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Sample records for induced cracking hic

  1. Role of Ca treatment in hydrogen induced cracking of hot rolled API pipeline steel in acid sour media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Joonoh; Kim, Seong-Ju; Lee, Changhee

    2013-01-01

    The effect of Ca treatment on hydrogen-induced cracking (HIC) resistance of hot rolled pipeline steel was evaluated. HIC testing was carried out in acidic condition according to NACE standard; results clearly prove that HIC resistance is very sensitive to Ca/S ratio. When Ca/S ratio is below the stoichiometric ratio, HIC occurred at mid-thickness of the steel regardless of the S content. This is closely related to the formation of spherical CaS inclusion with Ca treatment instead of MnS inclusion, which acts on crack initiation sites.

  2. Hydrogen-induced cracking of drip shield

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, S C

    1999-08-01

    A simple and conservative model has been developed to evaluate the effects of hydrogen-induced cracking on the drip shield. The basic premise of the model is that failure will occur once the hydrogen content exceeds a certain limit or critical value, HC. This model is very conservative because it assumes that, once the environmental and material conditions can support that particular corrosion process, failure will be effectively instantaneous. In the description of the HIC model presented in Section 6.1, extensive evidence has been provided to support a qualitative assessment of Ti-7 as an excellent choice of material for the drip shield with regard to degradation caused by hydrogen-induced cracking. LTCTF test data observed at LLNL, although unqualified, provides additional indication beyond a qualitative level that hydrogen concentration appears to be low in titanium materials. Quantitative evaluation based on the HIC model described in Section 6.1 indicates that the hydrogen concentration does not exceed the critical value. It is concluded that drip shield material (Ti-7) is able to sustain the effects of hydrogen-induced cracking.

  3. Hydrogen-Induced Cracking Assessment in Pipeline Steels Through Permeation and Crystallographic Texture Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohtadi-Bonab, M. A.; Karimdadashi, R.; Eskandari, M.; Szpunar, J. A.

    2016-05-01

    Electrochemical hydrogen charging and permeation techniques were used to characterize hydrogen distribution, trapping, and diffusion in X60 and X60 sour service (X60SS) pipeline steels. The results obtained contribute to better understanding of hydrogen-induced cracking (HIC). SEM observations illustrated that all HIC cracks were formed at the center of cross section in the X60 steel after 3-h hydrogen charging and length of cracks increased with charging time. No HIC cracks were recorded at the cross section of X60SS steel after the same charging for different durations. Hydrogen permeation tests showed that the density of reversible hydrogen traps was lower at the center of cross section in the X60SS steel compared to the X60 one, and this is considered as one of the main reasons for high resistance of X60SS steel to HIC. EBSD orientation imaging results proved that the accumulation of <111>||ND-oriented grains at the center of the cross section in the X60SS steel was high. This is also considered as another reason for higher resistance of this steel to HIC. Finally, the center segregation zone with higher hardness value in the X60 steel was more pronounced than in the X60SS steel which made the X60 steel susceptible to HIC cracking.

  4. Improvement of resistance to hydrogen induced cracking in electric resistance welded pipes fabricated with slit coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Hyun Uk; Lee, Jong Bong; Choi, Ho Jin

    2009-02-01

    The optimization of electric resistance welding (ERW) conditions was studied to improve the resistance to hydrogen induced cracking (HIC) at the bondline in small diameter API X60 ERW pipes fabricated with slit coils. The results show that HIC is initiated preferentially at the elongated Si, Mn and Al-rich oxide inclusions, normally known as a penetrator on the bondline. However, no evidence was found of any centerline segregation effect. The HIC ratio increases with the fraction of penetrators at the bondline, regardless of the degrees of center segregation. Furthermore, for a satisfactory level of HIC resistance, the fraction of penetrators must be less than 0.03 % and most of the penetrators should be circular-shaped. The design of experimental (DOE) method was used to determine the optimum ERW condition for minimization of the penetrator ratio. Finally, guideline is suggested for the optimum ERW condition for achieving excellent HIC resistance.

  5. Effect of different microstructural parameters on hydrogen induced cracking in an API X70 pipeline steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohtadi-Bonab, M. A.; Eskandari, M.; Karimdadashi, R.; Szpunar, J. A.

    2017-07-01

    In this study, the surface and cross section of an as-received API X70 pipeline steel was studied by SEM and EDS techniques in order to categorize the shape and morphology of inclusions. Then, an electrochemical hydrogen charging using a mixed solution of 0.2 M sulfuric acid and 3 g/l ammonium thiocyanate has been utilized to create hydrogen cracks in X70 steel. After hydrogen charging experiments, the cross section of this steel has been accurately checked by SEM in order to find out hydrogen cracks. The region of hydrogen cracks was investigated by SEM and EBSD techniques to predict the role of different microstructural parameters involving hydrogen induced cracking (HIC) phenomenon. The results showed that inclusions were randomly distributed in the cross section of tested specimens. Moreover, different types of inclusions in as-received X70 steel were found. However, only inclusions which were hard, brittle and incoherent with the metal matrix, such as manganese sulfide and carbonitride precipitates, were recognized to be harmful to HIC phenomenon. Moreover, HIC cracks propagate dominantly in transgraular manner through differently oriented grains with no clear preferential trend. Moreover, a different type of HIC crack with about 15-20 degrees of deviation from the rolling direction was found and studied by EBSD technique and role of micro-texture parameters on HIC was discussed.

  6. Hic-5 promotes invadopodia formation and invasion during TGF-β–induced epithelial–mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    Pignatelli, Jeanine; Tumbarello, David A.; Schmidt, Ronald P.

    2012-01-01

    Transforming growth factor β (TGF-β)–stimulated epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) is an important developmental process that has also been implicated in increased cell invasion and metastatic potential of cancer cells. Expression of the focal adhesion protein Hic-5 has been shown to be up-regulated in epithelial cells in response to TGF-β. Herein, we demonstrate that TGF-β–induced Hic-5 up-regulation or ectopic expression of Hic-5 in normal MCF10A cells promoted increased extracellular matrix degradation and invasion through the formation of invadopodia. Hic-5 was tyrosine phosphorylated in an Src-dependent manner after TGF-β stimulation, and inhibition of Src activity or overexpression of a Y38/60F nonphosphorylatable mutant of Hic-5 inhibited matrix degradation and invasion. RhoC, but not RhoA, was also required for TGF-β– and Hic-5–induced matrix degradation. Hic-5 also induced matrix degradation, cell migration, and invasion in the absence of TGF-β via Rac1 regulation of p38 MAPK. These data identify Hic-5 as a critical mediator of TGF-β–stimulated invadopodia formation, cell migration, and invasion. PMID:22529104

  7. Effect of Grain Orientation and Boundary Distributions on Hydrogen-Induced Cracking in Low-Carbon-Content Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoumi, Mohammad; Coelho, Hana Livia Frota; Tavares, Sérgio Souto Maior; Silva, Cleiton Carvalho; de Abreu, Hamilton Ferreira Gomes

    2017-03-01

    Hydrogen-induced cracking (HIC) causes considerable economic losses in a wide range of steels exposed to corrosive environments. The effect of crystallographic texture and grain boundary distributions tailored by rolling at 850 °C in three different steels with a body-centered cube structure was investigated on HIC resistance. The x-ray and electron backscattered diffraction techniques were used to characterize texture evolutions during the rolling process. The findings revealed a significant improvement against HIC based on texture engineering. In addition, increasing the number of {111} and {110} grains, associated with minimizing the number of {001} grains in warm-rolled samples, reduced HIC susceptibility. Moreover, the results showed that boundaries associated with low {hkl} indexing and denser packing planes had more resistance against crack propagation.

  8. Effect of Grain Orientation and Boundary Distributions on Hydrogen-Induced Cracking in Low-Carbon-Content Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoumi, Mohammad; Coelho, Hana Livia Frota; Tavares, Sérgio Souto Maior; Silva, Cleiton Carvalho; de Abreu, Hamilton Ferreira Gomes

    2017-08-01

    Hydrogen-induced cracking (HIC) causes considerable economic losses in a wide range of steels exposed to corrosive environments. The effect of crystallographic texture and grain boundary distributions tailored by rolling at 850 °C in three different steels with a body-centered cube structure was investigated on HIC resistance. The x-ray and electron backscattered diffraction techniques were used to characterize texture evolutions during the rolling process. The findings revealed a significant improvement against HIC based on texture engineering. In addition, increasing the number of {111} and {110} grains, associated with minimizing the number of {001} grains in warm-rolled samples, reduced HIC susceptibility. Moreover, the results showed that boundaries associated with low {hkl} indexing and denser packing planes had more resistance against crack propagation.

  9. Extracellular matrix-induced Hic-5 expression in glomerular mesangial cells leads to a prosclerotic phenotype independent of TGF-β.

    PubMed

    Hornigold, Nick; Mooney, Andrew

    2015-12-01

    Chronic fibroproliferative diseases account for approximately 45% of all deaths in the developed world. In the kidney, glomerulosclerosis is the underlying pathology in approximately half of patients with renal failure receiving dialysis. Mesangial cell expression of the LIM protein hydrogen peroxide-induced clone-5 (Hic-5) is important in its pathogenesis. Hic-5 expression increases following mesangial cell attachment to collagen I, associated with increased collagen I expression and increased susceptibility to apoptosis both in vitro and in experimental glomerulosclerosis. TGF-β has an established role in many fibrotic diseases, including glomerulosclerosis, where it increases collagen I deposition in vivo and promotes mesangial cell apoptosis in vitro. In other cell types, TGF-β induces Hic-5 expression. We investigated whether Hic-5-induced changes in mesangial cell phenotype were TGF-β-dependent. Adding exogenous TGF-β to mesangial cell cultures failed to increase Hic-5 expression; blocking TGF-β signaling did not reduce Hic-5 expression. However, inducing Hic-5 expression in mesangial cells by adhesion to collagen I led to TGF-β expression, which was abolished by small interfering RNA (siRNA) Hic-5 knockdown. Mesangial cells expressing Hic-5 showed altered latent TGF-β-binding protein expression and Smad signaling, with enhanced susceptibility to TGF-β-induced apoptosis. Mesangial cell attachment to collagen I led to increased Hic-5 expression within 2-4 h and increased procollagen I transcription within 12 h, whereas adding TGF-β to siRNA Hic-5 knockdown mesangial cells increased procollagen I transcription to a lesser degree after 48 h. Mesangial cell Hic-5 expression was associated with increased α-smooth muscle actin and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 expression. Taken together, these data indicate that there is a prosclerotic feedback loop in mesangial cells dependent on matrix-derived signals in which Hic-5 is a pivotal signaling protein

  10. Evaluation of Heat-affected Zone Hydrogen-induced Cracking in High-strength Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Xin

    Shipbuilding is heavily reliant on welding as a primary fabrication technique. Any high performance naval steel must also possess good weldability. It is therefore of great practical importance to conduct weldability testing of naval steels. Among various weldability issues of high-strength steels, hydrogen-induced cracking (HIC) in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) following welding is one of the biggest concerns. As a result, in the present work, research was conducted to study the HAZ HIC susceptibility of several naval steels. Since the coarse-grained heat-affected zone (CGHAZ) is generally known to be the most susceptible to HIC in the HAZ region, the continuous cooling transformation (CCT) behavior of the CGHAZ of naval steels HSLA-65, HSLA-100, and HY-100 was investigated. The CGHAZ microstructure over a range of cooling rates was characterized, and corresponding CCT diagrams were constructed. It was found that depending on the cooling rate, martensite, bainite, ferrite and pearlite can form in the CGHAZ of HSLA-65. For HSLA-100 and HY-100, only martensite and bainite formed over the range of cooling rates that were simulated. The constructed CCT diagrams can be used as a reference to select welding parameters to avoid the formation of high-hardness martensite in the CGHAZ, in order to ensure resistance to hydrogen-induced cracking. Implant testing was conducted on the naval steels to evaluate their susceptibility to HAZ HIC. Stress vs. time to failure curves were plotted, and the lower critical stress (LCS), normalized critical stress ratio (NCSR) and embrittlement index (EI) for each steel were determined, which were used to quantitatively compare HIC susceptibility. The CGHAZ microstructure of the naval steels was characterized, and the HIC fracture behavior was studied. Intergranular (IG), quasi-cleavage (QC) and microvoid coalescence (MVC) fracture modes were found to occur in sequence during the crack initiation and propagation process. This was

  11. Influence of Ti addition on the hydrogen induced cracking of API 5L X70 hot-rolled pipeline steel in acid sour media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Joonoh; Park, Chulbong; Kim, Seong-Ju

    2012-08-01

    In this study, Hydrogen Induced Cracking (HIC) testing of high strength API 5L grade X70 linepipe hot rolled steel containing Ti was performed to investigate the effects of (Nb, Ti, V)(C, N) particles on HIC susceptibility. By controlling chemical composition and hot rolling parameters, experimental steel with Bainitic ferrite and Bainite microstructures was fabricated. HIC testing was carried out within an acidic condition (pH=2.7±0.1) according to NACE standards with test results showing cracking propagated along coarse (Nb, Ti, V)(C, N) particles at mid-thickness. This is mainly due to centerline segregation and hydrogen blistering between matrix and coarse (Nb, Ti, V)(C, N) particles without external stress.

  12. Cracking-Induced Mistuning in Bladed Disks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    caused by blade vibrations 1. Adding to this concern is the increased use in modern engines of integrated bladed disks, or blisks , which have dynamic...cracking induced mistuning for a weakly coupled research blisk using 3D finite methods. It was found that the natural frequencies of the cracked blade...decreased significantly only when the crack was sufficiently large. However, the cracked blade dramatically changed the dynamic response of the blisk

  13. AN EVALUATION OF HYDROGEN INDUCED CRACKING SUSCEPTIBILITY OF TITANIUM ALLOYS IN US HIGH-LEVEL NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    G. De; K. Mon; G. Gordon; D. Shoesmith; F. Hua

    2006-02-21

    This paper evaluates hydrogen-induced cracking (HIC) susceptibility of titanium alloys in environments anticipated in the Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository with particular emphasis on the. effect of the oxide passive film on the hydrogen absorption process of titanium alloys being evaluated. The titanium alloys considered in this review include Ti 2, 5 , 7, 9, 11, 12, 16, 17, 18, 24 and 29. In general, the concentration of hydrogen in a titanium alloy can increase due to absorption of atomic hydrogen produced from passive general corrosion of that alloy or galvanic coupling of it to a less noble metal. It is concluded that under the exposure conditions anticipated in the Yucca Mountain repository, the HIC of titanium drip shield will not occur because there will not be sufficient hydrogen in the metal even after 10,000 years of emplacement. Due to the conservatisms adopted in the current evaluation, this assessment is considered very conservative.

  14. Hi-C Launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    The High resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) was launched on a NASA Black Brant IX two-stage rocket from White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico July 11, 2012. The experiment reached a maximum velocit...

  15. Effective Process Design for the Production of HIC-Resistant Linepipe Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieto, J.; Elías, T.; López, G.; Campos, G.; López, F.; Garcia, R.; De, Amar K.

    2013-09-01

    Production of slabs for sour service applications requires stringent control in slab internal quality and secondary processing so as to guarantee resistance against hydrogen-induced cracking (HIC). ArcelorMittal Steelmaking facility at Lazaro Cardenas, Mexico had recently implemented key steelmaking and casting processing technologies for production of sound, centerline free slabs for catering to the growing API Linepipe and off-shore market for sour service applications. State-of-the-art steelmaking with use of residual-free Direct-reduced Iron and continuous casting facilities with dynamic soft reduction were introduced for the production of slabs with ultra clean centerline. Introduction of controlled cooling of slabs for atomic hydrogen control well below 2 ppm has enabled production of slabs suitable for excellent HIC-resistant plate processing. Substantial tonnages of slabs were produced for production of API X52-X65 grade plates and pipes for sour service. Stringent quality control at each stage of steelmaking, casting, and slab inspection ensured slabs with excellent internal quality suitable for HIC resistance to be guaranteed in final product (Plates & Pipes). Details of production steps which resulted in successful HIC-resistant slab production have been described in this article.

  16. Differential roles of HIC-5 isoforms in the regulation of cell death and myotube formation during myogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Zhengliang; Deblis, Ryan; Glenn, Honor; Schwartz, Lawrence M.

    2007-11-15

    Hic-5 is a LIM-Only member of the paxillin superfamily of focal adhesion proteins. It has been shown to regulate a range of biological processes including: senescence, tumorigenesis, steroid hormone action, integrin signaling, differentiation, and apoptosis. To better understand the roles of Hic-5 during development, we initiated a detailed analysis of Hic-5 expression and function in C{sub 2}C{sub 12} myoblasts, a well-established model for myogenesis. We have found that: (1) myoblasts express at least 6 distinct Hic-5 isoforms; (2) the two predominant isoforms, Hic-5{alpha} and Hic-5{beta}, are differentially expressed during myogenesis; (3) any experimentally induced change in Hic-5 expression results in a substantial increase in apoptosis during differentiation; (4) ectopic expression of Hic-5{alpha} is permissive to differentiation while expression of either Hic-5{beta} or antisense Hic-5 blocks myoblast fusion but not chemodifferentiation; (5) Hic-5 localizes to focal adhesions in C{sub 2}C{sub 12} myoblasts and perturbation of Hic-5 leads to defects in cell spreading; (6) alterations in Hic-5 expression interfere with the normal dynamics of laminin expression; and (7) ectopic laminin, but not fibronectin, can rescue the Hic-5-induced blockade of myoblast survival and differentiation. Our data demonstrate differential roles for individual Hic-5 isoforms during myogenesis and support the hypothesis that Hic-5 mediates these effects via integrin signaling.

  17. Hi-C First Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cirtain, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Hi-C obtained the highest spatial and temporal resolution observatoins ever taken in the solar corona. Hi-C reveals dynamics and structure at the limit of its temporal and spatial resolution. Hi-C observed ubiquitous fine-scale flows consistent with the local sound speed.

  18. Fatigue crack sizing in rail steel using crack closure-induced acoustic emission waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dan; Kuang, Kevin Sze Chiang; Ghee Koh, Chan

    2017-06-01

    The acoustic emission (AE) technique is a promising approach for detecting and locating fatigue cracks in metallic structures such as rail tracks. However, it is still a challenge to quantify the crack size accurately using this technique. AE waves can be generated by either crack propagation (CP) or crack closure (CC) processes and classification of these two types of AE waves is necessary to obtain more reliable crack sizing results. As the pre-processing step, an index based on wavelet power (WP) of AE signal is initially established in this paper in order to distinguish between the CC-induced AE waves and their CP-induced counterparts. Here, information embedded within the AE signal was used to perform the AE wave classification, which is preferred to the use of real-time load information, typically adopted in other studies. With the proposed approach, it renders the AE technique more amenable to practical implementation. Following the AE wave classification, a novel method to quantify the fatigue crack length was developed by taking advantage of the CC-induced AE waves, the count rate of which was observed to be positively correlated with the crack length. The crack length was subsequently determined using an empirical model derived from the AE data acquired during the fatigue tests of the rail steel specimens. The performance of the proposed method was validated by experimental data and compared with that of the traditional crack sizing method, which is based on CP-induced AE waves. As a significant advantage over other AE crack sizing methods, the proposed novel method is able to estimate the crack length without prior knowledge of the initial crack length, integration of AE data or real-time load amplitude. It is thus applicable to the health monitoring of both new and existing structures.

  19. Effect of Ca/S ratio on HIC resistance of seamless line pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, T.E.; Quintanilla, H.; Rey, E.

    1998-12-31

    The effect of inclusion type and morphology, sulfur content and Ca/S ratio on Hydrogen Induced Cracking Resistance of seamless line pipes Grades X60 and X65 was studied. The sulfur content ranges between 0.0010% and 0.0040% and the Ca/S ratio varies from 0.6 to 2.7. HIC resistance was evaluated following NACE TM0264-96, using the solution with pH 2.7. Test duration was 192 hours. Fourteen of the steels tested presented slight cracking after the test. The obtained values of CLR, CTR and CSR were notably lower than the usual acceptance limits for these parameters. The maximum values of the crack ratios were obtained in materials with Ca/S ratio lower than 1 and S content higher than 0.003 %. In the range of sulfur tested, it was found that, for seamless line pipes, a Ca/S ratio between 0.6 and 1 is adequate to guarantee HIC resistance.

  20. Prediction of thermal cycling induced matrix cracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmanus, Hugh L.

    1992-01-01

    Thermal fatigue has been observed to cause matrix cracking in laminated composite materials. A method is presented to predict transverse matrix cracks in composite laminates subjected to cyclic thermal load. Shear lag stress approximations and a simple energy-based fracture criteria are used to predict crack densities as a function of temperature. Prediction of crack densities as a function of thermal cycling is accomplished by assuming that fatigue degrades the material's inherent resistance to cracking. The method is implemented as a computer program. A simple experiment provides data on progressive cracking of a laminate with decreasing temperature. Existing data on thermal fatigue is also used. Correlations of the analytical predictions to the data are very good. A parametric study using the analytical method is presented which provides insight into material behavior under cyclical thermal loads.

  1. Hydrogen-Induced Cracking of the Drip Shield

    SciTech Connect

    F. Hua

    2004-09-07

    Hydrogen-induced cracking is characterized by the decreased ductility and fracture toughness of a material due to the absorption of atomic hydrogen in the metal crystal lattice. Corrosion is the source of hydrogen generation. For the current design of the engineered barrier without backfill, hydrogen-induced cracking may be a concern because the titanium drip shield can be galvanically coupled to rock bolts (or wire mesh), which may fall onto the drip shield, thereby creating conditions for hydrogen production by electrochemical reaction. The purpose of this report is to analyze whether the drip shield will fail by hydrogen-induced cracking under repository conditions within 10,000 years after emplacement. Hydrogen-induced cracking is a scenario of premature failure of the drip shield. This report develops a realistic model to assess the form of hydrogen-induced cracking degradation of the drip shield under the hydrogen-induced cracking. The scope of this work covers the evaluation of hydrogen absorbed due to general corrosion and galvanic coupling to less noble metals (e.g., Stainless Steel Type 316 and carbon steels) under the repository conditions during the 10,000-year regulatory period after emplacement and whether the absorbed hydrogen content will exceed the critical hydrogen concentration value, above which the hydrogen-induced cracking is assumed to occur. This report also provides the basis for excluding the features, events, and processes (FEPs) related to hydrogen-induced cracking of the drip shield with particular emphasis on FEP 2.1.03.04.OB, hydride cracking of drip shields (DTN: M00407SEPFEPLA.000 [DIRS 170760]). This report is prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan (TWP) for: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169944]).

  2. Prediction of thermal cycling induced cracking in polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmanus, Hugh L.

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes the work done in the period February 1993 through July 1993 on the 'Prediction of Thermal Cycling Induced Cracking In Polymer Matrix Composites' program. An oral presentation of this work was given to Langley personnel in September of 1993. This document was prepared for archival purposes. Progress studies have been performed on the effects of spatial variations in material strength. Qualitative agreement was found with observed patterns of crack distribution. These results were presented to NASA Langley personnel in November 1992. The analytical methodology developed by Prof. McManus in the summer of 1992 (under an ASEE fellowship) has been generalized. A method for predicting matrix cracking due to decreasing temperatures and/or thermal cycling in all plies of an arbitrary laminate has been implemented as a computer code. The code also predicts changes in properties due to the cracking. Experimental progressive cracking studies on a variety of laminates were carried out at Langley Research Center. Results were correlated to predictions using the new methods. Results were initially mixed. This motivated an exploration of the configuration of cracks within laminates. A crack configuration study was carried out by cutting and/or sanding specimens in order to examine the distribution of cracks within the specimens. These investigations were supplemented by dye-penetrant enhanced X-ray photographs. The behavior of thin plies was found to be different from the behavior of thicker plies (or ply groups) on which existing theories are based. Significant edge effects were also noted, which caused the traditional metric of microcracking (count of cracks on a polished edge) to be very inaccurate in some cases. With edge and configuration taken into account, rough agreement with predictions was achieved. All results to date were reviewed with NASA Langley personnel in September 1993.

  3. Technique to eliminate helium induced weld cracking in stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Chin-An Wang; Chin, B.A.; Grossbeck, M.L.

    1992-12-31

    Experiments have shown that Type 316 stainless steel is susceptible to heat-affected-zone (HAZ) cracking upon cooling when welded using the gas tungsten arc (GTA) process under lateral constraint. The cracking has been hypothesized to be caused by stress-assisted helium bubble growth and rupture at grain boundaries. This study utilized an experimental welding setup which enabled different compressive stresses to be applied to the plates during welding. Autogenous GTA welds were produced in Type 316 stainless steel doped with 256 appm helium. The application of a compressive stress, 55 Mpa, during welding suppressed the previously observed catastrophic cracking. Detailed examinations conducted after welding showed a dramatic change in helium bubble morphology. Grain boundary bubble growth along directions parallel to the weld was suppressed. Results suggest that stress-modified welding techniques may be used to suppress or eliminate helium-induced cracking during joining of irradiated materials.

  4. Control of serpentinisation rate by reaction-induced cracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malvoisin, Benjamin; Brantut, Nicolas; Kaczmarek, Mary-Alix

    2017-10-01

    Serpentinisation of mantle rocks requires the generation and maintenance of transport pathways for water. The solid volume increase during serpentinisation can lead to stress build-up and trigger cracking, which ease fluid penetration into the rock. The quantitative effect of this reaction-induced cracking mechanism on reactive surface generation is poorly constrained, thus hampering our ability to predict serpentinisation rate in geological environments. Here we use a combined approach with numerical modelling and observations in natural samples to provide estimates of serpentinisation rate at mid-ocean ridges. We develop a micromechanical model to quantify the propagation of serpentinisation-induced cracks in olivine. The maximum crystallisation pressure deduced from thermodynamic calculations reaches several hundreds of megapascals but does not necessary lead to crack propagation if the olivine grain is subjected to high compressive stresses. The micromechanical model is then coupled to a simple geometrical model to predict reactive surface area formation during grain splitting, and thus bulk reaction rate. Our model reproduces quantitatively experimental kinetic data and the typical mesh texture formed during serpentinisation. We also compare the model results with olivine grain size distribution data obtained on natural serpentinised peridotites from the Marum ophiolite and the Papuan ultramafic belt (Papua New Guinea). The natural serpentinised peridotites show an increase of the number of olivine grains for a decrease of the mean grain size by one order of magnitude as reaction progresses from 5 to 40%. These results are in agreement with our model predictions, suggesting that reaction-induced cracking controls the serpentinisation rate. We use our model to estimate that, at mid-ocean ridges, serpentinisation occurs up to 12 km depth and reaction-induced cracking reduces the characteristic time of serpentinisation by one order of magnitude, down to values

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    MedlinePlus

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    MedlinePlus

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  7. Helium-induced weld cracking in irradiated 304 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Birchenall, A.K. )

    1989-01-01

    This report consists of slide notes for presentation to The Metallurgical Society of the American Institute of Mining, Metallurgical and Petroleum Engineers (AIME). The meeting in question will be held October 3, 1989 in Indianapolis. This presentation will be the second of three consecutive talks contributed by SRL personnel dealing with helium-induced weld cracking.

  8. Mesoscale modelling of crack-induced diffusivity in concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilenius, Filip; Larsson, Fredrik; Lundgren, Karin; Runesson, Kenneth

    2015-02-01

    Cracks have large impact on the diffusivity of concrete since they provide low-resistance pathways for moisture and chloride ions to migrate through the material. In this work, crack-induced diffusivity in concrete is modelled on the heterogeneous mesoscale and computationally homogenized to obtain macroscale diffusivity properties. Computations are carried out using the finite element method on three-dimensional statistical volume elements (SVEs) comprising the mesoscale constituents in terms of cement paste, aggregates and the interfacial transition zone (ITZ). The SVEs are subjected to uni-axial tension loading and cracks are simulated by use of an isotropic damage model. In a damaged finite element, the crack plane is assumed to be perpendicular to the largest principle strain, and diffusivity properties are assigned to the element only in the in-plane direction of the crack by anisotropic constitutive modelling. The numerical results show that the macroscale diffusivity of concrete can be correlated to the applied mechanical straining of the SVE and that the macroscale diffusivity increases mainly in the transversal direction relative to the axis of imposed mechanical straining.

  9. Prediction of thermal cycling induced cracking in polmer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmanus, Hugh L.

    1994-01-01

    The work done in the period August 1993 through February 1994 on the 'Prediction of Thermal Cycling Induced Cracking In Polymer Matrix Composites' program is summarized. Most of the work performed in this period, as well as the previous one, is described in detail in the attached Master's thesis, 'Analysis of Thermally Induced Damage in Composite Space Structures,' by Cecelia Hyun Seon Park. Work on a small thermal cycling and aging chamber was concluded in this period. The chamber was extensively tested and calibrated. Temperatures can be controlled very precisely, and are very uniform in the test chamber. Based on results obtained in the previous period of this program, further experimental progressive cracking studies were carried out. The laminates tested were selected to clarify the differences between the behaviors of thick and thin ply layers, and to explore other variables such as stacking sequence and scaling effects. Most specimens tested were made available from existing stock at Langley Research Center. One laminate type had to be constructed from available prepreg material at Langley Research Center. Specimens from this laminate were cut and prepared at MIT. Thermal conditioning was carried out at Langley Research Center, and at the newly constructed MIT facility. Specimens were examined by edge inspection and by crack configuration studies, in which specimens were sanded down in order to examine the distribution of cracks within the specimens. A method for predicting matrix cracking due to decreasing temperatures and/or thermal cycling in all plies of an arbitrary laminate was implemented as a computer code. The code also predicts changes in properties due to the cracking. Extensive correlations between test results and code predictions were carried out. The computer code was documented and is ready for distribution.

  10. An Evaluation of the Plasticity-Induced Crack-Closure Concept and Measurement Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, James C., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    An assessment of the plasticity-induced crack-closure concept is made, in light of some of the questions that have been raised on the validity of the concept, and the assumptions that have been made concerning crack-dp damage below the crack-opening stress. The impact of using other crack-tip parameters, such as the cyclic crack-tip displacement, to model crack-growth rate behavior was studied. Crack-growth simulations, using a crack-closure model, showed a close relation between traditional Delta K eff, and the cyclic crack-tip displacement (Delta eff) for an aluminum alloy and a steel. Evaluations of the cyclic hysteresis energy demonstrated that the cyclic plastic damage below the crack-opening stress was negligible in the Paris crack-growth regime. Some of the standard and newly proposed remote measurement methods to determine the 'effective' crack-tip driving parameter were evaluated on middle-crack tension specimens. A potential source of the Kmax effect on crack-growth rates was studied on an aluminum alloy. Results showed that the ratio of Kmax to Kc had a strong effect on crack-growth rates at high stress ratios and at low stress ratios for very high stress levels. The crack-closure concept and the traditional crack-growth rate equations were able to correlate and predict crack-growth rates under these extreme conditions.

  11. Hic-5 Regulates Actin Cytoskeletal Reorganization and Expression of Fibrogenic Markers and Myocilin in Trabecular Meshwork Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pattabiraman, Padmanabhan Paranji; Rao, Ponugoti Vasantha

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To explore the role of inducible focal adhesion (FA) protein Hic-5 in actin cytoskeletal reorganization, FA formation, fibrogenic activity, and expression of myocilin in trabecular meshwork (TM) cells. Methods Using primary cultures of human TM (HTM) cells, the effects of various external factors on Hic-5 protein levels, as well as the effects of recombinant Hic-5 and Hic-5 small interfering RNA (siRNA) on actin cytoskeleton, FAs, myocilin, α-smooth muscle actin (αSMA), and collagen-1 were determined by immunofluorescence and immunoblot analyses. Results Hic-5 distributes discretely to the FAs in HTM cells and throughout the TM and Schlemm's canal of the human aqueous humor (AH) outflow pathway. Transforming growth factor-β2 (TGF-β2), endothelin-1, lysophosphatidic acid, hydrogen peroxide, and RhoA significantly increased Hic-5 protein levels in HTM cells in association with reorganization of actin cytoskeleton and FAs. While recombinant Hic-5 induced actin stress fibers, FAs, αv integrin redistribution to the FAs, increased levels of αSMA, collagen-1, and myocilin, Hic-5 siRNA suppressed most of these responses in HTM cells. Hic-5 siRNA also suppressed TGF-β2-induced fibrogenic activity and dexamethasone-induced myocilin expression in HTM cells. Conclusions Taken together, these results reveal that Hic-5, whose levels were increased by various external factors implicated in elevated intraocular pressure, induces actin cytoskeletal reorganization, FAs, expression of fibrogenic markers, and myocilin in HTM cells. These characteristics of Hic-5 in TM cells indicate its importance in regulation of AH outflow through the TM in both normal and glaucomatous eyes. PMID:26313302

  12. Corrosion Product Film-Induced Stress Facilitates Stress Corrosion Cracking

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenwen; Zhang, Zhiliang; Ren, Xuechong; Guan, Yongjun; Su, Yanjing

    2015-01-01

    Finite element analyses were conducted to clarify the role of corrosion product films (CPFs) in stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Flat and U-shaped edge-notched specimens were investigated in terms of the CPF-induced stress in the metallic substrate and the stress in the CPF. For a U-shaped edge-notched specimen, the stress field in front of the notch tip is affected by the Young’s modulus of the CPF and the CPF thickness and notch geometry. The CPF-induced tensile stress in the metallic substrate is superimposed on the applied load to increase the crack tip strain and facilitate localized plasticity deformation. In addition, the stress in the CPF surface contributes to the rupture of the CPFs. The results provide physical insights into the role of CPFs in SCC. PMID:26066367

  13. Microstructural characterization of hydrogen induced cracking in TRIP-assisted steel by EBSD

    SciTech Connect

    Laureys, A.; Depover, T.; Petrov, R.; Verbeken, K.

    2016-02-15

    The present work evaluates hydrogen induced cracking by performing an elaborate EBSD (Electron BackScatter Diffraction) study in a steel with transformation induced plasticity (TRIP-assisted steel). This type of steel exhibits a multiphase microstructure which undergoes a deformation induced phase transformation. Additionally, each microstructural constituent displays a different behavior in the presence of hydrogen. The aim of this study is to obtain a better understanding on the mechanisms governing hydrogen induced crack initiation and propagation in the hydrogen saturated multiphase structure. Tensile tests on notched samples combined with in-situ electrochemical hydrogen charging were conducted. The tests were interrupted at stresses just after reaching the tensile strength, i.e. before macroscopic failure of the material. This allowed to study hydrogen induced crack initiation and propagation by SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy) and EBSD. A correlation was found between the presence of martensite, which is known to be very susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement, and the initiation of hydrogen induced cracks. Initiation seems to occur mostly by martensite decohesion. High strain regions surrounding the hydrogen induced crack tips indicate that further crack propagation may have occurred by the HELP (hydrogen-enhanced localized plasticity) mechanism. Small hydrogen induced cracks located nearby the notch are typically S-shaped and crack propagation was dominantly transgranularly. The second stage of crack propagation consists of stepwise cracking by coalescence of small hydrogen induced cracks. - Highlights: • Hydrogen induced cracking in TRIP-assisted steel is evaluated by EBSD. • Tensile tests were conducted on notched hydrogen saturated samples. • Crack initiation occurs by a H-Enhanced Interface DEcohesion (HEIDE) mechanism. • Crack propagation involves growth and coalescence of small cracks. • Propagation is governed by the characteristics of

  14. diffHic: a Bioconductor package to detect differential genomic interactions in Hi-C data.

    PubMed

    Lun, Aaron T L; Smyth, Gordon K

    2015-08-19

    Chromatin conformation capture with high-throughput sequencing (Hi-C) is a technique that measures the in vivo intensity of interactions between all pairs of loci in the genome. Most conventional analyses of Hi-C data focus on the detection of statistically significant interactions. However, an alternative strategy involves identifying significant changes in the interaction intensity (i.e., differential interactions) between two or more biological conditions. This is more statistically rigorous and may provide more biologically relevant results. Here, we present the diffHic software package for the detection of differential interactions from Hi-C data. diffHic provides methods for read pair alignment and processing, counting into bin pairs, filtering out low-abundance events and normalization of trended or CNV-driven biases. It uses the statistical framework of the edgeR package to model biological variability and to test for significant differences between conditions. Several options for the visualization of results are also included. The use of diffHic is demonstrated with real Hi-C data sets. Performance against existing methods is also evaluated with simulated data. On real data, diffHic is able to successfully detect interactions with significant differences in intensity between biological conditions. It also compares favourably to existing software tools on simulated data sets. These results suggest that diffHic is a viable approach for differential analyses of Hi-C data.

  15. Epigenetic silencing of HIC1 promotes epithelial-mesenchymal transition and drives progression in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Pei; Liu, Xiang; Dong, Zi-Ming; Ling, Zhi-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Downregulation of the novel tumor suppressor gene HIC1 (hypermethylated in cancer 1) occurs frequently in various tumors where it causes tumor progression and metastasis. In this study, we investigated a role of HIC1 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) and the underlying mechanisms. Downregulation of HIC1 occurred in approximately 70% of primary ESCCs at both mRNA and protein level where it was associated significantly with vascular invasion, advanced clinical stage, lymph node metastasis, and poor disease free survival (DFS). The promoter methylation analyses suggested that loss of HIC1 expression was mediated by epigenetic mechanisms. Functional studies established that ectopic re-expression of HIC1 in ESCC cells inhibited cell proliferation, clonogenicity, cell motility, tumor formation and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Our results decipher the mechanism through which HIC1 deficiency induce ESCC cells to undergo EMT and promote tumor progression and metastasis through activation of EphA2 signaling pathway. Together, loss of the regulation of EphA2 pathway through HIC1 epigenetic silencing could be an important mechanism in the ESCC progression. We identify a novel pathway that linking HIC1 downregulation to EphA2-inducing EMT in ESCC cells and may shed light on the development of novel anti-tumor therapeutics. PMID:26510908

  16. Stress-induced crack path in Aji granite under tensile stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudo, Yozo; Sano, Osam; Murashige, Naokuni; Mizuta, Yoshiaki; Nakagawa, Koji

    1992-12-01

    The double-torsion test using Aji granite was carried out to investigate the interaction between stress-induced crack path and mineral grains. Crack velocities were controlled at range 10-7 m/s to 10-1 m/s. After the stressed specimens were dyed, we checked the crack path by thin section analysis, using an optical microscope. The stress-induced crack path was divided into two types, transgranular and intergranular cracks, and each path was subdivided with respect to mineral grains. In spite of the extensive range of crack velocities, the ratios between the transgranular and intergranular crack lengths did not change. The crack paths were all jagged, and often showed detour around the grain boundary when faced with obstacles like hard grains or preexisting cracks. That is to say, quartz grain played an important role as an obstacle. Feldspar grain could change the crack path because of its cleavage plane. Biolite grain had a serious effect on the path even if its constitution ratio is very small. Fractal dimensions of the crack paths were calculated by three methods, as indicators of surface roughness. The fractal dimensions were shown in a slight trend with the change of crack velocity. This trend can be explained from the point of limited cracking rate in stress corrosion.

  17. Application of induced circumferential current for cracks inspection on pipe string

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xin'an; Li, Wei; Yin, Xiaokang; Chen, Guoming; Ge, Jiuhao

    2016-02-01

    Pipe strings (such as drill pipe, tube, pipeline, riser) are critical facilities in oil & gas industry, which are highly susceptible to cracks caused by stress corrosion and fatigue damage. The most common defects are longitudinal and transverse surface cracks on pipe strings in oil & gas industry. Conventional nondestructive testing (NDT) methods are inadequate for these surface cracks on pipe strings. In this paper, a full 360° circumferential current induced by a coaxial excitation coil is present for inspection of longitudinal and transverse surface cracks on pipe strings. The finite element method (FEM) is employed to obtain characteristics signals by analyzing the distorted electromagnetic field above the cracks. The induced circumferential current test system is set up and crack inspection experiments are carried out. The results show that both longitudinal and transverse surface cracks can be detected effectively at one pass scanning on pipe string using the induced circumferential current.

  18. Coronal Heating Observed with Hi-C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winebarger, Amy R.

    2013-01-01

    The recent launch of the High-Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) as a sounding rocket has offered a new, different view of the Sun. With approx 0.3" resolution and 5 second cadence, Hi-C reveals dynamic, small-scale structure within a complicated active region, including coronal braiding, reconnection regions, Alfven waves, and flows along active region fans. By combining the Hi-C data with other available data, we have compiled a rich data set that can be used to address many outstanding questions in solar physics. Though the Hi-C rocket flight was short (only 5 minutes), the added insight of the small-scale structure gained from the Hi-C data allows us to look at this active region and other active regions with new understanding. In this talk, I will review the first results from the Hi-C sounding rocket and discuss the impact of these results on the coronal heating problem.

  19. Cross Section Morphology of the Scratch Induced Cracks in Soda-Lime-Silica Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Jun; Guo, Danwei; Yoshida, Satoshi

    2017-03-01

    Scratch-induced cracking is a serious problem for the use of glass products. At the scratch process, both median (vertical to the glass surface) and lateral (horizontal to the glass surface) cracks are formed. In this study, morphology of the scratch-induced cracks in a commercial soda-lime-silica glass was investigated by the scanning electron microscopy for the specimen broken across the scratch groove. Scratch test was carried out using a Knoop indenter in water and in dehydrated heptane. When scratch speed was 70 x 10-6 ms-1, length of both vertical and horizontal cracks was proportional to the normal load at scratching, and environmental dependence was not observed. When scratch speed was increased with the constant normal load of 200g, length of both cracks was decreased. In the case of horizontal crack, no environmental effect was observed. On the other hand, length of the vertical crack scratched in water was much longer than that in heptane. At very high scratch speed as high as 1000 x 10-6 ms-1, no vertical crack was formed in the heptane. These differences between horizontal and vertical cracks should be due to the differences of crack initiation position and the influence of subcritical crack growth to these cracks.

  20. Influence of Subsurface Cracks on Laser Induced Surface Damage

    SciTech Connect

    Feit, M D; Rubenchik, A M

    2003-11-07

    Cracks can affect laser damage susceptibility in three ways. These are field intensification due to interference, enhanced absorption due to trapped material in the cracks, and increased mechanical weakness. Enhanced absorption is the most important effect.

  1. Propagation and interactions of cracks in Si induced by H supply into He-filled cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reboh, S.; Barbot, J. F.; Beaufort, M. F.; Fitchner, P. F. P.

    2011-02-01

    The phenomena of interaction and propagation of cracks under the contribution of hydrogen were studied in (001) silicon substrate in which an array of scattered over-pressurized He-plates was previously introduced at a given depth. Their propagation under subcritical regime was activated through diffusional supply of H atoms introduced by implantation/annealing. Interactions between the tips of non coplanar cracks take place in a nanometric scale; they can be of plastic-type leading to the formation of extended defects or of elastic-type resulting in deviations of crack-tip propagation. While the planar interactions facilitate the propagation of cracks, those of non coplanar-type stop them. The observations were carried out by transmission electron microscopy and the results were discussed and modelled by using concepts of elasticity and fracture mechanics.

  2. Development of an Improved Crack Propagation Model for Corrosion-Induced Cover Cracking in RC Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilyati, S.; Nizam, Z. M.; Zurisman, M. A. A.; Azhar, A. T. S.

    2017-06-01

    During the last two decades, reinforced concrete (RC) has been extensively used in most of the world as one of the common construction material due to its advantages and durability. However, RC structures exposed to marine environments are subjected to chloride attack. Chlorides from seawater penetrate into RC structures are not only causing severe corrosion problems but also affect the durability and serviceability of such structures. This paper investigates the influence of transverse reinforcement and spacing of reinforcing bars on concrete cover cracking of two-way RC slab specimens using accelerated corrosion tests. The experimental program involved the testing of four RC slab specimens and was generally designed to observe the crack width and the time of crack to propagate. An improved model for predicting the timing of crack propagation based on the experimental data was then developed.

  3. Nature and occurrence of cooling-induced cracking in volcanic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browning, John; Meredith, Philip G.; Gudmundssom, Agust

    2015-04-01

    Several hypotheses have been proposed regarding the role of thermo-mechanical contraction in producing cracks and joints in volcanic rocks. Nevertheless, most studies of thermally-induced cracking to date have focused on the generation of cracks formed during heating. In this latter case, the cracks are formed under an overall compressional regime. By contrast, cooling cracks are formed under an overall tensile regime. Therefore, both the nature and mechanism of crack formation during cooling are hypothesised to be different from those for crack formation during heating. Furthermore, it remains unclear whether cooling simply reactivates pre-existing cracks, induces the growth of new cracks, or both. We present results from experiments based on a new method for testing ideas on cooling-induced cracking. Cored samples of volcanic rock (basaltic to dacitic in composition) were heated at varying rates to different maximum temperatures inside a tube furnace. In the highest temperature experiments samples of both rocks were raised to the liquidus temperature appropriate to their composition, forcing melt interaction and crack annealing. We present in-situ seismic velocity and acoustic emission data, which were recorded throughout each heating and cooling cycle. It is found consistently that the rate of acoustic emission is much higher during cooling than during heating. In addition, acoustic emission events produced on cooling tend to be significantly higher in energy than those produced during heating. We therefore suggest that cracks formed during cooling are significantly larger than those formed during heating. Thin-section and crack morphology analysis of our cyclically heated samples provide further evidence of contrasting fracture morphologies. These new data are important for assessing the contribution of cooling-induced damage within volcanic structures and layers such as sills and lava flows. Our observations may also help to constrain evolving ideas regarding

  4. Hydrogen Induced Damage in Pipeline Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angus, Garrett R.

    The hydrogen induced cracking (HIC) resistance of several grades of plate steels was investigated using electrolytic hydrogen charging. HIC generated by electrolytic charging was also compared to the industrial standard test for HIC, the NACE standard TM0284. The electrolytic charging (EC) apparatus was designed to optimize the reproducibility of the HIC results and the robustness of the components during long charging times. A characterization study on the EC apparatus was undertaken. Alterations to applied current density and charging time were conducted on a highly susceptible plate steel, 100XF, to assess HIC damage as a function of charging conditions. Intermediate current densities of 10 to 15 mA/cm2 produced the greatest extent of cracking without significant corrosion related surface damage. The hydrogen charging time did not greatly affect the extent and depth of cracking for test times between 24 to 48 hours. Thus, for subsequent experiments, the applied current density was set to 15 mA/cm2 and the charging time was set to 24 hours. Plate steel grades X52, X60, X70, and 100XF were prestrained in tension to various levels and then electrolytically charged with hydrogen or tested with the NACE standard TM0284 test (solution A) saturated with H2S(g) to induce HIC. Prestrain was introduced to assess its impact on HIC. Hydrogen damage was quantified with the crack ratios defined in the NACE Standard TM0284. The results from the EC and NACE methods were very comparable to one, with respect to the magnitude of cracking and the trends between alloy and pre-strain conditions observed. Both methods showed that HIC substantially increased for the high strength 100XF steel compared to the lower strength alloys. This is consistent with NACE recommendations for HIC resistance steels, which suggests that alloy strength should be less than 116 ksi (800 MPa) or 248 HV (22 HRC). The HIC results were largely independent of the pre-strain levels imposed within the

  5. Influence of surface cracks on laser-induced damage resistance of brittle KH₂PO₄ crystal.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jian; Chen, Mingjun; Liao, Wei; Wang, Haijun; Wang, Jinghe; Xiao, Yong; Li, Mingquan

    2014-11-17

    Single point diamond turning (SPDT) currently is the leading finishing method for achieving ultra-smooth surface on brittle KH(2)PO(4) crystal. In this work, the light intensification modulated by surface cracks introduced by SPDT cutting is numerically simulated using finite-difference time-domain algorithm. The results indicate that the light intensification caused by surface cracks is wavelength, crack geometry and position dependent. Under the irradiation of 355 nm laser, lateral cracks on front surfaces and conical cracks on both front and rear surfaces can produce light intensification as high as hundreds of times, which is sufficient to trigger avalanche ionization and finally lower the laser damage resistance of crystal components. Furthermore, we experimentally tested the laser-induced damage thresholds (LIDTs) on both crack-free and flawed crystal surfaces. The results imply that brittle fracture with a series of surface cracks is the dominant source of laser damage initiation in crystal components. Due to the negative effect of surface cracks, the LIDT on KDP crystal surface could be sharply reduced from 7.85J/cm(2) to 2.33J/cm(2) (355 nm, 6.4 ns). In addition, the experiment of laser-induced damage growth is performed and the damage growth behavior agrees well with the simulation results of light intensification caused by surface cracks with increasing crack depths.

  6. Corrosion cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Goel, V.S.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on alloy corrosion cracking. Topics considered at the conference included the effect of niobium addition on intergranular stress corrosion cracking, corrosion-fatigue cracking in fossil-fueled-boilers, fracture toughness, fracture modes, hydrogen-induced thresholds, electrochemical and hydrogen permeation studies, the effect of seawater on fatigue crack propagation of wells for offshore structures, the corrosion fatigue of carbon steels in seawater, and stress corrosion cracking and the mechanical strength of alloy 600.

  7. Hydrogen-Induced Cold Cracking in High-Frequency Induction Welded Steel Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Kumkum

    2016-04-01

    Detailed investigation was carried out on 0.4C steel tubes used for the telescopic front fork of two-wheelers to establish the root cause for the occurrence of transverse cracks at the weld heat-affected zone of the tubes. Fractographic and microstructural observations provide evidences of delayed hydrogen-induced cracking. The beneficial microstructure for avoiding the transverse cracks was found to be the bainitic-martensitic, while martensitic structure was noted to be deleterious.

  8. Stress-free chromatography: IEC and HIC.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Tsutomu; Kita, Yoshiko; Ejima, Daisuke

    2009-06-01

    Ion exchange chromatography (IEC) poses stresses on proteins in both binding and elution steps. Proteins often bind to the column with high affinity, resulting in concentration of the protein upon binding. Elution often requires high salt concentration, leading to high protein concentration with high salt concentration. Although hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) involves weak interaction, salting-out salts are used for binding. These conditions may cause protein aggregation. This short article describes an approach to reduce such aggregation in IEC and HIC. This was achieved by adding small amount of salt or arginine in the loading sample or elution solvent, resulting in elution of proteins with less aggregation or higher recovery.

  9. Hi-C and AIA View the Sun

    NASA Image and Video Library

    The movie starts with the full sun AIA images taken during the Hi-C flight and zooms into the Hi-C field of full field of view. Comparisons of the Hi-C data, show in the panel on the right, are com...

  10. Microstructural changes induced near crack tip during corrosion fatigue tests in austenitic-ferritic steel.

    PubMed

    Gołebiowski, B; Swiatnicki, W A; Gaspérini, M

    2010-03-01

    Microstructural changes occurring during fatigue tests of austenitic-ferritic duplex stainless steel (DSS) in air and in hydrogen-generating environment have been investigated. Hydrogen charging of steel samples during fatigue crack growth (FCG) tests was performed by cathodic polarization of specimens in 0.1M H(2)SO(4) aqueous solution. Microstructural investigations of specimens after FCG tests were carried out using transmission electron microscopy to reveal the density and arrangement of dislocations formed near crack tip. To determine the way of crack propagation in the microstructure, electron backscatter diffraction investigations were performed on fatigue-tested samples in both kinds of environment. To reveal hydrogen-induced phase transformations the atomic force microscopy was used. The above investigations allowed us to define the character of fatigue crack propagation and microstructural changes near the crack tip. It was found that crack propagation after fatigue tests in air is accompanied with plastic deformation; a high density of dislocations is observed at large distance from the crack. After fatigue tests performed during hydrogen charging the deformed zone containing high density of dislocations is narrow compared to that after fatigue tests in air. It means that hydrogenation leads to brittle character of fatigue crack propagation. In air, fatigue cracks propagate mostly transgranularly, whereas in hydrogen-generating environment the cracks have mixed transgranular/interfacial character.

  11. Characteristics of thermally-induced transverse cracks in graphite epoxy composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, D. S.; Bowles, D. E.; Herakovich, C. T.

    1983-01-01

    The characteristics of thermally induced transverse cracks in T300/5208 graphite-epoxy cross-ply and quasi-isotropic laminates were investigated both experimentally and analytically. The formation of transverse cracks and the subsequent crack spacing present during cool down to -250 F (116K) and thermal cycling between 250 and -250 F (116 and 394K) was investigated. The state of stress in the vicinity of a transverse crack and the influence of transverse cracking on the laminate coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) was predicted using a generalized plane strain finite element analysis and a modified shear lag analysis. A majority of the cross-ply laminates experienced transverse cracking during the initial cool down to -250 F whereas the quasi-isotropic laminates remained uncracked. The in situ transverse strength of the 90 degree layers was more than 1.9 times greater than the transverse strength of the unidirectional 90 degree material for all laminates investigated.

  12. Semiconductor laser asymmetry cutting glass with laser induced thermal-crack propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Chunyang; Zhang, Hongzhi; Wang, Yang

    2014-12-01

    Laser induced thermal-crack propagation (LITP) makes the material to produce an uneven temperature field, maximum temperature can't soften or melt the material, induces the thermal stress, then the crack separates along the cutting path. One of the problems in laser asymmetry cutting glass with LITP is the cutting deviation along scanning trajectory. This study lays great emphasis on considering the dynamic extension of crack to explain the reason of the cutting deviation in laser asymmetry cutting glass, includes asymmetric linear cutting and a quarter of a circular curve cutting. This paper indicates the experiments of semiconductor laser asymmetry cutting glass with LITP. Optical microscope photographs of the glass sheet are obtained to examine the cutting deviation. The extended finite element method (XFEM) is used to simulate the dynamic propagation of crack; the crack path does not have to be specified a priori. The cutting deviation mechanism and the crack propagation process are studied by the stress fields using finite element software ABAQUS. This work provides a theoretical basis to investigate the cutting deviation in laser asymmetry cutting glass. In semiconductor laser asymmetry cutting glass, the tensile stress is the basis of crack propagation, then the compressive stress not only makes the crack to extend stably, but also controls the direction of crack propagation.

  13. HIC1 loss promotes prostate cancer metastasis by triggering epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Hao, Mingang; Li, Yue; Wang, Jinglong; Qin, Jun; Wang, Yingying; Ding, Yufeng; Jiang, Min; Sun, Xueqing; Zu, Lidong; Chang, Kun; Lin, Guowen; Du, Jiangyuan; Korinek, Vladimir; Ye, Din-Wei; Wang, Jianhua

    2017-08-01

    Metastatic disease is the leading cause of death due to prostate cancer (PCa). Although the hypermethylated in cancer 1 (HIC1) gene has been observed to be epigenetically modified in PCa, its intrinsic role and mechanism in PCa metastasis still remain uncertain. Here, we show that hypermethylation of the HIC1 promoter markedly reduces its suppressive function in metastatic PCa tissues as compared with primary and adjacent normal prostate tissues, and is associated with poor patient survival. PCas in cancer-prone mice homozygous for a prostate-targeted Hic1 conditional knockout showed stronger metastatic behaviour than those in heterozygous mice, as a result of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Moreover, impairment of HIC1 expression in PCa cells induced their migration and metastasis through EMT, by enhancing expression of Slug and CXCR4, both of which are critical to PCa metastasis; the CXCL12-CXCR4 axis promotes EMT by activating the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 pathway. Taken together, our results suggest that evaluation of HIC1-CXCR4-Slug signalling may provide a potential predictor for PCa aggressiveness. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Hi-C in Budding Yeast.

    PubMed

    Belton, Jon-Matthew; Dekker, Job

    2015-07-01

    Hi-C enables simultaneous detection of interaction frequencies between all possible pairs of restriction fragments in the genome. The Hi-C method is based on chromosome conformation capture (3C), which uses formaldehyde cross-linking to fix chromatin regions that interact in three-dimensional space, irrespective of their genomic locations. In the Hi-C protocol described here, cross-linked chromatin is digested with HindIII and the ends are filled in with a nucleotide mix containing biotinylated dCTP. These fragments are ligated together, and the resulting chimeric molecules are purified and sheared to reduce length. Finally, biotinylated ligation junctions are pulled down with streptavidin-coated beads, linked to high-throughput sequencing adaptors, and amplified via polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The resolution of the Hi-C data set will depend on the depth of sequencing and choice of restriction enzyme. When sufficient sequence reads are obtained, information on chromatin interactions and chromosome conformation can be derived at single restriction fragment resolution for complete genomes.

  15. Modelling of liquid sodium induced crack propagation in T91 martensitic steel: Competition with ductile fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemery, Samuel; Berdin, Clotilde; Auger, Thierry; Bourhi, Mariem

    2016-12-01

    Liquid metal embrittlement (LME) of T91 steel is numerically modeled by the finite element method to analyse experimental results in an axisymmetric notched geometry. The behavior of the material is identified from tensile tests then a crack with a constant crack velocity is introduced using the node release technique in order to simulate the brittle crack induced by LME. A good agreement between the simulated and the experimental macroscopic behavior is found: this suggests that the assumption of a constant crack velocity is correct. Mechanical fields during the embrittlement process are then extracted from the results of the finite element model. An analysis of the crack initiation and propagation stages: the ductile fracture probably breaks off the LME induced brittle fracture.

  16. A new criterion for failure of materials by environment-induced cracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, D. P.

    1973-01-01

    A new criterion has been developed for predicting failure of materials by environment-induced cracking. The criterion has been developed by the use of fracture mechanics concepts and assumes that the relationship between crack-growth rate and stress intensity can be described by three separable regions of behavior as first suggested by Wiederhorn. The analytical form of the criterion relates failure time to the initial crack length and the critical crack length or alternatively, to the initial stress intensity and the fracture toughness for various conditions of stress and the environmental variables. The analytical expression is examined by the use of some experimental data on the hydrogen-induced cracking of Ti-5Al-2.5 Sn, and it is demonstrated that the expression predicts the general expected form of the relationship between the normalized stress intensity parameter and the failure time.

  17. Lead induced stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 690 in high temperature water

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, K.K.; Lim, J.K.; Moriya, Shinichi; Watanabe, Yutaka; Shoji, Tetsuo

    1995-12-31

    Recent investigations of cracked steam generator tubes at nuclear power plants concluded that lead significantly contributed to cracking the Alloy 600 materials. In order to investigate the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of Alloy 690, slow strain rate tests (SSRT) and anodic polarization measurements were performed. The SSRTs were conducted in a lead-chloride solution (PbCl{sub 2}) and in a chloride but lead free solution (NaCl) at pH of 3 and 4.5 at 288 C. The anodic polarization measurements were carried out at 30 C using the same solutions as in SSRT. The SSRT results showed that Alloy 690 was susceptible to SCC in both solutions. In the lead chloride solution, cracking had slight dependence on lead concentration and pH. Cracking tend to increase with a higher lead concentration and a lower pH and was mainly intergranular and was to be a few tens to hundreds micrometers in length. In the chloride only solution, cracking was similar to the lead induced SCC. The results of anodic polarization measurement and electron probe micro analysis (EPMA) helped to understand lead induced SCC. Lead was a stronger active corrosive element but had a minor affect on cracking susceptibility of the alloy. While, chloride was quite different from lead effect to SCC. A possible mechanism of lead induced SCC of Alloy 690 was also discussed based on the test results.

  18. Fractographic analysis of gaseous hydrogen induced cracking in 18Ni maraging steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, R. P.; Wei, R. P.

    1978-01-01

    Electron microscope fractographic analysis supplemented an extensive study of the kinetics of gaseous hydrogen assisted cracking in 18Ni maraging steel. Temperature determined the crack path morphology in each steel which, in turn, was directly related to the temperature dependence of the crack growth rate. Crack growth in the low temperature regime proceeded along prior austenite grain boundaries. Increasing the temperature above a critical value produced a continuously increasing proportion of transgranular quasi-cleavage associated with lath martensite boundaries. The amount of transgranular cracking was qualitatively correlated with the degree of temperature-induced deviation from Arrhenius behavior. Fractographic observations are interpreted in terms of hypothesized mechanisms for gaseous hydrogen embrittlement. It is concluded that hydrogen segregation to prior austenite and lath martensite boundaries must be considered as a significant factor in developing mechanisms for gaseous embrittlement of high strength steels.

  19. Cracks in Martian boulders exhibit preferred orientations that point to solar-induced thermal stress.

    PubMed

    Eppes, Martha-Cary; Willis, Andrew; Molaro, Jamie; Abernathy, Stephen; Zhou, Beibei

    2015-03-27

    The origins of fractures in Martian boulders are unknown. Here, using Mars Exploration Rover 3D data products, we obtain orientation measurements for 1,857 cracks visible in 1,573 rocks along the Spirit traverse and find that Mars rock cracks are oriented in statistically preferred directions similar to those compiled herein for Earth rock cracks found in mid-latitude deserts. We suggest that Martian directional cracking occurs due to the preferential propagation of microfractures favourably oriented with respect to repeating geometries of diurnal peaks in sun-induced thermal stresses. A numerical model modified here with Mars parameters supports this hypothesis both with respect to the overall magnitude of stresses as well as to the times of day at which the stresses peak. These data provide the first direct field and numerical evidence that insolation-related thermal stress potentially plays a principle role in cracking rocks on portions of the Martian surface.

  20. Detection and Analysis of Enamel Cracks by Quantitative Light-induced Fluorescence Technology.

    PubMed

    Jun, Mi-Kyoung; Ku, Hye-Min; Kim, Euiseong; Kim, Hee-Eun; Kwon, Ho-Keun; Kim, Baek-Il

    2016-03-01

    The ability to accurately detect tooth cracks and quantify their depth would allow the prediction of crack progression and treatment success. The aim of this in vitro study was to determine the capabilities of quantitative light-induced fluorescence (QLF) technology in the detection of enamel cracks. Ninety-six extracted human teeth were selected for examining naturally existing or suspected cracked teeth surfaces using a photocuring unit. QLF performed with a digital camera (QLF-D) images were used to assess the ability to detect enamel cracks based on the maximum fluorescence loss value (ΔFmax, %), which was then analyzed using the QLF-D software. A histologic evaluation was then performed in which the samples were sectioned and observed with the aid of a polarized light microscope. The relationship between ΔFmax and the histology findings was assessed based on the Spearman rank correlation. The sensitivity and specificity were calculated to evaluate the validity of using QLF-D to analyze enamel inner-half cracks and cracks extending to the dentin-enamel junction. There was a strong correlation between the results of histologic evaluations of enamel cracks and the ΔFmax value, with a correlation coefficient of 0.84. The diagnostic accuracy of QLF-D had a sensitivity of 0.87 and a specificity of 0.98 for enamel inner-half cracks and a sensitivity of 0.90 and a specificity of 1.0 for cracks extending to the dentin-enamel junction. These results indicate that QLF technology would be a useful clinical tool for diagnosing enamel cracks, especially given that this is a nondestructive method. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Numerical simulation of stress amplification induced by crack interaction in human femur bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alia, Noor; Daud, Ruslizam; Ramli, Mohammad Fadzli; Azman, Wan Zuki; Faizal, Ahmad; Aisyah, Siti

    2015-05-01

    This research is about numerical simulation using a computational method which study on stress amplification induced by crack interaction in human femur bone. Cracks in human femur bone usually occur because of large load or stress applied on it. Usually, the fracture takes longer time to heal itself. At present, the crack interaction is still not well understood due to bone complexity. Thus, brittle fracture behavior of bone may be underestimated and inaccurate. This study aims to investigate the geometrical effect of double co-planar edge cracks on stress intensity factor (K) in femur bone. This research focuses to analyze the amplification effect on the fracture behavior of double co-planar edge cracks, where numerical model is developed using computational method. The concept of fracture mechanics and finite element method (FEM) are used to solve the interacting cracks problems using linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) theory. As a result, this study has shown the identification of the crack interaction limit (CIL) and crack unification limit (CUL) exist in the human femur bone model developed. In future research, several improvements will be made such as varying the load, applying thickness on the model and also use different theory or method in calculating the stress intensity factor (K).

  2. Dynamic Moss Observed with Hi-C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, Caroline; Winebarger, Amy; Morton, Richard; Savage, Sabrina

    2014-01-01

    The High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C), flown on 11 July 2012, has revealed an unprecedented level of detail and substructure within the solar corona. Hi-C imaged a large active region (AR11520) with 0.2-0.3'' spatial resolution and 5.5s cadence over a 5 minute period. An additional dataset with a smaller FOV, the same resolution, but with a higher temporal cadence (1s) was also taken during the rocket flight. This dataset was centered on a large patch of 'moss' emission that initially seemed to show very little variability. Image processing revealed this region to be much more dynamic than first thought with numerous bright and dark features observed to appear, move and disappear over the 5 minute observation. Moss is thought to be emission from the upper transition region component of hot loops so studying its dynamics and the relation between the bright/dark features and underlying magnetic features is important to tie the interaction of the different atmospheric layers together. Hi-C allows us to study the coronal emission of the moss at the smallest scales while data from SDO/AIA and HMI is used to give information on these structures at different heights/temperatures. Using the high temporal and spatial resolution of Hi-C the observed moss features were tracked and the distribution of displacements, speeds, and sizes were measured. This allows us to comment on both the physical processes occurring within the dynamic moss and the scales at which these changes are occurring.

  3. An Assessment of Remote Visual Testing System Capabilities for the Detection of Service Induced Cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Michael T.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Doctor, Steven R.

    2005-09-01

    Remote visual testing is typically employed to ascertain the condition of materials in components that are inaccessible for direct examination. In the power and petrochemical industries, remote visual testing is used to assess whether service-related degradation is being manifested that, if left unchecked, may eventually impair the structural reliability of a component. Several codes and standards require that visual examinations be periodically conducted. Many of these inspections must be performed remotely due to harsh environments or design geometries of the subject components. This paper describes the attributes and limitations of remote visual testing, performance demonstration standards for camera systems, typical dimensions for service-induced cracking phenomena, and an assessment of the reliability of remote video camera systems at finding cracks. Because many forms of service-induced cracks have very small crack opening dimensions, the reliability of remote visual testing may not be adequate to ensure component integrity, given the capabilities of current camera systems and application practices.

  4. Distinct roles for paxillin and Hic-5 in regulating breast cancer cell morphology, invasion, and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Deakin, Nicholas O.; Turner, Christopher E.

    2011-01-01

    Individual metastatic tumor cells exhibit two interconvertible modes of cell motility during tissue invasion that are classified as either mesenchymal or amoeboid. The molecular mechanisms by which invasive breast cancer cells regulate this migratory plasticity have yet to be fully elucidated. Herein we show that the focal adhesion adaptor protein, paxillin, and the closely related Hic-5 have distinct and unique roles in the regulation of breast cancer cell lung metastasis by modulating cell morphology and cell invasion through three-dimensional extracellular matrices (3D ECMs). Cells depleted of paxillin by RNA interference displayed a highly elongated mesenchymal morphology, whereas Hic-5 knockdown induced an amoeboid phenotype with both cell populations exhibiting reduced plasticity, migration persistence, and velocity through 3D ECM environments. In evaluating associated signaling pathways, we determined that Rac1 activity was increased in cells devoid of paxillin whereas Hic-5 silencing resulted in elevated RhoA activity and associated Rho kinase–induced nonmuscle myosin II activity. Hic-5 was essential for adhesion formation in 3D ECMs, and analysis of adhesion dynamics and lifetime identified paxillin as a key regulator of 3D adhesion assembly, stabilization, and disassembly. PMID:21148292

  5. Role of Grain Boundaries and Microstructure on the Environment Assisted Cracking of Pipeline Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arafin, Muhammad

    2011-12-01

    In this research, two common types of environment assisted cracking (EAC) of pipeline steels, namely the intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) and the hydrogen induced cracking (HIC), have been studied, and computer models have been developed to simulate the intergranular stress corrosion crack propagation behaviour in pipeline steel as well as to predict the intergranular fracture susceptibility, due to mechanical loading in non-corrosive environment, of polycrystalline materials. First, a new understanding of the IGSCC resistance of pipeline steel has been obtained by studying the grain boundary character and crystallographic orientation in both cracked and non-cracked pipeline steel samples using electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) and X-ray texture measurements. It has been found that the low-angle and certain types of special boundaries, known as the coincident site lattice (CSL) boundaries (S5, S11, and S13b types), are crack-resistant while the random high angle boundaries are prone to cracking. However, it has been also observed that the grain boundaries associated with {110} and {111} neighbour grain orientations having <110> and <111> rotation axis, respectively, are crack-resistant, while the cracked boundaries are mainly linked to the {100} orientation with <100> rotation axis. Subsequently, a novel integrated modeling approach, combining Voronoi Algorithm, Markov Chain theory, and Monte Carlo simulations, has been developed in order to predict the IGSCC behaviour of pipeline steels. The model takes both the physical microstructural features, such as the grain shape and grain size distribution, as well as the grain boundary characters and their orientations with respect to the external stress axis into account. The predicted crack propagation behaviour has been found to be in excellent agreement with the experimental crack-propagation and arrest data in API X65 pipeline steel. In addition, a texture based grain boundary character

  6. Environment-induced embrittlement: Stress corrosion cracking and metal-induced embrittlement; Environmental embrittlement of iron aluminide alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Heldt, L.A.; Milligan, W.W.; White, C.L.

    1991-01-01

    This research program has included two thrusts. The first addressed environment-induced embrittlement in a parallel study of stress corrosion cracking and metal-induced embrittlement. This work has examined (1) mechanical properties as influenced by embrittling environments, (2) fractography and crystallography or transgranular cracking, (3) the mechanics of cracking, (4) the extent and role of local plastic flow, and (5) local chemistry within stress corrosion and metal-induced cracks. The embrittlement of iron aluminide alloys by air was addressed by determining the effect of water and hydrogen upon the mechanical properties. Slow strain rate testing in aqueous environments was carried out at controlled anodic and cathodic potentials. The effect of cathodically charged hydrogen and the effect of subsequent baking were measured. Environmental susceptibility was measured as affected by alloy composition, microstructure and degree of ordering.

  7. HIC1 (hypermethylated in cancer 1) SUMOylation is dispensable for DNA repair but is essential for the apoptotic DNA damage response (DDR) to irreparable DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs).

    PubMed

    Paget, Sonia; Dubuissez, Marion; Dehennaut, Vanessa; Nassour, Joe; Harmon, Brennan T; Spruyt, Nathalie; Loison, Ingrid; Abbadie, Corinne; Rood, Brian R; Leprince, Dominique

    2017-01-10

    The tumor suppressor gene HIC1 (Hypermethylated In Cancer 1) encodes a transcriptional repressor mediating the p53-dependent apoptotic response to irreparable DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) through direct transcriptional repression of SIRT1. HIC1 is also essential for DSB repair as silencing of endogenous HIC1 in BJ-hTERT fibroblasts significantly delays DNA repair in functional Comet assays. HIC1 SUMOylation favours its interaction with MTA1, a component of NuRD complexes. In contrast with irreparable DSBs induced by 16-hours of etoposide treatment, we show that repairable DSBs induced by 1 h etoposide treatment do not increase HIC1 SUMOylation or its interaction with MTA1. Furthermore, HIC1 SUMOylation is dispensable for DNA repair since the non-SUMOylatable E316A mutant is as efficient as wt HIC1 in Comet assays. Upon induction of irreparable DSBs, the ATM-mediated increase of HIC1 SUMOylation is independent of its effector kinase Chk2. Moreover, irreparable DSBs strongly increase both the interaction of HIC1 with MTA1 and MTA3 and their binding to the SIRT1 promoter. To characterize the molecular mechanisms sustained by this increased repression potential, we established global expression profiles of BJ-hTERT fibroblasts transfected with HIC1-siRNA or control siRNA and treated or not with etoposide. We identified 475 genes potentially repressed by HIC1 with cell death and cell cycle as the main cellular functions identified by pathway analysis. Among them, CXCL12, EPHA4, TGFβR3 and TRIB2, also known as MTA1 target-genes, were validated by qRT-PCR analyses. Thus, our data demonstrate that HIC1 SUMOylation is important for the transcriptional response to non-repairable DSBs but dispensable for DNA repair.

  8. Loop Evolution Observed with AIA and Hi-C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulu-Moore, Fana; Winebarger, Amy R.; Cirtain, Jonathan W.; Kobayashi, Ken; Korreck, Kelly E.; Golub, Leon; Kuzin, Sergei; Walsh, Robert William; DeForest, Craig E.; De Pontieu, Bart; Title, Alan M.; Weber, Mark

    2012-01-01

    In the past decade, the evolution of EUV loops has been used to infer the loop substructure. With the recent launch of High Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C), this inference can be validated. In this presentation we discuss the first results of loop analysis comparing AIA and Hi-C data. In the past decade, the evolution of EUV loops has been used to infer the loop substructure. With the recent launch of High Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C), this inference can be validated. In this presentation we discuss the first results of loop analysis comparing AIA and Hi-C data.

  9. Evolution of residual-strain distribution through an overload-induced retardation period during fatigue-crack growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S. Y.; Sun, Y.; An, K.; Choo, H.; Hubbard, C. R.; Liaw, P. K.

    2010-01-01

    Neutron diffraction was employed to investigate the crack-growth retardation phenomenon after a single tensile overload by mapping both one-dimensional and two-dimensional residual-strain distributions around the crack tip in a series of compact-tension specimens representing various crack-growth stages through an overload-induced retardation period. The results clearly show a large compressive residual-strain field near the crack tip immediately after the overload. As the fatigue crack propagates through the overload-induced plastic zone, the compressive residual strains are gradually relaxed, and a new compressive residual-strain field is developed around the propagating crack tip, illustrating that the subsequent fatigue-induced plastic zone grows out of the large plastic zone caused by the overloading. The relationship between the overload-induced plastic zone and subsequent fatigue-induced plastic zone, and its influence on the residual-strain distributions in the perturbed plastic zone are discussed.

  10. Separating plasticity-induced closure and residual stress contributions to fatigue crack retardation following an overload

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvati, Enrico; Zhang, Hongjia; Fong, Kai Soon; Song, Xu; Korsunsky, Alexander M.

    2017-01-01

    performing comparison between the two loading conditions (R=0.7 and R=0.1), information was extracted regarding the role of residual stress alone, and then, by subtracting this effect for the R=0.1 sample, for crack closure alone. To enable this analysis, we propose a introducing the concept of equivalent effective stress intensity factor range, ∆ K eq , eff proposed by Walker. Afterwards, the SIF range reduction ratio, β , which represents the "knock down" factor with respect to the steady state growth was assessed. It is in terms of these newly introduced parameters that the magnitude and extent of the overload-induced crack growth rate retardation can be plotted, fitted and decomposed into closure and residual stress effects, respectively. It is concluded that although the residual stress effect is present at all values of the load ratio R, its effect is relatively short-lived, whilst the closure effect that is dominant at low values of R causes longer range retardation.

  11. Experimental simulation of frost wedging-induced crack propagation in alpine rockwall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Hailiang; Leith, Kerry; Krautblatter, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Frost wedging is widely presumed to be the principal mechanism responsible for shattering jointed low-porosity rocks in high alpine rockwalls. The interaction of ice and rock physics regulates the efficacy of frost wedging. In order to better understand temporal aspects of this interaction, we present results of a series of laboratory experiments monitoring crack widening as a result of ice formation in an artificial crack (4mm wide, 80mm deep) cut 20 mm from the end of a rectangular granite block. Our results indicate that i) freezing direction plays a key role in determining the magnitude of crack widening; in short-term (1 day) experiments, maximum crack widening during top-down freezing (associated with 'autumn' conditions) was around 0.11mm, while inside-out freezing (resulting from 'spring' conditions) produced only 0.02 mm of deformation; ii) neither ice, nor water pressure (direct tension and hydraulic fracturing respectively) caused measurable irreversible crack widening during short-term tests, as the calculated maximum stress intensity at the crack tip was less than the fracture toughness of our granite sample; iii) development of ice pressure is closely related to the mechanical properties of the fracture in which it forms, and as such, the interaction of ice and rock is intrinsically dynamic; iv) irreversible crack widening (about 0.03mm) was only observed following a long-term (53 day) experiment representing a simplified transition from autumn to winter conditions. We suggest this is the result of stress corrosion aided by strong opening during freezing, and to a lesser degree by ice segregation up to one week after the initial freezing period, and downward migration of liquid water during the remainder of the test. Our results suggest the fundamental assumption of frost wedging, that rapid freezing from open ends of cracks can seal water inside the crack and thus cause damage through excessive stresses induced by volumetric expansion seems

  12. Thermally induced transverse cracking in graphite-epoxy cross-ply laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, D. S.; Bowles, D. E.; Herakovich, C. T.

    1986-01-01

    Thermally induced transverse cracking in T300/5208 graphite-epoxy cross-ply laminates was investigated experimentally and theoretically. The six laminate configurations studied were: 0/90(3)s, 0(2)/90(2)s, 0(3)/90s, 90/0(3)s, 90(2)/0(2)s, and 90(3)/0s. The thermal load required to initiate transverse cracking was determined experimentally and compared to a theoretical prediction. Experimental results for the accumulation of transverse cracks under cyclic thermal loading between - 250 and 250 F for up to 500 thermal cycles are presented. The calculated in situ transverse-lamina strength was determined to be at least 1.9 times the unidirectional-lamina transverse tensile strength. All laminate configurations exhibited an increase in crack density with increasing thermal cycles.

  13. Dynamic Moss Observed with Hi-C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, Caroline; Winebarger, Amy; Morton, Richard; Savage, Sabrina

    2014-01-01

    The High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C), flown on 11 July 2012, has revealed an unprecedented level of detail and substructure within the solar corona. Hi-­-C imaged a large active region (AR11520) with 0.2-0.3'' spatial resolution and 5.5s cadence over a 5 minute period. An additional dataset with a smaller FOV, the same resolution, but with a higher temporal cadence (1s) was also taken during the rocket flight. This dataset was centered on a large patch of 'moss' emission that initially seemed to show very little variability. Image processing revealed this region to be much more dynamic than first thought with numerous bright and dark features observed to appear, move and disappear over the 5 minute observation. Moss is thought to be emission from the upper transition region component of hot loops so studying its dynamics and the relation between the bright/dark features and underlying magnetic features is important to tie the interaction of the different atmospheric layers together. Hi-C allows us to study the coronal emission of the moss at the smallest scales while data from SDO/AIA and HMI is used to give information on these structures at different heights/temperatures. Using the high temporal and spatial resolution of Hi-C the observed moss features were tracked and the distribution of displacements, speeds, and sizes were measured. This allows us to comment on both the physical processes occurring within the dynamic moss and the scales at which these changes are occurring.

  14. Functional and Structural Analysis of HicA3-HicB3, a Novel Toxin-Antitoxin System of Yersinia pestis

    PubMed Central

    Bibi-Triki, Sabrina; Li de la Sierra-Gallay, Inès; Lazar, Noureddine; Leroy, Arnaud; Van Tilbeurgh, Herman

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms involved in the virulence of Yersinia pestis, the plague pathogen, are not fully understood. In previous research, we found that a Y. pestis mutant lacking the HicB3 (YPO3369) putative orphan antitoxin was attenuated for virulence in a murine model of bubonic plague. Toxin-antitoxin systems (TASs) are widespread in prokaryotes. Most bacterial species possess many TASs of several types. In type II TASs, the toxin protein is bound and neutralized by its cognate antitoxin protein in the cytoplasm. Here we identify the hicA3 gene encoding the toxin neutralized by HicB3 and show that HicA3-HicB3 constitutes a new functional type II TAS in Y. pestis. Using biochemical and mutagenesis-based approaches, we demonstrate that the HicA3 toxin is an RNase with a catalytic histidine residue. HicB3 has two functions: it sequesters and neutralizes HicA3 by blocking its active site, and it represses transcription of the hicA3B3 operon. Gel shift assays and reporter fusion experiments indicate that the HicB3 antitoxin binds to two operators in the hicA3B3 promoter region. We solved the X-ray structures of HicB3 and the HicA3-HicB3 complex; thus, we present the first crystal structure of a TA complex from the HicAB family. HicB3 forms a tetramer that can bind two HicA3 toxin molecules. HicA3 is monomeric and folds as a double-stranded-RNA-binding domain. The HicB3 N-terminal domain occludes the HicA3 active site, whereas its C-terminal domain folds as a ribbon-helix-helix DNA-binding motif. PMID:25112480

  15. Hydrogen Induced Intergranular Cracking of Nickel-Base Alloys.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-07-01

    propagating crack according to Rice [38]. 75 FIGURE 32. Evan’s diagram [39]. 80 FIGURE 33. Diagram showing schematically the effect of promoter...increase in permeability at -470mV SCE but no effect at -580mV SCE? One could consider this with the help of the Evans’ diagram shown in Figure 32...Cathode) ’corr A I Mixed 7corrosion (Anode) Aoj Polarization 109 current density FIGURE 32. Evans’ diagram 1391. grain boundaries can not dissolve

  16. Hydrogen-Induced Delayed Cracking in TRIP-Aided Lean-Alloyed Ferritic-Austenitic Stainless Steels.

    PubMed

    Papula, Suvi; Sarikka, Teemu; Anttila, Severi; Talonen, Juho; Virkkunen, Iikka; Hänninen, Hannu

    2017-06-03

    Susceptibility of three lean-alloyed ferritic-austenitic stainless steels to hydrogen-induced delayed cracking was examined, concentrating on internal hydrogen contained in the materials after production operations. The aim was to study the role of strain-induced austenite to martensite transformation in the delayed cracking susceptibility. According to the conducted deep drawing tests and constant load tensile testing, the studied materials seem not to be particularly susceptible to delayed cracking. Delayed cracks were only occasionally initiated in two of the materials at high local stress levels. However, if a delayed crack initiated in a highly stressed location, strain-induced martensite transformation decreased the crack arrest tendency of the austenite phase in a duplex microstructure. According to electron microscopy examination and electron backscattering diffraction analysis, the fracture mode was predominantly cleavage, and cracks propagated along the body-centered cubic (BCC) phases ferrite and α'-martensite. The BCC crystal structure enables fast diffusion of hydrogen to the crack tip area. No delayed cracking was observed in the stainless steel that had high austenite stability. Thus, it can be concluded that the presence of α'-martensite increases the hydrogen-induced cracking susceptibility.

  17. Hydrogen-Induced Delayed Cracking in TRIP-Aided Lean-Alloyed Ferritic-Austenitic Stainless Steels

    PubMed Central

    Papula, Suvi; Sarikka, Teemu; Anttila, Severi; Talonen, Juho; Virkkunen, Iikka; Hänninen, Hannu

    2017-01-01

    Susceptibility of three lean-alloyed ferritic-austenitic stainless steels to hydrogen-induced delayed cracking was examined, concentrating on internal hydrogen contained in the materials after production operations. The aim was to study the role of strain-induced austenite to martensite transformation in the delayed cracking susceptibility. According to the conducted deep drawing tests and constant load tensile testing, the studied materials seem not to be particularly susceptible to delayed cracking. Delayed cracks were only occasionally initiated in two of the materials at high local stress levels. However, if a delayed crack initiated in a highly stressed location, strain-induced martensite transformation decreased the crack arrest tendency of the austenite phase in a duplex microstructure. According to electron microscopy examination and electron backscattering diffraction analysis, the fracture mode was predominantly cleavage, and cracks propagated along the body-centered cubic (BCC) phases ferrite and α’-martensite. The BCC crystal structure enables fast diffusion of hydrogen to the crack tip area. No delayed cracking was observed in the stainless steel that had high austenite stability. Thus, it can be concluded that the presence of α’-martensite increases the hydrogen-induced cracking susceptibility. PMID:28772975

  18. Crack cocaine inhalation induces schizophrenia-like symptoms and molecular alterations in mice prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Areal, Lorena Bianchine; Herlinger, Alice Laschuk; Pelição, Fabrício Souza; Martins-Silva, Cristina; Pires, Rita Gomes Wanderley

    2017-03-06

    Crack cocaine (crack) addiction represents a major social and health burden, especially seeing as users are more prone to engage in criminal and violent acts. Crack users show a higher prevalence of psychiatric comorbidities - particularly antisocial personality disorders - when compared to powder cocaine users. They also develop cognitive deficits related mainly to executive functions, including working memory. It is noteworthy that stimulant drugs can induce psychotic states, which appear to mimic some symptoms of schizophrenia among users. Social withdraw and executive function deficits are, respectively, negative and cognitive symptoms of schizophrenia mediated by reduced dopamine (DA) tone in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) of patients. That could be explained by an increased expression of D2R short isoform (D2S) in the PFC of such patients and/or by hypofunctioning NMDA receptors in this region. Reduced DA tone has already been described in the PFC of mice exposed to crack smoke. Therefore, it is possible that behavioral alterations presented by crack users result from molecular and biochemical neuronal alterations akin to schizophrenia. Accordingly, we found that upon crack inhalation mice have shown decreased social interaction and working memory deficits analogous to schizophrenia's symptoms, along with increased D2S/D2L expression ratio and decreased expression of NR1, NR2A and NR2B NMDA receptor subunits in the PFC. Herein we propose two possible mechanisms to explain the reduced DA tone in the PFC elicited by crack consumption in mice, bringing also the first direct evidence that crack use may result in schizophrenia-like neurochemical, molecular and behavioral alterations.

  19. Size scaling and bursting activity due to thermally induced cracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kun, F.; Yoshioka, N.; Ito, N.

    2012-04-01

    Sub-critical rupture, occurring under a constant load below the fracture strength of materials, is of fundamental importance in a wide range of physical, biological, and geological systems. During the last decade major progress has been achieved in the understanding of the role of quenched disorder in the size scaling of materials strength. However, under sub-critical loads, the interplay of annealed disorder (thermal noise) and of the inhomogeneous stress field in the rupture process still remained an open fundamental problem. We study sub-critical fracture driven by thermally activated crack nucleation in the framework of fiber bundle models. Based on analytic calculations and computer simulations we show that in the presence of stress inhomogeneities, thermally activated cracking results in an anomalous size effect, i.e. the average lifetime of the system decreases as a power law of the system size, where the exponent depends on the external load and on the temperature. We propose a modified form of the Arrhenius law which provides a comprehensive description of thermally activated breakdown. On the microlevel, thermal fluctuations trigger bursts of breakings which proved to have a power law size distribution. We compare analytic results obtained in the mean field limit to the computer simulations of localized load redistribution to reveal the effect of the range of interaction on the time evolution. Focusing on the waiting times between consecutive bursts we show that the time evolution has two distinct forms: at high load values the breaking process continuously accelerates towards macroscopic failure, however, for low loads and high enough temperatures the acceleration is preceded by a slow-down. Analyzing the structural entropy and the location of consecutive bursts we show that in the presence of stress concentration the early acceleration is the consequence of damage localization. The distribution of waiting times has a power law form with an exponent

  20. Plastic ratcheting induced cracks in thin film structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, M.; Suo, Z.; Ma, Q.

    2002-05-01

    In the microelectronic and photonic industries, temperature cycling has long been used as a reliability test to qualify integrated materials structures of small feature sizes. The test is time consuming, and is a bottleneck for innovation. Tremendous needs exist to understand various failure modes in the integrated structures caused by cyclic temperatures. This paper presents a systematic study of a failure mechanism recently discovered by the authors. In a thin film structure comprising both ductile and brittle materials, the thermal expansion mismatch can cause the ductile material to plastically yield in every temperature cycle. Under certain circumstances, the plastic deformation ratchets, namely, accumulates in the same direction as the temperature cycles. The ratcheting deformation in the ductile material may build up stress in the brittle materials, leading to cracking. The paper introduces an analogy between ratcheting and viscous flow. An analytical model is developed, which explains the experimental observations, and allows one to design the structure to avert this failure mode. Design rules with increasing levels of sophistication are described. Concepts presented here are generic to related phenomena in thin film structures.

  1. He+ irradiation induced cracking and exfoliating on the surface of Ti3AlC2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, H. H.; Ao, L.; Li, F. Z.; Peng, S. M.; Zhang, H. B.; Sun, K.; Zu, X. T.

    2017-03-01

    We report a systematic study of the effects of a 400 keV helium ion beam irradiation on the surface morphology and crystal structure of Ti3AlC2 by combined scanning electron microscopy, grazing incidence X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Helium irradiation experiments were performed at both room temperature and 500 °C, respectively, with fluence up to 2.0 × 1017 He+/cm2. After irradiation, intragranular orientated cracks grew along the (10 1 bar 0)Ti3AlC2 plane and the surface has started to exfoliate. The formation of the cracks is mainly attributed to the reduction of the lattice parameter along the a direction induced by ion irradiation, and the crack growth is affected by the grain size and the content of impurity phase TiAl3. The surface exfoliation is due to the blistering of He bubbles at the projected depth.

  2. PFC2D simulation of thermally induced cracks in concrete specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xinghong; Chang, Xiaolin; Zhou, Wei; Li, Shuirong

    2013-06-01

    The appearance of cracks exposed to severe environmental conditions can be critical for concrete structures. The research is to validate Particle Flow Code(PFC2D) method in the context of concrete thermally-induced cracking simulations. First, concrete was discreted as meso-level units of aggregate, cement mortar and the interfaces between them. Parallel bonded-particle model in PFC2D was adapted to describe the constitutive relation of the cementing material. Then, the concrete mechanics meso-parameters were obtained through several groups of biaxial tests, in order to make the numerical results comply with the law of the indoor test. The concrete thermal meso-parameters were determined by compared with the parameters in the empirical formula through the simulations imposing a constant heat flow to the left margin of concrete specimens. At last, a case of 1000mm×500mm concrete specimen model was analyzed. It simulated the formation and development process of the thermally-induced cracks under the cold waves of different durations and temperature decline. Good agreements in fracture morphology and process were observed between the simulations, previous studies and laboratory data. The temperature decline limits during cold waves were obtained when its tensile strength was given as 3MPa. And it showed the feasibility of using PFC2D to simulate concrete thermally-induced cracking.

  3. Laser cutting silicon-glass double layer wafer with laser induced thermal-crack propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Yecheng; Yang, Lijun; Zhang, Hongzhi; Wang, Yang

    2016-07-01

    This study was aimed at introducing the laser induced thermal-crack propagation (LITP) technology to solve the silicon-glass double layer wafer dicing problems in the packaging procedure of silicon-glass device packaged by WLCSP technology, investigating the feasibility of this idea, and studying the crack propagation process of LITP cutting double layer wafer. In this paper, the physical process of the 1064 nm laser beam interact with the double layer wafer during the cutting process was studied theoretically. A mathematical model consists the volumetric heating source and the surface heating source has been established. The temperature and stress distribution was simulated by using finite element method (FEM) analysis software ABAQUS. The extended finite element method (XFEM) was added to the simulation as the supplementary features to simulate the crack propagation process and the crack propagation profile. The silicon-glass double layer wafer cutting verification experiment under typical parameters was conducted by using the 1064 nm semiconductor laser. The crack propagation profile on the fracture surface was examined by optical microscope and explained from the stress distribution and XFEM status. It was concluded that the quality of the finished fracture surface has been greatly improved, and the experiment results were well supported by the numerical simulation results.

  4. Laser cutting sandwich structure glass-silicon-glass wafer with laser induced thermal-crack propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Yecheng; Wang, Maolu; Zhang, Hongzhi; Yang, Lijun; Fu, Xihong; Wang, Yang

    2017-08-01

    Silicon-glass devices are widely used in IC industry, MEMS and solar energy system because of their reliability and simplicity of the manufacturing process. With the trend toward the wafer level chip scale package (WLCSP) technology, the suitable dicing method of silicon-glass bonded structure wafer has become necessary. In this paper, a combined experimental and computational approach is undertaken to investigate the feasibility of cutting the sandwich structure glass-silicon-glass (SGS) wafer with laser induced thermal-crack propagation (LITP) method. A 1064 nm semiconductor laser cutting system with double laser beams which could simultaneously irradiate on the top and bottom of the sandwich structure wafer has been designed. A mathematical model for describing the physical process of the interaction between laser and SGS wafer, which consists of two surface heating sources and two volumetric heating sources, has been established. The temperature stress distribution are simulated by using finite element method (FEM) analysis software ABAQUS. The crack propagation process is analyzed by using the J-integral method. In the FEM model, a stationary planar crack is embedded in the wafer and the J-integral values around the crack front edge are determined using the FEM. A verification experiment under typical parameters is conducted and the crack propagation profile on the fracture surface is examined by the optical microscope and explained from the stress distribution and J-integral value.

  5. Weld cracking in corner joints by submerged-arc welding with high heat input

    SciTech Connect

    Wada, T.; Satoshi, I.; Terasaki, T.

    1995-12-31

    One-pass submerged arc welding (SAW) with high heat input is widely employed in Japan for the comer seam of box-shaped columns with a plate thickness of up to 70mm. The welding efficiency of one-pass SAW is several times higher than that of multipass welding. However, an internal crack similar to lamellar tearing occasionally occurs in the center-thickness position of the flange plate. ne mechanism of this crack and appropriate countermeasures to cracking were studied. It was found that this cracking was a kind of hydrogen induced cracking(HIC), and that the dominant material factors of this cracking were an elongated manganese sulfide (MnS) in the center segregation band, and martensite-austenite constituents (M-A) around MnS formed by intercritical heat affection of one-pass SAW. Drying of the flux was the most effective countermeasure in the welding conditions. As a groove for the one-pass SAW comer joint, a bevel groove was preferable to a V groove to prevent cracking. These effects were also clarified by the finite differential method(FDM) for the diffusion of hydrogen. As countermeasures in the production of steel plates, addition of Ca, soft reduction in continuous casting, and application of thermo-mechanical-control-process (TMCP) were effective.

  6. Hydrogen induced cracking tests of high strength steels and nickel-iron base alloys using the bolt-loaded specimen

    SciTech Connect

    Vigilante, G.N.; Underwood, J.H.; Crayon, D.; Tauscher, S.; Sage, T.; Troiano, E.

    1997-12-31

    Hydrogen induced cracking tests were conducted on high strength steels and nickel-iron base alloys using the constant displacement bolt-loaded compact specimen. The bolt-loaded specimen was subjected to both acid and electrochemical cell environments in order to produce hydrogen. The materials tested were A723, Maraging 200, PH 13-8 Mo, Alloy 718, Alloy 706, and A286, and ranged in yield strength from 760--1400 MPa. The effects of chemical composition, refinement, heat treatment, and strength on hydrogen induced crack growth rates and thresholds were examined. In general, all high strength steels tested exhibited similar crack growth rates and thresholds were examined. In general, all high strength steels tested exhibited similar crack growth rates and threshold levels. In comparison, the nickel-iron base alloys tested exhibited up to three orders of magnitude lower crack growth rates than the high strength steels tested. It is widely known that high strength steels and nickel base alloys exhibit different crack growth rates, in part, because of their different crystal cell structure. In the high strength steels tested, refinement and heat treatment had some effect on hydrogen induced cracking, though strength was the predominant factor influencing susceptibility to cracking. When the yield strength of one of the high strength steels tested was increased moderately, from 1130 MPa to 1275 MPa, the incubation times decreased by over two orders of magnitude, the crack growth rates increased by an order of magnitude, and the threshold stress intensity was slightly lower.

  7. Volume analysis of heat-induced cracks in human molars: A preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Sandholzer, Michael A.; Baron, Katharina; Heimel, Patrick; Metscher, Brian D.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Only a few methods have been published dealing with the visualization of heat-induced cracks inside bones and teeth. Aims: As a novel approach this study used nondestructive X-ray microtomography (micro-CT) for volume analysis of heat-induced cracks to observe the reaction of human molars to various levels of thermal stress. Materials and Methods: Eighteen clinically extracted third molars were rehydrated and burned under controlled temperatures (400, 650, and 800°C) using an electric furnace adjusted with a 25°C increase/min. The subsequent high-resolution scans (voxel-size 17.7 μm) were made with a compact micro-CT scanner (SkyScan 1174). In total, 14 scans were automatically segmented with Definiens XD Developer 1.2 and three-dimensional (3D) models were computed with Visage Imaging Amira 5.2.2. The results of the automated segmentation were analyzed with an analysis of variance (ANOVA) and uncorrected post hoc least significant difference (LSD) tests using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) 17. A probability level of P < 0.05 was used as an index of statistical significance. Results: A temperature-dependent increase of heat-induced cracks was observed between the three temperature groups (P < 0.05, ANOVA post hoc LSD). In addition, the distributions and shape of the heat-induced changes could be classified using the computed 3D models. Conclusion: The macroscopic heat-induced changes observed in this preliminary study correspond with previous observations of unrestored human teeth, yet the current observations also take into account the entire microscopic 3D expansions of heat-induced cracks within the dental hard tissues. Using the same experimental conditions proposed in the literature, this study confirms previous results, adds new observations, and offers new perspectives in the investigation of forensic evidence. PMID:25125923

  8. Hi-C: A Detailed View of the Sun

    NASA Image and Video Library

    This 10-second movie includes imagery collected from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly instrument flying on NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory and Hi-C. Hi-C’s resolution is five times more detaile...

  9. Strain energy density: Distance criterion for the initiation of hydrogen-induced cracking of Alloy X-750

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, M.M. Jr.; Symons, D.M.; Kearns, J.J.

    1991-12-31

    A criterion for initiation of subcritical crack growth at blunt notches and sharp defects was developed and applied to hydrogen- induced cracking of the Ni-base superalloy X-750. Onset of crack growth is shown to occur when a critical strain energy density is attained at a distance from the notch and crack tips characteristic of the microstructure along the prospective crack path. Rising load crack growth initiation data were obtained using homogeneous hydrogen precharged notched and fatigue precracked bend specimens. Notch root radius, grain size and hydrogen concentration were varied. Crack growth initiation loads were dependent on both notch root radius and bulk precharged hydrogen concentration. These data were shown to be correlated using a critical strain energy at-a-distance (SEDAD) criterion. Furthermore, an elastic-plastic analysis of the strain energy distributions showed that the critical strain energy density value is attained at one grain diameter from the notch and fatigue precrack tips. Mechanical and microstructural aspects of crack growth process and relevance to hydrogen-induced cracking are discussed.

  10. Analysis of cracks induced by elevated temperature in rock using micro-focus X-ray CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheon, D. S.; Park, E. S.

    2016-12-01

    Thermal energy storage facilities and deep borehole nuclear waste disposal in the underground are repeatedly applied by heat. The thermal stress induced by heat can generate micro-cracks and extend the existing micro-cracks of rocks. For long-term stabilities of the above facilities, the features of thermal induced cracks should be investigated. In this paper, we investigated occurred the features of thermal cracks using micro-focus X-ray CT before and after thermal experiments. Two different kinds of rock core specimens (limestone, granite) were heated within the furnace with the elevated temperatures of 250 °C, 400 °C and 550 °C. In thermal experiments, we heated rocks with the speed of 1.5 ºC /min to avoid thermal shock. Total 16 cases were subjected to X-ray imaging and post-processing to observe thermally induced fractures. Micro-cracks induced by thermal loading may not be extractable by a thresholding method such that the manual tracking within the ROI (Region of Interest) was implemented by using the VG Studio Software. Identified fractures were grouped by each object whose orientation was fitted by 3D plane. And then, its normal vector was computed and visualized. Nominal fractures (less than 10 voxel size) were excluded. Each fracture was projected on the 3D sphere and its volume was represented by color map. Thermal induced cracks in the limestone observed on CT images were very small. On the other hand, they could be more clearly observed in the granite. In case of limestone, the number of cracks is only 4 after heating up 550 °C and most of them occurred within the mineral. In case of granite, 157 cracks are detected both at the boundaries of minerals and within the mineral. In both rocks, the development of thermal cracks within a certain mineral was superior to them that occurred along the interface between minerals. After heating up to 550 °C the occurred cracks significantly increased. Crack volume was also similar pattern to the number of

  11. Laser shock processing induced residual compression: Impact on predicted crack growth threshold performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepard, M. J.

    2005-08-01

    Design credit is not currently taken for laser shock processing (LSP) induced compressive residual stresses in damage tolerant design. The inclusion of these and other compressive stresses in design practice has the potential to dramatically increase predicted fatigue crack growth threshold performance and damage tolerant design life. In the current effort, Ti-6Al-4V coupons will be subjected to shot peening, glass bead peening, and high intensity laser shock processing. The in-depth residual stresses due to processing will be analyzed and then input into a linear elastic fracture mechanics analysis code to predict fatigue crack growth threshold performance. This analysis establishes both the utility and feasibility of incorporating LSP-induced compressive residual stresses into damage tolerant design practice.

  12. Crack propagation analysis of surface enhanced titanium alloys with fretting induced damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Daniel Benjamin

    2005-11-01

    The objectives of this research project were to analyze, characterize, and predict the influences that surface treatments have on crack propagation in the presence of fretting fatigue damage. The titanium alloys, Ti-6Al-4V and Ti-17, were implemented for this research, and the surface enhancement methods consisted of shot peening and laser shock peening. The approach was to incorporate methods of contact mechanics, fractography, and fracture mechanics so that the influence of surface enhancements on fretting fatigue could be better understood. The specimens were obtained from prior fretting fatigue experiments that consisted of dog-bones and contact pads with both surface enhanced and bare conditions. The dog-bone specimens had fretting fatigue damage, which is a combination of a cyclic bulk load and the fretting induced damage. These specimens were incorporated in life prediction analyses in which a procedure for calculating fretting fatigue life by correlating nucleation and propagation through a non-arbitrary crack initiation criterion was introduced. The life prediction results show that the fretting fatigue life can be determined with knowledge of the fretting stress field and nature of the fretting cracks. The results also show that surface enhancements do not stop fretting fatigue cracks from forming, do slow the propagation and increase the fretting fatigue life. The contact pads had what is known as 'pure fretting' damage, which consists of the damage from the contact stresses but no cyclic bulk load. The contact pads are the basis for the development of the C-specimen experiment. The contact pads were machined into C-specimens that help measure the threshold stress intensity factor. The objective of the C-specimen experiment is to increase the cyclically applied load of the specimen through step testing until a fatigue crack propagates from the existing fretting induced crack. The testing technique provides for the threshold stress intensity factor to be

  13. Strain-induced corrosion cracking behaviour of low-alloy steels under boiling water reactor conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, H. P.; Ritter, S.

    2008-09-01

    The strain-induced corrosion cracking (SICC) behaviour of different low-alloy reactor pressure vessel (RPV) and piping steels and of a RPV weld filler/weld heat-affected zone (HAZ) material was characterized under simulated boiling water reactor (BWR)/normal water chemistry (NWC) conditions by slow rising load (SRL) and very low-frequency fatigue tests with pre-cracked fracture mechanics specimens. Under highly oxidizing BWR/NWC conditions (ECP ⩾+50 mV SHE, ⩾0.4 ppm dissolved oxygen), the SICC crack growth rates were comparable for all materials (hardness <350 HV5) and increased (once initiated) with increasing loading rates and with increasing temperature with a possible maximum/plateau at 250 °C. A minimum KI value of 25 MPa m 1/2 had to be exceeded to initiate SICC in SRL tests. Above this value, the SICC rates increased with increasing loading rate d KI/d t, but were not dependent on the actual KI values up to 60 MPa m 1/2. A maximum in SICC initiation susceptibility occurred at intermediate temperatures around 200-250 °C and at slow strain rates in all materials. In contrast to crack growth, the SICC initiation susceptibility was affected by environmental and material parameters within certain limits.

  14. Experimental measurements and influence of overload-induced residual stress field on constant amplitude fatigue crack growth in aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahab, M. A.; Rohrsheim, G. R.; Brown, I. H.

    1997-03-01

    The aim of this research is to investigate current methods in Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics for their suitability to predict crack growth in Aluminum alloy 7050 - T7451, when a compressive residual stress field is introduced by an overload. A comparative study has been made on the effect of various levels of tensile overload on the crack growth rate in Aluminum alloy. Experiments were performed on center-cracked tension specimens at various values of range of stress- intensity-factor ((Delta) K). Crack growth measurements are performed using crack propagation gauges and a travelling microscope. The average crack growth rate is used to determine an effective (Delta) K value for each interval using the fatigue crack propagation curve. After the application of overloads, the propagation gauges revealed a period of significant retardation before the crack growth rates returned to their baseline levels. The results from the numerical predictions are compared with the experimental results. The prediction model produces conservative results for both constant amplitude crack growth and overload induced retarded growth.

  15. Probabilistic evaluation of initiation time in RC bridge beams with load-induced cracks exposed to de-icing salts

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Zhaohui; Zhao Yangang; Yu Zhiwu; Ding Faxing

    2011-03-15

    In this study, a reliability-based method for predicting the initiation time of reinforced concrete bridge beams with load-induced cracks exposed to de-icing salts is presented. A practical model for predicting the diffusion coefficient of chloride ingress into load-induced cracked concrete is proposed. Probabilistic information about uncertainties related to the surface chloride content and the threshold chloride concentration has been estimated from a wide review of previous experimental or statistical studies. Probabilistic analysis to estimate the time to corrosion initiation with/without considering the effect of the load-induced cracks on the chloride ingress into concrete has been carried out. Results of the analysis demonstrate the importance of considering the effect of the load-induced cracks for correct prediction of corrosion initiation in RC bridge beams exposed to chlorides.

  16. Evaluation of Environmentally Assisted Cracking of Armour Wires in Flexible Pipes, Power Cables and Umbilicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhiying

    Environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) of armour wires in flexible pipes, power cables and umbilicals is a major concern with the development of oil and gas fields and wind farms in harsh environments. Hydrogen induced cracking (HIC) or hydrogen embrittlement (HE) of steel armour wires used in deep-water and ultra-deep-water has been evaluated. Simulated tests have been carried out in simulated sea water, under conditions where the susceptibility is the highest, i.e. at room temperature, at the maximum negative cathodic potential and at the maximum stress level expected in service for 150 hours. Examinations of the tested specimens have not revealed cracking or blistering, and measurement of hydrogen content has confirmed hydrogen charging. In addition, sulphide stress cracking (SSC) and chloride stress cracking (CSC) of nickel-based alloy armour wires used in harsh down-hole environments has been evaluated. Simulated tests have been carried out in simulated solution containing high concentration of chloride, with high hydrogen sulphide partial pressure, at high stress level and at 120 °C for 720 hours. Examinations of the tested specimens have not revealed cracking or blistering. Subsequent tensile tests of the tested specimens at ambient pressure and temperature have revealed properties similar to the as-received specimens.

  17. Stress-induced amorphization at moving crack tips in NiTi.

    SciTech Connect

    Okamoto, P. R.; Heuer, J.; Lam, N. Q.; Ohnuki, S.; Matsukawa, Y.; Tozawa, K.; Stubbins, J. F.

    1998-01-29

    In situ fracture studies on thin-film NiTi intermetallic compounds have been carried out in the high-voltage electron microscope at Argonne National Laboratory. Local stress-induced amorphization of regions directly in front of moving crack tips has been observed under tensile loading conditions. The stress-induced amorphization at crack tips exhibits a temperature dependence similar to that of ion-induced amorphization of NiTi. The upper limiting temperature for stress-induced amorphization is the same as that for ion-induced amorphization of crystalline NiTi and for amorphous phase formation during ion-beam mixing of Ni and Ti multilayer specimens. This upper limiting temperature of 600K is also the lowest temperature at which stress-induced amorphous phase crystallizes during isothermal annealing. This isothermal crystallization temperature is nearly 200K less than the kinetic crystallization temperature during heating of unrelaxed NiTi glasses formed by rapid quenching or vapor phase deposition.

  18. Hi-C Observations of Sunspot Penumbral Bright Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpert, Shane E.; Tiwari, Sanjiv K.; Moore, Ronald L.; Winebarger, Amy R.; Savage, Sabrina L.

    2016-05-01

    We report observations of bright dots (BDs) in a sunspot penumbra using High Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) data in 193 Å and examine their sizes, lifetimes, speeds, and intensities. The sizes of the BDs are on the order of 1″ and are therefore hard to identify in the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) 193 Å images, which have a 1.″2 spatial resolution, but become readily apparent with Hi-C's spatial resolution, which is five times better. We supplement Hi-C data with data from AIA's 193 Å passband to see the complete lifetime of the BDs that appeared before and/or lasted longer than Hi-C's three-minute observation period. Most Hi-C BDs show clear lateral movement along penumbral striations, either toward or away from the sunspot umbra. Single BDs often interact with other BDs, combining to fade away or brighten. The BDs that do not interact with other BDs tend to have smaller displacements. These BDs are about as numerous but move slower on average than Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) BDs, which was recently reported by Tian et al., and the sizes and lifetimes are on the higher end of the distribution of IRIS BDs. Using additional AIA passbands, we compare the light curves of the BDs to test whether the Hi-C BDs have transition region (TR) temperatures like those of the IRIS BDs. The light curves of most Hi-C BDs peak together in different AIA channels, indicating that their temperatures are likely in the range of the cooler TR (1-4 × 105 K).

  19. Crack-induced Ag nanowire networks for transparent, stretchable, and highly sensitive strain sensors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chan-Jae; Park, Keum Hwan; Han, Chul Jong; Oh, Min Suk; You, Banseok; Kim, Young-Seok; Kim, Jong-Woong

    2017-08-11

    Crack-based strain sensor systems have been known for its high sensitivity, but suffer from the small fracture strain of the thin metal films employed in the sensor which results in its negligible stretchability. Herein, we fabricated a transparent (>90% at 550 nm wavelength), stretchable (up to 100%), and sensitive (gauge factor (GF) of 30 at 100% strain) strain gauge by depositing an encapsulated crack-induced Ag nanowire (AgNW) network on a hydroxylated poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) film. Stretching the encapsulated AgNWs/PDMS resulted in the formation of a percolation network of nanowire ligaments with abundant percolation paths. The encapsulating polymer was designed to adhere strongly to both the AgNW and PDMS. The improved adhesion ensured the resistance of the crack-induced network of AgNWs varied reversibly, stably, and sensitively when stretched and released, at strains of up to 100%. The developed sensor successfully detected human motions when applied to the skin.

  20. A film-rupture model of hydrogen-induced, slow crack growth in alpha-beta titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, H. G.

    1975-01-01

    The appearance of the terrace like fracture morphology of gaseous hydrogen induced crack growth in acicular alpha-beta titanium alloys is discussed as a function of specimen configuration, magnitude of applied stress intensity, test temperature, and hydrogen pressure. Although the overall appearance of the terrace structure remained essentially unchanged, a distinguishable variation is found in the size of the individual terrace steps, and step size is found to be inversely dependent upon the rate of hydrogen induced slow crack growth. Additionally, this inverse relationship is independent of all the variables investigated. These observations are quantitatively discussed in terms of the formation and growth of a thin hydride film along the alpha-beta boundaries and a qualitative model for hydrogen induced slow crack growth is presented, based on the film-rupture model of stress corrosion cracking.

  1. Crack initiation and propagation behavior of zirconium cladding under an environment of iodine-induced stress corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sang Yoon; Kim, Jun Hwan; Choi, Byung Kwon; Jeong, Yong Hwan

    2007-04-01

    Tests of iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking (ISCC) were carried out to elucidate the initiation and propagation of cracks in the claddings of zirconium alloys. Zircaloy-4 cladding and Nb-contained zirconium cladding were pressurized with and without a pre-cracked state at 350°C in an iodine environment. The results show that pitting nucleation and growth play an important role in initiating ISCC. Pits preferentially grow and agglomerate around the grain boundary, where the number of pits increases with the iodine concentration and the hoop stress of the claddings. A model of grain-boundary pitting coalescence and a model of pitting-assisted slip cleavage, which were proposed to clearly elucidate the crack initiation and propagation process under ISCC, produce reasonable results. The Nb-contained zirconium cladding exhibits higher ISCC resistance than Zircaloy-4 from the standpoint of a higher threshold stress-intensity factor and a lower crack propagation rate.

  2. Hi-C Observations of Penumbral Bright Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpert, S.; Tiwari, S. K.; Moore, R. L.; Savage, S. L.; Winebarger, A. R.

    2014-12-01

    We use high-quality data obtained by the High Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) to examine bright dots (BDs) in a sunspot's penumbra. The sizes of these BDs are on the order of 1 arcsecond (1") and are therefore hard to identify using the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly's (AIA) 0.6" pixel-1 resolution. These BDs become readily apparent with Hi-C's 0.1" pixel-1 resolution. Tian et al. (2014) found penumbral BDs in the transition region (TR) by using the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS). However, only a few of their dots could be associated with any enhanced brightness in AIA channels. In this work, we examine the characteristics of the penumbral BDs observed by Hi-C in a sunspot penumbra, including their sizes, lifetimes, speeds, and intensity. We also attempt to relate these BDs to the IRIS BDs. There are fewer Hi-C BDs in the penumbra than seen by IRIS, though different sunspots were studied. We use 193Å Hi-C data from July 11, 2012 which observed from ~18:52:00 UT--18:56:00 UT and supplement it with data from AIA's 193Å passband to see the complete lifetime of the dots that were born before and/or lasted longer than Hi-C's 5-minute observation period. We use additional AIA passbands and compare the light curves of the BDs at different temperatures to test whether the Hi-C BDs are TR BDs. We find that most Hi-C BDs show clear movement, and of those that do, they move in a radial direction, toward or away from the sunspot umbra. Single BDs interact with other BDs, combining to fade away or brighten. The BDs that do not interact with other BDs tend to move less. Our BDs are similar to the exceptional IRIS BDs: they move slower on average and their sizes and lifetimes are on the high end of the distribution of IRIS BDs. We infer that our penumbral BDs are some of the larger BDs observed by IRIS, those that are bright enough in TR emission to be seen in the 193Å band of Hi-C.

  3. Hypermethylation of the HIC1 promoter and aberrant expression of HIC1/SIRT1 contribute to the development of thyroid papillary carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wenyi; Zhang, Liting; Lin, Jianqing; Huang, Hanwei; Shi, Bai; Lin, Xingong; Huang, Zhongxin; Wang, Chaoyang; Qiu, Jianlong; Wei, Xiaolong

    2016-12-20

    Hypermethylation leading to the loss of hypermethylated in cancer-1 (HIC1) gene expression occurs in many different types of human cancer. HIC1 is a transcriptional repressor that directly binds to the promoter region of NAD-dependent deacetylase sirtuin-1 (SIRT1). SIRT1 functions in cell growth, is anti-apoptotic, protect neurons, functions in senescence, and regulates energy restriction. Epigenetic modification and dysregulation affecting the HIC1/SIRT1 axis is potentially important for the development of malignancies. However, the importance of HIC1 expression in the development of papillary thyroid carcinoma, especially in Chinese patients, is uncertain. Therefore, we assessed the level of methylation in the HIC1 promoter and the mRNA and protein expression levels of HIC1 and SIRT1 in human thyroid papillary carcinoma and tumor adjacent control tissues. The demethylation reagent 5-aza-2'-deoxyctidine (5-aza-dc) and an HIC1 overexpression plasmid were used to manipulate the HIC1/SIRT1 pathway, and the effects on cell senescence, apoptosis, and cell cycle progression were assessed. Compared to normal thyroid tissue, thyroid tumors had lower expression of HIC1 and higher SIRT1 expression. The level of HIC1 methylation was also higher in thyroid carcinoma tissues than adjacent tissues. HIC1 expression was closely correlated with patient age and tumor progression. Restoration of HIC1 expression through an overexpression plasmid or 5-aza-dC treatment reduced SIRT1 expression and cell proliferation, and led to senescence, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis. Aberrant expression of HIC1/SIRT1 and hypermethylation of the HIC1 promoter may be critical for the development and progression of papillary thyroid cancer.

  4. Quantification of DNA cleavage specificity in Hi-C experiments.

    PubMed

    Meluzzi, Dario; Arya, Gaurav

    2016-01-08

    Hi-C experiments produce large numbers of DNA sequence read pairs that are typically analyzed to deduce genomewide interactions between arbitrary loci. A key step in these experiments is the cleavage of cross-linked chromatin with a restriction endonuclease. Although this cleavage should happen specifically at the enzyme's recognition sequence, an unknown proportion of cleavage events may involve other sequences, owing to the enzyme's star activity or to random DNA breakage. A quantitative estimation of these non-specific cleavages may enable simulating realistic Hi-C read pairs for validation of downstream analyses, monitoring the reproducibility of experimental conditions and investigating biophysical properties that correlate with DNA cleavage patterns. Here we describe a computational method for analyzing Hi-C read pairs to estimate the fractions of cleavages at different possible targets. The method relies on expressing an observed local target distribution downstream of aligned reads as a linear combination of known conditional local target distributions. We validated this method using Hi-C read pairs obtained by computer simulation. Application of the method to experimental Hi-C datasets from murine cells revealed interesting similarities and differences in patterns of cleavage across the various experiments considered.

  5. Stress-Induced Martensite in Front of Crack Tips in NiTi Shape Memory Alloys: Modeling Versus Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maletta, C.; Young, M. L.

    2011-07-01

    NiTi-based shape memory alloys (SMAs) exhibit an unusual stress distribution at the crack tip as compared to common engineering materials, due to a stress-induced martensitic transformation resulting from highly localized stresses. Understanding the fracture mechanics of NiTi-based SMAs is critical to many of their applications. Here, we develop an analytical model, which predicts the boundaries of the transformation region in the crack tip vicinity of NiTi-based SMAs. The proposed model is based on a recent analytical approach which uses modified linear elastic fracture mechanics concepts to predict the crack tip stress distribution and transformation region in SMAs but, unfortunately, it applies only to the plane stress condition. To overcome this limitation, the proposed model accounts for stress triaxiality, which plays an important role in restricting crack tip plastic deformations in common ductile metals as well as the stress-induced martensite in NiTi SMAs. The effects of triaxial stress at the crack tip are taken into account by including a new parameter, the transformation constraint factor, which is based on the plastic constraint factor of elasto-plastic materials. The predictions of the model are compared with synchrotron x-ray micro-diffraction observations and satisfactory agreement is observed between the two results. Finally, the evolution of crack tip transformation boundaries during fracture tests of miniature compact tension specimens is predicted and the effects of applied load and crack length are discussed.

  6. Engineering diagnostics for vortex-induced stay vanes cracks in a Francis turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Agostini Neto, Alexandre; Gissoni, Humberto, Dr.; Gonçalves, Manuel, Dr.; Cardoso, Rogério; Jung, Alexander, Dr.; Meneghini, Julio, Prof.

    2016-11-01

    Despite the fact that vortex-induced vibration (VIV) in hydraulic turbines components (especially in stay vanes) is a well-known phenomenon, it still remains challenging for operation and maintenance teams in several power plants around the world. Since the first publication of a similar problem in 1967, literature shows that at least 27 other turbines witnessed strong stay vane vibrations associated with vortex shedding. Recurrent stay vane cracks in a 250 MW Francis turbine in Brazil motivated an engineering study involving prototype measurements, structural and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis in order to determine a proper geometry modification that could eliminate the periodic vortex wake generated at the stay vanes trailing edge. First cracks appeared in 1978 just after the machine was put into operation. A study published in 1982 associated these cracks with dynamic excitations caused by the water flow at high flow conditions. New stay vane profiles were proposed and executed as well as improved welding recommendations. Cracks however, continued to appear requiring welding repairs roughly every two years. Although Voith Hydro was not the original equipment manufacturer for these units, the necessary information was available to study the issue and propose and execute new stay vane profiles. This paper details the approach taken for the study. First, indirect vibration measurements were used to determine vibration frequencies to help to characterize the affected mode shapes. These results were compared to finite element (FE) calculations. Strain gage measurements performed afterwards confirmed the conclusions of this analysis. Next, transient CFD calculations were run to reproduce the measured phenomenon and to serve as a basis for a new stay vane geometry. This modification was then implemented in the actual turbine stay vanes. A new set of indirect vibration measurements indicated the effectiveness of the proposed solution. Final confirmation

  7. Competitive interaction of agonists and antagonists with 5-HT3 recognition sites in membranes of neuroblastoma cells labelled with (/sup 3/H)ICS 205-930

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyer, D.; Neijt, H.C.; Karpf, A.

    1989-01-01

    (3H)ICS 205-930 labelled 5-HT3 recognition sites in membranes prepared from murine neuroblastoma N1E-115 cells. Binding was rapid, reversible, saturable and stereoselective to an apparently homogeneous population of sites. Kinetic studies revealed that agonists and antagonists produced a monophasic dissociation reaction of (3H)ICS 205-930 from its recognition sites. The dissociation rate constant of the radioligand was similar whether the dissociation was induced by an agonist or an antagonist. Competition studies carried out with agonists and antagonists also suggested the presence of a homogeneous population of (3H)ICS 205-930 recognition sites. Competition curves were best fit for a 1 site model. (3H)ICS 205-930 binding sites displayed the pharmacological profile of a 5-HT3 receptor. The interactions of agonists and antagonists with (3H)ICS 205-930 recognition sites were apparently competitive in nature, as demonstrated in kinetic and equilibrium experiments. In saturation experiments carried out with (3H)ICS 205-930 in the presence and the absence of unlabelled agonists and antagonists, apparent Bmax values were not reduced whereas apparent Kd values were increased in the presence of competing ligands. There was a good agreement between apparent pKB values calculated for the competing ligands in saturation experiments and pKd values calculated from competition experiments. The present data demonstrate that (3H)ICS 205-930 labels a homogeneous population of sites at which agonists and antagonists interact competitively.

  8. Microcracking in Composite Laminates: Simulation of Crack-Induced Ultrasound Attenuation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leckey, C. A. C.; Rogge, M. D.; Parker, F. R.

    2012-01-01

    Microcracking in composite laminates is a known precursor to the growth of inter-ply delaminations and larger scale damage. Microcracking can lead to the attenuation of ultrasonic waves due to the crack-induced scattering. 3D elastodynamic finite integration technique (EFIT) has been implemented to explore the scattering of ultrasonic waves due to microcracks in anisotropic composite laminates. X-ray microfocus computed tomography data was directly input into the EFIT simulation for these purposes. The validated anisotropic 3D EFIT code is shown to be a useful tool for exploring the complex multiple-scattering which arises from extensive microcracking.

  9. Software tools for visualizing Hi-C data.

    PubMed

    Yardımcı, Galip Gürkan; Noble, William Stafford

    2017-02-03

    High-throughput assays for measuring the three-dimensional (3D) configuration of DNA have provided unprecedented insights into the relationship between DNA 3D configuration and function. Data interpretation from assays such as ChIA-PET and Hi-C is challenging because the data is large and cannot be easily rendered using standard genome browsers. An effective Hi-C visualization tool must provide several visualization modes and be capable of viewing the data in conjunction with existing, complementary data. We review five software tools that do not require programming expertise. We summarize their complementary functionalities, and highlight which tool is best equipped for specific tasks.

  10. Transient cracks and triple junctions induced by Cocos-Nazca propagating rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schouten, H.; Smith, D. K.; Zhu, W.; Montesi, L. G.; Mitchell, G. A.; Cann, J. R.

    2009-12-01

    The Galapagos triple junction is a ridge-ridge-ridge triple junction where the Cocos, Nazca, and Pacific plates meet around the Galapagos microplate (GMP). On the Cocos plate, north of the large gore that marks the propagating Cocos-Nazca (C-N) Rift, a 250-km-long and 50-km-wide band of NW-SE-trending cracks crosscuts the N-S-trending abyssal hills of the East Pacific Rise (EPR). These appear as a succession of minor rifts, accommodating some NE-SW extension of EPR-generated seafloor. The rifts successively intersected the EPR in triple junctions at distances of 50-100 km north of the tip of the C-N Rift. We proposed a simple crack interaction model to explain the location of the transient rifts and their junction with the EPR. The model predicts that crack locations are controlled by the stress perturbation along the EPR, induced by the dominant C-N Rift, and scaled by the distance of its tip to the EPR (Schouten et al., 2008). The model also predicts that tensile stresses are symmetric about the C-N Rift and thus, similar cracks should have occurred south of the C-N Rift prior to formation of the GMP about 1 Ma. There were no data at the time to test this prediction. In early 2009 (AT 15-41), we mapped an area on the Nazca plate south of the C-N rift out to 4 Ma. The new bathymetric data confirm the existence of a distinctive pattern of cracks south of the southern C-N gore that mirrors the pattern on the Cocos plate until about 1 Ma, and lends support to the crack interaction model. The envelope of the symmetric cracking pattern indicates that the distance between the C-N Rift tip and the EPR varied between 40 and 65 km during this time (1-4 Ma). The breakdown of the symmetry at 1 Ma accurately dates the onset of a southern plate boundary of the GMP, now Dietz Deep Rift. At present, the southern rift boundary of the GMP joins the EPR with a steep-sided, 80 km long ridge. This ridge releases the stress perturbation otherwise induced along the EPR by elastic

  11. Importance of crack-propagation-induced ε-martensite in strain-controlled low-cycle fatigue of high-Mn austenitic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huichao; Koyama, Motomichi; Sawaguchi, Takahiro; Tsuzaki, Kaneaki; Noguchi, Hiroshi

    2015-06-01

    We investigated the roles of deformation-induced ε-martensitic transformation on strain-controlled low-cycle fatigue (LCF) through crack-propagation analysis involving a notching technique that used a focused ion beam (FIB) setup on Fe-30Mn-4Si-2Al austenitic steel. Using the FIB notch, we separated the microstructure evolution into macroscopic cyclic deformation-induced and crack-propagation-induced microstructures. Following this, we clarified the fatigue crack-propagation-induced ε-martensitic transformation to decelerate crack propagation at a total strain range of 2%, obtaining an extraordinary LCF life of 1.1 × 104 cycles.

  12. Cbl-c Ubiquitin Ligase Activity Is Increased via the Interaction of Its RING Finger Domain with a LIM Domain of the Paxillin Homolog, Hic 5

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Philip E.; Kales, Stephen C.; Yadavalli, Rajgopal; Nau, Marion M.; Zhang, Han; Lipkowitz, Stanley

    2012-01-01

    Cbl proteins (Cbl, Cbl-b and Cbl-c) are ubiquitin ligases that are critical regulators of tyrosine kinase signaling. In this study we identify a new Cbl-c interacting protein, Hydrogen peroxide Induced Construct 5 (Hic-5). The two proteins interact through a novel interaction mediated by the RING finger of Cbl-c and the LIM2 domain of Hic-5. Further, this interaction is mediated and dependent on specific zinc coordinating complexes within the RING finger and LIM domain. Binding of Hic-5 to Cbl-c leads to an increase in the ubiquitin ligase activity of Cbl-c once Cbl-c has been activated by Src phosphorylation or through an activating phosphomimetic mutation. In addition, co-transfection of Hic-5 with Cbl-c leads to an increase in Cbl-c mediated ubiquitination of the EGFR. These data suggest that Hic-5 enhances Cbl-c ubiquitin ligase activity once Cbl-c has been phosphorylated and activated. Interactions between heterologous RING fingers have been shown to activate E3s. This is the first demonstration of enhancement of ubiquitin ligase activity of a RING finger ubiquitin ligase by the direct interaction of a LIM zinc coordinating domain. PMID:23145173

  13. Hydrogen-induced cold cracking in heat-affected zone of low-carbon high-strength steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Liangyun; Kong, Xiangwei; Hu, Zhiyong; Qiu, Chunlin

    2014-12-01

    The Y-groove cracking test by submerged arc welding was employed to study the susceptibility of a low-carbon high-strength steel to hydrogen-induced cold cracking (HICC). The morphology of hydrogen cracks was observed using an electron probe microscope. The results showed that the heat-affected zone (HAZ) has a higher susceptibility to HICC than the weld metal and that increasing heat input can improve the HICC resistance of the weldment. The intergranular microcracking is the main HICC mode at the lowest heat input condition, accompanied with some transgranular microcracks attached to complex inclusions. In combination with phase transformation behaviour in sub-zones, the effect of the phase transformation sequence is proposed to try to illustrate the fact that the fine-grained HAZ has higher probability of hydrogen cracking than the coarse-grained HAZ owing to the occurrence of hydrogen enrichment in the fine-grained HAZ after the transformation.

  14. Environment-induced embrittlement: Stress corrosion cracking and metal-induced embrittlement; Environmental embrittlement of iron aluminide alloys. Final report, September 1, 1986--August 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Heldt, L.A.; Milligan, W.W.; White, C.L.

    1991-12-31

    This research program has included two thrusts. The first addressed environment-induced embrittlement in a parallel study of stress corrosion cracking and metal-induced embrittlement. This work has examined (1) mechanical properties as influenced by embrittling environments, (2) fractography and crystallography or transgranular cracking, (3) the mechanics of cracking, (4) the extent and role of local plastic flow, and (5) local chemistry within stress corrosion and metal-induced cracks. The embrittlement of iron aluminide alloys by air was addressed by determining the effect of water and hydrogen upon the mechanical properties. Slow strain rate testing in aqueous environments was carried out at controlled anodic and cathodic potentials. The effect of cathodically charged hydrogen and the effect of subsequent baking were measured. Environmental susceptibility was measured as affected by alloy composition, microstructure and degree of ordering.

  15. Hi-C Observations of Penumbral Bright Dots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alpert, S. E.; Tiwari, S. K.; Moore, R. L.; Savage, S. L.; Winebarger, A. R.

    2014-01-01

    We use high-quality data obtained by the High Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) to examine bright dots (BDs) in a sunspot's penumbra. The sizes of these BDs are on the order of 1 arcsecond (1") and are therefore hard to identify using the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly's (AIA) 0.6" pixel(exp -1) resolution. These BD become readily apparent with Hi-C's 0.1" pixel(exp -1) resolution. Tian et al. (2014) found penumbral BDs in the transition region (TR) by using the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS). However, only a few of their dots could be associated with any enhanced brightness in AIA channels. In this work, we examine the characteristics of the penumbral BDs observed by Hi-C in a sunspot penumbra, including their sizes, lifetimes, speeds, and intensity. We also attempt to find any association of these BDs to the IRIS BDs. There are fewer Hi-C BDs in the penumbra than seen by IRIS, though different sunspots were studied. We use 193 Angstroms Hi-C data from July 11, 2012 which observed from approximately 18:52:00 UT- 18:56:00 UT and supplement it with data from AIA's 193 Angstrom passband to see the complete lifetime of the dots that were born before and/or lasted longer than Hi- C's 5-minute observation period. We use additional AIA passbands and compare the light curves of the BDs at different temperatures to test whether the Hi-C BDs are TR BDs. We find that most Hi-C BDs show clear movement, and of those that do, they move in a radial direction, toward or away from the sunspot umbra. Single BDs interact with other BDs, combining to fade away or brighten. The BDs that do not interact with other BDs tend to move less. Many of the properties of our BDs are similar to the extreme values of the IRIS BDs, e.g., they move slower on average and their sizes and lifetimes are on the higher end of the IRIS BDs. We infer that our penumbral BDs are the large-scale end of the distribution of BDs observed by IRIS.

  16. Capturing Three-Dimensional Genome Organization in Individual Cells by Single-Cell Hi-C.

    PubMed

    Nagano, Takashi; Wingett, Steven W; Fraser, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Hi-C is a powerful method to investigate genome-wide, higher-order chromatin and chromosome conformations averaged from a population of cells. To expand the potential of Hi-C for single-cell analysis, we developed single-cell Hi-C. Similar to the existing "ensemble" Hi-C method, single-cell Hi-C detects proximity-dependent ligation events between cross-linked and restriction-digested chromatin fragments in cells. A major difference between the single-cell Hi-C and ensemble Hi-C protocol is that the proximity-dependent ligation is carried out in the nucleus. This allows the isolation of individual cells in which nearly the entire Hi-C procedure has been carried out, enabling the production of a Hi-C library and data from individual cells. With this new method, we studied genome conformations and found evidence for conserved topological domain organization from cell to cell, but highly variable interdomain contacts and chromosome folding genome wide. In addition, we found that the single-cell Hi-C protocol provided cleaner results with less technical noise suggesting it could be used to improve the ensemble Hi-C technique.

  17. Hydrogen peroxide inducible clone-5 mediates reactive oxygen species signaling for hepatocellular carcinoma progression

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jia-Ru; Hu, Chi-Tan; You, Ren-In; Pan, Siou-Mei; Cheng, Chuan-Chu; Lee, Ming-Che; Wu, Chao-Chuan; Chang, Yao-Jen; Lin, Shu-Chuan; Chen, Chang-Shan; Lin, Teng-Yi; Wu, Wen-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    One of the signaling components involved in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) progression is the focal adhesion adaptor paxillin. Hydrogen peroxide inducible clone-5 (Hic-5), one of the paralogs of paxillin, exhibits many biological functions distinct from paxillin, but may cooperate with paxillin to trigger tumor progression. Screening of Hic-5 in 145 surgical HCCs demonstrated overexpression of Hic-5 correlated well with intra- and extra-hepatic metastasis. Hic-5 highly expressed in the patient derived HCCs with high motility such as HCC329 and HCC353 but not in the HCCs with low motility such as HCC340. Blockade of Hic-5 expression prevented constitutive migration of HCC329 and HCC353 and HGF-induced cell migration of HCC340. HCC329Hic-5(−), HCC353Hic-5(−), HCC372Hic-5(−), the HCCs stably depleted of Hic-5, exhibited reduced motility compared with each HCC expressing Scramble shRNA. Moreover, intra/extrahepatic metastasis of HCC329Hic-5(−) in SCID mice greatly decreased compared with HCC329Scramble. On the other hand, ectopic Hic-5 expression in HCC340 promoted its progression. Constitutive and HGF-induced Hic-5 expression in HCCs were suppressed by the reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavengers catalase and dithiotheritol and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor SP600125. On the contrary, depletion of Hic-5 blocked constitutive and HGF-induced ROS generation and JNK phosphorylation in HCCs. Also, ectopic expression of Hic-5 enhanced ROS generation and JNK phosphorylation. These highlighted that Hic-5 plays a central role in the positive feedback ROS-JNK signal cascade. Finally, the Chinese herbal derived anti-HCC peptide LZ-8 suppressed constitutive Hic-5 expression and JNK phosphorylation. In conclusion, Hic-5 mediates ROS-JNK signaling and may serve as a therapeutic target for prevention of HCC progression. PMID:26416447

  18. Quantitative observations of hydrogen-induced, slow crack growth in a low alloy steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, H. G.; Williams, D. P.

    1973-01-01

    Hydrogen-induced slow crack growth, da/dt, was studied in AISI-SAE 4130 low alloy steel in gaseous hydrogen and distilled water environments as a function of applied stress intensity, K, at various temperatures, hydrogen pressures, and alloy strength levels. At low values of K, da/dt was found to exhibit a strong exponential K dependence (Stage 1 growth) in both hydrogen and water. At intermediate values of K, da/dt exhibited a small but finite K dependence (Stage 2), with the Stage 2 slope being greater in hydrogen than in water. In hydrogen, at a constant K, (da/dt) sub 2 varied inversely with alloy strength level and varied essentially in the same complex manner with temperature and hydrogen pressure as noted previously. The results of this study provide support for most of the qualitative predictions of the lattice decohesion theory as recently modified by Oriani. The lack of quantitative agreement between data and theory and the inability of theory to explain the observed pressure dependence of slow crack growth are mentioned and possible rationalizations to account for these differences are presented.

  19. Microwave-induced cracking of pyrolytic tars coupled to microwave pyrolysis for syngas production.

    PubMed

    Beneroso, D; Bermúdez, J M; Montes-Morán, M A; Arenillas, A; Menéndez, J A

    2016-10-01

    Herein a new process is proposed to produce a syngas-rich gas fraction (>80vol% H2+CO) from biowaste based on microwave heating within two differentiated steps in order to avoid tars production. The first step consists of the microwave pyrolysis of biowaste induced by a char-based susceptor at 400-800°C; tars, char and syngas-rich gas fractions being produced. The tars are then fed into the second step where a portion of the char from the first step is used as a bed material in a 0.3:1wt% ratio. This bed is heated up by microwaves up to 800°C, allowing thermal cracking of tars and additional syngas (>90vol% H2+CO) being then produced. This new concept arises as an alternative technology to the gasification of biowastes for producing syngas with no need for catalysts or gasifying reagents to minimise tars production.

  20. Hydrogen Induced Cracking in Titanium Drip Shield of High-Level Waste Repository

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, S C

    2001-05-30

    Both qualitative and quantitative assessments have been conducted to evaluate the effects of hydrogen induced cracking on the drip shield. The basic premise of the assessments is that failure will occur once the hydrogen content exceeds a certain limit or critical value, H{sub c}. Potential mechanisms for hydrogen absorption in the drip shield have been identified to be general passive corrosion and galvanic couple with steel components. Both qualitative and quantitative evaluations indicated that hydrogen concentration in the drip shield will be below the critical value by a considerable margin. The choice of the mathematical models and associated parameters appears to be reasonable. Continued effort in data collection and development should provide validation and improved level of confidence of the proposed models.

  1. Modelling of iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking in CANDU fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, B. J.; Thompson, W. T.; Kleczek, M. R.; Shaheen, K.; Juhas, M.; Iglesias, F. C.

    2011-01-01

    Iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking (I-SCC) is a recognized factor for fuel-element failure in the operation of nuclear reactors requiring the implementation of mitigation measures. I-SCC is believed to depend on certain factors such as iodine concentration, oxide layer type and thickness on the fuel sheath, irradiation history, metallurgical parameters related to sheath like texture and microstructure, and the mechanical properties of zirconium alloys. This work details the development of a thermodynamics and mechanistic treatment accounting for the iodine chemistry and kinetics in the fuel-to-sheath gap and its influence on I-SCC phenomena. The governing transport equations for the model are solved with a finite-element technique using the COMSOL Multiphysics® commercial software platform. Based on this analysis, this study also proposes potential remedies for I-SCC.

  2. Analysis of laser generated ultrasonic wave frequency characteristics induced by a partially closed surface-breaking crack.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia; Zhang, Hongchao; Ni, Chenyin; Shen, Zhonghua

    2013-06-20

    This research focuses on analyzing the frequency characteristics of ultrasonic waves induced by a partially closed surface-breaking crack. When acoustic waves interact with the crack, transmission, reflection, and mode conversions occur and the frequency characteristics of signals perform obvious changes. A pulsed laser line source is used to generate ultrasonic waves in the sample with a partially closed surface-breaking crack, and one can see how the frequency characteristics of detected signals change as the pulsed laser beam scans across the sample surface. The optical deflection beam method is developed to detect the ultrasonic signals experimentally. The fast Fourier transform (FFT) is used to analyze the time-domain data, and the FFT data are visualized by a B-scan plot. A clear disruption in the B-scan can be observed when the laser beam illuminates directly onto the crack, which is due to the changes of frequency characteristics induced by the partially closed crack. A frequency-domain B-scan of numerical simulation results is presented, and the clear disruption can also be observed clearly.

  3. Implication of rapid thermal annealing-induced cracks on the performance of multiple-quantum-well laser diodes.

    PubMed

    Yee, Hoshin H; Yu, Chih-Ping

    2003-05-20

    We investigated the effects of rapid thermal annealing (RTA)-induced cracks on the diode performance fabricated with GaAs-AlGaAs microstructures. These effects were examined and characterized after quantum-well intermixing within an epitaxial structure capped by either SiO2 or SrF2 layers. The results show clearly that the density of surface crackes strongly depends on the atomic interdiffusion between the well and the barrier layers and on the quality of the dielectric caps as well. Moreover, surface-crack correlation with the RTA process an dielectric deposition parameters, and the cracking effects on diode performance were observed and analyzed in detail. The results demonstrate that diode characteristics can be greatly improved by good surface morphology. Most importantly, we explored an effective way of reducing the density of RTA-induced cracks for the dielectrics grown by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition, which was beneficial for dielectric-cap quantum-well disordering.

  4. Hic-5 mediates the initiation of endothelial sprouting by regulating a key surface metalloproteinase

    PubMed Central

    Dave, Jui M.; Abbey, Colette A.; Duran, Camille L.; Seo, Heewon; Johnson, Gregory A.; Bayless, Kayla J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT During angiogenesis, endothelial cells must coordinate matrix proteolysis with migration. Here, we tested whether the focal adhesion scaffold protein Hic-5 (also known as TGFB1I1) regulated endothelial sprouting in three dimensions. Hic-5 silencing reduced endothelial sprouting and lumen formation, and sprouting defects were rescued by the return of Hic-5 expression. Pro-angiogenic factors enhanced colocalization and complex formation between membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP, also known as MMP14) and Hic-5, but not between paxillin and MT1-MMP. The LIM2 and LIM3 domains of Hic-5 were necessary and sufficient for Hic-5 to form a complex with MT1-MMP. The degree of interaction between MT1-MMP and Hic-5 and the localization of the complex within detergent-resistant membrane fractions were enhanced during endothelial sprouting, and Hic-5 depletion lowered the surface levels of MT1-MMP. In addition, we observed that loss of Hic-5 partially reduced complex formation between MT1-MMP and focal adhesion kinase (FAK, also known as PTK2), suggesting that Hic-5 bridges MT1-MMP and FAK. Finally, Hic-5 LIM2–LIM3 deletion mutants reduced sprout initiation. Hic-5, MT1-MMP and FAK colocalized in angiogenic vessels during porcine pregnancy, supporting that this complex assembles during angiogenesis in vivo. Collectively, Hic-5 appears to enhance complex formation between MT1-MMP and FAK in activated endothelial cells, which likely coordinates matrix proteolysis and cell motility. PMID:26769900

  5. Development of chloride-induced corrosion in pre-cracked RC beams under sustained loading: Effect of load-induced cracks, concrete cover, and exposure conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Linwen; François, Raoul; Dang, Vu Hiep; L'Hostis, Valérie; Gagné, Richard

    2015-01-15

    This paper deals with corrosion initiation and propagation in pre-cracked reinforced concrete beams under sustained loading during exposure to a chloride environment. Specimen beams that were cast in 2010 were compared to specimens cast in 1984. The only differences between the two sets of beams were the casting direction in relation to tensile reinforcement and the exposure conditions in the salt-fog chamber. The cracking maps, corrosion maps, chloride profiles, and cross-sectional loss of one group of two beams cast in 2010 were studied and their calculated corrosion rates were compared to that of beams cast in 1984 in order to investigate the factors influencing the natural corrosion process. Experimental results show that, after rapid initiation of corrosion at the crack tip, the corrosion process practically halted and the time elapsing before corrosion resumed depended on the exposure conditions and cover depth.

  6. Stress-induced amorphization at moving crack tips in NiTi

    SciTech Connect

    Okamoto, P.R.; Heuer, J.K.; Lam, N.Q.; Ohnuki, S.; Matsukawa, Y.; Tozawa, K.; Stubbins, J.F.

    1998-07-01

    {ital In situ} fracture studies have been carried out on thin films of the NiTi intermetallic compound under plane stress, tensile loading conditions in the high-voltage electron microscope. Local stress-induced amorphization of regions directly in front of moving crack tips has been observed. The upper cutoff temperature, T{sub C{endash}A}{sup max}, for the stress-induced crystalline-to-amorphous transformation was found to be 600 K, identical to that for heavy ion-induced amorphization of NiTi and for ion-beam mixing-induced amorphization of Ni and Ti multilayer specimens. 600 K is also both the lower cutoff temperature, T{sub A{endash}C}{sup min}, for radiation-induced crystallization of initially-unrelaxed amorphous NiTi and the lowest isothermal annealing temperature, T{sub X}{sup min}, at which stress-induced amorphous NiTi crystallizes. Since T{sub X}{sup min} should be T{sub K}, the ideal glass transition temperature, the discovery that T{sub C{endash}A}{sup max}=T{sub A{endash}C}{sup min}=T{sub X}{sup min}=T{sub K} implies that disorder-driven crystalline-to-amorphous transformations result in the formation of the ideal glass, i.e., the glassy state that has the same entropy as that of the defect-free crystal. As the glassy state with the lowest free energy, its formation can be understood as the most energetically-favored, kinetically-constrained response of crystalline alloys driven far from equilibrium. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Coronal Loop Evolution Observed with AIA and Hi-C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulu-Moore, Fana; Winebarger, A.; Cirtain, J.; Kobayashi, K.; Korreck, K.; Golub, L.; Kuzin. S.; Walsh, R.; DeForest, C.; DePontieu, B.; Weber, M.

    2012-01-01

    Despite much progress toward understanding the dynamics of the solar corona, the physical properties of coronal loops are not yet fully understood. Recent investigations and observations from different instruments have yielded contradictory results about the true physical properties of coronal loops. In the past, the evolution of loops has been used to infer the loop substructure. With the recent launch of High Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C), this inference can be validated. In this poster we discuss the first results of loop analysis comparing AIA and Hi-C data. We find signatures of cooling in a pixel selected along a loop structure in the AIA multi-filter observations. However, unlike previous studies, we find that the cooling time is much longer than the draining time. This is inconsistent with previous cooling models.

  8. Environment-Assisted Cracking of Twinning Induced Plasticity (TWIP) Steel: Role of pH and Twinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh Raman, R. K.; Khalissi, Muhammed; Khoddam, Shahin

    2014-04-01

    This article presents the study of the environment-assisted cracking (EAC) of twinning induced plasticity (TWIP) steels that possess remarkable combination of strength and ductility. EAC of a high-manganese TWIP steel was investigated, using aqueous solutions of different pH, which provided a mechanistic insight into the combined role of the localized deformation due to twinning and the electrochemical characteristic of the steel. Slow strain rate testing in inert environment as well as in acidic, neutral and alkaline solutions, and the fractography of the failed specimens have suggested a profound role of twinning in EAC crack propagation.

  9. Effect of disorder on temporal fluctuations in drying-induced cracking.

    PubMed

    Villalobos, Gabriel; Kun, Ferenc; Muñoz, José D

    2011-10-01

    We investigate by means of computer simulations the effect of structural disorder on the statistics of cracking for a thin layer of material under uniform and isotropic drying. For this purpose, the layer is discretized into a triangular lattice of springs with a slightly randomized arrangement. The drying process is captured by reducing the natural length of all springs by the same factor, and the amount of quenched disorder is controlled by varying the width ξ of the distribution of the random breaking thresholds for the springs. Once a spring breaks, the redistribution of the load may trigger an avalanche of breaks, not necessarily as part of the same crack. Our computer simulations revealed that the system exhibits a phase transition with the amount of disorder as control parameter: at low disorders, the breaking process is dominated by a macroscopic crack at the beginning, and the size distribution of the subsequent breaking avalanches shows an exponential form. At high disorders, the fracturing proceeds in small-sized avalanches with an exponential distribution, generating a large number of microcracks, which eventually merge and break the layer. Between both phases, a sharp transition occurs at a critical amount of disorder ξ(c)=0.40±0.01, where the avalanche size distribution becomes a power law with exponent τ=2.6±0.08, in agreement with the mean-field value τ=5/2 of the fiber bundle model. Moreover, good quality data collapses from the finite-size scaling analysis show that the average value of the largest burst ⟨Δ(max)⟩ can be identified as the order parameter, with β/ν=1.4 and 1/ν≃1.0, and that the average ratio ⟨m(2)/m(1)⟩ of the second m(2) and first moments m(1) of the avalanche size distribution shows similar behavior to the susceptibility of a continuous transition, with γ/ν=1, 1/ν≃0.9. These results suggest that the disorder-induced transition of the breakup of thin layers is analogous to a continuous phase transition.

  10. Cracking-induced permeability alterations in geomaterials: A comparison of experiments and computational predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massart, T. J.; Selvadurai, A. P.

    2012-12-01

    continuum descriptions [1]. Using this procedure, the effect of progressive microcracking on the overall permeability properties of quasi-brittle geomaterials is investigated. The procedures are used to estimate the variation of permeability with the confining pressures and deviatoric stresses applied in triaxial testing. The influence of fine-scale phenomena such as stiffness degradation or crack dilatancy on the resulting macroscopic permeability and its anisotropic evolution are scrutinized. The obtained quantities are compared with experimental results for the permeability evolution in granite samples, and it is shown that the computational approach is able to satisfactorily match the experimental results. [1] T.J. Massart, A.P.S. Selvadurai, Stress-induced permeability evolution in a quasi-brittle geomaterial, J. Geophys. Res., 117, B07207, 2012.

  11. Identifying and Understanding Environment-Induced Crack propagation Behavior in Ni-based Superalloy INCONEL 617

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Longzhou

    2012-11-30

    The nickel-based superalloy INCONEL 617 is a candidate material for heat exchanger applications in the next-generation nuclear plant (NGNP) system. This project will study the crack propagation process of alloy 617 at temperatures of 650°C-950°C in air under static/cyclic loading conditions. The goal is to identify the environmental and mechanical damage components and to understand in-depth the failure mechanism. Researchers will measure the fatigue crack propagation (FCP) rate (da/dn) under cyclic and hold-time fatigue conditions, and sustained crack growth rates (da/dt) at elevated temperatures. The independent FCP process will be identified and the rate-controlled sustained loading crack process will be correlated with the thermal activation equation to estimate the oxygen thermal activation energy. The FCP-dependent model indicates that if the sustained loading crack growth rate, da/dt, can be correlated with the FCP rate, da/dn, at the full time dependent stage, researchers can confirm stress-accelerated grain-boundary oxygen embrittlement (SAGBOE) as a predominate effect. Following the crack propagation tests, the research team will examine the fracture surface of materials in various cracking stages using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and an optical microscope. In particular, the microstructure of the crack tip region will be analyzed in depth using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron energy loss spectrum (EELS) mapping techniques to identify oxygen penetration along the grain boundary and to examine the diffused oxygen distribution profile around the crack tip. The cracked sample will be prepared by focused ion beam nanofabrication technology, allowing researchers to accurately fabricate the TEM samples from the crack tip while minimizing artifacts. Researchers will use these microscopic and spectroscopic results to interpret the crack propagation process, as well as distinguish and understand the environment or

  12. Crack-induced debonding failure in fiber reinforced plastics (FRP) strengthened concrete beams: Experimental and theoretical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Jinlong

    External bonding of FRP plates to the tension substrate of RC beams has been accepted as an efficient and effective technique for flexural strengthening. In this thesis, different problems related to crack-induced debonding of the FRP plate in the flexural strengthened concrete beams have been investigated. FRP strengthened RC beam may fail by FRP debonding from the bottom of a major flexural crack in the span. This kind of failure is studied with the direct shear test in the present research work. Our experimental investigation focuses on the effect of concrete composition on the bond behavior between FRP and concrete. Based on the test results, the bond capacity of the specimen is found to be governed by the concrete surface tensile strength, aggregate size and aggregate content. Then, the neural network is employed to derive an empirical expression for the interfacial fracture energy in terms of concrete surface tensile strength and aggregate content. Using the empirical equation, simulated bond capacity is in good agreement with experimental results. In the FRP strengthened RC beams, debonding of the FRP plate often occurs under the presence of multiple cracks along the span. In the present thesis, experimental and theoretical investigations are performed to study the effect of multiple secondary cracks on the debonding behavior and ultimate load capacity. A new analytical model for FRP debonding under multiple cracks has been developed. The effect of the multiple secondary cracks on the shear softening in the debonded zone is explicitly considered in the model. Using the new model, the simulated values of ultimate load when debonding occurs are in good agreement with measured values. In the FRP strengthened RC beams, concrete cover separation or plate end debonding can be avoided by applying tapers at the FRP plate end. In this situation, it is easier for FRP debonding to be induced by a major flexural crack close to the support. To study the effect of the

  13. Computational Modeling of Micro-Crack Induced Attenuation in CFRP Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, R. A.; Leckey, C. A. C.

    2012-01-01

    A computational study is performed to determine the contribution to ultrasound attenuation in carbon fiber reinforced polymer composite laminates of linear elastic scattering by matrix micro-cracking. Multiple scattering approximations are benchmarked against exact computational approaches. Results support linear scattering as the source of observed increased attenuation in the presence of micro-cracking.

  14. Computational modeling of micro-crack induced attenuation in CFRP composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, R. A.; Leckey, C. A. C.

    2013-01-01

    A computational study is performed to determine the contribution to ultrasound attenuation in carbon fiber reinforced polymer composite laminates of linear elastic scattering by matrix micro-cracking. Multiple scattering approximations are benchmarked against exact computational approaches. Results support linear scattering as the source of observed increased attenuation in the presence of micro-cracking.

  15. Prediction of reinforcement corrosion using corrosion induced cracks width in corroded reinforced concrete beams

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Inamullah; François, Raoul; Castel, Arnaud

    2014-02-15

    This paper studies the evolution of reinforcement corrosion in comparison to corrosion crack width in a highly corroded reinforced concrete beam. Cracking and corrosion maps of the beam were drawn and steel reinforcement was recovered from the beam to observe the corrosion pattern and to measure the loss of mass of steel reinforcement. Maximum steel cross-section loss of the main reinforcement and average steel cross-section loss between stirrups were plotted against the crack width. The experimental results were compared with existing models proposed by Rodriguez et al., Vidal et al. and Zhang et al. Time prediction models for a given opening threshold are also compared to experimental results. Steel cross-section loss for stirrups was also measured and was plotted against the crack width. It was observed that steel cross-section loss in the stirrups had no relationship with the crack width of longitudinal corrosion cracks. -- Highlights: •Relationship between crack and corrosion of reinforcement was investigated. •Corrosion results of natural process and then corresponds to in-situ conditions. •Comparison with time predicting model is provided. •Prediction of load-bearing capacity from crack pattern was studied.

  16. Modeling of water absorption induced cracks in resin-based composite supported ceramic layer structures.

    PubMed

    Huang, Min; Thompson, V P; Rekow, E D; Soboyejo, W O

    2008-01-01

    Cracking patterns in the top ceramic layers of the modeled dental multilayers with polymer foundation are observed when they are immersed in water. This article developed a model to understand this cracking mechanism. When water diffuses into the polymer foundation of dental restorations, the foundation will expand; as a result, the stress will build up in the top ceramic layer because of the bending and stretching. A finite element model based on this mechanism is built to predict the stress build-up and the slow crack growth in the top ceramic layers during the water absorption. Our simulations show that the stress build-up by this mechanism is high enough to cause the cracking in the top ceramic layers and the cracking patterns predicted by our model are well consistent with those observed in experiments on glass/epoxy/polymer multilayers. The model is then used to discuss the life prediction of different dental ceramics.

  17. Concrete cover cracking with reinforcement corrosion of RC beam during chloride-induced corrosion process

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Ruijin; Castel, Arnaud; Francois, Raoul

    2010-03-15

    This paper deals with the evolution of the corrosion pattern based on two beams corroded by 14 years (beam B1CL1) and 23 years (beam B2CL1) of conservation in a chloride environment. The experimental results indicate that, at the cracking initiation stage and the first stage of cracking propagation, localized corrosion due to chloride ingress is the predominant corrosion pattern and pitting corrosion is the main factor that influences the cracking process. As corrosion cracking increases, general corrosion develops rapidly and gradually becomes predominant in the second stage of cracking propagation. A comparison between existing models and experimental results illustrates that, although Vidal et al.'s model can better predict the reinforcement corrosion of beam B1CL1 under localized corrosion, it cannot predict the corrosion of beam B2CL1 under general corrosion. Also, Rodriguez's model, derived from the general corrosion due to electrically accelerated corrosion experiments, cannot match natural chloride corrosion irrespective of whether corrosion is localized or general. Thus, for natural general corrosion in the second stage of cracking propagation, a new model based on the parameter of average steel cross-section loss is put forward to predict steel corrosion from corrosion cracking.

  18. Analysis of delamination in cross-ply laminates initiating from impact induced matrix cracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salpekar, S. A.

    1993-01-01

    Two-dimensional finite element analyses of (02/90(8)/02) glass/epoxy and graphite/epoxy composite laminates were performed to investigate some of the characteristics of damage development due to an impact load. A cross section through the thickness of the laminate with fixed ends, and carrying a transverse load in the center, was analyzed. Inclined matrix cracks, such as those produced by a low-velocity impact, were modeled in the 90 deg ply group. The introduction of the matrix cracks caused large interlaminar tensile and shear stresses in the vicinity of both crack tips in the 0/90 and 90/0 interfaces, indicating that matrix cracking may give rise to delamination. The ratio of Mode I to total strain energy release rate, G(I)/G(total), at the beginning of delamination, calculated at the two (top and bottom) matrix crack tips was 60 and 28 percent, respectively, in the glass/epoxy laminate. The corresponding ratio was 97 and 77 percent in the graphite/epoxy laminate. Thus, a significant Mode I component of strain energy release rate may be present at the delamination initiation due to an impact load. The value of strain energy release rate at either crack tip increased due to an increase in the delamination length at the other crack tip and may give rise to an unstable delamination growth under constant load.

  19. Effects of thickness on plasticity-induced fatigue crack closure: Analysis and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, C.; Chan, K.K.; Yu, J.

    1999-07-01

    The crack-opening stress was measured using a strain gage technique on 7050 aluminum alloy, under constant amplitude and repeated overload. The behavior of crack-opening stress predicted by Newman's FASTRAN-II is consistent with the experimental results for repeated overload. It is also found that the FASTRAN-II program is capable of predicting crack growth on the 7050-T76 aluminum plate and 7050-T76 aluminum plate and 7050-T7452 aluminum hand forging under complex simulated flight loading which contains a significant number of compression cycles.

  20. Massively multiplex single-cell Hi-C.

    PubMed

    Ramani, Vijay; Deng, Xinxian; Qiu, Ruolan; Gunderson, Kevin L; Steemers, Frank J; Disteche, Christine M; Noble, William S; Duan, Zhijun; Shendure, Jay

    2017-03-01

    We present single-cell combinatorial indexed Hi-C (sciHi-C), a method that applies combinatorial cellular indexing to chromosome conformation capture. In this proof of concept, we generate and sequence six sciHi-C libraries comprising a total of 10,696 single cells. We use sciHi-C data to separate cells by karyotypic and cell-cycle state differences and identify cell-to-cell heterogeneity in mammalian chromosomal conformation. Our results demonstrate that combinatorial indexing is a generalizable strategy for single-cell genomics.

  1. Current understanding of stress-corrosion cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Parkins, R.N. )

    1992-12-01

    The mechanisms that cause stress corrosion cracking and the conditions in which they apply are reviewed. Attention is given to hydrogen-assisted cracking, film-induced cleavage, dissolution mechanisms, surface-mobility mechanism, cracking environments, deformation and cracking, and stochastic aspects of cracking. 70 refs.

  2. Alternating field induced crack patterns in desiccating Laponite solutions: experiment and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sircar, Sudeshna; Khatun, Tajkera; Dutta, Tapati; Tarafdar, Sujata

    2016-12-01

    A randomized spring-network model is proposed to simulate crack patterns in drying aqueous solution of Laponite in the presence of a radial inhomogeneous direct current (DC) and alternating current (AC) electric field. The simulation model produces realistic radial and cross-radial cracks in DC field for the two cases: centre positive and centre negative, respectively. Having validated the model for the case of DC, it is applied to study patterns in drying clay colloidal solutions in an AC field. In this case, the cracks curve along their path after their emergence from the inner electrode. The crack patterns are analyzed in terms of applied voltage, electrode and system size. Our experiments on aqueous Laponite films drying in the presence of an AC field, compare favourably with the simulation results.

  3. Analysis of delamination in cross ply laminates initiating from impact induced matrix cracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salpekar, S. A.

    1991-01-01

    Several two dimensional finite element analyses of (0 sub 2/90 sub 8/0 sub 2) glass/epoxy and graphite-epoxy composite laminates were performed to study some of the characteristics of damage development due to an impact load. A cross section through the thickness of the laminate with fixed ends, and carrying a transverse load in the center was analyzed. Inclined matrix cracks such as those produced by low velocity impact were modeled in the 90 deg ply group. The introduction of the matrix cracks caused large interlaminar tension and shear stresses in the vicinity of both crack tips in the 0/90 and 90/0 interfaces. The large interlaminar stresses at the ends of the matrix cracks indicate that matrix cracking may give rise to delamination. The ratio of mode I to total strain energy release rate at the beginning of delamination calculated at the two matrix crack tips was 60 and 28 pct., respectively, in the glass/epoxy laminate. The corresponding ratio was 97 and 77 pct. in the graphite-epoxy laminate. Thus, a significant mode I component of strain energy release rate may be present at the delamination initiation due to an impact load.

  4. Determining the energy level of laser induced cracks in alumina substrate via acoustic emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslan, M.; Beausang, J.; Tittmann, B. R.

    2000-05-01

    The electronics industry relies on alumina (Al2O3) substrates to isolate, electrically and thermally, the computer chip from the rest of the circuit. In order to improve the manufacturing process of these chips, it is desirable to machine the substrates with a laser rather than the conventional techniques. Unfortunately, the high thermal stresses due to the intensity of the laser cause the extremely brittle ceramic to crack and sometimes fail. The purpose of this research was to study the response of a thin alumina ceramic substrate while it was slowly drilled with a CO2 laser. The energy released by the cracks were measured in-situ via acoustic emission (AE). AE is ideal for capturing the stress wave emissions emitted from the cracking events, while the ceramic is being drilled with the laser. One of the components of the AE system, the Digital Wave Fracture Wave Detector™, recorded the AE signals emitted during slow laser drilling of the alumina plates. Total crack length was correlated with total AE energy emitted, and these data were compared in two experiments, slow drilling and crack extension. A fundamental trend of increasing AE energy with increasing crack length was verified in these experiments.—This work has been partially supported by National Science Foundation Grant #CMS-9634744.

  5. Hydrogen-induced cracking along the fusion boundary of dissimilar metal welds

    SciTech Connect

    Rowe, M.D.; Nelson, T.W.; Lippold, J.C.

    1999-02-01

    Presented here are the results from a series of experiments in which dissimilar metals welds were made using the gas tungsten arc welding process with pure argon or argon-6% hydrogen shielding gas. The objective was to determine if cracking near the fusion boundary of dissimilar metal welds could be caused by hydrogen absorbed during welding and to characterize the microstructures in which cracking occurred. Welds consisted of ER308 and ER309LSi austenitic stainless steel and ERNiCr-3-nickel-based filler metals deposited on A36 steel base metal. Cracking was observed in welds made with all three filler metals. A ferrofluid color metallography technique revealed that cracking was confined to regions in the weld metal containing martensite. Microhardness indentations indicated that martensitic regions in which cracking occurred had hardness values from 400 to 550 HV. Cracks did not extend into bulk weld metal with hardness less than 350 HV. Martensite formed near the fusion boundary in all three filler metals due to regions of locally increased base metal dilution.

  6. Hic-5 is required for myofibroblast differentiation by regulating mechanically dependent MRTF-A nuclear accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Varney, Scott D.; Betts, Courtney B.; Zheng, Rui; Wu, Lei; Hinz, Boris; Zhou, Jiliang; Van De Water, Livingston

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT How mechanical cues from the extracellular environment are translated biochemically to modulate the effects of TGF-β on myofibroblast differentiation remains a crucial area of investigation. We report here that the focal adhesion protein, Hic-5 (also known as TGFB1I1), is required for the mechanically dependent generation of stress fibers in response to TGF-β. Successful generation of stress fibers promotes the nuclear localization of the transcriptional co-factor MRTF-A (also known as MKL1), and this correlates with the mechanically dependent induction of α smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and Hic-5 in response to TGF-β. As a consequence of regulating stress fiber assembly, Hic-5 is required for the nuclear accumulation of MRTF-A and the induction of α-SMA as well as cellular contractility, suggesting a crucial role for Hic-5 in myofibroblast differentiation. Indeed, the expression of Hic-5 was transient in acute wounds and persistent in pathogenic scars, and Hic-5 colocalized with α-SMA expression in vivo. Taken together, these data suggest that a mechanically dependent feed-forward loop, elaborated by the reciprocal regulation of MRTF-A localization by Hic-5 and Hic-5 expression by MRTF-A, plays a crucial role in myofibroblast differentiation in response to TGF-β. PMID:26759173

  7. DISCOVERY OF FINELY STRUCTURED DYNAMIC SOLAR CORONA OBSERVED IN THE Hi-C TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Winebarger, Amy R.; Cirtain, Jonathan; Savage, Sabrina; Alexander, Caroline; Golub, Leon; DeLuca, Edward; Schuler, Timothy

    2014-05-20

    In the Summer of 2012, the High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) flew on board a NASA sounding rocket and collected the highest spatial resolution images ever obtained of the solar corona. One of the goals of the Hi-C flight was to characterize the substructure of the solar corona. We therefore examine how the intensity scales from AIA resolution to Hi-C resolution. For each low-resolution pixel, we calculate the standard deviation in the contributing high-resolution pixel intensities and compare that to the expected standard deviation calculated from the noise. If these numbers are approximately equal, the corona can be assumed to be smoothly varying, i.e., have no evidence of substructure in the Hi-C image to within Hi-C's ability to measure it given its throughput and readout noise. A standard deviation much larger than the noise value indicates the presence of substructure. We calculate these values for each low-resolution pixel for each frame of the Hi-C data. On average, 70% of the pixels in each Hi-C image show no evidence of substructure. The locations where substructure is prevalent is in the moss regions and in regions of sheared magnetic field. We also find that the level of substructure varies significantly over the roughly 160 s of the Hi-C data analyzed here. This result indicates that the finely structured corona is concentrated in regions of heating and is highly time dependent.

  8. HicAB toxin-antitoxin complex from Escherichia coli: expression and crystallization.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jingsi; Xu, Bingshuang; Gao, Zengqiang; Zhou, Ke; Liu, Peng; Dong, Yuhui; Zhang, Jianjun; Liu, Quansheng

    2017-09-01

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems are widespread in both bacteria and archaea, where they enable cells to adapt to environmental cues. TA systems play crucial roles in various cellular processes, such as programmed cell death, cell growth, persistence and virulence. Here, two distinct forms of the type II toxin-antitoxin complex HicAB were identified and characterized in Escherichia coli K-12, and both were successfully overexpressed and purified. The two proposed forms, HicAB(L) and HicAB(S), differed in the presence or absence of a seven-amino-acid segment at the N-terminus in the antitoxin HicB. The short form HicAB(S) readily crystallized under the conditions 0.1 M Tris-HCl pH 8.0, 20%(w/v) PEG 6000, 0.2 M ammonium sulfate. The HicAB(S) crystal diffracted and data were collected to 2.5 Å resolution. The crystal belonged to space group I222 or I212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 67.04, b = 66.31, c = 120.78 Å. Matthews coefficient calculation suggested the presence of two molecules each of HicA and HicB(S) in the asymmetric unit, with a solvent content of 55.28% and a Matthews coefficient (VM) of 2.75 Å(3) Da(-1).

  9. Discovery of Finely Structured Dynamic Solar Corona Observed in the Hi-C Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winebarger, A.; Cirtain, J.; Golub, L.; DeLuca, E.; Savage, S.; Alexander, C.; Schuler, T.

    2014-01-01

    In the summer of 2012, the High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) flew aboard a NASA sounding rocket and collected the highest spatial resolution images ever obtained of the solar corona. One of the goals of the Hi-C flight was to characterize the substructure of the solar corona. We therefore examine how the intensity scales from AIA resolution to Hi-C resolution. For each low-resolution pixel, we calculate the standard deviation in the contributing high-resolution pixel intensities and compare that to the expected standard deviation calculated from the noise. If these numbers are approximately equal, the corona can be assumed to be smoothly varying, i.e. have no evidence of substructure in the Hi-C image to within Hi-C's ability to measure it given its throughput and readout noise. A standard deviation much larger than the noise value indicates the presence of substructure. We calculate these values for each low-resolution pixel for each frame of the Hi-C data. On average, 70 percent of the pixels in each Hi-C image show no evidence of substructure. The locations where substructure is prevalent is in the moss regions and in regions of sheared magnetic field. We also find that the level of substructure varies significantly over the roughly 160 s of the Hi-C data analyzed here. This result indicates that the finely structured corona is concentrated in regions of heating and is highly time dependent.

  10. Environmentally Assisted Cracking of Drill Pipes in Deep Drilling Oil and Natural Gas Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziomek-Moroz, M.

    2012-06-01

    Corrosion fatigue (CF), hydrogen induced cracking (HIC) and sulfide stress cracking (SSC), or environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) have been identified as the most challenging causes of catastrophic brittle fracture of drill pipes during drilling operations of deep oil and natural gas wells. Although corrosion rates can be low and tensile stresses during service can be below the material yield stress, a simultaneous action between the stress and corrosive environment can cause a sudden brittle failure of a drill component. Overall, EAC failure consists of two stages: incubation and propagation. Defects, such as pits, second-phase inclusions, etc., serve as preferential sites for the EAC failure during the incubation stage. Deep oil and gas well environments are rich in chlorides and dissolved hydrogen sulfide, which are extremely detrimental to steels used in drilling operations. This article discusses catastrophic brittle fracture mechanisms due to EAC of drill pipe materials, and the corrosion challenges that need to be overcome for drilling ultra-deep oil and natural gas wells.

  11. Understanding spatial organizations of chromosomes via statistical analysis of Hi-C data

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Ming; Deng, Ke; Qin, Zhaohui; Liu, Jun S.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how chromosomes fold provides insights into the transcription regulation, hence, the functional state of the cell. Using the next generation sequencing technology, the recently developed Hi-C approach enables a global view of spatial chromatin organization in the nucleus, which substantially expands our knowledge about genome organization and function. However, due to multiple layers of biases, noises and uncertainties buried in the protocol of Hi-C experiments, analyzing and interpreting Hi-C data poses great challenges, and requires novel statistical methods to be developed. This article provides an overview of recent Hi-C studies and their impacts on biomedical research, describes major challenges in statistical analysis of Hi-C data, and discusses some perspectives for future research. PMID:26124977

  12. Coronal Fine Structure in Dynamic Events Observed by Hi-C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winebarger, Amy; Schuler, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    The High-Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) flew aboard a NASA sounding rocket on 2012 July 11 and captured roughly 345 s of high spatial and temporal resolution images of the solar corona in a narrowband 193 Angstrom channel. We have analyzed the fluctuations in intensity of Active Region 11520. We selected events based on a lifetime greater than 11 s (two Hi-C frames) and intensities greater than a threshold determined from the photon and readout noise. We compare the Hi-C events with those determined from AIA. We find that HI-C detects shorter and smaller events than AIA. We also find that the intensity increase in the Hi-C events is approx. 3 times greater than the intensity increase in the AIA events we conclude the events are related to linear sub-structure that is unresolved by AIA

  13. Avoidance of crack inducement when laser welding hot-formed car body components - a variable analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, Johnny K.

    The Volvo XC60 car body contains numerous parts in Ultra High Strength Steels (UHSS) in order to guarantee the structural integrity of the car in the event of a crash situation. Most of the parts are manufactured in a hot-forming process, so called presshardening, resulting in component tensile strength in the range of 1,500 MPa. As this type of material also presents fairly high carbon content (˜0.22%) it brings a challenge when it comes to welding. The Volvo XC60 car body is at the same time to a large extent assembled by laser welding technology. In early development stages of the project (Y413), it was observed that laser welding of hot-formed components presented a number of challenges due to the unique conditions offered by this welding method. The presentation will thoroughly describe the modes of procedure how to avoid crack inducement during the welding operation. A variable analysis approach was used based on the present circumstances at the production facility in the Gent plant. Crucial variables at laser welding such as gap between sheets, focal point position, welding speed and laser weld position relative to the flange edge were included in a test matrix and welding trials were carried out accordingly in the Pilot Plant in Gothenburg. The paper will discuss those welding results, the subsequent analysis and plausible theoretic explanations. From the lessons learnt in this research, the optimum laser welding parameters were then transferred to the laser welding stations in the Gent plant. There it has been proven, that also at high volume automotive manufacturing, it is possible to provide an outstanding weld quality also at such difficult pre-conditions. The presentation ends with some facts and figures and experiences from high volume series production, which also includes aspects on quality assurance.

  14. Model boiler testing to evaluate inhibitors for caustic induced stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Daret, J.; Paine, J.P.N.; Partridge, M.J.

    1995-12-31

    A series of model boiler tests, using a mixture of precracked and non-precracked (virgin) tube-to-tube support plate intersections was performed. The testing supported the qualification of inhibitors for mitigating the secondary side corrosion of alloy 600 steam generator tubes. Many utilities suspect that the caustic impurities come from the feedwater. Candidate inhibitors included boric acid (as a reference), cerous acetate, and two forms of titanium dioxide: a laboratory produced titania-silica sol-gel, and manometer sized anatase The latter was combined with a 150 C pre-soaking with a titanium lactate, and was tested with and without a zeta potential treatment by sodium aluminate. Effectiveness of boric acid to prevent and retard caustic induced intergranular corrosion was confirmed in all crevice configurations (open and packed). The cerous acetate treatment multiplied by two to four the time necessary to detect a primary-to-secondary leak on virgin tubes, and reduced the propagation rate on precracked tubes. Cerium was found intimately mixed, as cerianite, with the free span and crevice deposits, when the crevices were sufficiently accessible. Due to its very low solubility and large particle size, the titania-silica sol-gel was unable to penetrate the crevices and had no effect on the degradation process. The nanometric particle size titania treatment and/or the preceding soaking with soluble titanium lactate drastically increased the titanium concentration in free span and open crevice deposit (with no added sodium aluminate, titania reacted with magnetite to form ilmenite) and showed undeniable capacity to prevent tubing degradation. Its effectiveness, in the case of packed crevices and for arresting cracks, was not so conclusive.

  15. Isolated Mesoporous Microstructures Prepared by Stress Localization-Induced Crack Manipulation.

    PubMed

    Wooh, Sanghyuk; Lee, Soojin; Lee, Yunchan; Ryu, Ji Ho; Lee, Won Bo; Yoon, Hyunsik; Char, Kookheon

    2016-09-22

    Cracks observed in brittle materials are mostly regarded as defects or failures. However, they can be a valuable tool when implemented in a controlled way. Here, we introduce a strategy to control the crack propagation of mesoporous micropatterns (prisms and pyramids), which leads to the isolation of well-defined microstructures. Mesoporous micropatterns were fabricated by the soft imprinting technique with wet TiO2 nanoparticle (NP) pastes, followed by sintering to remove organic components. Since the volume of the paste significantly shrinks during the sintering step, stress is localized at the edge of micropatterns, in good agreement with finite element method simulations, creating well-defined cracks and their propagation. It was demonstrated that the degree of stress localization is determined by the thickness of residual layers, NP size, and heating rate. After controlled crack propagation and delamination of microparticles from the substrates, mesoporous microwires and microparticles were successfully produced and functionalized from the isolated mesoporous prisms and pyramids. The method proposed in this study for controlled crack manipulation and delamination opens a door for straightforward and economical fabrication of well-defined mesoporous microparticles.

  16. An analytical model which combines roughness- and plasticity- induced fatigue crack closure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Nong

    In this study an analytical PICC-RICC Model was developed to describe better the near-threshold fatigue behavior. The PICC-RICC Model was built upon a strip-yield type PICC model originally proposed by Newman and later modified by Hou and Lawrence. A zigzag crack growth path was introduced to simulate surface roughness. The two opposing crack surfaces were considered to be translated and thus mismatched by the mixed-mode displacements occurring near the deflected crack tip. The model is powerful and unique in that it combines the effects of RICC and PICC. Thus, the gradual transition from RICC to PICC dominated crack closure is handled naturally by this model. The influences of the geometrical features of the surface roughness, R-ratio and the cyclic load range on RICC were examined using the PICC-RICC Model. Near-threshold fatigue behavior of various materials was predicted. The effect of microstructure on the RICC level was studied. The predicted results compared favorably with experimental data. The fatigue notch size effect was investigated using the PICC-RICC model. The initial crack length (asb{i}) for propagation was estimated. The predicted notch fatigue strength compared favorably with the Initiation-Propagation (I-P) Model prediction and test data. The existence of a "worst case notch" previously postulated using the I-P Model was confirmed.

  17. Microstructure and yield strength effects on hydrogen and tritium induced cracking in HERF (high-energy-rate-forged) stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, M J; Tosten, M H

    1989-01-01

    Rising-load J-integral measurements and falling-load threshold stress intensity measurements were used to characterize hydrogen and tritium induced cracking in high-energy-rate-forged (HERF) 21-6-9 stainless steel. Samples having yield strengths in the range 517--930 MPa were thermally charged with either hydrogen or tritium and tested at room temperature in either air or high-pressure hydrogen gas. In general, the hydrogen isotopes reduced the fracture toughness by affecting the fracture process. Static recrystallization in the HERF microstructures affected the material's fracture toughness and its relative susceptibility to hydrogen and tritium induced fracture. In hydrogen-exposed samples, the reduction in fracture toughness was primarily dependent on the susceptibility of the microstructure to intergranular fracture and only secondarily affected by strength in the range of 660 to 930 MPa. Transmission-electron microscopy observations revealed that the microstructures least susceptible to hydrogen-induced intergranular cracking contained patches of fully recrystallized grains. These grains are surrounded by highly deformed regions containing a high number density of dislocations. The microstructure can best be characterized as duplex'', with soft recrystallized grains embedded in a hard, deformed matrix. The microstructures most susceptible to hydrogen-induced intergranular fracture showed no well-developed recrystallized grains. The patches of recrystallized grains seemed to act as crack barriers to hydrogen-induced intergranular fracture. In tritium-exposed-and-aged samples, the amount of static recrystallization also affected the fracture toughness properties but to a lesser degree. 7 refs., 25 figs.

  18. Microscopic study of stress effects around micro-crack tips using a non-contact stress-induced light scattering method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakata, Y.; Terasaki, N.; Nonaka, K.

    2016-09-01

    Fine-polishing techniques may cause micro-cracks under glass substrate surfaces. According to highly requirement from production field, a thermal stress-induced light scattering method (T-SILSM) was successfully developed for a non-contact inspection to detect the micro-cracks through changing in the intensity of light scattering accompanied by applying thermal stress at the responding position of the micro-cracks. In this study, in order to investigate that the origin of the measuring principle in microscopic order, a newly developed microscopic T-SILSM system with a rotation stage and a numerical simulation analysis were used to investigate the following; (1) the scattering points and surface in the micro-crack, (2) the stress concentration points in the micro-crack, and (3) the relationship between these information and the point in which intensity of the light scattering changes in the micro-crack through T-SILSM. Light scattering was observed at the responding position of the micro-crack with selectivity in the direction of laser irradiation even in the microscopic order. In addition, the position of the changes in the light scattering in was at both tips in the micro-crack, and it was consistent with the stress concentration point in the micro-crack. Therefore, it can be concluded that the intentional change in light scattering though T-SILSM is originated from light scattering at micro-crack and also from stress concentration and consecutive change in refractive index at both tips in micro-crack.

  19. Electromigration-induced cracks in Cu/Sn3.5Ag/Cu solder reaction couple at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hongwen, He; Guangchen, Xu; Fu, Guo

    2009-03-01

    Electromigration (EM) behavior of Cu/Sn3.5Ag/Cu solder reaction couple was investigated with a high current density of 5 × 103 A/cm2 at room temperature. One dimensional structure, copper wire/solder ball/copper wire SRC was designed and fabricated to dissipate the Joule heating induced by the current flow. In addition, thermomigration effect was excluded due to the symmetrical structure of the SRC. The experimental results indicated that micro-cracks initially appeared near the cathode interface between solder matrix and copper substrate after 474 h current stressing. With current stressing time increased, the cracks propagated and extended along the cathode interface. It should be noted that the continuous Cu6Sn5 intermetallic compounds (IMCs) layer both at the anode and at the cathode remained their sizes. Interestingly, tiny cracks appeared at the root of some long column-type Cu6Sn5 at the cathode interface due to the thermal stress.

  20. Binding of vitronectin and Factor H to Hic contributes to immune evasion of Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 3.

    PubMed

    Kohler, Sylvia; Hallström, Teresia; Singh, Birendra; Riesbeck, Kristian; Spartà, Giuseppina; Zipfel, Peter F; Hammerschmidt, Sven

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 3 strains are highly resistant to opsonophagocytosis due to recruitment of the complement inhibitor Factor H via Hic, a member of the pneumococcal surface protein C (PspC) family. In this study, we demonstrated that Hic also interacts with vitronectin, a fluid-phase regulator involved in haemostasis, angiogenesis, and the terminal complement cascade as well as a component of the extracellular matrix. Blocking of Hic by specific antiserum or genetic deletion significantly reduced pneumococcal binding to soluble and immobilised vitronectin and to Factor H, respectively. In parallel, ectopic expression of Hic on the surface of Lactococcus lactis conferred binding to soluble and immobilised vitronectin as well as Factor H. Molecular analyses with truncated Hic fragments narrowed down the vitronectin-binding site to the central core of Hic (aa 151-201). This vitronectin-binding region is separate from that of Factor H, which binds to the N-terminus of Hic (aa 38-92). Binding of pneumococcal Hic was localised to the C-terminal heparin-binding domain (HBD3) of vitronectin. However, an N-terminal region to HBD3 was further involved in Hic-binding to immobilised vitronectin. Finally, vitronectin bound to Hic was functionally active and inhibited formation of the terminal complement complex. In conclusion, Hic interacts with vitronectin and simultaneously with Factor H, and both human proteins may contribute to colonisation and invasive disease caused by serotype 3 pneumococci.

  1. Identification and Characterization of the HicAB Toxin-Antitoxin System in the Opportunistic Pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gang; Shen, Mengyu; Lu, Shuguang; Le, Shuai; Tan, Yinling; Wang, Jing; Zhao, Xia; Shen, Wei; Guo, Keke; Yang, Yuhui; Zhu, Hongbin; Rao, Xiancai; Hu, Fuquan; Li, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems are small genetic modules that are widely distributed in the genomes of bacteria and archaea and have been proposed to fulfill numerous functions. Here, we describe the identification and characterization of a type II TA system, comprising the hicAB locus in the human opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The hicAB locus consists of genes hicA and hicB encoding a toxin and its cognate antitoxin, respectively. BLAST analysis revealed that hicAB is prevalent in approximately 36% of P. aeruginosa strains and locates in the same genomic region. RT-PCR demonstrated that hicAB forms a bicistronic operon that is cotranscribed under normal growth conditions. Overproduction of HicA inhibited the growth of Escherichia coli, and this effect could be counteracted by co-expression of HicB. The Escherichia coli kill/rescue assay showed that the effect of HicA is bacteriostatic, rather than bactericidal. Deletion of hicAB had no effect on the biofilm formation and virulence of P. aeruginosa in a mice infection model. Collectively, this study presents the first characterization of the HicAB system in the opportunistic pathogen P. aeruginosa. PMID:27104566

  2. Identification and Characterization of the HicAB Toxin-Antitoxin System in the Opportunistic Pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Shen, Mengyu; Lu, Shuguang; Le, Shuai; Tan, Yinling; Wang, Jing; Zhao, Xia; Shen, Wei; Guo, Keke; Yang, Yuhui; Zhu, Hongbin; Rao, Xiancai; Hu, Fuquan; Li, Ming

    2016-04-19

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems are small genetic modules that are widely distributed in the genomes of bacteria and archaea and have been proposed to fulfill numerous functions. Here, we describe the identification and characterization of a type II TA system, comprising the hicAB locus in the human opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The hicAB locus consists of genes hicA and hicB encoding a toxin and its cognate antitoxin, respectively. BLAST analysis revealed that hicAB is prevalent in approximately 36% of P. aeruginosa strains and locates in the same genomic region. RT-PCR demonstrated that hicAB forms a bicistronic operon that is cotranscribed under normal growth conditions. Overproduction of HicA inhibited the growth of Escherichia coli, and this effect could be counteracted by co-expression of HicB. The Escherichia coli kill/rescue assay showed that the effect of HicA is bacteriostatic, rather than bactericidal. Deletion of hicAB had no effect on the biofilm formation and virulence of P. aeruginosa in a mice infection model. Collectively, this study presents the first characterization of the HicAB system in the opportunistic pathogen P. aeruginosa.

  3. Continuous Monitoring of Stress Corrosion Cracking Growth in Type 316L Stainless Steel Weldment Using Induced Current Potential Drop Technique at Elevated Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Yasumoto; Atsumi, Takeo; Shoji, Tetsuo

    In this study, induced current potential drop (ICPD) technique was applied to monitor SCC crack growth. The SCC crack monitored was introduced on the internal wall of a pipe specimen in which simulated BWR water flows. The measurement was performed on the external wall of the pipe specimen. It was shown that the ICPD technique permits continuous monitoring of the SCC growth, which initiates from the inner wall of the pipe specimen under elevated temperature.

  4. Elevated temperature crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, K. S.; Vanstone, R. H.

    1989-01-01

    Alloy 718 crack growth experiments were conducted to assess the ability of the selected path-independent (P-I) integrals to describe the elevated temperature crack growth behavior. These tests were performed on single edge notch (SEN) specimens under displacement control with multiple extensometers to monitor the specimen and crack mouth opening displacement (CMOD). The displacements in these tests were sufficiently high to induce bulk cyclic inelastic deformation of the specimen. Under these conditions, the linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) parameter K does not correlate the crack growth data. The experimentally measured displacement gradients at the end of specimen gage length were used as the boundary conditions in elastic-plastic finite element method (FEM) analyses. These analyses were performed with a node release approach using CYANIDE, a GEAE FEM code, which included a gap element which is capable of efficiently simulating crack closure. Excellent correlation was obtained between the experimentally measured and predicted variation of stress and CMOD with crack length and the stress-CMOD loops for Alloy 718 tests conducted at 538 C. This confirmed the accuracy of the FEM crack growth simulation approach. The experimentally measured crack growth rate data correlated well the selected P-I integrals. These investigations have produced significant progress in developing P-I integrals as non-linear fracture mechanics parameters. The results suggest that this methodology has the potential of accurately describing elevated temperature crack growth behavior under the combined influence of thermal cycling and bulk elastic-inelastic deformation states.

  5. HiCUP: pipeline for mapping and processing Hi-C data.

    PubMed

    Wingett, Steven; Ewels, Philip; Furlan-Magaril, Mayra; Nagano, Takashi; Schoenfelder, Stefan; Fraser, Peter; Andrews, Simon

    2015-01-01

    HiCUP is a pipeline for processing sequence data generated by Hi-C and Capture Hi-C (CHi-C) experiments, which are techniques used to investigate three-dimensional genomic organisation. The pipeline maps data to a specified reference genome and removes artefacts that would otherwise hinder subsequent analysis. HiCUP also produces an easy-to-interpret yet detailed quality control (QC) report that assists in refining experimental protocols for future studies. The software is freely available and has already been used for processing Hi-C and CHi-C data in several recently published peer-reviewed studies.

  6. Juicebox Provides a Visualization System for Hi-C Contact Maps with Unlimited Zoom.

    PubMed

    Durand, Neva C; Robinson, James T; Shamim, Muhammad S; Machol, Ido; Mesirov, Jill P; Lander, Eric S; Aiden, Erez Lieberman

    2016-07-01

    Hi-C experiments study how genomes fold in 3D, generating contact maps containing features as small as 20 bp and as large as 200 Mb. Here we introduce Juicebox, a tool for exploring Hi-C and other contact map data. Juicebox allows users to zoom in and out of Hi-C maps interactively, just as a user of Google Earth might zoom in and out of a geographic map. Maps can be compared to one another, or to 1D tracks or 2D feature sets.

  7. HiCUP: pipeline for mapping and processing Hi-C data

    PubMed Central

    Wingett, Steven; Ewels, Philip; Furlan-Magaril, Mayra; Nagano, Takashi; Schoenfelder, Stefan; Fraser, Peter; Andrews, Simon

    2015-01-01

    HiCUP is a pipeline for processing sequence data generated by Hi-C and Capture Hi-C (CHi-C) experiments, which are techniques used to investigate three-dimensional genomic organisation. The pipeline maps data to a specified reference genome and removes artefacts that would otherwise hinder subsequent analysis. HiCUP also produces an easy-to-interpret yet detailed quality control (QC) report that assists in refining experimental protocols for future studies. The software is freely available and has already been used for processing Hi-C and CHi-C data in several recently published peer-reviewed studies. PMID:26835000

  8. Scanning electron acoustic microscopy of indentation-induced cracks and residual stresses in ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H.; Qian, Menglu; Ravichandran, M. V.; Knowles, K. M.

    1990-01-01

    The ability of scanning electron acoustic microscopy (SEAM) to characterize ceramic materials is assessed. SEAM images of Vickers indentations in SiC whisker-reinforced alumina clearly reveal not only the radial cracks, the length of which can be used to estimate the fracture toughness of the material, but also reveal strong contrast, interpreted as arising from the combined effects of lateral cracks and the residual stress field left in the SiC whisker-reinforced alumina by the indenter. The strong contrast is removed after the material is heat treated at 1000 C to relieve the residual stresses around the indentations. A comparison of these observations with SEAM and reflected polarized light observations of Vickers indentations in soda-lime glass both before and after heat treatment confirms the interpretation of the strong contrast.

  9. Scanning electron acoustic microscopy of indentation-induced cracks and residual stresses in ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H.; Qian, Menglu; Ravichandran, M. V.; Knowles, K. M.

    1990-01-01

    The ability of scanning electron acoustic microscopy (SEAM) to characterize ceramic materials is assessed. SEAM images of Vickers indentations in SiC whisker-reinforced alumina clearly reveal not only the radial cracks, the length of which can be used to estimate the fracture toughness of the material, but also reveal strong contrast, interpreted as arising from the combined effects of lateral cracks and the residual stress field left in the SiC whisker-reinforced alumina by the indenter. The strong contrast is removed after the material is heat treated at 1000 C to relieve the residual stresses around the indentations. A comparison of these observations with SEAM and reflected polarized light observations of Vickers indentations in soda-lime glass both before and after heat treatment confirms the interpretation of the strong contrast.

  10. The release of trapped gases from amorphous solid water films. I. "Top-down" crystallization-induced crack propagation probed using the molecular volcano.

    PubMed

    May, R Alan; Smith, R Scott; Kay, Bruce D

    2013-03-14

    In this (Paper I) and the companion paper (Paper II; R. May, R. Smith, and B. Kay, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 104502 (2013)), we investigate the mechanisms for the release of trapped gases from underneath amorphous solid water (ASW) films. In prior work, we reported the episodic release of trapped gases in concert with the crystallization of ASW, a phenomenon that we termed the "molecular volcano." The observed abrupt desorption is due to the formation of cracks that span the film to form a connected pathway for release. In this paper, we utilize the "molecular volcano" desorption peak to characterize the formation of crystallization-induced cracks. We find that the crack length distribution is independent of the trapped gas (Ar, Kr, Xe, CH4, N2, O2, or CO). Selective placement of the inert gas layer is used to show that cracks form near the top of the film and propagate downward into the film. Isothermal experiments reveal that, after some induction time, cracks propagate linearly in time with an Arrhenius dependent velocity corresponding to an activation energy of 54 kJ∕mol. This value is consistent with the crystallization growth rates reported by others and establishes a direct connection between crystallization growth rate and the crack propagation rate. A two-step model in which nucleation and crystallization occurs in an induction zone near the top of the film followed by the propagation of a crystallization∕crack front into the film is in good agreement with the temperature programmed desorption results.

  11. The Release of Trapped Gases from Amorphous Solid Water Films: I. “Top-Down” Crystallization-Induced Crack Propagation Probed using the Molecular Volcano

    SciTech Connect

    May, Robert A.; Smith, R. Scott; Kay, Bruce D.

    2013-03-14

    In this (Paper I) and the companion paper (Paper II) we investigate the mechanisms for the release of trapped gases from underneath of amorphous solid water (ASW) films. In prior work, we reported the episodic release of trapped gases in concert with the crystallization ASW, a phenomenon that we termed the "molecular volcano". The observed abrupt desorption is due to the formation of cracks that span the film to form a connected pathway for release. In this paper we utilize the "molecular volcano" desorption peak to characterize the formation of crystallization-induced cracks. We find that the crack length and distribution are independent of the trapped gas (Ar, Kr, Xe, CH4, N2, O2 or CO). Selective placement of the inert gas layer is used to show that cracks form near the top of the film and propagate downward into the film. Isothermal experiments reveal that, after some induction time, cracks propagate linearly in time with an Arrhenius dependent velocity corresponding to an activation energy of 54 kJ/mol. This value is consistent with the crystallization growth rate reported by others and establishes a direct connection between crystallization growth rate and the crack propagation rate. A two-step model in which nucleation and crystallization occurs in an induction zone near the top of the film followed by the propagation of a crystallization/crack front into the film is in good agreement with the temperature programmed desorption results.

  12. Hydrogen induced surface cracking in an 8090 Al-Li alloy during high cycle fatigue

    SciTech Connect

    Laffin, C.; Raghunath, C.R.; Lopez, H.F. . Materials Dept.)

    1993-10-01

    In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in understanding the effects of aggressive or moist environments on the properties of Al-Li alloys. However, most of the existing work has been focused on their stress corrosion cracking resistance. Consequently, only a few reports are available on the environmental fatigue strength of these alloys. Upon exposure to aggressive environments, the fatigue crack propagation resistance can be detrimentally affected. R. Piascik and R. Gangloff found enhanced cyclic crack growth rates in an Al-Li-Cu alloy when a critical water vapor pressure was exceeded. Thermodynamically, at atmospheric pressures, strong interactions between hydrogen and lithium are expected to give rise to stable lithium hydrides. Evidence for the development of hydride phases in Al-Li alloys exposed to hydrogen environments has been reported by various workers. Thus, it is likely that HE via hydride formation can be the relevant mechanisms in Al-Li alloys that have been in contact with hydrogen. Since lithium hydrides are stable up to temperatures of 773 K, previous hydrogen exposure can lead to an irreversible mode of embrittlement. Thus, it was the objective of the present work to investigate the effects of hydrogen during aging on the ensuing high cycle fatigue (HCF) performance of an 8090 Al-Li alloy.

  13. Hi-C 2.0: An optimized Hi-C procedure for high-resolution genome-wide mapping of chromosome conformation.

    PubMed

    Belaghzal, Houda; Dekker, Job; Gibcus, Johan H

    2017-07-01

    Chromosome conformation capture-based methods such as Hi-C have become mainstream techniques for the study of the 3D organization of genomes. These methods convert chromatin interactions reflecting topological chromatin structures into digital information (counts of pair-wise interactions). Here, we describe an updated protocol for Hi-C (Hi-C 2.0) that integrates recent improvements into a single protocol for efficient and high-resolution capture of chromatin interactions. This protocol combines chromatin digestion and frequently cutting enzymes to obtain kilobase (kb) resolution. It also includes steps to reduce random ligation and the generation of uninformative molecules, such as unligated ends, to improve the amount of valid intra-chromosomal read pairs. This protocol allows for obtaining information on conformational structures such as compartment and topologically associating domains, as well as high-resolution conformational features such as DNA loops. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Development of a novel non-contact inspection technique to detect micro cracks under the surface of a glass substrate by thermal stress-induced light scattering method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakata, Yoshitaro; Terasaki, Nao; Nonaka, Kazuhiro

    2017-05-01

    Fine polishing techniques, such as a chemical mechanical polishing treatment, are important techniques in glass substrate manufacturing. However, these techniques may cause micro cracks under the surface of glass substrates because they used mechanical friction. A stress-induced light scattering method (SILSM), which was combined with light scattering method and mechanical stress effects, was proposed for inspecting surfaces to detect polishing-induced micro cracks. However, in the conventional SILSM, samples need to be loaded with physical contact, and the loading point is invisible in transparent materials. Here, we introduced a novel non-contact SILSM using a heating device. A glass substrate was heated first, and then the light scattering intensity of micro cracks was detected by a cooled charge-couple device camera during the natural cooling process. Results clearly showed during the decreasing surface temperature of a glass substrate, appropriate thermal stress is generated for detecting micro cracks by using the SILSM and light scattering intensity from micro cracks changes. We confirmed that non-contact thermal SILSM (T-SILSM) can detect micro cracks under the surface of transparent materials.

  15. Behavioural, biochemical and molecular changes induced by chronic crack-cocaine inhalation in mice: The role of dopaminergic and endocannabinoid systems in the prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Areal, Lorena B; Rodrigues, Livia C M; Andrich, Filipe; Moraes, Livia S; Cicilini, Maria A; Mendonça, Josideia B; Pelição, Fabricio S; Nakamura-Palacios, Ester M; Martins-Silva, Cristina; Pires, Rita G W

    2015-09-01

    Crack-cocaine addiction has increasingly become a public health problem worldwide, especially in developing countries. However, no studies have focused on neurobiological mechanisms underlying the severe addiction produced by this drug, which seems to differ from powder cocaine in many aspects. This study investigated behavioural, biochemical and molecular changes in mice inhaling crack-cocaine, focusing on dopaminergic and endocannabinoid systems in the prefrontal cortex. Mice were submitted to two inhalation sessions of crack-cocaine a day (crack-cocaine group) during 11 days, meanwhile the control group had no access to the drug. We found that the crack-cocaine group exhibited hyperlocomotion and a peculiar jumping behaviour ("escape jumping"). Blood collected right after the last inhalation session revealed that the anhydroecgonine methyl ester (AEME), a specific metabolite of cocaine pyrolysis, was much more concentrated than cocaine itself in the crack-cocaine group. Most genes related to the endocannabinoid system, CB1 receptor and cannabinoid degradation enzymes were downregulated after 11-day crack-cocaine exposition. These changes may have decreased dopamine and its metabolites levels, which in turn may be related with the extreme upregulation of dopamine receptors and tyrosine hydroxylase observed in the prefrontal cortex of these animals. Our data suggest that after 11 days of crack-cocaine exposure, neuroadaptive changes towards downregulation of reinforcing mechanisms may have taken place as a result of neurochemical changes observed on dopaminergic and endocannabinoid systems. Successive changes like these have never been described in cocaine hydrochloride models before, probably because AEME is only produced by cocaine pyrolysis and this metabolite may underlie the more aggressive pattern of addiction induced by crack-cocaine.

  16. Non-destructive analysis of hydrogen-induced cracking of api steels using acoustic microscopy and small-angle neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, S. B.; Choi, Y.; Jung, H. G.; Kho, S. W.; Lee, C. S.

    2014-12-01

    Acoustic microscopy and small-angle neutron scattering were applied to non-destructively evaluate the hydrogen-induced cracking of API steels and to find the initiation time of the crack. The API steels had equiaxed grains with about 4 to 12-μm average grain size along the rolling, sample-normal, and transverse directions. For 5 days of immersion in a sodium-acetic solution with chloride ions (NaCl: CH3COOH: H2O: FeCl2 = 50: 5: 944: 1, pH = 2.7), micro-sized cracks were not formed in the as-received specimen, but they did form in the 7% deformed specimen. Nano-sized cracks were observed in the specimen after 3 days of immersion by small-angle neutron scattering.

  17. Serotype 3 pneumococci sequester platelet-derived human thrombospondin-1 via the adhesin and immune evasion protein Hic.

    PubMed

    Binsker, Ulrike; Kohler, Thomas P; Krauel, Krystin; Kohler, Sylvia; Habermeyer, Johanna; Schwertz, Hansjörg; Hammerschmidt, Sven

    2017-04-07

    Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 3 strains emerge frequently within clinical isolates of invasive diseases. Bacterial invasion into deeper tissues is associated with colonization and immune evasion mechanisms. Thus, pneumococci express a versatile repertoire of surface proteins sequestering and interacting specifically with components of the human extracellular matrix and serum. Hic, a PspC-like pneumococcal surface protein, possesses vitronectin and factor H binding activity. Here, we show that heterologously expressed Hic domains interact, similar to the classical PspC molecule, with human matricellular thrombospondin-1 (hTSP-1). Binding studies with isolated human thrombospondin-1 and various Hic domains suggest that the interaction between hTSP-1 and Hic differs from binding to vitronectin and factor H. Binding of Hic to hTSP-1 is inhibited by heparin and chondroitin sulfate A, indicating binding to the N-terminal globular domain or type I repeats of hTSP-1. Competitive inhibition experiments with other pneumococcal hTSP-1 adhesins demonstrated that PspC and PspC-like Hic recognize similar domains, whereas PavB and Hic can bind simultaneously to hTSP-1. In conclusion, Hic binds specifically hTSP-1; however, truncation in the N-terminal part of Hic decreases the binding activity, suggesting that the full length of the α-helical regions of Hic is required for an optimal interaction.

  18. Optimization and quality control of genome-wide Hi-C library preparation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiang-Yuan; He, Chao; Ye, Bing-Yu; Xie, De-Jian; Shi, Ming-Lei; Zhang, Yan; Shen, Wen-Long; Li, Ping; Zhao, Zhi-Hu

    2017-09-20

    Highest-throughput chromosome conformation capture (Hi-C) is one of the key assays for genome- wide chromatin interaction studies. It is a time-consuming process that involves many steps and many different kinds of reagents, consumables, and equipments. At present, the reproducibility is unsatisfactory. By optimizing the key steps of the Hi-C experiment, such as crosslinking, pretreatment of digestion, inactivation of restriction enzyme, and in situ ligation etc., we established a robust Hi-C procedure and prepared two biological replicates of Hi-C libraries from the GM12878 cells. After preliminary quality control by Sanger sequencing, the two replicates were high-throughput sequenced. The bioinformatics analysis of the raw sequencing data revealed the mapping-ability and pair-mate rate of the raw data were around 90% and 72%, respectively. Additionally, after removal of self-circular ligations and dangling-end products, more than 96% of the valid pairs were reached. Genome-wide interactome profiling shows clear topological associated domains (TADs), which is consistent with previous reports. Further correlation analysis showed that the two biological replicates strongly correlate with each other in terms of both bin coverage and all bin pairs. All these results indicated that the optimized Hi-C procedure is robust and stable, which will be very helpful for the wide applications of the Hi-C assay.

  19. Mapping three-dimensional genome architecture through in situ DNase Hi-C

    PubMed Central

    Ramani, Vijay; Cusanovich, Darren A; Hause, Ronald J; Ma, Wenxiu; Qiu, Ruolan; Deng, Xinxian; Blau, C. Anthony; Disteche, Christine M.; Noble, William S; Shendure, Jay; Duan, Zhijun

    2017-01-01

    With the advent of massively parallel sequencing, considerable work has gone into adapting chromosome conformation capture (3C) techniques to study chromosomal architecture at genome-scale. We recently demonstrated that the inactive murine X chromosome adopts a bipartite structure using a novel 3C protocol, termed in situ DNase Hi-C. Like traditional Hi-C protocols, during in situ DNase Hi-C chromatin is chemically crosslinked, digested, end-repaired, and proximity ligated with a biotinylated bridge adaptor. The resulting ligation products are optionally sheared, affinity-purified via streptavidin bead immobilization, and subjected to traditional next-generation library preparation for Illumina paired-end sequencing. Importantly, in situ DNase Hi-C obviates the dependence on a restriction enzyme to digest chromatin, instead relying on the endonuclease DNase I. Libraries generated by in situ DNase Hi-C have a higher effective resolution than traditional Hi-C libraries, making them valuable in cases where high sequencing depth is allowed for, or when hybrid capture technologies are expected to be used. The protocol described here, which involves approximately four days of bench work, is optimized for the study of mammalian cells but can be broadly applicable to any cell or tissue of interest given experimental parameter optimization. PMID:27685100

  20. Mapping 3D genome architecture through in situ DNase Hi-C.

    PubMed

    Ramani, Vijay; Cusanovich, Darren A; Hause, Ronald J; Ma, Wenxiu; Qiu, Ruolan; Deng, Xinxian; Blau, C Anthony; Disteche, Christine M; Noble, William S; Shendure, Jay; Duan, Zhijun

    2016-11-01

    With the advent of massively parallel sequencing, considerable work has gone into adapting chromosome conformation capture (3C) techniques to study chromosomal architecture at a genome-wide scale. We recently demonstrated that the inactive murine X chromosome adopts a bipartite structure using a novel 3C protocol, termed in situ DNase Hi-C. Like traditional Hi-C protocols, in situ DNase Hi-C requires that chromatin be chemically cross-linked, digested, end-repaired, and proximity-ligated with a biotinylated bridge adaptor. The resulting ligation products are optionally sheared, affinity-purified via streptavidin bead immobilization, and subjected to traditional next-generation library preparation for Illumina paired-end sequencing. Importantly, in situ DNase Hi-C obviates the dependence on a restriction enzyme to digest chromatin, instead relying on the endonuclease DNase I. Libraries generated by in situ DNase Hi-C have a higher effective resolution than traditional Hi-C libraries, which makes them valuable in cases in which high sequencing depth is allowed for, or when hybrid capture technologies are expected to be used. The protocol described here, which involves ∼4 d of bench work, is optimized for the study of mammalian cells, but it can be broadly applicable to any cell or tissue of interest, given experimental parameter optimization.

  1. Modeling of fatigue crack induced nonlinear ultrasonics using a highly parallelized explicit local interaction simulation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yanfeng; Cesnik, Carlos E. S.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a parallelized modeling technique for the efficient simulation of nonlinear ultrasonics introduced by the wave interaction with fatigue cracks. The elastodynamic wave equations with contact effects are formulated using an explicit Local Interaction Simulation Approach (LISA). The LISA formulation is extended to capture the contact-impact phenomena during the wave damage interaction based on the penalty method. A Coulomb friction model is integrated into the computation procedure to capture the stick-slip contact shear motion. The LISA procedure is coded using the Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA), which enables the highly parallelized supercomputing on powerful graphic cards. Both the explicit contact formulation and the parallel feature facilitates LISA's superb computational efficiency over the conventional finite element method (FEM). The theoretical formulations based on the penalty method is introduced and a guideline for the proper choice of the contact stiffness is given. The convergence behavior of the solution under various contact stiffness values is examined. A numerical benchmark problem is used to investigate the new LISA formulation and results are compared with a conventional contact finite element solution. Various nonlinear ultrasonic phenomena are successfully captured using this contact LISA formulation, including the generation of nonlinear higher harmonic responses. Nonlinear mode conversion of guided waves at fatigue cracks is also studied.

  2. Hi-C Observations of Penumbral Bright Dots: Comparison with the IRIS Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alpert, S. E.; Tiwari, S. K.; Moore, R. L.; Savage, S. L.; Winebarger, A. R.

    2014-01-01

    We observed bright dots (BDs) in a sunspot penumbra by using data acquired by the High Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C). The sizes of these BDs are on the order of 1 arcsecond (1') and are therefore hard to identify using the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly's (AIA) 0.6' pixel -1 resolution. These BDs become readily apparent with Hi-C's 0.1' pixel -1 resolution. Tian et al. (2014) found penumbral BDs in the transition region (TR) by using the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS). However, only a few of their dots could be associated with any enhanced brightness in AIA channels. In this work, we examine the characteristics of the penumbral BDs observed by Hi-C in a sunspot penumbra, including their sizes, lifetimes, speeds, and intensity. We also attempt to relate these BDs to the IRIS BDs. There are fewer Hi-C BDs in the penumbra than seen by IRIS, though different sunspots were studied and Hi-C had a short observation time. We use 193 A Hi-C data from July 11, 2012 which observed from 18:52:00 UT{18:56:00 UT and supplement it with data from AIA's 193 A passband to see the complete lifetime of the dots that were born before and/or lasted longer than Hi-C's 5-minute observation period. We use additional AIA passbands and compare the light curves of the BDs at different temperatures to test whether the Hi-C BDs are TR BDs. We find that most Hi-C BDs show clear movement, and of those that do, they move in a radial direction, toward or away from the sunspot umbra, sometimes doing both. BDs interact with other BDs, combining to fade away or brighten. The BDs that do not interact with other BDs tend to move less and last longer. We examine the properties of the Hi-C BDs and compare them with the IRIS BDs. Our BDs are similar to the exceptional values of the IRIS BDs: they move slower on average and their sizes and lifetimes are on the higher end of the distributions of IRIS BDs. We infer that our penumbral BDs are some of the larger BDs observed by IRIS.

  3. Two-dimensional segmentation for analyzing Hi-C data

    PubMed Central

    Lévy-Leduc, Celine; Delattre, M.; Mary-Huard, T.; Robin, S.

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: The spatial conformation of the chromosome has a deep influence on gene regulation and expression. Hi-C technology allows the evaluation of the spatial proximity between any pair of loci along the genome. It results in a data matrix where blocks corresponding to (self-)interacting regions appear. The delimitation of such blocks is critical to better understand the spatial organization of the chromatin. From a computational point of view, it results in a 2D segmentation problem. Results: We focus on the detection of cis-interacting regions, which appear to be prominent in observed data. We define a block-wise segmentation model for the detection of such regions. We prove that the maximization of the likelihood with respect to the block boundaries can be rephrased in terms of a 1D segmentation problem, for which the standard dynamic programming applies. The performance of the proposed methods is assessed by a simulation study on both synthetic and resampled data. A comparative study on public data shows good concordance with biologically confirmed regions. Availability and implementation: The HiCseg R package is available from the Comprehensive R Archive Network and from the Web page of the corresponding author. Contact: celine.levy-leduc@agroparistech.fr PMID:25161224

  4. Stress Intensity Solutions of Thermally Induced Cracks in Combustor Liner Hot Spots Using Finite Element Analysis (FEA)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    thermal cycles per crack length.......... 90 Table B.1 Equivalent Hole Formulas............................................................... 120...readings for 4 radial locations vs. time during initial blister test...Figure 6.9 Schematic of the initial crack pattern (all thru cracks) and respective distances of the blister test specimen after 170 thermal cycles

  5. The progesterone receptor coactivator Hic-5 is involved in the pathophysiology of endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Aghajanova, Lusine; Velarde, Michael C; Giudice, Linda C

    2009-08-01

    Endometriosis is an estrogen-dependent disorder primarily associated with pelvic pain and infertility in up to 10% of women of reproductive age. Recent studies suggest that resistance to progesterone action may contribute to the development and pathophysiology of this disorder. In this study we examined the in vivo and in vitro expression and function of one progesterone receptor (PR) coactivator, Hic-5, in human endometrium and endometrial stromal fibroblasts (hESFs) from 29 women with and 30 (control) women without endometriosis. Hic-5 was highly expressed in stromal, but not epithelial, cells in women without endometriosis, in a cycle-dependent manner. In contrast, Hic-5 expression was not regulated during the menstrual cycle in hESFs from women with endometriosis and was significantly reduced in hESFs from women with vs. without disease. Hic-5 mRNA expression throughout the cycle in endometrium from control women, but not those with endometriosis, correlated with expression of PR. Hic-5 mRNA in hESFs was significantly up-regulated in control but not endometriosis hESFs after treatment in vitro with 8-bromoadenosine-cAMP for 96 h but only modestly after 14 d of progesterone treatment. Hic-5 silencing did not influence cAMP-regulated gene expression but affected genes regulated solely by progesterone (e.g. DKK1 and calcitonin). Together the data suggest that the proposed progesterone resistance in endometrium from women with endometriosis derives, in part, from impaired expression of the PR coactivator, Hic-5, in endometrial tissue and cultured endometrial stromal fibroblasts.

  6. Hospital incident command system (HICS) performance in Iran; decision making during disasters

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Hospitals are cornerstones for health care in a community and must continue to function in the face of a disaster. The Hospital Incident Command System (HICS) is a method by which the hospital operates when an emergency is declared. Hospitals are often ill equipped to evaluate the strengths and vulnerabilities of their own management systems before the occurrence of an actual disaster. The main objective of this study was to measure the decision making performance according to HICS job actions sheets using tabletop exercises. Methods This observational study was conducted between May 1st 2008 and August 31st 2009. Twenty three Iranian hospitals were included. A tabletop exercise was developed for each hospital which in turn was based on the highest probable risk. The job action sheets of the HICS were used as measurements of performance. Each indicator was considered as 1, 2 or 3 in accordance with the HICS. Fair performance was determined as < 40%; intermediate as 41-70%; high as 71-100% of the maximum score of 192. Descriptive statistics, T-test, and Univariate Analysis of Variance were used. Results None of the participating hospitals had a hospital disaster management plan. The performance according to HICS was intermediate for 83% (n = 19) of the participating hospitals. No hospital had a high level of performance. The performance level for the individual sections was intermediate or fair, except for the logistic and finance sections which demonstrated a higher level of performance. The public hospitals had overall higher performances than university hospitals (P = 0.04). Conclusions The decision making performance in the Iranian hospitals, as measured during table top exercises and using the indicators proposed by HICS was intermediate to poor. In addition, this study demonstrates that the HICS job action sheets can be used as a template for measuring the hospital response. Simulations can be used to assess preparedness, but the correlation with

  7. Bleaching and micro-cracking phenomena induced in various types of sapphires by keV-electron beam irradiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Bo-Hyun; Teraji, Tokuyuki; Ito, Toshimichi

    2006-08-01

    Electron-beam-induced phenomena on α-Al 2O 3 single-crystals have been investigated using a scanning electron microscope with a cathodoluminescence (CL) apparatus. Various types of sapphires were irradiated at room temperature by keV electrons of the total fluences up to ≈6 × 10 20 electrons cm -2. In the case of colored specimens, increasing amounts of electron irradiations induced a reversible "bleaching" phenomenon and subsequently an irreversible "cracking" phenomenon on nanometer scales in the surface and subsurface layers. The details of the fluence dependences of these beam-induced changes differed among the various natural and synthetic sapphires. These changes were dramatically reduced by the presence of thin metal layers on the insulating sapphire surfaces, indicating that these phenomena were induced by the presence of charges accumulated in the specimens. Such electron irradiations also varied CL intensities of the F + center peaked at 330 nm while the Cr 3+ center CL peak observed at 697 nm was almost unchanged in intensity with increasing the electron fluence. Furthermore, information on these CL centers along the depth direction from the specimen surface was obtained using variable incident electron energies ranging from 1 to 25 keV. The above phenomena are discussed in relation to the crystalline quality of the specimens examined.

  8. TECHNICAL NOTE: Characterization of the effects of applied electric fields on fracture toughness and cyclic electric field induced fatigue crack growth for piezoceramic PIC 151

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. P.; Galea, S.; Ye, L.; Mai, Y. W.

    2004-02-01

    The influence of applied electric field on fracture toughness and cyclic electric field induced fatigue crack growth behaviour was characterized for an actuator piezoelectric ceramic under the combined loading of a high electric field and a mechanical stress. Results show that there exists a strong anisotropic effect on fracture toughness and electric field induced fatigue crack growth in polarized PZT. It is found that the apparent fracture toughness in the orientation parallel to the polarization direction is much higher than that in the transverse orientation. Under a positive electric field, increasing the electric field intensity reduces the fracture toughness in the transverse orientation but enhances that in the parallel orientation. However, the reverse is true under a negative electric field. A sphere cavity model in dielectrics was employed to characterize the effect of the external applied electric field on the evolution of cracking in an indentation. The results also show that low electric field intensity does not result in fatigue crack growth in PZT. For a relatively high applied electric field, the cracks initially grow quickly and then are arrested. This result is very significant for the long-term durability of PZT actuators.

  9. Crack propagation in teeth: a comparison of perimortem and postmortem behavior of dental materials and cracks.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Cris E; White, Crystal A

    2009-03-01

    This study presents a new method for understanding postmortem heat-induced crack propagation patterns in teeth. The results demonstrate that patterns of postmortem heat-induced crack propagation differ from perimortem and antemortem trauma-induced crack propagation patterns. Dental material of the postmortem tooth undergoes dehydration leading to a shrinking and more brittle dentin material and a weaker dentin-enamel junction. Dentin intertubule tensile stresses are amplified by the presence of the pulp cavity, and initiates crack propagation from the internal dentin, through the dentin-enamel junction and lastly the enamel. In contrast, in vivo perimortem and antemortem trauma-induced crack propagation initiates cracking from the external surface of the enamel toward the dentin-enamel junction where the majority of the energy of the crack is dissipated, eliminating the crack's progress into the dentin. These unique patterns of crack propagation can be used to differentiate postmortem taphonomy-induced damage from antemortem and perimortem trauma in teeth.

  10. The Substructure of the Solar Corona Observed in the Hi-C Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winebarger, A.; Cirtain, J.; Golub, L.; DeLuca, E.; Savage, S.; Alexander, C.; Schuler, T.

    2014-01-01

    In the summer of 2012, the High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) flew aboard a NASA sounding rocket and collected the highest spatial resolution images ever obtained of the solar corona. One of the goals of the Hi-C flight was to characterize the substructure of the solar corona. We therefore calculate how the intensity scales from a low-resolution (AIA) pixels to high-resolution (Hi-C) pixels for both the dynamic events and "background" emission (meaning, the steady emission over the 5 minutes of data acquisition time). We find there is no evidence of substructure in the background corona; the intensity scales smoothly from low-resolution to high-resolution Hi-C pixels. In transient events, however, the intensity observed with Hi-C is, on average, 2.6 times larger than observed with AIA. This increase in intensity suggests that AIA is not resolving these events. This result suggests a finely structured dynamic corona embedded in a smoothly varying background.

  11. HiC-Pro: an optimized and flexible pipeline for Hi-C data processing.

    PubMed

    Servant, Nicolas; Varoquaux, Nelle; Lajoie, Bryan R; Viara, Eric; Chen, Chong-Jian; Vert, Jean-Philippe; Heard, Edith; Dekker, Job; Barillot, Emmanuel

    2015-12-01

    HiC-Pro is an optimized and flexible pipeline for processing Hi-C data from raw reads to normalized contact maps. HiC-Pro maps reads, detects valid ligation products, performs quality controls and generates intra- and inter-chromosomal contact maps. It includes a fast implementation of the iterative correction method and is based on a memory-efficient data format for Hi-C contact maps. In addition, HiC-Pro can use phased genotype data to build allele-specific contact maps. We applied HiC-Pro to different Hi-C datasets, demonstrating its ability to easily process large data in a reasonable time. Source code and documentation are available at http://github.com/nservant/HiC-Pro .

  12. A Novel Matrix Protein Hic31 from the Prismatic Layer of Hyriopsis Cumingii Displays a Collagen-Like Structure.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaojun; Zeng, Shimei; Dong, Shaojian; Jin, Can; Li, Jiale

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we clone and characterize a novel matrix protein, hic31, from the mantle of Hyriopsis cumingii. The amino acid composition of hic31 consists of a high proportion of Glycine residues (26.67%). Tissue expression detection by RT-PCR indicates that hic31 is expressed specifically at the mantle edge. In situ hybridization results reveals strong signals from the dorsal epithelial cells of the outer fold at the mantle edge, and weak signals from inner epithelial cells of the same fold, indicating that hic31 is a prismatic-layer matrix protein. Although BLASTP results identify no shared homology with other shell-matrix proteins or any other known proteins, the hic31 tertiary structure is similar to that of collagen I, alpha 1 and alpha 2. It has been well proved that collagen forms the basic organic frameworks in way of collagen fibrils and minerals present within or outside of these fibrils. Therefore, hic31 might be a framework-matrix protein involved in the prismatic-layer biomineralization. Besides, the gene expression of hic31 increase in the early stages of pearl sac development, indicating that hic31 may play important roles in biomineralization of the pearl prismatic layer.

  13. A Novel Matrix Protein Hic31 from the Prismatic Layer of Hyriopsis Cumingii Displays a Collagen-Like Structure

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Shaojian; Jin, Can; Li, Jiale

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we clone and characterize a novel matrix protein, hic31, from the mantle of Hyriopsis cumingii. The amino acid composition of hic31 consists of a high proportion of Glycine residues (26.67%). Tissue expression detection by RT-PCR indicates that hic31 is expressed specifically at the mantle edge. In situ hybridization results reveals strong signals from the dorsal epithelial cells of the outer fold at the mantle edge, and weak signals from inner epithelial cells of the same fold, indicating that hic31 is a prismatic-layer matrix protein. Although BLASTP results identify no shared homology with other shell-matrix proteins or any other known proteins, the hic31 tertiary structure is similar to that of collagen I, alpha 1 and alpha 2. It has been well proved that collagen forms the basic organic frameworks in way of collagen fibrils and minerals present within or outside of these fibrils. Therefore, hic31 might be a framework-matrix protein involved in the prismatic-layer biomineralization. Besides, the gene expression of hic31 increase in the early stages of pearl sac development, indicating that hic31 may play important roles in biomineralization of the pearl prismatic layer. PMID:26262686

  14. Hi-C Observations of an Active Region Corona, and Investigation of the Underlying Magnetic Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, S. K.; Alexander, C. E.; Winebarger, A.; Moore, R. L.

    2014-01-01

    The solar corona is much hotter (>=10(exp 6) K) than its surface (approx 6000 K), puzzling astrophysicists for several decades. Active region (AR) corona is again hotter than the quiet Sun (QS) corona by a factor of 4-10. The most widely accepted mechanism that could heat the active region corona is the energy release by current dissipation via reconnection of braided magnetic field structure, first proposed by E. N. Parker three decades ago. The first observational evidence for this mechanism has only recently been presented by Cirtain et al. by using High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) observations of an AR corona at a spatial resolution of 0.2 arcsec, which is required to resolve the coronal loops, and was not available before the rocket flight of Hi-C in July 2012. The Hi-C project is led by NASA/MSFC. In the case of the QS, work done by convection/granulation on the inter-granular feet of the coronal field lines translates into the heat observed in the corona. In the case of the AR, as here, there could be flux emergence, cancellation/submergence, or shear flows generating large stress and tension in coronal field loops which is released as heat in the corona. We are currently investigating the changes taking place in photospheric feet of the magnetic field involved with brightenings in the Hi-C AR corona. For this purpose, we are also using SDO/AIA data of +/- 2 hours around the 5 minutes Hi-C flight. In the present talk, I will first summarize some of the results of the Hi-C observations and then present some results from our recent analysis on what photospheric processes feed the magnetic energy that dissipates into heat in coronal loops.

  15. Prediction of Shear-induced Crack Initiation in AHSS Deep Drawing Operation with a Phenomenological Fracture Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Meng; Li, Yaning; Gerlach, Joerg; Wierzbicki, Tomasz

    2010-06-01

    Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) draws enormous attentions in automotive industry because it has great potential in reducing weight and improving fuel efficiency. Nonetheless, their relatively low formability also causes many problems in manufacturing processes, such as shear-induced fracture during deep drawing or stamping. This type of fracture could not be predicted using traditional necking-based Forming Limit Diagram (FLD), which is commonly used by the forming community. In the present paper, a recently developed Modified Mohr-Coulomb (MMC)[1] ductile fracture model is employed to make up the deficiency of FLD. In the limiting case of plane stress, the MMC fracture locus consists of four branches when represented on the plane of the equivalent strain to fracture and the stress triaxiality. A transformation of above 2D fracture locus to the space of principal strains was performed which revealed the existence of two new branches not known before. The existence of those branches explains the formation of shear-induced fracture. As an illustration of this new approach, initiation and propagation of cracks in a series of deep drawing tests is predicted and compared with the experimental observations. It was shown that the location of fracture as well as the magnitude of punch travel corresponding to first fracture was correctly predicted by MMC fracture model for both square and circular punch cases.

  16. Disposal demonstration of a high integrity container (HIC) containing an EPICOR-II prefilter from Three Mile Island

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, J.W. Jr.; Tyacke, M.J.; Schmitt, R.C.; Reno, H.W.

    1985-02-01

    A high integrity container (HIC) was developed, tested, and certified for use in disposing of unusual low-level radioactive waste from Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2). The work was coordinated by EG and G Idaho, Inc. and funded by the US Department of Energy. A disposal demonstration using an HIC containing an EPICOR-II prefilter from TMI-2 was completed at the commercial disposal facility in the State of Washington. A Certification of Compliance was issued by the Department of Social and Health Services of the State of Washington to use the HIC in disposing of up to 50 EPICOR-II prefilters. That Certification of Compliance was issued after rigorous review of the HIC design and test program by the State and by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This report describes the processes of loading, transporting, and disposing of the demonstration HIC and briefly describes the design, testing, and approval effort leading up to the demonstration.

  17. Radiation-induced instability of MnS precipitates and its possible consequences on irradiation-induced stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.; Sanecki, J.E.; Garner, F.A.

    1996-12-01

    Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) is a significant materials issue for the light water reactor (LWR) industry and may also pose a problem for fusion power reactors that will use water as coolant. A new metallurgical process is proposed that involves the radiation-induced release into solution of minor impurity elements not usually thought to participate in IASCC. MnS-type precipitates, which contain most of the sulfur in stainless steels, are thought to be unstable under irradiation. First, Mn transmutes strongly to Fe in thermalized neutron spectra. Second, cascade-induced disordering and the inverse Kirkendall effect operating at the incoherent interfaces of MnS precipitates are thought to act as a pump to export Mn from the precipitate into the alloy matrix. Both of these processes will most likely allow sulfur, which is known to exert a deleterious influence on intergranular cracking, to re-enter the matrix. To test this hypothesis, compositions of MnS-type precipitates contained in several unirradiated and irradiated heats of Type 304, 316, and 348 stainless steels (SSs) were analyzed by Auger electron spectroscopy. Evidence is presented that shows a progressive compositional modification of MnS precipitates as exposure to neutrons increases in boiling water reactors. As the fluence increases, the Mn level in MnS decreases, whereas the Fe level increases. The S level also decreases relative to the combined level of Mn and Fe. MnS precipitates were also found to be a reservoir of other deleterious impurities such as F and O which could be also released due to radiation-induced instability of the precipitates.

  18. Uni-axial stretching regulates intracellular localization of Hic-5 expressed in smooth-muscle cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kim-Kaneyama, Joo-ri; Suzuki, Wataru; Ichikawa, Kiyoko; Ohki, Takahiro; Kohno, Yoko; Sata, Masataka; Nose, Kiyoshi; Shibanuma, Motoko

    2005-03-01

    Hic-5 is a focal adhesion protein belonging to the paxillin LIM family that shuttles in and out of the nucleus. In the present study, we examined the expression of Hic-5 among mouse tissues by immunohistochemistry and found its expression only in smooth-muscle cells in several tissues. This result is consistent with a previous report on adult human tissues and contradicts the relatively ubiquitous expression of paxillin, the protein most homologous to Hic-5. One factor characterizing smooth-muscle cells in vivo is a continuous exposure to mechanical stretching in the organs. To study the involvement of Hic-5 in cellular responses to mechanical stress, we exposed mouse embryo fibroblasts to a uni-axial cyclic stretching and found that Hic-5 was relocalized from focal adhesions to stress fibers through its C-terminal LIM domains during the stress. In sharp contrast to this, paxillin did not change its focal-adhesion-based localization. Of the factors tested, which included interacting partners of Hic-5, only CRP2 (an only-LIM protein expressed in vascular smooth-muscle cells) and GIT1 were, like Hic-5, localized to stress fibers during the cyclic stretching. Interestingly, Hic-5 showed a suppressive effect on the contractile capability of cells embedded in three-dimensional collagen gels, and the effect was further augmented when CRP2 co-localized with Hic-5 to fiber structures of those cells. These results suggested that Hic-5 was a mediator of tensional force, translocating directly from focal adhesions to actin stress fibers upon mechanical stress and regulating the contractile capability of cells in the stress fibers.

  19. Preventing Cracking of Anodized Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, Charles C.; Heslin, Thomas M.

    1995-01-01

    Anodized coatings have been used as optical and thermal surfaces in spacecraft. Particulate contamination from cracked coatings is a concern for many applications. The major cause for the cracking is the difference in the coefficient of thermal expansion between the oxide coatings and the aluminum substrate. The loss of water when the coating is exposed to a vacuum also could induce cracking of the coating. Hot-water sealing was identified as the major cause for the cracking of the coatings because of the large temperature change when the parts were immersed in boiling water and the water was absorbed in the coating. when the hot-water sealing process was eliminated, the cracking resistance of the anodized coatings was greatly improved. Also, it was found that dyed black coatings were more susceptible than clear coatings to cracking during thermo-vacuum cyclings.

  20. Formation and interpretation of dilatant echelon cracks.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollard, D.D.; Segall, P.; Delaney, P.T.

    1982-01-01

    The relative displacements of the walls of many veins, joints, and dikes demonstrate that these structures are dilatant cracks. We infer that dilatant cracks propagate in a principal stress plane, normal to the maximum tensile or least compressive stress. Arrays of echelon crack segments appear to emerge from the peripheries of some dilatant cracks. Breakdown of a parent crack into an echelon array may be initiated by a spatial or temporal rotation of the remote principal stresses about an axis parallel to the crack propagation direction. Near the parent-crack tip, a rotation of the local principal stresses is induced in the same sense, but not necessarily through the same angle. Incipient echelon cracks form at the parent-crack tip normal to the local maximum tensile stress. Further longitudinal growth along surfaces that twist about axes parallel to the propagation direction realigns each echelon crack into a remote principal stress plane. The walls of these twisted cracks may be idealized as helicoidal surfaces. An array of helicoidal cracks sweeps out less surface area than one parent crack twisting through the same angle. Thus, many echelon cracks grow from a single parent because the work done in creating the array, as measured by its surface area decreases as the number of cracks increases. -from Authors

  1. Cryo-induced cracking in high-alpine rock-wall, evidences from acoustic emissions monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amitrano, D.; Gruber, S.; Girard, L.

    2012-04-01

    Ice formation within rock is known to be an important driver of near-surface frost weathering as well as rock damage at the depth of several meters, which may play a crucial role for the slow preconditioning of rock fall in steep permafrost areas. This letter reports results from an experiment where acoustic emission (AE) monitoring was used to investigate rock damage in a high-alpine rock-wall induced by natural thermal cycling and freezing/thawing. The analysis of the large catalog of events obtained shows (i) robust power-law distributions in the time and energy domains, a footprint of rock micro-fracturing activity induced by stresses arising from thermal variations and associated freezing/thawing of rock; (ii) liquid water availability and rock temperature affect AE activity, suggesting the importance of freezing-induced stresses. These results suggest that the framework of further modeling studies (theoretical and numerical) should include damage, elastic interaction and poro-mechanics in order to describe freezing-related stresses.

  2. Effects of crack aspect ratio on the behavior of small surface cracks in fatigue: Part I. Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravichandran, K. S.

    1997-01-01

    A simple simulation of alternate growth of a small surface crack in the surface and depth directions was performed to illustrate the changes in crack aspect ratio, induced by grain boundaries, as a function of crack size. It is shown that at small crack sizes, large variations in aspect ratio, a/c ( a is the crack depth and c is the half-surface length), occur, due to local crack front perturbations induced by grains that are oriented for crack growth. At these crack sizes, the assumption of a semicircular crack shape ( a/c=1.0) was found to cause errors in stress intensity range (Δ K) calculations. This, in turn, led to significant scatter or “anomaly” in small crack growth rates relative to large cracks. At large crack sizes, the effects of local crack front perturbations on crack aspect ratio and Δ K were found to be insignificant. As a result, the scatter in crack growth data was found to decrease to a negligible level at large crack sizes. It is suggested that the limiting crack size above which the small crack behaves as a large crack, l 2=10 d ( d = grain size), proposed by Taylor and Knott, is related to the crack size above which the effects due to aspect ratio variations are small.

  3. An investigation of penetrant techniques for detection of machining-induced surface-breaking cracks on monolithic ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Forster, G.A.; Ellingson, W.A.

    1996-02-01

    The purpose of this effort was to evaluate penetrant methods for their ability to detect surface-breaking cracks in monolithic ceramic materials with an emphasis on detection of cracks generated by machining. There are two basic penetrant types, visible and fluorescent. The visible penetrant method is usually augmented by powder developers and cracks detected can be seen in visible light. Cracks detected by fluorescent penetrant are visible only under ultraviolet light used with or without a developer. The developer is basically a powder that wicks up penetrant from a crack to make it more observable. Although fluorescent penetrants were recommended in the literature survey conducted early in this effort, visible penetrants and two non-standard techniques, a capillary gaseous diffusion method under development at the institute of Chemical Physics in Moscow, and the {open_quotes}statiflux{close_quotes} method which involves use of electrically charged particles, were also investigated. SiAlON ring specimens (1 in. diameter, 3/4 in. wide) which had been subjected to different thermal-shock cycles were used for these tests. The capillary gaseous diffusion method is based on ammonia; the detector is a specially impregnated paper much like litmus paper. As expected, visible dye penetrants offered no detection sensitivity for tight, surface-breaking cracks in ceramics. Although the non-standard statiflux method showed promise on high-crack-density specimens, it was ineffective on limited-crack-density specimens. The fluorescent penetrant method was superior for surface-breaking crack detection, but successful application of this procedure depends greatly on the skill of the user. Two presently available high-sensitivity fluorescent penetrants were then evaluated for detection of microcracks on Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and SiC from different suppliers. Although 50X optical magnification may be sufficient for many applications, 200X magnification provides excellent delectability.

  4. Cracking catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Otterstedt, J. E. A.; Jaras, S. G.; Pudas, R.; Upson, L. L.

    1985-05-07

    A cracking catalyst having good resistance to metal poisoning has at least two particle fractions of different particle sizes, the cracking catalyzing zeolite material being concentrated to the coarser particle size fractions, and the finer particle size fractions being formed from material having relatively lower or no or insignificant cracking catalyzing activity. The particles of the finer particle size fractions have a matrix of kaolin and amorphous alumina--silica and may contain for example, an SO /SUB x/ eliminating additive such as Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, CaO and/or MgO. The coarser particle size fractions having cracking catalyzing effect have a mean particle size of from 80 to 125 ..mu..m and the finer particle size fractions a mean particle size of from 30 to 75 ..mu..m. The coarser particle size fractions have a zeolite content of at least 20 weight % and may have a zeolite content of up to 100 weight %, the remainder consisting essentially of material which has relatively lower or no or insignificant cracking-catalyzing activity and which consists of kaolin and amorphous alumina-silica. The catalyst mass as a whole may have a zeolite content of up to 50 weight %.

  5. Anti-parallel filament flows and bright dots observed in the EUV with Hi-C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, C. E.; Regnier, S.; Walsh, R. W.; Winebarger, A. R.; Cirtain, J. W.

    2013-12-01

    The Hi-C instrument imaged the million degree corona at the highest spatial and temporal resolution to date. The instrument imaged a complicated active region which contained several interesting features. Scientists at UCLan in the UK, in collaboration with other members of the Hi-C science team, studied two of these festures: anti-parallel filament flows and bright EUV dots. Plasma flows within prominences/filaments have been observed for many years and hold valuable clues concerning the mass and energy balance within these structures. Evidence of ';counter-steaming' flows has previously been inferred from these cool plasma observations but now, for the first time, these flows have been directly imaged along fundamental filament threads within the million degree corona (at 193 Å). We present observations of an active region filament observed with Hi-C that exhibits anti-parallel flows along adjacent filament threads. The ultra-high spatial and temporal resolution of Hi-C allow the anti-parallel flow velocities to be measured (70 - 80 km/s) and gives an indication of the resolvable thickness of the individual strands (0.8' × 0.1'). The temperature distribution of the plasma flows was estimated to be log T(K) = 5.45 × 0.10 using EM loci analysis. Short-lived, small brightenings sparkling at the edge of the active region, calle EUV Bright Dots (EBDs) were also investigated. EBDs have a characteristic duration of 25 s with a characteristic length of 680 km. These brightenings are not fully resolved by the SDO/AIA instrument at the same wavelength, but can however be identified with respect to the Hi-C location of the EBDs. In addition, EBDs are seen in other chromospheric/coronal channels of SDO/AIA suggesting a temperature between 0.5 and 1.5 MK. Based on a potential field extrapolation from an SDO/HMI magnetogram, the EBDs appear at the footpoints of large-scale trans-equatorial coronal loops. The Hi-C observations provide the first evidence of small-scale EUV

  6. HIC1 controls cellular- and HIV-1- gene transcription via interactions with CTIP2 and HMGA1

    PubMed Central

    Le Douce, Valentin; Forouzanfar, Faezeh; Eilebrecht, Sebastian; Van Driessche, Benoit; Ait-Ammar, Amina; Verdikt, Roxane; Kurashige, Yoshihito; Marban, Céline; Gautier, Virginie; Candolfi, Ermanno; Benecke, Arndt G.; Van Lint, Carine; Rohr, Olivier; Schwartz, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Among many cellular transcriptional regulators, Bcl11b/CTIP2 and HGMA1 have been described to control the establishment and the persistence of HIV-1 latency in microglial cells, the main viral reservoir in the brain. In this present work, we identify and characterize a transcription factor i.e. HIC1, which physically interacts with both Bcl11b/CTIP2 and HMGA1 to co-regulate specific subsets of cellular genes and the viral HIV-1 gene. Our results suggest that HIC1 represses Tat dependent HIV-1 transcription. Interestingly, this repression of Tat function is linked to HIC1 K314 acetylation status and to SIRT1 deacetylase activity. Finally, we show that HIC1 interacts and cooperates with HGMA1 to regulate Tat dependent HIV-1 transcription. Our results also suggest that HIC1 repression of Tat function happens in a TAR dependent manner and that this TAR element may serve as HIC1 reservoir at the viral promoter to facilitate HIC1/TAT interaction. PMID:27725726

  7. Sparkling extreme-ultraviolet bright dots observed with Hi-C

    SciTech Connect

    Régnier, S.; Alexander, C. E.; Walsh, R. W.; Winebarger, A. R.; Cirtain, J.; Golub, L.; Korreck, K. E.; Weber, M.; Mitchell, N.; Platt, S.; De Pontieu, B.; Title, A.; Kobayashi, K.; Kuzin, S.; DeForest, C. E.

    2014-04-01

    Observing the Sun at high time and spatial scales is a step toward understanding the finest and fundamental scales of heating events in the solar corona. The high-resolution coronal (Hi-C) instrument has provided the highest spatial and temporal resolution images of the solar corona in the EUV wavelength range to date. Hi-C observed an active region on 2012 July 11 that exhibits several interesting features in the EUV line at 193 Å. One of them is the existence of short, small brightenings 'sparkling' at the edge of the active region; we call these EUV bright dots (EBDs). Individual EBDs have a characteristic duration of 25 s with a characteristic length of 680 km. These brightenings are not fully resolved by the SDO/AIA instrument at the same wavelength; however, they can be identified with respect to the Hi-C location of the EBDs. In addition, EBDs are seen in other chromospheric/coronal channels of SDO/AIA, which suggests a temperature between 0.5 and 1.5 MK. Based on their frequency in the Hi-C time series, we define four different categories of EBDs: single peak, double peak, long duration, and bursty. Based on a potential field extrapolation from an SDO/HMI magnetogram, the EBDs appear at the footpoints of large-scale, trans-equatorial coronal loops. The Hi-C observations provide the first evidence of small-scale EUV heating events at the base of these coronal loops, which have a free magnetic energy of the order of 10{sup 26} erg.

  8. Comparison of Hi-C results using in-solution versus in-nucleus ligation.

    PubMed

    Nagano, Takashi; Várnai, Csilla; Schoenfelder, Stefan; Javierre, Biola-Maria; Wingett, Steven W; Fraser, Peter

    2015-08-26

    Chromosome conformation capture and various derivative methods such as 4C, 5C and Hi-C have emerged as standard tools to analyze the three-dimensional organization of the genome in the nucleus. These methods employ ligation of diluted cross-linked chromatin complexes, intended to favor proximity-dependent, intra-complex ligation. During development of single-cell Hi-C, we devised an alternative Hi-C protocol with ligation in preserved nuclei rather than in solution. Here we directly compare Hi-C methods employing in-nucleus ligation with the standard in-solution ligation. We show in-nucleus ligation results in consistently lower levels of inter-chromosomal contacts. Through chromatin mixing experiments we show that a significantly large fraction of inter-chromosomal contacts are the result of spurious ligation events formed during in-solution ligation. In-nucleus ligation significantly reduces this source of experimental noise, and results in improved reproducibility between replicates. We also find that in-nucleus ligation eliminates restriction fragment length bias found with in-solution ligation. These improvements result in greater reproducibility of long-range intra-chromosomal and inter-chromosomal contacts, as well as enhanced detection of structural features such as topologically associated domain boundaries. We conclude that in-nucleus ligation captures chromatin interactions more consistently over a wider range of distances, and significantly reduces both experimental noise and bias. In-nucleus ligation creates higher quality Hi-C libraries while simplifying the experimental procedure. We suggest that the entire range of 3C applications are likely to show similar benefits from in-nucleus ligation.

  9. Statistical study of ductility-dip cracking induced plastic deformation in polycrystalline laser 3D printed Ni-based superalloy

    DOE PAGES

    Qian, Dan; Xue, Jiawei; Zhang, Anfeng; ...

    2017-06-06

    Ductility-dip cracking in Ni-based superalloy, resulting from heat treatment, is known to cause disastrous failure, but its mechanism is still not completely clear. A statistical study of the cracking behavior as a function of crystal orientation in a laser 3D-printed DL125L Ni-based superalloy polycrystal is investigated here using the synchrotron X-ray microdiffraction. The dislocation slip system in each of the forty crystal grains adjacent to the 300 μm long crack has been analyzed through Laue diffraction peak shapes. In all these grains, edge-type geometrically necessary dislocations (GNDs) dominate, and their dislocation line directions are almost parallel to the crack plane.more » Based on Schmid's law, the equivalent uniaxial tensile force direction is revealed normal to the trace of the crack. A qualitative mechanism is thus proposed. Thermal tensile stress perpendicular to the laser scanning direction is elevated due to a significant temperature gradient, and thus locations in the materials where the thermal stress exceeds the yield stress undergo plastic deformation mediated by GND activations. As the dislocations slip inside the crystal grains and pile up at the grain boundaries, local strain/stress keeps increasing, until the materials in these regions fail to sustain further deformation, leading to voids formation and cracks propagation.« less

  10. Isolation of the role of radiation-induced segregation in irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking of proton-irradiated austenitic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busby, Jeremy Todd

    2001-11-01

    The role of radiation-induced segregation (RIS) in irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) was studied in order to better understand the underlying mechanisms of IASCC. High-purity 304L (HP-304L), commercial purity 304 (CP-304) and commercial purity 316 (CP-316) stainless steel alloys were irradiated with 3.2 MeV protons at 400°C (HP-304L) and 360°C (CP-304 and CP-316) to doses ranging from 0.1 and 5.0 dpa. Grain boundary chemistry was measured using scanning transmission electron microscopy with energy-dispersive spectroscopy (STEM/EDS) in both unirradiated and irradiated samples. Unirradiated and irradiated samples of the two commercial purity alloys were also strained to failure in an aqueous environment representative of boiling water reactor cores. The cracking susceptibility and RIS in the proton-irradiated CP-304 is very similar to that from the neutron-irradiated samples. The CP-316 alloy did not crack. Radiation-induced segregation, cracking susceptibility, and dislocation loop microstructure developed at the same rate as a function of dose in the CP-304 alloy. To isolate the effects of RIS in IASCC, post-irradiation annealing was utilized. Simulations of post-irradiation annealing of RIS and dislocation loop microstructure show that dislocation loops are removed preferentially over RIS due to the density of vacancies required and kinetic considerations. Experimental anneals were conducted on HP-304L samples irradiated to 1.0 dpa and CP-304 samples irradiated to 1.0 and 2.5 dpa. Post-irradiation anneals were performed at temperatures ranging from 400°C to 650°C for times between 45 minutes and 5 hours. At all temperatures, the hardness and dislocation densities decreased with increasing annealing time much faster than RIS did. Annealing at 600°C for 90 minutes removed virtually all dislocation microstructure while leaving RIS intact. Cracking susceptibility in the CP-304 alloy was mitigated rapidly during post-irradiation annealing

  11. Reaction-induced grain boundary cracking and anisotropic fluid flow during prograde devolatilization reactions within subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Atsushi; Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Fukuda, Jun-ichi; Muto, Jun; Okudaira, Takamoto

    2017-09-01

    Devolatilization reactions during prograde metamorphism are a key control on the fluid distribution within subduction zones. Garnets in Mn-rich quartz schist within the Sanbagawa metamorphic belt of Japan are characterized by skeletal structures containing abundant quartz inclusions. Each quartz inclusion was angular-shaped, and showed random crystallographic orientations, suggesting that these quartz inclusions were trapped via grain boundary cracking during garnet growth. Such skeletal garnet within the quartz schist formed related to decarbonation reactions with a positive total volume change (Δ V t > 0), whereas the euhedral garnet within the pelitic schists formed as a result of dehydration reaction with negative Δ V t values. Coupled hydrological-chemical-mechanical processes during metamorphic devolatilization reactions were investigated by a distinct element method (DEM) numerical simulation on a foliated rock that contained reactive minerals and non-reactive matrix minerals. Negative Δ V t reactions cause a decrease in fluid pressure and do not produce fractures within the matrix. In contrast, a fluid pressure increase by positive Δ V t reactions results in hydrofracturing of the matrix. This fracturing preferentially occurs along grain boundaries and causes episodic fluid pulses associated with the development of the fracture network. The precipitation of garnet within grain boundary fractures could explain the formation of the skeletal garnet. Our DEM model also suggests a strong influence of reaction-induced fracturing on anisotropic fluid flow, meaning that dominant fluid flow directions could easily change in response to changes in stress configuration and the magnitude of differential stress during prograde metamorphism within a subduction zone.

  12. The effect of ion plated silver and sliding friction on tensile stress-induced cracking in aluminum oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.; Spalvins, Talivaldis

    1991-01-01

    A Hertzian analysis of the effect of sliding friction on contact stresses in alumina is used to predict the critical load for crack generation. The results for uncoated alumina and alumina coated with ion plated silver are compared. Friction coefficient inputs to the analysis are determined experimentally with a scratch test instrument employing an 0.2 mm radius diamond stylus. A series of scratches were made at constant load increments on coated and uncoated flat alumina surfaces. Critical loads for cracking are detected by microscopic examination of cross sections of scratches made at various loads and friction coefficients. Acoustic emission (AE) and friction trends were also evaluated as experimental techniques for determining critical loads for cracking. Analytical predictions correlate well with micrographic evidence and with the lowest load at which AE is detected in multiple scratch tests. Friction/load trends are not good indicators of early crack formation. Lubrication with silver films reduced friction and thereby increased the critical load for crack initiation in agreement with analytical predictions.

  13. The effect of ion-plated silver and sliding friction on tensile stress-induced cracking in aluminum oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.; Spalvins, Talivaldis

    1993-01-01

    A Hertzian analysis of the effect of sliding friction on contact stresses in alumina is used to predict the critical load for crack generation. The results for uncoated alumina and alumina coated with ion plated silver are compared. Friction coefficient inputs to the analysis are determined experimentally with a scratch test instrument employing an 0.2 mm radius diamond stylus. A series of scratches were made at constant load increments on coated and uncoated flat alumina surfaces. Critical loads for cracking are detected by microscopic examination of cross sections of scratches made at various loads and friction coefficients. Acoustic emission (AE) and friction trends were also evaluated as experimental techniques for determining critical loads for cracking. Analytical predictions correlate well with micrographic evidence and with the lowest load at which AE is detected in multiple scratch tests. Friction/load trends are not good indicators of early crack formation. Lubrication with silver films reduced friction and thereby increased the critical load for crack initiation in agreement with analytical predictions.

  14. The effect of ion-plated silver and sliding friction on tensile stress-induced cracking in aluminum oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.; Spalvins, Talivaldis

    1993-01-01

    A Hertzian analysis of the effect of sliding friction on contact stresses in alumina is used to predict the critical load for crack generation. The results for uncoated alumina and alumina coated with ion plated silver are compared. Friction coefficient inputs to the analysis are determined experimentally with a scratch test instrument employing an 0.2 mm radius diamond stylus. A series of scratches were made at constant load increments on coated and uncoated flat alumina surfaces. Critical loads for cracking are detected by microscopic examination of cross sections of scratches made at various loads and friction coefficients. Acoustic emission (AE) and friction trends were also evaluated as experimental techniques for determining critical loads for cracking. Analytical predictions correlate well with micrographic evidence and with the lowest load at which AE is detected in multiple scratch tests. Friction/load trends are not good indicators of early crack formation. Lubrication with silver films reduced friction and thereby increased the critical load for crack initiation in agreement with analytical predictions.

  15. HiC-spector: a matrix library for spectral and reproducibility analysis of Hi-C contact maps.

    PubMed

    Yan, Koon-Kiu; Yardimci, Galip Gürkan; Yan, Chengfei; Noble, William S; Gerstein, Mark

    2017-07-15

    Genome-wide proximity ligation based assays like Hi-C have opened a window to the 3D organization of the genome. In so doing, they present data structures that are different from conventional 1D signal tracks. To exploit the 2D nature of Hi-C contact maps, matrix techniques like spectral analysis are particularly useful. Here, we present HiC-spector, a collection of matrix-related functions for analyzing Hi-C contact maps. In particular, we introduce a novel reproducibility metric for quantifying the similarity between contact maps based on spectral decomposition. The metric successfully separates contact maps mapped from Hi-C data coming from biological replicates, pseudo-replicates and different cell types. Source code in Julia and Python, and detailed documentation is available at https://github.com/gersteinlab/HiC-spector . koonkiu.yan@gmail.com or mark@gersteinlab.org. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  16. Capture Hi-C identifies the chromatin interactome of colorectal cancer risk loci.

    PubMed

    Jäger, Roland; Migliorini, Gabriele; Henrion, Marc; Kandaswamy, Radhika; Speedy, Helen E; Heindl, Andreas; Whiffin, Nicola; Carnicer, Maria J; Broome, Laura; Dryden, Nicola; Nagano, Takashi; Schoenfelder, Stefan; Enge, Martin; Yuan, Yinyin; Taipale, Jussi; Fraser, Peter; Fletcher, Olivia; Houlston, Richard S

    2015-02-19

    Multiple regulatory elements distant from their targets on the linear genome can influence the expression of a single gene through chromatin looping. Chromosome conformation capture implemented in Hi-C allows for genome-wide agnostic characterization of chromatin contacts. However, detection of functional enhancer-promoter interactions is precluded by its effective resolution that is determined by both restriction fragmentation and sensitivity of the experiment. Here we develop a capture Hi-C (cHi-C) approach to allow an agnostic characterization of these physical interactions on a genome-wide scale. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated with complex diseases often reside within regulatory elements and exert effects through long-range regulation of gene expression. Applying this cHi-C approach to 14 colorectal cancer risk loci allows us to identify key long-range chromatin interactions in cis and trans involving these loci.

  17. Single cell Hi-C reveals cell-to-cell variability in chromosome structure

    PubMed Central

    Schoenfelder, Stefan; Yaffe, Eitan; Dean, Wendy; Laue, Ernest D.; Tanay, Amos; Fraser, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Large-scale chromosome structure and spatial nuclear arrangement have been linked to control of gene expression and DNA replication and repair. Genomic techniques based on chromosome conformation capture assess contacts for millions of loci simultaneously, but do so by averaging chromosome conformations from millions of nuclei. Here we introduce single cell Hi-C, combined with genome-wide statistical analysis and structural modeling of single copy X chromosomes, to show that individual chromosomes maintain domain organisation at the megabase scale, but show variable cell-to-cell chromosome territory structures at larger scales. Despite this structural stochasticity, localisation of active gene domains to boundaries of territories is a hallmark of chromosomal conformation. Single cell Hi-C data bridge current gaps between genomics and microscopy studies of chromosomes, demonstrating how modular organisation underlies dynamic chromosome structure, and how this structure is probabilistically linked with genome activity patterns. PMID:24067610

  18. Single-cell Hi-C reveals cell-to-cell variability in chromosome structure.

    PubMed

    Nagano, Takashi; Lubling, Yaniv; Stevens, Tim J; Schoenfelder, Stefan; Yaffe, Eitan; Dean, Wendy; Laue, Ernest D; Tanay, Amos; Fraser, Peter

    2013-10-03

    Large-scale chromosome structure and spatial nuclear arrangement have been linked to control of gene expression and DNA replication and repair. Genomic techniques based on chromosome conformation capture (3C) assess contacts for millions of loci simultaneously, but do so by averaging chromosome conformations from millions of nuclei. Here we introduce single-cell Hi-C, combined with genome-wide statistical analysis and structural modelling of single-copy X chromosomes, to show that individual chromosomes maintain domain organization at the megabase scale, but show variable cell-to-cell chromosome structures at larger scales. Despite this structural stochasticity, localization of active gene domains to boundaries of chromosome territories is a hallmark of chromosomal conformation. Single-cell Hi-C data bridge current gaps between genomics and microscopy studies of chromosomes, demonstrating how modular organization underlies dynamic chromosome structure, and how this structure is probabilistically linked with genome activity patterns.

  19. Metabolic regulation of SIRT1 transcription via a HIC1:CtBP corepressor complex

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qinghong; Wang, Su-Yan; Fleuriel, Capucine; Leprince, Dominique; Rocheleau, Jonathan V.; Piston, David W.; Goodman, Richard H.

    2007-01-01

    The Sir2 histone deacetylases are important for gene regulation, metabolism, and longevity. A unique feature of these enzymes is their utilization of NAD+ as a cosubstrate, which has led to the suggestion that Sir2 activity reflects the cellular energy state. We show that SIRT1, a mammalian Sir2 homologue, is also controlled at the transcriptional level through a mechanism that is specific for this isoform. Treatment with the glycolytic blocker 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) decreases association of the redox sensor CtBP with HIC1, an inhibitor of SIRT1 transcription. We propose that the reduction in transcriptional repression mediated by HIC1, due to the decrease of CtBP binding, increases SIRT1 expression. This mechanism allows the specific regulation of SIRT1 in response to nutrient deprivation. PMID:17213307

  20. HiCRep: assessing the reproducibility of Hi-C data using a stratum-adjusted correlation coefficient.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tao; Zhang, Feipeng; Yardımcı, Galip Gürkan; Song, Fan; Hardison, Ross C; Noble, William Stafford; Yue, Feng; Li, Qunhua

    2017-08-30

    Hi-C is a powerful technology for studying genome-wide chromatin interactions. However, current methods for assessing Hi-C data reproducibility can produce misleading results because they ignore spatial features in Hi-C data, such as domain structure and distance dependence. We present HiCRep, a framework for assessing the reproducibility of Hi-C data that systematically accounts for these features. In particular, we introduce a novel similarity measure, the stratum adjusted correlation coefficient (SCC), for quantifying the similarity between Hi-C interaction matrices. Not only does it provide a statistically sound and reliable evaluation of reproducibility, SCC can also be used to quantify differences between Hi-C contact matrices and to determine the optimal sequencing depth for a desired resolution. The measure consistently shows higher accuracy than existing approaches in distinguishing subtle differences in reproducibility and depicting interrelationships of cell lineages. The proposed measure is straightforward to interpret and easy to compute, making it well-suited for providing standardized, interpretable, automatable, and scalable quality control. The freely available R package HiCRep implements our approach. © 2017 Yang et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  1. The LIM domains of hic-5 protein recognize specific DNA fragments in a zinc-dependent manner in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Nishiya, N; Sabe, H; Nose, K; Shibanuma, M

    1998-01-01

    hic-5 protein is a member of the LIM protein family, containing four LIM domains in its C-terminal region. It is mainly localized in focal adhesions and shows striking similarity to paxillin in its LIM domains, although the function of these LIM domains has remained elusive. In the present study, we found that full-length and the C-terminal half of hic-5 protein, including four LIM domains, bound to DNA in a zinc-dependent manner in vitro . Mouse genomic fragments that specifically bound to the hic-5 protein were isolated by successive rounds of hic-5 protein-DNA complex immunoprecipitation and PCR amplification. Seven independent clones were isolated, which contained high amounts of G+A and/or a long A/T tract. A DNA binding protein blot assay revealed the specificity of the interaction between hic-5 protein and the DNA fragment. Using a series of truncated forms of the hic-5 LIM domains, each of the four LIM domains was found to contribute to DNA binding in a distinctive manner. PMID:9722648

  2. HIC1 interacts with a specific subunit of SWI/SNF complexes, ARID1A/BAF250A

    SciTech Connect

    Van Rechem, Capucine; Boulay, Gaylor; Leprince, Dominique

    2009-08-07

    HIC1, a tumor suppressor gene epigenetically silenced in many human cancers encodes a transcriptional repressor involved in regulatory loops modulating p53-dependent and E2F1-dependent cell survival and stress responses. HIC1 is also implicated in growth control since it recruits BRG1, one of the two alternative ATPases (BRM or BRG1) of SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complexes to repress transcription of E2F1 in quiescent fibroblasts. Here, through yeast two-hybrid screening, we identify ARID1A/BAF250A, as a new HIC1 partner. ARID1A/BAF250A is one of the two mutually exclusive ARID1-containing subunits of SWI/SNF complexes which define subsets of complexes endowed with anti-proliferative properties. Co-immunoprecipitation assays in WI38 fibroblasts and in BRG1-/- SW13 cells showed that endogenous HIC1 and ARID1A proteins interact in a BRG1-dependent manner. Furthermore, we demonstrate that HIC1 does not interact with BRM. Finally, sequential chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP-reChIP) experiments demonstrated that HIC1 represses E2F1 through the recruitment of anti-proliferative SWI/SNF complexes containing ARID1A.

  3. A computational algorithm for crack determination: The multiple crack case

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryan, Kurt; Vogelius, Michael

    1992-01-01

    An algorithm for recovering a collection of linear cracks in a homogeneous electrical conductor from boundary measurements of voltages induced by specified current fluxes is developed. The technique is a variation of Newton's method and is based on taking weighted averages of the boundary data. The method also adaptively changes the applied current flux at each iteration to maintain maximum sensitivity to the estimated locations of the cracks.

  4. Forward modeling transient brightenings and microflares around an active region observed with Hi-C

    SciTech Connect

    Kobelski, Adam R.; McKenzie, David E.

    2014-10-20

    Small-scale flare-like brightenings around active regions are among the smallest and most fundamental of energetic transient events in the corona, providing a testbed for models of heating and active region dynamics. In a previous study, we modeled a large collection of these microflares observed with Hinode/X-Ray Telescope (XRT) using EBTEL and found that they required multiple heating events, but could not distinguish between multiple heating events on a single strand, or multiple strands each experiencing a single heating event. We present here a similar study, but with extreme-ultraviolet data of Active Region 11520 from the High Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) sounding rocket. Hi-C provides an order of magnitude improvement to the spatial resolution of XRT, and a cooler temperature sensitivity, which combine to provide significant improvements to our ability to detect and model microflare activity around active regions. We have found that at the spatial resolution of Hi-C (≈0.''3), the events occur much more frequently than expected (57 events detected, only 1 or 2 expected), and are most likely made from strands of the order of 100 km wide, each of which is impulsively heated with multiple heating events. These findings tend to support bursty reconnection as the cause of the energy release responsible for the brightenings.

  5. An integrated model for detecting significant chromatin interactions from high-resolution Hi-C data

    PubMed Central

    Carty, Mark; Zamparo, Lee; Sahin, Merve; González, Alvaro; Pelossof, Raphael; Elemento, Olivier; Leslie, Christina S.

    2017-01-01

    Here we present HiC-DC, a principled method to estimate the statistical significance (P values) of chromatin interactions from Hi-C experiments. HiC-DC uses hurdle negative binomial regression account for systematic sources of variation in Hi-C read counts—for example, distance-dependent random polymer ligation and GC content and mappability bias—and model zero inflation and overdispersion. Applied to high-resolution Hi-C data in a lymphoblastoid cell line, HiC-DC detects significant interactions at the sub-topologically associating domain level, identifying potential structural and regulatory interactions supported by CTCF binding sites, DNase accessibility, and/or active histone marks. CTCF-associated interactions are most strongly enriched in the middle genomic distance range (∼700 kb–1.5 Mb), while interactions involving actively marked DNase accessible elements are enriched both at short (<500 kb) and longer (>1.5 Mb) genomic distances. There is a striking enrichment of longer-range interactions connecting replication-dependent histone genes on chromosome 6, potentially representing the chromatin architecture at the histone locus body. PMID:28513628

  6. Accurate identification of centromere locations in yeast genomes using Hi-C.

    PubMed

    Varoquaux, Nelle; Liachko, Ivan; Ay, Ferhat; Burton, Joshua N; Shendure, Jay; Dunham, Maitreya J; Vert, Jean-Philippe; Noble, William S

    2015-06-23

    Centromeres are essential for proper chromosome segregation. Despite extensive research, centromere locations in yeast genomes remain difficult to infer, and in most species they are still unknown. Recently, the chromatin conformation capture assay, Hi-C, has been re-purposed for diverse applications, including de novo genome assembly, deconvolution of metagenomic samples and inference of centromere locations. We describe a method, Centurion, that jointly infers the locations of all centromeres in a single genome from Hi-C data by exploiting the centromeres' tendency to cluster in three-dimensional space. We first demonstrate the accuracy of Centurion in identifying known centromere locations from high coverage Hi-C data of budding yeast and a human malaria parasite. We then use Centurion to infer centromere locations in 14 yeast species. Across all microbes that we consider, Centurion predicts 89% of centromeres within 5 kb of their known locations. We also demonstrate the robustness of the approach in datasets with low sequencing depth. Finally, we predict centromere coordinates for six yeast species that currently lack centromere annotations. These results show that Centurion can be used for centromere identification for diverse species of yeast and possibly other microorganisms.

  7. DETECTING NANOFLARE HEATING EVENTS IN SUBARCSECOND INTER-MOSS LOOPS USING Hi-C

    SciTech Connect

    Winebarger, Amy R.; Moore, Ronald; Cirtain, Jonathan; Walsh, Robert W.; De Pontieu, Bart; Title, Alan; Hansteen, Viggo; Golub, Leon; Korreck, Kelly; Weber, Mark; Kobayashi, Ken; DeForest, Craig; Kuzin, Sergey

    2013-07-01

    The High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) flew aboard a NASA sounding rocket on 2012 July 11 and captured roughly 345 s of high-spatial and temporal resolution images of the solar corona in a narrowband 193 A channel. In this paper, we analyze a set of rapidly evolving loops that appear in an inter-moss region. We select six loops that both appear in and fade out of the Hi-C images during the short flight. From the Hi-C data, we determine the size and lifetimes of the loops and characterize whether these loops appear simultaneously along their length or first appear at one footpoint before appearing at the other. Using co-aligned, co-temporal data from multiple channels of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we determine the temperature and density of the loops. We find the loops consist of cool ({approx}10{sup 5} K), dense ({approx}10{sup 10} cm{sup -3}) plasma. Their required thermal energy and their observed evolution suggest they result from impulsive heating similar in magnitude to nanoflares. Comparisons with advanced numerical simulations indicate that such dense, cold and short-lived loops are a natural consequence of impulsive magnetic energy release by reconnection of braided magnetic field at low heights in the solar atmosphere.

  8. Hi-C Observations of an Active Region Corona, and Investigation of the Underlying Magnetic Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, Sanjiv K.; Alexander, Caroline E.; Winebarger, Amy R.; Moore, Ronald L.

    2014-01-01

    Hi-C: first observational evidence of field line braiding in the AR corona; NLFFF extrapolations support. Flux emergence and/or cancellation in the coronal braided region generate large stresses and tension in the coronal field loops which is released as heat in the corona. The field in these sub-regions are highly sheared and have apparent high speed plasma flows, therefore, the contribution from shearing flows to power the coronal and transition region heating can not be ruled out! The spatial resolution of Hi-­C is five times better than AIA. The cadence of Hi-C is 2.5 - 6 times better than AIA. The 193 Å was selected because of the strong emission line of Fe XII (peak formation temperature of 1.5 MK). Hi-­C collected data for 345 s @ 5.4 s cadence. The Hi-C target region was NOAA AR 11520; 11 July 2012, 18:51-18:57 UT. NLFFF extrapolation confirms the braided structure, and free magnetic energy estimates in the given volume.

  9. Hydrogen embrittlement and stress corrosion cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Gibala, R.; Hehemann, R.F.

    1984-01-01

    Topics related to hydrogen embrittlement are discussed, taking into account an overview on hydrogen degradation phenomena, theories of hydrogen induced cracking of steels, the hydrogen embrittlement of steels, hydrogen trapping in iron and steels, some recent results on the direct observation of hydrogen trapping in metals and its consequences on embrittlement mechanisms, fracture mechanics and surface chemistry investigations of environment-assisted crack growth, the role of microstructure in hydrogen embrittlement, and hydrogen related second phase embrittlement of solids. Subjects in the area of stress corrosion cracking are also explored, giving attention to recent observations on the propagation of stress corrosion cracks and their relevance to proposed mechanisms of stress corrosion cracking, films and their importance in the nucleation of stress corrosion cracking in stainless steel, and fundamentals of corrosion fatigue behavior of metals and alloys. Stress corrosion cracking of ferritic and austenitic stainless steels is also considered along with embrittlement studies on metallic glasses.

  10. Isolation and characterization of a novel acidic matrix protein hic22 from the nacreous layer of the freshwater mussel, Hyriopsis cumingii.

    PubMed

    Liu, X J; Jin, C; Wu, L M; Dong, S J; Zeng, S M; Li, J L

    2016-07-29

    Matrix proteins that either weakly acidic or unusually highly acidic have important roles in shell biomineralization. In this study, we have identified and characterized hic22, a weakly acidic matrix protein, from the nacreous layer of Hyriopsis cumingii. Total protein was extracted from the nacre using 5 M EDTA and hic22 was purified using a DEAE-sepharose column. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of hic22 was determined and the complete cDNA encoding hic22 was cloned and sequenced by rapid amplification of cDNA ends-polymerase chain reaction. Finally, the localization and distribution of hic22 was determined by in situ hybridization. Our results revealed that hic22 encodes a 22-kDa protein composed of 185 amino acids. Tissue expression analysis and in situ hybridization indicated that hic22 is expressed in the dorsal epithelial cells of the mantle pallial; moreover, significant expression levels of hic22 were observed after the early formation of the pearl sac (days 19-77), implying that hic22 may play an important role in biomineralization of the nacreous layer.

  11. Stretch-Induced Drug Delivery from Superhydrophobic Polymer Composites: Use of Crack Propagation Failure Modes for Controlling Release Rates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Julia; Kaplan, Jonah A; Colson, Yolonda L; Grinstaff, Mark W

    2016-02-18

    The concept of using crack propagation in polymeric materials to control drug release and its first demonstration are reported. The composite drug delivery system consists of highly-textured superhydrophobic electrosprayed microparticle coatings, composed of biodegradable and biocompatible polymers poly(caprolactone) and poly(glycerol monostearate carbonate-co-caprolactone), and a cellulose/polyester core. The release of entrapped agents is controlled by the magnitude of applied strain, resulting in a graded response from water infiltration through the propagating patterned cracks in the coating. Strain-dependent delivery of the anticancer agents cisplatin and 7-ethyl-10-hydroxycamptothecin to esophageal cancer cells (OE33) in vitro is observed. Finally the device is integrated with an esophageal stent to demonstrate delivery of fluorescein diacetate, using applied tension, to an ex vivo esophagus. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Hydrogen embrittlement and stress corrosion cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Gibala, R.; Hehemann, R.F.

    1984-01-01

    This book presents proceedings which give an account of knowledge and understanding of hydrogen embrittlement and stress corrosion cracking from the viewpoints of the authors. The book is divided into two sections: (1) hydrogen embrittlement and (2) stress corrosion cracking, with papers by experts in the field contained in each section. Contents include: Hydrogen Embrittlement: Overview on hydrogen degradation phenomena; theories of hydrogen induced cracking of steels; hydrogen embrittlement of steels; hydrogen trapping and hydrogen embrittlement; some recent results on the direct observation of hydrogen trapping in metals and its consequence on embrittlement mechanisms; fracture mechanisms and surface chemistry; investigations of environment-assisted crack growth; the role of microstructure in hydrogen embrittlement; hydrogen related second phase embrittlement of solids. Stress corrosion cracking: Recent observations on the propagation of stress corrosion cracks and their relevance to proposed mechanisms of stress corrosion cracking; films and their importance in the nucleation of stress corrosion cracking stainless steel; stress corrosion cracking of ferritic and austenitic stainless steels; fundamentals of corrosion fatigue behavior of metals and alloys; hydrogen embrittlement and stress corrosion cracking of aluminum alloys; hydrogen permeation and embrittlement studies on metallic glasses; and industrial occurrence of stress corrosion cracking and means for prediction.

  13. Combining Hi-C data with phylogenetic correlation to predict the target genes of distal regulatory elements in human genome.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yulan; Zhou, Yuanpeng; Tian, Weidong

    2013-12-01

    Defining the target genes of distal regulatory elements (DREs), such as enhancer, repressors and insulators, is a challenging task. The recently developed Hi-C technology is designed to capture chromosome conformation structure by high-throughput sequencing, and can be potentially used to determine the target genes of DREs. However, Hi-C data are noisy, making it difficult to directly use Hi-C data to identify DRE-target gene relationships. In this study, we show that DREs-gene pairs that are confirmed by Hi-C data are strongly phylogenetic correlated, and have thus developed a method that combines Hi-C read counts with phylogenetic correlation to predict long-range DRE-target gene relationships. Analysis of predicted DRE-target gene pairs shows that genes regulated by large number of DREs tend to have essential functions, and genes regulated by the same DREs tend to be functionally related and co-expressed. In addition, we show with a couple of examples that the predicted target genes of DREs can help explain the causal roles of disease-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms located in the DREs. As such, these predictions will be of importance not only for our understanding of the function of DREs but also for elucidating the causal roles of disease-associated noncoding single-nucleotide polymorphisms.

  14. Beyond the Flipped Classroom: A Highly Interactive Cloud-Classroom (HIC) Embedded into Basic Materials Science Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liou, Wei-Kai; Bhagat, Kaushal Kumar; Chang, Chun-Yen

    2016-06-01

    The present study compares the highly interactive cloud-classroom (HIC) system with traditional methods of teaching materials science that utilize crystal structure picture or real crystal structure model, in order to examine its learning effectiveness across three dimensions: knowledge, comprehension and application. The aim of this study was to evaluate the (HIC) system, which incorporates augmented reality, virtual reality and cloud-classroom to teach basic materials science courses. The study followed a pretest-posttest quasi-experimental research design. A total of 92 students (aged 19-20 years), in a second-year undergraduate program, participated in this 18-week-long experiment. The students were divided into an experimental group and a control group. The experimental group (36 males and 10 females) was instructed utilizing the HIC system, while the control group (34 males and 12 females) was led through traditional teaching methods. Pretest, posttest, and delayed posttest scores were evaluated by multivariate analysis of covariance. The results indicated that participants in the experimental group who used the HIC system outperformed the control group, in the both posttest and delayed posttest, across three learning dimensions. Based on these results, the HIC system is recommended to be incorporated in formal materials science learning settings.

  15. HiView: an integrative genome browser to leverage Hi-C results for the interpretation of GWAS variants.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zheng; Zhang, Guosheng; Duan, Qing; Chai, Shengjie; Zhang, Baqun; Wu, Cong; Jin, Fulai; Yue, Feng; Li, Yun; Hu, Ming

    2016-03-11

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified thousands of genetic variants associated with complex traits and diseases. However, most of them are located in the non-protein coding regions, and therefore it is challenging to hypothesize the functions of these non-coding GWAS variants. Recent large efforts such as the ENCODE and Roadmap Epigenomics projects have predicted a large number of regulatory elements. However, the target genes of these regulatory elements remain largely unknown. Chromatin conformation capture based technologies such as Hi-C can directly measure the chromatin interactions and have generated an increasingly comprehensive catalog of the interactome between the distal regulatory elements and their potential target genes. Leveraging such information revealed by Hi-C holds the promise of elucidating the functions of genetic variants in human diseases. In this work, we present HiView, the first integrative genome browser to leverage Hi-C results for the interpretation of GWAS variants. HiView is able to display Hi-C data and statistical evidence for chromatin interactions in genomic regions surrounding any given GWAS variant, enabling straightforward visualization and interpretation. We believe that as the first GWAS variants-centered Hi-C genome browser, HiView is a useful tool guiding post-GWAS functional genomics studies. HiView is freely accessible at: http://www.unc.edu/~yunmli/HiView .

  16. Magnetic Structure of Sites of Braiding in Hi-C Active Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, S. K.; Alexander, C. E.; Winebarger, A.; Moore, R. L.

    2014-01-01

    High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) observations of an active region (AR) corona, at a spatial resolution of 0.2 arcsec, have offered the first direct evidence of field lines braiding, which could deliver sufficient energy to heat the AR corona by current dissipation via magnetic reconnection, a proposal given by Parker three decades ago. The energy required to heat the corona must be transported from the photosphere along the field lines. The mechanism that drives the energy transport to the corona is not yet fully understood. To investigate simultaneous magnetic and intensity structure in and around the AR in detail, we use SDO/HMI+AIA data of + / - 2 hours around the 5 minute Hi-C flight. In the case of the QS, work done by convection/granulation on the inter-granular feet of the coronal field lines probably translates into the heat observed in the corona. In the case of the AR, as here, there could be flux emergence, cancellation/submergence, or shear flows generating large stress and tension in coronal field loops which is released as heat in the corona. However, to the best of our knowledge, there is no observational evidence available to these processes. We investigate the changes taking place in the photospheric feet of the magnetic field involved with brightenings in the Hi-C AR corona. Using HMI 45s magnetograms of four hours we find that, out of the two Hi-C sub-regions where the braiding of field lines were recently detected, flux emergence takes place in one region and flux cancellation in the other. The field in these sub-regions are highly sheared and have apparent high speed plasma flows at their feet. Therefore, shearing flows plausibly power much of the coronal and transition region heating in these areas of the AR. In addition, the presence of large flux emergence/cancellation strongly suggests that the work done by these processes on the pre-existing field also drives much of the observed heating.

  17. Magnetic structure of sites of braiding in Hi-C active region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Sanjiv Kumar; Alexander, Caroline; Winebarger, Amy R.; Moore, Ronald L.

    2014-06-01

    High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) observations of an active region (AR) corona, at a spatial resolution of 0.2 arcsec, have offered the first direct evidence of field lines braiding, which could deliver sufficient energy to heat the AR corona by current dissipation via magnetic reconnection, a proposal given by Parker three decades ago. The energy required to heat the corona must be transported from the photosphere along the field lines. The mechanism that drives the energy transport to the corona is not yet fully understood.To investigate simultaneous magnetic and intensity structure in and around the AR in detail, we use SDO/HMI+AIA data of + / - 2 hours around the 5 minute Hi-C flight. In the case of the QS, work done by convection/granulation on the inter-granular feet of the coronal field lines probably translates into the heat observed in the corona. In the case of the AR, as here, there could be flux emergence, cancellation/submergence, or shear flows generating large stress and tension in coronal field loops which is released as heat in the corona. However, to the best of our knowledge, there is no observational evidence available to these processes. We investigate the changes taking place in the photospheric feet of the magnetic field involved with brightenings in the Hi-C AR corona. Using HMI 45s magnetograms of four hours we find that, out of the two Hi-C sub-regions where the braiding of field lines were recently detected, flux emergence takes place in one region and flux cancellation in the other. The field in these sub-regions are highly sheared and have apparent high speed plasma flows at their feet. Therefore, shearing flows plausibly power much of the coronal and transition region heating in these areas of the AR. In addition, the presence of large flux emergence/cancellation strongly suggests that the work done by these processes on the pre-existing field also drives much of the observed heating.For this work, SKT and CEA were supported by an

  18. Crack, crack house sex, and HIV risk.

    PubMed

    Inciardi, J A

    1995-06-01

    Limited attention has been focused on HIV risk behaviors of crack smokers and their sex partners, yet there is evidence that the crack house and the crack-using life-style may be playing significant roles in the transmission of HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases. The purposes of this research were to study the attributes and patterns of "sex for crack" exchanges, particularly those that occurred in crack houses, and to assess their potential impact on the spread of HIV. Structured interviews were conducted with 17 men and 35 women in Miami, Florida, who were regular users of crack and who had exchanged sex for crack (or for money to buy crack) during the past 30 days. In addition, participant observation was conducted in 8 Miami crack houses. Interview and observational data suggest that individuals who exchange sex for crack do so with considerable frequency, and through a variety of sexual activities. Systematic data indicated that almost a third of the men and 89% of the women had had 100 or more sex partners during the 30-day period prior to study recruitment. Not only were sexual activities anonymous, extremely frequent, varied, uninhibited (often undertaken in public areas of crack houses), and with multiple partners but, in addition, condoms were not used during the majority of contacts. Of the 37 subjects who were tested for HIV and received their test results 31% of the men and 21% of the women were HIV seropositive.

  19. Comparative analysis of MazEF and HicAB toxin-antitoxin systems of the cyanobacterium, Anabaena sp. PCC7120.

    PubMed

    Potnis, Akhilesh A; Raghavan, Prashanth S; Shelke, Ashwini; Nikam, T D; Rajaram, Hema

    2017-01-01

    Anabaena PCC7120 has two annotated toxin-antitoxin systems: MazEF and HicAB. Overexpression of either of the toxins severely inhibited the growth of Escherichia coli BL21(plysS)(DE3). Of the two Anabaena toxins, MazF exhibited higher toxicity than HicA as evidenced by (i) 100-fold lower viability upon overexpression of MazF compared to HicA; (ii) complete loss of cell viability within 1 h of induction of MazF expression, as against >10(3) colony forming units mL(-1) in case of HicA; (iii) inability to maintain the MazF overexpressing plasmid in E. coli cells; and (iv) neutralisation of the toxin was effective at the molar ratio of 1:1.9 for MazF:MazE and 13:1 for HicA:HicB, indicating higher antitoxin requirement for neutralisation of MazF. The growth inhibitory effect of MazF was found to be higher in lag phase cultures compared to mid-logarithmic phase cultures of E. coli, while the reverse was true for HicA. The results suggest possible distinct roles for MazEF and HicAB systems of Anabaena.

  20. Single-cell Hi-C for genome-wide detection of chromatin interactions that occur simultaneously in a single cell.

    PubMed

    Nagano, Takashi; Lubling, Yaniv; Yaffe, Eitan; Wingett, Steven W; Dean, Wendy; Tanay, Amos; Fraser, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Hi-C is a powerful method that provides pairwise information on genomic regions in spatial proximity in the nucleus. Hi-C requires millions of cells as input and, as genome organization varies from cell to cell, a limitation of Hi-C is that it only provides a population average of genome conformations. We developed single-cell Hi-C to create snapshots of thousands of chromatin interactions that occur simultaneously in a single cell. To adapt Hi-C to single-cell analysis, we modified the protocol to include in-nucleus ligation. This enables the isolation of single nuclei carrying Hi-C-ligated DNA into separate tubes, followed by reversal of cross-links, capture of biotinylated ligation junctions on streptavidin-coated magnetic beads and PCR amplification of single-cell Hi-C libraries. The entire laboratory protocol can be carried out in 1 week, and although we have demonstrated its use in mouse T helper (TH1) cells, it should be applicable to any cell type or species for which standard Hi-C has been successful. We also developed an analysis pipeline to filter noise and assess the quality of data sets in a few hours. Although the interactome maps produced by single-cell Hi-C are sparse, the data provide useful information to understand cellular variability in nuclear genome organization and chromosome structure. Standard wet and dry laboratory skills in molecular biology and computational analysis are required.

  1. Combustion in cracks of PBX 9501

    SciTech Connect

    Berghout, H. L.; Son, S. F.; Bolme, C. A.; Hill, L. G.; Asay, B. W.; Dickson, P. M.; Henson, B. F.; Smilowitz, L. B.

    2002-01-01

    Recent experiments involving the combustion of PBX 9501 explosive under confined conditions reveal the importance of crack and flaws in reaction violence. Experiments on room temperature confined disks of pristine and thermally damaged PBX 9501 reveal that crack ignition depends on hot gases entering existing or pressure induced cracks rather than on energy release at the crack tip. PBX 9501 slot combustion experiments show that the reaction propagation rate in the slot does not depend on the external pressure. We have observed 1500 d s in long slots of highly-confined PBX 9501. We present experiments that examine the combustion of mechanically and thermally damaged samples of PBX 9501.

  2. Ethanol and nitrous oxide produce withdrawal-induced convulsions by similar mechanisms in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Belknap, J.K.; Laursen, S.E.; Crabbe, J.C.

    1987-10-26

    Twenty generations of selective breeding were used to produce lines (strains) of mice which differ markedly from one another in ethanol physical dependence development as indexed by handling-induced convulsions (HIC) induced by withdrawal from ethanol. These withdrawal seizure prone (WSP) and withdrawal seizure resistant (WSR) selection lines now differ by over 10-fold in HIC scores after equivalent exposure to intoxicating levels of ethanol via inhalation. Since handling-induced convulsions can be readily elicited following withdrawal from nitrous oxide, the authors sought to determine if the very large differences in ethanol withdrawal-induced HIC bred into these selection lines would generalize to nitrous oxide. Following a 60 min exposure to 75% nitrous oxide (in O/sub 2/), a greater than 10-fold difference in HIC scores, and a 2-fold difference in tremor incidence was seen upon withdrawal in WSP vs. WSR mice. These finding closely parallel those seen with ethanol, and demonstrate that a large degree of commonality exists in the genes and the mechanisms determining these withdrawal signs. HIC elicited by nitrous oxide withdrawal were readily suppressed by ethanol, and HIC elicited by ethanol withdrawal were promptly suppressed by 75% nitrous oxide in WSP mice. Nitrous oxide also suppressed HIC and tremor associated with nitrous oxide withdrawal. 19 references, 1 figure, 4 tables.

  3. Formation of cracks in layered rock considering layer thickness variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Xu; Lu, Jianyou; Wang, Shanyong; Wang, Shuren; Liu, Xiliang

    2017-09-01

    The formation mechanisms for layer interface-parallel discontinuities and their interactions with vertical cracks in layered rocks with varying layer thickness are investigated. The interface behaviour between rock layers is modeled by a shear displacement response and rock crack behaviour is described by a damage model. Three typical failures can be captured: (1) vertical cracking, (2) delamination and (3) interface-parallel cracking. The result further indicates these crack modes are determined by a threshold of the interfacial strength. When the interfacial strength is higher than the threshold, a combined pattern of vertical cracking and interface-parallel cracking occurs. If the strength is lower than the threshold, a combined pattern of vertical cracking and interfacial delamination can be found. If the strength for the interface is near the threshold, a combined pattern of interface-parallel cracking, vertical cracking and interfacial delamination occurs. The result shows the interface-parallel discontinuities are induced by interface-delamination, interface-parallel cracks, or their coupling behaviour. Both interfacial delamination and interface-parallel cracking can reduce the tensile stress between two adjacent cracks and thus lead to a saturation state. Layer thickness variations can further influence the infilling process of vertical cracks and the crack spacing to average layer thickness ratios.

  4. Elastomer-induced crevice corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of stainless steel heat exchanger plates in sour amine service

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, M.G.; Baron, J.J.; Moffat, T.A.

    1996-08-01

    Types S31600 and S31254 stainless steel heat exchanger plates have suffered crevice corrosion and stress corrosion cracking under gaskets in rich amine service in a sour gas plant. The gasket material, ethylene-propylene-diene monomer (EPDM), has been used successfully for many years at other sour gas plants. Laboratory testing has duplicated the corrosion observed and shown that the mechanism is synergistic sulfide-halide attack. The use of a bromine plus chlorine-activated curing system for the EPDM rubber gaskets provided the necessary halides. Laboratory testing identified some nickel-based superalloys which were resistant to this corrosion and also demonstrated that essentially halogen-free, peroxide-cured EPDM gaskets do not cause attack of S31600 or S31254. The heat exchanger packs were replaced with S31600 plates and peroxide-cured EPDM gaskets having a specified total halogen concentration of 200 ppm maximum. Field operating experience has been excellent.

  5. The Capabilities and Limitation of Remote Visual Methods to Detect Service-Induced Cracks in Reactor Components

    SciTech Connect

    Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Doctor, Steven R.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2006-11-01

    Since 1977, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research has funded a multiyear program at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to evaluate the reliability and accuracy of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques employed for inservice inspection (ISI). Recently, the U.S. nuclear industry proposed replacing current volumetric and/or surface examinations of certain components in commercial nuclear power plants, as required by ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Section XI, with a simpler visual testing (VT) method. The advantages of VT are that these tests generally involve much less radiation exposure and examination times than do volumetric examinations such as ultrasonic testing (UT). However, for industry to justify supplamenting volumetric metods with VT, and analysis of pertinent issues is needed to support the reliability of VT in determining the structural intefrity of reactor components. As piping and pressure vessel compoents in a nuclear power station are generally underwater and in high radiation field, they need to be examined by VT from a distance with radiation-hardened video systems. Remote visual testing has been used by nuclear utilities to find cracks in pressure vessel cladding in pressurized water reactors, for shrouds in boiling water reactors, and to investigate leaks in piping and reactor components. These visual tests are performed using a wide variety of procedures and equipment. The techniques for remote visual testing use submersible closed-circuit video cameras to examine reactor components and welds. PNNL has conducted a parametric study that examines the important variables that affect the effectiveness of a remote visual test. Tested variables include lighting techniques, camera resolution, camera movement, and magnification. PNNL has also conductrd a laboratory test using a commercial visual testing camera system to experimentally determine the ability of the camera system to

  6. Modeling the Interactions Between Multiple Crack Closure Mechanisms at Threshold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, John A.; Riddell, William T.; Piascik, Robert S.

    2003-01-01

    A fatigue crack closure model is developed that includes interactions between the three closure mechanisms most likely to occur at threshold; plasticity, roughness, and oxide. This model, herein referred to as the CROP model (for Closure, Roughness, Oxide, and Plasticity), also includes the effects of out-of plane cracking and multi-axial loading. These features make the CROP closure model uniquely suited for, but not limited to, threshold applications. Rough cracks are idealized here as two-dimensional sawtooths, whose geometry induces mixed-mode crack- tip stresses. Continuum mechanics and crack-tip dislocation concepts are combined to relate crack face displacements to crack-tip loads. Geometric criteria are used to determine closure loads from crack-face displacements. Finite element results, used to verify model predictions, provide critical information about the locations where crack closure occurs.

  7. Fretting Fatigue with Cylindrical-On-Flat Contact: Crack Nucleation, Crack Path and Fatigue Life

    PubMed Central

    Noraphaiphipaksa, Nitikorn; Manonukul, Anchalee; Kanchanomai, Chaosuan

    2017-01-01

    Fretting fatigue experiments and finite element analysis were carried out to investigate the influence of cylindrical-on-flat contact on crack nucleation, crack path and fatigue life of medium-carbon steel. The location of crack nucleation was predicted using the maximum shear stress range criterion and the maximum relative slip amplitude criterion. The prediction using the maximum relative slip amplitude criterion gave the better agreement with the experimental result, and should be used for the prediction of the location of crack nucleation. Crack openings under compressive bulk stresses were found in the fretting fatigues with flat-on-flat contact and cylindrical-on-flat contacts, i.e., fretting-contact-induced crack openings. The crack opening stress of specimen with flat-on-flat contact was lower than those of specimens with cylindrical-on-flat contacts, while that of specimen with 60-mm radius contact pad was lower than that of specimen with 15-mm radius contact pad. The fretting fatigue lives were estimated by integrating the fatigue crack growth curve from an initial propagating crack length to a critical crack length. The predictions of fretting fatigue life with consideration of crack opening were in good agreement with the experimental results. PMID:28772522

  8. Gear Crack Propagation Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Reduced weight is a major design goal in aircraft power transmissions. Some gear designs incorporate thin rims to help meet this goal. Thin rims, however, may lead to bending fatigue cracks. These cracks may propagate through a gear tooth or into the gear rim. A crack that propagates through a tooth would probably not be catastrophic, and ample warning of a failure could be possible. On the other hand, a crack that propagates through the rim would be catastrophic. Such cracks could lead to disengagement of a rotor or propeller from an engine, loss of an aircraft, and fatalities. To help create and validate tools for the gear designer, the NASA Lewis Research Center performed in-house analytical and experimental studies to investigate the effect of rim thickness on gear-tooth crack propagation. Our goal was to determine whether cracks grew through gear teeth (benign failure mode) or through gear rims (catastrophic failure mode) for various rim thicknesses. In addition, we investigated the effect of rim thickness on crack propagation life. A finite-element-based computer program simulated gear-tooth crack propagation. The analysis used principles of linear elastic fracture mechanics, and quarter-point, triangular elements were used at the crack tip to represent the stress singularity. The program had an automated crack propagation option in which cracks were grown numerically via an automated remeshing scheme. Crack-tip stress-intensity factors were estimated to determine crack-propagation direction. Also, various fatigue crack growth models were used to estimate crack-propagation life. Experiments were performed in Lewis' Spur Gear Fatigue Rig to validate predicted crack propagation results. Gears with various backup ratios were tested to validate crack-path predictions. Also, test gears were installed with special crack-propagation gages in the tooth fillet region to measure bending-fatigue crack growth. From both predictions and tests, gears with backup ratios

  9. Crack healing in alumina bioceramics.

    PubMed

    Fischer, H; Weiss, R; Telle, R

    2008-03-01

    Microscopic cracks can occur at the surface of oxide ceramic restorations as a result of the manufacturing process and mainly due to the final mechanical preparation in the dental laboratory. A method is presented to heal up such microscopic cracks by a glass infiltration process. Bar specimens made of high purity bio-alumina were manufactured. On two batches of specimens microscopic cracks were induced using the Vickers indentation technique. The small microscopic cracks at the tip of the resulting half-penny-shape cracks were extended by the bridge loading method. The indentation pattern of the specimens of one batch was subsequently glass-infiltrated. The surface layers of the specimens with the Vickers indentation were removed by grinding as far as only the extended microscopic cracks (with and without glass) remained at the surface. The strengths of untreated, micro-damaged, and micro-damaged and glass-infiltrated specimens were determined. The microstructure of the fracture surfaces was analyzed using SEM. The characteristic strength of the specimens decreased from sigma(0)=378 to 196 MPa and the Weibull modulus from m=13.7 to 2.3 due to the micro-damaging. The strength and the scatter-in-strength were significantly improved by the glass infiltration process. The strength of the "healed" specimens (sigma(0)=434 MPa, m=17.3) was even better than that of the untreated samples. Microscopic cracks that can occur at the surface of dental restorations made of alumina like abutments or cores of crowns and bridges during the manufacturing and preparation process could reliably be healed by a glass infiltration process.

  10. Beyond the Flipped Classroom: A Highly Interactive Cloud-Classroom (HIC) Embedded into Basic Materials Science Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liou, Wei-Kai; Bhagat, Kaushal Kumar; Chang, Chun-Yen

    2016-01-01

    The present study compares the highly interactive cloud-classroom (HIC) system with traditional methods of teaching materials science that utilize crystal structure picture or real crystal structure model, in order to examine its learning effectiveness across three dimensions: knowledge, comprehension and application. The aim of this study was to…

  11. Beyond the Flipped Classroom: A Highly Interactive Cloud-Classroom (HIC) Embedded into Basic Materials Science Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liou, Wei-Kai; Bhagat, Kaushal Kumar; Chang, Chun-Yen

    2016-01-01

    The present study compares the highly interactive cloud-classroom (HIC) system with traditional methods of teaching materials science that utilize crystal structure picture or real crystal structure model, in order to examine its learning effectiveness across three dimensions: knowledge, comprehension and application. The aim of this study was to…

  12. ChromContact: A web tool for analyzing spatial contact of chromosomes from Hi-C data.

    PubMed

    Sato, Tetsuya; Suyama, Mikita

    2015-12-15

    Hi-C analysis has revealed the three-dimensional architecture of chromosomes in the nucleus. Although Hi-C data contains valuable information on long-range interactions of chromosomes, the data is not yet widely utilized by molecular biologists because of the quantity of data. We developed a web tool, ChromContact, to utilize the information obtained by Hi-C. The web tool is designed to be simple and easy to use. By specifying a locus of interest, ChromContact calculates contact profiles and generates links to the UCSC Genome Browser, enabling users to visually examine the contact information with various annotations. ChromContact provides wide-range of molecular biologists with a user-friendly means to access high-resolution Hi-C data. One of the possible applications of ChromContact is investigating novel long-range promoter-enhancer interactions. This facilitates the functional interpretation of statistically significant markers identified by GWAS or ChIP-seq peaks that are located far from any annotated genes. ChromContact is freely accessible at http://bioinfo.sls.kyushu-u.ac.jp/chromcontact/ .

  13. Crack spectra analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Tiernan, M.

    1980-09-01

    Crack spectra derived from velocity data have been shown to exhibit systematics which reflect microstructural and textural differences between samples (Warren and Tiernan, 1980). Further research into both properties and information content of crack spectra have yielded the following: Spectral features are reproducible even at low pressures; certain observed spectral features may correspond to non-in-situ crack populations created during sample retrieval; the functional form of a crack spectra may be diagnostic of the sample's grain texture; hysteresis is observed in crack spectra between up and down pressure runs - it may be due to friction between the faces of closed crack populations.

  14. Influence of fatigue crack wake length and state of stress on crack closure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Telesman, J.; Fisher, D. M.

    1986-01-01

    The location of crack closure with respect to crack wake and specimen thickness under different loading conditions was determined. The rate of increase of K sub CL in the crack wake was found to be significantly higher for plasticity induced closure in comparison to roughness induced closure. Roughness induced closure was uniform throughout the thickness of the specimen while plasticity induced closure levels were 50 percent higher in the near surface region than in the midthickness. The influence of state of stress on low-high load interaction effects was also examined. Load interaction effects differed depending upon the state of stress and were explained in terms of delta K sub eff.

  15. Crack depth determination with inductive thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oswald-Tranta, B.; Schmidt, R.

    2015-05-01

    Castings, forgings and other steel products are nowadays usually tested with magnetic particle inspection, in order to detect surface cracks. An alternative method is active thermography with inductive heating, which is quicker, it can be well automated and as in this paper presented, even the depth of a crack can be estimated. The induced eddy current, due to its very small penetration depth in ferro-magnetic materials, flows around a surface crack, heating this selectively. The surface temperature is recorded during and after the short inductive heating pulse with an infrared camera. Using Fourier transformation the whole IR image sequence is evaluated and the phase image is processed to detect surface cracks. The level and the local distribution of the phase around a crack correspond to its depth. Analytical calculations were used to model the signal distribution around cracks with different depth and a relationship has been derived between the depth of a crack and its phase value. Additionally, also the influence of the heating pulse duration has been investigated. Samples with artificial and with natural cracks have been tested. Results are presented comparing the calculated and measured phase values depending on the crack depth. Keywords: inductive heating, eddy current, infrared

  16. Fatigue behavior of Long and Short Cracks in Aluminum Alloys.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-05-01

    deposits ,37 40 irregular fracture morphologies coupled with crack tip shear displacements, 4 1 4 3 and fluid-induced pressure44 in addition to...Associated Auger measurements of the extent of crack surface corrosion deposits are shown in Fig. 4.6. In marked contrast to behavior in lower...6 8 10 12 CRACK LENGTH MEASURED FROM NOTCH (mm) Fig. 4.6: Scanning Auger spectroscopic measurements of excess crack surface oxide deposits as a

  17. Hi-C: a method to study the three-dimensional architecture of genomes.

    PubMed

    van Berkum, Nynke L; Lieberman-Aiden, Erez; Williams, Louise; Imakaev, Maxim; Gnirke, Andreas; Mirny, Leonid A; Dekker, Job; Lander, Eric S

    2010-05-06

    The three-dimensional folding of chromosomes compartmentalizes the genome and and can bring distant functional elements, such as promoters and enhancers, into close spatial proximity (2-6). Deciphering the relationship between chromosome organization and genome activity will aid in understanding genomic processes, like transcription and replication. However, little is known about how chromosomes fold. Microscopy is unable to distinguish large numbers of loci simultaneously or at high resolution. To date, the detection of chromosomal interactions using chromosome conformation capture (3C) and its subsequent adaptations required the choice of a set of target loci, making genome-wide studies impossible (7-10). We developed Hi-C, an extension of 3C that is capable of identifying long range interactions in an unbiased, genome-wide fashion. In Hi-C, cells are fixed with formaldehyde, causing interacting loci to be bound to one another by means of covalent DNA-protein cross-links. When the DNA is subsequently fragmented with a restriction enzyme, these loci remain linked. A biotinylated residue is incorporated as the 5' overhangs are filled in. Next, blunt-end ligation is performed under dilute conditions that favor ligation events between cross-linked DNA fragments. This results in a genome-wide library of ligation products, corresponding to pairs of fragments that were originally in close proximity to each other in the nucleus. Each ligation product is marked with biotin at the site of the junction. The library is sheared, and the junctions are pulled-down with streptavidin beads. The purified junctions can subsequently be analyzed using a high-throughput sequencer, resulting in a catalog of interacting fragments. Direct analysis of the resulting contact matrix reveals numerous features of genomic organization, such as the presence of chromosome territories and the preferential association of small gene-rich chromosomes. Correlation analysis can be applied to the

  18. Gear crack propagation investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.; Ballarini, Roberto

    1996-01-01

    Analytical and experimental studies were performed to investigate the effect of gear rim thickness on crack propagation life. The FRANC (FRacture ANalysis Code) computer program was used to simulate crack propagation. The FRANC program used principles of linear elastic fracture mechanics, finite element modeling, and a unique re-meshing scheme to determine crack tip stress distributions, estimate stress intensity factors, and model crack propagation. Various fatigue crack growth models were used to estimate crack propagation life based on the calculated stress intensity factors. Experimental tests were performed in a gear fatigue rig to validate predicted crack propagation results. Test gears were installed with special crack propagation gages in the tooth fillet region to measure bending fatigue crack growth. Good correlation between predicted and measured crack growth was achieved when the fatigue crack closure concept was introduced into the analysis. As the gear rim thickness decreased, the compressive cyclic stress in the gear tooth fillet region increased. This retarded crack growth and increased the number of crack propagation cycles to failure.

  19. Hi-Corrector: a fast, scalable and memory-efficient package for normalizing large-scale Hi-C data.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenyuan; Gong, Ke; Li, Qingjiao; Alber, Frank; Zhou, Xianghong Jasmine

    2015-03-15

    Genome-wide proximity ligation assays, e.g. Hi-C and its variant TCC, have recently become important tools to study spatial genome organization. Removing biases from chromatin contact matrices generated by such techniques is a critical preprocessing step of subsequent analyses. The continuing decline of sequencing costs has led to an ever-improving resolution of the Hi-C data, resulting in very large matrices of chromatin contacts. Such large-size matrices, however, pose a great challenge on the memory usage and speed of its normalization. Therefore, there is an urgent need for fast and memory-efficient methods for normalization of Hi-C data. We developed Hi-Corrector, an easy-to-use, open source implementation of the Hi-C data normalization algorithm. Its salient features are (i) scalability-the software is capable of normalizing Hi-C data of any size in reasonable times; (ii) memory efficiency-the sequential version can run on any single computer with very limited memory, no matter how little; (iii) fast speed-the parallel version can run very fast on multiple computing nodes with limited local memory. The sequential version is implemented in ANSI C and can be easily compiled on any system; the parallel version is implemented in ANSI C with the MPI library (a standardized and portable parallel environment designed for solving large-scale scientific problems). The package is freely available at http://zhoulab.usc.edu/Hi-Corrector/. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  20. Laser Peening--Strengthening Metals to Improve Fatigue Lifetime and Retard Stress-Induced Corrosion Cracking in Gears, Bolts and Cutter

    SciTech Connect

    Hackel, L A; Chen, H-L

    2003-08-20

    Laser peening is an emerging modern process that impresses a compressive stress into the surfaces of metals. Treatment can reduce the rate of fatigue cracking and stress-corrosion-cracking in metals (such as gears, bolts and cutters) needed for tunnel boring and other construction & mining applications. Laser peening could also be used to form metals or alloys into a precise shape without yielding and leaving both sulfates in a crack resistant compressive state.

  1. Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... That People Abuse » Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Listen Cocaine is a white ... Version Download "My life was built around getting cocaine and getting high." ©istock.com/ Marjot Stacey is ...

  2. CHiCAGO: robust detection of DNA looping interactions in Capture Hi-C data.

    PubMed

    Cairns, Jonathan; Freire-Pritchett, Paula; Wingett, Steven W; Várnai, Csilla; Dimond, Andrew; Plagnol, Vincent; Zerbino, Daniel; Schoenfelder, Stefan; Javierre, Biola-Maria; Osborne, Cameron; Fraser, Peter; Spivakov, Mikhail

    2016-06-15

    Capture Hi-C (CHi-C) is a method for profiling chromosomal interactions involving targeted regions of interest, such as gene promoters, globally and at high resolution. Signal detection in CHi-C data involves a number of statistical challenges that are not observed when using other Hi-C-like techniques. We present a background model and algorithms for normalisation and multiple testing that are specifically adapted to CHi-C experiments. We implement these procedures in CHiCAGO ( http://regulatorygenomicsgroup.org/chicago ), an open-source package for robust interaction detection in CHi-C. We validate CHiCAGO by showing that promoter-interacting regions detected with this method are enriched for regulatory features and disease-associated SNPs.

  3. 3D chromosome rendering from Hi-C data using virtual reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yixin; Selvaraj, Siddarth; Weber, Philip; Fang, Jennifer; Schulze, Jürgen P.; Ren, Bing

    2015-01-01

    Most genome browsers display DNA linearly, using single-dimensional depictions that are useful to examine certain epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation. However, these representations are insufficient to visualize intrachromosomal interactions and relationships between distal genome features. Relationships between DNA regions may be difficult to decipher or missed entirely if those regions are distant in one dimension but could be spatially proximal when mapped to three-dimensional space. For example, the visualization of enhancers folding over genes is only fully expressed in three-dimensional space. Thus, to accurately understand DNA behavior during gene expression, a means to model chromosomes is essential. Using coordinates generated from Hi-C interaction frequency data, we have created interactive 3D models of whole chromosome structures and its respective domains. We have also rendered information on genomic features such as genes, CTCF binding sites, and enhancers. The goal of this article is to present the procedure, findings, and conclusions of our models and renderings.

  4. Unbiased analysis of potential targets of breast cancer susceptibility loci by Capture Hi-C.

    PubMed

    Dryden, Nicola H; Broome, Laura R; Dudbridge, Frank; Johnson, Nichola; Orr, Nick; Schoenfelder, Stefan; Nagano, Takashi; Andrews, Simon; Wingett, Steven; Kozarewa, Iwanka; Assiotis, Ioannis; Fenwick, Kerry; Maguire, Sarah L; Campbell, James; Natrajan, Rachael; Lambros, Maryou; Perrakis, Eleni; Ashworth, Alan; Fraser, Peter; Fletcher, Olivia

    2014-11-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified more than 70 common variants that are associated with breast cancer risk. Most of these variants map to non-protein-coding regions and several map to gene deserts, regions of several hundred kilobases lacking protein-coding genes. We hypothesized that gene deserts harbor long-range regulatory elements that can physically interact with target genes to influence their expression. To test this, we developed Capture Hi-C (CHi-C), which, by incorporating a sequence capture step into a Hi-C protocol, allows high-resolution analysis of targeted regions of the genome. We used CHi-C to investigate long-range interactions at three breast cancer gene deserts mapping to 2q35, 8q24.21, and 9q31.2. We identified interaction peaks between putative regulatory elements ("bait fragments") within the captured regions and "targets" that included both protein-coding genes and long noncoding (lnc) RNAs over distances of 6.6 kb to 2.6 Mb. Target protein-coding genes were IGFBP5, KLF4, NSMCE2, and MYC; and target lncRNAs included DIRC3, PVT1, and CCDC26. For one gene desert, we were able to define two SNPs (rs12613955 and rs4442975) that were highly correlated with the published risk variant and that mapped within the bait end of an interaction peak. In vivo ChIP-qPCR data show that one of these, rs4442975, affects the binding of FOXA1 and implicate this SNP as a putative functional variant.

  5. ANTI-PARALLEL EUV FLOWS OBSERVED ALONG ACTIVE REGION FILAMENT THREADS WITH HI-C

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, Caroline E.; Walsh, Robert W.; Régnier, Stéphane; Cirtain, Jonathan; Winebarger, Amy R.; Golub, Leon; Korreck, Kelly; Weber, Mark; Kobayashi, Ken; Platt, Simon; Mitchell, Nick; DePontieu, Bart; Title, Alan; DeForest, Craig; Kuzin, Sergey

    2013-09-20

    Plasma flows within prominences/filaments have been observed for many years and hold valuable clues concerning the mass and energy balance within these structures. Previous observations of these flows primarily come from Hα and cool extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) lines (e.g., 304 Å) where estimates of the size of the prominence threads has been limited by the resolution of the available instrumentation. Evidence of 'counter-steaming' flows has previously been inferred from these cool plasma observations, but now, for the first time, these flows have been directly imaged along fundamental filament threads within the million degree corona (at 193 Å). In this work, we present observations of an AR filament observed with the High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) that exhibits anti-parallel flows along adjacent filament threads. Complementary data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager are presented. The ultra-high spatial and temporal resolution of Hi-C allow the anti-parallel flow velocities to be measured (70-80 km s{sup –1}) and gives an indication of the resolvable thickness of the individual strands (0.''8 ± 0.''1). The temperature of the plasma flows was estimated to be log T (K) = 5.45 ± 0.10 using Emission Measure loci analysis. We find that SDO/AIA cannot clearly observe these anti-parallel flows or measure their velocity or thread width due to its larger pixel size. We suggest that anti-parallel/counter-streaming flows are likely commonplace within all filaments and are currently not observed in EUV due to current instrument spatial resolution.

  6. Unbiased analysis of potential targets of breast cancer susceptibility loci by Capture Hi-C

    PubMed Central

    Dryden, Nicola H.; Broome, Laura R.; Dudbridge, Frank; Johnson, Nichola; Orr, Nick; Schoenfelder, Stefan; Nagano, Takashi; Andrews, Simon; Wingett, Steven; Kozarewa, Iwanka; Assiotis, Ioannis; Fenwick, Kerry; Maguire, Sarah L.; Campbell, James; Natrajan, Rachael; Lambros, Maryou; Perrakis, Eleni; Ashworth, Alan; Fraser, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified more than 70 common variants that are associated with breast cancer risk. Most of these variants map to non-protein-coding regions and several map to gene deserts, regions of several hundred kilobases lacking protein-coding genes. We hypothesized that gene deserts harbor long-range regulatory elements that can physically interact with target genes to influence their expression. To test this, we developed Capture Hi-C (CHi-C), which, by incorporating a sequence capture step into a Hi-C protocol, allows high-resolution analysis of targeted regions of the genome. We used CHi-C to investigate long-range interactions at three breast cancer gene deserts mapping to 2q35, 8q24.21, and 9q31.2. We identified interaction peaks between putative regulatory elements (“bait fragments”) within the captured regions and “targets” that included both protein-coding genes and long noncoding (lnc) RNAs over distances of 6.6 kb to 2.6 Mb. Target protein-coding genes were IGFBP5, KLF4, NSMCE2, and MYC; and target lncRNAs included DIRC3, PVT1, and CCDC26. For one gene desert, we were able to define two SNPs (rs12613955 and rs4442975) that were highly correlated with the published risk variant and that mapped within the bait end of an interaction peak. In vivo ChIP-qPCR data show that one of these, rs4442975, affects the binding of FOXA1 and implicate this SNP as a putative functional variant. PMID:25122612

  7. Anti-parallel EUV Flows Observed along Active Region Filament Threads with Hi-C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Caroline E.; Walsh, Robert W.; Régnier, Stéphane; Cirtain, Jonathan; Winebarger, Amy R.; Golub, Leon; Kobayashi, Ken; Platt, Simon; Mitchell, Nick; Korreck, Kelly; DePontieu, Bart; DeForest, Craig; Weber, Mark; Title, Alan; Kuzin, Sergey

    2013-09-01

    Plasma flows within prominences/filaments have been observed for many years and hold valuable clues concerning the mass and energy balance within these structures. Previous observations of these flows primarily come from Hα and cool extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) lines (e.g., 304 Å) where estimates of the size of the prominence threads has been limited by the resolution of the available instrumentation. Evidence of "counter-steaming" flows has previously been inferred from these cool plasma observations, but now, for the first time, these flows have been directly imaged along fundamental filament threads within the million degree corona (at 193 Å). In this work, we present observations of an AR filament observed with the High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) that exhibits anti-parallel flows along adjacent filament threads. Complementary data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager are presented. The ultra-high spatial and temporal resolution of Hi-C allow the anti-parallel flow velocities to be measured (70-80 km s-1) and gives an indication of the resolvable thickness of the individual strands (0.''8 ± 0.''1). The temperature of the plasma flows was estimated to be log T (K) = 5.45 ± 0.10 using Emission Measure loci analysis. We find that SDO/AIA cannot clearly observe these anti-parallel flows or measure their velocity or thread width due to its larger pixel size. We suggest that anti-parallel/counter-streaming flows are likely commonplace within all filaments and are currently not observed in EUV due to current instrument spatial resolution.

  8. Tubing weld cracking test

    SciTech Connect

    Lundin, C.D.; Qiao, C.Y.P.

    1995-12-31

    A tubing weld cracking (TWC) test was developed for applications involving advanced austenitic alloys (such as modified 800H and 310HCbN). Compared to the Finger hot cracking test, the TWC test shows an enhanced ability to evaluate the crack sensitivity of tubing materials. The TWC test can evaluate the cracking tendency of base as well as filter materials. Thus, it is a useful tool for tubing suppliers, filler metal producers and fabricators.

  9. In Situ Hi-C Library Preparation for Plants to Study Their Three-Dimensional Chromatin Interactions on a Genome-Wide Scale.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang

    2017-01-01

    The spatial organization of the genome in the nucleus is critical for many cellular processes. It has been broadly accepted that the packing of chromatin inside the nucleus is not random, but structured at several hierarchical levels. The Hi-C method combines Chromatin Conformation Capture and high-throughput sequencing, which allows interrogating genome-wide chromatin interactions. Depending on the sequencing depth, chromatin packing patterns derived from Hi-C experiments can be viewed on a chromosomal scale or at a local genic level. Here, I describe a protocol of plant in situ Hi-C library preparation, which covers procedures starting from tissue fixation to library amplification.

  10. Crack suppression of silica glass formed by zoned F2 laser-induced photochemical surface modification of hard silicone thin film coating on polycarbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nojiri, Hidetoshi; Okoshi, Masayuki

    2016-12-01

    The surface layer of a hard silicone thin film coating on polycarbonate was modified to silica glass (SiO2) through F2-laser-induced photochemical reactions. To obtain samples with higher abrasion resistances, SiO2 films of 1 µm thickness and over were successfully formed without cracking, by zoning the laser-irradiated area of micrometer order. With the conversion of silicone to SiO2, the volumetric shrinkage of the sample was induced, which simply depended on the number of photons, by varying the single-pulse fluence and irradiation time of a F2 laser. The ratio of volumetric shrinkage to the original silicone was estimated to be approximately 0.85, generating tensile stress in SiO2. The stress could be suppressed to be lower than 48 MPa for typical SiO2 by reducing the laser-irradiated area to be of micrometer order. Also, when the length of one side of the irradiated area is 1 mm, the thickness of the SiO2 film is expected to increase to approximately 5 µm.

  11. Seeding Cracks Using a Fatigue Tester for Accelerated Gear Tooth Breaking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nenadic, Nenad G.; Wodenscheck, Joseph A.; Thurston, Michael G.; Lewicki, David G.

    2011-01-01

    This report describes fatigue-induced seeded cracks in spur gears and compares them to cracks created using a more traditional seeding method, notching. Finite element analysis (FEA) compares the effective compliance of a cracked tooth to the effective compliance of a notched tooth where the crack and the notch are of the same depth. In this analysis, cracks are propagated to the desired depth using FRANC2D and effective compliances are computed in ANSYS. A compliance-based feature for detecting cracks on the fatigue tester is described. The initiated cracks are examined using both nondestructive and destructive methods. The destructive examination reveals variability in the shape of crack surfaces.

  12. Interfacial Crack Arrest in Sandwich Panels with Embedded Crack Stoppers Subjected to Fatigue Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martakos, G.; Andreasen, J. H.; Berggreen, C.; Thomsen, O. T.

    2017-02-01

    A novel crack arresting device has been implemented in sandwich panels and tested using a special rig to apply out-of-plane loading on the sandwich panel face-sheets. Fatigue crack propagation was induced in the face-core interface of the sandwich panels which met the crack arrester. The effect of the embedded crack arresters was evaluated in terms of the achieved enhancement of the damage tolerance of the tested sandwich panels. A finite element (FE) model of the experimental setup was used for predicting propagation rates and direction of the crack growth. The FE simulation was based on the adoption of linear fracture mechanics and a fatigue propagation law (i.e. Paris law) to predict the residual fatigue life-time and behaviour of the test specimens. Finally, a comparison between the experimental results and the numerical simulations was made to validate the numerical predictions as well as the overall performance of the crack arresters.

  13. Crack opening: from colloidal systems to paintings.

    PubMed

    Léang, Marguerite; Giorgiutti-Dauphiné, Frédérique; Lee, Lay-Theng; Pauchard, Ludovic

    2017-08-30

    Shrinkage cracks are observed in many materials, particularly in paintings where great interest lies in deducing quantitative information on the material with the aim of proposing authentication methods. We present experimental measurements on the crack opening induced by the drying of colloidal layers and compare these results to the case of a pictorial layer. We propose a simple model to predict the crack width as a function of the thickness of the drying layer, based on the balance between the drying stress buildup and the shear frictional stress with the substrate. Key parameters of the model include the mechanical properties that are measured experimentally using micro-indentation testing. A good agreement between theory and experimental data for both colloidal layers and the real painting is found. These results, by comparing the shrinkage cracks in model layers and in pictorial layers, validate the method based on the use of colloidal systems to simulate and to reproduce drying cracks in paintings.

  14. Fatigue crack growth in ferroelectrics driven by cyclic electric loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ting; Yang, Wei

    1998-12-01

    Fatigue crack growth has been observed recently in ferroelectrics under cyclic electric loading. Does the crack grow by electric breakdown, or by the stress field near the crack tip? The present paper provides a mechanistic explanation for the electric-field-induced fatigue crack growth. The non-uniform electric field near an insulated crack tip might cause domain switching which in turn produces a concentrated stress field characterized by a stress intensity factor. For ferroelectrics poled along a direction perpendicular to the crack, we are able to show quantitatively that: (1) the stress intensity factor under a negative electric field is nine times as large as the stress intensity factor under a positive electric field; (2) the crack starts to grow if the stress intensity factor is higher than the fracture toughness of the material, but the stress intensity factor decreases as the crack extends and eventually results in crack arrest; (3) by reversing the electric field, the stress intensity factor is increased and crack growth resumes; and (4) this model can predict the extent of fatigue crack growth. In contrast to the conventional perception of (mechanical) fatigue, the fatigue crack growth in ferroelectrics under cyclic electric loading is a step by step cleavage process caused by a domain switching sequence that generates a cyclic driving stress field near the crack tip.

  15. Review of Environmentally Assisted Cracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadananda, K.; Vasudevan, A. K.

    2011-02-01

    Many efforts have been made in the past by several researchers to arrive at some unifying principles governing the embrittlement phenomena. An inescapable conclusion reached by all these efforts was that the behavior is very complex. Hence, recognizing the complexity of material/environment behavior, we focus our attention here only in extracting some similarities in the experimental trends to arrive at some generic principles of behavior. Crack nucleation and growth are examined under static load in the presence of internal and external environments. Stress concentration, either pre-existing or in-situ generated, appears to be a requirement for embrittlement. A chemical stress concentration factor is defined for a given material/environment system as the ratio of failure stress with and without the damaging chemical environment. All factors that affect the buildup of the required stress concentration, such as planarity of slip, stacking fault energy, etc., also affect the stress-corrosion behavior. The chemical stress concentration factor is coupled with the mechanical stress concentration factor. In addition, generic features for all systems appear to be (a) an existence of a threshold stress as a function of concentration of the damaging environment and flow properties of the material, and (b) an existence of a limiting threshold as a function of concentration, indicative of a damage saturation for that environment. Kinetics of crack growth also depends on concentration and the mode of crack growth. In general, environment appears to enhance crack tip ductility on one side by the reduction of energy for dislocation nucleation and glide, and to reduce cohesive energy for cleavage, on the other. These two opposing factors are coupled to provide environmentally induced crack nucleation and growth. The relative ratio of these two opposing factors depends on concentration and flow properties, thereby affecting limiting thresholds. The limiting concentration or

  16. Fatigue life and crack growth prediction methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.; Phillips, E. P.; Everett, R. A., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The capabilities of a plasticity-induced crack-closure model and life-prediction code to predict fatigue crack growth and fatigue lives of metallic materials are reviewed. Crack-tip constraint factors, to account for three-dimensional effects, were selected to correlate large-crack growth rate data as a function of the effective-stress-intensity factor range (delta(K(sub eff))) under constant-amplitude loading. Some modifications to the delta(K(sub eff))-rate relations were needed in the near threshold regime to fit small-crack growth rate behavior and endurance limits. The model was then used to calculate small- and large-crack growth rates, and in some cases total fatigue lives, for several aluminum and titanium alloys under constant-amplitude, variable-amplitude, and spectrum loading. Fatigue lives were calculated using the crack growth relations and microstructural features like those that initiated cracks. Results from the tests and analyses agreed well.

  17. Seismic wave propagation in cracked porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pointer, Tim; Liu, Enru; Hudson, John A.

    2000-07-01

    The movement of interstitial fluids within a cracked solid can have a significant effect on the properties of seismic waves of long wavelength propagating through the solid. We consider three distinct mechanisms of wave-induced fluid flow: flow through connections between cracks in an otherwise non-porous material, fluid movement within partially saturated cracks, and diffusion from the cracks into a porous matrix material. In each case the cracks may be aligned or randomly oriented, leading, respectively, to anisotropic or isotropic wave speeds and attenuation factors. In general, seismic velocities exhibit behaviour that is intermediate between that of empty cracks and that of isolated liquid-filled cracks if fluid flow is significant. In the range of frequencies for which considerable fluid flow occurs there is high attenuation and dispersion of seismic waves. Fluid flow may be on either a wavelength scale or a local scale depending on the model and whether the cracks are aligned or randomly oriented, resulting in completely different effects on seismic wave propagation. A numerical analysis shows that all models can have an effect over the exploration seismic frequency range.

  18. Ellipsometry-like analysis of polarization state for micro cracks using stress-induced light scattering method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakata, Yoshitaro; Terasaki, Nao; Sakai, Kazufumi; Nonaka, Kazuhiro

    2016-03-01

    Fine polishing techniques, such as chemical mechanical polishing (CMP), are important to glass substrate manufacturing. When these techniques involve mechanical interaction in the form of friction between the abrasive and the substrate surface during polishing, latent flaws may form on the product. Fine polishing induced latent flaws in glass substrates may become obvious during a subsequent cleaning process if the glass surface is eroded away by chemical interaction with a cleaning liquid. Thus, latent flaws reduce product yield. A novel technique (the stress-induced light scattering method; SILSM) which was combined with light scattering method and stress effects was proposed for inspecting surface to detect polishing induced latent flaws. This method is able to distinguish between latent flaws and tiny particles on the surface. In this method, an actuator deforms a sample inducing stress effects around the tip of a latent flaw caused by the deformation, which in turn changes the refractive index of the material around the tip of the latent flaw because of the photoelastic effect. A CCD camera detects this changed refractive index as variations in light-scattering intensity. In this study, the changes in reflection coefficients and polarization states after application of stress to a glass substrate were calculated and evaluated qualitatively using Jones matrix-like ellipsometry. As the results, it was shown that change in the polarization states around the tip of latent flaw were evaluated between before and after applied stress, qualitatively.

  19. Hydrogen-Induced Stress Corrosion Cracking Susceptibility Analysis of Pitch Links From the AH-64 Apache Helicopter

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-09-01

    due to service. Retempering the HRC 52 pitch links to HRC 38 resulted in properties similar to those expected from the 4340 ESR steel directly heat...would lead to uncontrollable descent of the aircraft. A 4340 electroslag remelted ( ESR ) steel heat treated to a hardness of HRC 52 is used to manufacture...material), as well as virgin 4340 ESR steel heat treated to HRC 52 and HRC 38 harness levels (virgin material). Hydrogen-Induced Stress Corrosion

  20. Investigation of Helicopter Longeron Cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, John A.; Baughman, James; Wallace, Terryl A.

    2009-01-01

    Four cracked longerons, containing a total of eight cracks, were provided for study. Cracked regions were cut from the longerons. Load was applied to open the cracks, enabling crack surface examination. Examination revealed that crack propagation was driven by fatigue loading in all eight cases. Fatigue crack initiation appears to have occurred on the top edge of the longerons near geometric changes that affect component bending stiffness. Additionally, metallurgical analysis has revealed a local depletion in alloying elements in the crack initiation regions that may be a contributing factor. Fatigue crack propagation appeared to be initially driven by opening-mode loading, but at a crack length of approximately 0.5 inches (12.7 mm), there is evidence of mixed-mode crack loading. For the longest cracks studied, shear-mode displacements destroyed crack-surface features of interest over significant portions of the crack surfaces.

  1. Detecting Spatial Chromatin Organization by Chromosome Conformation Capture II: Genome-Wide Profiling by Hi-C.

    PubMed

    Vietri Rudan, Matteo; Hadjur, Suzana; Sexton, Tom

    2017-01-01

    The chromosome conformation capture (3C) method has been invaluable in studying chromatin interactions in a population of cells at a resolution surpassing that of light microscopy, for example in the detection of functional contacts between enhancers and promoters. Recent developments in sequencing-based chromosomal contact mapping (Hi-C, 5C and 4C-Seq) have allowed researchers to interrogate pairwise chromatin interactions on a wider scale, shedding light on the three-dimensional organization of chromosomes. These methods present significant technical and bioinformatic challenges to consider at the start of the project. Here, we describe two alternative methods for Hi-C, depending on the size of the genome, and discuss the major computational approaches to convert the raw sequencing data into meaningful models of how genomes are organized.

  2. Surface texturing effect on crack suppression of SiO2 film formed by F2 laser-induced photochemical surface modification of silicone on polycarbonate under heat resistance test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nojiri, Hidetoshi; Okoshi, Masayuki

    2017-08-01

    A crack-free SiO2 film was successfully fabricated on silicone-coated polycarbonate (PC) even under heat resistance tests at 100 and 120 °C for 3 h by an additional rubbing treatment with steel wool for use as an automobile window material. The SiO2 film was formed by 157 nm F2 laser-induced photochemical surface modification of silicone on PC. The modified SiO2 layer was also zoned with a mesh mask during the laser irradiation. The zoned SiO2 layer was effective for suppressing cracks during laser irradiation. However, even the zoned layer caused cracks under heat resistance tests. A mechanism of the cracking was analyzed on the basis of observations of sample surfaces by confocal laser microscopy. The rubbed samples showed high heat resistance. By atomic force microscopy, the surface of the modified SiO2 layer was clearly observed to be textured, which reduced the large difference in the thermal expansion coefficient between SiO2 and silicone on PC, thus maintaining optical transparency.

  3. Fatigue crack closure: a review of the physical phenomena

    PubMed Central

    Pippan, R.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Plasticity‐induced, roughness‐induced and oxide‐induced crack closures are reviewed. Special attention is devoted to the physical origin, the consequences for the experimental determination and the prediction of the effective crack driving force for fatigue crack propagation. Plasticity‐induced crack closure under plane stress and plane strain conditions require, in principle, a different explanation; however, both types are predictable. This is even the case in the transition region from the plane strain to the plane stress state and all types of loading conditions including constant and variable amplitude loading, the short crack case or the transition from small‐scale to large‐scale yielding. In contrast, the prediction of roughness‐induced and oxide‐induced closures is not as straightforward. PMID:28616624

  4. GOTHiC, a probabilistic model to resolve complex biases and to identify real interactions in Hi-C data.

    PubMed

    Mifsud, Borbala; Martincorena, Inigo; Darbo, Elodie; Sugar, Robert; Schoenfelder, Stefan; Fraser, Peter; Luscombe, Nicholas M

    2017-01-01

    Hi-C is one of the main methods for investigating spatial co-localisation of DNA in the nucleus. However, the raw sequencing data obtained from Hi-C experiments suffer from large biases and spurious contacts, making it difficult to identify true interactions. Existing methods use complex models to account for biases and do not provide a significance threshold for detecting interactions. Here we introduce a simple binomial probabilistic model that resolves complex biases and distinguishes between true and false interactions. The model corrects biases of known and unknown origin and yields a p-value for each interaction, providing a reliable threshold based on significance. We demonstrate this experimentally by testing the method against a random ligation dataset. Our method outperforms previous methods and provides a statistical framework for further data analysis, such as comparisons of Hi-C interactions between different conditions. GOTHiC is available as a BioConductor package (http://www.bioconductor.org/packages/release/bioc/html/GOTHiC.html).

  5. Palliative hepatic intraarterial chemotherapy (HIC) using a novel combination of gemcitabine and mitomycin C: results in hepatic metastases.

    PubMed

    Vogl, Thomas J; Zangos, Stephan; Eichler, Katrin; Selby, J Bayne; Bauer, Ralf W

    2008-03-01

    To evaluate repeated hepatic intraarterial chemotherapy (HIC) as a palliative treatment option for unresectable cholangiocarcinoma and liver metastases of various origins that were progressive under systemic chemotherapy. Between 2002 and 2006, 55 patients were treated in 4-week intervals (mean five sessions). Combined gemcitabine/mitomycin was administered intraarterially within 1 h. Tumor response was evaluated after the third session according to RECIST. Treated tumor entities were colorectal carcinoma (CRC) (n = 12), breast cancer (BC) (n = 12), cholangiocarcinoma (CCC) (n = 10), pancreatic (n = 4), ovarian (n = 3), gastric, cervical, papillary (each n = 2), prostate, esophageal carcinoma, leiomyosarcoma (each n = 1), cancer of unknown primacy (CUP) (n = 5). All patients tolerated the treatment well without any major side effects or complications. In total, there were 1 complete response (CR), 19 partial responses (PR), 19 stable (SD) and 16 progressive diseases (PD). We observed 5 PR, 3 SD and 4 PD in CRC; 1 CR, 4 PR, 6 SD in BC; and 2 PR, 2 SD and 6 PD in CCC. Median survival after first HIC was 9.7 months for CRC, 11.4 months for BC and 6.0 months for CCC. HIC with gemcitabine/mitomycin is a safe, minimally invasive, palliative treatment for hepatic metastases that are progressive under systemic chemotherapy. The treatment yields respectable tumor control rates in CRC and BC patients.

  6. Bonded half-planes containing two arbitrarily oriented cracks: a study of containment of the hydraulically induced fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, C.K.; Yew, C.H.

    1983-06-01

    The subject is studied in the first part of this work by introducing 2 modified singular integrals. The problem is reduced to a set of singular integral equations; and it is solved numerically by employing the Lobatto-Chebyshev method. The stress intensity factor at the fracture tips of a hydraulically induced fracture in a layered medium is calculated in the second part of the work. The effect of the fluid pressure and the in situ stress gradient as well as the effect of the relative layer material properties to the magnitude of the strees intensity factors are studied numerically. It has been shown that the relative magnitude of the stress intensity factor at the fracture tips can be used as an indicator to the direction of the fracture movement. 20 references.

  7. Nonlinear Crack Growth Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, DE

    2001-03-27

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory has developed a new technique to monitor the growth of cracks in structural members, and to predict when failure due to this damage is imminent. This technique requires the measurement of global loadings and local deflections/strains at critical locations to indicate the increasing growth of hidden cracks with sufficient warning time prior to failure to take preventative action to correct the problem or retire the structure before failure. The techniques, as described in the referenced report have been proven on a laboratory scale to successfully detect the onset of failure due to fatigue cracking (including cracking of corroded samples), stress corrosion cracking, and low temperature creep crack growth, with a reasonable degree of warning before failure.

  8. Catalytic cracking of hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Absil, R.P.L.; Bowes, E.; Green, G.J.; Marler, D.O.; Shihabi, D.S.; Socha, R.F.

    1992-02-04

    This patent describes an improvement in a catalytic cracking process in which a hydrocarbon feed is cracked in a cracking zone in the absence of added hydrogen and in the presence of a circulating inventory of solid acidic cracking a catalyst which acquires a deposit of coke that contains chemically bound nitrogen while the cracking catalyst is in the cracking zone, the coke catalyst being circulated to t regeneration zone to convert the coke catalyst to a regenerated catalyst with the formation of a flue gas comprising nitrogen oxides: the improvement comprises incorporating into the circulating catalyst inventory an amount of additive particles comprising a synthetic porous crystalline material containing copper metal or cations, to reduce the content of nitrogen oxides in the flue gas.

  9. Elevated temperature crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, K. S.; Vanstone, R. H.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this program was to extend the work performed in the base program (CR 182247) into the regime of time-dependent crack growth under isothermal and thermal mechanical fatigue (TMF) loading, where creep deformation also influences the crack growth behavior. The investigation was performed in a two-year, six-task, combined experimental and analytical program. The path-independent integrals for application to time-dependent crack growth were critically reviewed. The crack growth was simulated using a finite element method. The path-independent integrals were computed from the results of finite-element analyses. The ability of these integrals to correlate experimental crack growth data were evaluated under various loading and temperature conditions. The results indicate that some of these integrals are viable parameters for crack growth prediction at elevated temperatures.

  10. CRACK MODELLING FOR RADIOGRAPHY

    SciTech Connect

    Chady, T.; Napierala, L.

    2010-02-22

    In this paper, possibility of creation of three-dimensional crack models, both random type and based on real-life radiographic images is discussed. Method for storing cracks in a number of two-dimensional matrices, as well algorithm for their reconstruction into three-dimensional objects is presented. Also the possibility of using iterative algorithm for matching simulated images of cracks to real-life radiographic images is discussed.

  11. The cracked tooth.

    PubMed

    Zuckerman, G R

    1998-01-01

    Fractured molars and premolars are very common. Fractures usually result from cracks that develop and slowly extend until the tooth separates into buccal and lingual fragments. Sometimes, as these cracks expand, the patient exhibits symptoms of what is commonly referred to as "cracked tooth syndrome" (CTS). When CTS occurs, an opportunity exists to diagnose and treat these patients, to relieve their discomfort and prevent sequelae that would require more extensive treatment.

  12. Detection of fatigue-induced micro-cracks in a pipe by using time-reversed nonlinear guided waves: a three-dimensional model study.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiasheng; Zhang, Dong; Zhang, Jie

    2012-09-01

    Localization of fatigue-related micro-cracks in pipelines is of increasing importance in industrial applications. A three-dimensional (3D) fatigue-crack imaging technique combining nonlinear guided waves with time reversal is proposed in this paper for potential applications in pipeline inspections. By using this method, the non-classical nonlinear guided waves generated from micro-cracks with hysteretic behavior are recorded, and the third harmonic waves are used to reconstruct the fatigue-crack images in a pipe by using a time reversal (TR) process. The feasibility of this method is examined by the imaging simulations for a steel pipe with varied defect areas. A finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) code is programmed to solve the wave equations under cylindrical coordinates, and simulate the experimental process of wave propagation. The results show that: (1) the proposed technique has excellent spatial retrofocusing capability; (2) the accuracy of defect localization and sizing depends on the crack orientation and the adopted guided wave mode; and (3) different displacement/stress components have varied sensitivities to the crack orientation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Quenched catalytic cracking process

    SciTech Connect

    Krambeck, F.J.; Penick, J.E.; Schipper, P.H.

    1990-12-18

    This paper describes improvement in a fluidized catalytic cracking process wherein a fluidizable catalyst cracking catalyst and a hydrocarbon feed are charged to a reactor riser at catalytic riser cracking conditions to form catalytically cracked vapor product and spent catalyst which are discharged into a reactor vessel having a volume via a riser reactor outlet equipped with a separation means to produce a catalyst lean phase. It comprises: a majority of the cracked product, and a catalyst rich phase comprising a majority of the spend catalyst. The the catalyst rich phase is discharged into a dense bed of catalyst maintained below the riser outlet and the catalyst lean phase is discharged into the vessel for a time, and at a temperature, which cause unselective thermal cracking of the cracked product in the reactor volume before product is withdrawn from the vessel via a vessel outlet. The improvement comprises: addition, after riser cracking is completed, and after separation of cracked products from catalyst, of a quenching stream into the vessel above the dense bed of catalyst, via a quench stream addition point which allows the quench stream to contact at least a majority of the volume of the vessel above the dense bed.

  14. A Crack Growth Rate Conversion Module: Theory, Development, User Guide and Examples

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    crack closure model, such as FASTRAN, CGAP and AFGROW, requires the conversion of crack growth rate versus the nominal stress ...based on plasiticty-induced crack closure model, such as FASTRAN, CGAP and AFGROW, requires the conversion of crack growth rate versus the nominal stress ...intensity range curves to a "single" curve of crack growth rate versus the effective stress intensity range. In order to minimise the error

  15. Inferential Structure Determination of Chromosomes from Single-Cell Hi-C Data

    PubMed Central

    Nilges, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome conformation capture (3C) techniques have revealed many fascinating insights into the spatial organization of genomes. 3C methods typically provide information about chromosomal contacts in a large population of cells, which makes it difficult to draw conclusions about the three-dimensional organization of genomes in individual cells. Recently it became possible to study single cells with Hi-C, a genome-wide 3C variant, demonstrating a high cell-to-cell variability of genome organization. In principle, restraint-based modeling should allow us to infer the 3D structure of chromosomes from single-cell contact data, but suffers from the sparsity and low resolution of chromosomal contacts. To address these challenges, we adapt the Bayesian Inferential Structure Determination (ISD) framework, originally developed for NMR structure determination of proteins, to infer statistical ensembles of chromosome structures from single-cell data. Using ISD, we are able to compute structural error bars and estimate model parameters, thereby eliminating potential bias imposed by ad hoc parameter choices. We apply and compare different models for representing the chromatin fiber and for incorporating singe-cell contact information. Finally, we extend our approach to the analysis of diploid chromosome data. PMID:28027298

  16. Inferential Structure Determination of Chromosomes from Single-Cell Hi-C Data.

    PubMed

    Carstens, Simeon; Nilges, Michael; Habeck, Michael

    2016-12-01

    Chromosome conformation capture (3C) techniques have revealed many fascinating insights into the spatial organization of genomes. 3C methods typically provide information about chromosomal contacts in a large population of cells, which makes it difficult to draw conclusions about the three-dimensional organization of genomes in individual cells. Recently it became possible to study single cells with Hi-C, a genome-wide 3C variant, demonstrating a high cell-to-cell variability of genome organization. In principle, restraint-based modeling should allow us to infer the 3D structure of chromosomes from single-cell contact data, but suffers from the sparsity and low resolution of chromosomal contacts. To address these challenges, we adapt the Bayesian Inferential Structure Determination (ISD) framework, originally developed for NMR structure determination of proteins, to infer statistical ensembles of chromosome structures from single-cell data. Using ISD, we are able to compute structural error bars and estimate model parameters, thereby eliminating potential bias imposed by ad hoc parameter choices. We apply and compare different models for representing the chromatin fiber and for incorporating singe-cell contact information. Finally, we extend our approach to the analysis of diploid chromosome data.

  17. Comparative Hi-C reveals that CTCF underlies evolution of chromosomal domain architecture.

    PubMed

    Vietri Rudan, Matteo; Barrington, Christopher; Henderson, Stephen; Ernst, Christina; Odom, Duncan T; Tanay, Amos; Hadjur, Suzana

    2015-03-03

    Topological domains are key architectural building blocks of chromosomes, but their functional importance and evolutionary dynamics are not well defined. We performed comparative high-throughput chromosome conformation capture (Hi-C) in four mammals and characterized the conservation and divergence of chromosomal contact insulation and the resulting domain architectures within distantly related genomes. We show that the modular organization of chromosomes is robustly conserved in syntenic regions and that this is compatible with conservation of the binding landscape of the insulator protein CTCF. Specifically, conserved CTCF sites are co-localized with cohesin, are enriched at strong topological domain borders, and bind to DNA motifs with orientations that define the directionality of CTCF's long-range interactions. Conversely, divergent CTCF binding between species is correlated with divergence of internal domain structure, likely driven by local CTCF binding sequence changes, demonstrating how genome evolution can be linked to a continuous flux of local conformation changes. We also show that large-scale domains are reorganized during genome evolution as intact modules.

  18. Exploring spatially adjacent TFBS-clustered regions with Hi-C data.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hebing; Jiang, Shuai; Zhang, Zhuo; Li, Hao; Lu, Yiming; Bo, Xiaochen

    2017-09-01

    Transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) are clustered in the human genome, forming the TFBS-clustered regions that regulate gene transcription, which requires dynamic chromatin configurations between promoters and distal regulatory elements. Here, we propose a regulatory model called spatially adjacent TFBS-clustered regions (SATs), in which TFBS-clustered regions are connected by spatial proximity as identified by high-resolution Hi-C data. TFBS-clustered regions forming SATs appeared less frequently in gene promoters than did isolated TFBS-clustered regions, whereas SATs as a whole appeared more frequently. These observations indicate that multiple distal TFBS-clustered regions combined to form SATs to regulate genes. Further examination confirmed that a substantial portion of genes regulated by SATs were located between the paired TFBS-clustered regions instead of the downstream. We reconstructed the chromosomal conformation of the H1 human embryonic stem cell line using the ShRec3D algorithm and proposed the SAT regulatory model. ylu.phd@gmail.com or boxc@bmi.ac.cn. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  19. Medicinal Mushroom Cracked-Cap Polypore, Phellinus rimosus (Higher Basidiomycetes) Attenuates Acute Ethanol-Induced Lipid Peroxidation in Mice.

    PubMed

    Ajith, Thekkuttuparambil A; Janardhanan, Kainoor K

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol abuse and alcoholism remain one of the major health issues worldwide, especially in developing countries. The protective effect of Phellinus rimosus against acute alcohol-induced lipid peroxidation in the liver, kidney, and brain as well as its effect against antioxidant enzyme activity such as superoxide (SOD) and catalase (CAT) in the liver was evaluated in mice. Ethyl acetate extract of Ph. Rimosus (50 mg/kg body wt, p.o.) 1 h before each administration of alcohol (3 mL/kg, p.o.; total 2 doses at 24-h intervals) protected against lipid peroxidation in all organs and attenuated the decline of SOD and CAT activity in the liver. The fold increase in lipid peroxidation, including conjugated diene and thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) levels, was highest in the liver. There were 2.6- and 1.5- fold increases in TBARS levels in the liver of the alcohol alone- and alcohol+Ph. Rimosus-treated groups, compared with that of the normal group. Activity of SOD and CAT in the liver of alcohol- and alcohol+Ph. Rimosus- treated animals was 9.05±1.38, 18.76±1.71, and 11.26±1.02, 31.58±3.35 IU/mg protein, respectively. Extract at 1 mg/mL inhibited 50.6% activity of aniline hydroxylase (CYP2E1) in liver homogenate. From these results, we concluded that the extract significantly protected against the lipid peroxidation. Protection in the liver may be due to the inhibitory effect on CYP2E1 as well as the direct radical scavenging effect of Ph. Rimosus, which warrants further research.

  20. HiC-bench: comprehensive and reproducible Hi-C data analysis designed for parameter exploration and benchmarking.

    PubMed

    Lazaris, Charalampos; Kelly, Stephen; Ntziachristos, Panagiotis; Aifantis, Iannis; Tsirigos, Aristotelis

    2017-01-05

    Chromatin conformation capture techniques have evolved rapidly over the last few years and have provided new insights into genome organization at an unprecedented resolution. Analysis of Hi-C data is complex and computationally intensive involving multiple tasks and requiring robust quality assessment. This has led to the development of several tools and methods for processing Hi-C data. However, most of the existing tools do not cover all aspects of the analysis and only offer few quality assessment options. Additionally, availability of a multitude of tools makes scientists wonder how these tools and associated parameters can be optimally used, and how potential discrepancies can be interpreted and resolved. Most importantly, investigators need to be ensured that slight changes in parameters and/or methods do not affect the conclusions of their studies. To address these issues (compare, explore and reproduce), we introduce HiC-bench, a configurable computational platform for comprehensive and reproducible analysis of Hi-C sequencing data. HiC-bench performs all common Hi-C analysis tasks, such as alignment, filtering, contact matrix generation and normalization, identification of topological domains, scoring and annotation of specific interactions using both published tools and our own. We have also embedded various tasks that perform quality assessment and visualization. HiC-bench is implemented as a data flow platform with an emphasis on analysis reproducibility. Additionally, the user can readily perform parameter exploration and comparison of different tools in a combinatorial manner that takes into account all desired parameter settings in each pipeline task. This unique feature facilitates the design and execution of complex benchmark studies that may involve combinations of multiple tool/parameter choices in each step of the analysis. To demonstrate the usefulness of our platform, we performed a comprehensive benchmark of existing and new TAD callers

  1. Pyrolytic carbon indentation crack morphology.

    PubMed

    Ely, J L; Stupka, J; Haubold, A D

    1996-06-01

    In studying fatigue and fracture behavior of brittle materials, Vickers diamond indentation cracks are often used. Many of the studies of indentation cracks use crack system models such as the radial-median crack or Palmqvist crack. These systems are also used to study small crack growth in brittle materials, and have been studied for pyrolytic carbon. However, the true morphology of these cracks in pyrolytic carbon coatings on graphite substrates have not been described. This study examined Vickers diamond and spherical ball indentation cracks in pyrolytic carbon coatings using several techniques, including serial metallographic cross sections, indentation fracture in bending, acoustic emission, and residual surface indentation scanning. The crack systems developed using these techniques were not typical of either radial median or Palmqvist systems. The morphology is unique to this material, possibly because of the coating thickness limitations. Given the difference in crack system, the application of standard indentation crack equations in studying fracture mechanics, especially for small cracks, must be questioned.

  2. Determination of crack morphology parameters from service failures for leak-rate analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkowski, G.; Ghadiali, N.; Paul, D.

    1997-04-01

    In leak-rate analyses described in the literature, the crack morphology parameters are typically not well agreed upon by different investigators. This paper presents results on a review of crack morphology parameters determined from examination of service induced cracks. Service induced cracks were found to have a much more tortuous flow path than laboratory induced cracks due to crack branching associated with the service induced cracks. Several new parameters such as local and global surface roughnesses, as well as local and global number of turns were identified. The effect of each of these parameters are dependent on the crack-opening displacement. Additionally, the crack path is typically assumed to be straight through the pipe thickness, but the service data show that the flow path can be longer due to the crack following a fusion line, and/or the number of turns, where the number of turns in the past were included as a pressure drop term due to the turns, but not the longer flow path length. These parameters were statistically evaluated for fatigue cracks in air, corrosion-fatigue, IGSCC, and thermal fatigue cracks. A refined version of the SQUIRT leak-rate code was developed to account for these variables. Sample calculations are provided in this paper that show how the crack size can vary for a given leak rate and the statistical variation of the crack morphology parameters.

  3. The effect of a capillary bridge on the crack opening of a penny crack.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fuqian; Zhao, Ya-Pu

    2016-02-07

    Young's relation is based on the equilibrium of horizontal components of surface tensions for a liquid droplet on a "rigid" substrate without addressing the substrate deformation induced by the net vertical component of surface tensions. Upon realizing the importance of wetting in controlling the integrity of flexible structures and electronics, the effect of a capillary bridge or a liquid droplet on the crack opening of a penny crack under the action of a far-field tensile stress is analyzed. Closed-form solutions are derived for both the crack opening and the stress intensity factor, which are functions of the size of the capillary bridge or the droplet, surface tension, and the contact angle. Both the capillary bridge and the droplet can introduce the crack closure. The minimum far-field tensile stresses needed for complete crack opening, i.e. no crack closure, are obtained analytically. The net vertical component of the surface tensions introduces the formation of a surface ridge on the crack face at the edge of the droplet for an open crack. The amplitude of the surface ridge increases with the increase of the net vertical component of the surface tensions and the decrease of the breadth width.

  4. Crack layer theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chudnovsky, A.

    1984-01-01

    A damage parameter is introduced in addition to conventional parameters of continuum mechanics and consider a crack surrounded by an array of microdefects within the continuum mechanics framework. A system consisting of the main crack and surrounding damage is called crack layer (CL). Crack layer propagation is an irreversible process. The general framework of the thermodynamics of irreversible processes are employed to identify the driving forces (causes) and to derive the constitutive equation of CL propagation, that is, the relationship between the rates of the crack growth and damage dissemination from one side and the conjugated thermodynamic forces from another. The proposed law of CL propagation is in good agreement with the experimental data on fatigue CL propagation in various materials. The theory also elaborates material toughness characterization.

  5. Corrosion pitting and environmentally assisted small crack growth.

    PubMed

    Turnbull, Alan

    2014-09-08

    In many applications, corrosion pits act as precursors to cracking, but qualitative and quantitative prediction of damage evolution has been hampered by lack of insights into the process by which a crack develops from a pit. An overview is given of recent breakthroughs in characterization and understanding of the pit-to-crack transition using advanced three-dimensional imaging techniques such as X-ray computed tomography and focused ion beam machining with scanning electron microscopy. These techniques provided novel insights with respect to the location of crack development from a pit, supported by finite-element analysis. This inspired a new concept for the role of pitting in stress corrosion cracking based on the growing pit inducing local dynamic plastic strain, a critical factor in the development of stress corrosion cracks. Challenges in quantifying the subsequent growth rate of the emerging small cracks are then outlined with the potential drop technique being the most viable. A comparison is made with the growth rate for short cracks (through-thickness crack in fracture mechanics specimen) and long cracks and an electrochemical crack size effect invoked to rationalize the data.

  6. Corrosion pitting and environmentally assisted small crack growth

    PubMed Central

    Turnbull, Alan

    2014-01-01

    In many applications, corrosion pits act as precursors to cracking, but qualitative and quantitative prediction of damage evolution has been hampered by lack of insights into the process by which a crack develops from a pit. An overview is given of recent breakthroughs in characterization and understanding of the pit-to-crack transition using advanced three-dimensional imaging techniques such as X-ray computed tomography and focused ion beam machining with scanning electron microscopy. These techniques provided novel insights with respect to the location of crack development from a pit, supported by finite-element analysis. This inspired a new concept for the role of pitting in stress corrosion cracking based on the growing pit inducing local dynamic plastic strain, a critical factor in the development of stress corrosion cracks. Challenges in quantifying the subsequent growth rate of the emerging small cracks are then outlined with the potential drop technique being the most viable. A comparison is made with the growth rate for short cracks (through-thickness crack in fracture mechanics specimen) and long cracks and an electrochemical crack size effect invoked to rationalize the data. PMID:25197249

  7. Small-crack test methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, James M.; Allison, John E.

    This book contains chapters on fracture mechanics parameters for small fatigue cracks, monitoring small-crack growth by the replication method, measurement of small cracks by photomicroscopy (experiments and analysis), and experimental mechanics of microcracks. Other topics discussed are the real-time measurement of small-crack-opening behavior using an interferometric strain/displacement gage; direct current electrical potential measurement of the growth of small cracks; an ultrasonic method for the measurement of the size and opening behavior of small fatigue cracks; and the simulation of short crack and other low closure loading conditions, utilizing constant K(max) Delta-K-decreasing fatigue crack growth procedures.

  8. Transply crack density detection by acousto-ultrasonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemann, John H.; Bowles, Kenneth J.; Kautz, Harold; Cavano, Paul

    1987-01-01

    The acousto-ultrasonic method was applied to a PMR-15 8-harness, satin Celion 3000 fabric composite to determine the extent of transply cracking. A six-ply 0/90 laminate was also subjected to mechanical loading, which induced transply cracking. The stress wave factor (SWF) is defined as the energy contained in the received signal from a 2.25-MHz center frequency transducer. The correlation of the SWF with transply crack density is shown.

  9. Refinement and evaluation of crack-opening-area analyses for circumferential through-wall cracks in pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Rahman, S.; Brust, F.; Ghadiali, N.; Krishnaswamy, P.; Wilkowski, G.; Choi, Y.H. |; Moberg, F.; Brickstad, B. |

    1995-04-01

    Leak-before-break (LBB) analyses for circumferentially cracked pipes are currently being conducted in the nuclear industry to justify elimination of pipe whip restraints and jet impingement shields which are present because of the expected dynamic effects from pipe rupture. The application of the LBB methodology frequently requires calculation of leak rates. These leak rates depend on the crack-opening area of a through-wall crack in the pipe. In addition to LBB analyses, which assume a hypothetical flaw size, there is also interest in the integrity of actual leaking cracks corresponding to current leakage detection requirements in NRC Regulatory Guide 1.45, or for assessing temporary repair of Class 2 and 3 pipes that have leaks as are being evaluated in ASME Section 11. This study was requested by the NRC to review, evaluate, and refine current analytical models for crack-opening-area analyses of pipes with circumferential through-wall cracks. Twenty-five pipe experiments were analyzed to determine the accuracy of the predictive models. Several practical aspects of crack-opening such as; crack-face pressure, off-center cracks, restraint of pressure-induced bending, cracks in thickness transition regions, weld residual stresses, crack-morphology models, and thermal-hydraulic analysis, were also investigated. 140 refs., 105 figs., 41 tabs.

  10. Single-nucleus Hi-C reveals unique chromatin reorganization at oocyte-to-zygote transition.

    PubMed

    Flyamer, Ilya M; Gassler, Johanna; Imakaev, Maxim; Brandão, Hugo B; Ulianov, Sergey V; Abdennur, Nezar; Razin, Sergey V; Mirny, Leonid A; Tachibana-Konwalski, Kikuë

    2017-04-06

    Chromatin is reprogrammed after fertilization to produce a totipotent zygote with the potential to generate a new organism. The maternal genome inherited from the oocyte and the paternal genome provided by sperm coexist as separate haploid nuclei in the zygote. How these two epigenetically distinct genomes are spatially organized is poorly understood. Existing chromosome conformation capture-based methods are not applicable to oocytes and zygotes owing to a paucity of material. To study three-dimensional chromatin organization in rare cell types, we developed a single-nucleus Hi-C (high-resolution chromosome conformation capture) protocol that provides greater than tenfold more contacts per cell than the previous method. Here we show that chromatin architecture is uniquely reorganized during the oocyte-to-zygote transition in mice and is distinct in paternal and maternal nuclei within single-cell zygotes. Features of genomic organization including compartments, topologically associating domains (TADs) and loops are present in individual oocytes when averaged over the genome, but the presence of each feature at a locus varies between cells. At the sub-megabase level, we observed stochastic clusters of contacts that can occur across TAD boundaries but average into TADs. Notably, we found that TADs and loops, but not compartments, are present in zygotic maternal chromatin, suggesting that these are generated by different mechanisms. Our results demonstrate that the global chromatin organization of zygote nuclei is fundamentally different from that of other interphase cells. An understanding of this zygotic chromatin 'ground state' could potentially provide insights into reprogramming cells to a state of totipotency.

  11. Active Seismic Monitoring of Crack Initiation, Propagation, and Coalescence in Rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modiriasari, Anahita; Bobet, Antonio; Pyrak-Nolte, Laura J.

    2017-09-01

    Active seismic monitoring was used to detect and characterize crack initiation, crack propagation and crack coalescence in pre-cracked rock specimens. Uniaxial compression tests were conducted on Indiana limestone specimens with two parallel pre-existing cracks. During the experiments, the mechanically induced cracks around the flaw tips were monitored by measuring surface displacements using digital image correlation (DIC). Transmitted and reflected compressional and shear waves through the specimens were also recorded during the loading to detect any damage or cracking phenomena. The amplitude of transmitted compressional and shear waves decreased with uniaxial compression. However, the rate of decrease of the amplitude of the transmitted waves intensified well before the initiation of tensile cracks. In addition, a distinct minimum in the amplitude of transmitted waves occurred close to coalescence. The normalized amplitude of waves reflecting from the new cracks increased before new tensile and shear cracks initiated around the flaw tips. In addition, the location of new cracks could be identified using the traveling time of the reflected waves. The experimental results indicate that changes in normalized amplitude of transmitted and reflected signals associated with crack initiation and crack coalescence were detected much earlier than with DIC, at a load of about 80-90% of the load at which the cracks appeared on the surface. The tests show conclusively that active wave monitoring is an effective tool to detect damage and new cracks in rock, as well as to estimate the location of the new cracks.

  12. Fast electromigration crack in nanoscale aluminum film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emelyanov, O. A.; Ivanov, I. O.

    2014-08-01

    The current-induced breakage of 20 nm thin aluminum layers deposited onto capacitor grade polypropylene (PP) films is experimentally studied. Biexponential current pulses of different amplitude (10-15 A) and duration (0.1-1 μs) were applied to the samples. Breakage occurred after fast development of electromigrating ˜200 nm-wide cracks with initial propagation velocity of ˜1 m/s under a high current density of ˜1012 A/m2. The cracks stopped when their lengths reached 250-450 μm. This behavior is explained by the balance of electromigration and stress-induced atomic fluxes.

  13. Electromagnetic pulsed thermography for natural cracks inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yunlai; Tian, Gui Yun; Wang, Ping; Wang, Haitao; Gao, Bin; Woo, Wai Lok; Li, Kongjing

    2017-02-01

    Emerging integrated sensing and monitoring of material degradation and cracks are increasingly required for characterizing the structural integrity and safety of infrastructure. However, most conventional nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods are based on single modality sensing which is not adequate to evaluate structural integrity and natural cracks. This paper proposed electromagnetic pulsed thermography for fast and comprehensive defect characterization. It hybrids multiple physical phenomena i.e. magnetic flux leakage, induced eddy current and induction heating linking to physics as well as signal processing algorithms to provide abundant information of material properties and defects. New features are proposed using 1st derivation that reflects multiphysics spatial and temporal behaviors to enhance the detection of cracks with different orientations. Promising results that robust to lift-off changes and invariant features for artificial and natural cracks detection have been demonstrated that the proposed method significantly improves defect detectability. It opens up multiphysics sensing and integrated NDE with potential impact for natural understanding and better quantitative evaluation of natural cracks including stress corrosion crack (SCC) and rolling contact fatigue (RCF).

  14. Electromagnetic pulsed thermography for natural cracks inspection.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yunlai; Tian, Gui Yun; Wang, Ping; Wang, Haitao; Gao, Bin; Woo, Wai Lok; Li, Kongjing

    2017-02-07

    Emerging integrated sensing and monitoring of material degradation and cracks are increasingly required for characterizing the structural integrity and safety of infrastructure. However, most conventional nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods are based on single modality sensing which is not adequate to evaluate structural integrity and natural cracks. This paper proposed electromagnetic pulsed thermography for fast and comprehensive defect characterization. It hybrids multiple physical phenomena i.e. magnetic flux leakage, induced eddy current and induction heating linking to physics as well as signal processing algorithms to provide abundant information of material properties and defects. New features are proposed using 1st derivation that reflects multiphysics spatial and temporal behaviors to enhance the detection of cracks with different orientations. Promising results that robust to lift-off changes and invariant features for artificial and natural cracks detection have been demonstrated that the proposed method significantly improves defect detectability. It opens up multiphysics sensing and integrated NDE with potential impact for natural understanding and better quantitative evaluation of natural cracks including stress corrosion crack (SCC) and rolling contact fatigue (RCF).

  15. Electromagnetic pulsed thermography for natural cracks inspection

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yunlai; Tian, Gui Yun; Wang, Ping; Wang, Haitao; Gao, Bin; Woo, Wai Lok; Li, Kongjing

    2017-01-01

    Emerging integrated sensing and monitoring of material degradation and cracks are increasingly required for characterizing the structural integrity and safety of infrastructure. However, most conventional nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods are based on single modality sensing which is not adequate to evaluate structural integrity and natural cracks. This paper proposed electromagnetic pulsed thermography for fast and comprehensive defect characterization. It hybrids multiple physical phenomena i.e. magnetic flux leakage, induced eddy current and induction heating linking to physics as well as signal processing algorithms to provide abundant information of material properties and defects. New features are proposed using 1st derivation that reflects multiphysics spatial and temporal behaviors to enhance the detection of cracks with different orientations. Promising results that robust to lift-off changes and invariant features for artificial and natural cracks detection have been demonstrated that the proposed method significantly improves defect detectability. It opens up multiphysics sensing and integrated NDE with potential impact for natural understanding and better quantitative evaluation of natural cracks including stress corrosion crack (SCC) and rolling contact fatigue (RCF). PMID:28169361

  16. Micro-Cracking Detection in Laminated Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Tsuchin; Leyte, Alma; DiGregorio, Anthony; Russell, Samuel S.; Walker, James L.; Thom, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Porosity and fatigue cracking are two critical factors that affect the performance and safety of cryogenic fuel tanks and feedlines made from unlined laminated or weaved carbon/epoxy materials. This paper presents the experiments to induce fatigue cracking of laminated composites through thermal cycling as well as the feasibility of using Thermography and Ultrasound Spectroscopy technology (UT) to detect and measure such micro-cracking. Carbon/epoxy laminated composite panels were built and cut into strips. These specimens were partially submerged in liquid nitrogen while subjected to various loads on a test machine. Edges of some specimens were polished and etched to determine the degree of micro-cracking. The rest of specimens were then examined with Thermography and Ultrasound Spectroscopy NDE systems to investigate the feasibility of finding such micro-cracking in the laminated composites. Thermography is utilized to determine changes in thermal diffusivity. The degree of cracking may reduce the apparent thermal diffusivity and therefore change the thermal response on the surface. Thermography testing was conducted on a group of specimens where it is desired to have some correlation between the predetermined stress and the thermography data. Ultrasound Spectroscopy was used to determine peak changes between the pre-stressed and stressed samples. Data from the inspections were analyzed and the results are presented in this paper.

  17. Quantity effect of radial cracks on the cracking propagation behavior and the crack morphology.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jingjing; Xu, Jun; Liu, Bohan; Yao, Xuefeng; Li, Yibing

    2014-01-01

    In this letter, the quantity effect of radial cracks on the cracking propagation behavior as well as the circular crack generation on the impacted glass plate within the sandwiched glass sheets are experimentally investigated via high-speed photography system. Results show that the radial crack velocity on the backing glass layer decreases with the crack number under the same impact conditions during large quantities of repeated experiments. Thus, the "energy conversion factor" is suggested to elucidate the physical relation between the cracking number and the crack propagation speed. Besides, the number of radial crack also takes the determinative effect in the crack morphology of the impacted glass plate. This study may shed lights on understanding the cracking and propagation mechanism in laminated glass structures and provide useful tool to explore the impact information on the cracking debris.

  18. Quantity Effect of Radial Cracks on the Cracking Propagation Behavior and the Crack Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jingjing; Xu, Jun; Liu, Bohan; Yao, Xuefeng; Li, Yibing

    2014-01-01

    In this letter, the quantity effect of radial cracks on the cracking propagation behavior as well as the circular crack generation on the impacted glass plate within the sandwiched glass sheets are experimentally investigated via high-speed photography system. Results show that the radial crack velocity on the backing glass layer decreases with the crack number under the same impact conditions during large quantities of repeated experiments. Thus, the “energy conversion factor” is suggested to elucidate the physical relation between the cracking number and the crack propagation speed. Besides, the number of radial crack also takes the determinative effect in the crack morphology of the impacted glass plate. This study may shed lights on understanding the cracking and propagation mechanism in laminated glass structures and provide useful tool to explore the impact information on the cracking debris. PMID:25048684

  19. Elevated temperature crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, K. S.; Vanstone, R. H.; Malik, S. N.; Laflen, J. H.

    1988-01-01

    A study was performed to examine the applicability of path-independent (P-I) integrals to crack growth problems in hot section components of gas turbine aircraft engines. Alloy 718 was used and the experimental parameters included combined temperature and strain cycling, thermal gradients, elastic-plastic strain levels, and mean strains. A literature review was conducted of proposed P-I integrals, and those capable of analyzing hot section component problems were selected and programmed into the postprocessor of a finite element code. Detailed elastic-plastic finite element analyses were conducted to simulate crack growth and crack closure of the test specimen, and to evaluate the P-I integrals. It was shown that the selected P-I integrals are very effective for predicting crack growth for isothermal conditions.

  20. Elevated temperature crack propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orange, Thomas W.

    1994-02-01

    This paper is a summary of two NASA contracts on high temperature fatigue crack propagation in metals. The first evaluated the ability of fairly simple nonlinear fracture parameters to correlate crack propagation. Hastelloy-X specimens were tested under isothermal and thermomechanical cycling at temperatures up to 980 degrees C (1800 degrees F). The most successful correlating parameter was the crack tip opening displacement derived from the J-integral. The second evaluated the ability of several path-independent integrals to correlate crack propagation behavior. Inconel 718 specimens were tested under isothermal, thermomechanical, temperature gradient, and creep conditions at temperatures up to 650 degrees C (1200 degrees F). The integrals formulated by Blackburn and by Kishimoto correlated the data reasonably well under all test conditions.

  1. Elevated temperature crack propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Orange, T.W.

    1994-02-01

    This paper is a summary of two NASA contracts on high temperature fatigue crack propagation in metals. The first evaluated the ability of fairly simple nonlinear fracture parameters to correlate crack propagation. Hastelloy-X specimens were tested under isothermal and thermomechanical cycling at temperatures up to 980 degrees C (1800 degrees F). The most successful correlating parameter was the crack tip opening displacement derived from the J-integral. The second evaluated the ability of several path-independent integrals to correlate crack propagation behavior. Inconel 718 specimens were tested under isothermal, thermomechanical, temperature gradient, and creep conditions at temperatures up to 650 degrees C (1200 degrees F). The integrals formulated by Blackburn and by Kishimoto correlated the data reasonably well under all test conditions.

  2. Ethylene by Naphta Cracking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiseman, Peter

    1977-01-01

    Presents a discussion of the manufacture of ethylene by thermal cracking of hydrocarbon feedstocks that is useful for introducing the subject of industrial chemistry into a chemistry curriculum. (MLH)

  3. Elevated Temperature Crack Propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orange, Thomas W.

    1994-01-01

    This paper is a summary of two NASA contracts on high temperature fatigue crack propagation in metals. The first evaluated the ability of fairly simple nonlinear fracture parameters to correlate crack propagation. Hastelloy-X specimens were tested under isothermal and thermomechanical cycling at temperatures up to 980 degrees C (1800 degrees F). The most successful correlating parameter was the crack tip opening displacement derived from the J-integral. The second evaluated the ability of several path-independent integrals to correlate crack propagation behavior. Inconel 718 specimens were tested under isothermal, thermomechanical, temperature gradient, and creep conditions at temperatures up to 650 degrees C (1200 degrees F). The integrals formulated by Blackburn and by Kishimoto correlated the data reasonably well under all test conditions.

  4. Ethylene by Naphta Cracking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiseman, Peter

    1977-01-01

    Presents a discussion of the manufacture of ethylene by thermal cracking of hydrocarbon feedstocks that is useful for introducing the subject of industrial chemistry into a chemistry curriculum. (MLH)

  5. Inspecting cracks in foam insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cambell, L. W.; Jung, G. K.

    1979-01-01

    Dye solution indicates extent of cracking by penetrating crack and showing original crack depth clearly. Solution comprised of methylene blue in denatured ethyl alcohol penetrates cracks completely and evaporates quickly and is suitable technique for usage in environmental or structural tests.

  6. Inspecting cracks in foam insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cambell, L. W.; Jung, G. K.

    1979-01-01

    Dye solution indicates extent of cracking by penetrating crack and showing original crack depth clearly. Solution comprised of methylene blue in denatured ethyl alcohol penetrates cracks completely and evaporates quickly and is suitable technique for usage in environmental or structural tests.

  7. HIC gene, a candidate suppressor gene within a minimal region of loss at 7q31.1 in myeloid neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Cigognini, Daniela; Corneo, Gianmarco; Fermo, Elisa; Zanella, Alberto; Tripputi, Pasquale

    2007-04-01

    We studied monosomy and deletions of chromosome 7 in 170 patients with myeloid disorders and we identified a minimal region of loss in 7q31.1 spanning between the D7S2554 and D7S2460 markers. The closest gene to our most deleted microsatellite, D7S2554, is the human I-mfa domain containing (HIC) gene, alias MyoD family inhibitor domain containing (MDFIC). We investigated the involvement of HIC in myeloid neoplasms by screening for mutations the coding regions and the intron-exon boundaries of this gene in 15 patients who presented chromosome 7 deletions in the region of HIC. No mutations were found in the coding region of this gene.

  8. Crack injection in silver gold alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiying

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is a materials degradation phenomena resulting from a combination of stress and a corrosive environment. Among the alphabet soup of proposed mechanism of SCC the most important are film-rupture, film-induced cleavage and hydrogen embrittlement. This work examines various aspects of film-induced cleavage in gold alloys for which the operation of hydrogen embrittlement processes can be strictly ruled out on thermodynamic grounds. This is so because in such alloys SCC occurs under electrochemical conditions within which water is stable to hydrogen gas evolution. The alloy system examined in this work is AgAu since the corrosion processes in this system occur by a dealloying mechanism that results in the formation of nanoporous gold. The physics behind the dealloying process as well as the resulting formation of nanoporous gold is today well understood. Two important aspects of the film-induced cleavage mechanism are examined in this work: dynamic fracture in monolithic nanoporous gold and crack injection. In crack injection there is a finite thickness dealloyed layer formed on a AgAu alloy sample and the question of whether or not a crack that nucleates within this layer can travel for some finite distance into the un-corroded parent phase alloy is addressed. Dynamic fracture tests were performed on single edge-notched monolithic nanoporous gold samples as well as "infinite strip" sample configurations for which the stress intensity remains constant over a significant portion of the crack length. High-speed photography was used to measure the crack velocity. In the dynamic fracture experiments cracks were observed to travel at speeds as large as 270 m/s corresponding to about 68% of the Raleigh wave velocity. Crack injection experiments were performed on single crystal Ag77Au23, polycrystalline Ag72Au28 and pure gold, all of which had thin nanoporous gold layers on the surface of samples. Through-thickness fracture was seen in both the

  9. Towards a better understanding of the cracking behavior in soils

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Understanding and modeling shrinkage-induced cracks helps bridge the gap between flow problem in the laboratory and at the field. Modeling flow at the field scale with Darcian fluxes developed at the laboratory scales is challenged with preferential flows attributed to the cracking behavior of soils...

  10. Mechanics of Interface Cracks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-09-27

    tip fields along with a correspondence of these fields to the well characterized small strain (HRR) fields in homogeneous media . In particular, it...crack dimension. Our results showed that for cases involving two elastic-plastic media that the fields, in both materials, are parts of a single...of an geneous media (e.g., Hutchinson, 1983). In one sense the work infinite crack embedded in an infinite bimaterial body (see Fig. complimented

  11. Cracked Plain, Buried Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    4 September 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a cracked plain in western Utopia Planitia. The three circular crack patterns indicate the location of three buried meteor impact craters. These landforms are located near 41.9oN, 275.9oW. The image covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) across. Sunlight illuminates this scene from the lower left.

  12. Surface crack detection in different materials with inductive thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oswald-Tranta, Beata

    2017-05-01

    Inductive thermography has been proved to be an excellent method for detecting surface cracks in metallic materials. The Joule heating is generated directly in the workpiece due to the induced eddy current and its penetration depth is determined by material properties and by the excitation frequency. Whether an additional temperature increase or a colder area around the crack occurs, is determined by the ratio of the crack depth to the penetration depth. It is investigated how material parameters, excitation frequency, crack depth and its inclination angle affect the temperature distribution around a crack after a short heating pulse. With finite element simulations material independent results are calculated showing in which frequency and temporal range crack detection is possible. These results are analyzed more closely for four selected metals: ferro-magnetic and non-magnetic steel, aluminum and titanium.

  13. Chromosome3D: reconstructing three-dimensional chromosomal structures from Hi-C interaction frequency data using distance geometry simulated annealing.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Badri; Trieu, Tuan; Cheng, Jianlin

    2016-11-07

    Reconstructing three-dimensional structures of chromosomes is useful for visualizing their shapes in a cell and interpreting their function. In this work, we reconstruct chromosomal structures from Hi-C data by translating contact counts in Hi-C data into Euclidean distances between chromosomal regions and then satisfying these distances using a structure reconstruction method rigorously tested in the field of protein structure determination. We first evaluate the robustness of the overall reconstruction algorithm on noisy simulated data at various levels of noise by comparing with some of the state-of-the-art reconstruction methods. Then, using simulated data, we validate that Spearman's rank correlation coefficient between pairwise distances in the reconstructed chromosomal structures and the experimental chromosomal contact counts can be used to find optimum conversion rules for transforming interaction frequencies to wish distances. This strategy is then applied to real Hi-C data at chromosome level for optimal transformation of interaction frequencies to wish distances and for ranking and selecting structures. The chromosomal structures reconstructed from a real-world human Hi-C dataset by our method were validated by the known two-compartment feature of the human chromosome organization. We also show that our method is robust with respect to the change of the granularity of Hi-C data, and consistently produces similar structures at different chromosomal resolutions. Chromosome3D is a robust method of reconstructing chromosome three-dimensional models using distance restraints obtained from Hi-C interaction frequency data. It is available as a web application and as an open source tool at http://sysbio.rnet.missouri.edu/chromosome3d/ .

  14. Analyses of Fatigue Crack Growth and Closure Near Threshold Conditions for Large-Crack Behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    A plasticity-induced crack-closure model was used to study fatigue crack growth and closure in thin 2024-T3 aluminum alloy under constant-R and constant-K(sub max) threshold testing procedures. Two methods of calculating crack-opening stresses were compared. One method was based on a contact-K analyses and the other on crack-opening-displacement (COD) analyses. These methods gave nearly identical results under constant-amplitude loading, but under threshold simulations the contact-K analyses gave lower opening stresses than the contact COD method. Crack-growth predictions tend to support the use of contact-K analyses. Crack-growth simulations showed that remote closure can cause a rapid rise in opening stresses in the near threshold regime for low-constraint and high applied stress levels. Under low applied stress levels and high constraint, a rise in opening stresses was not observed near threshold conditions. But crack-tip-opening displacement (CTOD) were of the order of measured oxide thicknesses in the 2024 alloy under constant-R simulations. In contrast, under constant-K(sub max) testing the CTOD near threshold conditions were an order-of-magnitude larger than measured oxide thicknesses. Residual-plastic deformations under both constant-R and constant-K(sub max) threshold simulations were several times larger than the expected oxide thicknesses. Thus, residual-plastic deformations, in addition to oxide and roughness, play an integral part in threshold development.

  15. Effects of Dynamic and Static Loading on Eddy Current Nde of Fatigue Cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, C. C. H.; Nakagawa, N.

    2009-03-01

    This paper reports on a study of the effects of dynamic and static loading on eddy current (EC) crack signals in aerospace materials. In situ EC measurements were performed on a series of fatigue crack samples grown in Al 6061 bars under dynamic loading. The EC signals detected at a fixed location on the fatigue cracks were found to vary periodically with cyclic loading. Under dynamic tension, the amplitude of the vertical component of the crack signal, which is perpendicular to the lift off direction, increases with the load amplitude and the effect is stronger for longer cracks. Such changes in EC signals are attributable to crack morphology changes (i.e. crack opening) under tension. In contrast, the amplitude of crack signal remains relatively unchanged under compression, possibly due to the insulation effect of the oxidation layer on the crack face. The loading effects on crack signals in the Al samples were confirmed by obtaining c-scan images of the fatigue cracks under static loads. C-scans conducted on a series of Ti 64 fatigue crack samples under static loads revealed significantly stronger stress-induced changes of crack signal for Ti 64 than for the Al samples. The results are interpreted in terms of load-induced crack morphology changes, taking into account of likely differences between the Al and Ti alloy samples.

  16. The Effect of Water on Crack Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaede, O.; Regenauer-Lieb, K.

    2009-04-01

    While the mechanical coupling between pore fluid and solid phase is relatively well understood, quantitative studies dealing with chemical-mechanical weakening in geological materials are rare. Many classical poroelastic problems can be addressed with the simple law of effective stress. Experimental studies show that the presence of a chemically active fluid can have effects that exceed the predictions of the law of effective stress. These chemical fluid-rock interactions alter the mechanical properties of the solid phase. Especially chemical-mechanical weakening has important ramifications for many areas of applied geosciences ranging from nuclear waste disposal over reservoir enhancement to fault stability. In this study, we model chemically induced changes of the size of the process zone around a crack tip. The knowledge of the process zone size is used to extend existing effective medium approximations of cracked solids. The stress distribution around a crack leads to a chemical potential gradient. This gradient will be a driver for mass diffusion through the solid phase. As an example, mass diffusion is towards the crack tip for a mode I crack. In this case a chemical reaction, that weakens the solid phase, will increase the size of the process zone around the crack tip. We apply our model to the prominent hydrolytic weakening effect observed in the quartz-water system (Griggs and Blacic, 1965). Hydrolytic weakening is generally attributed to water hydrolyzing the strong Si-O bonds of the quartz crystal. The hydrolysis replaces a Si-O-Si bridge with a relatively weak hydrogen bridge between two silanol groups. This enhances dislocation mobility and hence the yield stress is reduced. The plastic process zone around a crack tip is therefore larger in a wet crystal than in a dry crystal. We calculate the size of the process zone by solving this coupled mechanical-chemical problem with the Finite Element code ABAQUS. We consider single crack, collinear crack and

  17. Constraining the Coronal Heating Mechanism Using Data from AIA, EIS, and Hi-C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martens, P. C.; Plowman, J.; Kankelborg, C. C.

    2013-12-01

    We have developed an ultra-fast DEM inversion code that computes over 1000 DEMs/sec for a sample active region observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on SDO, and achieves reduced chi-squareds of order unity with no negative emission in all but a few test cases (Plowman et al. 2013 ApJ). Applying the code to simultaneous Hinode/EIS data we find good agreement, and of course much less uncertainty in the EIS DEMs. For the short interval that we have Hi-C data we can estimate filling factors from those. We are using this new tool to constrain the still elusive mechanism of coronal heating. In one approach we use simultaneous AIA and EIS data of loops that are mostly north-south oriented, and hence do not require a broad EIS raster. We derive the density in these loops from density sensitive line pairs, and the DEMs from AIA data. In many cases the background subtracted DEMs indicate a single temperature at many points in the loop, and hence we have a measurement of both density and temperature along a good part of the loop. Combining these results with analytical (Martens 2010) models for loop heating we find that the heating is concentrated at the footpoints, consistent with, for example, Ohmic heating, but inconsistent with several other popular models for coronal heating. In the second approach we use the remarkable speed of our DEM inversion code to measure the occurrence of heating events in Active Regions (AR). We have determined that with the cadence of about ten seconds of the combined AIA channels, our code can detect heating events roughly down to the energy of nano-flares, about 10^24 ergs. By analyzing the DEMs sequences per pixel of target ARs we derive statistics on the heating events, in particular their frequency and energy distribution. Therefrom we can determine whether the energy input from nano-flares and more energetic events provides the energy required to sustain the AR corona.

  18. Evaluation of the effect of crack closure on fatigue crack growth of simulated short cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Telesman, J.; Fisher, D. M.

    1984-01-01

    A test program was performed to determine the influence of crack closure on fatigue crack growth (FCG) rates of short cracks. By use of the standard compact tension specimen, test procedures were devised to evaluate closure loads in the wake of the crack behind its tip. The first procedure determined the magnitude of crack closure as a function of the fatigued crack wave by incrementally removing the contacting wake surfaces and measuring closure load at each increment. The second procedure used a low-high loading sequence to simulate short crack behavior. Based on the results, it was concluded that crack closure is not the major reason for the more rapid growth of short cracks as compared to long crack growth.

  19. Single-cell Hi-C bridges microscopy and genome-wide sequencing approaches to study 3D chromatin organization.

    PubMed

    Ulianov, Sergey V; Tachibana-Konwalski, Kikue; Razin, Sergey V

    2017-10-01

    Recent years have witnessed an explosion of the single-cell biochemical toolbox including chromosome conformation capture (3C)-based methods that provide novel insights into chromatin spatial organization in individual cells. The observations made with these techniques revealed that topologically associating domains emerge from cell population averages and do not exist as static structures in individual cells. Stochastic nature of the genome folding is likely to be biologically relevant and may reflect the ability of chromatin fibers to adopt a number of alternative configurations, some of which could be transiently stabilized and serve regulatory purposes. Single-cell Hi-C approaches provide an opportunity to analyze chromatin folding in rare cell types such as stem cells, tumor progenitors, oocytes, and totipotent cells, contributing to a deeper understanding of basic mechanisms in development and disease. Here, we review key findings of single-cell Hi-C and discuss possible biological reasons and consequences of the inferred dynamic chromatin spatial organization. © 2017 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Three Dimensional Liquid Chromatography Coupling IEC/HIC/RPC for Effective Protein Separation in Top-Down Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Gregorich, Zachery R.; Guner, Huseyin; Jin, Song; Ge, Ying

    2015-01-01

    To address the complexity of proteome in mass spectrometry (MS)-based top-down proteomics, multi-dimensional liquid chromatography (MDLC) strategies that can effectively separate proteins with high resolution and automation are highly desirable. Although various MDLC methods that can effectively separate peptides from protein digests exist, very few MDLC strategies, primarily consisting of 2DLC, are available for intact protein separation, which is insufficient to address the proteome complexity. We recently demonstrated that hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) utilizing a MS-compatible salt can provide high resolution separation of intact proteins for top-down proteomics. Herein, we have developed a novel 3DLC strategy by coupling HIC with ion exchange chromatography (IEC) and reverse phase chromatography (RPC) for intact protein separation. We demonstrated that a 3D (IECHIC-RPC) approach greatly outperformed the conventional 2D IEC-RPC approach. For the same IEC fraction (out of 35 fractions) from a crude HEK 293 cell lysate, a total of 640 proteins were identified in the 3D approach (corresponding to 201 non-redundant proteins) as compared to 47 in the 2D approach, whereas simply prolonging the gradients in RPC in the 2D approach only led to minimal improvement in protein separation and identifications. Therefore this novel 3DLC method has great potential for effective separation of intact proteins to achieve deep proteome coverage in top-down proteomics. PMID:25867201

  1. Role of particle shape anisotropy on crack formation in drying of colloidal suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dugyala, Venkateshwar Rao; Lama, Hisay; Satapathy, Dillip K.; Basavaraj, Madivala G.

    2016-08-01

    Cracks in a colloidal film formed by evaporation induced drying can be controlled by changing drying conditions. We show, for the first time that the crack morphologies in colloidal films are dependent on shape of constituting particles apart from the microstructure and particle assembly. In order to investigate the particle shape effect on crack patterns, monodispered spherical and ellipsoidal particles are used in sessile drop experiments. On observing the dried sessile drop we found cracks along the radial direction for spherical particle dispersions and circular crack patterns for ellipsoidal particle dispersions. The change in crack pattern is a result of self assembly of shape anisotropic particles and their ordering. The ordering of particles dictate the crack direction and the cracks follow the path of least resistance to release the excess stress stored in the particle film. Ellipsoids having different aspect ratio (~3 to 7) are used and circular crack patterns are repeatedly observed in all experiments.

  2. Role of particle shape anisotropy on crack formation in drying of colloidal suspension

    PubMed Central

    Dugyala, Venkateshwar Rao; Lama, Hisay; Satapathy, Dillip K.; Basavaraj, Madivala G.

    2016-01-01

    Cracks in a colloidal film formed by evaporation induced drying can be controlled by changing drying conditions. We show, for the first time that the crack morphologies in colloidal films are dependent on shape of constituting particles apart from the microstructure and particle assembly. In order to investigate the particle shape effect on crack patterns, monodispered spherical and ellipsoidal particles are used in sessile drop experiments. On observing the dried sessile drop we found cracks along the radial direction for spherical particle dispersions and circular crack patterns for ellipsoidal particle dispersions. The change in crack pattern is a result of self assembly of shape anisotropic particles and their ordering. The ordering of particles dictate the crack direction and the cracks follow the path of least resistance to release the excess stress stored in the particle film. Ellipsoids having different aspect ratio (~3 to 7) are used and circular crack patterns are repeatedly observed in all experiments. PMID:27477261

  3. Ambient temperature stress-corrosion cracking of sensitized stainless steels. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Sieradzki, K.; Isaacs, H.S.; Newman, R.C.

    1982-01-01

    Stress-corrosion cracking of sensitized Type 304 steel in low temperature borated water has been observed. The probable role of low levels of chloride ions or sulfur-containing ions is described, including the relationship of the phenomenon to polythionic acid cracking. The mechanism of the sulfur-induced cracking and its usefulness as a test for sensitization are outlined.

  4. Cracking of high-solids epoxy coatings on steel structures in The Netherlands

    SciTech Connect

    Bijen, J. ); Montfort, J. van

    1999-05-01

    High-solids epoxy coatings on steel flood barriers in The Netherlands showed cracking shortly after application. An investigation revealed the cause of cracking. It appeared that shrinkage-induced stresses caused the coatings to fail. Two cracking phenomena are described and simulated by an accelerated test and computer modeling.

  5. Fatigue-crack propagation in advanced aerospace materials: Aluminum-lithium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Venkateswara Rao, K.T.; Ritchie, R.O.

    1988-10-01

    Characteristics of fatigue-crack propagation behavior are reviewed for recently developed commercial aluminum-lithium alloys, with emphasis on the underlying micromechanisms associated with crack advance and their implications to damage-tolerant design. Specifically, crack-growth kinetics in Alcoa 2090-T8E41, Alcan 8090 and 8091, and Pechiney 2091 alloys, and in certain powder-metallurgy alloys, are examined as a function of microstructure, plate orientation, temperature, crack size, load ratio and loading sequence. In general, it is found that growth rates for long (> 10 mm) cracks are nearly 2--3 orders of magnitude slower than in traditional 2000 and 7000 series alloys at comparable stress-intensity levels. In additions, Al-Li alloys shown enhanced crack-growth retardations following the application of tensile overloads and retain superior fatigue properties even after prolonged exposure at overaging temperatures; however, they are less impressive in the presence of compression overloads and further show accelerated crack-growth behavior for microstructurally-small (2--1000 {mu}m) cracks (some three orders of magnitude faster than long cracks). These contrasting observations are attributed to a very prominent role of crack-tip shielding during fatigue-crack growth in Al-Li alloys, promoted largely by the tortuous and zig-zag nature of the crack-path morphologies. Such crack paths result in locally reduced crack-tip stress intensities, due to crack deflection and consequent crack wedging from fracture-surface asperities (roughness-induced crack closure); however, such mechanisms are far less potent in the presence of compressive loads, which act to crush the asperities, and for small cracks, where the limited crack wake severely restricts the shielding effect. 50 refs., 21 figs.

  6. Intermittent crack growth in fatigue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokkoniemi, R.; Miksic, A.; Ovaska, M.; Laurson, L.; Alava, M. J.

    2017-07-01

    Fatigue occurs under cyclic loading at stresses below a material’s static strength limit. We consider fatigue crack growth as a stochastic process and perform crack growth experiments in a metal (copper). We follow optically cracks propagating from initial edge notches. The main interest is in the dynamics of the crack growth—the Paris’ law and the initiation phase prior to that—and especially the intermittency this is discovered to display. How the sampling of the crack advancement, performed at regular intervals, influences such measurement results is analysed by the analogy of planar crack dynamics in slow, driven growth.

  7. Crack propagation in Hastelloy X

    SciTech Connect

    Weerasooriya, T.; Strizak, J.P.

    1980-05-01

    The fatigue and creep crack growth rates of Hastelloy X were examined both in air and impure helium. Creep crack growth rate is higher in air and impure helium at 650/sup 0/C. Initial creep crack growth from the original sharp fatigue crack is by an intergranular mode of fracture. As the cracking accelerates at higher stress intensities, growth is by a mixed mode of both intergranular and transgranular fracture. Fatigue crack growth rate increases with increasing temperature and decreasing frequency for the range of stress intensities reported in the literature and is lower in impure helium than in air.

  8. Fatigue Behavior of Long and Short Cracks in Wrought and Powder Aluminum Alloys.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-05-01

    deposits ,24-26 irregular fracture morphologies coupled with crack tip shear displacements,27-29 and fluid-induced pressure3 5 ,36 in addition to...compliance curves of load versus relative strain deviated from linearity. Crack surface corrosion deposits were measured with Scanning Auger Spectroscopy...linear with far fewer crack deflections. Associated Auger measurements of the extent of crack surface corrosion deposits are shown in Fig. 4.7. In marked

  9. Catalytic cracking process

    SciTech Connect

    Aufdembrink, B.A.; Degnan, T.F.; Kresge, C.T.

    1990-01-23

    This patent describes a process for catalytically cracking a petroleum fraction to lighter hydrocarbons. The process comprises providing a feedstock containing a petroleum fraction and then contacting the feedstock with a catalyst under catalytic cracking conditions. The catalyst composition includes a titanometallate layered metal oxide material comprising a layered metal oxide material comprising a layered metal oxide and pillars of a chalcogenide of at least one element selected from Groups IB, IIB, IIIA, IIIB, IVB, VA, VB, VIA, VIIA and VIIIA of the Periodic Table of Elements separating the layers of the metal oxides.

  10. Crack suppression of SiO2 thin film formed by 157 nm F2 laser induced photochemical surface modification of hard silicone coating film on polycarbonate(Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nojiri, Hidetoshi; Okoshi, Masayuki

    2017-03-01

    Light-weighting of vehicle is now strongly required for reducing gasoline consumption and CO2 emission. In this study, F2 laser was irradiated to the surface of hard silicone resin, coated by dip coating method onto the film of acrylic resin on a polycarbonate substrate. The surface part of the silicone resin was photo-chemically modified into SiO2. One of two types of aperture mask, 3×3 mm2 and 50×50 μm2, was set on the sample surface. The single pulse fluence was varied from 4 to 14 mJ/cm2, pulse repetition frequency was set to 10 Hz, and irradiation time was changed from 30 to 120 s. N2 gas was induced around the surface of the sample. After modification, SiO2 modified layer was etched by HF 1% diluted solution, and the etched depth was measured by a stylus-type surface profilometer. As a result of experiments, stress in the SiO2 modified layer increased by increasing of F2 laser irradiation time. In case of using aperture mask of 3×3 mm2, cracks were generated only on the irradiated area for longer irradiation time than 60 s. It is considered that the tensile stress in the modified layer exceeded the tensile fracture strength of 48 MPa of typical SiO2. When a mesh mask of 50×50 μm2 aperture was used, no crack generated even for a long irradiation of 200 s. We found, the tensile stress in SiO2 modified film can be reduced remarkably with using smaller aperture size of mesh mask, and it is very effective to prevent cracking.

  11. Fatigue Crack Growth and Crack Bridging in SCS-6/Ti-24-11

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosn, Louis J.; Kantzos, Pete; Telesman, Jack

    1995-01-01

    Interfacial damage induced by relative fiber/matrix sliding was found to occur in the bridged zone of unidirectional SCS-6/Ti-24Al-11Nb intermetallic matrix composite specimens subjected to fatigue crack growth conditions. The degree of interfacial damage was not uniform along the bridged crack wake. Higher damage zones were observed near the machined notch in comparison to the crack tip. The interfacial friction shear strength tau(sub f) measured in the crack wake using pushout testing revealed lower values than the as-received interface. Interfacial wear also reduced the strength of the bridging fibers. The reduction in fiber strength is thought to be a function of the magnitude of relative fiber/matrix displacements ind the degree of interfacial damage. Furthermore, two different fiber bridging models were used to predict the influence of bridging on the fatigue crack driving force. The shear lag model required a variable tau(sub f) in the crack wake (reflecting the degradation of the interface) before its predictions agreed with trends exhibited by the experimental data. The fiber pressure model did an excellent job in predicting both the FCG data and the DeltaCOD in the bridged zone even though it does not require a knowledge of tau(sub f).

  12. Collar crack of birch

    Treesearch

    Alex L. Shigo

    1964-01-01

    The name "Collar crack" is suggested for a condition of birches observed in the past 4 years during field studies of forest disease problems in the White Mountains of New Hampshire. The first close observations of this condition were made during the summer of 1963. This is a report on those observations and an explanation of the possible cause.

  13. Cracking the Credit Hour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laitinen, Amy

    2012-01-01

    The basic currency of higher education--the credit hour--represents the root of many problems plaguing America's higher education system: the practice of measuring time rather than learning. "Cracking the Credit Hour" traces the history of this time-based unit, from the days of Andrew Carnegie to recent federal efforts to define a credit…

  14. A Creaking and Cracking Comet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faurschou Hviid, Stubbe; Hüttig, Christian; Groussin, Olivier; Mottola, Stefano; Keller, Horst Uwe; OSIRIS Team

    2016-10-01

    Since the middle of 2014 the OSIRIS cameras on the ESA Rosetta mission have been monitoring the evolution of the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko as it passed through perihelion. During the perihelion passage several change events have been observed on the nucleus surface. For example existing large scale cracks have expanded and new large scale cracks have been created. Also several large scale "wave pattern" like change events have been observed in the Imhotep and Hapi regions. These are events not directly correlated with any normal visible cometary activity. One interpretation is that these are events likely caused by "seismic" activity. The seismic activity is created by the self-gravity stress of the non-spherical comet nucleus and stress created by the non-gravitational forces acting on the comet. The non-gravitational forces are changing the rotation period of the comet (~20min/perihelion passage) which induces a changing mechanical stress pattern through the perihelion passage. Also the diurnal cycle with its changing activity pattern is causing a periodic wobble in the stress pattern that can act as a trigger for a comet quake. The stress pattern has been modeled using a finite element model that includes self-gravity, the comet spin and the non-gravitational forces based on a cometary activity model. This paper will discuss what can be learned about the comet nucleus structure and about the cometary material properties from these events and from the FEM model.

  15. The tumor suppressor gene HIC1 (hypermethylated in cancer 1) is a sequence-specific transcriptional repressor: definition of its consensus binding sequence and analysis of its DNA binding and repressive properties.

    PubMed

    Pinte, Sébastien; Stankovic-Valentin, Nicolas; Deltour, Sophie; Rood, Brian R; Guérardel, Cateline; Leprince, Dominique

    2004-09-10

    HIC1 (hypermethylated in cancer 1) is a tumor suppressor gene located at chromosome 17p13.3, a region frequently hypermethylated or deleted in human tumors and in a contiguous-gene syndrome, the Miller-Dieker syndrome. HIC1 is a transcriptional repressor containing five Krüppel-like C(2)H(2) zinc fingers and an N-terminal dimerization and autonomous repression domain called BTB/POZ. Although some of the HIC1 transcriptional repression mechanisms have been recently deciphered, target genes are still to be discovered. In this study, we determined the consensus binding sequence for HIC1 and investigated its DNA binding properties. Using a selection and amplification of binding sites technique, we identified the sequence 5'-(C)/(G)NG(C)/(G)GGGCA(C)/(A) CC-3' as an optimal binding site. In silico and functional analyses fully validated this consensus and highlighted a GGCA core motif bound by zinc fingers 3 and 4. The BTB/POZ domain inhibits the binding of HIC1 to a single site but mediates cooperative binding to a probe containing five concatemerized binding sites, a property shared by other BTB/POZ proteins. Finally, full-length HIC1 proteins transiently expressed in RK13 cells and more importantly, endogenous HIC1 proteins from the DAOY medulloblastoma cell line, repress the transcription of a reporter gene through their direct binding to these sites, as confirmed by chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments. The definition of the HIC1-specific DNA binding sequence as well as the requirement for multiple sites for optimal binding of the full-length protein are mandatory prerequisites for the identification and analyses of bona fide HIC1 target genes.

  16. Thermal cracking of retort oil

    SciTech Connect

    Dearth, J.D.; Smith, R.H.

    1980-10-14

    The thermal cracking of retort oil vapors in an elongated reactor is improved by passing the effluent oil vapors and gases from a retort to a thermal cracking unit before the temperature of the retort effluent falls below 680* F. This encourages the more desirable cracking reactions, increases the thermal efficiency of the process, and avoids preheater coking.

  17. Capture Hi-C reveals novel candidate genes and complex long-range interactions with related autoimmune risk loci.

    PubMed

    Martin, Paul; McGovern, Amanda; Orozco, Gisela; Duffus, Kate; Yarwood, Annie; Schoenfelder, Stefan; Cooper, Nicholas J; Barton, Anne; Wallace, Chris; Fraser, Peter; Worthington, Jane; Eyre, Steve

    2015-11-30

    Genome-wide association studies have been tremendously successful in identifying genetic variants associated with complex diseases. The majority of association signals are intergenic and evidence is accumulating that a high proportion of signals lie in enhancer regions. We use Capture Hi-C to investigate, for the first time, the interactions between associated variants for four autoimmune diseases and their functional targets in B- and T-cell lines. Here we report numerous looping interactions and provide evidence that only a minority of interactions are common to both B- and T-cell lines, suggesting interactions may be highly cell-type specific; some disease-associated SNPs do not interact with the nearest gene but with more compelling candidate genes (for example, FOXO1, AZI2) often situated several megabases away; and finally, regions associated with different autoimmune diseases interact with each other and the same promoter suggesting common autoimmune gene targets (for example, PTPRC, DEXI and ZFP36L1).

  18. De novo assembly of the Aedes aegypti genome using Hi-C yields chromosome-length scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Dudchenko, Olga; Batra, Sanjit S; Omer, Arina D; Nyquist, Sarah K; Hoeger, Marie; Durand, Neva C; Shamim, Muhammad S; Machol, Ido; Lander, Eric S; Aiden, Aviva Presser; Aiden, Erez Lieberman

    2017-04-07

    The Zika outbreak, spread by the Aedes aegypti mosquito, highlights the need to create high-quality assemblies of large genomes in a rapid and cost-effective way. Here we combine Hi-C data with existing draft assemblies to generate chromosome-length scaffolds. We validate this method by assembling a human genome, de novo, from short reads alone (67× coverage). We then combine our method with draft sequences to create genome assemblies of the mosquito disease vectors Aeaegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus, each consisting of three scaffolds corresponding to the three chromosomes in each species. These assemblies indicate that almost all genomic rearrangements among these species occur within, rather than between, chromosome arms. The genome assembly procedure we describe is fast, inexpensive, and accurate, and can be applied to many species.

  19. Chrom3D: three-dimensional genome modeling from Hi-C and nuclear lamin-genome contacts.

    PubMed

    Paulsen, Jonas; Sekelja, Monika; Oldenburg, Anja R; Barateau, Alice; Briand, Nolwenn; Delbarre, Erwan; Shah, Akshay; Sørensen, Anita L; Vigouroux, Corinne; Buendia, Brigitte; Collas, Philippe

    2017-01-30

    Current three-dimensional (3D) genome modeling platforms are limited by their inability to account for radial placement of loci in the nucleus. We present Chrom3D, a user-friendly whole-genome 3D computational modeling framework that simulates positions of topologically-associated domains (TADs) relative to each other and to the nuclear periphery. Chrom3D integrates chromosome conformation capture (Hi-C) and lamin-associated domain (LAD) datasets to generate structure ensembles that recapitulate radial distributions of TADs detected in single cells. Chrom3D reveals unexpected spatial features of LAD regulation in cells from patients with a laminopathy-causing lamin mutation. Chrom3D is freely available on github.

  20. Specific Dephosphorylation at Tyr-554 of Git1 by Ptprz Promotes Its Association with Paxillin and Hic-5

    PubMed Central

    Fujikawa, Akihiro; Matsumoto, Masahito; Kuboyama, Kazuya; Suzuki, Ryoko; Noda, Masaharu

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor kinase-interactor 1 (Git1) is involved in cell motility control by serving as an adaptor that links signaling proteins such as Pix and PAK to focal adhesion proteins. We previously demonstrated that Git1 was a multiply tyrosine-phosphorylated protein, its primary phosphorylation site was Tyr-554 in the vicinity of the focal adhesion targeting-homology (FAH) domain, and this site was selectively dephosphorylated by protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor type Z (Ptprz). In the present study, we showed that Tyr-554 phosphorylation reduced the association of Git1 with the FAH-domain-binding proteins, paxillin and Hic-5, based on immunoprecipitation experiments using the Tyr-554 mutants of Git1. The Tyr-554 phosphorylation of Git1 was higher, and its binding to paxillin was consistently lower in the brains of Ptprz-deficient mice than in those of wild-type mice. We then investigated the role of Tyr-554 phosphorylation in cell motility control using three different methods: random cell motility, wound healing, and Boyden chamber assays. The shRNA-mediated knockdown of endogenous Git1 impaired cell motility in A7r5 smooth muscle cells. The motility defect was rescued by the exogenous expression of wild-type Git1 and a Git1 mutant, which only retained Tyr-554 among the multiple potential tyrosine phosphorylation sites, but not by the Tyr-554 phosphorylation-defective or phosphorylation-state mimic Git1 mutant. Our results suggested that cyclic phosphorylation-dephosphorylation at Tyr-554 of Git1 was crucial for dynamic interactions between Git1 and paxillin/Hic-5 in order to ensure coordinated cell motility. PMID:25742295

  1. Crack fusion dynamics: A model for large earthquakes

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, W.I.; Knopoff, L.

    1982-07-01

    The physical processes of the fusion of small cracks into larger ones are nonlinear in character. A study of the nonlinear properties of fusion may lead to an understanding of the instabilities that give rise to clustering of large earthquakes. We have investigated the properties of simple versions of fusion processes to see if instabilities culminating in repetitive massive earthquakes are possible. We have taken into account such diverse phenomena as the production of aftershocks, the rapid extension of large cracks to overwhelm and absorb smaller cracks, the influence of anelastic creep-induced time delays, healing, the genesis of ''juvenile'' cracks due to plate motions, and others. A preliminary conclusion is that the time delays introduced by anelastic creep may be responsible for producing catastrophic instabilities characteristic of large earthquakes as well as aftershock sequences. However, it seems that nonlocal influences, i.e., the spatial diffusion of cracks, may play a dominant role in producing episodes of seismicity and clustering.

  2. Finite element modelling of internal and multiple localized cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saloustros, Savvas; Pelà, Luca; Cervera, Miguel; Roca, Pere

    2017-02-01

    Tracking algorithms constitute an efficient numerical technique for modelling fracture in quasi-brittle materials. They succeed in representing localized cracks in the numerical model without mesh-induced directional bias. Currently available tracking algorithms have an important limitation: cracking originates either from the boundary of the discretized domain or from predefined "crack-root" elements and then propagates along one orientation. This paper aims to circumvent this drawback by proposing a novel tracking algorithm that can simulate cracking starting at any point of the mesh and propagating along one or two orientations. This enhancement allows the simulation of structural case-studies experiencing multiple cracking. The proposed approach is validated through the simulation of a benchmark example and an experimentally tested structural frame under in-plane loading. Mesh-bias independency of the numerical solution, computational cost and predicted collapse mechanisms with and without the tracking algorithm are discussed.

  3. Nonlinear ultrasonic fatigue crack detection using a single piezoelectric transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Yun-Kyu; Lee, Dong Jun

    2016-04-01

    This paper proposes a new nonlinear ultrasonic technique for fatigue crack detection using a single piezoelectric transducer (PZT). The proposed technique identifies a fatigue crack using linear (α) and nonlinear (β) parameters obtained from only a single PZT mounted on a target structure. Based on the different physical characteristics of α and β, a fatigue crack-induced feature is able to be effectively isolated from the inherent nonlinearity of a target structure and data acquisition system. The proposed technique requires much simpler test setup and less processing costs than the existing nonlinear ultrasonic techniques, but fast and powerful. To validate the proposed technique, a real fatigue crack is created in an aluminum plate, and then false positive and negative tests are carried out under varying temperature conditions. The experimental results reveal that the fatigue crack is successfully detected, and no positive false alarm is indicated.

  4. Biological Dimensions of Crack Morphology in Dryland Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeCarlo, K. F.; Spiegel, M.; Caylor, K. K.

    2014-12-01

    Macropores and cracks have an integral role in soil hydrology, and the physicochemical factors that induce them have been the subject of much laboratory research. How these processes translate to field soils, however, is often obfuscated by the biological elements present that complicate its formation and dynamics. In this study, we investigated the biological influence of herbivores and vegetation on 3D crack morphology in a dryland swelling soil (black cotton/vertisol). Fieldwork was conducted at and near the Kenya Long-Term Exclosure Experiment (KLEE) plots in Mpala, central Kenya, where three different soil regions were identified: highly vegetated areas, animal trails, and termite mounds. Crack networks were physically characterized by pouring liquid resin into the soil and excavating them when dry, after which they were imaged and quantified using medical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Cracking intensity of each cast was corrected via soil moisture and bulk density measurements at 5 cm intervals over 30 cm. 3D characterization of the soil system shows that mechanical compaction is a major influence in the formation of extensive and deep cracks in animal trails, with megaherbivores (e.g. elephants) inducing the most extreme cracks. Bioturbation is seen as a major influence in the formation of shallower cracks in termite mounds, as termites loosen and aerate the soil and reduce the soil's cohesive properties. Highly vegetated soils show a large degree of variability: small, disconnected soil patches induced by vegetative cover and a larger root network results in smaller and shallower cracks, but full vegetative cover induces deep and irregular cracks, possibly due to diverted rainfall. Our results highlight the intricate connections between the biology and physics that dictate soil processes in a complex soil system at the field scale.

  5. Experimental investigation on centrifugal compressor blade crack classification using the squared envelope spectrum.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongkun; Zhang, Xuefeng; Xu, Fujian

    2013-09-18

    Centrifugal compressors are a key piece of equipment for modern production. Among the components of the centrifugal compressor, the impeller is a pivotal part as it is used to transform kinetic energy into pressure energy. Blade crack condition monitoring and classification has been broadly investigated in the industrial and academic area. In this research, a pressure pulsation (PP) sensor arranged in close vicinity to the crack area and the corresponding casing vibration signals are used to monitor blade crack information. As these signals cannot directly demonstrate the blade crack, the method employed in this research is based on the extraction of weak signal characteristics that are induced by blade cracking. A method for blade crack classification based on the signals monitored by using a squared envelope spectrum (SES) is presented. Experimental investigations on blade crack classification are carried out to verify the effectiveness of this method. The results show that it is an effective tool for blade crack classification in centrifugal compressors.

  6. Fatigue crack detection in a plate girder using Lamb waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greve, D. W.; Oppenheim, I. J.; Wu, Wei; Zheng, Peng

    2007-04-01

    We report on the application of wafer-type PZT transducers to the detection of flaws in steel plate girders. In these experiments one transducer is used to emit a pulse and the second receives the pulse and reflections from nearby boundaries, flaws, or discontinuities (pitch-catch mode). In this application there will typically be numerous reflections observed in the undamaged structure. A major challenge is to recognize new reflections caused by fatigue cracks in the presence of these background reflections. A laboratory specimen plate girder was fabricated at approximately half scale, 910 mm deep with an h/t ratio of 280 for the web and a b/t ratio of 16 for the flanges, and with transverse stiffeners fabricated with a web gap at the tension flange. Two wafer-type transducers were mounted on the web approximately 175 mm from the crack location, one on each side of the stiffener. The transducers were operated in pitch-catch mode, excited by a windowed sinusoid to create a narrowband transient excitation. The transducer location relative to the crack corresponded to a total included angle of roughly 30 degrees in the path reflecting from the crack. Cyclic loading was applied to develop a distortion-induced fatigue crack in the web at the web gap location. After appearance of the crack, ultrasonic measurements were performed at a range of center frequencies below the cutoff frequency of the A1 Lamb wave mode. Subsequently the crack was extended mechanically to simulate crack growth under primary longitudinal (bending) stress and the measurements were repeated. Direct differencing of the signals showed arrivals at times corresponding to reflection from the crack location, growing in amplitude as the crack was lengthened mechanically. These results demonstrate the utility of Lamb waves for crack detection even in the presence of numerous background reflections.

  7. Study on fatigue crack propagation characteristics around welded joint interface in complexed conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ota, Akihiko; Suzuki, Naoyuki; Maeda, Yoshio; Mawari, Toshio; Matsuoka, Saburo; Nishijima, Satoshi

    1993-01-01

    Marine structures are often constructed by welding, and they are subject to repeated loading such as waves and mechanical vibrations which can create fatigue cracks and consequently break the structures. Fatigue crack propagation properties of welded joints are studied under random loading in the air, synthetic sea water, and compressive cycling. It was found that the most crucial factor that controls fatigue crack propagation was high tensile residual stress fields of welded joints. This stress constantly kept the cracks open, simplifying fatigue crack propagation, and therefore, the rate of crack propagation could be assessed with high accuracy. In the transverse matching welded joints with cracks in the center, crack closure did not occur due to the tensile residual stress constantly induced at the crack ends in the center of the test samples. Fatigue crack propagation was accelerated both in artificial sea water and in compressive cycling compared to that in the air, and the fatigue lowest values were about half. Serious crack closures occurred in compressive cycling in which dry hours exceeded 45 minutes, and the fatigue crack propagation rate deteriorated remarkably. Mean fatigue crack propagation rate under the random loading is estimated precisely using equivalent stress intensity factor limit.

  8. A Review of Crack Closure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-04-01

    OVERLOAD EFFECTS [27,32,36,55,65,80-94] 104 4.3 SHORT CRACK BEHAVIOUR 113 4.4 SURFACE CRACK BEHAVIOUR 116 4.5 EFFECT OF RESIDUAL STRESS 117 4.6...Compressive Stresses Developed 16 on a Growing Fatigue Crack During a Constant Amplitude Cyclic Load Control Test. 4 Plastic Zone and Residual Compressive... Stresses Developed 18 on a Saw Cut Sharp Crack During a Constant Amplitude Cyclic Load Control Test. Residual Stresses Developed in the Plane of Crack

  9. Near-IR imaging of cracks in teeth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fried, William A.; Simon, Jacob C.; Lucas, Seth; Chan, Kenneth H.; Darling, Cynthia L.; Staninec, Michal; Fried, Daniel

    2014-02-01

    Dental enamel is highly transparent at near-IR wavelengths and several studies have shown that these wavelengths are well suited for optical transillumination for the detection and imaging of tooth decay. We hypothesize that these wavelengths are also well suited for imaging cracks in teeth. Extracted teeth with suspected cracks were imaged at several wavelengths in the near-IR from 1300-1700-nm. Extracted teeth were also examined with optical coherence tomography to confirm the existence of suspected cracks. Several teeth of volunteers were also imaged in vivo at 1300-nm to demonstrate clinical potential. In addition we induced cracks in teeth using a carbon dioxide laser and imaged crack formation and propagation in real time using near-IR transillumination. Cracks were clearly visible using near-IR imaging at 1300-nm in both in vitro and in vivo images. Cracks and fractures also interfered with light propagation in the tooth aiding in crack identification and assessment of depth and severity.

  10. Fatigue-Life Prediction Methodology Using Small-Crack Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newmann, James C., Jr.; Phillips, Edward P.; Swain, M. H.

    1997-01-01

    This paper reviews the capabilities of a plasticity-induced crack-closure model to predict fatigue lives of metallic materials using 'small-crack theory' for various materials and loading conditions. Crack-tip constraint factors, to account for three-dimensional state-of-stress effects, were selected to correlate large-crack growth rate data as a function of the effective-stress-intensity factor range (delta K(eff)) under constant-amplitude loading. Some modifications to the delta k(eff)-rate relations were needed in the near-threshold regime to fit measured small-crack growth rate behavior and fatigue endurance limits. The model was then used to calculate small- and large-crack growth rates, and to predict total fatigue lives, for notched and un-notched specimens made of two aluminum alloys and a steel under constant-amplitude and spectrum loading. Fatigue lives were calculated using the crack-growth relations and microstructural features like those that initiated cracks for the aluminum alloys and steel for edge-notched specimens. An equivalent-initial-flaw-size concept was used to calculate fatigue lives in other cases. Results from the tests and analyses agreed well.

  11. Near-IR imaging of cracks in teeth.

    PubMed

    Fried, William A; Simon, Jacob C; Lucas, Seth; Chan, Kenneth H; Darling, Cynthia L; Staninec, Michal; Fried, Daniel

    2014-02-18

    Dental enamel is highly transparent at near-IR wavelengths and several studies have shown that these wavelengths are well suited for optical transillumination for the detection and imaging of tooth decay. We hypothesize that these wavelengths are also well suited for imaging cracks in teeth. Extracted teeth with suspected cracks were imaged at several wavelengths in the near-IR from 1300-1700-nm. Extracted teeth were also examined with optical coherence tomography to confirm the existence of suspected cracks. Several teeth of volunteers were also imaged in vivo at 1300-nm to demonstrate clinical potential. In addition we induced cracks in teeth using a carbon dioxide laser and imaged crack formation and propagation in real time using near-IR transillumination. Cracks were clearly visible using near-IR imaging at 1300-nm in both in vitro and in vivo images. Cracks and fractures also interfered with light propagation in the tooth aiding in crack identification and assessment of depth and severity.

  12. Sudden bending of cracked laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sih, G. C.; Chen, E. P.

    1980-01-01

    A dynamic approximate laminated plate theory is developed with emphasis placed on obtaining effective solution for the crack configuration where the 1/square root of r stress singularity and the condition of plane strain are preserved. The radial distance r is measured from the crack edge. The results obtained show that the crack moment intensity tends to decrease as the crack length to laminate plate thickness is increased. Hence, a laminated plate has the desirable feature of stabilizing a through crack as it increases its length at constant load. Also, the level of the average load intensity transmitted to a through crack can be reduced by making the inner layers to be stiffer than the outer layers. The present theory, although approximate, is useful for analyzing laminate failure to crack propagation under dynamic load conditions.

  13. Fatigue crack propagation in dual-phase steels: Effects of ferritic-martensitic microstructures on crack path morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, V. B.; Suresh, S.; Ritchie, R. O.

    1984-06-01

    microstructures with maximum resistance to fatigue crack extension while maintaining high strength levels. A wide range of crack growth rates has been examined, from ~10-8 to 10-3 mm per cycle, in a series of duplex microstructures of comparable yield strength and prior austenite grain size where intercritical heat treatments were used to vary the proportion, morphology, and distribution of the ferrite and martensite phases. Results of fatigue crack propagation tests, conducted on “long cracks” in room temperature moist air environments, revealed a very large influence of microstructure over the entire spectrum of growth rates at low load ratios. Similar trends were observed at high load ratio, although the extent of the microstructural effects on crack growth behavior was significantly less marked. Specifically, microstructures containing fine globular or coarse martensite in a coarse-grained ferritic matrix demonstrated exceptionally high resistance to crack growth without loss in strength properties. To our knowledge, these microstructures yielded the highest ambient temperature fatigue threshold stress intensity range ΔK0 values reported to date, and certainly the highest combination of strength and ΔK0 for steels ( i.e., ΔK0 values above 19 MPa√m with yield strengths in excess of 600 MPa). Such unusually high crack growth resistance is attributed primarily to a tortuous morphology of crack path which results in a reduction in the crack driving force from crack deflection and roughness-induced crack closure mechanisms. Quantitative metallography and experimental crack closure measurements, applied to currently available analytical models for the deflection and closure processes, are presented to substantiate such interpretations.

  14. CIRCUMFERENTIAL MFL IN-LINE INSPECTION FOR CRACKS IN PIPELINES

    SciTech Connect

    J.B. Nestleroth

    2003-06-01

    Circumferential MFL is a new implementation of a widely used technology that has potential to provide improved detection and quantification of axially oriented defects such as cracks, seam weld defects, mechanical damage, and groove corrosion. This implementation works by orienting the magnetic field around the pipe rather that along the axis. By orienting the magnetic field around the pipe (the circumferential direction), the axial defects that were magnetically transparent can disrupt more of the magnetic field and can be more easily detected. Initial implementations of circumferential MFL have found that flux leakage from cracks at the interior of the pipe is small, and the signals from cracks are difficult to detect. The objective of this project is to improve detection of cracks by changing the implementation along with using data from overlapping and complementary inspection techniques. Two technology enhancements were investigated: Combining high- and low-magnetization technology for stress detection; and Combining axial and circumferential MFL methods. Although a method combining high- and low-magnetization technology showed promise for characterizing gouges cause by third party excavation equipment, its commercial development was not successful for two reasons. First, the stress diminishes the crack signal, while the opening of the crack increases the signal. The stress-induced changes in flux leakage around cracks were small and any critical information on the severity of cracks and crack-like defects is difficult to distinguish from changes caused by the crack opening and other inspection variables. Second, it is difficult to magnetize pipe material in the circumferential direction. A relatively low, non-uniform magnetization level produced by the circumferential magnetizer makes detection of changes due to stress extremely difficult. This project also examined combining axial and circumferential MFL to improve crack detection and distinguish cracks for

  15. Understanding the Risk of Chloride Induced Stress Corrosion Cracking of Interim Storage Containers for the Dry Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel: Evolution of Brine Chemistry on the Container Surface.

    SciTech Connect

    Enos, David; Bryan, Charles R.

    2015-10-01

    Although the susceptibility of austenitic stainless steels to chloride-induced stress corrosion cracking is well known, uncertainties exist in terms of the environmental conditions that exist on the surface of the storage containers. While a diversity of salts is present in atmospheric aerosols, many of these are not stable when placed onto a heated surface. Given that the surface temperature of any container storing spent nuclear fuel will be well above ambient, it is likely that salts deposited on its surface may decompose or degas. To characterize this effect, relevant single and multi-salt mixtures are being evaluated as a function of temperature and relative humidity to establish the rates of degassing, as well as the likely final salt and brine chemistries that will remain on the canister surface.

  16. On the driving force for crack growth during thermal actuation of shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxevanis, T.; Parrinello, A. F.; Lagoudas, D. C.

    2016-04-01

    The effect of thermomechanically induced phase transformation on the driving force for crack growth in polycrystalline shape memory alloys is analyzed in an infinite center-cracked plate subjected to a thermal actuation cycle under mechanical load in plain strain. Finite element calculations are carried out to determine the mechanical fields near the static crack and the crack-tip energy release rate using the virtual crack closure technique. A substantial increase of the energy release rate - an order of magnitude for some material systems - is observed during the thermal cycle due to the stress redistribution induced by large scale phase transformation. Thus, phase transformation occurring due to thermal variations under mechanical load may result in crack growth if the crack-tip energy release rate reaches a material specific critical value.

  17. Elevated temperature crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malik, S. N.; Vanstone, R. H.; Kim, K. S.; Laflen, J. H.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose is to determine the ability of currently available P-I integrals to correlate fatigue crack propagation under conditions that simulate the turbojet engine combustor liner environment. The utility of advanced fracture mechanics measurements will also be evaluated during the course of the program. To date, an appropriate specimen design, a crack displacement measurement method, and boundary condition simulation in the computational model of the specimen were achieved. Alloy 718 was selected as an analog material based on its ability to simulate high temperature behavior at lower temperatures. Tensile and cyclic tests were run at several strain rates so that an appropriate constitutive model could be developed. Suitable P-I integrals were programmed into a finite element post-processor for eventual comparison with experimental data.

  18. Cracked and Pitted Plain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-536, 6 November 2003

    This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a typical view--at 1.5 meters (5 feet) per pixel--of surfaces in far western Utopia Planitia. In this region, the plains have developed cracks and pit chains arranged in a polygonal pattern. The pits form by collapse along the trend of a previously-formed crack. This picture is located near 45.0oN, 275.4oW. This April 2003 image covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is illuminated by sunlight from the lower left.

  19. Elevated temperature crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yau, J. F.; Malik, S. N.; Kim, K. S.; Vanstone, R. H.; Laflen, J. H.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of the Elevated Temperature Crack Growth Project is to evaluate proposed nonlinear fracture mechanics methods for application to combustor liners of aircraft gas turbine engines. During the first year of this program, proposed path-independent (P-I) integrals were reviewed for such applications. Several P-I integrals were implemented into a finite-element postprocessor which was developed and verified as part of the work. Alloy 718 was selected as the analog material for use in the forthcoming experimental work. A buttonhead, single-edge notch specimen was designed and verified for use in elevated-temperature strain control testing with significant inelastic strains. A crack mouth opening displacement measurement device was developed for further use.

  20. Statistical crack mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Dienes, J.K.

    1983-01-01

    An alternative to the use of plasticity theory to characterize the inelastic behavior of solids is to represent the flaws by statistical methods. We have taken such an approach to study fragmentation because it offers a number of advantages. Foremost among these is that, by considering the effects of flaws, it becomes possible to address the underlying physics directly. For example, we have been able to explain why rocks exhibit large strain-rate effects (a consequence of the finite growth rate of cracks), why a spherical explosive imbedded in oil shale produces a cavity with a nearly square section (opening of bedding cracks) and why propellants may detonate following low-speed impact (a consequence of frictional hot spots).

  1. Subcritical crack growth in marble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nara, Yoshitaka; Nishida, Yuki; Toshinori, Ii; Harui, Tomoki; Tanaka, Mayu; Kashiwaya, Koki

    2016-04-01

    It is essential to study time-dependent deformation and fracturing in various rock materials to prevent natural hazards related to the failure of a rock mass. In addition, information of time-dependent fracturing is essential to ensure the long-term stability of a rock mass surrounding various structures. Subcritical crack growth is one of the main causes of time-dependent fracturing in rock. It is known that subcritical crack growth is influenced by not only stress but also surrounding environment. Studies of subcritical crack growth have been widely conducted for silicate rocks such as igneous rocks and sandstones. By contrast, information of subcritical crack growth in carbonate rocks is not enough. Specifically, influence of surrounding environment on subcritical crack growth in carbonate rock should be clarified to ensure the long-term stability of a rock mass. In this study, subcritical crack growth in marble was investigated. Especially, the influence of the temperature, relative humidity and water on subcritical crack growth in marble is investigated. As rock samples, marbles obtained in Skopje-City in Macedonia and Carrara-City in Italy were used. To measure subcritical crack growth, we used the load relaxation method of the double-torsion (DT) test. All measurements by DT test were conducted under controlled temperature and relative humidity. For both marbles, it was shown that the crack velocity in marble in air increased with increasing relative humidity at a constant temperature. Additionally, the crack velocity in water was much higher than that in air. It was also found that the crack velocity increased with increasing temperature. It is considered that temperature and water have significant influences on subcritical crack growth in marble. For Carrara marble in air, it was recognized that the value of subcritical crack growth index became low when the crack velocity was higher than 10-4 m/s. This is similar to Region II of subcritical crack growth

  2. Utopia Cracks and Polygons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-339, 23 April 2003

    This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a pattern of polygonal cracks and aligned, elliptical pits in western Utopia Planitia. The picture covers an area about 3 km (about 1.9 mi) wide near 44.9oN, 274.7oW. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the left.

  3. Characterizing the effect of creep on stress corrosion cracking of cold worked Alloy 690 in supercritical water environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lefu; Chen, Kai; Du, Donghai; Gao, Wenhua; Andresen, Peter L.; Guo, Xianglong

    2017-08-01

    The effect of creep on stress corrosion cracking (SCC) was studied by measuring crack growth rates (CGRs) of 30% cold worked (CW) Alloy 690 in supercritical water (SCW) and inert gas environments at temperatures ranging from 450 °C to 550 °C. The SCC crack growth rate under SCW environments can be regarded as the cracking induced by the combined effect of corrosion and creep, while the CGR in inert gas environment can be taken as the portion of creep induced cracking. Results showed that the CW Alloy 690 sustained high susceptibility to intergranular (IG) cracking, and creep played a dominant role in the SCC crack growth behavior, contributing more than 80% of the total crack growth rate at each testing temperature. The temperature dependence of creep induced CGRs follows an Arrhenius dependency, with an apparent activation energy (QE) of about 225 kJ/mol.

  4. Catalytic cracking process

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, R.L.; Perigard, R.G.; Rabo, J.A.

    1989-08-08

    This patent describes a process for catalytic cracking of hydrocarbon feedstocks. It comprises contacting the hydrocarbon feedstock under conditions effective to crack the feedstock with a catalyst. The catalyst is prepared by a process comprising the following step: contacting a fluid mixture of a large pore zeolite having a SiO/sub 2/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ ratio of about 3.5 to less than about 20 and an inorganic oxide matrix, with a fluoro salt of the formula A/sub (n-m)/(MF/sub n/)/sub z/. Wherein A is an organic or inorganic ionic moiety; (MF/sub n/)/sub z/ is a fluoroanion moiety comprising the element M; M is an element selected from the group of elements for Groups VB, VIB, VII, IIIA, IVA and VA of the Periodic Table of Elements; n is the coordination number of M; m is the valence of M and z is the valence or charge associated with A, at an effective pH value greater than about 3, at effective conditions of temperature and time to produce a catalyst product, whereby the cracking activity of the zeolite is enhanced.

  5. Effect of Measured Welding Residual Stresses on Crack Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hampton, Roy W.; Nelson, Drew; Doty, Laura W. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Welding residual stresses in thin plate A516-70 steel and 2219-T87 aluminum butt weldments were measured by the strain-gage hole drilling and X-ray diffraction methods. The residual stress data were used to construct 3D strain fields which were modeled as thermally induced strains. These 3D strain fields were then analyzed with the WARP31) FEM fracture analysis code in order to predict their effect on fatigue and on fracture. For analyses of fatigue crack advance and subsequent verification testing, fatigue crack growth increments were simulated by successive saw-cuts and incremental loading to generate, as a function of crack length, effects on crack growth of the interaction between residual stresses and load induced stresses. The specimen experimental response was characterized and compared to the WARM linear elastic and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics analysis predictions. To perform the fracture analysis, the plate material's crack tearing resistance was determined by tests of thin plate M(T) specimens. Fracture analyses of these specimen were performed using WARP31D to determine the critical Crack Tip Opening Angle [CTOA] of each material. These critical CTOA values were used to predict crack tearing and fracture in the weldments. To verify the fracture predictions, weldment M(T) specimen were tested in monotonic loading to fracture while characterizing the fracture process.

  6. Effect of Measured Welding Residual Stresses on Crack Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hampton, Roy W.; Nelson, Drew; Doty, Laura W. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Welding residual stresses in thin plate A516-70 steel and 2219-T87 aluminum butt weldments were measured by the strain-gage hole drilling and X-ray diffraction methods. The residual stress data were used to construct 3D strain fields which were modeled as thermally induced strains. These 3D strain fields were then analyzed with the WARP31) FEM fracture analysis code in order to predict their effect on fatigue and on fracture. For analyses of fatigue crack advance and subsequent verification testing, fatigue crack growth increments were simulated by successive saw-cuts and incremental loading to generate, as a function of crack length, effects on crack growth of the interaction between residual stresses and load induced stresses. The specimen experimental response was characterized and compared to the WARM linear elastic and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics analysis predictions. To perform the fracture analysis, the plate material's crack tearing resistance was determined by tests of thin plate M(T) specimens. Fracture analyses of these specimen were performed using WARP31D to determine the critical Crack Tip Opening Angle [CTOA] of each material. These critical CTOA values were used to predict crack tearing and fracture in the weldments. To verify the fracture predictions, weldment M(T) specimen were tested in monotonic loading to fracture while characterizing the fracture process.

  7. Fast electromigration crack in nanoscale aluminum film

    SciTech Connect

    Emelyanov, O. A. Ivanov, I. O.

    2014-08-14

    The current-induced breakage of 20 nm thin aluminum layers deposited onto capacitor grade polypropylene (PP) films is experimentally studied. Biexponential current pulses of different amplitude (10–15 A) and duration (0.1–1 μs) were applied to the samples. Breakage occurred after fast development of electromigrating ∼200 nm-wide cracks with initial propagation velocity of ∼1 m/s under a high current density of ∼10{sup 12 }A/m{sup 2}. The cracks stopped when their lengths reached 250–450 μm. This behavior is explained by the balance of electromigration and stress-induced atomic fluxes.

  8. Fatigue Crack Growth in Peened Friction Stir Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forth, Scott C.; Hatamleh, Omar

    2008-01-01

    Friction stir welding induces residual stresses that accelerates fatigue crack growth in the weld nugget. Shot peening over the weld had little effect on growth rate. Laser peening over the weld retarded the growth rate: Final crack growth rate was comparable to the base, un-welded material. Crack tunneling evident from residual compressive stresses. 2195-T8 fracture surfaces were highly textured. Texturing makes comparisons difficult as the material system is affecting the data as much as the processing. Material usage becoming more common in space applications requiring additional work to develop useful datasets for damage tolerance analyses.

  9. Investigation of Cracks Found in Helicopter Longerons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, John A.; Baughman, James M.; Wallace, Terryl A.

    2009-01-01

    Four cracked longerons, containing a total of eight cracks, were provided for study. Cracked regions were cut from the longerons. Load was applied to open the cracks, enabling crack surface examination. Examination revealed that crack propagation was driven by fatigue loading in all eight cases. Fatigue crack initiation appears to have occurred on the top edge of the longerons near geometric changes that affect component bending stiffness. Additionally, metallurigical analysis has revealed a local depletion in alloying elements in the crack initiation regions that may be a contributing factor. Fatigue crack propagation appeared to be initially driven by opening-mode loading, but at a crack length of approximately 0.5 inches (12.7 mm), there is evidence of mixed-mode crack loading. For the longest cracks studied, shear-mode displacements destroyed crack-surface features of interest over significant portions of the crack surfaces.

  10. Fatigue crack growth in metastable austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, Z.; Chang, G.; Morris, J.W. Jr.

    1988-06-01

    The research reported here is an investigation of the influence of the mechanically induced martensitic transformation on the fatigue crack growth rate in 304-type steels. The alloys 304L and 304LN were used to test the influence of composition, the testing temperatures 298 K and 77 K were used to study the influence of test temperature, and various load ratios (R) were used to determine the influence of the load ratio. It was found that decreasing the mechanical stability of the austenite by changing composition or lowering temperature decreases the fatigue crack growth rate. The R-ratio effect is more subtle. The fatigue crack growth rate increases with increasing R-ratio, even though this change increases the martensite transformation. Transformation-induced crack closure can explain the results in the threshold regime, but cannot explain the R-ratio effect at higher cyclic stress intensities. 26 refs., 6 figs.

  11. Combination of thermal cracking with vacuum distillation of cracked tar

    SciTech Connect

    Telyashev, G.G.; Gimaev, R.N.; Makhov, A.F.; Usmanov, R.M.; Baimbetov, A.M.; Vafin, I.A.

    1987-11-01

    A method of obtaining greater amounts of distillate feedstocks from the heavy gasoil recovered by vacuum distillation of the products of thermal cracking of petroleum resids was examined. At the Novo-Ufa Petroleum Refinery, a two-furnace thermal cracking unit was reconstructed, adding a vacuum section for distillation of the cracked tar. A simplified flow plan of this unit is shown. Vacuum resid from atmospheric-vacuum tubestill units is heated in double-pipe heat exchangers, using heat from the gasoil and cracked tar. The new method makes it possible to curtail production of boiler fuel, expand the resources of feed, and improve the quality of petroleum coke.

  12. On the Crack Bifurcation and Fanning of Crack Growth Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, Royce G.; Zanganeh, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Crack growth data obtained from ASTM load shedding method for different R values show some fanning especially for aluminum alloys. It is believed by the authors and it has been shown before that the observed fanning is due to the crack bifurcation occurs in the near threshold region which is a function of intrinsic properties of the alloy. Therefore, validity of the ASTM load shedding test procedure and results is confirmed. However, this position has been argued by some experimentalists who believe the fanning is an artifact of the test procedure and thus the obtained results are invalid. It has been shown that using a special test procedure such as using compressively pre-cracked specimens will eliminate the fanning effect. Since not using the fanned data fit can result in a significantly lower calculated cyclic life, design of a component, particularly for rotorcraft and propeller systems will considerably be impacted and therefore this study is of paramount importance. In this effort both test procedures i.e. ASTM load shedding and the proposed compressive pre-cracking have been used to study the fatigue crack growth behavior of compact tension specimens made of aluminum alloy 2524-T3. Fatigue crack growth paths have been closely observed using SEM machines to investigate the effects of compression pre-cracking on the crack bifurcation behavior. The results of this study will shed a light on resolving the existing argument by better understanding of near threshold fatigue crack growth behavior.

  13. CHiCP: a web-based tool for the integrative and interactive visualization of promoter capture Hi-C datasets

    PubMed Central

    Schofield, E. C.; Carver, T.; Achuthan, P.; Freire-Pritchett, P.; Spivakov, M.; Todd, J. A.; Burren, O. S.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Promoter capture Hi-C (PCHi-C) allows the genome-wide interrogation of physical interactions between distal DNA regulatory elements and gene promoters in multiple tissue contexts. Visual integration of the resultant chromosome interaction maps with other sources of genomic annotations can provide insight into underlying regulatory mechanisms. We have developed Capture HiC Plotter (CHiCP), a web-based tool that allows interactive exploration of PCHi-C interaction maps and integration with both public and user-defined genomic datasets. Availability and Implementation: CHiCP is freely accessible from www.chicp.org and supports most major HTML5 compliant web browsers. Full source code and installation instructions are available from http://github.com/D-I-L/django-chicp. Contact: ob219@cam.ac.uk PMID:27153610

  14. CHiCP: a web-based tool for the integrative and interactive visualization of promoter capture Hi-C datasets.

    PubMed

    Schofield, E C; Carver, T; Achuthan, P; Freire-Pritchett, P; Spivakov, M; Todd, J A; Burren, O S

    2016-08-15

    Promoter capture Hi-C (PCHi-C) allows the genome-wide interrogation of physical interactions between distal DNA regulatory elements and gene promoters in multiple tissue contexts. Visual integration of the resultant chromosome interaction maps with other sources of genomic annotations can provide insight into underlying regulatory mechanisms. We have developed Capture HiC Plotter (CHiCP), a web-based tool that allows interactive exploration of PCHi-C interaction maps and integration with both public and user-defined genomic datasets. CHiCP is freely accessible from www.chicp.org and supports most major HTML5 compliant web browsers. Full source code and installation instructions are available from http://github.com/D-I-L/django-chicp ob219@cam.ac.uk. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  15. Evaluation of the propensity of replacements for halon 1301 to induce stress-corrosion cracking in alloys used in aircraft fire-suppressant storage and distribution systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoudt, M. R.; Fink, J. L.; Ricker, R. E.

    1996-08-01

    The fire-suppressant agents halon 1301 and halon 1211 have both been determined to possess sufficient ozone layer depletion potential to warrant strict limitations on their production and use. The service conditions aboard jet aircraft subject engine fire-suppressant storage vessels to the agents for long durations at elevated temperatures and pressures. Stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) of the materials of the vessel wall and/or rupture disk assembly (agent release valve) could prevent proper operation. Therefore, the compatibility of potential replacements with the materials used in the fire-suppressant storage and distribution systems is a serious concern. An evaluation of the relative SCC propensity of 12 halon replacement candidates was conducted to enable the selection of three of these compounds for further study. The slow-strain-rate (SSR) tensile test was selected, and a statistical method was developed for ranking the relative susceptibility of each alloy in each agent from the SSR test results. The results revealed that most agents had little tendency to cause SCC, but that some agent/alloy combinations were undesirable. The statistical technique allowed relative comparison, ranking, and combination of these results with other types of tests for the identification of three agents suitable for development and evaluation as aircraft fire suppressants.

  16. Cracking in charged anisotropic cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharif, M.; Sadiq, Sobia

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, we study the stability of static charged anisotropic cylindrically symmetric compact object through cracking. The Einstein-Maxwell field equations and conservation equation are formulated. We then apply local density perturbation and study the behavior of force distribution function. Finally, the cracking is explored for two models satisfying specific form of Chaplygin equation of state. It is found that these models exhibit cracking and the instability increases as the value of charge parameter is increased.

  17. Shuttle Fuel Feedliner Cracking Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesman, Tomas E.; Turner, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of material covered during 'Space Shuttle Fuel Feedliner Cracking Investigation MSFC Fluids Workshop' held November 19-21, 2002. Topics covered include: cracks on fuel feed lines of Orbiter space shuttles, fluid driven cracking analysis, liner structural modes, structural motion in a fluid, fluid borne drivers, three dimensional computational fluid dynamics models, fluid borne drivers from pumps, amplification mechanisms, flow parameter mapping, and flight engine flow map.

  18. Identifying Causal Genes at the Multiple Sclerosis Associated Region 6q23 Using Capture Hi-C.

    PubMed

    Martin, Paul; McGovern, Amanda; Massey, Jonathan; Schoenfelder, Stefan; Duffus, Kate; Yarwood, Annie; Barton, Anne; Worthington, Jane; Fraser, Peter; Eyre, Stephen; Orozco, Gisela

    2016-01-01

    The chromosomal region 6q23 has been found to be associated with multiple sclerosis (MS) predisposition through genome wide association studies (GWAS). There are four independent single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with MS in this region, which spans around 2.5 Mb. Most GWAS variants associated with complex traits, including these four MS associated SNPs, are non-coding and their function is currently unknown. However, GWAS variants have been found to be enriched in enhancers and there is evidence that they may be involved in transcriptional regulation of their distant target genes through long range chromatin looping. The aim of this work is to identify causal disease genes in the 6q23 locus by studying long range chromatin interactions, using the recently developed Capture Hi-C method in human T and B-cell lines. Interactions involving four independent associations unique to MS, tagged by rs11154801, rs17066096, rs7769192 and rs67297943 were analysed using Capture Hi-C Analysis of Genomic Organisation (CHiCAGO). We found that the pattern of chromatin looping interactions in the MS 6q23 associated region is complex. Interactions cluster in two regions, the first involving the rs11154801 region and a second containing the rs17066096, rs7769192 and rs67297943 SNPs. Firstly, SNPs located within the AHI1 gene, tagged by rs11154801, are correlated with expression of AHI1 and interact with its promoter. These SNPs also interact with other potential candidate genes such as SGK1 and BCLAF1. Secondly, the rs17066096, rs7769192 and rs67297943 SNPs interact with each other and with immune-related genes such as IL20RA, IL22RA2, IFNGR1 and TNFAIP3. Finally, the above-mentioned regions interact with each other and therefore, may co-regulate these target genes. These results suggest that the four 6q23 variants, independently associated with MS, are involved in the regulation of several genes, including immune genes. These findings could help understand mechanisms

  19. Identifying Causal Genes at the Multiple Sclerosis Associated Region 6q23 Using Capture Hi-C

    PubMed Central

    Schoenfelder, Stefan; Barton, Anne; Worthington, Jane; Eyre, Stephen; Orozco, Gisela

    2016-01-01

    Background The chromosomal region 6q23 has been found to be associated with multiple sclerosis (MS) predisposition through genome wide association studies (GWAS). There are four independent single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with MS in this region, which spans around 2.5 Mb. Most GWAS variants associated with complex traits, including these four MS associated SNPs, are non-coding and their function is currently unknown. However, GWAS variants have been found to be enriched in enhancers and there is evidence that they may be involved in transcriptional regulation of their distant target genes through long range chromatin looping. Aim The aim of this work is to identify causal disease genes in the 6q23 locus by studying long range chromatin interactions, using the recently developed Capture Hi-C method in human T and B-cell lines. Interactions involving four independent associations unique to MS, tagged by rs11154801, rs17066096, rs7769192 and rs67297943 were analysed using Capture Hi-C Analysis of Genomic Organisation (CHiCAGO). Results We found that the pattern of chromatin looping interactions in the MS 6q23 associated region is complex. Interactions cluster in two regions, the first involving the rs11154801 region and a second containing the rs17066096, rs7769192 and rs67297943 SNPs. Firstly, SNPs located within the AHI1 gene, tagged by rs11154801, are correlated with expression of AHI1 and interact with its promoter. These SNPs also interact with other potential candidate genes such as SGK1 and BCLAF1. Secondly, the rs17066096, rs7769192 and rs67297943 SNPs interact with each other and with immune-related genes such as IL20RA, IL22RA2, IFNGR1 and TNFAIP3. Finally, the above-mentioned regions interact with each other and therefore, may co-regulate these target genes. Conclusion These results suggest that the four 6q23 variants, independently associated with MS, are involved in the regulation of several genes, including immune genes. These findings

  20. Three-Dimensional Gear Crack Propagation Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.; Sane, Ashok D.; Drago, Raymond J.; Wawrzynek, Paul A.

    1998-01-01

    Three-dimensional crack growth simulation was performed on a split-tooth gear design using boundary element modeling and linear elastic fracture mechanics. Initial cracks in the fillet of the teeth produced stress intensity factors of greater magnitude (and thus, greater crack growth rates) than those in the root or groove areas of the teeth. Crack growth simulation was performed on a case study to evaluate crack propagation paths. Tooth fracture was predicted from the crack growth simulation for an initial crack in the tooth fillet region. Tooth loads on the uncracked mesh of the split-tooth design were up to five times greater than those on the cracked mesh if equal deflections of the cracked and uncracked teeth were considered. Predicted crack shapes as well as crack propagation life are presented based on calculated stress intensity factors, mixed-mode crack propagation trajectory theories, and fatigue crack growth theories.

  1. Retrofitting olefin cracking plants

    SciTech Connect

    Sumner, C.; Fernandez-Baujin, J.M.

    1983-12-01

    This article discusses the retrofitting of liquid crackers which produce olefins so that gaseous feedstocks can be used. Naphtha and gas oil are the predominant design feedstocks for producing olefins. The price of gaseous feedstocks such as ethane, propane and butane have become economically more attractive than liquid feedstocks. Existing liquid crackers will be able to produce ethylene at 85% or higher capacity when cracking propane and butane feedstock with only minor changes. Topics considered include revamping for vacuum gas oil (VGO) feedstocks and revamping for liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) feedstocks.

  2. Mode II fatigue crack propagation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, R.; Kibler, J. J.

    1971-01-01

    Fatigue crack propagation rates were obtained for 2024-T3 bare aluminum plates subjected to in-plane, mode I, extensional loads and transverse, mode II, bending loads. These results were compared to the results of Iida and Kobayashi for in-plane mode I-mode II extensional loads. The engineering significance of mode I-mode II fatigue crack growth is considered in view of the present results. A fatigue crack growth equation for handling mode I-mode II fatigue crack growth rates from existing mode I data is also discussed.

  3. Shear fatigue crack growth - A literature survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, H. W.

    1985-01-01

    Recent studies of shear crack growth are reviewed, emphasizing test methods and data analyses. The combined mode I and mode II elastic crack tip stress fields are considered. The development and design of the compact shear specimen are described, and the results of fatigue crack growth tests using compact shear specimens are reviewed. The fatigue crack growth tests are discussed and the results of inclined cracks in tensile panels, center cracks in plates under biaxial loading, cracked beam specimens with combined bending and shear loading, center-cracked panels and double edge-cracked plates under cyclic shear loading are examined and analyzed in detail.

  4. Thermal cracking and amplitude dependent attenuation

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, D.H.; Toksoez, M.N.

    1980-02-10

    The role of crack and grain boundary contacts in determining seismic wave attenuation in rock is investigated by examining Q as a function of thermal cycling (cracking) and wave strain amplitude. Q values are obtained using a longitudinal resonant bar technique in the 10- to 20-kHz range for maximum strain amplitudes varying from roughly 10/sup -8/ to 10/sup -5/. The samples studied include the Berea and Navajo sandstones, Plexiglas, Westerly granite, Solenhofen limestone, and Frederick diabase, the latter two relatively crack free in their virgin state. Measurements were made at room temperature and pressure in air. Q values for both sandstones are constant at low strains (<10/sup -6/) but decrease rapidly with amplitude at higher strains. There is no hysteresis of Q with amplitude. Q values for Plexiglas show no indication of amplitude dependent behavior. The granite, limestone, and diabase are thermally cycled at both fast and slow heating rates in order to induce cracking. Samples slowly cycled at 400/sup 0/C show a marked increase in Q that cannot be entirely explained by outgassing of volatiles. Cycling may also widen thin cracks and grain boundaries, reducing contact areas. Samples heated beyond 400/sup 0/C, or rapidly heated, result in generally decreasing Q values. The amplitude dependence of Q is found to be coupled to the effects of thermal cycling. For rock slowly cycled 400)C or less, the transition from low-amplitude contant Q to high-amplitude variable Q behavior decreases to lower amplitudes as a function of maximum temperature. Above 400/sup 0/C, and possibly in th rapidly heated samples also, the transition moves to higher amplitudes.

  5. [Abberant methylation of p16, HIC1, N33 and GSTP1 genes in tumor epitelium and tumor-associated stromal cells of prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Kekeeva, T V; Popova, O P; Shegaĭ, P V; Alekseev, B Ia; Adnreeva, Iu Iu; Zaletaev, D V; Nemtsova, M V

    2007-01-01

    The methylation status of four genes significant in prostate carcinogenesis p16, HIC1, N33 and GSTP1, were evaluated using quantitative methylationsensitive polymerase chain reaction. Tumor epithelia, tumor-associated stroma, normal epithelia, foci of PIN and benign prostate hyperplasia, and stroma adjacent to tumor tissues were isolated from whole-mount prostatectomy specimens of patients with localized prostate cancer by using laser capture microdissection. We found high levels of gene methylation in the tumor epithelium and tumor-associated stromal cells and some methylation in both hyperplastic epithelium and stromal cells in normal-appearing tissues located adjacent to tumors. Promoter methylation in the non-neoplastic cells of the prostate tumor microenvironment may play an important role in cancer development and progression. We examined the promoter methylation status of pl6, HIC1, N33 and GSTP1 in prostate biopsy fragments and prostate tissues after radical prostatectomy from patients with adenocarcinoma without laser capture microdissection. Methylation frequencies of all genes in tumor samples were considerably lower than frequencies in microdissected tumour samples (HIC1, 71 versus 89%; p16, 22 versus 78%; GSTP1, 32 versus 100%; N33, 20 versus 33%). The laser capture microdissection is required procedure in methylation studies taking into account multifocality and heterogenity of prostate cancer tissue.

  6. HIC1 and miR-23~27~24 clusters form a double-negative feedback loop in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanbo; Liang, Hongwei; Zhou, Geyu; Hu, Xiuting; Liu, Zhengya; Jin, Fangfang; Yu, Mengchao; Sang, Jianfeng; Zhou, Yong; Fu, Zheng; Zhang, Chen-Yu; Zhang, Weijie; Zen, Ke; Chen, Xi

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as a major regulator of the initiation and progression of human cancers, including breast cancer. However, the cooperative effects and transcriptional regulation of multiple miRNAs, especially miRNAs that are present in clusters, remain largely undiscovered. Here we showed that all members of the miR-23~27~24 clusters are upregulated and function as oncogenes in breast cancer and simultaneously target HIC1. Furthermore, we found that HIC1 functions as a transcriptional repressor to negatively control the expression of miR-23~27~24 clusters and forms a double-negative (overall positive) feedback loop. This feedback regulatory pathway is important because overexpression of miR-23~27~24 clusters can remarkably accelerate tumor growth, whereas restoration of HIC1 significantly blocks tumor growth in vivo. A mathematical model was created to quantitatively illustrate the regulatory circuit. Our finding highlights the cooperative effects of miRNAs in a cluster and adds another layer of complexity to the miRNA regulatory network. This study may also provide insight into the molecular mechanisms of breast cancer progression. PMID:28009350

  7. A three-dimensional analytical model for interpreting contact acoustic nonlinearity generated by a "breathing" crack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kai; Su, Zhongqing; Yuan, Shenfang

    2017-04-01

    Extending a two-dimensional analytical framework previously developed for understanding contact acoustic nonlinearity (CAN) in a beam-like structure bearing a contact crack[1], this study reports an analytical model for interpreting CAN induced due to the modulation from a "breathing" crack in a plate-like structure on propagating guided ultrasonic waves (GUWs) in a three-dimensional (3-D) scenario. The "breathing" crack is considered, in a 3-D manner, as a second source to excite additional wave fields. Thorough investigation of the interaction between the probing GUWs and the "breathing" crack leads to explicit, analytical and full-field description of additional wave fields. In this study, influences of reflected and diffracted waves by the crack on the motion of crack surfaces are scrutinized, yielding a depiction of the "breathing" behavior of the crack, beneficial for quantifying the crack-induced source at double frequency, with which the crack-induced nonlinearity (i.e. second harmonic) can be evaluated quantitatively, in conjunction with the use of an elasto-dynamic method. A nonlinearity index is consequently defined to represent the severity of the "breathing" crack. Results obtained from the 3-D model are compared with those from a finite element simulation, to affirm good agreement. This model does not request a benchmarking process against baseline signals for evaluation of damage.

  8. Application of hydrogen embrittlement models to the crack growth behavior of fusion reactor materials

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.H.

    1986-03-01

    Hydrogen induced crack growth rates of HT-9 have been estimated for three sources of hydrogen: the plasma, nuclear reaction and aqueous corrosion. Estimates of crack growth rates were derived using hydrogen embrittlement models which describe the temperature and hydrogen activity dependence of cracking. A crack growth rate of 10/sup -3/ cm/s at a reactor operating temperature of 400/sup 0/C was obtained for a steady-state hydrogen concentration of 0.5 appM resulting from (n,p) reactions, while a much slower crack growth rate was predicted for the same steady-state hydrogen concentration with an alternate model. These calculations have shown the need for further research to assess the effect of temperature on crack growth. Other sources of hydrogen give very slow hydrogen induced crack growth rates at reactor operating temperatures, while significant hydrogen induced crack growth rates are possible at lower temperatures. For instance, hydrogen from a cathodic corrosion reaction could produce a crack growth rate of 10/sup -7/ cm/s at 25/sup 0/C which could be significant during extended downtime. Also, a non-equilibrium hydrogen uptake from the plasma could occur from surface reaction controlled effects, and a crack growth rate of 10/sup -1/ cm/s was estimated for this condition at a temperature of 75/sup 0/C.

  9. Smart sensing skin for detection and localization of fatigue cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharroub, Sari; Laflamme, Simon; Song, Chunhui; Qiao, Daji; Phares, Brent; Li, Jian

    2015-06-01

    Fatigue cracks on steel components may have strong consequences on the structure’s serviceability and strength. Their detection and localization is a difficult task. Existing technologies enabling structural health monitoring have a complex link signal-to-damage or have economic barriers impeding large-scale deployment. A solution is to develop sensing methods that are inexpensive, scalable, with signals that can directly relate to damage. The authors have recently proposed a smart sensing skin for structural health monitoring applications to mesosystems. The sensor is a thin film soft elastomeric capacitor (SEC) that transduces strain into a measurable change in capacitance. Arranged in a network configuration, the SEC would have the capacity to detect and localize damage by detecting local deformation over a global surface, analogous to biological skin. In this paper, the performance of the SEC at detecting and localizing fatigue cracks in steel structures is investigated. Fatigue cracks are induced in steel specimens equipped with SECs, and data measured continuously. Test results show that the fatigue crack can be detected at an early stage. The smallest detectable crack length and width are 27.2 and 0.254 mm, respectively, and the average detectable crack length and width are 29.8 and 0.432 mm, respectively. Results also show that, when used in a network configuration, only the sensor located over the formed fatigue crack detect the damage, thus validating the capacity of the SEC at damage localization.

  10. Effect of fracture surface roughness on shear crack growth

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, T.S.; Watt, D.W. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Mendelsohn, D.A. . Dept. of Engineering Mechanics)

    1992-12-01

    A model of fracture surface interference for Mode I fatigue crack profiles was developed and evaluated. Force required to open the crack faces is estimated from point contact expressions for Mode I stress intensity factor. Force transfer across contacting asperities is estimated and used to calculate Mode II resistance stress intensity factor (applied factor is sum of effective and resistance factors). Electro-optic holographic interferometry was used to measure 3-D displacement field around a Mode I fatigue pre-crack in Al loaded in Mode II shear. Induced Mode I crack face displacements were greater than Mode II displacements. Plane stress shear lip caused displacement normal to surface as the crack faces are displaced. Algorithms are being developed to track the displacements associated with the original coordinate system in the camera. A 2-D boundary element method code for mixed mode I and II loading of a rough crack (sawtooth asperity model) has been completed. Addition of small-scale crack tip yielding and a wear model are completed and underway, respectively.

  11. Crack instability of ferroelectric solids under alternative electric loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hao-Sen; Wang, He-Ling; Pei, Yong-Mao; Wei, Yu-Jie; Liu, Bin; Fang, Dai-Ning

    2015-08-01

    The low fracture toughness of the widely used piezoelectric and ferroelectric materials in technological applications raises a big concern about their durability and safety. Up to now, the mechanisms of electric-field induced fatigue crack growth in those materials are not fully understood. Here we report experimental observations that alternative electric loading at high frequency or large amplitude gives rise to dramatic temperature rise at the crack tip of a ferroelectric solid. The temperature rise subsequently lowers the energy barrier of materials for domain switch in the vicinity of the crack tip, increases the stress intensity factor and leads to unstable crack propagation finally. In contrast, at low frequency or small amplitude, crack tip temperature increases mildly and saturates quickly, no crack growth is observed. Together with our theoretical analysis on the non-linear heat transfer at the crack tip, we constructed a safe operating area curve with respect to the frequency and amplitude of the electric field, and validated the safety map by experiments. The revealed mechanisms about how electro-thermal-mechanical coupling influences fracture can be directly used to guide the design and safety assessment of piezoelectric and ferroelectric devices.

  12. Hot Cracking Susceptibility of Binary Mg-Al Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Guoping; Kou, Sindo; Chang, Y. Austin

    The susceptibility of binary Mg-Al alloys in permanent mold casting was tested, including Mg-0.25Al, Mg-0.6Al, Mg-1Al, Mg-2Al, Mg-4Al and Mg-8Al (all in wt %). A steel mold was used for constrained rod casting (CRC), in which rods of various lengths were cast with sudden enlargement at both ends of each rod to prevent it from free contraction during solidification and thus induce hot cracking. The cooling rate near the location of cracking was measured. The hot cracking susceptibility was evaluated based on the widths and locations of the cracks observed. The curve of crack susceptibility vs. Al content was determined and compared with previous curves based on ring casting in steel molds and constrained rod casting in sand molds. The Scheil model of solidification was used to calculate the curves of temperature vs. fraction solid (T-fS) of the alloys. The crack susceptibility curve based on a simplified hot cracking criterion and the T-fS and cooling curves was compared with that based on CRC.

  13. Effect of Crack Opening on Penetrant Crack Detectability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, Devin

    2009-01-01

    Results: From the testing we were able to determine all the cracks within the test range were detectable or better with developer. Many of the indications after development lost their linearity and gave circular indications. Our tests were performed in a laboratory and our procedure would be difficult in an industrial setting. Conclusions: The "V" did not significantly affect our ability to detect the POD cracks with fluorescent penetrant. Conduct same experiment with more cracks. The 0.025 and 0.050 POD specimens are clean and documented with the SEM. Conduct water-wash fluorescent penetrant test at EAFB. The poppet cracks are tighter than the POD specimen cracks. Flight FCV poppets: 0.01 mils (0.3 microns) Langley fatigue cracked poppets: 0.02 mils (0.5 microns) POD specimen (post 5 mils): 0.05 mils (1.4 microns) We could not detect cracks in Langley fatigue-cracked poppets with fluorescent penetrant. Investigate inability of penetrant to wet the poppet surface.

  14. Crack paths, microstructure, and fatigue crack growth in annealed and cold-rolled AISI 304 stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Ming; Chen, Shuchun; Wei, Robert P.

    1992-01-01

    To assist in the understanding of micromechanisms for corrosion fatigue crack growth in metastable austenitic steels, the relationships between the crack paths and the underlying microstructure were investigated for annealed and cold-rolled (CR) 304 stainless steels that had been tested in a deaerated 3.5 pct NaCl solution, air, and vacuum. Corrosion fatigue in the deleterious environments (3.5 pct NaCl and air) was brittle and occurred primarily by {001}γ and other unidentified, quasi-cleavage (QC), accompanied by preferential cracking along {111}γ twin and grain boundaries. In contrast, fatigue cracking in vacuum was ductile, fully transgranular, and noncrystallographic. Transformation to alpha prime (α'-) martensite by fatigue was found to be essentially complete in the CR steel, which contained ɛ-martensite, and in the annealed steel tested in vacuum, but was substantially less in the annealed steel tested in air and 3.5 pct NaCl solution. These results, taken in conjunction with the crack growth and electrochemical reaction data, support hydrogen embrittlement (HE) as the mechanism for corrosion fatigue crack growth in 304 stainless steels in 3.5 pct NaCl solution. Martensitic transformation appears not to be the only responsible factor for embrittlement. Other microstructural components, such as twin and grain boundaries, slip bands, and cold work-induced lattice defects, may play more important roles in enhancing crack growth rates.

  15. Mapping long-range promoter contacts in human cells with high-resolution capture Hi-C.

    PubMed

    Mifsud, Borbala; Tavares-Cadete, Filipe; Young, Alice N; Sugar, Robert; Schoenfelder, Stefan; Ferreira, Lauren; Wingett, Steven W; Andrews, Simon; Grey, William; Ewels, Philip A; Herman, Bram; Happe, Scott; Higgs, Andy; LeProust, Emily; Follows, George A; Fraser, Peter; Luscombe, Nicholas M; Osborne, Cameron S

    2015-06-01

    Transcriptional control in large genomes often requires looping interactions between distal DNA elements, such as enhancers and target promoters. Current chromosome conformation capture techniques do not offer sufficiently high resolution to interrogate these regulatory interactions on a genomic scale. Here we use Capture Hi-C (CHi-C), an adapted genome conformation assay, to examine the long-range interactions of almost 22,000 promoters in 2 human blood cell types. We identify over 1.6 million shared and cell type-restricted interactions spanning hundreds of kilobases between promoters and distal loci. Transcriptionally active genes contact enhancer-like elements, whereas transcriptionally inactive genes interact with previously uncharacterized elements marked by repressive features that may act as long-range silencers. Finally, we show that interacting loci are enriched for disease-associated SNPs, suggesting how distal mutations may disrupt the regulation of relevant genes. This study provides new insights and accessible tools to dissect the regulatory interactions that underlie normal and aberrant gene regulation.

  16. Automatic Event Detection and Characterization of solar events with IRIS, SDO/AIA and Hi-C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Caroline; Fayock, Brian; Winebarger, Amy

    2016-05-01

    Dynamic, low-lying loops with peak temperatures <1 MK are observed throughout the solar transition region. These loops can be observed in SDO/AIA data due to some lower temperature spectral lines in the passbands, but have not been studied in great detail. We have developed a technique to automatically identify events (i.e., brightenings) on a pixel-by-pixel basis applying a set of selection criteria. The pixels are then grouped according to their proximity in space and relative progression of the event. This method allows us to characterize their overall lifetime and the rate at which these events occur. Our current progress includes identification of these groups of events in IRIS data, determination of their existence in AIA data, and characterization based on a comparison between the two. This technique has also been used on Hi-C data in preparation for the rocket re-flight in July 2016. Results on the success of this technique at identifying real structures and sources of heating will be shown.

  17. Capture Hi-C reveals novel candidate genes and complex long-range interactions with related autoimmune risk loci

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Paul; McGovern, Amanda; Orozco, Gisela; Duffus, Kate; Yarwood, Annie; Schoenfelder, Stefan; Cooper, Nicholas J.; Barton, Anne; Wallace, Chris; Fraser, Peter; Worthington, Jane; Eyre, Steve

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have been tremendously successful in identifying genetic variants associated with complex diseases. The majority of association signals are intergenic and evidence is accumulating that a high proportion of signals lie in enhancer regions. We use Capture Hi-C to investigate, for the first time, the interactions between associated variants for four autoimmune diseases and their functional targets in B- and T-cell lines. Here we report numerous looping interactions and provide evidence that only a minority of interactions are common to both B- and T-cell lines, suggesting interactions may be highly cell-type specific; some disease-associated SNPs do not interact with the nearest gene but with more compelling candidate genes (for example, FOXO1, AZI2) often situated several megabases away; and finally, regions associated with different autoimmune diseases interact with each other and the same promoter suggesting common autoimmune gene targets (for example, PTPRC, DEXI and ZFP36L1). PMID:26616563

  18. Identification of a novel interspecific hybrid yeast from a metagenomic spontaneously inoculated beer sample using Hi-C.

    PubMed

    Heil, Caiti Smukowski; Burton, Joshua N; Liachko, Ivan; Friedrich, Anne; Hanson, Noah A; Morris, Cody L; Schacherer, Joseph; Shendure, Jay; Thomas, James H; Dunham, Maitreya J

    2017-09-11

    Interspecific hybridization is a common mechanism enabling genetic diversification and adaptation; however, the detection of hybrid species has been quite difficult. The identification of microbial hybrids is made even more complicated, as most environmental microbes are resistant to culturing and must be studied in their native mixed communities. We have previously adapted the chromosome conformation capture method Hi-C to the assembly of genomes from mixed populations. Here, we show the method's application in assembling genomes directly from an uncultured, mixed population from a spontaneously inoculated beer sample. Our assembly method has enabled us to de-convolute 4 bacterial and 4 yeast genomes from this sample, including a putative yeast hybrid. Downstream isolation and analysis of this hybrid confirmed its genome to consist of Pichia membranifaciens and that of another related, but undescribed yeast. Our work shows that Hi-C-based metagenomic methods can overcome the limitation of traditional sequencing methods in studying complex mixtures of genomes. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. Heat-affected zone liquation crack on resistance spot welded TWIP steels

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, Dulal Chandra; Chang, InSung; Park, Yeong-Do

    2014-07-01

    In this study, the heat affected zone (HAZ) liquation crack and segregation behavior of the resistance spot welded twinning induced plasticity (TWIP) steel have been reported. Cracks appeared in the post-welded joints that originated at the partially melted zone (PMZ) and propagated from the PMZ through the heat affected zone (HAZ) to the base metal (BM). The crack length and crack opening widths were observed increasing with heat input; and the welding current was identified to be the most influencing parameter for crack formation. Cracks appeared at the PMZ when nugget diameter reached at 4.50 mm or above; and the liquation cracks were found to occur along two sides of the notch tip in the sheet direction rather than in the electrode direction. Cracks were backfilled with the liquid films which has lamellar structure and supposed to be the eutectic constituent. Co-segregation of alloy elements such as, C and Mn were detected on the liquid films by electron-probe microanalysis (EPMA) line scanning and element map which suggests that the liquid film was enrich of Mn and C. The eutectic constituent was identified by analyzing the calculated phase diagram along with thermal temperature history of finite element simulation. Preliminary experimental results showed that cracks have less/no significant effect on the static cross-tensile strength (CTS) and the tensile-shear strength (TSS). In addition, possible ways to avoid cracking were discussed. - Highlights: • The HAZ liquation crack during resistance spot welding of TWIP steel was examined. • Cracks were completely backfilled and healed with divorced eutectic secondary phase. • Co-segregation of C and Mn was detected in the cracked zone. • Heat input was the most influencing factor to initiate liquation crack. • Cracks have less/no significant effect on static tensile properties.

  20. Sub-10-micrometer toughening and crack tip toughness of dental enamel.

    PubMed

    Ang, Siang Fung; Schulz, Anja; Pacher Fernandes, Rodrigo; Schneider, Gerold A

    2011-04-01

    In previous studies, enamel showed indications to occlude small cracks in-vivo and exhibited R-curve behaviors for bigger cracks ex-vivo. This study quantifies the crack tip's toughness (K(I0),K(III0)), the crack's closure stress and the cohesive zone size at the crack tip of enamel and investigates the toughening mechanisms near the crack tip down to the length scale of a single enamel crystallite. The crack-opening-displacement (COD) profile of cracks induced by Vickers indents on mature bovine enamel was studied using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The mode I crack tip toughness K(I0) of cracks along enamel rod boundaries and across enamel rods exhibit a similar range of values: K(I0,Ir)=0.5-1.6MPa m(0.5) (based on Irwin's 'near-field' solution) and K(I0,cz)=0.8-1.5MPa m(0.5) (based on the cohesive zone solution of the Dugdale-Muskhelishvili (DM) crack model). The mode III crack tip toughness K(III0,Ir) was computed as 0.02-0.15MPa m(0.5). The crack-closure stress at the crack tip was computed as 163-770 MPa with a cohesive zone length and width 1.6-10.1μm and 24-44 nm utilizing the cohesive zone solution. Toughening elements were observed under AFM and SEM: crack bridging due to protein ligament and hydroxyapatite fibres (micro- and nanometer scale) as well as microcracks were identified. Crown Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Replica-Based Crack Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, John A.; Willard, Scott A.; Smith, Stephen W.; Piascik, Robert S.

    2008-01-01

    Surface replication has been proposed as a method for crack detection in space shuttle main engine flowliner slots. The results of a feasibility study show that examination of surface replicas with a scanning electron microscope can result in the detection of cracks as small as 0.005 inch, and surface flaws as small as 0.001 inch, for the flowliner material.

  2. Experiences on IGSCC crack manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Veron, P.

    1997-02-01

    The author presents his experience in manufacturing IGSCC realistic defects, mainly in INCONEL 600 MA Steam Generator Tubes. From that experience he extracts some knowledge about this cracking (influence of chemistry in the environment, stress state, crack growth rate, and occurrence in laboratory condition of break before leak).

  3. Hydrocarbon cracking and reforming process

    SciTech Connect

    Le, Q.N.; Schipper, P.H.; Owen, H.

    1992-03-31

    This patent describes a process for upgrading paraffinic naphtha to high octane fuel. It comprises: contacting a fresh naphtha feedstock stream containing a major amount of C{sub 7+} alkanes and naphthenes with medium pore acid cracking catalyst under low pressure selective cracking conditions effective to produce 4-C5 isoalkene and C4-C5 isoalkane, the cracking catalyst being substantially free of hydrogenation-dehydrogenation metal components and having an acid cracking activity less than 15; separating cracking effluent to obtain an olefinic fraction rich in C4-C5 isoalkene and a C6+ fraction; etherifying the C4-C5 isoalkene fraction by catalytic reaction with lower alkanol to produce tertiary-alkyl ether product; and reforming the C6+ fraction to provide high octane gasoline components.

  4. Cracking in Drying Colloidal Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Karnail B.; Tirumkudulu, Mahesh S.

    2007-05-01

    It has long been known that thick films of colloidal dispersions such as wet clays, paints, and coatings crack under drying. Although capillary stresses generated during drying have been recently identified as the cause for cracking, the existence of a maximum crack-free film thickness that depends on particle size, rigidity, and packing has not been understood. Here, we identify two distinct regimes for crack-free films based on the magnitude of compressive strain at the maximum attainable capillary pressure and show remarkable agreement of measurements with our theory. We anticipate our results to not only form the basis for design of coating formulations for the paints, coatings, and ceramics industry but also assist in the production of crack-free photonic band gap crystals.

  5. Concrete Cracking Prediction Including the Filling Proportion of Strand Corrosion Products

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Dai, Lizhao; Zhang, Xuhui; Zhang, Jianren

    2016-01-01

    The filling of strand corrosion products during concrete crack propagation is investigated experimentally in the present paper. The effects of stirrups on the filling of corrosion products and concrete cracking are clarified. A prediction model of crack width is developed incorporating the filling proportion of corrosion products and the twisting shape of the strand. Experimental data on cracking angle, crack width, and corrosion loss obtained from accelerated corrosion tests of concrete beams are presented. The proposed model is verified by experimental data. Results show that the filling extent of corrosion products varies with crack propagation. The rust filling extent increases with the propagating crack until a critical width. Beyond the critical width, the rust-filling extent remains stable. Using stirrups can decrease the critical crack width. Stirrups can restrict crack propagation and reduce the rust filling. The tangent of the cracking angle increases with increasing corrosion loss. The prediction of corrosion-induced crack is sensitive to the rust-filling extent. PMID:28772367

  6. Role of prism decussation on fatigue crack growth and fracture of human enamel.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Devendra; Arola, Dwayne

    2009-10-01

    The role of prism decussation on the crack growth resistance of human enamel is evaluated. Miniature inset compact tension (CT) specimens embodying a section of cuspal enamel were subjected to Mode I cyclic or monotonic loads. Cracks were grown in either the forward (from outer enamel inwards) or reverse (from inner enamel outwards) direction and the responses were compared quantitatively. Results showed that the outer enamel exhibits lower resistance to the inception and growth of cracks. Regardless of the growth direction, the near-threshold region of cyclic extension was typical of "short crack" behavior (i.e. deceleration of growth with an increase in crack length). Cyclic crack growth was more stable in the forward direction and occurred over twice the spatial distance achieved in the reverse direction. In response to the monotonic loads, a rising R-curve response was exhibited by growth in the forward direction only. The total energy absorbed in fracture for the forward direction was more than three times that in the reverse. The rise in crack growth resistance was largely attributed to a combination of mechanisms that included crack bridging, crack bifurcation and crack curving, which were induced by decussation in the inner enamel. An analysis of the responses distinguished that the microstructure of enamel appears optimized for resisting crack growth initiating from damage at the tooth's surface.

  7. High speed thin plate fatigue crack monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Buzz A. (Inventor); Heyman, Joseph S. (Inventor); Namkung, Min (Inventor); Fulton, James P. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A device and method are provided which non-destructively detect crack length and crack geometry in thin metallic plates. A non-contacting vibration apparatus produces resonant vibrations without introducing extraneous noise. Resulting resonant vibration shifts in cracked plates are correlated to known crack length in plates with similar resonant vibration shifts. In addition, acoustic emissions of cracks at resonance frequencies are correlated to acoustic emissions from known crack geometries.

  8. Three-dimensional crack closure behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawicke, D. S.; Grandt, A. F., Jr.; Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    A crack closure measurement technique involving fatigue striations was used to produce a three-dimensional crack opening load profile for 2024-T351 aluminum alloy. The crack opening load profile, determined through the specimen thickness, was compared with crack opening load measurements made with strain gages and displacement gages. The results of this study indicate that a significant three-dimensional variation in crack closure behavior occurs in the alloy examined. An understanding of this phehomenon is important in understanding crack growth behavior, predicting crack shape changes, and interpreting 'standard' crack closure measurement techniques.

  9. In vivo oxide-induced stress corrosion cracking of Ti-6Al-4V in a neck-stem modular taper: Emergent behavior in a new mechanism of in vivo corrosion.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Jeremy L; Mali, Sachin; Urban, Robert M; Silverton, Craig D; Jacobs, Joshua J

    2012-02-01

    In vivo modular taper corrosion in orthopedic total joint replacements has been documented to occur for head-neck tapers, modular-body tapers, and neck-stem tapers. While the fretting corrosion mechanism by which this corrosion occurs has been described in the literature, this report shows new and as yet unreported mechanisms at play. A retrieved Ti-6Al-4V/Ti-6Al-4V neck-stem taper interface, implanted for 6 years is subjected to failure analysis to document taper corrosion processes that lead to oxide driven crack formation on the medial side of the taper. Metallurgical sectioning techniques and scanning electron microscopy analysis are used to document the taper corrosion processes. The results show large penetrating pitting attack of both sides of the taper interface where corrosion selectively attacks the beta phase of the microstructure and eventually consumes the alpha phase. The pitting attack evolves into plunging pits that ultimately develop into cracks where the crack propagation process is one of corrosion resulting in oxide formation and subsequent reorganization. This process drives open the crack and advances the front by a combination of oxide-driven crack opening stresses and corrosion attack at the tip. The oxide that forms has a complex evolving structure including a network of transport channels that provide access of fluid to the crack tip. This emergent behavior does not appear to require continued fretting corrosion to propagate the pitting and cracking. This new mechanism is similar to stress corrosion cracking where the crack tip stresses arise from the oxide formation in the crack and not externally applied tensile stresses. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Prediction of fatigue crack-growth patterns and lives in three-dimensional cracked bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.; Raju, I. S.

    1986-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth patterns and lives for surface cracks, surface cracks at holes, and corner cracks at holes in three dimensional bodies were predicted using linear-elastic fracture mechanics concepts that were modified to account for crack-closure behavior. The predictions were made by using stress intensity factor equations for these crack configurations and the fatigue crack-growth (delta K against rate) relationship for the material of interest. The crack configurations were subjected to constant-amplitude fatigue loading under either remote tension or bending loads. The predicted crack growth patterns and crack growth lives for aluminum alloys agreed well with test data from the literature.

  11. Prediction of fatigue crack-growth patterns and lives in three-dimensional cracked bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.; Raju, I. S.

    1984-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth patterns and lives for surface cracks, surface cracks at holes, and corner cracks at holes in three dimensional bodies were predicted using linear-elastic fracture mechanics concepts that were modified to account for crack-closure behavior. The predictions were made by using stress intensity factor equations for these crack configurations and the fatigue crack-growth (delta K against rate) relationship for the material of interest. The crack configurations were subjected to constant-amplitude fatigue loading under either remote tension or bending loads. The predicted crack growth patterns and crack growth lives for aluminum alloys agreed well with test data from the literature.

  12. Hypoglycemic and Hypolipidemic Effects of the Cracked-Cap Medicinal Mushroom Phellinus rimosus (Higher Basidiomycetes) in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats.

    PubMed

    Rony, Kuttikkadan A; Ajith, Thekkuttuparambil A; Janardhanan, Kainoor K

    2015-01-01

    Phellinus rimosus is a parasitic host specific polypore mushroom with profound antioxidant, antihepatotoxic, anti-inflammatory, antitumor, and antimutagenic activities. This study investigated the hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic activities of the wood-inhabiting polypore mushroom Ph. Rimosus in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Diabetes was induced by single intraperitoneal injection of STZ (45 mg/kg) to Wistar rats. The effects of 30 days treatment with Ph. Rimosus (50 and 250 mg/ kg) and glibenclamide (0.65 mg/kg) on blood glucose level, serum insulin, serum lipid profile, liver glycogen, liver function enzymes, and non-enzymic and enzymic antioxidants activities in pancreas, liver, and kidney were evaluated in STZ-induced diabetic rats. Oral administration of Ph. Rimosus extract exhibited a significant reduction in blood glucose, triacylglycerol, total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, and liver function enzymes, and increased serum insulin, liver glycogen, and HDL-cholesterol levels in STZ-induced diabetic rats. Furthermore, Ph. Rimosus treatment increased antioxidant status in pancreas, liver, and kidney tissues with concomitant decreases in levels of thiobarbituric acid- reactive substances. Results of this study indicated that Ph. Rimosus possessed significant hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic activities and this effect may be related to its insulinogenic and antioxidant effect.

  13. Stress cracking potential of HDPE geogrids. Final report, April 1993--July 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Elias, V.; Carlson, D.; Bachus, R.; Giroud, J.P.

    1998-08-01

    The report presents the development of a testing protocol to measure the potential for stress cracking of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) geogrids used for soil reinforcement. The developed data demonstrate that local stress cracking in the unoriented transverse node of HDPE geogrids can occur as a result of construction-induced damage. Undamaged geogrids are not prone to stress cracking at load levels below their 100-year limiting creep load.

  14. Evaluation of Catalytic and Thermal Cracking in a JP-8 Fueled Pulsed Detonation Engine (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    Additionally, a zeolite catalytic coating is applied to the heat-exchanger surfaces to stimulate further cracking of the fuel and reduce coke deposition. To...concentric-counter-flow heat exchangers to elevate the fuel temperature levels sufficiently to induce thermal cracking. Additionally, a zeolite catalytic ...to elevate the fuel temperatures sufficiently to crack the fuel thermally with the assistance of a zeolite catalytic coating. II. Background

  15. NASA/FLAGRO - FATIGUE CRACK GROWTH COMPUTER PROGRAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, R. G.

    1994-01-01

    Structural flaws and cracks may grow under fatigue inducing loads and, upon reaching a critical size, cause structural failure to occur. The growth of these flaws and cracks may occur at load levels well below the ultimate load bearing capability of the structure. The Fatigue Crack Growth Computer Program, NASA/FLAGRO, was developed as an aid in predicting the growth of pre-existing flaws and cracks in structural components of space systems. The earlier version of the program, FLAGRO4, was the primary analysis tool used by Rockwell International and the Shuttle subcontractors for fracture control analysis on the Space Shuttle. NASA/FLAGRO is an enhanced version of the program and incorporates state-of-the-art improvements in both fracture mechanics and computer technology. NASA/FLAGRO provides the fracture mechanics analyst with a computerized method of evaluating the "safe crack growth life" capabilities of structural components. NASA/FLAGRO could also be used to evaluate the damage tolerance aspects of a given structural design. The propagation of an existing crack is governed by the stress field in the vicinity of the crack tip. The stress intensity factor is defined in terms of the relationship between the stress field magnitude and the crack size. The propagation of the crack becomes catastrophic when the local stress intensity factor reaches the fracture toughness of the material. NASA/FLAGRO predicts crack growth using a two-dimensional model which predicts growth independently in two directions based on the calculation of stress intensity factors. The analyst can choose to use either a crack growth rate equation or a nonlinear interpolation routine based on tabular data. The growth rate equation is a modified Forman equation which can be converted to a Paris or Walker equation by substituting different values into the exponent. This equation provides accuracy and versatility and can be fit to data using standard least squares methods. Stress

  16. NASA/FLAGRO - FATIGUE CRACK GROWTH COMPUTER PROGRAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, R. G.

    1994-01-01

    Structural flaws and cracks may grow under fatigue inducing loads and, upon reaching a critical size, cause structural failure to occur. The growth of these flaws and cracks may occur at load levels well below the ultimate load bearing capability of the structure. The Fatigue Crack Growth Computer Program, NASA/FLAGRO, was developed as an aid in predicting the growth of pre-existing flaws and cracks in structural components of space systems. The earlier version of the program, FLAGRO4, was the primary analysis tool used by Rockwell International and the Shuttle subcontractors for fracture control analysis on the Space Shuttle. NASA/FLAGRO is an enhanced version of the program and incorporates state-of-the-art improvements in both fracture mechanics and computer technology. NASA/FLAGRO provides the fracture mechanics analyst with a computerized method of evaluating the "safe crack growth life" capabilities of structural components. NASA/FLAGRO could also be used to evaluate the damage tolerance aspects of a given structural design. The propagation of an existing crack is governed by the stress field in the vicinity of the crack tip. The stress intensity factor is defined in terms of the relationship between the stress field magnitude and the crack size. The propagation of the crack becomes catastrophic when the local stress intensity factor reaches the fracture toughness of the material. NASA/FLAGRO predicts crack growth using a two-dimensional model which predicts growth independently in two directions based on the calculation of stress intensity factors. The analyst can choose to use either a crack growth rate equation or a nonlinear interpolation routine based on tabular data. The growth rate equation is a modified Forman equation which can be converted to a Paris or Walker equation by substituting different values into the exponent. This equation provides accuracy and versatility and can be fit to data using standard least squares methods. Stress

  17. Dissolution Condensation Mechanism of Stress Corrosion Cracking in Liquid Metals: Driving Force and Crack Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glickman, Evgeny E.

    2011-02-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in aqueous solution is driven by exothermic reactions of metal oxidation. This stimulus, as well as classical mechanisms of SCC, does not apply to SCC in liquid metals (LMs). In the framework of the dissolution-condensation mechanism (DCM), we analyzed the driving force and crack kinetics for this nonelectrochemical mode of SCC that is loosely called "liquid metal embrittlement" (LME). According to DCM, a stress-induced increase in chemical potential at the crack tip acts as the driving force for out-of-the-tip diffusion mass transfer that is fast because diffusion in LMs is very fast and surface energy at the solid-liquid interface is small. In this article, we review two versions of DCM mechanism, discuss the major physics behind them, and develop DCM further. The refined mechanism is applied then to the experimental data on crack velocity V vs stress intensity factor, the activation energy of LME, and alloying effects. It is concluded that DCM provides a good conceptual framework for analysis of a unified kinetic mechanism of LME and may also contribute to SCC in aqueous solutions.

  18. Prediction of corrosion fatigue crack initiation behavior of A7N01P-T4 aluminum alloy welded joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, J.; Chen, J.; Gou, G.; Chen, H.; Wang, W.

    2017-07-01

    Through investigating the corrosion fatigue crack initiation behavior of A7N01P-T4 aluminum alloy welded joints in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution, corrosion fatigue crack initiation life is formulated as Ni = 6.97 × 1012[Δσeqv1.739 - 491.739]-2 and the mechanism of corrosion fatigue crack initiation is proposed. SEM and TEM tests revealed that several corrosion fatigue cracks formed asynchronously and the first crack does not necessarily develop into the leading crack. The uneven reticular dislocations produced by fatigue loading are prone to piling up and tangling near the grain boundaries or the second phases and form the “high dislocation-density region” (HDDR), which acts as an anode in microbatteries and dissolved to form small crack. Thus the etching pits, HDDR near the grain boundaries and second phases are confirmed as the main causes inducing the initiation of fatigue crack.

  19. A comprehensive theoretical, numerical and experimental approach for crack detection in power plant rotating machinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoisser, C. M.; Audebert, S.

    2008-05-01

    -flexibility induced by the crack in the shaft. The validated crack model is then applied to predict the dynamical behaviour of large industrial rotating machinery and to verify the crack detection capability based on the vibratory response. With respect to 900 MW turboset units, with cracks affecting LP rotors, a map of crack detection capabilities, based on 1× rev. and 2× rev. components as a function of circumferential extension ratio and crack depth, is drawn. If the crack depth is higher than 37% of the rotor diameter, on-line measurements of 2× rev. vibratory level shift allow to detect the crack. On the opposite, 1× rev. monitoring is necessary for cracks with circumferential extension superior to 270°. It is also observed that LP rotor bending mode shift monitoring theoretically allows to detect cracks with depths equal to or greater than 20% of the rotor diameter or with circumferential extension greater than 120°. The difficulties encountered for distinguishing the LP rotor bending mode frequencies, which may also evolve in time, independently from the cracks, limit the industrial application of this latter technique. Therefore new studies will focus on the analysis of torsion dynamic behaviour and on its sensitivity to cracks. With respect to RCP units, when half of the shaft section is cracked, the 2× rev. component remains very small. Whilst the result is simply due to a small excitation, a more accurate estimation of the external forces acting on the shaft could lead to more accurate numerical predictions.

  20. Fatigue crack initiation potential from defects in terms of local stress analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Mingliang; Xuan, Fuzhen

    2014-05-01

    The competition of surface and subsurface crack initiation induced failure is critical to understand very high cycle fatigue(VHCF) behavior, which necessitates the elucidation of the underlying mechanisms for the transition of crack initiation from surface to interior defects. Crack initiation potential in materials containing defects is investigated numerically by focusing on defect types, size, shape, location, and residual stress influences. Results show that the crack initiation potency is higher in case of serious property mismatching between matrix and defects, and higher strength materials are more sensitive to soft inclusions(elastic modulus lower than the matrix). The stress localization around inclusions are correlated to interior crack initiation mechanisms in the VHCF regime such as inclusion-matrix debonding at soft inclusions and inclusion-cracking for hard inclusions(elastic modulus higher than the matrix). It is easier to emanate cracks from the subsurface pores with the depth 0.7 times as large as their diameter. There exists an inclusion size independent region for crack incubation, outside which crack initiation will transfer from the subsurface soft inclusion to the interior larger one. As for elliptical inclusions, reducing the short-axis length can decrease the crack nucleation potential and promote the interior crack formation, whereas the long-axis length controls the site of peak stress concentration. The compressive residual stress at surface is helpful to shift crack initiation from surface to interior inclusions. Some relaxation of residual stress can not change the inherent crack initiation from interior inclusions in the VHCF regime. The work reveals the crack initiation potential and the transition among various defects under the influences of both intrinsic and extrinsic factors in the VHCF regime, and is helpful to understand the failure mechanism of materials containing defects under long-term cyclic loadings.

  1. Threshold intensity factors as lower boundaries for crack propagation in ceramics

    PubMed Central

    Marx, Rudolf; Jungwirth, Franz; Walter, Per-Ole

    2004-01-01

    Background Slow crack growth can be described in a v (crack velocity) versus KI (stress intensity factor) diagram. Slow crack growth in ceramics is attributed to corrosion assisted stress at the crack tip or at any pre-existing defect in the ceramic. The combined effect of high stresses at the crack tip and the presence of water or body fluid molecules (reducing surface energy at the crack tip) induces crack propagation, which eventually may result in fatigue. The presence of a threshold in the stress intensity factor, below which no crack propagation occurs, has been the subject of important research in the last years. The higher this threshold, the higher the reliability of the ceramic, and consequently the longer its lifetime. Methods We utilize the Irwin K-field displacement relation to deduce crack tip stress intensity factors from the near crack tip profile. Cracks are initiated by indentation impressions. The threshold stress intensity factor is determined as the time limit of the tip stress intensity when the residual stresses have (nearly) disappeared. Results We determined the threshold stress intensity factors for most of the all ceramic materials presently important for dental restorations in Europe. Of special significance is the finding that alumina ceramic has a threshold limit nearly identical with that of zirconia. Conclusion The intention of the present paper is to stress the point that the threshold stress intensity factor represents a more intrinsic property for a given ceramic material than the widely used toughness (bend strength or fracture toughness), which refers only to fast crack growth. Considering two ceramics with identical threshold limits, although with different critical stress intensity limits, means that both ceramics have identical starting points for slow crack growth. Fast catastrophic crack growth leading to spontaneous fatigue, however, is different. This growth starts later in those ceramic materials that have larger

  2. In situ examination of moving crack tips in ordered intermetallics.

    SciTech Connect

    Heuer, J.; Lam, N. Q.; Okamoto, P. R.; Stubbins, J. F.

    1999-01-25

    Recent studies have shown that high stress concentrations at moving crack tips in the intermetallic compound NiTi can induce a crystalline-to-amorphous (C-A) transformation of the crack tip region. This stress-induced C-A transformation has a temperature dependence and crystallization behavior similar to those of ion irradiation-induced C-A transformation of NiTi. The present study examines if these similarities between stress- and irradiation-induced amorphization hold true for two other intermetallic compounds, CuTi and Ni{sub 3}Ti. In situ straining was performed in an intermediate-voltage transmission electron microscope. The presence or absence of an amorphous phase was determined by dark field imaging and selected area diffraction of crack tip regions. Crack tips in both CuTi and Ni{sub 3}Ti were found to remain crystalline upon fracture. The observed absence of stress-induced amorphization in Ni{sub 3}Ti is consistent with its known absence during irradiation, but the absence in CuTi differs from its known irradiation-induced amorphization behavior. Reasons for the similarity and difference are discussed.

  3. In situ examination of moving crack tips in ordered intermetallics

    SciTech Connect

    Heuer, J.K. |; Lam, N.Q.; Okamoto, P.R.; Stubbins, J.F.

    1999-08-01

    Recent studies have shown that high stress concentrations at moving crack tips in the intermetallic compound NiTi can induce a crystalline-to-amorphous (C-A) transformation of the crack tip region. This stress-induced C-A transformation has a temperature dependence and crystallization behavior similar to those of ion irradiation-induced C-A transformation of NiTi. The present study examines if these similarities between stress- and irradiation-induced amorphization hold true for two other intermetallic compounds, CuTi and Ni{sub 3}Ti. In situ straining was performed in an intermediate-voltage transmission electron microscope. The presence or absence of an amorphous phase was determined by dark field imaging and selected area diffraction of crack tip regions. Crack tips in both CuTi and Ni{sub 3}Ti were found to remain crystalline upon fracture. The observed absence of stress-induced amorphization in Ni{sub 3}Ti is consistent with its known absence during irradiation, but the absence in CuTi differs from its known irradiation-induced amorphization behavior. Reasons for the similarity and difference are discussed.

  4. FASTRAN II - FATIGUE CRACK GROWTH STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS (UNIX VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C.

    1994-01-01

    Predictions of fatigue crack growth behavior can be made with the Fatigue Crack Growth Structural Analysis (FASTRAN II) computer program. As cyclic loads are applied to a selected crack configuration with an initial crack size, FASTRAN II predicts crack growth as a function of cyclic load history until either a desired crack size is reached or failure occurs. FASTRAN II is based on plasticity-induced crack-closure behavior of cracks in metallic materials and accounts for load-interaction effects, such as retardation and acceleration, under variable-amplitude loading. The closure model is based on the Dugdale model with modifications to allow plastically deformed material to be left along the crack surfaces as the crack grows. Plane stress and plane strain conditions, as well as conditions between these two, can be simulated in FASTRAN II by using a constraint factor on tensile yielding at the crack front to approximately account for three-dimensional stress states. FASTRAN II contains seventeen predefined crack configurations (standard laboratory fatigue crack growth rate specimens and many common crack configurations found in structures); and the user can define one additional crack configuration. The baseline crack growth rate properties (effective stress-intensity factor against crack growth rate) may be given in either equation or tabular form. For three-dimensional crack configurations, such as surface cracks or corner cracks at holes or notches, the fatigue crack growth rate properties may be different in the crack depth and crack length directions. Final failure of the cracked structure can be modelled with fracture toughness properties using either linear-elastic fracture mechanics (brittle materials), a two-parameter fracture criterion (brittle to ductile materials), or plastic collapse (extremely ductile materials). The crack configurations in FASTRAN II can be subjected to either constant-amplitude, variable-amplitude or spectrum loading. The applied

  5. FASTRAN II - FATIGUE CRACK GROWTH STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS (IBM PC VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C.

    1994-01-01

    Predictions of fatigue crack growth behavior can be made with the Fatigue Crack Growth Structural Analysis (FASTRAN II) computer program. As cyclic loads are applied to a selected crack configuration with an initial crack size, FASTRAN II predicts crack growth as a function of cyclic load history until either a desired crack size is reached or failure occurs. FASTRAN II is based on plasticity-induced crack-closure behavior of cracks in metallic materials and accounts for load-interaction effects, such as retardation and acceleration, under variable-amplitude loading. The closure model is based on the Dugdale model with modifications to allow plastically deformed material to be left along the crack surfaces as the crack grows. Plane stress and plane strain conditions, as well as conditions between these two, can be simulated in FASTRAN II by using a constraint factor on tensile yielding at the crack front to approximately account for three-dimensional stress states. FASTRAN II contains seventeen predefined crack configurations (standard laboratory fatigue crack growth rate specimens and many common crack configurations found in structures); and the user can define one additional crack configuration. The baseline crack growth rate properties (effective stress-intensity factor against crack growth rate) may be given in either equation or tabular form. For three-dimensional crack configurations, such as surface cracks or corner cracks at holes or notches, the fatigue crack growth rate properties may be different in the crack depth and crack length directions. Final failure of the cracked structure can be modelled with fracture toughness properties using either linear-elastic fracture mechanics (brittle materials), a two-parameter fracture criterion (brittle to ductile materials), or plastic collapse (extremely ductile materials). The crack configurations in FASTRAN II can be subjected to either constant-amplitude, variable-amplitude or spectrum loading. The applied

  6. FASTRAN II - FATIGUE CRACK GROWTH STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS (UNIX VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C.

    1994-01-01

    Predictions of fatigue crack growth behavior can be made with the Fatigue Crack Growth Structural Analysis (FASTRAN II) computer program. As cyclic loads are applied to a selected crack configuration with an initial crack size, FASTRAN II predicts crack growth as a function of cyclic load history until either a desired crack size is reached or failure occurs. FASTRAN II is based on plasticity-induced crack-closure behavior of cracks in metallic materials and accounts for load-interaction effects, such as retardation and acceleration, under variable-amplitude loading. The closure model is based on the Dugdale model with modifications to allow plastically deformed material to be left along the crack surfaces as the crack grows. Plane stress and plane strain conditions, as well as conditions between these two, can be simulated in FASTRAN II by using a constraint factor on tensile yielding at the crack front to approximately account for three-dimensional stress states. FASTRAN II contains seventeen predefined crack configurations (standard laboratory fatigue crack growth rate specimens and many common crack configurations found in structures); and the user can define one additional crack configuration. The baseline crack growth rate properties (effective stress-intensity factor against crack growth rate) may be given in either equation or tabular form. For three-dimensional crack configurations, such as surface cracks or corner cracks at holes or notches, the fatigue crack growth rate properties may be different in the crack depth and crack length directions. Final failure of the cracked structure can be modelled with fracture toughness properties using either linear-elastic fracture mechanics (brittle materials), a two-parameter fracture criterion (brittle to ductile materials), or plastic collapse (extremely ductile materials). The crack configurations in FASTRAN II can be subjected to either constant-amplitude, variable-amplitude or spectrum loading. The applied

  7. FASTRAN II - FATIGUE CRACK GROWTH STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS (IBM PC VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C.

    1994-01-01

    Predictions of fatigue crack growth behavior can be made with the Fatigue Crack Growth Structural Analysis (FASTRAN II) computer program. As cyclic loads are applied to a selected crack configuration with an initial crack size, FASTRAN II predicts crack growth as a function of cyclic load history until either a desired crack size is reached or failure occurs. FASTRAN II is based on plasticity-induced crack-closure behavior of cracks in metallic materials and accounts for load-interaction effects, such as retardation and acceleration, under variable-amplitude loading. The closure model is based on the Dugdale model with modifications to allow plastically deformed material to be left along the crack surfaces as the crack grows. Plane stress and plane strain conditions, as well as conditions between these two, can be simulated in FASTRAN II by using a constraint factor on tensile yielding at the crack front to approximately account for three-dimensional stress states. FASTRAN II contains seventeen predefined crack configurations (standard laboratory fatigue crack growth rate specimens and many common crack configurations found in structures); and the user can define one additional crack configuration. The baseline crack growth rate properties (effective stress-intensity factor against crack growth rate) may be given in either equation or tabular form. For three-dimensional crack configurations, such as surface cracks or corner cracks at holes or notches, the fatigue crack growth rate properties may be different in the crack depth and crack length directions. Final failure of the cracked structure can be modelled with fracture toughness properties using either linear-elastic fracture mechanics (brittle materials), a two-parameter fracture criterion (brittle to ductile materials), or plastic collapse (extremely ductile materials). The crack configurations in FASTRAN II can be subjected to either constant-amplitude, variable-amplitude or spectrum loading. The applied

  8. Corrosion and stress corrosion cracking in supercritical water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Was, G. S.; Ampornrat, P.; Gupta, G.; Teysseyre, S.; West, E. A.; Allen, T. R.; Sridharan, K.; Tan, L.; Chen, Y.; Ren, X.; Pister, C.

    2007-09-01

    Supercritical water (SCW) has attracted increasing attention since SCW boiler power plants were implemented to increase the efficiency of fossil-based power plants. The SCW reactor (SCWR) design has been selected as one of the Generation IV reactor concepts because of its higher thermal efficiency and plant simplification as compared to current light water reactors (LWRs). Reactor operating conditions call for a core coolant temperature between 280 °C and 620 °C at a pressure of 25 MPa and maximum expected neutron damage levels to any replaceable or permanent core component of 15 dpa (thermal reactor design) and 100 dpa (fast reactor design). Irradiation-induced changes in microstructure (swelling, radiation-induced segregation (RIS), hardening, phase stability) and mechanical properties (strength, thermal and irradiation-induced creep, fatigue) are also major concerns. Throughout the core, corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, and the effect of irradiation on these degradation modes are critical issues. This paper reviews the current understanding of the response of candidate materials for SCWR systems, focusing on the corrosion and stress corrosion cracking response, and highlights the design trade-offs associated with certain alloy systems. Ferritic-martensitic steels generally have the best resistance to stress corrosion cracking, but suffer from the worst oxidation. Austenitic stainless steels and Ni-base alloys have better oxidation resistance but are more susceptible to stress corrosion cracking. The promise of grain boundary engineering and surface modification in addressing corrosion and stress corrosion cracking performance is discussed.

  9. Analysis of Crack Arrest Toughness.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-15

    vload(m) vp tn(m) Vertical Source Load (kN) on wedge HY80 Finite Element 0.0122 0.0099 3.81x10 -4 144 Steel Calculations Experiment 0.0122 --- 3.74x10-4...curve, are bona fide measures of the fracture arrest capability of tough ductile steels . The second is that the J-values represent the crack driving...fibrous mode of crack extension. (b) A new test method for studying fast fracture and arrest in tough steels . (c) Measurements of fast fracture and crack

  10. Transition-Region/Coronal Signatures of Penumbral Microjets: Hi-C, SDO/AIA and Hinode (SOT/FG) Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, Sanjiv K.; Alpert, Shane E.; Moore, Ronald L.; Winebarger, Amy R.

    2014-01-01

    Penumbral microjets are bright, transient features seen in the chromosphere of sunspot penumbrae. Katsuaka et al. (2007) noted their ubiquity and characterized them using the Ca II H-line filter on Hinode's Solar Optical Telescope (SOT). The jets are 1000{4000 km in length, 300{400 km in width, and last less than one minute. It was proposed that these penumbral microjets could contribute to the transition-region and coronal heating above sunspots. We examine whether these microjets appear in the transition-region (TR) and/or corona or are related{ temporally and spatially{ to similar brightenings in the TR and/or corona. First, we identify penumbral microjets with the SOT's Ca II H-line filter. The chosen sunspot is observed on July 11, 2012 from 18:50:00 UT to 20:00:00 UT at approx. 14 inches, -30 inches. We then examine the sunspot in the same field of view and at the same time in other wavelengths. We use the High Resolution Coronal Imager Telescope (Hi-C) at 193A and the 1600A, 304A, 171A, 193A, and 94A passbands of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard the Solar Dynamic Observatory. We include examples of these jets and where they should appear in the other passbands, but find no signifcant association, except for a few jets with longer lifetimes and bigger sizes seen at locations in the penumbra with repeated stronger brightenings. We conclude that the normal microjets are not heated to transition-region/coronal temperatures, but the larger jets are.

  11. Stress intensity and crack displacement for small edge cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orange, Thomas W.

    1988-01-01

    The weight function method was used to derive stress intensity factors and crack mouth displacement coefficients for small edge cracks (less than 20 percent of the specimen width) in common fracture specimen configurations. Contact stresses due to point application of loads were found to be small but significant for three-point bending and insignificant for four-point bending. The results are compared with available equations and numerical solutions from the literature and with unpublished boundary collocation results.

  12. Nonlinear spectral correlation for fatigue crack detection under noisy environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Peipei; Sohn, Hoon; Jeon, Ikgeun

    2017-07-01

    When ultrasonic waves at two distinct frequencies are applied to a structure with a fatigue crack, crack-induced nonlinearity creates nonlinear ultrasonic modulations at the sum and difference of the two input frequencies. The amplitude of the nonlinear modulation components is typically one or two orders of magnitude smaller than that of the primary linear components. Therefore, the modulation components can be easily buried under noise levels and it becomes difficult to extract the nonlinear modulation components under noisy environments using a conventional spectral density function. In this study, nonlinear spectral correlation, which calculates the spectral correlation between nonlinear modulation components, is proposed to isolate the nonlinear modulation components from noisy environments and used for fatigue crack detection. The proposed nonlinear spectral correlation offers the following benefits: (1) Stationary noises have little effect on nonlinear spectral correlation; (2) By using a wideband high-frequency input and a single low-frequency input, the contrast of nonlinear spectral correlation between damage and intact conditions can be enhanced; and (3) The test efficiency can be also improved via reducing the data collection time. Validation tests are performed on aluminum plates and scaled steel shafts with real fatigue cracks. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed nonlinear spectral correlation owns a higher sensitivity to fatigue crack than the classical nonlinear coefficient estimated from the spectral density function, and the usage of nonlinear spectral correlation allows the detection of fatigue crack even using noncontact air-coupled transducers with a low signal-to-noise ratio.

  13. Crack closure on rehydration of glass-ionomer materials.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, Sharanbir K; Pilecki, Peter; Sherriff, Martyn; Watson, Timothy F

    2004-10-01

    Moisture-sensitivity of immature glass-ionomer cements suggests that hydration-induced volumetric expansion might close and potentially heal established cracks. Crack closure in glass-ionomer cements (GICs) was observed following rehydration. Circular cavities were prepared in 15 teeth: 10 were restored with resin-modified GICs (5 with Fuji II LC and 5 with Photac-Fil) and 5 were restored with a conventional GIC (Fuji IX); all were dehydrated for 1 min with air and imaged immediately by confocal microscopy. Crack formation in each was located, after which water was placed on the surface and observed for 15 min via a CCD camera. Dehydration caused cracks with measurable gaps, while rehydration resulted in varying degrees of closure: closure was limited in the conventional GIC, and complete or near complete along part/s of the crack in the resin-modified GICs. In all, closure movement became imperceptible after the first 10 min. Statistical analysis indicated no significant difference between the closure behavior of all materials. However, the resin-modified GICs appeared to show a greater potential for closure of established cracks than the conventional GIC upon rehydration.

  14. Microbial healing of cracks in concrete: a review.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Sumit; Goyal, Shweta; Mukherjee, Abhijit; Reddy, M Sudhakara

    2017-09-12

    Concrete is the most widely used construction material of the world and maintaining concrete structures from premature deterioration is proving to be a great challenge. Early age formation of micro-cracking in concrete structure severely affects the serviceability leading to high cost of maintenance. Apart from conventional methods of repairing cracks with sealants or treating the concrete with adhesive chemicals to prevent the cracks from widening, a microbial crack-healing approach has shown promising results. The unique feature of the microbial system is that it enables self-healing of concrete. The effectiveness of microbially induced calcium carbonate precipitation (MICCP) in improving durability of cementitious building materials, restoration of stone monuments and soil bioclogging is discussed. Main emphasis has been laid on the potential of bacteria-based crack repair in concrete structure and the applications of different bacterial treatments to self-healing cracks. Furthermore, recommendations to employ the MICCP technology at commercial scale and reduction in the cost of application are provided in this review.

  15. Velocity Dispersion Measurements in Cracked Quartzite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schijns, H. M.; Schmitt, D. R.; Jackson, I.

    2011-12-01

    Oscillating stress induced by seismic waves is expected to cause reversible fluid flow within low aspect ratio cracks, resulting in strongly frequency dependent seismic wave velocities. Laboratory measurements of seismic velocities typically made at MHz frequencies, well logging undertaken at kHz frequencies and in-situ exploration seismic (10-300 Hz) measurements are unlikely to be directly comparable as a result of this fluid flow effect. Experimental measurements over a broad range of frequencies are necessary to constrain theoretical velocity dispersion models. Here we present a preliminary comparison of ultrasonic (MHz) measurements on two cracked quartzite samples with measurements made in the mHz-Hz frequency band using forced oscillation. Quartzite samples from Cape Sorell, Australia and Alberta, Canada are cracked by thermally heating the samples to 1100 C and quenching them in liquid nitrogen and water, respectively. A relatively isotropic distribution of cracks, with average aperture of 1 μm and aspect ratio of <0.01, is induced in both samples for total porosities of ~2%. Measurements are made on the quartzite samples when they are dry, and after saturating with argon and water. The difference in viscosity between argon (0.025 mPa s at 10 MPa and 20 C) and water (1 mPa s) allow the investigation of different time scales of fluid flow. Further, measurements are made over effective pressures from 10-150 MPa, with progressive crack closure observed between 10-100 MPa. High frequency (0.64 MHz) measurements using piezoelectric transducers are used in conjunction with density measurements to calculate high frequency Young's and shear moduli. Low frequency (mHz-Hz) moduli are measured using a forced oscillation apparatus at Australian National University. The experimental assembly consists of a long cylindrical beam; the top of the beam is held fixed while the bottom is driven using time-varying electromagnetic drivers. The polarization of the applied force

  16. Prediction of Crack Growth under Variable-Amplitude Loading in Thin-Sheet 2024-T3 Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    The present paper is concerned with the application of a "plasticity-induced" crack closure model to study fatigue crack growth under various load histories. The model was based on the Dugdale model but modified to leave plastically deformed material in the wake of the advancing crack. The model was used to correlate crack growth rates under constant-amplitude loading and then used to predict crack growth under variable-amplitude and spectrum loading on thin-sheet 2024- T3 aluminum alloys. Predicted crack-opening stresses agreed well with test data from the literature. The crack-growth lives agreed within a factor of two for single and repeated spike overloads/underloads and within 20 percent for spectrum loading. Differences were attributed to fretting-product-debris-induced closure and three-dimensional affects not included in the model.

  17. It Shrinks! It Cracks!

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-04-20

    Given enough time, impact craters on Mars tend to fill up with different materials. For instance, some craters on Mars had lakes inside them in the past. When these lakes dried out, they left behind traces of their past existence, such as sedimentary deposits (materials that were carried along with the running water into the lake inside the crater and then settled down). Some craters, especially in high latitudes, contain ice deposits that filled the crater when an earlier ice age allowed ice to extend into the crater's latitude. Here, NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spies a crater that lies close to Elysium, a major volcanic system on Mars. The whole region surrounding the crater was at some point covered by lava from the volcano creating vast lava plains, and in the process, flooding impact craters in their way. When the lava eventually cooled down, it solidified and began to shrink in size. This shrinking led to formation of cracks on the surface of the lava that grew in a circular pattern matching the shape of the crater it was filling. Scientists can study these fractures and estimate how much it shrank in volume to better understand the properties of the lava (such as its temperature) during the time it filled the crater. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21596

  18. Peridynamic model for fatigue cracking.

    SciTech Connect

    Silling, Stewart Andrew; Abe Askari

    2014-10-01

    The peridynamic theory is an extension of traditional solid mechanics in which the field equations can be applied on discontinuities, such as growing cracks. This paper proposes a bond damage model within peridynamics to treat the nucleation and growth of cracks due to cyclic loading. Bond damage occurs according to the evolution of a variable called the "remaining life" of each bond that changes over time according to the cyclic strain in the bond. It is shown that the model reproduces the main features of S-N data for typical materials and also reproduces the Paris law for fatigue crack growth. Extensions of the model account for the effects of loading spectrum, fatigue limit, and variable load ratio. A three-dimensional example illustrates the nucleation and growth of a helical fatigue crack in the torsion of an aluminum alloy rod.

  19. Vibrations Caused By Cracked Turbopump Bearing Race

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goggin, David G.; Dweck, Robert A.

    1990-01-01

    Expansion gives rise to eccentricity. Report presents analysis of dynamic effects caused by cracking of inner race of ball bearing in turbopump. Crack manifested itself via increase in vibrations synchronous with rotation and smaller increase at twice frequency of rotation. Analysis conducted to verify these increases were caused solely by crack and to understand implications for future such cracks.

  20. Shaft vibrations in turbomachinery excited by cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grabowski, B.

    1982-01-01

    During the past years the dynamic behavior of rotors with cracks has been investigated mainly theoretically. This paper deals with the comparison of analytical and experimental results of the dynamics of a rotor with an artificial crack. The experimental results verify the crack model used in the analysis. They show the general possibility to determine a crack by extended vibration control.

  1. Cocaine/Crack: The Big Lie.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. on Drug Abuse (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD.

    This pamphlet focuses on cocaine and crack use and the addictive nature of cocaine/crack. It contains a set of 21 questions about crack and cocaine, each accompanied by a clear and complete response. Interspersed throughout the booklet are photographs and quotes from former cocaine or crack users/addicts. Questions and answers focus on what…

  2. 46 CFR 59.10-5 - Cracks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... APPURTENANCES Welding Repairs to Boilers and Pressure Vessels in -Service § 59.10-5 Cracks. (a) Cracks extending... corrugated furnaces may be repaired by welding provided any one crack does not exceed 20 inches in length. (e... any direction, nor more than a total of four cracks in a drum, and further provided the welding...

  3. 46 CFR 59.10-5 - Cracks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cracks. 59.10-5 Section 59.10-5 Shipping COAST GUARD... APPURTENANCES Welding Repairs to Boilers and Pressure Vessels in -Service § 59.10-5 Cracks. (a) Cracks extending... cracks are veed out so that complete penetration of the weld metal is secured. (b) Circumferential...

  4. 21 CFR 137.190 - Cracked wheat.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cracked wheat. 137.190 Section 137.190 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Related Products § 137.190 Cracked wheat. Cracked wheat is the food prepared by so cracking or cutting...

  5. 21 CFR 137.190 - Cracked wheat.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cracked wheat. 137.190 Section 137.190 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Related Products § 137.190 Cracked wheat. Cracked wheat is the food prepared by so cracking or cutting...

  6. 21 CFR 137.190 - Cracked wheat.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cracked wheat. 137.190 Section 137.190 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Related Products § 137.190 Cracked wheat. Cracked wheat is the food prepared by so cracking or cutting...

  7. 21 CFR 137.190 - Cracked wheat.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cracked wheat. 137.190 Section 137.190 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Related Products § 137.190 Cracked wheat. Cracked wheat is the food prepared by so cracking or cutting...

  8. Effects of Different R ratios on Fatigue Crack Growth in Laser Peened Friction Stir Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatamleh, Omar; Hackel, Lloyd; Forth, Scott

    2007-01-01

    The influence of laser peening on the fatigue crack growth behavior of friction stir welded (FSW) Aluminum Alloy (AA) 7075-T7351 sheets was investigated. The surface modification resulting from the peening process on the fatigue crack growth of FSW was assessed for two different R ratios. The investigation indicated a significant decrease in fatigue crack growth rates resulting from using laser shock peening compared with unpeened, welded and unwelded specimens. The slower fatigue crack growth rate was attributed to the compressive residual stresses induced by the peening.

  9. Thermal fatigue crack behavior of SiCp/A356 composites prepared by stirring casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Like; Han, Jianmin; Yang, Zhiyong; Li, Xiang; Wang, Jialin; Li, Zhiqiang; Li, Weijing

    The thermal fatigue crack initiation and propagation behavior of SiCp/A356 composites which is produced by stirring casting were studied. Specimens with a V-shaped notch were used in the thermal fatigue experiment. Optical microscope (OM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) were used to observe the crack growth. Crack initiated at the notch tip after about 150 cycles of heating and cooling from room temperature to 250 °C. The crack propagation stage was dominated during the whole crack growth. Cracks mainly propagated along the interface of particle and through the matrix. The propagation stage experienced the cycle of slow propagation and fast propagation, and a Step-Like shape was observed during the crack growth process. The micro cracks appeared in the interface of particle and the matrix after repeated thermal cycles, and induced fast propagation by coalescing with the main cracks. Distributions of the particle play an important role in hindering thermal fatigue crack propagation. Hardness of the composites decreased with the increase of the number of cycles, and decreased by 46.1% after thermal 290 cycles.

  10. Effects of loading on the growth rates of deep stress-corrosion cracks

    SciTech Connect

    Beavers, J.A.; Christman, T.K.

    1990-08-01

    The goal of this research program was to determine the effects of loading on growth of stress-corrosion cracks (SCC) in line pipe steel and whether special loading procedures could actually inhibit crack growth. Of particular interest was the effect of hydrostatic retesting on the subsequent growth of existing cracks. The growth rate experiments showed that the slow-strain rate loading could successfully nucleate a group of fine cracks with depths up to 0.025 inches (0.64 mm). However, the subsequent cyclic loading at typical operating stress levels (lower than experienced during the slow- strain rate loading) produced minimal crack growth and stopped soon after the test was started. The limited growth is believed to be a real phenomenon which means this is not a suitable procedure for the measurement of average crack growth rates. These experiments indicate that cracks grown at high stress (as in the slow-strain rate phase) do not readily propagate at lower stress levels. This may be because of crack closure (compressive crack tip residual stress) induced by the initial higher stress level. If that is true, then hydrostatic retests could inhibit the growth of existing stress-corrosion cracks, especially if the hydrostatic tests are conducted at high stress levels. 15 figures, 3 tabs.

  11. Role of Prism Decussation on Fatigue Crack Growth and Fracture of Human Enamel

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Devendra; Arola, Dwayne

    2009-01-01

    The role of prism decussation on the crack growth resistance of human enamel is evaluated. Miniature inset Compact Tension (CT) specimens embodying a section of cuspal enamel were subjected to Mode I cyclic or monotonic loads. Cracks were grown in either the forward (from outer enamel inwards) or reverse (from inner enamel outwards) direction and the responses were compared quantitatively. Results showed that the outer enamel exhibits lower resistance to the inception and growth of cracks. Regardless of the growth direction, the near threshold region of cyclic extension was typical of ‘short crack’ behavior (i.e. deceleration of growth with an increase in crack length). Cyclic crack growth was more stable in the forward direction and occurred over twice the spatial distance achieved in the reverse direction. In response to the monotonic loads, a rising R-curve response was exhibited by growth in the forward direction only. The total energy absorbed in fracture for the forward direction was more than three times that in the reverse. The rise in crack growth resistance was largely attributed to a combination of mechanisms that included crack bridging, crack bifurcation and crack curving, which were induced by decussation in the inner enamel. An analysis of the responses distinguished that the microstructure of enamel appears optimized for resisting crack growth initiating from damage at the tooth’s surface. PMID:19433137

  12. The medicinal cracked-cap polypore mushroom Phellinus rimosus (higher Basidiomycetes) attenuates alloxan-induced hyperglycemia and oxidative stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Rony, Kuttikkadan A; Ajith, Thekkuttuparambil A; Mathew, John; Janardhanan, Kainoor K

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes is usually associated with increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), impaired antioxidant defense systems, or both, which result in oxidative damage and lead to ROS-mediated diabetic pathogenesis. This investigation was undertaken to evaluate the role of extract from the wood-inhabiting polypore medicinal mushroom Phellinus rimosus in an alloxan-induced diabetic model and the oral glucose tolerance test in rats. Oral administration of extract at doses of 50 and 250 mg/kg body weight/day for 10 days to rats with alloxan-induced diabetes was found to possess significant dose-dependent hypoglycemic activity. In the oral glucose tolerance test, hypoglycemic effect of P. rimosus (250 mg/kg) was significant (P < 0.01) and maximum at 90 minutes after the glucose challenge when compared with that of control group. The effect of extract on antioxidant status in the pancreas, liver, and kidney was estimated. The diabetic control rats exhibited elevated levels of lipid peroxidation and lower activities of copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and reduced glutathione (GSH) content in pancreatic, hepatic, and renal tissues compared with normal tissues. The activities of SOD, CAT, GPx, and GSH were found to be increased in diabetic rats treated with the extract. The increased level of lipid peroxidation in diabetic rats also was found to revert to near-normal status in groups treated with the extract. The findings thus suggest the therapeutic efficiency of Ph. Rimosus against declined antioxidant status as well as hyperglycemia associated with diabetes.

  13. Initiation and propagation of small corner cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellyin, Ferdnand; Kujawski, Daniel; Craig, David F.

    1994-01-01

    The behaviour of small corner cracks, inclined or perpendicular to loading direction, is presented. There are two aspects to this investigation: initiation of small cracks and monitoring their subsequent growth. An initial pre-cracking procedure under cyclic compression is adopted to minimize the residual damage at the tip of the growing and self-arresting crack under cyclic compression. A final fatigue specimen, cut from the larger pre-cracked specimen, has two corner flaws. The opening load of corner flaw is monitored using a novel strain gauge approach. The behaviour of small corner cracks is described in terms of growth rate relative to the size of the crack and its shape.

  14. Microscopic origins of stochastic crack growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardee, W. J.; Morris, W. L.; Cox, B. N.

    Physical arguments are made to obtain a mathematical model of the stochastic growth of surface fatigue cracks in a ductile metal alloy. The model is a set of coupled partial differential equations for the expected statistical density of cracks per unit area. The differential equations describe the smooth, deterministic local evolution of crack states, with the stochastic effects of abrupt local changes of material in the crack path appearing as transitions between distinct subspaces of single crack state space. Results are related to observables such as statistical distributions of crack growth rate and of time for at least one crack to reach macroscopic length.

  15. Hi-C as a tool for precise detection and characterisation of chromosomal rearrangements and copy number variation in human tumours.

    PubMed

    Harewood, Louise; Kishore, Kamal; Eldridge, Matthew D; Wingett, Steven; Pearson, Danita; Schoenfelder, Stefan; Collins, V Peter; Fraser, Peter

    2017-06-27

    Chromosomal rearrangements occur constitutionally in the general population and somatically in the majority of cancers. Detection of balanced rearrangements, such as reciprocal translocations and inversions, is troublesome, which is particularly detrimental in oncology where rearrangements play diagnostic and prognostic roles. Here we describe the use of Hi-C as a tool for detection of both balanced and unbalanced chromosomal rearrangements in primary human tumour samples, with the potential to define chromosome breakpoints to bp resolution. In addition, we show copy number profiles can also be obtained from the same data, all at a significantly lower cost than standard sequencing approaches.

  16. Mitigation of Crack Damage in Metallic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leser, Patrick E.; Newman, John A.; Smith, Stephen W.; Leser, William P.; Wincheski, Russell A.; Wallace, Terryl A.; Glaessgen, Edward H.; Piascik, Robert S.

    2014-01-01

    A system designed to mitigate or heal crack damage in metallic materials has been developed where the protected material or component is coated with a low-melting temperature film. After a crack is formed, the material is heated, melting the film which then infiltrates the crack opening through capillary action. Upon solidification, the healing material inhibits further crack damage in two ways. While the crack healing material is intact, it acts like an adhesive that bonds or bridges the crack faces together. After fatigue loading damages, the healing material in the crack mouth inhibits further crack growth by creating artificially-high crack closure levels. Mechanical test data show that this method sucessfully arrests or retards crack growth in laboratory specimens.

  17. Cracks in a Crater Ice

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-12-07

    Many impact craters on Mars were filled with ice in past climates. Sometimes this ice flows or slumps down the crater walls into the center and acquires concentric wrinkles as a result. This image shows an example of this. There are other ways that scientists know the material in the crater is icy. Surface cracks that form polygonal shapes cover the material in the crater. They are easy to see in this spring-time image because seasonal frost hides inside the cracks, outlining them in bright white. These cracks form because ice within the ground expands and contracts a lot as it warms and cools. Scientists can see similar cracks in icy areas of the Earth and other icy locations on Mars. If you look closely, you'll see small polygons inside larger ones. The small polygons are younger and the cracks shallower while the large ones are outlined with cracks that penetrate more deeply. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21215

  18. The kinetics of hydrocarbon cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Groten, W.A.; Wojciechowski, B.W. )

    1993-03-01

    A general kinetic model which describes the catalytic cracking of pure hydrocarbons is presented. The model includes a monomolecular cracking path based on the Langmuir adsorption isotherm as well as a bimolecular path, following Rideal kinetics, which accounts for the possibility of a chain cracking mechanism being involved. Catalyst decay is accounted for using the time-on-stream-decay function. Fitting of experimental data from n-nonane cracking on USHY at 673 K, combined with Monte Carlo simulations indicates that, in that case, the total catalytic activity could include between 0 and 90% of activity due to chain processes. This large margin of error stems from the combined effects of a large decay rate, forcing the experimenter to use average conversion data, and of experimental error. Fitting of the model to previously published cracking data for 2-methylpentane on USHY showed that the model lacks a suitable parameter to account for thermal reactions which were not accounted for in the original data set. This observation supports the impression that the model is sensitive to departures from the postulated mechanism. The above kinetic model has also been fitted to the results of n-nonane cracking at three temperatures as well as to previously published data for various other linear paraffins. 32 refs., 17 figs., 6 tabs.

  19. Path (un)predictability of two interacting cracks in polycarbonate sheets using Digital Image Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Koivisto, J.; Dalbe, M.-J.; Alava, M. J.; Santucci, S.

    2016-01-01

    Crack propagation is tracked here with Digital Image Correlation analysis in the test case of two cracks propagating in opposite directions in polycarbonate, a material with high ductility and a large Fracture Process Zone (FPZ). Depending on the initial distances between the two crack tips, one may observe different complex crack paths with in particular a regime where the two cracks repel each other prior to being attracted. We show by strain field analysis how this can be understood according to the principle of local symmetry: the propagation is to the direction where the local shear - mode KII in fracture mechanics language - is zero. Thus the interactions exhibited by the cracks arise from symmetry, from the initial geometry, and from the material properties which induce the FPZ. This complexity makes any long-range prediction of the path(s) impossible. PMID:27578388

  20. Non-contact visualization of nonlinear ultrasonic modulation for reference-free fatigue crack detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Hyung Jin; Song, Byeongju; Park, Byeongjin; Liu, Peipei; Sohn, Hoon

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents a fatigue crack detection technique based on visualization of nonlinear ultrasonic wave modulation produced by a fatigue crack. When distinctive low frequency (LF) and high frequency (HF) inputs are generated and applied to a structure, the presence of a fatigue crack can provide a mechanism for nonlinear ultrasonic modulation and create spectral sidebands around the frequency of the HF signal. In this study, the two input signals are created by two air-coupled transducers (ACT), and the corresponding ultrasonic responses are scanned over a target specimen using a 3D laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV). The crack-induced spectral sidebands are isolated using a combination of linear response subtraction (LRS), and continuous wavelet transform (CWT) filtering. Then, the extracted spectral sideband components are visualized near the fatigue crack. The effectiveness of the proposed non-contact scanning technique is tested using an aluminum plate with a real fatigue crack.

  1. Restrained shrinkage cracking in fiber reinforced concrete: A novel test technique

    SciTech Connect

    Banthia, N.; Yan, C.; Mindess, S.

    1996-01-01

    A novel experimental technique was developed to assess the cracking potential of cement-based materials when used as a bonded overlay. Specimens were cast directly on to a substrate and the assembly was subjected to a drying environment to induce cracking. Lengths and widths of the resulting cracks in the overlay were monitored as a function of time. The use of fibers was found to be very effective not only in reducing the widths of the shrinkage cracks but also in allowing multiple cracking to occur. Interestingly, these two phenomena occurred only up to a fiber volume fraction of 0.5%; at 1% by volume of fibers, only minimal cracking was seen to occur even under a particularly severe environment.

  2. Path (un)predictability of two interacting cracks in polycarbonate sheets using Digital Image Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koivisto, J.; Dalbe, M.-J.; Alava, M. J.; Santucci, S.

    2016-08-01

    Crack propagation is tracked here with Digital Image Correlation analysis in the test case of two cracks propagating in opposite directions in polycarbonate, a material with high ductility and a large Fracture Process Zone (FPZ). Depending on the initial distances between the two crack tips, one may observe different complex crack paths with in particular a regime where the two cracks repel each other prior to being attracted. We show by strain field analysis how this can be understood according to the principle of local symmetry: the propagation is to the direction where the local shear - mode KII in fracture mechanics language - is zero. Thus the interactions exhibited by the cracks arise from symmetry, from the initial geometry, and from the material properties which induce the FPZ. This complexity makes any long-range prediction of the path(s) impossible.

  3. Fatigue Growth and Closure of Short Cracks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-03

    TESTS 87 4.5 SHORT CRACK FATIGUE TESTS IN NOTCHED SPECIMENS 101 5. DISCUSSION 5.1 DURABILITY ANALYSIS - EQUIVALENT INITIAL FLAW SIZE 232 5.2 SHORT... equivalent initial flaw size approach, (2) effects of plasticity, (3) crack closure response of long cracks and (4) crack closure response of short...cracks. 5.1 EQUIVALENT INITIAL FLAW SIZE - DURABILITY ANALYSIS Aerospace structures were Initially designed on a safe-life approach. The underlying

  4. Modeling Disk Cracks in Rotors by Utilizing Speed Dependent Eccentricity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyekenyesi, Andrew L.; Sawicki, Jerzy T.; Haase, Wayne C.

    2010-03-01

    This paper discusses the feasibility of vibration-based structural health monitoring for detecting disk cracks in rotor systems. The approach of interest assumes that a crack located on a rotating disk causes a minute change in the system’s center of mass due to the centrifugal force induced opening of the crack. The center of mass shift is expected to reveal itself in the vibration vector (i.e., whirl response; plotted as amplitude and phase versus speed) gathered during a spin-up and/or spin-down test. Here, analysis is accomplished by modeling a Jeffcott rotor that is characterized by analytical, numerical, and experimental data. The model, which has speed dependent eccentricity, is employed in order to better understand the sensitivity of the approach. For the experimental set-up emulated here (i.e., a single disk located mid-span on a flexible shaft), it appears that a rather sizable flaw in the form of a through-thickness notch could be detected by monitoring the damage-induced shift in center of mass. Although, identifying actual disk cracks in complex “real world” environments, where noncritical crack lengths are small and excessive mechanical and/or electrical noise are present, would prove to be rather challenging. Further research is needed in this regard.

  5. Cracks in Utopia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Many of the craters found on the northern plains of Mars have been partly filled or buried by some material (possibly sediment). The Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image presented here (MOC2-136b, above left) shows a high-resolution view of a tiny portion of the floor of one of these northern plains craters. The crater, located in Utopia Planitia at 44oN, 258oW, is shown on the right (MOC2-136a)with a small white box to indicate the location of the MOC image. The MOC image reveals that the material covering the floor of this crater is cracked and pitted. The origin and source of material that has been deposited in this crater is unknown.

    The MOC image was acquired in June 1999 and covers an area only 1.1 kilometers (0.7 miles) wide at a resolution of 1.8 meters (6 feet) per pixel. The context picture is a mosaic of Viking 2 orbiter images 010B53 and 010B55, taken in 1976. Both images are illuminated from the left. Malin Space Science Systems and the California Institute of Technology built the MOC using spare hardware from the Mars Observer mission. MSSS operates the camera from its facilities in San Diego, CA. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mars Surveyor Operations Project operates the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft with its industrial partner, Lockheed Martin Astronautics, from facilities in Pasadena, CA and Denver, CO.

  6. Computed tomographic imaging of subchondral fatigue cracks in the distal end of the third metacarpal bone in the thoroughbred racehorse can predict crack micromotion in an ex-vivo model.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Marie-Soleil; Morello, Samantha; Rayment, Kelsey; Markel, Mark D; Vanderby, Ray; Kalscheur, Vicki L; Hao, Zhengling; McCabe, Ronald P; Marquis, Patricia; Muir, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Articular stress fracture arising from the distal end of the third metacarpal bone (MC3) is a common serious injury in Thoroughbred racehorses. Currently, there is no method for predicting fracture risk clinically. We describe an ex-vivo biomechanical model in which we measured subchondral crack micromotion under compressive loading that modeled high speed running. Using this model, we determined the relationship between subchondral crack dimensions measured using computed tomography (CT) and crack micromotion. Thoracic limbs from 40 Thoroughbred racehorses that had sustained a catastrophic injury were studied. Limbs were radiographed and examined using CT. Parasagittal subchondral fatigue crack dimensions were measured on CT images using image analysis software. MC3 bones with fatigue cracks were tested using five cycles of compressive loading at -7,500N (38 condyles, 18 horses). Crack motion was recorded using an extensometer. Mechanical testing was validated using bones with 3 mm and 5 mm deep parasagittal subchondral slots that modeled naturally occurring fatigue cracks. After testing, subchondral crack density was determined histologically. Creation of parasagittal subchondral slots induced significant micromotion during loading (p<0.001). In our biomechanical model, we found a significant positive correlation between extensometer micromotion and parasagittal crack area derived from reconstructed CT images (SR = 0.32, p<0.05). Correlations with transverse and frontal plane crack lengths were not significant. Histologic fatigue damage was not significantly correlated with crack dimensions determined by CT or extensometer micromotion. Bones with parasagittal crack area measurements above 30 mm2 may have a high risk of crack propagation and condylar fracture in vivo because of crack micromotion. In conclusion, our results suggest that CT could be used to quantify subchondral fatigue crack dimensions in racing Thoroughbred horses in-vivo to assess risk of

  7. Computed Tomographic Imaging of Subchondral Fatigue Cracks in the Distal End of the Third Metacarpal Bone in the Thoroughbred Racehorse Can Predict Crack Micromotion in an Ex-Vivo Model

    PubMed Central

    Dubois, Marie-Soleil; Morello, Samantha; Rayment, Kelsey; Markel, Mark D.; Vanderby, Ray; Kalscheur, Vicki L.; Hao, Zhengling; McCabe, Ronald P.; Marquis, Patricia; Muir, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Articular stress fracture arising from the distal end of the third metacarpal bone (MC3) is a common serious injury in Thoroughbred racehorses. Currently, there is no method for predicting fracture risk clinically. We describe an ex-vivo biomechanical model in which we measured subchondral crack micromotion under compressive loading that modeled high speed running. Using this model, we determined the relationship between subchondral crack dimensions measured using computed tomography (CT) and crack micromotion. Thoracic limbs from 40 Thoroughbred racehorses that had sustained a catastrophic injury were studied. Limbs were radiographed and examined using CT. Parasagittal subchondral fatigue crack dimensions were measured on CT images using image analysis software. MC3 bones with fatigue cracks were tested using five cycles of compressive loading at -7,500N (38 condyles, 18 horses). Crack motion was recorded using an extensometer. Mechanical testing was validated using bones with 3 mm and 5 mm deep parasagittal subchondral slots that modeled naturally occurring fatigue cracks. After testing, subchondral crack density was determined histologically. Creation of parasagittal subchondral slots induced significant micromotion during loading (p<0.001). In our biomechanical model, we found a significant positive correlation between extensometer micromotion and parasagittal crack area derived from reconstructed CT images (SR = 0.32, p<0.05). Correlations with transverse and frontal plane crack lengths were not significant. Histologic fatigue damage was not significantly correlated with crack dimensions determined by CT or extensometer micromotion. Bones with parasagittal crack area measurements above 30 mm2 may have a high risk of crack propagation and condylar fracture in vivo because of crack micromotion. In conclusion, our results suggest that CT could be used to quantify subchondral fatigue crack dimensions in racing Thoroughbred horses in-vivo to assess risk of

  8. Fatigue crack monitoring with coupled piezoelectric film acoustic emission sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Changjiang

    Fatigue-induced cracking is a commonly seen problem in civil infrastructures reaching their original design life. A number of high-profile accidents have been reported in the past that involved fatigue damage in structures. Such incidences often happen without prior warnings due to lack of proper crack monitoring technique. In order to detect and monitor the fatigue crack, acoustic emission (AE) technique, has been receiving growing interests recently. AE can provide continuous and real-time monitoring data on damage progression in structures. Piezoelectric film AE sensor measures stress-wave induced strain in ultrasonic frequency range and its feasibility for AE signal monitoring has been demonstrated recently. However, extensive work in AE monitoring system development based on piezoelectric film AE sensor and sensor characterization on full-scale structures with fatigue cracks, have not been done. A lack of theoretical formulations for understanding the AE signals also hinders the use of piezoelectric film AE sensors. Additionally, crack detection and source localization with AE signals is a very important area yet to be explored for this new type of AE sensor. This dissertation presents the results of both analytical and experimental study on the signal characteristics of surface stress-wave induced AE strain signals measured by piezoelectric film AE sensors in near-field and an AE source localization method based on sensor couple theory. Based on moment tensor theory, generalized expression for AE strain signal is formulated. A special case involving the response of piezoelectric film AE sensor to surface load is also studied, which could potentially be used for sensor calibration of this type of sensor. A new concept of sensor couple theory based AE source localization technique is proposed and validated with both simulated and experimental data from fatigue test and field monitoring. Two series of fatigue tests were conducted to perform fatigue crack

  9. Observation of Intralaminar Cracking in the Edge Crack Torsion Specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Czabaj, Michael W.; Ratcliffe, James G.; Davidson, Barry D.

    2013-01-01

    The edge crack torsion (ECT) test is evaluated to determine its suitability for measuring fracture toughness associated with mode III delamination growth onset. A series of ECT specimens with preimplanted inserts with different lengths is tested and examined using nondestructive and destructive techniques. Ultrasonic inspection of all tested specimens reveals that delamination growth occurs at one interface ply beneath the intended midplane interface. Sectioning and optical microscopy suggest that the observed delamination growth results from coalescence of angled intralaminar matrix cracks that form and extend across the midplane plies. The relative orientation of these cracks is approximately 45 deg with respect to the midplane, suggesting their formation is caused by resolved principal tensile stresses arising due to the global mode-III shear loading. Examination of ECT specimens tested to loads below the level corresponding to delamination growth onset reveals that initiation of intralaminar cracking approximately coincides with the onset of nonlinearity in the specimen's force-displacement response. The existence of intralaminar cracking prior to delamination growth onset and the resulting delamination extension at an unintended interface render the ECT test, in its current form, unsuitable for characterization of mode III delamination growth onset. The broader implications of the mechanisms observed in this study are also discussed with respect to the current understanding of shear-driven delamination in tape-laminate composites.

  10. Steady-state response of a geared rotor system with slant cracked shaft and time-varying mesh stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Qinkai; Zhao, Jingshan; Lu, Wenxiu; Peng, Zhike; Chu, Fulei

    2014-04-01

    The dynamic behavior of geared rotor system with defects is helpful for the failure diagnosis and state detecting of the system. Extensive efforts have been devoted to study the dynamic behaviors of geared systems with tooth root cracks. When surface cracks (especially for slant cracks) appear on the transmission shaft, the dynamic characteristics of the system have not gained sufficient attentions. Due to the parametric excitations induced by slant crack breathing and time-varying mesh stiffness, the steady-state response of the cracked geared rotor system differs distinctly from that of the uncracked system. Thus, utilizing the direct spectral method (DSM), the forced response spectra of a geared rotor system with slant cracked shaft and time-varying mesh stiffness under transmission error, unbalance force and torsional excitations are, respectively, obtained and discussed in detail. The effects of crack types (straight or slant crack) and crack depth on the forced response spectra of the system without and with torsional excitation are considered in the analysis. In addition, how the frequency response characteristics change after considering the crack is also investigated. It is shown that the torsional excitations have significant influence on the forced response spectra of slant cracked system. Sub-critical resonances are also found in the frequency response curves. The results could be used for shaft crack detection in geared rotor system.

  11. Small Crack Growth and Fatigue Life Predictions for High-Strength Aluminium Alloys. Part 1; Experimental and Fracture Mechanics Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, X. R.; Newman, J. C.; Zhao, W.; Swain, M. H.; Ding, C. F.; Phillips, E. P.

    1998-01-01

    The small crack effect was investigated in two high-strength aluminium alloys: 7075-T6 bare and LC9cs clad alloy. Both experimental and analytical investigations were conducted to study crack initiation and growth of small cracks. In the experimental program, fatigue tests, small crack and large crack tests A,ere conducted under constant amplitude and Mini-TWIST spectrum loading conditions. A pronounced small crack effect was observed in both materials, especially for the negative stress ratios. For all loading conditions, most of the fatigue life of the SENT specimens was shown to be crack propagation from initial material defects or from the cladding layer. In the analysis program, three-dimensional finite element and A weight function methods were used to determine stress intensity factors and to develop SIF equations for surface and corner cracks at the notch in the SENT specimens. A plastisity-induced crack-closure model was used to correlate small and large crack data, and to make fatigue life predictions, Predicted crack-growth rates and fatigue lives agreed well with experiments. A total fatigue life prediction method for the aluminum alloys was developed and demonstrated using the crack-closure model.

  12. The effect of tempering temperature on near- threshold fatigue crack behavior in quenched and tempered 4140 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    London, B.; Nelson, D. V.; Shyne, J. C.

    1988-10-01

    Fatigue crack growth in compact tension samples of high purity 4140 steel quenched and tempered to various strength levels was investigated. Tempering temperatures of 200, 400, 550, and 700 °C produced yield strengths from 1600 to 875 MPa, respectively. Crack propagation and crack closure were monitored in K-decreasing tests performed under R = 0.05 loading conditions in laboratory air. Results indicated that as the yield strength increased the crack growth rate increased at a given ΔK and ΔKth decreased. Threshold values varied from 2.8 MPa m1/2 (200 °C temper) to 9.5 MPa m1/2 (700 °C temper). Cracks in the 200 °C tempered samples grew by an intergranular mechanism following prior austenite grain boundaries probably caused by hydrogen embrittlement or tempered martensite embrittlement. Tempering above 200 °C produced transgranular fatigue crack growth. The level of crack closure increased with tempering temperature and with crack propagation in a given tempered condition. Crack closure was caused by a combination of plasticity-induced and oxide-induced mechanisms. The use of an effective stress intensity range based on crack closure consolidated the fatigue crack growth curves and the threshold values for all tempering temperatures except 200 °C.

  13. Extending non-fatigue Mode I subcritical crack growth data to subcritical fatigue crack growth: Demonstration of the equivalence of the Charles' law and Paris law exponents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keanini, Russell; Eppes, Martha-Cary

    2016-04-01

    Paris's law connects fatigue-induced subcritical crack growth and fatigue loading. Environmentally-driven subcritical crack growth, while a random process, can be decomposed into a spectrum of cyclic processes, where each spectral component is governed by Paris's law. Unfortunately, almost no data exists concerning the Paris law exponent, m; rather, the great majority of existing sub-critical crack growth measurements on rock have been carried out via Mode I tensile tests, where corresponding data are generally correlated using Charles' law, and where the latter, similar to Paris's law, exposes a power law relationship between crack growth rate and stress intensity. In this study, a statistical argument is used to derive a simple, rigorous relationship between the all-important Paris law and Charles law exponents, m and n. This result has a significant practical implication: subcritical fatigue crack growth in rock, driven by various random environmental weathering processes can now be predicted using available Mode I stress corrosion indices, n.

  14. Defining process design space for a hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) purification step: application of quality by design (QbD) principles.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Canping; Flansburg, Lisa; Ghose, Sanchayita; Jorjorian, Paul; Shukla, Abhinav A

    2010-12-15

    The concept of design space has been taking root under the quality by design paradigm as a foundation of in-process control strategies for biopharmaceutical manufacturing processes. This paper outlines the development of a design space for a hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) process step. The design space included the impact of raw material lot-to-lot variability and variations in the feed stream from cell culture. A failure modes and effects analysis was employed as the basis for the process characterization exercise. During mapping of the process design space, the multi-dimensional combination of operational variables were studied to quantify the impact on process performance in terms of yield and product quality. Variability in resin hydrophobicity was found to have a significant influence on step yield and high-molecular weight aggregate clearance through the HIC step. A robust operating window was identified for this process step that enabled a higher step yield while ensuring acceptable product quality. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Corrosion fatigue crack propagation in metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, Richard P.

    1990-01-01

    This review assesses fracture mechanics data and mechanistic models for corrosion fatigue crack propagation in structural alloys exposed to ambient temperature gases and electrolytes. Extensive stress intensity-crack growth rate data exist for ferrous, aluminum and nickel based alloys in a variety of environments. Interactive variables (viz., stress intensity range, mean stress, alloy composition and microstructure, loading frequency, temperature, gas pressure and electrode potential) strongly affect crack growth kinetics and complicate fatigue control. Mechanistic models to predict crack growth rates were formulated by coupling crack tip mechanics with occluded crack chemistry, and from both the hydrogen embrittlement and anodic dissolution/film rupture perspectives. Research is required to better define: (1) environmental effects near threshold and on crack closure; (2) damage tolerant life prediction codes and the validity of similitude; (3) the behavior of microcrack; (4) probes and improved models of crack tip damage; and (5) the cracking performance of advanced alloys and composites.

  16. Crack propagation driven by crystal growth

    SciTech Connect

    A. Royne; Paul Meaking; A. Malthe-Sorenssen; B. Jamtveit; D. K. Dysthe

    2011-10-01

    Crystals that grow in confinement may exert a force on their surroundings and thereby drive crack propagation in rocks and other materials. We describe a model of crystal growth in an idealized crack geometry in which the crystal growth and crack propagation are coupled through the stress in the surrounding bulk solid. Subcritical crack propagation takes place during a transient period, which may be very long, during which the crack velocity is limited by the kinetics of crack propagation. When the crack is sufficiently large, the crack velocity becomes limited by the kinetics of crystal growth. The duration of the subcritical regime is determined by two non-dimensional parameters, which relate the kinetics of crack propagation and crystal growth to the supersaturation of the fluid and the elastic properties of the surrounding material.

  17. Residual stress in glass: indentation crack and fractography approaches.

    PubMed

    Anunmana, Chuchai; Anusavice, Kenneth J; Mecholsky, John J

    2009-11-01

    To test the hypothesis that the indentation crack technique can determine surface residual stresses that are not statistically significantly different from those determined from the analytical procedure using surface cracks, the four-point flexure test, and fracture surface analysis. Soda-lime-silica glass bar specimens (4 mm x 2.3 mm x 28 mm) were prepared and annealed at 650 degrees C for 30 min before testing. The fracture toughness values of the glass bars were determined from 12 specimens based on induced surface cracks, four-point flexure, and fractographic analysis. To determine the residual stress from the indentation technique, 18 specimens were indented under 19.6N load using a Vickers microhardness indenter. Crack lengths were measured within 1 min and 24h after indentation, and the measured crack lengths were compared with the mean crack lengths of annealed specimens. Residual stress was calculated from an equation developed for the indentation technique. All specimens were fractured in a four-point flexure fixture and the residual stress was calculated from the strength and measured crack sizes on the fracture surfaces. The results show that there was no significant difference between the residual stresses calculated from the two techniques. However, the differences in mean residual stresses calculated within 1 min compared with those calculated after 24h were statistically significant (p=0.003). This study compared the indentation technique with the fractographic analysis method for determining the residual stress in the surface of soda-lime-silica glass. The indentation method may be useful for estimating residual stress in glass.

  18. Residual stress in glass: indentation crack and fractography approaches

    PubMed Central

    Anunmana, Chuchai; Anusavice, Kenneth J.; Mecholsky, John J.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis that the indentation crack technique can determine surface residual stresses that are not statistically significantly different from those determined from the analytical procedure using surface cracks, the four-point flexure test, and fracture surface analysis. Methods Soda-lime-silica glass bar specimens (4 mm × 2.3 mm × 28 mm) were prepared and annealed at 650 °C for 30 min before testing. The fracture toughness values of the glass bars were determined from 12 specimens based on induced surface cracks, four-point flexure, and fractographic analysis. To determine the residual stress from the indentation technique, 18 specimens were indented under 19.6 N load using a Vickers microhardness indenter. Crack lengths were measured within 1 min and 24 h after indentation, and the measured crack lengths were compared with the mean crack lengths of annealed specimens. Residual stress was calculated from an equation developed for the indentation technique. All specimens were fractured in a four-point flexure fixture and the residual stress was calculated from the strength and measured crack sizes on the fracture surfaces. Results The results show that there was no significant difference between the residual stresses calculated from the two techniques. However, the differences in mean residual stresses calculated within 1 min compared with those calculated after 24 h were statistically significant (p=0.003). Significance This study compared the indentation technique with the fractographic analysis method for determining the residual stress in the surface of soda-lime silica glass. The indentation method may be useful for estimating residual stress in glass. PMID:19671475

  19. Salinity Effects on Cracking Morphology and Dynamics in Desiccating Clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeCarlo, K.; Shokri, N.

    2013-12-01

    Saline conditions induce not only chemical but physical changes in swelling clays, and have a significant influence on the crack dynamics in desiccating clays. In this study, we used X-ray computerized tomography (CT) to experimentally investigate the effects of sodium chloride on the morphology and dynamics of desiccation cracks in three-dimensional mixtures of sand-bentonite slurry under varying rheological conditions. Rectangular glass containers (40.5x40.5x56 mm^3) were packed with sand-bentonite slurries of different salt concentrations, with the top boundary exposed to air for evaporation. The growth and propagation of the cracking network that subsequently formed was visualized in 3D at multiple intervals. 3D characterization of cracking dynamics shows a high extent of localized superficial crack networks at low salinity, with a transition to less extensive but deeper, more centralized crack networks with increased salinity. The observed behavior was described in the context of rheological and colloidal properties of the clay, which suggest the transition from a voluminous and poorly-sorted stacked clay structure to a more compact and highly cohesive entangled clay structure as salt concentration increases in the evaporating samples. This is further corroborated by vertical profiles of sample water distribution, which shows localized uniform drying at the higher salt concentrations. Our results provide new insights regarding the formation, patterns, dynamics and characteristics of desiccation cracks formed during evaporation from 3D saline clay structures, which will be useful in various hydrological applications including water management, land surface evaporation, and subsurface contaminant transport.

  20. Getter materials for cracking ammonia

    DOEpatents

    Boffito, Claudio; Baker, John D.

    1999-11-02

    A method is provided for cracking ammonia to produce hydrogen. The method includes the steps of passing ammonia over an ammonia-cracking catalyst which is an alloy including (1) alloys having the general formula Zr.sub.1-x Ti.sub.x M.sub.1 M.sub.2, wherein M.sub.1 and M.sub.2 are selected independently from the group consisting of Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni, and x is between about 0.0 and about 1.0 inclusive; and between about 20% and about 50% Al by weight. In another aspect, the method of the invention is used to provide methods for operating hydrogen-fueled internal combustion engines and hydrogen fuel cells. In still another aspect, the present invention provides a hydrogen-fueled internal combustion engine and a hydrogen fuel cell including the above-described ammonia-cracking catalyst.