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Sample records for induced cold hypersensitivity

  1. Pharmacological characterization of standard analgesics on oxaliplatin-induced acute cold hypersensitivity in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Meng; Nakamura, Saki; Miyake, Takahito; So, Kanako; Shirakawa, Hisashi; Tokuyama, Shogo; Narita, Minoru; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Kaneko, Shuji

    2014-01-01

    Oxaliplatin, a platinum-based chemotherapeutic agent, causes an acute peripheral neuropathy triggered by cold in almost all patients during or within hours after its infusion. We recently reported that a single administration of oxaliplatin induced cold hypersensitivity 2 h after the administration in mice. In this study, we examined whether standard analgesics relieve the oxaliplatin-induced acute cold hypersensitivity. Gabapentin, tramadol, mexiletine, and calcium gluconate significantly inhibited and morphine and milnacipran decreased the acute cold hypersensitivity, while diclofenac and amitriptyline had no effects. These results suggest that gabapentin, tramadol, mexiletine, and calcium gluconate are effective against oxaliplatin-induced acute peripheral neuropathy. PMID:24671055

  2. A Polyamine-Deficient Diet Prevents Oxaliplatin-Induced Acute Cold and Mechanical Hypersensitivity in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ferrier, Jérémy; Bayet-Robert, Mathilde; Pereira, Bruno; Daulhac, Laurence; Eschalier, Alain; Pezet, Denis; Moulinoux, Jacques-Philippe; Balayssac, David

    2013-01-01

    Background Oxaliplatin is an anticancer drug used for the treatment of advanced colorectal cancer, but it can also cause painful peripheral neuropathies. The pathophysiology of these neuropathies has not been yet fully elucidated, but may involve spinal N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, particularly the NR2B subunit. As polyamines are positive modulators of NMDA-NR2B receptors and mainly originate from dietary intake, the modulation of polyamines intake could represent an interesting way to prevent/modulate neuropathic pain symptoms by opposing glutamate neurotransmission. Methods The effect of a polyamine deficient diet was investigated in an animal model of oxaliplatin-induced acute pain hypersensitivity using behavioral tests (mechanical and cold hypersensitivity). The involvement of spinal glutamate neurotransmission was monitored by using a proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy based metabolomic approach and by assessing the expression and phosphorylation of the NR2B subunit of the NMDA receptor. Results A 7-day polyamine deficient diet totally prevented oxaliplatin-induced acute cold hypersensitivity and mechanical allodynia. Oxaliplatin-induced pain hypersensitivity was not associated with an increase in NR2B subunit expression or phosphorylation, but with an increase of glutamate level in the spinal dorsal horn which was completely prevented by a polyamine deficient diet. As a validation that the oxaliplatin-induced hypersensitivity could be due to an increased activity of the spinal glutamate system, an intrathecal administration of the specific NR2B antagonist, ifenprodil, totally reversed oxaliplatin-induced mechanical and cold hypersensitivity. Conclusion A polyamine deficient diet could represent a promising and valuable nutritional therapy to prevent oxaliplatin-induced acute pain hypersensitivity. PMID:24204988

  3. Effects of L-citrulline diet on stress-induced cold hypersensitivity in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Yoshinori; Narita, Kazuki; Chiba, Kotaro; Takemoto, Hiroaki; Morita, Masahiko; Morishita, Koji

    2014-01-01

    Background: L-citrulline is an amino acid discovered in watermelon (Citrullus lanatus, Cucurbitaceae) and is a known component of the nitric oxide (NO) cycle that plays an important role in adjusting blood circulation and supplying NO and a key component of the endothelium-derived relaxing factor. Objective: The objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of L-citrulline on a newly established stress-induced cold hypersensitivity mouse model. Materials and Methods: When normal mice were forced to swim in water at 25°C for 15 min, their core body temperature dropped to 28.9°C, and then quickly recovered to normal temperature after the mice were transferred to a dry cage at room temperature (25°C). A 1-h immobilization before swimming caused the core body temperature to drop to ca. 24.1°C (4.8°C lower than normal mice), and the speed of core body temperature recovery dropped to 57% of the normal control. We considered this delay in recovery from hypothermia to be a sign of stress-induced cold hypersensitivity. Similar cold hypersensitivity was induced by administration of 50 mM L-NG-nitroarginine methyl ester, a NO synthesis inhibitor. Results: In this study, we showed that recovery speed from the stress-induced hypothermia remarkably improved in mice fed a 1% L-citrulline-containing diet for 20 days. Furthermore, the nonfasting blood level of L-arginine and L-citrulline increased significantly in the L-citrulline diet group, and higher serum nitrogen oxide levels were observed during recovery from the cold. Conclusions: These results suggested that oral L-citrulline supplementation strengthens vascular endothelium function and attenuates stress-induced cold hypersensitivity by improving blood circulation. PMID:25276066

  4. Effects of electroacupuncture on oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic cold hypersensitivity in rats.

    PubMed

    Moon, Hak Jin; Lim, Bong-Soo; Lee, Dae-Il; Ye, Min Sook; Lee, Giseog; Min, Byung-Il; Bae, Hyunsu; Na, Heung Sik; Kim, Sun Kwang

    2014-03-01

    This study investigated whether and how electroacupuncture (EA) attenuates cold hypersensitivity (allodynia) in a rat model of oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic pain. Cold allodynia [evaluated by immersing the tail into cold water (4 °C) and measuring the withdrawal latency] was induced 3 days after an oxaliplatin administration (6 mg/kg, i.p.). EA stimulation (2/100 Hz, 0.3-ms pulse duration, 0.2-0.3 mA) was delivered to ST36 acupoint or non-acupoint for 20 min. Low-frequency (2 Hz) EA at ST36 relieved cold allodynia more effectively than high-frequency EA at ST36 or low-frequency EA at non-acupoint. Naloxone (opioid antagonist, 2 mg/kg, i.p.) completely blocked such EA-induced anti-allodynia, whereas phentolamine (α-adrenergic antagonist, 2 mg/kg, i.p.) did not. Moreover, plasma β-endorphin levels significantly increased right after the end of EA and subsequently decreased. These results indicate that low-frequency EA at ST36 in rats has a marked relieving effect on oxaliplatin-induced cold allodynia that is mediated by the endogenous opioid, but not noradrenergic, system.

  5. Effects of electroacupuncture on oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic cold hypersensitivity in rats.

    PubMed

    Moon, Hak Jin; Lim, Bong-Soo; Lee, Dae-Il; Ye, Min Sook; Lee, Giseog; Min, Byung-Il; Bae, Hyunsu; Na, Heung Sik; Kim, Sun Kwang

    2014-03-01

    This study investigated whether and how electroacupuncture (EA) attenuates cold hypersensitivity (allodynia) in a rat model of oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic pain. Cold allodynia [evaluated by immersing the tail into cold water (4 °C) and measuring the withdrawal latency] was induced 3 days after an oxaliplatin administration (6 mg/kg, i.p.). EA stimulation (2/100 Hz, 0.3-ms pulse duration, 0.2-0.3 mA) was delivered to ST36 acupoint or non-acupoint for 20 min. Low-frequency (2 Hz) EA at ST36 relieved cold allodynia more effectively than high-frequency EA at ST36 or low-frequency EA at non-acupoint. Naloxone (opioid antagonist, 2 mg/kg, i.p.) completely blocked such EA-induced anti-allodynia, whereas phentolamine (α-adrenergic antagonist, 2 mg/kg, i.p.) did not. Moreover, plasma β-endorphin levels significantly increased right after the end of EA and subsequently decreased. These results indicate that low-frequency EA at ST36 in rats has a marked relieving effect on oxaliplatin-induced cold allodynia that is mediated by the endogenous opioid, but not noradrenergic, system. PMID:24158835

  6. Oxaliplatin-induced cold hypersensitivity is due to remodelling of ion channel expression in nociceptors.

    PubMed

    Descoeur, Juliette; Pereira, Vanessa; Pizzoccaro, Anne; Francois, Amaury; Ling, Bing; Maffre, Violette; Couette, Brigitte; Busserolles, Jérôme; Courteix, Christine; Noel, Jacques; Lazdunski, Michel; Eschalier, Alain; Authier, Nicolas; Bourinet, Emmanuel

    2011-05-01

    Cold hypersensitivity is the hallmark of oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy, which develops in nearly all patients under this chemotherapy. To date, pain management strategies have failed to alleviate these symptoms, hence development of adapted analgesics is needed. Here, we report that oxaliplatin exaggerates cold perception in mice as well as in patients. These symptoms are mediated by primary afferent sensory neurons expressing the thermoreceptor TRPM8. Mechanistically, oxaliplatin promotes over-excitability by drastically lowering the expression of distinct potassium channels (TREK1, TRAAK) and by increasing the expression of pro-excitatory channels such as the hyperpolarization-activated channels (HCNs). These findings are corroborated by the analysis of TREK1-TRAAK null mice and use of the specific HCN inhibitor ivabradine, which abolishes the oxaliplatin-induced cold hypersensibility. These results suggest that oxaliplatin exacerbates cold perception by modulating the transcription of distinct ionic conductances that together shape sensory neuron responses to cold. The translational and clinical implication of these findings would be that ivabradine may represent a tailored treatment for oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy. PMID:21438154

  7. Oxaliplatin-induced cold hypersensitivity is due to remodelling of ion channel expression in nociceptors

    PubMed Central

    Descoeur, Juliette; Pereira, Vanessa; Pizzoccaro, Anne; Francois, Amaury; Ling, Bing; Maffre, Violette; Couette, Brigitte; Busserolles, Jérôme; Courteix, Christine; Noel, Jacques; Lazdunski, Michel; Eschalier, Alain; Authier, Nicolas; Bourinet, Emmanuel

    2011-01-01

    Cold hypersensitivity is the hallmark of oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy, which develops in nearly all patients under this chemotherapy. To date, pain management strategies have failed to alleviate these symptoms, hence development of adapted analgesics is needed. Here, we report that oxaliplatin exaggerates cold perception in mice as well as in patients. These symptoms are mediated by primary afferent sensory neurons expressing the thermoreceptor TRPM8. Mechanistically, oxaliplatin promotes over-excitability by drastically lowering the expression of distinct potassium channels (TREK1, TRAAK) and by increasing the expression of pro-excitatory channels such as the hyperpolarization-activated channels (HCNs). These findings are corroborated by the analysis of TREK1-TRAAK null mice and use of the specific HCN inhibitor ivabradine, which abolishes the oxaliplatin-induced cold hypersensibility. These results suggest that oxaliplatin exacerbates cold perception by modulating the transcription of distinct ionic conductances that together shape sensory neuron responses to cold. The translational and clinical implication of these findings would be that ivabradine may represent a tailored treatment for oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy. PMID:21438154

  8. TRPA1 Contributes to Cold Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Camino, Donato del; Murphy, Sarah; Heiry, Melissa; Barrett, Lee B.; Earley, Taryn J.; Cook, Colby A.; Petrus, Matt J.; Zhao, Michael; D'Amours, Marc; Deering, Nate; Brenner, Gary J.; Costigan, Michael; Hayward, Neil J.; Chong, Jayhong A.; Fanger, Christopher M.; Woolf, Clifford J.; Patapoutian, Ardem; Moran, Magdalene M.

    2010-01-01

    TRPA1 is a non-selective cation channel expressed by nociceptors. While it is widely accepted that TRPA1 serves as a broad irritancy receptor for a variety of reactive chemicals, its role in cold sensation remains controversial. Here, we demonstrate that mild cooling markedly increases agonist-evoked rat TRPA1 currents. In the absence of an agonist, even noxious cold only increases current amplitude slightly. These results suggest that TRPA1 is a key mediator of cold hypersensitivity in pathological conditions where reactive oxygen species and pro-inflammatory activators of the channel are present, but likely plays a comparatively minor role in acute cold sensation. Supporting this, cold hypersensitivity can be induced in wild-type but not Trpa1-/- mice by subcutaneous administration of a TRPA1 agonist. Furthermore, the selective TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031 reduces cold hypersensitivity in rodent models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. PMID:21068322

  9. Cannabinoid 1 receptor knockout mice display cold allodynia, but enhanced recovery from spared-nerve injury-induced mechanical hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Piskoun, Boris; Russo, Lori; Norcini, Monica; Blanck, Thomas; Recio-Pinto, Esperanza

    2016-01-01

    among genotypes. Conclusion Cold allodynia and significant recovery from spared-nerve injury-induced mechanical hypersensitivity are two novel phenotypes which characterize the global CB1R−/− mice. An increase in transient receptor potential channel of melastatin 8 channel function in DRG neurons may underlie the cold phenotype. Recovery of mechanical thresholds in the CB1R knockouts was independent of motor function. These results indicate that CB1R expression contributes to the development of persistent mechanical hypersensitivity, protects against the development of robust cold allodynia but is not involved in motor impairment following spared-nerve injury in mice. PMID:27206660

  10. Cold and L-menthol-induced sensitization in healthy volunteers--a cold hypersensitivity analogue to the heat/capsaicin model.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Hjalte H; Poulsen, Jeppe N; Uchida, Yugo; Nikbakht, Anahita; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Gazerani, Parisa

    2015-05-01

    Topical high-concentration L-menthol is the only established human experimental pain model to study mechanisms underlying cold hyperalgesia. We aimed at investigating the combinatorial effect of cold stimuli and topical L-menthol on cold pain and secondary mechanical hyperalgesia. Analogue to the heat-capsaicin model on skin sensitization, we proposed that cold/menthol enhances or prolong L-menthol-evoked sensitization. Topical 40% L-menthol or vehicle was applied (20 minutes) on the volar forearms of 20 healthy females and males (age, 28.7 ± 0.6 years). Cold stimulation of 5°C for 5 minutes was then applied to the treated area 3 times with 40-minute intervals. Cold detection threshold and pain, mechanical hyperalgesia (pinprick), static and dynamic mechanical allodynia (von Frey and brush), skin blood flow (laser speckle), and temperature (thermocamera) were assessed. Cold detection threshold and cold pain threshold (CPT) increased after L-menthol and remained high after the cold rekindling cycles (P < 0.001). L-menthol evoked secondary hyperalgesia to pinprick (P < 0.001) particularly in females (P < 0.05) and also induced secondary allodynia to von Frey and brush (P < 0.001). Application of cold stimuli kept these areas enlarged with a higher response in females to brush after the third cold cycle (P < 0.05). Skin blood flow increased after L-menthol (P < 0.001) and stayed stable after cold cycles. Repeated application of cold on skin treated by L-menthol facilitated and prolonged L-menthol-induced cold pain and hyperalgesia. This model may prove beneficial for testing analgesic compounds when a sufficient duration of time is needed to see drug effects on CPT or mechanical hypersensitivity. PMID:25719613

  11. Cold and L-menthol-induced sensitization in healthy volunteers--a cold hypersensitivity analogue to the heat/capsaicin model.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Hjalte H; Poulsen, Jeppe N; Uchida, Yugo; Nikbakht, Anahita; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Gazerani, Parisa

    2015-05-01

    Topical high-concentration L-menthol is the only established human experimental pain model to study mechanisms underlying cold hyperalgesia. We aimed at investigating the combinatorial effect of cold stimuli and topical L-menthol on cold pain and secondary mechanical hyperalgesia. Analogue to the heat-capsaicin model on skin sensitization, we proposed that cold/menthol enhances or prolong L-menthol-evoked sensitization. Topical 40% L-menthol or vehicle was applied (20 minutes) on the volar forearms of 20 healthy females and males (age, 28.7 ± 0.6 years). Cold stimulation of 5°C for 5 minutes was then applied to the treated area 3 times with 40-minute intervals. Cold detection threshold and pain, mechanical hyperalgesia (pinprick), static and dynamic mechanical allodynia (von Frey and brush), skin blood flow (laser speckle), and temperature (thermocamera) were assessed. Cold detection threshold and cold pain threshold (CPT) increased after L-menthol and remained high after the cold rekindling cycles (P < 0.001). L-menthol evoked secondary hyperalgesia to pinprick (P < 0.001) particularly in females (P < 0.05) and also induced secondary allodynia to von Frey and brush (P < 0.001). Application of cold stimuli kept these areas enlarged with a higher response in females to brush after the third cold cycle (P < 0.05). Skin blood flow increased after L-menthol (P < 0.001) and stayed stable after cold cycles. Repeated application of cold on skin treated by L-menthol facilitated and prolonged L-menthol-induced cold pain and hyperalgesia. This model may prove beneficial for testing analgesic compounds when a sufficient duration of time is needed to see drug effects on CPT or mechanical hypersensitivity.

  12. Ionic mechanisms of spinal neuronal cold hypersensitivity in ciguatera.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ryan; Brice, Nicola L; Lewis, Richard J; Dickenson, Anthony H

    2015-12-01

    Cold hypersensitivity is evident in a range of neuropathies and can evoke sensations of paradoxical burning cold pain. Ciguatoxin poisoning is known to induce a pain syndrome caused by consumption of contaminated tropical fish that can persist for months and include pruritus and cold allodynia; at present no suitable treatment is available. This study examined, for the first time, the neural substrates and molecular components of Pacific ciguatoxin-2-induced cold hypersensitivity. Electrophysiological recordings of dorsal horn lamina V/VI wide dynamic range neurones were made in non-sentient rats. Subcutaneous injection of 10 nm ciguatoxin-2 into the receptive field increased neuronal responses to innocuous and noxious cooling. In addition, neuronal responses to low-threshold but not noxious punctate mechanical stimuli were also elevated. The resultant cold hypersensitivity was not reversed by 6-({2-[2-fluoro-6-(trifluoromethyl)phenoxy]-2-methylpropyl}carbamoyl)pyridine-3-carboxylic acid, an antagonist of transient receptor potential melastatin 8 (TRPM8). Both mechanical and cold hypersensitivity were completely prevented by co-injection with the Nav 1.8 antagonist A803467, whereas the transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) antagonist A967079 only prevented hypersensitivity to innocuous cooling and partially prevented hypersensitivity to noxious cooling. In naive rats, neither innocuous nor noxious cold-evoked neuronal responses were inhibited by antagonists of Nav 1.8, TRPA1 or TRPM8 alone. Ciguatoxins may confer cold sensitivity to a subpopulation of cold-insensitive Nav 1.8/TRPA1-positive primary afferents, which could underlie the cold allodynia reported in ciguatera. These data expand the understanding of central spinal cold sensitivity under normal conditions and the role of these ion channels in this translational rat model of ciguatoxin-induced hypersensitivity. PMID:26454262

  13. Mold-induced hypersensitivity pneumonitis.

    PubMed

    Greenberger, Paul A

    2004-01-01

    Mold-induced hypersensitivity pneumonitis results from macrophage- and lymphocyte-driven inflammation, which may be attributable to contaminated humidifiers or heating-ventilation systems or sources in homes, schools, or workplaces. A case may be suspected when there is water intrusion or inadequate drainage. Some fungal causes include species of Alternaria, Aspergillus, Cryptostroma, Penicillium, Pullularia, Rhodotorula, and Trichosporon. The differential diagnosis includes mold-induced asthma, sick building syndrome, mass psychogenic illness (epidemic hysteria), unjustified fears of "toxic" molds, and conditions causing recurrent pneumonitis. PMID:15510579

  14. A case of chlorpheniramine maleate-induced hypersensitivity with aspirin intolerance.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Hye; Lee, Sang-Min; Lee, So-Hee; Kwon, Hyouk-Soo; Kim, Sae-Hoon; Cho, Sang-Heon; Min, Kyung-Up; Kim, You-Young; Chang, Yoon-Seok

    2011-01-01

    Antihistamines are commonly used to treat allergic disease, such as allergic rhinitis, urticaria, and angioedema. Although several previous reports describe hypersensitivity to antihistamines such as cetirizine and hydroxyzine, documented cases of chlorpheniramine hypersensitivity are extremely rare. Here, we report the case of a 45-year-old Korean woman who presented with urticaria after ingesting a cold medication. Over the previous 5 years, she had also experienced a food allergy to crab and shrimp, allergic rhinitis, and repeated urticaria after ingesting cold medication. Provocation with aspirin elicited generalized urticaria. Intravenous chlorpheniramine and methylprednisolone was injected for symptom control, but in fact appeared to aggravate urticaria. A second round of skin and provocation tests for chlorpheniramine and methylprednisolone showed positive results only for chlorpheniramine. She was diagnosed with aspirin intolerance and chlorpheniramine hypersensitivity, and was instructed to avoid these drugs. To date, this is the second of only two cases of chlorpheniramine-induced type I hypersensitivity with aspirin intolerance. Although the relationship between aspirin intolerance and chlorpheniramine-induced type I hypersensitivity is unclear, physicians should be aware of the possibility of urticaria or other allergic reactions in response to antihistamines.

  15. Application of hypersensitivity skin testing in chemotherapy-induced pneumonitis

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, James C; Hawkins, Carolyn A

    2015-01-01

    Skin testing has been utilised to determine the culprit allergenic agent in drug reactions. Its application in the setting of hypersensitivity reaction relating to combination chemotherapeutic regimens may help identify the causative drug, allowing drug that is safe to be continued and avoiding limiting treatment options for patients. We report what we believe to be the first published case of hypersensitivity skin testing for gemcitabine-induced pneumonitis in a patient with metastatic leiomyosarcoma and another case of docetaxel-induced pneumonitis in a patient with metastatic HER2-positive breast cancer. PMID:26539407

  16. Novel TRPM8 antagonist attenuates cold hypersensitivity after peripheral nerve injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ryan; Gonçalves, Leonor; Newman, Robert; Jiang, Feng Li; Goldby, Anne; Reeve, Jennifer; Hendrick, Alan; Teall, Martin; Hannah, Duncan; Almond, Sarah; Brice, Nicola; Dickenson, Anthony H

    2014-04-01

    Abnormal cold sensitivity is a common feature of a range of neuropathies. In the murine somatosensory system, multiple aspects of cold sensitivity are dependent on TRPM8, both short term and in response to peripheral nerve injury. The specialized nature of cold-sensitive afferents and the restricted expression of TRPM8 render it an attractive target for the treatment of cold hypersensitivity. This current study examines the effect of a novel TRPM8 antagonist (M8-An) in naive and spinal nerve-ligated rats through behavioral and in vivo electrophysiological approaches. In vitro, M8-An inhibited icilin-evoked Ca(2+) currents in HEK293 cells stably expressing human TRPM8 with an IC(50) of 10.9 nM. In vivo, systemic M8-An transiently decreased core body temperature. Deep dorsal horn recordings were made in vivo from neurons innervating the hind paw. M8-An inhibited neuronal responses to innocuous and noxious cooling of the receptive field in spinal nerve-ligated rats but not in naive rats. No effect on neuronal responses to mechanical and heat stimulation was observed. In addition, M8-An also attenuated behavioral responses to cold but not mechanical stimulation after nerve ligation without affecting the uninjured contralateral response. The data presented here support a contribution of TRPM8 to the pathophysiology of cold hypersensitivity in this model and highlight the potential of the pharmacological block of TRPM8 in alleviating the associated symptoms. PMID:24472724

  17. [Allopurinol-induced hypersensitivity syndrome resulting in death].

    PubMed

    Laurisch, Sören; Jaedtke, Maren; Demir, Reyhan; Sorrentino, Sajoscha A; Kielstein, Jan T; Rennekampff, Hans-Oliver; Vogt, Peter M; Meyer, Gerd P; Fuchs, Martin; Klein, Gunnar; Drexler, Hartmut; Schieffer, Bernhard; Napp, L Christian

    2010-04-01

    The present report describes the case of a 67-year-old patient who developed an allopurinol-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (AHS) with toxic epidermal necrolysis and subsequently died of septic multiorgan failure. Considering the increasing prescription rate of allopurinol, the present case report intends to demonstrate the underestimated threat of AHS.

  18. Lead induced testicular hypersensitivity in stressed rats.

    PubMed

    Saxena, D K; Lal, B; Srivastava, R S; Chandra, S V

    1990-01-01

    Rats were immobilized for 2 h and treated i.p. with lead Pb2+ (8 mg/kg/day) for 45 d to investigate the testicular effects of lead on rats kept under immobilization stress. Marked alteration in SDH. G6PDH activity, cholesterol and ascorbic acid contents and reduced sperm counts associated with marked pathological changes in the testis of rats were observed after combined treatment with lead and immobilization stress in comparison to either alone. An increase in the disturbances of testicular androgen synthesis seems to be responsible for enhanced testicular injury in lead induced stressed rats. PMID:2401350

  19. Lead induced testicular hypersensitivity in stressed rats.

    PubMed

    Saxena, D K; Lal, B; Srivastava, R S; Chandra, S V

    1990-01-01

    Rats were immobilized for 2 h and treated i.p. with lead Pb2+ (8 mg/kg/day) for 45 d to investigate the testicular effects of lead on rats kept under immobilization stress. Marked alteration in SDH. G6PDH activity, cholesterol and ascorbic acid contents and reduced sperm counts associated with marked pathological changes in the testis of rats were observed after combined treatment with lead and immobilization stress in comparison to either alone. An increase in the disturbances of testicular androgen synthesis seems to be responsible for enhanced testicular injury in lead induced stressed rats.

  20. Airway Inflammation and Hypersensitivity Induced by Chronic Smoking

    PubMed Central

    Kou, Yu Ru; Kwong, Kevin; Lee, Lu-Yuan

    2011-01-01

    Airway hypersensitivity, characterized by enhanced excitability of airway sensory nerves, is a prominent pathophysiological feature in patients with airway inflammatory diseases. Although the underlying pathogenic mechanism is not fully understood, chronic airway inflammation is believed to be primarily responsible. Cigarette smoking is known to cause chronic airway inflammation, accompanied by airway hyperresponsiveness. Experimental evidence indicates that enhanced excitability of vagal bronchopulmonary sensory nerves and increased tachykinin synthesis in these nerves resulting from chronic inflammation are important contributing factors to the airway hyperresponsiveness. Multiple inflammatory mediators released from various types of structural and inflammatory cells are involved in the smoking-induced airway inflammation, which is mainly regulated by redox-sensitive signaling pathways and transcription factors. Furthermore, recent studies have reported potent sensitizing and stimulatory effects of these inflammatory mediators such as prostanoids and reactive oxygen species on these sensory nerves. In summary, these studies using cigarette smoking as an experimental approach have identified certain potentially important cell signaling pathways and underlying mechanisms of the airway hypersensitivity induced by chronic airway inflammation. PMID:21397052

  1. Radiation-induced lung injury: a hypersensitivity pneumonitis

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, P.G.; Bryant, D.H.; Morgan, G.W.; Yeates, M.; Fernandez, V.; Penny, R.; Breit, S.N.

    1988-08-15

    Radiation pneumonitis occurs 6 to 12 weeks after thoracic irradiation, and is thought to be due to direct radiation-induced lung injury. Four patients who developed pneumonitis after unilateral thoracic irradiation for carcinoma of the breast were studied with bronchoalveolar lavage, gallium scan of the lung, and respiratory function tests. On the irradiated side of the chest, all four patients showed an increase in total cells recovered from the lavage fluid and a marked increase in the percentage of lymphocytes. When results for the unirradiated lung were compared with results for the irradiated lung, there was a comparable increase in total cells and percentage of lymphocytes. Gallium scans showed increases for both irradiated and unirradiated lungs. Prompt improvement was seen after corticosteroid therapy in all patients. The fact that abnormal findings occur equally in irradiated and unirradiated lung is inconsistent with simple direct radiation-induced injury and suggests an immunologically mediated mechanism such as a hypersensitivity pneumonitis.

  2. Clinical Features of Oxaliplatin Induced Hypersensitivity Reactions and Therapeutic Approaches.

    PubMed

    Bano, Nusrat; Najam, Rahila; Qazi, Faaiza; Mateen, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Oxaliplatin, a third generation novel platinum compound is the most effective first line chemotherapeutic agent for colorectal cancer (CRC) in combination with 5FU and leucovorin. It is indicated for pancreatic, gastric and testicular cancers combined with bevacuzimab, capecitabine, irinotecan and other cytotoxic agents. However, moderate to severe hypersensitivity reactions (HSR) during or after oxaliplatin infusion usually require cessation of chemotherapy or substitution of the key therapeutic drug which largely interferes with improved patient prognosis. This mini- review showcases recent and accepted opinions/approaches in oxaliplatin induced HSR management. Physicians and oncologists have varying attitudes regarding the decision to rechallenge the patient after an HSR experience, efficacy of desensitization protocols, effectiveness and selection of drugs for premedication and possibilities of cross sensitivity to other platinum agents (e.g. carboplatin). A brief insight into underlying molecular mechanisms and clinical manifestations of oxaliplatin induced HSR is offered. We have also discussed the management of oxaliplatin induced HSR and risk stratification for a successful and complete chemotherapeutic plan. PMID:27221832

  3. Clinical Features of Oxaliplatin Induced Hypersensitivity Reactions and Therapeutic Approaches.

    PubMed

    Bano, Nusrat; Najam, Rahila; Qazi, Faaiza; Mateen, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Oxaliplatin, a third generation novel platinum compound is the most effective first line chemotherapeutic agent for colorectal cancer (CRC) in combination with 5FU and leucovorin. It is indicated for pancreatic, gastric and testicular cancers combined with bevacuzimab, capecitabine, irinotecan and other cytotoxic agents. However, moderate to severe hypersensitivity reactions (HSR) during or after oxaliplatin infusion usually require cessation of chemotherapy or substitution of the key therapeutic drug which largely interferes with improved patient prognosis. This mini- review showcases recent and accepted opinions/approaches in oxaliplatin induced HSR management. Physicians and oncologists have varying attitudes regarding the decision to rechallenge the patient after an HSR experience, efficacy of desensitization protocols, effectiveness and selection of drugs for premedication and possibilities of cross sensitivity to other platinum agents (e.g. carboplatin). A brief insight into underlying molecular mechanisms and clinical manifestations of oxaliplatin induced HSR is offered. We have also discussed the management of oxaliplatin induced HSR and risk stratification for a successful and complete chemotherapeutic plan.

  4. A novel bacterial Water Hypersensitivity-like protein shows in vivo protection against cold and freeze damage.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Dominique; Ferreras, Eloy; Trindade, Marla; Cowan, Don

    2015-08-01

    Metagenomic library screening, by functional or sequence analysis, has become an established method for the identification of novel genes and gene products, including genetic elements implicated in microbial stress response and adaptation. We have identified, using a sequence-based approach, a fosmid clone from an Antarctic desert soil metagenome library containing a novel gene which codes for a protein homologous to a Water Hypersensitivity domain (WHy). The WHy domain is typically found as a component of specific LEA (Late Embryogenesis Abundant) proteins, particularly the LEA-14 (LEA-8) variants, which occur widely in plants, nematodes, bacteria and archaea and which are typically induced by exposure to stress conditions. The novel WHy-like protein (165 amino acid, 18.6 kDa) exhibits a largely invariant NPN motif at the N-terminus and has high sequence identity to genes identified in Pseudomonas genomes. Expression of this protein in Escherichia coli significantly protected the recombinant host against cold and freeze stress. PMID:26187747

  5. Stachybotrys chartarum-Induced Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis Is TLR9 Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Bhan, Urvashi; Newstead, Michael J.; Zeng, Xianying; Ballinger, Megan N.; Standiford, Louis R.; Standiford, Theodore J.

    2011-01-01

    Hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP), an inflammatory lung disease, develops after repeated exposure to inhaled particulate antigen and is characterized by a vigorous T helper type 1-mediated immune response, resulting in the release of IL-12 and interferon (IFN)-γ. These T helper type 1 cytokines may participate in the pathogenesis of HP. Stachybotrys chartarum (SC) is a dimorphic fungus implicated in a number of respiratory illnesses, including HP. Here, we have developed a murine model of SC-induced HP that reproduces pathology observed in human HP and hypothesized that toll receptor-like 9 (TLR9)-mediated dendritic cell responses are required for the generation of granulomatous inflammation induced by inhaled SC. Mice sensitized and challenged with 106 SC spores develop granulomatous inflammation with multinucleate giant cells, accompanied by increased accumulation of neutrophils and CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. SC sensitization and challenge resulted in robust pulmonary expression of tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-12, and IFN-γ. SC-mediated granulomatous inflammation required IFN-γ and was TLR9 dependent, because TLR9−/− mice displayed reduced peribronchial inflammation, decreased accumulation and/or activation of polymorphonuclear (PMN) and CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, and reduced lung expression of type 1 cytokines and chemokines. T-cell production of IFN-γ was IL-12 dependent. Our studies suggest that TLR9 is critical for dendritic cell-mediated development of a type 1 granulomatous inflammation in the lung in response to SC. PMID:21982832

  6. Total Knee Arthroplasty Failure Induced by Metal Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ryan; Phan, Duy; Schwarzkopf, Ran

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 70 Final Diagnosis: Metal hypersensitivity Symptoms: Joint pain • swelling • instability Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Revision total knee arthroplasty Specialty: Orthopedics and Traumatology Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Metal hypersensitivity is an uncommon complication after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) that can lead to significant functional impairment and aseptic prosthesis failure. Case Report: We describe a 70-year-old patient who presented with persistent pain, swelling, and instability 2 years after a primary TKA. The patient had a history of metal hypersensitivity following bilateral metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty (THA) that was revised to ceramic-on-polyethylene implants. Knee radiographs showed severe osteolysis with implant loosening. Serum cobalt was elevated and serum chromium was significantly elevated, while joint aspiration and inflammatory marker levels ruled out a periprosthetic infection. Revision TKA was performed, with intraoperative tissue pathology and postoperative leukocyte transformation testing confirming metal hypersensitivity as the cause for aseptic implant failure. Conclusions: This case report demonstrates the clinical and laboratory signs that suggest metal hypersensitivity in total knee arthroplasty and the potential for joint function restoration with revision surgery. PMID:26278890

  7. Pharmacological attenuation of chronic alcoholic pancreatitis induced hypersensitivity in rats

    PubMed Central

    McIlwrath, Sabrina L; Westlund, Karin N

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To characterize an alcohol and high fat diet induced chronic pancreatitis rat model that mimics poor human dietary choices. METHODS: Experimental rats were fed a modified Lieber-DeCarli alcohol (6%) and high-fat (65%) diet (AHF) for 10 wk while control animals received a regular rodent chow diet. Weekly behavioral tests determined mechanical and heat sensitivity. In week 10 a fasting glucose tolerance test was performed, measuring blood glucose levels before and after a 2 g/kg bodyweight intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of glucose. Post mortem histological analysis was performed by staining pancreas and liver tissue sections with hematoxylin and eosin. Pancreas sections were also stained with Sirius red and fast green to quantify collagen content. Insulin-expressing cells were identified immunohistochemically in separate sections. Tissue staining density was quantified using Image J software. After mechanical and heat sensitivity became stable (weeks 6-10) in the AHF-fed animals, three different drugs were tested for their efficacy in attenuating pancreatitis associated hypersensitivity: a Group II metabotropic glutamate receptor specific agonist (2R,4R)-4-Aminopyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylate (APDC, 3 mg/kg, ip; Tocris, Bristol, United Kingdom), nociceptin (20, 60, 200 nmol/kg, ip; Tocris), and morphine sulfate (3 mg/kg, μ-opioid receptor agonist; Baxter Healthcare, Deerfield, IL, United States). RESULTS: Histological analysis of pancreas and liver determined that unlike control rats, AHF fed animals had pancreatic fibrosis, acinar and beta cell atrophy, with steatosis in both organs. Fat vacuolization was significantly increased in AHF fed rats (6.4% ± 1.1% in controls vs 23.8% ± 4.2%, P < 0.05). Rats fed the AHF diet had reduced fasting glucose tolerance in week 10 when peak blood glucose levels reached significantly higher concentrations than controls (127.4 ± 9.2 mg/dL in controls vs 161.0 ± 8.6 mg/dL, P < 0.05). This concurred with a 3.5 fold higher

  8. Contribution of afferent pathways to nerve injury-induced spontaneous pain and evoked hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    King, Tamara; Qu, Chaoling; Okun, Alec; Mercado, Ramon; Ren, Jiyang; Brion, Triza; Lai, Josephine; Porreca, Frank

    2011-09-01

    A predominant complaint in patients with neuropathic pain is spontaneous pain, often described as burning. Recent studies have demonstrated that negative reinforcement can be used to unmask spontaneous neuropathic pain, allowing for mechanistic investigations. Here, ascending pathways that might contribute to evoked and spontaneous components of an experimental neuropathic pain model were explored. Desensitization of TRPV1-positive fibers with systemic resiniferatoxin (RTX) abolished spinal nerve ligation (SNL) injury-induced thermal hypersensitivity and spontaneous pain, but had no effect on tactile hypersensitivity. Ablation of spinal NK-1 receptor-expressing neurons blocked SNL-induced thermal and tactile hypersensitivity as well as spontaneous pain. After nerve injury, upregulation of neuropeptide Y (NPY) is observed almost exclusively in large-diameter fibers, and inactivation of the brainstem target of these fibers in the nucleus gracilis prevents tactile but not thermal hypersensitivity. Blockade of NPY signaling within the nucleus gracilis failed to block SNL-induced spontaneous pain or thermal hyperalgesia while fully reversing tactile hypersensitivity. Moreover, microinjection of NPY into nucleus gracilis produced robust tactile hypersensitivity, but failed to induce conditioned place aversion. These data suggest that spontaneous neuropathic pain and thermal hyperalgesia are mediated by TRPV1-positive fibers and spinal NK-1-positive ascending projections. In contrast, the large-diameter dorsal column projection can mediate nerve injury-induced tactile hypersensitivity, but does not contribute to spontaneous pain. Because inhibition of tactile hypersensitivity can be achieved either by spinal manipulations or by inactivation of signaling within the nucleus gracilis, the enhanced paw withdrawal response evoked by tactile stimulation does not necessarily reflect allodynia.

  9. Cold sensitivity of TRPA1 is unveiled by the prolyl hydroxylation blockade-induced sensitization to ROS.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Takahito; Nakamura, Saki; Zhao, Meng; So, Kanako; Inoue, Keisuke; Numata, Tomohiro; Takahashi, Nobuaki; Shirakawa, Hisashi; Mori, Yasuo; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Kaneko, Shuji

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) is a polymodal nociceptor that plays an important role in pain generation, but its role as a cold nociceptor is still controversial. Here, we propose that TRPA1 can sense noxious cold via transduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) signalling. We show that inhibiting hydroxylation of a proline residue within the N-terminal ankyrin repeat of human TRPA1 by mutation or using a prolyl hydroxylase (PHD) inhibitor potentiates the cold sensitivity of TRPA1 in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. Inhibiting PHD in mice triggers mouse TRPA1 sensitization sufficiently to sense cold-evoked ROS, which causes cold hypersensitivity. Furthermore, this phenomenon underlies the acute cold hypersensitivity induced by the chemotherapeutic agent oxaliplatin or its metabolite oxalate. Thus, our findings provide evidence that blocking prolyl hydroxylation reveals TRPA1 sensitization to ROS, which enables TRPA1 to convert ROS signalling into cold sensitivity. PMID:27628562

  10. Cold sensitivity of TRPA1 is unveiled by the prolyl hydroxylation blockade-induced sensitization to ROS

    PubMed Central

    Miyake, Takahito; Nakamura, Saki; Zhao, Meng; So, Kanako; Inoue, Keisuke; Numata, Tomohiro; Takahashi, Nobuaki; Shirakawa, Hisashi; Mori, Yasuo; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Kaneko, Shuji

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) is a polymodal nociceptor that plays an important role in pain generation, but its role as a cold nociceptor is still controversial. Here, we propose that TRPA1 can sense noxious cold via transduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) signalling. We show that inhibiting hydroxylation of a proline residue within the N-terminal ankyrin repeat of human TRPA1 by mutation or using a prolyl hydroxylase (PHD) inhibitor potentiates the cold sensitivity of TRPA1 in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. Inhibiting PHD in mice triggers mouse TRPA1 sensitization sufficiently to sense cold-evoked ROS, which causes cold hypersensitivity. Furthermore, this phenomenon underlies the acute cold hypersensitivity induced by the chemotherapeutic agent oxaliplatin or its metabolite oxalate. Thus, our findings provide evidence that blocking prolyl hydroxylation reveals TRPA1 sensitization to ROS, which enables TRPA1 to convert ROS signalling into cold sensitivity. PMID:27628562

  11. Antibiotic hypersensitivity in CF: drug-induced life-threatening hemolytic anemia in a pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Chavez, Alma; Mian, Amir; Scurlock, Amy M; Blackall, Douglas; Com, Gulnur

    2010-12-01

    Adverse reactions to antibiotics in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) are a growing concern. We report the case of a pediatric patient with CF with multiple comorbidities and a history of drug reactions, who developed life-threatening piperacillin-induced immune hemolytic anemia. We review drug-induced hemolytic anemia (DIIHA) in particular, and antibiotic hypersensitivity in CF in general, including the frequency, pathogenesis, and risk factors. Finally, we discuss the treatment options and propose an algorithm for the management of drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions in patients with CF. PMID:20833594

  12. Role of spinal 5-HT receptors in cutaneous hypersensitivity induced by REM sleep deprivation.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hong; Ma, Ainiu; Wang, Yong-Xiang; Pertovaara, Antti

    2008-06-01

    Previous studies indicate that rapid eye movement (REM) sleep deprivation facilitates pain sensitivity. Since serotoninergic raphe neurons are involved both in regulation of sleep and descending pain modulation, we studied whether spinal 5-HT receptors have a role in sleep deprivation-induced facilitation of pain-related behavior. REM sleep deprivation of 48h was induced by the flower pot method in the rat. The pain modulatory influence of various serotoninergic compounds administered intrathecally was assessed by determining limb withdrawal response to monofilaments. REM sleep deprivation produced a marked hypersensitivity. Sleep deprivation-induced hypersensitivity and normal sensitivity in controls were reduced both by a 5-HT(1A) receptor antagonist (WAY-100635) and a 5-HT(2C) receptor antagonist (RS-102221). An antagonist of the 5-HT(3) receptor (LY-278584) failed to modulate hypersensitivity in sleep-deprived or control animals. Paradoxically, sensitivity in sleep-deprived and control animals was reduced not only by a 5-HT(1A) receptor antagonist but also by a 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist (8-OHDPAT). The results indicate that serotoninergic receptors in the spinal cord have a complex role in the control of sleep-deprivation induced cutaneous hypersensitivity as well as baseline sensitivity in control conditions. While endogenous serotonin acting on 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(2C) receptors may facilitate mechanical sensitivity in animals with a sleep deprivation-induced hypersensitivity as well as in controls, increased activation of spinal 5-HT(1A) receptors by an exogenous agonist leads to suppression of mechanical sensitivity in both conditions. Spinal 5-HT(3) receptors do not contribute to cutaneous hypersensitivity induced by sleep deprivation.

  13. DNase I hypersensitive sites within the inducible qa gene cluster of Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed Central

    Baum, J A; Giles, N H

    1986-01-01

    DNase I hypersensitive regions were mapped within the 17.3-kilobase qa (quinic acid) gene cluster of Neurospora crassa. The 5'-flanking regions of the five qa structural genes and the two qa regulatory genes each contain DNase I hypersensitive sites under noninducing conditions and generally exhibit increases in DNase I cleavage upon induction of transcription with quinic acid. The two large intergenic regions of the qa gene cluster appear to be similarly organized with respect to the positions of constitutive and inducible DNase I hypersensitive sites. Inducible hypersensitive sites on the 5' side of one qa gene, qa-x, appear to be differentially regulated. Employing these and previously published data, we have identified a conserved sequence element that may mediate the activator function of the qa-1F regulatory gene. Variants of the 16-base-pair consensus sequence are consistently found within DNase I-protected regions adjacent to inducible DNase I hypersensitive sites within the gene cluster. Images PMID:2944110

  14. Unusual formaldehyde-induced hypersensitivity in two schoolgirls

    SciTech Connect

    Gammage, R.B. ); Hanna, W.T.; Painter, P.B. )

    1990-01-01

    Two schoolgirls developed a syndrome resembling Henoch-Schonlein purpura while attending a recently opened school insulated with urea-formaldehyde foam (UFFI). Skin rashes and swellings were accompanied by bizarre, blue-green discoloration of the skin. Subsequent investigations by county, state and federal authorities, and low measured concentrations of formaldehyde, prompted initial conclusions that in-school formaldehyde exposures were not responsible for the girls' problems. Subsequent controlled exposures to UFFI and formaldehyde while in hospital elicited the whole cascade of symptoms. The chronology of the onset and amplification of systems make it probable that the formaldehyde exposures precipitating the girls' hypersensitivity, occurred in the school. 3 refs.

  15. HLA-A★3101 and Carbamazepine-Induced Hypersensitivity Reactions in Europeans

    PubMed Central

    McCormack, Mark; Alfirevic, Ana; Bourgeois, Stephane; Farrell, John J.; Kasperavičiūtė, Dalia; Carrington, Mary; Sills, Graeme J.; Marson, Tony; Jia, Xiaoming; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Chinthapalli, Krishna; Molokhia, Mariam; Johnson, Michael R.; O’Connor, Gerard D.; Chaila, Elijah; Alhusaini, Saud; Shianna, Kevin V.; Radtke, Rodney A.; Heinzen, Erin L.; Walley, Nicole; Pandolfo, Massimo; Pichler, Werner; Park, B. Kevin; Depondt, Chantal; Sisodiya, Sanjay M.; Goldstein, David B.; Deloukas, Panos; Delanty, Norman; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L.; Pirmohamed, Munir

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Carbamazepine causes various forms of hypersensitivity reactions, ranging from maculopapular exanthema to severe blistering reactions. The HLA-B★1502 allele has been shown to be strongly correlated with carbamazepine-induced Stevens–Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS–TEN) in the Han Chinese and other Asian populations but not in European populations. METHODS We performed a genomewide association study of samples obtained from 22 subjects with carbamazepine-induced hypersensitivity syndrome, 43 subjects with carbamazepine-induced maculopapular exanthema, and 3987 control subjects, all of European descent. We tested for an association between disease and HLA alleles through proxy single-nucleotide polymorphisms and imputation, confirming associations by high-resolution sequence-based HLA typing. We replicated the associations in samples from 145 subjects with carbamazepine-induced hypersensitivity reactions. RESULTS The HLA-A★3101 allele, which has a prevalence of 2 to 5% in Northern European populations, was significantly associated with the hypersensitivity syndrome (P = 3.5×10−8). An independent genomewide association study of samples from subjects with maculopapular exanthema also showed an association with the HLA-A★3101 allele (P = 1.1×10−6). Follow-up genotyping confirmed the variant as a risk factor for the hypersensitivity syndrome (odds ratio, 12.41; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.27 to 121.03), maculopapular exanthema (odds ratio, 8.33; 95% CI, 3.59 to 19.36), and SJS–TEN (odds ratio, 25.93; 95% CI, 4.93 to 116.18). CONCLUSIONS The presence of the HLA-A★3101 allele was associated with carbamazepine-induced hypersensitivity reactions among subjects of Northern European ancestry. The presence of the allele increased the risk from 5.0% to 26.0%, whereas its absence reduced the risk from 5.0% to 3.8%. (Funded by the U.K. Department of Health and others.) PMID:21428769

  16. Virus Infections Incite Pain Hypersensitivity by Inducing Indoleamine 2,3 Dioxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lei; Ou, Rong; Rabelo de Souza, Guilherme; Cunha, Thiago M.; Lemos, Henrique; Mohamed, Eslam; Li, Lingqian; Pacholczyk, Gabriela; Randall, Janice; Munn, David H.; Mellor, Andrew L.

    2016-01-01

    Increased pain sensitivity is a comorbidity associated with many clinical diseases, though the underlying causes are poorly understood. Recently, chronic pain hypersensitivity in rodents treated to induce chronic inflammation in peripheral tissues was linked to enhanced tryptophan catabolism in brain mediated by indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO). Here we show that acute influenza A virus (IAV) and chronic murine leukemia retrovirus (MuLV) infections, which stimulate robust IDO expression in lungs and lymphoid tissues, induced acute or chronic pain hypersensitivity, respectively. In contrast, virus-induced pain hypersensitivity did not manifest in mice lacking intact IDO1 genes. Spleen IDO activity increased markedly as MuLV infections progressed, while IDO1 expression was not elevated significantly in brain or spinal cord (CNS) tissues. Moreover, kynurenine (Kyn), a tryptophan catabolite made by cells expressing IDO, incited pain hypersensitivity in uninfected IDO1-deficient mice and Kyn potentiated pain hypersensitivity due to MuLV infection. MuLV infection stimulated selective IDO expression by a discreet population of spleen cells expressing both B cell (CD19) and dendritic cell (CD11c) markers (CD19+ DCs). CD19+ DCs were more susceptible to MuLV infection than B cells or conventional (CD19neg) DCs, proliferated faster than B cells from early stages of MuLV infection and exhibited mature antigen presenting cell (APC) phenotypes, unlike conventional (CD19neg) DCs. Moreover, interactions with CD4 T cells were necessary to sustain functional IDO expression by CD19+ DCs in vitro and in vivo. Splenocytes from MuLV-infected IDO1-sufficient mice induced pain hypersensitivity in uninfected IDO1-deficient recipient mice, while selective in vivo depletion of DCs alleviated pain hypersensitivity in MuLV-infected IDO1-sufficient mice and led to rapid reduction in splenomegaly, a hallmark of MuLV immune pathogenesis. These findings reveal critical roles for CD19+ DCs

  17. Altered colorectal afferent function associated with TNBS-induced visceral hypersensitivity in mice.

    PubMed

    Feng, Bin; La, Jun-Ho; Tanaka, Takahiro; Schwartz, Erica S; McMurray, Timothy P; Gebhart, G F

    2012-10-01

    Inflammation of the distal bowel is often associated with abdominal pain and hypersensitivity, but whether and which colorectal afferents contribute to the hypersensitivity is unknown. Using a mouse model of 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis, we investigated colorectal hypersensitivity following intracolonic TNBS and associated changes in colorectum and afferent functions. C57BL/6 mice were treated intracolonically with TNBS or saline. Visceromotor responses to colorectal distension (15-60 mmHg) were recorded over 8 wk in TNBS- and saline-treated (control) mice. In other mice treated with TNBS or saline, colorectal inflammation was assessed by myeloperoxidase assay and immunohistological staining. In vitro single-fiber recordings were conducted on both TNBS and saline-treated mice to assess colorectal afferent function. Mice exhibited significant colorectal hypersensitivity through day 14 after TNBS treatment that resolved by day 28 with no resensitization through day 56. TNBS induced a neutrophil- and macrophage-based colorectal inflammation as well as loss of nerve fibers, all of which resolved by days 14-28. Single-fiber recordings revealed a net increase in afferent drive from stretch-sensitive colorectal afferents at day 14 post-TNBS and reduced proportions of mechanically insensitive afferents (MIAs) at days 14-28. Intracolonic TNBS-induced colorectal inflammation was associated with the development and recovery of hypersensitivity in mice, which correlated with a transient increase and recovery of sensitization of stretch-sensitive colorectal afferents and MIAs. These results indicate that the development and maintenance of colorectal hypersensitivity following inflammation are mediated by peripheral drive from stretch-sensitive colorectal afferents and a potential contribution from MIAs.

  18. Altered colorectal afferent function associated with TNBS-induced visceral hypersensitivity in mice

    PubMed Central

    La, Jun-Ho; Tanaka, Takahiro; Schwartz, Erica S.; McMurray, Timothy P.; Gebhart, G. F.

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation of the distal bowel is often associated with abdominal pain and hypersensitivity, but whether and which colorectal afferents contribute to the hypersensitivity is unknown. Using a mouse model of 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis, we investigated colorectal hypersensitivity following intracolonic TNBS and associated changes in colorectum and afferent functions. C57BL/6 mice were treated intracolonically with TNBS or saline. Visceromotor responses to colorectal distension (15–60 mmHg) were recorded over 8 wk in TNBS- and saline-treated (control) mice. In other mice treated with TNBS or saline, colorectal inflammation was assessed by myeloperoxidase assay and immunohistological staining. In vitro single-fiber recordings were conducted on both TNBS and saline-treated mice to assess colorectal afferent function. Mice exhibited significant colorectal hypersensitivity through day 14 after TNBS treatment that resolved by day 28 with no resensitization through day 56. TNBS induced a neutrophil- and macrophage-based colorectal inflammation as well as loss of nerve fibers, all of which resolved by days 14–28. Single-fiber recordings revealed a net increase in afferent drive from stretch-sensitive colorectal afferents at day 14 post-TNBS and reduced proportions of mechanically insensitive afferents (MIAs) at days 14–28. Intracolonic TNBS-induced colorectal inflammation was associated with the development and recovery of hypersensitivity in mice, which correlated with a transient increase and recovery of sensitization of stretch-sensitive colorectal afferents and MIAs. These results indicate that the development and maintenance of colorectal hypersensitivity following inflammation are mediated by peripheral drive from stretch-sensitive colorectal afferents and a potential contribution from MIAs. PMID:22859364

  19. DIESEL AND CARBON PARTICLES ENHANCE HOUSE DUST MITE-INDUCED PULMONARY HYPERSENSITIVITY IN BROWN NORWAY RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diesel and Carbon Particles Enhance House Dust Mite-Induced Pulmonary Hypersensitivity in Brown Norway Rats. P. Singh1, M.J. Daniels2, D. Winsett2, J. Richards2, K. Crissman2, M. Madden2 and M.I. Gilmour2. 1NCSU, Raleigh, NC and 2 USEPA, Research Triangle Park, NC.

    Ep...

  20. Activated platelets release sphingosine 1-phosphate and induce hypersensitivity to noxious heat stimuli in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Weth, Daniela; Benetti, Camilla; Rauch, Caroline; Gstraunthaler, Gerhard; Schmidt, Helmut; Geisslinger, Gerd; Sabbadini, Roger; Proia, Richard L.; Kress, Michaela

    2015-01-01

    At the site of injury activated platelets release various mediators, one of which is sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P). It was the aim of this study to explore whether activated human platelets had a pronociceptive effect in an in vivo mouse model and whether this effect was based on the release of S1P and subsequent activation of neuronal S1P receptors 1 or 3. Human platelets were prepared in different concentrations (105/μl, 106/μl, 107/μl) and assessed in mice with different genetic backgrounds (WT, S1P1fl/fl, SNS-S1P1−/−, S1P3−/−). Intracutaneous injections of activated human platelets induced a significant, dose-dependent hypersensitivity to noxious thermal stimulation. The degree of heat hypersensitivity correlated with the platelet concentration as well as the platelet S1P content and the amount of S1P released upon platelet activation as measured with LC MS/MS. Despite the significant correlations between S1P and platelet count, no difference in paw withdrawal latency (PWL) was observed in mice with a global null mutation of the S1P3 receptor or a conditional deletion of the S1P1 receptor in nociceptive primary afferents. Furthermore, neutralization of S1P with a selective anti-S1P antibody did not abolish platelet induced heat hypersensitivity. Our results suggest that activated platelets release S1P and induce heat hypersensitivity in vivo. However, the platelet induced heat hypersensitivity was caused by mediators other than S1P. PMID:25954148

  1. Neurotrophins: peripherally and centrally acting modulators of tactile stimulus-induced inflammatory pain hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Mannion, R J; Costigan, M; Decosterd, I; Amaya, F; Ma, Q P; Holstege, J C; Ji, R R; Acheson, A; Lindsay, R M; Wilkinson, G A; Woolf, C J

    1999-08-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is expressed in nociceptive sensory neurons and transported anterogradely to the dorsal horn of the spinal cord where it is located in dense core vesicles in C-fiber terminals. Peripheral inflammation substantially up-regulates BDNF mRNA and protein in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) in a nerve growth factor-dependent fashion and results in novel expression of BDNF by DRG neurons with myelinated axons. C-fiber electrical activity also increases BDNF expression in the DRG, and both inflammation and activity increase full-length TrkB receptor levels in the dorsal horn. Sequestration of endogenous BDNF/neurotrophin 4 by intraspinal TrkB-Fc fusion protein administration does not, in noninflamed animals, change basal pain sensitivity nor the mechanical hypersensitivity induced by peripheral capsaicin administration, a measure of C fiber-mediated central sensitization. TrkB-Fc administration also does not modify basal inflammatory pain hypersensitivity, but does block the progressive hypersensitivity elicited by low-intensity tactile stimulation of inflamed tissue. BDNF, by virtue of its nerve growth factor regulation in sensory neurons including novel expression in A fibers, has a role as a central modulator of tactile stimulus-induced inflammatory pain hypersensitivity.

  2. Cold Hypersensitivity in the Hands and Feet May Be Associated with Functional Dyspepsia: Results of a Multicenter Survey Study

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Kwang-Ho; Lee, Ju Ah; Park, Ki-Hyun; Yoo, Jong-Hyang; Lee, Siwoo

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To investigate whether dyspepsia symptoms differ depending on the presence or absence of cold hypersensitivity in the hands and feet (CHHF). Methods. In all, 6044 patients were recruited and provided with a questionnaire about CHHF and dyspepsia. Based on their responses, subjects were divided into a CHHF group (persons who noted cold sensations; n = 1209) and a non-CHHF group (persons who noted warm or intermediate sensations; n = 1744). The groups were compared in terms of their usual digestion status, using chi-square tests and logistic regression analyses to calculate the propensity score and odds ratios (ORs). We analyzed the participants' responses to questions on dyspepsia symptoms. Results. After matching, chi-square tests indicated that the CHHF group had higher frequencies of the following symptoms: bad digestion, poor appetite, discomfort in the upper abdomen, motion sickness, epigastric burning, postprandial fullness, nausea, and bloating. Additionally, CHHF was associated with an increased OR for dyspepsia (bad digestion, vomiting, motion sickness, epigastric burning, postprandial fullness, nausea, epigastric pain, and bloating) compared with the non-CHHF group. Conclusion. This study confirmed that CHHF patients have elevated frequencies of most dyspepsia symptoms. PMID:27069497

  3. Possible role for TRPV1 in neomycin-induced inhibition of visceral hypersensitivity in rat.

    PubMed

    van den Wijngaard, R M; Welting, O; Bulmer, D C; Wouters, M M; Lee, K; de Jonge, W J; Boeckxstaens, G E

    2009-08-01

    Transient receptor ion channel 1 (TRPV1) is a nociceptor involved in visceral hypersensitivity. Aminoglycosides like neomycin are not only potent antibiotics but in vitro data suggest that neomycin also acts as a TRPV1-antagonist and alleviates somatic pain responses. To what extent neomycin reduces visceral hypersensitivity remains unknown. Therefore, we aimed to investigate whether neomycin can inhibit in vivo TRPV1-dependent hypersensitivity responses in two rat models of visceral pain. In the first model rats were pretreated with intraperitoneal (i.p.) capsazepine, the selective TRPV1 antagonist SB-705498, neomycin or vehicle alone and 30 min later instilled with intracolonic TRPV1-activating capsaicin. Likewise, rats were pretreated with 10 days oral neomycin and then subjected to intracolonic capsaicin. The visceromotor response (VMR) to distension was measured before and after capsaicin application. In addition, the VMR to distension was measured in adult maternal separated rats before and after acute stress. Before the 2nd distension protocol these rats were treated with i.p. neomycin, amoxycillin or vehicle alone. Our results showed that capsaicin administration induced an enhanced VMR to distension that was prevented by i.p. capsazepine, SB-705498 and neomycin. Oral neomycin treatment changed bacterial faecal content but could not inhibit capsaicin induced visceral hypersensitivity. In maternal separated rats acute stress induced an enhanced response to distension that was reversed by i.p. neomycin, but not amoxycillin. These data indicate that (i.p.) neomycin can inhibit visceral hypersensitivity to distension in a nonbactericidal manner and suggest that TRPV1-modulation may be involved.

  4. Histone hyperacetylation modulates spinal type II metabotropic glutamate receptor alleviating stress-induced visceral hypersensitivity in female rats

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Dong-Yuan; Bai, Guang; Ji, Yaping; Karpowicz, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Stress is often a trigger to exacerbate chronic pain including visceral hypersensitivity associated with irritable bowel syndrome, a female predominant functional bowel disorder. Epigenetic mechanisms that mediate stress responses are a potential target to interfere with visceral pain. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of a histone deacetylase inhibitor, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid, on visceral hypersensitivity induced by a subchronic stressor in female rats and to investigate the involvement of spinal glutamate receptors. Three daily sessions of forced swim induced visceral hypersensitivity. Intrathecal suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid prevented or reversed the stress-induced visceral hypersensitivity, increased spinal histone 3 acetylation and increased mGluR2 and mGluR3 expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis revealed enrichment of H3K9Ac and H3K18Ac at several promoter Grm2 and Grm3 regions. The mGluR2/3 antagonist LY341495 reversed the inhibitory effect of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid on the stress-induced visceral hypersensitivity. In surprising contrast, stress and/or suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid had no effect on spinal NMDA receptor expression or function. These data reveal histone modification modulates mGluR2/3 expression in the spinal cord to attenuate stress-induced visceral hypersensitivity. HDAC inhibitors may provide a potential approach to relieve visceral hypersensitivity associated with irritable bowel syndrome. PMID:27385724

  5. EXPRESS: Histone hyperacetylation modulates spinal type II metabotropic glutamate receptor alleviating stress-induced visceral hypersensitivity in female rats.

    PubMed

    Cao, Dong-Yuan; Bai, Guang; Ji, Yaping; Karpowicz, Jane M; Traub, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    Stress is often a trigger to exacerbate chronic pain including visceral hypersensitivity associated with irritable bowel syndrome, a female predominant functional bowel disorder. Epigenetic mechanisms that mediate stress responses are a potential target to interfere with visceral pain. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of a histone deacetylase inhibitor, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid, on visceral hypersensitivity induced by a subchronic stressor in female rats and to investigate the involvement of spinal glutamate receptors. Three daily sessions of forced swim induced visceral hypersensitivity. Intrathecal suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid prevented or reversed the stress-induced visceral hypersensitivity, increased spinal histone 3 acetylation and increased mGluR2 and mGluR3 expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis revealed enrichment of H3K9Ac and H3K18Ac at several promoter Grm2 and Grm3 regions. The mGluR2/3 antagonist LY341495 reversed the inhibitory effect of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid on the stress-induced visceral hypersensitivity. In surprising contrast, stress and/or suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid had no effect on spinal NMDA receptor expression or function. These data reveal histone modification modulates mGluR2/3 expression in the spinal cord to attenuate stressinduced visceral hypersensitivity. HDAC inhibitors may provide a potential approach to relieve visceral hypersensitivity associated with irritable bowel syndrome. PMID:27385724

  6. Molecular Mechanisms for Drug Hypersensitivity Induced by the Malaria Parasite’s Chloroquine Resistance Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Eileen S.; Webster, Michael W.; Lehane, Adele M.; Shafik, Sarah H.; Martin, Rowena E.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the Plasmodium falciparum ‘chloroquine resistance transporter’ (PfCRT) confer resistance to chloroquine (CQ) and related antimalarials by enabling the protein to transport these drugs away from their targets within the parasite’s digestive vacuole (DV). However, CQ resistance-conferring isoforms of PfCRT (PfCRTCQR) also render the parasite hypersensitive to a subset of structurally-diverse pharmacons. Moreover, mutations in PfCRTCQR that suppress the parasite’s hypersensitivity to these molecules simultaneously reinstate its sensitivity to CQ and related drugs. We sought to understand these phenomena by characterizing the functions of PfCRTCQR isoforms that cause the parasite to become hypersensitive to the antimalarial quinine or the antiviral amantadine. We achieved this by measuring the abilities of these proteins to transport CQ, quinine, and amantadine when expressed in Xenopus oocytes and complemented this work with assays that detect the drug transport activity of PfCRT in its native environment within the parasite. Here we describe two mechanistic explanations for PfCRT-induced drug hypersensitivity. First, we show that quinine, which normally accumulates inside the DV and therewithin exerts its antimalarial effect, binds extremely tightly to the substrate-binding site of certain isoforms of PfCRTCQR. By doing so it likely blocks the normal physiological function of the protein, which is essential for the parasite’s survival, and the drug thereby gains an additional killing effect. In the second scenario, we show that although amantadine also sequesters within the DV, the parasite’s hypersensitivity to this drug arises from the PfCRTCQR-mediated transport of amantadine from the DV into the cytosol, where it can better access its antimalarial target. In both cases, the mutations that suppress hypersensitivity also abrogate the ability of PfCRTCQR to transport CQ, thus explaining why rescue from hypersensitivity restores the parasite

  7. A Hyperresponsive HPA Axis May Confer Resilience Against Persistent Paclitaxel-Induced Mechanical Hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Kozachik, Sharon L; Page, Gayle G

    2016-05-01

    Paclitaxel (PAC) treatment is associated with persistent, debilitating neuropathic pain that affects the hands and feet. Female sex and biological stress responsivity are risk factors for persistent pain, but it is unclear whether these important biologically based factors confer risk for PAC-induced neuropathic pain. To determine the relative contributions of sex and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA)-axis stress responsivity to PAC-induced mechanical hypersensitivity, we employed a PAC protocol consisting of three, 2-week cycles of every-other-day doses of PAC 1 mg/kg versus saline (Week 1) and recovery (Week 2), totaling 42 days, in mature male and female Fischer 344, Lewis, and Sprague Dawley (SD) rats, known to differ in HPA axis stress responsivity. Mechanical sensitivity was operationalized using von Frey filaments, per the up-down method. Among PAC-injected rats, SD rats exhibited significantly greater mechanical hypersensitivity relative to accumulative PAC doses compared to Fischer 344 rats. Lewis rats were not significantly different in mechanical hypersensitivity from SD or Fischer 344 rats. At the end of the protocol, PAC-injected SD rats exhibited profound mechanical hypersensitivity, whereas the PAC-injected Fischer 344 rats appeared relatively resilient to the long-term effects of PAC and exhibited mechanical sensitivity that was not statistically different from their saline-injected counterparts. Sex differences were mixed and noted only early in the PAC protocol. Moderate HPA axis stress responsivity may confer additional risk for the painful effects of PAC. If these findings hold in humans, clinicians may be better able to identify persons who may be at increased risks for developing neuropathic pain during PAC therapy. PMID:26512050

  8. A Hyperresponsive HPA Axis May Confer Resilience Against Persistent Paclitaxel-Induced Mechanical Hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Kozachik, Sharon L; Page, Gayle G

    2016-05-01

    Paclitaxel (PAC) treatment is associated with persistent, debilitating neuropathic pain that affects the hands and feet. Female sex and biological stress responsivity are risk factors for persistent pain, but it is unclear whether these important biologically based factors confer risk for PAC-induced neuropathic pain. To determine the relative contributions of sex and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA)-axis stress responsivity to PAC-induced mechanical hypersensitivity, we employed a PAC protocol consisting of three, 2-week cycles of every-other-day doses of PAC 1 mg/kg versus saline (Week 1) and recovery (Week 2), totaling 42 days, in mature male and female Fischer 344, Lewis, and Sprague Dawley (SD) rats, known to differ in HPA axis stress responsivity. Mechanical sensitivity was operationalized using von Frey filaments, per the up-down method. Among PAC-injected rats, SD rats exhibited significantly greater mechanical hypersensitivity relative to accumulative PAC doses compared to Fischer 344 rats. Lewis rats were not significantly different in mechanical hypersensitivity from SD or Fischer 344 rats. At the end of the protocol, PAC-injected SD rats exhibited profound mechanical hypersensitivity, whereas the PAC-injected Fischer 344 rats appeared relatively resilient to the long-term effects of PAC and exhibited mechanical sensitivity that was not statistically different from their saline-injected counterparts. Sex differences were mixed and noted only early in the PAC protocol. Moderate HPA axis stress responsivity may confer additional risk for the painful effects of PAC. If these findings hold in humans, clinicians may be better able to identify persons who may be at increased risks for developing neuropathic pain during PAC therapy.

  9. Bronchoscopic Investigation of Atypical Drug-induced Hypersensitivity Syndrome Showing Viral Lung Involvement.

    PubMed

    Hase, Isano; Arakawa, Hiroaki; Sakuma, Hideo; Kaneko, Fumio; Watanabe, Yuzuru; Fujiu, Koichi; Miyamoto, Hideaki; Ishii, Yoshiki

    2016-01-01

    We herein report a case of atypical drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS) involving serological reactivation of cytomegalovirus induced by carbamazepine with pulmonary and skin manifestations. These lesions were not present on admission, but developed on virus reactivation as indicated by the presence of inclusion bodies and multinucleated giant cells in alveolar cells with CD8(+) T lymphocyte infiltration on a transbronchial lung biopsy. Although the precise mechanism of DIHS remains unknown, this case suggests the crucial role of viral reactivation in pulmonary lesions in DIHS. PMID:27629969

  10. Beryllium-Induced Hypersensitivity: Genetic Susceptibility and Neoantigen Generation.

    PubMed

    Fontenot, Andrew P; Falta, Michael T; Kappler, John W; Dai, Shaodong; McKee, Amy S

    2016-01-01

    Chronic beryllium (Be) disease is a granulomatous lung disorder that results from Be exposure in a genetically susceptible host. The disease is characterized by the accumulation of Be-responsive CD4(+) T cells in the lung, and genetic susceptibility is primarily linked to HLA-DPB1 alleles possessing a glutamic acid at position 69 of the β-chain. Recent structural analysis of a Be-specific TCR interacting with a Be-loaded HLA-DP2-peptide complex revealed that Be is coordinated by amino acid residues derived from the HLA-DP2 β-chain and peptide and showed that the TCR does not directly interact with the Be(2+) cation. Rather, the TCR recognizes a modified HLA-DP2-peptide complex with charge and conformational changes. Collectively, these findings provide a structural basis for the development of this occupational lung disease through the ability of Be to induce posttranslational modifications in preexisting HLA-DP2-peptide complexes, resulting in the creation of neoantigens.

  11. Beryllium-Induced Hypersensitivity: Genetic Susceptibility and Neoantigen Generation.

    PubMed

    Fontenot, Andrew P; Falta, Michael T; Kappler, John W; Dai, Shaodong; McKee, Amy S

    2016-01-01

    Chronic beryllium (Be) disease is a granulomatous lung disorder that results from Be exposure in a genetically susceptible host. The disease is characterized by the accumulation of Be-responsive CD4(+) T cells in the lung, and genetic susceptibility is primarily linked to HLA-DPB1 alleles possessing a glutamic acid at position 69 of the β-chain. Recent structural analysis of a Be-specific TCR interacting with a Be-loaded HLA-DP2-peptide complex revealed that Be is coordinated by amino acid residues derived from the HLA-DP2 β-chain and peptide and showed that the TCR does not directly interact with the Be(2+) cation. Rather, the TCR recognizes a modified HLA-DP2-peptide complex with charge and conformational changes. Collectively, these findings provide a structural basis for the development of this occupational lung disease through the ability of Be to induce posttranslational modifications in preexisting HLA-DP2-peptide complexes, resulting in the creation of neoantigens. PMID:26685315

  12. Parainfluenza 3-Induced Cough Hypersensitivity in the Guinea Pig Airways.

    PubMed

    Zaccone, Eric J; Lieu, TinaMarie; Muroi, Yukiko; Potenzieri, Carl; Undem, Blair E; Gao, Peisong; Han, Liang; Canning, Brendan J; Undem, Bradley J

    2016-01-01

    The effect of respiratory tract viral infection on evoked cough in guinea pigs was evaluated. Guinea pigs were inoculated intranasally with either parainfluenza type 3 (PIV3) and cough was quantified in conscious animals. The guinea pigs infected with PIV3 (day 4) coughed nearly three times more than those treated with the viral growth medium in response to capsaicin, citric acid, and bradykinin. Since capsaicin, citric acid, and bradykinin evoked coughing in guinea pigs can be inhibited by drugs that antagonize the transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily V, member 1 (TRPV1), it was reasoned that the virally-induced hypertussive state may involve alterations in TPRV1 activity. PIV3 infection caused a phenotypic switch in tracheal nodose Aδ "cough receptors" such that nearly 50% of neurons began to express, de novo, TRPV1 mRNA. There was also an increase TRPV1 expression in jugular C-fiber neurons as determined by qPCR. It has previously been reported that tracheal-specific nodose neurons express the BDNF receptor TrkB and jugular neurons express the NGF receptor TrkA. Jugular neurons also express the artemin receptor GFRα3. All these neurotrophic factors have been associated with increases in TRPV1 expression. In an ex vivo perfused guinea pig tracheal preparation, we demonstrated that within 8 h of PIV3 infusion there was no change in NGF mRNA expression, but there was nearly a 10-fold increase in BDNF mRNA in the tissue, and a small but significant elevation in the expression of artemin mRNA. In summary, PIV3 infection leads to elevations in TRPV1 expression in the two key cough evoking nerve subtypes in the guinea pig trachea, and this is associated with a hypertussive state with respect to various TRPV1 activating stimuli. PMID:27213574

  13. Parainfluenza 3-Induced Cough Hypersensitivity in the Guinea Pig Airways

    PubMed Central

    Lieu, TinaMarie; Muroi, Yukiko; Potenzieri, Carl; Undem, Blair E.; Gao, Peisong; Han, Liang; Canning, Brendan J.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of respiratory tract viral infection on evoked cough in guinea pigs was evaluated. Guinea pigs were inoculated intranasally with either parainfluenza type 3 (PIV3) and cough was quantified in conscious animals. The guinea pigs infected with PIV3 (day 4) coughed nearly three times more than those treated with the viral growth medium in response to capsaicin, citric acid, and bradykinin. Since capsaicin, citric acid, and bradykinin evoked coughing in guinea pigs can be inhibited by drugs that antagonize the transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily V, member 1 (TRPV1), it was reasoned that the virally-induced hypertussive state may involve alterations in TPRV1 activity. PIV3 infection caused a phenotypic switch in tracheal nodose Aδ “cough receptors” such that nearly 50% of neurons began to express, de novo, TRPV1 mRNA. There was also an increase TRPV1 expression in jugular C-fiber neurons as determined by qPCR. It has previously been reported that tracheal-specific nodose neurons express the BDNF receptor TrkB and jugular neurons express the NGF receptor TrkA. Jugular neurons also express the artemin receptor GFRα3. All these neurotrophic factors have been associated with increases in TRPV1 expression. In an ex vivo perfused guinea pig tracheal preparation, we demonstrated that within 8 h of PIV3 infusion there was no change in NGF mRNA expression, but there was nearly a 10-fold increase in BDNF mRNA in the tissue, and a small but significant elevation in the expression of artemin mRNA. In summary, PIV3 infection leads to elevations in TRPV1 expression in the two key cough evoking nerve subtypes in the guinea pig trachea, and this is associated with a hypertussive state with respect to various TRPV1 activating stimuli. PMID:27213574

  14. Parainfluenza 3-Induced Cough Hypersensitivity in the Guinea Pig Airways.

    PubMed

    Zaccone, Eric J; Lieu, TinaMarie; Muroi, Yukiko; Potenzieri, Carl; Undem, Blair E; Gao, Peisong; Han, Liang; Canning, Brendan J; Undem, Bradley J

    2016-01-01

    The effect of respiratory tract viral infection on evoked cough in guinea pigs was evaluated. Guinea pigs were inoculated intranasally with either parainfluenza type 3 (PIV3) and cough was quantified in conscious animals. The guinea pigs infected with PIV3 (day 4) coughed nearly three times more than those treated with the viral growth medium in response to capsaicin, citric acid, and bradykinin. Since capsaicin, citric acid, and bradykinin evoked coughing in guinea pigs can be inhibited by drugs that antagonize the transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily V, member 1 (TRPV1), it was reasoned that the virally-induced hypertussive state may involve alterations in TPRV1 activity. PIV3 infection caused a phenotypic switch in tracheal nodose Aδ "cough receptors" such that nearly 50% of neurons began to express, de novo, TRPV1 mRNA. There was also an increase TRPV1 expression in jugular C-fiber neurons as determined by qPCR. It has previously been reported that tracheal-specific nodose neurons express the BDNF receptor TrkB and jugular neurons express the NGF receptor TrkA. Jugular neurons also express the artemin receptor GFRα3. All these neurotrophic factors have been associated with increases in TRPV1 expression. In an ex vivo perfused guinea pig tracheal preparation, we demonstrated that within 8 h of PIV3 infusion there was no change in NGF mRNA expression, but there was nearly a 10-fold increase in BDNF mRNA in the tissue, and a small but significant elevation in the expression of artemin mRNA. In summary, PIV3 infection leads to elevations in TRPV1 expression in the two key cough evoking nerve subtypes in the guinea pig trachea, and this is associated with a hypertussive state with respect to various TRPV1 activating stimuli.

  15. Cold-induced changes in amphibian oocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Angelier, N.; Moreau, N.A.; N'Da, E.A.; Lautredou, N.F. )

    1989-08-01

    Female Pleurodeles waltl newts (Amphibia, urodele), usually raised at 20 degrees C, were submitted to low temperatures; oocytes responded to this cold stress by drastic changes both in lampbrush chromosome structure and in protein pattern. Preexisting lateral loops of lampbrush chromosomes were reduced in size and number, while cold-induced loops which were tremendously developed, occurred on defined bivalents of the oocyte at constant, reproducible sites. A comparison of protein patterns in control and stressed oocytes showed two main differences: in stressed oocytes, overall protein synthesis was reduced, except for a set of polypeptides, the cold-stress proteins; second, there was a striking inversion of the relative amount of beta- and gamma-actin found in the oocyte nucleus before and after cold stress. Whereas beta-actin was the predominant form in control oocytes, gamma-actin became the major form in stressed oocytes.

  16. Cold-induced thermoregulation and biological aging.

    PubMed

    Florez-Duquet, M; McDonald, R B

    1998-04-01

    Aging is associated with diminished cold-induced thermoregulation (CIT). The mechanisms accounting for this phenomenon have yet to be clearly elucidated but most likely reflect a combination of increased heat loss and decreased metabolic heat production. The inability of the aged subject to reduce heat loss during cold exposure is associated with diminished reactive tone of the cutaneous vasculature and, to a lesser degree, alterations in the insulative properties of body fat. Cold-induced metabolic heat production via skeletal muscle shivering thermogenesis and brown adipose tissue nonshivering thermogenesis appears to decline with age. Few investigations have directly linked diminished skeletal muscle shivering thermogenesis with the age-related reduction in cold-induced thermoregulatory capacity. Rather, age-related declines in skeletal muscle mass and metabolic activity are cited as evidence for decreased heat production via shivering. Reduced mass, GDP binding to brown fat mitochondria, and uncoupling protein (UCP) levels are cited as evidence for attenuated brown adipose tissue cold-induced nonshivering thermogenic capacity during aging. The age-related reduction in brown fat nonshivering thermogenic capacity most likely reflects altered cellular signal transduction rather than changes in neural and hormonal signaling. The discussion in this review focuses on how alterations in CIT during the life span may offer insight into possible mechanisms of biological aging. Although the preponderance of evidence presented here demonstrates that CIT declines with chronological time, the mechanism reflecting this attenuated function remains to be elucidated. The inability to draw definitive conclusions regarding biological aging and CIT reflects the lack of a clear definition of aging. It is unlikely that the mechanisms accounting for the decline in cold-induced thermoregulation during aging will be determined until biological aging is more precisely defined. PMID

  17. Cold-induced thermoregulation and biological aging.

    PubMed

    Florez-Duquet, M; McDonald, R B

    1998-04-01

    Aging is associated with diminished cold-induced thermoregulation (CIT). The mechanisms accounting for this phenomenon have yet to be clearly elucidated but most likely reflect a combination of increased heat loss and decreased metabolic heat production. The inability of the aged subject to reduce heat loss during cold exposure is associated with diminished reactive tone of the cutaneous vasculature and, to a lesser degree, alterations in the insulative properties of body fat. Cold-induced metabolic heat production via skeletal muscle shivering thermogenesis and brown adipose tissue nonshivering thermogenesis appears to decline with age. Few investigations have directly linked diminished skeletal muscle shivering thermogenesis with the age-related reduction in cold-induced thermoregulatory capacity. Rather, age-related declines in skeletal muscle mass and metabolic activity are cited as evidence for decreased heat production via shivering. Reduced mass, GDP binding to brown fat mitochondria, and uncoupling protein (UCP) levels are cited as evidence for attenuated brown adipose tissue cold-induced nonshivering thermogenic capacity during aging. The age-related reduction in brown fat nonshivering thermogenic capacity most likely reflects altered cellular signal transduction rather than changes in neural and hormonal signaling. The discussion in this review focuses on how alterations in CIT during the life span may offer insight into possible mechanisms of biological aging. Although the preponderance of evidence presented here demonstrates that CIT declines with chronological time, the mechanism reflecting this attenuated function remains to be elucidated. The inability to draw definitive conclusions regarding biological aging and CIT reflects the lack of a clear definition of aging. It is unlikely that the mechanisms accounting for the decline in cold-induced thermoregulation during aging will be determined until biological aging is more precisely defined.

  18. Genetic AVP deficiency abolishes cold-induced diuresis but does not attenuate cold-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhongjie

    2006-06-01

    Chronic cold exposure causes hypertension and diuresis. The aim of this study was to determine whether vasopressin (AVP) plays a role in cold-induced hypertension and diuresis. Two groups of Long-Evans (LE) and two groups of homozygous AVP-deficient Brattleboro (VD) rats were used. Blood pressure (BP) was not different among the four groups during a 2-wk control period at room temperature (25 degrees C, warm). After the control period, one LE group and one VD group were exposed to cold (5 degrees C); the remaining groups were kept at room temperature. BP and body weight were measured weekly during exposure to cold. Food intake, water intake, urine output, and urine osmolality were measured during weeks 1, 3, and 5 of cold exposure. At the end of week 5, all animals were killed and blood was collected for measurement of plasma AVP. Kidneys were removed for measurement of renal medulla V2 receptor mRNA and aquaporin-2 (AQP-2) protein expression. BP of LE and VD rats increased significantly by week 2 of cold exposure and reached a high level by week 5. BP elevations developed at approximately the same rate and to the same degree in LE and VD rats. AVP deficiency significantly increased urine output and solute-free water clearance and decreased urine osmolality. Chronic cold exposure increased urine output and solute-free water clearance and decreased urine osmolality in LE rats, indicating that cold exposure caused diuresis in LE rats. Cold exposure failed to affect these parameters in VD rats, suggesting that the AVP system is responsible for cold-induced diuresis. Cold exposure did not alter plasma AVP in LE rats. Renal medulla V2 receptor mRNA and AQP-2 protein expression levels were decreased significantly in the cold-exposed LE rats, suggesting that cold exposure inhibited renal V2 receptors and AVP-inducible AQP-2 water channels. We conclude that 1) AVP may not be involved in the pathogenesis of cold-induced hypertension, 2) the AVP system plays a critical role

  19. Prevention of ultraviolet radiation-induced immunosuppression by sunscreen in Candida albicans-induced delayed-type hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, QUAN; LI, RUNXIANG; ZHAO, XIAOXIA; LIANG, BIHUA; MA, SHAOYIN; LI, ZHENJIE; ZHU, HUILAN

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation-induced immunosuppression leading to skin cancer has received increased attention in previous years. The present study aimed to investigate the immunoprotection offered by Anthelios sunscreen in a mouse model of Candida albicans-induced delayed-type hypersensitivity. Anthelios sunscreen was applied to the skin on the dorsal skin of BALB/c mice treated with a sub-erythema dose of solar-simulated radiation. Delayed-type hypersensitivity was induced by immunization with Candida albicans. Changes in the skin thickness of the foot pads were measured, and immunosuppression rates were also evaluated. The expression levels of CD207, CD80 and CD86 in the Langerhans cells were semi-quantitatively detected using Western blotting and immunohistochemical assays. The delayed-type hypersensitivity mouse model was successfully established. The minimal erythema doses of UVA and UVB exposure to the mice were 2,000 and 145 mJ/cm2, respectively. The immunosuppression rates in the sunscreen group and non-sunscreen group were 24.39 and 65.85%, respectively (P<0.01). The results of the Western blotting and immunohistochemistry showed that the expression levels of CD207 (P<0.01), CD80 (P<0.05) and CD86 (P<0.01) were higher in the sunscreen group, compared with those in the non-sunscreen group. UV exposure reduced Candida albicans antigen-induced delayed-type hypersensitivity. Anthelios sunscreen was found to protect the skin from immunosuppression through the activation of epidermal Langerhans cells. PMID:27175551

  20. Prevention of ultraviolet radiation‑induced immunosuppression by sunscreen in Candida albicans‑induced delayed‑type hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Quan; Li, Runxiang; Zhao, Xiaoxia; Liang, Bihua; Ma, Shaoyin; Li, Zhenjie; Zhu, Huilan

    2016-07-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation-induced immunosuppression leading to skin cancer has received increased attention in previous years. The present study aimed to investigate the immunoprotection offered by Anthelios sunscreen in a mouse model of Candida albicans‑induced delayed‑type hypersensitivity. Anthelios sunscreen was applied to the skin on the dorsal skin of BALB/c mice treated with a sub‑erythema dose of solar‑simulated radiation. Delayed‑type hypersensitivity was induced by immunization with Candida albicans. Changes in the skin thickness of the foot pads were measured, and immunosuppression rates were also evaluated. The expression levels of CD207, CD80 and CD86 in the Langerhans cells were semi‑quantitatively detected using Western blotting and immunohistochemical assays. The delayed‑type hypersensitivity mouse model was successfully established. The minimal erythema doses of UVA and UVB exposure to the mice were 2,000 and 145 mJ/cm2, respectively. The immunosuppression rates in the sunscreen group and non‑sunscreen group were 24.39 and 65.85%, respectively (P<0.01). The results of the Western blotting and immunohistochemistry showed that the expression levels of CD207 (P<0.01), CD80 (P<0.05) and CD86 (P<0.01) were higher in the sunscreen group, compared with those in the non‑sunscreen group. UV exposure reduced Candida albicans antigen‑induced delayed‑type hypersensitivity. Anthelios sunscreen was found to protect the skin from immunosuppression through the activation of epidermal Langerhans cells. PMID:27175551

  1. Drug-induced Hypersensitivity Syndrome Accompanied by Pulmonary Lesions Exhibiting Centrilobular Nodular Shadows.

    PubMed

    Sawata, Tetsuro; Bando, Masashi; Kogawara, Haruna; Nakayama, Masayuki; Mato, Naoko; Yamasawa, Hideaki; Takemura, Tamiko; Sugiyama, Yukihiko

    2016-01-01

    A 51-year-old woman diagnosed with Crohn's disease developed drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS) 12 and six weeks after starting the oral intake of mesalazine and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, respectively. Chest CT showed centrilobular nodular shadows and a transbronchial lung biopsy (TBLB) revealed infiltration of inflammatory cells predominantly in the small pulmonary artery walls and bronchiolar walls. Regarding pulmonary lesions of DIHS, infiltrative shadows have sometimes been reported, whereas nodular shadows have rarely been documented. This is a valuable case report for considering the mechanism underlying the development of pulmonary lesions in case of DIHS. PMID:27150872

  2. A case of sulfasalazine-induced hypersensitivity syndrome confirmed by enzyme-linked immunospot assay.

    PubMed

    Phatharacharukul, Parkpoom; Klaewsongkram, Jettanong

    2013-11-01

    A 24-year-old male with a history of spondyloarthropathy presented with high fever, cervical lymphadenopathy and generalized maculopapular rash. He was treated with prednisolone for chronic uveitis before being switched to sulfasalazine 3 weeks prior to admission. Laboratory findings revealed marked leukocytosis with frequent atypical lymphocytes. Sulfasalazine was discontinued and the etiology of mononucleosis syndrome explored. During admission, he developed acalculous cholecystitis and hypotension. All symptoms quickly improved following administration of systemic corticosteroids. The investigation for infectious mononucleosis yielded negative results and a diagnosis of sulfasalazine-induced hypersensitivity syndrome was confirmed using enzyme-linked immunospot assays. PMID:24179690

  3. Drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome due to anticonvulsants in a two-year-old boy.

    PubMed

    Criado, Paulo Ricardo; Criado, Roberta F J; Vasconcellos, Cidia; Pegas, Jose Roberto P; Cera, Patrícia Calil

    2004-12-01

    Drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS) usually refers to severe cutaneous drug eruption associated with systemic involvement and potentially fatal outcome. We report a 2-year-old Caucasian boy who developed DIHS due to phenytoin and phenobarbital and who showed extensive internal organ involvement. We are alerting that failure to recognize this drug eruption and discontinue the culprit drug may result in increased severity, greater extent of internal organ involvement, and fatal outcome. The recent research about the influence of human herpesvirus 6 co-infection on the pathogenesis of DIHS is also discussed by the authors in this paper. PMID:15801266

  4. Hapten-Induced Contact Hypersensitivity, Autoimmune Reactions, and Tumor Regression: Plausibility of Mediating Antitumor Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Erkes, Dan A.; Selvan, Senthamil R.

    2014-01-01

    Haptens are small molecule irritants that bind to proteins and elicit an immune response. Haptens have been commonly used to study allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) using animal contact hypersensitivity (CHS) models. However, extensive research into contact hypersensitivity has offered a confusing and intriguing mechanism of allergic reactions occurring in the skin. The abilities of haptens to induce such reactions have been frequently utilized to study the mechanisms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) to induce autoimmune-like responses such as autoimmune hemolytic anemia and to elicit viral wart and tumor regression. Hapten-induced tumor regression has been studied since the mid-1900s and relies on four major concepts: (1) ex vivo haptenation, (2) in situ haptenation, (3) epifocal hapten application, and (4) antigen-hapten conjugate injection. Each of these approaches elicits unique responses in mice and humans. The present review attempts to provide a critical appraisal of the hapten-mediated tumor treatments and offers insights for future development of the field. PMID:24949488

  5. Transcription factor NFAT1 controls allergic contact hypersensitivity through regulation of activation induced cell death program

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Ho-Keun; Kim, Gi-Cheon; Hwang, Ji Sun; Kim, Young; Chae, Chang-Suk; Nam, Jong Hee; Jun, Chang-Duk; Rudra, Dipayan; Surh, Charles D.; Im, Sin-Hyeog

    2016-01-01

    Allergic contact hypersensitivity (CHS) is an inflammatory skin disease mediated by allergen specific T cells. In this study, we investigated the role of transcription factor NFAT1 in the pathogenesis of contact hypersensitivity. NFAT1 knock out (KO) mice spontaneously developed CHS-like skin inflammation in old age. Healthy young NFAT1 KO mice displayed enhanced susceptibility to hapten-induced CHS. Both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from NFAT1 KO mice displayed hyper-activated properties and produced significantly enhanced levels of inflammatory T helper 1(Th1)/Th17 type cytokines. NFAT1 KO T cells were more resistant to activation induced cell death (AICD), and regulatory T cells derived from these mice showed a partial defect in their suppressor activity. NFAT1 KO T cells displayed a reduced expression of apoptosis associated BCL-2/BH3 family members. Ectopic expression of NFAT1 restored the AICD defect in NFAT1 KO T cells and increased AICD in normal T cells. Recipient Rag2−/− mice transferred with NFAT1 KO T cells showed more severe CHS sensitivity due to a defect in activation induced hapten-reactive T cell apoptosis. Collectively, our results suggest the NFAT1 plays a pivotal role as a genetic switch in CD4+/CD8+ T cell tolerance by regulating AICD process in the T cell mediated skin inflammation. PMID:26777750

  6. Carboplatin-induced severe hypersensitivity reaction: role of IgE-dependent basophil activation and FcεRI.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Takuya; Hirai, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Nozomi; Kobayashi, Natsuki; Sugimoto, Hiroko; Tabata, Tsutomu; Okuda, Masahiro

    2014-11-01

    Basophil activation was observed in patients with a history of carboplatin-induced severe hypersensitivity reaction (HR). However, the precise mechanism by which carboplatin induces basophil activation and the associated surrogate markers remains to be elucidated. To investigate whether IgE-dependent mechanisms, including the overexpression of FcεRI, participate in carboplatin-induced basophil activation, 13 ovarian cancer patients were enrolled: 5 with a history of carboplatin-induced severe hypersensitivity reaction within the past 2 years, and 8 with no such history. The expression levels of FcεRI, IgE, and CD203c on basophils were measured using a flow cytometer. Immunoglobulin E-dependent basophil activation was evaluated by testing for IgE passive sensitization using lactic acid, and by testing for phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibition, using wortmannin. In three patients positive for carboplatin hypersensitivity, pretreatment with wortmannin almost completely inhibited carboplatin-induced basophil activation (P < 0.05). In a healthy control subject, whose own IgE showed no response to carboplatin, acquired reactivity to carboplatin when exposed to plasma from patients positive for carboplatin hypersensitivity. This did not occur when the same experiment was carried out using plasma from the patients negative for carboplatin hypersensitivity. Moreover, pretreatment with omalizumab, a monoclonal anti-IgE antibody, almost completely blocked carboplatin-induced basophil activation in the plasma of patients positive for carboplatin hypersensitivity. On further investigation, the HR-positive group had significantly higher levels of FcεRI compared with the negative group (P < 0.05). In conclusion, an IgE-dependent mechanism incorporating FcεRI overexpression participates in carboplatin-induced severe HR. These results establish the relevance of monitoring the pharmacodynamic changes of basophils to prevent carboplatin-induced severe HR.

  7. Bacteriophage T4 Mutants Hypersensitive to an Antitumor Agent That Induces Topoisomerase-DNA Cleavage Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Woodworth, D. L.; Kreuzer, K. N.

    1996-01-01

    Many antitumor agents and antibiotics affect cells by interacting with type II topoisomerases, stabilizing a covalent enzyme-DNA complex. A pathway of recombination can apparently repair this DNA damage. In this study, transposon mutagenesis was used to identify possible components of the repair pathway in bacteriophage T4. Substantial increases in sensitivity to the antitumor agent m-AMSA [4'-(9-acridinyl-amino) methanesulfon-m-anisidide] were found with transposon insertion mutations that inactivate any of six T4-encoded proteins: UvsY (DNA synaptase accessory protein), UvsW (unknown function), Rnh (RNase H and 5' to 3' DNA exonuclease), α-gt (α-glucosyl transferase), gp47.1 (uncharacterized), and NrdB (β subunit of ribonucleotide reductase). The role of the rnh gene in drug sensitivity was further characterized. First, an in-frame rnh deletion mutation was constructed and analyzed, providing evidence that the absence of Rnh protein causes hypersensitivity to m-AMSA. Second, the m-AMSA sensitivity of the rnh-deletion mutant was shown to require a drug-sensitive T4 topoisomerase. Third, analysis of double mutants suggested that uvsW and rnh mutations impair a common step in the recombinational repair pathway for m-AMSA-induced damage. Finally, the rnh-deletion mutant was found to be hypersensitive to UV, implicating Rnh in recombinational repair of UV-induced damage. PMID:8807283

  8. Anisakis simplex: from Obscure Infectious Worm to Inducer of Immune Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Audicana, M. Teresa; Kennedy, Malcolm W.

    2008-01-01

    Summary: Infection of humans with the nematode worm parasite Anisakis simplex was first described in the 1960s in association with the consumption of raw or undercooked fish. During the 1990s it was realized that even the ingestion of dead worms in food fish can cause severe hypersensitivity reactions, that these may be more prevalent than infection itself, and that this outcome could be associated with food preparations previously considered safe. Not only may allergic symptoms arise from infection by the parasites (“gastroallergic anisakiasis”), but true anaphylactic reactions can also occur following exposure to allergens from dead worms by food-borne, airborne, or skin contact routes. This review discusses A. simplex pathogenesis in humans, covering immune hypersensitivity reactions both in the context of a living infection and in terms of exposure to its allergens by other routes. Over the last 20 years, several studies have concentrated on A. simplex antigen characterization and innate as well as adaptive immune response to this parasite. Molecular characterization of Anisakis allergens and isolation of their encoding cDNAs is now an active field of research that should provide improved diagnostic tools in addition to tools with which to enhance our understanding of pathogenesis and controversial aspects of A. simplex allergy. We also discuss the potential relevance of parasite products such as allergens, proteinases, and proteinase inhibitors and the activation of basophils, eosinophils, and mast cells in the induction of A. simplex-related immune hypersensitivity states induced by exposure to the parasite, dead or alive. PMID:18400801

  9. Noise-induced Hypersensitivity and Stochastic Resonance: Can Living Systems Use Them at a Molecular Level?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerashchenko, O. V.; Ginzburg, S. L.; Pustovoit, M. A.

    2003-05-01

    Living organisms are known to receive and transduce useful signals in a very noisy environment. A natural question whether they can use this noise constructively is still lacking solid answer. Some recent works demonstrated that one of the phenomena where noise plays a constructive role, the stochastic resonance (SR), occurs in biology at system and cellular levels of organization. Its existence at molecular level, in ionic channels of cell membranes, is now a subject for intensive, though mainly theoretical, studies. In the present work we study a simple two-state model of ionic channel together with its continuous equivalent, the asymmetrical Kramers oscillator, with external periodic signal and dichotomous external noise. We found that the new kind of SR appears for adiabatically slow external noise, when its amplitude becomes equal to static bias, thus dynamically recovering the system symmetry. These findings are confirmed with analog circuit simulations. The next promising effect is the noise-induced hypersensitivity to small signals. The phenomenon arises in stochastic systems with on-off intermittency. Such a system at optimal external noise intensity and correlation time becomes sensitive to an ultrasmall signal, amplifying it by many orders of magnitude. Such a hypersensitivity is often robust to additive thermal noise. We speculate that a similar effect might occur in various sensory systems that are known to be very noisy and to display unique sensitivity to environmental signals. A simple model system of two neurons with common strong noise source is hypersensitive to small differential signal only in the ideal case of absence of internal noise.

  10. The combined predictive capacity of rat models of algogen-induced and neuropathic hypersensitivity to clinically used analgesics varies with nociceptive endpoint and consideration of locomotor function.

    PubMed

    Munro, Gordon; Storm, Ann; Hansen, Merete K; Dyhr, Helene; Marcher, Lotte; Erichsen, Helle K; Sheykhzade, Majid

    2012-05-01

    Different neurobiological mechanism(s) might contribute to evoked and non-evoked pains and to limited translational drug discovery efforts. Other variables including the pain model and sensory testing method used, dose/route/preadministration time of compound(s), lack of adverse effect profiling and level of observer experience might also contribute. With these points in mind, we tested three mechanistically distinct analgesics in rat models of algogen-induced and neuropathic pain. In chronic constriction injury (CCI) rats evoked hindpaw mechanical hypersensitivity and spontaneous weight bearing deficits developed quickly and persisted for at least 3 weeks post-injury. In contrast, evoked cold hypersensitivity, or movement-associated behavioural deficits (rotarod, beam-walking) were less manifested or dissipated rapidly post-injury. Mechanical hypersensitivity was dose-dependently reversed by morphine (3-10 mg/kg, s.c.) and gabapentin (50-200 mg/kg, i.p.). Weight bearing deficits and cold hypersensitivity were reversed only by high doses of each drug. Surprisingly, duloxetine (10-60 mg/kg, s.c.) was largely ineffective in neuropathic rats although it partially reduced formalin-induced spontaneous nocifensive behaviours; especially during interphase, a period associated with activation of descending monoaminergic inhibition. Morphine and gabapentin markedly attenuated second phase formalin- and in addition capsaicin-induced nocifensive behaviours; indicative of effects on central sensitization and nociceptor hyperexcitability mechanisms. Only gabapentin consistently attenuated nociceptive behaviours at a dose that did not impair exploratory locomotor behaviour in naïve rats. Accordingly, this comparative analysis indicates that the pharmacological sensitivity of evoked and non-evoked pain indices does not necessarily correlate within models, perhaps reflecting differing underlying mechanisms. Conversely, the pharmacological specificity of non-evoked pain indices to

  11. Proteomics Study on Nonallergic Hypersensitivity Induced by Compound 4880 and Ovalbumin.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yubin; Guo, Na; Dou, Deqiang; Ran, Xiaoku; Ma, Xiande; Kuang, Haixue

    2016-01-01

    Nonallergic hypersensitivity reaction (NHR) accounts for more than 77% of all immune-mediated immediate hypersensitivity reactions and has become a serious threat to public health. Here, proteomics was used to study the NHR mechanism of two typical substances, the compound 4880 and ovalbumin. Twelve different proteins were suggested as potential biomarkers for examining the NHR mechanism, and our results revealed that the mechanism mainly encompassed 2 processes, i.e., generation and effect processes. The generation process could be classified as direct stimulation, complement (classical and alternative), coagulation, kallikrein-kinin, and integrated pathways. Thus glutathione peroxidase 1, terminal complement complex (complement factor 4d and Bb), coagulation 13, kininogen-1, and IgE could be used as candidate biomarkers for the indication of the corresponding pathways respectively, the proteins were further confirmed by ELISA. And the effect process was mainly composed of histamine as well as proteins such as DCD and MYLPF, which could be used as important indices for the symptoms of NHR. Our study differs from previous studies in that C4880 was found to not only be involved in the direct stimulation pathway, but also in the activated complement and kallikrein-kinin pathways through the coagulation pathway. We also report for the first time that ovalbumin-induced NHR could be a combination of the coagulation, classical complement, and integrated pathways.

  12. Proteomics Study on Nonallergic Hypersensitivity Induced by Compound 4880 and Ovalbumin

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yubin; Guo, Na; Dou, Deqiang; Ran, Xiaoku; Ma, Xiande; Kuang, Haixue

    2016-01-01

    Nonallergic hypersensitivity reaction (NHR) accounts for more than 77% of all immune-mediated immediate hypersensitivity reactions and has become a serious threat to public health. Here, proteomics was used to study the NHR mechanism of two typical substances, the compound 4880 and ovalbumin. Twelve different proteins were suggested as potential biomarkers for examining the NHR mechanism, and our results revealed that the mechanism mainly encompassed 2 processes, i.e., generation and effect processes. The generation process could be classified as direct stimulation, complement (classical and alternative), coagulation, kallikrein-kinin, and integrated pathways. Thus glutathione peroxidase 1, terminal complement complex (complement factor 4d and Bb), coagulation 13, kininogen-1, and IgE could be used as candidate biomarkers for the indication of the corresponding pathways respectively, the proteins were further confirmed by ELISA. And the effect process was mainly composed of histamine as well as proteins such as DCD and MYLPF, which could be used as important indices for the symptoms of NHR. Our study differs from previous studies in that C4880 was found to not only be involved in the direct stimulation pathway, but also in the activated complement and kallikrein-kinin pathways through the coagulation pathway. We also report for the first time that ovalbumin-induced NHR could be a combination of the coagulation, classical complement, and integrated pathways. PMID:26829397

  13. Drug-reaction eosinophilia and systemic symptoms and drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Suran L

    2014-02-01

    Drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS), also known as drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS), is a rare, severe cutaneous adverse reaction characterised by fever, rash, lymphadenopathy, eosinophilia and/or other leukocyte abnormalities, and internal organ involvement and often has a relapsing-remitting course despite withdrawal of the drug. The drugs that are most implicated include aromatic anticonvulsants, allopurinol, sulphonamides, antiretrovirals (abacavir and nevirapine), and minocycline. The pathogenesis of DRESS/DIHS is far from clear but probably involves a combination of impaired pharmacokinetics and the accumulation of drug metabolites, the sequential reactivation of the herpesvirus family and genetic susceptibility conferred by the association with certain human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I alleles. The strong association between abacavir and HLA-B*5701 has enabled pharmacogenetics screening to be employed successfully to minimise the occurrence of hypersensitivity. A prolonged course of oral corticosteroids is required to treat DRESS/DIHS, given the relapsing-remitting nature of the condition with i.v. immunoglobulin and valgangciclovir reserved for refractory or life-threatening cases.

  14. The VGF-derived peptide TLQP-21 contributes to inflammatory and nerve injury-induced hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Fairbanks, Carolyn A.; Peterson, Cristina D.; Speltz, Rebecca H.; Riedl, Maureen S.; Kitto, Kelley F.; Dykstra, Jaclyn A.; Braun, Patrick D.; Sadahiro, Masato; Salton, Stephen R.; Vulchanova, Lucy

    2014-01-01

    VGF (non-acronymic) is a granin-like protein that is packaged and proteolytically processed within the regulated secretory pathway. VGF and peptides derived from its processing have been implicated in neuroplasticity associated with learning, memory, depression, and chronic pain. In sensory neurons, VGF is rapidly increased following peripheral nerve injury and inflammation. Several bioactive peptides generated from the C-terminus of VGF have pro-nociceptive spinal effects. The goal of the present study was to examine the spinal effects of the peptide TLQP-21 and determine whether it participates in spinal mechanisms of persistent pain. Application of exogenous TLQP-21 induced dose-dependent thermal hyperalgesia in the warm water immersion tail withdrawal test. This hyperalgesia was inhibited by a p38 MAPK inhibitor as well as inhibitors of cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase. We used immunoneutralization of TLQP-21 to determine the function of the endogenous peptide in mechanisms underlying persistent pain. In mice injected intradermally with complete Freund’s adjuvant, intrathecal treatment with anti-TLQP21 IgG immediately prior to or 5 h after induction of inflammation dose-dependently inhibited tactile hypersensitivity and thermal hyperalgesia. Intrathecal anti-TL21 administration also attenuated the development and maintenance of tactile hypersensitivity in the spared nerve injury model of neuropathic pain. These results provide evidence that endogenous TLQP-21 peptide contributes to the mechanisms of spinal neuroplasticity after inflammation and nerve injury. PMID:24657450

  15. Vitamin C and common cold-induced asthma: a systematic review and statistical analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Asthma exacerbations are often induced by the common cold, which, in turn, can be alleviated by vitamin C. Objective To investigate whether vitamin C administration influences common cold-induced asthma. Methods Systematic review and statistical analysis of the identified trials. Medline, Scopus and Cochrane Central were searched for studies that give information on the effects of vitamin C on common cold-induced asthma. All clinically relevant outcomes related to asthma were included in this review. The estimates of vitamin C effect and their confidence intervals [CI] were calculated for the included studies. Results Three studies that were relevant for examining the role of vitamin C on common cold-induced asthma were identified. The three studies had a total of 79 participants. Two studies were randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trials. A study in Nigeria on asthmatics whose asthma attacks were precipitated by respiratory infections found that 1 g/day vitamin C decreased the occurrence of asthma attacks by 78% (95% CI: 19% to 94%). A cross-over study in former East-Germany on patients who had infection-related asthma found that 5 g/day vitamin C decreased the proportion of participants who had bronchial hypersensitivity to histamine by 52 percentage points (95% CI: 25 to 71). The third study did not use a placebo. Administration of a single dose of 1 gram of vitamin C to Italian non-asthmatic common cold patients increased the provocative concentration of histamine (PC20) 3.2-fold (95% CI: 2.0 to 5.1), but the vitamin C effect was significantly less when the same participants did not suffer from the common cold. Conclusions The three reviewed studies differed substantially in their methods, settings and outcomes. Each of them found benefits from the administration of vitamin C; either against asthma attacks or against bronchial hypersensitivity, the latter of which is a characteristic of asthma. Given the evidence suggesting that vitamin C

  16. Alcohol and high fat induced chronic pancreatitis: TRPV4 antagonist reduces hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L P; Kline, R H; Deevska, G; Ma, F; Nikolova-Karakashian, M; Westlund, K N

    2015-12-17

    The pathogenesis of pain in chronic pancreatitis is poorly understood, and its treatment can be a major clinical challenge. Surgical and other invasive methods have variable outcomes that can be unsatisfactory. Therefore, there is a great need for further discovery of the pathogenesis of pancreatitis pain and new therapeutic targets. Human and animal studies indicate a critical role for oxidative stress and activation of transient receptor potential (TRP) cation channel subfamily members TRPV1 and TRPA1 on pancreatic nociceptors in sensitization mechanisms that result in pain. However, the in vivo role of transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 4 (TRPV4) in chronic pancreatitis needs further evaluation. The present study characterized a rat alcohol/high fat diet (AHF)-induced chronic pancreatitis model with hypersensitivity, fibrotic pathology, and fat vacuolization consistent with the clinical syndrome. The rats with AHF-induced pancreatitis develop referred visceral pain-like behaviors, i.e. decreased hindpaw mechanical thresholds and shortened abdominal and hindpaw withdrawal latency to heat. In this study, oxidative stress was characterized as well as the role of TRPV4 in chronic visceral hypersensitivity. Lipid peroxidase and oxidative stress were indicated by increased plasma thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and diminished pancreatic manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD). The secondary sensitization associated with AHF-induced pancreatitis was effectively alleviated by the TRPV4 antagonist, HC 067047. Similarity of the results to those with the peripherally restricted μ-opiate receptor agonist, loperamide, suggested TRPV4 channel activated peripheral sensitization. This study using a reliable model that provides pre-clinical correlates of human chronic pancreatitis provides further evidence that TRPV4 channel is a potential therapeutic target for treatment of pancreatitis pain.

  17. Neurological and cellular regulation of visceral hypersensitivity induced by chronic stress and colonic inflammation in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, J; Winston, J H; Sarna, S K

    2013-09-17

    The role of inflammation in inducing visceral hypersensitivity (VHS) in ulcerative colitis patients remains unknown. We tested the hypothesis that acute ulcerative colitis-like inflammation does not induce VHS. However, it sets up molecular conditions such that chronic stress following inflammation exaggerates single-unit afferent discharges to colorectal distension. We used dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) to induce ulcerative colitis-like inflammation and a 9-day heterotypic chronic stress protocol in rats. DSS upregulated Nav1.8 mRNA in colon-responsive dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, TRPV1 in colonic muscularis externae (ME) and BDNF in spinal cord without affecting the spike frequency in spinal afferents or VMR to CRD. By contrast, chronic stress did not induce inflammation but it downregulated Kv1.1 and Kv1.4 mRNA in DRG neurons, and upregulated TRPA1 and nerve growth factor in ME, which mediated the increase of spike frequency and VMR to CRD. Chronic stress following inflammation exacerbated spike frequency in spinal afferent neurons. TRPA1 antagonist suppressed the sensitization of afferent neurons. DSS-inflammation did not affect the composition or excitation thresholds of low-threshold and high-threshold fibers. Chronic stress following inflammation increased the percent composition of high-threshold fibers and lowered the excitation threshold of both types of fibers. We conclude that not all types of inflammation induce VHS, whereas chronic stress induces VHS in the absence of inflammation. PMID:23806714

  18. Microtubule Polymerization Functions in Hypersensitive Response and Accumulation of H2O2 in Wheat Induced by the Stripe Rust.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan; Wang, Yang; Liu, Xinjie; Xu, Yuanliu; Ma, Qing

    2016-01-01

    The plant cytoskeleton, including microtubules and microfilaments, is one of the important factors in determining the polarity of cell division and growth, as well as the interaction of plants with invading pathogens. In defense responses of wheat against the stripe rust (Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici) infection, hypersensitive response is the most crucial event to prevent the spread of pathogens. In order to reveal the effect of microtubules on the hypersensitive cell death and H2O2 accumulation in the interaction of wheat (Triticum aestivum) cv. Suwon 11 with an incompatible race, CYR23, wheat leaves were treated with microtubule inhibitor, oryzalin, before inoculation. The results showed that the frequency of infection sites with hypersensitive response occurrence was significantly reduced, and hypersensitive cell death in wheat leaves was suppressed compared to the control. In addition, the frequency and the incidence of infected cells with H2O2 accumulation were also reduced after the treatment with oryzalin. Those results indicated that microtubules are related to hypersensitive response and H2O2 accumulation in wheat induced by the stripe rust, and depolymerization of microtubules reduces the resistance of plants to pathogen infection in incompatible interaction, suggesting that microtubules play a potential role in the expression of resistance of wheat against the stripe rust fungus.

  19. Microtubule Polymerization Functions in Hypersensitive Response and Accumulation of H2O2 in Wheat Induced by the Stripe Rust.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan; Wang, Yang; Liu, Xinjie; Xu, Yuanliu; Ma, Qing

    2016-01-01

    The plant cytoskeleton, including microtubules and microfilaments, is one of the important factors in determining the polarity of cell division and growth, as well as the interaction of plants with invading pathogens. In defense responses of wheat against the stripe rust (Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici) infection, hypersensitive response is the most crucial event to prevent the spread of pathogens. In order to reveal the effect of microtubules on the hypersensitive cell death and H2O2 accumulation in the interaction of wheat (Triticum aestivum) cv. Suwon 11 with an incompatible race, CYR23, wheat leaves were treated with microtubule inhibitor, oryzalin, before inoculation. The results showed that the frequency of infection sites with hypersensitive response occurrence was significantly reduced, and hypersensitive cell death in wheat leaves was suppressed compared to the control. In addition, the frequency and the incidence of infected cells with H2O2 accumulation were also reduced after the treatment with oryzalin. Those results indicated that microtubules are related to hypersensitive response and H2O2 accumulation in wheat induced by the stripe rust, and depolymerization of microtubules reduces the resistance of plants to pathogen infection in incompatible interaction, suggesting that microtubules play a potential role in the expression of resistance of wheat against the stripe rust fungus. PMID:27610380

  20. Microtubule Polymerization Functions in Hypersensitive Response and Accumulation of H2O2 in Wheat Induced by the Stripe Rust

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xinjie; Xu, Yuanliu

    2016-01-01

    The plant cytoskeleton, including microtubules and microfilaments, is one of the important factors in determining the polarity of cell division and growth, as well as the interaction of plants with invading pathogens. In defense responses of wheat against the stripe rust (Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici) infection, hypersensitive response is the most crucial event to prevent the spread of pathogens. In order to reveal the effect of microtubules on the hypersensitive cell death and H2O2 accumulation in the interaction of wheat (Triticum aestivum) cv. Suwon 11 with an incompatible race, CYR23, wheat leaves were treated with microtubule inhibitor, oryzalin, before inoculation. The results showed that the frequency of infection sites with hypersensitive response occurrence was significantly reduced, and hypersensitive cell death in wheat leaves was suppressed compared to the control. In addition, the frequency and the incidence of infected cells with H2O2 accumulation were also reduced after the treatment with oryzalin. Those results indicated that microtubules are related to hypersensitive response and H2O2 accumulation in wheat induced by the stripe rust, and depolymerization of microtubules reduces the resistance of plants to pathogen infection in incompatible interaction, suggesting that microtubules play a potential role in the expression of resistance of wheat against the stripe rust fungus.

  1. Microtubule Polymerization Functions in Hypersensitive Response and Accumulation of H2O2 in Wheat Induced by the Stripe Rust

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xinjie; Xu, Yuanliu

    2016-01-01

    The plant cytoskeleton, including microtubules and microfilaments, is one of the important factors in determining the polarity of cell division and growth, as well as the interaction of plants with invading pathogens. In defense responses of wheat against the stripe rust (Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici) infection, hypersensitive response is the most crucial event to prevent the spread of pathogens. In order to reveal the effect of microtubules on the hypersensitive cell death and H2O2 accumulation in the interaction of wheat (Triticum aestivum) cv. Suwon 11 with an incompatible race, CYR23, wheat leaves were treated with microtubule inhibitor, oryzalin, before inoculation. The results showed that the frequency of infection sites with hypersensitive response occurrence was significantly reduced, and hypersensitive cell death in wheat leaves was suppressed compared to the control. In addition, the frequency and the incidence of infected cells with H2O2 accumulation were also reduced after the treatment with oryzalin. Those results indicated that microtubules are related to hypersensitive response and H2O2 accumulation in wheat induced by the stripe rust, and depolymerization of microtubules reduces the resistance of plants to pathogen infection in incompatible interaction, suggesting that microtubules play a potential role in the expression of resistance of wheat against the stripe rust fungus. PMID:27610380

  2. A single-arm Phase II validation study of preventing oxaliplatin-induced hypersensitivity reactions by dexamethasone: the AVOID trial

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Yoichiro; Hirata, Keiji; Matsuoka, Hiroshi; Iwamoto, Shigeyoshi; Kotaka, Masahito; Fujita, Hideto; Aisu, Naoya; Hoshino, Seiichiro; Kosaka, Takeo; Maeda, Kotaro; Kiyomi, Fumiaki; Yamashita, Yuichi

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with colorectal cancer treated with oxaliplatin are at risk of hypersensitivity reactions, with the incidence estimated to be 12%–20%. Coinfusion of dexamethasone and oxaliplatin could potentially reduce the incidence of these reactions, but oxaliplatin is reported to be incompatible with alkaline compounds in solution. However, in a previous retrospective study we found that the pH of a solution of dexamethasone and oxaliplatin was less than 7.4, and that hypersensitivity to oxaliplatin could have been prevented by coinfusion of dexamethasone. We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of coinfusion of dexamethasone and oxaliplatin to prevent oxaliplatin-induced hypersensitivity reactions. Patients and methods The AVOID trial was a prospective, multicenter, open-label, single-arm Phase II trial conducted from January to September 2013. The study included 73 patients who received capecitabine plus oxaliplatin (XELOX) or XELOX plus bevacizumab therapy for colorectal cancer. In all patients, oxaliplatin was administered in combination with dexamethasone. The primary outcome measure was the presence of hypersensitivity reactions. Results Hypersensitivity reactions occurred in three patients (4.1%); all three experienced a cutaneous reaction (grade 1 erythema). None of the 73 patients developed respiratory symptoms, ocular symptoms, or anaphylaxis. Grade 3 or higher hemotoxicity occurred in 13.7% of the patients and grade 3 or higher nonhematological toxicity occurred in 13.7%. The response rate to treatment was 64.4%. Conclusion The coinfusion of dexamethasone and oxaliplatin effectively reduced oxaliplatin-induced hypersensitivity reactions in patients with colorectal cancer. This approach should be considered for all patients treated with oxaliplatin, allowing treatment to be completed as planned. PMID:26648694

  3. Successful desensitization therapy for a patient with isoniazid-induced hypersensitivity pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Chihara, Yuichi; Takahashi, Ken-Ichi; Sakai, Naoki; Sato, Atsuo; Tsuboi, Tomomasa

    2016-01-01

    A 57-year-old male was diagnosed with mycobacterium tuberculoma and was treated with isoniazid, rifampicin, ethambutol, and pyrazinamide. Three weeks after initiation of treatment, he presented with fever and appetite loss. Chest radiograph showed diffuse micronodular shadows on both lung fields. High-resolution chest computed tomography findings were diffuse parenchymal micronodules in both lungs, which was consistent with hypersensitivity pneumonia. Because drug-induced pneumonia was suspected, the antituberculous regimen was discontinued. The symptoms and diffuse micronodular shadows improved. A drug lymphocyte stimulation test was only positive for isoniazid, so we suspected that the pneumonia was induced by isoniazid. Rifampicin and ethambutol were reintroduced without any recurrence of the abnormal shadows. Next, we tried desensitization to isoniazid over a period of two weeks, which was successful without any adverse events. Although isoniazid-induced pneumonia is extremely rare, it is important to recognize that isoniazid can cause such an adverse reaction. In addition, drug desensitization may be useful in drug-induced pneumonia. PMID:27330958

  4. Characterization of Candida albicans mannan-induced, mannan-specific delayed hypersensitivity suppressor cells.

    PubMed

    Garner, R E; Childress, A M; Human, L G; Domer, J E

    1990-08-01

    We have shown previously that CBA/J mice immunized with Candida albicans developed delayed hypersensitivity (DH) demonstrable with mannan (MAN) extracted from the same organism and that the intravenous (i.v.) injection of MAN prior to or during the immunization phase resulted in the suppression of the MAN-specific DH response. In this study, we demonstrate that MAN-induced suppression of DH is a T-lymphocyte-mediated phenomenon. Suppressor cells induced in vivo by the i.v. injection of MAN into naive mice 1 to 7 days prior to harvest were passaged through nylon wool, treated with various surface-specific antibodies and complement, and then injected i.v. into immunized syngeneic recipients. Enrichment of splenic T cells by passage over nylon wool and transfer of the nylon-wool-nonadherent populations to immunized recipient mice suppressed DH in a dose-dependent manner. Depletion of Thy+ or Lyt-2+ cells from nylon-wool-nonadherent populations regularly ablated the ability of such suspensions to transfer suppression. Treatment of the same transfer suspensions with anti-Lyt-1 had variable effects, suggesting that the surface density of the Lyt-1 antigen was not as constant from population to population as was the Lyt-2 antigen. In addition, C. albicans MAN-induced suppressor cells were able to suppress DH demonstrable with Candida tropicalis MAN in animals immunized with C. tropicalis. Suppression of DH by MAN in this model, therefore, is mediated by Thy+ Lyt-2+ lymphocytes.

  5. Hypersensitivity and pain induced by operative procedures and the "cracked tooth" syndrome.

    PubMed

    Seltzer, S; Boston, D

    1997-01-01

    Various dental conditions are responsible for tooth hypersensitivity and pain. They include hypersensitive dentin; the "cracked tooth" syndrome; pulp and periapical irritation, inflammation and/or degeneration; barodontalgia (aerodontalgia); and periodontal pathoses, particularly the pulpal-periodontal syndrome. Each operative condition is reviewed with respect to its etiology, symptomatology, and diagnosis. Some treatment recommendations are made to prevent or reduce symptoms.

  6. Neuropathy-Induced Spinal GAP-43 Expression Is Not a Main Player in the Onset of Mechanical Pain Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Jaken, Robby J.; van Gorp, Sebastiaan; Joosten, Elbert A.; Losen, Mario; Martínez-Martínez, Pilar; De Baets, Marc; Marcus, Marco A.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Structural plasticity within the spinal nociceptive network may be fundamental to the chronic nature of neuropathic pain. In the present study, the spatiotemporal expression of growth-associated protein-43 (GAP-43), a protein which has been traditionally implicated in nerve fiber growth and sprouting, was investigated in relation to mechanical pain hypersensitivity. An L5 spinal nerve transection model was validated by the presence of mechanical pain hypersensitivity and an increase in the early neuronal activation marker cFos within the superficial spinal dorsal horn upon innocuous hindpaw stimulation. Spinal GAP-43 was found to be upregulated in the superficial L5 dorsal horn from 5 up to 10 days after injury. GAP-43 was co-localized with calcitonin-gene related peptide (CGRP), but not vesicular glutamate transporter-1 (VGLUT-1), IB4, or protein kinase-γ (PKC-γ), suggesting the regulation of GAP-43 in peptidergic nociceptive afferents. These GAP-43/CGRP fibers may be indicative of sprouting peptidergic fibers. Fiber sprouting largely depends on growth factors, which are typically associated with neuro-inflammatory processes. The putative role of neuropathy-induced GAP-43 expression in the development of mechanical pain hypersensitivity was investigated using the immune modulator propentofylline. Propentofylline treatment strongly attenuated the development of mechanical pain hypersensitivity and glial responses to nerve injury as measured by microglial and astroglial markers, but did not affect neuropathy-induced levels of spinal GAP-43 or GAP-43 regulation in CGRP fibers. We conclude that nerve injury induces structural plasticity in fibers expressing CGRP, which is regarded as a main player in central sensitization. Our data do not, however, support a major role of these structural changes in the onset of mechanical pain hypersensitivity. PMID:21671799

  7. Spinal histamine in attenuation of mechanical hypersensitivity in the spinal nerve ligation-induced model of experimental neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hong; Viisanen, Hanna; You, Hao-Jun; Pertovaara, Antti

    2016-02-01

    Here we studied whether and through which mechanisms spinal administration of histamine dihydrochloride (histamine) attenuates pain behavior in neuropathic animals. Experiments were performed in rats with spinal nerve ligation-induced neuropathy and a chronic intrathecal catheter for spinal drug delivery. Mechanical hypersensitivity was assessed with monofilaments while radiant heat was used for assessing nociception. Ongoing neuropathic pain and its attenuation by histamine was assessed using conditioned place-preference test. Following spinal administration, histamine at doses 0.1-10µg produced a dose-related mechanical antihypersensitivity effect. With prolonged treatment (twice daily 10µg for five days), the antihypersensitivity effect of spinal histamine was reduced. In place-preference test, neuropathic animals preferred the chamber paired with histamine (10µg). Histamine (10µg) failed to influence heat nociception in neuropathic animals or mechanically induced pain behavior in a group of healthy control rats. Histamine-induced mechanical antihypersensitivity effect was prevented by spinal pretreatment with zolantidine (histamine H2 receptor antagonist), prazosine (α1-adrenoceptor antagonist) and bicuculline (γ-aminobutyric acid subtype A, GABA(A), receptor antagonist), but not by pyrilamine (histamine H1 receptor antagonist), atipamezole (α2-adrenoceptor antagonist), or raclopride (dopamine D2 receptor antagonist). A-960656, a histamine H3 receptor antagonist alone that presumably increased endogenous histamine levels reduced hypersensitivity. Additionally, histamine prevented central (presumably postsynaptically-induced) facilitation of hypersensitivity induced by N-methyl-d-aspartate. The results indicate that spinal histamine at the dose range of 0.1-10µg selectively attenuates mechanical hypersensitivity and ongoing pain in neuropathy. The spinal histamine-induced antihypersensitivity effect involves histamine H2 and GABA(A) receptors and

  8. Effect of oil composition on both adjuvant-induced arthritis and delayed hypersensitivity to purified protein derivative and peptidoglycans in various rat strains.

    PubMed Central

    Kohashi, O; Pearson, M; Beck, F J; Alexander, M

    1977-01-01

    We confirmed that, when immunized with a conventional complete Freund adjuvant (water in oil), Lewis rats were highly susceptible to adjuvant arthritis, Fisher rats were less susceptible, and Buffalo rats were much less susceptible. However, mycobacterial delipidated cells in squalane (squalane-type adjuvant) produced severe arthritis with almost 100% incidence even in the less susceptible rat strains except for Buffalo rats. With regard to an immune response, Freund complete adjuvant induced strong delayed hypersensitivity to purified protein derivative (PPD) and peptidoglycan (PG) in all rat strains used, Whereas the squalane-type adjuvant induced these hypersensitivities only in Lewis and Buffalo rats, but not in Fisher and Brown Norway rats. No correlation was found between development of arthritis and delayed hypersensitivity to either PPD or PG, or both. It seems that PPD hypersensitivity may be inherited differently from PG hypersensitivity. PMID:892904

  9. Effect of oil composition on both adjuvant-induced arthritis and delayed hypersensitivity to purified protein derivative and peptidoglycans in various rat strains.

    PubMed

    Kohashi, O; Pearson, M; Beck, F J; Alexander, M

    1977-08-01

    We confirmed that, when immunized with a conventional complete Freund adjuvant (water in oil), Lewis rats were highly susceptible to adjuvant arthritis, Fisher rats were less susceptible, and Buffalo rats were much less susceptible. However, mycobacterial delipidated cells in squalane (squalane-type adjuvant) produced severe arthritis with almost 100% incidence even in the less susceptible rat strains except for Buffalo rats. With regard to an immune response, Freund complete adjuvant induced strong delayed hypersensitivity to purified protein derivative (PPD) and peptidoglycan (PG) in all rat strains used, Whereas the squalane-type adjuvant induced these hypersensitivities only in Lewis and Buffalo rats, but not in Fisher and Brown Norway rats. No correlation was found between development of arthritis and delayed hypersensitivity to either PPD or PG, or both. It seems that PPD hypersensitivity may be inherited differently from PG hypersensitivity.

  10. Establishment of diagnostic criteria for feline nonflea-induced hypersensitivity dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Favrot, Claude; Steffan, Jean; Seewald, Wolfgang; Hobi, Stefan; Linek, Monika; Marignac, Geneviève; Olivry, Thierry; Beco, Luc; Nett, Claudia; Fontaine, Jacques; Roosje, Petra; Bergvall, Kerstin; Belova, Svetlana; Koebrich, Stefanie; Pin, Didier; Kovalik, Marcel; Meury, Sabrina; Wilhelm, Sylvia

    2012-02-01

    Hypersensitivity dermatitides (HD) are commonly seen in cats, and they are usually caused by environmental, food and/or flea allergens. Affected cats normally present with one of the following clinical reaction patterns: head and neck excoriations, usually symmetrical self-induced alopecia, eosinophilic skin lesions or miliary dermatitis. Importantly, none of these clinical presentations is considered to be pathognomonic for HD skin diseases, and the diagnosis of HD is usually based on the exclusion of other pruritic diseases and on a positive response to therapy. The objectives of this study were to propose sets of criteria for the diagnosis of nonflea-induced HD (NFHD). We recruited 501 cats with pruritus and skin lesions and compared clinical parameters between cats with NFHD (encompassing those with nonflea, nonfood HD and those with food HD), flea HD and other pruritic conditions. Using simulated annealing techniques, we established two sets of proposed criteria for the following two different clinical situations: (i) the diagnosis of NFHD in a population of pruritic cats; and (ii) the diagnosis of NFHD after exclusion of cats with flea HD. These criteria sets were associated with good sensitivity and specificity and may be useful for homogeneity of enrolment in clinical trials and to evaluate the probability of diagnosis of NFHD in clinical practice. Finally, these criteria were not useful to differentiate cats with NFHD from those with food HD.

  11. Drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome due to minocycline complicated by severe myocarditis.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Kyoko; Sakai, Hiroyuki; Yamada, Yutaka; Iizuka, Hajime

    2014-02-01

    A 60-year-old woman presented with a 13-day history of a generalized erythematous rash accompanied by fever, periorbital edema and axillary lymphadenopathy. Prior to the appearance of the rash, the patient had been treated with intermittent courses of oral minocycline for cystitis. The patient was diagnosed with drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS) due to minocycline. During the admission, infectious endocarditis was suspected and the patient was treated with i.v. gammaglobulin (0.4 g/kg per day). The following day, the patient suffered from systemic deterioration and symptomatic low blood pressure that prompted repeat echocardiography which revealed an ejection fraction of 10%. DIHS-associated myocarditis was suspected and management with circulation assistance devices and steroid pulse therapy were started, resulting in satisfactory resolution. A rise in titer of human herpesvirus-6, cytomegalovirus and Herpes simplex virus-1 antibodies was detected. Although minocycline-induced myocarditis is rare, this severe drug reaction should be considered with DIHS.

  12. Perfluorooctanoic acid exposure for 28 days affects glucose homeostasis and induces insulin hypersensitivity in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Shengmin; Zhang, Hongxia; Zheng, Fei; Sheng, Nan; Guo, Xuejiang; Dai, Jiayin

    2015-06-01

    Perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) are widely used in many applications due to their unique physical and chemical characteristics. Because of the increasing prevalence of metabolic syndromes, including obesity, dyslipidemia and insulin resistance, concern has arisen about the roles of environmental pollutants in such diseases. Earlier epidemiologic studies showed a potential association between perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and glucose metabolism, but how PFOA influences glucose homeostasis is still unknown. Here, we report on the modulation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-serine/threonine protein kinase (PI3K-AKT) signaling pathway in the livers of mice after 28 d of exposure to PFOA. Compared with normal mice, PFOA exposure significantly decreased the expression of the phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) protein and affected the PI3K-AKT signaling pathway in the liver. Tolerance tests further indicated that PFOA exposure induced higher insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance in mice. Biochemical analysis revealed that PFOA exposure reduced hepatic glycogen synthesis, which might be attributed to gluconeogenesis inhibition. The levels of several circulating proteins were altered after PFOA exposure, including proteins potentially related to diabetes and liver disease. Our results suggest that PFOA affected glucose metabolism and induced insulin hypersensitivity in mice.

  13. The hypersensitive induced reaction and leucine-rich repeat proteins regulate plant cell death associated with disease and plant immunity.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyong Woo; Kim, Young Jin; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2011-01-01

    Pathogen-induced programmed cell death (PCD) is intimately linked with disease resistance and susceptibility. However, the molecular components regulating PCD, including hypersensitive and susceptible cell death, are largely unknown in plants. In this study, we show that pathogen-induced Capsicum annuum hypersensitive induced reaction 1 (CaHIR1) and leucine-rich repeat 1 (CaLRR1) function as distinct plant PCD regulators in pepper plants during Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria infection. Confocal microscopy and protein gel blot analyses revealed that CaLRR1 and CaHIR1 localize to the extracellular matrix and plasma membrane (PM), respectively. Bimolecular fluorescent complementation and coimmunoprecipitation assays showed that the extracellular CaLRR1 specifically binds to the PM-located CaHIR1 in pepper leaves. Overexpression of CaHIR1 triggered pathogen-independent cell death in pepper and Nicotiana benthamiana plants but not in yeast cells. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) of CaLRR1 and CaHIR1 distinctly strengthened and compromised hypersensitive and susceptible cell death in pepper plants, respectively. Endogenous salicylic acid levels and pathogenesis-related gene transcripts were elevated in CaHIR1-silenced plants. VIGS of NbLRR1 and NbHIR1, the N. benthamiana orthologs of CaLRR1 and CaHIR1, regulated Bax- and avrPto-/Pto-induced PCD. Taken together, these results suggest that leucine-rich repeat and hypersensitive induced reaction proteins may act as cell-death regulators associated with plant immunity and disease.

  14. Genetic factors in the predisposition to drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions.

    PubMed

    Pirmohamed, Munir

    2006-02-03

    Drug hypersensitivity reactions can occur with most drugs, although the frequency, severity, and clinical manifestations vary. Case reports have suggested that there may be familial clustering of drug hypersensitivity suggesting a genetic predisposition. As with most other forms of drug response, predisposition to drug hypersensitivity reactions is likely to be multifactorial and multigenic. Given the immune pathogenesis of these reactions, it is perhaps not surprising that the most significant genetic associations have been identified in the major histocompatibility complex for drugs such as abacavir, carbamazepine, and allopurinol. For abacavir, it has been suggested that preprescription genotyping for HLA-B*5701 in whites may reduce the incidence of hypersensitivity. It is likely that as our knowledge of variation in the human genome improves, coupled with improvements in technology, many more significant genetic predisposing factors for drug hypersensitivity are likely to be identified in the next decade. However, as we search for these genetic factors, it is important that we do not forget environmental predisposition, and to bear in mind that a genetic marker for drug hypersensitivity in one population may not necessarily be relevant for another population. Notwithstanding the advances in genetic technologies, the ultimate determinant of success in this area of research will be the identification and careful phenotyping of patients with drug hypersensitivity reactions. As we progress to whole genome scanning, in order to satisfy the requirements for adequate statistical power, the identification of large numbers of carefully phenotyped patients will be feasible only through international collaborations.

  15. In vitro Models to Evaluate Drug-Induced Hypersensitivity: Potential Test Based on Activation of Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Galbiati, Valentina; Papale, Angela; Kummer, Elena; Corsini, Emanuela

    2016-01-01

    Hypersensitivity drug reactions (HDRs) are the adverse effect of pharmaceuticals that clinically resemble allergy. HDRs account for approximately 1/6 of drug-induced adverse effects, and include immune-mediated (“allergic”) and non-immune-mediated (“pseudo allergic”) reactions. In recent years, the severe and unpredicted drug adverse events clearly indicate that the immune system can be a critical target of drugs. Enhanced prediction in preclinical safety evaluation is, therefore, crucial. Nowadays, there are no validated in vitro or in vivo methods to screen the sensitizing potential of drugs in the pre-clinical phase. The problem of non-predictability of immunologically-based hypersensitivity reactions is related to the lack of appropriate experimental models rather than to the lack of -understanding of the adverse phenomenon. We recently established experimental conditions and markers to correctly identify drug associated with in vivo hypersensitivity reactions using THP-1 cells and IL-8 production, CD86 and CD54 expression. The proposed in vitro method benefits from a rationalistic approach with the idea that allergenic drugs share with chemical allergens common mechanisms of cell activation. This assay can be easily incorporated into drug development for hazard identification of drugs, which may have the potential to cause in vivo hypersensitivity reactions. The purpose of this review is to assess the state of the art of in vitro models to assess the allergenic potential of drugs based on the activation of dendritic cells. PMID:27462271

  16. In vitro Models to Evaluate Drug-Induced Hypersensitivity: Potential Test Based on Activation of Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Galbiati, Valentina; Papale, Angela; Kummer, Elena; Corsini, Emanuela

    2016-01-01

    Hypersensitivity drug reactions (HDRs) are the adverse effect of pharmaceuticals that clinically resemble allergy. HDRs account for approximately 1/6 of drug-induced adverse effects, and include immune-mediated ("allergic") and non-immune-mediated ("pseudo allergic") reactions. In recent years, the severe and unpredicted drug adverse events clearly indicate that the immune system can be a critical target of drugs. Enhanced prediction in preclinical safety evaluation is, therefore, crucial. Nowadays, there are no validated in vitro or in vivo methods to screen the sensitizing potential of drugs in the pre-clinical phase. The problem of non-predictability of immunologically-based hypersensitivity reactions is related to the lack of appropriate experimental models rather than to the lack of -understanding of the adverse phenomenon. We recently established experimental conditions and markers to correctly identify drug associated with in vivo hypersensitivity reactions using THP-1 cells and IL-8 production, CD86 and CD54 expression. The proposed in vitro method benefits from a rationalistic approach with the idea that allergenic drugs share with chemical allergens common mechanisms of cell activation. This assay can be easily incorporated into drug development for hazard identification of drugs, which may have the potential to cause in vivo hypersensitivity reactions. The purpose of this review is to assess the state of the art of in vitro models to assess the allergenic potential of drugs based on the activation of dendritic cells. PMID:27462271

  17. Visceral Hypersensitivity Is Provoked by 2,4,6-Trinitrobenzene Sulfonic Acid-Induced Ileitis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Manoj K.; Wan, Juan; Janyaro, Habibullah; Tahir, Adnan H.; Cui, Luying; Ding, Ming-Xing

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Crohn’s Disease (CD), a chronic Inflammatory Bowel Disease, can occur in any part of the gastrointestinal tract, but most frequently in the ileum. Visceral hypersensitivity contributes for development of chronic abdominal pain in this disease. Currently, the understanding of the mechanism underlying hypersensitivity of Crohn’s ileitis has been hindered by a lack of specific animal model. The present study is undertaken to investigate the visceral hypersensitivity provoked by 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic (TNBS)-induced ileitis rats. Methods: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were anaesthetized and laparotomized for intraileal injection of TNBS (0.6 ml, 80 mg/kg body weight in 30% ethanol, n = 48), an equal volume of 30% Ethanol (n = 24), and Saline (n = 24), respectively. Visceral hypersensitivity was assessed by visceromotor responses (VMR) to 20, 40, 60, 80, and 100 mmHg colorectal distension pressure (CRD) at day 1, 3, 7, 14, 21, and 28. Immediately after CRD test, the rats were euthanized for collecting the terminal ileal segment for histopathological examinations and ELISA of myleoperoxidase and cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6), and dorsal root ganglia (T11) for determination of calcitonin gene-related peptide by immunohistochemistry, respectively. Results: Among all groups, TNBS-treatment showed transmural inflammation initially at 3 days, reached maximum at 7 days and persisted up to 21 days. The rats with ileitis exhibited (P < 0.05) VMR to CRD at day 7 to day 21. The calcitonin gene-related peptide-immunoreactive positive cells increased (P < 0.05) in dorsal root ganglia at day 7 to 21, which was persistently consistent with visceral hypersensitivity in TNBS-treated rats. Conclusion: TNBS injection into the ileum induced transmural ileitis including granuloma and visceral hypersensitivity. As this model mimics clinical manifestations of CD, it may provide a road map to probe the pathogenesis of gut inflammation and visceral

  18. Modality-specific mechanisms of protein kinase C-induced hypersensitivity of TRPV1: S800 is a polymodal sensitization site.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sen; Joseph, John; Ro, Jin Y; Chung, Man-Kyo

    2015-05-01

    TRPV1 is a nociceptive ion channel activated by polymodal stimuli such as capsaicin, proton, and noxious heat. Multiple inflammatory mediators activate protein kinases, especially protein kinase C (PKC), which phosphorylates TRPV1. Emerging evidence suggests that phosphorylation of TRPV1 constitutes specific signals underpinning pathological nociception. Although the mechanisms of hypersensitivity of TRPV1 to capsaicin are well studied, the phosphorylation residues that contribute to hypersensitivity to heat or acid have not been identified. In this study, we investigated modality-specific mechanisms of PKC-induced hypersensitivity using mutagenic ablation of PKC-associated phosphorylation sites in TRPV1. In heterologous systems, TRPV1 S502 and S800, but not T704, are known to be involved in hypersensitivity to capsaicin after the application of phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), a PKC agonist. Unlike capsaicin, PMA-induced hypersensitivity to heat was attenuated in TRPV1 mutants T704A and S800A, but not in S502A. In contrast, PMA-induced hypersensitivity to acid was attenuated only in S800A. To examine the roles of these phosphorylation sites in more physiologically relevant conditions, TRPV1 and mutants were tested in sensory neurons from TRPV1-null mice. In sensory neurons expressing mutated TRPV1, we found that alanine mutation of S800 commonly attenuates PMA-induced hypersensitivity to capsaicin, heat, and acid. Moreover, bradykinin-induced hypersensitivity to capsaicin was largely attenuated by the S800A mutation. These results suggest that mechanisms of PKC-induced hypersensitivity of TRPV1 are modality specific and that S800 is a polymodal sensitization site integrating multiple inflammatory signals in nociceptors. Our data provide a rationale for a novel approach targeting TRPV1 S800 for antihyperalgesia.

  19. Role of mast cell in the late phase of contact hypersensitivity induced by trimellitic anhydride

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Ok Hee

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells are known as effector cells of IgE-mediated allergic responses, but role of mast cells in contact hypersensitivity (CHS) has been considered controversial. In this study, we investigated role of mast cell in trimellitic anhydride (TMA)-induced CHS. The mice were sensitized to TMA on the back and repeatedly challenged with TMA on the left ear at 1-week intervals. The ear after challenge showed biphasic responses. The repetition of TMA challenge shifted in time course of ear response and enlarged the extent of early and late phase reactions in proportion to the frequency of TMA challenges in C57BL/6 mice. In late phase reaction, peak of ear response by single challenge showed at 24 hours after challenge, but the peak by repeat challenges at 8 hours after the last challenge. Number of mast cells and eosinophils per unit area increased in proportion to frequency of TMA challenges. However, mast cell-deficient WBB6F1/J-KitW/KitW-v mice developed the late phase reaction without the early phase reaction. The repetition of TMA challenge shifted in time course of ear response and enlarged the extent of ear response and the infiltration of eosinophils. The magnitude of these responses observed according to the frequency of the TMA challenge in mast cell-deficient WBB6F1/J-KitW/KitW-v mice was significantly lower than that in C57BL/6 mice. Also TMA elicited mast cell degranulation and histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Conclusively, TMA induces the early and late phase reactions in CHS, and mast cells may be required for TMA-induced CHS. PMID:26770872

  20. Performance of genetic risk factors in prediction of trichloroethylene induced hypersensitivity syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Yufei; Chen, Ying; Huang, Hanlin; Zhou, Wei; Niu, Yong; Zhang, Mingrong; Bin, Ping; Dong, Haiyan; Jia, Qiang; Huang, Jianxun; Yi, Juan; Liao, Qijun; Li, Haishan; Teng, Yanxia; Zang, Dan; Zhai, Qingfeng; Duan, Huawei; Shen, Juan; He, Jiaxi; Meng, Tao; Sha, Yan; Shen, Meili; Ye, Meng; Jia, Xiaowei; Xiang, Yingping; Huang, Huiping; Wu, Qifeng; Shi, Mingming; Huang, Xianqing; Yang, Huanming; Luo, Longhai; Li, Sai; Li, Lin; Zhao, Jinyang; Li, Laiyu; Wang, Jun; Zheng, Yuxin

    2015-01-01

    Trichloroethylene induced hypersensitivity syndrome is dose-independent and potentially life threatening disease, which has become one of the serious occupational health issues and requires intensive treatment. To discover the genetic risk factors and evaluate the performance of risk prediction model for the disease, we conducted genomewide association study and replication study with total of 174 cases and 1761 trichloroethylene-tolerant controls. Fifty seven SNPs that exceeded the threshold for genome-wide significance (P < 5 × 10−8) were screened to relate with the disease, among which two independent SNPs were identified, that is rs2857281 at MICA (odds ratio, 11.92; Pmeta = 1.33 × 10−37) and rs2523557 between HLA-B and MICA (odds ratio, 7.33; Pmeta = 8.79 × 10−35). The genetic risk score with these two SNPs explains at least 20.9% of the disease variance and up to 32.5-fold variation in inter-individual risk. Combining of two SNPs as predictors for the disease would have accuracy of 80.73%, the area under receiver operator characteristic curves (AUC) scores was 0.82 with sensitivity of 74% and specificity of 85%, which was considered to have excellent discrimination for the disease, and could be considered for translational application for screening employees before exposure. PMID:26190474

  1. HLA-DR9 and DR14 are associated with the allopurinol-induced hypersensitivity in hematologic malignancy.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jae-Woo; Kim, Ju-Young; Yoon, Sung-Soo; Cho, Sang-Heon; Park, Seon-Yang; Kang, Hye-Ryun

    2014-01-01

    Allopurinol, a widely used urate-lowering agent, is a leading cause of severe cutaneous adverse reactions (SCARs), especially in patients with HLA-B*58:01. Despite its routine use for the prevention of tumor lysis-related hyperuricemia prior to chemotherapy, the risk of allopurinol-induced hypersensitivity has not been investigated in patients with hematologic malignancies. This retrospective cohort study was conducted to investigate the incidence and risk factors of allopurinol-induced hypersensitivity in patients at least 18 years of age with hematologic malignancies. We reviewed 463 patients who had ever taken allopurinol for the prevention of hyperuricemia prior to chemotherapy and had undergone serologic HLA typing as a pre-transplant evaluation from January 2000 to May 2010. Thirteen (2.8%) patients experienced maculopapular eruptions (MPE) and none experienced SCARs. Among subtypes of underlying hematologic malignancies, percentage of chronic myeloid leukemia was significantly higher in the allopurinol hypersensitivity group compared with the tolerant group (23.1% (3/13) vs. 5.9% (26/440), P = 0.044). According to HLA subtypes, the incidence of allopurinol-induced MPE was 4.0% in HLA-B58 (+) patients (2/50) and 2.7% in HLA-B58 (-) patients (11/403) but this difference was statistically insignificant. In contrast to HLA-B58, the frequencies of DR9 and DR14 were significantly higher in the allopurinol-induced MPE group compared with the allopurinol tolerant group (38.5% (5/13) vs. 13.6% (53/443), P = 0.019, and 38.5% (5/13) vs. 15.6% (41/440), P = 0.038, respectively). In conclusion, HLA-DR9 and DR14, but not HLA-B58, are associated with hypersensitivity reaction by allopurinol when administered in patients with hematologic malignancy prior to chemotherapy.

  2. Immobilization-induced hypersensitivity associated with spinal cord sensitization during cast immobilization and after cast removal in rats.

    PubMed

    Hamaue, Yohei; Nakano, Jiro; Sekino, Yuki; Chuganji, Sayaka; Sakamoto, Jyunya; Yoshimura, Toshiro; Origuchi, Tomoki; Okita, Minoru

    2013-11-01

    This study examined mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity in the rat hind paw during cast immobilization of the hind limbs for 4 or 8 weeks and following cast removal. Blood flow, skin temperature, and volume of the rat hind paw were assessed in order to determine peripheral circulation of the hind limbs. Sensitization was analyzed by measuring the expression of the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in the spinal dorsal horn following cast immobilization. Two weeks post immobilization, mechanical and thermal sensitivities increased significantly in all rats; however, peripheral circulation was not affected by immobilization. Cast immobilization for 8 weeks induced more serious hypersensitivity compared to cast immobilization for 4 weeks. Moreover, CGRP expression in the deeper lamina layer of the spinal dorsal horn increased in the rats immobilized for 8 weeks but not in those immobilized for 4 weeks. These findings suggest that immobilization-induced hypersensitivity develops during the immobilization period without affecting peripheral circulation. Our results also highlight the possibility that prolonged immobilization induces central sensitization in the spinal cord.

  3. Phospholipase C/diacylglycerol kinase-mediated signalling is required for benzothiadiazole-induced oxidative burst and hypersensitive cell death in rice suspension-cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Zhang, Weidong; Song, Fengming; Zheng, Zhong

    2007-01-01

    The involvement of phospholipase C/diacylglycerol kinase (PLC/DGK)-mediated signalling in oxidative burst and hypersensitive cell death was studied in rice suspension-cultured cells treated with benzothiadiazole (BTH) and infected by Xanthomonas oryza pv. oryza (Xoo), the causal agent of rice leaf blight disease. Treatment of rice suspension cells with BTH resulted in a significant oxidative burst, as indicated by accumulation of superoxide anion and H(2)O(2), and hypersensitive cell death, as determined by Evans blue staining. A peak in oxidative burst was detected 3-4 h after BTH treatment and hypersensitive cell death was observed 8 h after treatment. In addition, significant oxidative burst and hypersensitive cell death were detected in BTH-treated suspension cells, but not in untreated control cells, after Xoo infection. Scavengers and antioxidants of active oxygen species, e.g., superoxide dismutase, catalase, N-acetylcysteine, and flavone, reduced significantly the BTH-induced oxidative burst and hypersensitive cell death, indicating that oxidative burst is required for BTH-induced hypersensitive cell death. Expression of the PLC/DGK pathway genes, a diacylglycerol kinase gene, OsDAGK1, and a phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C gene, OsPI-PLC1, and a defence-related EREBP transcriptional factor gene, OsBIERF3, was activated in rice cells after BTH treatment and in the BTH-treated cells after Xoo infection. Treatment of rice cells with phosphatidic acid, a phospholipid signalling molecule, resulted in the production of oxidative burst and hypersensitive cell death. However, neomycin, a PLC inhibitor, inhibited partially but not completely the production of oxidative burst, hypersensitive cell death, and expression of OsBIERF3 and OsDAGK1 induced by BTH in rice cells. These results suggest that PLC/DGK-mediated signalling plays an important role in BTH-induced oxidative burst, hypersensitive response, and activation of defence response in rice.

  4. Commercial sunscreen lotions prevent ultraviolet-radiation-induced immune suppression of contact hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Roberts, L K; Beasley, D G

    1995-09-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation suppresses certain immunologic responses, such as contact hypersensitivity (CH). Some previous studies, using sunlamps emitting nonsolar-spectrum UV or excessive UV doses, have questioned the ability of sunscreens to prevent UV-induced immune suppression. Our study evaluated the immune protection capacities of commercial sunscreen lotions in relation to the effects of UV spectrum and dose. C3H mice were exposed to a fixed UV dose from Kodacel-filtered FS sunlamps that caused maximum Langerhans cell depletion and suppression of CH. Kodacel film blocks UV energy below 290 nm, thus eliminating immune-suppressive effects of UVC (200-290 nm) not present in sunlight. CH was equally suppressed in unprotected and placebo-lotion-treated, UV-exposed mice. Mice protected with sun protection factor (SPF)-15 and SPF-30 sunscreens mounted normal CH responses. SPF-4 and SPF-8 sunscreen-protected mice had CH responses significantly greater than those of unprotected mice. Direct effects of UV spectral differences on the immune protection value of an SPF-15 sunscreen were determined by exposing mice to UV radiation from unfiltered and Kodacel-filtered sunlamps and a 1000-W xenon lamp solar simulator (UV spectrum nearly equivalent to sunlight). The sunscreen immune protection value was 30 times the minimum immune suppression dose for the solar simulator, while being 7.5 times this dose for Kodacel-filtered and 2 times the dose for unfiltered sunlamps. These results demonstrate that commercial sunscreen lotions prevent UV-induced immune suppression at a level exceeding the labeled SPF when tested with an environmentally relevant UV source.

  5. Commercial sunscreen lotions prevent ultraviolet-radiation-induced immune suppression of contact hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Roberts, L K; Beasley, D G

    1995-09-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation suppresses certain immunologic responses, such as contact hypersensitivity (CH). Some previous studies, using sunlamps emitting nonsolar-spectrum UV or excessive UV doses, have questioned the ability of sunscreens to prevent UV-induced immune suppression. Our study evaluated the immune protection capacities of commercial sunscreen lotions in relation to the effects of UV spectrum and dose. C3H mice were exposed to a fixed UV dose from Kodacel-filtered FS sunlamps that caused maximum Langerhans cell depletion and suppression of CH. Kodacel film blocks UV energy below 290 nm, thus eliminating immune-suppressive effects of UVC (200-290 nm) not present in sunlight. CH was equally suppressed in unprotected and placebo-lotion-treated, UV-exposed mice. Mice protected with sun protection factor (SPF)-15 and SPF-30 sunscreens mounted normal CH responses. SPF-4 and SPF-8 sunscreen-protected mice had CH responses significantly greater than those of unprotected mice. Direct effects of UV spectral differences on the immune protection value of an SPF-15 sunscreen were determined by exposing mice to UV radiation from unfiltered and Kodacel-filtered sunlamps and a 1000-W xenon lamp solar simulator (UV spectrum nearly equivalent to sunlight). The sunscreen immune protection value was 30 times the minimum immune suppression dose for the solar simulator, while being 7.5 times this dose for Kodacel-filtered and 2 times the dose for unfiltered sunlamps. These results demonstrate that commercial sunscreen lotions prevent UV-induced immune suppression at a level exceeding the labeled SPF when tested with an environmentally relevant UV source. PMID:7665909

  6. Relationships of self-identified cold tolerance and cold-induced vasodilatation in the finger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Joonhee; Lee, Joo-Young

    2016-04-01

    This study was conducted to investigate relationships of self-identified cold tolerance and cold-induced vasodilatation (CIVD) in the finger. Nine males and 34 females participated in the following 2 tests: a CIVD test and a self-reported survey. The CIVD test was conducted 30-min cold-water immersion (3.8 ± 0.3 °C) of the middle finger at an air temperature of 27.9 ± 0.1 °C. The self-reported questionnaire consisted of 28 questions about whole and local body cold and heat tolerances. By a cluster analysis on the survey results, the participants were divided into two groups: high self-identified cold tolerance (HSCT, n = 25) and low self-identified cold tolerance (LSCT, n = 18). LSCT had lower self-identified cold tolerance ( P < 0.001), preferred hot thermal stimulation ( P = 0.006), and wore heavier clothing during daily life ( P < 0.001) than HSCT. LSCT had significantly lower maximal finger temperatures ( T max) ( P = 0.040), smaller amplitude ( P = 0.029), and delayed onset time of CIVD ( P = 0.080) when compared to HSCT. Some questions examining the self-identified cold or heat tolerance had relationships with cold tolerance index, T max, and amplitude ( P < 0.1). These results indicate that self-identified cold tolerance classified through a standardized survey could be a good index to predict physiological cold tolerance.

  7. Spinal D-amino acid oxidase contributes to mechanical pain hypersensitivity induced by sleep deprivation in the rat.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hong; Gong, Nian; Huang, Jin-Lu; Fan, Hui; Ma, Ai-Niu; Li, Xin-Yan; Wang, Yong-Xiang; Pertovaara, Antti

    2013-10-01

    We studied the hypothesis that spinal d-amino acid oxidase (DAAO) that is expressed in astrocytes and that has been reported to promote tonic pain in various pathophysiological conditions plays a role in 'physiological' pain hypersensitivity induced by rapid eye movement sleep deprivation (REMSD). The experiments were performed in healthy rats with a chronic intrathecal (i.t.) catheter. Pain behavior was assessed by determining limb withdrawal response to repetitive stimulation of the hind paw with a calibrated series of monofilaments. REMSD of 48 h duration produced a significant mechanical hypersensitivity. At 48 h of REMSD, the animals were treated i.t. with a DAAO inhibitor or vehicle. Three structurally different DAAO inhibitors were tested in this study: 6-chlorobenzo[d]isoxazol-3-ol (CBIO), sodium benzoate, and 5-methylpyrazole-3-carboxylic acid (AS-057278). CBIO (1-3 μg), sodium benzoate (30-100 μg) and AS-057278 (3-10 μg) produced dose-related antihypersensitivity effects in sleep-deprived animals. In control animals (with no sleep deprivation), the currently used doses of DAAO inhibitors failed to produce significant changes in mechanically evoked pain behavior. The results indicate that among spinal pain facilitatory mechanisms that contribute to the sleep deprivation-induced mechanical pain hypersensitivity is DAAO, presumably due to production of reactive oxygen species, such as hydrogen peroxide, an endogenous agonist of the pronociceptive TRPA1 ion channel.

  8. Ralstonia solanacearum type III secretion system effector Rip36 induces a hypersensitive response in the nonhost wild eggplant Solanum torvum.

    PubMed

    Nahar, Kamrun; Matsumoto, Iyo; Taguchi, Fumiko; Inagaki, Yoshishige; Yamamoto, Mikihiro; Toyoda, Kazuhiro; Shiraishi, Tomonori; Ichinose, Yuki; Mukaihara, Takafumi

    2014-04-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum is a Gram-negative soil-borne bacterium that causes bacterial wilt disease in more than 200 plant species, including economically important Solanaceae species. In R. solanacearum, the hypersensitive response and pathogenicity (Hrp) type III secretion system is required for both the ability to induce the hypersensitive response (HR) in nonhost plants and pathogenicity in host plants. Recently, 72 effector genes, called rip (Ralstonia protein injected into plant cells), have been identified in R. solanacearum RS1000. RS1002, a spontaneous nalixidic acid-resistant derivative of RS1000, induced strong HR in the nonhost wild eggplant Solanum torvum in an Hrp-dependent manner. An Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression system revealed that Rip36, a putative Zn-dependent protease effector of R. solanacearum, induced HR in S. torvum. A mutation in the putative Zn-binding motif (E149A) completely abolished the ability to induce HR. In agreement with this result, the RS1002-derived Δrip36 and rip36E149A mutants lost the ability to induce HR in S. torvum. An E149A mutation had no effect on the translocation of Rip36 into plant cells. These results indicate that Rip36 is an avirulent factor that induces HR in S. torvum and that a putative Zn-dependent protease motif is essential for this activity.

  9. Oral administration of drugs with hypersensitivity potential induces germinal center hyperplasia in secondary lymphoid organ/tissue in Brown Norway rats, and this histological lesion is a promising candidate as a predictive biomarker for drug hypersensitivity occurrence in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Tamura, Akitoshi Miyawaki, Izuru; Yamada, Toru; Kimura, Juki; Funabashi, Hitoshi

    2013-08-15

    It is important to evaluate the potential of drug hypersensitivity as well as other adverse effects during the preclinical stage of the drug development process, but validated methods are not available yet. In the present study we examined whether it would be possible to develop a new predictive model of drug hypersensitivity using Brown Norway (BN) rats. As representative drugs with hypersensitivity potential in humans, phenytoin (PHT), carbamazepine (CBZ), amoxicillin (AMX), and sulfamethoxazole (SMX) were orally administered to BN rats for 28 days to investigate their effects on these animals by examinations including observation of clinical signs, hematology, determination of serum IgE levels, histology, and flow cytometric analysis. Skin rashes were not observed in any animals treated with these drugs. Increases in the number of circulating inflammatory cells and serum IgE level did not necessarily occur in the animals treated with these drugs. However, histological examination revealed that germinal center hyperplasia was commonly induced in secondary lymphoid organs/tissues in the animals treated with these drugs. In cytometric analysis, changes in proportions of lymphocyte subsets were noted in the spleen of the animals treated with PHT or CBZ during the early period of administration. The results indicated that the potential of drug hypersensitivity was identified in BN rat by performing histological examination of secondary lymphoid organs/tissues. Data obtained herein suggested that drugs with hypersensitivity potential in humans gained immune reactivity in BN rat, and the germinal center hyperplasia induced by administration of these drugs may serve as a predictive biomarker for drug hypersensitivity occurrence. - Highlights: • We tested Brown Norway rats as a candidate model for predicting drug hypersensitivity. • The allergic drugs did not induce skin rash, whereas D-penicillamine did so in the rats. • Some of allergic drugs increased

  10. Protection against UV-induced suppression of contact hypersensitivity responses by sunscreens in humans.

    PubMed

    Cooper, K D; Baron, E D; LeVee, G; Stevens, S R

    2002-01-01

    Both in vivo skin immune responses and the skin's reaction to sun exposure integrate a complex interplay of biologic responses. The complexity and multiplicity of events that occur in the skin during an immune response make it a sensitive indication of both UVB and UVA-induced changes in the skin by sun damage, as well as those changes that are prevented by various sunscreens. Sunscreens are the most effective and widely available intervention for sun damage, other than sun avoidance or clothing. However, sunscreens vary widely in their relative ability to screen various UV waveband components, and their testing has been variably applied to outcomes other than for erythema to determine the sunburn protection factor (SPF), a measure primarily of UVB filtration only. Determination of an immune protection factor (IPF) has been proposed as an alternative or adjunctive measure to SPF, and recent studies show IPF can indeed detect added in vivo functionality of sunscreens, such as high levels of UVA protection, that SPF cannot. Clarification of the definition of IPF, however, is required. Excellent data are available on quantification of the IPF for restoring the afferent or induction arm of contact sensitivity, but other immune parameters have also been measured. Proposed here is nomenclature for whether the IPF is measured using contact sensitivity induction (IPF-CS-I), contact sensitivity elicitation (IPF-CS-E), delayed-type hypersensitivity elicitation (IPF-DTH-E), antigen-presenting cell function (IPF-APC-FXN) or numbers (IPF-APC-#), and cytokine modification such as IL-10 (i.e. IPF-cyto-IL-10). Similar nomenclatures could be used for other measures of skin function protection (i.e. DNA damage, p53 induction, oxidation products, etc.). A review of in vivo human studies, in which sunscreens are used to intervene in a UV-induced modulation of immune response, cells or cytokines, highlights the technical variables and statistical approaches which must also be

  11. Hypersensitivity pneumonitis

    MedlinePlus

    Hypersensitivity pneumonitis usually occurs in people who work in places where there are high levels of organic dusts, fungus, or molds. Long-term exposure can lead to lung inflammation and acute lung disease . ...

  12. Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis Also known as extrinsic allergic alveolitis, bird fancier’s lung, farmer’s lung, hot tub lung, and ... May 27, 2016 Twitter Facebook YouTube Google+ SITE INDEX ACCESSIBILITY PRIVACY STATEMENT FOIA OIG CONTACT US National ...

  13. Comparison of the hypersensitive response induced by the tomato Cf-4 and Cf-9 genes in Nicotiana spp.

    PubMed

    Thomas, C M; Tang, S; Hammond-Kosack, K; Jones, J D

    2000-04-01

    We have previously shown that tomato Cf-9 induces an Avr9-dependent hypersensitive response (HR) in Nicotiana tabacum and potato. We show here that Cf-4 also induces an Avr4-dependent HR in two tobacco species (N. tabacum and N. benthamiana). The HR induced by Cf-4 and Cf-9 was compared in stable tobacco transgenics by a seedling lethal assay and resistance to recombinant Potato virus X expressing Avr4 or Avr9. We also compared HR induction with Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression. The Cf-4/Avr4 combination induced a more rapid HR than Cf-9/Avr9. Sensitive assays for Cf-9 and Cf-4 function should prove useful for structure/function analyses of these resistance proteins in tobacco. PMID:10755310

  14. Chronic prenatal stress epigenetically modifies spinal cord BDNF expression to induce sex specific visceral hypersensitivity in offspring

    PubMed Central

    Winston, John H.; Li, Qingjie; Sarna, Sushil K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a heterogeneous disorder with abdomen pain as one of the primary symptoms. The etiology of IBS remains unknown. Epidemiological studies found that a subset of these patients have a history of adverse early-life events. We tested the hypothesis that chronic prenatal stress (CPS) epigenetically enhances brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in spinal cord to aggravate colon sensitivity to colorectal distension (CRD) differentially in male and female offspring. Methods We used heterotypic intermittent chronic stress (HeICS) protocols in pregnant dams from E11 until delivery. Results CPS induced significant visceral hypersensitivity (VHS) to CRD in male and female offspring. A second exposure to HeICS in adult offspring exacerbated VHS greater in female offspring that persisted longer than in male offspring. CPS upregulated BDNF expression in the lumbar-sacral dorsal horn that correlated with the exacerbation of VHS in female, but not in male offspring. The upregulation of BDNF was due to a significant increase in RNA Pol II binding, histone H3 acetylation and significant decrease in histone deacetylase 1 association with the core promoter of BDNF in female offspring. Other chronic prenatal and neonatal stress protocols were less effective than HeICS. Conclusion & Inferences The development of visceral hypersensitivity, which contributes to the symptom of intermittent abdominal pain, is a two-step process, chronic in utero stress followed by chronic stress in adult-life. This two-step process induces aggravated and persistent colon hypersensitivity in female than in male offspring. Our preclinical model explains several clinical features in IBS patients. PMID:24588943

  15. Enhanced sympathetic nerve activity induced by neonatal colon inflammation induces gastric hypersensitivity and anxiety-like behavior in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Winston, John H; Sarna, Sushil K

    2016-07-01

    Gastric hypersensitivity (GHS) and anxiety are prevalent in functional dyspepsia patients; their underlying mechanisms remain unknown largely because of lack of availability of live visceral tissues from human subjects. Recently, we demonstrated in a preclinical model that rats subjected to neonatal colon inflammation show increased basal plasma norepinephrine (NE), which contributes to GHS through the upregulation of nerve growth factor (NGF) expression in the gastric fundus. We tested the hypothesis that neonatal colon inflammation increases anxiety-like behavior and sympathetic nervous system activity, which upregulates the expression of NGF to induce GHS in adult life. Chemical sympathectomy, but not adrenalectomy, suppressed the elevated NGF expression in the fundus muscularis externa and GHS. The measurement of heart rate variability showed a significant increase in the low frequency-to-high frequency ratio in GHS vs. the control rats. Stimulus-evoked release of NE from the fundus muscularis externa strips was significantly greater in GHS than in the control rats. Tyrosine hydroxylase expression was increased in the celiac ganglia of the GHS vs. the control rats. We found an increase in trait but not stress-induced anxiety-like behavior in GHS rats in an elevated plus maze. We concluded that neonatal programming triggered by colon inflammation upregulates tyrosine hydroxylase in the celiac ganglia, which upregulates the release of NE in the gastric fundus muscularis externa. The increase of NE release from the sympathetic nerve terminals concentration dependently upregulates NGF, which proportionately increases the visceromotor response to gastric distention. Neonatal programming concurrently increases anxiety-like behavior in GHS rats. PMID:27151940

  16. Comparison of CD63 Upregulation Induced by NSAIDs on Basophils and Monocytes in Patients with NSAID Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Abuaf, N.; Rostane, H.; Barbara, J.; Toly-Ndour, C.; Gaouar, H.; Mathelier-Fusade, P.; Leynadier, F.; Francès, C.; Girot, R.

    2012-01-01

    Background. An in vitro basophil activation test, based on the detection of CD63 upregulation induced by NSAIDs, has been described. Its clinical significance remains controversial. Objectives. In patients with a history of nonallergic NSAID hypersensitivity, stratified according to the severity of the symptoms, to assess with NSAIDs the predictive value of basophil (BAT) and monocyte (MAT) activation tests. Patients/Methods. Sixty patients who had NSAIDs-induced or exacerbated urticaria/angiooedema and 20 controls was included. After incubation with NSAIDs or acetaminophen, leukocytes were analysed for CD63 upregulation. Results. With aspirin, the sensitivity (37%) and specificity (90%) of BAT agree with already published results. In contrast, when patients had had cutaneous and visceral reactions, the frequency of positive BAT 14/22 (64%, P < 0.001) or MAT 10/22 (46%, P < 0.01) were increased. Conclusions. Positive tests were more frequent among patients having a severe hypersensitivity contrasting with the other patients who had results similar to controls. PMID:22187572

  17. TAFA4, a chemokine-like protein, modulates injury-induced mechanical and chemical pain hypersensitivity in mice.

    PubMed

    Delfini, Marie-Claire; Mantilleri, Annabelle; Gaillard, Stéphane; Hao, Jizhe; Reynders, Ana; Malapert, Pascale; Alonso, Serge; François, Amaury; Barrere, Christian; Seal, Rebecca; Landry, Marc; Eschallier, Alain; Alloui, Abdelkrim; Bourinet, Emmanuel; Delmas, Patrick; Le Feuvre, Yves; Moqrich, Aziz

    2013-10-31

    C-low-threshold mechanoreceptors (C-LTMRs) are unique among C-unmyelinated primary sensory neurons. These neurons convey two opposite aspects of touch sensation: a sensation of pleasantness, and a sensation of injury-induced mechanical pain. Here, we show that TAFA4 is a specific marker of C-LTMRs. Genetic labeling in combination with electrophysiological recordings show that TAFA4+ neurons have intrinsic properties of mechano-nociceptors. TAFA4-null mice exhibit enhanced mechanical and chemical hypersensitivity following inflammation and nerve injury as well as increased excitability of spinal cord lamina IIi neurons, which could be reversed by intrathecal or bath application of recombinant TAFA4 protein. In wild-type C57/Bl6 mice, intrathecal administration of TAFA4 strongly reversed carrageenan-induced mechanical hypersensitivity, suggesting a potent analgesic role of TAFA4 in pain relief. Our data provide insights into how C-LTMR-derived TAFA4 modulates neuronal excitability and controls the threshold of somatic sensation.

  18. Obesity Takes Its Toll on Visceral Pain: High-Fat Diet Induces Toll-Like Receptor 4-Dependent Visceral Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Dinan, Timothy G.; Cryan, John F.

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to high-fat diet induces both, peripheral and central alterations in TLR4 expression. Moreover, functional TLR4 is required for the development of high-fat diet-induced obesity. Recently, central alterations in TLR4 expression have been associated with the modulation of visceral pain. However, it remains unknown whether there is a functional interaction between the role of TLR4 in diet-induced obesity and in visceral pain. In the present study we investigated the impact of long-term exposure to high-fat diet on visceral pain perception and on the levels of TLR4 and Cd11b (a microglial cell marker) protein expression in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus. Peripheral alterations in TLR4 were assessed following the stimulation of spleenocytes with the TLR4-agonist LPS. Finally, we evaluated the effect of blocking TLR4 on visceral nociception, by administering TAK-242, a selective TLR4-antagonist. Our results demonstrated that exposure to high-fat diet induced visceral hypersensitivity. In parallel, enhanced TLR4 expression and microglia activation were found in brain areas related to visceral pain, the PFC and the hippocampus. Likewise, peripheral TLR4 activity was increased following long-term exposure to high-fat diet, resulting in an increased level of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Finally, TLR4 blockage counteracted the hyperalgesic phenotype present in mice fed on high-fat diet. Our data reveal a role for TLR4 in visceral pain modulation in a model of diet-induced obesity, and point to TLR4 as a potential therapeutic target for the development of drugs to treat visceral hypersensitivity present in pathologies associated to fat diet consumption. PMID:27159520

  19. [Hypersensitive reaction after application of heparin with activation heparin induced trombocytopenia in initiation of intermittent haemodialysis].

    PubMed

    Masopust, Jan; Charvát, Jiří; Mokrá, Dana; Hloch, Ondřej; Háša, Jan

    2015-03-01

    Our report describes the case of patient with hypersensitive reaction regularly arising early after initiation of haemodialysis. This characteristic reaction with pletoric face coloration, bronchospasm, increase of blood pressure, anxiety and decrease of blood oxygen saturation at the consequence and central cyanosis was regularly present without dependence on type of dialysis membrane, drug premedication or prophylactic flushing haemodialysis system by isotonic natrium chloride solution. Low platelet value and trouble-free haemodialysis realized without heparin showed real cause of patients problem. Resolution of this state was regional citrate anticoagulation during intermitent haemodialysis. PMID:25873123

  20. Transplant-mediated enhancement of spinal cord GABAergic inhibition reverses paclitaxel-induced mechanical and heat hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Bráz, João M; Wang, Xidao; Guan, Zhonghui; Rubenstein, John L; Basbaum, Allan I

    2015-06-01

    Decreased spinal cord GABAergic inhibition is a major contributor to the persistent neuropathic pain that can follow peripheral nerve injury. Recently, we reported that restoring spinal cord GABAergic signaling by intraspinal transplantation of cortical precursors of GABAergic interneurons from the embryonic medial ganglionic eminence (MGE) can reverse the mechanical hypersensitivity (allodynia) that characterizes a neuropathic pain model in the mouse. We show that MGE cell transplants are also effective against both the mechanical allodynia and the heat hyperalgesia produced in a paclitaxel-induced chemotherapy model of neuropathic pain. To test the necessity of GABA release by the transplants, we also studied the utility of transplanting MGE cells from mice with a deletion of VGAT, the vesicular GABA transporter. Transplants from these mice, in which GABA is synthesized but cannot be stored or released, had no effect on mechanical hypersensitivity or heat hyperalgesia in the paclitaxel model. Taken together, these results demonstrate the therapeutic potential of GABAergic precursor cell transplantation in diverse neuropathic pain models and support our contention that restoration of inhibitory controls through release of GABA from the transplants is their mode of action. PMID:25760475

  1. The excitatory amino acid receptor antagonist MK-801 prevents the hypersensitivity induced by spinal cord ischemia in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, J.X.; Xu, X.J.; Aldskogius, H.; Seiger, A.; Wiesenfeld-Hallin, Z. )

    1991-08-01

    Protection by the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 against transient spinal cord ischemia-induced hypersensitivity was studied in rats. The spinal ischemia was initiated by vascular occlusion resulting from the interaction between the photosensitizing dye Erythrosin B and an argon laser beam. The hypersensitivity, termed allodynia, where the animals reacted by vocalization to nonnoxious mechanical stimuli in the flank area, was consistently observed during several days after induction of the ischemia. Pretreatment with MK-801 (0.1-0.5 mg/kg, iv) 10 min before laser irradiation dose dependently prevented the occurrence of allodynia. The neuroprotective effect of MK-801 was not reduced by maintaining normal body temperature during and after irradiation. There was a significant negative correlation between the delay in the administration of MK-801 after irradiation and the protective effect of the drug. Histological examination revealed slight morphological damage in the spinal cord in 38% of control rats after 1 min of laser irradiation without pretreatment with MK-801. No morphological abnormalities were observed in rats after pretreatment with MK-801 (0.5 mg/kg). The present results provide further evidence for the involvement of excitatory amino acids, through activation of the NMDA receptor, in the development of dysfunction following ischemic trauma to the spinal cord.

  2. Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis.

    PubMed

    Wysong, Kristi; Phillips, Jennan A; Hammond, Stephanie

    2016-06-01

    Chronic exposure to a broad array of antigens after workers inhale aerosolized organic dust particles from mold, animal dander, bird droppings, and chemicals, especially pesticides or herbicides, increases risk for hypersensitivity pneumonitis. Several demographic characteristics of immigrant workers in farming, poultry processing, construction, and landscaping increase this worker population's risk. PMID:27067273

  3. Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis.

    PubMed

    Wysong, Kristi; Phillips, Jennan A; Hammond, Stephanie

    2016-06-01

    Chronic exposure to a broad array of antigens after workers inhale aerosolized organic dust particles from mold, animal dander, bird droppings, and chemicals, especially pesticides or herbicides, increases risk for hypersensitivity pneumonitis. Several demographic characteristics of immigrant workers in farming, poultry processing, construction, and landscaping increase this worker population's risk.

  4. Selective class I histone deacetylase inhibitors suppress persistent spontaneous nociception and thermal hypersensitivity in a rat model of bee venom-induced inflammatory pain.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Yang, Yan; Wang, Yan; Yang, Fei; Li, Chun-Li; Wang, Xiao-Liang; Li, Zhen; Chen, Jun

    2015-10-25

    To confirm whether class I histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) are effective in relief of peripheral inflammatory pain, the effects of two selective inhibitors, MS-275 and MGCD0103, were studied in rats inflamed by subcutaneous (s.c.) injection of bee venom (BV). The BV test is characterized by displaying both persistent spontaneous nociception (PSN) and primary hypersensitivity. Intrathecal (i.t.) pre-treatment of either MS-275 or MGCD0103 with a single dose of 60 nmol/20 μL resulted in profound suppression of both PSN and primary thermal hypersensitivity but without significant influence upon the primary mechanical hypersensitivity and mirror-image thermal hypersensitivity. Moreover, the up-regulation of both HDAC1 and HDAC2 induced by s.c. BV injection was completely suppressed by i.t. pre-treatment of MS-275. The present results provide with another new line of evidence showing involvement of epigenetic regulation of chromatin structure by HDAC1/2-mediated histone hypoacetylation in the BV-induced PSN and thermal hypersensitivity and demonstrate the beneficial effects of class I HDACIs in prevention of peripheral inflammatory pain from occurring. PMID:26490061

  5. Denervation of nasal mucosa induced by posterior nasal neurectomy suppresses nasal secretion, not hypersensitivity, in an allergic rhinitis rat model.

    PubMed

    Nishijima, Hironobu; Kondo, Kenji; Toma-Hirano, Makiko; Iwasaki, Shinichi; Kikuta, Shu; Fujimoto, Chisato; Ueha, Rumi; Kagoya, Ryoji; Yamasoba, Tatsuya

    2016-09-01

    The posterior nasal nerve is the dominant source of the parasympathetic, sympathetic, and sensory fibers that innervate the nasal respiratory mucosa. Therefore, a posterior nasal neurectomy (PNN) is thought to induce denervation of the nasal mucosa and relieve the nasal symptoms of allergic rhinitis. However, the underlying mechanisms and therapeutic action of PNN remain unknown. To investigate the impact of PNN-induced denervation of the nasal mucosa on allergic rhinitis, we developed a rat model of PNN and examined the effects of PNN on allergic rhinitis in ovalbumin-sensitized rats. This rat model of PNN was characterized by the depletion of nerve fibers, choline acetyltransferase, and neuropeptides (eg, substance P, calcitonin gene-related peptide, vasoactive intestinal peptide, and neuropeptide Y) in the nasal respiratory mucosa. These animals exhibited nasal gland and goblet cell hypertrophy in the septal mucosa and atrophy of the submucosal gland in the lateral nasal wall, as well as reduced nasal secretion due to deficient acetylcholine synthesis. In an ovalbumin-sensitized model of allergic rhinitis, PNN also induced the depletion of nerve fibers, choline acetyltransferase, and neuropeptides in the nasal mucosa and suppressed nasal secretion. However, PNN did not affect mucosal thickening, eosinophil and mast cell infiltration, interleukin-4 and interferon-γ mRNA expression, and allergic symptoms (ie, sneezing and nasal scratching). These results suggest that the peripheral nerves and corresponding neuropeptides regulate nasal secretion, but not hypersensitivity, in allergic rhinitis, and that allergic rhinitis-related mucosal reactions occur in a highly denervated mucosa after PNN. Posterior nasal neurectomy may be a therapeutic option for the treatment of hyperrhinorrhea, but not allergic rhinitis hypersensitivity. PMID:27322954

  6. The 2a protein of Cucumber mosaic virus induces a hypersensitive response in cowpea independently of its replicase activity.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhongze; Zhang, Tianqi; Yao, Min; Feng, Zhike; Miriam, Karwitha; Wu, Jianyan; Zhou, Xueping; Tao, Xiaorong

    2012-12-01

    Resistance in cowpea to infection with strains of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) involves a local hypersensitive response (HR), and previous studies indicated that the 2a replicase of CMV is involved in HR induction. In this study, we confirmed and extended this observation by demonstrating that the nonviral expression of the 2a protein encoded by CMV is able to induce a cell death response in cowpea plants, whereas no other CMV-encoded proteins elicits such response. The 2a single-amino acid mutant, F631Y, no longer induces the necrosis response, yet the A641S mutant still induces cell death. The 2a double mutant, F631Y and A641S, does not induce HR. However, the three 2a mutants have comparable replicase activities in a fluorescence reporter assay. The 2a(D610A) mutant that alters the highly conserved GDD motif abolishes the replicase activity, however it does not affect HR induction in cowpea. The 2a(301-778aa) fragment introduced with the same D610A mutation in the GDD motif is also capable of inducing HR in cowpea. Collectively, these findings suggest that the 2a protein of CMV is sufficient to induce HR in cowpea independently of its replicase activity.

  7. Osteopontin Is Involved in the Initiation of Cutaneous Contact Hypersensitivity by Inducing Langerhans and Dendritic Cell Migration to Lymph Nodes

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, J.M.; Renkl, A.C.; Maier, C.S.; Kimmig, M.; Liaw, L.; Ahrens, T.; Kon, S.; Maeda, M.; Hotta, H.; Uede, T.; Simon, J.C.

    2001-01-01

    Osteopontin (OPN) is a chemotactic protein that attracts immune cells, to inflammatory sites. The sensitization phase of allergic cutaneous contact hypersensitivity (CHS) requires the migration of Langerhans cells/dendritic cells (LCs/DCs) from skin to draining lymph nodes. Characterizing OPN function for LC/DC migration we found upregulated OPN expression in hapten sensitized skin and draining lymph nodes. OPN induces chemotactic LC/DC migration, initiates their emigration from the epidermis, and attracts LCs/DCs to draining lymph nodes by interacting with CD44 and αv integrin. Furthermore, OPN-deficient mice have a significantly reduced CHS response that correlates with an impaired ability of OPN-deficient mice to attract LCs/DCs to draining lymph nodes. In conclusion, OPN is an important factor in the initiation of CHS by guiding LCs/DCs from skin into lymphatic organs. PMID:11696588

  8. A Case of Sublingual Ranula That Responded Successfully to Localized Injection Treatment with OK-432 after Healing from Drug Induced Hypersensitivity Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yoshizawa, Kunio; Moroi, Akinori; Kawashiri, Shuichi; Ueki, Koichiro

    2016-01-01

    A ranula is a mucus retention cyst or pseudocyst caused by leakage of mucus from the sublingual gland and generally occurs in the oral floor. In addition, drug induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS) is a rare but well-recognized serious adverse effect characterized by fever, skin rashes, generalized lymphadenopathy, hepatitis, and hepatosplenomegaly and oral stomatitis. This paper presents the first case of successfully treated sublingual ranula with localized injection of OK-432 after healing from drug induced hypersensitivity syndrome, which has previously been unreported in the literature. We present the case of a 38-year-old Japanese woman with sublingual ranula that responded successfully to localized injection treatment with OK-432 after healing from drug induced hypersensitivity syndrome. She was affected with cutaneous myositis and interstitial lung disease when she was 26 years old. At the age 34 years, she received additional oral treatment of diaminodiphenyl-sulfone due to deterioration of the cutaneous myositis, which resulted in drug induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS) with severe oral stomatitis. Local injection of OK-432 to the ranula may be a very safe and useful treatment method even if the patient has a history of drug allergy and has connective tissue disease such as cutaneous myositis. PMID:27144039

  9. A Case of Sublingual Ranula That Responded Successfully to Localized Injection Treatment with OK-432 after Healing from Drug Induced Hypersensitivity Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yoshizawa, Kunio; Moroi, Akinori; Kawashiri, Shuichi; Ueki, Koichiro

    2016-01-01

    A ranula is a mucus retention cyst or pseudocyst caused by leakage of mucus from the sublingual gland and generally occurs in the oral floor. In addition, drug induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS) is a rare but well-recognized serious adverse effect characterized by fever, skin rashes, generalized lymphadenopathy, hepatitis, and hepatosplenomegaly and oral stomatitis. This paper presents the first case of successfully treated sublingual ranula with localized injection of OK-432 after healing from drug induced hypersensitivity syndrome, which has previously been unreported in the literature. We present the case of a 38-year-old Japanese woman with sublingual ranula that responded successfully to localized injection treatment with OK-432 after healing from drug induced hypersensitivity syndrome. She was affected with cutaneous myositis and interstitial lung disease when she was 26 years old. At the age 34 years, she received additional oral treatment of diaminodiphenyl-sulfone due to deterioration of the cutaneous myositis, which resulted in drug induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS) with severe oral stomatitis. Local injection of OK-432 to the ranula may be a very safe and useful treatment method even if the patient has a history of drug allergy and has connective tissue disease such as cutaneous myositis.

  10. Dietary histidine increases mouse skin urocanic acid levels and enhances UVB-induced immune suppression of contact hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Reilly, S K; De Fabo, E C

    1991-04-01

    Urocanic Acid (UCA) exists in mammalian skin primarily as the trans isomer and is photoisomerized to cis UCA upon UVB absorption. Our previous studies indicated that the photoisomerization of UCA is the initiating event in UBV-induced suppression of cell-mediated immunity (tUCA----cUCA----immune suppression). The purpose of this study was to verify the role of UCA in UV-induced immune suppression of contact hypersensitivity (CHS) in BALB/c mice. Since UCA is a metabolite of the amino acid L-histidine, we reasoned that increased dietary levels of histidine should raise skin tUCA levels. If skin tUCA is the UVB photoreceptor for immune suppression, this increase should enhance UV-induced suppression of CHS. HPLC analysis of skin from BALB/c mice given a histidine-rich diet (10%) showed that the total amount of UCA is significantly higher in these animals than in mice fed a normal diet. Further, levels of suppression of CHS of 3% and 49% in control fed mice, induced by 4.8 and 7.2 kJ/m2 UVB were significantly increased to 21% and 71% respectively in histidine-fed animals at these same UVB doses. These findings provide additional support for the UCA model for immune suppression, and provide the first evidence that UV-induced immune suppression can be enhanced by a dietary component, L-histidine. PMID:1857737

  11. Spinal transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 channel induces mechanical hypersensitivity, increases cutaneous blood flow, and mediates the pronociceptive action of dynorphin A.

    PubMed

    Wei, H; Saarnilehto, M; Falck, L; Viisanen, H; Lasierra, M; Koivisto, A; Pertovaara, A

    2013-06-01

    We characterized pain behavior and cutaneous blood flow response induced by activation of the spinal transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) channel using intrathecal drug administrations in the rat. Additionally, we assessed whether the pronociceptive actions induced by intrathecally administered dynorphin A, cholecystokinin or prostaglandin F(2α) are mediated by the spinal TRPA1 channel. Cinnamaldehyde, a TRPA1 agonist, produced a dose-related (3-10 μg) cutaneous blood flow increase and mechanical hypersensitivity effect. These effects at the currently used doses were of short duration and attenuated, although not completely, by pretreatment with A-967079, a TRPA1 antagonist. The cinnamaldehyde-induced hypersensitivity was also reduced by pretreatment with minocycline (an inhibitor of microglial activation), but not by carbenoxolone (a gap junction decoupler). In vitro study, however, indicated that minocycline only poorly blocks the TRPA1 channel. The mechanical hypersensitivity effect induced by dynorphin A, but not that by cholecystokinin or prostaglandin F(2α), was attenuated by a TRPA1 antagonist Chembridge-5861528 as well as A-967079. The cinnamaldehyde-induced cutaneous blood flow increase was not suppressed by MK-801, an NMDA receptor antagonist, or bicuculline, a GABA(A) receptor antagonist. The results indicate that spinal TRPA1 channels promote mechanical pain hypersensitivity and due to antidromic activation of nociceptive nerve fibers increase cutaneous blood flow. The attenuation of the cinnamaldehyde-induced hypersensitivity effect by minocycline may be explained by action other than block of the TRPA1 channel. Moreover, the spinal TRPA1 channel is involved in mediating the pronociceptive action of dynorphin A, but not that of the spinal cholecystokinin or prostaglandin F(2α).

  12. Dentine hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    West, Nicola; Seong, Joon; Davies, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Dentine hypersensitivity is a common oral pain condition affecting many individuals. The aetiology is multifactorial; however, over recent years the importance of erosion has become more evident. For dentine hypersensitivity to occur, the lesion must first be localised on the tooth surface and then initiated to exposed dentine tubules which are patent to the pulp. The short, sharp pain symptom is thought to be derived from the hydrodynamic pain theory and, although transient, is arresting, affecting quality of life. This episodic pain condition is likely to become a more frequent dental complaint in the future due to the increase in longevity of the dentition and the rise in tooth wear, particularly amongst young adults. Many efficacious treatment regimens are now available, in particular a number of over-the-counter home use products. The basic principles of treatment are altering fluid flow in the dentinal tubules with tubule occlusion or modifying or chemically blocking the pulpal nerve. PMID:24993261

  13. [Dentinal hypersensitivity].

    PubMed

    Steinkeller-Dekel, M; Smidt, A; Pilo, R

    2010-01-01

    Dentinal hypersensitivity is defined as short and transient painful response of exposed dentin, usually cervical, to different stimuli, such as thermal, mechanical osmotic or chemical. The etiology of dentinal hypersensitivity is open tubules (because of enamel loss or gingival recession), allowing painful stimulus to reach the pulp. The hydrodynamic theory explains the mechanism through which pain is aroused. When treating dentinal hypersensitivity, dentists always have to rule out other pathologies, such as carries, leakage, postoperative sensitivity, cracked tooth etc., and only then assess pain intensity and treat the tooth. Treatment always starts with prevention of both stimulus and exposure of dentin, and reducing predisposing factors. The treatment options include OTC products, such as fluoride and/or potassium enriched mouth washes and dentifrices, or in-office treatments, such as high content fluoride varnishes and gels, potassium oxalate chelating agents, Glutaraldehyde containing tissue fixating agents, bonding materials, low viscosity glass ionomers and even non-conservative treatments such as root canal therapy or mucogingival surgical interventions.

  14. [Dentinal hypersensitivity].

    PubMed

    Steinkeller-Dekel, M; Smidt, A; Pilo, R

    2010-01-01

    Dentinal hypersensitivity is defined as short and transient painful response of exposed dentin, usually cervical, to different stimuli, such as thermal, mechanical osmotic or chemical. The etiology of dentinal hypersensitivity is open tubules (because of enamel loss or gingival recession), allowing painful stimulus to reach the pulp. The hydrodynamic theory explains the mechanism through which pain is aroused. When treating dentinal hypersensitivity, dentists always have to rule out other pathologies, such as carries, leakage, postoperative sensitivity, cracked tooth etc., and only then assess pain intensity and treat the tooth. Treatment always starts with prevention of both stimulus and exposure of dentin, and reducing predisposing factors. The treatment options include OTC products, such as fluoride and/or potassium enriched mouth washes and dentifrices, or in-office treatments, such as high content fluoride varnishes and gels, potassium oxalate chelating agents, Glutaraldehyde containing tissue fixating agents, bonding materials, low viscosity glass ionomers and even non-conservative treatments such as root canal therapy or mucogingival surgical interventions. PMID:20597258

  15. Observation of an electromagnetically induced grating in cold sodium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsunaga, Masaharu; Imoto, Nobuyuki

    1999-06-01

    We have observed diffraction signals by a grating originating from electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in a three-level Λ system of cold sodium atoms. Theoretical and experimental analyses of this phenomenon, called the electromagnetically induced grating (EIG), have revealed that EIG spectra exhibit background-free, Lorentzian signal profiles regardless of the pump frequencies, making a clear contrast to the case of ordinary EIT spectra.

  16. A novel cold-inducible expression system for Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Thuy Le, Ai Thi; Schumann, Wolfgang

    2007-06-01

    Production of recombinant proteins at low temperatures is one strategy to prevent formation of protein aggregates and the use of an expensive inducer such as IPTG. We report on the construction of two expression vectors both containing the cold-inducible des promoter of Bacillus subtilis, where one allows intra- and the other extracellular synthesis of recombinant proteins. Production of recombinant proteins started within the first 30min after temperature downshock to 25 degrees C and continued for about 5h.

  17. Pain hypersensitivity induced by paradoxical sleep deprivation is not due to altered binding to brain mu-opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Danielle C; Andersen, Monica L; Hipólide, Débora Cristina; Nobrega, José N; Tufik, Sergio

    2007-03-28

    Previous studies have established a relationship between sleep disruption and pain, and it has been suggested that hyperalgesia induced by paradoxical sleep deprivation (PSD) could be due to a reduction of opioidergic neurotransmission in the brain. In the present study rats deprived of sleep for 96 h as well as rats allowed to recover for 24h after PSD and normal controls received vehicle or morphine (2.5, 5 and 10 mg/kg, i.p.) and were tested on a hot plate 1h later. Quantitative receptor autoradiography was used to map alterations in binding to brain mu-opioid receptors in separate groups. Results demonstrated that PSD induced a significant reduction in thermal pain threshold, as measured by paw withdrawal latencies. This effect did not return to baseline control values after 24h of sleep recovery. The usual analgesic effect of morphine was observed in the control group but not in PSD or rebound groups except at the highest dose (10 mg/kg). Binding of [3H]DAMGO to mu sites did not differ significantly among the three groups in any of the 33 brain regions examined. These results do not exclude the participation of the opioid system in PSD-induced pain hypersensitivity since sleep-deprived rats were clearly resistant to morphine. However, the fact no changes were seen in [3H]DAMGO binding indicates that mechanisms other than altered mu-opioid binding must be sought to explain the phenomenon.

  18. Cold acclimation induced genes of trifoliate orange (Poncirus trifoliata).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Can-kui; Lang, Ping; Dane, Fenny; Ebel, Robert C; Singh, Narendra K; Locy, Robert D; Dozier, William A

    2005-03-01

    Commercial citrus varieties are sensitive to low temperature. Poncirus trifoliata is a close relative of Citrus species and has been widely used as a cold-hardy rootstock for citrus production in low-temperature environments. mRNA differential display-reverse transcription (DDRT)-PCR and quantitative relative-RT-PCR were used to study gene expression of P. trifoliata under a gradual cold-acclimation temperature regime. Eight up-regulated cDNA fragments were isolated and sequenced. These fragments showed high similarities at the amino acid level to the following genes with known functions: betaine/proline transporter, water channel protein, aldo-keto reductase, early light-induced protein, nitrate transporter, tetratricopeptide-repeat protein, F-box protein, and ribosomal protein L15. These cold-acclimation up-regulated genes in P. trifoliata are also regulated by osmotic and photo-oxidative signals in other plants.

  19. A non-cold-inducible cold shock protein homolog mainly contributes to translational control under optimal growth conditions.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Toshiko; Mega, Ryosuke; Kim, Kwang; Shinkai, Akeo; Masui, Ryoji; Kuramitsu, Seiki; Nakagawa, Noriko

    2012-03-01

    Cold shock proteins (Csps) include both cold-induced and non-cold-induced proteins, contrary to their name. Cold-induced Csps are well studied; they function in cold acclimation by controlling transcription and translation. Some Csps have been reported to contribute to other cellular processes. However, the functions of non-cold-induced Csps under optimal growth conditions remain unknown. To elucidate these functions, we used transcriptome and proteome analyses as comprehensive approaches and have compared the outputs of wild-type and non-cold-induced Csp-deletion mutant cells. As a model organism, we selected Thermus thermophilus HB8 because it has only two csp genes (ttcsp1 and ttcsp2); ttCsp1 is the only non-cold-induced Csp. Surprisingly, the amount of transcripts and proteins upon deletion of the ttcsp1 gene was quite different. DNA microarray analysis revealed that the deletion of ttcsp1 did not affect the amount of transcripts, although the ttcsp1 gene was constantly expressed in the wild-type cell. Nonetheless, proteomic analysis revealed that the expression levels of many proteins were significantly altered when ttcsp1 was deleted. These results suggest that ttCsp1 functions in translation independent of transcription. Furthermore, ttCsp1 is involved in both the stimulation and inhibition of translation of specific proteins. Here, we have determined the crystal structure of ttCsp1 at 1.65 Å. This is the first report to present the structure of a non-cold-inducible cold shock protein. We also report the nucleotide binding affinity of ttCsp1. Finally, we discuss the functions of non-cold-induced Csps and propose how they modulate the levels of specific proteins to suit the prevailing environmental conditions.

  20. Exertion-induced fatigue and thermoregulation in the cold.

    PubMed

    Young, A J; Castellani, J W

    2001-04-01

    Cold exposure facilitates body heat loss which can reduce body temperature, unless mitigated by enhanced heat conservation or increased heat production. When behavioral strategies inadequately defend body temperature, vasomotor and thermogenic responses are elicited, both of which are modulated if not mediated by sympathetic nervous activation. Both exercise and shivering increase metabolic heat production which helps offset body heat losses in the cold. However, exercise also increases peripheral blood flow, in turn facilitating heat loss, an effect that can persist for some time after exercise ceases. Whether exercise alleviates or exacerbates heat debt during cold exposure depends on the heat transfer coefficient of the environment, mode of activity and exercise intensity. Prolonged exhaustive exercise leading to energy substrate depletion could compromise maintenance of thermal balance in the cold simply by precluding continuation of further exercise and the associated thermogenesis. Hypoglycemia impairs shivering, but this appears to be centrally mediated, rather than a limitation to peripheral energy metabolism. Research is equivocal regarding the importance of muscle glycogen depletion in explaining shivering impairments. Recent research suggests that when acute exercise leads to fatigue without depleting energy stores, vasoconstrictor responses to cold are impaired, thus body heat conservation becomes degraded. Fatigue that was induced by chronic overexertion sustained over many weeks, appeared to delay the onset of shivering until body temperature fell lower than when subjects were rested, as well as impair vasoconstrictor responses. When heavy physical activity is coupled with underfeeding for prolonged periods, the resulting negative energy balance leads to loss of body mass, and the corresponding reduction in tissue insulation, in turn, compromises thermal balance by facilitating conductive transfer of body heat from core to shell. The possibility that

  1. Spinal actions of lipoxin A4 and 17(R)-resolvin D1 attenuate inflammation-induced mechanical hypersensitivity and spinal TNF release.

    PubMed

    Abdelmoaty, Sally; Wigerblad, Gustaf; Bas, Duygu B; Codeluppi, Simone; Fernandez-Zafra, Teresa; El-Awady, El-Sayed; Moustafa, Yasser; Abdelhamid, Alaa El-Din S; Brodin, Ernst; Svensson, Camilla I

    2013-01-01

    Lipoxins and resolvins have anti-inflammatory and pro-resolving actions and accumulating evidence indicates that these lipid mediators also attenuate pain-like behavior in a number of experimental models of inflammation and tissue injury-induced pain. The present study was undertaken to assess if spinal administration of lipoxin A4 (LXA4) or 17 (R)-resolvin D1 (17(R)-RvD1) attenuates mechanical hypersensitivity in the carrageenan model of peripheral inflammation in the rat. Given the emerging role of spinal cytokines in the generation and maintenance of inflammatory pain we measured cytokine levels in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) after LXA4 or 17(R)-RvD1 administration, and the ability of these lipid metabolites to prevent stimuli-induced release of cytokines from cultured primary spinal astrocytes. We found that intrathecal bolus injection of LXA4 and17(R)-RvD1 attenuated inflammation-induced mechanical hypersensitivity without reducing the local inflammation. Furthermore, both LXA4 and 17(R)-RvD1 reduced carrageenan-induced tumor necrosis factor (TNF) release in the CSF, while only 17(R)-RvD1attenuated LPS and IFN-γ-induced TNF release in astrocyte cell culture. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that lipoxins and resolvins potently suppress inflammation-induced mechanical hypersensitivity, possibly by attenuating cytokine release from spinal astrocytes. The inhibitory effect of lipoxins and resolvins on spinal nociceptive processing puts them in an intriguing position in the search for novel pain therapeutics.

  2. Allergen-Specific Cytokine Polarization Protects Shetland Ponies against Culicoides obsoletus-Induced Insect Bite Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Meulenbroeks, Chantal; van der Lugt, Jaco J.; van der Meide, Nathalie M. A.; Willemse, Ton; Rutten, Victor P. M. G.; Zaiss, Dietmar M. W.

    2015-01-01

    The immunological mechanisms explaining development of an allergy in some individuals and not in others remain incompletely understood. Insect bite hypersensitivity (IBH) is a common, seasonal, IgE-mediated, pruritic skin disorder that affects considerable proportions of horses of different breeds, which is caused by bites of the insect Culicoides obsoletus (C. obsoletus). We investigated the allergen-specific immune status of individual horses that had either been diagnosed to be healthy or to suffer of IBH. Following intradermal allergen injection, skin biopsies were taken of IBH-affected and healthy ponies and cytokine expression was determined by RT-PCR. In addition, allergen-specific antibody titers were measured and cytokine expression of in vitro stimulated, allergen-specific CD4 T-cells was determined. 24 hrs after allergen injection, a significant increase in mRNA expression of the type-2 cytokine IL-4 was observed in the skin of IBH-affected Shetland ponies. In the skin of healthy ponies, however, an increase in IFNγ mRNA expression was found. Analysis of allergen-specific antibody titers revealed that all animals produced allergen-specific antibodies, and allergen-specific stimulation of CD4 T-cells revealed a significant higher percentage of IFNγ-expressing CD4 T-cells in healthy ponies compared to IBH-affected ponies. These data indicate that horses not affected by IBH, in contrast to the so far established dogma, are not immunologically ignorant but have a Th1-skewed allergen-specific immune response that appears to protect against IBH-associated symptoms. To our knowledge this is the first demonstration of a natural situation, in which an allergen-specific immune skewing is protective in an allergic disorder. PMID:25901733

  3. Increased /sup 3/H-spiperone binding sites in mesolimbic area related to methamphetamine-induced behavioral hypersensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Akiyama, K.; Sato, M.; Otsuki, S.

    1982-02-01

    The specific /sup 3/H-spiperone binding to membrane homogenates of the striatum, mesolimbic area, and frontal cortex was examined in two groups of rats pretreated once daily with saline or 4 mg/kg of methamphetamine (MAP) for 14 days. At 7 days following cessation of chronic pretreatment, all rats received an injection of 4 mg/kg of MAP and were decapitated 1 hr after the injection. In the chronic saline-pretreatment group, the single administration of MAP induced significant changes in the number (Bmax) of specific /sup 3/H-spiperone binding sites (a decrease in the striatum and an increase in the mesolimbic area and frontal cortex), but no significant changes in the affinity (KD) in any brain area. The chronic MAP pretreatment markedly augmented the changes in Bmax in the striatum and mesolimbic area. The increase in specific /sup 3/H-spiperone binding sites in the mesolimbic area is discussed in relation to MAP-induced behavioral hypersensitivity.

  4. Transcriptome Analysis of Capsicum Chlorosis Virus-Induced Hypersensitive Resistance Response in Bell Capsicum

    PubMed Central

    Widana Gamage, Shirani M. K.; McGrath, Desmond J.; Persley, Denis M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Capsicum chlorosis virus (CaCV) is an emerging pathogen of capsicum, tomato and peanut crops in Australia and South-East Asia. Commercial capsicum cultivars with CaCV resistance are not yet available, but CaCV resistance identified in Capsicum chinense is being introgressed into commercial Bell capsicum. However, our knowledge of the molecular mechanisms leading to the resistance response to CaCV infection is limited. Therefore, transcriptome and expression profiling data provide an important resource to better understand CaCV resistance mechanisms. Methodology/Principal Findings We assembled capsicum transcriptomes and analysed gene expression using Illumina HiSeq platform combined with a tag-based digital gene expression system. Total RNA extracted from CaCV/mock inoculated CaCV resistant (R) and susceptible (S) capsicum at the time point when R line showed a strong hypersensitive response to CaCV infection was used in transcriptome assembly. Gene expression profiles of R and S capsicum in CaCV- and buffer-inoculated conditions were compared. None of the genes were differentially expressed (DE) between R and S cultivars when mock-inoculated, while 2484 genes were DE when inoculated with CaCV. Functional classification revealed that the most highly up-regulated DE genes in R capsicum included pathogenesis-related genes, cell death-associated genes, genes associated with hormone-mediated signalling pathways and genes encoding enzymes involved in synthesis of defense-related secondary metabolites. We selected 15 genes to confirm DE expression levels by real-time quantitative PCR. Conclusion/Significance DE transcript profiling data provided comprehensive gene expression information to gain an understanding of the underlying CaCV resistance mechanisms. Further, we identified candidate CaCV resistance genes in the CaCV-resistant C. annuum x C. chinense breeding line. This knowledge will be useful in future for fine mapping of the CaCV resistance locus and

  5. Effect of body temperature on cold induced vasodilation.

    PubMed

    Flouris, Andreas D; Westwood, David A; Mekjavic, Igor B; Cheung, Stephen S

    2008-10-01

    Cold-induced vasodilation (CIVD) is an acute increase in peripheral blood flow observed during cold exposures. It is hypothesized to protect against cold injuries, yet despite continuous research it remains an unexplained phenomenon. Contrary to the traditionally held view, we propose that CIVD is a thermoregulatory reflex mechanism contributing to heat loss. Ten adults (4 females; 23.8 +/- 2.0 years) randomly underwent three 130-min exposures to -20 degrees C incorporating a 10-min moderate exercise period at the 65th min, while wearing a liquid conditioning garment (LCG) and military arctic clothing. In the pre-warming condition, rectal temperature was increased by 0.5 degrees C via the LCG before the cold exposure. In the warming condition, participants regulated the LCG throughout the cold exposure to subjective comfort. In the control condition, the LCG was worn but was not operated either before or during the cold exposure. Results demonstrated that the majority of CIVD occurred during the warming condition when the thermometrically-estimated mean body temperature (T (b)) was at its highest. A thermoregulatory pattern was identified whereby CIVD occurred soon after T (b) increased past a threshold (approximately 36.65 degrees C in warming and pre-warming; approximately 36.4 degrees C in control). When CIVD occurred, T (b) was reduced and CIVD ceased when T (b) fell below the threshold. These findings were independent of extremity temperature since CIVD episodes occurred at a large range of finger temperatures (7.2-33.5 degrees C). These observations were statistically confirmed by auto-regressive integrated moving average analysis (t = 9.602, P < 0.001). We conclude that CIVD is triggered by increased T (b) supporting the hypothesis that CIVD is a thermoregulatory mechanism contributing to heat loss.

  6. [Electromagnetic fields hypersensitivity].

    PubMed

    Sobiczewska, Elzbieta; Szmigielski, Stanisław

    2009-01-01

    The development of industry, particularly of new technologies in communication systems, gives rise to the number and diversty of electromagnetic field (EMF) sources in the environment. These sources, including power-frequent, radiofrequent and microwaves, make human life richer, safer and easier. But at the same time, there is growing concern about possible health risks connected with EMF exposure. An increasing number of persons have recently reported on a variety of health problems induced, in their opinion, by exposure to EMF. It is important to note that EMF levels to which these individuals are exposed are generally well below the recommended exposure limits and are certainly far below those known to produce any adverse effects. These persons call themselves "electromagnetic hypersensitivity individuals" And complain about experiencing various types of non-specific symptoms, including dermatological, neurological and vegetative. In the present paper, the problem of electromagnetic hypersensitivity phenomenon is discussed based on the recently published literature.

  7. Lack of TAK1 in dendritic cells inhibits the contact hypersensitivity response induced by trichloroethylene in local lymph node assay.

    PubMed

    Yao, Pan; Hongqian, Chu; Qinghe, Meng; Lanqin, Shang; Jianjun, Jiang; Xiaohua, Yang; Xuetao, Wei; Weidong, Hao

    2016-09-15

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a ubiquitous environmental contaminant. Occupational TCE exposure has been associated with severe, generalized contact hypersensitivity (CHS) skin disorder. The development of CHS depends on innate and adaptive immune functions. Transforming growth factor-β activated kinase-1 (TAK1) controls the survival of dendritic cells (DCs) that affect the immune system homeostasis. We aimed to investigate the role of TAK1 activity in DC on TCE-induced CHS response. Control mice and DC-specific TAK1 deletion mice were treated with 80% (v/v) TCE using local lymph node assay (LLNA) to establish a TCE-induced CHS model. The draining lymph nodes (DLNs) were excised and the lymphocytes were measure for proliferation by BrdU-ELISA, T-cell phenotype analysis by flow cytometry and signaling pathway activation by western blot. The ears were harvested for histopathological analysis. Control mice in the 80% TCE group displayed an inflammatory response in the ears, increased lymphocyte proliferation, elevated regulatory T-cell and activated T-cell percentages, and more IFN-γ producing CD8(+) T cells in DLNs. In contrast to control mice, DC-specific TAK1 deletion mice in the 80% TCE group showed an abolished CHS response and this was associated with defective T-cell expansion, activation and IFN-γ production. This effect may occur through Jnk and NF-κB signaling pathways. Overall, this study demonstrates a pivotal role of TAK1 in DCs in controlling TCE-induced CHS response and suggests that targeting TAK1 function in DCs may be a viable approach to preventing and treating TCE-related occupational health hazards. PMID:27473013

  8. Lack of TAK1 in dendritic cells inhibits the contact hypersensitivity response induced by trichloroethylene in local lymph node assay.

    PubMed

    Yao, Pan; Hongqian, Chu; Qinghe, Meng; Lanqin, Shang; Jianjun, Jiang; Xiaohua, Yang; Xuetao, Wei; Weidong, Hao

    2016-09-15

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a ubiquitous environmental contaminant. Occupational TCE exposure has been associated with severe, generalized contact hypersensitivity (CHS) skin disorder. The development of CHS depends on innate and adaptive immune functions. Transforming growth factor-β activated kinase-1 (TAK1) controls the survival of dendritic cells (DCs) that affect the immune system homeostasis. We aimed to investigate the role of TAK1 activity in DC on TCE-induced CHS response. Control mice and DC-specific TAK1 deletion mice were treated with 80% (v/v) TCE using local lymph node assay (LLNA) to establish a TCE-induced CHS model. The draining lymph nodes (DLNs) were excised and the lymphocytes were measure for proliferation by BrdU-ELISA, T-cell phenotype analysis by flow cytometry and signaling pathway activation by western blot. The ears were harvested for histopathological analysis. Control mice in the 80% TCE group displayed an inflammatory response in the ears, increased lymphocyte proliferation, elevated regulatory T-cell and activated T-cell percentages, and more IFN-γ producing CD8(+) T cells in DLNs. In contrast to control mice, DC-specific TAK1 deletion mice in the 80% TCE group showed an abolished CHS response and this was associated with defective T-cell expansion, activation and IFN-γ production. This effect may occur through Jnk and NF-κB signaling pathways. Overall, this study demonstrates a pivotal role of TAK1 in DCs in controlling TCE-induced CHS response and suggests that targeting TAK1 function in DCs may be a viable approach to preventing and treating TCE-related occupational health hazards.

  9. Selective agonists of somatostatin receptor subtype 1 or 2 injected peripherally induce antihyperalgesic effect in two models of visceral hypersensitivity in mice

    PubMed Central

    Mulak, Agata; Larauche, Muriel; Biraud, Mandy; Million, Mulugeta; Rivier, Jean; Taché, Yvette

    2014-01-01

    Somatostatin interacts with 5 G-protein-coupled receptor (sst1–5). Octreotide, a stable sst2≫3≥5 agonist, octreotide, exerts a visceral anti-hyperalgesic effect in experimental and clinical studies. Little is known on the receptor subtypes involved. We investigated the influence of the stable sst1–5 agonist, ODT8-SST and selective receptor subtype peptide agonists (3 or 10 μg/mouse) injected intraperitoneally (ip) on visceral hypersensitivity in mice induced by repeated noxious colorectal distensions (4 sets of 3 CRD, each at 55 mmHg) or corticotropin-releasing factor receptor 1 agonist, cortagine given between 2 sets of graded CRD (15, 30, 45, and 60 mmHg, 3 times each pressure). The mean visceromotor response (VMR) was assessed using a non-invasive manometry method and values were expressed as percentage of the VMR to the 1st set of CRD baseline or to the 60 mmHg CRD, respectively. ODT8-SST (10 μg) and the sst2 agonist, S-346-011 (3 and 10 μg) prevented mechanically-induced visceral hypersensitivity in the 3 sets of CRD, the sst1 agonist (10 μg) blocked only the 2nd set and showed a trend at 3 μg while the sst4 agonist had no effect. The selective sst2 antagonist, S-406-028 blocked the sst2 agonist but not the sst1 agonist effect. The sst1 agonist (3 and 10 μg) prevented cortagine-induced hypersensitivity to CRD at each pressure while the sst2 agonist at 10 μg reduced it. These data indicate that in addition to sst2, the sst1 agonist may provide a novel promising target to alleviate visceral hypersensitivity induced by mechanoreceptor sensitization and more prominently, stress-related visceral nociceptive sensitization. PMID:25451334

  10. TLR9-Dependent IL-23/IL-17 is Required for the Generation of Stachybotrys chartarum-induced Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis

    PubMed Central

    Bhan, Urvashi; Newstead, Michael J.; Zeng, Xianying; Podsaid, Amy; Goswami, Moloy; Ballinger, Megan N.; Kunkel, Steven L.; Standiford, Theodore J.

    2012-01-01

    Hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) is an inflammatory lung disease that develops following repeated exposure to inhaled particulate antigen. Stachybotrys chartarum (SC) is a dimorphic fungus that has been implicated in a number of respiratory illnesses, including HP (1). In this study we have developed a murine model of SC- induced HP that reproduces pathology observed in human HP and hypothesized that TLR9–mediated IL-23/IL-17 responses are required for the generation of granulomatous inflammation induced by inhaled SC. Mice that undergo i.p. sensitization and i.t. challenge with 106 SC spores developed granulomatous inflammation with multinucleate giant cells, accompanied by increased accumulation of T cells. SC sensitization and challenge resulted in robust pulmonary expression of IL-17 and IL-23. SC-mediated granulomatous inflammation required intact IL-23/IL-17 responses and required TLR9, as TLR9−/− mice displayed reduced IL-17 and IL-23 expression in whole lung associated with decreased accumulation of IL-17 expressing CD4+ and γδ T cells. As compared to SC-sensitized dendritic cells (DC) isolated from WT mice, DC isolated from TLR9−/− mice had a reduced ability to produce IL-23 in responses to SC. Moreover, shRNA knockdown of IL-23 in DC abolished IL-17 production from splenocytes in response to antigen challenge. Finally, the i.t. reconstitution of IL-23 in TLR9−/− mice recapitulated the immunopathology observed in WT mice. In conclusion, our studies suggest that TLR9 is critical for development of Th17-mediated granulomatous inflammation in the lung in response to SC. PMID:23180821

  11. Influence of different types of contact hypersensitivity on imiquimod-induced psoriasis-like inflammation in mice

    PubMed Central

    BAI, SHUANG; ZHANG, ZHENYING; HOU, SUCHUN; LIU, XIAOMING

    2016-01-01

    It is currently believed that psoriasis and allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) are different diseases; however, they share clinical similarities. The involvement of T helper 17 (Th17) cells in these disorders provides a novel opportunity to investigate the relationship between them. The present study aimed to determine whether the same or overlapping inflammatory pathways are involved in the two diseases, and the influence of different types of ACD on psoriasis. Compound mouse models of Th1 or Th2-type contact hyper-sensitivity (CHS) combined with imiquimod (IMQ)-induced psoriasis-like inflammation were established, in order to mimic the characteristics of ACD and psoriasis. Histopathology, immunohistochemistry and cytokine detection in blood serum and tissues were used to compare the differences between the mice treated with IMQ alone or IMQ combined with Th1 and Th2-type CHS. As compared with the IMQ-treated mice or IMQ-treated Th1-type CHS mice, the mice with Th2-type CHS treated with IMQ exhibited more serious psoriasis-like inflammation with increased epidermal thickness and infiltrating cells in the derma. High mRNA expression levels of interleukin (IL)-17, IL-22, IL-23, TNF-α and RORγt were detected in back skin lesions. Additionally, high levels of IL-17 and IL-22 in blood serum were detected in IMQ-treated mice combined with Th2-type CHS. The mice treated with IMQ alone, and IMQ treatment combined with Th1-type CHS had a comparable psoriasis-like inflammatory response in the back skin. In conclusion, these data demonstrate that Th2-type CHS exacerbated the IMQ-treated psoriatic inflammation of mice via the IL-23/IL-17 axis. Th17 cells and associated pathways may link ACD and psoriasis. Therefore, patients with psoriasis should avoid contact with specific sensitizers, such as fragrance and rubber products, which may induce Th2 polarization. PMID:27221314

  12. Avocado hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Blanco, C; Carrillo, T; Castillo, R; Quiralte, J; Cuevas, M

    1994-07-01

    The avocado (Av) is a fruit that belongs to the Lauraceae family. We report 17 patients with immediate hypersensitivity to avocado. Clinical manifestations in relation to avocado ingestion were as follows: systemic anaphylaxis in seven patients, angioedema/urticaria in six, vomiting in two, bronchial asthma in one, and rhinoconjunctivitis in one. Skin prick test (SPT) with fresh avocado was positive in all patients with the Strong avocado variety (SAv) and in 14 patients with the Hass avocado variety (HAv). Our patient-associated sensitizations were as follows: 10 to latex, eight to chestnut, eight to banana, four to kiwi, and four to walnut. Avocado-sensitized patients with latex allergy were typically middle-aged women, professionally exposed to latex, who also exhibited frequent associated sensitizations to chestnut, banana, and other fruits. Specific IgE against avocado was demonstrated in 11 of our patients, by both commercial CAP and RAST with avocado extract coupled to nitrocellulose disks. Despite its lower protein content, SAv seems to be more allergenic than HAv, both in vivo and in vitro. On incubating a pool of sera from our patients with avocado, latex, chestnut, and banana extracts, a progressive RAST inhibition was obtained, with SAv- and chestnut-marked disks. This suggests the existence of common antigenic determinants among these allergens.

  13. Ester Hydrolysis Differentially Reduces Aconitine-Induced Anti-hypersensitivity and Acute Neurotoxicity: Involvement of Spinal Microglial Dynorphin Expression and Implications for Aconitum Processing

    PubMed Central

    Li, Teng-Fei; Gong, Nian; Wang, Yong-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Aconitines, including bulleyaconitine A, probably the most bioactive and abundant alkaloids in Aconitum plant, are a group of diester C19-diterpenoid alkaloids with one acetylester group attached to C8 of the diterpenoid skeleton and one benzoylester group to C14. Hydrolysis of both groups is involved in the processing of Aconitum, a traditional Chinese medicinal approach. We recently demonstrated that bulleyaconitine A produced anti-hypersensitivity, which was mediated by stimulation of spinal microglial dynorphin A expression. This study aimed to elucidate whether the acetylester and benzoylester groups are involved in aconitine-induced dynorphin A expression, anti-hypersensitivity, neurotoxicity in neuropathic rats. Intrathecal administration of aconitine and benzoylaconine (but not aconine) attenuated mechanical allodynia and heat hyperalgesia, with normalized ED50 values of 35 pmol and 3.6 nmol, respectively. Aconitine and benzoylaconine anti-allodynia was completely blocked by the microglial inhibitor, dynorphin A antiserum, and κ-opioid receptor antagonist. Aconitine and benzoylaconine, but not aconine, stimulated dynorphin A expression in cultured primary spinal microglia, with EC50 values of 32 nM and 3 μM, respectively. Intrathecal aconitine, benzoylaconine and aconine induced flaccid paralysis and death, with normalized TD50 values of 0.5 nmol, 0.2 μmol, and 1.6 μmol, respectively. The TD50/ED50 ratios of aconitine and benzolyaconine were 14:1 and 56:1. Our results suggest that both the C8-acetyl and C14-benzoyl groups are essential for aconitine to stimulate spinal microglial dynorphin A expression and subsequent anti-hypersensitivity, which can be separated from neurotoxicity, because both benzoylaconine and aconine differentially produced anti-hypersensitivity and neurotoxicity due to their different stimulatory ability on dynorphin A expression. Our results support the scientific rationale for Aconitum processing, but caution should be taken to

  14. Cold-inducible RNA-binding protein mediates cold air inducible airway mucin production through TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lingxiu; Ran, Danhua; Xie, Wenyue; Xu, Qing; Zhou, Xiangdong

    2016-10-01

    Mucus overproduction is an important feature in patients with chronic inflammatory airway diseases and cold air stimulation has been shown to be associated with the severity of these diseases. However, the regulatory mechanisms that mediate excessive mucin production under cold stress remain elusive. Recently, the cold-inducible RNA-binding protein (CIRP) has been shown to be markedly induced after exposure to cold air. In this study, we sought to explore the expression of CIRP within bronchial biopsy specimens, the effect on mucin5AC (MUC5AC) production in chronic inflammatory airway diseases and the potential signaling pathways involved in cold air stimulation process. We found that CIRP protein expression was significantly increased in patients with COPD and in mice treated with cold air. Moreover, cold air stimulation induced MUC5AC expression in wild-type mice but not in CIRP(-/-) mice. In vitro, cold air stress significantly elevated the transcriptional and protein expression levels of MUC5AC in human bronchial epithelial cells. CIRP, toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and phosphorylated NF-κB p65 (p-p65) increased significantly in response to cold stress and CIRP siRNA, TLR4 - neutralizing Ab and a specific inhibitor of NF-κB could attenuated cold stress inducible MUC5AC expression. In addition, CIRP siRNA could hindered the expression levels of TLR4 and p-p65 both induced by cold stress. Taken together, these results suggest that airway epithelial cells constitutively express CIRP in vitro and in vivo. CIRP is responsible for cold-inducible MUC5AC expression by activating TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:27423012

  15. Cold-inducible RNA-binding protein mediates cold air inducible airway mucin production through TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lingxiu; Ran, Danhua; Xie, Wenyue; Xu, Qing; Zhou, Xiangdong

    2016-10-01

    Mucus overproduction is an important feature in patients with chronic inflammatory airway diseases and cold air stimulation has been shown to be associated with the severity of these diseases. However, the regulatory mechanisms that mediate excessive mucin production under cold stress remain elusive. Recently, the cold-inducible RNA-binding protein (CIRP) has been shown to be markedly induced after exposure to cold air. In this study, we sought to explore the expression of CIRP within bronchial biopsy specimens, the effect on mucin5AC (MUC5AC) production in chronic inflammatory airway diseases and the potential signaling pathways involved in cold air stimulation process. We found that CIRP protein expression was significantly increased in patients with COPD and in mice treated with cold air. Moreover, cold air stimulation induced MUC5AC expression in wild-type mice but not in CIRP(-/-) mice. In vitro, cold air stress significantly elevated the transcriptional and protein expression levels of MUC5AC in human bronchial epithelial cells. CIRP, toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and phosphorylated NF-κB p65 (p-p65) increased significantly in response to cold stress and CIRP siRNA, TLR4 - neutralizing Ab and a specific inhibitor of NF-κB could attenuated cold stress inducible MUC5AC expression. In addition, CIRP siRNA could hindered the expression levels of TLR4 and p-p65 both induced by cold stress. Taken together, these results suggest that airway epithelial cells constitutively express CIRP in vitro and in vivo. CIRP is responsible for cold-inducible MUC5AC expression by activating TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway.

  16. Spinal Actions of Lipoxin A4 and 17(R)-Resolvin D1 Attenuate Inflammation-Induced Mechanical Hypersensitivity and Spinal TNF Release

    PubMed Central

    Abdelmoaty, Sally; Wigerblad, Gustaf; Bas, Duygu B.; Codeluppi, Simone; Fernandez-Zafra, Teresa; El-Awady, El-Sayed; Moustafa, Yasser; Abdelhamid, Alaa El-din S.; Brodin, Ernst; Svensson, Camilla I.

    2013-01-01

    Lipoxins and resolvins have anti-inflammatory and pro-resolving actions and accumulating evidence indicates that these lipid mediators also attenuate pain-like behavior in a number of experimental models of inflammation and tissue injury-induced pain. The present study was undertaken to assess if spinal administration of lipoxin A4 (LXA4) or 17 (R)-resolvin D1 (17(R)-RvD1) attenuates mechanical hypersensitivity in the carrageenan model of peripheral inflammation in the rat. Given the emerging role of spinal cytokines in the generation and maintenance of inflammatory pain we measured cytokine levels in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) after LXA4 or 17(R)-RvD1 administration, and the ability of these lipid metabolites to prevent stimuli-induced release of cytokines from cultured primary spinal astrocytes. We found that intrathecal bolus injection of LXA4 and17(R)-RvD1 attenuated inflammation-induced mechanical hypersensitivity without reducing the local inflammation. Furthermore, both LXA4 and 17(R)-RvD1 reduced carrageenan-induced tumor necrosis factor (TNF) release in the CSF, while only 17(R)-RvD1attenuated LPS and IFN-γ-induced TNF release in astrocyte cell culture. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that lipoxins and resolvins potently suppress inflammation-induced mechanical hypersensitivity, possibly by attenuating cytokine release from spinal astrocytes. The inhibitory effect of lipoxins and resolvins on spinal nociceptive processing puts them in an intriguing position in the search for novel pain therapeutics. PMID:24086560

  17. Overexpression of pigeonpea stress-induced cold and drought regulatory gene (CcCDR) confers drought, salt, and cold tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Tamirisa, Srinath; Vudem, Dashavantha Reddy; Khareedu, Venkateswara Rao

    2014-09-01

    A potent cold and drought regulatory protein-encoding gene (CcCDR) was isolated from the subtractive cDNA library of pigeonpea plants subjected to drought stress. CcCDR was induced by different abiotic stress conditions in pigeonpea. Overexpression of CcCDR in Arabidopsis thaliana imparted enhanced tolerance against major abiotic stresses, namely drought, salinity, and low temperature, as evidenced by increased biomass, root length, and chlorophyll content. Transgenic plants also showed increased levels of antioxidant enzymes, proline, and reducing sugars under stress conditions. Furthermore, CcCDR-transgenic plants showed enhanced relative water content, osmotic potential, and cell membrane stability, as well as hypersensitivity to abscisic acid (ABA) as compared with control plants. Localization studies confirmed that CcCDR could enter the nucleus, as revealed by intense fluorescence, indicating its possible interaction with various nuclear proteins. Microarray analysis revealed that 1780 genes were up-regulated in CcCDR-transgenics compared with wild-type plants. Real-time PCR analysis on selected stress-responsive genes, involved in ABA-dependent and -independent signalling networks, revealed higher expression levels in transgenic plants, suggesting that CcCDR acts upstream of these genes. The overall results demonstrate the explicit role of CcCDR in conferring multiple abiotic stress tolerance at the whole-plant level. The multifunctional CcCDR seems promising as a prime candidate gene for enhancing abiotic stress tolerance in diverse plants. PMID:24868035

  18. Overexpression of pigeonpea stress-induced cold and drought regulatory gene (CcCDR) confers drought, salt, and cold tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Tamirisa, Srinath; Vudem, Dashavantha Reddy; Khareedu, Venkateswara Rao

    2014-09-01

    A potent cold and drought regulatory protein-encoding gene (CcCDR) was isolated from the subtractive cDNA library of pigeonpea plants subjected to drought stress. CcCDR was induced by different abiotic stress conditions in pigeonpea. Overexpression of CcCDR in Arabidopsis thaliana imparted enhanced tolerance against major abiotic stresses, namely drought, salinity, and low temperature, as evidenced by increased biomass, root length, and chlorophyll content. Transgenic plants also showed increased levels of antioxidant enzymes, proline, and reducing sugars under stress conditions. Furthermore, CcCDR-transgenic plants showed enhanced relative water content, osmotic potential, and cell membrane stability, as well as hypersensitivity to abscisic acid (ABA) as compared with control plants. Localization studies confirmed that CcCDR could enter the nucleus, as revealed by intense fluorescence, indicating its possible interaction with various nuclear proteins. Microarray analysis revealed that 1780 genes were up-regulated in CcCDR-transgenics compared with wild-type plants. Real-time PCR analysis on selected stress-responsive genes, involved in ABA-dependent and -independent signalling networks, revealed higher expression levels in transgenic plants, suggesting that CcCDR acts upstream of these genes. The overall results demonstrate the explicit role of CcCDR in conferring multiple abiotic stress tolerance at the whole-plant level. The multifunctional CcCDR seems promising as a prime candidate gene for enhancing abiotic stress tolerance in diverse plants.

  19. In Vivo Expansion of Endogenous Regulatory T Cell Populations Induces Long-Term Suppression of Contact Hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    El Beidaq, Asmaa; Link, Christopher W M; Hofmann, Katharina; Frehse, Britta; Hartmann, Karin; Bieber, Katja; Martin, Stefan F; Ludwig, Ralf J; Manz, Rudolf A

    2016-09-01

    Contact hypersensitivity (CHS) of murine skin serves as a model of allergic contact dermatitis. Hapten-specific CD8 T cells and neutrophils represent the major effector cells driving this inflammatory reaction whereas Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) control the severity of inflammation. However, whether in vivo expansion of endogenous Tregs can downregulate CHS-mediated inflammation remains to be elucidated. In this study, we addressed this issue by using injection of an IL-2/anti-IL-2 mAb JES6-1 complex (IL-2/JES6-1) as a means of Treg induction in 2,4,6-trinitrochlorobenzene-induced CHS. IL-2/JES6-1 injection before or after hapten sensitization led to a considerable reduction of skin inflammation, even when rechallenged up to 3 wk after the last treatment. Conversely, Treg depletion re-established the CHS response in IL-2/JES6-1-treated mice. IL-2/JES6-1 injection resulted in increased frequencies of natural and peripheral Tregs in spleen and draining lymph nodes (LNs), elevated IL-10 and TGF-β production by CD4 T cells, reduced CD86 expression by dendritic cells, and led to lower numbers of hapten-specific IFN-γ-producing CD8 T effector cells in LNs. Neutrophil and CD8 T cell infiltration was reduced in inflamed ear tissue, whereas CTLA-4(+)Foxp3(+) Treg frequencies were augmented. Adoptive transfer of LN cells of sensitized mice into recipients treated with IL-2/JES6-1 showed impaired CHS. Our results show that in vivo Treg expansion results in a prolonged CHS suppression, a sustained reduction of hapten-specific CD8 T cells, and a decrease in effector cell influx in inflamed tissue. PMID:27439515

  20. Dopaminergic inhibition by G9a/Glp complex on tyrosine hydroxylase in nerve injury-induced hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Nan; Shen, Xiaofeng; Bao, Senzhu; Feng, Shan-Wu; Wang, Wei; Liu, Yusheng; Wang, Yiquan; Wang, Xian; Guo, Xirong; Shen, Rong; Wu, Haibo; Lei, Liming; Wang, Fuzhou

    2016-01-01

    The neural balance between facilitation and inhibition determines the final tendency of central sensitization. Nerve injury-induced hypersensitivity was considered as the results from the enhanced ascending facilitation and the diminished descending inhibition. The role of dopaminergic transmission in the descending inhibition has been well documented, but its underlying molecular mechanisms are unclear. Previous studies demonstrated that the lysine dimethyltransferase G9a/G9a-like protein (Glp) complex plays a critical role in cocaine-induced central plasticity, and given cocaine’s role in the nerve system is relied on its function on dopamine system, we herein proposed that the reduced inhibition of dopaminergic transmission was from the downregulation of tyrosine hydroxylase expression by G9a/Glp complex through methylating its gene Th. After approval by the Animal Care and Use Committee, C57BL/6 mice were used for pain behavior using von Frey after spared nerve injury, and Th CpG islands methylation was measured using bisulfite sequencing at different nerve areas. The inhibitor of G9a/Glp, BIX 01294, was administered intraventricularly daily with bolus injection. The protein levels of G9a, Glp, and tyrosine hydroxylase were measured with immunoblotting. Dopamine levels were detected using high-performance liquid chromatography. The expression of G9a but not Glp was upregulated in ventral tegmental area at post-injury day 4 till day 49 (the last day of the behavioral test). Correspondingly, the Th CpG methylation is increased, but the tyrosine hydroxylase expression was downregulated and the dopamine level was decreased. After the intracerebroventriclar injection of BIX 01294 since the post-injury days 7 and 14 for consecutive three days, three weeks, and six weeks, the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase was upregulated with a significant decrease in Th methylation and increase in dopamine level. Moreover, the pain after G9a/Glp inhibitor was attenuated

  1. Dopaminergic inhibition by G9a/Glp complex on tyrosine hydroxylase in nerve injury-induced hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Nan; Shen, Xiaofeng; Bao, Senzhu; Feng, Shan-Wu; Wang, Wei; Liu, Yusheng; Wang, Yiquan; Wang, Xian; Guo, Xirong; Shen, Rong; Wu, Haibo; Lei, Liming; Xu, Shiqin; Wang, Fuzhou

    2016-01-01

    The neural balance between facilitation and inhibition determines the final tendency of central sensitization. Nerve injury-induced hypersensitivity was considered as the results from the enhanced ascending facilitation and the diminished descending inhibition. The role of dopaminergic transmission in the descending inhibition has been well documented, but its underlying molecular mechanisms are unclear. Previous studies demonstrated that the lysine dimethyltransferase G9a/G9a-like protein (Glp) complex plays a critical role in cocaine-induced central plasticity, and given cocaine's role in the nerve system is relied on its function on dopamine system, we herein proposed that the reduced inhibition of dopaminergic transmission was from the downregulation of tyrosine hydroxylase expression by G9a/Glp complex through methylating its gene Th After approval by the Animal Care and Use Committee, C57BL/6 mice were used for pain behavior using von Frey after spared nerve injury, and Th CpG islands methylation was measured using bisulfite sequencing at different nerve areas. The inhibitor of G9a/Glp, BIX 01294, was administered intraventricularly daily with bolus injection. The protein levels of G9a, Glp, and tyrosine hydroxylase were measured with immunoblotting. Dopamine levels were detected using high-performance liquid chromatography. The expression of G9a but not Glp was upregulated in ventral tegmental area at post-injury day 4 till day 49 (the last day of the behavioral test). Correspondingly, the Th CpG methylation is increased, but the tyrosine hydroxylase expression was downregulated and the dopamine level was decreased. After the intracerebroventriclar injection of BIX 01294 since the post-injury days 7 and 14 for consecutive three days, three weeks, and six weeks, the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase was upregulated with a significant decrease in Th methylation and increase in dopamine level. Moreover, the pain after G9a/Glp inhibitor was attenuated

  2. Effects of Schisandra chinensis extracts on cough and pulmonary inflammation in a cough hypersensitivity guinea pig model induced by cigarette smoke exposure.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Shan; Nie, Yi-chu; Gan, Zhen-yong; Liu, Xiao-dong; Fang, Zhang-fu; Zhong, Bo-nian; Tian, Jin; Huang, Chu-qin; Lai, Ke-fang; Zhong, Nan-shan

    2015-05-13

    Schisandra chinensis (S. chinensis) is a traditional Chinese medicine commonly used in prescription medications for the treatment of chronic cough. However, the material basis of S. chinensis in relieving cough has not been completely elucidated yet. This study established a guinea pig model of cough hypersensitivity induced by 14 days of cigarette smoke (CS) exposure, to evaluate the antitussive, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory effects of three S. chinensis extracts. And then the function of four lignans in reducing expression of TRPV1 and TRPA1 was examined using A549 cells induced by cigarette smoke extract (CSE). The results demonstrated that both ethanol extract (EE) and ethanol-water extract (EWE) of S. chinensis, but not water extract (WE), significantly reduced the cough frequency enhanced by 0.4M citric acid solution in these cough hypersensitivity guinea pigs. Meanwhile, pretreatment with EE and EWE both significantly attenuated the CS-induced increase in infiltration of pulmonary neutrophils and total inflammatory cells, as well as pulmonary MDA, TNF-α, and IL-8, while remarkably increased activities of pulmonary SOD and GSH. According to H&E and immunofluorescence staining assays, airway epithelium hyperplasia, smooth muscle thickening, inflammatory cells infiltration, as well as expression of TRPV1 and TRPA1, were significantly attenuated in animals pretreatment with 1g/kg EE. Moreover, four lignans of EE, including schizandrin, schisantherin A, deoxyschizandrin and γ-schisandrin, significantly inhibited CSE-induced expression of TRPV1, TRPA1 and NOS3, as well as NO release in A549 cells. In conclusion, S. chinensis reduces cough frequency and pulmonary inflammation in the CS-induced cough hypersensitivity guinea pigs. Lignans may be the active components.

  3. Hypersensitivity to pain in congenital blindness.

    PubMed

    Slimani, Hocine; Danti, Sabrina; Ricciardi, Emiliano; Pietrini, Pietro; Ptito, Maurice; Kupers, Ron

    2013-10-01

    Vision is important for avoiding encounters with objects in the environment that may imperil physical integrity. We tested whether, in the absence of vision, a lower pain threshold would arise from an adaptive shift to other sensory channels. We therefore measured heat and cold pain thresholds and responses to suprathreshold heat stimuli in 2 groups of congenitally blind and matched normal-sighted participants. We also assessed detection thresholds for innocuous warmth and cold, and participants' attitude toward painful encounters in daily life. Our results show that, compared to sighted subjects, congenitally blind subjects have lower heat pain thresholds, rate suprathreshold heat pain stimuli as more painful, and have increased sensitivity for cold pain stimuli. Thresholds for nonpainful thermal stimulation did not differ between groups. The results of the pain questionnaires further indicated that blind subjects are more attentive to signals of external threats. These findings indicate that the absence of vision from birth induces a hypersensitivity to painful stimuli, lending new support to a model of sensory integration of vision and pain processing. PMID:24040972

  4. Reduced sleep, stress responsivity, and female sex contribute to persistent inflammation-induced mechanical hypersensitivity in rats.

    PubMed

    Page, Gayle G; Opp, Mark R; Kozachik, Sharon L

    2014-08-01

    Studies in humans suggest that female sex, reduced sleep opportunities and biological stress responsivity increase risk for developing persistent pain conditions. To investigate the relative contribution of these three factors to persistent pain, we employed the Sciatic Inflammatory Neuritis (SIN) model of repeated left sciatic perineurial exposures to zymosan, an inflammatory stimulus, to determine their impact upon the development of persistent mechanical hypersensitivity. Following an initial moderate insult, a very low zymosan dose was infused daily for eight days to model a sub-threshold inflammatory perturbation to which only susceptible animals would manifest or maintain mechanical hypersensitivity. Using Sprague Dawley rats, maintaining wakefulness throughout the first one-half of the 12-h light phase resulted in a bilateral reduction in paw withdrawal thresholds (PWTs); zymosan infusion reduced ipsilateral PWTs in all animals and contralateral PWTs only in females. This sex difference was validated in Fischer 344, Lewis and Sprague Dawley rats, suggesting that females are the more susceptible phenotype for both local and centrally driven responses to repeated low-level inflammatory perturbations. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis hyporesponsive Lewis rats exhibited the most robust development of mechanical hypersensitivity and HPA axis hyperresponsive Fischer 344 rats matched the Lewis rats' mechanical hypersensitivity throughout the latter four days of the protocol. If HPA axis phenotype does indeed influence these findings, the more balanced responsivity of Sprague Dawley rats would seem to promote resilience in this paradigm. Taken together, these findings are consistent with what is known regarding persistent pain development in humans.

  5. Intrathecal administration of a gap junction decoupler, an inhibitor of Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) cotransporter 1, or a GABA(A) receptor agonist attenuates mechanical pain hypersensitivity induced by REM sleep deprivation in the rat.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hong; Hao, Bin; Huang, Jin-Lu; Ma, Ai-Niu; Li, Xin-Yan; Wang, Yong-Xiang; Pertovaara, Antti

    2010-12-01

    We studied the hypothesis that some of the spinal mechanisms that are involved in neuropathic hypersensitivity play a role in hypersensitivity induced by REM sleep deprivation (REMSD). Rats with a chronic intrathecal (i.t.) catheter had REMSD of 48h duration that induced hypersensitivity to mechanical stimulation. After REMSD, the animals were treated i.t. with carbenoxolone (a gap junction decoupler), bumetanide (a blocker of Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) cotransporter 1 or NKCC1), muscimol (a GABA(A) receptor agonist), or pretreated intraperitoneally with minocycline (an inhibitor of microglia activation). Previously, all these treatments attenuated neuropathic hypersensitivity. Following REMSD, carbenoxolone, bumetanide and muscimol had a strong antihypersensitivity effect, whereas pretreatment with minocycline failed to prevent development of hypersensitivity. The results suggest that among spinal pain facilitatory mechanisms that are common to REMSD and neuropathy are NKCC1 blocker- and gap junction decoupler-reversible mechanisms. Moreover, there is a net pain inhibitory effect by spinal administration of an exogenous GABA(A) receptor agonist following REMSD as shown earlier in neuropathy. In contrast, activation of spinal microglia may not be as important for the development of hypersensitivity induced by REMSD as following nerve injury.

  6. Apoptosis in vascular cells induced by cold atmospheric plasma treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sladek, Raymond; Stoffels, Eva

    2006-10-01

    Apoptosis is a natural mechanism of cellular self-destruction. It can be triggered by moderate, yet irreversible damage. Apoptosis plays a major role in tissue renewal. Artificial apoptosis induction will become a novel therapy that meets all requirements for tissue-saving surgery. Diseased tissues can disappear without inflammation and scarring. This is particularly important in treatment of blockages in body tracts (e.g. cardiovascular diseases). Artificial induction of apoptosis can be achieved by means of cold plasma treatment. In this work an atmospheric micro-plasma operated in helium/air has been used to induce apoptosis in vascular cells. Parametric studies of apoptosis induction have been conducted; the efficiency is almost 100%. The apoptotic factors are ROS/RNS (reactive oxygen and nitrogen species). Their densities in the plasma have been measured by mass spectrometry. For apoptosis induction, RNS seem to be more important than ROS, because of their relative abundance. Moreover, addition of a ROS scavenger (ascorbic acid) to the cell culture medium does not reduce the occurrence of apoptosis. Cold plasma is a very efficient tool for fundamental studies of apoptosis, and later, for controlled tissue removal in vivo.

  7. Helium-cold induced hypothermia in the white rat.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musacchia, X. J.; Jacobs, M.

    1973-01-01

    Hypothermia was induced in white rats by exposing them to low ambient temperatures (about 0 C) and a gaseous atmosphere of 80% helium and 20% oxygen (helox). Biological survival, in which revival from hypothermia to normothermia is achieved, and clinical survival, in which one or more functional attributes are monitored in the hypothermic animal until it dies, are examined. The helium-cold method appears to produce a hypothermic state in the rat quite similar to that resulting from such techniques as ice water immersion or hypercapnia + hypoxia. There is a direct relationship between body weight and percent survival. Despite the fact that they require a longer period to become hypothermic, the heavier animals are better able to survive.

  8. Cold/menthol TRPM8 receptors initiate the cold-shock response and protect germ cells from cold-shock-induced oxidation.

    PubMed

    Borowiec, Anne-Sophie; Sion, Benoit; Chalmel, Frédéric; D Rolland, Antoine; Lemonnier, Loïc; De Clerck, Tatiana; Bokhobza, Alexandre; Derouiche, Sandra; Dewailly, Etienne; Slomianny, Christian; Mauduit, Claire; Benahmed, Mohamed; Roudbaraki, Morad; Jégou, Bernard; Prevarskaya, Natalia; Bidaux, Gabriel

    2016-09-01

    Testes of most male mammals present the particularity of being externalized from the body and are consequently slightly cooler than core body temperature (4-8°C below). Although, hypothermia of the testis is known to increase germ cells apoptosis, little is known about the underlying molecular mechanisms, including cold sensors, transduction pathways, and apoptosis triggers. In this study, using a functional knockout mouse model of the cold and menthol receptors, dubbed transient receptor potential melastatine 8 (TRPM8) channels, we found that TRPM8 initiated the cold-shock response by differentially modulating cold- and heat-shock proteins. Besides, apoptosis of germ cells increased in proportion to the cooling level in control mice but was independent of temperature in knockout mice. We also observed that the rate of germ cell death correlated positively with the reactive oxygen species level and negatively with the expression of the detoxifying enzymes. This result suggests that the TRPM8 sensor is a key determinant of germ cell fate under hypothermic stimulation.-Borowiec, A.-S., Sion, B., Chalmel, F., Rolland, A. D., Lemonnier, L., De Clerck, T., Bokhobza, A., Derouiche, S., Dewailly, E., Slomianny, C., Mauduit, C., Benahmed, M., Roudbaraki, M., Jégou, B., Prevarskaya, N., Bidaux, G. Cold/menthol TRPM8 receptors initiate the cold-shock response and protect germ cells from cold-shock-induced oxidation. PMID:27317670

  9. Cold/menthol TRPM8 receptors initiate the cold-shock response and protect germ cells from cold-shock–induced oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Borowiec, Anne-Sophie; Sion, Benoit; Chalmel, Frédéric; D. Rolland, Antoine; Lemonnier, Loïc; De Clerck, Tatiana; Bokhobza, Alexandre; Derouiche, Sandra; Dewailly, Etienne; Slomianny, Christian; Mauduit, Claire; Benahmed, Mohamed; Roudbaraki, Morad; Jégou, Bernard; Prevarskaya, Natalia; Bidaux, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    Testes of most male mammals present the particularity of being externalized from the body and are consequently slightly cooler than core body temperature (4–8°C below). Although, hypothermia of the testis is known to increase germ cells apoptosis, little is known about the underlying molecular mechanisms, including cold sensors, transduction pathways, and apoptosis triggers. In this study, using a functional knockout mouse model of the cold and menthol receptors, dubbed transient receptor potential melastatine 8 (TRPM8) channels, we found that TRPM8 initiated the cold-shock response by differentially modulating cold- and heat-shock proteins. Besides, apoptosis of germ cells increased in proportion to the cooling level in control mice but was independent of temperature in knockout mice. We also observed that the rate of germ cell death correlated positively with the reactive oxygen species level and negatively with the expression of the detoxifying enzymes. This result suggests that the TRPM8 sensor is a key determinant of germ cell fate under hypothermic stimulation.—Borowiec, A.-S., Sion, B., Chalmel, F., Rolland, A. D., Lemonnier, L., De Clerck, T., Bokhobza, A., Derouiche, S., Dewailly, E., Slomianny, C., Mauduit, C., Benahmed, M., Roudbaraki, M., Jégou, B., Prevarskaya, N., Bidaux, G. Cold/menthol TRPM8 receptors initiate the cold-shock response and protect germ cells from cold-shock–induced oxidation. PMID:27317670

  10. Intermixing in Cu/Ni multilayers induced by cold rolling

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Z.; Perepezko, J. H.; Larson, D.; Reinhard, D.

    2015-04-28

    Repeated cold rolling was performed on multilayers of Cu60/Ni40 and Cu40/Ni60 foil arrays to study the details of driven atomic scale interfacial mixing. With increasing deformation, there is a significant layer refinement down to the nm level that leads to the formation of a solid solution phase from the elemental end members. Intriguingly, the composition of the solid solution is revealed by an oscillation in the composition profile across the multilayers, which is different from the smoothly varying profile due to thermally activated diffusion. During the reaction, Cu mixed into Ni preferentially compared to Ni mixing into Cu, which is also in contrast to the thermal diffusion behavior. This is confirmed by observations from X-ray diffraction, electron energy loss spectrum and atom probe tomography. The diffusion coefficient induced by cold rolling is estimated as 1.7 × 10{sup −17} m{sup 2}/s, which cannot be attributed to any thermal effect. The effective temperature due to the deformation induced mixing is estimated as 1093 K and an intrinsic diffusivity d{sub b}, which quantifies the tendency towards equilibrium in the absence of thermal diffusion, is estimated as 6.38 × 10{sup −18} m{sup 2}/s. The fraction of the solid solution phase formed is illustrated by examining the layer thickness distribution and is described by using an error function representation. The evolution of mixing in the solid solution phase is described by a simplified sinusoid model, in which the amplitude decays with increased deformation level. The promoted diffusion coefficient could be related to the effective temperature concept, but the establishment of an oscillation in the composition profile is a characteristic behavior that develops due to deformation.

  11. Drug-Hypersensitivity Syndrome: Diagnosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hamm, Rose L.

    2012-01-01

    Drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome is a systemic autoimmune disorder that results in mucocutaneous symptoms ranging in severity from mild pruritus to life-threatening skin and mucosal loss, with different nomenclature depending on the severity of the symptoms. The purpose of this article is to review the recent advances in understanding the pathology of drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome, as well as current recommendations for both medical and wound management. PMID:24527369

  12. Cells Deficient in the Fanconi Anemia Protein FANCD2 are Hypersensitive to the Cytotoxicity and DNA Damage Induced by Coffee and Caffeic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Burgos-Morón, Estefanía; Calderón-Montaño, José Manuel; Orta, Manuel Luis; Guillén-Mancina, Emilio; Mateos, Santiago; López-Lázaro, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have found a positive association between coffee consumption and a lower risk of cardiovascular disorders, some cancers, diabetes, Parkinson and Alzheimer disease. Coffee consumption, however, has also been linked to an increased risk of developing some types of cancer, including bladder cancer in adults and leukemia in children of mothers who drink coffee during pregnancy. Since cancer is driven by the accumulation of DNA alterations, the ability of the coffee constituent caffeic acid to induce DNA damage in cells may play a role in the carcinogenic potential of this beverage. This carcinogenic potential may be exacerbated in cells with DNA repair defects. People with the genetic disease Fanconi Anemia have DNA repair deficiencies and are predisposed to several cancers, particularly acute myeloid leukemia. Defects in the DNA repair protein Fanconi Anemia D2 (FANCD2) also play an important role in the development of a variety of cancers (e.g., bladder cancer) in people without this genetic disease. This communication shows that cells deficient in FANCD2 are hypersensitive to the cytotoxicity (clonogenic assay) and DNA damage (γ-H2AX and 53BP1 focus assay) induced by caffeic acid and by a commercial lyophilized coffee extract. These data suggest that people with Fanconi Anemia, or healthy people who develop sporadic mutations in FANCD2, may be hypersensitive to the carcinogenic activity of coffee. PMID:27399778

  13. Cells Deficient in the Fanconi Anemia Protein FANCD2 are Hypersensitive to the Cytotoxicity and DNA Damage Induced by Coffee and Caffeic Acid.

    PubMed

    Burgos-Morón, Estefanía; Calderón-Montaño, José Manuel; Orta, Manuel Luis; Guillén-Mancina, Emilio; Mateos, Santiago; López-Lázaro, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have found a positive association between coffee consumption and a lower risk of cardiovascular disorders, some cancers, diabetes, Parkinson and Alzheimer disease. Coffee consumption, however, has also been linked to an increased risk of developing some types of cancer, including bladder cancer in adults and leukemia in children of mothers who drink coffee during pregnancy. Since cancer is driven by the accumulation of DNA alterations, the ability of the coffee constituent caffeic acid to induce DNA damage in cells may play a role in the carcinogenic potential of this beverage. This carcinogenic potential may be exacerbated in cells with DNA repair defects. People with the genetic disease Fanconi Anemia have DNA repair deficiencies and are predisposed to several cancers, particularly acute myeloid leukemia. Defects in the DNA repair protein Fanconi Anemia D2 (FANCD2) also play an important role in the development of a variety of cancers (e.g., bladder cancer) in people without this genetic disease. This communication shows that cells deficient in FANCD2 are hypersensitive to the cytotoxicity (clonogenic assay) and DNA damage (γ-H2AX and 53BP1 focus assay) induced by caffeic acid and by a commercial lyophilized coffee extract. These data suggest that people with Fanconi Anemia, or healthy people who develop sporadic mutations in FANCD2, may be hypersensitive to the carcinogenic activity of coffee. PMID:27399778

  14. The chemical mediation of delayed hypersensitivity skin reactions. I. Purification of a macrophage-chemotactic factor from bovien gamma-globulin-induced skin reactions in guinea pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Kambara, T.; Ueda, K.; Maeda, S.

    1977-01-01

    A macrophage-chemotactic factor (MCFS) was extracted in the pseudoglobulin fraction from delayed hypersensitivity skin lesions induced by bovine gamma-globulin in guinea pigs. Its chemotactic activity was estimated by a modification of Boyden's method using Nuclepore filter. After chromatography of the protein fraction using Sephadex G-50 and DEAE-cellulose, in that order, two chemotactic fractions were obtained. The chemotactic factor with stronger activity (MCFS-1) was further highly purified (488-fold) by chromatography on CM-Sephadex. This factor migrated in a single band on acrylamide disc gel electrophoresis and was found to be a protein that was free of nucleic acid. Gel filtration showed that its molecular weight was similar to that of IgG. Its chemotactic activity was heat labile. Intradermal injection of this factor into normal guinea pigs induced a pronounced mononuclear cell emigration from venules. These findings are pertinent to understanding macrophage reaction in the delayed hypersensitivity reactions. Am J Pathol 87:359-374, 1977). Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:66878

  15. STUDIES ON HYPERSENSITIVITY

    PubMed Central

    Gell, P. G. H.; Benacerraf, B.

    1961-01-01

    In earlier observations with the picryl system, it was concluded that contact sensitivity was a form of delayed (cellular) hypersensitivity to conjugates of sensitizer with autologous proteins indistinguishable in its immunological mechanism from other classical forms of delayed hypersensitivity to proteins. This conclusion has been confirmed and extended with the picryl and chlorbenzoyl chloride systems. 1. It is shown that to induce a state of contact sensitivity, the minimal necessary amounts of hapten are of the same order of magnitude, whether this hapten is conjugated with protein or the free reactive chemical itself. From this, it is evident that contamination of conjugates with small amounts of unreacted sensitizer plays no part in the induction of contact reactivity by the conjugate. With the dinitrophenyl system, no contact sensitivity could be induced by the conjugates used; possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed. 2. Animals sensitized to contact by homologous conjugate can be completely desensitized by injections of such a conjugate in large amount; a similar injection schedule has no effect on the contact sensitivity of animals sensitized with the free reactive sensitizer. 3. The capacity of heterologous (ovalbumin) conjugates to evoke anti-hapten antibodies is shown to be greater than that of homologous (guinea pig seralbumin) conjugates: the reverse is true of their capacity to induce delayed reactivity. 4. Evidence is brought forward to suggest that in animals sensitized with homologous albumin conjugates, the specificity of the delayed reaction involves more than the hapten alone, even though the carrier protein is non-antigenic on its own. The contrast with the apparent lesser specificity of the antibodies later produced is discussed. PMID:13704282

  16. Cold rolling induced alloying behaviors in metallic multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhe

    Phase transformation and atomic scale intermixing induced by deformation are important and fundamental issues in the mechanical alloying processes. Repeated cold rolling and folding experiments were performed on the metallic multilayers in order to study the deformation driven behaviors. Various binary systems such as isomorphous, eutectic and thermodynamically immiscible systems were studied. Moreover, monometallic Pd, Pt and Fe were selected in order to study the deformation driven recrystallization behavior. In Cu/Ni multilayers, the composition of the solid solution is revealed by an oscillation in the composition profile across the multilayers, which is different from the smoothly varying profile due to thermally activated diffusion. During the reaction, Cu mixed into Ni preferentially compared to Ni mixing into Cu, which is also in contrast to the thermal diffusion behavior. During the cold rolling of multilayers of Ni and V, deformation induces phase transformation and an interfacial mixing with suppression of nucleation of intermetallic phases. The results also demonstrate that between pure Ni and V layers a metastable fcc solid solution phase forms in Ni70V30, a metastable bcc solid solution phase forms in Ni30V70 and metastable fcc and bcc solid solution phases form in Ni57V43. Compared to the stored energy due to dislocation and interfaces, the excess chemical free energy from the interfacial mixing is the largest portion of total stored energy from deformation, which represents a form of mechanochemical transduction. The difference in the intermixing behaviors between Cu/Ni and Ni/V systems is due to that the systems have different heat of mixing and interface characters. Deformation of Cu/Fe multilayers yields a smooth and monotonic variation in the composition profile. From the local composition consumption it is revealed that that Fe mixes into Cu preferentially than Cu mixing into Fe. The room temperature deformation driven recrystallization was

  17. Virus-induced gene silencing reveals signal transduction components required for the Pvr9-mediated hypersensitive response in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Tran, Phu-Tri; Choi, Hoseong; Choi, Doil; Kim, Kook-Hyung

    2016-08-01

    Resistance to pathogens mediated by plant resistance (R) proteins requires different signaling transduction components and pathways. Our previous studies revealed that a potyvirus resistance gene in pepper, Pvr9, confers a hypersensitive response (HR) to pepper mottle virus in Nicotiana benthamiana. Our results show that the Pvr9-mediated HR against pepper mottle virus infection requires HSP90, SGT1, NDR1, but not EDS1. These results suggest that the Pvr9-mediated HR is possibly related to the SA pathway but not the ET, JA, ROS or NO pathways.

  18. Effect of the hot water extract of Artocarpus camansi leaves on 2,4,6-trinitrochlorobenzene (TNCB)-induced contact hypersensitivity in mice.

    PubMed

    Salonga, Reginald Bayani; Hisaka, Shinsuke; Nose, Mitsuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Medicinal plants with reported anti-inflammatory activity could have the potential use as anti-allergens and inhibitors of allergic contact dermatitis reactions produced by allergens and chemicals. Some species from the genus Artocarpus were reported to have anti-inflammatory activity. In the Philippines one local source is Artocarpus camansi BLANCO (Moraceae), which is utilized as an ingredient of their cuisine, and decoction of leaves is used for diabetes and baths of people with rheumatism. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of the hot water extract of A. camansi leaves on contact hypersensitivity (CHS) in mice. Contact hypersensitivity was induced using 2,4,6-trinitrochlorobenzene (TNCB). The results showed that the A. camansi hot water extract exhibited significant activity against the swelling produced during 24 h and 48 h post-challenge. The same responses were observed from the mice that received the kamansi ethanol-precipitate (KEP) and kamansi ethanol precipitate water-soluble (KEPWS) fractions. Since the high molecular mass fraction showed the significant activity, we therefore speculate that the compound responsible might be a polysaccharide and/or glycoprotein. In conclusion, our results suggest that the hot water extract of A. camansi leaves might be an effective natural product to treat allergic contact dermatitis. However, further investigations are required to understand the mechanisms involved.

  19. Effect of the hot water extract of Artocarpus camansi leaves on 2,4,6-trinitrochlorobenzene (TNCB)-induced contact hypersensitivity in mice.

    PubMed

    Salonga, Reginald Bayani; Hisaka, Shinsuke; Nose, Mitsuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Medicinal plants with reported anti-inflammatory activity could have the potential use as anti-allergens and inhibitors of allergic contact dermatitis reactions produced by allergens and chemicals. Some species from the genus Artocarpus were reported to have anti-inflammatory activity. In the Philippines one local source is Artocarpus camansi BLANCO (Moraceae), which is utilized as an ingredient of their cuisine, and decoction of leaves is used for diabetes and baths of people with rheumatism. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of the hot water extract of A. camansi leaves on contact hypersensitivity (CHS) in mice. Contact hypersensitivity was induced using 2,4,6-trinitrochlorobenzene (TNCB). The results showed that the A. camansi hot water extract exhibited significant activity against the swelling produced during 24 h and 48 h post-challenge. The same responses were observed from the mice that received the kamansi ethanol-precipitate (KEP) and kamansi ethanol precipitate water-soluble (KEPWS) fractions. Since the high molecular mass fraction showed the significant activity, we therefore speculate that the compound responsible might be a polysaccharide and/or glycoprotein. In conclusion, our results suggest that the hot water extract of A. camansi leaves might be an effective natural product to treat allergic contact dermatitis. However, further investigations are required to understand the mechanisms involved. PMID:24583870

  20. Cold and hunger induce diurnality in a nocturnal mammal.

    PubMed

    van der Vinne, Vincent; Riede, Sjaak J; Gorter, Jenke A; Eijer, Willem G; Sellix, Michael T; Menaker, Michael; Daan, Serge; Pilorz, Violetta; Hut, Roelof A

    2014-10-21

    The mammalian circadian system synchronizes daily timing of activity and rest with the environmental light-dark cycle. Although the underlying molecular oscillatory mechanism is well studied, factors that influence phenotypic plasticity in daily activity patterns (temporal niche switching, chronotype) are presently unknown. Molecular evidence suggests that metabolism may influence the circadian molecular clock, but evidence at the level of the organism is lacking. Here we show that a metabolic challenge by cold and hunger induces diurnality in otherwise nocturnal mice. Lowering ambient temperature changes the phase of circadian light-dark entrainment in mice by increasing daytime and decreasing nighttime activity. This effect is further enhanced by simulated food shortage, which identifies metabolic balance as the underlying common factor influencing circadian organization. Clock gene expression analysis shows that the underlying neuronal mechanism is downstream from or parallel to the main circadian pacemaker (the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus) and that the behavioral phenotype is accompanied by phase adjustment of peripheral tissues. These findings indicate that nocturnal mammals can display considerable plasticity in circadian organization and may adopt a diurnal phenotype when energetically challenged. Our previously defined circadian thermoenergetics hypothesis proposes that such circadian plasticity, which naturally occurs in nocturnal mammals, reflects adaptive maintenance of energy balance. Quantification of energy expenditure shows that diurnality under natural conditions reduces thermoregulatory costs in small burrowing mammals like mice. Metabolic feedback on circadian organization thus provides functional benefits by reducing energy expenditure. Our findings may help to clarify relationships between sleep-wake patterns and metabolic phenotypes in humans. PMID:25288753

  1. Cold and hunger induce diurnality in a nocturnal mammal.

    PubMed

    van der Vinne, Vincent; Riede, Sjaak J; Gorter, Jenke A; Eijer, Willem G; Sellix, Michael T; Menaker, Michael; Daan, Serge; Pilorz, Violetta; Hut, Roelof A

    2014-10-21

    The mammalian circadian system synchronizes daily timing of activity and rest with the environmental light-dark cycle. Although the underlying molecular oscillatory mechanism is well studied, factors that influence phenotypic plasticity in daily activity patterns (temporal niche switching, chronotype) are presently unknown. Molecular evidence suggests that metabolism may influence the circadian molecular clock, but evidence at the level of the organism is lacking. Here we show that a metabolic challenge by cold and hunger induces diurnality in otherwise nocturnal mice. Lowering ambient temperature changes the phase of circadian light-dark entrainment in mice by increasing daytime and decreasing nighttime activity. This effect is further enhanced by simulated food shortage, which identifies metabolic balance as the underlying common factor influencing circadian organization. Clock gene expression analysis shows that the underlying neuronal mechanism is downstream from or parallel to the main circadian pacemaker (the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus) and that the behavioral phenotype is accompanied by phase adjustment of peripheral tissues. These findings indicate that nocturnal mammals can display considerable plasticity in circadian organization and may adopt a diurnal phenotype when energetically challenged. Our previously defined circadian thermoenergetics hypothesis proposes that such circadian plasticity, which naturally occurs in nocturnal mammals, reflects adaptive maintenance of energy balance. Quantification of energy expenditure shows that diurnality under natural conditions reduces thermoregulatory costs in small burrowing mammals like mice. Metabolic feedback on circadian organization thus provides functional benefits by reducing energy expenditure. Our findings may help to clarify relationships between sleep-wake patterns and metabolic phenotypes in humans.

  2. Effects of repeated short-term cold exposures on cold induced thermogenesis of women

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silami-Garcia, E.; Haymes, E. M.

    1989-12-01

    The effects of repeated exposures to resting cold air (10°C) on the shivering and thermogenic responses of women to standard cold stress were investigated. Ten women, aged 18 to 34 years, were divided into two groups of five women each. One group, the acclimated (A) was exposed ten times within 2 weeks, the first and the last exposures being the pre-and post-tests respectively. The second group, the control (C) was exposed twice within 18 days. Measurements of rectal and skin temperatures, oxygen uptake, time to onset of shivering (TOS), and perceived cold were performed during all exposures. Shivering responses were evaluated by electromyography and visually. A significant ( P<0.05), increase was seen in TOS (from 26.2 min to 55.6 min), and a significant decrease was seen in thermoregulatory heat production (from 14.78 kcal/h to -2.64 kcal/h) in group A; these changes were evident after about five exposures. It is concluded that the women became cold acclimated as a result of the repeated short-term resting cold air exposures.

  3. Wheat hypersensitive-induced reaction genes TaHIR1 and TaHIR3 are involved in response to stripe rust fungus infection and abiotic stresses.

    PubMed

    Duan, Yinghui; Guo, Jun; Shi, Xuexia; Guan, Xiangnan; Liu, Furong; Bai, Pengfei; Huang, Lili; Kang, Zhensheng

    2013-02-01

    KEY MESSAGE : TaHIR1 and TaHIR3 play positive roles in resistance to the stripe rust fungus via inducing HR and regulating defense-related genes, but are negatively regulated by various abiotic stimuli. Plant hypersensitive-induced reaction (HIR) genes are known to be associated with the hypersensitive response and disease defense. In wheat, two HIR genes, TaHIR1 and TaHIR3, have been identified and found to be up-regulated after infection with the stripe rust fungus. Here, we further determined their roles in defense against abiotic stresses and the stripe rust pathogen, Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici. TaHIR1 and TaHIR3 proteins were localized in the plasma membrane of tobacco cells. The expression of TaHIR1 and TaHIR3 was reduced by the environmental stimuli, including low temperature, drought, and high salinity stresses. In addition, the expression of TaHIR1 and TaHIR3 was down-regulated by exogenously applied ethrel and abscisic acid, whereas expression was not affected by treatments with salicylic acid and methyl jasmonate. Furthermore, barley stripe mosaic virus-induced gene silencing of TaHIR1 and TaHIR3 reduced resistance in wheat cultivar Suwon11 against an avirulent stripe rust pathotype CYR23 and area of necrotic cells neighboring the infection sites, and altered the expression levels of defense-related genes. These results suggest that TaHIR1 and TaHIR3 function positively in the incompatible interaction of wheat-stripe rust fungus, but exhibit negative transcriptional response to abiotic stresses.

  4. Drug hypersensitivity reactions involving skin.

    PubMed

    Hausmann, Oliver; Schnyder, Benno; Pichler, Werner J

    2010-01-01

    Immune reactions to drugs can cause a variety of diseases involving the skin, liver, kidney, lungs, and other organs. Beside immediate, IgE-mediated reactions of varying degrees (urticaria to anaphylactic shock), many drug hypersensitivity reactions appear delayed, namely hours to days after starting drug treatment, showing a variety of clinical manifestations from solely skin involvement to fulminant systemic diseases which may be fatal. Immunohistochemical and functional studies of drug-specific T cells in patients with delayed reactions confirmed a predominant role for T cells in the onset and maintenance of immune-mediated delayed drug hypersensitivity reactions (type IV reactions). In these reactions, drug-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells are stimulated by drugs through their T cell receptors (TCR). Drugs can stimulate T cells in two ways: they can act as haptens and bind covalently to larger protein structures (hapten-carrier model), inducing a specific immune response. In addition, they may accidentally bind in a labile, noncovalent way to a particular TCR of the whole TCR repertoire and possibly also major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-molecules - similar to their pharmacologic action. This seems to be sufficient to reactivate certain, probably in vivo preactivated T cells, if an additional interaction of the drug-stimulated TCR with MHC molecules occurs. The mechanism was named pharmacological interaction of a drug with (immune) receptor and thus termed the p-i concept. This new concept may explain the frequent skin symptoms in drug hypersensitivity to oral or parenteral drugs. Furthermore, the various clinical manifestations of T cell-mediated drug hypersensitivity may be explained by distinct T cell functions leading to different clinical phenotypes. These data allowed a subclassification of the delayed hypersensitivity reactions (type IV) into T cell reactions which, by releasing certain cytokines and chemokines, preferentially activate and recruit

  5. Frequent Extreme Cold Exposure and Brown Fat and Cold-Induced Thermogenesis: A Study in a Monozygotic Twin

    PubMed Central

    Vosselman, Maarten J.; Vijgen, Guy H. E. J.; Kingma, Boris R. M.; Brans, Boudewijn; van Marken Lichtenbelt, Wouter D.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Mild cold acclimation is known to increase brown adipose tissue (BAT) activity and cold-induced thermogenesis (CIT) in humans. We here tested the effect of a lifestyle with frequent exposure to extreme cold on BAT and CIT in a Dutch man known as ‘the Iceman’, who has multiple world records in withstanding extreme cold challenges. Furthermore, his monozygotic twin brother who has a ‘normal’ sedentary lifestyle without extreme cold exposures was measured. Methods The Iceman (subject A) and his brother (subject B) were studied during mild cold (13°C) and thermoneutral conditions (31°C). Measurements included BAT activity and respiratory muscle activity by [18F]FDG-PET/CT imaging and energy expenditure through indirect calorimetry. In addition, body temperatures, cardiovascular parameters, skin perfusion, and thermal sensation and comfort were measured. Finally, we determined polymorphisms for uncoupling protein-1 and β3-adrenergic receptor. Results Subjects had comparable BAT activity (A: 1144 SUVtotal and B: 1325 SUVtotal), within the range previously observed in young adult men. They were genotyped with the polymorphism for uncoupling protein-1 (G/G). CIT was relatively high (A: 40.1% and B: 41.9%), but unlike during our previous cold exposure tests in young adult men, here both subjects practiced a g-Tummo like breathing technique, which involves vigorous respiratory muscle activity. This was confirmed by high [18F]FDG-uptake in respiratory muscle. Conclusion No significant differences were found between the two subjects, indicating that a lifestyle with frequent exposures to extreme cold does not seem to affect BAT activity and CIT. In both subjects, BAT was not higher compared to earlier observations, whereas CIT was very high, suggesting that g-Tummo like breathing during cold exposure may cause additional heat production by vigorous isometric respiratory muscle contraction. The results must be interpreted with caution given the low

  6. NADPH Oxidase-Derived ROS Induced by Chronic Intermittent Hypoxia Mediates Hypersensitivity of Lung Vagal C Fibers in Rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chang-Huan; Zhuang, Wei-Ling; Shen, Yan-Jhih; Lai, Ching Jung; Kou, Yu Ru

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), manifested by exposure to chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) and excess production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the airways, is associated with hyperreactive airway diseases. ROS, particularly when created by NADPH oxidase, are known to sensitize lung vagal C fibers (LVCFs), which may contribute to airway hypersensitivity pathogenesis. We investigated whether CIH augments the reflex and afferent responses of LVCFs to chemical stimulants and the roles of ROS and NADPH oxidase in such airway hypersensitivity. Rats were exposed to room air (RA) or CIH with/without daily treatment with MnTMPyP (a superoxide anion scavenger), apocynin (an NADPH oxidase inhibitor), or vehicle. At 16 h after their last exposure, intravenous capsaicin, adenosine, or α,β-methylene-ATP evoked an augmented apneic response in anesthetized rats with 14-days CIH exposure, compared to anesthetized rats with 14-days RA exposure. The augmented apneic responses to these LVCF stimulants were abolished by bilateral vagotomy or perivagal capsaicin treatment, which block LVCFs neural conduction and were significantly suppressed by treatment with MnTMPyP or apocynin, but not vehicle. Electrophysiological studies revealed that 14-days CIH exposure potentiated the responses of LVCFs to these stimulants. This effect was inhibited by treatment with MnTMPyP or apocynin treatment and was not seen in rats who received 7-days of CIH exposure. Biochemical analysis indicated that 14-days CIH exposure increased both lung lipid peroxidation, which is indicative of oxidative stress, and expression of the p47(phox) subunit in the membrane fraction of lung tissue, which is an index of NADPH oxidase activation. The former was prevented by treatment with either MnTMPyP or apocynin, while the later was prevented by treatment with apocynin only. These results suggest that 14-days CIH exposure sensitizes LVCFs in rats, leading to an exaggerated reflex and afferent responses to

  7. NADPH Oxidase-Derived ROS Induced by Chronic Intermittent Hypoxia Mediates Hypersensitivity of Lung Vagal C Fibers in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chang-Huan; Zhuang, Wei-Ling; Shen, Yan-Jhih; Lai, Ching Jung; Kou, Yu Ru

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), manifested by exposure to chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) and excess production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the airways, is associated with hyperreactive airway diseases. ROS, particularly when created by NADPH oxidase, are known to sensitize lung vagal C fibers (LVCFs), which may contribute to airway hypersensitivity pathogenesis. We investigated whether CIH augments the reflex and afferent responses of LVCFs to chemical stimulants and the roles of ROS and NADPH oxidase in such airway hypersensitivity. Rats were exposed to room air (RA) or CIH with/without daily treatment with MnTMPyP (a superoxide anion scavenger), apocynin (an NADPH oxidase inhibitor), or vehicle. At 16 h after their last exposure, intravenous capsaicin, adenosine, or α,β-methylene-ATP evoked an augmented apneic response in anesthetized rats with 14-days CIH exposure, compared to anesthetized rats with 14-days RA exposure. The augmented apneic responses to these LVCF stimulants were abolished by bilateral vagotomy or perivagal capsaicin treatment, which block LVCFs neural conduction and were significantly suppressed by treatment with MnTMPyP or apocynin, but not vehicle. Electrophysiological studies revealed that 14-days CIH exposure potentiated the responses of LVCFs to these stimulants. This effect was inhibited by treatment with MnTMPyP or apocynin treatment and was not seen in rats who received 7-days of CIH exposure. Biochemical analysis indicated that 14-days CIH exposure increased both lung lipid peroxidation, which is indicative of oxidative stress, and expression of the p47phox subunit in the membrane fraction of lung tissue, which is an index of NADPH oxidase activation. The former was prevented by treatment with either MnTMPyP or apocynin, while the later was prevented by treatment with apocynin only. These results suggest that 14-days CIH exposure sensitizes LVCFs in rats, leading to an exaggerated reflex and afferent responses to

  8. In vivo photoacoustic tomography of mouse cerebral edema induced by cold injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhun; Zhu, Quing; Wang, Lihong V.

    2011-06-01

    For the first time, we have implemented photoacoustic tomography (PAT) to image the water content of an edema in vivo. We produced and imaged a cold-induced cerebral edema transcranially, then obtained blood vessel and water accumulation images at 610 and 975 nm, respectively. We tracked the changes at 12, 24, and 36 h after the cold injury. The blood volume decreased after the cold injury, and the maximum area of edema was observed 24 h after the cold injury. We validated PAT of the water content of the edema through magnetic Resonance Imaging and the water spectrum from the spectrophotometric measurement.

  9. Cold stress aggravates inflammatory responses in an LPS-induced mouse model of acute lung injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, Su-Yeon; Park, Mi-Ju; Kim, Kyun-Ha; Choi, Hee-Jung; Chung, Tae-Wook; Kim, Yong Jin; Kim, Joung Hee; Kim, Keuk-Jun; Joo, Myungsoo; Ha, Ki-Tae

    2016-08-01

    Although the relationship between environmental cold temperature and susceptibility to respiratory infection is generally accepted, the effect of ambient cold temperature on host reactivity in lung inflammation has not been fully studied. To examine the function of ambient cold temperature on lung inflammation, mice were exposed to 4 °C for 8 h each day for 14 days. In the lungs of mice exposed to cold stress, inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and lung tissues were slightly increased by about twofold. However, the structures of pulmonary epithelial cells were kept within normal limits. Next, we examined the effect of cold stress on the inflammatory responses in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) mouse model. The infiltration of neutrophils and inflammation of lung tissue determined by histology were significantly increased by exposure to ambient cold temperature. In addition, the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines including interleukin (IL)-12, IL-17, and monokine induced by gamma interferon (MIG) was elevated by exposure to cold stress. Therefore, we suggest that cold stress is a factor that exacerbates lung inflammation including ALI. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the relationship between cold stress and severity of lung inflammation.

  10. Genotyping for Severe Drug Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Karlin, Eric; Phillips, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, there have been significant advances in our understanding of the immunopathogenesis and pharmacogenomics of severe immunologically-mediated adverse drug reactions. Such T-cell-mediated adverse drug reactions such as Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN), drug-induced liver disease (DILI) and other drug hypersensitivity syndromes have more recently been shown to be mediated through interactions with various class I and II HLA alleles. Key examples have included the associations of HLA-B*15:02 and carbamazepine induced SJS/TEN in Southeast Asian populations and HLA-B*57:01 and abacavir hypersensitivity. HLA-B*57:01 screening to prevent abacavir hypersensitivity exemplifies a successful translational roadmap from pharmacogenomic discovery through to widespread clinical implementation. Ultimately, our increased understanding of the interaction between drugs and the MHC could be used to inform drug design and drive pre-clinical toxicity programs to improve drug safety. PMID:24429903

  11. [Induced sputum supernatant prostaglandin E2 during oral aspirin challenge of asthmatic patients with and without aspirin hypersensitivity and healthy controls--pilot study].

    PubMed

    Ignacak, Maria; Celejewska-Wójcik, Natalia; Wójcik, Krzysztof; Sałapa, Kinga; Konduracka, Ewa; Sanak, Marek; Tyrak, Katarzyna; Sładek, Krzysztof; Musiał, Jacek; Mastalerz, Lucyna

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate changes in the concentration of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in induced sputum supernatant in 3 groups: sub- jects with NSAID-exacerbated respira- tory disease (NERD), aspirin tolerant asthma (ATA) and healthy controls (HC), before and after oral aspirin chal- lenge test. The study was conducted in the years 2014-2015 at the Clinical Department of the Pulmonology Clinic at the University Hospital in Cracow. 43 patients were enrolled in the study (NERD - n = 15, ATA - n = 15 and HC - n = 13). All of them underwent a placebo-controlled oral aspirin challenge. Sputum was induced 24 hours before the challenge and immediately after the test. Induced sputum was processed in order to obtain cystospin slides to depict inflammatory cell patterns and supernatants, in which PGE2 was measured. The concentration of PGE2 was determined using mass spectrometry coupled with gas chromatography (gas chromatography/mass spectrometry - GC/MS). After aspirin challenge, the concentration of PGE2 in induced sputum supernatant decreased in both asthmatics hypersensitive to aspirin (p = 0.01) and those who tolerated aspirin well (p = 0.17). The change in the healthy control group was not statistically significant. These results support the cyclooxygenase theory of PGE2 inhibition by aspirin. However, the mechanism of bronchoconstriction after aspirin administration alone in patients with NSAID-exacerbated respiratory disease remains unclear.

  12. [Induced sputum supernatant prostaglandin E2 during oral aspirin challenge of asthmatic patients with and without aspirin hypersensitivity and healthy controls--pilot study].

    PubMed

    Ignacak, Maria; Celejewska-Wójcik, Natalia; Wójcik, Krzysztof; Sałapa, Kinga; Konduracka, Ewa; Sanak, Marek; Tyrak, Katarzyna; Sładek, Krzysztof; Musiał, Jacek; Mastalerz, Lucyna

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate changes in the concentration of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in induced sputum supernatant in 3 groups: sub- jects with NSAID-exacerbated respira- tory disease (NERD), aspirin tolerant asthma (ATA) and healthy controls (HC), before and after oral aspirin chal- lenge test. The study was conducted in the years 2014-2015 at the Clinical Department of the Pulmonology Clinic at the University Hospital in Cracow. 43 patients were enrolled in the study (NERD - n = 15, ATA - n = 15 and HC - n = 13). All of them underwent a placebo-controlled oral aspirin challenge. Sputum was induced 24 hours before the challenge and immediately after the test. Induced sputum was processed in order to obtain cystospin slides to depict inflammatory cell patterns and supernatants, in which PGE2 was measured. The concentration of PGE2 was determined using mass spectrometry coupled with gas chromatography (gas chromatography/mass spectrometry - GC/MS). After aspirin challenge, the concentration of PGE2 in induced sputum supernatant decreased in both asthmatics hypersensitive to aspirin (p = 0.01) and those who tolerated aspirin well (p = 0.17). The change in the healthy control group was not statistically significant. These results support the cyclooxygenase theory of PGE2 inhibition by aspirin. However, the mechanism of bronchoconstriction after aspirin administration alone in patients with NSAID-exacerbated respiratory disease remains unclear. PMID:27197430

  13. [Evaluation of short-time premedication with d-chlorpheniramine maleate injection for paclitaxel-induced hypersensitivity reaction].

    PubMed

    Harada, Tomohiko; Doi, Masakazu; Yamada, Yasuhiko; Akase, Tomohide

    2008-08-01

    Paclitaxel(referred to hereinafter as PTX )is used in ovarian cancer, non-small cell lung cancer, breast cancer, gastric cancer, and endometrial cancer with positive treatment result reports. However, severe allergic reactions such as decreases in blood pressure and impaired breathing occur with relatively high frequency. For the prevention of such allergic reactions, administration of a premedication composed of the three components, dexamethasone sodium phosphate injection, diphenhydramine hydrochloride tablet, and ranitidine hydrochloride injection solution(or injectable famodine), is advised in the appended documentation. Administration is difficult because, among these three components, only diphenhydramine hydrochloride is administered orally and thus must be provided through the internal medicine department. Particularly when this combined dosage is administered as outpatient chemotherapy, the doctor must prescribe diphenhydramine hydrochloride tablets, and the patient must not forget to bring them on the day in which chemotherapy is administered. Also, checks by the medical staff such as pharmacists and nurses are required, complicating the administration of this therapy further. Taking this situation into consideration, our hospital uses a short-time premedication method wherein d-Chlorpheniramine Maleate injections are substituted for diphenhydramine hydrochloride tablets, and the time required for premedication is reduced to 15 minutes. This study investigated the allergic reaction ratio to consider the safety and usefulness of the short-time premedication method used at our hospital. The chemotherapy regimens conducted for the subject patients were 9 cases of PTX+CBDCA, 6 cases of biweekly- PTX, and 5 cases of weekly-PTX. A total of 67 PTX injections were given, 15 of them being first-time administrations. The ratio of allergic/hypersensitivity reactions was 10.0%(2 cases in 20). The short-time premedication method using d-Chlorpheniramine Maleate

  14. Cellular origins of cold-induced brown adipocytes in adult mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yun-Hee; Petkova, Anelia P.; Konkar, Anish A.; Granneman, James G.

    2015-01-01

    This work investigated how cold stress induces the appearance of brown adipocytes (BAs) in brown and white adipose tissues (WATs) of adult mice. In interscapular brown adipose tissue (iBAT), cold exposure increased proliferation of endothelial cells and interstitial cells expressing platelet-derived growth factor receptor, α polypeptide (PDGFRα) by 3- to 4-fold. Surprisingly, brown adipogenesis and angiogenesis were largely restricted to the dorsal edge of iBAT. Although cold stress did not increase proliferation in inguinal white adipose tissue (ingWAT), the percentage of BAs, defined as multilocular adipocytes that express uncoupling protein 1, rose from undetectable to 30% of total adipocytes. To trace the origins of cold-induced BAs, we genetically tagged PDGFRα+ cells and adipocytes prior to cold exposure, using Pdgfra-Cre recombinase estrogen receptor T2 fusion protein (CreERT2) and adiponectin-CreERT2, respectively. In iBAT, cold stress triggered the proliferation and differentiation of PDGFRα+ cells into BAs. In contrast, all newly observed BAs in ingWAT (5207 out of 5207) were derived from unilocular adipocytes tagged by adiponectin-CreERT2-mediated recombination. Surgical denervation of iBAT reduced cold-induced brown adipogenesis by >85%, whereas infusion of norepinephrine (NE) mimicked the effects of cold in warm-adapted mice. NE-induced de novo brown adipogenesis in iBAT was eliminated in mice lacking β1-adrenergic receptors. These observations identify a novel tissue niche for brown adipogenesis in iBAT and further define depot-specific mechanisms of BA recruitment.—Lee, Y.-H., Petkova, A. P., Konkar, A. A., Granneman, J. G. Cellular origins of cold-induced brown adipocytes in adult mice. PMID:25392270

  15. Treatment of dentin hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Trushkowsky, Richard D; Oquendo, Anabella

    2011-07-01

    Dentinal hypersensitivity is exemplified by brief, sharp, well-localized pain in response to thermal, evaporative, tactile, osmotic, or chemical stimuli that cannot be ascribed to any other form of dental defect or pathology. Pulpal pain is usually more prolonged, dull, aching, and poorly localized and lasts longer than the applied stimulus. Up to 30% of adults have dentinal hypersensitivity at some time. Current techniques for treatment may be only transient in nature and results are not always predictable. Two methods of treatment of dentin hypersensitivity are tubular occlusion and blockage of nerve activity. A differential diagnosis needs to be accomplished before any treatment. PMID:21726693

  16. Targeting the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) assembly domain attenuates inflammation-induced hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Robyn; Chapman, Kevin; Iftinca, Mircea; Aboushousha, Reem; Varela, Diego; Altier, Christophe

    2014-06-13

    The transient receptor potential channel vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) is a non-selective cation channel expressed in sensory neurons of the dorsal root and trigeminal ganglia. TRPV1 is a polymodal channel activated by noxious heat, capsaicin, and protons. As a sensor for noxious stimuli, TRPV1 channel has been described as a key contributor to pain signaling. To form a functional channel, TRPV1 subunits must assemble into tetramers, and several studies have identified the TRPV1 C terminus as an essential element in subunit association. Here we combined biochemical assays with electrophysiology and imaging-based bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) in live cells to identify a short motif in the C-terminal tail of the TRPV1 subunit that governs channel assembly. Removing this region through early truncation or targeted deletion results in loss of subunit association and channel function. Importantly, we found that interfering with TRPV1 subunit association using a plasma membrane-tethered peptide attenuated mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity in two mouse models of inflammatory hyperalgesia. This represents a novel mechanism to disrupt TRPV1 subunit assembly and hence may offer a new analgesic tool for pain relief.

  17. Targeting the Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid Type 1 (TRPV1) Assembly Domain Attenuates Inflammation-induced Hypersensitivity*

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Robyn; Chapman, Kevin; Iftinca, Mircea; Aboushousha, Reem; Varela, Diego; Altier, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    The transient receptor potential channel vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) is a non-selective cation channel expressed in sensory neurons of the dorsal root and trigeminal ganglia. TRPV1 is a polymodal channel activated by noxious heat, capsaicin, and protons. As a sensor for noxious stimuli, TRPV1 channel has been described as a key contributor to pain signaling. To form a functional channel, TRPV1 subunits must assemble into tetramers, and several studies have identified the TRPV1 C terminus as an essential element in subunit association. Here we combined biochemical assays with electrophysiology and imaging-based bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) in live cells to identify a short motif in the C-terminal tail of the TRPV1 subunit that governs channel assembly. Removing this region through early truncation or targeted deletion results in loss of subunit association and channel function. Importantly, we found that interfering with TRPV1 subunit association using a plasma membrane-tethered peptide attenuated mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity in two mouse models of inflammatory hyperalgesia. This represents a novel mechanism to disrupt TRPV1 subunit assembly and hence may offer a new analgesic tool for pain relief. PMID:24808184

  18. The Major Soybean Allergen Gly m Bd 28K Induces Hypersensitivity Reactions in Mice Sensitized to Cow's Milk Proteins.

    PubMed

    Candreva, Ángela María; Smaldini, Paola Lorena; Curciarello, Renata; Fossati, Carlos Alberto; Docena, Guillermo Horacio; Petruccelli, Silvana

    2016-02-24

    Reactions to soy have been reported in a proportion of patients with IgE-mediated cow's milk allergy (CMA). In this work, we analyzed if Gly m Bd 28K/P28, one of the major soybean allergens, is a cross-reactive allergen with cow milk proteins (CMP). We showed that P28 was recognized by IgE sera from CMA patients and activated human peripheral basophils degranulation. Moreover, IgE sera of mice exclusively sensitized to CMP recognized P28. Splenocytes from sensitized animals secreted IL-5 and IL-13 when incubated with CMP or soy proteins, but only IL-13 when treated with P28. In addition, a skin test was strongly positive for CMP and weakly positive for P28. Remarkably, milk-sensitized mice showed hypersensitivity symptoms following sublingual challenge with P28 or CMP. With the use of bioinformatics' tools seven putative cross-reactive epitopes were identified. In conclusion, using in vitro and in vivo tests we demonstrated that P28 is a novel cross-reactive allergen with CMP.

  19. Targeting the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) assembly domain attenuates inflammation-induced hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Robyn; Chapman, Kevin; Iftinca, Mircea; Aboushousha, Reem; Varela, Diego; Altier, Christophe

    2014-06-13

    The transient receptor potential channel vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) is a non-selective cation channel expressed in sensory neurons of the dorsal root and trigeminal ganglia. TRPV1 is a polymodal channel activated by noxious heat, capsaicin, and protons. As a sensor for noxious stimuli, TRPV1 channel has been described as a key contributor to pain signaling. To form a functional channel, TRPV1 subunits must assemble into tetramers, and several studies have identified the TRPV1 C terminus as an essential element in subunit association. Here we combined biochemical assays with electrophysiology and imaging-based bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) in live cells to identify a short motif in the C-terminal tail of the TRPV1 subunit that governs channel assembly. Removing this region through early truncation or targeted deletion results in loss of subunit association and channel function. Importantly, we found that interfering with TRPV1 subunit association using a plasma membrane-tethered peptide attenuated mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity in two mouse models of inflammatory hyperalgesia. This represents a novel mechanism to disrupt TRPV1 subunit assembly and hence may offer a new analgesic tool for pain relief. PMID:24808184

  20. 5,6-EET Is Released upon Neuronal Activity and Induces Mechanical Pain Hypersensitivity via TRPA1 on Central Afferent Terminals

    PubMed Central

    Sisignano, Marco; Park, Chul-Kyu; Angioni, Carlo; Zhang, Dong Dong; von Hehn, Christian; Cobos, Enrique J.; Ghasemlou, Nader; Xu, Zhen-Zhong; Kumaran, Vigneswara; Lu, Ruirui; Grant, Andrew; Fischer, Michael J. M.; Schmidtko, Achim; Reeh, Peter; Ji, Ru-Rong; Woolf, Clifford J.; Geisslinger, Gerd; Scholich, Klaus; Brenneis, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) are cytochrome P450-epoxygenase-derived metabolites of arachidonic acid that act as endogenous signaling molecules in multiple biological systems. Here we have investigated the specific contribution of 5,6-EET to transient receptor potential (TRP) channel activation in nociceptor neurons and its consequence for nociceptive processing. We found that, during capsaicin-induced nociception, 5,6-EET levels increased in dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) and the dorsal spinal cord, and 5,6-EET is released from activated sensory neurons in vitro. 5,6-EET potently induced a calcium flux (100 nm) in cultured DRG neurons that was completely abolished when TRPA1 was deleted or inhibited. In spinal cord slices, 5,6-EET dose dependently enhanced the frequency, but not the amplitude, of spontaneous EPSCs (sEPSCs) in lamina II neurons that also responded to mustard oil (allyl isothiocyanate), indicating a presynaptic action. Furthermore, 5,6-EET-induced enhancement of sEPSC frequency was abolished in TRPA1-null mice, suggesting that 5,6-EET presynaptically facilitated spinal cord synaptic transmission by TRPA1. Finally, in vivo intrathecal injection of 5,6-EET caused mechanical allodynia in wild-type but not TRPA1-null mice. We conclude that 5,6-EET is synthesized on the acute activation of nociceptors and can produce mechanical hypersensitivity via TRPA1 at central afferent terminals in the spinal cord. PMID:22553041

  1. Cold exposure induces alterations in porcine triiodothyronine tissue distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Quesada, M.H.; Reed, H.L.; Hesslink, R.; Licauco, G.; Castro, S.; Homer, L.; Young, B. Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton )

    1991-03-11

    Evidence suggests that thyroid hormone plays an active role in modulation of tissue metabolism in response to cold challenge. In an attempts to identify tissues that may have increased capacity for triiodothyronine (T{sub 3}) and be actively involved in the thermogenic process, the authors investigated the T{sub 3} tissue distribution in 5 month old swine exposed to cold (4C) (N = 5) for three weeks, compared with controls at a thermoneutral temperature (20C) (N = 4). Both groups were injected I.V. with ({sup 125}I)T{sub 3} three hours before sacrifice. ({sup 125}I)T{sub 3} was organically extracted from heart, kidney, thyroid gland, adrenal, brain, 4 different types of striated muscles and fat tissues and counted to determine the CPM/gm of tissue. Serum total T{sub 3} and free T{sub 3} were elevated. The bulk of the tissue/serum ratios of cold exposed swine compared with controls were unchanged. However, calculation of the T{sub 3} organ pools revealed that the majority was elevated 2 to 3 times over control. Increases in tissue distribution volume (TVD) occurred in hip fat. Body and organ weights tended to increase but not to a significant degree except for the thyroid gland, which increased 66% over the average control value. The physiological significance of the cold associated augmented organ pool and the increased TCD in hip fat needs to be explored.

  2. Hydrogen peroxide is involved in the cold acclimation-induced chilling tolerance of tomato plants.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jie; Wang, Jian; Shi, Kai; Xia, Xiao Jian; Zhou, Yan Hong; Yu, Jing Quan

    2012-11-01

    Cold acclimation increases plant tolerance to a more-severe chilling and in this process an accumulation of H(2)O(2) in plants is often observed. To examine the role of H(2)O(2) in cold acclimation in plants, the accumulation of H(2)O(2), antioxidant metabolism, the glutathione redox state, gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence were analyzed after cold acclimation at 12/10 °C and during the subsequent chilling at 7/4 °C in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants. Cold acclimation modestly elevated the levels of H(2)O(2), the gene expression of respiratory burst oxidase homolog 1 (Rboh1) and NADPH oxidase activity, leading to the up-regulation of the expression and activity of antioxidant enzymes. In non-acclimated plants chilling caused a continuous rise in the H(2)O(2) content, an increase in the malondialdehyde (MDA) content and in the oxidized redox state of glutathione, followed by reductions in the CO(2) assimilation rate and the maximum quantum yield of photosystem II (F(v)/F(m)). However, in cold-acclimated plants chilling-induced photoinhibition, membrane peroxidation and reductions in the CO(2) assimilation rate were significantly alleviated. Furthermore, a treatment with an NADPH oxidase inhibitor or H(2)O(2) scavenger before the plants subjected to the cold acclimation abolished the cold acclimation-induced beneficial effects on photosynthesis and antioxidant metabolism, leading to a loss of the cold acclimation-induced tolerance against chilling. These results strongly suggest that the H(2)O(2) generated by NADPH oxidase in the apoplast of plant cells plays a crucial role in cold acclimation-induced chilling tolerance.

  3. Serotonin signalling is crucial in the induction of PUVA-induced systemic suppression of delayed-type hypersensitivity but not local apoptosis or inflammation of the skin.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Peter; Byrne, Scott N; Limon-Flores, Alberto Y; Hoefler, Gerald; Ullrich, Stephen E

    2016-07-01

    Psoralen and UVA (PUVA) has immunosuppressive and proapoptotic effects, which are thought to be responsible alone or in combination for its therapeutic efficacy. However, the molecular mechanism by which PUVA mediates its effects is not well understood. Activation of the serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) pathway has been suggested to be involved in the modulation of T-cell responses and found to mediate UVB-induced immune suppression. In particular, the activation of the 5-HT2A receptor has been proposed as one mechanism responsible for UV-induced immune suppression. We therefore hypothesized that 5-HT may play a role in PUVA-induced effects. The model of systemic suppression of delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) to Candida albicans was used to study immune function after exposure of C3H and KIT(W) (-Sh/W-Sh) mice to a minimal inflammatory dose of topical PUVA. The intra-peritoneal injection of the 5-HT2 receptor antagonist ketanserin or cyproheptadine or an anti-5-HT antibody immediately before PUVA exposure entirely abrogated suppression of DTH but had no significant effect on inflammation, as measured by swelling and cellular infiltration of the skin, and apoptosis as determined by the number of sunburn cells in C3H mice. Importantly, the systemic injection of 5-HT recapitulated PUVA immune suppression of DTH but did not induce inflammation or apoptosis in the skin. KIT(W) (-Sh/W-Sh) mice (exhibiting myelopoietic abnormalities, including lack of 5-HT-containing mast cells) were resistant to PUVA-induced suppression of DTH but not local skin swelling. Thus, this points towards a crucial role of 5-HT signalling in PUVA-induced immune suppression but not inflammation or apoptosis in situ in the skin.

  4. Serotonin signalling is crucial in the induction of PUVA-induced systemic suppression of delayed-type hypersensitivity but not local apoptosis or inflammation of the skin.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Peter; Byrne, Scott N; Limon-Flores, Alberto Y; Hoefler, Gerald; Ullrich, Stephen E

    2016-07-01

    Psoralen and UVA (PUVA) has immunosuppressive and proapoptotic effects, which are thought to be responsible alone or in combination for its therapeutic efficacy. However, the molecular mechanism by which PUVA mediates its effects is not well understood. Activation of the serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) pathway has been suggested to be involved in the modulation of T-cell responses and found to mediate UVB-induced immune suppression. In particular, the activation of the 5-HT2A receptor has been proposed as one mechanism responsible for UV-induced immune suppression. We therefore hypothesized that 5-HT may play a role in PUVA-induced effects. The model of systemic suppression of delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) to Candida albicans was used to study immune function after exposure of C3H and KIT(W) (-Sh/W-Sh) mice to a minimal inflammatory dose of topical PUVA. The intra-peritoneal injection of the 5-HT2 receptor antagonist ketanserin or cyproheptadine or an anti-5-HT antibody immediately before PUVA exposure entirely abrogated suppression of DTH but had no significant effect on inflammation, as measured by swelling and cellular infiltration of the skin, and apoptosis as determined by the number of sunburn cells in C3H mice. Importantly, the systemic injection of 5-HT recapitulated PUVA immune suppression of DTH but did not induce inflammation or apoptosis in the skin. KIT(W) (-Sh/W-Sh) mice (exhibiting myelopoietic abnormalities, including lack of 5-HT-containing mast cells) were resistant to PUVA-induced suppression of DTH but not local skin swelling. Thus, this points towards a crucial role of 5-HT signalling in PUVA-induced immune suppression but not inflammation or apoptosis in situ in the skin. PMID:26914366

  5. Platinum hypersensitivity and desensitization.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Shingo; Okada, Rika; Ando, Kazumichi

    2015-09-01

    Platinum agents are drugs used for various types of cancer. With increased frequency of administration of platinum agents, hypersensitivity reactions appear more frequently, occurring in over 25% of cases from the seventh cycle or second line onward. It then becomes difficult to conduct treatment using these agents. Various approaches have been investigated to address hypersensitivity reactions to platinum agents. Desensitization, which gradually increases the concentration of the anticancer drug considered to be the antigen until the target dosage, has been reported as being particularly effective, with a success rate of 80-100%. The aims of this paper are to present the current findings regarding hypersensitivity reactions to platinum agents and to discuss attempts of using desensitization against hypersensitivity reactions worldwide.

  6. Depletion of endogenous spinal 5-HT attenuates the behavioural hypersensitivity to mechanical and cooling stimuli induced by spinal nerve ligation.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Wahida; Suzuki, Rie; Webber, Mark; Hunt, Stephen P; Dickenson, Anthony H

    2006-08-01

    There is compelling evidence for a strong facilitatory drive modulating spinal nociceptive transmission. This is in part via serotonergic pathways and originates from the rostroventral medulla. We previously demonstrated that neuropathic pain is associated with an enhanced descending facilitatory drive onto the mechanical evoked responses of dorsal horn neurones, mediated by 5-HT acting at spinal 5-HT3 receptors. Furthermore, depletion of spinal 5-HT has been shown to reduce the at-level mechanical allodynia that follows spinal cord injury. To further clarify the role and direction of effect of endogenous 5-HT, we investigated the effects of depleting spinal 5-HT, via intrathecal injection of 5,7di-hydroxytryptamine (5,7DHT), on pain behaviours after spinal nerve ligation (SNL). Depletion of spinal 5-HT in normal animals leads to reductions in mechanical and thermal evoked responses of deep dorsal horn neurones implying that spinal 5-HT has a predominant facilitatory function. After nerve injury, the frequency of paw withdrawals to low intensity mechanical and cooling stimulation of the ipsilateral hindpaw in the SNL-5,7DHT group was significantly attenuated when compared with the SNL-saline group from day seven post-nerve injury. Sham-5,7DHT and sham-saline animals showed very little response sensitivity on either hindpaw. This 5-HT-mediated difference in behaviour was independent of both the up-regulation of the NK1 receptor and spinal microglial activation produced by nerve injury. These data suggest that supraspinal serotonergic influences under these conditions are facilitatory and are implicated in the maintenance of spinal cord neuronal events leading to the behavioural hypersensitivity manifested after peripheral nerve damage. PMID:16644129

  7. Carmine hypersensitivity masquerading as azithromycin hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Greenhawt, Matthew; McMorris, Marc; Baldwin, James

    2009-01-01

    Macrolide hypersensitivity is a rarely reported event. However, carmine dye has become increasingly important as a provocative agent. We present a case of a woman with documented carmine hypersensitivity, who reported anaphylaxis 90 minutes after ingestion of a generic azithromycin. Our investigations revealed that this was an allergy to the carmine dye in the tablet's coating rather than to the antibiotic. Seven extracts were prepared including carmine dye, crushed dried female cochineal insects, crushed tablets of Zithromax (Pfizer Inc.) and generic azithromycin (Teva Pharmaceuticals), and the crushed colored coatings from both tablets. These were suspended in preservative-free normal saline, and then applied as a skin-prick test and read at 30 minutes. The skin-prick skin test results were 4+ to histamine and carmine dye, but negative to cochineal insect extract, Pfizer crushed tablets, and negative control. The patient was 1+ to the Teva crushed tablet, but was 4+ to the Teva brand coating and negative to the Pfizer brand coating, which did not contain carmine. The patient subsequently ingested Pfizer Zithromax without any sequelae. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of carmine anaphylaxis attributed to carmine-containing medication. Careful history and skin-prick testing to the appropriate agents allowed elucidation of the subtlety of the true offending agent without unnecessary avoidance of the medication class. Patients with a carmine hypersensitivity should actively check with their pharmacy or prescribing physician to verify their medications are free of this offending agent. PMID:19331724

  8. A physiologic differentiation between delayed and immediate hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Apicella, Michael A.; Allen, James C.

    1969-01-01

    Studies have been made of movement of various macromolecules into and out of the pleural space of guinea pigs during the course of a delayed hypersensitivity reaction to purified protein derivative (PPD), and a passively transferred immediate hypersensitivity reaction to ovalbumin. While the immediate hypersensitivity reaction transiently alters vascular permeability as shown by increased movement of macromolecules into the chest, the delayed hypersensitivity reaction is marked by a decreased capacity to resorb macromolecules from the pleural space. The data suggest that the two hypersensitivity reactions may be distinguished by these physiologic differences. Additional data from studies of a chemically induced pleural effusion in these animals suggest that some type of outflow obstruction is necessary for the development of effusion, but that the outflow defect caused by the irritating chemical is based on a different mechanism than that seen during the delayed hypersensitivity reaction. PMID:4179171

  9. Peripheral nervous control of cold-induced reduction in the respiratory quotient of the rat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refinetti, Roberto

    1990-03-01

    Cold-exposed rats show a reduction in the respiratory quotient which is indicative of a relative shift from carbohydrates to lipids as substrates for oxidative metabolism. In the present study, the effects of food deprivation and cold exposure on the respiratory quotient were observed. In addition, the involvement of the three main branches of the peripheral nervous system (sympathetic, parasympathetic, and somatic) was investigated by means of synaptic blockade with propranolol, atropine, and quinine, respectively. Both propranolol and quinine blocked the cold-induced decrease in respiratory quotient and increase in heat production, whereas atropine had only minor and very brief effects. It is concluded that both the sympathetic and somatic branches are involved in the metabolic changes associated with cold-induced thermogenesis and that the increase in metabolic heat production involves a shift from carbohydrate to lipid utilization irrespective of which of the two branches is activated.

  10. Oligomerization, Conformational Stability and Thermal Unfolding of Harpin, HrpZPss and Its Hypersensitive Response-Inducing C-Terminal Fragment, C-214-HrpZPss

    PubMed Central

    Tarafdar, Pradip K.; Vedantam, Lakshmi Vasudev; Sankhala, Rajeshwer S.; Purushotham, Pallinti; Podile, Appa Rao; Swamy, Musti J.

    2014-01-01

    HrpZ—a harpin from Pseudomonas syringae—is a highly thermostable protein that exhibits multifunctional abilities e.g., it elicits hypersensitive response (HR), enhances plant growth, acts as a virulence factor, and forms pores in plant plasma membranes as well as artificial membranes. However, the molecular mechanism of its biological activity and high thermal stability remained poorly understood. HR inducing abilities of non-overlapping short deletion mutants of harpins put further constraints on the ability to establish structure-activity relationships. We characterized HrpZPss from Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae and its HR inducing C-terminal fragment with 214 amino acids (C-214-HrpZPss) using calorimetric, spectroscopic and microscopic approaches. Both C-214-HrpZPss and HrpZPss were found to form oligomers. We propose that leucine-zipper-like motifs may take part in the formation of oligomeric aggregates, and oligomerization could be related to HR elicitation. CD, DSC and fluorescence studies showed that the thermal unfolding of these proteins is complex and involves multiple steps. The comparable conformational stability at 25°C (∼10.0 kcal/mol) of HrpZPss and C-214-HrpZPss further suggest that their structures are flexible, and the flexibility allows them to adopt proper conformation for multifunctional abilities. PMID:25502017

  11. Simulation of a cold-stressed finger including the effects of wind, gloves, and cold-induced vasodilatation.

    PubMed

    Shitzer, A; Bellomo, S; Stroschein, L A; Gonzalez, R R; Pandolf, K B

    1998-06-01

    The thermal response of fingers exposed to cold weather conditions has been simulated. Energy balance equations were formulated, in a former study, for the tissue layers and the arterial, venous, and capillary blood vessels. The equations were solved by a finite difference scheme using the Thomas algorithm and the method of alternating directions. At this stage of development the model does not include any autonomic control functions. Model simulations assumed an electrical heating element to be embedded in the glove layers applied on the finger. A 1.3 W power input was calculated for maintaining finger temperatures at their pre-cold exposure level in a 0 degree C environment. Alternate assumptions of nutritional (low) and basal (high) blood flows in the finger demonstrated the dominance of this factor in maintaining finger temperatures at comfortable levels. Simulated exposures to still and windy air, at 4.17 m/s (15 km/h), indicated the profound chilling effects of wind on fingers in cold environments. Finally, the effects of variable blood flow in the finger, known as "cold-induced vasodilatation," were also investigated. Blood flow variations were assumed to be represented by periodic, symmetric triangular waves allowing for gradual opening-closing cycles of blood supply to the tip of the finger. Results of this part of the simulation were compared with measured records of bare finger temperatures. Good conformity was obtained for a plausible pattern of change in blood flow, which was assumed to be provided in its entirety to the tip of the finger alone.

  12. Cold-Atom Physics Using Ultrathin Optical Fibers: Light-Induced Dipole Forces and Surface Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sague, G.; Vetsch, E.; Alt, W.; Meschede, D.; Rauschenbeutel, A.

    2007-10-19

    The strong evanescent field around ultrathin unclad optical fibers bears a high potential for detecting, trapping, and manipulating cold atoms. Introducing such a fiber into a cold-atom cloud, we investigate the interaction of a small number of cold cesium atoms with the guided fiber mode and with the fiber surface. Using high resolution spectroscopy, we observe and analyze light-induced dipole forces, van der Waals interaction, and a significant enhancement of the spontaneous emission rate of the atoms. The latter can be assigned to the modification of the vacuum modes by the fiber.

  13. Cellular origins of cold-induced brown adipocytes in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yun-Hee; Petkova, Anelia P; Konkar, Anish A; Granneman, James G

    2015-01-01

    This work investigated how cold stress induces the appearance of brown adipocytes (BAs) in brown and white adipose tissues (WATs) of adult mice. In interscapular brown adipose tissue (iBAT), cold exposure increased proliferation of endothelial cells and interstitial cells expressing platelet-derived growth factor receptor, α polypeptide (PDGFRα) by 3- to 4-fold. Surprisingly, brown adipogenesis and angiogenesis were largely restricted to the dorsal edge of iBAT. Although cold stress did not increase proliferation in inguinal white adipose tissue (ingWAT), the percentage of BAs, defined as multilocular adipocytes that express uncoupling protein 1, rose from undetectable to 30% of total adipocytes. To trace the origins of cold-induced BAs, we genetically tagged PDGFRα(+) cells and adipocytes prior to cold exposure, using Pdgfra-Cre recombinase estrogen receptor T2 fusion protein (CreER(T2)) and adiponectin-CreER(T2), respectively. In iBAT, cold stress triggered the proliferation and differentiation of PDGFRα(+) cells into BAs. In contrast, all newly observed BAs in ingWAT (5207 out of 5207) were derived from unilocular adipocytes tagged by adiponectin-CreER(T2)-mediated recombination. Surgical denervation of iBAT reduced cold-induced brown adipogenesis by >85%, whereas infusion of norepinephrine (NE) mimicked the effects of cold in warm-adapted mice. NE-induced de novo brown adipogenesis in iBAT was eliminated in mice lacking β1-adrenergic receptors. These observations identify a novel tissue niche for brown adipogenesis in iBAT and further define depot-specific mechanisms of BA recruitment.

  14. Spin Hall effects for cold atoms in a light induced gauge potential

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Shi-Liang; Fu, Hao; Wu, C.-J.; Zhang, S.-C.; Duan, L.-M. /Michigan U., MCTP

    2010-03-16

    We propose an experimental scheme to observe spin Hall effects with cold atoms in a light induced gauge potential. Under an appropriate configuration, the cold atoms moving in a spatially varying laser field experience an effective spin-dependent gauge potential. Through numerical simulation, we demonstrate that such a gauge field leads to observable spin Hall currents under realistic conditions. We also discuss the quantum spin Hall state in an optical lattice.

  15. HLA-B allele and haplotype diversity among Thai patients identified by PCR-SSOP: evidence for high risk of drug-induced hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Puangpetch, Apichaya; Koomdee, Napatrupron; Chamnanphol, Montri; Jantararoungtong, Thawinee; Santon, Siwalee; Prommas, Santirhat; Hongkaew, Yaowaluck; Sukasem, Chonlaphat

    2015-01-01

    Background: There are 3 classes of HLA molecules; HLA class I, II and III, of which different classes have different functions. HLA-B gene which belongs to HLA class I play an important role predicting drug hypersensitivity. Materials and Methods: Nine hundred and eighty-six Thai subjects who registered at a pharmacogenomics laboratory were determined for HLA-B genotype using a two-stage sequence-specific oligonucleotide probe system (PCR-SSOP). Results: In this study, HLA-B alleles did not deviate from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (P > 0.05). The most common HLA-B alleles observed in this population were HLA-B*46:01 (11.51%), HLA-B*58:01 (8.62%), HLA-B*40:01 (8.22%), HLA-B*15:02 (8.16%) and HLA-B*13:01 (6.95%). This finding revealed that HLA-B allele frequency in the Thai population was consistent with the Chinese population (p > 0.05), however, differed from the Malaysian population (p < 0.05). The top five HLA-B genotypes were HLA-B*40:01/46:01 (2.13%), HLA-B*46:01/46:01 (2.03%), HLA-B*40:01/58:01 (2.03%), HLA-B*46:01/58:01 (1.93%) and HLA-B*15:02/46:01 (1.83%). This study found that 15.92% of Thai subjects carry HLA-B*15:02, which has been associated with carbamazepine-induced severe cutaneous adverse drug reactions (SCARs). Moreover, 16.33% of Thai subjects carry the HLA-B*58:01 allele, which has been associated with allopurinol-induced SCARs. Conclusion: This study demonstrates a high diversity of HLA-B polymorphisms in this Thai population. The high frequency of HLA-B pharmacogenomic markers in the population emphasizes the importance of such screening to predict/avoid drug hypersensitivity. PMID:25657656

  16. In vitro evidence of delayed-type hypersensitivity to hydrocortisone.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, S M; English, J S; Mattey, D L

    1993-11-01

    Hypersensitivity to topical hydrocortisone is becoming increasingly recognized. We present further evidence that this is mediated via a delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction. A hydrocortisone: albumin complex was able to induce a proliferative response in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of patients allergic to hydrocortisone. Protein binding of hydrocortisone or a degradation product may be important in the development of corticosteroid allergy.

  17. Molecular characterization of the cold- and heat-induced Arabidopsis PXL1 gene and its potential role in transduction pathways under temperature fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Jung, Chang Gyo; Hwang, Sun-Goo; Park, Yong Chan; Park, Hyeon Mi; Kim, Dong Sub; Park, Duck Hwan; Jang, Cheol Seong

    2015-03-15

    LRR-RLK (Leucine-Rich Repeat Receptor-Like Kinase) proteins are believed to play essential roles in cell-to-cell communication during various cellular processes including development, hormone perception, and abiotic stress responses. We isolated an LRR-RLK gene previously named Arabidopsis PHLOEM INTERCALATED WITH XYLEM-LIKE 1 (AtPXL1) and examined its expression patterns. AtPXL1 was highly induced by cold and heat stress, but not by drought. The fluorescence signal of 35S::AtPXL1-EGFP was closely localized to the plasma membrane. A yeast two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay exhibited that AtPXL1 interacts with both proteins, A. thaliana histidine-rich dehydrin1 (AtHIRD1) and A. thaliana light-harvesting protein complex I (AtLHCA1). We found that AtPXL1 possesses autophosphorylation activity and phosphorylates AtHIRD1 and AtLHCA1 in an in vitro assay. Subsequently, we found that the knockout line (atpxl1) showed hypersensitive phenotypes when subjected to cold and heat during the germination stage, while the AtPXL1 overexpressing line as well as wild type plants showed high germination rates compared to the knockout plants. These results provide an insight into the molecular function of AtPXL1 in the regulation of signal transduction pathways under temperature fluctuations.

  18. Molecular characterization of the cold- and heat-induced Arabidopsis PXL1 gene and its potential role in transduction pathways under temperature fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Jung, Chang Gyo; Hwang, Sun-Goo; Park, Yong Chan; Park, Hyeon Mi; Kim, Dong Sub; Park, Duck Hwan; Jang, Cheol Seong

    2015-03-15

    LRR-RLK (Leucine-Rich Repeat Receptor-Like Kinase) proteins are believed to play essential roles in cell-to-cell communication during various cellular processes including development, hormone perception, and abiotic stress responses. We isolated an LRR-RLK gene previously named Arabidopsis PHLOEM INTERCALATED WITH XYLEM-LIKE 1 (AtPXL1) and examined its expression patterns. AtPXL1 was highly induced by cold and heat stress, but not by drought. The fluorescence signal of 35S::AtPXL1-EGFP was closely localized to the plasma membrane. A yeast two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay exhibited that AtPXL1 interacts with both proteins, A. thaliana histidine-rich dehydrin1 (AtHIRD1) and A. thaliana light-harvesting protein complex I (AtLHCA1). We found that AtPXL1 possesses autophosphorylation activity and phosphorylates AtHIRD1 and AtLHCA1 in an in vitro assay. Subsequently, we found that the knockout line (atpxl1) showed hypersensitive phenotypes when subjected to cold and heat during the germination stage, while the AtPXL1 overexpressing line as well as wild type plants showed high germination rates compared to the knockout plants. These results provide an insight into the molecular function of AtPXL1 in the regulation of signal transduction pathways under temperature fluctuations. PMID:25602612

  19. Broad-spectrum sunscreens provide greater protection against ultraviolet-radiation-induced suppression of contact hypersensitivity to a recall antigen in humans.

    PubMed

    Damian, D L; Halliday, G M; Barnetson, R S

    1997-08-01

    This study investigates the extent to which sunscreens protect humans from ultraviolet (UV)-radiation-induced immunosuppression. In the presence of solar-simulated UV, three sunscreens with differing UVA transmission were assessed for their ability to protect the contact hypersensitivity (CHS) response to nickel of 16 nickel-allergic subjects. The sunscreens contained 2-ethylhexyl para-methoxycinnamate (cinnamate), cinnamate with oxybenzone, or cinnamate with zinc oxide, respectively. All had sun protection factors of 10 and hence inhibited UV erythema to similar extents. Volunteers were irradiated on their backs with suberythemal UV daily for 5 d after application of the sunscreens and their base lotion to different sites. Nickel-containing patches were then applied to both UV-treated sites and adjacent, unirradiated control sites. Erythema caused by nickel CHS at each site was quantitated 72 h later with a reflectance erythema meter. In comparison of the nickel reactions of irradiated and unirradiated skin, there was 35% mean immunosuppression in unprotected UV-treated skin. Significant immunosuppression also occurred at sites irradiated through the narrow-spectrum cinnamate-only sunscreen but was prevented by the two broad-spectrum sunscreens. To determine whether UV-induced suppression of the nickel response is specific for cell-mediated immunity or reflects suppression of nonspecific inflammation, a further 16 subjects were patch-tested with a skin irritant, sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS), following a sunscreen and irradiation protocol identical to that of the nickel volunteers. UV had no significant effect on SLS responses. We conclude that nickel patch testing is a valid means of assessing UV-induced immunosuppression in humans and that even with suberythemal UV, immune protection was provided only by sunscreens filtering both UVA and UVB.

  20. The N-terminal fragment of the tomato torrado virus RNA1-encoded polyprotein induces a hypersensitive response (HR)-like reaction in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Wieczorek, Przemysław; Obrępalska-Stęplowska, Aleksandra

    2016-07-01

    The hypersensitive response (HR) is a defence reaction observed during incompatible plant-pathogen interactions in plants infected with a wide range of fungi, bacteria and viruses. Here, we show that an N-terminal polyprotein fragment encoded by tomato torrado virus RNA1, located between the first ATG codon and the protease cofactor (ProCo) motif, induces an HR-like reaction in Nicotiana benthamiana. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transient expression of the first 105 amino acids (the calculated molecular weight of the fragment was ca. 11.33 kDa, hereafter refered to as the 11K domain) from ToTV RNA1 induced an HR-like phenotype in infiltrated leaves. To investigate whether the 11K domain could influence the virulence and pathogenicity of a recombinant virus, we created a potato virus X (PVX) with the 11K coding sequence inserted under a duplicated coat protein promoter. We found that 11K substantially increased the virulence of the recombinant virus. Disease phenotype induced in N. benthamiana by PVX-11K was characterized by strong local and systemic necrosis. This was not observed when the 11K domain was expressed from PVX in an antisense orientation. Further analyses revealed that the 11K domain could not suppress posttranscriptional gene silencing (PTGS) of green fluorescent protein (GFP) in the N. benthamiana 16c line. In silico analysis of the predicted secondary structure of the 11K domain indicated the presence of two putative helices that are highly conserved in tomato-infecting representatives of the genus Torradovirus. PMID:27072852

  1. An Elicitor from Botrytis cinerea Induces the Hypersensitive Response in Arabidopsis thaliana and Other Plants and Promotes the Gray Mold Disease.

    PubMed

    Govrin, Eri M; Rachmilevitch, Shimon; Tiwari, Budhi Sagar; Solomon, Mazal; Levine, Alex

    2006-03-01

    ABSTRACT Botrytis cinerea is a necrotrophic fungus that infects over 200 plant species. Previous studies showed that host cells collapse in advance of the hyphae, suggesting secretion of toxins or elicitors. We have partially characterized elicitor activity from intercellular fluid extracted from Arabidopsis thaliana leaves infected with B. cinerea. Treatment of intact leaves or cell cultures with either intercellular fluid from infected leaves or medium from inoculated A. thaliana cell culture induced generation of reactive oxygen species, resulting in reduced photosynthesis, electrolyte leakage, and necrotic lesions that resembled the hypersensitive response (HR). The necrosis was inhibited by diphenyleneiodonium, a specific inhibitor of NADPH oxidase, and by chelating free iron, suggesting the involvement of hydroxyl radicals. The necrosis was also suppressed in dnd1 mutants that are compromised in HR. In contrast, increased cell death was observed in acd2 mutants, indicating the involvement of the host defense signaling pathways. Treatment with the intercellular fluid from infected leaves also induced transcription of pathogenesis-related (PR) genes, such as PR-1, PR-5, HSR203J, and of senescence-associated gene SAG-13. Moreover, rapid transcription of the ethylene-dependent AtEBP gene was detected, indicating induction of ethylene production. The inter-cellular fluid from infected A. thaliana induced cell death in other plants, in line with the lack of B. cinerea specificity. In summary, the intercellular fluid mimicked a range of molecular and physiological host responses that are observed during infection with a live fungus. Moreover, it accelerated the B. cinerea infection, suggesting that the elicitor may act as a pathogenicity factor in the progression of gray mold disease.

  2. Immunization against an IL-6 peptide induces anti-IL-6 antibodies and modulates the Delayed-Type Hypersensitivity reaction in cynomolgus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Desallais, Lucille; Bouchez, Caroline; Mouhsine, Hadley; Moreau, Gabriel; Ratsimandresy, Rojo; Montes, Matthieu; Do, Hervé; Quintin-Colonna, Françoise; Zagury, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) overproduction has been involved in the pathogenesis of several chronic inflammatory diseases and the administration of an anti-IL-6 receptor monoclonal antibody has been proven clinically efficient to treat them. However, the drawbacks of monoclonal antibodies have led our group to develop an innovative anti-IL-6 strategy using a peptide-based active immunization. This approach has previously shown its efficacy in a mouse model of systemic sclerosis. Here the safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy of this strategy was assessed in non human primates. No unscheduled death and clinical signs of toxicity was observed during the study. Furthermore, the cynomolgus monkeys immunized against the IL-6 peptide produced high levels of anti-IL-6 antibodies as well as neutralizing antibodies compared to control groups. They also showed an important decrease of the cumulative inflammatory score following a delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction induced by the Tetanus vaccine compared to control groups (minus 57,9%, P = 0.014). These findings are highly significant because the immunizing IL-6 peptide used in this study is identical in humans and in monkeys and this novel anti-IL-6 strategy could thus represent a promising alternative to monoclonal antibodies. PMID:26782790

  3. Low Concentrations of Flavonoid - Rich Fraction of Shallot Extract Induce Delayed - Type Hypersensitivity and TH1 Cytokine IFNγ Expression in BALB/c Mice.

    PubMed

    Farhadi, Leila; Mohammadi-Motlagh, Hamid-Reza; Seyfi, Parivash; Mostafaie, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Flavonoids are potentially immunomodulatory factors and it may be inferred that these phytochemicals contribute to immunomodulatory properties of the Allium family. In the present study, we investigated the potential mechanism underlying the immunomodulatory effect of shallot and its ethyl acetate (EA) fraction as flavonoid-rich sources. Ex vivo, effects of a hydroalcoholic extract of shallot, its fractions and quercetin on lymphocyte viability were evaluated. The proliferative effects of the fractions were examined using naive mouse lymphocytes to determine the fraction with highest impact/ activity. In addition, in a mouse model, both delayed- type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses and production of a key cytokine (interferon [IFN]-ᵧ) were evaluated. Both the shallot extract and its fractions inhibited lymphocytes cell growth and survival in a concentration- dependent manner. The findings also showed that the extract and especially the ethyl acetate (EA) fraction could induce lymphocyte proliferation. The evaluation of the extract and its EA fraction on DTH responses indicated that both caused a significant increase in DTH response. Furthermore, they triggered significant increases in IFNγ and decreases in interleukin (IL)-4 production by splenic mononuclear cells. Because of the significant immunomodulatory activity displayed in these studies, it is plausible that shallot could have a potential use as an immunomodulatory agent in clinical settings.

  4. [A case of isocyanate-induced hypersensitivity pneumonitis and a compression-air mask thought to be effective in its prevention].

    PubMed

    Idezuka, J; Ikarashi, H; Nozawa, S; Maruyama, M; Sasagawa, M; Suzuki, E

    1991-07-01

    A 41-year-old paint sprayer, who had worked with polyurethane paint since the spring of 1989, developed exertional dyspnea and dry cough and entered hospital on December 4, 1989. Plain chest X-ray film and a computed tomogram of the lung revealed diffuse micronodular shadows in both lower lung fields. DLco was shown to be significantly decreased in a pulmonary function test. A sample of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid showed increased T lymphocytes and a decreased CD4/8 ratio. A lung biopsy specimen revealed alveolitis, but neither Masson body nor granulomas were seen. Serum antibody specific to TDI-HSA was detected, and an environmental provocation test was positive. From these results, the patient was diagnosed as having isocyanate-induced hypersensitivity pneumonitis. We advised him to wear a compression-air mask when he worked, because he did not want to quit his job. Respiratory symptoms have not been seen since then, but careful observation was thought to be necessary. The involvement of type III humoral and type IV cellular immunity was suspected in this case.

  5. Low Concentrations of Flavonoid - Rich Fraction of Shallot Extract Induce Delayed - Type Hypersensitivity and TH1 Cytokine IFNγ Expression in BALB/c Mice.

    PubMed

    Farhadi, Leila; Mohammadi-Motlagh, Hamid-Reza; Seyfi, Parivash; Mostafaie, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Flavonoids are potentially immunomodulatory factors and it may be inferred that these phytochemicals contribute to immunomodulatory properties of the Allium family. In the present study, we investigated the potential mechanism underlying the immunomodulatory effect of shallot and its ethyl acetate (EA) fraction as flavonoid-rich sources. Ex vivo, effects of a hydroalcoholic extract of shallot, its fractions and quercetin on lymphocyte viability were evaluated. The proliferative effects of the fractions were examined using naive mouse lymphocytes to determine the fraction with highest impact/ activity. In addition, in a mouse model, both delayed- type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses and production of a key cytokine (interferon [IFN]-ᵧ) were evaluated. Both the shallot extract and its fractions inhibited lymphocytes cell growth and survival in a concentration- dependent manner. The findings also showed that the extract and especially the ethyl acetate (EA) fraction could induce lymphocyte proliferation. The evaluation of the extract and its EA fraction on DTH responses indicated that both caused a significant increase in DTH response. Furthermore, they triggered significant increases in IFNγ and decreases in interleukin (IL)-4 production by splenic mononuclear cells. Because of the significant immunomodulatory activity displayed in these studies, it is plausible that shallot could have a potential use as an immunomodulatory agent in clinical settings. PMID:24551817

  6. Immunization against an IL-6 peptide induces anti-IL-6 antibodies and modulates the Delayed-Type Hypersensitivity reaction in cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Desallais, Lucille; Bouchez, Caroline; Mouhsine, Hadley; Moreau, Gabriel; Ratsimandresy, Rojo; Montes, Matthieu; Do, Hervé; Quintin-Colonna, Françoise; Zagury, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) overproduction has been involved in the pathogenesis of several chronic inflammatory diseases and the administration of an anti-IL-6 receptor monoclonal antibody has been proven clinically efficient to treat them. However, the drawbacks of monoclonal antibodies have led our group to develop an innovative anti-IL-6 strategy using a peptide-based active immunization. This approach has previously shown its efficacy in a mouse model of systemic sclerosis. Here the safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy of this strategy was assessed in non human primates. No unscheduled death and clinical signs of toxicity was observed during the study. Furthermore, the cynomolgus monkeys immunized against the IL-6 peptide produced high levels of anti-IL-6 antibodies as well as neutralizing antibodies compared to control groups. They also showed an important decrease of the cumulative inflammatory score following a delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction induced by the Tetanus vaccine compared to control groups (minus 57,9%, P = 0.014). These findings are highly significant because the immunizing IL-6 peptide used in this study is identical in humans and in monkeys and this novel anti-IL-6 strategy could thus represent a promising alternative to monoclonal antibodies. PMID:26782790

  7. Study on the storm surges induced by cold waves in the Northern East China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Dongxue; Hou, Yijun; Li, Jian; Liu, Yahao

    2016-08-01

    Cold wave, a kind of severe weather system, can bring strong wind and induce significant sea level rise to the Northern East China Sea. Based on CFSR data, the study shows the monthly distributions of invaded days and the spatiotemporal distributions of cold-wave wind direction and wind speed. A three-dimensional numerical model (ROMS) was developed to study storm surges induced by cold waves. The role of wind direction, wind speed, wind duration, extratropical cyclone and tide-surge interaction is investigated by conducting different sensitivity experiments. The results indicate that storm surges mainly happen at the coasts perpendicular to the wind directions. Surge range and time lag are related to the geometry of the basin and the continental shelf. The response of the sea-level fluctuations to cold wave indicates that there is a positive correlation between crests and wind speed, a negative correlation between troughs and wind speed, but no obvious correlations to wind duration. Coupled weather cold waves, which yield a larger range and a multi-peak structure of surges, can be classified according to cold wave tracks and extratropical cyclones. The tide-surge interaction has an obvious and different effect on the magnitudes and phases of storm surges for different tidal stages.

  8. Mitofusin-2 protects against cold stress-induced cell injury in HEK293 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenbin; Chen, Yaomin; Yang, Qun; Che, Honglei; Chen, Xiangjun; Yao, Ting; Zhao, Fang; Liu, Mingchao; Ke, Tao; Chen, Jingyuan; Luo, Wenjing

    2010-06-25

    Mitochondrial impairment is hypothesized to contribute to cell injury during cold stress. Mitochondria fission and fusion are closely related in the function of the mitochondria, but the precise mechanisms whereby these processes regulate cell injury during cold stress remain to be determined. HEK293 cells were cultured in a cold environment (4.0+/-0.1 degrees C) for 2, 4, 8, or 12h. Western blot analyses showed that these cells expressed decreased fission-related protein Drp1 and increased fusion-related protein Mfn2 at 4h; meanwhile, electron microscopy analysis revealed large and long mitochondrial morphology within these cells, indicating increased mitochondrial fusion. With silencing of Mfn2 but not of Mfn1 by siRNA promoted cold-stress-induced cell death with decreased ATP production in HEK293 cells. Our results show that increased expression of Mfn2 and mitochondrial fusion are important for mitochondrial function as well as cell survival during cold stress. These findings have important implications for understanding the mechanisms of mitochondrial fusion and fission in cold-stress-induced cell injury.

  9. Mitofusin-2 protects against cold stress-induced cell injury in HEK293 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wenbin; Chen, Yaomin; Yang, Qun; Che, Honglei; Chen, Xiangjun; Yao, Ting; Zhao, Fang; Liu, Mingchao; Ke, Tao; Chen, Jingyuan; Luo, Wenjing

    2010-06-25

    Mitochondrial impairment is hypothesized to contribute to cell injury during cold stress. Mitochondria fission and fusion are closely related in the function of the mitochondria, but the precise mechanisms whereby these processes regulate cell injury during cold stress remain to be determined. HEK293 cells were cultured in a cold environment (4.0 {+-} 0.1 {sup o}C) for 2, 4, 8, or 12 h. Western blot analyses showed that these cells expressed decreased fission-related protein Drp1 and increased fusion-related protein Mfn2 at 4 h; meanwhile, electron microscopy analysis revealed large and long mitochondrial morphology within these cells, indicating increased mitochondrial fusion. With silencing of Mfn2 but not of Mfn1 by siRNA promoted cold-stress-induced cell death with decreased ATP production in HEK293 cells. Our results show that increased expression of Mfn2 and mitochondrial fusion are important for mitochondrial function as well as cell survival during cold stress. These findings have important implications for understanding the mechanisms of mitochondrial fusion and fission in cold-stress-induced cell injury.

  10. VAMP7 regulates constitutive membrane incorporation of the cold-activated channel TRPM8.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Debapriya; Pinto, Silvia; Danglot, Lydia; Vandewauw, Ine; Segal, Andrei; Van Ranst, Nele; Benoit, Melissa; Janssens, Annelies; Vennekens, Rudi; Vanden Berghe, Pieter; Galli, Thierry; Vriens, Joris; Voets, Thomas

    2016-02-04

    The cation channel TRPM8 plays a central role in the somatosensory system, as a key sensor of innocuously cold temperatures and cooling agents. Although increased functional expression of TRPM8 has been implicated in various forms of pathological cold hypersensitivity, little is known about the cellular and molecular mechanisms that determine TRPM8 abundance at the plasma membrane. Here we demonstrate constitutive transport of TRPM8 towards the plasma membrane in atypical, non-acidic transport vesicles that contain lysosomal-associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP1), and provide evidence that vesicle-associated membrane protein 7 (VAMP7) mediates fusion of these vesicles with the plasma membrane. In line herewith, VAMP7-deficient mice exhibit reduced functional expression of TRPM8 in sensory neurons and concomitant deficits in cold avoidance and icilin-induced cold hypersensitivity. Our results uncover a cellular pathway that controls functional plasma membrane incorporation of a temperature-sensitive TRP channel, and thus regulates thermosensitivity in vivo.

  11. Hypersensitivity to fluoroquinolones

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Tahia D.; Ariza, Adriana; Palomares, Francisca; Montañez, María I.; Salas, María; Martín-Serrano, Angela; Fernández, Rubén; Ruiz, Arturo; Blanca, Miguel; Mayorga, Cristobalina; Torres, María J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although fluoroquinolones (FQs) are generally well-tolerated antibiotics, increasing numbers of hypersensitivity reactions have been reported. These can be evaluated in vitro by basophil activation tests (BATs); however, sensitivity is not optimal. Many factors could influence sensitivity such as basophil activation markers. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of 2 different activations markers, CD63 and CD203c, on the sensitivity of BAT to FQ. We studied 17 patients with immediate allergic reactions to FQ. BAT was performed with moxifloxacin and ciprofloxacin using CD193 (CCR3) for basophil selection and CD203c or CD63 as activation markers. Stimulation with ciprofloxacin induced a significantly higher expression of CD63 in ciprofloxacin-allergic patients compared to moxifloxacin-allergic patients (P = 0.002). In patients allergic to moxifloxacin with anaphylactic shock, we have observed an increase in the percentage of cells that upregulate CD203c, whereas patients with anaphylaxis preferentially upregulate CD63. The best sensitivity–specificity was obtained using a cutoff of 3 and the culprit FQ, using CD203c for moxifloxacin-allergic patients (sensitivity = 36.4%; specificity = 94.4%), and CD63 for ciprofloxacin-allergic patients (sensitivity = 83.3%; specificity = 88.9%). A negative correlation was found between the upregulation of CD63 and CD203c and the time interval between the reaction occurrence and the performance of the test (Spearman r = −0.446; P < 0.001 for CD63 and Spearman r = −0.386; P < 0.001 for CD203c). The performance of BAT for FQ allergy must be optimized for each drug, taking into account possible differences in the stimulation mechanism that leads to the upregulation of different activation markers. PMID:27281069

  12. Hypersensitivity to antineoplastic agents.

    PubMed

    Castells, M C

    2008-01-01

    The need to offer first line therapy for primary and recurrent cancers has spurred the clinical development of rapid desensitizations for chemotherapy and monoclonal antibodies. Rapid desensitizations allow patients to be treated with medications to which they have presented with hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs), including anaphylaxis. Rapid desensitization achieves temporary tolerization to full therapeutic doses by slow administration of incremental doses of the drug inducing the HSR. Protocols are available for most chemotherapy agents, including taxanes, platins, doxorubicin, monoclonal antibodies, and others. Candidate patients include those who present with type I HSRs, mast cell/IgE dependent, including anaphylaxis, and non-IgE mediated HSRs, during the chemotherapy infusion or shortly after. Idiosyncratic reactions, erythema multiforme, Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis are not amenable to rapid desensitization. The recommendation for rapid desensitization can only be made by allergy and immunology specialists and can only be performed in settings with one-to-one nurse-patient care and where resuscitation personnel and resources are readily available. Repeated desensitizations can be safely performed in outpatient settings with similar conditions, which allow cancer patients to remain in clinical studies. We have generated a universal 12-step protocol that was applied to 413 cases of intravenous and intraperitoneal rapid desensitizations using taxanes, platins, liposomal doxorubicin, doxorubicin, rituximab, and other chemotherapy drugs. Under this protocol all patients were able to complete their target dose, and 94% of the patients had limited or no reactions. No deaths or codes were reported, indicating that the procedure was safe and effective in delivering first line chemotherapy drugs. PMID:18991707

  13. New insights into visceral hypersensitivity--clinical implications in IBS.

    PubMed

    Zhou, QiQi; Verne, G Nicholas

    2011-06-01

    A subset of patients with IBS have visceral hypersensitivity and/or somatic hypersensitivity. Visceral hypersensitivity might have use as a clinical marker of IBS and could account for symptoms of urgency for bowel movements, bloating and abdominal pain. The mechanisms that lead to chronic visceral hypersensitivity in patients who have IBS are unclear. However, several working models may be considered, including: nociceptive input from the colon that leads to hypersensitivity; increased intestinal permeability that induces a visceral nociceptive drive; and alterations in the expression of microRNAs in gastrointestinal tissue that might be delivered via blood microvesicles to other target organs, such as the peripheral and/or central nervous system. As such, the chronic visceral hypersensitivity that is present in a subset of patients with IBS might be maintained by both peripheral and central phenomena. The theories underlying the development of chronic visceral hypersensitivity in patients with IBS are supported by findings from new animal models in which hypersensitivity follows transient inflammation of the colon. The presence of somatic hypersensitivity and an alteration in the neuroendocrine system in some patients who have IBS suggests that multisystemic factors are involved in the overall disorder. Thus, IBS is similar to other chronic pain disorders, such as fibromyalgia, chronic regional pain disorder and temporomandibular joint disorder, as chronic nociceptive mechanisms are activated in all of these disorders.

  14. Cold-induced Spreading of Water Drops on Hydrophobic Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavakoli, Faryar; Kavehpour, Pirouz

    2013-11-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces received tremendous attention in recent years mainly due to their self-cleaning properties. Wenzel and Cassie-Baxter models for relating stable equilibrium contact angle to physical parameters of liquid and solid ignore tangible factors such as temperature and humidity. Here, we show a peculiar behavior of equilibrium contact angle on cold hydrophobic surfaces. Water drops were cooled by a peltier element to temperatures below the melting point of water and, surprisingly, substantial change in static contact angle and base diameter were observed during the cooling process. Physical variables such as substrate temperature, humidity, drop volume, and even fabrication type of hydrophobic surfaces are found to be detrimental to post-spreading shape.

  15. Mechanism of sand slide - cold lahar induced by extreme rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuoka, Hiroshi; Yamada, Masumi; Dok, Atitkagna

    2014-05-01

    Along with the increasing frequencies of extreme rainfall events in almost every where on the earth, shallow slide - debris flow, i.e. cold lahars running long distance often occurs and claims downslope residents lives. In the midnight of 15 October 2013, Typhoon Wilpha attacked the Izu-Oshima, a active volcanic Island and the extreme rainfall of more than 800 mm / 24 hours was recorded. This downpour of more than 80 mm/hr lasted 4 hours at its peak and caused a number of cold lahars. The initial stage of those lahars was shallow slides of surface black volcanic ash deposits, containing mostly fine sands. The thickness was only 50 cm - 1 m. In the reconnaissance investigation, author found that the sliding surface was the boundary of two separate volcanic ash layers between the black and yellow colored and apparently showing contrast of permeability and hardness. Permeability contrast may have contributed to generation of excess pore pressure on the border and trigger the slide. Then, the unconsolidated, unpacked mass was easily fluidized and transformed into mud flows, that which volcanologists call cold lahars. Seismometers installed for monitoring the active volcano's activities, succeeded to detect many tremors events. Many are spikes but 5 larger and longer events were extracted. They lasted 2 -3 minutes and if we assume that this tremors reflects the runout movement, then we can calculate the mean velocity of the lahars. Estimated velocity was 45 - 60 km/h, which is much higher than the average speed 30 - 40 km/h of debris flows observed in Japan. Flume tests of volcanic ash flows by the Forestry and Forest Products Research Institute showed the wet volcanic ash can run at higher speed than other materials. The two tremor records were compare d with the local residents witnessed and confirmed by newspaper reported that the reach of the lahar was observed at the exact time when tremor ends. We took the black volcanic ash and conducted ring shear tests to

  16. Inflammatory Role of ROS-Sensitive AMP-Activated Protein Kinase in the Hypersensitivity of Lung Vagal C Fibers Induced by Intermittent Hypoxia in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chang-Huan; Shen, Yan-Jhih; Lai, Ching Jung; Kou, Yu Ru

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), manifested by airway exposure to intermittent hypoxia (IH), is associated with excess reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in airways, airway inflammation, and hyperreactive airway diseases. The cause-effect relationship for these events remains unclear. We investigated the inflammatory role of ROS-sensitive AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in IH-induced airway hypersensitivity mediated by lung vagal C fibers (LVCFs) in rats. Conscious rats were exposed to room air (RA) or IH with or without treatment with N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC, an antioxidant), Compound C (an AMPK inhibitor), ibuprofen (a cyclooxygenase inhibitor), or their vehicles. Immediately after exposure (24 h), we found that intravenous capsaicin, phenylbiguanide, or α,β-methylene-ATP evoked augmented LVCF-mediated apneic responses and LVCF afferent responses in rats subjected to IH exposure in comparison with those in RA rats. The potentiating effect of IH on LVCF responses decreased at 6 h after and vanished at 12 h after the termination of IH exposure. The potentiating effect of IH on LVCF-mediated apneic and LVCF afferent responses was significantly attenuated by treatment with NAC, compound C, or ibuprofen, but not by their vehicles. Further biochemical analysis revealed that rats exposed to IH displayed increased lung levels of lipid peroxidation (an index of oxidative stress), AMPK phosphorylation (an index of AMPK activation), and prostaglandin E2 (a cyclooxygenase metabolite), compared with those exposed to RA. IH-induced increase in lipid peroxidation was considerably suppressed by treatment with NAC but not by compound C or ibuprofen. IH-induced increase in AMPK phosphorylation was totally abolished by NAC or compound C but not by ibuprofen. IH-induced increase in prostaglandin E2 was considerably prevented by any of these three inhibitor treatments. The vehicles of these inhibitors exerted no significant effect on the three IH-induced responses. These

  17. A plant-inducible gene of Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris encodes an exocellular component required for growth in the host and hypersensitivity on nonhosts.

    PubMed Central

    Kamoun, S; Kado, C I

    1990-01-01

    Using Tn4431, a transposon that allows transcriptional fusions to a promoterless luciferase (lux) operon, we have isolated a nonpathogenic mutant of Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, i.e., JS111, that does not incite any of the black rot symptoms on all tested cruciferous host plants (J. J. Shaw, L. G. Settles, and C. I. Kado, Mol. Plant Microbe Interact. 1:39-45, 1988). In the study reported here, we determined that in contrast to the wild-type strain, JS111 is unable to induce a hypersensitive necrotic response on nonhost plants such as datura, tomato, and cucumber, suggesting that JS111 is a nonpathogenic, nonhypersensitive Hrp mutant. JS111 displayed culture growth rates, exopolysaccharide production, and protease, pectate lysase, cellulase, amylase, and phosphatase activities comparable to those of the wild-type strain. However, the growth of JS111 in host leaves was markedly attenuated. Coinoculation of JS111 with the wild-type strain in cauliflower or radish leaves rescued the growth deficiency of the mutant to normal levels. The locus mutated in JS111 was cloned and named hrpXc, and transcriptional and genetic complementation analyses of the hrpXc locus were conducted. The regulation of hrpXc expression was also investigated in vitro and in planta, using fusions to a lux or chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene. The hrpXc gene was found to be strongly induced in radish leaves. This is the first report and analysis of a hrp locus from a Xanthomonas species. Images PMID:2168373

  18. Transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 activation enhances hapten sensitization in a T-helper type 2-driven fluorescein isothiocyanate-induced contact hypersensitivity mouse model

    SciTech Connect

    Shiba, Takahiro; Tamai, Takuma; Sahara, Yurina; Kurohane, Kohta; Watanabe, Tatsuo; Imai, Yasuyuki

    2012-11-01

    Some chemicals contribute to the development of allergies by increasing the immunogenicity of other allergens. We have demonstrated that several phthalate esters, including dibutyl phthalate (DBP), enhance skin sensitization to fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) in a mouse contact hypersensitivity model, in which the T-helper type 2 (Th2) response is essential. On the other hand, some phthalate esters were found to activate transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) cation channels on sensory neurons. We then found a positive correlation between the enhancing effects of several types of phthalate esters on skin sensitization to FITC and their ability to activate TRPA1. Here we examined the involvement of TRPA1 in sensitization to FITC by using TRPA1 agonists other than phthalate esters. During skin sensitization to FITC, the TRPA1 agonists (menthol, carvacrol, cinnamaldehyde and DBP) augmented the ear-swelling response as well as trafficking of FITC-presenting dendritic cells to draining lymph nodes. We confirmed that these TRPA1 agonists induced calcium influx into TRPA1-expressing Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. We also found that TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031 inhibited DBP-induced calcium influx into TRPA1-expressing CHO cells. After pretreatment with this antagonist upon skin sensitization to FITC, the enhancing effect of DBP on sensitization was suppressed. These results suggest that TRPA1 activation will become a useful marker to find chemicals that facilitate sensitization in combination with other immunogenic haptens. -- Highlights: ► Role of TRPA1 activation was revealed in a mouse model of skin sensitization to FITC. ► TRPA1 agonists enhanced skin sensitization as well as dendritic cell trafficking. ► Dibutyl phthalate (DBP) has been shown to enhance skin sensitization to FITC. ► TRPA1 activation by DBP was inhibited by a selective antagonist, HC-030031. ► HC-030031 inhibited the enhancing effect of DBP on skin sensitization to FITC.

  19. Cold-inducible RNA-binding protein mediates airway inflammation and mucus hypersecretion through a post-transcriptional regulatory mechanism under cold stress.

    PubMed

    Juan, Yang; Haiqiao, Wu; Xie, Wenyao; Huaping, Huang; Zhong, Han; Xiangdong, Zhou; Kolosov, Victor P; Perelman, Juliy M

    2016-09-01

    Acute or chronic cold exposure exacerbates chronic inflammatory airway diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma. Cold-inducible RNA-binding protein (CIRP) is a cold-shock protein and is induced by various environmental stressors, such as hypothermia and hypoxia. In this study, we showed that CIRP gene and protein levels were significantly increased in patients with COPD and in rats with chronic airway inflammation compared with healthy subjects. Similarly, inflammatory cytokine production and MUC5AC secretion were up-regulated in rats following cigarette smoke inhalation. Cold temperature-induced CIRP overexpression and translocation were shown to be dependent on arginine methylation in vitro. CIRP overexpression promoted stress granule (SG) assembly. In the cytoplasm, the stability of pro-inflammatory cytokine mRNAs was increased through specific interactions between CIRP and mediator mRNA 3'-UTRs; these interactions increased the mRNA translation, resulting in MUC5AC overproduction in response to cold stress. Conversely, CIRP silencing and a methyltransferase inhibitor (adenosine dialdehyde) promoted cytokine mRNA degradation and inhibited the inflammatory response and mucus hypersecretion. These findings indicate that cold temperature can induce an airway inflammatory response and excess mucus production via a CIRP-mediated increase in mRNA stability and protein translation. PMID:27477308

  20. Electrosensibility and electromagnetic hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Leitgeb, Norbert; Schröttner, Jörg

    2003-09-01

    Electromagnetic sensibility, the ability to perceive electric and electromagnetic exposure, and electromagnetic hypersensitivity (EHS), developing health symptoms due to exposure to environmental electromagnetic fields, need to be distinguished. Increased electrosensibility is a necessary, however, not a sufficient condition for electromagnetic hypersensitivity. At an extended sample of the general population of 708 adults, including 349 men and 359 women aged between 17 and 60 years, electrosensibility was investigated and characterized by perception threshold and its standard deviation. By analyzing the probability distributions of the perception threshold of electric 50 Hz currents, evidence could be found for the existence of a subgroup of people with significantly increased electrosensibility (hypersensibility) who as a group could be differentiated from the general population. The presented data show that the variation of the electrosensibility among the general population is significantly larger than has yet been estimated by nonionizing radiation protection bodies, but much smaller than claimed by hypersensitivity self-aid groups. These quantitative results should contribute to a less emotional discussion of this problem. The investigation method presented, is capable of exclusion diagnostics for persons suffering from the hypersensitivity syndrome. PMID:12929157

  1. A novel plant defensin-like gene of winter wheat is specifically induced during cold acclimation.

    PubMed

    Koike, Michiya; Okamoto, Takashi; Tsuda, Sakae; Imai, Ryozo

    2002-10-18

    A novel cDNA clone, Tad1, was isolated from crown tissue of winter wheat after differential screening of cold acclimation-induced genes. The Tad1 cDNA encoded a 23kDa polypeptide with a potential N-terminal signal sequence. The putative mature sequence showed striking similarity to plant defensins or gamma-thionins, representing low molecular size antipathogenic polypeptides. High levels of Tad1 mRNA accumulation occurred within one day of cold acclimation in crown tissue and the level was maintained throughout 14 days of cold acclimation. Similar rapid induction was observed in young seedlings treated with low temperature but not with exogenous abscisic acid. In contrast to defensins from other plant species, neither salicylic acid nor methyl jasmonate induced expression of Tad1. The recombinant mature form of TAD1 polypeptide inhibited the growth of the phytopathogenic bacteria, Pseudomonas cichorii; however, no antifreeze activity was detected. Collectively, these data suggested that Tad1 is induced in cold-acclimated winter wheat independent of major defense signaling(s) and is involved in low temperature-induced resistance to pathogens during winter hardening. PMID:12379218

  2. Cold Atmospheric Plasma Induces a Predominantly Necrotic Cell Death via the Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Cousty, Sarah; Cambus, Jean-Pierre; Valentin, Alexis

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Cold plasma is a partially ionized gas generated by an electric field at atmospheric pressure that was initially used in medicine for decontamination and sterilization of inert surfaces. There is currently growing interest in using cold plasma for more direct medical applications, mainly due to the possibility of tuning it to obtain selective biological effects in absence of toxicity for surrounding normal tissues,. While the therapeutic potential of cold plasma in chronic wound, blood coagulation, and cancer treatment is beginning to be documented, information on plasma/cell interaction is so far limited and controversial. Methods and Results Using normal primary human fibroblast cultures isolated from oral tissue, we sought to decipher the effects on cell behavior of a proprietary cold plasma device generating guided ionization waves carried by helium. In this model, cold plasma treatment induces a predominantly necrotic cell death. Interestingly, death is not triggered by a direct interaction of the cold plasma with cells, but rather via a transient modification in the microenvironment. We show that modification of the microenvironment redox status suppresses treatment toxicity and protects cells from death. Moreover, necrosis is not accidental and seems to be an active response to an environmental cue, as its execution can be inhibited to rescue cells. Conclusion These observations will need to be taken into account when studying in vitro plasma/cell interaction and may have implications for the design and future evaluation of the efficacy and safety of this new treatment strategy. PMID:26275141

  3. A specific glycerol kinase induces rapid cold hardening of the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella.

    PubMed

    Park, Youngjin; Kim, Yonggyun

    2014-08-01

    Insects in temperate zones survive low temperatures by migrating or tolerating the cold. The diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella, is a serious insect pest on cabbage and other cruciferous crops worldwide. We showed that P. xylostella became cold-tolerant by expressing rapid cold hardiness (RCH) in response to a brief exposure to moderately low temperature (4°C) for 7h along with glycerol accumulation in hemolymph. Glycerol played a crucial role in the cold-hardening process because exogenously supplying glycerol significantly increased the cold tolerance of P. xylostella larvae without cold acclimation. To determine the genetic factor(s) responsible for RCH and the increase of glycerol, four glycerol kinases (GKs), and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (PxGPDH) were predicted from the whole P. xylostella genome and analyzed for their function associated with glycerol biosynthesis. All predicted genes were expressed, but differed in their expression during different developmental stages and in different tissues. Expression of the predicted genes was individually suppressed by RNA interference (RNAi) using double-stranded RNAs specific to target genes. RNAi of PxGPDH expression significantly suppressed RCH and glycerol accumulation. Only PxGK1 among the four GKs was responsible for RCH and glycerol accumulation. Furthermore, PxGK1 expression was significantly enhanced during RCH. These results indicate that a specific GK, the terminal enzyme to produce glycerol, is specifically inducible during RCH to accumulate the main cryoprotectant.

  4. Treatments for hypersensitive noncarious cervical lesions

    PubMed Central

    Veitz-Keenan, Analia; Barna, Julie Ann; Strober, Brad; Matthews, Abigail G.; Collie, Damon; Vena, Donald; Curro, Frederick A.; Thompson, Van P.

    2014-01-01

    Background The Practitioners Engaged in Applied Research and Learning (PEARL) Network conducted a three-armed randomized clinical study to determine the comparative effectiveness of three treatments for hypersensitive noncarious cervical lesions (NCCLs): use of a potassium nitrate dentifrice for treatment of hypersensitivity, placement of a resin-based composite restoration and placement of a sealant. Methods Seventeen trained practitioner-investigators (P-Is) in the PEARL Network enrolled participants (N = 304) with hypersensitive posterior NCCLs who met enrollment criteria. Participants were assigned to treatments randomly. Evaluations were conducted at baseline and at one, three and six months thereafter. Primary outcomes were the reduction or elimination of hypersensitivity as measured clinically and by means of patient-reported outcomes. Results Lesion depth and pretreatment sensitivity (mean, 5.3 on a 0- to 10-point scale) were balanced across treatments, as was sleep bruxism (present in 42.2 percent of participants). The six-month participant recall rate was 99 percent. Treatments significantly reduced mean sensitivity (P < .01), with the sealant and restoration groups displaying a significantly higher reduction (P < .01) than did the dentifrice group. The dentifrice group’s mean (standard deviation) sensitivity at six months was 2.1 (2.1); those of the sealant and restoration groups were 1.0 (1.6) and 0.8 (1.4), respectively. Patient-reported sensitivity (to cold being most pronounced) paralleled clinical measurements at each evaluation. Conclusions Sealing and restoration treatments were effective overall in reducing NCCL hypersensitivity. The potassium nitrate dentifrice reduced sensitivity with increasing effectiveness through six months but not to the degree offered by the other treatments. Practical Implications Sealant or restoration placement is an effective method of immediately reducing NCCL sensitivity. Although a potassium nitrate dentifrice

  5. Comparison of free radicals formation induced by cold atmospheric plasma, ultrasound, and ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Rehman, Mati Ur; Jawaid, Paras; Uchiyama, Hidefumi; Kondo, Takashi

    2016-09-01

    Plasma medicine is increasingly recognized interdisciplinary field combining engineering, physics, biochemistry and life sciences. Plasma is classified into two categories based on the temperature applied, namely "thermal" and "non-thermal" (i.e., cold atmospheric plasma). Non-thermal or cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) is produced by applying high voltage electric field at low pressures and power. The chemical effects of cold atmospheric plasma in aqueous solution are attributed to high voltage discharge and gas flow, which is transported rapidly on the liquid surface. The argon-cold atmospheric plasma (Ar-CAP) induces efficient reactive oxygen species (ROS) in aqueous solutions without thermal decomposition. Their formation has been confirmed by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin trapping, which is reviewed here. The similarities and differences between the plasma chemistry, sonochemistry, and radiation chemistry are explained. Further, the evidence for free radical formation in the liquid phase and their role in the biological effects induced by cold atmospheric plasma, ultrasound and ionizing radiation are discussed.

  6. Comparison of free radicals formation induced by cold atmospheric plasma, ultrasound, and ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Rehman, Mati Ur; Jawaid, Paras; Uchiyama, Hidefumi; Kondo, Takashi

    2016-09-01

    Plasma medicine is increasingly recognized interdisciplinary field combining engineering, physics, biochemistry and life sciences. Plasma is classified into two categories based on the temperature applied, namely "thermal" and "non-thermal" (i.e., cold atmospheric plasma). Non-thermal or cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) is produced by applying high voltage electric field at low pressures and power. The chemical effects of cold atmospheric plasma in aqueous solution are attributed to high voltage discharge and gas flow, which is transported rapidly on the liquid surface. The argon-cold atmospheric plasma (Ar-CAP) induces efficient reactive oxygen species (ROS) in aqueous solutions without thermal decomposition. Their formation has been confirmed by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin trapping, which is reviewed here. The similarities and differences between the plasma chemistry, sonochemistry, and radiation chemistry are explained. Further, the evidence for free radical formation in the liquid phase and their role in the biological effects induced by cold atmospheric plasma, ultrasound and ionizing radiation are discussed. PMID:27085689

  7. The scorpion toxin Amm VIII induces pain hypersensitivity through gain-of-function of TTX-sensitive Na⁺ channels.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Najwa; Gaudioso-Tyzra, Christelle; Bonnet, Caroline; Gabriac, Mélanie; Amsalem, Muriel; Lonigro, Aurélie; Padilla, Françoise; Crest, Marcel; Martin-Eauclaire, Marie-France; Delmas, Patrick

    2013-08-01

    Voltage-gated Na(+) channels (Nav) are the targets of a variety of scorpion toxins. Here, we investigated the effects of Amm VIII, a toxin isolated from the venom of the scorpion Androctonus mauretanicus mauretanicus, on pain-related behaviours in mice. The effects of Amm VIII were compared with the classic scorpion α-toxin AaH II from Androctonus australis. Contrary to AaH II, intraplantar injection of Amm VIII at relatively high concentrations caused little nocifensive behaviours. However, Amm VIII induced rapid mechanical and thermal pain hypersensitivities. We evaluated the toxins' effects on Nav currents in nociceptive dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and immortalized DRG neuron-derived F11 cells. Amm VIII and AaH II enhanced tetrodotoxin-sensitive (TTX-S) Nav currents in DRG and F11 cells. Both toxins impaired fast inactivation and negatively shifted activation. AaH II was more potent than Amm VIII at modulating TTX-S Nav currents with EC50 of 5 nM and 1 μM, respectively. AaH II and Amm VIII also impaired fast inactivation of Nav1.7, with EC50 of 6.8 nM and 1.76 μM, respectively. Neither Nav1.8 nor Nav1.9 was affected by the toxins. AaH II and Amm VIII reduced first spike latency and lowered action potential threshold. Amm VIII was less efficient than AaH II in increasing the gain of the firing frequency-stimulation relationship. In conclusion, our data show that Amm VIII, although less potent than AaH II, acts as a gating-modifier peptide reminiscent of classic α-toxins, and suggest that its hyperalgesic effects can be ascribed to gain-of-function of TTX-S Na(+) channels in nociceptors. PMID:23685008

  8. The scorpion toxin Amm VIII induces pain hypersensitivity through gain-of-function of TTX-sensitive Na⁺ channels.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Najwa; Gaudioso-Tyzra, Christelle; Bonnet, Caroline; Gabriac, Mélanie; Amsalem, Muriel; Lonigro, Aurélie; Padilla, Françoise; Crest, Marcel; Martin-Eauclaire, Marie-France; Delmas, Patrick

    2013-08-01

    Voltage-gated Na(+) channels (Nav) are the targets of a variety of scorpion toxins. Here, we investigated the effects of Amm VIII, a toxin isolated from the venom of the scorpion Androctonus mauretanicus mauretanicus, on pain-related behaviours in mice. The effects of Amm VIII were compared with the classic scorpion α-toxin AaH II from Androctonus australis. Contrary to AaH II, intraplantar injection of Amm VIII at relatively high concentrations caused little nocifensive behaviours. However, Amm VIII induced rapid mechanical and thermal pain hypersensitivities. We evaluated the toxins' effects on Nav currents in nociceptive dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and immortalized DRG neuron-derived F11 cells. Amm VIII and AaH II enhanced tetrodotoxin-sensitive (TTX-S) Nav currents in DRG and F11 cells. Both toxins impaired fast inactivation and negatively shifted activation. AaH II was more potent than Amm VIII at modulating TTX-S Nav currents with EC50 of 5 nM and 1 μM, respectively. AaH II and Amm VIII also impaired fast inactivation of Nav1.7, with EC50 of 6.8 nM and 1.76 μM, respectively. Neither Nav1.8 nor Nav1.9 was affected by the toxins. AaH II and Amm VIII reduced first spike latency and lowered action potential threshold. Amm VIII was less efficient than AaH II in increasing the gain of the firing frequency-stimulation relationship. In conclusion, our data show that Amm VIII, although less potent than AaH II, acts as a gating-modifier peptide reminiscent of classic α-toxins, and suggest that its hyperalgesic effects can be ascribed to gain-of-function of TTX-S Na(+) channels in nociceptors.

  9. Hypersensitivity Induced by Activation of Spinal Cord PAR2 Receptors Is Partially Mediated by TRPV1 Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Mrozkova, Petra; Spicarova, Diana; Palecek, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    Protease-activated receptors 2 (PAR2) and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) receptors in the peripheral nerve endings are implicated in the development of increased sensitivity to mechanical and thermal stimuli, especially during inflammatory states. Both PAR2 and TRPV1 receptors are co-expressed in nociceptive dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons on their peripheral endings and also on presynaptic endings in the spinal cord dorsal horn. However, the modulation of nociceptive synaptic transmission in the superficial dorsal horn after activation of PAR2 and their functional coupling with TRPV1 is not clear. To investigate the role of spinal PAR2 activation on nociceptive modulation, intrathecal drug application was used in behavioural experiments and patch-clamp recordings of spontaneous, miniature and dorsal root stimulation-evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs, mEPSCs, eEPSCs) were performed on superficial dorsal horn neurons in acute rat spinal cord slices. Intrathecal application of PAR2 activating peptide SLIGKV-NH2 induced thermal hyperalgesia, which was prevented by pretreatment with TRPV1 antagonist SB 366791 and was reduced by protein kinases inhibitor staurosporine. Patch-clamp experiments revealed robust decrease of mEPSC frequency (62.8 ± 4.9%), increase of sEPSC frequency (127.0 ± 5.9%) and eEPSC amplitude (126.9 ± 12.0%) in dorsal horn neurons after acute SLIGKV-NH2 application. All these EPSC changes, induced by PAR2 activation, were prevented by SB 366791 and staurosporine pretreatment. Our results demonstrate an important role of spinal PAR2 receptors in modulation of nociceptive transmission in the spinal cord dorsal horn at least partially mediated by activation of presynaptic TRPV1 receptors. The functional coupling between the PAR2 and TRPV1 receptors on the central branches of DRG neurons may be important especially during different pathological states when it may enhance pain perception. PMID:27755539

  10. Plant innate immunity induced by flagellin suppresses the hypersensitive response in non-host plants elicited by Pseudomonas syringae pv. averrhoi.

    PubMed

    Wei, Chia-Fong; Hsu, Shih-Tien; Deng, Wen-Ling; Wen, Yu-Der; Huang, Hsiou-Chen

    2012-01-01

    A new pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae pv. averrhoi (Pav), which causes bacterial spot disease on carambola was identified in Taiwan in 1997. Many strains of this pathovar have been isolated from different locations and several varieties of hosts. Some of these strains, such as HL1, are nonmotile and elicit a strong hypersensitive response (HR) in nonhost tobacco leaves, while other strains, such as PA5, are motile and elicit a weak HR. Based on the image from a transmission electron microscope, the results showed that HL1 is flagellum-deficient and PA5 has normal flagella. Here we cloned and analyzed the fliC gene and glycosylation island from Pav HL1 and PA5. The amino acid sequences of FliC from HL1 and PA5 are identical to P. s. pvs. tabaci (Pta), glycinea and phaseolicola and share very high similarity with other pathovars of P. syringae. In contrast to the flagellin mutant PtaΔfliC, PA5ΔfliC grows as well as wild type in the host plant, but it elicits stronger HR than wild type does in non-host plants. Furthermore, the purified Pav flagellin, but not the divergent flagellin from Agrobacterium tumefaciens, is able to impair the HR induced by PA5ΔfliC. PA5Δfgt1 possessing nonglycosylated flagella behaved as its wild type in both bacterial growth in host and HR elicitation. Flagellin was infiltrated into tobacco leaves either simultaneously with flagellum-deficient HL1 or prior to the inoculation of wild type HL1, and both treatments impaired the HR induced by HL1. Moreover, the HR elicited by PA5 and PA5ΔfliC was enhanced by the addition of cycloheximide, suggesting that the flagellin is one of the PAMPs (pathogen-associated molecular patterns) contributed to induce the PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI). Taken together, the results shown in this study reveal that flagellin in Pav is capable of suppressing HR via PTI induction during an incompatible interaction.

  11. Plant innate immunity induced by flagellin suppresses the hypersensitive response in non-host plants elicited by Pseudomonas syringae pv. averrhoi.

    PubMed

    Wei, Chia-Fong; Hsu, Shih-Tien; Deng, Wen-Ling; Wen, Yu-Der; Huang, Hsiou-Chen

    2012-01-01

    A new pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae pv. averrhoi (Pav), which causes bacterial spot disease on carambola was identified in Taiwan in 1997. Many strains of this pathovar have been isolated from different locations and several varieties of hosts. Some of these strains, such as HL1, are nonmotile and elicit a strong hypersensitive response (HR) in nonhost tobacco leaves, while other strains, such as PA5, are motile and elicit a weak HR. Based on the image from a transmission electron microscope, the results showed that HL1 is flagellum-deficient and PA5 has normal flagella. Here we cloned and analyzed the fliC gene and glycosylation island from Pav HL1 and PA5. The amino acid sequences of FliC from HL1 and PA5 are identical to P. s. pvs. tabaci (Pta), glycinea and phaseolicola and share very high similarity with other pathovars of P. syringae. In contrast to the flagellin mutant PtaΔfliC, PA5ΔfliC grows as well as wild type in the host plant, but it elicits stronger HR than wild type does in non-host plants. Furthermore, the purified Pav flagellin, but not the divergent flagellin from Agrobacterium tumefaciens, is able to impair the HR induced by PA5ΔfliC. PA5Δfgt1 possessing nonglycosylated flagella behaved as its wild type in both bacterial growth in host and HR elicitation. Flagellin was infiltrated into tobacco leaves either simultaneously with flagellum-deficient HL1 or prior to the inoculation of wild type HL1, and both treatments impaired the HR induced by HL1. Moreover, the HR elicited by PA5 and PA5ΔfliC was enhanced by the addition of cycloheximide, suggesting that the flagellin is one of the PAMPs (pathogen-associated molecular patterns) contributed to induce the PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI). Taken together, the results shown in this study reveal that flagellin in Pav is capable of suppressing HR via PTI induction during an incompatible interaction. PMID:22911741

  12. Cavity-Induced Spin-Orbit Coupling in Cold Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Chuanzhou; Dong, Lin; Pu, Han

    2016-05-01

    We consider a single ultracold atom trapped inside a single-mode optical cavity, where a two-photon Raman process induces an effective coupling between atom's pseudo-spin and external center-of-mass (COM) motion. Without the COM motion, this system is described by the Jaynes-Cummings (JC) model. We show how the atomic COM motion dramatically modifies the predictions based on the JC model, and how the cavity photon field affects the properties of spin-orbit coupled system. We take a quantum Master equation approach to investigate the situation when the cavity pumping and decay are taken into account.

  13. Pharmacological Activation/Inhibition of the Cannabinoid System Affects Alcohol Withdrawal-Induced Neuronal Hypersensitivity to Excitotoxic Insults

    PubMed Central

    Rubio, Marina; Villain, Hélène; Docagne, Fabian; Roussel, Benoit D.; Ramos, José Antonio; Vivien, Denis; Fernandez-Ruiz, Javier; Ali, Carine

    2011-01-01

    Cessation of chronic ethanol consumption can increase the sensitivity of the brain to excitotoxic damages. Cannabinoids have been proposed as neuroprotectants in different models of neuronal injury, but their effect have never been investigated in a context of excitotoxicity after alcohol cessation. Here we examined the effects of the pharmacological activation/inhibition of the endocannabinoid system in an in vitro model of chronic ethanol exposure and withdrawal followed by an excitotoxic challenge. Ethanol withdrawal increased N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-evoked neuronal death, probably by altering the ratio between GluN2A and GluN2B NMDA receptor subunits. The stimulation of the endocannabinoid system with the cannabinoid agonist HU-210 decreased NMDA-induced neuronal death exclusively in ethanol-withdrawn neurons. This neuroprotection could be explained by a decrease in NMDA-stimulated calcium influx after the administration of HU-210, found exclusively in ethanol-withdrawn neurons. By contrast, the inhibition of the cannabinoid system with the CB1 receptor antagonist rimonabant (SR141716) during ethanol withdrawal increased death of ethanol-withdrawn neurons without any modification of NMDA-stimulated calcium influx. Moreover, chronic administration of rimonabant increased NMDA-stimulated toxicity not only in withdrawn neurons, but also in control neurons. In summary, we show for the first time that the stimulation of the endocannabinoid system is protective against the hyperexcitability developed during alcohol withdrawal. By contrast, the blockade of the endocannabinoid system is highly counterproductive during alcohol withdrawal. PMID:21886913

  14. Pharmacogenetics of drug hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Elizabeth J; Mallal, Simon A

    2010-01-01

    Drug hypersensitivity reactions and severe cutaneous adverse drug reactions, such as Stevens–Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis, are examples of serious adverse drug reactions mediated through a combination of metabolic and immunological mechanisms that could traditionally not have been predicted based on the pharmacological characteristics of the drug alone. The discovery of new associations between these syndromes and specific HLA has created the promise that risk for these reactions could be predicted through pharmacogenetic screening, thereby avoiding serious morbidity and mortality associated with these types of drug reactions. Despite this, several hurdles exist in the translation of these associations into pharmacogenetic tests that could be routinely used in the clinical setting. HLA-B*5701 screening to prevent abacavir hypersensitivity syndrome is an example of a test now in widespread routine clinical use in the developed world. PMID:20602616

  15. Photosynthesis-dependent physiological and genetic crosstalk between cold acclimation and cold-induced resistance to fungal pathogens in triticale (Triticosecale Wittm.).

    PubMed

    Szechyńska-Hebda, Magdalena; Wąsek, Iwona; Gołębiowska-Pikania, Gabriela; Dubas, Ewa; Żur, Iwona; Wędzony, Maria

    2015-04-01

    The breeding for resistance against fungal pathogens in winter triticale (Triticosecale Wittm.) continues to be hindered by a complexity of the resistance mechanisms, strong interaction with environmental conditions, and dependence on the plant genotype. We showed, that temperature below 4 °C induced the plant genotype-dependent resistance against the fungal pathogen Microdochium nivale. The mechanism involved, at least, the adjustment of the reactions in the PSII proximity and photoprotection, followed by an improvement of the growth and development. The genotypes capable to develop the cold-induced resistance, showed a higher maximum quantum yield of PSII and a more efficient integration of the primary photochemistry of light reactions with the dark reactions. Moreover, induction of the photoprotective mechanism, involving at least the peroxidases scavenging hydrogen peroxide, was observed for such genotypes. Adjustment of the photosynthesis and stress acclimation has enabled fast plant growth and avoidance of the developmental stages sensitive to fungal infection. The same mechanisms allowed the quick regrow of plants during the post-disease period. In contrast, genotypes that were unable to develop resistance despite cold hardening had less flexible balancing of the photoprotection and photoinhibition processes. Traits related to: photosynthesis-dependent cold-acclimation and cold-induced resistance; biomass accumulation and growth; as well as protection system involving peroxidases; were integrated also at a genetic level. Analysing 95 lines of the mapping population SaKa3006×Modus we determined region on chromosomes 5B and 7R shared within all tested traits. Moreover, similar expression pattern of a set of the genes related to PSII was determined with the metaanalysis of the multiple microarray experiments. Comparable results for peroxidases, involving APXs and GPXs and followed by PRXs, indicated a similar function during cold acclimation and defense

  16. Photosynthesis-dependent physiological and genetic crosstalk between cold acclimation and cold-induced resistance to fungal pathogens in triticale (Triticosecale Wittm.).

    PubMed

    Szechyńska-Hebda, Magdalena; Wąsek, Iwona; Gołębiowska-Pikania, Gabriela; Dubas, Ewa; Żur, Iwona; Wędzony, Maria

    2015-04-01

    The breeding for resistance against fungal pathogens in winter triticale (Triticosecale Wittm.) continues to be hindered by a complexity of the resistance mechanisms, strong interaction with environmental conditions, and dependence on the plant genotype. We showed, that temperature below 4 °C induced the plant genotype-dependent resistance against the fungal pathogen Microdochium nivale. The mechanism involved, at least, the adjustment of the reactions in the PSII proximity and photoprotection, followed by an improvement of the growth and development. The genotypes capable to develop the cold-induced resistance, showed a higher maximum quantum yield of PSII and a more efficient integration of the primary photochemistry of light reactions with the dark reactions. Moreover, induction of the photoprotective mechanism, involving at least the peroxidases scavenging hydrogen peroxide, was observed for such genotypes. Adjustment of the photosynthesis and stress acclimation has enabled fast plant growth and avoidance of the developmental stages sensitive to fungal infection. The same mechanisms allowed the quick regrow of plants during the post-disease period. In contrast, genotypes that were unable to develop resistance despite cold hardening had less flexible balancing of the photoprotection and photoinhibition processes. Traits related to: photosynthesis-dependent cold-acclimation and cold-induced resistance; biomass accumulation and growth; as well as protection system involving peroxidases; were integrated also at a genetic level. Analysing 95 lines of the mapping population SaKa3006×Modus we determined region on chromosomes 5B and 7R shared within all tested traits. Moreover, similar expression pattern of a set of the genes related to PSII was determined with the metaanalysis of the multiple microarray experiments. Comparable results for peroxidases, involving APXs and GPXs and followed by PRXs, indicated a similar function during cold acclimation and defense

  17. Cardiac-specific VLCAD deficiency induces dilated cardiomyopathy and cold intolerance

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Dingding; He, Huamei; James, Jeanne; Tokunaga, Chonan; Powers, Corey; Huang, Yan; Osinska, Hanna; Towbin, Jeffrey A.; Purevjav, Enkhsaikhan; Balschi, James A.; Javadov, Sabzali; McGowan, Francis X.; Strauss, Arnold W.

    2013-01-01

    The very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) enzyme catalyzes the first step of mitochondrial β-oxidation. Patients with VLCAD deficiency present with hypoketotic hypoglycemia and cardiomyopathy, which can be exacerbated by fasting and/or cold stress. Global VLCAD knockout mice recapitulate these phenotypes: mice develop cardiomyopathy, and cold exposure leads to rapid hypothermia and death. However, the contribution of different tissues to development of these phenotypes has not been studied. We generated cardiac-specific VLCAD-deficient (cVLCAD−/−) mice by Cre-mediated ablation of the VLCAD in cardiomyocytes. By 6 mo of age, cVLCAD−/− mice demonstrated increased end-diastolic and end-systolic left ventricular dimensions and decreased fractional shortening. Surprisingly, selective VLCAD gene ablation in cardiomyocytes was sufficient to evoke severe cold intolerance in mice who rapidly developed severe hypothermia, bradycardia, and markedly depressed cardiac function in response to fasting and cold exposure (+5°C). We conclude that cardiac-specific VLCAD deficiency is sufficient to induce cold intolerance and cardiomyopathy and is associated with reduced ATP production. These results provide strong evidence that fatty acid oxidation in myocardium is essential for maintaining normal cardiac function under these stress conditions. PMID:24285112

  18. Cardiac-specific VLCAD deficiency induces dilated cardiomyopathy and cold intolerance.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Dingding; He, Huamei; James, Jeanne; Tokunaga, Chonan; Powers, Corey; Huang, Yan; Osinska, Hanna; Towbin, Jeffrey A; Purevjav, Enkhsaikhan; Balschi, James A; Javadov, Sabzali; McGowan, Francis X; Strauss, Arnold W; Khuchua, Zaza

    2014-02-01

    The very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) enzyme catalyzes the first step of mitochondrial β-oxidation. Patients with VLCAD deficiency present with hypoketotic hypoglycemia and cardiomyopathy, which can be exacerbated by fasting and/or cold stress. Global VLCAD knockout mice recapitulate these phenotypes: mice develop cardiomyopathy, and cold exposure leads to rapid hypothermia and death. However, the contribution of different tissues to development of these phenotypes has not been studied. We generated cardiac-specific VLCAD-deficient (cVLCAD(-/-)) mice by Cre-mediated ablation of the VLCAD in cardiomyocytes. By 6 mo of age, cVLCAD(-/-) mice demonstrated increased end-diastolic and end-systolic left ventricular dimensions and decreased fractional shortening. Surprisingly, selective VLCAD gene ablation in cardiomyocytes was sufficient to evoke severe cold intolerance in mice who rapidly developed severe hypothermia, bradycardia, and markedly depressed cardiac function in response to fasting and cold exposure (+5°C). We conclude that cardiac-specific VLCAD deficiency is sufficient to induce cold intolerance and cardiomyopathy and is associated with reduced ATP production. These results provide strong evidence that fatty acid oxidation in myocardium is essential for maintaining normal cardiac function under these stress conditions.

  19. In vivo measurement of energy substrate contribution to cold-induced brown adipose tissue thermogenesis.

    PubMed

    Labbé, Sébastien M; Caron, Alexandre; Bakan, Inan; Laplante, Mathieu; Carpentier, André C; Lecomte, Roger; Richard, Denis

    2015-05-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the effects of cold on brown adipose tissue (BAT) energy substrate utilization in vivo using the positron emission tomography tracers [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose (glucose uptake), 14(R,S)-[(18)F]fluoro-6-thia-heptadecanoic acid [nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA) uptake], and [(11)C]acetate (oxidative activity). The measurements were performed in rats adapted to 27°C, which were acutely subjected to cold (10°C) for 2 and 6 hours, and in rats chronically adapted to 10°C for 21 days, which were returned to 27°C for 2 and 6 hours. Cold exposure (acutely and chronically) led to increases in BAT oxidative activity, which was accompanied by concomitant increases in glucose and NEFA uptake. The increases were particularly high in cold-adapted rats and largely readily reduced by the return to a warm environment. The cold-induced increase in oxidative activity was meaningfully blunted by nicotinic acid, a lipolysis inhibitor, which emphasizes in vivo the key role of intracellular lipid in BAT thermogenesis. The changes in BAT oxidative activity and glucose and NEFA uptakes were paralleled by inductions of genes involved in not only oxidative metabolism but also in energy substrate replenishment (triglyceride and glycogen synthesis). The capacity of BAT for energy substrate replenishment is remarkable.

  20. Suppression of the vacuolar invertase gene prevents cold-induced sweetening in potato.

    PubMed

    Bhaskar, Pudota B; Wu, Lei; Busse, James S; Whitty, Brett R; Hamernik, Andy J; Jansky, Shelley H; Buell, C Robin; Bethke, Paul C; Jiang, Jiming

    2010-10-01

    Potato (Solanum tuberosum) is the third most important food crop in the world. Potato tubers must be stored at cold temperatures to prevent sprouting, minimize disease losses, and supply consumers and the processing industry with high-quality tubers throughout the year. Unfortunately, cold storage triggers an accumulation of reducing sugars in tubers. High-temperature processing of these tubers results in dark-colored, bitter-tasting products. Such products also have elevated amounts of acrylamide, a neurotoxin and potential carcinogen. We demonstrate that silencing the potato vacuolar acid invertase gene VInv prevents reducing sugar accumulation in cold-stored tubers. Potato chips processed from VInv silencing lines showed a 15-fold acrylamide reduction and were light in color even when tubers were stored at 4°C. Comparable, low levels of VInv gene expression were observed in cold-stored tubers from wild potato germplasm stocks that are resistant to cold-induced sweetening. Thus, both processing quality and acrylamide problems in potato can be controlled effectively by suppression of the VInv gene through biotechnology or targeted breeding.

  1. Cold induction of Arabidopsis CBF genes involves multiple ICE (inducer of CBF expression) promoter elements and a cold-regulatory circuit that is desensitized by low temperature.

    PubMed

    Zarka, Daniel G; Vogel, Jonathan T; Cook, Daniel; Thomashow, Michael F

    2003-10-01

    The Arabidopsis CBF1, 2, and 3 genes (also known as DREB1b, c, and a, respectively) encode transcriptional activators that have a central role in cold tolerance. CBF1-3 are rapidly induced upon exposing plants to low temperature, followed by expression of CBF-targeted genes, the CBF regulon, resulting in an increase in plant freezing tolerance. At present, little is known about the cold-sensing mechanism that controls CBF expression. Results presented here indicate that this mechanism does not require a cold shock to bring about the accumulation of CBF transcripts, but instead, absolute temperature is monitored with a greater degree of input, i.e. lower temperature, resulting in a greater output, i.e. higher levels of CBF transcripts. Temperature-shift experiments also indicate that the cold-sensing mechanism becomes desensitized to a given low temperature, such as 4 degrees C, and that resensitization to that temperature requires between 8 and 24 h at warm temperature. Gene fusion experiments identified a 125-bp section of the CBF2 promoter that is sufficient to impart cold-responsive gene expression. Mutational analysis of this cold-responsive region identified two promoter segments that work in concert to impart robust cold-regulated gene expression. These sequences, designated ICEr1 and ICEr2 (induction of CBF expression region 1 or 2), were also shown to stimulate transcription in response to mechanical agitation and the protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide.

  2. Dentin Hypersensitivity and Oxalates

    PubMed Central

    Cunha-Cruz, J.; Stout, J.R.; Heaton, L.J.; Wataha, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    Treatment of dentin hypersensitivity with oxalates is common, but oxalate efficacy remains unclear. Our objective was to systematically review clinical trials reporting an oxalate treatment compared with no treatment or placebo with a dentin hypersensitivity outcome. Risk-of-bias assessment and data extraction were performed independently by two reviewers. Standardized mean differences (SMD) were estimated by random-effects meta-analysis. Of 677 unique citations, 12 studies with high risk-of-bias were included. The summary SMD for 3% monohydrogen-monopotassium oxalate (n = 8 studies) was -0.71 [95% Confidence Interval: -1.48, 0.06]. Other treatments, including 30% dipotassium oxalate (n = 1), 30% dipotassium oxalate plus 3% monohydrogen monopotassium oxalate (n = 3), 6% monohydrogen monopotassium oxalate (n = 1), 6.8% ferric oxalate (n = 1), and oxalate-containing resin (n = 1), also were not statistically significantly different from placebo treatments. With the possible exception of 3% monohydrogen monopotassium oxalate, available evidence currently does not support the recommendation of dentin hypersensitivity treatment with oxalates. PMID:21191127

  3. [Food hypersensitivity in children].

    PubMed

    Kolacek, Sanja

    2011-01-01

    Food hypersensitivity affects children and adults with an increasing prevalence, and is therefore an important public health problem in the majority of developed countries. Moreover, self-reported reactions to food are of several times higher prevalence, compared to hypersensitivity diagnosed following well established evidence-based diagnostic guidelines. In children, allergic food reactions are more common compared to non-allergic food hypersensitivity reactions, and 90% of them are caused with only 8 food allergens: cow's milk, soya, egg, fish, shellfish, peanut, tree-nuts and gluten. Diagnosis should be based on challenge tests with the potentially offending food allergens. Concerning other, more conservative diagnostic procedures, negative serology and negative skin-prick tests can exclude IgE-mediated food allergy, but positive tests, due to high rate of false positive reactions are not sufficient for diagnosis. Strict dietary avoidance of incriminated allergens is the only well established management strategy. However, this should be applied only if food allergy is well documented - following the exposition tests. Introducing elimination diet in a paediatric population, particularly with the elimination of multiple foods, could cause inappropriate growth and disturb organ maturation. Concerning allergy prevention, avoidance of allergens is not efficacious either during pregnancy and lactation or weaning period, and is therefore, not recommended neither as a population preventive measure, nor in children at risk.

  4. ICE1: a regulator of cold-induced transcriptome and freezing tolerance in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Chinnusamy, Viswanathan; Ohta, Masaru; Kanrar, Siddhartha; Lee, Byeong-ha; Hong, Xuhui; Agarwal, Manu; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2003-01-01

    Cold temperatures trigger the expression of the CBF family of transcription factors, which in turn activate many downstream genes that confer chilling and freezing tolerance to plants. We report here the identification of ICE1 (inducer of CBF expression 1), an upstream transcription factor that regulates the transcription of CBF genes in the cold. An Arabidopsis ice1 mutant was isolated in a screen for mutations that impair cold-induced transcription of a CBF3 promoter-luciferase reporter gene. The ice1 mutation blocks the expression of CBF3 and decreases the expression of many genes downstream of CBFs, which leads to a significant reduction in plant chilling and freezing tolerance. ICE1 encodes a MYC-like bHLH transcriptional activator. ICE1 binds specifically to the MYC recognition sequences in the CBF3 promoter. ICE1 is expressed constitutively, and its overexpression in wild-type plants enhances the expression of the CBF regulon in the cold and improves freezing tolerance of the transgenic plants. PMID:12672693

  5. Construction of efficient, tuber-specific, and cold-inducible promoters in potato.

    PubMed

    Li, Meng; Xie, Conghua; Song, Botao; Ou, Yongbin; Lin, Yuan; Liu, Xun; Zhang, Huiling; Liu, Jun

    2015-06-01

    Promoter activity is crucial for precise gene expression. Previously, a synthetic tuber-specific and cold-inducible promoter, pCL, containing a C-repeat/dehydration-responsive element (CRT/DRE) cassette and a tuber-specific fragment, was constructed in order to regulate cold-induced sweetening (CIS) in potatoes. However, the utility of pCL is limited due to its low activity. To improve its inducibility in response to low temperatures, we modified the CRT/DRE and flanking sequences. In particular, promoter activity was significantly improved by site-specific mutation of flanking sequences next to the core element (CCGAC) of CRT/DRE. We also inserted a modified CRT/DRE cassette into pCL; although this enhanced activity, it was not more effective than mutation of the flanking sequences. Indeed, up to 20-fold enhanced pCL activity could be achieved by replacing the CRT/DRE cassette in pCL with tandem repeats of two mutated CRT/DRE cassettes. This improvement was due to an enhanced affinity between the CRT/DRE cassette(s) and the StCBF1 transcription factor. Together, these data suggest that altering the structure of CRT/DRE can enhance CBF-related transcription complex formation and thus improve the activity of this cold-inducible promoter.

  6. The Effects of Cold Pressor-Induced Pain on PASAT Performance.

    PubMed

    Tapscott, Brian E; Etherton, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Although clinicians have frequently observed that patients with chronic pain experience cognitive deficits related to memory and concentration, research on these deficits is equivocal, with some studies showing significant impairment and others suggesting minimal deficits. As such, the present study sought to examine the relationship between laboratory-induced pain and performance on the Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test (PASAT) using a mixed factorial design. Seventy-two nonclinical volunteers were randomly assigned to a pain group, who took the PASAT while experiencing cold pressor-induced pain, or a control group, who took the PASAT while experiencing painless room-temperature water immersion. To account for practice effects, all participants were administered 1 practice trial and 3 standard trials of the PASAT, with the final trial administered in cold pressor-induced pain or painless water immersion. The results revealed a significant interaction between condition and PASAT performance, F(1, 64) = 23.63, p < .001, partial η(2) = .27. The control group increased performance by 6 items while the pain group showed no such improvement. The results suggest that because the pain group did not demonstrate the same practice effects relative to the control group, their performance was impaired by cold pressor-induced pain. However, the impairment was relatively mild (about 0.5 standard deviation) and did not occur in all participants. PMID:25275422

  7. Heat resistance and salt hypersensitivity in Lactococcus lactis due to spontaneous mutation of llmg_1816 (gdpP) induced by high-temperature growth.

    PubMed

    Smith, William M; Pham, Thi Huong; Lei, Lin; Dou, Junchao; Soomro, Aijaz H; Beatson, Scott A; Dykes, Gary A; Turner, Mark S

    2012-11-01

    During construction of several gene deletion mutants in Lactococcus lactis MG1363 which involved a high-temperature (37.5°C) incubation step, additional spontaneous mutations were observed which resulted in stable heat resistance and in some cases salt-hypersensitive phenotypes. Whole-genome sequencing of one strain which was both heat resistant and salt hypersensitive, followed by PCR and sequencing of four other mutants which shared these phenotypes, revealed independent mutations in llmg_1816 in all cases. This gene encodes a membrane-bound stress signaling protein of the GdpP family, members of which exhibit cyclic dimeric AMP (c-di-AMP)-specific phosphodiesterase activity. Mutations were predicted to lead to single amino acid substitutions or protein truncations. An independent llmg_1816 mutant (Δ1816), created using a suicide vector, also displayed heat resistance and salt hypersensitivity phenotypes which could be restored to wild-type levels following plasmid excision. L. lactis Δ1816 also displayed improved growth in response to sublethal concentrations of penicillin G. High-temperature incubation of a wild-type industrial L. lactis strain also resulted in spontaneous mutation of llmg_1816 and heat-resistant and salt-hypersensitive phenotypes, suggesting that this is not a strain-specific phenomenon and that it is independent of a plasmid integration event. Acidification of milk by the llmg_1816-altered strain was inhibited by lower salt concentrations than the parent strain. This study demonstrates that spontaneous mutations can occur during high-temperature growth of L. lactis and that inactivation of llmg_1816 leads to temperature resistance and salt hypersensitivity.

  8. Magnetic anisotropy induced by cold rolling in Co and Co-Fe alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, T.; Takahashi, M.; Kadowaki, S.; Wakiyama, T.

    1991-01-01

    The roll reduction and concentration dependences of the uniaxial magnetic anisotropy induced by cold-rolling, Kur, were investigated for hexagonal Co and Co-Fe alloys. The maximum value of Kur was 3×105 erg/cm3 at 10%-20% roll reduction for Co and Co-1.5% Fe. The easy direction was perpendicular and parallel to the rolling direction for the alloys containing less than 1.2% Fe and more than 1.2% Fe at room temperature, respectively. The easy direction of Kur changed at 260 °C for Co. The texture produced by cold-rolling was detected by Schulz's method. The induced anisotropies were evaluated by using the Ku1, Ku2, and the x-ray reflected intensities. The calculated values and easy direction agreed well with the experimental results. The origin of Kur for hexagonal Co and Co-Fe alloys is clearly explained by formation of rolling texture.

  9. Immediate-type hypersensitivity drug reactions

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Shelley F; Phillips, Elizabeth J; Wiese, Michael D; Heddle, Robert J; Brown, Simon G A

    2014-01-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions including anaphylaxis have been reported for nearly all classes of therapeutic reagents and these reactions can occur within minutes to hours of exposure. These reactions are unpredictable, not directly related to dose or the pharmacological action of the drug and have a relatively high mortality risk. This review will focus on the clinical presentation, immune mechanisms, diagnosis and prevention of the most serious form of immediate onset drug hypersensitivity reaction, anaphylaxis. The incidence of drug-induced anaphylaxis deaths appears to be increasing and our understanding of the multiple and complex reasons for the unpredictable nature of anaphylaxis to drugs is also expanding. This review highlights the importance of enhancing our understanding of the biology of the patient (i.e. immune response, genetics) as well as the pharmacology and chemistry of the drug when investigating, diagnosing and treating drug hypersensitivity. Misdiagnosis of drug hypersensitivity leads to substantial patient risk and cost. Although oral provocation is often considered the gold standard of diagnosis, it can pose a potential risk to the patient. There is an urgent need to improve and standardize diagnostic testing and desensitization protocols as other diagnostic tests currently available for assessment of immediate drug allergy are not highly predictive. PMID:24286446

  10. [Nonallergic hypersensitivity to environmental factors].

    PubMed

    Rakhmanin, Iu A; Fedoseeva, V N; Makovetskaia, A K; Fedoskova, T G

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence and severity of manifestations of non-allergic hypersensitivity to chemical environmental factors pose the question about the need to study the mechanisms of its formation in population. It should be borne in mind that, in the absence of immunological mechanisms of formation of the mentioned state, the term "chemical sensitization" must be replaced by the term "non-allergic hypersensitivity." The investigation of this problem should permit to reduce the risk of formation of different types of hypersensitivity in population.

  11. Asymmetrical hypersensitivity to bovine collagen.

    PubMed

    Somerville, P; Wray, R C

    1993-05-01

    We report a unique patient with true asymmetrical hypersensitivity to bovine collagen. Hypersensitivity is the development of an inflammatory response at a treatment site after a negative skin test. She developed an inflammatory response in only one of two simultaneously injected sites. About 1.5% of patients with a negative skin test have a hypersensitivity reaction consisting of firmness, erythema, and swelling. The signs and symptoms generally resolve spontaneously in a few months.

  12. Topical glucocorticoids application induced an augmentation in the expression of IL-1alpha while inhibiting the expression of IL-10 in the epidermis in murine contact hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Igawa, K; Yokozeki, H; Miyazaki, Y; Minatohara, K; Satoh, T; Katayama, I; Nishioka, K

    2001-03-01

    The repeated application of glucocorticoids (GC) on the skin augmented the inflammatory response of both allergic and irritant contact dermatitis in our studies. In order to further clarify the mechanism of such an augmentation of contact hypersensitivity (CHS), we investigated the modulatory effects of cytokines in the epidermis after the administration of GC at challenged sites in CHS. Diflucortolone valerate was applied to BALB/c mice on alternate days for a total of nine times. On day 12, they were contact sensitized with dinitrofluorobenzene (DNFB). Next, on day 17, one day after the last application of GC, they were challenged with DNFB on the ear. The whole challenged ear lobes were removed after a hapten challenge and then were analysed by the RT-PCR method or underwent an immunohistochemical analysis. To clarify the modulatory effects of cytokines in vivo, DNFB sensitized mice pre-treated with GC were injected with rIL-10, IL-1 receptor antagonist (ra) and anti-IL-1alpha monoclonal antibody (mAb) and thereafter were challenged with DNFB. A RT-PCR analysis has demonstrated IL-10 mRNA to be detected in the challenged skin of non-GC-pretreated mice but not in that of GC-pre-treated mice after challenge. On the other hand, the expression of IL-1alpha mRNA in the challenged skin of mice pretreated with GC was more strongly detected that that in mice without GC-pretreatment. Furthermore, an immuno-histochemical analysis in the challenge showed the expression of IL-10 in the skin showed the expression of IL-10 in the challenged epidermis of the non-GC-pretreated mice but not in the GC-pretreated mice and IL-1alpha was also strongly expressed in the epidermis of the GC-pretreated mice. A subcutaneous injection of anti-IL-1alpha mAb or IL-1 ra inhibited the augmented CHS reaction in the GC-pretreated mice. A subcutaneous injection of rIL-10 also inhibited the augmentation of the CHS reaction in the GC-pretreated mice; however, no such inhibition was observed in the

  13. The confinement induced resonance in spin-orbit coupled cold atoms with Raman coupling

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi-Cai; Song, Shu-Wei; Liu, Wu-Ming

    2014-01-01

    The confinement induced resonance provides an indispensable tool for the realization of the low-dimensional strongly interacting quantum system. Here, we investigate the confinement induced resonance in spin-orbit coupled cold atoms with Raman coupling. We find that the quasi-bound levels induced by the spin-orbit coupling and Raman coupling result in the Feshbach-type resonances. For sufficiently large Raman coupling, the bound states in one dimension exist only for sufficiently strong attractive interaction. Furthermore, the bound states in quasi-one dimension exist only for sufficient large ratio of the length scale of confinement to three dimensional s-wave scattering length. The Raman coupling substantially changes the confinement-induced resonance position. We give a proposal to realize confinement induced resonance through increasing Raman coupling strength in experiments. PMID:24862314

  14. Formation of a katabatic induced cold front at the east Andean slopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trachte, K.; Nauss, T.,; Rollenbeck, R.; Bendix, J.

    2009-04-01

    Within the DFG research unit 816, climate dynamics in a tropical mountain rain forest in the national reserve of the Reserva Biósfera de San Francisco in South Ecuador are investigated. Precipitation measurements in the mountain environment of the Estación Científica de San Francisco (ECSF) with a vertical rain radar profiler have been made over the last seven years. They reveal unexpected constant early morning rainfall events. On the basis of cloud top temperatures from corresponding GOES satellite imageries, a Mesoscale Convective System could be derived. Its formation region is located south-east of the ECSF in the Peruvian Amazon basin. The generation of the MCS is assumed to results from an interaction of both local and mesoscale conditions. Nocturnal drainage air from the Andean slopes and valleys confluences in the Amazon basin due to the concave lined terrain. This cold air converges with the warm-moist air of the Amazon inducing a local cold front. This process yields to deep convection resulting in a MCS. With the numerical model ARPS the hypothesized formation of a cloud cluster due to a katabatic induced cold front is shown in an ideal case study. Therefor an ideal terrain model representing the features of the Andes in the target area has been used. The simplification of the oprography concerns a concave lined slope and a valley draining into the basin. It describes the confluence of the cold drainage air due to the shape of the terrain. Inside the basin the generation of a local cold front is shown, which triggers the formation of a cloud cluster.

  15. Left ventricular dysfunction induced by cold exposure in patients with systemic sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, W.W.; Baer, A.N.; Robertson, R.M.; Pincus, T.; Kronenberg, M.W.

    1986-03-01

    Raynaud's phenomenon and cardiac abnormalities are frequent in patients with systemic sclerosis. Radionuclide ventriculograms were obtained in 16 patients with Raynaud's phenomenon and systemic sclerosis or the related CREST syndrome and in 11 normal volunteers in order to evaluate changes in left ventricular function that might be induced by exposure to cold. Left ventricular regional wall motion abnormalities developed in nine of 16 patients during cooling compared with only one of 11 control subjects, despite a comparable rise in mean arterial pressure (p less than 0.02). The abnormalities occurred in seven of 11 patients with systemic sclerosis, one of four with CREST syndrome, and one with Raynaud's disease. To test the potential protective effect of nifedipine, radionuclide ventriculograms were then obtained during cooling after sublingual nifedipine (20 mg). Only five of 13 patients had wall motion abnormalities, and the severity of the abnormalities was significantly less than during the first cooling period (p = 0.03). Five of eight patients who had cold-induced wall motion abnormalities during the first cooling period had none after nifedipine, whereas two other patients demonstrated small abnormalities only during the second cooling period after treatment with nifedipine. It is concluded that cold induces segmental myocardial dysfunction in patients with systemic sclerosis and that nifedipine may blunt the severity of this abnormal response.

  16. Biologically Synthesized Gold Nanoparticles Ameliorate Cold and Heat Stress-Induced Oxidative Stress in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xi-Feng; Shen, Wei; Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi

    2016-01-01

    Due to their unique physical, chemical, and optical properties, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have recently attracted much interest in the field of nanomedicine, especially in the areas of cancer diagnosis and photothermal therapy. Because of the enormous potential of these nanoparticles, various physical, chemical, and biological methods have been adopted for their synthesis. Synthetic antioxidants are dangerous to human health. Thus, the search for effective, nontoxic natural compounds with effective antioxidative properties is essential. Although AuNPs have been studied for use in various biological applications, exploration of AuNPs as antioxidants capable of inhibiting oxidative stress induced by heat and cold stress is still warranted. Therefore, one goal of our study was to produce biocompatible AuNPs using biological methods that are simple, nontoxic, biocompatible, and environmentally friendly. Next, we aimed to assess the antioxidative effect of AuNPs against oxidative stress induced by cold and heat in Escherichia coli, which is a suitable model for stress responses involving AuNPs. The response of aerobically grown E. coli cells to cold and heat stress was found to be similar to the oxidative stress response. Upon exposure to cold and heat stress, the viability and metabolic activity of E. coli was significantly reduced compared to the control. In addition, levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and malondialdehyde (MDA) and leakage of proteins and sugars were significantly elevated, and the levels of lactate dehydrogenase activity (LDH) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) significantly lowered compared to in the control. Concomitantly, AuNPs ameliorated cold and heat-induced oxidative stress responses by increasing the expression of antioxidants, including glutathione (GSH), glutathione S-transferase (GST), super oxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase (CAT). These consistent physiology and biochemical data suggest that AuNPs can ameliorate cold and heat stress-induced

  17. Laryngeal hypersensitivity in chronic cough.

    PubMed

    Hull, J H; Menon, A

    2015-12-01

    Patients with chronic cough often report symptoms arising in the throat, in response to non-specific stimuli. Accordingly, the concept of a 'hypersensitivity' of the larynx in chronic cough has evolved over the past ten years. Patients with cough and laryngeal hypersensitivity frequently report features that overlap other laryngeal dysfunction syndromes, including a tendency for the vocal cords to inappropriately adduct. The mechanisms underlying laryngeal hypersensitivity in chronic cough are currently unclear, however recent studies provide new clinical and physiological techniques to aid detection and monitoring of laryngeal hypersensitivity. This review provides an overview of the current state of knowledge in this field.

  18. Increasing the Brightness of Cold Ion Beams by Suppressing Disorder-Induced Heating with Rydberg Blockade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, D.; Scholten, R. E.; Sparkes, B. M.

    2015-11-01

    A model for the equilibrium coupling of an ion system with varying initial hard-sphere Rydberg blockade correlations is used to quantify the suppression of disorder-induced heating in Coulomb-expanding cold ion bunches. We show that bunches with experimentally achievable blockade parameters have an emittance reduced by a factor of 2.6 and increased focusability and brightness compared to a disordered bunch. Demonstrating suppression of disorder-induced heating is an important step in the development of techniques for the creation of beam sources with sufficient phase-space density for ultrafast, single-shot coherent diffractive imaging.

  19. Molecular characterization of a cold-induced plasma membrane protein gene from wheat.

    PubMed

    Koike, Michiya; Sutoh, Keita; Kawakami, Akira; Torada, Atsushi; Oono, Kiyoharu; Imai, Ryozo

    2005-12-01

    As a means to study the function of plasma membrane proteins during cold acclimation, we have isolated a cDNA clone for wpi6 which encodes a putative plasma membrane protein from cold-acclimated winter wheat. The wpi6 gene encodes a putative 5.9 kDa polypeptide with two predicted membrane-spanning domains, the sequence of which shows high sequence similarity with BLT101-family proteins from plants and yeast. Strong induction of wpi6 mRNA was observed during an early stage of cold acclimation in root and shoot tissues of both winter and spring wheat cultivars. In contrast to blt101 in barley, wpi6 mRNA was also induced by drought and salinity stresses, and exogenous application of ABA. Expression of wpi6 in a Deltapmp3 mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which is disturbed in plasma membrane potential due to the lack of a BLT101-family protein, partially complemented NaCl sensitivity of the mutant. Transient expression analysis of a WPI6::GFP fusion protein in onion epidermal cells revealed that WPI6 is localized in the plasma membrane. Taken together, these data suggested that WPI6 may have a protective role in maintaining plasma membrane function during cold acclimation in wheat.

  20. Anticonvulsant hypersensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Morkunas, A R; Miller, M B

    1997-10-01

    Anticonvulsant hypersensitivity syndrome (AHS) is an uncommon but potentially fatal adverse effect that can occur from exposure to phenytoin, carbamazepine, or phenobarbital. It has diverse clinical features and a variable presentation which results in a delay in making the diagnosis. The syndrome commonly begins within 3 weeks after initiation of an anticonvulsant. Patients typically present with a constellation of fever, usually followed by the development of a rash of variable severity and type, and lymphadenopathy. In patients presenting with these features, the clinician should have a high index of suspicion for AHS. PMID:9330838

  1. Chronic hypersensitivity pneumonitis

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Carlos AC; Gimenez, Andréa; Kuranishi, Lilian; Storrer, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HSP) is a common interstitial lung disease resulting from inhalation of a large variety of antigens by susceptible individuals. The disease is best classified as acute and chronic. Chronic HSP can be fibrosing or not. Fibrotic HSP has a large differential diagnosis and has a worse prognosis. The most common etiologies for HSP are reviewed. Diagnostic criteria are proposed for both chronic forms based on exposure, lung auscultation, lung function tests, HRCT findings, bronchoalveolar lavage, and biopsies. Treatment options are limited, but lung transplantation results in greater survival in comparison to idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Randomized trials with new antifibrotic agents are necessary. PMID:27703382

  2. Sunscreens and T4N5 liposomes differ in their ability to protect against ultraviolet-induced sunburn cell formation, alterations of dendritic epidermal cells, and local suppression of contact hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Wolf, P; Cox, P; Yarosh, D B; Kripke, M L

    1995-02-01

    Exposure of skin to ultraviolet (UV) radiation can lead to diverse biologic effects, including inflammation, sunburn cell formation, alterations of cutaneous immune cells, and impaired induction of contact hypersensitivity responses. The molecular mechanisms of these UV-induced effects are not completely understood. We investigated the ability of sunscreens and liposomes containing the DNA excision repair enzyme T4 endonuclease V to prevent these effects of UV radiation. The use of T4N5 liposomes, which increase the repair of cyclobutyl pyrimidine dimers, provides an approach for assessing the role of DNA damage in the effects of UV radiation on the skin. Exposing C3H mice to 500 mJ/cm2 UVB radiation from FS40 sunlamps resulted in skin edema, sunburn cell formation, and morphologic alterations and decreased numbers of Langerhans cells and Thy-1+ dendritic epidermal T cells. In addition, the induction of contact hypersensitivity after application of 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene on UV-irradiated skin was diminished by 80%. Applying sunscreens containing octyl-N-dimethyl-p-aminobenzoate, 2-ethylhexyl-p-methoxycinnamate, or benzophenone-3 before this dose of UV irradiation gave nearly complete protection against all of these effects of UV irradiation. In contrast, topical application of T4N5 liposomes after UV irradiation had no effect on UV-induced skin edema and only partially protected against sunburn cell formation and local suppression of contact hypersensitivity, although its ability to protect against alterations in dendritic immune cells was comparable to that of the sunscreens. These results suggest that DNA damage is involved in only some of the local effects of UV radiation on the skin. In addition, T4N5 liposomes may be a useful adjunct to sunscreens because they can reduce some of the deleterious effects of UV radiation on skin even after a sunburn has been initiated. PMID:7829886

  3. Immediate and Delayed Hypersensitivity Reactions to Proton Pump Inhibitors: Evaluation and Management.

    PubMed

    Otani, Iris M; Banerji, Aleena

    2016-03-01

    PPIs are among the most commonly administered medications in the USA and are generally well tolerated. Immediate and delayed immune-mediated hypersensitivity reactions are rare but increasingly recognized adverse effects of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). Immediate hypersensitivity reactions can occur due to IgE-mediated hypersensitivity to PPIs and can be evaluated by immediate hypersensitivity skin testing and oral provocation challenge testing. A desensitization protocol can be used when PPI use cannot be avoided in an allergic patient. Delayed hypersensitivity reactions to PPIs have also been reported. Occupational exposures causing cutaneous reactions to PPIs are the most commonly reported delayed hypersensitivity reaction, followed by drug-induced subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus. This review presents a summary of the clinical presentation, diagnostic evaluation, and management of immune-mediated hypersensitivity reactions to PPIs.

  4. Spectral Broadening of Excitation induced by Ultralong-range Interaction in a Cold Gas of Rydberg Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Loboda, A. V.; Mischenko, E. V.; Gurnitskaya, E. P.; Glushkov, A. V.; Khetselius, O. Yu.

    2008-10-22

    Preliminary results of calculating the broadening of spectral lines of excited atoms induced by ultralong- range (100 Bohr radii) interactions in a cold gas of Rb atoms within the 'own pressure' approximation and perturbation theory formalism are presented.

  5. Use of cold intravenous fluid to induce hypothermia in a comatose child after cardiac arrest due to a lightning strike.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Min; Jeong, Ju-Hwan; Kyong, Yeon-Young; Kim, Han-Joon; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Park, Jeong-Ho; Park, Kyu-Nam

    2008-11-01

    We report a case in which mild hypothermia was induced successfully using a cold intravenous fluid infusion in a 12-year-old boy who was comatose following 21 min of cardiac arrest caused by a lightning strike. PMID:18805616

  6. Drug hypersensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Rashmi; Timshina, Dependra K; Thappa, Devinder Mohan

    2011-01-01

    Drug hypersensitivity syndrome (DHS) is an adverse drug reaction commonly associated with the aromatic antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), viz., phenytoin (PHT), carbamazepine (CBZ), phenobarbital (PB), lamotrigine, primidone, etc. It can also be caused by other drugs, such as sulfonamides, dapsone, minocycline, gold derivatives, cyclosporine, captopril, diltiazem, terbinafine, azathioprine and allopurinol. Diagnosis of DHS may be difficult because of the variety of clinical and laboratory abnormalities and manifestations and because the syndrome may mimic infectious, neoplastic or collagen vascular disorders. The risk for developing hypersensitivity within 60 days of the first or second prescription in new users of PHT or CBZ was estimated to be 2.3-4.5 per 10,000 and 1-4.1 per 10,000, respectively. The syndrome is defined by the fever, skin rash, lymphadenopathy and internal organ involvement within the first 2-8 weeks after initiation of therapy. Internal manifestations include, among others, agranulocytosis, hepatitis, nephritis and myositis. Insufficient detoxification may lead to cell death or contribute to the formation of antigen that triggers an immune reaction. Cross-reactivity among PHT, CBZ and PB is as high as 70%-80%. Management mainly includes immediate withdrawal of the culprit drug, symptomatic treatment and systemic steroids or immunoglobulins.

  7. Light-induced effect on the density distribution in a sample of cold trapped atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaplik, A. V.; Ioriatti, L.; Bagnato, V. S.

    1992-12-01

    As it is known [1] an intense laser field can induce atom-atom interaction according to a dipole-dipole R -3 law. Such an interaction depends on the angle between light polarization and interatomic vector-position R. This angular dependence may produce an anisotropy in the spatial density distribution of the confined sample of cold atoms. We develop the main relations and apply them to the case of an atomic cloud of cold trapped neutral atoms with the density higher than or of the order of λ-3, where λ is the wavelength of light. The results presented here show the effect of such an interaction in a density regime of high experimental interest.

  8. A Hydrogen-Induced Decohesion Model for Treating Cold Dwell Fatigue in Titanium-Based Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Kwai S.; Moody, Jonathan

    2016-05-01

    Cold dwell fatigue in near-alpha Ti alloys is a time-dependent fracture process at ambient temperature that involves fatigue in the presence of creep to produce cracking on low-energy fracture ( e.g., cleavage) facets in hard alpha grains. In this article, cold dwell fatigue is treated as a hydrogen-induced decohesion process by using a nonlinear cohesive stress-strain relation to describe the decrease in the cohesive strength with increasing local hydrogen contents. It is postulated that during cold dwell fatigue, time-dependent deformation occurs by < a> slip that results in dislocation pileups in soft alpha grains. The stress and dilatational fields of the dislocation pileups assist the transport of internal hydrogen atoms from soft grains to neighboring hard grains. The accumulation of internal hydrogen atoms at the trap sites leads to decohesion along crystallographic planes, which can be slip or hydride habit planes. The decohesion model is applied to treat cold dwell fatigue in Ti-6Al-4V with a basal-transverse texture by modeling the effects of hydrogen-induced decohesion on the stress-fatigue life ( S- N f) response, the time-dependent crack growth response (d a/d t), and the fracture toughness ( K c) as functions of grain orientation. A probabilistic time-dependent fatigue crack growth analysis is then performed to assess the influence of microtexture on the dwell fatigue life of a Ti-6Al-4V ring disk subjected to a long-duration hold at the peak stress of the loading cycle. The results of the probabilistic life computations indicate that dwell fatigue resistance in Ti-6Al-4V may be improved and the risk of disk fracture may be reduced significantly by controlling the microtexture or reducing the size and volume fraction of hard alpha grains in the microstructure.

  9. Skeletal muscle phenotype affects fasting-induced mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation flexibility in cold-acclimated ducklings.

    PubMed

    Monternier, Pierre-Axel; Fongy, Anaïs; Hervant, Frédéric; Drai, Jocelyne; Collin-Chavagnac, Delphine; Rouanet, Jean-Louis; Roussel, Damien

    2015-08-01

    Starvation is particularly challenging for endotherms that remain active in cold environments or during winter. The aim of this study was to determine whether fasting-induced mitochondrial coupling flexibility depends upon the phenotype of skeletal muscles. The rates of oxidative phosphorylation and mitochondrial efficiency were measured in pectoralis (glycolytic) and gastrocnemius (oxidative) muscles from cold-acclimated ducklings (Cairina moschata). Pyruvate and palmitoyl-l-carnitine were used in the presence of malate as respiratory substrates. Plasma metabolites, skeletal muscle concentrations of triglycerides, glycogen and total protein and mitochondrial levels of oxidative phosphorylation complexes were also quantified. Results from ad libitum fed ducklings were compared with those from ducklings that were fasted for 4 days. During the 4 days of nutritional treatment, birds remained in the cold, at 4°C. The 4 days of starvation preferentially affected the pectoralis muscles, inducing an up-regulation of mitochondrial efficiency, which was associated with a reduction of both total muscle and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation protein, and with an increase of intramuscular lipid concentration. By contrast, fasting decreased the activity of oxidative phosphorylation but did not alter the coupling efficiency and protein expression of mitochondria isolated from the gastrocnemius muscles. Hence, the adjustment of mitochondrial efficiency to fasting depends upon the muscle phenotype of cold-acclimated birds. Furthermore, these results suggest that the reduced cost of mitochondrial ATP production in pectoralis muscles may trigger lipid storage within this tissue and help to sustain an important metabolic homeostatic function of skeletal muscles, which is to maintain levels of amino acids in the circulation during the fast.

  10. Changes in white and brown adipose tissue microRNA expression in cold-induced mice.

    PubMed

    Tao, Cong; Huang, Shujuan; Wang, Yajun; Wei, Gang; Zhang, Yang; Qi, Desheng; Wang, Yanfang; Li, Kui

    2015-07-31

    There are two classic adipose tissues in mammals, white adipose tissue (WAT) and brown adipose tissue (BAT). It has been well known that browning of WAT can be induced by cold exposure. In this study, to identify the novel cold responsive key miRNAs that are involved in browning, mice were housed at 6 °C for 10 days, and deep sequencing of the miRNAs of WAT and BAT was performed. Our data showed that WAT and BAT displayed distinct expression profiles due to their different locations, morphology and biological function. A total of 27 BAT and 29 WAT differentially expressed (DE) miRNAs were identified in response to cold stimulation, respectively (fold change >2 and false discovery rate (FDR) <0.05), of which, 9 were overlapped in both adipose tissues. Furthermore, the potential target genes of the DE miRNAs from BAT and WAT were predicted computationally, and the KEGG pathway analysis revealed the enrichment pathways in cold stimulated adipose tissues. The expression pattern of miR-144-3p/Bmpr1b/Phlda1 and miR-146a-5p/Sphk2 were further measured by qPCR. Finally, we found that miR-146a-5p was significantly induced during the primary adipogenesis caused by BAT differentiation, whereas miR-144-3p was decreased. Our study identifies for the first time the novel miRNAs involved in browning of WAT by sequencing and expands the therapeutic approaches for combating metabolic diseases.

  11. The Nav1.9 channel is a key determinant of cold pain sensation and cold allodynia.

    PubMed

    Lolignier, Stéphane; Bonnet, Caroline; Gaudioso, Christelle; Noël, Jacques; Ruel, Jérôme; Amsalem, Muriel; Ferrier, Jérémy; Rodat-Despoix, Lise; Bouvier, Valentine; Aissouni, Youssef; Prival, Laetitia; Chapuy, Eric; Padilla, Françoise; Eschalier, Alain; Delmas, Patrick; Busserolles, Jérôme

    2015-05-19

    Cold-triggered pain is essential to avoid prolonged exposure to harmfully low temperatures. However, the molecular basis of noxious cold sensing in mammals is still not completely understood. Here, we show that the voltage-gated Nav1.9 sodium channel is important for the perception of pain in response to noxious cold. Nav1.9 activity is upregulated in a subpopulation of damage-sensing sensory neurons responding to cooling, which allows the channel to amplify subthreshold depolarizations generated by the activation of cold transducers. Consequently, cold-triggered firing is impaired in Nav1.9(-/-) neurons, and Nav1.9 null mice and knockdown rats show increased cold pain thresholds. Disrupting Nav1.9 expression in rodents also alleviates cold pain hypersensitivity induced by the antineoplastic agent oxaliplatin. We conclude that Nav1.9 acts as a subthreshold amplifier in cold-sensitive nociceptive neurons and is required for the perception of cold pain under normal and pathological conditions.

  12. [Mechanism of dwarfing effect of tomato (Solanum lycopersicon) seedlings induced by cold-shock treatment under high temperature stress].

    PubMed

    Li, Sheng-li; Bi, Ming-ming; Chen, Fei; Sun, Zhi-qiang

    2015-07-01

    To explore the dwarfing mechanism of tomato seedlings induced by cold-shock treatment followed by high temperature, tomato seedlings were subjected to cold-shock treatment once a day at 8:00 with temperature of 5, 10 and 15 °C for 10, 20 and 30 min, respectively, and ethylene production rate was measured. Plant height, ethylene production and gibberellin (GA3) content of the seedlings treated with T10 °C D10 min (cold-shock with 10 °C for 10 min), coupled with utilization of growth regulators, were also evaluated. The results showed that the release of ethylene was increased with the decrease of cold-shock temperature and extension of treatment time. The cold-shock treatment of 5 °C and 30 min had the highest ethylene production rate of 60.3 nL h-1 . g-1, which was 6.5 times of the control. None of ethephon (ETH), silver thiosulphate (STS), GA, or paclobutrazol (PP333) could completely block high ethylene production induced by cold-shock treatment. Tomato seedlings with cold-shock treatment (T10 °C D10 min ) resulted in reduction in GA3 content by 38.1% compared with the value of control (130.6 µg . g-1). Neither ethephon nor STS had significant effect on the dwarfing induced by cold-shock. However, GA3 weakened the dwarfing effect induced by cold-shock treatment (T10 °C D10 min), while PP333 greatly enhanced it. The dwarfing effect by cold-shock treatment of T10 °C D10 min was equivalent to that of application of 4.0 mg . L-1 PP333 based on the seedling height as an evaluation indicator. It was concluded that cold-shock treatment stimulated shoot ethylene production and blocked GA3 synthesis. GA3 played a vital role in dwarfing effect on tomato seedling induced by cold-shock treatment. Cold-shock with 10 °C and duration of 10 min could promote the growth of tomato seedlings with shorter stem and higher dry mass accumulation. PMID:26710633

  13. [Mechanism of dwarfing effect of tomato (Solanum lycopersicon) seedlings induced by cold-shock treatment under high temperature stress].

    PubMed

    Li, Sheng-li; Bi, Ming-ming; Chen, Fei; Sun, Zhi-qiang

    2015-07-01

    To explore the dwarfing mechanism of tomato seedlings induced by cold-shock treatment followed by high temperature, tomato seedlings were subjected to cold-shock treatment once a day at 8:00 with temperature of 5, 10 and 15 °C for 10, 20 and 30 min, respectively, and ethylene production rate was measured. Plant height, ethylene production and gibberellin (GA3) content of the seedlings treated with T10 °C D10 min (cold-shock with 10 °C for 10 min), coupled with utilization of growth regulators, were also evaluated. The results showed that the release of ethylene was increased with the decrease of cold-shock temperature and extension of treatment time. The cold-shock treatment of 5 °C and 30 min had the highest ethylene production rate of 60.3 nL h-1 . g-1, which was 6.5 times of the control. None of ethephon (ETH), silver thiosulphate (STS), GA, or paclobutrazol (PP333) could completely block high ethylene production induced by cold-shock treatment. Tomato seedlings with cold-shock treatment (T10 °C D10 min ) resulted in reduction in GA3 content by 38.1% compared with the value of control (130.6 µg . g-1). Neither ethephon nor STS had significant effect on the dwarfing induced by cold-shock. However, GA3 weakened the dwarfing effect induced by cold-shock treatment (T10 °C D10 min), while PP333 greatly enhanced it. The dwarfing effect by cold-shock treatment of T10 °C D10 min was equivalent to that of application of 4.0 mg . L-1 PP333 based on the seedling height as an evaluation indicator. It was concluded that cold-shock treatment stimulated shoot ethylene production and blocked GA3 synthesis. GA3 played a vital role in dwarfing effect on tomato seedling induced by cold-shock treatment. Cold-shock with 10 °C and duration of 10 min could promote the growth of tomato seedlings with shorter stem and higher dry mass accumulation.

  14. Lymphocyte transformation studies in drug hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Warrington, R.J.; Tse, K.S.

    1979-01-01

    In a group of patients with clinically diagnosed drug hypersensitivity the in vitro lymphocyte response to the suspected drug was assessed by the lymphocyte transformation test. The test gave positive results in all 15 patients with penicillin-induced immediate or accelerated allergic reactions and positive immediate skin-test reactivity to the major or the minor antigenic determinant of penicillin, or both, but in only 3 of the 12 patients with delayed-onset maculopapular rashes induced by penicillin, despite positive immediate reactivity to the skin-test reagents. Lymphocyte stimulation greater than five times the control level was demonstrated for five patients with penicillin-induced erythroderma, Stevens-Johnson syndrome or a serum-sickness-like illness, or with methicillin-induced interstitial nephritis, all of whom had negative reactions to the appropriate skin-test reagents. A low level of stimulation was seen in eight other skin-test-negative patients with possible allergic reactions induced by penicillins. However, in all subjects tested the stimulation was significantly greater than the mean for control subjects. For 9 of 11 patients with isoniazid-induced hepatitis or maculopapular rashes, but for only 8 of 31 patients with eruptions induced by a variety of drugs other than penicillins and isoniazid, significant stimulation occurred in the lymphocyte transformation test. It is concluded that the lymphocyte transformation test is useful in the detection of hypersensitivity to the penicillins (although in IgE-mediated reactions skin testing is clearly preferable) and isoniazid but is of limited value in the demonstration of hypersensitivity to other drugs. PMID:445303

  15. Hypersensitivity associated with sugammadex administration: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Tsur, A; Kalansky, A

    2014-11-01

    Sugammadex is a drug used to reverse neuromuscular blockade induced by rocuronium or vecuronium. It has not yet been approved by the Food and Drug Administration in the USA due to concerns regarding hypersensitivity. The objective of this review was to identify similarities in the presentation of hypersensitivity reactions to sugammadex. A comprehensive search was performed in PubMed, Scopus and Web of Science for cases reporting hypersensitivity reactions to sugammadex. In addition, we contacted regulatory agencies and the company marketing the drug for unpublished reports. Reports were included if they were in English, primary investigations, lacked an alternative probable explanation for the reaction and included a comprehensive description of the hypersensitivity. We identified 15 cases of hypersensitivity following sugammadex administration. All cases that reported exact timing (14/15) occurred in 4 min or less. Most of the patients (11/15; 73%) met World Anaphylaxis Organization criteria for anaphylaxis. Awareness must be raised for the possibility of drug-induced hypersensitivity during the critical 5-min period immediately following sugammadex administration.

  16. Density-induced geometric frustration of ultra-cold bosons in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, T.; Greschner, S.; Santos, L.

    2016-04-01

    A density-dependent gauge field may induce density-induced geometric frustration, leading to a non-trivial interplay between density modulation and frustration, which we illustrate for the particular case of ultra-cold bosons in zig-zag optical lattices with a density-dependent hopping amplitude. We show that the density-induced frustration leads to a rich landscape of quantum phases, including Mott insulator, bond-order insulator, two-component superfluids, chiral superfluids, and partially paired superfluids. We show as well that the density-dependent hopping results in an effective repulsive or attractive interaction, and that for the latter case the vacuum may be destabilized leading to a strong compressibility. Finally, we discuss the characteristic momentum distribution of the predicted phases, which can be used to detect the phases in time-of-flight measurements.

  17. Delayed drug hypersensitivity reactions.

    PubMed

    Pichler, Werner J

    2003-10-21

    Immune reactions to small molecular compounds, such as drugs, can cause a variety of diseases involving the skin, liver, kidney, and lungs. In many drug hypersensitivity reactions, drug-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells recognize drugs through their alphabeta T-cell receptors in an MHC-dependent way. Drugs stimulate T cells if they act as haptens and bind covalently to peptides or if they have structural features that allow them to interact with certain T-cell receptors directly. Immunohistochemical and functional studies of drug-reactive T cells in patients with distinct forms of exanthema reveal that distinct T-cell functions lead to different clinical phenotypes. In maculopapular exanthema, perforin-positive and granzyme B-positive CD4+ T cells kill activated keratinocytes, while a large number of cytotoxic CD8+ T cells in the epidermis is associated with formation of vesicles and bullae. Drug-specific T cells also orchestrate inflammatory skin reactions through the release of various cytokines (for example, interleukin-5, interferon) and chemokines (such as interleukin-8). Activation of T cells with a particular function seems to lead to a specific clinical picture (for example, bullous or pustular exanthema). Taken together, these data allow delayed hypersensitivity reactions (type IV) to be further subclassified into T-cell reactions, which through the release of certain cytokines and chemokines preferentially activate and recruit monocytes (type IVa), eosinophils (type IVb), or neutrophils (type IVd). Moreover, cytotoxic functions by either CD4+ or CD8+ T cells (type IVc) seem to participate in all type IV reactions.

  18. Cold exposure impairs dark-pulse capacity to induce REM sleep in the albino rat.

    PubMed

    Baracchi, Francesca; Zamboni, Giovanni; Cerri, Matteo; Del Sindaco, Elide; Dentico, Daniela; Jones, Christine Ann; Luppi, Marco; Perez, Emanuele; Amici, Roberto

    2008-06-01

    In the albino rat, a REM sleep (REMS) onset can be induced with a high probability and a short latency when the light is suddenly turned off (dark pulse, DP) during non-REM sleep (NREMS). The aim of this study was to investigate to what extent DP delivery could overcome the integrative thermoregulatory mechanisms that depress REMS occurrence during exposure to low ambient temperature (Ta). To this aim, the efficiency of a non-rhythmical repetitive DP (3 min each) delivery during the first 6-h light period of a 12 h:12 h light-dark cycle in inducing REMS was studied in the rat, through the analysis of electroencephalogram, electrocardiogram, hypothalamic temperature and motor activity at different Tas. The results showed that DP delivery triggers a transition from NREMS to REMS comparable to that which occurs spontaneously. However, the efficiency of DP delivery in inducing REMS was reduced during cold exposure to an extent comparable with that observed in spontaneous REMS occurrence. Such impairment was associated with low Delta activity and high sympathetic tone when DPs were delivered. Repetitive DP administration increased REMS amount during the delivery period and a subsequent negative REMS rebound was observed. In conclusion, DP delivery did not overcome the integrative thermoregulatory mechanisms that depress REMS in the cold. These results underline the crucial physiological meaning of the mutual exclusion of thermoregulatory activation and REMS occurrence, and support the hypothesis that the suspension of the central control of body temperature is a prerequisite for REMS occurrence.

  19. Cold-induced precipitation of a monoclonal IgM: a negative activation enthalpy reaction.

    PubMed

    Meliga, Stefano C; Farrugia, William; Ramsland, Paul A; Falconer, Robert J

    2013-01-17

    Cold-induced precipitation of a monoclonal IgM cryoglobulin isolated from a patient with Waldenström's macroglobulinemia was observed to have a negative activation enthalpy. The rate of the reaction increased, as the temperature decreased. Differential scanning calorimetry of the monoclonal IgM showed precipitation as an inverted peak during a downward temperature scan. The transition temperature was between 14 and 15 °C and was possibly concentration dependent. At temperatures below the transition the precipitation was best described by second-order kinetics. The difference in change in enthalpy between precipitation and disassociation suggests that cold-induced precipitation had a fast precipitation stage followed by a slower consolidation reaction. Negligible curvature of the Eyring plot suggested the precipitation reaction was dominated by van der Waal forces and hydrogen bonding. Conversely, during an upward temperature scan, disassociation was observed as a positive enthalpy peak. This reaction had two stages, a reaction undoing consolidation followed by heat-induced disassociation that had first-order kinetics.

  20. Cold-induced precipitation of a monoclonal IgM: a negative activation enthalpy reaction.

    PubMed

    Meliga, Stefano C; Farrugia, William; Ramsland, Paul A; Falconer, Robert J

    2013-01-17

    Cold-induced precipitation of a monoclonal IgM cryoglobulin isolated from a patient with Waldenström's macroglobulinemia was observed to have a negative activation enthalpy. The rate of the reaction increased, as the temperature decreased. Differential scanning calorimetry of the monoclonal IgM showed precipitation as an inverted peak during a downward temperature scan. The transition temperature was between 14 and 15 °C and was possibly concentration dependent. At temperatures below the transition the precipitation was best described by second-order kinetics. The difference in change in enthalpy between precipitation and disassociation suggests that cold-induced precipitation had a fast precipitation stage followed by a slower consolidation reaction. Negligible curvature of the Eyring plot suggested the precipitation reaction was dominated by van der Waal forces and hydrogen bonding. Conversely, during an upward temperature scan, disassociation was observed as a positive enthalpy peak. This reaction had two stages, a reaction undoing consolidation followed by heat-induced disassociation that had first-order kinetics. PMID:23240622

  1. Two randomized controlled trials of zinc gluconate lozenge therapy of experimentally induced rhinovirus colds.

    PubMed Central

    Farr, B M; Conner, E M; Betts, R F; Oleske, J; Minnefor, A; Gwaltney, J M

    1987-01-01

    The therapeutic efficacy of zinc gluconate lozenge therapy in experimentally induced rhinovirus infection was assessed in two randomized controlled trials in susceptible adult volunteers. In trial 1, lozenges containing either zinc gluconate (23 mg of elemental zinc) or placebo were given 36 h after nasal inoculation of rhinovirus type 39 and administered eight times per day for 5 days. All of the volunteers had early cold symptoms at the time that treatment was begun. In trial 2, the same lozenge regimen was used, beginning 2 h after nasal inoculation with rhinovirus type 13, and continued for 7 days. Zinc therapy did not reduce the severity or duration of cold symptoms or the frequency or duration of viral shedding in either trial. Viral titers were measured in trial 2 and were shown to be unaffected by zinc therapy. Nasal mucus weights and the numbers of paper tissues used were slightly higher in zinc recipients. A statistically significant increase in levels of zinc in serum was documented in zinc recipients after 5 days of therapy. These data suggest that zinc gluconate lozenge therapy is not therapeutically useful in the treatment of rhinovirus colds. PMID:2820298

  2. Reproducibility of exercise-induced modulation of cardiovascular responses to cold stress.

    PubMed

    Rashed, H M; Leventhal, G; Madu, E C; Reddy, R; Cardoso, S

    1997-04-01

    The modulation of cardiovascular responses to the cold pressor test (CPT) as produced by exercise was studied in 13 volunteers. The reproducibility of the measurements selected for the study, i.e. heart rate (HR), blood pressure (BP), blood flow (BF) and skin temperature (ST), was investigated through repeat experiments in the fall of 1994 and the winter of 1995. HR was monitored before, during and after a 10-min period of bicycling at 70% of reserve HR. BP, cutaneous BF and ST were measured before and after exercise. Two CPTs (hand into ice-cold water for 1 min) were performed: one preceding exercise and another at 3 min after exercise. The results obtained allow us to conclude that in non-hypertensive volunteers (1) the pronounced cardiovascular responses (ST, BF and BP) induced by CPT are reproducible (p > 0.2) when compared to basal level values and (2) cardiovascular responses to cold stress are significantly attenuated by exercise (p < 0.03). Our study, therefore, supports and validates the use of our coupled exercise-CPT method in ongoing epidemiological studies attempting to identify individuals at risk for the development of hypertension as well as those most likely to benefit from preventative exercise programs.

  3. Use of antioxidants for the prophylaxis of cold-induced peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Fernanda; Pollock, Martin; Karim, Alveera; Jiang, Yuying

    2002-09-01

    "Trench foot" is a particular risk for those involved in adventure tourism, for soldiers in winter mountain training exercises, and for the homeless. Nonfreezing cold nerve injury is characterized by axonal degeneration, which is attributed to free radicals released during cycles of ischemia and reperfusion. This pilot study sought to determine whether the administration of antioxidants might prevent or ameliorate the development of cold nerve injury. Twenty-six rats were divided into two groups. Group 1 animals received, by gavage, a mixture of vitamin C (150 mg/kg/d), vitamin E (100 mg/kg/d), and N-acetyl-L-cysteine (250 mg/kg/d) daily for 4 weeks. Allopurinol (20 mg/kg/d) was added in the last 4 days of treatment. Group 2 animals served as controls and did not receive any antioxidant supplements. After 1 month, two cycles of sciatic nerve cooling (0 degrees C) were induced in 10 controls and 10 experimental animals using circulating water through a nerve cuff. Six additional control animals were subjected to surgery but did not undergo nerve cooling. All animals were killed on the third postoperative day, and their nerves were processed for ultrastructural and quantitative studies. The proportion of degenerated myelinated and unmyelinated axons showed no significant difference between treated and untreated animals. We conclude that the administration of commonly used antioxidants does not prevent cold nerve injury.

  4. Cold-induced pulmonary oedema in scuba divers and swimmers and subsequent development of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Wilmshurst, P T; Nuri, M; Crowther, A; Webb-Peploe, M M

    1989-01-14

    The effect of cold and/or a raised partial pressure of oxygen was examined in eleven people with no demonstrable cardiac abnormality but who had pulmonary oedema when scuba diving or surface swimming, and in ten normal divers. These stimuli induced pathological vasoconstriction in the pulmonary oedema group, nine of whom also showed signs of cardiac decompensation when so stimulated. The pulmonary oedema patients have been followed-up for an average of 8 years. Seven have become hypertensive. Except for the onset of lone atrial fibrillation in one normotensive female diver and development of Raynaud's phenomenon in a normotensive man, there have been no cardiovascular events and no deaths.

  5. Phytohemagglutinin induces major short-term protease-sensitive lymphocyte traffic involving high endothelium venule-like blood vessels in acute delayed-type hypersensitivity-like reactions in skin and other tissues.

    PubMed

    Binns, R M; Licence, S T; Wooding, F B

    1990-05-01

    Injection of phytohemagglutinin induces dose-dependent acute delayed-type hypersensitivity-like reactions in young pig skin which attract large numbers of labeled peripheral blood lymphocytes and lymphoblasts but not red cells. Similar reactions are induced in the gut wall, joints, and draining lymph nodes, and also in the skin of sheep and cattle, and by concanavalin A. Labeled peripheral blood lymphocyte entry starts within 2 h, is maximal at 6-18 h and is effectively over by 48 h and, both early and late, is markedly inhibited in a selective way by trypsinization, like high endothelium venule-mediated entry to lymphoid tissues. Electron microscopy showed development of high endothelium venule-like blood vessels with intramural lymphoid cells in mononuclear infiltrates. Inductive processes in this model short-term peripheral defense mechanism are being investigated.

  6. Cold exposure rapidly induces virtual saturation of brown adipose tissue nuclear T sub 3 receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Bianco, A.C.; Silva, J.E. Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA )

    1988-10-01

    Cold exposure induces a rapid increase in uncoupling protein (UCP) concentration in the brown adipose tissue (BAT) of euthyroid, but not hypothyroid, rats. To normalize this response with exogenous 3,5,3{prime}-triiodothyronine (T{sub 3}), it is necessary to cause systemic hyperthyroidism. In contrast, the same result can be obtained with just replacement doses of thyroxine (T{sub 4}) and, in euthyroid rats, the normal response of UCP to cold occurs without hyperthyroid plasma T{sub 3} levels. Consequently, the authors explored the possibility that the cold-induced activation of the type II 5{prime}-deiodinase resulted in high levels of nuclear T{sub 3} receptor occupancy in euthyroid rats. Studies were performed with pulse injections of tracer T{sub 3} or T{sub 4} in rats exposed to 4{degree}C for different lengths of time (1 h-3 wk). Within 4 h of cold exposure, they observed a significant increase in the nuclear ({sup 125}I)T{sub 3} derived from the tracer ({sup 125}I)T{sub 4} injections (T{sub 3}(T{sub 4})) and a significant reduction in the nuclear ({sup 125}I)T{sub 3} derived from ({sup 125}I)T{sub 3} injections (T{sub 3}(T{sub 3})). The number of BAT nuclear T{sub 3} receptors did not increase for up to 3 wk of observation at 4{degree}C. The mass of nuclear-bound T{sub 3} was calculated from the nuclear tracer ({sup 125}I)T{sub 3}(T{sub 3}) and ({sup 125}I)T{sub 3}(T{sub 4}) at equilibrium and the specific activity of serum T{sub 3} and T{sub 4}, respectively. By 4 h after the initiation of the cold exposure, the receptors were >95% occupied and remained so for the 3 weeks of observation. They conclude that the simultaneous activation of the deiodinase with adrenergic BAT stimulation serves the purpose of nearly saturating the nuclear T{sub 3} receptors. This makes possible the realization of the full thermogenic potential of the tissue without causing systemic hyperthyroidism.

  7. Cold induces micro- and nano-scale reorganization of lipid raft markers at mounds of T-cell membrane fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong; Qin, Jie; Cai, Jiye; Chen, Zheng W

    2009-01-01

    Whether and how cold causes changes in cell-membrane or lipid rafts remain poorly characterized. Using the NSOM/QD and confocal imaging systems, we found that cold caused microscale redistribution of lipid raft markers, GM1 for lipid and CD59 for protein, from the peripheral part of microdomains to the central part on Jurkat T cells, and that cold also induced the nanoscale size-enlargement (1/3- to 2/3-fold) of the nanoclusters of lipid raft markers and even the colocalization of GM1 and CD59 nanoclusters. These findings indicate cold-induced lateral rearrangement/coalescence of raft-related membrane heterogeneity. The cold-induced re-distribution of lipid raft markers under a nearly-natural condition provide clues for their alternations, and help to propose a model in which raft lipids associate themselves or interact with protein components to generate functional membrane heterogeneity in response to stimulus. The data also underscore the possible cold-induced artifacts in early-described cold-related experiments and the detergent-resistance-based analyses of lipid rafts at 4 degrees C, and provide a biophysical explanation for recently-reported cold-induced activation of signaling pathways in T cells. Importantly, our fluorescence-topographic NSOM imaging demonstrated that GM1/CD59 raft markers distributed and re-distributed at mounds but not depressions of T-cell membrane fluctuations. Such mound-top distribution of lipid raft markers or lipid rafts provides spatial advantage for lipid rafts or contact molecules interacting readily with neighboring cells or free molecules.

  8. Hypoxia induces no change in cutaneous thresholds for warmth and cold sensation.

    PubMed

    Malanda, U L; Reulen, J P H; Saris, W H M; van Marken Lichtenbelt, W D

    2008-09-01

    Hypoxia can affect perception of temperature stimuli by impeding thermoregulation at a neural level. Whether this impact on the thermoregulatory response is solely due to affected thermoregulation is not clear, since reaction time may also be affected by hypoxia. Therefore, we studied the effect of hypoxia on thermal perception thresholds for warmth and cold. Thermal perception thresholds were determined in 11 healthy overweight adult males using two methods for small nerve fibre functioning: a reaction-time inclusive method of limits (MLI) and a reaction time exclusive method of levels (MLE). The subjects were measured under normoxic and hypoxic conditions using a cross-over design. Before the thermal threshold tests under hypoxic conditions were conducted, the subjects were acclimatized by staying 14 days overnight (8 h) in a hypoxic tent system (Colorado Altitude Training: 4,000 m). For normoxic measurements the same subjects were not acclimatized, but were used to sleep in the same tent system. Measurements were performed in the early morning in the tent. Normoxic MLI cold sensation threshold decreased significantly from 30.3 +/- 0.4 (mean +/- SD) to 29.9 +/- 0.7 degrees C when exposed to hypoxia (P < 0.05). Similarly, mean normoxic MLI warm sensation threshold increased from 34.0 +/- 0.9 to 34.5 +/- 1.1 degrees C (P < 0.05). MLE measured threshold for cutaneous cold sensation was 31.4 +/- 0.4 and 31.2 +/- 0.9 degrees C under respectively normoxic and hypoxic conditions (P > 0.05). Neither was there a significant change in MLE warm threshold comparing normoxic (32.8 +/- 0.9 degrees C) with hypoxic condition (32.9 +/- 1.0 degrees C) (P > 0.05). Exposure to normobaric hypoxia induces slowing of neural activity in the sensor-to-effector pathway and does not affect cutaneous sensation threshold for either warmth or cold detection.

  9. A new mathematical model to simulate AVA cold-induced vasodilation reaction to local cooling.

    PubMed

    Rida, Mohamad; Karaki, Wafaa; Ghaddar, Nesreen; Ghali, Kamel; Hoballah, Jamal

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this work was to integrate a new mathematical model with a bioheat model, based on physiology and first principles, to predict thermoregulatory arterio-venous anastomoses (AVA) and cold-induced vasodilation (CIVD) reaction to local cooling. The transient energy balance equations of body segments constrained by thermoregulatory controls were solved numerically to predict segmental core and skin temperatures, and arterial blood flow for given metabolic rate and environmental conditions. Two similar AVA-CIVD mechanisms were incorporated. The first was activated during drop in local skin temperature (<32 °C). The second mechanism was activated at a minimum finger skin temperature, T(CIVD, min), where the AVA flow is dilated and constricted once the skin temperature reached a maximum value. The value of T(CIVD,min) was determined empirically from values reported in literature for hand immersions in cold fluid. When compared with published data, the model predicted accurately the onset time of CIVD at 25 min and T(CIVD,min) at 10 °C for hand exposure to still air at 0 °C. Good agreement was also obtained between predicted finger skin temperature and experimentally published values for repeated immersion in cold water at environmental conditions of 30, 25, and 20 °C. The CIVD thermal response was found related to core body temperature, finger skin temperature, and initial finger sensible heat loss rate upon exposure to cold fluid. The model captured central and local stimulations of the CIVD and accommodated observed variability reported in literature of onset time of CIVD reaction and T(CIVD,min).

  10. DNase I hypersensitivity and methylation of the 5'-flanking region of the alpha 1-fetoprotein gene during developmental and glucocorticoid-induced repression of its activity in rat liver.

    PubMed Central

    Turcotte, B; Guertin, M; Chevrette, M; LaRue, H; Bélanger, L

    1986-01-01

    Three major regions of DNase I hypersensitivity (DH) were found in alpha 1-fetoprotein (AFP) chromatin of rat liver. DH site I is located at the transcription initiation site and associated with ongoing AFP transcription. DH site II is located 2.5 kb upstream from the cap site: it is developmental stage-dependent but dissociable from ongoing AFP transcription. DH site III, 3.7 kb upstream from the cap site, behaves as hepatocyte-constitutive. DH sites are present in similar regions of liver albumin chromatin. Dexamethasone-induced AFP gene repression is accompanied by the selective loss of AFP DH site I, a likely result of glucocorticoid receptors binding to a DNA recognition sequence located 5'-adjacent to DH site I. Sl nuclease-hypersensitive sites were found on naked superhelical AFP and albumin DNA, but do not appear to contribute DH sites in liver chromatin. The extent of hypomethylation of HpaII sites at the 5'-end of the AFP gene correlates positively with the level of potential and actual expression of the gene. We conclude that developmental and hormonal regulation of the AFP gene is confined within congruent to 4 kb of 5'-flanking DNA, and we discuss possible hierarchical interactions among DH sites, in relation to DNA methylation and replication. Images PMID:2433681

  11. Participation of NMDA receptors in the lateral hypothalamus in gastric erosion induced by cold-water restraint.

    PubMed

    Landeira-Fernandez, J

    2015-03-01

    The present study investigated whether neurons in the lateral hypothalamus (LH) play a role in the occurrence of gastric ulcerations induced by cold-water restraint. The first experiment indicated that bilateral N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) lesions of the LH (20μg/1μl per side) reduced the amount of gastric ulceration induced by cold-water restraint. In the second experiment, the NMDA antagonist DL-2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (APV; 2.5μg/0.5μl per side) or its vehicle was microinjected bilaterally into the LH prior to the cold-water restraint procedure. APV did not induce gastric ulcerations but reduced the amount of ulceration induced by cold-water restraint. These results indicate that NMDA receptors in the LH play an important role in the occurrence of gastric ulceration induced by cold-water restraint. The participation of the LH and possible neuronal circuitry involved in stress-induced ulceration are discussed.

  12. Protective effects of a recombinant fragment of human surfactant protein D in a murine model of pulmonary hypersensitivity induced by dust mite allergens.

    PubMed

    Singh, Mamta; Madan, Taruna; Waters, Patrick; Parida, Shreemanta K; Sarma, P Usha; Kishore, Uday

    2003-05-01

    Lung surfactant protein D (SP-D) is a carbohydrate pattern recognition immune molecule. It can interact with a range of pathogens, stimulate immune cells and manipulate cytokine profiles during host's immune response. SP-D has also been shown to interact, via its carbohydrate recognition domains, with glycoprotein allergens of house dust mite (Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, Derp), inhibiting specific IgE isolated from mite-sensitive asthmatic patients from binding these allergens, and blocking subsequent histamine release from sensitized basophils. In the present study, we have examined the protection offered by various doses of intranasal administration of a recombinant fragment of human SP-D (rhSP-D) in a murine model of pulmonary hypersensitivity to Derp allergens which showed characteristic high levels of specific IgE antibodies, peripheral blood eosinophilia, pulmonary infiltrates and a Th2 cytokine response. Treatment of Derp mice with rhSP-D led to significant reduction in Derp-specific IgE levels, blood eosinophilia and pulmonary cellular infiltration. The levels of IL-4 and IL-5 were decreased, while those of IL-12 and IFN-gamma were raised in the supernatant of the cultured splenocytes, indicating a Th2 to Th1 polarization. These results suggest that SP-D has a protective role in the modulation of allergic sensitization and in the development of allergic reactions to Derp allergens and highlight potential of the rhSP-D as a therapeutic for pulmonary hypersensitivity. PMID:12706535

  13. Assessing the changes in the biomechanical properties of the crystalline lens induced by cold cataract with air-pulse OCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C.; Singh, M.; Liu, C.-H.; Han, Z.; Li, J.; Raghunathan, R.; Larin, K. V.

    2015-11-01

    A cataract is the increase in opacity of the crystalline lens that can pathologically degrade visual acuity. In this study, we utilized a phase-sensitive optical coherence elastography (OCE) system to study the effects of a cold cataract on the biomechanical properties of the porcine crystalline lens in vitro. The cold cataract was induced by placing the whole lens in a low temperature environment until the lens was obviously clouded. Air-pulse OCE measurements were conducted on 6 lenses before and after cold cataract induction. A low amplitude displacement (≤ 10 µm) was induced by a focused air-pulse and the temporal deformation profiles from the surface and within the lenses were analyzed. The results demonstrated that the stiffness of the porcine lens increased after induction of the cold cataract, and it demonstrated the feasibility of OCE to assess the biomechanical changes in the lens due to cataract.

  14. Amelioration of cold injury-induced cortical brain edema formation by selective endothelin ETB receptor antagonists in mice.

    PubMed

    Michinaga, Shotaro; Nagase, Marina; Matsuyama, Emi; Yamanaka, Daisuke; Seno, Naoki; Fuka, Mayu; Yamamoto, Yui; Koyama, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    Brain edema is a potentially fatal pathological condition that often occurs in stroke and head trauma. Following brain insults, endothelins (ETs) are increased and promote several pathophysiological responses. This study examined the effects of ETB antagonists on brain edema formation and disruption of the blood-brain barrier in a mouse cold injury model (Five- to six-week-old male ddY mice). Cold injury increased the water content of the injured cerebrum, and promoted extravasation of both Evans blue and endogenous albumin. In the injury area, expression of prepro-ET-1 mRNA and ET-1 peptide increased. Intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of BQ788 (ETB antagonist), IRL-2500 (ETB antagonist), or FR139317 (ETA antagonist) prior to cold injury significantly attenuated the increase in brain water content. Bolus administration of BQ788, IRL-2500, or FR139317 also inhibited the cold injury-induced extravasation of Evans blue and albumin. Repeated administration of BQ788 and IRL-2500 beginning at 24 h after cold injury attenuated both the increase in brain water content and extravasation of markers. In contrast, FR139317 had no effect on edema formation when administrated after cold injury. Cold injury stimulated induction of glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive reactive astrocytes in the injured cerebrum. Induction of reactive astrocytes after cold injury was attenuated by ICV administration of BQ788 or IRL-2500. These results suggest that ETB receptor antagonists may be an effective approach to ameliorate brain edema formation following brain insults.

  15. A new generation of proto-oncogenes: cold-inducible RNA binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Lleonart, M E

    2010-01-01

    This review focuses on the roles of two major cold-inducible RNA binding proteins known in human cells: CIRP and RBM3. Both proteins were discovered when they were shown to be induced after exposure to a moderate cold-shock and other cellular stresses such as UV radiation and hypoxia. Initially, it was suggested that these proteins have a suppressive rather stimulatory effect on proliferation; however, proliferative and/or proto-oncogenic functions have recently been assigned to CIRP and RBM3. In a high throughput genetic screen, we recently identified CIRP as an immortalized gene in murine primary cells. On the other hand, the role of RBM3 in transformation has already been demonstrated. Interestingly, both CIRP and RBM3 have been found to be up-regulated in human tumors. This article highlights the roles of CIRP and RBM3 in tumorigenesis, and proposes a model by which CIRP might contribute to senescence bypass by counteracting the deleterious effects of oxidative damage.

  16. Studies on the mechanism of systemic suppression of contact hypersensitivity by UVB radiation. II. Differences in the suppression of delayed and contact hypersensitivity in mice.

    PubMed

    Kripke, M L; Morison, W L

    1986-05-01

    Exposing mice to UV radiation in the UVB range (280-320 nm) causes a selective immune suppression that contributes to the development of UVB-induced skin cancers. Among the immune responses suppressed by UVB irradiation are contact and delayed hypersensitivity reactions to haptens administered at unexposed sites. In these studies we provide evidence that delayed and contact hypersensitivity to the same hapten are not equivalent reactions and that they are suppressed in UVB-irradiated mice by 2 different mechanisms. This conclusion is based on the findings that: suppression of contact hypersensitivity could not be overcome by immunizing UVB-irradiated mice with hapten-coupled antigen-presenting cells derived from normal donors; and treatment of UVB-irradiated mice with methylprednisolone before immunization prevented the suppression of delayed hypersensitivity but had no effect on the suppression of contact hypersensitivity. The decreased ability to induce contact hypersensitivity in UVB-irradiated mice could be transferred to x-irradiated mice by reconstituting them with spleen cells from UVB-irradiated donors. The induction of hapten-specific suppressor cells, however, required both UVB irradiation and priming with hapten. Based on these results, we postulate that UVB irradiation induces a population of suppressor-inducer cells with specificity for a modified skin antigen and that this antigen serves as a carrier molecule for haptens that induce contact hypersensitivity and for tumor-specific transplantation antigens on UVB-induced tumors. PMID:3745963

  17. Stent hypersensitivity and infection in sinus cavities

    PubMed Central

    Soufras, George D.; Hahalis, George

    2013-01-01

    Persistent mucosal inflammation, granulation tissue formation, hypersensitivity, and multifactorial infection are newly described complications of retained drug-eluting stents from endoscopic sinus surgery for refractory rhinosinusitis. In an important report published in Allergy and Rhinology, a 45-year-old male patient suffering from recalcitrant chronic rhinosinusitis underwent functional endoscopic sinus surgery and was found, for the first time, to have steroid-eluting catheters that were inadvertently left in the ethmoid and frontal sinuses. The retained catheters had caused persistent mucosal inflammation and formation of granulation tissue denoting hypersensitivity reaction. These consequences had induced perpetuation of symptoms of chronic rhinosinusitis. Meticulous removal of the retained stents with the nitinol wings from inflamed tissues of the frontal, ethmoidal, and sphenoethmoidal recesses in which they were completely imbedded was successfully performed without polypoid regrowth. Cultures of specimens taken from both left and right stents showed heavy growth of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and moderate growth of Klebsiella oxytoca, coagulase negative Staphylococcus, and beta-hemolytic Streptococcus anginosus. Fungal infection was not detected. The current knowledge and experience regarding stent hypersensitivity and infection in relation with the use of stents in sinus cavities is reviewed. PMID:24498522

  18. Drug Hypersensitivity: Pharmacogenetics and Clinical Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Elizabeth J.; Chung, Wen-Hung; Mockenhaupt, Maja; Roujeau, Jean-Claude; Mallal, Simon A.

    2011-01-01

    Severe cutaneous adverse reactions (SCARs) include syndromes such as drug reaction, eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) or drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS) and Stevens-Johnson Syndrome/Toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN). An important advance has been the discovery of associations between HLA alleles and many of these syndromes including abacavir hypersensitivity reaction, allopurinol DRESS/DIHS and SJS/TEN and SJS/TEN associated with aromatic amine anticonvulsants. These HLA associations have created the promise for prevention through screening and have additionally shed further light on the immunopathogenesis of SCARs. The roll-out of HLA-B*5701 into routine clinical practice as a genetic screening test to prevent abacavir hypersensitivity provides a translational roadmap for other drugs. Numerous hurdles exist in the widespread translation of several other drugs such as carbamazepine where the positive predictive value of HLA-B*1502 is low and the negative predictive value of HLA-B*1502 for SJS/TEN may not be 100% in all ethnic groups. International collaborative consortia have been formed with the goal of developing phenotype standardization and undertaking HLA and genome-wide analyses in diverse populations with these syndromes. PMID:21354501

  19. Hypersensitivity reactions to iodinated contrast media.

    PubMed

    Guéant-Rodriguez, Rosa-Maria; Romano, Antonino; Barbaud, Annick; Brockow, Knut; Guéant, Jean-Louis

    2006-01-01

    Adverse reactions after iodinate contrast media (ICM) administration have been observed, which can be classified as immediate (i.e., occurring within one hour after administration) and delayed or non-immediate (i.e., occurring more than one hour after administration). Even though the incidence of ICM adverse reactions has been significantly reduced by the introduction of non-ionic compounds, immediate reactions still occur in about 3% of administrations. Different pathogenic mechanisms have been suggested for ICM reactions, including immunologic ones. Basophils and mast cells participate in immediate reactions through the release of mediators like histamine and tryptase, whereas a T-cell-mediated pathogenic mechanism is involved in most non-immediate reactions, particularly maculopapular rashes. Skin tests and specific IgE assays are carried out to diagnose immediate hypersensitivity reactions, while both delayed-reading intradermal tests and patch tests are usually performed to evaluate non-immediate reactions. However, in vitro specific IgE assays are not commercially available. As far as in vitro tests are concerned, a response involving ICM-related T-cell activity may be assessed by the lymphocyte transformation test. Allergologic evaluation appears to be indicated in hypersensitivity reactions to ICM, although the sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values of allergologic tests have not yet been established. This paper summarizes the current state of the art and addresses the research that is still needed on the pathogenic mechanisms, diagnosis, and prevention of ICM-induced hypersensitivity reactions.

  20. Sulfite hypersensitivity. A critical review

    SciTech Connect

    Gunnison, A.F.; Jacobsen, D.W.

    1987-01-01

    Sulfiting agents (sulfur dioxide and the sodium and potassium salts of bisulfite, sulfite, and metabisulfite) are widely used as preservatives in foods, beverages, and pharmaceuticals. Within the past 5 years, there have been numerous reports of adverse reactions to sulfiting agents. This review presents a comprehensive compilation and discussion of reports describing reactions to ingested, inhaled, and parenterally administered sulfite. Sulfite hypersensitivity is usually, but not exclusively, found within the chronic asthmatic population. Although there is some disagreement on its prevalence, a number of studies have indicated that 5 to 10% of all chronic asthmatics are sulfite hypersensitive. This review also describes respiratory sulfur dioxide sensitivity which essentially all asthmatics experience. Possible mechanisms of sulfite hypersensitivity and sulfur dioxide sensitivity are discussed in detail. Sulfite metabolism and the role of sulfite oxidase in the detoxification of exogenous sulfite are reviewed in relationship to the etiology of sulfite hypersensitivity. 147 references.

  1. Cold-inducible RNA-binding protein causes endothelial dysfunction via activation of Nlrp3 inflammasome.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weng-Lang; Sharma, Archna; Wang, Zhimin; Li, Zhigang; Fan, Jie; Wang, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Cold-inducible RNA-binding protein (CIRP) is a damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP) molecule which stimulates proinflammatory cytokine release in hemorrhage and sepsis. Under these medical conditions, disruption of endothelial homeostasis and barrier integrity, typically induced by proinflammatory cytokines, is an important factor contributing to morbidity and mortality. However, the role of CIRP in causing endothelial dysfunction has not been investigated. In this study, we show that intravenous injection of recombinant murine CIRP (rmCIRP) in C57BL/6 mice causes lung injury, evidenced by vascular leakage, edema, increased leukocyte infiltration and cytokine production in the lung tissue. The CIRP-induced lung damage is accompanied with endothelial cell (EC) activation marked by upregulation of cell-surface adhesion molecules E-selectin and ICAM-1. Using in vitro primary mouse lung vascular ECs (MLVECs), we demonstrate that rmCIRP treatment directly increases the ICAM-1 protein expression and activates NAD(P)H oxidase in MLVECs. Importantly, CIRP stimulates the assembly and activation of Nlrp3 inflammasome in MLVECs accompanied with caspase-1 activation, IL-1β release and induction of proinflammatory cell death pyroptosis. Finally, our study demonstrates CIRP-induced EC pyroptosis in the lungs of C57BL/6 mice for the first time. Taken together, the released CIRP in shock can directly activate ECs and induce EC pyroptosis to cause lung injury. PMID:27217302

  2. Cold-inducible RNA-binding protein causes endothelial dysfunction via activation of Nlrp3 inflammasome

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Weng-Lang; Sharma, Archna; Wang, Zhimin; Li, Zhigang; Fan, Jie; Wang, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Cold-inducible RNA-binding protein (CIRP) is a damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP) molecule which stimulates proinflammatory cytokine release in hemorrhage and sepsis. Under these medical conditions, disruption of endothelial homeostasis and barrier integrity, typically induced by proinflammatory cytokines, is an important factor contributing to morbidity and mortality. However, the role of CIRP in causing endothelial dysfunction has not been investigated. In this study, we show that intravenous injection of recombinant murine CIRP (rmCIRP) in C57BL/6 mice causes lung injury, evidenced by vascular leakage, edema, increased leukocyte infiltration and cytokine production in the lung tissue. The CIRP-induced lung damage is accompanied with endothelial cell (EC) activation marked by upregulation of cell-surface adhesion molecules E-selectin and ICAM-1. Using in vitro primary mouse lung vascular ECs (MLVECs), we demonstrate that rmCIRP treatment directly increases the ICAM-1 protein expression and activates NAD(P)H oxidase in MLVECs. Importantly, CIRP stimulates the assembly and activation of Nlrp3 inflammasome in MLVECs accompanied with caspase-1 activation, IL-1β release and induction of proinflammatory cell death pyroptosis. Finally, our study demonstrates CIRP-induced EC pyroptosis in the lungs of C57BL/6 mice for the first time. Taken together, the released CIRP in shock can directly activate ECs and induce EC pyroptosis to cause lung injury. PMID:27217302

  3. Cold inducible RNA binding protein upregulation in pituitary corticotroph adenoma induces corticotroph cell proliferation via Erk signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Wei; Tang, Hao; Chen, Xiao; Zhao, Yao; Zheng, Lili; Pan, Sijian; Wang, Weiqing; Bian, Liuguan; Sun, Qingfang

    2016-01-01

    Cushing's disease is caused by pituitary corticotroph adenoma, and the pathogenesis of it has remained obscure. Here, we showed that cold inducible RNA binding protein (CIRP) was markedly elevated in corticotroph tumors. Forced overexpression of CIRP in murine AtT20 pituitary corticotroph cell line increased corticotroph precursor hormone proopiomelanocortin (POMC) transcription, ACTH secretion and cellular proliferation. In vivo, CIRP overexpression promotes murine corticotroph tumor growth and enhances ACTH production. Mechanistically, we show that CIRP could promote AtT20 cells proliferation by inducing cyclinD1 and decreasing p27 expression via Erk1/2 signaling pathway. Clinically, CIRP overexpression is significantly correlated with Cushing's disease recurrence. CIRP appears to play a critical tumorigenesis function in Cushing's disease and its expression might be a useful biomarker for tumor recurrence. PMID:26824322

  4. HLA Associations and Clinical Implications in T-Cell Mediated Drug Hypersensitivity Reactions: An Updated Review

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chi-Yuan; Chen, Chi-Hua; Chen, Wei-Li; Deng, Shin-Tarng; Chung, Wen-Hung

    2014-01-01

    T-cell mediated drug hypersensitivity reactions may range from mild rash to severe fatal reactions. Among them, drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) or drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS), Stevens-Johnson syndrome/ toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN), are some of the most life-threatening severe cutaneous adverse reactions (SCARs). Recent advances in pharmacogenetic studies show strong genetic associations between human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles and susceptibility to drug hypersensitivity. This review summarizes the literature on recent progresses in pharmacogenetic studies and clinical application of pharmacogenetic screening based on associations between SCARs and specific HLA alleles to avoid serious conditions associated with drug hypersensitivity. PMID:24901010

  5. Repeated PD-1/PD-L1 monoclonal antibody administration induces fatal xenogeneic hypersensitivity reactions in a murine model of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mall, Christine; Sckisel, Gail D.; Proia, David A.; Mirsoian, Annie; Grossenbacher, Steven K.; Pai, Chien-Chun Steven; Chen, Mingyi; Monjazeb, Arta M.; Kelly, Karen; Blazar, Bruce R.; Murphy, William J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) targeting coinhibitory molecules such as PD-1, PD-L1 and CTLA-4 are increasingly used as targets of therapeutic intervention against cancer. While these targets have led to a critical paradigm shift in treatments for cancer, these approaches are also plagued with limitations owing to cancer immune evasion mechanisms and adverse toxicities associated with continuous treatment. It has been difficult to reproduce and develop interventions to these limitations preclinically due to poor reagent efficacy and reagent xenogenecity not seen in human trials. In this study, we investigated adverse effects of repeated administration of PD-1 and PD-L1 mAbs in the murine 4T1 mammary carcinoma model. We observed rapid and fatal hypersensitivity reactions in tumor bearing mice within 30–60 min after 4–5 administrations of PD-L1 or PD-1 mAb but not CTLA-4 antibody treatment. These events occurred only in mice bearing the highly inflammatory 4T1 tumor and did not occur in mice bearing non-inflammatory tumors. We observed that mortality was associated with systemic accumulation of IgG1 antibodies, antibodies specific to the PD-1 mAb, and accumulation of Gr-1high neutrophils in lungs which have been implicated in the IgG mediated pathway of anaphylaxis. Anti-PD-1 associated toxicities were alleviated when PD-1 blockade was combined with the therapeutic HSP90 inhibitor, ganetespib, which impaired immune responses toward the xenogeneic PD-1 mAb. This study highlights a previously uncharacterized fatal hypersensitivity exacerbated by the PD-1/PD-L1 axis in the broadly used 4T1 tumor model as well as an interesting relationship between this particular class of checkpoint blockade and tumor-dependent immunomodulation. PMID:27057446

  6. Oxidant and enzymatic antioxidant status (gene expression and activity) in the brain of chickens with cold-induced pulmonary hypertension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanpour, Hossein; Khalaji-Pirbalouty, Valiallah; Nasiri, Leila; Mohebbi, Abdonnaser; Bahadoran, Shahab

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate oxidant and antioxidant status of the brain (hindbrain, midbrain, and forebrain) in chickens with cold-induced pulmonary hypertension, the measurements of lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation, antioxidant capacity, enzymatic activity, and gene expression (for catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and superoxide dismutases) were done. There were high lipid peroxidation/protein oxidation and low antioxidant capacity in the hindbrain of cold-induced pulmonary hypertensive chickens compared to control ( P < 0.05). In the hypertensive chickens, superoxide dismutase activity was decreased (forebrain, midbrain, and hindbrain), while catalase activity was increased (forebrain and midbrain) ( P < 0.05). Glutathione peroxidase activity did not change. Relative gene expression of catalase and superoxide dismutases (1 and 2) was downregulated, while glutathione peroxidase was upregulated in the brain of the cold-induced pulmonary hypertensive chickens. Probably, these situations in the oxidant and antioxidant status of the brain especially hindbrain may change its function at cardiovascular center and sympathetic nervous system to exacerbate pulmonary hypertension.

  7. Repetitive Electroacupuncture Attenuates Cold-Induced Hypertension through Enkephalin in the Rostral Ventral Lateral Medulla

    PubMed Central

    Li, Min; Tjen-A-Looi, Stephanie C.; Guo, Zhi-Ling; Longhurst, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Acupuncture lowers blood pressure (BP) in hypertension, but mechanisms underlying its action are unclear. To simulate clinical studies, we performed electroacupuncture (EA) in unanesthetized rats with cold-induced hypertension (CIH) induced by six weeks of cold exposure (6 °C). EA (0.1 – 0.4 mA, 2 Hz) was applied at ST36-37 acupoints overlying the deep peroneal nerve for 30 min twice weekly for five weeks while sham-EA was conducted with the same procedures as EA except for no electrical stimulation. Elevated BP was reduced after six sessions of EA treatment and remained low 72 hrs after EA in 18 CIH rats, but not in sham-EA (n = 12) and untreated (n = 6) CIH ones. The mRNA level of preproenkephalin in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (rVLM) 72 hr after EA was increased (n = 9), compared to the sham-EA (n = 6), untreated CIH rats (n = 6) and normotensive control animals (n = 6). Microinjection of ICI 174,864, a δ-opioid receptor antagonist, into the rVLM of EA-treated CIH rats partially reversed EA’s effect on elevated BP (n = 4). Stimulation of rVLM of CIH rats treated with sham-EA using a δ-opioid agonist, DADLE, decreased BP (n = 6). These data suggest that increased enkephalin in the rVLM induced by repetitive EA contributes to BP lowering action of EA. PMID:27775047

  8. Herbicides induce change in metabolic and genetic diversity of bacterial community from a cold oligotrophic lake.

    PubMed

    Aguayo, P; González, C; Barra, R; Becerra, J; Martínez, M

    2014-03-01

    Pristine cold oligotrophic lakes show unique physical and chemical characteristics with permanent fluctuation in temperature and carbon source availability. Incorporation of organic toxic matters to these ecosystems could alter the bacterial community composition. Our goal was to assess the effects of simazine (Sz) and 2,4 dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) upon the metabolic and genetic diversity of the bacterial community in sediment samples from a pristine cold oligotrophic lake. Sediment samples were collected in winter and summer season, and microcosms were prepared using a ration 1:10 (sediments:water). The microcosms were supplemented with 0.1 mM 2,4-D or 0.5 mM Sz and incubated for 20 days at 10 °C. Metabolic diversity was evaluated by using the Biolog Ecoplate™ system and genetic diversity by 16S rDNA amplification followed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis. Total bacterial counts and live/dead ratio were determined by epifluorescence microscopy. The control microcosms showed no significant differences (P > 0.05) in both metabolic and genetic diversity between summer and winter samples. On the other hand, the addition of 2,4-D or Sz to microcosms induces statistical significant differences (P < 0.05) in metabolic and genetic diversity showing the prevalence of Actinobacteria group which are usually not detected in the sediments of these non-contaminated lacustrine systems. The obtained results suggest that contaminations of cold pristine lakes with organic toxic compounds of anthropic origin alter their homeostasis by inhibiting specific susceptible bacterial groups. The concomitant increase of usually low representative bacterial groups modifies the bacterial composition commonly found in this pristine lake.

  9. Materials for damping the PTC-induced thermal fluctuations of the cold-head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catarino, I.; Martins, D.; Sudiwala, R.

    2015-12-01

    The cold head on mechanical Pulse Tube Cryocoolers (PTCs) is subject to substantially less mechanical vibration and electromagnetic interference compared to that typically found in Gifford MacMahon coolers. However, thermal fluctuations at the PTC frequency are still present at the cold-head, typically at a level of 200 mK peak-to-peak at 1.4 Hz for a Cryomech Model PT405 cooler running at 4 K. It is highly desirable to damp out these fluctuations if PTCs are to be used successfully for running systems sensitive to such thermal fluctuations, for example, bolometeric detectors. We report here the characterization over the temperature range 2.5 K to 6 K of two materials, GOS (Gd2O2S) and GAP (GdAlO3), for use as low-pass thermal filters. These materials have antiferromagnetic transitions at around 4 K giving rise to an enhanced heat capacity and have a high thermal conductance. These are two highly desirable properties for thermal dampers in this application. Those materials were fired as ceramic discs to be tested as thermal dumpers. Thermal filter assemblies with discs of diameter 75 mm and thickness 2.5 mm and 1.6 mm (GOS and GAP, respectively) mounted in a PTC show thermal attenuation levels of x0.12 (GOS) and x0.11 (GAP) at 0.01Hz with a clean-side temperature of 4 K; the PTC induced fluctuations at 1.48 Hz are damped completely to within the noise limits (0.2 mK) of the thermometers. Experimentally determined thermal conductance and heat capacity data are reported. For this system, with a PTC cold-head (dirty-side) temperature of 3.3 K, a clean-side power dissipation of up to 30 mW is realized before its temperature rises above 4.2 K.

  10. Cold-induced vasoconstriction may persist long after cooling ends: an evaluation of multiple cryotherapy units

    PubMed Central

    Khoshnevis, Sepideh; Craik, Natalie K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Localized cooling is widely used in treating soft tissue injuries by modulating swelling, pain, and inflammation. One of the primary outcomes of localized cooling is vasoconstriction within the underlying skin. It is thought that in some instances, cryotherapy may be causative of tissue necrosis and neuropathy via cold-induced ischaemia leading to nonfreezing cold injury (NFCI). The purpose of this study is to quantify the magnitude and persistence of vasoconstriction associated with cryotherapy. Methods Data are presented from testing with four different FDA approved cryotherapy devices. Blood perfusion and skin temperature were measured at multiple anatomical sites during baseline, active cooling, and passive rewarming periods. Results Local cutaneous blood perfusion was depressed in response to cooling the skin surface with all devices, including the DonJoy (DJO, p = 2.6 × 10−8), Polar Care 300 (PC300, p = 1.1 × 10−3), Polar Care 500 Lite (PC500L, p = 0.010), and DeRoyal T505 (DR505, p = 0.016). During the rewarming period, parasitic heat gain from the underlying tissues and the environment resulted in increased temperatures of the skin and pad for all devices, but blood perfusion did not change significantly, DJO (n.s.), PC300 (n.s.), PC500L (n.s.), and DR505 (n.s.). Conclusions The results demonstrate that cryotherapy can create a deep state of vasoconstriction in the local area of treatment. In the absence of independent stimulation, the condition of reduced blood flow persists long after cooling is stopped and local temperatures have rewarmed towards the normal range, indicating that the maintenance of vasoconstriction is not directly dependent on the continuing existence of a cold state. The depressed blood flow may dispose tissue to NFCI. PMID:24562697

  11. Human thermoregulatory responses during cold-water immersion after artificially-induced sunburn

    SciTech Connect

    Pandolf, K.B.; Gange, R.W.; Latzka, W.A.; Blank, I.H.; Young, A.J.; Sawka, M.N. Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston )

    1991-03-11

    Thermoregulatory responses during cold-water immersion (T{sub w} = 22C) were compared in 10 men prior to artificially-induced sunburn (CONB), as well as 24-h, and 1-wk after a 2 minimal erythemal dose of UV-B radiation (SUNB) which covered {approximately}85% of the body. After 10 min of rest in cold water, these men exercised for 50 min ({approximately}51% {dot V}O{sub 2}max). Esophageal (T{sub es}), rectal (T{sub re}), and mean skin ({bar T}{sub sk}) temperatures, mean heat flow ({bar h}{sub c}), and heart rate (HR) were measured. Venous blood samples were collected before and after immersion. The {bar T}{sub sk} was higher throughout the 60-min immersion both 24-h and 1-wk after SUNB compared to CONB. The {anti h}{sub c} was higher after 10 min resting immersion and during the first 10 min of exercise when 24-h SUNB waqs compared to CONB with the difference attributed to higher h{sub c} from the back and chest. While T{sub re} and HR did not differ between conditions, T{sub es} prior to and throughout the 60-min immersion was higher when 24-h SUNB was compared to CONB. Plasma volume increased after 1-wk SUNB compared to CONB while plasma protein was reduced. Post-exercise cortisol was greater 24-h SUNB compared to either CONB or 1-wk SUNB. In conclusion, sunburn impaired the ability of these men to vasoconstrict during cold-water immersion resulting in greater heat loss. These adverse effects were still present 1 wk after sunburn when the associated erythema had disappeared.

  12. Lipid-induced thermogenesis is up-regulated by the first cold-water immersions in juvenile penguins.

    PubMed

    Teulier, Loïc; Rey, Benjamin; Tornos, Jérémy; Le Coadic, Marion; Monternier, Pierre-Axel; Bourguignon, Aurore; Dolmazon, Virginie; Romestaing, Caroline; Rouanet, Jean-Louis; Duchamp, Claude; Roussel, Damien

    2016-07-01

    The passage from shore to marine life is a critical step in the development of juvenile penguins and is characterized by a fuel selection towards lipid oxidation concomitant to an enhancement of lipid-induced thermogenesis. However, mechanisms of such thermogenic improvement at fledging remain undefined. We used two different groups of pre-fledging king penguins (Aptenodytes patagonicus) to investigate the specific contribution of cold exposure during water immersion to lipid metabolism. Terrestrial penguins that had never been immersed in cold water were compared with experimentally cold-water immersed juveniles. Experimentally immersed penguins underwent ten successive immersions at approximately 9-10 °C for 5 h over 3 weeks. We evaluated adaptive thermogenesis by measuring body temperature, metabolic rate and shivering activity in fully immersed penguins exposed to water temperatures ranging from 12 to 29 °C. Both never-immersed and experimentally immersed penguins were able to maintain their homeothermy in cold water, exhibiting similar thermogenic activity. In vivo, perfusion of lipid emulsion at thermoneutrality induced a twofold larger calorigenic response in experimentally immersed than in never-immersed birds. In vitro, the respiratory rates and the oxidative phosphorylation efficiency of isolated muscle mitochondria were not improved with cold-water immersions. The present study shows that acclimation to cold water only partially reproduced the fuel selection towards lipid oxidation that characterizes penguin acclimatization to marine life. PMID:26924130

  13. Lipid-induced thermogenesis is up-regulated by the first cold-water immersions in juvenile penguins.

    PubMed

    Teulier, Loïc; Rey, Benjamin; Tornos, Jérémy; Le Coadic, Marion; Monternier, Pierre-Axel; Bourguignon, Aurore; Dolmazon, Virginie; Romestaing, Caroline; Rouanet, Jean-Louis; Duchamp, Claude; Roussel, Damien

    2016-07-01

    The passage from shore to marine life is a critical step in the development of juvenile penguins and is characterized by a fuel selection towards lipid oxidation concomitant to an enhancement of lipid-induced thermogenesis. However, mechanisms of such thermogenic improvement at fledging remain undefined. We used two different groups of pre-fledging king penguins (Aptenodytes patagonicus) to investigate the specific contribution of cold exposure during water immersion to lipid metabolism. Terrestrial penguins that had never been immersed in cold water were compared with experimentally cold-water immersed juveniles. Experimentally immersed penguins underwent ten successive immersions at approximately 9-10 °C for 5 h over 3 weeks. We evaluated adaptive thermogenesis by measuring body temperature, metabolic rate and shivering activity in fully immersed penguins exposed to water temperatures ranging from 12 to 29 °C. Both never-immersed and experimentally immersed penguins were able to maintain their homeothermy in cold water, exhibiting similar thermogenic activity. In vivo, perfusion of lipid emulsion at thermoneutrality induced a twofold larger calorigenic response in experimentally immersed than in never-immersed birds. In vitro, the respiratory rates and the oxidative phosphorylation efficiency of isolated muscle mitochondria were not improved with cold-water immersions. The present study shows that acclimation to cold water only partially reproduced the fuel selection towards lipid oxidation that characterizes penguin acclimatization to marine life.

  14. Overexpression of cold-inducible wheat galactinol synthase confers tolerance to chilling stress in transgenic rice.

    PubMed

    Shimosaka, Etsuo; Ozawa, Kenjirou

    2015-12-01

    Galactinol synthase (GolS) is considered to be a key regulator of the biosynthesis of Raffinose family oligosaccharides (RFOs). Accumulation of RFOs has been reported to play a role in protection against abiotic stresses. We identified two cDNAs encoding galactinol synthase from wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), which we designated as TaGolS1 and TaGolS2. Expression of the two TaGolS genes was induced by cold stress but not by drought, heat stress or ABA treatment in wheat. We generated transgenic lines of rice (Oryza sativa L.) constitutively overexpressing TaGolS1 or TaGolS2. These transgenic plants accumulated significantly higher levels of galactinol and raffinose than did wild-type plants and exhibited enhanced cold-stress tolerance. The results demonstrate the involvement of galactinol and raffinose in the development of chilling stress in rice and indicate that the genetic modification of the biosynthesis of RFOs by transformation with GolS genes could be an effective method for enhancing chilling-stress tolerance in rice. PMID:26719738

  15. Altered Microbiota Contributes to Reduced Diet-Induced Obesity upon Cold Exposure.

    PubMed

    Ziętak, Marika; Kovatcheva-Datchary, Petia; Markiewicz, Lidia H; Ståhlman, Marcus; Kozak, Leslie P; Bäckhed, Fredrik

    2016-06-14

    Maintenance of body temperature in cold-exposed animals requires induction of thermogenesis and management of fuel. Here, we demonstrated that reducing ambient temperature attenuated diet-induced obesity (DIO), which was associated with increased iBAT thermogenesis and a plasma bile acid profile similar to that of germ-free mice. We observed a marked shift in the microbiome composition at the phylum and family levels within 1 day of acute cold exposure and after 4 weeks at 12°C. Gut microbiota was characterized by increased levels of Adlercreutzia, Mogibacteriaceae, Ruminococcaceae, and Desulfovibrio and reduced levels of Bacilli, Erysipelotrichaceae, and the genus rc4-4. These genera have been associated with leanness and obesity, respectively. Germ-free mice fed a high-fat diet at room temperature gained less adiposity and improved glucose tolerance when transplanted with caecal microbiota of mice housed at 12°C compared to mice transplanted with microbiota from 29°C. Thus, a microbiota-liver-BAT axis may mediate protection against obesity at reduced temperature. PMID:27304513

  16. Overexpression of cold-inducible wheat galactinol synthase confers tolerance to chilling stress in transgenic rice

    PubMed Central

    Shimosaka, Etsuo; Ozawa, Kenjirou

    2015-01-01

    Galactinol synthase (GolS) is considered to be a key regulator of the biosynthesis of Raffinose family oligosaccharides (RFOs). Accumulation of RFOs has been reported to play a role in protection against abiotic stresses. We identified two cDNAs encoding galactinol synthase from wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), which we designated as TaGolS1 and TaGolS2. Expression of the two TaGolS genes was induced by cold stress but not by drought, heat stress or ABA treatment in wheat. We generated transgenic lines of rice (Oryza sativa L.) constitutively overexpressing TaGolS1 or TaGolS2. These transgenic plants accumulated significantly higher levels of galactinol and raffinose than did wild-type plants and exhibited enhanced cold-stress tolerance. The results demonstrate the involvement of galactinol and raffinose in the development of chilling stress in rice and indicate that the genetic modification of the biosynthesis of RFOs by transformation with GolS genes could be an effective method for enhancing chilling-stress tolerance in rice. PMID:26719738

  17. The role of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) in cold-induced diuresis (CID)

    SciTech Connect

    Agnew, J.W.; Freund, B.J.; DuBose, D.A.; McKay, J.M.; Hashiro, G.M. Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, HI )

    1991-03-11

    The hormonal control of cold-induced diuresis (CID) remains unresolved. This study investigated the role of ANP, plasma vasopressin (AVP), and aldosterone (ALDO) on CID. Four semi-nude men participated in a 210 min exposure to 15C and 29C air, on separate days. These subjects drank 300 mL of water and had an intravenous saline drip throughout both exposures to replace blood and insensible fluid losses. CID was observed in 15C but not in the 29C experiment, as indicated by a greater urine output. In 15C, atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) increased after 90 min by 41% and remained elevated for 2 h relative to 29C. No differences were observed in AVP between 15C and 29C. In the 15C versus the 29C experiment, ALDO was approximately 37% lower at the pre, 15 and 90 min time periods. Mean arterial blood pressure was generally greater but only significant at 60 min during the 15C versus the 29C experiment. Urinary NA{sup +} excretion was elevated in 15C relative to 29C while no difference in K{sup +} excretion was observed. Although pressure effects may contribute, the observed natriuresis in the absence of a kaliuresis in the cold suggests a physiological role of ANP in CID.

  18. Cold-restraint induced gastric lesions in normotensive and spontaneously hypertensive rats

    SciTech Connect

    Athey, G.R.; Iams, S.G.

    1981-02-23

    Spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) rats and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats were subjected to 2 hr of cold-restraint stress at 4-6/sup o/C following a 24 hr fast. WKY rats had a significantly greater incidence and degree of ulceration of the gastric glandular mucosa than did SHR rats. Mean arterial pressure, obtained from a chronic arterial cannula, fell during 2 hr of cold-restraint stress in both SHR and WKY rats. Heart rate was unchanged in WKY but fell significantly in SHR. Plasma norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine (E), determined by radioenzymatic assay, increased significantly following stress. Increased levels of NE remained similar for both SHR and WKY rats, while post-stress levels of E for the SHR rats greatly exceeded E levels for WKY rats. A greater degree of hypothermia was also noted in SHR rats. Decreased stress induced ulcerogenesis in the SHR may be due to the well-known altered hemodynamic and autonomic nervous system reactivity in this strain or other factors not yet discovered.

  19. Anaplasma phagocytophilum induces Ixodes scapularis ticks to express an antifreeze glycoprotein gene that enhances their survival in the cold

    PubMed Central

    Neelakanta, Girish; Sultana, Hameeda; Fish, Durland; Anderson, John F.; Fikrig, Erol

    2010-01-01

    In the United States, Ixodes scapularis ticks overwinter in the Northeast and Upper Midwest and transmit the agent of human granulocytic anaplasmosis, Anaplasma phagocytophilum, among other pathogens. We now show that the presence of A. phagocytophilum in I. scapularis ticks increases their ability to survive in the cold. We identified an I. scapularis antifreeze glycoprotein, designated IAFGP, and demonstrated via RNAi knockdown studies the importance of IAFGP for the survival of I. scapularis ticks in a cold environment. Transfection studies also show that IAFGP increased the viability of yeast cells subjected to cold temperature. Remarkably, A. phagocytophilum induced the expression of iafgp, thereby increasing the cold tolerance and survival of I. scapularis. These data define a molecular basis for symbiosis between a human pathogenic bacterium and its arthropod vector and delineate what we believe to be a new pathway that may be targeted to alter the life cycle of this microbe and its invertebrate host. PMID:20739755

  20. Delayed drug hypersensitivity reactions - new concepts.

    PubMed

    Posadas, S J; Pichler, W J

    2007-07-01

    Immune reactions to small molecular compounds such as drugs can cause a variety of diseases mainly involving skin, but also liver, kidney, lungs and other organs. In addition to the well-known immediate, IgE-mediated reactions to drugs, many drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions appear delayed. Recent data have shown that in these delayed reactions drug-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells recognize drugs through their T cell receptors (TCR) in an MHC-dependent way. Immunohistochemical and functional studies of drug-reactive T cells in patients with distinct forms of exanthems revealed that distinct T cell functions lead to different clinical phenotypes. Taken together, these data allow delayed hypersensitivity reactions (type IV) to be further subclassified into T cell reactions, which by releasing certain cytokines and chemokines preferentially activate and recruit monocytes (type IVa), eosinophils (type IVb), or neutrophils (type IVd). Moreover, cytotoxic functions by either CD4(+) or CD8(+) T cells (type IVc) seem to participate in all type IV reactions. Drugs are not only immunogenic because of their chemical reactivity, but also because they may bind in a labile way to available TCRs and possibly MHC-molecules. This seems to be sufficient to stimulate certain, probably preactivated T cells. The drug seems to bind first to the fitting TCR, which already exerts some activation. For full activation, an additional interaction of the TCR with the MHC molecules is needed. The drug binding to the receptor structures is reminiscent of a pharmacological interaction between a drug and its (immune) receptor and was thus termed the p-i concept. In some patients with drug hypersensitivity, such a response occurs within hours even upon the first exposure to the drug. The T cell reaction to the drug might thus not be due to a classical, primary response, but is due to peptide-specific T cells which happen to be stimulated by a drug. This new concept has major implications

  1. Angular distribution of products of ternary nuclear fission induced by cold polarized neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Bunakov, V. E. Kadmensky, S. G. Kadmensky, S. S.

    2008-11-15

    Within quantum fission theory, angular distributions of products originating from the ternary fission of nuclei that is induced by polarized cold and thermal neutrons are investigated on the basis of a non-evaporative mechanism of third-particle emission and a consistent description of fission-channel coupling. It is shown that the inclusion of Coriolis interaction both in the region of the discrete and in the region of the continuous spectrum of states of the system undergoing fission leads to T-odd correlations in the aforementioned angular distributions. The properties of the TRI and ROT effects discovered recently, which are due to the interference between the fission amplitudes of neutron resonances, are explored. The results obtained here are compared with their counterparts from classic calculations based on the trajectory method.

  2. Identification of cold-inducible inner membrane proteins of the psychrotrophic bacterium, Shewanella livingstonensis Ac10, by proteomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Park, Jungha; Kawamoto, Jun; Esaki, Nobuyoshi; Kurihara, Tatsuo

    2012-03-01

    Shewanella livingstonensis Ac10 is a psychrotrophic Gram-negative bacterium that grows at temperatures close to 0°C. Previous proteomic studies of this bacterium identified cold-inducible soluble proteins and outer membrane proteins that could possibly be involved in its cold adaptation (Kawamoto et al. in Extremophiles 11:819-826, 2007). In this study, we established a method for separating the inner and outer membranes by sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation and performed proteomic studies of the inner membrane fraction. The cells were grown at temperatures of 4 and 18°C, and phospholipid-enriched inner membrane fractions were obtained. Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and peptide mass fingerprinting analysis of the proteins identified 14 cold-inducible proteins (more than a 2-fold increase at 4°C). Six of these proteins were predicted to be inner membrane proteins. Two predicted periplasmic proteins, 5 predicted cytoplasmic proteins, and 1 predicted outer membrane protein were also found in the inner membrane fraction, suggesting their association with the inner membrane proteins and/or lipids. These cold-inducible proteins included proteins that are presumed to be involved in chemotaxis (AtoS and PspA), membrane protein biogenesis (DegP, SurA, and FtsY), and morphogenesis (MreB). These findings provide a basis for further studies on the cold-adaptation mechanism of this bacterium.

  3. A DEAD Box RNA Helicase Is Critical for Pre-mRNA Splicing, Cold-Responsive Gene Regulation, and Cold Tolerance in Arabidopsis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Qingmei; Wu, Jianmin; Zhang, Yanyan; Jiang, Changhua; Liu, Renyi; Chai, Chenglin; Zhu, Jianhua

    2013-01-01

    Cold stress resulting from chilling and freezing temperatures substantially reduces crop production worldwide. To identify genes critical for cold tolerance in plants, we screened Arabidopsis thaliana mutants for deregulated expression of a firefly luciferase reporter gene under the control of the C-REPEAT BINDING FACTOR2 (CBF2) promoter (CBF2:LUC). A regulator of CBF gene expression1 (rcf1-1) mutant that is hypersensitive to cold stress was chosen for in-depth characterization. RCF1 encodes a cold-inducible DEAD (Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp) box RNA helicase. Unlike a previously reported DEAD box RNA helicase (LOW EXPRESSION OF OSMOTICALLY RESPONSIVE GENES4 [LOS4]) that regulates mRNA export, RCF1 does not play a role in mRNA export. Instead, RCF1 functions to maintain proper splicing of pre-mRNAs; many cold-responsive genes are mis-spliced in rcf1-1 mutant plants under cold stress. Functional characterization of four genes (PSEUDO-RESPONSE REGULATOR5 [PRR5], SHAGGY-LIKE SERINE/THREONINE KINASE12 [SK12], MYB FAMILY TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR CIRCADIAN1 [CIR1], and SPFH/PHB DOMAIN-CONTAINING MEMBRANE-ASSOCIATED PROTEIN [SPFH]) that are mis-spliced in rcf1-1 revealed that these genes are cold-inducible positive (CIR1 and SPFH) and negative (PRR5 and SK12) regulators of cold-responsive genes and cold tolerance. Together, our results suggest that the cold-inducible RNA helicase RCF1 is essential for pre-mRNA splicing and is important for cold-responsive gene regulation and cold tolerance in plants. PMID:23371945

  4. Relationship between Sympathetic Skin Responses and Auditory Hypersensitivity to Different Auditory Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Fumi; Iwanaga, Ryoichiro; Chono, Mami; Fujihara, Saori; Tokunaga, Akiko; Murata, Jun; Tanaka, Koji; Nakane, Hideyuki; Tanaka, Goro

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] Auditory hypersensitivity has been widely reported in patients with autism spectrum disorders. However, the neurological background of auditory hypersensitivity is currently not clear. The present study examined the relationship between sympathetic nervous system responses and auditory hypersensitivity induced by different types of auditory stimuli. [Methods] We exposed 20 healthy young adults to six different types of auditory stimuli. The amounts of palmar sweating resulting from the auditory stimuli were compared between groups with (hypersensitive) and without (non-hypersensitive) auditory hypersensitivity. [Results] Although no group × type of stimulus × first stimulus interaction was observed for the extent of reaction, significant type of stimulus × first stimulus interaction was noted for the extent of reaction. For an 80 dB-6,000 Hz stimulus, the trends for palmar sweating differed between the groups. For the first stimulus, the variance became larger in the hypersensitive group than in the non-hypersensitive group. [Conclusion] Subjects who regularly felt excessive reactions to auditory stimuli tended to have excessive sympathetic responses to repeated loud noises compared with subjects who did not feel excessive reactions. People with auditory hypersensitivity may be classified into several subtypes depending on their reaction patterns to auditory stimuli. PMID:25140103

  5. Relationship between Sympathetic Skin Responses and Auditory Hypersensitivity to Different Auditory Stimuli.

    PubMed

    Kato, Fumi; Iwanaga, Ryoichiro; Chono, Mami; Fujihara, Saori; Tokunaga, Akiko; Murata, Jun; Tanaka, Koji; Nakane, Hideyuki; Tanaka, Goro

    2014-07-01

    [Purpose] Auditory hypersensitivity has been widely reported in patients with autism spectrum disorders. However, the neurological background of auditory hypersensitivity is currently not clear. The present study examined the relationship between sympathetic nervous system responses and auditory hypersensitivity induced by different types of auditory stimuli. [Methods] We exposed 20 healthy young adults to six different types of auditory stimuli. The amounts of palmar sweating resulting from the auditory stimuli were compared between groups with (hypersensitive) and without (non-hypersensitive) auditory hypersensitivity. [Results] Although no group × type of stimulus × first stimulus interaction was observed for the extent of reaction, significant type of stimulus × first stimulus interaction was noted for the extent of reaction. For an 80 dB-6,000 Hz stimulus, the trends for palmar sweating differed between the groups. For the first stimulus, the variance became larger in the hypersensitive group than in the non-hypersensitive group. [Conclusion] Subjects who regularly felt excessive reactions to auditory stimuli tended to have excessive sympathetic responses to repeated loud noises compared with subjects who did not feel excessive reactions. People with auditory hypersensitivity may be classified into several subtypes depending on their reaction patterns to auditory stimuli.

  6. Immediate hypersensitivity reaction with mango.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ashok; Gera, Kamal

    2014-01-01

    Hypersensitivity to the fruit mango is extremely rare and can exhibit either as immediate or delayed reactions. Since 1939, only 22 patients (10 with immediate type I reactions and 12 with delayed) have been documented with allergy to mango. History of atopy and geographical region may influence the type of reaction. Immediate reactions occurred most often in patients with history of atopy, while delayed reactions developed in non-atopic individuals. Clustering of delayed hypersensitivity reports from Australia and immediate reactions from Europe has been documented. We report a 50-year-old man with immediate type I hypersensitivity to mango, who developed cough, wheezing dyspnoea, generalised itching and abdominal discomfort after ingestion of mango. Life threatening event can also happen making it imperative to diagnose on time, so as to prevent significant morbidity and potential mortality. PMID:25133813

  7. Dentin hypersensitivity and its management.

    PubMed

    Chu, C H; Lam, Anty; Lo, Edward C M

    2011-01-01

    Dentin hypersensitivity is a common patient complaint that is more prevalent than the profession realizes. It is important for dentists to diagnose dentin hypersensitivity by exclusion and provide appropriate treatment recommendations for patients. Various treatment methods have been proposed but no universally accepted desensitizing agent or treatment has been identified. When a patient has symptoms that can be attributed to dentin hypersensitivity, a thorough clinical examination should be carried out to rule out other likely causes prior to diagnosis and treatment. Depending on the identified cause, a combination of individualized instructions on proper oral health behaviors, use of at-home products, and professional treatment may be required to manage the problem. PMID:21903521

  8. Cold-inducible RNA-binding protein is an important mediator of alcohol-induced brain inflammation.

    PubMed

    Rajayer, Salil R; Jacob, Asha; Yang, Weng-Lang; Zhou, Mian; Chaung, Wayne; Wang, Ping

    2013-01-01

    Binge drinking has been associated with cerebral dysfunction. Ethanol induced microglial activation initiates an inflammatory process that causes upregulation of proinflammatory cytokines which in turn creates neuronal inflammation and damage. However, the molecular mechanism is not fully understood. We postulate that cold-inducible RNA-binding protein (CIRP), a novel proinflammatory molecule, can contribute to alcohol-induced neuroinflammation. To test this theory male wild-type (WT) mice were exposed to alcohol at concentrations consistent to binge drinking and blood and brain tissues were collected. At 5 h after alcohol, a significant increase of 53% in the brain of CIRP mRNA was observed and its expression remained elevated at 10 h and 15 h. Brain CIRP protein levels were increased by 184% at 10 h and remained high at 15 h. We then exposed male WT and CIRP knockout (CIRP(-/-)) mice to alcohol, and blood and brain tissues were collected at 15 h post-alcohol infusion. Serum levels of tissue injury markers (AST, ALT and LDH) were significantly elevated in alcohol-exposed WT mice while they were less increased in the CIRP(-/-) mice. Brain TNF-α mRNA and protein expressions along with IL-1β protein levels were significantly increased in WT mice, which was not seen in the CIRP(-/-) mice. In cultured BV2 cells (mouse microglia), ethanol at 100 mM showed an increase of CIRP mRNA by 274% and 408% at 24 h and 48 h respectively. Corresponding increases in TNF-α and IL-1β were also observed. CIRP protein levels were markedly increased in the medium, suggesting that CIRP was secreted by the BV2 cells. From this we conclude that alcohol exposure activates microglia to produce and secrete CIRP and possibly induce pro-inflammatory response and thereby causing neuroinflammation. CIRP could be a novel mediator of alcohol-induced brain inflammation.

  9. Maternal and postnatal dietary probiotic supplementation enhances splenic regulatory T helper cell population and reduces peanut allergen-induced hypersensitivity responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Toomer, Ondulla T; Ferguson, Martine; Pereira, Marion; Do, Andrew; Bigley, Elmer; Gaines, Dennis; Williams, Kristina

    2014-09-01

    Neonatal to early childhood is the critical period for establishing a balance of T helper 1 (Th1) versus T helper 2 (Th2) cellular immunity within the gut, which is strongly influenced by the source and establishment of gut microflora. Probiotic administration has been shown to attenuate Th2-biased cellular immunity and predisposition to food allergies. To test this hypothesis we provided ad libitum a probiotic-supplemented (Primalac 454 Feed Grade Microbials) or control diet to lactating dams with suckling pups and weaned pups until 10 weeks of age. Weaned mice were sensitized/challenged with peanut extract, saline or adjuvant at 6, 8 and 10 weeks of age. At 3, 6, 8 and 10 weeks, fecal samples were collected for microbial analysis, while blood samples were analyzed for total plasma IgE levels. At termination (10 weeks of age), splenic T lymphocyte population subtypes were determined using FACS analysis and Th1/Th2/Th17 gene expression by PCR array. Mice given the probiotic-supplemented diet had significantly enhanced probiotic fecal counts compared to controls at 3, 6, 8 and 10 weeks. Moreover, mice fed the probiotic-supplemented diet had enhanced splenic naturally occurring T regulatory cell populations, and reduced splenic gene expression of allergic mediator IL-13 compared to controls. These results provide evidence that early probiotic supplementation may provide host protection to hypersensitivity reactions to food allergens by attenuating food allergen inflammatory responses.

  10. Effects of early cold adaptation on food efficiency and dietary-induced thermogenesis in the adult rat.

    PubMed

    Davis, J R; Tagliaferro, A R; Roberts, J S; Hill, J O

    1982-07-01

    The food intakes of male and female rats (Harvard strain) adapted to cold (5 degrees C) starting at weaning were studied in the cold and during reacclimation to 25 degrees C. Following 24 hr food deprivation, the male rats regained the weight they had lost without making up for the food they had missed (increased food efficiency), while the female rats ate 75% more food than they had missed in regaining their body weights (decreased food efficiency), independent of the temperature at which the animals were housed. On a high fat diet, both cold groups gained less weight than did the two control groups. However, each female group gained significantly less weight than its same temperature male group. Dietary-induced thermogenesis was significantly enhanced in male cold adapted rats 3 months after reacclimation to the zone of thermal neutrality but not in cold adapted female rats. Sex and strain differences are discussed. These data indicate that early chronic cold exposure results in both immediate and long-term changes in food efficiency and metabolism in adult rats, but the effects vary with the sex of the animal.

  11. Cold-inducible RNA-binding protein inhibits neuron apoptosis through the suppression of mitochondrial apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hai-Tao; Xue, Jing-Hui; Zhang, Zhi-Wen; Kong, Hai-Bo; Liu, Ai-Jun; Li, Shou-Chun; Xu, Dong-Gang

    2015-10-01

    Cold-inducible RNA-binding protein (CIRP) is induced by mild hypothermia in several mammals, but the precise mechanism by which CIRP mediates hypothermia-induced neuroprotection remains unknown. We aimed to investigate the molecular mechanisms by which CIRP protects the nervous system during mild hypothermia. Rat cortical neurons were isolated and cultured in vitro under mild hypothermia (32°C). Apoptosis was measured by annexin V and propidium iodide staining, visualized by flow cytometry. Neuron ultrastructure was visualized by transmission electron microscopy. CIRP overexpression and knockdown were achieved via infection with pL/IRES/GFP-CIRP and pL/shRNA/F-CIRP-A lentivirus. RT(2) Profiler PCR Array Pathway Analysis and western blotting were used to evaluate the effects of CIRP overexpresion/knockdown on the neurons׳ transcriptome. Neuron late apoptosis was significantly reduced at day 7 of culture by 12h hypothermia, but neuron ultrastructure remained relatively intact. RT(2) Profiler PCR Array Pathway Analysis of 84 apoptosis pathway-associated factors revealed that mild hypothermia and CIRP overexpression induce similar gene expression profiles, specifically alterations of genes implicated in the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway. Mild hypothermia-treated neurons up-regulated 12 and down-regulated 38 apoptosis pathway-associated genes. CIRP-overexpressing neurons up-regulated 15 and down-regulated 46 genes. CIRP-knocked-down hypothermia-treated cells up-regulated 9 and down-regulated 40 genes. Similar results were obtained at the protein level. In conclusion, CIRP may inhibit neuron apoptosis through the suppression of the mitochondria apoptosis pathway during mild hypothermia.

  12. Exogenous 5-Aminolevulenic Acid Promotes Seed Germination in Elymus nutans against Oxidative Damage Induced by Cold Stress

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Juanjuan; Sun, Yongfang; Chu, Xitong; Xu, Yuefei; Hu, Tianming

    2014-01-01

    The protective effects of 5-aminolevulenic acid (ALA) on germination of Elymus nutans Griseb. seeds under cold stress were investigated. Seeds of E. nutans (Damxung, DX and Zhengdao, ZD) were pre-soaked with various concentrations (0, 0.1, 0.5, 1, 5, 10 and 25 mg l−1) of ALA for 24 h before germination under cold stress (5°C). Seeds of ZD were more susceptible to cold stress than DX seeds. Both seeds treated with ALA at low concentrations (0.1–1 mg l−1) had higher final germination percentage (FGP) and dry weight at 5°C than non-ALA-treated seeds, whereas exposure to higher ALA concentrations (5–25 mg l−1) brought about a dose dependent decrease. The highest FGP and dry weight of germinating seeds were obtained from seeds pre-soaked with 1 mg l−1 ALA. After 5 d of cold stress, pretreatment with ALA provided significant protection against cold stress in the germinating seeds, significantly enhancing seed respiration rate and ATP synthesis. ALA pre-treatment also increased reduced glutathione (GSH), ascorbic acid (AsA), total glutathione, and total ascorbate concentrations, and the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and glutathione reductase (GR), whereas decreased the contents of malondialdehyde (MDA) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and superoxide radical (O2•−) release in both germinating seeds under cold stress. In addition, application of ALA increased H+-ATPase activity and endogenous ALA concentration compared with cold stress alone. Results indicate that ALA considered as an endogenous plant growth regulator could effectively protect E. nutans seeds from cold-induced oxidative damage during germination without any adverse effect. PMID:25207651

  13. Exogenous 5-aminolevulenic acid promotes seed germination in Elymus nutans against oxidative damage induced by cold stress.

    PubMed

    Fu, Juanjuan; Sun, Yongfang; Chu, Xitong; Xu, Yuefei; Hu, Tianming

    2014-01-01

    The protective effects of 5-aminolevulenic acid (ALA) on germination of Elymus nutans Griseb. seeds under cold stress were investigated. Seeds of E. nutans (Damxung, DX and Zhengdao, ZD) were pre-soaked with various concentrations (0, 0.1, 0.5, 1, 5, 10 and 25 mg l(-1)) of ALA for 24 h before germination under cold stress (5°C). Seeds of ZD were more susceptible to cold stress than DX seeds. Both seeds treated with ALA at low concentrations (0.1-1 mg l(-1)) had higher final germination percentage (FGP) and dry weight at 5°C than non-ALA-treated seeds, whereas exposure to higher ALA concentrations (5-25 mg l(-1)) brought about a dose dependent decrease. The highest FGP and dry weight of germinating seeds were obtained from seeds pre-soaked with 1 mg l(-1) ALA. After 5 d of cold stress, pretreatment with ALA provided significant protection against cold stress in the germinating seeds, significantly enhancing seed respiration rate and ATP synthesis. ALA pre-treatment also increased reduced glutathione (GSH), ascorbic acid (AsA), total glutathione, and total ascorbate concentrations, and the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and glutathione reductase (GR), whereas decreased the contents of malondialdehyde (MDA) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and superoxide radical (O2•-) release in both germinating seeds under cold stress. In addition, application of ALA increased H+-ATPase activity and endogenous ALA concentration compared with cold stress alone. Results indicate that ALA considered as an endogenous plant growth regulator could effectively protect E. nutans seeds from cold-induced oxidative damage during germination without any adverse effect. PMID:25207651

  14. Management of hypersensitivity reactions to anti-D immunoglobulin preparations.

    PubMed

    Rutkowski, K; Nasser, S M

    2014-11-01

    RhD immunoglobulin G (anti-D) administered to pregnant Rh(-) women prevents Rh isoimmunization. Its use has significantly reduced the incidence of haemolytic disease of the foetus and newborn previously responsible for one death in every 2200 births. In pregnancy, acute drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions including anaphylaxis can have serious deleterious effects on the mother and foetus/neonate. Women can be erroneously labelled as drug allergic as the investigation of hypersensitivity reactions in pregnancy is complex and drug challenges are usually contraindicated. We present three cases of suspected anti-D hypersensitivity clinically presenting as anaphylaxis and delayed transfusion-related reaction. We also propose a new algorithm for the investigations of such reaction. It relies on detailed history, cautious interpretation of skin tests, foetal Rh genotyping from maternal blood and, in some cases, anti-D challenges. This is not to deprive women of anti-D which might put their future pregnancies at risk. PMID:25066207

  15. Using the nonlinear control of anaesthesia-induced hypersensitivity of EEG at burst suppression level to test the effects of radiofrequency radiation on brain function

    PubMed Central

    Lipping, Tarmo; Rorarius, Michael; Jäntti, Ville; Annala, Kari; Mennander, Ari; Ferenets, Rain; Toivonen, Tommi; Toivo, Tim; Värri, Alpo; Korpinen, Leena

    2009-01-01

    Background In this study, investigating the effects of mobile phone radiation on test animals, eleven pigs were anaesthetised to the level where burst-suppression pattern appears in the electroencephalogram (EEG). At this level of anaesthesia both human subjects and animals show high sensitivity to external stimuli which produce EEG bursts during suppression. The burst-suppression phenomenon represents a nonlinear control system, where low-amplitude EEG abruptly switches to very high amplitude bursts. This switching can be triggered by very minor stimuli and the phenomenon has been described as hypersensitivity. To test if also radio frequency (RF) stimulation can trigger this nonlinear control, the animals were exposed to pulse modulated signal of a GSM mobile phone at 890 MHz. In the first phase of the experiment electromagnetic field (EMF) stimulation was randomly switched on and off and the relation between EEG bursts and EMF stimulation onsets and endpoints were studied. In the second phase a continuous RF stimulation at 31 W/kg was applied for 10 minutes. The ECG, the EEG, and the subcutaneous temperature were recorded. Results No correlation between the exposure and the EEG burst occurrences was observed in phase I measurements. No significant changes were observed in the EEG activity of the pigs during phase II measurements although several EEG signal analysis methods were applied. The temperature measured subcutaneously from the pigs' head increased by 1.6°C and the heart rate by 14.2 bpm on the average during the 10 min exposure periods. Conclusion The hypothesis that RF radiation would produce sensory stimulation of somatosensory, auditory or visual system or directly affect the brain so as to produce EEG bursts during suppression was not confirmed. PMID:19615084

  16. Structural basis of metal hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Metal hypersensitivity is a common immune disorder. Human immune systems mount the allergic attacks on metal ions through skin contacts, lung inhalation and metal-containing artificial body implants. The consequences can be simple annoyances to life-threatening systemic illness. Allergic hyper-reactivities to nickel (Ni) and beryllium (Be) are the best-studied human metal hypersensitivities. Ni-contact dermatitis affects 10 % of the human population, whereas Be compounds are the culprits of chronic Be disease (CBD). αβ T cells (T cells) play a crucial role in these hypersensitivity reactions. Metal ions work as haptens and bind to the surface of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and peptide complex. This modifies the binding surface of MHC and triggers the immune response of T cells. Metal-specific αβ T cell receptors (TCRs) are usually MHC restricted, especially MHC class II (MHCII) restricted. Numerous models have been proposed, yet the mechanisms and molecular basis of metal hypersensitivity remain elusive. Recently, we determined the crystal structures of the Ni and Be presenting human MHCII molecules, HLA-DR52c (DRA*0101, DRB3*0301) and HLA-DP2 (DPA1*0103, DPB1*0201). These structures revealed unusual features of MHCII molecules and shed light on how metal ions are recognized by T cells. PMID:22983897

  17. Production of diploid male gametes in Arabidopsis by cold-induced destabilization of postmeiotic radial microtubule arrays.

    PubMed

    De Storme, Nico; Copenhaver, Gregory P; Geelen, Danny

    2012-12-01

    Whole-genome duplication through the formation of diploid gametes is a major route for polyploidization, speciation, and diversification in plants. The prevalence of polyploids in adverse climates led us to hypothesize that abiotic stress conditions can induce or stimulate diploid gamete production. In this study, we show that short periods of cold stress induce the production of diploid and polyploid pollen in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Using a combination of cytological and genetic analyses, we demonstrate that cold stress alters the formation of radial microtubule arrays at telophase II and consequently leads to defects in postmeiotic cytokinesis and cell wall formation. As a result, cold-stressed male meiosis generates triads, dyads, and monads that contain binuclear and polynuclear microspores. Fusion of nuclei in binuclear and polynuclear microspores occurs spontaneously before pollen mitosis I and eventually leads to the formation of diploid and polyploid pollen grains. Using segregation analyses, we also found that the majority of cold-induced dyads and triads are genetically equivalent to a second division restitution and produce diploid gametes that are highly homozygous. In a broader perspective, these findings offer insights into the fundamental mechanisms that regulate male gametogenesis in plants and demonstrate that their sensitivity to environmental stress has evolutionary significance and agronomic relevance in terms of polyploidization.

  18. Proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β suppresses cold-induced thermogenesis in adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Goto, Tsuyoshi; Naknukool, Supaporn; Yoshitake, Rieko; Hanafusa, Yuki; Tokiwa, Soshi; Li, Yongjia; Sakamoto, Tomoya; Nitta, Takahiro; Kim, Minji; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Yu, Rina; Daiyasu, Hiromi; Seno, Shigeto; Matsuda, Hideo; Kawada, Teruo

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of interleukin-1β (IL-1β), a typical proinflammatory cytokine on the β-adrenoreceptor-stimulated induction of uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) expression in adipocytes. IL-1β mRNA expression levels were upregulated in white adipose tissues of obese mice and in RAW264.7 macrophages under conditions designed to mimic obese adipose tissue. Isoproterenol-stimulated induction of UCP1 mRNA expression was significantly inhibited in C3H10T1/2 adipocytes by conditioned medium from lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages in comparison with control conditioned medium. This inhibition was significantly attenuated in the presence of recombinant IL-1 receptor antagonist and IL-1β antibody, suggesting that activated macrophage-derived IL-1β is an important cytokine for inhibition of β-adrenoreceptor-stimulated UCP1 induction in adipocytes. IL-1β suppressed isoproterenol-induced UCP1 mRNA expression in C3H10T1/2 adipocytes, and this effect was partially but significantly abrogated by inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). IL-1β also suppressed the isoproterenol-induced activation of the UCP1 promoter and transcription factors binding to the cAMP response element. Moreover, intraperitoneal administration of IL-1β suppressed cold-induced UCP1 expression in adipose tissues. These findings suggest that IL-1β upregulated in obese adipose tissues suppresses β-adrenoreceptor-stimulated induction of UCP1 expression through ERK activation in adipocytes.

  19. [Epidemiology of teeth hypersensitivity].

    PubMed

    Lutskaia, I K; Zinovenko, O G; Kovalenko, I P

    2015-01-01

    A clinical examination of 98 patients aged 20 to 75 years was carried out to identifyclinical and epidemiological features of hard tooth tissueshypersensitivity. The survey found out what stimuli (cold, hot, sour, mechanical, chemical) cause the appearance of dental hyperesthesia. The detailed survey of the affected area aimed to determine the presence of dental caries, gingival recession, wedge-shaped defects, erosions, microcracks and chipped enamel, as well as wear of the tooth crown. Forty-threepatients of 98 (43.88%) had tooth sensitivity. Most affected age group was 25-34 years (33%). Among patients studied with hyperesthesia 86% complained of pain. It was establishedthat dental hyperesthesia most often causes an intense, but quickly passing pain response, wherein upon exposure of several types of stimuli. Teeth with high sensitivity showed signs of abrasion (74.1%), most often--on the vestibular surface (44.4%). Patients under 45 years had notable cracks and wedge-shaped defects. In patients 45 years and older cracks and increased abrasion of hard dental tissues was seen. PMID:26271696

  20. Interference of L-α-aminoocy-β-phenylpropionic acid with cold-induced sphagnorubin synthesis in Sphagnum magellanicum BRID.

    PubMed

    Tutschek, R

    1982-08-01

    The ability of the phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL)-inhibitor L-α-aminooxy-β-phenyl-propionic acid (AOPP) to suppress the synthesis of the main reddish-violet wall pigment of Sphagnum magellanicum (sphagnorubin) was investigated. Fifty percent inhibition is achieved with 14 μM AOPP in mosses stimulated to intensive coloring by sugar feeding. AOPP does not affect the content of free amino acids, except for phenylalanine, during cold-induced sphagnorubin synthesis. AOPP dramatically amplifies the increase in extractable PAL activity in response to cold treatment. Phenylalanine applied in vivo causes an eminent increase in PAL activity, above the level of the cold-treated mosses. The results from the feeding experiments are discussed in connection with a possible end-product repression in PAL activity with sphagnorubin-synthesizing mosses. These results are correspond best to the theory that the enzyme level is regulated independently from a mechanism of feedback repression. PMID:24271864

  1. Glutathione Transferases Superfamily: Cold-Inducible Expression of Distinct GST Genes in Brassica oleracea

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakumar, Harshavardhanan; Thamilarasan, Senthil Kumar; Shanmugam, Ashokraj; Natarajan, Sathishkumar; Jung, Hee-Jeong; Park, Jong-In; Kim, HyeRan; Chung, Mi-Young; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2016-01-01

    Plants, as sessile organisms, can suffer serious growth and developmental consequences under cold stress conditions. Glutathione transferases (GSTs, EC 2.5.1.18) are ubiquitous and multifunctional conjugating proteins, which play a major role in stress responses by preventing oxidative damage by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Currently, understanding of their function(s) during different biochemical and signaling pathways under cold stress condition remain unclear. In this study, using combined computational strategy, we identified 65 Brassica oleracea glutathione transferases (BoGST) and characterized them based on evolutionary analysis into 11 classes. Inter-species and intra-species duplication was evident between BoGSTs and Arabidopsis GSTs. Based on localization analyses, we propose possible pathways in which GST genes are involved during cold stress. Further, expression analysis of the predicted putative functions for GST genes were investigated in two cold contrasting genotypes (cold tolerance and susceptible) under cold condition, most of these genes were highly expressed at 6 h and 1 h in the cold tolerant (CT) and cold susceptible (CS) lines, respectively. Overall, BoGSTU19, BoGSTU24, BoGSTF10 are candidate genes highly expressed in B. oleracea. Further investigation of GST superfamily in B. oleracea will aid in understanding complex mechanism underlying cold tolerance in plants. PMID:27472324

  2. Glutathione Transferases Superfamily: Cold-Inducible Expression of Distinct GST Genes in Brassica oleracea.

    PubMed

    Vijayakumar, Harshavardhanan; Thamilarasan, Senthil Kumar; Shanmugam, Ashokraj; Natarajan, Sathishkumar; Jung, Hee-Jeong; Park, Jong-In; Kim, HyeRan; Chung, Mi-Young; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2016-01-01

    Plants, as sessile organisms, can suffer serious growth and developmental consequences under cold stress conditions. Glutathione transferases (GSTs, EC 2.5.1.18) are ubiquitous and multifunctional conjugating proteins, which play a major role in stress responses by preventing oxidative damage by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Currently, understanding of their function(s) during different biochemical and signaling pathways under cold stress condition remain unclear. In this study, using combined computational strategy, we identified 65 Brassica oleracea glutathione transferases (BoGST) and characterized them based on evolutionary analysis into 11 classes. Inter-species and intra-species duplication was evident between BoGSTs and Arabidopsis GSTs. Based on localization analyses, we propose possible pathways in which GST genes are involved during cold stress. Further, expression analysis of the predicted putative functions for GST genes were investigated in two cold contrasting genotypes (cold tolerance and susceptible) under cold condition, most of these genes were highly expressed at 6 h and 1 h in the cold tolerant (CT) and cold susceptible (CS) lines, respectively. Overall, BoGSTU19, BoGSTU24, BoGSTF10 are candidate genes highly expressed in B. oleracea. Further investigation of GST superfamily in B. oleracea will aid in understanding complex mechanism underlying cold tolerance in plants. PMID:27472324

  3. TRPA1 contributes to capsaicin-induced facial cold hyperalgesia in rats.

    PubMed

    Honda, Kuniya; Shinoda, Masamichi; Furukawa, Akihiko; Kita, Kozue; Noma, Noboru; Iwata, Koichi

    2014-12-01

    Orofacial cold hyperalgesia is known to cause severe persistent pain in the face following trigeminal nerve injury or inflammation, and transient receptor potential (TRP) vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) and TRP ankylin 1 (TRPA1) are thought to be involved in cold hyperalgesia. However, how these two receptors are involved in cold hyperalgesia is not fully understood. To clarify the mechanisms underlying facial cold hyperalgesia, nocifensive behaviors to cold stimulation, the expression of TRPV1 and TRPA1 in trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons, and TG neuronal excitability to cold stimulation following facial capsaicin injection were examined in rats. The head-withdrawal reflex threshold (HWRT) to cold stimulation of the lateral facial skin was significantly decreased following facial capsaicin injection. This reduction of HWRT was significantly recovered following local injection of TRPV1 antagonist as well as TRPA1 antagonist. Approximately 30% of TG neurons innervating the lateral facial skin expressed both TRPV1 and TRPA1, and about 64% of TRPA1-positive neurons also expressed TRPV1. The TG neuronal excitability to noxious cold stimulation was significantly increased following facial capsaicin injection and this increase was recovered by pretreatment with TRPA1 antagonist. These findings suggest that TRPA1 sensitization via TRPV1 signaling in TG neurons is involved in cold hyperalgesia following facial skin capsaicin injection.

  4. Hypersensitivity pneumonitis in a high school teacher.

    PubMed

    Moniodis, A; Hamilton, T; Racila, E; Cockrill, B; McCunney, R

    2015-10-01

    Hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) is an inflammatory lung disease mediated by an immunological response to an inhaled antigen. Outbreaks of HP have been reported in industrial settings where manufacturing workers are exposed to water-based metalworking fluids (MWFs). Water-based MWFs promote growth of microorganisms and can be easily aerosolized and are thus potential aetiological agents of HP. We present a case of HP caused by exposure to water-based MWF in a vocational high school teacher. Culture of MWF used at his school grew Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes. This is the first known report of MWF-induced HP outside an industrial setting. The growth of Pseudomonas spp in this case recalls the earliest reports of the microbiology of MWF-induced HP and suggests that routine bacterial culture may be useful in the diagnosis of HP in workplaces without standard cleaning and biocide regulations. PMID:26136595

  5. Therapeutic effect of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on cold stress induced changes in the hippocampus of rats.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Saravana Kumar Sampath; Perumal, Saraswathi; Rajagopalan, Vijayaraghavan

    2014-10-01

    The present study aims to evaluate the effect of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on cold stress induced neuronal changes in hippocampal CA1 region of Wistar rats. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were isolated from a 6-week-old Wistar rat. Bone marrow from adult femora and tibia was collected and mesenchymal stem cells were cultured in minimal essential medium containing 10% heat-inactivated fetal bovine serum and were sub-cultured. Passage 3 cells were analyzed by flow cytometry for positive expression of CD44 and CD90 and negative expression of CD45. Once CD44 and CD90 positive expression was achieved, the cells were cultured again to 90% confluence for later experiments. Twenty-four rats aged 8 weeks old were randomly and evenly divided into normal control, cold water swim stress (cold stress), cold stress + PBS (intravenous infusion), and cold stress + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (1 × 10(6); intravenous infusion) groups. The total period of study was 60 days which included 1 month stress period followed by 1 month treatment. Behavioral functional test was performed during the entire study period. After treatment, rats were sacrificed for histological studies. Treatment with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells significantly increased the number of neuronal cells in hippocampal CA1 region. Adult bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells injected by intravenous administration show potential therapeutic effects in cognitive decline associated with stress-related lesions.

  6. Cold-induced vasodilatation of finger and maximal oxygen consumption of young female athletes born in Hokkaido

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriya, Kiyoshi; Nakagawa, Koya

    1990-03-01

    To determine whether there is a direct correlation between endurance capacity and cold tolerance, maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max), and cold-induced vasodilatation (CIVD), we measured these factors in 14 young female athletes born in Hokkaido, Japan's northernmost island. We determined the VO2max by a standard incremental test on a cycle ergometer and measured the oxygen consumption (VO2) by means of the Douglas-bag method. We determined the CIVD reaction by measuring the skin temperature of the left middle finger during immersion in cold water at 0°C for 20 min. The athletes showed significant positive correlations between VO2max, expressed as l/min, and CIVD as well as other peripheral cold tolerance indexes (resistance index against frostbite and CIVD index). The body weight VO2max (VO2max/kg body weight) failed to correlate significantly with either the CIVD or with other cold tolerance indexes. These results suggest that CIVD in females may depend on factors other than those determined in this study, in addition to the functional spread of the vascular beds in peripheral tissues, including striated muscle; it is known that the size and the vascular bed in this tissue are affected by exercise training and that this results in the elevation of VO2max and VO2max/kg body weight.

  7. The Arabidopsis 14-3-3 Protein RARE COLD INDUCIBLE 1A Links Low-Temperature Response and Ethylene Biosynthesis to Regulate Freezing Tolerance and Cold Acclimation[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Catalá, Rafael; López-Cobollo, Rosa; Mar Castellano, M.; Angosto, Trinidad; Alonso, José M.; Ecker, Joseph R.; Salinas, Julio

    2014-01-01

    In plants, the expression of 14-3-3 genes reacts to various adverse environmental conditions, including cold, high salt, and drought. Although these results suggest that 14-3-3 proteins have the potential to regulate plant responses to abiotic stresses, their role in such responses remains poorly understood. Previously, we showed that the RARE COLD INDUCIBLE 1A (RCI1A) gene encodes the 14-3-3 psi isoform. Here, we present genetic and molecular evidence implicating RCI1A in the response to low temperature. Our results demonstrate that RCI1A functions as a negative regulator of constitutive freezing tolerance and cold acclimation in Arabidopsis thaliana by controlling cold-induced gene expression. Interestingly, this control is partially performed through an ethylene (ET)-dependent pathway involving physical interaction with different ACC SYNTHASE (ACS) isoforms and a decreased ACS stability. We show that, consequently, RCI1A restrains ET biosynthesis, contributing to establish adequate levels of this hormone in Arabidopsis under both standard and low-temperature conditions. We further show that these levels are required to promote proper cold-induced gene expression and freezing tolerance before and after cold acclimation. All these data indicate that RCI1A connects the low-temperature response with ET biosynthesis to modulate constitutive freezing tolerance and cold acclimation in Arabidopsis. PMID:25122152

  8. Hemolysate-mediated renal vasoconstriction and hypersensitization.

    PubMed

    Burke, T J; Falk, S; Conger, J D; Voelkel, N F

    1999-01-01

    The present studies measured vessel diameter, before and after addition of hemolysate, in isolated afferent arterioles (AA) and efferent arterioles (EA) obtained from the rat kidney. Human red blood cells (RBC) were hemolyzed in distilled water and membranes were discarded after centrifugation. Hemolysate added to the bath solution caused vigorous AA and EA contraction and, after washout, hypersensitized the AA and EA to doses of angiotensin II (AII) which would normally only elicit 50% contraction (EC50). Neither the contraction nor the hypersensitization were mimicked by pure human hemoglobin. The vasoconstrictive responses in the AA and EA were accompanied by increased cytosolic-free calcium concentration. Further purification (desalting) of the hemolysate to remove substance of < or = 1000 Da (which include ATP) did not eliminate the vasoconstrictive component from the hemolysate. Finally, cultured rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells also demonstrated a rapid increase in (Ca2+i) when exposed to hemolysate. This increase in (Ca2+i) was, in part, dependent on Ca2+ influx since it could be attenuated with diltiazem (10(-5) M). In conclusion, hemolysate contains a factor which induces contractions of the isolated rat kidney AA and EA and rapid elevations in (Ca2+i). This factor, from hemolyzed RBC, is not hemoglobin itself. PMID:10048115

  9. Creation and tidal advection of a cold salinity front in Storfjorden: 2. Supercooling induced by turbulent mixing of cold water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPhee, Miles G.; Skogseth, Ragnheid; Nilsen, Frank; Smedsrud, Lars H.

    2013-08-01

    Measurements near the edge of fast ice in Freemansundet, Svalbard, reveal mixing processes associated with tidal advection of a sharp front in salinity, including possible supercooling induced by double diffusion in a fully turbulent water column. The front translated back and forth with the semidiurnal tide between an area of mobile (drifting) ice in Storfjorden proper, and the narrow sound covered by fast ice. Water on each side of the front was near its salinity-determined freezing temperature. Instruments deployed about 400 m into the sound from the fast ice edge measured current, temperature, conductivity, and turbulence quantities through several tidal cycles. Turbulence data illustrate that as the steep horizontal salinity (density) gradient advected past the measurement site, vertical shear near the fast-ice base induced marked flood/ebb asymmetry in turbulent mixing. As fresher water entered the sound on the flood phase, inward transport of denser water near the upper boundary was retarded, leading to statically unstable conditions and enhanced turbulence. The opposite occurred during ebb tide, as denser water underran lighter. Transient episodes of supercooling accompanied frontal passage on both flood and ebb phases. The most likely explanation for a zone of supercooled water within the strongly mixed frontal region is that during mixing of fresher, slightly warmer (but still at freezing) water from outside with saltier, colder water in the sound, the former constituent lost heat faster than gaining salt. This interpretation (differing turbulent diffusivities for heat and salt) challenges strict application of Reynolds analogy for highly turbulent shear flow.

  10. Cold denaturation induces inversion of dipole and spin transfer in chiral peptide monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Eckshtain-Levi, Meital; Capua, Eyal; Refaely-Abramson, Sivan; Sarkar, Soumyajit; Gavrilov, Yulian; Mathew, Shinto P.; Paltiel, Yossi; Levy, Yaakov; Kronik, Leeor; Naaman, Ron

    2016-01-01

    Chirality-induced spin selectivity is a recently-discovered effect, which results in spin selectivity for electrons transmitted through chiral peptide monolayers. Here, we use this spin selectivity to probe the organization of self-assembled α-helix peptide monolayers and examine the relation between structural and spin transfer phenomena. We show that the α-helix structure of oligopeptides based on alanine and aminoisobutyric acid is transformed to a more linear one upon cooling. This process is similar to the known cold denaturation in peptides, but here the self-assembled monolayer plays the role of the solvent. The structural change results in a flip in the direction of the electrical dipole moment of the adsorbed molecules. The dipole flip is accompanied by a concomitant change in the spin that is preferred in electron transfer through the molecules, observed via a new solid-state hybrid organic–inorganic device that is based on the Hall effect, but operates with no external magnetic field or magnetic material. PMID:26916536

  11. DYNAMICAL HEATING INDUCED BY DWARF PLANETS ON COLD KUIPER BELT–LIKE DEBRIS DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Muñoz-Gutiérrez, M. A.; Pichardo, B.; Peimbert, A.; Reyes-Ruiz, M.

    2015-10-01

    With the use of long-term numerical simulations, we study the evolution and orbital behavior of cometary nuclei in cold Kuiper belt–like debris disks under the gravitational influence of dwarf planets (DPs); we carry out these simulations with and without the presence of a Neptune-like giant planet. This exploratory study shows that in the absence of a giant planet, 10 DPs are enough to induce strong radial and vertical heating on the orbits of belt particles. On the other hand, the presence of a giant planet close to the debris disk, acts as a stability agent reducing the radial and vertical heating. With enough DPs, even in the presence of a Neptune-like giant planet some radial heating remains; this heating grows steadily, re-filling resonances otherwise empty of cometary nuclei. Specifically for the solar system, this secular process seems to be able to provide material that, through resonant chaotic diffusion, increase the rate of new comets spiraling into the inner planetary system, but only if more than the ∼10 known DP sized objects exist in the trans-Neptunian region.

  12. Cold denaturation induces inversion of dipole and spin transfer in chiral peptide monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckshtain-Levi, Meital; Capua, Eyal; Refaely-Abramson, Sivan; Sarkar, Soumyajit; Gavrilov, Yulian; Mathew, Shinto P.; Paltiel, Yossi; Levy, Yaakov; Kronik, Leeor; Naaman, Ron

    2016-02-01

    Chirality-induced spin selectivity is a recently-discovered effect, which results in spin selectivity for electrons transmitted through chiral peptide monolayers. Here, we use this spin selectivity to probe the organization of self-assembled α-helix peptide monolayers and examine the relation between structural and spin transfer phenomena. We show that the α-helix structure of oligopeptides based on alanine and aminoisobutyric acid is transformed to a more linear one upon cooling. This process is similar to the known cold denaturation in peptides, but here the self-assembled monolayer plays the role of the solvent. The structural change results in a flip in the direction of the electrical dipole moment of the adsorbed molecules. The dipole flip is accompanied by a concomitant change in the spin that is preferred in electron transfer through the molecules, observed via a new solid-state hybrid organic-inorganic device that is based on the Hall effect, but operates with no external magnetic field or magnetic material.

  13. Light storage based on four-wave mixing and electromagnetically induced transparency in cold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jinghui; Liu, Yang; Ding, Dong-Sheng; Zhou, Zhi-Yuan; Shi, Bao-Sen; Guo, Guang-Can

    2013-01-01

    We performed an experiment to observe the storage of an input probe field and an idler field generated through an off-axis four-wave mixing (FWM) process via a double-Λ configuration in a cold atomic ensemble. We analyzed the underlying physics in detail and found that the retrieved idler field came from two parts if there was no single-photon detuning for the pump pulse: Part 1 was from the collective atomic spin (the input probe field, the coupling field, and the pump field combined to generate the idler field through FWM; then the idler was stored through electromagnetically induced transparency). Part 2 was from the generated new FWM process during the retrieval process (the retrieved probe field, the coupling field, and the pump field combined to generate a new FWM signal). If there was single-photon detuning for the pump pulse, then the retrieved idler was mainly from part 2. The retrieved two fields exhibited damped oscillations with the same oscillatory period when a homogeneous external magnetic field was applied, which was caused by the Larmor spin precession. We also experimentally realized the storage and retrieval of an image of light using FWM, in which an image was added into the input signal. After the storage, the retrieved idler beams and input signal carried the same image. This image storage technique holds promise for applications in image processing, remote sensing, and quantum communication.

  14. Temperature regulates splicing efficiency of the cold-inducible RNA-binding protein gene Cirbp

    PubMed Central

    Gotic, Ivana; Omidi, Saeed; Fleury-Olela, Fabienne; Molina, Nacho; Naef, Felix; Schibler, Ueli

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, body temperature fluctuates diurnally around a mean value of 36°C–37°C. Despite the small differences between minimal and maximal values, body temperature rhythms can drive robust cycles in gene expression in cultured cells and, likely, animals. Here we studied the mechanisms responsible for the temperature-dependent expression of cold-inducible RNA-binding protein (CIRBP). In NIH3T3 fibroblasts exposed to simulated mouse body temperature cycles, Cirbp mRNA oscillates about threefold in abundance, as it does in mouse livers. This daily mRNA accumulation cycle is directly controlled by temperature oscillations and does not depend on the cells’ circadian clocks. Here we show that the temperature-dependent accumulation of Cirbp mRNA is controlled primarily by the regulation of splicing efficiency, defined as the fraction of Cirbp pre-mRNA processed into mature mRNA. As revealed by genome-wide “approach to steady-state” kinetics, this post-transcriptional mechanism is widespread in the temperature-dependent control of gene expression. PMID:27633015

  15. Stress-induced microcracking and cooperative motion of cold dusty plasma liquids.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chi; I, Lin

    2014-04-01

    We investigate the microresponse of the quasi-two-dimensional dusty plasma liquid around freezing to the shear force from a laser beam through the center of the liquid cluster. It is found that the cold liquid can be viewed as a patchwork of crystalline ordered domains (CODs) which are solidlike but can be cracked and rearranged by weak thermal agitation and external stress, through COD rotations and drifting. Under weak external stress comparable to thermal agitation, the laser zone is not the preferred region mastering cracking initiation. CODs in the laser zone can either break locally, or sustain and propagate the stress to remote regions for cracking, in the form of intermittent bursts. The COD rotation and drifting induced by the persistent torques and momentum from the stress causes the formation of the center shear band with a higher longitudinal speed. Increasing stress can enhance cracking initiation around the shear zone and then spread to other remote regions. It deteriorates the local structural order and causes strong shear banding dominated by longitudinal cooperative hopping. PMID:24827183

  16. Indicators for microbiologically induced corrosion of copper pipes in a cold-water plumbing system.

    PubMed

    Arens, P; Tuschewitzki, G J; Wollmann, M; Follner, H; Jacobi, H

    1995-01-01

    Corrosion damage in the copper cold-water plumbing system of a large building was investigated. An unusual combination of corrosion patterns was found on the inner copper pipe surfaces that were in contact with water. Damage was in the form of shallow cavities, a surface cover or pinprick-like pits. The corrosion system was influenced by thermal treatment and also by cefoxitin dosing. The latter fact in particular is a clear indication of microbiological involvement in this corrosive action. Different parameters, to be measured in standing water (24-h stagnation), are considered typical for this type of corrosion: the detection of Sphingomonas spec. and other species in whose cell wall regions copper can accumulate, a copper content of more than 2 mg/l, oxygen consumption of more than 4 mg/l and an increase in pH. With the help of these indicators, it is possible to recognize microbiologically induced corrosion in copper plumbing systems before pipe perforation occur. PMID:7727024

  17. Geometry-Induced Memory Effects in Isolated Quantum Systems: Cold-Atom Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Chen-Yen; Chien, Chih-Chun

    2016-03-01

    Memory effects result from the history-dependent behavior of a system, are abundant in our daily life, and have broad applications. Here, we explore the possibilities of generating memory effects in simple isolated quantum systems. By utilizing geometrical effects from a class of lattices supporting flatbands consisting of localized states, memory effects could be observed in ultracold atoms in optical lattices. As the optical lattice continuously transforms from a triangular lattice into a kagome lattice with a flatband, history-dependent density distributions manifest quantum memory effects even in noninteracting systems, including fermionic as well as bosonic systems, in the proper ranges of temperatures. Rapid growth of ultracold technology predicts a bright future for quantum memory-effect systems, and here two prototypical applications of geometry-induced quantum memory effects are proposed: A cold-atom-based accelerometer using an atomic differentiator to record the mechanical change rate of a coupled probe, and an atomic quantum memory cell for storing information with write-in and readout schemes.

  18. Temperature regulates splicing efficiency of the cold-inducible RNA-binding protein gene Cirbp.

    PubMed

    Gotic, Ivana; Omidi, Saeed; Fleury-Olela, Fabienne; Molina, Nacho; Naef, Felix; Schibler, Ueli

    2016-09-01

    In mammals, body temperature fluctuates diurnally around a mean value of 36°C-37°C. Despite the small differences between minimal and maximal values, body temperature rhythms can drive robust cycles in gene expression in cultured cells and, likely, animals. Here we studied the mechanisms responsible for the temperature-dependent expression of cold-inducible RNA-binding protein (CIRBP). In NIH3T3 fibroblasts exposed to simulated mouse body temperature cycles, Cirbp mRNA oscillates about threefold in abundance, as it does in mouse livers. This daily mRNA accumulation cycle is directly controlled by temperature oscillations and does not depend on the cells' circadian clocks. Here we show that the temperature-dependent accumulation of Cirbp mRNA is controlled primarily by the regulation of splicing efficiency, defined as the fraction of Cirbp pre-mRNA processed into mature mRNA. As revealed by genome-wide "approach to steady-state" kinetics, this post-transcriptional mechanism is widespread in the temperature-dependent control of gene expression. PMID:27633015

  19. Protective effect of hydrogen sulfide against cold restraint stress-induced gastric mucosal injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Aboubakr, Esam M; Taye, Ashraf; El-Moselhy, Mohamed A; Hassan, Magdy K

    2013-12-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an endogenous gaseous mediator plays a potential role in modulating gastric inflammatory responses. However, its putative protective role remains to be defined. The present study aimed to evaluate role of the exogenously released and endogenously synthesized H2S in cold restraint stress (CRS)-induced oxidative gastric damage in rats. Rats were restrained, and maintained at 4 °C for 3 h. The H2S donor, sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) (60 μmol/kg) was injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) before CRS. Our results revealed that NaHS pretreatment significantly attenuated ulcer index, free and total acid output, and pepsin activity in gastric juice along with decreased gastric mucosal carbonyl content and reactive oxygen species production. This was accompanied by increased gastric juice pH and mucin concentration in addition to restoring the deficits in the gastric reduced glutathione, catalase as well as superoxide dismutase enzyme activities. NaHS pretreatment markedly reduced the serum level of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) and myeloperoxidase activity compared to CRS-non-treated. Moreover, NaHS preadministration significantly abrogated the inflammatory and the deleterious responses of gastric mucosa in CRS. The protective effects of H2S were confirmed by gastric histopathological examination. However, pretreatment with the H2S-synthesizing enzyme, cystathionine-gamma-lyase inhibitor, beta-cyano-L-alanine (50 mg/kg, i.p.) reversed the gastroprotection afforded by the endogenous H2S. Collectively, our results suggest that H2S can protect rat gastric mucosa against CRS-induced gastric ulceration possibly through mechanisms that involve anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory actions alongside enhancement of gastric mucosal barrier and reduction in acid secretory parameters. PMID:23812778

  20. Importance and determinants of induction of cold-induced DEAD RNA helicase in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis.

    PubMed

    Nagaoka, Eriko; Hidese, Ryota; Imanaka, Tadayuki; Fujiwara, Shinsuke

    2013-08-01

    Thermococcus kodakarensis, which grows optimally at 85°C, expresses cold stress-inducible DEAD box RNA helicase (Tk-deaD) when shifted to 60°C. A DDA1 deletion (ΔTk-deaD) mutant exhibited decreased cell growth, and cells underwent lysis at 60°C in nutrient broth in the absence of elemental sulfur. In contrast, cells in medium containing elemental sulfur at 60°C did not undergo lysis, suggesting that Tk-deaD is necessary for cell growth in sulfur-free medium. To identify the element responsible for the cold response, a pTKR expression probe plasmid was constructed using thermostable catalase from Pyrobaculum calidifontis as a reporter. The plasmid pTKRD, which contained the transcription factor B recognition element, TATA region, and Shine-Dalgarno (SD) region, including the initiation codon of the Tk-deaD gene, exhibited cold inducibility. We also constructed a series of deletion and chimeric constructs with the glutamate dehydrogenase (gdh) promoter, whose expression is constitutive independent of culture temperatures and catalase expression. Reporter assay experiments indicated that the regulatory element is located in the region between the SD region and the initiation codon (ATG). Nucleotide sequences in the upstream regions of Tk-deaD and gdh were compared and revealed a five-adenosine (AAAAA) sequence between SD and ATG of Tk-deaD that was not present in gdh. Replacement of the repeated adenosine sequence with other sequences revealed that the AAAAA sequence is important for cold induction. This sequence-specific mechanism is unique and is one that has not been identified in other known cold-inducible genes. PMID:23729644

  1. Important roles of drought- and cold-inducible genes for galactinol synthase in stress tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Taji, Teruaki; Ohsumi, Chieko; Iuchi, Satoshi; Seki, Motoaki; Kasuga, Mie; Kobayashi, Masatomo; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko; Shinozaki, Kazuo

    2002-02-01

    Raffinose family oligosaccharides (RFO) accumulating during seed development are thought to play a role in the desiccation tolerance of seeds. However, the functions of RFO in desiccation tolerance have not been elucidated. Here we examine the functions of RFO in Arabidopsis thaliana plants under drought- and cold-stress conditions, based on the analyses of function and expression of genes involved in RFO biosynthesis. Sugar analysis showed that drought-, high salinity- and cold-treated Arabidopsis plants accumulate a large amount of raffinose and galactinol, but not stachyose. Raffinose and galactinol were not detected in unstressed plants. This suggests that raffinose and galactinol are involved in tolerance to drought, high salinity and cold stresses. Galactinol synthase (GolS) catalyses the first step in the biosynthesis of RFO from UDP-galactose. We identified three stress-responsive GolS genes (AtGolS1, 2 and 3) among seven Arabidopsis GolS genes. AtGolS1 and 2 were induced by drought and high-salinity stresses, but not by cold stress. By contrast, AtGolS3 was induced by cold stress but not by drought or salt stress. All the GST fusion proteins of GST-AtGolS1, 2 and 3 expressed in Escherichia coli had galactinol synthase activities. Overexpression of AtGolS2 in transgenic Arabidopsis caused an increase in endogenous galactinol and raffinose, and showed reduced transpiration from leaves to improve drought tolerance. These results show that stress-inducible galactinol synthase plays a key role in the accumulation of galactinol and raffinose under abiotic stress conditions, and that galactinol and raffinose may function as osmoprotectants in drought-stress tolerance of plants.

  2. A cold inducible multidomain cystatin from winter wheat inhibits growth of the snow mold fungus, Microdochium nivale.

    PubMed

    Christova, Petya Koeva; Christov, Nikolai Kirilov; Imai, Ryozo

    2006-05-01

    A novel cold-induced cystatin cDNA clone (TaMDC1) was isolated from cold acclimated winter wheat crown tissue by using a macroarray-based differential screening method. The deduced amino acid sequence consisted of a putative N-terminal secretory signal peptide of 37 amino acids and a mature protein (mTaMDC1) with a molecular mass of 23 kDa. The mTaMDC1 had a highly conserved N-terminal cystatin domain and a long C-terminal extension containing a second region, which exhibited partial similarity to the cystatin domain. The recombinant mTaMDC1 was purified from Escherichia coli and its cysteine proteinase inhibitory activity against papain was analyzed. The calculated Ki value of 5.8 x 10(-7) M is comparable to those reported for other phytocystatins. Northern and western blot analyses showed elevated expression of TaMDC1 mRNA and protein during cold acclimation of wheat. In addition to cold, accumulation of the TaMDC1 message was induced by other abiotic stresses including drought, salt and ABA treatment. Investigation of in vitro antifungal activity of mTaMDC1 showed strong inhibition on the mycelium growth of the snow mold fungus Microdochium nivale. Hyphae growth was totally inhibited in the presence of 50 mug/ml mTaMDC1 and morphological changes such as swelling, fragmentation and sporulation of the fungus were observed. The mechanisms of the in vitro antifungal effects and the possible involvement of TaMDC1 in cold induced snow mold resistance of winter wheat are discussed.

  3. Importance and Determinants of Induction of Cold-Induced DEAD RNA Helicase in the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis

    PubMed Central

    Nagaoka, Eriko; Hidese, Ryota; Imanaka, Tadayuki

    2013-01-01

    Thermococcus kodakarensis, which grows optimally at 85°C, expresses cold stress-inducible DEAD box RNA helicase (Tk-deaD) when shifted to 60°C. A DDA1 deletion (ΔTk-deaD) mutant exhibited decreased cell growth, and cells underwent lysis at 60°C in nutrient broth in the absence of elemental sulfur. In contrast, cells in medium containing elemental sulfur at 60°C did not undergo lysis, suggesting that Tk-deaD is necessary for cell growth in sulfur-free medium. To identify the element responsible for the cold response, a pTKR expression probe plasmid was constructed using thermostable catalase from Pyrobaculum calidifontis as a reporter. The plasmid pTKRD, which contained the transcription factor B recognition element, TATA region, and Shine-Dalgarno (SD) region, including the initiation codon of the Tk-deaD gene, exhibited cold inducibility. We also constructed a series of deletion and chimeric constructs with the glutamate dehydrogenase (gdh) promoter, whose expression is constitutive independent of culture temperatures and catalase expression. Reporter assay experiments indicated that the regulatory element is located in the region between the SD region and the initiation codon (ATG). Nucleotide sequences in the upstream regions of Tk-deaD and gdh were compared and revealed a five-adenosine (AAAAA) sequence between SD and ATG of Tk-deaD that was not present in gdh. Replacement of the repeated adenosine sequence with other sequences revealed that the AAAAA sequence is important for cold induction. This sequence-specific mechanism is unique and is one that has not been identified in other known cold-inducible genes. PMID:23729644

  4. Cold-induced mortality of invasive Burmese pythons in south Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mazzotti, Frank J.; Cherkiss, Michael S.; Hart, Kristen M.; Snow, Ray W.; Rochford, Michael R.; Dorcas, Michael E.; Reed, Robert N.

    2011-01-01

    A recent record cold spell in southern Florida (2-11 January 2010) provided an opportunity to evaluate responses of an established population of Burmese pythons (Python molurus bivittatus) to a prolonged period of unusually cold weather. We observed behavior, characterized thermal biology, determined fate of radio-telemetered (n = 10) and non-telemetered (n = 104) Burmese pythons, and analyzed habitat and environmental conditions experienced by pythons during and after a historic cold spell. Telemetered pythons had been implanted with radio-transmitters and temperature-recording data loggers prior to the cold snap. Only one of 10 telemetered pythons survived the cold snap, whereas 59 of 99 (60%) non-telemetered pythons for which we determined fate survived. Body temperatures of eight dead telemetered pythons fluctuated regularly prior to 9 January 2010, then declined substantially during the cold period (9-11 January) and exhibited no further evidence of active thermoregulation indicating they were likely dead. Unusually cold temperatures in January 2010 were clearly associated with mortality of Burmese pythons in the Everglades. Some radiotelemetered pythons appeared to exhibit maladaptive behavior during the cold spell, including attempting to bask instead of retreating to sheltered refugia. We discuss implications of our findings for persistence and spread of introduced Burmese pythons in the United States and for maximizing their rate of removal.

  5. Relationship between airway reactivity induced by methacholine or ultrasonically nebulized distilled cold water and BAL fluid cellular constituents in patients with sulfur mustard gas-induced asthma.

    PubMed

    Emad, Ali; Emad, Yasaman

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this article was to evaluate the relationship between the bronchial reactivity to methacholine and distilled cold water and inflammatory bronchial alveolar lavage (BAL) cells in mustard gas-induced asthma. This was a randomized, crossover clinical study set in a university hospital. The patients were 17 veterans with mustard gas-induced asthma and 17 normal veterans as a control group. Inhalation challenges with ultrasonically nebulized distilled water and methacholine and BAL via bronchoscopy and were performed in all patients and subjects. All patients did sustain a 20% fall in FEV(1) after methacholine, whereas two of them did not with distilled cold water. The patients were sensitive to distilled cold water with a median PD20 of 8.44 +/- 6.55 mL and sensitive to methacholine with the median PC20 of 4.88 +/- 4.22 mg/mL. Significant correlation was found between PC20 of methacholine and PD20 of distilled cold water (r = -0.74, p = 0.005). The proportion of BAL macrophages was significantly lower in patients with asthma than in the control group (p = 0.001). The proportions of lymphocytes and neutrophils were similar in the two groups. The percentage of eosinophils was higher in BAL fluid from the asthmatics compared with that in BAL fluid from the control group (p < 0.001). The percentage of the BAL eosinophils significantly correlated with both PC20 of methacholine (r = - 0.58, p = 0.01) and PD20 of distilled cold water (r = -0.81, p = 0.002). No relationship between PC20 of methacholine or PD20 of distilled cold water was found for other inflammatory BAL cells. This study showed that in patients with mustard gas-induced asthma, the degree of airway responsiveness to both methacholine and distilled water was associated with the percentage of BAL eosinophils.

  6. Relationship between airway reactivity induced by methacholine or ultrasonically nebulized distilled cold water and BAL fluid cellular constituents in patients with sulfur mustard gas-induced asthma.

    PubMed

    Emad, Ali; Emad, Yasaman

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this article was to evaluate the relationship between the bronchial reactivity to methacholine and distilled cold water and inflammatory bronchial alveolar lavage (BAL) cells in mustard gas-induced asthma. This was a randomized, crossover clinical study set in a university hospital. The patients were 17 veterans with mustard gas-induced asthma and 17 normal veterans as a control group. Inhalation challenges with ultrasonically nebulized distilled water and methacholine and BAL via bronchoscopy and were performed in all patients and subjects. All patients did sustain a 20% fall in FEV(1) after methacholine, whereas two of them did not with distilled cold water. The patients were sensitive to distilled cold water with a median PD20 of 8.44 +/- 6.55 mL and sensitive to methacholine with the median PC20 of 4.88 +/- 4.22 mg/mL. Significant correlation was found between PC20 of methacholine and PD20 of distilled cold water (r = -0.74, p = 0.005). The proportion of BAL macrophages was significantly lower in patients with asthma than in the control group (p = 0.001). The proportions of lymphocytes and neutrophils were similar in the two groups. The percentage of eosinophils was higher in BAL fluid from the asthmatics compared with that in BAL fluid from the control group (p < 0.001). The percentage of the BAL eosinophils significantly correlated with both PC20 of methacholine (r = - 0.58, p = 0.01) and PD20 of distilled cold water (r = -0.81, p = 0.002). No relationship between PC20 of methacholine or PD20 of distilled cold water was found for other inflammatory BAL cells. This study showed that in patients with mustard gas-induced asthma, the degree of airway responsiveness to both methacholine and distilled water was associated with the percentage of BAL eosinophils. PMID:17894540

  7. Spinal transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 channel contributes to central pain hypersensitivity in various pathophysiological conditions in the rat.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hong; Koivisto, Ari; Saarnilehto, Marja; Chapman, Hugh; Kuokkanen, Katja; Hao, Bin; Huang, Jin-Lu; Wang, Yong-Xiang; Pertovaara, Antti

    2011-03-01

    The transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) ion channel is expressed on nociceptive primary afferent neurons. On the proximal nerve ending within the spinal dorsal horn, TRPA1 regulates transmission to spinal interneurons, and thereby pain hypersensitivity. Here we assessed whether the contribution of the spinal TRPA1 channel to pain hypersensitivity varies with the experimental pain model, properties of test stimulation or the behavioral pain response. The antihypersensitivity effect of intrathecally (i.t.) administered Chembridge-5861528 (CHEM; a selective TRPA1 channel antagonist; 5-10μg) was determined in various experimental models of pain hypersensitivity in the rat. In spinal nerve ligation and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep deprivation models, i.t. CHEM attenuated mechanical hypersensitivity. Capsaicin-induced secondary (central) but not primary (peripheral) mechanical hypersensitivity was also reduced by i.t. administration of CHEM or A-967079, another TRPA1 channel antagonist. Formalin-induced secondary mechanical hypersensitivity, but not spontaneous pain, was suppressed by i.t. CHEM. Moreover, mechanical hypersensitivity induced by cholekystokinin in the rostroventromedial medulla was attenuated by i.t. pretreatment with CHEM. Independent of the model, the antihypersensitivity effect induced by i.t. CHEM was predominant on responses evoked by low-intensity stimuli (⩽6g). CHEM (10μg i.t.) failed to attenuate pain behavior in healthy controls or mechanical hypersensitivities induced by i.t. administrations of a GABA(A) receptor antagonist, or NMDA or 5-HT(3) receptor agonists. Conversely, i.t. administration of a TRPA1 channel agonist, cinnamon aldehyde, induced mechanical hypersensitivity. The results indicate that the spinal TRPA1 channel exerts an important role in secondary (central) pain hypersensitivity to low-intensity mechanical stimulation in various pain hypersensitivity conditions. The spinal TRPA1 channel provides a promising target

  8. Two cold-induced family 19 glycosyl hydrolases from cherimoya (Annona cherimola) fruit: an antifungal chitinase and a cold-adapted chitinase.

    PubMed

    Goñi, Oscar; Sanchez-Ballesta, María T; Merodio, Carmen; Escribano, María I

    2013-11-01

    Two cold-induced chitinases were isolated and purified from the mesocarp cherimoyas (Annona cherimola Mill.) and they were characterised as acidic endochitinases with a Mr of 24.79 and 47.77kDa (AChi24 and AChi48, respectively), both family 19 glycosyl hydrolases. These purified chitinases differed significantly in their biochemical and biophysical properties. While both enzymes had similar optimal acidic pH values, AChi24 was enzymatically active and stable at alkaline pH values, as well as displaying an optimal temperature of 45°C and moderate thermostability. Kinetic studies revealed a great catalytic efficiency of AChi24 for oligomeric and polymeric substrates. Conversely, AChi48 hydrolysis showed positive co-operativity that was associated to a mixture of different functional oligomeric states through weak transient protein interactions. The rise in the AChi48 kcat at increasing enzyme concentrations provided evidence of its oligomerisation. AChi48 chitinase was active and stable in a broad acidic pH range, and while it was relatively labile as temperatures increased, with an optimal temperature of 35°C, it retained about 50% of its maximal activity from 5 to 50°C. Thermodynamic characterisation reflected the high kcat of AChi48 and the remarkably lower ΔH(‡), ΔS(‡) and ΔG(‡) values at 5°C compared to AChi24, indicating that the hydrolytic activity of AChi48 was less thermodependent. In vitro functional studies revealed that AChi24 had a strong antifungal defence potential against Botrytis cinerea, whereas they displayed no cryoprotective or antifreeze activity. Hence, based on biochemical, thermodynamic and functional data, this study demonstrates that two acidic endochitinases are induced at low temperatures in a subtropical fruit, and that one of them acts in an oligomeric cold-adapted manner. PMID:23890591

  9. Two cold-induced family 19 glycosyl hydrolases from cherimoya (Annona cherimola) fruit: an antifungal chitinase and a cold-adapted chitinase.

    PubMed

    Goñi, Oscar; Sanchez-Ballesta, María T; Merodio, Carmen; Escribano, María I

    2013-11-01

    Two cold-induced chitinases were isolated and purified from the mesocarp cherimoyas (Annona cherimola Mill.) and they were characterised as acidic endochitinases with a Mr of 24.79 and 47.77kDa (AChi24 and AChi48, respectively), both family 19 glycosyl hydrolases. These purified chitinases differed significantly in their biochemical and biophysical properties. While both enzymes had similar optimal acidic pH values, AChi24 was enzymatically active and stable at alkaline pH values, as well as displaying an optimal temperature of 45°C and moderate thermostability. Kinetic studies revealed a great catalytic efficiency of AChi24 for oligomeric and polymeric substrates. Conversely, AChi48 hydrolysis showed positive co-operativity that was associated to a mixture of different functional oligomeric states through weak transient protein interactions. The rise in the AChi48 kcat at increasing enzyme concentrations provided evidence of its oligomerisation. AChi48 chitinase was active and stable in a broad acidic pH range, and while it was relatively labile as temperatures increased, with an optimal temperature of 35°C, it retained about 50% of its maximal activity from 5 to 50°C. Thermodynamic characterisation reflected the high kcat of AChi48 and the remarkably lower ΔH(‡), ΔS(‡) and ΔG(‡) values at 5°C compared to AChi24, indicating that the hydrolytic activity of AChi48 was less thermodependent. In vitro functional studies revealed that AChi24 had a strong antifungal defence potential against Botrytis cinerea, whereas they displayed no cryoprotective or antifreeze activity. Hence, based on biochemical, thermodynamic and functional data, this study demonstrates that two acidic endochitinases are induced at low temperatures in a subtropical fruit, and that one of them acts in an oligomeric cold-adapted manner.

  10. Estrogen-dependent visceral hypersensitivity following stress in rats

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, Catherine S; Karpowicz, Jane M; Furman, Andrew J; da Silva, Joyce Teixeira; Traub, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    We used functional MRI and a longitudinal design to investigate the brain mechanisms in a previously reported estrogen-dependent visceral hypersensitivity model. We hypothesized that noxious visceral stimulation would be associated with activation of the insula, anterior cingulate cortex, and amygdala, and that estrogen-dependent, stress-induced visceral hypersensitivity would both enhance activation of these regions and recruit activation of other brain areas mediating affect and reward processing. Ovariectomized rats were treated with estrogen (17 β-estradiol, E2) or vehicle (n = 5 per group) and scanned in a 7T MRI at three different time points: pre-stress (baseline), 2 days post-stress, and 18 days post-stress. Stress was induced via a forced-swim paradigm. In a separate group of ovariectomized rats, E2 treatment induced visceral hypersensitivity at the 2 days post-stress time point, and this hypersensitivity returned to baseline at the 18 days post-stress time point. Vehicle-treated rats show no hypersensitivity following stress. During the MRI scans, rats were exposed to noxious colorectal distention. Across groups and time points, noxious visceral stimulation led to activations in the insula, anterior cingulate, and left amygdala, parabrachial nuclei, and cerebellum. A group-by-time interaction was seen in the right amygdala, ventral striatum-pallidum, cerebellum, hippocampus, mediodorsal thalamus, and pontine nuclei. Closer inspection of the data revealed that vehicle-treated rats showed consistent activations and deactivations across time, whereas estrogen-treated animals showed minimal deactivation with noxious visceral stimulation. This unexpected finding suggests that E2 may dramatically alter visceral nociceptive processing in the brain following an acute stressor. This study is the first to examine estrogen-stress dependent interactions in response to noxious visceral stimulation using functional MRI. Future studies that include other control

  11. Food hypersensitivity in a cat.

    PubMed

    Medleau, L; Latimer, K S; Duncan, J R

    1986-09-15

    Food hypersensitivity was diagnosed in a 4-year-old Siamese cat. Clinical signs included intense erythema, with alopecia, excoriations, erosions, and crusts involving the ventral portion of the abdomen, inguinal region, medial aspect of each thigh, and cranial and lateral aspects of all 4 limbs. The cat was intensely pruritic. Histologically, there was cutaneous mast cell hyperplasia and diffuse infiltration of eosinophils in the dermis. Blood eosinophilia also was found. Clinical signs resolved after exclusive feeding of a hypoallergenic diet.

  12. Hypersensitivity pneumonitis during minocycline treatment.

    PubMed

    Kloppenburg, M; Dijkmans, B A; Breedveld, F C

    1994-06-01

    A patient is reported who developed dyspnoea, fever, pleuritic chest pain and a non-productive cough following treatment with minocycline for 9 days. The chest radiograph showed an interstitial pattern and there was a peripheral eosinophilia. A diagnosis of hypersensitivity pneumonitis attributable to minocycline was made. The disease responded quickly to withdrawal of the drug. This observation shows that minocycline, despite its mild toxicity profile, can give rise to serious adverse effects.

  13. Large-scale production of soluble recombinant amyloid-β peptide 1-42 using cold-inducible expression system.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Kyung; Moon, Jeong Chan; Lee, Jeong Mi; Jeong, Min Seop; Oh, Choongseob; Ahn, Sung-Min; Yoo, Yung Joon; Jang, Ho Hee

    2012-11-01

    Amyloid-β peptide 1-42 (Aβ(1-42)), the predominant form in senile plaques, plays important roles in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Because Aβ(1-42) has aggregation-prone nature, it has been difficult to produce in a soluble state in bacterial expression systems. In this study, we modified our expression system to increase the soluble fraction of Aβ(1-42) in Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells. The expression level and solubility of recombinant Aβ(1-42) induced at the low temperature (16°C) is highly increased compared to that induced at 37°C. To optimize expression temperature, the coding region of Aβ(1-42) was constructed in a pCold vector, pCold-TF, which has a hexahistidine-tagged trigger factor (TF). Recombinant Aβ(1-42) was expressed primarily as a soluble protein using pCold vector system and purified with a nickel-chelating resin. When the toxic effect of recombinant Aβ(1-42) examined on human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells, the purified Aβ(1-42) induced cell toxicity on SH-SY5Y cells. In conclusion, the system developed in this study will provide a useful method for the production of aggregation prone-peptide such as Aβ(1-42).

  14. Neuropeptide FF and related peptides attenuates warm-, but not cold-water swim stress-induced analgesia in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Han, Zheng-lan; Fang, Quan; Wang, Zi-long; Tang, Hong-zhu; Ren, Hui; Wang, Rui

    2012-08-01

    Neuropeptide FF (NPFF) belongs to a neuropeptide family including two receptors (NPFF(1) and NPFF(2)). NPFF system has been reported to play important roles in pain transmission. The aim of the present study was to investigate the roles of NPFF related peptides and their receptors in swim stress-induced analgesia (SIA). Nociceptive test was performed in mice stressed by forced swimming in water at 15 °C (cold water swimming) or 32 °C (warm water swimming). Warm water swimming produced a naloxone-mediated antinociceptive effect. This warm water swim SIA was dose-dependently antagonized by i.c.v. injection of NPFF and two related peptides (3-30 nmol), NPVF and dNPA, which exhibited the highest selectivities for NPFF(1) and NPFF(2) receptors, respectively. Moreover, the selective NPFF receptor antagonist RF9 (30 nmol) was inactive by itself, but prevented the effects of NPFF and related peptides. Cold-water swimming produced a wilder analgesic effect that was blocked by MK-801, but not naloxone. However, NPFF system failed to modify the cold water swim stress-induced analgesia. These findings demonstrated that NPFF and related peptides attenuated opioid-mediated form of SIA via NPFF receptors in the brain, but not non-opioid swim stress-induced analgesia. These data further support an anti-opioid character of NPFF system.

  15. Intra-carotid cold magnesium sulfate infusion induces selective cerebral hypothermia and neuroprotection in rats with transient middle cerebral artery occlusion.

    PubMed

    Song, Wei; Wu, Yong-Ming; Ji, Zhong; Ji, Ya-Bin; Wang, Sheng-Nan; Pan, Su-Yue

    2013-04-01

    Local hypothermia induced by intra-arterial infusion of cold saline reduces brain injury in ischemic stroke. Administration of magnesium sulfate through the internal carotid artery is also known to reduce ischemic brain damage. The neuroprotective effects of combination therapy with local endovascular hypothermia and intra-carotid magnesium sulfate infusion has not been evaluated. The aim of the study was to determine whether infusion of intra-carotid cold magnesium offers neuroprotective efficacy superior to cold saline infusion alone. Sixty-eight Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to 3 h of middle cerebral artery occlusion and were randomly divided into six groups: sham-operated group; stroke control group; local cold magnesium infusion group; local cold saline infusion group; local normothermic magnesium infusion group; and local normothermic saline infusion group. Before reperfusion, ischemic rats received local infusion or no treatment. Infarct volume, neurological deficit, and brain water content were evaluated at 48 h after reperfusion. Selective brain hypothermia (33-34 °C) was successfully induced by intra-carotid cold infusion. Local cold saline infusion and local cold magnesium infusion reduced the infarct volumes by 48 % (p < 0.001) and 65 % (p < 0.001), respectively, compared with stroke controls. Brain water content was decreased significantly in animals treated with local cold magnesium infusion. Furthermore, the rats given a local cold magnesium infusion had the best neurological outcome. Local normothermic infusion failed to improve ischemic brain damage. These data suggest that local hypothermia induced by intra-carotid administration of cold magnesium is more effective in reducing acute ischemic damage than infusion of cold saline alone.

  16. Atmospheric-Pressure Cold Plasma Induces Transcriptional Changes in Ex Vivo Human Corneas

    PubMed Central

    Rosani, Umberto; Tarricone, Elena; Venier, Paola; Brun, Paola; Deligianni, Velika; Zuin, Matteo; Martines, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Background Atmospheric pressure cold plasma (APCP) might be considered a novel tool for tissue disinfection in medicine since the active chemical species produced by low plasma doses, generated by ionizing helium gas in air, induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) that kill microorganisms without substantially affecting human cells. Objectives In this study, we evaluated morphological and functional changes in human corneas exposed for 2 minutes (min) to APCP and tested if the antioxidant n-acetyl l-cysteine (NAC) was able to inhibit or prevent damage and cell death. Results Immunohistochemistry and western blotting analyses of corneal tissues collected at 6 hours (h) post-APCP treatment demonstrated no morphological tissue changes, but a transient increased expression of OGG1 glycosylase that returned to control levels in 24 h. Transcriptome sequencing and quantitative real time PCR performed on different corneas revealed in the treated corneas many differentially expressed genes: namely, 256 and 304 genes showing expression changes greater than ± 2 folds in the absence and presence of NAC, respectively. At 6 h post-treatment, the most over-expressed gene categories suggested an active or enhanced cell functioning, with only a minority of genes specifically concerning oxidative DNA damage and repair showing slight over-expression values (<2 folds). Moreover, time-related expression analysis of eight genes up-regulated in the APCP-treated corneas overall demonstrated the return to control expression levels after 24 h. Conclusions These findings of transient oxidative stress accompanied by wide-range transcriptome adjustments support the further development of APCP as an ocular disinfectant. PMID:26203910

  17. Acceptor sites for retroviral integrations map near DNase I-hypersensitive sites in chromatin.

    PubMed Central

    Vijaya, S; Steffen, D L; Robinson, H L

    1986-01-01

    Seven cellular loci with acceptor sites for retroviral integrations have been mapped for the presence of DNase I-hypersensitive sites in chromatin. Integrations in three of these loci, chicken c-erbB, rat c-myc, and a rat locus, dsi-1, had been selected for in retrovirus-induced tumors. Of the remaining four, two, designated dsi-3 and dsi-4, harbored acceptor sites for apparently unselected integrations of Moloney murine leukemia virus in a Moloney murine leukemia virus-induced thymoma, and two, designated C and F, harbored unselected acceptor sites for Moloney murine leukemia virus integrations in a rat fibroblast cell line. Each acceptor site mapped to within 500 base pairs of a DNase I-hypersensitive site. In the analyses of the unselected integrations, six hypersensitive sites were observed in 39 kilobases of DNA. The four acceptor sites in this DNA were localized between 0.05 and 0.43 kilobases of a hypersensitive site. The probability of this close association occurring by chance was calculated to be extremely low. Hypersensitive sites were mapped in cells representing the lineage in which integration had occurred as well as in an unrelated lineage. In six of the seven acceptor loci hypersensitive sites could not be detected in the unrelated lineage. Our results indicate that retroviruses preferentially integrate close to DNase I-hypersensitive sites and that many of these sites are expressed in some but not all cells. Images PMID:3490582

  18. The Role of Inducible Hsp70, and Other Heat Shock Proteins, in Adaptive Complex of Cold Tolerance of the Fruit Fly (Drosophila melanogaster)

    PubMed Central

    Štětina, Tomáš; Koštál, Vladimír; Korbelová, Jaroslava

    2015-01-01

    Background The ubiquitous occurrence of inducible Heat Shock Proteins (Hsps) up-regulation in response to cold-acclimation and/or to cold shock, including massive increase of Hsp70 mRNA levels, often led to hasty interpretations of its role in the repair of cold injury expressed as protein denaturation or misfolding. So far, direct functional analyses in Drosophila melanogaster and other insects brought either limited or no support for such interpretations. In this paper, we analyze the cold tolerance and the expression levels of 24 different mRNA transcripts of the Hsps complex and related genes in response to cold in two strains of D. melanogaster: the wild-type and the Hsp70- null mutant lacking all six copies of Hsp70 gene. Principal Findings We found that larvae of both strains show similar patterns of Hsps complex gene expression in response to long-term cold-acclimation and during recovery from chronic cold exposures or acute cold shocks. No transcriptional compensation for missing Hsp70 gene was seen in Hsp70- strain. The cold-induced Hsps gene expression is most probably regulated by alternative splice variants C and D of the Heat Shock Factor. The cold tolerance in Hsp70- null mutants was clearly impaired only when the larvae were exposed to severe acute cold shock. No differences in mortality were found between two strains when the larvae were exposed to relatively mild doses of cold, either chronic exposures to 0°C or acute cold shocks at temperatures down to -4°C. Conclusions The up-regulated expression of a complex of inducible Hsps genes, and Hsp70 mRNA in particular, is tightly associated with cold-acclimation and cold exposure in D. melanogaster. Genetic elimination of Hsp70 up-regulation response has no effect on survival of chronic exposures to 0°C or mild acute cold shocks, while it negatively affects survival after severe acute cold shocks at temperaures below -8°C. PMID:26034990

  19. Ca(2+)-activated anion channels and membrane depolarizations induced by blue light and cold in Arabidopsis seedlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, B. D.; Karlin-Neumann, G.; Davis, R. W.; Spalding, E. P.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    The activation of an anion channel in the plasma membrane of Arabidopsis thaliana hypocotyls by blue light (BL) is believed to be a signal-transducing event leading to growth inhibition. Here we report that the open probability of this particular anion channel depends on cytoplasmic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]cyt) within the concentration range of 1 to 10 microM, raising the possibility that BL activates the anion channel by increasing [Ca2+]cyt. Arabidopsis seedlings cytoplasmically expressing aequorin were generated to test this possibility. Aequorin luminescence did not increase during or after BL, providing evidence that Ca2+ does not play a second-messenger role in the activation of anion channels. However, cold shock simultaneously triggered a large increase in [Ca2+]cyt and a 110-mV transient depolarization of the plasma membrane. A blocker of the anion channel, 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoic acid, blocked 61% of the cold-induced depolarization without affecting the increase in [Ca2+]cyt. These data led us to propose that cold shock opens Ca2+ channels at the plasma membrane, allowing an inward, depolarizing Ca2+ current. The resulting large increase in [Ca2+]cyt activates the anion channel, which further depolarizes the membrane. Although an increase in [Ca2+]cyt may activate anion channels in response to cold, it appears that BL does so via a Ca(2+)-independent pathway.

  20. Ca(2+)-activated anion channels and membrane depolarizations induced by blue light and cold in Arabidopsis seedlings.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, B D; Karlin-Neumann, G; Davis, R W; Spalding, E P

    1997-01-01

    The activation of an anion channel in the plasma membrane of Arabidopsis thaliana hypocotyls by blue light (BL) is believed to be a signal-transducing event leading to growth inhibition. Here we report that the open probability of this particular anion channel depends on cytoplasmic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]cyt) within the concentration range of 1 to 10 microM, raising the possibility that BL activates the anion channel by increasing [Ca2+]cyt. Arabidopsis seedlings cytoplasmically expressing aequorin were generated to test this possibility. Aequorin luminescence did not increase during or after BL, providing evidence that Ca2+ does not play a second-messenger role in the activation of anion channels. However, cold shock simultaneously triggered a large increase in [Ca2+]cyt and a 110-mV transient depolarization of the plasma membrane. A blocker of the anion channel, 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoic acid, blocked 61% of the cold-induced depolarization without affecting the increase in [Ca2+]cyt. These data led us to propose that cold shock opens Ca2+ channels at the plasma membrane, allowing an inward, depolarizing Ca2+ current. The resulting large increase in [Ca2+]cyt activates the anion channel, which further depolarizes the membrane. Although an increase in [Ca2+]cyt may activate anion channels in response to cold, it appears that BL does so via a Ca(2+)-independent pathway. PMID:9276950

  1. The alternative complement component factor B regulates UV-induced oedema, systemic suppression of contact and delayed hypersensitivity, and mast cell infiltration into the skin.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Scott N; Hammond, Kirsten J L; Chan, Carling Y-Y; Rogers, Linda J; Beaugie, Clare; Rana, Sabita; Marsh-Wakefield, Felix; Thurman, Joshua M; Halliday, Gary M

    2015-04-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths in sunlight are the prime cause of skin cancer in humans with both the UVA and UVB wavebands making a contribution to photocarcinogenesis. UV has many different biological effects on the skin that contribute to carcinogenesis, including suppression of adaptive immunity, sunburn and altering the migration of mast cells into and away from irradiated skin. Many molecular mechanisms have been identified as contributing to skin responses to UV. Recently, using gene set enrichment analysis of microarray data, we identified the alternative complement pathway with a central role for factor B (fB) in UVA-induced immunosuppression. In the current study we used mice genetically deficient in fB (fB-/- mice) to study the functional role of the alternative complement pathway in skin responses to UV. We found that fB is required for not only UVA but also UVB-induced immunosuppression and solar-simulated UV induction of the oedemal component of sunburn. Factor B-/- mice had a larger number of resident skin mast cells than control mice, but unlike the controls did not respond to UV by increasing mast cell infiltration into the skin. This study provides evidence for a function role for fB in skin responses to UV radiation. Factor B regulates UVA and UVB induced immunosuppression, UV induced oedema and mast cell infiltration into the skin. The alternative complement pathway is therefore an important regulator of skin responses to UV.

  2. Cold-Induced Changes in Gene Expression in Brown Adipose Tissue, White Adipose Tissue and Liver

    PubMed Central

    Shore, Andrew M.; Karamitri, Angeliki; Kemp, Paul; Speakman, John R.; Graham, Neil S.; Lomax, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Cold exposure imposes a metabolic challenge to mammals that is met by a coordinated response in different tissues to prevent hypothermia. This study reports a transcriptomic analysis in brown adipose tissue (BAT), white adipose (WAT) and liver of mice in response to 24 h cold exposure at 8°C. Expression of 1895 genes were significantly (P<0.05) up- or down-regulated more than two fold by cold exposure in all tissues but only 5 of these genes were shared by all three tissues, and only 19, 14 and 134 genes were common between WAT and BAT, WAT and liver, and BAT and liver, respectively. We confirmed using qRT-PCR, the increased expression of a number of characteristic BAT genes during cold exposure. In both BAT and the liver, the most common direction of change in gene expression was suppression (496 genes in BAT and 590 genes in liver). Gene ontology analysis revealed for the first time significant (P<0.05) down regulation in response to cold, of genes involved in oxidoreductase activity, lipid metabolic processes and protease inhibitor activity, in both BAT and liver, but not WAT. The results reveal an unexpected importance of down regulation of cytochrome P450 gene expression and apolipoprotein, in both BAT and liver, but not WAT, in response to cold exposure. Pathway analysis suggests a model in which down regulation of the nuclear transcription factors HNF4α and PPARα in both BAT and liver may orchestrate the down regulation of genes involved in lipoprotein and steroid metabolism as well as Phase I enzymes belonging to the cytochrome P450 group in response to cold stress in mice. We propose that the response to cold stress involves decreased gene expression in a range of cellular processes in order to maximise pathways involved in heat production. PMID:23894377

  3. The C2 protein of tomato yellow leaf curl Sardinia virus acts as a pathogenicity determinant and a 16-amino acid domain is responsible for inducing a hypersensitive response in plants.

    PubMed

    Matić, Slavica; Pegoraro, Mattia; Noris, Emanuela

    2016-04-01

    The role of the C2 protein in the pathogenicity of tomato yellow leaf curl Sardinia virus (TYLCSV) was investigated. Here we report that Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression of TYLCSV C2 resulted in a strong hypersensitive response (HR) in Nicotiana benthamiana, N. tabacum, and Arabidopsis thaliana, with induction of plant cell death and production of H2O2. Since HR is not evident in plants infected by TYLCSV, it is expected that TYLCSV encodes a gene (or genes) that counters this response. HR was partially counteracted by co-agroinfiltration of TYLCSV V2 and Rep, leading to chlorotic reaction, with no HR development. Considering that the corresponding C2 protein of the closely related tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) did not induce HR, alignment of the C2 proteins of TYLCSV and TYLCV were carried out and a hypervariable region of 16 amino acids was identified. Its role in the induction of HR was demonstrated using TYLCSV-TYLCV C2 chimeric genes, encoding two TYLCSV C2 variants with a complete (16 aa) or a partial (10 aa only) swap of the corresponding sequence of TYLCV C2. Furthermore, using NahG transgenic N. benthamiana lines compromised in the accumulation of salicylic acid (SA), a key regulator of HR, only a chlorotic response occurred in TYLCSV C2-infiltrated tissue, indicating that SA participates in such plant defense process. These findings demonstrate that TYLCSV C2 acts as a pathogenicity determinant and induces host defense responses controlled by the SA pathway. PMID:26826600

  4. Protection against ultraviolet-B radiation-induced local and systemic suppression of contact hypersensitivity and edema responses in C3H/HeN mice by green tea polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Katiyar, S K; Elmets, C A; Agarwal, R; Mukhtar, H

    1995-11-01

    Exposure of skin to UV radiation can cause diverse biological effects, including induction of inflammation, alteration in cutaneous immune cells and impairment of contact hypersensitivity (CHS) responses. Our laboratory has demonstrated that oral feeding as well as topical application of a polyphenolic fraction isolated from green tea (GTP) affords protection against the carcinogenic effects of UVB (280-320 nm) radiation. In this study, we investigated whether GTP could protect against UVB-induced immunosuppression and cutaneous inflammatory responses in C3H mice. Immunosuppression was assessed by contact sensitization with 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene applied to UVB-irradiated skin (local suppression) or to a distant site (systemic suppression), while double skin-fold swelling was used as the measure of UVB-induced inflammation. Topical application of GTP (1-6 mg/animal), 30 min prior to or 30 min after exposure to a single dose of UVB (2 kJ/m2) resulted in significant protection against local (25-90%) and systemic suppression (23-95%) of CHS and inflammation in mouse dorsal skin (70-80%). These protective effects were dependent on the dose of GTP employed; increasing the dose (1-6 mg/animal) resulted in an increased protective effect (25-93%). The protective effects were also dependent on the dose of UVB (2-32 kJ/m2). Among the four major epicatechin derivatives present in GTP, (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate, the major constituent in GTP, was found to be the most effective in affording protection against UVB-caused CHS and inflammatory responses. Our study suggests that green tea, specifically polyphenols present therein, may be useful against inflammatory dermatoses and immunosuppression caused by solar radiation.

  5. Ectopic AtCBF1 over-expression enhances freezing tolerance and induces cold acclimation-associated physiological modifications in potato.

    PubMed

    Pino, María-Teresa; Skinner, Jeffrey S; Jeknić, Zoran; Hayes, Patrick M; Soeldner, Alfred H; Thomashow, Michael F; Chen, Tony H H

    2008-04-01

    We studied the effect of ectopic AtCBF over-expression on physiological alterations that occur during cold exposure in frost-sensitive Solanum tuberosum and frost-tolerant Solanum commersonii. Relative to wild-type plants, ectopic AtCBF1 over-expression induced expression of COR genes without a cold stimulus in both species, and imparted a significant freezing tolerance gain in both species: 2 degrees C in S. tuberosum and up to 4 degrees C in S. commersonii. Transgenic S. commersonii displayed improved cold acclimation potential, whereas transgenic S. tuberosum was still incapable of cold acclimation. During cold treatment, leaves of wild-type S. commersonii showed significant thickening resulting from palisade cell lengthening and intercellular space enlargement, whereas those of S. tuberosum did not. Ectopic AtCBF1 activity induced these same leaf alterations in the absence of cold in both species. In transgenic S. commersonii, AtCBF1 activity also mimicked cold treatment by increasing proline and total sugar contents in the absence of cold. Relative to wild type, transgenic S. commersonii leaves were darker green, had higher chlorophyll and lower anthocyanin levels, greater stomatal numbers, and displayed greater photosynthetic capacity, suggesting higher productivity potential. These results suggest an endogenous CBFpathway is involved in many of the structural, biochemical and physiological alterations associated with cold acclimation in these Solanum species.

  6. Zirconium granuloma resulting from an aluminum zirconium complex: a previously unrecognized agent in the development of hypersensitivity granulomas.

    PubMed

    Skelton, H G; Smith, K J; Johnson, F B; Cooper, C R; Tyler, W F; Lupton, G P

    1993-05-01

    Zirconium compounds have been associated with the development of hypersensitivity granulomas. However, aluminum zirconium complexes have not previously been shown to induce sensitization. We present the clinical and histologic findings of a case in which a patient developed an acute hypersensitivity reaction to an aluminum zirconium complex. PMID:8491884

  7. VAMP7 regulates constitutive membrane incorporation of the cold-activated channel TRPM8.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Debapriya; Pinto, Silvia; Danglot, Lydia; Vandewauw, Ine; Segal, Andrei; Van Ranst, Nele; Benoit, Melissa; Janssens, Annelies; Vennekens, Rudi; Vanden Berghe, Pieter; Galli, Thierry; Vriens, Joris; Voets, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The cation channel TRPM8 plays a central role in the somatosensory system, as a key sensor of innocuously cold temperatures and cooling agents. Although increased functional expression of TRPM8 has been implicated in various forms of pathological cold hypersensitivity, little is known about the cellular and molecular mechanisms that determine TRPM8 abundance at the plasma membrane. Here we demonstrate constitutive transport of TRPM8 towards the plasma membrane in atypical, non-acidic transport vesicles that contain lysosomal-associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP1), and provide evidence that vesicle-associated membrane protein 7 (VAMP7) mediates fusion of these vesicles with the plasma membrane. In line herewith, VAMP7-deficient mice exhibit reduced functional expression of TRPM8 in sensory neurons and concomitant deficits in cold avoidance and icilin-induced cold hypersensitivity. Our results uncover a cellular pathway that controls functional plasma membrane incorporation of a temperature-sensitive TRP channel, and thus regulates thermosensitivity in vivo. PMID:26843440

  8. VAMP7 regulates constitutive membrane incorporation of the cold-activated channel TRPM8

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Debapriya; Pinto, Silvia; Danglot, Lydia; Vandewauw, Ine; Segal, Andrei; Van Ranst, Nele; Benoit, Melissa; Janssens, Annelies; Vennekens, Rudi; Vanden Berghe, Pieter; Galli, Thierry; Vriens, Joris; Voets, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The cation channel TRPM8 plays a central role in the somatosensory system, as a key sensor of innocuously cold temperatures and cooling agents. Although increased functional expression of TRPM8 has been implicated in various forms of pathological cold hypersensitivity, little is known about the cellular and molecular mechanisms that determine TRPM8 abundance at the plasma membrane. Here we demonstrate constitutive transport of TRPM8 towards the plasma membrane in atypical, non-acidic transport vesicles that contain lysosomal-associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP1), and provide evidence that vesicle-associated membrane protein 7 (VAMP7) mediates fusion of these vesicles with the plasma membrane. In line herewith, VAMP7-deficient mice exhibit reduced functional expression of TRPM8 in sensory neurons and concomitant deficits in cold avoidance and icilin-induced cold hypersensitivity. Our results uncover a cellular pathway that controls functional plasma membrane incorporation of a temperature-sensitive TRP channel, and thus regulates thermosensitivity in vivo. PMID:26843440

  9. Oral immunotherapy induces IgG antibodies that act via FcγRIIb to suppress IgE-mediated hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Oliver T.; Logsdon, Stephanie L.; Zhou, Joseph S.; Medina-Tamayo, Jaciel; Abdel-Gadir, Azza; Rivas, Magali Noval; Koleoglou, Kyle J.; Chatila, Talal A.; Schneider, Lynda C.; Rachid, Rima; Umetsu, Dale T.; Oettgen, Hans C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Food anaphylaxis is triggered by specific IgE antibodies. Paradoxically, some individuals with significant IgE levels can ingest allergenic foods without incident. Similarly, subjects completing oral immunotherapy (OIT) tolerate food challenges despite persistent high-titer food-specific IgE. Objective To test whether IgG antibodies induced by food immunotherapy prevent food-induced anaphylaxis, and whether this occurs via the inhibitory receptor FcγRIIb. Methods Food allergy-susceptible Il4raF709 mice were enterally sensitized to ovalbumin (OVA). Similarly sensitized IgE-deficient Il4raF709/IgE−/− mice, which can ingest OVA without anaphylaxis, were subjected to a high-dose enteral OVA desensitization protocol (OIT). Sera from both groups were tested for the ability to activate or inhibit bone marrow mast cells (BMMC) exposed to allergen, or to passively transfer allergy to naïve hosts. In parallel experiments, sera obtained from peanut allergic patients before and after undergoing OIT were interrogated for their ability to enhance or suppress peanut-induced activation in an indirect assay using basophils from non-allergic donors. Results Il4raF709 mice exhibited strong OVA-specific IgE responses. Their sera efficiently sensitized BMMC for activation by antigen challenge. Sera from Il4raF709/IgE−/− mice subjected to OVA OIT suppressed BMMC responses. This inhibition was IgG-mediated and FcγRIIb-dependent. Similarly, pre-OIT, but not post-OIT sera from patients efficiently sensitized basophils for peanut-induced activation. IgG antibodies in post-OIT sera suppressed basophil activation by pre-OIT sera. This inhibition was blocked by antibodies against FcγRII. Conclusion Food-specific IgG antibodies, such as those induced during OIT, inhibit IgE-mediated reactions. Strategies that favor IgG responses might prove useful in the management of food allergy. PMID:25042981

  10. Hypersensitivity syndrome caused by amitriptyline administration

    PubMed Central

    Milionis, H.; Skopelitou, A.; Elisaf, M.

    2000-01-01

    Adverse cutaneous manifestations are among the most common side effects associated with psychotropic drugs. Skin reactions due to amitriptyline (a tricyclic antidepressant agent) include rashes and hypersensitivity reactions (for example, urticaria and photosensitivity) as well as hyperpigmentation. Hypersensitivity syndrome is a specific severe idiosyncratic reaction causing skin, liver, joint, and haematological abnormalities, which usually resolve after the discontinuation of the implicated drug. A case of a 24 year old woman who experienced hypersensitivity syndrome three weeks after the initiation of amitriptyline is reported.


Keywords: tricyclic antidepressant drugs; amitriptyline; adverse cutaneous reactions; hypersensitivity syndrome PMID:10824052

  11. Cold-Induced Browning Dynamically Alters the Expression Profiles of Inflammatory Adipokines with Tissue Specificity in Mice.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiao; Jia, Ru; Zhang, Qiangling; Sun, Bo; Yan, Jianqun

    2016-01-01

    Cold exposure or β₃-adrenoceptor agonist treatment induces the adipose tissues remodeling, relevant for beige adipogenesis within white adipose tissue (WAT). It remains unclear whether this process influences inflammatory adipokines expression in adipose tissues. We determine the temporal profile of cold or β₃-adrenoceptor agonist (CL316,243)-induced changes in the expression of inflammatory adipokines in adipose tissues in mice or primary mice adipocytes. Male C57BL/6J mice at eight weeks old were exposed to 4 °C for 1-5 days. Interscapular brown adipose tissue (iBAT), inguinal subcutaneous WAT (sWAT) and epididymal WAT (eWAT) were harvested for gene and protein expression analysis. In addition, cultured primary mice brown adipocyte (BA) and white adipocyte (WA) treated with or without CL316,243 were harvested for gene expression analysis. The inflammatory adipokines expressed significantly higher in WAT than BAT at baseline. They were rapidly changed in iBAT, while down-regulated in sWAT and up-regulated in eWAT during the cold acclimation. Upon CL316,243 treatment, detected inflammatory adipokines except Leptin were transiently increased in both BA and WA. Our in vivo and in vitro data demonstrate that the browning process alters the inflammatory adipokines expression in adipose tissues, which is acutely responded to in iBAT, dynamically decreased in sWAT whilst increased in eWAT for compensation. PMID:27223282

  12. Chronic Cold-Water-Induced Hypothermia Impairs Memory Retrieval and Nepeta menthoides as a Traditional "Hot" Herb Reverses the Impairment.

    PubMed

    Ahmadian-Attar, Mohammad Mahdi; Ahmadiani, Abolhassan; Kamalinejad, Mohammad; Dargahi, Leila; Mosaddegh, Mahmoud

    2014-01-01

    Iranian Traditional Medicine (ITM) describes a kind of dementia with similar signs and symptoms of Alzheimer's disease (AD). It explains the pathology of dementia with cold intemperament of the brain, which means that the brain is colder than its healthy form. ITM strategy for treatment of dementia is to heat the brain up by medical "hot" herbs. Nepeta menthoides (NM) is one of these "hot" herbs. To evaluate the veracity of ITM concept about dementia and its treatment, we first try to examine if coldness of brain can make memory impairment. If so, can NM reverse memory impairment? Rats in cold-water-induced hypothermic (CWH) groups were immersed up to the neck in 3.5 °C water, for 5 min during 14 consecutive days. As a control, rats were forced to swim in warm water at the same conditions. To eliminate the impact of forced swimming stress, a group of intact rats was also added. After last swimming in day 14, some groups received drug (100 or 500 mg/ Kg aqueous extract of NM) or vehicle via i.p. injection. Learning and memory were assessed by Morris water maze, and tau hyperphosphorylation was measured by western blotting. The results showed that CWH impairs learning and memory and induces tau hyperphosphorylation. 100 mg/Kg of NM reversed memory impairment as well as tau hyperphosphorylation. ITM theory about the relationship between brain hypothermia and dementia is in accordance with our findings.

  13. Chronic Cold-Water-Induced Hypothermia Impairs Memory Retrieval and Nepeta menthoides as a Traditional "Hot" Herb Reverses the Impairment.

    PubMed

    Ahmadian-Attar, Mohammad Mahdi; Ahmadiani, Abolhassan; Kamalinejad, Mohammad; Dargahi, Leila; Mosaddegh, Mahmoud

    2014-01-01

    Iranian Traditional Medicine (ITM) describes a kind of dementia with similar signs and symptoms of Alzheimer's disease (AD). It explains the pathology of dementia with cold intemperament of the brain, which means that the brain is colder than its healthy form. ITM strategy for treatment of dementia is to heat the brain up by medical "hot" herbs. Nepeta menthoides (NM) is one of these "hot" herbs. To evaluate the veracity of ITM concept about dementia and its treatment, we first try to examine if coldness of brain can make memory impairment. If so, can NM reverse memory impairment? Rats in cold-water-induced hypothermic (CWH) groups were immersed up to the neck in 3.5 °C water, for 5 min during 14 consecutive days. As a control, rats were forced to swim in warm water at the same conditions. To eliminate the impact of forced swimming stress, a group of intact rats was also added. After last swimming in day 14, some groups received drug (100 or 500 mg/ Kg aqueous extract of NM) or vehicle via i.p. injection. Learning and memory were assessed by Morris water maze, and tau hyperphosphorylation was measured by western blotting. The results showed that CWH impairs learning and memory and induces tau hyperphosphorylation. 100 mg/Kg of NM reversed memory impairment as well as tau hyperphosphorylation. ITM theory about the relationship between brain hypothermia and dementia is in accordance with our findings. PMID:24711845

  14. Cold-Induced Browning Dynamically Alters the Expression Profiles of Inflammatory Adipokines with Tissue Specificity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xiao; Jia, Ru; Zhang, Qiangling; Sun, Bo; Yan, Jianqun

    2016-01-01

    Cold exposure or β3-adrenoceptor agonist treatment induces the adipose tissues remodeling, relevant for beige adipogenesis within white adipose tissue (WAT). It remains unclear whether this process influences inflammatory adipokines expression in adipose tissues. We determine the temporal profile of cold or β3-adrenoceptor agonist (CL316,243)-induced changes in the expression of inflammatory adipokines in adipose tissues in mice or primary mice adipocytes. Male C57BL/6J mice at eight weeks old were exposed to 4 °C for 1–5 days. Interscapular brown adipose tissue (iBAT), inguinal subcutaneous WAT (sWAT) and epididymal WAT (eWAT) were harvested for gene and protein expression analysis. In addition, cultured primary mice brown adipocyte (BA) and white adipocyte (WA) treated with or without CL316,243 were harvested for gene expression analysis. The inflammatory adipokines expressed significantly higher in WAT than BAT at baseline. They were rapidly changed in iBAT, while down-regulated in sWAT and up-regulated in eWAT during the cold acclimation. Upon CL316,243 treatment, detected inflammatory adipokines except Leptin were transiently increased in both BA and WA. Our in vivo and in vitro data demonstrate that the browning process alters the inflammatory adipokines expression in adipose tissues, which is acutely responded to in iBAT, dynamically decreased in sWAT whilst increased in eWAT for compensation. PMID:27223282

  15. A theoretical analysis on characteristics of protein structures induced by cold denaturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshima, Hiraku; Yoshidome, Takashi; Amano, Ken-ichi; Kinoshita, Masahiro

    2009-11-01

    Yeast frataxin is a protein exhibiting cold denaturation at an exceptionally high temperature (280 K). We show that the microscopic mechanism of cold denaturation, which has recently been suggested by us [Yoshidome and Kinoshita, Phys. Rev. E 79, 030905-R (2009)], is also applicable to yeast frataxin. The hybrid of the angle-dependent integral equation theory combined with the multipolar water model and the morphometric approach is employed for calculating hydration thermodynamic quantities of the protein with a prescribed structure. In order to investigate the characteristics of the cold-denatured structures of yeast frataxin, we consider the entropy change upon denaturation comprising the loss of the water entropy and the gain in the protein conformational entropy. The minimum and maximum values of the conformational-entropy gain (i.e., the range within which the exact value lies) are estimated via two routes. The range of the water-entropy loss is then determined from the entropy change experimentally obtained [Pastore et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 129, 5374 (2007)]. We calculate the water-entropy loss upon the transition from the native structure to a variety of unfolded structures. We then select the unfolded structures for which the water-entropy loss falls within the determined range. The selection is performed at cold and heat denaturation temperatures of yeast frataxin. The structures characterizing cold and heat denaturations are thus obtained. It is found that the average values of the radius of gyration, excluded volume, and water-accessible surface area for the cold-denatured structures are almost the same as those for the heat-denatured ones. We theoretically estimate the cold denaturation temperature of yeast frataxin from the experimental data for the enthalpy, entropy, and heat-capacity changes upon denaturation. The finding is that the temperature is considerably higher than 273 K. These results are in qualitatively good accord with the experimental

  16. Physical changes within a large tropical hydroelectric reservoir induced by wintertime cold front activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtarelli, M. P.; Alcântara, E. H.; Rennó, C. D.; Stech, J. L.

    2014-08-01

    We investigated the influence of wintertime cold front activity on the physical processes within a large tropical reservoir located in Brazil. The period chosen for this study consisted of 49 days between 28 April 2010 and 15 July 2010. This period was defined based on information from the Brazilian Center for Weather Forecasting and Climate Studies (CPTEC), data collected in situ and the interpretation of remotely sensed images. To better understand the governing processes that drive changes in the heat balance, differential cooling and mixing dynamics, a simulation was performed that utilized a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model enforced with in situ and remote sensing data. The results showed that during a cold front passage over the reservoir, the sensible and latent heat fluxes were enhanced by approximately 77 and 16%, respectively. The reservoir's daily averaged heat loss was up to 167% higher on the days with cold front activity than on the days without activity. The cold front passage also intensified the differential cooling process; in some cases the difference between the water temperature of the littoral and pelagic zones reached up to 8 °C. The occurrence of cold front passages impacted the diurnal mixed layer (DML), by increasing the turbulent energy input (∼54%) and the DML depth (∼41%). Our results indicate that the cold front events are one of the main meteorological disturbances driving the physical processes within hydroelectric reservoirs located in tropical South America during the wintertime. Hence, cold front activity over these aquatic systems has several implications for water quality and reservoir management in Brazil.

  17. The acute effect of cold air exercise in determination of exercise-induced bronchospasm in apparently healthy athletes.

    PubMed

    Carey, Daniel G; Aase, Katelyn A; Pliego, German J

    2010-08-01

    The primary objective of this study was to assess the acute effects for both cold and warm air running on pulmonary function testing and the diagnosis of exercise-induced bronchospasm (EIB). Subjects (n = 12, 8 men, 4 women) were distance runners (25.91 +/- 4.91 milesxwk) with mean age 30.2 +/- 5.1 years, mean height 179.0 +/- 11.5 cm, and mean weight 77.1 +/- 15.7 kg. Subjects first performed a maximal oxygen test on a motor-driven treadmill to assess Vo2max and maximal heart rate (MHR). On 2 subsequent days and within a 1-week time period, subjects ran 8 minutes in random order either on an outside 478.2-m course or on the treadmill at 6% grade. Speed was adjusted under both conditions to elicit 85-95% of MHR achieved on the Vo2max test. All tests were conducted in the month of January to maximize the potential for a cold climate. Pulmonary function test was performed immediately prerun, immediately postrun, and at 5, 10, 18, and 30 minutes postrun. There was no significant difference in any of the pulmonary function tests over time for cold vs. warm running (p > 0.05). Also, the pattern of change over time for the pulmonary function variables was not significantly different by condition (p > 0.05). Although group comparisons were not significant over time and for any variable between the 2 conditions, 7 of our subjects (58.3%) at some point postexercise exhibited a change that would be considered a positive response and diagnostic of EIB. Cold running produced significantly more positive responses (75%) than warm running (25%) (p = 0.001). It is concluded that healthy individuals need not be concerned about the acute effects of cold air exercise on the lungs. Also, physicians need to be vigilant in prescribing medications and should use strict, objective criteria when doing so.

  18. [Delayed hypersensitivity to protamine and immediate hypersensitivity to insulin].

    PubMed

    Köllner, A; Senff, H; Engelmann, L; Kalveram, K J; Velcovsky, H G; Haneke, E

    1991-08-16

    A 63-year-old female, with type II diabetes mellitus, diagnosed in 1967, was started on combination therapy with sulphonylureas and human depot insulin in May 1989, because of inadequate blood sugar control with sulphonylureas alone. Within 3 months she began to develop nodular skin reactions at the site of injection, 12-24 hours after insulin injections. Intradermal testing demonstrated delayed (Gell and Coombs type IV) hypersensitivity to protamine. No specific IgE or IgG antibodies were demonstrable. She was changed to protamine-free human delayed action insulin. After an initial reaction-free period, red urticarial lesions, attributable to immediate (Gell and Coombs type I) hypersensitivity to human insulin, appeared at the injection sites. There were no other complications with continued insulin therapy, and after about 6 weeks no further local reactions were detectable. When an allergic reaction to an insulin preparation is suspected, careful immunological investigation should be performed, to ensure adequate treatment without risk to the patient.

  19. Pharmacogenetics and Predictive Testing of Drug Hypersensitivity Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Böhm, Ruwen; Cascorbi, Ingolf

    2016-01-01

    Adverse drug reactions adverse drug reaction (ADR) occur in approximately 17% of patients. Avoiding ADR is thus mandatory from both an ethical and an economic point of view. Whereas, pharmacogenetics changes of the pharmacokinetics may contribute to the explanation of some type A reactions, strong relationships of genetic markers has also been shown for drug hypersensitivity belonging to type B reactions. We present the classifications of ADR, discuss genetic influences and focus on delayed-onset hypersensitivity reactions, i.e., drug-induced liver injury, drug-induced agranulocytosis, and severe cutaneous ADR. A guidance how to read and interpret the contingency table is provided as well as an algorithm whether and how a test for a pharmacogenetic biomarker should be conducted.

  20. Inactivation of MARK4, an AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-related kinase, leads to insulin hypersensitivity and resistance to diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chao; Tian, Liang; Nie, Jia; Zhang, Hai; Han, Xiao; Shi, Yuguang

    2012-11-01

    MARK4, also known as Par-1d/MarkL1, is a member of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-related family of kinases, which are implicated in the regulation of dynamic biological functions, including glucose and energy homeostasis. However, the physiological function of MARK4 in mammals remains elusive. Here, we investigated a role for MARK4 in regulating energy homeostasis by generating mice with targeted inactivation of the mark4 gene. We show that MARK4 deficiency in mice caused hyperphagia, hyperactivity, and hypermetabolism, leading to protection from diet-induced obesity and its related metabolic complications through up-regulation of brown fat activity. Consequently, MARK4 deficiency mitigated insulin resistance associated with diet-induced obesity by dramatically enhancing insulin-stimulated AKT phosphorylation in major metabolic tissues. Ablation of MARK4 also significantly improved glucose homeostasis by up-regulating the activity and expression of AMPK kinase in key metabolic tissues. Taken together, these data identify a key role of MARK4 in energy metabolism, implicating the kinase as a novel drug target for the treatment of obesity and type 2 diabetes. PMID:22992738

  1. A mutation in the expansin-like A2 gene enhances resistance to necrotrophic fungi and hypersensitivity to abiotic stress in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Abuqamar, Synan; Ajeb, Suad; Sham, Arjun; Enan, Mohamed Rizq; Iratni, Rabah

    2013-10-01

    Expansins are cell wall loosening agents, known for their endogenous function in cell wall extensibility. The Arabidopsis expansin-like A2 (EXLA2) gene was identified by its down-regulation in response to infection by the necrotrophic pathogen Botrytis cinerea, and by the reduced susceptibility of an exla2 mutant to the same pathogen. The exla2 mutant was equally susceptible to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato, but was more resistant to the necrotrophic fungus Alternaria brassicicola, when compared with the wild-type or with transgenic, ectopic EXLA2-overexpressing lines. The exla2 mutants also enhanced tolerance to the phytoprostane-A1 . This suggests that the absence or down-regulation of EXLA2 leads to increased resistance to B. cinerea in a CORONATINE INSENSITIVE 1 (COI1)-dependent manner, and this down-regulation can be achieved by phytoprostane-A1 treatment. EXLA2 is induced significantly by salinity and cold, and by the exogenous application of abscisic acid. The exla2 mutant also showed hypersensitivity towards increased salt and cold, and this hypersensitivity required a functional abscisic acid pathway. The differential temporal expression of EXLA2 and the phenotypes in transgenic plants with altered expression of EXLA2 indicate that plant cell wall structure is an important player during Arabidopsis developmental stages. Our results indicate that EXLA2 appears to be important in response to various biotic and abiotic stresses, particularly in the pathogenesis of necrotrophic pathogens and in the tolerance to abiotic stress.

  2. The low temperature induced physiological responses of Avena nuda L., a cold-tolerant plant species.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenying; Yu, Kenming; He, Tengfei; Li, Feifei; Zhang, Dongxu; Liu, Jianxia

    2013-01-01

    The paperaim of the was to study the effect of low temperature stress on Avena nuda L. seedlings. Cold stress leads to many changes of physiological indices, such as membrane permeability, free proline content, malondialdehyde (MDA) content, and chlorophyll content. Cold stress also leads to changes of some protected enzymes such as peroxidase (POD), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase (CAT). We have measured and compared these indices of seedling leaves under low temperature and normal temperature. The proline and MDA contents were increased compared with control; the chlorophyll content gradually decreased with the prolongation of low temperature stress. The activities of SOD, POD, and CAT were increased under low temperature. The study was designated to explore the physiological mechanism of cold tolerance in naked oats for the first time and also provided theoretical basis for cultivation and antibiotic breeding in Avena nuda L. PMID:23843738

  3. Cold Exposure Can Induce an Exaggerated Early-Morning Blood Pressure Surge in Young Prehypertensives.

    PubMed

    Hong, Cian-Hui; Kuo, Terry B J; Huang, Bo-Chi; Lin, Yu-Cheng; Kuo, Kuan-Liang; Chern, Chang-Ming; Yang, Cheryl C H

    2016-01-01

    Prehypertension is related to a higher risk of cardiovascular events than normotension. Our previous study reported that cold exposure elevates the amplitude of the morning blood pressure surge (MBPS) and is associated with a sympathetic increase during the final sleep transition, which might be critical for sleep-related cardiovascular events in normotensives. However, few studies have explored the effects of cold exposure on autonomic function during sleep transitions and changes of autonomic function among prehypertensives. Therefore, we conducted an experiment for testing the effects of cold exposure on changes of autonomic function during sleep and the MBPS among young prehypertensives are more exaggerate than among young normotensives. The study groups consisted of 12 normotensive and 12 prehypertensive male adults with mean ages of 23.67 ± 0.70 and 25.25 ± 0.76 years, respectively. The subjects underwent cold (16°C) and warm (23°C) conditions randomly. The room temperature was maintained at either 23°C or 16°C by central air conditioning and recorded by a heat-sensitive sensor placed on the forehead and extended into the air. BP was measured every 30 minutes by using an autonomic BP monitor. Electroencephalograms, electrooculograms, electromyograms, electrocardiograms, and near body temperature were recorded by miniature polysomnography. Under cold exposure, a significantly higher amplitude of MBPS than under the warm condition among normotensives; however, this change was more exaggerated in prehypertensives. Furthermore, there was a significant decrease in parasympathetic-related RR and HF during the final sleep transition and a higher early-morning surge in BP and in LF% among prehypertensives, but no such change was found in normotensives. Our study supports that cold exposure might increase the risk of sleep-related cardiovascular events in prehypertensives.

  4. Cold Exposure Can Induce an Exaggerated Early-Morning Blood Pressure Surge in Young Prehypertensives.

    PubMed

    Hong, Cian-Hui; Kuo, Terry B J; Huang, Bo-Chi; Lin, Yu-Cheng; Kuo, Kuan-Liang; Chern, Chang-Ming; Yang, Cheryl C H

    2016-01-01

    Prehypertension is related to a higher risk of cardiovascular events than normotension. Our previous study reported that cold exposure elevates the amplitude of the morning blood pressure surge (MBPS) and is associated with a sympathetic increase during the final sleep transition, which might be critical for sleep-related cardiovascular events in normotensives. However, few studies have explored the effects of cold exposure on autonomic function during sleep transitions and changes of autonomic function among prehypertensives. Therefore, we conducted an experiment for testing the effects of cold exposure on changes of autonomic function during sleep and the MBPS among young prehypertensives are more exaggerate than among young normotensives. The study groups consisted of 12 normotensive and 12 prehypertensive male adults with mean ages of 23.67 ± 0.70 and 25.25 ± 0.76 years, respectively. The subjects underwent cold (16°C) and warm (23°C) conditions randomly. The room temperature was maintained at either 23°C or 16°C by central air conditioning and recorded by a heat-sensitive sensor placed on the forehead and extended into the air. BP was measured every 30 minutes by using an autonomic BP monitor. Electroencephalograms, electrooculograms, electromyograms, electrocardiograms, and near body temperature were recorded by miniature polysomnography. Under cold exposure, a significantly higher amplitude of MBPS than under the warm condition among normotensives; however, this change was more exaggerated in prehypertensives. Furthermore, there was a significant decrease in parasympathetic-related RR and HF during the final sleep transition and a higher early-morning surge in BP and in LF% among prehypertensives, but no such change was found in normotensives. Our study supports that cold exposure might increase the risk of sleep-related cardiovascular events in prehypertensives. PMID:26919177

  5. Cold Exposure Can Induce an Exaggerated Early-Morning Blood Pressure Surge in Young Prehypertensives

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Bo-Chi; Lin, Yu-Cheng; Kuo, Kuan-Liang; Chern, Chang-Ming; Yang, Cheryl C. H.

    2016-01-01

    Prehypertension is related to a higher risk of cardiovascular events than normotension. Our previous study reported that cold exposure elevates the amplitude of the morning blood pressure surge (MBPS) and is associated with a sympathetic increase during the final sleep transition, which might be critical for sleep-related cardiovascular events in normotensives. However, few studies have explored the effects of cold exposure on autonomic function during sleep transitions and changes of autonomic function among prehypertensives. Therefore, we conducted an experiment for testing the effects of cold exposure on changes of autonomic function during sleep and the MBPS among young prehypertensives are more exaggerate than among young normotensives. The study groups consisted of 12 normotensive and 12 prehypertensive male adults with mean ages of 23.67 ± 0.70 and 25.25 ± 0.76 years, respectively. The subjects underwent cold (16°C) and warm (23°C) conditions randomly. The room temperature was maintained at either 23°C or 16°C by central air conditioning and recorded by a heat-sensitive sensor placed on the forehead and extended into the air. BP was measured every 30 minutes by using an autonomic BP monitor. Electroencephalograms, electrooculograms, electromyograms, electrocardiograms, and near body temperature were recorded by miniature polysomnography. Under cold exposure, a significantly higher amplitude of MBPS than under the warm condition among normotensives; however, this change was more exaggerated in prehypertensives. Furthermore, there was a significant decrease in parasympathetic-related RR and HF during the final sleep transition and a higher early-morning surge in BP and in LF% among prehypertensives, but no such change was found in normotensives. Our study supports that cold exposure might increase the risk of sleep-related cardiovascular events in prehypertensives. PMID:26919177

  6. Antigenic specificities of delayed hypersensitivity in mice to dinitrophenylated proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yonemasu, K.; Crowle, A. J.

    1973-01-01

    Humoral antibodies capable of suppressing induction of delayed hypersensitivity to dinitrophenylated proteins in mice were tested for specific absorbability onto chemically insolubilized antigen and for the antigenic determinant specificities of their immunosuppressive (i.e. contrasensitizing) effects. The activity of an antiserum could be completely removed by absorption with homologous antigen, and it could be recovered by dissociating the absorbed antibodies at low pH and high salt concentration. The immunosuppressive antibodies therefore are specific for determinants on the native antigen, and non-antibody serum constituents are non-essential. By selective immunoabsorptions and elutions, antibodies specific for carrier protein, for dinitrophenyl hapten, and for new determinants unique to the hapten—protein complexes were prepared and were compared with unfractionated antiserum for contrasensitizing activity. Nearly all activity could be accounted for by the anti-hapten antibodies, although anti-carrier antibodies also had some. Despite this evidence that immunosuppressiveness was hapten-specific, the delayed hypersensitivity being suppressed by these antibodies was shown to be directed against hapten—carrier complexes or against carrier but not against hapten alone. Hence, humoral antibodies against a portion of an antigen molecule can suppress induction of delayed hypersensitivity specific for other sometimes unrelated parts of this same molecule, and it is possible to induce antibody-mediated tolerance to a multi-determinant antigen with an antibody response against just a part of the antigen. The theoretical and practical implications of these findings are discussed. Notable theoretically is the observation that although determinant specificities of humoral antibody and delayed hypersensitivity responses to one antigen usually differ, the former can regulate the latter for a given species of antigen molecule. Most important practically is the implication

  7. Characterization of cspB, a Bacillus subtilis inducible cold shock gene affecting cell viability at low temperatures.

    PubMed Central

    Willimsky, G; Bang, H; Fischer, G; Marahiel, M A

    1992-01-01

    A new class of cold shock-induced proteins that may be involved in an adaptive process required for cell viability at low temperatures or may function as antifreeze proteins in Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been identified. We purified a small Bacillus subtilis cold shock protein (CspB) and determined its amino-terminal sequence. By using mixed degenerate oligonucleotides, the corresponding gene (cspB) was cloned on two overlapping fragments of 5 and 6 kb. The gene encodes an acidic 67-amino-acid protein (pI 4.31) with a predicted molecular mass of 7,365 Da. Nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequence comparisons revealed 61% identity to the major cold shock protein of E. coli and 43% identity to a family of eukaryotic DNA binding proteins. Northern RNA blot and primer extension studies indicated the presence of one cspB transcript that was initiated 119 bp upstream of the initiation codon and was found to be induced severalfold when exponentially growing B. subtilis cell cultures were transferred from 37 degrees C to 10 degrees C. Consistent with this cold shock induction of cspB mRNA, a six- to eightfold induction of a cspB-directed beta-galactosidase synthesis was observed upon downshift in temperature. To investigate the function of CspB, we inactivated the cold shock protein by replacing the cspB gene in the B. subtilis chromosome with a cat-interrupted copy (cspB::cat) by marker replacement recombination. The viability of cells of this mutant strain, GW1, at freezing temperatures was strongly affected. However, the effect of having no CspB in GW1 could be slightly compensated for when cells were preincubated at 10 degrees C before freezing. These results indicate that CspB belongs to a new type of stress-inducible proteins that might be able to protect B. subtilis cells from damage caused by ice crystal formation during freezing. Images PMID:1400185

  8. Hypersensitivity to antineoplastic agents: mechanisms and treatment with rapid desensitization.

    PubMed

    Castells, Mariana; Sancho-Serra, Maria del Carmen; Simarro, Maria

    2012-09-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs) to chemotherapy drugs, such as taxanes and platins, and to monoclonal antibodies limit their therapeutic use due to the severity of some reactions and the fear of inducing a potentially lethal reaction in highly sensitized patients. Patients who experience hypersensitivity reactions face the prospect of abandoning first-line treatment and switching to a second-line, less effective therapy. Some of these reactions are mast cell-mediated hypersensitivity reactions, a subset of which occur through an immunoglobulin (IgE)-dependent mechanism, and are thus true allergies. Others involve mast cells without a demonstrable IgE mechanism. Whether basophils can participate in these reactions has not been demonstrated. Rapid drug desensitization (RDD) is a procedure that induces temporary tolerance to a drug, allowing a medication allergic patient to receive the optimal agent for his or her disease. Through RDD, patients with IgE and non-IgE HSRs can safely be administered important medications while minimizing or completely inhibiting adverse reactions. Due to the clinical expansion and success of RDD, the molecular mechanisms inducing the temporary tolerization have been investigated and are partially understood, allowing for safer and more effective protocols. This article reviews the current literature on molecular mechanisms of RDD with an emphasis in our recent contributions to this field as well as the indications, methods and outcomes of RDD for taxanes, platins, and monoclonal antibodies. PMID:22576054

  9. Paediatric feather duvet hypersensitivity pneumonitis.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Louise E; Guy, Emma

    2015-01-01

    A previously well 12-year-old boy was admitted with a second insidious episode of dyspnoea, dry cough, anorexia, weight loss and chest pain. At admission, he had an oxygen requirement, significantly impaired lung function and reduced exercise tolerance. Initial forced expiratory volume in 1 s was 26%; a 3 min exercise test stopped at 1 min 50 when saturations dropped to 85%. CT scan showed ground-glass nodularity with lymphadenopathy. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) for Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia and viruses were negative, and microbiology results for the BAL were reported in the absence of histology. This is because at the time the BAL samples were collected, a lung biopsy was performed. The biopsy was consistent with hypersensitivity pneumonitis. Echo was normal and CT pulmonary angiography negative. After taking a thorough history, exposure to feather duvets prior to each episode was elicited. IgG of avian precipitants was raised at 10.6 mgA/L (normal <10 mgA/L). Clinical improvement began with avoidance of exposure, while the boy was an inpatient. Antigen avoidance continued on discharge. He continues to improve since discharge. The condition was diagnosed as hypersensitivity pneumonitis secondary to exposure to antigens from feather duvets. PMID:26113584

  10. Paediatric feather duvet hypersensitivity pneumonitis.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Louise E; Guy, Emma

    2015-01-01

    A previously well 12-year-old boy was admitted with a second insidious episode of dyspnoea, dry cough, anorexia, weight loss and chest pain. At admission, he had an oxygen requirement, significantly impaired lung function and reduced exercise tolerance. Initial forced expiratory volume in 1 s was 26%; a 3 min exercise test stopped at 1 min 50 when saturations dropped to 85%. CT scan showed ground-glass nodularity with lymphadenopathy. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) for Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia and viruses were negative, and microbiology results for the BAL were reported in the absence of histology. This is because at the time the BAL samples were collected, a lung biopsy was performed. The biopsy was consistent with hypersensitivity pneumonitis. Echo was normal and CT pulmonary angiography negative. After taking a thorough history, exposure to feather duvets prior to each episode was elicited. IgG of avian precipitants was raised at 10.6 mgA/L (normal <10 mgA/L). Clinical improvement began with avoidance of exposure, while the boy was an inpatient. Antigen avoidance continued on discharge. He continues to improve since discharge. The condition was diagnosed as hypersensitivity pneumonitis secondary to exposure to antigens from feather duvets.

  11. Hypersensitivity of prediabetic JCR:LA-cp rats to fine airborne combustion particle-induced direct and noradrenergic-mediated vascular contraction.

    PubMed

    Proctor, Spencer D; Dreher, Kevin L; Kelly, Sandra E; Russell, James C

    2006-04-01

    Particulate matter with mean aerodynamic diameter < or =2.5 microm (PM(2.5)), from diesel exhaust, coal or residual oil burning, and from industrial plants, is a significant component of airborne pollution. Type 2 diabetes is associated with enhanced risk of adverse cardiovascular events following exposure to PM(2.5). Particle properties, sources, and pathophysiological mechanisms responsible are unknown. We studied effects of residual oil fly ash (ROFA) from a large U.S. powerplant on vascular function in a prediabetic, hyperinsulinemic model, the JCR:LA-cp rat. Residual oil fly ash leachate (ROFA-L) was studied using aortic rings from young-adult, obese, insulin-resistant rats and lean normal rats in vitro. Contractile response to phenylephrine and relaxant response to acetylcholine were determined in the presence and absence of L-NAME (N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester). In a separate series of studies, the direct contractile effects of ROFA-L on repeated exposure were determined. ROFA-L (12.5 microg ml(-1)) increased phenylephrine-mediated contraction in obese (p < 0.05), but not in lean rat aortae, with the effect being exacerbated by L-NAME, and it reduced acetylcholine-mediated relaxation of both obese and lean aortae (p < 0.0001). Initial exposure of aortae to ROFA-L caused a small contractile response (<0.05 g), which was markedly greater on second exposure in the obese (approximately 0.6 g, p < 0.0001) aortae but marginal in lean (approximately 0.1 g) aortae. Our data demonstrate that bioavailable constituents of oil combustion particles enhance noradrenergic-mediated vascular contraction, impair endothelium-mediated relaxation, and induce direct vasocontraction in prediabetic rats. These observations provide the first direct evidence of the causal properties of PM(2.5) and identify the pathophysiological role of the early prediabetic state in susceptibility to environmentally induced cardiovascular disease. These are important implications for public

  12. Antisense expression of an Arabidopsis ran binding protein renders transgenic roots hypersensitive to auxin and alters auxin-induced root growth and development by arresting mitotic progress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, S. H.; Arnold, D.; Lloyd, A.; Roux, S. J.

    2001-01-01

    We cloned a cDNA encoding an Arabidopsis Ran binding protein, AtRanBP1c, and generated transgenic Arabidopsis expressing the antisense strand of the AtRanBP1c gene to understand the in vivo functions of the Ran/RanBP signal pathway. The transgenic plants showed enhanced primary root growth but suppressed growth of lateral roots. Auxin significantly increased lateral root initiation and inhibited primary root growth in the transformants at 10 pM, several orders of magnitude lower than required to induce these responses in wild-type roots. This induction was followed by a blockage of mitosis in both newly emerged lateral roots and in the primary root, ultimately resulting in the selective death of cells in the tips of both lateral and primary roots. Given the established role of Ran binding proteins in the transport of proteins into the nucleus, these findings are consistent with a model in which AtRanBP1c plays a key role in the nuclear delivery of proteins that suppress auxin action and that regulate mitotic progress in root tips.

  13. Hypersensitivity reactions to titanium: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Wood, Megan M; Warshaw, Erin M

    2015-01-01

    Titanium is notable for its biocompatibility and is used as biologic implant material across surgical specialties, especially in metal-sensitive individuals. However, rare cases of titanium hypersensitivity reactions are reported in the literature. This article discusses the properties and biological behavior of titanium and provides a thorough review of the literature on reported cases, diagnostic techniques, and approach to management of titanium hypersensitivity.

  14. Management of dentinal hypersensitivity: a review.

    PubMed

    Parolia, Abhishek; Kundabala, M; Mohan, Mandakini

    2011-03-01

    Dentinal hypersensitivity is a very common clinical finding that can cause considerable concern for the patient. Clinicians must understand the various etiological factors, their complexities, and numerous treatment options available. This article reviews the etiology, management, and prevention of dentinal hypersensitivity. PMID:21563596

  15. An animal model of oxaliplatin-induced cold allodynia reveals a crucial role for Nav1.6 in peripheral pain pathways

    PubMed Central

    Deuis, Jennifer R; Zimmermann, Katharina; Romanovsky, Andrej A; Possani, Lourival D; Cabot, Peter J; Lewis, Richard J; Vetter, Irina

    2013-01-01

    Cold allodynia, pain in response to cooling, occurs during or within hours of oxaliplatin infusion and is thought to arise from a direct effect of oxaliplatin on peripheral sensory neurons. To characterize the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying acute oxaliplatin-induced cold allodynia, we established a new intraplantar oxaliplatin mouse model that rapidly developed long-lasting cold allodynia mediated entirely through tetrodotoxin-sensitive Nav pathways. Using selective inhibitors and knockout animals, we found that Nav1.6 was the key isoform involved, while thermosensitive transient receptor potential channels were not involved. Consistent with a crucial role for delayed-rectifier potassium channels in excitability in response to cold, intraplantar administration of the K+-channel blocker 4-aminopyridine mimicked oxaliplatin-induced cold allodynia and was also inhibited by Navl.6 blockers. Intraplantar injection of the Nav1.6-activator Cn2 elicited spontaneous pain, mechanical allodynia and enhanced 4-aminopyridine-induced cold allodynia. These findings provide behavioural evidence for a crucial role of Nav1.6 in multiple peripheral pain pathways including cold allodynia. PMID:23711479

  16. A cognitive deficit induced in rats by chronic intermittent cold stress is reversed by chronic antidepressant treatment

    PubMed Central

    Danet, M.; Lapiz-Bluhm, S.; Morilak, David A.

    2010-01-01

    We have previously reported that 14-days of chronic intermittent cold (CIC) stress induced a cognitive deficit in reversal learning on the rat attentional set-shifting test. This effect may be related to dysregulation of 5-HT function in orbitofrontal cortex, as a model of cognitive dysfunction in depression. To test the ability of chronic antidepressant drug treatment to reverse the cognitive deficit induced by CIC, it was first necessary to assess the temporal characteristics of the CIC-induced cognitive deficit. Thus, in the first study, we assessed the duration of the cognitive deficit following 2-weeks CIC stress. Replicating previous experiments, CIC induced a reversal learning deficit tested 3 days after the last cold exposure. However, cognitive performance of CIC-stressed rats was no different from unstressed controls when tested 7, 14 or 21 days after termination of the stress treatment. We next compared behavior 3 days after 2-weeks CIC to that seen 3 days after 5-weeks CIC, and found similar deficits in reversal learning. Thus, in the final study, antidepressant drug treatment was initiated after 2-weeks of CIC stress, and was maintained for 3 weeks, concurrent with the continuation of CIC stress. Both chronic and acute treatment with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, citalopram, but not the norepinephrine reuptake blocker, desipramine, reversed the cognitive deficit induced by CIC stress. Thus, this stress-induced cognitive deficit may be a useful model for cognitive deficits related to prefrontal cortical hypoactivity in depression, and for investigating neurobiological mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of chronic antidepressant drug treatment. PMID:20149267

  17. Lacosamide diminishes dryness-induced hyperexcitability of corneal cold sensitive nerve terminals.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Illés; Dienes, Lóránt; Perényi, Kristóf; Quirce, Susana; Luna, Carolina; Mizerska, Kamila; Acosta, M Carmen; Belmonte, Carlos; Gallar, Juana

    2016-09-15

    Lacosamide is an anti-epileptic drug that is also used for the treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy acting through voltage-gated sodium channels. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of acute application of lacosamide on the electrical activity of corneal cold nerve terminals in lacrimo-deficient guinea pigs. Four weeks after unilateral surgical removal of the main lachrimal gland in guinea pigs, corneas were excised and superfused in vitro at 34°C for extracellular electrophysiological recording of nerve terminal impulse activity of cold thermosensitive nerve terminals. The characteristics of the spontaneous and the stimulus-evoked (cooling ramps from 34°C to 15°C) activity before and in presence of lacosamide 100µM and lidocaine 100µM were compared. Cold nerve terminals (n=34) recorded from dry eye corneas showed significantly enhanced spontaneous activity (8.0±1.1 vs. 5.2±0.7imp/s; P<0.05) and cold response (21.2±1.7 vs. 16.8±1.3imp/s; P<0.05) as well as reduced cold threshold (1.5±0.1 vs. 2.8±0.2 Δ°C; P<0.05) to cooling ramps compared to terminals (n=58) from control animals. Both lacosamide and lidocaine decreased spontaneous activity and peak response to cooling ramps significantly (P<0.05). Temperature threshold was increased by the addition of lidocaine (P<0.05) but not lacosamide (P>0.05) to the irrigation fluid. In summary, the application of lacosamide results in a significant decrease of the augmented spontaneous activity and responsiveness to cold of corneal sensory nerves from tear-deficient animals. Based on these promising results we speculate that lacosamide might be used to reduce the hyperexcitability of corneal cold receptors caused by prolonged ocular surface dryness due to hyposecretory or evaporative dry eye disease. PMID:27263827

  18. Evolutionary conservation of cold-induced antisense RNAs of FLOWERING LOCUS C in Arabidopsis thaliana perennial relatives.

    PubMed

    Castaings, Loren; Bergonzi, Sara; Albani, Maria C; Kemi, Ulla; Savolainen, Outi; Coupland, George

    2014-07-17

    Antisense RNA (asRNA) COOLAIR is expressed at A. thaliana FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC) in response to winter temperatures. Its contribution to cold-induced silencing of FLC was proposed but its functional and evolutionary significance remain unclear. Here we identify a highly conserved block containing the COOLAIR first exon and core promoter at the 3' end of several FLC orthologues. Furthermore, asRNAs related to COOLAIR are expressed at FLC loci in the perennials A. alpina and A. lyrata, although some splicing variants differ from A. thaliana. Study of the A. alpina orthologue, PERPETUAL FLOWERING 1 (PEP1), demonstrates that AaCOOLAIR is induced each winter of the perennial life cycle. Introduction of PEP1 into A. thaliana reveals that AaCOOLAIR cis-elements confer cold-inducibility in this heterologous species while the difference between PEP1 and FLC mRNA patterns depends on both cis-elements and species-specific trans-acting factors. Thus, expression of COOLAIR is highly conserved, supporting its importance in FLC regulation.

  19. Hypersensitivity reactions to synthetic haemodialysis membranes.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Villanueva, Rafael J; González, Elena; Quirce, Santiago; Díaz, Raquel; Alvarez, Laura; Menéndez, David; Rodríguez-Gayo, Lucía; Bajo, M Auxiliadora; Selgas, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Undergoing a haemodialysis (HD) session poses a certain risk of hypersensitivity adverse reactions as large quantities of blood are in contact with various synthetic materials. Hypersensitivity reactions to ethylene oxide and non-biocompatible membranes, such as cuprophane, have been described in HD. Cases of hypersensitivity with biocompatible membranes, such as polysulfone, and even polysulfone-polyvinylpyrrolidone, have also been reported. In this article we describe six cases of mostly early-stage hypersensitivity reactions to HD occurring in our department, characterised by malaise, desaturation, bronchospasm and arterial hypotension, with good response to the session’s temporary suspension and with reappearance in subsequent sessions that used a synthetic dialyser. No hypersensitivity reactions reappeared in successive observations when the sessions were carried out using a cellulose membrane.

  20. Effects of Cold Rolling and Strain-Induced Martensite Formation in a SAF 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breda, Marco; Brunelli, Katya; Grazzi, Francesco; Scherillo, Antonella; Calliari, Irene

    2015-02-01

    Duplex stainless steels (DSSs) are biphasic steels having a ferritic-austenitic microstructure that allows them to combine good mechanical and corrosion-resistance properties. However, these steels are sensitive to microstructural modifications, such as ferrite decomposition at high temperatures and the possibility of strain-induced martensite (SIM) formation from cold-worked austenite, which can significantly alter their interesting features. In the present work, the effects of cold rolling on the developed microstructural features in a cold-rolled SAF 2205 DSS and the onset of martensitic transformation are discussed. The material was deformed at room temperature from 3 to 85 pct thickness reduction, and several characterization techniques (scanning and transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, hardness measurements, and time-of-flight-neutron diffraction) were employed in order to fully describe the microstructural behavior of the steel. Despite the low stacking fault energy of DSS austenite, which contributed to SIM formation, the steel was found to be more stable than other stainless steel grades, such as AISI 304L. Rolling textures were similar to those pertaining to single-phase materials, but the presence of the biphasic (Duplex) microstructure imposed deformation constraints that affected the developed microstructural features, owing to phases interactions. Moreover, even if an intensification of the strain field in austenite was revealed, retarded SIM transformation kinetics and lower martensite amounts with respect to AISI 304L were observed.

  1. The potato amylase inhibitor gene SbAI regulates cold-induced sweetening in potato tubers by modulating amylase activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huiling; Liu, Jun; Hou, Juan; Yao, Ying; Lin, Yuan; Ou, Yongbin; Song, Botao; Xie, Conghua

    2014-09-01

    Potato cold-induced sweetening (CIS) is critical for the postharvest quality of potato tubers. Starch degradation is considered to be one of the key pathways in the CIS process. However, the functions of the genes that encode enzymes related to starch degradation in CIS and the activity regulation of these enzymes have received less attention. A potato amylase inhibitor gene known as SbAI was cloned from the wild potato species Solanum berthaultii. This genetic transformation confirmed that in contrast to the SbAI suppression in CIS-resistant potatoes, overexpressing SbAI in CIS-sensitive potatoes resulted in less amylase activity and a lower rate of starch degradation accompanied by a lower reducing sugar (RS) content in cold-stored tubers. This finding suggested that the SbAI gene may play crucial roles in potato CIS by modulating the amylase activity. Further investigations indicated that pairwise protein-protein interactions occurred between SbAI and α-amylase StAmy23, β-amylases StBAM1 and StBAM9. SbAI could inhibit the activities of both α-amylase and β-amylase in potato tubers primarily by repressing StAmy23 and StBAM1, respectively. These findings provide the first evidence that SbAI is a key regulator of the amylases that confer starch degradation and RS accumulation in cold-stored potato tubers.

  2. Evaluation of Dentifrice Containing Nano-hydroxyapatite for Dentinal Hypersensitivity: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gopinath, Nithin Manchery; John, Joseph; Nagappan, N; Prabhu, S; Kumar, E Senthil

    2015-01-01

    Background: This randomized, double-blind, parallel arm study was carried out to evaluate and compare the effectiveness between nano-hydroxyapatite (HAP) and a benchmark dentifrice in reducing dentin hypersensitivity. Materials and Methods: About 36 patients were selected, randomly divided into two groups and was evaluated clinically using three different stimuli, i.e., tactile, air blast, and cold water test. The patient’s responses to various stimuli were recorded using a visual analog scale at baseline and after 4 weeks. Results: Statistical analysis was done using unpaired and paired t-tests. It was seen that patients treated in both groups showed significant reductions scores across all sensitivity measures at the end of 4 weeks. Conclusion: The HAP containing toothpaste was effective in reducing dentin hypersensitivity with pre-existing benchmark toothpaste tested and hence can be advocated in the management of hypersensitivity. PMID:26464553

  3. Pain hypersensitivity and spinal nociceptive hypersensitivity in chronic pain: prevalence and associated factors.

    PubMed

    Curatolo, Michele; Müller, Monika; Ashraf, Aroosiah; Neziri, Alban Y; Streitberger, Konrad; Andersen, Ole K; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2015-11-01

    Hypersensitivity of pain pathways is considered a relevant determinant of symptoms in chronic pain patients, but data on its prevalence are very limited. To our knowledge, no data on the prevalence of spinal nociceptive hypersensitivity are available. We studied the prevalence of pain hypersensitivity and spinal nociceptive hypersensitivity in 961 consecutive patients with various chronic pain conditions. Pain threshold and nociceptive withdrawal reflex threshold to electrical stimulation were used to assess pain hypersensitivity and spinal nociceptive hypersensitivity, respectively. Using 10th percentile cutoff of previously determined reference values, the prevalence of pain hypersensitivity and spinal nociceptive hypersensitivity (95% confidence interval) was 71.2 (68.3-74.0) and 80.0 (77.0-82.6), respectively. As a secondary aim, we analyzed demographic, psychosocial, and clinical characteristics as factors potentially associated with pain hypersensitivity and spinal nociceptive hypersensitivity using logistic regression models. Both hypersensitivity parameters were unaffected by most factors analyzed. Depression, catastrophizing, pain-related sleep interference, and average pain intensity were significantly associated with hypersensitivity. However, none of them was significant for both unadjusted and adjusted analyses. Furthermore, the odds ratios were very low, indicating modest quantitative impact. To our knowledge, this is the largest prevalence study on central hypersensitivity and the first one on the prevalence of spinal nociceptive hypersensitivity in chronic pain patients. The results revealed an impressively high prevalence, supporting a high clinical relevance of this phenomenon. Electrical pain thresholds and nociceptive withdrawal reflex explore aspects of pain processing that are mostly independent of sociodemographic, psychological, and clinical pain-related characteristics.

  4. Cold-induced activities of cytochromes P450 1A1 and 1A2 in rat liver: putative role of endogenous compounds in induction mechanism.

    PubMed

    Perepechaeva, M L; Grishanova, A Yu

    2013-03-01

    Adaptation to cold includes adaptive changes at the organism and molecular levels. One of the interesting facts is induction of cytochromes P450 subfamily 1A (CYP1A) in the liver of rats, inducible enzymes participating in biotransformation of procarcinogenic xenobiotics, under the effect of moderate cold exposure. Cold activation of CYP1A can be mediated by adaptive changes and the resultant redistribution or intensification of the synthesis of mediator compounds. This hypothesis is verified in the present study. The role of bilirubin, tocopherol, and corticosterone as mediators of cold induction of CYP1A in the rat liver was evaluated. The results indicate that these compounds can be involved in cold induction of CYP1A, but none of them is the only mediator in this process.

  5. Studies of the quenching phenomenon in delayed contact hypersensitivity reactions.

    PubMed

    Basketter, D A; Allenby, C F

    1991-09-01

    Studies in guinea pig and man have shown that eugenol can quench non-specifically contact urticarial responses, whereas limonene seems largely ineffective. In a comprehensive series of studies, there was little evidence of quenching of delayed contact hypersensitivity reactions to cinnamic aldehyde or citral, including in 'pre-quenched' material supplied by a perfume/flavour company, and in a similar mixture prepared in this laboratory, in the guinea pig model. In addition, there was no evidence of the quenching by eugenol of allergic reactions to cinnamic aldehyde in a panel of human subjects with a proven history of cinnamic-aldehyde-induced allergic contact dermatitis. Overall, the results lend little credibility to earlier literature reports of quenching phenomena in delayed contact hypersensitivity responses.

  6. Cold Sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... delivered directly to your desktop! more... What Are Cold Sores? Article Chapters What Are Cold Sores? Cold ... January 2012 Previous Next Related Articles: Canker and Cold Sores Aloe Vera May Help Relieve Mouth Sores ...

  7. Potential effects of pleasant and cold stimuli on nausea and vomiting induced by disgusting tastes.

    PubMed

    Gonella, Silvia; Dimonte, Valerio

    2016-05-01

    Several pharmacological agents have disgusting tastes that are perceived strongly in the back of the mouth and may trigger nausea and vomiting (NV), resulting in poor adherence to medication schedules and negative impacts on clinical outcomes. Pleasant stimuli and cold temperature lessen the disgusting stimuli, lowering NV through different mechanisms. A pleasant stimulus can mask an unpleasant one, presumably through lateral inhibitory connections in the local neuronal circuit. Similarly, temperature deeply influences taste perception because the response to bitter as well as to salty and sour has been found to assume a reversed U-shaped form, being reduced by cooling to 18°C and enhanced by warming to 30-37°C. This Review describes the mechanisms by which pleasant and cold stimuli may mask emetogenic disgusting stimuli and identifies the potential clinical applications of cooling for inhibiting objectionable drug-related gustatory reactions. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26896189

  8. Bunching-induced asymmetry in degenerate four-wave mixing with cold atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Gattobigio, G. L.; Michaud, F.; Kaiser, R.; Javaloyes, J.

    2006-10-15

    We have investigated degenerate four-wave mixing in a sample of cold rubidium atoms. A red-blue asymmetry is observed for high intensities of the pumping beams. This asymmetry is explained by the spatial bunching of the atoms in the nodes or antinodes of the strong standing wave of the pump beams. This explanation is confirmed by different experimental configurations and by numerical simulations.

  9. Severe hypersensitivity reaction to minocycline.

    PubMed

    de Paz, S; Pérez, A; Gómez, M; Trampal, A; Domínguez Lázaro, A

    1999-01-01

    Minocycline is a tetracycline derivative mainly used in the treatment of acne vulgaris in young persons. Adverse events have been reported with minocycline, although it can be considered a safe drug. We report a case of severe hypersensitivity reaction to minocycline in a young patient. Laboratory examinations, chest X-ray, skin test and skin biopsy were performed. Oral challenge test with minocycline was not carried out as it can be hazardous. A case of severe reaction to minocycline is described in this article. The clinical and laboratory findings may be helpful in diagnosing similar reactions for which the immunological mechanisms are unknown. Moreover, this type of reaction must be recognized early due to the potential fatal outcome.

  10. Hypersensitivity reactions to vaccine components.

    PubMed

    Heidary, Noushin; Cohen, David E

    2005-09-01

    Vaccines are responsible for the control of many infectious diseases that were once common in the United States, including polio, measles, diphtheria, pertussis (whooping cough), rubella (German measles), mumps, tetanus, and Haemophilus influenzae type b. National efforts to generate collaboration between federal, state, and local governments and public and private health care providers have resulted in record high levels of vaccination coverage in the United States. The high rate of US vaccinations is paralleled by growing concerns about the safety of their delivery. The variety of substances used in vaccines sometimes causes the development of cutaneous reactions in susceptible adults and children. This article will review adverse cutaneous events consistent with hypersensitivity reactions to the following ingredients in vaccines: aluminum, thimerosal, 2-phenoxyethanol, formaldehyde, and neomycin.

  11. Testing for Drug Hypersensitivity Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Rive, Craig M; Bourke, Jack; Phillips, Elizabeth J

    2013-01-01

    Adverse drug reactions are a common cause of patient morbidity and mortality. Type B drug reactions comprise only 20% of all drug reactions but they tend to be primarily immunologically mediated and less dependent on the drug’s pharmacological action and dose. Common Type B reactions seen in clinical practice are those of the immediate, IgE, Gell-Coombs Type I reactions, and the delayed, T-cell mediated, Type IV reactions. Management of these types of reactions, once they have occurred, requires careful consideration and recognition of the utility of routine diagnostic tests followed by ancillary specialised diagnostic testing. For Type I, IgE mediated reactions this includes prick/intradermal skin testing and oral provocation. For Type IV, T-cell mediated reactions this includes a variety of in vivo (patch testing) and ex vivo tests, many of which are currently mainly used in highly specialised research laboratories. The recent association of many serious delayed (Type IV) hypersensitivity reactions to specific drugs with HLA class I and II alleles has created the opportunity for HLA screening to exclude high risk populations from exposure to the implicated drug and hence prevent clinical reactions. For example, the 100% negative predictive value of HLA-B*5701 for true immunologically mediated abacavir hypersensitivity and the development of feasible, inexpensive DNA-based molecular tests has led to incorporation of HLA-B*5701 screening in routine HIV clinical practice. The mechanism by which drugs specifically interact with HLA has been recently characterised and promises to lead to strategies for pre-clinical screening to inform drug development and design. PMID:23592889

  12. Cloning and characterization of cold, salt and drought inducible C-repeat binding factor gene from a highly cold adapted ecotype of Lepidium latifolium L.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, M; Jaiswal, A; Jaiswal, J P; Qureshi, M I; Tufchi, M; Singh, N K

    2013-04-01

    The dehydration-responsive element-binding (DREB) protein/C-Repeat Binding Factors (CBFs) belongs to APETALA2 (AP2) family transcription factors that binds to DRE/CRT cis-element in cold-responsive (COR) genes and induce COR genes. CBFs have been isolated and characterized from evolutionarily diverse plant species. CBF pathway is conserved by CBF regulon and the size or the number and kind of target genes vary among freezing sensitive and tolerant plants. Hence, cloning of CBFs from highly freezing tolerant plants such as Lepidium latifolium L. will be useful in understanding the freezing tolerance of this species. In this study, LlCBF, a CBF1 family gene from L. Latifolium L., was cloned using RT-PCR and RACE-PCR. The full length mRNA of LlCBF is 948 bp with an open reading frame of 642 bp, encoding a protein of 213 amino acids with a molecular weight of 23.92 kDa and a theoretical isoelectric point of 4.80. Amino acid sequence analysis showed that LlCBF has an AP2 DNA binding domain, a potential CBF type nuclear localization signal (NLS) and C-terminal acidic domain. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis of LlCBF revealed that this gene is up-regulated by high salt, dehydration and low temperature stresses. The investigation is therefore successful in cloning of a gene having strong homology with CBF transcription factors and responsive to low temperature, high salt and dehydration conditions.

  13. Cold fluorescent light as major inducer of lipid oxidation in soybean oil stored at household conditions for eight weeks.

    PubMed

    Pignitter, Marc; Stolze, Klaus; Gartner, Stephanie; Dumhart, Bettina; Stoll, Christiane; Steiger, Georg; Kraemer, Klaus; Somoza, Veronika

    2014-03-12

    Light, temperature, and oxygen availability has been shown to promote rancidity in vegetable oils. However, the contribution of each of these environmental factors to lipid oxidation in oil stored under household conditions is not known. We aimed to identify the major inducer of oxidative deterioration of soybean oil stored at constant (67.0 mL) or increasing (67.0-283 mL) headspace volume, 22 or 32 °C, with or without illumination by cold fluorescent light for 56 days by means of fatty acid composition, peroxide value, formation of conjugated dienes, lipid radicals, hexanal, and the decrease in the contents of tocopherols. Soybean oil stored in the dark for 56 days showed an increase of the peroxide value by 124 ± 0.62% (p = 0.006), whereas exposure of the oil to light in a cycle of 12 h light alternating with 12 h darkness for 56 days led to a rise of the peroxide value by 1473 ± 1.79% (p ≤ 0.001). Little effects on the oxidative status of the oil were observed after elevating the temperature from 22 to 32 °C and the headspace volume from 67.0 to 283 mL during 56 days of storage. We conclude that storing soybean oil in transparent bottles under household conditions might pose an increased risk for accelerated lipid oxidation induced by exposure to cold fluorescent light. PMID:24548005

  14. Cold Atmospheric Plasma Treatment Induces Anti-Proliferative Effects in Prostate Cancer Cells by Redox and Apoptotic Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Martin; Gümbel, Denis; Hanschmann, Eva-Maria; Mandelkow, Robert; Gelbrich, Nadine; Zimmermann, Uwe; Walther, Reinhard; Ekkernkamp, Axel; Sckell, Axel; Kramer, Axel; Burchardt, Martin; Lillig, Christopher H; Stope, Matthias B

    2015-01-01

    One of the promising possibilities of the clinical application of cold plasma, so-called cold atmospheric plasma (CAP), is its application on malignant cells and cancer tissue using its anti-neoplastic effects, primarily through the delivery of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS, RNS). In this study, we investigated the impact of CAP on cellular proliferation and consecutive molecular response mechanisms in established prostate cancer (PC) cell lines. PC cells showed a significantly reduced cell growth following CAP treatment as a result of both an immediate increase of intracellular peroxide levels and through the induction of apoptosis indicated by annexin V assay, TUNEL assay, and the evaluation of changes in nuclear morphology. Notably, co-administration of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) completely neutralized CAP effects by NAC uptake and rapid conversion to glutathione (GSH). Vitamin C could not counteract the CAP induced effects on cell growth. In summary, relatively short treatments with CAP of 10 seconds were sufficient to induce a significant inhibition of cancer proliferation, as observed for the first time in urogenital cancer. Therefore, it is important to understand the mode of CAP related cell death and clarify and optimize CAP as cancer therapy. Increased levels of peroxides can alter redox-regulated signaling pathways and can lead to growth arrest and apoptosis. We assume that the general intracellular redox homeostasis, especially the levels of cellular GSH and peroxidases such as peroxiredoxins affect the outcome of the CAP treatment. PMID:26132846

  15. Cold Atmospheric Plasma Treatment Induces Anti-Proliferative Effects in Prostate Cancer Cells by Redox and Apoptotic Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Martin; Gümbel, Denis; Hanschmann, Eva-Maria; Mandelkow, Robert; Gelbrich, Nadine; Zimmermann, Uwe; Walther, Reinhard; Ekkernkamp, Axel; Sckell, Axel; Kramer, Axel; Burchardt, Martin; Lillig, Christopher H; Stope, Matthias B

    2015-01-01

    One of the promising possibilities of the clinical application of cold plasma, so-called cold atmospheric plasma (CAP), is its application on malignant cells and cancer tissue using its anti-neoplastic effects, primarily through the delivery of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS, RNS). In this study, we investigated the impact of CAP on cellular proliferation and consecutive molecular response mechanisms in established prostate cancer (PC) cell lines. PC cells showed a significantly reduced cell growth following CAP treatment as a result of both an immediate increase of intracellular peroxide levels and through the induction of apoptosis indicated by annexin V assay, TUNEL assay, and the evaluation of changes in nuclear morphology. Notably, co-administration of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) completely neutralized CAP effects by NAC uptake and rapid conversion to glutathione (GSH). Vitamin C could not counteract the CAP induced effects on cell growth. In summary, relatively short treatments with CAP of 10 seconds were sufficient to induce a significant inhibition of cancer proliferation, as observed for the first time in urogenital cancer. Therefore, it is important to understand the mode of CAP related cell death and clarify and optimize CAP as cancer therapy. Increased levels of peroxides can alter redox-regulated signaling pathways and can lead to growth arrest and apoptosis. We assume that the general intracellular redox homeostasis, especially the levels of cellular GSH and peroxidases such as peroxiredoxins affect the outcome of the CAP treatment.

  16. Magnetic-field-induced Crystallographic Texture Enhancement in Cold-deformed FePt/Fe3Pt Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, B. Z.; Li, D. S.; Han, K.; Schneider-Muntau, H. J.; Liu, J. P.; Garmestani, H.; Dempsey, N. M.

    2005-03-01

    We introduce a unique approach to obtaining anisotropic FePt/Fe3Pt nanocomposites with crystallographic texture of the hard phase: roll-bonding and magnetic annealing. Magnetic-field- induced crystallographic texture and magnetic property enhancement in cold-deformed Fe62Pt38 nanostructured magnets have been studied. Compared with the samples annealed without a magnetic field, the annealing in the presence of both out-of- plane and in-plane 19 T fields enhances texture of the hard FePt phase by about 50 %. Consequently, annealing samples in a 19 T field improves iHc, Br, and (BH)max. Especially, (BH)max was increased by 21 - 25 %. Additionally, magnetically anisotropic behavior and better squareness of the demagnetization curves were observed in the magnetically annealed samples. It is suggested that cold-rolling-induced textures in both Fe and Pt phases and magnetic-field-assisted phase transformation should be responsible for the notice improvement of the crystallographic texture and magnetic properties in the magnetically annealed samples.

  17. Developing scaffolds for tissue engineering using the Ca2+-induced cold gelation by an experimental design approach.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Artur J A M; Gomes, Andreia C; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur M

    2012-11-01

    The Ca(2+)-induced cold gelation technique was found suitable to prepare highly porous biodegradable scaffolds based on bovine serum albumin (BSA) and alpha-casein from bovine milk for tissue engineering. A 2(3) full factorial design was used to study the influence and impact of each factor on the several responses of the scaffolds. In vitro degradation (ID), swelling ratio (SR), porosity (PO), and pore size (PS) as well cytotoxicity (CT) were evaluated and shown to be dependent on the pH of sample preparation and on the amount of BSA and casein present, making these scaffolds tunable structures. Under optimized working conditions (4.19% of BSA, 0.69% of Casein, pH 7.07), the ID attained was 37.97%, the SR observed was 11.87, the PO was 82.11%, the PS measured was 180.63 μm at surface, and 175.91 μm at fracture, whereas maximum cell viability was 84% in comparison to controls. Moreover, the scaffold supported cell adhesion and proliferation. These results, consistent with the prediction by the experimental design approach, support the use of this methodology to develop tunable scaffolds for tissue engineering using the Ca(2+)-induced cold gelation.

  18. Effect of a fluoride solution on dentinal hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Thrash, W J; Jones, D L; Dodds, W J

    1992-12-01

    This two-phase experiment assessed the effects over time of a solution containing 1.09% sodium fluoride, .40% stannous fluoride, and .14% hydrogen fluoride (.717% fluoride solution, DentinBloc) on pain associated with dentinal hypersensitivity. During phase I, 30 subjects demonstrating dentinal hypersensitivity to a blast of cool air were divided into three double blind experimental groups. After baseline data were collected for all subjects, one group was instructed to apply the .717% fluoride solution twice a day. A second group was instructed to apply a gel containing .04% stannous fluoride (Gel-Kam) twice a day. A third group was instructed to apply distilled water. Each subject was assessed at 2, 4, 8, and 16 weeks utilizing the "method of limits" with a standardized, repeatable cold thermal stimulus. The results of a two factor repeated ANOVA indicated that those subjects who applied the .717% fluoride solution reported significantly less sensitivity at the 2-week period than the other groups (P < .05). In addition, those subjects whose solution contained the 0.4% stannous fluoride reported significantly less sensitivity at the 4- to 8-week periods (P < .05). Phase II of the study assessed the .717% fluoride solution on a more precise time course. These included: immediately, 15 minute, 1 day, 1 week and 2 weeks. A one factor repeated ANOVA revealed that this effect presented 15-minute post application (P < .05) and continued throughout the testing periods. It was concluded that the fully active 0.717% fluoride solution was an effective agent in the control of dentinal hypersensitivity after two 1-minute applications.

  19. Winter cold of eastern continental boundaries induced by warm ocean waters.

    PubMed

    Kaspi, Yohai; Schneider, Tapio

    2011-03-31

    In winter, northeastern North America and northeastern Asia are both colder than other regions at similar latitudes. This has been attributed to the effects of stationary weather systems set by elevated terrain (orography), and to a lack of maritime influences from the prevailing westerly winds. However, the differences in extent and orography between the two continents suggest that further mechanisms are involved. Here we show that this anomalous winter cold can result in part from westward radiation of large-scale atmospheric waves--nearly stationary Rossby waves--generated by heating of the atmosphere over warm ocean waters. We demonstrate this mechanism using simulations with an idealized general circulation model, with which we show that the extent of the cold region is controlled by properties of Rossby waves, such as their group velocity and its dependence on the planetary rotation rate. Our results show that warm ocean waters contribute to the contrast in mid-latitude winter temperatures between eastern and western continental boundaries not only by warming western boundaries, but also by cooling eastern boundaries.

  20. Cold pressor stress induces opposite effects on cardioceptive accuracy dependent on assessment paradigm.

    PubMed

    Schulz, André; Lass-Hennemann, Johanna; Sütterlin, Stefan; Schächinger, Hartmut; Vögele, Claus

    2013-04-01

    Interoception depends on visceral afferent neurotraffic and central control processes. Physiological arousal and organ activation provide the biochemical and mechanical basis for visceral afferent neurotraffic. Perception of visceral symptoms occurs when attention is directed toward body sensations. Clinical studies suggest that stress contributes to the generation of visceral symptoms. However, during stress exposure attention is normally shifted away from bodily signals. Therefore, the net effects of stress on interoception remain unclear. We, therefore, investigated the impact of the cold pressor test or a control intervention (each n=21) on three established laboratory paradigms to assess cardioceptive accuracy (CA): for the Schandry-paradigm, participants were asked to count heartbeats, while during the Whitehead-tasks subjects were asked to rate whether a cardiac sensation appeared simultaneously with an auditory or visual stimulus. CA was increased by stress when attention was focused on visceral sensations (Schandry), while it decreased when attention was additionally directed toward external stimuli (visual Whitehead). Explanations for these results are offered in terms of internal versus external deployment of attention, as well as specific effects of the cold pressor on the cardiovascular system.

  1. Cold shock induces apoptosis of dorsal root ganglion neurons plated on infrared windows.

    PubMed

    Aboualizadeh, Ebrahim; Mattson, Eric C; O'Hara, Crystal L; Smith, Amanda K; Stucky, Cheryl L; Hirschmugl, Carol J

    2015-06-21

    The chemical status of live sensory neurons is accessible with infrared microspectroscopy of appropriately prepared cells. In this paper, individual dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons have been prepared with two different protocols, and plated on glass cover slips, BaF2 and CaF2 substrates. The first protocol exposes the intact DRGs to 4 °C for between 20-30 minutes before dissociating individual neurons and plating 2 hours later. The second protocol maintains the neurons at 23 °C for the entire duration of the sample preparation. The visual appearance of the neurons is similar. The viability was assessed by means of trypan blue exclusion method to determine the viability of the neurons. The neurons prepared under the first protocol (cold exposure) and plated on BaF2 reveal a distinct chemical signature and chemical distribution that is different from the other sample preparations described in the paper. Importantly, results for other sample preparation methods, using various substrates and temperature protocols, when compared across the overlapping spectral bandwidth, present normal chemical distribution within the neurons. The unusual chemically specific spatial variation is dominated by a lack of protein and carbohydrates in the center of the neurons and signatures of unra