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Sample records for induced lung cancer

  1. Radiation-induced esophagitis in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Sarah; Fairchild, Alysa

    2016-01-01

    Radiation-induced esophagitis is the most common local acute toxicity of radiotherapy (RT) delivered for the curative or palliative intent treatment of lung cancer. Although concurrent chemotherapy and higher RT dose are associated with increased esophagitis risk, advancements in RT techniques as well as adherence to esophageal dosimetric constraints may reduce the incidence and severity. Mild acute esophagitis symptoms are generally self-limited, and supportive management options include analgesics, acid suppression, diet modification, treatment for candidiasis, and maintenance of adequate nutrition. Esophageal stricture is the most common late sequela from esophageal irradiation and can be addressed with endoscopic dilatation. Approaches to prevent or mitigate these toxicities are also discussed. PMID:28210168

  2. Radiation-induced heart disease in lung cancer radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ming, Xin; Feng, Yuanming; Yang, Chengwen; Wang, Wei; Wang, Ping; Deng, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD), which affects the patients’ prognosis with both acute and late side effects, has been published extensively in the radiotherapy of breast cancer, lymphoma and other benign diseases. Studies on RIHD in lung cancer radiotherapy, however, are less extensive and clear even though the patients with lung cancer are delivered with higher doses to the heart during radiation treatment. Methods: In this article, after extensive literature search and analysis, we reviewed the current evidence on RIHD in lung cancer patients after their radiation treatments and investigated the potential risk factors for RIHD as compared to other types of cancers. Result: Cardiac toxicity has been found highly relevant in lung cancer radiotherapy. So far, the crude incidence of cardiac complications in the lung cancer patients after radiotherapy has been up to 33%. Conclusion: The dose to the heart, the lobar location of tumor, the treatment modality, the history of heart and pulmonary disease and smoking were considered as potential risk factors for RIHD in lung cancer radiotherapy. As treatment techniques improve over the time with better prognosis for lung cancer survivors, an improved prediction model can be established to further reduce the cardiac toxicity in lung cancer radiotherapy. PMID:27741117

  3. Lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Aisner, J.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 13 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: The Pathology of Lung Cancer; Radiotherapy for Non-Small-Cell Cancer of the Lung; Chemotherapy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer; Immunotherapy in the Management of Lung Cancer; Preoperative Staging and Surgery for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer; and Prognostic Factors in Lung Cancer.

  4. Radiation-induced lung damage promotes breast cancer lung-metastasis through CXCR4 signaling.

    PubMed

    Feys, Lynn; Descamps, Benedicte; Vanhove, Christian; Vral, Anne; Veldeman, Liv; Vermeulen, Stefan; De Wagter, Carlos; Bracke, Marc; De Wever, Olivier

    2015-09-29

    Radiotherapy is a mainstay in the postoperative treatment of breast cancer as it reduces the risks of local recurrence and mortality after both conservative surgery and mastectomy. Despite recent efforts to decrease irradiation volumes through accelerated partial irradiation techniques, late cardiac and pulmonary toxicity still occurs after breast irradiation. The importance of this pulmonary injury towards lung metastasis is unclear. Preirradiation of lung epithelial cells induces DNA damage, p53 activation and a secretome enriched in the chemokines SDF-1/CXCL12 and MIF. Irradiated lung epithelial cells stimulate adhesion, spreading, growth, and (transendothelial) migration of human MDA-MB-231 and murine 4T1 breast cancer cells. These metastasis-associated cellular activities were largely mimicked by recombinant CXCL12 and MIF. Moreover, an allosteric inhibitor of the CXCR4 receptor prevented the metastasis-associated cellular activities stimulated by the secretome of irradiated lung epithelial cells. Furthermore, partial (10%) irradiation of the right lung significantly stimulated breast cancer lung-specific metastasis in the syngeneic, orthotopic 4T1 breast cancer model.Our results warrant further investigation of the potential pro-metastatic effects of radiation and indicate the need to develop efficient drugs that will be successful in combination with radiotherapy to prevent therapy-induced spread of cancer cells.

  5. Radiation-induced lung damage promotes breast cancer lung-metastasis through CXCR4 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Feys, Lynn; Descamps, Benedicte; Vanhove, Christian; Vral, Anne; Veldeman, Liv; Vermeulen, Stefan; De Wagter, Carlos; Bracke, Marc; De Wever, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy is a mainstay in the postoperative treatment of breast cancer as it reduces the risks of local recurrence and mortality after both conservative surgery and mastectomy. Despite recent efforts to decrease irradiation volumes through accelerated partial irradiation techniques, late cardiac and pulmonary toxicity still occurs after breast irradiation. The importance of this pulmonary injury towards lung metastasis is unclear. Preirradiation of lung epithelial cells induces DNA damage, p53 activation and a secretome enriched in the chemokines SDF-1/CXCL12 and MIF. Irradiated lung epithelial cells stimulate adhesion, spreading, growth, and (transendothelial) migration of human MDA-MB-231 and murine 4T1 breast cancer cells. These metastasis-associated cellular activities were largely mimicked by recombinant CXCL12 and MIF. Moreover, an allosteric inhibitor of the CXCR4 receptor prevented the metastasis-associated cellular activities stimulated by the secretome of irradiated lung epithelial cells. Furthermore, partial (10%) irradiation of the right lung significantly stimulated breast cancer lung-specific metastasis in the syngeneic, orthotopic 4T1 breast cancer model. Our results warrant further investigation of the potential pro-metastatic effects of radiation and indicate the need to develop efficient drugs that will be successful in combination with radiotherapy to prevent therapy-induced spread of cancer cells. PMID:26396176

  6. Discovery of 2'-hydroxychalcones as autophagy inducer in A549 lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang-Wu; Wang, Sheng-Qing; Zhao, Bao-Xiang; Miao, Jun-Ying

    2014-05-21

    A series of 2'-hydroxychalcone derivatives was synthesized and the effects of all the compounds on growth of A549 lung cancer cell were investigated. The results showed that all compounds had inhibitory effects on the growth of A549 lung cancer cells and compound possessed the highest growth inhibitory effect and induced autophagy of A549 lung cancer cells.

  7. Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Lung cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. It is a leading cause of cancer death in men and women in the United States. Cigarette smoking causes most lung cancers. The more cigarettes you smoke per day and ...

  8. What Is Lung Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Graphics Infographic Stay Informed Cancer Home What Is Lung Cancer? Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... cancer starts in the lungs, it is called lung cancer. Lung cancer begins in the lungs and may ...

  9. Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... has been a steady drop in lung cancer deaths among men, mainly because fewer men are smoking, and since the turn of the century, lung cancer deaths in women have been slowly declining. Cigarette smoking rates had been dropping steadily in the 1990s ...

  10. Tumor-Induced CD8+ T-Cell Dysfunction in Lung Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Prado-Garcia, Heriberto; Romero-Garcia, Susana; Aguilar-Cazares, Dolores; Meneses-Flores, Manuel; Lopez-Gonzalez, Jose Sullivan

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide and one of the most common types of cancers. The limited success of chemotherapy and radiotherapy regimes have highlighted the need to develop new therapies like antitumor immunotherapy. CD8+ T-cells represent a major arm of the cell-mediated anti-tumor response and a promising target for developing T-cell-based immunotherapies against lung cancer. Lung tumors, however, have been considered to possess poor immunogenicity; even so, lung tumor-specific CD8+ T-cell clones can be established that possess cytotoxicity against autologous tumor cells. This paper will focus on the alterations induced in CD8+ T-cells by lung cancer. Although memory CD8+ T-cells infiltrate lung tumors, in both tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) and malignant pleural effusions, these cells are dysfunctional and the effector subset is reduced. We propose that chronic presence of lung tumors induces dysfunctions in CD8+ T-cells and sensitizes them to activation-induced cell death, which may be associated with the poor clinical responses observed in immunotherapeutic trials. Getting a deeper knowledge of the evasion mechanisms lung cancer induce in CD8+ T-cells should lead to further understanding of lung cancer biology, overcome tumor evasion mechanisms, and design improved immunotherapeutic treatments for lung cancer. PMID:23118782

  11. Tumor-induced CD8+ T-cell dysfunction in lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Prado-Garcia, Heriberto; Romero-Garcia, Susana; Aguilar-Cazares, Dolores; Meneses-Flores, Manuel; Lopez-Gonzalez, Jose Sullivan

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide and one of the most common types of cancers. The limited success of chemotherapy and radiotherapy regimes have highlighted the need to develop new therapies like antitumor immunotherapy. CD8+ T-cells represent a major arm of the cell-mediated anti-tumor response and a promising target for developing T-cell-based immunotherapies against lung cancer. Lung tumors, however, have been considered to possess poor immunogenicity; even so, lung tumor-specific CD8+ T-cell clones can be established that possess cytotoxicity against autologous tumor cells. This paper will focus on the alterations induced in CD8+ T-cells by lung cancer. Although memory CD8+ T-cells infiltrate lung tumors, in both tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) and malignant pleural effusions, these cells are dysfunctional and the effector subset is reduced. We propose that chronic presence of lung tumors induces dysfunctions in CD8+ T-cells and sensitizes them to activation-induced cell death, which may be associated with the poor clinical responses observed in immunotherapeutic trials. Getting a deeper knowledge of the evasion mechanisms lung cancer induce in CD8+ T-cells should lead to further understanding of lung cancer biology, overcome tumor evasion mechanisms, and design improved immunotherapeutic treatments for lung cancer.

  12. Inhibition of thromboxane synthase induces lung cancer cell death via increasing the nuclear p27

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Kin Chung; Hsin, Michael K.Y.; Chan, Joey S.Y.; Yip, Johnson H.Y.; Li, Mingyue; Leung, Billy C.S.; Mok, Tony S.K.; Warner, Timothy D.; Underwood, Malcolm J.; Chen, George G.

    2009-10-15

    The role of thromboxane in lung carcinogenesis is not clearly known, though thromboxane B2 (TXB{sub 2}) level is increased and antagonists of thromboxane receptors or TXA2 can induce apoptosis of lung cancer cells. p27, an atypical tumor suppressor, is normally sequestered in the nucleus. The increased nuclear p27 may result in apoptosis of tumor cells. We hypothesize that the inhibition of thromboxane synthase (TXS) induces the death of lung cancer cells and that such inhibition is associated with the nuclear p27 level. Our experiment showed that the inhibition of TXS significantly induced the death or apoptosis in lung cancer cells. The activity of TXS was increased in lung cancer. The nuclear p27 was remarkably reduced in lung cancer tissues. The inhibition of TXS caused the cell death and apoptosis of lung cancer cells, likely via the elevation of the nuclear p27 since the TXS inhibition promoted the nuclear p27 level and the inhibition of p27 by its siRNA recovered the cell death induced by TXS inhibition. Collectively, lung cancer cells produce high levels of TXB{sub 2} but their nuclear p27 is markedly reduced. The inhibition of TXS results in the p27-related induction of cell death in lung cancer cells.

  13. Tobacco carcinogen NNK-induced lung cancer animal models and associated carcinogenic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ge, Guang-Zhe; Xu, Tian-Rui; Chen, Ceshi

    2015-07-01

    Tobacco usage is a major risk factor in the development, progression, and outcomes for lung cancer. Of the carcinogens associated with lung cancer, tobacco-specific nitrosamines 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) is among the most potent ones. The oncogenic mechanisms of NNK are not entirely understood, hindering the development of effective strategies for preventing and treating smoking-associated lung cancers. Here, we introduce the NNK-induced lung cancer animal models in different species and its potential mechanisms. Finally, we summarize several chemopreventive agents developed from these animal models.

  14. AKT1E¹⁷K Is Oncogenic in Mouse Lung and Cooperates with Chemical Carcinogens in Inducing Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Malanga, Donatella; Belmonte, Stefania; Colelli, Fabiana; Scarfò, Marzia; De Marco, Carmela; Oliveira, Duarte Mendes; Mirante, Teresa; Camastra, Caterina; Gagliardi, Monica; Rizzuto, Antonia; Mignogna, Chiara; Paciello, Orlando; Papparella, Serenella; Fagman, Henrik; Viglietto, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    The hotspot AKT1E17K mutation in the pleckstrin homology domain of AKT1 occurs in approximately 0.6-2% of human lung cancers. Recently, we have demonstrated that AKT1E17K transforms immortalized human bronchial cells. Here by use of a transgenic Cre-inducible murine strain in the wild type Rosa26 (R26) locus (R26-AKT1E17K mice) we demonstrate that AKT1E17K is a bona-fide oncogene and plays a role in the development of lung cancer in vivo. In fact, we report that mutant AKT1E17K induces bronchial and/or bronchiolar hyperplastic lesions in murine lung epithelium, which progress to frank carcinoma at very low frequency, and accelerates tumor formation induced by chemical carcinogens. In conclusion, AKT1E17K induces hyperplasia of mouse lung epithelium in vivo and cooperates with urethane to induce the fully malignant phenotype.

  15. Risk assessment methodologies for passive smoking-induced lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Repace, J.L.; Lowrey, A.H. )

    1990-03-01

    Risk assessment methodologies have been successfully applied to control societal risk from outdoor air pollutants. They are now being applied to indoor air pollutants such as environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) and radon. Nonsmokers' exposures to ETS have been assessed based on dosimetry of nicotine, its metabolite, continine, and on exposure to the particulate phase of ETS. Lung cancer responses have been based on both the epidemiology of active and of passive smoking. Nine risk assessments of nonsmokers' lung cancer risk from exposure to ETS have been performed. Some have estimated risks for lifelong nonsmokers only; others have included ex-smokers; still others have estimated total deaths from all causes. To facilitate interstudy comparison, in some cases lung cancers had to be interpolated from a total, or the authors' original estimate had to be adjusted to include ex-smokers. Further, all estimates were adjusted to 1988. Excluding one study whose estimate differs from the mean of the others by two orders of magnitude, the remaining risk assessments are in remarkable agreement. The mean estimate is approximately 5000 +/- 2400 nonsmokers' lung cancer deaths (LCDSs) per year. This is a 25% greater risk to nonsmokers than is indoor radon, and is about 57 times greater than the combined estimated cancer risk from all the hazardous outdoor air pollutants currently regulated by the Environmental Protection Agency: airborne radionuclides, asbestos, arsenic, benzene, coke oven emissions, and vinyl chloride. 48 references.

  16. Lung Cancer Workshop XI: Tobacco-Induced Disease: Advances in Policy, Early Detection and Management.

    PubMed

    Mulshine, James L; Avila, Rick; Yankelevitz, David; Baer, Thomas M; Estépar, Raul San Jose; Ambrose, Laurie Fenton; Aldigé, Carolyn R

    2015-05-01

    The Prevent Cancer Foundation Lung Cancer Workshop XI: Tobacco-Induced Disease: Advances in Policy, Early Detection and Management was held in New York, NY on May 16 and 17, 2014. The two goals of the Workshop were to define strategies to drive innovation in precompetitive quantitative research on the use of imaging to assess new therapies for management of early lung cancer and to discuss a process to implement a national program to provide high quality computed tomography imaging for lung cancer and other tobacco-induced disease. With the central importance of computed tomography imaging for both early detection and volumetric lung cancer assessment, strategic issues around the development of imaging and ensuring its quality are critical to ensure continued progress against this most lethal cancer.

  17. Lung cancer - small cell

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - lung - small cell; Small cell lung cancer; SCLC ... About 15% of all lung cancer cases are SCLC. Small cell lung cancer is slightly more common in men than women. Almost all cases of SCLC are ...

  18. Proteomic Analysis of Serum in Lung Cancer Induced by 3-Methylcholanthrene

    PubMed Central

    Li, Minhua; Ye, Bo; Zhang, Yuxia; Chen, Honglei; Xia, Dong; Liu, Mingqiu; Yang, Fei

    2009-01-01

    Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Early detection of lung cancer is problematic due to the lack of a marker with high diagnosis sensitivity and specificity. To determine the differently expressed proteins in the serum of lung cancer and figure out the function of the proteins, two-dimensional electrophoresis (2DE) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) were used to screen the serum proteins of lung cancer model induced by 3-methylcholanthrene (MCA). From optimized 2DE image, 455 spots in the normal sera and 716 spots in the lung cancers sera were detected. Among them, 141 protein spots were differentially expressed when comparing the serum from normal rat and serum from lung cancer model, including 82 overexpressed proteins and 59 underexpressed proteins. Changes of haptoglobin, transthyretin, and TNF superfamily member 8 (TNFRS8) were confirmed in sera from lung cancer by MALDI-TOF-MS. Proteomics technology leads to identify changes of haptoglobin, transthyretin, and TNFRS8 in serum of rat lung cancer model and represents a powerful tool in searching for candidate proteins as biomarkers. PMID:19794824

  19. Immunotherapy in Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Castellanos, Emily H; Horn, Leora

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer has not traditionally been viewed as an immune-responsive tumor. However, it is becoming evident that tumor-induced immune suppression is vital to malignant progression. Immunotherapies act by enhancing the patient's innate immune response and hold promise for inducing long-term responses in select patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Immune checkpoint inhibitors, in particular, inhibitors to cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4) and programmed death 1 (PD-1) and programmed death receptor ligand 1 (PD-L1) have shown promise in early studies and are currently in clinical trials in both small cell lung cancer and non-small cell lung cancer patients. Two large randomized phase III trials recently demonstrated superior overall survival (OS) in patients treated with anti-PD-1 therapy compared to chemotherapy in the second-line setting.

  20. 6 Common Cancers - Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Lung Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... Desperate Housewives. (Photo ©2005 Kathy Hutchins / Hutchins) Lung Cancer Lung cancer causes more deaths than the next ...

  1. Inhibition of hypoxia-induced miR-155 radiosensitizes hypoxic lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Babar, Imran A; Czochor, Jennifer; Steinmetz, Allison; Weidhaas, Joanne B; Glazer, Peter M; Slack, Frank J

    2011-11-15

    miR-155 is a prominent microRNA (miRNA) that regulates genes involved in immunity and cancer-related pathways. miR-155 is overexpressed in lung cancer, which correlates with poor patient prognosis. It is unclear how miR-155 becomes increased in lung cancers and how this increase contributes to reduced patient survival. Here, we show that hypoxic conditions induce miR-155 expression in lung cancer cells and trigger a corresponding decrease in a validated target, FOXO3A. Furthermore, we find that increased levels of miR-155 radioprotects lung cancer cells, while inhibition of miR-155 radiosensitizes these cells. Moreover, we reveal a therapeutically important link between miR-155 expression, hypoxia, and irradiation by demonstrating that anti-miR-155 molecules also sensitize hypoxic lung cancer cells to irradiation. Our study helps explain how miR-155 becomes elevated in lung cancers, which contain extensive hypoxic microenvironments, and demonstrates that inhibition of miR-155 may have important therapeutic potential as a means to radiosensitize hypoxic lung cancer cells.

  2. Benzo(a)pyrene induced lung cancer: Role of dietary phytochemicals in chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Kasala, Eshvendar Reddy; Bodduluru, Lakshmi Narendra; Barua, Chandana C; Sriram, Chandra Shekhar; Gogoi, Ranadeep

    2015-10-01

    Lung cancer is the major cause of overall cancer deaths, and chemoprevention is a promising strategy to control this disease. Benzo(a)pyrene [B(a)P], a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, is one among the principal constituents of tobacco smoke that plays a key role in lung carcinogenesis. The B(a)P induced lung cancer in mice offers a relevant model to study the effect of natural products and has been widely used by many researchers and found considerable success in ameliorating the pathophysiological changes of lung cancer. Currently available synthetic drugs that constitute the pharmacological armamentarium are themselves effective in managing the condition but not without setbacks. These hunches have accelerated the requisite for natural products, which may be used as dietary supplement to prevent the progress of lung cancer. Besides, these agents also supplement the conventional treatment and offer better management of the condition with less side effects. In the context of soaring interest toward dietary phytochemicals as newer pharmacological interventions for lung cancer, in the present review, we are attempting to give a silhouette of mechanisms of B(a)P induced lung carcinogenesis and the role of dietary phytochemicals in chemoprevention.

  3. Relevance of particle-induced rat lung tumors for assessing lung carcinogenic hazard and human lung cancer risk.

    PubMed Central

    Mauderly, J L

    1997-01-01

    Rats and other rodents are exposed by inhalation to identify agents that might present hazards for lung cancer in humans exposed by inhalation. In some cases, the results are used in attempts to develop quantitative estimates of human lung cancer risk. This report reviews evidence for the usefulness of the rat for evaluation of lung cancer hazards from inhaled particles. With the exception of nickel sulfate, particulate agents thought to be human lung carcinogens cause lung tumors in rats exposed by inhalation. The rat is more sensitive to carcinogenesis from nonfibrous particles than mice or Syrian hamsters, which have both produced false negatives. However, rats differ from mice and nonhuman primates in both the pattern of particle retention in the lung and alveolar epithelial hyperplastic responses to chronic particle exposure. Present evidence warrants caution in extrapolation from the lung tumor response of rats to inhaled particles to human lung cancer hazard, and there is considerable uncertainty in estimating unit risks for humans from rat data. It seems appropriate to continue using rats in inhalation carcinogenesis assays of inhaled particles, but the upper limit of exposure concentrations must be set carefully to avoid false-positive results. A positive finding in both rats and mice would give greater confidence that an agent presents a carcinogenic hazard to man, and both rats and mice should be used if the agent is a gas or vapor. There is little justification for including Syrian hamsters in assays of the intrapulmonary carcinogenicity of inhaled agents. PMID:9400748

  4. Tobacco smoke induces production of chemokine CCL20 to promote lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gui-Zhen; Cheng, Xin; Li, Xin-Chun; Liu, Yong-Qiang; Wang, Xian-Quan; Shi, Xu; Wang, Zai-Yong; Guo, Yong-Qing; Wen, Zhe-Sheng; Huang, Yun-Chao; Zhou, Guang-Biao

    2015-07-10

    Tobacco kills nearly 6 million people each year, and 90% of the annual 1.59 million lung cancer deaths worldwide are caused by cigarette smoke. Clinically, a long latency is required for individuals to develop lung cancer since they were first exposed to smoking. In this study, we aimed to identify clinical relevant inflammatory factors that are critical for carcinogenesis by treating normal human lung epithelial cells with tobacco carcinogen nicotine-derived nitrosaminoketone (NNK) for a long period (60 days) and systematic screening in 84 cytokines/chemokines. We found that a chemokine CCL20 was significantly up-regulated by NNK, and in 78/173 (45.1%) patients the expression of CCL20 was higher in tumor samples than their adjacent normal lung tissues. Interestingly, CCL20 was up-regulated in 48/92 (52.2%) smoker and 29/78 (37.2%) nonsmoker patients (p = 0.05), and high CCL20 was associated with poor prognosis. NNK induced the production of CCL20, which promoted lung cancer cell proliferation and migration. In addition, an anti-inflammation drug, dexamethasone, inhibited NNK-induced CCL20 production and suppressed lung cancer in vitro and in vivo. These results indicate that CCL20 is crucial for tobacco smoke-caused lung cancer, and anti-CCL20 could be a rational approach to fight against this deadly disease.

  5. Nicotine prevents the apoptosis induced by menadione in human lung cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Tao; Lu Heng; Shang Xuan; Tian Yihao; Zheng Congyi; Wang Shiwen; Cheng Hanhua . E-mail: hhcheng@whu.edu.cn; Zhou Rongjia . E-mail: rjzhou@whu.edu.cn

    2006-04-14

    Approximately 50% of long-term cigarette smokers die prematurely from the adverse effects of smoking, including on lung cancer and other illnesses. Nicotine is a main component in tobacco and has been implicated as a potential factor in the pathogenesis of human lung cancer. However, the mechanism of nicotine action in the development of lung cancer remains largely unknown. In the present study, we designed a nicotine-apoptosis system, by pre-treatment of nicotine making lung cancer cell A549 to be in a physiological nicotine environment, and observed that nicotine promoted cell proliferation and prevented the menadione-induced apoptosis, and exerts its role of anti-apoptosis by shift of apoptotic stage induced by menadione from late apoptotic stage to early apoptotic stage, in which NF-{kappa}B was up-regulated. Interference analysis of NF-{kappa}B in A549 cells showed that knock down of NF-{kappa}B resulted in apoptosis promotion and counteracted the protective effect of nicotine. The findings suggest that nicotine has potential effect in lung cancer genesis, especially in patients with undetectable early tumor development and development of specific NF-{kappa}B inhibitors would represent a potentially exciting new pharmacotherapy for tobacco-related lung cancer.

  6. CYLD Promotes TNF-α-Induced Cell Necrosis Mediated by RIP-1 in Human Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xing; Chen, Qianshun; Huang, Chen

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. Cylindromatosis (CYLD) is a deubiquitination enzyme and contributes to the degradation of ubiquitin chains on RIP1. The aim of the present study is to investigate the levels of CYLD in lung cancer patients and explore the molecular mechanism of CYLD in the lung cancer pathogenesis. The levels of CYLD were detected in human lung cancer tissues and the paired paracarcinoma tissues by real-time PCR and western blotting analysis. The proliferation of human lung cancer cells was determined by MTT assay. Cell apoptosis and necrosis were determined by FACS assay. The results demonstrated that low levels of CYLD were detected in clinical lung carcinoma specimens. Three pairs of siRNA were used to knock down the endogenous CYLD in lung cancer cells. Knockdown of CYLD promoted cell proliferation of lung cancer cells. Otherwise overexpression of CYLD induced TNF-α-induced cell death in A549 cells and H460 cells. Moreover, CYLD-overexpressed lung cancer cells were treated with 10 μM of z-VAD-fmk for 12 hours and the result revealed that TNF-α-induced cell necrosis was significantly enhanced. Additionally, TNF-α-induced cell necrosis in CYLD-overexpressed H460 cells was mediated by receptor-interacting protein 1 (RIP-1) kinase. Our findings suggested that CYLD was a potential target for the therapy of human lung cancers. PMID:27738385

  7. Oral kanglaite injection (KLTI) attenuates the lung cancer-promoting effect of high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhenzhen; Zheng, Yaqiu; Geng, Shengnan; Meng, Mingjing; Du, Zhenhua; Lin, Haihong; Duan, Yongjian; Du, Gangjun

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for cancer and cancer-related mortality, however, its role in lung cancer progression remains controversial. This study aimed to assess whether high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity promotes lung cancer progression and whether the promotion can be decreased by Kanglaite injection (KLTI). In vivo, HFD-induced overweight or obesity increases the lung carcinoma incidence and multiplicity in a urethane-induced lung carcinogenic model and cancer-related mortality in a LLC allograft model by increasing oxidative stress and cellular signaling molecules including JAK, STAT3, Akt, mTOR, NF-κB and cyclin D1. These changes resulted in increases in vascular disruption and the lung water content, thereby promoting lung epithelial proliferation and the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) during carcinogenesis. Chronic KLTI treatment substantially prevented the weight gain resulting from HFD consumption, thereby reversing the metabolic dysfunction-related physiological changes and reducing susceptibility to lung carcinogenesis. In vitro, KLTI significantly suppressed the proliferation and induced apoptosis and differentiation in 3T3-L1 preadipocyte cells and attenuated endothelial cell permeability in HUVECs. Our study indicates that there is a potential relationship between obesity and lung cancer. This is the first study to show that obesity can directly accelerate carcinogen-induced lung cancer progression and that KLTI can decrease the lung cancer-promoting effect of HFD-induced obesity. PMID:27528218

  8. Antibiotic drug levofloxacin inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis of lung cancer cells through inducing mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Song, Meijun; Wu, Hongcheng; Wu, Shibo; Ge, Ting; Wang, Guoan; Zhou, Yingyan; Sheng, Shimo; Jiang, Jingbo

    2016-12-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide and its clinical management remains challenge. Here, we repurposed antibiotic levofloxacin for lung cancer treatment. We show that levofloxacin is effectively against a panel of lung cancer cell lines via inhibiting proliferation and inducing apoptosis, regardless of cellular origin and genetic pattern, in in vitro cell culture system and in vivo xenograft lung tumor model. Mechanistically, levofloxacin inhibits activities of mitochondrial electron transport chain complex I and III, leading to inhibition of mitochondrial respiration and reduction of ATP production. In addition, levofloxacin significantly increases levels of ROS, mitochondrial superoxide and hydrogen peroxide in vitro and oxidative stress markers (HEL and 4-HNE) in vivo. Antioxidants, such as NAC and vitamin C, prevent the inhibitory effects of levofloxacin, confirming the induction of oxidative damage as the mechanism of its action in lung cancer cells. Our work demonstrates that levofloxacin is a useful addition to the treatment of lung cancer. Our work also suggests that targeting mitochondria may be an alternative therapeutic strategy for lung cancer treatment.

  9. AKT1E17K Is Oncogenic in Mouse Lung and Cooperates with Chemical Carcinogens in Inducing Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Malanga, Donatella; Belmonte, Stefania; Colelli, Fabiana; Scarfò, Marzia; De Marco, Carmela; Oliveira, Duarte Mendes; Mirante, Teresa; Camastra, Caterina; Gagliardi, Monica; Rizzuto, Antonia; Mignogna, Chiara; Paciello, Orlando; Papparella, Serenella; Fagman, Henrik; Viglietto, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    The hotspot AKT1E17K mutation in the pleckstrin homology domain of AKT1 occurs in approximately 0.6–2% of human lung cancers. Recently, we have demonstrated that AKT1E17K transforms immortalized human bronchial cells. Here by use of a transgenic Cre-inducible murine strain in the wild type Rosa26 (R26) locus (R26-AKT1E17K mice) we demonstrate that AKT1E17K is a bona-fide oncogene and plays a role in the development of lung cancer in vivo. In fact, we report that mutant AKT1E17K induces bronchial and/or bronchiolar hyperplastic lesions in murine lung epithelium, which progress to frank carcinoma at very low frequency, and accelerates tumor formation induced by chemical carcinogens. In conclusion, AKT1E17K induces hyperplasia of mouse lung epithelium in vivo and cooperates with urethane to induce the fully malignant phenotype. PMID:26859676

  10. CD147 deficiency blocks IL-8 secretion and inhibits lung cancer-induced osteoclastogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hongkai; Zhuo, Yunyun; Hu, Xu; Shen, Weiwei; Zhang, Ying; Chu, Tongwei

    2015-03-06

    Bone is a frequent target of lung cancer metastasis, which is associated with significant morbidity and poor prognosis; however, the molecular basis of this process is still unknown. This study investigated the role of extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (also known as cluster of differentiation (CD)147) in osteoclastogenesis resulting from bone metastasis, based on the enrichment of this glycoprotein on the surface of many malignant bone tumors. RNA interference was used to silence CD147 expression in A549 human lung cancer cells. Compared with conditioned medium (CM) from control cells (A549-CM), CM from CD147-deficient cells (A549-si-CM) suppressed receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand-stimulated osteoclastogenesis in RAW 264.7 cells and bone marrow-derived macrophages. The mRNA levels of osteoclast-specific genes such as tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase, calcitonin receptor, and cathepsin K were also reduced in the presence of A549-si-CM. CD147 knockdown in A549 cells decreased interleukin (IL)-8mRNA and protein expression. IL-8 is present in large amounts in A549-CM and mimicked its inductive effect on osteoclastogenesis; this was reversed by depletion of IL-8 from the medium. Taken together, these results indicate that CD147 promotes lung cancer-induced osteoclastogenesis by modulating IL-8 secretion, and suggest that CD147 is a potential therapeutic target for cancer-associated bone resorption in lung cancer patients. - Highlights: • Bone loss frequently results from lung cancer metastasis. • Cluster of differentiation (CD)147 was depleted in A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells. • RAW 264.7 cell osteoclastogenesis was blocked by medium from CD147-deficient cells. • Interleukin (IL)-8 level was reduced in the conditioned medium. • Osteoclastogenesis induced by lung tumor cells requires CD147-mediated IL-8 release.

  11. Subamolide a induces mitotic catastrophe accompanied by apoptosis in human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hung, Jen-Yu; Wen, Ching-Wen; Hsu, Ya-Ling; Lin, En-Shyh; Huang, Ming-Shyan; Chen, Chung-Yi; Kuo, Po-Lin

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the anticancer effects of subamolide A (Sub-A), isolated from Cinnamomum subavenium, on human nonsmall cell lung cancer cell lines A549 and NCI-H460. Treatment of cancer cells with Sub-A resulted in decreased cell viability of both lung cancer cell lines. Sub-A induced lung cancer cell death by triggering mitotic catastrophe with apoptosis. It triggered oxidant stress, indicated by increased cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and decreased glutathione level. The elevated ROS triggered the activation of ataxia-telangiectasia mutation (ATM), which further enhanced the ATF3 upregulation and subsequently enhanced p53 function by phosphorylation at Serine 15 and Serine 392. The antioxidant, EUK8, significantly decreased mitotic catastrophe by inhibiting ATM activation, ATF3 expression, and p53 phosphorylation. The reduction of ATM and ATF3 expression by shRNA decreased Sub-A-mediated p53 phosphorylation and mitotic catastrophe. Sub-A also caused a dramatic 70% reduction in tumor size in an animal model. Taken together, cell death of lung cancer cells in response to Sub-A is dependent on ROS generation, which triggers mitotic catastrophe followed by apoptosis. Therefore, Sub-A may be a novel anticancer agent for the treatment of nonsmall cell lung cancer.

  12. Prevention of tobacco carcinogen-induced lung cancer in female mice using antiestrogens.

    PubMed

    Stabile, Laura P; Rothstein, Mary E; Cunningham, Diana E; Land, Stephanie R; Dacic, Sanja; Keohavong, Phouthone; Siegfried, Jill M

    2012-11-01

    Increasing evidence shows that estrogens are involved in lung cancer proliferation and progression, and most human lung tumors express estrogen receptor β (ERβ) as well as aromatase. To determine if the aromatase inhibitor anastrozole prevents development of lung tumors induced by a tobacco carcinogen, alone or in combination with the ER antagonist fulvestrant, ovariectomized female mice received treatments with the tobacco carcinogen 4-(methylnitrosoamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) along with daily supplements of androstenedione, the substrate for aromatase. Placebo, anastrozole and/or fulvestrant were administered in both an initiation and a promotion protocol of lung tumorigenesis. The combination of fulvestrant and anastrozole given during NNK exposure resulted in significantly fewer NNK-induced lung tumors (mean = 0.5) compared with placebo (mean = 4.6, P < 0.001), fulvestrant alone (mean = 3.4, P < 0.001) or anastrozole alone (mean = 2.8, P = 0.002). A significantly lower Ki67 cell proliferation index was also observed compared with single agent and control treatment groups. Beginning antiestrogen treatment after NNK exposure, when preneoplastic lesions had already formed, also yielded maximum antitumor effects with the combination. Aromatase expression was found mainly in macrophages infiltrating preneoplastic and tumorous areas of the lungs, whereas ERβ was found in both macrophages and tumor cells. Antiestrogens, especially in combination, effectively inhibited tobacco carcinogen-induced murine lung tumorigenesis and may have application for lung cancer prevention. An important source of estrogen synthesis may be inflammatory cells that infiltrate the lungs in response to carcinogens, beginning early in the carcinogenesis process. ERβ expressed by inflammatory and neoplastic epithelial cells in the lung may signal in response to local estrogen production.

  13. Chronic cadmium exposure in vitro induces cancer cell characteristics in human lung cells

    SciTech Connect

    Person, Rachel J.; Tokar, Erik J.; Xu, Yuanyuan; Orihuela, Ruben; Ngalame, Ntube N. Olive; Waalkes, Michael P.

    2013-12-01

    Cadmium is a known human lung carcinogen. Here, we attempt to develop an in vitro model of cadmium-induced human lung carcinogenesis by chronically exposing the peripheral lung epithelia cell line, HPL-1D, to a low level of cadmium. Cells were chronically exposed to 5 μM cadmium, a noncytotoxic level, and monitored for acquired cancer characteristics. By 20 weeks of continuous cadmium exposure, these chronic cadmium treated lung (CCT-LC) cells showed marked increases in secreted MMP-2 activity (3.5-fold), invasion (3.4-fold), and colony formation in soft agar (2-fold). CCT-LC cells were hyperproliferative, grew well in serum-free media, and overexpressed cyclin D1. The CCT-LC cells also showed decreased expression of the tumor suppressor genes p16 and SLC38A3 at the protein levels. Also consistent with an acquired cancer cell phenotype, CCT-LC cells showed increased expression of the oncoproteins K-RAS and N-RAS as well as the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition marker protein Vimentin. Metallothionein (MT) expression is increased by cadmium, and is typically overexpressed in human lung cancers. The major MT isoforms, MT-1A and MT-2A were elevated in CCT-LC cells. Oxidant adaptive response genes HO-1 and HIF-1A were also activated in CCT-LC cells. Expression of the metal transport genes ZNT-1, ZNT-5, and ZIP-8 increased in CCT-LC cells culminating in reduced cadmium accumulation, suggesting adaptation to the metal. Overall, these data suggest that exposure of human lung epithelial cells to cadmium causes acquisition of cancer cell characteristics. Furthermore, transformation occurs despite the cell's ability to adapt to chronic cadmium exposure. - Highlights: • Chronic cadmium exposure induces cancer cell characteristics in human lung cells. • This provides an in vitro model of cadmium-induced human lung cell transformation. • This occurred with general and lung specific changes typical for cancer cells. • These findings add insight to the relationship

  14. Nicotine-induced resistance of non-small cell lung cancer to treatment--possible mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Czyżykowski, Rafał; Połowinczak-Przybyłek, Joanna; Potemski, Piotr

    2016-03-04

    Cigarette smoking is the leading risk factor of lung cancer. Data from several clinical studies suggest that continuation of smoking during therapy of tobacco-related cancers is associated with lower response rates to chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy, and even with decreased survival. Although nicotine--an addictive component of tobacco--is not a carcinogen, it may influence cancer development and progression or effectiveness of anti-cancer therapy. Several in vitro and in vivo trials have evaluated the influence of nicotine on lung cancer cells. The best known mechanisms by which nicotine impacts cancer biology involve suppression of apoptosis induced by certain drugs or radiation, promotion of proliferation, angiogenesis, invasion and migration of cancer cells. This effect is mainly mediated by membranous nicotinic acetylcholine receptors whose stimulation leads to sustained activation of such intracellular pathways as PI3K/Akt/mTOR, RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK and JAK/STAT, induction of NF-κB activity, enhanced transcription of mitogenic promoters, inhibition of the mitochondrial death pathway or stimulation of pro-angiogenic factors. We herein summarize the mechanisms underlying nicotine's influence on biology of lung cancer cells and the effectiveness of anti-cancer therapy.

  15. Threshold for Radon-Induced Lung Cancer From Inhaled Plutonium Data.

    PubMed

    Cuttler, Jerry M; Sanders, Charles L

    2015-01-01

    Cohen's lung cancer mortality data, from his test of the LNT theory, do not extend to the no observed adverse effects level (NOAEL) above which inhaled radon decay products begin to induce excess lung cancer mortality. Since there is concern about the level of radon in homes, it is important to set the radon limit near the NOAEL to avoid the risk of losing a health benefit. Assuming that dogs model humans, data from a study on inhaled plutonium dioxide particulates in dogs were assessed, and the NOAEL for radon-induced lung tumors was estimated to be about 2100 Bq/m(3). The US Environmental Protection Agency should consider raising its radon action level from 150 to at least 1000 Bq/m(3).

  16. A natural small molecule, catechol, induces c-Myc degradation by directly targeting ERK2 in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Lim, Do Young; Shin, Seung Ho; Lee, Mee-Hyun; Malakhova, Margarita; Kurinov, Igor; Wu, Qiong; Xu, Jinglong; Jiang, Yanan; Dong, Ziming; Liu, Kangdong; Lee, Kun Yeong; Bae, Ki Beom; Choi, Bu Young; Deng, Yibin; Bode, Ann; Dong, Zigang

    2016-06-07

    Various carcinogens induce EGFR/RAS/MAPK signaling, which is critical in the development of lung cancer. In particular, constitutive activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 (ERK2) is observed in many lung cancer patients, and therefore developing compounds capable of targeting ERK2 in lung carcinogenesis could be beneficial. We examined the therapeutic effect of catechol in lung cancer treatment. Catechol suppressed anchorage-independent growth of murine KP2 and human H460 lung cancer cell lines in a dose-dependent manner. Catechol inhibited ERK2 kinase activity in vitro, and its direct binding to the ERK2 active site was confirmed by X-ray crystallography. Phosphorylation of c-Myc, a substrate of ERK2, was decreased in catechol-treated lung cancer cells and resulted in reduced protein stability and subsequent down-regulation of total c-Myc. Treatment with catechol induced G1 phase arrest in lung cancer cells and decreased protein expression related to G1-S progression. In addition, we showed that catechol inhibited the growth of both allograft and xenograft lung cancer tumors in vivo. In summary, catechol exerted inhibitory effects on the ERK2/c-Myc signaling axis to reduce lung cancer tumor growth in vitro and in vivo, including a preclinical patient-derived xenograft (PDX) model. These findings suggest that catechol, a natural small molecule, possesses potential as a novel therapeutic agent against lung carcinogenesis in future clinical approaches.

  17. A natural small molecule, catechol, induces c-Myc degradation by directly targeting ERK2 in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Do Young; Shin, Seung Ho; Lee, Mee-Hyun; Malakhova, Margarita; Kurinov, Igor; Wu, Qiong; Xu, Jinglong; Jiang, Yanan; Dong, Ziming; Liu, Kangdong; Lee, Kun Yeong; Bae, Ki Beom; Choi, Bu Young; Deng, Yibin; Bode, Ann; Dong, Zigang

    2016-01-01

    Various carcinogens induce EGFR/RAS/MAPK signaling, which is critical in the development of lung cancer. In particular, constitutive activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 (ERK2) is observed in many lung cancer patients, and therefore developing compounds capable of targeting ERK2 in lung carcinogenesis could be beneficial. We examined the therapeutic effect of catechol in lung cancer treatment. Catechol suppressed anchorage-independent growth of murine KP2 and human H460 lung cancer cell lines in a dose-dependent manner. Catechol inhibited ERK2 kinase activity in vitro, and its direct binding to the ERK2 active site was confirmed by X-ray crystallography. Phosphorylation of c-Myc, a substrate of ERK2, was decreased in catechol-treated lung cancer cells and resulted in reduced protein stability and subsequent down-regulation of total c-Myc. Treatment with catechol induced G1 phase arrest in lung cancer cells and decreased protein expression related to G1-S progression. In addition, we showed that catechol inhibited the growth of both allograft and xenograft lung cancer tumors in vivo. In summary, catechol exerted inhibitory effects on the ERK2/c-Myc signaling axis to reduce lung cancer tumor growth in vitro and in vivo, including a preclinical patient-derived xenograft (PDX) model. These findings suggest that catechol, a natural small molecule, possesses potential as a novel therapeutic agent against lung carcinogenesis in future clinical approaches. PMID:27167001

  18. CD147 deficiency blocks IL-8 secretion and inhibits lung cancer-induced osteoclastogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongkai; Zhuo, Yunyun; Hu, Xu; Shen, Weiwei; Zhang, Ying; Chu, Tongwei

    2015-03-06

    Bone is a frequent target of lung cancer metastasis, which is associated with significant morbidity and poor prognosis; however, the molecular basis of this process is still unknown. This study investigated the role of extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (also known as cluster of differentiation (CD)147) in osteoclastogenesis resulting from bone metastasis, based on the enrichment of this glycoprotein on the surface of many malignant bone tumors. RNA interference was used to silence CD147 expression in A549 human lung cancer cells. Compared with conditioned medium (CM) from control cells (A549-CM), CM from CD147-deficient cells (A549-si-CM) suppressed receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand-stimulated osteoclastogenesis in RAW 264.7 cells and bone marrow-derived macrophages. The mRNA levels of osteoclast-specific genes such as tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase, calcitonin receptor, and cathepsin K were also reduced in the presence of A549-si-CM. CD147 knockdown in A549 cells decreased interleukin (IL)-8mRNA and protein expression. IL-8 is present in large amounts in A549-CM and mimicked its inductive effect on osteoclastogenesis; this was reversed by depletion of IL-8 from the medium. Taken together, these results indicate that CD147 promotes lung cancer-induced osteoclastogenesis by modulating IL-8 secretion, and suggest that CD147 is a potential therapeutic target for cancer-associated bone resorption in lung cancer patients.

  19. ER stress and autophagy are involved in the apoptosis induced by cisplatin in human lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    SHI, SHAOMIN; TAN, PING; YAN, BINGDI; GAO, RONG; ZHAO, JIANJUN; WANG, JING; GUO, JIA; LI, NING; MA, ZHONGSEN

    2016-01-01

    Cisplatin [cis-diamminedichloroplatinum II (CDDP)] is one of the most classical and effective chemotherapeutic drugs for the treatment of cancers including lung cancer. However, the presence of cisplatin resistance in cancer lowers its curative effect and limits its usage in the clinic. The aim of the present study was to investigate the underlying mechanisms of cisplatin resistance in lung cancer involving endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and autophagy. In the present study, we detected the effect of cisplatin on cell viability, ER stress and autophagy in lung cancer cell lines A549 and H460. We also tested the effects of ER stress and autophagy on apoptosis induced by cisplatin. The results showed that cisplatin induced apoptosis, ER stress and autophagy in lung cancer cell lines. In addition, the inhibition of ER stress by 4-phenylbutyric acid (4-PBA) or tauroursodeoxycholic acid sodium (TUDC) enhanced cisplatin-induced apoptosis in the human lung cancer cells. Meanwhile, combination treatment with the autophagic inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA) or chloroquine (CQ) further increased the apoptosis induced by cisplatin in the human lung cancer cells. The present study provides a novel treatment strategy - cisplatin in combination with an autophagic inhibitor or an ER stress inhibitor leads to increased apoptosis in human lung cancer cells. PMID:26985651

  20. Calmodulin inhibition contributes to sensitize TRAIL-induced apoptosis in human lung cancer H1299 cells.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Mi-kyung; Min, Yong Ki; Kim, Seong Hwan

    2009-12-01

    Tumor necrosis factor related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) preferentially triggers apoptosis in tumor cells versus normal cells. However, TRAIL alone is not effective in treating TRAIL-resistant tumors. We evaluated the effect of 180 enzyme inhibitors on TRAIL-induced apoptosis in human lung cancer H1299 cells, and found fluphenazine-N-2-chloroethane (a calmodulin (CaM) antagonist) sensitized TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Interestingly, in the presence of TRAIL, it increased caspase-8 binding to the Fas-associated death domain (FADD), but decreased binding of FADD-like interleukin-1beta-converting enzyme inhibitory proteins (FLIPs). Additionally, its combination with TRAIL inhibited Akt phosphorylation. These results were consistently observed in cells treated with CaM siRNA. We suggested the blockade of CaM could sensitize lung cancer cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis in at least 2 ways: (i) it can activate death-inducing signaling complex mediated apoptosis by inhibiting TRAIL-induced binding of FLIP and TRAIL-enhanced binding of caspase-8 to FADD; (ii) it can inhibit Akt phosphorylation, consequently leading to decreased expression of anti-apoptotic molecules such as FLIP and members of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein family. This study suggests the combination of CaM antagonists with TRAIL may have the therapeutic potential to overcome the resistance of lung cancers to apoptosis.

  1. Curcumin inhibits B[a]PDE-induced procarcinogenic signals in lung cancer cells, and curbs B[a]P-induced mutagenesis and lung carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Puliyappadamba, Vineshkumar T; Thulasidasan, Arun Kumar T; Vijayakurup, Vinod; Antony, Jayesh; Bava, Smitha V; Anwar, Shabna; Sundaram, Sankar; Anto, Ruby John

    2015-01-01

    Benzo[a]pyrene is a procarcinogen present in environment and cigarette smoke, which could be bio-transformed in vivo to B[a]PDE, a potent carcinogen known to form DNA adducts and induce mutations. We observed that curcumin, a known chemopreventive, could significantly inhibit the survival of lung cancer cells exposed to B[a]PDE. It also downregulates B[a]PDE-induced nuclear translocation of NF-κB as assessed by Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assay (EMSA) and NF-κB-dependent reporter gene assay. Ames assay demonstrated its ability to revert the mutagenic property of benzo[a]pyrene. These observations prompted us to evaluate the efficacy of curcumin in preventing B[a]P-induced lung carcinogenesis in vivo and to explore the molecular mechanism associated with it. The average number of tumor nodules present in the lungs of the Swiss albino mice, which received benzo[a]pyrene, was significantly high compared to that received curcumin as 2% diet along with B[a]P. Curcumin treatment significantly reverted histopathological deviations in the lung tissues due to benzo[a]pyrene ingestion. Moreover, curcumin diet reduced benzo[a]pyrene-induced activation of NF-κB and MAPK signaling and Cox-2 transcription in lung tissues of mice. Taken together, this study illustrates multifaceted efficacy of curcumin in preventing lung cancer.

  2. Cantharidin induces apoptosis of H460 human lung cancer cells through mitochondria-dependent pathways.

    PubMed

    Hsia, Te-Chun; Yu, Chien-Chih; Hsu, Shu-Chun; Tang, Nou-Ying; Lu, Hsu-Feng; Huang, Yi-Ping; Wu, Shin-Hwar; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2014-07-01

    Lung cancer is one of the leading causes of death in cancer-related diseases. Cantharidin (CTD) is one of the components of natural mylabris (Mylabris phalerata Pallas). Numerous studies have shown that CTD induced cytotoxic effects on cancer cells. However, there is no report to demonstrate that CTD induced apoptosis in human lung cancer cells. Herein, we investigated the effect of CTD on the cell death via the induction of apoptosis in H460 human lung cancer cells. Flow cytometry assay was used for examining the percentage of cell viability, sub-G1 phase of the cell cycle, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and Ca²⁺ productions and the levels of mitochondrial membrane potential (∆Ψm). Annexin V/PI staining and DNA gel electrophoresis were also used for examining cell apoptosis. Western blot analysis was used to examine the changes of apoptosis associated protein expression and confocal microscopy for examining the translocation apoptosis associated protein. Results indicated that CTD significantly induced cell morphological changes and decreased the percentage of viable H460 cells. CTD induced apoptosis based on the occurrence of sub-G1 phase and DNA fragmentation. We found that CTD increased gene expression (mRNA) of caspase-3 and -8. Moreover, CTD increased ROS and Ca2+ production and decreased the levels of ∆Ψm. Western blot analysis results showed that CTD increased the expression of cleavage caspase-3 and -8, cytochrome c, Bax and AIF but inhibited the levels of Bcl-xL. CTD promoted ER stress associated protein expression such as GRP78, IRE1α, IRE1β, ATF6α and caspase-4 and it also promoted the expression of calpain 2 and XBP-1, but inhibited calpain 1 that is associated with apoptosis pathways. Based on those observations, we suggest that CTD may be used as a novel anticancer agent for the treatment of lung cancer in the future.

  3. Identification of gene markers in the development of smoking-induced lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhao; Zhuan, Bing; Yan, Ying; Jiang, Simin; Wang, Tao

    2016-01-15

    Lung cancer is a malignant tumor with high mortality in both women and men. To study the mechanisms of smoking-induced lung cancer, we analyzed microarray of GSE4115. GSE4115 was downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus including 78 and 85 bronchial epithelium tissue samples separately from smokers with and without lung cancer. Limma package in R was used to screen differentially expressed genes (DEGs). Hierarchical cluster analysis for DEGs was conducted using orange software and visualized by distance map. Using DAVID software, functional and pathway enrichment analyses separately were conducted for the DEGs. And protein-protein interaction (PPI) network was constructed using Cytoscape software. Then, the pathscores of enriched pathways were calculated. Besides, functional features were screened and optimized using the recursive feature elimination (RFE) method. Additionally, the support vector machine (SVM) method was used to train model. Total 1923 DEGs were identified between the two groups. Hierarchical cluster analysis indicated that there were differences in gene level between the two groups. And SVM analysis indicated that the five features had potential diagnostic value. Importantly, MAPK1 (degree=30), SRC (degree=29), SMAD4 (degree=23), EEF1A1 (degree=21), TRAF2 (degree=21) and PLCG1 (degree=20) had higher degrees in the PPI network of the DEGs. They might be involved in smoking-induced lung cancer by interacting with each other (e.g. MAPK1-SMAD4, SMAD4-EEF1A1 and SRC-PLCG1). MAPK1, SRC, SMAD4, EEF1A1, TRAF2 and PLCG1 might be responsible for the development of smoking-induced lung cancer.

  4. Chidamide alleviates TGF-β-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition in lung cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Lin, Sheng-Hao; Wang, Bing-Yen; Lin, Ching-Hsiung; Chien, Peng-Ju; Wu, Yueh-Feng; Ko, Jiunn-Liang; Chen, Jeremy J W

    2016-07-01

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition is a critical process in the initiation of metastasis of various types of cancer. Chidamide is a class I histone deacetylase inhibitor with anti-tumor activity. This study investigated the effects of chidamide on TGF-β-mediated suppression of E-cadherin expression in adenocarcinomic lung epithelial cells and the molecular mechanisms involved in these effects. Western blot analysis, confocal microscopy, Quantitative methyl-specific PCR and bisulfite sequencing were used to evaluate the effects of different treatments on chidamide ameliorating TGF-β induced-E-cadherin loss. H3 acetylation binding to the promoter of E-cadherin was detected by chromatin immunoprecipitations (CHIP). We found that chidamide reduced the level of lung cancer cell migration observed using a Boyden chamber assay (as an indicator of metastatic potential). Chidamide inhibited TGF-β-induced SMAD2 phosphorylation and attenuated TGF-β-induced loss of E-cadherin expression in lung cancer cells by Western blotting and confocal microscopy, respectively. Quantitative methyl-specific PCR and bisulfite sequencing revealed that TGF-β-enhanced E-cadherin promoter methylation was ameliorated in cells treated with chidamide. We demonstrated that histone H3 deacetylation within the E-cadherin promoter was required for TGF-β-induced E-cadherin loss; cell treatment with chidamide increased the H3 acetylation detected by CHIP. Taken together, our results demonstrate that TGF-β suppressed E-cadherin expression by regulating promoter methylation and histone H3 acetylation. Chidamide significantly enhanced E-cadherin expression in TGF-β-treated cells and inhibited lung cancer cell migration. These findings indicate that chidamide has a potential therapeutic use due to its capacity to prevent cancer cell metastasis.

  5. Radiation Therapy for Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... are available to help. HELPFUL WEB SITES ON LUNG CANCER American Lung Association www.lung.org Lungcancer.org www.lungcancer.org Lung Cancer Alliance www.lungcanceralliance.org Lung Cancer Online www. ...

  6. Interleukin-17-induced EMT promotes lung cancer cell migration and invasion via NF-κB/ZEB1 signal pathway

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Kuo; Li, Ming-Ming; Shen, Jing; Liu, Fang; Cao, Jing-Yan; Jin, Shi; Yu, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory cytokine interleukin-17 (IL-17) has been associated with the risk of progressive cancers including lung cancer. However, it remains unclear how IL-17 may contribute to the invasion and development of these inflammation-associated malignancies. Here we aimed to investigate the role of IL-17 in lung cancer cell development. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) has been recently proposed as a developmental process which plays an important role in cancer progression and metastases. Here we show that IL-17 might promote EMT in lung cancer cells by inducing the transcriptional repressor ZEB1. Exposure to IL-17 upregulated the signature EMT phenotypic markers vimentin and E-cadherin in lung cancer cells, and compared with controls, increased cell migration was observed in IL-17-treated lung cancer cells. ZEB1 mRNA and protein expression was induced by IL-17, and IL-17 stimulated nuclear localization of phosphorylated ZEB1. Conversely, suppressing ZEB1 expression by ZEB1 siRNA abrogated IL-17-stimulated vimentin expression and cell migration. Moreover, the phosphorylation of IκBα was required for IL-17-induced expression of ZEB1, suggesting the involvement of canonical NF-κB signaling. To check this hypothesis, we used IKK inhibitor BAY 11-7028 to block NF-κB activity. We found that BAY 11-7028 abrogated IL-17-induced ZEB1 expression, cell migration, and EMT, thus confirming that NF-κB is required for IL-17 to induce these aggressive phenotypes in lung cancer cells. Taken together, our data support the idea that IL-17-induced EMT promotes lung cancer cell migration and invasion via NF-κB-mediated upregulation of ZEB1. This study reveals a new signaling axis through which the tumor microenvironment causes ZEB1 expression to promote cancer metastasis. We suggest that targeting IL-17-induced ZEB1 expression may offer an effective therapeutic strategy for lung cancer treatment. PMID:26045995

  7. Xylitol induces cell death in lung cancer A549 cells by autophagy.

    PubMed

    Park, Eunjoo; Park, Mi Hee; Na, Hee Sam; Chung, Jin

    2015-05-01

    Xylitol is a widely used anti-caries agent that has anti-inflammatory effects. We have evaluated the potential of xylitol in cancer treatment. It's effects on cell proliferation and cytotoxicity were measured by MTT assay and LDH assay. Cell morphology and autophagy were examined by immunostaining and immunoblotting. Xylitol inhibited cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner in these cancer cells: A549, Caki, NCI-H23, HCT-15, HL-60, K562, and SK MEL-2. The IC50 of xylitol in human gingival fibroblast cells was higher than in cancer cells, indicating that it is more specific for cancer cells. Moreover, xylitol induced autophagy in A549 cells that was inhibited by 3-methyladenine, an autophagy inhibitor. These results indicate that xylitol has potential in therapy against lung cancer by inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing autophagy of A549 cells.

  8. Comparative Pathobiology of Environmentally Induced Lung Cancers in Humans and Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Pandiri, Arun

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer is the number one cause of cancer-related deaths in humans worldwide. Environmental factors play an important role in the epidemiology of these cancers. Rodents are the most common experimental model to study human lung cancers and are frequently used in bioassays to identify environmental exposure hazards associated with lung cancer. Lung tumors in rodents are common, particularly in certain strains of mice. Rodent lung tumors are predominantly bronchioloalveolar carcinomas and usually follow a progressive continuum of hyperplasia to adenoma to carcinoma. Human lung cancers are phenotypically more diverse and broadly constitute 2 types: small cell lung cancers or non-small cell lung cancers. Rodent lung tumors resulting from exposure to environmental agents are comparable to certain adenocarcinomas that are a subset of human non-small cell lung cancers. Human pulmonary carcinomas differ from rodent lung tumors by exhibiting greater morphologic heterogeneity (encompassing squamous cell, neuroendocrine, mucinous, sarcomatoid, and multiple cell combinations), higher metastatic rate, higher stromal response, aggressive clinical behavior, and lack of a clear continuum of proliferative lesions. In spite of these differences, rodent lung tumors recapitulate several fundamental aspects of human lung tumor biology at the morphologic and molecular level especially in lung cancers resulting from exposure to environmental carcinogens. PMID:25351923

  9. Lung cancer screening update

    PubMed Central

    Dhillon, Samjot Singh; Loewen, Gregory; Jayaprakash, Vijayvel; Reid, Mary E.

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality globally and the American cancer society estimates approximately 226,160 new cases and 160,340 deaths from lung cancer in the USA in the year 2012. The majority of lung cancers are diagnosed in the later stages which impacts the overall survival. The 5-year survival rate for pathological st age IA lung cancer is 73% but drops to only 13% for stage IV. Thus, early detection through screening and prevention are the keys to reduce the global burden of lung cancer. This article discusses the current state of lung cancer screening, including the results of the National Lung Cancer Screening Trial, the consideration of implementing computed tomography screening, and a brief overview of the role of bronchoscopy in early detection and potential biomarkers that may aid in the early diagnosis of lung cancer. PMID:23599684

  10. MiR-122 Induces Radiosensitization in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Debin; Jia, Hui; Qin, Mengmeng; Dai, Wenjie; Wang, Tao; Liang, Erguang; Dong, Guofu; Wang, Zuojun; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Feng, Fan

    2015-01-01

    MiR-122 is a novel tumor suppresser and its expression induces cell cycle arrest, or apoptosis, and inhibits cell proliferation in multiple cancer cells, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. Radioresistance of cancer cell leads to the major drawback of radiotherapy for NSCLC and the induction of radiosensitization could be a useful strategy to fix this problem. The present work investigates the function of miR-122 in inducing radiosensitization in A549 cell, a type of NSCLC cells. MiR-122 induces the radiosensitization of A549 cells. MiR-122 also boosts the inhibitory activity of ionizing radiation (IR) on cancer cell anchor-independent growth and invasion. Moreover, miR-122 reduced the expression of its targeted genes related to tumor-survival or cellular stress response. These results indicate that miR-122 would be a novel strategy for NSCLC radiation-therapy. PMID:26389880

  11. Genetic damage induced by benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide and risk of lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Q.; Cheng, L.; Li, D.

    1997-10-01

    Lung cancer is the paradigm of carcinogen-induced disease. A chemical carcinogen, benzo[a]pyrene, commonly found in tobacco, is both mutagenic and carcinogenic. It is hypothesized that individuals have varying responses to exposure to environmental carcinogens. In this study, we used benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide (BPDE) as the test mutagen to investigate three in-vitro susceptibility markers in lymphocytes from 51 patients with lung cancer and 172 cancer-free controls. These markers were: BPDE-induced chromosomal aberrations, BPDE-induced DNA adducts, and DNA repair capacity using host cell reactivation assay with BPDE-damaged plasmid. Using the medians of the controls as the cutoff values, increased risk of lung cancer was associated with increased frequency of chromosomal aberrations (OR=6.53; 95% confidence interval (C.I.), 3.74-11.4), increased BPDE-DNA adduct level (odds ratio (OR)=4.7; 95% C.I., 1.2-18.5), and reduced DNA repair capacity (OR=5.7; 95% C.I., 2.1-15.7). In correlation analyses, cellular ability to repair BPDE-induced DNA damage was found to be inversely correlated with the levels of BPDE-induced DNA adducts (n=34; r=0.34; p=0.048) and the levels of BPDE-DNA adducts correlated significantly with the frequency of chromosomal aberrations (n=62; r=0.42; p=0.001). However, cellular ability to repair BPDE-induced DNA damage was not correlated significantly with the frequency of chromosomal aberrations (n=47; r=0.06; p=0.677). These biomarkers have differing sensitivities in measuring repair of damage induced by chemical carcinogens; therefore, the complementary use of these assays should increase the probability of identifying individuals with susceptibility to smoking-related cancers.

  12. Lung cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Slatore, Christopher; Sockrider, Marianna

    2014-11-15

    Lung cancer is a common form of cancer.There are things you can do to lower your risk of lung cancer. Stop smoking tobacco. Ask your health care provider for help in quitting, including use of medicines to help with nicotine dependence. discuss with your healthcare provider,what you are taking or doing to decrease your risk for lung cancer

  13. Thromboxane synthase suppression induces lung cancer cell apoptosis via inhibiting NF-{kappa}B

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Kin Chung; Li, Ming-Yue; Leung, Billy C.S.; Hsin, Michael K.Y.; Mok, Tony S.K.; Underwood, Malcolm J.; Chen, George G.

    2010-12-10

    Accumulating evidence shows that the inhibition of thromboxane synthase (TXS) induced apoptosis in cancer cells. TXS inhibitor 1-Benzylimidzole (1-BI) can trigger apoptosis in lung cancer cells but the mechanism is not fully defined. In this study, lung cancer cells were treated with 1-BI. In this study, the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was measured and NF-{kappa}B activity was determined in human lung cancer cells. The roles of ROS and NF-{kappa}B in 1-BI-mediated cell death were analyzed. The results showed that 1-BI induced ROS generation but decreased the activity of NF-{kappa}B by reducing phosphorylated I{kappa}B{alpha} (p-I{kappa}B{alpha}) and inhibiting the translocation of p65 into the nucleus. In contrast to 1-BI, antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) stimulated cell proliferation and significantly protected the cells from 1-BI-mediated cell death by neutralizing ROS. Collectively, apoptosis induced by 1-BI is associated with the over-production of ROS and the reduction of NF-{kappa}B. Antioxidants can significantly block the inhibitory effect of 1-BI.

  14. Epidemiology of Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Brock, Malcolm V.; Ford, Jean G.; Samet, Jonathan M.; Spivack, Simon D.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Ever since a lung cancer epidemic emerged in the mid-1900s, the epidemiology of lung cancer has been intensively investigated to characterize its causes and patterns of occurrence. This report summarizes the key findings of this research. Methods: A detailed literature search provided the basis for a narrative review, identifying and summarizing key reports on population patterns and factors that affect lung cancer risk. Results: Established environmental risk factors for lung cancer include smoking cigarettes and other tobacco products and exposure to secondhand tobacco smoke, occupational lung carcinogens, radiation, and indoor and outdoor air pollution. Cigarette smoking is the predominant cause of lung cancer and the leading worldwide cause of cancer death. Smoking prevalence in developing nations has increased, starting new lung cancer epidemics in these nations. A positive family history and acquired lung disease are examples of host factors that are clinically useful risk indicators. Risk prediction models based on lung cancer risk factors have been developed, but further refinement is needed to provide clinically useful risk stratification. Promising biomarkers of lung cancer risk and early detection have been identified, but none are ready for broad clinical application. Conclusions: Almost all lung cancer deaths are caused by cigarette smoking, underscoring the need for ongoing efforts at tobacco control throughout the world. Further research is needed into the reasons underlying lung cancer disparities, the causes of lung cancer in never smokers, the potential role of HIV in lung carcinogenesis, and the development of biomarkers. PMID:23649439

  15. Hypoxia-induced autophagy mediates cisplatin resistance in lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hui-Mei; Jiang, Zi-Feng; Ding, Pei-Shan; Shao, Li-Jie; Liu, Rong-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia which commonly exists in solid tumors, leads to cancer cells chemoresistance via provoking adaptive responses including autophagy. Therefore, we sought to evaluate the role of autophagy and hypoxia as well as the underlying mechanism in the cisplatin resistance of lung cancer cells. Our study demonstrated that hypoxia significantly protected A549 and SPC-A1 cells from cisplatin-induced cell death in a Hif-1α- and Hif-2α- dependent manner. Moreover, compared with normoxia, cisplatin-induced apoptosis under hypoxia was markedly reduced. However, when autophagy was inhibited by 3-MA or siRNA targeted ATG5, this reduction was effectively attenuated, which means autophagy mediates cisplatin resisitance under hypoxia. In parallel, we showed that hypoxia robustly augmented cisplatin-induced autophagy activation, accompanying by suppressing cisplatin-induced BNIP3 death pathways, which was due to the more efficient autophagic process under hypoxia. Consequently, we proposed that autophagy was a protective mechanism after cisplatin incubation under both normoxia and hypoxia. However, under normoxia, autophagy activation ‘was unable to counteract the stress induced by cisplatin, therefore resulting in cell death, whereas under hypoxia, autophagy induction was augmented that solved the cisplatin-induced stress, allowing the cells to survival. In conclusion, augmented induction of autophagy by hypoxia decreased lung cancer cells susceptibility to cisplatin-induced apoptosis. PMID:26201611

  16. MicroRNA-203 induces apoptosis by upregulating Puma expression in colon and lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Funamizu, Naotake; Lacy, Curtis R; Kamada, Minori; Yanaga, Katsuhiko; Manome, Yoshinobu

    2015-11-01

    The present study investigated the relationship between microRNA-203 (miR-203) and the p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis (Puma) in colon (HCT116) and lung cancer (A549) cells. Colon and lung cancer cell lines were selected for this study since a relationship between p53/miR-203 and p53/Puma has been established in both cancers. In the present study, adriamycin and nutlin-3 were used to activate p53, which induced both miR-203 and Puma expression in HCT116 cells. In contrast, HCT 116 cells with downregulated p53 showed decreased miR-203 and Puma expression. Importantly, we found that overexpressed miR-203 in HCT116 cells resulted in significantly increased Puma expression (P<0.05). Based on these findings, we hypothesized that another limb of the p53/Puma axis depends on miR-203 expression. To further validate this relationship, we used lung cancer cells (A549) and found that activated p53 increased both miR-203 and Puma expression. In addition, we found that Puma expression remained elevated in cells with overexpressed miR-203 in the presence of p53 downregulation. Cumulatively, our data purport that p53 not only increased Puma expression directly, but that it may also do so through miR-203. Additionally, functional studies revealed that miR-203 overexpression induced apoptosis and inhibited cell invasiveness.

  17. Assessment of the mode of action for hexavalent chromium-induced lung cancer following inhalation exposures.

    PubMed

    Proctor, Deborah M; Suh, Mina; Campleman, Sharan L; Thompson, Chad M

    2014-11-05

    Inhalation of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is associated with increased lung cancer risk among workers in several industries, most notably chromate production workers exposed to high concentrations of Cr(VI) (≥100 μg/m(3)), for which clear exposure-response relationships and respiratory irritation and tissue damage have been reported. Data from this industry are used to assess lung cancer risk associated with environmental and current occupational exposures, occurring at concentrations that are significantly lower. There is considerable uncertainty in the low dose extrapolation of historical occupational epidemiology data to assess risk at current exposures because no published or well recognized mode of action (MOA) for Cr(VI)-induced lung tumors exists. We conducted a MOA analysis for Cr(VI)-induced lung cancer evaluating toxicokinetic and toxicological data in humans and rodents and mechanistic data to assess plausibility, dose-response, and temporal concordance for potential MOAs. Toxicokinetic data support that extracellular reduction of Cr(VI), which limits intracellular absorption of Cr(VI) and Cr(VI)-induced toxicity, can be overwhelmed at high exposure levels. In vivo genotoxicity and mutagenicity data are mostly negative and do not support a mutagenic MOA. Further, both chronic bioassays and the epidemiologic literature support that lung cancer occurs at exposures that cause tissue damage. Based on this MOA analysis, the overall weight of evidence supports a MOA involving deposition and accumulation of particulate chromium in the bifurcations of the lung resulting in exceedance of clearance mechanisms and cellular absorption of Cr(VI). Once inside the cell, reduction of Cr(VI) results in oxidative stress and the formation of Cr ligands. Subsequent protein and DNA damage lead to tissue irritation, inflammation, and cytotoxicity. These effects, concomitant with increased cell proliferation, result in changes to DNA sequences and/or methylation status

  18. Cholecystokinin attenuates radiation-induced lung cancer cell apoptosis by modulating p53 gene transcription

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yi; Su, Chongyu; Yu, Daping; Zhou, Shijie; Song, Xiaoyun; Liu, Shuku; Qin, Ming; Li, Yunsong; Xiao, Ning; Cao, Xiaoqing; Shi, Kang; Cheng, Xu; Liu, Zhidong

    2017-01-01

    The deregulation of p53 in cancer cells is one of the important factors by which cancer cells escape from the immune surveillance. Cholecystokinin (CCK) has strong bioactivity in the regulation of a number of cell activities. This study tests a hypothesis that CCK interferes with p53 expression to affect the apoptotic process in lung cancer (tumor) cells. In this study, tumor-bearing mice and A549 cells (a tumor cell line) were irradiated. The expression of CCK and p53 in tumor cells was assessed with RT-qPCR and Western blotting. The binding of p300 to the promoter of p53 was evaluated by chromatin immunoprecipitation. We observed that, with a given amount and within a given period, small doses/more sessions of irradiation markedly increased the levels of CCK in the sera and tumor cells, which were positively correlated with the tumor growth in mice and negatively correlated with tumor cell apoptosis. CCK increased the levels of histone acetyltransferase p300 and repressed the levels of nuclear factor-kB at the p53 promoter locus in tumor cells, which suppressed the expression of p53. In conclusion, CCK plays an important role in attenuating the radiation-induced lung cancer cell apoptosis. CCK may be a novel therapeutic target in the treatment of lung cancers. PMID:28337291

  19. Ouabain downregulates Mcl-1 and sensitizes lung cancer cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Chanvorachote, Pithi; Pongrakhananon, Varisa

    2013-02-01

    Resistance to tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a prerequisite for cancer progression, and TRAIL resistance is prevalent in lung cancer. Ouabain, a recently identified human hormone, has shown therapeutic promise by potentiating the apoptotic response of metastatic lung cancer cells to TRAIL. Nontoxic concentrations of ouabain are shown to increase caspase-3 activation, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage, and apoptosis of H292 cells in response to TRAIL. While ouabain had a minimal effect on c-FLIP, Bcl-2, and Bax levels, we show that it possesses an ability to downregulate the antiapoptotic Mcl-1 protein. The present study also reveals that the sensitizing effect of ouabain is associated with its ability to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS), and hydrogen peroxide is identified as the principle ROS triggering proteasomal Mcl-1 degradation. In summary, our results indicate a novel function for ouabain in TRAIL-mediated cancer cell death through Mcl-1 downregulation, thereby providing new insight into a potential lung cancer treatment as well as a better understanding of the physiological activity of ouabain.

  20. Cancer stem-like cells can be induced through dedifferentiation under hypoxic conditions in glioma, hepatoma and lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pan; Wan, Wen-wu; Xiong, Shuang-Long; Feng, Hua; Wu, Nan

    2017-01-01

    Traditional studies have shown that transcription factors, including SOX-2, OCT-4, KLF-4, Nanog and Lin-28A, contribute to the dedifferentiation and reprogramming process in normal tissues. Hypoxia is a physiological phenomenon that exists in tumors and promotes the expression of SOX-2, OCT-4, KLF-4, Nanog and Lin-28A. Therefore, an interesting question is whether hypoxia as a stimulating factor promotes the process of dedifferentiation and induces the formation of cancer stem-like cells. Studies have shown that OCT-4 and Nanog overexpression induced the formation of cancer stem cell-like cells through dedifferentiation and enhanced malignancy in lung adenocarcinoma, and reprogramming SOX-2 in pancreatic cancer cells also promoted the dedifferentiation process. Therefore, we investigated this phenomenon in glioma, lung cancer and hepatoma cells and found that the transcription factors mentioned above were highly expressed under hypoxic conditions and induced the formation of spheres, which exhibited asymmetric division and cell cycle arrest. The dedifferentiation process induced by hypoxia highlights a new pattern of cancer development and recurrence, demonstrating that all kinds of cancer cells and the hypoxic microenvironment should be taken into consideration when developing tumor therapies. PMID:28179999

  1. Endoplasmic reticulum-Golgi intermediate compartment protein 3 knockdown suppresses lung cancer through endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced autophagy.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seong-Ho; Chang, Seung-Hee; Cho, Kyung-Cho; Kim, Sanghwa; Park, Sungjin; Lee, Ah Young; Jiang, Hu-Lin; Kim, Hyeon-Jeong; Lee, Somin; Yu, Kyeong-Nam; Seo, Hwi Won; Chae, Chanhee; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Park, Jongsun; Cho, Myung-Haing

    2016-10-04

    Trafficking from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the Golgi apparatus is elevated in cancer cells. Therefore, proteins of the ER-Golgi intermediate compartment (ERGIC) attract significant attention as targets for cancer treatment. Enhanced cancer cell growth and epithelial-mesenchymal transition by ERGICs correlates with poor-prognosis of lung cancer. This prompted us to assess whether knockdown of ERGIC3 may decrease lung cancer growth. To test the hypothesis, the effects of ERGIC3 short hairpin RNA (shERGIC3) on ER stress-induced cell death and lung tumorigenesis were investigated both in vitro and in vivo. Knockdown of ERGIC3 led to ER stress-induced autophagic cell death and suppression of proliferation in the A549 human lung cancer cell-line. Moreover, non-invasive aerosol-delivery of shERGIC3 using the biocompatible carrier glycerol propoxylate triacrylate and spermine (GPT-SPE) inhibited lung tumorigenesis in the K-rasLA1 murine model of lung cancer. Our data suggest that suppression of ERGIC3 could provide a framework for the development of effective lung cancer therapies.

  2. Endoplasmic reticulum-Golgi intermediate compartment protein 3 knockdown suppresses lung cancer through endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Seong-Ho; Chang, Seung-Hee; Cho, Kyung-Cho; Kim, Sanghwa; Park, Sungjin; Lee, Ah Young; Jiang, Hu-Lin; Kim, Hyeon-Jeong; Lee, Somin; Yu, Kyeong-Nam; Seo, Hwi Won; Chae, Chanhee; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Park, Jongsun; Cho, Myung-Haing

    2016-01-01

    Trafficking from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the Golgi apparatus is elevated in cancer cells. Therefore, proteins of the ER-Golgi intermediate compartment (ERGIC) attract significant attention as targets for cancer treatment. Enhanced cancer cell growth and epithelial-mesenchymal transition by ERGICs correlates with poor-prognosis of lung cancer. This prompted us to assess whether knockdown of ERGIC3 may decrease lung cancer growth. To test the hypothesis, the effects of ERGIC3 short hairpin RNA (shERGIC3) on ER stress-induced cell death and lung tumorigenesis were investigated both in vitro and in vivo. Knockdown of ERGIC3 led to ER stress-induced autophagic cell death and suppression of proliferation in the A549 human lung cancer cell-line. Moreover, non-invasive aerosol-delivery of shERGIC3 using the biocompatible carrier glycerol propoxylate triacrylate and spermine (GPT-SPE) inhibited lung tumorigenesis in the K-rasLA1 murine model of lung cancer. Our data suggest that suppression of ERGIC3 could provide a framework for the development of effective lung cancer therapies. PMID:27588471

  3. Photodynamic activity of aloe-emodin induces resensitization of lung cancer cells to anoikis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hong-Zin; Yang, Wen-Hui; Hour, Mann-Jen; Wu, Chi-Yu; Peng, Wen-Huang; Bao, Bo-Ying; Han, Ping-Hsiu; Bau, Da-Tian

    2010-12-01

    Aloe-emodin was found to be a photosensitizer and possess anti-tumor activity. However, the detailed mechanism underlying the biological effects of aloe-emodin remains unknown. In this study, we explored the mechanisms of photocytotoxicity induced by aloe-emodin in lung cancer H460 cells. According to the results of the photoactivated aloe-emodin-induced disruption of cytoskeleton, we verify that aloe-emodin with irradiation induces anoikis of H460 cells. Photosensitized aloe-emodin-induced anoikis is associated with the protein expression of α-actinin and mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase members. In this study, a rapid opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore and the change in apoptosis-related protein expression were involved in photoactivated aloe-emodin-induced cell death. We also demonstrated that anoikis induced by aloe-emodin with irradiation is mediated through the intrinsic and extrinsic death pathways in a caspase-dependent manner in H460 cells.

  4. MUC1 in macrophage contributions to cigarette smoke-induced lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiuling; Padilla, Mabel T.; Li, Bilan; Wells, Alexandria; Kato, Kosuke; Tellez, Carmen; Belinsky, Steven A.; Kim, Kwang Chul; Lin, Yong

    2013-01-01

    Expression of the pro-oncogenic mucin MUC1 is elevated by inflammation in airway epithelial cells, but the contributions of MUC1 to the development of lung cancer are uncertain. In this study, we developed our finding that cigarette smoke (CS) increases Muc1 expression in lung macrophages, where we hypothesized it might contribute to CS-induced transformation of bronchial epithelial cells. In human macrophages, CS extract (CSE) strongly induced MUC1 expression through a mechanism involving the nuclear receptor PPAR-γ. CSE-induced ERK activation was also required for MUC1 expression, but it had little effect on MUC1 transcription. RNAi-mediated attenuation of MUC1 suppressed CSE-induced secretion of TNF-α from macrophages, by suppressing the activity of the TNF-α processing enzyme TACE, arguing that MUC1 is required for CSE-induced and TACE-mediated TNF-α secretion. Similarly, MUC1 blockade after CSE induction through suppression of PPAR-γ or ERK inhibited TACE activity and TNF-α secretion. Conditioned media from CSE-treated macrophages induced MUC1 expression and potentiated CSE-induced transformation of human bronchial epithelial cells (HBEC) in a TNF-α-dependent manner. Together, our results identify a signaling pathway involving PPAR-γ, ERK and MUC1 that is used by CSE to trigger TNF-α secretion from macrophages. Further, our results show how that MUC1 contributes to smoking-induced lung cancers that are driven by inflammatory signals driven by macrophages PMID:24282280

  5. Rapamycin induces Bad phosphorylation in association with its resistance to human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Sun, Shi-Yong; Owonikoko, Taofeek K; Sica, Gabriel L; Curran, Walter J; Khuri, Fadlo R; Deng, Xingming

    2012-01-01

    Inhibition of mTOR signaling by rapamycin has been shown to activate extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 or 2 (ERK1/2) and Akt in various types of cancer cells, which contributes to rapamycin resistance. However, the downstream effect of rapamycin-activated ERKs and Akt on survival or death substrate(s) remains unclear. We discovered that treatment of human lung cancer cells with rapamycin results in enhanced phosphorylation of Bad at serine (S) 112 and S136 but not S155 in association with activation of ERK1/2 and Akt. A higher level of Bad phosphorylation was observed in rapamycin-resistant cells compared with parental rapamycin-sensitive cells. Thus, Bad phosphorylation may contribute to rapamycin resistance. Mechanistically, rapamycin promotes Bad accumulation in the cytosol, enhances Bad/14-3-3 interaction, and reduces Bad/Bcl-XL binding. Rapamycin-induced Bad phosphorylation promotes its ubiquitination and degradation, with a significant reduction of its half-life (i.e., from 53.3-37.5 hours). Inhibition of MEK/ERK by PD98059 or depletion of Akt by RNA interference blocks rapamycin-induced Bad phosphorylation at S112 or S136, respectively. Simultaneous blockage of S112 and S136 phosphorylation of Bad by PD98059 and silencing of Akt significantly enhances rapamycin-induced growth inhibition in vitro and synergistically increases the antitumor efficacy of rapamycin in lung cancer xenografts. Intriguingly, either suppression of Bad phosphorylation at S112 and S136 sites or expression of the nonphosphorylatable Bad mutant (S112A/S136A) can reverse rapamycin resistance. These findings uncover a novel mechanism of rapamycin resistance, which may promote the development of new strategies for overcoming rapamycin resistance by manipulating Bad phosphorylation at S112 and S136 in human lung cancer.

  6. Apoptosis inducing ability of silver decorated highly reduced graphene oxide nanocomposites in A549 lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Khan, Merajuddin; Khan, Mujeeb; Al-Marri, Abdulhadi H; Al-Warthan, Abdulrahman; Alkhathlan, Hamad Z; Siddiqui, Mohammed Rafiq H; Nayak, Vadithe Lakshma; Kamal, Ahmed; Adil, Syed F

    2016-01-01

    Recently, graphene and graphene-based materials have been increasingly used for various biological applications due to their extraordinary physicochemical properties. Here, we demonstrate the anticancer properties and apoptosis-inducing ability of silver doped highly reduced graphene oxide nanocomposites synthesized by employing green approach. These nano composites (PGE-HRG-Ag) were synthesized by using Pulicaria glutinosa extract (PGE) as a reducing agent and were evaluated for their anticancer properties against various human cancer cell lines with tamoxifen as the reference drug. A correlation between the amount of Ag nanoparticles on the surface of highly reduced graphene oxide (HRG) and the anticancer activity of nanocomposite was observed, wherein an increase in the concentration of Ag nanoparticles on the surface of HRG led to the enhanced anticancer activity of the nanocomposite. The nanocomposite PGE-HRG-Ag-2 exhibited more potent cytotoxicity than standard drug in A549 cells, a human lung cancer cell line. A detailed investigation was undertaken and Fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis demonstrated that the nanocomposite PGE-HRG-Ag-2 showed G0/G1 phase cell cycle arrest and induced apoptosis in A549 cells. Studies such as, measurement of mitochondrial membrane potential, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and Annexin V-FITC staining assay suggested that this compound induced apoptosis in human lung cancer cells.

  7. [Lung cancer screening].

    PubMed

    Sánchez González, M

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer is a very important disease, curable in early stages. There have been trials trying to show the utility of chest x-ray or computed tomography in Lung Cancer Screening for decades. In 2011, National Lung Screening Trial results were published, showing a 20% reduction in lung cancer mortality in patients with low dose computed tomography screened for three years. These results are very promising and several scientific societies have included lung cancer screening in their guidelines. Nevertheless we have to be aware of lung cancer screening risks, such as: overdiagnosis, radiation and false positive results. Moreover, there are many issues to be solved, including choosing the appropriate group to be screened, the duration of the screening program, intervals between screening and its cost-effectiveness. Ongoing trials will probably answer some of these questions. This article reviews the current evidence on lung cancer screening.

  8. Osthole induces lung cancer cell apoptosis through inhibition of inhibitor of apoptosis family proteins

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiao-Man; Zhang, Man-Li; Zhang, Yi; Zhao, Li

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effects and mechanisms of Osthole on the apoptosis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells and its synergistic effect with Embelin. Our results revealed that treatment with both Osthole and Embelin inhibited cell proliferation. Notably, combination treatment of Osthole and Embelin inhibited cell proliferation more significantly compared with monotherapy. In addition, morphological analysis and Annexin V/propidium iodide analysis revealed that the combination of Osthole and Embelin enhanced their effect on cell apoptosis. We further examined the effect of Osthole on the expression of inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP) family proteins. That treatment of A549 lung cancer cells with various concentrations of Osthole was observed to decrease the protein expression of X-chromosome-encoded IAP, c-IAP1, c-IAP2 and Survivin, and increase Smac expression in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, it was noted that Osthole or Embelin alone increased the expression of BAX, caspase-3, caspase-9, cleaved caspase-3 and cleaved caspase-9, and decreased Bcl-2 levels following treatment. Osthole and Embelin combination treatment had a synergistic effect on the regulation of these proteins. In conclusion, our study demonstrated that Osthole inhibited proliferation and induced the apoptosis of lung cancer cells via IAP family proteins in a dose-dependent manner. Osthole enhances the antitumor effect of Embelin, indicating that combination of Osthole and Embelin has potential clinical significance in the treatment of NSCLC. PMID:27895730

  9. Long noncoding RNA MALAT1 promotes brain metastasis by inducing epithelial-mesenchymal transition in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Shen, Liqin; Chen, Lei; Wang, Yongsheng; Jiang, Xiaochun; Xia, Hongping; Zhuang, Zhixiang

    2015-01-01

    Brain metastasis often has a poor prognosis in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Therefore, it is urgent to identify factors associated with lung cancer brain metastasis. Metastasis associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1) also known as noncoding nuclear-enriched abundant transcript 2 is a long noncoding RNA, which is highly conserved amongst mammals. It has been shown to be increased in a variety of tumors including NSCLC and regulate the expression of metastasis-associated genes. However, the role of MALAT1 in lung cancer brain metastasis has not been investigated. In this study, we examined the level of MALAT1 in 78 cases of NSCLC samples with 19 brain metastasis and 59 non-brain metastasis by qRT-PCR. We observed that the level of MALAT1 was significantly higher in brain metastasis than that of non brain metastasis samples (P < 0.001). The level of MALAT1 was associated with patients' survival. To investigate the role of MALAT1 in brain metastasis, we established a highly invasive and metastatic cell subline using the brain metastasis lung cancer cell H1915. We found that MALAT1 is increased in highly invasive subline of brain metastasis lung cancer cells. Further functional studies indicate that silencing MALAT1 inhibits highly invasive subline of brain metastasis lung cancer cell migration and metastasis by inducing epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Therefore, increased level of long noncoding RNA MALAT1 promotes lung cancer brain metastasis by inducing EMT, which may be a promising prognosis factor and therapeutic target to treat lung cancer brain metastasis in future.

  10. Middle infrared radiation induces G2/M cell cycle arrest in A549 lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hsin-Yi; Shih, Meng-Her; Huang, Hsuan-Cheng; Tsai, Shang-Ru; Juan, Hsueh-Fen; Lee, Si-Chen

    2013-01-01

    There were studies investigating the effects of broadband infrared radiation (IR) on cancer cell, while the influences of middle-infrared radiation (MIR) are still unknown. In this study, a MIR emitter with emission wavelength band in the 3-5 µm region was developed to irradiate A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells. It was found that MIR exposure inhibited cell proliferation and induced morphological changes by altering the cellular distribution of cytoskeletal components. Using quantitative PCR, we found that MIR promoted the expression levels of ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated), ATR (ataxia-telangiectasia and Rad3-related and Rad3-related), TP53 (tumor protein p53), p21 (CDKN1A, cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A) and GADD45 (growth arrest and DNA-damage inducible), but decreased the expression levels of cyclin B coding genes, CCNB1 and CCNB2, as well as CDK1 (Cyclin-dependent kinase 1). The reduction of protein expression levels of CDC25C, cyclin B1 and the phosphorylation of CDK1 at Thr-161 altogether suggest G(2)/M arrest occurred in A549 cells by MIR. DNA repair foci formation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) marker γ-H2AX and sensor 53BP1 was induced by MIR treatment, it implies the MIR induced G(2)/M cell cycle arrest resulted from DSB. This study illustrates a potential role for the use of MIR in lung cancer therapy by initiating DSB and blocking cell cycle progression.

  11. Women and Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... 442 Cervical Uterine Ovarian Breast Lung RESEARCH FUNDING LEVELS FISCAL YEAR 2012 (DOLLARS PER DEATH) MORE RESEARCH URGENT LY NEEDED • The biology of lung cancer is different in women • Mutations ...

  12. Analysis of Clinical and Dosimetric Factors Influencing Radiation-Induced Lung Injury in Patients with Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Han, Shuiyun; Gu, Feiying; Lin, Gang; Sun, Xiaojiang; Wang, Yuezhen; Wang, Zhun; Lin, Qingren; Weng, Denghu; Xu, Yaping; Mao, Weimin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Dose escalation of thoracic radiation can improve the local tumor control and surivival, and is in the meantime limited by the occurrence of radiation-induced lung injury (RILI). This study investigated the clinical and dosimetric factors influencing RILI in lung-cancer patients receiving chemoradiotherapy for better radiation planning. Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis was carried out on 161 patients with non-small-cell or small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC and SCLC, respectively), who underwent chemoradiotherapy between April 2010 and May 2011 with a median follow-up time of 545 days (range: 39-1453). Chemotherapy regimens were based on the histological type (squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, or SCLC), and radiotherapy was delivered in 1.8-3.0 Gy (median, 2.0 Gy) fractions, once daily, to a total of 39-66 Gy (median, 60 Gy). Univariate analysis was performed to analyze clinical and dosimetric factors associated with RILI. Multivariate analysis using logistic regression identified independent risk factors correlated to RILI. Results: The incidence of symptomatic RILI (≥grade 2) was 31.7%. Univariate analysis showed that V5, V20, and mean lung dose (MLD) were significantly associated with RILI incidence (P=0.029, 0.048, and 0.041, respectively). The association was not statistically significant for histological type (NSCLC vs. SCLC, P = 0.092) or radiation technology (IMRT vs. 3D-CRT, P = 0.095). Multivariate analysis identified MLD as an independent risk factor for symptomatic RILI (OR=1.249, 95%CI=1.055-1.48, P= 0.01). The incidence of bilateral RILI in cases where the tumor was located unilaterally was 22.7% (32/141) and all dosimetric-parameter values were not significantly different (P>0.05) for bilateral versus ipsilateral injury, except grade-1 (low) RILI (P < 0.05). The RILI grade was higher in cases of ipsilateral lung injury than in bilateral cases (Mann-Whitney U test, z=8.216, P< 0.001). Conclusion: The dosimetric parameter

  13. Crocodile blood extract induces the apoptosis of lung cancer cells through PTEN activity.

    PubMed

    Ou, Yuqian; Ho, Wing Shing

    2016-09-01

    Current treatment strategies for lung cancer cause undesirable side‑effects. Integrated medicine with a curative approach has become a common approach to the treatment strategy. Recent studies suggest that American alligator blood is effective in reducing colorectal cancer cell viability in vitro, but the mechanism remains unclear. In the present study, we aimed to study the anticancer activity of crocodile blood extracts on lung cancer cell line A549 and investigate the possible mechanisms involved. In vitro studies were utilized to investigate the effects on the cancer cells after incubation with the blood extracts. The active fraction that showed more efficacy in inhibiting cell growth was characterized in the supernatant (S2) from whole blood extracts. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis revealed that S2 contained more polar moiety from whole blood. S2 induced DNA fragmentation. Cell cycle arrest in the G1/M phase was demonstrated and mitochondrial membrane permeability was disrupted. An increase in the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and increased activities of caspase-3 and caspase-7 were detected. Furthermore, release of cytochrome c, upregulation of expression of Bax, p53, p21, Bid, cleaved forms of the caspase family and PARP along with downregulation of Bcl-2, PCNA, MDM2, caspase‑8, wild types of caspase family proteins and PARP were recorded after treatment with S2 fractions. Moreover, the PI3K/AKT survival pathway was downregulated by S2 fractions in the lung cancer cell line.

  14. Lung Cancer Indicators Recurrence

    Cancer.gov

    This study describes prognostic factors for lung cancer spread and recurrence, as well as subsequent risk of death from the disease. The investigators observed that regardless of cancer stage, grade, or type of lung cancer, patients in the study were more

  15. Mitomycin C treatment induces resistance and enhanced migration via phosphorylated Akt in aggressive lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Liang-Chuan; Chuang, Eric Y.; Tsai, Mong-Hsun

    2016-01-01

    Since 1984, mitomycin C (MMC) has been applied in the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). MMC-based chemotherapeutic regimens are still under consideration owing to the efficacy and low cost as compared with other second-line regimens in patients with advanced NSCLC. Hence, it is important to investigate whether MMC induces potential negative effects in NSCLC. Here, we found that the malignant lung cancer cells, CL1-2 and CL1-5, were more resistant to MMC than were the parental CL1-0 cells and pre-malignant CL1-1 cells. CL1-2 and CL1-5 cells consistently showed lower sub-G1 fractions post MMC treatment. DNA repair-related proteins were not induced more in CL1-5 than in CL1-0 cells, but the levels of endogenous and MMC-induced phosphorylated Akt (p-Akt) were higher in CL1-5 cells. Administering a p-Akt inhibitor reduced the MMC resistance, demonstrating that p-Akt is important in the MMC resistance of CL1-5 cells. Furthermore, we revealed that cell migration was enhanced by MMC but lowered by a p-Akt inhibitor in CL1-5 cells. This study suggests that in CL1-5 cells, the activity of p-Akt, rather than DNA repair mechanisms, may underlie the resistance to MMC and enhance the cells' migration abilities after MMC treatment. PMID:27833080

  16. Carboxyl-terminal modulator protein induces apoptosis by regulating mitochondrial function in lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Soon-Kyung; Minai-Tehrani, Arash; Yu, Kyeong-Nam; Chang, Seung-Hee; Kim, Ji-Eun; Lee, Kee-Ho; Park, Jongsun; Beck, George R; Cho, Myung-Haing

    2012-05-01

    Serine/threonine protein kinase B (PKB/Akt) is involved in cell survival and growth. Carboxyl-terminal modulator protein (CTMP), a novel Akt binding partner, prevents Akt activation at the plasma membrane in response to various stimuli, and thus possesses a tumor suppressor-like function. In a previous study, we have demonstrated that CTMP inhibits tumor progression by facilitating apoptosis in a mouse lung cancer model. However, the precise mechanism of CTMP-induced apoptosis remains to be elucidated. The present study was performed to examine the role of CTMP in mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis and regulation of mitochondrial function in human lung carcinoma cells. Our results showed that CTMP altered mitochondrial morphology and caused the release of cytochrome c by inhibiting OPA1 expression. Additionally, CTMP facilitated mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis by inhibiting heat-shock protein 27 and preventing cytochrome c interaction with Apaf-1. Our data suggest that CTMP may therefore play a critical role in mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis in lung cancer cells.

  17. Chronic inorganic arsenic exposure in vitro induces a cancer cell phenotype in human peripheral lung epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Person, Rachel J.; Olive Ngalame, Ntube N.; Makia, Ngome L.; Bell, Matthew W.; Waalkes, Michael P.; Tokar, Erik J.

    2015-07-01

    Inorganic arsenic is a human lung carcinogen. We studied the ability of chronic inorganic arsenic (2 μM; as sodium arsenite) exposure to induce a cancer phenotype in the immortalized, non-tumorigenic human lung peripheral epithelial cell line, HPL-1D. After 38 weeks of continuous arsenic exposure, secreted matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP2) activity increased to over 200% of control, levels linked to arsenic-induced cancer phenotypes in other cell lines. The invasive capacity of these chronic arsenic-treated lung epithelial (CATLE) cells increased to 320% of control and colony formation increased to 280% of control. CATLE cells showed enhanced proliferation in serum-free media indicative of autonomous growth. Compared to control cells, CATLE cells showed reduced protein expression of the tumor suppressor gene PTEN (decreased to 26% of control) and the putative tumor suppressor gene SLC38A3 (14% of control). Morphological evidence of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) occurred in CATLE cells together with appropriate changes in expression of the EMT markers vimentin (VIM; increased to 300% of control) and e-cadherin (CDH1; decreased to 16% of control). EMT is common in carcinogenic transformation of epithelial cells. CATLE cells showed increased KRAS (291%), ERK1/2 (274%), phosphorylated ERK (p-ERK; 152%), and phosphorylated AKT1 (p-AKT1; 170%) protein expression. Increased transcript expression of metallothioneins, MT1A and MT2A and the stress response genes HMOX1 (690%) and HIF1A (247%) occurred in CATLE cells possibly in adaptation to chronic arsenic exposure. Thus, arsenic induced multiple cancer cell characteristics in human peripheral lung epithelial cells. This model may be useful to assess mechanisms of arsenic-induced lung cancer. - Highlights: • Chronic arsenic exposure transforms a human peripheral lung epithelia cell line. • Cells acquire characteristics in common with human lung adenocarcinoma cells. • These transformed cells provide a

  18. Immunotherapy for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Steven, Antonius; Fisher, Scott A; Robinson, Bruce W

    2016-07-01

    Treatment of lung cancer remains a challenge, and lung cancer is still the leading cause of cancer-related mortality. Immunotherapy has previously failed in lung cancer but has recently emerged as a very effective new therapy, and there is now growing worldwide enthusiasm in cancer immunotherapy. We summarize why immune checkpoint blockade therapies have generated efficacious and durable responses in clinical trials and why this has reignited interest in this field. Cancer vaccines have also been explored in the past with marginal success. Identification of optimal candidate neoantigens may improve cancer vaccine efficacy and may pave the way to personalized immunotherapy, alone or in combination with other immunotherapy such as immune checkpoint blockade. Understanding the steps in immune recognition and eradication of cancer cells is vital to understanding why previous immunotherapies failed and how current therapies can be used optimally. We hold an optimistic view for the future prospect in lung cancer immunotherapy.

  19. Lung cancer in women

    PubMed Central

    Barrera-Rodriguez, Raúl; Morales-Fuentes, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    Recent biological advances in tumor research provide clear evidence that lung cancer in females is different from that in males. These differences appear to have a direct impact on the clinical presentation, histology, and outcomes of lung cancer. Women are more likely to present with lung adenocarcinoma, tend to receive a diagnosis at an earlier age, and are more likely to be diagnosed with localized disease. Women may also be more predisposed to molecular aberrations resulting from the carcinogenic effects of tobacco, but do not appear to be more susceptible than men to developing lung cancer. The gender differences found in female lung cancer make it mandatory that gender stratification is used in clinical trials in order to improve the survival rates of patients with lung cancer. PMID:28210127

  20. Lung injury and lung cancer caused by cigarette smoke-induced oxidative stress: Molecular mechanisms and therapeutic opportunities involving the ceramide-generating machinery and epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Goldkorn, Tzipora; Filosto, Simone; Chung, Samuel

    2014-11-20

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer are frequently caused by tobacco smoking. However, these diseases present opposite phenotypes involving redox signaling at the cellular level. While COPD is characterized by excessive airway epithelial cell death and lung injury, lung cancer is caused by uncontrolled epithelial cell proliferation. Notably, epidemiological studies have demonstrated that lung cancer incidence is significantly higher in patients who have preexisting emphysema/lung injury. However, the molecular link and common cell signaling events underlying lung injury diseases and lung cancer are poorly understood. This review focuses on studies of molecular mechanism(s) underlying smoking-related lung injury (COPD) and lung cancer. Specifically, the role of the ceramide-generating machinery during cigarette smoke-induced oxidative stress leading to both apoptosis and proliferation of lung epithelial cells is emphasized. Over recent years, it has been established that ceramide is a sphingolipid playing a major role in lung epithelia structure/function leading to lung injury in chronic pulmonary diseases. However, new and unexpected findings draw attention to its potential role in lung development, cell proliferation, and tumorigenesis. To address this dichotomy in detail, evidence is presented regarding several protein targets, including Src, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and neutral sphingomyelinase 2, the major sphingomyelinase that controls ceramide generation during oxidative stress. Furthermore, their roles are presented not only in apoptosis and lung injury but also in enhancing cell proliferation, lung cancer development, and resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor-targeted therapy for treating lung cancer.

  1. Local Correlation Between Monte-Carlo Dose and Radiation-Induced Fibrosis in Lung Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Stroian, Gabriela; Martens, Chandra; Souhami, Luis; Collins, D. Louis; Seuntjens, Jan

    2008-03-01

    Purpose: To present a new method of evaluating the correlation between radiotherapy (RT)-induced fibrosis and the local dose delivered to non-small-cell lung cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Treatment plans were generated using the CadPlan treatment planning system (pencil beam, no heterogeneity corrections), and RT delivery was based on these plans. Retrospective Monte-Carlo dose calculations were performed, and the Monte-Carlo distributions of dose to real tissue were calculated using the planning computed tomography (CT) images and the number of monitor units actually delivered. After registration of the follow-up CT images with the planning CT images, different grades of radiologic fibrosis were automatically segmented on the follow-up CT images. Subsequently, patient-specific fibrosis probabilities were studied as a function of the local dose and a function of time after RT completion. Results: A strong patient-specific variation in the fibrosis volumes was found during the follow-up period. For both lungs, the threshold dose for which the probability of fibrosis became significant coincided with the threshold dose at which significant volumes of the lung were exposed. At later stages, only fibrosis localized in the high-dose regions persisted for both lungs. Overall, the Monte-Carlo dose distributions correlated much better with the probability of RT-induced fibrosis than did the CadPlan dose distributions. Conclusion: The presented method allows for an accurate, systematic, patient-specific and post-RT time-dependent numeric study of the relationship between RT-induced fibrosis and the local dose.

  2. Curcumin increases exosomal TCF21 thus suppressing exosome-induced lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Chao; Wu, Da; Mu, Zhimin; Chen, Baokun; Xie, Yuancai; Ye, Yiwang; Liu, Jixian

    2016-01-01

    Curcumin is a novel drug for lung cancer treatment. However, the mechanism underlying the anti-tumor effect of curcumin remains elusive. Previous evidences indicated that, the methylating transferase DNMT1 is downregulated by curcumin, and the transcription factor 21 (TCF21) is suppressed by DNMT1. We hereby attempt to elucidate the correlation between curcumin treatment and TCF21 expression. Exosomes derived from curcumin-pretreated H1299 cells were used to treat BEAS-2B cells, which induced proliferation, colony formation and migration of BEAS-2B cells. An increase in TCF21 expression in response to curcumin was also seen, as revealed by real-time PCR (RT-PCR) and western blot. Analysis using the GEO database (access #GSE21210) indicated that a positive correlation existed between TCF21 levels and lung cancer patient survival. TCF21 overexpression and knockdown was introduced to H1299 cells through lentiviral system, which led to suppression and promotion of tumor growth, respectively. We also demonstrated that DNMT1 expression was downregulated by curcumin. Therefore, curcumin exerts its anti-cancer function by downregulating DNMT1, thereby upregulating TCF21. PMID:27894084

  3. Lung Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... following substances increases the risk of lung cancer: Asbestos . Arsenic . Chromium. Nickel. Beryllium. Cadmium . Tar and soot. ... being exposed to cancer-causing substances, such as asbestos, arsenic, nickel, and chromium, may help lower their ...

  4. Ethanolic Extract of Marsdenia condurango Ameliorates Benzo[a]pyrene-induced Lung Cancer of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sikdar, Sourav; Mukherjee, Avinaba; Khuda-Bukhsh, Anisur Rahman

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Condurango is widely used in various systems of complementary and alternative medicines (CAM) against oesophageal and stomach ailments including certain types of cancer. However, until now no systematic study has been conducted to verify its efficacy and dose with proper experimental support. Therefore, we examined if ethanolic extract of Condurango could ameliorate benzo[a]pyrene (BaP)-induced lung cancer in rats, in vivo to validate its use as traditional medicine. Methods Fifteen male and 15 female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were treated with 0.28 mg/kg of Sweet Bee Venom (SBV) (high-dosage group) and the same numbers of male and female SD rats were treated with 0.2 mL/kg of normal saline (control group) for 13 weeks. We selected five male and five female SD rats from the high-dosage group and the same numbers of male and female SD rats from the control group, and we observed these rats for four weeks. We conducted body-weight measurements, ophthalmic examinations, urinalyses and hematology, biochemistry, histology tests. Results: A histological study revealed gradual progress in lung tissue-repair activity in Condurango-fed cancer-bearing rats, showing gradual tissue recovery after three months of drug administration. Condurango has the capacity to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS), which may contribute to a reduction in anti-oxidative activity and to an induction of oxidative stress-mediated cancer cell-death. Condurango-activated pro-apoptotic genes (Bax, caspase-3, caspase-9, p53, cytochrome-c, apaf-1, ICAD and PARP) and down-regulated antiapoptotic-Bcl-2 expression were noted both at mRNA and protein levels. Studies on caspase-3 activation and PARP cleavage by western blot analysis revealed that Condurango induced apoptosis through a caspase-3-dependent pathway. Conclusion: The anticancer efficacy of an ethanolic extract of Condurango for treating BaP-induced lung cancer in rats lends support for its use in various traditional systems of

  5. COX-2 and PPAR-γ confer cannabidiol-induced apoptosis of human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ramer, Robert; Heinemann, Katharina; Merkord, Jutta; Rohde, Helga; Salamon, Achim; Linnebacher, Michael; Hinz, Burkhard

    2013-01-01

    The antitumorigenic mechanism of cannabidiol is still controversial. This study investigates the role of COX-2 and PPAR-γ in cannabidiol's proapoptotic and tumor-regressive action. In lung cancer cell lines (A549, H460) and primary cells from a patient with lung cancer, cannabidiol elicited decreased viability associated with apoptosis. Apoptotic cell death by cannabidiol was suppressed by NS-398 (COX-2 inhibitor), GW9662 (PPAR-γ antagonist), and siRNA targeting COX-2 and PPAR-γ. Cannabidiol-induced apoptosis was paralleled by upregulation of COX-2 and PPAR-γ mRNA and protein expression with a maximum induction of COX-2 mRNA after 8 hours and continuous increases of PPAR-γ mRNA when compared with vehicle. In response to cannabidiol, tumor cell lines exhibited increased levels of COX-2-dependent prostaglandins (PG) among which PGD(2) and 15-deoxy-Δ(12,14)-PGJ(2) (15d-PGJ(2)) caused a translocation of PPAR-γ to the nucleus and induced a PPAR-γ-dependent apoptotic cell death. Moreover, in A549-xenografted nude mice, cannabidiol caused upregulation of COX-2 and PPAR-γ in tumor tissue and tumor regression that was reversible by GW9662. Together, our data show a novel proapoptotic mechanism of cannabidiol involving initial upregulation of COX-2 and PPAR-γ and a subsequent nuclear translocation of PPAR-γ by COX-2-dependent PGs.

  6. Autophagy inhibition enhances isorhamnetin-induced mitochondria-dependent apoptosis in non-small cell lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    RUAN, YUSHU; HU, KE; CHEN, HONGBO

    2015-01-01

    Isorhamnetin (ISO) is a flavonoid from plants of the Polygonaceae family and is also an immediate metabolite of quercetin in mammals. To date, the anti-tumor effects of ISO and the underlying mechanisms have not been elucidated in lung cancer cells. The present study investigated the inhibitory effects of ISO on the growth of human lung cancer A549 cells. Treatment of the lung cancer cells with ISO significantly suppressed cell proliferation and colony formation. ISO treatment also resulted in a significant increase in apoptotic cell death of A549 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Further investigation showed that the apoptosis proceeded via the mitochondria-dependent pathway as indicated by alteration of the mitochondrial membrane potential, the release of cytochrome C and caspase activation. Of note, treatment with ISO also induced the formation of autophagosomes and light chain 3-II protein in A549 cells. Furthermore, co-treatment with autophagy inhibitors 3-methyladenine and hydroxychloroquine significantly inhibited the ISO-induced autophagy and enhanced the ISO-induced apoptotic cell death in vitro as well as in vivo. Thus, the results of the present study suggested that ISO is a potential anti-lung cancer agent. In addition, the results indicated that the inhibition of autophagy may be a useful strategy for enhancing the chemotherapeutic effect of ISO on lung cancer cells. PMID:26238746

  7. Nivolumab-Induced Severe Akathisia in an Advanced Lung Cancer Patient.

    PubMed

    Abe, Jiro; Sato, Taku; Tanaka, Ryota; Okazaki, Toshimasa; Takahashi, Satomi

    2016-11-23

    BACKGROUND Nivolumab is an anti-PD-1 immune checkpoint inhibitor that was recently developed for cancer immunotherapy. In the clinical trials of nivolumab, its adverse effects were reported to be less likely than those of conventional anti-cancer agents; however, after practical clinical distribution, it has come to be known that nivolumab induces various immune-related adverse events. CASE REPORT A 58-year-old male with a recurrence of lung adenocarcinoma was treated with nivolumab. Only four days after the initial administration of nivolumab, the patient presented with unbearable restlessness and distress that was resistant to all therapeutic agents used, and it gradually became worse. He finally came to need deep sedation despite his cancer status being stable during the course. Clinical tests including magnetic resonance imaging, cerebrospinal fluid cytology, and antibodies of paraneoplastic syndrome exhibited no signs of encephalitis or another possible cause of the neuropathy. The diagnosis of akathisia could be made only by his somatoform presentation. It was uncertain whether or not this complication was correlated with the activation of his immune system. CONCLUSIONS Anti-immune check point inhibitors may induce many unknown adverse events. Severe akathisia induced by nivolumab, as in our case, has not been reported yet. Collecting every adverse event of nivolumab may be important to make a better algorithm to manage its huge variety of complications.

  8. Longitudinal follow-up study of smoking-induced emphysema progression in low-dose CT screening of lung cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, H.; Matsuhiro, M.; Kawata, Y.; Niki, N.; Nakano, Y.; Ohmatsu, H.; Kusumoto, M.; Tsuchida, T.; Eguchi, K.; Kaneko, Masahiro; Moriyama, N.

    2014-03-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is a major public health problem that is predicted to be third leading cause of death in 2030. Although spirometry is traditionally used to quantify emphysema progression, it is difficult to detect the loss of pulmonary function by emphysema in early stage, and to assess the susceptibility to smoking. This study presents quantification method of smoking-induced emphysema progression based on annual changes of low attenuation volume (LAV) by each lung lobe acquired from low-dose CT images in lung cancer screening. The method consists of three steps. First, lung lobes are segmented using extracted interlobar fissures by enhancement filter based on fourdimensional curvature. Second, LAV of each lung lobe is segmented. Finally, smoking-induced emphysema progression is assessed by statistical analysis of the annual changes represented by linear regression of LAV percentage in each lung lobe. This method was applied to 140 participants in lung cancer CT screening for six years. The results showed that LAV progressions of nonsmokers, past smokers, and current smokers are different in terms of pack-year and smoking cessation duration. This study demonstrates effectiveness in diagnosis and prognosis of early emphysema in lung cancer CT screening.

  9. Fisetin induces apoptosis in human nonsmall lung cancer cells via a mitochondria-mediated pathway.

    PubMed

    Kang, Kyoung Ah; Piao, Mei Jing; Hyun, Jin Won

    2015-03-01

    The present study investigated the apoptotic effects of fisetin, a phenolic compound, against the human nonsmall cell lung cancer cell line, NCI-H460. Fisetin showed dose-dependent cytotoxic activity against NCI-H460 cells, with 50% inhibition of cell viability occurring at a concentration of 75 μg/mL. Fisetin induced both the production of intracellular reactive oxygen species and apoptosis, as evidenced by apoptotic body formation, DNA fragmentation, an increase in the number of sub-G1 phase cells, and mitochondrial membrane depolarization. Moreover, fisetin significantly modulated the expression of apoptosis-associated proteins, resulting in reduced expression of B cell lymphoma-2, increased expression of Bcl-2-associated X protein, and activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3. In addition, pretreatment with a caspase inhibitor blocked fisetin-induced cell death.

  10. The prevention of lung cancer induced by a tobacco-specific carcinogen in rodents by green and black Tea.

    PubMed

    Chung, F L

    1999-04-01

    A growing body of evidence from studies in laboratory animals indicates that green tea protects against cancer development at various organ sites. We have previously shown that green tea, administered as drinking water, inhibits lung tumor development in A/J mice treated with 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-l-butanone (NNK), a potent nicotine-derived lung carcinogen found in tobacco. The inhibitory effect of green tea has been attributed to its major polyphenolic compound, epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), and, to a lesser extent, to caffeine. We have also demonstrated that while levels of O6-methylguanine, a critical lesion in NNK lung tumorigenesis, were not affected in lung DNA. However, the levels of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OH-dG), a marker of oxidative DNA damage, were significantly suppressed in mice treated with green tea or EGCG. These studies underscore the importance of the antioxidant activity of green tea and EGCG for their inhibitory activity against lung tumorigenesis. Unlike green tea, the effect of black tea on carcinogenesis has been scarcely studied, even though the worldwide production and consumption of black tea far exceeds that of green tea. The oxidation products found in black tea, thearubigins and theaflavins, also possess antioxidant activity, suggesting that black tea may also inhibit NNK-induced lung tumorigenesis. Indeed, bioassays in A/J mice have shown that black tea given as drinking water retarded the development of lung cancer caused by NNK. However, data on the relationship of black tea consumption with the lung cancer risk in humans are limited and inconclusive. There is a need for additional tumor bioassays in animal models to better examine the protective role of black tea against lung cancer. The development of adenocarcinomas and adenosquamous carcinomas in F344 rats upon chronic administration of NNK provides an important and relevant model for lung carcinogenesis in smokers. Thus far, no information was previously

  11. Occupational lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Coultas, D.B.; Samet, J.M. )

    1992-06-01

    The overall importance of occupational agents as a cause of lung cancer has been a controversial subject since the 1970s. A federal report, released in the late 1970s, projected a surprisingly high burden of occupational lung cancer; for asbestos and four other agents, from 61,000 to 98,000 cases annually were attributed to these agents alone. Many estimates followed, some much more conservative. For example, Doll and Peto estimated that 15% of lung cancer in men and 5% in women could be attributed to occupational exposures. A number of population-based case-control studies also provide relevant estimates. In a recent literature review, Vineis and Simonato cited attributable risk estimates for occupation and lung cancer that ranged from 4% to 40%; for asbestos alone, the estimates ranged from 1% to 5%. These estimates would be expected to vary across locations and over time. Nevertheless, these recent estimates indicate that occupation remains an important cause of lung cancer. Approaches to Prevention. Prevention of lung cancer mortality among workers exposed to agents or industrial processes that cause lung cancer may involve several strategies, including eliminating or reducing exposures, smoking cessation, screening, and chemo-prevention. For example, changes in industrial processes that have eliminated or reduced exposures to chloromethyl ethers and nickel compounds have provided evidence of reduced risk of lung cancer following these changes. Although occupational exposures are important causes of lung cancer, cigarette smoking is the most important preventable cause of lung cancer. For adults, the work site offers an important location to target smoking cessation efforts. In fact, the work site may be the only place to reach many smokers.

  12. Analysis of non-thermal plasma-induced cell injury in human lung cancer cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurita, Hirofumi; Sano, Kaori; Wada, Motoi; Mizuno, Kazue; Ono, Ryo; Yasuda, Hachiro; Takashima, Kazunori; Mizuno, Akira

    2015-09-01

    Recent progress of biomedical application of atmospheric pressure plasma shows that the biological effects are mainly due to reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) in liquid produced by the plasma exposure. To elucidate the cellular responses induced by exposure to the plasma, we focused on identification and quantification of reactive chemical species in plasma-exposed cell culture medium, and cell injury in mammalian cells after treatment of the plasma-exposed medium. In this study, we examined human lung cancer cell lines. The contribution of H2O2 to the cellular responses was considered. Here, an atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) sustained by a pulsed power supply in argon was used. After APPJ exposure to cell culture medium, RONS detection in liquid was conducted. It showed that OH radical, ONOO-, NO2-, NO3-, and H2O2 were produced in the plasma-exposed medium. Cellular responses of human lung cancer cell lines to the plasma-exposed medium in a concentration-dependence manner were also studied. It showed that the plasma-exposed medium and the H2O2 treatment gave similar reduction in viability and induction of apoptosis. This work was partly supported by MEXT KAKENHI Grant Number 24108005 and JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 26390096.

  13. Molecular Determinants of AHPN (CD437)-Induced Growth Arrest and Apoptosis in Human Lung Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yin; Lin, Bingzhen; Agadir, Anissa; Liu, Ru; Dawson, Marcia I.; Reed, John C.; Fontana, Joseph A.; Bost, Frédéric; Hobbs, Peter D.; Zheng, Yun; Chen, Guo-quan; Shroot, Braham; Mercola, Dan; Zhang, Xiao-kun

    1998-01-01

    6-[3-(1-Adamantyl)-4-hydroxyphenyl]-2-naphthalene carboxylic acid (AHPN or CD437), originally identified as a retinoic acid receptor γ-selective retinoid, was previously shown to induce growth inhibition and apoptosis in human breast cancer cells. In this study, we investigated the role of AHPN/CD437 and its mechanism of action in human lung cancer cell lines. Our results demonstrated that AHPN/CD437 effectively inhibited lung cancer cell growth by inducing G0/G1 arrest and apoptosis, a process that is accompanied by rapid induction of c-Jun, nur77, and p21WAF1/CIP1. In addition, we found that expression of p53 and Bcl-2 was differentially regulated by AHPN/CD437 in different lung cancer cell lines and may play a role in regulating AHPN/CD437-induced apoptotic process. On constitutive expression of the c-JunAla(63,73) protein, a dominant-negative inhibitor of c-Jun, in A549 cells, nur77 expression and apoptosis induction by AHPN/CD437 were impaired, whereas p21WAF1/CIP1 induction and G0/G1 arrest were not affected. Furthermore, overexpression of antisense nur77 RNA in A549 and H460 lung cancer cell lines largely inhibited AHPN/CD437-induced apoptosis. Thus, expression of c-Jun and nur77 plays a critical role in AHPN/CD437-induced apoptosis. Together, our results reveal a novel pathway for retinoid-induced apoptosis and suggest that AHPN/CD437 or analogs may have a better therapeutic efficacy against lung cancer. PMID:9671482

  14. Multi-walled carbon nanotube-induced gene signatures in the mouse lung: potential predictive value for human lung cancer risk and prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Nancy L; Wan, Ying-Wooi; Denvir, James; Porter, Dale W; Pacurari, Maricica; Wolfarth, Michael G; Castranova, Vincent; Qian, Yong

    2012-01-01

    Concerns over the potential for multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) to induce lung carcinogenesis have emerged. This study sought to (1) identify gene expression signatures in the mouse lungs following pharyngeal aspiration of well-dispersed MWCNT and (2) determine if these genes were associated with human lung cancer risk and progression. Genome-wide mRNA expression profiles were analyzed in mouse lungs (n=160) exposed to 0, 10, 20, 40, or 80 µg of MWCNT by pharyngeal aspiration at 1, 7, 28, and 56 days post-exposure. By using pairwise-Statistical Analysis of Microarray (SAM) and linear modeling, 24 genes were selected, which have significant changes in at least two time points, have a more than 1.5 fold change at all doses, and are significant in the linear model for the dose or the interaction of time and dose. Additionally, a 38-gene set was identified as related to cancer from 330 genes differentially expressed at day 56 post-exposure in functional pathway analysis. Using the expression profiles of the cancer-related gene set in 8 mice at day 56 post-exposure to 10 µg of MWCNT, a nearest centroid classification accurately predicts human lung cancer survival with a significant hazard ratio in training set (n=256) and test set (n=186). Furthermore, both gene signatures were associated with human lung cancer risk (n=164) with significant odds ratios. These results may lead to development of a surveillance approach for early detection of lung cancer and prognosis associated with MWCNT in the workplace. PMID:22891886

  15. Cepharanthine induces apoptosis through reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial dysfunction in human non-small-cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hua, Peiyan; Sun, Mei; Zhang, Guangxin; Zhang, Yifan; Tian, Xin; Li, Xin; Cui, Ranji; Zhang, Xingyi

    2015-05-01

    Cepharanthine is a medicinal plant-derived natural compound which possesses potent anti-cancer properties. However, there is little report about its effects on lung cancer cells. In this study, we investigated the effects of cepharanthine on the cell viability and apoptosis in human non-small-cell lung cancer H1299 and A549 cells. It was found that cepharanthine inhibited the growth of H1299 and A549 cells in a dose-dependent manner which was associated with the generation of reactive oxygen species(ROS) and the dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm). These effects were markedly abrogated when cells were pretreated with N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a specific ROS inhibitor, indicating that the apoptosis-inducing effect of cepharanthine in lung cancer cells was mediated by ROS. In addition, cepharanthine triggered apoptosis in non-small lung cancer cells via the upregulation of Bax, downregulation of Bcl-2 and significant activation of caspase-3 and PARP. These results provide the rationale for further research and preclinical investigation of cepharanthine's anti-tumor effect against human non-small-cell lung cancer.

  16. Familial risk for lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kanwal, Madiha; Ding, Xiao-Ji; Cao, Yi

    2017-01-01

    Lung cancer, which has a low survival rate, is a leading cause of cancer-associated mortality worldwide. Smoking and air pollution are the major causes of lung cancer; however, numerous studies have demonstrated that genetic factors also contribute to the development of lung cancer. A family history of lung cancer increases the risk for the disease in both smokers and never-smokers. This review focuses on familial lung cancer, in particular on the familial aggregation of lung cancer. The development of familial lung cancer involves shared environmental and genetic factors among family members. Familial lung cancer represents a good model for investigating the association between environmental and genetic factors, as well as for identifying susceptibility genes for lung cancer. In addition, studies on familial lung cancer may help to elucidate the etiology and mechanism of lung cancer, and may identify novel biomarkers for early detection and diagnosis, targeted therapy and improved prevention strategies. This review presents the aetiology and molecular biology of lung cancer and then systematically introduces and discusses several aspects of familial lung cancer, including the characteristics of familial lung cancer, population-based studies on familial lung cancer and the genetics of familial lung cancer. PMID:28356926

  17. Lung cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Tanoue, Lynn T; Tanner, Nichole T; Gould, Michael K; Silvestri, Gerard A

    2015-01-01

    The United States Preventive Services Task Force recommends lung cancer screening with low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) in adults of age 55 to 80 years who have a 30 pack-year smoking history and are currently smoking or have quit within the past 15 years. This recommendation is largely based on the findings of the National Lung Screening Trial. Both policy-level and clinical decision-making about LDCT screening must consider the potential benefits of screening (reduced mortality from lung cancer) and possible harms. Effective screening requires an appreciation that screening should be limited to individuals at high risk of death from lung cancer, and that the risk of harm related to false positive findings, overdiagnosis, and unnecessary invasive testing is real. A comprehensive understanding of these aspects of screening will inform appropriate implementation, with the objective that an evidence-based and systematic approach to screening will help to reduce the enormous mortality burden of lung cancer.

  18. Pharmacological strategies in lung cancer-induced cachexia: effects on muscle proteolysis, autophagy, structure, and weakness.

    PubMed

    Chacon-Cabrera, Alba; Fermoselle, Clara; Urtreger, Alejandro J; Mateu-Jimenez, Mercè; Diament, Miriam J; de Kier Joffé, Elisa D Bal; Sandri, Marco; Barreiro, Esther

    2014-11-01

    Cachexia is a relevant comorbid condition of chronic diseases including cancer. Inflammation, oxidative stress, autophagy, ubiquitin-proteasome system, nuclear factor (NF)-κB, and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) are involved in the pathophysiology of cancer cachexia. Currently available treatment is limited and data demonstrating effectiveness in in vivo models are lacking. Our objectives were to explore in respiratory and limb muscles of lung cancer (LC) cachectic mice whether proteasome, NF-κB, and MAPK inhibitors improve muscle mass and function loss through several molecular mechanisms. Body and muscle weights, limb muscle force, protein degradation and the ubiquitin-proteasome system, signaling pathways, oxidative stress and inflammation, autophagy, contractile and functional proteins, myostatin and myogenin, and muscle structure were evaluated in the diaphragm and gastrocnemius of LC (LP07 adenocarcinoma) bearing cachectic mice (BALB/c), with and without concomitant treatment with NF-κB (sulfasalazine), MAPK (U0126), and proteasome (bortezomib) inhibitors. Compared to control animals, in both respiratory and limb muscles of LC cachectic mice: muscle proteolysis, ubiquitinated proteins, autophagy, myostatin, protein oxidation, FoxO-1, NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways, and muscle abnormalities were increased, while myosin, creatine kinase, myogenin, and slow- and fast-twitch muscle fiber size were decreased. Pharmacological inhibition of NF-κB and MAPK, but not the proteasome system, induced in cancer cachectic animals, a substantial restoration of muscle mass and force through a decrease in muscle protein oxidation and catabolism, myostatin, and autophagy, together with a greater content of myogenin, and contractile and functional proteins. Attenuation of MAPK and NF-κB signaling pathway effects on muscles is beneficial in cancer-induced cachexia.

  19. Nivolumab-Induced Severe Akathisia in an Advanced Lung Cancer Patient

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Jiro; Sato, Taku; Tanaka, Ryota; Okazaki, Toshimasa; Takahashi, Satomi

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 58 Final Diagnosis: Nivolumab induced severe akathisia Symptoms: Distress fidgety • restlessness Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Methylprednisolone pulse therapy and other drugs Specialty: Oncology Objective: Adverse events of drug therapy Background: Nivolumab is an anti-PD-1 immune checkpoint inhibitor that was recently developed for cancer immunotherapy. In the clinical trials of nivolumab, its adverse effects were reported to be less likely than those of conventional anti-cancer agents; however, after practical clinical distribution, it has come to be known that nivolumab induces various immune-related adverse events. Case Report: A 58-year-old male with a recurrence of lung adenocarcinoma was treated with nivolumab. Only four days after the initial administration of nivolumab, the patient presented with unbearable restlessness and distress that was resistant to all therapeutic agents used, and it gradually became worse. He finally came to need deep sedation despite his cancer status being stable during the course. Clinical tests including magnetic resonance imaging, cerebrospinal fluid cytology, and antibodies of paraneoplastic syndrome exhibited no signs of encephalitis or another possible cause of the neuropathy. The diagnosis of akathisia could be made only by his somatoform presentation. It was uncertain whether or not this complication was correlated with the activation of his immune system. Conclusions: Anti-immune check point inhibitors may induce many unknown adverse events. Severe akathisia induced by nivolumab, as in our case, has not been reported yet. Collecting every adverse event of nivolumab may be important to make a better algorithm to manage its huge variety of complications. PMID:27893699

  20. Lung Cancer Biomarkers.

    PubMed

    I, Hoseok; Cho, Je-Yoel

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most frequently occurring cancer in the world and continually leads in mortality among cancers. The overall 5-year survival rate for lung cancer has risen only 4% (from 12% to 16%) over the past 4 decades, and late diagnosis is a major obstacle in improving lung cancer prognosis. Survival of patients undergoing lung resection is greater than 80%, suggesting that early detection and diagnosis of cancers before they become inoperable and lethal will greatly improve mortality. Lung cancer biomarkers can be used for screening, detection, diagnosis, prognosis, prediction, stratification, therapy response monitoring, and so on. This review focuses on noninvasive diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers. For that purpose, our discussion in this review will focus on biological fluid-based biomarkers. The body fluids include blood (serum or plasma), sputum, saliva, BAL, pleural effusion, and VOC. Since it is rich in different cellular and molecular elements and is one of the most convenient and routine clinical procedures, serum or plasma is the main source for the development and validation of many noninvasive biomarkers. In terms of molecular aspects, the most widely validated ones are proteins, some of which are used in the clinical sector, though in limited accessory purposes. We will also discuss the lung cancer (protein) biomarkers in clinical trials and currently in the validation phase with hundreds of samples. After proteins, we will discuss microRNAs, methylated DNA, and circulating tumor cells, which are being vigorously developed and validated as potential lung cancer biomarkers. The main aim of this review is to provide researchers and clinicians with an understanding of the potential noninvasive lung cancer biomarkers in biological fluids that have recently been discovered.

  1. G4-Tetra DNA Duplex Induce Lung Cancer Cell Apoptosis in A549 Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaobo; Zhao, YiZhuo; Lu, Hu; Fu, Cuiping; Li, Xiao; Jiang, Liyan; Li, Shanqun

    2016-10-01

    The specific DNA is typically impermeable to the plasma membrane due to its natural characters, but DNA tetra structures (DTNs) can be readily uptake by cells in the absence of transfection agents, providing a new strategy to deliver DNA drugs. In this research, the delivery efficiency of tetrahedral DNA nanostructures was measured on adenocarcinomic human alveolar basal epithelial (A549) cells via delivering AS1411 (G4). The DNA tetra-AS1411 complex was rapidly and abundantly uptake by A549 cells, and the induced apoptosis was enhanced. Furthermore, biodistribution in mouse proved the rapid clearance from non-targeted organs in vivo. This study improved the understanding of potential function in DNA-based drug delivery and proved that DTNs-AS1411 could be potentially useful for the treatment of lung cancer.

  2. Lung Cancer Screening Update.

    PubMed

    Ruchalski, Kathleen L; Brown, Kathleen

    2016-07-01

    Since the release of the US Preventive Services Task Force and Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services recommendations for lung cancer screening, low-dose chest computed tomography screening has moved from the research arena to clinical practice. Lung cancer screening programs must reach beyond image acquisition and interpretation and engage in a multidisciplinary effort of clinical shared decision-making, standardization of imaging and nodule management, smoking cessation, and patient follow-up. Standardization of radiologic reports and nodule management will systematize patient care, provide quality assurance, further reduce harm, and contain health care costs. Although the National Lung Screening Trial results and eligibility criteria of a heavy smoking history are the foundation for the standard guidelines for low-dose chest computed tomography screening in the United States, currently only 27% of patients diagnosed with lung cancer would meet US lung cancer screening recommendations. Current and future efforts must be directed to better delineate those patients who would most benefit from screening and to ensure that the benefits of screening reach all socioeconomic strata and racial and ethnic minorities. Further optimization of lung cancer screening program design and patient eligibility will assure that lung cancer screening benefits will outweigh the potential risks to our patients.

  3. Silencing of AP-4 inhibits proliferation, induces cell cycle arrest and promotes apoptosis in human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xuanyu; Guo, Wei; Chen, Shanshan; Xu, Yizhuo; Li, Ping; Wang, Huaqi; Chu, Heying; Li, Juan; DU, Yuwen; Chen, Xiaonan; Zhang, Guojun; Zhao, Guoqiang

    2016-06-01

    Activating enhancer-binding protein (AP)-4 is a member of the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors, and is involved in tumor biology. However, the role of AP-4 in human lung cancer remains to be fully elucidated. In the present study, the expression of AP-4 in human lung cancer tissues and cells was investigated by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and it was observed that the level of AP-4 was increased in tumor tissues and cells compared with their normal counterparts. AP-4 expression was knocked down by transfection with a specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) in lung cancer cells, and this indicated that siRNA-mediated silencing of AP-4 inhibited cell proliferation, arrested the cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase and induced apoptosis by modulating the expression of p21 and cyclin D1. The results of the present study suggest that AP-4 may be an oncoprotein that has a significant role in lung cancer, and that siRNA-mediated silencing of AP-4 may have therapeutic potential as a strategy for the treatment of lung cancer.

  4. Reversine Induced Multinucleated Cells, Cell Apoptosis and Autophagy in Human Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ching-Yen; Chen, Yih-Yuan; Chen, Ping-Tzu; Tseng, Ya-Shih

    2016-01-01

    Reversine, an A3 adenosine receptor antagonist, has been shown to induce differentiated myogenic-lineage committed cells to become multipotent mesenchymal progenitor cells. We and others have reported that reversine has an effect on human tumor suppression. This study revealed anti-tumor effects of reversine on proliferation, apoptosis and autophagy induction in human non-small cell lung cancer cells. Treatment of these cells with reversine suppressed cell growth in a time- and dosage-dependent manner. Moreover, polyploidy occurred after reversine treatment. In addition, caspase-dependent apoptosis and activation of autophagy by reversine in a dosage-dependent manner were also observed. We demonstrated in this study that reversine contributes to growth inhibition, apoptosis and autophagy induction in human lung cancer cells. Therefore, reversine used as a potential therapeutic agent for human lung cancer is worthy of further investigation. PMID:27385117

  5. Venom present in sea anemone (Heteractis magnifica) induces apoptosis in non-small-cell lung cancer A549 cells through activation of mitochondria-mediated pathway.

    PubMed

    Ramezanpour, Mahnaz; da Silva, Karen Burke; Sanderson, Barbara J S

    2014-03-01

    Lung cancer is a major cause of cancer deaths throughout the world and the complexity of apoptosis resistance in lung cancer is apparent. Venom from Heteractis magnifica caused dose-dependent decreases in survival of the human non-small-cell lung cancer cell line, as determined by the MTT and Crystal Violet assays. The H. magnifica venom induced cell cycle arrest and induced apoptosis of A549 cells, as confirmed by annexin V/propidium iodide staining. The venom-induced apoptosis in A549 cells was characterized by cleavage of caspase-3 and a reduction in the mitochondrial membrane potential. Interestingly, crude extracts from H. magnifica had less effect on the survival of non-cancer cell lines. In the non-cancer cells, the mechanism via which cell death occurred was through necrosis not apoptosis. These findings are important for future work using H. magnifica venom for pharmaceutical development to treat human lung cancer.

  6. Lycopene and Lung Cancer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although epidemiological studies have shown dietary intake of lycopene is associated with decreased risk of lung cancer, the effect of lycopene on lung carcinogenesis has not been well studied. A better understanding of lycopene metabolism and the mechanistic basis of lycopene chemoprevention must ...

  7. Lung Cancer: Glossary

    MedlinePlus

    ... another type of non-small cell lung cancer Larynx: The voice box; located above the windpipe Limited ... allows for the passage of air from the larynx to the bronchial tubes Transfusion: The infusion of ...

  8. Lung Cancer Rates by State

    MedlinePlus

    ... HPV-Associated Ovarian Prostate Skin Uterine Cancer Home Lung Cancer Rates by State Language: English Español (Spanish) ... incidence data are currently available. Rates of Getting Lung Cancer by State The number of people who ...

  9. Delicaflavone induces autophagic cell death in lung cancer via Akt/mTOR/p70S6K signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Sui, Yuxia; Yao, Hong; Li, Shaoguang; Jin, Long; Shi, Peiying; Li, Zhijun; Wang, Gang; Lin, Shilan; Wu, Youjia; Li, Yuxiang; Huang, Liying; Liu, Qicai; Lin, Xinhua

    2017-03-01

    Searching for potential anticancer agents from natural sources is an effective strategy for developing novel chemotherapeutic agents. In this study, data supporting the in vitro and in vivo anticancer effects of delicaflavone, a rarely occurring biflavonoid from Selaginella doederleinii, were reported. Delicaflavone exhibited favorable anticancer properties, as shown by the MTT assay and xenograft model of human non-small cell lung cancer in male BALB/c nude mice without observable adverse effect. By transmission electron microscopy with acridine orange and Cyto-ID®Autophagy detection dyes, Western blot analysis, and RT-PCR assay, we confirmed that delicaflavone induces autophagic cell death by increasing the ratio of LC3-II to LC3-I, which are autophagy-related proteins, and promoting the generation of acidic vesicular organelles and autolysosomes in the cytoplasm of human lung cancer A549 and PC-9 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Delicaflavone downregulated the expression of phospho-Akt, phospho-mTOR, and phospho-p70S6K in a time- and dose-dependent manner, suggesting that it induced autophagy by inhibiting the Akt/mTOR/p70S6K pathway in A549 and PC-9 cells. Delicaflavone is a potential anticancer agent that can induce autophagic cell death in human non-small cell lung cancer via the Akt/mTOR/p70S6K signaling pathway. Delicaflavone showed anti-lung cancer effects in vitro and in vivo. Delicaflavone induced autophagic cell death via Akt/mTOR/p70S6K signaling pathway. Delicaflavone did not show observable side effects in a xenograft mouse model. Delicaflavone may represent a potential therapeutic agent for lung cancer.

  10. Miniature Dielectric Barrier Discharge Nonthermal Plasma Induces Apoptosis in Lung Cancer Cells and Inhibits Cell Migration.

    PubMed

    Karki, Surya B; Yildirim-Ayan, Eda; Eisenmann, Kathryn M; Ayan, Halim

    2017-01-01

    Traditional cancer treatments like radiotherapy and chemotherapy have drawbacks and are not selective for killing only cancer cells. Nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasmas with dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) can be applied to living cells and tissues and have emerged as novel tools for localized cancer therapy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the different effects caused by miniature DBD (mDBD) plasma to A549 lung cancer cells. In this study, A549 lung cancer cells cultured in 12 well plates were treated with mDBD plasma for specified treatment times to assess the changes in the size of the area of cell detachment, the viability of attached or detached cells, and cell migration. Furthermore, we investigated an innovative mDBD plasma-based therapy for localized treatment of lung cancer cells through apoptotic induction. Our results indicate that plasma treatment for 120 sec causes apoptotic cell death in 35.8% of cells, while mDBD plasma treatment for 60 sec, 30 sec, or 15 sec causes apoptotic cell death in 20.5%, 14.1%, and 6.3% of the cell population, respectively. Additionally, we observed reduced A549 cell migration in response to mDBD plasma treatment. Thus, mDBD plasma system can be a viable platform for localized lung cancer therapy.

  11. Miniature Dielectric Barrier Discharge Nonthermal Plasma Induces Apoptosis in Lung Cancer Cells and Inhibits Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Eisenmann, Kathryn M.

    2017-01-01

    Traditional cancer treatments like radiotherapy and chemotherapy have drawbacks and are not selective for killing only cancer cells. Nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasmas with dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) can be applied to living cells and tissues and have emerged as novel tools for localized cancer therapy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the different effects caused by miniature DBD (mDBD) plasma to A549 lung cancer cells. In this study, A549 lung cancer cells cultured in 12 well plates were treated with mDBD plasma for specified treatment times to assess the changes in the size of the area of cell detachment, the viability of attached or detached cells, and cell migration. Furthermore, we investigated an innovative mDBD plasma-based therapy for localized treatment of lung cancer cells through apoptotic induction. Our results indicate that plasma treatment for 120 sec causes apoptotic cell death in 35.8% of cells, while mDBD plasma treatment for 60 sec, 30 sec, or 15 sec causes apoptotic cell death in 20.5%, 14.1%, and 6.3% of the cell population, respectively. Additionally, we observed reduced A549 cell migration in response to mDBD plasma treatment. Thus, mDBD plasma system can be a viable platform for localized lung cancer therapy. PMID:28243603

  12. Transforming Growth Factor-β-Induced RBFOX3 Inhibition Promotes Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition of Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yong-Eun; Kim, Jong Ok; Park, Ki-Sun; Won, Minho; Kim, Kyoon Eon; Kim, Kee K.

    2016-01-01

    The RNA-binding protein Rbfox3 is a well-known splicing regulator that is used as a marker for post-mitotic neurons in various vertebrate species. Although recent studies indicate a variable expression of Rbfox3 in non-neuronal tissues, including lung tissue, its cellular function in lung cancer remains largely unknown. Here, we report that the number of RBFOX3-positive cells in tumorous lung tissue is lower than that in normal lung tissue. As the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling pathway is important in cancer progression, we investigated its role in RBFOX3 expression in A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells. TGF-β1 treatment inhibited RBFOX3 expression at the transcriptional level. Further, RBFOX3 depletion led to a change in the expression levels of a subset of proteins related to epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), such as E-cadherin and Claudin-1, during TGF-β1-induced EMT. In immunofluorescence microscopic analysis, mesenchymal morphology was more prominent in RBFOX3-depleted cells than in control cells. These findings show that TGF-β-induced RBFOX3 inhibition plays an important role in EMT and propose a novel role for RBFOX3 in cancer progression. PMID:27432190

  13. Cigarette smoke induces aberrant EGF receptor activation that mediates lung cancer development and resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Filosto, Simone; Becker, Cathleen R; Goldkorn, Tzipora

    2012-04-01

    The EGF receptor (EGFR) and its downstream signaling are implicated in lung cancer development. Therefore, much effort was spent in developing specific tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) that bind to the EGFR ATP-pocket, blocking EGFR phosphorylation/signaling. Clinical use of TKIs is effective in a subset of lung cancers with mutations in the EGFR kinase domain, rendering the receptor highly susceptible to TKIs. However, these benefits are limited, and emergence of additional EGFR mutations usually results in TKI resistance and disease progression. Previously, we showed one mechanism linking cigarette smoke to EGFR-driven lung cancer. Specifically, exposure of lung epithelial cells to cigarette smoke-induced oxidative stress stimulates aberrant EGFR phosphorylation/activation with impaired receptor ubiquitination/degradation. The abnormal stabilization of the activated receptor leads to uncontrolled cell growth and tumorigenesis. Here, we describe for the first time a novel posttranslational mechanism of EGFR resistance to TKIs. Exposure of airway epithelial cells to cigarette smoke causes aberrant phosphorylation/activation of EGFR, resulting in a conformation that is different from that induced by the ligand EGF. Unlike EGF-activated EGFR, cigarette smoke-activated EGFR binds c-Src and caveolin-1 and does not undergo canonical dimerization. Importantly, the cigarette smoke-activated EGFR is not inhibited by TKIs (AG1478; erlotinib; gefitinib); in fact, the cigarette smoke exposure induces TKI-resistance even in the TKI-sensitive EGFR mutants. Our findings show that cigarette smoke exposure stimulates not only aberrant EGFR phosphorylation impairing receptor degradation, but also induces a different EGFR conformation and signaling that are resistant to TKIs. Together, these findings offer new insights into cigarette smoke-induced lung cancer development and TKI resistance.

  14. Crosstalk with cancer-associated fibroblasts induces resistance of non-small cell lung cancer cells to epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Choe, Chungyoul; Shin, Yong-Sung; Kim, Changhoon; Choi, So-Jung; Lee, Jinseon; Kim, So Young; Cho, Yong Beom; Kim, Jhingook

    2015-01-01

    Although lung cancers with activating mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) are highly sensitive to selective EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), these tumors invariably develop acquired drug resistance. Host stromal cells have been found to have a considerable effect on the sensitivity of cancer cells to EGFR TKIs. Little is known, however, about the signaling mechanisms through which stromal cells contribute to the response to EGFR TKI in non-small cell lung cancer. This work examined the role of hedgehog signaling in cancer-associated fibroblast (CAF)-mediated resistance of lung cancer cells to the EGFR TKI erlotinib. PC9 cells, non-small cell lung cancer cells with EGFR-activating mutations, became resistant to the EGFR TKI erlotinib when cocultured in vitro with CAFs. Polymerase chain reaction and immunocytochemical assays showed that CAFs induced epithelial to mesenchymal transition phenotype in PC9 cells, with an associated change in the expression of epithelial to mesenchymal transition marker proteins including vimentin. Importantly, CAFs induce upregulation of the 7-transmembrane protein smoothened, the central signal transducer of hedgehog, suggesting that the hedgehog signaling pathway is active in CAF-mediated drug resistance. Indeed, downregulation of smoothened activity with the smoothened antagonist cyclopamine induces remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton independently of Gli-mediated transcriptional activity in PC9 cells. These findings indicate that crosstalk with CAFs plays a critical role in resistance of lung cancer to EGFR TKIs through induction of the epithelial to mesenchymal transition and may be an ideal therapeutic target in lung cancer. PMID:26676152

  15. Terpinen-4-ol Induces Apoptosis in Human Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer In Vitro and In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chieh-Shan; Chen, Yun-Ju; Chen, Jeremy J W; Shieh, Jeng-Jer; Huang, Chia-Hsin; Lin, Pei-Shan; Chang, Gee-Chen; Chang, Jinghua-Tsai; Lin, Chi-Chen

    2012-01-01

    Terpinen-4-ol, a monoterpene component of the essential oils of several aromatic plants, exhibits antitumor effects. In this study, the antitumor effects of terpinen-4-ol and the cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for it were evaluated and studied, respectively on human nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. Our results indicated that terpinen-4-ol elicited a dose-dependent cytotoxic effect, as determined by MTT assay. Increased sub-G1 population and annexin-V binding, activation of caspases 9 and 3, cleavage of poly(ADPribose) polymerase (PARP), and a decrease of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) indicated involvement of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in terpinen-4-ol-treated A549 and CL1-0 cells. Elevation of the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and a decrease in IAP family proteins XIAP and survivin were also observed following terpinen-4-ol treatment. Notably, terpinen-4-ol was able to increase p53 levels in A549 and CL1-0 cells. Diminution of p53 by RNA interference induced necrosis instead of apoptosis in A549 cells following terpinen-4-ol treatment, indicating that terpinen-4-ol-elicited apoptosis is p53-dependent. Moreover, intratumoral administration of terpinen-4-ol significantly suppressed the growth of s.c. A549 xenografts by inducing apoptosis, as confirmed by TUNEL assay. Collectively, these data provide insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying terpinen-4-ol-induced apoptosis in NSCLC cells, rendering this compound a potential anticancer drug for NSCLC.

  16. Erlotinib Induced Fatal Interstitial Lung Disease in a Patient with Metastatic Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Case Report and Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Mangla, Ankit; Agarwal, Nikki; Carmel, Chou; Lad, Thomas

    2016-09-05

    Erlotinib is one of the most widely used tyrosine kinase inhibitor targeting human epidermal growth factor receptor. Since its introduction, it has revolutionized the treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer. Skin rashes and diarrhea are the most often reported side effects of erlotinib however it is also associated with interstitial pneumonitis or interstitial lung disease, which often turns out to be fatal complication of using this medicine. Though reported scarcely in the western world, the association of interstitial lung disease with epidermal growth factor receptor has attracted a lot of attention in the recent times. Various researches working with murine models of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis have found a pro and con role of the receptor in development of the interstitial lung disease. We present the case of a patient diagnosed with stage IV adenocarcinoma of the lung with metastasis to brain. He was found to be positive for the human epidermal growth factor mutation and was hence started on erlotinib. Within a few weeks of starting the medicine the patient was admitted with diarrhea. During the course of this admission he developed acute shortness of breath diagnosed as interstitial pneumonitis. The purpose of this case report is to review the literature associated with erlotinib induced interstitial pneumonitis and make the practicing oncologists aware of this rare yet fatal complication of erlotinib. Here we will also review literature, pertaining to the role of epidermal growth factor receptor in development of interstitial lung disease.

  17. Smoking-induced CXCL14 expression in the human airway epithelium links chronic obstructive pulmonary disease to lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Shaykhiev, Renat; Sackrowitz, Rachel; Fukui, Tomoya; Zuo, Wu-Lin; Chao, Ion Wa; Strulovici-Barel, Yael; Downey, Robert J; Crystal, Ronald G

    2013-09-01

    CXCL14, a recently described epithelial cytokine, plays putative multiple roles in inflammation and carcinogenesis. In the context that chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer are both smoking-related disorders associated with airway epithelial disorder and inflammation, we hypothesized that the airway epithelium responds to cigarette smoking with altered CXCL14 gene expression, contributing to the disease-relevant phenotype. Using genome-wide microarrays with subsequent immunohistochemical analysis, the data demonstrate that the expression of CXCL14 is up-regulated in the airway epithelium of healthy smokers and further increased in COPD smokers, especially within hyperplastic/metaplastic lesions, in association with multiple genes relevant to epithelial structural integrity and cancer. In vitro experiments revealed that the expression of CXCL14 is induced in the differentiated airway epithelium by cigarette smoke extract, and that epidermal growth factor mediates CXCL14 up-regulation in the airway epithelium through its effects on the basal stem/progenitor cell population. Analyses of two independent lung cancer cohorts revealed a dramatic up-regulation of CXCL14 expression in adenocarcinoma and squamous-cell carcinoma. High expression of the COPD-associated CXCL14-correlating cluster of genes was linked in lung adenocarcinoma with poor survival. These data suggest that the smoking-induced expression of CXCL14 in the airway epithelium represents a novel potential molecular link between smoking-associated airway epithelial injury, COPD, and lung cancer.

  18. Chrysin enhances doxorubicin-induced cytotoxicity in human lung epithelial cancer cell lines: The role of glutathione

    SciTech Connect

    Brechbuhl, Heather M.; Kachadourian, Remy; Min, Elysia; Chan, Daniel; Day, Brian J.

    2012-01-01

    We hypothesized that flavonoid-induced glutathione (GSH) efflux through multi-drug resistance proteins (MRPs) and subsequent intracellular GSH depletion is a viable mechanism to sensitize cancer cells to chemotherapies. This concept was demonstrated using chrysin (5–25 μM) induced GSH efflux in human non-small cell lung cancer lines exposed to the chemotherapeutic agent, doxorubicin (DOX). Treatment with chrysin resulted in significant and sustained intracellular GSH depletion and the GSH enzyme network in the four cancer cell types was predictive of the severity of chrysin induced intracellular GSH depletion. Gene expression data indicated a positive correlation between basal MRP1, MRP3 and MRP5 expression and total GSH efflux before and after chrysin exposure. Co-treating the cells for 72 h with chrysin (5–30 μM) and DOX (0.025–3.0 μM) significantly enhanced the sensitivity of the cells to DOX as compared to 72-hour DOX alone treatment in all four cell lines. The maximum decrease in the IC{sub 50} values of cells treated with DOX alone compared to co-treatment with chrysin and DOX was 43% in A549 cells, 47% in H157 and H1975 cells and 78% in H460 cells. Chrysin worked synergistically with DOX to induce cancer cell death. This approach could allow for use of lower concentrations and/or sensitize cancer cells to drugs that are typically resistant to therapy. -- Graphical abstract: Possible mechanisms by which chrysin enhances doxorubicin-induced toxicity in cancer cells. Highlights: ► Chyrsin sustains a significant depletion of GSH levels in lung cancer cells. ► Chyrsin synergistically potentiates doxorubicin-induced cancer cell cytotoxicity. ► Cancer cell sensitivity correlated with GSH and MRP gene network expression. ► This approach could allow for lower side effects and targeting resistant tumors.

  19. Successful treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer with afatinib and a glucocorticoid following gefitinib- and erlotinib-induced interstitial lung disease: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Tani, Tetsuo; Naoki, Katsuhiko; Asakura, Takanori; Hirano, Toshiyuki; Suzuki, Shoji; Masuzawa, Keita; Hasegawa, Hanako; Kuroda, Aoi; Yasuda, Hiroyuki; Ishii, Makoto; Soejima, Kenzo; Betsuyaku, Tomoko

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKI)-induced interstitial lung disease (ILD) may be a life-threatening condition that may develop during treatment of lung cancer patients harboring EGFR mutations. We herein present the case of a 41-year-old female patient diagnosed with lung adenocarcinoma with an EGFR mutation (exon 19 deletion). The patient was treated with gefitinib followed by erlotinib and developed ILD induced by both EGFR-TKIs; furthermore, the patient acquired resistance to EGFR-TKI treatment. A repeat biopsy revealed a T790M mutation, which is associated with resistance to first-generation EGFR-TKIs, along with an exon 19 deletion identified by cytology of the pleural fluid. Treatment with afatinib and prednisolone resulted in tumor shrinkage, without worsening of the ILD. The present case demonstrated that combination treatment with afatinib and a glucocorticoid may be effective for the treatment of lung cancer patients who develop EGFR-TKI-induced ILD. PMID:27699048

  20. Gefitinib induces lung cancer cell autophagy and apoptosis via blockade of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, ZHONG-QUAN; YU, ZHONG-YANG; LI, JIE; OUYANG, XUE-NONG

    2016-01-01

    Gefitinib is a selective inhibitor of the tyrosine kinase epidermal growth factor receptor, which inhibits tumor pathogenesis, metastasis and angiogenesis, as well as promoting apoptosis. Therefore, gefitinib presents an effective drug for the targeted therapy of lung cancer. However, the underlying mechanisms by which gefitinib induces lung cancer cell death remain unclear. To investigate the effects of gefitinib on lung cancer cells and the mechanism of such, the present study analyzed the effect of gefitinib on the autophagy, apoptosis and proliferation of the A549 and A549-gefitinib-resistant (GR) cell lines GR. The regulation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (AKT)/ mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway was also investigated. Acridine orange staining revealed that gefitinib induced autophagy of A549 cells but not A549-GR cells. In addition, gefitinib promoted apoptosis and inhibited proliferation of A549 cells but not A549-GR cells. Furthermore, western blot analysis demonstrated that gefitinib treatment led to the downregulation of PI3K, AKT, pAKT, mTOR and phosphorylated-mTOR protein expression in A549 cells but not A549-GR cells. LY294002 blocked the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway and induced autophagy and apoptosis of A549 cells, however, no synergistic effect was observed following combined treatment with gefitinib and LY294002. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicate that gefitinib promotes autophagy and apoptosis of lung cancer cells via blockade of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway, which leads to lung cancer cell death. PMID:27347100

  1. Lung cancer - non-small cell

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - lung - non-small cell; Non-small cell lung cancer; NSCLC; Adenocarcinoma - lung; Squamous cell carcinoma - lung ... Smoking causes most cases (around 90%) of lung cancer. The risk depends on the number of cigarettes ...

  2. Petroleum ether extract of Chenopodium album L. prevents cell growth and induces apoptosis of human lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ting; Pan, Hui; Feng, Yang; Li, Haizhou; Zhao, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Chenopodium album L. is a common edible herb distributed in China that has been used as a traditional Chinese medicine for antiviral, antifungal, anti-inflammatory and cancer treatment. However, to the best of our knowledge no previous reports have investigated its the function of its phytochemical extracts in lung cancer cells. The purpose of the present study was to assess the anticancer activities of the phytochemical extracts of C. album L. on human non-small cell lung cancer A549 cells. The present findings demonstrated that the petroleum ether (PE) extract of C. album L. exhibited significant growth inhibitory effects on A549 with an IC50 value of 33.31±2.79 µg/ml. As determined by MTT and colony formation assays, its growth inhibitory effects were dose- and time-dependent. Furthermore, PE extract-treated A549 cells exhibited dose-dependent cell growth arrest at the G1 phase of the cell cycle and cell apoptosis was induced. These results provide useful data on the anticancer activities of C. album L. in human lung cancer and demonstrated the novel possibilities of this plant in developing lung cancer therapies. PMID:27882153

  3. Hyperthermia induces cytoskeletal alterations and mitotic catastrophe in p53-deficient H1299 lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Pawlik, Andrzej; Nowak, Jakub Marcin; Grzanka, Dariusz; Gackowska, Lidia; Michalkiewicz, Jacek; Grzanka, Alina

    2013-01-01

    Hyperthermia is used in cancer therapy, however much remains to be discovered regarding its mechanisms of action at the cellular level. In this study, the effects of hyperthermia on cell death, survival, morphology and the cytoskeleton were investigated in a non-small cell lung cancer cell line, H1299. Despite the fact that this cell line is widely used in research, it has not yet been tested for heat shock sensitivity. Cells were given a 30-min heat shock at 43.5°C and 45°C and left to recover at 37°C for 24 and 48 h. 24 h after heat shock treatment, we monitored changes in the organization of the cytoskeleton using immunofluorescence microscopy. The number of actin stress fibers was significantly reduced, microtubules formed a looser meshwork, a portion of the cells possessed multipolar mitotic spindles, whereas vimentin filaments collapsed into perinuclear complexes. 48 h following heat stress, most of the cells showed recovery of the cytoskeleton, however we observed a considerable number of giant cells that were multinucleated or contained one enlarged nucleus. The data obtained by MTT assay showed a dose-dependent decrease of cell viability, while flow cytometric analysis revealed an increase in the number of cells with externalized phosphatidylserine. The results suggest that one of the modes of heat-induced cell death in H1299 cells is mitotic catastrophe, which probably ends in apoptosis.

  4. EGF Induced RET Inhibitor Resistance in CCDC6-RET Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Ji Hea; Moon, Sung Ung; Kim, Han-Soo; Kim, Jin Won; Lee, Jong Seok

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Rearrangement of the proto-oncogene rearranged during transfection (RET) has been newly identified potential driver mutation in lung adenocarcinoma. Clinically available tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) target RET kinase activity, which suggests that patients with RET fusion genes may be treatable with a kinase inhibitor. Nevertheless, the mechanisms of resistance to these agents remain largely unknown. Thus, the present study aimed to determine whether epidermal growth factor (EGF) and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) trigger RET inhibitor resistance in LC-2/ad cells with CCDC6-RET fusion genes. Materials and Methods The effects of EGF and HGF on the susceptibility of a CCDC6-RET lung cancer cell line to RET inhibitors (sunitinib, E7080, vandetanib, and sorafenib) were examined. Results CCDC6-RET lung cancer cells were highly sensitive to RET inhibitors. EGF activated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and triggered resistance to sunitinib, E7080, vandetanib, and sorafenib by transducing bypass survival signaling through ERK and AKT. Reversible EGFR-TKI (gefitinib) resensitized cancer cells to RET inhibitors, even in the presence of EGF. Endothelial cells, which are known to produce EGF, decreased the sensitivity of CCDC6-RET lung cancer cells to RET inhibitors, an effect that was inhibited by EGFR small interfering RNA (siRNA), anti-EGFR antibody (cetuximab), and EGFR-TKI (Iressa). HGF had relatively little effect on the sensitivity to RET inhibitors. Conclusion EGF could trigger resistance to RET inhibition in CCDC6-RET lung cancer cells, and endothelial cells may confer resistance to RET inhibitors by EGF. E7080 and other RET inhibitors may provide therapeutic benefits in the treatment of RET-positive lung cancer patients. PMID:27873490

  5. SU-E-J-190: Characterization of Radiation Induced CT Number Changes in Tumor and Normal Lung During Radiation Therapy for Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, C; Liu, F; Tai, A; Gore, E; Johnstone, C; Li, X

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To measure CT number (CTN) changes in tumor and normal lung as a function of radiation therapy (RT) dose during the course of RT delivery for lung cancer using daily IGRT CT images and single respiration phase CT images. Methods: 4D CT acquired during planning simulation and daily 3D CT acquired during daily IGRT for 10 lung cancer cases randomly selected in terms of age, caner type and stage, were analyzed using an in-house developed software tool. All patients were treated in 2 Gy fractions to primary tumors and involved nodal regions. Regions enclosed by a series of isodose surfaces in normal lung were delineated. The obtained contours along with target contours (GTVs) were populated to each singlephase planning CT and daily CT. CTN in term of Hounsfield Unit (HU) of each voxel in these delineated regions were collectively analyzed using histogram, mean, mode and linear correlation. Results: Respiration induced normal lung CTN change, as analyzed from single-phase planning CTs, ranged from 9 to 23 (±2) HU for the patients studied. Normal lung CTN change was as large as 50 (±12) HU over the entire treatment course, was dose and patient dependent and was measurable with dose changes as low as 1.5 Gy. For patients with obvious tumor volume regression, CTN within the GTV drops monotonically as much as 10 (±1) HU during the early fractions with a total dose of 20 Gy delivered. The GTV and CTN reductions are significantly correlated with correlation coefficient >0.95. Conclusion: Significant RT dose induced CTN changes in lung tissue and tumor region can be observed during even the early phase of RT delivery, and may potentially be used for early prediction of radiation response. Single respiration phase CT images have dramatically reduced statistical noise in ROIs, making daily dose response evaluation possible.

  6. Early Growth Response-1 Induces and Enhances Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor-A Expression in Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shimoyamada, Hiroaki; Yazawa, Takuya; Sato, Hanako; Okudela, Koji; Ishii, Jun; Sakaeda, Masashi; Kashiwagi, Korehito; Suzuki, Takehisa; Mitsui, Hideaki; Woo, Tetsukan; Tajiri, Michihiko; Ohmori, Takahiro; Ogura, Takashi; Masuda, Munetaka; Oshiro, Hisashi; Kitamura, Hitoshi

    2010-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) is crucial for angiogenesis, vascular permeability, and metastasis during tumor development. We demonstrate here that early growth response-1 (EGR-1), which is induced by the extracellular signal–regulated kinase (ERK) pathway activation, activates VEGF-A in lung cancer cells. Increased EGR-1 expression was found in adenocarcinoma cells carrying mutant K-RAS or EGFR genes. Hypoxic culture, siRNA experiment, luciferase assays, chromatin immunoprecipitation, electrophoretic mobility shift assays, and quantitative RT-PCR using EGR-1–inducible lung cancer cells demonstrated that EGR-1 binds to the proximal region of the VEGF-A promoter, activates VEGF-A expression, and enhances hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α)-mediated VEGF-A expression. The EGR-1 modulator, NAB-2, was rapidly induced by increased levels of EGR-1. Pathology samples of human lung adenocarcinomas revealed correlations between EGR-1/HIF-1α and VEGF-A expressions and relative elevation of EGR-1 and VEGF-A expression in mutant K-RAS- or EGFR-carrying adenocarcinomas. Both EGR-1 and VEGF-A expression increased as tumors dedifferentiated, whereas HIF-1α expression did not. Although weak correlation was found between EGR-1 and NAB-2 expressions on the whole, NAB-2 expression decreased as tumors dedifferentiated, and inhibition of DNA methyltransferase/histone deacetylase increased NAB-2 expression in lung cancer cells despite no epigenetic alteration in the NAB-2 promoter. These findings suggest that EGR-1 plays important roles on VEGF-A expression in lung cancer cells, and epigenetic silencing of transactivator(s) associated with NAB-2 expression might also contribute to upregulate VEGF-A expression. PMID:20489156

  7. Lung Cancer Biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Villalobos, Pamela; Wistuba, Ignacio I

    2017-02-01

    The molecular characterization of lung cancer has changed the classification and treatment of these tumors, becoming an essential component of pathologic diagnosis and oncologic therapy decisions. Through the recognition of novel biomarkers, such as epidermal growth factor receptor mutations and anaplastic lymphoma kinase translocations, it is possible to identify subsets of patients who benefit from targeted molecular therapies. The success of targeted anticancer therapies and new immunotherapy approaches has created a new paradigm of personalized therapy and has led to accelerated development of new drugs for lung cancer treatment. This article focuses on clinically relevant cancer biomarkers as targets for therapy and potential new targets for drug development.

  8. Daxx inhibits hypoxia-induced lung cancer cell metastasis by suppressing the HIF-1α/HDAC1/Slug axis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ching-Wen; Wang, Lu-Kai; Wang, Shu-Ping; Chang, Yi-Liang; Wu, Yi-Ying; Chen, Hsuan-Yu; Hsiao, Tzu-Hung; Lai, Wei-Yun; Lu, Hsuan-Hsuan; Chang, Ya-Hsuan; Yang, Shuenn-Chen; Lin, Ming-Wei; Chen, Chi-Yuan; Hong, Tse-Ming; Yang, Pan-Chyr

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia is a major driving force of cancer invasion and metastasis. Here we show that death domain-associated protein (Daxx) acts to negatively regulate hypoxia-induced cell dissemination and invasion by inhibiting the HIF-1α/HDAC1/Slug pathway. Daxx directly binds to the DNA-binding domain of Slug, impeding histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1) recruitment and antagonizing Slug E-box binding. This, in turn, stimulates E-cadherin and occludin expression and suppresses Slug-mediated epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) and cell invasiveness. Under hypoxic conditions, stabilized hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α downregulates Daxx expression and promotes cancer invasion, whereas re-expression of Daxx represses hypoxia-induced cancer invasion. Daxx also suppresses Slug-mediated lung cancer metastasis in an orthotopic lung metastasis mouse model. Using clinical tumour samples, we confirmed that the HIF-1α/Daxx/Slug pathway is an outcome predictor. Our results support that Daxx can act as a repressor in controlling HIF-1α/HDAC1/Slug-mediated cancer cell invasion and is a potential therapeutic target for inhibition of cancer metastasis. PMID:28004751

  9. TU-G-BRA-01: Assessing Radiation-Induced Reductions in Regional Lung Perfusion Following Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    McGurk, R; Green, R; Lawrence, M; Schreiber, E; Das, S; Zagar, T; Marks, L; Sheikh, A; McCartney, W; Rivera, P

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The dose-dependent nature of radiation therapy (RT)-induced lung injury following hypo-fractionated stereotactic RT is unclear. We herein report preliminary results of a prospective study assessing the magnitude of RT-induced reductions in regional lung perfusion following hypo-fractionated stereotactic RT. Methods: Four patients undergoing hypo-fractionated stereotactic lung RT (SBRT: 12 Gy x 4 fractions or 10 Gy x 5 fractions) had a pre-treatment SPECT (single-photon emission computed tomography) perfusion scan providing a 3D map of regional lung perfusion. Scans were repeated 3–6 months post-treatment. Pre- and post SPECT scans were registered to the planning CT scan (and hence the 3D dose data). Changes in regional perfusion (counts per cc on the pre-post scans) were computed in regions of the lung exposed to different doses of radiation (in 5 Gy intervals), thus defining a dose-response function. SPECT scans were internally normalized to the regions receiving <5 Gy. Results: At 3 months post-RT, the changes in perfusion are highly variable. At 6 months, there is a consistent dose-dependent reduction in regional perfusion. The average percent decline in regional perfusion was 10% at 15–20 Gy, 20% at 20–25 Gy, and 30% at 25–30 Gy representing a relatively linear dose response with an approximate 2% reduction per Gray for doses in excess of 10 Gy. There was a subtle increase in perfusion in the lung receiving <10 Gy. Conclusion: Hypo-fractionated stereotactic RT appears to cause a dose-dependent reduction in regional lung perfusion. There appears to be a threshold effect with no apparent perfusion loss at doses <10 Gy, though this might be in part due to the normalization technique used. Additional data is needed from a larger number of patients to better assess this issue. This sort of data can be used to assist optimizing RT treatment plans that minimize the risk of lung injury. Partly supported by the NIH (CA69579) and the Lance Armstrong

  10. Retinoic acid reduces chemotherapy-induced neuropathy in an animal model and patients with lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Pedro, N.; Fernández-González- Aragón, M.C.; Saavedra-Pérez, D.; Campos-Parra, A.D.; Ríos-Trejo, M.Á.; Cerón-Lizárraga, T.; Martínez-Barrera, L.; Pineda, B.; Ordóñez, G.; Ortiz-Plata, A.; Granados-Soto, V.; Sotelo, J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) as treatment for chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy in an experimental animal model and in a randomized, double-blinded, controlled trial in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: Forty male Wistar rats were randomized in 5 groups: group A, control; groups B and C, treated with cisplatin; and groups D and E, treated with paclitaxel. ATRA (20 mg/kg PO) was administered for 15 days in groups C and E. We evaluated neuropathy and nerve regeneration–related morphologic changes in sciatic nerve, the concentration of nerve growth factor (NGF), and retinoic acid receptor (RAR)–α and RAR-β expression. In addition, 95 patients with NSCLC under chemotherapy treatment were randomized to either ATRA (20 mg/m2/d) or placebo. Serum NGF, neurophysiologic tests, and clinical neurotoxicity were assessed. Results: The experimental animals developed neuropathy and axonal degeneration, associated with decreased NGF levels in peripheral nerves. Treatment with ATRA reversed sensorial changes and nerve morphology; this was associated with increased NGF levels and RAR-β expression. Patients treated with chemotherapy had clinical neuropathy and axonal loss assessed by neurophysiology, which was related to decreased NGF levels. ATRA reduced axonal degeneration demonstrated by nerve conduction velocity and clinical manifestations of neuropathy grades ≥2. Conclusions: ATRA reduced chemotherapy-induced experimental neuropathy, increased NGF levels, and induced RAR-β expression in nerve. In patients, reduction of NGF in serum was associated with the severity of neuropathy; ATRA treatment reduced the electrophysiologic alterations. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class II evidence that ATRA improves nerve conduction in patients with chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy. Neurology® 2011;77:987–995 PMID:21865574

  11. A novel synthetic analog of militarin, MA-1 induces mitochondrial dependent apoptosis by ROS generation in human lung cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Deok Hyo; Lim, Mi-Hee; Lee, Yu Ran; Sung, Gi-Ho; Lee, Tae-Ho; Jeon, Byeong Hwa; Cho, Jae Youl; Song, Won O.; Park, Haeil; Choi, Sunga; Kim, Tae Woong

    2013-12-15

    A synthetic Militarin analog-1[(2R,3R,4R,5R)-1,6-bis(4-(2,4,4-trimethylpentan-2-yl)phenoxy) hexane-2,3,4,5-tetraol] is a novel derivative of constituents from Cordyceps militaris, which has been used to treat a variety of chronic diseases including inflammation, diabetes, hyperglycemia and cancers. Here, we report for the first time the synthesis of Militarin analog-1 (MA-1) and the apoptotic mechanism of MA-1 against human lung cancer cell lines. Treatment with MA-1 significantly inhibited the viability of 3 human lung cancer cell lines. The inhibition of viability and growth in MA-1-treated A549 cells with an IC{sub 50} of 5 μM were mediated through apoptosis induction, as demonstrated by an increase in DNA fragmentation, sub-G{sub 0}/G{sub 1}-DNA fraction, nuclear condensation, and phosphatidylserine exposure. The apoptotic cell death caused mitochondrial membrane permeabilization through regulation of expression of the Bcl-2 family proteins, leading to cytochrome c release in a time-dependent manner. Subsequently, the final stage of apoptosis, activation of caspase-9/-3 and cleavage of poly (ADP ribose) polymerase, was induced. Furthermore, A549 lung cancer cells were more responsive to MA-1 than a bronchial epithelial cell line (BEAS-2B), involving the rapid generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation. The pharmacological inhibition of ROS generation and JNK/p38 MAPK exhibited attenuated DNA fragmentation in MA-1-induced apoptosis. Oral administration of MA-1 also retarded growth of A549 orthotopic xenografts. In conclusion, the present study indicates that the new synthetic derivative MA-1 triggers mitochondrial apoptosis through ROS generation and regulation of MAPKs and may be a potent therapeutic agent against human lung cancer. - Highlights: • We report a novel synthesized derivative, militarin analog-1 (MA-1). • MA-1-induced cancer cell death was triggered by

  12. SHMT1 knockdown induces apoptosis in lung cancer cells by causing uracil misincorporation

    PubMed Central

    Paone, A; Marani, M; Fiascarelli, A; Rinaldo, S; Giardina, G; Contestabile, R; Paiardini, A; Cutruzzolà, F

    2014-01-01

    Reprogramming of cellular metabolism towards de novo serine production fuels the growth of cancer cells, providing essential precursors such as amino acids and nucleotides and controlling the antioxidant and methylation capacities of the cell. The enzyme serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT) has a key role in this metabolic shift, and directs serine carbons to one-carbon units metabolism and thymidilate synthesis. While the mitochondrial isoform of SHMT (SHMT2) has recently been identified as an important player in the control of cell proliferation in several cancer types and as a hot target for anticancer therapies, the role of the cytoplasmic isoform (SHMT1) in cancerogenesis is currently less defined. In this paper we show that SHMT1 is overexpressed in tissue samples from lung cancer patients and lung cancer cell lines, suggesting that, in this widespread type of tumor, SHMT1 plays a relevant role. We show that SHMT1 knockdown in lung cancer cells leads to cell cycle arrest and, more importantly, to p53-dependent apoptosis. Our data demonstrate that the induction of apoptosis does not depend on serine or glycine starvation, but is because of the increased uracil accumulation during DNA replication. PMID:25412303

  13. Radiotherapy for lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bleehen, N.M.; Cox, J.D.

    1985-05-01

    The role of radiation therapy in the management of lung cancer was reviewed at a workshop held in Cambridge, England, in June 1984. It was concluded that there was a continuing role for radiation therapy in the primary management of small cell lung cancer, including the loco-regional treatment for patients with limited disease. Radical radiotherapy for patients with non-small cell carcinoma could be curative for a proportion of patients with limited disease. Careful planning and quality control was essential. Palliative radiotherapy provided useful treatment for many other patients. Other related aspects of treatment are also presented.

  14. Vapor of Volatile Oils from Litsea cubeba Seed Induces Apoptosis and Causes Cell Cycle Arrest in Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Seal, Soma; Chatterjee, Priyajit; Bhattacharya, Sushmita; Pal, Durba; Dasgupta, Suman; Kundu, Rakesh; Mukherjee, Sandip; Bhattacharya, Shelley; Bhuyan, Mantu; Bhattacharyya, Pranab R.; Baishya, Gakul; Barua, Nabin C.; Baruah, Pranab K.; Rao, Paruchuri G.; Bhattacharya, Samir

    2012-01-01

    Non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) is a major killer in cancer related human death. Its therapeutic intervention requires superior efficient molecule(s) as it often becomes resistant to present chemotherapy options. Here we report that vapor of volatile oil compounds obtained from Litsea cubeba seeds killed human NSCLC cells, A549, through the induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. Vapor generated from the combined oils (VCO) deactivated Akt, a key player in cancer cell survival and proliferation. Interestingly VCO dephosphorylated Akt at both Ser473 and Thr308; through the suppression of mTOR and pPDK1 respectively. As a consequence of this, diminished phosphorylation of Bad occurred along with the decreased Bcl-xL expression. This subsequently enhanced Bax levels permitting the release of mitochondrial cytochrome c into the cytosol which concomitantly activated caspase 9 and caspase 3 resulting apoptotic cell death. Impairment of Akt activation by VCO also deactivated Mdm2 that effected overexpression of p53 which in turn upregulated p21 expression. This causes enhanced p21 binding to cyclin D1 that halted G1 to S phase progression. Taken together, VCO produces two prong effects on lung cancer cells, it induces apoptosis and blocked cancer cell proliferation, both occurred due to the deactivation of Akt. In addition, it has another crucial advantage: VCO could be directly delivered to lung cancer tissue through inhalation. PMID:23091605

  15. Vapor of volatile oils from Litsea cubeba seed induces apoptosis and causes cell cycle arrest in lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Seal, Soma; Chatterjee, Priyajit; Bhattacharya, Sushmita; Pal, Durba; Dasgupta, Suman; Kundu, Rakesh; Mukherjee, Sandip; Bhattacharya, Shelley; Bhuyan, Mantu; Bhattacharyya, Pranab R; Baishya, Gakul; Barua, Nabin C; Baruah, Pranab K; Rao, Paruchuri G; Bhattacharya, Samir

    2012-01-01

    Non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) is a major killer in cancer related human death. Its therapeutic intervention requires superior efficient molecule(s) as it often becomes resistant to present chemotherapy options. Here we report that vapor of volatile oil compounds obtained from Litsea cubeba seeds killed human NSCLC cells, A549, through the induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. Vapor generated from the combined oils (VCO) deactivated Akt, a key player in cancer cell survival and proliferation. Interestingly VCO dephosphorylated Akt at both Ser(473) and Thr(308); through the suppression of mTOR and pPDK1 respectively. As a consequence of this, diminished phosphorylation of Bad occurred along with the decreased Bcl-xL expression. This subsequently enhanced Bax levels permitting the release of mitochondrial cytochrome c into the cytosol which concomitantly activated caspase 9 and caspase 3 resulting apoptotic cell death. Impairment of Akt activation by VCO also deactivated Mdm2 that effected overexpression of p53 which in turn upregulated p21 expression. This causes enhanced p21 binding to cyclin D1 that halted G1 to S phase progression. Taken together, VCO produces two prong effects on lung cancer cells, it induces apoptosis and blocked cancer cell proliferation, both occurred due to the deactivation of Akt. In addition, it has another crucial advantage: VCO could be directly delivered to lung cancer tissue through inhalation.

  16. Personalized prediction of EGFR mutation-induced drug resistance in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Debby D.; Zhou, Weiqiang; Yan, Hong; Wong, Maria; Lee, Victor

    2013-01-01

    EGFR mutation-induced drug resistance has significantly impaired the potency of small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors in lung cancer treatment. Computational approaches can provide powerful and efficient techniques in the investigation of drug resistance. In our work, the EGFR mutation feature is characterized by the energy components of binding free energy (concerning the mutant-inhibitor complex), and we combine it with specific personal features for 168 clinical subjects to construct a personalized drug resistance prediction model. The 3D structure of an EGFR mutant is computationally predicted from its protein sequence, after which the dynamics of the bound mutant-inhibitor complex is simulated via AMBER and the binding free energy of the complex is calculated based on the dynamics. The utilization of extreme learning machines and leave-one-out cross-validation promises a successful identification of resistant subjects with high accuracy. Overall, our study demonstrates advantages in the development of personalized medicine/therapy design and innovative drug discovery. PMID:24092472

  17. Personalized prediction of EGFR mutation-induced drug resistance in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Debby D; Zhou, Weiqiang; Yan, Hong; Wong, Maria; Lee, Victor

    2013-10-04

    EGFR mutation-induced drug resistance has significantly impaired the potency of small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors in lung cancer treatment. Computational approaches can provide powerful and efficient techniques in the investigation of drug resistance. In our work, the EGFR mutation feature is characterized by the energy components of binding free energy (concerning the mutant-inhibitor complex), and we combine it with specific personal features for 168 clinical subjects to construct a personalized drug resistance prediction model. The 3D structure of an EGFR mutant is computationally predicted from its protein sequence, after which the dynamics of the bound mutant-inhibitor complex is simulated via AMBER and the binding free energy of the complex is calculated based on the dynamics. The utilization of extreme learning machines and leave-one-out cross-validation promises a successful identification of resistant subjects with high accuracy. Overall, our study demonstrates advantages in the development of personalized medicine/therapy design and innovative drug discovery.

  18. Lung Cancer Brain Metastases.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Sarah B; Contessa, Joseph N; Omay, Sacit B; Chiang, Veronica

    2015-01-01

    Brain metastases are common among patients with lung cancer and have been associated with significant morbidity and limited survival. However, the treatment of brain metastases has evolved as the field has advanced in terms of central nervous system imaging, surgical technique, and radiotherapy technology. This has allowed patients to receive improved treatment with less toxicity and more durable benefit. In addition, there have been significant advances in systemic therapy for lung cancer in recent years, and several treatments including chemotherapy, targeted therapy, and immunotherapy exhibit activity in the central nervous system. Utilizing systemic therapy for treating brain metastases can avoid or delay local therapy and often allows patients to receive effective treatment for both intracranial and extracranial disease. Determining the appropriate treatment for patients with lung cancer brain metastases therefore requires a clear understanding of intracranial disease burden, tumor histology, molecular characteristics, and overall cancer prognosis. This review provides updates on the current state of surgery and radiotherapy for the treatment of brain metastases, as well as an overview of systemic therapy options that may be effective in select patients with intracranial metastases from lung cancer.

  19. Quantitative assessment of smoking-induced emphysema progression in longitudinal CT screening for lung cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, H.; Mizuguchi, R.; Matsuhiro, M.; Kawata, Y.; Niki, N.; Nakano, Y.; Ohmatsu, H.; Kusumoto, M.; Tsuchida, T.; Eguchi, K.; Kaneko, M.; Moriyama, N.

    2015-03-01

    Computed tomography has been used for assessing structural abnormalities associated with emphysema. It is important to develop a robust CT based imaging biomarker that would allow quantification of emphysema progression in early stage. This paper presents effect of smoking on emphysema progression using annual changes of low attenuation volume (LAV) by each lung lobe acquired from low-dose CT images in longitudinal screening for lung cancer. The percentage of LAV (LAV%) was measured after applying CT value threshold method and small noise reduction. Progression of emphysema was assessed by statistical analysis of the annual changes represented by linear regression of LAV%. This method was applied to 215 participants in lung cancer CT screening for five years (18 nonsmokers, 85 past smokers, and 112 current smokers). The results showed that LAV% is useful to classify current smokers with rapid progression of emphysema (0.2%/year, p<0.05). This paper demonstrates effectiveness of the proposed method in diagnosis and prognosis of early emphysema in CT screening for lung cancer.

  20. [Epidemiology of lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Becker, N

    2010-08-01

    Lung cancer is by far the most common form of cancer worldwide and in Germany is now "only" still the commonest cause of death from cancer. The most important single risk factor is smoking but in selected population groups, for example in the professional area, other factors can also play a role which cannot be ignored and open up a corresponding potential for prevention. Effective early detection procedures are at present unknown. The most promising, however, is multislice computed tomography (MSCT) which for this reason is presently being tested for effectiveness in several large research projects. The results are not expected for some years. Until then the early detection of lung cancer with MSCT cannot be considered suitable for routine use but can only be justified within the framework of research studies.

  1. Synthetic tambjamine analogues induce mitochondrial swelling and lysosomal dysfunction leading to autophagy blockade and necrotic cell death in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Rodilla, Ananda M; Korrodi-Gregório, Luís; Hernando, Elsa; Manuel-Manresa, Pilar; Quesada, Roberto; Pérez-Tomás, Ricardo; Soto-Cerrato, Vanessa

    2017-02-15

    Current pharmacological treatments for lung cancer show very poor clinical outcomes, therefore, the development of novel anticancer agents with innovative mechanisms of action is urgently needed. Cancer cells have a reversed pH gradient compared to normal cells, which favours cancer progression by promoting proliferation, metabolic adaptation and evasion of apoptosis. In this regard, the use of ionophores to modulate intracellular pH appears as a promising new therapeutic strategy. Indeed, there is a growing body of evidence supporting ionophores as novel antitumour drugs. Despite this, little is known about the implications of pH deregulation and homeostasis imbalance triggered by ionophores at the cellular level. In this work, we deeply analyse for the first time the anticancer effects of tambjamine analogues, a group of highly effective anion selective ionophores, at the cellular and molecular levels. First, their effects on cell viability were determined in several lung cancer cell lines and patient-derived cancer stem cells, demonstrating their potent cytotoxic effects. Then, we have characterized the induced lysosomal deacidification, as well as, the massive cytoplasmic vacuolization observed after treatment with these compounds, which is consistent with mitochondrial swelling. Finally, the activation of several proteins involved in stress response, autophagy and apoptosis was also detected, although they were not significantly responsible for the cell death induced. Altogether, these evidences suggest that tambjamine analogues provoke an imbalance in cellular ion homeostasis that triggers mitochondrial dysfunction and lysosomal deacidification leading to a potent cytotoxic effect through necrosis in lung cancer cell lines and cancer stem cells.

  2. CCN2 inhibits lung cancer metastasis through promoting DAPK-dependent anoikis and inducing EGFR degradation

    PubMed Central

    Chang, C-C; Yang, M-H; Lin, B-R; Chen, S-T; Pan, S-H; Hsiao, M; Lai, T-C; Lin, S-K; Jeng, Y-M; Chu, C-Y; Chen, R-H; Yang, P-C; Eugene Chin, Y; Kuo, M-L

    2013-01-01

    CCN family protein 2 (CCN2), also known as connective tissue growth factor, is a secreting protein that modulates multiple cellular events. We previously demonstrated the metastasis-suppressive effect of CCN2 in lung cancer cells. In this study, we investigate the role of CCN2 in anoikis, a form of programmed cell death that is critical in suppressing cancer metastasis. CCN2 binds to the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and triggers ubiquitination by inhibiting the formation of the β-pix/Cbl complex, resulting in the degradation of EGFR. Binding of CCN2 to EGFR suppresses the phosphorylation of c-Src and extracellular signal-regulated kinase but increases the expression of death-associated protein kinase, which leads to anoikis. Overall, our findings provide evidence validating the use of CCN2 as an anti-metastatic therapy in lung cancer patients, and prospect a potential therapeutic synergy between CCN2 and the anti-EGFR antibody for the treatment of lung cancer. PMID:23175185

  3. Nutrition aspects of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Cranganu, Andreea; Camporeale, Jayne

    2009-12-01

    Lung cancer is the most common type of cancer, excluding nonmelanoma skin cancer, and is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Notable carcinogens involved in the development of lung cancer include smoking, secondhand smoke, and radon. Lung cancer is divided into 2 major types: non-small-cell lung cancer, the most prevalent, and small-cell lung cancer. Treatment includes surgery, chemotherapy, radiation, or a combination of the same. Medical nutrition therapy is often required for nutrition-related side effects of cancer treatment, which include but are not limited to anorexia, nausea and vomiting, and esophagitis. The best protection against lung cancer is avoidance of airborne carcinogens and increased consumption of fruits and vegetables. Studies have shown that smokers taking large amounts of beta-carotene and vitamin A supplements had increased lung cancer incidence and mortality. However, ingestion of beta-carotene from foods, along with a diet rich in fruits and vegetables, has a protective role against lung disease. The use of complementary and alternative medicine by lung cancer patients is prevalent; therefore, clinicians should investigate whether complementary and alternative therapies are used by patients and advise them on the use of these therapies to avoid any potential side effects and interactions with conventional therapies. The article concludes with a case study of a patient with non-small-cell lung cancer and illustrates the use of medical nutrition therapy in relation to cancer treatment side effects.

  4. Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase Mediates Bronchioalveolar Stem Cell Expansion in Mouse Models of Oncogenic K-ras-Induced Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yanan; Iwanaga, Kentaro; Raso, Maria Gabriela; Wislez, Marie; Hanna, Amy E.; Wieder, Eric D.; Molldrem, Jeffrey J.; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Powis, Garth; Demayo, Francesco J.; Kim, Carla F.; Kurie, Jonathan M.

    2008-01-01

    Background Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common cause of cancer-related death in Western countries. Developing more effective NSCLC therapeutics will require the elucidation of the genetic and biochemical bases for this disease. Bronchioalveolar stem cells (BASCs) are a putative cancer stem cell population in mouse models of oncogenic K-ras-induced lung adenocarcinoma, an histologic subtype of NSCLC. The signals activated by oncogenic K-ras that mediate BASC expansion have not been fully defined. Methodology/Principal Findings We used genetic and pharmacologic approaches to modulate the activity of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), a key mediator of oncogenic K-ras, in two genetic mouse models of lung adenocarcinoma. Oncogenic K-ras-induced BASC accumulation and tumor growth were blocked by treatment with a small molecule PI3K inhibitor and enhanced by inactivation of phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted from chromosome 10, a negative regulator of PI3K. Conclusions/Significance We conclude that PI3K is a critical regulator of BASC expansion, supporting treatment strategies to target PI3K in NSCLC patients. PMID:18493606

  5. The efficacy of oral glutamine in prevention of acute radiotherapy-induced esophagitis in patients with lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tutanc, Oznur Donmez; Aydogan, Akin; Sunbul, Ahmet Taner; Zincircioglu, Seyit Burhanedtin; Alpagat, Gulistan; Erden, Ersin Sukru

    2013-01-01

    Aim of the study This study explores the efficacy of oral glutamine in the prevention of acute radiotherapy-induced esophagitis in patients with lung cancer who are treated with thoracic radiotherapy. Material and methods This study was planned as a retrospective randomized experimental study. Forty-six patients with lung cancer, who were treated and kept under control between January 2008 and January 2010, were included in the study by the Department of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, Dicle University. The patients were divided into two groups. The first group (n = 21) was given prophylactic oral powder glutamine (daily 30 g), while the second group (n = 25) was not given oral glutamine. Results There were 21 patients in Group 1 (45.7%) and 25 patients in Group 2 (54.3%). No significant statistical difference was observed between the two groups in terms of age, gender, stage, histopathological type, treatment choice, received radiation doses, esophagus length in RT field, or location of the tumor (p > 0.05). A significant statistical difference was observed between the glutamine-supplemented group (first group) and the glutamine-free group (second group) according to the grade of esophagitis (p < 0.0001). Conclusions In our retrospective randomized experimental study, we determined that the severity of acute radiotherapy-induced esophagitis might be decreased with oral glutamine in patients with lung cancer who were treated with thoracic radiotherapy. PMID:24592140

  6. Capsaicin-induced genotoxic stress does not promote apoptosis in A549 human lung and DU145 prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lewinska, Anna; Jarosz, Paulina; Czech, Joanna; Rzeszutek, Iwona; Bielak-Zmijewska, Anna; Grabowska, Wioleta; Wnuk, Maciej

    2015-02-01

    Capsaicin is the major pungent component of the hot chili peppers of the genus Capsicum, which are consumed worldwide as a food additive. More recently, the selective action of capsaicin against cancer cells has been reported. Capsaicin was found to induce apoptosis and inhibit proliferation of a wide range of cancer cells in vitro, whereas being inactive against normal cells. As data on capsaicin-induced genotoxicity are limited and the effects of capsaicin against human lung A549 and DU145 prostate cancer cells were not explored in detail, we were interested in determining whether capsaicin-associated genotoxicity may also provoke A549 and DU145 cell death. Capsaicin-induced decrease in metabolic activity and cell proliferation, and changes in the cell cycle were limited to high concentrations used (≥ 100 μM), whereas, at lower concentrations, capsaicin stimulated both DNA double strand breaks and micronuclei production. Capsaicin was unable to provoke apoptotic cell death when used up to 250 μM concentrations. Capsaicin induced oxidative stress, but was ineffective in provoking the dissipation of the mitochondrial inner transmembrane potential. A different magnitude of p53 binding protein 1 (53BP1) recruitment contributed to diverse capsaicin-induced genotoxic effects in DU145 and A549 cells. Capsaicin was also found to be a DNA hypermethylating agent in A549 cells. In summary, we have shown that genotoxic effects of capsaicin may contribute to limited susceptibility of DU145 and A549 cancer cells to apoptosis in vitro, which may question the usefulness of capsaicin-based anticancer therapy, at least in a case of lung and prostate cancer.

  7. Chrysin enhances doxorubicin-induced cytotoxicity in human lung epithelial cancer cell lines: the role of glutathione

    PubMed Central

    Brechbuhl, Heather M.; Kachadourian, Remy; Min, Elysia; Chan, Daniel; Day, Brian J.

    2011-01-01

    We hypothesized that flavonoid-induced glutathione (GSH) efflux through multi-drug resistance proteins (MRPs) and subsequent intracellular GSH depletion is a viable mechanism to sensitize cancer cells to chemotherapies. This concept was demonstrated using chrysin (5–25 μM) induced GSH efflux in human non-small cell lung cancer lines exposed to the chemotherapeutic agent, doxorubicin (DOX). Treatment with chrysin resulted in significant and sustained intracellular GSH depletion and the GSH enzyme network in the four cancer cell types was predictive of the severity of chrysin induced intracellular GSH depletion. Gene expression data indicated a positive correlation between basal MRP1, MRP3 and MRP5 expression and total GSH efflux before and after chrysin exposure. Co-treating the cells for 72 hours with chrysin (5–30 μM) and DOX (0.025–3.0 μM) significantly enhanced the sensitivity of the cells to DOX as compared to 72-hour DOX alone treatment in all four cell lines. The maximum decrease in the IC50 values of cells treated with DOX alone compared to co-treatment with chrysin and DOX was 43% in A549 cells, 47% in H157 and H1975 cells and 78% in H460 cells. Chrysin worked synergistically with DOX to induce cancer cell death. This approach could allow for use of lower concentrations and/or sensitize cancer cells to drugs that are typically resistant to therapy. PMID:21856323

  8. Calotropin from Asclepias curasavica induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in cisplatin-resistant lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Mo, En-Pan; Zhang, Rong-Rong; Xu, Jun; Zhang, Huan; Wang, Xiao-Xiong; Tan, Qiu-Tong; Liu, Fang-Lan; Jiang, Ren-Wang; Cai, Shao-Hui

    2016-09-16

    Calotropin (M11), an active compound isolated from Asclepias curasavica L., was found to exert strong inhibitory and pro-apoptotic activity specifically against cisplatin-induced resistant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells (A549/CDDP). Molecular mechanism study revealed that M11 induced cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase through down-regulating cyclins, CDK1, CDK2 and up-regulating p53 and p21. Furthermore, M11 accelerated apoptosis through the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway which was accompanied by increase Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential, increase in reactive oxygen species production, activations of caspases 3 and 9 as well as cleavage of poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP). The activation and phosphorylation of JNK was also found to be involved in M11-induced apoptosis, and SP610025 (specific JNK inhibitor) partially prevented apoptosis induced by M11. In contrast, all of the effects that M11 induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in A549/CDDP cells were not significant in A549 cells. Drugs with higher sensitivity against resistant tumor cells than the parent cells are rather rare. Results of this study supported the potential application of M11 on the non-small lung cancer (NSCLC) with cisplatin resistance.

  9. Cardiac glycosides induce autophagy in human non-small cell lung cancer cells through regulation of dual signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Qiu, Qiang; Shen, Jia-Jia; Li, Dian-Dong; Jiang, Xue-Jun; Si, Shu-Yi; Shao, Rong-Guang; Wang, Zhen

    2012-11-01

    Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase targeted cancer therapy has attracted increasing interests of oncologists in lung cancer field. Although multiple anti-cancer mechanisms of cardiac glycosides as Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase inhibitors are revealed, the role of autophagy and related molecular signaling pathway for the class of compounds in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells has not been systematically examined. We herein investigated the anti-cancer effects of two representative cardiac glycosides, digoxin and ouabain, in A549 and H460 cell lines. Both agents caused significant growth inhibition at nanomolar level. The cardiac glycosides were found to induce moderate G(2)/M arrest but not apoptosis at IC(50) level in the NSCLC cell lines. Moreover, autophagy was markedly induced by both agents, as evidenced by the time- and dose-dependent increase of LC3-II, up-regulation of Atg5 and Beclin1, as well as by the observations through acridine orange staining, transmission electron microscopy and quantification of GFP-LC3 fluorescence. Importantly, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) pathway was activated, resulting in mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) deactivation during autophagy induction. Moreover, extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) activation was simultaneously found to be involved in the autophagy regulation. Co-treatment with respective inhibitors or siRNAs could either block the autophagic phenotypes and signals, or significantly increase the cellular viability, indicating the drugs-induced autophagy plays tumor-suppressing role. This work provides first evidence showing that the cardiac glycosides induce autophagy in human NSCLC cells through regulation of both mTOR and ERK1/2 signaling pathways. The autophagy may at least partially account for the growth inhibitory effects of the compounds in human NSCLC cells.

  10. EZH2-mediated Puma gene repression regulates non-small cell lung cancer cell proliferation and cisplatin-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haidan; Li, Wei; Yu, Xinfang; Gao, Feng; Duan, Zhi; Ma, Xiaolong; Tan, Shiming; Yuan, Yunchang; Liu, Lijun; Wang, Jian; Zhou, Xinmin; Yang, Yifeng

    2016-08-30

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins are highly conserved epigenetic effectors that maintain the silenced state of genes. EZH2 is the catalytic core and one of the most important components of the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2). In non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells and primary lung tumors, we found that PRC2 components, including EZH2, are overexpressed. High levels of EZH2 protein were associated with worse overall survival rate in NSCLC patients. RNA interference mediated attenuation of EZH2 expression blunted the malignant phenotype in this setting, exerting inhibitory effects on cell proliferation, anchorage-independent growth, and tumor development in a xenograft mouse model. Unexpectedly, we discovered that, in the suppression of EZH2, p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA) expression was concomitantly induced. This is achieved through EZH2 directly binds to the Puma promoter thus epigenetic repression of PUMA expression. Furthermore, cisplatin-induced apoptosis of EZH2-knocking down NSCLC cells was elevated as a consequence of increased PUMA expression. Our work reveals a novel epigenetic regulatory mechanism controlling PUMA expression and suggests that EZH2 offers a candidate molecular target for NSCLC therapy and EZH2-regulated PUMA induction would synergistically increase the sensitivity to platinum agents in non-small cell lung cancers.

  11. EZH2-mediated Puma gene repression regulates non-small cell lung cancer cell proliferation and cisplatin-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xinfang; Gao, Feng; Duan, Zhi; Ma, Xiaolong; Tan, Shiming; Yuan, Yunchang; Liu, Lijun; Wang, Jian; Zhou, Xinmin; Yang, Yifeng

    2016-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins are highly conserved epigenetic effectors that maintain the silenced state of genes. EZH2 is the catalytic core and one of the most important components of the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2). In non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells and primary lung tumors, we found that PRC2 components, including EZH2, are overexpressed. High levels of EZH2 protein were associated with worse overall survival rate in NSCLC patients. RNA interference mediated attenuation of EZH2 expression blunted the malignant phenotype in this setting, exerting inhibitory effects on cell proliferation, anchorage-independent growth, and tumor development in a xenograft mouse model. Unexpectedly, we discovered that, in the suppression of EZH2, p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA) expression was concomitantly induced. This is achieved through EZH2 directly binds to the Puma promoter thus epigenetic repression of PUMA expression. Furthermore, cisplatin-induced apoptosis of EZH2-knocking down NSCLC cells was elevated as a consequence of increased PUMA expression. Our work reveals a novel epigenetic regulatory mechanism controlling PUMA expression and suggests that EZH2 offers a candidate molecular target for NSCLC therapy and EZH2-regulated PUMA induction would synergistically increase the sensitivity to platinum agents in non-small cell lung cancers. PMID:27472460

  12. Bisdemethoxycurcumin induces DNA damage and inhibits DNA repair associated protein expressions in NCI-H460 human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chien-Chih; Yang, Su-Tso; Huang, Wen-Wen; Peng, Shu-Fen; Huang, An-Cheng; Tang, Nou-Ying; Liu, Hsin-Chung; Yang, Mei-Due; Lai, Kuang-Chi; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-08-30

    Nonsmall cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) is a devastating primary lung tumor resistant to conventional therapies. Bisdemethoxycurcumin (BDMC) is one of curcumin derivate from Turmeric and has been shown to induce NSCLC cell death. Although there is one report to show BDMC induced DNA double strand breaks, however, no available information to show BDMC induced DNA damage action with inhibited DNA repair protein in lung cancer cells in detail. In this study, we tested BDMC-induced DNA damage and condensation in NCI-H460 cells by using Comet assay and DAPI staining examinations, respectively and we found BDMC induced DNA damage and condension. Western blotting was used to examine the effects of BDMC on protein expression associated with DNA damage and repair and results indicated that BDMC suppressed the protein levels associated with DNA damage and repair, such as 14-3-3σ (an important checkpoint keeper of DDR), O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase, DNA repair proteins breast cancer 1, early onset, mediator of DNA damage checkpoint 1 but activate phosphorylated p53 and p-H2A.X (phospho Ser140) in NCI-H460 cells. Confocal laser systems microscopy was used for examining the protein translocation and results show that BDMC increased the translocation of p-p53 and p-H2A.X (phospho Ser140) from cytosol to nuclei in NCI-H460 cells. In conclusion, BDMC induced DNA damage and condension and affect DNA repair proteins in NCI-H460 cells in vitro. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol, 2015.

  13. Demethoxycurcumin induces the apoptosis of human lung cancer NCI-H460 cells through the mitochondrial-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Ko, Yang-Ching; Lien, Jin-Cherng; Liu, Hsin-Chung; Hsu, Shu-Chun; Ji, Bin-Chuan; Yang, Mei-Due; Hsu, Wu-Huei; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-05-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer-related mortality in the US as well as other regions of the world. Curcumin, demethoxycurcumin (DMC) and bisdemethoxycurcumin (BDMC) are the major components of Curcuma longa L. It has been reported that curcumin inhibits the growth of various types of cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. However, the mechanisms involved in the inhibition of cell growth and induced apoptosis by DMC in human lung cancer cells remain unclear. In the present study, we investigated the effect of DMC on cell death via the induction of apoptosis in NCI-H460 human lung cancer cells. Flow cytometric assay was used to examine the total percentage of viable cells, the population of cells in the sub-G1 phase of the cell cycle, the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS), Ca²⁺ production, mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and caspase activity. Western blotting was used to examine the changes in the expression of cell cycle- and apoptosis-associated proteins. Confocal microscopy was used to examine the translocation of apoptosis-associated proteins. The results indicated that DMC significantly induced cell morphological changes and decreased the percentage of viable NCI-H460 cells and DMC induced apoptosis based on the cell distribution in the sub-G1 phase. Moreover, DMC promoted ROS and Ca²⁺ production and decreased the level of ΔΨm and promoted the activities of caspase-3, -8 and -9. The Western blotting results showed that DMC promoted the expression of AIF, Endo G and PARP. The levels of Fas ligand (Fas L) and Fas were also upregulated. Furthermore, DMC promoted expression of ER stress-associated proteins such as GRP78, GADD153, IRE1β, ATF-6α, ATF-6β and caspase-4. Based on the findings, we suggest that DMC may be used as a novel anticancer agent for the treatment of lung cancer in the future.

  14. Pulmonary Rehabilitation in Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongmei; Liu, Xin; Rice, Shawn J; Belani, Chandra P

    2016-10-01

    Lung cancer remains a challenging disease with high morbidity and mortality despite targeted therapy. Symptom burden related to cancer impairs quality of life and functional status in patients with lung cancer and in survivors. Pulmonary rehabilitation has been recognized as an effective, noninvasive intervention for patients with chronic respiratory disease. It is well established that pulmonary rehabilitation benefits patients with chronic obstruction pulmonary disease through improved exercise capacity and symptoms. Evidence is increasing that the benefit of pulmonary rehabilitation can be applied to patients with lung cancer. Comprehensive pulmonary rehabilitation has made its way as a cornerstone of integrated care for patients with lung cancer.

  15. Immunotherapy in Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Du, Lingling; Herbst, Roy S; Morgensztern, Daniel

    2017-02-01

    The treatment of patients with good performance status and advanced stage non-small cell lung cancer has been based on the use of first-line platinum-based doublet and second-line docetaxel. Immunotherapy represents a new therapeutic approach with the potential for prolonged benefit. Although the vaccines studied have not shown benefit in patients with non-small cell lung cancer, immune checkpoint inhibitors against the PD-1/PD-L1 axis showed increased overall survival compared with docetaxel in randomized clinical trials, which led to the approval of nivolumab and pembrolizumab. Because only a minority of patients benefit from this class of drugs, there has been an intense search for biomarkers.

  16. Geraniin inhibits TGF-β1-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition and suppresses A549 lung cancer migration, invasion and anoikis resistance.

    PubMed

    Ko, Hyeonseok

    2015-09-01

    The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is an important cellular process during which epithelial polarized cells become motile mesenchymal-appeared cells, which, in turn, induces the metastatic of cancer. Geraniin is a polyphenolic component isolated from Phyllanthus amarus, which exhibits a wide range of pharmacological and physiological activities, such as antitumor, anti-hyperglycemic, anti-hypertensive, antimicrobial, and antiviral activities. However, the possible role of geraniin in the EMT is unclear. We investigated the effect of geraniin on the EMT. Transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1) induces the EMT to promote lung adenocarcinoma migration, invasion, and anoikis resistance. To understand the suppressive role of geraniin in lung cancer migration, invasion, and anoikis resistance, we investigated the use of geraniin as inhibitors of TGF-β1-induced EMT in A549 lung cancer cells in vitro. Here, we show that geraniin remarkably increased expression of the epithelial marker E-cadherin and repressed Snail upregulation and expression of the mesenchymal marker N-cadherin and vimentin during the TGF-β1-induced EMT. Geraniin also inhibited the TGF-β1-induced increase in cell migration, invasion, and anoikis resistance of A549 lung cancer cells. Additionally, geraniin markedly inhibited TGF-β1-regulated activation of Smad2. Taken together, our findings provide new evidence that geraniin suppresses lung cancer migration, invasion, and anoikis resistance in vitro by inhibiting the TGF-β1-induced EMT.

  17. Celecoxib and sulindac inhibit TGF-β1-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition and suppress lung cancer migration and invasion via downregulation of sirtuin 1

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Ki-Eun; Cho, Kyung-Hwa; Oh, Seon-Hee; Kim, Byoung-Ryun; Jun, Hong-Young; Yoon, Kwon-Ha; Jeong, Eun-Taik; Kim, Hak-Ryul

    2016-01-01

    The non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) celecoxib and sulindac have been reported to suppress lung cancer migration and invasion. The class III deacetylase sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) possesses both pro- and anticarcinogenic properties. However, its role in inhibition of lung cancer cell epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) by NSAIDs is not clearly known. We attempted to investigate the potential use of NSAIDs as inhibitors of TGF-β1-induced EMT in A549 cells, and the underlying mechanisms of suppression of lung cancer migration and invasion by celecoxib and sulindac. We demonstrated that celecoxib and sulindac were effective in preventing TGF-β1-induced EMT, as indicated by upregulation of the epithelial marker, E-cadherin, and downregulation of mesenchymal markers and transcription factors. Moreover, celecoxib and sulindac could inhibit TGF-β1-enhanced migration and invasion of A549 cells. SIRT1 downregulation enhanced the reversal of TGF-β1-induced EMT by celecoxib or sulindac. In contrast, SIRT1 upregulation promoted TGF-β1-induced EMT. Taken together, these results indicate that celecoxib and sulindac can inhibit TGF-β1-induced EMT and suppress lung cancer cell migration and invasion via downregulation of SIRT1. Our findings implicate overexpressed SIRT1 as a potential therapeutic target to reverse TGF-β1-induced EMT and to prevent lung cancer cell migration and invasion. PMID:27528025

  18. Singly protonated dehydronorcantharidin silver coordination polymer induces apoptosis of lung cancer cells via reactive oxygen species-mediated mitochondrial pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Senpeng; Zhang, Shuo; Jin, Xing; Tan, Xuejie; Lou, Jianfang; Zhang, Xiumei; Zhao, Yunxue

    2014-10-30

    Silver complexes have been shown to possess antimicrobial and anticancer properties. Ag-SP-DNC, a novel silver and singly protonated dehydronorcantharidin complex, was synthesized in our previous study. In this study, we offer evidence that Ag-SP-DNC elicits a reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated mitochondrial apoptosis in lung cancer cells. Ag-SP-DNC inhibited the growth of A549 cells by inducing G2/M phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Ag-SP-DNC induced apoptosis was associated with the levels of intracellular ROS. The further study revealed that Ag-SP-DNC disrupted the mitochondrial membrane potential, induced the caspase-3 activation and led to the translocation of apoptosis inducing factor and endonucleaseG to the nucleus. These findings have important implications for the development of silver complexes for anticancer applications.

  19. Apigenin induces apoptosis in human lung cancer H460 cells through caspase- and mitochondria-dependent pathways.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hsu-Feng; Chie, Yu-Jie; Yang, Ming-Sung; Lu, Kung-Wen; Fu, Jene-John; Yang, Jai-Sing; Chen, Hung-Yi; Hsia, Te-Chun; Ma, Chia-Yu; Ip, Siu-Wan; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2011-08-01

    Apigenin (4,5,7-trihydroxyflavone), a promising chemopreventive agent presented in fruits and vegetables, has been shown to induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in many types of human cancer cell lines. However, there is no available information to address the effects of apigenin on human lung cancer H460 cells. In the present studies, H460 cells were treated with apigenin for different time and then were analyzed for the morphological changes, induction of apoptosis, protein levels associated with apoptosis and results in dose-dependent induction of morphological changes, decrease in the percentage of viability, induced DNA damage and apoptosis; down-modulation of the protein expression of Bid, Bcl-2, procaspase-8; up-regulation of protein levels of Bax, caspase-3, AIF, cytochrome c, GRP78 and GADD153; decreased the levels of mitochondrial membrane potential and increased the productions of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and Ca(2+) in H460 cells. Taken together, this is the first systematic in vitro study showing the involvement of apoptosis regulatory proteins as potential molecular targets of apigenin in human lung cancer H460 cells.

  20. Colchicine induces autophagy and senescence in lung cancer cells at clinically admissible concentration: potential use of colchicine in combination with autophagy inhibitor in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Surela; Das, Amlan; Datta, Satabdi; Ganguli, Arnab; Chakrabarti, Gopal

    2016-08-01

    Colchicine is a well-known and potent microtubule targeting agent, but the therapeutic value of colchicine against cancer is limited by its toxicity against normal cells. But, there is no report of its cytotoxic potential against lung cancer cell, at clinically permissible or lower concentrations, minimally toxic to non-cancerous cells. Hence, in the present study, we investigated the possible mechanism by which the efficacy of colchicine against lung cancer cells at less toxic dose could be enhanced. Colchicine at clinically admissible concentration of 2.5 nM had no cytotoxic effect and caused no G2/M arrest in A549 cells. However, at this concentration, colchicine strongly hindered the reformation of cold depolymerised interphase and spindle microtubule. Colchicine induced senescence and reactive oxygen species mediated autophagy in A549 cells at this concentration. Autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA) sensitised the cytotoxicity of colchicine in A549 cells by switching senescence to apoptotic death, and this combination had reduced cytotoxicity to normal lung fibroblast cells (WI38). Together, these findings indicated the possible use of colchicine at clinically relevant dose along with autophagy inhibitor in cancer therapy.

  1. Pain management in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Nurwidya, Fariz; Syahruddin, Elisna; Yunus, Faisal

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Not only burdened by the limited overall survival, lung cancer patient also suffer from various symptoms, such as pain, that implicated in the quality of life. Cancer pain is a complicated and transiently dynamic symptom that results from multiple mechanisms. This review will describe the pathophysiology of cancer pain and general approach in managing a patient with lung cancer pain. The use of opioids, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and adjuvant analgesia, as part of the pharmacology therapy along with interventional strategy, will also be discussed.

  2. RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) depletes nutrients, inducing phosphorylation of AMP-activated kinase in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Guo, Chengcheng; Hao, Chuncheng; Shao, RuPing; Fang, Bingliang; Correa, Arlene M; Hofstetter, Wayne L; Roth, Jack A; Behrens, Carmen; Kalhor, Neda; Wistuba, Ignacio I; Swisher, Stephen G; Pataer, Apar

    2015-05-10

    We have demonstrated that RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) and its downstream protein p-eIF2α are independent prognostic markers for overall survival in lung cancer. In the current study, we further investigate the interaction between PKR and AMPK in lung tumor tissue and cancer cell lines. We examined PKR protein expression in 55 frozen primary lung tumor tissues by Western blotting and analyzed the association between PKR expression and expression of 139 proteins on tissue samples examined previously by Reverse Phase Protein Array (RPPA) from the same 55 patients. We observed that biomarkers were either positively (phosphorylated AMP-activated kinase(T172) [p-AMPK]) or negatively (insulin receptor substrate 1, meiotic recombination 11, ATR interacting protein, telomerase, checkpoint kinase 1, and cyclin E1) correlated with PKR. We further confirmed that induction of PKR with expression vectors in lung cancer cells causes activation of the AMPK protein independent of the LKB1, TAK1, and CaMKKβ pathway. We found that PKR causes nutrient depletion, which increases AMP levels and decreases ATP levels, causing AMPK phosphorylation. We further demonstrated that inhibiting AMPK expression with compound C or siRNA enhanced PKR-mediated cell death. We next explored the combination of PKR and p-AMPK expression in NSCLC patients and observed that expression of p-AMPK predicted a poor outcome for adenocarcinoma patients with high PKR expression and a better prognosis for those with low PKR expression. These findings were consistent with our in vitro results. AMPK might rescue cells facing metabolic stresses, such as ATP depletion caused by PKR. Our data indicate that PKR causes nutrient depletion, which induces the phosphorylation of AMPK. AMPK might act as a protective response to metabolic stresses, such as nutrient deprivation.

  3. Palliative care in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Ferrell, Betty; Koczywas, Marianna; Grannis, Fred; Harrington, Annie

    2011-04-01

    Advancements in the surgical and medical treatment of lung cancer have resulted in more favorable short-term survival outcomes. After initial treatment, lung cancer requires continued surveillance and follow-up for long-term side effects and possible recurrence. The integration of quality palliative care into routine clinical care of patients with lung cancer after surgical intervention is essential in preserving function and optimizing quality of life through survivorship. An interdisciplinary palliative care model can effectively link patients to the appropriate supportive care services in a timely fashion. This article describes the role of palliative care for patients with lung cancer.

  4. Role of TGF-β-induced Claudin-4 expression through c-Jun signaling in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Rachakonda, Girish; Vu, Trung; Jin, Lin; Samanta, Debangshu; Datta, Pran K

    2016-10-01

    Claudin-4 has been identified as an integral member of tight junctions and has been found to be upregulated in various types of cancers especially in metastatic cancers. However, the molecular mechanism of the upregulation of Claudin-4 and its role in lung tumorigenesis are unknown. The aim of the present study is to investigate the role of Claudin-4 on migration and tumorigenicity of lung cancer cells and to examine the regulatory effects of TGF-β on Claudin-4 expression. We have observed that TGF-β induces the expression of Claudin-4 dramatically in lung cell lines in a time dependent manner. TGF-β-induced Smad signaling is important for enhancing Claudin-4 mRNA level through inducing its promoter activity. Treatment with curcumin, a c-Jun inhibitor, or stable knockdown of c-Jun abrogates TGF-β-induced Claudin-4 expression suggesting an involvement of the c-Jun pathway. Notably, TGF-β-induced Claudin-4 expression through c-Jun pathway plays a role in TGF-β-mediated motility and tumorigenicity of these cells. In support of these observations, we have uncovered that Claudin-4 is upregulated in 14 of 24 (58%) lung tumors when compared with normal lung tissue. This is the first study to show how TGF-β regulates the expression of Claudin-4 through c-Jun signaling and how this pathway contributes to the migratory and tumorigenic phenotype of lung tumor cells.

  5. Ascorbic Acid and a Cytostatic Inhibitor of Glycolysis Synergistically Induce Apoptosis in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vuyyuri, Saleha B.; Rinkinen, Jacob; Worden, Erin; Shim, Hyekyung; Lee, Sukchan; Davis, Keith R.

    2013-01-01

    Ascorbic acid (AA) exhibits significant anticancer activity at pharmacologic doses achievable by parenteral administration that have minimal effects on normal cells. Thus, AA has potential uses as a chemotherapeutic agent alone or in combination with other therapeutics that specifically target cancer-cell metabolism. We compared the effects of AA and combinations of AA with the glycolysis inhibitor 3-(3-pyridinyl)-1-(4-pyridinyl)-2-propen-1-one (3-PO) on the viability of three non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines to the effects on an immortalized lung epithelial cell line. AA concentrations of 0.5 to 5 mM caused a complete loss of viability in all NSCLC lines compared to a <10% loss of viability in the lung epithelial cell line. Combinations of AA and 3-PO synergistically enhanced cell death in all NSCLC cell lines at concentrations well below the IC50 concentrations for each compound alone. A synergistic interaction was not observed in combination treatments of lung epithelial cells and combination treatments that caused a complete loss of viability in NSCLC cells had modest effects on normal lung cell viability and reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. Combination treatments induced dramatically higher ROS levels compared to treatment with AA and 3-PO alone in NSCLC cells and combination-induced cell death was inhibited by addition of catalase to the medium. Analyses of DNA fragmentation, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage, annexin V-binding, and caspase activity demonstrated that AA-induced cell death is caused via the activation of apoptosis and that the combination treatments caused a synergistic induction of apoptosis. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of AA against NSCLC cells and that combinations of AA with 3-PO synergistically induce apoptosis via a ROS-dependent mechanism. These results support further evaluation of pharmacologic concentrations of AA as an adjuvant treatment for NSCLC and that combination of AA with glycolysis

  6. Lysyl oxidase mediates hypoxia-induced radioresistance in non-small cell lung cancer A549 cells

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Chongwen; Gu, Runxia; Jin, Honglin; Sun, Yao; Li, Zhenyu; Wu, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia-induced radioresistance has been well known as the main obstacle in cancer radiotherapy. Lysyl oxidase (LOX) was previously demonstrated to play an important role in hypoxia-induced biological behaviors, such as metastasis and angiogenesis, through hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), which is an important contributing factor to radioresistance in tumor cells. However, how LOX plays a role in hypoxia-induced radioresistance has yet to be determined. Here, we found that LOX expression was in accordance with HIF-1α expression, and LOX expression at the mRNA and protein level, and enzymatic activity were remarkably upregulated in the hypoxic A549 cells, compared with normoxic A549 cells. Inhibition of LOX resulted in the reduction of the ability to repair double-stranded breaks (DSBs), promotion of apoptosis, relief of G2/M cycle arrest, and eventually reduction of hypoxia-induced radioresistance in the hypoxic A549 cells. This suggests that LOX may play an important role in hypoxia-induced radioresistance. Together, our results might suggest a novel potential therapeutic target in the management of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). PMID:26515140

  7. American Cancer Society Lung Cancer Screening Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Wender, Richard; Fontham, Elizabeth T. H.; Barrera, Ermilo; Colditz, Graham A.; Church, Timothy R.; Ettinger, David S.; Etzioni, Ruth; Flowers, Christopher R.; Gazelle, G. Scott; Kelsey, Douglas K.; LaMonte, Samuel J.; Michaelson, James S.; Oeffinger, Kevin C.; Shih, Ya-Chen Tina; Sullivan, Daniel C.; Travis, William; Walter, Louise; Wolf, Andrew M. D.; Brawley, Otis W.; Smith, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Findings from the National Cancer Institute’s National Lung Screening Trial established that lung cancer mortality in specific high-risk groups can be reduced by annual screening with low-dose computed tomography. These findings indicate that the adoption of lung cancer screening could save many lives. Based on the results of the National Lung Screening Trial, the American Cancer Society is issuing an initial guideline for lung cancer screening. This guideline recommends that clinicians with access to high-volume, high-quality lung cancer screening and treatment centers should initiate a discussion about screening with apparently healthy patients aged 55 years to 74 years who have at least a 30-pack-year smoking history and who currently smoke or have quit within the past 15 years. A process of informed and shared decision-making with a clinician related to the potential benefits, limitations, and harms associated with screening for lung cancer with low-dose computed tomography should occur before any decision is made to initiate lung cancer screening. Smoking cessation counseling remains a high priority for clinical attention in discussions with current smokers, who should be informed of their continuing risk of lung cancer. Screening should not be viewed as an alternative to smoking cessation. PMID:23315954

  8. American Cancer Society lung cancer screening guidelines.

    PubMed

    Wender, Richard; Fontham, Elizabeth T H; Barrera, Ermilo; Colditz, Graham A; Church, Timothy R; Ettinger, David S; Etzioni, Ruth; Flowers, Christopher R; Gazelle, G Scott; Kelsey, Douglas K; LaMonte, Samuel J; Michaelson, James S; Oeffinger, Kevin C; Shih, Ya-Chen Tina; Sullivan, Daniel C; Travis, William; Walter, Louise; Wolf, Andrew M D; Brawley, Otis W; Smith, Robert A

    2013-01-01

    Findings from the National Cancer Institute's National Lung Screening Trial established that lung cancer mortality in specific high-risk groups can be reduced by annual screening with low-dose computed tomography. These findings indicate that the adoption of lung cancer screening could save many lives. Based on the results of the National Lung Screening Trial, the American Cancer Society is issuing an initial guideline for lung cancer screening. This guideline recommends that clinicians with access to high-volume, high-quality lung cancer screening and treatment centers should initiate a discussion about screening with apparently healthy patients aged 55 years to 74 years who have at least a 30-pack-year smoking history and who currently smoke or have quit within the past 15 years. A process of informed and shared decision-making with a clinician related to the potential benefits, limitations, and harms associated with screening for lung cancer with low-dose computed tomography should occur before any decision is made to initiate lung cancer screening. Smoking cessation counseling remains a high priority for clinical attention in discussions with current smokers, who should be informed of their continuing risk of lung cancer. Screening should not be viewed as an alternative to smoking cessation.

  9. Drugs Approved for Lung Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for lung cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  10. TMPRSS4 induces cancer stem cell-like properties in lung cancer cells and correlates with ALDH expression in NSCLC patients.

    PubMed

    de Aberasturi, Arrate L; Redrado, Miriam; Villalba, Maria; Larzabal, Leyre; Pajares, Maria J; Garcia, Javier; Evans, Stephanie R; Garcia-Ros, David; Bodegas, Maria Elena; Lopez, Lissett; Montuenga, Luis; Calvo, Alfonso

    2016-01-28

    Metastasis involves a series of changes in cancer cells that promote their escape from the primary tumor and colonization to a new organ. This process is related to the transition from an epithelial to a mesenchymal phenotype (EMT). Recently, some authors have shown that migratory cells with an EMT phenotype share properties of cancer stem cells (CSCs), which allow them to form a new tumor mass. The type II transmembrane serine protease TMPRSS4 is highly expressed in some solid tumors, promotes metastasis and confers EMT features to cancer cells. We hypothesized that TMPRSS4 could also provide CSC properties. Overexpression of TMPRSS4 reduces E-cadherin and induces N-cadherin and vimentin in A549 lung cancer cells, supporting an EMT phenotype. These changes are accompanied by enhanced migration, invasion and tumorigenicity in vivo. TMPRSS4 expression was highly increased in a panel of lung cancer cells cultured as tumorspheres (a typical assay to enrich for CSCs). H358 and H441 cells with knocked-down TMPRSS4 levels were significantly less able to form primary and secondary tumorspheres than control cells. Moreover, they showed a lower proportion of ALDH+ cells (examined by FACS analysis) and lower expression of some CSC markers than controls. A549 cells overexpressing TMPRSS4 conferred the opposite phenotype and were also more sensitive to the CSC-targeted drug salinomycin than control cells, but were more resistant to regular chemotherapeutic drugs (cisplatin, gemcitabine and 5-fluorouracil). Analysis of 70 NSCLC samples from patients revealed a very significant correlation between TMPRSS4 expression and CSC markers ALDH (p = 0.0018) and OCT4 (p = 0.0004), suggesting that TMPRSS4 is associated with a CSC phenotype in patients' tumors. These results show that TMPRSS4, in addition to inducing EMT, can also promote CSC features in lung cancer; therefore, CSC-targeting drugs could be an appropriate treatment for TMPRSS4+ tumors.

  11. Sera from patients with colon, breast and lung cancer induce resistance to lysis mediated by NK cytotoxic factors (NKCF).

    PubMed Central

    Marubayashi, M.; Solana, R.; Ramirez, R.; Aranda, E.; Galan, F.; Peña, J.

    1991-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are involved in the antitumoral immunologic mechanism. These cells act through the release of cytotoxic molecules defined as NK cytotoxic factors (NKCF). Inhibitory factors of NK and NKCF mediated lysis have been described in in vitro assays. This study evaluates the induction of resistance to NKCF cytotoxicity by sera from 27 patients with colon, breast and lung cancer. Addition of these sera to the cytolytic assay where K562 cells and concentrated NKCF were used, induced resistance to NKCF mediated cytotoxicity in 21 cases (77%). The sera from the group with metastasis blocked NKCF lysis more markedly than the group with local tumours. However, no differences were observed when the groups with colon, breast and lung cancers were compared. This blocking effect was not found to be related to gamma interferon (IFN) levels. In a previous study, we described a tumour factor (NK-RIF) produced by human cell lines derived from metastatic adenocarcinomas. This factor blocked lysis of tumour target cells by NK cells. Consequently, it is proposed that the release of similar tumour factors with a capacity to induce resistance to NKCF may be involved in tumour growth and metastatic spreading in in vivo. PMID:1906292

  12. Xanthohumol induces apoptosis and S phase cell cycle arrest in A549 non-small cell lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Wai Kuan; Ho, Yen Fong; Malek, Sri Nurestri Abd

    2015-01-01

    Background: Xanthohumol, a major prenylated chalcone found in female hop plant, Humulus lupulus, was reported to have various chemopreventive and anti-cancer properties. However, its apoptotic effect on human alveolar adenocarcinoma cell line (A549) of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) was unknown. Objective: This study aimed to investigate the effects of xanthohumol on apoptosis in A549 human NSCLC cells. Materials and Methods: A549 cell proliferation was determined by sulforhodamine B assay. Morphological changes of the cells were studied via phase contrast and fluorescent microscopy. Induction of apoptosis was assessed by Annexin-V fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide (Annexin V-FITC/PI) staining, DNA fragmentation (TUNEL) assay mitochondrial membrane potential assay, cell cycle analysis, and caspase activity studies. Results: Xanthohumol was found to decrease cell proliferation in A549 cells but had relatively low cytotoxicity on normal human lung fibroblast cell line (MRC-5). Typical cellular and nuclear apoptotic features were also observed in A549 cells treated with xanthohumol. Onset of apoptosis in A549 cells was further confirmed by externalization of phosphatidylserine, changes in mitochondrial membrane potential, and DNA fragmentation in the cells after treatment. Xanthohumol induced accumulation of cells in sub G1 and S phase based on cell cycle analysis and also increased the activities of caspase-3, -8, and -9. Conclusion: This work suggests that xanthohumol as an apoptosis inducer, may be a potent therapeutic compound for NSCLC. PMID:26664015

  13. Dose Constraints to Prevent Radiation-Induced Brachial Plexopathy in Patients Treated for Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Amini, Arya; Yang Jinzhong; Williamson, Ryan; McBurney, Michelle L.; Erasmus, Jeremy; Allen, Pamela K.; Karhade, Mandar; Komaki, Ritsuko; Liao, Zhongxing; Gomez, Daniel; Cox, James; Dong, Lei; Welsh, James

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: As the recommended radiation dose for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) increases, meeting dose constraints for critical structures like the brachial plexus becomes increasingly challenging, particularly for tumors in the superior sulcus. In this retrospective analysis, we compared dose-volume histogram information with the incidence of plexopathy to establish the maximum dose tolerated by the brachial plexus. Methods and Materials: We identified 90 patients with NSCLC treated with definitive chemoradiation from March 2007 through September 2010, who had received >55 Gy to the brachial plexus. We used a multiatlas segmentation method combined with deformable image registration to delineate the brachial plexus on the original planning CT scans and scored plexopathy according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.03. Results: Median radiation dose to the brachial plexus was 70 Gy (range, 56-87.5 Gy; 1.5-2.5 Gy/fraction). At a median follow-up time of 14.0 months, 14 patients (16%) had brachial plexopathy (8 patients [9%] had Grade 1, and 6 patients [7%] had Grade {>=}2); median time to symptom onset was 6.5 months (range, 1.4-37.4 months). On multivariate analysis, receipt of a median brachial plexus dose of >69 Gy (odds ratio [OR] 10.091; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.512-67.331; p = 0.005), a maximum dose of >75 Gy to 2 cm{sup 3} of the brachial plexus (OR, 4.909; 95% CI, 0.966-24.952; p = 0.038), and the presence of plexopathy before irradiation (OR, 4.722; 95% CI, 1.267-17.606; p = 0.021) were independent predictors of brachial plexopathy. Conclusions: For lung cancers near the apical region, brachial plexopathy is a major concern for high-dose radiation therapy. We developed a computer-assisted image segmentation method that allows us to rapidly and consistently contour the brachial plexus and establish the dose limits to minimize the risk of brachial plexopathy. Our results could be used as a guideline in future prospective

  14. [Asbestos-related lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Lotti, M

    2010-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of tumour death and a large percentage of it is associated with tobacco smoking. Epidemiology has shown that asbestos cumulative exposures increase the risk of lung cancer to a variable extent, depending on the manufacturing process and the specific job. The risk appears relatively small (< or = 2) and is detectable after massive exposures only. Clinical diagnosis of asbestos-related lung cancer is based upon medical history (exposures > 25 ff.ml years double the risk), possible lung fibrosis and counts of asbestos bodies and fibers in bronchoalveolar lavage and lung tissues. Pleural plaques do not correlate with the cumulative exposures that are associated with lung cancer. The multiplicative interaction between smoke and asbestos is only detectable when the risk associated with asbestos exposure is increased, i.e. after high exposures.

  15. LUNG CANCER AND PULMONARY THROMBOEMBOLISM

    PubMed Central

    Cukic, Vesna; Ustamujic, Aida

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Malignant diseases including lung cancer are the risk for development of pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE). Objective: To show the number of PTE in patients with lung cancer treated in Clinic for pulmonary diseases and TB “Podhrastovi” in three-year period: from 2012-2014. Material and methods: This is the retrospective study in which we present the number of various types of lung cancer treated in three-year period, number and per cent of PTE in different types of lung carcinoma, number and per cent of PTE of all diagnosed PTE in lung carcinoma according to the type of carcinoma. Results: In three-year period (from 2012 to 2014) 1609 patients with lung cancer were treated in Clinic for pulmonary diseases and TB “Podhrastovi” Clinical Centre of Sarajevo University. 42 patients: 25 men middle –aged 64.4 years and 17 women middle- aged 66.7 or 2.61% of all patients with lung cancer had diagnosed PTE. That was the 16. 7% of all patients with PTE treated in Clinic “Podhrastovi “in that three-year period. Of all 42 patients with lung cancer and diagnosed PTE 3 patients (7.14%) had planocellular cancer, 4 patients (9.53%) had squamocellular cancer, 9 (21.43%) had adenocarcinoma, 1 (2.38%) had NSCLC, 3 (7.14 %) had microcellular cancer, 1 (2.38%) had neuroendocrine cancer, 2 (4.76%) had large cell-macrocellular and 19 (45.24%) had histological non-differentiated lung carcinoma. Conclusion: Malignant diseases, including lung cancer, are the risk factor for development of PTE. It is important to consider the including anticoagulant prophylaxis in these patients and so to slow down the course of diseases in these patients. PMID:26622205

  16. Increased expression of differentiation markers can accompany laminin-induced attachment of small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed Central

    Giaccone, G.; Broers, J.; Jensen, S.; Fridman, R. I.; Linnoila, R.; Gazdar, A. F.

    1992-01-01

    We investigated the interaction between human lung cancer cells, laminin, and several differentiating agents. When grown on laminin coated substrate eight out of 11 small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell lines exhibited attachment to laminin and three had extensive outgrowth of long neurite-like processes. Of seven non-small cell lung cancer cell lines, selected for their in vitro anchorage-independent growth, attachment was observed in only three cell lines, and process formation was far less extensive than in SCLC cell lines. Among several differentiating agents, only dcAMP, which alone induced attachment and some process formation, increased laminin-mediated attachment and process formation of two SCLC cell lines, NCI-N417 a variant cell line, and NCI-H345, a classic cell line. The expression of several neuroendocrine and neuronal markers was investigated in these two SCLC cell lines. The expression of the light subunit of neurofilaments increased in NCI-N417 within 3 to 4 days of seeding, while NCI-H345 exhibited approximately 5 fold increase in expression of the GRP gene and a 3 fold increase expression of the beta-actin gene. The expression of a number of other neuroendocrine and neuronal markers did not change following growth on laminin. The doubling times remained unchanged independent of the presence of and attachment to laminin while topoisomerase II gene expression levels in NCI-N417 cells decreased approximately 5 fold when cells were growing on laminin. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:1325826

  17. Propofol inhibits lung cancer cell viability and induces cell apoptosis by upregulating microRNA-486 expression

    PubMed Central

    Yang, N.; Liang, Y.; Yang, P.; Yang, T.; Jiang, L.

    2017-01-01

    Propofol is a frequently used intravenous anesthetic agent. Recent studies show that propofol exerts a number of non-anesthetic effects. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of propofol on lung cancer cell lines H1299 and H1792 and functional role of microRNA (miR)-486 in these effects. H1299 and/or H1792 cells were treated with or without propofol and transfected or not with miR-486 inhibitor, and then cell viability and apoptosis were analyzed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) and flow cytometry. The expression of miR-486 was determined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) with or without propofol treatment. Western blot was performed to analyze the protein expression of Forkhead box, class O (FOXO) 1 and 3, Bcl-2 interacting mediator of cell death (Bim), and pro- and activated caspases-3. Results showed that propofol significantly increased the miR-486 levels in both H1299 and H1792 cells compared to untreated cells in a dose-dependent manner (P<0.05 or P<0.01). Propofol statistically decreased cell viability but increased the percentages of apoptotic cells and protein expressions of FOXO1, FOXO3, Bim, and pro- and activated caspases-3; however, miR-486 inhibitor reversed the effects of propofol on cell viability, apoptosis, and protein expression (P<0.05 or P<0.01). In conclusion, propofol might be an ideal anesthetic for lung cancer surgery by effectively inhibiting lung cancer cell viability and inducing cell apoptosis. Modulation of miR-486 might contribute to the anti-tumor activity of propofol. PMID:28076456

  18. Polonium and Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zagà, Vincenzo; Lygidakis, Charilaos; Chaouachi, Kamal; Gattavecchia, Enrico

    2011-01-01

    The alpha-radioactive polonium 210 (Po-210) is one of the most powerful carcinogenic agents of tobacco smoke and is responsible for the histotype shift of lung cancer from squamous cell type to adenocarcinoma. According to several studies, the principal source of Po-210 is the fertilizers used in tobacco plants, which are rich in polyphosphates containing radio (Ra-226) and its decay products, lead 210 (Pb-210) and Po-210. Tobacco leaves accumulate Pb-210 and Po-210 through their trichomes, and Pb-210 decays into Po-210 over time. With the combustion of the cigarette smoke becomes radioactive and Pb-210 and Po-210 reach the bronchopulmonary apparatus, especially in bifurcations of segmental bronchi. In this place, combined with other agents, it will manifest its carcinogenic activity, especially in patients with compromised mucous-ciliary clearance. Various studies have confirmed that the radiological risk from Po-210 in a smoker of 20 cigarettes per day for a year is equivalent to the one deriving from 300 chest X-rays, with an autonomous oncogenic capability of 4 lung cancers per 10000 smokers. Po-210 can also be found in passive smoke, since part of Po-210 spreads in the surrounding environment during tobacco combustion. Tobacco manufacturers have been aware of the alpha-radioactivity presence in tobacco smoke since the sixties. PMID:21772848

  19. Combining Physical and Biologic Parameters to Predict Radiation-Induced Lung Toxicity in Patients With Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Definitive Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Stenmark, Matthew H.; Cai Xuwei; Shedden, Kerby; Hayman, James A.; Yuan Shuanghu; Ritter, Timothy; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Kong Fengming

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To investigate the plasma dynamics of 5 proinflammatory/fibrogenic cytokines, including interleukin-1beta (IL-1{beta}), IL-6, IL-8, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-{alpha}), and transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-{beta}1) to ascertain their value in predicting radiation-induced lung toxicity (RILT), both individually and in combination with physical dosimetric parameters. Methods and Materials: Treatments of patients receiving definitive conventionally fractionated radiation therapy (RT) on clinical trial for inoperable stages I-III lung cancer were prospectively evaluated. Circulating cytokine levels were measured prior to and at weeks 2 and 4 during RT. The primary endpoint was symptomatic RILT, defined as grade 2 and higher radiation pneumonitis or symptomatic pulmonary fibrosis. Minimum follow-up was 18 months. Results: Of 58 eligible patients, 10 (17.2%) patients developed RILT. Lower pretreatment IL-8 levels were significantly correlated with development of RILT, while radiation-induced elevations of TGF-ss1 were weakly correlated with RILT. Significant correlations were not found for any of the remaining 3 cytokines or for any clinical or dosimetric parameters. Using receiver operator characteristic curves for predictive risk assessment modeling, we found both individual cytokines and dosimetric parameters were poor independent predictors of RILT. However, combining IL-8, TGF-ss1, and mean lung dose into a single model yielded an improved predictive ability (P<.001) compared to either variable alone. Conclusions: Combining inflammatory cytokines with physical dosimetric factors may provide a more accurate model for RILT prediction. Future study with a larger number of cases and events is needed to validate such findings.

  20. Crocus sativus L. (Saffron) Stigma Aqueous Extract Induces Apoptosis in Alveolar Human Lung Cancer Cells through Caspase-Dependent Pathways Activation

    PubMed Central

    Samarghandian, Saeed; Borji, Abasalt; Farahmand, Seyed Kazem; Afshari, Reza; Davoodi, Saeideh

    2013-01-01

    Worldwide, lung cancer is the most common form of cancer. Saffron has been used in folk medicine for centuries. We investigated the potential of saffron to induce cytotoxic and apoptotic effects in lung cancer cells (A549). We also examined the caspase-dependent pathways activation of saffron-induced apoptosis against the A549 cells. A549 cells were incubated with different concentrations of saffron extract; then cell morphological changes, cell viability, and apoptosis were determined by the normal invertmicroscope, MTT assay, Annexin V and propidium iodide, and flow cytometric analysis, respectively. Activated caspases were detected by treatment of saffron in lung cancer cells using fluorescein-labeled inhibitors of polycaspases. The proliferation of the A549 cells were decreased after treatment with saffron in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The percentage of apoptotic cells increased with saffron concentrations. Saffron induced morphological changes, decreased percentage of viable cells, and induced apoptosis. Saffron could induce apoptosis in the A549 cells and activate caspase pathways. The levels of caspases involved in saffron-induced apoptosis in the A549 cells indicating caspase-dependent pathway were induced by saffron. The anticancer activity of the aqueous extract of saffron could be attributed partly to its inhibition of the cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis in cancer cells through caspase-dependent pathways activation. PMID:24288678

  1. Crocus sativus L. (saffron) stigma aqueous extract induces apoptosis in alveolar human lung cancer cells through caspase-dependent pathways activation.

    PubMed

    Samarghandian, Saeed; Borji, Abasalt; Farahmand, Seyed Kazem; Afshari, Reza; Davoodi, Saeideh

    2013-01-01

    Worldwide, lung cancer is the most common form of cancer. Saffron has been used in folk medicine for centuries. We investigated the potential of saffron to induce cytotoxic and apoptotic effects in lung cancer cells (A549). We also examined the caspase-dependent pathways activation of saffron-induced apoptosis against the A549 cells. A549 cells were incubated with different concentrations of saffron extract; then cell morphological changes, cell viability, and apoptosis were determined by the normal invertmicroscope, MTT assay, Annexin V and propidium iodide, and flow cytometric analysis, respectively. Activated caspases were detected by treatment of saffron in lung cancer cells using fluorescein-labeled inhibitors of polycaspases. The proliferation of the A549 cells were decreased after treatment with saffron in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The percentage of apoptotic cells increased with saffron concentrations. Saffron induced morphological changes, decreased percentage of viable cells, and induced apoptosis. Saffron could induce apoptosis in the A549 cells and activate caspase pathways. The levels of caspases involved in saffron-induced apoptosis in the A549 cells indicating caspase-dependent pathway were induced by saffron. The anticancer activity of the aqueous extract of saffron could be attributed partly to its inhibition of the cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis in cancer cells through caspase-dependent pathways activation.

  2. Knockdown of TWIST1 enhances arsenic trioxide- and ionizing radiation-induced cell death in lung cancer cells by promoting mitochondrial dysfunction

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Sung-Keum; Kim, Jae-Hee; Choi, Ha-Na; Choe, Tae-Boo; Hong, Seok-Il; Yi, Jae-Youn; Hwang, Sang-Gu; Lee, Hyun-Gyu; Lee, Yun-Han; Park, In-Chul

    2014-07-11

    Highlights: • Knockdown of TWIST1 enhanced ATO- and IR-induced cell death in NSCLCs. • Intracellular ROS levels were increased in cells treated with TWIST1 siRNA. • TWIST1 siRNA induced MMP loss and mitochondrial fragmentation. • TWIST1 siRNA upregulated the fission-related proteins FIS1 and DRP1. - Abstract: TWIST1 is implicated in the process of epithelial mesenchymal transition, metastasis, stemness, and drug resistance in cancer cells, and therefore is a potential target for cancer therapy. In the present study, we found that knockdown of TWIST1 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) enhanced arsenic trioxide (ATO)- and ionizing radiation (IR)-induced cell death in non-small-cell lung cancer cells. Interestingly, intracellular reactive oxygen species levels were increased in cells treated with TWIST1 siRNA and further increased by co-treatment with ATO or IR. Pretreatment of lung cancer cells with the antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine markedly suppressed the cell death induced by combined treatment with TWIST1 siRNA and ATO or IR. Moreover, treatment of cells with TWIST1 siRNA induced mitochondrial membrane depolarization and significantly increased mitochondrial fragmentation (fission) and upregulated the fission-related proteins FIS1 and DRP1. Collectively, our results demonstrate that siRNA-mediated TWIST1 knockdown induces mitochondrial dysfunction and enhances IR- and ATO-induced cell death in lung cancer cells.

  3. Irigenin, a novel lead from Western Himalayan chemiome inhibits Fibronectin-Extra Domain A induced metastasis in Lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Asif; Chikan, Naveed Anjum; Mokhdomi, Taseem A.; Bukhari, Shoiab; Koul, Aabid M.; Shah, Basit Amin; Gharemirshamlu, Fatemeh Rahimi; Wafai, Asrar H.; Qadri, Ayub; Qadri, Raies A.

    2016-01-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that Fibronectin Extra Domain A (EDA) promotes metastatic capacity of tumor cells by engaging cell surface α9β1 integrins. This interaction mediated by the C-C loop of EDA activates pro-oncogenic signaling pathways leading to epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) of tumor cells, thus signifying its importance in control of metastatic progression. In this context the present study was designed to explore the active compounds from selected ethno-medicinal plants of western Himalayan region for targeting EDA of Fibronectin in lung carcinoma cells. Structure based informatics for drug designing and screening was employed to generate a lead compound(s) feed that were conformationally and energetically viable. Out of 120 compounds selected, Irigenin showed best binding-affinity with C-C loop of EDA. Irigenin specifically targeted α9β1 and α4β1 integrin binding sites on EDA comprising LEU46, PHE47, PRO48, GLU58, LEU59 and GLN60 in its C-C loop as evaluated by energy decomposition per residue of Irigenin–EDA complex. In-vitro cell motility assays complemented with EDA knock-in and knockdown assays distinctively demonstrated that Irigenin prevents metastatic capacity of lung cancer cells by selectively blocking EDA. The results presented thus project Irigenin as a lead compound to overcome Fibronectin EDA induced metastatic progression in lung carcinoma cells. PMID:27849000

  4. Lipocalin 2, a new GADD153 target gene, as an apoptosis inducer of endoplasmic reticulum stress in lung cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hsin, I-Lun; Hsiao, Yueh-Chieh; Wu, Ming-Fang; Jan, Ming-Shiou; Tang, Sheau-Chung; Lin, Yu-Wen; Hsu, Chung-Ping; Ko, Jiunn-Liang

    2012-09-15

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is activated under severe cellular conditions. GADD153, a member of the C/EBP family, is an unfolded protein response (UPR) responsive transcription factor. Increased levels of lipocalin 2, an acute phase protein, have been found in several epithelial cancers. The aim of this study is to investigate the function of lipocalin 2 in lung cancer cells under ER stress. Treatment with thapsigargin, an ER stress activator, led to increases in cytotoxicity, ER stress, apoptosis, and lipocalin 2 expression in A549 cells. GADD153 silencing decreased lipocalin 2 expression in A549 cells. On chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, ER stress increased GADD153 DNA binding to lipocalin 2 promoter. Furthermore, silencing of lipocalin 2 mitigated ER stress-mediated apoptosis in A549 cells. Our findings demonstrated that lipocalin 2 is a new GADD153 target gene that mediates ER stress-induced apoptosis. Highlights: ► We demonstrate that Lipocalin 2 is a new GADD153 target gene. ► Lipocalin 2 mediates ER stress-induced apoptosis. ► ER stress-induced lipocalin 2 expression is calcium-independent in A549 cells. ► Lipocalin 2 dose not play a major role in ER stress-induced autophagy.

  5. Osimertinib induces autophagy and apoptosis via reactive oxygen species generation in non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zheng-Hai; Cao, Wen-Xiang; Su, Min-Xia; Chen, Xiuping; Lu, Jin-Jian

    2017-04-15

    Osimertinib (OSI), also known as AZD9291, is a third-generation epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor that has been approved for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients harboring EGFR T790M mutation. Herein, we indicated for the first time that OSI increased the accumulations of cytoplasmic vacuoles, the expression of phosphatidylethanolamine-modified microtubule-associated protein light-chain 3 (LC3-II), and the formation of GFP-LC3 puncta in various cancer cells. The OSI-induced expression of LC3-II was further increased when combined treatment with chloroquine (CQ), an autophagy inhibitor, and the mRFP-EGFP-LC3 plasmid-transfected cells exposed to OSI led to the production of more red-fluorescent puncta than green-fluorescent puncta, indicating OSI induced autophagic flux in the NSCLC cells. Knockdown of EGFR showed no effect on the OSI-induced expression of LC3-II in NCI-H1975 cells. In addition, OSI increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and scavenge of ROS via pretreatment with N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC), catalase (CAT), or vitamin E (Vita E) significantly inhibited OSI-induced the accumulations of cytoplasmic vacuoles, the expression of LC3-II, as well as the formation of GFP-LC3 puncta. Combinative treatment with CQ could not remarkably change the OSI-induced cell viability decrease, whereas the OSI-induced cell viability decrease and apoptosis could be reversed through pretreatment with NAC, CAT, and Vita E, respectively. Taken together, this is the first report that OSI induces an accompanied autophagy and the generation of ROS is critical for the OSI-induced autophagy, cell viability decrease, and apoptosis in NSCLC cells.

  6. Nano neodymium oxide induces massive vacuolization and autophagic cell death in non-small cell lung cancer NCI-H460 cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong; Yang, Lisong; Feng, Chao; Wen, Long-Ping

    2005-11-11

    Neodymium, a rare earth element, was known to exhibit cytotoxic effects and induce apoptosis in certain cancer cells. Here we show that nano-sized neodymium oxide (Nano Nd2O3) induced massive vacuolization and cell death in non-small cell lung cancer NCI-H460 cells at micromolar equivalent concentration range. Cell death elicited by Nano Nd2O3 was not due to apoptosis and caspases were not involved. Electron microscopy and acridine orange staining revealed extensive autophagy in the cytoplasm of the cells treated by Nano Nd2O3. Autophagy induced by Nano Nd2O3 was accompanied by S-phase cell cycle arrest, mild disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential, and inhibition of proteasome activity. Bafilomycin A1, but not 3-MA, induced apoptosis while inhibiting autophagy. Our results revealed a novel biological function for Nano Nd2O3 and may have implications for the therapy of non-small cell lung cancer.

  7. Synergism through combination of chemotherapy and oxidative stress-induced autophagy in A549 lung cancer cells using redox-responsive nanohybrids: a new strategy for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hsin-Yi; Chang, Ya-Ju; Fan, Nien-Chu; Wang, Li-Sheng; Lai, Nien-Chu; Yang, Chia-Min; Wu, Li-Chen; Ho, Ja-an Annie

    2015-02-01

    A combination of various therapeutic approaches has emerged as a promising strategy for cancer treatment. A safe and competent nano-delivery system is thus in urgent demand to facilitate the simultaneous transport of various therapeutic agents to cancer cells and a tumor region to achieve synergistic effect. Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) and mesoporous silica nanoparticle (MSNs) were fabricated herein as potential candidates for drug delivery. Serving as gatekeepers, GNPs (5 nm in diameter) were attached onto the amino-functionalized MSNs (denoted as NMSNs) via a relatively weak gold-nitrogen bonding. The resulting nanohybrids (denoted as GCMSNs) were uptaken by cells, and the detachment of GNPs and subsequent intracellular drug release from NMSNs were achieved by competitive binding of intracellular glutathione to GNPs. In addition to the function of gatekeeping, GNPs also play another role as the oxidative stress elicitor. Our in vitro studies revealed that GCMSNs induced higher oxidative stress in lung cancer cells (A549) than in normal cells (3T3-L1). This growth inhibitory effect found in the cancer cells was likely induced by mitochondria dysfunction originated from the GCMSN-induced, oxidative stress-triggered mitochondria-mediated autophagy. The redox-responsive nanohybrids were further loaded with camptothecin and the intensified synergistic therapeutic effects were observed associated with combined chemotherapy and oxidative stress strategy. The results clearly demonstrate that such unique nanohybrids hold great promise for selective and effective cancer treatments.

  8. The matricellular protein CCN1 suppresses lung cancer cell growth by inducing senescence via the p53/p21 pathway.

    PubMed

    Jim Leu, Shr-Jeng; Sung, Jung-Sung; Chen, Mei-Yu; Chen, Chih-Wei; Cheng, Jian-Yu; Wang, Tse-Yen; Wang, Jeng-Jung

    2013-09-01

    CCN1, a secreted matrix-associated molecule, is involved in multiple cellular processes. Previous studies have indicated that expression of CCN1 correlates inversely with the aggressiveness of non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC); however, the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Using three NSCLC cell line systems, here we show that long-term treatment of cells with the recombinant CCN1 protein led to a permanent cell cycle arrest in G1 phase; cells remained viable as judged by apoptotic assays. CCN1-treated NSCLC cells acquired a phenotype characteristic of senescent cells, including an enlarged and flattened cell shape and expression of the senescence-associated β-galactosidase. Immunoblot analysis showed that addition of CCN1 increased the abundance of hypo-phosphorylated Rb, as well as accumulation of p53 and p21. Silencing the expression of p53 or p21 by lentivirus-mediated shRNA production in cells blocked the CCN1-induced senescence. Furthermore, a CCN1 mutant defective for binding integrin α6β1 and co-receptor heparan sulfate proteoglycans was incapable of senescence induction. Our finding that direct addition of CCN1 induces senescence in NSCLC cells provides a potential novel strategy for therapeutic intervention of lung cancers.

  9. [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose Uptake Patterns in Lung Before Radiotherapy Identify Areas More Susceptible to Radiation-Induced Lung Toxicity in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Petit, Steven F.; Elmpt, Wouter J.C. van; Oberije, Cary J.G.; Vegt, Erik; Dingemans, Anne-Marie C.; Lambin, Philippe; Dekker, Andre L.A.J.; De Ruysscher, Dirk

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: Our hypothesis was that pretreatment inflammation in the lung makes pulmonary tissue more susceptible to radiation damage. The relationship between pretreatment [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose ([{sup 18}F]FDG) uptake in the lungs (as a surrogate for inflammation) and the delivered radiation dose and radiation-induced lung toxicity (RILT) was investigated. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively studied a prospectively obtained cohort of 101 non-small-cell lung cancer patients treated with (chemo)radiation therapy (RT). [{sup 18}F]FDG-positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) scans used for treatment planning were studied. Different parameters were used to describe [{sup 18}F]FDG uptake patterns in the lungs, excluding clinical target volumes, and the interaction with radiation dose. An increase in the dyspnea grade of 1 (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0) or more points compared to the pre-RT score was used as an endpoint for analysis of RILT. The effect of [{sup 18}F]FDG and CT-based variables, dose, and other patient or treatment characteristics that effected RILT was studied using logistic regression. Results: Increased lung density and pretreatment [{sup 18}F]FDG uptake were related to RILT after RT with univariable logistic regression. The 95th percentile of the [{sup 18}F]FDG uptake in the lungs remained significant in multivariable logistic regression (p = 0.016; odds ratio [OR] = 4.3), together with age (p = 0.029; OR = 1.06), and a pre-RT dyspnea score of {>=}1 (p = 0.005; OR = 0.20). Significant interaction effects were demonstrated among the 80th, 90th, and 95th percentiles and the relative lung volume receiving more than 2 and 5 Gy. Conclusions: The risk of RILT increased with the 95th percentile of the [{sup 18}F]FDG uptake in the lungs, excluding clinical tumor volume (OR = 4.3). The effect became more pronounced as the fraction of the 5%, 10%, and 20% highest standardized uptake value voxels that

  10. A Look at the Grouping Effect on Population-level Risk Assessment of Radon-Induced Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jing; Moir, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    On the basis of considerable knowledge gained by studying health effects in uranium and other underground miners who worked in radon-rich environments, radon exposure has been identified as a cause of lung cancer. Recent pooled analyses of residential studies have shown that radon poses a similar risk of causing lung cancer in the general public when exposure occurs at generally lower levels found in homes. With the increasing accessibility of statistical data via the internet, people are performing their own analyses and asking why, in some cases, the lung cancer occurrence at the community level does not correlate to the radon levels. This study uses statistical data available to the general public from official websites and performs simple analyses. The results clearly show the difficulty in linking observed lung cancer incidence rates at the provincial/territorial level, with possible cause, such as smoking or radon exposure. Even the effect of smoking, a well-documented cause of lung cancer, can be overlooked or misinterpreted if the data being investigated is too general (i.e., summary data at population level) or is influenced by other factors. These difficulties with simple comparisons are one of the main reasons that epidemiological studies of lung cancer incidence and radon exposure requires the use of cohorts or case controls at the individual level as opposed to the more easily performed ecological studies at the population level. PMID:24171868

  11. Cordycepin induces human lung cancer cell apoptosis by inhibiting nitric oxide mediated ERK/Slug signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jung Hoo; Park, Soo Jung; Ko, Won Gyu; Kang, Seong-Mun; Lee, Da Bin; Bang, Junho; Park, Byung-Joo; Wee, Chung-Beum; Kim, Dae Joon; Jang, Ik-Soon; Ko, Jae-Hong

    2017-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important signaling molecule and a component of the inflammatory cascade. Besides, it is also involved in tumorigenesis. Aberrant upregulation and activation of the ERK cascade by NO often leads to tumor cell development. However, the role of ERK inactivation induced by the negative regulation of NO during apoptosis is not completely understood. In this study, treatment of A549 and PC9 human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines with cordycepin led to a reduction in their viability. Analysis of the effect of cordycepin treatment on ERK/Slug signaling activity in the A549 cell line revealed that LPS-induced inflammatory microenvironments could stimulate the expression of TNF-α, CCL5, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and upregulate NO, phospho-ERK (p-ERK), and Slug expression. In addition, constitutive expression of NO was observed. Cordycepin inhibited LPS-induced stimulation of iNOS, NO, p-ERK, and Slug expression. L-NAME, an inhibitor of NOS, inhibited p-ERK and Slug expression. It was also found that cordycepin-mediated inhibition of ERK downregulated Slug, whereas overexpression of ERK led to an upregulation of Slug levels in the cordycepin-treated A549 cells. Inhibition of Slug by siRNA induced Bax and caspase-3, leading to cordycepin-induced apoptosis. Cordycepin-mediated inhibition of ERK led to a reduction in phospho-GSK3β (p-GSK3β) and Slug levels, whereas LiCl, an inhibitor of GSK3β, upregulated p-GSK3β and Slug. Overall, the results obtained indicate that cordycepin inhibits the ERK/Slug signaling pathway through the activation of GSK3β which, in turn, upregulates Bax, leading to apoptosis of the lung cancer cells.

  12. Occupational exposure and lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Spyratos, Dionysios; Porpodis, Konstantinos; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Kougioumtzi, Ioanna; Dryllis, Georgios; Kallianos, Anastasios; Rapti, Aggeliki; Li, Chen; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death for male and the second most usual cancer for women after breast cancer. Currently there are available several non-specific cytotoxic agents and several targeted agents for lung cancer therapy. However; early stage diagnosis is still unavailable and several efforts are being made towards this direction. Novel biomarkers are being investigated along with new biopsy techniques. The occupational and environmental exposure to carcinogenic agents is an everyday phenomenon. Therefore until efficient early diagnosis is available, avoidance of exposure to carcinogenic agents is necessary. In the current mini-review occupational and environmental carcinogenic agents will be presented. PMID:24102018

  13. Nickel may contribute to EGFR mutation and synergistically promotes tumor invasion in EGFR-mutated lung cancer via nickel-induced microRNA-21 expression.

    PubMed

    Chiou, Yu-Hu; Liou, Saou-Hsing; Wong, Ruey-Hong; Chen, Chih-Yi; Lee, Huei

    2015-08-19

    We recently reported that nickel accumulation in lung tissues may be associated with an increased in p53 mutation risk via reduced DNA repair activity. Here, we hypothesized that nickel accumulation in lung tissues could contribute to EGFR mutations in never-smokers with lung cancer. We enrolled 76 never-smoking patients to evaluate nickel level in adjacent normal lung tissues by ICP-MS. The prevalence of EGFR mutations was significantly higher in the high-nickel subgroup than in the low-nickel subgroup. Intriguingly, the OR for the occurrence of EGFR mutations in female, adenocarcinoma, and female adenocarcinoma patients was higher than that of all patients. Mechanistically, SPRY2 and RECK expressions were decreased by nickel-induced miR-21 via activation of the EGFR/NF-κB signaling pathway, which promoted invasiveness in lung cancer cells, and particularly in the cells with EGFR L858R expression vector transfection. The patients' nickel levels were associated with miR-21 expression levels. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed poorer overall survival (OS) and shorter relapse free survival (RFS) in the high-nickel subgroup than in low-nickel subgroup. The high-nickel/high-miR-21 subgroup had shorter OS and RFS periods when compared to the low-nickel/low-miR-21 subgroup. Our findings support previous epidemiological studies indicating that nickel exposure may not only contribute to cancer incidence but also promote tumor invasion in lung cancer.

  14. A potential role for estrogen in cigarette smoke-induced microRNA alterations and lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Amit; Smith, Yoav

    2016-01-01

    Alteration in the expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) is associated with oncogenesis and cancer progression. In this review we aim to suggest that elevated levels of estrogens and their metabolites inside the lungs as a result of cigarette smoke exposure can cause widespread repression of miRNA and contribute to lung tumor development. Anti-estrogenic compounds, such as the components of cruciferous vegetables, can attenuate this effect and potentially reduce the risk of lung cancer (LC) among smokers. PMID:27413713

  15. A pyrazolopyran derivative preferentially inhibits the activity of human cytosolic serine hydroxymethyltransferase and induces cell death in lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Fiascarelli, Alessio; Macone, Alberto; Gargano, Maurizio; Rinaldo, Serena; Giardina, Giorgio; Pontecorvi, Valentino; Koes, David; McDermott, Lee; Yang, Tianyi; Paiardini, Alessandro; Contestabile, Roberto; Cutruzzolà, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT) is a central enzyme in the metabolic reprogramming of cancer cells, providing activated one-carbon units in the serine-glycine one-carbon metabolism. Previous studies demonstrated that the cytoplasmic isoform of SHMT (SHMT1) plays a relevant role in lung cancer. SHMT1 is overexpressed in lung cancer patients and NSCLC cell lines. Moreover, SHMT1 is required to maintain DNA integrity. Depletion in lung cancer cell lines causes cell cycle arrest and uracil accumulation and ultimately leads to apoptosis. We found that a pyrazolopyran compound, namely 2.12, preferentially inhibits SHMT1 compared to the mitochondrial counterpart SHMT2. Computational and crystallographic approaches suggest binding at the active site of SHMT1 and a competitive inhibition mechanism. A radio isotopic activity assay shows that inhibition of SHMT by 2.12 also occurs in living cells. Moreover, administration of 2.12 in A549 and H1299 lung cancer cell lines causes apoptosis at LD50 34 μM and rescue experiments underlined selectivity towards SHMT1. These data not only further highlight the relevance of the cytoplasmic isoform SHMT1 in lung cancer but, more importantly, demonstrate that, at least in vitro, it is possible to find selective inhibitors against one specific isoform of SHMT, a key target in metabolic reprogramming of many cancer types. PMID:26717037

  16. Local health campaigns to reduce lung cancers induced by radon and smoking--who responds?

    PubMed

    Denman, Antony Roger; Timson, Karen; Shield, George; Groves-Kirkby, Christopher John; Rogers, Stephen; Campbell, Jackie Ann; Phillips, Paul Scott

    2009-12-01

    The greatest risk factor for lung cancer is smoking, the second largest factor being raised radon levels at home. Initiatives to stop smoking and reduce domestic radon levels have met with some success, but in both cases a significant proportion of those affected have not taken action. The two risk factors combine, so that those who smoke and live in a house with high radon levels are at higher risk than if exposed to only one of the two threats. There is the potential for combined public health campaigns to better target those affected. Using postal questionnaires, we collected demographic information of those in Northamptonshire, UK, a radon Affected Area, who participated in Smoking Cessation Programmes, and compared these to a recent study by our group of those who had taken action to reduce radon. The comparison suggests that these two groups are significantly different, and in some cases differ from the general population. In addition, those who continue to quit smoking at 1 year were more likely to have children under 18 at home, and live with a parent or partner compared to those who had relapsed after the previous assessment at 4 weeks. There is merit in extending Smoking Cessation Programmes to include advice on reducing the risks from radon.

  17. The Utility of Exercise Testing in Patients with Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ha, Duc; Mazzone, Peter J; Ries, Andrew L; Malhotra, Atul; Fuster, Mark

    2016-09-01

    The harm associated with lung cancer treatment include perioperative morbidity and mortality and therapy-induced toxicities in various organs, including the heart and lungs. Optimal treatment therefore entails a need for risk assessment to weigh the probabilities of benefits versus harm. Exercise testing offers an opportunity to evaluate a patient's physical fitness/exercise capacity objectively. In lung cancer, it is most often used to risk-stratify patients undergoing evaluation for lung cancer resection. In recent years, its use outside this context has been described, including in nonsurgical candidates and lung cancer survivors. In this article we review the physiology of exercise testing and lung cancer. Then, we assess the utility of exercise testing in patients with lung cancer in four contexts (preoperative evaluation for lung cancer resection, after lung cancer resection, lung cancer prognosis, and assessment of efficiency of exercise training programs) after systematically identifying original studies involving the most common forms of exercise tests in this patient population: laboratory cardiopulmonary exercise testing and simple field testing with the 6-minute walk test, shuttle walk test, and/or stair-climbing test. Lastly, we propose a conceptual framework for risk assessment of patients with lung cancer who are being considered for therapy and identify areas for further studies in this patient population.

  18. The Fate of Chrysotile-Induced Multipolar Mitosis and Aneuploid Population in Cultured Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    de Araujo Cortez, Beatriz; Quassollo, Gonzalo; Caceres, Alfredo; Machado-Santelli, Glaucia Maria

    2011-01-01

    Chrysotile is one of the six types of asbestos, and it is the only one that can still be commercialized in many countries. Exposure to other types of asbestos has been associated with serious diseases, such as lung carcinomas and pleural mesotheliomas. The association of chrysotile exposure with disease is controversial. However, in vitro studies show the mutagenic potential of chrysotile, which can induce DNA and cell damage. The present work aimed to analyze alterations in lung small cell carcinoma cultures after 48 h of chrysotile exposure, followed by 2, 4 and 8 days of recovery in fiber-free culture medium. Some alterations, such as aneuploid cell formation, increased number of cells in G2/M phase and cells in multipolar mitosis were observed even after 8 days of recovery. The presence of chrysotile fibers in the cell cultures was detected and cell morphology was observed by laser scanning confocal microscopy. After 4 and 8 days of recovery, only a few chrysotile fragments were present in some cells, and the cellular morphology was similar to that of control cells. Cells transfected with the GFP-tagged α-tubulin plasmid were treated with chrysotile for 24 or 48 h and cells in multipolar mitosis were observed by time-lapse microscopy. Fates of these cells were established: retention in metaphase, cell death, progression through M phase generating more than two daughter cells or cell fusion during telophase or cytokinesis. Some of them were related to the formation of aneuploid cells and cells with abnormal number of centrosomes. PMID:21483691

  19. Local recurrence of small cell lung cancer following radiofrequency ablation is induced by HIF-1α expression in the transition zone

    PubMed Central

    WAN, JUN; WU, WEI; ZHANG, RENQUAN

    2016-01-01

    Local recurrence of lung cancer following radiofrequency ablation (RFA) treatment is common. The aims of the present study were to assess how RFA treatment affects the growth of small cell lung cancer (SCLC) micrometastases in the transition zone (TZ) surrounding the ablated region and in the reference zones (RZs) of the ablated or unablated lobes and to identify the molecular mechanism(s) of lung cancer recurrence following RFA treatment. After lung micrometastases of human SCLCs had formed, RFA treatment was applied to the right upper lobe (RUL) of the lung in nude mice. Hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1α expression, proliferation and angiogenesis potential both in the TZ and RZ were evaluated over time. Separately, at day 1, 7 and 14 following RFA treatment, the growth of micrometastases showed an ~2-fold increase in the TZ compared to the RZ of the unablated lobe, as the right lower lobe (RLL) and the growth of micrometastases in the RZ of the RUL was also induced by RFA. In addition, accelerated tumor growth in the TZ was induced by HIF-1α, but was not associated with tissue angiogenesis potential. We concluded that local recurrences of SCLCs caused by overproliferation of micrometastases following RFA treatment were driven by HIF-1α, although angiogenesis was not the driving force in the TZ. PMID:26750332

  20. Effects of Respiration-Induced Density Variations on Dose Distributions in Radiotherapy of Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mexner, Vanessa; Wolthaus, Jochem W.H.; Herk, Marcel van; Damen, Eugene M.F.; Sonke, Jan-Jakob

    2009-07-15

    Purpose: To determine the effect of respiration-induced density variations on the estimated dose delivered to moving structures and, consequently, to evaluate the necessity of using full four-dimensional (4D) treatment plan optimization. Methods and Materials: In 10 patients with large tumor motion (median, 1.9 cm; range, 1.1-3.6 cm), the clinical treatment plan, designed using the mid-ventilation ([MidV]; i.e., the 4D-CT frame closest to the time-averaged mean position) CT scan, was recalculated on all 4D-CT frames. The cumulative dose was determined by transforming the doses in all breathing phases to the MidV geometry using deformable registration and then averaging the results. To determine the effect of density variations, this cumulative dose was compared with the accumulated dose after similarly deforming the planned (3D) MidV-dose in each respiratory phase using the same transformation (i.e., 'blurring the dose'). Results: The accumulated tumor doses, including and excluding density variations, were almost identical. Relative differences in the minimum gross tumor volume (GTV) dose were less than 2% for all patients. The relative differences were even smaller in the mean lung dose and the V20 (<0.5% and 1%, respectively). Conclusions: The effect of respiration-induced density variations on the dose accumulated over the respiratory cycle was very small, even in the presence of considerable respiratory motion. A full 4D-dose calculation for treatment planning that takes into account such density variations is therefore not required. Planning using the MidV-CT derived from 4D-CT with an appropriate margin for geometric uncertainties is an accurate and safe method to account for respiration-induced anatomy variations.

  1. Lung cancer and tobacco smoking.

    PubMed

    Boyle, P; Maisonneuve, P

    1995-06-01

    The dominant role of tobacco smoking in the causation of lung cancer has been repeatedly demonstrated over the past 50 years. Current lung cancer rates reflect cigarette smoking habits of men and women in the past decades, but not necessarily current smoking patterns, since there is an interval of several decades between the change in smoking habits in a population and its consequences on lung cancer rates. Over 90% of lung cancer may be avoidable simply through avoidance of cigarette smoking. There is at present a huge premature loss of life world-wide caused by smoking. Rates of lung cancer present in central and eastern Europe at the present time are higher than those ever before recorded elsewhere; lung cancer has increased 10-fold in men and eightfold in women in Japan since 1950. There is a world-wide epidemic of smoking among young women which will be translated into increasing rates of tobacco-related disease, including cancer, in the coming decades. There is another epidemic of lung cancer and tobacco-related deaths building up in China as the cohorts of men in whom tobacco smoking became popular reach ages where cancer is an important hazard. Many solutions have been attempted to reduce cigarette smoking and increasingly many countries are enacting legislation to curb this habit. Cigarette smoking remains the number one target for Public Health action aimed at reducing cancer risk in the general population. General practitioners, hospital physicians and everyone working in oncology have a particularly important exemplary role to play in this process.

  2. Cordycepin Induces Apoptosis and Inhibits Proliferation of Human Lung Cancer Cell Line H1975 via Inhibiting the Phosphorylation of EGFR.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng; Wu, Xue; Liang, Yan-Ni; Wang, Li; Song, Zhong-Xing; Liu, Jian-Li; Tang, Zhi-Shu

    2016-09-27

    Cordycepin is an active component of the traditional Chinese medicine Cordyceps sinensis and Cordyceps militaris with notable anticancer activity. Though the prominent inhibitory activity was reported in different kinds of cancer cell lines, the concrete mechanisms remain elusive. It was reported that cordycepin could be converted into tri-phosphates in vivo to confuse a number of enzymes and interfere the normal cell function. For the inhibitory mechanism of EGFR inhibitors and the structure similarity of ATP and tri-phosphated cordycepin, human lung cancer cell line H1975 was employed to investigate the inhibitory effect of cordycepin. The results showed that cordycepin could inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Cell cycle analysis revealed that H1975 cells could be arrested at the G₀/G₁ phase after cordycepin treatment. The expression levels of apoptosis-related protein Caspase-3 and Bcl-2 and phosphorylated expression levels of EGFR, AKT and ERK1/2 were all decreased compared with the control group stimulated with EGF. However, the protein expression levels of proapoptotic protein Bax and cleaved caspase-3 were increased. These results implied that cordycepin could inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis via the EGFR signaling pathway. Our results indicated that there was potential to seek a novel EGFR inhibitor from cordycepin and its chemical derivatives.

  3. Thiazolidinediones enhance vascular endothelial growth factor expression and induce cell growth inhibition in non-small-cell lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background It is known that thiazolidinediones are involved in regulating the expression of various genes, including the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) gene via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ); VEGF is a prognostic biomarker for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods In this study, we investigated the effects of troglitazone and ciglitazone on the mRNA expression of VEGF and its receptors in human NSCLC cell lines, RERF-LC-AI, SK-MES-1, PC-14, and A549. These mRNA expressions were evaluated by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis. We also studied the effect of Je-11, a VEGF inhibitor, on the growth of these cells. Results In NSCLC cells, thiazolidinediones increased the mRNA expression of VEGF and neuropilin-1, but not that of other receptors such as fms-like tyrosine kinase and kinase insert domain receptor-1. Furthermore, the PPARγ antagonist GW9662 completely reversed this thiazolidinedione-induced increase in VEGF expression. Furthermore, the addition of VEGF inhibitors into the culture medium resulted in the reversal of thiazolidinedione-induced growth inhibition. Conclusions Our results indicated that thiazolidinediones enhance VEGF and neuropilin-1 expression and induce the inhibition of cell growth. We propose the existence of a pathway for arresting cell growth that involves the interaction of thiazolidinedione-induced VEGF and neuropilin-1 in NSCLC. PMID:20214829

  4. Brain microvascular endothelium induced-annexin A1 secretion contributes to small cell lung cancer brain metastasis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Liu, Yong-Shuo; Wu, Peng-Fei; Li, Qiang; Dai, Wu-Min; Yuan, Shuai; Xu, Zhi-Hua; Liu, Ting-Ting; Miao, Zi-Wei; Fang, Wen-Gang; Chen, Yu-Hua; Li, Bo

    2015-09-01

    Small cell lung cancer is the most aggressive histologic subtype of lung cancer, with a strong predilection for metastasizing to brain early. However, the cellular and molecular basis is poorly known. Here, we provided evidence to reveal the role of annexin A1 in small cell lung cancer metastasis to brain. Firstly, the elevated annexin A1 serum levels in small cell lung cancer patients were associated with brain metastasis. The levels of annexin A1 were also upregulated in NCI-H446 cells, a small cell lung cancer cell line, upon migration into the mice brain. More interestingly, annexin A1 was secreted by NCI-H446 cells in a time-dependent manner when co-culturing with human brain microvascular endothelial cells, which was identified with the detections of annexin A1 in the co-cultured cellular supernatants by ELISA and western blot. Further results showed that blockage of annexin A1 in the co-cultured cellular supernatants using a neutralized antibody significantly inhibited NCI-H446 cells adhesion to brain endothelium and its transendothelial migration. Conversely, the addition of Ac2-26, an annexin A1 mimic peptide, enhanced these effects. Furthermore, knockdown of annexin A1 in NCI-H446 cells prevented its transendothelial migration in vitro and metastasis to mice brain in vivo. Our data showed that small cell lung cancer cell in brain microvasculature microenvironment could express much more annexin A1 and release it outside, which facilitated small cell lung cancer cell to gain malignant properties of entry into brain. These findings provided a potential target for the management of SCLC brain metastasis.

  5. Retinoids in lung cancer chemoprevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Toma, S; Raffo, P; Isnardi, L; Palumbo, R

    1999-01-01

    In this review, we aim to synthesize the emerging picture of retinoids in lung cancer through a summary of ongoing investigations in biology, chemoprevention and therapy settings, in an attempt to clarify the possible role of these agents in such a disease. Early work in head and neck cancer has evidenced the capability of retinoids to interrupt field carcinogenesis by reversing premalignant lesions and decreasing the incidence of second primary tumors (SPTs). At this time, the completed randomized trials in lung cancer have failed to demonstrate an evident chemopreventive effect of the tested agents on different study end points, although both a marginally significant benefit of retinol palmitate in time-to-development rates for smoke-related SPTs and a potential preventive effect of retinol supplementation against mesothelioma in selected populations of asbestos-exposed workers have been recently reported. Concerning the role of retinoids in lung cancer treatment, a moderate activity of 13-cis-retinoic acid (13cRA) or all-transretinoic acid (ATRA) as single agents has been reported in small series of advanced, mostly pretreated lung cancer patients. More encouraging findings derive from combination studies, in which retinoids, especially ATRA, are added to either alpha-interferon or chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Major recent advances have been made towards the understanding of retinoids mechanisms of action; at this regard, the role of RAR-beta basal or treatment-induced levels seems to be of particular interest as intermediate end point and/or independent prognostic factor, besides their known importance in lung carcinogenesis. Future research for chemopreventive and therapeutic programs with retinoids in lung cancer should be focused on the investigation of new generation compounds with a specificity for individual retinoid nuclear receptors. Such selective molecules may have a greater activity against lung cancer, with a more favourable toxicity profile, as

  6. Fucoidan induces Toll-like receptor 4-regulated reactive oxygen species and promotes endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated apoptosis in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Hsien-Yeh; Lin, Tung-Yi; Lu, Mei-Kuang; Leng, Pei-Ju; Tsao, Shu-Ming; Wu, Yu-Chung

    2017-01-01

    Fucoidan, a sulfated polysaccharide extracted from brown algae, exhibits anti-cancer activity. However, the effects and mechanism of fucoidan-induced apoptosis via endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that fucoidan prevents tumorigenesis and reduces tumor size in LLC1-xenograft male C57BL/6 mice. Fucoidan induces an ER stress response by activating the PERK-ATF4-CHOP pathway, resulting in apoptotic cell death in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, ATF4 knockdown abolishes fucoidan-induced CHOP expression and rescues cell viability. Specifically, fucoidan increases intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), which increase ATF4 and CHOP in lung cancer cells. Using the ROS scavenger N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC), we found that ROS generation is involved in fucoidan-induced ER stress-mediated apoptosis. Moreover, via Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) knockdown, we demonstrated that fucoidan-induced ROS and CHOP expression were attenuated. Our study is the first to identify a novel mechanism for the antitumor activity of fucoidan. We showed that fucoidan inhibits tumor viability by activating the TLR4/ROS/ER stress axis and the downstream PERK-ATF4-CHOP pathway, leading to apoptosis and suppression of lung cancer cell progression. Together, these results indicate that fucoidan is a potential preventive and therapeutic agent for lung cancer that acts via activation of ROS-dependent ER stress pathways. PMID:28332554

  7. Fucoidan induces Toll-like receptor 4-regulated reactive oxygen species and promotes endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated apoptosis in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Hsien-Yeh; Lin, Tung-Yi; Lu, Mei-Kuang; Leng, Pei-Ju; Tsao, Shu-Ming; Wu, Yu-Chung

    2017-03-23

    Fucoidan, a sulfated polysaccharide extracted from brown algae, exhibits anti-cancer activity. However, the effects and mechanism of fucoidan-induced apoptosis via endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that fucoidan prevents tumorigenesis and reduces tumor size in LLC1-xenograft male C57BL/6 mice. Fucoidan induces an ER stress response by activating the PERK-ATF4-CHOP pathway, resulting in apoptotic cell death in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, ATF4 knockdown abolishes fucoidan-induced CHOP expression and rescues cell viability. Specifically, fucoidan increases intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), which increase ATF4 and CHOP in lung cancer cells. Using the ROS scavenger N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC), we found that ROS generation is involved in fucoidan-induced ER stress-mediated apoptosis. Moreover, via Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) knockdown, we demonstrated that fucoidan-induced ROS and CHOP expression were attenuated. Our study is the first to identify a novel mechanism for the antitumor activity of fucoidan. We showed that fucoidan inhibits tumor viability by activating the TLR4/ROS/ER stress axis and the downstream PERK-ATF4-CHOP pathway, leading to apoptosis and suppression of lung cancer cell progression. Together, these results indicate that fucoidan is a potential preventive and therapeutic agent for lung cancer that acts via activation of ROS-dependent ER stress pathways.

  8. Erlotinib induces the human non-small-cell lung cancer cells apoptosis via activating ROS-dependent JNK pathways.

    PubMed

    Shan, Fenglian; Shao, Zewei; Jiang, Shenghua; Cheng, Zhaozhong

    2016-11-01

    Although erlotinib (ERL) has drawn more and more attention toward its anticancer properties effect, the underlying mechanisms of ERL's anticancer properties effect remain unclear yet. So, the aim of this research was to explore the underlying anticancer mechanisms of ERL and to explore whether the reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway contributed to the anticancer properties provided by ERL. In our study, we used MTT assay to detect the anticell growth ability of ERL on human non-small-cell lung cancer cell lines (A549). The extent of cell apoptosis was determined by Hoechst 33342 staining and fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) assay. Then, DCFH-DA and JC-1 staining were used to monitor intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), respectively. Finally, the effect of ERL on phosphorylation state of JNK protein and downstream apoptosis concerned proteins were detected by western blotting assay. Results showed that ERL significantly suppressed the growth and reproduction of A549 cells with the concentration rising up in vitro. Hoechst 33342 staining and FACS assay also confirmed the proapoptosis effect of ERL on A549 cells with the concentration rising up. Furthermore, exposure of A549 cells to ERL increased the intracellular ROS production. As expected, intracellular ROS activated the proapoptotic JNK signaling pathway and inhibited the activation of EFGR signaling pathway. Our results also revealed that ERL could induce cell-cycle arrest at G0/G1 period. Activation of JNK protein decreased MMP and downregulated content of antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 concomitant with the upregulated content of proapoptotic protein Bax in A549 cells. In addition, c-Jun and cleaved caspase-3 were also activated by the phosphorylated JNK induced by ERL. All of these proapoptosis effect of ERL was reversed by administration of N-acetylcysteine (NAC), which performed as a ROS scavenger. Our results

  9. Total Tanshinones-Induced Apoptosis and Autophagy Via Reactive Oxygen Species in Lung Cancer 95D Cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hongwei; Sun, Wen; Zhao, Wenwen; Hao, Wenhui; Leung, Chung-Hang; Lu, Jinjian; Chen, Xiuping

    2015-01-01

    Tanshinones are a group of bioactive constituents isolated from Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge, a widely prescribed traditional Chinese herb. In the current study, the anticancer properties of total tanshinones (TDT) were evaluated using 95D lung cancer cells. Tanshinone IIA was identified as the main component of TDT. Compared with tanshinone IIA, TDT showed more cytotoxic effects on the 95D cells. Annexin V/7-AAD double staining, the depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) (Δψ), the up-regulation of pro-apoptotic proteins, such as cleaved-PARP, cleaved-caspase-3, Bax, and Bad, and the down-regulation of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 were evidence of TDT-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, TDT-induced autophagy as demonstrated by monodansylcadaverine (MDC) staining and the up-regulation of autophagy-associated proteins, such as LC3-II, Beclin-1, Atg3, Atg5, Atg7, and Atg12. Autophagy inhibitors, 3-methyladenine (3-MA) and bafilomycin A1, enhanced TDT-induced cell death. 3-MA pretreatment enhanced the TDT-induced up-regulation of Bax and cleaved-PARP. In addition, TDT induced the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which was reversed by N-acetylcysteine (NAC). NAC also reversed TDT-induced depolarization of Δψ, MDC staining, up-regulation of Bax, cleaved-PARP, Beclin-1, LC3-II, and cell viability. In conclusion, our findings showed that TDT-induced apoptosis and protective autophagy in 95D cells mediated by increasing intracellular ROS production.

  10. Wnt signaling induces gene expression of factors associated with bone destruction in lung and breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Rachelle W.; Merkel, Alyssa R.; Page, Jonathan M.; Ruppender, Nazanin S.; Guelcher, Scott A.; Sterling, Julie A.

    2014-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) is an important regulator of bone destruction in bone metastatic tumors. Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) stimulates PTHrP production in part through the transcription factor Gli2, which is regulated independent of the Hedgehog signaling pathway in osteolytic cancer cells. However, inhibition of TGF-β in vivo does not fully inhibit tumor growth in bone or tumor-induced bone destruction, suggesting other pathways are involved. While Wnt signaling regulates Gli2 in development, the role of Wnt signaling in bone metastasis is unknown. Therefore, we investigated whether Wnt signaling regulates Gli2 expression in tumor cells that induce bone destruction. We report here that Wnt activation by β-catenin/T-cell factor 4 (TCF4) over-expression or lithium chloride (LiCl) treatment increased Gli2 and PTHrP expression in osteolytic cancer cells. This was mediated through the TCF and Smad binding sites within the Gli2 promoter as determined by promoter mutation studies, suggesting cross-talk between TGF-β and Wnt signaling. Culture of tumor cells on substrates with bone-like rigidity increased Gli2 and PTHrP production, enhanced autocrine Wnt activity and led to an increase in the TCF/Wnt signaling reporter (TOPFlash), enriched β-catenin nuclear accumulation, and elevated Wnt-related genes by PCR-array. Stromal cells serve as an additional paracrine source of Wnt ligands and enhanced Gli2 and PTHrP mRNA levels in MDA-MB-231 and RWGT2 cells in vitro and promoted tumor-induced bone destruction in vivo in a β-catenin/Wnt3a-dependent mechanism. These data indicate that a combination of matrix rigidity and stromal-secreted factors stimulate Gli2 and PTHrP through Wnt signaling in osteolytic breast cancer cells, and there is significant cross-talk between the Wnt and TGF-β signaling pathways. This suggests that the Wnt signaling pathway may be a potential therapeutic target for inhibiting tumor cell response to the bone

  11. Lung cancer of radiochemical industry workers

    SciTech Connect

    Khokhryakov, V.F.; Romanov, S.A.

    1993-12-31

    The frequency of lung cancers among 2346 radiochemical industry workers exposed to combined external {beta}-{gamma} and internal incorporated plutonium irradiation has been investigated. The results of observation were analyzed assuming the linear relative risk model taking into account prolongation of exposure. On the basis of the obtained data it was shown that life span incidence, of radiation-induced lung cancer is several times greater than 8.5 x 10{sup -3}Sv{sup -1}, which is recommended by ICRP Publication 60 to estimate the carcinogenic risk of organ exposure.

  12. pp-GalNAc-T13 induces high metastatic potential of murine Lewis lung cancer by generating trimeric Tn antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Yasuyuki; Zhang, Qing; Akita, Kaoru; Nakada, Hiroshi; Hamamura, Kazunori; Tokuda, Noriyo; Tsuchida, Akiko; Matsubara, Takeshi; Hori, Tomoko; Okajima, Tetsuya; Furukawa, Keiko; Urano, Takeshi; Furukawa, Koichi

    2012-03-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ppGalNAc-T13 was up-regulated in high metastatic sublines of Lewis lung cancer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ppGalNAc-T13 expression enhanced cell invasion activity in low metastatic sublines. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Trimeric Tn antigen was induced in the transfectant cells of ppGalNAc-T13 cDNA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A major protein carrying trimeric Tn structure was identified as Syndecan-1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silencing of ppGalNAc-T13 resulted in the reduction of invasion and of metastasis.. -- Abstract: In order to analyze the mechanisms for cancer metastasis, high metastatic sublines (H7-A, H7-Lu, H7-O, C4-sc, and C4-ly) were obtained by repeated injection of mouse Lewis lung cancer sublines H7 and C4 into C57BL/6 mice. These sublines exhibited increased proliferation and invasion activity in vitro. Ganglioside profiles exhibited lower expression of GM1 in high metastatic sublines than the parent lines. Then, we established GM1-Si-1 and GM1-Si-2 by stable silencing of GM1 synthase in H7 cells. These GM1-knockdown clones exhibited increased proliferation and invasion. Then, we explored genes that markedly altered in the expression levels by DNA microarray in the combination of C4 vs. C4-ly or H7 vs. H7 (GM1-Si). Consequently, pp-GalNAc-T13 gene was identified as up-regulated genes in the high metastatic sublines. Stable transfection of pp-GalNAc-T13 cDNA into C4 (T13-TF) resulted in increased invasion and motility. Then, immunoblotting and flow cytometry using various antibodies and lectins were performed. Only anti-trimeric Tn antibody (mAb MLS128), showed increased expression levels of trimeric Tn antigen in T13-TF clones. Moreover, immunoprecipitation/immunoblotting was performed by mAb MLS128, leading to the identification of an 80 kDa band carrying trimeric Tn antigen, i.e. Syndecan-1. Stable silencing of endogenous pp-GalNAc-T13 in C4-sc (T13-KD) revealed that primary tumors generated by

  13. Early detection of COPD is important for lung cancer surveillance.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Yasuo; Katsura, Hideki; Koh, Eitetsu; Hiroshima, Kenzo; Fujisawa, Takehiko

    2012-05-01

    It is well known that chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a significant risk factor for lung cancer. Approximately 1% of COPD patients develop lung cancer every year, which may be associated with genetic susceptibility to cigarette smoke. Chronic inflammation caused by toxic gases can induce COPD and lung cancer. Inflammatory mediators may promote the growth of bronchioalveolar stem cells, and activation of nuclear factor-κB and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 play crucial roles in the development of lung cancer from COPD. Low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) is an effective procedure for the early detection of lung cancer in high-risk patients. However, determining which patients should be screened for lung cancer in a primary care setting is difficult. In this article, we review the epidemiology and aetiology of lung cancer associated with COPD, verify the efficacy of lung cancer screening by LDCT, and discuss the importance of early detection of COPD for lung cancer surveillance. We propose that, for the prevention of both diseases, COPD screening in smokers should be initiated as early as possible, so they can stop smoking and so that candidates for an efficient lung cancer screening programme can be identified.

  14. mTOR inhibitor-induced interstitial lung disease in cancer patients: Comprehensive review and a practical management algorithm.

    PubMed

    Willemsen, Annelieke E C A B; Grutters, Jan C; Gerritsen, Winald R; van Erp, Nielka P; van Herpen, Carla M L; Tol, Jolien

    2016-05-15

    Mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors (mTORi) have clinically significant activity against various malignancies, such as renal cell carcinoma and breast cancer, but their use can be complicated by several toxicities. Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is an adverse event of particular importance. Mostly, mTORi-induced ILD remains asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic, but it can also lead to severe morbidity and even mortality. Therefore, careful diagnosis and management of ILD is warranted. The reported incidence of mTORi-induced ILD varies widely because of a lack of uniform diagnostic criteria and active surveillance. Because of the nonspecific clinical features, a broad differential diagnosis that includes (opportunistic) infections should be considered in case of suspicion of mTORi-induced ILD. The exact mechanism or interplay of mechanisms leading to the development of ILD remains to be defined. Suggested mechanisms are either a direct toxic effect or immune-mediated mechanisms, considering mTOR inhibitors have several effects on the immune system. The clinical course of ILD varies widely and is difficult to predict. Consequently, the discrimination between when mTOR inhibitors can be continued safely and when discontinuation is indicated is challenging. In this review, we give a comprehensive review of the incidence, clinical presentation and pathophysiology of mTORi-induced ILD in cancer patients. We present newly developed diagnostic criteria for ILD, which include clinical symptoms as well as basic pulmonary function tests and radiological abnormalities. In conjunction with these diagnostic criteria, we provide a detailed and easily applicable clinical management algorithm.

  15. EML4-ALK induces epithelial–mesenchymal transition consistent with cancer stem cell properties in H1299 non-small cell lung cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Fuchun; Liu, Xiaoke Qing, Qin Sang, Yaxiong Feng, Chengjun Li, Xiaoyu Jiang, Li Su, Pei Wang, Yongsheng

    2015-04-10

    The echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4(EML4) – anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) fusion gene has been identified as a driver mutation in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, the role of EML4-ALK in malignant transformation is not entirely clear. Here, for the first time, we showed that H1299 NSCLC cells stably expressing EML4-ALK acquire EMT phenotype, associated with enhanced invasive migration and increased expression of EMT-inducing transcription factors. H1299-EML4-ALK cells also displayed cancer stem cell-like properties with a concomitant up-regulation of CD133 and enhanced ability of mammospheres formation. Moreover, we found that inhibition of ERK1/2 reversed EMT induced by EML4-ALK in H1299 cells. Taken together, these results suggested that EML4-ALK induced ERK activation is mechanistically associated with EMT phenotype. Thus, inhibition of ERK signaling pathway could be a potential strategy in treatment of NSCLC patients with EML4-ALK translocation. - Highlights: • EML4-ALK induced epithelial–mesenchymal transition in H1299 cells. • Expression of EML4-ALK promotes invasion and migration in vitro. • EML4-ALK enhanced sphere formation and stem cell-like properties in H1299 cells. • Blockage of ERK1/2 reverse Epithelial–Mesenchymal transition induced by EML4-ALK.

  16. Genome-wide Association Study on Platinum-induced Hepatotoxicity in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Cao, Songyu; Wang, Cheng; Ma, Hongxia; Yin, Rong; Zhu, Meng; Shen, Wei; Dai, Juncheng; Shu, Yongqian; Xu, Lin; Hu, Zhibin; Shen, Hongbing

    2015-06-23

    Platinum-based chemotherapy has been shown to improve the survival of advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients; the platinum-induced toxicity severely impedes the success of chemotherapy. Genetic variations, such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), may contribute to patients' responses to the platinum-based chemotherapy. To identify SNPs that modify the risk of hepatotoxicity in NSCLC patients receiving platinum-based chemotherapy, we performed a genome-wide association scan in 334 subjects followed by a replication study among 375 subjects. Consistent associations with platinum-induced hepatotoxicity risk was identified for SNP rs2838566 located at 21q22.3, as the minor A allele could significantly increase the risk of liver injury (OR = 3.78, 95%CI = 1.99-7.19, P = 4.90 × 10(-5) for GWAS scan, OR = 1.89, 95%CI = 1.03-3.46, P = 0.039 for replication, and OR = 2.56, 95%CI = 1.65-3.95, P = 2.55 × 10(-5) for pooled population). These results suggested that genetic variants at 21q22.3 may contribute to the susceptibility of platinum-induced hepatotoxicity in NSCLC patients.

  17. Patient-specific quantification of respiratory motion-induced dose uncertainty for step-and-shoot IMRT of lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Heng; Park, Peter; Liu, Wei; Matney, Jason; Balter, Peter; Zhang, Xiaodong; Li, Xiaoqiang; Zhu, X. Ronald; Liao, Zhongxing; Li, Yupeng

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to quantify respiratory motion-induced dose uncertainty at the planning stage for step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) using an analytical technique.Methods: Ten patients with stage II/III lung cancer who had undergone a planning four-dimensional (4D) computed tomographic scan and step-and-shoot IMRT planning were selected with a mix of motion and tumor size for this retrospective study. A step-and-shoot IMRT plan was generated for each patient. The maximum and minimum doses with respiratory motion were calculated for each plan, and the mean deviation from the 4D dose was calculated, taking delivery time, fractionation, and patient breathing cycle into consideration.Results: For all patients evaluated in this study, the mean deviation from the 4D dose in the planning target volume (PTV) was <2.5%, with a standard deviation <1.2%, and maximum point dose variation from the 4D dose was <6.2% in the PTV assuming delivery dose rate of 200 MU/min and patient breathing cycle of 8 s. The motion-induced dose uncertainty is a function of motion, fractionation, MU (plan modulation), dose rate, and patient breathing cycle.Conclusions: Respiratory motion-induced dose uncertainty varies from patient to patient. Therefore, it is important to evaluate the dose uncertainty on a patient-specific basis, which could be useful for plan evaluation and treatment strategy determination for selected patients.

  18. Genome-wide Association Study on Platinum-induced Hepatotoxicity in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Songyu; Wang, Cheng; Ma, Hongxia; Yin, Rong; Zhu, Meng; Shen, Wei; Dai, Juncheng; Shu, Yongqian; Xu, Lin; Hu, Zhibin; Shen, Hongbing

    2015-01-01

    Platinum-based chemotherapy has been shown to improve the survival of advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients; the platinum-induced toxicity severely impedes the success of chemotherapy. Genetic variations, such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), may contribute to patients’ responses to the platinum-based chemotherapy. To identify SNPs that modify the risk of hepatotoxicity in NSCLC patients receiving platinum-based chemotherapy, we performed a genome-wide association scan in 334 subjects followed by a replication study among 375 subjects. Consistent associations with platinum-induced hepatotoxicity risk was identified for SNP rs2838566 located at 21q22.3, as the minor A allele could significantly increase the risk of liver injury (OR = 3.78, 95%CI = 1.99–7.19, P = 4.90 × 10−5 for GWAS scan, OR = 1.89, 95%CI = 1.03–3.46, P = 0.039 for replication, and OR = 2.56, 95%CI = 1.65–3.95, P = 2.55 × 10−5 for pooled population). These results suggested that genetic variants at 21q22.3 may contribute to the susceptibility of platinum-induced hepatotoxicity in NSCLC patients. PMID:26100964

  19. Suppression of radiation-induced migration of non-small cell lung cancer through inhibition of Nrf2-Notch Axis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qiuyue; Mao, Aihong; Guo, Ruoshui; Zhang, Liping; Yan, Jiawei; Sun, Chao; Tang, Jinzhou; Ye, Yancheng; Zhang, Yanshan; Zhang, Hong

    2017-03-28

    Nuclear factor E2 related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a transcription factor that is associated with tumor growth and resistance to radiation. The canonical Notch signaling pathway is also crucial for maintaining non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Aberrant Nrf2 and Notch signaling has repeatedly been showed to facilitate metastasis of NSCLC. Here, we show that radiation induce Nrf2 and Notch1 expression in NSCLC. Knockdown of Nrf2 enhanced radiosensitivity of NSCLC and reduced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Importantly, we found that knockdown of Nrf2 dramatically decreased radiation-induced NSCLC invasion and significantly increased E-cadherin, but reduced N-cadherin and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2/9 expression. We found that Notch1 knockdown also upregulated E-cadherin and suppressed N-cadherin expression. Nrf2 contributes to NSCLC cell metastatic properties and this inhibition correlated with reduced Notch1 expression. These results establish that Nrf2 and Notch1 downregulation synergistically inhibit radiation-induced migratory and invasive properties of NSCLC cells.

  20. Characterization of azoxymethane-induced colon tumor metastasis to lung in a mouse model relevant to human sporadic colorectal cancer and evaluation of grape seed extract efficacy.

    PubMed

    Derry, Molly M; Raina, Komal; Agarwal, Rajesh; Agarwal, Chapla

    2014-08-01

    The second leading cause of cancer-related deaths (both genders combined) in the United States is colorectal cancer (CRC). This emphasizes the need to develop both effective therapies for CRC patients and pre-clinical models mimicking human disease that carry translational potential in drug-development. Notably, at present there are no in situ models of CRC metastasis to lung. In our azoxymethane-induced colon tumorigenesis study in A/J mice assessing grape seed extract (GSE) efficacy, during necropsy we also found multiple lung nodules suggestive of colon tumor metastasis to lung that were significantly inhibited in GSE fed group. Both histopathological and molecular studies were performed to characterize and establish the origin of these lesions in lung. Histologically these nodules were determined as adenocarcinoma of mucin origin. Molecular analyses by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and RT-PCR revealed strong protein and transcript levels of colon specific markers CDX2 and CK20 in these lung nodules compared to uninvolved control lung tissue. Vis-à-vis, these nodules also showed minimally expressed lung specific biomarkers, specifically surfactant D and TTF-1, in IHC analysis. Additionally, 0.25% GSE supplementation in diet (w/w) decreased the incidence of these lung nodules by 53% and their total number by 66%. Together, the characterization of this unique in situ mouse model of CRC metastasis to lung provides translational opportunities in developing effective therapies to clinically manage and treat CRC at the advanced stage. Moreover, GSE efficacy in inhibiting CRC metastasis to lung in this model further supports its translational potential in controlling CRC growth, progression and metastasis in patients.

  1. Role of Parp Activity in Lung Cancer-induced Cachexia: Effects on Muscle Oxidative Stress, Proteolysis, Anabolic Markers and Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Chacon-Cabrera, Alba; Mateu-Jimenez, Mercè; Langohr, Klaus; Fermoselle, Clara; García-Arumí, Elena; Andreu, Antoni L; Yelamos, Jose; Barreiro, Esther

    2017-02-08

    Strategies to treat cachexia are still at its infancy. Enhanced muscle protein breakdown and ubiquitin-proteasome system are common features of cachexia associated with chronic conditions including lung cancer (LC). Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARP), which play a major role in chromatin structure regulation, also underlie maintenance of muscle metabolism and body composition. We hypothesized that protein catabolism, proteolytic markers, muscle fiber phenotype, and muscle anabolism may improve in respiratory and limb muscles of LC-cachectic Parp-1-deficient (Parp-1(-/-) ) and Parp-2(-/-) mice. In diaphragm and gastrocnemius of LC (LP07 adenocarcinoma) bearing mice (wild type, Parp-1(-/-) and Parp-2(-/-) ), PARP activity (ADP-ribose polymers, pADPr), redox balance, muscle fiber phenotype, apoptotic nuclei, tyrosine release, protein ubiquitination, muscle-specific E3 ligases, NFkB signaling pathway, markers of muscle anabolism (Akt, mTOR, p70S6K, and mitochondrial DNA) were evaluated along with body and muscle weights and limb muscle force. Compared to wild type cachectic animals, in both respiratory and limb muscles of Parp-1(-/-) and Parp-2(-/-) cachectic mice: cancer induced-muscle wasting characterized by increased PARP activity, protein oxidation, tyrosine release, and ubiquitin-proteasome system (total protein ubiquitination, atrogin-1, and 20S proteasome C8 subunit) were blunted, the reduction in contractile myosin and atrophy of the fibers was attenuated, while no effects were seen in other structural features (inflammatory cells, internal or apoptotic nuclei), and markers of muscle anabolism partly improved. Activation of either PARP-1 or -2 is likely to play a role in muscle protein catabolism via oxidative stress, NF-kB signaling, and enhanced proteasomal degradation in cancer-induced cachexia. Therapeutic potential of PARP activity inhibition deserves attention. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  2. Early detection of lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Midthun, David E.

    2016-01-01

    Most patients with lung cancer are diagnosed when they present with symptoms, they have advanced stage disease, and curative treatment is no longer an option. An effective screening test has long been desired for early detection with the goal of reducing mortality from lung cancer. Sputum cytology, chest radiography, and computed tomography (CT) scan have been studied as potential screening tests. The National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) demonstrated a 20% reduction in mortality with low-dose CT (LDCT) screening, and guidelines now endorse annual LDCT for those at high risk. Implementation of screening is underway with the desire that the benefits be seen in clinical practice outside of a research study format. Concerns include management of false positives, cost, incidental findings, radiation exposure, and overdiagnosis. Studies continue to evaluate LDCT screening and use of biomarkers in risk assessment and diagnosis in attempt to further improve outcomes for patients with lung cancer. PMID:27158468

  3. A novel double carbonyl analog of curcumin induces the apoptosis of human lung cancer H460 cells via the activation of the endoplasmic reticulum stress signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Ye, Hui; Wei, Xiaoyan; Wang, Zhankun; Zhang, Shanshan; Ren, Jiye; Yao, Song; Shi, Lingyi; Yang, Lizhu; Qiu, Peihong; Wu, Jianzhang; Liang, Guang

    2016-09-01

    Curcumin can inhibit the growth of a variety of cancer cells; however, its poor bioavailability and pharmacokinetic profiles, which are attributed to its instability under physiological conditions, have limited its application in anticancer therapy. In the present study, we screened a double carbonyl analog of curcumin (A17) and analyzed its effects and mechanism of inducing apoptosis in human lung cancer H460 cells. The results showed that A17 not only induced CHOP expression in human lung cancer H460 cells, but also induced the apoptosis of H460 cells in a dose-responsive manner, and this effect was related to corresponding activation of some important components in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-mediated apoptosis pathway. When CHOP was knocked down by specific siRNA, A17-induced cell apoptosis was attenuated, thereby further demonstrating that the apoptotic pathway is ER stress‑dependent. Our studies demonstrated that A17 has better stability and antitumor activity than curcumin in H460 cells via an ER stress-mediated mechanism. These results imply that A17 could be further explored as a potential anticancer agent for the treatment of human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

  4. Lewis Lung Cancer Cells Promote SIGNR1(CD209b)-Mediated Macrophages Polarization Induced by IL-4 to Facilitate Immune Evasion.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiaolong; Li, Wenhai; Pan, Lei; Fu, Enqing; Xie, Yonghong; Chen, Min; Mu, Deguang

    2016-05-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages are a prominent component of lung cancer and contribute to tumor progression by facilitating the immune evasion of cancer cells. DC-SIGN (CD209) assists in the immune evasion of a broad spectrum of pathogens and neoplasms by inhibiting the maturation of DCs and subsequent cytokines production. However, the expression of DC-SIGN in macrophages and its role in mediating immune evasion in lung cancer and the underlying mechanism remain unclear. Our study aimed to identify the immunosuppressive role of SIGNR1 in murine macrophage differentiation and lung cancer progression. We found that SIGNR1-positive RAW264.7 macrophages were enriched in mixed cultures with Lewis lung cancer cells (LLC) (ratio of RAW 264.7 to LLC being 1:1) after stimulation with IL-4. Moreover, LLC-educated macrophages exhibited significantly higher levels of IL-10 but lower IL-12 in response to IL-4 treatment as determined by RT-PCR and ELISA. However, inhibition of SIGNR1 markedly hampered the production of IL-10, indicating that SIGNR1 was indispensable for IL-4+LLC induced macrophage polarization towards the M2 subtype. Furthermore, polarized M2 cells immersed in a tumor microenvironment promoted the migration of LLCs, as measured by transwell assays, but migration was suppressed after blockade of SIGNR1 using CD209b antibody. In addition, IL-4+LLC-educated macrophages reduced the proliferation of the activated T cells and reduced IFN-γ-mediated Th1 response in T cells, while SIGNR1 inhibition rescued Th1 cell functions. In conclusion, murine SIGNR1 expressed in LLC-educated macrophages appears to mediate IL-4-induced RAW264.7 macrophage polarization and thus facilitate lung cancer evasion.

  5. Lung Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing lung cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  6. Carotenoids and lung cancer prevention

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding the molecular actions of carotenoids is critical for human studies involving carotenoids for prevention of lung cancer and cancers at other tissue sites. While the original hypothesis prompting the beta-carotene intervention trials was that beta-carotene exerts beneficial effects thro...

  7. Molecular and cellular mechanisms of hexavalent chromium-induced lung cancer: an updated perspective.

    PubMed

    Urbano, A M; Ferreira, L M R; Alpoim, M C

    2012-03-01

    For over a century, chromium (Cr) has found widespread industrial and commercial use, namely as a pigment, in the production of stainless steel and in chrome plating. The adverse health effects to the skin and respiratory tract of prolonged exposure to Cr have been known or suspected for a long time, but it was much more recently that the toxicity of this element was unequivocally attributed to its hexavalent state. Based on the combined results of extensive epidemiological studies, animal carcinogenicity studies and several types of other relevant data, authoritative regulatory agencies have found sufficient evidence to classify hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] compounds as encountered in the chromate production, chromate pigment production and chromium plating industries as carcinogenic to humans. Crucial for the development of novel strategies to prevent, detect and/or treat Cr(VI)-induced cancers is a detailed knowledge of the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying these pathologies. Unfortunately, in spite of a considerable research effort, crucial facets of these mechanisms remain essentially unknown. This review is intended to provide a concise, integrated and critical perspective of the current state of knowledge concerning multiple aspects of Cr(VI) carcinogenesis. It will present recent theories of Cr(VI)-induced carcinogenesis and will include aspects not traditionally covered in other reviews, such as the possible involvement of the energy metabolism in this process. A brief discussion on the models that have been used in the studies of Cr(VI)-induced carcinogenicity will also be included, due to the impact of this parameter on the relevance of the results obtained.

  8. Cigarette smoke and lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Martonen, T.B.; Hofmann, W.; Lowe, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    Cigarette smoke has been implicated in a causal relationship with carcinoma of the lung. An intriguing feature of the disease is the site-selectivity with which bronchogenic cancer manifests itself; most cancers are detected in the main, lobar and segmental bronchi, perhaps specifically at airway bifurcations. The elevated risk of lung cancer to smokers may result from a complex interplay between smoking and exposure to ambient Rn progeny, including the promotional-effect role (as opposed to being the initiating event) of cigarette smoke in tumor development. It has been determined that smokers exposed to average indoor Rn progency levels receive surprisingly high doses at hot spots within bronchial bifurcations.

  9. Functional imaging in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Harders, S W; Balyasnikowa, S; Fischer, B M

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer represents an increasingly frequent cancer diagnosis worldwide. An increasing awareness on smoking cessation as an important mean to reduce lung cancer incidence and mortality, an increasing number of therapy options and a steady focus on early diagnosis and adequate staging have resulted in a modestly improved survival. For early diagnosis and precise staging, imaging, especially positron emission tomography combined with CT (PET/CT), plays an important role. Other functional imaging modalities such as dynamic contrast-enhanced CT (DCE-CT) and diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DW-MRI) have demonstrated promising results within this field. The purpose of this review is to provide the reader with a brief and balanced introduction to these three functional imaging modalities and their current or potential application in the care of patients with lung cancer. PMID:24289258

  10. Quality of Life in Patients Undergoing Radiation Therapy for Primary Lung Cancer, Head and Neck Cancer, or Gastrointestinal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-19

    Anal Cancer; Colorectal Cancer; Esophageal Cancer; Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Gallbladder Cancer; Gastric Cancer; Head and Neck Cancer; Liver Cancer; Lung Cancer; Pancreatic Cancer; Small Intestine Cancer

  11. A sesquiterpene lactone antrocin from Antrodia camphorata negatively modulates JAK2/STAT3 signaling via microRNA let-7c and induces apoptosis in lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Chi-Tai; Huang, Wen-Chien; Rao, Yerra Koteswara; Ye, Min; Lee, Wei-Hwa; Wang, Liang-Shun; Tzeng, David T W; Wu, Chih-Hsiung; Shieh, Yi-Shing; Huang, Chi-Ying F; Chen, Yu-Jen; Hsiao, Michael; Wu, Alexander T H; Yang, Zhen; Tzeng, Yew-Min

    2013-12-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide and current therapies fail to treat this disease in majority of cases. Antrodia camphorata is a medicinal mushroom being widely used as food dietary supplement for cancer prevention. The sesquiterpene lactone antrocin is the most potent among >100 secondary metabolites isolated from A. camphorata. However, the molecular mechanisms of antrocin-mediated anticancer effects remain unclear. In this study, we found that antrocin inhibited cell proliferation in two non-small-cell lung cancer cells, namely H441 (wild-type epidermal growth factor receptor, IC50 = 0.75 μM) and H1975 (gefitnib-resistant mutant T790M, IC50 = 0.83 μM). Antrocin dose dependently suppressed colony formation and induced apoptosis as evidenced by activated caspase-3 and increased Bax/Bcl2 ratio. Gene profiling studies indicated that antrocin downregulated Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK/STAT) signaling pathway. We further demonstrated that antrocin suppressed both constitutively activated and interleukin 6-induced STAT3 phosphorylation and its subsequent nuclear translocation. Such inhibition is found to be achieved through the suppression of JAK2 and interaction between STAT3 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase. Additionally, antrocin increased microRNA let-7c expression and suppressed STAT signaling. The combination of antrocin and JAK2/STAT3 gene silencing significantly increased apoptosis in H441 cells. Such dual interruption of JAK2 and STAT3 pathways also induced downregulation of antiapoptotic protein mcl-1 and increased caspase-3 expression. In vivo intraperitoneal administration of antrocin significantly suppressed the growth of lung cancer tumor xenografts. Our results indicate that antrocin may be a potential therapeutic agent for human lung cancer cells through constitutive inhibition of JAK2/STAT3 pathway.

  12. Impacts of Exercise on Prognostic Biomarkers in Lung Cancer Patients

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-18

    Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Healthy, no Evidence of Disease; Limited Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  13. Cancer upregulated gene 2 induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition of human lung cancer cells via TGF-β signaling.

    PubMed

    Kaowinn, Sirichat; Kim, Jeonghyo; Lee, Jaebeom; Shin, Dong Hoon; Kang, Chi-Dug; Kim, Dae-Kee; Lee, Soojin; Kang, Min Kyung; Koh, Sang Seok; Kim, Seong-Jin; Chung, Young-Hwa

    2017-01-17

    Cancer upregulated gene 2 (CUG2) enhances cell migration and invasion, but the underlying mechanism has not been revealed. Herein, CUG2 decreased the expression of E-cadherin and increased the expression of N-cadherin and vimentin, characteristics of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). A CUG2 deletion mutant, lacking interaction with nucleophosmin 1 (NPM1), or suppression of NPM1 reduced wound healing and cell invasion, indicating that CUG2-mediated EMT requires NPM1. CUG2 enhanced activation of Smad2/3 and expression of Snail and Twist, while the CUG2 silence decreased these TGF-β signaling pathways, leading to suppression of EMT. NPM silence also inhibited the CUG2-induced TGF-β signaling. These results suggest that TGF-β signaling is involved in CUG2-induced EMT. Treatment with EW-7197, a novel inhibitor of TGF-β signaling, diminished CUG2-mediated EMT and inhibition of Akt, ERK, JNK, and p38 MAPK, non-canonical TGF-β signaling molecules, also decreased expression of Smad2/3, Snail and Twist, leading to inhibition of EMT. The results confirm that TGF-β signaling is essential for CUG2-mediated EMT. Interestingly, TGF-β enhanced CUG2 expression. We further found that both CUG2-induced TGF-β production and TGF-β-induced CUG2 up-regulation required a physical interaction between Sp1 and Smad2/3 in the CUG2 and TGF-β promoter, as demonstrated by a promoter reporter assay, immunoprecipitation, and ChIP assay. These results indicated close crosstalk between CUG2 and TGF-β. Conversely, suppression of CUG2 or NPM1 did not completely inhibit TGF-β-induced EMT, indicating that the effect of TGF-β on EMT is dominant over the effect of CUG2 on EMT. Collectively, our findings suggest that CUG2 induces the EMT via TGF-β signaling.

  14. Canadian population risk of radon induced lung cancer: a re-assessment based on the recent cross-Canada radon survey

    PubMed Central

    Chen, J.; Moir, D.; Whyte, J.

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to indoor radon has been determined to be the second leading cause of lung cancer after tobacco smoking. Canadian population risk of radon induced lung cancer was assessed in 2005 with the radon distribution characteristics determined from a radon survey carried out in the late 1970s in 19 cities. In that survey, a grab sampling method was used to measure radon levels. The observed radon concentration in 14 000 Canadian homes surveyed followed a log–normal distribution with a geometric mean (GM) of 11.2 Bq m–3 and a geometric standard deviation (GSD) of 3.9. Based on the information from that survey, it was estimated that ∼10 % of lung cancers in Canada resulted from indoor radon exposure. To gain a better understanding of radon concentrations in homes across the country, a national residential radon survey was launched in April 2009. In the recent survey, long-term (3 month or longer) indoor radon measurements were made in roughly 14 000 homes in 121 health regions across Canada. The observed radon concentrations follow, as expected, a log–normal distribution with a GM of 41.9 Bq m–3 and a GSD of 2.8. Based on the more accurate radon distribution characteristics obtained from the recent cross-Canada radon survey, a re-assessment of Canadian population risk for radon induced lung cancer was undertaken. The theoretical estimates show that 16 % of lung cancer deaths among Canadians are attributable to indoor radon exposure. These results strongly suggest the ongoing need for the Canadian National Radon Program. In particular, there is a need for a focus on education and awareness by all levels of government, and in partnership with key stakeholders, to encourage Canadians to take action to reduce the risk from indoor radon exposure. PMID:22874897

  15. PATZ1 induces PP4R2 to form a negative feedback loop on IKK/NF-κB signaling in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Ming-Yi; Liang, Chi-Ming; Liang, Shu-Mei

    2016-01-01

    Activation of IKK enhances NF-κB signaling to facilitate cancer cell migration, invasion and metastasis. Here, we uncover the existence of a negative feedback loop of IKK. The transcription factor PATZ1 induces protein phosphatase-4 (PP4) regulatory subunit 2 (PP4R2) in an IKK-dependent manner. PP4R2 enhances the binding of PP4 to phosphorylated IKK to inactivate IKK/NF-κB signaling during sustained stimulation by cellular stimuli such as growth factors and inflammatory mediators. Matched pair studies reveal that primary lung cancers express more PATZ1 and PP4R2 than lymph node metastases in patients. Ectopic PATZ1 decreases invasion/colonization of lung cancers and prolongs the survival of xenograft mice. These effects of PATZ1 are reversed by downregulating PP4R2. Our results suggest that PATZ1 and PP4R2 provide negative feedback on IKK/NF-κB signaling to prevent cancer cells from over-stimulation from cellular stimuli; a decline in PATZ1 and PP4R2 is functionally associated with cancer migration/invasion and agents enhancing PATZ1 and PP4R2 are worth exploring to prevent invasion/metastasis of lung cancers. PMID:27391343

  16. EML4-ALK induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition consistent with cancer stem cell properties in H1299 non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Fuchun; Liu, Xiaoke; Qing, Qin; Sang, Yaxiong; Feng, Chengjun; Li, Xiaoyu; Jiang, Li; Su, Pei; Wang, Yongsheng

    2015-04-10

    The echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4(EML4)--anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) fusion gene has been identified as a driver mutation in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, the role of EML4-ALK in malignant transformation is not entirely clear. Here, for the first time, we showed that H1299 NSCLC cells stably expressing EML4-ALK acquire EMT phenotype, associated with enhanced invasive migration and increased expression of EMT-inducing transcription factors. H1299-EML4-ALK cells also displayed cancer stem cell-like properties with a concomitant up-regulation of CD133 and enhanced ability of mammospheres formation. Moreover, we found that inhibition of ERK1/2 reversed EMT induced by EML4-ALK in H1299 cells. Taken together, these results suggested that EML4-ALK induced ERK activation is mechanistically associated with EMT phenotype. Thus, inhibition of ERK signaling pathway could be a potential strategy in treatment of NSCLC patients with EML4-ALK translocation.

  17. Expression of nerve growth factor and hypoxia inducible factor-1α and its correlation with angiogenesis in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qing-li; Liu, Jian; Zhu, Xiao-li; Xu, Wen-jia

    2014-06-01

    In order to investigate the expression of nerve growth factor (NGF) and hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and its correlation with angiogenesis in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), paraffin-embedded tissue blocks from 20 patients with NSCLC were examined. Twenty corresponding para-cancerous lung tissue specimens were obtained to serve as a control. The expression of NGF, HIF-1α, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the NSCLC tissues was detected by using immunohistochemistry. The microvascular density (MVD) was determined by CD31 staining. The results showed that the expression levels of NGF, HIF-1α and VEGF in the NSCLC tissues were remarkably higher than those in the para-cancerous lung tissues (P<0.05). There was significant difference in the MVD between the NSCLC tissues (9.19±1.43) and para-cancerous lung tissues (2.23±1.19) (P<0.05). There were positive correlations between NGF and VEGF, between HIF-1α and VEGF, and between NGF and HIF-1α in NSCLC tissues, with the spearman correlation coefficient being 0.588, 0.519 and 0.588, respectively. In NSCLC tissues, the MVD had a positive correlation with the three factors (P<0.05). Theses results suggest that NGF and HIF-1α are synergically involved in the angiogenesis of NSCLC.

  18. Chemoprevention of lung cancer by tea.

    PubMed

    Clark, Julie; You, Ming

    2006-02-01

    Tea is the second only to water as the most consumed beverage in the world. Both green and black teas have been studied for their health benefits for a variety of diseases, particularly cancer. Lung cancer is the predominant cause of cancer mortality in developed countries. Smokers' risk of lung cancer is 20 times that of persons who have never smoked. Epidemiological studies on the cancer-preventive effects of tea produce inconsistent results, which could in part be attributed to the lack of a universal standard for tea preparations. However, most animal studies indicate that tea has strong chemopreventive effects against lung tumorigenesis. The reported mechanisms for chemopreventive activity of green tea are antioxidation, induction of phase II enzymes, inhibition of TNFalpha expression and release, inhibition of cell proliferation, and induction of apoptosis. Cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induced by green tea are probably the two most significant factors. Future studies are needed to determine how green tea affects the genes associated with cell cycle regulation and apoptosis during the mouse lung carcinogenesis process.

  19. Coenzyme Q0 from Antrodia cinnamomea in Submerged Cultures Induces Reactive Oxygen Species-Mediated Apoptosis in A549 Human Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Cheng-Han; Lee, Kung-Ta

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the anticancer effects of Antrodia cinnamomea, a medicinal mushroom from Taiwan, on A549 human lung cancer cells using the ethyl acetate extract from submerged culture filtrates. Our results showed that 2,3-dimethoxy-5-methyl-1,4-benzoquinone (coenzyme Q0; CoQ0) derived from A. cinnamomea submerged culture filtrates has anticancer activity. CoQ0 treatment reduced the viability of A549, HepG2, and SW480 cancer cell lines. Furthermore, CoQ0 induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and apoptosis in A549 cells, which was inhibited by the antioxidant ascorbic acid. To our knowledge, these data demonstrate for the first time that CoQ0 derived from A. cinnamomea submerged culture filtrates exerts its anticancer effect through the induction of ROS-mediated apoptosis in A549 human lung cancer cells. PMID:25431605

  20. Risk Profiling May Improve Lung Cancer Screening

    Cancer.gov

    A new modeling study suggests that individualized, risk-based selection of ever-smokers for lung cancer screening may prevent more lung cancer deaths and improve the effectiveness and efficiency of screening compared with current screening recommendations

  1. Tobacco Smoking and Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Furrukh, Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    Tobacco smoking remains the most established cause of lung carcinogenesis and other disease processes. Over the last 50 years, tobacco refinement and the introduction of filters have brought a change in histology, and now adenocarcinoma has become the most prevalent subtype. Over the last decade, smoking also has emerged as a strong prognostic and predictive patient characteristic along with other variables. This article briefly reviews scientific facts about tobacco, and the process and molecular pathways involved in lung carcinogenesis in smokers and never-smokers. The evidence from randomised trials about tobacco smoking’s impact on lung cancer outcomes is also reviewed. PMID:23984018

  2. Erythromycin and clarithromycin modulation of growth factor-induced expression of heparanase mRNA on human lung cancer cells in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, M; Ito, T; Kashima, M; Fukui, S; Izumiyama, N; Watanabe, A; Sano, M; Fujiwara, Y; Miura, M

    2001-01-01

    Heparanase activity is correlated with the metastatic potential of several cancer cells and is a key enzyme in the breakdown of tissue barriers. It is also involved in the regulation of growth factor and cytokine activity. However, little is known about the factors that induce heparanase in cancer cells. We investigated the effect of three growth factors, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), on heparanase mRNA induction in lung cancer cells in vitro. In addition, we examined the effect of erythromycin (EM) and clarithromycin (CAM), which are 14-membered ring macrolide antibiotics that act as biological response modifiers, on the expression of heparanase mRNA induced by growth factors. PDGF, HGF and bFGF stimulated cell migration activity and enhanced the expression of heparanase mRNA in the human lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549. Via different mechanisms, EM and CAM modulate the induction by these factors of heparanase mRNA expression on A549 cells. EM also significantly suppressed A549 cell migration induced by PDGF and HGF, and CAM significantly suppressed A549cell migration induced by bFGF. The results suggest that the growth factors PDGF, HGF and bFGF are important inducers of heparanase in potentially invasive and metastatic cancer cells. The suppressive effect of heparanase mRNA expression by EM and CAM may have interestingtherapeutic applications in the prevention of metastasis. PMID:11759110

  3. Novel indole-based tambjamine-analogues induce apoptotic lung cancer cell death through p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase activation.

    PubMed

    Manuel-Manresa, Pilar; Korrodi-Gregório, Luís; Hernando, Elsa; Villanueva, Alberto; Martínez-García, David; Rodilla, Ananda M; Ramos, Ricard; Fardilha, Margarida; Moya, Juan; Quesada, Roberto; Soto-Cerrato, Vanessa; Perez-Tomas, Ricardo

    2017-04-10

    Lung cancer has become the leading killer cancer worldwide, due to late diagnosis and lack of efficient anticancer drugs. We have recently described novel natural-derived tambjamine analogues that are potent anion transporters capable of disrupting cellular ion balance, inducing acidification of the cytosol and hyperpolarization of cellular plasma membranes. Although these tambjamine analogues were able to compromise cell survival, their molecular mechanism of action remains largely unknown. Herein we characterize the molecular cell responses induced by highly active indole-based tambjamine analogues treatment in lung cancer cells. Expression changes produced after compounds treatment comprised genes related to apoptosis, cell cycle, growth factors and its receptors, protein kinases and topoisomerases, among others. Dysregulation of BCL2 and BIRC5/survivin genes suggested the apoptotic pathway as the induced molecular cell death mechanism. In fact, activation of several pro-apoptotic markers (caspase 9, caspase 3 and PARP) and reversion of the cytotoxic effect upon treatment with an apoptosis inhibitor (Z-VAD-FMK) were observed. Moreover, members of the Bcl-2 protein family suffered changes after tambjamine analogues treatment, with a concomitant protein decrease towards the pro-survival members. Besides this, it was observed cellular accumulation of ROS upon compound treatment and an activation of the stress-kinase p38 MAPK route that, when inhibited, reverted the cytotoxic effect of the tambjamine analogues. Finally, a significant therapeutic effect of these compounds was observed in subcutaneous and orthotopic lung cancer mice models. Taken together, these results shed light on the mechanism of action of novel cytotoxic anionophores and demonstrate the therapeutic effects against lung cancer.

  4. MiR-23a regulates TGF-β-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition by targeting E-cadherin in lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Cao, Mengru; Seike, Masahiro; Soeno, Chie; Mizutani, Hideaki; Kitamura, Kazuhiro; Minegishi, Yuji; Noro, Rintaro; Yoshimura, Akinobu; Cai, Li; Gemma, Akihiko

    2012-09-01

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) has been shown to be related to the pathogenesis of various diseases including lung cancer. Recently, microRNAs (miRNA) have been recognized as a new class of genes involved in human tumorigenesis. MiR-23a/24/27a is a miRNA cluster located in chromosome 19p13.12, which can function as an oncogene in several human cancers. In this study, we analyzed miR-23a/24/27a expression in 10 non-small cell cancer (NSCLC) cell lines by real-time PCR analysis. Correlation between expression of these miRNAs and TGF-β/Smad signaling was evaluated. We found that miR-23a could be regulated by TGF-β1 in a Smad-dependent manner in A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells showing the EMT phenomenon. Knockdown of miR-23a partially restored E-cadherin expression under conditions of TGF-β1 stimulation. In contrast, overexpression of miR-23a could suppress E-cadherin expression and stimulate EMT. Furthermore, A549 cells with overexpressed miR-23a were more resistant to gefitinib compared to the parental cells. These findings suggest that miR-23a regulates TGF-β-induced EMT by targeting E-cadherin in lung cancer cells and may be useful as a new therapeutic target in NSCLC.

  5. Science, medicine, and the future. Lung cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, T.

    1997-01-01

    Lung cancer, the most prevalent cancer in the Western world, is mainly caused by smoking. Nevertheless, only 20% of smokers develop lung cancer and while prevention is important, environmental factors are expected to contribute to the predicted rise in the incidence of lung cancer in the next 25 years. Survival of lung cancer is still poor, and new treatments are urgently needed. This review examines potential new therapeutic developments which have arisen from a greater understanding of the molecular and cellular biology of lung cancers. PMID:9066480

  6. Interleukin-6 Prevents the Initiation but Enhances the Progression of Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Qu, Zhaoxia; Sun, Fan; Zhou, Jingjiao; Li, Liwen; Shapiro, Steven D; Xiao, Gutian

    2015-08-15

    Recent studies suggest that high expression of the proinflammatory cytokine IL6 is associated with poor survival of lung cancer patients. Accordingly, IL6 has been a target of great interest for lung cancer therapy. However, the role of IL6 in lung cancer has not been determined yet. Here, we demonstrate that IL6 plays opposite roles in the initiation and growth of lung cancer in a mouse model of lung cancer induced by the K-Ras oncogene. We find that compared with wild-type mice, IL6-deficient mice developed much more lung tumors after an activating mutant of K-Ras was induced in the lungs. However, lung tumors developed in IL6-deficient mice were significantly smaller. Notably, both the lung tumor-suppressing and -promoting functions of IL6 involve its ability in activating the transcription factor STAT3. IL6/STAT3 signaling suppressed lung cancer initiation through maintaining lung homeostasis, regulating lung macrophages, and activating cytotoxic CD8 T cells under K-Ras oncogenic stress, whereas it promoted lung cancer cell growth through inducing the cell proliferation regulator cyclin D1. These studies reveal a previously unexplored role of IL6/STAT3 signaling in maintaining lung homeostasis and suppressing lung cancer induction. These studies also significantly improve our understanding of lung cancer and provide a molecular basis for designing IL6/STAT3-targeted therapies for this deadliest human cancer.

  7. Novel curcumin analogue IHCH exhibits potent anti‑proliferative effects by inducing autophagy in A549 lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Guang-Zhou; Xu, Su-Li; Sun, Gang-Chun; Chen, Xiao-Bing

    2014-07-01

    Curcumin is a natural polyphenolic compound that exhibits strong antioxidant and anticancer activities; however, low bioavailability has restricted its application in chemotherapeutic trials. The present study aimed to investigate the anticancer effect of the novel curcumin derivative 2E,6E‑2‑(1H‑indol‑3‑yl) methylene)‑6‑(4‑hydroxy‑3‑methoxy benzylidene)‑cyclohexanone (IHCH) on A549 lung cancer cells. Cells were treated with IHCH at different concentrations (1‑40 µM) for different time periods (1‑36 h). Microscopic analysis revealed that IHCH inhibited A549 cell growth and induced the formation of characteristic autophagolysosomes in a dose‑ and time‑dependent manner. Furthermore, the inhibitory rate of IHCH (40 µM) on A549 cell viability was 77.34% after 36 h of treatment. Acridine orange staining revealed an increase in autophagic vacuoles in the IHCH‑treated A549 cells. Monodansylcadaverine staining was used to analyze autophagy rate. Immunocytochemistry revealed an increase in light chain (LC) 3 protein expression in the IHCH‑treated cells and western blot analysis detected the conversion of LC3‑I to LC3‑II, as well as the recruitment of LC3 to autophagosomes in the cytoplasmatic compartment, suggesting the occurrence of autophagy. These findings show that IHCH induced autophagy in A549 cells, which is a novel cell death mechanism induced by curcumin derivatives.

  8. Non-small-cell lung cancer-induced immunosuppression by increased human regulatory T cells via Foxp3 promoter demethylation.

    PubMed

    Ke, Xing; Zhang, Shuping; Xu, Jian; Liu, Genyan; Zhang, Lixia; Xie, Erfu; Gao, Li; Li, Daqian; Sun, Ruihong; Wang, Fang; Pan, Shiyang

    2016-05-01

    Patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have immune defects that are poorly understood. Forkhead box protein P3 (Foxp3) is crucial for immunosuppression by CD4(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs). It is not well known how NSCLC induces Foxp3 expression and causes immunosuppression in tumor-bearing patients. Our study found a higher percentage of CD4(+) Tregs in the peripheral blood of NSCLC compared with healthy donors. NSCLC patients showed demethylation of eight CpG sites within the Foxp3 promoter with methylation ratios negatively correlated with CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) T levels. Foxp3 expression in CD4(+) Tregs was directly regulated by Foxp3 promoter demethylation and was involved in immunosuppression by NSCLC. To verify the effect of tumor cells on the phenotype and function of CD4(+) Tregs, we established a coculture system using NSCLC cell line and healthy CD4(+) T cells and showed that SPC-A1 induced IL-10 and TGF-β1 secretion by affecting the function of CD4(+) Tregs. The activity of DNA methyltransferases from CD4(+) T was decreased during this process. Furthermore, eight CpG sites within the Foxp3 promoter also appeared to have undergone demethylation. Foxp3 is highly expressed in CD4(+) T cells, and this may be caused by gene promoter demethylation. These induced Tregs are highly immunosuppressive and dramatically inhibit the proliferative activity of naïve CD4(+) T cells. Our study provides one possible mechanism describing Foxp3 promoter demethylation changes by which NSCLC down-regulates immune responses and contributes to tumor progression. Foxp3 represents an important target for NSCLC anti-tumor immunotherapy.

  9. A carbazole alkaloid deactivates mTOR through the suppression of rictor and that induces apoptosis in lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Priyajit; Seal, Soma; Mukherjee, Sandip; Kundu, Rakesh; Bhuyan, Mantu; Barua, Nabin C; Baruah, Pranab K; Babu, Santi Prasad Sinha; Bhattacharya, Samir

    2015-07-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is known to be a difficult cancer to treat because of its poor prognosis, limited option for surgery, and resistance to chemo or radiotherapy. In this study, we have demonstrated that suppression of rictor expression in A549 and H1299 NSCLC cells by mahanine, a carbazole alkaloid, disrupted constitutive activation of mTOR and Akt. Mahanine suppression of rictor gene expression and consequent attenuation of its protein expression affected the inhibition of mTOR (Ser-2481) and Akt (Ser-473) phosphorylation. Since mahanine treatment revealed this new insight of rictor-mTOR relationship, we examined an association between mTOR activation with rictor expression. Interestingly, in rictor knockdown (KD) NSCLC cells, mTOR activation was significantly impaired. Transfection of rictor over-expression vector into the NSCLC cells reversed this situation. In fact, both rictor KD and mahanine treated cells showed considerably depleted phospho-mTOR level. These results indicate that rictor is required to maintain constitutive activation of mTOR in lung cancer cells. When mTOR kinase activity in rictor KD cells was examined with Akt as substrate, a significant reduction of Akt phosphorylation indicated impairment of mTOR kinase potentiality. Disruption of mTOR and Akt activation caused drastic mortality of NSCLC cancer cells through apoptosis. Hence, our study reveals a new dimension in mTOR-rictor relationship, where rictor stands to be a suitable therapeutic target for lung cancer.

  10. Smoking induces epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in non-small cell lung cancer through HDAC-mediated downregulation of E-cadherin.

    PubMed

    Nagathihalli, Nagaraj S; Massion, Pierre P; Gonzalez, Adriana L; Lu, Pengcheng; Datta, Pran K

    2012-11-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown that most cases of lung cancers (85%-90%) are directly attributable to tobacco smoking. Although association between cigarette smoking and lung cancer is well documented, surprisingly little is known about the molecular mechanisms of how smoking is involved in epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) through epigenetic changes. Here, we show that lung cancer patients with a smoking history have low E-cadherin levels and loss of E-cadherin is a poor prognostic factor in smokers. Moreover, the downregulation of E-cadherin correlates with the number of pack years. In an attempt to determine the role of long-term cigarette smoking on EMT, we observed that treatment of lung cell lines with cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) induces EMT through downregulation of epithelial markers, including E-cadherin and upregulation of mesenchymal markers. CSC decreases E-cadherin expression at the transcriptional level through upregulation of LEF1 and Slug, and knockdown of these two proteins increases E-cadherin expression. Importantly, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays suggest that LEF-1 and Slug binding to E-cadherin promoter is important for CSC-mediated downregulation of E-cadherin. The histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor MS-275 reverses CSC-induced EMT, migration, and invasion through the restoration of E-cadherin expression. These results suggest that recruitment of HDACs by transcriptional repressors LEF-1 and Slug is responsible for E-cadherin suppression and EMT in cigarette smokers and provide a potential drug target toward the treatment of lung cancer.

  11. Fisetin induces apoptosis and endoplasmic reticulum stress in human non-small cell lung cancer through inhibition of the MAPK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Kang, Kyoung Ah; Piao, Mei Jing; Madduma Hewage, Susara Ruwan Kumara; Ryu, Yea Seong; Oh, Min Chang; Kwon, Taeg Kyu; Chae, Sungwook; Hyun, Jin Won

    2016-07-01

    Fisetin (3,3',4',7-tetrahydroxyflavone), a dietary flavonoid compound, is currently being investigated for its anticancer effect in various cancer models, including lung cancer. Recent studies show that fisetin induces cell growth inhibition and apoptosis in the human non-small cell lung cancer line NCI-H460. In this study, we investigated whether fisetin can induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-mediated apoptosis in NCI-H460 cells. Fisetin induced mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) and characteristic signs of ER stress: ER staining; mitochondrial Ca(2+) overload; expression of ER stress-related proteins; glucose-regulated protein (GRP)-78, phosphorylation of protein kinase RNA (PKR)-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK) and phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor-2 α subunit; cleavage of activating transcription factor-6; phosphorylation of inositol-requiring kinase-1 and splicing of X-box transcription factor-1; induction of C/EBP homologous protein and cleaved caspase-12. siRNA-mediated knockdown of CHOP and ATF-6 attenuated fisetin-induced apoptotic cell death. In addition, fisetin induced phosphorylation of ERK, JNK, and p38 MAPK. Moreover, silencing of the MAPK signaling pathway prevented apoptotic cell death. In summary, our results indicate that, in NCI-H460 cells, fisetin induces apoptosis and ER stress that is mediated by induction of the MAPK signaling pathway.

  12. Therapeutic inhibition of TRF1 impairs the growth of p53-deficient K-RasG12V-induced lung cancer by induction of telomeric DNA damage.

    PubMed

    García-Beccaria, María; Martínez, Paula; Méndez-Pertuz, Marinela; Martínez, Sonia; Blanco-Aparicio, Carmen; Cañamero, Marta; Mulero, Francisca; Ambrogio, Chiara; Flores, Juana M; Megias, Diego; Barbacid, Mariano; Pastor, Joaquín; Blasco, Maria A

    2015-07-01

    Telomeres are considered anti-cancer targets, as telomere maintenance above a minimum length is necessary for cancer growth. Telomerase abrogation in cancer-prone mouse models, however, only decreased tumor growth after several mouse generations when telomeres reach a critically short length, and this effect was lost upon p53 mutation. Here, we address whether induction of telomere uncapping by inhibition of the TRF1 shelterin protein can effectively block cancer growth independently of telomere length. We show that genetic Trf1 ablation impairs the growth of p53-null K-Ras(G12V)-induced lung carcinomas and increases mouse survival independently of telomere length. This is accompanied by induction of telomeric DNA damage, apoptosis, decreased proliferation, and G2 arrest. Long-term whole-body Trf1 deletion in adult mice did not impact on mouse survival and viability, although some mice showed a moderately decreased cellularity in bone marrow and blood. Importantly, inhibition of TRF1 binding to telomeres by small molecules blocks the growth of already established lung carcinomas without affecting mouse survival or tissue function. Thus, induction of acute telomere uncapping emerges as a potential new therapeutic target for lung cancer.

  13. Triggering of TLR7 and TLR8 expressed by human lung cancer cells induces cell survival and chemoresistance

    PubMed Central

    Cherfils-Vicini, Julien; Platonova, Sophia; Gillard, Mélanie; Laurans, Ludivine; Validire, Pierre; Caliandro, Rafaele; Magdeleinat, Pierre; Mami-Chouaib, Fathia; Dieu-Nosjean, Marie-Caroline; Fridman, Wolf-Herman; Damotte, Diane; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Cremer, Isabelle

    2010-01-01

    Compelling evidence suggests that inflammation, cell survival, and cancer are linked, with a central role played by NF-κB. Recent studies implicate some TLRs in tumor development based on their ability to facilitate tumor growth; however, to our knowledge, involvement of neither TLR7 nor TLR78 has yet been demonstrated. Here we have demonstrated expression of TLR7 and TLR8, the natural receptors for single-stranded RNA, by tumor cells in human lung cancer in situ and in human lung tumor cell lines. Stimulation with TLR7 or TLR8 agonists led to activated NF-κB, upregulated expression of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2, increased tumor cell survival, and chemoresistance. Transcriptional analysis performed on human primary lung tumor cells and TLR7- or TLR8-stimulated human lung tumor cell lines revealed a gene expression signature suggestive of chronic stimulation of tumor cells by TLR ligands in situ. Together, these data emphasize that TLR signaling can directly favor tumor development and further suggest that researchers developing anticancer immunotherapy using TLR7 or TLR8 agonists as adjuvants should take into account the expression of these TLRs in lung tumor cells. PMID:20237413

  14. Unfolded Protein Response Promotes Doxorubicin-Induced Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer Cells Apoptosis via the mTOR Pathway Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaofang; Yang, Yan; Yao, Fuli; Xiao, Bin; Cheng, Ying; Feng, Chunhong; Duan, Chunyan; Zhang, Chunyan; Liu, Youping; Li, Hong; Xiao, Bo; Dai, Rongyang

    2016-12-01

    Drug resistance is extremely common in nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and is one of the major problems in NSCLC chemotherapy. However, the detailed mechanisms remain largely unknown. Unfolded protein response (UPR) is involved in the tumorigenesis of NSCLC. Here, the authors demonstrated that the UPR promotes poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase activation (PARP) cleavage in NSCLC cells on doxorubicin treatment, which is a hallmark of apoptosis and caspase activation. In NSCLC cells, doxorubicin treatment triggers the UPR activation, which subsequently promotes doxorubicin-mediated apoptosis. Importantly, mild endoplasmic reticulum stress precondition enhances the sensitivity of NSCLC cells to doxorubicin-initiated apoptosis. Furthermore, the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α (eIF2α) branch of the UPR is involved in the synergistic role of the UPR in NSCLC cell apoptosis on doxorubicin treatment. They also demonstrated that the mTOR pathway plays an essential role in synergistic induction of apoptosis by the UPR and doxorubicin in NSCLC cells. Taken together, these results provide a potential mechanism that the UPR promotes doxorubicin-induced apoptosis in NSCLC cells, at least in part, by eIF2α-mediated mTOR signal inactivation.

  15. Serine Proteases Enhance Immunogenic Antigen Presentation on Lung Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Peters, Haley L; Tripathi, Satyendra C; Kerros, Celine; Katayama, Hiroyuki; Garber, Haven R; St John, Lisa S; Federico, Lorenzo; Meraz, Ismail M; Roth, Jack A; Sepesi, Boris; Majidi, Mourad; Ruisaard, Kathryn; Clise-Dwyer, Karen; Roszik, Jason; Gibbons, Don L; Heymach, John V; Swisher, Stephen G; Bernatchez, Chantale; Alatrash, Gheath; Hanash, Samir; Molldrem, Jeffrey J

    2017-03-02

    Immunotherapies targeting immune checkpoints have proven efficacious in reducing the burden of lung cancer in patients; however, the antigenic targets of these reinvigorated T cells remain poorly defined. Lung cancer tumors contain tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) and neutrophils, which release the serine proteases neutrophil elastase (NE) and proteinase 3 (P3) into the tumor microenvironment. NE and P3 shape the antitumor adaptive immune response in breast cancer and melanoma. In this report, we demonstrate that lung cancer cells cross-presented the tumor-associated antigen PR1, derived from NE and P3. Additionally, NE and P3 enhanced the expression of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules on lung cancer cells and induced unique, endogenous peptides in the immunopeptidome, as detected with mass spectrometry sequencing. Lung cancer patient tissues with high intratumoral TAMs were enriched for MHC class I genes and T-cell markers, and patients with high TAM and cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) infiltration had improved overall survival. We confirmed the immunogenicity of unique, endogenous peptides with cytotoxicity assays against lung cancer cell lines, using CTLs from healthy donors that had been expanded against select peptides. Finally, CTLs specific for serine proteases-induced endogenous peptides were detected in lung cancer patients using peptide/HLA-A2 tetramers and were elevated in tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes. Thus, serine proteases in the tumor microenvironment of lung cancers promote the presentation of HLA class I immunogenic peptides that are expressed by lung cancer cells, thereby increasing the antigen repertoire that can be targeted in lung cancer. Cancer Immunol Res; 5(4); 1-11. ©2017 AACR.

  16. Lung Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... medical care even if there are symptoms. False-positive test results can occur. Screening test results may ... even though no cancer is present. A false-positive test result (one that shows there is cancer ...

  17. Dexamethasone suppresses the growth of human non-small cell lung cancer via inducing estrogen sulfotransferase and inactivating estrogen

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li-jie; Li, Jian; Hao, Fang-ran; Yuan, Yin; Li, Jing-yun; Lu, Wei; Zhou, Tian-yan

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Dexamethasone (DEX) is a widely used synthetic glucocorticoid, which has shown anti-cancer efficacy and anti-estrogenic activity. In this study we explored the possibility that DEX might be used as an endocrine therapeutic agent to treat human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: The viability and proliferation of human NSCLC cell lines A549 and H1299 were assessed in vitro. Anti-tumor action was also evaluated in A549 xenograft nude mice treated with DEX (2 or 4 mg·kg−1·d−1, ig) or the positive control tamoxifen (50 mg·kg−1·d−1, ig) for 32 d. The expression of estrogen sulfotransferase (EST) in tumor cells and tissues was examined. The intratumoral estrogen levels and uterine estrogen responses were measured. Results: DEX displayed mild cytotoxicity to the NSCLC cells (IC50 >500 μmol/L) compared to tamoxifen (IC50 <50 μmol/L), but it was able to inhibit the cell proliferation at low micromolar ranges. Furthermore, DEX (0.1–10 μmol/L) dose-dependently up-regulated EST expression in the cells, and inhibited the cell migration in vitro. Triclosan, a sulfation inhibitor, was able to diminish DEX-caused inhibition on the cell viability. In A549 xenograft nude mice, DEX or tamoxifen administration remarkably suppressed the tumor growth. Moreover, DEX administration dose-dependently increased EST expression in tumor tissues, and reduced intratumoral estrogen levels as well as the volumes and weights of uterine. Conclusion: DEX suppresses the growth of A549 xenograft tumors via inducing EST and decreasing estradiol levels in tumor tissues, suggesting that DEX may be used as anti-estrogenic agent for the treatment of NSCLC. PMID:27133297

  18. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for Stage I lung cancer with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: special reference to survival and radiation-induced pneumonitis

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Toshihiko; Shiomi, Hiroya; Oh, Ryoong-Jin

    2015-01-01

    This retrospective study aimed to evaluate radiation-induced pneumonitis (RIP) and a related condition that we define in this report—prolonged minimal RIP (pmRIP)—after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for Stage I primary lung cancer in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We assessed 136 Stage I lung cancer patients with COPD who underwent SBRT. Airflow limitation on spirometry was classified into four Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) grades, with minor modifications: GOLD 1 (mild), GOLD 2 (moderate), GOLD 3 (severe) and GOLD 4 (very severe). On this basis, we defined two subgroups: COPD-free (COPD −) and COPD-positive (COPD +). There was no significant difference in overall survival or cause-specific–survival between these groups. Of the 136 patients, 44 (32%) had pmRIP. Multivariate analysis showed that COPD and the Brinkman index were statistically significant risk factors for the development of pmRIP. COPD and the Brinkman index were predictive factors for pmRIP, although our findings also indicate that SBRT can be tolerated in early lung cancer patients with COPD. PMID:25887042

  19. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for Stage I lung cancer with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: special reference to survival and radiation-induced pneumonitis.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Toshihiko; Shiomi, Hiroya; Oh, Ryoong-Jin

    2015-07-01

    This retrospective study aimed to evaluate radiation-induced pneumonitis (RIP) and a related condition that we define in this report--prolonged minimal RIP (pmRIP)--after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for Stage I primary lung cancer in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We assessed 136 Stage I lung cancer patients with COPD who underwent SBRT. Airflow limitation on spirometry was classified into four Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) grades, with minor modifications: GOLD 1 (mild), GOLD 2 (moderate), GOLD 3 (severe) and GOLD 4 (very severe). On this basis, we defined two subgroups: COPD-free (COPD -) and COPD-positive (COPD +). There was no significant difference in overall survival or cause-specific-survival between these groups. Of the 136 patients, 44 (32%) had pmRIP. Multivariate analysis showed that COPD and the Brinkman index were statistically significant risk factors for the development of pmRIP. COPD and the Brinkman index were predictive factors for pmRIP, although our findings also indicate that SBRT can be tolerated in early lung cancer patients with COPD.

  20. Lung cancer in elderly patients

    PubMed Central

    Diso, Daniele; Onorati, Ilaria; Anile, Marco; Mantovani, Sara; Rendina, Erino A.

    2016-01-01

    There is a worldwide-accepted evidence of a population shift toward older ages. This shift favors an increased risk of developing lung cancer that is primarily a disease of older populations. Decision making is extremely difficult in elderly patients, since this group is under-represented in clinical trials with only 25% of them historically opening to patients older than 65 years. For all these reasons, a “customized” preoperative assessment to identify physiological or pathological frailty should be encouraged since standard tools may be less reliable. The work already done to improve patient selection for lung surgery in the elderly population clearly shows that surgical resection seems the treatment of choice for early stage lung cancer. Further studies are required to improve outcome by reducing postoperative morbidity and mortality. PMID:27942414

  1. Molecular Epidemiology of Female Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yim, Seon-Hee; Chung, Yeun-Jun

    2011-01-01

    Lung cancer is still a leading cause of cancer mortality in the world. The incidence of lung cancer in developed countries started to decrease mainly due to global anti-smoking campaigns. However, the incidence of lung cancer in women has been increasing in recent decades for various reasons. Furthermore, since the screening of lung cancer is not as yet very effective, clinically applicable molecular markers for early diagnosis are much required. Lung cancer in women appears to have differences compared with that in men, in terms of histologic types and susceptibility to environmental risk factors. This suggests that female lung cancer can be derived by carcinogenic mechanisms different from those involved in male lung cancer. Among female lung cancer patients, many are non-smokers, which could be studied to identify alternative carcinogenic mechanisms independent from smoking-related ones. In this paper, we reviewed molecular susceptibility markers and genetic changes in lung cancer tissues observed in female lung cancer patients, which have been validated by various studies and will be helpful to understand the tumorigenesis of lung cancer. PMID:24212786

  2. A superoxide-mediated mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 degradation and c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase activation pathway for luteolin-induced lung cancer cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Bai, Lang; Xu, Xiuling; Wang, Qiong; Xu, Shanling; Ju, Wei; Wang, Xia; Chen, Wenshu; He, Weiyang; Tang, Hong; Lin, Yong

    2012-04-01

    Although luteolin is identified as a potential cancer therapeutic and preventive agent because of its potent cancer cell-killing activity, the molecular mechanisms by which its cancer cell cytotoxicity is achieved have not been well elucidated. In this report, luteolin-induced cellular signaling was systematically investigated, and a novel pathway for luteolin's lung cancer killing was identified. The results show that induction of superoxide is an early and crucial step for luteolin-induced apoptotic and nonapoptotic death in lung cancer cells. The c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) was potently activated after superoxide accumulation. Suppression of superoxide completely blocked luteolin-induced JNK activation, which was well correlated to alleviation of luteolin's cytotoxicity. Although luteolin slightly stimulated the JNK-activating kinase mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 7, the latter was not dependent on superoxide. We further found that luteolin triggers a superoxide-dependent rapid degradation of the JNK-inactivating phosphatase mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1). Introduction of a degradation-resistant MKP-1 mutant effectively attenuated luteolin-induced JNK activation and cytotoxicity, suggesting that inhibition of the JNK suppressor MKP-1 plays a major role in luteolin-induced lung cancer cell death. Taken together, our results unveil a novel pathway consisting of superoxide, MKP-1, and JNK for luteolin's cytotoxicity in lung cancer cells, and manipulation of this pathway could be a useful approach for applying luteolin for lung cancer prevention and therapy.

  3. Genetics Home Reference: lung cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... present in up to half of all lung cancer cases. These genes each provide instructions for making a protein that is embedded within the cell membrane. When these proteins are turned on (activated) by binding to other molecules, signaling pathways are triggered within cells that promote cell growth ...

  4. Metastatic cancer to the lung

    MedlinePlus

    ... ray Lung with squamous cell cancer - CT scan Respiratory system References Arenberg DA, Pickens A. Metastatic malignant tumors. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst JD, et al, eds. Murray and Nadel's Textbook of Respiratory Medicine . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016: ...

  5. KLF4 regulates adult lung tumor-initiating cells and represses K-Ras-mediated lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Yu, T; Chen, X; Zhang, W; Liu, J; Avdiushko, R; Napier, D L; Liu, A X; Neltner, J M; Wang, C; Cohen, D; Liu, C

    2016-02-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality in both men and women worldwide. To identify novel factors that contribute to lung cancer pathogenesis, we analyzed a lung cancer database from The Cancer Genome Atlas and found that Krüppel-like Factor 4 (KLF4) expression is significantly lower in patients' lung cancer tissue than in normal lung tissue. In addition, we identified seven missense mutations in the KLF4 gene. KLF4 is a transcription factor that regulates cell proliferation and differentiation as well as the self-renewal of stem cells. To understand the role of KLF4 in the lung, we generated a tamoxifen-induced Klf4 knockout mouse model. We found that KLF4 inhibits lung cancer cell growth and that depletion of Klf4 altered the differentiation pattern in the developing lung. To understand how KLF4 functions during lung tumorigenesis, we generated the K-ras(LSL-G12D/+);Klf4(fl/fl) mouse model, and we used adenovirus-expressed Cre to induce K-ras activation and Klf4 depletion in the lung. Although Klf4 deletion alone or K-ras mutation alone can trigger lung tumor formation, Klf4 deletion combined with K-ras mutation significantly enhanced lung tumor formation. We also found that Klf4 deletion in conjunction with K-ras activation caused lung inflammation. To understand the mechanism whereby KLF4 is regulated during lung tumorigenesis, we analyzed KLF4 promoter methylation and the profiles of epigenetic factors. We found that Class I histone deacetylases (HDACs) are overexpressed in lung cancer and that HDAC inhibitors induced expression of KLF4 and inhibited proliferation of lung cancer cells, suggesting that KLF4 is probably repressed by histone acetylation and that HDACs are valuable drug targets for lung cancer treatment.

  6. Salinomycin enhances cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity in human lung cancer cells via down-regulation of AKT-dependent thymidylate synthase expression.

    PubMed

    Ko, Jen-Chung; Zheng, Hao-Yu; Chen, Wen-Ching; Peng, Yi-Shuan; Wu, Chia-Hung; Wei, Chia-Li; Chen, Jyh-Cheng; Lin, Yun-Wei

    2016-12-15

    Salinomycin, a polyether antibiotic, acts as a highly selective potassium ionophore and has anticancer activity on various cancer cell lines. Cisplatin has been proved as chemotherapy drug for advanced human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Thymidylate synthase (TS) is a key enzyme in the pyrimidine salvage pathway, and increased expression of TS is thought to be associated with resistance to cisplatin. In this study, we showed that salinomycin (0.5-2μg/mL) treatment down-regulating of TS expression in an AKT inactivation manner in two NSCLC cell lines, human lung adenocarcinoma A549 and squamous cell carcinoma H1703 cells. Knockdown of TS using small interfering RNA (siRNA) or inhibiting AKT activity with PI3K inhibitor LY294002 enhanced the cytotoxicity and cell growth inhibition of salinomycin. A combination of cisplatin and salinomycin resulted in synergistic enhancement of cytotoxicity and cell growth inhibition in NSCLC cells, accompanied with reduced activation of phospho-AKT, and TS expression. Overexpression of a constitutive active AKT (AKT-CA) expression vector reversed the salinomycin and cisplatin-induced synergistic cytotoxicity. In contrast, pretreatment with LY294002 further decreased the cell viability in salinomycin and cisplatin cotreated cells. Our findings suggested that the down-regulation of AKT-mediated TS expression by salinomycin enhanced the cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity in NSCLC cells. These results may provide a rationale to combine salinomycin with cisplatin for lung cancer treatment.

  7. Antitumor activity of intratracheal inhalation of temozolomide (TMZ) loaded into gold nanoparticles and/or liposomes against urethane-induced lung cancer in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Hamzawy, Mohamed A; Abo-Youssef, Amira M; Salem, Heba F; Mohammed, Sameh A

    2017-11-01

    The current study aimed to develop gold nanoparticles (GNPs) and liposome-embedded gold nanoparticles (LGNPs) as drug carriers for temozolomide (TMZ) and investigate the possible therapeutic effects of intratracheal inhalation of nanoformulation of TMZ-loaded gold nanoparticles (TGNPs) and liposome-embedded TGNPs (LTGNPs) against urethane-induced lung cancer in BALB/c mice. Physicochemical characters and zeta potential studies for gold nanoparticles (GNPs) and liposome-embedded gold nanoparticles (LGNPs) were performed. The current study was conducted by inducing lung cancer chemically via repeated exposure to urethane in BALB/C mice. GNPs and LGNPs were exhibited in uniform spherical shape with adequate dispersion stability. GNPs and LGNPs showed no significant changes in comparison to control group with high safety profile, while TGNPs and LTGNPs succeed to improve all biochemical data and histological patterns. GNPs and LGNPs are promising drug carriers and succeeded in the delivery of small and efficient dose of temozolomide in treatment lung cancer. Antitumor activity was pronounced in animal-treated LTGNPs, these effects may be due to synergistic effects resulted from combination of temozolomide and gold nanoparticles and liposomes that may improve the drug distribution and penetration.

  8. Practical use of advanced mouse models for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Safari, Roghaiyeh; Meuwissen, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    To date a variety of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and small cell lung cancer (SCLC) mouse models have been developed that mimic human lung cancer. Chemically induced or spontaneous lung cancer in susceptible inbred strains has been widely used, but the more recent genetically engineered somatic mouse models recapitulate much better the genotype-phenotype correlations found in human lung cancer. Additionally, improved orthotopic transplantation of primary human cancer tissue fragments or cells into lungs of immune-compromised mice can be valuable tools for preclinical research such as antitumor drug tests. Here we give a short overview of most somatic mouse models for lung cancer that are currently in use. We accompany each different model with a description of its practical use and application for all major lung tumor types, as well as the intratracheal injection or direct injection of fresh or freeze-thawed tumor cells or tumor cell lines into lung parenchyma of recipient mice. All here presented somatic mouse models are based on the ability to (in) activate specific alleles at a time, and in a tissue-specific cell type, of choice. This spatial-temporal controlled induction of genetic lesions allows the selective introduction of main genetic lesions in an adult mouse lung as found in human lung cancer. The resulting conditional somatic mouse models can be used as versatile powerful tools in basic lung cancer research and preclinical translational studies alike. These distinctively advanced lung cancer models permit us to investigate initiation (cell of origin) and progression of lung cancer, along with response and resistance to drug therapy. Cre/lox or FLP/frt recombinase-mediated methods are now well-used techniques to develop tissue-restricted lung cancer in mice with tumor-suppressor gene and/or oncogene (in)activation. Intranasal or intratracheal administration of engineered adenovirus-Cre or lentivirus-Cre has been optimized for introducing Cre

  9. Preclinical Activity of Simvastatin Induces Cell Cycle Arrest in G1 via Blockade of Cyclin D-Cdk4 Expression in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yu-Wei; Chang, Chi-Chang; Hung, Chao-Ming; Chen, Tzu-Yu; Huang, Tzuu-Yuan; Hsu, Yi-Chiang

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer-related death. Nonetheless, a decrease in overall incidence and mortality has been observed in the last 30 years due to prevention strategies and improvements in the use of chemotherapeutic agents. In recent studies, Simvastatin (SIM) has demonstrated anti-tumor activity, as well as potent chemopreventive action. As an inhibitor of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMG-CoA), SIM has been shown to stimulate apoptotic cell death. In this study, an MTT assay revealed the cytotoxic activity of SIM against human large cell lung cancer (Non-small cell lung cancer; NSCLC) cells (NCI-H460); however, induced apoptosis was not observed in NCI-H460 cells. Protein expression levels of cell cycle regulating proteins Cdk4, Cyclin D1, p16 and p27 were markedly altered by SIM. Collectively, our results indicate that SIM inhibits cell proliferation and arrests NCI-H460 cell cycle progression via inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinases and cyclins and the enhancement of CDK inhibitors p16 and p27. Our findings suggest that, in addition to the known effects on hypercholesterolemia therapy, SIM may also provide antitumor activity in established NSCLC. PMID:23481641

  10. Efficacy of aerosol therapy of lung cancer correlates with EGFR paralysis induced by AvidinOX-anchored biotinylated Cetuximab

    PubMed Central

    Santis, Rita De; Rosi, Antonio; Anastasi, Anna Maria; Chiapparino, Caterina; Albertoni, Claudio; Leoni, Barbara; Pelliccia, Angela; Santapaola, Daniela; Carollo, Valeria; Marra, Emanuele; Aurisicchio, Luigi; Arseni, Brunilde; Pacello, Maria Lucrezia; Palmieri, Gabriella; Battella, Simone; Petronzelli, Fiorella; Milazzo, Ferdinando Maria

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer, as well as lung metastases from distal primary tumors, could benefit from aerosol treatment. Unfortunately, because of lung physiology, clearance of nebulized drugs is fast, paralleled by unwanted systemic exposure. Here we report that nebulized AvidinOX can act as an artificial receptor for biotinylated drugs. In nude and SCID mice with advanced human KRAS-mutated A549 metastatic lung cancer, pre-nebulization with AvidinOX enables biotinylated Cetuximab to control tumor growth at a dose lower than 1/25,000 the intravenous effective dose. This result correlates with a striking, specific and unpredictable effect of AvidinOX-anchored biotinylated Cetuximab, as well as Panitumumab, observed on a panel of tumor cell lines, leading to inhibition of dimerization and signalling, blockade of endocytosis, induction of massive lysosomal degradation and abrogation of nuclear translocation of EGFR. Excellent tolerability, together with availability of pharmaceutical-grade AvidinOX and antibodies, will allow rapid clinical translation of the proposed therapy. PMID:25238453

  11. Efficacy of aerosol therapy of lung cancer correlates with EGFR paralysis induced by AvidinOX-anchored biotinylated Cetuximab.

    PubMed

    De Santis, Rita; Rosi, Antonio; Anastasi, Anna Maria; Chiapparino, Caterina; Albertoni, Claudio; Leoni, Barbara; Pelliccia, Angela; Santapaola, Daniela; Carollo, Valeria; Marra, Emanuele; Aurisicchio, Luigi; Arseni, Brunilde; Pacello, Maria Lucrezia; Palmieri, Gabriella; Battella, Simone; Petronzelli, Fiorella; Milazzo, Ferdinando Maria

    2014-10-15

    Lung cancer, as well as lung metastases from distal primary tumors, could benefit from aerosol treatment. Unfortunately, because of lung physiology, clearance of nebulized drugs is fast, paralleled by unwanted systemic exposure. Here we report that nebulized AvidinOX can act as an artificial receptor for biotinylated drugs. In nude and SCID mice with advanced human KRAS-mutated A549 metastatic lung cancer, pre-nebulization with AvidinOX enables biotinylated Cetuximab to control tumor growth at a dose lower than 1/25,000 the intravenous effective dose. This result correlates with a striking, specific and unpredictable effect of AvidinOX-anchored biotinylated Cetuximab, as well as Panitumumab, observed on a panel of tumor cell lines, leading to inhibition of dimerization and signalling, blockade of endocytosis, induction of massive lysosomal degradation and abrogation of nuclear translocation of EGFR. Excellent tolerability, together with availability of pharmaceutical-grade AvidinOX and antibodies, will allow rapid clinical translation of the proposed therapy.

  12. Apoptotic action of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma activation in human non small-cell lung cancer is mediated via proline oxidase-induced reactive oxygen species formation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Young; Ahn, Jin Hee; Cheon, Hyae Gyeong

    2007-09-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-gamma ligands have been shown to inhibit human lung cancers by inducing apoptosis and differentiation. In the present study, we elucidated the apoptotic mechanism of PPARgamma activation in human lung cancers by using a novel PPARgamma agonist, 1-(trans-methylimino-N-oxy)-6-(2-morpholinoethoxy)-3-phenyl-(1H-indene-2-carboxylic acid ethyl ester (KR-62980), and rosiglitazone. PPARgamma activation selectively inhibited cell viability of non-small-cell lung cancer with little effect on small-cell lung cancer and normal lung cells. The cell death induced by PPARgamma activation presented apoptotic features of oligonucleosomal DNA fragmentation in A549 human non-small-cell lung cancer cell line. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was accompanied by increased expression of proline oxidase (POX), a redox enzyme expressed in mitochondria, upon incubation with the agonists. POX RNA interference treatment blocked PPARgamma-induced ROS formation and cytotoxicity, suggesting that POX plays a functional role in apoptosis through ROS formation. The apoptotic effects by the agonists were antagonized by bisphenol A diglycidyl ether, a PPARgamma antagonist, and by knockdown of PPARgamma expression, indicating the involvement of PPARgamma in these actions. The results of the present study suggest that PPARgamma activation induces apoptotic cell death in non-small-cell lung carcinoma mainly through ROS formation via POX induction.

  13. Post-cancer Treatment with Condurango 30C Shows Amelioration of Benzo[a]pyrene-induced Lung Cancer in Rats Through the Molecular Pathway of Caspa- se-3-mediated Apoptosis Induction

    PubMed Central

    Sikdar, Sourav; Mukherjee, Avinaba; Bishayee, Kausik; Paul, Avijit; Saha, Santu Kumar; Ghosh, Samrat; Khuda-Bukhsh, Anisur Rahman

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The present investigation aimed at examining if post-cancer treatment with a potentized homeopathic drug, Condurango 30C, which is generally used to treat oesophageal cancer, could also show an ameliorating effect through apoptosis induction on lung cancer induced by benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) in white rats (Rattus norvegicus). Methods: Lung cancer was induced after four months by chronic feeding of BaP to rats through gavage at a dose of 50 mg/kg body weight for one month. After four months, the lung-cancer-bearing rats were treated with Condurango 30C for the next one (5th), two (5th-6th) and three (5th-7th) months, respectively, and were sacrificed at the corresponding time- points. The ameliorating effect, if any, after Condurango 30C treatment for the various periods was evaluated by using protocols such as histology, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), annexinV-FITC/PI assay, flow cytometry of the apoptosis marker, DNA fragmentation, reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), immunohistochemistry, and western blot analyses of lung tissue samples. Results: Striking recovery of lung tissue to a near normal status was noticed after post-cancerous drug treatment, as evidenced by SEM and histology, especially after one and two months of drug treatment. Data from the annexinV-FITC/PI and DNA fragmentation assays revealed that Condurango 30C could induce apoptosis in cancer cells after post-cancer treatment. A critical analysis of signalling cascade, evidenced through a RT-PCR study, demonstrated up-regulation and down-regulation of different pro- and anti-apoptotic genes, respectively, related to a caspase-3-mediated apoptotic pathway, which was especially discernible after one-month and two- month drug treatments. Correspondingly, Western blot and immunohistochemistry studies confirmed the ameliorative potential of Condurango 30C by its ability to down-regulate the elevated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression, a hallmark of lung

  14. Enhancement of antitumor effect of paclitaxel in combination with immunomodulatory Withania somnifera on benzo(a)pyrene induced experimental lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Senthilnathan, Palaniyandi; Padmavathi, Radhakrishnan; Banu, Syed Mumtaz; Sakthisekaran, Dhanapal

    2006-02-25

    The current experimental work deals with the immunomodulatory studies on the extract of Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal root powder against benzo(a)pyrene induced lung cancer in male Swiss albino mice. In our previous study, we reported the antioxidant and anticarcinogenic effect of W. somnifera (L.) Dunal along with paclitaxel. Immune dysfunction has been found to be associated with cancer and chemotherapy. Benzo(a)pyrene induced cancer animals were treated with 400mg/kg bodyweight of W. somnifera (L.) Dunal extract for 30 days significantly alters the levels of immunocompetent cells, immune complexes and immunoglobulins. Based on the data, the carcinogen as well as the paclitaxel affects the immune system, the toxic side effects on the immune system is more reversible and more controllable by W. somnifera (L.) Dunal. These results concluded the immunomodulatory activity of W. somnifera (L.) Dunal extract, which is a known immunomodulator in indigenous medicine.

  15. Pathogenesis sequences in Gejiu miners with lung cancer: an introduction.

    PubMed

    Li, Bian; Ruan, Yonghua; Ma, Liju; Hua, Hairong; Li, Zhou; Tuo, Xiaoyu; Zhou, Zheyan; Li, Ting; Liu, Shiyue; Jin, Kewei

    2015-09-01

    Tin miners in Gejiu, Yunnan Province, China are at high risk of developing lung cancer with significant occupational characteristics. Tissue samples from these miners presented pathological characteristics, such as fibroplasia in carcinomas, peri-cancerous tissue in lung cancers, and hyperplasia and dysplasia of epithelial cells in peri-cancerous tissue. Carcinomas induced by Yunnan tin mine dust in the animal experiment underwent inflammation, fibroplasia, hyperplasia, dysplasia, and carcinogenesis of epithelial cells. A correlated and synergistic relationship was observed between bronchial epithelial cell transformation and fibroblast activation in vitro induced by mine dust. Fibroblast hyperplasia and activation are important factors that promote the transformation and carcinogenesis of epithelial cells. Our findings suggested that pulmonary fibrosis may increase the risk and promote the occurrence of lung cancer, which can lead to lung fiber hyperplasia.

  16. Nano neodymium oxide induces massive vacuolization and autophagic cell death in non-small cell lung cancer NCI-H460 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Yong; Yang Lisong; Feng Chao; Wen Longping . E-mail: lpwen@ustc.edu.cn

    2005-11-11

    Neodymium, a rare earth element, was known to exhibit cytotoxic effects and induce apoptosis in certain cancer cells. Here we show that nano-sized neodymium oxide (Nano Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3}) induced massive vacuolization and cell death in non-small cell lung cancer NCI-H460 cells at micromolar equivalent concentration range. Cell death elicited by Nano Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3} was not due to apoptosis and caspases were not involved. Electron microscopy and acridine orange staining revealed extensive autophagy in the cytoplasm of the cells treated by Nano Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Autophagy induced by Nano Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3} was accompanied by S-phase cell cycle arrest, mild disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential, and inhibition of proteasome activity. Bafilomycin A1, but not 3-MA, induced apoptosis while inhibiting autophagy. Our results revealed a novel biological function for Nano Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3} and may have implications for the therapy of non-small cell lung cancer.

  17. Isolinderalactone inhibits proliferation of A549 human non‑small cell lung cancer cells by arresting the cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase and inducing a Fas receptor and soluble Fas ligand-mediated apoptotic pathway.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wei-An; Lin, En-Shyh; Tsai, Ming-Ju; Huang, Ming-Shyan; Kuo, Po-Lin

    2014-05-01

    Lung cancer is currently the leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. In Taiwan, lung cancer is also the type of malignancy that is the major cause of cancer-mortality. Investigating the mechanism of apoptosis of lung cancer cells is important in the treatment of lung cancer. In the present study, isolinderalactone was demonstrated to exhibit anticancer effects in A549 human non-small cell lung cancer cells. The effect of isolinderalactone on apoptosis, cell cycle distribution p21 levels and the Fas receptor and soluble Fas ligand (sFasL) were assayed in order to determine the mechanism underlying the anticancer effect of isolinderalactone. It was demonstrated that isolinderalactone may induce p21 expression and then cause the cell cycle arrest of A549 cells. The data of the present study also revealed that the Fas/sFasL apoptotic system is significant in the mechanism of isolinderalactone‑induced apoptosis of A549 cells. These novel findings demonstrated that isolinderalactone may cause the cell cycle arrest of A549 cells by induction of p21, and induce apoptosis of A549 human non-small-cell lung carcinoma cells through the Fas/sFasL apoptotic system.

  18. Antitumor Effects of Laminaria Extract Fucoxanthin on Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mei, ChengHan; Zhou, ShunChang; Zhu, Lin; Ming, JiaXiong; Zeng, FanDian; Xu, Rong

    2017-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide and non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common type. Marine plants provide rich resources for anticancer drug discovery. Fucoxanthin (FX), a Laminaria japonica extract, has attracted great research interest for its antitumor activities. Accumulating evidence suggests anti-proliferative effects of FX on many cancer cell lines including NSCLCs, but the detailed mechanisms remain unclear. In the present investigation, we confirmed molecular mechanisms and in vivo anti-lung cancer effect of FX at the first time. Flow cytometry, real-time PCR, western blotting and immunohistochemistry revealed that FX arrested cell cycle and induced apoptosis by modulating expression of p53, p21, Fas, PUMA, Bcl-2 and caspase-3/8. These results show that FX is a potent marine drug for human non-small-cell lung cancer treatment. PMID:28212270

  19. TBMS1 exerts its cytotoxicity in NCI-H460 lung cancer cells through nucleolar stress-induced p53/MDM2-dependent mechanism, a quantitative proteomics study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yingying; Xie, Guobin; Xia, Ji; Su, Dan; Liu, Jie; Jiang, Fuquan; Xu, Yang

    2016-02-01

    Tubeimoside-1 (TBMS1) exerts its anticancer effects by inducing G2/M arrest and apoptosis of cancer cells. However, the precise molecular mechanism of its anti-tumor effects has not been fully elucidated, especially the signaling pathways involved in the early stage of TBMS1 stimulation. In this study, we employed stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC)-based quantitative proteomics approach and identified 439 proteins that exhibit significant differential expressions in NCI-H460 lung cancer cells upon exposure to TBMS1. Gene ontology and network analysis using DAVID and STRING on-line tools revealed that several nucleolar stress (ribosomal biogenesis) response proteins were differentially regulated by TBMS1. Functional validation demonstrated that TBMS1-induced NCI-H460 cell cytotoxicity involved nucleolar stress-induced p53/murine double minute clone 2 (MDM2), mTOR, and NF-κB signaling pathways.

  20. Pleural involvement in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Giannou, Anastasios D.; Stathopoulos, Georgios T.

    2015-01-01

    The pleural space, a sterile secluded environment in the thoracic cavity, represents an attractive metastatic site for various cancers of lung, breast and gastrointestinal origins. Whereas lung and breast adenocarcinomas could invade the pleural space because of their anatomic proximity, “distant” cancers like ovarian or gastrointestinal tract adenocarcinomas may employ more active mechanisms to the same end. A pleural metastasis is often accompanied by a malignant pleural effusion (MPE), an unfavorable complication that severely restricts the quality of life and expectancy of the cancer patient. MPE is the net “product” of three different processes, namely inflammation, enhanced angiogenesis and vascular leakage. Current efforts are focusing on the identification of cancer cell autocrine (specific mutation spectra and biochemical pathways) and paracrine (cytokine and chemokine signals) characteristics as well as host features (immunological or other) that underlie the MPE phenotype. Herein we examine the pleural histology, cytology and molecular characteristics that make the pleural cavity an attractive metastasis destination for lung adenocarcinoma. Mesothelial and tumor features that may account for the tumor’s ability to invade the pleural space are highlighted. Finally, possible therapeutic interventions specifically targeting MPE are discussed. PMID:26150915

  1. Lung cancer screening and management.

    PubMed

    Jones, G S; Baldwin, D R

    2015-12-01

    Deaths from lung cancer are greater than for any other type of malignancy. Many people present with advanced stage cancer at diagnosis and survival is limited. Low radiation dose CT (LDCT) screening appears to offer part of the solution to this. The US National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) showed a 20% reduction in cancer related mortality and a 6.7% reduction in all cause mortality in patients who had LDCT compared to chest X-ray. Lung Cancer screening is now being implemented in the US using the NLST screening criteria but many questions remain about the details of the methodology of screening and its cost effectiveness. Many of these questions are being answered by ongoing European trials that are reporting their findings. In this review we objectively analyse current research evidence and explore the issues that need to be resolved before implementation, including technical considerations, selection criteria and effective nodule management protocols. We discuss the potential barriers that will be faced when beginning a national screening programme and possible solutions to them.

  2. Obtusilactone A and (-)-sesamin induce apoptosis in human lung cancer cells by inhibiting mitochondrial Lon protease and activating DNA damage checkpoints.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui-Min; Cheng, Kuo-Chen; Lin, Cheng-Jung; Hsu, Shu-Wei; Fang, Wei-Cheng; Hsu, Tai-Feng; Chiu, Chien-Chih; Chang, Hsueh-Wei; Hsu, Chun-Hua; Lee, Alan Yueh-Luen

    2010-12-01

    Several compounds from Cinnamomum kotoense show anticancer activities. However, the detailed mechanisms of most compounds from C. kotoense remain unknown. In this study, we investigated the anticancer activity of obtusilactone A (OA) and (-)-sesamin in lung cancer. Our results show that human Lon is upregulated in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines, and downregulation of Lon triggers caspase-3 mediated apoptosis. Through enzyme-based screening, we identified two small-molecule compounds, obtusilactone A (OA) and (-)-sesamin from C. kotoense, as potent Lon protease inhibitors. Obtusilactone A and (-)-sesamin interact with Ser855 and Lys898 residues in the active site of the Lon protease according to molecular docking analysis. Thus, we suggest that cancer cytotoxicity of the compounds is partly due to the inhibitory effects on Lon protease. In addition, the compounds are able to cause DNA double-strand breaks and activate checkpoints. Treatment with OA and (-)-sesamin induced p53-independent DNA damage responses in NSCLC cells, including G(1) /S checkpoint activation and apoptosis, as evidenced by phosphorylation of checkpoint proteins (H2AX, Nbs1, and Chk2), caspase-3 cleavage, and sub-G(1) accumulation. In conclusion, OA and (-)-sesamin act as both inhibitors of human mitochondrial Lon protease and DNA damage agents to activate the DNA damage checkpoints as well induce apoptosis in NSCLC cells. These dual functions open a bright avenue to develop more selective chemotherapy agents to overcome chemoresistance and sensitize cancer cells to other chemotherapeutics.

  3. MALT1 is required for EGFR-induced NF-κB activation and contributes to EGFR-driven lung cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Pan, D; Jiang, C; Ma, Z; Blonska, M; You, M J; Lin, X

    2016-02-18

    The transcription factor nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) has been implicated in having a crucial role in the tumorigenesis of many types of human cancers. Although epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) can directly activate NF-κB, the mechanism by which EGFR induces NF-κB activation and the role of NF-κB in EGFR-associated tumor progression is still not fully defined. Herein, we found that mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue 1 (MALT1) is involved in EGFR-induced NF-κB activation in cancer cells, and that MALT1 deficiency impaired EGFR-induced NF-κB activation. MALT1 mainly functions as a scaffold protein by recruiting E3 ligase TRAF6 to IKK complex to activate NF-κB in response to EGF stimulation. Functionally, MALT1 inhibition shows significant defects in EGFR-associated tumor malignancy, including cell migration, metastasis and anchorage-independent growth. To further access a physiological role of MALT1-dependent NF-κB activation in EGFR-driven tumor progression, we generated triple-transgenic mouse model (tetO-EGFR(L858R); CCSP-rtTA; Malt1(-/-)), in which mutant EGFR-driven lung cancer was developed in the absence of MALT1 expression. MALT1-deficient mice show significantly less lung tumor burden when compared with its heterozygous controls, suggesting that MALT1 is required for the progression of EGFR-induced lung cancer. Mechanistically, MALT1 deficiency abolished both NF-κB and STAT3 activation in vivo, which is a result of a defect of interleukin-6 production. In comparison, MALT1 deficiency does not affect tumor progression in a mouse model (LSL-K-ras(G12D); CCSP-Cre; Malt1(-/-)) in which lung cancer is induced by expressing a K-ras mutant. Thus, our study has provided the cellular and genetic evidence that suggests MALT1-dependent NF-κB activation is important in EGFR-associated solid-tumor progression.

  4. Combined treatment with the Cox-2 inhibitor niflumic acid and PPARγ ligand ciglitazone induces ER stress/caspase-8-mediated apoptosis in human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byeong Mo; Maeng, Kyungah; Lee, Kee-Ho; Hong, Sung Hee

    2011-01-28

    The present study was performed to investigate the possible combined use of the Cox-2 inhibitor niflumic acid and the PPARγ ligand ciglitazone and to elucidate the mechanisms underlying enhanced apoptosis by this combination treatment in human lung cancer cells. Combined niflumic acid-ciglitazone treatment synergistically induced apoptotic cell death, activated caspase-9, caspase-3, and induced caspase-3-mediated PARP cleavage. The combination treatment also triggered apoptosis through caspase-8/Bid/Bax activation, and the inhibition of caspase-8 suppressed caspase-8/Bid activation, caspase-3-mediated PARP cleavage, and concomitant apoptosis. In addition, combined niflumic acid-ciglitazone treatment significantly induced ER stress responses, and suppression of CHOP expression significantly attenuated the combined niflumic acid-ciglitazone treatment-induced activation of caspase-8 and caspase-3, and the subsequent apoptotic cell death, indicating a role of ER stress in caspase-8 activation and apoptosis. Interestingly, the pro-apoptotic effects of combined niflumic acid-ciglitazone treatment were realized through Cox-2- and PPARγ-independent mechanisms. Taken together, these results suggest that sequential ER stress and caspase-8 activation are critical in combined niflumic acid-ciglitazone treatment-induced apoptosis in human lung cancer cells.

  5. Gingerol Reverses the Cancer-Promoting Effect of Capsaicin by Increased TRPV1 Level in a Urethane-Induced Lung Carcinogenic Model.

    PubMed

    Geng, Shengnan; Zheng, Yaqiu; Meng, Mingjing; Guo, Zhenzhen; Cao, Ning; Ma, Xiaofang; Du, Zhenhua; Li, Jiahuan; Duan, Yongjian; Du, Gangjun

    Both gingerol and capsaicin are agonists of TRPV1, which can negatively control tumor progression. This study observed the long-term effects of oral administration of 6-gingerol alone or in combination with capsaicin for 20 weeks in a urethane-induced lung carcinogenic model. We showed that lung carcinoma incidence and multiplicity were 70% and 21.2 ± 3.6, respectively, in the control versus 100% and 35.6 ± 5.2 in the capsaicin group (P < 0.01) and 50% and 10.8 ± 3.1 in the 6-gingerol group (P < 0.01). The combination of 6-gingerol and capsaicin reversed the cancer-promoting effect of capsaicin (carcinoma incidence of 100% versus 20% and multiplicity of 35.6 ± 5.2 versus 4.7 ± 2.3; P < 0.001). The cancer-promoting effect of capsaicin was due to increased epidermal growth-factor receptor (EGFR) level by decreased transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1 (TRPV1) level (P < 0.01) . The capsaicin-decreased EGFR level subsequently reduced levels of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and cyclin D1 that favored enhanced lung epithelial proliferation and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) during lung carcinogenesis (P < 0.01). In contrast, 6-gingerol promoted TRPV1 level and drastically decreased the levels of EGFR, NF-κB, and cyclin D1 that favored reduced lung epithelial proliferation and EMT (P < 0.01). This study provides valuable information for the long-term consumption of chili-pepper-rich diets to decrease the risk of cancer development.

  6. Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Stage IIIB or Stage IV Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-08-04

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Bronchoalveolar Cell Lung Cancer; Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  7. Cryotherapy in Treating Patients With Lung Cancer That Has Spread to the Other Lung or Parts of the Body

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-17

    Advanced Malignant Mesothelioma; Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Lung Metastases; Recurrent Malignant Mesothelioma; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  8. Lung cancer: Biology and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Lemjabbar-Alaoui, Hassan; Hassan, Omer Ui; Yang, Yi-Wei; Buchanan, Petra

    2015-12-01

    Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer mortality in men and women in the U.S. and worldwide. About 90% of lung cancer cases are caused by smoking and the use of tobacco products. However, other factors such as radon gas, asbestos, air pollution exposures, and chronic infections can contribute to lung carcinogenesis. In addition, multiple inherited and acquired mechanisms of susceptibility to lung cancer have been proposed. Lung cancer is divided into two broad histologic classes, which grow and spread differently: small-cell lung carcinomas (SCLCs) and non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLCs). Treatment options for lung cancer include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and targeted therapy. Therapeutic-modalities recommendations depend on several factors, including the type and stage of cancer. Despite the improvements in diagnosis and therapy made during the past 25 years, the prognosis for patients with lung cancer is still unsatisfactory. The responses to current standard therapies are poor except for the most localized cancers. However, a better understanding of the biology pertinent to these challenging malignancies, might lead to the development of more efficacious and perhaps more specific drugs. The purpose of this review is to summarize the recent developments in lung cancer biology and its therapeutic strategies, and discuss the latest treatment advances including therapies currently under clinical investigation.

  9. Adenovirus vector-mediated FAM176A overexpression induces cell death in human H1299 non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hong; Hu, Jia; Pan, Huan; Lou, Yaxin; Lv, Ping; Chen, Yingyu

    2014-02-01

    FAM176A (family with sequence similarity 176 member A) is a novel molecule related to programmed cell death. A decreased expression of FAM176A has been found in several types of human tumors in including lung cancers. In the present study, we investigated the biological activities of FAM176A on the human non-small cell lung cancer cell line H1299 cells. We constructed a recombinant adenovirus 5-FAM176A vector (Ad5-FAM176A) and evaluated the expression and anti-tumor activities in vitro. Cell viability analysis revealed that the adenovirus-mediated increase of FAM176A inhibited the growth of the tumor cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. This inhibitory effect was mediated by both autophagy and apoptosis that involved caspase activation. In addition, cell cycle analysis suggested that Ad5-FAM176A could induce cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase, all of which suggested that adenovirus-mediated FAM176A gene transfer might present a new therapeutic approach for lung cancer treatment.

  10. The effect of Lfcin-B on non-small cell lung cancer H460 cells is mediated by inhibiting VEGF expression and inducing apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shusheng; Tu, Jiancheng; Zhou, Cuijie; Li, Jianwei; Huang, Long; Tao, Lei; Zhao, Lei

    2015-02-01

    Lfcin-B, an antimicrobial peptide found in various exocrine secretions of mammals, showed antitumor effects. However, the effect and relative mechanism of Lfcin-B on non-small cell lung cancer is unclear. In this study, assay of cell viability, quantitative real-time PCR, Western blot, annexin V/propidium iodide assay, flow cytometry and tumor-xenograft model were applied to elucidate the mechanism of Lfcin-B on non-small cell lung cancer NCI-H460 (H460) cells. Lfcin-B significantly suppressed the proliferation of H460 cells in vitro. Additionally, the transcription and translation of the VEGF gene in H460 cells were restrained after exposure to Lfcin-B. Moreover, the apoptosis of H460 cells was induced by Lfcin-B through stimulating caspase-3, caspase-9 and preventing survivin expression on both the transcription and translation level. Meanwhile, Lfcin-B increased the production of reactive oxygen species and suppressed the RNA of antioxidant enzymes (GPX1, GPX2, SOD3 and catalase) in H460 cells. Finally, Lfcin-B significantly prevented the tumor growth in the H460-bearing mice model. These results indicated that Lfcin-B could be a potential candidate for the treatment of lung cancer.

  11. Anti-lung cancer potential of pure esteric-glycoside condurangogenin A against nonsmall-cell lung cancer cells in vitro via p21/p53 mediated cell cycle modulation and DNA damage-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Sikdar, Sourav; Mukherjee, Avinaba; Khuda-Bukhsh, Anisur Rahman

    2015-01-01

    Background: Marsdenia condurango (condurango) is a tropical woody vine native to South America. Our earlier study was limited to evaluation of anti-cancer potentials of crude condurango extract and its glycoside-rich components in vitro on lung cancer. Objective: This study aims at evaluating the effect of the single isolated active ingredient condurangogenin A (ConA; C32H42O7) on A549, H522 and H460-nonsmall-cell lung cancer cells. Materials and Methods: ConA was isolated by column chromatography and analyzed by mass spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and proton-nuclear magnetic resonance. diphenyltetrazolium bromide assays were conducted on three cell-types using 6%-alcohol as control. Critical studies on cellular morphology, cell-cycle regulation, reactive oxygen species, mitochondrial membrane potential, and DNA-damage were made, and expressions of related signaling markers studied. Results: As IC50 doses of ConA proved to be too high and toxic to both A549 and H522 cells, all experimental studies were carried out on H460 cells with the IC50 dose (32 μg/ml − 24 h). Cellular morphology revealed typical apoptotic features after ConA treatment. At early treatment hours (2 h-12 h), maximum cells were arrested at G0/G1 phase that could be correlated with reduced level of cyclin D1-CDK with p21 up-regulation. At 18 h − 24 h, sub G0/G1 cell population was increased gradually, as revealed from cytochrome-c release and caspase-3 activation, further confirming the apoptosis-inducing ability of ConA at later phases. Gradual increase of TUNEL-positive cells with significant modulation of mitochondria-dependent apoptotic markers at longer time-points would establish apoptosis-induction property of ConA, indicating its potential as a strong candidate for anti-cancer drug formulation. Conclusion: Further studies are warranted against other types of cancer cells and animal models before its possible human use. PMID:26109778

  12. Lung cancer stem cells—characteristics, phenotype

    PubMed Central

    George, Rachel; Sethi, Tariq

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer remains a major cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide with unfavourable prognosis mainly due to the late stage of disease at presentation. High incidence and disease recurrence rates are a fact despite advances in treatment. Ongoing experimental and clinical observations suggest that the malignant phenotype in lung cancer is sustained by lung cancer stem cells (CSCs) which are putative stem cells situated throughout the airways that have the potential of initiating lung cancer formation. These cells share the common characteristic of increased proliferation and differentiation, long life span and resistance to chemotherapy and radiation therapy. This review summarises the current knowledge on their characteristics and phenotype. PMID:27413709

  13. [Cannabis smoking and lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Underner, M; Urban, T; Perriot, J; de Chazeron, I; Meurice, J-C

    2014-06-01

    Cannabis is the most commonly smoked illicit substance in the world. It can be smoked alone in plant form (marijuana) but it is mainly smoked mixed with tobacco. The combined smoking of cannabis and tobacco is a common-place phenomenon in our society. However, its use is responsible for severe pulmonary consequences. The specific impact of smoking cannabis is difficult to assess precisely and to distinguish from the effect of tobacco. Marijuana smoke contains polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and carcinogens at higher concentration than tobacco smoke. Cellular, tissue, animal and human studies, and also epidemiological studies, show that marijuana smoke is a risk factor for lung cancer. Cannabis exposure doubles the risk of developing lung cancer. This should encourage clinicians to identify cannabis use and to offer patients support in quitting.

  14. Lung Cancer Awareness Week

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glennon, Catherine; Laczko, Lori

    2003-01-01

    Smoking is the most preventable cause of death in our society. Tobacco use is responsible for nearly one in five deaths in the United States and the cause of premature death of approximately 2 million individuals in developed countries. Smoking accounts for at least 30% of all cancer deaths and is a major cause of heart disease, cerebrovascular…

  15. Suppression of reactive oxygen species-mediated ERK and JNK activation sensitizes dihydromyricetin-induced mitochondrial apoptosis in human non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Kao, Shang-Jyh; Lee, Wei-Jiunn; Chang, Jer-Hwa; Chow, Jyh-Ming; Chung, Chi-Li; Hung, Wen-Yueh; Chien, Ming-Hsien

    2017-04-01

    Nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common type of lung cancer with a high mortality rate and still remains a therapeutic challenge. A strategy for targeting NSCLC is to identify agents that are effective against NSCLC cells while sparing normal cells. Dihydromyricetin (DHM) is the major flavonoid component derived from Ampelopsis grossedentata, which has a long history of use in medicine. Herein, the molecular mechanisms by which DHM exerts its anticancer effects against NSCLC cells were investigated. Results from MTS, colony formation, Western blot, flow cytometric, and JC-1 mitochondrial membrane potential assays revealed that DHM showed a selective cytotoxic effect against NSCLC cells (A549 and H1975), but not against normal lung (WI-38) fibroblasts, by inducing apoptosis. DHM-induced cell apoptosis occurred through Bcl-w suppression-mediated mitochondrial membrane depolarization, caspase-9/-7/-3 activation, and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage in A549 and H1975 cells. Moreover, treatment of A549 and H1975 cells with DHM induced increase of intracellular peroxide and sustained activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)1/2, and the reactive oxygen species scavenger, N-acetylcysteine (NAC), reversed DHM-induced ERK and JNK activation. Furthermore, treatment of cells with specific inhibitors of ERK and JNK or NAC significantly promoted the DHM-induced activation of caspase-9/-7/-3 and PARP cleavage and also sensitized the antitumorigenic effect of DHM on NSCLC cells. These findings define and support a novel function of DHM of inducing mitochondrion-derived apoptosis in human NSCLC cells, and a combination of DHM with ERK and JNK inhibitors should be a good strategy for preventing NSCLC proliferation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 32: 1426-1438, 2017.

  16. Aberrations of chromosome 19 in asbestos-associated lung cancer and in asbestos-induced micronuclei of bronchial epithelial cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ruosaari, Salla T; Nymark, Penny E H; Aavikko, Mervi M; Kettunen, Eeva; Knuutila, Sakari; Hollmén, Jaakko; Norppa, Hannu; Anttila, Sisko L

    2008-05-01

    Exposure to asbestos is known to induce lung cancer, and our previous studies have suggested that specific chromosomal regions, such as 19p13, are preferentially aberrant in lung tumours of asbestos-exposed patients. Here, we further examined the association between the 19p region and exposure to asbestos using array comparative genomic hybridization and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in lung tumours and FISH characterization of asbestos-induced micronuclei (MN) in human bronchial epithelial BEAS 2B cells in vitro. We detected an increased number of 19p losses in the tumours of asbestos-exposed patients in comparison with tumours from non-exposed subjects with similar distribution of tumour histology in both groups (13/33; 39% versus 3/25; 12%, P = 0.04). In BEAS 2B cells, a 48 h exposure to crocidolite asbestos (2.0 microg/cm(2)) was found to induce centromere-negative MN-harbouring chromosomal fragments. Furthermore, an increased frequency of rare MN containing a 19p fragment was observed after the crocidolite treatment in comparison with untreated controls (6/6000 versus 1/10 000, P = 0.01). The results suggest that 19p has significance in asbestos-associated carcinogenesis and that asbestos may be capable of inducing specific chromosome aberrations.

  17. E2F1-mediated DNA damage is implicated in 8-Cl-adenosine-induced chromosome missegregation and apoptosis in human lung cancer H1299 cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Yu-Ying; Zhou, Zhe; Cao, Ji-Xiang; Jin, Ya-Qiong; Li, Shu-Yan; Ni, Ju-Hua; An, Guo-Shun; Zhang, Yu-Xiang; Jia, Hong-Ti

    2013-12-01

    Although E2F1-mediated DNA double-stranded breaks (DSBs) and tetraploid have been extensively studied, the role of E2F1 in mitotic catastrophe is still unknown. We have previously shown that 8-chloro-adenosine (8-Cl-Ado) induces DNA DSBs and aberrant mitosis in human lung cancer cells, followed by delayed apoptosis. Here, we demonstrate that E2F1-mediated DNA damage is implicated in 8-Cl-Ado-induced chromosome missegregation and apoptosis in lung cancer H1299 cells. We showed that E2F1 was accumulated upon 8-Cl-Ado-induced DNA DSBs. Induction of E2F1 by 8-Cl-Ado caused DNA damage in cycling cells including M cells. In contrast, silencing of E2F1 expression decreased 8-Cl-Ado-induced DNA DSBs, particularly eliminated E2F1-mediated mitotic DNA damage. Over-expression of E2F1 and/or 8-Cl-Ado exposure resulted in aberrant mitotic spindles and chromosome segregation errors. Furthermore, over-expression of E2F1 expression enhanced 8-Cl-Ado-induced apoptosis. Together, our data indicate that E2F1-mediated DNA damage, in particular mitotic DNA damage, is an important fraction of 8-Cl-Ado-induced DNA damage, which is implicated in 8-Cl-Ado-induced mitotic catastrophe and delayed apoptosis. Induction of E2F1 by 8-Cl-Ado may contribute at least partly to the drug-inhibited proliferation of cancer cells.

  18. Activation-induced cell death of memory CD8+ T cells from pleural effusion of lung cancer patients is mediated by the type II Fas-induced apoptotic pathway.

    PubMed

    Prado-Garcia, Heriberto; Romero-Garcia, Susana; Morales-Fuentes, Jorge; Aguilar-Cazares, Dolores; Lopez-Gonzalez, Jose Sullivan

    2012-07-01

    Lung cancer is the second most common form of cancer and the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Pleural effusions, containing high numbers of mononuclear and tumor cells, are frequent in patients with advanced stages of lung cancer. We reported that in pleural effusions from primary lung cancer, the CD8+ T cell subpopulation, and particularly the terminally differentiated subset, is reduced compared to that of non-malignant effusions. We analyzed the participation of activation-induced cell death (AICD) and extrinsic pathways (type I or II) as mechanisms for the decrease in pleural effusion CD8+ T cell subpopulation. Pleural effusion or peripheral blood CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, from lung cancer patients, were stimulated with anti-CD3 antibody and analyzed for (a) apoptosis by annexin-V-binding and TUNEL assay, (b) transcript levels of Fas ligand (FasL) and TRAIL by real-time RT-PCR, (c) expression of FasL and TRAIL, measured as integrated mean fluorescence intensities (iMFI) by flow cytometry, (d) expression of Bcl-2 and BIM molecules, measured as MFI, and (e) apoptosis inhibition using caspase-8 and -9 inhibitors. Pleural effusion CD8+ T cells, but not CD4+ T cells, from cancer patients underwent AICD. Blocking FasL/Fas pathway protected from AICD. Upregulation of FasL and TRAIL expressions was found in pleural effusion CD8+ T cells, which also showed a subset of Bcl-2 low cells. In memory CD8+ T cells, AICD depended on both extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways. Hence, in the pleural space of lung cancer patients, AICD might compromise the antitumor function of CD8+ T cells.

  19. LUCIS: lung cancer imaging studies.

    PubMed

    Harders, Stefan Walbom

    2012-11-01

    Pulmonary nodules are of high clinical importance, as they may prove to be an early manifestation of lung cancer. Pulmonary nodules are small, focal opacities that may be solitary or multiple. A solitary pulmonary nodule (SPN) is a single, small (= 30 mm in diameter) radiographic opacity. Larger opacities are called masses and are often malignant. As imaging techniques improve and more nodules are detected, the optimal management of SPNs remains unclear. Current strategies include tissue sampling or CT follow-up. The aim of this PhD was to examine current non-invasive methods used to characterise pulmonary nodules and masses in patients with suspected lung cancer and to stage NSCLC. In doing so, this PhD helps to validate the existing methods used to diagnose and stage lung cancer correctly and, hopefully, aids in the development of new methods. In the first study, 213 participants with pulmonary nodules on CT were examined with an additional HRCT. In this study, it was concluded that HRCT of a solitary pulmonary nodule, assessed using attenuation and morphological criteria is a fast, widely available and effective method for diagnosing lung cancer correctly, and especially for ruling out cancer. In the second study, 168 patients with pulmonary lesions on CT were examined with an additional F-18-FDG PET/CT. It was concluded that when used early in the work-up of the lesions, CT raised the prevalence of lung cancer in the population to the point at which further diagnostic imaging examination could be considered redundant. Standard contrast-enhanced CT seems better suited to identify patients with lung cancer than to rule out cancer. Finally, the overall diagnostic accuracy as well as the classification probabilities and predictive values of the two modalities were not significantly different. The reproducibility of the above results was substantial. In the third study, 59 patients with pulmonary nodules or masses on chest radiography were examined with an

  20. Lung carcinogenesis from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: characteristics of lung cancer from COPD and contribution of signal transducers and lung stem cells in the inflammatory microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Yasuo; Hata, Atsushi; Koh, Eitetsu; Hiroshima, Kenzo

    2014-07-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer are closely related. The annual incidence of lung cancer arising from COPD has been reported to be 0.8-1.7 %. Treatment of lung cancer from COPD is very difficult due to low cardiopulmonary function, rapid tumor growth, and resistance to molecularly targeted therapies. Chronic inflammation caused by toxic gases can induce COPD and lung cancer. Carcinogenesis in the inflammatory microenvironment occurs during cycles of tissue injury and repair. Cellular damage can induce induction of necrotic cell death and loss of tissue integrity. Quiescent normal stem cells or differentiated progenitor cells are introduced to repair injured tissues. However, inflammatory mediators may promote the growth of bronchioalveolar stem cells, and activation of NF-κB and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) play crucial roles in the development of lung cancer from COPD. Many of the protumorgenic effects of NF-κB and STAT3 activation in immune cells are mediated through paracrine signaling. NF-κB and STAT3 also contribute to epithelial-mesenchymal transition. To improve lung cancer treatment outcomes, lung cancer from COPD must be overcome. In this article, we review the characteristics of lung cancer from COPD and the mechanisms of carcinogenesis in the inflammatory microenvironment. We also propose the necessity of identifying the mechanisms underlying progression of COPD to lung cancer, and comment on the clinical implications with respect to lung cancer prevention, screening, and therapy.

  1. Resection of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancers Reverses Tumor-Induced Gene Expression Changes in the Peripheral Immune System

    PubMed Central

    Kossenkov, Andrew V.; Vachani, Anil; Chang, Celia; Nichols, Calen; Billouin, Shere; Horng, Wenhwai; Rom, William N.; Albelda, Steven M.; Showe, Michael K.; Showe, Louise C.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE To characterize the interactions of Non-small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) tumors with the immune system at the level of mRNA and microRNA (miRNA) expression and to define expression signatures that characterize the presence of a malignant tumor vs. a non-malignant nodule. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN We have examined the changes of both mRNA and miRNA expression levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) between paired samples collected from NSCLC patients before and after tumor removal using Illumina gene expression arrays. RESULTS We found that malignant tumor removal significantly changes expression of more than 3,000 protein-coding genes, especially genes in pathways associated with suppression of the innate immune response, including NK cell signaling and apoptosis-associated ceramide signaling. Binding sites for the ETS-domain transcription factors ELK1, ELK4 and SPI1 were enriched in promoter regions of genes upregulated in the presence of a tumor. Additional important regulators included five miRNAs expressed at significantly higher levels before tumor removal. Repressed protein-coding targets of those miRNAs included many transcription factors, several involved in immunologically important pathways. While there was a significant overlap in the effects of malignant tumors and benign lung nodules on PBMC gene expression, we identified one gene panel which indicates a tumor or nodule presence and a second panel that can distinguish malignant from non-malignant nodules. CONCLUSIONS A tumor presence in the lung influences mRNA and miRNA expression in PBMC and this influence is reversed by tumor removal. These results suggest that PBMC gene expression signatures could be used for lung cancer diagnosis. PMID:21807633

  2. Bufalin inhibits TGF-β-induced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and migration in human lung cancer A549 cells by downregulating TGF-β receptors

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, LEI; LIU, SHIZHOU; CHE, XIAOFANG; HOU, KEZUO; MA, YANJU; LI, CE; WEN, TI; FAN, YIBO; HU, XUEJUN; LIU, YUNPENG; QU, XIUJUAN

    2015-01-01

    The epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a well-known prerequisite for cancer cells to acquire the migratory and invasive capacity, and to subsequently metastasize. Bufalin is one of the major active components of the traditional Chinese medicine Chan Su, and accumulating evidence has shown its anticancer effect in multipe types of cancer. However, the role of bufalin in transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)-induced EMT and migration remains unclear. In the present study, the effect of bufalin on TGF-β-induced EMT and migration was investigated in human lung cancer A549 cells. TGF-β induced EMT in A549 cells and increased their migratory ability, which were markedly suppressed by bufalin. Additionally, TGF-β-induced upregulation of Twist2 and zinc finger E-box binding homeobox 2 (ZEB2), as well as the phosphorylation of Smad2 and Smad3 were also inhibited by bufalin. However, the Smad-independent signaling pathways were not affected. Further analysis showed that the TGF-β receptor I (TβRI) and TGF-β receptor II (TβRII) were downregulated in the presence of bufalin. Pretreatment with SB431542, a potent inhibitor of the phosphorylation of TβRI, significantly attenuated TGF-β-induced EMT, mimicking the effect of bufalin on A549 cells. Taken together, these results suggest that bufalin suppresses TGF-β-induced EMT and migration by downregulating TβRI and TβRII in A549 cells. PMID:26133118

  3. Differential Reactions of Microglia to Brain Metastasis of Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    He, Bei Ping; Wang, Jian Jun; Zhang, Xian; Wu, Yan; Wang, Miao; Bay, Boon-Huat; Chang, Alex Yuang-Chi

    2006-01-01

    The brain is a common metastatic site for various types of cancers, especially lung cancer. Patients with brain metastases have a poor prognosis in spite of radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy. It is postulated that immune cells in the brain may play a major role in cancer metastasis, dormancy, and relapse. Although microglia may serve as a major component in the brain immune system, the interaction between metastatic cancer cells and microglia is still largely unknown and remains to be elucidated. In this study, we have investigated microglial reactions in brain tissues with metastatic lung cancer cells and evaluated the cytotoxic effects of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated microglia on metastatic lung cancer cells in vitro. In the vicinity of metastatic lung cancer mass in the brain, microglia showed signs of significant activation. There was an obvious increase in the number of microglia labeled with ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule 1 (Iba-1) antibody, a specific marker of microglia. The microglia were observed to form a clear boundary between the tumor mass and normal brain tissue. In the region where the tumor mass was situated, only a few microglia expressed inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), indicating differential activation in those microglia. The supernatant from LPS-activated microglia induced apoptosis of metastatic lung cancer cells in vitro in a dose- and time-dependent manner. However, at lower concentrations of activated microglial supernatant, trophic effects on cancer cells were observed, some lung cancer cells being insensitive to microglial cytotoxicity. Together with the observation that TNF-α alone induced proliferation of the tumor cells, the findings provide possible clues to the mechanism involved in metastasis of lung cancer cells to the brain. PMID:17088948

  4. WSTF promotes proliferation and invasion of lung cancer cells by inducing EMT via PI3K/Akt and IL-6/STAT3 signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Meng, Jin; Zhang, Xu-Tao; Liu, Xin-Li; Fan, Lei; Li, Chen; Sun, Yang; Liang, Xiao-Hua; Wang, Jian-Bo; Mei, Qi-Bing; Zhang, Feng; Zhang, Tao

    2016-11-01

    Williams syndrome transcription factor (WSTF), which is encoded by the BAZ1B gene, was first identified as a hemizygously deleted gene in patients with Williams syndrome. WSTF protein has been reported to be involved in transcription, replication, chromatin remodeling and DNA damage response, and also functions as a tyrosine protein kinase. However, the function of WSTF in cancer is not known. Here, we show that WSTF overexpression promotes proliferation, colony formation, migration and invasion of lung cancer A549 and H1299 cells. WSTF overexpression also promotes tumor growth and invasive abilities of lung cancer cells in mouse xenograft models. cDNA microarray and subsequent qRT-PCR validation revealed that WSTF overexpression significantly upregulated the expression of EMT (epithelial to mesenchymal transition) marker fibronectin (FN1) and EMT-inducing genes Fos and CEACAM6. The changes of EMT markers including downregulated E-cadherin and upregulated N-cadherin and FN1 were further confirmed at both mRNA and protein levels upon WSTF overexpression, with typical morphological changes of EMT. Furthermore, WSTF activates both PI3K/Akt and IL-6/STAT3 oncogenic signaling pathways. Treatment with PI3K inhibitor ZSTK474 or STAT3 inhibitor niclosamide reversed the effects of WSTF overexpression by inhibiting cell proliferation, migration and invasion, with decreased level of p-Akt, p-STAT3 and IL-6. ZSTK474 and niclosamide also reversed EMT markers and EMT-inducing proteins including Snail, Slug, Twist and CEACAM6 in WSTF-overexpressing A549 cells. Taken together, these results demonstrate that WSTF may act as an oncoprotein in lung cancer to accelerate tumor aggressiveness by promoting EMT via activation of PI3K/Akt and IL-6/STAT3 pathways.

  5. Lung and Upper Aerodigestive Cancer | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    [[{"fid":"180","view_mode":"default","fields":{"format":"default","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"Lung and Upper Aerodigestive Cancer Research Group Homepage Logo","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":"Lung and Upper Aerodigestive Cancer Research Group Homepage Logo","field_folder[und]":"15"},"type":"media","attributes":{"alt":"Lung and Upper Aerodigestive Cancer Research Group Homepage Logo","title":"Lung and Upper Aerodigestive Cancer Research Group Homepage Logo","heigh | Conducts and supports research on the prevention and early detection of lung and head and neck cancers.

  6. Curcumin inhibits interferon-{alpha} induced NF-{kappa}B and COX-2 in human A549 non-small cell lung cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jeeyun |; Im, Young-Hyuck | E-mail: imyh@smc.samsung.co.kr; Jung, Hae Hyun; Kim, Joo Hyun; Park, Joon Oh |; Kim, Kihyun |; Kim, Won Seog |; Ahn, Jin Seok

    2005-08-26

    The A549 cells, non-small cell lung cancer cell line from human, were resistant to interferon (IFN)-{alpha} treatment. The IFN-{alpha}-treated A549 cells showed increase in protein expression levels of NF-{kappa}B and COX-2. IFN-{alpha} induced NF-{kappa}B binding activity within 30 min and this increased binding activity was markedly suppressed with inclusion of curcumin. Curcumin also inhibited IFN-{alpha}-induced COX-2 expression in A549 cells. Within 10 min, IFN-{alpha} rapidly induced the binding activity of a {gamma}-{sup 32}P-labeled consensus GAS oligonucleotide probe, which was profoundly reversed by curcumin. Taken together, IFN-{alpha}-induced activations of NF-{kappa}B and COX-2 were inhibited by the addition of curcumin in A549 cells.

  7. Newly synthesized podophyllotoxin derivative, LJ12, induces apoptosis and mitotic catastrophe in non-small cell lung cancer cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hui, Ling; Sang, Chunyan; Wang, Donghong; Wang, Xiaohui; Wang, Meiliang; Jia, Qinghua; Ma, Mingren; Chen, Shiwu

    2016-01-01

    Deoxypodophyllotoxin (DPT), an active compound isolated from a number of herbs and used in traditional medicine, has been reported to exhibit promising anti‑tumor activity. A newly synthesized derivative, N-(1-oxyl‑4'-demethyl-4-deoxyp odophyllic)-L‑methine-4'-piperazine carbamate (LJ12) may have improved antitumor activity and fewer side effects. The present study assessed the effect of LJ12 on cell viability, apoptosis, cell cycle distribution and mitotic catastrophe in A549 human lung cancer cells in vitro. The molecular mechanisms underlying the antitumor activity of LJ12 were also examined. The results demonstrated that LJ12 reduced A549 cell viability in a time‑ and dose‑dependent manner, with a lower half maximal inhibitory concentration of ~0.1 µM, compared with another known DPT derivative, etoposide (10 µM). Flow cytometric analysis showed that LJ12 induced tumor cell arrest at the G2/M phase of the cell cycle. The present study also observed an expected concomitant decrease in the numbers of cells cells in the G0/G1 and S phases. LJ12 was found to upregulate the protein expression levels of Cdc2 and Cyclin B1. Furthermore, LJ12 induced tumor cell apoptosis and the protein expression of B cell lymphoma‑2‑associated X protein, caspase‑3 and p53. The present study also observed the formation of giant, multinucleated cells, indicating that LJ12 induced mitotic catastrophe in the tumor cells. These results indicated that LJ12 has anti‑non‑small cell lung cancer activity in vitro. Further investigations aim to develop LJ12 as a therapeutic agent for the treatment of lung cancer.

  8. Mimulone-induced autophagy through p53-mediated AMPK/mTOR pathway increases caspase-mediated apoptotic cell death in A549 human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    An, Hyun-Kyu; Kim, Kyoung-Sook; Lee, Ji-Won; Park, Mi-Hyun; Moon, Hyung-In; Park, Shin-Ji; Baik, Ji-Sue; Kim, Cheorl-Ho; Lee, Young-Choon

    2014-01-01

    Anticancer properties and mechanisms of mimulone (MML), C-geranylflavonoid isolated from the Paulownia tomentosa fruits, were firstly elucidated in this study. MML prevented cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent way and triggered apoptosis through the extrinsic pathway in A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cells. Furthermore, MML-treated cells displayed autophagic features, such as the formation of autophagic vacuoles, a primary morphological feature of autophagy, and the accumulation of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) puncta, another typical maker of autophagy, as determined by FITC-conjugated immunostaining and monodansylcadaverine (MDC) staining, respectively. The expression levels of LC3-I and LC3-II, specific markers of autophagy, were also augmented by MML treatment. Autophagy inhibition by 3-methyladenine (3-MA), pharmacological autophagy inhibitor, and shRNA knockdown of Beclin-1 reduced apoptotic cell death induced by MML. Autophagic flux was not significantly affected by MML treatment and lysosomal inhibitor, chloroquine (CQ) suppressed MML-induced autophagy and apoptosis. MML-induced autophagy was promoted by decreases in p53 and p-mTOR levels and increase of p-AMPK. Moreover, inhibition of p53 transactivation by pifithrin-α (PFT-α) and knockdown of p53 enhanced induction of autophagy and finally promoted apoptotic cell death. Overall, the results demonstrate that autophagy contributes to the cytotoxicity of MML in cancer cells harboring wild-type p53. This study strongly suggests that MML is a potential candidate for an anticancer agent targeting both autophagy and apoptotic cell death in human lung cancer. Moreover, co-treatment of MML and p53 inhibitor would be more effective in human lung cancer therapy.

  9. Mimulone-Induced Autophagy through p53-Mediated AMPK/mTOR Pathway Increases Caspase-Mediated Apoptotic Cell Death in A549 Human Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji-Won; Park, Mi-Hyun; Moon, Hyung-In; Park, Shin-Ji; Baik, Ji-Sue; Kim, Cheorl-Ho; Lee, Young-Choon

    2014-01-01

    Anticancer properties and mechanisms of mimulone (MML), C-geranylflavonoid isolated from the Paulownia tomentosa fruits, were firstly elucidated in this study. MML prevented cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent way and triggered apoptosis through the extrinsic pathway in A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cells. Furthermore, MML-treated cells displayed autophagic features, such as the formation of autophagic vacuoles, a primary morphological feature of autophagy, and the accumulation of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) puncta, another typical maker of autophagy, as determined by FITC-conjugated immunostaining and monodansylcadaverine (MDC) staining, respectively. The expression levels of LC3-I and LC3-II, specific markers of autophagy, were also augmented by MML treatment. Autophagy inhibition by 3-methyladenine (3-MA), pharmacological autophagy inhibitor, and shRNA knockdown of Beclin-1 reduced apoptotic cell death induced by MML. Autophagic flux was not significantly affected by MML treatment and lysosomal inhibitor, chloroquine (CQ) suppressed MML-induced autophagy and apoptosis. MML-induced autophagy was promoted by decreases in p53 and p-mTOR levels and increase of p-AMPK. Moreover, inhibition of p53 transactivation by pifithrin-α (PFT-α) and knockdown of p53 enhanced induction of autophagy and finally promoted apoptotic cell death. Overall, the results demonstrate that autophagy contributes to the cytotoxicity of MML in cancer cells harboring wild-type p53. This study strongly suggests that MML is a potential candidate for an anticancer agent targeting both autophagy and apoptotic cell death in human lung cancer. Moreover, co-treatment of MML and p53 inhibitor would be more effective in human lung cancer therapy. PMID:25490748

  10. mTOR inhibitors radiosensitize PTEN-deficient non-small-cell lung cancer cells harboring an EGFR activating mutation by inducing autophagy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Ju; Jeong, Jae-Hoon; Bae, Sangwoo; Kang, Seongman; Kim, Cheol Hyeon; Lim, Young-Bin

    2013-06-01

    Clinical resistance to gefitinib, an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI), in patients with lung cancer has been linked to acquisition of the T790M resistance mutation in activated EGFR or amplification of MET. Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) loss has been recently reported as a gefitinib resistance mechanism in lung cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of radiotherapy in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with acquired gefitinib resistance caused by PTEN deficiency to suggest radiotherapy as an alternative to EGFR TKIs. PTEN deficient-mediated gefitinib resistance was generated in HCC827 cells, an EGFR TKI sensitive NSCLC cell line, by PTEN knockdown with a lentiviral vector expressing short hairpin RNA-targeting PTEN. The impact of PTEN knockdown on sensitivity to radiation in the presence or absence of PTEN downstream signaling inhibitors was investigated. PTEN knockdown conferred acquired resistance not only to gefitinib but also to radiation on HCC827 cells. mTOR inhibitors alone failed to reduce HCC827 cell viability, regardless of PTEN expression, but ameliorated PTEN knockdown-induced radioresistance. PTEN knockdown-mediated radioresistance was accompanied by repression of radiation-induced cytotoxic autophagy, and treatment with mTOR inhibitors released the repression of cytotoxic autophagy to overcome PTEN knockdown-induced radioresistance in HCC827 cells. These results suggest that inhibiting mTOR signaling could be an effective strategy to radiosensitize NSCLC harboring the EGFR activating mutation that acquires resistance to both TKIs and radiotherapy due to PTEN loss or inactivation mutations.

  11. Knockdown of Tubulin Polymerization Promoting Protein Family Member 3 Suppresses Proliferation and Induces Apoptosis in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yintao; Xu, Yali; Ye, Kuanping; Wu, Nan; Li, Junfeng; Liu, Naijia; He, Min; Lu, Bin; Zhou, Wenbai; Hu, Renming

    2016-01-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that depletion of tubulin polymerization promoting protein family member 3 (TPPP3) inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis of HeLa cells. However, the expression and roles of TPPP3 in cancers remain largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the expression of TPPP3 in clinicopathological correlations in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) samples by immunohistochemistry. TPPP3 expression was significantly upregulated in NSCLC tissues, and high TPPP3 expression was positively associated with tumor size, lymph node metastasis, clinical stage, and poor survival. Furthermore, knockdown of TPPP3 by shRNA significantly inhibited cell proliferation and induced cell apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in vitro. In addition, depletion of TPPP3 inhibited lung cancer growth in vivo in the xenografts of H1299 cells; this effect was accompanied by the suppression of Ki67 expression. Our data suggested that TPPP3 might act as an oncogene in NSCLC. TPPP3 warrants consideration as a therapeutic candidate with anti-tumor potential. PMID:27390593

  12. Cordycepin induces autophagy-mediated c-FLIPL degradation and leads to apoptosis in human non-small cell lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xianfang; Guo, Sen; Lin, Yidan; Liu, Xiangguo; Su, Ling

    2017-01-01

    Cordycepin, a main active composition extracted from Cordyceps militaris, has been reported to exert anti-tumor activity in a broad spectrum of cancer types. However, the function of cordycepin on human non-small cell lung cancer cells is still obscure. Our present work showed that cordycepin inhibited cell growth by inducing apoptosis and autophagy in human NSCLC cells. Further study revealed that cordycepin triggered extrinsic apoptosis associated with down-regulation of c-FLIPL which suppresses the activity of caspase-8. And ectopic expression of c-FLIPL dramatically prevented cordycepin-caused apoptosis. Meanwhile, cordycepin stimulated autophagy through suppressing mTOR signaling pathway in lung cancer cells. When autophagy was blocked by Atg5 siRNA or PI3K inhibitor LY294002, the levels of apoptosis caused by cordycepin were obviously attenuated. In addition, suppression of autophagy could also elevate the level of c-FLIPL which indicated cordycepin-triggered autophagy promoted the degradation of c-FLIPL. Therefore, we conclude that cordycepin induces apoptosis through autophagy-mediated downregulation of c-FLIPL in human NSCLC cells. Taken together, our findings provide a novel prospect on the anti-tumor property of cordycepin, which may further prompt cordycepin to serve as a promising therapeutic approach in NSCLC treatment. PMID:28035061

  13. Curcumin inhibited HGF-induced EMT and angiogenesis through regulating c-Met dependent PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathways in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Demin; Wang, Jian; Lu, Wei; Tang, Xiali; Chen, Jun; Mou, Hao; Chen, Qing-yong

    2016-01-01

    The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and angiogenesis have emerged as two pivotal events in cancer progression. Curcumin has been extensively studied in preclinical models and clinical trials of cancer prevention due to its favorable toxicity profile. However, the possible involvement of curcumin in the EMT and angiogenesis in lung cancer remains unclear. This study found that curcumin inhibited hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)-induced migration and EMT-related morphological changes in A549 and PC-9 cells. Moreover, pretreatment with curcumin blocked HGF-induced c-Met phosphorylation and downstream activation of Akt, mTOR, and S6. These effects mimicked that of c-Met inhibitor SU11274 or PI3 kinase inhibitor LY294002 or mTOR inhibitor rapamycin treatment. c-Met gene overexpression analysis further demonstrated that curcumin suppressed lung cancer cell EMT by inhibiting c-Met/Akt/mTOR signaling pathways. In human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), we found that curcumin also significantly inhibited PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling and induced apoptosis and reduced migration and tube formation of HGF-treated HUVEC. Finally, in the experimental mouse model, we showed that curcumin inhibited HGF-stimulated tumor growth and induced an increase in E-cadherin expression and a decrease in vimentin, CD34, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression. Collectively, these findings indicated that curcumin could inhibit HGF-promoted EMT and angiogenesis by targeting c-Met and blocking PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathways. PMID:27525306

  14. Inhibitor of differentiation 1 (Id1) expression attenuates the degree of TiO2-induced cytotoxicity in H1299 non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Sook; Yoon, Seokjoo; Yoon, Hea Jin; Lee, Kyuhong; Yoon, Hyoun Kyoung; Lee, Jeung-Hoon; Song, Chang Woo

    2009-09-28

    The inhibitor of differentiation (Id) family of genes, which encodes negative regulators of basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors, has been implicated in diverse cellular processes such as proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation, and migration. However, the specific role of Id1 in titanium dioxide (TiO2)-induced lung injury has not been investigated. In the present study, we investigated whether TiO2 induces apoptosis in H1299 lung cancer cells and by which pathways. Based on the results of the LDH assay, dual staining with Annexin V-FITC and propidium iodide (PI), and RT-PCR analysis of apoptosis-related gene expression, TiO2 caused a dose- and time-dependent decrease in cell viability and appeared to involve both necrosis and apoptosis. Furthermore, Id1 expression was significantly reduced in TiO2-treated cells compared with control cells. To further investigate the functional role of Id1, cells were transduced with a recombinant adenovirus expressing Id1, and the effects on sensitivity to TiO2 were analyzed. Id1 overexpression led to the enhancement of cellular proliferation and reduced the sensitivity of H1299 cells to TiO2. Our results indicate that Id1 expression attenuates the degree of TiO2-induced cytotoxicity in lung cells.

  15. DANGER is involved in high glucose-induced radioresistance through inhibiting DAPK-mediated anoikis in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Kwon, TaeWoo; Youn, HyeSook; Son, Beomseok; Kim, Daehoon; Seong, Ki Moon; Park, Sungkyun; Kim, Wanyeon; Youn, BuHyun

    2016-02-09

    18F-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake during FDG positron emission tomography seems to reflect increased radioresistance. However, the exact molecular mechanism underlying high glucose (HG)-induced radioresistance is unclear. In the current study, we showed that ionizing radiation-induced activation of the MEK-ERK-DAPK-p53 signaling axis is required for anoikis (anchorage-dependent apoptosis) of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells in normal glucose media. Phosphorylation of DAPK at Ser734 by ERK was essential for p53 transcriptional activity and radiosensitization. In HG media, overexpressed DANGER directly bound to the death domain of DAPK, thus inhibiting the catalytic activity of DAPK. In addition, inhibition of the DAPK-p53 signaling axis by DANGER promoted anoikis-resistance and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), resulting in radioresistance of HG-treated NSCLC cells. Notably, knockdown of DANGER enhanced anoikis, EMT inhibition, and radiosensitization in a mouse xenograft model of lung cancer. Taken together, our findings offered evidence that overexpression of DANGER and the subsequent inhibitory effect on DAPK kinase activity are critical responses that account for HG-induced radioresistance of NSCLC.

  16. [Lung cancer and lymph drainage].

    PubMed

    Riquet, M

    2007-01-01

    Lung cancer is lymphophile and may involve lymph nodes (LN) belonging to lung lymph drainage. LN metastases are figured within stations numbered 1 to 14. These stations are located along lymph vessels. The lymph vessels and the LN are forming together anatomical chains. Lymph vessels are valved and pulsatile and travel to the cervical venous confluence where they pour the lung lymph into the blood circulation. They may be totally or partly nodeless along their travel, anastomose with each other around the trachea, and connect with the thoracic duct within the mediastinum. Within the anatomical LN chains, LN are variable in number and in size from one individual to another. They may be absent from one or several stations of the international mapping. Stations are located along the anatomical chains: pulmonary ligament (9), tracheal bifurcation(8 and 7), right paratracheal (4R, 2R and 1), preaortic (5 and 6), left paratracheal (4L, 2L and 1). Station 3 is located on 2 differents chains (phrenic and right esophagotracheal). Station 10 are located at the beginning of the mediastinal lymph nodes chains. Each chain connects with the blood circulation, anastomoses with he neighbouring chains and behave as an own entity whatever the number of its LN. International station mapping misknowns this anatomy and occults the true pronostic value of lung lymph drainage.

  17. Curcumin induces apoptosis in human non-small cell lung cancer NCI-H460 cells through ER stress and caspase cascade- and mitochondria-dependent pathways.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shin-Hwar; Hang, Liang-Wen; Yang, Jai-Sing; Chen, Hung-Yi; Lin, Hui-Yi; Chiang, Jo-Hua; Lu, Chi-Cheng; Yang, Jiun-Long; Lai, Tung-Yuan; Ko, Yang-Ching; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2010-06-01

    It has been reported that curcumin inhibited various types of cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. However, mechanisms of curcumin-inhibited cell growth and -induced apoptosis in human non-small cell lung cancer cells (NCI-H460) still remain unclear. In this study, NCI-H460 cells were treated with curcumin to determine its anticancer activity. Different concentrations of curcumin were used for different durations in NCI-H460 cells and the subsequent changes in the cell morphology, viability, cell cycle, mRNA and protein expressions were determined. Curcumin induced apoptotic morphologic changes in NCI-H460 cells in a dose-dependent manner. After curcumin treatment, BAX and BAD were up-regulated, BCL-2, BCL-X(L) and XIAP were down-regulated. In addition, reactive oxygen species (ROS), intracellular Ca(2+) and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress were increased in NCI-H460 cells after exposure to curcumin. These signals led to a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (Delta Psi(m)) and culminated in caspase-3 activation. Curcumin-induced apoptosis was also stimulated through the FAS/caspase-8 (extrinsic) pathway and ER stress proteins, growth arrest- and DNA damage-inducible gene 153 (GADD153) and glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) were activated in the NCI-H460 cells. Apoptotic cell death induced by curcumin was significantly reversed by pretreatment with ROS scavenger or caspase-8 inhibitor. Furthermore, the NCI-H460 cells tended to be arrested at the G(2)/M cell cycle stage after curcumin treatment and down-regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1) may be involved. In summary, curcumin exerts its anticancer effects on lung cancer NCI-H460 cells through apoptosis or cell cycle arrest.

  18. Alpha5 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor mediates nicotine-induced HIF-1α and VEGF expression in non-small cell lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Xiaoli; Jia, Yanfei; Zu, Shanshan; Li, Ruisheng; Jia, Ying; Zhao, Yun; Xiao, Dongjie; Dang, Ningning; Wang, Yunshan

    2014-07-15

    By binding to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), nicotine induces the proliferation and apoptosis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Previous studies have indicated that α5-nAChR is highly associated with lung cancer risk and nicotine dependence. However, the mechanisms through which α5-nAChRs may influence lung carcinogenesis are far from clear. In the present study, we investigated the roles of α5-nAChR in the nicotine-induced expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Immunohistochemistry was used to detect the expression of α5-nAChR and HIF-1α in 60 specimens of lung cancer and para-carcinoma tissue. The correlations between the expression levels of α5-nAChR and HIF-1α and other clinicopathological data were analyzed. In a cell line that highly expressed α5-nAChR, the loss of α5-nAChR function by siRNA was used to study whether α5-nAChR is involved in the nicotine-induced expression of HIF-1α and VEGF through the activation of the ERK1/2 and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways. Cell growth was detected using the cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8). α5-nAChR (78.3%) and HIF-1α (88.3%) were both overexpressed in NSCLC, and their expression levels were found to be correlated with each other (P < 0.05). In the A549 cell line, α5-nAChR and HIF-1α were found to be expressed under normal conditions, and their expression levels were significantly increased in response to nicotine treatment. The silencing of α5-nAChR significantly inhibited the nicotine-induced cell proliferation compared with the control group and attenuated the nicotine-induced upregulation of HIF-1α and VEGF, and these effects required the cooperation of the ERK1/2 and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways. These results show that the α5-nAChR/HIF-1α/VEGF axis is involved in nicotine-induced tumor cell proliferation, which suggests that α5-nAChR may serve as a potential anticancer target in nicotine-associated lung cancer. - Highlights

  19. Role of α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in nicotine-induced invasion and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in human non-small cell lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xin-Jie; An, Shi-Min; Wang, Hao; Xu, Lu; Zhu, Liang; Chen, Hong-Zhuan

    2016-01-01

    Nicotine via nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) stimulates non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell invasion and epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) which underpin the cancer metastasis. However, the receptor subtype-dependent effects of nAChRs on NSCLC cell invasion and EMT, and the signaling pathway underlying the effects remain not fully defined. We identified that nicotine induced NSCLC cell invasion, migration, and EMT; the effects were suppressed by pharmacological intervention using α7-nAChR selective antagonists or by genetic intervention using α7-nAChR knockdown via RNA inference. Meanwhile, nicotine induced activation of MEK/ERK signaling in NSCLC cells; α7-nAChR antagonism or MEK/ERK signaling pathway inhibition suppressed NSCLC cell invasion and EMT marker expression. These results indicate that nicotine induces NSCLC cell invasion, migration, and EMT; the effects are mediated by α7-nAChRs and involve MEK/ERK signaling pathway. Delineating the effect of nicotine on the NSCLC cell invasion and EMT at receptor subtype level would improve the understanding of cancer biology and offer potentials for the exploitation of selective ligands for the control of the cancer metastasis. PMID:27409670

  20. Demethoxycurcumin-induced DNA Damage Decreases DNA Repair-associated Protein Expression Levels in NCI-H460 Human Lung Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Ko, Yang-Ching; Lien, Jin-Cherng; Liu, Hsin-Chung; Hsu, Shu-Chun; Lin, Hui-Yi; Chueh, Fu-Shin; Ji, Bin-Chuan; Yang, Mei-Due; Hsu, Wu-Huei; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-05-01

    Demethoxycurcumin (DMC) is a key component of Chinese medicine (Turmeric) and has been proven effective in killing various cancer cells. Its role in inducing cytotoxic effects in many cancer cells has been reported, but its role regarding DNA damage on lung cancer cells has not been studied in detail. In the present study, we demonstrated DMC-induced DNA damage and condensation in NCI-H460 cells by using the Comet assay and DAPI staining examinations, respectively. Western blotting indicated that DMC suppressed the protein levels associated with DNA damage and repair, such as 14-3-3σ (an important checkpoint keeper of DNA damage response), DNA repair proteins breast cancer 1, early onset (BRCA1), O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), mediator of DNA damage checkpoint 1 (MDC1), and p53 (tumor suppressor protein). DMC activated phosphorylated p53 and p-H2A.X (phospho Ser140) in NCI-H460 cells. Furthermore, we used confocal laser systems microscopy to examine the protein translocation. The results showed that DMC promotes the translocation of p-p53 and p-H2A.X from the cytosol to the nuclei in NCI-H460 cells. Taken together, DMC induced DNA damage and affected DNA repair proteins in NCI-H460 cells in vitro.

  1. Class I HDACs are mediators of smoke-carcinogen induced stabilization of DNMT1 and serve as promising targets for chemoprevention of lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Brodie, Seth A; Li, Ge; El-Kommos, Adam; Kang, Hyunseok; Ramalingam, Suresh S; Behera, Madhusmita; Gandhi, Khanjan; Kowalski, Jeanne; Sica, Gabriel L; Khuri, Fadlo R; Vertino, Paula M.; Brandes, Johann C

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation is an early event in bronchial carcinogenesis and increased DNA methyltransferase (DNMT)1 protein expression is a crucial step in the oncogenic transformation of epithelia. Here, we investigate the role of class I histone deacetylases (HDACs) 1–3 in the stabilization of DNMT1 protein and as a potential therapeutic target for lung cancer chemoprevention. Long-term exposure of immortalized bronchial epithelial cells (HBEC-3KT) to low doses of tobacco-related carcinogens led to oncogenic transformation, increased HDAC expression, cell cycle independent increased DNMT1 stability and DNA hypermethylation. Overexpression of HDACs was associated with increased DNMT1 stability and knockdown of HDACs reduced DNMT1 protein levels and induced DNMT1 acetylation. This suggests a causal relationship among increased class I HDACs levels, upregulation of DNMT1 protein, and subsequent promoter hypermethylation. Targeting of class I HDACs with valproic acid (VPA) was associated with reduced HDAC expression and a profound reduction of DNMT1 protein level. Treatment of transformed bronchial epithelial cells with VPA resulted in reduced colony formation, demethylation of the aberrantly methylated SFRP2 promoter and de-repression of SFRP2 transcription. These data suggest that inhibition of HDAC activity may reverse or prevent carcinogen induced transformation. Finally, immunohistochemistry on human lung cancer specimens revealed a significant increase in DNMT1, HDAC1, HDAC2, and HDAC3 expression, supporting our hypotheses that class I HDACs are mediators of DNMT1 stability. In summary, our study provides evidence for an important role of class I HDACs in controlling the stability of DNMT1 and suggests that HDAC inhibition could be an attractive approach for lung cancer chemoprevention. PMID:24441677

  2. Enhanced Quitline Intervention in Smoking Cessation for Patients With Non-Metastatic Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-20

    Limited Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Tobacco Use Disorder

  3. Screening and early detection of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Van't Westeinde, Susan C; van Klaveren, Rob J

    2011-01-01

    Lung cancer with an estimated 342,000 deaths in 2008 (20% of total) is the most common cause of death from cancer, followed by colorectal cancer (12%), breast cancer (8%), and stomach cancer (7%) in Europe. In former smokers, the absolute lung cancer risk remains higher than in never-smokers; these data therefore call for effective secondary preventive measures for lung cancer in addition to smoking cessation programs. This review presents and discusses the most recent advances in the early detection and screening of lung cancer.An overview of randomized controlled computerized tomography-screening trials is given, and the role of bronchoscopy and new techniques is discussed. Finally, the approach of (noninvasive) biomarker testing in the blood, exhaled breath, sputum, and bronchoscopic specimen is reviewed.

  4. Identification of epigallocatechin-3-gallate in green tea polyphenols as a potent inducer of p53-dependent apoptosis in the human lung cancer cell line A549.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Rieko; Sasaki, Kaori; Yoshida, Kenichi

    2009-08-01

    The effects of green tea polyphenols on cultured cancer cells have been well characterized, especially the effects of epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCg), since EGCg suppresses oncogenic signaling pathways and induces cell cycle arrest or apoptosis by regulating cell cycle-associated proteins. In the present study, we attempted to identify signaling pathways or target molecules regulated by each of or a mixture of green tea polyphenols, including epicatechin (EC), epicatechin-3-gallate (ECg), epigallocatechin (EGC), and EGCg, in the human lung cancer cell line A549. ECg, EGC, and a catechin mixture, in addition to EGCg, significantly decreased cell viability. In contrast, caspase 3/7 activity, an apoptosis indicator, was specifically induced by EGCg. By conducting a series of luciferase-based reporter assays, we revealed that the catechin mixture only up-regulates the p53 reporter. EGCg was a more potent inducer of p53-dependent transcription, and this induction was further supported by the induced level of p53 protein. RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated p53 knockdown completely abolished EGCg-induced apoptosis. Finally, a proteome and western blot analysis using approximately 70 different antibodies failed to detect up-regulated proteins in catechin mixture-treated A549 cells. Taken together, these results indicate that EGCg, among several green tea polyphenols, is a potent apoptosis inducer that functions exclusively through a p53-dependent pathway in A549 cells.

  5. Hippocampal-Sparing Whole-Brain Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ren; Kong, Wei; Shang, Jun; Zhe, Hong; Wang, Yan-Yang

    2017-03-01

    Brain metastases occur in 20% to 40% of lung cancer patients. Whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) has long been considered the treatment of choice for many patients with lung cancer, because of its wide availability, ease of delivery, and effectiveness in prolonging survival. However, WBRT is also associated with several side effects, such as decline in memory and other cognitive functions. There exists significant preclinical and clinical evidence that radiation-induced injury to the hippocampus correlates with neurocognitive decline of patients who receive WBRT. Technological advances in treatment planning and delivery facilitate the use of hippocampal-sparing (HS) WBRT as prophylactic cranial irradiation or the primary treatment modality for lung cancer patients with brain metastases. In this review, we provide a detailed and comprehensive discussion of the safety profile, techniques for hippocampus-sparing, and the clinical evidence of HS-WBRT for lung cancer patients.

  6. Lung cancer stem cells: An epigenetic perspective.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Samriddhi; Khan, Sajid; Sinha, Sonam; Meeran, Syed Musthapa

    2017-02-05

    Lung cancer remains the major cause of human mortality among all the cancer types despite the colossal amount of efforts to prevent the cancer onset and to provide the appropriate cure. Recent reports have identified that important contributors of lung cancer-related mortality are the drug resistance and aggressive tumor relapse, the characteristics contributed by the presence of lung cancer stem cells (CSCs). The identification of lung CSCs is inherently complex due to the quiescent nature of lung epithelium, which makes the distinction between the normal lung epithelium and lung CSCs difficult. Recently, multiple researches have helped in the identification of lung CSCs based on the presence or absence of certain specific types of stem cell markers. Maintenance of lung CSCs is chiefly mediated through the epigenetic modifications of their genome. In this review, we will discuss about the origin of lung CSCs and the role of epigenetic modifications in their maintenance. We will also discuss in brief the major lung CSC markers and the therapeutic approaches to selectively target this population of cells.

  7. Temozolomide-perillyl alcohol conjugate induced reactive oxygen species accumulation contributes to its cytotoxicity against non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xingguo; Xie, Li; Wang, Xingwu; Zeng, Qian; Chen, Thomas C.; Wang, Weijun; Song, Xianrang

    2016-01-01

    Temozolomide-perillyl alcohol conjugate (TMZ − POH), a novel temozolomide analog, was reported to play a cytotoxic role in triple-negative breast cancer and TMZ-resistant gliomas. In a current study we had demonstrated how TMZ − POH also exhibited its cytotoxicity against non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the most common type of lung cancer, as evidence from cell/tumor proliferation inhibition, G2/M arrest, DNA damage and mitochondrial apoptosis. Importantly, TMZ − POH’s cytotoxicity is closely related to reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation because it can be reversed by two ROS scavengers, catalase (CAT) and N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC). TMZ − POH induces mitochondrial transmembrane potential (MTP) decrease and ROS accumulation, in turn activates mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPKs) signaling and mitochondrial apoptosis, and then exerts its cytotoxicity, thus proposing TMZ − POH as a potential therapeutic candidate for NSCLC. PMID:26949038

  8. Association of P53 and ATM Polymorphisms With Risk of Radiation-Induced Pneumonitis in Lung Cancer Patients Treated With Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Ming; Zhang Li; Bi Nan; Ji Wei; Tan Wen; Zhao Lujun; Yu Dianke; Wu Chen; Wang Luhua

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: Radiation-induced pneumonitis (RP) is the most common dose-limiting complication in lung cancer patients treated with radiotherapy. Accumulating evidence indicates that P53 and the ataxia telangiectasia-mutated protein (ATM)-dependent signaling response cascade play a crucial role in radiation-induced diseases. Consistent with this, our previous study showed that a functional genetic ATM polymorphism was associated with increased RP risk. Methods and Materials: To evaluate the role of genetic P53 polymorphism in RP, we analyzed the P53 Arg72Pro polymorphism in a cohort including 253 lung cancer patients receiving thoracic irradiation. Results: We found that the P53 72Arg/Arg genotype was associated with increased RP risk compared with the 72Pro/Pro genotype. Furthermore, the P53 Arg72Pro and ATM -111G>A polymorphisms display an additive combination effect in intensifying the risk of developing RP. The cross-validation test showed that 63.2% of RP cases can be identified by P53 and ATM genotypes. Conclusions: These results indicate that genetic polymorphisms in the ATM-P53 pathway influence susceptibility to RP and genotyping P53 and ATM polymorphisms might help to identify patients susceptible to developing RP when receiving radiotherapy.

  9. Chaetocin induces endoplasmic reticulum stress response and leads to death receptor 5-dependent apoptosis in human non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xianfang; Guo, Sen; Liu, Xiangguo; Su, Ling

    2015-11-01

    Epigenetic abnormalities are associated with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) initiation and progression. Epigenetic drugs are being studied and in clinical trials. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the apoptosis by the epigenetic agents remains unclear. SUV39H1 is an important methyl-transferase for lysine 9 on histone H3 and usually related to gene transcriptional suppression, and chaetocin acts as the inhibitor of SUV39H1. We demonstrated here that chaetocin effectively suppressed the growth of multiple lung cancer cells through inducing apoptosis in a death receptor 5 (DR5)-dependent manner. Chaetocin treatment activated endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress which gave rise to the up-regulation of ATF3 and CHOP. Furthermore, ATF3 and CHOP contributed to the induction of DR5 and subsequent apoptosis. When SUV39H1 was silenced with siRNA, the expression of ATF3, CHOP and DR5 was elevated. Thereafter, knockdown of SUV39H1 induced apoptosis in NSCLC cells. In summary, chaetocin pharmacologically inhibits the activity of SUV39H1 which provokes ER stress and results in up-regulation of ATF3 and CHOP, leading to DR5-dependent apoptosis eventually. These findings provide a novel interpretation on the anti-neoplastic activity of epigenetic drugs as a new therapeutic approach in NSCLC.

  10. Lipid-soluble ginseng extract induces apoptosis and G0/G1 cell cycle arrest in NCI-H460 human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kang, Moo Rim; Kim, Hwan Mook; Kang, Jong Soon; Lee, Kiho; Lee, Sung Dong; Hyun, Dong-Hoon; In, Man-Jin; Park, Song-Kyu; Kim, Dong Chung

    2011-06-01

    This study was performed to elucidate the anticancer mechanism of a lipid-soluble ginseng extract (LSGE) by analyzing induction of apoptosis and arrest of cell cycle progression using the NCI-H460 human lung cancer cell line. Proliferation of NCI-H460 cells was potently inhibited by LSGE in a dose-dependent manner. The cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase in NCI-H460 cells was induced by LSGE. The percentage of G0/G1 phase cells significantly increased, while that of S phase cells decreased after treatment with LSGE. The expression levels of cyclin-dependent kinase2 (CDK2), CDK4, CDK6, cyclin D3 and cyclin E related to G0/G1 cells progression were also altered by LSGE. In addition, LSGE-induced cell death occurred through apoptosis, which was accompanied by increasing the activity of caspases including caspase-8, caspase-9 and caspase-3. Consistent with enhancement of caspase activity, LSGE increased protein levels of cleaved caspase-3, caspase-8, caspase-9, and poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP). These apoptotic effects of LSGE were inhibited by the pan-caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-fmk. These findings indicate that LSGE inhibits NCI-H460 human lung cancer cell growth by cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase and induction of caspase-mediated apoptosis.

  11. Cancer Stem Cells in Lung Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kratz, Johannes R.; Yagui-Beltrán, Adam; Jablons, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Although stem cells were discovered more than 50 years ago, we have only recently begun to understand their potential importance in cancer biology. Recent advances in our ability to describe, isolate, and study lung stem cell populations has led to a growing recognition of the central importance cells with stem cell-like properties may have in lung tumorigenesis. This article reviews the major studies supporting the existence and importance of cancer stem cells in lung tumorigenesis. Continued research in the field of lung cancer stem cell biology is vital, as ongoing efforts promise to yield new prognostic and therapeutic targets. PMID:20493987

  12. Lung cancer screening: the way forward

    PubMed Central

    Field, J K; Duffy, S W

    2008-01-01

    To take lung cancer screening into national programmes, we first have to answer the question whether low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) screening and treatment of early lesions will decrease lung cancer mortality compared with a control group, to accurately estimate the balance of benefits and harms, and to determine the cost-effectiveness of the intervention. PMID:18665179

  13. Lung Cancer - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Arabic) سرطان الرئة - العربية Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Bosnian (Bosanski) Lung Cancer Karcinom pluća - Bosanski (Bosnian) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese - Simplified (简体中文) Lung Cancer 肺癌 - 简体中文 (Chinese - ...

  14. Recent advances in lung cancer biology

    SciTech Connect

    Lechner, J.

    1995-12-31

    This paper provides an overview of carcinogenesis, especially as related to lung cancers. Various growth factors and their mutated forms as oncogenes are discussed with respect to gene location and their role in the oncogenic process. Finally the data is related to lung cancer induction in uranium miners and exposure to radon.

  15. Lung Cancer Clinical Trials: Advances in Immunotherapy

    Cancer.gov

    New treatments for lung cancer and aspects of joining a clinical trial are discussed in this 30-minute Facebook Live event, hosted by NCI’s Dr. Shakun Malik, head of thoracic oncology therapeutics, and Janet Freeman-Daily, lung cancer patient activist and founding member of #LCSM.

  16. Indoor radon and lung cancer in China

    SciTech Connect

    Blot, W.J.; Xu, Z.Y.; Boice, J.D. Jr.; Zhao, D.Z.; Stone, B.J.; Sun, J.; Jing, L.B.; Fraumeni, J.F. Jr. )

    1990-06-20

    Radon has long been known to contribute to risk of lung cancer, especially in undergound miners who are exposed to large amounts of the carcinogen. Recently, however, lower amounts of radon present in living areas have been suggested as an important cause of lung cancer. In an effort to clarify the relationship of low amounts of radon with lung cancer risk, we placed alpha-track radon detectors in the homes of 308 women with newly diagnosed lung cancer and 356 randomly selected female control subjects of similar age. Measurements were taken after 1 year. All study participants were part of the general population of Shenyang, People's Republic of China, an industrial city in the northeast part of the country that has one of the world's highest rates of lung cancer in women. The median time of residence in the homes was 24 years. The median household radon level was 2.3 pCi/L of air; 20% of the levels were greater than 4 pCi/L. Radon levels tended to be higher in single-story houses or on the first floor of multiple-story dwellings, and they were also higher in houses with increased levels of indoor air pollution from coal-burning stoves. However, the levels were not higher in homes of women who developed lung cancer than in homes of controls, nor did lung cancer risk increase with increasing radon level. No association between radon and lung cancer was observed regardless of cigarette-smoking status, except for a nonsignificant trend among heavy smokers. No positive associations of lung cancer cell type with radon were observed, except for a nonsignificant excess risk of small cell cancers among the more heavily exposed residents. Our data suggest that projections from surveys of miners exposed to high radon levels may have overestimated the overall risks of lung cancer associated with levels typically seen in homes in this Chinese city.

  17. Ski prevents TGF-β-induced EMT and cell invasion by repressing SMAD-dependent signaling in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Haiping; Zhan, Lei; Yang, Tianjie; Wang, Longqiang; Li, Chang; Zhao, Jun; Lei, Zhe; Li, Xiangdong; Zhang, Hong-Tao

    2015-07-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a key event in cancer metastasis, which confers cancer cells with increased motility and invasiveness, and EMT is characterized by loss of epithelial marker E-cadherin and gain of mesenchymal marker N-cadherin. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling is a crucial inducer of EMT in various types of cancer. Ski is an important negative regulator of TGF-β signaling, which interacts with SMADs to repress TGF-β signaling activity. Although there is accumulating evidence that Ski functions as a promoter or suppressor in human types of cancer, the molecular mechanisms by which Ski affects TGF-β-induced EMT and invasion in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are not largely elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the mechanistic role of Ski in NSCLC metastasis. Ski was significantly reduced in metastatic NSCLC cells or tissues when compared with non-metastatic NSCLC cells or tissues. Moreover, following TGF-β stimulation Ski-silenced A549 cells had more significant features of EMT and a higher invasive activity when compared with A549 cells overexpressing Ski. Mechanistically, Ski-silenced and overexpressed A549 cells showed an increase and a reduction in the SMAD3 phosphorylation level, respectively. This was supported by plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) promoter activity obtained in Ski-silenced and overexpressed A549 cells. However, after treatment of SIS3 (inhibitor of SMAD3 phosphorylation) followed by TGF-β1 stimulation, we did not observe any effect of Ski on TGF-β-induced EMT, and invasion in Ski-silenced and overexpressed A549 cells. In conclusion, our findings suggest that Ski represses TGF-β-induced EMT and invasion by inhibiting SMAD-dependent signaling in NSCLC.

  18. Pulmonary Rehabilitation in Improving Lung Function in Patients With Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Undergoing Chemoradiation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-05

    Cachexia; Fatigue; Pulmonary Complications; Radiation Toxicity; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  19. Molecular features in arsenic-induced lung tumors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Arsenic is a well-known human carcinogen, which potentially affects ~160 million people worldwide via exposure to unsafe levels in drinking water. Lungs are one of the main target organs for arsenic-related carcinogenesis. These tumors exhibit particular features, such as squamous cell-type specificity and high incidence among never smokers. Arsenic-induced malignant transformation is mainly related to the biotransformation process intended for the metabolic clearing of the carcinogen, which results in specific genetic and epigenetic alterations that ultimately affect key pathways in lung carcinogenesis. Based on this, lung tumors induced by arsenic exposure could be considered an additional subtype of lung cancer, especially in the case of never-smokers, where arsenic is a known etiological agent. In this article, we review the current knowledge on the various mechanisms of arsenic carcinogenicity and the specific roles of this metalloid in signaling pathways leading to lung cancer. PMID:23510327

  20. Drug delivery and nanodetection in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Badrzadeh, Fariba; Rahmati-Yamchi, Mohammad; Badrzadeh, Kazem; Valizadeh, Alireza; Zarghami, Nosratollah; Farkhani, Samad Mussa; Akbarzadeh, Abolfazl

    2016-01-01

    Lung carcinoma is the most widespread type of cancer worldwide, and is responsible for more deaths than other types of cancer. Lung cancer remains the chief cause of cancer-related deaths in both men and women worldwide, and is increasingly common in women. Each year, the number of deaths from lung cancer is greater than the number due to breast and colorectal cancer combined. Lung cancer accounted for 13% (1.6 million) of the total cases and 18% (1.4 million) of the deaths in 2008. In Iran, lung cancer is one of the five leading tumors. Among females, it was the fourth most commonly diagnosed cancer, and the second leading cause of cancer death. Nanotechnology can be defined as the science and engineering involved in the design, characterization, and application of materials and devices whose smallest functional organization in at least one dimension is on the nanometer scale, i.e. one billionth of a meter. It is an exciting multidisciplinary field that involves the design and engineering of nano objects or nanotools with diameters less than 500 nanometers (nm), and it is one of the most interesting fields of the 21st century. Nanotechnology also offers the ability to detect diseases, such as tumors, much earlier than ever imaginable. This article presents nano devices for lung cancer detection and drug delivery systems.

  1. The Impact of the Cancer Genome Atlas on Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jeremy Tzu-Huai; Lee, Yee-Ming; Huang, R. Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) has profiled over 10,000 samples derived from 33 types of cancer to date, with the goal of improving our understanding of the molecular basis of cancer and advancing our ability to diagnose, treat, and prevent cancer. This review focuses on lung cancer as it is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide in both men and women. Particularly, non-small cell lung cancers (including lung adenocarcinoma and lung squamous cell carcinoma) were evaluated. Our goal is to demonstrate the impact of TCGA on lung cancer research under four themes: namely, diagnostic markers, disease progression markers, novel therapeutic targets, and novel tools. Examples were given related to DNA mutation, copy number variation, mRNA, and microRNA expression along with methylation profiling. PMID:26318634

  2. BIX02189 inhibits TGF-β1-induced lung cancer cell metastasis by directly targeting TGF-β type I receptor.

    PubMed

    Park, Seong Ji; Choi, Yu Sun; Lee, Seungkoo; Lee, Young Jae; Hong, Suntaek; Han, Sanghwa; Kim, Byung-Chul

    2016-10-28

    Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) promotes tumor metastasis by inducing an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in cancer cells. In this study, we investigated the effects of BIX02189 and XMD8-92, pharmacologic inhibitors of the MEK5 [mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK)5] signaling pathway, on the EMT and migration of cancer cells induced by TGF-β1. In human A549 lung cancer cells, TGF-β1-induced EMT, cell motility, and expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 were completely inhibited by BIX02189, but not by XMD8-92 or small interference RNAs specific to MEK5 and ERK5. Interestingly, BIX02189 strongly blocked the activation of TGF-β1 signaling components, and this inhibitory effect was not reproduced by MEK5 inhibition. Molecular docking simulation and kinase assays revealed that BIX02189 binds directly to the ATP-binding site of the TGF-β receptor type I (TβRI) and suppresses its kinase activity. Finally, the anti-metastatic effect of BIX02189 was validated in a TβRI-derived A549 xenograft mouse model. Collectively, these findings newly characterize BIX02189 as a potent inhibitor of TβRI that can block the tumor metastatic activity of TGF-β1.

  3. Yu Ping Feng San reverses cisplatin-induced multi-drug resistance in lung cancer cells via regulating drug transporters and p62/TRAF6 signalling

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Jian-Shu; Yan, Lu; Bi, Cathy W. C.; Chan, Gallant K. L.; Wu, Qi-Yun; Liu, Yun-Le; Huang, Yun; Yao, Ping; Du, Crystal Y. Q.; Dong, Tina T. X.; Tsim, Karl W. K.

    2016-01-01

    Yu Ping Feng San (YPFS), an ancient Chinese herbal decoction composed of Astragali Radix, Atractylodis Macrocephalae Rhizoma and Saposhnikoviae Radix, has been used in the clinic for treating immune deficiency. In cancer therapy, YPFS is being combined with chemotherapy drugs to achieve improved efficacy; however, scientific evidence to illustrate this combination effect is lacking. The present study aims to demonstrate the anti-drug resistance of YPFS in cisplatin (DDP)-resistant non-small cell lung cancer cells (A549/DDP). The application of YPFS exhibited a synergistic enhancement of DDP-induced cytotoxicity as well as of the apoptotic signalling molecules. DDP-induced expression of the multi-drug-resistance efflux transporters was markedly reduced in the presence of YPFS, resulting in a higher intracellular concentration of DDP. In addition, the application of YPFS increased DDP-induced ROS accumulation and MMP depletion, decreased p62/TRAF6 signalling in DDP-treated A549/DDP cells. The co-treatment of DDP and YPFS in tumour-bearing mice reduced the tumour size robustly (by more than 80%), which was much better than the effect of DDP alone. These results indicate that YPFS can notably improve the DDP-suppressed cancer effect, which may be a consequence of the elevation of intracellular DDP via the drug transporters as well as the down regulation of p62/TRAF6 signalling. PMID:27558312

  4. (−)-Guaiol regulates RAD51 stability via autophagy to induce cell apoptosis in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qingyuan; Wu, Jianchun; Luo, Yingbin; Huang, Nan; Zhen, Ni; Zhou, Yun; Sun, Fenyong; Li, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    (−)-Guaiol, generally known as an antibacterial compound, has been found in many medicinal plants. Its roles in tumor suppression are still under investigation. In the study, we mainly focused on exploring its applications in dealing with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and the underlying mechanisms. Here, we show that (−)-Guaiol significantly inhibits cell growth of NSCLC cells both in vitro and in vivo. Further high throughput analysis reveals that RAD51, a pivotal factor in homologous recombination repair, is a potential target for it. The following mechanism studies show that (−)-Guaiol is involved in cell autophagy to regulate the expression of RAD51, leading to double-strand breaks triggered cell apoptosis. Moreover, targeting RAD51, which is highly overexpressed in the lung adenocarcinoma tissues, can significantly increase the chemosensitivity of NSCLC cells to (−)-Guaiol both in vitro and in vivo. All in all, our studies provide an attractive insight in applying (−)-Guaiol into NSCLC treatments and further suggest that knockdown of oncogenic RAD51 will greatly enhance the chemosensitivity of patients with NSCLC. PMID:27566579

  5. MicroRNA-21 modulates radiation resistance through upregulation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α-promoted glycolysis in non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shumei; Wang, Renben; Yan, Hongjiang; Jin, Linzhi; Dou, Xue; Chen, Dong

    2016-05-01

    Aberrant microRNA (miRNA) expression in cancer affects the transcription of target genes, and profoundly influences cancer‑associated signaling pathways. Radiation resistance is a major problem encountered in the treatment of cancer. The present study aimed to investigate the role of miRNA (miR)‑21 in the development of radiation resistance in non‑small cell lung cancer cells. A radiation‑resistant cell line was generated from A549 cells. Significant upregulation of miR‑21 was detected in the radioresistant cancer cells, as compared with the radiosensitive cells, and overexpression of miR‑21 rendered A549 parental cells resistant to radiation. In addition, glycolysis was increased in the radioresistant cells, as compared with the sensitive cells. Furthermore, hypoxia‑inducible factor‑1α (HIF1α) was upregulated by miR‑21 in radioresistant cells, resulting in promotion of the key enzymes of glycolysis. Inhibition of HIF1α by small interfering RNA suppressed glycolysis and resensitized the cancer cells to radiation, whereas the recovery of HIF1α in miR‑21‑inhibited radioresistant cells resulted in recovery of radioresistance. In conclusion, the present study suggested that miR‑21 may modulate radioresistance through the upregulation of HIF1α. These results may provide a novel perspective on miRNA for the development of anti-radioresistance drugs.

  6. Early diagnosis of lung cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saccomanno, Geno; Bechtel, Joel J.

    1991-06-01

    Lung cancer remains the leading cause of death in the United States. Although the incidence of cigarette smoking is decreasing in the United States it appears to be increasing worldwide. The five-year survival rate has not improved in cases with advanced disease, but several articles have indicated that survival can be improved in cases diagnosed early by sputum cytology and chest x-ray. In cases diagnosed while the lesion is in the in-situ stage or measures less than 1 cm in diameter, surgical excision and/or radiation therapy improves survival; therefore, the early diagnosis of high-risk patients should be vigorously pursued. A recent study at a community hospital in Grand Junction, Colorado, presented 45 lung cancer cases diagnosed with positive sputum cytology and negative chest x-ray, and indicates that early diagnosis does improve survival. This study has been conducted during the past six years; 16 cases have survived three years and six cases show five-year survival.

  7. Biphasic Effects of Nitric Oxide Radicals on Radiation-Induced Lethality and Chromosome Aberrations in Human Lung Cancer Cells Carrying Different p53 Gene Status

    SciTech Connect

    Su Xiaoming; Takahashi, Akihisa; Guo Guozhen; Mori, Eiichiro; Okamoto, Noritomo; Ohnishi, Ken; Iwasaki, Toshiyasu; Ohnishi, Takeo

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to clarify the effects of nitric oxide (NO) on radiation-induced cell killing and chromosome aberrations in two human lung cancer cell lines with a different p53 gene status. Methods and Materials: We used wild-type (wt) p53 and mutated (m) p53 cell lines that were derived from the human lung cancer H1299 cell line, which is p53 null. The wtp53 and mp53 cell lines were generated by transfection of the appropriate p53 constructs into the parental cells. Cells were pretreated with different concentrations of isosorbide dinitrate (ISDN) (an NO donor) and/or 2-(4-Carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (c-PTIO) (an NO scavenger) and then exposed to X-rays. Cell survival, apoptosis, and chromosome aberrations were scored by use of a colony-forming assay, Hoechst 33342 staining assay and TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP [deoxyuridine triphosphate] nick end labeling) assay, and chromosomal banding techniques, respectively. Results: In wtp53 cells the induction of radioresistance and the inhibition of apoptosis and chromosome aberrations were observed in the presence of ISDN at low 2- to 10-{mu}mol/L concentrations before X-irradiation. The addition of c-PTIO and ISDN into the culture medium 6 h before irradiation almost completely suppressed these effects. However, at high concentrations of ISDN (100-500 {mu}mol/L), clear evidence of radiosensitization, enhancement of apoptosis, and chromosome aberrations was detected. However, these phenomena were not observed in mp53 cells at either concentration range with ISDN. Conclusions: These results indicate that low and high concentrations of NO radicals can choreograph inverse radiosensitivity, apoptosis, and chromosome aberrations in human lung cancer cells and that NO radicals can affect the fate of wtp53 cells.

  8. Study of Ponatinib in Patients With Lung Cancer Preselected Using Different Candidate Predictive Biomarkers

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-07

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Limited Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  9. Involvement of EZH2, SUV39H1, G9a and associated molecules in pathogenesis of urethane induced mouse lung tumors: Potential targets for cancer control

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, Manuraj; Sahay, Satya; Tiwari, Prakash; Upadhyay, Daya S.; Sultana, Sarwat; Gupta, Krishna P.

    2014-10-15

    In the present study, we showed the correlation of EZH2, SUV39H1 or G9a expression and histone modifications with the urethane induced mouse lung tumorigenesis in the presence or absence of antitumor agent, inositol hexaphosphate (IP6). Tumorigenesis and the molecular events involved therein were studied at 1, 4, 12 or 36 weeks after the exposure. There were no tumors at 1 or 4 weeks but tumors started appearing at 12 weeks and grew further till 36 weeks after urethane exposure. Among the molecular events, upregulation of EZH2 and SUV39H1 expressions appeared to be time dependent, but G9a expression was altered significantly only at later stages of 12 or 36 weeks. Alteration in miR-138 expression supports the upregulation of its target, EZH2. H3K9me2, H3K27me3 or H4K20me3 was found to be altered at 12 or 36 weeks. However, ChIP analysis of p16 and MLH1 promoters showed their binding with H3K9me2 and H3K27me3 which was maximum at 36 weeks. Thus, histone modification and their interactions with gene promoter resulted in the reduced expression of p16 and MLH1. IP6 prevented the incidence and the size of urethane induced lung tumors. IP6 also prevented the urethane induced alterations in EZH2, SUV39H1, G9a expressions and histone modifications. Our results suggest that the alterations in the histone modification pathways involving EZH2 and SUV39H1 expressions are among the early events in urethane induced mouse lung tumorigenesis and could be exploited for cancer control. - Highlights: • Urethane induces mouse lung tumor in a time dependent manner. • EZH2, SUV39H1, G9a induced by urethane and progress with time • Downregulation of miRNA-138 supports the EZH2 upregulation. • Methylation of histones showed a consequence of upregulated EZH2, SUV39H1 and G9a. • IP6 inhibits urethane induced changes and prevents tumor development.

  10. Early Lung Cancer Diagnosis by Biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuqian; Yang, Dongliang; Weng, Lixing; Wang, Lianhui

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer causes an extreme threat to human health, and the mortality rate due to lung cancer has not decreased during the last decade. Prognosis or early diagnosis could help reduce the mortality rate. If microRNA and tumor-associated antigens (TAAs), as well as the corresponding autoantibodies, can be detected prior to clinical diagnosis, such high sensitivity of biosensors makes the early diagnosis and prognosis of cancer realizable. This review provides an overview of tumor-associated biomarker identifying methods and the biosensor technology available today. Laboratorial researches utilizing biosensors for early lung cancer diagnosis will be highlighted. PMID:23892596

  11. Nasal Swab Shows Promise in Confirming Lung Cancers

    MedlinePlus

    ... 163805.html Nasal Swab Shows Promise in Confirming Lung Cancers Simple technique is based on cancer DNA ... 27, 2017 MONDAY, Feb. 27, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Lung cancer remains by far the leading cancer killer ...

  12. Lipopolysaccharide induces inflammation and facilitates lung metastasis in a breast cancer model via the prostaglandin E2-EP2 pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Shancheng; Xu, Xiaoya; Jiang, Man; Bi, Yuli; Xu, Jiying; Han, Mingyong

    2015-06-01

    Inflammation is a potent promoter of tumor metastasis. The aim of the present study was to explore the function of systemic inflammation in the formation of lung metastasis of breast cancer cells in a mouse model. BALB/c mice were injected intraperitoneally with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in order to establish an inflammatory animal model and 4T1 murine breast cancer cells were injected through the tail vein to induce lung metastasis. The levels of proinflammatory cytokines were evaluated by ELISA. Metastases on the surface of the lungs were counted and histologically analyzed by hematoxylin and eosin staining. Angiogenesis in the lungs was examined by CD31 immunofluorescence. Mouse pulmonary endothelial cells (MPVECs) were isolated and used to assay endothelial tube formation and determine the protein expression levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in vitro. Serum levels of VEGF and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), the number and size of metastatic lesions, and the expression levels of cyclooxygenase‑2 were significantly greater in the lungs of LPS‑treated mice, as compared with those in control mice threated with phosphate‑buffered saline. Blood vessel density was also markedly increased in the LPS‑treated mice. These increases were reversed by treatment with celecoxib. In vitro, the protein expression levels of VEGF produced by the PGE2‑treated cells were significantly increased in a concentration‑dependent manner. In addition, the production of VEGF was increased in response to treatment with the PGE2 receptor (EP2) agonist ONO‑AE1‑259‑01; however, this increase was abrogated by treatment with AH6809, an EP2 receptor antagonist. Treatment with PGE2 or VEGF alone promoted the tube formation of MPVECs and this effect was reversed by treatment with celecoxib. These results demonstrated that PGE2 may regulate the release of VEGF by MPVECs through the EP2 receptor pathway and thereby promoted pulmonary angiogenesis and breast cancer

  13. Nutritional aspects regarding lung cancer chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Thanopoulou, E; Baltayiannis, N; Lykogianni, V

    2006-01-01

    Lung cancer is still one of the major causes of cancer-related deaths and its mortality figures argue powerfully for new approaches to control this leading cancer threat. Chemoprevention can be defined as the use of specific agents to reverse, or prevent premalignancy from progressing to invasive cancer. The use of foods and dietary supplements present a safe chemopreventive strategy. Data for this review were identified by searches of PubMed and references from relevant articles. Articles were identified by use of the search terms "lung cancer", "chemoprevention", "carcinogenesis", and "retinoids". Only papers published in English were included. Trials in lung cancer chemoprevention have so far produced either neutral or harmful primary endpoint results, whether in the primary, secondary, or tertiary settings. Lung cancer was not prevented by beta-carotene, alpha-tocopherol, retinol, retinyl palmitate, N-acetylcysteine, or isotretinoin in smokers. Ongoing trials may help define new avenues for chemoprevention. The concept of chemoprevention in lung cancer is still in its infancy, but in the future it may have a significant impact on the incidence and mortality of lung cancer. In addition to epidemiologic studies, basic science research to detect mechanisms and evaluate the chemopreventive potential of food components is necessary. The overwhelming evidence of a major role of nutrition in carcinogenesis, the many leads that nutritional intervention may reduce cancer incidence, and the growth and increasing sophistication of clinical trials networks point to a very promising future for nutritional intervention trials leading to substantial public benefit.

  14. Differential roles of STAT3 in the initiation and growth of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhou, J; Qu, Z; Yan, S; Sun, F; Whitsett, J A; Shapiro, S D; Xiao, G

    2015-07-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is linked to multiple cancers, including pulmonary adenocarcinoma. However, the role of STAT3 in lung cancer pathogenesis has not been determined. Using lung epithelial-specific inducible knockout strategies, we demonstrate that STAT3 has contrasting roles in the initiation and growth of both chemically and genetically induced lung cancers. Selective deletion of lung epithelial STAT3 in mice before cancer induction by the smoke carcinogen, urethane, resulted in increased lung tissue damage and inflammation, K-Ras oncogenic mutations and tumorigenesis. Deletion of lung epithelial STAT3 after establishment of lung cancer inhibited cancer cell proliferation. Simultaneous deletion of STAT3 and expression of oncogenic K-Ras in mouse lung elevated pulmonary injury, inflammation and tumorigenesis, but reduced tumor growth. These studies indicate that STAT3 prevents lung cancer initiation by maintaining pulmonary homeostasis under oncogenic stress, whereas it facilitates lung cancer progression by promoting cancer cell growth. These studies also provide a mechanistic basis for targeting STAT3 to lung cancer therapy.

  15. Genomic heterogeneity of multiple synchronous lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu; Zhang, Jianjun; Li, Lin; Yin, Guangliang; Zhang, Jianhua; Zheng, Shan; Cheung, Hannah; Wu, Ning; Lu, Ning; Mao, Xizeng; Yang, Longhai; Zhang, Jiexin; Zhang, Li; Seth, Sahil; Chen, Huang; Song, Xingzhi; Liu, Kan; Xie, Yongqiang; Zhou, Lina; Zhao, Chuanduo; Han, Naijun; Chen, Wenting; Zhang, Susu; Chen, Longyun; Cai, Wenjun; Li, Lin; Shen, Miaozhong; Xu, Ningzhi; Cheng, Shujun; Yang, Huanming; Lee, J. Jack; Correa, Arlene; Fujimoto, Junya; Behrens, Carmen; Chow, Chi-Wan; William, William N.; Heymach, John V.; Hong, Waun Ki; Swisher, Stephen; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Wang, Jun; Lin, Dongmei; Liu, Xiangyang; Futreal, P. Andrew; Gao, Yanning

    2016-01-01

    Multiple synchronous lung cancers (MSLCs) present a clinical dilemma as to whether individual tumours represent intrapulmonary metastases or independent tumours. In this study we analyse genomic profiles of 15 lung adenocarcinomas and one regional lymph node metastasis from 6 patients with MSLC. All 15 lung tumours demonstrate distinct genomic profiles, suggesting all are independent primary tumours, which are consistent with comprehensive histopathological assessment in 5 of the 6 patients. Lung tumours of the same individuals are no more similar to each other than are lung adenocarcinomas of different patients from TCGA cohort matched for tumour size and smoking status. Several known cancer-associated genes have different mutations in different tumours from the same patients. These findings suggest that in the context of identical constitutional genetic background and environmental exposure, different lung cancers in the same individual may have distinct genomic profiles and can be driven by distinct molecular events. PMID:27767028

  16. HDAC10 promotes lung cancer proliferation via AKT phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhantong; Wang, Hsin-tzu; Duan, Baoyu; Ye, Dan; Wang, Chenxin; Jing, Ruiqi; Leng, Ye; Xi, Jiajie; Chen, Wen; Wang, Guiying; Jia, Wenwen; Zhu, Songcheng; Kang, Jiuhong

    2016-01-01

    Histone deacetylase 10 (HDAC10) is a member of the class II HDACs, and its role in cancer is emerging. In this study, we found that HDAC10 is highly expressed in lung cancer tissues. It resides mainly in the cytoplasm of lung cancer cells but resides in the nucleus of adjacent normal cells. Further examinations revealed that HDAC10 resides in the cytoplasm in multiple lung cancer cell lines, including the A549, H358 and H460 cell lines, but mainly resides in the nucleus of normal lung epithelial 16HBE cells. A leucine-rich motif, R505L506L507C508V509A510L511, was identified as its nuclear localization signal (NLS), and a mutant (Mut-505-511) featuring mutations to A at each of its original R and L positions was found to be nuclear-localization defective. Functional analysis revealed that HDAC10 promoted lung cancer cell growth and that its knockdown induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Mechanistic studies showed that HDAC10 knockdown significantly decreased the phosphorylation of AKT at Ser473 and that AKT expression significantly rescued the cell cycle arrest and apoptosis elicited by HDAC10 knockdown. A co-immunoprecipitation assay suggested that HDAC10 interacts with AKT and that inhibition of HDAC10 activity decreases its interaction with and phosphorylation of AKT. Finally, we confirmed that HDAC10 promoted lung cancer proliferation in a mouse model. Our study demonstrated that HDAC10 localizes and functions in the cytoplasm of lung cancer cells, thereby underscoring its potential role in the diagnosis and treatment of lung cancer. PMID:27449083

  17. Lung cancer exosomes as drivers of epithelial mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Mohammad A.; Barger, Jennifer F.; Lovat, Francesca; Gao, Min; Otterson, Gregory A.; Nana-Sinkam, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes, a subgroup of extracellular vesicles (EVs), have been shown to serve as a conduit for the exchange of genetic information between cells. Exosomes are released from all types of cells but in abundance from cancer cells. The contents of exosomes consist of proteins and genetic material (mRNA, DNA and miRNA) from the cell of origin. In this study, we examined the effects of exosomes derived from human lung cancer serum and both highly metastatic and non-metastatic cells on recipient human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs). We found that exosomes derived from highly metastatic lung cancer cells and human late stage lung cancer serum induced vimentin expression, and epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) in HBECs. Exosomes derived from highly metastatic cancer cells as well as late stage lung cancer serum induce migration, invasion and proliferation in non-cancerous recipient cells. Our results suggest that cancer derived exosomes could be a potential mediator of EMT in the recipient cells. PMID:27363026

  18. Antioxidants accelerate lung cancer progression in mice.

    PubMed

    Sayin, Volkan I; Ibrahim, Mohamed X; Larsson, Erik; Nilsson, Jonas A; Lindahl, Per; Bergo, Martin O

    2014-01-29

    Antioxidants are widely used to protect cells from damage induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS). The concept that antioxidants can help fight cancer is deeply rooted in the general population, promoted by the food supplement industry, and supported by some scientific studies. However, clinical trials have reported inconsistent results. We show that supplementing the diet with the antioxidants N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and vitamin E markedly increases tumor progression and reduces survival in mouse models of B-RAF- and K-RAS-induced lung cancer. RNA sequencing revealed that NAC and vitamin E, which are structurally unrelated, produce highly coordinated changes in tumor transcriptome profiles, dominated by reduced expression of endogenous antioxidant genes. NAC and vitamin E increase tumor cell proliferation by reducing ROS, DNA damage, and p53 expression in mouse and human lung tumor cells. Inactivation of p53 increases tumor growth to a similar degree as antioxidants and abolishes the antioxidant effect. Thus, antioxidants accelerate tumor growth by disrupting the ROS-p53 axis. Because somatic mutations in p53 occur late in tumor progression, antioxidants may accelerate the growth of early tumors or precancerous lesions in high-risk populations such as smokers and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease who receive NAC to relieve mucus production.

  19. Capsaicin synergizes with camptothecin to induce increased apoptosis in human small cell lung cancers via the calpain pathway.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Jamie R; Perry, Haley E; Brown, Kathleen C; Gao, Ying; Lin, Ju; Stevenson, Cathyrn D; Hurley, John D; Nolan, Nicholas A; Akers, Austin T; Chen, Yi Charlie; Denning, Krista L; Brown, Linda G; Dasgupta, Piyali

    2017-04-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is characterized by excellent initial response to chemotherapy and radiation therapy with a majority of the patients showing tumor shrinkage and even remission. However, the challenge with SCLC therapy is that patients inevitably relapse and subsequently do not respond to the first line treatment. Recent clinical studies have investigated the possibility of camptothecin-based combination therapy as first line treatment for SCLC patients. Conventionally, camptothecin is used for recurrent SCLC and has poor survival outcomes. Therefore, drugs which can improve the therapeutic index of camptothecin should be valuable for SCLC therapy. Extensive evidence shows that nutritional compounds like capsaicin (the spicy compound of chili peppers) can improve the anti-cancer activity of chemotherapeutic drugs in both cell lines and animal models. Statistical analysis shows that capsaicin synergizes with camptothecin to enhance apoptosis of human SCLC cells. The synergistic activity of camptothecin and capsaicin is observed in both classical and variant SCLC cell lines and, in vivo, in human SCLC tumors xenotransplanted on chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) models. The synergistic activity of capsaicin and camptothecin are mediated by elevation of intracellular calcium and the calpain pathway. Our data foster hope for novel nutrition based combination therapies in SCLC.

  20. Griffipavixanthone from Garcinia oblongifolia champ induces cell apoptosis in human non-small-cell lung cancer H520 cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jun-Min; Huang, Hui-Juan; Qiu, Sheng-Xiang; Feng, Shi-Xiu; Li, Xu-E

    2014-01-27

    Griffipavixanthone (GPX) is a dimeric xanthone which was isolated in a systematic investigation of Garcinia oblongifolia Champ. In this study, we investigate the effect of GPX on cell proliferation and apoptosis on human Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells in vitro and determine the mechanisms of its action. GPX inhibited the growth of H520 cells in dose- and time-dependent manners, with IC50 values of 3.03 ± 0.21 μM at 48 h. The morphologic characteristics of apoptosis and apoptotic bodies were observed by fluorescence microscope and transmission electron microscope. In addition, Annexin V/PI double staining assay revealed that cells in early stage of apoptosis were significantly increased upon GPX treatment dose-dependently. Rh123 staining assay indicated that GPX reduced the mitochondrial membrane potential. DCFH-DA staining revealed that intracellular ROS increased with GPX treatment. Moreover, GPX cleaved and activated caspase-3. In summary, this study showed that GPX inhibited H520 cell proliferation in dose- and time-dependent manner. Further mechanistic study indicated that GPX induced cell apoptosis through mitochondrial apoptotic pathway accompanying with ROS production. Our results demonstrate the potential application of GPX as an anti-non-small cell lung cancer agent.

  1. Transforming growth factor-β1 induces EMT by the transactivation of epidermal growth factor signaling through HA/CD44 in lung and breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    LI, LINGMEI; QI, LISHA; LIANG, ZHIJIE; SONG, WANGZHAO; LIU, YANXUE; WANG, YALEI; SUN, BAOCUN; ZHANG, BIN; CAO, WENFENG

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a process closely related to tumor development, is regulated by a variety of signaling pathways and growth factors, such as transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and epidermal growth factor (EGF). Hyaluronan (HA) has been shown to induce EMT through either TGF-β1 or EGF signaling and to be a regulator of the crosstalk between these two pathways in fibroblasts. In this study, in order to clarify whether HA has the same effect in tumor cells, we utilized the lung cancer cell line, A549, and the breast cancer cell line, MCF-7, and found that the effects of stimulation with TGF-β1 were more potent than those of EGF in regulating the expression of EMT-associated proteins and in enhancing cell migration and invasion. In addition, we observed that TGF-β1 activated EGF receptor (EGFR) and its downstream AKT and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathways. Furthermore, we found that TGF-β1 upregulated the expression of hyaluronan synthases (HAS1, HAS2 and HAS3) and promoted the expression of CD44, a cell surface receptor for HA, which interacts with EGFR, resulting in the activation of the downstream AKT and ERK pathways. Conversely, treatment with 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU; an inhibitor of HAS) prior to stimulation with TGF-β1, inhibited the expression of CD44 and EGFR, abolished the interaction between CD44 and EGFR. Furthermore, the use of shRNA targeting CD44 impaired the expression of EGFR, deactivated the AKT and ERK pathways, reversed EMT and decreased the migration and invasion ability of cells. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that TGF-β1 induces EMT by the transactivation of EGF signaling through HA/CD44 in lung and breast cancer cells. PMID:26005723

  2. Relative Apoptosis-inducing Potential of Homeopa-thic Condurango 6C and 30C in H460 Lung Cancer Cells In vitro

    PubMed Central

    Sikdar, Sourav; Kumar Saha, Santu; Rahman Khuda-Bukhsh, Anisur

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: In homeopathy, it is claimed that more homeopathically-diluted potencies render more protective/curative effects against any disease condition. Potentized forms of Condurango are used successfully to treat digestive problems, as well as esophageal and stomach cancers. However, the comparative efficacies of Condurango 6C and 30C, one diluted below and one above Avogadro’s limit (lacking original drug molecule), respectively, have not been critically analyzed for their cell-killing (apoptosis) efficacy against lung cancer cells in vitro, and signalling cascades have not been studied. Hence, the present study was undertaken. Methods: 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenylte-trazolium bromide (MTT) assays were conducted on H460-non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells by using a succussed ethyl alcohol vehicle (placebo) as a control. Studies on cellular morphology, cell cycle regulation, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), changes in mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), and DNA-damage were made, and expressions of related signaling markers were studied. The observations were done in a “blinded” manner. Results: Both Condurango 6C and 30C induced apoptosis via cell cycle arrest at subG0/G1 and altered expressions of certain apoptotic markers significantly in H460 cells. The drugs induced oxidative stress through ROS elevation and MMP depolarization at 18-24 hours. These events presumably activated a caspase-3-mediated signalling cascade, as evidenced by reverse transcriptase- polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), western blot and immunofluorescence studies at a late phase (48 hours) in which cells were pushed towards apoptosis. Conclusion: Condurango 30C had greater apoptotic effect than Condurango 6C as claimed in the homeopathic doctrine. PMID:25780691

  3. Chan-Yu-Bao-Yuan-Tang and 5-fluorouracil synergistically induce apoptosis by means of the caspase-3 signaling pathway in lung and cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Fang; Liu, Xiaoguang; Li, Yuncheng; Chen, Gang; Wang, Yekai; Zhou, Shiquan; Zhu, Wangyu; Huang, Yanyan; Zhou, Jiehang; Li, Shibo; Zhang, Yongkui

    2011-01-01

    Previous clinical studies have shown the safety and efficacy of the traditional Chinese medicinal herbal aqueous extract Chan-Yu-Bao-Yuan-Tang (CYBYT) for the treatment of lung and cervical cancer patients. Used in combination with 5-fluorouracil (5-Fu), CYBYT has been observed to be particularly effective in cancer treatment. Herein, the combined anticancer effect and the underlying mechanisms of 5-Fu and CYBYT in the human lung cancer cell line A549 and the human cervical cancer cell line HeLa were investigated in vitro. The MTT assay, Annexin V-FITC staining and Western blotting were applied to identify cell viability, the stages of apoptosis and the expression of signaling proteins, respectively. The results indicated that CYBYT and 5-Fu, alone or in combination, significantly inhibited proliferation and induced marked apoptosis in A549 and HeLa cells, but had no significant inhibitory effects on normal human IMR-90 fibroblasts. The rate of mid and late apoptosis or necrosis was greater after 5-Fu treatment compared to treatment with CYBYT or the combination of agents; however, the early apoptotic rate showed opposite results. CYBYT and 5-Fu, alone or in combination, up-regulated cleaved caspase-3 expression in a time-dependent manner, with CYBYT being more effective than 5-Fu. Taken together, our data show that the pro-apoptotic activity of the two-drug combination was much stronger than that of CYBYT or 5-Fu alone; CYBYT combined with 5-Fu had synergistic effects at lower concentrations and promoted apoptosis, while the combined treatment also decreased the cytotoxic side effects of 5-Fu.

  4. Lung Cancer in HIV-Infected Patients.

    PubMed

    Mena, Álvaro; Meijide, Héctor; Marcos, Pedro J

    2016-01-01

    The widespread use of HAART for persons living with HIV since 1996 has resulted in a dramatic decline in AIDS-related mortality. However, other comorbidities are increasing, such as metabolic disturbances or cancers, including solid organ malignancies. Among the latest, lung cancer, especially the adenocarcinoma subtype, is on the rise. HIV infection, even controlling for smoking, is an independent risk factor for developing lung cancer. HIV could promote lung cancers through immunosuppression, chronic inflammation, and a direct oncogenic effect. Smoking, lung infections, and chronic pulmonary diseases are risk factors for lung cancer. All may contribute to the cumulative incidence of lung cancer in persons living with HIV. It is double that in the general population. The role of HAART in lung cancer development in persons living with HIV is not well established. Although data supporting it could be too preliminary, persons living with HIV should be considered within high-risk groups that could benefit from screening strategies with low-dose computed tomography, especially those with airway obstruction and emphysema. Current evidence suggests that quitting smoking strategies in persons living with HIV achieve abstinence rates comparable to those in healthy HIV-negative smokers.

  5. Human Apurinic/Apyrimidinic Endonuclease siRNA Inhibits the Angiogenesis Induced by X-Ray Irradiation in Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Xianqing; Cun, Yanping; Li, Mengxia; Qing, Yi; Jin, Feng; Zhong, Zhaoyang; Dai, Nan; Qian, Chengyuan; Sui, Jiangdong; Wang, Dong

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Radiotherapy is an important and effective treatment method for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Nonetheless, radiotherapy can alter the expression of proangiogenic molecules and induce angiogenesis. Human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease (APE1) is a multifunctional protein, which has DNA repair and redox function. Our previous studies indicated APE1 is also a crucial angiogenic regulator. Thus, we investigated the effect of APE1 on radiation-induced angiogenesis in lung cancer and its underlying mechanism. Methods: Tumor specimens of 136 patients with NSCLC were obtained from 2003 to 2008. The APE1 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression, as well as microvessel density (MVD) were observed with immunohistochemistry in tumor samples. Human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells were treated with Ad5/F35-APE1 siRNA and/or irradiation, and then the cells were used for APE1 analysis by Western blot and VEGF analysis by RT-PCR and ELISA. To elucidate the underline mechanism of APE1 on VEGF expression, HIF-1α protein level was determined by Western blot, and the DNA binding activity of HIF-1α was detected by EMSA. Transwell migration assay and capillary-like structure assay were used to observe the migration and capillary-like structure formation ability of human umbilical veins endothelial cells (HUVECs) that were co-cultured with Ad5/F35-APE1 siRNA and (or) irradiation treated A549 cells culture medium. Results: The high expression rates of APE1 and VEGF in NSCLC were 77.94% and 66.18%, respectively. The expressions of APE1 was significantly correlated with VEGF and MVD (r=0.369, r=0.387). APE1 and VEGF high expression were significantly associated with reduced disease free survival (DFS) time. The high expressions of APE1 and VEGF on A549 cells were concurrently induced by X-ray irradiation in a dose-dependent manner. Silencing of APE1 by Ad5/F35-APE1 siRNA significantly decreased DNA binding activity of HIF-1α and suppressed the expression

  6. The liquid biopsy in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Junaid; Yun, Jungmi W; Kompelli, Anvesh R; Moufarrej, Youmna E; Alexander, Jonathan S; Herrera, Guillermo A; Shackelford, Rodney E

    2016-11-01

    The incidence of lung cancer has significantly increased over the last century, largely due to smoking, and remains the most common cause of cancer deaths worldwide. This is often due to lung cancer first presenting at late stages and a lack of curative therapeutic options at these later stages. Delayed diagnoses, inadequate tumor sampling, and lung cancer misdiagnoses are also not uncommon due to the limitations of the tissue biopsy. Our better understanding of the tumor microenvironment and the systemic actions of tumors, combined with the recent advent of the liquid biopsy, may allow molecular diagnostics to be done on circulating tumor markers, particularly circulating tumor DNA. Multiple liquid biopsy molecular methods are presently being examined to determine their efficacy as surrogates to the tumor tissue biopsy. This review will focus on new liquid biopsy technologies and how they may assist in lung cancer detection, diagnosis, and treatment.

  7. The liquid biopsy in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Junaid; Yun, Jungmi W.; Kompelli, Anvesh R.; Moufarrej, Youmna E.; Alexander, Jonathan S.; Herrera, Guillermo A.; Shackelford, Rodney E.

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of lung cancer has significantly increased over the last century, largely due to smoking, and remains the most common cause of cancer deaths worldwide. This is often due to lung cancer first presenting at late stages and a lack of curative therapeutic options at these later stages. Delayed diagnoses, inadequate tumor sampling, and lung cancer misdiagnoses are also not uncommon due to the limitations of the tissue biopsy. Our better understanding of the tumor microenvironment and the systemic actions of tumors, combined with the recent advent of the liquid biopsy, may allow molecular diagnostics to be done on circulating tumor markers, particularly circulating tumor DNA. Multiple liquid biopsy molecular methods are presently being examined to determine their efficacy as surrogates to the tumor tissue biopsy. This review will focus on new liquid biopsy technologies and how they may assist in lung cancer detection, diagnosis, and treatment. PMID:28191282

  8. Targeting Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor-Resistant Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer by Inducing Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Degradation via Methionine 790 Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Elaine Lai-Han; Fan, Xing-Xing; Wong, Maria Pik; Jiang, Zhi-Hong; Liu, Zhong-Qiu; Yao, Xiao-Jun; Lu, Lin-Lin; Zhou, Yan-Ling; Yau, Li-Fong; Tin, Vicky Pui-Chi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have been developed to treat non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with EGFR mutation, but TKI resistance is common. Almost half of the acquired resistance patients are due to additional T790M mutation on EGFR (EGFRT790M), thus overcoming TKI resistance is important. In this study, we aim to investigate the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in TKI resistance as well as the molecular and biological effects of EGFRT790M after redox manipulation. Results: The basal ROS levels in EGFRT790M-containing TKI-resistant NSCLC cell lines were substantially high. Sixty-three human lung tumors showed higher NADPH oxidase isoform 2 (NOX2) expression than normal lung tissues, which may contribute to high basal ROS in cancer and poor survival. Interestingly, only NOX3 was upregulated by sanguinarine, a pharmacological agent to elevate ROS, and resulted in EGFR overoxidation, degradation, and apoptosis. By contrast, such responses were lacking in EGFRWT cells. Selective EGFRT790M degradation was manipulated by redox imbalance between NOX3 and methionine reductase A (MsrA). Furthermore, the in vivo tumor suppression effect of sanguinarine, NOX3 upregulation, and EGFR degradation were confirmed. Innovation: We have found a new treatment strategy to overcome TKI resistance by selectively inducing EGFRT790M degradation via specific stimulation of methionine 790 (M790) oxidation. It can be achieved via manipulating redox imbalance between NOX3 and MsrA. Conclusion: Targeting EGFR by elevating ROS and redox imbalance is a potential new strategy to develop a new EGFR inhibitor for TKI-resistant patients with a wide therapeutic window between EGFRT790M and EGFRWT. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 24, 263–279. PMID:26528827

  9. Cancer Genomics Identifies Regulatory Gene Networks Associated with the Transition from Dysplasia to Advanced Lung Adenocarcinomas Induced by c-Raf-1

    PubMed Central

    Rohrbeck, Astrid; Borlak, Jürgen

    2009-01-01

    Background Lung cancer is a leading cause of cancer morbidity. To improve an understanding of molecular causes of disease a transgenic mouse model was investigated where targeted expression of the serine threonine kinase c-Raf to respiratory epithelium induced initialy dysplasia and subsequently adenocarcinomas. This enables dissection of genetic events associated with precancerous and cancerous lesions. Methodology/Principal Findings By laser microdissection cancer cell populations were harvested and subjected to whole genome expression analyses. Overall 473 and 541 genes were significantly regulated, when cancer versus transgenic and non-transgenic cells were compared, giving rise to three distinct and one common regulatory gene network. At advanced stages of tumor growth predominately repression of gene expression was observed, but genes previously shown to be up-regulated in dysplasia were also up-regulated in solid tumors. Regulation of developmental programs as well as epithelial mesenchymal and mesenchymal endothelial transition was a hall mark of adenocarcinomas. Additionaly, genes coding for cell adhesion, i.e. the integrins and the tight and gap junction proteins were repressed, whereas ligands for receptor tyrosine kinase such as epi- and amphiregulin were up-regulated. Notably, Vegfr- 2 and its ligand Vegfd, as well as Notch and Wnt signalling cascades were regulated as were glycosylases that influence cellular recognition. Other regulated signalling molecules included guanine exchange factors that play a role in an activation of the MAP kinases while several tumor suppressors i.e. Mcc, Hey1, Fat3, Armcx1 and Reck were significantly repressed. Finally, probable molecular switches forcing dysplastic cells into malignantly transformed cells could be identified. Conclusions/Significance This study provides insight into molecular pertubations allowing dysplasia to progress further to adenocarcinoma induced by exaggerted c-Raf kinase activity. PMID:19812696

  10. Pelitinib (EKB-569) targets the up-regulation of ABCB1 and ABCG2 induced by hyperthermia to eradicate lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    To, Kenneth K W; Poon, Daniel C; Wei, Yuming; Wang, Fang; Lin, Ge; Fu, Liwu

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Pelitinib is a potent irreversible EGFR TK inhibitor currently in clinical trials for the treatment of lung cancer. Hyperthermia has been applied concomitantly with chemotherapy and radiotherapy to enhance treatment outcome. In this study, we investigated the ability of the combination of pelitinib with other conventional anticancer drugs to specifically target cancer cells with up-regulated efflux transporters ABCB1/ABCG2 after hyperthermia as a novel way to eradicate the cancer stem-like cells responsible for cancer recurrence. Experimental Approach Alterations in intracellular topotecan accumulation, the efflux of fluorescent probe substrates, expression and ATPase activity of ABCB1/ABCG2 and tumoursphere formation capacity of side population (SP) cells sorted after hyperthermia were examined to elucidate the mechanism of pelitinib-induced chemosensitization. Key Results While pelitinib did not modulate ABCB1/ABCG2 expressions, the combination of pelitinib with transporter substrate anticancer drugs induced more marked apoptosis, specifically in cells exposed to hyperthermia. The flow cytometric assay showed that both ABCB1- and ABCG2-mediated drug effluxes were significantly inhibited by pelitinib in a concentration-dependent manner. The inhibition kinetics suggested that pelitinib is a competitive inhibitor of ABCB1/ABCG2, which is consistent with its ability to stimulate their ATPase activity. SP cells sorted after hyperthermia were found to be more resistant to anticancer drugs, presumably due to the up-regulation of ABCB1 and ABCG2. Importantly, pelitinib specifically enhanced the chemosensitivity but reduced the tumoursphere formation capacity of these SP cells. Conclusions and Implications This study demonstrated a novel approach, exploiting drug resistance, to selectively kill cancer stem-like cells after hyperthermia. PMID:25988710

  11. Selective Cox-2 inhibitor celecoxib induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition in human lung cancer cells via activating MEK-ERK signaling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zi-li; Fan, Zhi-qiang; Jiang, Han-dong; Qu, Jie-ming

    2013-03-01

    Increasing evidence has suggested that high expression level of cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) is associated with the malignancies of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), leading to a rationale of applying Cox-2 inhibitors as adjuvant therapy in the treatment of NSCLC. However, the addition of celecoxib, a selective Cox-2 inhibitor, to chemotherapy in clinical trials failed to benefit the survival of NSCLC patients, which urges the investigation to re-evaluate this strategy for NSCLC treatment. In this study, we observed that celecoxib treatment at clinically relevant concentrations induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in NSCLC cells regardless of Cox-2 status, which, however, was not recapitulated using another Cox-2 inhibitor, etodolac. Celecoxib-stimulated EMT in turn promoted cell invasion and rendered cells resistant to chemotherapy. Further mechanistic investigation by disrupting the integrity of signaling pathways using specific inhibitors or RNA interference revealed that celecoxib-induced EMT in NSCLC cells is indispensable of transforming growth factor-β1/Smad signaling. Instead, the activated MEK/ERK/SNAIL1 signaling largely accounted for celecoxib-induced EMT. Taken together, our study reveals the diverse impacts of Cox-2 inhibitors on EMT in NSCLC cells independent of Cox-2 inhibition, where celecoxib treatment leads to metastasis and chemoresistance via EMT induction. These findings reveal the increased risks of cancer metastasis and chemoresistance by applying Cox-2 inhibitors, celecoxib in particular, in clinical trials of NSCLC treatment and urge intensive preclinical assessment before proceeding to clinical application.

  12. NNK-Induced Lung Tumors: A Review of Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hua-Chuan; Takano, Yasuo

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of lung adenocarcinoma has been remarkably increasing in recent years due to the introduction of filter cigarettes and secondary-hand smoking because the people are more exposed to higher amounts of nitrogen oxides, especially 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone(NNK), which is widely applied in animal model of lung tumors. In NNK-induced lung tumors, genetic mutation, chromosome instability, gene methylation, and activation of oncogenes have been found so as to disrupt the expression profiles of some proteins or enzymes in various cellular signal pathways. Transgenic animal with specific alteration of lung cancer-related molecules have also been introduced to clarify the molecular mechanisms of NNK in the pathogenesis and development of lung tumors. Based on these animal models, many antioxidant ingredients and antitumor chemotherapeutic agents have been proved to suppress the NNK-induced lung carcinogenesis. In the future, it is necessary to delineate the most potent biomarkers of NNK-induced lung tumorigenesis, and to develop efficient methods to fight against NNK-associated lung cancer using animal models. PMID:21559252

  13. The Canadian Lung Cancer Conference 2016

    PubMed Central

    Melosky, B.; Ho, C.

    2016-01-01

    Each February, the Canadian Lung Cancer Conference brings together lung cancer researchers, clinicians, and care professionals who are united in their commitment to improve the care of patients with lung cancer. This year’s meeting, held 11–12 February, featured a resident education session, a welcome dinner, networking sessions, lectures, breakout sessions, debates, and a satellite symposium. Key themes from this year’s meeting included innovations across the care spectrum and results of recent clinical trials with targeted agents, immuno-oncology agents, and novel drug combinations.

  14. Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated activation mediates tumor necrosis factor-alpha induced MMP-13 up-regulation and metastasis in lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Hong Qiong; Zhang, Di; Shi, Yuan Yuan; You, Xiang; Shi, Lei; Li, Qing; Gao, Feng Guang

    2016-01-01

    Despite that ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is involved in IL-6 promoted lung cancer chemotherapeutic resistance and metastasis, the exact role of ATM in tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) increasing tumor migration is still elusive. In the present study, we demonstrated that TNF-α promoted lung cancer cell migration by up-regulation of matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13). Notably, by gene silencing or kinase inhibition, we proposed for the first time that ATM is a key up-stream regulator of TNF-α activated ERK/p38-NF-κB pathway. The existence of TNF-α secreted in autocrine or paracrine manner by components of tumor microenvironment highlights the significance of TNF-α in inflammation-associated tumor metastasis. Importantly, in vivo lung cancer metastasis test showed that ATM depletion actually reduce the number of metastatic nodules and cancer nests in lung tissues, verifying the critical role of ATM in metastasis. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that ATM, which could be activated by lung cancer-associated TNF-α, up-regulate MMP-13 expression and thereby augment tumor metastasis. Therefore, ATM might be a promising target for prevention of inflammation-associated lung cancer metastasis. PMID:27556690

  15. Personalized chemotherapy of lung cancer: What the radiologist should know.

    PubMed

    Ferretti, G R; Reymond, E; Delouche, A; Sakhri, L; Jankowski, A; Moro-Sibilot, D; Lantuejoul, S; Toffart, A C

    2016-03-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of deaths due to cancer in France. More than half of lung cancers are discovered at an advanced-stage. New anticancer treatment strategies (i.e., the so-called personalized or targeted therapy) have recently been introduced and validated for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), in addition to or in association with standard chemotherapy. Personalized therapy includes tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), antiangiogenic treatments and immunotherapy. Because these treatments may be responsible for atypical thoracic adverse effects and responses as compared to standard chemotherapy, RECIST 1.1 criteria may be inadequate to evaluate the responses to these agents. The goal of this article was to review personalized treatment strategies for NSCLC, to consider the therapy-specific responses and thoracic complications induced by these new therapeutic agents and finally to discuss future directions for the personalized assessment of tumor response.

  16. Elevation of Plasma TGF-{beta}1 During Radiation Therapy Predicts Radiation-Induced Lung Toxicity in Patients With Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: A Combined Analysis From Beijing and Michigan

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Lujun; Wang Luhua Ji Wei; Wang Xiaozhen; Zhu Xiangzhi; Hayman, James A.; Kalemkerian, Gregory P.; Yang Weizhi; Brenner, Dean; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Kong, F.-M.

    2009-08-01

    Purpose: To test whether radiation-induced elevations of transforming growth factor-{beta}1 (TGF-{beta}1) during radiation therapy (RT) correlate with radiation-induced lung toxicity (RILT) in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and to evaluate the ability of mean lung dose (MLD) to improve the predictive power. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients included those with Stage I-III NSCLC treated with RT with or without chemotherapy. Platelet-poor plasma was obtained pre-RT and at 4-5 weeks (40-50 Gy) during RT. TGF-{beta}1 was measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The primary endpoint was {>=} Grade 2 RILT. Mann-Whitney U test, logistic regression, and chi-square were used for statistical analysis. Results: A total of 165 patients were enrolled in this study. The median radiation dose was 60 Gy, and the median MLD was 15.3 Gy. Twenty-nine patients (17.6%) experienced RILT. The incidence of RILT was 46.2% in patients with a TGF-{beta}1 ratio > 1 vs. 7.9% in patients with a TGF-{beta}1 ratio {<=} 1 (p < 0.001), and it was 42.9% if MLD > 20 Gy vs. 17.4% if MLD {<=} 20 Gy (p = 0.024). The incidence was 4.3% in patients with a TGF-{beta}1 ratio {<=} 1 and MLD {<=} 20 Gy, 47.4% in those with a TGF-{beta}1 ratio >1 or MLD > 20 Gy, and 66.7% in those with a TGF-{beta}1 ratio >1 and MLD > 20 Gy (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Radiation-induced elevation of plasma TGF-{beta}1 level during RT is predictive of RILT. The combination of TGF- {beta}1 and MLD may help stratify the patients for their risk of RILT.

  17. Posttranslational modification of E-cadherin by core fucosylation regulates Src activation and induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition-like process in lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shao, Kang; Chen, Zhong Yi; Gautam, Suraj; Deng, Nian Hui; Zhou, You; Wu, Xing Zhong

    2016-02-01

    E-cadherin is often dysregulated in aggressive lung cancer, the mechanism of which cannot always be explained at the level of transcription. In 66 patients with lung cancer, immunohistochemical staining demonstrated that co-localization of E-cadherin and core fucose by Lens culinaris agglutinin was significantly less extensive in tumor than in nontumor tissue. Through gain and loss of fucosylation experiments in the giant lung carcinoma cell lines 95C and 95D, our results revealed that E-cadherin core fucosylation in 95C cells overexpressing α-1, 6-fucosyltransferase (Fut8) inhibited Fut8-95C cell migration, whereas knockdown of Fut8 in 95D cells enhanced migration of short-interfering RNA-targeting Fut8 (siFut8)-95D cells. The level of active Src (phosphorylated Src [Y416]) was significantly reduced in Fut8-95C cells, but elevated in siFut8-95D cells. In protein complexes immunoprecipitated from Fut8-95C cell lysates with anti-E-cadherin, less phosphorylated Src (Y416) and more β-catenin were observed, but immunoprecipitates from siFut8-95D cells, containing less core fucosylated E-cadherin, contained an elevated level of phospho-Src Y416. In Fut8-95C cells, phosphorylation of Akt (Y315, Y326) and GSK-3β (S9) was significantly reduced, but β-catenin (S37) phosphorylation was enhanced. Expression of N-cadherin and Snail1 was also reduced in Fut8-95C cells, but significantly increased in siFut8-95D cells. Intriguingly, when Src kinase activity was inhibited by treatment of cells with PP2 and SU6656, regulation of N-cadherin, Snail1 and cell migration by E-cadherin core fucosylation was abrogated in both Fut8-95C and siFut8-95D cells. Therefore, posttranslational modification of E-cadherin by less core fucosylation recruited and activated Src, and induced an epithelial-mesenchymal transition-like process in lung cancer cells.

  18. Gene expression subtraction of non-cancerous lung from smokers and non-smokers with adenocarcinoma, as a predictor for smokers developing lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stav, David; Bar, Ilan; Sandbank, Judith

    2008-01-01

    Background Lung cancer is the commonest cause of cancer death in developed countries. Adenocarcinoma is becoming the most common form of lung cancer. Cigarette smoking is the main risk factor for lung cancer. Long-term cigarettes smoking may be characterized by genetic alteration and diffuse injury of the airways surface, named field cancerization, while cancer in non-smokers is usually clonally derived. Detecting specific genes expression changes in non-cancerous lung in smokers with adenocarcinoma may give us instrument for predicting smokers who are going to develop this malignancy. Objectives We described the gene expression in non-cancerous lungs from 21 smoker patients with lung adenocarcinoma and compare it to gene expression in non-cancerous lung tissue from 10 non-smokers with primary lung adenocarcinoma. Methods Total RNA was isolated from peripheral non-cancerous lung tissue. The cDNA was hybridized to the U133A GeneChip array. Hierarchical clustering analysis on genes obtained from smokers and non-smokers, after subtracting were exported to the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis software for further analysis. Results The genes subtraction resulted in disclosure of 36 genes with high score. They were subsequently mapped and sorted based on location, cellular components, and biochemical activity. The gene functional analysis disclosed 20 genes, which are involved in cancer process (P = 7.05E-5 to 2.92E-2). Conclusion Detected genes may serve as a predictor for smokers who may be at high risk of developing lung cancer. In addition, since these genes originating from non-cancerous lung, which is the major area of the lungs, a sample from an induced sputum may represent it. PMID:18811983

  19. Animal models of beryllium-induced lung disease

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, G.L.; Hoover, M.D.; Hahn, F.F.

    1996-10-01

    The Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute (ITRI) is conducting research to improve the understanding of chronic beryllium disease (CBD) and beryllium-induced lung cancer. Initial animal studies examined beagle dogs that inhaled BeO calcined at either 500 or 1000{degrees}C. At similar lung burdens, the 500{degrees}C BeO induced more severe and extensive granulomatous pneumonia, lymphocytic infiltration into the lung, and positive Be-specific lymphocyte proliferative responses in vitro than the 1000{degrees}C BeO. However, the progressive nature of human CBD was not duplicated. More recently, Strains A/J and C3H/HeJ mice were exposed to Be metal by inhalation. This produced a marked granulomatous pneumonia, diffuse infiltrates, and multifocal aggregates of interstitial lymphocytes with a pronounced T helper component and pulmonary in situ lymphocyte proliferation. With respect to lung cancer, at a mean lung burden as low as 17 pg Be/g lung, inhaled Be metal induced benign and/or malignant lung tumors in over 50% of male and female F344 rats surviving {ge}1 year on study. Substantial tumor multiplicity was found, but K-ras and p53 gene mutations were virtually absent. In mice, however, a lung burden of approximately 60 {mu}g ({approximately}300 {mu}g Be/g lung) caused only a slight increase in crude lung tumor incidence and multiplicity over controls in strain A/J mice and no elevated incidence in strain C3H mice. Taken together, this research program constitutes a coordinated effort to understand beryllium-induced lung disease in experimental animal models. 47 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  20. Missed lung cancer: when, where, and why?

    PubMed Central

    del Ciello, Annemilia; Franchi, Paola; Contegiacomo, Andrea; Cicchetti, Giuseppe; Bonomo, Lorenzo; Larici, Anna Rita

    2017-01-01

    Missed lung cancer is a source of concern among radiologists and an important medicolegal challenge. In 90% of the cases, errors in diagnosis of lung cancer occur on chest radiographs. It may be challenging for radiologists to distinguish a lung lesion from bones, pulmonary vessels, mediastinal structures, and other complex anatomical structures on chest radiographs. Nevertheless, lung cancer can also be overlooked on computed tomography (CT) scans, regardless of the context, either if a clinical or radiologic suspect exists or for other reasons. Awareness of the possible causes of overlooking a pulmonary lesion can give radiologists a chance to reduce the occurrence of this eventuality. Various factors contribute to a misdiagnosis of lung cancer on chest radiographs and on CT, often very similar in nature to each other. Observer error is the most significant one and comprises scanning error, recognition error, decision-making error, and satisfaction of search. Tumor characteristics such as lesion size, conspicuity, and location are also crucial in this context. Even technical aspects can contribute to the probability of skipping lung cancer, including image quality and patient positioning and movement. Albeit it is hard to remove missed lung cancer completely, strategies to reduce observer error and methods to improve technique and automated detection may be valuable in reducing its likelihood. PMID:28206951

  1. Green tea and prevention of esophageal and lung cancers.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jian-Min

    2011-06-01

    Green tea contains high concentrations of tea polyphenols that have shown inhibitory effects against the development, progress, and growth of carcinogen-induced tumors in animal models at different organ sites, including the esophagus and lung. Green tea polyphenols also have shown to suppress cell proliferation and induce apoptosis. Besides antioxidative property, green tea polyphenols have pro-oxidative activities under certain conditions and modulate phase II metabolic enzymes that can enhance the detoxification pathway of environmental toxicants and carcinogens. Although epidemiological studies have provided inconclusive results on the effect of green tea consumption against the development of esophageal and lung cancers in humans overall, the inverse association between green tea intake and risk of esophageal cancer risk is more consistently observed in studies with adequate control for potential confounders. Epidemiological studies also have demonstrated an inverse, albeit moderate, association between green tea consumption and lung cancer, especially in non-smokers. This article reviews data on the cancer-preventive activities of green tea extract and green tea polyphenols and possible mechanisms against the esophageal and lung carcinogenesis in experimental animals, and summarizes the current knowledge from epidemiological studies on the relationship between green tea consumption and esophageal and lung cancer risk in humans.

  2. Protein kinase C delta-mediated cytoskeleton remodeling is involved in aloe-emodin-induced photokilling of human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wen-Te; You, Bang-Jau; Yang, Wen-Hui; Wu, Chi-Yu; Bau, Da-Tian; Lee, Hong-Zin

    2012-09-01

    Photodynamic therapy is becoming a widely accepted form of cancer treatment using a photosensitizing agent and light. Our previous study has demonstrated that photoactivated aloe-emodin induced anoikis and changes in cell morphology, which were in part mediated through its effect on cytoskeleton in lung carcinoma H460 cells. However, the molecular mechanisms of these photoactivated aloe-emodin-induced changes remain unknown. The present study demonstrated that the expression of protein kinase Cδ (PKCδ) was triggered by aloe-emodin and irradiation in H460 cells. Furthermore, the photoactivated aloe-emodin-induced cell death and translocation of PKCδ from the cytosol to the nucleus was found to be significantly inhibited by rottlerin, a PKCδ-selective inhibitor. Western blot analysis demonstrated that rottlerin also reversed the decrease in protein expression of cytoskeleton-related proteins, such as rat sarcoma (RAS), ras homolog gene family member A (RHO), p38, heat shock protein 27 (HSP27), focal adhesion kinase (FAK), α-actinin and tubulin, induced by photoactivated aloe-emodin. Our findings suggest that the regulation of cytoskeleton-related proteins mediated by PKCδ may be the mechanisms for the protective effects of rottlerin against the photoactivated aloe-emodin induced H460 cell death.

  3. Cantharidin induces DNA damage and inhibits DNA repair-associated protein levels in NCI-H460 human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hsia, Te-Chun; Lin, Ju-Hwa; Hsu, Shu-Chun; Tang, Nou-Ying; Lu, Hsu-Feng; Wu, Shin-Hwar; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-09-01

    Cantharidin is one of the major compounds from mylabris and it has cytotoxic effects in many different types of human cancer cells. Previously, we found that cantharidin induced cell death through cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induction in human lung cancer NCI-H460 cells. However, cantharidin-affected DNA damage, repair, and associated protein levels in NCI-H460 cells have not been examined. In this study, we determined whether cantharidin induced DNA damage and condensation and altered levels of proteins in NCI-H460 cells in vitro. Incubation of NCI-H460 cells with 0, 2.5, 5, 10, and 15 μM of cantharidin caused a longer DNA migration smear (comet tail). Cantharidin also increased DNA condensation. These effects were dose-dependent. Cantharidin (5, 10, and 15 μM) treatment of NCI-H460 cells reduced protein levels of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), breast cancer 1, early onset (BRCA-1), 14-3-3 proteins sigma (14-3-3σ), DNA-dependent serine/threonine protein kinase (DNA-PK), O(6) -methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), and mediator of DNA damage checkpoint protein 1 (MDC1). Protein translocation of p-p53, p-H2A.X (S140), and MDC1 from cytoplasm to nucleus was induced by cantharidin in NCI-H460 cells. Taken together, this study showed that cantharidin caused DNA damage and inhibited levels of DNA repair-associated proteins. These effects may contribute to cantharidin-induced cell death in vitro.

  4. A1E inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in NCI-H460 lung cancer cells via extrinsic and intrinsic pathways.

    PubMed

    Bak, Yesol; Ham, Sunyoung; Baatartsogt, O; Jung, Seung Hyun; Choi, Kang-Duk; Han, Tae-Young; Han, Il-Young; Yoon, Do-Young

    2013-07-01

    It has been reported that extracts from Asian traditional/medical herbs possess therapeutic agents against cancers, metabolic diseases, inflammatory diseases, and other intractable diseases. In this study, we assessed the molecular mechanisms involved in the anticancer effects of A1E, the extract of Korean medicinal herbs. We examined the role of the cytotoxic and apoptotic pathways in the cancer chemopreventive activity in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines NCI-H460 and NCI-H1299. A1E inhibited the proliferation of NCI-H460 more efficiently than NCI-H1299 (p53(-/-)) cells. The apoptosis was detected by nuclear morphological changes, annexin V-FITC/PI staining, cell cycle analysis, western blot, RT-PCR, and measurement of mitochondrial membrane potential. A1E induced cellular morphological changes and nuclear condensation at 24 h in a dose-dependent manner. A1E also perturbed cell cycle progression at the sub-G1 stage and altered cell cycle regulatory factors in NCI-H460 cells. Furthermore, A1E inhibited the PI3K/Akt and NF-κB survival pathways, and it activated apoptotic intrinsic and extrinsic pathways. A1E increased the expression levels of members of the extrinsic death receptor complex FasL and FADD. In addition, A1E treatment induced cleavage of caspase-8, caspase-9, caspase-3, and poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP), whereas the expression levels of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xl were downregulated. A1E induced mitochondrial membrane potential collapse and cytochrome C release. Our results suggest that A1E induces apoptosis via activation of both extrinsic and intrinsic pathways and inhibition of PI3K/Akt survival signaling pathways in NCI-H460 cells. In conclusion, these data demonstrate the potential of A1E as a novel chemotherapeutic agent in NSCLC.

  5. Mithramycin represses basal and cigarette smoke-induced expression of ABCG2 and inhibits stem cell signaling in lung and esophageal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mary; Mathur, Aarti; Zhang, Yuwei; Xi, Sichuan; Atay, Scott; Hong, Julie A; Datrice, Nicole; Upham, Trevor; Kemp, Clinton D; Ripley, R Taylor; Wiegand, Gordon; Avital, Itzak; Fetsch, Patricia; Mani, Haresh; Zlott, Daniel; Robey, Robert; Bates, Susan E; Li, Xinmin; Rao, Mahadev; Schrump, David S

    2012-08-15

    Cigarette smoking at diagnosis or during therapy correlates with poor outcome in patients with lung and esophageal cancers, yet the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. In this study, we observed that exposure of esophageal cancer cells to cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) led to upregulation of the xenobiotic pump ABCG2, which is expressed in cancer stem cells and confers treatment resistance in lung and esophageal carcinomas. Furthermore, CSC increased the side population of lung cancer cells containing cancer stem cells. Upregulation of ABCG2 coincided with increased occupancy of aryl hydrocarbon receptor, Sp1, and Nrf2 within the ABCG2 promoter, and deletion of xenobiotic response elements and/or Sp1 sites markedly attenuated ABCG2 induction. Under conditions potentially achievable in clinical settings, mithramycin diminished basal as well as CSC-mediated increases in AhR, Sp1, and Nrf2 levels within the ABCG2 promoter, markedly downregulated ABCG2, and inhibited proliferation and tumorigenicity of lung and esophageal cancer cells. Microarray analyses revealed that mithramycin targeted multiple stem cell-related pathways in vitro and in vivo. Collectively, our findings provide a potential mechanistic link between smoking status and outcome of patients with lung and esophageal cancers, and support clinical use of mithramycin for repressing ABCG2 and inhibiting stem cell signaling in thoracic malignancies.

  6. Effect of additive oxygen gas on cellular response of lung cancer cells induced by atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joh, Hea Min; Choi, Ji Ye; Kim, Sun Ja; Chung, T. H.; Kang, Tae-Hong

    2014-10-01

    The atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet driven by pulsed dc voltage was utilized to treat human lung cancer cells in vitro. The properties of plasma plume were adjusted by the injection type and flow rate of additive oxygen gas in atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet. The plasma characteristics such as plume length, electric current and optical emission spectra (OES) were measured at different flow rates of additive oxygen to helium. The plasma plume length and total current decreased with an increase in the additive oxygen flow rate. The electron excitation temperature estimated by the Boltzmann plot from several excited helium emission lines increased slightly with the additive oxygen flow. The oxygen atom density in the gas phase estimated by actinometry utilizing argon was observed to increase with the additive oxygen flow. The concentration of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) measured by fluorescence assay was found to be not exactly proportional to that of extracellular ROS (measured by OES), but both correlated considerably. It was also observed that the expression levels of p53 and the phospho-p53 were enhanced in the presence of additive oxygen flow compared with those from the pure helium plasma treatment.

  7. Effect of additive oxygen gas on cellular response of lung cancer cells induced by atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet.

    PubMed

    Joh, Hea Min; Choi, Ji Ye; Kim, Sun Ja; Chung, T H; Kang, Tae-Hong

    2014-10-16

    The atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet driven by pulsed dc voltage was utilized to treat human lung cancer cells in vitro. The properties of plasma plume were adjusted by the injection type and flow rate of additive oxygen gas in atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet. The plasma characteristics such as plume length, electric current and optical emission spectra (OES) were measured at different flow rates of additive oxygen to helium. The plasma plume length and total current decreased with an increase in the additive oxygen flow rate. The electron excitation temperature estimated by the Boltzmann plot from several excited helium emission lines increased slightly with the additive oxygen flow. The oxygen atom density in the gas phase estimated by actinometry utilizing argon was observed to increase with the additive oxygen flow. The concentration of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) measured by fluorescence assay was found to be not exactly proportional to that of extracellular ROS (measured by OES), but both correlated considerably. It was also observed that the expression levels of p53 and the phospho-p53 were enhanced in the presence of additive oxygen flow compared with those from the pure helium plasma treatment.

  8. Estimated risks of radon-induced lung cancer for different exposure profiles based on the new EPA model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing

    2005-04-01

    Radon is a naturally occurring radioactive gas. When inhaled, radon can cause mutations that lead to lung cancer. Some new epidemiologic studies indicate that indoor radon is a public health problem. The BEIR VI report outlined its preferred two risk models for the combined effects of smoking and exposure to radon progeny, and listed the estimated risk to ever-smokers and never-smokers of both sexes due to lifetime exposure. However, exposures for shorter periods of time are of practical interest since exposure to elevated levels of radon may occur and end at any age. This study aims to produce practical tables of lifetime relative risks for exposures between any two age intervals from 0 to 110, and for various radon concentrations found in homes from 100 to 1,000 Bq m(-3). The calculations are based on the risk model developed recently by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The EPA's risk model is a single model that gives risk values midway between those obtained from the two BEIR VI preferred models. The detailed tables provide a clearer view of the age groups at higher risk and the effect of exposure duration. The results will help radiation protection practitioners to better communicate indoor radon risk to members of the public.

  9. The green tea polyphenol, epigallocatechin-3-gallate inhibits telomerase and induces apoptosis in drug-resistant lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sadava, David; Whitlock, Elizabeth; Kane, Susan E

    2007-08-17

    Epidemiological studies on humans and investigations in animal models suggest that consumption of green tea has anti-cancer effects. Small-cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) has a poor prognosis, particularly due to the development of drug resistance. We investigated the effects of the green tea polyphenol, epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) on human SCLC cells. EGCG had similar effects (IC(50) of approximately 70 microM) on drug-sensitive (H69) and drug-resistant (H69VP) SCLC cells, indicating that it is not part of the drug resistance phenotype expressed in these cells. In both cell lines, incubation in EGCG at 1 x IC(50) for 24h resulted in 50-60% reduced telomerase activity as measured by a PCR-based assay for telomeric repeats. Colorimetric assays of cells treated for 36 h with EGCG demonstrated a reduction in activities of caspases 3 (50%) and 9 (70%) but not caspase 8, indicating initiation of apoptosis. DNA fragmentation as measured by ELISA occurred within cells treated with EGCG and this was confirmed by TUNEL staining. Flow cytometric analysis of SCLC cells incubated for 36 h in EGCG indicated a cell-cycle block in S phase. These data indicate the potential use of EGCG, and possibly green tea, in treating SCLC.

  10. Effect of additive oxygen gas on cellular response of lung cancer cells induced by atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet

    PubMed Central

    Joh, Hea Min; Choi, Ji Ye; Kim, Sun Ja; Chung, T. H.; Kang, Tae-Hong

    2014-01-01

    The atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet driven by pulsed dc voltage was utilized to treat human lung cancer cells in vitro. The properties of plasma plume were adjusted by the injection type and flow rate of additive oxygen gas in atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet. The plasma characteristics such as plume length, electric current and optical emission spectra (OES) were measured at different flow rates of additive oxygen to helium. The plasma plume length and total current decreased with an increase in the additive oxygen flow rate. The electron excitation temperature estimated by the Boltzmann plot from several excited helium emission lines increased slightly with the additive oxygen flow. The oxygen atom density in the gas phase estimated by actinometry utilizing argon was observed to increase with the additive oxygen flow. The concentration of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) measured by fluorescence assay was found to be not exactly proportional to that of extracellular ROS (measured by OES), but both correlated considerably. It was also observed that the expression levels of p53 and the phospho-p53 were enhanced in the presence of additive oxygen flow compared with those from the pure helium plasma treatment. PMID:25319447

  11. Fyn mediates transforming growth factor-beta1-induced down-regulation of E-cadherin in human A549 lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, An Na; Jeon, Woo-Kwang; Lim, Kyu-Hyoung; Lee, Hui-Young; Kim, Woo Jin; Kim, Byung-Chul

    2011-04-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) signaling positively contributes to the regulation of tumor metastasis. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms are less well defined. We here show that Fyn, a member of Src family tyrosine kinases, plays a critical role in mediating TGF-β1-induced down-regulation of E-cadherin in human A549 lung cancer cells. Blockade of Fyn with siRNA knockdown or ligand-binding defective mutant significantly lowered the ability of TGF-β1 to repress E-cadherin expression. Furthermore, our results demonstrated that Fyn facilitates TGF-β1-mediated suppression of E-cadherin through p38 kinase-dependent induction of Snail. Collectively, our findings identify a Fyn-p38-Snail cascade as a new signaling pathway mediating oncogenic TGF-β function.

  12. Physical activity and lung cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Emaus, Aina; Thune, Inger

    2011-01-01

    Since lung cancer is among the cancers with the highest incidence and has the highest mortality rate of cancer worldwide, the means of reducing its impact are urgently needed. Emerging evidence shows that physical activity plays an etiological role in lung cancer risk reduction. The majority of studies support the fact that total and recreational physical activity reduces lung cancer risk by 20-30% for women and 20-50% for men, and there is evidence of a dose-response effect. The biological mechanisms operating between physical activity and lung cancer are likely complex and influenced by many factors including inherited or acquired susceptibility genes, gender, smoking, and other environmental factors. Several plausible biological factors and mechanisms have been hypothesized linking physical activity to reduced lung cancer risk including: improved pulmonary function, reduced concentrations of carcinogenic agents in the lungs, enhanced immune function, reduced inflammation, enhanced DNA repair capacity, changes in growth factor levels and possible gene-physical activity interactions. Future research should target the possible subgroup effects and the biologic mechanisms that may be involved.

  13. Elevated SP-1 Transcription Factor Expression and Activity Drives Basal and Hypoxia-induced Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) Expression in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Deacon, Karl; Onion, David; Kumari, Rajendra; Watson, Susan A.; Knox, Alan J.

    2012-01-01

    VEGF plays a central role in angiogenesis in cancer. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tumors have increased microvascular density, localized hypoxia, and high VEGF expression levels; however, there is a lack of understanding of how oncogenic and tumor microenvironment changes such as hypoxia lead to greater VEGF expression in lung and other cancers. We show that NSCLC cells secreted higher levels of VEGF than normal airway epithelial cells. Actinomycin D inhibited all NSCLC VEGF secretion, and VEGF minimal promoter-luciferase reporter constructs were constitutively active until the last 85 base pairs before the transcription start site containing three SP-1 transcription factor-binding sites; mutation of these VEGF promoter SP-1-binding sites eliminated VEGF promoter activity. Furthermore, dominant negative SP-1, mithramycin A, and SP-1 shRNA decreased VEGF promoter activity, whereas overexpression of SP-1 increased VEGF promoter activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated SP-1, p300, and PCA/F histone acetyltransferase binding and histone H4 hyperacetylation at the VEGF promoter in NSCLC cells. Cultured NSCLC cells expressed higher levels of SP-1 protein than normal airway epithelial cells, and double-fluorescence immunohistochemistry showed a strong correlation between SP-1 and VEGF in human NSCLC tumors. In addition, hypoxia-driven VEGF expression in NSCLC cells was SP-1-dependent, with hypoxia increasing SP-1 activity and binding to the VEGF promoter. These studies are the first to demonstrate that overexpression of SP-1 plays a central role in hypoxia-induced VEGF secretion. PMID:22992725

  14. [6]-Shogaol inhibits growth and induces apoptosis of non-small cell lung cancer cells by directly regulating Akt1/2

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myoung Ok; Lee, Mee-Hyun; Oi, Naomi; Kim, Sung-Hyun; Dong, Zigang

    2014-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide. Despite progress in developing chemotherapeutics for the treatment of NSCLC, primary and secondary resistance limits therapeutic success. NSCLC cells exhibit multiple mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), which cause aberrant activation of diverse cell signaling pathways. Therefore, suppression of the inappropriate amplification of EGFR downstream signaling cascades is considered to be a rational therapeutic and preventive strategy for the management of NSCLC. Our initial molecular target–oriented virtual screening revealed that the ginger components, including [6]-shogaol, [6]-paradol and [6]-gingerol, seem to be potential candidates for the prevention and treatment of NSCLC. Among the compounds, [6]-shogaol showed the greatest inhibitory effects on the NSCLC cell proliferation and anchorage-independent growth. [6]-Shogaol induced cell cycle arrest (G1 or G2/M) and apoptosis. Furthermore, [6]-shogaol inhibited Akt kinase activity, a downstream mediator of EGFR signaling, by binding with an allosteric site of Akt. In NCI-H1650 lung cancer cells, [6]-shogaol reduced the constitutive phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3) and decreased the expression of cyclin D1/3, which are target proteins in the Akt signaling pathway. The induction of apoptosis in NCI-H1650 cells by [6]-shogaol corresponded with the cleavage of caspase-3 and caspase-7. Moreover, intraperitoneal administration of [6]-shogaol inhibited the growth of NCI-H1650 cells as tumor xenografts in nude mice. [6]-Shogaol suppressed the expression of Ki-67, cyclin D1 and phosphorylated Akt and STAT3 and increased terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling-positivity in xenograft tumors. The current study clearly indicates that [6]-shogaol can be exploited for the prevention and/or treatment of NSCLC. PMID:24282290

  15. Cisplatin treatment increases stemness through upregulation of hypoxia-inducible factors by interleukin-6 in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fuquan; Duan, Shanzhou; Tsai, Ying; Keng, Peter C; Chen, Yongbing; Lee, Soo Ok; Chen, Yuhchyau

    2016-06-01

    Cisplatin-resistant A549 and H157 (A549CisR and H157CisR) non-small cell lung cancer cells show increased stemness of cancer stem cells (CSCs) compared to their parental cells. We investigated whether interleukin-6 (IL-6) signaling contributes to this increased stemness in cisplatin-resistant cells. When A549CisR and H157CisR cells were treated with neutralizing IL-6 antibody, decreased cisplatin resistance was observed, whereas IL-6 treatment of parental cells resulted in increased cisplatin resistance. Expression of the CSC markers was significantly upregulated in IL-6-expressing scramble cells (in vitro) and scramble cell-derived tumor tissues (in vivo) after cisplatin treatment, but not in IL-6 knocked down (IL-6si) (in vitro) cells and in IL-6si cell-derived tumor tissues (in vivo), suggesting the importance of IL-6 signaling in triggering increased stemness during cisplatin resistance development. Hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs) were upregulated by IL-6 and responsible for the increased CSC stemness on cisplatin treatment. Mechanism dissection studies found that upregulation of HIFs by IL-6 was through transcriptional control and inhibition of HIF degradation. Treatment of HIF inhibitor (FM19G11) abolished the upregulation of CSC markers and increased sphere formations in IL-6 expressing cells on cisplatin treatment. In all, IL-6-mediated HIF upregulation is important in increasing stemness during cisplatin resistance development, and we suggest that the strategies of inhibiting IL-6 signaling or its downstream HIF molecules can be used as future therapeutic approaches to target CSCs after cisplatin treatment for lung cancer.

  16. MiR-206 inhibits HGF-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition and angiogenesis in non-small cell lung cancer via c-Met /PI3k/Akt/mTOR pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qing-yong; Jiao, De-min; Wu, Yu-quan; Chen, Jun; Wang, Jian; Tang, Xia-li; Mou, Hao; Hu, Hui-zhen; Song, Jia; Yan, Jie; Wu, Li-jun; Chen, Jianyan; Wang, Zhiwei

    2016-04-05

    MiR-206 is low expression in lung cancers and associated with cancer metastasis. However, the roles of miR-206 in epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and angiogenesis in lung cancer remain unknown. In this study, we find that hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) induces EMT, invasion and migration in A549 and 95D lung cancer cells, and these processes could be markedly inhibited by miR-206 overexpression. Moreover, we demonstrate that miR-206 directly targets c-Met and inhibits its downstream PI3k/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway. In contrast, miR-206 inhibitors promote the expression of c-Met and activate the PI3k/Akt/mTOR signaling, and this effect could be attenuated by the PI3K inhibitor. Moreover, c-Met overexpression assay further confirms the significant inhibitory effect of miR-206 on HGF-induced EMT, cell migration and invasion. Notably, we also find that miR-206 effectively inhibits HGF-induced tube formation and migration of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), and the mechanism is also related to inhibition of PI3k/Akt/mTOR signaling. Finally, we reveal the inhibitory effect of miR-206 on EMT and angiogenesis in xenograft tumor mice model. Taken together, miR-206 inhibits HGF-induced EMT and angiogenesis in lung cancer by suppressing c-Met/PI3k/Akt/mTOR signaling. Therefore, miR-206 might be a potential target for the therapeutic strategy against EMT and angiogenesis of lung cancer.

  17. Potent organometallic osmium compounds induce mitochondria-mediated apoptosis and S-phase cell cycle arrest in A549 non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    van Rijt, Sabine H; Romero-Canelón, Isolda; Fu, Ying; Shnyder, Steve D; Sadler, Peter J

    2014-05-01

    The problems of acquired resistance associated with platinum drugs may be addressed by chemotherapeutics based on other transition metals as they offer the possibility of novel mechanisms of action. In this study, the cellular uptake and induction of apoptosis in A549 human non-small cell lung cancer cells of three promising osmium(II) arene complexes containing azopyridine ligands, [Os(η(6)-arene)(p-R-phenylazopyridine)X]PF6, where arene is p-cymene or biphenyl, R is OH or NMe2, and X is Cl or I, were investigated. These complexes showed time-dependent (4–48 h) potent anticancer activity with highest potency after 24 h (IC50 values ranging from 0.1 to 3.6 μM). Cellular uptake of the three compounds as quantified by ICP-MS, was independent of their logP values (hydrophobicity). Furthermore, maximum cell uptake was observed after 24 h, with evident cell efflux of the osmium after 48 and 72 h of exposure, which correlated with the corresponding IC50 values. The most active compound 2, [Os(η(6)-p-cymene)(NMe2-phenylazopyridine)I]PF6, was taken up by lung cancer cells predominately in a temperature-dependent manner indicating that energy-dependent mechanisms are important in the uptake of 2. Cell fractionation studies showed that all three compounds accumulated mainly in cellular membranes. Furthermore, compound 2 induced apoptosis and caused accumulation in the S-phase of the cell cycle. In addition, 2 induced cytochrome c release and alterations in mitochondrial membrane potential even after short exposure times, indicating that mitochondrial apoptotic pathways are involved. This study represents the first steps towards understanding the mode of action of this promising class of new osmium-based chemotherapeutics.

  18. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs induce severe hematologic toxicities in lung cancer patients receiving pemetrexed plus carboplatin: A retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Ishida, Yuri; Takechi, Kenshi; Katayama, Hitoshi; Ito, Ryoji; Yakushijin, Yoshihiro; Moriguchi, Toshihide; Tanaka, Mamoru; Tanaka, Akihiro; Araki, Hiroaki

    2017-01-01

    Purpose As the major toxicity induced by pemetrexed plus carboplatin is severe hematologic toxicities, the aim of this study was to determine the risk factors for severe hematologic toxicities in lung cancer patients. Methods We retrospectively investigated data from lung cancer patients who had received pemetrexed plus carboplatin, with or without bevacizumab. This observational study was carried out at Ehime University Hospital using electronic medical records dating from July 2009 to March 2015. Severe hematologic toxicities were defined as grade 3 or 4, according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. Results Forty-two patients were included in the study. The incidence of grade 3 or 4 hematologic toxicities during the first cycle of chemotherapy and during all cycles was 19.0% and 16.1%, respectively. Multivariate time-depend generalized estimating equations logistic regression analysis revealed that regular use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) was significantly associated with an increased risk of severe hematologic toxicities during all cycles (adjusted odds ratio (OR): 8.32, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.27–54.38; p = 0.03), whereas creatinine clearance of <45 mL/min was not significantly associated with an increased risk of severe hematologic toxicities during all cycles (adjusted OR: 0.91, 95% CI: 0.25–3.34; p = 0.88). Conclusions The results suggest that severe hematologic toxicities in patients receiving carboplatin-based pemetrexed may be significantly induced by the inhibition of renal tubular pemetrexed secretion through drug–drug interactions between NSAIDs and pemetrexed rather than through glomerular filtration of pemetrexed, even with moderate to sufficient renal function. PMID:28158216

  19. An anthraquinone derivative from Luffa acutangula induces apoptosis in human lung cancer cell line NCI-H460 through p53-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Vanajothi, Ramar; Srinivasan, Pappu

    2016-01-01

    The current study was designed to evaluate the in vitro antiproliferative activity of 1,8-dihydroxy-4-methylanthracene-9,10-dione (DHMA) isolated from the Luffa acutangula against human non-small cell lung cancer cell line (NCI-H460). Induction of apoptosis and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was determined through fluorescence microscopic technique. Quantitative real-time PCR and western blotting analysis was carried out to detect the expression of pro-apoptotic (p53, p21, caspase-3, Bax, GADD45A, and ATM) and anti-apoptotic (NF-κB) proteins in NCI-H460 cell line. In silico studies also performed to predict the binding mechanism of DHMA with MDM2-p53 protein. The DHMA inhibited the cell viability of NCI-H460 cells in a dose-dependent manner with an IC(50) of about 50 µg/ml. It significantly reduced cell viability correlated with induction of apoptosis, which was associated with ROS generation. The apoptotic cell death was further confirmed through dual staining and DNA fragmentation assay. DHMA significantly increased the expression of anti-apoptotic protein such as p53, p21, Bax, and caspase-3 but downregulated the expression of NF-κB in NCI-H460 cell line. In silico studies demonstrate that DHMA formed hydrogen bond interaction with key residues Trp26, Phe55 and Lys24 by which it disrupt the binding of p53 with MDM2 receptor. These findings suggested that DHMA induces apoptosis in NCI-H460 via a p53-dependent pathway. This the first study on cytotoxic and apoptosis inducing activity of DHMA from L. acutangula against NCI-H460 cell line. Therefore, DHMA has therapeutic potential for lung cancer treatment.

  20. Hypoxia in Models of Lung Cancer: Implications for Targeted Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Graves, Edward E.; Vilalta, Marta; Cecic, Ivana K.; Erler, Janine T.; Tran, Phuoc T.; Felsher, Dean; Sayles, Leanne; Sweet-Cordero, Alejandro; –Thu Le, Quynh; Giaccia, Amato J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose In order to efficiently translate experimental methods from bench to bedside, it is imperative that laboratory models of cancer mimic human disease as closely as possible. In this study we sought to compare patterns of hypoxia in several standard and emerging mouse models of lung cancer in order to establish the appropriateness of each for evaluating the role of oxygen in lung cancer progression and therapeutic response. Experimental Design Subcutaneous and orthotopic human A549 lung carcinomas growing in nude mice as well as spontaneous K-ras or Myc-induced lung tumors grown in situ or subcutaneously were studied using fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and fluoroazomycin arabinoside (FAZA) positron emission tomography (PET), and post-mortem by immunohistochemical observation of the hypoxia marker pimonidazole. The response of these models to the hypoxia-activated cytotoxin PR-104 was also quantified by formation of γH2AX foci in vitro and in vivo. Finally, our findings were compared with oxygen electrode measurements of human lung cancers. Results Minimal FAZA and pimonidazole accumulation was seen in tumors growing within the lungs, while subcutaneous tumors showed substantial trapping of both hypoxia probes. These observations correlated with the response of these tumors to PR-104, and with the reduced incidence of hypoxia in human lung cancers relative to other solid tumor types. Conclusions These findings suggest that in situ models of lung cancer in mice may be more reflective of the human disease, and encourage judicious selection of preclinical tumor models for the study of hypoxia imaging and anti-hypoxic cell therapies. PMID:20858837

  1. [Lung cancer screening and management of small pulmonary nodules].

    PubMed

    Schulz, Christian

    2015-03-01

    Worldwide lung cancer is the leading cause of death from cancer. Most lung cancers are diagnosed at an advanced stage, so survival after lung cancer is generally poor. Diagnosis of lung cancer at earlier stages may be associated with an increased survival rate. This indicates that the implementation of lung cancer screening programs at the population level by means of low dose computed tomography might helpful to improve the outcome and mortality of lung cancer patients. By means of rapid advances in imaging technologies over the last decades it became possible to detect small lung nodules as small as a couple of millimeters. This recent developments require management algorithms to guide the clinical management of suspicious and indeterminate lung nodules found in computer tomography during lung cancer screening or by incidental finding.This review will focus on both, the recent advances in lung cancer screening and the guidelines for the management of small pulmonary nodules.

  2. Inhibition of TWIST1 leads to activation of oncogene-induced senescence in oncogene-driven non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Burns, Timothy F; Dobromilskaya, Irina; Murphy, Sara C; Gajula, Rajendra P; Thiyagarajan, Saravanan; Chatley, Sarah N H; Aziz, Khaled; Cho, Yoon-Jae; Tran, Phuoc T; Rudin, Charles M

    2013-04-01

    A large fraction of non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) are dependent on defined oncogenic driver mutations. Although targeted agents exist for EGFR- and EML4-ALK-driven NSCLCs, no therapies target the most frequently found driver mutation, KRAS. Furthermore, acquired resistance to the currently targetable driver mutations is nearly universally observed. Clearly a novel therapeutic approach is needed to target oncogene-driven NSCLCs. We recently showed that the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor Twist1 cooperates with mutant Kras to induce lung adenocarcinoma in transgenic mouse models and that inhibition of Twist1 in these models led to Kras-induced senescence. In the current study, we examine the role of TWIST1 in oncogene-driven human NSCLCs. Silencing of TWIST1 in KRAS-mutant human NSCLC cell lines resulted in dramatic growth inhibition and either activation of a latent oncogene-induced senescence program or, in some cases, apoptosis. Similar effects were observed in EGFR mutation-driven and c-Met-amplified NSCLC cell lines. Growth inhibition by silencing of TWIST1 was independent of p53 or p16 mutational status and did not require previously defined mediators of senescence, p21 and p27, nor could this phenotype be rescued by overexpression of SKP2. In xenograft models, silencing of TWIST1 resulted in significant growth inhibition of KRAS-mutant, EGFR-mutant, and c-Met-amplified NSCLCs. Remarkably, inducible silencing of TWIST1 resulted in significant growth inhibition of established KRAS-mutant tumors. Together these findings suggest that silencing of TWIST1 in oncogene driver-dependent NSCLCs represents a novel and promising therapeutic strategy.

  3. Physical activity and lung cancer survivorship.

    PubMed

    Jones, Lee W

    2011-01-01

    A lung cancer diagnosis and associated therapeutic management is associated with unique and varying degrees of adverse physical/functional impairments that dramatically reduce a patient's ability to tolerate exercise. Poor exercise tolerance predisposes to increased susceptibility to other common age-related diseases, poor quality of life (QOL), and likely premature death. Here we review the putative literature investigating the role of exercise as an adjunct therapy across the lung cancer continuum (i.e., diagnosis to palliation). The current evidence suggests that exercise training is a safe and feasible adjunct therapy for operable lung cancer patients both before and after pulmonary resection. Among patients with inoperable disease, feasibility and safety studies of carefully prescribed exercise training are warranted. Preliminary evidence in this area supports that exercise therapy may be an important consideration in multidisciplinary management of patients diagnosed with lung cancer.

  4. Exercise therapy across the lung cancer continuum.

    PubMed

    Jones, Lee W; Eves, Neil D; Waner, Emily; Joy, Anil A

    2009-07-01

    A lung cancer diagnosis and associated therapeutic management are associated with unique and varying degrees of adverse physical/functional impairments that dramatically reduce patients' ability to tolerate exercise. Poor exercise capacity predisposes to increased susceptibility to other common age-related diseases, poor quality of life, and likely premature death. This article reviews the literature investigating the role of exercise as an adjunct therapy across the lung cancer continuum (ie, prevention to palliation). The current evidence suggests that exercise training is a safe and feasible adjunct therapy for patients with operable lung cancer both before and after pulmonary resection. Among patients with inoperable disease, feasibility and safety studies of carefully prescribed exercise training are warranted. Preliminary evidence in this area suggests that exercise therapy may be an important consideration in multidisciplinary management of patients diagnosed with lung cancer.

  5. Lung cancer in the Indian subcontinent

    PubMed Central

    Noronha, Vanita; Pinninti, Rakesh; Patil, Vijay M.; Joshi, Amit; Prabhash, Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Smoking tobacco, both cigarettes and beedis, is the principal risk factor for causation of lung cancer in Indian men; however, among Indian women, the association with smoking is not strong, suggesting that there could be other risk factors besides smoking. Despite numerous advances in recent years in terms of diagnostic methods, molecular changes, and therapeutic interventions, the outcomes of the lung cancer patients remain poor; hence, a better understanding of the risk factors may impact the preventive measures to be implemented at the community level. There is a lack of comprehensive data on lung cancer in India. In this review, we attempt to collate the available data on lung cancer from India. PMID:27606290

  6. Siamese crocodile bile induces apoptosis in NCI-H1299 human non-small cell lung cancer cells via a mitochondria-mediated intrinsic pathway and inhibits tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Tian, Ling; Deng, Yi-Tao; Dong, Xin; Fan, Jia-Yi; Li, Hua-Liang; Ding, Yu-Mei; Peng, Wei-Xi; Chen, Qing-Xi; Shen, Dong-Yan

    2017-02-16

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a widespread and particularly aggressive form of cancer. Patients with NSCLC and early metastases typically have poor prognosis, highlighting the critical need for additional drugs to improve disease outcome following surgical resection. The present study aimed to determine if Siamese crocodile bile (SCB) had an anti‑cancer effect on NCI‑H1299 human NSCLC cells. The inhibitory mechanism of SCB was examined in cell culture and nude mice. In vitro experimental results revealed that SCB inhibited the proliferation and colony‑forming ability of NCI‑H1299 cells by arresting cell cycle and inducing apoptosis. The loss of the mitochondrial membrane potential and the release of cytochrome c indicated that SCB treatment may lead to mitochondrial dysfunction in NCI‑H1299 cells. At the molecular level, SCB altered the ratio of protein expression of Bax/Bcl‑2 and activated associated caspases, suggesting that intrinsic pathway involvement in the SCB‑induced apoptosis of NCI‑H1299 cells. In the in vivo experiments, intraperitoneal injection of SCB for 4 weeks inhibited xenograft tumor growth by 46.8% without observable toxicity in nude mice. Immunohistochemistry analysis of proliferating cell nuclear antigen and vascular endothelial growth factor also revealed that SCB inhibited cell proliferation and metastasis in NSCLC xenograft tumors. Overall, SCB exerted an anti-cancer effect on NCI‑H1299 human NSCLC cells in vitro and in vivo and may have therapeutic potential for the treatment of human NSCLC.

  7. Cancer-targeted BikDD gene therapy elicits protective antitumor immunity against lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Sher, Yuh-Pyng; Liu, Shih-Jen; Chang, Chun-Mien; Lien, Shu-Pei; Chen, Chien-Hua; Han, Zhenbo; Li, Long-Yuan; Chen, Jin-Shing; Wu, Cheng-Wen; Hung, Mien-Chie

    2011-04-01

    Targeted cancer-specific gene therapy is a promising strategy for treating metastatic lung cancer, which is a leading cause of lung cancer-related deaths. Previously, we developed a cancer-targeted gene therapy expression system with high tumor specificity and strong activity that selectively induced lung cancer cell killing without affecting normal cells in immunocompromised mice. Here, we found this cancer-targeted gene therapy, SV-BikDD, composed of the survivin promoter in the VP16-GAL4-WPRE integrated systemic amplifier system to drive the apoptotic gene BikDD, not only caused cytotoxic effects in cancer cells but also elicited a cancer-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte response to synergistically increase the therapeutic effect and further develop an effective systemic antitumoral immunity against rechallenges of tumorigenic dose of parental tumor cells inoculated at distant sites in immunocompetent mice. In addition, this cancer-targeted gene therapy does not elicit an immune response against normal tissues, but CMV-BikDD treatment does. The therapeutic vector could also induce proinflammatory cytokines to activate innate immunity and provide some benefits in antitumor gene therapy. Thus, this study provides a promising strategy with benefit of antitumoral immune response worthy of further development in clinical trials for treating lung cancer via cancer-targeted gene therapy.

  8. Immunotherapy for lung cancer: advances and prospects

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Li; Wang, Liping; Zhang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer as well as the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. To date, surgery is the first choice treatment, but most clinically diagnosed cases are inoperable. While chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy are the next considered options for such cases, these treatment modalities have adverse effects and are sometimes lethal to patients. Thus, new effective strategies with minimal side effects are urgently needed. Cancer immunotherapy provides either active or passive immunity to target tumors. Multiple immunotherapy agents have been proposed and tested for potential therapeutic benefit against lung cancer, and some pose fewer side effects as compared to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy. In this article, we discuss studies focusing on interactions between lung cancer and the immune system, and we place an emphasis on outcome evidence in order to create a knowledge base well-grounded in clinical reality. Overall, this review highlights the need for new lung cancer treatment options, with much ground to be paved for future advances in the field. We believe that immunotherapy agents alone or with other forms of treatment can be recognized as next modality of lung cancer treatment. PMID:27168951

  9. Trace element load in cancer and normal lung tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubala-Kukuś , A.; Braziewicz, J.; Banaś , D.; Majewska, U.; Góź Dź , S.; Urbaniak, A.

    1999-04-01

    Samples of malignant and benign human lung tissues were analysed by two complementary methods, i.e., particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TRXRF). The concentration of trace elements of P, S, K, Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Se, Sr, Hg and Pb was determined in squamous cancer of lung tissue from 65 people and in the benign lung tumour tissue from 5 people. Several elements shows enhancement in cancerous lung tissue of women in comparison to men, i.e., titanium show maximum enhancement by 48% followed by Cr (20%) and Mn (36%). At the same time trace element concentration of Sr and Pb are declaimed by 30% and 20% in women population. Physical basis of used analytical methods, experimental set-up and the procedure of sample preparation are described.

  10. Exhaled breath analysis for lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sutedja, Tom G.; Zimmerman, Paul V.

    2013-01-01

    Early diagnosis of lung cancer results in improved survival compared to diagnosis with more advanced disease. Early disease is not reliably indicated by symptoms. Because investigations such as bronchoscopy and needle biopsy have associated risks and substantial costs, they are not suitable for population screening. Hence new easily applicable tests, which can be used to screen individuals at risk, are required. Biomarker testing in exhaled breath samples is a simple, relatively inexpensive, non-invasive approach. Exhaled breath contains volatile and non-volatile organic compounds produced as end-products of metabolic processes and the composition of such compounds varies between healthy subjects and subjects with lung cancer. Many studies have analysed the patterns of these compounds in exhaled breath. In addition studies have also reported that the exhaled breath condensate (EBC) can reveal gene mutations or DNA abnormalities in patients with lung cancer. This review has summarised the scientific evidence demonstrating that lung cancer has distinct chemical profiles in exhaled breath and characteristic genetic changes in EBC. It is not yet possible to accurately identify individuals with lung cancer in at risk populations by any of these techniques. However, analysis of both volatile organic compounds in exhaled breath and of EBC have great potential to become clinically useful diagnostic and screening tools for early stage lung cancer detection. PMID:24163746

  11. Lung Cancer Screening with Low Dose CT

    PubMed Central

    Caroline, Chiles

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The announcement of the results of the NLST, showing a 20% reduction in lung-cancer specific mortality with LDCT screening in a high risk population, marked a turning point in lung cancer screening. This was the first time that a randomized controlled trial had shown a mortality reduction with an imaging modality aimed at early detection of lung cancer. Current guidelines endorse LDCT screening for smokers and former smokers ages 55 to 74, with at least a 30 pack year smoking history. Adherence to published algorithms for nodule follow-up is strongly encouraged. Future directions for screening research include risk stratification for selection of the screening population, and improvements in the diagnostic follow-up for indeterminate pulmonary nodules. As with screening for other malignancies, screening for lung cancer with LDCT has revealed that there are indolent lung cancers which may not be fatal. More research is necessary if we are to maximize the risk-benefit ratio in lung cancer screening. PMID:24267709

  12. On the origin of G --> T transversions in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Pfeifer, Gerd P; Hainaut, Pierre

    2003-05-15

    G-->T transversions in the TP53 gene are more common in lung cancers from smokers than in any other cancer except for hepatocellular carcinomas linked to aflatoxin. The high frequency of G-->T transversions in lung cancer has been attributed to the mutagenic action of cigarette smoke components, in particular polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). In a recent review [Mutat. Res. 508 (2002) 1-19], Rodin and Rodin have questioned the direct mutagenic action of PAH-like compounds and have suggested that other factors, such as selection of pre-existing endogenous mutations by smoke-induced stress, can better explain the excess of G-->T transversions in lung tumors. Their two main arguments against an involvement of PAH are that smoking may inhibit the repair of G-->T primary lesions on the non-transcribed strand and that lung cancer cell lines show a higher frequency of G-->T transversions than primary lung tumors suggesting that these mutations are not related to smoking. We illustrate here that both of these suggestions are incompatible with available evidence and that the abundance and sequence specificity of G-->T transversions in lung tumors is best explained by a direct mutagenic action of PAH compounds present in cigarette smoke.

  13. The ethanol extract of Scutellaria baicalensis and the active compounds induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis including upregulation of p53 and Bax in human lung cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Jiayu; Morgan, Winston A.; Sanchez-Medina, Alberto; Corcoran, Olivia

    2011-08-01

    Despite a lack of scientific authentication, Scutellaria baicalensis is clinically used in Chinese medicine as a traditional adjuvant to chemotherapy of lung cancer. In this study, cytotoxicity assays demonstrated that crude ethanolic extracts of S. baicalensis were selectively toxic to human lung cancer cell lines A549, SK-LU-1 and SK-MES-1 compared with normal human lung fibroblasts. The active compounds baicalin, baicalein and wogonin did not exhibit such selectivity. Following exposure to the crude extracts, cellular protein expression in the cancer cell lines was assessed using 2D gel electrophoresis coupled with MALDI-TOF-MS/Protein Fingerprinting. The altered protein expression indicated that cell growth arrest and apoptosis were potential mechanisms of cytotoxicity. These observations were supported by PI staining cell cycle analysis using flow cytometry and Annexin-V apoptotic analysis by fluorescence microscopy of cancer cells treated with the crude extract and pure active compounds. Moreover, specific immunoblotting identification showed the decreased expression of cyclin A results in the S phase arrest of A549 whereas the G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} phase arrest in SK-MES-1 cells results from the decreased expression of cyclin D1. Following treatment, increased expression in the cancer cells of key proteins related to the enhancement of apoptosis was observed for p53 and Bax. These results provide further insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying the clinical use of this herb as an adjuvant to lung cancer therapy. - Research Highlights: > Scutellaria baicalensis is a clinical adjuvant to lung cancer chemotherapy in China. > Scutellaria ethanol extracts selectively toxic to A549, SK-LU-1 and SK-MES-1. > Baicalin, baicalein and wogonin were toxic to all lung cancer cell lines. > Proteomics identified increased p53 and BAX in response to Scutellaria extracts.

  14. Indoor radon and lung cancer in China.

    PubMed

    Blot, W J; Xu, Z Y; Boice, J D; Zhao, D Z; Stone, B J; Sun, J; Jing, L B; Fraumeni, J F

    1990-06-20

    Radon has long been known to contribute to risk of lung cancer, especially in undergound miners who are exposed to large amounts of the carcinogen. Recently, however, lower amounts of radon present in living areas have been suggested as an important cause of lung cancer. In an effort to clarify the relationship of low amounts of radon with lung cancer risk, we placed alpha-track radon detectors in the homes of 308 women with newly diagnosed lung cancer and 356 randomly selected female control subjects of similar age. Measurements were taken after 1 year. All study participants were part of the general population of Shenyang, People's Republic of China, an industrial city in the northeast part of the country that has one of the world's highest rates of lung cancer in women. The median time of residence in the homes was 24 years. The median household radon level was 2.3 pCi/L of air; 20% of the levels were greater than 4 pCi/L. Radon levels tended to be higher in single-story houses or on the first floor of multiple-story dwellings, and they were also higher in houses with increased levels of indoor air pollution from coal-burning stoves. However, the levels were not higher in homes of women who developed lung cancer than in homes of controls, nor did lung cancer risk increase with increasing radon level. No association between radon and lung cancer was observed regardless of cigarette-smoking status, except for a nonsignificant trend among heavy smokers. No positive associations of lung cancer cell type with radon were observed, except for a nonsignificant excess risk of small cell cancers among the more heavily exposed residents. Our data suggest that projections from surveys of miners exposed to high radon levels may have overestimated the overall risks of lung cancer associated with levels typically seen in homes in this Chinese city. However, further studies in other population groups are needed to clarify the carcinogenic potential of indoor radon.

  15. Opioid and nicotine receptors affect growth regulation of human lung cancer cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Maneckjee, R.; Minna, J.D. Uniformed Services Univ. of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD )

    1990-05-01

    Using specific radioactively-labeled ligands, the authors find that lung cancer cell lines of diverse histologic types express multiple, high-affinity membrane receptors for {mu}, {delta}, and {kappa} opioid agonists and for nicotine and {alpha}-bungarotoxin. These receptors are biologically active because cAMP levels decreased in lung cancer cells after opioid and nicotine application. Nicotine at concentrations found in the blood of smokers had no effect on in vitro lung cancer cell growth, whereas {mu}, {delta}, and {kappa} opioid agonists at low concentrations inhibited lung cancer growth in vitro. They also found that lung cancer cells expressed various combinations of immunoreactive opioid peptides ({beta}-endorphin, enkephalin, or dynorphin), suggesting the participation of opioids in a negative autocrine loop or tumor-suppressing system. Due to the almost universal exposure of patients with lung cancer to nicotine, they tested whether nicotine affected the response of lung cancer cell growth to opioids and found that nicotine at concentrations of 100-200 nM partially or totally reversed opioid-induced growth inhibition in 9/14 lung cancer cell lines. These in vitro results for lung cancer cells suggest that opioids could function as part of a tumor suppressor system and that nicotine can function to circumvent this system in the pathogenesis of lung cancer.

  16. Genetic Evidence for XPC-KRAS Interactions During Lung Cancer Development

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoli; He, Nonggao; Gu, Dongsheng; Wickliffe, Jeff; Salazar, James; Boldogh, Istavan; Xie, Jingwu

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer causes more deaths than breast, colorectal and prostate cancers combined. Despite major advances in targeted therapy in a subset of lung adenocarcinomas, the overall 5-year survival rate for lung cancer worldwide has not significantly changed for the last few decades. DNA repair deficiency is known to contribute to lung cancer development. In fact, human polymorphisms in DNA repair genes such as xeroderma pigmentosum group C (XPC) are highly associated with lung cancer incidence. However, the direct genetic evidence for the role of XPC for lung cancer development is still lacking. Mutations of the Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (Kras) or its downstream effector genes occur in almost all lung cancer cells, and there are a number of mouse models for lung cancer using these mutations. Using activated Kras, KrasLA1, as a driver for lung cancer development in mice, we showed for the first time that mice with KrasLA1 and Xpc knockout had worst outcomes in lung cancer development, and this phenotype was associated with accumulated DNA damage. Using cultured cells, we demonstrated that induced expression of oncogenic KRASG12V led to increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as well as DNA damage, and both can be suppressed by anti-oxidants. Thus, it appears that XPC may help repair DNA damage caused by KRAS-mediated production of ROS. PMID:26554912

  17. The early diagnosis of lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Deeley, T. J.

    1972-01-01

    Earlier diagnosis of malignant disease in the lung may bring about improvements in the treatment. This article discusses the effects of early diagnosis on the prognosis. Cancer of the lung may be associated with other lung pathology, thus increasing the problems of diagnosis. Diagnosis depends on radiological examination, cytology of the sputum, radio-isotope lung scanning and mediastinoscopy: an account is given of how these may be used to diagnose the condition whilst it is still at an early stage and suitable for radical treatment. PMID:4552427

  18. Mineral particles, mineral fibers, and lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Churg, A.; Wiggs, B.

    1985-08-01

    The total fibrous and nonfibrous mineral content of the lung has been analyzed in a series of 14 men with lung cancer but no history of occupational dust exposure, and in a series of 14 control men matched for age, smoking history, and general occupational class. The lung cancer patients had an average of 525 +/- 369 X 10(6) exogenous mineral particles and 17.4 +/- 19.6 X 10(6) exogenous mineral fibers/g dry lung, while the controls had averages of 261 +/- 175 mineral particles and 4.7 +/- 3.2 X 10(6) mineral fibers/g dry lung. These differences are statistically significant for both particles and fibers. Kaolinite, talc, mica, feldspars, and crystalline silica comprised the majority of particles of both groups. Approximately 90% of the particles were smaller than 2 micron in diameter and approximately 60% smaller than 1 micron. In both groups, patients who had smoked more than 35 pack years had greater numbers of particles than patients who had smoked less than 35 pack years. It is concluded that, in this study, lungs from patients with lung cancer had statistically greater numbers of mineral particles and fibers than lungs from controls, and that smoking influences total long-term retention of particles from all sources.

  19. MicroRNA-429 induces tumorigenesis of human non-small cell lung cancer cells and targets multiple tumor suppressor genes

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, Yaoguo; Xu, Shidong; Ma, Jianqun; Wu, Jun; Jin, Shi; Cao, Shoubo; Yu, Yan

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • MiR-429 expression is upregulated in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). • MiR-429 inhibits PTEN, RASSF8 and TIMP2 expression. • MiR-429 promotes metastasis and proliferation. • We report important regulatory mechanisms involved in NSCLC progression. • MiR-429 is a potential therapeutic target and diagnostic marker. - Abstract: Lung cancer is the major cause of cancer death globally. MicroRNAs are evolutionally conserved small noncoding RNAs that are critical for the regulation of gene expression. Aberrant expression of microRNA (miRNA) has been implicated in cancer initiation and progression. In this study, we demonstrated that the expression of miR-429 are often upregulated in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) compared with normal lung tissues, and its expression level is also increased in NSCLC cell lines compared with normal lung cells. Overexpression of miR-429 in A549 NSCLC cells significantly promoted cell proliferation, migration and invasion, whereas inhibition of miR-429 inhibits these effects. Furthermore, we demonstrated that miR-429 down-regulates PTEN, RASSF8 and TIMP2 expression by directly targeting the 3′-untranslated region of these target genes. Taken together, our results suggest that miR-429 plays an important role in promoting the proliferation and metastasis of NSCLC cells and is a potential target for NSCLC therapy.

  20. [The new TNM classification in lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Wrona, Anna; Jassem, Jacek

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the new TNM classification in lung cancer and its history. Seventh edition of tumor, node, metastasis (TNM) classification in lung cancer has been published by the International Union Against Cancer (UICC) and the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) at the beginning of 2009. The changes were based upon the results of the international project of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC). The database included 81.495 patients from the entire world (68.463 with non-small cell lung cancer and 13.032 with small cell lung cancer) treated with various modalities between 1990 and 2000. The collected data were validated internally and externally. The tumor size was considered of prognostic relevance: T1 tumors were subdivided into T1a (≤ 2 cm) and T1b (〉 2 cm - ≤ 3 cm), T2 tumors into T2a (〉 3 cm - ≤ 5 cm) and T2b (〉 5 cm - ≤ 7 cm), and T2 tumors 〉 7 cm were reclassified as T3. Tumors with the additional nodules in the same lobe as the primary tumor were classified as T3, those with additional nodules in another ipsilateral lobe - as T4. There were no changes in N category. In the M category, M1 was subclassified into M1a (contralateral lung nodules and pleural dissemination) and M1b (distant metastasis). Large T2 tumors (T2bN0M0) were upstaged from IB to IIA, small T2 tumors (T2aN1M0) were downstaged from the IIB to IIA and T4N0-N1M0 - from IIIB to IIIA. The TNM classification was also recommended for small cell lung cancer instead of previously used categories of limited and extensive disease.

  1. ∆Np73beta induces caveolin-1 in human non-small cell lung cancer cell line H1299.

    PubMed

    Caiola, Elisa; Marrazzo, Eleonora; Alesci, Simona; Broggini, Massimo; Marabese, Mirko

    2016-02-01

    Caveolins have recently attracted attention for their possible involvement in signal transduction. Their role in cancer is debated, being reported both a suppressive and oncogenic role in different experimental conditions. Caveolin-1 is regulated by the tumor suppressor p53 which is able to bind its promoter and activate transcription. We had previous evidences indicating that a specific p73 isoform, namely ∆Np73β, when overexpressed in NCI-H1299 induced growth arrest and cell death. By gene expression analysis in cell transiently overexpressed with ∆Np73β, a strong induction of caveolin-1 was found. Caveolin was induced both at mRNA and protein level, and we characterised the promoter sequence of the gene encoding for caveolin-1 and found that the promoter region containing the putative p53 (and hence p73) binding sequence was responsive to ∆Np73β, but not to ∆Np73α and ∆Np73γ which do not induce growth arrest as ∆Np73β does. A reduction in cell adhesion was observed in ∆Np73β overexpressing cells, again supporting a possible role of caveolins in determining these effects. By using specific siRNA directed against human caveolin-1, we could not however antagonize the effects induced by ∆Np73β. Although caveolin-1 represents one of the genes whose expression is strongly activated by ∆Np73β, we could not define a role of caveolin-1 as a mediator of ∆Np73β associated growth arrest. It could well be that the expression of caveolin-1 is able to mediate other activities of ∆Np73β, and studies are in progress to determine whether its expression is mainly associated to metastatic spread.

  2. Tumor necrosis factor alpha induces spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase through nuclear factor kappaB in non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Babbar, Naveen; Hacker, Amy; Huang, Yi; Casero, Robert A

    2006-08-25

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) is a potent pleiotropic cytokine produced by many cells in response to inflammatory stress. The molecular mechanisms responsible for the multiple biological activities of TNFalpha are due to its ability to activate multiple signal transduction pathways, including nuclear factor kappaB (NFkappaB), which plays critical roles in cell proliferation and survival. TNFalpha displays both apoptotic and antiapoptotic properties, depending on the nature of the stimulus and the activation status of certain signaling pathways. Here we show that TNFalpha can lead to the induction of NFkappaB signaling with a concomitant increase in spermidine/spermine N(1)-acetyltransferase (SSAT) expression in A549 and H157 non-small cell lung cancer cells. Induction of SSAT, a stress-inducible gene that encodes a rate-limiting polyamine catabolic enzyme, leads to lower intracellular polyamine contents and has been associated with decreased cell growth and increased apoptosis. Stable overexpression of a mutant, dominant negative IkappaBalpha protein led to the suppression of SSAT induction by TNFalpha in these cells, thereby substantiating a role of NFkappaB in the induction of SSAT by TNFalpha. SSAT promoter deletion constructs led to the identification of three potential NFkappaB response elements in the SSAT gene. Electromobility shift assays, chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments and mutational studies confirmed that two of the three NFkappaB response elements play an important role in the regulation of SSAT in response to TNFalpha. The results of these studies indicate that a common mediator of inflammation can lead to the induction of SSAT expression by activating the NFkappaB signaling pathway in non-small cell lung cancer cells.

  3. Depression induces poor prognosis associates with the down-regulation brain derived neurotrophic factor of serum in advanced small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yufeng; Si, Ruirui; Yang, Sen; Xia, Suhua; He, Zelai; Wang, Lili; He, Zhen; Wang, Qiming; Tang, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Patients with lung cancer often experience a state of depression, and these conditions may severely affect their quality of life (QoL) and prescription compliance. The current study was conducted to delineate the complex links between depression and the prognosis of patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and the underlying mechanism was also explored. 186 patients who received platinum-based chemotherapy for newly diagnosed stage III or stage IV SCLC were enrolled. The Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS) questionnaire was completed the day before the start of chemotherapy to assess the depression status of the patients. Patients with stage IV SCLC or lower BMI have higher depression scores. In terms of the adverse effects of chemotherapy, depression severely decreases patient tolerance to chemotherapy and their QoL score (R2 = 0.2385) and is also associated with severe vomiting (P < 0.001), leukopenia (R2 = 0.2332), and prolonged hospital stay (R2 = 0.1961). More importantly, severe depression reduces the PFS (R2 = 0.1943) and OS (P < 0.01) of the patients. We found that patients with severe depression displayed a downregulated level of serum BDNF and that the level of serum BDNF was highly correlated with the OS of the patients (R2 = 0.2292). Using the MTT cell viability assay in vitro, we observed that cotreatment with BDNF clearly enhanced the chemosensitivity of NCI-H69 tumor cells to Cisplatin and induced the downregulation of ABCG2. Based on this evidence, it appears that a relationship does exist between depression and prognosis in SCLC and that the mechanism by which depression affects prognosis is achieved via the downregulation of BDNF expression. PMID:27852063

  4. Racial and Ethnic Differences in the Epidemiology of Lung Cancer and the Lung Cancer Genome

    PubMed Central

    Schabath, Matthew B.; Cress, W. Douglas; Muñoz-Antonia, Teresita

    2017-01-01

    Background Globally and in the United States, lung cancer has been the most common cancer for the past several decades. In addition to the well-established geographical- and sex-specific differences in lung cancer incidence, mortality and survival, there is also growing evidence for racial and ethnic differences. Methods Based on available published data, we present a summary of the current knowledge and substantive findings related to racial and ethnic differences in lung cancer. Results Although this report is not a systematic review, we summarized the current knowledge and substantive findings related to racial and ethnic differences in lung cancer with a particular focus on lung cancer statistics(incidence, mortality, and survival), cigarette smoking, prevention and early detection, and the lung cancer genome. Finally, we summarize some the systems-level and provider-related issues that likely contribute to racial and ethnic-specific health disparities and provide some suggestions for future strategies that may reduce the disproportionate burden of lung cancer. Conclusions Although lung carcinogenesis is a multifactorial process driven by exogenous exposures (e.g., cigarette smoking), inherited genetic variations, and an accumulation of somatic genetic events, this multifactorial process appears to have racial and ethnic differences which in turn impacts the observed epidemiologic differences in incidence, mortality, and survival. PMID:27842323

  5. The Hedgehog Signaling Networks in Lung Cancer: The Mechanisms and Roles in Tumor Progression and Implications for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer-related death worldwide and is classified into small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Several gene mutations that contribute to aberrant cell proliferation have been identified in lung adenocarcinoma, a part of NSCLC. Various anticancer drugs that target these mutated molecules have been developed for NSCLC treatment. However, although molecularly targeted drugs are initially effective for patients, the 5-year survival rate remains low because of tumor relapse. Therefore, more effective drugs for lung cancer treatment should be developed. The hedgehog (HH) signaling pathway contributes to organ development and stem cell maintenance, and aberrant activation of this signaling pathway is observed in various cancers including lung cancer. In lung cancer, HH signaling pathway upregulates cancer cell proliferation and maintains cancer stem cells as well as cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs). Furthermore, physical contact between CAFs and NSCLC cells induces HH signaling pathway activation in NSCLC cells to enhance their metastatic potential. Therefore, HH signaling pathway inhibitors could be a useful option for lung cancer therapy. PMID:28105432

  6. Hedgehog Pathway Inhibition Radiosensitizes Non-Small Cell Lung Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Jing; Aziz, Khaled; Chettiar, Sivarajan T.; Aftab, Blake T.; Armour, Michael; Gajula, Rajendra; Gandhi, Nishant; Salih, Tarek; Herman, Joseph M.; Wong, John; Rudin, Charles M.; Tran, Phuoc T.; Hales, Russell K.

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: Despite improvements in chemoradiation, local control remains a major clinical problem in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. The Hedgehog pathway has been implicated in tumor recurrence by promoting survival of tumorigenic precursors and through effects on tumor-associated stroma. Whether Hedgehog inhibition can affect radiation efficacy in vivo has not been reported. Methods and Materials: We evaluated the effects of a targeted Hedgehog inhibitor (HhAntag) and radiation on clonogenic survival of human non-small cell lung cancer lines in vitro. Using an A549 cell line xenograft model, we examined tumor growth, proliferation, apoptosis, and gene expression changes after concomitant HhAntag and radiation. In a transgenic mouse model of Kras{sup G12D}-induced and Twist1-induced lung adenocarcinoma, we assessed tumor response to radiation and HhAntag by serial micro-computed tomography (CT) scanning. Results: In 4 human lung cancer lines in vitro, HhAntag showed little or no effect on radiosensitivity. By contrast, in both the human tumor xenograft and murine inducible transgenic models, HhAntag enhanced radiation efficacy and delayed tumor growth. By use of the human xenograft model to differentiate tumor and stromal effects, mouse stromal cells, but not human tumor cells, showed significant and consistent downregulation of Hedgehog pathway gene expression. This was associated with increased tumor cell apoptosis. Conclusions: Targeted Hedgehog pathway inhibition can increase in vivo radiation efficacy in lung cancer preclinical models. This effect is associated with pathway suppression in tumor-associated stroma. These data support clinical testing of Hedgehog inhibitors as a component of multimodality therapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

  7. Decitabine reverses TGF-β1-induced epithelial–mesenchymal transition in non-small-cell lung cancer by regulating miR-200/ZEB axis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Nan; Liu, Yanyang; Wang, Yuyi; Zhao, Maoyuan; Tu, Li; Luo, Feng

    2017-01-01

    Objective Epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a crucial driver of tumor progression. Tumor growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1) is an important factor in EMT induction in tumorigenesis. The targeting of EMT may, therefore, represent a promising approach in anticancer treatment. Methods In this study, we determined the effect of decitabine, a DNA methyltransferase inhibitor, on TGF-β1-induced EMT in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) PC9 and A549 cells. We also assessed the involvement of the miR-200/ZEB axis. Results Decitabine reversed TGF-β1-induced EMT in PC9 cells, but not in A549 cells. This phenomenon was associated with epigenetic changes in the miR-200 family, which regulated EMT by altering the expression of ZEB1 and ZEB2. TGF-β1 induced aberrant methylation in miR-200 promoters, leading to EMT in PC9 cells. Decitabine attenuated this effect and inhibited tumor cell migration in vitro and in vivo. In A549 cells, however, neither TGF-β1 nor decitabine exhibited an effect on miR-200 promoter methylation. Conclusion Our findings suggest that epigenetic regulation of the miR-200/ZEB axis is responsible for EMT induction by TGF-β1 in PC9 cells. Decitabine inhibits EMT in NSCLC cell PC9 through its epigenetic-based therapeutic activity.

  8. Inhibition of autophagy potentiates pemetrexed and simvastatin-induced apoptotic cell death in malignant mesothelioma and non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Ki-Eun; Kim, Young-Suk; Jung, Jae-Wan; Kwon, Su-Jin; Park, Do-Sim; Cha, Byong-Ki; Oh, Seon-Hee; Yoon, Kwon-Ha; Jeong, Eun-Taik; Kim, Hak-Ryul

    2015-10-06

    Pemetrexed, a multitarget antifolate used to treat malignant mesothelioma and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), has been shown to stimulate autophagy. In this study, we determined whether autophagy could be induced by pemetrexed and simvastatin cotreatment in malignant mesothelioma and NSCLC cells. Furthermore, we determined whether inhibition of autophagy drives apoptosis in malignant mesothelioma and NSCLC cells. Malignant mesothelioma MSTO-211H and A549 NSCLC cells were treated with pemetrexed and simvastatin alone and in combination to evaluate their effect on autophagy and apoptosis. Cotreatment with pemetrexed and simvastatin induced greater caspase-dependent apoptosis and autophagy than either drug alone in malignant mesothelioma and NSCLC cells. 3-Methyladenine (3-MA), ATG5 siRNA, bafilomycin A, and E64D/pepstatin A enhanced the apoptotic potential of pemetrexed and simvastatin, whereas rapamycin and LY294002 attenuated their induction of caspase-dependent apoptosis. Our data indicate that pemetrexed and simvastatin cotreatment augmented apoptosis and autophagy in malignant mesothelioma and NSCLC cells. Inhibition of pemetrexed and simvastatin-induced autophagy was shown to enhance apoptosis, suggesting that this could be a novel therapeutic strategy against malignant mesothelioma and NSCLC.

  9. Controversies in asbestos-related lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, M.R.

    1987-04-01

    Despite clear agreement that asbestos exposure causes lung cancer and despite prodigious research efforts in clinical, epidemiologic, toxicologic and mineralogic aspects of the problem, wide disagreement exists in the scientific community on many crucial points. Put in the simplest way neither the biologically relevant measure of dose nor the full shape of the dose-response curve at either the high or (especially) low end is understood. Nor is the relationship between the carcinogenic potential of the fibers and their fibrogenic properties. In the long run, full resolution of these issues will probably require the unravelling of the basic mechanisms by which the fibers induce cancer; unfortunately, despite recent progress, this understanding is probably too far off to be of use in the solution to the very real, omnipresent clinical and public health cancer-control problems. Decisions will have to be made using data sets far less satisfactory. Hopefully, by pursuing some of the avenues suggested in the sections above, enough can be learned to facilitate more rational approaches to the problems at hand.

  10. Mortality due to lung cancer in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Ruíz-Godoy, L; Rizo Rios, P; Sánchez Cervantes, F; Osornio-Vargas, A; García-Cuellar, C; Meneses García, A

    2007-11-01

    The highest mortality due to cancer worldwide for both genders corresponds to lung cancer (1,179,000 deaths). In Mexico, the crude mortality rate due to lung cancer was of 5.01 per 10(5) inhabitants in 1979. The most important risk factor is smoking. The present study was aimed at analyzing the mortality due to lung cancer in Mexico, assessing data from each of the states constituting the Mexican Republic during the 1998-2004 period. Data were obtained from the National Institute of Statistics, Geography and Informatics (INEGI, for its initials in Spanish) corresponding to deaths due to lung cancer (1998-2004). We estimated the mean annual mortality rate (MAMR) for each of the 32 states of Mexico. We used the "World Population Standard". The MAMR was standardized according to age (ARS) direct method, and the standard error was determined by Poisson's approximation at a 95% confidence interval. To know the excess risk due to mortality, we calculated the standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) of ARS for each federal state, using the national rate as reference. In this period, 397,400 deaths due to malignant neoplasms were recorded, corresponding 45,578 (11.5%) to lung cancer; for men, 31,025 (68.1%) with MAMR of 8.9 and the respective ARS of 13.2 both x10(5) inhabitants. For women, results were 4553 (31.9%) deaths with MAMR of 4.1 and ARS of 5.4 both x10(5) inhabitants. The highest mortality rates due to lung cancer in both genders were observed in the north of Mexico, whereas for women this was observed in the central states. Although smoking is the main risk for lung cancer, there are other factors such as environmental pollution or exposure to toxicants that could be associated to this cancer. The years potentially lost due to lung cancer were 258,550 for men and 133,315 for women, with a total of 391,865 according to histopathology registry neoplasm malignant RHNM (1985-1995). Studies focused on the characteriz