can differentiate into pancreatic insulin-producing cells (IPCs) and modify immunological responses in nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice. Undifferentiated WJ-MSCs underwent lentiviral transduction to express green fluorescent protein (GFP) and then were injected into the retro-orbital venous sinus of NOD mice. Seven days after transplantation, fluorescent islet-like cell clusters in the pancreas were apparent. WJ-MSC-GFP-treated NOD mice had significantly lower blood glucose and higher survival rates than saline-treated mice. Systemic and local levels of autoaggressive T-cells, including T helper 1 cells and IL-17-producing T-cells, were reduced, and regulatory T-cell levels were increased. Furthermore, anti-inflammatory cytokine levels were increased, and dendritic cells were decreased. At 23 days, higher human C-peptide and serum insulin levels and improved glucose tolerance were found. Additionally, WJ-MSCs-GFP differentiated into IPCs as shown by colocalization of human C-peptide and GFP in the pancreas. Significantly more intact islets and less severe insulitis were observed. In conclusion, undifferentiated WJ-MSCs can differentiate into IPCs in vivo with immunomodulatory effects and repair the destroyed islets in NOD mice.

  15. Randomized trial of loperamide versus dose escalation of octreotide acetate for chemotherapy-induced diarrhea in bone marrow transplant and leukemia patients.

    PubMed

    Geller, R B; Gilmore, C E; Dix, S P; Lin, L S; Topping, D L; Davidson, T G; Holland, H K; Wingard, J R

    1995-11-01

    This study compares maximal daily doses of loperamide to escalating doses of continuous intravenous (CI) octreotide acetate in bone marrow transplant (BMT) and leukemia patients. Following chemotherapy, BMT and leukemia patients who developed > or = 600 ml of stool volume in a 24-hr period were randomized to receive loperamide 4 mg po q6h or octreotide 150 micrograms mixed in hyperalimentation solution or normal saline and administered CI. Patients were assessed at 48 hr intervals for decrease in stool volume from baseline. Complete response (CR) was defined as > or = 50% from baseline stool volume (BSV). Patients receiving octreotide who did not achieve a CR at 48 hr were dose escalated by doubling the dose to a maximum of 2,400 micrograms with evaluations at 48 hr intervals. Patients receiving loperamide who did not achieve a CR at 48 hr had treatment discontinued. A total of 36 patients were enrolled in the study. Of these, all were evaluable for intention to treat, and 31 were evaluable for initial response. Based on intent to treat at the initial 48 hr, patients receiving loperamide had a higher complete response rate (86% vs. 45%, P = 0.033) than did those who received octreotide. By treatment analysis (patients who actually received the drug), patients receiving loperamide had a higher complete response rate (92% vs. 56%, P = 0.0448) than did those who received octreotide at the 150 micrograms dosage level. Additional octreotide patients eventually achieved a CR at a higher dosage level (78%). Loperamide at maximal doses of 4 mg po q6h is more effective than octreotide 150 micrograms CI in treating diarrhea following chemotherapy in BMT and leukemia patients. Higher doses of octreotide may be required in a significant number of patients not responding to lower doses.

  16. Fetal tissue transplantation: can it be morally insulated from abortion?

    PubMed

    Strong, C

    1991-06-01

    Ethical controversy over transplantation of human fetal tissue has arisen because the source of tissue is induced abortions. Opposition to such transplants has been based on various arguments, including the following: rightful informed consent cannot be obtained for use of fetal tissue from induced abortions, and fetal tissue transplantation might result in an increase in the number of abortions. These arguments were not accepted by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Human Fetal Tissue Transplantation Research Panel. The majority opinion of the panel stated that abortion and fetal tissue use are entirely separate issues, and that tissue use is ethically acceptable because it can be morally insulated from the issue of abortion. In support of this view, panel members and others have replied to the arguments put forward by opponents of fetal tissue use. However, replies to the two arguments mentioned above have been unsatisfactory, and the shortcomings of those replies are identified herein. Examination of the arguments pro and con suggests that fetal tissue use cannot be completely insulated from the issue of abortion. Thus, in seeking an ethical justification for fetal tissue transplantation we must consider reasons other than those put forward by the NIH panel. In this paper it is argued that whatever wrong is involved in using fetal tissue from induced abortions must be balanced against the benefits for patients, and it is on this basis that fetal tissue transplantation can be ethically justified.

  17. Transplantation for stroke.

    PubMed

    Roitberg, Ben

    2004-04-01

    Stroke is the most common cause of disability in the United States, and one of the leading causes of mortality and disability in the world. The hope that damage to the CNS can be reversed or at least ameliorated is the central idea behind the research into neural repair. The ultimate repair for the brain should restore the entire lost structure and it's function. However, partial benefit is possible from addressing some of the needs of the injured brain. These partial solutions are the basis of current research into brain repair after stroke. An opportunity arises for two kinds of intervention: (1) replacement of neurons; (2) support of existing neurons, to prevent excessive degeneration and promote rewiring and plasticity. Transplantation for stroke in the rat model was regularly reported starting in 1992, demonstrating graft survival and even evidence of connection with the host brain. These studies determined several parameters for future work in stroke models, but ultimately had limited efficacy and did not progress to clinical experiments. A variety of cell types have been tried for restoration of brain function after stroke, mostly in rodent models. Human fetal cells had shown some promise in clinical studies for the treatment of Parkinson's disease. The technical and ethical difficulties associated with these cells promoted a search for alternatives. These include porcine fetal cells, human cultured stem cells, immortalized cell lines, marrow stromal cells, Sertoli cells pineal cells, and other sources. Human clonal cell lines have few ethical limitations, but some questions remain regarding their safety and efficacy. Autologous somatic stem cells are a very attractive source--there are no ethical concerns and graft rejection is not an issue. However, it is not clear that somatic cells can are plastic enough and can be safely induced to a neural fate. Restorative treatment for stroke is a new field of study. Naturally, new ideas abound and many strategies

  18. [Renal transplantation: ethical issues].

    PubMed

    Mamzer-Bruneel, Marie-France; Laforêt, Emmanuelle Grand; Kreis, Henri; Thervet, Éric; Martinez, Frank; Snanoudj, Renaud; Hervé, Christian; Legendre, Christophe

    2012-12-01

    One of the most significant advances in medicine during the last 50 years is the development of organ transplantation. In the context of chronic kidney diseases, renal transplantation offers patients a better clinical outcome than other treatment options. However, the benefits of organ transplantation have not been maximized due to an inadequate supply of organs for transplantation. Despite the establishment of elaborate legal rules for organs procurement, both on deceased and living donors in numerous countries, ethical concerns remain. Most of them are consequences of the strategies implemented or proposed to address the so-called organ shortage. The involvement of society in these complex problems is crucial as numerous questions emerge: could actual state of organ procurement change? Is it possible and/or realistic to increase the number of organs, with respects to living donors or deceased persons? Is the shortage an indicator to limit the use of kidney transplantation? How do we maintain efficiency and justice, in this context. PMID:23168353

  19. Stem Cell Transplants (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Stem Cell Transplants KidsHealth > For Teens > Stem Cell Transplants Print ... Does it Take to Recover? Coping What Are Stem Cells? As you probably remember from biology class, every ...

  20. Intraocular retinal transplantation: a review.

    PubMed

    Hammer, R M; Yinon, U

    1991-01-01

    This review covers intraocular transplantation of retinal tissue. This has importance both for theoretical understanding of retinal and neural development and for possible future clinical application. Transplantation sites have ranged from the anterior chamber through the retina to the subretinal space. Transplanted tissue has ranged from whole retina to specific retinal layers or specific types of retinal cells. Both within-species and inter-species transplants have been performed, and donor age has ranged from embryonic to adult. The ability of transplanted tissue to be accepted and to differentiate in host eyes has been studied. The conditions under which successful transplants are obtained, host-graft interactions, and transplantation methodologies have been explored. Morphological, and to a small extent, also functional characteristics of the transplants have been studied. PMID:1747393

  1. About the Operation: Liver Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heart/Lung Kidney Pancreas Kidney/Pancreas Liver Intestine Liver Transplant There are two very different surgical approaches to liver transplantation: the orthotopic and the heterotopic approach, both ...

  2. The Need for Inducing Tolerance in Vascularized Composite Allotransplantation

    PubMed Central

    Ravindra, Kadiyala V.; Xu, Hong; Bozulic, Larry D.; Song, David D.; Ildstad, Suzanne T.

    2012-01-01

    Successful hand and face transplantation in the last decade has firmly established the field of vascularized composite allotransplantation (VCA). The experience in VCA has thus far been very similar to solid organ transplantation in terms of the morbidity associated with long-term immunosuppression. The unique immunological features of VCA such as split tolerance and resistance to chronic rejection are being investigated. Simultaneously there has been laboratory work studying tolerogenic protocols in animal VCA models. In order to optimize VCA outcomes, translational studies are needed to develop less toxic immunosuppression and possibly achieve donor-specific tolerance. This article reviews the immunology, animal models, mixed chimerism & tolerance induction in VCA and the direction of future research to enable better understanding and wider application of VCA. PMID:23251216

  3. The need for inducing tolerance in vascularized composite allotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Ravindra, Kadiyala V; Xu, Hong; Bozulic, Larry D; Song, David D; Ildstad, Suzanne T

    2012-01-01

    Successful hand and face transplantation in the last decade has firmly established the field of vascularized composite allotransplantation (VCA). The experience in VCA has thus far been very similar to solid organ transplantation in terms of the morbidity associated with long-term immunosuppression. The unique immunological features of VCA such as split tolerance and resistance to chronic rejection are being investigated. Simultaneously there has been laboratory work studying tolerogenic protocols in animal VCA models. In order to optimize VCA outcomes, translational studies are needed to develop less toxic immunosuppression and possibly achieve donor-specific tolerance. This article reviews the immunology, animal models, mixed chimerism & tolerance induction in VCA and the direction of future research to enable better understanding and wider application of VCA.

  4. Gut microbiota and allogeneic transplantation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weilin; Xu, Shaoyan; Ren, Zhigang; Jiang, Jianwen; Zheng, Shusen

    2015-08-23

    The latest high-throughput sequencing technologies show that there are more than 1000 types of microbiota in the human gut. These microbes are not only important to maintain human health, but also closely related to the occurrence and development of various diseases. With the development of transplantation technologies, allogeneic transplantation has become an effective therapy for a variety of end-stage diseases. However, complications after transplantation still restrict its further development. Post-transplantation complications are closely associated with a host's immune system. There is also an interaction between a person's gut microbiota and immune system. Recently, animal and human studies have shown that gut microbial populations and diversity are altered after allogeneic transplantations, such as liver transplantation (LT), small bowel transplantation (SBT), kidney transplantation (KT) and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HTCT). Moreover, when complications, such as infection, rejection and graft versus host disease (GVHD) occur, gut microbial populations and diversity present a significant dysbiosis. Several animal and clinical studies have demonstrated that taking probiotics and prebiotics can effectively regulate gut microbiota and reduce the incidence of complications after transplantation. However, the role of intestinal decontamination in allogeneic transplantation is controversial. This paper reviews gut microbial status after transplantation and its relationship with complications. The role of intervention methods, including antibiotics, probiotics and prebiotics, in complications after transplantation are also discussed. Further research in this new field needs to determine the definite relationship between gut microbial dysbiosis and complications after transplantation. Additionally, further research examining gut microbial intervention methods to ameliorate complications after transplantation is warranted. A better understanding of the

  5. Donor selection in heart transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Emani, Sitaramesh; Sai-Sudhakar, Chittoor B.; Higgins, Robert S. D.; Whitson, Bryan A.

    2014-01-01

    There is increased scrutiny on the quality in health care with particular emphasis on institutional heart transplant survival outcomes. An important aspect of successful transplantation is appropriate donor selection. We review the current guidelines as well as areas of controversy in the selection of appropriate hearts as donor organs to ensure optimal outcomes. This decision is paramount to the success of a transplant program as well as recipient survival and graft function post-transplant. PMID:25132976

  6. [Monomorphic post-transplant T-lymphoproliferative disorder after autologous stem cell transplantation for multiple myeloma].

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Shimizu, Hiroaki; Takei, Toshifumi; Koya, Hiroko; Iriuchishima, Hirono; Hosiho, Takumi; Hirato, Junko; Kojima, Masaru; Handa, Hiroshi; Nojima, Yoshihisa; Murakami, Hirokazu

    2016-01-01

    We report a rare case of T cell type monomorphic post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) after autologous stem cell transplantation. A 53-year-old man with multiple myeloma received autologous stem cell transplantation and achieved a very good partial response. Nine months later, he developed a high fever and consciousness disturbance, and had multiple swollen lymph nodes and a high titer of Epstein-Barr (EB) virus DNA in his peripheral blood. Neither CT nor MRI of the brain revealed any abnormalities. Cerebrospinal fluid contained no malignant cells, but the EB virus DNA titer was high. Lymph node biopsy revealed T cell type monomorphic PTLD. Soon after high-dose treatment with methotrexate and cytosine arabinoside, the high fever and consciousness disturbance subsided, and the lymph node swelling and EB virus DNA disappeared. Given the efficacy of chemotherapy in this case, we concluded that the consciousness disturbance had been induced by central nervous system involvement of monomorphic PTLD. PMID:26861102

  7. [Monomorphic post-transplant T-lymphoproliferative disorder after autologous stem cell transplantation for multiple myeloma].

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Shimizu, Hiroaki; Takei, Toshifumi; Koya, Hiroko; Iriuchishima, Hirono; Hosiho, Takumi; Hirato, Junko; Kojima, Masaru; Handa, Hiroshi; Nojima, Yoshihisa; Murakami, Hirokazu

    2016-01-01

    We report a rare case of T cell type monomorphic post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) after autologous stem cell transplantation. A 53-year-old man with multiple myeloma received autologous stem cell transplantation and achieved a very good partial response. Nine months later, he developed a high fever and consciousness disturbance, and had multiple swollen lymph nodes and a high titer of Epstein-Barr (EB) virus DNA in his peripheral blood. Neither CT nor MRI of the brain revealed any abnormalities. Cerebrospinal fluid contained no malignant cells, but the EB virus DNA titer was high. Lymph node biopsy revealed T cell type monomorphic PTLD. Soon after high-dose treatment with methotrexate and cytosine arabinoside, the high fever and consciousness disturbance subsided, and the lymph node swelling and EB virus DNA disappeared. Given the efficacy of chemotherapy in this case, we concluded that the consciousness disturbance had been induced by central nervous system involvement of monomorphic PTLD.

  8. Liver transplantation: current concepts.

    PubMed Central

    Wall, W J

    1988-01-01

    In this decade liver transplantation has been established as the preferred treatment for children and adults with irreversible end-stage liver disease. Biliary atresia in children and nonalcoholic cirrhosis in adults are the most common indications for the procedure. Transplantation currently plays only a minor role in the treatment of hepatic malignant disease. Blood group compatibility between donor and recipient is preferred, but histocompatibility matching (tissue typing) currently has no significant role in the selection of recipients. Approximately 70% of recipients survive for 1 year, and these patients have an excellent prospect of long-term survival. The emerging evidence indicates that the quality of life and rehabilitation of most liver recipients are good. The current success of liver transplantation can be attributed to critical selection of recipients, modern anesthetic and surgical techniques, improved perioperative care, accurate diagnosis of rejection and superior immunosuppression with cyclosporine. PMID:3289710

  9. Pediatric liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Spada, Marco; Riva, Silvia; Maggiore, Giuseppe; Cintorino, Davide; Gridelli, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    In previous decades, pediatric liver transplantation has become a state-of-the-art operation with excellent success and limited mortality. Graft and patient survival have continued to improve as a result of improvements in medical, surgical and anesthetic management, organ availability, immunosuppression, and identification and treatment of postoperative complications. The utilization of split-liver grafts and living-related donors has provided more organs for pediatric patients. Newer immunosuppression regimens, including induction therapy, have had a significant impact on graft and patient survival. Future developments of pediatric liver transplantation will deal with long-term follow-up, with prevention of immunosuppression-related complications and promotion of as normal growth as possible. This review describes the state-of-the-art in pediatric liver transplantation. PMID:19222089

  10. THEMES OF LIVER TRANSPLANTATION

    PubMed Central

    Starzl, Thomas E.; Fung, John J.

    2010-01-01

    Liver transplantation was the product of 5 interlocking themes. These began in 1958-59 with canine studies of then theoretical hepatotrophic molecules in portal venous blood (Theme I) and with the contemporaneous parallel development of liver and multivisceral transplant models (Theme II). Further Theme I investigations showed that insulin was the principal, although not the only, portal hepatotrophic factor. In addition to resolving long-standing controversies about the pathophysiology of portacaval shunt, the hepatotrophic studies blazed new trails in the regulation of liver size, function, and regeneration. They also targeted inborn metabolic errors (e.g. familial hyperlipoproteinemia) whose palliation by portal diversion presaged definitive correction with liver replacement. Clinical use of the Theme II transplant models depended on multiple drug immunosuppression (Theme III, Immunology), guided by an empirical algorithm of pattern recognition and therapeutic response. Successful liver replacement was first accomplished in 1967 with azathioprine, prednisone, and ALG. With this regimen, the world’s longest surviving liver recipient is now 40 years postoperative. Incremental improvements in survival outcome occurred (Theme IV) when azathioprine was replaced by cyclosporine (1979) which was replaced in turn by tacrolimus (1989). However, the biologic meaning of alloengraftment remained enigmatic until multilineage donor leukocyte microchimerism was discovered in 1992 in long surviving organ recipients. Seminal mechanisms were then identified (clonal exhaustion-deletion and immune ignorance) that linked organ engraftment and the acquired tolerance of bone marrow transplantation and eventually clarified the relationship of transplantation immunology to the immunology of infections, neoplasms, and autoimmune disorders. With this insight, better strategies of immunosuppression have evolved. As liver and other kinds of organ transplantation became accepted as

  11. Depletion of autoreactive immunologic memory followed by autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in patients with refractory SLE induces long-term remission through de novo generation of a juvenile and tolerant immune system.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Tobias; Thiel, Andreas; Rosen, Oliver; Massenkeil, Gero; Sattler, Arne; Kohler, Siegfried; Mei, Henrik; Radtke, Hartmut; Gromnica-Ihle, Erika; Burmester, Gerd-Rüdiger; Arnold, Renate; Radbruch, Andreas; Hiepe, Falk

    2009-01-01

    Clinical trials have indicated that immunoablation followed by autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (ASCT) has the potential to induce clinical remission in patients with refractory systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), but the mechanisms have remained unclear. We now report the results of a single-center prospective study of long-term immune reconstitution after ASCT in 7 patients with SLE. The clinical remissions observed in these patients are accompanied by the depletion of autoreactive immunologic memory, reflected by the disappearance of pathogenic anti-double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) antibodies and protective antibodies in serum and a fundamental resetting of the adaptive immune system. The latter comprises recurrence of CD31(+)CD45RA(+)CD4(+) T cells (recent thymic emigrants) with a doubling in absolute numbers compared with age-matched healthy controls at the 3-year follow-up (P = .016), the regeneration of thymic-derived FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells, and normalization of peripheral T-cell receptor (TCR) repertoire usage. Likewise, responders exhibited normalization of the previously disturbed B-cell homeostasis with numeric recovery of the naive B-cell compartment within 1 year after ASCT. These data are the first to demonstrate that both depletion of the autoreactive immunologic memory and a profound resetting of the adaptive immune system are required to reestablish self-tolerance in SLE.

  12. A Combination of Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Pancreatic Endoderm Transplant with LDHA-Repressing miRNA Can Attenuate High-Fat Diet Induced Type II Diabetes in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yunya; Wang, Xiujie; Shao, Xinyu

    2015-01-01

    Type II diabetes mellitus (T2D) is a chronic metabolic disorder that results from defects in both insulin secretion and insulin action. The deficit and dysfunction of insulin secreting β-cell are signature symptom for T2D. Additionally, in pancreatic β-cell, a small group of genes which are abundantly expressed in most other tissues are highly selectively repressed. Lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA) is one of such genes. Upregulation of LDHA is found in both human T2D and rodent T2D models. In this study, we identified a LDHA-suppressing microRNA (hsa-miR-590-3p) and used it together with human embryonic stem cell (hESC) derived pancreatic endoderm (PE) transplantation into a high-fat diet induced T2D mouse model. The procedure significantly improved glucose metabolism and other symptoms of T2D. Our findings support the potential T2D treatment using the combination of microRNA and hESC-differentiated PE cells. PMID:26770982

  13. Immunosuppressive Therapy in Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Allison, Terri L

    2016-03-01

    This article discusses immunosuppressive medications used in organ and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Induction, maintenance, and rescue therapy are administered throughout different periods during and after transplantation to modulate the immune system response in the recipient to prevent or treat rejection or graft-versus-host disease. Indications, dosing strategies, required monitoring, complications, adverse events, and concomitant drug interactions associated with immunosuppressive medications are presented. Classes of medications discussed include polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies, calcineurin inhibitors, antiproliferative agents, mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors, and corticosteroids. Medications having significant interactions with immunosuppression are also examined.

  14. Xenogeneic lung transplantation models

    PubMed Central

    Burdorf, Lars; Azimzadeh, Agnes M.; Pierson, Richard N.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Study of lung xenografts has proven useful to understand the remaining barriers to successful transplantation of other organ xenografts. In this chapter, the history and current status of lung xenotransplantation will be briefly reviewed and two different experimental models, the ex vivo porcine-to-human lung perfusion and the in vivo xenogeneic lung transplantation, will be presented. We will focus on the technical details of these lung xenograft models in sufficient detail, list the needed materials and mention analysis techniques to allow others to adopt them with minimal learning curve. PMID:22565996

  15. Obesity and liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Ayloo, Subhashini; Armstrong, John; Hurton, Scott; Molinari, Michele

    2015-01-01

    The percentage of overweight and obese patients (OPs) waiting for a liver transplant continues to increase. Despite the significant advances occurred in bariatric medicine, obesity is still considered a relative contraindication to liver transplantation (LT). The main aim of this review is to appraise the literature on the outcomes of OPs undergoing LT, treatments that might reduce their weight before, during or after surgery, and discuss some of the controversies and limitations of the current knowledge with the intent of highlighting areas where future research is needed. PMID:26421262

  16. Photoacoustic imaging of angiogenesis in subdermal islet transplant sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wei; Pawlick, Rena; Bruni, Antonio; Rafiei, Yasmin; Pepper, Andrew R.; Gala-Lopez, Boris; Choi, Min; Malcolm, Andrew; Zemp, Roger J.; Shapiro, A. M. James

    2016-03-01

    Exogenous insulin administration is the mainstay treatment therapy for patients with Type-1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). However, for select patients, clinical islet transplantation is an alternative therapeutic treatment. In this procedure, islets are transplanted into the hepatic portal vein, and despite improved success within the last decade, obstacles are still associated with this approach. It has been discovered that the subcutaneous space may be an effective alternative site for islet transplantation, and may provide advantages of easy access and potential for simple monitoring. The ability to monitor islet viability and the transplant microenvironment may be key to future success in islet transplantation. A subcutaneous device-less technique has been developed to facilitate angiogenesis in the islet transplant site, however, a method for monitoring the potential engraftment site have yet to be explored fully. Here we demonstrate the ability to track angiogenesis in mice with 1, 2, 3 and 4 weeks post-catheter implant on both sides of the abdomen using a FujiFilm VisualSonics Vevo-LAZR system. Quantitative analysis on vessel densities exhibited gradual vessel growth successfully induced by catheter implantation. Our study demonstrates the ability of employing photoacoustic and micro-ultrasound imaging to track angiogenesis around the catheter site prior to islet transplantation.

  17. Changing Role of Heart Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kittleson, Michelle M

    2016-07-01

    Heart transplantation has become standard of care for end-stage heart failure. Challenges include the limited supply of donor organs and the increased complexity of heart transplant candidates who are at higher risk for poor outcomes. Recent advances may address these challenges, including proposed changes in heart transplant allocation policy, a better understanding of the definition and management of primary graft dysfunction, and advances in the management of sensitized heart transplant candidates. Developments in these areas may result in more equitable distribution and expansion of the donor pool and improved quality of life and survival for heart transplant recipients. PMID:27371517

  18. [Running through the liver transplantation].

    PubMed

    Grecu, F

    2003-01-01

    An overview of the organization, timing and developing of the liver transplantation is difficult to be made in terms of multiple sequences and a great variety of activities during the developing of such activity. A well-trained transplant team must carry out the potential donor, the liver grafts manipulation and the graft receptor, in the condition of a competitive medical system. A summary presentation, showing the essentials of the proceedings in liver transplantation could be assimilated as a guide of multidisciplinary sequences that leads to the completion of the liver grafting. The common feature of all that means the liver transplantation and generally in organ transplantation is the performance and exactingness.

  19. Lung Transplantation for Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Frederick R.; Aurora, Paul; Barker, David H.; Barr, Mark L.; Blackwell, Laura S.; Bosma, Otto H.; Brown, Samuel; Cox, D. R.; Jensen, Judy L.; Kurland, Geoffrey; Nossent, George D.; Quittner, Alexandra L.; Robinson, Walter M.; Romero, Sandy L.; Spencer, Helen; Sweet, Stuart C.; van der Bij, Wim; Vermeulen, J.; Verschuuren, Erik A. M.; Vrijlandt, Elianne J. L. E.; Walsh, William; Woo, Marlyn S.; Liou, Theodore G.

    2009-01-01

    Lung transplantation is a complex, high-risk, potentially life-saving therapy for the end-stage lung disease of cystic fibrosis (CF). The decision to pursue transplantation involves comparing the likelihood of survival with and without transplantation as well as assessing the effect of wait-listing and transplantation on the patient's quality of life. Although recent population-based analyses of the US lung allocation system for the CF population have raised controversies about the survival benefits of transplantation, studies from the United Kingdom and Canada have suggested a definite survival advantage for those receiving transplants. In response to these and other controversies, leaders in transplantation and CF met together in Lansdowne, Virginia, to consider the state of the art in lung transplantation for CF in an international context, focusing on advances in surgical technique, measurement of outcomes, use of prognostic criteria, variations in local control over listing, and prioritization among the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, and The Netherlands, patient adherence before and after transplantation and other issues in the broader context of lung transplantation. Finally, the conference members carefully considered how efforts to improve outcomes for lung transplantation for CF lung disease might best be studied. This Roundtable seeks to communicate the substance of our discussions. PMID:20008865

  20. Facial transplantation: A concise update

    PubMed Central

    Barrera-Pulido, Fernando; Gomez-Cia, Tomas; Sicilia-Castro, Domingo; Garcia-Perla-Garcia, Alberto; Gacto-Sanchez, Purificacion; Hernandez-Guisado, Jose-Maria; Lagares-Borrego, Araceli; Narros-Gimenez, Rocio; Gonzalez-Padilla, Juan D.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Update on clinical results obtained by the first worldwide facial transplantation teams as well as review of the literature concerning the main surgical, immunological, ethical, and follow-up aspects described on facial transplanted patients. Study design: MEDLINE search of articles published on “face transplantation” until March 2012. Results: Eighteen clinical cases were studied. The mean patient age was 37.5 years, with a higher prevalence of men. Main surgical indication was gunshot injuries (6 patients). All patients had previously undergone multiple conventional surgical reconstructive procedures which had failed. Altogether 8 transplant teams belonging to 4 countries participated. Thirteen partial face transplantations and 5 full face transplantations have been performed. Allografts are varied according to face anatomical components and the amount of skin, muscle, bone, and other tissues included, though all were grafted successfully and remained viable without significant postoperative surgical complications. The patient with the longest follow-up was 5 years. Two patients died 2 and 27 months after transplantation. Conclusions: Clinical experience has demonstrated the feasibility of facial transplantation as a valuable reconstructive option, but it still remains considered as an experimental procedure with unresolved issues to settle down. Results show that from a clinical, technical, and immunological standpoint, facial transplantation has achieved functional, aesthetic, and social rehabilitation in severely facial disfigured patients. Key words:Face transplantation, composite tissue transplantation, face allograft, facial reconstruction, outcomes and complications of face transplantation. PMID:23229268

  1. Imaging in liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Caruso, Settimo; Miraglia, Roberto; Maruzzelli, Luigi; Gruttadauria, Salvatore; Luca, Angelo; Gridelli, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to illustrate the role of non-invasive imaging tools such as ultrasonography, multi-detector row computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of pediatric and adult liver recipients and potential liver donors, and in the detection of potential complications arising from liver transplantation. PMID:19222090

  2. Organ Harvesting and Transplants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baskette, Kimberly G.; Ritz, John M.

    2010-01-01

    Humans and animals need healthy organs to live. Due to medical conditions and accidents, some organs fail to function properly. For these reasons, the medical community has experimented and can now perform successful organ transplants, allowing patients to continue to live their lives. Many countries have medical programs where individuals can…

  3. After the Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... you from post-surgical pain for a short time. Follow your team's pain management instructions to make the overall experience as comfortable as possible. Transplant is major surgery. It may take time to get back to eating normally, moving around, ...

  4. Hair transplantation update.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Nicole E

    2015-06-01

    Contemporary hair transplant surgery offers results that are natural and undetectable. It is an excellent treatment option for male and female pattern hair loss. Patients are encouraged to also use medical therapy to help protect their surgical results and prevent ongoing thinning of the surrounding hairs. The two major techniques of donor elliptical harvesting and follicular unit extraction are discussed here. PMID:26176286

  5. Ovary and uterus transplantation.

    PubMed

    Gosden, Roger G

    2008-12-01

    Ovarian and uterine transplantation are procedures gaining more attention again because of potential applications in respectively fertility preservation for cancer and other patients and, more tentatively, women with uterine agenesis or hysterectomy. Cryopreservation of tissue slices, and possibly whole organs, is providing opportunities for banking ovaries for indefinite periods before transplanting them back to restore fertility. The natural plasticity of this organ facilitates grafting to different sites where they can be revascularized and rapidly restore the normal physiology of secretion and ovulation. Ischemic damage is a chief limitation because many follicles are lost, at least in avascular grafts, and functional longevity is reduced. Nevertheless, grafts of young ovarian tissue, even after cryopreservation, can be highly fertile in laboratory rodents and, in humans, autografts have functioned for up to 3 years before needing replacement. Transplantation by vascular anastomosis provides potentially longer function but it is technically much more demanding and riskier for the recipient. It is the only practicable method with the uterus, and has enabled successful pregnancies in several species, but not yet in humans. Contrary to claims made many years ago, neither organ is privileged immunologically, and allografts become rapidly rejected except in hosts whose immune system is deficient or suppressed pharmacologically. All in all, transplantation of these organs, especially the ovary, provides a broad platform of opportunities for research and new applications in reproductive medicine and conservation biology.

  6. Reappraisal of HLA antibody analysis and crossmatching in kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Po-Chang; Ozawa, Miyuki

    2007-01-01

    no antibodies, CDC no crossmatches- was 88%. The PPV was 55% for sera with HLA class I DSA and 67% with HLA class II sera. On the other hand, NPV was 84% with sera negative for HLA class I DSA and 86% with sera negative for HLA class II DSA. Pretransplant sera from 48 patients with followup data at NCKUH were retested by both ELISA LAT-M and Luminex in order to compare the efficacy of those two methods. ELISA found pre-transplant HLA antibodies in 8 of the 48 (17%). Luminex found HLA antibodies in 27 (56%). Functional graft survival at 5, 10 and 15 years was not significantly different between the 27 patients whom Luminex identified as having pre-transplant HLA antibodies and the 21 patients Luminex found to be free of those antibodies (P=0.7197). For patients shown by Luminex to have pre-transplant class II DSA (N=8), functional graft survival was significantly lower than for those Luminex showed negative for HLA antibodies (P=0.0036). The concept of virtual XM relies on accurate HLA typing and thorough evaluation of HLA antibodies by solid-phase assays. While a negative virtual XM proved to be very reliable to rule out the presence of donor-specific HLA antibodies, it becomes more a concern whether all HLA antibodies detected by flow-beads are in fact clinically relevant. The virtual XM approach-in which antibodies are characterized by solid-phase assays prior to crossmatching-was reported to predict a negative flow XM in greater than 90% of cases. The predictive value for a correct CDC XM, however, was only 75%. A potential disadvantage of the virtual XM approach is that transplants may be excluded based on antibody results with unknown clinical relevance. Based on our results, we believe HLA antibody identification using ELISA still has a role in predicting long term graft survival and negative predictive value for CDC crossmatch before transplantation. Further analysis of HLA antibody, using Luminex, will be done to compare with present data.

  7. Cancer in the Transplant Recipient

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Jeremy R.; Webster, Angela C.; Wong, Germaine

    2013-01-01

    Malignancy has become one of the three major causes of death after transplantation in the past decade and is thus increasingly important in all organ transplant programs. Death from cardiovascular disease and infection are both decreasing in frequency from a combination of screening, prophylaxis, aggressive risk factor management, and interventional therapies. Cancer, on the other hand, is poorly and expensively screened for; risk factors are mostly elusive and/or hard to impact on except for the use of immunosuppression itself; and finally therapeutic approaches to the transplant recipient with cancer are often nihilistic. This article provides a review of each of the issues as they come to affect transplantation: cancer before wait-listing, cancer transmission from the donor, cancer after transplantation, outcomes of transplant recipients after a diagnosis of cancer, and the role of screening and therapy in reducing the impact of cancer in transplant recipients. PMID:23818517

  8. Hypercoagulability in Kidney Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Parajuli, Sandesh; Lockridge, Joseph B; Langewisch, Eric D; Norman, Douglas J; Kujovich, Jody L

    2016-04-01

    Thrombosis remains an important complication after kidney transplantation. Outcomes for graft and deep vein thrombosis are not favorable. The majority of early kidney transplant failure in adults is due to allograft thrombosis. Risk stratification, early diagnosis, and appropriate intervention are critical to the management of thrombotic complications of transplant. In patients with end-stage renal disease, the prevalence of acquired risk factors for thrombosis is significantly high. Because of hereditary and acquired risk factors, renal transplant recipients manifest features of a chronic prothrombotic state. Identification of hereditary thrombotic risk factors before transplantation may be a useful tool for selecting appropriate candidates for thrombosis prophylaxis immediately after transplantation. Short-term anticoagulation may be appropriate for all patients after kidney transplantation.

  9. Transplant tourism: a growing phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Cohen, David J

    2009-03-01

    Medical tourism is increasing owing to high costs of care, lack of availability or long waits for procedures, and improvements in technology and standards of care in many countries. Transplant tourism is one example of medical tourism that has been attracting increasing attention because of concerns over poor treatment and outcomes of both donors and recipients. Most such cases involve vended kidneys obtained from vulnerable populations, and both donors and recipients receive inferior care by US standards. This commentary discusses a paper by Gill et al. that compared outcomes of 33 transplant tourists with those of patients transplanted at a US center. Fewer complications and better outcomes were seen in patients transplanted in the US center than among transplant tourists. Large transplant centers with long waiting times are increasingly likely to see patients return newly transplanted from overseas; such patients require urgent attention, with particular consideration to infectious complications.

  10. Will Regenerative Medicine Replace Transplantation?

    PubMed Central

    Orlando, Giuseppe; Soker, Shay; Stratta, Robert J.; Atala, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Recent groundbreaking advances in organ bioengineering and regeneration have provided evidence that regenerative medicine holds promise to dramatically improve the approach to organ transplantation. The two fields, however, share a common heritage. Alexis Carrel can be considered the father of both regenerative medicine and organ transplantation, and it is now clear that his legacy is equally applicable for the present and future generations of transplant and regenerative medicine investigators. In this review, we will briefly illustrate the interplay that should be established between these two complementary disciplines of health sciences. Although regenerative medicine has shown to the transplant field its potential, transplantation is destined to align with regenerative medicine and foster further progress probably more than either discipline alone. Organ bioengineering and regeneration technologies hold the promise to meet at the same time the two most urgent needs in organ transplantation, namely, the identification of a new, potentially inexhaustible source of organs and immunosuppression-free transplantation of tissues and organs. PMID:23906883

  11. Will regenerative medicine replace transplantation?

    PubMed

    Orlando, Giuseppe; Soker, Shay; Stratta, Robert J; Atala, Anthony

    2013-08-01

    Recent groundbreaking advances in organ bioengineering and regeneration have provided evidence that regenerative medicine holds promise to dramatically improve the approach to organ transplantation. The two fields, however, share a common heritage. Alexis Carrel can be considered the father of both regenerative medicine and organ transplantation, and it is now clear that his legacy is equally applicable for the present and future generations of transplant and regenerative medicine investigators. In this review, we will briefly illustrate the interplay that should be established between these two complementary disciplines of health sciences. Although regenerative medicine has shown to the transplant field its potential, transplantation is destined to align with regenerative medicine and foster further progress probably more than either discipline alone. Organ bioengineering and regeneration technologies hold the promise to meet at the same time the two most urgent needs in organ transplantation, namely, the identification of a new, potentially inexhaustible source of organs and immunosuppression-free transplantation of tissues and organs.

  12. Kidney Transplantation in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Edmund; Segev, Dorry L.; Rabb, Hamid

    2010-01-01

    Summary There is an increase in the older incident end-stage renal disease population that is associated with an increasing prevalence of end-stage renal disease in the United States. This trend is paralleled by an increasing rate of kidney transplantation in the elderly. Although patient survival is lower in older versus younger kidney recipients, the elderly benefit from a reduction in mortality rate and improved quality of life with transplantation compared with dialysis. Immunologic, physiologic, and psychosocial factors influence transplant outcomes and should be recognized in the care of the elderly transplant patient. In this review, we discuss transplantation in the elderly patient, particularly the topics of access to transplantation, patient and graft survival, the impact of donor quality on transplant outcomes, immunology and immunosuppression of aging, and ethical considerations in the development of an equitable organ allocation scheme. PMID:20006794

  13. Will regenerative medicine replace transplantation?

    PubMed

    Orlando, Giuseppe; Soker, Shay; Stratta, Robert J; Atala, Anthony

    2013-08-01

    Recent groundbreaking advances in organ bioengineering and regeneration have provided evidence that regenerative medicine holds promise to dramatically improve the approach to organ transplantation. The two fields, however, share a common heritage. Alexis Carrel can be considered the father of both regenerative medicine and organ transplantation, and it is now clear that his legacy is equally applicable for the present and future generations of transplant and regenerative medicine investigators. In this review, we will briefly illustrate the interplay that should be established between these two complementary disciplines of health sciences. Although regenerative medicine has shown to the transplant field its potential, transplantation is destined to align with regenerative medicine and foster further progress probably more than either discipline alone. Organ bioengineering and regeneration technologies hold the promise to meet at the same time the two most urgent needs in organ transplantation, namely, the identification of a new, potentially inexhaustible source of organs and immunosuppression-free transplantation of tissues and organs. PMID:23906883

  14. Fetal stem cell transplantation: Past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Tetsuya; Eto, Koji

    2014-09-26

    Since 1928, human fetal tissues and stem cells have been used worldwide to treat various conditions. Although the transplantation of the fetal midbrain substantia nigra and dopaminergic neurons in patients suffering from Parkinson's disease is particularly noteworthy, the history of other types of grafts, such as those of the fetal liver, thymus, and pancreas, should be addressed as there are many lessons to be learnt for future stem cell transplantation. This report describes previous practices and complications that led to current clinical trials of isolated fetal stem cells and embryonic stem (ES) cells. Moreover, strategies for transplantation are considered, with a particular focus on donor cells, cell processing, and the therapeutic cell niche, in addition to ethical issues associated with fetal origin. With the advent of autologous induced pluripotent stem cells and ES cells, clinical dependence on fetal transplantation is expected to gradually decline due to lasting ethical controversies, despite landmark achievements.

  15. Glaucoma drainage implant surgery and ocular surface transplant graft preservation.

    PubMed

    Aref, Ahmad A; Sivaraman, Kavitha R; Djalilian, Ali R

    2015-05-01

    Glaucoma may develop or worsen after ocular surface transplantation and often requires surgical management for adequate intraocular pressure control. Traditional glaucoma filtering procedures in patients with prior ocular surface transplant may be problematic for several reasons, which include mechanical disruption of the pre-existing graft, epithelial and stem cell toxicity induced by antifibrotic agents, and increased risk of future corneal transplantation failure. We describe the implantation of a glaucoma drainage implant via a limbal-based conjunctival incision with tube placement in the ciliary sulcus in three eyes of two patients with prior ocular surface transplantation. At a follow-up interval of 3-7 months, all three eyes have excellent postoperative control of intraocular pressure, stable vision, and healthy ocular surface grafts.

  16. Fetal stem cell transplantation: Past, present, and future

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Tetsuya; Eto, Koji

    2014-01-01

    Since 1928, human fetal tissues and stem cells have been used worldwide to treat various conditions. Although the transplantation of the fetal midbrain substantia nigra and dopaminergic neurons in patients suffering from Parkinson’s disease is particularly noteworthy, the history of other types of grafts, such as those of the fetal liver, thymus, and pancreas, should be addressed as there are many lessons to be learnt for future stem cell transplantation. This report describes previous practices and complications that led to current clinical trials of isolated fetal stem cells and embryonic stem (ES) cells. Moreover, strategies for transplantation are considered, with a particular focus on donor cells, cell processing, and the therapeutic cell niche, in addition to ethical issues associated with fetal origin. With the advent of autologous induced pluripotent stem cells and ES cells, clinical dependence on fetal transplantation is expected to gradually decline due to lasting ethical controversies, despite landmark achievements. PMID:25258662

  17. The effect of MICA antigens on kidney transplantation outcomes.

    PubMed

    Luo, Lei; Li, Zhengyu; Wu, Weidong; Luo, Guangheng; Mei, Hong; Sun, Zhaolin; Xu, Chuan

    2013-01-01

    Good HLA matches do not guarantee rejection-free kidney transplantation, indicating that other antigens might be targets for rejection. The major histocompatibility complex class I-related antigens A (MICA) are polymorphic. Mismatched MICA epitopes may lead to antibodies against MICA antigens and induce immune response. Establishment of detection technique for MICA, including solid-phase, immunofluorescence, flow-crossmatch, make it possible to detect the types of MICA antibodies. Therefore, the pathological role of MICA antibodies has received an increased attention in kidney transplantation. This review describes and summarizes the data from recent studies related to the impact of MICA antibodies on kidney allografts rejection and survival. And also provides evidence that the presence of MICA antibodies before or after transplantation, as a risk factor, is likely to be responsible for transplant outcomes.

  18. Management of biliary tract stones in heart transplant patients.

    PubMed Central

    Milas, M; Ricketts, R R; Amerson, J R; Kanter, K

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors report their experience with biliary tract stones in adult and pediatric heart transplant patients, and review the current literature relative to this problem. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Prior studies in adults have noted that heart transplant patients frequently have cholelithiasis, but offer no consensus about treatment strategy. Few studies exist for pediatric heart transplant patients. A higher rate of hemolysis and cyclosporine-induced changes in bile metabolism may contribute to lithogenesis in this population. METHODS: A chart review was conducted for 211 patients who had heart transplants between January 1988 and September 1994 to determine prevalence of biliary tract stones, management strategies used, and outcome. RESULTS: Of 175 long-term heart transplant survivors, 52 (29.7%) had stones detected: 32.8% of adults (47/143) and 15.6% of children (5/32). The majority of patients (31) were diagnosed 4 months (mean) after transplantation; cholelithiasis developed in 10 of these patients (32%) within 11 months (median) after a negative ultrasound. Symptoms developed in 45% of patients. All patients underwent either elective (36) or urgent (6) cholecystectomy via an open (32) or laparoscopic (10) approach, or endoscopy for common bile duct stones (2). There were no deaths or complications during a follow-up period of up to 7 years. CONCLUSION: Heart transplant patients have a high prevalence of symptomatic biliary tract stone disease. They can be treated safely via an open or laparoscopic approach after transplantation. The authors recommend routine gallbladder ultrasound screening and elective cholecystectomy in the post-transplant period if stones are detected. Images Figure 4. PMID:8645048

  19. Key issues in transplant tourism.

    PubMed

    Akoh, Jacob A

    2012-02-24

    Access to organ transplantation depends on national circumstances, and is partly determined by the cost of health care, availability of transplant services, the level of technical capacity and the availability of organs. Commercial transplantation is estimated to account for 5%-10% (3500-7000) of kidney transplants performed annually throughout the world. This review is to determine the state and outcome of renal transplantation associated with transplant tourism (TT) and the key challenges with such transplantation. The stakeholders of commercial transplantation include: patients on the waiting lists in developed countries or not on any list in developing countries; dialysis funding bodies; middlemen, hosting transplant centres; organ-exporting countries; and organ vendors. TT and commercial kidney transplants are associated with a high incidence of surgical complications, acute rejection and invasive infection which cause major morbidity and mortality. There are ethical and medical concerns regarding the management of recipients of organs from vendors. The growing demand for transplantation, the perceived failure of altruistic donation in providing enough organs has led to calls for a legalised market in organ procurement or regulated trial in incentives for donation. Developing transplant services worldwide has many benefits - improving results of transplantation as they would be performed legally, increasing the donor pool and making TT unnecessary. Meanwhile there is a need to re-examine intrinsic attitudes to TT bearing in mind the cultural and economic realities of globalisation. Perhaps the World Health Organization in conjunction with The Transplantation Society would set up a working party of stakeholders to study this matter in greater detail and make recommendations. PMID:24175191

  20. Key issues in transplant tourism.

    PubMed

    Akoh, Jacob A

    2012-02-24

    Access to organ transplantation depends on national circumstances, and is partly determined by the cost of health care, availability of transplant services, the level of technical capacity and the availability of organs. Commercial transplantation is estimated to account for 5%-10% (3500-7000) of kidney transplants performed annually throughout the world. This review is to determine the state and outcome of renal transplantation associated with transplant tourism (TT) and the key challenges with such transplantation. The stakeholders of commercial transplantation include: patients on the waiting lists in developed countries or not on any list in developing countries; dialysis funding bodies; middlemen, hosting transplant centres; organ-exporting countries; and organ vendors. TT and commercial kidney transplants are associated with a high incidence of surgical complications, acute rejection and invasive infection which cause major morbidity and mortality. There are ethical and medical concerns regarding the management of recipients of organs from vendors. The growing demand for transplantation, the perceived failure of altruistic donation in providing enough organs has led to calls for a legalised market in organ procurement or regulated trial in incentives for donation. Developing transplant services worldwide has many benefits - improving results of transplantation as they would be performed legally, increasing the donor pool and making TT unnecessary. Meanwhile there is a need to re-examine intrinsic attitudes to TT bearing in mind the cultural and economic realities of globalisation. Perhaps the World Health Organization in conjunction with The Transplantation Society would set up a working party of stakeholders to study this matter in greater detail and make recommendations.

  1. Key issues in transplant tourism

    PubMed Central

    Akoh, Jacob A

    2012-01-01

    Access to organ transplantation depends on national circumstances, and is partly determined by the cost of health care, availability of transplant services, the level of technical capacity and the availability of organs. Commercial transplantation is estimated to account for 5%-10% (3500-7000) of kidney transplants performed annually throughout the world. This review is to determine the state and outcome of renal transplantation associated with transplant tourism (TT) and the key challenges with such transplantation. The stakeholders of commercial transplantation include: patients on the waiting lists in developed countries or not on any list in developing countries; dialysis funding bodies; middlemen, hosting transplant centres; organ-exporting countries; and organ vendors. TT and commercial kidney transplants are associated with a high incidence of surgical complications, acute rejection and invasive infection which cause major morbidity and mortality. There are ethical and medical concerns regarding the management of recipients of organs from vendors. The growing demand for transplantation, the perceived failure of altruistic donation in providing enough organs has led to calls for a legalised market in organ procurement or regulated trial in incentives for donation. Developing transplant services worldwide has many benefits - improving results of transplantation as they would be performed legally, increasing the donor pool and making TT unnecessary. Meanwhile there is a need to re-examine intrinsic attitudes to TT bearing in mind the cultural and economic realities of globalisation. Perhaps the World Health Organization in conjunction with The Transplantation Society would set up a working party of stakeholders to study this matter in greater detail and make recommendations. PMID:24175191

  2. Functional clonal deletion versus suppressor cell-induced transplantation tolerance in chimeras prepared with a short course of total-lymphoid irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Slavin, S.; Morecki, S.; Weigensberg, M.; Bar, S.; Weiss, L.

    1986-06-01

    Allogeneic bone marrow (BM) chimeras induced by infusion of BM cells into recipients conditioned with total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) were shown to develop humoral and cell-mediated tolerance to host and donor-type alloantigens by a number of in vitro and in vivo assays. Spleen cells of tolerant chimeras exhibited suppressive activity of mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR). MLR suppression was not abrogated by depletion of Lyt-2 cells, and neither could Lyt-2-positive cells sorted from the spleens of tolerant chimeras suppress MLR or attenuate graft-versus-host reactivity in vivo. Likewise, specifically unresponsive spleen cells obtained from chimeras could not be induced to respond in MLR against tolerizing host-type cells following depletion of Lyt-2 or passage through a nylon-wool column. Tolerance of chimera spleen cells to host alloantigens, best documented by permanent survival of donor-type skin allografts, could be adoptively transferred into syngeneic recipients treated by heavy irradiation but not into untreated or mildly irradiated recipients. Adoptive transfer of tolerance seemed to be associated with experimental conditions favoring engraftment of tolerant cells rather than suppression of host reactivity. We speculate that although host and/or donor-derived suppressor cells may be operating in reducing the pool of specific alloreactive clones by blocking cell proliferation in response to allogeneic challenge, the final outcome in tolerant chimeras is actual or functional deletion of alloreactive clones.

  3. Associations of Pre-Transplant Serum Albumin with Post-Transplant Outcomes in Kidney Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Molnar, Miklos Z; Kovesdy, Csaba P; Bunnapradist, Suphamai; Streja, Elani; Mehrotra, Rajnish; Krishnan, Mahesh; Nissenson, Allen R; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2011-01-01

    The association between pre-transplant serum albumin concentration and post-transplant outcomes in kidney transplant recipients is unclear. We hypothesized that in transplant-waitlisted hemodialysis patients, lower serum albumin concentrations are associated with worse post-transplant outcomes. Linking the 5-year patient data of a large dialysis organization (DaVita) to the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients, we identified 8961 hemodialysis patients who underwent first kidney transplantation. Mortality or graft failure and delayed graft function (DGF) risks were estimated by Cox regression (hazard ratio [HR]) and logistic regression (Odds ratio [OR]), respectively. Patients were 48±13 years old and included 37% women and 27% diabetics. The higher pre-transplant serum albumin was associated with lower mortality, graft failure and DGF risk even after multivariate adjustment for case-mix, malnutrition-inflammation complex and transplant related variable. Every 0.2 g/dL higher pre-transplant serum albumin concentration was associated with 13% lower all-cause mortality (HR=0.87 [95% confidence interval: 0.82-0.93]), 17% lower cardiovascular mortality (HR=0.83[0.74-0.93]), 7% lower combined risk of death or graft failure (HR=0.93[0.89-0.97]), and 4% lower DGF risk (OR=0.96[0.93-0.99]). Hence, lower pre-transplant serum albumin level is associated with worse post-transplant outcomes. Clinical trials to examine interventions to improve nutritional status in transplant-wait-listed hemodialysis patients and their impacts on post-transplant outcomes are indicated. PMID:21449945

  4. Alloimmune Activation Promotes Anti-Cancer Cytotoxicity after Rat Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lacotte, Stéphanie; Oldani, Graziano; Slits, Florence; Orci, Lorenzo A.; Rubbia-Brandt, Laura; Morel, Philippe; Mentha, Gilles; Toso, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Liver transplantation for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) results in a specific condition where the immune response is potentially directed against both allogeneic and cancer antigens. We have investigated the level of anti-cancer immunity during allogeneic immune response. Dark Agouti-to-Lewis and Lewis-to-Lewis rat liver transplantations were performed and the recipients anti-cancer immunity was analysed at the time of alloimmune activation. The occurrence of rejection in the allogeneic recipients was confirmed by a shorter survival (p<0.01), increased liver function tests (p<0.01), the presence of signs of rejection on histology, and a donor-specific ex vivo mixed lymphocyte reaction. At the time of alloimmune activation, blood mononuclear cells of the allogeneic group demonstrated increased anti-cancer cytotoxicity (p<0.005), which was related to an increased natural killer (NK) cell frequency (p<0.05) and a higher monocyte/macrophage activation level (p<0.01). Similarly, liver NK cell anti-cancer cytotoxicity (p<0.005), and liver monocyte/macrophage activation levels (p<0.01) were also increased. The alloimmune-associated cytotoxicity was mediated through the NKG2D receptor, whose expression was increased in the rejected graft (p<0.05) and on NK cells and monocyte/macrophages. NKG2D ligands were expressed on rat HCC cells, and its inhibition prevented the alloimmune-associated cytotoxicity. Although waiting for in vivo validation, alloimmune-associated cytotoxicity after rat liver transplantation appears to be linked to increased frequencies and levels of activation of NK cells and monocyte/macrophages, and is at least in part mediated through the NKG2D receptor. PMID:24651497

  5. Alloimmune activation promotes anti-cancer cytotoxicity after rat liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lacotte, Stéphanie; Oldani, Graziano; Slits, Florence; Orci, Lorenzo A; Rubbia-Brandt, Laura; Morel, Philippe; Mentha, Gilles; Toso, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Liver transplantation for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) results in a specific condition where the immune response is potentially directed against both allogeneic and cancer antigens. We have investigated the level of anti-cancer immunity during allogeneic immune response. Dark Agouti-to-Lewis and Lewis-to-Lewis rat liver transplantations were performed and the recipients anti-cancer immunity was analysed at the time of alloimmune activation. The occurrence of rejection in the allogeneic recipients was confirmed by a shorter survival (p<0.01), increased liver function tests (p<0.01), the presence of signs of rejection on histology, and a donor-specific ex vivo mixed lymphocyte reaction. At the time of alloimmune activation, blood mononuclear cells of the allogeneic group demonstrated increased anti-cancer cytotoxicity (p<0.005), which was related to an increased natural killer (NK) cell frequency (p<0.05) and a higher monocyte/macrophage activation level (p<0.01). Similarly, liver NK cell anti-cancer cytotoxicity (p<0.005), and liver monocyte/macrophage activation levels (p<0.01) were also increased. The alloimmune-associated cytotoxicity was mediated through the NKG2D receptor, whose expression was increased in the rejected graft (p<0.05) and on NK cells and monocyte/macrophages. NKG2D ligands were expressed on rat HCC cells, and its inhibition prevented the alloimmune-associated cytotoxicity. Although waiting for in vivo validation, alloimmune-associated cytotoxicity after rat liver transplantation appears to be linked to increased frequencies and levels of activation of NK cells and monocyte/macrophages, and is at least in part mediated through the NKG2D receptor.

  6. Ohio solid organ transplantation consortium criteria for liver transplantation in patients with alcoholic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Hajifathalian, Kaveh; Humberson, Annette; Hanouneh, Mohamad A; Barnes, David S; Arora, Zubin; Zein, Nizar N; Eghtesad, Bijan; Kelly, Dympna; Hanouneh, Ibrahim A

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate risk of recidivism on a case-by-case basis. METHODS From our center’s liver transplant program, we selected patients with alcoholic liver disease who were listed for transplant based on Ohio Solid Organ Transplantation Consortium (OSOTC) exception criteria. They were considered to have either a low or medium risk of recidivism, and had at least one or three or more months of abstinence, respectively. They were matched based on gender, age, and Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score to controls with alcohol-induced cirrhosis from Organ Procurement and Transplant Network data. RESULTS Thirty six patients with alcoholic liver disease were approved for listing based on OSOTC exception criteria and were matched to 72 controls. Nineteen patients (53%) with a median [Inter-quartile range (IQR)] MELD score of 24 (13) received transplant and were followed for a median of 3.4 years. They were matched to 38 controls with a median (IQR) MELD score of 25 (9). At one and five years, cumulative survival rates (± standard error) were 90% ± 7% and 92% ± 5% and 73% ± 12% and 77% ± 8% in patients and controls, respectively (Log-rank test, P = 0.837). Four (21%) patients resumed drinking by last follow-up visit. CONCLUSION Compared to traditional criteria for assessment of risk of recidivism, a careful selection process with more flexibility to evaluate eligibility on a case-by-case basis can lead to similar survival rates after transplantation. PMID:27721920

  7. Liver transplantation at Mount Sinai.

    PubMed

    Kim-Schluger, L; Florman, S S; Gondolesi, G; Emre, S; Sheiner, P A; Fishbein, T M; Schwartz, M E; Miller, C M

    2000-01-01

    Nearly 2000 liver transplants have been performed over the past 12 years at Mount Sinai, with a recent exponential growth in living donor surgeries. Living-donor liver transplantation has emerged as an important option for our patients with end-stage liver disease. We are only beginning to recognize fully the advantages that 'scheduled' liver transplantation can offer. In this era of severe cadaver organ shortages, living donation offers patients the option of liver replacement in a timely fashion, before life-threatening complications of hepatic failure and/or carcinoma progression prohibit transplantation. The next era of transplantation at Mount Sinai will bring significant increases in the number of transplants performed with living donors, with projections of over 50% of the total transplants each year expected to involve living donations. We are committed to offering this option while recognizing that donor safety remains paramount and cannot be overemphasized. Proper donor and recipient selection, as well as surgical experience are imperative to success with this technically demanding procedure. Recurrent disease after transplantation, particularly with hepatitis C, remains a challenge clinically. Further investigations into the pathogenesis of the rapid progression of recurrent hepatitis C need to be addressed. Living donor transplantation could be an important option for these patients and would allow timely transplantation and the potential for improved survival in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:11512318

  8. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for HIV cure.

    PubMed

    Kuritzkes, Daniel R

    2016-02-01

    The apparent cure of an HIV-infected person following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) from an allogeneic donor homozygous for the ccr5Δ32 mutation has stimulated the search for strategies to eradicate HIV or to induce long-term remission without requiring ongoing antiretroviral therapy. A variety of approaches, including allogeneic HSCT from CCR5-deficient donors and autologous transplantation of genetically modified hematopoietic stem cells, are currently under investigation. This Review covers the experience with HSCT in HIV infection to date and provides a survey of ongoing work in the field. The challenges of developing HSCT for HIV cure in the context of safe, effective, and convenient once-daily antiretroviral therapy are also discussed.

  9. Interneuron Progenitor Transplantation to Treat CNS Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Chohan, Muhammad O.; Moore, Holly

    2016-01-01

    Due to the inadequacy of endogenous repair mechanisms diseases of the nervous system remain a major challenge to scientists and clinicians. Stem cell based therapy is an exciting and viable strategy that has been shown to ameliorate or even reverse symptoms of CNS dysfunction in preclinical animal models. Of particular importance has been the use of GABAergic interneuron progenitors as a therapeutic strategy. Born in the neurogenic niches of the ventral telencephalon, interneuron progenitors retain their unique capacity to disperse, integrate and induce plasticity in adult host circuitries following transplantation. Here we discuss the potential of interneuron based transplantation strategies as it relates to CNS disease therapeutics. We also discuss mechanisms underlying their therapeutic efficacy and some of the challenges that face the field. PMID:27582692

  10. The Transplant Patient and Transplant Medicine in Family Practice

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Lloyd D.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last two decades in particular there has been a remarkable increase in the number of solid organ transplants being performed worldwide alongside improvements in long-term survival rates. However, the infrastructure at transplant centres has been unable to keep pace with the current volume of the transplant patient work load. These pressures on transplant specialist centres has led to calls for an increased role of the general practitioner (GP) managing particular aspects of transplant patients’ medical care. Indeed, many aspects of follow-up care such as screening for malignancies, preventing infection through immunisation programmes, and managing cardiovascular risk factors are already important aspects of family practice medicine. This paper aims to review some of the aspects of transplant patient care that is important for healthcare workers in family practice to manage. PMID:25657941

  11. Adaptive Natural Killer Cell and Killer Cell Immunoglobulin-Like Receptor-Expressing T Cell Responses are Induced by Cytomegalovirus and Are Associated with Protection against Cytomegalovirus Reactivation after Allogeneic Donor Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Davis, Zachary B; Cooley, Sarah A; Cichocki, Frank; Felices, Martin; Wangen, Rose; Luo, Xianghua; DeFor, Todd E; Bryceson, Yenan T; Diamond, Don J; Brunstein, Claudio; Blazar, Bruce R; Wagner, John E; Weisdorf, Daniel J; Horowitz, Amir; Guethlein, Lisbeth A; Parham, Peter; Verneris, Michael R; Miller, Jeffrey S

    2015-09-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) reactivates in >30% of CMV-seropositive patients after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Previously, we reported an increase of natural killer (NK) cells expressing NKG2C, CD57, and inhibitory killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) in response to CMV reactivation after HCT. These NK cells persist after the resolution of infection and display "adaptive" or memory properties. Despite these findings, the differential impact of persistent/inactive versus reactivated CMV on NK versus T cell maturation after HCT from different graft sources has not been defined. We compared the phenotype of NK and T cells from 292 recipients of allogeneic sibling (n = 118) or umbilical cord blood (UCB; n = 174) grafts based on recipient pretransplantation CMV serostatus and post-HCT CMV reactivation. This cohort was utilized to evaluate CMV-dependent increases in KIR-expressing NK cells exhibiting an adaptive phenotype (NKG2C(+)CD57(+)). Compared with CMV-seronegative recipients, those who reactivated CMV had the highest adaptive cell frequencies, whereas intermediate frequencies were observed in CMV-seropositive recipients harboring persistent/nonreplicating CMV. The same effect was observed in T cells and CD56(+) T cells. These adaptive lymphocyte subsets were increased in CMV-seropositive recipients of sibling but not UCB grafts and were correlated with lower rates of CMV reactivation (sibling 33% versus UCB 51%; P < .01). These data suggest that persistent/nonreplicating recipient CMV induces rapid production of adaptive NK and T cells from mature cells from sibling but not UCB grafts. These adaptive lymphocytes are associated with protection from CMV reactivation. PMID:26055301

  12. Adaptive Natural Killer Cell and Killer Cell Immunoglobulin-Like Receptor-Expressing T Cell Responses are Induced by Cytomegalovirus and Are Associated with Protection against Cytomegalovirus Reactivation after Allogeneic Donor Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Davis, Zachary B; Cooley, Sarah A; Cichocki, Frank; Felices, Martin; Wangen, Rose; Luo, Xianghua; DeFor, Todd E; Bryceson, Yenan T; Diamond, Don J; Brunstein, Claudio; Blazar, Bruce R; Wagner, John E; Weisdorf, Daniel J; Horowitz, Amir; Guethlein, Lisbeth A; Parham, Peter; Verneris, Michael R; Miller, Jeffrey S

    2015-09-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) reactivates in >30% of CMV-seropositive patients after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Previously, we reported an increase of natural killer (NK) cells expressing NKG2C, CD57, and inhibitory killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) in response to CMV reactivation after HCT. These NK cells persist after the resolution of infection and display "adaptive" or memory properties. Despite these findings, the differential impact of persistent/inactive versus reactivated CMV on NK versus T cell maturation after HCT from different graft sources has not been defined. We compared the phenotype of NK and T cells from 292 recipients of allogeneic sibling (n = 118) or umbilical cord blood (UCB; n = 174) grafts based on recipient pretransplantation CMV serostatus and post-HCT CMV reactivation. This cohort was utilized to evaluate CMV-dependent increases in KIR-expressing NK cells exhibiting an adaptive phenotype (NKG2C(+)CD57(+)). Compared with CMV-seronegative recipients, those who reactivated CMV had the highest adaptive cell frequencies, whereas intermediate frequencies were observed in CMV-seropositive recipients harboring persistent/nonreplicating CMV. The same effect was observed in T cells and CD56(+) T cells. These adaptive lymphocyte subsets were increased in CMV-seropositive recipients of sibling but not UCB grafts and were correlated with lower rates of CMV reactivation (sibling 33% versus UCB 51%; P < .01). These data suggest that persistent/nonreplicating recipient CMV induces rapid production of adaptive NK and T cells from mature cells from sibling but not UCB grafts. These adaptive lymphocytes are associated with protection from CMV reactivation.

  13. Impact of cytomegalovirus on early immunosenescence of CD8+ T lymphocytes after solid organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Cantisán, Sara; Torre-Cisneros, Julián; Lara, Rosario; Zarraga, Sofía; Montejo, Miguel; Solana, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    The increasing number of elderly people eligible for solid organ transplants has made it necessary to reevaluate how the decline in immune function associated to ageing (immunosenescence) affects solid organ transplants. Some immunosenescence biomarkers, such as the expansion of CD28(-)CD8+ T lymphocytes, have been associated to cytomegalovirus infection and are related to a form of accelerated immune senescence in transplant recipients. However, the impact of cytomegalovirus replication on downregulation of CD28 on total CD8+ T cells is independent of patients' age, whereas downregulation on cytomegalovirus-specific CD8+ T cells depends on patients' age, inducing early immunosenescence of cytomegalovirus-specific CD8+ T cells in young but not elderly solid organ transplants recipients. Although immunosenescence in transplant recipients should be considered a two-edged sword as it is a risk factor for the development of tumors after transplantation, it has a beneficial effect in attenuating acute allograft rejection and correlates with better clinical outcomes.

  14. Cardiac transplants. Heart and heart-lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Holmquist, T; Gamberg, P L

    1992-02-01

    OR nurses play an important role in organ procurement. They are responsible for gathering the necessary equipment, which includes cardioplegia supplies, normal saline, a sterile container for transplantation of the heart, a sterile retractor, vascular clamps, and dissection instruments. Orthotopic heart transplantation involves excision of the recipient heart with placement of the donor heart in a normal anatomic position. Heterotopic transplant, which consists of placing the donor heart in the right side of the chest parallel to the native heart, is rarely used. In heart-lung transplantation procedures, attention is given to the removal of the heart and each lung separately to prevent injury to the vagus, phrenic, and laryngeal nerves.

  15. Site-specific success of three transplanting methods and the effect of planting time on the establishment of Zostera marina transplants.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung-Im; Lee, Kun-Seop

    2007-08-01

    Eelgrass, Zostera marina, is the most abundant seagrass species on the coast of Korea, but most large eelgrass meadows have disappeared since the 1970s due to human-induced disturbance. To restore disturbed seagrass habitats in die-off areas, seagrass transplanting has been attempted using various methods. Here, we assessed the feasibility and efficiency of seagrass transplanting methods depending on the sediment type at the planting site. Additionally, the effect of planting time on the establishment of transplant was examined to determine the optimal season for planting. We conducted an eelgrass transplanting experiment from fall 2003 to summer 2004 at three sites with different sediment types using three planting techniques. The staple method resulted in the highest transplant survival rate (77.1-93.8%) at all three sites, but was labor intensive. Transplanting Eelgrass Remotely with Frame Systems (TERFS) method also resulted in relatively a high survival rate (58.7-69.0%) at all sites. The shell method is a newer eelgrass transplanting method in which oyster shells are used as an anchoring device, and does not require SCUBA diving for subtidal transplanting. The shell method resulted in high survival rates in muddy (81.3%) and silty sediments (76.5%), but remarkably low survival rate in sandy sediments (5.0%). The TERFS, and shell methods reduced underwater labor; thus, these methods is suitable for large-scale seagrass restoration. Eelgrass transplants planted in summer had exhibited significant mortality due to high summer water temperatures. Although transplants planted in fall to spring had relatively high survival rates, transplanting and collection of vegetative shoots are difficult in winter and spring. Therefore, fall was suggested as the most effective transplanting season off the coast of Korea.

  16. Corneal transplantation and glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Haddadin, Ramez I; Chodosh, James

    2014-01-01

    Glaucoma is the leading cause of irreversible vision loss post-keratoplasty and an important cause of graft failure. With newer techniques, such as lamellar, endothelial, and laser-assisted keratoplasty as well as keratoprosthesis gaining popularity, clinicians will need to consider the incidence, risks, evaluation, and management of glaucoma for each type of keratoplasty when determining which type of transplant may be most appropriate. A comprehensive literature search of glaucoma in the setting of corneal transplantation was performed and serves as the basis for this review. Preexisting glaucoma and aphakia are notable risk factors. Patients that are candidates for deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty may benefit from reduced rates of post-keratoplasty glaucoma. Although glaucoma also complicates eyes with Descemet stripping endothelial keratoplasty, the severity is less and the intraocular pressure is more easily controlled when compared to penetrating keratoplasty. Endothelial keratoplasty creates unique perioperative issues mostly related to management of anterior chamber air bubbles.

  17. Bioengineering Kidneys for Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Madariaga, Maria Lucia L.; Ott, Harald C.

    2014-01-01

    One in ten Americans suffer from chronic kidney disease, and close to 90,000 people die each year from causes related to kidney failure. Patients with end-stage renal disease are faced with two options: hemodialysis or transplantation. Unfortunately, the reach of transplantation is limited because of the shortage of donor organs and the need for immunosuppression. Bioengineered kidney grafts theoretically present a novel solution to both problems. Herein we discuss the history of bioengineering organs, the current status of bioengineered kidneys, considerations for the future of the field, and challenges to clinical translation. We hope that by integrating principles of tissue engineering, and stem cell and developmental biology, bioengineered kidney grafts will advance the field of regenerative medicine while meeting a critical clinical need. PMID:25217267

  18. Selenium Induces an Anti-tumor Effect Via Inhibiting Intratumoral Angiogenesis in a Mouse Model of Transplanted Canine Mammary Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenyu; Guo, Mengyao; Liu, Yuzhu; Mu, Weiwei; Deng, Ganzhen; Li, Chengye; Qiu, Changwei

    2016-06-01

    Selenium (Se) has been widely reported to possess anti-tumor effects. Angiogenesis is the formation of new blood vessels and is required to supply oxygen, nutrients, and growth factors for tumor growth, progression, and metastasis. To explore whether the anti-tumor effect of Se was associated with angiogenesis in vivo, we studied the effects of sodium selenite (Sel) and methylseleninic acid (MSA) on tumors induced by canine mammary tumor cells (CMT1211) in mice; cyclophosphamide (CTX) served as a positive control. The results showed that the Se content was significantly increased in the Sel and MSA groups. Se significantly inhibited the tumor weights and volumes. Large necrotic areas and scattered and abnormal small necrotic areas were observed in the Se treatment group. Immunofluorescence double staining showed a reduction in the microvessel density (MVD) and increment in the vessel maturation index (VMI) compared with the untreated control group. As expected, the protein and mRNA levels of the angiogenesis factors angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were decreased in the Se-treated tumors by IHC, as shown by western blotting and RT-QPCR. We also found that organic Se MSA provided stronger inhibition of tumor growth compared with inorganic sodium selenite (Sel). Altogether, our results indicated that Se exerted anti-tumor effects in vivo at least partially by inhibiting angiogenic factors. PMID:26507439

  19. Analgesia after liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Milan, Zoka

    2015-01-01

    This article addresses postoperative analgesia in patients with end-stage liver disease who have undergone liver transplantation (LT). Postoperative analgesia determines how patients perceive LT. Although important, this topic is underrepresented in the current literature. With an increased frequency of fast tracking in LT, efficient intra- and postoperative analgesia are undergoing changes. We herein review the current literature, compare the benefits and disadvantages of the therapeutic options, and make recommendations based on the current literature and clinical experience. PMID:26413222

  20. Vitamin therapy after heart transplantation.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jignesh

    2015-10-01

    The need for routine nutritional supplementation with vitamins in most healthy individuals remains a matter of debate and current guidelines recommend that the need for these essential nutrients be met primarily through consuming an adequate diet. However, after heart transplantation, multiple factors, including the effects of prolonged debilitation prior to surgery and immunosuppression, may lead to physiological stress, which may justify consideration for vitamin supplementation. In general, clinical trials have not focused on vitamin supplementation after heart transplantation. There appears to be some limited clinical data to support the use of certain vitamins after heart transplantation. In particular, the putative antioxidant properties of vitamins C and E after heart transplantation may be beneficial as prophylaxis against cardiac allograft vasculopathy, and vitamin D, in conjunction with calcium, may help prevent post-transplant bone loss. Current guidelines only address the use of vitamin D after heart transplantation.

  1. Neurological Complications of Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Pruitt, Amy A.; Graus, Francesc; Rosenfeld, Myrna R.

    2013-01-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is the preferred treatment for an expanding range of neoplastic and nonmalignant conditions. Increasing numbers of solid organ transplantations (SOTs) add an additional population of immunosuppressed patients with multiple potential neurological problems. While the spectrum of neurological complications varies with conditioning procedure and hematopoietic cell or solid organ source, major neurological complications occur with all transplantation procedures. This 2 part review emphasizes a practical consultative approach to central and peripheral nervous system problems related to HCT or SOT with clinical and neuroimaging examples from the authors’ institutional experience with the following conditions: the diversity of manifestations of common infections such as varicella zoster virus, Aspergillus, and progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), drug therapy-related complications, stroke mechanisms, the spectrum of graft versus host disease (GVHD), and neurologically important syndromes of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS), posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES), and posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD). These complications preferentially occur at specific intervals after HCT and SOT, and neurological consultants must recognize an extensive spectrum of syndromes in order to effect timely diagnosis and expedite appropriate treatment. PMID:23983885

  2. Ethical issues in transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sells, R A

    1994-09-01

    The transplantation of gastrointestinal organs has relied on cadaver donors for its successful development. The fact that success has been achieved is largely due to the certainty with which brain death can be diagnosed, and the acceptance of these criteria as signifying actual death by doctors, in particular, intensivists. If continuing goodwill leads to further co-operative effort, cadaveric liver, pancreas and eventually, small bowel transplants, should become more frequent. At present the numbers of recipients requiring these operations are considerably less than those in need of kidneys. There are grounds for believing therefore that the pressure to subvert good ethical standards in acquiring these organs (that pressure imposed by long waiting lists and a high death rate on those waiting lists) should be avoidable. The solution to the problem of deficits in cadaveric liver and pancreatic grafts will be achieved only by better education of nurses and doctors, professionalization and expansion of co-ordinator organizations, legal reform, and cultural change. Only by such progress, achieved at medical, governmental, and societal levels can we avoid the insidious tendency to commercialism which we have witnessed with disquiet in renal transplantation.

  3. Neoplastic complications of transplantation.

    PubMed

    Penn, I

    1993-09-01

    Cancer incidence in transplant patients ranges from 4% to 18% (average, 6%). We present data on 7668 types of malignancy that occurred in 7192 patients. The predominant tumors are skin/lip carcinomas, lymphomas, vulvar/perineal carcinomas, in situ uterine cervical carcinomas, Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), renal carcinomas, hepatobiliary tumors, and soft tissue/visceral sarcomas. Tumors appear relatively early after transplantation. The earliest is KS, appearing an average of 22 months post-transplantation whereas the latest are vulva/perineal carcinomas, presenting an average of 113 months posttransplantation. Skin cancers present unusual features: a remarkable frequency of KS; reversal of the high ratio of basal to squamous-cell carcinomas seen in the general population; the low age of the patients; and a high incidence of multiple tumors (in 42% of patients). Unusual features of lymphomas are the high incidence of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL); common involvement of extranodal sites; marked predilection for the brain; and frequent allograft involvement. Lymphomas are much more common in nonrenal than in renal allograft recipients. Vulvar/perineal carcinomas occur at a much lower age than in the general population, and are often preceded by condyloma acuminatum. Neoplastic regression following reduction or cessation of immunosuppressive therapy occurs in some patients with NHL or KS. PMID:8016484

  4. [INTESTINAL TRANSPLANTATION IN PEDIATRICS

    PubMed

    Alarcón M, Pedro; Alarcón M, Jorge

    1997-01-01

    I