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Sample records for induced gamma frequency

  1. Intrinsic Cornu Ammonis Area 1 Theta-Nested Gamma Oscillations Induced by Optogenetic Theta Frequency Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Butler, James L.; Mendonça, Philipe R. F.; Robinson, Hugh P. C.

    2016-01-01

    Gamma oscillations (30–120 Hz) are thought to be important for various cognitive functions, including perception and working memory, and disruption of these oscillations has been implicated in brain disorders, such as schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. The cornu ammonis area 1 (CA1) of the hippocampus receives gamma frequency inputs from upstream regions (cornu ammonis area 3 and medial entorhinal cortex) and generates itself a faster gamma oscillation. The exact nature and origin of the intrinsic CA1 gamma oscillation is still under debate. Here, we expressed channelrhodopsin-2 under the CaMKIIα promoter in mice and prepared hippocampal slices to produce a model of intrinsic CA1 gamma oscillations. Sinusoidal optical stimulation of CA1 at theta frequency was found to induce robust theta-nested gamma oscillations with a temporal and spatial profile similar to CA1 gamma in vivo. The results suggest the presence of a single gamma rhythm generator with a frequency range of 65–75 Hz at 32°C. Pharmacological analysis found that the oscillations depended on both AMPA and GABAA receptors. Cell-attached and whole-cell recordings revealed that excitatory neuron firing slightly preceded interneuron firing within each gamma cycle, suggesting that this intrinsic CA1 gamma oscillation is generated with a pyramidal–interneuron circuit mechanism. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT This study demonstrates that the cornu ammonis area 1 (CA1) is capable of generating intrinsic gamma oscillations in response to theta input. This gamma generator is independent of activity in the upstream regions, highlighting that CA1 can produce its own gamma oscillation in addition to inheriting activity from the upstream regions. This supports the theory that gamma oscillations predominantly function to achieve local synchrony, and that a local gamma generated in each area conducts the signal to the downstream region. PMID:27076416

  2. The repair of gamma-ray-induced chromosomal damage in human lymphocytes after exposure to extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, D; Hone, P; Edwards, A; Cox, R; Halls, J

    2004-01-01

    G(0) human blood lymphocytes were irradiated with 2.0 Gy gamma-rays and cultured to metaphase whilst held in a 50-Hz power frequency magnetic field of 0.23, 0.47 or 0.7 mT. No differences were found in the frequencies of gamma-induced chromosome aberrations observed in cells held in the EM fields compared with replicates held in a sham coil. Similar field conditions have been reported to increase the frequency of gamma-induced HPRT mutations, leading to a suggestion that the EM fields alter the fidelity of repair of genomic lesions. This was not confirmed by the chromosome aberration assay described here.

  3. Cholinergic and glutamatergic agonists induce gamma frequency activity in dorsal subcoeruleus nucleus neurons

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Christen; Kezunovic, Nebojsa; Williams, D. Keith; Urbano, Francisco J.

    2011-01-01

    The dorsal subcoeruleus nucleus (SubCD) is involved in generating two signs of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep: muscle atonia and ponto-geniculo-occipital (PGO) waves. We tested the hypothesis that single cell and/or population responses of SubCD neurons are capable of generating gamma frequency activity in response to intracellular stimulation or receptor agonist activation. Whole cell patch clamp recordings (immersion chamber) and population responses (interface chamber) were conducted on 9- to 20-day-old rat brain stem slices. All SubCD neurons (n = 103) fired at gamma frequency when subjected to depolarizing steps. Two statistically distinct populations of neurons were observed, which were distinguished by their high (>80 Hz, n = 24) versus low (35–80 Hz, n = 16) initial firing frequencies. Both cell types exhibited subthreshold oscillations in the gamma range (n = 43), which may underlie the gamma band firing properties of these neurons. The subthreshold oscillations were blocked by the sodium channel blockers tetrodotoxin (TTX, n = 21) extracellularly and N-(2,6-dimethylphenylcarbamoylmethyl)triethylammonium bromide (QX-314) intracellularly (n = 5), indicating they were sodium channel dependent. Gamma frequency subthreshold oscillations were observed in response to the nonspecific cholinergic receptor agonist carbachol (CAR, n = 11, d = 1.08) and the glutamate receptor agonists N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA, n = 12, d = 1.09) and kainic acid (KA, n = 13, d = 0.96), indicating that cholinergic and glutamatergic inputs may be involved in the activation of these subthreshold currents. Gamma band activity also was observed in population responses following application of CAR (n = 4, P < 0.05), NMDA (n = 4, P < 0.05) and KA (n = 4, P < 0.05). Voltage-sensitive, sodium channel-dependent gamma band activity appears to be a part of the intrinsic membrane properties of SubCD neurons. PMID:21543743

  4. The frequency of visually induced gamma-band oscillations depends on the size of early human visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Schwarzkopf, D. Samuel; Robertson, David J.; Song, Chen; Barnes, Gareth R.; Rees, Geraint

    2012-01-01

    The structural and functional architecture of the human brain is characterized by considerable variability with consequences for visual perception. However the neurophysiological events mediating this relationship between inter-individual differences in cortical surface area and visual perception have until now remained unknown. Here, we show that the retinotopically defined surface areas of central V1 and V2 were correlated with the peak frequency of visually-induced oscillations in the gamma band measured with magnetoencephalography (MEG). Gamma-band oscillations are thought to play an important role in visual processing. We propose that individual differences in macroscopic gamma frequency may be attributed to inter-individual variability in the microscopic architecture of visual cortex. PMID:22279235

  5. Dissecting gamma frequency activity during human memory processing.

    PubMed

    Kucewicz, Michal T; Berry, Brent M; Kremen, Vaclav; Brinkmann, Benjamin H; Sperling, Michael R; Jobst, Barbara C; Gross, Robert E; Lega, Bradley; Sheth, Sameer A; Stein, Joel M; Das, Sandthitsu R; Gorniak, Richard; Stead, S Matthew; Rizzuto, Daniel S; Kahana, Michael J; Worrell, Gregory A

    2017-03-13

    Gamma frequency activity (30-150 Hz) is induced in cognitive tasks and is thought to reflect underlying neural processes. Gamma frequency activity can be recorded directly from the human brain using intracranial electrodes implanted in patients undergoing treatment for drug-resistant epilepsy. Previous studies have independently explored narrowband oscillations in the local field potential and broadband power increases. It is not clear, however, which processes contribute to human brain gamma frequency activity, or their dynamics and roles during memory processing. Here a large dataset of intracranial recordings obtained during encoding of words from 101 patients was used to detect, characterize and compare induced gamma frequency activity events. Individual bursts of gamma frequency activity were isolated in the time-frequency domain to determine their spectral features, including peak frequency, amplitude, frequency span, and duration. We found two distinct types of gamma frequency activity events that showed either narrowband or broadband frequency spans revealing characteristic spectral properties. Narrowband events, the predominant type, were induced by word presentations following an initial induction of broadband events, which were temporally separated and selectively correlated with evoked response potentials, suggesting that they reflect different neural activities and play different roles during memory encoding. The two gamma frequency activity types were differentially modulated during encoding of subsequently recalled and forgotten words. In conclusion, we found evidence for two distinct activity types induced in the gamma frequency range during cognitive processing. Separating these two gamma frequency activity components contributes to the current understanding of electrophysiological biomarkers, and may prove useful for emerging neurotechnologies targeting, mapping and modulating distinct neurophysiological processes in normal and epileptogenic brain.

  6. Visual stimulus eccentricity affects human gamma peak frequency.

    PubMed

    van Pelt, Stan; Fries, Pascal

    2013-09-01

    The peak frequency of neuronal gamma-band synchronization has received much attention in recent years. Gamma peak frequency shifts to higher frequency values for higher contrast, faster moving, and attended stimuli. In monkey V1, gamma peak frequency for a drifting grating is higher for a parafoveal as compared to an eccentric stimulus (Lima et al., 2010). This effect might be due to the cortical magnification factor: the higher cortical magnification for parafoveal stimuli increases the velocity with which the cortical representations of the moving grating stripes move across the cortical surface. Since faster moving stimuli lead to higher gamma frequency, a faster moving cortical representation might do the same. This explanation predicts that the eccentricity effect on gamma peak frequency is absent for stationary stimuli. To test this, we investigated the effect of eccentricity on gamma peak frequency by recording magnetoencephalography in human subjects while they viewed moving or stationary gratings. We found that both the moving and the stationary stimuli induced lower peak frequencies for larger eccentricities, arguing against an explanation based on the cortical magnification factor. We further investigated whether this eccentricity effect was explained by differences in the size or the spatial frequency of the expected cortical activation. Neither of those explained the eccentricity effect. We propose that the different stimulus and top-down factors leading to higher gamma peak frequency all result in higher stimulus salience, that salience is translated into gamma peak frequency, and that gamma peak frequency might subserve the preferential processing of neuronal activity induced by salient stimuli.

  7. Seizure-induced alterations in fast-spiking basket cell GABA currents modulate frequency and coherence of gamma oscillation in network simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Proddutur, Archana; Yu, Jiandong; Elgammal, Fatima S.; Santhakumar, Vijayalakshmi

    2013-12-15

    Gamma frequency oscillations have been proposed to contribute to memory formation and retrieval. Fast-spiking basket cells (FS-BCs) are known to underlie development of gamma oscillations. Fast, high amplitude GABA synapses and gap junctions have been suggested to contribute to gamma oscillations in FS-BC networks. Recently, we identified that, apart from GABAergic synapses, FS-BCs in the hippocampal dentate gyrus have GABAergic currents mediated by extrasynaptic receptors. Our experimental studies demonstrated two specific changes in FS-BC GABA currents following experimental seizures [Yu et al., J. Neurophysiol. 109, 1746 (2013)]: increase in the magnitude of extrasynaptic (tonic) GABA currents and a depolarizing shift in GABA reversal potential (E{sub GABA}). Here, we use homogeneous networks of a biophysically based model of FS-BCs to examine how the presence of extrasynaptic GABA conductance (g{sub GABA-extra}) and experimentally identified, seizure-induced changes in g{sub GABA-extra} and E{sub GABA} influence network activity. Networks of FS-BCs interconnected by fast GABAergic synapses developed synchronous firing in the dentate gamma frequency range (40–100 Hz). Systematic investigation revealed that the biologically realistic range of 30 to 40 connections between FS-BCs resulted in greater coherence in the gamma frequency range when networks were activated by Poisson-distributed dendritic synaptic inputs rather than by homogeneous somatic current injections, which were balanced for FS-BC firing frequency in unconnected networks. Distance-dependent conduction delay enhanced coherence in networks with 30–40 FS-BC interconnections while inclusion of gap junctional conductance had a modest effect on coherence. In networks activated by somatic current injections resulting in heterogeneous FS-BC firing, increasing g{sub GABA-extra} reduced the frequency and coherence of FS-BC firing when E{sub GABA} was shunting (−74 mV), but failed to alter average

  8. Seizure-induced alterations in fast-spiking basket cell GABA currents modulate frequency and coherence of gamma oscillation in network simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proddutur, Archana; Yu, Jiandong; Elgammal, Fatima S.; Santhakumar, Vijayalakshmi

    2013-12-01

    Gamma frequency oscillations have been proposed to contribute to memory formation and retrieval. Fast-spiking basket cells (FS-BCs) are known to underlie development of gamma oscillations. Fast, high amplitude GABA synapses and gap junctions have been suggested to contribute to gamma oscillations in FS-BC networks. Recently, we identified that, apart from GABAergic synapses, FS-BCs in the hippocampal dentate gyrus have GABAergic currents mediated by extrasynaptic receptors. Our experimental studies demonstrated two specific changes in FS-BC GABA currents following experimental seizures [Yu et al., J. Neurophysiol. 109, 1746 (2013)]: increase in the magnitude of extrasynaptic (tonic) GABA currents and a depolarizing shift in GABA reversal potential (EGABA). Here, we use homogeneous networks of a biophysically based model of FS-BCs to examine how the presence of extrasynaptic GABA conductance (gGABA-extra) and experimentally identified, seizure-induced changes in gGABA-extra and EGABA influence network activity. Networks of FS-BCs interconnected by fast GABAergic synapses developed synchronous firing in the dentate gamma frequency range (40-100 Hz). Systematic investigation revealed that the biologically realistic range of 30 to 40 connections between FS-BCs resulted in greater coherence in the gamma frequency range when networks were activated by Poisson-distributed dendritic synaptic inputs rather than by homogeneous somatic current injections, which were balanced for FS-BC firing frequency in unconnected networks. Distance-dependent conduction delay enhanced coherence in networks with 30-40 FS-BC interconnections while inclusion of gap junctional conductance had a modest effect on coherence. In networks activated by somatic current injections resulting in heterogeneous FS-BC firing, increasing gGABA-extra reduced the frequency and coherence of FS-BC firing when EGABA was shunting (-74 mV), but failed to alter average FS-BC frequency when EGABA was depolarizing

  9. Cholinergic receptor activation induces a relative facilitation of synaptic responses in the entorhinal cortex during theta- and gamma-frequency stimulation of parasubicular inputs.

    PubMed

    Sparks, D W; Chapman, C A

    2013-01-29

    The parasubiculum sends its single major output to layer II of the entorhinal cortex, and it may therefore interact with inputs to the entorhinal cortex from other cortical areas, and help to shape the activity of layer II entorhinal cells that project to the hippocampal formation. Cholinergic inputs are thought to contribute to the generation of theta- and gamma-frequency activities in the parasubiculum and entorhinal cortex, and the present study assessed how cholinergic receptor activation affects synaptic responses of the entorhinal cortex to theta- and gamma-frequency stimulation. Depth profiles of field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) in acute brain slices showed a short-latency negative fEPSP in layer II, consistent with the activation of excitatory synaptic inputs to layer II. Application of the cholinergic agonist carbachol (CCh) suppressed synaptic responses and enhanced paired-pulse facilitation. CCh also resulted in a marked relative facilitation of synaptic responses evoked during short 5-pulse trains of stimulation at both theta- and gamma-frequencies. Application of the M(1) antagonist pirenzepine, but not the M(2) antagonist methoctramine, blocked the facilitation of responses. Inhibition of the M-current or block of GABA(B) receptors had no effect, but the facilitation effect was partially blocked by the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist APV, indicating that NMDA receptors play a role. Application of ZD7288, a selective inhibitor of the hyperpolarization-activated cationic current I(h), almost completely blocked the relative facilitation of responses, and the less potent I(h)-blocker Cs(+) also resulted in a partial block. The relative facilitation of synaptic responses induced by CCh is therefore likely mediated by multiple mechanisms including the cholinergic suppression of transmitter release that enhances transmitter availability during repetitive stimulation, NMDA receptor-mediated effects on pre- or postsynaptic function, and

  10. Gamma Frequency and the Spatial Tuning of Primary Visual Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Fusca, Marco; Rees, Geraint; Schwarzkopf, D. Samuel; Barnes, Gareth

    2016-01-01

    Visual stimulation produces oscillatory gamma responses in human primary visual cortex (V1) that also relate to visual perception. We have shown previously that peak gamma frequency positively correlates with central V1 cortical surface area. We hypothesized that people with larger V1 would have smaller receptive fields and that receptive field size, not V1 area, might explain this relationship. Here we set out to test this hypothesis directly by investigating the relationship between fMRI estimated population receptive field (pRF) size and gamma frequency in V1. We stimulated both the near-center and periphery of the visual field using both large and small stimuli in each location and replicated our previous finding of a positive correlation between V1 surface area and peak gamma frequency. Counter to our expectation, we found that between participants V1 size (and not PRF size) accounted for most of the variability in gamma frequency. Within-participants we found that gamma frequency increased, rather than decreased, with stimulus eccentricity directly contradicting our initial hypothesis. PMID:27362265

  11. Control of hippocampal gamma oscillation frequency by tonic inhibition and excitation of interneurons.

    PubMed

    Mann, Edward O; Mody, Istvan

    2010-02-01

    Gamma-frequency oscillations depend on phasic synaptic GABA(A) receptor (GABA(A)R)-mediated inhibition to synchronize spike timing. The spillover of synaptically released GABA can also activate extrasynaptic GABA(A)Rs, and such tonic inhibition may also contribute to modulating network dynamics. In many neuronal cell types, tonic inhibition is mediated by delta subunit-containing GABA(A)Rs. We found that the frequency of in vitro cholinergically induced gamma oscillations in the mouse hippocampal CA3 region was increased by the activation of NMDA receptors (NMDARs) on interneurons. The NMDAR-dependent increase of gamma oscillation frequency was counteracted by the tonic inhibition of the interneurons mediated by delta subunit-containing GABA(A)Rs. Recordings of synaptic currents during gamma activity revealed that NMDAR-mediated increases in oscillation frequency correlated with a progressive synchronization of phasic excitation and inhibition in the network. Thus, the balance between tonic excitation and tonic inhibition of interneurons may modulate gamma frequency by shaping interneuronal synchronization.

  12. The relationship between gamma frequency and running speed differs for slow and fast gamma rhythms in freely behaving rats.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Chenguang; Bieri, Kevin Wood; Trettel, Sean Gregory; Colgin, Laura Lee

    2015-08-01

    In hippocampal area CA1 of rats, the frequency of gamma activity has been shown to increase with running speed (Ahmed and Mehta, 2012). This finding suggests that different gamma frequencies simply allow for different timings of transitions across cell assemblies at varying running speeds, rather than serving unique functions. However, accumulating evidence supports the conclusion that slow (∼25-55 Hz) and fast (∼60-100 Hz) gamma are distinct network states with different functions. If slow and fast gamma constitute distinct network states, then it is possible that slow and fast gamma frequencies are differentially affected by running speed. In this study, we tested this hypothesis and found that slow and fast gamma frequencies change differently as a function of running speed in hippocampal areas CA1 and CA3, and in the superficial layers of the medial entorhinal cortex (MEC). Fast gamma frequencies increased with increasing running speed in all three areas. Slow gamma frequencies changed significantly less across different speeds. Furthermore, at high running speeds, CA3 firing rates were low, and MEC firing rates were high, suggesting that CA1 transitions from CA3 inputs to MEC inputs as running speed increases. These results support the hypothesis that slow and fast gamma reflect functionally distinct states in the hippocampal network, with fast gamma driven by MEC at high running speeds and slow gamma driven by CA3 at low running speeds.

  13. Resting GABA and glutamate concentrations do not predict visual gamma frequency or amplitude

    PubMed Central

    Cousijn, Helena; Haegens, Saskia; Wallis, George; Near, Jamie; Stokes, Mark G.; Harrison, Paul J.; Nobre, Anna C.

    2014-01-01

    Gamma band oscillations arise in neuronal networks of interconnected GABAergic interneurons and excitatory pyramidal cells. A previous study found a correlation between visual gamma peak frequency, as measured with magnetoencephalography, and resting GABA levels, as measured with magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), in 12 healthy volunteers. If true, this would allow studies in clinical populations testing modulation of this relationship, but this finding has not been replicated. We addressed this important question by measuring gamma oscillations and GABA, as well as glutamate, in 50 healthy volunteers. Visual gamma activity was evoked using an established gratings paradigm, and we applied a beamformer spatial filtering technique to extract source-reconstructed gamma peak frequency and amplitude from the occipital lobe. We determined gamma peak frequency and amplitude from the location with maximal activation and from the location of the MRS voxel to assess the relationship of GABA with gamma. Gamma peak frequency was estimated from the highest value of the raw spectra and by a Gaussian fit to the spectra. MRS data were acquired from occipital cortex. We did not replicate the previously found correlation between gamma peak frequency and GABA concentration. Calculation of a Bayes factor provided strong evidence in favor of the null hypothesis. We also did not find a correlation between gamma activity and glutamate or between gamma and the ratio of GABA/glutamate. Our results suggest that cortical gamma oscillations do not have a consistent, demonstrable relationship to excitatory/inhibitory network activity as proxied by MRS measurements of GABA and glutamate. PMID:24927588

  14. Lack of kainic acid-induced gamma oscillations predicts subsequent CA1 excitotoxic cell death

    PubMed Central

    Jinde, Seiichiro; Belforte, Juan E.; Yamamoto, Jun; Wilson, Matthew A.; Tonegawa, Susumu; Nakazawa, Kazu

    2009-01-01

    Gamma oscillations are a prominent feature of hippocampal network activity, but their functional role remains debated, ranging from mere epiphenomenon to crucial for information processing. Similarly, persistent gamma oscillations sometimes appear prior to epileptic discharges in patients with mesial temporal sclerosis. However, the significance of this activity in hippocampal excitotoxicity is unclear. We assessed the relationship between kainic acid (KA)-induced gamma oscillations and excitotoxicity in genetically-engineered mice in which N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor deletion was confined to CA3 pyramidal cells. Mutants showed reduced CA3 pyramidal cell firing and augmented sharp wave-ripple activity, resulting in higher susceptibility to KA-induced seizures, and leading to strikingly selective neurodegeneration in the CA1 subfield. Interestingly, the KA-induced gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) level increases and persistent 30-50 Hz gamma oscillations observed in control mice prior to the first seizure discharge was abolished in the mutants. Consequently, on subsequent days, mutants manifested prolonged epileptiform activity and massive neurodegeneration of CA1 cells, including local GABAergic neurons. Remarkably, pretreatment with the potassium channel blocker α-dendrotoxin (DTX) increased GABA levels, restored gamma oscillations, and prevented CA1 degeneration in the mutants. These results demonstrate that emergence of low frequency gamma oscillations predicts increased resistance to KA-induced excitotoxicity, raising the possibility that gamma oscillations may have potential prognostic value for the treatment of epilepsy. PMID:19735292

  15. Superior orientation discrimination and increased peak gamma frequency in autism spectrum conditions.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Abigail; Bruyns-Haylett, Michael; Smith, Richard; Jones, Myles; Milne, Elizabeth

    2016-04-01

    While perception is recognized as being atypical in individuals with autism spectrum conditions (ASC), the underlying mechanisms for such atypicality are unclear. Here we test the hypothesis that individuals with ASC will show enhanced orientation discrimination compared with neurotypical observers. This prediction is based both on anecdotal report of superior discriminatory skills in ASC and also on evidence in the auditory domain that some individuals with ASC have superior pitch discrimination. In order to establish whether atypical perception might be mediated by an imbalance in the ratio of neural excitation and inhibition (E:I ratio), we also measured peak gamma frequency, which provides an indication of neural inhibition levels. Using a rigorous thresholding method, we found that orientation discrimination thresholds for obliquely oriented stimuli were significantly lower in participants with ASC. Using EEG to measure the visually induced gamma band response, we also found that peak gamma frequency was higher in participants with ASC, relative to a well-matched control group. These novel results suggest that neural inhibition may be increased in the occipital cortex of individuals with ASC. Implications for existing theories of an imbalance in the E:I ratio of ASC are discussed.

  16. Significant reductions in human visual gamma frequency by the gaba reuptake inhibitor tiagabine revealed by robust peak frequency estimation

    PubMed Central

    Muthukumaraswamy, Suresh D.; Campbell, Anne E.; Hamandi, Khalid; Lingford‐Hughes, Anne; Myers, Jim F. M.; Nutt, David J.; Sumner, Petroc; Wilson, Sue J.; Singh, Krish D.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The frequency of visual gamma oscillations is determined by both the neuronal excitation–inhibition balance and the time constants of GABAergic processes. The gamma peak frequency has been linked to sensory processing, cognitive function, cortical structure, and may have a genetic contribution. To disentangle the intricate relationship among these factors, accurate and reliable estimates of peak frequency are required. Here, a bootstrapping approach that provides estimates of peak frequency reliability, thereby increasing the robustness of the inferences made on this parameter was developed. The method using both simulated data and real data from two previous pharmacological MEG studies of visual gamma with alcohol and tiagabine was validated. In particular, the study by Muthukumaraswamy et al. [2013a] (Neuropsychopharmacology 38(6):1105–1112), in which GABAergic enhancement by tiagabine had previously demonstrated a null effect on visual gamma oscillations, contrasting with strong evidence from both animal models and very recent human studies was re‐evaluated. After improved peak frequency estimation and additional exclusion of unreliably measured data, it was found that the GABA reuptake inhibitor tiagabine did produce, as predicted, a marked decrease in visual gamma oscillation frequency. This result demonstrates the potential impact of objective approaches to data quality control, and provides additional translational evidence for the mechanisms of GABAergic transmission generating gamma oscillations in humans. Hum Brain Mapp 37:3882–3896, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27273695

  17. Significant reductions in human visual gamma frequency by the gaba reuptake inhibitor tiagabine revealed by robust peak frequency estimation.

    PubMed

    Magazzini, Lorenzo; Muthukumaraswamy, Suresh D; Campbell, Anne E; Hamandi, Khalid; Lingford-Hughes, Anne; Myers, Jim F M; Nutt, David J; Sumner, Petroc; Wilson, Sue J; Singh, Krish D

    2016-11-01

    The frequency of visual gamma oscillations is determined by both the neuronal excitation-inhibition balance and the time constants of GABAergic processes. The gamma peak frequency has been linked to sensory processing, cognitive function, cortical structure, and may have a genetic contribution. To disentangle the intricate relationship among these factors, accurate and reliable estimates of peak frequency are required. Here, a bootstrapping approach that provides estimates of peak frequency reliability, thereby increasing the robustness of the inferences made on this parameter was developed. The method using both simulated data and real data from two previous pharmacological MEG studies of visual gamma with alcohol and tiagabine was validated. In particular, the study by Muthukumaraswamy et al. [] (Neuropsychopharmacology 38(6):1105-1112), in which GABAergic enhancement by tiagabine had previously demonstrated a null effect on visual gamma oscillations, contrasting with strong evidence from both animal models and very recent human studies was re-evaluated. After improved peak frequency estimation and additional exclusion of unreliably measured data, it was found that the GABA reuptake inhibitor tiagabine did produce, as predicted, a marked decrease in visual gamma oscillation frequency. This result demonstrates the potential impact of objective approaches to data quality control, and provides additional translational evidence for the mechanisms of GABAergic transmission generating gamma oscillations in humans. Hum Brain Mapp 37:3882-3896, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Frequency of gamma oscillations routes flow of information in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Colgin, Laura Lee; Denninger, Tobias; Fyhn, Marianne; Hafting, Torkel; Bonnevie, Tora; Jensen, Ole; Moser, May-Britt; Moser, Edvard I

    2009-11-19

    Gamma oscillations are thought to transiently link distributed cell assemblies that are processing related information, a function that is probably important for network processes such as perception, attentional selection and memory. This 'binding' mechanism requires that spatially distributed cells fire together with millisecond range precision; however, it is not clear how such coordinated timing is achieved given that the frequency of gamma oscillations varies substantially across space and time, from approximately 25 to almost 150 Hz. Here we show that gamma oscillations in the CA1 area of the hippocampus split into distinct fast and slow frequency components that differentially couple CA1 to inputs from the medial entorhinal cortex, an area that provides information about the animal's current position, and CA3, a hippocampal subfield essential for storage of such information. Fast gamma oscillations in CA1 were synchronized with fast gamma in medial entorhinal cortex, and slow gamma oscillations in CA1 were coherent with slow gamma in CA3. Significant proportions of cells in medial entorhinal cortex and CA3 were phase-locked to fast and slow CA1 gamma waves, respectively. The two types of gamma occurred at different phases of the CA1 theta rhythm and mostly on different theta cycles. These results point to routeing of information as a possible function of gamma frequency variations in the brain and provide a mechanism for temporal segregation of potentially interfering information from different sources.

  19. Input-Dependent Frequency Modulation of Cortical Gamma Oscillations Shapes Spatial Synchronization and Enables Phase Coding

    PubMed Central

    Lowet, Eric; Roberts, Mark; Hadjipapas, Avgis; Peter, Alina; van der Eerden, Jan; De Weerd, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Fine-scale temporal organization of cortical activity in the gamma range (∼25–80Hz) may play a significant role in information processing, for example by neural grouping (‘binding’) and phase coding. Recent experimental studies have shown that the precise frequency of gamma oscillations varies with input drive (e.g. visual contrast) and that it can differ among nearby cortical locations. This has challenged theories assuming widespread gamma synchronization at a fixed common frequency. In the present study, we investigated which principles govern gamma synchronization in the presence of input-dependent frequency modulations and whether they are detrimental for meaningful input-dependent gamma-mediated temporal organization. To this aim, we constructed a biophysically realistic excitatory-inhibitory network able to express different oscillation frequencies at nearby spatial locations. Similarly to cortical networks, the model was topographically organized with spatially local connectivity and spatially-varying input drive. We analyzed gamma synchronization with respect to phase-locking, phase-relations and frequency differences, and quantified the stimulus-related information represented by gamma phase and frequency. By stepwise simplification of our models, we found that the gamma-mediated temporal organization could be reduced to basic synchronization principles of weakly coupled oscillators, where input drive determines the intrinsic (natural) frequency of oscillators. The gamma phase-locking, the precise phase relation and the emergent (measurable) frequencies were determined by two principal factors: the detuning (intrinsic frequency difference, i.e. local input difference) and the coupling strength. In addition to frequency coding, gamma phase contained complementary stimulus information. Crucially, the phase code reflected input differences, but not the absolute input level. This property of relative input-to-phase conversion, contrasting with latency

  20. Input-dependent frequency modulation of cortical gamma oscillations shapes spatial synchronization and enables phase coding.

    PubMed

    Lowet, Eric; Roberts, Mark; Hadjipapas, Avgis; Peter, Alina; van der Eerden, Jan; De Weerd, Peter

    2015-02-01

    Fine-scale temporal organization of cortical activity in the gamma range (∼25-80Hz) may play a significant role in information processing, for example by neural grouping ('binding') and phase coding. Recent experimental studies have shown that the precise frequency of gamma oscillations varies with input drive (e.g. visual contrast) and that it can differ among nearby cortical locations. This has challenged theories assuming widespread gamma synchronization at a fixed common frequency. In the present study, we investigated which principles govern gamma synchronization in the presence of input-dependent frequency modulations and whether they are detrimental for meaningful input-dependent gamma-mediated temporal organization. To this aim, we constructed a biophysically realistic excitatory-inhibitory network able to express different oscillation frequencies at nearby spatial locations. Similarly to cortical networks, the model was topographically organized with spatially local connectivity and spatially-varying input drive. We analyzed gamma synchronization with respect to phase-locking, phase-relations and frequency differences, and quantified the stimulus-related information represented by gamma phase and frequency. By stepwise simplification of our models, we found that the gamma-mediated temporal organization could be reduced to basic synchronization principles of weakly coupled oscillators, where input drive determines the intrinsic (natural) frequency of oscillators. The gamma phase-locking, the precise phase relation and the emergent (measurable) frequencies were determined by two principal factors: the detuning (intrinsic frequency difference, i.e. local input difference) and the coupling strength. In addition to frequency coding, gamma phase contained complementary stimulus information. Crucially, the phase code reflected input differences, but not the absolute input level. This property of relative input-to-phase conversion, contrasting with latency codes

  1. Gamma radiation induced resistivity changes in Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tundwal, Ambika; Kumar, V.; Datta, A.

    2017-03-01

    Monte Carlo Code JA-IPU is used for estimation of Frenkel pairs and their effect on change of resistivity of Iron on irradiation by gamma spectrum of Co60. The Code includes three cascade processes of incident gamma, produced electrons and recoiled atoms and simulation of the lattice structure of the target material. Change in experimentally measured resistivity of Iron is found to vary with number of Frenkel pairs as (x - 1) ln N d .

  2. Volatile anesthetics disrupt frontal-posterior recurrent information transfer at gamma frequencies in rat.

    PubMed

    Imas, Olga A; Ropella, Kristina M; Ward, B Douglas; Wood, James D; Hudetz, Anthony G

    2005-10-28

    We seek to understand neural correlates of anesthetic-induced unconsciousness. We hypothesize that cortical integration of sensory information may underlie conscious perception and may be disrupted by anesthetics. A critical role in frontal-posterior interactions has been proposed, and gamma (20-60 Hz) oscillations have also been assigned an essential role in consciousness. Here we investigated whether general anesthetics may interfere with the exchange of information encoded in gamma oscillations between frontal and posterior cortices. Bipolar electrodes for recording of event-related potentials (ERP) were chronically implanted in the primary visual cortex, parietal association and frontal association cortices of six rats. Sixty light flashes were presented every 5s, and ERPs were recorded at increasing concentrations of halothane or isoflurane (0-2%). Information exchange was estimated by transfer entropy, a novel measure of directional information transfer. Transfer entropy was calculated from 1-s wavelet-transformed ERPs. We found that (1) feedforward transfer entropy (FF-TE) and feedback transfer entropy (FB-TE) were balanced in conscious-sedated state; (2) anesthetics at concentrations producing unconsciousness augmented both FF-TE and FB-TE at 30 Hz but reduced them at 50 Hz; (3) reduction at 50 Hz was more pronounced for FB-TE, especially between frontal and posterior regions; (4) at high concentrations, both FF-TE and FB-TE at all frequencies were at or below conscious-sedated baseline. Our findings suggest that inhalational anesthetics preferentially impair frontal-posterior FB information transfer at high gamma frequencies consistent with the postulated role of frontal-posterior interactions in consciousness.

  3. The measurement of gamma ray induced heating in a mixed neutron and gamma ray environment

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, H.K.

    1991-10-01

    The problem of measuring the gamma heating in a mixed DT neutron and gamma ray environment was explored. A new detector technique was developed to make this measurement. Gamma heating measurements were made in a low-Z assembly irradiated with 14-Mev neutrons and (n, n{prime}) gammas produced by a Texas Nuclear Model 9400 neutron generator. Heating measurements were made in the mid-line of the lattice using a proportional counter operating in the Continuously-varied Bias-voltage Acquisition mode. The neutron-induced signal was separated from the gamma-induced signal by exploiting the signal rise-time differences inherent to radiations of different linear energy transfer coefficient, which are observable in a proportional counter. The operating limits of this measurement technique were explored by varying the counter position in the low-Z lattice, hence changing the irradiation spectrum observed. The experiment was modelled numerically to help interpret the measured results. The transport of neutrons and gamma rays in the assembly was modelled using the one- dimensional radiation transport code ANISN/PC. The cross-section set used for these calculations was derived from the ENDF/B-V library using the code MC{sup 2}-2 for the case of DT neutrons slowing down in a low-Z material. The calculated neutron and gamma spectra in the slab and the relevant mass-stopping powers were used to construct weighting factors which relate the energy deposition in the counter fill-gas to that in the counter wall and in the surrounding material. The gamma energy deposition at various positions in the lattice is estimated by applying these weighting factors to the measured gamma energy deposition in the counter at those locations.

  4. High Energy Neutron Induced Gamma Production

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D A; Johnson, M; Navratil, P

    2007-09-28

    N Division has an interest in improving the physics and accuracy of the gamma data it provides to its customers. It was asked to look into major gamma producing reactions for 14 MeV incident neutrons for several low-Z materials and determine whether LLNL's processed data files faithfully represent the current state of experimental and theoretical knowledge for these reactions. To address this, we surveyed the evaluations of the requested materials, made recommendations for the next ENDL release and noted isotopes that will require further experimental study. This process uncovered several major problems in our translation and processing of the ENDF formatted evaluations, most of which have been resolved.

  5. Evaluation of gamma interferon (IFN-gamma)-induced protein 10 (IP-10) responses for detection of cattle infected with Mycobacterium bovis: comparisons to IFN-gamma responses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gamma interferon (IFN-gamma)-induced protein 10 (IP-10) has recently shown promise as a diagnostic biomarker of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection of humans. The aim of the current study was to compare IP-10 and IFN-gamma responses upon Mycobacterium bovis infection in cattle using archived sample...

  6. Detection of 16 gamma-ray pulsars through blind frequency searches using the Fermi LAT.

    PubMed

    Abdo, A A; Ackermann, M; Ajello, M; Anderson, B; Atwood, W B; Axelsson, M; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Baring, M G; Bastieri, D; Baughman, B M; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Berenji, B; Bignami, G F; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Bonamente, E; Borgland, A W; Bregeon, J; Brez, A; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Burnett, T H; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Casandjian, J M; Cecchi, C; Celik, O; Chekhtman, A; Cheung, C C; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Conrad, J; Cutini, S; Dermer, C D; de Angelis, A; de Luca, A; de Palma, F; Digel, S W; Dormody, M; do Couto e Silva, E; Drell, P S; Dubois, R; Dumora, D; Farnier, C; Favuzzi, C; Fegan, S J; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Gehrels, N; Germani, S; Giebels, B; Giglietto, N; Giommi, P; Giordano, F; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Grenier, I A; Grondin, M-H; Grove, J E; Guillemot, L; Guiriec, S; Gwon, C; Hanabata, Y; Harding, A K; Hayashida, M; Hays, E; Hughes, R E; Jóhannesson, G; Johnson, R P; Johnson, T J; Johnson, W N; Kamae, T; Katagiri, H; Kataoka, J; Kawai, N; Kerr, M; Knödlseder, J; Kocian, M L; Kuss, M; Lande, J; Latronico, L; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lott, B; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Madejski, G M; Makeev, A; Marelli, M; Mazziotta, M N; McConville, W; McEnery, J E; Meurer, C; Michelson, P F; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Nolan, P L; Norris, J P; Nuss, E; Ohsugi, T; Omodei, N; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Paneque, D; Parent, D; Pelassa, V; Pepe, M; Pesce-Rollins, M; Pierbattista, M; Piron, F; Porter, T A; Primack, J R; Rainò, S; Rando, R; Ray, P S; Razzano, M; Rea, N; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Reposeur, T; Ritz, S; Rochester, L S; Rodriguez, A Y; Romani, R W; Ryde, F; Sadrozinski, H F-W; Sanchez, D; Sander, A; Saz Parkinson, P M; Scargle, J D; Sgrò, C; Siskind, E J; Smith, D A; Smith, P D; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Starck, J-L; Strickman, M S; Suson, D J; Tajima, H; Takahashi, H; Takahashi, T; Tanaka, T; Thayer, J G; Thompson, D J; Tibaldo, L; Tibolla, O; Torres, D F; Tosti, G; Tramacere, A; Uchiyama, Y; Usher, T L; Van Etten, A; Vasileiou, V; Vilchez, N; Vitale, V; Waite, A P; Wang, P; Watters, K; Winer, B L; Wolff, M T; Wood, K S; Ylinen, T; Ziegler, M

    2009-08-14

    Pulsars are rapidly rotating, highly magnetized neutron stars emitting radiation across the electromagnetic spectrum. Although there are more than 1800 known radio pulsars, until recently only seven were observed to pulse in gamma rays, and these were all discovered at other wavelengths. The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) makes it possible to pinpoint neutron stars through their gamma-ray pulsations. We report the detection of 16 gamma-ray pulsars in blind frequency searches using the LAT. Most of these pulsars are coincident with previously unidentified gamma-ray sources, and many are associated with supernova remnants. Direct detection of gamma-ray pulsars enables studies of emission mechanisms, population statistics, and the energetics of pulsar wind nebulae and supernova remnants.

  7. Frequency-Domain Multiplexed Readout for Superconducting Gamma-Ray Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Dreyer, Jonathan G.; Arnold, Kam; Lanting, Trevor M.; Dobbs, Matt A.; Friedrich, Stephan; Lee, Adrian T.; Spieler, Helmuth G.

    2006-08-30

    We are developing a frequency-multiplexed readout for arrays of high-resolution Gamma detectors based on superconducting transition edge sensors (TESs). Each sensor is part of an LCR resonant circuit and is biased at an identifying carrier frequency. Several carrier signals are added and amplified with a single SQUID preamplifier at 4 K. Gamma absorption modulates the amplitude of the carrier, and demodulation at room temperature retrieves the initial temperature evolution of the sensor. This multiplexing system has originally been developed to read out large arrays of bolometers for cosmic microwave background studies. To accommodate the faster Gamma-ray signals, its demodulator bandwidth is being extended to 20 kHz to allow reading out up to eight TESs with a detector bandwidth of 10 kHz. Here we characterize the system noise performance and show how this multiplexing scheme can be adapted to read out arrays of superconducting Gamma-ray detectors.

  8. Induced gamma band responses predict recognition delays during object identification.

    PubMed

    Martinovic, Jasna; Gruber, Thomas; Müller, Matthias M

    2007-06-01

    Neural mechanisms of object recognition seem to rely on activity of distributed neural assemblies coordinated by synchronous firing in the gamma-band range (>20 Hz). In the present electroencephalogram (EEG) study, we investigated induced gamma band activity during the naming of line drawings of upright objects and objects rotated in the image plane. Such plane-rotation paradigms elicit view-dependent processing, leading to delays in recognition of disoriented objects. Our behavioral results showed reaction time delays for rotated, as opposed to upright, images. These delays were accompanied by delays in the peak latency of induced gamma band responses (GBRs), in the absence of any effects on other measures of EEG activity. The latency of the induced GBRs has thus, for the first time, been selectively modulated by an experimental manipulation that delayed recognition. This finding indicates that induced GBRs have a genuine role as neural markers of late representational processes during object recognition. In concordance with the view that object recognition is achieved through dynamic learning processes, we propose that induced gamma band activity could be one of the possible cortical markers of such dynamic object coding.

  9. Acute effects of alcohol on stimulus-induced gamma oscillations in human primary visual and motor cortices.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Anne E; Sumner, Petroc; Singh, Krish D; Muthukumaraswamy, Suresh D

    2014-08-01

    Alcohol is a rich drug affecting both the γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) and glutamatergic neurotransmitter systems. Recent findings from both modeling and pharmacological manipulation have indicated a link between GABAergic activity and oscillations measured in the gamma frequency range (30-80 Hz), but there are no previous reports of alcohol's modulation of gamma-band activity measured by magnetoencephalography (MEG) or electroencephalography (EEG). In this single-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study, 16 participants completed two study days, on one day of which they consumed a dose of 0.8 g/kg alcohol, and on the other day a placebo. MEG recordings of brain activity were taken before and after beverage consumption, using visual grating and finger abduction paradigms known to induce gamma-band activity in the visual and motor cortices respectively. Time-frequency analyses of beamformer source reconstructions in the visual cortex showed that alcohol increased peak gamma amplitude and decreased peak frequency. For the motor task, alcohol increased gamma amplitude in the motor cortex. These data support the notion that gamma oscillations are dependent, in part, on the balance between excitation and inhibition. Disruption of this balance by alcohol, by increasing GABAergic inhibition at GABAA receptors and decreasing glutamatergic excitation at N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptors, alters both the amplitude and frequency of gamma oscillations. The findings provide further insight into the neuropharmacological action of alcohol.

  10. Induced Background in the Mars Observer Gamma-Ray Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boynton, W. V.; Evans, L. G.; Starr, R.; Brückner, J.; Bailey, S. H.; Trombka, J. I.

    Gamma-Ray Spectrometers in space must necessarily work in an environment of a background of lines due to natural and cosmic-ray induced radioactivity and lines due to prompt emission following nuclear reactions caused by primary and secondary cosmic rays. The Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (GRS) on the Mar Observer mission has provided important data allowing one to estimate for future missions the extent of the background due to cosmic rays. These data will help in the design of instruments and in calculation of realistic background intensities that may effect the sensitivity of determining the intensity of lines of interest.

  11. Induced Background in the Mars Observer Gamma-Ray Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boynton, William V.; Evans, Larry G.; Starr, Richard; Bruekner, Johnnes; Bailey, S. H.; Trombka, Jacob I.

    1997-01-01

    Gamma-Ray Spectrometers in space must necessarily work in an environment of a background of lines due to natural and cosmic-ray induced radioactivity and lines due to prompt emission following nuclear reactions caused by primary and secondary cosmic rays. The Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (GRS) on the Mar Observer mission has provided important data allowing one to estimate for future missions the extent of the background due to cosmic rays. These data will help in the design of instruments and in calculation of realistic background intensities that may effect the sensitivity of determining the intensity of lines of interest.

  12. Frequency spectrum analysis for spectrum stabilization in airborne gamma-ray spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Guoqiang; Tan, Chengjun; Ge, Liangquan; Zhang, Qingxian; Gu, Yi

    2014-02-01

    Abnormal multi-crystal spectral drifts often can be observed when power on the airborne gamma-ray spectrometer. Currently, these spectral drifts of each crystal are generally eliminated through manual adjustment, which is time-consuming and labor-ineffective. To realize this quick automatic spectrum stabilization of multi-crystal, a frequency spectrum analysis method for natural gamma-ray background spectrum is put forward in this paper to replace traditional spectrum stabilization method used characteristic peak. Based on the polynomial fitting of high harmonics in frequency spectrum and gamma-ray spectral drift, it calculates overall spectral drift of natural gamma-ray spectrum and adjusts the gain of spectrometer by this spectral drift value, thus completing quick spectrum stabilization in the power on stage of spectrometer. This method requires no manual intervention and can obtain the overall spectral drift value automatically under no time-domain pre-processing to the natural gamma-ray spectra. The spectral drift value calculated by this method has an absolute error less than five channels (1024 resolution) and a relative error smaller than 0.80%, which can satisfy the quick automatic spectrum stabilization requirement when power on the airborne gamma-ray spectrometer instead of manual operation.

  13. Neutron-induced gamma-ray production

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, R.O.; Drake, D.M.; Haight, R.C.; Laymon, C.M.; Wender, S.A.; Young, P.G. ); Drosg, M.; Pavlik, A.; Vonach, H. . Inst. fuer Radiumforschung und Kernphysik); Larson, D.C. )

    1990-01-01

    High resolution Ge detectors coupled with the WNR high-intensity, high-energy, pulsed neutron source at LAMPF recently have been used to measure a variety of reactions including (n,xn) for 1 {le} x {le} 11, (n,n{alpha}), (n,np), etc. The reactions are identified by the known gamma-ray energies of prompt transitions between the low lying states in the final nuclei. With our spallation neutron source cross section data are obtained at all neutron energies from a few MeV to over 200 MeV. Applications of the data range from assisting the interpretation of the planned Mars Observer mission to map the elemental composition of the martian surface, to providing data for nuclear model verification and understanding reaction mechanisms. For example, a study of the Pb(n,xn) reactions for 2 {le} x {le} 11 populating the first excited states of the even Pb isotopes is underway. These data will be used to test preequilibrium and other reaction models. 9 refs., 5 figs.

  14. A new frequency-multiplied interferometer system in the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror.

    PubMed

    Kohagura, J; Yoshikawa, M; Shima, Y; Morikawa, Y; Yamada, T; Akita, D; Tatebe, K; Ichimura, M; Hirata, M; Ikezoe, R; Yokoyama, T; Imai, T

    2012-10-01

    A new interferometer is installed on the west anchor cell of the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror. In GAMMA 10, we have used a heterodyne-type interferometer with a 70-GHz IMPATT oscillator and a 150-MHz oscillator for frequency modulation. The new interferometer consists of a 17.5-GHz phase locked dielectric resonator oscillator and a 37.5-MHz temperature-compensated crystal oscillator, as well as frequency multipliers. The main motivation for the new interferometer using frequency multipliers is to achieve a stable and cost effective interferometer. Direct anchor heating experiments with new anchor ion cyclotron range of frequency antennas in both the west and the east anchor cells are carried out. Density increases in both anchor cells are clearly observed using the new interferometer.

  15. Memory Retrieval Time and Memory Capacity of the CA3 Network: Role of Gamma Frequency Oscillations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Almeida, Licurgo; Idiart, Marco; Lisman, John E.

    2007-01-01

    The existence of recurrent synaptic connections in CA3 led to the hypothesis that CA3 is an autoassociative network similar to the Hopfield networks studied by theorists. CA3 undergoes gamma frequency periodic inhibition that prevents a persistent attractor state. This argues against the analogy to Hopfield nets, in which an attractor state can be…

  16. Increased frequency of {gamma}{delta} T cells in cerebrospinal fluid and peripheral blood of patients with multiple sclerosis: Reactivity, cytotoxicity, and T cell receptor V gene rearrangements

    SciTech Connect

    Stinissen, P.; Vandevyver, C.; Medaer, R.

    1995-05-01

    Infiltrating {gamma}{delta} T cells are potentially involved in the central nervous system demyelination in multiple sclerosis (MS). To further study this hypothesis, we analyzed the frequency and functional properties of {gamma}{delta} T cells in peripheral blood (PB) and paired cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with MS and control subjects, including patients with other neurologic diseases (OND) and healthy individuals. The frequency analysis was performed under limiting dilution condition using rIL-2 and PHA. After PHA stimulation, a significantly increased frequency of {gamma}{delta} T cells was observed in PB and in CSF of MS patients as compared with PB and CSF of patients with OND. The frequency was represented equally in OND patients and normal individuals. Similarly, the IL-2-responsive {gamma}{delta} T cells occurred at a higher frequency in PB of MS than of control subjects. Forty-three percent of the {gamma}{delta} T cell clones isolates from PB and CSF of MS patients responded to heat shock protein (HSP70) but not HSP65, whereas only 2 of 30 control {gamma}{delta} T cell clones reacted to the HSP. The majority of the {gamma}{delta} T cell clones were able to induce non-MHC-restricted cytolysis of Daudi cells. All clones displayed a substantial reactivity to bacterial superantigens staphylococcal enterotoxin B and toxic shock syndrome toxin-1, irrespective of their {gamma}{delta} V gene usage. Furthermore, the {gamma}{delta} T cell clones expressed predominantly TCRDV2 and GV2 genes, whereas the clones derived from CSF of MS patients expressed either DV1 or DV2 genes. The obtained {gamma}{delta} clones, in general, represented rather heterogeneous clonal origins, even though a predominant clonal origin was found in a set of 10 {gamma}{delta} clones derived from one patient with MS. The present study provides new evidence supporting a possible role of {gamma}{delta} T cells in the secondary inflammatory processes in MS. 39 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Did gamma ray burst induce Cambrian explosion?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Pisin; Ruffini, R.

    2015-06-01

    One longstanding mystery in bio-evolution since Darwin's time is the origin of the Cambrian explosion that happened around 540 million years ago (Mya), where an extremely rapid increase of species occurred. Here we suggest that a nearby GRB event 500 parsecs away, which should occur about once per 5 Gy, might have triggered the Cambrian explosion. Due to a relatively lower cross section and the conservation of photon number in Compton scattering, a substantial fraction of the GRB photons can reach the sea level and would induce DNA mutations in organisms protected by a shallow layer of water or soil, thus expediting the bio-diversification. This possibility of inducing genetic mutations is unique among all candidate sources for major incidents in the history of bio-evolution. A possible evidence would be the anomalous abundance of certain nuclear isotopes with long half-lives transmuted by the GRB photons in geological records from the Cambrian period. Our notion also imposes constraints on the evolution of exoplanet organisms and the migration of panspermia.

  18. Ontogeny of kainate-induced gamma oscillations in the rat CA3 hippocampus in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Tsintsadze, Vera; Minlebaev, Marat; Suchkov, Dimitry; Cunningham, Mark O.; Khazipov, Roustem

    2015-01-01

    GABAergic inhibition, which is instrumental in the generation of hippocampal gamma oscillations, undergoes significant changes during development. However, the development of hippocampal gamma oscillations remains largely unknown. Here, we explored the developmental features of kainate-induced oscillations (KA-Os) in CA3 region of rat hippocampal slices. Up to postnatal day P5, the bath application of kainate failed to evoke any detectable oscillations. KA-Os emerged by the end of the first postnatal week; these were initially weak, slow (20–25 Hz, beta range) and were poorly synchronized with CA3 units and synaptic currents. Local field potential (LFP) power, synchronization of units and frequency of KA-Os increased during the second postnatal week to attain gamma (30–40 Hz) frequency by P15–21. Both beta and gamma KA-Os are characterized by alternating sinks and sources in the pyramidal cell layer, likely generated by summation of the action potential—associated currents and GABAergic synaptic currents, respectively. Blockade of GABA(A) receptors with gabazine completely suppressed KA-Os at all ages indicating that GABAergic mechanisms are instrumental in their generation. Bumetanide, a NKCC1 chloride co-transporter antagonist which renders GABAergic responses inhibitory in the immature hippocampal neurons, failed to induce KA-Os at P2–4 indicating that the absence of KA-Os in neonates is not due to depolarizing actions of GABA. The linear developmental profile, electrographic features and pharmacological properties indicate that CA3 hippocampal beta and gamma KA-Os are fundamentally similar in their generative mechanisms and their delayed onset and developmental changes likely reflect the development of perisomatic GABAergic inhibition. PMID:26041996

  19. Gamma radiation induced changes in nuclear waste glass containing Eu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohapatra, M.; Kadam, R. M.; Mishra, R. K.; Kaushik, C. P.; Tomar, B. S.; Godbole, S. V.

    2011-10-01

    Gamma radiation induced changes were investigated in sodium-barium borosilicate glasses containing Eu. The glass composition was similar to that of nuclear waste glasses used for vitrifying Trombay research reactor nuclear waste at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, India. Photoluminescence (PL) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) techniques were used to study the speciation of the rare earth (RE) ion in the matrix before and after gamma irradiation. Judd-Ofelt ( J- O) analyses of the emission spectra were done before and after irradiation. The spin counting technique was employed to quantify the number of defect centres formed in the glass at the highest gamma dose studied. PL data suggested the stabilisation of the trivalent RE ion in the borosilicate glass matrix both before and after irradiation. It was also observed that, the RE ion distributes itself in two different environments in the irradiated glass. From the EPR data it was observed that, boron oxygen hole centre based radicals are the predominant defect centres produced in the glass after irradiation along with small amount of E’ centres. From the spin counting studies the concentration of defect centres in the glass was calculated to be 350 ppm at 900 kGy. This indicated the fact that bulk of the glass remained unaffected after gamma irradiation up to 900 kGy.

  20. Synaptic Mechanisms of Tight Spike Synchrony at Gamma Frequency in Cerebral Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Salkoff, David B.; Zagha, Edward; Yüzgeç, Özge

    2015-01-01

    During the generation of higher-frequency (e.g., gamma) oscillations, cortical neurons can exhibit pairwise tight (<10 ms) spike synchrony. To understand how synaptic currents contribute to rhythmic activity and spike synchrony, we performed dual whole-cell recordings in mouse entorhinal cortical slices generating periodic activity (the slow oscillation). This preparation exhibited a significant amount of gamma-coherent spike synchrony during the active phase of the slow oscillation (Up state), particularly among fast-spiking inhibitory interneurons. IPSCs arriving in pairs of either pyramidal or fast-spiking neurons during the Up state were highly synchronized and exhibited significant coherence at frequencies from 10 to 100 Hz, peaking at ∼40 Hz, suggesting both synchronous discharge of, and synaptic divergence from, nearby inhibitory neurons. By inferring synaptic currents related to spike generation in simultaneously recorded pyramidal or fast-spiking neurons, we detected a decay of inhibition ∼20 ms before spiking. In fast-spiking interneurons, this was followed by an even larger excitatory input immediately before spike generation. Consistent with an important role for phasic excitation in driving spiking, we found that the correlation of excitatory inputs was highly predictive of spike synchrony in pairs of fast-spiking interneurons. Interestingly, spike synchrony in fast-spiking interneurons was not related to the strength of gap junctional coupling, and was still prevalent in connexin 36 knock-out animals. Our results support the pyramidal-interneuron gamma model of fast rhythmic oscillation in the cerebral cortex and suggest that spike synchrony and phase preference arises from the precise interaction of excitatory–inhibitory postsynaptic currents. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT We dissected the cellular and synaptic basis of spike synchrony occurring at gamma frequency (30–80 Hz). We used simultaneous targeted whole-cell recordings in an active slice

  1. The effect of gamma radiation on recombination frequency in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Kim, J S; Rose, A M

    1987-06-01

    We have studied the effect of gamma radiation on recombination frequency for intervals across the cluster of linkage group I in Caenorhabditis elegans. Recombination frequency increased approximately twofold across the dpy-5-unc-13 interval after treatment with 2000 rads (1 rad = 10 mGy) of cobalt 60 gamma radiation. Several factors affecting the magnitude of the increase have been characterized. Recombination frequency increased more with higher doses of radiation. However, the increase in recombination frequency with increasing dose was accompanied by a reduced average number of progeny from radiation-treated individuals. The amount of the increase was affected by meiotic stage, age at the time of treatment (premeiotic), and radiation dose. The increase in recombination was detectable in the B brood and remained elevated for the remainder of egg production. X-chromosome nondisjunction was also increased by radiation treatment. A high frequency of the recombinant progeny produced with radiation treatment were sterile unlike their nonrecombinant siblings. When parameters affecting recombination frequency are held constant during treatment, chromosomal regions of high gene density on the meiotic map increased more (fourfold) than an adjacent region of low gene density (no increase). The greatest increase was across the dpy-14-unc-13 interval near the center of the gene cluster. These results may suggest that the physical length of DNA per map unit is greater within the cluster than outside.

  2. Modification of microcrystalline cellulose by gamma radiation-induced grafting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madrid, Jordan F.; Abad, Lucille V.

    2015-10-01

    Modified microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) was prepared through gamma radiation-induced graft polymerization of glycidyl methacrylate (GMA). Simultaneous grafting was employed wherein MCC with GMA in methanol was irradiated with gamma radiation in nitrogen atmosphere. The effects of different experimental factors such as monomer concentration, type of solvent and absorbed dose on the degree of grafting, Dg, were studied. The amount of grafted GMA, expressed as Dg, was determined gravimetrically. Information from grafted samples subjected to Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) in attenuated total reflectance (ATR) mode showed peaks corresponding to GMA which indicates successful grafting. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis revealed that the crystalline region of MCC was not adversely affected after grafting with GMA. The thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) data showed that the decomposition of grafted MCC occurred at higher temperature compared to the base MCC polymer.

  3. PPAR gamma mediates high-fat diet-induced adipocyte hypertrophy and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Kubota, N; Terauchi, Y; Miki, H; Tamemoto, H; Yamauchi, T; Komeda, K; Satoh, S; Nakano, R; Ishii, C; Sugiyama, T; Eto, K; Tsubamoto, Y; Okuno, A; Murakami, K; Sekihara, H; Hasegawa, G; Naito, M; Toyoshima, Y; Tanaka, S; Shiota, K; Kitamura, T; Fujita, T; Ezaki, O; Aizawa, S; Kadowaki, T

    1999-10-01

    Agonist-induced activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR gamma) is known to cause adipocyte differentiation and insulin sensitivity. The biological role of PPAR gamma was investigated by gene targeting. Homozygous PPAR gamma-deficient embryos died at 10.5-11.5 dpc due to placental dysfunction. Quite unexpectedly, heterozygous PPAR gamma-deficient mice were protected from the development of insulin resistance due to adipocyte hypertrophy under a high-fat diet. These phenotypes were abrogated by PPAR gamma agonist treatment. Heterozygous PPAR gamma-deficient mice showed overexpression and hypersecretion of leptin despite the smaller size of adipocytes and decreased fat mass, which may explain these phenotypes at least in part. This study reveals a hitherto unpredicted role for PPAR gamma in high-fat diet-induced obesity due to adipocyte hypertrophy and insulin resistance, which requires both alleles of PPAR gamma.

  4. Investigation of gamma radiation induced changes in local structure of borosilicate glass by TDPAC and EXAFS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ashwani; Nayak, C.; Rajput, P.; Mishra, R. K.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Kaushik, C. P.; Tomar, B. S.

    2016-12-01

    Gamma radiation induced changes in local structure around the probe atom (Hafnium) were investigated in sodium barium borosilicate (NBS) glass, used for immobilization of high level liquid waste generated from the reprocessing plant at Trombay, Mumbai. The (NBS) glass was doped with 181Hf as a probe for time differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC) spectroscopy studies, while for studies using extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, the same was doped with 0.5 and 2 % (mole %) hafnium oxide. The irradiated as well as un-irradiated glass samples were studied by TDPAC and EXAFS techniques to obtain information about the changes (if any) around the probe atom due to gamma irradiation. TDPAC spectra of unirradiated and irradiated glasses were similar and reminescent of amorphous materials, indicating negligible effect of gamma radiation on the microstructure around Hafnium probe atom, though the quaqdrupole interaction frequency ( ω Q) and asymmetry parameter ( η) did show a marginal decrease in the irradiated glass compared to that in the unirradiated glass. EXAFS measurements showed a slight decrease in the Hf-O bond distance upon gamma irradiation of Hf doped NBS glass indicating densification of the glass matrix, while the cordination number around hafnium remains unchanged.

  5. New insights into mechanisms of gamma-diketone-induced axonopathy.

    PubMed

    Tshala-Katumbay, Desire; Desjardins, Paul; Sabri, Mohammad; Butterworth, Roger; Spencer, Peter

    2009-11-01

    We analyzed the impact of axonopathy-inducing agents 1,2-diacetylbenzene (1,2-DAB) and 2,5-hexanedione (2,5-HD) on membrane-bound protein disulfide isomerase (mPDI) versus soluble PDI (sPDI), or PDI-family member thioredoxin (THX), and asked whether changes in PDI/THX were associated with production of oxidative/nitrosative species in the Sprague-Dawley rat. We show that 1,2-DAB and 2,5-HD lower the abundance of sPDI and THX. However, the protein expression of mPDI is increased in 1,2-DAB axonopathy and neuroproteins became more S-nitrosylated. The abundance of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and isoforms of nitric oxide synthase (neuronal, endothelial, and inducible NOS) remained unchanged suggesting that S-nitrosylation occured via increased mPDI-transnitrosylation and/or diminished THX-denitrosylation. The transcription of PDI and glucose regulated protein-78 (GRP-78) remained unchanged indicating that post-translational modifications, e.g. S-nitrosylation, mediate the pathogenesis of gamma-diketone axonopathy. These findings open opportunities for new therapeutic testing (e.g., supplementation with denitrosylating THX) in gamma-diketone-induced axonal disease.

  6. Cbl competitively inhibits epidermal growth factor-induced activation of phospholipase C-gamma1.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jang Hyun; Bae, Sun Sik; Park, Jong Bae; Ha, Sang Hoon; Song, Hebok; Kim, Jae-Ho; Cocco, Lucio; Ryu, Sung Ho; Suh, Pann-Ghill

    2003-04-30

    Phospholipase C-gamma1 (PLC-gamma1) plays pivotal roles in cellular growth and proliferation through its two Src homology (SH) 2 domains and its single SH3 domain, which interact with signaling molecules in response to various growth factors and hormones. However, the role of the SH domains in the growth factor-induced regulation of PLC-gamma1 is unclear. By peptide-mass fingerprinting analysis we have identified Cbl as a binding protein for the SH3 domain of PLC-gamma1 from rat pheochromatocyte PC12 cells. Association of Cbl with PLC-gamma1 was induced by epidermal growth factor (EGF) but not by nerve growth factor (NGF). Upon EGF stimulation, both Cbl and PLC-gamma1 were recruited to the activated EGF receptor through their SH2 domains. Mutation of the SH2 domains of either Cbl or PLC-gamma1 abrogated the EGF-induced interaction of PLC-gamma1 with Cbl, indicating that SH2-mediated translocation is essential for the association of PLC-gamma1 and Cbl. Overexpression of Cbl attenuated EGF-induced tyrosine phosphorylation and the subsequent activation of PLC-gamma1 by interfering competitively with the interaction between PLC-gamma1 and EGFR. Taken together, these results provide the first indications that Cbl may be a negative regulator of intracellular signaling following EGF-induced PLC-gamma1 activation.

  7. Cell death is induced by ciglitazone, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) agonist, independently of PPAR{gamma} in human glioma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Myoung Woo; Kim, Dae Seong; Kim, Hye Ryung; Kim, Hye Jin; Yang, Jin Mo; Ryu, Somi; Noh, Yoo Hun; Lee, Soo Hyun; Son, Meong Hi; Jung, Hye Lim; Yoo, Keon Hee; Koo, Hong Hoe; Sung, Ki Woong

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Greater than 30 {mu}M ciglitazone induces cell death in glioma cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell death by ciglitazone is independent of PPAR{gamma} in glioma cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CGZ induces cell death by the loss of MMP via decreased Akt. -- Abstract: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) regulates multiple signaling pathways, and its agonists induce apoptosis in various cancer cells. However, their role in cell death is unclear. In this study, the relationship between ciglitazone (CGZ) and PPAR{gamma} in CGZ-induced cell death was examined. At concentrations of greater than 30 {mu}M, CGZ, a synthetic PPAR{gamma} agonist, activated caspase-3 and induced apoptosis in T98G cells. Treatment of T98G cells with less than 30 {mu}M CGZ effectively induced cell death after pretreatment with 30 {mu}M of the PPAR{gamma} antagonist GW9662, although GW9662 alone did not induce cell death. This cell death was also observed when cells were co-treated with CGZ and GW9662, but was not observed when cells were treated with CGZ prior to GW9662. In cells in which PPAR{gamma} was down-regulated cells by siRNA, lower concentrations of CGZ (<30 {mu}M) were sufficient to induce cell death, although higher concentrations of CGZ ( Greater-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 30 {mu}M) were required to induce cell death in control T98G cells, indicating that CGZ effectively induces cell death in T98G cells independently of PPAR{gamma}. Treatment with GW9662 followed by CGZ resulted in a down-regulation of Akt activity and the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), which was accompanied by a decrease in Bcl-2 expression and an increase in Bid cleavage. These data suggest that CGZ is capable of inducing apoptotic cell death independently of PPAR{gamma} in glioma cells, by down-regulating Akt activity and inducing MMP collapse.

  8. UNVEILING THE NATURE OF THE UNIDENTIFIED GAMMA-RAY SOURCES. III. GAMMA-RAY BLAZAR-LIKE COUNTERPARTS AT LOW RADIO FREQUENCIES

    SciTech Connect

    Massaro, F.; Funk, S.; D'Abrusco, R.; Paggi, A.; Giroletti, M.; Masetti, N.; Tosti, G.; Nori, M.

    2013-07-01

    About one-third of the {gamma}-ray sources listed in the second Fermi Large Area Telescope catalog (2FGL) have no firmly established counterpart at lower energies and so are classified as unidentified gamma-ray sources (UGSs). Here, we propose a new approach to find candidate counterparts for the UGSs based on the 325 MHz radio survey performed with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope in the northern hemisphere. First, we investigate the low-frequency radio properties of blazars, the largest known population of {gamma}-ray sources; then we search for sources with similar radio properties combining the information derived from the Westerbork Northern Sky Survey (WENSS) with those of the NRAO Very Large Array Sky Survey. We present a list of candidate counterparts for 32 UGSs with at least one counterpart in the WENSS. We also performed an extensive research in the literature to look for infrared and optical counterparts of the {gamma}-ray blazar candidates selected using the low-frequency radio observations to confirm their nature. On the basis of our multifrequency research, we identify 23 new {gamma}-ray blazar candidates out of the 32 UGSs investigated. Comparison with previous results on the UGSs is also presented. Finally, we speculate on the advantages of using low-frequency radio observations to associate UGSs and to search for {gamma}-ray pulsar candidates.

  9. Areas V1 and V2 show microsaccade-related 3-4-Hz covariation in gamma power and frequency.

    PubMed

    Lowet, E; Roberts, M J; Bosman, C A; Fries, P; De Weerd, P

    2016-05-01

    Neuronal gamma-band synchronization (25-80 Hz) in visual cortex appears sustained and stable during prolonged visual stimulation when investigated with conventional averages across trials. However, recent studies in macaque visual cortex have used single-trial analyses to show that both power and frequency of gamma oscillations exhibit substantial moment-by-moment variation. This has raised the question of whether these apparently random variations might limit the functional role of gamma-band synchronization for neural processing. Here, we studied the moment-by-moment variation in gamma oscillation power and frequency, as well as inter-areal gamma synchronization, by simultaneously recording local field potentials in V1 and V2 of two macaque monkeys. We additionally analyzed electrocorticographic V1 data from a third monkey. Our analyses confirm that gamma-band synchronization is not stationary and sustained but undergoes moment-by-moment variations in power and frequency. However, those variations are neither random and nor a possible obstacle to neural communication. Instead, the gamma power and frequency variations are highly structured, shared between areas and shaped by a microsaccade-related 3-4-Hz theta rhythm. Our findings provide experimental support for the suggestion that cross-frequency coupling might structure and facilitate the information flow between brain regions.

  10. Photon-induced positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy using ultrashort laser-Compton-scattered gamma-ray pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Taira, Y.; Toyokawa, H.; Kuroda, R.; Yamamoto, N.; Adachi, M.; Tanaka, S.; Katoh, M.

    2013-05-15

    High-energy ultrashort gamma-ray pulses can be generated via laser Compton scattering with 90 Degree-Sign collisions at the UVSOR-II electron storage ring. As an applied study of ultrashort gamma-ray pulses, a new photon-induced positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy approach has been developed. Ultrashort gamma-ray pulses with a maximum energy of 6.6 MeV and pulse width of 2.2 ps created positrons throughout bulk lead via pair production. Annihilation gamma rays were detected by a BaF{sub 2} scintillator mounted on a photomultiplier tube. A positron lifetime spectrum was obtained by measuring the time difference between the RF frequency of the electron storage ring and the detection time of the annihilation gamma rays. We calculated the response of the BaF{sub 2} scintillator and the time jitter caused by the variation in the total path length of the ultrashort gamma-ray pulses, annihilation gamma rays, and scintillation light using a Monte Carlo simulation code. The positron lifetime for bulk lead was successfully measured.

  11. Photon-induced positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy using ultrashort laser-Compton-scattered gamma-ray pulses.

    PubMed

    Taira, Y; Toyokawa, H; Kuroda, R; Yamamoto, N; Adachi, M; Tanaka, S; Katoh, M

    2013-05-01

    High-energy ultrashort gamma-ray pulses can be generated via laser Compton scattering with 90° collisions at the UVSOR-II electron storage ring. As an applied study of ultrashort gamma-ray pulses, a new photon-induced positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy approach has been developed. Ultrashort gamma-ray pulses with a maximum energy of 6.6 MeV and pulse width of 2.2 ps created positrons throughout bulk lead via pair production. Annihilation gamma rays were detected by a BaF2 scintillator mounted on a photomultiplier tube. A positron lifetime spectrum was obtained by measuring the time difference between the RF frequency of the electron storage ring and the detection time of the annihilation gamma rays. We calculated the response of the BaF2 scintillator and the time jitter caused by the variation in the total path length of the ultrashort gamma-ray pulses, annihilation gamma rays, and scintillation light using a Monte Carlo simulation code. The positron lifetime for bulk lead was successfully measured.

  12. Comparative gene expression profiles induced by PPAR{gamma} and PPAR{alpha}/{gamma} agonists in rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Rogue, Alexandra; Renaud, Marie Pierre; Claude, Nancy; Guillouzo, Andre; Spire, Catherine

    2011-07-01

    Species-differential toxic effects have been described with PPAR{alpha} and PPAR{gamma} agonists between rodent and human liver. PPAR{alpha} agonists (fibrates) are potent hypocholesterolemic agents in humans while they induce peroxisome proliferation and tumors in rodent liver. By contrast, PPAR{gamma} agonists (glitazones) and even dual PPAR{alpha}/{gamma} agonists (glitazars) have caused idiosyncratic hepatic and nonhepatic toxicities in human without evidence of any damage in rodent during preclinical studies. The mechanisms involved in such differences remain largely unknown. Several studies have identified the major target genes of PPAR{alpha} agonists in rodent liver while no comprehensive analysis has been performed on gene expression changes induced by PPAR{gamma} and dual PPAR{alpha}/{gamma} agonists. Here, we investigated transcriptomes of rat hepatocytes after 24 h treatment with two PPAR{gamma} (troglitazone and rosiglitazone) and two PPAR{alpha}/{gamma} (muraglitazar and tesaglitazar) agonists. Although, hierarchical clustering revealed a gene expression profile characteristic of each PPAR agonist class, only a limited number of genes was specifically deregulated by glitazars. Functional analyses showed that many genes known as PPAR{alpha} targets were also modulated by both PPAR{gamma} and PPAR{alpha}/{gamma} agonists and quantitative differences in gene expression profiles were observed between these two classes. Moreover, most major genes modulated in rat hepatocytes were also found to be deregulated in rat liver after tesaglitazar treatment. Taken altogether, these results support the conclusion that differential toxic effects of PPAR{alpha} and PPAR{gamma} agonists in rodent liver do not result from transcriptional deregulation of major PPAR target genes but rather from qualitative and/or quantitative differential responses of a small subset of genes.

  13. [Mechanisms of gamma-inducible death of Jurkat cells line].

    PubMed

    Gamkrelidze, M M; Bezhitashvili, N D; Pavliashvili, A T; Mchedlishvili, T V; Sanikidze, T V

    2008-06-01

    Mechanisms of radio-inducible death of Jurkat cells were investigated. Human lymphoblastoid T-cell line Jurkat is widely established model for studying apoptosis mechanisms. The cell was radiated by "Teragam" (Czech Republic) by dose 2 g during 1 minute. After radiation cells were incubated at standard conditions during 24 hours. After gamma radiation in cell population amount of cells in gaplois (apoptotic G 0) stage was increased 8,2 folds, in diplois (G 0/G1) stage - by 17%, in synthetic (S) stage decreased by 35% and tetraploid (G2/M) stage by 73% in comparison to control group. It was revealed intensive production of free radicals of oxygen and nitric oxide and decreasing activity of antioxidant enzymes (superoxidismutasa, catalasa and glutathione peroxidase). Revealed dependence between intensification of apoptosis and radiation-induced arrest of cell cycle G2/M phase may be determined by excess amount of free oxygen and nitrogen radicals generated in Jurkat cells as a result of nondirect effects of low doses of gamma radiation.

  14. Comparison between spontaneous and kainate-induced gamma oscillations in the mouse hippocampus in vitro.

    PubMed

    Pietersen, Alexander N J; Patel, Nisha; Jefferys, John G R; Vreugdenhil, Martin

    2009-06-01

    Neuronal synchronization at gamma frequency, implicated in cognition, can be evoked in hippocampal slices by pharmacological activation. We characterized spontaneous small-amplitude gamma oscillations (SgammaO) recorded in area CA3 of mouse hippocampal slices and compared it with kainate-induced gamma oscillations (KgammaO). SgammaO had a lower peak frequency, a more sinusoidal waveform and was spatially less coherent than KgammaO, irrespective of oscillation amplitude. CA3a had the smallest oscillation power, phase-led CA3c by approximately 4 ms and had the highest SgammaO frequency in isolated subslices. During SgammaO CA3c neurons fired at the rebound of inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSPs) that were associated with a current source in stratum lucidum, whereas CA3a neurons often fired from spikelets, 3-4 ms earlier in the cycle, and had smaller IPSPs. Kainate induced faster/larger IPSPs that were associated with an earlier current source in stratum pyramidale. SgammaO and KgammaO power were dependent on alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors, gap junctions and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)(A) receptors. SgammaO was suppressed by elevating extracellular KCl, blocking N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors or muscarinic receptors, or activating GluR5-containing kainate receptors. SgammaO was not affected by blocking metabotropic glutamate receptors or hyperpolarization-activated currents. The adenosine A(1) receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dimethoxyxanthine (8-CPT) and the CB1 cannabinoid receptor antagonist N-(piperidin-1-yl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (AM251) increased SgammaO power, indicating that endogenous adenosine and/or endocannabinoids suppress or prevent SgammaO in vitro. SgammaO emerges from a similar basic network as KgammaO, but differs in involvement of somatically projecting interneurons and pharmacological modulation profile. These observations advocate

  15. Lymphocytes from wasted mice express enhanced spontaneous and {gamma}-ray-induced apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E. |; Chang-Liu, Chin-Mei; Chung, Jen; Libertin, C.R.

    1993-09-01

    Mice bearing the autosomal recessive mutation wasted (wst/wst) display a disease pattern including faulty repair of DNA damage in lymphocytes after radiation exposure, neurologic abnormalities, and immunodeficiency. Many of the features of this mouse model have suggested a premature or increased spontaneous frequency of apoptosis in thymocytes; past work has shown an inability to establish cultured T cell lines, an abnormally high death rate of stimulated T cells in culture, and an increased sensitivity of T cells to the killing effects of ionizing radiations in wst/wst mice relative to controls. The experiments reported here were designed to examine splenic and thymic lymphocytes from wasted and control mice for signs of early apoptosis. Our results revealed enhanced expression of Rp-8 mRNA (associated with apoptosis) in thymic lymphocytes and reduced expression in splenic lymphocytes of wst/wst mice relative to controls; expression of Rp-2 and Td-30 mRNA (induced during apoptosis) were not detectable in spleen or thymus. Higher spontaneous DNA fragmentation was observed in wasted mice than in controls; however, {gamma}-ray-induced DNA fragmentation peaked at a lower dose and occurred to a greater extent in wasted mice relative to controls. These results provide evidence for high spontaneous and {gamma}-ray-induced apoptosis in T cells of wasted mice as a mechanism underlying the observed lymphocyte and DNA repair abnormalities.

  16. On cross-frequency phase-phase coupling between theta and gamma oscillations in the hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Scheffer-Teixeira, Robson; Tort, Adriano BL

    2016-01-01

    Phase-amplitude coupling between theta and multiple gamma sub-bands is a hallmark of hippocampal activity and believed to take part in information routing. More recently, theta and gamma oscillations were also reported to exhibit phase-phase coupling, or n:m phase-locking, suggesting an important mechanism of neuronal coding that has long received theoretical support. However, by analyzing simulated and actual LFPs, here we question the existence of theta-gamma phase-phase coupling in the rat hippocampus. We show that the quasi-linear phase shifts introduced by filtering lead to spurious coupling levels in both white noise and hippocampal LFPs, which highly depend on epoch length, and that significant coupling may be falsely detected when employing improper surrogate methods. We also show that waveform asymmetry and frequency harmonics may generate artifactual n:m phase-locking. Studies investigating phase-phase coupling should rely on appropriate statistical controls and be aware of confounding factors; otherwise, they could easily fall into analysis pitfalls. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20515.001 PMID:27925581

  17. Clonally Expanding Thymocytes Having Lineage Capability in Gamma-Ray-Induced Mouse Atrophic Thymus

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Takashi; Morita, Shin-ichi; Go, Rieka; Obata, Miki; Katsuragi, Yoshinori; Fujita, Yukari; Maeda, Yoshitaka; Yokoyama, Minesuke; Aoyagi, Yutaka; Ichikawa, Hitoshi; Mishima, Yukio; Kominami, Ryo

    2010-05-01

    Purpose: To characterize, in the setting of gamma-ray-induced atrophic thymus, probable prelymphoma cells showing clonal growth and changes in signaling, including DNA damage checkpoint. Methods and Materials: A total of 111 and 45 mouse atrophic thymuses at 40 and 80 days, respectively, after gamma-irradiation were analyzed with polymerase chain reaction for D-J rearrangements at the TCRbeta locus, flow cytometry for cell cycle, and Western blotting for the activation of DNA damage checkpoints. Results: Limited D-J rearrangement patterns distinct from normal thymus were detected at high frequencies (43 of 111 for 40-day thymus and 21 of 45 for 80-day thymus). Those clonally expanded thymocytes mostly consisted of CD4{sup +}CD8{sup +} double-positive cells, indicating the retention of lineage capability. They exhibited pausing at a late G1 phase of cell cycle progression but did not show the activation of DNA damage checkpoints such as gammaH2AX, Chk1/2, or p53. Of interest is that 17 of the 52 thymuses showing normal D-J rearrangement patterns at 40 days after irradiation showed allelic loss at the Bcl11b tumor suppressor locus, also indicating clonal expansion. Conclusion: The thymocytes of clonal growth detected resemble human chronic myeloid leukemia in possessing self-renewal and lineage capability, and therefore they can be a candidate of the lymphoma-initiating cells.

  18. GABAB receptor-mediated, layer-specific synaptic plasticity reorganizes gamma-frequency neocortical response to stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Ainsworth, Matthew; Lee, Shane; Kaiser, Marcus; Simonotto, Jennifer; Kopell, Nancy J.

    2016-01-01

    Repeated presentations of sensory stimuli generate transient gamma-frequency (30–80 Hz) responses in neocortex that show plasticity in a task-dependent manner. Complex relationships between individual neuronal outputs and the mean, local field potential (population activity) accompany these changes, but little is known about the underlying mechanisms responsible. Here we show that transient stimulation of input layer 4 sufficient to generate gamma oscillations induced two different, lamina-specific plastic processes that correlated with lamina-specific changes in responses to further, repeated stimulation: Unit rates and recruitment showed overall enhancement in supragranular layers and suppression in infragranular layers associated with excitatory or inhibitory synaptic potentiation onto principal cells, respectively. Both synaptic processes were critically dependent on activation of GABAB receptors and, together, appeared to temporally segregate the cortical representation. These data suggest that adaptation to repetitive sensory input dramatically alters the spatiotemporal properties of the neocortical response in a manner that may both refine and minimize cortical output simultaneously. PMID:27118845

  19. Gamma Ray and Very Low Frequency Radio Observations from a Balloon-Borne Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, C.; Sheldon, A.; Cully, C. M.; Davalos, A.; Osakwe, C.; Galts, D.; Delfin, J.; Duffin, C.; Mansell, J.; Russel, M.; Bootsma, M.; Williams, R.; Patrick, M.; Mazzino, M. L.; Knudsen, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    The University of Calgary's Student Organization for Aerospace Research (SOAR) built an instrument to participate in the High Altitude Student Platform (HASP) initiative organized by Louisiana State University and supported by the NASA Balloon Program Office (BPO) and the Louisiana Space Consortium (LaSPACE). The HASP platform will be launched in early September 2015 from Fort Sumner, New Mexico and will reach heights of 36 kilometers with a flight duration of 15 to 20 hours. The instrument, Atmospheric Phenomenon Observer Gamma/VLF Emissions Experiment (APOGEE), measures Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes (TGF) and sferics from lightning strikes with the use of Geiger tubes and a VLF detector. TGFs, which are quick bursts of high energy radiation that can occur alongside lightning, are believed to be the result of Relativistic Runaway Electron Avalanche (RREA). RREA occurs when a large number of relativistic electrons overcome atmospheric frictional forces and accelerate to relativistic velocities which excite secondary electrons that collide with the atmosphere causing bremsstrahlung radiation. Lightning strikes also produce sferics within the Extremely Low Frequency (ELF) and Very Low Frequency (VLF) bands which can be detected and used to locate the strikes. The goal of APOGEE is to further investigate the link between TGFs and RREA. These phenomena are very difficult to measure together as Bremsstrahlung radiation is easily detected from space but ionospheric reflection facilitates surface detection of sferics. A high altitude balloon provides a unique opportunity to study both phenomena using one instrument because both phenomena can easily be detected from its altitude. APOGEE has been designed and built by undergraduate students at the University of Calgary with faculty assistance and funding, and is equipped with three devices for data collection: a camera to have visual conformation of events, a series of Geiger Tubes to obtain directional gamma readings, and

  20. Early and Late Chromosome Damages in Human Lymphocytes Induced by Gamma Rays and Fe Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sunagawa, Mayumi; Zhang, Ye; Yeshitla, Samrawit; Kadhim, Munira; Wilson, Bobby; Wu, Honglu

    2014-01-01

    Chromosomal translocations and inversions are considered stable, and cells containing these types of chromosome aberrations can survive multiple cell divisions. An efficient method to detect an inversion is multi-color banding fluorescent in situ hybridization (mBAND) which allows identification of both inter- and intrachromosome aberrations simultaneously. Post irradiation, chromosome aberrations may also arise after multiple cell divisions as a result of genomic instability. To investigate the stable or late-arising chromosome aberrations induced after radiation exposure, we exposed human lymphocytes to gamma rays and Fe ions ex vivo, and cultured the cells for multiple generations. Chromosome aberrations were analyzed in cells collected at first mitosis and at several time intervals during the culture period post irradiation. With gamma irradiation, about half of the damages observed at first mitosis remained after 7 day- and 14 day- culture, suggesting the transmissibility of damages to the surviving progeny. Detailed analysis of chromosome break ends participating in exchanges revealed a greater fraction of break ends involved in intrachromosome aberrations in the 7- and 14-day samples in comparison to the fraction at first mitosis. In particular, simple inversions were found at 7 and 14 days, but not at the first mitosis, suggesting that some of the aberrations might be formed days post irradiation. In contrast, at the doses that produced similar frequencies of gamma-induced chromosome aberrations as observed at first mitosis, a significantly lower yield of aberrations remained at the same population doublings after Fe ion exposure. At these equitoxic doses, more complex type aberrations were observed for Fe ions, indicating that Fe ion-induced initial chromosome damages are more severe and may lead to cell death. Comparison between low and high doses of Fe ion irradiation in the induction of late damages will also be discussed.

  1. Genome-wide survey of artificial mutations induced by ethyl methanesulfonate and gamma rays in tomato.

    PubMed

    Shirasawa, Kenta; Hirakawa, Hideki; Nunome, Tsukasa; Tabata, Satoshi; Isobe, Sachiko

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide mutations induced by ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) and gamma irradiation in the tomato Micro-Tom genome were identified by a whole-genome shotgun sequencing analysis to estimate the spectrum and distribution of whole-genome DNA mutations and the frequency of deleterious mutations. A total of ~370 Gb of paired-end reads for four EMS-induced mutants and three gamma-ray-irradiated lines as well as a wild-type line were obtained by next-generation sequencing technology. Using bioinformatics analyses, we identified 5920 induced single nucleotide variations and insertion/deletion (indel) mutations. The predominant mutations in the EMS mutants were C/G to T/A transitions, while in the gamma-ray mutants, C/G to T/A transitions, A/T to T/A transversions, A/T to G/C transitions and deletion mutations were equally common. Biases in the base composition flanking mutations differed between the mutagenesis types. Regarding the effects of the mutations on gene function, >90% of the mutations were located in intergenic regions, and only 0.2% were deleterious. In addition, we detected 1,140,687 spontaneous single nucleotide polymorphisms and indel polymorphisms in wild-type Micro-Tom lines. We also found copy number variation, deletions and insertions of chromosomal segments in both the mutant and wild-type lines. The results provide helpful information not only for mutation research, but also for mutant screening methodology with reverse-genetic approaches.

  2. Interferon gamma rapidly induces in human monocytes a DNA-binding factor that recognizes the gamma response region within the promoter of the gene for the high-affinity Fc gamma receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, K C; Finbloom, D S

    1992-01-01

    Interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) transcriptionally activates several early-response genes in monocytes that are important for the ultimate phenotype of the activated macrophage. One of these genes is the high-affinity Fc receptor for IgG (Fc gamma RI). Recently, Pearse et al. [Pearse, R.N., Feinman, R. & Ravetch, J. V. (1991) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 88, 11305-11309] defined within the promoter region of the Fc gamma RI gene an element, the gamma response region, which was necessary for IFN-gamma-induced enhancement of Fc gamma RI. In this report we describe the induction by IFN-gamma of a DNA-binding factor, FcRF gamma (Fc gamma RI DNA-binding factor, IFN-gamma induced), that specifically recognizes the gamma response region element. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) demonstrated the presence of FcRF gamma in human monocytes within 1 min after exposure to IFN-gamma. On EMSA, FcRF gamma consisted of two complexes termed FcRF gamma 1 and FcRF gamma 2. The nuclear concentration of FcRF gamma rapidly increased, peaked at 15 min, and then fell after 1-2 hr. Dose-response studies revealed (i) as little as 0.05 ng of IFN-gamma per ml induced FcRF gamma, (ii) maximum activation occurred at 1 ng/ml, and (iii) steady-state levels of Fc gamma RI mRNA closely paralleled that of FcRF gamma. Since FcRF gamma was activated in cells normally not expressing Fc gamma RI RNA, other regulatory mechanisms must control Fc gamma RI-restricted tissue expression. Activation of FcRF gamma by IFN-gamma was inhibited by pretreatment with 500 nM staurosporin and 25 microM phenyl arsine oxide. These data suggest that a kinase and possibly a phosphatase activity are required for IFN-gamma-induced signaling of FcRF gamma in monocytes. Images PMID:1334553

  3. Ih Tunes Theta/Gamma Oscillations and Cross-Frequency Coupling In an In Silico CA3 Model

    PubMed Central

    Neymotin, Samuel A.; Hilscher, Markus M.; Moulin, Thiago C.; Skolnick, Yosef; Lazarewicz, Maciej T.; Lytton, William W.

    2013-01-01

    channels are uniquely positioned to act as neuromodulatory control points for tuning hippocampal theta (4–12 Hz) and gamma (25 Hz) oscillations, oscillations which are thought to have importance for organization of information flow. contributes to neuronal membrane resonance and resting membrane potential, and is modulated by second messengers. We investigated oscillatory control using a multiscale computer model of hippocampal CA3, where each cell class (pyramidal, basket, and oriens-lacunosum moleculare cells), contained type-appropriate isoforms of . Our model demonstrated that modulation of pyramidal and basket allows tuning theta and gamma oscillation frequency and amplitude. Pyramidal also controlled cross-frequency coupling (CFC) and allowed shifting gamma generation towards particular phases of the theta cycle, effected via 's ability to set pyramidal excitability. Our model predicts that in vivo neuromodulatory control of allows flexibly controlling CFC and the timing of gamma discharges at particular theta phases. PMID:24204609

  4. Ih tunes theta/gamma oscillations and cross-frequency coupling in an in silico CA3 model.

    PubMed

    Neymotin, Samuel A; Hilscher, Markus M; Moulin, Thiago C; Skolnick, Yosef; Lazarewicz, Maciej T; Lytton, William W

    2013-01-01

    Ih channels are uniquely positioned to act as neuromodulatory control points for tuning hippocampal theta (4-12 Hz) and gamma (25 Hz) oscillations, oscillations which are thought to have importance for organization of information flow. contributes to neuronal membrane resonance and resting membrane potential, and is modulated by second messengers. We investigated oscillatory control using a multiscale computer model of hippocampal CA3, where each cell class (pyramidal, basket, and oriens-lacunosum moleculare cells), contained type-appropriate isoforms of . Our model demonstrated that modulation of pyramidal and basket allows tuning theta and gamma oscillation frequency and amplitude. Pyramidal also controlled cross-frequency coupling (CFC) and allowed shifting gamma generation towards particular phases of the theta cycle, effected via 's ability to set pyramidal excitability. Our model predicts that in vivo neuromodulatory control of allows flexibly controlling CFC and the timing of gamma discharges at particular theta phases.

  5. Role of interferon-gamma in interleukin 12-induced pathology in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Car, B. D.; Eng, V. M.; Schnyder, B.; LeHir, M.; Shakhov, A. N.; Woerly, G.; Huang, S.; Aguet, M.; Anderson, T. D.; Ryffel, B.

    1995-01-01

    Interleukin 12 (IL-12) activates natural killer (NK) and T cells with the secondary synthesis and release of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and other cytokines. IL-12-induced organ alterations are reported for mice and the pathogenetic role of IFN-gamma is investigated by the use of mice deficient in the IFN-gamma receptor (IFN-gamma R-/-). IL-12 caused a rapid infiltration of liver and splenic red pulp with activated macrophages; this and increased NK cells resulted in a fivefold increase of splenic weight in wild-type mice. Splenomegaly was associated with myelosuppression and decreasing peripheral leukocyte counts. IL-12-induced changes in wild-type mice were associated with markedly increased IFN-gamma serum levels and up-regulation of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II expression in various epithelia. IL-12 induced a qualitatively similar macrophage infiltration in IFN-gamma R-/- mice, less marked splenomegaly (to 2 x normal), and no MHC upregulation. Strikingly increased vascular endothelial intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression was apparent in both IFN-gamma R-/- and IFN-gamma R+/+ mice. Restricted to mutant mice was a severe, invariably lethal, interstitial, and perivascular pulmonary macrophage infiltration with diffuse pulmonary edema. Extensive quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed an increase of only IL-6 and IL-10 pulmonary gene transcripts in IFN-gamma R-/- mice compared with wild-type mice. IL-12-induced myelosuppression is due to IFN-gamma-release from NK cells and T cells, and is associated with macrophage activation and distinct MHC class I and II antigen upregulation. The pulmonary pathology in IFN-gamma R-/- mice, however, reveals a toxic potential for IL-12 and suggests that endogenous IFN-gamma plays a protective role in preventing fatal pulmonary disease in these mice. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:7495294

  6. EIGHT {gamma}-RAY PULSARS DISCOVERED IN BLIND FREQUENCY SEARCHES OF FERMI LAT DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Dormody, M.; Ziegler, M.; Belfiore, A.; Johnson, R. P.; Ray, P. S.; Abdo, A. A.; Grove, J. E.; Gwon, C.; Ballet, J.; Burnett, T. H.; Caliandro, G. A.; Camilo, F.; Caraveo, P. A.; De Luca, A.; Ferrara, E. C.; Harding, A. K.; Johnson, T. J.; Freire, P. C. C. E-mail: mdormody@ucsc.ed E-mail: Paul.Ray@nrl.navy.mi

    2010-12-10

    We report the discovery of eight {gamma}-ray pulsars in blind frequency searches of {approx}650 source positions using the Large Area Telescope (LAT), on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. We present the timing models, light curves, and detailed spectral parameters of the new pulsars. PSRs J1023-5746, J1044-5737, J1413-5205, J1429-5911, and J1954+2836 are young ({tau}{sub c} < 100 kyr), energetic (E-dot {approx}>10{sup 36} erg s{sup -1}), and located within the Galactic plane (|b| < 3{sup 0}). The remaining three pulsars, PSRs J1846+0919, J1957+5033, and J2055+25, are less energetic, and located off the plane. Five pulsars are associated with sources included in the Fermi-LAT bright {gamma}-ray source list, but only one, PSR J1413-6205, is clearly associated with an EGRET source. PSR J1023-5746 has the smallest characteristic age ({tau}{sub c} = 4.6 kyr) and is the most energetic (E-dot = 1.1x10{sup 37} erg s{sup -1}) of all {gamma}-ray pulsars discovered so far in blind searches. By analyzing >100 ks of publicly available archival Chandra X-ray data, we have identified the likely counterpart of PSR J1023-5746 as a faint, highly absorbed source, CXOU J102302.8-574606. The large X-ray absorption indicates that this could be among the most distant {gamma}-ray pulsars detected so far. PSR J1023-5746 is positionally coincident with the TeV source HESS J1023-575, located near the young stellar cluster Westerlund 2, while PSR J1954+2836 is coincident with a 4.3{sigma} excess reported by Milagro at a median energy of 35 TeV. PSRs J1957+5033 and J2055+25 have the largest characteristic ages ({tau}{sub c} {approx} 1 Myr) and are the least energetic (E-dot {approx}5x10{sup 33} erg s{sup -1}) of the newly discovered pulsars. We used recent XMM observations to identify the counterpart of PSR J2055+25 as XMMU J205549.4+253959. Deep radio follow-up observations of the eight pulsars resulted in no detections of pulsations and upper limits comparable to the faintest known

  7. Investigation of Annual Modulation Signal from Radon Induced Gamma Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chao; Mei, Dongming

    2015-10-01

    The phenomenon of annual modulation is believed to be one of the signatures induced by Weakly Interacting Massive Particles(WIMPs) through elastic scattering off nucleus in the target for direct dark matter searches. Both DAMA and CoGeNT experiments have claimed the discovery of dark matter in terms of annual modulation while many other experiments have ruled out the entire claimed region. However, the sources that caused the annual modulation in DAMA and CoGeNT are still unknown which need to be investigated. Annual modulations of Radon at underground sites are reported by many experiments. As a potential source, we investigate (alpha, gamma) reactions, induced by radon decay chain, occurring on the surface of those common shielding materials and explain how this background annual modulation may mimic dark matter signature. This work is supported by NSF in part by the NSF PHY-0758120, DOE Grant DE-FG02-10ER46709, and the State of South Dakota.

  8. Atomic jump frequencies in intermetallic compounds studied using perturbed angular correlation of gamma rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newhouse, Randal Leslie

    Atomic jump frequencies were determined in a variety of intermetallic compounds through analysis of nuclear relaxation of spectra measured using the nuclear hyperfine technique, perturbed angular correlation (PAC) of gamma rays. Observed at higher temperatures, this relaxation is attributed to fluctuations in the orientation or magnitude of electric field gradients (EFG) at nuclei of 111In/Cd probe atoms as the atoms make diffusive jumps. Jump frequencies were obtained by fitting dynamically relaxed PAC spectra using either an empirical relaxation function or using ab initio relaxation models created using the program PolyPacFit. Jump frequency activation enthalpies were determined from measurements over a range of temperatures. Diffusion was studied in the following systems: 1) Pseudo-binary alloys having the L12 crystal structure such as In3(La1-xPrx). The goal was to see how jump frequencies were affected by random disorder. 2) The family of layered phases, LanCoIn3n+2 ( n=0,1,2,3…∞). The goal was to see how jump frequencies varied with the spacing of Co layers, which were found to block diffusion. 3) Phases having the FeGa3 structure. The goal was to analyze dynamical relaxation for probe atoms having multiple inequivalent jump vectors. 4) Phases having the tetragonal Al4Ba structure. The goal was to search for effects in the PAC spectra caused by fluctuations in magnitudes of EFGs without fluctuations in orientations. Ab initio relaxation models were developed to simulate and fit dynamical relaxation for PAC spectra of FeGa3, and several phases with the Al4Ba structure in order to determine underlying microscopic jump frequencies. In the course of this work, site preferences also were observed for 111In/Cd probe atoms in several FeGa 3 and Al4Ba phases.

  9. Grb2 negatively regulates epidermal growth factor-induced phospholipase C-gamma1 activity through the direct interaction with tyrosine-phosphorylated phospholipase C-gamma1.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jang Hyun; Hong, Won-Pyo; Yun, Sanguk; Kim, Hyeon Soo; Lee, Jong-Ryul; Park, Jong Bae; Bae, Yun Soo; Ryu, Sung Ho; Suh, Pann-Ghill

    2005-10-01

    Phospholipase C-gamma1 (PLC-gamma1) plays pivotal roles in cellular growth and proliferation. Upon the stimulation of growth factors and hormones, PLC-gamma1 is rapidly phosphorylated at three known sites; Tyr771, Tyr783 and Tyr1254 and its enzymatic activity is up-regulated. In this study, we demonstrate for the first time that Grb2, an adaptor protein, specifically interacts with tyrosine-phosphorylated PLC-gamma1 at Tyr783. The association of Grb2 with PLC-gamma1 was induced by the treatment with epidermal growth factor (EGF). Replacement of Tyr783 with Phe completely blocked EGF-induced interaction of PLC-gamma1 with Grb2, indicating that tyrosine phosphorylation of PLC-gamma1 at Tyr783 is essential for the interaction with Grb2. Interestingly, the depletion of Grb2 from HEK-293 cells by RNA interference significantly enhanced increased EGF-induced PLC-gamma1 enzymatic activity and mobilization of the intracellular Ca2+, while it did not affect EGF-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of PLC-gamma1. Furthermore, overexpression of Grb2 inhibited PLC-gamma1 enzymatic activity. Taken together, these results suggest Grb2, in addition to its key function in signaling through Ras, may have a negatively regulatory role on EGF-induced PLC-gamma1 activation.

  10. The mirror illusion induces high gamma oscillations in the absence of movement.

    PubMed

    Butorina, A; Prokofyev, A; Nazarova, M; Litvak, V; Stroganova, T

    2014-12-01

    We tested whether mirror visual feedback (MVF) from a moving hand induced high gamma oscillation (HGO) response in the hemisphere contralateral to the mirror and ipsilateral to the self-paced movement. MEG was recorded in 14 subjects under three conditions: bilateral synchronous movements of both index fingers (BILATERAL), movements of the right hand index finger while observing the immobile left index finger (NOMIRROR), and movements of the right hand index finger while observing its mirror reflection (MIRROR). The right hemispheric spatiospectral regions of interests (ROIs) in the sensor space, sensitive to bilateral movements, were found by statistical comparison of the BILATERAL spectral responses to baseline. For these ROIs, the post-movement HGO responses were compared between the MIRROR and NOMIRROR conditions. We found that MVF from the moving hand, similarly to the real movements of the opposite hand, induced HGOs (55-85Hz) in the sensorimotor cortex. This MVF effect was frequency-specific and did not spread to oscillations in other frequency bands. This is the first study demonstrating movement-related HGO induced by MVF from the moving hand in the absence of proprioceptive feedback signaling. Our findings support the hypothesis that MVF can trigger the feedback-based control processes specifically associated with perception of one's own movements.

  11. Double strand breaks induced by low doses of {gamma} rays or heavy ions: Quantitation in nonradioactive human DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, B.M.; Bennett, P.V.; Sutherland, J.C.

    1996-07-15

    We have developed a method of quantitating low frequencies (0-30 sites/10{sup 9} base pairs) of double strand breaks in {approximately}1 {mu}g of nonradioactive human DNA. Unirradiated or irradiated DNA is digested with the restriction endonuclease NotI, producing cleavage fragments that include a major group centered at {approximately}1.2-1.3 Mbp. The DNA molecules are separated as a function of size by transverse alternating field electrophoresis. The frequency of double strand breaks is computed directly from the decrease in number average molecular length induced in the 1.2 to 1.3-Mbp cleavage fragment group by {sup 137}Cs {gamma} or Fe{sup 26+} (1.1 GeV/nucleon) irradiation vs the corresponding unirradiated DNA samples. The double strand break frequency can be quantitated easily in the dose range of 0-10 cGy of {gamma} rays. The frequency of breaks per unit dose calculated for {gamma} irradiation of DNA in human cells ({approximately}4.6 double strand breaks/10{sup 9} bp/Gy) who used methods requiring higher doses. 55 refs., 4 figs.

  12. Connection of Very High Energy Gamma-ray Flares in Blazars to Activity at Lower Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marscher, Alan P.; Jorstad, Svetlana G.

    2016-04-01

    The author will briefly review the results of multi-wavelength observations of blazars that emit very high-energy (VHE) gamma rays. The VHE gamma-ray emission is generally episodic, including flares that are often very short-lived. While many of these flares have counterparts only at X-ray energies, or no counterparts at all, some events are seen also at optical wavelengths, and a number are associated with the passage of new superluminal knots passing through the core in mm-wave VLBA images. Two explanations for the short-term VHE flares in the relativistic jets are supersonic turbulence and ultra-fast plasma jets resulting from magnetic reconnections. Observations of frequency-dependent linear polarization during flares can potentially decide between these models. VLBA images can help to locate VHE events that are seen at millimeter wavelengths. In some cases, the flares take place near the parsec-scale core, while in others they occur closer to the black hole.This research is supported in part by NASA through Swift Guest Investigator grants NNX15AR45G and NNX15AR34G.

  13. Atorvastatin enhances kainate-induced gamma oscillations in rat hippocampal slices.

    PubMed

    Li, Chengzhang; Wang, Jiangang; Zhao, Jianhua; Wang, Yali; Liu, Zhihua; Guo, Fang Li; Wang, Xiao Fang; Vreugdenhil, Martin; Lu, Cheng Biao

    2016-09-01

    Atorvastatin has been shown to affect cognitive functions in rodents and humans. However, the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. Because hippocampal gamma oscillations (γ, 20-80 Hz) are associated with cognitive functions, we studied the effect of atorvastatin on persistent kainate-induced γ oscillation in the CA3 area of rat hippocampal slices. The involvement of NMDA receptors and multiple kinases was tested before and after administration of atorvastatin. Whole-cell current-clamp and voltage-clamp recordings were made from CA3 pyramidal neurons and interneurons before and after atorvastatin application. Atorvastatin increased γ power by ~ 50% in a concentration-dependent manner, without affecting dominant frequency. Whereas atorvastatin did not affect intrinsic properties of both pyramidal neurons and interneurons, it increased the firing frequency of interneurons but not that of pyramidal neurons. Furthermore, whereas atorvastatin did not affect synaptic current amplitude, it increased the frequency of spontaneous inhibitory post-synaptic currents, but did not affect the frequency of spontaneous excitatory post-synaptic currents. The atorvastatin-induced enhancement of γ oscillations was prevented by pretreatment with the PKA inhibitor H89, the ERK inhibitor U0126, or the PI3K inhibitor wortmanin, but not by the NMDA receptor antagonist D-AP5. Taken together, these results demonstrate that atorvastatin enhanced the kainate-induced γ oscillation by increasing interneuron excitability, with an involvement of multiple intracellular kinase pathways. Our study suggests that the classical cholesterol-lowering agent atorvastatin may improve cognitive functions compromised in disease, via the enhancement of hippocampal γ oscillations.

  14. Signals features extraction in liquid-gas flow measurements using gamma densitometry. Part 2: frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanus, Robert; Zych, Marcin; Petryka, Leszek; Jaszczur, Marek; Hanus, Paweł

    2016-03-01

    Knowledge of the structure of a flow is really significant for the proper conduct a number of industrial processes. In this case a description of a two-phase flow regimes is possible by use of the time-series analysis e.g. in frequency domain. In this article the classical spectral analysis based on Fourier Transform (FT) and Short-Time Fourier Transform (STFT) were applied for analysis of signals obtained for water-air flow using gamma ray absorption. The presented method was illustrated by use data collected in experiments carried out on the laboratory hydraulic installation with a horizontal pipe of 4.5 m length and inner diameter of 30 mm equipped with two 241Am radioactive sources and scintillation probes with NaI(Tl) crystals. Stochastic signals obtained from detectors for plug, bubble, and transitional plug - bubble flows were considered in this work. The recorded raw signals were analyzed and several features in the frequency domain were extracted using autospectral density function (ADF), cross-spectral density function (CSDF), and the STFT spectrogram. In result of a detail analysis it was found that the most promising to recognize of the flow structure are: maximum value of the CSDF magnitude, sum of the CSDF magnitudes in the selected frequency range, and the maximum value of the sum of selected amplitudes of STFT spectrogram.

  15. First-principles calculations on anharmonic vibrational frequencies of polyethylene and polyacetylene in the Gamma approximation.

    PubMed

    Keçeli, Murat; Hirata, So; Yagi, Kiyoshi

    2010-07-21

    The frequencies of the infrared- and/or Raman-active (k=0) vibrations of polyethylene and polyacetylene are computed by taking account of the anharmonicity in the potential energy surfaces (PESs) and the resulting phonon-phonon couplings explicitly. The electronic part of the calculations is based on Gaussian-basis-set crystalline orbital theory at the Hartree-Fock and second-order Møller-Plesset (MP2) perturbation levels, providing one-, two-, and/or three-dimensional slices of the PES (namely, using the so-called n-mode coupling approximation with n=3), which are in turn expanded in the fourth-order Taylor series with respect to the normal coordinates. The vibrational part uses the vibrational self-consistent field, vibrational MP2, and vibrational truncated configuration-interaction (VCI) methods within the Gamma approximation, which amounts to including only k=0 phonons. It is shown that accounting for both electron correlation and anharmonicity is essential in achieving good agreement (the mean and maximum absolute deviations less than 50 and 90 cm(-1), respectively, for polyethylene and polyacetylene) between computed and observed frequencies. The corresponding values for the calculations including only one of such effects are in excess of 120 and 300 cm(-1), respectively. The VCI calculations also reproduce semiquantitatively the frequency separation and intensity ratio of the Fermi doublet involving the nu(2)(0) fundamental and nu(8)(pi) first overtone in polyethylene.

  16. PLC-gamma1 and Rac1 coregulate EGF-induced cytoskeleton remodeling and cell migration.

    PubMed

    Li, Siwei; Wang, Qian; Wang, Yi; Chen, Xinmei; Wang, Zhixiang

    2009-06-01

    It is well established that epidermal growth factor (EGF) induces the cytoskeleton reorganization and cell migration through two major signaling cascades: phospholipase C-gamma1 (PLC-gamma1) and Rho GTPases. However, little is known about the cross talk between PLC-gamma1 and Rho GTPases. Here we showed that PLC-gamma1 forms a complex with Rac1 in response to EGF. This interaction is direct and mediated by PLC-gamma1 Src homology 3 (SH3) domain and Rac1 (106)PNTP(109) motif. This interaction is critical for EGF-induced Rac1 activation in vivo, and PLC-gamma1 SH3 domain is actually a potent and specific Rac1 guanine nucleotide exchange factor in vitro. We have also demonstrated that the interaction between PLC-gamma1 SH3 domain and Rac1 play a significant role in EGF-induced F-actin formation and cell migration. We conclude that PLC-gamma1 and Rac1 coregulate EGF-induced cell cytoskeleton remodeling and cell migration by a direct functional interaction.

  17. Feedforward inhibition underlies the propagation of cholinergically induced gamma oscillations from hippocampal CA3 to CA1.

    PubMed

    Zemankovics, Rita; Veres, Judit M; Oren, Iris; Hájos, Norbert

    2013-07-24

    Gamma frequency (30-80 Hz) oscillations are implicated in memory processing. Such rhythmic activity can be generated intrinsically in the CA3 region of the hippocampus from where it can propagate to the CA1 area. To uncover the synaptic mechanisms underlying the intrahippocampal spread of gamma oscillations, we recorded local field potentials, as well as action potentials and synaptic currents in anatomically identified CA1 and CA3 neurons during carbachol-induced gamma oscillations in mouse hippocampal slices. The firing of the vast majority of CA1 neurons and all CA3 neurons was phase-coupled to the oscillations recorded in the stratum pyramidale of the CA1 region. The predominant synaptic input to CA1 interneurons was excitatory, and their discharge followed the firing of CA3 pyramidal cells at a latency indicative of monosynaptic connections. Correlation analysis of the input-output characteristics of the neurons and local pharmacological block of inhibition both agree with a model in which glutamatergic CA3 input controls the firing of CA1 interneurons, with local pyramidal cell activity having a minimal role. The firing of phase-coupled CA1 pyramidal cells was controlled principally by their inhibitory inputs, which dominated over excitation. Our results indicate that the synchronous firing of CA3 pyramidal cells rhythmically recruits CA1 interneurons and that this feedforward inhibition generates the oscillatory activity in CA1. These findings identify distinct synaptic mechanisms underlying the generation of gamma frequency oscillations in neighboring hippocampal subregions.

  18. Gamma1- and gamma2-melanocyte stimulating hormones induce central anxiogenic effects and potentiate ethanol withdrawal responses in the elevated plus-maze test in mice.

    PubMed

    Jansone, Baiba; Rumaks, Juris; Dzirkale, Zane; Pupure, Jolanta; Svirskis, Simons; Muceniece, Ruta; Klusa, Vija

    2009-04-01

    Little is known about the endogenous functions of gamma1- and gamma2-melanocyte stimulating hormones (gamma1- and gamma2-MSH). Although gamma-MSHs bind to melanocortin receptor subtypes 3 and 4, we have previously shown that these peptides also influence non-melanocortinergic processes, such as dopaminergic and GABAergic. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of gamma1- and gamma2-MSH (at doses 0.3, 1 and 2 nmol/mouse/5 microl) on the anxiety levels in mice in elevated plus maze. Three experimental paradigms were performed to assess the effects of peptides on: a) ethanol withdrawal; b) acute ethanol-induced anxiolytic action; c) peptides per se. We used ethanol as the model substance, since its action involves either dopaminergic/GABAergic or melanocortinergic processes. gamma-MSHs were administered intracisternally in mice and behavioural responses were assessed in the elevated plus maze test. This study provides the first demonstration of an anxiogenic effect of gamma1- and gamma2-MSH, their synergistic/additive effect on ethanol withdrawal-induced anxiety behaviour, and an antagonism of peptides involved in the anxiolytic action of ethanol. Furthermore, results suggest that gamma-MSHs belong to an anxiogenic peptide family that may play an important role in anxiety disorders as well as in the development of alcohol dependence and/or alcohol withdrawal-induced behaviours.

  19. Comparison of EEG and MEG in source localization of induced human gamma-band oscillations during visual stimulus.

    PubMed

    Mideksa, K G; Hoogenboom, N; Hellriegel, H; Krause, H; Schnitzler, A; Deuschl, G; Raethjen, J; Heute, U; Muthuraman, M

    2015-08-01

    High frequency gamma oscillations are indications of information processing in cortical neuronal networks. Recently, non-invasive detection of these oscillations have become one of the main research areas in magnetoencephalography (MEG) and electroencephalography (EEG) studies. The aim of this study, which is a continuation of our previous MEG study, is to compare the capability of the two modalities (EEG and MEG) in localizing the source of the induced gamma activity due to a visual stimulus, using a spatial filtering technique known as dynamic imaging of coherent sources (DICS). To do this, the brain activity was recorded using simultaneous MEG and EEG measurement and the data were analyzed with respect to time, frequency, and location of the strongest response. The spherical head modeling technique, such as, the three-shell concentric spheres and an overlapping sphere (local sphere) have been used as a forward model to calculate the external electromagnetic potentials and fields recorded by the EEG and MEG, respectively. Our results from the time-frequency analysis, at the sensor level, revealed that the parieto-occipital electrodes and sensors from both modalities showed a clear and sustained gamma-band activity throughout the post-stimulus duration and that both modalities showed similar strongest gamma-band peaks. It was difficult to interpret the spatial pattern of the gamma-band oscillatory response on the scalp, at the sensor level, for both modalities. However, the source analysis result revealed that MEG3 sensor type, which measure the derivative along the longitude, showed the source more focally and close to the visual cortex (cuneus) as compared to that of the EEG.

  20. Reduction in mutation frequency by very low-dose gamma irradiation of Drosophila melanogaster germ cells.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Keiji; Magae, Junji; Kawakami, Yasushi; Koana, Takao

    2009-01-01

    To determine whether the linear no-threshold (LNT) model for stochastic effects of ionizing radiation is applicable to very low-dose radiation at a low dose rate, we irradiated immature male germ cells of the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, with several doses of (60)Co gamma rays at a dose rate of 22.4 mGy/h. Thereafter, we performed the sex-linked recessive lethal mutation assay by mating the irradiated males with nonirradiated females. The mutation frequency in the group irradiated with 500 microGy was found to be significantly lower than that in the control group (P < 0.01), whereas in the group subjected to 10 Gy irradiation, the mutation frequency was significantly higher than that in the control group (P < 0.03). A J-shaped dose-response relationship was evident. Molecular experiments using DNA microarray and quantitative reverse transcription PCR indicated that several genes known to be expressed in response to heat or chemical stress and grim, a positive regulator of apoptosis, were up-regulated immediately after irradiation with 500 microGy. The involvement of an apoptosis function in the non-linear dose-response relationship was suggested.

  1. Optogenetically induced spatiotemporal gamma oscillations and neuronal spiking activity in primate motor cortex

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yao; Truccolo, Wilson; Wagner, Fabien B.; Vargas-Irwin, Carlos E.; Ozden, Ilker; Zimmermann, Jonas B.; May, Travis; Agha, Naubahar S.; Wang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Transient gamma-band (40–80 Hz) spatiotemporal patterns are hypothesized to play important roles in cortical function. Here we report the direct observation of gamma oscillations as spatiotemporal waves induced by targeted optogenetic stimulation, recorded by intracortical multichannel extracellular techniques in macaque monkeys during their awake resting states. Microelectrode arrays integrating an optical fiber at their center were chronically implanted in primary motor (M1) and ventral premotor (PMv) cortices of two subjects. Targeted brain tissue was transduced with the red-shifted opsin C1V1(T/T). Constant (1-s square pulses) and ramp stimulation induced narrowband gamma oscillations during awake resting states. Recordings across 95 microelectrodes (4 × 4-mm array) enabled us to track the transient gamma spatiotemporal patterns manifested, e.g., as concentric expanding and spiral waves. Gamma oscillations were induced well beyond the light stimulation volume, via network interactions at distal electrode sites, depending on optical power. Despite stimulation-related modulation in spiking rates, neuronal spiking remained highly asynchronous during induced gamma oscillations. In one subject we examined stimulation effects during preparation and execution of a motor task and observed that movement execution largely attenuated optically induced gamma oscillations. Our findings demonstrate that, beyond previously reported induced gamma activity under periodic drive, a prolonged constant stimulus above a certain threshold may carry primate motor cortex network dynamics into gamma oscillations, likely via a Hopf bifurcation. More broadly, the experimental capability in combining microelectrode array recordings and optogenetic stimulation provides an important approach for probing spatiotemporal dynamics in primate cortical networks during various physiological and behavioral conditions. PMID:25761956

  2. Optogenetically induced spatiotemporal gamma oscillations and neuronal spiking activity in primate motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yao; Truccolo, Wilson; Wagner, Fabien B; Vargas-Irwin, Carlos E; Ozden, Ilker; Zimmermann, Jonas B; May, Travis; Agha, Naubahar S; Wang, Jing; Nurmikko, Arto V

    2015-06-01

    Transient gamma-band (40-80 Hz) spatiotemporal patterns are hypothesized to play important roles in cortical function. Here we report the direct observation of gamma oscillations as spatiotemporal waves induced by targeted optogenetic stimulation, recorded by intracortical multichannel extracellular techniques in macaque monkeys during their awake resting states. Microelectrode arrays integrating an optical fiber at their center were chronically implanted in primary motor (M1) and ventral premotor (PMv) cortices of two subjects. Targeted brain tissue was transduced with the red-shifted opsin C1V1(T/T). Constant (1-s square pulses) and ramp stimulation induced narrowband gamma oscillations during awake resting states. Recordings across 95 microelectrodes (4 × 4-mm array) enabled us to track the transient gamma spatiotemporal patterns manifested, e.g., as concentric expanding and spiral waves. Gamma oscillations were induced well beyond the light stimulation volume, via network interactions at distal electrode sites, depending on optical power. Despite stimulation-related modulation in spiking rates, neuronal spiking remained highly asynchronous during induced gamma oscillations. In one subject we examined stimulation effects during preparation and execution of a motor task and observed that movement execution largely attenuated optically induced gamma oscillations. Our findings demonstrate that, beyond previously reported induced gamma activity under periodic drive, a prolonged constant stimulus above a certain threshold may carry primate motor cortex network dynamics into gamma oscillations, likely via a Hopf bifurcation. More broadly, the experimental capability in combining microelectrode array recordings and optogenetic stimulation provides an important approach for probing spatiotemporal dynamics in primate cortical networks during various physiological and behavioral conditions.

  3. Memory retrieval time and memory capacity of the CA3 network: Role of gamma frequency oscillations

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Licurgo; Idiart, Marco; Lisman, John E.

    2007-01-01

    The existence of recurrent synaptic connections in CA3 led to the hypothesis that CA3 is an autoassociative network similar to the Hopfield networks studied by theorists. CA3 undergoes gamma frequency periodic inhibition that prevents a persistent attractor state. This argues against the analogy to Hopfield nets, in which an attractor state can be used for working memory. However, we show that such periodic inhibition allows one cycle of recurrent excitatory activity and that this is sufficient for memory retrieval (within milliseconds). Thus, gamma oscillations are compatible with a long-term autoassociative memory function for CA3. A second goal of our work was to evaluate previous methods for estimating the memory capacity (P) of CA3. We confirm the equation, P = c/a2, where c is the probability that any two cells are recurrently connected and a is the fraction of cells representing a memory item. In applying this to CA3, we focus on CA3a, the subregion where recurrent connections are most numerous (c = 0.2) and approximate randomness. We estimate that a memory item is represented by ∼225 of the 70,000 neurons in CA3a (a = 0.003) and that ∼20,000 memory items can be stored. Our general conclusion is that the physiological and anatomical findings of CA3a are consistent with an autoassociative function. The nature of the information that is associated in CA3a is discussed. We also discuss how the autoassociative properties of CA3 and the heteroassociative properties of dentate synapses (linking sequential memories) form an integrated system for the storage and recall of item sequences. The recall process generates the phase precession in dentate, CA3, and entorhinal cortex. PMID:18007022

  4. Gamma-glutamylcysteinylethyl ester attenuates progression of carbon tetrachloride-induced acute liver injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Nishida, K; Ohta, Y; Ishiguro, I

    1998-02-20

    We examined the effect of gamma-glutamylcysteinylethyl ester (gamma-GCE), which is readily transported into hepatocytes and increases hepatocellular reduced glutathione (GSH) levels, on the progression of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced liver injury in mice in comparison with that of GSH. Administration of more than 160 micromol/kg of gamma-GCE, but not GSH, to mice at 3 h after intraperitoneal injection of CCl4 (1 ml/kg) significantly attenuated increases in serum aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase activities at 24 h after the CCl4 injection. Increases in hepatic lipid peroxide (LPO) concentrations and decreases in hepatic GSH concentrations after the CCl4 injection were significantly diminished by the gamma-GCE (160 micromol/kg) administration, but not by the same dose of GSH. Gamma-GCE, gamma-glutamylcysteine, and cysteine acted as substrates for glutathione peroxidases much less efficiently than GSH in the post-mitochondrial fraction of normal mouse liver cells. These results indicate that gamma-GCE attenuates the progression of CCl4-induced acute liver injury in mice through the maintenance of hepatic GSH levels, leading to inhibition of hepatic LPO formation, which could be due to an efficient utilization of GSH converted from gamma-GCE in the liver cells.

  5. Inositol 5'-phosphatase, SHIP1 interacts with phospholipase C-gamma1 and modulates EGF-induced PLC activity.

    PubMed

    Song, Minseok; Kim, Myung Jong; Ha, Sanghoon; Park, Jong Bae; Ryu, Sung Ho; Suh, Pann-Ghill

    2005-06-30

    Phospholipase C-gamma1, containing two SH2 and one SH3 domains which participate in the interaction between signaling molecules, plays a significant role in the growth factor-induced signal transduction. However, the role of the SH domains in the growth factor-induced PLC-gamma1 regulation is unclear. By peptide-mass fingerprinting analysis, we have identified SHIP1 as the binding protein for the SH3 domain of PLC-gamma1. SHIP1 was co-immunoprecipitated with PLC-gamma1 and potentiated EGF-induced PLC-gamma1 activation. However, inositol 5'-phosphatase activity of SHIP1 was not required for the potentiation of EGF-induced PLC-gamma1 activation. Taken together, these results suggest that SHIP1 may function as an adaptor protein which can potentiate EGF-induced PLC-gamma1 activation without regards to its inositol 5'-phosphatase activity.

  6. Low-Frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) Modulates Evoked-Gamma Frequency Oscillations in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)

    PubMed Central

    Baruth, Joshua M.; Casanova, Manuel F.; El-Baz, Ayman; Horrell, Tim; Mathai, Grace; Sears, Lonnie; Sokhadze, Estate

    2010-01-01

    Introduction It has been reported that individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) have abnormal reactions to the sensory environment and visuo-perceptual abnormalities. Electrophysiological research has provided evidence that gamma band activity (30-80 Hz) is a physiological indicator of the co-activation of cortical cells engaged in processing visual stimuli and integrating different features of a stimulus. A number of studies have found augmented and indiscriminative gamma band power at early stages of visual processing in ASD; this may be related to decreased inhibitory processing and an increase in the ratio of cortical excitation to inhibition. Low frequency or ‘slow’ (≤1HZ) repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has been shown to increase inhibition of stimulated cortex by the activation of inhibitory circuits. Methods We wanted to test the hypothesis of gamma band abnormalities at early stages of visual processing in ASD by investigating relative evoked (i.e. ~ 100 ms) gamma power in 25 subjects with ASD and 20 age-matched controls using Kanizsa illusory figures. Additionally, we wanted to assess the effects of 12 sessions of bilateral ‘slow’ rTMS to the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) on evoked gamma activity using a randomized controlled design. Results In individuals with ASD evoked gamma activity was not discriminative of stimulus type, whereas in controls early gamma power differences between target and non-target stimuli were highly significant. Following rTMS individuals with ASD showed significant improvement in discriminatory gamma activity between relevant and irrelevant visual stimuli. We also found significant improvement in the responses on behavioral questionnaires (i.e., irritability, repetitive behavior) as a result of rTMS. Conclusion We proposed that ‘slow’ rTMS may have increased cortical inhibitory tone which improved discriminatory gamma activity at early stages of visual processing. rTMS has the

  7. Neutron induced background in the COMPTEL detector on the Gamma Ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, D. J.; Aarts, H.; Bennett, K.; Busetta, M.; Byrd, R.; Collmar, W.; Connors, A.; Diehl, R.; Eymann, G.; Foster, C.

    1992-01-01

    Interactions of neutrons in a prototype of the Compton imaging telescope (COMPTEL) gamma ray detector for the Gamma Ray Observatory were studied to determine COMPTEL's sensitivity as a neutron telescope and to estimate the gamma ray background resulting from neutron interactions. The IUCF provided a pulsed neutron beam at five different energies between 18 and 120 MeV. These measurements showed that the gamma ray background from neutron interactions is greater than previously expected. It was thought that most such events would be due to interactions in the upper detector modules of COMPTEL and could be distinguished by pulse shape discrimination. Rather, the bulk of the gamma ray background appears to be due to interactions in passive material, primarily aluminum, surrounding the D1 modules. In a considerable fraction of these interactions, two or more gamma rays are produced simultaneously, with one interacting in the D1 module and the other interacting in the module of the lower (D2) detector. If the neutron interacts near the D1 module, the D1 D2 time of flight cannot distinguish such an event from a true gamma ray event. In order to assess the significance of this background, the flux of neutrons in orbit has been estimated based on observed events with neutron pulse shape signature in D1. The strength of this neutron induced background is estimated. This is compared with the rate expected from the isotropic cosmic gamma ray flux.

  8. Neutron-induced 2.2 MeV background in gamma ray telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zanrosso, E. M.; Long, J. L.; Zych, A. D.; White, R. S.

    1985-01-01

    Neutron-induced gamma ray production is an important source of background in Compton scatter gamma ray telescopes where organic scintillator material is used. Most important is deuteron formation when atmospheric albedo and locally produced neutrons are thermalized and subsequently absorbed in the hydrogenous material. The resulting 2.2 MeV gamma ray line radiation essentially represents a continuous isotropic source within the scintillator itself. Interestingly, using a scintillator material with a high hydrogen-to-carbon ratio to minimize the scintillator material with a high hydrogen-to-carbon ratio to minimize the neutron-induced 4.4 MeV carbon line favors the np reaction. The full problem of neutron-induced background in Compton scatter telescopes has been previously discussed. Results are presented of observations with the University of California balloon-borne Compton scatter telescope where the 2.2 MeV induced line emission is prominently seen.

  9. Gamma knife surgery-induced ependymoma after the treatment of meningioma - a case report.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ke; Pan, Li; Che, Xiaoming; Lou, Meiqing

    2012-01-01

    Gamma knife surgery is widely used for a number of neurological disorders. However, little is known about its long-term complications such as carcinogenic risks. Here, we present a case of a radiosurgery-induced ependymoma by gamma knife surgery for the treatment of a spinal meningioma in a 7-year-old patient. In light of reviewing the previous reports, we advocate high caution in making young patients receive this treatment.

  10. Study on chemical, UV and gamma radiation-induced grafting of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate onto chitosan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casimiro, M. H.; Botelho, M. L.; Leal, J. P.; Gil, M. H.

    2005-04-01

    In the present study, 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate has been grafted onto chitosan by using either chemical initiation, or photo-induction or gamma radiation-induced polymerisation, all under heterogeneous conditions. The evidence of grafting was provided by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermal analysis. The results concerning the effect of initiator concentration, initial monomer concentration and dose rate influencing on the yield of grafting reactions are presented. These suggest that gamma irradiation is the method that leads to higher yields of grafting.

  11. Hydroxymethyl-phytochelatins [(gamma-glutamylcysteine)n-serine] are metal-induced peptides of the Poaceae.

    PubMed Central

    Klapheck, S; Fliegner, W; Zimmer, I

    1994-01-01

    Exposure of several species of the family Poaceae to cadmium results in the formation of metal-induced peptides of the general structure (gamma-Glu-Cys)n-Ser (n=2-4). They are assumed to be formed from hydroxymethyl-glutathione (gamma-Glu-Cys-Ser) and are termed hydroxymethyl-phytochelatins (hm-PCs) in analogy to the homo-phytochelatins [(gamma-Glu-Cys)n-beta-Ala], discovered in legumes, and the phytochelatins [PCs, (gamma-Glu-Cys)n-Gly] found in most other plants and many fungi. The hm-PCs were isolated from the roots of cadmium-exposed rice (Oryza sativa L. cv Strella), and their structure was confirmed by amino acid analysis after total and enzymic hydrolysis and by tandem mass spectrometry. The hm-PCs probably play a significant role in heavy metal detoxication in rice. In addition to this new form of gamma-Glu-Cys (gamma EC) peptide, PCs and gamma EC peptides without C-terminal Ser or Gly are found. All gamma EC peptides are synthesized without delay after incubation of rice plants in 100 microM CdCl2 in the roots as well as in the shoots. Incubation times exceeding 24 h or higher concentrations of cadmium result in a selective enrichment of gamma EC peptides with higher chain length and an increased ratio of PCs to hm-PCs. gamma EC peptide synthesis is accompanied by a decrease of the glutathione content and an increase of the hydroxymethyl-glutathione content in roots and shoots of rice plants. PMID:8016264

  12. Hyperexpression of interferon-gamma-induced MHC class II genes associated with reorganization of the cytoskeleton.

    PubMed Central

    Ulevitch, R. J.; Kline, L.; Schreiber, R. D.; Pingel, J.; Amaldi, I.; Reith, W.; Mach, B.

    1991-01-01

    Class I and class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) gene products are key recognition units in the induction and regulation of the immune response. Expression of class I and class II may be constitutive or inducible by cytokines such as interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma). A key step in the induction of MHC genes is recognition of IFN-gamma by its membrane receptor. The work described here examines the regulation of the occupied IFN-gamma receptor by the cytoskeleton. To do this the authors have used the fungal metabolites dihydrocytochalasin B (DHCB) and cytochalasin D (CD), substances that bind to actin filaments and thereby disrupt the cytoskeleton. The authors have studied the effect of DHCB and CD on IFN-gamma-induced MHC gene expression in 143 B cells, a human osteosarcoma-derived cell line. Herein the authors demonstrate that alterations in the cytoskeleton induced by DHCB and CD can lead to increases in IFN-gamma-induced MHC gene expression. Dihydrocytochalasin B added up to 3 hours after IFN-gamma results in a threefold to sixfold increase in levels of class II mRNA while producing minimal enhancement of class I gene expression. In contrast, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase mRNA expression was unaltered by IFN-gamma or by the cytochalasins. The increased amount of class II mRNA can be accounted for by a concomitant increase in transcription rate of this gene. Studies using 125I-IFN-gamma demonstrate that the occupied IFN-gamma receptor associates with a Triton X-100 insoluble fraction of 143 B cells and that DHCB and CD markedly inhibit this association. The results described here provide evidence that is consistent with the hypothesis that the activity of the occupied IFN-gamma receptor may be modulated by interactions with the cytoskeleton of the cell. This receptor may be one of a group of plasma membrane receptors that are sensitive to the action of cytochalasins after ligand binding. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:1907805

  13. Gamma radiation-induced synthesis and characterization of Polyvinylpyrrolidone nanogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ges, A. A.; Viltres, H.; Borja, R.; Rapado, M.; Aguilera, Y.

    2017-01-01

    Due to the importance of bioactive peptides, proteins and drug for pharmaceutical purpose, there is a growing interest for suitable delivery systems, able to increase their bioavailability and to target them to the desired location. Some of the most studied delivery systems involve encapsulation or entrapment of drugs into biocompatible polymeric devices. A multitude of techniques have been described for the synthesis of nanomaterials from polymers, however, the use of ionizing radiation (γ, e-), to obtain nano- and microgels polymer is characterized by the possibility of obtaining products with a high degree of purity. Although, in the world, electronic radiation is used for this purpose, gamma radiation has not been utilized for these purposes. In this paper is developed the formulation the formulation of Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) nanogels synthesized by gamma radiation techniques, for their evaluation as potential system of drug delivery. Experiments were performed in absence of oxygen using aqueous solutions of PVP (0.05% -1%). Crosslinking reactions were carried out at 25° C in a gamma irradiation chamber with a 60Co source (MPX-γ 30). The Viscosimetry, Light Scattering, X-Ray Diffraction and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), were used as characterization techniques.

  14. Multi-Frequency Observations of Gamma-Ray Blazar 1633 plus 382

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorstad, S. G.; Marscher, A. P.; Agudo, I.; Smith, P. S.; Larionov, V. M.; Laehteenmaeki, A.

    2011-01-01

    We perform monthly monitoring of the quasar 1633+382 (4C+38.41) within a sample of gamma-ray blazars with the VLBA at 43 GHz along with optical photometric and polarimetric observations. We construct the gamma-ray light curve of 1633+382 using data obtained by the Fermi LAT. We find that a high gamma-ray state of the quasar starting in 2009 September is simultaneous with an increase of the flux in the mm-wave VLBI core. We resolve a superluminal feature on the VLBA images that appears to be responsible for the mm-wave flux increase. We find a strong correlation between optical and gamma-ray light curves with a delay of gamma-ray variations of 5+/-3 days, as well as a strong correlation between optical flux and degree of polarization during the high gamma-ray state. Comparison between the optical polarization position angle and that in the VLBI core supports the idea that in the quasar 1633+382 a high gamma-ray state is connected with processes originating near the mm-VLBI core.

  15. Displacement damage induced in iron by gammas and neutrons under irradiation in the IFMIF test cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simakov, S. P.; Fischer, U.

    2011-10-01

    This work presents a complete comparative analysis of the radiation damage induced in iron-based materials in IFMIF by photons and neutrons. The gamma induced damage takes into account, for the first time, both photonuclear and photoatomic reaction mechanisms. The relevant cross sections were taken from available data evaluations. The gamma and neutron radiation fields were calculated by the McDeLicious Monte Carlo code using a 3-D geometry model. Finally the gamma and neutron induced damages in the iron have been assessed inside the IFMIF test cell and the surrounding concrete walls. It was found that the photoatomic mechanism dominates the photonuclear with at least one hundred times higher damage rates. The ratio of the gamma and the neutron induced displacement damage was found to be 10 -3 inside the concrete wall and 10 -5 in the components close to d-Li source. This fraction may increase a few times due to the uncertainty of the evaluated γ-dpa cross sections and the different surviving probabilities for defects produced by gammas and neutrons, nevertheless unlikely exceed 1%.

  16. Functional immobilization of interferon-gamma induces neuronal differentiation of neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Leipzig, Nic D; Xu, Changchang; Zahir, Tasneem; Shoichet, Molly S

    2010-05-01

    Stem cell transplantation provides significant promise to regenerative strategies after injury in the central nervous system. Neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) have been studied in terms of their regenerative capacity and their ability to differentiate into neurons when exposed to various soluble factors. In this study, interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) was compared with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and erythropoietin and was shown to be the best single growth factor for inducing neuronal differentiation from adult rat brain-derived NSPCs. Next, IFN-gamma was surface immobilized to a methacrylamide chitosan (MAC) scaffold that was specifically designed to match the modulus of brain tissue and neuronal differentiation of NSPCs was examined in vitro by immunohistochemistry. Bioactive IFN-gamma was successfully immobilized and quantified by ELISA. Both soluble and immobilized IFN-gamma on MAC surfaces showed dose dependent neuronal differentiation with soluble saturation occurring at 100 ng/mL and the most effective immobilized IFN-gamma dose at 37.5 ng/cm(2), where significantly more neurons resulted compared with controls including soluble IFN-gamma.

  17. Overexpression of gamma-sarcoglycan induces severe muscular dystrophy. Implications for the regulation of Sarcoglycan assembly.

    PubMed

    Zhu, X; Hadhazy, M; Groh, M E; Wheeler, M T; Wollmann, R; McNally, E M

    2001-06-15

    The sarcoglycan complex is found normally at the plasma membrane of muscle. Disruption of the sarcoglycan complex, through primary gene mutations in dystrophin or sarcoglycan subunits, produces membrane instability and muscular dystrophy. Restoration of the sarcoglycan complex at the plasma membrane requires reintroduction of the mutant sarcoglycan subunit in a manner that will permit normal assembly of the entire sarcoglycan complex. To study sarcoglycan gene replacement, we introduced transgenes expressing murine gamma-sarcoglycan into muscle of normal mice. Mice expressing high levels of gamma-sarcoglycan, under the control of the muscle-specific creatine kinase promoter, developed a severe muscular dystrophy with greatly reduced muscle mass and early lethality. Marked gamma-sarcoglycan overexpression produced cytoplasmic aggregates that interfered with normal membrane targeting of gamma-sarcoglycan. Overexpression of gamma-sarcoglycan lead to the up-regulation of alpha- and beta-sarcoglycan. These data suggest that increased gamma-sarcoglycan and/or mislocalization of gamma-sarcoglycan to the cytoplasm is sufficient to induce muscle damage and provides a new model of muscular dystrophy that highlights the importance of this protein in the assembly, function, and downstream signaling of the sarcoglycan complex. Most importantly, gene dosage and promoter strength should be given serious consideration in replacement gene therapy to ensure safety in human clinical trials.

  18. Nonlinear Frequency Chirping of β-induced Alfven Eigenmode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huasen

    2012-03-01

    The β-induced Alfven eigenmode (BAE) have been observed in many tokamaks. The BAE oscillates with the GAM frequency φ0, and therefore, has strong interactions with both thermal and energetic particles. In this work, linear gyrokinetic particle simulations show that nonperturbative contributions by energetic particles and kinetic effects of thermal particles modify BAE mode structure and frequency relative to the MHD theory. Gyrokinetic simulations have been verified by theory-simulation comparison and by benchmark with MHD-gyrokinetic hybrid simulation. Nonlinear simulations show that the unstable BAE saturates due to nonlinear wave-particle interactions with thermal and energetic particles. Wavelet analysis shows that the mode frequency chirping occurs in the absence of sources and sinks, thus it complements the standard ``bump-on-tail'' paradigm for the frequency chirping of Alfven eigenmodes. Analysis of nonlinear wave-particle interactions shows that the frequency chirping is induced by the nonlinear evolution of coherent structures in the energetic particle phase space of (ζ,φd) with toroidal angle ζ and precessional frequency φd. The dynamics of the coherent structures is controlled by the formation and destruction of phase space islands of energetic particles in the canonical variables of (ζ,Pζ) with canonical angular momentum Pζ. Our studies use the gyrokinetic toroidal code (GTC) recently upgraded with a comprehensive formulation for simulating kinetic-MHD processes. In collaborations with GTC team and SciDAC GSEP Center.

  19. [UVB-induced skin damage and the protection/treatment--effects of a novel, hydrophilic gamma-tocopherol derivative].

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Shizuko

    2006-09-01

    Ultraviolet radiation is the major environmental cause of skin damage. Although only 0.5% of ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation reaches the earth, it is the main cause of sunburn and inflammation and the most carcinogenic constituent of sunlight. We investigated whether the topical application of a novel, water-soluble gamma-tocopherol (gamma-Toc) derivative, gamma-tocopherol-N,N-dimethylglycinate hydrochloride (gamma-TDMG), could protect against UV-induced skin damage. Topical pre- or postapplication of gamma-TDMG solution significantly prevented sunburn cell formation, lipid peroxidation, and edema/inflammation that were induced by exposure to a single dose of UV irradiation. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)-catalyzed synthesis of prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) levels seen after UV exposure were significantly suppressed by pre- or posttreatment with gamma-TDMG. The increase in COX-2 activity was significantly inhibited by gamma-TDMG, suggesting that the reduction in PGE(2) concentration was due to the direct inhibition of COX-2 activity by gamma-TDMG. The derivative strongly inhibited inducible nitric oxide synthase mRNA expression and nitric oxide production. With the application of gamma-TDMG, the pigmentation in melanocytes was lightened and the increase melanin concentration was suppressed. Gamma-TDMG is converted to gamma-Toc in the skin and has higher bioavailability than gamma-Toc itself. These results suggest that gamma-TDMG-derived gamma-Toc acts as an antioxidant, antiinflammatory and antipigmentation agent. Our data further suggest that the topical application of gamma-TDMG may be efficacious in preventing and reducing UV-induced skin damage in humans.

  20. Predictions of induced background radiations at gamma/X-ray experiment envelopes in NASA spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischbein, W. L.; Debiak, T.; Rossi, M.; Stauber, M.; Suh, P.

    1979-01-01

    This work seeks to predict secondary radiation levels induced in spacecraft structures by space protons. The radiations analyzed are secondary neutrons from spallation and evaporation reactions and gamma and beta rays from the decay of induced radioactivity, as sources of interfering background to spaceborne measurements of galactic and planetary gamma rays below 10 MeV. The spacecraft considered are the Multi-Mission Spacecraft (MMS) and the Space Shuttle, modeled as spherical shells. The proton environment is that of the South Atlantic Anomaly, as well as cosmic ray protons. The induced radioactivity is analyzed in terms of its interference with various gamma-ray lines of astrophysical interest, as well as its contribution to several spectral regions of the gamma-ray continuum. The buildup of the line and continuum radioactivity background is predicted for a period of nearly 9 months in orbit (approximately 4100 orbits). In addition, background contributions from cosmic ray electron bremsstrahlung and earth gamma-ray albedo are estimated.

  1. Excitation of low-frequency waves via coupling between slow Alfven waves in the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikezoe, R.; Ichimura, M.; Okada, T.; Hirata, M.; Sakamoto, M.; Iwamoto, Y.; Sumida, S.; Jang, S.; Itagaki, J.; Onodera, Y.; Yoshikawa, M.; Kohagura, J.; Shima, Y.; Wang, X.; Nakashima, Y.

    2015-11-01

    In normal discharges of the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror, confined energy is saturated against heating power and unstable slow Alfven wave named as Alfven-Ion-Cyclotron (AIC) wave is observed in the saturated phase. This saturation may be partly related to (1) the decay of ICRF heating power, which is the main power source in GAMMA 10, due to the coupling with the AIC waves to produce difference-frequency waves and (2) the enhancement of axial transport of high-energy ions owing to nonlinearly excited low-frequency waves. To investigate these phenomena precisely, reflectometry is applied, which can provide assessment of nonlinear process at the location where the nonlinear process are taking place without any disturbance. Bispectral analysis applied to the density fluctuations measured at a wide radial region clearly shows the occurrence of various wave-wave couplings among the heating ICRF wave and the AIC waves. Generation of low-frequency waves via the coupling between coexisting AIC waves is found to be significant only near the core region. Details of measured nonlinear couplings are presented along with the observation showing the clear relation of generated low-frequency waves with the axial transport of high-energy ions. This work is partly supported by JSPS, Japan (25400531, 15K17797) and by NIFS, Japan (NIFS15KUGM101).

  2. Process for gamma ray induced degradation of polychlorinated biphenyls

    DOEpatents

    Meikrantz, David H.; Mincher, Bruce J.; Arbon, Rodney E.

    1998-01-01

    The invention is a process for the in-situ destruction of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) compounds in transformer oils and transformers. These compounds are broken down selectively by irradiation of the object or mixture using spent nuclear fuel or any isotopic source of high energy gamma radiation. For example, the level of applied dose required to decompose 400 ppm of polychlorinated biphenyl in transformer oil to less than 50 ppm is 500 kilogray. Destruction of polychlorinated biphenyls to levels of less than 50 ppm renders the transformer oil or transformer non-PCB contaminated under current regulations. Therefore, this process can be used to treat PCB contaminated oil and equipment to minimize or eliminate the generation of PCB hazardous waste.

  3. Process for gamma ray induced degradation of polychlorinated biphenyls

    DOEpatents

    Meikrantz, D.H.; Mincher, B.J.; Arbon, R.E.

    1998-08-25

    The invention is a process for the in-situ destruction of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) compounds in transformer oils and transformers. These compounds are broken down selectively by irradiation of the object or mixture using spent nuclear fuel or any isotopic source of high energy gamma radiation. For example, the level of applied dose required to decompose 400 ppm of polychlorinated biphenyl in transformer oil to less than 50 ppm is 500 kilograms. Destruction of polychlorinated biphenyls to levels of less than 50 ppm renders the transformer oil or transformer non-PCB contaminated under current regulations. Therefore, this process can be used to treat PCB contaminated oil and equipment to minimize or eliminate the generation of PCB hazardous waste. 5 figs.

  4. A second function of gamma frequency oscillations: an E%-max winner-take-all mechanism selects which cells fire.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Licurgo; Idiart, Marco; Lisman, John E

    2009-06-10

    The role of gamma oscillations in producing synchronized firing of groups of principal cells is well known. Here, we argue that gamma oscillations have a second function: they select which principal cells fire. This selection process occurs through the interaction of excitation with gamma frequency feedback inhibition. We sought to understand the rules that govern this process. One possibility is that a constant fraction of cells fire. Our analysis shows, however, that the fraction is not robust because it depends on the distribution of excitation to different cells. A robust description is termed E%-max: cells fire if they have suprathreshold excitation (E) within E% of the cell that has maximum excitation. The value of E%-max is approximated by the ratio of the delay of feedback inhibition to the membrane time constant. From measured values, we estimate that E%-max is 5-15%. Thus, an E%-max winner-take-all process can discriminate between groups of cells that have only small differences in excitation. To test the utility of this framework, we analyzed the role of oscillations in V1, one of the few systems in which both spiking and intracellular excitation have been directly measured. We show that an E%-max winner-take-all process provides a simple explanation for why the orientation tuning of firing is narrower than that of the excitatory input and why this difference is not affected by increasing excitation. Because gamma oscillations occur in many brain regions, the framework we have developed for understanding the second function of gamma is likely to have wide applicability.

  5. Effects of 900-MHz microwave radiation on gamma-ray-induced damage to mouse hematopoietic system.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yi; Xu, Qian; Jin, Zong-Da; Zhang, Jun; Lu, Min-Xia; Nie, Ji-Hua; Tong, Jian

    2010-01-01

    Exposure of humans simultaneously to microwave and gamma-ray irradiation may be a commonly encountered phenomenon. In a previous study data showed that low-dose microwave radiation increased the survival rate of mice irradiated with 8Gy gamma-ray; however, the mechanisms underlying these findings remain unclear. Consequently, studies were undertaken to examine the effects of microwave exposure on hematopoietic system adversely altered by gamma-ray irradiation in mice. Preexposure to low-dose microwaves attenuated the damage produced by gamma-ray irradiation as evidenced by less severe pathological alterations in bone marrow and spleen. The protective effects of microwaves were postulated to be due to up-expression of some hematopoietic growth factors, stimulation of proliferation of the granulocyte-macrophages in bone marrow, and inhibition of the gamma-ray induced suppression of hematopoietic stem cells/hematopoietic progenitor cells. Data thus indicate that prior exposure to microwaves may be beneficial in providing protection against injuries produced by gamma-ray on the hematopoietic system in mice.

  6. Neutron-induced gamma-ray spectroscopy: simulations for chemical mapping of planetary surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Brueckner, J.; Waenke, H.; Reedy, R.C.

    1986-01-01

    Cosmic rays interact with the surface of a planetary body and produce a cascade of secondary particles, such as neutrons. Neutron-induced scattering and capture reactions play an important role in the production of discrete gamma-ray lines that can be measured by a gamma-ray spectrometer on board of an orbiting spacecraft. These data can be used to determine the concentration of many elements in the surface of a planetary body, which provides clues to its bulk composition and in turn to its origin and evolution. To investigate the gamma rays made by neutron interactions, thin targets were irradiated with neutrons having energies from 14 MeV to 0.025 eV. By means of foil activation technique the ratio of epithermal to thermal neutrons was determined to be similar to that in the Moon. Gamma rays emitted by the targets and the surrounding material were detected by a high-resolution germanium detector in the energy range of 0.1 to 8 MeV. Most of the gamma-ray lines that are expected to be used for planetary gamma-ray spectroscopy were found in the recorded spectra and the principal lines in these spectra are presented. 58 refs., 7 figs., 9 tabs.

  7. Continuous versus pulse neutron induced gamma spectroscopy for soil carbon analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Neutron induced gamma spectra analysis (NGA) provides a means of measuring carbon in large soil volumes without destructive sampling. Calibration of the NGA system must account for system background and the interference of other nuclei on the carbon peak at 4.43 MeV. Accounting for these factors pro...

  8. Sucrose delays membrane deterioration of chrysanthemum flowers induced by gamma-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, O. K.; Todoriki, S.; Hayashi, T.

    1998-06-01

    Fluidity of the flower membranes of cut chrysanthemums ( Dendranthema grandiflorum Kitamura) decreased soon after gamma-irradiation at 750Gy and continued to decrease during storage following irradiation. Holding chrysanthemum cut inflorescence in 2% sucrose suppressed the decrease. The results suggest that sugars reduce radiation-induced physiological deterioration of chrysanthemum flower membranes.

  9. Gamma-ray burst constraints on the galactic frequency of extrasolar Oort Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shull, J. Michael; Stern, S. Alan

    1995-01-01

    With the strong Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory/Burst and Transient Source Experiment (CGRO/BATSE) evidence that most gamma-ray bursts do not come from galactic neutron stars, models involving the accretion of a comet onto a neutron star (NS) no longer appear to be strong contenders for explaining the majority of bursts. If this is the case, then it is worth asking whether the lack of an observed galactic gamma-ray burst population provides a useful constraint on the number of comets and comet clouds in the galaxy. Owing to the previously unrecognized structural weakness of cometary nuclei, we find the capture cross sections for comet-NS events to be much higher than previously published estimates, with tidal breakup at distances R(sub b) approx. equals 4 x 10(exp 10) cm from the NS. As a result, impacts of comets onto field NSs penetrating the Oort Clouds of other stars are found to dominate all other galactic NS-comet capture rates by a factor of 100. This in turn predicts that if comet clouds are common, there should be a significant population of repeater sources with (1) a galactic distribution, (2) space-correlated repetition, and (3) a wide range of peak luminosities and luminosity time histories. If all main sequence stars have Oort Clouds like our own, we predict approximately 4000 such repeater sources in the Milky Way at any time, each repeating on time scales of months to years. Based on estimates of the sensitivity of the CGRO/BATSE instrument and assuming isotropic gamma-ray beaming from such events, we estimate that a population of approximately 20-200 of these galactic NS-Oort Cloud gamma-ray repeater sources should be detectable by CGRO. In addition, if giant planet formation is common in the galaxy, we estimate that the accretion of isolated comets injected to the interstellar medium by giant planet formation should produce an additional source of galactic, nonrepeating, events. Comparing these estimates to the 3-4 soft gamma-ray repeater sources

  10. mBAND Analysis of Late Chromosome Aberrations in Human Lymphocytes Induced by Gamma Rays and Fe Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sunagawa, Mayumi; Zhang, Ye; Yeshitla, Samrawit; Kadhim, Munira; Wilson, Bobby; Wu, Honglu

    2014-01-01

    Chromosomal translocations and inversions are considered stable, and cells containing these types of chromosome aberrations can survive multiple cell divisions. An efficient method to detect an inversion is multi-color banding fluorescent in situ hybridization (mBAND) which allows identification of both inter- and intrachromosome aberrations simultaneously. Post irradiation, chromosome aberrations may also arise after multiple cell divisions as a result of genomic instability. To investigate the stable or late-arising chromosome aberrations induced after radiation exposure, we exposed human lymphocytes to gamma rays and Fe ions ex vivo, and cultured the cells for multiple generations. Chromosome aberrations were analyzed in cells collected at first mitosis and at several time intervals during the culture period post irradiation. With gamma irradiation, about half of the damages observed at first mitosis remained after 7 day- and 14 day- culture, suggesting the transmissibility of damages to the surviving progeny. Detailed analysis of chromosome break ends participating in exchanges revealed a greater fraction of break ends involved in intrachromosome aberrations in the 7- and 14-day samples in comparison to the fraction at first mitosis. In particular, simple inversions were found at 7 and 14 days, but not at the first mitosis, suggesting that some of the aberrations might be formed days post irradiation. In contrast, at the doses that produced similar frequencies of gamma-induced chromosome aberrations as observed at first mitosis, a significantly lower yield of aberrations remained at the same population doublings after Fe ion exposure. At these equitoxic doses, more complex type aberrations were observed for Fe ions, indicating that Fe ion-induced initial chromosome damages are more severe and may lead to cell death. Comparison between low and high doses of Fe ion irradiation in the induction of late damages will also be discussed.

  11. Afferent inputs to cortical fast-spiking interneurons organize pyramidal cell network oscillations at high-gamma frequencies (60–200 Hz)

    PubMed Central

    Crone, Nathan E.; Franaszczuk, Piotr J.

    2014-01-01

    High-gamma activity, ranging in frequency between ∼60 Hz and 200 Hz, has been observed in local field potential, electrocorticography, EEG and magnetoencephalography signals during cortical activation, in a variety of functional brain systems. The origin of these signals is yet unknown. Using computational modeling, we show that a cortical network model receiving thalamic input generates high-gamma responses comparable to those observed in local field potential recorded in monkey somatosensory cortex during vibrotactile stimulation. These high-gamma oscillations appear to be mediated mostly by an excited population of inhibitory fast-spiking interneurons firing at high-gamma frequencies and pacing excitatory regular-spiking pyramidal cells, which fire at lower rates but in phase with the population rhythm. The physiological correlates of high-gamma activity, in this model of local cortical circuits, appear to be similar to those proposed for hippocampal ripples generated by subsets of interneurons that regulate the discharge of principal cells. PMID:25210164

  12. Gamma irradiation-induced oxidative stress and developmental impairment in the hermaphroditic fish, Kryptolebias marmoratus embryo.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Jae-Sung; Kim, Bo-Mi; Kang, Chang-Mo; Lee, Young-Mi; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2012-08-01

    This study investigated the effects of gamma radiation on the early developmental stages in hermaphroditic fish embryos of Kryptolebias marmoratus. The authors measured reactive oxygen species (ROS) level and antioxidant enzyme activities with the endpoint hatching rate after gamma irradiation of different embryonic stages. Then, the transcriptional changes of antioxidant enzyme-coding genes were evaluated by quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction in response to gamma radiation on embryonic stages. Gamma radiation inhibited hatching rate and caused developmental impairment in a dose-dependent manner. Embryos showed tolerances in a developmental stage-dependent manner, indicating that early embryonic stages were more sensitive to the negative effects of gamma radiation than were later stages. After 5 Gy rate of radiation, the ROS level increased significantly at embryonic stages 2, 3, and 4 with a significant induction of all antioxidant enzyme activities. The expressions of glutathione S-transferase isoforms, catalase, superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD, Cu/Zn-SOD), glutathione reductase, and glutathione peroxidase mRNA were upregulated in a dose-and-developmental stage-dependent manner. This finding indicates that gamma radiation can induce oxidative stress and subsequently modulates the expression of antioxidant enzyme-coding genes as one of the defense mechanisms. Interestingly, embryonic stage 1 exposed to gamma radiation showed a decreased expression in most antioxidant enzyme-coding genes, suggesting that this is also related to a lower hatching rate and developmental impairment. The results of this study provide a better understanding of the molecular mode of action of gamma radiation in aquatic organisms.

  13. Gamma ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paciesas, William S.

    1992-01-01

    Miscellaneous tasks related to mission operations and data analysis for the Burst and Transient Source Experiment on the Gamma Ray Observatory, to collection, analysis, and interpretation of data from the Marshall Space Flight Center Very Low Frequency transient monitoring program, and to compilation and analysis of induced radioactivity data were performed. The results are summarized and relevant references are included.

  14. Membrane Properties and the Balance between Excitation and Inhibition Control Gamma-Frequency Oscillations Arising from Feedback Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Economo, Michael N.; White, John A.

    2012-01-01

    Computational studies as well as in vivo and in vitro results have shown that many cortical neurons fire in a highly irregular manner and at low average firing rates. These patterns seem to persist even when highly rhythmic signals are recorded by local field potential electrodes or other methods that quantify the summed behavior of a local population. Models of the 30–80 Hz gamma rhythm in which network oscillations arise through ‘stochastic synchrony’ capture the variability observed in the spike output of single cells while preserving network-level organization. We extend upon these results by constructing model networks constrained by experimental measurements and using them to probe the effect of biophysical parameters on network-level activity. We find in simulations that gamma-frequency oscillations are enabled by a high level of incoherent synaptic conductance input, similar to the barrage of noisy synaptic input that cortical neurons have been shown to receive in vivo. This incoherent synaptic input increases the emergent network frequency by shortening the time scale of the membrane in excitatory neurons and by reducing the temporal separation between excitation and inhibition due to decreased spike latency in inhibitory neurons. These mechanisms are demonstrated in simulations and in vitro current-clamp and dynamic-clamp experiments. Simulation results further indicate that the membrane potential noise amplitude has a large impact on network frequency and that the balance between excitatory and inhibitory currents controls network stability and sensitivity to external inputs. PMID:22275859

  15. Radioprotective effect of sesamol on gamma-radiation induced DNA damage, lipid peroxidation and antioxidants levels in cultured human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Prasad, N Rajendra; Menon, Venugopal P; Vasudev, V; Pugalendi, K V

    2005-05-05

    Sesamol pretreated (1, 5 and 10 microg/ml) lymphocytes were exposed to different doses of gamma-radiation, i.e., 1, 2 and 4 Gray (Gy) and the cellular changes were estimated by using cytokinesis blocked micronucleus assay (MN), dicentric aberration (DC), thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), reduced glutathione (GSH) and the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx). Radiation significantly increased MN, DC frequencies, TBARS levels and decreased GSH and antioxidant enzyme levels in a dose dependent manner. The highest damage to lymphocytes was observed at 4 Gy irradiation. On the other hand, sesamol pretreatment significantly decreased MN, DC frequencies, TBARS levels and increased GSH levels and SOD, CAT and GPx activities in a concentration dependent manner. At 1 Gy irradiation all concentrations of sesamol (1, 5 and 10 microg/ml) significantly protects the lymphocytes from radiation damage. At 2 Gy irradiation 5 and 10 microg/ml of sesamol shows significant radioprotection. Since the highest damage was observed at 4 Gy irradiation both 1 and 5 microg/ml of sesamol pretreatment were not sufficient to protect the lymphocytes from radiation damage but 10 microg/ml of sesamol significantly (p<0.05) protects the lymphocytes from radiation effect. Thus, sesamol pretreatment gives significant protection to cultured human lymphocytes against gamma-radiation induced cellular damage. The possible mechanism involved in the radioprotective influence of sesamol is discussed.

  16. Interferon gamma-induced human guanylate binding protein 1 inhibits mammary tumor growth in mice.

    PubMed

    Lipnik, Karoline; Naschberger, Elisabeth; Gonin-Laurent, Nathalie; Kodajova, Petra; Petznek, Helga; Rungaldier, Stefanie; Astigiano, Simonetta; Ferrini, Silvano; Stürzl, Michael; Hohenadl, Christine

    2010-01-01

    Interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) has recently been implicated in cancer immunosurveillance. Among the most abundant proteins induced by IFN-gamma are guanylate binding proteins (GBPs), which belong to the superfamily of large GTPases and are widely expressed in various species. Here, we investigated whether the well-known human GBP-1 (hGBP-1), which has been shown to exert antiangiogenic activities and was described as a prognostic marker in colorectal carcinomas, may contribute to an IFN-gamma-mediated tumor defense. To this end, an IFN-independent, inducible hGBP-1 expression system was established in murine mammary carcinoma (TS/A) cells, which were then transplanted into syngeneic immune-competent Balb/c mice. Animals carrying TS/A cells that had been given doxycycline for induction of hGBP-1 expression revealed a significantly reduced tumor growth compared with mock-treated mice. Immunohistochemical analysis of the respective tumors demonstrated a tightly regulated, high-level expression of hGBP-1. No signs of an enhanced immunosurveillance were observed by investigating the number of infiltrating B and T cells. However, hemoglobin levels as well as the number of proliferating tumor cells were shown to be significantly reduced in hGBP-1-expressing tumors. This finding corresponded to reduced amounts of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) released by hGBP-1-expressing TS/A cells in vitro and reduced VEGF-A protein levels in the corresponding mammary tumors in vivo. The results suggest that hGBP-1 may contribute to IFN-gamma-mediated antitumorigenic activities by inhibiting paracrine effects of tumor cells on angiogenesis. Consequently, owing to these activities GBPs might be considered as potent members in an innate, IFN-gamma-induced antitumoral defense system.

  17. Nonlinear Frequency Chirping of beta-induced Aflven eigenmode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huasen

    2011-10-01

    The β-induced Alfvén eigenmode (BAE) is studied using global gyrokinetic toroidal code GTC. Linear simulations show that kinetic effects modify BAE mode structure and reduce the frequency relative to the MHD theory. Both passing and trapped energetic particles contribute to BAE excitation through transit and bounce- precessional resonance, respectively. Nonlinear simulations show that the unstable BAE saturates due to nonlinear wave-particle interaction with both thermal and energetic particles. The saturated amplitude exhibits a coherent oscillation with an asymmetric growing and damping phase. Wavelet analysis shows that the mode frequency has a strong chirping associated with the oscillation of the mode amplitude. Analysis of nonlinear wave-particle interaction shows that the frequency chirping is induced by the nonlinear evolution of coherent structures in the energetic particle phase space of toroidal angle and precessional frequency. Controlled simulations further find that thermal particle nonlinearity plays a key role in controlling the saturation amplitude. We will also report self-consistent energetic particle transport from turbulence simulation with wave-particle and wave-wave nonlinearity treated on the same footing for the first time. Work in collaboration with W. Deng, I. Holod, Z. Lin, Y. Xiao and supported by DOE SciDAC GSEP Center and INCITE Program.

  18. Gamma-ray burst constraints on the galactic frequency of extra-solar Oort clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shull, J. Michael; Stern, S. Alan

    1994-01-01

    With the strong CGRO/BATSE evidence that most gamma-ray bursts do not come from galactic neutron stars, models involving the accretion of a comet onto a neutron star (NS) no longer appear to be strong contenders for explaining the majority of bursts. If this is the case, then it is worth asking whether the lack of an observed galactic gamma-ray burst population provides a useful constraint on the number of comets and comet clouds in the galaxy. Owing to the previously unrecognized structural weakness of cometary nuclei, we find the capture cross sections for comet-NS events to be much higher than previously published estimates, with tidal breakup at distances R(sub b) approximately equals to 4 x 10(exp 10) cm from the NS. As a result, impacts of comets onto field NS's penetrating the Oort Clouds of other stars are found to dominate all other galactic NS-comet capture rates by a factor of 100. This in turn predicts that if comet clouds are common, there should be a significant population of repeater sources with (1) a galactic distribution, (2) space-correlated repetition, and (3) a wide range of peak luminosities and luminosity time histories. If all main sequences stars have Oort Clouds like our own, we predict approximately 4000 such repeater sources in the Milky Way at any time, each repeating on timescales of months to years. Based on estimates of the sensitivity of the CGRO/BATSE instrument and assuming isotropic gamma-ray beaming from such events, we estimate that a population of approximately 20-200 of these galactic NS-Oort Cloud gamma-ray repeater sources should be detectable by CGRO. In addition, if giant planet formation is common in the galaxy, we estimate that the accretion of isolated comets injected to the interstellar medium by giant planet formation should produce an additional source of galactic, nonrepeating events. Comparing these estimates to the three to four soft gamma-ray repeater sources detected by BATSE, one is forced to conclude that (1

  19. Reduced gamma frequency in the medial frontal cortex of aged rats during behavior and rest: implications for age-related behavioral slowing

    PubMed Central

    Insel, Nathan; Patron, Lilian A.; Hoang, Lan T.; Nematollahi, Saman; Schimanski, Lesley A.; Lipa, Peter; Barnes, Carol A.

    2012-01-01

    Age-related cognitive and behavioral slowing may be caused by changes in the speed of neural signaling or by changes in the number of signaling steps necessary to achieve a given function. In the mammalian cortex, neural communication is organized by a 30–100 Hz “gamma” oscillation. There is a putative link between the gamma frequency and the speed of processing in a neural network: the dynamics of pyramidal neuron membrane time constants suggest that synaptic integration is framed by the gamma cycle, and pharmacological slowing of gamma also slows reaction times on behavioral tasks. The present experiments identify reductions in a robust 40–70 Hz gamma oscillation in the aged rat medial frontal cortex. The reductions were observed in the form of local field potentials (LFPs), later peaks in fast-spiking neuron autocorrelations, and delays in the spiking of inhibitory neurons following local excitatory signals. Gamma frequency did not vary with movement speed, but rats with slower gamma also moved more slowly. Gamma frequency age differences were not observed in hippocampus. Hippocampal CA1 fast-spiking neurons exhibited inter-spike intervals consistent with a fast (70–100 Hz) gamma frequency, a pattern maintained across theta phases and theta frequencies independent of fluctuations in the neurons’ average firing rates. We propose that an average lengthening of the cortical 15–25 ms gamma cycle is one factor contributing to age-related slowing, and that future attempts to offset cognitive declines will find a target in the response of fast-spiking inhibitory neurons to excitatory inputs. PMID:23152616

  20. Transport induced by ion cyclotron range of frequencies waves

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Debing Xu, Yingfeng; Wang, Shaojie

    2014-11-15

    The Vlasov equation, which includes the effect of the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) waves, can be written as the Fokker-Planck equation which describes the quasilinear transport in phase space by using the Lie-transform method. The radial transport fluxes of particle, energy and parallel momentum driven by ICRF waves in the slab geometry have been derived. The results show that the ICRF-induced radial redistributions of particle, energy and parallel momentum are driven by the inhomogeneity in energy of the equilibrium distribution function, and related to the correlation between the excursion in the real space and the excursion in energy. For the case with strong asymmetry of k{sub y} spectrum, the ICRF-induced radial transport driven by the energy inhomogeneity dominates the ICRF-induced radial transport driven by the spatial inhomogeneity.

  1. Induced Radioactivity in Recovered Skylab Materials. [gamma ray spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, G. J.; Meegan, C. A.

    1980-01-01

    Four radioactive isotopes found in aluminum and stainless steel samples from Skylab debris were recovered in Australia. The low-level activity was induced by high-energy protons and neutrons in the space environment. Measurements of the specific activities are given.

  2. Developmental toxicity and oxidative stress induced by gamma irradiation in zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Hu, Miao; Hu, Nan; Ding, Dexin; Zhao, Weichao; Feng, Yongfu; Zhang, Hui; Li, Guangyue; Wang, Yongdong

    2016-11-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the biological effects of gamma irradiation on zebrafish embryos. Different doses of gamma rays (0.01, 0.05, 0.1, 0.5 and 1 Gy) were used to irradiate zebrafish embryos at three developmental stages (stage 1, 6 h post-fertilization (hpf); stage 2, 12 hpf; stage three, 24 hpf), respectively. The survival, malformation and hatching rates of the zebrafish embryos were measured at the morphological endpoint of 96 hpf. The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) were assayed. Morphology analysis showed that gamma irradiation inhibited hatching and induced developmental toxicity in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, after irradiation the malformation rate changed not only in a dose-dependent manner but also in a developmental stage-dependent manner, indicating that the zebrafish embryos at stage 1 were more sensitive to gamma rays than those at other stages. Biochemical analysis showed that gamma irradiation modulated the activities of antioxidant enzymes in a dose-dependent manner. A linear relationship was found between GPx activity and irradiation dose in 0.1-1 Gy group, and GPx was a suitable biomarker for gamma irradiation in the dose range from 0.1 to 1 Gy. Furthermore, the activities of SOD, CAT, GR and GPx of the zebrafish embryos at stage 3 were found to be much higher than those at other stages, indicating that the zebrafish embryos at stage 3 had a greater ability to protect against gamma rays than those at other stages, and thus the activities of antioxidant enzymes changed in a developmental stage-dependent manner.

  3. Extract of Xylopia aethiopica (Annonaceae) protects against gamma-radiation induced testicular damage in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Adaramoye, Oluwatosin Adekunle; Adedara, Isaac Adegboyega; Popoola, Bosede; Farombi, Ebenezer Olatunde

    2010-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is an important environmental risk factor and, a major therapeutic agent for cancer treatment. This study was designed to evaluate the protective effect of extract of Xylopia aethiopica (XA) on gamma-radiation-induced testicular damage in rats. Vitamin C (VC) served as the reference antioxidant during the study. The study consists of 4 groups of 11 rats each. Group I received corn oil (vehicle), groups II and IV were pretreated with XA (250 mg/kg) and VC (250mg/kg) for 6 weeks before and 8 weeks after exposure to gamma-radiation; group III was exposed to a single dose of gamma-radiation (5 Gy). Biochemical analysis revealed that gamma-irradiation caused a significant increase (p < .05) in serum and testicular lipid peroxidation (LPO) levels by 217% and 221%, respectively. Irradiated rats had markedly decreased testicular catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), and reduced glutathione (GSH) levels. Irradiation resulted in 59% and 40% decreases in spermatozoa motility and live/dead sperm count, respectively, and a 161% increase in total sperm abnormalities. Histologically, testes of the irradiated rats showed extensive degenerative changes in the seminiferous tubules and defoliation of spermatocytes. Supplementation of XA and VC reversed the adverse effects of gamma-radiation on biochemical and histological indices of the rats. These findings demonstrated that Xylopia aethiopica has a protective effect by inhibiting oxidative damage in testes of irradiated rats.

  4. Analysis of Neutron Induced Gamma Activity in Lowbackground Ge - Spectroscopy Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovančević, Nikola; Krmar, Midrag

    Neutron interactions with materials of Ge-spectroscopy systems are one of the main sources of background radiation in low-level gamma spectroscopy measurements. Because of that detailed analysis of neutron induced gamma activity in low-background Ge-spectroscopy systems was done. Two HPGe detectors which were located in two different passive shields: one in pre-WW II made iron and the second in commercial low background lead were used in the experiment. Gamma lines emitted after neutron capture, as well as after inelastic scattering on the germanium crystal and shield materials (lead, iron, hydrogen, NaI) were detected and then analyzed. The thermal and fast neutron fluxes were calculated and their values were compared for the two different kinds of detector shield. The relative intensities of several gamma lines emitted after the inelastic scattering of neutrons (created by cosmic muons) in 56Fe were report. These relative intensities of detected gamma lines of 56Fe are compared with the results collected in the same iron shield by the use of the 252Cf neutrons.

  5. Laser frequency locking based on Rydberg electromagnetically induced transparency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuechun, Jiao; Jingkui, Li; Limei, Wang; Hao, Zhang; Linjie, Zhang; Jianming, Zhao; Suotang, Jia

    2016-05-01

    We present a laser frequency locking to Rydberg transition with electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) spectra in a room-temperature cesium vapor cell. Cesium levels 6S1/2, 6P3/2, and the nD5/2 state, compose a cascade three-level system, where a coupling laser drives Rydberg transition, and probe laser detects the EIT signal. The error signal, obtained by demodulating the EIT signal, is used to lock the coupling laser frequency to Rydberg transition. The laser frequency fluctuation, ˜0.7 MHz, is obtained after locking on, with the minimum Allan variance to be 8.9 × 10-11. This kind of locking method can be used to stabilize the laser frequency to the excited transition. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB921603), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grants Nos. 11274209, 61475090, 61378039, and 61378013), and the Research Project Supported by Shanxi Scholarship Council of China (Grant No. 2014-009).

  6. [Induced radioactivity in irradiated foods by X ray or gamma ray].

    PubMed

    Miyahara, Makoto

    2007-01-01

    In the course of the archival studies on safety of irradiated foods by the US Army, experimental records conducted by Glass & Smith, and Kruger & Wilson were investigated, based on our experimental experience. Food irradiation by Co-60 or 4 approximately 24MeV X ray can induce small amount of radioactivity in the foods. The principal mechanisms of the nuclear reactions are (gamma, n). The resulting nuclear products found in irradiated target solutions were Ba-135m, Pb-204m, Hg-199m, Ag-107m,Ag-109m, Cd-111m,Cd-113m, Sn-117m, Sn-119m, Sr-87m, Nb-93m, In113m, In-115m, Te-123m, Te-125m, Lu-178m Hf-160m by the (gamma, n) reaction. The total radio-activities in beef, bacon, shrimp, chicken, and green beans were counted at 60 days after irradiation by Cs-137, Co-60, and fuel element. The activities more than background were found in irradiated bacon and beef by Co-60. and activities were found in most foods when foods were irradiated by high energy X ray and the fuel element. The results were understood as the neutron activation by (gamma, n) or (n, gamma) reaction. Therefore, high energy X ray and spent fuel element were not used for food irradiation. As the results of this study Co-60 has been used with small amount of induced radioactivity in food.

  7. Induced gamma-band activity elicited by visual representation of unattended objects.

    PubMed

    Martinovic, Jasna; Gruber, Thomas; Ohla, Kathrin; Müller, Matthias M

    2009-01-01

    Object recognition is achieved through neural mechanisms reliant on the activity of distributed neural assemblies that are thought to be coordinated by synchronous firing in the gamma-band range (>20 Hz). An outstanding question focuses on the extent to which the role of gamma oscillations in object recognition is dependent on attention. Attentional mechanisms determine the allocation of perceptual resources to objects in complex scenes biasing the outcome of their mutual competitive interactions. Would object-related enhancements in gamma activity also occur for unattended objects when perceptual resources are traded off to the processing of concurrent visual material? The present electroencephalogram study investigated event-related potentials and evoked (time- and phase-locked) and induced (non-time- and phase-locked to stimulus onset) gamma-band activity (GBA) using a visual discrimination task of low or high perceptual load at fixation. The task was performed while task-irrelevant familiar or unfamiliar objects coappeared in the surrounding central area. Attentional focus was kept at fixation by varying perceptual load between trials; in such conditions, only holistic object processing or low-level perceptual processing, requiring little or no attention, are thought to occur. Although evoked GBA remained unmodulated, induced GBA enhancements, specific to familiar object presentations, were observed, thus providing evidence for cortical visual representation of unattended objects. In addition, the effect was mostly driven by object-specific activity under low load, implying that, in cluttered or complex scenes, attentional selection likely plays a more significant role in object representation.

  8. PPAR-gamma knockout in pancreatic epithelial cells abolishes the inhibitory effect of rosiglitazone on caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Ivashchenko, C Y; Duan, S Z; Usher, M G; Mortensen, R M

    2007-07-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-gamma) agonists, such as the thiazolidinediones (TZDs), decrease acute inflammation in both pancreatic cell lines and mouse models of acute pancreatitis. Since PPAR-gamma agonists have been shown to exert some of their actions independent of PPAR-gamma, the role of PPAR-gamma in pancreatic inflammation has not been directly tested. Furthermore, the differential role of PPAR-gamma in endodermal derivatives (acini, ductal cells, and islets) as opposed to the endothelial or inflammatory cells is unknown. To determine whether the effects of a TZD, rosiglitazone, on caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis are dependent on PPAR-gamma in the endodermal derivatives, we created a cell-type specific knock out of PPAR-gamma in pancreatic acini, ducts, and islets. PPAR-gamma knockout animals show a greater response in some inflammatory genes after caerulein challenge. The anti-inflammatory effect of rosiglitazone on edema, macrophage infiltration, and expression of the proinflammatory cytokines is significantly decreased in pancreata of the knockout animals compared with control animals. However, rosiglitazone retains its effect in the lungs of the pancreatic-specific PPAR-gamma knockout animals, likely due to direct anti-inflammatory effect on lung parenchyma. These data show that the PPAR-gamma in the pancreatic epithelia and islets is important in suppressing inflammation and is required for the anti-inflammatory effects of TZDs in acute pancreatitis.

  9. Change in Ion Beam Induced Current from Si Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Capacitors after Gamma-Ray Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ohshima, T.; Onoda, S.; Hirao, T.; Takahashi, Y.; Vizkelethy, G.; Doyle, B. L.

    2009-03-10

    To investigate the effects of gamma-ray irradiation on transient current induced in MOS capacitors by heavy ion incidence, Si MOS capacitors were irradiated with gamma-rays up to 60.9 kGy(SiO2). The change in Transient Ion Beam Induced Current (TIBIC) signals due to gamma-ray irradiation was investigated using 15 MeV-oxygen ion microbeams. After gamma-ray irradiation, the peak current of the TIBIC signal vs. bias voltage curve shifted toward negative voltages. This shift can be interpreted in terms of the charge trapped in the oxide. In this dose range, no significant effects of the interface traps induced by gamma-ray irradiation on the TIBIC signals were observed.

  10. Sex-dependent Differences in Intestinal Tumorigenesis Induced in Apc1638N/+ Mice by Exposure to {gamma} Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Trani, Daniela; Moon, Bo-Hyun; Kallakury, Bhaskar; Hartmann, Dan P.; Datta, Kamal; Fornace, Albert J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to assess the effect of 1 and 5 Gy radiation doses and to investigate the interplay of gender and radiation with regard to intestinal tumorigenesis in an adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) mutant mouse model. Methods and Materials: Apc1638N/+ female and male mice were exposed whole body to either 1 Gy or 5 Gy of {gamma} rays and euthanized when most of the treated mice became moribund. Small and large intestines were processed to determine tumor burden, distribution, and grade. Expression of proliferation marker Ki-67 and estrogen receptor (ER)-{alpha} were also assessed by immunohistochemistry. Results: We observed that, with both 1 Gy and 5 Gy of {gamma} rays, females displayed reduced susceptibility to radiation-induced intestinal tumorigenesis compared with males. As for radiation effect on small intestinal tumor progression, although no substantial differences were found in the relative frequency and degree of dysplasia of adenomas in irradiated animals compared with controls, invasive carcinomas were found in 1-Gy- and 5-Gy-irradiated animals. Radiation exposure was also shown to induce an increase in protein levels of proliferation marker Ki-67 and sex-hormone receptor ER-{alpha} in both non tumor mucosa and intestinal tumors from irradiated male mice. Conclusions: We observed important sex-dependent differences in susceptibility to radiation-induced intestinal tumorigenesis in Apc1638N/+ mutants. Furthermore, our data provide evidence that exposure to radiation doses as low as 1 Gy can induce a significant increase in intestinal tumor multiplicity as well as enhance tumor progression in vivo.

  11. Dynamic modulation of excitation and inhibition during stimulation at gamma and beta frequencies in the CA1 hippocampal region.

    PubMed

    Bracci, E; Vreugdenhil, M; Hack, S P; Jefferys, J G

    2001-06-01

    Fast oscillations at gamma and beta frequency are relevant to cognition. During this activity, excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs and IPSPs) are generated rhythmically and synchronously and are thought to play an essential role in pacing the oscillations. The dynamic changes occurring to excitatory and inhibitory synaptic events during repetitive activation of synapses are therefore relevant to fast oscillations. To cast light on this issue in the CA1 region of the hippocampal slice, we used a train of stimuli, to the pyramidal layer, comprising 1 s at 40 Hz followed by 2--3 s at 10 Hz, to mimic the frequency pattern observed during fast oscillations. Whole cell current-clamp recordings from CA1 pyramidal neurons revealed that individual stimuli at 40 Hz produced EPSPs riding on a slow biphasic hyperpolarizing-depolarizing waveform. EPSP amplitude initially increased; it then decreased concomitantly with the slow depolarization and with a large reduction in membrane resistance. During the subsequent 10-Hz train: the cells repolarized, EPSP amplitude and duration increased to above control, and no IPSPs were detected. In the presence of GABA(A) receptor antagonists, the slow depolarization was blocked, and EPSPs of constant amplitude were generated by 10-Hz stimuli. Altering pyramidal cell membrane potential affected the time course of the slow depolarization, with the peak being reached earlier at more negative potentials. Glial recordings revealed that the trains were associated with extracellular potassium accumulation, but the time course of this event was slower than the neuronal depolarization. Numerical simulations showed that intracellular chloride accumulation (due to massive GABAergic activation) can account for these observations. We conclude that synchronous activation of inhibitory synapses at gamma frequency causes a rapid chloride accumulation in pyramidal neurons, decreasing the efficacy of inhibitory potentials. The resulting

  12. Protective effect of ferulic acid on gamma-radiation-induced micronuclei, dicentric aberration and lipid peroxidation in human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Prasad, N Rajendra; Srinivasan, M; Pugalendi, K V; Menon, Venugopal P

    2006-02-28

    In this study we examined radioprotective effect of ferulic acid (FA) on gamma radiation-induced dicentric aberration and lipid peroxidation with reference to alterations in cellular antioxidant status in cultured lymphocytes. To establish most effective protective support we used three different concentrations of FA (1, 5 and 10 microg/ml) and three different doses of gamma-radiation (1, 2 and 4 Gy). Treatment of lymphocytes with FA alone (at 10 microg/ml) gave no significant change in micronuclei (MN), dicentric aberration (DC), thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), reduced glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) or glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities when compared with normal lymphocytes; irradiation at 1, 2 and 4 Gy increased the MN and DC frequencies in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment with FA for 30 min before radiation exposure resulted in a significant decline of MN and DC yields as FA concentration increased. Compared to 1 Gy exposure alone, the extent to which FA (1 microg/ml) reduced the MN and DC yields was 75% and 50%, respectively. With 4 Gy irradiation, FA (10 microg/ml) decreased 45% MN and 25% DC frequencies. FA-pretreated lymphocytes (1, 5 and 10 microg/ml) showed progressively decreased TBARS levels after irradiation. Irradiation (1, 2 and 4 Gy) significantly decreased GSH levels, SOD, CAT and GPx activities in a dose-dependent manner. Pretreatment with 10 microg/ml of FA significantly (p<0.05) prevented the decreases in the radiation-induced GSH, SOD, CAT and GPx activities. These findings suggest potential use and benefit of FA as a radioprotector.

  13. Short-Latency Median-Nerve Somatosensory-Evoked Potentials and Induced Gamma-Oscillations in Humans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fukuda, Miho; Nishida, Masaaki; Juhasz, Csaba; Muzik, Otto; Sood, Sandeep; Chugani, Harry T.; Asano, Eishi

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that cortical gamma-oscillations are tightly linked with various forms of physiological activity. In the present study, the dynamic changes of intracranially recorded median-nerve somatosensory-evoked potentials (SEPs) and somatosensory-induced gamma-oscillations were animated on a three-dimensional MR image, and the…

  14. Virus-specific intestinal IFN-gamma producing T cell responses induced by human rotavirus infection and vaccines are correlated with protection against rotavirus diarrhea in gnotobiotic pigs.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Lijuan; Wen, Ke; Azevedo, Marli S P; Gonzalez, Ana M; Zhang, Wei; Saif, Linda J

    2008-06-19

    We examined rotavirus-specific IFN-gamma producing CD4+, CD8+ and CD4+CD8+ T cell responses in gnotobiotic pigs infected with a virulent human rotavirus (VirHRV) or vaccinated with an attenuated (Att) HRV vaccine (AttHRV3x or AttHRV2x) or an AttHRV oral priming and 2/6-virus-like particle (VLP) intranasal boosting (AttHRV-2/6VLP) regimen. In VirHRV infected pigs, HRV-specific IFN-gamma producing T cells reside primarily in ileum. AttHRV-2/6VLP induced similar frequencies of intestinal IFN-gamma producing T cells as the VirHRV, whereas AttHRV3x or 2x vaccines were less effective. Protection rates against rotavirus diarrhea upon VirHRV challenge significantly correlated (r=0.97-1.0, p<0.005) with frequencies of intestinal IFN-gamma producing T cells, suggesting their role in protective immunity.

  15. Dependence of enhanced asymmetry-induced transport on collision frequency

    SciTech Connect

    Eggleston, D. L.

    2014-07-15

    A single-particle code with collisional effects is used to study how asymmetry-induced radial transport in a non-neutral plasma depends on collision frequency. For asymmetries of the form ϕ{sub 1}(r) cos(kz) cos(ωt−lθ), two sources for the transport have been identified: resonant particles and axially trapped particles. The simulation shows that this latter type, which occurs near the radius where ω matches the azimuthal rotation frequency ω{sub R}, is usually dominant at low collision frequency ν but becomes negligible at higher ν. This behavior can be understood by noting that axially trapped particles have a lower trapping frequency than resonant particles. In the low ν (banana) regime, the radial oscillations have amplitude Δr ≈ v{sub r}/ω{sub T}, so axially trapped particles dominate, and the transport may even exceed the resonant particle plateau regime level. As ν increases, collisions start to interrupt the slower axially trapped particle oscillations, while the resonant particles are still in the banana regime, so the axially trapped particle contribution to the transport decreases. At the largest ν values, axially trapped particle transport is negligible and the observed diffusion coefficient matches that given by plateau regime resonant particle theory. Heuristic models based on these considerations give reasonable agreement with the observed scaling laws for the value of the collision frequency where axially trapped particle transport starts to decrease and for the enhancement of the diffusion coefficient produced by axially trapped particles.

  16. Rogue-wave pattern transition induced by relative frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Li-Chen; Xin, Guo-Guo; Yang, Zhan-Ying

    2014-08-01

    We revisit a rogue wave in a two-mode nonlinear fiber whose dynamics is described by two-component coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations. The relative frequency between two modes can induce different rogue wave patterns transition. In particular, we find a four-petaled flower structure rogue wave can exist in the two-mode coupled system, which possesses an asymmetric spectrum distribution. Furthermore, spectrum analysis is performed on these different type rogue waves, and the spectrum relations between them are discussed. We demonstrate qualitatively that different modulation instability gain distribution can induce different rogue wave excitation patterns. These results would deepen our understanding of rogue wave dynamics in complex systems.

  17. Rogue-wave pattern transition induced by relative frequency.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Li-Chen; Xin, Guo-Guo; Yang, Zhan-Ying

    2014-08-01

    We revisit a rogue wave in a two-mode nonlinear fiber whose dynamics is described by two-component coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations. The relative frequency between two modes can induce different rogue wave patterns transition. In particular, we find a four-petaled flower structure rogue wave can exist in the two-mode coupled system, which possesses an asymmetric spectrum distribution. Furthermore, spectrum analysis is performed on these different type rogue waves, and the spectrum relations between them are discussed. We demonstrate qualitatively that different modulation instability gain distribution can induce different rogue wave excitation patterns. These results would deepen our understanding of rogue wave dynamics in complex systems.

  18. Lycopene, quercetin and tyrosol prevent macrophage activation induced by gliadin and IFN-gamma.

    PubMed

    De Stefano, Daniela; Maiuri, Maria Chiara; Simeon, Vittorio; Grassia, Gianluca; Soscia, Antonio; Cinelli, Maria Pia; Carnuccio, Rosa

    2007-07-02

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in inflammatory process of celiac disease. We have studied the effect of the lycopene, quercetin and tyrosol natural antioxidants on the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) gene expression in RAW 264.7 macrophages stimulated by gliadin in association with IFN-gamma. The IFN-gamma plus gliadin combination treatment was capable of enhancing iNOS and COX-2 gene expression and nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB), interferon regulatory factor-1 (IRF-1) and signal transducer and activator of transcription-1alpha (STAT-1alpha) activation induced by reactive oxygen species generation at 24 h. Lycopene, quercetin and tyrosol inhibited all these effects. The results here reported suggest that these compounds may represent non toxic agents for the control of pro-inflammatory genes involved in celiac disease.

  19. Proton-induced X-ray and gamma ray emission analysis of biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Gene S.; Navon, Eliahu

    1986-04-01

    A 4.1 MeV external proton beam was employed to simultaneously induce X-ray emission (PIXE) and gamma ray emission (PIGE) in biological samples that included human colostrum, spermatozoa, teeth, tree-rings, and follicular fluids. The analytical method was developed to simultaneously determine the elements lithium (Z = 3) through uranium (Z = 92) in the samples. PIXE-PIGE experimental design is described as well as applications in environmental and medical fields.

  20. Continuous versus pulse neutron induced gamma spectroscopy for soil carbon analysis.

    PubMed

    Kavetskiy, A; Yakubova, G; Torbert, H A; Prior, S A

    2015-02-01

    Neutron induced gamma spectra analysis (NGA) provides a means of measuring carbon in large soil volumes without destructive sampling. Calibration of the NGA system must account for system background and the interference of other nuclei on the carbon peak at 4.43 MeV. Accounting for these factors produced measurements in agreement with theoretical considerations. The continuous NGA mode was twice as fast and just as accurate as the pulse mode, thus this mode was preferable for routine soil carbon analysis.

  1. Mitigation of whole-body gamma radiation-induced damages by Clerodendron infortunatum in mammalian organisms.

    PubMed

    Chacko, Tiju; Menon, Aditya; Majeed, Teeju; Nair, Sivaprabha V; John, Nithu Sara; Nair, Cherupally Krishnan Krishnan

    2016-11-17

    Several phytoceuticals and extracts of medicinal plants are reported to mitigate deleterious effects of ionizing radiation. The potential of hydro-alcoholic extract of Clerodendron infortunatum (CIE) for providing protection to mice exposed to gamma radiation was investigated. Oral administration of CIE bestowed a survival advantage to mice exposed to lethal doses of gamma radiation. Radiation-induced depletion of the total blood count and bone marrow cellularity were prevented by treatment with CIE. Damage to the cellular DNA (as was evident from the comet assay and the micronucleus index) was also found to be decreased upon CIE administration. Radiation-induced damages to intestinal crypt cells was also reduced by CIE. Studies on gene expression in intestinal cells revealed that there was a marked increase in the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio in mice exposed to whole-body 4 Gy gamma radiation, and that administration of CIE resulted in significant lowering of this ratio, suggestive of reduction of radiation-induced apoptosis. Also, in the intestinal tissue of irradiated animals, following CIE treatment, levels of expression of the DNA repair gene Atm were found to be elevated, and there was reduction in the expression of the inflammatory Cox-2 gene. Thus, our results suggest a beneficial use of Clerodendron infortunatum for mitigating radiation toxicity.

  2. Energy determination of gamma-ray induced air showers observed by an extensive air shower array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawata, K.; Sako, T. K.; Ohnishi, M.; Takita, M.; Nakamura, Y.; Munakata, K.

    2017-03-01

    We propose a new energy estimator to determine the energies of gamma-ray induced air showers based on the lateral distribution of extensive air showers in the energy range between 10 TeV and 1000 TeV. We carry out a detailed Monte Carlo simulation assuming the Tibet air shower array located at an altitude of 4,300 m above sea level. We define S50, which denotes the particle density at 50 m from the air shower axis, as a new energy estimator. Using S50, the energy resolution is estimated to be approximately 16 % at 100 TeV in the range of the zenith angle 𝜃 < 20∘. We find S50 giving a better energy resolution than 27 % for the air shower size (N e) and 30 % for the sum of detected particles ( \\sum ρ ), which have been used so far, at 100 TeV. We also compare the reconstructed age distributions of gamma-ray induced air showers and hadronic cosmic-ray induced air showers. The age parameter may help to discriminate between primary gamma rays and hadronic cosmic rays.

  3. Gamma radiation induces hydrogen absorption by copper in water

    PubMed Central

    Lousada, Cláudio M.; Soroka, Inna L.; Yagodzinskyy, Yuriy; Tarakina, Nadezda V.; Todoshchenko, Olga; Hänninen, Hannu; Korzhavyi, Pavel A.; Jonsson, Mats

    2016-01-01

    One of the most intricate issues of nuclear power is the long-term safety of repositories for radioactive waste. These repositories can have an impact on future generations for a period of time orders of magnitude longer than any known civilization. Several countries have considered copper as an outer corrosion barrier for canisters containing spent nuclear fuel. Among the many processes that must be considered in the safety assessments, radiation induced processes constitute a key-component. Here we show that copper metal immersed in water uptakes considerable amounts of hydrogen when exposed to γ-radiation. Additionally we show that the amount of hydrogen absorbed by copper depends on the total dose of radiation. At a dose of 69 kGy the uptake of hydrogen by metallic copper is 7 orders of magnitude higher than when the absorption is driven by H2(g) at a pressure of 1 atm in a non-irradiated dry system. Moreover, irradiation of copper in water causes corrosion of the metal and the formation of a variety of surface cavities, nanoparticle deposits, and islands of needle-shaped crystals. Hence, radiation enhanced uptake of hydrogen by spent nuclear fuel encapsulating materials should be taken into account in the safety assessments of nuclear waste repositories. PMID:27086752

  4. Gamma radiation induces hydrogen absorption by copper in water.

    PubMed

    Lousada, Cláudio M; Soroka, Inna L; Yagodzinskyy, Yuriy; Tarakina, Nadezda V; Todoshchenko, Olga; Hänninen, Hannu; Korzhavyi, Pavel A; Jonsson, Mats

    2016-04-18

    One of the most intricate issues of nuclear power is the long-term safety of repositories for radioactive waste. These repositories can have an impact on future generations for a period of time orders of magnitude longer than any known civilization. Several countries have considered copper as an outer corrosion barrier for canisters containing spent nuclear fuel. Among the many processes that must be considered in the safety assessments, radiation induced processes constitute a key-component. Here we show that copper metal immersed in water uptakes considerable amounts of hydrogen when exposed to γ-radiation. Additionally we show that the amount of hydrogen absorbed by copper depends on the total dose of radiation. At a dose of 69 kGy the uptake of hydrogen by metallic copper is 7 orders of magnitude higher than when the absorption is driven by H2(g) at a pressure of 1 atm in a non-irradiated dry system. Moreover, irradiation of copper in water causes corrosion of the metal and the formation of a variety of surface cavities, nanoparticle deposits, and islands of needle-shaped crystals. Hence, radiation enhanced uptake of hydrogen by spent nuclear fuel encapsulating materials should be taken into account in the safety assessments of nuclear waste repositories.

  5. Gamma radiation induces hydrogen absorption by copper in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lousada, Cláudio M.; Soroka, Inna L.; Yagodzinskyy, Yuriy; Tarakina, Nadezda V.; Todoshchenko, Olga; Hänninen, Hannu; Korzhavyi, Pavel A.; Jonsson, Mats

    2016-04-01

    One of the most intricate issues of nuclear power is the long-term safety of repositories for radioactive waste. These repositories can have an impact on future generations for a period of time orders of magnitude longer than any known civilization. Several countries have considered copper as an outer corrosion barrier for canisters containing spent nuclear fuel. Among the many processes that must be considered in the safety assessments, radiation induced processes constitute a key-component. Here we show that copper metal immersed in water uptakes considerable amounts of hydrogen when exposed to γ-radiation. Additionally we show that the amount of hydrogen absorbed by copper depends on the total dose of radiation. At a dose of 69 kGy the uptake of hydrogen by metallic copper is 7 orders of magnitude higher than when the absorption is driven by H2(g) at a pressure of 1 atm in a non-irradiated dry system. Moreover, irradiation of copper in water causes corrosion of the metal and the formation of a variety of surface cavities, nanoparticle deposits, and islands of needle-shaped crystals. Hence, radiation enhanced uptake of hydrogen by spent nuclear fuel encapsulating materials should be taken into account in the safety assessments of nuclear waste repositories.

  6. Radiation-induced degradation of cyclohexanebutyric acid in aqueous solutions by gamma ray irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Wenbao; He, Yanquan; Ling, Yongsheng; Hei, Daqian; Shan, Qing; Zhang, Yan; Li, Jiatong

    2015-04-01

    The radiation-induced degradation of cyclohexanebutyric acid under gamma ray irradiation was investigated. Degradation experiments were performed with 100 mL sealed Pyrex glass vessels loaded with 80 mL of cyclohexanebutyric acid solutions at various initial concentrations of 10, 20, and 40 mg L-1. The absorbed doses were controlled at 0, 0.65, 1.95, 3.25, 6.5, 9.75, and 13 kGy. The results showed that gamma ray irradiation could effectively degrade cyclohexanebutyric acid in aqueous solutions. The removal rate of cyclohexanebutyric acid increased significantly with the increase of absorbed dose and the decrease of its initial concentration. At the same time, the removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD) was as effective as that of cyclohexanebutyric acid. The kinetic studies showed that the degradation of cyclohexanebutyric acid followed pseudo first-order reaction. Above all, the proposed mechanism obtained when NaNO2, NaNO3 and tert-butanol were added showed that the •OH radical played a major role in the gamma degradation process of cyclohexanebutyric acid, while •H and eaq- played a minor role in the gamma degradation process. The degradation products were identified by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) during cyclohexanebutyric acid degradation.

  7. Gamma Radiation-Induced Damage in the Zinc Finger of the Transcription Factor IIIA

    PubMed Central

    Miao, YuJi; Hu, XiaoDan; Min, Rui; Liu, PeiDang; Zhang, HaiQian

    2016-01-01

    A zinc finger motif is an element of proteins that can specifically recognize and bind to DNA. Because they contain multiple cysteine residues, zinc finger motifs possess redox properties. Ionizing radiation generates a variety of free radicals in organisms. Zinc finger motifs, therefore, may be a target of ionizing radiation. The effect of gamma radiation on the zinc finger motifs in transcription factor IIIA (TFIIIA), a zinc finger protein, was investigated. TFIIIA was exposed to different gamma doses from 60Co sources. The dose rates were 0.20 Gy/min and 800 Gy/h, respectively. The binding capacity of zinc finger motifs in TFIIIA was determined using an electrophoretic mobility shift assay. We found that 1000 Gy of gamma radiation impaired the function of the zinc finger motifs in TFIIIA. The sites of radiation-induced damage in the zinc finger were the thiol groups of cysteine residues and zinc (II) ions. The thiol groups were oxidized to form disulfide bonds and the zinc (II) ions were indicated to be reduced to zinc atoms. These results indicate that the zinc finger motif is a target domain for gamma radiation, which may decrease 5S rRNA expression via impairment of the zinc finger motifs in TFIIIA. PMID:27803644

  8. Gamma radiation-induced blue shift of resonance peaks of Bragg gratings in pure silica fibres

    SciTech Connect

    Faustov, A V; Mégret, P; Wuilpart, M; Kinet, D; Gusarov, A I; Zhukov, A V; Novikov, S G; Svetukhin, V V; Fotiadi, A A

    2016-02-28

    We report the first observation of a significant gamma radiation-induced blue shift of the reflection/transmission peak of fibre Bragg gratings inscribed into pure-silica core fibres via multiphoton absorption of femtosecond pulses. At a total dose of ∼100 kGy, the shift is ∼20 pm. The observed effect is attributable to the ionising radiation-induced decrease in the density of the silica glass when the rate of colour centre formation is slow. We present results of experimental measurements that provide the key parameters of the dynamics of the gratings for remote dosimetry and temperature sensing. (laser crystals and braggg ratings)

  9. Physical properties of the gamma-ray binary LS 5039 through low- and high-frequency radio observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcote, B.; Ribó, M.; Paredes, J. M.; Ishwara-Chandra, C. H.

    2015-07-01

    We have studied in detail the 0.15-15 GHz radio spectrum of the gamma-ray binary LS 5039 to look for a possible turnover and absorption mechanisms at low frequencies, and to constrain the physical properties of its emission. We have analysed two archival Very Large Array monitorings, all the available archival Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) data and a coordinated quasi-simultaneous observational campaign conducted in 2013 with Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope and Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope. The data show that the radio emission of LS 5039 is persistent on day, week and year time-scales, with a variability ≲ 25 per cent at all frequencies, and no signature of orbital modulation. The obtained spectra reveal a power-law shape with a curvature below 5 GHz and a turnover at ˜0.5GHz, which can be reproduced by a one-zone model with synchrotron self-absorption plus Razin effect. We obtain a coherent picture for the size of the emitting region of ˜0.85 mas, setting a magnetic field of B ˜ 20 mG, an electron density of ne ˜ 4 × 105 cm-3 and a mass-loss rate of dot{M}˜ 5× 10^{-8} M_{⊙ yr^{-1}}. These values imply a significant mixing of the stellar wind with the relativistic plasma outflow from the compact companion. At particular epochs the Razin effect is negligible, implying changes in the injection and the electron density or magnetic field. The Razin effect is reported for the first time in a gamma-ray binary, giving further support to the young non-accreting pulsar scenario.

  10. Rat p67 GBP is induced by interferon-gamma and isoprenoid-modified in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Vestal, D J; Buss, J E; Kelner, G S; Maciejewski, D; Asundi, V K; Maki, R A

    1996-07-16

    The guanylate binding proteins, GBPs, are a family of interferon-induced GTP-binding proteins that include the rat p67. We report here that rat p67, for which interferon regulation had not previously been demonstrated, is induced by IFN-gamma and also by LPS in both cultured bone marrow-derived macrophages and microglia. The basal level of rat p67 in macrophages is low but increases dramatically between 2 and 4 hours after treating cells with either IFN-gamma or LPS. It then remains elevated over the next 24 hours. Rat p67 is isoprenoid modified. The isoprenoid modification was detected in p67 isolated both from primary IFN-gamma-activated macrophages and when the gene for p67 was transfected into COS cells. This is the first demonstration of in vivo prenylation of a GBP. The interferon regulation and prenylation of rat p67 point toward this protein being significant in the functions of both activated macrophages and microglia.

  11. The {alpha}-induced thick-target {gamma}-ray yield from light elements

    SciTech Connect

    Heaton, R.K. |

    1994-10-01

    The {alpha}-induced thick-target {gamma}-ray yield from light elements has been measured in the energy range 5.6 MeV {le} E{sub {alpha}} {le} 10 MeV. The {gamma}-ray yield for > 2.1 MeV from thick targets of beryllium, boron nitride, sodium fluoride, magnesium, aluminum and silicon were measured using the {alpha}-particle beam from the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories 88 in. cyclotron. The elemental yields from this experiment were used to construct the {alpha}-induced direct production {gamma}-ray spectrum from materials in the SNO detector, a large volume ultra-low background neutrino detector located in the Creighton mine near Sudbury, Canada. This background source was an order of magnitude lower than predicted by previous calculations. These measurements are in good agreement with theoretical calculations of this spectrum based on a statistical nuclear model of the reaction, with the gross high energy spectrum structure being reproduced to within a factor of two. Detailed comparison of experimental and theoretical excitation population distribution of several residual nuclei indicate the same level of agreement within experimental uncertainties.

  12. Low-frequency Electrical Response to Microbial Induced Sulfide Precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Ntarlagiannis, Dimitrios; Williams, Kenneth H.; Slater, Lee D.; Hubbard, Susan S.

    2005-11-19

    We investigated the sensitivity of low-frequency electrical measurements to microbeinduced metal sulfide precipitation. Three identical sand-packed monitoring columns were used; a geochemical column, an electrical column and a control column. In the first experiment, continuous upward flow of nutrients and metals in solution was established in each column. Cells of Desulfovibrio vulgaris (D. vulgaris) were injected into the center of the geochemical and electrical columns. Geochemical sampling and post-experiment destructive analysis showed that microbial induced sulfate reduction led to metal precipitation on bacteria cells, forming motile biominerals. Precipitation initially occurred in the injection zone, followed by chemotactic migration of D. vulgaris and ultimate accumulation around the nutrient source at the column base.

  13. High frequency stimulation induces sonic hedgehog release from hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yujuan; Yuan, Yuan; Feng, Shengjie; Ma, Shaorong; Wang, Yizheng

    2017-01-01

    Sonic hedgehog (SHH) as a secreted protein is important for neuronal development in the central nervous system (CNS). However, the mechanism about SHH release remains largely unknown. Here, we showed that SHH was expressed mainly in the synaptic vesicles of hippocampus in both young postnatal and adult rats. High, but not low, frequency stimulation, induces SHH release from the neurons. Moreover, removal of extracellular Ca2+, application of tetrodotoxin (TTX), an inhibitor of voltage-dependent sodium channels, or downregulation of soluble n-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein attachment protein receptors (SNAREs) proteins, all blocked SHH release from the neurons in response to HFS. Our findings suggest a novel mechanism to control SHH release from the hippocampal neurons. PMID:28262835

  14. Mach Cone Induced by {gamma}-Triggered Jets in High-Energy Heavy-Ion Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Li Hanlin; Liu Fuming; Zhu Yan; Ma Guoliang; Wang Xinnian

    2011-01-07

    Medium excitation by jet shower propagation inside a quark-gluon plasma is studied within a linear Boltzmann transport and a multiphase transport model. Contrary to the naive expectation, it is the deflection of both the jet shower and the Mach-cone-like excitation in an expanding medium that is found to give rise to a double-peak azimuthal particle distribution with respect to the initial jet direction. Such a deflection is the strongest for hadron-triggered jets which are often produced close to the surface of a dense medium due to trigger bias and travel against or tangential to the radial flow. Without such trigger bias, the effect of deflection on {gamma}-jet showers and their medium excitation is weaker. Comparative study of hadron and {gamma}-triggered particle correlations can therefore reveal the dynamics of jet-induced medium excitation in high-energy heavy-ion collisions.

  15. Gamma-ray irradiation induced bulk photochromism in WO3-P2O5 glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Wei; Baccaro, Stefania; Cemmi, Alessia; Xu, Xiaoqing; Chen, Guorong

    2015-11-01

    In the present work, photochromism of WO3-P2O5 glass under gamma-ray irradiation was reported. As-prepared glass samples with different WO3 content are all optically transparent in the visible wavelength range thanks to the addition of a small amount of oxidizing couple Sb2O3-NaNO3. The photochromic properties are identified by transmission spectra of the glasses before and after irradiation. The results show that the irradiation induced darkening results from the reduction of W6+ to W5+ or W4+. The existence of WO6 clusters in glasses of high WO3 content is proved by XPS, which is the main reason for the obvious photochromic effects. The WO3-P2O5 glass is a promising candidate in gamma-ray sensitive detector.

  16. Glyphosate Inhibits PPAR Gamma Induction and Differentiation of Preadipocytes and is able to Induce Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Martini, Claudia N; Gabrielli, Matías; Brandani, Javier N; Vila, María Del C

    2016-08-01

    Glyphosate-based herbicides (GF) are extensively used for weed control. Thus, it is important to investigate their putative toxic effects. We have reported that GF at subagriculture concentrations inhibits proliferation and differentiation to adipocytes of 3T3-L1 fibroblasts. In this investigation, we evaluated the effect of GF on genes upregulated during adipogenesis. GF was able to inhibit the induction of PPAR gamma, the master gene in adipogenesis but not C/EBP beta, which precedes PPAR gamma activation. GF also inhibited differentiation and proliferation of another model of preadipocyte: mouse embryonic fibroblasts. In exponentially growing 3T3-L1 cells, GF increased lipid peroxidation and the activity of the antioxidant enzyme, superoxide dismutase. We also found that proliferation was inhibited with lower concentrations of GF when time of exposure was extended. Thus, GF was able to inhibit proliferation and differentiation of preadipocytes and to induce oxidative stress, which is indicative of its ability to alter cellular physiology.

  17. Induced parthenogenesis by gamma-irradiated pollen in loquat for haploid production

    PubMed Central

    Blasco, Manuel; Badenes, María Luisa; del Mar Naval, María

    2016-01-01

    Successful haploid induction in loquat (Eriobotrya japonica (Thunb.) Lindl.) through in situ-induced parthenogenesis with gamma-ray irradiated pollen has been achieved. Female flowers of cultivar ‘Algerie’ were pollinated using pollen of cultivars ‘Changhong-3’, ‘Cox’ and ‘Saval Brasil’ irradiated with two doses of gamma rays, 150 and 300 Gy. The fruits were harvested 90, 105 and 120 days after pollination (dap). Four haploid plants were obtained from ‘Algerie’ pollinated with 300-Gy-treated pollen of ‘Saval Brasil’ from fruits harvested 105 dap. Haploidy was confirmed by flow cytometry and chromosome count. The haploids showed a very weak development compared to the diploid plants. This result suggests that irradiated pollen can be used to obtain parthenogenetic haploids. PMID:27795686

  18. Removing Noises Induced by Gamma Radiation in Cerenkov Luminescence Imaging Using a Temporal Median Filter

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang; Zhan, Yonghua; Kang, Fei; Wang, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) can provide information of medical radionuclides used in nuclear imaging based on Cerenkov radiation, which makes it possible for optical means to image clinical radionuclide labeled probes. However, the exceptionally weak Cerenkov luminescence (CL) from Cerenkov radiation is susceptible to lots of impulse noises introduced by high energy gamma rays generating from the decays of radionuclides. In this work, a temporal median filter is proposed to remove this kind of impulse noises. Unlike traditional CLI collecting a single CL image with long exposure time and smoothing it using median filter, the proposed method captures a temporal sequence of CL images with shorter exposure time and employs a temporal median filter to smooth a temporal sequence of pixels. Results of in vivo experiments demonstrated that the proposed temporal median method can effectively remove random pulse noises induced by gamma radiation and achieve a robust CLI image. PMID:27648450

  19. Induced ICER I{gamma} down-regulates cyclin A expression and cell proliferation in insulin-producing {beta} cells

    SciTech Connect

    Inada, Akari; Weir, Gordon C.; Bonner-Weir, Susan . E-mail: susan.bonner-weir@joslin.harvard.edu

    2005-04-15

    We have previously found that cyclin A expression is markedly reduced in pancreatic {beta}-cells by cell-specific overexpression of repressor inducible cyclic AMP early repressor (ICER I{gamma}) in transgenic mice. Here we further examined regulatory effects of ICER I{gamma} on cyclin A gene expression using Min6 cells, an insulin-producing cell line. The cyclin A promoter luciferase assay showed that ICER I{gamma} directly repressed cyclin A gene transcription. In addition, upon ICER I{gamma} overexpression, cyclin A mRNA levels markedly decreased, thereby confirming an inhibitory effect of ICER I{gamma} on cyclin A expression. Suppression of cyclin A results in inhibition of BrdU incorporation. Under normal culture conditions endogenous cyclin A is abundant in these cells, whereas ICER is hardly detectable. However, serum starvation of Min6 cells induces ICER I{gamma} expression with a concomitant very low expression level of cyclin A. Cyclin A protein is not expressed unless the cells are in active DNA replication. These results indicate a potentially important anti-proliferative effect of ICER I{gamma} in pancreatic {beta} cells. Since ICER I{gamma} is greatly increased in diabetes as well as in FFA- or high glucose-treated islets, this effect may in part exacerbate diabetes by limiting {beta}-cell proliferation.

  20. Physiological and molecular characterization of the enhanced salt tolerance induced by low-dose gamma irradiation in Arabidopsis seedlings

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Wencai; Zhang, Liang; Xu, Hangbo; Wang, Lin; Jiao, Zhen

    2014-07-25

    Highlights: • 50-Gy gamma irradiation markedly promotes the seedling growth under salt stress in Arabidopsis. • The contents of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and MDA are obviously reduced by low-dose gamma irradiation under salt stress. • Low-dose gamma irradiation stimulates the activities of antioxidant enzymes under salt stress. • Proline accumulation is required for the low-gamma-ray-induced salt tolerance. • Low gamma rays differentially regulate the expression of genes related to salt stress. - Abstract: It has been established that gamma rays at low doses stimulate the tolerance to salt stress in plants. However, our knowledge regarding the molecular mechanism underlying the enhanced salt tolerance remains limited. In this study, we found that 50-Gy gamma irradiation presented maximal beneficial effects on germination index and root length in response to salt stress in Arabidopsis seedlings. The contents of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and MDA in irradiated seedlings under salt stress were significantly lower than those of controls. The activities of antioxidant enzymes and proline levels in the irradiated seedlings were markedly increased compared with the controls. Furthermore, transcriptional expression analysis of selected genes revealed that some components of salt stress signaling pathways were stimulated by low-dose gamma irradiation under salt stress. Our results suggest that gamma irradiation at low doses alleviates the salt stress probably by modulating the physiological responses as well as stimulating the stress signal transduction in Arabidopsis seedlings.

  1. Gamma-radiation-induced dielectric relaxation characteristics of layered crystals of phlogopite mica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Navjeet; Singh, Mohan; Singh, Lakhwant; Awasthi, A. M.; Kumar, Jitender

    2013-12-01

    In the present investigation, the influence of gamma irradiation on the dielectric relaxation characteristics of phlogopite mica was studied over the frequency range of 0.1 Hz-10 MHz and in the temperature range of 593-813 K by measuring the dielectric permittivity, electric modulus and conductivity. By comparing the dielectric spectra obtained for pristine and irradiated samples, it was observed that gamma irradiation significantly enhances the dielectric constants (ɛ‧ and ɛ″) of phlogopite mica because of the production of defects and lattice disorder by the gamma irradiation. The values of the activation energy for pristine and irradiated mica (determined from the electric modulus and the conductivity) were found to be substantially similar, suggesting that the same types of charge carriers are involved in the relaxation mechanism. The experimentally measured electric modulus and conductivity data could be well interpreted by the Havriliak-Negami dielectric relaxation function. The scaling of the electric-modulus spectra of both pristine and irradiated mica results in a master curve, which indicates that the relaxation mechanism is independent of temperature. Cole-Cole plots were also employed to analyze the non-Debye relaxation mechanism. This research will boost the reader's interest concerning the emerging contributions of irradiation and materials such as mica in electrical engineering.

  2. Evidence for an Inducible Repair-Recombination System in the Female Germ Line of Drosophila Melanogaster. II. Differential Sensitivity to Gamma Rays

    PubMed Central

    Laurencon, A.; Bregliano, J. C.

    1995-01-01

    In a previous paper, we reported that the reactivity level, which regulates the frequency of transposition of I factor, a LINE element-like retrotransposon, is enhanced by the same agents that induce the SOS response in Escherichia coli. In this report, we describe experimental evidence that, for identical genotypes, the reactivity levels correlate with the sensitivity of oogenesis to gamma rays, measured by the number of eggs laid and by frequency of dominant lethals. This strongly supports the hypothesis that the reactivity level is one manifestation of an inducible DNA repair system taking place in the female germ line of Drosophila melanogaster. The implications of this finding for the understanding of the regulation of I factor are discussed and some other possible biological roles of this system are outlined. PMID:8647394

  3. Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) induces cell death through MAPK-dependent mechanism in osteoblastic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sung Hun; Yoo, Chong Il; Kim, Hui Taek; Park, Ji Yeon; Kwon, Chae Hwa; Keun Kim, Yong . E-mail: kim430@pusan.ac.kr

    2006-09-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine the role of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) subfamilies in cell death induced by PPAR{gamma} agonists in osteoblastic cells. Ciglitazone and troglitazone, PPAR{gamma} agonists, resulted in a concentration- and time-dependent cell death, which was largely attributed to apoptosis. But a PPAR{alpha} agonist ciprofibrate did not affect the cell death. Ciglitazone caused reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and ciglitazone-induced cell death was prevented by antioxidants, suggesting an important role of ROS generation in the ciglitazone-induced cell death. ROS generation and cell death induced by ciglitazone were inhibited by the PPAR{gamma} antagonist GW9662. Ciglitazone treatment caused activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and p38. Activation of ERK was dependent on epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and that of p38 was independent. Ciglitazone-induced cell death was significantly prevented by PD98059, an inhibitor of ERK upstream kinase MEK1/2, and SB203580, a p38 inhibitor. Ciglitazone treatment increased Bax expression and caused a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, and its effect was prevented by N-acetylcysteine, PD98059, and SB203580. Ciglitazone induced caspase activation, which was prevented by PD98059 and SB203580. The general caspase inhibitor z-DEVD-FMK and the specific inhibitor of caspases-3 DEVD-CHO exerted the protective effect against the ciglitazone-induced cell death. The EGFR inhibitors AG1478 and suramin protected against the ciglitazone-induced cell death. Taken together, these findings suggest that the MAPK signaling pathways play an active role in mediating the ciglitazone-induced cell death of osteoblasts and function upstream of a mitochondria-dependent mechanism. These data may provide a novel insight into potential therapeutic strategies for treatment of osteoporosis.

  4. Repair of gamma-ray-induced DNA base damage in xeroderma pigmentosum cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fornace, A.J. Jr.; Dobson, P.P.; Kinsella, T.J.

    1986-04-01

    The repair of DNA damage produced by /sup 137/Cs gamma irradiation was measured with a preparation from Micrococcus luteus containing DNA damage-specific endonucleases in combination with alkaline elution. The frequency of these endonuclease sensitive sites (ESS) was determined after 54 or 110 Gy of oxic irradiation in normal and xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) fibroblasts from complementation groups A, C, D, and G. Repair was rapid in all cell strains with greater than 50% repair after 1.5 h of repair incubation. At later repair times, 12-17 h, more ESS remained in XP than in normal cells. The frequency of excess ESS in XP cells was approximately 0.04 per 10(9) Da of DNA per Gy which was equivalent to 10% of the initial ESS produced. The removal of ESS was comparable in XP cells with normal radiosensitivity and XP3BR cells which have been reported to be moderately radiosensitive.

  5. Interferon-gamma and transforming growth factor-beta modulate the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases and tumor necrosis factor-alpha production induced by Fc gamma-receptor stimulation in murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Rose, D M; Winston, B W; Chan, E D; Riches, D W; Henson, P M

    1997-09-08

    Engagement of receptors for the Fc region of IgG (Fc gamma R) can activate a variety of biological responses in macrophages, and these responses can be modulated either positively or negatively by co-stimulation with a variety of agents including cytokines such as interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta). We have previously demonstrated that Fc gamma R crosslinking activates the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family members p42MAPK, p38, and JNK. Herein, we examined the modulatory effect of IFN-gamma, TGF-beta, and platelet-activating factor (PAF) on Fc gamma R-induced MAPK activation in murine macrophages. Fc gamma R-induced activation of p42MAPK and JNK was augmented nearly two-fold by pretreatment with IFN-gamma. Conversely, TGF-beta pretreatment suppressed Fc gamma R-induced activation of p42MAPK, JNK, and p38. These modulatory effects of IFN-gamma and TGF-beta on MAPK activation correlated with changes in Fc gamma R-stimulated TNF-alpha production by these two cytokines.

  6. Investigation of cosmic-ray induced background of Germanium gamma spectrometer using GEANT4 simulation.

    PubMed

    Hung, Nguyen Quoc; Hai, Vo Hong; Nomachi, Masaharu

    2017-03-01

    In this article, a GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation toolkit was used to study the response of the cosmic-ray induced background on a High-Purity Germanium (HPGe) gamma spectrometer in the wide energy range, up to 100MeV. The natural radiation background measurements of the spectrometer were carried out in the energy region from 0.04 to 50MeV. The simulated cosmic-ray induced background of the Ge detector was evaluated in comparison with the measured data. The contribution of various cosmic-ray components including muons, neutrons, protons, electrons, positrons and photons was investigated. We also analyzed secondary particle showers induced by the muonic component.

  7. Effects of carotenoids on damage of biological lipids induced by gamma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Takeshi; Fujii, Noriko

    2014-05-01

    Carotenoids are considered to be involved in the radioresistant mechanisms of radioresistant bacteria. In these bacterial cells, carotenoids are present in biological lipids, and therefore may be related to the radiation-induced damage of lipids. However, only limited data are available for the role of carotenoids in such damage. In this study, we irradiated an α-linolenic acid-benzene solution with gamma rays and analyzed the resulting oxidative degradation and peroxidation damage in the presence or absence of two typical carotenoids: β-carotene and astaxanthin. The analyses revealed that oxidative degradation and peroxidation of α-linolenic acid, as evaluated by the amount of malondialdehyde and conjugated diene formed, respectively, increased in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, 8.5×10-3 M β-carotene inhibited gamma radiation-induced oxidative degradation of α-linolenic acid, whereas 5.0×10-5 and 5.0×10-6 M β-carotene, and 5.0×10-7 and 5.0×10-8 M astaxanthin promoted degradation. In contrast, neither β-carotene nor astaxanthin affected peroxidation of α-linolenic acid. These results suggest that an optimum concentration of carotenoids in radioresistant bacteria protects biological lipid structures from radiation-induced damage.

  8. Dual role of SLP-76 in mediating T cell receptor-induced activation of phospholipase C-gamma1.

    PubMed

    Beach, Dvora; Gonen, Ronnie; Bogin, Yaron; Reischl, Ilona G; Yablonski, Deborah

    2007-02-02

    Phospholipase C-gamma1 (PLC-gamma1) activation depends on a heterotrimeric complex of adaptor proteins composed of LAT, Gads, and SLP-76. Upon T cell receptor stimulation, a portion of PLC-gamma1 is recruited to a detergent-resistant membrane fraction known as the glycosphingolipid-enriched membrane microdomains (GEMs), or lipid rafts, to which LAT is constitutively localized. In addition to LAT, PLC-gamma1 GEM recruitment depended on SLP-76, and, in particular, required the Gads-binding domain of SLP-76. The N-terminal tyrosine phosphorylation sites and P-I region of SLP-76 were not required for PLC-gamma1 GEM recruitment, but were required for PLC-gamma1 phosphorylation at Tyr(783). Thus, GEM recruitment can be insufficient for full activation of PLC-gamma1 in the absence of a second SLP-76-mediated event. Indeed, a GEM-targeted derivative of PLC-gamma1 depended on SLP-76 for T cell receptor-induced phosphorylation at Tyr783 and subsequent NFAT activation. On a biochemical level, SLP-76 inducibly associated with both Vav and catalytically active ITK, which efficiently phosphorylated a PLC-gamma1 fragment at Tyr783 in vitro. Both associations were disrupted upon mutation of the N-terminal tyrosine phosphorylation sites of SLP-76. The P-I region deletion disrupted Vav association and reduced SLP-76-associated kinase activity. A smaller deletion within the P-I region, which does not impair PLC-gamma1 activation, did not impair the association with Vav, but reduced SLP-76-associated kinase activity. These results provide new insight into the multiple roles of SLP-76 and the functional importance of its interactions with other signaling proteins.

  9. Spectroscopic evaluation of painted layer structural changes induced by gamma radiation in experimental models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manea, Mihaela M.; Moise, Ioan V.; Virgolici, Marian; Negut, Constantin D.; Barbu, Olimpia-Hinamatsuri; Cutrubinis, Mihalis; Fugaru, Viorel; Stanculescu, Ioana R.; Ponta, Corneliu C.

    2012-02-01

    The degradation of cultural heritage objects by insects and microorganisms is an important issue for conservators, art specialists and humankind in general. Gamma irradiation is an efficient method of polychrome wooden artifacts disinfestation. Color changes and other modifications in the physical chemical properties of materials induced by gamma irradiation are feared by cultural heritage responsible committees and they have to be evaluated objectively and precisely. In this paper FTIR and FT-Raman spectroscopy methods were used to investigate the structural changes in some experimental models of tempera paint layers on wood following 11 kGy gamma irradiation at two dose rates. Radiation chemistry depends on the particular pigment, matrix formed by protein, resin (in case of varnished samples) and water presence. For the majority of painted layer in experimental models very small spectral variations were observed. Small changes in the FTIR spectra were observed for the raw sienna experimental model: for the higher dose rate the egg yolk protein oxidation peaks and the CH stretching bands due to lipids degradation products increased.

  10. Intersubject variability and induced gamma in the visual cortex: DCM with empirical Bayes and neural fields

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Gavin; Litvak, Vladimir; Singh, Krish D.; Friston, Karl J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This article describes the first application of a generic (empirical) Bayesian analysis of between‐subject effects in the dynamic causal modeling (DCM) of electrophysiological (MEG) data. It shows that (i) non‐invasive (MEG) data can be used to characterize subject‐specific differences in cortical microcircuitry and (ii) presents a validation of DCM with neural fields that exploits intersubject variability in gamma oscillations. We find that intersubject variability in visually induced gamma responses reflects changes in the excitation‐inhibition balance in a canonical cortical circuit. Crucially, this variability can be explained by subject‐specific differences in intrinsic connections to and from inhibitory interneurons that form a pyramidal‐interneuron gamma network. Our approach uses Bayesian model reduction to evaluate the evidence for (large sets of) nested models—and optimize the corresponding connectivity estimates at the within and between‐subject level. We also consider Bayesian cross‐validation to obtain predictive estimates for gamma‐response phenotypes, using a leave‐one‐out procedure. Hum Brain Mapp 37:4597–4614, 2016. © The Authors Human Brain Mapping Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27593199

  11. Gamma-radiation-induced wood-plastic composites from Syrian tree species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakraji, Elias Hanna; Salman, Numan; Al-kassiri, Haroun

    2001-05-01

    Wood-plastic composites (WPC) have been prepared with five low-grade woods, native to Syria, using three monomer systems; acrylamide, butylmethacrylate, and styrene, with methanol as the swelling solvent. Polymerization was induced at various radiation doses (10, 20, and 30 kGy) at a dose rate of 3.5 kGy/h using a 60Co gamma radiation source. Some physical properties of WPC, namely polymer loading and compression strength have been measured. The polymer loading decreases approximately with increasing density of the wood species used.

  12. Measurements of activation induced by environmental neutrons using ultra low-level gamma-ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Martínez Canet, M J; Hult, M; Köhler, M; Johnston, P N

    2000-03-01

    The flux of environmental neutrons is being studied by activation of metal discs of selected elements. Near the earth's surface the total neutron flux is in the order of 10(-2) cm(-2)s(-1), which gives induced activities of a few mBq in the discs. Initial results from this technique, involving activation at ground level for several materials (W, Au, Ta, In, Re, Sm, Dy and Mn) and ultra low-level gamma-ray spectrometry in an underground laboratory located at 500 m.w.e., are presented. Diffusion of environmental neutrons in water is also measured by activation of gold at different depths.

  13. Effect of pretreatment with cysteamine on gamma-radiation-induced sister chromatid exchanges in mouse bone marrow cells in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Mendiola-Cruz, M.T.; Morales-Ramirez, P.

    1989-04-01

    The effect of pretreatment with cysteamine on gamma-radiation-induced sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) and on the mitotic index and average generation time was determined. Groups of mice were treated in one of the following regimens: (1) irradiated, (2) treated with cysteamine and irradiated, (3) treated with cysteamine only, or (4) left untreated. Intraperitoneal administration of cysteamine preceding gamma-radiation exposure protected against SCE induction. However, radioprotection was not reflected by change in the mitotic index or in the average generation time. The results suggest that, under the experimental conditions of this study, the SCEs are caused by free radicals produced by gamma radiation, but not the additional damage indices measured.

  14. Retrospective dosimetry after criticality accidents using low-frequency EPR: a study of whole human teeth irradiated in a mixed neutron and gamma-radiation field.

    PubMed

    Zdravkova, M; Crokart, N; Trompier, F; Asselineau, B; Gallez, B; Gaillard-Lecanu, E; Debuyst, R

    2003-08-01

    In the context of accidental or intentional radiation exposures (nuclear terrorism), it is essential to separate rapidly those individuals with substantial exposures from those with exposures that do not constitute an immediate threat to health. Low-frequency electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy provides the potential advantage of making accurate and sensitive measurements of absorbed radiation dose in teeth without removing the teeth from the potential victims. Up to now, most studies focused on the dose-response curves obtained for gamma radiation. In radiation accidents, however, the contribution of neutrons to the total radiation dose should not be neglected. To determine how neutrons contribute to the apparent dose estimated by EPR dosimetry, extracted whole human teeth were irradiated at the SILENE reactor in a mixed neutron and gamma-radiation field simulating criticality accidents. The teeth were irradiated in free air as well as in a paraffin head phantom. Lead screens were also used to eliminate to a large extent the contribution of the gamma radiation to the dose received by the teeth. The EPR signals, obtained with a low-frequency (1.2 GHz) spectrometer, were compared to dosimetry measurements at the same location. The contribution of neutrons to the EPR dosimetric signal was negligible in the range of 0 to 10 Gy and was rather small (neutron/gamma-ray sensitivity in the range 0-0.2) at higher doses. This indicates that the method essentially provides information on the dose received from the gamma-ray component of the radiation.

  15. Gamma delta T cells promote inflammation and insulin resistance during high fat diet-induced obesity in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gamma delta T cells are resident in adipose tissue and increase during diet-induced obesity. Their possible contribution to the inflammatory response that accompanies diet-induced obesity was investigated in mice after a 5-10 week high milk fat diet. The high milk fat diet resulted in significant in...

  16. Low-frequency electrical response to microbial induced sulfide precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ntarlagiannis, Dimitrios; Williams, Kenneth Hurst; Slater, Lee; Hubbard, Susan

    2005-12-01

    We investigated the sensitivity of low-frequency electrical measurements to microbe-induced metal sulfide precipitation. Three identical sand-packed monitoring columns were used; a geochemical column, an electrical column and a control column. In the first experiment, continuous upward flow of nutrients and metals in solution was established in each column. Cells of Desulfovibrio vulgaris (D. vulgaris) were injected into the center of the geochemical and electrical columns. Geochemical sampling and post-experiment destructive analysis showed that microbial induced sulfate reduction led to metal precipitation on bacteria cells, forming motile biominerals. Precipitation initially occurred in the injection zone, followed by chemotactic migration of D. vulgaris and ultimate accumulation around the nutrient source at the column base. Results from this experiment conducted with metals show (1) polarization anomalies, up to 14 mrad, develop at the bacteria injection and final accumulation areas, (2) the onset of polarization increase occurs concurrently with the onset of lactate consumption, (3) polarization profiles are similar to calculated profiles of the rate of lactate consumption, and (4) temporal changes in polarization and conduction correlate with a geometrical rearrangement of metal-coated bacterial cells. In a second experiment, the same biogeochemical conditions were established except that no metals were added to the flow solution. Polarization anomalies were absent when the experiment was replicated without metals in solution. We therefore attribute the polarization increase observed in the first experiment to a metal-fluid interfacial mechanism that develops as metal sulfides precipitate onto microbial cells and form biominerals. Temporal changes in polarization and conductivity reflect changes in (1) the amount of metal-fluid interfacial area, and (2) the amount of electronic conduction resulting from microbial growth, chemotactic movement and final

  17. Reduction in LFP cross-frequency coupling between theta and gamma rhythms associated with impaired STP and LTP in a rat model of brain ischemia.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaxia; Zheng, Chenguang; Zhang, Tao

    2013-01-01

    The theta-gamma cross-frequency coupling (CFC) in hippocampus was reported to reflect memory process. In this study, we measured the CFC of hippocampal local field potentials (LFPs) in a two-vessel occlusion (2VO) rat model, combined with both amplitude and phase properties and associated with short and long-term plasticity indicating the memory function. Male Wistar rats were used and a 2VO model was established. STP and LTP were recorded in hippocampal CA3-CA1 pathway after LFPs were collected in both CA3 and CA1. Based on the data of relative power spectra and phase synchronization, it suggested that both the amplitude and phase coupling of either theta or gamma rhythm were involved in modulating the neural network in 2VO rats. In order to determine whether the CFC was also implicated in neural impairment in 2VO rats, the coupling of CA3 theta-CA1 gamma was measured by both phase-phase coupling (n:m phase synchronization) and phase-amplitude coupling. The attenuated CFC strength in 2VO rats implied the impaired neural communication in the coordination of theta-gamma entraining process. Moreover, compared with modulation index (MI) a novel algorithm named cross frequency conditional mutual information (CF-CMI), was developed to focus on the coupling between theta phase and the phase of gamma amplitude. The results suggest that the reduced CFC strength probably attributed to the disruption of the phase of CA1 gamma envelop. In conclusion, it implied that the phase coupling and CFC of hippocampal theta and gamma played an important role in supporting functions of neural network. Furthermore, synaptic plasticity on CA3-CA1 pathway was reduced in line with the decreased CFC strength from CA3 to CA1. It partly supported our hypothesis that directional CFC indicator might probably be used as a measure of synaptic plasticity.

  18. A comparison of enzyme activity mutation frequencies in germ cells of mice (Mus musculus) and golden hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus) after exposure to 2 + 2 Gy gamma-irradiation.

    PubMed

    Pretsch, W; Neuhäuser-Klaus, A; Favor, J

    2000-01-01

    The radiation-induced germ cell mutation rate has been investigated in two species of mammals. Mice and golden hamsters of both sexes were exposed to 2 + 2 Gy gamma-irradiation with a 24 h fractionation interval and mated to untreated partners. In mice, specific locus mutations were examined as positive controls and the obtained mutation rates (per locus and gamete x10(-5)) were 51.4, 10.1, 13.6 and 17.4 for irradiated post-spermatogonia, spermatogonia and 1-7 and >7 days post-treatment oocytes, respectively. Offspring of mice and golden hamsters were screened for activity alterations of 10 erythrocyte enzymes coded by at least 14 loci. The observed mutation rates per locus per gamete x10(-5) for treated post-spermatogonial stages, spermatogonia and oocytes 1-7 and >7 days post-treatment were 6.5, 1.5, 8.8 and 7.0, respectively, for mice and 16.7, 0, 7.6 and 0, respectively, for golden hamsters. There is a significant difference for mutation rates in mouse oocytes 1-7 days post-treatment compared with the control. No differences in the frequencies of mutations in the various germ cell stages could be observed between mice and golden hamsters. A critical assumption for the extrapolation of experimental mutagenesis studies to humans is that no species effects exist in sensitivity to mutation induction by irradiation. Our results do not contradict this assumption.

  19. Ligand-induced IFN gamma receptor tyrosine phosphorylation couples the receptor to its signal transduction system (p91).

    PubMed Central

    Greenlund, A C; Farrar, M A; Viviano, B L; Schreiber, R D

    1994-01-01

    Herein we report that interferon-gamma (IFN gamma) induces the rapid and reversible tyrosine phosphorylation of the IFN gamma receptor. Using a panel of receptor intracellular domain mutants, we show that a membrane-proximal LPKS sequence (residues 266-269) is required for ligand-induced tyrosine kinase activation and/or kinase-receptor association and biological responsiveness, and a functionally critical membrane-distal tyrosine residue (Y440) is a target of the activated enzyme. The biological significance of Y440 phosphorylation was demonstrated by showing that a receptor-derived nonapeptide corresponding to receptor residues 436-444 and containing phosphorylated Y440 bound specifically to p91, blocked p91 phosphorylation and inhibited the generation of an active p91-containing transcription factor complex. In contrast, nonphosphorylated wild-type, phosphorylated mutant, or phosphorylated irrelevant peptides did not. Moreover, the phosphorylated Y440-containing peptide did not interact with a related but distinct latent transcription factor (p113) which is activatible by IFN alpha but not IFN gamma. These results thus document the specific and inducible association of p91 with the phosphorylated IFN gamma receptor and thereby elucidate the mechanism by which ligand couples the IFN gamma receptor to its signal transduction system. Images PMID:8156998

  20. Method and System for Gamma-Ray Localization Induced Spacecraft Navigation Using Celestial Gamma-Ray Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheikh, Suneel I. (Inventor); Hisamoto, Chuck (Inventor); Arzoumanian, Zaven (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A method and system for spacecraft navigation using distant celestial gamma-ray bursts which offer detectable, bright, high-energy events that provide well-defined characteristics conducive to accurate time-alignment among spatially separated spacecraft. Utilizing assemblages of photons from distant gamma-ray bursts, relative range between two spacecraft can be accurately computed along the direction to each burst's source based upon the difference in arrival time of the burst emission at each spacecraft's location. Correlation methods used to time-align the high-energy burst profiles are provided. The spacecraft navigation may be carried out autonomously or in a central control mode of operation.

  1. High-Frequency Gravitational Wave Induced Nuclear Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Fontana, Giorgio; Baker, Robert M. L. Jr.

    2007-01-30

    Nuclear fusion is a process in which nuclei, having a total initial mass, combine to produce a single nucleus, having a final mass less than the total initial mass. Below a given atomic number the process is exothermic; that is, since the final mass is less than the combined initial mass and the mass deficit is converted into energy by the nuclear fusion. On Earth nuclear fusion does not happen spontaneously because electrostatic barriers prevent the phenomenon. To induce controlled, industrial scale, nuclear fusion, only a few methods have been discovered that look promising, but net positive energy production is not yet possible because of low overall efficiency of the systems. In this paper we propose that an intense burst of High Frequency Gravitational Waves (HFGWs) could be focused or beamed to a target mass composed of appropriate fuel or target material to efficiently rearrange the atomic or nuclear structure of the target material with consequent nuclear fusion. Provided that efficient generation of HFGW can be technically achieved, the proposed fusion reactor could become a viable solution for the energy needs of mankind and alternatively a process for beaming energy to produce a source of fusion energy remotely - even inside solid materials.

  2. Oxidative stress and gamma radiation-induced cancellous bone loss with musculoskeletal disuse

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Hisataka; Yumoto, Kenji; Alwood, Joshua S.; Mojarrab, Rose; Wang, Angela; Almeida, Eduardo A. C.; Searby, Nancy D.; Limoli, Charles L.

    2010-01-01

    Exposure of astronauts in space to radiation during weightlessness may contribute to subsequent bone loss. Gamma irradiation of postpubertal mice rapidly increases the number of bone-resorbing osteoclasts and causes bone loss in cancellous tissue; similar changes occur in skeletal diseases associated with oxidative stress. Therefore, we hypothesized that increased oxidative stress mediates radiation-induced bone loss and that musculoskeletal disuse changes the sensitivity of cancellous tissue to radiation exposure. Musculoskeletal disuse by hindlimb unloading (1 or 2 wk) or total body gamma irradiation (1 or 2 Gy of 137Cs) of 4-mo-old, male C57BL/6 mice each decreased cancellous bone volume fraction in the proximal tibiae and lumbar vertebrae. The extent of radiation-induced acute cancellous bone loss in tibiae and lumbar vertebrae was similar in normally loaded and hindlimb-unloaded mice. Similarly, osteoclast surface in the tibiae increased 46% as a result of irradiation, 47% as a result of hindlimb unloading, and 64% as a result of irradiation + hindlimb unloading compared with normally loaded mice. Irradiation, but not hindlimb unloading, reduced viability and increased apoptosis of marrow cells and caused oxidative damage to lipids within mineralized tissue. Irradiation also stimulated generation of reactive oxygen species in marrow cells. Furthermore, injection of α-lipoic acid, an antioxidant, mitigated the acute bone loss caused by irradiation. Together, these results showed that disuse and gamma irradiation, alone or in combination, caused a similar degree of acute cancellous bone loss and shared a common cellular mechanism of increased bone resorption. Furthermore, irradiation, but not disuse, may increase the number of osteoclasts and the extent of acute bone loss via increased reactive oxygen species production and ensuing oxidative damage, implying different molecular mechanisms. The finding that α-lipoic acid protected cancellous tissue from the

  3. Inhibitory effect of interferon gamma on frequency of Ehrlichia canis-infected cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Tomoko; Wada, Makoto

    2013-12-15

    Ehrlichia canis is an obligate intracellular bacterium that infects the macrophage-monocyte cells of dogs, causing canine monocytic ehrlichiosis. Interferon-γ (IFN-γ), along with other cytokines, mediates the immune response to such intracellular bacterial invasions. To determine the role of IFN-γ in the immunity of dogs to E. canis infection, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and white blood cells (WBC) were collected from E. canis-infected dogs and added to a culture of E. canis in DH82 cells. The number of E. canis inclusion-positive cells was significantly reduced in cultures containing PBMC and WBC from E. canis-infected dogs compared to uninfected dogs. However, this resistance was inhibited by the addition of an anti-dog IFN-γ antibody. Resistance was also observed when PBMC were added to the Cell Culture Inserts, which prohibited contact of PBMC to DH82 cells, while allowed the diffusion of soluble cell products. The results of this study indicate that resistance was not dependent on cell to cell contact, but was associated with soluble cell products, such as IFN-γ. The addition of recombinant canine IFN-γ to the E. canis culture also reduced the number of infected cells. A commercial recombinant canine IFN-γ, which is sold in Japan, was also effective at reducing E. canis-infected cell number. These results indicate that IFN-γ has an inhibitory effect on the frequency of E. canis-infected cells in vitro and that contact between effector and target cells is not necessary for the resistance.

  4. Monitoring of Gamma-Ray Bright AGN: The Multi-Frequency Polarization of the Flaring Blazar 3C 279

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Sincheol; Lee, Sang-Sung; Byun, Do-Young

    2015-10-01

    We present results of long-term multi-wavelength polarization observations of the powerful blazar 3C 279 after its γ-ray flare on 2013 December 20. We followed up this flare with single-dish polarization observations using two 21-m telescopes of the Korean VLBI Network. Observations carried out weekly from 2013 December 25 to 2015 January 11, at 22 GHz, 43 GHz, 86 GHz simultaneously, as part of the Monitoring Of GAmma-ray Bright AGN (MOGABA) program. We measured 3C 279 total flux densities of 22-34 Jy at 22 GHz, 15-28 Jy (43 GHz), and 10-21 Jy (86 GHz), showing mild variability of ≤ 50 % over the period of our observations. The spectral index between 22 GHz and 86 GHz ranged from -0.13 to -0.36. Linear polarization angles were 27°-38°, 30°-42°, and 33°-50° at 22 GHz, 43 GHz, and 86 GHz, respectively. The degree of linear polarization was in the range of 6-12%, and slightly decreased with time at all frequencies. We investigated Faraday rotation and depolarization of the polarized emission at 22-86 GHz, and found Faraday rotation measures (RM) of -300 to -1200 rad m^{-2} between 22 GHz and 43 GHz, and -800 to -5100 rad m^{-2} between 43 GHz and 86 GHz.The RM values follow a power law with a mean power law index a of 2.2, implying that the polarized emission at these frequencies travels through a Faraday screen in or near the jet. We conclude that the regions emitting polarized radio emission may be different from the region responsible for the 2013 December γ-ray flare and are maintained by the dominant magnetic field perpendicular to the direction of the radio jet at milliarcsecond scales.

  5. Interferon gamma immunoreactivity in iris nerve fibres during endotoxin induced uveitis in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Yang, P.; de Vos, A. F; Kijlstra, A.

    1998-01-01

    AIMS—Previous studies have implied that interferon gamma (IFN-γ) is involved in the pathogenesis of endotoxin induced uveitis (EIU) in the rat. This study investigated the source of IFN-γ in the iris during EIU.
METHODS—Whole mounts of iris were isolated from Lewis rats before and at different times (from 4 hours to 14 days) after foot pad injection of 200 µg Salmonella typhimurium lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Immunohistological analysis was performed using monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specific to rat IFN-γ (DB12 and DB13). mAbs specific to monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells and MHC class II were used to asses the inflammatory response in the eye (ED-1, ED-2, and OX-6). An antibody specific to neurofilaments (2H3) was used to stain nerve fibres in the normal iris.
RESULTS—LPS administration induced acute intraocular inflammation, characterised by a massive infiltration of monocytes/macrophages and increased numbers of MHC class II positive cells in the iris. IFN-γ immunoreactive cells were not detected in iris whole mounts of control rats. Strikingly, IFN-γ immunoreactivity was found in fibres from 4 hours until 10 days after LPS injection, with the most intense staining at 48-72 hours. Other DB12 or DB13 positive cells were not detected in the iris. The pattern of DB12 and DB13 staining in the inflamed iris was similar to the 2H3 staining of neurons in the iris of control rats.
CONCLUSION—These results show that systemic LPS administration induces IFN-γ immunoreactivity in iris fibres and suggest that iris nerve fibres may be a source of IFN-γ during EIU. The IFN-γ immunoreactive material in the iris nerve fibres may be identical to neuronal IFN-γ.

 Keywords: endotoxin induced uveitis; cytokines; interferon gamma; rat PMID:9797675

  6. Electromagnetic coupling in frequency domain induced polarisation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Routh, Partha Sarathi

    2000-11-01

    Frequency domain induced polarization (IP) surveys are commonly carried out to provide information about the chargeability structure of the earth. The goals might be as diverse as trying to delineate a mineralized and/or alteration zone for mineral exploration, or to find a region of contaminants for an environmental problem. Unfortunately, the measured responses can have contributions from inductive and galvanic effects of the ground. The inductive components are called EM coupling effects. They are considered to be ``noise'' and much of this thesis is devoted towards either removing these effects, or reformulating the inverse problem so that inductive effects are part of the ``signal''. If the forward modeling is based on galvanic responses only, then the inductive responses must first be removed from the data. The motivation for attacking the problem in this manner is that it is easier to solve D.C. resistivity equation than the full Maxwell's equation. The separation of the inductive response from the total response is derived by expressing the total electric field as a product of an IP response function, and an electric field which depends on EM coupling response. This enables me to generate formulae to obtain IP amplitude (PFE) and phase response from the raw data. The data can then be inverted, using a galvanic forward modeling. I illustrate this with 1D and 3D synthetic examples. To handle field data sets, I have developed an approximate method for estimating the EM coupling effects based upon the assumption that the earth is locally 1D. The 1D conductivity is obtained from a 2D inversion of the low frequency DC resistivity data. Application of this method to a field data set has shown encouraging results. I also examine the EM coupling problem in terms of complex conductivity. I show that if the forward modeling is carried out with full Maxwell's equation, then there is no need to remove EM coupling. I illustrate this with 1D synthetic example. In summary

  7. Frequency and wavelength prediction of ultrasonic induced liquid surface waves.

    PubMed

    Mahravan, Ehsan; Naderan, Hamid; Damangir, Ebrahim

    2016-12-01

    A theoretical investigation of parametric excitation of liquid free surface by a high frequency sound wave is preformed, using potential flow theory. Pressure and velocity distributions, resembling the sound wave, are applied to the free surface of the liquid. It is found that for impinging wave two distinct capillary frequencies will be excited: One of them is the same as the frequency of the sound wave, and the other is equal to the natural frequency corresponding to a wavenumber equal to the horizontal wavenumber of the sound wave. When the wave propagates in vertical direction, mathematical formulation leads to an equation, which has resonance frequency equal to half of the excitation frequency. This can explain an important contradiction between the frequency and the wavelength of capillary waves in the two cases of normal and inclined interaction of the sound wave and the free surface of the liquid.

  8. High-frequency solitons in media with induced scattering from damped low-frequency waves with nonuniform dispersion and nonlinearity

    SciTech Connect

    Aseeva, N. V. Gromov, E. M.; Tyutin, V. V.

    2015-12-15

    The dynamics of high-frequency field solitons is considered using the extended nonhomogeneous nonlinear Schrödinger equation with induced scattering from damped low-frequency waves (pseudoinduced scattering). This scattering is a 3D analog of the stimulated Raman scattering from temporal spatially homogeneous damped low-frequency modes, which is well known in optics. Spatial inhomogeneities of secondorder linear dispersion and cubic nonlinearity are also taken into account. It is shown that the shift in the 3D spectrum of soliton wavenumbers toward the short-wavelength region is due to nonlinearity increasing in coordinate and to decreasing dispersion. Analytic results are confirmed by numerical calculations.

  9. Effect of curcumin analog on gamma-radiation-induced cellular changes in primary culture of isolated rat hepatocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, M; Sudheer, A Ram; Rajasekaran, K N; Menon, Venugopal P

    2008-10-22

    The present study was aimed to evaluate the radioprotective effect of curcumin analog, on gamma-radiation-induced toxicity in primary cultures of isolated rat hepatocytes. Hepatocytes were isolated from the liver of rats by collagenase perfusion. The DNA damage was analysed by single cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay). An increase in the severity of DNA damage was observed with the increase in gamma-radiation dose at 1-4 Gy in cultured rat hepatocytes. The levels of lipid peroxidative indices like thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARSs) were increased significantly, whereas the levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) and antioxidant enzymes were significantly decreased in gamma-irradiated groups. The maximum damage to hepatocytes was observed at 4Gy gamma-irradiation. Pretreatment with different concentrations of curcumin analog (1.38, 6.91 and 13.82 microM) shows a significant decrease in the levels of TBARS and DNA damage. Pretreatment with curcumin analog prevents the loss of enzymic and non-enzymic antioxidants like GSH upon gamma-irradiation. The maximum protection of hepatocytes was observed at 6.91 microM of curcumin analog pretreatment. Thus, our result shows that pretreatment with curcumin analog protects the hepatocytes against gamma-radiation-induced cellular damage.

  10. PPAR{gamma} ligands induce growth inhibition and apoptosis through p63 and p73 in human ovarian cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Soyeon; Lee, Jae-Jung; Heo, Dae Seog

    2011-03-18

    Research highlights: {yields} PPAR{gamma} ligands increased the rate of apoptosis and inhibition of proliferation in ovarian cancer cells. {yields} PPAR{gamma} ligands induced p63 and p73 expression, but not p53. {yields} p63 and p73 leads to an increase in p21 expression and apoptosis in ovarian cancer cells with treatment PPAR{gamma} ligands. {yields} These findings suggest that PPAR{gamma} ligands suppressed growth of ovarian cancer cells through upregulation of p63 and p73. -- Abstract: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR{gamma}) agonists, including thiazolidinediones (TZDs), can induce anti-proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis in various cancer cell types. This study investigated the mechanism of the anticancer effect of TZDs on human ovarian cancer. Six human ovarian cancer cell lines (NIH:OVCAR3, SKOV3, SNU-251, SNU-8, SNU-840, and 2774) were treated with the TZD, which induced dose-dependent inhibition of cell growth. Additionally, these cell lines exhibited various expression levels of PPAR{gamma} protein as revealed by Western blotting. Flow cytometry showed that the cell cycle was arrested at the G1 phase, as demonstrated by the appearance of a sub-G1 peak. This observation was corroborated by the finding of increased levels of Bax, p21, PARP, and cleaved caspase 3 in TGZ-treated cells. Interestingly, when we determined the effect of p53-induced growth inhibition in these three human ovarian cancer cells, we found that they either lacked p53 or contained a mutant form of p53. Furthermore, TGZ induced the expression of endogenous or exogenous p63 and p73 proteins and p63- or p73-directed short hairpin (si) RNAs inhibited the ability of TGZ to regulate expression of p21 in these cells. Thus, our results suggest that PPAR{gamma} ligands can induce growth suppression of ovarian cancer cells and mediate p63 and p73 expression, leading to enhanced growth inhibition and apoptosis. The tumor suppressive effects of PPAR{gamma} ligands

  11. Decomposition Byproducts Induced by Gamma Radiation and their Toxicity: the Case of 2-Nitrophenol.

    PubMed

    Alsager, Omar A; Basfar, Ahmed A; Muneer, Majid

    2017-04-10

    The induced degradation and detoxification of 2-nitrophenol (2-NP) in aqueous media by gamma irradiation were carefully evaluated in this study. Gamma radiation at absorbed doses as low as 20 kGy was able to degrade 2-NP to reach a removal of at least 85% across the investigated range of concentration (50-150 ppm). 2-NP breaks down to aromatic based compounds with increasing number of byproducts upon increasing the radiation treatment from the absorbed dose of 50% decomposition (D50) to the absorbed dose of 90% decomposition (D90), after which no byproducts could be detected indicating the formation of undetectable aliphatic hydrocarbons, insoluble, or volatile byproducts. Toxicology studies showed that the degradation of 2-NP under absorbed doses up to D90 resulted in a more toxic byproducts than the parent compound and a remarkable reduction in the toxicity was observed with the irradiated samples with absorbed doses above D90. Furthermore, the effect of other experimental conditions on the decomposition efficiency of 2-NP were investigated along with their influence on the toxicity. Varying the pH of the media to acidic or basic conditions did not significantly alter the degradation behavior of 2-NP. However, a notable improvement of the detoxification was associated with the samples of acidic pH. Adding 0.5% of H2O2 to 2-NP solutions had a positive effect by reducing D90 by a factor of nine and diminishing the toxicity by two folds. The results of the present study pave the way to the real application of gamma radiation and similar technologies to decompose contaminates such as 2-NP of high toxicity, poor biodegradability and carcinogenic and recalcitrant properties.

  12. Successful memory encoding is associated with increased cross-frequency coupling between frontal theta and posterior gamma oscillations in human scalp-recorded EEG.

    PubMed

    Friese, Uwe; Köster, Moritz; Hassler, Uwe; Martens, Ulla; Trujillo-Barreto, Nelson; Gruber, Thomas

    2013-02-01

    Although previous studies have established that successful memory encoding is associated with increased synchronization of theta-band and gamma-band oscillations, it is unclear if there is a functional relationship between oscillations in these frequency bands. Using scalp-recorded EEG in healthy human participants, we demonstrate that cross-frequency coupling between frontal theta phase and posterior gamma power is enhanced during the encoding of visual stimuli which participants later on remember versus items which participants subsequently forget ("subsequent memory effect," SME). Conventional wavelet analyses and source localizations revealed SMEs in spectral power of theta-, alpha-, and gamma-band. Successful compared to unsuccessful encoding was reflected in increased theta-band activity in right frontal cortex as well as increased gamma-band activity in parietal-occipital regions. Moreover, decreased alpha-band activity in prefrontal and occipital cortex was also related to successful encoding. Overall, these findings support the idea that during the formation of new memories frontal cortex regions interact with cortical representations in posterior areas.

  13. Transcriptional basis for hyporesponsiveness of the human inducible nitric oxide synthase gene to lipopolysaccharide/interferon-gamma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X; Laubach, V E; Alley, E W; Edwards, K A; Sherman, P A; Russell, S W; Murphy, W J

    1996-04-01

    The work reported here resolves, at the level of gene regulation, the controversy as to whether or not human monocytes/macrophages can produce nitric oxide (NO) when stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), with or without co-stimulation by interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma). Studies included structural comparison of the promoters for human and mouse inducible NO synthase (iNOS) genes, transfection and assay of human and mouse iNOS promoter regions in response to LPS +/- IFN-gamma, and electrophoretic mobility shift assays of kappa B response elements. Two explanations for hyporesponsiveness of the human iNOS promoter to LPS +/- IFN-gamma were found: (1) multiple inactivating nucleotide substitutions in the human counterpart of the enhancer element that has been shown to regulate LPS/IFN-gamma induced expression of the mouse iNOS gene; and (2) and absence of one or more nuclear factors in human macrophages (e.g., an LPS-inducible nuclear factor-kappa B/Rel complex), that is (are) required for maximal expression of the gene. The importance of resolution of this controversy is that future research in this area should be directed toward the understanding of alternative mechanisms that can result in the successful production of NO.

  14. Molecular characterisation of murine acute myeloid leukaemia induced by 56Fe ion and 137Cs gamma ray irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Bacher, Jeffery W.

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to sparsely ionising gamma- or X-ray irradiation is known to increase the risk of leukaemia in humans. However, heavy ion radiotherapy and extended space exploration will expose humans to densely ionising high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation for which there is currently no understanding of leukaemia risk. Murine models have implicated chromosomal deletion that includes the hematopoietic transcription factor gene, PU.1 (Sfpi1), and point mutation of the second PU.1 allele as the primary cause of low-LET radiation-induced murine acute myeloid leukaemia (rAML). Using array comparative genomic hybridisation, fluorescence in situ hybridisation and high resolution melt analysis, we have confirmed that biallelic PU.1 mutations are common in low-LET rAML, occurring in 88% of samples. Biallelic PU.1 mutations were also detected in the majority of high-LET rAML samples. Microsatellite instability was identified in 42% of all rAML samples, and 89% of samples carried increased microsatellite mutant frequencies at the single-cell level, indicative of ongoing instability. Instability was also observed cytogenetically as a 2-fold increase in chromatid-type aberrations. These data highlight the similarities in molecular characteristics of high-LET and low-LET rAML and confirm the presence of ongoing chromosomal and microsatellite instability in murine rAML. PMID:22987027

  15. Gamma irradiation induced in situ synthesis of lead sulfide nanoparticles in poly(vinyl alcohol) hydrogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuljanin-Jakovljević, Jadranka Ž.; Radosavljević, Aleksandra N.; Spasojević, Jelena P.; Carević, Milica V.; Mitrić, Miodrag N.; Kačarević-Popović, Zorica M.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the nanocomposites based on semiconductor lead sulfide (PbS) nanoparticles and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) were investigated. The gamma irradiation induced in situ incorporation of PbS nanoparticles in crosslinked polymer network i.e. PVA hydrogel was performed. PVA hydrogel was previously obtained also under the influence of gamma irradiation. UV-Vis absorption and X-ray diffraction measurements were employed to investigate optical and structural properties of PbS nanoparticles, respectively, and obtained results indicates the presence of nanoparticles with approximately 6 nm in diameter and face centered cubic rock-salt crystal structure. The porous morphology was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. Swelling data revealed that investigated hydrogels (PVA and PbS-PVA nanocomposite) shows non-Fickian diffusion, indicating that both diffusion and polymer relaxation processes controlled the fluid transport. The values of diffusion coefficients have an order of magnitude 10-9 cm2/s (typical values for water diffusion in polymers) and the best fit with the experimental results showed the Etters approximation. Comparing the thermal properties of PbS-PVA xerogel nanocomposite with PVA xerogel it was observed that incorporation of PbS nanoparticles in crosslinked PVA matrix just slightly enhanced the thermal stability of nanocomposite.

  16. The combined effect of uranium and gamma radiation on biological responses and oxidative stress induced in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Vanhoudt, Nathalie; Vandenhove, Hildegarde; Horemans, Nele; Wannijn, Jean; Van Hees, May; Vangronsveld, Jaco; Cuypers, Ann

    2010-11-01

    Uranium never occurs as a single pollutant in the environment, but always in combination with other stressors such as ionizing radiation. As effects induced by multiple contaminants can differ markedly from the effects induced by the individual stressors, this multiple pollution context should not be neglected. In this study, effects on growth, nutrient uptake and oxidative stress induced by the single stressors uranium and gamma radiation are compared with the effects induced by the combination of both stressors. By doing this, we aim to better understand the effects induced by the combined stressors but also to get more insight in stressor-specific response mechanisms. Eighteen-day-old Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings were exposed for 3 days to 10 muM uranium and 3.5 Gy gamma radiation. Gamma radiation interfered with uranium uptake, resulting in decreased uranium concentrations in the roots, but with higher transport to the leaves. This resulted in a better root growth but increased leaf lipid peroxidation. For the other endpoints studied, effects under combined exposure were mostly determined by uranium presence and only limited influenced by gamma presence. Furthermore, an important role is suggested for CAT1/2/3 gene expression under uranium and mixed stressor conditions in the leaves.

  17. Properties of light induced EPR signals in enamel and their possible interference with gamma-induced signals

    SciTech Connect

    Shalom, S.V.; Chumak, V.V.; Haskell, E.H.; Hayes, R.B.; Kenner, G.H.

    1996-01-01

    Exposure of enamel to UV light (sunlight and artificial) results in EPR signals with g-factors of 2.0018 (perpendicular),1.9975 (parallel), 2.0045, 20052, and 2.0083. The first two signals correspond to the components of the radiation induced signal and the third signal corresponds to the native signal reported in dosimetry and dating studies. The remaining signals were found to be stable and sensitive to both gamma and sunlight exposure. Their sensitivity response to light and radiation was considerably different which gives rise to the possibility that the g=2.0052 and g=2.0083 signals might be used as indicators of the dose resulting from light exposure.

  18. Ways of making-sense: Local gamma synchronization reveals differences between semantic processing induced by music and language.

    PubMed

    Barraza, Paulo; Chavez, Mario; Rodríguez, Eugenio

    2016-01-01

    Similar to linguistic stimuli, music can also prime the meaning of a subsequent word. However, it is so far unknown what is the brain dynamics underlying the semantic priming effect induced by music, and its relation to language. To elucidate these issues, we compare the brain oscillatory response to visual words that have been semantically primed either by a musical excerpt or by an auditory sentence. We found that semantic violation between music-word pairs triggers a classical ERP N400, and induces a sustained increase of long-distance theta phase synchrony, along with a transient increase of local gamma activity. Similar results were observed after linguistic semantic violation except for gamma activity, which increased after semantic congruence between sentence-word pairs. Our findings indicate that local gamma activity is a neural marker that signals different ways of semantic processing between music and language, revealing the dynamic and self-organized nature of the semantic processing.

  19. Molecular weight changes induced in an anionic polydimethylsiloxane by gamma irradiation in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satti, Angel J.; Andreucetti, Noemí A.; Ciolino, Andrés E.; Vitale, Cristian; Sarmoria, Claudia; Vallés, Enrique M.

    2010-11-01

    An anionic almost monodisperse linear polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) was subjected to gamma irradiation under vacuum at room temperature. The molecular weight changes induced by the radiation process have been investigated using size exclusion chromatography (SEC) with refraction index (RI) and multi angle laser light scattering (MALLS) detectors, to obtain the number and weight average molecular weights of the irradiated samples. The analysis of the data indicates that crosslinking reactions predominated over scission reactions. The results obtained by an SEC-RI have confirmed the presence of small, but measurable amounts of scission. A previously developed mathematical model of the irradiation process that accounts for simultaneous scission and crosslinking and allows for both H- and Y-crosslinks, fitted well the measured molecular weight data. This prediction is in accordance with the experimental data obtained by 29Si-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and previously reported data for commercial linear PDMS ( Satti et al., 2008).

  20. Superhigh moduli and tension-induced phase transition of monolayer gamma-boron at finite temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Junhua; Yang, Zhaoyao; Wei, Ning; Kou, Liangzhi

    2016-01-01

    Two dimensional (2D) gamma-boron (γ-B28) thin films have been firstly reported by the experiments of the chemical vapor deposition in the latest study. However, their mechanical properties are still not clear. Here we predict the superhigh moduli (785 ± 42 GPa at 300 K) and the tension-induced phase transition of monolayer γ-B28 along a zigzag direction for large deformations at finite temperatures using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The new phase can be kept stable after unloading process at these temperatures. The predicted mechanical properties are reasonable when compared with our results from density functional theory. This study provides physical insights into the origins of the new phase transition of monolayer γ-B28 at finite temperatures. PMID:26979283

  1. Boron analysis for neutron capture therapy using particle-induced gamma-ray emission.

    PubMed

    Nakai, Kei; Yamamoto, Yohei; Okamoto, Emiko; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Yoshida, Fumiyo; Matsumura, Akira; Yamada, Naoto; Kitamura, Akane; Koka, Masashi; Satoh, Takahiro

    2015-12-01

    The neutron source of BNCT is currently changing from reactor to accelerator, but peripheral facilities such as a dose-planning system and blood boron analysis have still not been established. To evaluate the potential application of particle-induced gamma-ray emission (PIGE) for boron measurement in clinical boron neutron capture therapy, boronophenylalanine dissolved within a cell culture medium was measured using PIGE. PIGE detected 18 μgB/mL f-BPA in the culture medium, and all measurements of any given sample were taken within 20 min. Two hours of f-BPA exposure was required to create a boron distribution image. However, even though boron remained in the cells, the boron on the cell membrane could not be distinguished from the boron in the cytoplasm.

  2. {gamma} Irradiation-induced degradation of organochlorinated pollutants in fatty esters and in Cod

    SciTech Connect

    Lepine, F.L.; Brochu, F.; Milot, S.

    1995-02-01

    The {gamma} irradiation-induced degradation of 2,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl)-1,1,1-trichloroethane (DDT), 2,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl)-1,1-dichloroethane (DDD), and 2,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl)-1,1-dichloroethylene (DDE) dissolved in methyl myristate and methyl oleate was studied. DDT and DDE produced DDD and 2,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl)chloroethylene (DDMU) respectively, in agreement with a previous study performed with aliphatic solvents. The degradation of these two former compounds was larger in methyl myristate than in methyl oleate and addition products between methyl myristate and the organochlorines were found. While DDD, DDE, and many PCB congeners in a cod sample were not measurably degraded at 15 KGy, DDT underwent 30% degradation. 9 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  3. Development of a Reference Database for Particle-Induced Gamma-ray Emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitriou, P.; Becker, H.-W.; Bogdanović-Radović, I.; Chiari, M.; Goncharov, A.; Jesus, A. P.; Kakuee, O.; Kiss, A. Z.; Lagoyannis, A.; Räisänen, J.; Strivay, D.; Zucchiatti, A.

    2016-03-01

    Particle-Induced Gamma-ray Emission (PIGE) is a powerful analytical technique that exploits the interactions of rapid charged particles with nuclei located near a sample surface to determine the composition and structure of the surface regions of solids by measurement of characteristic prompt γ rays. The potential for depth profiling of this technique has long been recognized, however, the implementation has been limited owing to insufficient knowledge of the physical data and lack of suitable user-friendly computer codes for the applications. Although a considerable body of published data exists in the nuclear physics literature for nuclear reaction cross sections with γ rays in the exit channel, there is no up-to-date, comprehensive compilation specifically dedicated to IBA applications. A number of PIGE cross-section data had already been uploaded to the Ion Beam Analysis Nuclear Data Library (IBANDL)

  4. Gamma-effects on 2-dimensional transonic aerodynamics. [specific heat ratio due to shock induced separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuzla, K.; Russell, D. A.; Wai, J. C.

    1976-01-01

    Nonlifting 10% biconvex airfoils are mounted in a 30 x 40 cm Ludwieg-tube-driven transonic test-section and the flow field recorded with a holographic interferometer. Nitrogen, argon, and carbon dioxide are used as the principal test gases. Experiments are conducted with Reynolds number based on chord of (0.5-3.5) x 10 to the 6th with Mach numbers of 0.70, 0.75, and 0.80. Supporting calculations use inviscid transonic small-disturbance and full-potential computer codes coupled with simple integral boundary-layer modeling. Systematic studies show that significant gamma-effects can occur due to shock-induced separation.

  5. Hesperidin a flavanoglycone protects against gamma-irradiation induced hepatocellular damage and oxidative stress in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Pradeep, Kannampalli; Park, Sang Hyun; Ko, Kyong Cheol

    2008-06-10

    Oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis and progression of gamma-irradiation induced cellular damage and the administration of dietary antioxidants has been suggested to protect against the subsequent tissue damage. Here, we present the data to explore the hepatoprotective and antioxidant effect of hesperidin, a naturally occurring citrus flavanoglycone, against gamma-irradiation induced oxidative damage in the liver of rats. Healthy male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to gamma-irradiation (1 Gy, 3 Gy and 5 Gy) and were administered hesperidin (50 mg/kg and 100 mg/kg, b.w, orally) for 7 days post irradiation. The changes in body weight, liver weight, spleen index, serum and liver aspartate transaminase (AST), alanine transaminase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (gamma-GT) and serum ceruloplasmin levels were determined along with differences in the liver histopathology. Liver thiobarbuturic acid reactive substance as an index for lipid peroxidation and the levels of enzymatic antioxidants like superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase and the status of non-enzymatic antioxidants as an index for oxidative stress were also determined. Exposure to gamma-irradiation resulted in hepatocellular damage in a dose-dependent manner, featuring a significantly decreased body weight and liver weight and higher levels of serum AST, ALT, ALP, LDH and gamma-GT levels and a simultaneous decrease in their levels in the liver tissue. Oxidative stress was evidenced by elevated levels of lipid peroxidation and a decrease in the levels of key enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants in the liver. However, the gamma-irradiation induced toxic effects were dramatically and dose-dependently inhibited by hesperidin treatment as observed by the restoration in the altered levels of the marker enzymes, lipid peroxidation, enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants. The results of the biochemical

  6. Modulatory effects of new curcumin analogues on gamma-irradiation - Induced nephrotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Amel F M; Zaher, Nashwa H; El-Hossary, Ebaa M; El-Gazzar, Marwa G

    2016-12-25

    In the present study, a new series of 2-amino-pyran-3-carbonitrile derivatives of curcumin 2-7 have been synthesized via one-pot simple and efficient protocol, involving the reaction of curcumin 1 with substituted-benzylidene-malononitrile to modify the 1,3-diketone moiety. The structures of the synthesized compounds 2-7 were elucidated by microanalytical and spectral data, which were found consistent with the assigned structures. The nephroprotective mechanism of these new curcumin analogues was evaluated on the post-gamma-irradiation (7 Gy) - induced nephrotoxicity in rats. Activation of Nrf2 by these curcumin analogues is responsible for the amendment of the antioxidant status, impairment of NF-κB signal, thus attenuate the nephrotoxicity induced post-γ-irradiation exposure. 4-Chloro-phenyl curcumin analogue 7 showed the most potent activity. In conclusion, the results of the present study demonstrate a promising role of these new curcumin analogues to attenuate the early symptoms of nephrotoxicity induced by γ-irradiation in rats via activation of Nrf2 gene expression. These new curcumin analogues need further toxicological investigations to assess their therapeutic index.

  7. Numerical simulations of planetary gamma-ray spectra induced by galactic cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Masarik, J.; Reedy, R.C.

    1994-07-01

    The fluxes of cosmic-ray-produced gamma rays escaping from Mars were calculated using the LAHET Code System and basic nuclear data for {gamma}-ray production. Both surface water content and atmospheric thickness strongly affect the fluxes of {gamma}-ray lines escaping from Mars.

  8. Interferon gamma regulates antigen-induced eosinophil recruitment into the mouse airways by inhibiting the infiltration of CD4+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    We have previously shown that antigen-induced eosinophil recruitment into the tissue of sensitized mice is mediated by CD4+ T cells and interleukin 5. To determine whether interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) regulates antigen-induced eosinophil recruitment into the tissue, we studied the effect of recombinant (r) murine IFN-gamma and of anti-IFN- gamma monoclonal antibody (mAb) on the eosinophil infiltration of the trachea induced by antigen inhalation in mice. The intraperitoneal administration of rIFN-gamma prevented antigen-induced eosinophil infiltration in the trachea of sensitized mice. The administration of rIFN-gamma also decreased antigen-induced CD4+ T cell but not CD8+ T cell infiltration in the trachea. On the other hand, pretreatment with anti-IFN-gamma mAb enhanced antigen-induced eosinophil and CD4+ T cell infiltration in the trachea. These results indicate that IFN-gamma regulates antigen-induced eosinophil recruitment into the tissue by inhibiting CD4+ T cell infiltration. PMID:8093895

  9. Dynamics of large-scale cortical interactions at high gamma frequencies during word production: event related causality (ERC) analysis of human electrocorticography (ECoG).

    PubMed

    Korzeniewska, Anna; Franaszczuk, Piotr J; Crainiceanu, Ciprian M; Kuś, Rafał; Crone, Nathan E

    2011-06-15

    Intracranial EEG studies in humans have shown that functional brain activation in a variety of functional-anatomic domains of human cortex is associated with an increase in power at a broad range of high gamma (>60Hz) frequencies. Although these electrophysiological responses are highly specific for the location and timing of cortical processing and in animal recordings are highly correlated with increased population firing rates, there has been little direct empirical evidence for causal interactions between different recording sites at high gamma frequencies. Such causal interactions are hypothesized to occur during cognitive tasks that activate multiple brain regions. To determine whether such causal interactions occur at high gamma frequencies and to investigate their functional significance, we used event-related causality (ERC) analysis to estimate the dynamics, directionality, and magnitude of event-related causal interactions using subdural electrocorticography (ECoG) recorded during two word production tasks: picture naming and auditory word repetition. A clinical subject who had normal hearing but was skilled in American Signed Language (ASL) provided a unique opportunity to test our hypothesis with reference to a predictable pattern of causal interactions, i.e. that language cortex interacts with different areas of sensorimotor cortex during spoken vs. signed responses. Our ERC analyses confirmed this prediction. During word production with spoken responses, perisylvian language sites had prominent causal interactions with mouth/tongue areas of motor cortex, and when responses were gestured in sign language, the most prominent interactions involved hand and arm areas of motor cortex. Furthermore, we found that the sites from which the most numerous and prominent causal interactions originated, i.e. sites with a pattern of ERC "divergence", were also sites where high gamma power increases were most prominent and where electrocortical stimulation mapping

  10. Association between a high-expressing interferon-gamma allele and a lower frequency of kidney angiomyolipomas in TSC2 patients.

    PubMed

    Dabora, Sandra L; Roberts, Penelope; Nieto, Andres; Perez, Ron; Jozwiak, Sergiusz; Franz, David; Bissler, John; Thiele, Elizabeth A; Sims, Katherine; Kwiatkowski, David J

    2002-10-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a familial hamartoma syndrome in which renal involvement is common and, at times, life threatening. We have investigated the potential effect of a non-TSC gene on renal disease in a cohort of 172 TSC patients with TSC2 mutations. Patients were genotyped for an interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) microsatellite polymorphism, within intron 1, for which one common allele (allele 2, with 12 CA repeats) has been shown to have a higher expression of IFN-gamma. A chi(2) analysis was used to examine the association between IFN-gamma allele 2 and the development of kidney angiomyolipomas (KAMLs) in this TSC2 cohort. Because of the age-dependent development of KAMLs in TSC, we initially focused on the 127 patients who were >5 years old. Additional subgroup analyses were done to investigate the influence of age and gender. The transmission/disequilibrium test (TDT) was also performed in a subset of this cohort (46 probands) for whom parent and/or sibling samples were available for analysis. Both chi(2) analysis and TDT suggested an association between IFN-gamma allele 2 and the absence of KAMLs in patients who have known TSC2 mutations. Among the 127 patients who were >5 years old, KAMLs were present in 95 (75%) and were absent in 32 (25%). In the group with KAML present, the frequency of IFN-gamma allele 2 was 56%; in the group with KAML absent, the frequency of IFN-gamma allele 2 was significantly higher, at 78% (P=.02, by chi(2) analysis). The family-based TDT analysis gave similar results, with a TDT statistic (TDT chi2=5.45) corresponding to a P value of.02. Subgroup analyses show that both age and gender may influence the impact of this association. Although these results should be replicated in other populations with TSC, the present study suggests that modifier genes play a role in the variable expression of TSC and also suggests a potential therapy for KAMLs in patients with TSC.

  11. Nonlinear Cavity and Frequency Comb Radiations Induced by Negative Frequency Field Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lourés, Cristian Redondo; Faccio, Daniele; Biancalana, Fabio

    2015-11-01

    Optical Kerr frequency combs (KFCs) are an increasingly important optical metrology tool with applications ranging from ultraprecise spectroscopy to time keeping. KFCs may be generated in compact resonators with extremely high quality factors. Here, we show that the same features that lead to high quality frequency combs in these resonators also lead to an enhancement of nonlinear emissions that may be identified as originating from the presence of a negative frequency (NF) component in the optical spectrum. While the negative frequency component of the spectrum is naturally always present in the real-valued optical field, it is not included in the principal theoretical model used to model nonlinear cavities, i.e., the Lugiato-Lefever equation. We therefore extend these equations in order to include the contribution of NF components and show that the predicted emissions may be studied analytically, in excellent agreement with full numerical simulations. These results are of importance for a variety of fields, such as Bose-Einstein condensates, mode-locked lasers, nonlinear plasmonics, and polaritonics.

  12. Nonlinear Cavity and Frequency Comb Radiations Induced by Negative Frequency Field Effects.

    PubMed

    Lourés, Cristian Redondo; Faccio, Daniele; Biancalana, Fabio

    2015-11-06

    Optical Kerr frequency combs (KFCs) are an increasingly important optical metrology tool with applications ranging from ultraprecise spectroscopy to time keeping. KFCs may be generated in compact resonators with extremely high quality factors. Here, we show that the same features that lead to high quality frequency combs in these resonators also lead to an enhancement of nonlinear emissions that may be identified as originating from the presence of a negative frequency (NF) component in the optical spectrum. While the negative frequency component of the spectrum is naturally always present in the real-valued optical field, it is not included in the principal theoretical model used to model nonlinear cavities, i.e., the Lugiato-Lefever equation. We therefore extend these equations in order to include the contribution of NF components and show that the predicted emissions may be studied analytically, in excellent agreement with full numerical simulations. These results are of importance for a variety of fields, such as Bose-Einstein condensates, mode-locked lasers, nonlinear plasmonics, and polaritonics.

  13. Interferon-gamma - Inducible Inflammation: Contribution to Aging and Aging-Associated Psychiatric Disorders.

    PubMed

    Oxenkrug, Gregory

    2011-12-01

    Aging is associated with the chronic, low grade, Th-1 type inflammation. The key Th-1 type, pro-inflammatory cytokine, interferon-gamma (IFNG), transcriptionally induces the rate-limiting enzyme of tryptophan (TRY) - kynurenine (KYN) pathway, indoleamine 2,3- dioxygenase (IDO). Activation of IDO shunts TRY metabolism from production of serotonin (substrate of antidepressant effect) and its derivatives: N-acetylserotonin (an agonist to the receptors of brain derived neurotropic factor), and melatonin (regulator of sleep and other circadian rhythms), towards production of KYN and its derivatives (anxiogenic, neurotoxic and pro-oxidant factors). Some of kynurenines up-regulate nitric oxide synthase (NOS). Concurrently with activation of IDO, IFNG induces guanosine triphosphate cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH), the rate limiting enzyme of GTP conversion into BH2 (and increases formation of a stable derivative of BH2, neopterin, at the expense of production of BH4, the mandatory co-factor of NOS). Combination of increased NOS activity (by kynurenines) with decreased formation of BH4 leads to the uncoupling of NOS with consequent shift of arginine metabolism from biosynthesis of NO to formation of superoxide anion and other free radicals, and exacerbation of depression, anxiety and cognitive impairment caused by kynurenines. Polymorphism of IFNG (+874) T/A gene, that encodes production of IFNG protein, impacts the IDO and GTPCH activity that might be assessed in humans by KYN/TRY ratio and neopterin concentrations in biological fluids (e.g., blood, urine and spinal fluid). The hypothesis of IFNG inducible IDO/GTPCH inflammation cascade helps to understand the increased association between aging, inflammation and aging-associated psychiatric and medical (insulin resistance, obesity) disorders. Evaluation of markers of IFNG-inducible inflammation cascade might be used to assess the severity of corresponding behavioral and cognitive changes and the efficacy of pharmacological

  14. Evaluation of the cosmic-ray induced background in coded aperture high energy gamma-ray telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, Alan; Barbier, Loius M.; Frye, Glenn M.; Jenkins, Thomas L.

    1991-01-01

    While the application of coded-aperture techniques to high-energy gamma-ray astronomy offers potential arc-second angular resolution, concerns were raised about the level of secondary radiation produced in a thick high-z mask. A series of Monte-Carlo calculations are conducted to evaluate and quantify the cosmic-ray induced neutral particle background produced in a coded-aperture mask. It is shown that this component may be neglected, being at least a factor of 50 lower in intensity than the cosmic diffuse gamma-rays.

  15. Luminescence sensitivity changes in natural quartz induced by high temperature annealing: a high frequency EPR and OSL study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poolton, N. R. J.; Smith, G. M.; Riedi, P. C.; Bulur, E.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Murray, A. S.; Adrian, M.

    2000-04-01

    Quartz undergoes very significant luminescence sensitivity changes after high temperature annealing (0-1200 °C), with particular enhancement occurring between the phase transition temperatures 573 and 870 °C. In order to understand why this occurs, high frequency electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), operating at 90 GHz, has been used to monitor the structure and population of defects in natural sedimentary quartz, following annealing and icons/Journals/Common/gamma" ALT="gamma" ALIGN="TOP"/> -irradiation. The results are compared with the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) data of the same samples. It is shown that: (i) the structure and population of the dominant [AlO4 ]0 recombination centres are largely unaffected by the annealing process; (ii) the oxygen vacancy E´ centres are destroyed when annealed at temperatures between the phase transitions and; (iii) the numbers of both [TiO4 /H+ ]0 and [TiO4 /Li+ ]0 donors increase between 400 and 700 °C. Photo-EPR spectra are presented, providing evidence that both the Ti associated donors and Al acceptors are directly involved in the OSL process. The heat-induced changes in the population of these EPR defects is mirrored in part by the change in the luminescence sensitivity of several OSL components. Evidence is also presented suggesting that E´ may act as non-radiative centres competing in the OSL process.

  16. Measurements of Hurricane Induced High-Frequency Currents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    averaged, modified periodogram method is utilized [12]. In order to preserve as much frequency resolution as possible, the window length is the...Time Averaging Over Short, Modified Periodograms , IEEE Trans. Audio Eleclroacoust.. AU- 15,70-73. Powell, M. D., S. H. Houston, L. R. Amat, and N

  17. Spectral analysis of paramagnetic centers induced in human tooth enamel by x-rays and gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirillov, V. A.; Kuchuro, I. I.

    2010-03-01

    Based on study of spectral and relaxation characteristics, we have established that paramagnetic centers induced in tooth enamel by x-rays and gamma radiation are identical in nature. We show that for the same exposure dose, the intensity of the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signal induced by x-radiation with effective energy 34 keV is about an order of magnitude higher than the amplitude of the signal induced by gamma radiation. We have identified a three-fold attenuation of the EPR signal along the path of the x-radiation from the buccal to the lingual side of a tooth, which is evidence that the individual had undergone diagnostic x-ray examination of the dentition or skull. We have shown that the x-ray exposure doses reconstructed from the EPR spectra are an order of magnitude higher than the applied doses, while the dose loads due to gamma radiation are equal to the applied doses. The data obtained indicate that for adequate reconstruction of individual absorbed doses from EPR spectra of tooth enamel in the population subjected to the combined effect of x-radiation and accidental external gamma radiation as a result of the disaster at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant, we need to take into account the contribution to the dose load from diagnostic x-rays in examination of the teeth, jaw, or skull.

  18. Gamma-vinyl GABA inhibits methamphetamine, heroin, or ethanol-induced increases in nucleus accumbens dopamine.

    PubMed

    Gerasimov, M R; Ashby, C R; Gardner, E L; Mills, M J; Brodie, J D; Dewey, S L

    1999-10-01

    We examined the acute effect of the irreversible GABA-transaminase inhibitor, gamma-vinyl GABA (GVG, Sabril((R)), Vigabatrin((R))) on increases in nucleus accumbens (NAc) dopamine (DA) following acute administration of methamphetamine, heroin, or ethanol. Methamphetamine (2.5 mg/kg) produced a dose-dependent increase (2, 700%) in NAc DA. GVG preadministration (300 or 600 mg/kg), however, inhibited this response by approximately 39 and 61%, respectively. The lower dose of methamphetamine (1.25 mg/kg), increased DA by 1, 700%. This response was inhibited to a similar extent (44%) regardless of the GVG dose preadministered (300 or 600 mg/kg). In addition, heroin-induced increases in NAc DA (0.5 mg/kg, 170%) were inhibited or completely abolished by GVG (150 or 300 mg/kg, 65 and 100%, respectively). Finally, at half the dose necessary for heroin, GVG (150 mg/kg) also completely abolished ethanol-induced increases in NAc DA following a 0.25 g/kg challenge dose (140%). Taken with our previous findings using nicotine or cocaine as the challenge drug, these results indicate that GVG attenuates increases in NAc DA by a mechanism common to many drugs of abuse. However, it appears unlikely that an acute dose of GVG can completely inhibit increases in NAc DA following challenges with a drug whose mechanism of action is mediated primarily through the DA reuptake site.

  19. Microscopic observations of X-ray and gamma-ray induced decomposition of ammonium perchlorate crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herley, P. J.; Levy, P. W.

    1972-01-01

    The X-ray and gamma-ray induced decomposition of ammonium perchlorate was studied by optical, transmission, and scanning electron microscopy. This material is a commonly used oxidizer in solid propellents which could be employed in deep-space probes, and where they will be subjected to a variety of radiations for as long as ten years. In some respects the radiation-induced damage closely resembles the effects produced by thermal decomposition, but in other respects the results differ markedly. Similar radiation and thermal effects include the following: (1) irregular or ill-defined circular etch pits are formed in both cases; (2) approximately the same size pits are produced; (3) the pit density is similar; (4) the c face is considerably more reactive than the m face; and (5) most importantly, many of the etch pits are aligned in crystallographic directions which are the same for thermal or radiolytic decomposition. Thus, dislocations play an important role in the radiolytic decomposition process.

  20. Risperidone significantly inhibits interferon-gamma-induced microglial activation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kato, Takahiro; Monji, Akira; Hashioka, Sadayuki; Kanba, Shigenobu

    2007-05-01

    Microglia has recently been regarded to be a mediator of neuroinflammation via the release of proinflammatory cytokines, nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the central nervous system (CNS). Microglia has thus been reported to play an important role in the pathology of neurodegenerative disease, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD). The pathological mechanisms of schizophrenia remain unclear while some recent neuroimaging studies suggest even schizophrenia may be a kind of neurodegenerative disease. Risperidone has been reported to decrease the reduction of MRI volume during the clinical course of schizophrenia. Many recent studies have demonstrated that immunological mechanisms via such as interferon (IFN)-gamma and cytokines might be relevant to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. In the present study, we thus investigated the effects of risperidone on the generation of nitric oxide, inducible NO synthase (iNOS) expression and inflammatory cytokines: interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha by IFN-gamma-activated microglia by using Griess assay, Western blotting and ELISA, respectively. In comparison with haloperidol, risperidone significantly inhibited the production of NO and proinflammatory cytokines by activated microglia. The iNOS levels of risperidone-treated cells were much lower than those of the haloperidol-treated cells. Antipsychotics, especially risperidone may have an anti-inflammatory effect via the inhibition of microglial activation, which is not only directly toxic to neurons but also has an inhibitory effect on neurogenesis and oligodendrogenesis, both of which have been reported to play a crucial role in the pathology of schizophrenia.

  1. Low-Dose Gamma Radiation Does Not Induce an Adaptive Response for Micronucleus Induction in Mouse Splenocytes.

    PubMed

    Bannister, L A; Serran, M L; Mantha, R R

    2015-11-01

    Low-dose ionizing radiation is known to induce radioadaptive responses in cells in vitro as well as in mice in vivo. Low-dose radiation decreases the incidence and increases latency for spontaneous and radiation-induced tumors in mice, potentially as a result of enhanced cellular DNA repair efficiency or a reduction in genomic instability. In this study, the cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assay was used to examine dose response and potential radioadaptive response for cytogenetic damage and cell survival in C57BL/6 and BALB/c spleen cells exposed in vitro or in vivo to low-dose 60Co gamma radiation. The effects of genetic background, radiation dose and dose rate, sampling time and cell cycle were investigated with respect to dose response and radioadaptive response. In C57BL/6 mice, a linear-quadratic dose-response relationship for the induction of micronuclei (MN) was observed for doses between 100 mGy and 2 Gy. BALB/c mice exhibited increased radiosensitivity for MN induction compared to C57BL/6 mice. A 20 mGy dose had no effect on MN frequencies in splenocytes of either mouse strain, however, increased spleen weight and a reduced number of dead cells were noted in the C57BL/6 strain only. Multiple experimental parameters were investigated in radioadaptive response studies, including dose and dose rate of the priming dose (20 mGy at 0.5 mGy/min and 100 mGy at 10 mGy/min), time interval (4 and 24 h) between priming and challenge doses, cell cycle stage (resting or proliferating) at exposure and kinetics after the challenge dose. Radioadaptive responses were not observed for MN induction for either mouse strain under any of the experimental conditions investigated. In contrast, a synergistic response for radiation-induced micronuclei in C57BL/6 spleen was detected after in vivo 20 mGy irradiation. This increase in the percentage of cells with cytogenetic damage was associated with a reduction in the number of nonviable spleen cells, suggesting that low

  2. Modes and the alpha-gamma transition in rf capacitive discharges in N{sub 2}O at different rf frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Lisovskiy, V.; Booth, J.-P.; Landry, K.; Douai, D.; Cassagne, V.; Yegorenkov, V.

    2006-10-15

    This paper reports current-voltage characteristics and pressure-voltage transition curves from the weak-current {alpha}-mode to the strong-current {gamma}-mode for rf capacitive discharges in N{sub 2}O at frequencies of 2 MHz, 13.56 MHz, and 27.12 MHz. At 2 MHz the rf discharge is mostly resistive whereas at 13.56 MHz and 27.12 MHz it is mostly capacitive. The weak-current {alpha}-mode was found to exist only above a certain minimum gas pressure for all frequencies studied. N. Yatsenko [Sov. Phys. Tech. Phys. 26, 678 (1981)] previously proposed that the {alpha}-{gamma} transition corresponds to breakdown of the sheaths. However, we show that this is the case only for sufficiently high gas pressures. At lower pressure there is a smooth transition from the weak-current {alpha}-mode to a strong-current {gamma}-mode, in which the sheaths produce fast electrons but the sheath has not undergone breakdown.

  3. Combined treatment of gamma-tocotrienol with statins induce mammary tumor cell cycle arrest in G1.

    PubMed

    Wali, Vikram B; Bachawal, Sunitha V; Sylvester, Paul W

    2009-06-01

    Statins and gamma-tocotrienol (a rare isoform of vitamin E) both inhibit 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMGCoA) reductase activity and display anticancer activity. However, clinical application of statins has been limited by high dose toxicity. Previous studies showed that combined statin and gamma-tocotrienol treatment synergistically inhibits growth of highly malignant +SA mammary epithelial cells in culture. To investigate the mechanism mediating this growth inhibition, studies were conducted to determine the effect of combination low dose gamma-tocotrienol and statin treatment on +SA mammary tumor cell cycle progression. Treatment with 0.25 microM simvastatin, lovastatin, mevastatin, 10 microM pravastatin or 2.0 microM gamma-tocotrienol alone had no effect, while combined treatment of individual statins with gamma-tocotrienol significantly inhibited +SA cell proliferation during the 4-day culture period. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that combined treatment induced cell cycle arrest in G1. Additional studies showed that treatment with 0.25 microM simvastatin or 2 microM gamma-tocotrienol alone had no effect on the relative intracellular levels of cyclin D1, CDK2, CDK4 and CDK6, but combined treatment caused a large reduction in cyclin D1 and CDK2 levels. Combined treatments also caused a relatively large increase in p27, but had no effect on p21 and p15 levels, and resulted in a large reduction in retinoblastoma (Rb) protein phosphorylation at ser780 and ser807/811. Similar effects were observed following combined treatment of gamma-tocotrienol with low doses of lovastatin, mevastatin and pravastatin. These findings demonstrate that combination low dose statin and gamma-tocotrienol treatment induced mammary tumor cell cycle arrest at G1, resulting from an increase in p27 expression, and a corresponding decrease in cyclin D1, CDK2, and hypophosphorylation of Rb protein. These findings suggest that combined treatment of statins with gamma

  4. Fluorine concentrations in bone biopsy samples determined by proton-induced gamma-ray emission and cyclic neutron activation.

    PubMed

    Spyrou, N M; Altaf, W J; Gill, B S; Jeynes, C; Nicolaou, G; Pietra, R; Sabbioni, E; Surian, M

    1990-01-01

    Fluorine concentrations in bone biopsy samples taken from the iliac crest of subjects, divided into four groups depending on the length of dialysis treatment, and aluminium levels in blood and bone pathology, in terms of osteoporosis, were determined by two instrumental methods. Proton-induced gamma-ray emission (PIGE), making use of the resonance reaction of 19F(p, alpha gamma)16O at 872 keV, and cyclic neutron activation analysis (CNAA), using the 19F(n, gamma)20F reaction in a reactor irradiation facility, were employed. Rutherford backscattering (RBS) was used to calculate the volume, and, hence, mass of the sample excited in PIGE by determining the major element composition of the samples in order to express results in terms of concentration. From this preliminary investigation, a relationship is suggested between fluorine concentrations in bone and aluminium levels in the system.

  5. Gamma rays induce DNA damage and oxidative stress associated with impaired growth and reproduction in the copepod Tigriopus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Han, Jeonghoon; Won, Eun-Ji; Lee, Bo-Young; Hwang, Un-Ki; Kim, Il-Chan; Yim, Joung Han; Leung, Kenneth Mei Yee; Lee, Yong Sung; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2014-07-01

    Nuclear radioisotope accidents are potentially ecologically devastating due to their impact on marine organisms. To examine the effects of exposure of a marine organism to radioisotopes, we irradiated the intertidal copepod Tigriopus japonicus with several doses of gamma radiation and analyzed the effects on mortality, fecundity, and molting by assessing antioxidant enzyme activities and gene expression patterns. No mortality was observed at 96h, even in response to exposure to a high dose (800Gy) of radiation, but mortality rate was significantly increased 120h (5 days) after exposure to 600 or 800Gy gamma ray radiation. We observed a dose-dependent reduction in fecundity of ovigerous females; even the group irradiated with 50Gy showed a significant reduction in fecundity, suggesting that gamma rays are likely to have a population level effect. In addition, we observed growth retardation, particularly at the nauplius stage, in individuals after gamma irradiation. In fact, nauplii irradiated with more than 200Gy, though able to molt to copepodite stage 1, did not develop into adults. Upon gamma radiation, T. japonicus showed a dose-dependent increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, the activities of several antioxidant enzymes, and expression of double-stranded DNA break damage genes (e.g. DNA-PK, Ku70, Ku80). At a low level (sub-lethal dose) of gamma irradiation, we found dose-dependent upregulation of p53, implying cellular damage in T. japonicus in response to sub-lethal doses of gamma irradiation, suggesting that T. japonicus is not susceptible to sub-lethal doses of gamma irradiation. Additionally, antioxidant genes, phase II enzyme (e.g. GSTs), and cellular chaperone genes (e.g. Hsps) that are involved in cellular defense mechanisms also showed the same expression patterns for sublethal doses of gamma irradiation (50-200Gy). These findings indicate that sublethal doses of gamma radiation can induce oxidative stress-mediated DNA damage and increase

  6. Lattice-induced nonadiabatic frequency shifts in optical lattice clocks

    SciTech Connect

    Beloy, K.

    2010-09-15

    We consider the frequency shift in optical lattice clocks which arises from the coupling of the electronic motion to the atomic motion within the lattice. For the simplest of three-dimensional lattice geometries this coupling is shown to affect only clocks based on blue-detuned lattices. We have estimated the size of this shift for the prospective strontium lattice clock operating at the 390-nm blue-detuned magic wavelength. The resulting fractional frequency shift is found to be on the order of 10{sup -18} and is largely overshadowed by the electric quadrupole shift. For lattice clocks based on more complex geometries or other atomic systems, this shift could potentially be a limiting factor in clock accuracy.

  7. High frequency resonant waveguide grating imager for assessing drug-induced cardiotoxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrie, Ann M.; Wu, Qi; Deichmann, Oberon D.; Fang, Ye

    2014-05-01

    We report a high-frequency resonant waveguide grating imager for assessing compound-induced cardiotoxicity. The imager sweeps the wavelength range from 823 nm to 838 nm every 3 s to identify and monitor compound-induced shifts in resonance wavelength and then switch to the intensity-imaging mode to detect the beating rhythm and proarrhythmic effects of compounds on induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes. This opens possibility to study cardiovascular biology and compound-induced cardiotoxicity.

  8. Dose response of multiple parameters for calyculin A-induced premature chromosome condensation in human peripheral blood lymphocytes exposed to high doses of cobalt-60 gamma-rays.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xue; Zhao, Hua; Feng, Jiang-Bin; Zhao, Xiao-Tao; Chen, De-Qing; Liu, Qing-Jie

    2016-09-01

    Many studies have investigated exposure biomarkers for high dose radiation. However, no systematic study on which biomarkers can be used in dose estimation through premature chromosome condensation (PCC) analysis has been conducted. The present study aims to screen the high-dose radiation exposure indicator in calyculin A-induced PCC. The dose response of multiple biological endpoints, including G2/A-PCC (G2/M and M/A-PCC) index, PCC ring (PCC-R), ratio of the longest/shortest length (L/L ratio), and length and width ratio of the longest chromosome (L/B ratio), were investigated in calyculin A-induced G2/A-PCC spreads in human peripheral blood lymphocytes exposed to 0-20Gy (dose-rate of 1Gy/min) cobalt-60 gamma-rays. The G2/A-PCC index was decreased with enhanced absorbed doses of 4-20Gy gamma-rays. The G2/A PCC-R at 0-12Gy gamma-rays conformed to Poisson distribution. Three types of PCC-R were scored according to their shape and their solidity or hollowness. The frequencies of hollow PCC-R and PCC-R including or excluding solid ring in G2/A-PCC spreads were enhanced with increased doses. The length and width of the longest chromosome, as well as the length of the shortest chromosome in each G2/M-PCC or M/A-PCC spread, were measured. All L/L or L/B ratios in G2/M-PCC or M/A-PCC spread increased with enhanced doses. A blind test with two new irradiated doses was conducted to validate which biomarker could be used in dose estimation. Results showed that hollow PCC-R and PCC-R including solid ring can be utilized for accurate dose estimation, and that hollow PCC-R was optimal for practical application.

  9. Gamma-aminobutyric acid aggravates nephrotoxicity induced by cisplatin in female rats

    PubMed Central

    Peysepar, Elham; Soltani, Nepton; Nematbakhsh, Mehdi; Eshraghi-Jazi, Fatemeh; Talebi, Ardeshir

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Cisplatin (CP) is a major antineoplastic drug for treatment of solid tumors. CP-induced nephrotoxicity may be gender-related. This is while gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system that has renoprotective impacts on acute renal injury. Objectives: This study was designed to investigate the protective role of GABA against CP-induced nephrotoxicity in male and female rats. Materials and Methods: Sixty Wistar male and female rats were used in eight experimental groups. Both genders received GABA (50 μg/kg/day; i. p.) for 14 days and CP (2.5 mg/kg/day; i. p.) was added from day 8 to the end of the study, and they were compared with the control groups. At the end of the study, all animals were sacrificed and the serum levels of blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine (Cr), nitrite, malondialdehyde (MDA), and magnesium (Mg) were measured. The kidney tissue damage was also determined via staining. Results: CP significantly increased the serum levels of Cr and BUN, kidney weight, and kidney tissue damage score in both genders (P<0.05). GABA did not attenuate these markers in males; even these biomarkers were intensified in females. Serum level of Mg, and testis and uterus weights did not alter in the groups. However, the groups were significantly different in terms of nitrite and MDA levels. Conclusion: It seems that GABA did not improve nephrotoxicity induced by CP-treated rats, and it exacerbated renal damage in female rats. PMID:27689121

  10. EPR spectra induced by gamma-irradiation of some dry medical herbs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yordanov, N. D.; Lagunov, O.; Dimov, K.

    2009-04-01

    The radiation-induced EPR spectra in some medical herbs are reported. The samples studied are: (i) leaves of nettle, common balm, peppermint and thyme; (ii) stalks of common balm, thyme, milfoil, yarrow and marigold; (iii) blossoms of yarrow and marigold; (iv) blossoms and leaves of hawthorn and tutsan; and (v) roots of common valerian, nettle, elecampane (black and white), restharrows and carlina. Before irradiation all samples exhibit one weak anisotropic singlet EPR line with effective g-value of 2.0050±0.0002. The radiation-induced spectra fall into three groups. EPR spectra of irradiated blossoms of yarrow and marigold, stalks of common balm, thyme, tutsan and yarrow as well as roots of common valerian, nettle and elecampane (black and white) show "cellulose-like" EPR spectrum typical for irradiated plants. It is characterized by one intense central line with g=2.0050±0.0005 and two weak satellite lines situated ca. 30 G left and right to it. EPR spectra of gamma-irradiated restharrows and carlina are complex. They may be represented by one triplet corresponding to the "cellulose-like" EPR spectrum, one relatively intense singlet, situated in the center of the spectrum, and five weak additional satellite lines left and right to the center. The last spectrum was assigned as "carbohydrate-like" type. Only one intense EPR singlet with g=2.0048±0.0005 was recorded after irradiation of leaves of nettle and common balm. The lifetime of the radiation-induced EPR spectra was followed for a period of 3 months.

  11. [Dynamics of the gamma-band power of induced EEG responses to facial stimuli with increased visual working memory load].

    PubMed

    Dumenko, V N; Kozlov, M K

    2012-01-01

    The dynamics of power of short-term (0.8 s) induced responses to facial stimuli (wavelet transform in the 15-60 Hz band) were assessed in the study of the visual cognitive set under conditions of different loads on working memory in two groups of subjects. Subjects of the first group had to react only to facial stimuli (n = 29), whereas the second group solved an additional task loading the working memory (they had to find a target stimulus in a matrix of letters, n = 35). We estimated wavelet spectra in the occipital, temporal, central and frontal areas of both hemispheres. In both groups of subjects with the plastic form of set, the power level in the gamma2 band (41-60 Hz) was significantly higher than in subject with the rigid form. In group A at the set-testing stage, the largest increase in the gamma2 band was related to the central areas of the left hemisphere. In more complex situation (group ), the increase in power in the gamma2 and gamma1 (21-40 Hz) bands was observed in the occipital and temporal areas of both hemispheres. At the same time, the EEG power of the central areas in these gamma bands was significantly lower. In the frontal areas there were no significant differences in the dynamics of power between the subjects of both groups.

  12. Electron avalanches and diffused {gamma}-mode in radio-frequency capacitively coupled atmospheric-pressure microplasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, D. W.; Iza, F.; Kong, M. G.

    2009-07-20

    Space-, time- and wavelength-resolved optical emission profiles suggest that the helium emission at 706 nm can be used to indicate the presence of high energy electrons and estimate the sheath in helium rf discharges containing small concentration of air impurities. Furthermore, the experimental data supports the theoretical predictions of energetic electron avalanches transiting across the discharge gap in rf microdischarges and the absence of an {alpha}-mode. Nonetheless, microdischarges sustained between bare metal electrodes and operating in the {gamma}-mode can produce diffuse glowlike discharges rather than the typical radially constricted plasmas observed in millimeter-size rf atmospheric-pressure {gamma} discharges.

  13. Noise-Induced Phase Locking and Frequency Mixing in an Optical Bistable System with Delayed Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misono, Masatoshi; Miyakawa, Kenji

    2011-11-01

    The interplay between stochastic resonance (SR) and coherence resonance (CR) is experimentally studied in an optical bistable system with a time-delayed feedback loop. We demonstrate that the phase of the noise-induced motion is locked to that of the periodic input when the ratio of their frequencies is a simple rational number. We also demonstrate that the interplay between SR and CR generates frequency-mixed modes, and that the efficiency of frequency mixing is enhanced by the optimum noise.

  14. Suppression and Feedback Control of Anomalous Induced Backscattering by Pump-Frequency Modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Arkhipenko, V. I.; Simonchik, L. V.; Truhachev, F. M.; Gusakov, E. Z.

    2008-10-24

    The possibility of induced backscattering parametric decay instability resonant suppression by harmonic pump-frequency modulation is demonstrated experimentally. It is shown that the pump anomalous reflection is strongly reduced at the modulation frequency equal to the difference of the decay instability eigenfrequencies. The parametric instability feedback control method is proposed based on this effect.

  15. The F-GAMMA programme: multi-frequency study of active galactic nuclei in the Fermi era. Programme description and the first 2.5 years of monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuhrmann, L.; Angelakis, E.; Zensus, J. A.; Nestoras, I.; Marchili, N.; Pavlidou, V.; Karamanavis, V.; Ungerechts, H.; Krichbaum, T. P.; Larsson, S.; Lee, S. S.; Max-Moerbeck, W.; Myserlis, I.; Pearson, T. J.; Readhead, A. C. S.; Richards, J. L.; Sievers, A.; Sohn, B. W.

    2016-11-01

    Context. To fully exploit the scientific potential of the Fermi mission for the physics of active galactic nuclei (AGN), we initiated the F-GAMMA programme. Between 2007 and 2015 the F-GAMMA was the prime provider of complementary multi-frequency monitoring in the radio regime. Aims: We quantify the radio variability of γ-ray blazars. We investigate its dependence on source class and examine whether the radio variability is related to the γ-ray loudness. Finally, we assess the validity of a putative correlation between the two bands. Methods: The F-GAMMA performed monthly monitoring of a sample of about 60 sources at up to twelve radio frequencies between 2.64 and 228.39 GHz. We perform a time series analysis on the first 2.5-yr data set to obtain variability parameters. A maximum likelihood analysis is used to assess the significance of a correlation between radio and γ-ray fluxes. Results: We present light curves and spectra (coherent within ten days) obtained with the Effelsberg 100 m and IRAM 30 m telescopes. All sources are variable across all frequency bands with amplitudes increasing with frequency up to rest frame frequencies of around 60-80 GHz as expected by shock-in-jet models. Compared to flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs), BL Lacertae objects (BL Lacs) show systematically lower variability amplitudes, brightness temperatures, and Doppler factors at lower frequencies, while the difference vanishes towards higher ones. The time scales appear similar for the two classes. The distribution of spectral indices appears flatter or more inverted at higher frequencies for BL Lacs. Evolving synchrotron self-absorbed components can naturally account for the observed spectral variability. We find that the Fermi-detected sources show larger variability amplitudes, brightness temperatures, and Doppler factors than non-detected ones. Flux densities at 86.2 and 142.3 GHz correlate with 1 GeV fluxes at a significance level better than 3σ, implying that γ rays are

  16. FEF-Controlled Alpha Delay Activity Precedes Stimulus-Induced Gamma-Band Activity in Visual Cortex.

    PubMed

    Popov, Tzvetan; Kastner, Sabine; Jensen, Ole

    2017-04-12

    Recent findings in the visual system of nonhuman primates have demonstrated an important role of gamma-band activity (40-100 Hz) in the feedforward flow of sensory information, whereas feedback control appears to be established dynamically by oscillations in the alpha (8-13 Hz) and beta (13-18 Hz) bands (van Kerkoerle et al., 2014; Bastos et al., 2015). It is not clear, however, how alpha oscillations are controlled and how they interact with the flow of visual information mediated by gamma-band activity. Using noninvasive human MEG recordings in subjects performing a visuospatial attention task, we show that fluctuations in alpha power during a delay period in a spatial attention task preceded subsequent stimulus-driven gamma-band activity. Importantly, these interactions correlated with behavioral performance. Using Granger analysis, we further show that the right frontal-eye field (rFEF) exerted feedback control of the visual alpha oscillations. Our findings suggest that alpha oscillations controlled by the FEF route cortical information flow by modulating gamma-band activity.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Visual perception relies on a feedforward flow of information from sensory regions, which is modulated by a feedback drive. We have identified the neuronal dynamics supporting integration of the feedforward and feedback information. Alpha oscillations in early visual regions reflect feedback control when spatial attention is allocated and this control is exercised by the right frontal eye field. Importantly, the alpha-band activity predicted both performance and activity in the gamma band. In particular, gamma activity was modulated by the phase of the alpha oscillations. These findings provide novel insight into how the brain operates as a network and suggest that the integration of feedforward and feedback information is implemented by cross-frequency interactions between slow and fast neuronal oscillations.

  17. Novel PPAR-gamma agonists identified from a natural product library: a virtual screening, induced-fit docking and biological assay study.

    PubMed

    Salam, Noeris K; Huang, Tom H-W; Kota, Bhavani P; Kim, Moon S; Li, Yuhao; Hibbs, David E

    2008-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-gamma) plays an essential role in lipid and glucose homeostasis. It is recognized as the receptor of the thiazolidinediones-a synthetic class of anti-diabetic drugs-and is the target of many drug discovery efforts because of its role in disease states, such as type II diabetes mellitus. In this study, structure-based virtual screening of the PPAR-gamma ligand binding domain against a natural product library has revealed 29 potential agonists. In vitro testing of this list identified six flavonoids to have stimulated PPAR-gamma transcriptional activity in a transcriptional factor assay. Of these, flavonoid-psi-baptigenin-was classed as the most potent PPAR-gamma agonist, possessing low micromolar affinity (EC(50) = 2.9 microM). Further in vitro testing using quantitative RT-PCR and immunoblotting experiments demonstrated that psi-baptigenin activated PPAR-gamma mRNA (4.1 +/- 0.2-fold) and protein levels (2.9 +/- 0.4-fold) in THP-1 macrophages. Moreover, psi-baptigenin's-induced PPAR-gamma enhancement was abolished in the presence of a selective PPAR-gamma antagonist, GW9662. Induced-fit docking investigations provide a detailed understanding on the ligands' mechanism of action, suggesting five of the active flavonoids induce significant conformational change in the receptor upon binding. Overall, these results offer insight into various naturally derived flavonoids as leads/templates for development of novel PPAR-gamma ligands.

  18. Molecular and expression analysis of an interferon-gamma-inducible guanylate-binding protein from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Robertsen, Børre; Zou, Jun; Secombes, Chris; Leong, Jo-Ann

    2006-01-01

    Guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs) are some of the most abundant proteins accumulating in mammalian cells in response to interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma). GBPs have been suggested to function in antiviral activity, macrophage activation, fibroblast proliferation and inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation and invasiveness. Here we confirm that IFN-gamma-inducible GBP also exist in fish. A 2 kb GBP cDNA was cloned from head kidney of rainbow trout treated with an IFN-inducing compound. The open reading frame predicts a 635 amino acid protein (rbtGBP) of 72.7 kDa possessing a tripartite GTP binding motif and a secondary structure similar to human GBP1. Like most mammalian GBPs, rbtGBP possesses an isoprenylation motif at the C-terminal end. The overall amino acid sequence identity between rbtGBP and mammalian GBPs is only 41-47%, however. The rainbow trout macrophage cell line RTS11 showed a dose-dependent increase in rbtGBP transcripts in response to IFN-gamma after 6h of stimulation, with rbtGBP being undetectable in non-treated RTS11 cells. Moreover, polyinosinic polycytidylic acid (poly I:C) induced increased GBP transcript levels in RTS11 and RTG2 cells after 4-6 h of stimulation, and in head kidney and liver of live fish after 24 h. These studies suggest that rbtGBP is an early response gene in rainbow trout, which may have similar functions in IFN-gamma mediated responses as mammalian GBPs.

  19. Abdominal {gamma}-Radiation Induces an Accumulation of Function-Impaired Regulatory T Cells in the Small Intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Billiard, Fabienne; Buard, Valerie; Benderitter, Marc; Linard, Christine

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: To assess the frequency and the functional characteristics of one major component of immune tolerance, the CD4{sup +}FoxP3{sup +} regulatory T cells (Tregs) in a mouse model of abdominal irradiation. Methods and Materials: Mice were exposed to a single abdominal dose of {gamma}-radiation (10 Gy). We evaluated small intestine Treg infiltration by Foxp3 immunostaining and the functional suppressive activity of Tregs isolated from mesenteric lymph nodes. Results: Foxp3 immunostaining showed that radiation induced a long-term infiltration of the intestine by Tregs (levels 5.5 times greater than in controls). Co-culture of Tregs from mesenteric lymph nodes with CD4{sup +} effector cells showed that the Tregs had lost their suppressive function. This loss was associated with a significant decrease in the levels of Foxp3, TGF-{beta}, and CTLA-4 mRNA, all required for optimal Treg function. At Day 90 after irradiation, Tregs regained their suppressive activity as forkhead box P3 (Foxp3), transforming growth factor beta (TGF-{beta}), and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) expression returned to normal. Analysis of the secretory function of mesenteric lymph node Tregs, activated in vitro with anti-CD3/anti-CD28 Abs, showed that this dysfunction was independent of a defect in interleukin-10 secretion. Conclusion: Radiation caused a long-term accumulation of function-impaired Foxp3{sup +}CD4{sup +} Tregs in the intestine. Our study provides new insights into how radiation affects the immune tolerance in peripheral tissues.

  20. Ameliorative effect of septilin, an ayurvedic preparation against gamma-irradiation-induced oxidative stress and tissue injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Heba Hosny; Ismael, Naglaa El-Sayed Rifaat; Hafez, Hafez Farouk

    2014-04-01

    Ionizing radiation is known to induce multiple organ dysfunctions directly related to an increase of cellular oxidative stress, due to overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS). This study was aimed to investigate the effect of septilin (an ayurvedic poly-herbal formulation containing the principal herbs, namely Commiphora wightii, Trinospora cordifolia, Rubia cardifolia, Emblica officinalis, Saussurea lappa and Glycyrrhiza glabra) against whole body gamma-irradiation-induced oxidative damage in hepatic and brain tissues in rats. Administration of septilin for 5 days (100 mg/kg) prior to radiation resulted in a significant increase in both superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and total glutathione (GSH) level in hepatic and brain tissues, while serum high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL) was reduced by gamma-irradiation. Also, septilin resulted in a significant decrease in NO(x), nitric oxide and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels in hepatic and brain tissues and a significant decrease in serum triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL) and total cholesterol levels and serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels and alkaline phosphatase (ALP), gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT) activities, as well as serum tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), compared to irradiated group. In conclusion, data obtained from this study indicated that septilin exhibited potential antioxidant activity and showed radioprotective effect against gamma-radiation by preventing oxidative stress and scavenging free radicals.

  1. The influences of extremely low frequency magnetic fields on clonidine-induced sleep in 2-day-old chicks.

    PubMed

    Min, Y S; Jeong, J H; Choi, Y M; Lee, B C; Huh, I H; Lee, S Y; Sohn, U D

    2001-08-01

    1. It has been shown that magnetic fields (MFs) affect a variety of biological effects in animal brains. There have been few experiments on the effects of MFs on sleep. Therefore, we investigated whether extremely low frequency (ELF) MFs affect the sleep induced by clonidine, a central alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonist. Clonidine produced dose-related increase of the sleeping time and dose-related decrease of the onset time in 2-day-old chicks. 2. Exposure of chicks to MFs (5, 10, 20 G; for 3, 6, 9, 12 h) significantly increased the clonidine-induced sleep time as a direct function of intensity and duration of MF application. Clonidine reduced noradrenaline or tyrosine in the brain, an effect which was not further changed in animals exposed to MF. 3. To determine whether the gamma amino butyric acid A (GABA(A))/benzodiazepine (BZD) receptor system is involved in the decrease in clonidine-induced sleep caused by activation of central alpha(2)-adrenergic systems, we examined exposure of chicks to the effects of the BZD receptor antagonist flumazenil (0.5 mg kg(-1), i.p.) and GABA(A) antagonist bicuculline (0.1 mg kg-1, i.p.) on clonidine-induced sleep. Bicuculline and flumazenil inhibited the increase of clonidine-induced sleep time by MFs. Clonidine or MFs did not change GABA levels in the brain. 4. These results suggest that MFs can increase clonidine-induced sleep via a change of GABA(A) and BZD receptor system irrespective of the concentration of GABA or noradrenaline in the brain of 2-day-old chicks.

  2. Suppressed expression of non-DSB repair genes inhibits gamma-radiation-induced cytogenetic repair and cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ye; Rohde, Larry H; Emami, Kamal; Hammond, Dianne; Casey, Rachael; Mehta, Satish K; Jeevarajan, Antony S; Pierson, Duane L; Wu, Honglu

    2008-11-01

    Changes of gene expression profile are one of the most important biological responses in living cells after ionizing radiation (IR) exposure. Although some studies have shown that genes up-regulated by IR may play important roles in DNA damage repair, the relationship between the regulation of gene expression by IR, particularly genes not known for their roles in double-strand break (DSB) repair, and its impact on cytogenetic responses has not been well studied. The purpose of this study is to identify new roles of IR inducible genes in regulating DSB repair and cell cycle progression. In this study, the expression of 25 genes selected on the basis of their transcriptional changes in response to IR was individually knocked down by small interfering RNA in human fibroblast cells. Frequency of micronuclei (MN) formation and chromosome aberrations were measured to determine efficiency of cytogenetic repair, especially DSB repair. In response to IR, the formation of MN was significantly increased by suppressed expression of five genes: Ku70 (DSB repair pathway), XPA (nucleotide excision repair pathway), RPA1 (mismatch repair pathway), RAD17 and RBBP8 (cell cycle control). Knocked-down expression of four genes (MRE11A, RAD51 in the DSB pathway, SESN1, and SUMO1) significantly inhibited cell cycle progression, possibly because of severe impairment of DNA damage repair. Moreover, decreased XPA, p21, or MLH1 expression resulted in both significantly enhanced cell cycle progression and increased yields of chromosome aberrations, indicating that these gene products modulate both cell cycle control and DNA damage repair. Nine of these eleven genes, whose knock-down expression affected cytogenetic repair, were up-regulated in cells exposed to gamma radiation, suggesting that genes transcriptionally modulated by IR were critical to regulate IR-induced biological consequences. Furthermore, eight non-DBS repair genes showed involvement in regulating DSB repair, indicating that

  3. Evidence for an Inducible Repair-Recombination System in the Female Germ Line of Drosophila Melanogaster. I. Induction by Inhibitors of Nucleotide Synthesis and by Gamma Rays

    PubMed Central

    Bregliano, J. C.; Laurencon, A.; Degroote, F.

    1995-01-01

    In the I-R system of hybrid dysgenesis in Drosophila melanogaster, the transposition frequency of I factor, a LINE element-like retrotransposon, is regulated by the reactivity level of the R mother. This reactivity is a cellular state maternally inherited but chromosomally determined, which has been shown to undergo heritable, cumulative and reversible changes with aging and some environmental conditions. We propose the hypothesis that this reactivity level is one manifestation of an inducible repair-recombination system whose biological role might be analogous to the SOS response in bacteria. In this paper, we show that inhibitors of DNA synthesis and gamma rays enhance the reactivity level in a very similar way. This enhancement is heritable, cumulative and reversible. PMID:8647393

  4. Sodium valproate induced increased frequency of micturition and enuresis.

    PubMed

    Gosavi, Devesh D; Suman, Akanksha; Jain, Manish

    2013-01-01

    Sodium valproate is a commonly used antiepileptic drug (AED) for control of a broad range of seizures. Adverse drug reactions (ADR) due to sodium valproate range from sedation to nausea, vomiting, weight gain, idiosyncratic adverse effects like hepatotoxicity and life threatening conditions like pancreatitis. We present a case of sodium valproate induced enuresis in child. This ADR of valproate is an underreported ADR and requires special attention of pediatricians as it can interfere with the further treatment of the disease.

  5. DETECTABILITY OF PLANCK-SCALE-INDUCED BLURRING WITH GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Steinbring, Eric

    2015-03-20

    Microscopic fluctuations inherent to the fuzziness of spacetime at the Planck scale might accumulate in wavefronts propagating a cosmological distance and lead to noticeable blurring in an image of a pointlike source. Distant quasars viewed in the optical and ultraviolet with Hubble Space Telescope (HST) may show this weakly, and if real suggests a stronger effect should be seen for gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) in X-rays and γ-rays. Those telescopes, however, operate far from their diffraction limits. A description of how Planck-scale-induced blurring could be sensed at high energy, including with cosmic rays, while still agreeing with the HST results is discussed. It predicts dilated apparent source size and inflated uncertainties in positional centroids, effectively a threshold angular accuracy restricting knowledge of source location on the sky. These outcomes are found to be consistent with an analysis of the 10 highest-redshift GRB detections reported for the Fermi satellite. Confusion with photon cascade and scattering phenomena is also possible; prospects for a definitive multiwavelength measurement are considered.

  6. Hydroxyl radical-induced degradation of fenuron in pulse and gamma radiolysis: kinetics and product analysis.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Krisztina; Mile, Viktoria; Csay, Tamás; Takács, Erzsébet; Wojnárovits, László

    2014-11-01

    Radiolytic reactions of phenylureas were studied in detail with fenuron model compound in dilute aqueous solutions using pulse radiolysis for detection of the intermediates, gamma radiolysis with UV-Vis and HPLC-MS techniques for analysis of the final products. The kinetics of oxidation was followed by COD, TOC and toxicity measurements. During radiolysis of aerated solutions hydroxyl radical ((•)OH), eaq (-), H(•) and O2 (•-)/HO2 (•) reactive intermediates are produced, the degradation of solute takes place practically entirely through (•)OH reactions. Therefore, the product distribution is similar to the distributions reported in other advanced oxidation processes with (•)OH as main reactant. (•)OH mainly reacts with the aromatic ring, forming cyclohexadienyl radical as an intermediate. This radical in pulse radiolysis has a wide absorption band in the 310-390 nm wavelength range with a maximum at 350 nm. Cyclohexadienyl radical reacts with dissolved O2 with a rate coefficient of ∼ 4 × 10(8) mol(-1) dm(3) s(-1) forming peroxy radical. The latter may eliminate HO2 (•) giving phenols or undergoes fragmentation. The one-electron oxidant (•)OH on average induces more than two-electron oxidations. The toxicity first increases with absorbed dose, then decreases. This increase is partly due to phenols formed during the first degradation period.

  7. On the induced gravitational collapse scenario of gamma-ray bursts associated with supernovae

    DOE PAGES

    Becerra, L.; Bianco, C. L.; Fryer, C. L.; ...

    2016-12-10

    Following the induced gravitational collapse (IGC) paradigm of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) associated with type Ib/c supernovae, we present numerical simulations of the explosion of a carbon–oxygen (CO) core in a binary system with a neutron-star (NS) companion. The supernova ejecta trigger a hypercritical accretion process onto the NS thanks to a copious neutrino emission and the trapping of photons within the accretion flow. We show that temperatures of 1–10 MeV develop near the NS surface, hence electron–positron annihilation into neutrinos becomes the main cooling channel leading to accretion rates of 10–9–more » $${10}^{-1}\\,{M}_{\\odot }$$ s–1 and neutrino luminosities of 1043–1052 erg s–1 (the shorter the orbital period the higher the accretion rate). We estimate the maximum orbital period, $${P}_{\\max },$$ as a function of the NS initial mass, up to which the NS companion can reach by hypercritical accretion the critical mass for gravitational collapse leading to black hole formation. We then estimate the effects of the accreting and orbiting NS companion onto a novel geometry of the supernova ejecta density profile. We present the results of a $$1.4\\times {10}^{7}$$ particle simulation which show that the NS induces accentuated asymmetries in the ejecta density around the orbital plane. We elaborate on the observables associated with the above features of the IGC process. We apply this framework to specific GRBs: we find that X-ray flashes (XRFs) and binary-driven hypernovae are produced in binaries with $$P\\gt {P}_{\\max }$$ and $$P\\lt {P}_{\\max },$$ respectively. As a result, we analyze in detail the case of XRF 060218.« less

  8. On the Induced Gravitational Collapse Scenario of Gamma-ray Bursts Associated with Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becerra, L.; Bianco, C. L.; Fryer, C. L.; Rueda, J. A.; Ruffini, R.

    2016-12-01

    Following the induced gravitational collapse (IGC) paradigm of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) associated with type Ib/c supernovae, we present numerical simulations of the explosion of a carbon-oxygen (CO) core in a binary system with a neutron-star (NS) companion. The supernova ejecta trigger a hypercritical accretion process onto the NS thanks to a copious neutrino emission and the trapping of photons within the accretion flow. We show that temperatures of 1-10 MeV develop near the NS surface, hence electron-positron annihilation into neutrinos becomes the main cooling channel leading to accretion rates of 10-9-{10}-1 {M}⊙ s-1 and neutrino luminosities of 1043-1052 erg s-1 (the shorter the orbital period the higher the accretion rate). We estimate the maximum orbital period, {P}\\max , as a function of the NS initial mass, up to which the NS companion can reach by hypercritical accretion the critical mass for gravitational collapse leading to black hole formation. We then estimate the effects of the accreting and orbiting NS companion onto a novel geometry of the supernova ejecta density profile. We present the results of a 1.4× {10}7 particle simulation which show that the NS induces accentuated asymmetries in the ejecta density around the orbital plane. We elaborate on the observables associated with the above features of the IGC process. We apply this framework to specific GRBs: we find that X-ray flashes (XRFs) and binary-driven hypernovae are produced in binaries with P\\gt {P}\\max and P\\lt {P}\\max , respectively. We analyze in detail the case of XRF 060218.

  9. On the induced gravitational collapse scenario of gamma-ray bursts associated with supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Becerra, L.; Bianco, C. L.; Fryer, C. L.; Rueda, J. A.; Ruffini, R.

    2016-12-10

    Following the induced gravitational collapse (IGC) paradigm of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) associated with type Ib/c supernovae, we present numerical simulations of the explosion of a carbon–oxygen (CO) core in a binary system with a neutron-star (NS) companion. The supernova ejecta trigger a hypercritical accretion process onto the NS thanks to a copious neutrino emission and the trapping of photons within the accretion flow. We show that temperatures of 1–10 MeV develop near the NS surface, hence electron–positron annihilation into neutrinos becomes the main cooling channel leading to accretion rates of 10–9–${10}^{-1}\\,{M}_{\\odot }$ s–1 and neutrino luminosities of 1043–1052 erg s–1 (the shorter the orbital period the higher the accretion rate). We estimate the maximum orbital period, ${P}_{\\max },$ as a function of the NS initial mass, up to which the NS companion can reach by hypercritical accretion the critical mass for gravitational collapse leading to black hole formation. We then estimate the effects of the accreting and orbiting NS companion onto a novel geometry of the supernova ejecta density profile. We present the results of a $1.4\\times {10}^{7}$ particle simulation which show that the NS induces accentuated asymmetries in the ejecta density around the orbital plane. We elaborate on the observables associated with the above features of the IGC process. We apply this framework to specific GRBs: we find that X-ray flashes (XRFs) and binary-driven hypernovae are produced in binaries with $P\\gt {P}_{\\max }$ and $P\\lt {P}_{\\max },$ respectively. As a result, we analyze in detail the case of XRF 060218.

  10. Evolutionary mechanism of the defects in the fluoride-containing phosphate based glasses induced by gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Pengfei; He, Quanlong; Lu, Min; Li, Weinan; Peng, Bo

    2016-01-01

    In the laser driven inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experimental target chamber, like the 3ω (351 nm) laser irradiation, the irradiation of gamma ray and X-rays, will also cause the formation and increase of various defects in the investigated series of fluoride-containing phosphate based glasses that have potential use in novel high performance color separation optics. The induced defects contribute to the increase of absorption in the UV region, which will make the UV performance of these laser glasses deteriorated. Some of the induced defects can be bleached to some extent through the subsequent thermal treatment process, resulting from the release and capture of the electrons in conduction band. Through the gamma radiation and post-heat treatment experiments, a general model of the evolutionary mechanism of the defects in these fluoride-containing phosphate based glasses was proposed.

  11. Ion-induced gamma-ray detection of fast ions escaping from fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiura, M. Mushiake, T.; Doi, K.; Wada, M.; Taniike, A.; Matsuki, T.; Shimazoe, K.; Yoshino, M.; Nagasaka, T.; Tanaka, T.; Kisaki, M.; Fujimoto, Y.; Fujioka, K.; Yamaoka, H.; Matsumoto, Y.

    2014-11-15

    A 12 × 12 pixel detector has been developed and used in a laboratory experiment for lost fast-ion diagnostics. With gamma rays in the MeV range originating from nuclear reactions {sup 9}Be(α, nγ){sup 12}C, {sup 9}Be(d, nγ){sup 12}C, and {sup 12}C(d, pγ){sup 13}C, a high purity germanium (HPGe) detector measured a fine-energy-resolved spectrum of gamma rays. The HPGe detector enables the survey of background-gamma rays and Doppler-shifted photo peak shapes. In the experiments, the pixel detector produces a gamma-ray image reconstructed from the energy spectrum obtained from total photon counts of irradiation passing through the detector's lead collimator. From gamma-ray image, diagnostics are able to produce an analysis of the fast ion loss onto the first wall in principle.

  12. Gamma-Radiation-Induced Degradation of Actively Pumped Single-Mode Ytterbium-Doped Optical Laser - Postprint

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    discussed. Keywords: Radiation effects, radiation-induced absorption, gamma irradiation, rare- earth doped fibers, rare- earth doped fiber amplifiers...passive optical fibers have identified that the major mechanism of performance degradation is the creation of absorbing species in the fiber, which in...turn inhibit the transmission of light at certain wavelengths1,2,3,4. In recent years, the use of rare- earth (RE) doped optical fibers has expanded

  13. Low Frequency Vibrations Induce Malformations in Two Aquatic Species in a Frequency-, Waveform-, and Direction-Specific Manner

    PubMed Central

    Vandenberg, Laura N.; Stevenson, Claire; Levin, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Environmental toxicants such as industrial wastes, air particulates from machinery and transportation vehicles, and pesticide run-offs, as well as many chemicals, have been widely studied for their effects on human and wildlife populations. Yet other potentially harmful environmental pollutants such as electromagnetic pulses, noise and vibrations have remained incompletely understood. Because developing embryos undergo complex morphological changes that can be affected detrimentally by alterations in physical forces, they may be particularly susceptible to exposure to these types of pollutants. We investigated the effects of low frequency vibrations on early embryonic development of two aquatic species, Xenopus laevis (frogs) and Danio rerio (zebrafish), specifically focusing on the effects of varying frequencies, waveforms, and applied direction. We observed treatment-specific effects on the incidence of neural tube defects, left-right patterning defects and abnormal tail morphogenesis in Xenopus tadpoles. Additionally, we found that low frequency vibrations altered left-right patterning and tail morphogenesis, but did not induce neural tube defects, in zebrafish. The results of this study support the conclusion that low frequency vibrations are toxic to aquatic vertebrates, with detrimental effects observed in two important model species with very different embryonic architectures. PMID:23251546

  14. Frequency of light-flashes induced by Cerenkov radiation from heavy cosmic-ray nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madey, R.; Mcnulty, P. J.

    1972-01-01

    The expected frequency was calculated for light flashes induced in the dark-adapted eye by Cerenkov radiation from the flux of heavy nuclei that exists in space beyond the geomagnetic field. The expected frequency of light flashes depends on the threshold number of photons that must be absorbed in a rod cluster. The results of the calculation are presented as a curve of the mean frequency of light flashes versus the threshold number of absorbed photons. The results are not sensitive to variations in the path length from 5 to 15 grams per square centimeter of water-equivalent before the nucleus reaches the retina. Calculations were based on the fluxes and energy spectra of galactic cosmic ray nuclei of helium to iron, measured at a time of minimum solar modulation. The expected light flash frequencies induced by Cerenkov radiation are consistent with the frequencies reported by the astronauts on Apollo missions 11 through 14.

  15. A stable frequency comb directly referenced to rubidium electromagnetically induced transparency and two-photon transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Dong; Wu, Jiutao; Zhang, Shuangyou; Ren, Quansheng; Zhang, Zhigang; Zhao, Jianye

    2014-03-01

    We demonstrate an approach to create a stable erbium-fiber-based frequency comb at communication band by directly locking the combs to two rubidium atomic transitions resonances (electromagnetically induced transparency absorption and two-photon absorption), respectively. This approach directly transfers the precision and stability of the atomic transitions to the comb. With its distinguishing feature of compactness by removing the conventional octave-spanning spectrum and f-to-2f beating facilities and the ability to directly control the comb's frequency at the atomic transition frequency, this stable optical comb can be widely used in optical communication, frequency standard, and optical spectroscopy and microscopy.

  16. A stable frequency comb directly referenced to rubidium electromagnetically induced transparency and two-photon transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, Dong; Wu, Jiutao; Zhang, Shuangyou; Ren, Quansheng; Zhang, Zhigang; Zhao, Jianye

    2014-03-17

    We demonstrate an approach to create a stable erbium-fiber-based frequency comb at communication band by directly locking the combs to two rubidium atomic transitions resonances (electromagnetically induced transparency absorption and two-photon absorption), respectively. This approach directly transfers the precision and stability of the atomic transitions to the comb. With its distinguishing feature of compactness by removing the conventional octave-spanning spectrum and f-to-2f beating facilities and the ability to directly control the comb's frequency at the atomic transition frequency, this stable optical comb can be widely used in optical communication, frequency standard, and optical spectroscopy and microscopy.

  17. Sphingosine kinase inhibitor suppresses IL-18-induced interferon-gamma production through inhibition of p38 MAPK activation in human NK cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cheon, Soyoung; Song, Seok Bean; Jung, Minkyung; Park, Yoorim; Bang, Jung-Wook; Kim, Tae Sung; Park, Hyunjeong; Kim, Cherl-hyun; Yang, Yool-hee; Bang, Sa Ik; Cho, Daeho

    2008-09-12

    Natural killer (NK) cells play an important role in the innate immune response. Interleukin-18 (IL-18) is a well-known interferon-gamma (IFN-{gamma} inducing factor, which stimulates immune response in NK and T cells. Sphingosine kinase (SPHK) catalyzes the formation of sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), which acts as a second messenger to function as an anti-apoptotic factor and proliferation stimulator of immune cells. In this study, to elucidate whether SPHK is involved in IL-18-induced IFN-{gamma} production, we measured IL-18-induced IFN-{gamma} production after pre-treatment with SPHK inhibitor (SKI) in NK-92MI cells. We found that IL-18-induced IFN-{gamma} expression was blocked by SKI pre-treatment in both mRNA and protein levels. In addition, the increased IFN-{gamma} production by stimulation with IL-18 is mediated through both SPHK and p38 MAPK. To determine the upstream signals of SKI and p38 MAPK in IL-18-induced IFN-{gamma} production, phosphorylation levels of p38 MAPK was measured after SKI pre-treatment. As a result, inhibition of SPHK by SKI blocked phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, showing that SPHK activation by IL-18 is an upstream signal of p38 MAPK activation. Inhibition of SPHK by SKI also inhibited IL-18-induced IFN-{gamma} production in human primary NK cells. In conclusion, SPHK activation is an essential factor for IL-18-induced IFN-{gamma} production via p38 MAPK.

  18. EMISSION PATTERNS AND LIGHT CURVES OF GAMMA RAYS IN THE PULSAR MAGNETOSPHERE WITH A CURRENT-INDUCED MAGNETIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X.; Zhang, L.

    2011-12-20

    We study the emission patterns and light curves of gamma rays in the pulsar magnetosphere with a current-induced magnetic field perturbation. Based on the solution of a static dipole with the magnetic field induced by some currents (perturbation field), we derive the solutions of a static as well as a retarded dipole with the perturbation field in the Cartesian coordinates. The static (retarded) magnetic field can be expressed as the sum of the pure static (retarded) dipolar magnetic field and the static (retarded) perturbation field. We use the solution of the retarded magnetic field to investigate the influence of the perturbation field on the emission patterns and light curves, and apply the perturbed solutions to calculate the gamma-ray light curves for the case of the Vela pulsar. We find that the perturbation field induced by the currents will change the emission patterns and then the light curves of gamma rays, especially for a larger perturbation field. Our results indicate that the perturbation field created by the outward-flowing (inward-flowing) electrons (positrons) can decrease the rotation effect on the magnetosphere and makes emission pattern appear to be smoother relative to that of the pure retarded dipole, but the perturbation field created by the outward-flowing (inward-flowing) positrons (electrons) can make the emission pattern less smooth.

  19. Frequency weighting for vibration-induced white finger compatible with exposure-response models.

    PubMed

    Brammer, Anthony J; Pitts, Paul M

    2012-01-01

    An analysis has been performed to derive a frequency weighting for the development of vibration-induced white finger (VWF). It employs a model to compare health risks for pairs of population groups that are selected to have similar health outcomes from operating power tools or machines with markedly different acceleration spectra (rock drills, chain saws, pavement breakers and motorcycles). The model defines the Relative Risk, RR(f(trial)), which is constructed from the ratio of daily exposures and includes a trial frequency weighting that is applied to the acceleration spectra. The trial frequency weighting consists of a frequency-independent primary frequency range, and subordinate frequency ranges in which the response to vibration diminishes, with cut-off frequencies that are changed to influence the magnitude of RR(f(trial)). The frequency weighting so derived when RR(f(trial)) = 1 is similar to those obtained by other methods (W(hf), W(hT)). It consists of a frequency independent range from about 25 Hz to 500 Hz (-3 dB frequencies), with an amplitude cut-off rate of 12 dB/octave below 25 Hz and above 500 Hz. The range is compatible with studies of vasoconstriction in persons with VWF. The results provide further evidence that the ISO frequency weighting may be inappropriate for assessing the risk of developing VWF.

  20. Overexpression of a Rrp1 transgene reduces the somatic mutation and recombination frequency induced by oxidative DNA damage in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Szakmary, A; Huang, S M; Chang, D T; Beachy, P A; Sander, M

    1996-02-20

    Recombination repair protein 1 (Rrp1) includes a C-terminal region homologous to several DNA repair proteins, including Escherichia coli exonuclease III and human APE, that repair oxidative and alkylation damage to DNA. The nuclease activities of Rrp1 include apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease, 3'-phosphodiesterase, 3'-phosphatase, and 3'-exonuclease. As shown previously, the C-terminal nuclease region of Rrp1 is sufficient to repair oxidative- and alkylation-induced DNA damage in repair-deficient E. coli mutants. DNA strand-transfer and single-stranded DNA renaturation activities are associated with the unique N-terminal region of Rrp1, which suggests possible additional functions that include recombinational repair or homologous recombination. By using the Drosophila w/w+ mosaic eye system, which detects loss of heterozygosity as changes in eye pigmentation, somatic mutation and recombination frequencies were determined in transgenic flies overexpressing wild-type Rrp1 protein from a heat-shock-inducible transgene. A large decrease in mosaic clone frequency is observed when Rrp1 overexpression precedes treatment with gamma-rays, bleomycin, or paraquat. In contrast, Rrp1 overexpression does not alter the spot frequency after treatment with the alkylating agents methyl methanesulfonate or methyl nitrosourea. A reduction in mosaic clone frequency depends on the expression of the Rrp1 transgene and on the nature of the induced DNA damage. These data suggest a lesion-specific involvement of Rrp1 in the repair of oxidative DNA damage.

  1. Regulation of CD3-induced phospholipase C-gamma 1 (PLC gamma 1) tyrosine phosphorylation by CD4 and CD45 receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Kanner, S B; Deans, J P; Ledbetter, J A

    1992-01-01

    Stimulation of the signal transduction cascade in T cells through the T-cell receptor (CD3) coincides with activation of the phosphatidylinositol-phospholipase C (PI-PLC) pathway. activation of phospholipase C-gamma 1 (PLC gamma 1) occurs through tyrosine phosphorylation in T cells following surface ligation of CD3 receptors with CD3-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAb). Here we show that cross-linking of CD4 molecules with CD3 augments the tyrosine phosphorylation of PLC gamma 1, while co-ligation of CD3 with CD45 (a receptor tyrosine phosphatase) results in reduced PLC gamma 1 tyrosine phosphorylation. Mobilization of intracellular calcium correlated with the extent of PLC gamma 1 tyrosine phosphorylation, indicating that PLC gamma 1 enzymatic activity in T cells may be regulated by its phosphorylation state. The time-course of PLC gamma 1 tyrosine phosphorylation in cells stimulated by soluble anti-CD3 was transient and closely paralleled that of calcium mobilization, while the kinetics in cells stimulated by immobilized anti-CD3 were prolonged. The PI-PLC pathway in T cells was not stimulated by tyrosine phosphorylation of PLC gamma 2, a homologue of PLC gamma 1, demonstrating the strict regulation of PLC gamma isoform usage in CD3-stimulated T cells. A 35,000/36,000 MW tyrosine phosphorylated protein in T cells formed stable complexes with PLC gamma 1, and its tyrosine phosphorylation was co-regulated with that of PLC gamma 1 by CD4 and CD45 receptors. Enzymatic activation and tyrosine phosphorylation of PLC gamma 1 occurs during growth factor stimulation of fibroblasts, where PLC gamma 1 exists in multi-component complexes. The observation that PLC gamma 1 exists in complexes with unique tyrosine phosphorylated proteins in T cells suggests that haematopoietic lineage-specific proteins associated with PLC gamma 1 may play roles in cellular signalling. Images Figure 1 Figure 4 PMID:1533389

  2. Pain modulation induced by respiration: phase and frequency effects.

    PubMed

    Arsenault, Marianne; Ladouceur, Alexandra; Lehmann, Alexandre; Rainville, Pierre; Piché, Mathieu

    2013-11-12

    The voluntary control of respiration is used as a common means to regulate pain and emotions and is fundamental to various relaxation and meditation techniques. The aim of the present study was to examine how breathing frequency and phase affect pain perception, spinal nociceptive activity (RIII-reflex) and brain activity (scalp somatosensory-evoked potentials - SEP's). In 20 healthy volunteers, painful electric shocks individually adjusted to 120% of the RIII-reflex threshold were delivered to the sural nerve near the end of inspiration or expiration phases, during three cued-breathing conditions: (1) slow breathing (0.1 Hz) with slow (4s) inspiration (0.1Hz-SlowIns), (2) slow breathing (0.1 Hz) with fast (2s) inspiration (0.1 Hz-FastIns), and (3) normal breathing (0.2 Hz) with fast (2s) inspiration (0.2 Hz). Pain ratings were not affected by breathing patterns (p=0.3), but were significantly lower during inspiration compared with expiration (p=0.02). This phase effect was also observed on the N100 component of SEP's, but only in the 0.1-Hz-FastIns condition (p=0.03). In contrast, RIII-reflex amplitude was greater during inspiration compared with expiration (p=0.02). It was also decreased in the 0.1-Hz-SlowIns compared with the 0.2-Hz condition (p=0.01). Slow breathing also increased the amplitude of respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA), although these changes were not significantly associated with changes in pain responses. In conclusion, this study shows that pain and pain-related brain activity may be reduced during inspiration but these changes are dissociated from spinal nociceptive transmission. The small amplitude of these effects suggests that factors other than respiration contribute to the analgesic effects of relaxation and meditation techniques.

  3. Charged Particle Induced Radiation damage of Germanium Detectors in Space: Two Mars Observer Gamma-Ray Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruekner, J.; Koenen, M.; Evans, L. G.; Starr, R.; Bailey, S. H.; Boynton W. V.

    1997-01-01

    The Mars Observer Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (MO GRS) was designed to measure gamma-rays emitted by the Martian surface. This gamma-ray emission is induced by energetic cosmic-ray particles penetrating the Martian surface and producing many secondary particles and gamma rays. The MO GRS consisted of an high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector with a passive cooler. Since radiation damage due to permanent bombardment of energetic cosmic ray particles (with energies up to several GeV) was expected for the MO GRS HPGe crystal, studies on radiation damage effects of HPGe crystals were carried on earth. One of the HPGe crystals (paradoxically called FLIGHT) was similar to the MO GRS crystal. Both detectors, MO GRS and FLIGHT, contained closed-end coaxial n-type HPGe crystals and had the same geometrical dimensions (5.6 x 5.6 cm). Many other parameters, such as HV and operation temperature, differed in space and on earth, which made it somewhat difficult to directly compare the performance of both detector systems. But among other detectors, detector FLIGHT provided many useful data to better understand radiation damage effects.

  4. Investigations on neutron-induced prompt gamma ray analysis of bulk samples.

    PubMed

    Dokhale, P A; Csikai, J; Oláh, L

    2001-06-01

    A systematic investigation was carried out for the improvement of the prompt gamma interrogation method used for contraband detection by the pulsed fast/thermal neutron analysis (PFTNA) technique. Optimizations of source detector shielding and geometry, role of the type and dimension of the gamma detector, attenuation of neutrons and gamma rays in bulky samples were also studied. Results obtained for both the shielding materials and elemental content of cocaine simulants have been compared with the values calculated by the MCNP-4A code.

  5. Occurrence in vivo of sister chromatid exchanges at the same locus in successive cell divisions caused by nonrepairable lesions induced by gamma rays.

    PubMed

    Morales-Ramírez, P; Vallarino-Kelly, T; Rodríguez-Reyes, R

    1988-01-01

    The capacity of lesions induced by gamma radiation to produce sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) in successive divisions in mouse bone marrow cells in vivo was evaluated using a protocol for the three-way differentiation of sister chromatids. Evidence was obtained that exposure to gamma radiation induces DNA lesions that result in the formation of SCE at the same locus in two successive cell divisions. The relevance of this observation with respect to DNA repair and mutagenesis is discussed.

  6. Prenylation of an interferon-gamma-induced GTP-binding protein: the human guanylate binding protein, huGBP1.

    PubMed

    Nantais, D E; Schwemmle, M; Stickney, J T; Vestal, D J; Buss, J E

    1996-09-01

    Interferons (IFN) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) cause multiple changes in isoprenoid-modified proteins in murine macrophages, the most dramatic being the expression of a prenyl protein of 65 kDa. The guanylate binding proteins (GBPs) are IFN-inducible GTP-binding proteins of approximately 65 kDa that possess a CaaX motif at their C-terminus, indicating that they might be substrates for prenyltransferases. The human GBP1 protein, when expressed in transfected COS-1 cells, incorporates radioactivity from the isoprenoid precursor [3H]mevalonate. In addition, huGBPs expressed from the endogenous genes in IFN-gamma-treated human fibroblasts or monocytic cells were also found to be isoprenoid modified. IFN-gamma-induced huGBPs in HL-60 cells were not labeled by the specific C20 isoprenoid, [3H]geranylgeraniol, but did show decreased isoprenoid incorporation in cells treated with the farnesyl transferase inhibitor BZA-5B, indicating that huGBPs in HL-60 cells are probably modified by a C15 farnesyl rather than the more common C20 lipid. Differentiated HL-60 cells treated with IFN-gamma/LPS showed no change in the profile of constitutive isoprenylated proteins and the IFN-gamma/LPS-induced huGBPs remained prenylated. Despite being prenylated, huGBP1 in COS cells and endogenous huGBPs in HL-60 cells were primarily (approximately 85%) cytosolic. Human GBPs are thus among the select group of prenyl proteins whose synthesis is tightly regulated by a cytokine. HuGBP1 is an abundant protein whose prenylation may be vulnerable to farnesyl transferase inhibitors that are designed to prevent farnesylation of Ras proteins.

  7. Interferon-gamma inducible protein-10 as a potential biomarker in localized scleroderma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this study was to evaluate the presence and levels of interferon-gamma inducible protein-10 (IP-10) in the plasma and skin of pediatric localized scleroderma (LS) patients compared to those of healthy pediatric controls and to determine if IP-10 levels correlate to clinical disease activity measures. Methods The presence of IP-10 in the plasma was analyzed using a Luminex panel in 69 pediatric patients with LS and compared to 71 healthy pediatric controls. Of these patients, five had available skin biopsy specimens with concurrent clinical and serological data during the active disease phase, which were used to analyze the presence and location of IP-10 in the skin by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Results IP-10 levels were significantly elevated in the plasma of LS patients compared to that of healthy controls and correlated to clinical disease activity measures in LS. Immunohistochemistry staining of IP-10 was present in the dermal infiltrate of LS patients and was similar to that found in psoriasis skin specimens, the positive disease control. Conclusions Elevation of IP-10 levels in the plasma compared to those of healthy controls and the presence of IP-10 staining in the affected skin of LS patients indicates that IP-10 is a potential biomarker in LS. Furthermore, significant elevation of IP-10 in LS patients with active versus inactive disease and correlations between IP-10 levels and standardized disease outcome measures of activity in LS strongly suggest that IP-10 may be a biomarker for disease activity in LS. PMID:24499523

  8. Sulindac, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, selectively inhibits interferon-{gamma}-induced expression of the chemokine CXCL9 gene in mouse macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Sakaeda, Yoshiichi; Hiroi, Miki; Shimojima, Takahiro; Iguchi, Mayumi; Kanegae, Haruhide; Ohmori, Yoshihiro . E-mail: ohmori@dent.meikai.ac.jp

    2006-11-17

    Sulindac, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, has been shown to exert an anti-tumor effect on several types of cancer. To determine the effect of sulindac on intracellular signaling pathways in host immune cells such as macrophages, we investigated the effect of the drug on interferon gamma (IFN{gamma})-induced expression of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) and other genes in mouse macrophage-like cell line RAW264.7 cells. Sulindac, but not aspirin or sodium salicylate, inhibited IFN{gamma}-induced expression of the CXC ligand 9 (CXCL9) mRNA, a chemokine for activated T cells, whereas the interferon-induced expression of CXCL10 or IFN regulatory factor-1 was not affected by sulindac. Luciferase reporter assay demonstrated that sulindac inhibited IFN{gamma}-induced promoter activity of the CXCL9 gene. Surprisingly, sulindac had no inhibitory effect on IFN{gamma}-induced STAT1 activation; however, constitutive nuclear factor {kappa}B activity was suppressed by the drug. These results indicate that sulindac selectively inhibited IFN{gamma}-inducible gene expression without inhibiting STAT1 activation.

  9. [Gamma interferon induced in human leukocytes by phytohemagglutinin: its production and biological characteristics].

    PubMed

    Danielescu, G; Maniu, H; Georgescu, T; Cajal, N

    1988-01-01

    Human gamma type interferon (IFN) preparations were obtained through phytohemagglutinin stimulation of leukocytes from the peripheral blood. Biological value of these preparations varied between 160 u and 800 u/ml, depending on leukocyte incubation medium, culture system and inductor conservation. The rising of the antiviral activity through association between gamma (3 u) and alpha (27 u) interferons was revealed by the virus quantity reduction (in this case the vesicular stomatitis virus was used) during a 24-hour multiplication cycle. The protection ensured by the mixture of the two types of interferon was about ten times higher than the additive effect of the two preparations. Study of the antiproliferative activity of a gamma interferon preparation was conducted on two human cell lines of tumoral origin (T-10 from a glioblastoma, and HEp-2) and revealed the difficulties to quantify precisely this property of the crude gamma interferon preparations.

  10. Radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in ataxia telangiectasia cells: high frequency of deletions and misrejoining detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawata, Tetsuya; Ito, Hisao; George, Kerry; Wu, Honglu; Uno, Takashi; Isobe, Kouichi; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2003-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the hyper-radiosensitivity of AT cells were investigated by analyzing chromosome aberrations in the G(2) and M phases of the cell cycle using a combination of chemically induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with chromosome painting probes. Confluent cultures of normal fibroblast cells (AG1522) and fibroblast cells derived from an individual with AT (GM02052) were exposed to gamma rays and allowed to repair at 37 degrees C for 24 h. At doses that resulted in 10% survival, GM02052 cells were approximately five times more sensitive to gamma rays than AG1522 cells. For a given dose, GM02052 cells contained a much higher frequency of deletions and misrejoining than AG1522 cells. For both cell types, a good correlation was found between the percentage of aberrant cells and cell survival. The average number of color junctions, which represent the frequency of chromosome misrejoining, was also found to correlate well with survival. However, in a similar surviving population of GM02052 and AG1522 cells, induced by 1 Gy and 6 Gy, respectively, AG1522 cells contained four times more color junctions and half as many deletions as GM02052 cells. These results indicate that both repair deficiency and misrepair may be involved in the hyper-radiosensitivity of AT cells.

  11. Protein fluorescence decay: A gamma function description of thermally induced interconversion of amino acid rotamers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolinski, Olaf J.; Scobie, Katherine; Birch, David J. S.

    2009-05-01

    We present a description of fluorescence decay kinetics in complex environments based on gamma functions rather than the conventional approach using exponentials. The gamma function description is tested in measurements on the temperature dependence of the protein human serum albumin (HSA), N-acetyl tryptophanamide (NATA), and 2, 5-dipenyl oxazole (PPO). The monitoring of macromolecular structure and dynamics is demonstrated by means of distinct tryptophan (Trp) rotamer populations and their interconversion in HSA.

  12. Time-Dependence of VHE Gamma-Ray induced Pair Cascades in Radio Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roustazadeh, Parisa; Boettcher, Markus; Thrush, Samantha

    2016-04-01

    Recently, several intermediate frequency peaked BL Lac objects (IBL), low frequency peaked BL Lac objects (LBL) and flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQ) were detected as very high energy ( VHE, E > 100 ˜ GeV) γ-ray sources. These discoveries suggest that γγ absorption and pair cascades might occur in those objects, leading to excess γ-ray emission which may be observable also in off-axis viewing directions (i.e., like in radio galaxies) when deflected by moderately strong magnetic fields. Here, we investigate the time dependence of the Compton γ-ray emission from such VHE γ-ray induced pair cascades. We show that the cascade emission is variable on time scales much shorter than the light-crossing time across the characteristic extent of the external radiation field, depending on the viewing angle and γ-ray energy. Thus, we find that the cascade Compton interpretation for the Fermi γ-ray emission from radio galaxies is still consistent with the day-scale variability detected in the Fermi γ-ray emission of radio galaxies, such as NGC 1275, which we use as a specific example.

  13. Eimeria tenella infection induces local gamma interferon production and intestinal lymphocyte subpopulation changes.

    PubMed

    Yun, C H; Lillehoj, H S; Choi, K D

    2000-03-01

    The role of intestinal lymphocytes and gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) production in protective immunity to Eimeria tenella infection was evaluated in two inbred strains of chickens (SC and TK) that display different patterns of susceptibility to coccidiosis. Oral inoculation of either strain with E. tenella led to parasite invasion of the intestinal cecum and cecal tonsils. Greater fecal oocyst shedding was seen in TK chickens. Flow cytometric analyses of cecal tonsil lymphocytes demonstrated greater numbers of CD4(+) and T-cell receptor gammadelta-positive (TCR1(+)) cells in SC chickens and elevated numbers of CD8(+) and TCR2(+) cells in TK chickens following primary infection. IFN-gamma mRNA expression was significantly increased in cecal tonsil and intraepithelial lymphocytes at days 6 and 8, respectively, after primary infection in SC compared to TK chickens. While no differences were noted between cecal tonsil lymphocytes of the two strains following secondary infection, TK chickens showed elevated IFN-gamma transcript levels in intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes at this time. Selective depletion of CD4(+), but not CD8(+), cecal tonsil lymphocytes in SC chickens resulted in a reduced IFN-gamma mRNA expression, indicating that CD4(+) cells are the primary source of this cytokine. Collectively, these results indicate that local lymphocyte responses and production of IFN-gamma are influenced by host genetic factors.

  14. Expression of IP-10, a lipopolysaccharide- and interferon-gamma-inducible protein, in murine mesangial cells in culture.

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Chiarri, M.; Hamilton, T. A.; Egido, J.; Emancipator, S. N.

    1993-01-01

    IP-10 is an early gene induced in multiple cell types by a variety of proinflammatory agents, notably interferons (IFNs) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). To determine whether this protein might play a role in amplifying immune-mediated glomerular injury, we cultured mouse mesangial cells with several stimuli for various times. Increasing amounts of IFN-gamma (to 100 units/ml) elicited increasing levels of IP-10 messenger RNA (mRNA), sustained to 24 hours, but had no effect on tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) mRNA. LPS induced transient IP-10 mRNA expression that peaked at 8 hours; TNF-alpha mRNA was also increased. TNF-alpha at doses up to 10 ng/ml and soluble immune complexes up to 150 micrograms/ml antibody evoked 3- to 5-fold increases in IP-10 mRNA expression, much less than the 30- to 70-fold increases seen with IFN-gamma and LPS. We conclude that IFN-gamma, LPS, and other agonists can amplify glomerular immune injury, perhaps via elevated expression of IP-10. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8434640

  15. IL-1, IL-2 and IFN-gamma production by Theiler's virus-induced encephalomyelitic SJL/J mice.

    PubMed Central

    Rubio, N; Torres, C

    1991-01-01

    Interleukins have been postulated to exert an important modulatory and recruiting role in the Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV)-induced demyelination of the central nervous system (CNS) in SJL/J mice. Using bio- and radioimmunoassays, we have detected and quantified some of the interleukins suspected to play a role in this immune-mediated process. The interleukins 1 and 2 (IL-1, IL-2) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) have been measured in homogenates from the CNS and sera from infected animals, as well as in supernatants from antigen-specific in vitro-stimulated spleen and meningeal cells. IL-1 was detected both in CNS tissue homogenates (approximately 20-40 fmol/ml) and in splenic cultures (200 U/ml). IL-2 was detected only after TMEV-specific antigenic stimulation in spleen cultures (approximately 120 U/ml). In vitro, IL-2 and IL-1 synthesis appear in a dose- and time-dependent manner. IFN-gamma could not be found in any case. The precise nature of IL-1 and IL-2 activity was further assessed by HPLC. The above results strongly indicate the presence of functionally active macrophages in the CNS infiltrates of cells triggering this autoaggressive immune process. In addition, we propose a central role for IL-1 in augmenting the intracerebral immune response leading to the inflammatory demyelination induced by TMEV. PMID:1748475

  16. Effect of gamma-linolenic acid and dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene-induced mammary tumorigenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Ramchurren, N.; Karmali, R.A. )

    1991-03-15

    Gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) and its sequential metabolite, dihomogamma-linolenic acid (DHLA) have been reported to influence growth of neoplastic cells in culture. The pure forms of these fatty acids have not been tested in vivo. The authors have studied the effect of GLA and DHLA on mammary tumors induced by 7,12-dimethylbenz(a) anthracene (DMBA) (7.5 mg/rat) in female Sprague-Dawley rats. Rats received either 0.15 g of GLA or DHLA or corn oil (CO) orally, twice weekly for a period of 12 weeks. All three groups of rats were maintained on a diet containing 5% (w/w) corn oil as fat. Tumor incidence and multiplicity were recorded. The group receiving 0.15 g Co had higher tumor yields than those receiving GLA or DHLA. At the end of the experiment, tumor incidence was the lowest in the group receiving DHLA. Tumor multiplicity was consistently lowest with GLA. Fatty acid composition of mammary tissue and liver reflected that of fatty acid treatment. These results suggest that oral administration of GLA or DHLA retards the development of DMBA-induced mammary tumors in rats receiving a diet containing 5% (w/w) corn oil.

  17. Body composition to climate change studies - the many facets of neutron induced prompt gamma-ray analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Mitra,S.

    2008-11-17

    In-vivo body composition analysis of humans and animals and in-situ analysis of soil using fast neutron inelastic scattering and thermal neutron capture induced prompt-gamma rays have been described. By measuring carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and oxygen (O), protein, fat and water are determined. C determination in soil has become important for understanding below ground carbon sequestration process in the light of climate change studies. Various neutron sources ranging from radio isotopic to compact 14 MeV neutron generators employing the associated particle neutron time-of-flight technique or micro-second pulsing were implemented. Gamma spectroscopy using recently developed digital multi-channel analyzers has also been described.

  18. Multi-point measurement using two-channel reflectometer with antenna switching for study of high-frequency fluctuations in GAMMA 10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikezoe, R.; Ichimura, M.; Okada, T.; Itagaki, J.; Hirata, M.; Sumida, S.; Jang, S.; Izumi, K.; Tanaka, A.; Yoshikawa, M.; Kohagura, J.; Sakamoto, M.; Nakashima, Y.

    2017-03-01

    A two-channel microwave reflectometer system with fast microwave antenna switching capability was developed and applied to the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror device to study high-frequency small-amplitude fluctuations in a hot mirror plasma. The fast switching of the antennas is controlled using PIN diode switches, which offers the significant advantage of reducing the number of high-cost microwave components and digitizers with high bandwidths and large memory that are required to measure the spatiotemporal behavior of the high-frequency fluctuations. The use of two channels rather than one adds the important function of a simultaneous two-point measurement in either the radial direction or the direction of the antenna array to measure the phase profile of the fluctuations along with the normal amplitude profile. The density fluctuations measured using this system clearly showed the high-frequency coherent fluctuations that are associated with Alfvén-ion-cyclotron (AIC) waves in GAMMA 10. A correlation analysis applied to simultaneously measured density fluctuations showed that the phase component that was included in a reflected microwave provided both high coherence and a clear phase difference for the AIC waves, while the amplitude component showed neither significant coherence nor clear phase difference. The axial phase differences of the AIC waves measured inside the hot plasma confirmed the formation of a standing wave structure. The axial variation of the radial profiles was evaluated and a clear difference was found among the AIC waves for the first time, which would be a key to clarify the unknown boundary conditions of the AIC waves.

  19. Theoretical analyses of cellular transmembrane voltage in suspensions induced by high-frequency fields.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yong; Wang, Changzhen; Peng, Ruiyun; Wang, Lifeng; Hu, Xiangjun

    2015-04-01

    A change of the transmembrane voltage is considered to cause biophysical and biochemical responses in cells. The present study focuses on the cellular transmembrane voltage (Δφ) induced by external fields. We detail analytical equations for the transmembrane voltage induced by external high-frequency (above the relaxation frequency of the cell membrane) fields on cells of a spherical shape in suspensions and layers. At direct current (DC) and low frequencies, the cell membrane was assumed to be non-conductive under physiologic conditions. However, with increasing frequency, the permittivity of the cytoplasm/extracellular medium and conductivity of the membrane must be accounted for. Our main work is to extend application of the analytical solution of Δφ to the high-frequency range. We first introduce the transmembrane voltage generated by DC and low-frequency exposures on a single cell. Then, we focus on cell suspensions exposed to high-frequency fields. Using the effective medium theory and the reasonable assumption, the approximate analytical solution of Δφ on cells in suspensions and layers can be derived. Phenomenological effective medium theory equations cannot be used to calculate the local electric field of cell suspensions, so we raised a possible solution based on the Bergman theory.

  20. Eye closure causes widespread low-frequency power increase and focal gamma attenuation in the human electrocorticogram

    PubMed Central

    Geller, Aaron S.; Burke, John F.; Sperling, Michael R.; Sharan, Ashwini D.; Litt, Brian; Baltuch, Gordon H.; Lucas, Timothy H.; Kahana, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We sought to characterize the effects of eye closure on EEG power using electrocorticography (ECoG). Specifically, we sought to elucidate the anatomical areas demonstrating an eye closure effect, and at which frequencies these effects occur. Methods: ECoG was recorded from 32 patients undergoing invasive monitoring for seizure focus localization. Patients were instructed to close and open their eyes repeatedly. ECoG power was compared in the epochs following eye closure and opening, for various frequency bands and brain regions. Results: We found that at low frequencies, eye closure causes widespread power increases involving all lobes of the brain. This effect was significant not only in the α (8–12 Hz) band but in the δ (2–4 Hz), θ (4–8 Hz), and β (15–30) bands as well. At high frequencies, eye closure causes comparatively focal power decreases over occipital cortex and frontal Brodmann areas 8 and 9. Conclusions: Eye closure (1) affects a broad range of frequencies outside the α band and (2) involves a distributed network of neural activity in anatomical areas outside visual cortex. Significance: This study constitutes the first large-scale, systematic application of ECoG to study eye closure, which is shown to influence a broad range of frequencies and brain regions. PMID:24631141

  1. Membrane Resonance Enables Stable and Robust Gamma Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Moca, Vasile V.; Nikolić, Danko; Singer, Wolf; Mureşan, Raul C.

    2014-01-01

    Neuronal mechanisms underlying beta/gamma oscillations (20–80 Hz) are not completely understood. Here, we show that in vivo beta/gamma oscillations in the cat visual cortex sometimes exhibit remarkably stable frequency even when inputs fluctuate dramatically. Enhanced frequency stability is associated with stronger oscillations measured in individual units and larger power in the local field potential. Simulations of neuronal circuitry demonstrate that membrane properties of inhibitory interneurons strongly determine the characteristics of emergent oscillations. Exploration of networks containing either integrator or resonator inhibitory interneurons revealed that: (i) Resonance, as opposed to integration, promotes robust oscillations with large power and stable frequency via a mechanism called RING (Resonance INduced Gamma); resonance favors synchronization by reducing phase delays between interneurons and imposes bounds on oscillation cycle duration; (ii) Stability of frequency and robustness of the oscillation also depend on the relative timing of excitatory and inhibitory volleys within the oscillation cycle; (iii) RING can reproduce characteristics of both Pyramidal INterneuron Gamma (PING) and INterneuron Gamma (ING), transcending such classifications; (iv) In RING, robust gamma oscillations are promoted by slow but are impaired by fast inputs. Results suggest that interneuronal membrane resonance can be an important ingredient for generation of robust gamma oscillations having stable frequency. PMID:23042733

  2. HCV core protein induces hepatic lipid accumulation by activating SREBP1 and PPAR{gamma}

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kook Hwan; Hong, Sung Pyo; Kim, KyeongJin; Park, Min Jung; Kim, Kwang Jin; Cheong, JaeHun . E-mail: molecule85@pusan.ac.kr

    2007-04-20

    Hepatic steatosis is a common feature in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. HCV core protein plays an important role in the development of hepatic steatosis in HCV infection. Because SREBP1 (sterol regulatory element binding protein 1) and PPAR{gamma} (peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor {gamma}) are involved in the regulation of lipid metabolism of hepatocyte, we sought to determine whether HCV core protein may impair the expression and activity of SREBP1 and PPAR{gamma}. In this study, it was demonstrated that HCV core protein increases the gene expression of SREBP1 not only in Chang liver, Huh7, and HepG2 cells transiently transfected with HCV core protein expression plasmid, but also in Chang liver-core stable cells. Furthermore, HCV core protein enhanced the transcriptional activity of SREBP1. In addition, HCV core protein elevated PPAR{gamma} transcriptional activity. However, HCV core protein had no effect on PPAR{gamma} gene expression. Finally, we showed that HCV core protein stimulates the genes expression of lipogenic enzyme and fatty acid uptake associated protein. Therefore, our finding provides a new insight into the mechanism of hepatic steatosis by HCV infection.

  3. Transition between fast and slow gamma modes in rat hippocampus area CA1 in vitro is modulated by slow CA3 gamma oscillations.

    PubMed

    Pietersen, Alexander N J; Ward, Peter D; Hagger-Vaughan, Nicholas; Wiggins, James; Jefferys, John G R; Vreugdenhil, Martin

    2014-02-15

    Hippocampal gamma oscillations have been associated with cognitive functions including navigation and memory encoding/retrieval. Gamma oscillations in area CA1 are thought to depend on the oscillatory drive from CA3 (slow gamma) or the entorhinal cortex (fast gamma). Here we show that the local CA1 network can generate its own fast gamma that can be suppressed by slow gamma-paced inputs from CA3. Moderate acetylcholine receptor activation induces fast (45 ± 1 Hz) gamma in rat CA1 minislices and slow (33 ± 1 Hz) gamma in CA3 minislices in vitro. Using pharmacological tools, current-source density analysis and intracellular recordings from pyramidal cells and fast-spiking stratum pyramidale interneurons, we demonstrate that fast gamma in CA1 is of the pyramidal-interneuron network gamma (PING) type, with the firing of principal cells paced by recurrent perisomal IPSCs. The oscillation frequency was only weakly dependent on IPSC amplitude, and decreased to that of CA3 slow gamma by reducing IPSC decay rate or reducing interneuron activation through tonic inhibition of interneurons. Fast gamma in CA1 was replaced by slow CA3-driven gamma in unlesioned slices, which could be mimicked in CA1 minislices by sub-threshold 35 Hz Schaffer collateral stimulation that activated fast-spiking interneurons but hyperpolarised pyramidal cells, suggesting that slow gamma frequency CA3 outputs can suppress the CA1 fast gamma-generating network by feed-forward inhibition and replaces it with a slower gamma oscillation driven by feed-forward inhibition. The transition between the two gamma oscillation modes in CA1 might allow it to alternate between effective communication with the medial entorhinal cortex and CA3, which have different roles in encoding and recall of memory.

  4. Transition between fast and slow gamma modes in rat hippocampus area CA1 in vitro is modulated by slow CA3 gamma oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Pietersen, Alexander N J; Ward, Peter D; Hagger-Vaughan, Nicholas; Wiggins, James; Jefferys, John G R; Vreugdenhil, Martin

    2014-01-01

    AbstractHippocampal gamma oscillations have been associated with cognitive functions including navigation and memory encoding/retrieval. Gamma oscillations in area CA1 are thought to depend on the oscillatory drive from CA3 (slow gamma) or the entorhinal cortex (fast gamma). Here we show that the local CA1 network can generate its own fast gamma that can be suppressed by slow gamma-paced inputs from CA3. Moderate acetylcholine receptor activation induces fast (45 ± 1 Hz) gamma in rat CA1 minislices and slow (33 ± 1 Hz) gamma in CA3 minislices in vitro. Using pharmacological tools, current-source density analysis and intracellular recordings from pyramidal cells and fast-spiking stratum pyramidale interneurons, we demonstrate that fast gamma in CA1 is of the pyramidal–interneuron network gamma (PING) type, with the firing of principal cells paced by recurrent perisomal IPSCs. The oscillation frequency was only weakly dependent on IPSC amplitude, and decreased to that of CA3 slow gamma by reducing IPSC decay rate or reducing interneuron activation through tonic inhibition of interneurons. Fast gamma in CA1 was replaced by slow CA3-driven gamma in unlesioned slices, which could be mimicked in CA1 minislices by sub-threshold 35 Hz Schaffer collateral stimulation that activated fast-spiking interneurons but hyperpolarised pyramidal cells, suggesting that slow gamma frequency CA3 outputs can suppress the CA1 fast gamma-generating network by feed-forward inhibition and replaces it with a slower gamma oscillation driven by feed-forward inhibition. The transition between the two gamma oscillation modes in CA1 might allow it to alternate between effective communication with the medial entorhinal cortex and CA3, which have different roles in encoding and recall of memory. PMID:24277864

  5. Thick target yields of proton induced gamma-ray emission from Al, Si and P

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jokar, A.; Kakuee, O.; Lamehi-Rachti, M.; Fathollahi, V.

    2017-03-01

    Thick target excitation yield curves of gamma-rays from the reactions 27Al(p,p‧γ)27Al (Eγ = 844 and 1014 keV), 27Al(p,αγ)27Al (Eγ = 1369 keV), 28Si(p,p‧γ)28Si (Eγ = 1779 keV), 29Si(p,p‧γ)29Si (Eγ = 1273 keV) and 31P(p,p‧γ)31P (Eγ = 1266 keV) were measured by bombarding pure-element targets with protons at energies below 3 MeV. Gamma-rays were detected with a High Purity Ge detector placed at an angle of 90° with respect to the beam direction. The obtained thick target gamma-ray yields were compared with the previously published data. The overall systematic uncertainty of the thick target yield values was estimated to be better than ±9%.

  6. Comparison of chromosome aberration frequencies in pre- and post-flight astronaut lymphocytes irradiated in vitro with gamma rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, H.; George, K.; Willingham, V.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2001-01-01

    If radiosensitivity is altered in a microgravity environment, it will affect the accuracy of assessing astronauts' risk from exposure to space radiation. To investigate the effects of space flight on radiosensitivity, we exposed a crewmember's blood to gamma rays at doses ranging from 0 to 3 Gy and analyzed chromosome aberrations in mitotic lymphocytes. The blood samples were collected 10 days prior to an 8-day Shuttle mission, the day the flight returned, and 14 days after the flight. After exposure, lymphocytes were stimulated to grow in media containing phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) and mitotic cells were harvested for chromosome analysis using a fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with whole chromosome specific probes. The dose response of total exchanges showed no changes in the radiosensitivity after the mission.

  7. Cytokine-inducing activity and antitumor effect of a liposome-incorporated interferon-gamma-inducing molecule derived from OK-432, a streptococcal preparation.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, M; Gohda, H; Ohe, G; Yoshida, H; Matsuno, T; Saito, M; Sato, M

    2000-01-01

    An interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma)-inducing molecule (OK-PSA) has been purified from OK-432 by an affinity chromatographic technique performed on cyanogen bromide-activated Sepharose 4B-bound TS-2 monoclonal antibody, which neutralizes IFN-gamma-inducing activity of OK-432. OK-PSA has striking anti-tumor activity in vivo and in vitro. In the current study, the liposomes were used to improve the delivery of the agent (OK-PSA) to effector cells and to increase the therapeutic effect. Significantly less OK-PSA encapsulated into liposomes (Lipo-OK-PSA) than OK-PSA alone (1/100 or less of OK-PSA alone) was required to induce IFN-gamma, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), TNF-beta, interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta), natural killer, and lymphokine-activated killer activities by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and mouse spleen cells. Furthermore, higher levels of these activities were detected in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and mouse spleen cells treated with Lipo-OK-PSA than in those treated with OK-PSA. All of these activities induced by Lipo-OK-PSA were almost completely neutralized by anti-asialo-GM1 antibody and complement (p < 0.001). In in vivo experiments, Lipo-OK-PSA elicited striking anti-tumor activity on syngeneic Meth-A tumor-bearing and colon 26-bearing BALB/c mice and on salivary gland tumor-bearing nude mice far better than did OK-PSA. Furthermore, high levels of natural killer and lymphokine-activated killer activities and a significant increase in the number of cells positive for asialo-GM1, IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, or IL-1 beta were detected in the spleen cells derived from the animals given Lipo-OK-PSA compared with those given saline. These findings clearly indicate that OK-PSA plays an important role in the anti-tumor efficiency of OK-432, and that, for the most part, liposome encapsulation of this molecule markedly accelerates its effect mediated by asialo-GM1-positive cells (mainly natural killer cells).

  8. Prediction of cellular radiosensitivity from DNA damage induced by gamma-rays and carbon ion irradiation in canine tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Wada, Seiichi; Van Khoa, Tran; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Funayama, Tomoo; Ogihara, Kikumi; Ueno, Shunji; Ito, Nobuhiko

    2005-11-01

    Diseases of companion animals are shifting from infectious diseases to neoplasms (cancer), and since radiation therapy is one of the effective choices available for cancer treatment, the application of radiotherapy in veterinary medicine is likely to increase. However tumor tissues have different radiosensitivities, and therefore it is important to determine the intrinsic radiosensitivity of tumors in individual patients in advance of radiotherapy. We have studied the relationship between the surviving cell fraction measured by a clonogenic assay and DNA double strand breaks detected by a comet assay under neutral conditions in three canine tumor cell lines, after gamma-ray and carbon ion irradiation. In all the cell lines, cell death assessed by the clonogenic assay was much higher following irradiation with carbon ions than with gamma-rays. The initial and residual (4 hr) DNA damage due to gamma-ray and carbon ion irradiation were higher in a radiosensitive cell line than in a radioresistant cell line. The surviving cell fraction at 2 Gy (SF2) showed a tendency for correlation with both the initial and residual DNA damage. In particular, the residual damage per Gy was significantly correlated with SF2, regardless of the type of radiation. This indicates that cellular radiosensitivity can be predicted by detection of radiation-induced residual DNA damage.

  9. Gamma induced atom displacements in LYSO and LuYAP crystals as used in medical imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piñera, Ibrahin; Cruz, Carlos M.; Abreu, Yamiel; Leyva, Antonio; Van Espen, Piet; Díaz, Angelina; Cabal, Ana E.; Van Remortel, Nick

    2015-08-01

    The radiation damage, in terms of atom displacements, induced by gamma irradiation in LYSO and LuYAP crystals is presented. 44Sc, 22Na and 48V are used as gamma sources for this study. The energy of gammas from the electron-positron annihilation processes (511 keV) is also included in the study. The atom displacements distributions inside each material are calculated following the Monte Carlo assisted Classical Method introduced by the authors. This procedure also allows to study the atom displacements in-depth distributions inside each crystal. The atom displacements damage in LYSO crystals is found to be higher than in LuYAP crystals, mainly provoked by the displacements of silicon and oxygen atoms. But the difference between atom displacements produced in LYSO and LuYAP decreases when more energetic sources are used. On the other hand, the correlation between the atom displacements and energy deposition in-depth distributions is excellent. The atom displacements to energy deposition ratio is found to increases with more energetic photon sources. LYSO crystals are then more liable to the atom displacements damage than LuYAP crystals.

  10. Gamma interferon induces Fas-dependent apoptosis of Peyer's patch T cells in mice following peroral infection with Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed Central

    Liesenfeld, O; Kosek, J C; Suzuki, Y

    1997-01-01

    Since we previously observed a remarkable decrease in the numbers of T cells in the Peyer's patches of the small intestines in C57BL/6 mice following peroral infection with Toxoplasma gondii, we performed studies to examine the mechanism(s) whereby this decrease in numbers of the T cells occurs. We found that apoptotic cell death of CD4+ and CD8+ alphabeta T cells occurred in Peyer's patches following infection. Upregulation of Fas expression was observed in these T cells. C57BL/6-background mutant mice which lack functional Fas antigen did not develop apoptosis in their Peyer's patches following infection. Treatment of infected C57BL/6 mice with anti-gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) monoclonal antibodies prevented the upregulation of Fas on their Peyer's patch T cells and inhibited the occurrence of apoptosis of these T cells. These results indicate that IFN-gamma induces Fas-dependent apoptosis in CD4+ and CD8+ alphabeta T cells in Peyer's patches in C57BL/6 mice following peroral infection with T. gondii. PMID:9353050

  11. [Induction of emotional states during oral reading of texts with different emotional valence and EEG power dynamics in frequency bands beta2 and gamma].

    PubMed

    Dan'ko, S G; Gracheva, L V; Boĭtsova, Iu A; Solov'eva, M L

    2011-01-01

    EEG power in frequency bands beta2 (18.5-29.5 Hz) and low gamma (30-40 Hz) was compared for situations while reading aloud with the technique "self-regulative utterance" texts as follow: a text with neutral emotional-semantic dominant; literary texts with either a positive or a negative emotional-semantic dominant; personal texts--recollections with similar dominants. Two groups of healthy subjects participated--a group of actor students (N=22) and a group of non-actor students (N=23). EEG power values in the states of emotiogenic texts reading are reproducibly differed with statistical significance from those in the state of reading ofa non-emotiogenic text. States of reading emotionally-positive texts are characterized by increases of EEG power in these bands, while those for emotionally negative texts--by decreases if compared with the state of emotionally neutral reading.

  12. Accurate Evaluation of Microwave-Leakage-Induced Frequency Shifts in Fountain Clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Fang; Liu, Kun; Chen, Wei-Liang; Liu, Nian-Feng; Suo, Rui; Li, Tian-Chun

    2014-10-01

    We report theoretical calculations of the transition probability errors introduced by microwave leakage in Cs fountain clocks, which will shift the clock frequency. The results show that the transition probability errors are affected by the Ramsey pulse amplitude, the relative phase between the Ramsey field and the leakage field, and the asymmetry of the leakage fields for the upward and downward passages. This effect is quite different for the leakage fields presenting below the Ramsey cavity and above the Ramsey cavity. The leakage-field-induced frequency shifts of the NIM5 fountain clock in different cases are measured. The results are consistent with the theoretical calculations, and give an accurate evaluation of the leakage-field-induced frequency shifts, as distinguished from other microwave-power-related effects for the first time.

  13. Gamma irradiation-induced modifications of polymers found in nuclear waste embedding processes Part I: The epoxy/amine resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debré, O.; Nsouli, B.; Thomas, J.-P.; Stevenson, I.; Colombini, D.; Romero, M.-A.

    1997-08-01

    In order to simulate the effect of embedded nuclear waste of low and medium activity, an epoxy/amine DGEBA/DDM system has been irradiated by gamma-rays. Various techniques have been used for the characterization of the induced modifications, either macroscopic (DMA), or dealing with the chemical structure (FTIR, HSF-SIMS). For two different dose rates (50 and 900 Gy/h), in two different media (air and water) and up to 2 MGy, no significant changes can be detected except oxidation processes at the surface. This last result comes from HSF-SIMS measurements, from which other peculiarities of the thermosetting polymer are also presented and discussed.

  14. T cell receptor-induced activation of phospholipase C-gamma1 depends on a sequence-independent function of the P-I region of SLP-76.

    PubMed

    Gonen, Ronnie; Beach, Dvora; Ainey, Carmit; Yablonski, Deborah

    2005-03-04

    SLP-76 forms part of a hematopoietic-specific adaptor protein complex, and is absolutely required for T cell development and activation. T cell receptor (TCR)-induced activation of phospholipase C-gamma1 (PLC-gamma1) depends on three features of SLP-76: the N-terminal tyrosine phosphorylation sites, the Gads-binding site, and an intervening sequence, denoted the P-I region, which binds to the SH3 domain of PLC-gamma1 (SH3(PLC)) via a low affinity interaction. Despite extensive research, the mechanism whereby SLP-76 regulates PLC-gamma1 remains uncertain. In this study, we uncover and explore an apparent paradox: whereas the P-I region as a whole is essential for TCR-induced activation of PLC-gamma1 and nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT), no particular part of this region is absolutely required. To better understand the contribution of the P-I region to PLC-gamma1 activation, we mapped the PLC-gamma1-binding site within the region, and created a SLP-76 mutant that fails to bind SH3(PLC), but is fully functional, mediating TCR-induced phosphorylation of PLC-gamma1 at tyrosine 783, calcium flux, and nuclear factor of activated T cells activation. Unexpectedly, full functionality of this mutant was maintained even under less than optimal stimulation conditions, such as a low concentration of the anti-TCR antibody. Another SLP-76 mutant, in which the P-I region was scrambled to abolish any sequence-dependent protein-binding motifs, also retained significant functionality. Our results demonstrate that SLP-76 need not interact with SH3(PLC) to activate PLC-gamma1, and further suggest that the P-I region of SLP-76 serves a structural role that is sequence-independent and is not directly related to protein-protein interactions.

  15. Threshold frequency of an electrically induced cramp increases following a repeated, localized fatiguing exercise.

    PubMed

    Stone, Marcus B; Edwards, Jeffrey E; Huxel, Kellie C; Cordova, Mitchell L; Ingersoll, Christopher D; Babington, J Patrick

    2010-02-01

    Though clinical observations and laboratory data provide some support for the neuromuscular imbalance theory of the genesis of exercise-associated muscle cramps, no direct evidence has been published. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of local muscle fatigue on the threshold frequency of an electrically induced muscle cramp. To determine baseline threshold frequency, a cramp was electrically induced in the flexor hallucis brevis of 16 apparently healthy participants (7 males, 9 females; age 25.1 +/- 4.8 years). The testing order of control and fatigue conditions was counterbalanced. In the control condition, participants rested in a supine position for 30 min followed by another cramp induction to determine post-threshold frequency. In the fatigue condition, participants performed five bouts of great toe curls at 60% one-repetition maximum to failure with 1 min rest between bouts followed immediately by a post-threshold frequency measurement. Repeated-measures analysis of variance and simple main effects testing showed post-fatigue threshold frequency (32.9 +/- 11.7 Hz) was greater (P < 0.001) than pre-fatigue threshold frequency (20.0 +/- 7.7 Hz). An increase in threshold frequency seems to demonstrate a decrease in one's propensity to cramp following the fatigue exercise regimen used. These results contradict the proposed theory that suggests cramp propensity should increase following fatigue. However, differences in laboratory versus clinical fatiguing exercise and contributions from other sources, as well as the notion of a graded response to fatiguing exercise, on exercise-associated muscle cramp and electrically induced muscle cramp should be considered.

  16. Cosmic-ray induced gamma-ray emission from the starburst galaxy NGC 253

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xilu; Fields, Brian D.

    2014-05-09

    Cosmic rays in galaxies interact with the interstellar medium and give us a direct view of nuclear and particle interactions in the cosmos. For example, cosmic-ray proton interactions with interstellar hydrogen produce gamma rays via PcrPism→π{sup 0}→γγ. For a 'normal' star-forming galaxy like the Milky Way, most cosmic rays escape the Galaxy before such collisions, but in starburst galaxies with dense gas and huge star formation rate, most cosmic rays do suffer these interactions [1,2]. We construct a 'thick-target' model for starburst galaxies, in which cosmic rays are accelerated by supernovae, and escape is neglected. This model gives an upper limit to the gamma-ray emission. Only two free parameters are involved in the model: cosmic-ray proton acceleration energy rate from supernova and the proton injection spectral index. The pionic gamma-radiation is calculated from 10 MeV to 10 TeV for the starburst galaxy NGC 253, and compared to Fermi and HESS data. Our model fits NGC 253 well, suggesting that cosmic rays in this starburst are in the thick target limit, and that this galaxy is a gamma-ray calorimeter.

  17. Possible effects on avionics induced by Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavani, Marco; Argan, Andrea; Paccagnella, Alessandro; Pesoli, Alessandro; Palma, Francesco; Gerardin, Simone; Bagatin, Marta; Trois, Alessio; Picozza, Piergiorgio; Benvenuti, Piero; Flamini, Enrico; Marisaldi, Martino; Pittori, Carlotta; Giommi, Paolo

    2013-04-01

    We address the issue of the possible susceptibility of typical aircraft electronics exposed to particle, gamma-ray and neutron irradiation coming from Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGF). We consider possible scenarios regarding the intensity, the duration, and geometry of TGFs influencing a nearby aircraft, and study their effects on electronic equipment. We calculate, for different assumptions, the total dose and the dose-rate, and estimate single-event effects. We find that in addition to the electromagnetic component (electrons/positrons, gamma-rays) also secondary neutrons produced by gamma-ray photoproduction in the aircraft structure substantially contribute to single-event effects in critical semiconductors components. Depending on the physical characteristics and geometry, TGFs may deliver a large flux of neutrons within a few milliseconds on an aircraft. This flux is calculated to be orders of magnitude larger than the natural cosmic-ray background, and may constitute a serious hazard to aircraft electronic equipment. We present a series of numerical simulations supporting our conclusions. Our results suggest the necessity of dedicated measurement campaigns addressing the radiative and particle environment of aircraft near or within thunderstorms.

  18. Possible effects on avionics induced by terrestrial gamma-ray flashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavani, M.; Argan, A.; Paccagnella, A.; Pesoli, A.; Palma, F.; Gerardin, S.; Bagatin, M.; Trois, A.; Picozza, P.; Benvenuti, P.; Flamini, E.; Marisaldi, M.; Pittori, C.; Giommi, P.

    2013-04-01

    Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are impulsive (intrinsically sub-millisecond) events associated with lightning in powerful thunderstorms. TGFs turn out to be very powerful natural accelerators known to accelerate particles and generate radiation up to hundreds of MeV energies. The number ratio of TGFs over normal lightning has been measured in tropical regions to be near 10-4. We address in this Article the issue of the possible susceptibility of typical aircraft electronics exposed to TGF particle, gamma ray and neutron irradiation. We consider possible scenarios regarding the intensity, the duration, and geometry of TGFs influencing nearby aircraft, and study their effects on electronic equipment. We calculate, for different assumptions, the total dose and the dose-rate, and estimate single-event-effects. We find that in addition to the electromagnetic component (electrons/positrons, gamma rays) also secondary neutrons produced by gamma-ray photo production in the aircraft structure substantially contribute to single-event effects in critical semiconductors components. Depending on the physical characteristics and geometry, TGFs may deliver a large flux of neutrons within a few milliseconds in an aircraft. This flux is calculated to be orders of magnitude larger than the natural cosmic-ray background, and may constitute a serious hazard to aircraft electronic equipment. We present a series of numerical simulations supporting our conclusions. Our results suggest the necessity of dedicated measurement campaigns addressing the radiative and particle environment of aircraft near or within thunderstorms.

  19. Antagonist of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} induces cerebellar amyloid-{beta} levels and motor dysfunction in APP/PS1 transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Jing; Sun, Bing; Chen, Kui; Fan, Li; Wang, Zhao

    2009-07-03

    Recent evidences show that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) is involved in the modulation of the amyloid-{beta} (A{beta}) cascade causing Alzheimer's disease (AD) and treatment with PPAR{gamma} agonists protects against AD pathology. However, the function of PPAR{gamma} steady-state activity in A{beta} cascade and AD pathology remains unclear. In this study, an antagonist of PPAR{gamma}, GW9662, was injected into the fourth ventricle of APP/PS1 transgenic mice to inhibit PPAR{gamma} activity in cerebellum. The results show that inhibition of PPAR{gamma} significantly induced A{beta} levels in cerebellum and caused cerebellar motor dysfunction in APP/PS1 transgenic mice. Moreover, GW9662 treatment markedly decreased the cerebellar levels of insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE), which is responsible for the cellular degradation of A{beta}. Since cerebellum is spared from significant A{beta} accumulation and neurotoxicity in AD patients and animal models, these findings suggest a crucial role of PPAR{gamma} steady-state activity in protection of cerebellum against AD pathology.

  20. Inhibition of gamma-radiation induced DNA damage in plasmid pBR322 by TMG, a water-soluble derivative of vitamin E.

    PubMed

    Rajagopalan, Rema; Wani, Khalida; Huilgol, Nagaraj G; Kagiya, Tsutomu V; Nair, Cherupally K Krishnan

    2002-06-01

    Alpha-tocopherol monoglucoside (TMG), a water-soluble derivative of alpha-tocopherol, has been examined for its ability to protect DNA against radiation-induced strand breaks. Gamma radiation, up to a dose of 6 Gy (dose rate, 0.7 Gy/minute), induced a dose-dependent increase in single strand breaks (SSBs) in plasmid pBR322 DNA. TMG inhibited the formation of gamma-radiation induced DNA single strand breaks (SSBs) in a concentration-dependent manner; 500 microM of TMG protected the single strand breaks completely. It also protected thymine glycol formation induced by gamma-radiation in a dose-dependent manner, based on an estimation of thymine glycol by HPLC.

  1. High spatial frequency periodic structures induced on metal surface by femtosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jian-Wu; Zhang, Cheng-Yun; Liu, Hai-Ying; Dai, Qiao-Feng; Wu, Li-Jun; Lan, Sheng; Gopal, Achanta Venu; Trofimov, Vyacheslav A; Lysak, Tatiana M

    2012-01-16

    The high spatial frequency periodic structures induced on metal surface by femtosecond laser pulses was investigated experimentally and numerically. It is suggested that the redistribution of the electric field on metal surface caused by the initially formed low spatial frequency periodic structures plays a crucial role in the creation of high spatial frequency periodic structures. The field intensity which is initially localized in the grooves becomes concentrated on the ridges in between the grooves when the depth of the grooves exceeds a critical value, leading to the ablation of the ridges in between the grooves and the formation of high spatial frequency periodic structures. The proposed formation process is supported by both the numerical simulations based on the finite-difference time-domain technique and the experimental results obtained on some metals such as stainless steel and nickel.

  2. [Comparative study of effect of infrared, submillimeter, and millimeter electromagnetic radiation on wing somatic mutations in Drosophila melanogaster induced by gamma-irradiation].

    PubMed

    Fedorov, V I; Pogodin, A S; Dubatolova, T D; Varlamov, A V; Leont'ev, K V; Khamoian, A G

    2001-01-01

    It was shown that the number of spontaneous and gamma-radiation-induced somatic mutations in wing cells of fruit flies (third instar larvae) exposed to laser irradiation of submillimeter range (lambda = 81.5 microns) was significantly lower than in control. Laser irradiation did not affect the number of recombinations. Exposure to laser radiation in the infrared range and electromagnetic waves of the millimeter range (lambda = 3.8 mm) enhanced the effect of gamma-irradiation.

  3. Full Bayes Poisson gamma, Poisson lognormal, and zero inflated random effects models: Comparing the precision of crash frequency estimates.

    PubMed

    Aguero-Valverde, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, complex statistical modeling approaches have being proposed to handle the unobserved heterogeneity and the excess of zeros frequently found in crash data, including random effects and zero inflated models. This research compares random effects, zero inflated, and zero inflated random effects models using a full Bayes hierarchical approach. The models are compared not just in terms of goodness-of-fit measures but also in terms of precision of posterior crash frequency estimates since the precision of these estimates is vital for ranking of sites for engineering improvement. Fixed-over-time random effects models are also compared to independent-over-time random effects models. For the crash dataset being analyzed, it was found that once the random effects are included in the zero inflated models, the probability of being in the zero state is drastically reduced, and the zero inflated models degenerate to their non zero inflated counterparts. Also by fixing the random effects over time the fit of the models and the precision of the crash frequency estimates are significantly increased. It was found that the rankings of the fixed-over-time random effects models are very consistent among them. In addition, the results show that by fixing the random effects over time, the standard errors of the crash frequency estimates are significantly reduced for the majority of the segments on the top of the ranking.

  4. Comparison of Interferon gamma inducible protein-10 and Interferon gamma based QuantiFERON TB Gold assays with tuberculin skin test in HIV infected subjects

    PubMed Central

    Basirudeen, S; Rajasekaran, S; Alamelu, R

    2011-01-01

    We aimed to compare the positivity of the QuantiFERON TB gold in-tube (QFT-IT antigens) specific Interferon gamma (IFN-γ/QFT-IT) and IFN-γ nducible protein-10 (IP-10/QFT-IT) assays with tuberculin skin test (TST) among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected individuals in a TB endemic setting. A total of 180 HIV infected subjects, with no evidence of active TB were recruited. IFN-γ nd IP-10 levels specific to QFT-IT antigens were measured in plasma from QFT-IT tubes. The overall positivity of TST at 5mm cut-off point (19%) was significantly lower when compared to IFN-γ/QFT-IT (38%) and IP-10/QFT-IT (45%) assays. The positivity of IP-10/QFT-IT was significantly higher than IFN-γ/QFT-IT (p=0.038). Indeterminate results for IFN-γ/QFT-IT and IP-10/QFT-IT were more frequent in subjects with CD4 count <100 cells/µl, than those with >100 cells/µl. IFN-γ/QFT-IT (9%) yielded significantly higher number of indeterminate results than IP-10/QFT-IT (5%). The frequency of these responses is higher than the proportion of individuals with positive TST results. However, 6 IFN-γ/QFT-IT or IP-10/QFT-IT negative subjects were positive for TST at 5mm cut-off point. Prospective and prognostic studies are required to clarify the significance of these data. PMID:21996360

  5. Limits on thunderstorm-induced radioactive chlorine from gamma ray observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundberg, J. L.; Millan, R. M.; Eack, K.

    2011-11-01

    We present analysis of thunderstorm data collected with a liquid nitrogen-cooled germanium spectrometer with energies between 13 keV-2.6 MeV that was deployed at Langmuir Lab on South Baldy Peak in New Mexico for June through August 2005. The motivation was to search for gamma ray emissions from radioactive chlorine-39 and chlorine-38, as suggested by Greenfield et al. (2003). Based on the observations, we place an upper limit on the rate of chlorine production through such a process (6.8 × 10-17 chlorine atoms per argon atom). This rate is sufficiently low to suggest that the anomalous gamma ray count increases observed by Greenfield et al. (2003) were not caused by radioactive chlorine.

  6. Chemical warfare agent and high explosive identification by spectroscopy of neutron-induced gamma rays

    SciTech Connect

    Caffrey, A.J.; Cole, J.D.; Gehrke, R.J.; Greenwood, R.C. )

    1992-10-01

    This paper reports on a non-destructive assay method to identify chemical warfare (CW) agents and high explosive (HE) munitions which was tested with actual chemical agents and explosives at the Tooele Army Depot, Tooele, Utah, from 22 April 1991 through 3 May 1991. The assay method exploits the gamma radiation produced by neutron interactions inside a container or munition to identify the elemental composition of its contents. The characteristic gamma-ray signatures of the chemical elements chlorine, phosphorus, and sulfur were observed form the CW agent containers and munitions, in sufficient detail to enable us to reliably discern agents GB (sarin), HD (mustard gas), and VX from one another, and from HE-filled munitions. By detecting of the presence of nitrogen, the key indictor of explosive compounds, and the absence of elements Cl, P, and S, HE shells were also clearly identified.

  7. Immunofluorescence detection of clustered gamma-H2AX foci induced by HZE-particle radiation.

    PubMed

    Desai, N; Davis, E; O'Neill, P; Durante, M; Cucinotta, F A; Wu, H

    2005-10-01

    We studied the spatial and temporal distributions of foci of the phosphorylated form of the histone protein H2AX (gamma-H2AX), which is known to be activated by double-strand breaks after irradiation of human fibroblast cells with high-energy silicon (54 keV/microm) and iron (176 keV/microm) ions. Here we present data obtained with the ion path parallel to a monolayer of human fibroblast cells that leads to gamma-H2AX aggregates in the shape of streaks stretching over several micrometers in an x/y plane, thus enabling the analysis of the fluorescence distributions along the ion trajectories. Qualitative analyses of these distributions provide insights into DNA damage processing kinetics for high charge and energy (HZE) ions, including evidence of increased clustering of DNA damage and slower processing with increasing LET.

  8. High energy irradiations simulating cosmic-ray-induced planetary gamma ray production. I - Fe target

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzger, A. E.; Parker, R. H.; Yellin, J.

    1986-01-01

    Two thick Fe targets were bombarded by a series of 6 GeV proton irradiations for the purpose of simulating the cosmic ray bombardment of planetary objects in space. Gamma ray energy spectra were obtained with a germanium solid state detector during the bombardment, and 46 of the gamma ray lines were ascribed to the Fe targets. A comparison between observed and predicted values showed good agreement for Fe lines from neutron inelastic scattering and spallation reactions, and less satisfactory agreement for neutron capture reactions, the latter attributed to the difference in composition between the Fe target and the mean lunar abundance used in the modeling. Through an analysis of the irradiation results together with continuum data obtained in lunar orbit, it was found that 100 hours of measurement with a current instrument should generate a spectrum containing approximately 20 lines due to Fe alone, with a 2-sigma sensitivity for detection of about 0.2 percent.

  9. The radiosensitizing effect of immunoadjuvant OM-174 requires cooperation between immune and tumor cells through interferon-gamma and inducible nitric oxide synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Ridder, Mark de . E-mail: Mark.De.Ridder@vub.ac.be; Verovski, Valeri N.; Chiavaroli, Carlo; Berge, Dirk L. van den; Monsaert, Christinne; Law, Kalun; Storme, Guy A.

    2006-12-01

    Purpose: To explore whether antitumor immunoadjuvant OM-174 can stimulate immune cells to produce interferon-{gamma} (IFN-{gamma}) and thereby radiosensitize tumor cells. Methods and Materials: Splenocytes from BALB/c mice were stimulated by OM-174 at plasma-achievable concentrations (0.03-3 {mu}g/mL), and afterward analyzed for the expression and secretion of IFN-{gamma} by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. Stimulated splenocytes were used as a source of IFN-{gamma} to radiosensitize hypoxic EMT-6 tumor cells through the cytokine-inducible isoform of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Results: OM-174 activated the production of IFN-{gamma} at high levels that reached 70 ng/mL in normoxia (21% oxygen) and 27 ng/mL in tumor-relevant hypoxia (1% oxygen). This caused up to 2.1-fold radiosensitization of EMT-6 tumor cells, which was associated with the iNOS-mediated production of the radiosensitizing molecule nitric oxide, as confirmed by accumulation of its oxidative metabolite nitrite, Western blot analysis, and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Both iNOS activation and radiosensitization were counteracted by neutralizing antibodies against IFN-{gamma}. The same mechanism of radiosensitization through the IFN-{gamma} secretion pathway was identified for IL-12 + IL-18, which are known to mediate IFN-{gamma} responses. Hypoxia displayed a dual effect on the immune-tumor cell interaction, by downregulating the expression of the IFN-{gamma} gene while upregulating iNOS at transcriptional level. Conclusion: Immunoadjuvant OM-174 is an efficient radiosensitizer of tumor cells through activation of the IFN-{gamma} secretion pathway in immune cells. This finding indicates a rationale for combining immunostimulatory and radiosensitizing strategies and extends the potential therapeutic applications of OM-174.

  10. Rapid, non-destructive carbon analysis of forest soils using neutron-induced gamma-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wielopolski, L.; Mitra, S.; Yanai, R. D.; Levine, C. R.; Vadeboncoeur, M. A.

    2010-08-01

    Forest soils are pivotal to understanding global carbon (C) cycling and evaluating policies for mitigating global change. However, they are very difficult to monitor because of the heterogeneity of soil characteristics, the difficulty of representative sampling, and the slow time scale of response to environmental change. Here we demonstrate that use of gamma-ray spectroscopy facilitates in situ non-destructive analysis of C and other elements in forest soils. In this approach the element-specific gamma-rays are induced by fast and thermal neutrons interacting with the nuclei of the elements present in the soil. Background gamma-rays emanating from naturally occurring radionuclides in the forest are recorded as well. We applied this approach in a mature northern hardwood forest on glacial till soils at the Bartlett Experimental Forest in New Hampshire, USA. The inelastic neutron scattering (INS) system yielded strong signals in gamma-ray counts/h, from C and other elements present in the soil matrix that included silicon, oxygen, hydrogen, iron, aluminum, manganese and potassium. The INS sensitivity for carbon was 20.656 counts h{sup -1} kg{sup -1} C m{sup -2} based on current net C gamma-ray counts and the data for the O horizon and mineral soil to a depth of 30 cm obtained from a nearby quantitative soil pit (7.35 kg C m{sup -2}). We estimate the minimum detectable change to be {approx}0.34 kg C m{sup -2}, which is {approx}5% of the current soil C content, and the minimum detectable limit to be {approx}0.23 kg C m{sup -1}. Eight % reproducibility from 11 measurements was limited, in part, by the large variability in the system counting geometry due to the uneven forest microtopography. The INS approach has the potential to revolutionize belowground monitoring of C and other elements, because the possibility of detecting a 5% change in forest soils has not been possible with destructive sampling methods.

  11. Search for Cosmic-Ray-Induced Gamma-Ray Emission in Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Allafort, A.; Atwood, W. B.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Bottacini, E.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cavazzuti, E.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Kuss, M.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Sgro, C.; Spandre, G.; Tinivella, M.

    2014-01-01

    Current theories predict relativistic hadronic particle populations in clusters of galaxies in addition to the already observed relativistic leptons. In these scenarios hadronic interactions give rise to neutral pions which decay into gamma rays that are potentially observable with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi space telescope. We present a joint likelihood analysis searching for spatially extended gamma-ray emission at the locations of 50 galaxy clusters in four years of Fermi-LAT data under the assumption of the universal cosmic-ray (CR) model proposed by Pinzke & Pfrommer. We find an excess at a significance of 2.7 delta, which upon closer inspection, however, is correlated to individual excess emission toward three galaxy clusters: A400, A1367, and A3112. We discuss these cases in detail and conservatively attribute the emission to unmodeled background systems (for example, radio galaxies within the clusters).Through the combined analysis of 50 clusters, we exclude hadronic injection efficiencies in simple hadronic models above 21% and establish limits on the CR to thermal pressure ratio within the virial radius, R(sub 200), to be below 1.25%-1.4% depending on the morphological classification. In addition, we derive new limits on the gamma-ray flux from individual clusters in our sample.

  12. Kinetics of the radiation-induced radicals in gamma irradiated solid cefazolin sodium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurus, S.; Korkmaz, M.

    2005-01-01

    Room and high temperature kinetic and spectroscopic features of the radical species produced in gamma irradiated cefazolin sodium (here after CS) were investigated in detail using electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy to determine the feasibility of its sterilization by radiation and to explore the dosimetric properties of this semi-synthetic representative of cephalosporins. Irradiated CS exhibits an unresolved ESR doublet as other cephalosporins reported up to date. Signal intensity data derived from microwave saturation, dose-response, decays at room and at high temperature studies were analysed assuming a model of two radical species giving rise to doublet and singlet ESR signals. Spectroscopic parameters of these species were determined through spectrum simulation calculations. Decay parameters calculated from annealing studies at seven different temperatures were used to calculate the activation energies of the contributing species. Radiosensitivity of CS to gamma rays was found to be relatively low in the dose range of 0-25 kGy. This conclusion was considered as an indication of the feasibility of radiosterilization of CS by gamma radiation. Five different functions were tried to explore dose-response data of CS in the dose range of 0-25 kGy and it was concluded that a function comprising a linear and a quadratic terms of applied dose describes best experimental results.

  13. Low-frequency stimulation in anterior nucleus of thalamus alleviates kainate-induced chronic epilepsy and modulates the hippocampal EEG rhythm.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Liang, Jiao; Xu, Cenglin; Wang, Ying; Kuang, Yifang; Xu, Zhenghao; Guo, Yi; Wang, Shuang; Gao, Feng; Chen, Zhong

    2016-02-01

    High-frequency stimulation (HFS) of the anterior nucleus of thalamus (ANT) is a new and alternative option for the treatment of intractable epilepsy. However, the responder rate is relatively low. The present study was designed to determine the effect of low-frequency stimulation (LFS) in ANT on chronic spontaneous recurrent seizures and related pathological pattern in intra-hippocampal kainate mouse model. We found that LFS (1 Hz, 100 μs, 300 μA), but not HFS (100 Hz, 100 μs, 30 μA), in bilateral ANT significantly decreased the frequency of spontaneous recurrent seizures, either non-convulsive focal seizures or tonic-clonic generalized seizures. The anti-epileptic effect persisted for one week after LFS cessation, which manifested as a long-term inhibition of the frequency of seizures with short (20-60 s) and intermediate duration (60-120 s). Meanwhile, LFS decreased the frequency of high-frequency oscillations (HFOs) and interictal spikes, two indicators of seizure severity, whereas HFS increased the HFO frequency. Furthermore, LFS decreased the power of the delta band and increased the power of the gamma band of hippocampal background EEG. In addition, LFS, but not HFS, improved the performance of chronic epileptic mice in objection-location task, novel objection recognition and freezing test. These results provide the first evidence that LFS in ANT alleviates kainate-induced chronic epilepsy and cognitive impairment, which may be related to the modulation of the hippocampal EEG rhythm. This may be of great therapeutic significance for clinical treatment of epilepsy with deep brain stimulation.

  14. Gamma-ray production cross sections in multiple channels for neutron induced reaction on 48Ti for En=1 to 200 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Dashdorj, D; Mitchell, G E; Garrett, P E; Agvaanluvsan, U; Becker, J A; Bernstein, L A; Chadwick, M B; Devlin, M; Fotiades, N; Kawano, T; Nelson, R O; Younes, W

    2006-07-06

    Prompt {gamma}-ray production cross sections were measured on a {sup 48}Ti sample for incident neutron energies from 1 MeV to 200 MeV. Partial {gamma}-ray cross sections for transitions in {sup 45-48}Ti, {sup 45-48}Sc, and {sup 43-45}Ca were determined. The observation of about 130 transitions from 11 different isotopes in the present work provides a demanding test of reaction model calculations, and is the first study in this mass region to extract partial {gamma}-ray cross sections for many different reaction channels over a wide range of incident neutron energies. The neutrons were produced by the Los Alamos National Laboratory spallation neutron source located at the LANSCE/WNR facility. The prompt-reaction {gamma} rays were detected with the large-scale Compton-suppressed GErmanium Array for Neutron Induced Excitations (GEANIE). Event neutron energies were determined by the time-of-flight technique. The {gamma}-ray excitation functions were converted to partial {gamma}-ray cross sections and then compared with model calculations using the enhanced GNASH reaction code. Compound nuclear, pre-equilibrium emission and direct reaction mechanisms are included. Overall the model calculations of the partial {gamma}-ray cross sections are in good agreement with measured values.

  15. 2WHSP: A multi-frequency selected catalog of VHE gamma-ray blazars and blazar candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yu Lin; Arsioli, Bruno; Giommi, Paolo; Padovani, Paolo

    2016-08-01

    High Synchrotron Peaked Blazars (HSPs) are extremely important for VHE astronomy. We built the largest existing catalog of High Synchrotron Blazars (2WHSP) based on multi-frequency data. The catalog is an extension of the 1WHSP list. We compared several general properties of HSPs such as the synchrotron peak, the redshift and IR the color-color diagram. We also built the logN-logS for the sources, trying to see the evolution and the deficiency of the catalog. The catalog will provide a unique sample of targets for VHE observations in future since the HSPs are the dominant extra-Galactic sources in VHE sky. This might help find more VHE sources later. In the future, we will use this catalog to estimate other VHE properties of HSPs.

  16. Growth Enhancement of Radish Sprouts Induced by Low Pressure O2 Radio Frequency Discharge Plasma Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitazaki, Satoshi; Koga, Kazunori; Shiratani, Masaharu; Hayashi, Nobuya

    2012-01-01

    We studied growth enhancement of radish sprouts (Raphanus sativus L.) induced by low pressure O2 radio frequency (RF) discharge plasma irradiation. The average length of radish sprouts cultivated for 7 days after O2 plasma irradiation is 30-60% greater than that without irradiation. O2 plasma irradiation does not affect seed germination. The experimental results reveal that oxygen related radicals strongly enhance growth, whereas ions and photons do not.

  17. Modification by chloramphenicol of diethyl sulphate-induced male recombination frequency in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Miglani, G S; Kaur, N P

    1995-06-01

    To study the effect of chloramphenicol (CPL, an inhibitor of protein synthesis) on diethyl sulphate (DES, a potent mutagen) induced male recombination frequency, the F1 (+/aristaless dumpy black cinnabar, al dp b cn) larvae of D. melanogaster were given a pre- or post-treatment of CPL with DES during the first or second half of larval life. In order to determine sensitivity of different germ cell stages to the induction and modification of male recombination frequency, five 3-day broods were taken from every F1 male. DES showed toxic effect on egg-to-adult development. DES was found to be a potent recombinogen. Several cases of non-reciprocal male recombination were recorded. The most frequent recombinant phenotype observed was b cn followed by cn and al. Majority of the recombinants appeared in clusters suggesting their pre-meiotic origin. DES produced male recombination at a stage where only primary spermatocytes were present in the larval testes. CPL when given as a pre- or post-treatment with DES revealed highest frequency of male recombination in broods that represented effect of treatment on spermatogonia predominantly. CPL enhanced the overall level of male recombination produced by DES in both pre- and post-treatments. The results suggested the role of protein synthesis in induction of male recombination in D. melanogaster. In addition, the present experiments give a methodology of enhancing the frequency of chemically-induced male recombination.

  18. Bisphenol A diglycidyl ether induces apoptosis in tumour cells independently of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma, in caspase-dependent and -independent manners.

    PubMed Central

    Fehlberg, Sebastian; Trautwein, Stefan; Göke, Alexandra; Göke, Rüdiger

    2002-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are nuclear transcription factors which are involved in many biological processes, such as regulation of cell differentiation, lipid metabolism, inflammation and cell death. PPARs consist of three families, PPAR-alpha, PPAR-delta and PPAR-gamma. Bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (BADGE) has been described as a pure antagonist of PPAR-gamma. However, recent data also revealed PPAR-gamma-agonistic activities of BADGE. Here we show that BADGE kills transformed cells by apoptosis and promotes the cytotoxic effects of tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and indomethacin. The cytotoxic effect of BADGE does not require PPAR-gamma expression and is mediated in caspase-dependent and caspase-independent manners. PMID:11879183

  19. MAGIC gamma-ray and multi-frequency observations of flat spectrum radio quasar PKS 1510-089 in early 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksić, J.; Ansoldi, S.; Antonelli, L. A.; Antoranz, P.; Babic, A.; Bangale, P.; Barres de Almeida, U.; Barrio, J. A.; Becerra González, J.; Bednarek, W.; Bernardini, E.; Biland, A.; Blanch, O.; Bonnefoy, S.; Bonnoli, G.; Borracci, F.; Bretz, T.; Carmona, E.; Carosi, A.; Carreto Fidalgo, D.; Colin, P.; Colombo, E.; Contreras, J. L.; Cortina, J.; Covino, S.; Da Vela, P.; Dazzi, F.; De Angelis, A.; De Caneva, G.; De Lotto, B.; Delgado Mendez, C.; Doert, M.; Domínguez, A.; Dominis Prester, D.; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Einecke, S.; Eisenacher, D.; Elsaesser, D.; Farina, E.; Ferenc, D.; Fonseca, M. V.; Font, L.; Frantzen, K.; Fruck, C.; García López, R. J.; Garczarczyk, M.; Garrido Terrats, D.; Gaug, M.; Godinović, N.; González Muñoz, A.; Gozzini, S. R.; Hadasch, D.; Hayashida, M.; Herrera, J.; Herrero, A.; Hildebrand, D.; Hose, J.; Hrupec, D.; Idec, W.; Kadenius, V.; Kellermann, H.; Kodani, K.; Konno, Y.; Krause, J.; Kubo, H.; Kushida, J.; La Barbera, A.; Lelas, D.; Lewandowska, N.; Lindfors, E.; Lombardi, S.; López, M.; López-Coto, R.; López-Oramas, A.; Lorenz, E.; Lozano, I.; Makariev, M.; Mallot, K.; Maneva, G.; Mankuzhiyil, N.; Mannheim, K.; Maraschi, L.; Marcote, B.; Mariotti, M.; Martínez, M.; Mazin, D.; Menzel, U.; Meucci, M.; Miranda, J. M.; Mirzoyan, R.; Moralejo, A.; Munar-Adrover, P.; Nakajima, D.; Niedzwiecki, A.; Nilsson, K.; Nishijima, K.; Noda, K.; Nowak, N.; Orito, R.; Overkemping, A.; Paiano, S.; Palatiello, M.; Paneque, D.; Paoletti, R.; Paredes, J. M.; Paredes-Fortuny, X.; Partini, S.; Persic, M.; Prada, F.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Prandini, E.; Preziuso, S.; Puljak, I.; Reinthal, R.; Rhode, W.; Ribó, M.; Rico, J.; Rodriguez Garcia, J.; Rügamer, S.; Saggion, A.; Saito, T.; Saito, K.; Satalecka, K.; Scalzotto, V.; Scapin, V.; Schultz, C.; Schweizer, T.; Shore, S. N.; Sillanpää, A.; Sitarek, J.; Snidaric, I.; Sobczynska, D.; Spanier, F.; Stamatescu, V.; Stamerra, A.; Steinbring, T.; Storz, J.; Strzys, M.; Sun, S.; Surić, T.; Takalo, L.; Takami, H.; Tavecchio, F.; Temnikov, P.; Terzić, T.; Tescaro, D.; Teshima, M.; Thaele, J.; Tibolla, O.; Torres, D. F.; Toyama, T.; Treves, A.; Uellenbeck, M.; Vogler, P.; Wagner, R. M.; Zandanel, F.; Zanin, R.; MAGIC Collaboration; Lucarelli, F.; Pittori, C.; Vercellone, S.; Verrecchia, F.; AGILE Collaboration; Buson, S.; D'Ammando, F.; Stawarz, L.; Giroletti, M.; Orienti, M.; Fermi-LAT Collaboration; Mundell, C.; Steele, I.; Zarpudin, B.; Raiteri, C. M.; Villata, M.; Sandrinelli, A.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Tammi, J.; Tornikoski, M.; Hovatta, T.; Readhead, A. C. S.; Max-Moerbeck, W.; Richards, J. L.; Jorstad, S.; Marscher, A.; Gurwell, M. A.; Larionov, V. M.; Blinov, D. A.; Konstantinova, T. S.; Kopatskaya, E. N.; Larionova, L. V.; Larionova, E. G.; Morozova, D. A.; Troitsky, I. S.; Mokrushina, A. A.; Pavlova, Yu. V.; Chen, W. P.; Lin, H. C.; Panwar, N.; Agudo, I.; Casadio, C.; Gómez, J. L.; Molina, S. N.; Kurtanidze, O. M.; Nikolashvili, M. G.; Kurtanidze, S. O.; Chigladze, R. A.; Acosta-Pulido, J. A.; Carnerero, M. I.; Manilla-Robles, A.; Ovcharov, E.; Bozhilov, V.; Metodieva, I.; Aller, M. F.; Aller, H. D.; Fuhrman, L.; Angelakis, E.; Nestoras, I.; Krichbaum, T. P.; Zensus, J. A.; Ungerechts, H.; Sievers, A.

    2014-09-01

    Aims: Amongst more than fifty blazars detected in very high energy (VHE, E> 100 GeV) γ rays, only three belong to the subclass of flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs). The detection of FSRQs in the VHE range is challenging, mainly because of their soft spectra in the GeV-TeV regime. MAGIC observed PKS 1510-089 (z = 0.36) starting 2012 February 3 until April 3 during a high activity state in the high energy (HE, E> 100 MeV) γ-ray band observed by AGILE and Fermi. MAGIC observations result in the detection of a source with significance of 6.0 standard deviations (σ). We study the multi-frequency behaviour of the source at the epoch of MAGIC observation, collecting quasi-simultaneous data at radio and optical (GASP-WEBT and F-Gamma collaborations, REM, Steward, Perkins, Liverpool, OVRO, and VLBA telescopes), X-ray (Swift satellite), and HE γ-ray frequencies. Methods: We study the VHE γ-ray emission, together with the multi-frequency light curves, 43 GHz radio maps, and spectral energy distribution (SED) of the source. The quasi-simultaneous multi-frequency SED from the millimetre radio band to VHE γ rays is modelled with a one-zone inverse Compton model. We study two different origins of the seed photons for the inverse Compton scattering, namely the infrared torus and a slow sheath surrounding the jet around the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) core. Results: We find that the VHE γ-ray emission detected from PKS 1510-089 in 2012 February-April agrees with the previous VHE observations of the source from 2009 March-April. We find no statistically significant variability during the MAGIC observations on daily, weekly, or monthly time scales, while the other two known VHE FSRQs (3C 279 and PKS 1222+216) have shown daily scale to sub-hour variability. The γ-ray SED combining AGILE, Fermi and MAGIC data joins smoothly and shows no hint of a break. The multi-frequency light curves suggest a common origin for the millimetre radio and HE γ-ray emission, and the HE

  20. Extremely low frequency magnetic fields induce spermatogenic germ cell apoptosis: possible mechanism.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Kon; Park, Sungman; Gimm, Yoon-Myoung; Kim, Yoon-Won

    2014-01-01

    The energy generated by an extremely low frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF) is too weak to directly induce genotoxicity. However, it is reported that an extremely low frequency magnetic field (ELF-MF) is related to DNA strand breakage and apoptosis. The testes that conduct spermatogenesis through a dynamic cellular process involving meiosis and mitosis seem vulnerable to external stress such as heat, MF exposure, and chemical or physical agents. Nevertheless the results regarding adverse effects of ELF-EMF on human or animal reproductive functions are inconclusive. According to the guideline of the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP; 2010) for limiting exposure to time-varying MF (1 Hz to 100 kHz), overall conclusion of epidemiologic studies has not consistently shown an association between human adverse reproductive outcomes and maternal or paternal exposure to low frequency fields. In animal studies there is no compelling evidence of causal relationship between prenatal development and ELF-MF exposure. However there is increasing evidence that EL-EMF exposure is involved with germ cell apoptosis in testes. Biophysical mechanism by which ELF-MF induces germ cell apoptosis has not been established. This review proposes the possible mechanism of germ cell apoptosis in testes induced by ELF-MF.

  1. Extremely Low Frequency Magnetic Fields Induce Spermatogenic Germ Cell Apoptosis: Possible Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Kon; Park, Sungman; Gimm, Yoon-Myoung; Kim, Yoon-Won

    2014-01-01

    The energy generated by an extremely low frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF) is too weak to directly induce genotoxicity. However, it is reported that an extremely low frequency magnetic field (ELF-MF) is related to DNA strand breakage and apoptosis. The testes that conduct spermatogenesis through a dynamic cellular process involving meiosis and mitosis seem vulnerable to external stress such as heat, MF exposure, and chemical or physical agents. Nevertheless the results regarding adverse effects of ELF-EMF on human or animal reproductive functions are inconclusive. According to the guideline of the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP; 2010) for limiting exposure to time-varying MF (1 Hz to 100 kHz), overall conclusion of epidemiologic studies has not consistently shown an association between human adverse reproductive outcomes and maternal or paternal exposure to low frequency fields. In animal studies there is no compelling evidence of causal relationship between prenatal development and ELF-MF exposure. However there is increasing evidence that EL-EMF exposure is involved with germ cell apoptosis in testes. Biophysical mechanism by which ELF-MF induces germ cell apoptosis has not been established. This review proposes the possible mechanism of germ cell apoptosis in testes induced by ELF-MF. PMID:25025060

  2. Effectiveness of daily eccentric contractions induced via kilohertz frequency transcutaneous electrical stimulation on muscle atrophy.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Minoru; Nakanishi, Ryosuke; Murakami, Shinichiro; Fujita, Naoto; Kondo, Hiroyo; Ishihara, Akihiko; Roy, Roland R; Fujino, Hidemi

    2016-01-01

    The effects of daily repeated bouts of concentric, isometric, or eccentric contractions induced by high frequency (kilohertz) transcutaneous electrical stimulation in ameliorating atrophy of the soleus muscle in hindlimb unloaded rats were determined. Five groups of male rats were studied: control, hindlimb unloaded for 2 weeks (HU), or HU plus two daily bouts of concentric, isometric, or eccentric high-frequency electrical stimulation-induced contractions of the calf musculature. Soleus mass and fiber size were smaller, the levels of phosphorylated Akt1 and FoxO3a lower, and atrogin-1 and ubiquitinated proteins higher in the HU, and the HU plus concentric or isometric contraction groups than in the control group. In contrast, daily bouts of eccentric contractions maintained these values at near control levels and all measures were significantly different from all other HU groups. These results indicate that daily bouts of eccentric contractions induced by high-frequency stimulation inhibited the ubiquitin-proteasome catabolic pathway and enhanced the Akt1/FoxO3a anabolic pathway that resulted in a prevention of the atrophic response of the soleus muscle to chronic unloading.

  3. Radiation cataractogenesis induced by neutron or gamma irradiation in the rat lens is reduced by vitamin E

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, W.M.; Creighton, M.O.; Trevithick, J.R. )

    1990-09-01

    Although cataract of the eye lens is a known late effect of ionizing radiation exposure, most of the experimental work to date has concentrated on single, acute high doses or multiple, fractionated, chronic exposures. Many papers have dealt with biochemical alterations in metabolism and cellular components, with microscopic and electron microscopic lesions to the epithelial and cortical layers, and with clinical cataract formation. However, the minimum cataractogenic dose for rats has for many years been considered to be about 2 Gy for a single, acute dose of low LET radiation. Our purpose in designing this pilot study was three fold: firstly, to determine whether any physical damage could be detected after low, acute exposure to neutron radiation (10 and 100 cGy); secondly, to compare the relative effectiveness of fast (14 MeV) neutrons with gamma-rays; and thirdly, to investigate the possibility that vitamin E could protect the lenses from radiation damage. The results revealed that morphological damage was already discernible within minutes after exposure to neutrons or gamma-rays, that it became greater after 24 hours, that neutrons were more damaging than gamma-rays, and that vitamin E could effectively reduce the cataractogenic damage induced by ionizing radiation. Control, non-irradiated lenses with or without vitamin E, either in vivo or in vitro, showed no damage. Also, it appeared that in vitro irradiation was more damaging to lenses than in vivo irradiation, so this culture technique may prove to be a sensitive tool for assessing early damage caused by ionizing radiation.

  4. Evidence that low concentrations of chlorophyllin (CHLN) increase the genetic damage induced by gamma rays in somatic cells of Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Cruces, M P; Pimentel, E; Zimmering, S

    2009-01-01

    It was first demonstrated in Salmonella that higher and lower concentrations of chlorophyllin (CHLN) may have effects in opposite directions, higher doses inhibiting and lower doses promoting the mutagenic activity of certain tobacco-related nitrosamines. Previous work of our group demonstrated that CHLN may have both a promoter and an inhibitory effect on mutagenesis in Drosophila. The present paper reviews the evidence obtained in our laboratory using gamma rays as the mutagenic agent, that higher and lower pretreatment concentrations of CHLN are associated with inhibitory and promoting effects, respectively, as in Salmonella. Employing the wing spot test, 48h larvae were pretreated with various concentrations of CHLN from 0 to 69 mM and then treated with 10 Gy gamma rays. With the highest concentration of CHLN, an approximate 54% reduction in mutagenesis was observed. At 35 mM a remnant of this inhibitory effect was found in that a significant decrease was limited to the twin spot category. Evidence of promotion was first seen at 4.3mM CHLN, an effect which persisted for the remaining five lower concentrations, the most pronounced evidence of promotion being found at the four lowest concentrations, 0.03-1.1 mM CHLN. It should be noted that no evidence of genotoxicity was found for CHLN alone, an observation consistent with the several reports in the literature. The results are taken as strong evidence that pretreatment with low concentrations of CHLN promotes DNA damage induced by gamma rays in somatic cells of Drosophila.

  5. Assessing the high frequency behavior of non-polarizable electrodes for spectral induced polarization measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdulsamad, Feras; Florsch, Nicolas; Schmutz, Myriam; Camerlynck, Christian

    2016-12-01

    During the last decades, the usage of spectral induced polarization (SIP) measurements in hydrogeology and detecting environmental problems has been extensively increased. However, the physical mechanisms which are responsible for the induced polarization response over the usual frequency range (typically 1 mHz to 10-20 kHz) require better understanding. The phase shift observed at high frequencies is sometimes attributed to the so-called Maxwell-Wagner polarization which takes place when charges cross an interface. However, SIP measurements of tap water show a phase shift at frequencies higher than 1 kHz, where no Maxwell-Wagner polarization may occur. In this paper, we enlighten the possible origin of this phase shift and deduce its likely relationship with the types of the measuring electrodes. SIP Laboratory measurements of tap water using different types of measuring electrodes (polarizable and non-polarizable electrodes) are carried out to detect the origin of the phase shift at high frequencies and the influence of the measuring electrodes types on the observed complex resistivity. Sodium chloride is used to change the conductivity of the medium in order to quantify the solution conductivity role. The results of these measurements are clearly showing the impact of the measuring electrodes type on the measured phase spectrum while the influence on the amplitude spectrum is negligible. The phenomenon appearing on the phase spectrum at high frequency (> 1 kHz) whatever the electrode type is, the phase shows an increase compared to the theoretical response, and the discrepancy (at least in absolute value) increases with frequency, but it is less severe when medium conductivity is larger. Additionally, the frequency corner is shifted upward in frequency. The dependence of this phenomenon on the conductivity and the measuring electrodes type (electrode-electrolyte interface) seems to be due to some dielectric effects (as an electrical double layer of small

  6. Temperature-sensitive polymer-conjugated IFN-gamma induces the expression of IDO mRNA and activity by fibroblasts populated in collagen gel (FPCG).

    PubMed

    Sarkhosh, Kourosh; Tredget, Edward E; Uludag, Hasan; Kilani, Ruhangiz T; Karami, Ali; Li, Yunyuan; Iwashina, Takashi; Ghahary, Aziz

    2004-10-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is an intracellular tryptophan-catabolizing enzyme possessing various immunosuppressive properties. Here, we report the use of this enzyme to suppress the proliferation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) co-cultured with IDO-expressing fibroblasts of an allogeneic skin substitute in vitro. Fetal foreskin fibroblasts populated within collagen gel (FPCG) were treated with interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) conjugated with a temperature-sensitive polymer to induce the expression of IDO mRNA and protein. SDS-PAGE showed successful conjugation of IFN-gamma with the temperature-sensitive polymer. Expression of IDO mRNA was evaluated by Northern analysis. IDO enzyme activity was evaluated by the measurement of kynurenine levels. The results of Northern blot analysis showed an induction of IDO mRNA expression when treated with polymer-conjugated IFN-gamma. Kynurenine levels, as a measure of IDO bioactivity, were significantly higher in IFN-gamma-treated fibroblasts than in controls (P < 0.001). In a lasting effect experiment, the expression of IDO mRNA in FPCG treated with polymer-conjugated IFN-gamma was significantly longer than in those treated with free (non-conjugated) IFN-gamma (P < 0.001). IFN-gamma radiolabeling showed a prolonged retention of IFN-gamma within collagen gel in its polymer-conjugated form, compared to its free form. Presence of IDO protein in FPCG was demonstrated by Western analysis even 16 days after removal of the conditioned medium (containing released IFN-gamma). To demonstrate the immunosuppressive effects of IDO on the proliferation of PBMC, IDO-expressing FPCG treated with polymer-conjugated IFN-gamma were co-cultured with PBMC for a period of 5 days. The results showed a significant reduction in proliferation of PBMC co-cultured with IFN-gamma-treated IDO-expressing fibroblasts, compared to those co-cultured with non-IDO-expressing fibroblasts (P < 0.001). The addition of an IDO inhibitor (1-methyl

  7. Gamma Radiation Induces Micronucleated Reticulocytes in 3-D Bone Marrow Bioreactors in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hongliang; Dertinger, Stephen D.; Hyrien, Ollivier; David Wu, J. H.; Chen, Yuhchyau

    2009-01-01

    Radiation injury to the bone marrow is potentially lethal due to the potent DNA-damaging effects on cells of the hematopoietic system, including bone marrow stem cell, progenitor, and the precursor cell populations. Investigation of radiation genotoxic effects on bone marrow progenitor/precursor cells has been challenged by the lack of optimal in vitro surrogate organ culture systems, and the overall difficulty to sustain lineage-specific proliferation and differentiation of hematopoiesis in vitro. We report the investigation of radiation genotoxic effects in bone marrow cultures of C57Bl/6 mice established in 3-D bioreactors, which sustain long-term bone marrow cultures. For these studies, genotoxicity is measured by the induction of micronucleated reticulocytes (MN-RET). The kinetics and dose-response relationship of MN-RET induction in response to gamma-radiation of bioreactor-maintained bone marrow cultures are presented. Our data showed that 3-D long-term bone marrow cultures had sustained erythropoiesis capable of generating reticulocytes up to 8 weeks. The peak time-interval of viable cell output and percentage of reticulocytes increased steadily and reached the initial peak between the 14th to 21st days after inoculations. This was followed by a rebound or staying relatively constant until week 8. The percentage of MN-RET reached the maximum between 24 and 32 hours post 1 Gy gamma-ray. There was a near linear MN-RET induction by gamma radiation from 0 Gy to 1.0 Gy, followed by an attenuated increase to 1.5 – 2.0 Gy. The MN-RET response showed a downtrend beyond 2 Gy. Our data suggest that bone marrow culture in the 3-D bioreactor may be a useful organ culture system for the investigation of radiation genotoxic effect in vitro. PMID:19786117

  8. In vivo elemental analysis by counting neutron-induced gamma rays for medical and biological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kehayias, Joseph J.; Ma, Ruimei; Zhuang, Hong; Moore, Robert; Dowling, Lisa

    1995-03-01

    Non-invasive in vivo elemental analysis is a technique used to assess human body composition which is indicative of nutritional status and health condition. The in vivo measurement of the body's major elements is used for a variety of medical studies requiring the determination of the body's compartments (protein, fat, water, bone). Whole body gamma-ray counters, consisting of Nal(Tl) crystal detectors in a shielded room, are used for measuring in vivo the body's Ca, Cl, Na and P by delayed neutron activation analysis. Thermal neutrons from a moderated 238Pu-Be source are used for the measurement of total body nitrogen (and thus protein) and chlorine at low radiation exposure (0.80 mSv). The resulting high energy prompt gamma-rays from nitrogen (10.83 MeV) and chlorine (6.11 MeV) are detected simultaneously with the irradiation. Body fat (the main energy store) and fat distribution (which relates to risk for cardiovascular disease) are measured by detecting C and O in vivo through fast neutron inelastic scattering. A small sealed D-T neutron generator is used for the pulsed (4 - 8 KHz) production of fast neutrons. Carbon and oxygen are detected by counting the 4.44 and 6.13 MeV gamma-rays resulting from the inelastic scattering of the fast neutrons from the 12C and 16O nuclei, respectively. One use of this method is the systematic study of the mechanisms driving the age-associated depletion of the metabolizing, oxygen-consuming cellular compartment of the body. The understanding of this catabolism may suggest ways to maintain lean tissue and thus to preserve quality of life for the very old.

  9. Morphological changes induced by different doses of gamma irradiation in garlic sprouts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegrini, C. N.; Croci, C. A.; Orioli, G. A.

    2000-03-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the effects of different doses of gamma rays applied in dormancy and post-dormancy on garlic bulbs in relation with some morphophysiological parameters. High (commercial) doses cause the complete inhibition of sprouting and mitosis (due to nuclear aberrations). Relatively low doses show no effects on bulbs but doses of 10 Gy applied in post-dormancy reduce sprouting and stop mitosis. This inhibition becomes noticeable from 150 days post-harvest onwards. Exogenous growth regulators can reverse these effects. Results may reinforce the good practice of radioinhibition processes in garlic.

  10. CARBON FIBRE COMPOSITE MATERIALS PRODUCED BY GAMMA RADIATION INDUCED CURING OF EPOXY RESINS

    SciTech Connect

    Dispenza, C.; Spadaro, G.; Alessi, S.

    2008-08-28

    It is well known that ionizing radiation can initiate polymerization of suitable monomers for many applications. In this work an epoxy difunctional monomer has been used as matrix of a carbon fibre composite in order to produce materials through gamma radiation, for aerospace and advanced automotive applications. Radiation curing has been performed at different absorbed doses and, as comparison, also thermal curing of the same monomer formulations has been done. Furthermore some irradiated samples have been also subjected to a post irradiation thermal curing in order to complete the polymerization reactions. The properties of the cured materials have been studied by moisture absorption isotherms, dynamic mechanical thermal analysis and mechanical flexural tests.

  11. Evaluation of cross-sections for particle induced gamma-ray emission (PIGE) spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurbich, A. F.

    2014-07-01

    The extension of the cross-section evaluation procedure to PIGE data was investigated and the first results are reported. Two different cases were studied: the gamma emission accompanying inelastic scattering of protons, and the (p,γ)-reaction. The corresponding theoretical calculations were performed in the framework of R-matrix and DWBA for the (p,p‧γ) reaction on 23Na, and using statistical model for the proton radiative capture by 52Cr. The possibility of achieving a close fit to the experimental data is demonstrated.

  12. TLR2/6 agonists and interferon-gamma induce human melanoma cells to produce CXCL10

    PubMed Central

    Mauldin, Ileana S.; Wang, Ena; Deacon, Donna H.; Olson, Walter C.; Bao, Yongde; Slingluff, Craig L.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical approaches to treat advanced melanoma include immune therapies, whose benefits depend on tumor-reactive T-cell infiltration of metastases. However, most tumors lack significant immune infiltration prior to therapy. Selected chemokines promote T-cell migration into tumors; thus, agents that induce these chemokines in the tumor microenvironment (TME) may improve responses to systemic immune therapy. CXCL10 has been implicated as a critical chemokine supporting T-cell infiltration into the TME. Here we show that toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists can induce chemokine production directly from melanoma cells when combined with IFNγ treatment. We find that TLR2 and TLR6 are widely expressed on human melanoma cells, and that TLR2/6 agonists (MALP-2 or FSL-1) synergize with interferon-gamma (IFNγ) to induce production of CXCL10 from melanoma cells. Furthermore, melanoma cells and immune cells from surgical specimens also respond to TLR2/6 agonists and IFNγ by upregulating CXCL10 production, compared to treatment with either agent alone. Collectively, these data identify a novel mechanism for inducing CXCL10 production directly from melanoma cells, with TLR2/6 agonists +IFNγ and raise the possibility that intratumoral administration of these agents may improve immune signatures in melanoma and have value in combination with other immune therapies, by supporting T-cell migration into melanoma metastases. PMID:25765738

  13. Alterations in the immunoreactivity for muscarinic acetylcholine receptors and colocalized PKC gamma in mouse hippocampus induced by spatial discrimination learning.

    PubMed

    Van der Zee, E A; Compaan, J C; Bohus, B; Luiten, P G

    1995-01-01

    group over all other groups. In contrast to the CA1-CA2 region, both pseudotrained and trained mice revealed high mAChR staining in the CA3-CA4 region and the DG. These results indicate that prolonged exposure to the hole board is sufficient for an enhanced mAChR-ir in the CA3-CA4 and DG, whereas the increase in CA1-CA2 pyramidal cells is a training-specific feature related to spatial orientation. Nonpyramidal neurons within the CA1-CA2 region with enhanced mAChR-ir in the pyramidal cells, however, revealed a decreased level of mAChR-ir. The opposing effect of pyramidal and nonpyramidal cells suggests a shift in the excitability of the hippocampal microcircuitry. Previously we demonstrated an increase and redistribution of hippocampal protein kinase C gamma-immunoreactivity (PKC gamma-ir) induced by hole board learning in mice (Van der Zee et al., 1992, J Neurosci 12:4808-4815). Immunofluorescence double-labeling experiments conducted in the present study in naive and trained animals revealed that the principal cells and DG interneurons co-express mAChRs and PKC gamma, and that the immunoreactivity for both markers increased in relation to spatial orientation within these neurons. The mAChR-positive nonpyramidal cells of the CA1-CA2 region were devoid of PKC gamma and revealed an opposite training-induced effect. These results suggest that the postsynaptic changes in mAChR- and PKC gamma-ir reflect functional alterations of the hippocampal formation induced by spatial learning.

  14. Ionizing radiation-induced mutant frequencies increase transiently in male germ cells of older mice.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guogang; McMahan, C Alex; Hildreth, Kim; Garcia, Rebecca A; Herbert, Damon C; Walter, Christi A

    2012-05-15

    Spontaneous mutant frequency in the male germline increases with age, thereby increasing the risk of siring offspring with genetic disorders. In the present study we investigated the effect of age on ionizing radiation-induced male germline mutagenesis. lacI transgenic mice were treated with ionizing radiation at 4-, 15- and 26-month-old, and mutant frequencies were determined for pachytene spermatocytes and round spermatids at 15 days or 49 days after ionizing radiation treatment. Cells collected 15 days after treatment were derivatives of irradiated differentiating spermatogenic cells while cells collected 49 days later were derivatives of spermatogonial stem cells. The results showed that (1) spontaneous mutant frequency increased in spermatogenic cells recovered from nonirradiated old mice (26-months-old), particularly in the round spermatids; (2) mutant frequencies were significantly increased in round spermatids obtained from middle-aged mice (15-months-old) and old age mice (26-months-old) at 15 and 49 days after irradiation compared to the sham-treated old mice; and (3) pachytene spermatocytes obtained from 15- or 26-month-old mice displayed a significantly increased mutant frequency at 15 days post irradiation. This study indicates that age modulates the mutagenic response to ionizing radiation in the male germline.

  15. Naturally induced secondary radiation in interplanetary space: Preliminary analyses for gamma radiation and radioisotope production from thermal neutron activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaza-Rosado, Heriberto

    1991-09-01

    Thermal neutron activation analyses were carried out for various space systems components to determine gamma radiation dose rates and food radiation contamination levels. The space systems components selected were those for which previous radiation studies existed. These include manned space vehicle radiation shielding, liquid hydrogen propellant tanks for a Mars mission, and a food supply used as space vehicle radiation shielding. The computational method used is based on the fast neutron distribution generated by the BRYNTRN and HZETRN transport codes for Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) at solar minimum conditions and intense solar flares in space systems components. The gamma dose rates for soft tissue are calculated for water and aluminum space vehicle slab shields considering volumetric source self-attenuation and exponential buildup factors. In the case of the lunar habitat with regolith shielding, a completely exposed spherical habitat was assumed for mathematical convenience and conservative calculations. Activation analysis of the food supply used as radiation shielding is presented for four selected nutrients: potassium, calcium, sodium, and phosphorus. Radioactive isotopes that could represent a health hazard if ingested are identified and their concentrations are identified. For nutrients soluble in water, it was found that all induced radioactivity was below the accepted maximum permissible concentrations.

  16. Naturally induced secondary radiation in interplanetary space: Preliminary analyses for gamma radiation and radioisotope production from thermal neutron activation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plaza-Rosado, Heriberto

    1991-01-01

    Thermal neutron activation analyses were carried out for various space systems components to determine gamma radiation dose rates and food radiation contamination levels. The space systems components selected were those for which previous radiation studies existed. These include manned space vehicle radiation shielding, liquid hydrogen propellant tanks for a Mars mission, and a food supply used as space vehicle radiation shielding. The computational method used is based on the fast neutron distribution generated by the BRYNTRN and HZETRN transport codes for Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) at solar minimum conditions and intense solar flares in space systems components. The gamma dose rates for soft tissue are calculated for water and aluminum space vehicle slab shields considering volumetric source self-attenuation and exponential buildup factors. In the case of the lunar habitat with regolith shielding, a completely exposed spherical habitat was assumed for mathematical convenience and conservative calculations. Activation analysis of the food supply used as radiation shielding is presented for four selected nutrients: potassium, calcium, sodium, and phosphorus. Radioactive isotopes that could represent a health hazard if ingested are identified and their concentrations are identified. For nutrients soluble in water, it was found that all induced radioactivity was below the accepted maximum permissible concentrations.

  17. Chemical effects induced by gamma-irradiation in solid and in aqueous methanol solutions of 4-iodophenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahfouz, R. M.; Siddiqui, M. R. H.; Al-Wassil, A. I.; Al-Resayes, S. I.; Al-Otaibi, A. M.

    2005-05-01

    The present work is a study on radiolyses of 4-iodophenol in aqueous methanol solutions. The radiolysis products are separated and identified using spectrophotometric and chromatographic techniques. The radiolytic products (I-2, I- and IO3-) formed in aerated solutions at room temperature were identified and the yields are investigated as a function of absorbed gamma-ray dose. The formation of I-2 is mainly dependent on the acidity of solution and produced via the pathway of secondary free radical reactions. Aromatic products of lower and higher molecular weight than the corresponding investigated compound were analysed and separated by HPLC. The results have been discussed in view of mechanisms based on free radicals and ion-molecule interactions. The chemical effects induced by gamma-irradiation in solid 4-iodophenol have also been investigated and the degradation products were identified in solid state by NMR, GC/MS experiments and HPLC after dissolution in aqueous methanol. The results were evaluated and compared with radiolysis data.

  18. Contrasting role of phospholipase C-{gamma}1 in the expression of immediate early genes induced by epidermal or platelet-derived growth factors

    SciTech Connect

    Liao Hongjun; Santos, Josue de los; Carpenter, Graham . E-mail: graham.carpenter@vanderbilt.edu

    2006-04-01

    While significant progress has been achieved in identifying the signal transduction elements that operate downstream of activated receptor tyrosine kinases, it remains unclear how different receptors utilize these signaling elements to achieve a common response. This study compares the capacity of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) to elicit the induction of immediate early gene (IEG) mRNAs in the presence or absence of phospholipase C-{gamma}1 (PLC-{gamma}1). The results show that while PDGF induction of nearly all IEG mRNAs is abrogated in plcg1 null cells, EGF induction of the same genes is variable in the null cells and exhibits three distinct responses. Five IEG mRNAs (Nup475, Cyr61, TF, Gly, TS7) are completely inducible by EGF in the presence or absence of PLC-{gamma}1, while three others (JE, KC, FIC) exhibit a stringent requirement for the presence of PLC-{gamma}1. The third type of response is exhibited by c-fos and COX-2. While these mRNAs are completely induced by EGF in the absence of PLC-{gamma}1, the time course of their accumulation is significantly delayed. No IEG was identified as completely inducible by EGF and PDGF in the absence of PLC-{gamma}1. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) demonstrate that PLC-{gamma}1 is necessary for nuclear extracts from PDGF-treated cells, but not EGF-treated cells, to interact with probes for AP-1 or NF-{kappa}B.

  19. Perception of social synchrony induces mother-child gamma coupling in the social brain.

    PubMed

    Levy, Jonathan; Goldstein, Abraham; Feldman, Ruth

    2017-04-11

    The recent call to move from focus on one brain's functioning to two-brain communication initiated a search for mechanisms that enable two humans to coordinate brain response during social interactions. Here, we utilized the mother-child context as a developmentally salient setting to study two-brain coupling. Mothers and their 9-year-old children were videotaped at home in positive and conflictual interactions. Positive interactions were microcoded for social synchrony and conflicts for overall dialogical style. Following, mother and child underwent magnetoencephalography while observing the positive vignettes. Episodes of behavioral synchrony, compared to non-synchrony, increased gamma-band power in the superior temporal sulcus (STS), hub of social cognition, mirroring and mentalizing. This neural pattern was coupled between mother and child. Brain-to-brain coordination was anchored in behavioral synchrony; only during episodes of behavioral synchrony, but not during non-synchronous moments, mother's and child's STS gamma power was coupled. Importantly, neural synchrony was not found during observation of unfamiliar mother-child interaction Maternal empathic/dialogical conflict style predicted mothers' STS activations whereas child withdrawal predicted attenuated STS response in both partners. Results define a novel neural marker for brain-to-brain synchrony, highlight the role of rapid bottom-up oscillatory mechanisms for neural coupling and indicate that behavior-based processes may drive synchrony between two brains during social interactions.

  20. Gamma-radiation-induced degradation of actively pumped single-mode ytterbium-doped optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singleton, B.; Petrosky, J.; Pochet, M.; Usechak, N. G.; Francis, S. A.

    2014-03-01

    The integration of optical components into the digital processing units of satellite subsystems has the potential to remove interconnect bottlenecks inherent to the volume, mass, complexity, reliability and crosstalk issues of copper-based interconnects. Assuming on-board high-bandwidth communications will utilize passive optical fibers as a communication channel, this work investigates the impact of gamma irradiation from a Co-60 source on both passive optical fibers and ytterbium-doped single-mode fibers operated as amplifiers for a 1060-nm light source. Standard optical patch cables were evaluated along with active Yb-doped double-clad fibers. Varied exposure times and signal transmission wavelengths were used to investigate the degradation of the fibers exposed to total doses above 100 krad (Si). The effect on the amplified signal gain was studied for the Yb-doped fibers. The increased attenuation in the fibers across a broad wavelength range in response to multiple levels of gamma radiation exposure along with the effect that the increased attenuation has on the actively pumped Yb-doped fiber amplifier performance, is discussed.

  1. Cloning and expression analysis of interferon-gamma-inducible-lysosomal thiol reductase gene in large yellow croaker (Pseudosciaena crocea).

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wenbiao; Chen, Xinhua

    2006-05-01

    In mammals, interferon-gamma-inducible-lysosomal thiol reductase (GILT) has been demonstrated to play a key role in the processing and presentation of MHC class II-restricted antigen (Ag) by catalyzing disulfide bond reduction, thus unfolding native protein Ag and facilitating subsequent cleavage by proteases. Here, we reported the cloning of a GILT gene homologue from the spleen of large yellow croaker, a marine fish (LycGILT). The full-length cDNA of LycGILT gene is 1033 nucleotides (nt) encoding a protein of 256 amino acids (aa), with a putative molecular weight of 28.9 kDa. The deduced protein is highly homologous to that of mammalian and zebrafish GILTs and shares 54.1% sequence identity to that of zebrafish and 43.2-39.2% sequence identity to that of various mammals. The deduced LycGILT possesses the typical structural feature of mammalian GILT, including an active-site CXXC motif, a GILT signature sequence CQHGX2ECX2NX4C, and other six cysteines responsible for the formation of disulfide bonds in the C-terminus. Genomic analysis revealed that LycGILT gene, spanning a 3159nt fragment, contained seven exons interrupted by six introns and exhibited a similar exon-intron organization to human and mouse GILT genes except for a slightly more compact intron arrangement. The LycGILT expression is obviously up-regulated in spleen and kidney after immunization with inactivated trivalent bacterial vaccine consisting of Vibrio alginolyticus, V. paraphaemolyticus, and Aeromonas hydrophila although it also is constitutively expressed in liver, gills, brain, and heart, suggesting that LycGILT may be involved in the immune response to bacterial challenge in large yellow croaker. A search of NCBI sequence data with LycGILT cDNA identified a pufferfish (fugu rubrides) GILT homologue cDNA and its genomic DNA sequence, where two putative interferon-gamma activation sites (GAS) were found within the promoter region. This provided evidence that a fish GILT homologue like

  2. Cosmic rays, gamma rays and synchrotron radiation from the Galaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Orlando, Elena

    2012-07-30

    Galactic cosmic rays (CR), interstellar gamma-ray emission and synchrotron radiation are related topics. CR electrons propagate in the Galaxy and interact with the interstellar medium, producing inverse-Compton emission measured in gamma rays and synchrotron emission measured in radio. I present an overview of the latest results with Fermi/LAT on the gamma-ray diffuse emission induced by CR nuclei and electrons. Then I focus on the recent complementary studies of the synchrotron emission in the light of the latest gamma-ray results. Relevant observables include spectral indices and their variations, using surveys over a wide range of radio frequencies. As a result, this paper emphasizes the importance of using the parallel study of gamma rays and synchrotron radiation in order to constrain the low-energy interstellar CR electron spectrum, models of propagation of CRs, and magnetic fields.

  3. Cosmic rays, gamma rays and synchrotron radiation from the Galaxy

    DOE PAGES

    Orlando, Elena

    2012-07-30

    Galactic cosmic rays (CR), interstellar gamma-ray emission and synchrotron radiation are related topics. CR electrons propagate in the Galaxy and interact with the interstellar medium, producing inverse-Compton emission measured in gamma rays and synchrotron emission measured in radio. I present an overview of the latest results with Fermi/LAT on the gamma-ray diffuse emission induced by CR nuclei and electrons. Then I focus on the recent complementary studies of the synchrotron emission in the light of the latest gamma-ray results. Relevant observables include spectral indices and their variations, using surveys over a wide range of radio frequencies. As a result, thismore » paper emphasizes the importance of using the parallel study of gamma rays and synchrotron radiation in order to constrain the low-energy interstellar CR electron spectrum, models of propagation of CRs, and magnetic fields.« less

  4. OH-radical induced degradation of hydroxybenzoic- and hydroxycinnamic acids and formation of aromatic products—A gamma radiolysis study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krimmel, Birgit; Swoboda, Friederike; Solar, Sonja; Reznicek, Gottfried

    2010-12-01

    The OH-radical induced degradation of hydroxybenzoic acids (HBA), hydroxycinnamic acids (HCiA) and methoxylated derivatives, as well as of chlorogenic acid and rosmarinic acid was studied by gamma radiolysis in aerated aqueous solutions. Primary aromatic products resulting from an OH-radical attachment to the ring (hydroxylation), to the position occupied by the methoxyl group (replacement -OCH 3 by -OH) as well as to the propenoic acid side chain of the cinnamic acids (benzaldehyde formations) were analysed by HPLC-UV and LC-ESI-MS. A comparison of the extent of these processes is given for 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid, vanillic acid, isovanillic acid, syringic acid, cinnamic acid, 4-hydroxycinnamic acid, caffeic acid, ferulic acid, isoferulic acid, chlorogenic acid, and rosmarinic acid. For all cinnamic acids and derivatives benzaldehydes were significant oxidation products. With the release of caffeic acid from chlorogenic acid the cleavage of a phenolic glycoside could be demonstrated. Reaction mechanisms are discussed.

  5. Determination of total fluorine in five coal reference materials by proton-induced gamma-ray emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Roelandts, I; Robaye, G; Delbrouck-Habaru, J M; Weber, G

    1996-03-01

    The direct non-destructive proton-induced gamma-ray emission (PIGE) technique with a germanium detector was applied to the determination of total fluorine concentration in five coal reference materials (BCR 40, NIST 1632b, NIST 1635, SARM 20 and USGS CLB-1). Duplicate analyses were made from five randomly selected bottles of each coal. Individual data are presented and some problems (calibration, proton stopping power, effects of sample heating by the proton beam, background estimation) which were encountered during this study are discussed. Sensitivity and reproducibility of the determinations, and homogeneity of the coal samples with respect to fluorine contents by analysis of variance were investigated. The present data are also compared with the few published values for these reference samples, including other PIGE data. The use of synthetic standards and spiked samples in the present study suggested that the PIGE method was more accurate than other techniques.

  6. Acupuncture Induces Divergent Alterations of Functional Connectivity within Conventional Frequency Bands: Evidence from MEG Recordings

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Ruwei; Zhong, Chongguang; Xue, Ting; Wang, Hu; Liu, Zhenyu; Wei, Wenjuan; Tian, Jie

    2012-01-01

    As an ancient Chinese healing modality which has gained increasing popularity in modern society, acupuncture involves stimulation with fine needles inserted into acupoints. Both traditional literature and clinical data indicated that modulation effects largely depend on specific designated acupoints. However, scientific representations of acupoint specificity remain controversial. In the present study, considering the new findings on the sustained effects of acupuncture and its time-varied temporal characteristics, we employed an electrophysiological imaging modality namely magnetoencephalography with a temporal resolution on the order of milliseconds. Taken into account the differential band-limited signal modulations induced by acupuncture, we sought to explore whether or not stimulation at Stomach Meridian 36 (ST36) and a nearby non-meridian point (NAP) would evoke divergent functional connectivity alterations within delta, theta, alpha, beta and gamma bands. Whole-head scanning was performed on 28 healthy participants during an eyes-closed no-task condition both preceding and following acupuncture. Data analysis involved calculation of band-limited power (BLP) followed by pair-wise BLP correlations. Further averaging was conducted to obtain local and remote connectivity. Statistical analyses revealed the increased connection degree of the left temporal cortex within delta (0.5–4 Hz), beta (13–30 Hz) and gamma (30–48 Hz) bands following verum acupuncture. Moreover, we not only validated the closer linkage of the left temporal cortex with the prefrontal and frontal cortices, but further pinpointed that such patterns were more extensively distributed in the ST36 group in the delta and beta bands compared to the restriction only to the delta band for NAP. Psychophysical results for significant pain threshold elevation further confirmed the analgesic effect of acupuncture at ST36. In conclusion, our findings may provide a new perspective to lend support for

  7. Tip-induced deformation of a phospholipid bilayer: Theoretical perspective of sum frequency generation imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Volkov, Victor

    2014-10-21

    The paper addresses theory of Sum Frequency Generation imaging of an atomic force microscopy tip-induced deformation of a bilayer phospholipid membrane deposited over a pore: known as a nano-drum system. Image modeling employed nonlinearities of the normal modes specific to hydrocarbon terminal methyls, which are distributed about the deformed surfaces of inner and outer leaflets. The deformed profiles are according to the solutions of shape equation for Canham-Helfrich Hamiltonian accounting properties of four membranes, which differ in elasticity and adhesion. The results indicate that in continuous deformed surfaces, the difference in the curvature of the outer and inner leaflets dominates in the imaged nonlinearity. This is different comparing to the results for a perfect bilayer spherical cap system (the subject of previous study), where nonlinear image response is dominated by the mismatch of the inner and outer leaflets’ surface areas (as projected to the image plane) at the edge of perfectly spherical structure. The results of theoretical studies, here, demonstrate that Sum Frequency Generation imaging in continuous and deformed bilayer surfaces are helpful to address curvature locally and anticipate mechanical properties of membrane. The articles discuss applicability and practical limitations of the approach. Combination of Atomic Force Microscopy and Sum Frequency Generation imaging under controlled tip-induced deformation provides a good opportunity to probe and test membranes physical properties with rigor of adopted theory.

  8. Cancelation of thermally induced frequency shifts in bimaterial cantilevers by nonlinear optomechanical interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vy, Nguyen Duy; Tri Dat, Le; Iida, Takuya

    2016-08-01

    Bimaterial cantilevers have recently been used in, for example, the calorimetric analysis with picowatt resolution in microscopic space based on state-of-the-art atomic force microscopes. However, thermally induced effects usually change physical properties of the cantilevers, such as the resonance frequency, which reduce the accuracy of the measurements. Here, we propose an approach to circumvent this problem that uses an optical microcavity formed between a metallic layer coated on the back of the cantilever and one coated at the end of an optical fiber irradiating the cantilever. In addition to increasing the sensitivity, the optical rigidity of this system diminishes the thermally induced frequency shift. For a coating thickness of several tens of nanometers, the input power is 5-10 μW. These values can be evaluated from parameters derived by directly irradiating the cantilever in the absence of the microcavity. The system has the potential of using the cantilever both as a thermometer without frequency shifting and as a sensor with nanometer-controlled accuracy.

  9. Tip-induced deformation of a phospholipid bilayer: Theoretical perspective of sum frequency generation imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, Victor

    2014-10-01

    The paper addresses theory of Sum Frequency Generation imaging of an atomic force microscopy tip-induced deformation of a bilayer phospholipid membrane deposited over a pore: known as a nano-drum system. Image modeling employed nonlinearities of the normal modes specific to hydrocarbon terminal methyls, which are distributed about the deformed surfaces of inner and outer leaflets. The deformed profiles are according to the solutions of shape equation for Canham-Helfrich Hamiltonian accounting properties of four membranes, which differ in elasticity and adhesion. The results indicate that in continuous deformed surfaces, the difference in the curvature of the outer and inner leaflets dominates in the imaged nonlinearity. This is different comparing to the results for a perfect bilayer spherical cap system (the subject of previous study), where nonlinear image response is dominated by the mismatch of the inner and outer leaflets' surface areas (as projected to the image plane) at the edge of perfectly spherical structure. The results of theoretical studies, here, demonstrate that Sum Frequency Generation imaging in continuous and deformed bilayer surfaces are helpful to address curvature locally and anticipate mechanical properties of membrane. The articles discuss applicability and practical limitations of the approach. Combination of Atomic Force Microscopy and Sum Frequency Generation imaging under controlled tip-induced deformation provides a good opportunity to probe and test membranes physical properties with rigor of adopted theory.

  10. Measurement of a hyperfine-induced spin-exchange frequency shift in atomic hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Walsworth, R.L.; Silvera, I.F. ); Mattison, E.M.; Vessot, R.F.C. )

    1992-09-01

    We have measured a hyperfine-induced spin-exchange frequency shift in the atomic-hydrogen ground-state hyperfine transition. A recent quantum-mechanical treatment of low-energy hydrogen-hydrogen scattering by Koelman {ital et} {ital al}. (Phys. Rev. A 38, 3535 (1988)) predicts such frequency shifts to become large at low temperature, and to affect the performance of atomic clocks such as the cryogenic hydrogen maser. The experiment reported here was performed with a hydrogen maser operating near room temperature, where the reported hyperfine effects are predicted to be small, but measurable. Using an adiabatic fast passage (AFP) technique to vary the incoming atomic population in the masing states from approximately 100% (AFP on) to 50% (AFP off), we determined the change in the dimensionless hyperfine-induced frequency-shift parameter {Omega} to be {Omega}{sub on}{minus}{Omega}{sub off}=5.38 (1.06){times}10{sup {minus}4}. The theoretical prediction at this temperature is {Omega}{sub on}{minus}{Omega}{sub off}={minus}0.76{times}10{sup {minus}4} to {minus}1.12{times}10{sup {minus}4}, for the range of masing-state populations used in the present experiment. We review the relevant theory, report our experimental method and results, and discuss possible reasons for the discrepancy between experiment and theory.

  11. Electromagnetic millimeter wave induced hypoalgesia: frequency dependence and involvement of endogenous opioids.

    PubMed

    Radzievsky, A A; Gordiienko, O V; Alekseev, S; Szabo, I; Cowan, A; Ziskin, M C

    2008-05-01

    Millimeter wave treatment (MMWT) is based on the systemic biological effects that develop following local skin exposure to low power electromagnetic waves in the millimeter range. In the present set of experiments, the hypoalgesic effect of this treatment was analyzed in mice. The murine nose area was exposed to MMW of "therapeutic" frequencies: 42.25, 53.57, and 61.22 GHz. MMWT-induced hypoalgesia was shown to be frequency dependent in two experimental models: (1) the cold water tail-flick test (chronic non-neuropathic pain), and (2) the wire surface test (chronic neuropathic pain following unilateral constriction injury to the sciatic nerve). Maximum hypoalgesic effect was obtained when the frequency was 61.22 GHz. Other exposure parameters were: incident power density = 13.3 mW/cm(2), duration of each exposure = 15 min. Involvement of delta and kappa endogenous opioids in the MMWT-induced hypoalgesia was demonstrated using selective blockers of delta- and kappa-opioid receptors and the direct ELISA measurement of endogenous opioids in CNS tissue. Possible mechanisms of the effect and the perspectives of the clinical application of MMWT are discussed.

  12. Alteration of cyclosporine (CsA)-induced nephrotoxicity by gamma linolenic acid (GLA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Morphake, P; Bariety, J; Darlametsos, I; Tsipas, G; Gkikas, G; Hornysh, A; Papanikolaou, N

    1994-01-01

    Administration of cyclosporine (CsA), 37.4 microM (45 mg)/Kg, per day for 7 days, to Wistar rats, induced decreased creatinine clearance (Ccr) and body weight loss (BWL), but it did not induce proteinuria. These changes were associated with enhanced urinary thromboxane B2 (TXB2) and diminished 6-keto-PGF1 alpha (6kPGF1 alpha) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) excretions. The augmentation in TXB2 and the decrease in PGs highly diminished the ratios of 6kPGF1 alpha/TXB2 and PGE2/TXB2. In microscopic sections all of the kidneys were affected to variable degrees. When CsA was administered to animals fed for 70 days, prior to the experiment, on standard chow (SC) containing evening primrose oil (EPO) or fish oil (FO), 1% and 10% respectively (EPO contained 9% gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) and FO 5.6% eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA)), the nephrotoxic effect of CsA was partially prevented. These changes were accompanied by increased ratios of urinary 6kPGF1 alpha/TXB2 and PGE2/TXB2 excretions. Light microscopic (LM) studies showed that rats' kidneys fed on SC containing EPO or FO were not always affected and the lesions were of minor importance. In conclusion, these results suggest that EPO (GLA) and FO (EPA) could play a beneficial role in the development or the modulation of the renal syndrome induced by CsA.

  13. Neonatal low-dose gamma irradiation-induced impaired fertility in mature rats.

    PubMed

    Freud, A; Canfi, A; Sod-Moriah, U A; Chayoth, R

    1990-11-01

    The reproductive capacity of mature rats at the age of 8 days was studied following neonatal exposure to 0.06 Gy dose of gamma-radiation. Decreased litter size and reduced body weight of the pups on weaning day, but not at parturition, were observed in female rats. The reduced litter size was not associated with impaired ovulation, impaired uterine implantation or mortality in utero, but resulted from increased death rate or at near parturition. Of the neonatally irradiated males 29% were found to be sterile and had degenerated or necrotic testes. The testicular damage and the reduced growth rate of the offspring of the irradiated females demonstrate the extreme sensitivity of the immature reproductive system to ionizing radiation, even at very low doses.

  14. Gamma irradiation induced disintegration of waste activated sludge for biological hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Yanan; Wang, Jianlong

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, gamma irradiation was applied for the disintegration and dissolution of waste activated sludge produced during the biological wastewater treatment, and the solubilized sludge was used as substrate for bio-hydrogen production. The experimental results showed that the solubilization of waste activated sludge was 53.7% at 20 kGy and pH=12, and the SCOD, polysaccharides, protein, TN and TP contents in the irradiated sludge solutions was 3789.6 mg/L, 268.3 mg/L, 1881.5 mg/L, 132.3 mg/L and 80.4 mg/L, respectively. The irradiated sludge was used for fermentative hydrogen production, and the hydrogen yield was 10.5±0.7 mL/g SCODconsumed. It can be concluded that the irradiated waste activated sludge could be used as a low-cost substrate for fermentative hydrogen production.

  15. Determination of changes induced by gamma radiation in nectar of kiwi fruit ( Actinidia deliciosa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harder, M. N. C.; De Toledo, T. C. F.; Ferreira, A. C. P.; Arthur, V.

    2009-07-01

    The kiwi ( Actinidia deliciosa; Actinidaceae) is an exotic fruit to Brazil, introduced from southeastern China. The kiwi fruit presents a high nutritional value, rich mainly in vitamin C and fibers, calcium, iron and phosphorus, which give it an excellent nutritional value. Its quality attributes and flavor has lead to acceptance in consuming markets, mainly among children. The objective of this work was to formulate a non-alcoholic sweetened drink based on kiwi fruits, to submit the drink to gamma radiation using increasing doses: 0 (control), 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 kGy, and to evaluate changes in physical and chemical quality attributes. We found that no significant difference was observed between treatments relative to the control. So we could conclude that for the doses tested significant alterations in the physiochemical characteristics of the kiwi nectar were introduced.

  16. Curcumin inhibits trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid-induced colitis in rats by activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ming; Deng, Changsheng; Zheng, Jiaju; Xia, Jian; Sheng, Dan

    2006-08-01

    Curcumin is a widely used spice with anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties. It has been reported that curcumin held therapeutic effects on experimental colitis by inhibition of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB). The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) is a nuclear receptor with anti-tumor and anti-inflammatory effects and its activation may inhibit the nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB. Several studies have shown that PPARgamma ligands had an important therapeutic effect in colitis. However there is no report about the alteration of PPARgamma in trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis treated with curcumin. In this study, we administered curcumin (30 mg/kg/day) by intraperitoneal injection immediately after colitis was induced and the injection lasted for two weeks. have evaluated the effects of curcumin on the colitis induced by trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid (TNBS). Curcumin (30 mg/kg d) was administered by intraperitoneal just after colitis was induced and lasted for two weeks. Therapeutic effects of dexamethasone (Dex, 2 mg/kg d) alone and the combined effects of curcumin+Dex were also examined. We found that curcumin improved long-term survival rate of disease-bearing rats, promoted rat body weight recovery, and decreased macroscopic scores of the colitis. The expression levels of PPARgamma, 15-deoxy-D12,14-prostaglandin J(2) (15d-PGJ(2)) and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) were all increased, but the expression level of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) was decreased in rats after administration of curcumin. Treatment with Dex improved PPARgamma expression and inhibited the expression of COX-2, 15d-PGJ(2) and PGE(2). Combined effects of curcumin+Dex were similar to that of Dex. In summary, curcumin showed therapeutic effects on TNBS-induced colitis and the mechanisms by which curcumin exerts its effects may involve activation of PPARgamma and its ligands.

  17. A biophysical model for estimating the frequency of radiation-induced mutations resulting from chromosomal translocations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Honglu; Durante, Marco

    Gene mutations can be induced by radiation as a result of chromosomal translocations. A biophysical model is developed to estimate the frequency of this type of mutation induced by low-LET radiation. Mutations resulting from translocations are assumed to be formed by misrejoining of two DNA double strand breaks (DSB), one within the gene and one on a different chromosome. The chromosome containing the gene is assumed to occupy a spherical territory and does not overlap spatially with other chromosomes. Misrejoining between two DSB can occur only if the two DSB are closer than an interaction distance at the time of their induction. Applying the model to mutations of the hprt gene induced in G0 human lymphocyte cells by low-LET radiation, it is calculated that mutations resulting from translocations account for about 14% of the total mutations. The value of the interaction distance is determined to be 0.6 μm by comparing with the observed frequency of translocations in the X-chromosome.

  18. The role of gamma-aminobutyric acid/glycinergic synaptic transmission in mediating bilirubin-induced hyperexcitation in developing auditory neurons.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xin-Lu; Liang, Min; Shi, Hai-Bo; Wang, Lu-Yang; Li, Chun-Yan; Yin, Shan-Kai

    2016-01-05

    Hyperbilirubinemia is a common clinical phenomenon observed in human newborns. A high level of bilirubin can result in severe jaundice and bilirubin encephalopathy. However, the cellular mechanisms underlying bilirubin excitotoxicity are unclear. Our previous studies showed the action of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)/glycine switches from excitatory to inhibitory during development in the ventral cochlear nucleus (VCN), one of the most sensitive auditory nuclei to bilirubin toxicity. In the present study, we investigated the roles of GABAA/glycine receptors in the induction of bilirubin hyperexcitation in early developing neurons. Using the patch clamp technique, GABAA/glycine receptor-mediated spontaneous inhibitory synaptic currents (sIPSCs) were recorded from bushy and stellate cells in acute brainstem slices from young mice (postnatal day 2-6). Bilirubin significantly increased the frequency of sIPSCs, and this effect was prevented by pretreatments of slices with either fast or slow Ca(2+) chelators BAPTA-AM and EGTA-AM suggesting that bilirubin can increase the release of GABA/glycine via Ca(2+)-dependent mechanisms. Using cell-attached recording configuration, we found that antagonists of GABAA and glycine receptors strongly attenuated spontaneous spiking firings in P2-6 neurons but produced opposite effect in P15-19 neurons. Furthermore, these antagonists reversed bilirubin-evoked hyperexcitability in P2-6 neurons, indicating that excitatory action of GABA/glycinergic transmission specifically contribute to bilirubin-induced hyperexcitability in the early stage of development. Our results suggest that bilirubin-induced enhancement of presynaptic release GABA/Glycine via Ca(2+)-dependent mechanisms may play a critical role in mediating neuronal hyperexcitation associated with jaundice, implicating potential new strategies for predicting, preventing, and treating bilirubin neurotoxicity.

  19. Deletion of the N-terminus of IKK{gamma} induces apoptosis in keratinocytes and impairs the AKT/PTEN signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Leis, Hugo; Sanchis, Ana; Perez, Paloma . E-mail: pperez@cipf.es

    2007-02-15

    The regulatory subunit IKK{gamma}/NEMO is crucial for skin development and function and although devoid of kinase activity, loss of IKK{gamma} function completely abolishes the activation of NF-{kappa}B by all pro-inflammatory cytokines. To inhibit the I{kappa}B kinase (IKK) complex in keratinocytes, we have used a dominant negative approach by generating stable transfectants of an N-terminal deletion of IKK{gamma} (IKK{gamma}-DN97) that uncouples formation of the IKK complex. Expression of this mutant in PB keratinocytes (PB-IKK{gamma}-DN97) delayed growth kinetics, caused morphological changes and dramatically augmented apoptosis even in the absence of pro-apoptotic stimuli, as determined by cell morphology, TUNEL and caspase-3 cleavage. Moreover, in PB-IKK{gamma}-DN97 cells, TNF-{alpha} and IL-1 treatment failed to induce degradation of I{kappa}B{alpha}, phosphorylation of p65 on Ser 536 and nuclear translocation which, consequently, reduced {kappa}B-binding activity. In PB-IKK{gamma}-DN97 cells, accumulation of I{kappa}B{alpha} correlated with a downregulation of AKT activity and an increase of PTEN protein levels whereas pro-apoptotic p53 target genes Bax and Puma were upregulated. These effects were most likely mediated through IKK since coexpression of the wild-type form of IKK{gamma} in keratinocytes partially reversed apoptosis and reduced PTEN expression. Thus, our data suggest a negative cross-talk mechanism involving PTEN and NF-{kappa}B, critical for the anti-apoptotic role of NF-{kappa}B in keratinocytes.

  20. Preventive effects of kilohertz frequency electrical stimulation on sepsis-induced muscle atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, M.; Tanaka, K.; Tategaki, J.; Fujino, H.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The present study sought to evaluate the effect of electrical stimulation (ES) by using kilohertz frequency on muscle atrophy induced by sepsis. Methods: Seventeen male ICR mice were randomly divided into 3 groups: control, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-injected for 4 days, LPS plus ES (LPS+ES). Sepsis was induced by 4 days of an intraperitoneal LPS injection (10 µg/g body weight/day). LPS+ES animals received the LPS injections and ES twice a day for 4 days. ELISA and western blot analysis determined the plasma levels of inflammatory cytokines and ubiquitinated proteins, while the tibialis anterior muscles were weighed and muscle fiber cross-sectional area (CSA) were measured to assess muscle atrophy, which were analyzed by Student’s t-test and ANOVA. Results: LPS induced increased plasma levels of inflammatory cytokines, significant muscle mass loss (LPS:-29.0%, LPS+ES:-23.1%), decreased fiber cross-sectional area, and an up-regulation of atrogin-1 and ubiquitinated proteins in the tibialis anterior muscle compared with the control. ES attenuated the sepsis-induced loss of muscle mass and decreased fiber CSA, as well as attenuated the atrogin-1 and ubiquitinated protein up-regulation. Conclusions: Electrical stimulation may prevent sepsis-induced muscle atrophy through ubiquitin-proteasome pathway inhibition. PMID:27282459

  1. Localized ultrahigh frequency acoustic fields induced micro-vortices for submilliseconds microfluidic mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Weiwei; Zhang, Hao; Zhang, Hongxiang; Yang, Yang; He, Meihang; Qu, Hemi; Pang, Wei; Zhang, Daihua; Duan, Xuexin

    2016-12-01

    We present an acoustic microfluidic mixing approach via acousto-mechanically induced micro-vortices sustained by localized ultrahigh frequency (UHF) acoustic fields. A micro-fabricated solid-mounted thin-film piezoelectric resonator (SMR) with a frequency of 1.54 GHz has been integrated into microfluidic systems. Experimental and simulation results show that UHF-SMR triggers strong acoustic field gradients to produce efficient and highly localized acoustic streaming vortices, providing a powerful source for microfluidic mixing. Homogeneous mixing with 87% mixing efficiency at a Peclet number of 35520 within 1 ms has been achieved. The proposed strategy shows a great potential for microfluidic mixing and enhanced molecule transportation in minimized analytical systems.

  2. Electromagnetically induced transparency metamaterial based on spoof localized surface plasmons at terahertz frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Zhen; Liu, Shuo; Ma, Hui Feng; Li, Chun; Jin, Biaobing; Cui, Tie Jun

    2016-06-01

    We numerically and experimentally demonstrate a plasmonic metamaterial whose unit cell is composed of an ultrathin metallic disk and four ultrathin metallic spiral arms at terahertz frequencies, which supports both spoof electric and magnetic localized surface plasmon (LSP) resonances. We show that the resonant wavelength is much larger than the size of the unit particle, and further find that the resonant wavelength is very sensitive to the particle’s geometrical dimensions and arrangements. It is clearly illustrated that the magnetic LSP resonance exhibits strong dependence to the incidence angle of terahertz wave, which enables the design of metamaterials to achieve an electromagnetically induced transparency effect in the terahertz frequencies. This work opens up the possibility to apply for the surface plasmons in functional devices in the terahertz band.

  3. Low frequency eardrum directionality in the barn owl induced by sound transmission through the interaural canal.

    PubMed

    Kettler, Lutz; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob; Larsen, Ole Næsbye; Wagner, Hermann

    2016-10-01

    The middle ears of birds are typically connected by interaural cavities that form a cranial canal. Eardrums coupled in this manner may function as pressure difference receivers rather than pressure receivers. Hereby, the eardrum vibrations become inherently directional. The barn owl also has a large interaural canal, but its role in barn owl hearing and specifically in sound localization has been controversial so far. We discuss here existing data and the role of the interaural canal in this species and add a new dataset obtained by laser Doppler vibrometry in a free-field setting. Significant sound transmission across the interaural canal occurred at low frequencies. The sound transmission induces considerable eardrum directionality in a narrow band from 1.5 to 3.5 kHz. This is below the frequency range used by the barn owl for locating prey, but may conceivably be used for locating conspecific callers.

  4. Formation of ultracold molecules induced by a high-power single-frequency fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes Passagem, Henry; Colín-Rodríguez, Ricardo; Ventura da Silva, Paulo Cesar; Bouloufa-Maafa, Nadia; Dulieu, Olivier; Marcassa, Luis Gustavo

    2017-02-01

    The influence of a high-power single-frequency fiber laser on the formation of ultracold 85Rb2 molecules is investigated as a function of its frequency (in the 1062–1070 nm range) in a magneto-optical trap. We find evidence for the formation of ground-state 85Rb2 molecules in low vibrational levels (v≤slant 20) with a maximal rate of 104 s‑1, induced by short-range photoassociation by the fiber laser followed by spontaneous emission. When this laser is used to set up a dipole trap, we measure an atomic loss rate at a wavelength far from the PA resonances, only four times smaller than that observed at a PA resonance wavelength. This work may have important consequences for atom trapping using lasers around the conventional 1064 nm wavelength.

  5. Theory of interaction-induced renormalization of Drude weight and plasmon frequency in chiral multilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao; Tse, Wang-Kong

    2017-02-01

    We develop a theory for the optical conductivity of doped ABC-stacked multilayer graphene including the effects of electron-electron interactions. Applying the quantum kinetic formalism, we formulate a set of pseudospin Bloch equations that govern the dynamics of the nonequilibrium density matrix driven by an external ac electric field under the influence of Coulomb interactions. These equations reveal a dynamical mechanism that couples the Drude and interband responses arising from the chirality of pseudospin textures in multilayer graphene systems. We demonstrate that this results in an interaction-induced enhancement of the Drude weight and plasmon frequency strongly dependent on the pseudospin winding number. Using bilayer graphene as an example, we also study the influence of higher-energy bands and find that they contribute considerable renormalization effects not captured by a low-energy two-band description. We argue that this enhancement of Drude weight and plasmon frequency occurs generally in materials characterized by electronic chirality.

  6. Electromagnetically induced transparency metamaterial based on spoof localized surface plasmons at terahertz frequencies.

    PubMed

    Liao, Zhen; Liu, Shuo; Ma, Hui Feng; Li, Chun; Jin, Biaobing; Cui, Tie Jun

    2016-06-09

    We numerically and experimentally demonstrate a plasmonic metamaterial whose unit cell is composed of an ultrathin metallic disk and four ultrathin metallic spiral arms at terahertz frequencies, which supports both spoof electric and magnetic localized surface plasmon (LSP) resonances. We show that the resonant wavelength is much larger than the size of the unit particle, and further find that the resonant wavelength is very sensitive to the particle's geometrical dimensions and arrangements. It is clearly illustrated that the magnetic LSP resonance exhibits strong dependence to the incidence angle of terahertz wave, which enables the design of metamaterials to achieve an electromagnetically induced transparency effect in the terahertz frequencies. This work opens up the possibility to apply for the surface plasmons in functional devices in the terahertz band.

  7. Muons in gamma showers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanev, T.; Vankov, C. P.; Halzen, F.

    1985-01-01

    Muon production in gamma-induced air showers, accounting for all major processes. For muon energies in the GeV region the photoproduction is by far the most important process, while the contribution of micron + micron pair creation is not negligible for TeV muons. The total rate of muons in gamma showers is, however, very low.

  8. [Malignant transformation of human fibroblasts by neutrons and by gamma radiation: Relationship to mutations induced

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    A brief overview if provided of selected reports presented at the International Symposium on Molecular Mechanisms of Radiation- and Chemical Carcinogen-Induced Cell Transformation held at Mackinac Island, Michigan on September 19-23, 1993.

  9. Mechanism of conduction block in amphibian myelinated axon induced by biphasic electrical current at ultra-high frequency.

    PubMed

    Tai, Changfeng; Guo, Dong; Wang, Jicheng; Roppolo, James R; de Groat, William C

    2011-11-01

    The mechanism of axonal conduction block induced by ultra-high frequency (≥ 20 kHz) biphasic electrical current was investigated using a lumped circuit model of the amphibian myelinated axon based on Frankenhaeuser-Huxley (FH) equations. The ultra-high frequency stimulation produces constant activation of both sodium and potassium channels at the axonal node under the block electrode causing the axonal conduction block. This blocking mechanism is different from the mechanism when the stimulation frequency is between 4 kHz and 10 kHz, where only the potassium channel is constantly activated. The minimal stimulation intensity required to induce a conduction block increases as the stimulation frequency increases. The results from this simulation study are useful to guide future animal experiments to reveal the different mechanisms underlying nerve conduction block induced by high-frequency biphasic electrical current.

  10. Aero-acoustics source separation with sparsity inducing priors in the frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwander, Olivier; Picheral, José; Gac, Nicolas; Mohammad-Djafari, Ali; Blacodon, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The characterization of acoustic sources is of great interest in many industrial applications, in particular for the aeronautic or automotive industry for the development of new products. While localization of sources using observations from a wind tunnel is a well-known subject, the characterization and separation of the sources still needs to be explored. We present here a Bayesian approach for sources separation. Two prior modeling of the sources are considered: a sparsity inducing prior in the frequency domain and an autoregressive model in the time domain. The proposed methods are evaluated on synthetic data simulating noise sources emitting from an airfoil inside a wind tunnel.

  11. Laser-induced resonance states as dynamic suppressors of ionization in high-frequency short pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Barash, Danny; Orel, Ann E.; Baer, Roi

    2000-01-01

    An adiabatic-Floquet formalism is used to study the suppression of ionization in short laser pulses. In the high-frequency limit the adiabatic equations involve only the pulse envelope where transitions are purely ramp effects. For a short-ranged potential having a single-bound state we show that ionization suppression is caused by the appearance of a laser-induced resonance state, which is coupled by the pulse ramp to the ground state and acts to trap ionizing flux. (c) 1999 The American Physical Society.

  12. Microwave leakage-induced frequency shifts in the primary frequency standards NIST-F1 and IEN-CSF1.

    PubMed

    Shirley, Jon H; Levi, Filippo; Heavner, Thomas P; Calonico, Davide; Yu, Dai-Hyuk; Jefferts, Steve R

    2006-12-01

    In atomic fountain primary frequency standards, the atoms ideally are subjected to microwave fields resonant with the ground-state, hyperfine splitting only during the two pulses of Ramsey's separated oscillatory field measurement scheme. As a practical matter, however, stray microwave fields can be present that shift the frequency of the central Ramsey fringe and, therefore, adversely affect the accuracy of the standard. We investigate these uncontrolled stray fields here and show that the frequency errors can be measured, and indeed even the location within the standard determined by the behavior of the measured frequency with respect to microwave power in the Ramsey cavity. Experimental results that agree with the theory are presented as well.

  13. Frequency effect on streaming phenomenon induced by Rayleigh surface acoustic wave in microdroplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alghane, M.; Fu, Y. Q.; Chen, B. X.; Li, Y.; Desmulliez, M. P. Y.; Walton, A. J.

    2012-10-01

    Acoustic streaming of ink particles inside a water microdroplet generated by a surface acoustic wave (SAW) has been studied numerically using a finite volume numerical method and these results have been verified using experimental measurements. Effects of SAW excitation frequency, droplet volume, and radio-frequency (RF) power are investigated, and it has been shown that SAW excitation frequency influences the SAW attenuation length, lSAW, and hence the acoustic energy absorbed by liquid. It has also been observed that an increase of excitation frequency generally enhances the SAW streaming behavior. However, when the frequency exceeds a critical value that depends on the RF power applied to the SAW device, weaker acoustic streaming is observed resulting in less effective acoustic mixing inside the droplet. This critical value is characterised by a dimensionless ratio of droplet radius to SAW attenuation length, i.e., Rd/lSAW. With a mean value of Rd/lSAW ≈ 1, a fast and efficient mixing can be induced, even at the lowest RF power of 0.05 mW studied in this paper. On the other hand, for the Rd/lSAW ratios much larger than ˜1, significant decreases in streaming velocities were observed, resulting in a transition from regular (strong) to irregular (weak) mixing/flow. This is attributed to an increased absorption rate of acoustic wave energy that leaks into the liquid, resulting in a reduction of the acoustic energy radiated away from the SAW interaction region towards the droplet free surface. It has been demonstrated in this study that a fast and efficient mixing process with a smaller RF power could be achieved if the ratio of Rd/lSAW ≤ 1 in the SAW-droplet based microfluidics.

  14. Picosecond laser-induced breakdown at 5321 and 5347 A - Observation of frequency-dependent behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, W. L.; Bechtel, J. H.; Bloembergen, N.

    1977-01-01

    A study is presented of picosecond laser-induced breakdown at 3547 and 5321 A of several materials. The thresholds obtained for breakdown at 5321 A are compared to previous results obtained at 1.064 microns using the same laser system. This comparison illustrates the transition of bulk laser-induced breakdown as it becomes increasingly frequency dependent. UV picosecond pulses are obtained by mixing 5321 A and 1.064 micron pulses in a KH2PO4 crystal. Upper and lower bounds on the 3547 A breakdown threshold are defined, although some effects of walk-off distortion and self-focusing are observed. The results are discussed with reference to models for the intrinsic processes involved in the breakdown, i.e., avalanche and multiphoton ionization.

  15. Interferons alpha and gamma induce p53-dependent and p53-independent apoptosis, respectively.

    PubMed

    Porta, Chiara; Hadj-Slimane, Reda; Nejmeddine, Mohamed; Pampin, Mathieu; Tovey, Michael G; Espert, Lucile; Alvarez, Sandra; Chelbi-Alix, Mounira K

    2005-01-20

    Type I interferon (IFN) enhances the transcription of the tumor suppressor gene p53. To elucidate the molecular mechanism mediating IFN-induced apoptosis, we analysed programmed cell death in response to type I (IFNalpha) or type II (IFNgamma) treatment in relation to p53 status. In two cell lines (MCF-7, SKNSH), IFNalpha, but not IFNgamma, enhanced apoptosis in a p53-dependent manner. Furthermore, only IFNalpha upregulated p53 as well as p53 target genes (Noxa, Mdm2 and CD95). The apoptotic response to IFNalpha decreased in the presence of ZB4, an anti-CD95 antibody, suggesting that CD95 is involved in this process. When p53 was inactivated by the E6 viral protein or the expression of a p53 mutant, IFNalpha-induced apoptosis and p53 target genes upregulation were abrogated. Altogether these results demonstrate that p53 plays a pivotal role in the IFNalpha-induced apoptotic response. IFNalpha-induced PML was unable to recruit p53 into nuclear bodies and its downregulation by siRNA did not alter CD95 expression. In contrast, IFNgamma-induced apoptosis is p53-independent. CD95 and IFN-regulatory factor 1 (IRF1) are directly upregulated by this cytokine. Apoptotic response to IFNgamma is decreased in the presence of ZB4 and strongly diminished by IRF1 siRNA, implicating both CD95 and IRF1 in IFNgamma-induced apoptotic response. Taken together, these results show that in two different cell lines, IFNalpha and IFNgamma, induce p53-dependent -independent apoptosis, respectively.

  16. Corticotropin-releasing factor induces phosphorylation of phospholipase C-gamma at tyrosine residues via its receptor 2beta in human epidermoid A-431 cells.

    PubMed

    Kiang, J G; Ding, X Z; Gist, I D; Jones, R R; Tsokos, G C

    1998-12-18

    This laboratory previously reported that corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) increased intracellular free calcium concentrations, cellular cAMP, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate, protein kinase C activity, and protein phosphorylation in human A-431 cells. The increase was blocked by CRF receptor antagonist. In this study, we identified the type of CRF receptors present and investigated whether CRF induced tyrosine phosphorylation of phospholipase C-gamma via CRF receptors. Using novel primers in reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, we determined the CRF receptor type to be that of 2beta. The levels of the CRF receptor type 2beta were not altered in cells treated with activators of protein kinase C, Ca2+ ionophore, or cells overexpressing heat shock protein 70 kDa. Cells treated with CRF displayed increases in protein tyrosine phosphorylation approximately at 150 kDa as detected by immunoblotting using an antibody against phosphotyrosine. Immunoprecipitation with antibodies directed against phospholipase C-beta3, -gamma1, or -gamma2 isoforms (which have molecular weights around 150 kDa) followed by Western blotting using an anti-phosphotyrosine antibody showed that only phospholipase C-gamma1 and -gamma2 were phosphorylated. The increase in phospholipase C-gamma phosphorylation was concentration-dependent with an EC50 of 4.2+/-0.1 pM. The maximal phosphorylation by CRF at 1 nM occurred by 5 min. The CRF-induced phosphorylation was inhibited by the protein tyrosine kinase inhibitors genistein and herbimycin A, suggesting that CRF activates protein tyrosine kinases. Treatment of cells with CRF receptor antagonist, but not pertussis toxin, prior to treatment with CRF inhibited the CRF-induced phosphorylation, suggesting it is mediated by the CRF receptor type 2beta that is not coupled to pertussis toxin-sensitive G-proteins. Treatment with 1,2-bis(2iminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid attenuated the phospholipase C-gamma phosphorylation. In summary

  17. Mycophenolic acid induces ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) expression through the PPAR{gamma}-LXR{alpha}-ABCA1 pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yanni; Lai, Fangfang; Xu, Yang; Wu, Yexiang; Liu, Qi; Li, Ni; Wei, Yuzhen; Feng, Tingting; Zheng, Zhihui; Jiang, Wei; Yu, Liyan; Hong, Bin; Si, Shuyi

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Using an ABCA1p-LUC HepG2 cell line, we found that MPA upregulated ABCA1 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MPA induced ABCA1 and LXR{alpha} protein expression in HepG2 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PPAR{gamma} antagonist GW9662 markedly inhibited MPA-induced ABCA1 and LXR{alpha} protein expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of MPA upregulating ABCA1 was due mainly to activation of the PPAR{gamma}-LXR{alpha}-ABCA1 pathway. -- Abstract: ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) promotes cholesterol and phospholipid efflux from cells to lipid-poor apolipoprotein A-I and plays an important role in atherosclerosis. In a previous study, we developed a high-throughput screening method using an ABCA1p-LUC HepG2 cell line to find upregulators of ABCA1. Using this method in the present study, we found that mycophenolic acid (MPA) upregulated ABCA1 expression (EC50 = 0.09 {mu}M). MPA upregulation of ABCA1 expression was confirmed by real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR and Western blot analysis in HepG2 cells. Previous work has indicated that MPA is a potent agonist of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR{gamma}; EC50 = 5.2-9.3 {mu}M). Liver X receptor {alpha} (LXR{alpha}) is a target gene of PPAR{gamma} and may directly regulate ABCA1 expression. Western blot analysis showed that MPA induced LXR{alpha} protein expression in HepG2 cells. Addition of PPAR{gamma} antagonist GW9662 markedly inhibited MPA-induced ABCA1 and LXR{alpha} protein expression. These data suggest that MPA increased ABCA1 expression mainly through activation of PPAR{gamma}. Thus, the effects of MPA on upregulation of ABCA1 expression were due mainly to activation of the PPAR{gamma}-LXR{alpha}-ABCA1 signaling pathway. This is the first report that the antiatherosclerosis activity of MPA is due to this mechanism.

  18. Chromosomal double-strand breaks induce gene conversion at high frequency in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Taghian, D G; Nickoloff, J A

    1997-01-01

    Double-strand breaks (DSBs) stimulate chromosomal and extrachromosomal recombination and gene targeting. Transcription also stimulates spontaneous recombination by an unknown mechanism. We used Saccharomyces cerevisiae I-SceI to stimulate recombination between neo direct repeats in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell chromosomal DNA. One neo allele was controlled by the dexamethasone-inducible mouse mammary tumor virus promoter and inactivated by an insertion containing an I-SceI site at which DSBs were introduced in vivo. The other neo allele lacked a promoter but carried 12 phenotypically silent single-base mutations that create restriction sites (restriction fragment length polymorphisms). This system allowed us to generate detailed conversion tract spectra for recipient alleles transcribed at high or low levels. Transient in vivo expression of I-SceI increased homologous recombination 2,000- to 10,000-fold, yielding recombinants at frequencies as high as 1%. Strikingly, 97% of these products arose by gene conversion. Most products had short, bidirectional conversion tracts, and in all cases, donor neo alleles (i.e., those not suffering a DSB) remained unchanged, indicating that conversion was fully nonreciprocal. DSBs in exogenous DNA are usually repaired by end joining requiring little or no homology or by nonconservative homologous recombination (single-strand annealing). In contrast, we show that chromosomal DSBs are efficiently repaired via conservative homologous recombination, principally gene conversion without associated crossing over. For DSB-induced events, similar recombination frequencies and conversion tract spectra were found under conditions of low and high transcription. Thus, transcription does not further stimulate DSB-induced recombination, nor does it appear to affect the mechanism(s) by which DSBs induce gene conversion. PMID:9343400

  19. Real-time analysis of arc-induced Long Period Gratings under gamma irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Flavio; Ranjan, Rajeev; Stăncălie, Andrei; Sporea, Dan; Neguţ, Daniel; Becherescu, Nicu; Campopiano, Stefania; Iadicicco, Agostino

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we present a comparative experimental and theoretical study on gamma radiation sensitivity of Long Period Gratings (LPGs), fabricated by electric arc discharge technique, as monitored in three single mode optical fibers supplied by different manufacturers. A real-time measurement of LPGs’ wavelength shift was performed until a total dose of 35 kGy was reached, with average dose rate of 0.18 kGy/h, the irradiation being done at room temperature. In one case, a maximum radiation sensitivity of 1.34 nm/kGy was recorded for doses up to 0.5 kGy. Moreover, by combining experimental results with numerical simulations, it was found that changes occurred in the core refractive index of the irradiated optical fibers up to 2.5 ∙ 10−5. The increase of the core thermo-optic coefficient up to 1.5 ∙ 10−8/°C was observed as well. PMID:28262784

  20. High doses of gamma radiation suppress allergic effect induced by food lectin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaz, Antônio F. M.; Souza, Marthyna P.; Vieira, Leucio D.; Aguiar, Jaciana S.; Silva, Teresinha G.; Medeiros, Paloma L.; Melo, Ana M. M. A.; Silva-Lucca, Rosemeire A.; Santana, Lucimeire A.; Oliva, Maria L. V.; Perez, Katia R.; Cuccovia, Iolanda M.; Coelho, Luana C. B. B.; Correia, Maria T. S.

    2013-04-01

    One of the most promising areas for the development of functional foods lies in the development of effective methods to reduce or eliminate food allergenicity, but few reports have summarized information concerning the progress made with food irradiation. In this study, we investigated the relationship between allergenicity and molecular structure of a food allergen after gamma irradiation and evaluate the profile of the allergic response to irradiated allergens. Cramoll, a lectin isolated from a bean and used as a food allergen, was irradiated and the possible structural changes were accompanied by spectrofluorimetry, circular dichroism and microcalorimetry. Subsequently, sensitized animals subjected to intragastric administration of non-irradiated and irradiated Cramoll were treated for 7 days. Then, body weight, leukocytes, cytokine profiles and histological parameters were also determined. Cramoll showed complete inhibition of intrinsic activity after high radiation doses. Changes in fluorescence and CD spectra with a simultaneous collapse of the tertiary structure followed by a pronounced decrease of native secondary structure were observed after irradiation. After oral challenge, sensitized mice demonstrate an association between Cramoll intake, body weight loss, eosinophilia, lymphocytic infiltrate in the gut and Eotaxin secretion. Irradiation significantly reduces, according to the dose, the effects observed by non-irradiated food allergens. We confirm that high-dose radiation may render protein food allergens innocuous by irreversibly compromising their molecular structure.

  1. Gamma-Band Activities in Mouse Frontal and Visual Cortex Induced by Coherent Dot Motion

    PubMed Central

    Han, Hio-Been; Hwang, Eunjin; Lee, Soohyun; Kim, Min-Shik; Choi, Jee Hyun

    2017-01-01

    A key question within systems neuroscience is to understand how the brain encodes spatially and temporally distributed local features and binds these together into one perceptual representation. Previous works in animal and human have shown that changes in neural synchrony occur during the perceptual processing and these changes are distinguished by the emergence of gamma-band oscillations (GBO, 30–80 Hz, centered at 40 Hz). Here, we used the mouse electroencephalogram to investigate how different cortical areas play roles in perceptual processing by assessing their GBO patterns during the visual presentation of coherently/incoherently moving random-dot kinematogram and static dots display. Our results revealed that GBO in the visual cortex were strongly modulated by the moving dots regardless of the existence of a global dot coherence, whereas GBO in frontal cortex were modulated by coherence of the motion. Moreover, concurrent GBO across the multiple cortical area occur more frequently for coherently moving dots. Taken together, these findings of GBO in the mouse frontal and visual cortex are related to the perceptual binding of local features into a globally-coherent representation, suggesting the dynamic interplay across the local/distributed networks of GBO in the global processing of optic flow. PMID:28252109

  2. Assessment of gamma ray-induced DNA damage in Lasioderma serricorne using the comet assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kameya, Hiromi; Miyanoshita, Akihiro; Imamura, Taro; Todoriki, Setsuko

    2012-03-01

    We attempted a DNA comet assay under alkaline conditions to verify the irradiation treatment of pests. Lasioderma serricorne (Fabricius) were chosen as test insects and irradiated with gamma rays from a 60Co source at 1 kGy. We conducted the comet assay immediately after irradiation and over time for 7 day. Severe DNA fragmentation in L. serricorne cells was observed just after irradiation and the damage was repaired during the post-irradiation period in a time-dependent manner. The parameters of the comet image analysis were calculated, and the degree of DNA damage and repair were evaluated. Values for the Ratio (a percentage determined by fluorescence in the damaged area to overall luminance, including intact DNA and the damaged area of a comet image) of individual cells showed that no cells in the irradiated group were included in the Ratio<0.1 category, the lowest grade. This finding was observed consistently throughout the 7-day post-irradiation period. We suggest that the Ratio values of individual cells can be used as an index of irradiation history and conclude that the DNA comet assay under alkaline conditions, combined with comet image analysis, can be used to identify irradiation history.

  3. Real-time analysis of arc-induced Long Period Gratings under gamma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Flavio; Ranjan, Rajeev; Stăncălie, Andrei; Sporea, Dan; Neguţ, Daniel; Becherescu, Nicu; Campopiano, Stefania; Iadicicco, Agostino

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we present a comparative experimental and theoretical study on gamma radiation sensitivity of Long Period Gratings (LPGs), fabricated by electric arc discharge technique, as monitored in three single mode optical fibers supplied by different manufacturers. A real-time measurement of LPGs’ wavelength shift was performed until a total dose of 35 kGy was reached, with average dose rate of 0.18 kGy/h, the irradiation being done at room temperature. In one case, a maximum radiation sensitivity of 1.34 nm/kGy was recorded for doses up to 0.5 kGy. Moreover, by combining experimental results with numerical simulations, it was found that changes occurred in the core refractive index of the irradiated optical fibers up to 2.5 • 10‑5. The increase of the core thermo-optic coefficient up to 1.5 • 10‑8/°C was observed as well.

  4. Nitric oxide-mediated antiplasmodial activity in human and murine hepatocytes induced by gamma interferon and the parasite itself: enhancement by exogenous tetrahydrobiopterin.

    PubMed Central

    Mellouk, S; Hoffman, S L; Liu, Z Z; de la Vega, P; Billiar, T R; Nussler, A K

    1994-01-01

    Expression of inducible nitric oxide (NO) synthase has been shown to inhibit the development of several pathogens, including fungi, bacteria, parasites, and viruses. However, there is still controversy as to whether this effector mechanism can inhibit the development of human pathogens. We now report that gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) induces the elimination of Plasmodium falciparum-infected primary human hepatocytes from cultures and that the antimalarial activity is dependent on NO. Infection with the parasite alone in the absence of added IFN-gamma caused a 10-fold increase in NO formation. Both spontaneous inhibition and IFN-gamma-induced inhibition of Plasmodium yoelii-infected murine hepatocytes were increased with the addition of the NO synthase cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin, or sepiapterin, which is converted to tetrahydrobiopterin. These results indicate that under in vitro conditions the parasite itself provides a signal that triggers induction of the NO pathway in human and murine hepatocytes and that NO formation in infected hepatocytes is limited by tetrahydrobiopterin availability. PMID:8063424

  5. Are Electrically Induced Muscle Cramps Able to Increase the Cramp Threshold Frequency, When Induced Once a Week?

    PubMed

    Behringer, Michael; Link, Tobias Walter; Montag, Johannes Caspar Konrad; McCourt, Molly Leigh; Mester, Joachim

    2015-09-28

    The cramp threshold frequency (CTF) is known to be positively correlated with the individual cramp susceptibility. Here we assessed CTF changes after two bouts of electrically induced muscle cramps (EIMCs). The EIMCs (6×5 sec) were unilaterally induced twice (separated by one week) in the gastrocnemius of an intervention group (n=8), while 5 participants served as control. The CTF increased from 25.1±4.6 Hz at baseline to 31.4±9.0 Hz and 31.7±8.5 Hz 24 h after bout 1 and 2 (P<0.05). Thereafter, the CTF declined following both bouts to reach values of 28.0±6.7 Hz and 29.1±7.7 Hz after 72 h after bout 1 and 2. Creatine kinase (CK) activity and perceived discomfort during cramps was lower after bout 2 (P<0.05). CTF, CK, and discomfort did not change in CG. That is, a single bout of EIMCs induces a 24 h CTF increment and a second bout sustains this effect, while perceived discomfort and muscle damage decreases. This short term effect may help athletes to reduce the cramp susceptibility for an important match.

  6. ZnO Luminescence and scintillation studied via photoexcitation, X-ray excitation, and gamma-induced positron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, J.; Colosimo, A. M.; Anwand, W.; Boatner, L. A.; Wagner, A.; Stepanov, P. S.; Trinh, T. T.; Liedke, M. O.; Krause-Rehberg, R.; Cowan, T. E.; Selim, F. A.

    2016-08-01

    The luminescence and scintillation properties of ZnO single crystals were studied by photoluminescence and X-ray-induced luminescence (XRIL) techniques. XRIL allowed a direct comparison to be made between the near-band emission (NBE) and trap emissions providing insight into the carrier recombination efficiency in the ZnO crystals. It also provided bulk luminescence measurements that were not affected by surface states. The origin of a green emission, the dominant trap emission in ZnO, was then investigated by gamma-induced positron spectroscopy (GIPS) - a unique defect spectroscopy method that enables positron lifetime measurements to be made for a sample without contributions from positron annihilation in the source materials. The measurements showed a single positron decay curve with a 175 ps lifetime component that was attributed to Zn vacancies passivated by hydrogen. Both oxygen vacancies and hydrogen-decorated Zn vacancies were suggested to contribute to the green emission. By combining scintillation measurements with XRIL, the fast scintillation in ZnO crystals was found to be strongly correlated with the ratio between the defect luminescence and NBE. This study reports the first application of GIPS to semiconductors, and it reveals the great benefits of the XRIL technique for the study of emission and scintillation properties of materials.

  7. Gamma rays induce a p53-independent mitochondrial biogenesis that is counter-regulated by HIF1α.

    PubMed

    Bartoletti-Stella, A; Mariani, E; Kurelac, I; Maresca, A; Caratozzolo, M F; Iommarini, L; Carelli, V; Eusebi, L H; Guido, A; Cenacchi, G; Fuccio, L; Rugolo, M; Tullo, A; Porcelli, A M; Gasparre, G

    2013-06-13

    Mitochondrial biogenesis is an orchestrated process that presides to the regulation of the organelles homeostasis within a cell. We show that γ-rays, at doses commonly used in the radiation therapy for cancer treatment, induce an increase in mitochondrial mass and function, in response to a genotoxic stress that pushes cells into senescence, in the presence of a functional p53. Although the main effector of the response to γ-rays is the p53-p21 axis, we demonstrated that mitochondrial biogenesis is only indirectly regulated by p53, whose activation triggers a murine double minute 2 (MDM2)-mediated hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF1α) degradation, leading to the release of peroxisome-proliferator activated receptor gamma co-activator 1β inhibition by HIF1α, thus promoting mitochondrial biogenesis. Mimicking hypoxia by HIF1α stabilization, in fact, blunts the mitochondrial response to γ-rays as well as the induction of p21-mediated cell senescence, indicating prevalence of the hypoxic over the genotoxic response. Finally, we also show in vivo that post-radiotherapy mitochondrial DNA copy number increase well correlates with lack of HIF1α increase in the tissue, concluding this may be a useful molecular tool to infer the trigger of a hypoxic response during radiotherapy, which may lead to failure of activation of cell senescence.

  8. Gamma irradiation induces acetylcholine-evoked, endothelium-independent relaxation and activatesk-channels of isolated pulmonary artery of rats

    SciTech Connect

    Eder, Veronique . E-mail: eder@med.univ-tours.fr; Gautier, Mathieu; Boissiere, Julien; Girardin, Catherine; Rebocho, Manuel; Bonnet, Pierre

    2004-12-01

    Purpose: To test the effects of irradiation (R*) on the pulmonary artery (PA). Methods and materials: Isolated PA rings were submitted to gamma irradiation (cesium, 8 Gy/min{sup -1}) at doses of 20 Gy-140 Gy. Rings were placed in an organ chamber, contracted with serotonin (10{sup -4} M 5-hydroxytryptamine [5-HT]), then exposed to acetylcholine (ACh) in incremental concentrations. Smooth muscle cell (SMC) membrane potential was measured with microelectrodes. Results: A high dose of irradiation (60 Gy) increased 5HT contraction by 20%, whereas lower (20 Gy) doses slightly decreased it compared with control. In the absence of the endothelium, 5-HT precontracted rings exposed to 20 Gy irradiation developed a dose-dependent relaxation induced by acetylcholine (EI-ACh) with maximal relaxation of 60 {+-} 17% (n = 13). This was totally blocked by L-NAME (10{sup -4} M), partly by 7-nitro indazole; it was abolished by hypoxia and iberiotoxin, decreased by tetra-ethyl-ammonium, and not affected by free radical scavengers. In irradiated rings, hypoxia induced a slight contraction which was never observed in control rings. No differences in SMC membrane potential were observed between irradiated and nonirradiated PA rings. Conclusion: Irradiation mediates endothelium independent relaxation by a mechanism involving the nitric oxide pathway and K-channels.

  9. ZnO Luminescence and scintillation studied via photoexcitation, X-ray excitation, and gamma-induced positron spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ji, J.; Colosimo, A. M.; Anwand, W.; Boatner, L. A.; Wagner, A.; Stepanov, P. S.; Trinh, T. T.; Liedke, M. O.; Krause-Rehberg, R.; Cowan, T. E.; Selim, F. A.

    2016-01-01

    The luminescence and scintillation properties of ZnO single crystals were studied by photoluminescence and X-ray-induced luminescence (XRIL) techniques. XRIL allowed a direct comparison to be made between the near-band emission (NBE) and trap emissions providing insight into the carrier recombination efficiency in the ZnO crystals. It also provided bulk luminescence measurements that were not affected by surface states. The origin of a green emission, the dominant trap emission in ZnO, was then investigated by gamma-induced positron spectroscopy (GIPS) - a unique defect spectroscopy method that enables positron lifetime measurements to be made for a sample without contributions from positron annihilation in the source materials. The measurements showed a single positron decay curve with a 175 ps lifetime component that was attributed to Zn vacancies passivated by hydrogen. Both oxygen vacancies and hydrogen-decorated Zn vacancies were suggested to contribute to the green emission. By combining scintillation measurements with XRIL, the fast scintillation in ZnO crystals was found to be strongly correlated with the ratio between the defect luminescence and NBE. This study reports the first application of GIPS to semiconductors, and it reveals the great benefits of the XRIL technique for the study of emission and scintillation properties of materials. PMID:27550235

  10. Skin-penetrating methotrexate alleviates imiquimod-induced psoriasiform dermatitis via decreasing IL-17-producing gamma delta T cells.

    PubMed

    Byamba, Dashlkhumbe; Kim, Do Young; Kim, Dae-Suk; Kim, Tae-Gyun; Jee, Hyunjoong; Kim, Sung Hee; Park, Tae-Yoon; Yang, Sang-Hwa; Lee, Sang-Kyou; Lee, Min-Geol

    2014-07-01

    Accumulating evidence has shown that the Toll-like receptor 7 agonist imiquimod (IMQ) induces psoriasiform skin inflammation in mice and that this inflammation is dependent on the IL-23/IL-17 axis. Moreover, it has been demonstrated that the main source of IL-17 is not Th17 but is dermal gamma delta (γδ) T cells in mouse psoriasiform skin. Recent advances in the understanding of immunopathogenesis of psoriasis led to an alteration in the treatment paradigm to the use of highly efficacious biologics. However, their high cost impedes the extensive use of these agents. Thus, inexpensive and safe medications are still considered valuable. In this study, we introduce the therapeutic efficacy of a newly formulated methotrexate (MTX), a chemical conjugate of MTX with cell permeable peptide, for the treatment of psoriasis. Topically applied skin-penetrating (SP)-MTX reduced the psoriasiform skin phenomenon, epidermal thickness and infiltrating immune cells into the dermis. IL-17A-producing dermal γδ T cells in the cellular infiltrate that contribute IL-23/IL-17 axis were well abrogated by SP-MTX. Furthermore, SP-MTX had no toxic effects on liver, kidney or myeloid cells, unlike systemic administration of MTX. In conclusion, topically applied SP-MTX ameliorated psoriasiform skin inflammation in mice with the criteria of clinical phenomenon, histopathology and immunology, without inducing systemic toxic effects.

  11. The role of meiotic cohesin REC8 in chromosome segregation in {gamma} irradiation-induced endopolyploid tumour cells

    SciTech Connect

    Erenpreisa, Jekaterina; Cragg, Mark S.; Salmina, Kristine; Hausmann, Michael; Scherthan, Harry

    2009-09-10

    Escape from mitotic catastrophe and generation of endopolyploid tumour cells (ETCs) represents a potential survival strategy of tumour cells in response to genotoxic treatments. ETCs that resume the mitotic cell cycle have reduced ploidy and are often resistant to these treatments. In search for a mechanism for genome reduction, we previously observed that ETCs express meiotic proteins among which REC8 (a meiotic cohesin component) is of particular interest, since it favours reductional cell division in meiosis. In the present investigation, we induced endopolyploidy in p53-dysfunctional human tumour cell lines (Namalwa, WI-L2-NS, HeLa) by gamma irradiation, and analysed the sub-cellular localisation of REC8 in the resulting ETCs. We observed by RT-PCR and Western blot that REC8 is constitutively expressed in these tumour cells, along with SGOL1 and SGOL2, and that REC8 becomes modified after irradiation. REC8 localised to paired sister centromeres in ETCs, the former co-segregating to opposite poles. Furthermore, REC8 localised to the centrosome of interphase ETCs and to the astral poles in anaphase cells where it colocalised with the microtubule-associated protein NuMA. Altogether, our observations indicate that radiation-induced ETCs express features of meiotic cell divisions and that these may facilitate chromosome segregation and genome reduction.

  12. Gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) induces cognitive deficits and affects GABAB receptors and IGF-1 receptors in male rats.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Jenny; Grönbladh, Alfhild; Hallberg, Mathias

    2014-08-01

    In recent years, the abuse of the club drug gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) has become increasingly popular among adolescents. The drug induces euphoria but can also result in sedation, anaesthesia as well as short-term amnesia. In addition, the abuse of GHB causes cognitive impairments and the mechanism by which GHB induces these impairments is not clarified. The present study investigates the impact of GHB treatment on spatial learning and memory using a water maze (WM) test in rats. Furthermore, the behavioural data is combined with an autoradiographic analysis of the GABAB and the IGF-1 receptor systems. The results demonstrate that the animals administered with GHB display an impaired performance in the WM test as compared to controls. In addition, significant alterations in GABAB and IGF-1 receptor density as well as GABAB receptor functionality, were observed in several brain regions associated with cognitive functions e.g. hippocampus. To conclude, our findings suggest that GHB treatment can affect spatial learning and memory, and that this outcome at least to some extent is likely to involve both GABAB and IGF-1 receptors.

  13. ZnO Luminescence and scintillation studied via photoexcitation, X-ray excitation, and gamma-induced positron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ji, J; Colosimo, A M; Anwand, W; Boatner, L A; Wagner, A; Stepanov, P S; Trinh, T T; Liedke, M O; Krause-Rehberg, R; Cowan, T E; Selim, F A

    2016-08-23

    The luminescence and scintillation properties of ZnO single crystals were studied by photoluminescence and X-ray-induced luminescence (XRIL) techniques. XRIL allowed a direct comparison to be made between the near-band emission (NBE) and trap emissions providing insight into the carrier recombination efficiency in the ZnO crystals. It also provided bulk luminescence measurements that were not affected by surface states. The origin of a green emission, the dominant trap emission in ZnO, was then investigated by gamma-induced positron spectroscopy (GIPS) - a unique defect spectroscopy method that enables positron lifetime measurements to be made for a sample without contributions from positron annihilation in the source materials. The measurements showed a single positron decay curve with a 175 ps lifetime component that was attributed to Zn vacancies passivated by hydrogen. Both oxygen vacancies and hydrogen-decorated Zn vacancies were suggested to contribute to the green emission. By combining scintillation measurements with XRIL, the fast scintillation in ZnO crystals was found to be strongly correlated with the ratio between the defect luminescence and NBE. This study reports the first application of GIPS to semiconductors, and it reveals the great benefits of the XRIL technique for the study of emission and scintillation properties of materials.

  14. Gamma ray-induced synthesis of hyaluronic acid/chondroitin sulfate-based hydrogels for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Linlin; Gwon, Hui-Jeong; Lim, Youn-Mook; Nho, Young-Chang; Kim, So Yeon

    2015-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA)/chondroitin sulfate (CS)/poly(acrylic acid) (PAAc) hydrogel systems were synthesized by gamma-ray irradiation without the use of additional initiators or crosslinking agents to achieve a biocompatible hydrogel system for skin tissue engineering. HA and CS derivatives with polymerizable residues were synthesized. Then, the hydrogels composed of glycosaminoglycans, HA, CS, and a synthetic ionic polymer, PAAc, were prepared using gamma-ray irradiation through simultaneous free radical copolymerization and crosslinking. The physicochemical properties of the HA/CS/PAAc hydrogels having various compositions were investigated to evaluate their feasibility as artificial skin substitutes. The gel fractions of the HA/CS/PAAc hydrogels increased in absorbed doses up to 15 kGy, and they exhibited 91-93% gel fractions under 15 kGy radiation. All of the HA/CS/PAAc hydrogels exhibited relatively high water contents of over 90% and reached an equilibrium swelling state within 24 h. The enzymatic degradation kinetics of the HA/CS/PAAc hydrogels depended on both the concentration of the hyaluronidase solution and the ratio of HA/CS/PAAc. The in vitro drug release profiles of the HA/CS/PAAc hydrogels were significantly influenced by the interaction between the ionic groups in the hydrogels and the ionic drug molecules as well as the swelling of the hydrogels. From the cytotoxicity results of human keratinocyte (HaCaT) cells cultured with extracts of the HA/CS/PAAc hydrogels, all of the HA/CS/PAAc hydrogel samples tested showed relatively high cell viabilities of more than 82%, and did not induce any significant adverse effects on cell viability.

  15. Caffeine induces a second wave of apoptosis after low dose-rate gamma radiation of HL-60 cells.

    PubMed

    Vávrová, Jirina; Mareková-Rezácová, Martina; Vokurková, Doris; Szkanderová, Sylva; Psutka, Jan

    2003-10-01

    Most cell lines that lack functional p53 protein are arrested in the G(2) phase of the cell cycle due to DNA damage. It was previously found that the human promyelocyte leukemia cells HL-60 (TP53 negative) that had been exposed to ionizing radiation at doses up to 10 Gy were arrested in the G(2) phase for a period of 24 h. The radioresistance of HL-60 cells that were exposed to low dose-rate gamma irradiation of 3.9 mGy/min, which resulted in a pronounced accumulation of the cells in the G(2) phase during the exposure period, increased compared with the radioresistance of cells that were exposed to a high dose-rate gamma irradiation of 0.6 Gy/min. The D(0) value (i.e. the radiation dose leading to 37% cell survival) for low dose-rate radiation was 3.7 Gy and for high dose-rate radiation 2.2 Gy. In this study, prevention of G(2) phase arrest by caffeine (2 mM) and irradiation of cells with low dose-rate irradiation in all phases of the cell cycle proved to cause radiosensitization (D(0)=2.2 Gy). The irradiation in the presence of caffeine resulted in a second wave of apoptosis on days 5-7 post-irradiation. Caffeine-induced apoptosis occurring later than day 7 post-irradiation is postulated to be a result of unscheduled DNA replication and cell cycle progress.

  16. Theta Frequency Stimulation Induces a Local Form of Late Phase LTP in the CA1 Region of the Hippocampus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Yan-You; Kandel, Eric R.

    2005-01-01

    The late phase of LTP (L-LTP) is typically induced by repeated high-frequency stimulation. This form of LTP requires activation of transcription and translation and results in the cell-wide distribution of gene products that can be captured by other marked synapses. Here we report that theta frequency stimulation (5 Hz, 30 sec) applied to the…

  17. In vivo BDNF modulation of hippocampal mossy fiber plasticity induced by high frequency stimulation.

    PubMed

    Schjetnan, Andrea Gómez-Palacio; Escobar, Martha L

    2012-01-01

    Changes in synaptic efficacy and morphology have been proposed as mechanisms underlying learning and memory processes. In our previous studies, high frequency stimulation (HFS) sufficient to induce LTP at the hippocampal mossy fiber (MF) pathway, leads to MF synaptogenesis, in a prominent contralateral form, at the stratum oriens of hippocampal CA3 area. Recently we reported that acute intrahippocampal microinfusion of BDNF induces a lasting potentiation of synaptic efficacy at the MF projection accompanied by a structural reorganization at the CA3 area within the stratum oriens region in a prominent ipsilateral form. It is considered that the capacity of synapses to express plastic changes is itself subject to variation dependent on previous experience. Here we used intrahippocampal microinfusion of BDNF to analyze its effects on functional and structural synaptic plasticity induced by subsequent mossy fiber HFS sufficient to induce LTP in adult rats, in vivo. Our results show that BDNF modifies the ability of the MF pathway to present LTP by HFS. Moreover BDNF modified the structural reorganization pattern produced by HFS, presenting a balanced bilateral appearance. Microinfusion of K252a blocks the functional and morphological effects produced by BDNF, revealing that the BDNF modulation is dependent on its TrkB receptor activation. These findings support the idea that BDNF actions modify subsequent synaptic plasticity; a homeostatic mechanism thought to be essential for synaptic integration among prolonged temporal domains in the adult mammalian brain.

  18. Effects of extremely low frequency magnetic fields on NGF induced neuronal differentiation of PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Jung, In-Soo; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Noh, Ran; Kim, Soo-Chan; Kim, Chan-Wha

    2014-10-01

    Extremely low-frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MFs) affect various cellular processes and systems, such as cell proliferation, differentiation and metabolic pathways. The present study investigated ELF-MFs effect on nerve growth factor (NGF) induced neuronal differentiation of PC12 cells using proteomic applications to understand its role in the enhancement of neuronal differentiation. After 50 Hz, 1 mT ELF-MFs 5-day exposure on NGF induced PC12 cells, it was observed to increase neurite length as well as an increase in the number of neurite bearing cells. It was also discovered that there was a decrease in proliferation activity, which is associated with an increase in differentiated cells. Neuronal differentiation related mRNA levels and protein levels were increased in NGF induced PC12 cells. Compared with NGF induced group, ELF-MFs stimulated PC12 cells had different protein expression as measured with two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) gels. Consequently six differentially expressed spots were detected between the 2-DE maps, which were identified by electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-Q-TOF LC/MS/MS) as: peripherin, neurosecretory protein nerve growth factor inducible (VGF8a) precursor, dnaK-type molecular chaperone sp72-ps1 (HSP72-psI), low molecular weight (Mr) phosphotyrosine protein phosphatase isoenzyme AcP1 (LMW-PTP/ACP1), Tubulin alpha-1A (TUBA1A) chain, outcome predictor in acute leukemia 1 homolog (OPA1L). The identification of these proteins provides clues to the mechanism of ELF-MFs stimulation on NGF induced PC12 cells that occur during neuronal differentiation and may contribute to the development novel treatments for neurodegenerative diseases.

  19. Frequency of inducible clindamycin resistance among gram-positive cocci in a tertiary hospital, Tehran, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Saffar, Hiva; Rajabiani, Afsaneh; Abdollahi, Alireza; Habibi, Shirin; Baseri, Zohreh

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Accurate designation of antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of the infecting microorganisms is an important crucial factor in making appropriate therapeutic decisions. Macrolide, lincosamide and streptogramin B antibiotics are in a family, reserved as an alternative approach in treatment of resistant Gram positive cocci. Amongst them, clindamycin has been considered as the preferred agent due to its excellent pharmacokinetic properties. The inducible resistance to clindamycin in Gram positive staphylococci and streptococci cannot be recognized by routine broth or agar based susceptibility tests and D-zone testing is necessary. This study is conducted to evaluate the frequency of inducible clindamycin resistance in Gram positive cocci. Materials and Methods: Using traditional culture methods, 487 isolates of staphylococcus and β-hemolytic streptococcus were evaluated. If they were resistant to erythromycin and sensitive to clindamycin in primary antibiotic susceptibility testing by Kirby-Bauer method, they were subjected to D-zone testing to detect possible inducible clindamycin resistance. Results: Thirty three out of 172 isolates of Staphylococcus aureus and 50 out of 277 isolates of coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) were subjected for D-zone testing. Among them 13/33 and 28/50 showed inducible clindamycin resistance, respectively. There was no significant difference in inducible clindamycin resistance regarding to methicillin susceptibility pattern. Positive D-test was observed in 17.39 and 13.33% of Group B streptococci and Streptococcus spp., respectively. Conclusion: Considerable number of isolates showed inducible clindamycin resistance in our study which falsely would be reported susceptible if D-zone testing was not performed. Thus, performing D-Zone testing is necessary to avoid misleading results which may cause treatment failure. PMID:28210463

  20. Low frequency vibration induced streaming in a Hele-Shaw cell

    SciTech Connect

    Costalonga, M.; Brunet, P.; Peerhossaini, H.

    2015-01-15

    When an acoustic wave propagates in a fluid, it can generate a second order flow whose characteristic time is much longer than the period of the wave. Within a range of frequency between ten and several hundred Hz, a relatively simple and versatile way to generate streaming flow is to put a vibrating object in the fluid. The flow develops vortices in the viscous boundary layer located in the vicinity of the source of vibrations, leading in turn to an outer irrotational streaming called Rayleigh streaming. Because the flow originates from non-linear time-irreversible terms of the Navier-Stokes equation, this phenomenon can be used to generate efficient mixing at low Reynolds number, for instance in confined geometries. Here, we report on an experimental study of such streaming flow induced by a vibrating beam in a Hele-Shaw cell of 2 mm span using long exposure flow visualization and particle-image velocimetry measurements. Our study focuses especially on the effects of forcing frequency and amplitude on flow dynamics. It is shown that some features of this flow can be predicted by simple scaling arguments and that this vibration-induced streaming facilitates the generation of vortices.

  1. Characterization of enzymatically induced degradation of articular cartilage using high frequency ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Töyräs, J.; Rieppo, J.; Nieminen, M. T.; Helminen, H. J.; Jurvelin, J. S.

    1999-11-01

    Ultrasound may provide a quantitative technique for the characterization of cartilage changes typical of early osteoarthrosis. In this study, specific changes in bovine articular cartilage were induced using collagenase and chondroitinase ABC, enzymes that selectively degrade collagen fibril network and digest proteoglycans, respectively. Changes in cartilage structure and properties were quantified using high frequency ultrasound, microscopic analyses and mechanical indentation tests. The ultrasound reflection coefficient of the physiological saline-cartilage interface (R1) decreased significantly (-96.4%, p<0.01) in the collagenase digested cartilage compared to controls. Also a significantly lower ultrasound velocity (-6.2%, p<0.01) was revealed after collagenase digestion. After chondroitinase ABC digestion, a new acoustic interface at the depth of the enzyme penetration front was detected. Cartilage thickness, as determined with ultrasound, showed a high, linear correlation (R = 0.943, n = 60, average difference 0.073 mm (4.0%)) with the thickness measured by the needle-probe method. Both enzymes induced a significant decrease in the Young's modulus of cartilage (p<0.01). Our results indicate that high frequency ultrasound provides a sensitive technique for the analysis of cartilage structure and properties. Possibly ultrasound may be utilized in vivo as a quantitative probe during arthroscopy.

  2. Stepped-frequency continuous-wave microwave-induced thermoacoustic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Nan, Hao Arbabian, Amin

    2014-06-02

    Microwave-induced thermoacoustic (TA) imaging combines the dielectric contrast of microwave imaging with the resolution of ultrasound imaging. Prior studies have only focused on time-domain techniques with short but powerful microwave pulses that require a peak output power in excess of several kilowatts to achieve sufficient signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This poses safety concerns as well as to render the imager expensive and bulky with requiring a large vacuum radio frequency source. Here, we propose and demonstrate a coherent stepped-frequency continuous-wave (SFCW) technique for TA imaging which enables substantial improvements in SNR and consequently a reduction in peak power requirements for the imager. Constructive and destructive interferences between TA signals are observed and explained. Full coherency across microwave and acoustic domains, in the thermo-elastic response, is experimentally verified and this enables demonstration of coherent SFCW microwave-induced TA imaging. Compared to the pulsed technique, an improvement of 17 dB in SNR is demonstrated.

  3. PPAR{alpha} deficiency augments a ketogenic diet-induced circadian PAI-1 expression possibly through PPAR{gamma} activation in the liver

    SciTech Connect

    Oishi, Katsutaka; Uchida, Daisuke; Ohkura, Naoki; Horie, Shuichi

    2010-10-15

    Research highlights: {yields} PPAR{alpha} deficiency augments a ketogenic diet-induced circadian PAI-1 expression. {yields} Hepatic expressions of PPAR{gamma} and PCG-1{alpha} are induced by a ketogenic diet. {yields} PPAR{gamma} antagonist attenuates a ketogenic diet-induced PAI-1 expression. {yields} Ketogenic diet advances the phase of circadian clock in a PPAR{alpha}-independent manner. -- Abstract: An increased level of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is considered a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, and PAI-1 gene expression is under the control of molecular circadian clocks in mammals. We recently showed that PAI-1 expression is augmented in a phase-advanced circadian manner in mice fed with a ketogenic diet (KD). To determine whether peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha} (PPAR{alpha}) is involved in hypofibrinolytic status induced by a KD, we examined the expression profiles of PAI-1 and circadian clock genes in PPAR{alpha}-null KD mice. Chronic administration of bezafibrate induced the PAI-1 gene expression in a PPAR{alpha}-dependent manner. Feeding with a KD augmented the circadian expression of PAI-1 mRNA in the hearts and livers of wild-type (WT) mice as previously described. The KD-induced mRNA expression of typical PPAR{alpha} target genes such as Cyp4A10 and FGF21 was damped in PPAR{alpha}-null mice. However, plasma PAI-1 concentrations were significantly more elevated in PPAR{alpha}-null KD mice in accordance with hepatic mRNA levels. These observations suggest that PPAR{alpha} activation is dispensable for KD-induced PAI-1 expression. We also found that hyperlipidemia, fatty liver, and the hepatic expressions of PPAR{gamma} and its coactivator PCG-1{alpha} were more effectively induced in PPAR{alpha}-null, than in WT mice on a KD. Furthermore, KD-induced hepatic PAI-1 expression was significantly suppressed by supplementation with bisphenol A diglycidyl ether, a PPAR{gamma} antagonist, in both WT and PPAR

  4. Tunable electromagnetically induced transparency at terahertz frequencies in coupled graphene metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Guo-Wen; Liu, Shao-Bin; Zhang, Hai-Feng; Kong, Xiang-Kun; Li, Hai-Ming; Li, Bing-Xiang; Liu, Si-Yuan; Li, Hai

    2015-11-01

    A graphene-based metamaterial with tunable electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT)-like transmission is numerically studied in this paper. The proposed structure consists of a graphene layer composed of coupled cut-wire pairs printed on a substrate. The simulation confirms that an EIT-like transparency window can be observed due to indirect coupling in a terahertz frequency range. More importantly, the peak frequency of the transmission window can be dynamically controlled over a broad frequency range by varying the Fermi energy levels of the graphene layer through controlling the electrostatic gating. The proposed metamaterial structure offers an additional opportunity to design novel applications such as switches or modulators. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61307052), the Youth Funding for Science & Technology Innovation in Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, China (Grant No. NS2014039), the Chinese Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education (Grant No. 20123218110017), the Innovation Program for Graduate Education of Jiangsu Province, China (Grant Nos. KYLX_0272, CXZZ13_0166, and CXLX13_155), the Open Research Program in National State Key Laboratory of Millimeter Waves of China (Grant No. K201609), and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China (Grant No. kfjj20150407).

  5. Is bone formation induced by high-frequency mechanical signals modulated by muscle activity?

    PubMed

    Judex, S; Rubin, C T

    2010-03-01

    Bone formation and resorption are sensitive to both external loads arising from gravitational loading as well to internal loads generated by muscular activity. The question as to which of the two sources provides the dominant stimulus for bone homeostasis and new bone accretion is arguably tied to the specific type of activity and anatomical site but it is often assumed that, because of their purportedly greater magnitude, muscle loads modulate changes in bone morphology. High-frequency mechanical signals may provide benefits at low- (<1g) and high- (>1g) acceleration magnitudes. While the mechanisms by which cells perceive high-frequency signals are largely unknown, higher magnitude vibrations can cause large muscle loads and may therefore be sensed by pathways similar to those associated with exercise. Here, we review experimental data to examine whether vibrations applied at very low magnitudes may be sensed directly by transmittance of the signal through the skeleton or whether muscle activity modulates, and perhaps amplifies, the externally applied mechanical stimulus. Current data indicate that the anabolic and anti-catabolic effects of whole body vibrations on the skeleton are unlikely to require muscular activity to become effective. Even high-frequency signals that induce bone matrix deformations of far less than five microstrain can promote bone formation in the absence of muscular activity. This independence of cells on large strains suggests that mechanical interventions can be designed that are both safe and effective.

  6. Scaling of frequency-magnitude distributions of fluid-induced seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinske, Carsten; Shapiro, Serge A.

    2015-04-01

    We compare b value and seismogenic index Σ estimates using two different approaches: a standard Gutenberg-Richter power-law fitting and a frequency-magnitude lower bound probability fitting. The latter takes into account the finite size of the perturbed rock volume. Our results reveal that the smaller is the perturbed rock volume the larger are the deviations between the two sets of derived parameters. It means that the magnitude statistics of the induced events is most affected for low injection volumes and/or short injection times. In sufficiently large stimulated volumes both fitting approaches provide comparable b value and seismogenic index estimates. In particular, the b value is then in the range universally obtained for tectonic earthquakes (b 0.8 - 1.2). We introduce the specific magnitude MΣ as a seismotectonic characteristic of a reservoir location. Defined as the ratio between seismogenic index Σ and b value, this magnitude scaling parameter is unaffected by the size of perturbed rock volumes. Using both seismogenic index model and specific magnitude model we predict frequency-magnitude distributions for two different scenarios and compare these to observed data. We conclude that the seismogenic index model provides reliable predictions which confirm its applicability as a forecast tool. On the other hand, the specific magnitude model can be applied to predict the asymptotical limit of probable frequency-magnitude distributions.

  7. Growth inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus induced by low-frequency electric and electromagnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Obermeier, Andreas; Matl, Florian Dominik; Friess, Wolfgang; Stemberger, Axel

    2009-05-01

    Magnetic field therapy is an established technique in the treatment of pseudarthrosis. In cases of osteomylitis, palliation is also observed. This study focuses on the impact of different electric and electromagnetic fields on the growth of Staphylococcus aureus by in vitro technologies. Cultures of Staphylococcus aureus in fluid and gel-like medium were exposed to a low-frequency electromagnetic field, an electromagnetic field combined with an additional electric field, a sinusoidal electric field and a static electric field. In gel-like medium no significant difference between colony-forming units of exposed samples and non-exposed references was detected. In contrast, Staphylococcus aureus concentrations in fluid medium could clearly be reduced under the influence of the four different applied fields within 24 h of experiment. The strongest effects were observed for the direct current electric field which could decrease CFU/ml of 37%, and the low-frequency electromagnetic field with additional induced electric alternating field with a decrease of Staphylococci concentration by 36%. The effects of the electromagnetic treatment on Staphylococci within fluid medium are significantly higher than in gel-like medium. The application of low-frequency electromagnetic fields corroborates clinical situations of bone infections during magnetic field therapy.

  8. Low frequency noise in single GaAsSb nanowires with self-induced compositional gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huh, Junghwan; Kim, Dong-Chul; Mazid Munshi, A.; Dheeraj, Dasa L.; Jang, Doyoung; Kim, Gyu-Tae; Fimland, Bjørn-Ove; Weman, Helge

    2016-09-01

    Due to bandgap tunability, GaAsSb nanowires (NWs) have received a great deal of attention for a variety of optoelectronic device applications. However, electrical and optical properties of GaAsSb are strongly affected by Sb-related defects and scattering from surface states and/or defects, which can limit the performance of GaAsSb NW devices. Thus, in order to utilize the GaAsSb NWs for high performance electronic and optoelectronic devices, it is required to study the material and interface properties (e.g. the interface trap density) in the GaAsSb NW devices. Here, we investigate the low frequency noise in single GaAsSb NWs with self-induced compositional gradients. The current noise spectral density of the GaAsSb NW device showed a typical 1/f noise behavior. The Hooge’s noise parameter and the interface trap density of the GaAsSb NW device were found to be ˜2.2 × 10-2 and ˜2 × 1012 eV-1 cm-2, respectively. By applying low frequency noise measurements, the noise equivalent power, a key figure of merit of photodetectors, was calculated. The observed low frequency noise properties can be useful as guidance for quality and reliability of GaAsSb NW based electronic devices, especially for photodetectors.

  9. Frequency-Induced Bulk Magnetic Domain-Wall Freezing Visualized by Neutron Dark-Field Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betz, B.; Rauscher, P.; Harti, R. P.; Schäfer, R.; Van Swygenhoven, H.; Kaestner, A.; Hovind, J.; Lehmann, E.; Grünzweig, C.

    2016-08-01

    We use neutron dark-field imaging to visualize and interpret the response of bulk magnetic domain walls to static and dynamic magnetic excitations in (110)-Goss textured iron silicon high-permeability steel alloy. We investigate the domain-wall motion under the influence of an external alternating sinusoidal magnetic field. In particular, we perform scans combining varying levels of dcoffset (0 - 30 A /m ) , oscillation amplitude Aac (0 - 1500 A /m ) , and frequency fac ((0 - 200 Hz ) . By increasing amplitude Aac while maintaining constant values of dcoffset and fac , we record the transition from a frozen domain-wall structure to a mobile one. Vice versa, increasing fac while keeping Aac and dcoffset constant led to the reverse transition from a mobile domain-wall structure into a frozen one. We show that varying both Aac and fac shifts the position of the transition region. Furthermore, we demonstrate that higher frequencies require higher oscillation amplitudes to overcome the freezing phenomena. The fundamental determination and understanding of the frequency-induced freezing process in high-permeability steel alloys is of high interest to the further development of descriptive models for bulk macromagnetic phenomena. Likewise, the efficiency of transformers can be improved based on our results, since these alloys are used as transformer core material.

  10. The Magnitude Frequency Distribution of Induced Earthquakes and Its Implications for Crustal Heterogeneity and Hazard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellsworth, W. L.

    2015-12-01

    Earthquake activity in the central United States has increased dramatically since 2009, principally driven by injection of wastewater coproduced with oil and gas. The elevation of pore pressure from the collective influence of many disposal wells has created an unintended experiment that probes both the state of stress and architecture of the fluid plumbing and fault systems through the earthquakes it induces. These earthquakes primarily release tectonic stress rather than accommodation stresses from injection. Results to date suggest that the aggregated magnitude-frequency distribution (MFD) of these earthquakes differs from natural tectonic earthquakes in the same region for which the b-value is ~1.0. In Kansas, Oklahoma and Texas alone, more than 1100 earthquakes Mw ≥3 occurred between January 2014 and June 2015 but only 32 were Mw ≥ 4 and none were as large as Mw 5. Why is this so? Either the b-value is high (> 1.5) or the magnitude-frequency distribution (MFD) deviates from log-linear form at large magnitude. Where catalogs from local networks are available, such as in southern Kansas, b-values are normal (~1.0) for small magnitude events (M < 3). The deficit in larger-magnitude events could be an artifact of a short observation period, or could reflect a decreased potential for large earthquakes. According to the prevailing paradigm, injection will induce an earthquake when (1) the pressure change encounters a preexisting fault favorably oriented in the tectonic stress field; and (2) the pore-pressure perturbation at the hypocenter is sufficient to overcome the frictional strength of the fault. Most induced earthquakes occur where the injection pressure has attenuated to a small fraction of the seismic stress drop implying that the nucleation point was highly stressed. The population statistics of faults satisfying (1) could be the cause of this MFD if there are many small faults (dimension < 1 km) and few large ones in a critically stressed crust

  11. M1 of Murine Gamma-Herpesvirus 68 Induces Endoplasmic Reticulum Chaperone Production

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Jiaying; Gong, Danyang; Fu, Xudong; Wu, Ting-ting; Wang, Jane; Chang, Jennifer; Zhou, Jingting; Lu, Gang; Wang, Yibin; Sun, Ren

    2015-01-01

    Viruses rely on host chaperone network to support their infection. In particular, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) resident chaperones play key roles in synthesizing and processing viral proteins. Influx of a large amount of foreign proteins exhausts the folding capacity in ER and triggers the unfolded protein response (UPR). A fully-executed UPR comprises signaling pathways that induce ER folding chaperones, increase protein degradation, block new protein synthesis and may eventually activate apoptosis, presenting both opportunities and threats to the virus. Here, we define a role of the MHV-68M1 gene in differential modulation of UPR pathways to enhance ER chaperone production. Ectopic expression of M1 markedly induces ER chaperone genes and expansion of ER. The M1 protein accumulates in ER during infection and this localization is indispensable for its function, suggesting M1 acts from the ER. We found that M1 protein selectively induces the chaperon-producing pathways (IRE1, ATF6) while, interestingly, sparing the translation-blocking arm (PERK). We identified, for the first time, a viral factor capable of selectively intervening the initiation of ER stress signaling to induce chaperon production. This finding provides a unique opportunity of using viral protein as a tool to define the activation mechanisms of individual UPR pathways. PMID:26615759

  12. Radioprotective effect of Rapana thomasiana hemocyanin in gamma induced acute radiation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kindekov, Ivan; Mileva, Milka; Krastev, Dimo; Vassilieva, Vladimira; Raynova, Yuliana; Doumanova, Lyuba; Aljakov, Mitko; Idakieva, Krassimira

    2014-05-04

    The radioprotective effect of Rapana thomasiana hemocyanin (RtH) against radiation-induced injuries (stomach ulcers, survival time and endogenous haemopoiesis) and post-radiation recovery was investigated in male albino mice (C3H strain). Radiation course was in a dose of 7.5 Gy (LD 100/30 - dose that kills 100% of the mice at 30 days) from (137)Cs with a dose of 2.05 Gy/min. Radiation injuries were manifested by inducing а hematopoietic form of acute radiation syndrome. RtH was administered intraperitoneally in a single dose of 50, 100, 150 and 200 mg/kg body weight (b. w.) once a day for five consecutive days before irradiation. The results obtained showed that radiation exposure led to (1) 100% mortality rate, (2) ulceration in the stomach mucosa and (3) decrease formation of spleen colonies as a marker of endogenous haemopoiesis. Administration of RtH at a dose of 200 mg/kg provided better protection against radiation-induced stomach ulceration, mitigated the lethal effects of radiation exposure and recovered endogenous haemopoiesis versus irradiated but not supplemented mice. It could be expected that RtH will find a use in mitigating radiation induced injury and enhanced radiorecovery.

  13. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and neuropeptides in neural areas mediating motion-induced emesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Damelio, F.; Daunton, Nancy G.; Fox, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    Immunocytochemical methods were employed to localize the neurotransmitter amino acid gamma-aminobutyric acid and the neuropeptides substance P and Met-enkephalin in the area postrema (AP), area subpostrema (ASP), nucleus of the tractus solitarius (NTS), dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve (DMNV), and lateral vestibular nucleus (LVN). Glutamic acid decarboxylase immunoreactive (GAD-IR) terminals and fibers were observed in the AP and particularly in the ASP. A gradual decrease in the density of terminals was seen towards the solitary complex. The DMNV revealed irregularly scattered GAD-IR terminals within the neuropil or closely surrounding neuronal cell bodies. The LVN, particularly the dorsal division, showed numerous axon terminals which were mostly localize around large neurons and their proximal dendrites. Substance P immunoreactive (SP-IR) terminals and fibers showed high density in the solitary complex, in particular within the lateral division. The ASP showed medium to low density of SP-IR fibers and terminals. The AP exhibited a small number of fibers and terminals irregularly distributed. The DMNV revealed a high density of SP-IR terminals and fibers that were mainly concentrated in the periphery. Very few terminals were detected in the LVN. Met-enkephalin immunoreactive (Met-Enk-IR) fibers and terminals showed high density and uniform distribution in the DMNV. Scattered terminals and fibers were observed in the AP, ASP, and NTS (particularly the lateral division). The very few fibers were observed in the LVN surrounded the neuronal cell bodies. The present report is part of a study designed to investigate the interaction between neuropeptides and conventional neurotransmitters under conditions producing motion sickness and in the process of sensory-motor adaptation.

  14. Amelioration of Gamma-hexachlorocyclohexane (Lindane) induced renal toxicity by Camellia sinensis in Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, W. L. N. V. Vara; Srilatha, Ch.; Sailaja, N.; Raju, N. K. B.; Jayasree, N.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: A study to assess the toxic effects of gamma-hexachlorocyclohexane (γ-HCH) (lindane) and ameliorative effects of Camellia sinensis on renal system has been carried out in male Wistar rats. Materials and Methods: Four groups of rats with 18 each were maintained under standard laboratory hygienic conditions and provided feed and water ad libitum. γ-HCH was gavaged at 20 mg/kg b.wt. using olive oil as vehicle to Groups II. C. sinensis at 100 mg/kg b.wt. was administered orally in distilled water to Group IV in addition to γ-HCH 20 mg/kg b.wt. up to 45 days to study ameliorative effects. Groups I and III were treated with distilled water and C. sinensis (100 mg/kg b.wt.), respectively. Six rats from each group were sacrificed at fortnight intervals. Serum was collected for creatinine estimation. The kidney tissues were collected in chilled phosphate buffer saline for antioxidant profile and in also 10% buffered formalin for histopathological studies. Results: γ-HCH treatment significantly increased serum creatinine and significantly reduced the renal antioxidative enzymes catalase, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione peroxidase. Grossly, severe congestion was noticed in the kidneys. Microscopically, kidney revealed glomerular congestion, atrophy, intertubular hemorrhages, degenerative changes in tubular epithelium with vacuolated cytoplasm, desquamation of epithelium and urinary cast formation. A significant reduction in serum creatinine levels, significant improvement in renal antioxidant enzyme activities and near to normal histological appearance of kidneys in Group IV indicated that the green tea ameliorated the effects of γ-HCH, on renal toxicity. Conclusion: This study suggested that C. sinensis extract combined with γ-HCH could enhance antioxidant/detoxification system which consequently reduced the oxidative stress thus potentially reducing γ-HCH toxicity and tissue damage. PMID:27956790

  15. Characterization of non-CG genomic hypomethylation associated with gamma-ray-induced suppression of CMT3 transcription in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Eun; Lee, Min Hee; Cho, Eun Ju; Kim, Ji Hong; Chung, Byung Yeoup; Kim, Jin-Hong

    2013-12-01

    Ionizing radiation causes various epigenetic changes, as well as a variety of DNA lesions such as strand breaks, cross-links, oxidative damages, etc., in genomes. However, radiation-induced epigenetic changes have rarely been substantiated in plant genomes. The current study investigates whether DNA methylation of Arabidopsis thaliana genome is altered by gamma rays. We found that genomic DNA methylation decreased in wild-type plants with increasing doses of gamma rays (5, 50 and 200 Gy). Irradiation with 200 Gy significantly increased the expression of transcriptionally inactive centromeric 180-bp (CEN) and transcriptionally silent information (TSI) repeats. This increase suggested that there was a substantial release of transcriptional gene silencing by gamma rays, probably by induction of DNA hypomethylation. High expression of the DNA demethylase ROS1 and low expression of the DNA methyltransferase CMT3 supported this hypothesis. Moreover, Southern blot analysis following digestion of genomic DNA with methylation-sensitive enzymes revealed that the DNA hypomethylation occured preferentially at CHG or CHH sites rather than CG sites, depending on the radiation dose. Unlike CEN and TSI repeats, the number of Ta3, AtSN1 and FWA repeats decreased in transcription but increased in non-CG methylation. In addition, the cmt3-11 mutant showed neither DNA hypomethylation nor transcriptional activation of silenced repeats upon gamma irradiation. Furthermore, profiles of genome-wide transcriptomes in response to gamma rays differed between the wild-type and cmt3-11 mutant. These results suggest that gamma irradiation induced DNA hypomethylation preferentially at non-CG sites of transcriptionally inactive repeats in a locus-specific manner, which depends on CMT3 activity.

  16. The effect of interferon gamma on conventional fractionated radiation-induced damage and fibrosis in the pelvic tissue of rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yunyi; Liu, Zi; Wang, Juan; Chai, Yanlan; Su, Jin; Shi, Fan; Wang, Jiquan; Che, Shao Min

    2016-01-01

    We aim to investigate the effect of interferon gamma (IFN-γ) on conventional fractionated radiation–induced damage and fibrosis in ureter and colorectal mucosa. Fifty-two rabbits were randomly divided into three groups comprising a conventional radiation group, an IFN-γ group, and a control group. X-rays were used to irradiate the pelvic tissues of the rabbits in the IFN-γ and conventional radiation groups. Five days after radiation exposure, the rabbits in the IFN-γ group were administered 250,000 U/kg IFN-γ intramuscularly once a week for 5 weeks. The rabbits in the conventional radiation group received 5.0 mL/kg saline. The rabbits were sacrificed at 4, 8, 12, and 16 weeks postradiation, and the rectal and ureteral tissues within the radiation areas were collected. The results showed that the morphology of rectal and ureteral tissues was changed by X-ray radiation. The degree of damage at 4, 8, and 12 weeks, but not at 16 weeks, postradiation was significantly different between the IFN-γ and conventional radiation groups. The expression of transforming growth factor beta 1 mRNA in the ureter and colorectal mucosa of the IFN-γ group was significantly lower than that in the conventional radiation group at 4, 8, 12, and 16 weeks postradiation, but it was still higher than that in the control group. There were significant differences in the expression of collagen III among the three groups. IFN-γ can inhibit the radiation-induced upregulation of transforming growth factor beta 1 mRNA and collagen III protein in the ureter and colorectal mucosa and attenuate radiation-induced damage and fibrosis. PMID:27274263

  17. Leukotriene E4 activates peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma and induces prostaglandin D2 generation by human mast cells.

    PubMed

    Paruchuri, Sailaja; Jiang, Yongfeng; Feng, Chunli; Francis, Sanjeev A; Plutzky, Jorge; Boyce, Joshua A

    2008-06-13

    Cysteinyl leukotrienes (cys-LTs) are potent inflammatory lipid mediators, of which leukotriene (LT) E(4) is the most stable and abundant in vivo. Although only a weak agonist of established G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) for cys-LTs, LTE(4) potentiates airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR) by a cyclooxygenase (COX)-dependent mechanism and induces bronchial eosinophilia. We now report that LTE(4) activates human mast cells (MCs) by a pathway involving cooperation between an MK571-sensitive GPCR and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)gamma, a nuclear receptor for dietary lipids. Although LTD(4) is more potent than LTE(4) for inducing calcium flux by the human MC sarcoma line LAD2, LTE(4) is more potent for inducing proliferation and chemokine generation, and is at least as potent for upregulating COX-2 expression and causing prostaglandin D(2) (PGD(2)) generation. LTE(4) caused phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), p90RSK, and cyclic AMP-regulated-binding protein (CREB). ERK activation in response to LTE(4), but not to LTD(4), was resistant to inhibitors of phosphoinositol 3-kinase. LTE(4)-mediated COX-2 induction, PGD(2) generation, and ERK phosphorylation were all sensitive to interference by the PPARgamma antagonist GW9662 and to targeted knockdown of PPARgamma. Although LTE(4)-mediated PGD(2) production was also sensitive to MK571, an antagonist for the type 1 receptor for cys-LTs (CysLT(1)R), it was resistant to knockdown of this receptor. This LTE(4)-selective receptor-mediated pathway may explain the unique physiologic responses of human airways to LTE(4) in vivo.

  18. Gamma-irradiation and UV-C light-induced lipid peroxidation: a Fourier transform-infrared absorption spectroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Kinder, R; Ziegler, C; Wessels, J M

    1997-05-01

    Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy of dry, multibilayer films has been used to study gamma-radiation and UV-C light induced lipid peroxidation in 1,2-dilinoleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine liposomes. The observed spectral changes were compared with the results obtained from measurement of hydroperoxides, conjugated dienes and to the formation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, such as malondialdehyde (MDA) or MDA-like substances. Upon irradiation a decrease in intensity of the asymmetric C - H stretching vibration (va(CH2)) of the isolated cis C = C - H groups (3010 cm-1) was observed. Directly correlated with the decrease of the va(CH2) absorption was a shift of the asymmetric phosphate ester stretching vibration (va(P = O)) towards smaller wavenumbers (1260-->1244 cm-1), indicating that the lipid peroxidation induced molecular alterations in the fatty acid chains influence the packing of the phospholipids in dry multibilayer films. In addition, the formation of a new absorption band at 1693 cm-1 could be detected, the intensity of which was comparable with the formation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and, therefore, attributed to the (C = O) stretching of alpha, beta unsaturated aldehydes. Dose-dependent studies using ionizing radiation showed that the decrease of va(CH2) was directly correlated with an increase in absorption of the conjugated dienes at 234 nm and with the formation of hydroperoxides suggesting that the absorption at 3010 cm-1 is solely due to isolated cis C = C - H groups and hence subject to the early stages of the radical chain reaction. UV-C light induced lipid peroxidation revealed a non-linear decrease of I3010, which was directly correlated with the formation of hydroperoxides. The observed early saturation of the conjugated dienes was attributed to an early photodecomposition of the conjugated double bonds.

  19. Structural and optical effects induced by gamma irradiation on NdPO{sub 4}: X-ray diffraction, spectroscopic and luminescence study

    SciTech Connect

    Sadhasivam, S.; Rajesh, N.P.

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • Inorganic NdPO{sub 4} crystal was grown first time using potassium polyphosphate (K{sub 6}P{sub 4}O{sub 13}) flux. • NdPO{sub 4} crystal is insoluble in water, non-hygroscopic and high radiation resistance favoring for actinides host. • Actinide immobilization can be made at 1273 K. • High yield of 1061 nm photon emission. - Abstract: Rare earth orthophosphate (NdPO{sub 4}) monazite single crystals were grown using high temperature flux growth method employing K{sub 6}P{sub 4}O{sub 13} (K{sub 6}) as molten solvent. Their structural parameters were studied using single crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD) method. The grown crystals were examined by SEM and EDX techniques for their homogeniousity and inclusion in the crystals. The influence of gamma irradiation in structural and optical absorption properties were studied by the powder XRD, FTIR and reflectance spectroscopy. The effect of gamma irradiation on luminescence properties was recorded. No significant structural change is observed up to 150 kGy gamma dose. The gamma ray induced charge trap in the crystal was saturated to 40 kGy dose. The luminescence intensity decreases with an increase in the irradiation. The emission of luminescence intensity stabilizes above 40 kGy gamma dose.

  20. Thermal, mechanical and ionic conductive behaviour of gamma-radiation induced PEO/PVDF(SIN)-LiClO 4 polymer electrolyte system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yongxian; Wu, Shuyun; Jing, Xiabing; Sun, Jiazhen; Chen, Donglin

    1997-05-01

    An effort has been made to modify the mechanical behaviour of our previously reported gel-type gamma-radiation crosslinked polyethylene oxide (PEO)-LiClO 4 polymer electrolyte. A highly polar and gamma-radiation crosslinkable crystalline polymer, polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF), was selected to blend with PEO and then subjected to gamma-irradiation in order to make an simultaneous interpenetrating network (SIN), which was used as a polymer host to impart stiffness to the plasticized system. Experimental results have shown that the presence of PVDF in the system, through gamma-radiation induced SIN formation, could not only give a rather high mechanical modulus of 10 7 Pa at ambient temperature, but also maintain the room temperature ionic conductivity at a high level (greater than 10 -4 S/cm). DSC, DMA and conductivity measurement techniques were used to examine the effects of blending, gamma-irradiation and plasticization on the variations of glass transition and melting endotherm, on the appearance of high elastic plateau and on the temperature dependence of ionic conductivity. In addition, it was found that, in contrast with the unplasticized system, the ionic conductivity mechanism of this gel-type electrolyte seems to conform to the Arrhenius model, suggesting that, as a result of the high degree of plasticization, the polymer chains act mainly as the skeleton of the networks or polymer cages to immobilize the liquid electrolyte solution, whereas the ionic species migrate as if they were in a liquid medium.

  1. Electromagnetic coupling in frequency-domain induced polarization data: a method for removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Routh, Partha S.; Oldenburg, Douglas W.

    2001-04-01

    Electromagnetic (EM) coupling is generally considered to be noise in induced polarization (IP) data and interpretation is difficult when its contribution is large compared to the IP signal. The effect is exacerbated by conductive environments and large-array survey geometries designed to explore deeper targets. In this paper we present a methodology to remove EM coupling from frequency-domain IP data. We first investigate the effect of EM coupling on the IP data and derive the necessary equations to represent the IP effect for both amplitude and phase responses of the signal. The separation of the inductive response from the total response in the low-frequency regime is derived using the electric field due to a horizontal electric dipole and it is assumed that at low frequencies the interaction of EM effects and IP effects is negligible. The total electric field is then expressed as a product of a scalar function, which is due to IP effects, and an electric field, which depends on the EM coupling response. It is this representation that enables us to obtain the IP response from EM-coupling-contaminated data. To compute the EM coupling response we recognize that conductivity information is necessary. We illustrate this with a synthetic example. The removal method developed in this work for the phase and the per cent frequency effect (PFE) data are applicable to 1-D, 2-D and 3-D structures. The practical utility of the method is illustrated on a 2-D field example that is typical of mineral exploration problems.

  2. Pine polyphenols from Pinus koraiensis prevent injuries induced by gamma radiation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui; Xu, Yier; Sun, Guicai

    2016-01-01

    Pine polyphenols (PPs) are bioactive dietary constituents that enhance health and help prevent diseases through antioxidants. Antioxidants reduce the level of oxidative damages caused by ionizing radiation (IR). The main purpose of this paper is to study the protective effect of PPs on peripheral blood, liver and spleen injuries in mice induced by IR. ICR (Institute of Cancer Research) male mice were administered orally with PPs (200 mg/kg b.wt.) once daily for 14 consecutive days prior to 7 Gy γ-radiations. PPs showed strong antioxidant activities. PPs significantly increased white blood cells, red blood cells and platelets counts. PPs also significantly reduced lipid peroxidation and increased the activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidases, and the level of glutathione. PPs reduced the spleen morphologic injury. In addition, PPs inhibited mitochondria-dependent apoptosis pathways in splenocytes induced by IR. These results indicate that PPs are radioprotective promising reagents. PMID:27069807

  3. Pine polyphenols from Pinus koraiensis prevent injuries induced by gamma radiation in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Wang, Zhenyu; Xu, Yier; Sun, Guicai

    2016-01-01

    Pine polyphenols (PPs) are bioactive dietary constituents that enhance health and help prevent diseases through antioxidants. Antioxidants reduce the level of oxidative damages caused by ionizing radiation (IR). The main purpose of this paper is to study the protective effect of PPs on peripheral blood, liver and spleen injuries in mice induced by IR. ICR (Institute of Cancer Research) male mice were administered orally with PPs (200 mg/kg b.wt.) once daily for 14 consecutive days prior to 7 Gy γ-radiations. PPs showed strong antioxidant activities. PPs significantly increased white blood cells, red blood cells and platelets counts. PPs also significantly reduced lipid peroxidation and increased the activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidases, and the level of glutathione. PPs reduced the spleen morphologic injury. In addition, PPs inhibited mitochondria-dependent apoptosis pathways in splenocytes induced by IR. These results indicate that PPs are radioprotective promising reagents.

  4. ACTIVATION OF PPAR GAMMA RECEPTORS REDUCES LEVODOPA-INDUCED DYSKINESIAS IN 6-OHDA-LESIONED RATS

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, A. A.; Morgese, M. G.; Pisanu, A.; Macheda, T.; Paquette, M. A.; Seillier, A.; Cassano, T.; Carta, A.R.; Giuffrida, A.

    2014-01-01

    Long-term administration of L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (levodopa), the mainstay treatment for Parkinson’s disease (PD), is accompanied by fluctuations in its duration of action and motor complications (dyskinesia) that dramatically affect the quality of life of patients. Levodopa-induced dyskinesias (LID) can be modeled in rats with unilateral 6-OHDA lesions via chronic administration of levodopa, which causes increasingly severe axial, limb and oro-facial abnormal involuntary movements (AIMs) over time. In previous studies, we showed that direct activation of CB1 cannabinoid receptors alleviated rat AIMs. Interestingly, elevation of the endocannabinoid anandamide by URB597 (URB), an inhibitor of endocannabinoid catabolism, produced an anti-dyskinetic response that was only partially mediated via CB1 receptors and required the concomitant blockade of transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1 (TRPV1) channels by capsazepine (CPZ) [1]. In this study, we showed that stimulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR), a family of transcription factors activated by anandamide, contributes to the anti-dyskinetic effects of URB+CPZ, and that direct activation of the PPARγ subtype by rosiglitazone (RGZ) alleviates levodopa-induced AIMs in 6-OHDA rats. AIM reduction was associated with an attenuation of levodopa-induced increase of dynorphin, zif-268 and of ERK phosphorylation in the denervated striatum. RGZ treatment did not decrease striatal levodopa and dopamine bioavailability, nor did it affect levodopa antiparkinsonian activity. Collectively, these data indicate that PPARγ may represent a new pharmacological target for the treatment of LID. PMID:25486547

  5. A new thiazolidinedione, NC-2100, which is a weak PPAR-gamma activator, exhibits potent antidiabetic effects and induces uncoupling protein 1 in white adipose tissue of KKAy obese mice.

    PubMed

    Fukui, Y; Masui, S; Osada, S; Umesono, K; Motojima, K

    2000-05-01

    Thiazolidinediones (TZDs) reduce insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes by increasing peripheral uptake of glucose, and they bind to and activate the transcriptional factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-gamma). Studies have suggested that TZD-induced activation of PPAR-gamma correlates with antidiabetic action, but the mechanism by which the activated PPAR-gamma is involved in reducing insulin resistance is not known. To examine whether activation of PPAR-gamma directly correlates with antidiabetic activities, we compared the effects of 4 TZDs (troglitazone, pioglitazone, BRL-49653, and a new derivative, NC-2100) on the activation of PPAR-gamma in a reporter assay, transcription of the target genes, adipogenesis, plasma glucose and triglyceride levels, and body weight using obese KKAy mice. There were 10- to 30-fold higher concentrations of NC-2100 required for maximal activation of PPAR-gamma in a reporter assay system, and only high concentrations of NC-2100 weakly induced transcription of the PPAR-gamma but not PPAR-alpha target genes in a whole mouse and adipogenesis of cultured 3T3L1 cells, which indicates that NC-2100 is a weak PPAR-gamma activator. However, low concentrations of NC-2100 efficiently lowered plasma glucose levels in KKAy obese mice. These results strongly suggest that TZD-induced activation of PPAR-gamma does not directly correlate with antidiabetic (glucose-lowering) action. Furthermore, NC-2100 caused the smallest body weight increase of the 4 TZDs, which may be partly explained by the finding that NC-2100 efficiently induces uncoupling protein (UCP)-2 mRNA and significantly induces UCP1 mRNA in white adipose tissue (WAT). NC-2100 induced UCP1 efficiently in mesenteric WAT and less efficiently in subcutaneous WAT, although pioglitazone and troglitazone also slightly induced UCP1 only in mesenteric WAT. These characteristics of NC-2100 should be beneficial for humans with limited amounts of brown adipose tissue.

  6. Gamma Delta T Cells Mediate Angiotensin II-Induced Hypertension and Vascular Injury.

    PubMed

    Caillon, Antoine; Mian, Muhammad Oneeb Rehman; Fraulob-Aquino, Julio C; Huo, Ku-Geng; Barhoumi, Tlili; Ouerd, Sofiane; Sinnaeve, Peter R; Paradis, Pierre; Schiffrin, Ernesto L

    2017-03-22

    Background -Innate antigen-presenting cells and adaptive immune T cells have been implicated in the development of hypertension. However, the T-lymphocyte subsets involved in the pathophysiology of hypertension remain unclear. A small subset of "innate-like" T cells expressing the γδ T cell receptor (TCR) rather than the αβ TCR could play a role in the initiation of the immune response in hypertension. We aimed to determine whether angiotensin (Ang) II caused kinetic changes in γδ T cells, whether deficiency in γδ T cells blunted Ang II-induced hypertension, vascular injury and T-cell activation, and whether γδ T cells are associated with human hypertension. Methods -Male C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) and Tcrδ(-/-) mice, which are devoid of γδ T cells, or WT mice injected IP with control isotype IgG or γδ T cell-depleting antibodies, were infused or not with Ang II for 3, 7 or 14 days. T cell profiling was determined by flow cytometry, systolic blood pressure (SBP) by telemetry and mesentery artery endothelial function by pressurized myography. TCR γ constant region gene expression levels and clinical data of a whole blood gene expression microarray study including normotensive and hypertensive subjects were used to demonstrate an association between γδ T cells and SBP. Results -Seven- and 14-day Ang II infusion increased γδ T cell numbers and activation in the spleen of WT mice (P<0.05). Fourteen days of Ang II infusion increased SBP (P<0.01) and decreased mesenteric artery endothelial function (P<0.01) in WT mice, both of which were abrogated in Tcrδ(-/-) mice (P<0.01). Anti-TCR γδ antibody-induced γδ T cell depletion blunted Ang II-induced SBP rise and endothelial dysfunction (P<0.05), compared to isotype antibody-treated Ang II-infused mice. Ang II-induced T cell activation in the spleen and perivascular adipose tissue was blunted in Tcrδ(-/-) mice (P<0.01). In humans, the association between SBP and γδ T cells was demonstrated by a

  7. Radio frequency radiation-induced hyperthermia using Si nanoparticle-based sensitizers for mild cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamarov, Konstantin P.; Osminkina, Liubov A.; Zinovyev, Sergey V.; Maximova, Ksenia A.; Kargina, Julia V.; Gongalsky, Maxim B.; Ryabchikov, Yury; Al-Kattan, Ahmed; Sviridov, Andrey P.; Sentis, Marc; Ivanov, Andrey V.; Nikiforov, Vladimir N.; Kabashin, Andrei V.; Timoshenko, Victor Yu

    2014-11-01

    Offering mild, non-invasive and deep cancer therapy modality, radio frequency (RF) radiation-induced hyperthermia lacks for efficient biodegradable RF sensitizers to selectively target cancer cells and thus avoid side effects. Here, we assess crystalline silicon (Si) based nanomaterials as sensitizers for the RF-induced therapy. Using nanoparticles produced by mechanical grinding of porous silicon and ultraclean laser-ablative synthesis, we report efficient RF-induced heating of aqueous suspensions of the nanoparticles to temperatures above 45-50°C under relatively low nanoparticle concentrations (<1 mg/mL) and RF radiation intensities (1-5 W/cm2). For both types of nanoparticles the heating rate was linearly dependent on nanoparticle concentration, while laser-ablated nanoparticles demonstrated a remarkably higher heating rate than porous silicon-based ones for the whole range of the used concentrations from 0.01 to 0.4 mg/mL. The observed effect is explained by the Joule heating due to the generation of electrical currents at the nanoparticle/water interface. Profiting from the nanoparticle-based hyperthermia, we demonstrate an efficient treatment of Lewis lung carcinoma in vivo. Combined with the possibility of involvement of parallel imaging and treatment channels based on unique optical properties of Si-based nanomaterials, the proposed method promises a new landmark in the development of new modalities for mild cancer therapy.

  8. Radio frequency radiation-induced hyperthermia using Si nanoparticle-based sensitizers for mild cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Tamarov, Konstantin P; Osminkina, Liubov A; Zinovyev, Sergey V; Maximova, Ksenia A; Kargina, Julia V; Gongalsky, Maxim B; Ryabchikov, Yury; Al-Kattan, Ahmed; Sviridov, Andrey P; Sentis, Marc; Ivanov, Andrey V; Nikiforov, Vladimir N; Kabashin, Andrei V; Timoshenko, Victor Yu

    2014-11-13

    Offering mild, non-invasive and deep cancer therapy modality, radio frequency (RF) radiation-induced hyperthermia lacks for efficient biodegradable RF sensitizers to selectively target cancer cells and thus avoid side effects. Here, we assess crystalline silicon (Si) based nanomaterials as sensitizers for the RF-induced therapy. Using nanoparticles produced by mechanical grinding of porous silicon and ultraclean laser-ablative synthesis, we report efficient RF-induced heating of aqueous suspensions of the nanoparticles to temperatures above 45-50 °C under relatively low nanoparticle concentrations (<1 mg/mL) and RF radiation intensities (1-5 W/cm(2)). For both types of nanoparticles the heating rate was linearly dependent on nanoparticle concentration, while laser-ablated nanoparticles demonstrated a remarkably higher heating rate than porous silicon-based ones for the whole range of the used concentrations from 0.01 to 0.4 mg/mL. The observed effect is explained by the Joule heating due to the generation of electrical currents at the nanoparticle/water interface. Profiting from the nanoparticle-based hyperthermia, we demonstrate an efficient treatment of Lewis lung carcinoma in vivo. Combined with the possibility of involvement of parallel imaging and treatment channels based on unique optical properties of Si-based nanomaterials, the proposed method promises a new landmark in the development of new modalities for mild cancer therapy.

  9. Radio frequency radiation-induced hyperthermia using Si nanoparticle-based sensitizers for mild cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tamarov, Konstantin P.; Osminkina, Liubov A.; Zinovyev, Sergey V.; Maximova, Ksenia A.; Kargina, Julia V.; Gongalsky, Maxim B.; Ryabchikov, Yury; Al-Kattan, Ahmed; Sviridov, Andrey P.; Sentis, Marc; Ivanov, Andrey V.; Nikiforov, Vladimir N.; Kabashin, Andrei V.; Timoshenko, Victor Yu

    2014-01-01

    Offering mild, non-invasive and deep cancer therapy modality, radio frequency (RF) radiation-induced hyperthermia lacks for efficient biodegradable RF sensitizers to selectively target cancer cells and thus avoid side effects. Here, we assess crystalline silicon (Si) based nanomaterials as sensitizers for the RF-induced therapy. Using nanoparticles produced by mechanical grinding of porous silicon and ultraclean laser-ablative synthesis, we report efficient RF-induced heating of aqueous suspensions of the nanoparticles to temperatures above 45-50°C under relatively low nanoparticle concentrations (<1 mg/mL) and RF radiation intensities (1–5 W/cm2). For both types of nanoparticles the heating rate was linearly dependent on nanoparticle concentration, while laser-ablated nanoparticles demonstrated a remarkably higher heating rate than porous silicon-based ones for the whole range of the used concentrations from 0.01 to 0.4 mg/mL. The observed effect is explained by the Joule heating due to the generation of electrical currents at the nanoparticle/water interface. Profiting from the nanoparticle-based hyperthermia, we demonstrate an efficient treatment of Lewis lung carcinoma in vivo. Combined with the possibility of involvement of parallel imaging and treatment channels based on unique optical properties of Si-based nanomaterials, the proposed method promises a new landmark in the development of new modalities for mild cancer therapy. PMID:25391603

  10. Comparison of structural changes in skin and amnion tissue grafts for transplantation induced by gamma and electron beam irradiation for sterilization.

    PubMed

    Mrázová, H; Koller, J; Kubišová, K; Fujeríková, G; Klincová, E; Babál, P

    2016-06-01

    Sterilization is an important step in the preparation of biological material for transplantation. The aim of the study is to compare morphological changes in three types of biological tissues induced by different doses of gamma and electron beam radiation. Frozen biological tissues (porcine skin xenografts, human skin allografts and human amnion) were irradiated with different doses of gamma rays (12.5, 25, 35, 50 kGy) and electron beam (15, 25, 50 kGy). Not irradiated specimens served as controls. The tissue samples were then thawn and fixed in 10 % formalin, processed by routine paraffin technique and stained with hematoxylin and eosin, alcian blue at pH 2.5, orcein, periodic acid Schiff reaction, phosphotungstic acid hematoxylin, Sirius red and silver impregnation. The staining with hematoxylin and eosin showed vacuolar cytoplasmic changes of epidermal cells mainly in the samples of xenografts irradiated by the lowest doses of gamma and electron beam radiation. The staining with orcein revealed damage of fine elastic fibers in the xenograft dermis at the dose of 25 kGy of both radiation types. Disintegration of epithelial basement membrane, especially in the xenografts, was induced by the dose of 15 kGy of electron beam radiation. The silver impregnation disclosed nuclear chromatin condensation mainly in human amnion at the lowest doses of both radiation types and disintegration of the fine collagen fibers in the papillary dermis induced by the lowest dose of electron beam and by the higher doses of gamma radiation. Irradiation by both, gamma rays and the electron beam, causes similar changes on cells and extracellular matrix, with significant damage of the basement membrane and of the fine and elastic and collagen fibers in the papillary dermis, the last caused already by low dose electron beam radiation.

  11. Measurement of {sup 235}U content and flow of UF{sub 6} using delayed neutrons or gamma rays following induced fission

    SciTech Connect

    Stromswold, D.C.; Peurrung, A.J.; Reeder, P.L.; Perkins, R.W.

    1996-06-01

    Feasibility experiments conducted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory demonstrate that either delayed neutrons or energetic gamma rays from short-lived fission products can be used to monitor the blending of UF{sub 6} gas streams. A {sup 252}Cf neutron source was used to induce {sup 235}U fission in a sample, and delayed neutrons and gamma rays were measured after the sample moved {open_quotes}down-stream.{close_quotes} The experiments used a UO{sub 2} powder that was transported down the pipe to simulate the flowing UF{sub 6} gas. Computer modeling and analytic calculation extended the test results to a flowing UF{sub 6} gas system. Neutron or gamma-ray measurements made at two downstream positions can be used to indicate both the {sup 235}U content and UF{sub 6} flow rate. Both the neutron and gamma-ray techniques have the benefits of simplicity and long-term reliability, combined with adequate sensitivity for low-intrusion monitoring of the blending process. Alternatively, measuring the neutron emission rate from (a, n) reactions in the UF{sub 6} provides an approximate measure of the {sup 235}U content without using a neutron source to induce fission.

  12. Lycopene as a natural protector against gamma-radiation induced DNA damage, lipid peroxidation and antioxidant status in primary culture of isolated rat hepatocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, M; Sudheer, A Ram; Pillai, K Raveendran; Kumar, P Raghu; Sudhakaran, P R; Menon, V P

    2007-04-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the radioprotective effect of lycopene, a naturally occurring dietary carotenoid, on gamma-radiation induced toxicity in cultured rat hepatocytes. The cellular changes were estimated using lipid peroxidative indices like thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), reduced glutathione (GSH), ceruloplasmin, vitamins A, E, C and uric acid. The DNA damage was analysed by single cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay). The increase in the severity of DNA damage was observed with the increase in gamma-radiation dose (1, 2 and 4 Gy) in cultured rat hepatocytes. TBARS were increased significantly whereas the levels of GSH, vitamins C, E and A, ceruloplasmin, uric acid and antioxidant enzymes were significantly decreased in gamma-irradiated groups. The maximum damage to hepatocytes was observed at 4 Gy irradiation. Pretreatment with lycopene (1.86, 9.31 and 18.62 microM) showed a significant decrease in the levels of TBARS and DNA damage. The antioxidant enzymes increased significantly along with the levels of GSH, vitamins A, E, C, uric acid and ceruloplasmin. The maximum protection of hepatocytes was observed at 9.31 muM of lycopene pretreatment. Thus, our results show that pretreatment with lycopene offers protection against gamma-radiation induced cellular damage and can be developed as an effective radioprotector during radiotherapy.

  13. The IgE-reactive autoantigen Hom s 2 induces damage of respiratory epithelial cells and keratinocytes via induction of IFN-gamma.

    PubMed

    Mittermann, Irene; Reininger, Renate; Zimmermann, Maya; Gangl, Katharina; Reisinger, Jürgen; Aichberger, Karl J; Greisenegger, Elli K; Niederberger, Verena; Seipelt, Joachim; Bohle, Barbara; Kopp, Tamara; Akdis, Cezmi A; Spitzauer, Susanne; Valent, Peter; Valenta, Rudolf

    2008-06-01

    Hom s 2, the alpha-chain of the nascent polypeptide-associated complex, is an intracellular autoantigen that has been identified with IgE autoantibodies from atopic dermatitis patients. We investigated the humoral and cellular immune response to purified recombinant Hom s 2 (rHom s 2). rHom s 2 exhibited IgE reactivity comparable to exogenous allergens, but did not induce relevant basophil cell degranulation. The latter may be attributed to the fact that patients recognized single epitopes on Hom s 2 as revealed by IgE epitope mapping with rHom s 2 fragments. In contrast to exogenous allergens, rHom s 2 had the intrinsic ability to induce the release of IFN-gamma in cultured peripheral blood mononuclear cells from atopic as well as non-atopic individuals. IFN-gamma-containing culture supernatants from Hom s 2-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells caused disintegration of respiratory epithelial cell layers and apoptosis of skin keratinocytes, which could be inhibited with a neutralizing anti-IFN-gamma antibody. Our data demonstrate that the Hom s 2 autoantigen can cause IFN-gamma-mediated cell damage.

  14. A subset of dendritic cells induces CD4+ T cells to produce IFN-gamma by an IL-12-independent but CD70-dependent mechanism in vivo.

    PubMed

    Soares, Helena; Waechter, HaeNa; Glaichenhaus, Nicholas; Mougneau, Evelyne; Yagita, Hideo; Mizenina, Olga; Dudziak, Diana; Nussenzweig, Michel C; Steinman, Ralph M

    2007-05-14

    Interferon (IFN)-gamma, a cytokine critical for resistance to infection and tumors, is produced by CD4(+) helper T lymphocytes after stimulation by cultured dendritic cells (DCs) that secrete a cofactor, interleukin (IL)-12. We have identified a major IL-12-independent pathway whereby DCs induce IFN-gamma-secreting T helper (Th)1 CD4(+) T cells in vivo. This pathway requires the membrane-associated tumor necrosis family member CD70 and was identified by targeting the LACK antigen from Leishmania major within an antibody to CD205 (DEC-205), an uptake receptor on a subset of DCs. Another major DC subset, targeted with 33D1 anti-DCIR2 antibody, also induced IFN-gamma in vivo but required IL-12, not CD70. Isolated CD205(+) DCs expressed cell surface CD70 when presenting antigen to T cell receptor transgenic T cells, and this distinction was independent of maturation stimuli. CD70 was also essential for CD205(+) DC function in vivo. Detection of the IL-12-independent IFN-gamma pathway was obscured with nontargeted LACK, which was presented by both DC subsets. This in situ analysis points to CD70 as a decision maker for Th1 differentiation by CD205(+) DCs, even in Th2-prone BALB/c animals and potentially in vaccine design. The results indicate that two DC subsets have innate propensities to differentially affect the Th1/Th2 balance in vivo and by distinct mechanisms.

  15. A PPAR-gamma agonist protects from radiation-induced intestinal toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Sottili, Mariangela; Gerini, Chiara; Desideri, Isacco; Bastida, Cinzia; Pallotta, Stefania; Castiglione, Francesca; Bonomo, Pierluigi; Meattini, Icro; Greto, Daniela; Cappelli, Sabrina; Di Brina, Lucia; Loi, Mauro; Biti, Giampaolo; Livi, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Objective Because of its anti-inflammatory, anti-fibrotic, anti-apoptotic and anti-neoplastic properties, the PPAR-γ agonist rosiglitazone is an interesting drug for investigating for use in the prevention and treatment of radiation-induced intestinal damage. We aimed to evaluate the radioprotective effect of rosiglitazone in a murine model of acute intestinal damage, assessing whether radioprotection is selective for normal tissues or also occurs in tumour cells. Methods Mice were total-body irradiated (12 Gy), with or without rosiglitazone (5 mg/kg/day). After 24 and 72 hours, mice were sacrificed and the jejunum was collected. HT-29 human colon cancer cells were irradiated with a single dose of 2 (1000 cells), 4 (1500 cells) or 6 (2000 cells) Gy, with or without adding rosiglitazone (20 µM) 1 hour before irradiation. HT-29-xenografted CD1 mice were irradiated (16 Gy) with or without rosiglitazone; tumour volumes were measured for 33 days. Results Rosiglitazone markedly reduced histological signs of altered bowel structures, that is, villi shortening, submucosal thickening, necrotic changes in crypts, oedema, apoptosis, and inflammatory infiltrate induced by irradiation. Rosiglitazone significantly decreased p-NF-kB p65 phosphorylation and TGFβ protein expression at 24 and 72 hours post-irradiation and significantly decreased gene expression of Collagen1, Mmp13, Tnfα and Bax at 24 hours and p53 at 72 hours post-irradiation. Rosiglitazone reduced HT-29 clonogenic survival, but only produced a slight reduction of xenograft tumour growth. Conclusion Rosiglitazone exerts a protective effect on normal tissues and reduces alterations in bowel structures and inflammation in a radiation-induced bowel toxicity model, without interfering with the radiation effect on HT-29 cancer cells. PPAR-γ agonists should be further investigated for their application in abdominal and pelvic irradiation. PMID:28344789

  16. Activation of PPAR gamma receptors reduces levodopa-induced dyskinesias in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats.

    PubMed

    Martinez, A A; Morgese, M G; Pisanu, A; Macheda, T; Paquette, M A; Seillier, A; Cassano, T; Carta, A R; Giuffrida, A

    2015-02-01

    Long-term administration of l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (levodopa), the mainstay treatment for Parkinson's disease (PD), is accompanied by fluctuations in its duration of action and motor complications (dyskinesia) that dramatically affect the quality of life of patients. Levodopa-induced dyskinesias (LID) can be modeled in rats with unilateral 6-OHDA lesions via chronic administration of levodopa, which causes increasingly severe axial, limb, and orofacial abnormal involuntary movements (AIMs) over time. In previous studies, we showed that the direct activation of CB1 cannabinoid receptors alleviated rat AIMs. Interestingly, elevation of the endocannabinoid anandamide by URB597 (URB), an inhibitor of endocannabinoid catabolism, produced an anti-dyskinetic response that was only partially mediated via CB1 receptors and required the concomitant blockade of transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1 (TRPV1) channels by capsazepine (CPZ) (Morgese et al., 2007). In this study, we showed that the stimulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR), a family of transcription factors activated by anandamide, contributes to the anti-dyskinetic effects of URB+CPZ, and that the direct activation of the PPARγ subtype by rosiglitazone (RGZ) alleviates levodopa-induced AIMs in 6-OHDA rats. AIM reduction was associated with an attenuation of levodopa-induced increase of dynorphin, zif-268, and of ERK phosphorylation in the denervated striatum. RGZ treatment did not decrease striatal levodopa and dopamine bioavailability, nor did it affect levodopa anti-parkinsonian activity. Collectively, these data indicate that PPARγ may represent a new pharmacological target for the treatment of LID.

  17. Reversal of gamma-radiation-induced leukemogenesis in mice by immunomodulation with thiabendazole and dinitrofluorobenzene

    SciTech Connect

    Elgebaly, S.A.; Barton, R.; Forouhar, F.

    1985-04-01

    The effect of thiabendazole (TBZ) and dinitrofluorobenzene (DNFB) on radiation-induced leukemogenesis was investigated in the C57BL/6 mouse model. Administration of TBZ-DNFB during, post, or during and post irradiation successfully blocked leukemogenesis, as indicated by the absence of leukemia blast cells in thymus and peripheral blood, as well as prevented thymic lymphoma. TBZ-DNFB treatment prevented the development of leukemia when studies were terminated both after 7 months of last irradiation (disease fully developed) and after 5 months of last irradiation (disease in the process of development). This TBZ-DNFB treatment also resulted in a significant increase in survival.

  18. Interferon-gamma-induced local leukocytoclastic vasculitis at the subcutaneous injection site*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fang; Liu, Juan-Hua; Zhao, Yu-Kun; Luo, Di-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous reactions associated with interferons (IFNs) treatment are either localized or generalized. The most common presentation of localized reactions at IFNs injection site is usually an erythematous patch or plaque. Local leukocytoclastic vasculitis presenting with cutaneous necrosis is extremely rare. We report a 19-year-old man with hepatitis B who had local leukocytoclastic vasculitis induced by interferon-gama injection at the injection site. After changing the injection sites and using the combined treatment of prednisone and colchicine, the previous lesion healed and no other cutaneous lesion occurred. We also made a mini review of such cases.

  19. Interferon Gamma Induces Protective Non-Canonical Signaling Pathways in Primary Neurons

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, Lauren A.; Henkins, Kristen M.; Kulkarni, Apurva; Matullo, Christine M.; Balachandran, Siddharth; Pattisapu, Anil K.; Rall, Glenn F.

    2016-01-01

    The signal transduction molecule, Stat1, is critical for the expression of type I and II interferon (IFN)-responsive genes in most cells; however, we previously showed that primary hippocampal mouse neurons express low basal Stat1, with delayed and attenuated expression of IFN-responsive genes. Moreover, IFNγ-dependent resolution of a neurotropic viral challenge in permissive mice is Stat1-independent. Here, we show that exogenous INFγ has no deleterious impact on neuronal viability, and staurosporine-induced apoptosis in neurons is significantly blunted by the addition of INFγ, suggesting that INFγ confers a pro-survival signal in neurons. To identify the pathways induced by INFγ in neurons, the activation of alternative signal transducers associated with INFγ signaling was assessed. Rapid and pronounced activation of extracellular signal regulated kinase (Erk1/2) was observed in neurons, compared to a modest response in fibroblasts. Moreover, the absence of Stat1 in primary fibroblasts led to enhanced Erk activation following IFNγ addition, implying that the cell-specific availability of signal transducers can diversify the cellular response following IFN engagement. PMID:26190522

  20. Induced of plastid mutations in soybean plant (Glycine max L. Merrill) with gamma radiation and determination with RAPD.

    PubMed

    Atak, Cimen; Alikamanoğlu, Sema; Açik, Leyla; Canbolat, Yasemin

    2004-11-22

    The aim of our study was to induce with radiation of atrazine resistant and tolerated mutants in Coles, Amsoy-71 and 1937 soybean varieties. Atrazine that is photosynthetic inhibitor is the most important herbicide of S-triazin group, and shows toxic effect on soybean plant. For the improvement of the atrazine resistant plants with mutation breeding, the seeds belonging to the three varieties were irradiated with 200 Gy of gamma radiation dose. The irradiated seeds were sown in the field and at the end of harvesting season, every pod at node situated on the main stem was picked up separately and M2 generations were obtained. At the plants, which were obtained from M2 generation, chlorophyll mutants were determined and atrazine selection was made. The percentage of chlorophyll mutants for Amsoy-71, Coles and 1937 soybean varieties were found as 1.07, 1.48 and 1.32, respectively. At the end of atrazine selection, the percentages of atrazine resistant plants for Amsoy-71, Coles and 1937 soybean varieties were 0.80, 0.60 and 0.53, respectively. The percentages of atrazine tolerated plants were 1.07, 1.18 and 1.05, respectively as well. In our research; the differences among the mutants replying to atrazine in various concentrations were examined by using RAPD procedure as the molecular marker techniques in comparison with polymorphism. In the study done by using 14 primers; according to the amplification results, the differences between atrazine resistant plants were shown.

  1. Formation and conversion of defect centers in low water peak single mode optical fiber induced by gamma rays irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, J. X.; Luo, W. Y.; Xiao, Z. Y.; Wang, T. Y.; Chen, Z. Y.; Zeng, X. L.

    2010-02-15

    The formation and conversion processes of defect centers in low water peak single mode optical (LWPSM) fiber irradiated with gamma rays were investigated at room temperature using electron spin resonance. Germanium electron center (GEC) and self-trapped hole center (STH) occur when the fibers are irradiated with 1 and 5 kGy cumulative doses, respectively. With the increase in irradiation doses, the GEC defect centers disappear, and new defect centers such as E{sup '} centers (Si and Ge) and nonbridge oxygen hole centers (NBOHCs) generate. The generation of GEC and STH is attributed to the electron transfer, which is completely balanced. This is the main reason that radiation-induced attenuation (RIA) of the LWPSM fiber is only 10 dB/km at communication window. The new defect centers come from the conversion of GEC and STH to E{sup '} centers and NBOHC, and the conversion processes cause bond cleavage, which is the root cause that the RIA of the LWPSM fiber significantly increases up to 180 dB/km at working window. Furthermore, the concentration of new defect centers is saturated easily even by increasing cumulative doses.

  2. Gamma-radiation-induced phosphorylation of p53 on serine 15 is dose-dependent in MOLT-4 leukaemia cells.

    PubMed

    Tichý, A; Záskodová, D; Zoelzer, F; Vávrová, J; Sinkorová, Z; Pejchal, J; Osterreicher, J; Rezácová, M

    2009-01-01

    Molecular indicators of the absorbed dose of ionizing radiation are powerful tools in biodosimetry. The studies reported here were undertaken with the motivation to find such a marker among the mo lecules involved in ataxia-telangiectasia mutated kinase- dependent signalling induced by ionizing radiation (ATM-kinase, checkpoint kinase-2, protein p53, and oncoprotein Mdm2). In our previous work on T-lymphocyte leukaemia MOLT-4 cells we described the mentioned molecules of ATM-dependent pathway and none of them showed a pronounced dosedependent response. Here we employed Western blotting and ELISA assay to investigate the response of post-translationally modified p53 (particularly phosphorylated on serine 15) after gamma-irradiation. We have found the amount of phosphorylated p53 to be homogenously increased after irradiation by the doses of 0.5 to 7.5 Gy. The dose-dependent response was pronounced especially after the doses up to 3.0 Gy. The presented data indicate that p53 phosphorylated on serine 15 might be used as a potential biodosimetric marker.

  3. The Envelope Gene of Transmitted HIV-1 Resists a Late Interferon Gamma-Induced Block

    PubMed Central

    Rihn, Suzannah J.; Foster, Toshana L.; Busnadiego, Idoia; Aziz, Muhamad Afiq; Hughes, Joseph; Neil, Stuart J. D.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Type I interferon (IFN) signaling engenders an antiviral state that likely plays an important role in constraining HIV-1 transmission and contributes to defining subsequent AIDS pathogenesis. Type II IFN (IFN-γ) also induces an antiviral state but is often primarily considered to be an immunomodulatory cytokine. We report that IFN-γ stimulation can induce an antiviral state that can be both distinct from that of type I interferon and can potently inhibit HIV-1 in primary CD4+ T cells and a number of human cell lines. Strikingly, we find that transmitted/founder (TF) HIV-1 viruses can resist a late block that is induced by type II IFN, and the use of chimeric IFN-γ-sensitive/resistant viruses indicates that interferon resistance maps to the env gene. Simultaneously, in vitro evolution also revealed that just a single amino acid substitution in the envelope can confer substantial resistance to IFN-mediated inhibition. Thus, the env gene of transmitted HIV-1 confers resistance to a late block that is phenotypically distinct from blocks previously described to be resisted by env and is therefore mediated by unknown IFN-γ-stimulated factor(s) in human CD4+ T cells and cell lines. This important unidentified block could play a key role in constraining HIV-1 transmission. IMPORTANCE The human immune system can hinder invading pathogens through interferon (IFN) signaling. One consequence of this signaling is that cells enter an antiviral state, increasing the levels of hundreds of defenses that can inhibit the replication and spread of viruses. The majority of HIV-1 infections result from a single virus particle (the transmitted/founder) that makes it past these defenses and colonizes the host. Thus, the founder virus is hypothesized to be a relatively interferon-resistant entity. Here, we show that certain HIV-1 envelope genes have the unanticipated ability to resist specific human defenses mediated by different types of interferons. Strikingly, the envelope

  4. Estrogens decrease {gamma}-ray-induced senescence and maintain cell cycle progression in breast cancer cells independently of p53

    SciTech Connect

    Toillon, Robert-Alain . E-mail: robert.toillon@univ-lille1.fr; Magne, Nicolas; Laios, Ioanna; Castadot, Pierre; Kinnaert, Eric; Van Houtte, Paul; Desmedt, Christine B.Sc.; Leclercq, Guy; Lacroix, Marc

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: Sequential administration of radiotherapy and endocrine therapy is considered to be a standard adjuvant treatment of breast cancer. Recent clinical reports suggest that radiotherapy could be more efficient in association with endocrine therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the estrogen effects on irradiated breast cancer cells (IR-cells). Methods and Materials: Using functional genomic analysis, we examined the effects of 17-{beta}-estradiol (E{sub 2}, a natural estrogen) on MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Results: Our results showed that E{sub 2} sustained the growth of IR-cells. Specifically, estrogens prevented cell cycle blockade induced by {gamma}-rays, and no modification of apoptotic rate was detected. In IR-cells we observed the induction of genes involved in premature senescence and cell cycle progression and investigated the effects of E{sub 2} on the p53/p21{sup waf1/cip1}/Rb pathways. We found that E{sub 2} did not affect p53 activation but it decreased cyclin E binding to p21{sup waf1/cip1} and sustained downstream Rb hyperphosphorylation by functional inactivation of p21{sup waf1/cip1}. We suggest that Rb inactivation could decrease senescence and allow cell cycle progression in IR-cells. Conclusion: These results may help to elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying the maintenance of breast cancer cell growth by E{sub 2} after irradiation-induced damage. They also offer clinicians a rational basis for the sequential administration of ionizing radiation and endocrine therapies.

  5. 5HT4 agonists inhibit interferon-gamma-induced MHC class II and B7 costimulatory molecules expression on cultured astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Zeinstra, Esther M; Wilczak, Nadine; Wilschut, Jan C; Glazenburg, Lisa; Chesik, Daniel; Kroese, Frans G M; De Keyser, Jacques

    2006-10-01

    A failure of tight control of MHC class II expression on astrocytes may play a role in the development of autoimmune responses in multiple sclerosis. The 5-HT(4) serotonin receptor agonists cisapride and prucalopride, at concentrations between 10(-10) M and 10(-8) M, reduced interferon-gamma-induced MHC class II immunostaining in cultured astrocytes derived from newborn Wistar rats by approximately 50-60%. The magnitude of MHC class II inhibition by 5-HT(4) agonists was comparable to that of interferon-beta. The alpha(1)-adrenergic receptor agonist phenylephrine was without effect. Cisapride (10(-9) M) also prevented interferon-gamma-induced B7-1 and B7-2 immunostaining. Our results suggest that 5-HT(4) agonists may have therapeutic potential in multiple sclerosis by inhibiting the up-regulation of immune responsiveness of astrocytes in the central nervous system.

  6. PEDF inhibits AGE-induced podocyte apoptosis via PPAR-gamma activation.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Yuji; Matsui, Takanori; Ohta, Keisuke; Tanoue, Ryuichiro; Takeuchi, Masayoshi; Asanuma, Katsuhiko; Fukami, Kei; Okuda, Seiya; Nakamura, Kei-ichiro; Yamagishi, Sho-ichi

    2013-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) formed at an accelerated rate under diabetes, elicit oxidative and pro-apoptotic reactions in various types of cells, including podocytes, thus being involved in the development and progression of diabetic nephropathy. Recently, we, along with others, have found that pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF), a glycoprotein with potent neuronal differentiating activity, inhibits AGE-elicited mesangial and tubular cell damage through its anti-oxidative properties. However, the effects of PEDF on podocyte loss, one of the characteristic features of diabetic nephropathy remain unknown. In this study, we investigated whether and how PEDF could protect against AGE-elicited podocyte apoptosis in vitro. AGEs decreased PEDF mRNA level in podocytes, which was blocked by neutralizing antibody raised against receptor for AGEs (RAGE-Ab). PEDF or RAGE-Ab was found to inhibit the AGE-induced up-regulation of RAGE mRNA level, oxidative stress generation and resultant apoptosis in podocytes. All of the beneficial effects of PEDF on AGE-exposed podocytes were blocked by the treatment of GW9662, an inhibitor of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ). Further, although PEDF did not affect protein expression levels of PPARγ, it significantly restored the PPARγ transcriptional activity in AGE-exposed podocytes. The present results demonstrated for the first time that PEDF could block the AGE-induced apoptotic cell death of podocytes by suppressing RAGE expression and subsequent ROS generation partly via PPARγ activation. Our present study suggests that substitution of PEDF proteins may be a promising strategy for preventing the podocyte loss in diabetic nephropathy.

  7. A mathematical model of extremely low frequency ocean induced electromagnetic noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dautta, Manik; Faruque, Rumana Binte; Islam, Rakibul

    2016-07-01

    Magnetic Anomaly Detection (MAD) system uses the principle that ferromagnetic objects disturb the magnetic lines of force of the earth. These lines of force are able to pass through both water and air in similar manners. A MAD system, usually mounted on an aerial vehicle, is thus often employed to confirm the detection and accomplish localization of large ferromagnetic objects submerged in a sea-water environment. However, the total magnetic signal encountered by a MAD system includes contributions from a myriad of low to Extremely Low Frequency (ELF) sources. The goal of the MAD system is to detect small anomaly signals in the midst of these low-frequency interfering signals. Both the Range of Detection (Rd) and the Probability of Detection (Pd) are limited by the ratio of anomaly signal strength to the interfering magnetic noise. In this paper, we report a generic mathematical model to estimate the signal-to-noise ratio or SNR. Since time-variant electro-magnetic signals are affected by conduction losses due to sea-water conductivity and the presence of air-water interface, we employ the general formulation of dipole induced electromagnetic field propagation in stratified media [1]. As a first step we employ a volumetric distribution of isolated elementary magnetic dipoles, each having its own dipole strength and orientation, to estimate the magnetic noise observed by a MAD system. Numerical results are presented for a few realizations out of an ensemble of possible realizations of elementary dipole source distributions.

  8. Strains Induced in Urban Structures by Ultra-High Frequency Blasting Rock Motions: A Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowding, C. H.; Hamdi, E.; Aimone-Martin, C. T.

    2016-10-01

    This paper describes measurement and interpretation of strains induced in two, multiple story, older, urban structures by ultra-high frequency rock blast excitation from contiguous excavation. These strains are obtained from relative displacements found by integrating time correlated velocity time histories from multiple positions on the structures and foundation rock. Observations are based on ten instrumented positions on the structures and in the foundation rock during eight blast events, which provided over 70 time histories for analysis. The case study and measurements allowed the following conclusions: despite particle velocities in the rock that greatly exceed regulatory limits, strains in external walls are similar to or lower than those necessary to crack masonry structures and weak wall covering materials. These strains are also lower than those sustained by single story residential structures when excited by low frequency motions with particle velocities below regulatory limits. Expected relative displacements calculated with pseudo velocity single degree of freedom response spectra of excitation motions measured in the rock are similar to those measured.

  9. Light-induced drift of Na using a frequency-modulated laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lignie, M. C.; Bloemink, H. I.; de Boer, A. H.; Eliel, E. R.

    1990-08-01

    The influence of the bandwidth of the radiation source on light-induced drift (LID) of Na is studied experimentally. Broadband radiation can be used to eliminate optical hyperfine pumping on the one hand, and to provide more efficient excitation due to an increased velocity coverage, on the other hand. These aspects are highlighted in two separate experiments. An increase of the drift velocity of Na by a factor of 4 compared to monochromatic excitation has been measured. A frequency-modulated (FM) ring dye laser is used as a broadband radiation source, having a bandwidth continuously variable from single mode to multimode with a bandwidth of 10 GHz. Contrary to passive multimode lasers, the spectrum of such a laser is well defined and stable. Various modulation frequencies are used to study the dependence of the drift velocity on the mode spacing of the multimode laser. Only small differences are found. All experimental results are compared with results of a four-level rate-equation model for LID of Na, in which the excited-state hyperfine structure of Na and the detailed shape of the FM spectrum are taken into account. Good agreement between the model and the experimental data is found. The model is also used to show that the FM spectrum yields almost the same values for the drift velocity as a rectangular spectrum, which so far has been considered optimal for LID.

  10. Conduction block in myelinated axons induced by high-frequency (kHz) non-symmetric biphasic stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shouguo; Yang, Guangning; Wang, Jicheng; Roppolo, James R.; de Groat, William C.; Tai, Changfeng

    2015-01-01

    This study used the Frankenhaeuser–Huxley axonal model to analyze the effects of non-symmetric waveforms on conduction block of myelinated axons induced by high-frequency (10–300 kHz) biphasic electrical stimulation. The results predict a monotonic relationship between block threshold and stimulation frequency for symmetric waveform and a non-monotonic relationship for non-symmetric waveforms. The symmetric waveform causes conduction block by constantly activating both sodium and potassium channels at frequencies of 20–300 kHz, while the non-symmetric waveforms share the same blocking mechanism from 20 kHz up to the peak threshold frequency. At the frequencies above the peak threshold frequency the non-symmetric waveforms block axonal conduction by either hyperpolarizing the membrane (if the positive pulse is longer) or depolarizing the membrane (if the negative pulse is longer). This simulation study further increases our understanding of conduction block in myelinated axons induced by high-frequency biphasic electrical stimulation, and can guide future animal experiments as well as optimize stimulation parameters that might be used for electrically induced nerve block in clinical applications. PMID:26217217

  11. Strain-induced vibration and temperature sensing BOTDA system combined frequency sweeping and slope-assisted techniques.

    PubMed

    Hu, Junhui; Xia, Lan; Yang, Li; Quan, Wenwen; Zhang, Xuping

    2016-06-13

    A BOTDA sensing scheme combined frequency sweeping and slope-assisted techniques is proposed and experimentally demonstrated for simultaneously temperature and strain-induced vibration sensing. In this scheme, during sweeping Brillouin gain spectrum (BGS) for temperature measurement, we simultaneously perform FFT to the time-domain traces whose probe-pump frequency difference (PPFD) is within the FWHM of the BGS at each position of fiber, and the location and the frequency of the strain-induced vibration event can be acquired based on SA-BOTDA technique. In this way, the vibration can be continuously measured at each selected working frequency point during the BGS scanning process and multiple measurements of vibration event can be completed in one whole BGS scanning process. Meanwhile, double sidebands probe method is employed to reduce the nonlocal effects. In our experiment, a temperature event and two vibration events with the frequency of 7.00Hz or 10.00Hz are simultaneously measured near the end of 10.6km long sensing fiber in a traditional BOTDA system. The system shows 1.2°C temperature accuracy and 0.67Hz frequency resolution, as well as a 3m spatial resolution. The proposed method may find some potential applications where both the strain-induced vibration frequency and temperature are the diagnostic objects.

  12. Freshly induced short-lived gamma-ray activity as a measure of fission rates in lightly re-irradiated spent fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kröhnert, H.; Perret, G.; Murphy, M. F.; Chawla, R.

    2010-12-01

    A new measurement technique has been developed to determine fission rates in burnt fuel, following re-irradiation in a zero-power research reactor. The development has been made in the frame of the LIFE@PROTEUS program at the Paul Scherrer Institute, which aims at characterizing the interfaces between fresh and highly burnt fuel assemblies in modern LWRs. To discriminate against the high intrinsic gamma-ray activity of the burnt fuel, the proposed measurement technique uses high-energy gamma-rays, above 2000 keV, emitted by short-lived fission products freshly produced in the fuel. To demonstrate the feasibility of this technique, a fresh UO 2 sample and a 36 GWd/t burnt UO 2 sample were irradiated in the PROTEUS reactor and their gamma-ray activities were recorded directly after irradiation. For both fresh and the burnt fuel samples, relative fission rates were derived for different core positions, based on the short-lived 142La (2542 keV), 89Rb (2570 keV), 138Cs (2640 keV) and 95Y (3576 keV) gamma-ray lines. Uncertainties on the inter-position fission rate ratios were mainly due to the uncertainties on the net-area of the gamma-ray peaks and were about 1-3% for the fresh sample, and 3-6% for the burnt one. Thus, for the first time, it has been shown that the short-lived gamma-ray activity, induced in burnt fuel by irradiation in a zero-power reactor, can be used as a quantitative measure of the fission rate. For both fresh and burnt fuel, the measured results agreed, within the uncertainties, with Monte Carlo (MCNPX) predictions.

  13. gamma-Tocotrienol modulates the paracrine secretion of VEGF induced by cobalt(II) chloride via ERK signaling pathway in gastric adenocarcinoma SGC-7901 cell line.

    PubMed

    Bi, Sheng; Liu, Jia-Ren; Li, Yang; Wang, Qi; Liu, Hui-Kun; Yan, Ya-Geng; Chen, Bing-Qing; Sun, Wen-Guang

    2010-01-01

    Hypoxia is a common characteristic feature of solid tumors, and carcinoma cells are known to secrete many growth factors. These growth factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), play a major role in the regulation of tumor angiogenesis and metastasis. In this study, the effect of gamma-tocotrienol, a natural product commonly found in palm oil and rice bran, on the accumulation of HIF-1alpha protein and the paracrine secretion of VEGF in human gastric adenocarcinoma SGC-7901 cell line induced by cobalt(II) chloride (as a hypoxia mimic) was investigated. These results showed that cobalt(II) chloride induced the high expression of VEGF in SGC-7901 cells at dose of 150 micromol/L for 24h. Both basal level and cobalt(II) chloride-induced HIF-1alpha protein accumulation and VEGF paracrine secretion were inhibited in SGC-7901 cells treated with gamma-tocotrienol at 60 micromol/L treatment for 24 h. U0126, a MEK1/2 inhibitor, decreased the expression of HIF-1alpha protein and the paracrine secretion of VEGF under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. In this study, gamma-tocotrienol also significantly inhibited the hypoxia-stimulated expression of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (p-ERK1/2). The mechanism seems to involve in inhibiting hypoxia-mediated activation of p-ERK1/2, it leads to a marked decrease in hypoxia-induced HIF-1alpha protein accumulation and VEGF secretion. These data suggest that HIF-1alpha/VEGF could be a promising target for gamma-tocotrienol in an effective method of chemoprevention and chemotherapy in human gastric cancer.

  14. [Synchronization of the activity of gamma oscillation and ERP components].

    PubMed

    Wang, Mingshi; Liu, Jin; Zhu, Qiang; Chen, Yun

    2005-10-01

    In the present study the activity of the gamma oscillation synchronized with the stimuli and ERP is investigated by means of unimodal and bimodal experiments. The multiresolution wavelet algorithm is used for signal extraction and Gabor transform is employed to represent the temporal evolution of the selected frequency components. The results show that the gamma oscillation is strongly phase-locked not only with the exogenous stimuli in the three experiments, but also with the endogenous components of ERPs (N2b, P300). And the ERP and the gamma oscillation induced by the bimodal stimuli show the audio-visual bisensory integration and relationship. In addition, the results from the experiments with the auditory stimuli show that the gamma oscillation may be closely related to the perception of auditory signals.

  15. Gene expression profiling in MOLT-4 cells during gamma-radiation-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Lindgren, Theres; Stigbrand, Torgny; Riklund, Katrine; Johansson, Lennart; Eriksson, David

    2012-06-01

    This study aims to identify the temporal changes in gene expression in MOLT-4, a leukemia cell line, in response to radiation and to present a comprehensive description of the pathways and processes that most significantly relate to the cellular biological responses. A global gene expression profile of 24,500 genes was performed on MOLT-4 tumor cells following exposure to 5 Gy of ionizing radiation ((60)Co) using a bead chip array (Illumina). Signaling pathways and processes significantly altered following irradiation were explored using MetaCore. Cellular viability [3-(4,5 dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide], activation of cell cycle checkpoints [fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS)], and induction of apoptosis (FACS, caspase assays) were evaluated to correlate these biological responses to the gene expression changes. Totally, 698 different genes displayed a significantly altered expression following radiation, and out of these transcripts, all but one showed increased expression. One hour following irradiation, the expression was changed only for a few genes. Striking changes appeared at later time-points. From 3 to 24 h post-irradiation, a significant fraction of the genes with altered expression were found to be involved in cell cycle checkpoints and their regulation (CDKN1A), DNA repair (GADD45A, DDB2, XPC), apoptosis induction (DR5, FasR, Apo-2L, Bax), and T-cell activation/proliferation (CD70, OX40L). Irradiated MOLT-4 cells were arrested at the G2-checkpoint, followed by a decrease in cell viability, most pronounced 48 h after exposure. The cell death was executed by induced apoptosis and was visualized by an increase in subG1 cells and an increased activation of initiator (caspase-8 and caspase-9) and execution (caspase-3) caspases. Activation of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis correlated well in time with the changes in gene expression of those genes important for these biological processes. Activation of the apoptotic signaling

  16. Administration of the peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} agonist pioglitazone during fractionated brain irradiation prevents radiation-induced cognitive impairment

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Weiling; Payne, Valerie; Tommasi, Ellen; Diz, Debra I.; Hsu, F.-C.; Robbins, Mike E. . E-mail: mrobbins@wfubmc.edu

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: We hypothesized that administration of the anti-inflammatory peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) agonist pioglitazone (Pio) to adult male rats would inhibit radiation-induced cognitive impairment. Methods and Materials: Young adult male F344 rats received one of the following: (1) fractionated whole brain irradiation (WBI); 40 or 45 Gy {gamma}-rays in 4 or 4.5 weeks, respectively, two fractions per week and normal diet; (2) sham-irradiation and normal diet; (3) WBI plus Pio (120 ppm) before, during, and for 4 or 54 weeks postirradiation; (4) sham-irradiation plus Pio; or (5) WBI plus Pio starting 24h after completion of WBI. Results: Administration of Pio before, during, and for 4 or 54 weeks after WBI prevented Radiation-induced cognitive impairment. Administration of Pio for 54 weeks starting after completion of fractionated WBI substantially but not significantly reduced Radiation-induced cognitive impairment. Conclusions: These findings offer the promise of improving the quality of life and increasing the therapeutic window for brain tumor patients.

  17. Inhibiting the repair of DNA damage induced by gamma irradiation in rat thymocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Smit, J.A.; Stark, J.H.

    1994-01-01

    This study assessed the ability of 11 established and potential radiosensitizing agents to retard the repair of radiation-induced DNA damage with a view to enhancing the immunosuppressive effects of in vivo lymphoid irradiation. The capability of irradiated rat thymocytes to repair DNA damage was assessed by an adaptation of the fluorimetric unwinding method. Three compounds, 3-aminobenzamide (3-AB), novobiocin and flavone-8-acetic acid (FAA), inhibited repair significantly. We also report the effect of low-dose irradiation combined with repair inhibitors on the relationship between DNA strand breaks, fragmentation, cell viability and use of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD). DNA fragmentation was increased by 1 mM/l FAA, 1 mM/l novobiocin and 50 {mu}M/l RS-61443 within 3 h of incubation. The latter two compounds also proved cytotoxic. All three drugs augmented the effect of ionizing radiation on the use of NAD. Of the agents investigated, FAA showed the most promise for augmenting the immunosuppressive action of irradiation at nontoxic, pharmacokinetically achievable concentrations. 33 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  18. Morphology of blazar-induced gamma ray halos due to a helical intergalactic magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Andrew J.; Vachaspati, Tanmay E-mail: tvachasp@asu.edu

    2015-09-01

    We study the characteristic size and shape of idealized blazar-induced cascade halos in the 1–100,GeV energy range assuming various non-helical and helical configurations for the intergalactic magnetic field (IGMF). While the magnetic field creates an extended halo, the helicity provides the halo with a twist. Under simplifying assumptions, we assess the parameter regimes for which it is possible to measure the size and shape of the halo from a single source and then to deduce properties of the IGMF. We find that blazar halo measurements with an experiment similar to Fermi-LAT are best suited to probe a helical magnetic field with strength and coherence length today in the ranges 10{sup −17} ∼< B{sub 0} / Gauss ∼< 10{sup −13} and 10 Mpc ∼< λ ∼< 10 Gpc where H ∼ B{sub 0}{sup 2} / λ is the magnetic helicity density. Stronger magnetic fields or smaller coherence scales can still potentially be investigated, but the connection between the halo morphology and the magnetic field properties is more involved. Weaker magnetic fields or longer coherence scales require high photon statistics or superior angular resolution.

  19. Gamma radiation-induced grafting of glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) onto water hyacinth fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madrid, Jordan F.; Nuesca, Guillermo M.; Abad, Lucille V.

    2013-04-01

    Water hyacinth fibers (Eichhornia crassipes) were functionalized using radiation-induced graft polymerization of glycidyl methacrylate by γ-rays from 60Co source. The simultaneous grafting technique was employed wherein the water hyacinth fibers were irradiated in nitrogen atmosphere in the presence of glycidyl methacrylate dissolved in water/methanol solvent. The effects of different grafting parameters to the grafting yield were evaluated. The optimal values of solvent, absorbed dose, dose rate, and concentration of monomer were found to be 1:3 (volume/volume) water-methanol solvent, 10 kGy, 8 kGy h-1 dose rate and 5% volume/volume glycidyl methacrylate, respectively. Using the optimum conditions, degree of grafting of approximately 58% was achieved. The grafted water hyacinth fibers were characterized using Attenuated Total Reflectance-Fourier Transformed Infrared Spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDX). The results of these tests confirmed the successful grafting of glycidyl methacrylate onto water hyacinth fibers.

  20. Induction of self awareness in dreams through frontal low current stimulation of gamma activity.

    PubMed

    Voss, Ursula; Holzmann, Romain; Hobson, Allan; Paulus, Walter; Koppehele-Gossel, Judith; Klimke, Ansgar; Nitsche, Michael A

    2014-06-01

    Recent findings link fronto-temporal gamma electroencephalographic (EEG) activity to conscious awareness in dreams, but a causal relationship has not yet been established. We found that current stimulation in the lower gamma band during REM sleep influences ongoing brain activity and induces self-reflective awareness in dreams. Other stimulation frequencies were not effective, suggesting that higher order consciousness is indeed related to synchronous oscillations around 25 and 40 Hz.