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Sample records for induced spinal cord

  1. Early radiation-induced endothelial cell loss and blood-spinal cord barrier breakdown in the rat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu-Qing; Chen, Paul; Jain, Vipan; Reilly, Raymond M; Wong, C Shun

    2004-02-01

    Using a rat spinal cord model, this study was designed to characterize radiation-induced vascular endothelial cell loss and its relationship to early blood-brain barrier disruption in the central nervous system. Adult rats were given a single dose of 0, 2, 8, 19.5, 22, 30 or 50 Gy to the cervical spinal cord. At various times up to 2 weeks after irradiation, the spinal cord was processed for histological and immunohistochemical analysis. Radiation-induced apoptosis was assessed by morphology and TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labeling combined with immunohistochemical markers for endothelial and glial cells. Image analysis was performed to determine endothelial cell and microvessel density using immunohistochemistry with endothelial markers, namely endothelial barrier antigen, glucose transporter isoform 1, laminin and zonula occludens 1. Blood-spinal cord barrier permeability was assessed using immunohistochemistry for albumin and (99m)Tc-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid as a vascular tracer. Endothelial cell proliferation was assessed using in vivo BrdU labeling. During the first 24 h after irradiation, apoptotic endothelial cells were observed in the rat spinal cord. The decrease in endothelial cell density at 24 h after irradiation was associated with an increase in albumin immunostaining around microvessels. The decrease in the number of endothelial cells persisted for 7 days and recovery of endothelial density was apparent by day 14. A similar pattern of blood-spinal cord barrier disruption and recovery of permeability was observed over the 2 weeks, and an increase in BrdU-labeled endothelial cells was seen at day 3. These results are consistent with an association between endothelial cell death and acute blood-spinal cord barrier disruption in the rat spinal cord after irradiation.

  2. Spinal Cord Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    Spinal cord tumor Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff A spinal tumor is a growth that develops within your ... as vertebral tumors. Tumors that begin within the spinal cord itself are called spinal cord tumors. There are ...

  3. Spinal Cord Injury Map

    MedlinePlus

    ... Counseling About Blog Facing Disability Jeff Shannon Donate Spinal Cord Injury Map Loss of function depends on what ... control. Learn more about spinal cord injuries. A spinal cord injury affects the entire family FacingDisability is designed ...

  4. Spinal Cord Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... Types of illnesses and disabilities Spinal cord injury Spinal cord injury Read advice from Dr. Jeffrey Rabin , a ... your health on a daily basis. Living with spinal cord injury — your questions answered top What are pediatric ...

  5. Recovery of spinal cord function induced by direct current stimulation of the injured rat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Wallace, M C; Tator, C H; Piper, I

    1987-06-01

    Direct current stimulation has been shown by others to enhance the regeneration of several types of tissues, including nervous tissue in some species. The purpose of the present experiment was to assess the value of direct current stimulation for enhancing the recovery of spinal cord function after clip compression injury of the rat spinal cord. Twenty Wistar rats underwent a 1-minute, 50-g clip compression injury at T-1, after which electrodes were placed epidurally with the anode proximal and the cathode distal to the injury site. These electrodes were attached to a stimulator implanted subcutaneously. Ten animals received stimulators that produced a constant current of 14 microA, and the remainder received stimulators with no electrical output and served as controls. Assignment of stimulators was random, and the treatment group was not identified until sacrifice. Neurological function was tested weekly for 15 weeks by the inclined plane technique, after which the animals were killed and the injured cords were examined for histological evidence of regeneration. The mean inclined plane result for the treatment group (39 +/- 5 degrees) was significantly better than that for the control group (31 +/- 6 degrees) (P less than 0.02), although there was no significant difference in histological findings between the two groups. Thus, direct current stimulation of the injured mammalian spinal cord produced improvement in neurological function and warrants further investigation.

  6. Experimental autoimmune prostatitis induces microglial activation in the spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Larry; Done, Joseph D.; Schaeffer, Anthony J.; Thumbikat, Praveen

    2014-01-01

    Background The pathogenesis of chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome is unknown and factors including the host’s immune response and the nervous system have been attributed to the development of CP/CPPS. We previously demonstrated that mast cells and chemokines such as CCL2 and CCL3 play an important role in mediating prostatitis. Here, we examined the role of neuroinflammation and microglia in the CNS in the development of chronic pelvic pain. Methods Experimental autoimmune prostatitis (EAP) was induced using a subcutaneous injection of rat prostate antigen. Sacral spinal cord tissue (segments S4–S5) was isolated and utilized for immunofluorescence or QRT-PCR analysis. Tactile allodynia was measured at baseline and at various points during EAP using Von Frey fibers as a function for pelvic pain. EAP mice were treated with minocycline after 30 days of prostatitis to test the efficacy of microglial inhibition on pelvic pain. Results Prostatitis induced the expansion and activation of microglia and the development of inflammation in the spinal cord as determined by increased expression levels of CCL3, IL-1β, Iba1, and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Microglial activation in mice with prostatitis resulted in increased expression of P2X4R and elevated levels of BDNF, two molecular markers associated with chronic pain. Pharmacological inhibition of microglia alleviated pain in mice with prostatitis and resulted in decreased expression of IL-1β, P2X4R, and BDNF. Conclusion Our data shows that prostatitis leads to inflammation in the spinal cord and the activation and expansion of microglia, mechanisms that may contribute to the development and maintenance of chronic pelvic pain. PMID:25263093

  7. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Therapies for Cervical Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Doulames, Vanessa M; Plant, Giles W

    2016-04-09

    Cervical-level injuries account for the majority of presented spinal cord injuries (SCIs) to date. Despite the increase in survival rates due to emergency medicine improvements, overall quality of life remains poor, with patients facing variable deficits in respiratory and motor function. Therapies aiming to ameliorate symptoms and restore function, even partially, are urgently needed. Current therapeutic avenues in SCI seek to increase regenerative capacities through trophic and immunomodulatory factors, provide scaffolding to bridge the lesion site and promote regeneration of native axons, and to replace SCI-lost neurons and glia via intraspinal transplantation. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are a clinically viable means to accomplish this; they have no major ethical barriers, sources can be patient-matched and collected using non-invasive methods. In addition, the patient's own cells can be used to establish a starter population capable of producing multiple cell types. To date, there is only a limited pool of research examining iPSC-derived transplants in SCI-even less research that is specific to cervical injury. The purpose of the review herein is to explore both preclinical and clinical recent advances in iPSC therapies with a detailed focus on cervical spinal cord injury.

  8. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Therapies for Cervical Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Doulames, Vanessa M.; Plant, Giles W.

    2016-01-01

    Cervical-level injuries account for the majority of presented spinal cord injuries (SCIs) to date. Despite the increase in survival rates due to emergency medicine improvements, overall quality of life remains poor, with patients facing variable deficits in respiratory and motor function. Therapies aiming to ameliorate symptoms and restore function, even partially, are urgently needed. Current therapeutic avenues in SCI seek to increase regenerative capacities through trophic and immunomodulatory factors, provide scaffolding to bridge the lesion site and promote regeneration of native axons, and to replace SCI-lost neurons and glia via intraspinal transplantation. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are a clinically viable means to accomplish this; they have no major ethical barriers, sources can be patient-matched and collected using non-invasive methods. In addition, the patient’s own cells can be used to establish a starter population capable of producing multiple cell types. To date, there is only a limited pool of research examining iPSC-derived transplants in SCI—even less research that is specific to cervical injury. The purpose of the review herein is to explore both preclinical and clinical recent advances in iPSC therapies with a detailed focus on cervical spinal cord injury. PMID:27070598

  9. Military gunshot wound-induced spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed

    Alaca, Ridvan; Yilmaz, Bilge; Goktepe, Ahmet Salim; Yazicioglu, Kamil; Gunduz, Sukru

    2002-11-01

    Gunshot wounds are the second leading cause of spinal cord injuries in developed countries, whereas in undeveloped and developing countries, this likelihood is much more. However, the weapon and injury characteristics are very different between those two groups of countries. The aim of this study was to review our experience with gunshot wound-caused spinal cord injury during our struggle with terrorism, to examine surgical and medical complications, and to determine the difference between civilian and military gunshot wounds. One hundred five male patients (mean, 25 years of age) were examined according to completeness, spinal and nonspinal injuries, American Spinal Injury Association classification, motor and pinprick scores, surgical and nonsurgical interventions, surgical complications, and spinal cord injury-related medical complications. This study has shown that the likelihood of completeness was higher in gunshot wounds with high velocity weapons. Because of their higher wounding capacity, the difference between vertebral and neurological levels was not very different as it was on the other etiologies. Fortunately, spinal cord injury-related medical complications were less than expected.

  10. Photochemically induced spinal ischaemia: a model of spinal cord trauma in the rat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olby, Natasha J.; Blakemore, W. F.

    1995-05-01

    Focal thrombosis was induced in the dorsal funiculus of the rat spinal cord by exposing the cord to light following intravenous injection of the photoactive dye, rose bengal. The light source was a 599 standing wave dye laser, pumped by an Innova 70 - 4 argon ion laser (Coherent Ltd, Cambridge, UK) and the light was delivered to the operative site via an optical fiber. The histological characteristics of the development and resolution of the lesion have been studied. Forty rats were examined with light and electron microscopy at various time points between 30 minutes and one month after irradiation and the lesion length was measured. Platelet aggregation, increased extracellular space in the white matter and vacuolation of the neurones and glia of the grey matter were present 30 minutes after injury. Progressive necrosis of the white and grey matter developed over the subsequent 24 hours to produce a fusiform lesion that occupied the dorsal funiculus and dorsal horns of the spinal cord at its center and tapered cranially and caudally along the dorsal columns for a total distance of seven millimeters. By one month after injury the area of necrosis had become a cyst lined by astrocytes ventrolaterally and meningeal cells dorsally. Measurements of lesion length showed a variability of 26%. This model of spinal cord trauma produces a lesion that is sufficiently reproducible to be suitable for performing studies aimed at tissue preservation and repair.

  11. Spinal Plasticity and Behavior: BDNF-Induced Neuromodulation in Uninjured and Injured Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Huie, J. Russell

    2016-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a member of the neurotrophic factor family of signaling molecules. Since its discovery over three decades ago, BDNF has been identified as an important regulator of neuronal development, synaptic transmission, and cellular and synaptic plasticity and has been shown to function in the formation and maintenance of certain forms of memory. Neural plasticity that underlies learning and memory in the hippocampus shares distinct characteristics with spinal cord nociceptive plasticity. Research examining the role BDNF plays in spinal nociception and pain overwhelmingly suggests that BDNF promotes pronociceptive effects. BDNF induces synaptic facilitation and engages central sensitization-like mechanisms. Also, peripheral injury-induced neuropathic pain is often accompanied with increased spinal expression of BDNF. Research has extended to examine how spinal cord injury (SCI) influences BDNF plasticity and the effects BDNF has on sensory and motor functions after SCI. Functional recovery and adaptive plasticity after SCI are typically associated with upregulation of BDNF. Although neuropathic pain is a common consequence of SCI, the relation between BDNF and pain after SCI remains elusive. This article reviews recent literature and discusses the diverse actions of BDNF. We also highlight similarities and differences in BDNF-induced nociceptive plasticity in naïve and SCI conditions. PMID:27721996

  12. Survey of spinal cord injury-induced neurogenic bladder studies using the Web of Science.

    PubMed

    Zou, Benjing; Zhang, Yongli; Li, Yucheng; Wang, Zantao; Zhang, Ping; Zhang, Xiyin; Wang, Bingdong; Long, Zhixin; Wang, Feng; Song, Guo; Wang, Yan

    2012-08-15

    To identify global trends in research on spinal cord injury-induced neurogenic bladder, through a bibliometric analysis using the Web of Science. We performed a bibliometric analysis of studies on spinal cord injury-induced neurogenic bladder using the Web of Science. Data retrieval was performed using key words "spinal cord injury", "spinal injury", "neurogenic bladder", "neuropathic bladder", "neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction", "neurogenic voiding dysfunction", "neurogenic urination disorder" and "neurogenic vesicourethral dysfunction". (a) published peer-reviewed articles on spinal cord injury-induced neurogenic bladder indexed in the Web of Science; (b) type of articles: original research articles and reviews; (c) year of publication: no limitation. (a) articles that required manual searching or telephone access; (b) Corrected papers and book chapters. (1) Annual publication output; (2) distribution according to journals; (3) distribution according to subject areas; (4) distribution according to country; (5) distribution according to institution; and (6) top cited publications. There were 646 research articles addressing spinal cord injury-induced neurogenic bladder in the Web of Science. Research on spinal cord injury-induced neurogenic bladder was found in the Science Citation Index-Expanded as of 1946. The United States, Ireland and Switzerland were the three major countries contributing to studies in spinal cord injury-induced neurogenic bladder in the 1970s. However, in the 1990s, the United States, the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, Germany and Japan published more papers on spinal cord injury-induced neurogenic bladder than Switzerland, and Ireland fell off the top ten countries list. In this century, the United States ranks first in spinal cord injury-induced neurogenic bladder studies, followed by France, the United Kingdom, Germany, Switzerland and Japan. Subject categories including urology, nephrology and clinical neurology, as well as

  13. Tethered Spinal Cord Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disparities Neural Interfaces Parkinson's Disease Spinal Cord Injury Stem Cells Traumatic Brain Injury Trans-Agency Activities Interagency Research ... Disparities Neural Interfaces Parkinson's Disease Spinal Cord Injury Stem Cells Traumatic Brain Injury Trans-Agency Activities Interagency Research ...

  14. Spinal Cord Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... your body and your brain. A spinal cord injury disrupts the signals. Spinal cord injuries usually begin with a blow that fractures or ... bone disks that make up your spine. Most injuries don't cut through your spinal cord. Instead, ...

  15. Treatment of refractory ischemic pain from chemotherapy-induced Raynaud's syndrome with spinal cord stimulation.

    PubMed

    Ting, Joseph C; Fukshansky, Mikhail; Burton, Allen W

    2007-06-01

    We report the successful treatment of refractory ischemic pain from cisplatin-induced Raynaud's syndrome with spinal cord stimulation after failed pharmacologic management and surgical sympathectomy. A 48-year-old man developed ischemic pain of the hands while undergoing cisplatin and gemcitabine chemotherapy for metastatic pancreatic carcinoma. After extensive pharmacologic management and surgical sympathectomy failed to provide adequate analgesia, the patient underwent a percutaneous spinal cord stimulation trial followed by permanent implantation and received significant pain relief prior to succumbing to his illness. Spinal cord stimulation provided effective therapy for refractory ischemic pain, even after failed sympathectomy.

  16. Spinal cord injury-induced immune deficiency syndrome enhances infection susceptibility dependent on lesion level.

    PubMed

    Brommer, Benedikt; Engel, Odilo; Kopp, Marcel A; Watzlawick, Ralf; Müller, Susanne; Prüss, Harald; Chen, Yuying; DeVivo, Michael J; Finkenstaedt, Felix W; Dirnagl, Ulrich; Liebscher, Thomas; Meisel, Andreas; Schwab, Jan M

    2016-03-01

    Pneumonia is the leading cause of death after acute spinal cord injury and is associated with poor neurological outcome. In contrast to the current understanding, attributing enhanced infection susceptibility solely to the patient's environment and motor dysfunction, we investigate whether a secondary functional neurogenic immune deficiency (spinal cord injury-induced immune deficiency syndrome, SCI-IDS) may account for the enhanced infection susceptibility. We applied a clinically relevant model of experimental induced pneumonia to investigate whether the systemic SCI-IDS is functional sufficient to cause pneumonia dependent on spinal cord injury lesion level and investigated whether findings are mirrored in a large prospective cohort study after human spinal cord injury. In a mouse model of inducible pneumonia, high thoracic lesions that interrupt sympathetic innervation to major immune organs, but not low thoracic lesions, significantly increased bacterial load in lungs. The ability to clear the bacterial load from the lung remained preserved in sham animals. Propagated immune susceptibility depended on injury of central pre-ganglionic but not peripheral postganglionic sympathetic innervation to the spleen. Thoracic spinal cord injury level was confirmed as an independent increased risk factor of pneumonia in patients after motor complete spinal cord injury (odds ratio = 1.35, P < 0.001) independently from mechanical ventilation and preserved sensory function by multiple regression analysis. We present evidence that spinal cord injury directly causes increased risk for bacterial infection in mice as well as in patients. Besides obvious motor and sensory paralysis, spinal cord injury also induces a functional SCI-IDS ('immune paralysis'), sufficient to propagate clinically relevant infection in an injury level dependent manner.

  17. Spinal cord injury-induced immune deficiency syndrome enhances infection susceptibility dependent on lesion level

    PubMed Central

    Brommer, Benedikt; Engel, Odilo; Kopp, Marcel A.; Watzlawick, Ralf; Müller, Susanne; Prüss, Harald; Chen, Yuying; DeVivo, Michael J.; Finkenstaedt, Felix W.; Dirnagl, Ulrich; Liebscher, Thomas; Meisel, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Pneumonia is the leading cause of death after acute spinal cord injury and is associated with poor neurological outcome. In contrast to the current understanding, attributing enhanced infection susceptibility solely to the patient’s environment and motor dysfunction, we investigate whether a secondary functional neurogenic immune deficiency (spinal cord injury-induced immune deficiency syndrome, SCI-IDS) may account for the enhanced infection susceptibility. We applied a clinically relevant model of experimental induced pneumonia to investigate whether the systemic SCI-IDS is functional sufficient to cause pneumonia dependent on spinal cord injury lesion level and investigated whether findings are mirrored in a large prospective cohort study after human spinal cord injury. In a mouse model of inducible pneumonia, high thoracic lesions that interrupt sympathetic innervation to major immune organs, but not low thoracic lesions, significantly increased bacterial load in lungs. The ability to clear the bacterial load from the lung remained preserved in sham animals. Propagated immune susceptibility depended on injury of central pre-ganglionic but not peripheral postganglionic sympathetic innervation to the spleen. Thoracic spinal cord injury level was confirmed as an independent increased risk factor of pneumonia in patients after motor complete spinal cord injury (odds ratio = 1.35, P < 0.001) independently from mechanical ventilation and preserved sensory function by multiple regression analysis. We present evidence that spinal cord injury directly causes increased risk for bacterial infection in mice as well as in patients. Besides obvious motor and sensory paralysis, spinal cord injury also induces a functional SCI-IDS (‘immune paralysis’), sufficient to propagate clinically relevant infection in an injury level dependent manner. PMID:26754788

  18. Prolotherapy-induced Cervical Spinal Cord Injury - A Case Report -.

    PubMed

    Yun, Hyun-Sik; Sun, Hyung-Seok; Seon, Hyo-Jeong; Han, Jae-Young; Choi, In-Sung; Lee, Sam-Gyu

    2011-08-01

    A 49-year-old man received prolotherapy in the upper cervical region at a local medical clinic. Immediately after the procedure, he felt a sensation resembling an electric shock in his right upper and lower extremities, and continuously complained of numbness and discomfort in the right hemibody. He visited our clinic a week later. Upon physical examination, there were no significant abnormal findings. The visual analog scale was 60 points. T2-weight magnetic resonance images of the cervical spine showed a 0.7 cm sized bright oval spot on the right side of the spinal cord at the level of C4-C5 disc, suggesting spinal cord injury. There were no definite electrodiagnostic abnormalities. Digital infrared thermal images showed moderately decreased surface temperature on lateral aspect of the right forearm and dorsum of the right hand compared with the other side. Considering that very rare complications like spinal cord injury may develop after prolotherapy, we suggest that special interventions such as prolotherapy be performed by professional experts.

  19. Prolotherapy-induced Cervical Spinal Cord Injury - A Case Report -

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Hyun-Sik; Sun, Hyung-Seok; Seon, Hyo-Jeong; Han, Jae-Young; Choi, In-Sung

    2011-01-01

    A 49-year-old man received prolotherapy in the upper cervical region at a local medical clinic. Immediately after the procedure, he felt a sensation resembling an electric shock in his right upper and lower extremities, and continuously complained of numbness and discomfort in the right hemibody. He visited our clinic a week later. Upon physical examination, there were no significant abnormal findings. The visual analog scale was 60 points. T2-weight magnetic resonance images of the cervical spine showed a 0.7 cm sized bright oval spot on the right side of the spinal cord at the level of C4-C5 disc, suggesting spinal cord injury. There were no definite electrodiagnostic abnormalities. Digital infrared thermal images showed moderately decreased surface temperature on lateral aspect of the right forearm and dorsum of the right hand compared with the other side. Considering that very rare complications like spinal cord injury may develop after prolotherapy, we suggest that special interventions such as prolotherapy be performed by professional experts. PMID:22506175

  20. Forebrain GABAergic neuron precursors integrate into adult spinal cord and reduce injury-induced neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Bráz, JM; Sharif-Naeini, R; Vogt, D; Kriegstein, A; Alvarez-Buylla, A; Rubenstein, JL; Basbaum, AI

    2012-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is a chronic debilitating disease characterized by mechanical allodynia and spontaneous pain. Because symptoms are often unresponsive to conventional methods of pain treatment, new therapeutic approaches are essential. Here, we describe a strategy that not only ameliorates symptoms of neuropathic pain, but is also potentially disease modifying. We show that transplantation of immature telencephalic GABAergic interneurons from the mouse medial ganglionic eminence (MGE) into the adult mouse spinal cord completely reverses the mechanical hypersensitivity produced by peripheral nerve injury. Underlying this improvement is a remarkable integration of the MGE transplants into the host spinal cord circuitry, in which the transplanted cells make functional connections with both primary afferent and spinal cord neurons. By contrast, MGE transplants were not effective against inflammatory pain. Our findings suggest that MGE-derived GABAergic interneurons overcome the spinal cord hyperexcitability that is a hallmark of nerve-injury induced neuropathic pain. PMID:22632725

  1. A simple and effective semi-invasive method for inducing local hypothermia in rat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Bazley, Faith A; Pashai, Nikta; Kerr, Candace; Thakor, Nitish; All, Angelo H

    2013-01-01

    Hypothermia has been shown to be an effective treatment for spinal cord injury. Local hypothermia is advantageous because it avoids inducing systemic side effects of general hypothermia while providing the opportunity for greater temperature reduction at the site of injury, which may contribute to increased neuroprotection. We report a new semi-invasive method for inducing local hypothermia in rats' spinal cords. Our method does not require laminectomy or penetration of the dura and is more effective at cooling the cord than transcutaneous approaches. We show that we were successfully able to cool the spinal cord to 30.2 ± 0.3°C for 2 hours with rectal temperature maintained at 37.3 ± 0.3°C after a spinal cord contusion injury. We also validated our method in control rats that received only a laminectomy. Furthermore, this method was able to reliably cool and rewarm the cord at a steady rate (Δ5.5°C in 30 min, or 0.2°C/min). Future work will include validating long-term functional improvements of injured rats after treatment and to apply local cooling to other spinal cord injury models, such as compression injuries.

  2. Oscillating field stimulation promotes spinal cord remyelination by inducing differentiation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cheng; Zhang, Guanghao; Rong, Wei; Wang, Aihua; Wu, Changzhe; Huo, Xiaolin

    2014-01-01

    Demyelination is part of the cascading secondary injury after the primary insult and contributes to the loss of function after spinal cord injury (SCI). Oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) are the main remyelinating cells in the central nervous system (CNS). We explored whether oscillating field stimulation (OFS) could efficiently promote OPC differentiation and improve remyelination after SCI. SD rats with SCI induced by the Allen method were randomly divided into two groups, the SCI+OFS group and SCI group. The former group received active stimulator units and the latter group received sham (inoperative) stimulator units. Additionally, rats that only received laminectomy were referred as the sham group. The electric field intensity was 600 μV/mm, and the polarity was alternated every 15 minutes. The results showed that the SCI+OFS rats had significantly less demyelination and better locomotor function recovery after 12-weeks treatment. The OFS treatment significantly increased the number of Gal C-positive OPCs after 2-weeks treatment. Furthermore, these rats had higher protein expression of oligodendroglial transcription factors Olig2 and NKx2.2. These findings suggest OFS can promote locomotor recovery and remyelination in SCI rats and this effect may be related to the improved differentiation of OPCs in the spinal cord.

  3. Spinal cord injury-induced pain: mechanisms and treatments.

    PubMed

    Siddall, Philip J; Middleton, James W

    2015-01-01

    Pain is a common consequence of a spinal cord injury (SCI) and has a major impact on quality of life through its impact on physical function, mood and participation in work, recreational and social activities. Several types of pain typically present following SCI with central neuropathic pain being a frequent and difficult to manage occurrence. Despite advances in our understanding of the mechanisms contributing to this type of pain and an increasing number of trials examining treatment efficacy, our ability to relieve neuropathic SCI pain is still very limited. Optimal management relies upon an integrated approach that uses a combination of pharmacological and nonpharmacological options.

  4. Spinal Cord Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Degenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and spinal muscular atrophy Symptoms vary but might include pain, numbness, loss of sensation and muscle weakness. These symptoms can occur around the spinal cord, and also in other areas such as ...

  5. Transplantation of placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cell-induced neural stem cells to treat spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhi; Zhao, Wei; Liu, Wei; Zhou, Ye; Jia, Jingqiao; Yang, Lifeng

    2014-01-01

    Because of their strong proliferative capacity and multi-potency, placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells have gained interest as a cell source in the field of nerve damage repair. In the present study, human placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells were induced to differentiate into neural stem cells, which were then transplanted into the spinal cord after local spinal cord injury in rats. The motor functional recovery and pathological changes in the injured spinal cord were observed for 3 successive weeks. The results showed that human placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells can differentiate into neuron-like cells and that induced neural stem cells contribute to the restoration of injured spinal cord without causing transplant rejection. Thus, these cells promote the recovery of motor and sensory functions in a rat model of spinal cord injury. Therefore, human placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells may be useful as seed cells during the repair of spinal cord injury. PMID:25657742

  6. Tanshinone IIA improves functional recovery in spinal cord injury-induced lower urinary tract dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yong-dong; Yu, Xing; Wang, Xiu-mei; Mu, Xiao-hong; He, Feng

    2017-01-01

    Tanshinone IIA, extracted from Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge, exerts neuroprotective effects through its anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative and anti-apoptotic properties. This study intravenously injected tanshinone IIA 20 mg/kg into rat models of spinal cord injury for 7 consecutive days. Results showed that tanshinone IIA could reduce the inflammation, edema as well as compensatory thickening of the bladder tissue, improve urodynamic parameters, attenuate secondary injury, and promote spinal cord regeneration. The number of hypertrophic and apoptotic dorsal root ganglion (L6–S1) cells was less after treatment with tanshinone IIA. The effects of tanshinone IIA were similar to intravenous injection of 30 mg/kg methylprednisolone. These findings suggested that tanshinone IIA improved functional recovery after spinal cord injury-induced lower urinary tract dysfunction by remodeling the spinal pathway involved in lower urinary tract control. PMID:28400810

  7. Nitric oxide mediates Fos expression in the spinal cord induced by mechanical noxious stimulation.

    PubMed

    Lee, J H; Wilcox, G L; Beitz, A J

    1992-10-01

    Immunocytochemical localization of Fos protein was used to analyze the involvement of nitric oxide (NO) in the expression of Fos in the spinal cord, induced by mechanical noxious stimulation (NS). Mechanical NS was applied to the left hindpaw 30 minutes after intrathecal administration of the NO synthase inhibitor, N omega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) and the resulting Fos expression in the spinal cord dorsal horn was compared with that obtained in rats exposed only to the mechanical NS. Pretreatment with L-NAME but not its stereoisomer N omega-nitro-D-arginine methyl ester (D-NAME), produced a dose-dependent suppression of Fos expression induced by mechanical noxious stimulation. These results indicate that NO modulates the expression of Fos in the dorsal horn induced by mechanical noxious stimulation and further support the hypothesis that NO is involved in nociceptive events occurring in the spinal cord in response to a peripheral noxious stimulus.

  8. Lipoxin A4 ameliorates ischemia/reperfusion induced spinal cord injury in rabbit model

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Zhang, Hong-Bin; Wang, Jian; Xia, Li-Jian; Zhang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) induced spinal cord injury is an important pathologic mechanism leading to the paraplegia observed after surgery to repairaortic aneurysms. This study aims to investigate the neuroprotective effects of Lipoxin A4 and its potential mechanism in a rabbit model with I/R spinal cord injury. Forty-five rabbits were randomly divided into three groups: sham group, I/R group and Lipoxin A4 group. Rabbits were subject to 30 min aortic occlusion to induce transient spinal cord ischemia. All animals were sacrificed after neurological evaluation with modified Tarlov criteria at the 48th hour after reperfusion, and the spinal cord segments (L4-6) were harvested for histopathological examination, as well as local malondialdehyde (MDA) and total superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity analysis. All animals in the I/R group became paraplegic. While after 48-hour treatment, compared with I/R group, Lipoxin A4 significantly improved neurological function, reduced cell apoptosis and MDA levels as well as increased SOD activity (P < 0.05). These results suggest that Lipoxin A4 can ameliorate I/R induced spinal cord injury in Rabbit through its antiapoptosis and antioxidant activity. PMID:26550197

  9. Not just the brain: methamphetamine disrupts blood-spinal cord barrier and induces acute glial activation and structural damage of spinal cord cells.

    PubMed

    Kiyatkin, Eugene A; Sharma, Hari S

    2015-01-01

    Acute methamphetamine (METH) intoxication induces metabolic brain activation as well as multiple physiological and behavioral responses that could result in life-threatening health complications. Previously, we showed that METH (9 mg/kg) used in freely moving rats induces robust leakage of blood-brain barrier, acute glial activation, vasogenic edema, and structural abnormalities of brain cells. These changes were tightly correlated with drug-induced brain hyperthermia and were greatly potentiated when METH was used at warm ambient temperatures (29°C), inducing more robust and prolonged hyperthermia. Extending this line of research, here we show that METH also strongly increases the permeability of the blood-spinal cord barrier as evidenced by entry of Evans blue and albumin immunoreactivity in T9-12 segments of the spinal cord. Similar to the blood-brain barrier, leakage of bloodspinal cord barrier was associated with acute glial activation, alterations of ionic homeostasis, water tissue accumulation (edema), and structural abnormalities of spinal cord cells. Similar to that in the brain, all neurochemical alterations correlated tightly with drug-induced elevations in brain temperature and they were enhanced when the drug was used at 29°C and brain hyperthermia reached pathological levels (>40°C). We discuss common features and differences in neural responses between the brain and spinal cord, two inseparable parts of the central nervous system affected by METH exposure.

  10. [Spinal cord ischemia].

    PubMed

    Masson, C; Leys, D; Meder, J F; Dousset, V; Pruvo, J P

    2004-01-01

    Traditional data and recent advances in the field of spinal cord ischemia are reviewed, with special attention to clinical and radiological features, as well as underlying etiology, outcome, and pathophysiology. Acute spinal cord ischemia includes arterial and venous infarction and global ischemia resulting from cardiac arrest or severe hypotension. MRI has become the technique of choice for the imaging diagnosis of spinal cord infarction. Correlation of clinical and MRI data has allowed diagnosis of clinical syndromes due to small infarcts in the central or peripheral arterial territory of the spinal cord. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging may increase the sensitivity and specificity for diagnosis of acute spinal cord infarction. Diagnosis of venous spinal cord infarction remains difficult. As for global ischemia, neuropathological studies demonstrated a great sensitivity of spinal cord to ischemia, with selective vulnerability of lumbosacral neurons. Chronic spinal cord ischemia results in a syndrome of progressive myelopathy. The cause is usually an arteriovenous malformation. Most often, diagnosis may be suspected on MRI, leading to diagnostic, and eventually therapeutic, spinal angiography.

  11. Blast overpressure induced axonal injury changes in rat brainstem and spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Kallakuri, Srinivasu; Purkait, Heena S; Dalavayi, Satya; VandeVord, Pamela; Cavanaugh, John M

    2015-01-01

    Blast induced neurotrauma has been the signature wound in returning soldiers from the ongoing wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Of importance is understanding the pathomechansim(s) of blast overpressure (OP) induced axonal injury. Although several recent animal models of blast injury indicate the neuronal and axonal injury in various brain regions, animal studies related to axonal injury in the white matter (WM) tracts of cervical spinal cord are limited. The purpose of this study was to assess the extent of axonal injury in WM tracts of cervical spinal cord in male Sprague Dawley rats subjected to a single insult of blast OP. Sagittal brainstem sections and horizontal cervical spinal cord sections from blast and sham animals were stained by neurofilament light (NF-L) chain and beta amyloid precursor protein immunocytochemistry and observed for axonal injury changes. Observations from this preliminary study demonstrate axonal injury changes in the form of prominent swellings, retraction bulbs, and putative signs of membrane disruptions in the brainstem and cervical spinal cord WM tracts of rats subjected to blast OP. Prominent axonal injury changes following the blast OP exposure in brainstem and cervical spinal WM tracts underscores the need for careful evaluation of blast induced injury changes and associated symptoms. NF-L immunocytochemistry can be considered as an additional tool to assess the blast OP induced axonal injury.

  12. Blast overpressure induced axonal injury changes in rat brainstem and spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Kallakuri, Srinivasu; Purkait, Heena S.; Dalavayi, Satya; VandeVord, Pamela; Cavanaugh, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Blast induced neurotrauma has been the signature wound in returning soldiers from the ongoing wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Of importance is understanding the pathomechansim(s) of blast overpressure (OP) induced axonal injury. Although several recent animal models of blast injury indicate the neuronal and axonal injury in various brain regions, animal studies related to axonal injury in the white matter (WM) tracts of cervical spinal cord are limited. Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess the extent of axonal injury in WM tracts of cervical spinal cord in male Sprague Dawley rats subjected to a single insult of blast OP. Materials and Methods: Sagittal brainstem sections and horizontal cervical spinal cord sections from blast and sham animals were stained by neurofilament light (NF-L) chain and beta amyloid precursor protein immunocytochemistry and observed for axonal injury changes. Results: Observations from this preliminary study demonstrate axonal injury changes in the form of prominent swellings, retraction bulbs, and putative signs of membrane disruptions in the brainstem and cervical spinal cord WM tracts of rats subjected to blast OP. Conclusions: Prominent axonal injury changes following the blast OP exposure in brainstem and cervical spinal WM tracts underscores the need for careful evaluation of blast induced injury changes and associated symptoms. NF-L immunocytochemistry can be considered as an additional tool to assess the blast OP induced axonal injury. PMID:26752889

  13. [Spontaneous spinal cord herniation].

    PubMed

    Rivas, J J; de la Lama, A; Gonza Lez, P; Ramos, A; Zurdo, M; Alday, R

    2004-10-01

    Spontaneous spinal cord herniation through a dural defect is an unusual condition. This entity has been probably underestimated before the introduction of MRI. We report a case of a 49-year-old man with a progressive Brown-Sequard syndrome. MRI and CT myelogram showed a ventrally displaced spinal cord at level T6-T7 and expansion of the posterior subarachnoid space. Through a laminectomy, a spinal cord herniation was identified and reduced. The anterior dural defect was repaired with a patch of lyophilized dura. The patient recovered muscle power but there was no improvement of the sensory disturbance. The diagnosis of spontaneous spinal cord herniation must be considered when progressive myelopathy occurs in middle-aged patients, without signs of spinal cord compression and typical radiological findings. Surgical treatment may halt the progressive deficits and even yield improvement in many cases.

  14. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells for Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Khazaei, Mohamad; Ahuja, Christopher S.; Fehlings, Michael G.

    2017-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a common cause of mortality and neurological morbidity. Although progress had been made in the last decades in medical, surgical, and rehabilitation treatments for SCI, the outcomes of these approaches are not yet ideal. The use of cell transplantation as a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of SCI is very promising. Cell therapies for the treatment of SCI are limited by several translational road blocks, including ethical concerns in relation to cell sources. The use of iPSCs is particularly attractive, given that they provide an autologous cell source and avoid the ethical and moral considerations of other stem cell sources. In addition, different cell types, that are applicable to SCI, can be created from iPSCs. Common cell sources used for reprogramming are skin fibroblasts, keratinocytes, melanocytes, CD34+ cells, cord blood cells and adipose stem cells. Different cell types have different genetic and epigenetic considerations that affect their reprogramming efficiencies. Furthermore, in SCI the iPSCs can be differentiated to neural precursor cells, neural crest cells, neurons, oligodendrocytes, astrocytes, and even mesenchymal stromal cells. These can produce functional recovery by replacing lost cells and/or modulating the lesion microenvironment. PMID:28154814

  15. Leuprolide acetate induces structural and functional recovery of injured spinal cord in rats

    PubMed Central

    Díaz Galindo, Carmen; Gómez-González, Beatriz; Salinas, Eva; Calderón-Vallejo, Denisse; Hernández-Jasso, Irma; Bautista, Eduardo; Quintanar, J Luis

    2015-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and its synthetic analog leuprolide acetate, a GnRH agonist, have neurotrophic properties. This study was designed to determine whether administration of leuprolide acetate can improve locomotor behavior, gait, micturition reflex, spinal cord morphology and the amount of microglia in the lesion epicenter after spinal cord injury in rats. Rats with spinal cord compression injury were administered leuprolide acetate or saline solution for 5 weeks. At the 5th week, leuprolide acetate-treated rats showed locomotor activity recovery by 38%, had improvement in kinematic gait and exhibited voiding reflex recovery by 60%, as compared with the 1st week. By contrast, saline solution-treated rats showed locomotor activity recovery only by 7%, but voiding reflex did not recover. More importantly, leuprolide acetate treatment reduced microglial immunological reaction and induced a trend towards greater area of white and gray matter in the spinal cord. Therefore, leuprolide acetate has great potential to repair spinal cord injury. PMID:26807118

  16. Leuprolide acetate induces structural and functional recovery of injured spinal cord in rats.

    PubMed

    Díaz Galindo, Carmen; Gómez-González, Beatriz; Salinas, Eva; Calderón-Vallejo, Denisse; Hernández-Jasso, Irma; Bautista, Eduardo; Quintanar, J Luis

    2015-11-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and its synthetic analog leuprolide acetate, a GnRH agonist, have neurotrophic properties. This study was designed to determine whether administration of leuprolide acetate can improve locomotor behavior, gait, micturition reflex, spinal cord morphology and the amount of microglia in the lesion epicenter after spinal cord injury in rats. Rats with spinal cord compression injury were administered leuprolide acetate or saline solution for 5 weeks. At the 5(th) week, leuprolide acetate-treated rats showed locomotor activity recovery by 38%, had improvement in kinematic gait and exhibited voiding reflex recovery by 60%, as compared with the 1(st) week. By contrast, saline solution-treated rats showed locomotor activity recovery only by 7%, but voiding reflex did not recover. More importantly, leuprolide acetate treatment reduced microglial immunological reaction and induced a trend towards greater area of white and gray matter in the spinal cord. Therefore, leuprolide acetate has great potential to repair spinal cord injury.

  17. Propofol protects against blood-spinal cord barrier disruption induced by ischemia/reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Li-jie; Huang, Jin-xiu; Yang, Jian; Yuan, Fen; Zhang, Shuang-shuang; Yu, Qi-jing; Hu, Ji

    2017-01-01

    Propofol has been shown to exert neuroprotective effects on the injured spinal cord. However, the effect of propofol on the blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) after ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI) is poorly understood. Therefore, we investigated whether propofol could maintain the integrity of the BSCB. Spinal cord IRI (SCIRI) was induced in rabbits by infrarenal aortic occlusion for 30 minutes. Propofol, 30 mg/kg, was intravenously infused 10 minutes before aortic clamping as well as at the onset of reperfusion. Then, 48 hours later, we performed histological and mRNA/protein analyses of the spinal cord. Propofol decreased histological damage to the spinal cord, attenuated the reduction in BSCB permeability, downregulated the mRNA and protein expression levels of matrix metalloprotease-9 (MMP-9) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), and upregulated the protein expression levels of occludin and claudin-5. Our findings suggest that propofol helps maintain BSCB integrity after SCIRI by reducing MMP-9 expression, by inhibiting the NF-κB signaling pathway, and by maintaining expression of tight junction proteins. PMID:28250758

  18. Neuropathic pain induced by spinal cord injury: Role of endothelin ETA and ETB receptors.

    PubMed

    Forner, S; Martini, A C; de Andrade, E L; Rae, G A

    2016-03-23

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating neurologic disorder that often inflicts neuropathic pain, which further impacts negatively on the patient's quality of life. Endothelin peptides, which exert their effects via endothelin A (ETAR) and endothelin B (ETBR) receptors, can contribute to sensory changes associated with inflammatory and neuropathic pain, but their role in nociception following SCI is unknown. At different time points after subjecting male Wistar rats to surgery for compression-induced T10 level SCI, the spinal cord levels of ETAR and ETBR were assessed by Western blot and immunohistochemistry, and the corresponding mRNAs by real-time PCR, alongside recordings of behavioural responses to mechanical stimulation of the hind paws with von Frey hairs. SCI was associated with development of hind paw mechanical allodynia from day 14 onwards, and up-regulation of ETAR and ETBR mRNA in the spinal cord and dorsal root ganglia, and of ETAR protein in the spinal cord. SCI increased ETAR protein expression in spinal grey matter. Treatment on day 21 after surgery with the ETAR selective antagonist BQ-123 (40 and 90 pmol, intrathecally) or the dual ETAR/ETBR antagonist bosentan (30 and 100mg/kg, orally) transiently reduced SCI-induced mechanical allodynia, but the ETBR antagonist BQ-788 was ineffective. Altogether, these data show that SCI upregulates ETAR expression in the spinal cord, which appears to contribute to the hind paw mechanical allodynia associated with this condition. Therapies directed towards blockade of spinal ETAR may hold potential to limit SCI-induced neuropathic pain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Long-Distance Axonal Growth from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells After Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Paul; Woodruff, Grace; Wang, Yaozhi; Graham, Lori; Hunt, Matt; Wu, Di; Boehle, Eileen; Ahmad, Ruhel; Poplawski, Gunnar; Brock, John; Goldstein, Lawrence S. B.; Tuszynski, Mark H.

    2014-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from a healthy 86 year-old male were differentiated into neural stem cells and grafted into adult immunodeficient rats after spinal cord injury. Three months after C5 lateral hemisections, iPSCs survived and differentiated into neurons and glia, and extended tens of thousands of axons from the lesion site over virtually the entire length of the rat central nervous system. These iPSC-derived axons extended through adult white matter of the injured spinal cord, frequently penetrating gray matter and forming synapses with rat neurons. In turn, host supraspinal motor axons penetrated human iPSC grafts and formed synapses. These findings indicate that intrinsic neuronal mechanisms readily overcome the inhibitory milieu of the adult injured spinal cord to extend many axons over very long distances; these capabilities persist even in neurons reprogrammed from very aged human cells. PMID:25123310

  20. Upregulation of complement inhibitors in association with vulnerable cells following contusion-induced spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Aileen J; Najbauer, Joseph; Huang, Wencheng; Young, Wise; Robert, Stephanie

    2005-03-01

    We have previously described the activation of the classical, alternative, and terminal complement cascade pathways after acute contusion spinal cord injury using the New York University (NYU) weight-drop impactor. In the present study, we examined the induction of protein regulators of the complement cascade, factor H (FH), and clusterin, in the same experimental paradigm. The spinal cord of laminectomized adult rats was subjected to mild or severe injury using impactor weight-drop heights of 12.5 and 50 mm, respectively. The spinal cords of control and injured animals were evaluated at 1, 7, and 42 days after injury. Immunocytochemistry revealed a robust increase in the numbers and intensity of staining of FH, and clusterin-positive cells in the injured cord at all three time points, with the highest increases observed at 1 and 42 days after injury. FH and clusterin-positive cells were observed among neurons as well as oligodendrocytes. The increased expression was detected both rostrally and caudally from the injury site, in the latter case at distances up to 20 mm. The precise biological significance of injury-induced upregulation of these proteins remains to be determined. However, FH and clusterin are potent regulators of complement activity targeting upstream (FH) and downstream (clusterin) molecules of the pro-inflammatory cascade, which could be of vital importance in preventing a "runaway" inflammatory reaction in the injured spinal cord.

  1. Modeling spinal cord biomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna, Carlos; Shah, Sameer; Cohen, Avis; Aranda-Espinoza, Helim

    2012-02-01

    Regeneration after spinal cord injury is a serious health issue and there is no treatment for ailing patients. To understand regeneration of the spinal cord we used a system where regeneration occurs naturally, such as the lamprey. In this work, we analyzed the stress response of the spinal cord to tensile loading and obtained the mechanical properties of the cord both in vitro and in vivo. Physiological measurements showed that the spinal cord is pre-stressed to a strain of 10%, and during sinusoidal swimming, there is a local strain of 5% concentrated evenly at the mid-body and caudal sections. We found that the mechanical properties are homogeneous along the body and independent of the meninges. The mechanical behavior of the spinal cord can be characterized by a non-linear viscoelastic model, described by a modulus of 20 KPa for strains up to 15% and a modulus of 0.5 MPa for strains above 15%, in agreement with experimental data. However, this model does not offer a full understanding of the behavior of the spinal cord fibers. Using polymer physics we developed a model that relates the stress response as a function of the number of fibers.

  2. Preconditioning with hyperbaric oxygen and hyperoxia induces tolerance against spinal cord ischemia in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hailong; Xiong, Lize; Zhu, Zhenghua; Chen, Shaoyang; Hou, Lichao; Sakabe, Takefumi

    2002-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if the ischemic tolerance could be induced in the spinal cord by pretreatment with hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) and what components of HBO (hyperoxia, hyperbaricity, and combination of these two) were critical in the induction of tolerance against ischemic injury. In experiment 1, 21 rabbits were randomly assigned to one of three groups (n = 7 each): animals in the control group received no HBO before spinal cord ischemia; animals in the HBO-1 and HBO-2 groups received HBO (2.5 atmosphere absolute [ATA], 100% O2) pretreatment 1 h/day for 3 and 5 days before ischemia, respectively. In experiment 2, 48 rabbits were randomly assigned to one of four groups (n = 12 each): the control group received no HBO (21% O2, 1 ATA, 1 h/day, 5 days) before spinal cord ischemia; the HB group received 1-h treatment in 21% O2 at 2.5 ATA each day for 5 days; the HO group received 1-h treatment in 100% oxygen at 1 ATA each day for 5 days; and the HBO group received HBO (2.5 ATA, 100% O2) treatment 1 h/day for 5 days. Twenty-four hours after the last treatment, spinal cord ischemia was induced by an infrarenal aorta clamping for 20 min. Forty-eight hours after reperfusion, hind-limb motor function and histopathology of the spinal cord were examined in a blinded fashion. In experiment 1, the neurologic outcome in the HBO-2 group was better than that of the control group (P = 0.004). The number of normal neurons in the anterior spinal cord in the HBO-2 group was more than that of the control group (P = 0.021). In experiment 2, the neurologic and histopathologic outcomes in the HBO group were better than that of the control group (P < 0.01). The histopathologic outcome in the HO group was better than that in the control group (P < 0.05). Serial exposure to high oxygen tension induced ischemic tolerance in spinal cord of rabbits. Simple hyperbaricity (2.5 ATA, 21% O2) did not induce ischemic tolerance.

  3. Spinal Cord Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... Circulatory control. A spinal cord injury may cause circulatory problems ranging from low blood pressure when you rise ( ... deep vein thrombosis or a pulmonary embolus. Another problem with circulatory control is a potentially life-threatening rise in ...

  4. Spinal Cord Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... almost complete recovery. Others will result in complete paralysis × Definition A spinal cord injury usually begins with ... almost complete recovery. Others will result in complete paralysis View Full Definition Treatment Improved emergency care for ...

  5. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... is "Braingate" research? What is the status of stem-cell research? How would stem-cell therapies work in the treatment of spinal cord injuries? What does stem-cell research on animals tell us? When can we ...

  6. Pax3 overexpression induces cell aggregation and perturbs commissural axon projection during embryonic spinal cord development.

    PubMed

    Lin, Juntang; Fu, Sulei; Yang, Ciqing; Redies, Christoph

    2017-05-01

    Pax3 is a transcription factor that belongs to the paired box family. In the developing spinal cord it is expressed in the dorsal commissural neurons, which project ascending axons contralaterally to form proper spinal cord-brain circuitry. While it has been shown that Pax3 induces cell aggregation in vitro, little is known about the role of Pax3 in cell aggregation and spinal circuit formation in vivo. We have reported that Pax3 is involved in neuron differentiation and that its overexpression induces ectopic cadherin-7 expression. In this study we report that Pax3 overexpression also induces cell aggregation in vivo. Tissue sections and open book preparations revealed that Pax3 overexpression prevents commissural axons from projecting to the contralateral side of the spinal cord. Cells overexpressing Pax3 aggregated in cell clusters that contained shortened neurites with perturbed axon growth and elongation. Pax3-specific shRNA partially rescued the morphological change induced by Pax3 overexpression in vivo. Our results indicate that the normal expression of Pax3 is necessary for proper axonal pathway finding and commissural axon projection. In conclusion, Pax3 regulates neural circuit formation during embryonic development. J. Comp. Neurol. 525:1618-1632, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Nrf2 Activation in Astrocytes Contributes to Spinal Cord Ischemic Tolerance Induced by Hyperbaric Oxygen Preconditioning

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jiajun; Huang, Guoyang; Zhang, Kun; Sun, Jinchuan; Xu, Tao; Li, Runping

    2014-01-01

    Abstract In this study, we investigated whether nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) activation in astrocytes contributes to the neuroprotection induced by a single hyperbaric oxygen preconditioning (HBO-PC) against spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion (SCIR) injury. In vivo: At 24 h after a single HBO-PC at 2.5 atmospheres absolute for 90 min, the male ICR mice underwent SCIR injury by aortic cross-clamping surgery and observed for 48 h. HBO-PC significantly improved hindlimb motor function, reduced secondary spinal cord edema, ameliorated the reactivity of spinal motor-evoked potentials, and slowed down the process of apoptosis to exert neuroprotective effects against SCIR injury. At 12 h or 24 h after HBO-PC without aortic cross-clamping surgery, Western blot, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, realtime-polymerase chain reaction and double-immunofluorescence staining were used to detect the Nrf2 activity of spinal cord tissue, such as mRNA level, protein content, DNA binding activity, and the expression of downstream gene, such as glutamate-cysteine ligase, γ-glutamyltransferase, multidrug resistance protein 1, which are key proteins for intracellular glutathione synthesis and transit. The Nrf2 activity and downstream genes expression were all enhanced in normal spinal cord with HBO-PC. Glutathione content of spinal cord tissue with HBO-PC significantly increased at all time points after SCIR injury. Moreover, Nrf2 overexpression mainly occurs in astrocytes. In vitro: At 24 h after HBO-PC, the primary spinal astrocyte-neuron co-cultures from ICR mouse pups were subjected to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) for 90 min to simulate the ischemia-reperfusion injury. HBO-PC significantly increased the survival rate of neurons and the glutathione content in culture medium, which was mainly released from asctrocytes. Moreover, the Nrf2 activity and downstream genes expression induced by HBO-PC were mainly enhanced in astrocytes, but not in

  8. Canine spinal cord glioma.

    PubMed

    Rissi, Daniel R; Barber, Renee; Burnum, Annabelle; Miller, Andrew D

    2017-01-01

    Spinal cord glioma is uncommonly reported in dogs. We describe the clinicopathologic and diagnostic features of 7 cases of canine spinal cord glioma and briefly review the veterinary literature on this topic. The median age at presentation was 7.2 y. Six females and 1 male were affected and 4 dogs were brachycephalic. The clinical course lasted from 3 d to 12 wk, and clinical signs were progressive and associated with multiple suspected neuroanatomic locations in the spinal cord. Magnetic resonance imaging of 6 cases revealed T2-weighted hyperintense lesions with variable contrast enhancement in the spinal cord. All dogs had a presumptive clinical diagnosis of intraparenchymal neoplasia or myelitis based on history, advanced imaging, and cerebrospinal fluid analysis. Euthanasia was elected in all cases because of poor outcome despite anti-inflammatory or immunosuppressive treatment or because of poor prognosis at the time of diagnosis. Tumor location during autopsy ranged from C1 to L6, with no clear predilection for a specific spinal cord segment. The diagnosis was based on histopathology and the immunohistochemistry expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein, oligodendrocyte lineage transcription factor 2, 2',3'-cyclic-nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase, neuron-specific enolase, synaptophysin, and Ki-67. Diagnoses consisted of 4 cases of oligodendroglioma, 2 cases of gliomatosis cerebri, and 1 astrocytoma. This case series further defines the clinicopathologic features of canine spinal glioma and highlights the need for comprehensive immunohistochemistry in addition to routine histopathology to confirm the diagnosis of these tumors.

  9. Living with Spinal Cord Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... to send and receive messages to and from the brain. About 200,000 people in the United States have spinal cord injuries. Most injuries occur from a traumatic event, according to the National Spinal Cord Injury ...

  10. Spinal transection induces widespread proliferation of cells along the length of the spinal cord in a weakly electric fish

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Antiño R.; Smith, G. Troy

    2013-01-01

    The ability to regenerate spinal cord tissue after tail amputation has been well studied in several species of teleost fish. The present study examined proliferation and survival of cells following complete spinal cord transection rather than tail amputation in the weakly electric fish Apteronotus leptorhynchus. To quantify cell proliferation along the length of the spinal cord, fish were given a single bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) injection immediately after spinal transection or sham surgery. Spinal transection significantly increased the density of BrdU+ cells along the entire length of the spinal cord at 1 day post transection (dpt), and most newly generated cells survived up to 14 dpt. To examine longer term survival of the newly proliferated cells, BrdU was injected for 5 days after the surgery, and fish were sacrificed 14 or 30 dpt. Spinal transection significantly increased proliferation and/or survival, as indicated by an elevated density of BrdU+ cells in the spinal cords of spinally transected compared to sham-operated and intact fish. At 14 dpt, BrdU+ cells were abundant at all levels of the spinal cord. By 30 dpt, the density of BrdU+ cells decreased at all levels of the spinal cord except at the tip of the tail. Thus, newly generated cells in the caudal-most segment of the spinal cord survived longer than those in more rostral segments. Our findings indicate that spinal cord transection stimulates widespread cellular proliferation; however, there were regional differences in the survival of the newly generated cells. PMID:23147638

  11. Lumbar muscle inflammation alters spinally mediated locomotor recovery induced by training in a mouse model of complete spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Jeffrey-Gauthier, Renaud; Piché, Mathieu; Leblond, Hugues

    2017-09-17

    Locomotor networks after spinal cord injury (SCI) are shaped by training-activated proprioceptive and cutaneous inputs. Nociception from injured tissues may alter these changes but has largely been overlooked. The objective of the present study was to ascertain whether lumbar muscle inflammation hinders locomotion recovery in a mouse model of complete SCI. Lower limb kinematics during treadmill training was assessed before and after complete SCI at T8 (2, 7, 14, 21 and 28days post-injury). Locomotor recovery was compared in 4 groups of CD1 mice: control spinal mice; spinal mice with daily locomotor training; spinal mice with lumbar muscle inflammation (Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA) injection); and spinal mice with locomotor training and CFA. On day 28, H-reflex excitability and its inhibition at high-frequency stimulation (frequency-dependent depression: FDD) were compared between groups, all of which showed locomotor recovery. Recovery was enhanced by training, whereas lumbar muscle inflammation hindered these effects (knee angular excursion and paw drag: p's<0.05). In addition, lumbar muscle inflammation impaired hind limb coupling during locomotion (p<0.05) throughout recovery. Also, H-reflex disinhibition was prevented by training, with or without CFA injection (p's<0.05). Altogether, these results indicate that back muscle inflammation modulates spinally mediated locomotor recovery in mice with complete SCI, in part, by reducing adaptive changes induced by training. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Retinoic Acid Induced-Autophagic Flux Inhibits ER-Stress Dependent Apoptosis and Prevents Disruption of Blood-Spinal Cord Barrier after Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yulong; Zhang, Hongyu; Zheng, Binbin; Ye, Libing; Zhu, Sipin; Johnson, Noah R; Wang, Zhouguang; Wei, Xiaojie; Chen, Daqing; Cao, Guodong; Fu, Xiaobing; Li, Xiaokun; Xu, Hua-Zi; Xiao, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) induces the disruption of the blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) which leads to infiltration of blood cells, an inflammatory response, and neuronal cell death, resulting spinal cord secondary damage. Retinoic acid (RA) has a neuroprotective effect in both ischemic brain injury and SCI, however the relationship between BSCB disruption and RA in SCI is still unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that autophagy and ER stress are involved in the protective effect of RA on the BSCB. RA attenuated BSCB permeability and decreased the loss of tight junction (TJ) molecules such as P120, β-catenin, Occludin and Claudin5 after injury in vivo as well as in Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells (BMECs). Moreover, RA administration improved functional recovery in the rat model of SCI. RA inhibited the expression of CHOP and caspase-12 by induction of autophagic flux. However, RA had no significant effect on protein expression of GRP78 and PDI. Furthermore, combining RA with the autophagy inhibitor chloroquine (CQ) partially abolished its protective effect on the BSCB via exacerbated ER stress and subsequent loss of tight junctions. Taken together, the neuroprotective role of RA in recovery from SCI is related to prevention of of BSCB disruption via the activation of autophagic flux and the inhibition of ER stress-induced cell apoptosis. These findings lay the groundwork for future translational studies of RA for CNS diseases, especially those related to BSCB disruption. PMID:26722220

  13. [Osteoporosis associated with spinal cord lesion].

    PubMed

    Miladinović, Ksenija; Vavra-Hadziahmetović, Narcisa; Muftić, Mirsad; Sakota, Slavica

    2007-01-01

    One of the complications caused by spinal lesion is osteoporosis which development is induced by lesion itself, and its mechanism is not explained enough. Risk factor of this kind of osteoporosis is fracture which management is difficult and is cause of further complications which aggravate already damaged quality of life of patients with spinal cord injury, and demand additional health insurance expenses. Importance of prevention and treatment of spinal cord injury induced osteoporosis is enlightened by case report.

  14. Chronic GABAergic blockade in the spinal cord in vivo induces motor alterations and neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Jarquín, Uri Nimrod; Tapia, Ricardo

    2017-05-01

    Inhibitory GABAergic and glycinergic neurotransmission in the spinal cord play a central role in the regulation of neuronal excitability, by maintaining a balance with the glutamate-mediated excitatory transmission. Glutamatergic agonists infusion in the spinal cord induce motor neuron death by excitotoxicity, leading to motor deficits and paralysis, but little is known on the effect of the blockade of inhibitory transmission. In this work we studied the effects of GABAergic and glycinergic blockade, by means of microdialysis perfusion (acute administration) and osmotic minipumps infusion (chronic administration) of GABA and glycine receptors antagonists directly in the lumbar spinal cord. We show that acute glycinergic blockade with strychnine or GABAergic blockade with bicuculline had no significant effects on motor activity and on motor neuron survival. However, chronic bicuculline infusion, but not strychnine, induced ipsilateral gait alterations, phalange flaccidity and significant motor neuron loss, and these effects were prevented by AMPA receptor blockade with CNQX but not by NMDA receptor blockade with MK801. In addition, we demonstrate that the chronic infusion of bicuculline enhanced the excitotoxic effect of AMPA, causing faster bilateral paralysis and increasing motor neuron loss. These findings indicate a relevant role of GABAergic inhibitory circuits in the regulation of motor neuron excitability and suggest that their alterations may be involved in the neurodegeneration processes characteristic of motor neuron diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

  15. Experimental Neuromyelitis Optica Induces a Type I Interferon Signature in the Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Kaufmann, Nathalie; Zeka, Bleranda; Schanda, Kathrin; Fujihara, Kazuo; Illes, Zsolt; Dahle, Charlotte; Reindl, Markus; Lassmann, Hans; Bradl, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is an acute inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS) which predominantly affects spinal cord and optic nerves. Most patients harbor pathogenic autoantibodies, the so-called NMO-IgGs, which are directed against the water channel aquaporin 4 (AQP4) on astrocytes. When these antibodies gain access to the CNS, they mediate astrocyte destruction by complement-dependent and by antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. In contrast to multiple sclerosis (MS) patients who benefit from therapies involving type I interferons (I-IFN), NMO patients typically do not profit from such treatments. How is I-IFN involved in NMO pathogenesis? To address this question, we made gene expression profiles of spinal cords from Lewis rat models of experimental neuromyelitis optica (ENMO) and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). We found an upregulation of I-IFN signature genes in EAE spinal cords, and a further upregulation of these genes in ENMO. To learn whether the local I-IFN signature is harmful or beneficial, we induced ENMO by transfer of CNS antigen-specific T cells and NMO-IgG, and treated the animals with I-IFN at the very onset of clinical symptoms, when the blood-brain barrier was open. With this treatment regimen, we could amplify possible effects of the I-IFN induced genes on the transmigration of infiltrating cells through the blood brain barrier, and on lesion formation and expansion, but could avoid effects of I-IFN on the differentiation of pathogenic T and B cells in the lymph nodes. We observed that I-IFN treated ENMO rats had spinal cord lesions with fewer T cells, macrophages/activated microglia and activated neutrophils, and less astrocyte damage than their vehicle treated counterparts, suggesting beneficial effects of I-IFN. PMID:26990978

  16. Spinal Glia Division Contributes to Conditioning Lesion-Induced Axon Regeneration Into the Injured Spinal Cord: Potential Role of Cyclic AMP-Induced Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-1.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huaqing; Angert, Mila; Nishihara, Tasuku; Shubayev, Igor; Dolkas, Jennifer; Shubayev, Veronica I

    2015-06-01

    Regeneration of sensory neurons after spinal cord injury depends on the function of dividing neuronal-glial antigen 2 (NG2)-expressing cells. We have shown that increases in the number of dividing NG2-positive cells through short-term pharmacologic inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases contributes to recovery after spinal cord injury. A conditioning sciatic nerve crush (SNC) preceding spinal cord injury stimulates central sensory axon regeneration via the intraganglionic action of cyclic adenosine monophosphate. Here, using bromodeoxyuridine, mitomycin (mitosis inhibitor), and cholera toxin B tracer, we demonstrate that SNC-induced division of spinal glia is related to the spinal induction of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 and contributes to central sensory axon growth into the damaged spinal cord. Dividing cells were mainly NG2-positive and Iba1-positive and included myeloid NG2-positive populations. The cells dividing in response to SNC mainly matured into oligodendrocytes and microglia within the injured spinal cord. Some postmitotic cells remained NG2-reactive and were associated with regenerating fibers. Moreover, intraganglionic tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 expression was induced after administration of SNC or cyclic adenosine monophosphate analog (dbcAMP) to dorsal root ganglia in vivo and in primary adult dorsal root ganglia cultures. Collectively, these findings support a novel model whereby a cyclic adenosine monophosphate-activated regeneration program induced in sensory neurons by a conditioning peripheral nerve lesion uses tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 to protect against short-term proteolysis, enabling glial cell division and promoting axon growth into the damaged CNS.

  17. Continuous distraction-induced delayed spinal cord injury on motor-evoked potentials and histological changes of spinal cord in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Hong, J-Y; Suh, S-W; Lee, S-H; Park, J-H; Park, S-Y; Rhyu, I J; Yang, J-H

    2016-09-01

    Experimental study. This study evaluated distraction-induced delayed spinal cord injury in a porcine model. Department of Orthopedics, Korea University Guro Hospital, Seoul, Korea. Global osteotomy of three columns was performed on the thirteenth thoracic vertebrae with 13 pigs. The osteotomized vertebrae were distracted to 57-103% of segmental vertebral height (SVH) length, which was less than the distraction length that induces prompt SCI. The vertebral height was maintained until the loss of motor-evoked potential (MEP) signals with continuous distraction. The distraction distance and the time at which SCI occurred were measured, and distraction was then released to observe MEP recovery patterns. We found delayed SCI in 8 of the 12 pigs, with a mean 20.9 mm (range 19-25 mm) and 10.7 min (range 8-12 min) of continuous spinal distraction, which was equivalent to 74.3% (68-84%) of SVH and 3.63% (3.42-4.31%) of thoracolumbar spinal length. A continuous 74.3% SVH distraction over an average of 10.7 min caused a delayed SCI, which was indicated by mild histologic changes in the spinal cord. Recovery patterns from SCI after distraction release were compatible with the degree of histological change; however, these patterns differed from the previously investigated prompt type of SCI. Late onset injury due to continuous spinal distraction, which is comparable to iatrogenic SCI in spinal correction surgery, is important for understanding the impact of corrective surgery.

  18. Acute traumatic spinal cord injury induces glial activation in the cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Miller, A D; Westmoreland, S V; Evangelous, N R; Graham, A; Sledge, J; Nesathurai, S

    2012-06-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury leads to direct myelin and axonal damage and leads to the recruitment of inflammatory cells to site of injury. Although rodent models have provided the greatest insight into the genesis of traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI), recent studies have attempted to develop an appropriate non-human primate model. We explored TSCI in a cynomolgus macaque model using a balloon catheter to mimic external trauma to further evaluate the underlying mechanisms of acute TSCI. Following 1hour of spinal cord trauma, there were focal areas of hemorrhage and necrosis at the site of trauma. Additionally, there was a marked increased expression of macrophage-related protein 8, MMP9, IBA-1, and inducible nitric oxide synthase in macrophages and microglia at the site of injury. This data indicate that acute TSCI in the cynomolgus macaque is an appropriate model and that the earliest immunohistochemical changes noted are within macrophage and microglia populations. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  19. Sensory Stimulation Prior to Spinal Cord Injury Induces Post-Injury Dysesthesia in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hoschouer, Emily L.; Finseth, Taylor; Flinn, Sharon; Basso, D. Michele

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Chronic pain and dysesthesias are debilitating conditions that can arise following spinal cord injury (SCI). Research studies frequently employ rodent models of SCI to better understand the underlying mechanisms and develop better treatments for these phenomena. While evoked withdrawal tests can assess hypersensitivity in these SCI models, there is little consensus over how to evaluate spontaneous sensory abnormalities that are seen in clinical SCI subjects. Overgrooming (OG) and biting after peripheral nerve injury or spinal cord excitotoxic lesions are thought to be one behavioral demonstration of spontaneous neuropathic pain or dysesthesia. However, reports of OG after contusion SCI are largely anecdotal and conditions causing this response are poorly understood. The present study investigated whether repeated application of sensory stimuli to the trunk prior to mid-thoracic contusion SCI would induce OG after SCI in mice. One week prior to SCI or laminectomy, mice were subjected either to nociceptive and mechanical stimulation, mechanical stimulation only, the testing situation without stimulation, or no treatment. They were then examined for 14 days after surgery and the sizes and locations of OG sites were recorded on anatomical maps. Mice subjected to either stimulus paradigm showed increased OG compared with unstimulated or uninjured mice. Histological analysis showed no difference in spinal cord lesion size due to sensory stimulation, or between mice that overgroomed or did not overgroom. The relationship between prior stimulation and contusion injury in mice that display OG indicates a critical interaction that may underlie one facet of spontaneous neuropathic symptoms after SCI. PMID:20121420

  20. Gene profiling of human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived astrocyte progenitors following spinal cord engraftment.

    PubMed

    Haidet-Phillips, Amanda M; Roybon, Laurent; Gross, Sarah K; Tuteja, Alisha; Donnelly, Christopher J; Richard, Jean-Philippe; Ko, Myungsung; Sherman, Alex; Eggan, Kevin; Henderson, Christopher E; Maragakis, Nicholas J

    2014-05-01

    The generation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) represents an exciting advancement with promise for stem cell transplantation therapies as well as for neurological disease modeling. Based on the emerging roles for astrocytes in neurological disorders, we investigated whether hiPSC-derived astrocyte progenitors could be engrafted to the rodent spinal cord and how the characteristics of these cells changed between in vitro culture and after transplantation to the in vivo spinal cord environment. Our results show that human embryonic stem cell- and hiPSC-derived astrocyte progenitors survive long-term after spinal cord engraftment and differentiate to astrocytes in vivo with few cells from other lineages present. Gene profiling of the transplanted cells demonstrates the astrocyte progenitors continue to mature in vivo and upregulate a variety of astrocyte-specific genes. Given this mature astrocyte gene profile, this work highlights hiPSCs as a tool to investigate disease-related astrocyte biology using in vivo disease modeling with significant implications for human neurological diseases currently lacking animal models.

  1. Spinal nociceptin inhibits AMPA-induced nociceptive behavior and Fos expression in rat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Menéndez, Luis; Lastra, Ana; Villanueva, Noemí; Hidalgo, Agustín; Baamonde, Ana

    2003-02-01

    The effects of intrathecal nociceptin (NOCI) on the nociceptive behavior (biting, scratching and licking; BSL) and the spinal Fos expression induced by intrathecal administration of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA, 4 microg/rat) or alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionate (AMPA, 2 microg/rat) were studied. Coadministration of NOCI (3 and 10 nmol/rat) with NMDA did not modify the NMDA-induced BSL or Fos expression. In contrast, NOCI (0.1-3 nmol/rat) dose-dependently inhibited the BSL behavior induced by AMPA. Furthermore, coadministration of NOCI (3 and 10 nmol/rat) significantly reduced the AMPA-induced expression of Fos protein in the superficial layers of the spinal dorsal horn. In order to test whether classical or opioid receptor-like type 1 (ORL1) receptors are involved in the inhibitions by NOCI of AMPA-evoked BSL, the corresponding antagonists were assayed. The administration of the nonselective opioid receptor antagonist, naloxone (10 mg/kg i.p.), did not modify the NOCI-induced inhibition of AMPA-evoked BSL. However, the selective ORL1 receptor antagonist, [N-Phe(1)]nociceptin-(1-13)-NH(2) (90 nmol/rat i.t.), completely prevented the NOCI-mediated inhibition of the nociceptive responses evoked by AMPA. In conclusion, NOCI, acting at ORL1 receptors can, at least in part, induce spinal analgesia by blocking the nociceptive responses produced through the stimulation of AMPA receptors.

  2. Galactorrhea: a complication of spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Yarkony, G M; Novick, A K; Roth, E J; Kirschner, K L; Rayner, S; Betts, H B

    1992-09-01

    Galactorrhea, a secretion of milk or milk-like products from the breast in the absence of parturition, has been reported to occur in women with spinal cord injuries in association with amenorrhea and hyperprolactinemia. Four cases of galactorrhea in association with spinal cord injury are reported. Galactorrhea developed in four spinal cord injured women who had thoracic paraplegia. The onset of galactorrhea was from one month to five months after injury. Although the onset of galactorrhea may have been related to prescribed medications in all four cases, insufficient data exist to draw conclusions. The three women whose galactorrhea persisted declined treatment and galactorrhea continuing for more than two years in one instance. We conclude that galactorrhea with or without amenorrhea may develop after a spinal cord injury and that spinal cord injured women may have an enhanced sensitivity to medication-induced galactorrhea.

  3. Immune activation is required for NT-3-induced axonal plasticity in chronic spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qin; Smith, George M.; Shine, H. David

    2009-01-01

    After an unilateral lesion of the corticospinal tract (CST) at the level of the medulla over-expression of Neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) in lumbar spinal cord motoneurons induced axonal sprouting of the intact CST in the acutely injured but not uninjured or chronically injured spinal cord in rats. This suggested that processes associated with immune-mediated wound healing may act with NT-3 to induce neuroplasticity. To test whether immune processes were involved we measured NT-3 induced axonal sprouting in immunosuppressed compared to immunocompetent rats. Rats were immunosuppressed with anti-leukocyte antibodies 1 day before receiving a CST lesion and then 2 weeks later NT-3 was over-expressed in the lumbar spinal motoneurons with an adenoviral vector carrying the NT-3 gene targeted to the motoneurons by retrograde transport. At 35 days post-lesion no axonal sprouting was measured in immunosuppressed rats whereas axonal sprouting was measured in the immunocompetent rats. We then tested whether re-evoking an immune response in chronically lesioned rats would induce neuroplasticity. Rats received CST lesions and then 4 months later were treated with systemic injections of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) 7 days before NT-3 was over-expressed in the lumbar spinal motoneurons. Axonal sprouting was observed in the LPS treated rats but not in control animals that were not treated with LPS. Further studies showed that lesioning the CST activated and LPS re-activated microglia and CD4+ T-cells in the acutely lesioned and chronically lesioned rats, respectively. However, immunosuppression only decreased the number of activated CD4+ T-cells suggesting they were responsible for the support of axonal growth. These observations demonstrate that processes associated with immune-mediated wound healing play a role in NT-3 induced neuroplasticity after injury. PMID:18191837

  4. Analgesia Induced by Isolated Bovine Chromaffin Cells Implanted in Rat Spinal Cord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagen, Jacqueline; Pappas, George D.; Pollard, Harvey B.

    1986-10-01

    Chromaffin cells synthesize and secrete several neuroactive substances, including catecholamines and opioid peptides, that, when injected into the spinal cord, induce analgesia. Moreover, the release of these substances from the cells can be stimulated by nicotine. Since chromaffin cells from one species have been shown to survive when transplanted to the central nervous system of another species, these cells are ideal candidates for transplantation to alter pain sensitivity. Bovine chromaffin cells were implanted into the subarachnoid space of the lumbar spinal region in adult rats. Pain sensitivity and response to nicotine stimulation was determined at various intervals following cell implantation. Low doses of nicotine were able to induce potent analgesia in implanted animals as early as one day following their introduction into the host spinal cord. This response could be elicited at least through the 4 months the animals were tested. The induction of analgesia by nicotine in implanted animals was dose related. This analgesia was blocked by the opiate antagonist naloxone and partially attenuated by the adrenergic antagonist phentolamine. These results suggest that the analgesia is due to the stimulated release of opioid peptides and catecholamines from the implanted bovine chromaffin cells and may provide a new therapeutic approach for the relief of pain.

  5. An ex vivo laser-induced spinal cord injury model to assess mechanisms of axonal degeneration in real-time.

    PubMed

    Okada, Starlyn L M; Stivers, Nicole S; Stys, Peter K; Stirling, David P

    2014-11-25

    Injured CNS axons fail to regenerate and often retract away from the injury site. Axons spared from the initial injury may later undergo secondary axonal degeneration. Lack of growth cone formation, regeneration, and loss of additional myelinated axonal projections within the spinal cord greatly limits neurological recovery following injury. To assess how central myelinated axons of the spinal cord respond to injury, we developed an ex vivo living spinal cord model utilizing transgenic mice that express yellow fluorescent protein in axons and a focal and highly reproducible laser-induced spinal cord injury to document the fate of axons and myelin (lipophilic fluorescent dye Nile Red) over time using two-photon excitation time-lapse microscopy. Dynamic processes such as acute axonal injury, axonal retraction, and myelin degeneration are best studied in real-time. However, the non-focal nature of contusion-based injuries and movement artifacts encountered during in vivo spinal cord imaging make differentiating primary and secondary axonal injury responses using high resolution microscopy challenging. The ex vivo spinal cord model described here mimics several aspects of clinically relevant contusion/compression-induced axonal pathologies including axonal swelling, spheroid formation, axonal transection, and peri-axonal swelling providing a useful model to study these dynamic processes in real-time. Major advantages of this model are excellent spatiotemporal resolution that allows differentiation between the primary insult that directly injures axons and secondary injury mechanisms; controlled infusion of reagents directly to the perfusate bathing the cord; precise alterations of the environmental milieu (e.g., calcium, sodium ions, known contributors to axonal injury, but near impossible to manipulate in vivo); and murine models also offer an advantage as they provide an opportunity to visualize and manipulate genetically identified cell populations and subcellular

  6. A rat model of chronic syringomyelia induced by epidural compression of the lumbar spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Yeoun; Kim, Shin Won; Kim, Saet Pyoul; Kim, Hyeonjin; Cheon, Jung-Eun; Kim, Seung-Ki; Paek, Sun Ha; Pang, Dachling; Wang, Kyu-Chang

    2017-02-17

    OBJECTIVE There has been no established animal model of syringomyelia associated with lumbosacral spinal lipoma. The research on the pathophysiology of syringomyelia has been focused on Chiari malformation, trauma, and inflammation. To understand the pathophysiology of syringomyelia associated with occult spinal dysraphism, a novel animal model of syringomyelia induced by chronic mechanical compression of the lumbar spinal cord was created. METHODS The model was made by epidural injection of highly concentrated paste-like kaolin solution through windows created by partial laminectomy of L-1 and L-5 vertebrae. Behavioral outcome in terms of motor (Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan score) and urinary function was assessed serially for 12 weeks. Magnetic resonance images were obtained in some animals to confirm the formation of a syrinx and to monitor changes in its size. Immunohistochemical studies, including analysis for glial fibrillary acidic protein, NeuN, CC1, ED-1, and caspase-3, were done. RESULTS By 12 weeks after the epidural compression procedure, syringomyelia formation was confirmed in 85% of the rats (34 of 40) on histology and/or MRI. The syrinx cavities were found rostral to the epidural compression. Motor deficit of varying degrees was seen immediately after the procedure in 28% of the rats (11 of 40). In 13 rats (33%), lower urinary tract dysfunction was seen. Motor deficit improved by 5 weeks after the procedure, whereas urinary dysfunction mostly improved by 2 weeks. Five rats (13%, 5 of 40) died 1 month postoperatively or later, and 3 of the 5 had developed urinary tract infection. At 12 weeks after the operation, IHC showed no inflammatory process, demyelination, or accelerated apoptosis in the spinal cords surrounding the syrinx cavities, similar to sham-operated animals. CONCLUSIONS A novel experimental model for syringomyelia by epidural compression of the lumbar spinal cord has been created. The authors hope that it will serve as an important research

  7. Thoracic Rat Spinal Cord Contusion Injury Induces Remote Spinal Gliogenesis but Not Neurogenesis or Gliogenesis in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Pfeifer, Kathrin; Kierdorf, Birthe; Sandner, Beatrice; Bogdahn, Ulrich; Blesch, Armin; Winner, Beate; Weidner, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    After spinal cord injury, transected axons fail to regenerate, yet significant, spontaneous functional improvement can be observed over time. Distinct central nervous system regions retain the capacity to generate new neurons and glia from an endogenous pool of progenitor cells and to compensate neural cell loss following certain lesions. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether endogenous cell replacement (neurogenesis or gliogenesis) in the brain (subventricular zone, SVZ; corpus callosum, CC; hippocampus, HC; and motor cortex, MC) or cervical spinal cord might represent a structural correlate for spontaneous locomotor recovery after a thoracic spinal cord injury. Adult Fischer 344 rats received severe contusion injuries (200 kDyn) of the mid-thoracic spinal cord using an Infinite Horizon Impactor. Uninjured rats served as controls. From 4 to 14 days post-injury, both groups received injections of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) to label dividing cells. Over the course of six weeks post-injury, spontaneous recovery of locomotor function occurred. Survival of newly generated cells was unaltered in the SVZ, HC, CC, and the MC. Neurogenesis, as determined by identification and quantification of doublecortin immunoreactive neuroblasts or BrdU/neuronal nuclear antigen double positive newly generated neurons, was not present in non-neurogenic regions (MC, CC, and cervical spinal cord) and unaltered in neurogenic regions (dentate gyrus and SVZ) of the brain. The lack of neuronal replacement in the brain and spinal cord after spinal cord injury precludes any relevance for spontaneous recovery of locomotor function. Gliogenesis was increased in the cervical spinal cord remote from the injury site, however, is unlikely to contribute to functional improvement. PMID:25050623

  8. Thoracic rat spinal cord contusion injury induces remote spinal gliogenesis but not neurogenesis or gliogenesis in the brain.

    PubMed

    Franz, Steffen; Ciatipis, Mareva; Pfeifer, Kathrin; Kierdorf, Birthe; Sandner, Beatrice; Bogdahn, Ulrich; Blesch, Armin; Winner, Beate; Weidner, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    After spinal cord injury, transected axons fail to regenerate, yet significant, spontaneous functional improvement can be observed over time. Distinct central nervous system regions retain the capacity to generate new neurons and glia from an endogenous pool of progenitor cells and to compensate neural cell loss following certain lesions. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether endogenous cell replacement (neurogenesis or gliogenesis) in the brain (subventricular zone, SVZ; corpus callosum, CC; hippocampus, HC; and motor cortex, MC) or cervical spinal cord might represent a structural correlate for spontaneous locomotor recovery after a thoracic spinal cord injury. Adult Fischer 344 rats received severe contusion injuries (200 kDyn) of the mid-thoracic spinal cord using an Infinite Horizon Impactor. Uninjured rats served as controls. From 4 to 14 days post-injury, both groups received injections of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) to label dividing cells. Over the course of six weeks post-injury, spontaneous recovery of locomotor function occurred. Survival of newly generated cells was unaltered in the SVZ, HC, CC, and the MC. Neurogenesis, as determined by identification and quantification of doublecortin immunoreactive neuroblasts or BrdU/neuronal nuclear antigen double positive newly generated neurons, was not present in non-neurogenic regions (MC, CC, and cervical spinal cord) and unaltered in neurogenic regions (dentate gyrus and SVZ) of the brain. The lack of neuronal replacement in the brain and spinal cord after spinal cord injury precludes any relevance for spontaneous recovery of locomotor function. Gliogenesis was increased in the cervical spinal cord remote from the injury site, however, is unlikely to contribute to functional improvement.

  9. Oral midodrine for prostaglandin e1 induced priapism in spinal cord injured patients.

    PubMed

    Soler, Jean-Marc; Previnaire, Jean-Gabriel; Mieusset, Roger; Plante, Pierre

    2009-09-01

    We evaluated midodrine as oral treatment for pharmacologically induced priapism in spinal cord injured patients. From 2004 to 2007 we treated 354 spinal cord injured patients with intracavernous injection of prostaglandin E1 to induce erection. Prolonged erection or priapism occurred in 14 cases (1.3% of intracavernous injections). High blood pressure and bradycardia (autonomic dysreflexia) were noted in 2 tetraplegic cases. Except in 2 patients oral midodrine was used as the only therapeutic approach to this event because of its alpha stimulant properties. All patients returned to the flaccid penile state within 30 to 45 minutes after midodrine administration. Oral midodrine was well tolerated with few side effects and without increasing the incidence of autonomic dysreflexia. At 6 months complete erection could be again induced by intracavernous injection in all treated patients. Midodrine administered orally is a simple and efficient treatment for the priapism induced by intracavernous injection of prostaglandin E1. It could be the first line therapeutic approach before more aggressive procedures.

  10. The cross-talk between autophagy and endoplasmic reticulum stress in blood-spinal cord barrier disruption after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yulong; Wu, Yanqing; Liu, Yanlong; He, Zili; Zou, Shuang; Wang, Qingqing; Li, Jiawei; Zheng, Zengming; Chen, Jian; Wu, Fenzan; Gong, Fanhua; Zhang, Hongyu; Xu, Huazi; Xiao, Jian

    2017-01-03

    Spinal cord injury induces the disruption of blood-spinal cord barrier and triggers a complex array of tissue responses, including endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and autophagy. However, the roles of ER stress and autophagy in blood-spinal cord barrier disruption have not been discussed in acute spinal cord trauma. In the present study, we respectively detected the roles of ER stress and autophagy in blood-spinal cord barrier disruption after spinal cord injury. Besides, we also detected the cross-talking between autophagy and ER stress both in vivo and in vitro. ER stress inhibitor, 4-phenylbutyric acid, and autophagy inhibitor, chloroquine, were respectively or combinedly administrated in the model of acute spinal cord injury rats. At day 1 after spinal cord injury, blood-spinal cord barrier was disrupted and activation of ER stress and autophagy were involved in the rat model of trauma. Inhibition of ER stress by treating with 4-phenylbutyric acid decreased blood-spinal cord barrier permeability, prevented the loss of tight junction (TJ) proteins and reduced autophagy activation after spinal cord injury. On the contrary, inhibition of autophagy by treating with chloroquine exacerbated blood-spinal cord barrier permeability, promoted the loss of TJ proteins and enhanced ER stress after spinal cord injury. When 4-phenylbutyric acid and chloroquine were combinedly administrated in spinal cord injury rats, chloroquine abolished the blood-spinal cord barrier protective effect of 4-phenylbutyric acid by exacerbating ER stress after spinal cord injury, indicating that the cross-talking between autophagy and ER stress may play a central role on blood-spinal cord barrier integrity in acute spinal cord injury. The present study illustrates that ER stress induced by spinal cord injury plays a detrimental role on blood-spinal cord barrier integrity, on the contrary, autophagy induced by spinal cord injury plays a furthersome role in blood-spinal cord barrier integrity in

  11. The cross-talk between autophagy and endoplasmic reticulum stress in blood-spinal cord barrier disruption after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    He, Zili; Zou, Shuang; Wang, Qingqing; Li, Jiawei; Zheng, Zengming; Chen, Jian; Wu, Fenzan; Gong, Fanhua; Zhang, Hongyu; Xu, Huazi; Xiao, Jian

    2017-01-01

    Spinal cord injury induces the disruption of blood-spinal cord barrier and triggers a complex array of tissue responses, including endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and autophagy. However, the roles of ER stress and autophagy in blood-spinal cord barrier disruption have not been discussed in acute spinal cord trauma. In the present study, we respectively detected the roles of ER stress and autophagy in blood-spinal cord barrier disruption after spinal cord injury. Besides, we also detected the cross-talking between autophagy and ER stress both in vivo and in vitro. ER stress inhibitor, 4-phenylbutyric acid, and autophagy inhibitor, chloroquine, were respectively or combinedly administrated in the model of acute spinal cord injury rats. At day 1 after spinal cord injury, blood-spinal cord barrier was disrupted and activation of ER stress and autophagy were involved in the rat model of trauma. Inhibition of ER stress by treating with 4-phenylbutyric acid decreased blood-spinal cord barrier permeability, prevented the loss of tight junction (TJ) proteins and reduced autophagy activation after spinal cord injury. On the contrary, inhibition of autophagy by treating with chloroquine exacerbated blood-spinal cord barrier permeability, promoted the loss of TJ proteins and enhanced ER stress after spinal cord injury. When 4-phenylbutyric acid and chloroquine were combinedly administrated in spinal cord injury rats, chloroquine abolished the blood-spinal cord barrier protective effect of 4-phenylbutyric acid by exacerbating ER stress after spinal cord injury, indicating that the cross-talking between autophagy and ER stress may play a central role on blood-spinal cord barrier integrity in acute spinal cord injury. The present study illustrates that ER stress induced by spinal cord injury plays a detrimental role on blood-spinal cord barrier integrity, on the contrary, autophagy induced by spinal cord injury plays a furthersome role in blood-spinal cord barrier integrity in

  12. Vibration-induced finger flexion reflex and inhibitory effect of acupuncture on this reflex in cervical spinal cord injury patients.

    PubMed

    Takakura, N; Iijima, S; Kanamaru, A; Shibuya, M; Homma, I; Ohashi, M

    1996-12-01

    The vibration-induced finger flexion reflex (VFR) and the inhibitory effect of acupuncture on this reflex were studied in five cervical spinal cord injury patients (C-SCIs). VFR, which is a tonic finger flexion reflex induced by vibratory stimulation on the finger tip, was induced before and after acupuncture was carried out on the same hand. A stainless steel needle was inserted to the Hoku point. As in healthy subjects, VFR was performed and it was significantly inhibited by acupuncture in the C-SCIs; mean maximum VFR was 204.2 +/- S.E. 68.6 g before and 119.8 +/- S.E. 42.2 g after acupuncture. The present results suggest that at least part of the reflex center for VFR is located in the spinal cord and that part of VFR inhibition by acupuncture may be mediated via the spinal cord.

  13. [Dynamic study of neurofilament contents in rat's spinal cord induced by 2, 5-hexanedione].

    PubMed

    Song, Fu-Yong; Wang, Qing-Shan; Zeng, Tao; Yu, Li-Hua; Zhu, Zhen-Ping; Xie, Ke-Qin

    2008-10-01

    To investigate the dynamic changes of neurofilament contents in rat's spinal cord induced by 2, 5-hexanedione (2, 5-HD), and explore the molecular mechanism of n-hexane neuropathy. Male Wistar rats were administered at a dosage of 400 mg/kg/day 2, 5-HD for 2, 4 and 8 weeks respectively. HD-induced neurological defects were detected and quantified using gait score, and the relative lev-els of NF-H, NF-M, and NF-L in spinal cords of rats were determined by Western Blotting. Exposure to 2, 5-HD produced progressive gait abnormalities, which suggested that the rat model of 2, 5-HD-induced neurotoxicity was established successfully. Western-Blotting results showed that NFs content in spinal cord demonstrated a progressive decline as the intoxication continued. In the supernatant fraction, compared to the controls, NF-H con-tent decreased by 15.7%, 57.0%, and 58.0% respectively after 2, 4, and 8-week treatment with 2, 5-HD (P < 0.01); accordingly, NF-M decreased by 36.0%, 61.3%, and 65.2% respectively (P < 0.01); NF-L decreased by 20.8%, 43.9%, and 44.3% respectively (P < 0.01). In the pellet fraction, the contents of NF-H in groups of 4 and 8 weeks' exposure to HD decreased by 35.6% and 43.2%, respectively (P < 0.01), and those of NF-L decreased by 26.4% and 42.1%, respectively (P < 0.01) when compared to the control. Further-more, NF-M contents in groups of 2, 4 and 8 weeks' exposure decreased by 23.3%, 33.9%, and 63.7% respectively (P < 0.01). The NFs level in spinal cords was highly correlated with gait abnormality of treated rats as the intoxication went on. Multiple correlation coefficients of NF-H, NF-M, and NF-L content with gait score of HD-treated rat were 0.8912, 0.9282 and 0.8981 (P < 0.01) respectively. The declines of NFs are high-ly related to neurobehavioral abnormality of 2, 5-HD-treated animals, and involved in the development of n-hexane neuropathy.

  14. Traumatic spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, Christopher S; Wilson, Jefferson R; Nori, Satoshi; Kotter, Mark R N; Druschel, Claudia; Curt, Armin; Fehlings, Michael G

    2017-04-27

    Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) has devastating consequences for the physical, social and vocational well-being of patients. The demographic of SCIs is shifting such that an increasing proportion of older individuals are being affected. Pathophysiologically, the initial mechanical trauma (the primary injury) permeabilizes neurons and glia and initiates a secondary injury cascade that leads to progressive cell death and spinal cord damage over the subsequent weeks. Over time, the lesion remodels and is composed of cystic cavitations and a glial scar, both of which potently inhibit regeneration. Several animal models and complementary behavioural tests of SCI have been developed to mimic this pathological process and form the basis for the development of preclinical and translational neuroprotective and neuroregenerative strategies. Diagnosis requires a thorough patient history, standardized neurological physical examination and radiographic imaging of the spinal cord. Following diagnosis, several interventions need to be rapidly applied, including haemodynamic monitoring in the intensive care unit, early surgical decompression, blood pressure augmentation and, potentially, the administration of methylprednisolone. Managing the complications of SCI, such as bowel and bladder dysfunction, the formation of pressure sores and infections, is key to address all facets of the patient's injury experience.

  15. Behavioral recovery induced by applied electric fields after spinal cord hemisection in guinea pig

    SciTech Connect

    Borgens, R.B.; Blight, A.R.; McGinnis, M.E.

    1987-10-16

    Applied electric fields were used to promote axonal regeneration in spinal cords of adult guinea pigs. A propriospinal intersegmental reflex (the cutaneous trunci muscle reflex) was used to test lateral tract function after hemisection of the thoracic spinal cord. An electrical field (200 microvolts per millimeter, cathode rostral) applied across the lesion led to functional recovery of the cutaneous trunci muscle reflex in 25 percent of experimental animals, whereas the functional deficit remained in control animals, which were implanted with inactive stimulators.

  16. Human-induced pluripotent stem cells generated from intervertebral disc cells improve neurologic functions in spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jinsoo; Lee, Kang-In; Kim, Hyeong-Taek; You, Youngsang; Yoon, Do Heum; Song, Ki Yeong; Cheong, Eunji; Ha, Yoon; Hwang, Dong-Youn

    2015-06-24

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have emerged as a promising cell source for immune-compatible cell therapy. Although a variety of somatic cells have been tried for iPSC generation, it is still of great interest to test new cell types, especially those which are hardly obtainable in a normal situation. In this study, we generated iPSCs by using the cells originated from intervertebral disc which were removed during a spinal operation after spinal cord injury. We investigated the pluripotency of disc cell-derived iPSCs (diPSCs) and neural differentiation capability as well as therapeutic effect in spinal cord injury. The diPSCs displayed similar characteristics to human embryonic stem cells and were efficiently differentiated into neural precursor cells (NPCs) with the capability of differentiation into mature neurons in vitro. When the diPSC-derived NPCs were transplanted into mice 9 days after spinal cord injury, we detected a significant amelioration of hindlimb dysfunction during follow-up recovery periods. Histological analysis at 5 weeks after transplantation identified undifferentiated human NPCs (Nestin(+)) as well as early (Tuj1(+)) and mature (MAP2(+)) neurons derived from the transplanted NPCs. Furthermore, NPC transplantation demonstrated a preventive effect on spinal cord degeneration resulting from the secondary injury. This study revealed that intervertebral discs removed during surgery for spinal stabilization after spinal cord injury, previously considered a "waste" tissue, may provide a unique opportunity to study iPSCs derived from difficult-to-access somatic cells and a useful therapeutic resource for autologous cell replacement therapy in spinal cord injury.

  17. Fluoro-Jade B evidence of induced ischemic tolerance in the rat spinal cord ischemia: physiological, neurological and histopathological consequences.

    PubMed

    Orendácová, J; Ondrejcák, T; Kuchárová, K; Cízková, D; Jergová, S; Mitrusková, B; Raceková, E; Vanický, I; Marsala, J

    2005-03-01

    Fluoro-Jade B, a marker of degenerating neurons, was used to label histopathological changes in the rat spinal cord after transient ischemia and ischemic preconditioning (IPC). To characterize postischemic neurodegenerations and consequent neurological changes, a particular attention was paid to the standardization of ischemic conditions in animals of both groups. 1. The control ischemic rats were submitted to a reversible occlusion of descending aorta by insertion and subsequent inflation of a 2F Fogarty catheter for 12 min. 2. In the IPC rats, an episode of short 3 min occlusion and 30 min reperfusion preceded the 12 min ischemia. Postischemic motor function testing (ambulation and stepping) was provided repeatedly for evaluation of neurological status 2 h and 24 h after surgery and at the end of postischemic survival, i.e. after 48 h. Fluoro-Jade B staining was used to demonstrate degenerated neurons. In the control rats, neurological consequences of histopathological changes in lumbosacral spinal cord, manifested as paraplegia, were present after 12 min ischemia. Thus, numbers of degenerated Fluoro-Jade B positive cells were visible in gray matter of the most injured L(4)-S(2) spinal cord segments. Slight motor function impairment, consequential from significant decreasing in Fluoro-Jade B-positivity in the L(4)-S(2) spinal cord segments of the IPC rats, was considered the pathomorpfological evidence that IPC induces spinal cord tolerance to ischemia. Our results are consistent with the previously published silver impregnation method for histopathological demonstration of ischemic degeneration.

  18. Gene Expression in the Spinal Cord in Female Lewis Rats with Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis Induced with Myelin Basic Protein

    PubMed Central

    Inglis, Hayley R.; Greer, Judith M.; McCombe, Pamela A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the best available model of multiple sclerosis, can be induced in different animal strains using immunization with central nervous system antigens. EAE is associated with inflammation and demyelination of the nervous system. Micro-array can be used to investigate gene expression and biological pathways that are altered during disease. There are few studies of the changes in gene expression in EAE, and these have mostly been done in a chronic mouse EAE model. EAE induced in the Lewis with myelin basic protein (MBP-EAE) is well characterised, making it an ideal candidate for the analysis of gene expression in this disease model. Methodology/Principal Findings MBP-EAE was induced in female Lewis rats by inoculation with MBP and adjuvants. Total RNA was extracted from the spinal cords and used for micro-array analysis using AffimetrixGeneChip Rat Exon 1.0 ST Arrays. Gene expression in the spinal cords was compared between healthy female rats and female rats with MBP-EAE. Gene expression in the spinal cord of rats with MBP-EAE differed from that in the spinal cord of normal rats, and there was regulation of pathways involved with immune function and nervous system function. For selected genes the change in expression was confirmed with real-time PCR. Conclusions/Significance EAE leads to modulation of gene expression in the spinal cord. We have identified the genes that are most significantly regulated in MBP-EAE in the Lewis rat and produced a profile of gene expression in the spinal cord at the peak of disease. PMID:23139791

  19. The dura causes spinal cord compression after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Saadoun, Samira; Werndle, Melissa C; Lopez de Heredia, Luis; Papadopoulos, Marios C

    2016-10-01

    MR scans from 65 patients with traumatic spinal cord injury were analysed; on admission 95% had evidence of cord compression - in 26% due to the dura, and in the remaining 74% due to extradural factors. Compression due to dural factors resolved with a half-life of 5.5 days. These findings suggest that bony decompression alone may not relieve spinal cord compression in the quarter of patients in whom dural factors are significant.

  20. Photochemically induced cystic lesion in the rat spinal cord. I. Behavioral and morphological analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, T.; Prado, R.; Watson, B.D.; Gonzalez-Carvajal, M.; Holets, V.R. )

    1990-08-01

    The present study describes the production of a spinal cord lesion which is initiated by vascular occlusion resulting from the interaction between the photosensitizing dye erythrosin B and an argon laser beam. The lesion has characteristics similar to those of the central cavity thought to lead to the production of post-traumatic syringomyelia (PTS) in humans. The present study examines the behavioral and morphological characteristics of this injury over a 28-day period. Histological analysis revealed a cavity extending from the dorsal horns to lamina VIII, with some lateral and ventral pathways being spared. The cavity volume reached a maximum 7 days after lesion induction. Behavioral changes were assessed using six different tests of motor and reflex function (motor function, climbing, waterbath, inclined plane, withdrawal to pain, and withdrawal to extension). Lesioned animals exhibited flaccid paralysis for 3-5 days, which resolved afterward. The photochemically induced cavity should provide a reproducible model for examining the effects of cystic spinal cord injury on locomotor and reflex function.

  1. Spinal Cord Injury Impairs Neurogenesis and Induces Glial Reactivity in the Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Jure, Ignacio; Pietranera, Luciana; De Nicola, Alejandro F; Labombarda, Florencia

    2017-03-13

    The incorporation of newborn neurons with increased synaptic remodeling and activity-dependent plasticity in the dentate gyrus enhances hippocampal-dependent learning performances. Astrocytes and microglial cells are components of the neurogenic niche and regulate neurogenesis under normal and neurophatological conditions leading to functional consequences for learning and memory. Although cognitive impairments were reported in patients after spinal cord injury (SCI), only few studies have considered remote changes in brain structures which are not related with sensory and motor cortex. Thus, we examined neurogenesis and glial reactivity by stereological assessment in dentate gyrus sub-regions after three different intensities of thoracic spinal cord compression in rats. Sixty days after injury we observed a decrease in the Basso-Bresnahan-Beattie locomotor scale scores, rotarod performance and volume of spare tissue that correlated with the severity of the compression. Regarding the hippocampus, we observed that neurogenesis and hilar neurons were reduced after severe SCI, while only neurogenesis decreased in the moderately injured group. In addition, severe SCI induced reactive microglia and astrogliosis in all dentate gyrus sub-regions. Furthermore, the density of reactive microglia increased in the hilus whereas astrogliosis developed in the molecular layer after moderate SCI. No changes were observed in the mildly injured rats. These results suggest glial response and neurogenesis are associated with injury intensity. Interestingly, hippocampal neurogenesis is more sensitive to SCI than astrocytes or microglia reaction, as moderate injury impairs the generation of new neurons without changing glial response in the subgranular zone.

  2. Activation of complement pathways after contusion-induced spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Aileen J; Robert, Stephanie; Huang, Wencheng; Young, Wise; Cotman, Carl W

    2004-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that a cellular inflammatory response is initiated, and inflammatory cytokines are synthesized, following experimental spinal cord injury (SCI). In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that the complement cascade, a major component of both the innate and adaptive immune response, is also activated following experimental SCI. We investigated the pathways, cellular localization, timecourse, and degree of complement activation in rat spinal cord following acute contusion-induced SCI using the New York University (NYU) weight drop impactor. Mild and severe injuries (12.5 and 50 mm drop heights) at 1, 7, and 42 days post injury time points were evaluated. Classical (C1q and C4), alternative (Factor B) and terminal (C5b-9) complement pathways were strongly activated within 1 day of SCI. Complement protein immunoreactivity was predominantly found in cell types vulnerable to degeneration, neurons and oligodendrocytes, and was not generally observed in inflammatory or astroglial cells. Surprisingly, immunoreactivity for complement proteins was also evident 6 weeks after injury, and complement activation was observed as far as 20 mm rostral to the site of injury. Axonal staining by C1q and Factor B was also observed, suggesting a potential role for the complement cascade in demyelination or axonal degeneration. These data support the hypothesis that complement activation plays a role in SCI.

  3. Exercise induces cortical plasticity after neonatal spinal cord injury in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Kao, T; Shumsky, JS; Murray, M; Moxon, KA

    2009-01-01

    Exercise-induced cortical plasticity is associated with improved functional outcome after brain or nerve injury. Exercise also improves functional outcomes after spinal cord injury, but its effects on cortical plasticity are not known. The goal of this investigation was to study the effect of moderate exercise (treadmill locomotion, 3 min/day, 5days/week) on the somatotopic organization of forelimb and hindlimb somatosensory cortex (SI) after neonatal thoracic transection. We used adult rats spinalized as neonates because some of these animals develop weight-supported stepping and, therefore, the relationship between cortical plasticity and stepping could also be examined. Acute, single-neuron mapping was used to determine the percentage of cortical cells responding to cutaneous forelimb stimulation in normal, spinalized, and exercised spinalized rats. Multiple single neuron recording from arrays of chronically implanted microwires examined the magnitude of response of these cells in normal and exercised spinalized rats. Our results show that exercise not only increased the percentage of responding cells in the hindlimb SI, but also increased the magnitude of the response of these cells. This increase in response magnitude was correlated with behavioral outcome measures. In the forelimb SI, neonatal transection reduced the percentage of responding cells to forelimb stimulation but exercise reversed this loss. This restoration in the percentage of responding cells after exercise was accompanied by an increase in their response magnitude. Therefore, the increase in responsiveness of hindlimb SI to forelimb stimulation after neonatal transection and exercise may be due, in part, to the effect of exercise on the forelimb SI. PMID:19515923

  4. Spinal cord stimulation suppresses bradycardias and atrial tachyarrhythmias induced by mediastinal nerve stimulation in dogs.

    PubMed

    Cardinal, René; Pagé, Pierre; Vermeulen, Michel; Bouchard, Caroline; Ardell, Jeffrey L; Foreman, Robert D; Armour, J Andrew

    2006-11-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) applied to the dorsal aspect of the cranial thoracic cord imparts cardioprotection under conditions of neuronally dependent cardiac stress. This study investigated whether neuronally induced atrial arrhythmias can be modulated by SCS. In 16 anesthetized dogs with intact stellate ganglia and in five with bilateral stellectomy, trains of five electrical stimuli were delivered during the atrial refractory period to right- or left-sided mediastinal nerves for up to 20 s before and after SCS (20 min). Recordings were obtained from 191 biatrial epicardial sites. Before SCS (11 animals), mediastinal nerve stimulation initiated bradycardia alone (12 nerve sites), bradycardia followed by tachyarrhythmia/fibrillation (50 sites), as well as tachyarrhythmia/fibrillation without a preceding bradycardia (21 sites). After SCS, the number of responsive sites inducing bradycardia was reduced by 25% (62 to 47 sites), and the cycle length prolongation in residual bradycardias was reduced. The number of responsive sites inducing tachyarrhythmia was reduced by 60% (71 to 29 sites). Once elicited, residual tachyarrhythmias arose from similar epicardial foci, displaying similar dynamics (cycle length) as in control states. In the absence of SCS, bradycardias and tachyarrhythmias induced by repeat nerve stimulation were reproducible (five additional animals). After bilateral stellectomy, SCS no longer influenced neuronal induction of bradycardia and atrial tachyarrhythmias. These data indicate that SCS obtunds the induction of atrial arrhythmias resulting from excessive activation of intrinsic cardiac neurons and that such protective effects depend on the integrity of nerves coursing via the subclavian ansae and stellate ganglia.

  5. Retraining the injured spinal cord

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edgerton, V. R.; Leon, R. D.; Harkema, S. J.; Hodgson, J. A.; London, N.; Reinkensmeyer, D. J.; Roy, R. R.; Talmadge, R. J.; Tillakaratne, N. J.; Timoszyk, W.; hide

    2001-01-01

    The present review presents a series of concepts that may be useful in developing rehabilitative strategies to enhance recovery of posture and locomotion following spinal cord injury. First, the loss of supraspinal input results in a marked change in the functional efficacy of the remaining synapses and neurons of intraspinal and peripheral afferent (dorsal root ganglion) origin. Second, following a complete transection the lumbrosacral spinal cord can recover greater levels of motor performance if it has been exposed to the afferent and intraspinal activation patterns that are associated with standing and stepping. Third, the spinal cord can more readily reacquire the ability to stand and step following spinal cord transection with repetitive exposure to standing and stepping. Fourth, robotic assistive devices can be used to guide the kinematics of the limbs and thus expose the spinal cord to the new normal activity patterns associated with a particular motor task following spinal cord injury. In addition, such robotic assistive devices can provide immediate quantification of the limb kinematics. Fifth, the behavioural and physiological effects of spinal cord transection are reflected in adaptations in most, if not all, neurotransmitter systems in the lumbosacral spinal cord. Evidence is presented that both the GABAergic and glycinergic inhibitory systems are up-regulated following complete spinal cord transection and that step training results in some aspects of these transmitter systems being down-regulated towards control levels. These concepts and observations demonstrate that (a) the spinal cord can interpret complex afferent information and generate the appropriate motor task; and (b) motor ability can be defined to a large degree by training.

  6. Retraining the injured spinal cord

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edgerton, V. R.; Leon, R. D.; Harkema, S. J.; Hodgson, J. A.; London, N.; Reinkensmeyer, D. J.; Roy, R. R.; Talmadge, R. J.; Tillakaratne, N. J.; Timoszyk, W.; Tobin, A.

    2001-01-01

    The present review presents a series of concepts that may be useful in developing rehabilitative strategies to enhance recovery of posture and locomotion following spinal cord injury. First, the loss of supraspinal input results in a marked change in the functional efficacy of the remaining synapses and neurons of intraspinal and peripheral afferent (dorsal root ganglion) origin. Second, following a complete transection the lumbrosacral spinal cord can recover greater levels of motor performance if it has been exposed to the afferent and intraspinal activation patterns that are associated with standing and stepping. Third, the spinal cord can more readily reacquire the ability to stand and step following spinal cord transection with repetitive exposure to standing and stepping. Fourth, robotic assistive devices can be used to guide the kinematics of the limbs and thus expose the spinal cord to the new normal activity patterns associated with a particular motor task following spinal cord injury. In addition, such robotic assistive devices can provide immediate quantification of the limb kinematics. Fifth, the behavioural and physiological effects of spinal cord transection are reflected in adaptations in most, if not all, neurotransmitter systems in the lumbosacral spinal cord. Evidence is presented that both the GABAergic and glycinergic inhibitory systems are up-regulated following complete spinal cord transection and that step training results in some aspects of these transmitter systems being down-regulated towards control levels. These concepts and observations demonstrate that (a) the spinal cord can interpret complex afferent information and generate the appropriate motor task; and (b) motor ability can be defined to a large degree by training.

  7. Electrically induced resistance training in individuals with motor complete spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Terence E; Brizendine, Jared T; Backus, Deborah; McCully, Kevin K

    2013-11-01

    To examine the effects of 16 weeks of electrically induced resistance training on insulin resistance and glucose tolerance, and changes in muscle size, composition, and metabolism in paralyzed muscle. Pre-post intervention. University-based trial. Participants (N=14; 11 men and 3 women) with chronic (>2y post spinal cord injury), motor complete spinal cord injury. Home-based electrically induced resistance exercise training twice weekly for 16 weeks. Plasma glucose and insulin throughout a standard clinical oral glucose tolerance test, thigh muscle and fat mass via dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, quadriceps and hamstrings muscle size and composition via magnetic resonance imaging, and muscle oxidative metabolism using phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Muscle mass increased in all participants (mean ± SD, 39%±27%; range, 5%-84%). The mean change ± SD in intramuscular fat was 3%±22%. Phosphocreatine mean recovery time constants ± SD were 102±24 and 77±18 seconds before and after electrical stimulation-induced resistance training, respectively (P<.05). There was no improvement in fasting blood glucose levels, homeostatic model assessment calculated insulin resistance, 2-hour insulin, or 2-hour glucose. Sixteen weeks of electrical stimulation-induced resistance training increased muscle mass, but did not reduce intramuscular fat. Similarly, factors associated with insulin resistance or glucose tolerance did not improve with training. We did find a 25% improvement in mitochondrial function, as measured by phosphocreatine recovery rates. Larger improvements in mitochondrial function may translate into improved glucose tolerance and insulin resistance. Copyright © 2013 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Spinal Rhythm Generation by Step-Induced Feedback and Transcutaneous Posterior Root Stimulation in Complete Spinal Cord-Injured Individuals.

    PubMed

    Minassian, Karen; Hofstoetter, Ursula S; Danner, Simon M; Mayr, Winfried; Bruce, Joy A; McKay, W Barry; Tansey, Keith E

    2016-03-01

    The human lumbosacral spinal circuitry can generate rhythmic motor output in response to different types of inputs after motor-complete spinal cord injury. To explore spinal rhythm generating mechanisms recruited by phasic step-related sensory feedback and tonic posterior root stimulation when provided alone or in combination. We studied stepping in 4 individuals with chronic, clinically complete spinal cord injury using a robotic-driven gait orthosis with body weight support over a treadmill. Electromyographic data were collected from thigh and lower leg muscles during stepping with 2 hip-movement conditions and 2 step frequencies, first without and then with tonic 30-Hz transcutaneous spinal cord stimulation (tSCS) over the lumbar posterior roots. Robotic-driven stepping alone generated rhythmic activity in a small number of muscles, mostly in hamstrings, coinciding with the stretch applied to the muscle, and in tibialis anterior as stance-phase synchronized clonus. Adding tonic 30-Hz tSCS increased the number of rhythmically responding muscles, augmented thigh muscle activity, and suppressed clonus. tSCS could also produce rhythmic activity without or independent of step-specific peripheral feedback. Changing stepping parameters could change the amount of activity generated but not the multimuscle activation patterns. The data suggest that the rhythmic motor patterns generated by the imposed stepping were responses of spinal reflex circuits to the cyclic sensory feedback. Tonic 30-Hz tSCS provided for additional excitation and engaged spinal rhythm-generating networks. The synergistic effects of these rhythm-generating mechanisms suggest that tSCS in combination with treadmill training might augment rehabilitation outcomes after severe spinal cord injury. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. Centralization of noxious stimulus-induced analgesia (NSIA) is related to activity at inhibitory synapses in the spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Tambeli, Claudia H; Levine, Jon D; Gear, Robert W

    2009-06-01

    The duration of noxious stimulus-induced antinociception (NSIA) has been shown to outlast the pain stimulus that elicited it, however, the mechanism that determines the duration of analgesia is unknown. We evaluated the role of spinal excitatory and inhibitory receptors (NMDA, mGluR(5), mu-opioid, GABA(A), and GABA(B)), previously implicated in NSIA initiation, in its maintenance. As in our previous studies, the supraspinal trigeminal jaw-opening reflex (JOR) in the rat was used for nociceptive testing because of its remoteness from the region of drug application, the lumbar spinal cord. NSIA was reversed by antagonists for two inhibitory receptors (GABA(B) and mu-opioid) but not by antagonists for either of the two excitatory receptors (NMDA and mGluR(5)), indicating that NSIA is maintained by ongoing activity at inhibitory synapses in the spinal cord. Furthermore, spinal administration of the GABA(B) agonist baclofen mimicked NSIA in that it could be blocked by prior injection of the mu-opioid receptor antagonist H-D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Arg-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH(2) (CTAP) in nucleus accumbens. CTAP also blocked baclofen antinociception when administered in the spinal cord. We conclude that analgesia induced by noxious stimulation is maintained by activity in spinal inhibitory receptors.

  10. Maladaptive spinal plasticity opposes spinal learning and recovery in spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Adam R.; Huie, J. Russell; Crown, Eric D.; Baumbauer, Kyle M.; Hook, Michelle A.; Garraway, Sandra M.; Lee, Kuan H.; Hoy, Kevin C.; Grau, James W.

    2012-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity within the spinal cord has great potential to facilitate recovery of function after spinal cord injury (SCI). Spinal plasticity can be induced in an activity-dependent manner even without input from the brain after complete SCI. A mechanistic basis for these effects is provided by research demonstrating that spinal synapses have many of the same plasticity mechanisms that are known to underlie learning and memory in the brain. In addition, the lumbar spinal cord can sustain several forms of learning and memory, including limb-position training. However, not all spinal plasticity promotes recovery of function. Central sensitization of nociceptive (pain) pathways in the spinal cord may emerge in response to various noxious inputs, demonstrating that plasticity within the spinal cord may contribute to maladaptive pain states. In this review we discuss interactions between adaptive and maladaptive forms of activity-dependent plasticity in the spinal cord below the level of SCI. The literature demonstrates that activity-dependent plasticity within the spinal cord must be carefully tuned to promote adaptive spinal training. Prior work from our group has shown that stimulation that is delivered in a limb position-dependent manner or on a fixed interval can induce adaptive plasticity that promotes future spinal cord learning and reduces nociceptive hyper-reactivity. On the other hand, stimulation that is delivered in an unsynchronized fashion, such as randomized electrical stimulation or peripheral skin injuries, can generate maladaptive spinal plasticity that undermines future spinal cord learning, reduces recovery of locomotor function, and promotes nociceptive hyper-reactivity after SCI. We review these basic phenomena, how these findings relate to the broader spinal plasticity literature, discuss the cellular and molecular mechanisms, and finally discuss implications of these and other findings for improved rehabilitative therapies after SCI. PMID

  11. CCL-1 in the spinal cord contributes to neuropathic pain induced by nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Akimoto, N; Honda, K; Uta, D; Beppu, K; Ushijima, Y; Matsuzaki, Y; Nakashima, S; Kido, M A; Imoto, K; Takano, Y; Noda, M

    2013-01-01

    Cytokines such as interleukins are known to be involved in the development of neuropathic pain through activation of neuroglia. However, the role of chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 1 (CCL-1), a well-characterized chemokine secreted by activated T cells, in the nociceptive transmission remains unclear. We found that CCL-1 was upregulated in the spinal dorsal horn after partial sciatic nerve ligation. Therefore, we examined actions of recombinant CCL-1 on behavioural pain score, synaptic transmission, glial cell function and cytokine production in the spinal dorsal horn. Here we show that CCL-1 is one of the key mediators involved in the development of neuropathic pain. Expression of CCL-1 mRNA was mainly detected in the ipsilateral dorsal root ganglion, and the expression of specific CCL-1 receptor CCR-8 was upregulated in the superficial dorsal horn. Increased expression of CCR-8 was observed not only in neurons but also in microglia and astrocytes in the ipsilateral side. Recombinant CCL-1 injected intrathecally (i.t.) to naive mice induced allodynia, which was prevented by the supplemental addition of N-methyl-𝒟-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, MK-801. Patch-clamp recordings from spinal cord slices revealed that application of CCL-1 transiently enhanced excitatory synaptic transmission in the substantia gelatinosa (lamina II). In the long term, i.t. injection of CCL-1 induced phosphorylation of NMDA receptor subunit, NR1 and NR2B, in the spinal cord. Injection of CCL-1 also upregulated mRNA level of glial cell markers and proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6). The tactile allodynia induced by nerve ligation was attenuated by prophylactic and chronic administration of neutralizing antibody against CCL-1 and by knocking down of CCR-8. Our results indicate that CCL-1 is one of the key molecules in pathogenesis, and CCL-1/CCR-8 signaling system can be a potential target for drug development in the treatment for neuropathic pain. PMID:23788036

  12. Attitudes Towards Individuals with Spinal Cord Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conway, Cassandra Sligh D.; Gooden, Randy; Nowell, Jennifer; Wilson, Navodda

    2010-01-01

    This paper will shed light on the lives of persons with spinal cord injuries by revealing the literature on spinal cord injuries that focuses on research that can shed light on attitudes towards persons with spinal cord injuries. The background literature related to incidences, the definition of spinal cord injury, and vocational opportunities are…

  13. Fatigue-induced motor cortex excitability changes in subjects with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Nardone, Raffaele; Höller, Yvonne; Brigo, Francesco; Höller, Peter; Christova, Monica; Tezzon, Frediano; Golaszewski, Stefan; Trinka, Eugen

    2013-10-01

    To further investigate the mechanisms of exercise-induced cortical plasticity after spinal cord injury (SCI), the cortical silent period (CoSP) evoked by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) during a fatiguing muscle contraction was evaluated in 5 patients with incomplete cervical SCI and in 5 healthy subjects. The physiological lengthening of CoSP end latency during fatigue was not observed in the SCI patients. This reduced intracortical inhibition, probably secondary to decreased activity of the GABAergic inhibitory interneurons that modulate the corticomotoneuronal output, could represent a 'positive' neuroplastic response in an attempt to compensate for the loss of corticospinal axons. The investigation of motor cortex excitability during fatiguing exercise may shed light on the role of exercise therapy in promoting brain reorganization and functional recovery in humans.

  14. Role of dorsal rhizotomy in spinal cord injury-induced spasticity.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Renee M; Morton, Ryan P; Walker, Marion L; Massagli, Teresa L; Browd, Samuel R

    2014-09-01

    Selective dorsal rhizotomy may have a role in the management of spinal cord injury (SCI)-induced spasticity. Spasticity and spasms are common sequelae of SCI in children. Depending on the clinical scenario, treatments may include physical and occupational therapy, oral medications, chemodenervation, and neurosurgical interventions. Selective dorsal rhizotomy (SDR) is used in the management of spasticity in selected children with cerebral palsy, but, to the authors' knowledge, its use has not been reported in children with SCI. The authors describe the cases of 3 pediatric patients with SCI and associated spasticity treated with SDR. Two of the 3 patients have had significant long-term improvement in their preoperative spasticity. Although the third patient also experienced initial relief, his spasticity quickly returned to its preoperative severity, necessitating additional therapies. Selective dorsal rhizotomy may have a place in the treatment of selected children with spasticity due to SCI.

  15. Proteomic and bioinformatic analyses of spinal cord injury-induced skeletal muscle atrophy in rats

    PubMed Central

    WEI, ZHI-JIAN; ZHOU, XIAN-HU; FAN, BAO-YOU; LIN, WEI; REN, YI-MING; FENG, SHI-QING

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) may result in skeletal muscle atrophy. Identifying diagnostic biomarkers and effective targets for treatment is an important challenge in clinical work. The aim of the present study is to elucidate potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets for SCI-induced muscle atrophy (SIMA) using proteomic and bioinformatic analyses. The protein samples from rat soleus muscle were collected at different time points following SCI injury and separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and compared with the sham group. The identities of these protein spots were analyzed by mass spectrometry (MS). MS demonstrated that 20 proteins associated with muscle atrophy were differentially expressed. Bioinformatic analyses indicated that SIMA changed the expression of proteins associated with cellular, developmental, immune system and metabolic processes, biological adhesion and localization. The results of the present study may be beneficial in understanding the molecular mechanisms of SIMA and elucidating potential biomarkers and targets for the treatment of muscle atrophy. PMID:27177391

  16. Cell transplantation therapies for spinal cord injury focusing on induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Masaya; Okano, Hideyuki

    2013-01-01

    Stimulated by the 2012 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine awarded for Shinya Yamanaka and Sir John Gurdon, there is an increasing interest in the induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells and reprograming technologies in medical science. While iPS cells are expected to open a new era providing enormous opportunities in biomedical sciences in terms of cell therapies and regenerative medicine, safety-related concerns for iPS cell-based cell therapy should be resolved prior to the clinical application of iPS cells. In this review, the pre-clinical investigations of cell therapy for spinal cord injury (SCI) using neural stem/progenitor cells derived from iPS cells, and their safety issues in vivo, are outlined. We also wish to discuss the strategy for the first human trails of iPS cell-based cell therapy for SCI patients.

  17. Implication of Hypothalamus in Alleviating Spinal Cord Injury-Induced Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Crowell, Andrew D.; King, Kevin; Deitermann, Annika; Miranpuri, Gurwattan S.; Resnick, Daniel K.

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain (NP) is common among spinal cord injury (SCI) patients, and there remain clinical difficulties in treating NP due to the lack of understanding of underlying mechanisms. Extracellular proteins, such as matrix metalloproteinase and β-catenin, have been shown to be activated in the spinal cord regions following an injury, and may play a key role in contributing to NP states. While these extracellular proteins have been used as therapeutic targets in the spinal cord, there has also been evidence of up-regulation in the hypothalamus following a SCI. We hypothesize that the hypothalamus is involved in regulating NP following a SCI, and hence should be researched further to determine if it is a viable target for future therapeutic treatments. PMID:27721586

  18. Tail nerve electrical stimulation induces body weight-supported stepping in rats with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shu-Xin; Huang, Fengfa; Gates, Mary; White, Jason; Holmberg, Eric G

    2010-03-30

    Walking or stepping has been considered the result from the activation of the central pattern generator (CPG). In most patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) the CPG is undamaged. To date, there are no noninvasive approaches for activating the CPG. Recently we developed a noninvasive technique, tail nerve electrical stimulation (TANES), which can induce positive hind limb movement of SCI rats. The purpose of this study is to introduce the novel technique and examine the effect of TANES on CPG activation. A 25 mm contusion injury was produced at spinal cord T10 of female, adult Long-Evans rats by using the NYU impactor device. Rats received TANES ( approximately 40 mA at 4 kHz) 7 weeks after injury. During TANES all injured rats demonstrated active body weight-supported stepping of hind limbs with left-right alternation and occasional front-hind coordination, resulting in significant, temporary increase in BBB scores (p<0.01). However, there is no response to TANES from rats with L2 transection, consistent with other reports that the CPG may be located at L1-2. S1 transection negatively implies the key role of TANES in CPG activation. The TANES not only renders paralyzed rats with a technique-induced ability to walk via activating CPG, but also is likely to be used for locomotor training. It has more beneficial effects for physical training over other training paradigms including treadmill training and invasive functional electrical stimulation. Therefore the TANES may have considerable potential for achieving improvement of functional recovery in animal models and a similar method may be suggested for human study. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Electroacupuncture preconditioning and postconditioning inhibit apoptosis and neuroinflammation induced by spinal cord ischemia reperfusion injury through enhancing autophagy in rats.

    PubMed

    Fang, Bo; Qin, Meiman; Li, Yun; Li, Xiaoqian; Tan, Wenfei; Zhang, Ying; Ma, Hong

    2017-03-06

    Electroacupuncture (EA) has beneficial effects on spinal cord ischemia reperfusion (I/R) injury, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. This study aimed to investigate the role of autophagy in the protection of EA preconditioning and postconditioning against spinal cord I/R injury. For this, spinal cord I/R injury was induced by 14min occlusion of the aortic arch, and rats were treated with EA for 20min before or after the surgery. The expression of autophagy components, light chain 3 and Beclin 1, was assessed by Western blot. The hind-limb motor function was assessed using the Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan (BBB) criteria, and motor neurons in the ventral gray matter were counted by histological examination. The apoptosis of neurocyte was assessed by the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay. The expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) was also measured using Western blot or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Either EA preconditioning or postconditioning enhanced autophagy, and minimized the neuromotor dysfunction and histopathological deficits after spinal cord I/R injury. In addition, EA suppressed I/R-induced apoptosis and increased in the expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, and MMP-9. In contrast, the autophagic inhibitor (3-methyladenine, 3-MA) inhibited the neuroprotective effects of EA. Moreover, 3-MA increased the apoptosis and the expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, and MMP-9. In summary, these findings suggested that EA preconditioning and postconditioning could alleviate spinal cord I/R injury, which was partly mediated by autophagy upregulation-induced inhibition of apoptosis and neuroinflammation.

  20. Development of an Animal Model of Thoracolumbar Burst Fracture Induced Acute Spinal Cord Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-01

    REPORT: Annual PREPARED FOR: U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command Fort Detrick, Maryland 21702-5012 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT: Approved... Medical Research and Materiel Command Fort Detrick, Maryland 21702-5012 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT NUMBER(S) 12. DISTRIBUTION / AVAILABILITY...contusion SCI that is seen in burst fracture using a custom-designed, controlled spinal cord impactor and sustained balloon compression. 2. Keywords Spinal

  1. Anti-NGF Local Therapy for Autonomic Dysreflexia in Spinal Cord Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    pathophysiological basis of neurogenic detrusor overactivity with spinal cord injury (SCI). However, the... bladder distention after SCI. Using adult female rats with chronic spinal cord injury induced by Th4 spinal cord transection, we will investigate: (1...autonomic dysreflexia during bladder distention in rats with spinal cord injury . 111th Annual Meeting AUA, Abstract No. 34, San Diego, May 4-8, 2013.

  2. Changes of blood flow, oxygen tension, action potential and vascular permeability induced by arterial ischemia or venous congestion on the spinal cord in canine model.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Shigeru; Yoshizawa, Hidezo; Shimada, Seiichiro; Guerrero, Alexander Rodríguez; Miyachi, Masaya

    2013-01-01

    It is generally considered that the genesis of myelopathy associated with the degenerative conditions of the spine may result from both mechanical compression and circulatory disturbance. Many references about spinal cord tissue ischemic damage can be found in the literature, but not detailed studies about spinal cord microvasculature damage related to congestion or blood permeability. This study investigates the effect of ischemia and congestion on the spinal cord using an in vivo model. The aorta was clamped as an ischemia model of the spinal cord and the inferior vena cava was clamped as a congestion model at the 6th costal level for 30 min using forceps transpleurally. Measurements of blood flow, partial oxygen pressure, and conduction velocity in the spinal cord were repeated over a period of 1 h after release of clamping. Finally, we examined the status of blood-spinal cord barrier under fluorescence and transmission electron microscope. Immediately after clamping of the inferior vena cava, the central venous pressure increased by about four times. Blood flow, oxygen tension and action potential were more severely affected by the aorta clamping; but this ischemic model did not show any changes of blood permeability in the spinal cord. The intramedullar edema was more easily produced by venous congestion than by arterial ischemia. In conclusions, venous congestion may be a preceding and essential factor of circulatory disturbance in the compressed spinal cord inducing myelopathy.

  3. Beclin-1-mediated autophagy protects spinal cord neurons against mechanical injury-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen-Yu; Lin, Jian-Hua; Muharram, Akram; Liu, Wen-Ge

    2014-06-01

    Apoptosis has been widely reported to be involved in the pathogenesis associated with spinal cord injury (SCI). Recently, autophagy has also been implicated in various neuronal damage models. However, the role of autophagy in SCI is still controversial and its interrelationship with apoptosis remains unclear. Here, we used an in vitro SCI model to observe a time-dependent induction of autophagy and apoptosis. Mechanical injury induced autophagy markers such as LC3 lipidation, LC3II/LC3I conversion, and Beclin-1 expression. Injured neurons showed decreased cell viability and increased apoptosis. To elucidate the effect of autophagy on apoptosis, the mechanically-injured neurons were treated with the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin and 3-methyl adenine (3-MA), which are known to regulate autophagy positively and negatively, respectively. Rapamycin-treated neurons showed the highest level of cell viability and lowest level of apoptosis among the injured neurons and those treated with 3-MA showed the reciprocal effect. Notably, rapamycin-treated neurons exhibited slightly reduced Bax expression and significantly increased Bcl-2 expression. Furthermore, by plasmid transfection, we showed that Beclin-1-overexpressing neuronal cells responded to mechanical injury with greater LC3II/LC3I conversion and cell viability, lower levels of apoptosis, higher Bcl-2 expression, and unaltered Bax expression as compared to vector control cells. Beclin-1-knockdown neurons showed almost the opposite effects. Taken together, our results suggest that autophagy may serve as a protection against apoptosis in mechanically-injured spinal cord neurons. Targeting mTOR and/or enhancing Beclin-1 expression might be alternative therapeutic strategies for SCI.

  4. Early Intervention for Spinal Cord Injury with Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Oligodendrocyte Progenitors

    PubMed Central

    All, Angelo H.; Gharibani, Payam; Gupta, Siddharth; Bazley, Faith A.; Pashai, Nikta; Chou, Bin-Kuan; Shah, Sandeep; Resar, Linda M.; Cheng, Linzhao; Gearhart, John D.; Kerr, Candace L.

    2015-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are at the forefront of research in regenerative medicine and are envisaged as a source for personalized tissue repair and cell replacement therapy. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that oligodendrocyte progenitors (OPs) can be derived from iPS cells generated using either an episomal, non-integrating plasmid approach or standard integrating retroviruses that survive and differentiate into mature oligodendrocytes after early transplantation into the injured spinal cord. The efficiency of OP differentiation in all 3 lines tested ranged from 40% to 60% of total cells, comparable to those derived from human embryonic stem cells. iPS cell lines derived using episomal vectors or retroviruses generated a similar number of early neural progenitors and glial progenitors while the episomal plasmid-derived iPS line generated more OPs expressing late markers O1 and RIP. Moreover, we discovered that iPS-derived OPs (iPS-OPs) engrafted 24 hours following a moderate contusive spinal cord injury (SCI) in rats survived for approximately two months and that more than 70% of the transplanted cells differentiated into mature oligodendrocytes that expressed myelin associated proteins. Transplanted OPs resulted in a significant increase in the number of myelinated axons in animals that received a transplantation 24 h after injury. In addition, nearly a 5-fold reduction in cavity size and reduced glial scarring was seen in iPS-treated groups compared to the control group, which was injected with heat-killed iPS-OPs. Although further investigation is needed to understand the mechanisms involved, these results provide evidence that patient-specific, iPS-derived OPs can survive for three months and improve behavioral assessment (BBB) after acute transplantation into SCI. This is significant as determining the time in which stem cells are injected after SCI may influence their survival and differentiation capacity. PMID:25635918

  5. Early intervention for spinal cord injury with human induced pluripotent stem cells oligodendrocyte progenitors.

    PubMed

    All, Angelo H; Gharibani, Payam; Gupta, Siddharth; Bazley, Faith A; Pashai, Nikta; Chou, Bin-Kuan; Shah, Sandeep; Resar, Linda M; Cheng, Linzhao; Gearhart, John D; Kerr, Candace L

    2015-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are at the forefront of research in regenerative medicine and are envisaged as a source for personalized tissue repair and cell replacement therapy. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that oligodendrocyte progenitors (OPs) can be derived from iPS cells generated using either an episomal, non-integrating plasmid approach or standard integrating retroviruses that survive and differentiate into mature oligodendrocytes after early transplantation into the injured spinal cord. The efficiency of OP differentiation in all 3 lines tested ranged from 40% to 60% of total cells, comparable to those derived from human embryonic stem cells. iPS cell lines derived using episomal vectors or retroviruses generated a similar number of early neural progenitors and glial progenitors while the episomal plasmid-derived iPS line generated more OPs expressing late markers O1 and RIP. Moreover, we discovered that iPS-derived OPs (iPS-OPs) engrafted 24 hours following a moderate contusive spinal cord injury (SCI) in rats survived for approximately two months and that more than 70% of the transplanted cells differentiated into mature oligodendrocytes that expressed myelin associated proteins. Transplanted OPs resulted in a significant increase in the number of myelinated axons in animals that received a transplantation 24 h after injury. In addition, nearly a 5-fold reduction in cavity size and reduced glial scarring was seen in iPS-treated groups compared to the control group, which was injected with heat-killed iPS-OPs. Although further investigation is needed to understand the mechanisms involved, these results provide evidence that patient-specific, iPS-derived OPs can survive for three months and improve behavioral assessment (BBB) after acute transplantation into SCI. This is significant as determining the time in which stem cells are injected after SCI may influence their survival and differentiation capacity.

  6. Early Trauma-Induced Coagulopathy is Associated with Increased Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia in Spinal Cord Injury Patients.

    PubMed

    Younan, Duraid; Lin, Erica; Griffin, Russell; Vanlandingham, Sean; Waters, Alicia; Harrigan, Mark; Pittet, Jean-Francois; Kerby, Jeffrey D

    2016-05-01

    Early trauma-induced coagulopathy may increase susceptibility to nosocomial infections such as ventilator-associated pneumonia. However, the relationship between trauma- induced coagulopathy and the development of ventilator-associated pneumonia in spinal cord injury patients has not been evaluated. We conducted a 5-year retrospective study of 300 spinal cord injury patients admitted to Level 1 trauma center. Standard coagulation studies were evaluated upon arrival, prior to fluid resuscitative efforts, and at 24  h after admission. Based on these studies, three groups of patients were identified: no coagulopathy, latent coagulopathy, and admission coagulopathy. Ventilator- associated pneumonia was identified utilizing Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria. Since we used the data in the trauma registry and did not have the information on FiO2 and PEEP, we elected to use the VAP terminology and not the VAE sequence. Demographic, injury, and clinical characteristics were compared among no coagulopathy, latent coagulopathy, and admission coagulopathy groups using chi-square test and ANOVA for categorical and continuous variables, respectively. A logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association between coagulopathy and both ventilator-associated pneumonia and mortality. The incidence of ventilator-associated pneumonia was 54.5% (OR 4.01, 95% CI 1.76-9.15) in spinal cord injury patients with admission coagulopathy, compared with the 17.5% in spinal cord injury patients with no coagulopathy. Mortality was significantly higher in spinal cord injury patients with admission coagulopathy than in spinal cord injury patients with no coagulopathy (OR 6.14, 95% CI 1.73-21.73).After adjusting for age, race, injury mechanism, Injury Severity Score, base deficit at admission, the number of pRBC units transfused in the first 24  h, and hospital stay, only the association of ventilator

  7. Intramedullary Cervical Spinal Cord Abscess.

    PubMed

    Bakhsheshian, Joshua; Kim, Paul E; Attenello, Frank J

    2017-10-01

    Intramedullary spinal cord abscesses are rarely encountered in modern neurosurgical practice. Select patients are at high risk for developing an intramedullary spinal cord abscess, which can result in acute neurologic deficits. Patients with failed conservative management may benefit from early surgical intervention; however, the evidence is limited by level 3 studies. In this case presentation, the patient failed conservative management for a cervical intramedullary spinal cord abscess and developed acute neurologic deficits. The decision was made to perform an urgent cervical laminectomy and drainage to avoid any further decline that may have occurred with continued conservative management. Increased awareness of intramedullary spinal cord abscess is warranted for its clinical suspicion and emergent treatment in select circumstances. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Development of an Animal Model of Thoracolumbar Burst Fracture-Induced Acute Spinal Cord Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-01

    right with an R-squared value of 0.9919, indicative of a strong linear correlation. Figure 3. Bar graph showing the outcome of the Porcine Neuro ...show the relative degree of neuronal apoptosis, demyelination, inflammation , and other effects of spinal cord injury. Finally, we used two validated

  9. Erythropoietin promotes oligodendrogenesis and myelin repair following lysolecithin-induced injury in spinal cord slice culture.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yun Kyung; Kim, Gunha; Park, Serah; Sim, Ju Hee; Won, You Jin; Hwang, Chang Ho; Yoo, Jong Yoon; Hong, Hea Nam

    2012-01-13

    Here, we sought to delineate the effect of EPO on the remyelination processes using an in vitro model of demyelination. We report that lysolecithin-induced demyelination elevated EPO receptor (EpoR) expression in oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs), facilitating the beneficial effect of EPO on the formation of oligodendrocytes (oligodendrogenesis). In the absence of EPO, the resultant remyelination was insufficient, possibly due to a limiting number of oligodendrocytes rather than their progenitors, which proliferate in response to lysolecithin-induced injury. By EPO treatment, lysolecithin-induced proliferation of OPCs was accelerated and the number of myelinating oligodendrocytes and myelin recovery was increased. EPO also enhanced the differentiation of neural progenitor cells expressing EpoR at high level toward the oligodendrocyte-lineage cells through activation of cyclin E and Janus kinase 2 pathways. Induction of myelin-forming oligodendrocytes by high dose of EPO implies that EPO might be the key factor influencing the final differentiation of OPCs. Taken together, our data suggest that EPO treatment could be an effective way to enhance remyelination by promoting oligodendrogenesis in association with elevated EpoR expression in spinal cord slice culture after lysolecithin-induced demyelination.

  10. Withania somnifera (Ashwagandha) attenuates antioxidant defense in aged spinal cord and inhibits copper induced lipid peroxidation and protein oxidative modifications.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sanjeev K; Dua, Anita; Vohra, Bhupinder P S

    2003-01-01

    Withania somnifera is classified in Ayurveda, the ancient Indian system of medicine, as a rasayana, a group of plant-derived drugs which promote physical and mental health, augment resistance of the body against disease and diverse adverse environmental factors, revitalize the body in debilitated conditions and increase longevity. We investigated the effects of Withania somnifera on copper-induced lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes in aging spinal cord of Wistar rats. The activity of glutathione peroxidase (GPx) decreased significantly in the spinal cord from adult to aged mice. Treatment with Withania somnifera successfully attenuated GPx activity and inhibited lipid peroxidation in a dose dependent manner. Withania somnifera inhibited both the lipid peroxidation and protein oxidative modification induced by copper. These effects were similar to those of superoxide dismutase and mannitol. The results indicate the therapeutic potential of Withania somnifera in aging and copper-induced pathophysiological conditions.

  11. Hyperbaric oxygenation alleviates chronic constriction injury (CCI)-induced neuropathic pain and inhibits GABAergic neuron apoptosis in the spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Fu, Huiqun; Li, Fenghua; Thomas, Sebastian; Yang, Zhongjin

    2017-09-15

    Dysfunction of GABAergic inhibitory controls contributes to the development of neuropathic pain. We examined our hypotheses that (1) chronic constriction injury (CCI)-induced neuropathic pain is associated with increased spinal GABAergic neuron apoptosis, and (2) hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBO) alleviates CCI-induced neuropathic pain by inhibiting GABAergic neuron apoptosis. Male rats were randomized into 3 groups: CCI, CCI+HBO and the control group (SHAM). Mechanical allodynia was tested daily following CCI procedure. HBO rats were treated at 2.4 atmospheres absolute (ATA) for 60min once per day. The rats were euthanized and the spinal cord harvested on day 8 and 14 post-CCI. Detection of GABAergic cells and apoptosis was performed. The percentages of double positive stained cells (NeuN/GABA), cleaved caspase-3 or Cytochrome C in total GABAergic cells or in total NeuN positive cells were calculated. HBO significantly alleviated mechanical allodynia. CCI-induced neuropathic pain was associated with significantly increased spinal apoptotic GABA-positive neurons. HBO considerably decreased these spinal apoptotic cells. Cytochrome-C-positive neurons and cleaved caspase-3-positive neurons were also significantly higher in CCI rats. HBO significantly decreased these positive cells. Caspase-3 mRNA was also significantly higher in CCI rats. HBO reduced mRNA expression of caspase-3. CCI-induced neuropathic pain was associated with increased apoptotic GABAergic neurons induced by activation of key proteins of mitochondrial apoptotic pathways in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. HBO alleviated CCI-induced neuropathic pain and reduced GABAergic neuron apoptosis. The beneficial effect of HBO may be via its inhibitory role in CCI-induced GABAergic neuron apoptosis by suppressing mitochondrial apoptotic pathways in the spinal cord. Increased apoptotic GABAergic neurons induced by activation of key proteins of mitochondrial apoptotic pathways in the dorsal horn of the spinal

  12. Motor Alterations Induced by Chronic 4-Aminopyridine Infusion in the Spinal Cord In vivo: Role of Glutamate and GABA Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Lazo-Gómez, Rafael; Tapia, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Motor neuron (MN) degeneration is the pathological hallmark of MN diseases, a group of neurodegenerative disorders clinically manifested as muscle fasciculations and hyperreflexia, followed by paralysis, respiratory failure, and death. Ample evidence supports a role of glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity in motor death. In previous work we showed that stimulation of glutamate release from nerve endings by perfusion of the K+-channel blocker 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) in the rat hippocampus induces seizures and neurodegeneration, and that AMPA infusion in the spinal cord produces paralysis and MN death. On these bases, in this work we have tested the effect of the chronic infusion of 4-AP in the spinal cord, using implanted osmotic minipumps, on motor activity and on MN survival, and the mechanisms underlying this effect. 4-AP produced muscle fasciculations and motor deficits assessed in two motor tests, which start 2–3 h after the implant, which ameliorated spontaneously within 6–7 days, but no neurodegeneration. These effects were prevented by both AMPA and NMDA receptors blockers. The role of GABAA receptors was also explored, and we found that chronic infusion of bicuculline induced moderate MN degeneration and enhanced the hyperexcitation produced by 4-AP. Unexpectedly, the GABAAR agonist muscimol also induced motor deficits and failed to prevent the MN death induced by AMPA. We conclude that motor alterations induced by chronic 4-AP infusion in the spinal cord in vivo is due to ionotropic glutamate receptor overactivation and that blockade of GABAergic neurotransmission induces MN death under chronic conditions. These results shed light on the role of glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission in the regulation of MN excitability in the spinal cord. PMID:27242406

  13. Spinal Cord Repair with Engineered Nervous Tissue

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    in order to minimize scarring and injected dissociated adult DRGs rostral to a dorsal column transection of the spinal cord. From the sensory... columns were dissected and post-fixed overnight in 4% paraformaldehyde, and then spinal cords were dissected from spinal columns and cryoprotected...AD______________ Award Number: W81XWH-10-1-0941 TITLE: Spinal Cord Repair with Engineered Nervous Tissue

  14. [Surgical anatomy of spinal cord tumors].

    PubMed

    Peltier, J; Chenin, L; Hannequin, P; Page, C; Havet, É; Foulon, P; Le Gars, D

    2015-08-03

    In this article, we respectively describe the morphology of the spinal cord, spinal meningeal layers, main fiber tracts, and both arterial and venous distribution in order to explain signs of spinal cord compression. We will then describe a surgical technique for spinal cord tumor removal.

  15. Combined approaches for the relief of spinal cord injury-induced neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Gwak, Young S; Kim, Hee Young; Lee, Bong Hyo; Yang, Chae Ha

    2016-04-01

    The adequate treatment of spinal cord injury (SCI)-induced neuropathic pain still remains an unresolved problem. The current medications predominantly used in the SCI-induced neuropathic pain therapy are morphine, anticonvulsants, antidepressants, and antiepileptics, which suggests that psychiatric aspects might be important factors in the treatment of neuropathic pain. It is well documented that the modulation of the sensory events is not a unique way for achieving pain relief. In addition, pain patients still express dissatisfaction and complain of unwanted effects of the medications, suggesting that alternative approaches for the treatment of neuropathic pain are essential. In psychiatry, pain relief represents relaxation and a feeling of comfort and satisfaction, which suggests that cognitive and emotional motivations are important factors in the treatment of neuropathic pain. The comorbidity of chronic pain and psychiatric disorders, which is well recognized, suggests that the effective therapeutic relief for neuropathic pain induced by SCI can be achieved in conjunction with the management of the sensory and psychiatric aspects of patient. In this review, we address the feasibility of a combined acupuncture and pharmacotherapy treatment for the relief of neuropathic pain behavior following SCI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Rapid corticosterone-induced impairment of amplectic clasping occurs in the spinal cord of roughskin newts (taricha granulosa).

    PubMed

    Lewis, Christine M; Rose, James D

    2003-01-01

    Courtship clasping, a reproductive behavior in male roughskin newts (Taricha granulosa), is rapidly blocked by an action of corticosterone (CORT) at a specific neuronal membrane receptor. The CORT-induced impairment of clasping in behaving newts appears to be mediated partly by an elimination of clasping-related activity in medullary reticulospinal neurons. Previous studies of rapid CORT actions in Taricha have focused on the brain, so existence of CORT action in the spinal cord or peripheral nervous system has not been assessed. The present study used newts with a high cervical spinal transection to examine potential spinal or peripheral CORT effects on clasping by the hindlimbs in response to pressure on the cloaca. Spinal transection causes clasps elicited by cloacal stimulation to be very sustained beyond the termination of the eliciting stimulus. In spinally transected newts, CORT caused a dose-dependent depression in the duration as well as quality of the clasp that appeared within 10 min of injection. CORT selectively impaired the usual sustained maintenance of a clasp after termination of cloacal stimulation, but not clasp elicitation during stimulation. These effects were not produced by dexamethasone, a synthetic glucocorticoid that binds poorly to the CORT membrane receptor. The CORT effect on clasp maintenance but not clasp elicitation implies selective action on an intraspinal generator for clasping but not on sensory or efferent neuromuscular aspects of the response. These results indicate the presence in the newt spinal cord of the CORT membrane receptor that exerts functional effects distinctly different from those on the brainstem.

  17. Role of Matrix Metalloproteinases 2 in Spinal Cord Injury-Induced Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Miranpuri, Gurwattan S.; Schomberg, Dominic T.; Alrfaei, Bahauddeen; King, Kevin C.; Rynearson, Bryan; Wesley, Vishwas S.; Khan, Nayab; Obiakor, Kristen; Wesley, Umadevi V.; Resnick, Daniel K.

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain (NP) affects approximately 4 million people in the United States with spinal cord injury (SCI) being a common cause. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) play an integral role in mediating inflammatory responses, cellular signaling, cell migration, extracellular matrix degradation and tissue remodeling and repair. As such, they are major components in the pathogenesis of secondary injury within the central nervous system. Other gene regulatory pathways, specifically MAPK/extracellular signaling-regulated kinase (ERK) and Wnt/β-catenin, are also believed to participate in secondary injury likely intersect. The study aims to examine the MMP-2 signaling pathway associated with ERK and Wnt/β-catenin activity during contusion SCI (cSCI)-induced NP in a rat model. This is an experimental study investigating the implication of MMP-2 in SCI-induced NP and its association with the cellular and molecular changes in the interactions between extracellular signaling kinase and β-catenin. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats received cSCI injury by NYU impactor by dropping 10 g weight from a height of 12.5 mm. Locomotor functional recovery of injured rats was measured on post cSCI day 1, and weekly thereafter for 6 weeks using Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan scores. Thermal hyperalgesia (TH) testing was performed on days 21, 28, 35 and 42 post cSCI. The expression and/or activity of MMP-2, β-catenin and ERK were studied following harvest of spinal cord tissues between 3 and 6 weeks post cSCI. All experiments were funded by the department of Neurological Surgery at the University of Wisconsin, School of Medicine and Public Health having no conflict of interest. MMP-2 and β-catenin expression were elevated and gradually increased from days 21 to 42 compared to sham-operated rats and injured rats that did not exhibit TH. The expression of phosphorylated ERK (phospho-ERK) increased on day 21 but returned to baseline levels on day 42 whereas total ERK levels remained relatively

  18. Spinal Autofluorescent Flavoprotein Imaging in a Rat Model of Nerve Injury-Induced Pain and the Effect of Spinal Cord Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Jongen, Joost L. M.; Smits, Helwin; Pederzani, Tiziana; Bechakra, Malik; Hossaini, Mehdi; Koekkoek, Sebastiaan K.; Huygen, Frank J. P. M.; De Zeeuw, Chris I.; Holstege, Jan C.; Joosten, Elbert A. J.

    2014-01-01

    Nerve injury may cause neuropathic pain, which involves hyperexcitability of spinal dorsal horn neurons. The mechanisms of action of spinal cord stimulation (SCS), an established treatment for intractable neuropathic pain, are only partially understood. We used Autofluorescent Flavoprotein Imaging (AFI) to study changes in spinal dorsal horn metabolic activity. In the Seltzer model of nerve-injury induced pain, hypersensitivity was confirmed using the von Frey and hotplate test. 14 Days after nerve-injury, rats were anesthetized, a bipolar electrode was placed around the affected sciatic nerve and the spinal cord was exposed by a laminectomy at T13. AFI recordings were obtained in neuropathic rats and a control group of naïve rats following 10 seconds of electrical stimulation of the sciatic nerve at C-fiber strength, or following non-noxious palpation. Neuropathic rats were then treated with 30 minutes of SCS or sham stimulation and AFI recordings were obtained for up to 60 minutes after cessation of SCS/sham. Although AFI responses to noxious electrical stimulation were similar in neuropathic and naïve rats, only neuropathic rats demonstrated an AFI-response to palpation. Secondly, an immediate, short-lasting, but strong reduction in AFI intensity and area of excitation occurred following SCS, but not following sham stimulation. Our data confirm that AFI can be used to directly visualize changes in spinal metabolic activity following nerve injury and they imply that SCS acts through rapid modulation of nociceptive processing at the spinal level. PMID:25279562

  19. Spinal autofluorescent flavoprotein imaging in a rat model of nerve injury-induced pain and the effect of spinal cord stimulation.

    PubMed

    Jongen, Joost L M; Smits, Helwin; Pederzani, Tiziana; Bechakra, Malik; Hossaini, Mehdi; Koekkoek, Sebastiaan K; Huygen, Frank J P M; De Zeeuw, Chris I; Holstege, Jan C; Joosten, Elbert A J

    2014-01-01

    Nerve injury may cause neuropathic pain, which involves hyperexcitability of spinal dorsal horn neurons. The mechanisms of action of spinal cord stimulation (SCS), an established treatment for intractable neuropathic pain, are only partially understood. We used Autofluorescent Flavoprotein Imaging (AFI) to study changes in spinal dorsal horn metabolic activity. In the Seltzer model of nerve-injury induced pain, hypersensitivity was confirmed using the von Frey and hotplate test. 14 Days after nerve-injury, rats were anesthetized, a bipolar electrode was placed around the affected sciatic nerve and the spinal cord was exposed by a laminectomy at T13. AFI recordings were obtained in neuropathic rats and a control group of naïve rats following 10 seconds of electrical stimulation of the sciatic nerve at C-fiber strength, or following non-noxious palpation. Neuropathic rats were then treated with 30 minutes of SCS or sham stimulation and AFI recordings were obtained for up to 60 minutes after cessation of SCS/sham. Although AFI responses to noxious electrical stimulation were similar in neuropathic and naïve rats, only neuropathic rats demonstrated an AFI-response to palpation. Secondly, an immediate, short-lasting, but strong reduction in AFI intensity and area of excitation occurred following SCS, but not following sham stimulation. Our data confirm that AFI can be used to directly visualize changes in spinal metabolic activity following nerve injury and they imply that SCS acts through rapid modulation of nociceptive processing at the spinal level.

  20. Hypothermia for spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Brian K; Mann, Cody; Sohn, Hong Moon; Hilibrand, Alan S; Phillips, Frank M; Wang, Jeffrey C; Fehlings, Michael G

    2008-01-01

    Interest in systemic and local hypothermia extends back over many decades, and both have been investigated as potential neuroprotective interventions in a number of clinical settings, including traumatic brain injury, stroke, cardiac arrest, and both intracranial and thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm surgery. The recent use of systemic hypothermia in an injured National Football League football player has focused a great deal of attention on the potential use of hypothermia in acute spinal cord injury. To provide spinal clinicians with an overview of the biological rationale for using hypothermia, the past studies and current clinical applications of hypothermia, and the basic science studies and clinical reports of the use of hypothermia in acute traumatic spinal cord injury. A review of the English literature on hypothermia was performed, starting with the original clinical description of the use of systemic hypothermia in 1940. Pertinent basic science and clinical articles were identified using PubMed and the bibliographies of the articles. Each article was reviewed to provide a concise description of hypothermia's biological rationale, current clinical applications, complications, and experience as a neuroprotective intervention in spinal cord injury. Hypothermia has a multitude of physiologic effects. From a neuroprotective standpoint, hypothermia slows basic enzymatic activity, reduces the cell's energy requirements, and thus maintains Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP) concentrations. As such, systemic hypothermia has been shown to be neuroprotective in patients after cardiac arrest, although its benefit in other clinical settings such as traumatic brain injury, stroke, and intracranial aneurysm surgery has not been demonstrated. Animal studies of local and systemic hypothermia in traumatic spinal cord injury models have produced mixed results. Local hypothermia was actively studied in the 1970s in human acute traumatic spinal cord injury, but no case series of

  1. The excitatory amino acid receptor antagonist MK-801 prevents the hypersensitivity induced by spinal cord ischemia in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, J.X.; Xu, X.J.; Aldskogius, H.; Seiger, A.; Wiesenfeld-Hallin, Z. )

    1991-08-01

    Protection by the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 against transient spinal cord ischemia-induced hypersensitivity was studied in rats. The spinal ischemia was initiated by vascular occlusion resulting from the interaction between the photosensitizing dye Erythrosin B and an argon laser beam. The hypersensitivity, termed allodynia, where the animals reacted by vocalization to nonnoxious mechanical stimuli in the flank area, was consistently observed during several days after induction of the ischemia. Pretreatment with MK-801 (0.1-0.5 mg/kg, iv) 10 min before laser irradiation dose dependently prevented the occurrence of allodynia. The neuroprotective effect of MK-801 was not reduced by maintaining normal body temperature during and after irradiation. There was a significant negative correlation between the delay in the administration of MK-801 after irradiation and the protective effect of the drug. Histological examination revealed slight morphological damage in the spinal cord in 38% of control rats after 1 min of laser irradiation without pretreatment with MK-801. No morphological abnormalities were observed in rats after pretreatment with MK-801 (0.5 mg/kg). The present results provide further evidence for the involvement of excitatory amino acids, through activation of the NMDA receptor, in the development of dysfunction following ischemic trauma to the spinal cord.

  2. Noninvasive Spinal Cord Stimulation: Technical Aspects and Therapeutic Applications.

    PubMed

    Nardone, Raffaele; Höller, Yvonne; Taylor, Alexandra; Thomschewski, Aljoscha; Orioli, Andrea; Frey, Vanessa; Trinka, Eugen; Brigo, Francesco

    2015-10-01

    Electrical and magnetic trans-spinal stimulation can be used to increase the motor output of multiple spinal segments and modulate cortico-spinal excitability. The application of direct current through the scalp as well as repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation are known to influence brain excitability, and hence can also modulate other central nervous system structures, including spinal cord. This study aimed to evaluate the effects and the therapeutic usefulness of these noninvasive neuromodulatory techniques in healthy subjects and in the neurorehabilitation of patients with spinal cord disorders, as well as to discuss the possible mechanisms of action. A comprehensive review that summarizes previous studies using noninvasive spinal cord stimulation is lacking. PubMed (MEDLINE) and EMBASE were systematically searched to identify the most relevant published studies. We performed here an extensive review in this field. By decreasing the spinal reflex excitability, electrical and magnetic trans-spinal stimulation could be helpful in normalizing reflex hyperexcitability and treating hypertonia in subjects with lesions to upper motor neurons. Transcutaneous spinal direct current stimulation, based on applying direct current through the skin, influences the ascending and descending spinal pathways as well as spinal reflex excitability, and there is increasing evidence that it also can induce prolonged functional neuroplastic changes. When delivered repetitively, magnetic stimulation could also modulate spinal cord functions; however, at present only a few studies have documented spastic-reducing effects induced by repetitive spinal magnetic stimulation. Moreover, paired peripheral and transcranial stimulation can be used to target the spinal cord and may have potential for neuromodulation in spinal cord-injured subjects. Noninvasive electrical and magnetic spinal stimulation may provide reliable means to characterize important neurophysiologic and

  3. Neurocontrol of Movement in Humans With Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Dimitrijevic, Milan R; Danner, Simon M; Mayr, Winfried

    2015-10-01

    In this review of neurocontrol of movement after spinal cord injury, we discuss neurophysiological evidences of conducting and processing mechanisms of the spinal cord. We illustrate that external afferent inputs to the spinal cord below the level of the lesion can modify, initiate, and maintain execution of movement in absence or partial presence of brain motor control after chronic spinal cord injury. We review significant differences between spinal reflex activity elicited by single and repetitive stimulation. The spinal cord can respond with sensitization, habituation, and dis-habituation to regular repetitive stimulation. Therefore, repetitive spinal cord reflex activity can contribute to the functional configuration of the spinal network. Moreover, testing spinal reflex activity in individuals with motor complete spinal cord injury provided evidences for subclinical residual brain influence, suggesting the existence of axons traversing the injury site and influencing the activities below the level of lesion. Thus, there are two motor control models of chronic spinal cord injury in humans: "discomplete" and "reduced and altered volitional motor control." We outline accomplishments in modification and initiation of altered neurocontrol in chronic spinal cord injury people with epidural and functional electrical stimulation. By nonpatterned electrical stimulation of lumbar posterior roots, it is possible to evoke bilateral extension as well as rhythmic motor outputs. Epidural stimulation during treadmill stepping shows increased and/or modified motor activity. Finally, volitional efforts can alter epidurally induced rhythmic activities in incomplete spinal cord injury. Overall, we highlight that upper motor neuron paralysis does not entail complete absence of connectivity between cortex, brain stem, and spinal motor cells, but there can be altered anatomy and corresponding neurophysiological characteristics. With specific input to the spinal cord below the level

  4. Transcranial magnetic stimulation after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Awad, Basem I; Carmody, Margaret A; Zhang, Xiaoming; Lin, Vernon W; Steinmetz, Michael P

    2015-02-01

    To review the basic principles and techniques of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and provide information and evidence regarding its applications in spinal cord injury clinical rehabilitation. A review of the available current and historical literature regarding TMS was conducted, and a discussion of its potential use in spinal cord injury rehabilitation is presented. TMS provides reliable information about the functional integrity and conduction properties of the corticospinal tracts and motor control in the diagnostic and prognostic assessment of various neurological disorders. It allows one to follow the evolution of motor control and to evaluate the effects of different therapeutic procedures. Motor-evoked potentials can be useful in follow-up evaluation of motor function during treatment and rehabilitation, specifically in patients with spinal cord injury and stroke. Although studies regarding somatomotor functional recovery after spinal cord injury have shown promise, more trials are required to provide strong and substantial evidence. TMS is a promising noninvasive tool for the treatment of spasticity, neuropathic pain, and somatomotor deficit after spinal cord injury. Further investigation is needed to demonstrate whether different protocols and applications of stimulation, as well as alternative cortical sites of stimulation, may induce more pronounced and beneficial clinical effects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Radiation tolerance of the cervical spinal cord

    SciTech Connect

    McCunniff, A.J.; Liang, M.J.

    1989-03-01

    The incidence of permanent injury to the spinal cord as a complication of radiation therapy generally correlates positively with total radiation dosage. However, several reports in the literature have indicated that fraction size is also an important factor in the development or nondevelopment of late injuries in normal tissue. To determine the effect of fraction size on the incidence of radiation-induced spinal cord injuries, we reviewed 144 cases of head and neck cancer treated at our institution between 1971 and 1980 with radiation greater than 5600 cGy to a portion of the cervical spinal cord. Most of these patients received greater than or equal to 6000 cGy, with fraction sizes ranging from 133 cGy to 200 cGy. Fifty-three of the 144 patients have been followed up for 2 years or more. Nearly half of these (26 patients) received greater than 6000 cGy with fraction sizes of 133 cGy to 180 cGy. Only 1 of the 53 (1.9%) has sustained permanent spinal cord injury; 20 months after completion of radiation treatments he developed Brown-Sequard syndrome. Our experience suggests that radiation injuries to the spinal cord correlate not only with total radiation dosage, but also with fraction size; low fraction sizes appear to decrease the incidence of such injuries.

  6. Directing Spinal Cord Plasticity: The Impact of Stretch Therapy on Functional Recovery after Spinal Cord Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0587 TITLE: Directing Spinal Cord Plasticity: The Impact of Stretch ...Directing Spinal Cord Plasticity: The Impact of Stretch Therapy on Functional Recovery after Spinal Cord Injury. 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1...ABSTRACT Essentially all spinal cord injured patients receive stretching therapies beginning within the first few weeks post-injury. Despite

  7. Neuropathic Pain Activates the Endogenous κ Opioid System in Mouse Spinal Cord and Induces Opioid Receptor Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Mei; Petraschka, Michael; McLaughlin, Jay P.; Westenbroek, Ruth E.; Caron, Marc G.; Lefkowitz, Robert J.; Czyzyk, Traci A.; Pintar, John E.; Terman, Gregory W.; Chavkin, Charles

    2008-01-01

    Release of endogenous dynorphin opioids within the spinal cord after partial sciatic nerve ligation (pSNL) is known to contribute to the neuropathic pain processes. Using a phosphoselective antibody [κ opioid receptor (KOR-P)] able to detect the serine 369 phosphorylated form of the KOR, we determined possible sites of dynorphin action within the spinal cord after pSNL. KOR-P immunoreactivity (IR) was markedly increased in the L4 –L5 spinal dorsal horn of wild-type C57BL/6 mice (7–21 d) after lesion, but not in mice pretreated with the KOR antagonist nor-binaltorphimine (norBNI). In addition, knock-out mice lacking prodynorphin, KOR, or G-protein receptor kinase 3 (GRK3) did not show significant increases in KOR-P IR after pSNL. KOR-P IR was colocalized in both GABAergic neurons and GFAP-positive astrocytes in both ipsilateral and contralateral spinal dorsal horn. Consistent with sustained opioid release, KOR knock-out mice developed significantly increased tactile allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in both the early (first week) and late (third week) interval after lesion. Similarly, mice pretreated with norBNI showed enhanced hyperalgesia and allodynia during the 3 weeks after pSNL. Because sustained activation of opioid receptors might induce tolerance, we measured the antinociceptive effect of the κ agonist U50,488 using radiant heat applied to the ipsilateral hindpaw, and we found that agonist potency was significantly decreased 7 d after pSNL. In contrast, neither prodynorphin nor GRK3 knock-out mice showed U50,488 tolerance after pSNL. These findings suggest that pSNL induced a sustained release of endogenous prodynorphin-derived opioid peptides that activated an anti-nociceptive KOR system in mouse spinal cord. Thus, endogenous dynorphin had both pronociceptive and antinociceptive actions after nerve injury and induced GRK3-mediated opioid tolerance. PMID:15140929

  8. IKVAV-linked cell membrane-spanning peptide treatment induces neuronal reactivation following spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Kazemi, Soheila; Baltzer, Wendy; Schilke, Karl; Mansouri, Hadi; Mata, John Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord regeneration following treatment with a novel membrane-spanning peptide (MSP) expressing the isoleucine-lysine-valine-alanine-valine (IKVAV) epitope was assessed in Balb-c mice. After hemilaminectomy and compression injury, mice were treated with IKVAV, IKVAV-MSP, peptide or vehicle control. Functional improvement was assessed using modified Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan Scale (mBBB) and spinal cord segments were studied histologically 28 days after injury. IKVAV-MSP group scores increased significantly compared with control groups after 4 weeks of observation (p < 0.05). The number of protoplasmic astrocytes, neurons and muscle bundle size in the IKVAV-MSP mice were significantly increased (p < 0.001; p < 0.05 and p < 0.007; respectively). This study demonstrates that it is possible to promote functional recovery after SCI using bioactive IKVAV presenting cell membrane-spanning peptides. PMID:28031930

  9. The effect of an NK1 receptor antagonist on blood spinal cord barrier permeability following balloon compression-induced spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Anna V; Vink, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The blood spinal cord barrier (BSCB) is disrupted following spinal cord injury (SCI) resulting in vasogenic edema and increased intrathecal pressure (ITP). The neuropeptide substance P (SP) has been implicated in the development of blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption, edema, and increased intracranial pressure following brain injury, although it has not been investigated in SCI. The balloon compression model of experimental SCI has many advantages in that it replicates the "closed" environment observed clinically. Accordingly, this study characterized whether this model produces an increase in BSCB permeability and edema, and whether a SP, NK1 tachykinin receptor antagonist, N-acetyl-L-tryptophan (NAT) reduces such BSCB disruption and edema formation. At 30 min post-injury, animals were administered 2.5 mg/kg NAT or saline. Subgroups of animals were assessed for BSCB permeability (Evan's Blue) and spinal cord edema (wet weight/dry weight). BSCB permeability and edema were significantly increased in injured groups compared with sham (p < 0.001). There was no significant difference between vehicle and NAT treatment. We conclude that the balloon compression model of SCI produces significant BSCB disruption although NAT treatment did not attenuate BSCB permeability or edema. Further studies are required to fully elucidate the role of SP following SCI.

  10. Optical Monitoring and Detection of Spinal Cord Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Mesquita, Rickson C.; D’Souza, Angela; Bilfinger, Thomas V.; Galler, Robert M.; Emanuel, Asher; Schenkel, Steven S.; Yodh, Arjun G.; Floyd, Thomas F.

    2013-01-01

    Spinal cord ischemia can lead to paralysis or paraparesis, but if detected early it may be amenable to treatment. Current methods use evoked potentials for detection of spinal cord ischemia, a decades old technology whose warning signs are indirect and significantly delayed from the onset of ischemia. Here we introduce and demonstrate a prototype fiber optic device that directly measures spinal cord blood flow and oxygenation. This technical advance in neurological monitoring promises a new standard of care for detection of spinal cord ischemia and the opportunity for early intervention. We demonstrate the probe in an adult Dorset sheep model. Both open and percutaneous approaches were evaluated during pharmacologic, physiological, and mechanical interventions designed to induce variations in spinal cord blood flow and oxygenation. The induced variations were rapidly and reproducibly detected, demonstrating direct measurement of spinal cord ischemia in real-time. In the future, this form of hemodynamic spinal cord diagnosis could significantly improve monitoring and management in a broad range of patients, including those undergoing thoracic and abdominal aortic revascularization, spine stabilization procedures for scoliosis and trauma, spinal cord tumor resection, and those requiring management of spinal cord injury in intensive care settings. PMID:24358279

  11. Nitric oxide in microgravity-induced orthostatic intolerance: relevance to spinal cord injury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaziri, N. D.; Purdy, R. E. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    Prolonged exposure to microgravity results in cardiovascular deconditioning which is marked by orthostatic intolerance in the returning astronauts and recovering bed-ridden patients. Recent studies conducted in our laboratories at University of California, Irvine have revealed marked elevation of nitric oxide (NO) production in the kidney, heart, brain, and systemic arteries coupled with significant reduction of NO production in the cerebral arteries of microgravity-adapted animals. We have further demonstrated that the observed alteration of NO metabolism is primarily responsible for the associated cardiovascular deconditioning. Recovery from acute spinal cord injury (SCI) is frequently complicated by orthostatic intolerance that is due to the combined effects of the disruption of efferent sympathetic pathway and cardiovascular deconditioning occasioned by prolonged confinement to bed. In this presentation, I will review the nature of altered NO metabolism and its role in the pathogenesis of microgravity-induced cardiovascular deconditioning. The possible relevance of the new findings to orthostatic intolerance in patients with acute SCI and its potential therapeutic implications will be discussed.

  12. Electrically Induced Muscle Contractions Influence Bone Density Decline After Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Shields, Richard K.; Dudley-Javoroski, Shauna; Frey Law, Laura A.

    2012-01-01

    Study Design Longitudinal repeated-measures; within-subject control. Objective We examined the extent to which an isometric plantar flexion training protocol attenuates bone loss longitudinally after SCI. Summary of Background Data After spinal cord injury (SCI), bone mineral density (BMD) of paralyzed extremities rapidly declines, likely because of loss of mechanical loading of bone via muscle contractions. Methods Six individuals with complete paralysis began a 3-year unilateral plantar flexor muscle activation program within 4.5 months after SCI. The opposite limb served as a control. Compliance with recommended dose was >80%. Tibia compressive force was >140% of body weight. Results Bilateral hip and untrained tibia BMD declined significantly over the course of the training. Lumbar spine BMD showed minimal change. Percent decline in BMD (from the baseline condition) for the trained tibia (~10%) was significantly less than the untrained tibia (~25%) (P < 0.05). Trained limb percent decline in BMD remained steady over the first 1.5 years of the study (P < 0.05). Conclusions Compressive loads of ~1 to 2 times body weight, induced by muscle contractions, partially prevent the loss of BMD after SCI. Future studies should establish dose-response curves for attenuation of bone loss after SCI. PMID:16508550

  13. Nitric oxide in microgravity-induced orthostatic intolerance: relevance to spinal cord injury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaziri, N. D.; Purdy, R. E. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    Prolonged exposure to microgravity results in cardiovascular deconditioning which is marked by orthostatic intolerance in the returning astronauts and recovering bed-ridden patients. Recent studies conducted in our laboratories at University of California, Irvine have revealed marked elevation of nitric oxide (NO) production in the kidney, heart, brain, and systemic arteries coupled with significant reduction of NO production in the cerebral arteries of microgravity-adapted animals. We have further demonstrated that the observed alteration of NO metabolism is primarily responsible for the associated cardiovascular deconditioning. Recovery from acute spinal cord injury (SCI) is frequently complicated by orthostatic intolerance that is due to the combined effects of the disruption of efferent sympathetic pathway and cardiovascular deconditioning occasioned by prolonged confinement to bed. In this presentation, I will review the nature of altered NO metabolism and its role in the pathogenesis of microgravity-induced cardiovascular deconditioning. The possible relevance of the new findings to orthostatic intolerance in patients with acute SCI and its potential therapeutic implications will be discussed.

  14. Calpain inhibitor AK 295 inhibits calpain-induced apoptosis and improves neurologic function after traumatic spinal cord injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Colak, A; Kaya, M; Karaoğlan, A; Sağmanligil, A; Akdemir, O; Sahan, E; Celik, O

    2009-06-01

    An increase in the level of intracellular calcium activates the calcium-dependent neutral protease calpain, which in turn leads to cellular dysfunction and cell death after an insult to the central nervous system. In this study, we evaluated the effect of a calpain inhibitor, AK 295, on spinal cord structure, neurologic function, and apoptosis after spinal cord injury (SCI) in a murine model. Thirty albino Wistar rats were divided into 3 groups of 10 each: the sham-operated control group (group 1), the spinal cord trauma group (group 2), and the spinal cord trauma plus AK 295 treatment group (group 3). After having received a combination of ketamine 60 mg/kg and xylazine 9 mg/kg to induce anesthesia, the rats in groups 2 and 3 were subjected to thoracic trauma by the weight drop technique (40 g-cm). One hour after having been subjected to that trauma, the rats in groups 2 and 3 were treated with an intraperitoneal injection of either dimethyl sulfoxide 2 mg/kg or AK 295 2 mg/kg. The effects of the injury and the efficacy of AK 295 were determined by an assessment of the TUNEL technique and the results of examination with a light microscope. The neurologic performance of 5 rats from group 2 and 5 from group 3 was assessed by means of the inclined plane technique and the modified Tarlov's motor grading scale 1, 3, and 5 days after spinal cord trauma. Light-microscopic examination of spinal cord specimens from group 2 revealed hemorrhage, edema, necrosis, and vascular thrombi 24 hours after trauma. Similar (but less prominent) features were seen in specimens obtained from group 3 rats. Twenty-four hours after injury, the mean apoptotic cell numbers in groups 1 and 2 were zero and 4.57 +/- 0.37 cells, respectively. In group 3, the mean apoptotic cell number was 2.30 +/- 0.34 cells, a value significantly lower than that in group 2 (P < .05). Five days after trauma, the injured rats in group 2 demonstrated significant motor dysfunction (P < .05). In comparison, the motor

  15. Hypersensitivity Induced by Activation of Spinal Cord PAR2 Receptors Is Partially Mediated by TRPV1 Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Mrozkova, Petra; Spicarova, Diana; Palecek, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    Protease-activated receptors 2 (PAR2) and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) receptors in the peripheral nerve endings are implicated in the development of increased sensitivity to mechanical and thermal stimuli, especially during inflammatory states. Both PAR2 and TRPV1 receptors are co-expressed in nociceptive dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons on their peripheral endings and also on presynaptic endings in the spinal cord dorsal horn. However, the modulation of nociceptive synaptic transmission in the superficial dorsal horn after activation of PAR2 and their functional coupling with TRPV1 is not clear. To investigate the role of spinal PAR2 activation on nociceptive modulation, intrathecal drug application was used in behavioural experiments and patch-clamp recordings of spontaneous, miniature and dorsal root stimulation-evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs, mEPSCs, eEPSCs) were performed on superficial dorsal horn neurons in acute rat spinal cord slices. Intrathecal application of PAR2 activating peptide SLIGKV-NH2 induced thermal hyperalgesia, which was prevented by pretreatment with TRPV1 antagonist SB 366791 and was reduced by protein kinases inhibitor staurosporine. Patch-clamp experiments revealed robust decrease of mEPSC frequency (62.8 ± 4.9%), increase of sEPSC frequency (127.0 ± 5.9%) and eEPSC amplitude (126.9 ± 12.0%) in dorsal horn neurons after acute SLIGKV-NH2 application. All these EPSC changes, induced by PAR2 activation, were prevented by SB 366791 and staurosporine pretreatment. Our results demonstrate an important role of spinal PAR2 receptors in modulation of nociceptive transmission in the spinal cord dorsal horn at least partially mediated by activation of presynaptic TRPV1 receptors. The functional coupling between the PAR2 and TRPV1 receptors on the central branches of DRG neurons may be important especially during different pathological states when it may enhance pain perception. PMID:27755539

  16. Aquaporins in the Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Oklinski, Michal K.; Skowronski, Mariusz T.; Skowronska, Agnieszka; Rützler, Michael; Nørgaard, Kirsten; Nieland, John D.; Kwon, Tae-Hwan; Nielsen, Søren

    2016-01-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are water channel proteins robustly expressed in the central nervous system (CNS). A number of previous studies described the cellular expression sites and investigated their major roles and function in the brain and spinal cord. Among thirteen different mammalian AQPs, AQP1 and AQP4 have been mainly studied in the CNS and evidence has been presented that they play important roles in the pathogenesis of CNS injury, edema and multiple diseases such as multiple sclerosis, neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, glioblastoma multiforme, Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. The objective of this review is to highlight the current knowledge about AQPs in the spinal cord and their proposed roles in pathophysiology and pathogenesis related to spinal cord lesions and injury. PMID:27941618

  17. Fall-induced spinal cord injury: External causes and implications for prevention.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuying; Tang, Ying; Allen, Victoria; DeVivo, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    To document the demographic and clinical profile of persons who sustained spinal cord injury (SCI) as a result of accidental falls and to determine the usual circumstances surrounding the fall-induced SCI. Cohort study. 21 SCI Model Systems centers throughout the United States. 6,408 individuals with traumatic SCI between 2005 and 2014 were recruited from the National SCI Database. 1,877 (29%) of them were injuries caused by falls. Not applicable. External causes of injury documented by the International Classification of Diseases, 10(th) revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-10-CM). Falls on the same level from slipping, tripping, and stumbling were the most common cause of fall-induced SCI (20%), followed by falls from building (16%), stairs and steps (16%), and ladder (9%). People who were 61 years of age and older had the highest frequency of falls on the same level, while those aged 16-45 years had a higher percentage of falls from buildings, usually work-related. The mechanisms of falls also varied by sex and race. Associated injury and vertebral injury occurred frequently among falls from buildings and ladders. High falls were more likely to be work-related and result in thoracic and complete injury, while low falls were more commonly associated with cervical and motor functionally incomplete injury. The study findings of different mechanisms of falls by age, sex, race and medical consequences provide an insight for future interventions aimed at high risk persons, activities, and environmental factors for preventing or reducing fall-induced SCI.

  18. Fall-induced spinal cord injury: External causes and implications for prevention

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Ying; Allen, Victoria; DeVivo, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Objective To document the demographic and clinical profile of persons who sustained spinal cord injury (SCI) as a result of accidental falls and to determine the usual circumstances surrounding the fall-induced SCI. Design Cohort study. Setting 21 SCI Model Systems centers throughout the United States. Participants 6,408 individuals with traumatic SCI between 2005 and 2014 were recruited from the National SCI Database. 1,877 (29%) of them were injuries caused by falls. Interventions Not applicable. Outcomes Measures External causes of injury documented by the International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-10-CM). Results Falls on the same level from slipping, tripping, and stumbling were the most common cause of fall-induced SCI (20%), followed by falls from building (16%), stairs and steps (16%), and ladder (9%). People who were 61 years of age and older had the highest frequency of falls on the same level, while those aged 16–45 years had a higher percentage of falls from buildings, usually work-related. The mechanisms of falls also varied by sex and race. Associated injury and vertebral injury occurred frequently among falls from buildings and ladders. High falls were more likely to be work-related and result in thoracic and complete injury, while low falls were more commonly associated with cervical and motor functionally incomplete injury. Conclusion The study findings of different mechanisms of falls by age, sex, race and medical consequences provide an insight for future interventions aimed at high risk persons, activities, and environmental factors for preventing or reducing fall-induced SCI. PMID:25832327

  19. Spinal Myoclonus After Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Calancie, Blair

    2006-01-01

    Background/Objective: In the course of examining spinal motor function in many hundreds of people with traumatic spinal cord injury, we encountered 6 individuals who developed involuntary and rhythmic contractions in muscles of their legs. Although there are many reports of unusual muscle activation patterns associated with different forms of myoclonus, we believe that certain aspects of the patterns seen with these 6 subjects have not been previously reported. These patterns share many features with those associated with a spinal central pattern generator for walking. Methods: Subjects in this case series had a history of chronic injury to the cervical spinal cord, resulting in either complete (ASIA A; n = 4) or incomplete (ASIA D; n = 2) quadriplegia. We used multi-channel electromyography recordings of trunk and leg muscles of each subject to document muscle activation patterns associated with different postures and as influenced by a variety of sensory stimuli. Results: Involuntary contractions spanned multiple leg muscles bilaterally, sometimes including weak abdominal contractions. Contractions were smooth and graded and were highly reproducible in rate for a given subject (contraction rates were 0.3–0.5 Hz). These movements did not resemble the brief rapid contractions (ie, "jerks") ascribed to some forms of spinal myoclonus. For all subjects, the onset of involuntary muscle contraction was dependent upon hip angle; contractions did not occur unless the hips (and knees) were extended (ie, subjects were supine). In the 4 ASIA A subjects, contractions occurred simultaneously in all muscles (agonists and antagonists) bilaterally. In sharp contrast, contractions in the 2 ASIA D subjects were reciprocal between agonists and antagonists within a limb and alternated between limbs, such that movements in these 2 subjects looked just like repetitive stepping. Finally, each of the 6 subjects had a distinct pathology of their spinal cord, nerve roots, distal trunk

  20. Evaluation of spinal cord injury animal models

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ning; Fang, Marong; Chen, Haohao; Gou, Fangming; Ding, Mingxing

    2014-01-01

    Because there is no curative treatment for spinal cord injury, establishing an ideal animal model is important to identify injury mechanisms and develop therapies for individuals suffering from spinal cord injuries. In this article, we systematically review and analyze various kinds of animal models of spinal cord injury and assess their advantages and disadvantages for further studies. PMID:25598784

  1. Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors in Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search Search En Español Category Cancer A-Z Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors in Adults If you have a brain or spinal cord tumor or are close to ... cope. Here you can find out all about brain and spinal cord tumors in adults, including risk ...

  2. Spinal Cord Monitoring Data in Pediatric Spinal Deformity Patients With Spinal Cord Pathology.

    PubMed

    Aleem, Alexander W; Thuet, Earl D; Padberg, Anne M; Wallendorf, Michael; Luhmann, Scott J

    2015-01-01

    Retrospective. The purpose of this study is to review the efficacy of monitoring data and outcomes in pediatric patients with spinal cord pathology. The incidence of spinal cord pathology in pediatric patients with scoliosis has been reported between 3% and 20%. Previous studies demonstrated that intraoperative spinal cord monitoring (IOM) during scoliosis surgery can be reliable despite underlying pathology. A single-center retrospective review of 119 spinal surgery procedures in 82 patients with spinal cord pathology was performed. Diagnoses included Arnold-Chiari malformation, syringomyelia, myelomeningocele, spinal cord tumor, tethered cord, and diastematomyelia. Baseline neurologic function and history of prior neurosurgical intervention were identified. Outcome measures included ability to obtain reliable monitoring data during surgery and presence of postoperative neurologic deficits. Results were compared for 82 patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). Usable IOM data were obtained in 82% of cases (97/119). Twenty-two cases (18%) had no lower extremity data. Patients with Arnold-Chiari malformation or syringomyelia pathologies, in isolation or together, had a significantly higher rate of reliable data compared to other pathologies (p < .0001). Among study group cases with usable data, there were 1 false negative (1%) and 4 true positive (4%) outcomes. There were no permanent neurologic deficits. The spinal cord pathology group demonstrated 80% sensitivity and 92% specificity. Spinal cord monitoring is a valuable tool in pediatric patients with spinal cord pathology undergoing spinal deformity surgeries. When obtained, data allow to detect changes in spinal cord function. Patients with a diagnosis of Arnold-Chiari or syringomyelia have monitoring data similar to those patients with AIS. Patients with other spinal cord pathologies have less reliable data, and surgeons should have a lower threshold for performing wake-up tests to assess spinal cord

  3. Proteomic analysis of the dorsal spinal cord in the mouse model of spared nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun-Sung; Ahn, Jung-Mo; Jeon, Sang-Min; Cho, Hee-Jung; Chung, Ki-Myung; Cho, Je-Yoel; Youn, Dong-Ho

    2017-09-03

    Peripheral nerve injury often causes neuropathic pain and is associated with changes in the expression of numerous proteins in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. To date, proteomic analysis method has been used to simultaneously analyze hundreds or thousands of proteins differentially expressed in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord in rats or dorsal root ganglion of rats with certain type of peripheral nerve injury. However, a proteomic study using a mouse model of neuropathic pain could be attempted because of abundant protein database and the availability of transgenic mice. In this study, whole proteins were extracted from the ipsilateral dorsal half of the 4(th)-6(th) lumbar spinal cord in a mouse model of spared nerve injury (SNI)-induced neuropathic pain. In-gel digests of the proteins size-separated on a polyacrylamide gel were subjected to reverse-phase liquid-chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization ion trap tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). After identifying proteins, the data were analyzed with subtractive proteomics using ProtAn, an in-house analytic program. Consequently, 15 downregulated and 35 upregulated proteins were identified in SNI mice. The identified proteins may contribute to the maintenance of neuropathic pain, and may provide new or valuable information in the discovery of new therapeutic targets for neuropathic pain.

  4. Cerebrolysin, a mixture of neurotrophic factors induces marked neuroprotection in spinal cord injury following intoxication of engineered nanoparticles from metals.

    PubMed

    Menon, Preeti Kumaran; Muresanu, Dafin Fior; Sharma, Aruna; Mössler, Herbert; Sharma, Hari Shanker

    2012-02-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is the world's most disastrous disease for which there is no effective treatment till today. Several studies suggest that nanoparticles could adversely influence the pathology of SCI and thereby alter the efficacy of many neuroprotective agents. Thus, there is an urgent need to find suitable therapeutic agents that could minimize cord pathology following trauma upon nanoparticle intoxication. Our laboratory has been engaged for the last 7 years in finding suitable therapeutic strategies that could equally reduce cord pathology in normal and in nanoparticle-treated animal models of SCI. We observed that engineered nanoparticles from metals e.g., aluminum (Al), silver (Ag) and copper (Cu) (50-60 nm) when administered in rats daily for 7 days (50 mg/kg, i.p.) resulted in exacerbation of cord pathology after trauma that correlated well with breakdown of the blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) to serum proteins. The entry of plasma proteins into the cord leads to edema formation and neuronal damage. Thus, future drugs should be designed in such a way to be effective even when the SCI is influenced by nanoparticles. Previous research suggests that a suitable combination of neurotrophic factors could induce marked neuroprotection in SCI in normal animals. Thus, we examined the effects of a new drug; cerebrolysin that is a mixture of different neurotrophic factors e.g., brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), glial cell line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), nerve growth factor (NGF), ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) and other peptide fragments to treat normal or nanoparticle-treated rats after SCI. Our observations showed that cerebrolysin (2.5 ml/kg, i.v.) before SCI resulted in good neuroprotection in normal animals, whereas nanoparticle-treated rats required a higher dose of the drug (5.0 ml/kg, i.v.) to induce comparable neuroprotection in the cord after SCI. Cerebrolysin also reduced spinal cord water content, leakage of plasma proteins

  5. Hot water immersion induces an acute cytokine response in cervical spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Leicht, C A; Kouda, K; Umemoto, Y; Banno, M; Kinoshita, T; Moriki, T; Nakamura, T; Bishop, N C; Goosey-Tolfrey, V L; Tajima, F

    2015-11-01

    The dysfunctional sympathetic nervous system in individuals with cervical spinal cord injury (CSCI) impairs adrenergic responses and may, therefore, contribute to the blunted post-exercise cytokine response. The purpose of this study was to investigate an alternative way to exercise to induce an acute cytokine response by passive core temperature elevation in CSCI. Seven male participants with a motor complete CSCI and 8 male able-bodied controls were immersed for 60 min in water set at a temperature 2 °C above the individuals' resting oesophageal temperature. Blood was collected pre, post, and every hour up to 4 h post-immersion. Hot water immersion resulted in an IL-6 plasma concentration mean increase of 133 ± 144 % in both groups (P = 0.001). On a group level, IL-6 plasma concentrations were 68 ± 38 % higher in CSCI (P = 0.06). In both groups, IL-8 increased by 14 ± 11 % (P = 0.02) and IL-1ra by 18 ± 17 % (P = 0.05). Catecholamine plasma concentrations were significantly reduced in CSCI (P < 0.05) and did not increase following immersion. Passive elevation of core temperature acutely elevates IL-6, IL-8 and IL-1ra in CSCI despite a blunted adrenergic response, which is in contrast to earlier exercise interventions in CSCI. The present study lays the foundation for future studies to explore water immersion as an alternative to exercise to induce an acute cytokine response in CSCI.

  6. SPINAL CORD MECHANISMS MEDIATING BEHAVIORAL HYPERALGESIA INDUCED BY NEUROKININ-1 TACHYKININ RECEPTOR ACTIVATION IN THE ROSTRAL VENTROMEDIAL MEDULLA

    PubMed Central

    Lagraize, S. C.; Guo, W.; Yang, K.; Wei, F.; Ren, K.; Dubner, R.

    2010-01-01

    Hyperalgesia in animal injury models is linked to activation of descending raphespinal modulatory circuits originating in the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM). A neurokinin-1 (NK-1) receptor antagonist microinjected into the RVM before or after inflammation produced by complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) resulted in an attenuation of thermal hyperalgesia. A transient (acute) or a continuous infusion of Substance P (SP) microinjected into the RVM of non-inflamed animals led to similar pain hypersensitivity. Intrathecal pretreatment or post-treatment of a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist (Y-25130 or ondansetron) blocked the SP-induced hyperalgesia. The SP-induced hyperalgesia was both GABAA and NMDA receptor-dependent after pre- and post-treatment with selective antagonists at the spinal level. A microinjection of SP into the RVM also led to increased NMDA NR1 receptor subunit phosphorylation in spinal cord tissue. The GABAA receptor-mediated hyperalgesia involved a shift in the anionic gradient in dorsal horn nociceptive neurons and an increase in phosphorylated NKCC1 protein (isoform of the Na-K-Cl cotransporter). Following a low dose of SP infused into the RVM, intrathecal muscimol (GABAA agonist) increased SP-induced thermal hyperalgesia, phosphorylated NKCC1 protein expression, and NMDA NR1 subunit phosphorylation in the spinal cord. The thermal hyperalgesia was blocked by intrathecal gabazine, the GABAA receptor antagonist, and MK-801, the NMDA receptor channel blocker. These findings indicate that NK-1 receptors in the RVM are involved in SP-induced thermal hyperalgesia, this hyperalgesia is 5-HT3-receptor dependent at the spinal level, and involves the functional interaction of spinal GABAA and NMDA receptors. PMID:20888891

  7. Management of Chronic Spinal Cord Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Abrams, Gary M.; Ganguly, Karunesh

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review: Both acute and chronic spinal cord disorders present multisystem management problems to the clinician. This article highlights key issues associated with chronic spinal cord dysfunction. Recent Findings: Advances in symptomatic management for chronic spinal cord dysfunction include use of botulinum toxin to manage detrusor hyperreflexia, pregabalin for management of neuropathic pain, and intensive locomotor training for improved walking ability in incomplete spinal cord injuries. Summary: The care of spinal cord dysfunction has advanced significantly over the past 2 decades. Management and treatment of neurologic and non-neurologic complications of chronic myelopathies ensure that each patient will be able to maximize their functional independence and quality of life. PMID:25651225

  8. Spinal cord glia and interleukin-1 do not appear to mediate persistent allodynia induced by intramuscular acidic saline in rats.

    PubMed

    Ledeboer, Annemarie; Mahoney, John H; Milligan, Erin D; Martin, David; Maier, Steven F; Watkins, Linda R

    2006-10-01

    Spinal glial activation and consequent interleukin-1 (IL-1) release are implicated in pain facilitation induced by inflammation/damage to skin and peripheral nerves. It is unclear whether pain facilitation induced at deep tissue sites also depends on these. We investigated whether spinal IL-1 and/or glial activation mediates bilateral allodynia induced by repeated unilateral intramuscular injections of acidic saline to rats. Given the prominent role of spinal IL-1 in various bilateral pain models, we predicted that intrathecal IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) would suppress bilateral allodynia in this model as well. Surprisingly, neither single nor repeated intrathecal injections of IL-1ra affected allodynia, measured by the von Frey test, induced by prior intramuscular acidic saline compared with vehicle-injected controls. In addition, we tested the effect of 2 additional intrathecal manipulations that are broadly efficacious in suppressing glially mediated pain facilitation: (1) a glial metabolic inhibitor (fluorocitrate) and (2) the anti-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin-10 (IL-10). Like IL-1ra, fluorocitrate and IL-10 each failed to reverse allodynia. Finally, we observed no significant activation of glial cells, as assessed by immunohistochemistry of glial activation markers, in the lumbar spinal cord in response to intramuscular acidic saline. Taken together, the present data suggest that acidic saline-induced bilateral allodynia is created independently of glial activation. From converging lines of evidence, the current studies suggest that persistent bilateral allodynia induced by repeated intramuscular acidic saline is not mediated by spinal IL-1 and/or spinal glial activation. As such, this might represent the first evidence for pain facilitation occurring in the absence of glial involvement.

  9. Connexin-43 induces chemokine release from spinal cord astrocytes to maintain late-phase neuropathic pain in mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gang; Park, Chul-Kyu; Xie, Rou-Gang; Berta, Temugin; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that spinal cord astrocytes play an important role in neuropathic pain sensitization by releasing astrocytic mediators (e.g. cytokines, chemokines and growth factors). However, it remains unclear how astrocytes control the release of astrocytic mediators and sustain late-phase neuropathic pain. Astrocytic connexin-43 (now known as GJ1) has been implicated in gap junction and hemichannel communication of cytosolic contents through the glial syncytia and to the extracellular space, respectively. Connexin-43 also plays an essential role in facilitating the development of neuropathic pain, yet the mechanism for this contribution remains unknown. In this study, we investigated whether nerve injury could upregulate connexin-43 to sustain late-phase neuropathic pain by releasing chemokine from spinal astrocytes. Chronic constriction injury elicited a persistent upregulation of connexin-43 in spinal astrocytes for >3 weeks. Spinal (intrathecal) injection of carbenoxolone (a non-selective hemichannel blocker) and selective connexin-43 blockers (connexin-43 mimetic peptides 43Gap26 and 37,43Gap27), as well as astroglial toxin but not microglial inhibitors, given 3 weeks after nerve injury, effectively reduced mechanical allodynia, a cardinal feature of late-phase neuropathic pain. In cultured astrocytes, TNF-α elicited marked release of the chemokine CXCL1, and the release was blocked by carbenoxolone, Gap26/Gap27, and connexin-43 small interfering RNA. TNF-α also increased connexin-43 expression and hemichannel activity, but not gap junction communication in astrocyte cultures prepared from cortices and spinal cords. Spinal injection of TNF-α-activated astrocytes was sufficient to induce persistent mechanical allodynia, and this allodynia was suppressed by CXCL1 neutralization, CXCL1 receptor (CXCR2) antagonist, and pretreatment of astrocytes with connexin-43 small interfering RNA. Furthermore, nerve injury persistently increased excitatory

  10. Isolated spinal cord contusion in rats induces chronic brain neuroinflammation, neurodegeneration, and cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Junfang; Stoica, Bogdan A; Luo, Tao; Sabirzhanov, Boris; Zhao, Zaorui; Guanciale, Kelsey; Nayar, Suresh K; Foss, Catherine A; Pomper, Martin G; Faden, Alan I

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive dysfunction has been reported in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI), but it has been questioned whether such changes may reflect concurrent head injury, and the issue has not been addressed mechanistically or in a well-controlled experimental model. Our recent rodent studies examining SCI-induced hyperesthesia revealed neuroinflammatory changes not only in supratentorial pain-regulatory sites, but also in other brain regions, suggesting that additional brain functions may be impacted following SCI. Here we examined effects of isolated thoracic SCI in rats on cognition, brain inflammation, and neurodegeneration. We show for the first time that SCI causes widespread microglial activation in the brain, with increased expression of markers for activated microglia/macrophages, including translocator protein and chemokine ligand 21 (C–C motif). Stereological analysis demonstrated significant neuronal loss in the cortex, thalamus, and hippocampus. SCI caused chronic impairment in spatial, retention, contextual, and fear-related emotional memory—evidenced by poor performance in the Morris water maze, novel objective recognition, and passive avoidance tests. Based on our prior work implicating cell cycle activation (CCA) in chronic neuroinflammation after SCI or traumatic brain injury, we evaluated whether CCA contributed to the observed changes. Increased expression of cell cycle-related genes and proteins was found in hippocampus and cortex after SCI. Posttraumatic brain inflammation, neuronal loss, and cognitive changes were attenuated by systemic post-injury administration of a selective cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor. These studies demonstrate that chronic brain neurodegeneration occurs after isolated SCI, likely related to sustained microglial activation mediated by cell cycle activation. PMID:25483194

  11. Pain following spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Ullrich, Philip M

    2007-05-01

    Pain is one of the most common, severe, and treatment-resistant complications that follows SCI. Recent years have seen a surge of research on methods for assessing and treating spinal cord injury pain. In this article, pain after SCI is reviewed in terms of nature, scope, assessment techniques, and treatment strategies.

  12. Assessment of in vivo spinal cord conduction velocity in rats in an experimental model of ischemic spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Basoglu, H; Kurtoglu, T; Cetin, N K; Bilgin, M D; Kiylioglu, N

    2013-08-01

    Experimental laboratory investigation of spinal cord conductivity alterations in a rat model of ischemic spinal cord injury (SCI). To observe the epidural spinal cord stimulation-induced electromyography responses, and to investigate the possible alterations of spinal cord conduction velocity (SCCV) and compound muscle action potentials (CMAPs) after ischemic SCI in rats. Adnan Menderes University, Institute of Health Science, Aydin, Turkey. SCI was induced by transient occlusion of the abdominal aorta in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Spinal cord histopathology was examined to determine neuronal damage and Tarlov scale was used to grade locomotor functions. Epidural electrical stimulation of spinal cord was performed by monopolar needle electrodes sequentially at L1-L2 and L5-L6 levels, and CMAPs were recorded from the left gastrocnemius muscle by surface electrodes. Amplitudes and durations of CMAPs were evaluated and SCCVs were calculated by analyzing the latency difference of CMAPs. Ischemia-induced SCI resulted in significant reduction of Tarlov scores and a significant decline in number of viable neurons. Similarly, a significant decrement was observed in SCCV following spinal cord ischemia. This study demonstrated that measurement of SCCV via epidural electrical stimulation is possible and displays a significant decline after spinal cord ischemia in rats. We suggest that this method can be beneficial to quantify neuronal damage after experimental ischemic SCI.

  13. Transection of Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Shulman, Stanford T.; Madden, John D.; Esterly, John R.; Shanklin, Douglas R.

    1971-01-01

    A newborn infant, delivered following mid-forceps rotation, presented with apnoea, anaesthesia below the level of the mid-neck, and flaccid quadriplegia. At necropsy there was transection of the cord, and atlanto-occipital and atlantoaxial dislocations. Cord injury usually follows breech presentation, the lesion is in the lower cervical or upper thoracic segments, and results from excessive traction. By contrast, in the rare cases following cephalic delivery, the lesion is most often in the upper cervical cord and probably results from rotational forces. PMID:5104538

  14. Early application of tail nerve electrical stimulation-induced walking training promotes locomotor recovery in rats with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, S-X; Huang, F; Gates, M; Shen, X; Holmberg, E G

    2016-11-01

    This is a randomized controlled prospective trial with two parallel groups. The objective of this study was to determine whether early application of tail nerve electrical stimulation (TANES)-induced walking training can improve the locomotor function. This study was conducted in SCS Research Center in Colorado, USA. A contusion injury to spinal cord T10 was produced using the New York University impactor device with a 25 -mm height setting in female, adult Long-Evans rats. Injured rats were randomly divided into two groups (n=12 per group). One group was subjected to TANES-induced walking training 2 weeks post injury, and the other group, as control, received no TANES-induced walking training. Restorations of behavior and conduction were assessed using the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan open-field rating scale, horizontal ladder rung walking test and electrophysiological test (Hoffmann reflex). Early application of TANES-induced walking training significantly improved the recovery of locomotor function and benefited the restoration of Hoffmann reflex. TANES-induced walking training is a useful method to promote locomotor recovery in rats with spinal cord injury.

  15. Strategies for neuroprotection following spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Tederko, Piotr; Krasuski, Marek; Kiwerski, Jerzy; Nyka, Izabela; Białoszewski, Dariusz

    2009-01-01

    Progress in neuropathology has made possible the description of local responses of neural tissue in early stages after traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). The recent identification of multiple factors responsible for secondary spinal cord damage and for potential regenerative abilities has not resulted in the development of a standard for neuroprotective therapy in SCI patients. The paper reviews current knowledge concerning the sequence of biochemical events in the injured spinal cord and gives an overview of therapeutic possibilities for preventing the spread of secondary injury. The literature survey has led to the following conclusions: 1. The primary zone of traumatic damage enlarges due to local vascular disturbances, hypoxia, and the resulting inflammation. 2. Inflammation in the region of secondary injury, apart from having a destructive impact, is the source of substances which may induce neural tissue repair. 3. The administration of methylprednisolone and surgical decompression of the spinal cord within several hours after SCI improves functional and neurological outcomes in patients with incomplete neurological deficits. Currently there is no sufficient scientific evidence to support the safety and efficacy of other neuroprotective methods in humans.

  16. Pharmacological approaches to induce neuroregeneration in spinal cord injury: an overview.

    PubMed

    Ibarra, Antonio; Martiñón, Susana

    2009-06-01

    Spinal cord (SC) injury causes serious neurological alterations that importantly disturb the physical, emotional and economical stability of affected individuals. Damage to the neural tissue is primarily caused by the lesion itself and secondarily by a multitude of destructive mechanisms that develop afterwards. Unfortunately, the restoring capacity of the central nervous system is very limited because of reduced intrinsic growth capacity and non-permissive environment for axonal elongation. The regenerative processes are blocked by diverse factors such as growth inhibitory proteins and the glial scar formed in the site of lesion. In spite of these problems, central neurons regenerate if a permissive environment is provided. In line with this thought, some pharmacological compounds have been tested to achieve neuroregeneration. The main objective of this manuscript is to provide the state-of-art of chemotherapeutic treatments for spinal cord regeneration after injury in the field. The efficacy and usefulness of different therapeutic strategies will be reviewed, including Rho-ROCK inhibitors, cyclic AMP-enhancers, glial scar inhibitors and immunophilin ligands. Aside from this, the use of hydrogels alone or in combination with drugs, growth factors or stem cells will also be revised.

  17. Cortical Overexpression of Neuronal Calcium Sensor-1 Induces Functional Plasticity in Spinal Cord Following Unilateral Pyramidal Tract Injury in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Yip, Ping K.; Wong, Liang-Fong; Sears, Thomas A.; Yáñez-Muñoz, Rafael J.; McMahon, Stephen B.

    2010-01-01

    Following trauma of the adult brain or spinal cord the injured axons of central neurons fail to regenerate or if intact display only limited anatomical plasticity through sprouting. Adult cortical neurons forming the corticospinal tract (CST) normally have low levels of the neuronal calcium sensor-1 (NCS1) protein. In primary cultured adult cortical neurons, the lentivector-induced overexpression of NCS1 induces neurite sprouting associated with increased phospho-Akt levels. When the PI3K/Akt signalling pathway was pharmacologically inhibited the NCS1-induced neurite sprouting was abolished. The overexpression of NCS1 in uninjured corticospinal neurons exhibited axonal sprouting across the midline into the CST-denervated side of the spinal cord following unilateral pyramidotomy. Improved forelimb function was demonstrated behaviourally and electrophysiologically. In injured corticospinal neurons, overexpression of NCS1 induced axonal sprouting and regeneration and also neuroprotection. These findings demonstrate that increasing the levels of intracellular NCS1 in injured and uninjured central neurons enhances their intrinsic anatomical plasticity within the injured adult central nervous system. PMID:20585375

  18. Spinal cord astrocytoma mimicking multifocal myelitis

    PubMed Central

    Neutel, Dulce; Teodoro, Tiago; Coelho, Miguel; Pimentel, José; Albuquerque, Luísa

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Differential diagnosis of acute/subacute intrinsic spinal cord lesions can be challenging. In addition, intramedullary neoplasms typically show gadolinium enhancement, mass effect, and cord expansion. Case report We report a patient with spinal cord and brain stem lesions resembling multifocal myelitis. Magnetic resonance imaging showed no spinal cord enlargement or gadolinium enhancing. Treatment of myelitis was undertaken without stopping the progression of the disease. Biopsy was made and led to a histological diagnosis of astrocytoma. Discussion Astrocytoma must remain as a possible diagnosis of spinal cord lesions, even without typical characteristics of neoplasms. Furthermore, biopsy should always be considered when diagnosis is uncertain. PMID:24621037

  19. Diffusion Assessment of Cortical Changes, Induced by Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Peng; Murphy, Rory K. J.; Gamble, Paul; George, Ajit; Song, Sheng-Kwei; Ray, Wilson Z.

    2017-01-01

    Promising treatments are being developed to promote functional recovery after spinal cord injury (SCI). Magnetic resonance imaging, specifically Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) has been shown to non-invasively measure both axonal and myelin integrity following traumatic brain and SCI. A novel data-driven model-selection algorithm known as Diffusion Basis Spectrum Imaging (DBSI) has been proposed to more accurately delineate white matter injury. The objective of this study was to investigate whether DTI/DBSI changes that extend to level of the cerebral peduncle and internal capsule following a SCI could be correlated with clinical function. A prospective non-randomized cohort of 23 patients with chronic spinal cord injuries and 17 control subjects underwent cranial diffusion weighted imaging, followed by whole brain DTI and DBSI computations. Region-based analyses were performed on cerebral peduncle and internal capsule. Three subgroups of patients were included in the region-based analysis. Tract-Based Spatial Statistics (TBSS) was also applied to allow whole-brain white matter analysis between controls and all patients. Functional assessments were made using International Standards for Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury (ISNCSCI) as modified by the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Scale. Whole brain white matter analysis using TBSS finds no statistical difference between controls and all patients. Only cervical ASIA A/B patients in cerebral peduncle showed differences from controls in DTI and DBSI results with region-based analysis. Cervical ASIA A/B SCI patients had higher levels of axonal injury and edema/tissue loss as measured by DBSI at the level of the cerebral peduncle. DTI Fractional Anisotropy (FA), Axial Diffusivity (AD) and Radial Diffusivity (RD) was able to detect differences in cervical ASIA A/B patients, but were non-specific to pathologies. Increased water fraction indicated by DBSI non-restricted isotropic diffusion fraction

  20. Leishmania (L). amazonensis induces hyperalgesia in balb/c mice: Contribution of endogenous spinal cord TNFα and NFκB activation.

    PubMed

    Borghi, Sergio M; Fattori, Victor; Ruiz-Miyazawa, Kenji W; Miranda-Sapla, Milena M; Casagrande, Rúbia; Pinge-Filho, Phileno; Pavanelli, Wander R; Verri, Waldiceu A

    2017-02-17

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is the most common form of the leishmaniasis in humans. Ulcerative painless skin lesions are predominant clinical features of CL. Wider data indicate pain accompanies human leishmaniasis, out with areas of painless ulcerative lesions per se. In rodents, Leishmania (L.) major infection induces nociceptive behaviors that correlate with peripheral cytokine levels. However, the role of the spinal cord in pain processing after Leishmania infection has not been investigated. Balb/c mice received intraplantar (i.pl.) injection of Leishmania (L). amazonensis and hyperalgesia, edema, parasitism, and spinal cord TNFα, TNFR1 and TNFR2 mRNA expression, and NFκB activation were evaluated. The effects of intrathecal (i.t.) injection of morphine, TNFα, TNFα inhibitors (etanercept and adalimumab) and NFκB inhibitor (PDTC) were investigated. The present study demonstrates that Leishmania (L.) amazonensis infection in balb/c mice induces chronic mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in an opioid-sensitive manner. Spinal cord TNFα mRNA expression increased in a time-dependent manner, peaking between 30 and 40 days after infection. At the peak of TNFα mRNA expression (day 30), there was a concomitant increase in TNFR1 and TNFR2 mRNA expression. TNFα i.t. injection enhanced L. (L.) amazonensis-induced hyperalgesia. Corroborating a role for TNFα in L. (L.) amazonensis-induced hyperalgesia, i.t. treatment with the TNFα inhibitors, etanercept and adalimumab inhibited the hyperalgesia. L. (L.) amazonensis also induced spinal cord activation of NFκB, and PDTC (given i.t.), also inhibited L. (L.) amazonensis-induced hyperalgesia, and spinal cord TNFα, TNFR1 and TNFR2 mRNA expression. Moreover, L. (L.) amazonensis-induced spinal cord activation of NFκB was also inhibited by etanercept and adalimumab as well as PDTC i.t.

  1. Psychological Aspects of Spinal Cord Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Daniel W.

    1976-01-01

    Reviewing literature on the psychological impact of spinal cord injury suggests: (a) depression may not be a precondition for injury adjustment; (b) many persons sustaining cord injury may have experienced psychological disruption prior to injury; and (c) indexes of rehabilitation success need to be developed for the spinal cord injured. (Author)

  2. Psychological Aspects of Spinal Cord Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Daniel W.

    1976-01-01

    Reviewing literature on the psychological impact of spinal cord injury suggests: (a) depression may not be a precondition for injury adjustment; (b) many persons sustaining cord injury may have experienced psychological disruption prior to injury; and (c) indexes of rehabilitation success need to be developed for the spinal cord injured. (Author)

  3. Tert-butylhydroquinone protects the spinal cord against inflammatory response produced by spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Jin, Wei; Ni, Hongbin; Hou, Xiaoshan; Ming, Xing; Wang, Jing; Yuan, Baoyu; Zhu, Tiansheng; Jiang, Jian; Wang, Handong; Liang, Weibang

    2014-01-01

    Antioxidant transcription factor nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) has been shown in our previous studies to play an important role in protection against spinal cord injury (SCI) induced inflammatory response. The objective of this study was to test whether tert-butylhydroquinone (tBHQ), a novel Nrf2 activator, can protect the spinal cord against SCI-induced inflammatory damage. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to laminectomy at T8-T9 and compression with a vascular clip. Three groups were analyzed: a sham group, a SCI group, and a SCI+rhEPO group (n=16 per group). We measured Nrf2 and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) binding activities by an electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). We also measured the concentrations of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA); we also measured hindlimb locomotion function by the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB) rating, spinal cord edema by wet/dry weight method, and apoptosis by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) analysis. The results showed that the induction of the Nrf2 activity by tBHQ markedly decreased NF-κB activation and inflammatory cytokines production in the injured spinal cord. Administration of tBHQ also significantly attenuated SCI induced hindlimb locomotion deficits, spinal cord edema, and apoptosis. To conclude, pre-treatment with tBHQ could attenuate the spinal cord inflammatory response after SCI.

  4. The shortened spinal cord in tetraodontiform fishes.

    PubMed

    Uehara, Masato; Hosaka, Yoshinao Z; Doi, Hiroyuki; Sakai, Harumi

    2015-03-01

    In teleosts, the spinal cord generally extends along the entire vertebral canal. The Tetraodontiformes, in which the spinal cord is greatly reduced in length with a distinct long filum terminale and cauda equina, have been regarded as an aberration. The aims of this study are: 1) to elucidate whether the spinal cord in all tetraodontiform fishes shorten with the filum terminale, and 2) to describe the gross anatomical and histological differences in the spinal cord among all families of the Tetraodontiformes. Representative species from all families of the Tetraodontiformes, and for comparison the carp as a common teleost, were investigated. In the Triacanthodidae, Triacanthidae, and Triodontidae, which are the more ancestral taxa of the Tetraodontiformes, the spinal cord extends through the entire vertebral canal. In the Triacanthidae and Triodontidae, the caudal half or more spinal segments of the spinal cord, however, lack gray matter and consist largely of nerve fibers. In the other tetraodontiform families, the spinal cord is shortened forming a filum terminale with the cauda equina, which is prolonged as far as the last vertebra. The shortened spinal cord is divided into three groups. In the Ostraciidae and Molidae, the spinal cord tapers abruptly at the cranium or first vertebra forming a cord-like filum terminale. In the Monacanthidae, Tetraodontidae, and Diodontidae, it abruptly flattens at the rostral vertebrae forming a flat filum terminale. The spinal cord is relatively longer in the Monacanthidae than that in the other two families. It is suggested by histological features of the flat filum terminale that shortening of the spinal cord in this group progresses in order of the Monacanthidae, Tetraodontidae, and Diodontidae. In the Balistidae and Aracanidae, the cord is relatively long and then gradually decreased in dorso-ventral thickness.

  5. Insulin action and long-term electrically induced training in individuals with spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed

    Mohr, T; Dela, F; Handberg, A; Biering-Sørensen, F; Galbo, H; Kjaer, M

    2001-08-01

    Individuals with spinal cord injuries (SCI) have an increased prevalence of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus. In able-bodied individuals, training with large muscle groups increases insulin sensitivity and may prevent type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, individuals with SCI cannot voluntarily recruit major muscle groups, but by functional electrical stimulation (FES) they can now perform ergometer bicycle training. Ten subjects with SCI (35 +/- 2 yr (mean +/- SE), 73 +/- 5 kg, level of lesion C6--Th4, time since injury: 12 +/- 2 yr) performed 1 yr of FES cycling (30 min x d(-1), 3 d x wk(-1) (intensive training)). Seven subjects continued 6 months with reduced training (1 d x wk(-1) (reduced training)). A sequential, hyperinsulinemic (50 mU x min(-1) x m(-2) (step 1) and 480 mU x min(-1) x m(-2) (step 2)), euglycemic clamp, an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), and determination of GLUT 4 transporter protein in muscle biopsies were performed before and after training. Insulin-stimulated glucose uptake rates increased after intensive training (from 4.9 +/- 0.5 mg x min(-1) x kg(-1) to 6.2 +/- 0.6 mg x min(-1) x kg(-1) (P < 0.008) (step 1) and from 9.0 +/- 0.8 mg x min(-1) x kg(-1) to 10.6 +/- 0.8 mg x min(-1) x kg(-1) (P = 0.103) (step 2)). With the reduction in training, insulin sensitivity decreased to a similar level as before training (P > 0.05). GLUT 4 increased by 105% after intense training and decreased again with the training reduction. The subjects had impaired glucose tolerance before and after training, and neither glucose tolerance nor insulin responses to OGTT were significantly altered by training. Electrically induced bicycle training, performed three times per week increases insulin sensitivity and GLUT 4 content in skeletal muscle in subjects with SCI. A reduction in training to once per week is not sufficient to maintain these effects. FES training may have a role in the prevention of the insulin resistance syndrome in persons with

  6. Therapeutic approaches for spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Cristante, Alexandre Fogaça; de Barros Filho, Tarcísio Eloy Pessoa; Marcon, Raphael Martus; Letaif, Olavo Biraghi; da Rocha, Ivan Dias

    2012-01-01

    This study reviews the literature concerning possible therapeutic approaches for spinal cord injury. Spinal cord injury is a disabling and irreversible condition that has high economic and social costs. There are both primary and secondary mechanisms of damage to the spinal cord. The primary lesion is the mechanical injury itself. The secondary lesion results from one or more biochemical and cellular processes that are triggered by the primary lesion. The frustration of health professionals in treating a severe spinal cord injury was described in 1700 BC in an Egyptian surgical papyrus that was translated by Edwin Smith; the papyrus reported spinal fractures as a “disease that should not be treated.” Over the last two decades, several studies have been performed to obtain more effective treatments for spinal cord injury. Most of these studies approach a patient with acute spinal cord injury in one of four manners: corrective surgery or a physical, biological or pharmacological treatment method. Science is unraveling the mechanisms of cell protection and neuroregeneration, but clinically, we only provide supportive care for patients with spinal cord injuries. By combining these treatments, researchers attempt to enhance the functional recovery of patients with spinal cord injuries. Advances in the last decade have allowed us to encourage the development of experimental studies in the field of spinal cord regeneration. The combination of several therapeutic strategies should, at minimum, allow for partial functional recoveries for these patients, which could improve their quality of life. PMID:23070351

  7. Spinal Cord Repair with Engineered Nervous Tissue

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    funded grant, we demonstrated proof-of-concept success of bridging a lateral hemisection of the rat spinal cord with engineered (“stretch-grown...AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-10-1-0941 TITLE: Spinal Cord Repair with Engineered...5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Spinal Cord Repair with Engineered Nervous Tissue 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-10-1-0941 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR

  8. Spinal Cord Repair with Engineered Nervous Tissue

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    success of bridging a lateral hemisection in the rat spinal cord with engineered (“stretch-grown”) living nervous tissue constructs 2 . For the current...AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-10-1-0941 TITLE: Spinal Cord Repair with Engineered...SUBTITLE Spinal Cord Repair with Engineered Nervous Tissue 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-10-1-0941 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6

  9. Nestin- and Doublecortin-Positive Cells Reside in Adult Spinal Cord Meninges and Participate in Injury-Induced Parenchymal Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Decimo, Ilaria; Bifari, Francesco; Rodriguez, Francisco Javier; Malpeli, Giorgio; Dolci, Sissi; Lavarini, Valentina; Pretto, Silvia; Vasquez, Sandra; Sciancalepore, Marina; Montalbano, Alberto; Berton, Valeria; Krampera, Mauro; Fumagalli, Guido

    2011-01-01

    Adult spinal cord has little regenerative potential, thus limiting patient recovery following injury. In this study, we describe a new population of cells resident in the adult rat spinal cord meninges that express the neural stem/precursor markers nestin and doublecortin. Furthermore, from dissociated meningeal tissue a neural stem cell population was cultured in vitro and subsequently shown to differentiate into functional neurons or mature oligodendrocytes. Proliferation rate and number of nestin- and doublecortin-positive cells increased in vivo in meninges following spinal cord injury. By using a lentivirus-labeling approach, we show that meningeal cells, including nestin- and doublecortin-positive cells, migrate in the spinal cord parenchyma and contribute to the glial scar formation. Our data emphasize the multiple roles of meninges in the reaction of the parenchyma to trauma and indicate for the first time that spinal cord meninges are potential niches harboring stem/precursor cells that can be activated by injury. Meninges may be considered as a new source of adult stem/precursor cells to be further tested for use in regenerative medicine applied to neurological disorders, including repair from spinal cord injury. Stem Cells 2011;29:2062–2076. PMID:22038821

  10. Systemic effects induced by intralesional injection of ω-conotoxin MVIIC after spinal cord injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Calcium channel blockers such as conotoxins have shown a great potential to reduce brain and spinal cord injury. MVIIC neuroprotective effects analyzed in in vitro models of brain and spinal cord ischemia suggest a potential role of this toxin in preventing injury after spinal cord trauma. However, previous clinical studies with MVIIC demonstrated that clinical side effects might limit the usefulness of this drug and there is no research on its systemic effects. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the potential toxic effects of MVIIC on organs and to evaluate clinical and blood profiles of rats submitted to spinal cord injury and treated with this marine toxin. Rats were treated with placebo or MVIIC (at doses of 15, 30, 60 or 120 pmol) intralesionally following spinal cord injury. Seven days after the toxin administration, kidney, brain, lung, heart, liver, adrenal, muscles, pancreas, spleen, stomach, and intestine were histopathologically investigated. In addition, blood samples collected from the rats were tested for any hematologic or biochemical changes. Results The clinical, hematologic and biochemical evaluation revealed no significant abnormalities in all groups, even in high doses. There was no significant alteration in organs, except for degenerative changes in kidneys at a dose of 120 pmol. Conclusions These findings suggest that MVIIC at 15, 30 and 60 pmol are safe for intralesional administration after spinal cord injury and could be further investigated in relation to its neuroprotective effects. However, 120 pmol doses of MVIIC may provoke adverse effects on kidney tissue. PMID:24739121

  11. Systemic effects induced by intralesional injection of ω-conotoxin MVIIC after spinal cord injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Karen M; Silva, Carla Maria O; Lavor, Mário Sérgio L; Rosado, Isabel R; Fukushima, Fabíola B; Assumpção, Anna Luiza Fv; Neves, Saira Mn; Motta, Guilherme R; Garcia, Fernanda F; Gomez, Marcus Vinícius; Melo, Marília M; Melo, Eliane G

    2014-01-01

    Calcium channel blockers such as conotoxins have shown a great potential to reduce brain and spinal cord injury. MVIIC neuroprotective effects analyzed in in vitro models of brain and spinal cord ischemia suggest a potential role of this toxin in preventing injury after spinal cord trauma. However, previous clinical studies with MVIIC demonstrated that clinical side effects might limit the usefulness of this drug and there is no research on its systemic effects. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the potential toxic effects of MVIIC on organs and to evaluate clinical and blood profiles of rats submitted to spinal cord injury and treated with this marine toxin. Rats were treated with placebo or MVIIC (at doses of 15, 30, 60 or 120 pmol) intralesionally following spinal cord injury. Seven days after the toxin administration, kidney, brain, lung, heart, liver, adrenal, muscles, pancreas, spleen, stomach, and intestine were histopathologically investigated. In addition, blood samples collected from the rats were tested for any hematologic or biochemical changes. The clinical, hematologic and biochemical evaluation revealed no significant abnormalities in all groups, even in high doses. There was no significant alteration in organs, except for degenerative changes in kidneys at a dose of 120 pmol. These findings suggest that MVIIC at 15, 30 and 60 pmol are safe for intralesional administration after spinal cord injury and could be further investigated in relation to its neuroprotective effects. However, 120 pmol doses of MVIIC may provoke adverse effects on kidney tissue.

  12. Nestin- and doublecortin-positive cells reside in adult spinal cord meninges and participate in injury-induced parenchymal reaction.

    PubMed

    Decimo, Ilaria; Bifari, Francesco; Rodriguez, Francisco Javier; Malpeli, Giorgio; Dolci, Sissi; Lavarini, Valentina; Pretto, Silvia; Vasquez, Sandra; Sciancalepore, Marina; Montalbano, Alberto; Berton, Valeria; Krampera, Mauro; Fumagalli, Guido

    2011-12-01

    Adult spinal cord has little regenerative potential, thus limiting patient recovery following injury. In this study, we describe a new population of cells resident in the adult rat spinal cord meninges that express the neural stem/precursor markers nestin and doublecortin. Furthermore, from dissociated meningeal tissue a neural stem cell population was cultured in vitro and subsequently shown to differentiate into functional neurons or mature oligodendrocytes. Proliferation rate and number of nestin- and doublecortin-positive cells increased in vivo in meninges following spinal cord injury. By using a lentivirus-labeling approach, we show that meningeal cells, including nestin- and doublecortin-positive cells, migrate in the spinal cord parenchyma and contribute to the glial scar formation. Our data emphasize the multiple roles of meninges in the reaction of the parenchyma to trauma and indicate for the first time that spinal cord meninges are potential niches harboring stem/precursor cells that can be activated by injury. Meninges may be considered as a new source of adult stem/precursor cells to be further tested for use in regenerative medicine applied to neurological disorders, including repair from spinal cord injury.

  13. Testosterone Plus Finasteride Treatment After Spinal Cord Injury

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-24

    Spinal Cord Injury; Spinal Cord Injuries; Trauma, Nervous System; Wounds and Injuries; Central Nervous System Diseases; Nervous System Diseases; Spinal Cord Diseases; Gonadal Disorders; Endocrine System Diseases; Hypogonadism; Genital Diseases, Male

  14. Survival Rates for Selected Childhood Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diagnosis, and Staging Survival Rates for Selected Childhood Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors Survival rates are often ... Childhood Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors More In Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors in Children About Brain ...

  15. Allicin protects spinal cord neurons from glutamate-induced oxidative stress through regulating the heat shock protein 70/inducible nitric oxide synthase pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shu-Guang; Ren, Peng-Yu; Wang, Guo-Yu; Yao, Shu-Xin; He, Xi-Jing

    2015-01-01

    Allicin, the main biologically active compound derived from garlic, exerts a broad spectrum of pharmacological activities and is considered to have therapeutic potential in many neurological disorders. Using an in vitro spinal cord injury model induced by glutamate treatment, we sought to investigate the neuroprotective effects of allicin in primary cultured spinal cord neurons. We found that allicin treatment significantly attenuated glutamate-induced lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, loss of cell viability and apoptotic neuronal death. This protection was associated with reduced oxidative stress, as evidenced by decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, reduced lipid peroxidation and preservation of antioxidant enzyme activities. The results of western blot analysis showed that allicin decreased the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), but had no effects on the expression of neuronal NOS (nNOS) following glutamate exposure. Moreover, allicin treatment significantly increased the expression of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) at both mRNA and protein levels. Knockdown of HSP70 by specific targeted small interfere RNA (siRNA) not only mitigated allicin-induced protective activity, but also partially nullified its effects on the regulation of iNOS. Collectively, these data demonstrate that allicin treatment may be an effective therapeutic strategy for spinal cord injury, and that the potential underlying mechanism involves HSP70/iNOS pathway-mediated inhibition of oxidative stress.

  16. Interlimb Reflexes Induced by Electrical Stimulation of Cutaneous Nerves after Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Jane E.; Godfrey, Sharlene; Thomas, Christine K.

    2016-01-01

    Whether interlimb reflexes emerge only after a severe insult to the human spinal cord is controversial. Here the aim was to examine interlimb reflexes at rest in participants with chronic (>1 year) spinal cord injury (SCI, n = 17) and able-bodied control participants (n = 5). Cutaneous reflexes were evoked by delivering up to 30 trains of stimuli to either the superficial peroneal nerve on the dorsum of the foot or the radial nerve at the wrist (5 pulses, 300 Hz, approximately every 30 s). Participants were instructed to relax the test muscles prior to the delivery of the stimuli. Electromyographic activity was recorded bilaterally in proximal and distal arm and leg muscles. Superficial peroneal nerve stimulation evoked interlimb reflexes in ipsilateral and contralateral arm and contralateral leg muscles of SCI and control participants. Radial nerve stimulation evoked interlimb reflexes in the ipsilateral leg and contralateral arm muscles of control and SCI participants but only contralateral leg muscles of control participants. Interlimb reflexes evoked by superficial peroneal nerve stimulation were longer in latency and duration, and larger in magnitude in SCI participants. Interlimb reflex properties were similar for both SCI and control groups for radial nerve stimulation. Ascending interlimb reflexes tended to occur with a higher incidence in participants with SCI, while descending interlimb reflexes occurred with a higher incidence in able-bodied participants. However, the overall incidence of interlimb reflexes in SCI and neurologically intact participants was similar which suggests that the neural circuitry underlying these reflexes does not necessarily develop after central nervous system injury. PMID:27049521

  17. Interlimb Reflexes Induced by Electrical Stimulation of Cutaneous Nerves after Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Butler, Jane E; Godfrey, Sharlene; Thomas, Christine K

    2016-01-01

    Whether interlimb reflexes emerge only after a severe insult to the human spinal cord is controversial. Here the aim was to examine interlimb reflexes at rest in participants with chronic (>1 year) spinal cord injury (SCI, n = 17) and able-bodied control participants (n = 5). Cutaneous reflexes were evoked by delivering up to 30 trains of stimuli to either the superficial peroneal nerve on the dorsum of the foot or the radial nerve at the wrist (5 pulses, 300 Hz, approximately every 30 s). Participants were instructed to relax the test muscles prior to the delivery of the stimuli. Electromyographic activity was recorded bilaterally in proximal and distal arm and leg muscles. Superficial peroneal nerve stimulation evoked interlimb reflexes in ipsilateral and contralateral arm and contralateral leg muscles of SCI and control participants. Radial nerve stimulation evoked interlimb reflexes in the ipsilateral leg and contralateral arm muscles of control and SCI participants but only contralateral leg muscles of control participants. Interlimb reflexes evoked by superficial peroneal nerve stimulation were longer in latency and duration, and larger in magnitude in SCI participants. Interlimb reflex properties were similar for both SCI and control groups for radial nerve stimulation. Ascending interlimb reflexes tended to occur with a higher incidence in participants with SCI, while descending interlimb reflexes occurred with a higher incidence in able-bodied participants. However, the overall incidence of interlimb reflexes in SCI and neurologically intact participants was similar which suggests that the neural circuitry underlying these reflexes does not necessarily develop after central nervous system injury.

  18. Effects of naloxone and nalmefene in rat spinal cord injury induced by the ventral compression technique.

    PubMed

    Benzel, E C; Khare, V; Fowler, M R

    1992-03-01

    The neural injury prevention capabilities of narcotic antagonists have previously been reported. Of the available narcotic antagonists, naloxone has been the most widely studied. Other agents with higher potency, longer half-lives, and greater specificity, however, may be more desirable for the prevention of the "secondary injury" following a primary neural insult. The relative neural injury prevention efficacies of the various narcotic antagonists is not known. The establishment of the relative effectiveness of these drugs is warranted and is of potential clinical importance. Therefore, a study was undertaken to compare the effects of the two narcotic antagonists, naloxone and nalmefene, with respect to their neuro-protective efficacy following experimental spinal cord injury (SCI) in rats. Ninety adult Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups--control; naloxone (2 mg/kg i.p., 45 min following injury); and nalmefene (0.1 mg/kg i.p., 45 min following injury)--following lesioning with the ventral SCI technique. Results were evaluated by the inclined-plane technique and neurologic examination at 1 day and 1 week following injury. Histomorphological evaluation of the injured segment of spinal cord was performed following euthanasia at 1 week following injury. A significant improvement (compared with the control group) was noted in both treatment groups. This was observed with respect to neurological examination and inclined-plane scores in both treatment groups at 24 h and 1 week following lesioning (with a significance level of at least p less than 0.001; analysis of variance). The nalmefene group demonstrated a greater level of function than the naloxone group at both 24 h and 1 week following injury (not significant; p greater than 0.05).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. GABA and Central Neuropathic Pain following Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Gwak, Young S.; Hulsebosch, Claire E.

    2012-01-01

    Spinal cord injury induces maladaptive synaptic transmission in the somatosensory system that results in chronic central neuropathic pain. Recent literature suggests that glial-neuronal interactions are important modulators in synaptic transmission following spinal cord injury. Neuronal hyperexcitability is one of the predominant phenomenon caused by maladaptive synaptic transmission via altered glial-neuronal interactions after spinal cord injury. In the somatosensory system, spinal inhibitory neurons counter balance the enhanced synaptic transmission from peripheral input. For a decade, the literature suggests that hypofunction of GABAergic inhibitory tone is an important factor in the enhanced synaptic transmission that often results in neuronal hyperexcitability in dorsal horn neurons following spinal cord injury. Neurons and glial cells synergistically control intracellular chloride ion gradients via modulation of chloride transporters, extracellular glutamate and GABA concentrations via uptake mechanisms. Thus, the intracellular “GABA-glutamate-glutamine cycle” is maintained for normal physiological homeostasis. However, hyperexcitable neurons and glial activation after spinal cord injury disrupts the balance of chloride ions, glutamate and GABA distribution in the spinal dorsal horn and results in chronic neuropathic pain. In this review, we address spinal cord injury induced mechanisms in hypofunction of GABAergic tone that results in chronic central neuropathic pain. PMID:21216257

  20. [Sequential expression of hypoxia-inducible factor 1alpha and its significance in secondary spinal cord injury].

    PubMed

    Niu, Qingfei; Jia, Changqing; Wang, Nan; Chen, Xiaochun; Chi, Renjie; Bai, Shuling

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the expression pattern of hypoxia-inducible factor 1alpha (HIF-1alpha) in experimental secondary spinal cord injury (SSCI) in rats and its potential effects on SSCI. A total of 66 SD rats (female or male) with weight (250 +/- 20) g were randomly divided into 3 groups: normal control group (group A, n = 6), pseudo injury group (group B, n = 6), and spinal cord injury (SCI) group (group C, n = 54). In group A, no treatment was given as normal control. In group B, only laminectomy was applied. In group C, laminectomy was applied and static compression model of SCI was built at T10 level. The expression of HIF-1alpha was measured with HE and immunohistochemical staining in groups A, B (1 hour after pseudo injury), and C (1, 3, 6, 12 hours and 1, 2, 3, 7, 14 days after SCI). Results All rats survived to the end of the experiment. HE staining showed that the spinal tissue of groups A and B were dense and the nucleus were round and big with light staining and clear nucleolus. The injured neuron at 1-12 hours after SCI of group C presented pyknosis and deep eosin staining. The swelling axon with bubbles and the disintegrated and disorganized medullary sheath in white matter appeared at 1-3 days after SCI. The hyperplasia of glial cells were obvious and gray matter cells were broken and apoptosis with cavities in injured spinal segment was observed at 7 and 14 days after SCI. Immunohistochemical staining showed that HIF-la was poorly expressed in group A and increased a little in group B. The positive expression in group C increased at 3 hours after SCI, which was found in spinal cord anterior horn neurons and a small amount of ganglion cells. It reached peak at 1 day, maintained at a high level during 1-3 days and then declined. At 14 days, it appeared only in a small amount of ganglion cells of white matter. There was no significant difference in the number of HIF-1alpha positive cells between groups A and B (t = 1.325, P = 0.137). The number of HIF-1alpha

  1. Search and Neutralize Factors (Cspgs) that Induce Decline in Transmission to Motoneurons from Spared Fibers after Chronic Spinal Cord Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    subcutaneous injections of antibiotic (Baytril, 5 mg/kg) and 5 ml sterile-lactated Ringer`s solution. Injections of antibiotic, analgesic , and Ringer`s...spinal cord: role of NMDA receptors . Journal of Neurophysiology, 107, 3027-3039, 2012. 4. Arvanian V. Role of Neurotrophins in Spinal Plasticity

  2. Partial agonistic action of endomorphins in the mouse spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Mizoguchi, H; Wu, H E; Narita, M

    2001-09-07

    The partial agonistic properties of endogenous mu-opioid peptides endomorphin-1 and endomorphin-2 for G-protein activation were determined in the mouse spinal cord, monitoring the increases in guanosine-5'-o-(3-[35S]thio)triphosphate binding. The G-protein activation induced by endogenous opioid peptide beta-endorphin in the spinal cord was significantly, but partially, attenuated by co-incubation with endomorphin-1 or endomorphin-2. The data indicates that endomorphin-1 and endomorphin-2 are endogenous partial agonists for mu-opioid receptor in the mouse spinal cord.

  3. Spinal cord compression in pseudohypoparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Timothy T; Khasnavis, Siddharth; Papaliodis, Dean N; Citone, Isabella; Carl, Allen L

    2013-12-01

    Spinal cord compression associated with pseudohypoparathyroidism (PHP) is an increasingly reported sequelae of the underlying metabolic syndrome. The association of neurologic dysfunction with PHP is not well appreciated. We believe this to be secondary to a combination of underlying congenital stenosis, manifest by short pedicles secondary to premature physeal closure, and hypertrophic ossification of the vertebral bony and ligamentous complexes. The purpose of this case report is to review the case of spinal stenosis in a child with PHP Type Ia. We are aware of only eight published reports of patients with PHP Type Ia and spinal stenosis-there are only two previously known cases of pediatric spinal stenosis secondary to PHP. This is a case report detailing the symptoms, diagnosis, interventions, complications, and ultimate outcomes of a pediatric patient undergoing spinal decompression and fusion for symptomatic stenosis secondary to PHP Type Ia. Literature search was reviewed regarding the reports of spinal stenosis and PHP, and the results are culminated and discussed. We report on a 14-year-old obese male with PHP and progressive lower extremity weakness secondary to congenital spinal stenosis. Examination revealed functional upper extremities with spastic paraplegia of bilateral lower extremities. The patient's neurologic function was cautiously monitored, but he deteriorated to a bed-bound state, preoperatively. The patient's chart was reviewed, summarized, and presented. Literature was searched using cross-reference of PHP and the terms "spinal stenosis," "myelopathy", "myelopathic," and "spinal cord compression." All relevant case reports were reviewed, and the results are discussed herein. The patient underwent decompression and instrumented fusion of T2-T11. He improved significantly with regard to lower extremity function, achieving unassisted ambulation function after extensive rehabilitation. Results from surgical decompression in previously reported

  4. Spinal cord homogenates from SOD1 familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis induce SOD1 aggregation in living cells.

    PubMed

    Pokrishevsky, Edward; Hong, Ran Ha; Mackenzie, Ian R; Cashman, Neil R

    2017-01-01

    Mutant Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) can confer its misfolding on wild-type SOD1 in living cells; the propagation of misfolding can also be transmitted between cells in vitro. Recent studies identified fluorescently-tagged SOD1G85R as a promiscuous substrate that is highly prone to aggregate by a variety of templates, in vitro and in vivo. Here, we utilized several SOD1-GFP reporter proteins with G37R, G85R, or G93A mutations in SOD1. We observed that human spinal cord homogenates prepared from SOD1 familial ALS (FALS) can induce significantly more intracellular reporter protein aggregation than spinal cord homogenates from sporadic ALS, Alzheimer's disease, multiple system atrophy or healthy control individuals. We also determined that the induction of reporter protein aggregation by SOD1-FALS tissue homogenates can be attenuated by incubating the cells with the SOD1 misfolding-specific antibody 3H1, or the small molecule 5-fluorouridine. Our study further implicates SOD1 as the seeding particle responsible for the spread of SOD1-FALS neurodegeneration from its initial onset site(s), and demonstrates two potential therapeutic strategies for SOD1-mediated disease. This work also comprises a medium-throughput cell-based platform of screening potential therapeutics to attenuate propagated aggregation of SOD1.

  5. Central nociceptive sensitization vs. spinal cord training: opposing forms of plasticity that dictate function after complete spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Adam R.; Huie, J. Russell; Crown, Eric D.; Grau, James W.

    2012-01-01

    The spinal cord demonstrates several forms of plasticity that resemble brain-dependent learning and memory. Among the most studied form of spinal plasticity is spinal memory for noxious (nociceptive) stimulation. Numerous papers have described central pain as a spinally-stored memory that enhances future responses to cutaneous stimulation. This phenomenon, known as central sensitization, has broad relevance to a range of pathological conditions. Work from the spinal cord injury (SCI) field indicates that the lumbar spinal cord demonstrates several other forms of plasticity, including formal learning and memory. After complete thoracic SCI, the lumbar spinal cord can be trained by delivering stimulation to the hindleg when the leg is extended. In the presence of this response-contingent stimulation the spinal cord rapidly learns to hold the leg in a flexed position, a centrally mediated effect that meets the formal criteria for instrumental (response-outcome) learning. Instrumental flexion training produces a central change in spinal plasticity that enables future spinal learning on both the ipsilateral and contralateral leg. However, if stimulation is given in a response-independent manner, the spinal cord develops central maladaptive plasticity that undermines future spinal learning on both legs. The present paper tests for interactions between spinal cord training and central nociceptive sensitization after complete spinal cord transection. We found that spinal training alters future central sensitization by intradermal formalin (24 h post-training). Conversely intradermal formalin impaired future spinal learning (24 h post-injection). Because formalin-induced central sensitization has been shown to involve NMDA receptor activation, we tested whether pre-treatment with NMDA would also affect spinal learning in manner similar to formalin. We found intrathecal NMDA impaired learning in a dose-dependent fashion, and that this effect endures for at least 24 h. These

  6. Part 1: recognizing neonatal spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Brand, M Colleen

    2006-02-01

    Neonatal spinal cord injury can occur in utero, as well as after either a difficult delivery or a nontraumatic delivery. Spinal cord injury can also be related to invasive nursery procedures or underlying neonatal pathology. Early clinical signs of spinal cord injury that has occurred in utero or at delivery includes severe respiratory compromise and profound hypotonia. Knowledge of risk factors and awareness of symptoms is required for early recognition and appropriate treatment. This article reviews the embryological development of the spinal column highlighting mechanisms of injury and identifying underlying factors that increase the risk of spinal cord injury in newborns. Signs and symptoms of injury, cervical spine immobilization, and the differential diagnosis are discussed. Nursing implications, general prognosis, and research in spinal cord injury are provided.

  7. Intrathecal Transplantation of Autologous Adherent Bone Marrow Cells Induces Functional Neurological Recovery in a Canine Model of Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Gabr, Hala; El-Kheir, Wael Abo; Farghali, Haithem A M A; Ismail, Zeinab M K; Zickri, Maha B; El Maadawi, Zeinab M; Kishk, Nirmeen A; Sabaawy, Hatem E

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) results in demyelination of surviving axons, loss of oligodendrocytes, and impairment of motor and sensory functions. We have developed a clinical strategy of cell therapy for SCI through the use of autologous bone marrow cells for transplantation to augment remyelination and enhance neurological repair. In a preclinical large mammalian model of SCI, experimental dogs were subjected to a clipping contusion of the spinal cord. Two weeks after the injury, GFP-labeled autologous minimally manipulated adherent bone marrow cells (ABMCs) were transplanted intrathecally to investigate the safety and efficacy of autologous ABMC therapy. The effects of ABMC transplantation in dogs with SCI were determined using functional neurological scoring, and the integration of ABMCs into the injured cords was determined using histopathological and immunohistochemical investigations and electron microscopic analyses of sections from control and transplanted spinal cords. Our data demonstrate the presence of GFP-labeled cells in the injured spinal cord for up to 16 weeks after transplantation in the subacute SCI stage. GFP-labeled cells homed to the site of injury and were detected around white matter tracts and surviving axons. ABMC therapy in the canine SCI model enhanced remyelination and augmented neural regeneration, resulting in improved neurological functions. Therefore, autologous ABMC therapy appears to be a safe and promising therapy for spinal cord injuries.

  8. [Vascular and autonomic disorders of the spinal cord in dystopia of the spinal motor segment].

    PubMed

    Gongal'skiĭ, V V; Kuftyreva, T P

    1992-01-01

    Microcirculation disorders may cause functional deviation in gray matter cells of the spinal cord. One of the setting moments of the disorders is the subluxation of a vertebra as a result of the disturbance in carrying ability of the spinal disc in case of spinal osteochondrosis. In this position the soft tissues of the spinal motional well innervated segment are stretched, which induces irritation in the segmental part of the spinal cord including vegetative nervous structures. Subluxation of a vertebra causes changes in the structures and in the microcirculation vessels which grow simultaneously and this permits supposing their interrelation.

  9. Protective effect of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) against spinal cord ischemia-reperfusion injury via reducing oxidative stress-induced neuronal apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Xie, Lei; Wang, Zhenfei; Li, Changwei; Yang, Kai; Liang, Yu

    2017-02-01

    As previous studies demonstrate that oxidative stress and apoptosis play crucial roles in ischemic pathogenesis and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) treatment attenuates oxidative stress-induced cell death among primary neurons and astrocytes as well as significantly reduce cerebral ischemic injury in rats. We used a spinal cord ischemia injury (SCII) model in rats to verify our hypothesis that NAD(+) could ameliorate oxidative stress-induced neuronal apoptosis. Adult male rats were subjected to transient spinal cord ischemia for 60min, and different doses of NAD(+) were administered intraperitoneally immediately after the start of reperfusion. Neurological function was determined by Basso, Beattie, Bresnahan (BBB) scores. The oxidative stress level was assessed by superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and malondialdehyde (MDA) content. The degree of apoptosis was analyzed by deoxyuridinetriphosphate nick-end labeling (TUNEL) staining and protein levels of cleaved caspase-3 and AIF (apoptosis inducing factor). The results showed that NAD(+) at 50 or 100mg/kg significantly decreased the oxidative stress level and neuronal apoptosis in the spinal cord of ischemia-reperfusion rats compared with saline, as accompanied with the decreased oxidative stress, NAD(+) administration significantly restrained the neuronal apoptosis after ischemia injury while improved the neurological and motor function. These findings suggested that NAD(+) might protect against spinal cord ischemia-reperfusion via reducing oxidative stress-induced neuronal apoptosis.

  10. Phenotypic changes in dorsal root ganglion and spinal cord in the collagen antibody-induced arthritis mouse model.

    PubMed

    Su, Jie; Gao, Tianle; Shi, Tiejun; Xiang, Qiong; Xu, Xiaojun; Wiesenfeld-Hallin, Zsuzsanna; Hökfelt, Tomas; Svensson, Camilla I

    2015-07-01

    The mechanisms underlying rheumatoid arthritis (RA)-induced pain are still not fully elucidated, and accumulating data indicate that peripheral inflammation is not the only factor driving pain in these patients. The focus of our work is to investigate the molecular basis for long-term alterations in nociceptive pathways induced by polyarthritis using the collagen antibody-induced arthritis (CAIA) mouse model. In this model, mechanical hypersensitivity outlasts the joint inflammation by weeks. Here we examined expression levels of neuropeptides, ion channels, and nerve injury markers associated with neuropathic and/or inflammatory pain in dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) and spinal cord both during the peak of inflammation (day 15) and when the inflammation has resolved but the hypersensitivity persists (days 45-47). No apparent differences were observed in substance P, calcitonin gene-related peptide, or neuropeptide Y protein expression in DRGs and spinal cord of CAIA mice. However, the neuropeptide galanin, the ATP-gated ion channel P2X3, and calcium channel subunit α2δ1 were significantly increased in the CAIA DRGs as compared to controls, both 15 and 47 days after induction of arthritis. On day 15 there was an increase in expression of two factors associated with nerve injury and cell stress, activating transcription factor 3 and growth-associated protein 43 in DRGs, whereby the latter was still dramatically upregulated after 47 days. In conclusion, this study suggests that long-term joint inflammation has an impact on DRG neurons that resembles both inflammation and nerve injury-induced pain states. Thus, antibody-driven inflammation generates a pain state with a unique neurochemical profile. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Disability, atrophy and cortical reorganization following spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Freund, Patrick; Weiskopf, Nikolaus; Ward, Nick S; Hutton, Chloe; Gall, Angela; Ciccarelli, Olga; Craggs, Michael; Friston, Karl; Thompson, Alan J

    2011-06-01

    The impact of traumatic spinal cord injury on structural integrity, cortical reorganization and ensuing disability is variable and may depend on a dynamic interaction between the severity of local damage and the capacity of the brain for plastic reorganization. We investigated trauma-induced anatomical changes in the spinal cord and brain, and explored their relationship to functional changes in sensorimotor cortex. Structural changes were assessed using cross-sectional cord area, voxel-based morphometry and voxel-based cortical thickness of T1-weighted images in 10 subjects with cervical spinal cord injury and 16 controls. Cortical activation in response to right-sided (i) handgrip; and (ii) median and tibial nerve stimulation were assessed using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Regression analyses explored associations between cord area, grey and white matter volume, cortical activations and thickness, and disability. Subjects with spinal cord injury had impaired upper and lower limb function bilaterally, a 30% reduced cord area, smaller white matter volume in the pyramids and left cerebellar peduncle, and smaller grey matter volume and cortical thinning in the leg area of the primary motor and sensory cortex compared with controls. Functional magnetic resonance imaging revealed increased activation in the left primary motor cortex leg area during handgrip and the left primary sensory cortex face area during median nerve stimulation in subjects with spinal cord injury compared with controls, but no increased activation following tibial nerve stimulation. A smaller cervical cord area was associated with impaired upper limb function and increased activations with handgrip and median nerve stimulation, but reduced activations with tibial nerve stimulation. Increased sensory deficits were associated with increased activations in the left primary sensory cortex face area due to median nerve stimulation. In conclusion, spinal cord injury leads to cord atrophy

  12. Nutrition of People with Spinal Cord Injuries

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This conference proceeding summarizes current knowledge about the nutritional status and needs of the spinal cord injured patient. Topics covered include the aspects of spinal cord injury that influence nutrient intakes and status, and the nutrients most likely to be problematic in this diverse gro...

  13. Spinal Cord Injury: Hope through Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... many organ systems, including parts of the abdomen. Lumbar spinal nerves (L1 to L5) emerge from the spinal cord ... L2 vertebral body level. A thick set of nerves from the lumbar and sacral cord form the “cauda equina” in ...

  14. Delayed paraplegia after spinal cord ischemic injury requires caspase-3 activation in mice.

    PubMed

    Kakinohana, Manabu; Kida, Kotaro; Minamishima, Shizuka; Atochin, Dmitriy N; Huang, Paul L; Kaneki, Masao; Ichinose, Fumito

    2011-08-01

    Delayed paraplegia remains a devastating complication after ischemic spinal cord injury associated with aortic surgery and trauma. Although apoptosis has been implicated in the pathogenesis of delayed neurodegeneration, mechanisms responsible for the delayed paraplegia remain incompletely understood. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of apoptosis in delayed motor neuron degeneration after spinal cord ischemia. Mice were subjected to spinal cord ischemia induced by occlusion of the aortic arch and left subclavian artery for 5 or 9 minutes. Motor function in the hind limb was evaluated up to 72 hours after spinal cord ischemia. Histological studies were performed to detect caspase-3 activation, glial activation, and motor neuron survival in the serial spinal cord sections. To investigate the impact of caspase-3 activation on spinal cord ischemia, outcome of the spinal cord ischemia was examined in mice deficient for caspase-3. In wild-type mice, 9 minutes of spinal cord ischemia caused immediate paraplegia, whereas 5 minutes of ischemia caused delayed paraplegia. Delayed paraplegia after 5 minutes of spinal cord ischemia was associated with histological evidence of caspase-3 activation, reactive astrogliosis, microglial activation, and motor neuron loss starting at approximately 24 to 48 hours after spinal cord ischemia. Caspase-3 deficiency prevented delayed paraplegia and motor neuron loss after 5 minutes of spinal cord ischemia, but not immediate paraplegia after 9 minutes of ischemia. The present results suggest that caspase-3 activation is required for delayed paraplegia and motor neuron degeneration after spinal cord ischemia.

  15. Sphingolipids in spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Zachary B; Ren, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a debilitating condition that affects millions of individuals worldwide. Despite progress over the last few decades, the molecular mechanisms of secondary SCI that continue to occur days and weeks after the original trauma remain poorly understood. As a result, current therapies for SCI are only marginally effective. Sphingolipids, a diverse class of bioactive lipids, have been shown to regulate SCI repair and key secondary injury processes such as apoptosis, ischemia and inflammation. This review will discuss the numerous roles of sphingolipids and highlight the potential of sphingolipid-targeted therapies for SCI. PMID:27570580

  16. A minimal dose of electrically induced muscle activity regulates distinct gene signaling pathways in humans with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Petrie, Michael A; Suneja, Manish; Faidley, Elizabeth; Shields, Richard K

    2014-01-01

    Paralysis after a spinal cord injury (SCI) induces physiological adaptations that compromise the musculoskeletal and metabolic systems. Unlike non-SCI individuals, people with spinal cord injury experience minimal muscle activity which compromises optimal glucose utilization and metabolic control. Acute or chronic muscle activity, induced through electrical stimulation, may regulate key genes that enhance oxidative metabolism in paralyzed muscle. We investigated the short and long term effects of electrically induced exercise on mRNA expression of human paralyzed muscle. We developed an exercise dose that activated the muscle for only 0.6% of the day. The short term effects were assessed 3 hours after a single dose of exercise, while the long term effects were assessed after training 5 days per week for at least one year (adherence 81%). We found a single dose of exercise regulated 117 biological pathways as compared to 35 pathways after one year of training. A single dose of electrical stimulation increased the mRNA expression of transcriptional, translational, and enzyme regulators of metabolism important to shift muscle toward an oxidative phenotype (PGC-1α, NR4A3, IFRD1, ABRA, PDK4). However, chronic training increased the mRNA expression of specific metabolic pathway genes (BRP44, BRP44L, SDHB, ACADVL), mitochondrial fission and fusion genes (MFF, MFN1, MFN2), and slow muscle fiber genes (MYH6, MYH7, MYL3, MYL2). These findings support that a dose of electrical stimulation (∼10 minutes/day) regulates metabolic gene signaling pathways in human paralyzed muscle. Regulating these pathways early after SCI may contribute to reducing diabetes in people with longstanding paralysis from SCI.

  17. A Minimal Dose of Electrically Induced Muscle Activity Regulates Distinct Gene Signaling Pathways in Humans with Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Petrie, Michael A.; Suneja, Manish; Faidley, Elizabeth; Shields, Richard K.

    2014-01-01

    Paralysis after a spinal cord injury (SCI) induces physiological adaptations that compromise the musculoskeletal and metabolic systems. Unlike non-SCI individuals, people with spinal cord injury experience minimal muscle activity which compromises optimal glucose utilization and metabolic control. Acute or chronic muscle activity, induced through electrical stimulation, may regulate key genes that enhance oxidative metabolism in paralyzed muscle. We investigated the short and long term effects of electrically induced exercise on mRNA expression of human paralyzed muscle. We developed an exercise dose that activated the muscle for only 0.6% of the day. The short term effects were assessed 3 hours after a single dose of exercise, while the long term effects were assessed after training 5 days per week for at least one year (adherence 81%). We found a single dose of exercise regulated 117 biological pathways as compared to 35 pathways after one year of training. A single dose of electrical stimulation increased the mRNA expression of transcriptional, translational, and enzyme regulators of metabolism important to shift muscle toward an oxidative phenotype (PGC-1α, NR4A3, IFRD1, ABRA, PDK4). However, chronic training increased the mRNA expression of specific metabolic pathway genes (BRP44, BRP44L, SDHB, ACADVL), mitochondrial fission and fusion genes (MFF, MFN1, MFN2), and slow muscle fiber genes (MYH6, MYH7, MYL3, MYL2). These findings support that a dose of electrical stimulation (∼10 minutes/day) regulates metabolic gene signaling pathways in human paralyzed muscle. Regulating these pathways early after SCI may contribute to reducing diabetes in people with longstanding paralysis from SCI. PMID:25531450

  18. Tissue-Engineered Regeneration of Completely Transected Spinal Cord Using Induced Neural Stem Cells and Gelatin-Electrospun Poly (Lactide-Co-Glycolide)/Polyethylene Glycol Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Li, Shangfu; Liu, Linshan; Shu, Tao; Zhou, Wei; Wang, Xuan; Rong, Limin; Liu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Tissue engineering has brought new possibilities for the treatment of spinal cord injury. Two important components for tissue engineering of the spinal cord include a suitable cell source and scaffold. In our study, we investigated induced mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) directly reprogrammed into neural stem cells (iNSCs), as a cell source. Three-dimensional (3D) electrospun poly (lactide-co-glycolide)/polyethylene glycol (PLGA-PEG) nanofiber scaffolds were used for iNSCs adhesion and growth. Cell growth, survival and proliferation on the scaffolds were investigated. Scanning electron microcopy (SEM) and nuclei staining were used to assess cell growth on the scaffolds. Scaffolds with iNSCs were then transplanted into transected rat spinal cords. Two or 8 weeks following transplantation, immunofluorescence was performed to determine iNSC survival and differentiation within the scaffolds. Functional recovery was assessed using the Basso, Beattie, Bresnahan (BBB) Scale. Results indicated that iNSCs showed similar morphological features with wild-type neural stem cells (wt-NSCs), and expressed a variety of neural stem cell marker genes. Furthermore, iNSCs were shown to survive, with the ability to self-renew and undergo neural differentiation into neurons and glial cells within the 3D scaffolds in vivo. The iNSC-seeded scaffolds restored the continuity of the spinal cord and reduced cavity formation. Additionally, iNSC-seeded scaffolds contributed to functional recovery of the spinal cord. Therefore, PLGA-PEG scaffolds seeded with iNSCs may serve as promising supporting transplants for repairing spinal cord injury (SCI). PMID:25803031

  19. Tissue-engineered regeneration of completely transected spinal cord using induced neural stem cells and gelatin-electrospun poly (lactide-co-glycolide)/polyethylene glycol scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang; Huang, Yong; Pang, Mao; Yang, Yang; Li, Shangfu; Liu, Linshan; Shu, Tao; Zhou, Wei; Wang, Xuan; Rong, Limin; Liu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Tissue engineering has brought new possibilities for the treatment of spinal cord injury. Two important components for tissue engineering of the spinal cord include a suitable cell source and scaffold. In our study, we investigated induced mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) directly reprogrammed into neural stem cells (iNSCs), as a cell source. Three-dimensional (3D) electrospun poly (lactide-co-glycolide)/polyethylene glycol (PLGA-PEG) nanofiber scaffolds were used for iNSCs adhesion and growth. Cell growth, survival and proliferation on the scaffolds were investigated. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and nuclei staining were used to assess cell growth on the scaffolds. Scaffolds with iNSCs were then transplanted into transected rat spinal cords. Two or 8 weeks following transplantation, immunofluorescence was performed to determine iNSC survival and differentiation within the scaffolds. Functional recovery was assessed using the Basso, Beattie, Bresnahan (BBB) Scale. Results indicated that iNSCs showed similar morphological features with wild-type neural stem cells (wt-NSCs), and expressed a variety of neural stem cell marker genes. Furthermore, iNSCs were shown to survive, with the ability to self-renew and undergo neural differentiation into neurons and glial cells within the 3D scaffolds in vivo. The iNSC-seeded scaffolds restored the continuity of the spinal cord and reduced cavity formation. Additionally, iNSC-seeded scaffolds contributed to functional recovery of the spinal cord. Therefore, PLGA-PEG scaffolds seeded with iNSCs may serve as promising supporting transplants for repairing spinal cord injury (SCI).

  20. Intracellular and extracellular expression of the major inducible 70kDa heat shock protein in experimental ischemia-reperfusion injury of the spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Awad, Hamdy; Suntres, Zacharias; Heijmans, John; Smeak, Daniel; Bergdall-Costell, Valerie; Christofi, Fievos L; Magro, Cynthia; Oglesbee, Michael

    2008-08-01

    Inflammatory responses exacerbate ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury of spinal cord, although understanding of mediators is incomplete. The major inducible 70kDa heat shock protein (hsp70) is induced by ischemia and extracellular hsp70 (e-hsp70) can modulate inflammatory responses, but there is no published information regarding e-hsp70 levels in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) or serum as part of any neurological disease state save trauma. The present work addresses this deficiency by examining e-hsp70 in serum and CSF of dogs in an experimental model of spinal cord IR injury. IR injury of spinal cord caused hind limb paraplegia within 2-3 h that was correlated to lumbosacral poliomalacia with T cell infiltrates at 3 d post-ischemia. In this context, we showed a 5.2-fold elevation of e-hsp70 in CSF that was induced by ischemia and was sustained for the following 3 d observation interval. Plasma e-hsp70 levels were unaffected by IR injury, indicating e-hsp70 release from within the central nervous system. A putative source of this e-hsp70 was ependymal cells in the ischemic penumbra, based upon elevated i-hsp70 levels detected within these cells. Results warrant further investigation of e-hsp70's potential to modulate spinal cord IR injury.

  1. A novel thermoelectric cooling device using Peltier modules for inducing local hypothermia of the spinal cord: the effect of local electrically controlled cooling for the treatment of spinal cord injuries in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Morizane, Kei; Ogata, Tadanori; Morino, Tadao; Horiuchi, Hideki; Yamaoka, Gotaro; Hino, Masayuki; Miura, Hiromasa

    2012-03-01

    We developed a novel thermoelectric cooling device using Peltier modules for the treatment of spinal cord injury in rats. The extracorporeal electrically cooling component was attached to the aluminum arched plate which was placed on the surface of the spinal cord after the contusion injury in the 11th thoracic spinal cord. During the hypothermic treatment, rats were awake and could move in the cage. Hind limb motor function, evaluated using a BBB scale, in the hypothermic animals (33°C for 48 h) was significantly higher than that in the normothermic animals from 2 weeks to 8 weeks after the injury.

  2. Simultaneous Brain-Cervical Cord fMRI Reveals Intrinsic Spinal Cord Plasticity during Motor Sequence Learning.

    PubMed

    Vahdat, Shahabeddin; Lungu, Ovidiu; Cohen-Adad, Julien; Marchand-Pauvert, Veronique; Benali, Habib; Doyon, Julien

    2015-06-01

    The spinal cord participates in the execution of skilled movements by translating high-level cerebral motor representations into musculotopic commands. Yet, the extent to which motor skill acquisition relies on intrinsic spinal cord processes remains unknown. To date, attempts to address this question were limited by difficulties in separating spinal local effects from supraspinal influences through traditional electrophysiological and neuroimaging methods. Here, for the first time, we provide evidence for local learning-induced plasticity in intact human spinal cord through simultaneous functional magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and spinal cord during motor sequence learning. Specifically, we show learning-related modulation of activity in the C6-C8 spinal region, which is independent from that of related supraspinal sensorimotor structures. Moreover, a brain-spinal cord functional connectivity analysis demonstrates that the initial linear relationship between the spinal cord and sensorimotor cortex gradually fades away over the course of motor sequence learning, while the connectivity between spinal activity and cerebellum gains strength. These data suggest that the spinal cord not only constitutes an active functional component of the human motor learning network but also contributes distinctively from the brain to the learning process. The present findings open new avenues for rehabilitation of patients with spinal cord injuries, as they demonstrate that this part of the central nervous system is much more plastic than assumed before. Yet, the neurophysiological mechanisms underlying this intrinsic functional plasticity in the spinal cord warrant further investigations.

  3. Simultaneous Brain–Cervical Cord fMRI Reveals Intrinsic Spinal Cord Plasticity during Motor Sequence Learning

    PubMed Central

    Cohen-Adad, Julien; Marchand-Pauvert, Veronique; Benali, Habib; Doyon, Julien

    2015-01-01

    The spinal cord participates in the execution of skilled movements by translating high-level cerebral motor representations into musculotopic commands. Yet, the extent to which motor skill acquisition relies on intrinsic spinal cord processes remains unknown. To date, attempts to address this question were limited by difficulties in separating spinal local effects from supraspinal influences through traditional electrophysiological and neuroimaging methods. Here, for the first time, we provide evidence for local learning-induced plasticity in intact human spinal cord through simultaneous functional magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and spinal cord during motor sequence learning. Specifically, we show learning-related modulation of activity in the C6–C8 spinal region, which is independent from that of related supraspinal sensorimotor structures. Moreover, a brain–spinal cord functional connectivity analysis demonstrates that the initial linear relationship between the spinal cord and sensorimotor cortex gradually fades away over the course of motor sequence learning, while the connectivity between spinal activity and cerebellum gains strength. These data suggest that the spinal cord not only constitutes an active functional component of the human motor learning network but also contributes distinctively from the brain to the learning process. The present findings open new avenues for rehabilitation of patients with spinal cord injuries, as they demonstrate that this part of the central nervous system is much more plastic than assumed before. Yet, the neurophysiological mechanisms underlying this intrinsic functional plasticity in the spinal cord warrant further investigations. PMID:26125597

  4. Spinal cord ischemia secondary to hypovolemic shock.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jacob Yl; Kapoor, Siddhant; Koh, Roy Km; Yang, Eugene Wr; Hee, Hwan-Tak

    2014-12-01

    A 44-year-old male presented with symptoms of spinal cord compression secondary to metastatic prostate cancer. An urgent decompression at the cervical-thoracic region was performed, and there were no complications intraoperatively. Three hours postoperatively, the patient developed acute bilateral lower-limb paralysis (motor grade 0). Clinically, he was in class 3 hypovolemic shock. An urgent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed, showing no epidural hematoma. He was managed aggressively with medical therapy to improve his spinal cord perfusion. The patient improved significantly, and after one week, he was able to regain most of his motor functions. Although not commonly reported, spinal cord ischemia post-surgery should be recognized early, especially in the presence of hypovolemic shock. MRI should be performed to exclude other potential causes of compression. Spinal cord ischemia needs to be managed aggressively with medical treatment to improve spinal cord perfusion. The prognosis depends on the severity of deficits, and is usually favorable.

  5. [Therapy progress of spinal cord compression by metastatic spinal tumor].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yao-sheng; He, Qi-zhen; Liu, Shu-bin; Jiang, Wei-gang; Lei, Ming-xing

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic epidural compression of the spinal cord is a significant source of morbidity in patients with systemic cancer. With improvment of oncotheray, survival period in the patients is improving and metastatic cord compression is en- countered increasingly often. Surgical management performed for early circumferential decompression for the spinal cord com- pression with spine instability, and spine reconstruction performed. Patients with radiosensitive tumours without spine instabili- ty, radiotherapy is an effective therapy. Spinal stereotactic radiosurgery and minimally invasive techniques, such as vertebro- plasty and kyphoplasty, percutaneous pedicle screw fixation, radiofrequency ablation are promising options for treatment of cer- tain selected patients with spinal metastases.

  6. Spinal cord stimulation-induced analgesia: electrical stimulation of dorsal column and dorsal roots attenuates dorsal horn neuronal excitability in neuropathic rats.

    PubMed

    Guan, Yun; Wacnik, Paul W; Yang, Fei; Carteret, Alene F; Chung, Chih-Yang; Meyer, Richard A; Raja, Srinivasa N

    2010-12-01

    The sites of action and cellular mechanisms by which spinal cord stimulation reduces neuropathic pain remain unclear. We examined the effect of bipolar electrical-conditioning stimulation (50 Hz, 0.2 ms, 5 min) of the dorsal column and lumbar dorsal roots on the response properties of spinal wide dynamic range (WDR) neurons in rats after L5 spinal nerve injury. The conditioning stimulation intensity was set at the lowest current that evoked a peak antidromic sciatic Aα/β-compound action potential without inducing an Aδ- or C-compound action potential. Within 15 min of the dorsal column or root conditioning stimulation, the spontaneous activity rate of WDR neurons was significantly reduced in nerve-injured rats. Conditioning stimulation also significantly attenuated WDR neuronal responses to mechanical stimuli in nerve-injured rats and inhibited the C-component of the neuronal response to graded intracutaneous electrical stimuli applied to the receptive field in nerve-injured and sham-operated rats. It is noteworthy that dorsal column stimulation blocked windup of WDR neuronal response to repetitive intracutaneous electrical stimulation (0.5 Hz) in nerve-injured and sham-operated rats, whereas dorsal root stimulation inhibited windup only in sham-operated rats. Therefore, stimulation of putative spinal substrates at A-fiber intensities with parameters similar to those used by patients with spinal cord stimulators attenuated established WDR neuronal hyperexcitability in the neuropathic condition and counteracted activity-dependent increase in neuronal excitability (i.e., windup). These results suggest a potential cellular mechanism underlying spinal cord stimulation-induced pain relief. This in vivo model allows the neurophysiologic basis for spinal cord stimulation-induced analgesia to be studied.

  7. Experimental Zika virus infection induces spinal cord injury and encephalitis in newborn Swiss mice.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Natália C C A; Nogueira, Juliana S; Réssio, Rodrigo A; Cirqueira, Cinthya S; Kimura, Lidia M; Fernandes, Karolina R; Cunha, Mariana S; Souza, Renato P; Guerra, Juliana M

    2017-02-01

    A widespread epidemic of Zika virus (ZIKV) infection was reported in 2015 in South and Central America, with neurological symptons including meningoencephalitis and Guillain-Barré syndrome in adults, besides an apparent increased incidence of microcephaly in infants born to infected mothers. It is becoming a necessity to have a trustworthy animal model to better understand ZIKV infection. In this study we used newborn white Swiss mice as a model to investigate the ZIKV strain recently isolated in Brazil. ZIKV was inoculated via intracerebral and subcutaneous routes and analysed through gross histopathology and immunohistochemistry. Here we demonstrated first that the intracerebral group (ICG) displayed severe cerebral lesions, with neuronal death, presence of apoptotic bodies, white matter degeneration and neutrophil perivascular cuffing. In the subcutaneous group (SCG), we observed moderate cerebral lesions, morphologically similar to that found in ICG and additional myelopathy, with architectural loss, marked by neuronal death and apoptotic bodies. Interestingly, we found an intense astrogliosis in brain of both groups, with increased immunoexpression of GFAP (glial fibrillary acidic protein) and presence of hypertrophic astrocytes. The spinal cord of subcutaneous group (SCG) exhibited reduction of astrocytes, but those positive for GFAP were hypertrophic and presented prolonged cellular processes. Finally significant lesions in the central nervous system (CNS) were present in newborn mice inoculated by both routes, but SCG method led to an important neurological manifestations (including myelopathy), during a longer period of time and appears for us to be a better model for ZIKV infection.

  8. Relationship between Spinal Cord Volume and Spinal Cord Injury due to Spinal Shortening

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Feng; Yang, Jin-Cheng; Ma, Xiang-Yang; Xu, Jun-Jie; Yang, Qing-Lei; Zhou, Xin; Xiao, Yao-Sheng; Hu, Hai-Sheng; Xia, Li-Hui

    2015-01-01

    Vertebral column resection is associated with a risk of spinal cord injury. In the present study, using a goat model, we aimed to investigate the relationship between changes in spinal cord volume and spinal cord injury due to spinal shortening, and to quantify the spinal cord volume per 1-mm height in order to clarify a safe limit for shortening. Vertebral column resection was performed at T10 in 10 goats. The spinal cord was shortened until the somatosensory-evoked potential was decreased by 50% from the baseline amplitude or delayed by 10% relative to the baseline peak latency. A wake-up test was performed, and the goats were observed for two days postoperatively. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to measure the spinal cord volume, T10 height, disc height, osteotomy segment height, and spinal segment height pre- and postoperatively. Two of the 10 goats were excluded, and hence, only data from eight goats were analyzed. The somatosensory-evoked potential of these eight goats demonstrated meaningful changes. With regard to neurologic function, five and three goats were classified as Tarlov grades 5 and 4 at two days postoperatively. The mean shortening distance was 23.6 ± 1.51 mm, which correlated with the d-value (post-pre) of the spinal cord volume per 1-mm height of the osteotomy segment (r = 0.95, p < 0.001) and with the height of the T10 body (r = 0.79, p = 0.02). The mean d-value (post-pre) of the spinal cord volume per 1-mm height of the osteotomy segment was 142.87 ± 0.59 mm3 (range, 142.19–143.67 mm3). The limit for shortening was approximately 106% of the vertebral height. The mean volumes of the osteotomy and spinal segments did not significantly change after surgery (t = 0.310, p = 0.765 and t = 1.241, p = 0.255, respectively). Thus, our results indicate that the safe limit for shortening can be calculated using the change in spinal cord volume per 1-mm height. PMID:26001196

  9. Topologically preserving straightening of spinal cord MRI.

    PubMed

    De Leener, Benjamin; Mangeat, Gabriel; Dupont, Sara; Martin, Allan R; Callot, Virginie; Stikov, Nikola; Fehlings, Michael G; Cohen-Adad, Julien

    2017-10-01

    To propose a robust and accurate method for straightening magnetic resonance (MR) images of the spinal cord, based on spinal cord segmentation, that preserves spinal cord topology and that works for any MRI contrast, in a context of spinal cord template-based analysis. The spinal cord curvature was computed using an iterative Non-Uniform Rational B-Spline (NURBS) approximation. Forward and inverse deformation fields for straightening were computed by solving analytically the straightening equations for each image voxel. Computational speed-up was accomplished by solving all voxel equation systems as one single system. Straightening accuracy (mean and maximum distance from straight line), computational time, and robustness to spinal cord length was evaluated using the proposed and the standard straightening method (label-based spline deformation) on 3T T2 - and T1 -weighted images from 57 healthy subjects and 33 patients with spinal cord compression due to degenerative cervical myelopathy (DCM). The proposed algorithm was more accurate, more robust, and faster than the standard method (mean distance = 0.80 vs. 0.83 mm, maximum distance = 1.49 vs. 1.78 mm, time = 71 vs. 174 sec for the healthy population and mean distance = 0.65 vs. 0.68 mm, maximum distance = 1.28 vs. 1.55 mm, time = 32 vs. 60 sec for the DCM population). A novel image straightening method that enables template-based analysis of quantitative spinal cord MRI data is introduced. This algorithm works for any MRI contrast and was validated on healthy and patient populations. The presented method is implemented in the Spinal Cord Toolbox, an open-source software for processing spinal cord MRI data. 1 Technical Efficacy: Stage 1 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2017;46:1209-1219. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  10. Success with neurotropin in treating pediatric lower extremity pain induced by spinal cord injury after epidural anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Mengye; Zhou, Fuqing; Li, Lingchao; Yin, Qin; Qiu, Mizhen; Zhang, Yong

    2017-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) complicated by epidural anesthesia, though rare, can result in neuropathic pain. However, the treatment for this kind of life-altering injury remains a challenge. A 7-year-old girl was referred with dyskinesia and severe pain in her right lower extremity due to an accidental SCI following lumbar puncture. After treatment with analgesics such as gabapentin, mecobalamin, and dexamethasone/methylprednisolone for 1 week, the myodynamia had improved, but progressive pain persisted. After treatment with neurotropin, a gradual decrease in visual analog scale score from 7 to 0 was observed. We herein first describe that neurotropin produced sustained relief of pain induced by SCI. This case suggests that neurotropin might be a promising drug in treating pediatric neuropathic pain caused by SCI. PMID:28652804

  11. Rikkunshito prevents paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy through the suppression of the nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) phosphorylation in spinal cord of mice.

    PubMed

    Kamei, Junzo; Hayashi, Shunsuke; Sakai, Akane; Nakanishi, Yuki; Kai, Misa; Ikegami, Megumi; Ikeda, Hiroko

    2017-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is the major side effect caused by paclitaxel, a microtubule-binding antineoplastic drug. Paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy causes a long-term negative impact on the patient's quality of life. However, the mechanism underlying paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy is still unknown, and there is no established treatment. Ghrelin is known to attenuate thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia in chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve, and inhibit the activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) in the spinal dorsal horn. Rikkunshito (RKT), a kampo medicine, increases the secretion of ghrelin in rodents and humans. Thus, RKT may attenuate paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy by inhibiting phosphorylated NFκB (pNFκB) in the spinal cord. We found that paclitaxel dose-dependently induced mechanical hyperalgesia in mice. Paclitaxel increased the protein levels of spinal pNFκB, but not those of spinal NFκB. NFκB inhibitor attenuated paclitaxel-induced mechanical hyperalgesia suggesting that the activation of NFκB mediates paclitaxel-induced hyperalgesia. RKT dose-dependently attenuated paclitaxel-induced mechanical hyperalgesia. Ghrelin receptor antagonist reversed the RKT-induced attenuation of paclitaxel-induced mechanical hyperalgesia. RKT inhibited the paclitaxel-induced increase in the protein levels of spinal pNFκB. Taken together, the present study indicates that RKT exerts an antihyperalgesic effect in paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain by suppressing the activation of spinal NFκB.

  12. Rikkunshito prevents paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy through the suppression of the nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) phosphorylation in spinal cord of mice

    PubMed Central

    Kamei, Junzo; Hayashi, Shunsuke; Sakai, Akane; Nakanishi, Yuki; Kai, Misa; Ikegami, Megumi; Ikeda, Hiroko

    2017-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is the major side effect caused by paclitaxel, a microtubule-binding antineoplastic drug. Paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy causes a long-term negative impact on the patient's quality of life. However, the mechanism underlying paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy is still unknown, and there is no established treatment. Ghrelin is known to attenuate thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia in chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve, and inhibit the activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) in the spinal dorsal horn. Rikkunshito (RKT), a kampo medicine, increases the secretion of ghrelin in rodents and humans. Thus, RKT may attenuate paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy by inhibiting phosphorylated NFκB (pNFκB) in the spinal cord. We found that paclitaxel dose-dependently induced mechanical hyperalgesia in mice. Paclitaxel increased the protein levels of spinal pNFκB, but not those of spinal NFκB. NFκB inhibitor attenuated paclitaxel-induced mechanical hyperalgesia suggesting that the activation of NFκB mediates paclitaxel-induced hyperalgesia. RKT dose-dependently attenuated paclitaxel-induced mechanical hyperalgesia. Ghrelin receptor antagonist reversed the RKT-induced attenuation of paclitaxel-induced mechanical hyperalgesia. RKT inhibited the paclitaxel-induced increase in the protein levels of spinal pNFκB. Taken together, the present study indicates that RKT exerts an antihyperalgesic effect in paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain by suppressing the activation of spinal NFκB. PMID:28182729

  13. [Traumatic recurrence of idiopathic spinal cord herniation].

    PubMed

    Lorente-Muñoz, Asís; Cortés-Franco, Severiano; Moles-Herbera, Jesús; Casado-Pellejero, Juan; Rivero-Celada, David; Alberdi-Viñas, Juan

    2013-01-01

    Idiopathic spinal cord herniation is a rare cause of thoracic myelopathy and its recurrence is even more infrequent. Cord herniation is through an anterior dural defect in thoracic spine with unknown causes. Symptomatic cases must be surgically treated to reduce the hernia and seal the defect to prevent recurrences. We report a patient presenting a Brown-Séquard syndrome secondary to a D5 spinal cord herniation treated successfully and its posterior traumatic recurrence.

  14. Corticospinal circuit plasticity in motor rehabilitation from spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Serradj, Najet; Agger, Sydney F; Hollis, Edmund R

    2016-12-06

    Restoring corticospinal function after spinal cord injury is a significant challenge as the corticospinal tract elicits no substantive, spontaneous regeneration, and its interruption leaves a permanent deficit. The corticospinal circuit serves multiple motor and sensory functions within the mammalian nervous system as the direct link between isocortex and spinal cord. Maturation of the corticospinal circuit involves the refinement of projections within the spinal cord and a subsequent refinement of motor maps within the cortex. The plasticity of these cortical motor maps mirrors the acquisition of skilled motor learning, and both the maps and motor skills are disrupted following injury to the corticospinal tract. The motor cortex exhibits the capacity to incorporate changes in corticospinal projections induced by both spontaneous and therapeutic-mediated plasticity of corticospinal axons through appropriate rehabilitation. An understanding of the mechanisms of corticospinal plasticity in motor learning will undoubtedly help inform strategies to improve motor rehabilitation after spinal cord injury.

  15. Dietary Omega-3 Deficiency from Gestation Increases Spinal Cord Vulnerability to Traumatic Brain Injury-Induced Damage

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Zhe; Feng, Cameron; Agrawal, Rahul; Zhuang, Yumei; Gomez-Pinilla, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Although traumatic brain injury (TBI) is often associated with gait deficits, the effects of TBI on spinal cord centers are poorly understood. We seek to determine the influence of TBI on the spinal cord and the potential of dietary omega-3 (n-3) fatty acids to counteract these effects. Male rodents exposed to diets containing adequate or deficient levels of n-3 since gestation received a moderate fluid percussion injury when becoming 14 weeks old. TBI reduced levels of molecular systems important for synaptic plasticity (BDNF, TrkB, and CREB) and plasma membrane homeostasis (4-HNE, iPLA2, syntaxin-3) in the lumbar spinal cord. These effects of TBI were more dramatic in the animals exposed to the n-3 deficient diet. Results emphasize the comprehensive action of TBI across the neuroaxis, and the critical role of dietary n-3 as a means to build resistance against the effects of TBI. PMID:23300842

  16. The SCIentinel study--prospective multicenter study to define the spinal cord injury-induced immune depression syndrome (SCI-IDS)--study protocol and interim feasibility data.

    PubMed

    Kopp, Marcel A; Druschel, Claudia; Meisel, Christian; Liebscher, Thomas; Prilipp, Erik; Watzlawick, Ralf; Cinelli, Paolo; Niedeggen, Andreas; Schaser, Klaus-Dieter; Wanner, Guido A; Curt, Armin; Lindemann, Gertraut; Nugaeva, Natalia; Fehlings, Michael G; Vajkoczy, Peter; Cabraja, Mario; Dengler, Julius; Ertel, Wolfgang; Ekkernkamp, Axel; Martus, Peter; Volk, Hans-Dieter; Unterwalder, Nadine; Kölsch, Uwe; Brommer, Benedikt; Hellmann, Rick C; Saidy, Ramin R Ossami; Laginha, Ines; Prüss, Harald; Failli, Vieri; Dirnagl, Ulrich; Schwab, Jan M

    2013-11-09

    Infections are the leading cause of death in the acute phase following spinal cord injury and qualify as independent risk factor for poor neurological outcome ("disease modifying factor"). The enhanced susceptibility for infections is not stringently explained by the increased risk of aspiration in tetraplegic patients, neurogenic bladder dysfunction, or by high-dose methylprednisolone treatment. Experimental and clinical pilot data suggest that spinal cord injury disrupts the balanced interplay between the central nervous system and the immune system. The primary hypothesis is that the Spinal Cord Injury-induced Immune Depression Syndrome (SCI-IDS) is 'neurogenic' including deactivation of adaptive and innate immunity with decreased HLA-DR expression on monocytes as a key surrogate parameter. Secondary hypotheses are that the Immune Depression Syndrome is i) injury level- and ii) severity-dependent, iii) triggers transient lymphopenia, and iv) causes qualitative functional leukocyte deficits, which may endure the post-acute phase after spinal cord injury. SCIentinel is a prospective, international, multicenter study aiming to recruit about 118 patients with acute spinal cord injury or control patients with acute vertebral fracture without neurological deficits scheduled for spinal surgery. The assessment points are: i) <31 hours, ii) 31-55 hours, iii) 7 days, iv) 14 days, and v) 10 weeks post-trauma. Assessment includes infections, concomitant injury, medication and neurological classification using American Spinal Injury Association impairment scale (AIS) and neurological level. Laboratory analyses comprise haematological profiling, immunophenotyping, including HLA-DR expression on monocytes, cytokines and gene expression of immune modulators. We provide an administrative interim analysis of the recruitment schedule of the trial. The objectives are to characterize the dysfunction of the innate and adaptive immune system after spinal cord injury and to explore its

  17. The SCIentinel study - prospective multicenter study to define the spinal cord injury-induced immune depression syndrome (SCI-IDS) - study protocol and interim feasibility data

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Infections are the leading cause of death in the acute phase following spinal cord injury and qualify as independent risk factor for poor neurological outcome (“disease modifying factor”). The enhanced susceptibility for infections is not stringently explained by the increased risk of aspiration in tetraplegic patients, neurogenic bladder dysfunction, or by high-dose methylprednisolone treatment. Experimental and clinical pilot data suggest that spinal cord injury disrupts the balanced interplay between the central nervous system and the immune system. The primary hypothesis is that the Spinal Cord Injury-induced Immune Depression Syndrome (SCI-IDS) is 'neurogenic’ including deactivation of adaptive and innate immunity with decreased HLA-DR expression on monocytes as a key surrogate parameter. Secondary hypotheses are that the Immune Depression Syndrome is i) injury level- and ii) severity-dependent, iii) triggers transient lymphopenia, and iv) causes qualitative functional leukocyte deficits, which may endure the post-acute phase after spinal cord injury. Methods/Design SCIentinel is a prospective, international, multicenter study aiming to recruit about 118 patients with acute spinal cord injury or control patients with acute vertebral fracture without neurological deficits scheduled for spinal surgery. The assessment points are: i) <31 hours, ii) 31–55 hours, iii) 7 days, iv) 14 days, and v) 10 weeks post-trauma. Assessment includes infections, concomitant injury, medication and neurological classification using American Spinal Injury Association impairment scale (AIS) and neurological level. Laboratory analyses comprise haematological profiling, immunophenotyping, including HLA-DR expression on monocytes, cytokines and gene expression of immune modulators. We provide an administrative interim analysis of the recruitment schedule of the trial. Discussion The objectives are to characterize the dysfunction of the innate and adaptive immune

  18. Rehabilitation of spinal cord injuries

    PubMed Central

    Nas, Kemal; Yazmalar, Levent; Şah, Volkan; Aydın, Abdulkadir; Öneş, Kadriye

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is the injury of the spinal cord from the foramen magnum to the cauda equina which occurs as a result of compulsion, incision or contusion. The most common causes of SCI in the world are traffic accidents, gunshot injuries, knife injuries, falls and sports injuries. There is a strong relationship between functional status and whether the injury is complete or not complete, as well as the level of the injury. The results of SCI bring not only damage to independence and physical function, but also include many complications from the injury. Neurogenic bladder and bowel, urinary tract infections, pressure ulcers, orthostatic hypotension, fractures, deep vein thrombosis, spasticity, autonomic dysreflexia, pulmonary and cardiovascular problems, and depressive disorders are frequent complications after SCI. SCI leads to serious disability in the patient resulting in the loss of work, which brings psychosocial and economic problems. The treatment and rehabilitation period is long, expensive and exhausting in SCI. Whether complete or incomplete, SCI rehabilitation is a long process that requires patience and motivation of the patient and relatives. Early rehabilitation is important to prevent joint contractures and the loss of muscle strength, conservation of bone density, and to ensure normal functioning of the respiratory and digestive system. An interdisciplinary approach is essential in rehabilitation in SCI, as in the other types of rehabilitation. The team is led by a physiatrist and consists of the patients’ family, physiotherapist, occupational therapist, dietician, psychologist, speech therapist, social worker and other consultant specialists as necessary. PMID:25621206

  19. Rehabilitation of spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed

    Nas, Kemal; Yazmalar, Levent; Şah, Volkan; Aydın, Abdulkadir; Öneş, Kadriye

    2015-01-18

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is the injury of the spinal cord from the foramen magnum to the cauda equina which occurs as a result of compulsion, incision or contusion. The most common causes of SCI in the world are traffic accidents, gunshot injuries, knife injuries, falls and sports injuries. There is a strong relationship between functional status and whether the injury is complete or not complete, as well as the level of the injury. The results of SCI bring not only damage to independence and physical function, but also include many complications from the injury. Neurogenic bladder and bowel, urinary tract infections, pressure ulcers, orthostatic hypotension, fractures, deep vein thrombosis, spasticity, autonomic dysreflexia, pulmonary and cardiovascular problems, and depressive disorders are frequent complications after SCI. SCI leads to serious disability in the patient resulting in the loss of work, which brings psychosocial and economic problems. The treatment and rehabilitation period is long, expensive and exhausting in SCI. Whether complete or incomplete, SCI rehabilitation is a long process that requires patience and motivation of the patient and relatives. Early rehabilitation is important to prevent joint contractures and the loss of muscle strength, conservation of bone density, and to ensure normal functioning of the respiratory and digestive system. An interdisciplinary approach is essential in rehabilitation in SCI, as in the other types of rehabilitation. The team is led by a physiatrist and consists of the patients' family, physiotherapist, occupational therapist, dietician, psychologist, speech therapist, social worker and other consultant specialists as necessary.

  20. Decorin blocks scarring and cystic cavitation in acute and induces scar dissolution in chronic spinal cord wounds.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Zubair; Bansal, Daljeet; Tizzard, Katie; Surey, Sarina; Esmaeili, Maryam; Gonzalez, Ana Maria; Berry, Martin; Logan, Ann

    2014-04-01

    In the injured central nervous system (CNS), transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1/2-induced scarring and wound cavitation impede axon regeneration implying that a combination of both scar suppression and axogenic treatments is required to achieve functional recovery. After treating acute and chronic dorsal funicular spinal cord lesions (DFL) in adult rats with the pan-TGF-β1/2 antagonist Decorin, we report that in: (1), acute DFL, the development of all injury parameters was significantly retarded e.g., wound cavity area by 68%, encapsulation of the wound by a glia limitans accessoria (GLA) by 65%, GLA basal lamina thickness by 94%, fibronectin, NG2 and Sema-3A deposition by 87%, 48% and 48%, respectively, and both macrophage and reactive microglia accumulations by 60%; and (2), chronic DFL, all the above parameters were attenuated to a lesser extent e.g., wound cavity area by 11%, GLA encapsulation by 25%, GLA basal lamina thickness by 31%, extracellular fibronectin, NG2 and Sema-3A deposition by 58%, 22% and 29%, respectively, and macrophage and reactive microglia accumulations by 44%. Moreover, in acute and chronic DFL, levels of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) were raised (by 236% and 482%, respectively), as were active-MMP-2 (by 64% and 91%, respectively) and active-MMP-9 (by 122% and 18%, respectively), while plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) was suppressed (by 56% and 23%, respectively) and active-TIMP-1 and active TIMP-2 were both lower but only significantly suppressed in acute DFL (by 56 and 21%, respectively). These findings demonstrate that both scar tissue mass and cavitation are attenuated in acute and chronic spinal cord wounds by Decorin treatment and suggest that the dominant effect of Decorin during acute scarring is anti-fibrogenic through suppression of inflammatory fibrosis by neutralisation of TGF-β1/2 whereas, in chronic lesions, Decorin-induction of tPA and MMP (concomitant with reduced complimentary levels of TIMP and PAI-1

  1. Segmentation of the human spinal cord.

    PubMed

    De Leener, Benjamin; Taso, Manuel; Cohen-Adad, Julien; Callot, Virginie

    2016-04-01

    Segmenting the spinal cord contour is a necessary step for quantifying spinal cord atrophy in various diseases. Delineating gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) is also useful for quantifying GM atrophy or for extracting multiparametric MRI metrics into specific WM tracts. Spinal cord segmentation in clinical research is not as developed as brain segmentation, however with the substantial improvement of MR sequences adapted to spinal cord MR investigations, the field of spinal cord MR segmentation has advanced greatly within the last decade. Segmentation techniques with variable accuracy and degree of complexity have been developed and reported in the literature. In this paper, we review some of the existing methods for cord and WM/GM segmentation, including intensity-based, surface-based, and image-based methods. We also provide recommendations for validating spinal cord segmentation techniques, as it is important to understand the intrinsic characteristics of the methods and to evaluate their performance and limitations. Lastly, we illustrate some applications in the healthy and pathological spinal cord. One conclusion of this review is that robust and automatic segmentation is clinically relevant, as it would allow for longitudinal and group studies free from user bias as well as reproducible multicentric studies in large populations, thereby helping to further our understanding of the spinal cord pathophysiology and to develop new criteria for early detection of subclinical evolution for prognosis prediction and for patient management. Another conclusion is that at the present time, no single method adequately segments the cord and its substructure in all the cases encountered (abnormal intensities, loss of contrast, deformation of the cord, etc.). A combination of different approaches is thus advised for future developments, along with the introduction of probabilistic shape models. Maturation of standardized frameworks, multiplatform availability, inclusion

  2. Inhibition of calpain activation protects MPTP-induced nigral and spinal cord neurodegeneration, reduces inflammation, and improves gait dynamics in mice

    PubMed Central

    Samantaray, Supriti; Knaryan, Varduhi H.; Shields, Donald C.; Cox, April A.; Haque, Azizul; Banik, Naren L.

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is the most common neurodegenerative movement disorder, resulting in dopaminergic (DA) neuronal loss in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) and damage to extranigral spinal cord neurons. Current therapies do not prevent the disease progression. Hence, developing efficacious therapeutic strategies for treatment of PD is of utmost importance. The goal of this study is to delineate the involvement of calpain-mediated inflammation and neurodegeneration in SN and spinal cord in MPTP-induced parkinsonian mice (C57BL/6N), thereby elucidating potential therapeutic target(s). Increased calpain expression was found localized to tyrosine hydroxylase (TH+) neurons in SN alongside with significantly increased TUNEL positive neurons in SN and spinal cord neurons in MPTP mice. Inflammatory markers Cox-2, caspase-1, and NOS-2 were significantly up-regulated in MPTP mice spinal cord as compared to control. These parameters correlated with the activation of astrocytes, microglia, infiltration of CD4+ / CD8+ T cells and macrophages. We found that subpopulations of CD4+ cells (Th1 & Tregs) were differentially expanded in MPTP mice, which could be regulated by inhibition of calpain with the potent inhibitor calpeptin. Pre-treatment with calpeptin (25 μg/kg, i.p.) attenuated glial activation, T cell infiltration, nigral dopaminergic degeneration in SN, and neuronal death in spinal cord. Importantly, calpeptin ameliorated MPTP-induced altered gait parameters (e.g. reduced stride length and increased stride frequency) as demonstrated by analyses of spatio-temporal gait indices using ventral plane videography. These findings suggest that calpain plays a pivotal role in MPTP-induced nigral and extranigral neurodegenerative processes, and may be a valid therapeutic target in PD. PMID:26108182

  3. The relationship of bone-tumor-induced spinal cord astrocyte activation and aromatase expression to mechanical hyperalgesia and cold hypersensitivity in intact female and ovariectomized mice.

    PubMed

    Smeester, B A; O'Brien, E E; Michlitsch, K S; Lee, J-H; Beitz, A J

    2016-06-02

    Recently, our group established a relationship between tumor-induced spinal cord astrocyte activation and aromatase expression and the development of bone tumor nociception in male mice. As an extension of this work, we now report on the association of tumor-induced mechanical hyperalgesia and cold hypersensitivity to changes in spinal cord dorsal horn GFAP and aromatase expression in intact (INT) female mice and the effect of ovariectomy on these parameters. Implantation of fibrosarcoma cells produced robust mechanical hyperalgesia in INT animals, while ovariectomized (OVX) females had significantly less mechanical hyperalgesia. Cold hypersensitivity was apparent by post-implantation day 7 in INT and OVX females compared to their saline-injected controls and increased throughout the experiment. The decrease in mechanical hyperalgesia in OVX females was mirrored by significant decreases in spinal astrocyte activity in laminae I-II, III-IV, V-VI and X and aromatase expression in laminae V-VI and X in the dorsal horn of tumor-bearing animals. Administration of the aromatase inhibitor letrozole reduced tumor-induced hyperalgesia in INT females only suggesting that the tumor-induced increase in aromatase expression and its associated increase in spinal estrogen play a role in the development of bone tumor-induced hyperalgesia. Finally, intrathecal (i.t.) administration of 17β-estradiol caused a significant increase in tumor-induced hyperalgesia in INT tumor-bearing females. Since i.t. 17β-estradiol increases tumor pain and ovariectomy significantly decreases tumor pain, as well as spinal aromatase, estrogen may play a critical role in the spinal cord response to the changing tumor environment and the development of tumor-induced nociception.

  4. Third-Degree Hindpaw Burn Injury Induced Apoptosis of Lumbar Spinal Cord Ventral Horn Motor Neurons and Sciatic Nerve and Muscle Atrophy in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Sheng-Hua; Cheng, Kuang-I; Chai, Chee-Yin; Yeh, Jwu-Lai; Wu, Tai-Cheng; Kwan, Aij-Lie

    2015-01-01

    Background. Severe burns result in hypercatabolic state and concomitant muscle atrophy that persists for several months, thereby limiting patient recovery. However, the effects of burns on the corresponding spinal dermatome remain unknown. This study aimed to investigate whether burns induce apoptosis of spinal cord ventral horn motor neurons (VHMNs) and consequently cause skeletal muscle wasting. Methods. Third-degree hindpaw burn injury with 1% total body surface area (TBSA) rats were euthanized 4 and 8 weeks after burn injury. The apoptosis profiles in the ventral horns of the lumbar spinal cords, sciatic nerves, and gastrocnemius muscles were examined. The Schwann cells in the sciatic nerve were marked with S100. The gastrocnemius muscles were harvested to measure the denervation atrophy. Result. The VHMNs apoptosis in the spinal cord was observed after inducing third-degree burns in the hindpaw. The S100 and TUNEL double-positive cells in the sciatic nerve increased significantly after the burn injury. Gastrocnemius muscle apoptosis and denervation atrophy area increased significantly after the burn injury. Conclusion. Local hindpaw burn induces apoptosis in VHMNs and Schwann cells in sciatic nerve, which causes corresponding gastrocnemius muscle denervation atrophy. Our results provided an animal model to evaluate burn-induced muscle wasting, and elucidate the underlying mechanisms. PMID:25695065

  5. Increased Spinal Cord Na+-K+-2Cl− Cotransporter-1 (NKCC1) Activity Contributes to Impairment of Synaptic Inhibition in Paclitaxel-induced Neuropathic Pain*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shao-Rui; Zhu, Lihong; Chen, Hong; Wen, Lei; Laumet, Geoffroy; Pan, Hui-Lin

    2014-01-01

    Microtubule-stabilizing agents, such as paclitaxel (Taxol), are effective chemotherapy drugs for treating many cancers, and painful neuropathy is a major dose-limiting adverse effect. Cation-chloride cotransporters, such as Na+-K+-2Cl− cotransporter-1 (NKCC1) and K+-Cl− cotransporter-2 (KCC2), critically influence spinal synaptic inhibition by regulating intracellular chloride concentrations. Here we show that paclitaxel treatment in rats significantly reduced GABA-induced membrane hyperpolarization and caused a depolarizing shift in GABA reversal potential of dorsal horn neurons. However, paclitaxel had no significant effect on AMPA or NMDA receptor-mediated glutamatergic input from primary afferents to dorsal horn neurons. Paclitaxel treatment significantly increased protein levels, but not mRNA levels, of NKCC1 in spinal cords. Inhibition of NKCC1 with bumetanide reversed the paclitaxel effect on GABA-mediated hyperpolarization and GABA reversal potentials. Also, intrathecal bumetanide significantly attenuated hyperalgesia and allodynia induced by paclitaxel. Co-immunoprecipitation revealed that NKCC1 interacted with β-tubulin and β-actin in spinal cords. Remarkably, paclitaxel increased NKCC1 protein levels at the plasma membrane and reduced NKCC1 levels in the cytosol of spinal cords. In contrast, treatment with an actin-stabilizing agent had no significant effect on NKCC1 protein levels in the plasma membrane or cytosolic fractions of spinal cords. In addition, inhibition of the motor protein dynein blocked paclitaxel-induced subcellular redistribution of NKCC1, whereas inhibition of kinesin-5 mimicked the paclitaxel effect. Our findings suggest that increased NKCC1 activity contributes to diminished spinal synaptic inhibition and neuropathic pain caused by paclitaxel. Paclitaxel disrupts intracellular NKCC1 trafficking by interfering with microtubule dynamics and associated motor proteins. PMID:25253692

  6. Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Protects against Spinal Cord Ischemia Reperfusion Injury-Induced Apoptosis by Blocking Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Sifei; Wang, Zhenfei; Yang, Kai; Liu, Zhuochao

    2017-01-01

    The role of autophagy, neuroprotective mechanisms of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+), and their relationship in spinal cord ischemic reperfusion injury (SCIR) was assessed. Forty-eight Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups: sham, ischemia reperfusion (I/R), 10 mg/kg NAD+, and 75 mg/kg NAD+. Western blotting, immunofluorescence, and immunohistochemistry were used to assess autophagy and apoptosis. Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB) scores were used to assess neurological function. Expression levels of Beclin-1, Atg12-Atg5, LC3B-II, cleaved caspase 3, and Bax were upregulated in the I/R group and downregulated in the 75 mg/kg NAD+ group; p-mTOR, p-AKT, p62, and Bcl-2 were downregulated in the I/R group and upregulated in the 75 mg/kg NAD+ group. Numbers of LC3B-positive, caspase 3-positive, Bax-positive, and TUNEL-positive cells were significantly increased in the I/R group and decreased in the 75 mg/kg NAD+ group. The mean integrated option density of Bax increased and that of Nissl decreased in the I/R group, and it decreased and increased, respectively, in the 75 mg/kg NAD+ group. BBB scores significantly increased in the 75 mg/kg NAD+ group relative to the I/R group. No difference was observed between I/R and 10 mg/kg NAD+ groups for these indicators. Therefore, excessive and sustained autophagy aggravates SCIR; administration of NAD+ alleviates injury. PMID:28367271

  7. Large-Dose Glucocorticoid Induced Secondary Adrenal Insufficiency in Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the incidence of adrenal insufficiency (AI) in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) with symptoms similar to those of AI and to assess the relevance of AI and large-dose glucocorticoids in SCI. Methods The medical records of 228 patients who were admitted to the rehabilitation center after SCI from January 2014 to January 2016 were reviewed retrospectively. Twenty-nine of 228 patients had persistent symptoms suspicious for AI despite continuous care for more than 4 weeks. Therefore, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) stimulation tests were conducted in these 29 patients. Results Twelve of these 29 patients (41.4%) with SCI who manifested AI-like symptoms were diagnosed as having AI. Among these 29 patients, 15 patients had a history of large-dose glucocorticoid treatment use and the other 14 patients did not have such a history. Ten of the 15 patients (66.7%) with SCI treated with large-dose glucocorticoids after injury were diagnosed as having AI. In 12 patients with AI, the most frequent symptom was fatigue (66%), followed by orthostatic dizziness (50%), and anorexia (25%). In the chi-square test, the presence of AI was positively correlated with large-dose glucocorticoid use (p=0.008, Fisher exact test). Conclusion Among the patients with SCI who manifested similar symptoms as those of AI, high incidence of AI was found especially in those who were treated with large-dose glucocorticoids. During management of SCI, if a patient has similar symptoms as those of AI, clinicians should consider the possibility of AI, especially when the patient has a history of large-dose glucocorticoid use. Early recognition and treatment of the underlying AI should be performed. PMID:28119833

  8. Tobacco-induced neuronal degeneration via cotinine in rats subjected to experimental spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Dalgic, Ali; Okay, Onder; Helvacioglu, Fatma; Daglioglu, Ergun; Akdag, Rifat; Take, Gulnur; Belen, Deniz

    2013-05-01

    Cigarette smoke contains over 4000 chemicals including well-characterized toxicants and carcinogens, among which is cotinine. Cotinine is the principal metabolite of nicotine that has adverse affects on the microcirculation via vasoconstriction, hypoxia and the wound-healing cascade. Its impact on spinal cord injury (SCI) has not been investigated yet. The aim of the present study is to investigate the cotinine effect on SCI. 48 male Wistar rats were divided into six groups as follows: sham-control, sham-trauma, vehicle-control, vehicle-trauma, cotinine-control, and cotinine-trauma. Initially, a defined concentration of cotinine blood level was maintained by daily intraperitoneal injection of cotinine for 14 days in the cotinine groups. The concentration was similar to the cotinine dose in the blood level of heavy smokers. Only ethyl alcohol was injected in the vehicle groups during the same period. Then, SCI was performed by a Tator clip. The cotinine groups were compared with rats subjected to vehicle and sham groups by immunohistochemical biomarkers such as glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and 2,3-cyclic nucleotide 3-phosphodiesterase (CNP) expressions. Electron microscopic examination was also performed. GFAP-positive cells were noted to be localized around degenerated astrocytes. Marked vacuolization with perivascular and perineural edema was seen in the cotinin consumption groups. These findings showed the inhibition of regeneration after SCI. Similarly, vacuolization within myelin layers was noted in the cotinine groups, which was detected through reduced CNP expression. Cotinine, a main metabolite of nicotine, has harmful effects on SCI via GFAP and CNP expression. The findings of the present study support the hypothesis that tobacco causes neuronal degeneration via cotinine. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. Role of rostral medulla in serotonin-induced changes of respiratory rhythm in newborn rat brainstem-spinal cord preparations.

    PubMed

    Makino, Michio; Saiki, Chikako; Ide, Ryoji; Matsumoto, Shigeji

    2014-01-24

    Abnormalities of the serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) system may induce respiratory disorders. We examined which regions in the rostral medulla are important for the effect of 5-HT on the frequency of respiratory-like nerve (fR-like) activity by transecting the preparations at different levels near the facial nucleus (nVII) in newborn rat brainstem-spinal cord preparations. The fR-like activity at the fourth cervical ventral root (C4) of the Pons-medulla-spinal cord preparations in 2-3-day-old rats (n=25) was monitored at 26°C, and the change in fR-like activity in response to application of 10μM 5-HT before and after transection was compared among three groups, in which nVII was retained (group A, n=10), partially retained (group B, n=7), or eliminated (group C, n=8) by the transection. Before transection, the resting fR-like activity (set to 100%) and stimulant effect of 5-HT (+101-143%) were similar among the groups. After transection, resting fR-like activity increased in all groups, but the facilitatory effects of 5-HT on the fR-like activity were abolished in groups A and C (fR-like activity of -4% and +7%, respectively). In group B, 5-HT became inhibitory (fR-like activity of -28%). In conclusion, a distinct part of the rostral medulla in the absence of pontine influences may mediate the inhibitory effects of 5-HT on the respiratory rhythm.

  10. Impaired toll like receptor-7 and 9 induced immune activation in chronic spinal cord injured patients contributes to immune dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Gungor, Bilgi; Kahraman, Tamer; Gursel, Mayda; Yilmaz, Bilge

    2017-01-01

    Reduced immune activation or immunosuppression is seen in patients withneurological diseases. Urinary and respiratory infections mainly manifested as septicemia and pneumonia are the most frequent complications following spinal cord injuries and they account for the majority of deaths. The underlying reason of these losses is believed to arise due to impaired immune responses to pathogens. Here, we hypothesized that susceptibility to infections of chronic spinal cord injured (SCI) patients might be due to impairment in recognition of pathogen associated molecular patterns and subsequently declining innate and adaptive immune responses that lead to immune dysfunction. We tested our hypothesis on healthy and chronic SCI patients with a level of injury above T-6. Donor PBMCs were isolated and stimulated with different toll like receptor ligands and T-cell inducers aiming to investigate whether chronic SCI patients display differential immune activation to multiple innate and adaptive immune cell stimulants. We demonstrate that SCI patients' B-cell and plasmacytoid dendritic cells retain their functionality in response to TLR7 and TLR9 ligand stimulation as they secreted similar levels of IL6 and IFNα. The immune dysfunction is not probably due to impaired T-cell function, since neither CD4+ T-cell dependent IFNγ producing cell number nor IL10 producing regulatory T-cells resulted different outcomes in response to PMA-Ionomycin and PHA-LPS stimulation, respectively. We showed that TLR7 dependent IFNγ and IP10 levels and TLR9 mediated APC function reduced substantially in SCI patients compared to healthy subjects. More importantly, IP10 producing monocytes were significantly fewer compared to healthy subjects in response to TLR7 and TLR9 stimulation of SCI PBMCs. When taken together this work implicated that these defects could contribute to persistent complications due to increased susceptibility to infections of chronic SCI patients. PMID:28170444

  11. Chronic pain following spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Rekand, Tiina; Hagen, Ellen Merete; Grønning, Marit

    2012-04-30

    Chronic pain following spinal cord injury is common, and may result in a substantially reduced quality of life. The aim of the paper is to provide an overview of pain conditions resulting from spinal cord injuries and an update on therapy options. The article is based on literature searches in PubMed review articles for the period 2006-2011, using the search phrases «pain and spinal cord injury/injuries», «chronic pain and spinal cord injury/injuries» and «neuropathic pain and spinal cord injury/injuries». Some key articles on neuropathic pain are also included, irrespective of the year of publication. Patients with spinal cord injury may develop nociceptive and/or neuropathic pain.The cause, nature and localisation of the pain must be established before therapy is initiated. Neuropathic pain should primarily be treated with amitriptyline, gabapentin or pregabalin. Duloxetine, lamotrigine and tramadol may also be effective. Local treatment with high-concentration capsaicin and lidocaine may relieve localised neuropathic pain. Selected patients with intractable chronic neuropathic pain can be treated with intrathecal medication using an implanted pain pump or by microsurgical DREZotomy (Dorsal Root Entry Zone). Physiotherapy, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and opioids are most widely used for treating nociceptive pain. Physical exercise and acupuncture may provide relief from shoulder pain. There may be several causes of chronic pain following spinal cord injury. Different measures have been tested for the management of chronic pain after spinal cord injury, but most studies have been performed on a limited number of patients. Further studies are needed to find more effective means of relieving pain following spinal cord injuries.

  12. Neonatal sciatic nerve transection induces TUNEL labeling of neurons in the rat spinal cord and DRG.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, A L; Risling, M; Deckner, M; Lindholm, T; Langone, F; Cullheim, S

    1997-09-08

    Transection of a peripheral nerve in neonatal rats induces an extensive death of axotomized neurons. We demonstrate here that spinal motoneurons and sensory dorsal root ganglia neurons become TUNEL-labeled after sciatic nerve transection in neonatal rats, thus indicating that apoptotic mechanisms are involved in the death process. Interestingly, there is also a profound increase of TUNEL-labeled interneurons in the deep dorsal horn. This location suggests that an intact afferent input and/or contact with target cells is essential for interneuronal survival. Death of motoneurons and sensory neurons could be a result of the injury per se and/or the deprivation of neurotrophic substances, secondary to the loss of contact with target cells.

  13. Nanomedicine for treating spinal cord injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyler, Jacqueline Y.; Xu, Xiao-Ming; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2013-09-01

    Spinal cord injury results in significant mortality and morbidity, lifestyle changes, and difficult rehabilitation. Treatment of spinal cord injury is challenging because the spinal cord is both complex to treat acutely and difficult to regenerate. Nanomaterials can be used to provide effective treatments; their unique properties can facilitate drug delivery to the injury site, enact as neuroprotective agents, or provide platforms to stimulate regrowth of damaged tissues. We review recent uses of nanomaterials including nanowires, micelles, nanoparticles, liposomes, and carbon-based nanomaterials for neuroprotection in the acute phase. We also review the design and neural regenerative application of electrospun scaffolds, conduits, and self-assembling peptide scaffolds.

  14. The effects of exercise on the GAP-43 expression in the spinal cord of arthritis-induced rats

    PubMed Central

    Park, Soo-Jin; Jung, Nam-Jin; Na, Sang-Su

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the study was to investigate the effects of exercise on the recovery of spinal cord nerve cells damaged due to pain signals which are a major symptom of osteoarthritis. [Subjects and Methods] Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (n=40) were used and induction of osteoarthritis by monosodium iodoacetate. Injected rats were randomly divided into 4 groups: Sham control group without MIA injection (SG), control group with injected MIA (CG), OA without exercise (NEG), OA with exercise (EG). Sham control group was injected normal cell line instead of MIA. The exercise group was submitted to 4-week training program on a treadmill for 5 days/week, 30 min/day, 16 m/min velocity, then spinal cord were removed and measured the GAP-43 expression by immunohistochemistry analysis. [Results] In this study, a results of measuring the expression of GAP-43. GAP-43 was observed in all groups, showed that the significant difference in each group. [Conclusion] It could be seen that exercise increased the GAP-43 expression in the spinal cord to promote the recovery of spinal cord nerve cells damaged due to chronic osteoarthritis. PMID:27821962

  15. Fitness and Spinal Cord Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Mackie, J. William; McCormack, Rebecca; Campbell, Duncan

    1989-01-01

    Activity for many disabled persons often begins as therapy, but the additional rewards derived from exercise must be appreciated. Public attitudes toward disabled persons have changed during the last few decades, recently focusing on abilities rather than on disabilities. The family physician of patients with spinal cord injuries will assist in managing acute medical problems and the association with loss of some degree of physical capacity. Physicians also can guide these individuals to choose a life that remains active and interesting over a “house-bound,” but safe, existence. Sensitivity and timing play key roles in establishing exercise as an intergral part of a disabled individuals' altered lifestyle. The physician can advocate increased access to wheelchairs and other facilities that make life easier for disabled individuals. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:21248871

  16. Spinal cord injury in youth.

    PubMed

    Apple, D F; Anson, C A; Hunter, J D; Bell, R B

    1995-02-01

    To identify special characteristics of the pediatric spinal cord-injured (SCI) population, we analyzed a database of 1,770 traumatic SCI patients; 88 (5%) fell into the two pediatric subgroups: 0-12 years (n = 26) and 13-15 years (n = 62) at time of injury. Differences between age groups were identified with regard to demographics, neurologic characteristics, associated injuries and complications, and management. Mode level of bony injury was C2 in preteens, C4 in teens, and C4-C5 in adults. Scoliosis developed far more frequently in children, particularly preteens (23%), than in adults (5%). Violent etiologies, predominantly gunshots, accounted for a disproportionate share of injuries to preteens (19%) and African-Americans (28%), as compared with adults (12%) and Caucasians (7%). This last finding underscores the urgent need to mount a response to the nationwide proliferation of gunshot-related SCI in children and minorities.

  17. Spinal cord transection in the larval zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Briona, Lisa K; Dorsky, Richard I

    2014-05-21

    Mammals fail in sensory and motor recovery following spinal cord injury due to lack of axonal regrowth below the level of injury as well as an inability to reinitiate spinal neurogenesis. However, some anamniotes including the zebrafish Danio rerio exhibit both sensory and functional recovery even after complete transection of the spinal cord. The adult zebrafish is an established model organism for studying regeneration following spinal cord injury, with sensory and motor recovery by 6 weeks post-injury. To take advantage of in vivo analysis of the regenerative process available in the transparent larval zebrafish as well as genetic tools not accessible in the adult, we use the larval zebrafish to study regeneration after spinal cord transection. Here we demonstrate a method for reproducibly and verifiably transecting the larval spinal cord. After transection, our data shows sensory recovery beginning at 2 days post-injury (dpi), with the C-bend movement detectable by 3 dpi and resumption of free swimming by 5 dpi. Thus we propose the larval zebrafish as a companion tool to the adult zebrafish for the study of recovery after spinal cord injury.

  18. Spinal cord lesions - The rehabilitation perspective.

    PubMed

    Faria, Filipa

    2006-02-01

    The present study provides an overview of the spinal cord injury focusing mainly on aspects related to rehabilitation. Spinal cord injury affects young people in an active phase of life, determining severe handicaps. Most of the lesions are traumatic, caused by car accidents. Until fifty years ago, the survival of individuals with spinal cord injury was very reduced and the leading cause of death was renal failure. Due to developments in medical knowledge and technical advances, the survival rates have significantly improved. The causes of death have also changed being respiratory complications, particularly pneumonia, the leading causes. Immediately after a spinal cord lesion there is a phase of spinal shock which is characterized by flaccid paralysis and bladder and bowel retention. Progressively there is a return of the spinal cord automatism with the beginning of some reflex activities. Based on neurological evaluation it is pos-sible to predict motor and functional recovery and establish the rehabilitation program. We can consider three phases on the rehabilitation program: the first while the patient is still in bed, directed to prevent or treat complications due to immobility and begin sphincters reeducation; the second phase is intended to achieve wheelchair autonomy; the last phase is training in ortostatism. The rehabilitation program also comprises sports and recreational activities, psychological and social support in order to achieve an integral of the individual with a spinal cord injury.

  19. Intrathecal urocortin I in the spinal cord as a murine model of stress hormone-induced musculoskeletal and tactile hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Larson, Alice A; Nunez, Myra G; Kissel, Casey L; Kovács, Katalin J

    2015-11-01

    Stress is antinociceptive in some models of pain, but enhances musculoskeletal nociceptive responses in mice and muscle pain in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome. To test the hypothesis that urocortins are stress hormones that are sufficient to enhance tactile and musculoskeletal hyperalgesia, von Frey fibre sensitivity and grip force after injection of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), urocortin I and urocortin II were measured in mice. Urocortin I (a CRF1 and CRF2 receptor ligand) produced hyperalgesia in both assays when injected intrathecally (i.t.) but not intracerebroventricularly, and only at a large dose when injected peripherally, suggesting a spinal action. Morphine inhibited urocortin I-induced changes in nociceptive responses in a dose-related fashion, confirming that changes in behaviour reflect hyperalgesia rather than weakness. No tolerance developed to the effect of urocortin I (i.t.) when injected repeatedly, consistent with a potential to enhance pain chronically. Tactile hyperalgesia was inhibited by NBI-35965, a CRF1 receptor antagonist, but not astressin 2B, a CRF2 receptor antagonist. However, while urocortin I-induced decreases in grip force were not observed when co-administered i.t. with either NBI-35965 or astressin 2B, they were even more sensitive to inhibition by astressin, a non-selective CRF receptor antagonist. Together these data indicate that urocortin I acts at CRF receptors in the mouse spinal cord to elicit a reproducible and persistent tactile (von Frey) and musculoskeletal (grip force) hyperalgesia. Urocortin I-induced hyperalgesia may serve as a screen for drugs that alleviate painful conditions that are exacerbated by stress.

  20. Cardiovascular control after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Gondim, F A A; Lopes, A C A; Oliveira, G R; Rodrigues, C L; Leal, P R L; Santos, A A; Rola, F H

    2004-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) leads to profound haemodynamic changes. Constant outflows from the central autonomic pattern generators modulate the activity of the spinal sympathetic neurons. Sudden loss of communication between these centers and the sympathetic neurons in the intermediolateral thoracic and lumbar spinal cord leads to spinal shock. After high SCI, experimental data demonstrated a brief hypertensive peak followed by bradycardia with escape arrhythmias and marked hypotension. Total peripheral resistance and cardiac output decrease, while central venous pressure remains unchanged. The initial hypertensive peak is thought to result from direct sympathetic stimulation during SCI and its presence is anaesthetic agent dependent. Hypotension improves within days in most animal species because of reasons not totally understood, which may include synaptic reorganization or hyper responsiveness of alpha receptors. No convincing data has demonstrated that the deafferented spinal cord can generate significant basal sympathetic activity. However, with the spinal shock resolution, the deafferented spinal cord (in lesions above T6) will generate life-threatening hypertensive bouts with compensatory bradycardia, known as autonomic hyperreflexia (AH) after stimuli such as pain or bladder/colonic distension. AH results from the lack of supraspinal control of the sympathetic neurons and altered neurotransmission (e.g. glutamatergic) within the spinal cord. Despite significant progress in recent years, further research is necessary to fully understand the spectrum of haemodynamic changes after SCI.

  1. VOLUNTARY EXERCISE INCREASES OLIGODENDROGENESIS IN SPINAL CORD

    PubMed Central

    Krityakiarana, W.; Espinosa-Jeffrey, A.; Ghiani, C.A.; Zhao, P. M.; Gomez-Pinilla, F.; Yamaguchi, M.; Kotchabhakdi, N.; de Vellis, J.

    2009-01-01

    Exercise has been shown to increase hippocampal neurogenesis, but the effects of exercise on oligodendrocyte generation have not yet been reported. In this study, we evaluated the hypothesis that voluntary exercise may affect neurogenesis, and more in particular, oligodendrogenesis, in the thoracic segment of the intact spinal cord of adult nestin-GFP transgenic mice. Voluntary exercise for 7 and 14 days increased nestin-GFP expression around the ependymal area. In addition, voluntary exercise for 7 days significantly increased nestin-GFP expression in both the white and gray matter of the thoracic segment of the intact spinal cord, whereas, 14 days-exercise decreased nestin-GFP expression. Markers for immature oligodendrocytes (Transferrin and CNPase) were significantly increased after 7 days of voluntary exercise. These results suggest that voluntary exercise positively influences oligodendrogenesis in the intact spinal cord, emphasizing the beneficial effect of voluntary exercise as a possible co-treatment for spinal cord injury. PMID:20374076

  2. Spinal Cord Injury Model System Information Network

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Women with SCI Video Series EatRight® Weight Management Program Smoking's Effects on ... of Alabama at Birmingham Spinal Cord Injury Model System (UAB-SCIMS) maintains this Information Network as a ...

  3. Ganglioside patterns in human spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Vorwerk, C K

    2001-12-01

    To examine the distribution of gangliosides in human cervical and lumbar spinal cord. Magdeburg, Germany. The ganglioside distribution of human cervical and lumbar spinal cord enlargements from 10 neurological normal patients was analyzed. Gangliosides were isolated from different areas corresponding to the columna anterior, columna lateralis and columna posterior. Ganglioside GfD1b/GD1b and GD3 were the most abundant gangliosides in all examined tissues. The total concentration of sialic acid bound gangliosides GM2 and GM3 was less than 5%. The GD3 fraction constantly consisted of a double band as assessed by TLC after lipid extraction. There were significant differences in the ganglioside distribution when comparing tissue from the columna anterior, columna lateralis and columna posterior of the lumbar enlargement of the spinal cord. Differences in the ganglioside composition in human spinal cord regions may reflect the different function of those molecules in the two regions investigated.

  4. Cell transplantation therapy for spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Assinck, Peggy; Duncan, Greg J; Hilton, Brett J; Plemel, Jason R; Tetzlaff, Wolfram

    2017-04-25

    Spinal cord injury can lead to severe motor, sensory and autonomic dysfunction. Currently, there is no effective treatment for the injured spinal cord. The transplantation of Schwann cells, neural stem cells or progenitor cells, olfactory ensheathing cells, oligodendrocyte precursor cells and mesenchymal stem cells has been investigated as potential therapies for spinal cord injury. However, little is known about the mechanisms through which these individual cell types promote repair and functional improvements. The five most commonly proposed mechanisms include neuroprotection, immunomodulation, axon regeneration, neuronal relay formation and myelin regeneration. A better understanding of the mechanisms whereby these cells promote functional improvements, as well as an appreciation of the obstacles in implementing these therapies and effectively modeling spinal cord injury, will be important to make cell transplantation a viable clinical option and may lead to the development of more targeted therapies.

  5. Dl-3-n-butylphthalide improves functional recovery in rats with spinal cord injury by inhibiting endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    He, Zili; Zhou, Yulong; Huang, Yan; Wang, Qingqing; Zheng, Binbin; Zhang, Hongyu; Li, Jiawei; Liu, Yanlong; Wu, Fenzan; Zhang, Xie; Tong, Songlin; Wang, Maofeng; Wang, Zhouguang; He, Huacheng; Xu, Huazi; Xiao, Jian

    2017-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-induced apoptosis occurs in the spinal cord following traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). Dl-3-n-butylphthalide (NBP) exerts an neuroprotective effects against both ischemic brain injury and neurodegenerative diseases; however, the relationship between ER stress-induced apoptosis and the therapeutic effect of NBP in SCI remains unclear. In this study, moderate spinal cord injuries were induced in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats with a vascular clip. NBP was administered by oral (80 mg/kg/d) gavage 2 h before injury and then once daily for 28 d thereafter. Neurological recovery was assessed using the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB) locomotion rating scale, the inclined plane test, and the footprint analysis. Neuronal cell death was examined by TUNEL staining at 7 days post-injury. ER stress and apoptosis-related proteins were quantified by immunofluorescence staining and western blotting both in vivo and in vitro. Our results showed that NBP significantly decreased spinal cord lesion cavity area and improved locomotor recovery in SD rats after SCI. NBP also decreased neuronal apoptosis and inhibited activation of the caspase 3 cascade. Upregulation of ER stress-related proteins, such as GRP78, ATF-6, ATF-4, PDI, XBP-1, and CHOP, was reversed by NBP treatment in SD rats with SCI. Similarly, NBP effectively ameliorated ER stress and apoptosis-related protein expression induced by incubation with thapsigargin (TG) in PC12 cells. Our findings demonstrate that NBP treatment alleviates secondary SCI by inhibiting ER stress-induced apoptosis, thereby promoting neurological and locomoter functional recovery. PMID:28386335

  6. Neuropraxia of the cervical spinal cord following cervical spinal cord trauma: a report of five patients.

    PubMed

    Bernsen, H J; Koetsveld, A; Frenken, C W; van Norel, G J

    2000-06-01

    Neuropraxia of the cervical spinal cord is a rare condition which is almost exclusively reported in American football players following cervical hyperextension or hyperflexion trauma. In this entity-neurological symptoms of both arms and legs for a period of up to 15 minutes are observed with complete recovery. We report the characteristics of five patients not involved in contact sport activities with a neuropraxia of the spinal cord following cervical trauma. In four of the five patients, this syndrome was associated with a cervical canal stenosis. Surgical decompression was performed in two patients with progressive neurological symptoms after an initial period of recovery. The cases illustrates that although neuropraxia of the spinal cord is usually seen in athletes, also other persons may be at risk for developing this condition, especially when a preexisting spinal stenosis is present. Patients who experienced neuropraxia of the spinal cord should thus be evaluated carefully for the presence of cervical spinal cord abnormalities.

  7. Tissue plasminogen activator contributes to morphine tolerance and induces mechanical allodynia via astrocytic IL-1β and ERK signaling in the spinal cord of mice

    PubMed Central

    Berta, Temugin; Liu, Yen-Chin; Xu, Zhen-Zhong; Ji, Ru-Rong

    2013-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that activation of spinal cord astrocytes contributes importantly to nerve injury and inflammation-induced persistent pain and chronic opioid-induced antinociceptive tolerance. Phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (pERK) and induction of interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) in spinal astrocytes have been implicated in astrocytes-mediated pain. Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is a serine protease that has been extensively used to treat stroke. We examined the potential involvement of tPA in chronic opioid-induced antinociceptive tolerance and activation of spinal astrocytes using tPA knockout (tPA−/−) mice and astrocyte cultures. tPA−/− mice exhibited unaltered nociceptive pain and morphine-induced acute analgesia. However, the antinociceptive tolerance, induced by chronic morphine (10 mg/kg/day, s.c.), is abrogated in tPA−/− mice. Chronic morphine induces tPA expression in GFAP-expressing spinal cord astrocytes. Chronic morphine also increases IL-1β expression in GFAP-expressing astrocytes, which is abolished in tPA-deficient mice. In cultured astrocytes, morphine treatment increases tPA, IL-1β, and pERK expression, and the increased IL-1β and pERK expression is abolished in tPA-deficient astrocytes. tPA is also sufficient to induce IL-1β and pERK expression in astrocyte cultures. Intrathecal injection of tPA results in up-regulation of GFAP and pERK in spinal astrocytes but not up-regulation of IBA-1 in spinal microglia. Finally, intrathecal tPA elicits persistent mechanical allodynia, which is inhibited by the astroglial toxin alpha-amino adipate and the MEK (ERK kinase) inhibitor U0126. Collectively, these data suggest an important role of tPA in regulating astrocytic signaling, pain hypersensitivity, and morphine tolerance. PMID:23707980

  8. Tissue plasminogen activator contributes to morphine tolerance and induces mechanical allodynia via astrocytic IL-1β and ERK signaling in the spinal cord of mice.

    PubMed

    Berta, T; Liu, Y-C; Xu, Z-Z; Ji, R-R

    2013-09-05

    Accumulating evidence indicates that activation of spinal cord astrocytes contributes importantly to nerve injury and inflammation-induced persistent pain and chronic opioid-induced antinociceptive tolerance. Phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (pERK) and induction of interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) in spinal astrocytes have been implicated in astrocytes-mediated pain. Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is a serine protease that has been extensively used to treat stroke. We examined the potential involvement of tPA in chronic opioid-induced antinociceptive tolerance and activation of spinal astrocytes using tPA knockout (tPA(-/-)) mice and astrocyte cultures. tPA(-/-) mice exhibited unaltered nociceptive pain and morphine-induced acute analgesia. However, the antinociceptive tolerance, induced by chronic morphine (10mg/kg/day, s.c.), is abrogated in tPA(-/-) mice. Chronic morphine induces tPA expression in glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-expressing spinal cord astrocytes. Chronic morphine also increases IL-1β expression in GFAP-expressing astrocytes, which is abolished in tPA-deficient mice. In cultured astrocytes, morphine treatment increases tPA, IL-1β, and pERK expression, and the increased IL-1β and pERK expression is abolished in tPA-deficient astrocytes. tPA is also sufficient to induce IL-1β and pERK expression in astrocyte cultures. Intrathecal injection of tPA results in up-regulation of GFAP and pERK in spinal astrocytes but not up-regulation of ionized calcium binding adapter molecule 1 in spinal microglia. Finally, intrathecal tPA elicits persistent mechanical allodynia, which is inhibited by the astroglial toxin alpha-amino adipate and the MEK (ERK kinase) inhibitor U0126. Collectively, these data suggest an important role of tPA in regulating astrocytic signaling, pain hypersensitivity, and morphine tolerance.

  9. Levodopa enhances immobility induced by spinal cord electromagnetic stimulation in rats.

    PubMed

    Sales, Paulo M G; de Andrade, Loraine M S; Pitcher, Meagan R; Rola, Francisco H; Gondim, Francisco de A A

    2016-10-28

    The repetitive ElectroMagnetic Stimulation (rEMS) is an innocuous method applied to modulate neurocircuits in real-time to study the physiology of the central nervous system and treat neuropsychiatric conditions. Preliminary data suggest that spinal rEMS induces behavioral changes in awake rats. However, the mechanisms behind this phenomenon remain largely unknown. Twenty-five male Wistar rats were divided into five subgroups of five animals each: one subgroup was drug-free, two subgroups received Levodopa+Benserazide 250+25mg/kg for two or seven days, and the remaining two subgroups received Haloperidol 0.1 or 0.3mg/kg for two days. The animals were restrained during sham rEMS (day 1) followed by real rEMS of the cervicothoracic region at a different day (day 2 or 7, depending on subgroup). Four behavioral parameters were quantified: Walking, Climbing, Grooming, and Cornering. rEMS reduced Walking and increased Cornering duration when applied over the cervicothoracic region of drug-free animals. A pretreatment with Levodopa+Benserazide for two or seven days induced an additional decrease in Walking after rEMS. This reduction was maximum after the treatment for seven days and associated with extinction of Climbing and increase in Cornering. A pretreatment with Haloperidol 0.1mg/kg reduced Grooming after rEMS, but did not prevent the reduction in Walking. Cervicothoracic rEMS induced complex immobility responses that are in part modulated by dopaminergic pathways in rats. Further studies are necessary to determine the specific mechanisms involved. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Retinoic acid signaling in spinal cord development.

    PubMed

    Lara-Ramírez, Ricardo; Zieger, Elisabeth; Schubert, Michael

    2013-07-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) is an important signaling molecule mediating intercellular communication through vertebrate development. Here, we present and discuss recent information on the roles of the RA signaling pathway in spinal cord development. RA is an important player in the patterning and definition of the spinal cord territory from very early stages of development, even before the appearance of the neural plate and further serves a role in the patterning of the spinal cord both along the dorsoventral and anteroposterior axes, particularly in the promotion of neuronal differentiation. It is thus required to establish a variety of neuronal cell types at specific positions of the spinal cord. The main goal of this review is to gather information from vertebrate models, including fish, frogs, chicken and mice, and to put this information in a comparative context in an effort to visualize how the RA pathway was incorporated into the evolving vertebrate spinal cord and to identify mechanisms that are both common and different in the various vertebrate models. In doing so, we try to reconstruct how spinal cord development has been regulated by the RA signaling cascade through vertebrate diversification, highlighting areas which require further studies to obtain a better understanding of the evolutionary events that shaped this structure in the vertebrate lineage. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Peripheral nerve grafts support regeneration after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Côté, Marie-Pascale; Amin, Arthi A; Tom, Veronica J; Houle, John D

    2011-04-01

    Traumatic insults to the spinal cord induce both immediate mechanical damage and subsequent tissue degeneration leading to a substantial physiological, biochemical, and functional reorganization of the spinal cord. Various spinal cord injury (SCI) models have shown the adaptive potential of the spinal cord and its limitations in the case of total or partial absence of supraspinal influence. Meaningful recovery of function after SCI will most likely result from a combination of therapeutic strategies, including neural tissue transplants, exogenous neurotrophic factors, elimination of inhibitory molecules, functional sensorimotor training, and/or electrical stimulation of paralyzed muscles or spinal circuits. Peripheral nerve grafts provide a growth-permissive substratum and local neurotrophic factors to enhance the regenerative effort of axotomized neurons when grafted into the site of injury. Regenerating axons can be directed via the peripheral nerve graft toward an appropriate target, but they fail to extend beyond the distal graft-host interface because of the deposition of growth inhibitors at the site of SCI. One method to facilitate the emergence of axons from a graft into the spinal cord is to digest the chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans that are associated with a glial scar. Importantly, regenerating axons that do exit the graft are capable of forming functional synaptic contacts. These results have been demonstrated in acute injury models in rats and cats and after a chronic injury in rats and have important implications for our continuing efforts to promote structural and functional repair after SCI.

  12. SIMS and MALDI MS imaging of the spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Monroe, Eric B.; Annangudi, Suresh P.; Hatcher, Nathan G.; Gutstein, Howard B.; Rubakhin, Stanislav S.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2009-01-01

    The application of mass spectrometry to imaging, or MS imaging (MSI), allows for the direct investigation of tissue sections to identify biological compounds and determine their spatial distribution. We present an approach to MSI that combines secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and MALDI MS for the imaging and analysis of rat spinal cord sections, thereby enhancing the chemical coverage obtained from an MSI experiment. The spinal cord is organized into discrete, anatomically defined areas that include motor and sensory networks composed of chemically diverse cells. The MSI data presented here reveal the spatial distribution of multiple phospholipids, proteins, and neuropeptides obtained within single, 20-μm sections of rat spinal cord. Analyte identities are initially determined by primary mass match and confirmed in follow-up experiments using LC MS/MS from extracts of adjacent spinal cord sections. Additionally, a regional analysis of differentially localized signals serves to rapidly screen compounds of varying intensities across multiple spinal regions. These MSI analyses reveal new insights into the chemical architecture of the spinal cord and set the stage for future imaging studies of the chemical changes induced by pain, anesthesia, and drug tolerance. PMID:18712768

  13. Alterations in the neural circuits from peripheral afferents to the spinal cord: possible implications for diabetic polyneuropathy in streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Kou, Zhen-Zhen; Li, Chun-Yu; Hu, Jia-Chen; Yin, Jun-Bin; Zhang, Dong-Liang; Liao, Yong-Hui; Wu, Zhen-Yu; Ding, Tan; Qu, Juan; Li, Hui; Li, Yun-Qing

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN) presents as a wide variety of sensorimotor symptoms and affects approximately 50% of diabetic patients. Changes in the neural circuits may occur in the early stages in diabetes and are implicated in the development of DPN. Therefore, we aimed to detect changes in the expression of isolectin B4 (IB4, the marker for nonpeptidergic unmyelinated fibers and their cell bodies) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP, the marker for peptidergic fibers and their cell bodies) in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and spinal cord of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced type 1 diabetic rats showing alterations in sensory and motor function. We also used cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) to show the morphological changes of the myelinated fibers and motor neurons. STZ-induced diabetic rats exhibited hyperglycemia, decreased body weight gain, mechanical allodynia and impaired locomotor activity. In the DRG and spinal dorsal horn, IB4-labeled structures decreased, but both CGRP immunostaining and CTB labeling increased from day 14 to day 28 in diabetic rats. In spinal ventral horn, CTB labeling decreased in motor neurons in diabetic rats. Treatment with intrathecal injection of insulin at the early stages of DPN could alleviate mechanical allodynia and impaired locomotor activity in diabetic rats. The results suggest that the alterations of the neural circuits between spinal nerve and spinal cord via the DRG and ventral root might be involved in DPN. PMID:24523675

  14. Transplantation of human umbilical cord blood or amniotic epithelial stem cells alleviates mechanical allodynia after spinal cord injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Roh, Dae-Hyun; Seo, Min-Soo; Choi, Hoon-Seong; Park, Sang-Bum; Han, Ho-Jae; Beitz, Alvin J; Kang, Kyung-Sun; Lee, Jang-Hern

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell therapy is a potential treatment for spinal cord injury (SCI), and a variety of different stem cell types have been grafted into humans suffering from spinal cord trauma or into animal models of spinal injury. Although several studies have reported functional motor improvement after transplantation of stem cells into injured spinal cord, the benefit of these cells for treating SCI-induced neuropathic pain is not clear. In this study, we investigated the therapeutic effect of transplanting human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCB-MSCs) or amniotic epithelial stem cells (hAESCs) on SCI-induced mechanical allodynia (MA) and thermal hyperalgesia (TH) in T13 spinal cord hemisected rats. Two weeks after SCI, hUCB-MSCs or hAESCs were transplanted around the spinal cord lesion site, and behavioral tests were performed to evaluate changes in SCI-induced MA and TH. Immunohistochemical and Western blot analyses were also performed to evaluate possible therapeutic effects on SCI-induced inflammation and the nociceptive-related phosphorylation of the NMDA NR1 receptor subunit. While transplantation of hUCB-MSCs showed a tendency to reduce MA, transplantation of hAESCs significantly reduced MA. Neither hUCB-MSC nor hAESC transplantation had any effect on SCI-induced TH. Transplantation of hAESCs also significantly reduced the SCI-induced increase in NMDA receptor NR1 subunit phosphorylation (pNR1) expression in the spinal cord. Both hUCB-MSCs and hAESCs reduced the SCI-induced increase in spinal cord expression of the microglial marker, F4/80, but not the increased expression of GFAP or iNOS. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that the transplantation of hAESCs into the injured spinal cord can suppress mechanical allodynia, and this effect seems to be closely associated with the modulation of spinal cord microglia activity and NR1 phosphorylation.

  15. Temporal and segmental distribution of constitutive and inducible nitric oxide synthases after traumatic spinal cord injury: effect of aminoguanidine treatment.

    PubMed

    Chatzipanteli, Katina; Garcia, Ronaldo; Marcillo, Alexander E; Loor, Kim E; Kraydieh, Susan; Dietrich, W Dalton

    2002-05-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been shown to play an important role in the pathophysiology of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and cerebral ischemia. However, its contribution to the pathogenesis of traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) remains to be clarified. This study determined the time course of constitutive and inducible nitric oxide synthases (cNOS and iNOS, respectively) after SCI. Rats underwent moderate SCI at T10 using the NYU impactor device and were allowed to survive for 3, 6, or 24 h and 3 days after SCI (n = 5 in each group). For the determination of enzymatic activities, spinal cords were dissected into five segments, including levels rostral and caudal (remote) to the injury site. Other rats were perfusion fixed for the immunohistochemical localization of iNOS protein levels. cNOS activity was significantly decreased at 3 and 6 h within the traumatized T10 segment and at 3, 6, and 24 h at the rostral (T9) level (p < 0.05). Rostral (T8) and caudal (T11, T12) to the injury site cNOS activity was also decreased at 3 h after injury (p < 0.05). However, cNOS activity returned to control levels within 6 h at T8, T11 and T12 and at one day at T10 and T9 segments. iNOS enzymatic activity was elevated at all time points tested (p < 0.05), with the most robust increase observed at 24 h. Immunostaining for iNOS at 24 h revealed that a significant cellular source of iNOS protein appeared to be invading polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNLs). To assess the functional consequences of iNOS inhibition, aminoguanidine treatment was initiated 5 min after SCI and rats tested using the BBB open field locomotor score. Treated rats demonstrated significantly improved hindlimb function up to 7 weeks after SCI. Histopathological analysis of contusion volume showed that aminoguanidine treatment decreased lesion volume by 37% (p < 0.05). In conclusion, these results indicate that (1) cNOS and iNOS activities are regionally and temporally affected after moderate SCI, (2) the early

  16. Quercetin Inhibits Peripheral and Spinal Cord Nociceptive Mechanisms to Reduce Intense Acute Swimming-Induced Muscle Pain in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Borghi, Sergio M.; Pinho-Ribeiro, Felipe A.; Fattori, Victor; Bussmann, Allan J. C.; Vignoli, Josiane A.; Camilios-Neto, Doumit; Casagrande, Rubia; Verri, Waldiceu A.

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of the flavonoid quercetin (3,3´,4´,5,7-pentahydroxyflavone) in a mice model of intense acute swimming-induced muscle pain, which resembles delayed onset muscle soreness. Quercetin intraperitoneal (i.p.) treatment dose-dependently reduced muscle mechanical hyperalgesia. Quercetin inhibited myeloperoxidase (MPO) and N-acetyl-β-D- glucosaminidase (NAG) activities, cytokine production, oxidative stress, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and gp91phox mRNA expression and muscle injury (creatinine kinase [CK] blood levels and myoblast determination protein [MyoD] mRNA expression) as well as inhibited NFκB activation and induced Nrf2 and HO-1 mRNA expression in the soleus muscle. Beyond inhibiting those peripheral effects, quercetin also inhibited spinal cord cytokine production, oxidative stress and glial cells activation (glial fibrillary acidic protein [GFAP] and ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 [Iba-1] mRNA expression). Concluding, the present data demonstrate that quercetin is a potential molecule for the treatment of muscle pain conditions related to unaccustomed exercise. PMID:27583449

  17. Treadmill training promotes spinal changes leading to locomotor recovery after partial spinal cord injury in cats.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Marina; Delivet-Mongrain, Hugo; Rossignol, Serge

    2013-06-01

    After a spinal hemisection at thoracic level in cats, the paretic hindlimb progressively recovers locomotion without treadmill training but asymmetries between hindlimbs persist for several weeks and can be seen even after a further complete spinal transection at T13. To promote optimal locomotor recovery after hemisection, such asymmetrical changes need to be corrected. In the present study we determined if the locomotor deficits induced by a spinal hemisection can be corrected by locomotor training and, if so, whether the spinal stepping after the complete spinal cord transection is also more symmetrical. This would indicate that locomotor training in the hemisected period induces efficient changes in the spinal cord itself. Sixteen adult cats were first submitted to a spinal hemisection at T10. One group received 3 wk of treadmill training, whereas the second group did not. Detailed kinematic and electromyographic analyses showed that a 3-wk period of locomotor training was sufficient to improve the quality and symmetry of walking of the hindlimbs. Moreover, after the complete spinal lesion was performed, all the trained cats reexpressed bilateral and symmetrical hindlimb locomotion within 24 h. By contrast, the locomotor pattern of the untrained cats remained asymmetrical, and the hindlimb on the side of the hemisection was still deficient. This study highlights the beneficial role of locomotor training in facilitating bilateral and symmetrical functional plastic changes within the spinal circuitry and in promoting locomotor recovery after an incomplete spinal cord injury.

  18. Down-regulation of PPARα in the spinal cord contributes to augmented peripheral inflammation and inflammatory hyperalgesia in diet-induced obese rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Zhang, Q; Zhao, L; Li, D; Fu, Z; Liang, L

    2014-10-10

    Obesity is associated with augmented peripheral inflammation and pain sensitivity in response to inflammatory stimulation, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Emerging evidence has shown that activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARα) in the central nervous system controls peripheral inflammation and pain. We hypothesized that obesity might down-regulate PPARα in the spinal cord, leading to enhanced peripheral inflammation and inflammatory hyperalgesia. Sprague-Dawley rats fed a high-fat diet (HF) for 12weeks developed metabolic disorder and displayed significantly decreased spinal PPARα expression and activity. Interestingly, intracerebroventricular (ICV) infusion of the PPARα activator palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) in HF-fed rats for 2weeks normalized spinal PPARα expression and activity without altering metabolic parameters. HF-fed rats were more sensitive to stimulation of the inflamed paw, and exhibited more severe paw edema following carrageenan injection, whereas HF-fed rats receiving ICV PEA had similar pain sensitivity and paw edema to LF-fed rats. No difference in the expression of inflammatory mediators or nuclear factor (NF)-κB activity was observed at baseline among groups. Carrageenan induced decreased PPARα expression and activity, increased spinal cord inflammatory mediator expression and NF-κB activity in both LF-and HF-fed rats. However, the increase was more pronounced in HF-fed rats and corrected by PEA. Intrathecal injection of small interfering RNA (siRNA) against PPARα in HF-fed rats completely abolished PEA effects on peripheral pain sensitivity and paw edema. These findings suggest that diet-induced obesity causes down-regulation of spinal PPARα, which facilitates the susceptibility to peripheral inflammatory challenge by increasing inflammatory response in the spinal cord, contributing to augmented peripheral inflammation and inflammatory hyperalgesia in obesity.

  19. Spinal cord thermosensitivity: An afferent phenomenon?

    PubMed Central

    Brock, James A.; McAllen, Robin M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We review the evidence for thermoregulatory temperature sensors in the mammalian spinal cord and reach the following conclusions. 1) Spinal cord temperature contributes physiologically to temperature regulation. 2) Parallel anterolateral ascending pathways transmit signals from spinal cooling and spinal warming: they overlap with the respective axon pathways of the dorsal horn neurons that are driven by peripheral cold- and warm-sensitive afferents. 3) We hypothesize that these ‘cold’ and ‘warm’ ascending pathways transmit all extracranial thermosensory information to the brain. 4) Cutaneous cold afferents can be activated not only by cooling the skin but also by cooling sites along their axons: we consider that this is functionally insignificant in vivo. 5) By a presynaptic action on their central terminals, local spinal cooling enhances neurotransmission from incoming ‘cold’ afferent action potentials to second order neurons in the dorsal horn; this effect disappears when the spinal cord is warm. 6) Spinal warm sensitivity is due to warm-sensitive miniature vesicular transmitter release from afferent terminals in the dorsal horn: this effect is powerful enough to excite second order neurons in the ‘warm’ pathway independently of any incoming sensory traffic. 7) Distinct but related presynaptic mechanisms at cold- and warm-sensitive afferent terminals can thus account for the thermoregulatory actions of spinal cord temperature. PMID:27857953

  20. Spinal cord stimulation: uses and applications.

    PubMed

    Golovac, Stanley

    2010-05-01

    Spinal cord stimulation has been used successfully for more than 40 years. The application of an electrical impulse field on to the spinal cord is used with a battery generator source and a variety of either cylindrical or paddle/plate leads. Energy is delivered from either a conventional internal programmable generator or a rechargeable style battery. Many clinical conditions such as complex regional pain syndrome, failed back spinal syndrome, and extremity neuropathic pain involving the trunk and limbs are approved for its use. This device allows patients to live a successful life without pain.

  1. Diagnosis and management of spinal cord emergencies.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, E P; Pittock, S J

    2017-01-01

    Most spinal cord injury is seen with trauma. Nontraumatic spinal cord emergencies are discussed in this chapter. These myelopathies are rare but potentially devastating neurologic disorders. In some situations prior comorbidity (e.g., advanced cancer) provides a clue, but in others (e.g., autoimmune myelopathies) it may come with little warning. Neurologic examination helps distinguish spinal cord emergencies from peripheral nervous system emergencies (e.g., Guillain-Barré), although some features overlap. Neurologic deficits are often severe and may quickly become irreversible, highlighting the importance of early diagnosis and treatment. Emergent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the entire spine is the imaging modality of choice for nontraumatic spinal cord emergencies and helps differentiate extramedullary compressive causes (e.g., epidural abscess, metastatic compression, epidural hematoma) from intramedullary etiologies (e.g., transverse myelitis, infectious myelitis, or spinal cord infarct). The MRI characteristics may give a clue to the diagnosis (e.g., flow voids dorsal to the cord in dural arteriovenous fistula). However, additional investigations (e.g., aquaporin-4-IgG) are often necessary to diagnose intramedullary etiologies and guide treatment. Emergency decompressive surgery is necessary for many extramedullary compressive causes, either alone or in combination with other treatments (e.g., radiation) and preoperative neurologic deficit is the best predictor of outcome.

  2. Inducing hindlimb locomotor recovery in adult rat after complete thoracic spinal cord section using repeated treadmill training with perineal stimulation only

    PubMed Central

    Alluin, Olivier; Delivet-Mongrain, Hugo

    2015-01-01

    Although a complete thoracic spinal cord section in various mammals induces paralysis of voluntary movements, the spinal lumbosacral circuitry below the lesion retains its ability to generate hindlimb locomotion. This important capacity may contribute to the overall locomotor recovery after partial spinal cord injury (SCI). In rats, it is usually triggered by pharmacological and/or electrical stimulation of the cord while a robot sustains the animals in an upright posture. In the present study we daily trained a group of adult spinal (T7) rats to walk with the hindlimbs for 10 wk (10 min/day for 5 days/wk), using only perineal stimulation. Kinematic analysis and terminal electromyographic recordings revealed a strong effect of training on the reexpression of hindlimb locomotion. Indeed, trained animals gradually improved their locomotion while untrained animals worsened throughout the post-SCI period. Kinematic parameters such as averaged and instant swing phase velocity, step cycle variability, foot drag duration, off period duration, and relationship between the swing features returned to normal values only in trained animals. The present results clearly demonstrate that treadmill training alone, in a normal horizontal posture, elicited by noninvasive perineal stimulation is sufficient to induce a persistent hindlimb locomotor recovery without the need for more complex strategies. This provides a baseline level that should be clearly surpassed if additional locomotor-enabling procedures are added. Moreover, it has a clinical value since intrinsic spinal reorganization induced by training should contribute to improve locomotor recovery together with afferent feedback and supraspinal modifications in patients with incomplete SCI. PMID:26203108

  3. International spinal cord injury spinal column injury basic data set.

    PubMed

    Dvorak, M F; Wing, P C; Fehlings, M G; Vaccaro, A R; Itshayek, E; Biering-Sorensen, F; Noonan, V K

    2012-11-01

    Survey of expert opinion, feedback and final consensus. To describe the development of the International Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Spinal Column Injury Basic Data Set. International working group. A committee of experts was established to select and define data elements. The data set was then disseminated to the appropriate committees and organizations for comment. All suggested revisions were considered and the final version was endorsed by both the International Spinal Cord Society (ISCoS) and the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA). The data set consists of seven variables: (1) penetrating or blunt injury, (2) spinal column injury(ies), (3) single or multiple level spinal column injury(ies), (4) spinal column injury level number, (5) spinal column injury level, (6) disc and/or posterior ligamentous complex injury and (7) traumatic translation. All variables are coded using numbers or characters. For variables 1, 2, 3, 4, 6 and 7, response categories are assigned a numeric point score. Variable 5 assigns both characters and numbers to identify level(s) of spinal injured vertebra(e). When there are several distinct and separate levels of injury, then each one is described using variables 4 through 7. The International SCI Spinal Column Injury Basic Data Set was developed to facilitate comparisons of spinal column injury data among studies, centres and countries. This data set is part of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Common Data Element project, and tools are now available to assist investigators in collecting this data in their SCI clinical studies.

  4. Selective increase of two ABC drug efflux transporters at the blood-spinal cord barrier suggests induced pharmacoresistance in ALS.

    PubMed

    Jablonski, Michael R; Jacob, Dena A; Campos, Christopher; Miller, David S; Maragakis, Nicholas J; Pasinelli, Piera; Trotti, Davide

    2012-08-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) drug efflux transporters in the CNS are predominantly localized to the luminal surface of endothelial cells in capillaries to impede CNS accumulation of xenobiotics. Inflammatory mediators and cellular stressors regulate their activity. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease of upper and lower motor neurons characterized by extensive neuroinflammation. Here we tested the hypothesis that disease-driven changes in ABC transporter expression and function occur in ALS. Given the multitude of ABC transporters with their widespread substrate recognition, we began by examining expression levels of several ABC transporters. We found a selective increase in only two transporters: P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) both at mRNA and protein levels, in the SOD1-G93A mouse model of ALS, specifically in disease-affected CNS regions. Detailed analysis revealed a similar disease-driven increase in P-gp and BCRP levels in spinal cord microvessels, indicating that their altered expression occurs at the blood spinal cord barrier. Transport activity of P-gp and BCRP increased with disease progression in spinal cord and cerebral cortex capillaries. Finally, P-gp and BCRP protein expression also increased in spinal cords of ALS patients. Preclinical drug trials in the mouse model of ALS have failed to decisively slow or arrest disease progression; pharmacoresistance imparted by ABC transporters is one possible explanation for these failures. Our observations have large implications for ALS therapeutics in humans and suggest that the obstacle provided by these transporters to drug treatments must be overcome to develop effective ALS pharmacotherapies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Search and Neutralize Factors (CSPGs) that Induce Decline in Transmission to Motoneurons from Spared Fibers after Chronic Spinal Cord Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    apply for 6- moths no-cost extension to conduct immunochemistry analyses of spinal cord tissue from this completed experiment. 15. SUBJECT TERMS...Neuroscience Forum, Prague 9/10/2013). We apply for 6- moths no-cost extension to complete post-mortem immunochemistry analyses in order to...Thus all 4 specific aims of the project have been successfully accomplished. We apply for 6- moths no-cost extension to complete post-mortem

  6. Bee Venom Acupuncture Reduces Interleukin-6, Increases Interleukin-10, and Induces Locomotor Recovery in a Model of Spinal Cord Compression.

    PubMed

    Nascimento de Souza, Raquel; Silva, Fernanda Kohn; Alves de Medeiros, Magda

    2017-06-01

    Spinal cord injuries (SCIs) initiate a series of molecular and cellular events in which inflammatory responses can lead to major neurological dysfunctions. The present study aims to investigate whether bee venom (BV) acupuncture applied at acupoints ST36 (Zusanli) and GV3 (Yaoyangquan) could minimize locomotor deficits and the magnitude of neural tissue losses, and change the balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines after an SCI by compression. Wistar rats were subjected to an SCI model by compression in which a 2-French Fogarty embolectomy catheter was inflated in the extradural space. The effects of BV acupuncture, in which 20 μL of BV diluted in saline (0.08 mg/kg) was injected at acupoints GV3 and ST36 [BV(ST36+GV3)-SCI] was compared with BV injected at nonacupoints [BV(NP)-SCI] and with no treatment [group subjected only to SCI (CTL-SCI)]. The BV(ST36+GV3)-SCI group showed a significant improvement in the locomotor performance and a decrease of lesion size compared with the controls. BV acupuncture at the ST36 + GV3 increased the expression of interleukin-10 (anti-inflammatory) at 6 hours and reduced the expression of interleukin-6 (proinflammatory) at 24 hours after SCI compared with the controls. Our results suggest that BV acupuncture can reduce neuroinflammation and induce recovery in the SCI compression model. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Roles of substance P and somatostatin on transmission of nociceptive information induced by formalin in spinal cord

    SciTech Connect

    Ohkubo, T.; Shibata, M.; Takahashi, H.; Inoki, R. )

    1990-03-01

    Nociceptive response induced by 0.5% Formalin in the hindpaw of mice had two peaks, 0-5 min (first phase) and 15-20 min (second phase). By using the distinct biphasic response, the nature of the transmitter systems activated by Formalin in the spinal cord was studied for the purpose of determining the difference of the role of substance P (SP) and somatostatin (SST). The injection of (D-Pro2, D-Trp7,9)SP, (D-Arg1, D-Pro2, D-Trp7,9, Leu11)SP and SP antiserum inhibited only the first phase response. The i.t. injection of -Aminoheptanoyl-Phe-D-Trp-Lys-(OBz)-Thr- (an SST antagonist), SST antiserum and cysteamine (an SST depletor) inhibited only the second phase. This result indicates that SP is involved in the transmission of the first phase, and SST is involved in the transmission of the second phase of the Formalin-induced nociceptive response. With regard to other nociceptive stimuli, two i.t. SP antagonists produced a significant analgesia in the hot plate and tail pinch tests but had no effect in the acetic acid writhing test. However, i.t. SST antagonist and cysteamine produced a significant analgesia in the writhing test but had no effect in the hot plate and tail pinch test. These results suggest that SP participates in the transient pain induced by such acute stimuli as hot plate, tail pinch and the first phase of Formalin response and that SST participates in the prolonged and inflammatory pain induced by stimuli such as acetic acid and the second phase response.

  8. Edaravone protects against oxygen-glucose-serum deprivation/restoration-induced apoptosis in spinal cord astrocytes by inhibiting integrated stress response

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Bin; Yan, Ting; Shen, Yi-xing; Xu, You-jia; Shen, Hai-bin; Chen, Dong; Wang, Jin-rong; He, Shuang-hua; Dong, Qi-rong; Zhang, Ai-liang

    2017-01-01

    We previously found that oxygen-glucose-serum deprivation/restoration (OGSD/R) induces apoptosis of spinal cord astrocytes, possibly via caspase-12 and the integrated stress response, which involves protein kinase R-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK), eukaryotic initiation factor 2-alpha (eIF2α) and activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4). We hypothesized that edaravone, a low molecular weight, lipophilic free radical scavenger, would reduce OGSD/R-induced apoptosis of spinal cord astrocytes. To test this, we established primary cultures of rat astrocytes, and exposed them to 8 hours/6 hours of OGSD/R with or without edaravone (0.1, 1, 10, 100 μM) treatment. We found that 100 μM of edaravone significantly suppressed astrocyte apoptosis and inhibited the release of reactive oxygen species. It also inhibited the activation of caspase-12 and caspase-3, and reduced the expression of homologous CCAAT/enhancer binding protein, phosphorylated (p)-PERK, p-eIF2α, and ATF4. These results point to a new use of an established drug in the prevention of OGSD/R-mediated spinal cord astrocyte apoptosis via the integrated stress response. PMID:28400812

  9. Prevention of deep tissue injury through muscle contractions induced by intermittent electrical stimulation after spinal cord injury in pigs

    PubMed Central

    Solis, Leandro R.; Twist, Elizabeth; Seres, Peter; Thompson, Richard B.

    2013-01-01

    Deep tissue injury (DTI) is a severe medical complication that commonly affects those with spinal cord injury. It is caused by prolonged external loading of the muscles, entrapping them between a bony prominence and the support surface. The entrapment causes excessive mechanical deformation and increases in interstitial pressure, leading to muscle breakdown deep around the bony prominences. We proposed the use of intermittent electrical stimulation (IES) as a novel prophylactic method for the prevention of DTI. In this study, we assessed the long-term effectiveness of this technique in pigs that had received a partial spinal cord injury that paralyzed one hindlimb. The pigs recovered for 2 wk postsurgery, and subsequently, their paralyzed limbs were loaded to 25% of their body weights 4 h/day for 4 consecutive days each week for 1 mo. One group of pigs (n = 3) received IES during the loading, whereas another group (n = 3) did not. DTI was quantified using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and postmortem histology. In the group that did not receive IES, MRI assessments revealed signs of tissue damage in 48% of the volume of the loaded muscle. In the group that did receive IES, only 8% of the loaded muscle volume showed signs of tissue damage. Similar findings were found through postmortem histology. This study demonstrates, for the first time, that IES may be an effective technique for preventing the formation of DTI in loaded muscles after spinal cord injury. PMID:23172030

  10. Neuroprotection and its molecular mechanism following spinal cord injury☆

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Nai-Kui; Xu, Xiao-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Acute spinal cord injury initiates a complex cascade of molecular events termed ‘secondary injury’, which leads to progressive degeneration ranging from early neuronal apoptosis at the lesion site to delayed degeneration of intact white matter tracts, and, ultimately, expansion of the initial injury. These secondary injury processes include, but are not limited to, inflammation, free radical-induced cell death, glutamate excitotoxicity, phospholipase A2 activation, and induction of extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways, which are important targets in developing neuroprotective strategies for treatment of spinal cord injury. Recently, a number of studies have shown promising results on neuroprotection and recovery of function in rodent models of spinal cord injury using treatments that target secondary injury processes including inflammation, phospholipase A2 activation, and manipulation of the PTEN-Akt/mTOR signaling pathway. The present review outlines our ongoing research on the molecular mechanisms of neuroprotection in experimental spinal cord injury and briefly summarizes our earlier findings on the therapeutic potential of pharmacological treatments in spinal cord injury. PMID:25624837

  11. Targeting Lumbar Spinal Neural Circuitry by Epidural Stimulation to Restore Motor Function After Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Minassian, Karen; McKay, W Barry; Binder, Heinrich; Hofstoetter, Ursula S

    2016-04-01

    Epidural spinal cord stimulation has a long history of application for improving motor control in spinal cord injury. This review focuses on its resurgence following the progress made in understanding the underlying neurophysiological mechanisms and on recent reports of its augmentative effects upon otherwise subfunctional volitional motor control. Early work revealed that the spinal circuitry involved in lower-limb motor control can be accessed by stimulating through electrodes placed epidurally over the posterior aspect of the lumbar spinal cord below a paralyzing injury. Current understanding is that such stimulation activates large-to-medium-diameter sensory fibers within the posterior roots. Those fibers then trans-synaptically activate various spinal reflex circuits and plurisegmentally organized interneuronal networks that control more complex contraction and relaxation patterns involving multiple muscles. The induced change in responsiveness of this spinal motor circuitry to any residual supraspinal input via clinically silent translesional neural connections that have survived the injury may be a likely explanation for rudimentary volitional control enabled by epidural stimulation in otherwise paralyzed muscles. Technological developments that allow dynamic control of stimulation parameters and the potential for activity-dependent beneficial plasticity may further unveil the remarkable capacity of spinal motor processing that remains even after severe spinal cord injuries.

  12. Traumatic induced total myelomalacia of the cervical spinal cord associated with a space-occupying subdural hematoma.

    PubMed

    Oehmichen, M; Meissner, C

    1999-01-01

    We report the case of a 20-year-old male driver who suffered from a trauma to the cervical vertebral column in a head-on collision with a tree. The injuries included subluxation of the 2nd and 3rd cervical vertebrae and fracture of the odontoid process of the axis with ventrally directed displacement of the proximal fragment and dorsally directed displacement of the distal fragment. Already at admission to hospital a space-occupying spinal subdural hematoma was diagnosed. Clinically, paraplegia was diagnosed with progressive loss of consciousness. Pneumonia led to death 40 days after the accident. Autopsy disclosed a total myelomalacia of the cervical spinal cord obviously resulting from an ischemia caused by a traumatic lesion of the dorsal truncus arteriosus spinalis as well as a compression by the spinal subdural hematoma.

  13. Imaging of Spinal Cord Injury: Acute Cervical Spinal Cord Injury, Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy, and Cord Herniation.

    PubMed

    Talekar, Kiran; Poplawski, Michael; Hegde, Rahul; Cox, Mougnyan; Flanders, Adam

    2016-10-01

    We review the pathophysiology and imaging findings of acute traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI), cervical spondylotic myelopathy, and briefly review the much less common cord herniation as a unique cause of myelopathy. Acute traumatic SCI is devastating to the patient and the costs to society are staggering. There are currently no "cures" for SCI and the only accepted pharmacologic treatment regimen for traumatic SCI is currently being questioned. Evaluation and prognostication of SCI is a demanding area with significant deficiencies, including lack of biomarkers. Accurate classification of SCI is heavily dependent on a good clinical examination, the results of which can vary substantially based upon the patient׳s condition or comorbidities and the skills of the examiner. Moreover, the full extent of a patients׳ neurologic injury may not become apparent for days after injury; by then, therapeutic response may be limited. Although magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the best imaging modality for the evaluation of spinal cord parenchyma, conventional MR techniques do not appear to differentiate edema from axonal injury. Recently, it is proposed that in addition to characterizing the anatomic extent of injury, metrics derived from conventional MRI and diffusion tensor imaging, in conjunction with the neurological examination, can serve as a reliable objective biomarker for determination of the extent of neurologic injury and early identification of patients who would benefit from treatment. Cervical spondylosis is a common disorder affecting predominantly the elderly with a potential to narrow the spinal canal and thereby impinge or compress upon the neural elements leading to cervical spondylotic myelopathy and radiculopathy. It is the commonest nontraumatic cause of spinal cord disorder in adults. Imaging plays an important role in grading the severity of spondylosis and detecting cord abnormalities suggesting myelopathy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  14. Managing chronic pain with spinal cord stimulation.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Lawrence J; Palmieri, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Since its introduction as a procedure of last resort in a terminally ill patient with intractable cancer-related pain, spinal cord stimulation has been used to effectively treat chronic pain of varied origins. Spinal cord stimulation is commonly used for control of pain secondary to failed back surgery syndrome and complex regional pain syndrome, as well as pain from angina pectoris, peripheral vascular disease, and other causes. By stimulating one or more electrodes implanted in the posterior epidural space, the patient feels paresthesias in their areas of pain, which reduces the level of pain. Pain is reduced without the side effects associated with analgesic medications. Patients have improved quality of life and improved function, with many returning to work. Spinal cord stimulation has been shown to be cost effective as compared with conservative management alone. There is strong evidence for efficacy and cost effectiveness of spinal cord stimulation in the treatment of pain associated with intractable angina, failed back surgery syndrome, and complex regional pain syndrome. In this article, we review the history and pathophysiology of spinal cord stimulation, and the evidence (or lack thereof) for efficacy in common clinical practice.

  15. TRESK contributes to pain threshold changes by mediating apoptosis via MAPK pathway in the spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jun; Lin, Wenjing; Chen, Hongtao; Fan, Youling; Yang, Chengxiang

    2016-12-17

    The mechanism underlying neuropathic pain (NP) is complex and has not been fully elucidated. The TWIK-related spinal cord K(+) (TRESK) is the major background potassium current in dorsal root ganglia (DRG), we found that mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signal pathway were activated in spinal cord accompanied by TRESK down regulation in response to NP. Therefore, we investigated whether TRESK mediates inflammation and apoptosis by MAPK pathway in the spinal cord of NP rats. SNI rats exhibited reduced TRESK expression in DRG and spinal cord and higher sensitivity to mechanical stimuli but no effect on thermal stimuli. Intrathecal injections of TRESK overexpressing adenovirus alleviated mechanical allodynia, inhibited phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and p38, and decreased inflammatory reactions and apoptosis in the spinal cords of SNI rats. Down regulation of TRESK in DRG and spinal cord was detected in normal rats after intrathecal TRESK shRNA lentivirus injection, which induced mechanical allodynia but had no effect on pain thresholds for heat stimulation. Phosphorylated ERK and p38 were increased in the spinal cord. Intrathecal injection of an ERK antagonist (PD98059) and p38 antagonist (SB203580) prevented ERK and p38 activation in the spinal cord and mechanical allodynia induced by TRESK shRNA lentivirus. In conclusion, our study clearly demonstrated an important role for TRESK in NP and that TRESK regulation contributes to pain sensitivity mediates inflammation and apoptosis by ERK and p38 MAPK signaling in the spinal cord.

  16. Vocational Rehabilitation of Persons with Spinal Cord Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poor, Charles R.

    1975-01-01

    Reviews historical development of organized vocational rehabilitation programming for the spinal cord injured in the United States. Significant factors that affect vocational rehabilitation outcomes with spinal cord injured persons are listed and discussed. (Author)

  17. How Are Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors in Children Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Children Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging How Are Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors Diagnosed in Children? Brain ... resonance angiography (MRA) or computerized tomographic angiography (CTA). Brain or spinal cord tumor biopsy Imaging tests such ...

  18. Characteristics and rehabilitation for patients with spinal cord stab injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fangyong; Zhang, Junwei; Tang, Hehu; Li, Xiang; Jiang, Shudong; Lv, Zhen; Liu, Shujia; Chen, Shizheng; Liu, Jiesheng; Hong, Yi

    2015-12-01

    [Purpose] The objective of the study was to compare the incidence, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of patients with spinal cord stab injury to those with the more common spinal cord contusion injury. [Subjects] Of patients hospitalized in China Rehabilitation Research Center from 1994 to 2014, 40 of those having a spinal cord stab injury and 50 with spinal cord contusion were selected. [Methods] The data of all patients were analyzed retrospectively. The cases were evaluated by collecting admission and discharge ASIA (American Spinal Injury Association) and ADL (activity of daily living) scores. [Results] After a comprehensive rehabilitation program, ASIA and ADL scores of patients having both spinal cord stab injury and spinal cord contusion significantly increase. However, the increases were noted to be higher in patients having a spinal cord stab injury than those having spinal cord contusion. [Conclusion] Comprehensive rehabilitation is effective both for patients having spinal cord stab injury and those with spinal cord contusion injury. However, the prognosis of patients having spinal cord stab injury is better than that of patients with spinal cord contusion.

  19. Characteristics and rehabilitation for patients with spinal cord stab injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fangyong; Zhang, Junwei; Tang, Hehu; Li, Xiang; Jiang, Shudong; Lv, Zhen; Liu, Shujia; Chen, Shizheng; Liu, Jiesheng; Hong, Yi

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The objective of the study was to compare the incidence, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of patients with spinal cord stab injury to those with the more common spinal cord contusion injury. [Subjects] Of patients hospitalized in China Rehabilitation Research Center from 1994 to 2014, 40 of those having a spinal cord stab injury and 50 with spinal cord contusion were selected. [Methods] The data of all patients were analyzed retrospectively. The cases were evaluated by collecting admission and discharge ASIA (American Spinal Injury Association) and ADL (activity of daily living) scores. [Results] After a comprehensive rehabilitation program, ASIA and ADL scores of patients having both spinal cord stab injury and spinal cord contusion significantly increase. However, the increases were noted to be higher in patients having a spinal cord stab injury than those having spinal cord contusion. [Conclusion] Comprehensive rehabilitation is effective both for patients having spinal cord stab injury and those with spinal cord contusion injury. However, the prognosis of patients having spinal cord stab injury is better than that of patients with spinal cord contusion. PMID:26834329

  20. Paralysis caused by acute myelitis in Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus strain GD VII infection is induced by CD4+ lymphocytes infiltrating the spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Kohanawa, M; Asano, M; Min, Y; Minagawa, T; Nakane, A

    1995-09-01

    Intravenous infection by Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus strain GD VII causes acute encephalomyelitis and paralysis in infected mice. However, nude mice and cyclophosphamide-treated ddY mice did not show paralysis when they were able to survive until day 20 post-infection (p.i.). Of ddY mice infected with 5 x 10(7) p.f.u./mouse, 70-80% showed symptoms of paralysis on day 20 p.i. The viral titres in the brain and spinal cord in infected mice were not significantly different between paralytic and non-paralytic mice. In all of the mice infected with the virus, CD4+ lymphocytes and CD8+ lymphocytes had infiltrated the brain on days 10, 12, 14 and 20 p.i. as demonstrated by flow cytometric analysis. In contrast, few T lymphocytes infiltrated the spinal cord in the non-paralytic mice. Administration of an anti-CD4 monoclonal antibody (MAb) or anti-T cell receptor-alpha beta MAb on day 6 p.i. inhibited paralysis until day 20 p.i., though 20% of the MAb-treated mice and 80% of the control mice showed paralysis. Administration of anti-CD8 MAb was not effective in the suppression of paralysis. The MAb treatment did not significantly augment viral replication in the spinal cord, although the viral titres in the brain of the MAb-treated mice increased significantly. After the transfer of spleen cells from infected C3H mice, the recipient mice infected with a small amount of the virus showed paralysis, though uninfected mice did not. This transfer could be blocked by CD4+ lymphocyte depletion of the donor mice. These results indicate that paralysis caused by acute myelitis in Theiler's virus strain GD VII infection is induced by CD4+ lymphocytes infiltrating the spinal cord.

  1. Scratching activates microglia in the mouse spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Dun, Siok L.; Chen, Yi-Hung; Luo, Jin J.; Cowan, Alan; Dun, Nae J.

    2014-01-01

    The present study tested the hypothesis that repetitive scratching provoked by either of two known pruritogens, compound 48/80 and 5′-guanidinonaltrindole (GNTI), is accompanied by activation of microglia cells in the mouse spinal cord. Immunohistochemical studies revealed that CD11b, a cell surface marker of microglia cells, was up-regulated in the spinal cord 10–30 min post subcutaneous (s.c.) injection of compound 48/80 (50 μg/100 μl) or GNTI (0.3 mg/kg) to the back of the mouse neck. Numerous intensely labeled CD11b immunoreactive (irCD11b) cells, with the appearance of hypertrophic reactive microglia, were distributed throughout the gray and white matter. In contrast, weakly labeled irCD11b cells were distributed in the spinal cord from mice injected with saline. Western blots showed that CD11b expression levels were significantly increased in spinal cords of mice injected s.c. with either pruritogen, reached a peak response in about 30 min, and declined toward the basal level in the ensuing 60 min. In addition, phospho-p38 (p-p38), but not p38, levels were up-regulated in spinal cords from mice injected with compound 48/80 or GNTI, with a time course parallel to that of CD11b expression. Pretreatment of the mice with nalfurafine (20 μg/kg; s.c.), a κ opioid receptor agonist that has been shown to suppress scratching, reduced CD11b and p-p38 expression induced by either pruritogen. The result demonstrates, for the first time, that scratch behavior induced by pruritogens GNTI and compound 48/80 is accompanied by a parallel activation of microglia cells in the spinal cord. PMID:25354468

  2. Scratching activates microglia in the mouse spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Dun, Siok L; Chen, Yi-Hung; Luo, Jin J; Cowan, Alan; Dun, Nae J

    2015-03-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that repetitive scratching provoked by two known pruritogens, compound 48/80 and 5'-guanidinonaltrindole (GNTI), is accompanied by activation of microglial cells in the mouse spinal cord. Immunohistochemical studies revealed that the complement receptor 3, also known as cluster determinant 11b (CD11b), a cell surface marker of microglial cells, was upregulated in the spinal cord 10-30 min after a subcutaneous (s.c.) injection of compound 48/80 (50 μg/100 μl) or GNTI (0.3 mg/kg) to the back of the mouse neck. Numerous intensely labeled CD11b-immunoreactive (CD11b-ir) cells, with the appearance of hypertrophic reactive microglia, were distributed throughout the gray and white matter. In contrast, weakly labeled CD11b-ir cells were distributed in the spinal cord from mice injected with saline. Western blots showed that CD11b expression levels were significantly increased in spinal cords of mice injected s.c. with either pruritogen, reached a peak response in about 30 min, and declined to about the basal level in the ensuing 60 min. In addition, phospho-p38 (p-p38) but not p38 levels were upregulated in spinal cords from mice injected with compound 48/80 or GNTI, with a time course parallel to that of CD11b expression. Pretreatment of the mice with nalfurafine (20 µg/kg; s.c.), a κ-opioid receptor agonist that has been shown to suppress scratching, reduced CD11b and p-p38 expression induced by either pruritogen. The results demonstrate, for the first time, that scratch behavior induced by the pruritogens GNTI and compound 48/80 is accompanied by a parallel activation of microglial cells in the spinal cord.

  3. Nociceptive plasticity inhibits adaptive learning in the spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, A R; Crown, E D; Grau, J W

    2006-08-11

    Spinal plasticity is known to play a role in central neurogenic pain. Over the last 100 years researchers have found that the spinal cord is also capable of supporting other forms of plasticity including several forms of learning. To study instrumental (response-outcome) learning in the spinal cord, we use a preparation in which spinally transected rats are given shock to the hind leg when the leg is extended. The spinal cord rapidly learns to hold the leg in a flexed position when given this controllable shock. However, if shock is independent of leg position (uncontrollable shock), subjects fail to learn. Uncontrollable shock also impairs future learning. As little as 6 min of uncontrollable shock to either the leg or the tail generates a learning deficit that lasts up to 48 h. Recent data suggest links between the learning deficit and the sensitization of pain circuits associated with inflammation or injury (central sensitization). Here, we explored whether central sensitization and the spinal learning deficit share pharmacological and behavioral features. Central sensitization enhances reactivity to mechanical stimulation (allodynia) and depends on the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR). The uncontrollable shock stimulus that generates a learning deficit produced a tactile allodynia (Exp. 1) and administration of the NMDAR antagonist MK-801 blocked induction of the learning deficit (Exp. 2). Finally, a treatment known to induce central sensitization, intradermal carrageenan, produced a spinal learning deficit (Exp. 3). The findings suggest that the induction of central sensitization inhibits selective response modifications.

  4. Spinal cord infarction: a rare cause of paraplegia.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sonali; Naidoo, Khimara; Thomas, Peter

    2014-06-25

    Spinal cord infarction is rare and represents a diagnostic challenge for many physicians. There are few reported cases worldwide with a prevalence of 1.2% of all strokes. Circulation to the spinal cord is supplied by a rich anastomosis. The anterior spinal artery supplies the anterior two thirds of the spinal cord and infarction to this area is marked by paralysis, spinothalamic sensory deficit and loss of sphincter control depending on where the lesion is. Treatment of spinal cord infarction focuses on rehabilitation with diverse outcomes. This report presents a case of acute spinal cord infarction with acquisition of MRI to aid diagnosis.

  5. Chronic prenatal stress epigenetically modifies spinal cord BDNF expression to induce sex specific visceral hypersensitivity in offspring

    PubMed Central

    Winston, John H.; Li, Qingjie; Sarna, Sushil K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a heterogeneous disorder with abdomen pain as one of the primary symptoms. The etiology of IBS remains unknown. Epidemiological studies found that a subset of these patients have a history of adverse early-life events. We tested the hypothesis that chronic prenatal stress (CPS) epigenetically enhances brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in spinal cord to aggravate colon sensitivity to colorectal distension (CRD) differentially in male and female offspring. Methods We used heterotypic intermittent chronic stress (HeICS) protocols in pregnant dams from E11 until delivery. Results CPS induced significant visceral hypersensitivity (VHS) to CRD in male and female offspring. A second exposure to HeICS in adult offspring exacerbated VHS greater in female offspring that persisted longer than in male offspring. CPS upregulated BDNF expression in the lumbar-sacral dorsal horn that correlated with the exacerbation of VHS in female, but not in male offspring. The upregulation of BDNF was due to a significant increase in RNA Pol II binding, histone H3 acetylation and significant decrease in histone deacetylase 1 association with the core promoter of BDNF in female offspring. Other chronic prenatal and neonatal stress protocols were less effective than HeICS. Conclusion & Inferences The development of visceral hypersensitivity, which contributes to the symptom of intermittent abdominal pain, is a two-step process, chronic in utero stress followed by chronic stress in adult-life. This two-step process induces aggravated and persistent colon hypersensitivity in female than in male offspring. Our preclinical model explains several clinical features in IBS patients. PMID:24588943

  6. Intrathecal infusion of BMAA induces selective motor neuron damage and astrogliosis in the ventral horn of the spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Hong Z.; Yu, Stephen; Hsu, Cheng-I; Liu, Joe; Acab, Allan; Wu, Richard; Tao, Anna; Chiang, Benjamin J.; Weiss, John H.

    2014-01-01

    The neurotoxin beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) was first identified as a “toxin of interest” in regard to the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis–Parkinsonism Dementia Complex of Guam (ALS/PDC); studies in recent years highlighting widespread environmental sources of BMAA exposure and providing new clues to toxic mechanisms have suggested possible relevance to sporadic ALS as well. However, despite clear evidence of uptake into tissues and a range of toxic effects in cells and animals, an animal model in which BMAA induces a neurodegenerative picture resembling ALS is lacking, possibly in part reflecting limited understanding of critical factors pertaining to its absorption, biodistribution and metabolism. To bypass some of these issues and ensure delivery to a key site of disease pathology, we examined effects of prolonged (30 day) intrathecal infusion in wild type (WT) rats, and rats harboring the familial ALS associated G93A SOD1 mutation, over an age range (80±2 to 110±2 days) during which the G93A rats are developing disease pathology yet remain asymptomatic. The BMAA exposures induced changes that in many ways resembles those seen in the G93A rats, with degenerative changes in ventral horn motor neurons (MNs) with relatively little dorsal horn pathology, marked ventral horn astrogliosis and increased 3-nitrotyrosine labeling in and surrounding MNs, a loss of labeling for the astrocytic glutamate transporter, GLT-1, surrounding MNs, and mild accumulation and aggregation of TDP-43 in the cytosol of some injured and degenerating MNs. Thus, prolonged intrathecal infusion of BMAA can reproduce a picture in spinal cord incorporating many of the pathological hallmarks of diverse forms of human ALS, including substantial restriction of overt pathological changes to the ventral horn, consistent with the possibility that environmental BMAA exposure could be a risk factor and/or contributor to some human disease. PMID:24918341

  7. Intrathecal infusion of BMAA induces selective motor neuron damage and astrogliosis in the ventral horn of the spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Yin, Hong Z; Yu, Stephen; Hsu, Cheng-I; Liu, Joe; Acab, Allan; Wu, Richard; Tao, Anna; Chiang, Benjamin J; Weiss, John H

    2014-11-01

    The neurotoxin beta-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) was first identified as a "toxin of interest" in regard to the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-Parkinsonism Dementia Complex of Guam (ALS/PDC); studies in recent years highlighting widespread environmental sources of BMAA exposure and providing new clues to toxic mechanisms have suggested possible relevance to sporadic ALS as well. However, despite clear evidence of uptake into tissues and a range of toxic effects in cells and animals, an animal model in which BMAA induces a neurodegenerative picture resembling ALS is lacking, possibly in part reflecting limited understanding of critical factors pertaining to its absorption, biodistribution and metabolism. To bypass some of these issues and ensure delivery to a key site of disease pathology, we examined effects of prolonged (30day) intrathecal infusion in wild type (WT) rats, and rats harboring the familial ALS associated G93A SOD1 mutation, over an age range (80±2 to 110±2days) during which the G93A rats are developing disease pathology yet remain asymptomatic. The BMAA exposures induced changes that in many ways resemble those seen in the G93A rats, with degenerative changes in ventral horn motor neurons (MNs) with relatively little dorsal horn pathology, marked ventral horn astrogliosis and increased 3-nitrotyrosine labeling in and surrounding MNs, a loss of labeling for the astrocytic glutamate transporter, GLT-1, surrounding MNs, and mild accumulation and aggregation of TDP-43 in the cytosol of some injured and degenerating MNs. Thus, prolonged intrathecal infusion of BMAA can reproduce a picture in spinal cord incorporating many of the pathological hallmarks of diverse forms of human ALS, including substantial restriction of overt pathological changes to the ventral horn, consistent with the possibility that environmental BMAA exposure could be a risk factor and/or contributor to some human disease.

  8. Causes of Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background: Knowledge of the causes of spinal cord injury (SCI) and associated factors is critical in the development of successful prevention programs. Objective: This study analyzed data from the National SCI Database (NSCID) and National Shriners SCI Database (NSSCID) in the United States to examine specific etiologies of SCI by age, sex, race, ethnicity, day and month of injury, and neurologic outcomes. Methods: NSCID and NSSCID participants who had a traumatic SCI from 2005 to 2011 with known etiology were included in the analyses (N=7,834). Thirty-seven causes of injury documented in the databases were stratified by personal characteristics using descriptive analysis. Results: The most common causes of SCI were automobile crashes (31.5%) and falls (25.3%), followed by gunshot wounds (10.4%), motorcycle crashes (6.8%), diving incidents (4.7%), and medical/surgical complications (4.3%), which collectively accounted for 83.1% of total SCIs since 2005. Automobile crashes were the leading cause of SCI until age 45 years, whereas falls were the leading cause after age 45 years. Gunshot wounds, motorcycle crashes, and diving caused more SCIs in males than females. The major difference among race/ethnicity was in the proportion of gunshot wounds. More SCIs occurred during the weekends and warmer months, which seemed to parallel the increase of motorcycle- and diving-related SCIs. Level and completeness of injury are also associated with etiology of injury. Conclusions: The present findings suggest that prevention strategies should be tailored to the targeted population and major causes to have a meaningful impact on reducing the incidence of SCI. PMID:23678280

  9. Mechanisms within the spinal cord are involved in the movement-induced attenuation of an H reflex in the dog.

    PubMed

    Misiaszek, J E; Barclay, J K; Brooke, J D

    1996-11-01

    1. H reflexes were elicited in the second interosseous muscle of the hindpaw of the anesthetized dog during passive rotation of the shank about the ipsilateral or contralateral knee. Reflexes sampled at four points in the cycle of movement were compared with stationary controls. For both the ipsilateral and contralateral limb manipulations, reflexes were significantly reduced (P < 0.05) across the cycle of movement. Position-related modulation of the reflex amplitude was not detected (P > 0.05) in either instance. 2. The experiments were then repeated after the spinal transection of each animal at the level of T13. Passive rotation about either the ipsilateral or contralateral knee significantly attenuated (P < 0.05) the H reflex across a cycle of movement in the spinal dog. There was little difference in the amount of inhibition produced by the movement between the intact and spinal animals. On average, the reflex was attenuated 29 +/- 2.4% (mean +/- SE) in the intact animals and 32 +/- 2.1% in the spinal animals. 3. It is concluded that passive rotation about the knee of either leg leads to suppression of the H reflex of the second interosseous muscle both in the ipsilateral, moving leg and the contralateral, stationary one. This reflex suppression occurs across the cycle of movement. The mediating circuitry lies within the spinal cord, caudal to T13.

  10. Surgical Neurostimulation for Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Chari, Aswin; Hentall, Ian D.; Papadopoulos, Marios C.; Pereira, Erlick A. C.

    2017-01-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating neurological condition characterized by a constellation of symptoms including paralysis, paraesthesia, pain, cardiovascular, bladder, bowel and sexual dysfunction. Current treatment for SCI involves acute resuscitation, aggressive rehabilitation and symptomatic treatment for complications. Despite the progress in scientific understanding, regenerative therapies are lacking. In this review, we outline the current state and future potential of invasive and non-invasive neuromodulation strategies including deep brain stimulation (DBS), spinal cord stimulation (SCS), motor cortex stimulation (MCS), transcutaneous direct current stimulation (tDCS) and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in the context of SCI. We consider the ability of these therapies to address pain, sensorimotor symptoms and autonomic dysregulation associated with SCI. In addition to the potential to make important contributions to SCI treatment, neuromodulation has the added ability to contribute to our understanding of spinal cord neurobiology and the pathophysiology of SCI. PMID:28208601

  11. Intractable Pruritus After Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Deborah A; Jaffee, Kenneth M; Kundu, Anjana

    2009-01-01

    Background: This report describes a young woman with incomplete traumatic cervical spinal cord injury and intractable pruritus involving her dorsal forearm. Method: Case report. Findings: Anatomic distribution of the pruritus corresponded to the dermatomal distribution of her level of spinal cord injury and vertebral fusion. Symptoms were attributed to the spinal cord injury and possible cervical root injury. Pruritus was refractory to all treatments, including topical lidocaine, gabapentin, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, intravenous Bier block, stellate ganglion block, and acupuncture. Conclusions: Further understanding of neuropathic pruritus is needed. Diagnostic workup of intractable pruritus should include advanced imaging to detect ongoing nerve root compression. If diagnostic studies suggest radiculopathy, epidural steroid injection should be considered. Because the autonomic nervous system may be involved in complex chronic pain or pruritic syndromes, sympatholysis via such techniques as stellate ganglion block might be effective. PMID:19777867

  12. Intractable pruritus after traumatic spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Crane, Deborah A; Jaffee, Kenneth M; Kundu, Anjana

    2009-01-01

    This report describes a young woman with incomplete traumatic cervical spinal cord injury and intractable pruritus involving her dorsal forearm. Case report. Anatomic distribution of the pruritus corresponded to the dermatomal distribution of her level of spinal cord injury and vertebral fusion. Symptoms were attributed to the spinal cord injury and possible cervical root injury. Pruritus was refractory to all treatments, including topical lidocaine, gabapentin, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, intravenous Bier block, stellate ganglion block, and acupuncture. Further understanding of neuropathic pruritus is needed. Diagnostic workup of intractable pruritus should include advanced imaging to detect ongoing nerve root compression. If diagnostic studies suggest radiculopathy, epidural steroid injection should be considered. Because the autonomic nervous system may be involved in complex chronic pain or pruritic syndromes, sympatholysis via such techniques as stellate ganglion block might be effective.

  13. Vascular anatomy of the spinal cord

    SciTech Connect

    Thron, A.K.

    1988-01-01

    The book summarizes the anatomic guidelines of external blood supply to the spinal cord. The basic principles of arterial supply and venous drainage are illustrated by explicit schemes for quick orientation. In the first part of the book, systematic radiologic-anatomic investigations of the superficial and deep vessels of all segments of the spinal cord are introduced. The microvascular morphology is portrayed by numerous microradiographic sections in all three dimensions without overshadowing. The three-dimensional representation of the vascular architecture illustrates elementary outlines and details of arterial territories, anastomotic cross-linking as well as the capillary system, particularly the hitherto unknown structure of the medullary venous system with its functionally important anastomoses and varying regional structures. These often now radiologic-anatomic findings are discussed as to their functional and pathophysiologic impact and constitute the basic on which to improve one's understanding of vascular syndromes of the spinal cord.

  14. PERK pathway is involved in oxygen-glucose-serum deprivation-induced NF-kB activation via ROS generation in spinal cord astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinbo; Du, Lijian

    2015-11-13

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a direct target of hypoxic/ischemic stress in astrocytes, which results in the increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Previous reports showed that ROS can activate NF-kB in spinal cord astrocytes, which occurs as a secondary injury during the pathological process of spinal cord injury (SCI). Protein kinase RNA (PKR)-like ER kinase (PERK) plays an important role in mitochondrial dysfunction. To elucidate the specific role of PERK in hypoxic/ischemic-induced NF-kB activation in spinal astrocytes, we utilized an in vitro oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) model, which showed an enhanced formation of ROS and NF-kB activation. Knockdown of PERK resulted in reduced activation of PERK and ROS generation in astrocytes under OGD conditions. Notably, the knockdown of PERK also induced NF-kB activation in astrocytes. These data suggest that PERK is required for the hypoxic/ischemic-induced-dependent regulation of ROS and that it is involved in NF-kB activation in the astrocytes.

  15. Sexuality Counseling with Clients Who Have Spinal Cord Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrow, Jeff

    1990-01-01

    Examines effects of spinal cord injury on sexuality. Discusses areas of sexual concern. Provides suggestions for treating clients with spinal cord injuries experiencing sexual difficulties. Concludes that major goal in working with clients with spinal cord injuries who have sexual difficulties should be the facilitation of a creative and…

  16. Turkish Adaptation of Spinal Cord Independence Measure--Version III

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kesiktas, Nur; Paker, Nurdan; Bugdayci, Derya; Sencan, Sureyya; Karan, Ayse; Muslumanoglu, Lutfiye

    2012-01-01

    Various rating scales have been used to assess ability in individuals with spinal cord injury. There is no specific functional assessment scale for Turkish patients with spinal cord injury. The Spinal Cord Independence Measure (SCIM) is a specific test, which has become popular in the last decade. A study was conducted to validate and evaluate the…

  17. Turkish Adaptation of Spinal Cord Independence Measure--Version III

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kesiktas, Nur; Paker, Nurdan; Bugdayci, Derya; Sencan, Sureyya; Karan, Ayse; Muslumanoglu, Lutfiye

    2012-01-01

    Various rating scales have been used to assess ability in individuals with spinal cord injury. There is no specific functional assessment scale for Turkish patients with spinal cord injury. The Spinal Cord Independence Measure (SCIM) is a specific test, which has become popular in the last decade. A study was conducted to validate and evaluate the…

  18. Sexuality Counseling with Clients Who Have Spinal Cord Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrow, Jeff

    1990-01-01

    Examines effects of spinal cord injury on sexuality. Discusses areas of sexual concern. Provides suggestions for treating clients with spinal cord injuries experiencing sexual difficulties. Concludes that major goal in working with clients with spinal cord injuries who have sexual difficulties should be the facilitation of a creative and…

  19. Delayed paraplegia after spinal cord Ischemic injury requires caspase-3 activation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kakinohana, Manabu; Kida, Kotaro; Minamishima, Shizuka; Atochin, Dmitriy N.; Huang, Paul L.; Kaneki, Masao; Ichinose, Fumito

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose Delayed paraplegia remains a devastating complication after ischemic spinal cord injury associated with aortic surgery and trauma. While apoptosis has been implicated in the pathogenesis of delayed neurodegeneration, mechanisms responsible for the delayed paraplegia remain incompletely understood. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of apoptosis in delayed motor neuron degeneration after spinal cord ischemia. Methods Mice were subjected to spinal cord ischemia induced by occlusion of the aortic arch and left subclavian artery for 5 or 9 min. Motor function in the hind limb was evaluated up to 72h after spinal cord ischemia. Histological studies were performed to detect caspase-3 activation, glial activation, and motor neuron survival in the serial spinal cord sections. To investigate the impact of caspase-3 activation on spinal cord ischemia, outcome of the spinal cord ischemia was examined in mice deficient for caspase-3. Results In wild-type mice, 9 min of spinal cord ischemia caused immediate paraplegia, whereas 5 min of ischemia caused delayed paraplegia. Delayed paraplegia after 5 min of spinal cord ischemia was associated with histological evidence of caspase-3 activation, reactive astrogliosis, microglial activation, and motor neuron loss starting around 24–48h after spinal cord ischemia. Caspase-3 deficiency prevented delayed paraplegia and motor neuron loss after 5 min of spinal cord ischemia, but not immediate paraplegia after 9 min of ischemia. Conclusion The present results suggest that caspase-3 activation is required for delayed paraplegia and motor neuron degeneration after spinal cord ischemia. PMID:21700940

  20. Vascular Defects and Spinal Cord Hypoxia in Spinal Muscular Atrophy.

    PubMed

    Somers, Eilidh; Lees, Robert D; Hoban, Katie; Sleigh, James N; Zhou, Haiyan; Muntoni, Francesco; Talbot, Kevin; Gillingwater, Thomas H; Parson, Simon H

    2016-02-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a major inherited cause of infant death worldwide. It results from mutations in a single, ubiquitously expressed gene (SMN1), with loss of lower motor neurons being the primary pathological signature. Systemic defects have also been reported in SMA patients and animal models. We investigated whether defects associated with the vasculature contribute to motor neuron pathology in SMA. Development and integrity of the capillary bed was examined in skeletal muscle and spinal cord of SMA mice, and muscle biopsies from SMA patients and controls, using quantitative morphometric approaches on immunohistochemically labeled tissue. Pimonidazole hydrochloride-based assays were used to identify functional hypoxia. The capillary bed in muscle and spinal cord was normal in presymptomatic SMA mice (postnatal day 1), but failed to match subsequent postnatal development in control littermates. At mid- and late-symptomatic time points, the extent of the vascular architecture observed in two distinct mouse models of SMA was ∼50% of that observed in control animals. Skeletal muscle biopsies from human patients confirmed the presence of developmentally similar, significant vascular depletion in severe SMA. Hypovascularity in SMA mouse spinal cord was accompanied by significant functional hypoxia and defects in the blood-spinal cord barrier. Our results indicate that vascular defects are a major feature of severe forms of SMA, present in both mouse models and patients, resulting in functional hypoxia of motor neurons. Thus, abnormal vascular development and resulting hypoxia may contribute to the pathogenesis of SMA. © 2016 American Neurological Association.

  1. Midodrine improves ejaculation in spinal cord injured men.

    PubMed

    Soler, J M; Previnaire, J G; Plante, P; Denys, P; Chartier-Kastler, E

    2007-11-01

    We evaluated the effect of the alpha1-adrenergic agonist midodrine given orally for anejaculation in spinal cord injured men. A total of 185 spinal cord injured patients who reported absent ejaculation during sexual intercourse and who failed to respond to penile vibratory stimulation were treated with midodrine 30 to 120 minutes before a new stimulation. The procedure was repeated weekly, increasing doses by 7.5 mg to a maximum of 30 mg. Cardiovascular effects were monitored throughout the procedure. Antegrade or retrograde ejaculation was achieved in 102 spinal cord injured men (64.6%). A positive response was more frequent in patients with complete lesions (American Spinal Injury Association A) and upper motor neuron lesions above T10. Midodrine induced a significant but moderate increase (maximum 10 mm Hg) in mean arterial pressure in all patients. The highest systolic blood pressure (more than 200 mm Hg) was seen in patients with quadriplegia. No other significant side effect was recorded. The average dose of midodrine required for ejaculation was 18.7 mg. Midodrine is a safe and efficient adjunct to penile vibratory stimulation for anejaculation in spinal cord injured patients.

  2. Low force contractions induce fatigue consistent with muscle mRNA expression in people with spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Petrie, Michael A.; Suneja, Manish; Faidley, Elizabeth; Shields, Richard K.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Spinal cord injury (SCI) is associated with muscle atrophy, transformation of muscle fibers to a fast fatigable phenotype, metabolic inflexibility (diabetes), and neurogenic osteoporosis. Electrical stimulation of paralyzed muscle may mitigate muscle metabolic abnormalities after SCI, but there is a risk for a fracture to the osteoporotic skeletal system. The goal of this study was to determine if low force stimulation (3 Hz) causes fatigue of chronically paralyzed muscle consistent with selected muscle gene expression profiles. We tested 29 subjects, nine with a SCI and 20 without and SCI, during low force fatigue protocol. Three SCI and three non‐SCI subjects were muscle biopsied for gene and protein expression analysis. The fatigue index (FI) was 0.21 ± 0.27 and 0.91 ± 0.01 for the SCI and non‐SCI groups, respectively, supporting that the low force protocol physiologically fatigued the chronically paralyzed muscle. The post fatigue potentiation index (PI) for the SCI group was increased to 1.60 ± 0.06 (P <0.001), while the non‐SCI group was 1.26 ± 0.02 supporting that calcium handling was compromised with the low force stimulation. The mRNA expression from genes that regulate atrophy and fast properties (MSTN, ANKRD1, MYH8, and MYCBP2) was up regulated, while genes that regulate oxidative and slow muscle properties (MYL3, SDHB, PDK2, and RyR1) were repressed in the chronic SCI muscle. MSTN, ANKRD1, MYH8, MYCBP2 gene expression was also repressed 3 h after the low force stimulation protocol. Taken together, these findings support that a low force single twitch activation protocol induces paralyzed muscle fatigue and subsequent gene regulation. These findings suggest that training with a low force protocol may elicit skeletal muscle adaptations in people with SCI. PMID:24744911

  3. Acute hemodynamic responses of spinal cord injured individuals to functional neuromuscular stimulation-induced knee extension exercise.

    PubMed

    Figoni, S F; Glaser, R M; Rodgers, M M; Hooker, S P; Ezenwa, B N; Collins, S R; Mathews, T; Suryaprasad, A G; Gupta, S C

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine and compare acute hemodynamic responses of spinal cord injured (SCI) quadriplegics (quads), and paraplegics (paras) during a graded-intensity knee extension (KE) exercise test utilizing functional neuromuscular stimulation (FNS) of paralyzed quadriceps muscles. Seven quads and seven paras (N = 14) performed a series of 4-minute stages of bilateral alternating FNS-KE exercise (approximately zero to 70 degree range of motion at the knee and 6 KE/min/leg) at ankle loads of 0, 5, 10, and 15 kg/leg. Physiologic responses were determined with open-circuit spirometry, impedance cardiography, and auscultation. Comparing rest with peak FNS-KE for both groups combined, FNS-KE exercise elicited significant (p less than 0.05) increases in oxygen uptake (130 percent), pulmonary ventilation (120 percent), respiratory exchange ratio (37 percent), arteriovenous oxygen difference (57 percent), cardiac output (32 percent), stroke volume (41 percent), mean arterial pressure (18 percent), and rate-pressure product (23 percent). Heart rate increased significantly by 11 percent from the 5- to the 15-kg/leg stages. Physiologic responses of quads and paras were very similar, except for lower (p less than 0.05) arterial pressures, rate-pressure product, and peripheral vascular resistance in quads. This graded FNS-KE exercise up to the 15-kg/leg load induced relatively small but appropriate increases in aerobic metabolism and cardiopulmonary responses that appear to be safe and easily tolerated by quads and paras. Arterial pressure needs to be monitored carefully in quads to prevent excessive hypertension or hypotension. Although FNS-KE exercise has been shown to elicit peripheral adaptations to improve muscle strength and endurance, it is probably not an effective central cardiovascular training tool for all but the least fit SCI individuals. This information is important for understanding the effects of FNS use during more complex activities such

  4. Oxytocin content of the cerebrospinal fluid of dogs and its relationship to pain induced by spinal cord compression.

    PubMed

    Brown, D C; Perkowski, S

    1998-01-01

    To determine whether oxytocin exists in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of dogs and whether the amount of oxytocin in the CSF of dogs with neck or back pain caused by spinal cord compression is significantly different than that in the CSF of clinically normal dogs. Prospective controlled study. A total of 15 purpose-bred beagles and 17 client-owned dogs. CSF was collected by needle puncture of the cerebellar medullary cistern after induction of general anesthesia. Oxytocin levels within the samples were determined through radioimmunoassay. Dogs with spinal cord compression had significantly more oxytocin in their CSF than the clinically normal dogs (13.76 +/- 2.0 pg/mL and 3.61 +/- 0.63 pg/mL, respectively; P < .0001). Dogs with chronic signs (>7 days) had significantly more oxytocin in their CSF than dogs with acute signs (<7 days) (21.60 +/- 0.86 pg/mL and 6.80 +/- 0.81 pg/mL, respectively; P < .0001). Both acutely and chronically affected dogs had significantly more oxytocin in their CSF than the controls (P < .005 and P < .0001 respectively). Dogs with neck and back pain caused by spinal cord compression have significantly more oxytocin in their CSF than clinically normal dogs. Dogs with chronic clinical signs have significantly more oxytocin in their CSF than dogs with acute clinical signs. In humans, intrathecal injection of oxytocin is effective in treating low back pain for up to 5 hours. Intrathecal oxytocin may be a logical choice for perioperative analgesia in dogs undergoing myelography because the intrathecal space is accessed for injection of contrast agent.

  5. Serotonergic transmission after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Nardone, Raffaele; Höller, Yvonne; Thomschewski, Aljoscha; Höller, Peter; Lochner, Piergiorgio; Golaszewski, Stefan; Brigo, Francesco; Trinka, Eugen

    2015-02-01

    Changes in descending serotonergic innervation of spinal neural activity have been implicated in symptoms of paralysis, spasticity, sensory disturbances and pain following spinal cord injury (SCI). Serotonergic neurons possess an enhanced ability to regenerate or sprout after many types of injury, including SCI. Current research suggests that serotonine (5-HT) release within the ventral horn of the spinal cord plays a critical role in motor function, and activation of 5-HT receptors mediates locomotor control. 5-HT originating from the brain stem inhibits sensory afferent transmission and associated spinal reflexes; by abolishing 5-HT innervation SCI leads to a disinhibition of sensory transmission. 5-HT denervation supersensitivity is one of the key mechanisms underlying the increased motoneuron excitability that occurs after SCI, and this hyperexcitability has been demonstrated to underlie the pathogenesis of spasticity after SCI. Moreover, emerging evidence implicates serotonergic descending facilitatory pathways from the brainstem to the spinal cord in the maintenance of pathologic pain. There are functional relevant connections between the descending serotonergic system from the rostral ventromedial medulla in the brainstem, the 5-HT receptors in the spinal dorsal horn, and the descending pain facilitation after tissue and nerve injury. This narrative review focussed on the most important studies that have investigated the above-mentioned effects of impaired 5-HT-transmission in humans after SCI. We also briefly discussed the promising therapeutical approaches with serotonergic drugs, monoclonal antibodies and intraspinal cell transplantation.

  6. Trigemino-cervical-spinal reflexes after traumatic spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Nardone, Raffaele; Höller, Yvonne; Orioli, Andrea; Brigo, Francesco; Christova, Monica; Tezzon, Frediano; Golaszewski, Stefan; Trinka, Eugen

    2015-05-01

    After spinal cord injury (SCI) reorganization of spinal cord circuits occur both above and below the spinal lesion. These functional changes can be determined by assessing electrophysiological recording. We aimed at investigating the trigemino-cervical reflex (TCR) and trigemino-spinal reflex (TSR) responses after traumatic SCI. TCR and TSR were registered after stimulation of the infraorbital nerve from the sternocleidomastoid, splenius, deltoid, biceps and first dorsal interosseous muscles in 10 healthy subjects and 10 subjects with incomplete cervical SCI. In the control subjects reflex responses were registered from the sternocleidomastoid, and splenium muscles, while no responses were obtained from upper limb muscles. In contrast, smaller but clear short latency EMG potentials were recorded from deltoid and biceps muscles in about half of the SCI patients. Moreover, the amplitudes of the EMG responses in the neck muscles were significantly higher in patients than in control subjects. The reflex responses are likely to propagate up the brainstem and down the spinal cord along the reticulospinal tracts and the propriospinal system. Despite the loss of corticospinal axons, synaptic plasticity in pre-existing pathways and/or formation of new circuits through sprouting processes above the injury site may contribute to the findings of this preliminary study and may be involved in the functional recovery. Trigemino-cervical-spinal reflexes can be used to demonstrate and quantify plastic changes at brainstem and cervical level following SCI. Copyright © 2014 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Vinpocetine Reduces Carrageenan-Induced Inflammatory Hyperalgesia in Mice by Inhibiting Oxidative Stress, Cytokine Production and NF-κB Activation in the Paw and Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Miyazawa, Kenji W.; Zarpelon, Ana C.; Pinho-Ribeiro, Felipe A.; Pavão-de-Souza, Gabriela F.; Casagrande, Rubia; Verri, Waldiceu A.

    2015-01-01

    Vinpocetine is a safe nootropic agent used for neurological and cerebrovascular diseases. The anti-inflammatory activity of vinpocetine has been shown in cell based assays and animal models, leading to suggestions as to its utility in analgesia. However, the mechanisms regarding its efficacy in inflammatory pain treatment are still not completely understood. Herein, the analgesic effect of vinpocetine and its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant mechanisms were addressed in murine inflammatory pain models. Firstly, we investigated the protective effects of vinpocetine in overt pain-like behavior induced by acetic acid, phenyl-p-benzoquinone (PBQ) and formalin. The intraplantar injection of carrageenan was then used to induce inflammatory hyperalgesia. Mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia were evaluated using the electronic von Frey and the hot plate tests, respectively, with neutrophil recruitment to the paw assessed by a myeloperoxidase activity assay. A number of factors were assessed, both peripherally and in the spinal cord, including: antioxidant capacity, reduced glutathione (GSH) levels, superoxide anion, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β) levels, as well as nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activation. Vinpocetine inhibited the overt pain-like behavior induced by acetic acid, PBQ and formalin (at both phases), as well as the carrageenan-induced mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia and associated neutrophil recruitment. Both peripherally and in the spinal cord, vinpocetine also inhibited: antioxidant capacity and GSH depletion; increased superoxide anion; IL-1β and TNF-α levels; and NF-κB activation. As such, vinpocetine significantly reduces inflammatory pain by targeting oxidative stress, cytokine production and NF-κB activation at both peripheral and spinal cord levels. PMID:25822523

  8. Short-term anesthesia inhibits formalin-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation in the rostral anterior cingulate cortex but not in the spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Tochiki, Keri K; Maiarù, Maria; Miller, James R C; Hunt, Stephen P; Géranton, Sandrine M

    2015-08-14

    The rostral anterior cingulate cortex (rACC) has been implicated in the negative affective response to injury, and importantly, it has been shown that activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling in the rACC contributes to the full expression of the affective component of pain in rodents. In this study, we investigated whether administration of anesthesia at the time of injury could reduce phosphorylated-ERK (PERK) expression in the rACC, which might eliminate the negative affective component of noxious stimulation. Intraplantar hindpaw formalin stimulation, an aversive event in the awake animal, was given with or without general isoflurane anesthesia, and PERK expression was subsequently quantified in the rACC using immunohistochemistry. Furthermore, as numerous studies have demonstrated the importance of spinal ERK signaling in the regulation of nociceptive behaviour, we also examined PERK in the superficial dorsal horn of the spinal cord. Formalin injection with and without short-term (<10 min) general isoflurane anesthesia induced the same level of PERK expression in spinal cord laminae I-II. However, PERK expression was significantly inhibited across all laminae of the rACC in animals anesthetized during formalin injection. The effect of anesthesia was such that levels of PERK were the same in formalin and sham treated anesthesized animals. This study is the first to demonstrate that isoflurane anesthesia can inhibit formalin-induced PERK in the rACC and therefore might eliminate the unpleasantness of restraint associated with awake hindpaw injection.

  9. Role of taurine in spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Gupta, R C; Seki, Y; Yosida, J

    2006-08-01

    Taurine is a sulfur amino acid. It is found endogenously in human and several others tissues. It is significantly in high concentration in mammals. Human body contains about 0.1% of body weight as taurine. It has a number of physiological and pharmacological actions. It is also used in the therapy of important organs dysfunctions. In spinal cord it has inhibitory effects; like antiepileptic and anti-nociceptive. Taurine also inhibits substance p induced biting and scratching behavior. In spinal cord injury elevated level of taurine has been observed. Higher level of taurine has been also recorded in SCI therapy using, known clinical agent methyl prednisolone (MP). The increased taurine concentration seems to be involved in protection and regeneration of tissues following injury. In SCI along with physical injury secondary activities also takes place which are complex in nature. Secondary activity includes vascular events and activation of neutrophils, resulting endothelial damage. Activated neutrophils; release a variety of inflammatory mediators such as myeloperoxidase (MPO), reactive oxygen species (ROS), and some others. It is believed that taurine exert its protective action through scavenging of ROS and down regulating several other inflammatory mediators like tumor necrosis factors (TNFalpha). The inside of mechanism reveals toxic substance HOCl is produced by MPO is converted to less toxic substances through scavenging action of taurine. Amino acid therapy has its own limitations and to over come such situation there is a need to develop small, simple lipophilic analogs of taurine. Use of taurine analogs has provided better results; for example, N- chloro taurine (NCT) which is a taurine derivative has exhibited therapeutic advances over taurine. Taurine and its analogs with sound experimental and clinical support may constitute a new class of therapeutic agents for SCI., and perhaps this review may provide enough material to think of this.

  10. Augmentation of Voluntary Locomotor Activity by Transcutaneous Spinal Cord Stimulation in Motor-Incomplete Spinal Cord-Injured Individuals.

    PubMed

    Hofstoetter, Ursula S; Krenn, Matthias; Danner, Simon M; Hofer, Christian; Kern, Helmut; McKay, William B; Mayr, Winfried; Minassian, Karen

    2015-10-01

    The level of sustainable excitability within lumbar spinal cord circuitries is one of the factors determining the functional outcome of locomotor therapy after motor-incomplete spinal cord injury. Here, we present initial data using noninvasive transcutaneous lumbar spinal cord stimulation (tSCS) to modulate this central state of excitability during voluntary treadmill stepping in three motor-incomplete spinal cord-injured individuals. Stimulation was applied at 30 Hz with an intensity that generated tingling sensations in the lower limb dermatomes, yet without producing muscle reflex activity. This stimulation changed muscle activation, gait kinematics, and the amount of manual assistance required from the therapists to maintain stepping with some interindividual differences. The effect on motor outputs during treadmill-stepping was essentially augmentative and step-phase dependent despite the invariant tonic stimulation. The most consistent modification was found in the gait kinematics, with the hip flexion during swing increased by 11.3° ± 5.6° across all subjects. This preliminary work suggests that tSCS provides for a background increase in activation of the lumbar spinal locomotor circuitry that has partially lost its descending drive. Voluntary inputs and step-related feedback build upon the stimulation-induced increased state of excitability in the generation of locomotor activity. Thus, tSCS essentially works as an electrical neuroprosthesis augmenting remaining motor control. Copyright © 2015 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. [The use micro-polarization in spinal cord lesions].

    PubMed

    Sheliakin, A M; Preobrazhenskaia, I G; Komantsev, V N; Makarovskiĭ, A N; Bogdanov, O V

    1998-01-01

    Transdermal micropolarization of the spinal cord was made in patients with consequences of the spinal cord injury or tuberculous spondylitis. Changes in clinical and electrophysiologic status were evaluated. It was found that local direct current through dermal electrodes promotes an improvement of both motor and autonomic functions in such patients. This corresponded to a positive dynamics both of the spinal cord state and cardiac activity. Possible mechanisms of influence of the direct current on the spinal cord as well as perspectives of application of micropolarization in spinal cord's damage are outlined.

  12. Employment Outcomes Following Spinal Cord Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engel, S.; Murphy, G. S.; Athanasou, J. A.; Hickey, L.

    1998-01-01

    A study of 83 Australian adults with spinal cord injuries found that at least 56% had worked at some time post-injury and those who were working when surveyed had done so for an average of close to 10 years. Clerical, office, and administrative occupations proved to be the most suitable. (Author/CR)

  13. Anorgasmia in anterior spinal cord syndrome.

    PubMed

    Berić, A; Light, J K

    1993-05-01

    Three male and two female patients with anorgasmia and dissociated sensory loss due to an anterior spinal cord syndrome are described. Clinical, neurophysiological and quantitative sensory evaluation revealed preservation of the large fibre dorsal column functions from the lumbosacral segments with concomitant severe dysfunction or absence of the small fibre neospinothalamic mediated functions. These findings indicate a role for the spinothalamic system in orgasm.

  14. Spinal cord compression due to vertebral hemangioma.

    PubMed

    Aksu, Gorkem; Fayda, Merdan; Saynak, Mert; Karadeniz, Ahmet

    2008-02-01

    This article presents a case of multiple vertebral hemangiomas in a 58-year-old man with pain in the dorsal region and bilateral progressive foot numbness. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed multiple vertebral hemangiomas. One hemangioma at the T7 level demonstrated epidural extension, causing spinal cord compression. After treatment with radiotherapy, the patient's symptoms improved significantly.

  15. Employment Outcomes Following Spinal Cord Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engel, S.; Murphy, G. S.; Athanasou, J. A.; Hickey, L.

    1998-01-01

    A study of 83 Australian adults with spinal cord injuries found that at least 56% had worked at some time post-injury and those who were working when surveyed had done so for an average of close to 10 years. Clerical, office, and administrative occupations proved to be the most suitable. (Author/CR)

  16. Accommodating Workers with Spinal Cord Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowler, Denetta; Batiste, Linda; Whidden, Eddie

    1998-01-01

    Examination of over 1,000 calls to the Job Accommodation Network involving workers with spinal cord injury identified the nature of the industry, job, career progression, and accessibility solutions. The number of calls increased dramatically after passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act. (SK)

  17. Simplified spinal cord phantom for evaluation of SQUID magnetospinography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Y.; Oyama, D.; Somchai, N.; Kawabata, S.; Uehara, G.

    2014-05-01

    Spinal cord functional imaging by magnetospinography (MSG) is a noninvasive diagnostic method for spinal cord diseases. However, the accuracy and spatial resolution of lesion localization by MSG have barely been evaluated in detail so far. We developed a simplified spinal cord phantom for MSG evaluation. The spinal cord phantom is composed of a cylindrical vessel filled with saline water, which acts as a model of a neck. A set of modeled vertebrae is arranged in the cylindrical vessel, which has a neural current model made from catheter electrodes. The neural current model emulates the current distribution around the activated site along the axon of the spinal cord nerve. Our MSG system was used to observe the magnetic field from the phantom; a quadrupole-like pattern of the magnetic field distribution, which is a typical distribution pattern for spinal cord magnetic fields, was successfully reproduced by the phantom. Hence, the developed spinal cord phantom can be used to evaluate MSG source analysis methods.

  18. Post-injury niches induce temporal shifts in progenitor fates to direct lesion repair after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Sellers, Drew L.; Maris, Don O.; Horner, Philip J.

    2009-01-01

    Progenitors that express NG2-proteoglycan are the predominant self-renewing cell within the CNS. NG2-progenitors replenish oligodendrocyte populations within the intact stem-cell niche, and cycling NG2-cells are among the first cells to react to CNS insults. We investigated the role of NG2-progenitors after spinal cord injury (SCI) and how bone morphogen protein (BMP) signals remodel the progressive post-injury niche. Progeny labeled by an NG2-specific reporter virus undergo a coordinated shift in differentiation profile. NG2-progeny born 24-hours post-injury (PI) produce scar-forming astrocytes and transient populations of novel phagocytic astrocytes shown to contain denatured myelin within cathepsin-D labeled endosomes, but NG2-progenitors born 7-days PI differentiate into oligodendrocytes and express myelin on processes that wrap axons. Analysis of spinal cord mRNA shows a temporal-shift in the niche-transcriptome of ligands that affect post-injury remodeling and direct progenitor differentiation. We conclude that NG2-progeny are diverse lineages that obey progressive-cues after trauma to replenish the injured niche. PMID:19458241

  19. Anti-IL-6-receptor antibody promotes repair of spinal cord injury by inducing microglia-dominant inflammation.

    PubMed

    Mukaino, Masahiko; Nakamura, Masaya; Yamada, Osamu; Okada, Seiji; Morikawa, Satoru; Renault-Mihara, Francois; Iwanami, Akio; Ikegami, Takeshi; Ohsugi, Yoshiyuki; Tsuji, Osahiko; Katoh, Hiroyuki; Matsuzaki, Yumi; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Liu, Meigen; Okano, Hideyuki

    2010-08-01

    We previously reported the beneficial effect of administering an anti-mouse IL-6 receptor antibody (MR16-1) immediately after spinal cord injury (SCI). The purpose of our present study was to clarify the mechanism underlying how MR16-1 improves motor function after SCI. Quantitative analyses of inflammatory cells using flow cytometry, and immunohistochemistry with bone marrow-chimeric mice generated by transplanting genetically marked purified hematopoietic stem cells, revealed that MR16-1 dramatically switched the central player in the post-traumatic inflammation, from hematogenous macrophages to resident microglia. This change was accompanied by alterations in the expression of relevant cytokines within the injured spinal cord; the expression of recruiting chemokines including CCL2, CCL5, and CXCL10 was decreased, while that of Granulocyte/Macrophage-Colony Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF), a known mitogen for microglia, was increased. We also showed that the resident microglia expressed higher levels of phagocytic markers than the hematogenous macrophages. Consistent with these findings, we observed significantly decreased tissue damage and reduced levels of myelin debris and Nogo-A, the axonal growth inhibitor, by MR16-1 treatment. Moreover, we observed increased axonal regeneration and/or sprouting in the MR16-1-treated mice. Our findings indicate that the functional improvement elicited by MR16-1 involves microglial functions, and provide new insights into the role of IL-6 signaling in the pathology of SCI.

  20. Orexin-B antagonized respiratory depression induced by sevoflurane, propofol, and remifentanil in isolated brainstem-spinal cords of neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Umezawa, Nobuo; Arisaka, Hirofumi; Sakuraba, Shigeki; Sugita, Takeo; Matsumoto, Akiko; Kaku, Yuki; Yoshida, Kazu-ichi; Kuwana, Shun-ichi

    2015-01-01

    Orexins (hypocretins) play a crucial role in arousal, feeding, and endocrine function. We previously reported that orexin-B activated respiratory neurons in the isolated brainstem-spinal cords of neonatal rats. We herein determined whether orexin-B antagonized respiratory depression induced by sevoflurane, propofol, or remifentanil. We recorded C4 nerve bursts as an index of inspiratory activity in a brainstem-spinal cord preparation. The preparation was superfused with a solution equilibrated with 3% sevoflurane alone for 10 min and the superfusate was then switched to a solution containing sevoflurane plus orexin-B. Sevoflurane decreased the C4 burst rate and the integrated C4 amplitude. The C4 burst rate and amplitude were reversed by 0.5 μM orexin-B, but not by 0.1 μM orexin-B. The decrease induced in the C4 burst rate by 10 μM propofol or 0.01 μM remifentanil was significantly antagonized by 0.1 μM orexin-B. Respiratory depression induced by a higher concentration (0.1 μM) of remifentanil was not restored by 0.1 μM orexin-B. These results demonstrated that orexin-B antagonized respiratory depression induced by sevoflurane, propofol, or remifentanil.

  1. Functional MRI of the thoracic spinal cord during vibration sensation.

    PubMed

    Kornelsen, Jennifer; Smith, Stephen D; McIver, Theresa A; Sboto-Frankenstein, Uta; Latta, Peter; Tomanek, Boguslaw

    2013-04-01

    To demonstrate that it is possible to acquire accurate functional magnetic resonance images from thoracic spinal cord neurons. The lower thoracic spinal dermatomes (T7-T11) on the right side of the body were mechanically stimulated by vibration for 15 participants. Neuronal responses to vibration sensation were measured in the thoracic spinal cord using a HASTE sequence on a 3 Tesla MRI system. Signal increases were observed in the corresponding lower thoracic spinal cord segments ipsilateral to the side of stimulation in the dorsal aspect of the spinal cord. This is the first study to provide proof of principle that functional imaging of the entire thoracic spinal cord is possible, by detecting neuronal activity in the thoracic spinal cord during sensory stimulation using spinal fMRI. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. A Neonatal Mouse Spinal Cord Compression Injury Model

    PubMed Central

    Züchner, Mark; Glover, Joel C.; Boulland, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) typically causes devastating neurological deficits, particularly through damage to fibers descending from the brain to the spinal cord. A major current area of research is focused on the mechanisms of adaptive plasticity that underlie spontaneous or induced functional recovery following SCI. Spontaneous functional recovery is reported to be greater early in life, raising interesting questions about how adaptive plasticity changes as the spinal cord develops. To facilitate investigation of this dynamic, we have developed a SCI model in the neonatal mouse. The model has relevance for pediatric SCI, which is too little studied. Because neural plasticity in the adult involves some of the same mechanisms as neural plasticity in early life1, this model may potentially have some relevance also for adult SCI. Here we describe the entire procedure for generating a reproducible spinal cord compression (SCC) injury in the neonatal mouse as early as postnatal (P) day 1. SCC is achieved by performing a laminectomy at a given spinal level (here described at thoracic levels 9-11) and then using a modified Yasargil aneurysm mini-clip to rapidly compress and decompress the spinal cord. As previously described, the injured neonatal mice can be tested for behavioral deficits or sacrificed for ex vivo physiological analysis of synaptic connectivity using electrophysiological and high-throughput optical recording techniques1. Earlier and ongoing studies using behavioral and physiological assessment have demonstrated a dramatic, acute impairment of hindlimb motility followed by a complete functional recovery within 2 weeks, and the first evidence of changes in functional circuitry at the level of identified descending synaptic connections1. PMID:27078037

  3. Transcutaneous electrical spinal-cord stimulation in humans.

    PubMed

    Gerasimenko, Yury; Gorodnichev, Ruslan; Moshonkina, Tatiana; Sayenko, Dimitry; Gad, Parag; Reggie Edgerton, V

    2015-09-01

    Locomotor behavior is controlled by specific neural circuits called central pattern generators primarily located at the lumbosacral spinal cord. These locomotor-related neuronal circuits have a high level of automaticity; that is, they can produce a "stepping" movement pattern also seen on electromyography (EMG) in the absence of supraspinal and/or peripheral afferent inputs. These circuits can be modulated by epidural spinal-cord stimulation and/or pharmacological intervention. Such interventions have been used to neuromodulate the neuronal circuits in patients with motor-complete spinal-cord injury (SCI) to facilitate postural and locomotor adjustments and to regain voluntary motor control. Here, we describe a novel non-invasive stimulation strategy of painless transcutaneous electrical enabling motor control (pcEmc) to neuromodulate the physiological state of the spinal cord. The technique can facilitate a stepping performance in non-injured subjects with legs placed in a gravity-neutral position. The stepping movements were induced more effectively with multi-site than single-site spinal-cord stimulation. From these results, a multielectrode surface array technology was developed. Our preliminary data indicate that use of the multielectrode surface array can fine-tune the control of the locomotor behavior. As well, the pcEmc strategy combined with exoskeleton technology is effective for improving motor function in paralyzed patients with SCI. The potential impact of using pcEmc to neuromodulate the spinal circuitry has significant implications for furthering our understanding of the mechanisms controlling locomotion and for rehabilitating sensorimotor function even after severe SCI. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Phenylbutyrate prevents disruption of blood-spinal cord barrier by inhibiting endoplasmic reticulum stress after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yulong; Ye, Libing; Zheng, Binbin; Zhu, Sipin; Shi, Hongxue; Zhang, Hongyu; Wang, Zhouguang; Wei, Xiaojie; Chen, Daqing; Li, Xiaokun; Xu, Huazi; Xiao, Jian

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the role of endocytoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress induced by spinal cord injury (SCI) in blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) disruption and the effect of phenylbutyrate (PBA) on BSCB disruption after SCI. After a moderate contusion injury at the T9 level of spinal cord with a vascular clip, PBA was immediately administered into injured rat via intraperitoneal injection (100 mg/kg) and then further treated once a day for 2 weeks for behavior test. Spinal cord was collected at 1 day post-injury for evaluation of the effects of ER stress and PBA on BSCB disruption after SCI. PBA significantly attenuated BSCB permeability and degradation of tight junction molecules such as P120, β-catenin, Occludin and Claudin5 at 1 day after injury and improved functional recovery in the rat model of trauma. The BSCB protective effect of PBA is related to the inhibition of ER stress induced by SCI. In addition, PBA significantly inhibited the increase of ER stress markers and prevents loss of tight junction and adherens junction proteins in TG-treated human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC). Taken together, our data demonstrate that therapeutic strategies targeting ER stress may be suitable for the therapy of preserving BSCB integrity after SCI. PBA may be a new candidate as a therapeutic agent for protecting SCI by a compromised BSCB. PMID:27186310

  5. Morphine Protects Spinal Cord Astrocytes from Glutamate-Induced Apoptosis via Reducing Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Wang, Chendan; Ren, Jianbo; Guo, Xiangjie; Yun, Keming

    2016-10-24

    Glutamate is not only a neurotransmitter but also an important neurotoxin in central nervous system (CNS). Chronic elevation of glutamate induces both neuronal and glial cell apoptosis. However, its effect on astrocytes is complex and still remains unclear. In this study, we investigated whether morphine, a common opioid ligand, could affect glutamate-induced apoptosis in astrocytes. Primary cultured astrocytes were incubated with glutamate in the presence/absence of morphine. It was found that morphine could reduce glutamate-induced apoptosis of astrocytes. Furthermore, glutamate activated Ca(2+) release, thereby inducing endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in astrocytes, while morphine attenuated this deleterious effect. Using siRNA to reduce the expression of κ-opioid receptor, morphine could not effectively inhibit glutamate-stimulated Ca(2+) release in astrocytes, the protective effect of morphine on glutamate-injured astrocytes was also suppressed. These results suggested that morphine could protect astrocytes from glutamate-induced apoptosis via reducing Ca(2+) overload and ER stress pathways. In conclusion, this study indicated that excitotoxicity participated in the glutamate mediated apoptosis in astrocytes, while morphine attenuated this deleterious effect via regulating Ca(2+) release and ER stress.

  6. Toll-like receptor 2-mediated alternative activation of microglia is protective after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Stirling, David P; Cummins, Karen; Mishra, Manoj; Teo, Wulin; Yong, V Wee; Stys, Peter

    2014-03-01

    Improving neurological outcome after spinal cord injury is a major clinical challenge because axons, once severed, do not regenerate but 'dieback' from the lesion site. Although microglia, the immunocompetent cells of the brain and spinal cord respond rapidly to spinal cord injury, their role in subsequent injury or repair remains unclear. To assess the role of microglia in spinal cord white matter injury we used time-lapse two-photon and spectral confocal imaging of green fluorescent protein-labelled microglia, yellow fluorescent protein-labelled axons, and Nile Red-labelled myelin of living murine spinal cord and revealed dynamic changes in white matter elements after laser-induced spinal cord injury in real time. Importantly, our model of acute axonal injury closely mimics the axonopathy described in well-characterized clinically relevant models of spinal cord injury including contusive-, compressive- and transection-based models. Time-lapse recordings revealed that microglia were associated with some acute pathophysiological changes in axons and myelin acutely after laser-induced spinal cord injury. These pathophysiological changes included myelin and axonal spheroid formation, spectral shifts in Nile Red emission spectra in axonal endbulbs detected with spectral microscopy, and 'bystander' degeneration of axons that survived the initial injury, but then succumbed to secondary degeneration. Surprisingly, modulation of microglial-mediated release of neurotoxic molecules failed to protect axons and myelin. In contrast, sterile stimulation of microglia with the specific toll-like receptor 2 agonist Pam2CSK4 robustly increased the microglial response to ablation, reduced secondary degeneration of central myelinated fibres, and induced an alternative (mixed M1:M2) microglial activation profile. Conversely, Tlr2 knock out: Thy1 yellow fluorescent protein double transgenic mice experienced greater axonal dieback than littermate controls. Thus, promoting an alternative

  7. Tyrosine phosphorylation of the N-Methyl-D-Aspartate receptor 2B subunit in spinal cord contributes to remifentanil-induced postoperative hyperalgesia: the preventive effect of ketamine

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Experimental and clinical studies showed that intraoperative infusionof remifentanil has been associated with postoperative hyperalgesia. Previous reports suggested that spinal N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors may contribute to the development and maintenance of opioid-induced hyperalgesia. In the present study, we used a rat model of postoperative pain to investigate the role of tyrosine phosphorylation of NMDA receptor 2B (NR2B) subunit in spinal cord in the postoperative hyperalgesia induced by remifentanil and the intervention of pretreatment with ketamine. Results Intraoperative infusion of remifentanil (0.04 mg/kg, subcutaneous) significantly enhanced mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia induced by the plantar incision during the postoperative period (each lasting between 2 h and 48 h), which was attenuated by pretreatment with ketamine (10 mg/kg, subcutaneous). Correlated with the pain behavior changes, immunocytochemical and western blotting experiments in our study revealed that there was a marked increase in NR2B phosphorylation at Tyr1472 in the superficial dorsal horn after intraoperative infusion of remifentanil, which was attenuated by pretreatment with ketamine. Conclusions This study provides direct evidence that tyrosine phosphorylation of the NR2B at Tyr1472 in spinal dosal horn contributes to postoperative hyperalgesia induced by remifentanil and supports the potential therapeutic value of ketamine for improving postoperative hyperalgesia induced by remifentanil. PMID:20042082

  8. Metastatic carcinoid tumour with spinal cord compression.

    PubMed

    Scott, Si; Antwi-Yeboah, Y; Bucur, Sd

    2012-07-01

    Carcinoid tumours are rare with an incidence of 5.25/100,000. They predominantly originate in the gastrointestinal tract (50-60%) or bronchopulmonary system (25-30%). Common sites of metastasis are lymph nodes, liver, lungs and bone. Spinal metastasis are rare, but has been reported in patients with symptoms of spinal cord compression including neurological deficits. We report a rare case of carcinoid metastasis with spinal cord compression, in a 63-year-old man, presenting with a one-year history of back pain without any neurological symptoms. The patient underwent a two-level decompressive laminectomy of T10 and T11 as well as piecemeal tumour resection. Post-operatively the patient made a good recovery without complications.

  9. Metastatic carcinoid tumour with spinal cord compression

    PubMed Central

    Scott, SI; Antwi-Yeboah, Y; Bucur, SD

    2012-01-01

    Carcinoid tumours are rare with an incidence of 5.25/100,000. They predominantly originate in the gastrointestinal tract (50-60%) or bronchopulmonary system (25-30%). Common sites of metastasis are lymph nodes, liver, lungs and bone. Spinal metastasis are rare, but has been reported in patients with symptoms of spinal cord compression including neurological deficits. We report a rare case of carcinoid metastasis with spinal cord compression, in a 63-year-old man, presenting with a one-year history of back pain without any neurological symptoms. The patient underwent a two-level decompressive laminectomy of T10 and T11 as well as piecemeal tumour resection. Post-operatively the patient made a good recovery without complications. PMID:24960730

  10. Radiation Dose-Volume Effects in the Spinal Cord

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, John P.; Kogel, Albert J. van der; Schultheiss, Timothy E.

    2010-03-01

    Dose-volume data for myelopathy in humans treated with radiotherapy (RT) to the spine is reviewed, along with pertinent preclinical data. Using conventional fractionation of 1.8-2 Gy/fraction to the full-thickness cord, the estimated risk of myelopathy is <1% and <10% at 54 Gy and 61 Gy, respectively, with a calculated strong dependence on dose/fraction (alpha/beta = 0.87 Gy.) Reirradiation data in animals and humans suggest partial repair of RT-induced subclinical damage becoming evident about 6 months post-RT and increasing over the next 2 years. Reports of myelopathy from stereotactic radiosurgery to spinal lesions appear rare (<1%) when the maximum spinal cord dose is limited to the equivalent of 13 Gy in a single fraction or 20 Gy in three fractions. However, long-term data are insufficient to calculate a dose-volume relationship for myelopathy when the partial cord is treated with a hypofractionated regimen.

  11. Inflammatory cascades mediate synapse elimination in spinal cord compression

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cervical compressive myelopathy (CCM) is caused by chronic spinal cord compression due to spondylosis, a degenerative disc disease, and ossification of the ligaments. Tip-toe walking Yoshimura (twy) mice are reported to be an ideal animal model for CCM-related neuronal dysfunction, because they develop spontaneous spinal cord compression without any artificial manipulation. Previous histological studies showed that neurons are lost due to apoptosis in CCM, but the mechanism underlying this neurodegeneration was not fully elucidated. The purpose of this study was to investigate the pathophysiology of CCM by evaluating the global gene expression of the compressed spinal cord and comparing the transcriptome analysis with the physical and histological findings in twy mice. Methods Twenty-week-old twy mice were divided into two groups according to the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings: a severe compression (S) group and a mild compression (M) group. The transcriptome was analyzed by microarray and RT-PCR. The cellular pathophysiology was examined by immunohistological analysis and immuno-electron microscopy. Motor function was assessed by Rotarod treadmill latency and stride-length tests. Results Severe cervical calcification caused spinal canal stenosis and low functional capacity in twy mice. The microarray analysis revealed 215 genes that showed significantly different expression levels between the S and the M groups. Pathway analysis revealed that genes expressed at higher levels in the S group were enriched for terms related to the regulation of inflammation in the compressed spinal cord. M1 macrophage-dominant inflammation was present in the S group, and cysteine-rich protein 61 (Cyr61), an inducer of M1 macrophages, was markedly upregulated in these spinal cords. Furthermore, C1q, which initiates the classical complement cascade, was more upregulated in the S group than in the M group. The confocal and electron microscopy observations indicated

  12. Reflex conditioning: A new strategy for improving motor function after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiang Yang; Chen, Yi; Wang, Yu; Thompson, Aiko; Carp, Jonathan S.; Segal, Richard L.; Wolpaw, Jonathan R.

    2010-01-01

    Spinal reflex conditioning changes reflex size, induces spinal cord plasticity, and modifies locomotion. Appropriate reflex conditioning can improve walking in rats after spinal cord injury (SCI). Reflex conditioning offers a new therapeutic strategy for restoring function in people with SCI. This approach can address the specific deficits of individuals with SCI by targeting specific reflex pathways for increased or decreased responsiveness. In addition, once clinically significant regeneration can be achieved, reflex conditioning could provide a means of re-educating the newly (and probably imperfectly) reconnected spinal cord. PMID:20590534

  13. Learning from the spinal cord: How the study of spinal cord plasticity informs our view of learning

    PubMed Central

    Grau, James W.

    2013-01-01

    The paper reviews research examining whether and how training can induce a lasting change in spinal cord function. A framework for the study of learning, and some essential issues in experimental design, are discussed. A core element involves delayed assessment under common conditions. Research has shown that brain systems can induce a lasting (memory-like) alteration in spinal function. Neurons within the lower (lumbosacral) spinal cord can also adapt when isolated from the brain by means of a thoracic transection. Using traditional learning paradigms, evidence suggests that spinal neurons support habituation and sensitization as well as Pavlovian and instrumental conditioning. At a neurobiological level, spinal systems support phenomena (e.g., long-term potentiation), and involve mechanisms (e.g., NMDA mediated plasticity, protein synthesis) implicated in brain-dependent learning and memory. Spinal learning also induces modulatory effects that alter the capacity for learning. Uncontrollable/unpredictable stimulation disables the capacity for instrumental learning and this effect has been linked to the cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF). Predictable/controllable stimulation enables learning and counters the adverse effects of uncontrollable simulation through a process that depends upon brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Finally, uncontrollable, but not controllable, nociceptive stimulation impairs recovery after a contusion injury. A process-oriented approach (neurofunctionalism) is outlined that encourages a broader view of learning phenomena. PMID:23973905

  14. Overview of Spinal Cord Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... information from a specific dermatome is carried by sensory nerve fibers to the spinal nerve root of a specific ... the back of the thigh, is carried by sensory nerve fibers to the 2nd sacral vertebra (S2) nerve root. ...

  15. Multiple sclerosis of the spinal cord: Magnetic resonance appearance

    SciTech Connect

    Thielen, K.R.; Miller, G.M.

    1996-05-01

    To determine the MR appearance of spinal cord multiple sclerosis (MS) plaques in patients presenting with myclopathy by using a high-field (1.5 T) imager. We studied 119 patients who underwent high-field (1.5 T) MR studies of the spinal cord for evaluation of myelopathy. All 119 patients were thought to have possible findings of spinal cord MS at the time of the MRI interpretation. Sixty-four plaques were studied in 47 patients with clinically definite MS and adequate quality MRI. Of these patients 68% had a single spinal cord plaque, 19% had two plaques, and 13% had three or more plaques. Sixty-two percent of the plaques occurred in the cervical spinal cord and most frequently involved the posterior (41%) and lateral (25%) aspects of the spinal cord. None of the 64 lesions involved the entire thickness of the spinal cord. The lesion length varied from 2 to 60 mm, with 84% of the lesions <15 mm in length. The spinal cord diameter was unchanged in 84% of plaques, enlarged at the level of the lesion in 14%, and atrophic in 2%. Just over half (55%) of the plaques enhanced with intravenously administered gadolinium. Of the patients who received synchronous head and spinal cord examinations on the same day, 24% had normal findings on the MR study of the head. Follow-up spinal cord studies were available in nine patients. New lesions developed in two patients, while previously described lesions resolved. In three patients only new lesions developed. In four patients no change occurred in the existing number of cord plaques. Spinal cord demyelinating plaques present as well-circumscribed foci of increased T2 signal that asymmetrically involve the spinal cord parenchyma. Knowledge of their usual appearance may prevent unnecessary biopsy. An MR examination of the head may confirm the imaging suggestion of spinal cord demyelinating disease, because up to 76% of patients have abnormal intracranial findings. 15 refs., 7 figs.

  16. Dopamine is produced in the rat spinal cord and regulates micturition reflex after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Hou, Shaoping; Carson, David M; Wu, Di; Klaw, Michelle C; Houlé, John D; Tom, Veronica J

    2016-11-01

    Dopamine (DA) neurons in the mammalian central nervous system are thought to be restricted to the brain. DA-mediated regulation of urinary activity is considered to occur through an interaction between midbrain DA neurons and the pontine micturition center. Here we show that DA is produced in the rat spinal cord and modulates the bladder reflex. We observed numerous tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)(+) neurons in the autonomic nuclei and superficial dorsal horn in L6-S3 spinal segments. These neurons are dopamine-β-hydroxylase (DBH)(-) and some contain detectable dopamine decarboxylase (DDC), suggesting their capacity to produce DA. Interestingly, following a complete thoracic spinal cord injury (SCI) to interrupt supraspinal projections, more TH(+) neurons emerged in the lumbosacral spinal cord, coincident with a sustained, low level of DA expression there and a partially recovered micturition reflex. Non-selective blockade of spinal DA receptors reduced bladder activity whereas activation of spinal D2-like receptors increased bladder activity and facilitated voiding. Additionally, depletion of lumbosacral TH(+) neurons with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) decreased bladder non-voiding contractions and voiding efficiency. Furthermore, injecting the transsynaptic neuronal tracer pseudorabies virus (PRV) into the bladder detrusor labeled TH(+) cells in the lumbosacral cord, confirming their involvement in spinal micturition reflex circuits. These results illustrate that DA is synthesized in the rat spinal cord; plasticity of lumbosacral TH(+) neurons following SCI may contribute to DA expression and modulate the spinal bladder reflex. Thus, spinally-derived DA and receptors could be a novel therapeutic target to improve micturition recovery after SCI.

  17. Dopamine is produced in the rat spinal cord and regulates micturition reflex after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Shaoping; Carson, David M.; Wu, Di; Klaw, Michelle C.; Houlé, John D.; Tom, Veronica J.

    2016-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) neurons in the mammalian central nervous system are thought to be restricted to the brain. DA-mediated regulation of urinary activity is considered to occur through an interaction between midbrain DA neurons and the pontine micturition center. Here we show that DA is produced in the rat spinal cord and modulates the bladder reflex. We observed numerous tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)+ neurons in the autonomic nuclei and superficial dorsal horn in L6–S3 spinal segments. These neurons are dopamine-β-hydroxylase (DBH)− and some contain detectable dopamine decarboxylase (DDC), suggesting their capacity to produce DA. Interestingly, following a complete thoracic spinal cord injury (SCI) to interrupt supraspinal projections, more TH+ neurons emerged in the lumbosacral spinal cord, coincident with a sustained, low level of DA expression there and a partially recovered micturition reflex. Non-selective blockade of spinal DA receptors reduced bladder activity whereas activation of spinal D2-like receptors increased bladder activity and facilitated voiding. Additionally, depletion of lumbosacral TH+ neurons with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) decreased bladder non-voiding contractions and voiding efficiency. Furthermore, injecting the transsynaptic neuronal tracer pseudorabies virus (PRV) into the bladder detrusor labeled TH+ cells in the lumbosacral cord, confirming their involvement in spinal micturition reflex circuits. These results illustrate that DA is synthesized in the rat spinal cord; plasticity of lumbosacral TH+ neurons following SCI may contribute to DA expression and modulate the spinal bladder reflex. Thus, spinally-derived DA and receptors could be a novel therapeutic target to improve micturition recovery after SCI. PMID:26655672

  18. Long-term production of BDNF and NT-3 induced by A91-immunization after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Martiñón, Susana; García-Vences, Elisa; Toscano-Tejeida, Diana; Flores-Romero, Adrian; Rodriguez-Barrera, Roxana; Ferrusquia, Manuel; Hernández-Muñoz, Rolando E; Ibarra, Antonio

    2016-06-30

    After spinal cord (SC)-injury, a non-modulated immune response contributes to the damage of neural tissue. Protective autoimmunity (PA) is a T cell mediated, neuroprotective response induced after SC-injury. Immunization with neural-derived peptides (INDP), such as A91, has shown to promote-in vitro-the production of neurotrophic factors. However, the production of these molecules has not been studied at the site of injury. In order to evaluate these issues, we performed four experiments in adult female Sprague-Dawley rats. In the first one, brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) concentrations were evaluated at the site of lesion 21 days after SC-injury. BDNF and NT-3 were significantly increased in INDP-treated animals. In the second experiment, proliferation of anti-A91 T cells was assessed at chronic stages of injury. In this case, we found a significant proliferation of these cells in animals subjected to SC-injury + INDP. In the third experiment, we explored the amount of BDNF and NT3 at the site of injury in the chronic phase of rats subjected to either SC-contusion (SCC; moderate or severe) or SC-transection (SCT; complete or incomplete). The animals were treated with INDP immediately after injury. Rats subjected to moderate contusion or incomplete SCT showed significantly higher levels of BDNF and NT-3 as compared to PBS-immunized ones. In rats with severe SCC and complete SCT, BDNF and NT-3 concentrations were barely detected. Finally, in the fourth experiment we assessed motor function recovery in INDP-treated rats with moderate SC-injury. Rats immunized with A91 showed a significantly higher motor recovery from the first week and up to 4 months after SC-injury. The results of this study suggest that PA boosted by immunization with A91 after moderate SC-injury can exert its benefits even at chronic stages, as shown by long-term production of BDNF and NT-3 and a substantial improvement in motor recovery.

  19. Combined transplantation of GDAsBMP and hr-decorin in spinal cord contusion repair

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Liang; Li, Jianjun; Chen, Liang; Zhang, Hong; Yuan, Li; Davies, Stephen JA

    2013-01-01

    Following spinal cord injury, astrocyte proliferation and scar formation are the main factors inhibiting the regeneration and growth of spinal cord axons. Recombinant decorin suppresses inflammatory reactions, inhibits glial scar formation, and promotes axonal growth. Rat models of T8 spinal cord contusion were created with the NYU impactor and these models were subjected to combined transplantation of bone morphogenetic protein-4-induced glial-restricted precursor-derived astrocytes and human recombinant decorin transplantation. At 28 days after spinal cord contusion, double-immunofluorescent histochemistry revealed that combined transplantation inhibited the early inflammatory response in injured rats. Furthermore, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, which was secreted by transplanted cells, protected injured axons. The combined transplantation promoted axonal regeneration and growth of injured motor and sensory neurons by inhibiting astrocyte proliferation and glial scar formation, with astrocytes forming a linear arrangement in the contused spinal cord, thus providing axonal regeneration channels. PMID:25206533

  20. Activation of Lysophosphatidic Acid Receptor Type 1 Contributes to Pathophysiology of Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Santos-Nogueira, Eva; López-Serrano, Clara; Hernández, Joaquim; Lago, Natalia; Astudillo, Alma M.; Balsinde, Jesús; Estivill-Torrús, Guillermo; de Fonseca, Fernando Rodriguez; Chun, Jerold

    2015-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is an extracellular lipid mediator involved in many physiological functions that signals through six known G-protein-coupled receptors (LPA1–LPA6). A wide range of LPA effects have been identified in the CNS, including neural progenitor cell physiology, astrocyte and microglia activation, neuronal cell death, axonal retraction, and development of neuropathic pain. However, little is known about the involvement of LPA in CNS pathologies. Herein, we demonstrate for the first time that LPA signaling via LPA1 contributes to secondary damage after spinal cord injury. LPA levels increase in the contused spinal cord parenchyma during the first 14 d. To model this potential contribution of LPA in the spinal cord, we injected LPA into the normal spinal cord, revealing that LPA induces microglia/macrophage activation and demyelination. Use of a selective LPA1 antagonist or mice lacking LPA1 linked receptor-mediated signaling to demyelination, which was in part mediated by microglia. Finally, we demonstrate that selective blockade of LPA1 after spinal cord injury results in reduced demyelination and improvement in locomotor recovery. Overall, these results support LPA–LPA1 signaling as a novel pathway that contributes to secondary damage after spinal cord contusion in mice and suggest that LPA1 antagonism might be useful for the treatment of acute spinal cord injury. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT This study reveals that LPA signaling via LPA receptor type 1 activation causes demyelination and functional deficits after spinal cord injury. PMID:26180199

  1. Spinal cord grey matter segmentation challenge.

    PubMed

    Prados, Ferran; Ashburner, John; Blaiotta, Claudia; Brosch, Tom; Carballido-Gamio, Julio; Cardoso, Manuel Jorge; Conrad, Benjamin N; Datta, Esha; Dávid, Gergely; Leener, Benjamin De; Dupont, Sara M; Freund, Patrick; Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A M Gandini; Grussu, Francesco; Henry, Roland; Landman, Bennett A; Ljungberg, Emil; Lyttle, Bailey; Ourselin, Sebastien; Papinutto, Nico; Saporito, Salvatore; Schlaeger, Regina; Smith, Seth A; Summers, Paul; Tam, Roger; Yiannakas, Marios C; Zhu, Alyssa; Cohen-Adad, Julien

    2017-03-07

    An important image processing step in spinal cord magnetic resonance imaging is the ability to reliably and accurately segment grey and white matter for tissue specific analysis. There are several semi- or fully-automated segmentation methods for cervical cord cross-sectional area measurement with an excellent performance close or equal to the manual segmentation. However, grey matter segmentation is still challenging due to small cross-sectional size and shape, and active research is being conducted by several groups around the world in this field. Therefore a grey matter spinal cord segmentation challenge was organised to test different capabilities of various methods using the same multi-centre and multi-vendor dataset acquired with distinct 3D gradient-echo sequences. This challenge aimed to characterize the state-of-the-art in the field as well as identifying new opportunities for future improvements. Six different spinal cord grey matter segmentation methods developed independently by various research groups across the world and their performance were compared to manual segmentation outcomes, the present gold-standard. All algorithms provided good overall results for detecting the grey matter butterfly, albeit with variable performance in certain quality-of-segmentation metrics. The data have been made publicly available and the challenge web site remains open to new submissions. No modifications were introduced to any of the presented methods as a result of this challenge for the purposes of this publication.

  2. MP4- and MOG:35-55-induced EAE in C57BL/6 mice differentially targets brain, spinal cord and cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Kuerten, Stefanie; Kostova-Bales, Dilyana A; Frenzel, Lukas P; Tigno, Justine T; Tary-Lehmann, Magdalena; Angelov, Doychin N; Lehmann, Paul V

    2007-09-01

    Mechanism-oriented studies of EAE rely mostly on gene-modified mice on the C57BL/6 background. Here we report that MP4-induced EAE displays characteristic differences in CNS pathology as compared to MOG peptide 35-55-elicited disease. While in the latter, the topology of CNS infiltration remained unchanged throughout the disease, in MP4-induced EAE it was dynamic and stage-dependent shifting from the brain to the spinal cord and finally to the cerebellum. Unlike in the MOG peptide model, the frequencies and sizes of CNS lesions in MP4-induced disease showed a clear correlation with clinical disease severity. These characteristic features of MP4-induced EAE may contribute to modelling the complex spectrum of disease manifestations seen in MS.

  3. MP4- and MOG:35–55-induced EAE in C57BL/6 mice differentially targets brain, spinal cord and cerebellum⋄

    PubMed Central

    Kuerten, Stefanie; Kostova-Bales, Dilyana A.; Frenzel, Lukas P.; Tigno, Justine T.; Tary-Lehmann, Magdalena; Angelov, Doychin N.; Lehmann, Paul V.

    2007-01-01

    Mechanism-oriented studies of EAE rely mostly on gene-modified mice on the C57BL/6 background. Here we report that MP4-induced EAE displays characteristic differences in CNS pathology as compared to MOG peptide 35–55-elicited disease. While in the latter, the topology of CNS infiltration remained unchanged throughout the disease, in MP4-induced EAE it was dynamic and stage-dependent shifting from the brain to the spinal cord and finally to the cerebellum. Unlike in the MOG peptide model, the frequencies and sizes of CNS lesions in MP4-induced disease showed a clear correlation with clinical disease severity. These characteristic features of MP4-induced EAE may contribute to modelling the complex spectrum of disease manifestations seen in MS. PMID:17655940

  4. Autocrine fibronectin from differentiating mesenchymal stem cells induces the neurite elongation in vitro and promotes nerve fiber regeneration in transected spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiang; Ma, Yuan-Huan; Chen, Yuan-Feng; Qiu, Xue-Cheng; Wu, Jin-Lang; Ling, Eng-Ang; Zeng, Yuan-Shan

    2016-08-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) expression is temporally and spatially regulated during the development of stem cells. We reported previously that fibronectin (FN) secreted by bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) was deposited on the surface of gelatin sponge (GS) soon after culture. In this study, we aimed to assess the function of accumulated FN on neuronal differentiating MSCs as induced by Schwann cells (SCs) in three dimensional transwell co-culture system. The expression pattern and amount of FN of differentiating MSCs was examined by immunofluorescence, Western blot and immunoelectron microscopy. The results showed that FN accumulated inside GS scaffold, although its mRNA expression in MSCs was progressively decreased during neural induction. MSC-derived neuron-like cells showed spindle-shaped cell body and long extending processes on FN-decorated scaffold surface. However, after blocking of FN function by application of monoclonal antibodies, neuron-like cells showed flattened cell body with short and thick neurites, together with decreased expression of integrin β1. In vivo transplantation study revealed that autocrine FN significantly facilitated endogenous nerve fiber regeneration in spinal cord transection model. Taken together, the present results showed that FN secreted by MSCs in the early stage accumulated on the GS scaffold and promoted the neurite elongation of neuronal differentiating MSCs as well as nerve fiber regeneration after spinal cord injury. This suggests that autocrine FN has a dynamic influence on MSCs in a three dimensional culture system and its potential application for treatment of traumatic spinal cord injury. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1902-1911, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Autocrine fibronectin from differentiating mesenchymal stem cells induces the neurite elongation in vitro and promotes nerve fiber regeneration in transected spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Xiang; Ma, Yuan‐huan; Chen, Yuan‐feng; Qiu, Xue‐cheng; Wu, Jin‐lang; Ling, Eng‐Ang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Extracellular matrix (ECM) expression is temporally and spatially regulated during the development of stem cells. We reported previously that fibronectin (FN) secreted by bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) was deposited on the surface of gelatin sponge (GS) soon after culture. In this study, we aimed to assess the function of accumulated FN on neuronal differentiating MSCs as induced by Schwann cells (SCs) in three dimensional transwell co‐culture system. The expression pattern and amount of FN of differentiating MSCs was examined by immunofluorescence, Western blot and immunoelectron microscopy. The results showed that FN accumulated inside GS scaffold, although its mRNA expression in MSCs was progressively decreased during neural induction. MSC‐derived neuron‐like cells showed spindle‐shaped cell body and long extending processes on FN‐decorated scaffold surface. However, after blocking of FN function by application of monoclonal antibodies, neuron‐like cells showed flattened cell body with short and thick neurites, together with decreased expression of integrin β1. In vivo transplantation study revealed that autocrine FN significantly facilitated endogenous nerve fiber regeneration in spinal cord transection model. Taken together, the present results showed that FN secreted by MSCs in the early stage accumulated on the GS scaffold and promoted the neurite elongation of neuronal differentiating MSCs as well as nerve fiber regeneration after spinal cord injury. This suggests that autocrine FN has a dynamic influence on MSCs in a three dimensional culture system and its potential application for treatment of traumatic spinal cord injury. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1902–1911, 2016. PMID:26991461

  6. Update on traumatic acute spinal cord injury. Part 2.

    PubMed

    Mourelo Fariña, M; Salvador de la Barrera, S; Montoto Marqués, A; Ferreiro Velasco, M E; Galeiras Vázquez, R

    2017-02-01

    The aim of treatment in acute traumatic spinal cord injury is to preserve residual neurologic function, avoid secondary injury, and restore spinal alignment and stability. In this second part of the review, we describe the management of spinal cord injury focusing on issues related to short-term respiratory management, where the preservation of diaphragmatic function is a priority, with prediction of the duration of mechanical ventilation and the need for tracheostomy. Surgical assessment of spinal injuries based on updated criteria is discussed, taking into account that although the type of intervention depends on the surgical team, nowadays treatment should afford early spinal decompression and stabilization. Within a comprehensive strategy in spinal cord injury, it is essential to identify and properly treat patient anxiety and pain associated to spinal cord injury, as well as to prevent and ensure the early diagnosis of complications secondary to spinal cord injury (thromboembolic disease, gastrointestinal and urinary disorders, pressure ulcers).

  7. [Role of tumor necrosis factor-alpha in spinal cord injury of rabbits with decompression sickness].

    PubMed

    Wang, Cuicui; Liu, Xiaohong; Qi, Ruixia; Cao, Yongcheng; Mao, Ruiqi; Bi, Liquan; Geng, Ming

    2015-10-01

    To observe the pathological changes in rabbits with spinal cord injury induced by decompression sickness (DCS), and to investigate the role of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) in spinal cord injury induced by DCS. Rabbits were randomly divided into normal control group, DCS group, and safe decompression group. The rabbit model of DCS was established. Light microscopy, real-time PCR, and immunohistochemical method were used to observe the pathomorphological changes in the thoracolumbar spinal cord and the mRNA and protein expression of TNF-α, respectively. The terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) was used to observe the apoptosis in the spinal cord. In the DCS group, cavities formed in the white matter of spinal cord and gliosis occurred around necrotic areas. Moreover, the mRNA and protein expression of TNF-α was significantly higher in the DCS group than in the normal control group and the safe decompression group (P<0.01). The results of TUNEL showed that the number of positive apoptotic cells was significantly larger in the DCS group than in the normal control group and the safe decompression group (P<0.05). Apoptosis plays an important role in spinal cord injury induced by DCS. In the early stage of DCS, the massive release of TNF-α initiates apoptosis and contributes to the pathological changes in spinal cord injury induced by DCS.

  8. Prefrontal cortex and spinal cord mediated anti-neuropathy and analgesia induced by Sarcosine, a glycine-T1 transporter inhibitor☆

    PubMed Central

    Centeno, Maria V.; Mutso, Amelia; Millecamps, Magali; Apkarian, A.Vania

    2009-01-01

    Sarcosine is a competitive inhibitor of glycine type 1 transporter. We hypothesized that it may have analgesic and anti-neuropathic efficacy by a dual action: affecting neurotransmission in the prefrontal cortex as well as within the spinal cord. In rats with spared nerve injury (SNI) oral sarcosine reduced mechanical sensitivity for the injured limb (anti-neuropathy or anti-allodynia) as well as for the uninjured limb (analgesia), showing better dose efficacy for the injured limb. Intrathecal administration of sarcosine was more effective in reducing mechanical sensitivity for the uninjured paw. In contrast, prefrontal cortex infusions of sarcosine acutely reduced mechanical sensitivity for the injured paw. Repeated daily oral sarcosine induced anti-neuropathy, observed only after days of repeated treatment; this long term effect disappeared a few days after treatment cessation. The findings indicate that manipulating glycine T1 transporter at multiple central sites can induce acute analgesia, as well as acute and long-term reduction in neuropathic pain behavior. Analgesic effects seem primarily mediated through spinal cord circuitry while anti-neuropathic effects through prefrontal cortex circuitry, most likely through distinct molecular pathways. The results suggest that such an approach may provide a novel venue for treating clinical pain conditions. PMID:19577367

  9. FasL, Fas, and death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) proteins are recruited to membrane rafts after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Davis, Angela R; Lotocki, George; Marcillo, Alex E; Dietrich, W Dalton; Keane, Robert W

    2007-05-01

    The Fas/CD95 receptor-ligand system plays an essential role in apoptosis that contributes to secondary damage after spinal cord injury (SCI), but the mechanism regulating the efficiency of FasL/Fas signaling in the central nervous system (CNS) is unknown. Here, FasL/Fas signaling complexes in membrane rafts were investigated in the spinal cord of adult female Fischer rats subjected to moderate cervical SCI and sham operation controls. In sham-operated animals, a portion of FasL, but not Fas was present in membrane rafts. SCI resulted in FasL and Fas translocation into membrane raft microdomains where Fas associates with the adaptor proteins Fas-associated death domain (FADD), caspase-8, cellular FLIP long form (cFLIPL ), and caspase-3, forming a death-inducing signaling complex (DISC). Moreover, SCI induced expression of Fas in clusters around the nucleus in both neurons and astrocytes. The formation of the DISC signaling platform leads to rapid activation of initiator caspase-8 and effector caspase-3, and the modification of signaling intermediates such as FADD and cFLIP(L) . Thus, FasL/Fas-mediated signaling after SCI is similar to Fas expressing Type I cell apoptosis.

  10. Cholinergic neuron-like cells derived from bone marrow stromal cells induced by tricyclodecane-9-yl-xanthogenate promote functional recovery and neural protection after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chunhui; Shao, Jing; Su, Le; Zhao, Jing; Bi, Jianzhong; Yang, Shaonan; Zhang, Shangli; Gao, Jiangang; Miao, Junying

    2013-01-01

    The rate of neuronal differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) in vivo is very low; therefore, it is necessary to elevate the number of BMSC-derived neurons to cure neurodegenerative diseases. We previously reported that tricyclodecane-9-yl-xanthogenate (D609), an inhibitor of phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC), induced BMSCs to differentiate into neuron-like cells in vitro. However, the neuronal type is not clear, and it is still unknown whether these neuron-like cells possess physiological properties of functional neurons and whether they can contribute to the recovery of neuron dysfunction. To answer these questions, we investigated their characteristics by detecting neuronal function-related neurotransmitters and calcium image. The results showed that these cells exhibited functional cholinergic neurons in vitro. Transplantation of these cholinergic neuron-like cells promoted the recovery of spinal cord-injured mice, and they were more effective than BMSCs. The number of cholinergic neurons was increased after injection with BMSC-derived cholinergic neuron-like cells, indicating their high differentiation rate in vivo. Moreover, the proportion of cholinergic neurons in host cells and secretion of acetylcholine were increased, and preservation of neurofilament was also observed in the lesion of mice implanted with BMSC-derived neurons, suggesting the neuronal protection of BMSC-derived neurons. Our findings provide both a simple method to induce the differentiation of BMSCs into cholinergic neuron-like cells and a putative strategy for the therapy of spinal cord injuries.

  11. Gene therapy approaches for spinal cord injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bright, Corinne

    As the biomedical engineering field expands, combination technologies are demonstrating enormous potential for treating human disease. In particular, intersections between the rapidly developing fields of gene therapy and tissue engineering hold promise to achieve tissue regeneration. Nonviral gene therapy uses plasmid DNA to deliver therapeutic proteins in vivo for extended periods of time. Tissue engineering employs biomedical materials, such as polymers, to support the regrowth of injured tissue. In this thesis, a combination strategy to deliver genes and drugs in a polymeric scaffold was applied to a spinal cord injury model. In order to develop a platform technology to treat spinal cord injury, several nonviral gene delivery systems and polymeric scaffolds were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Nonviral vector trafficking was evaluated in primary neuronal culture to develop an understanding of the barriers to gene transfer in neurons and their supporting glia. Although the most efficient gene carrier in vitro differed from the optimal gene carrier in vivo, confocal and electron microscopy of these nonviral vectors provided insights into the interaction of these vectors with the nucleus. A novel pathway for delivering nanoparticles into the nuclei of neurons and Schwann cells via vesicle trafficking was observed in this study. Reporter gene expression levels were evaluated after direct and remote delivery to the spinal cord, and the optimal nonviral vector, dose, and delivery strategy were applied to deliver the gene encoding the basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) to the spinal cord. An injectable and biocompatible gel, composed of the amphiphillic polymer poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(epsilon-caprolactone)-poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG-PCL-PEG) was evaluated as a drug and gene delivery system in vitro, and combined with the optimized nonviral gene delivery system to treat spinal cord injury. Plasmid DNA encoding the bFGF gene and the therapeutic NEP1--40 peptide

  12. Peripheral inflammation undermines the plasticity of the isolated spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Hook, Michelle A; Huie, John R; Grau, James W

    2008-02-01

    Peripheral capsaicin treatment induces molecular changes that sensitize the responses of nociceptive neurons in the spinal dorsal horn. The current studies demonstrate that capsaicin also undermines the adaptive plasticity of the spinal cord, rendering the system incapable of learning a simple instrumental task. In these studies, male rats are transected at the second thoracic vertebra and are tested 24 to 48 hours later. During testing, subjects receive shock to one hindleg when it is extended (controllable stimulation). Rats quickly learn to maintain the leg in a flexed position. Rats that have been injected with capsaicin (1% or 3%) in the hindpaw fail to learn, even when tested on the leg contralateral to the injection. This learning deficit lasts at least 24 hours. Interestingly, training with controllable electrical stimulation prior to capsaicin administration protects the spinal cord against the maladaptive effects. Rats pretrained with controllable stimulation do not display a learning deficit or tactile allodynia. Moreover, controllable stimulation, combined with naltrexone, reverses the capsaicin-induced deficit. These data suggest that peripheral inflammation, accompanying spinal cord injuries, might have an adverse effect on recovery. Copyright (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved.

  13. Increases in mRNA and DREAM protein expression in the rat spinal cord after formalin induced pain.

    PubMed

    Long, Idris; Suppian, Rapeah; Ismail, Zalina

    2011-03-01

    Downstream Regulatory Element Antagonist Modulator (DREAM) protein modulates pain by regulating prodynorphin gene transcription. Therefore, we investigate the changes of mRNA and DREAM protein in relation to the mRNA and prodynorphin protein expression on the ipsilateral side of the rat spinal cord after formalin injection (acute pain model). DREAM like immunoreactivity (DLI) was not significantly different between C and F groups. However, we detected the upregulation of mean relative DREAM protein level in the nuclear but not in the cytoplasmic extract in the F group. These effects were consistent with the upregulation of the relative DREAM mRNA level. Prodynorphin like immunoreactivity (PLI) expression increased but the relative prodynorphin mRNA level remained unchanged. In conclusion, we suggest that upregulation of DREAM mRNA and protein expression in the nuclear compartment probably has functional consequences other than just the repression of prodynorphin gene. It is likely that these mechanisms are important in the modulation of pain.

  14. Critical care of traumatic spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xiaofeng; Kowalski, Robert G; Sciubba, Daniel M; Geocadin, Romergryko G

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 11 000 people suffer traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI) in the United States, each year. TSCI incidences vary from 13.1 to 52.2 per million people and the mortality rates ranged from 3.1 to 17.5 per million people. This review examines the critical care of TSCI. The discussion will focus on primary and secondary mechanisms of injury, spine stabilization and immobilization, surgery, intensive care management, airway and respiratory management, cardiovascular complication management, venous thromboembolism, nutrition and glucose control, infection management, pressure ulcers and early rehabilitation, pharmacologic cord protection, and evolving treatment options including the use of pluripotent stem cells and hypothermia.

  15. Peroxynitrite generated in the rat spinal cord induces oxidation and nitration of proteins: reduction by Mn (III) tetrakis (4-benzoic acid) porphyrin.

    PubMed

    Bao, Feng; DeWitt, Douglas S; Prough, Donald S; Liu, Danxia

    2003-01-15

    To determine whether peroxynitrite at the concentration and duration present after spinal cord injury induces protein oxidation and nitration in vivo, the peroxynitrite donor 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1) was administered into the gray matter of the rat spinal cord for 5 hr. The cords were removed at 6, 12, 24, and 48 hr after SIN-1 exposure, immunohistochemically stained with antibodies to dinitrophenyl (DNP) and nitrotyrosine (Ntyr), markers of protein oxidation and nitration, respectively, and the immunostained neurons were counted. The percentages of DNP-positive (P = 0.023-0.002) and Ntyr-positive (P < 0.001 for all) neurons were significantly higher in the SIN-1-exposed groups than in the ACSF controls at each time, suggesting that peroxynitrite induced intracellular oxidation and nitration of proteins. The percentages of DNP- and Ntyr-positive neurons were not significantly different over time in either SIN-1- or ACSF-exposed groups (P = 0.20-1.00). The percentage of DNP-positive neurons was 7.6 +/- 3% to 12 +/- 4.2% at 6-24 hr, and it was 14 +/- 2% to 19 +/- 2% at 6-24 hr for Ntyr-positive neurons after SIN-1-exposure, whereas both ranged over 2-3% in ACSF controls. Mn (III) tetrakis (4-benzoic acid) porphyrin (MnTBAP, a broad-spectrum scavenger of reactive species) significantly reduced the percentages of DNP- and Ntyr-positive neurons (P = 0.04 and 0.002, respectively) compared to a SIN-1-exposed, untreated group at 24 hr after SIN-1 exposure. There were no significant differences between MnTBAP-treated and ACSF controls (P = 0.7 for DNP and 0.2 for Ntyr). These results further demonstrate peroxynitrite-induced protein oxidation and nitration and the efficiency of MnTBAP in scavenging peroxynitrite.

  16. Autologous bone marrow-derived cell therapy combined with physical therapy induces functional improvement in chronic spinal cord injury patients.

    PubMed

    El-Kheir, Wael Abo; Gabr, Hala; Awad, Mohamed Reda; Ghannam, Osama; Barakat, Yousef; Farghali, Haithem A M A; El Maadawi, Zeinab M; Ewes, Ibrahim; Sabaawy, Hatem E

    2014-04-01

    Spinal cord injuries (SCI) cause sensory loss and motor paralysis. They are normally treated with physical therapy, but most patients fail to recover due to limited neural regeneration. Here we describe a strategy in which treatment with autologous adherent bone marrow cells is combined with physical therapy to improve motor and sensory functions in early stage chronic SCI patients. In a phase I/II controlled single-blind clinical trial (clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT00816803), 70 chronic cervical and thoracic SCI patients with injury durations of at least 12 months were treated with either intrathecal injection(s) of autologous adherent bone marrow cells combined with physical therapy or with physical therapy alone. Patients were evaluated with clinical and neurological examinations using the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Impairment Scale (AIS), electrophysiological somatosensory-evoked potential, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and functional independence measurements. Chronic cervical and thoracic SCI patients (15 AIS A and 35 AIS B) treated with autologous adherent bone marrow cells combined with physical therapy showed functional improvements over patients in the control group (10 AIS A and 10 AIS B) treated with physical therapy alone, and there were no long-term cell therapy-related side effects. At 18 months posttreatment, 23 of the 50 cell therapy-treated cases (46%) showed sustained functional improvement. Compared to those patients with cervical injuries, a higher rate of functional improvement was achieved in thoracic SCI patients with shorter durations of injury and smaller cord lesions. Therefore, when combined with physical therapy, autologous adherent bone marrow cell therapy appears to be a safe and promising therapy for patients with chronic SCI of traumatic origin. Randomized controlled multicenter trials are warranted.

  17. Is hydrocephalus after spinal cord injury really caused by the injured spinal cord? Two case reports and a literature review.

    PubMed

    Chrastina, J; Novák, Z; Feitová, V

    Posttraumatic hydrocephalus caused by cerebrospinal fluid circulation disturbances frequently complicates the clinical course and treatment after craniocerebral injury. Hydrocephalus complicating spinal cord injury is only exceptionally reported. The paper presents two cases of complete cervical spinal cord injury with subsequent development of hydrocephalus. The analysis of both cases and literature data confirmed the dominant role of non-spinal factors in the development of hydrocephalus after spinal cord injury. Despite the exceptional occurrence of hydrocephalus after spinal cord injury, this diagnosis should be considered in cases of delayed deterioration of a patient with cervical spinal cord injury, particularly if cerebrospinal fluid space abnormalities and posttraumatic subarachnoid haemorrhage are present. spinal cord injury hydrocephalus subarachnoid hemorrhage Blakes pouch cyst neuroendoscopy.

  18. Hodgkin disease with spinal cord compression.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vineeta; Srivastava, Arvind; Bhatia, Baldev

    2009-10-01

    Hodgkin disease is a nodal disease. Spinal cord or root compression is a rare complication and usually seen in the setting of progressive, advanced disease. We report 2 cases of Hodgkin disease in pediatric patients who presented with neurologic signs. One patient had paravertebral masses and involvement of thoracic vertebrae, which was initially misdiagnosed as spinal tuberculosis. The second patient who presented with paraplegia and bladder and bowel involvement had an epidural mass with collapse of thoracic vertebra. Lymph node biopsy revealed Hodgkin disease, mixed cellularity in both the cases. Both were treated with chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy.

  19. Spinal cord testing: auditing for quality assurance.

    PubMed

    Marr, J A; Reid, B

    1991-04-01

    A quality assurance audit of spinal cord testing as documented by staff nurses was carried out. Twenty-five patient records were examined for accuracy of documented testing and compared to assessments performed by three investigators. A pilot study established interrater reliability of a tool that was designed especially for this study. Results indicated staff nurses failed to meet pre-established 100% standard in all categories of testing when compared with investigator's findings. Possible reasons for this disparity are discussed as well as indications for modifications in the spinal testing record, teaching program and preset standards.

  20. Spinal Cord Stimulation for Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    pain of postherpetic neuralgia, which is a persistent burning pain and hyperesthesia along the distribution of a cutaneous nerve after an attack of herpes zoster, is also managed with SCS. For each condition, SCS is considered as a pain management therapy only after conventional pain therapies, including pharmacological, nonpharmacological, and surgical treatments, if applicable, have been attempted and have failed. The Technology The SCS technology consists of 3 implantable components: a pulse generator, an extension cable, and a lead (a small wire). The pulse generator is the power source for the spinal cord stimulator. It generates low-voltage electrical pulses. The extension cable connects the pulse generator to the lead. The lead is a small, insulated wire that has a set of electrodes at one end. The lead is placed into the epidural space on the posterior aspect of the spinal cord, and the electrodes are positioned at the level of the nerve roots innervating the painful area. An electrical current from the electrodes induces a paresthesia, or a tingling sensation that masks the pain. Before SCS is initiated, candidates must have psychological testing to rule out major psychological illness, drug habituation, and issues of secondary gain that can negatively influence the success of the therapy. Successful candidates will have a SCS test stimulation period (trial period) to assess their responsiveness to SCS. The test stimulation takes about 1 week to complete, and candidates who obtain at least 50% pain relief during this period are deemed suitable to receive a permanent implantation of a spinal cord stimulator Review Strategy The Medical Advisory Secretariat (MAS) reviewed all published health technology assessments of spinal cord stimulation. Following this, a literature search was conducted from 2000 to January, 2005 and a systematic review of the literature was completed. The primary outcome for the systematic review was pain relief. Secondary outcomes included

  1. Spinal Cord Tolerance for Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sahgal, Arjun; Ma Lijun; Gibbs, Iris; Gerszten, Peter C.; Ryu, Sam; Soltys, Scott; Weinberg, Vivian; Wong Shun; Chang, Eric; Fowler, Jack; Larson, David A.

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: Dosimetric data are reported for five cases of radiation-induced myelopathy after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) to spinal tumors. Analysis per the biologically effective dose (BED) model was performed. Methods and Materials: Five patients with radiation myelopathy were compared to a subset of 19 patients with no radiation myelopathy post-SBRT. In all patients, the thecal sac was contoured to represent the spinal cord, and doses to the maximum point, 0.1-, 1-, 2-, and 5-cc volumes, were analyzed. The mean normalized 2-Gy-equivalent BEDs (nBEDs), calculated using an alpha/beta value of 2 for late toxicity with units Gy 2/2, were compared using the t test and analysis of variance test. Results: Radiation myelopathy was observed at the maximum point with doses of 25.6 Gy in two fractions, 30.9 Gy in three fractions, and 14.8, 13.1, and 10.6 Gy in one fraction. Overall, there was a significant interaction between patient subsets and volume based on the nBED (p = 0.0003). Given individual volumes, a significant difference was observed for the mean maximum point nBED (p = 0.01). Conclusions: The maximum point dose should be respected for spine SBRT. For single-fraction SBRT 10 Gy to a maximum point is safe, and up to five fractions an nBED of 30 to 35 Gy 2/2 to the thecal sac also poses a low risk of radiation myelopathy.

  2. SCT: Spinal Cord Toolbox, an open-source software for processing spinal cord MRI data.

    PubMed

    De Leener, Benjamin; Lévy, Simon; Dupont, Sara M; Fonov, Vladimir S; Stikov, Nikola; Louis Collins, D; Callot, Virginie; Cohen-Adad, Julien

    2017-01-15

    For the past 25 years, the field of neuroimaging has witnessed the development of several software packages for processing multi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) to study the brain. These software packages are now routinely used by researchers and clinicians, and have contributed to important breakthroughs for the understanding of brain anatomy and function. However, no software package exists to process mpMRI data of the spinal cord. Despite the numerous clinical needs for such advanced mpMRI protocols (multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injury, cervical spondylotic myelopathy, etc.), researchers have been developing specific tools that, while necessary, do not provide an integrative framework that is compatible with most usages and that is capable of reaching the community at large. This hinders cross-validation and the possibility to perform multi-center studies. In this study we introduce the Spinal Cord Toolbox (SCT), a comprehensive software dedicated to the processing of spinal cord MRI data. SCT builds on previously-validated methods and includes state-of-the-art MRI templates and atlases of the spinal cord, algorithms to segment and register new data to the templates, and motion correction methods for diffusion and functional time series. SCT is tailored towards standardization and automation of the processing pipeline, versatility, modularity, and it follows guidelines of software development and distribution. Preliminary applications of SCT cover a variety of studies, from cross-sectional area measures in large databases of patients, to the precise quantification of mpMRI metrics in specific spinal pathways. We anticipate that SCT will bring together the spinal cord neuroimaging community by establishing standard templates and analysis procedures.

  3. The regenerative effects of electromagnetic field on spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Ross, Christina L; Syed, Ishaq; Smith, Thomas L; Harrison, Benjamin S

    2017-01-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is typically the result of direct mechanical impact to the spine, leading to fracture and/or dislocation of the vertebrae along with damage to the surrounding soft tissues. Injury to the spinal cord results in disruption of axonal transmission of signals. This primary trauma causes secondary injuries that produce immunological responses such as neuroinflammation, which perpetuates neurodegeneration and cytotoxicity within the injured spinal cord. To date there is no FDA-approved pharmacological agent to prevent the development of secondary SCI and induce regenerative processes aimed at healing the spinal cord and restoring neurological function. An alternative method to electrically activate spinal circuits is the application of a noninvasive electromagnetic field (EMF) over intact vertebrae. The EMF method of modulating molecular signaling of inflammatory cells emitted in the extra-low frequency range of <100 Hz, and field strengths of <5 mT, has been reported to decrease inflammatory markers in macrophages, and increase endogenous mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) proliferation and differentiation rates. EMF has been reported to promote osteogenesis by improving the effects of osteogenic media, and increasing the proliferation of osteoblasts, while inhibiting osteoclast formation and increasing bone matrix in vitro. EMF has also been shown to increase chondrogenic markers and collagen and induce neural differentiation, while increasing cell viability by over 50%. As advances are made in stem cell technologies, stabilizing the cell line after differentiation is crucial to SCI repair. Once cell-seeded scaffolds are implanted, EMF may be applied outside the wound for potential continued adjunct treatment during recovery.

  4. Involvement of the chemokine CCL3 and the purinoceptor P2X7 in the spinal cord in paclitaxel-induced mechanical allodynia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Paclitaxel is an effective chemotherapeutic agent widely used for the treatment of solid tumors. The major dose-limiting toxicity of paclitaxel is peripheral neuropathy. The mechanisms underlying the development and maintenance of paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy are still unclear, and there are no currently established effective treatments. Accumulating evidence in models of neuropathic pain in which peripheral nerves are lesioned has implicated spinal microglia and chemokines in pain hypersensitivity, but little is know about their roles in chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy. In the present study, we investigated the role of CC-chemokine ligand 3 (CCL3) in the spinal cord in the development and maintenance of mechanical allodynia using a rat model of paclitaxel-induced neuropathy. Findings Repeated intravenous administration of paclitaxel induced a marked decrease in paw withdrawal threshold in response to mechanical stimulation (mechanical allodynia). In these rats, the number of microglia in the spinal dorsal horn (SDH) was significantly increased. Paclitaxel-treated rats showed a significant increase in the expression of mRNAs for CCL3 and its receptor CCR5 in the SDH. Intrathecal administration of a CCL3-neutralizing antibody not only attenuated the development of paclitaxel-induced mechanical allodynia but also reversed its maintenance. Paclitaxel also upregulated expression of purinoceptor P2X7 receptors (P2X7Rs), which have been implicated in the release of CCL3 from microglia, in the SDH. The selective P2X7R antagonist A438079 had preventive and reversal effects on paclitaxel-induced allodynia. Conclusions Our findings suggest a contribution of CCL3 and P2X7Rs in the SDH to paclitaxel-induced allodynia and may provide new therapeutic targets for paclitaxel-induced painful neuropathy. PMID:25127716

  5. Effects of DA-9701, a Novel Prokinetic Agent, on Phosphorylated Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase Expression in the Dorsal Root Ganglion and Spinal Cord Induced by Colorectal Distension in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Pyo; Lee, Kang Nyeong; Lee, Hang Lak; Jun, Dae Won; Yoon, Byung Chul; Choi, Ho Soon; Hwang, Se Jin; Lee, Seo Eun

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims DA-9701, a standardized extract of Pharbitis Semen and Corydalis Tuber, is a new prokinetic agent that exhibits an analgesic effect on the abdomen. We investigated whether DA-9701 affects visceral pain induced by colorectal distension (CRD) in rats. Methods A total of 21 rats were divided into three groups: group A (no CRD+no drug), group B (CRD+no drug), and group C (CRD+DA-9701). Expression of pain-related factors, substance P (SP), c-fos, and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK) in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and spinal cord was determined by immunohistochemical staining and Western blotting. Results The proportions of neurons in the DRG and spinal cord expressing SP, c-fos, and p-ERK were higher in group B than in group A. In the group C, the proportion of neurons in the DRG and spinal cord expressing p-ERK was lower than that in group B. Western blot results for p-ERK in the spinal cord indicated a higher level of expression in group B than in group A and a lower level of expression in group C than in group B. Conclusions DA-9701 may decrease visceral pain via the downregulation of p-ERK in the DRG and spinal cord. PMID:24672654

  6. Repair therapies in spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed

    Tederko, Piotr; Krasuski, Marek; Kiwerski, Jerzy; Nyka, Izabela; Białoszewski, Dariusz

    2009-01-01

    Spinal cord repair therapies (SCRT) are experimental treatments which are attracting a growing interest among both spinal cord injury sufferers and their families as well as physicians and physiotherapists. Basing on current professional literature, this article presents the most important SCRT strategies. The majority of currently developed SCRTs are at the stage of experimental in vitro or animal studies. Few of these studies are in the early clinical trial stage or are being offered as non-standard commercial health care services. Basing on a review of the literature, it can be stated that currently there are few studies which meet the criterion of reliability, and their results make possible an objective assessment of the safety and efficacy of SCRT. Available study results are insufficient to confirm the advisability of widespread application of these methods.

  7. Hydrogels in Spinal Cord Injury Repair Strategies

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Nowadays there are at present no efficient therapies for spinal cord injury (SCI), and new approaches have to be proposed. Recently, a new regenerative medicine strategy has been suggested using smart biomaterials able to carry and deliver cells and/or drugs in the damaged spinal cord. Among the wide field of emerging materials, research has been focused on hydrogels, three-dimensional polymeric networks able to swell and absorb a large amount of water. The present paper intends to give an overview of a wide range of natural, synthetic, and composite hydrogels with particular efforts for the ones studied in the last five years. Here, different hydrogel applications are underlined, together with their different nature, in order to have a clearer view of what is happening in one of the most sparkling fields of regenerative medicine. PMID:22816020

  8. Thoracic spinal cord compression by a tophus.

    PubMed

    Ntsiba, Honoré; Makosso, Edouard; Moyikoua, Armand

    2010-03-01

    We report a case of thoracic (T10) spinal cord compression by a tophus in a patient with known chronic gout. Spastic paraplegia developed gradually over 6 months in this 43-year-old man with hypertension, alcohol abuse, and chronic gouty arthritis with tophi. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography visualized an intradural nodule measuring 1.5cm in diameter at the level of T10, as well as geodes in the left T10 lamina and left T9-T10 articular processes. The nodule was removed surgically and shown by histological examination to be a tophus. The neurological impairments resolved rapidly and completely. We found about 60 similar cases in the literature. Spinal cord compression in a patient with chronic gout can be caused by a tophus. Copyright 2010 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Neural plasticity after spinal cord injury☆

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jian; Yang, Xiaoyu; Jiang, Lianying; Wang, Chunxin; Yang, Maoguang

    2012-01-01

    Plasticity changes of uninjured nerves can result in a novel neural circuit after spinal cord injury, which can restore sensory and motor functions to different degrees. Although processes of neural plasticity have been studied, the mechanism and treatment to effectively improve neural plasticity changes remain controversial. The present study reviewed studies regarding plasticity of the central nervous system and methods for promoting plasticity to improve repair of injured central nerves. The results showed that synaptic reorganization, axonal sprouting, and neurogenesis are critical factors for neural circuit reconstruction. Directed functional exercise, neurotrophic factor and transplantation of nerve-derived and non-nerve-derived tissues and cells can effectively ameliorate functional disturbances caused by spinal cord injury and improve quality of life for patients. PMID:25774179

  10. Therapeutic Antibodies for Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Tang, Dan-Yang; Zhao, Wei-Jiang

    2017-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a long-lasting damage in the spinal cord that leads to paraparesis, paraplegia, quadriplegia and other lifetime disabilities. The underlying mechanisms responsible for the failure of axonal regeneration after SCI remain only partially understood. Although a spectrum of medical treatments has been made available for this disease, the therapeutic effects remain disappointing. The emergence of antibody treatment has paved a new pathway for the management of SCI. In this current review, we summarized the application of antibodies in SCI in studies of myelin repair, neuroprotection, axon outgrowth, and anti-immune reaction. In the meantime, the combination treatment of the antibody with other reagents or stem cell transplant was also reviewed. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  11. Cardiac dysfunctions following spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Sandu, AM; Popescu, M; Iacobini, MA; Stoian, R; Neascu, C; Popa, F

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this article is to analyze cardiac dysfunctions occurring after spinal cord injury (SCI). Cardiac dysfunctions are common complications following SCI. Cardiovascular disturbances are the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in both acute and chronic stages of SCI. We reviewed epidemiology of cardiac disturbances after SCI, and neuroanatomy and pathophysiology of autonomic nervous system, sympathetic and parasympathetic. SCI causes disruption of descendent pathways from central control centers to spinal sympathetic neurons, originating into intermediolateral nuclei of T1–L2 spinal cord segments. Loss of supraspinal control over sympathetic nervous system results in reduced overall sympathetic activity below the level of injury and unopposed parasympathetic outflow through intact vagal nerve. SCI associates significant cardiac dysfunction. Impairment of autonomic nervous control system, mostly in patients with cervical or high thoracic SCI, causes cardiac dysrrhythmias, especially bradycardia and, rarely, cardiac arrest, or tachyarrhytmias and hypotension. Specific complication dependent on the period of time after trauma like spinal shock and autonomic dysreflexia are also reviewed. Spinal shock occurs during the acute phase following SCI and is a transitory suspension of function and reflexes below the level of the injury. Neurogenic shock, part of spinal shock, consists of severe bradycardia and hypotension. Autonomic dysreflexia appears during the chronic phase, after spinal shock resolution, and it is a life–threatening syndrome of massive imbalanced reflex sympathetic discharge occurring in patients with SCI above the splanchnic sympathetic outflow (T5–T6). Besides all this, additional cardiac complications, such as cardiac deconditioning and coronary heart disease may also occur. Proper prophylaxis, including nonpharmacologic and pharmacological strategies and cardiac rehabilitation diminish occurrence of the cardiac dysfunction following

  12. Shoulder biomechanics and muscle plasticity: implications in spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Lee, Thay Q; McMahon, Patrick J

    2002-10-01

    After spinal cord injury, excessive burden falls on the upper extremity, especially the shoulder. Overall, 51% of persons with spinal cord injury have shoulder problems. Common shoulder problems in persons with spinal cord injury begin with muscle imbalance that can lead to glenohumeral instability, impingement disease, rotator cuff tears, and subsequent degenerative joint disease. These problems can be attributed to the functional demands placed on the shoulder that are specific to patients with spinal cord injury, including overhead activities, wheelchair use, and transfers. Despite preventive exercises, shoulder problems in persons with spinal cord injury remain a significant problem, causing pain and functional limitations. The biomechanics of the shoulder for persons with spinal cord injury resulting from changes in muscle plasticity will be elucidated. Specifically, the effects of scapular protraction that can result from muscle imbalance, the age-dependent properties of the anterior band of the inferior glenohumeral ligament, and the influence of the dynamic restraints around the shoulder will be addressed.

  13. Update on traumatic acute spinal cord injury. Part 1.

    PubMed

    Galeiras Vázquez, R; Ferreiro Velasco, M E; Mourelo Fariña, M; Montoto Marqués, A; Salvador de la Barrera, S

    2017-02-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury requires a multidisciplinary approach both for specialized treatment of the acute phase and for dealing with the secondary complications. A suspicion or diagnosis of spinal cord injury is the first step for a correct management. A review is made of the prehospital management and characteristics of the acute phase of spinal cord injury. Respiratory monitoring for early selective intubation, proper identification and treatment of neurogenic shock are essential for the prevention of secondary spinal cord injury. The use of corticosteroids is currently not a standard practice in neuroprotective treatment, and hemodynamic monitoring and early surgical decompression constitute the cornerstones of adequate management. Traumatic spinal cord injury usually occurs as part of multiple trauma, and this can make diagnosis difficult. Neurological examination and correct selection of radiological exams prevent delayed diagnosis of spinal cord injuries, and help to establish the prognosis.

  14. Anorgasmia in anterior spinal cord syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Berić, A; Light, J K

    1993-01-01

    Three male and two female patients with anorgasmia and dissociated sensory loss due to an anterior spinal cord syndrome are described. Clinical, neurophysiological and quantitative sensory evaluation revealed preservation of the large fibre dorsal column functions from the lumbosacral segments with concomitant severe dysfunction or absence of the small fibre neospinothalamic mediated functions. These findings indicate a role for the spinothalamic system in orgasm. PMID:8505649

  15. Alleviating Autonomic Dysreflexia after Spinal Cord Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    SPN innervation. We have previously shown that we are able to promote robust functional axonal regeneration using a combination of transplantation and...spinal cord injury, transplantation , axon regeneration   2   ACCOMPLISHMENTS Through 9-30-2014 through 9-30-2015, we focused our efforts on...pressure and heart rate in conscious animals. At least one week later, we assay blood pressure and heart rate in these animals at rest and after

  16. Stem cell therapy for spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Kan, E M; Ling, E A; Lu, J

    2010-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) damages axons and disrupts myelination interrupting sensory and motor neuronal transmission to and from the brain. Patients suffering from SCI although continue to survive, are often left chronically disabled and with no promise of a cure. Advances in stem cell biology has opened up doors for the use of human embryonic, adult neural and induced pluripotent stem cell strategies for SCI. Despite great promise from animal research, clinical trials have been limited and the jury is still out on its safety and efficacy. This review discusses the advantages and disadvantages of the various stem cell types, barriers hindering translation from animal to humans, and the need for established guidelines for standardization of clinical trials ensuring subsequent implementation. Ultimately, unrealistic expectations of stem cell therapy (SCT) as the elixir for SCI should be managed. The success of SCT for SCI lies in the network of research scientists, medical professionals and patients working cooperatively to build up a knowledge-intensive platform for a comprehensive risk-benefit assessment of SCT for SCI.

  17. The Lineage Contribution and Role of Gbx2 in Spinal Cord Development

    PubMed Central

    Luu, Brian; Ellisor, Debra; Zervas, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Background Forging a relationship between progenitors with dynamically changing gene expression and their terminal fate is instructive for understanding the logic of how cell-type diversity is established. The mouse spinal cord is an ideal system to study these mechanisms in the context of developmental genetics and nervous system development. Here we focus on the Gastrulation homeobox 2 (Gbx2) transcription factor, which has not been explored in spinal cord development. Methodology/Principal Findings We determined the molecular identity of Gbx2-expressing spinal cord progenitors. We also utilized genetic inducible fate mapping to mark the Gbx2 lineage at different embryonic stages in vivo in mouse. Collectively, we uncover cell behaviors, cytoarchitectonic organization, and the terminal cell fate of the Gbx2 lineage. Notably, both ventral motor neurons and interneurons are derived from the Gbx2 lineage, but only during a short developmental period. Short-term fate mapping during mouse spinal cord development shows that Gbx2 expression is transient and is extinguished ventrally in a rostral to caudal gradient. Concomitantly, a permanent lineage restriction boundary ensures that spinal cord neurons derived from the Gbx2 lineage are confined to a dorsal compartment that is maintained in the adult and that this lineage generates inhibitory interneurons of the spinal cord. Using lineage tracing and molecular markers to follow Gbx2-mutant cells, we show that the loss of Gbx2 globally affects spinal cord patterning including the organization of interneuron progenitors. Finally, long-term lineage analysis reveals that the presence and timing of Gbx2 expression in interneuron progenitors results in the differential contribution to subtypes of terminally differentiated interneurons in the adult spinal cord. Conclusions/Significance We illustrate the complex cellular nature of Gbx2 expression and lineage contribution to the mouse spinal cord. In a broader context, this study

  18. The permeability alteration of brain and spinal cord vasculature to horseradish peroxidase during experimental decompression sickness as compared to the alteration in permeability induced by hyperosmolar solution.

    PubMed

    Lehtosalo, J; Panula, P; Laitinen, L A

    1982-01-01

    The permeability of microvasculature in the cerebral cortex, neostriatum, and spinal cord to i.v. injected horseradish peroxidase (HRP) has been investigated in rats following experimental compression to 6.1 bars (abs.) air for 90 min, and subsequent decompression to the ambient pressure in 1 min. For comparison, 1 ml of 2.0 M urea was injected into the right common carotid artery of rats during 15 s. After exposure to compression-decompression, under the light microscope focal leaky areas were found in all the regions examined. The leakage was most prominent in the grey matter of the spinal cord, and the cerebral cortex. In decompressed rats, arterioles were most often the site of peroxidase extravasation, whereas extravasation of HRP was less frequently displayed by capillaries and venules. In urea-treated rats, capillaries and venules frequently displayed extravasation of HRP as well. Parenchymal cells accumulated the trace adjacent to the leaky areas. Under the electron microscope, the extravasation of HRP was associated with peroxidase-containing pleomorphic vesicular structures in the endothelium, both in decompressed and urea-injected rats. Moreover, in contrast to decompressed rats, the junctions between endothelial cells were penetrated by the trace in urea-treated rats. Accordingly, the results indicate that during decompression sickness the pathway for the extravasation of proteins is through vesicular transfer, whereas the injection of hyperosmolar urea induces extravasation, both through vesicular transfer and junctions between the endothelial cells.

  19. Homocysteine-induced changes in cell proliferation and differentiation in the chick embryo spinal cord: implications for mechanisms of neural tube defects (NTD).

    PubMed

    Kobus-Bianchini, Karoline; Bourckhardt, Gilian Fernando; Ammar, Dib; Nazari, Evelise Maria; Müller, Yara Maria Rauh

    2017-02-24

    Maternal hyperhomocysteinemia during pregnancy is associated with increased risk of NTD in the offspring. Our study investigated the effects of homocysteine (Hcy) on proliferation and neuronal differentiation of the spinal cord cells in a chick embryo model. Embryos were treated with 20μmol D-L Hcy/50μL saline solution at embryonic day 2 (E2) and analyzed at embryonic days 4 (E4) and 6 (E6). Control embryos received exclusively 50μL saline solution. We performed immunolocalization and flow cytometry analyses using antibodies anti-phosphohistone H3 (pH3), anti-proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), anti-β-tubulin III and anti-p53. Our results revealed that Hcy interferes in the proliferation of the neural cells, and that this effect is age-dependent and differed between Hcy-treated embryos with and without NTD. Also, Hcy induced a decrease of neuronal differentiation in the spinal cord at both embryonic ages. These findings contribute to clarifying the cellular bases of NTD genesis, under experimental hiperhomocysteinemia.

  20. Fibronectin inhibits chronic pain development after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ching-Yi; Lee, Yu-Shang; Lin, Vernon W; Silver, Jerry

    2012-02-10

    Chronic pain following spinal cord injury (SCI) is a highly prevalent clinical condition that is difficult to treat. Using both von Frey filaments and radiant infrared heat to assess mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia, respectively, we have demonstrated that a one-time injection of fibronectin (50 μg/mL) into the spinal dorsal column (1 μL/min each injection for a total of 5 μL) immediately after SCI inhibits the development of mechanical allodynia (but not thermal hyperalgesia) over an 8-month observation period following spinal cord dorsal column crush (DCC). DCC will only induce mechanical Allodynia, but not thermal hyperalgesia or overt motor deficits. By applying various fibronectin fragments as well as competitive inhibitors, these effects were shown to be dependent on the connecting segment-1 (CS-1) motif of fibronectin. Furthermore, we found that acute fibronectin treatment diminished inflammation and blood-spinal cord barrier permeability, which in turn leads to enhanced fiber sparing and sprouting. In particular, the reduction of serotonin (5-HT) in the superficial dorsal horn, an important descending brainstem system in the modulation of pain, was blocked with fibronectin treatment. We conclude that treatment of SCI with fibronectin preserves sensory regulation and prevents the development of chronic allodynia, providing a potential therapeutic intervention to treat chronic pain following SCI.

  1. Fibronectin Inhibits Chronic Pain Development after Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yu-Shang; Lin, Vernon W.; Silver, Jerry

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Chronic pain following spinal cord injury (SCI) is a highly prevalent clinical condition that is difficult to treat. Using both von Frey filaments and radiant infrared heat to assess mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia, respectively, we have demonstrated that a one-time injection of fibronectin (50 μg/mL) into the spinal dorsal column (1 μL/min each injection for a total of 5 μL) immediately after SCI inhibits the development of mechanical allodynia (but not thermal hyperalgesia) over an 8-month observation period following spinal cord dorsal column crush (DCC). DCC will only induce mechanical Allodynia, but not thermal hyperalgesia or overt motor deficits. By applying various fibronectin fragments as well as competitive inhibitors, these effects were shown to be dependent on the connecting segment-1 (CS-1) motif of fibronectin. Furthermore, we found that acute fibronectin treatment diminished inflammation and blood–spinal cord barrier permeability, which in turn leads to enhanced fiber sparing and sprouting. In particular, the reduction of serotonin (5-HT) in the superficial dorsal horn, an important descending brainstem system in the modulation of pain, was blocked with fibronectin treatment. We conclude that treatment of SCI with fibronectin preserves sensory regulation and prevents the development of chronic allodynia, providing a potential therapeutic intervention to treat chronic pain following SCI. PMID:22022865

  2. Tracking Changes following Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Curt, Armin; Friston, Karl; Thompson, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury is often disabling and recovery of function is limited. As a consequence of damage, both spinal cord and brain undergo anatomical and functional changes. Besides clinical measures of recovery, biomarkers that can detect early anatomical and functional changes might be useful in determining clinical outcome—during the course of rehabilitation and recovery—as well as furnishing a tool to evaluate novel treatment interventions and their mechanisms of action. Recent evidence suggests an interesting three-way relationship between neurological deficit and changes in the spinal cord and of the brain and that, importantly, noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging techniques, both structural and functional, provide a sensitive tool to lay out these interactions. This review describes recent findings from multimodal imaging studies of remote anatomical changes (i.e., beyond the lesion site), cortical reorganization, and their relationship to clinical disability. These developments in this field may improve our understanding of effects on the nervous system that are attributable to the injury itself and will allow their distinction from changes that result from rehabilitation (i.e., functional retraining) and from interventions affecting the nervous system directly (i.e., neuroprotection or regeneration). PMID:22730072

  3. Spinal cord evolution in early Homo.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Marc R; Haeusler, Martin

    2015-11-01

    The discovery at Nariokotome of the Homo erectus skeleton KNM-WT 15000, with a narrow spinal canal, seemed to show that this relatively large-brained hominin retained the primitive spinal cord size of African apes and that brain size expansion preceded postcranial neurological evolution. Here we compare the size and shape of the KNM-WT 15000 spinal canal with modern and fossil taxa including H. erectus from Dmanisi, Homo antecessor, the European middle Pleistocene hominins from Sima de los Huesos, and Pan troglodytes. In terms of shape and absolute and relative size of the spinal canal, we find all of the Dmanisi and most of the vertebrae of KNM-WT 15000 are within the human range of variation except for the C7, T2, and T3 of KNM-WT 15000, which are constricted, suggesting spinal stenosis. While additional fossils might definitively indicate whether H. erectus had evolved a human-like enlarged spinal canal, the evidence from the Dmanisi spinal canal and the unaffected levels of KNM-WT 15000 show that unlike Australopithecus, H. erectus had a spinal canal size and shape equivalent to that of modern humans. Subadult status is unlikely to affect our results, as spinal canal growth is complete in both individuals. We contest the notion that vertebrae yield information about respiratory control or language evolution, but suggest that, like H. antecessor and European middle Pleistocene hominins from Sima de los Huesos, early Homo possessed a postcranial neurological endowment roughly commensurate to modern humans, with implications for neurological, structural, and vascular improvements over Pan and Australopithecus.

  4. Optical monitoring of spinal cord hemodynamics, a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadgan, Babak; Kwon, Brian K.; Streijger, Femke; Manouchehri, Neda; So, Kitty; Shortt, Katelyn; Cripton, Peter A.; Macnab, Andrew

    2017-02-01

    Background: After an acute traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI), the spinal cord is subjected to ischemia, hypoxia, and increased hydrostatic pressure which exacerbate further secondary damage and neuronal deficit. The purpose of this pilot study was to explore the use of near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) for non-invasive and real-time monitoring of these changes within the injured spinal cord in an animal model. NIRS is a non-invasive optical technique that utilizes light in the near infrared spectrum to monitor changes in the concentration of tissue chromophores from which alterations in tissues oxygenation and perfusion can be inferred in real time. Methods: A custom-made miniaturized NIRS sensor was developed to monitor spinal cord hemodynamics and oxygenation noninvasively and in real time simultaneously with invasive, intraparenchymal monitoring in a pig model of SCI. The spinal cord around the T10 injury site was instrumented with intraparenchymal probes inserted directly into the spinal cord to measure oxygen pressure, blood flow, and hydrostatic pressure, and the same region of the spinal cord was monitored with the custom-designed extradural NIRS probe. We investigated how well the extradural NIRS probe detected intraparenchymal changes adjacent to the injury site after alterations in systemic blood pressure, global hypoxia, and traumatic injury generated by a weight-drop contusion. Results: The NIRS sensor successfully identified periods of systemic hypoxia, re-ventilation and changes in spinal cord perfusion and oxygenation during alterations of mean arterial pressure and following spinal cord injury. Conclusion: This pilot study indicates that extradural NIRS monitoring of the spinal cord is feasible as a non-invasive optical method to identify changes in spinal cord hemodynamics and oxygenation in real time. Further development of this technique would allow clinicians to monitor real-time physiologic changes within the injured spinal cord during the

  5. Review of Epidural Spinal Cord Stimulation for Augmenting Cough after Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hachmann, Jan T.; Calvert, Jonathan S.; Grahn, Peter J.; Drubach, Dina I.; Lee, Kendall H.; Lavrov, Igor A.

    2017-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) remains a debilitating condition for which there is no cure. In addition to loss of somatic sensorimotor functions, SCI is also commonly associated with impairment of autonomic function. Importantly, cough dysfunction due to paralysis of expiratory muscles in combination with respiratory insufficiency can render affected individuals vulnerable to respiratory morbidity. Failure to clear sputum can aggravate both risk for and severity of respiratory infections, accounting for frequent hospitalizations and even mortality. Recently, epidural stimulation of the lower thoracic spinal cord has been investigated as novel means for restoring cough by evoking expiratory muscle contraction to generate large positive airway pressures and expulsive air flow. This review article discusses available preclinical and clinical evidence, current challenges and clinical potential of lower thoracic spinal cord stimulation (SCS) for restoring cough in individuals with SCI. PMID:28400726

  6. Review of Epidural Spinal Cord Stimulation for Augmenting Cough after Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Hachmann, Jan T; Calvert, Jonathan S; Grahn, Peter J; Drubach, Dina I; Lee, Kendall H; Lavrov, Igor A

    2017-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) remains a debilitating condition for which there is no cure. In addition to loss of somatic sensorimotor functions, SCI is also commonly associated with impairment of autonomic function. Importantly, cough dysfunction due to paralysis of expiratory muscles in combination with respiratory insufficiency can render affected individuals vulnerable to respiratory morbidity. Failure to clear sputum can aggravate both risk for and severity of respiratory infections, accounting for frequent hospitalizations and even mortality. Recently, epidural stimulation of the lower thoracic spinal cord has been investigated as novel means for restoring cough by evoking expiratory muscle contraction to generate large positive airway pressures and expulsive air flow. This review article discusses available preclinical and clinical evidence, current challenges and clinical potential of lower thoracic spinal cord stimulation (SCS) for restoring cough in individuals with SCI.

  7. What Are the Key Statistics about Brain and Spinal Cord Cancers?

    MedlinePlus

    ... in Adults What Are the Key Statistics About Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors? The American Cancer Society’s ... Spinal Cord Tumor Research and Treatment? More In Brain And Spinal Cord Tumors In Adults About Brain ...

  8. Histopathological and behavioral characterization of a novel cervical spinal cord displacement contusion injury in the rat.

    PubMed

    Pearse, D D; Lo, T P; Cho, K S; Lynch, M P; Garg, M S; Marcillo, A E; Sanchez, A R; Cruz, Y; Dietrich, W D

    2005-06-01

    Cervical contusive trauma accounts for the majority, of human spinal cord injury (SCI), yet experimental use of cervical contusion injury models has been limited. Considering that (1) the different ways of injuring the spinal cord (compression, contusion, and transection) induce very different processes of tissue damage and (2) the architecture of the spinal cord is not uniform, it is important to use a model that is more clinically applicable to human SCI. Therefore, in the current study we have developed a rat model of contusive, cervical SCI using the Electromagnetic Spinal Cord Injury Device (ESCID) developed at Ohio State University (OSU) to induce injury by spinal cord displacement. We used the device to perform mild, moderate and severe injuries (0.80, 0.95, and 1.1 mm displacements, respectively) with a single, brief displacement of <20 msec upon the exposed dorsal surface of the C5 cervical spinal cord of female (180-200 g) Fischer rats. Characterization of the model involved the analysis of the temporal histopathological progression of the injury over 9 weeks using histochemical stains to analyze white and gray mater integrity and immunohistochemistry to examine cellular changes and physiological responses within the injured spinal cord. Accompanying the histological analysis was a comprehensive determination of the behavioral functionality of the animals using a battery of motor tests. Characterization of this novel model is presented to enable and encourage its future use in the design and experimental testing of therapeutic strategies that may be used for human SCI.

  9. Congenital malformations of the spinal cord without early symptoms.

    PubMed

    Moffie, D; Stefanko, S Z; Makkink, B

    1986-01-01

    Description of 11 patients with congenital malformations of the spinal cord. Six of them were males, five females and the age varied from 7 to 70 years. Most of these cases produced clinical neurological signs indicating spinal cord disease in later life during an intercurrent disease. It was thought that changes in the bloodvessels and/or perfusion of the area of the spinal cord malformation was the ultimate cause of the neurological symptoms. An exact explanation of the origin of these developmental disturbances of the spinal cord remains unknown. Different hypotheses proposed in the literature, concerning these malformations, are not satisfactory.

  10. Effect of hypovolemia on traumatic spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    de Cassia Sampaio, O; Defino, H L A; Del Bel Belluz Guimarães, E A

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Experimentally evaluate the effect of hypovolemia in acute traumatic spinal cord injury. Methods: Twenty adult male Wistar rats were submitted to traumatic spinal cord injury through spinal cord contusion by direct impact. Ten animals were subjected to bleeding of 20% of their estimated blood to simulate a hypovolemic condition after spinal cord contusion and 10 animals were used as control. The animals were evaluated before, 1, 3, 7 and 14 days after the production of the spinal cord injury through behavioral tests (inclined plane test and motor assessment). Results: The spinal cord contusion associated with hypovolemia had a negative influence on functional outcomes of the spinal cord injury. The animals submitted to hypovolemia after spinal cord contusion had lower scores in behavioral tests (inclined plane test and motor assessment), presenting a slower recovery of the motor function. Conclusion: In the experimental model used, the group of animals with hypovolemia after traumatic spinal cord injury had slower recovery and lower intensity in behavioral tests. PMID:26951739

  11. The spinal cord: a review of functional neuroanatomy.

    PubMed

    Bican, Orhan; Minagar, Alireza; Pruitt, Amy A

    2013-02-01

    The spinal cord controls the voluntary muscles of the trunk and limbs and receives sensory input from these areas. It extends from the medulla oblongata to the lower border of the first lumbar vertebra. A basic knowledge of spinal cord anatomy is essential for interpretation of clinical signs and symptoms and for understanding of pathologic processes involving the spinal cord. In this article, anatomic structures are correlated with relevant clinical signs and symptoms and a step-wise approach to spinal cord diagnosis is outlined.

  12. Subacute combined degeneration mimicking traumatic spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Paul, Ian; Reichard, R Ross

    2009-03-01

    Subacute combined degeneration (SCD) of the spinal cord is the most common neurologic manifestation of vitamin B12 (cobalamin) deficiency and is usually secondary to autoimmune gastritis, but may also be seen in malnutrition syndromes such as chronic alcoholism, strict vegetarianism, gastrectomy, and also in nitrous oxide abuse. Although traumatic spinal cord injury is routinely encountered in the medical examiner's office, medical causes of spinal cord abnormalities such as SCD should be considered in the appropriate clinical setting. We report a case of alcohol-associated SCD mimicking traumatic spinal cord injury.

  13. Vascular dysfunctions following spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Popa, F; Grigorean, VT; Onose, G; Sandu, AM; Popescu, M; Burnei, G; Strambu, V; Sinescu, C

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this article is to analyze the vascular dysfunctions occurring after spinal cord injury (SCI). Vascular dysfunctions are common complications of SCI. Cardiovascular disturbances are the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in both acute and chronic stages of SCI. Neuroanatomy and physiology of autonomic nervous system, sympathetic and parasympathetic, is reviewed. SCI implies disruption of descendent pathways from central centers to spinal sympathetic neurons, originating in intermediolateral nuclei of T1–L2 cord segments. Loss of supraspinal control over sympathetic nervous system results in reduced overall sympathetic activity below the level of injury and unopposed parasympathetic outflow through intact vagal nerve. SCI associates significant vascular dysfunction. Spinal shock occurs during the acute phase following SCI and it is a transitory suspension of function and reflexes below the level of the injury. Neurogenic shock, part of spinal shock, consists of severe arterial hypotension and bradycardia. Autonomic dysreflexia appears during the chronic phase, after spinal shock resolution, and it is a life–threatening syndrome of massive imbalanced reflex sympathetic discharge occurring in patients with SCI above the splanchnic sympathetic outflow (T5–T6). Arterial hypotension with orthostatic hypotension occurs in both acute and chronic phases. The etiology is multifactorial. We described a few factors influencing the orthostatic hypotension occurrence in SCI: sympathetic nervous system dysfunction, low plasma catecholamine levels, rennin–angiotensin–aldosterone activity, peripheral alpha–adrenoceptor hyperresponsiveness, impaired function of baroreceptors, hyponatremia and low plasmatic volume, cardiovascular deconditioning, morphologic changes in sympathetic neurons, plasticity within spinal circuits, and motor deficit leading to loss of skeletal muscle pumping activity. Additional associated cardiovascular concerns in SCI, such as

  14. Vascular dysfunctions following spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Popa, Constantin; Popa, Florian; Grigorean, Valentin Titus; Onose, Gelu; Sandu, Aurelia Mihaela; Popescu, Mihai; Burnei, Gheorghe; Strambu, Victor; Sinescu, Crina

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this article is to analyze the vascular dysfunctions occurring after spinal cord injury (SCI). Vascular dysfunctions are common complications of SCI. Cardiovascular disturbances are the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in both acute and chronic stages of SCI. Neuroanatomy and physiology of autonomic nervous system, sympathetic and parasympathetic, is reviewed. SCI implies disruption of descendent pathways from central centers to spinal sympathetic neurons, originating in intermediolateral nuclei of T1-L2 cord segments. Loss of supraspinal control over sympathetic nervous system results in reduced overall sympathetic activity below the level of injury and unopposed parasympathetic outflow through intact vagal nerve. SCI associates significant vascular dysfunction. Spinal shock occurs during the acute phase following SCI and it is a transitory suspension of function and reflexes below the level of the injury. Neurogenic shock, part of spinal shock, consists of severe arterial hypotension and bradycardia. Autonomic dysreflexia appears during the chronic phase, after spinal shock resolution, and it is a life-threatening syndrome of massive imbalanced reflex sympathetic discharge occurring in patients with SCI above the splanchnic sympathetic outflow (T5-T6). Arterial hypotension with orthostatic hypotension occurs in both acute and chronic phases. The etiology is multifactorial. We described a few factors influencing the orthostatic hypotension occurrence in SCI: sympathetic nervous system dysfunction, low plasma catecholamine levels, rennin-angiotensin-aldosterone activity, peripheral alpha-adrenoceptor hyperresponsiveness, impaired function of baroreceptors, hyponatremia and low plasmatic volume, cardiovascular deconditioning, morphologic changes in sympathetic neurons, plasticity within spinal circuits, and motor deficit leading to loss of skeletal muscle pumping activity. Additional associated cardiovascular concerns in SCI, such as deep vein

  15. In-vivo spinal cord deformation in flexion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Qing; Dougherty, Lawrence; Margulies, Susan S.

    1997-05-01

    Traumatic mechanical loading of the head-neck complex results cervical spinal cord injury when the distortion of the cord is sufficient to produce functional or structural failure of the cord's neural and/or vascular components. Characterizing cervical spinal cord deformation during physiological loading conditions is an important step to defining a comprehensive injury threshold associated with acute spinal cord injury. In this study, in vivo quasi- static deformation of the cervical spinal cord during flexion of the neck in human volunteers was measured using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of motion with spatial modulation of magnetization (SPAMM). A custom-designed device was built to guide the motion of the neck and enhance more reproducibility. the SPAMM pulse sequence labeled the tissue with a series of parallel tagging lines. A single- shot gradient-recalled-echo sequence was used to acquire the mid-sagittal image of the cervical spine. A comparison of the tagged line pattern in each MR reference and deformed image pair revealed the distortion of the spinal cord. The results showed the cervical spinal cord elongates during head flexion. The elongation experienced by the spinal cord varies linearly with head flexion, with the posterior surface of the cord stretching more than the anterior surface. The maximal elongation of the cord is about 12 percent of its original length.

  16. Pediatric Spinal Cord Tumors and Masses

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Pamela E; Oleszek, Joyce L; Clayton, Gerald H

    2007-01-01

    Background/Objective: Spinal cord tumors are a relatively rare diagnosis, accounting for 1% to 10% of all pediatric central nervous system tumors. Understanding the etiology and clinical outcomes of these tumors is therefore very important. This study presents detailed information regarding clinical presentation, histological findings, outcomes, functional assessment, and management of a series of patients with this diagnosis. Method: Retrospective, descriptive study. Subjects: Thirty-five children with a final diagnosis of spinal cord tumor or mass, excluding dysraphism. Results: Neurodevelopmental tumors (dermoid tumors, epidermoid tumors, and teratomas) were the most common tumor type (31%), followed by astrocytomas (29%) and neuroblastomas (14%). Other types included schwannomas, meningiomas, giant cell tumors, extradural cystic masses, leukemic-related masses, and masses related to neurofibromatosis. Mean age at diagnosis was 6.6 years (SD = 5.5 y) and did not vary significantly by tumor type except for children with neuroblastoma (mean = 0.4 y, SD = 0.5 y). More boys (57%) were identified in the series than girls (43%); however, there was no association between tumor type and sex. Presenting complaints of pain were noted in 57% and were localized to the back, neck, or extremities. Extremity weakness was reported as an initial presenting symptom in 46%. Three children had scoliosis as a presenting issue and 14 had gait abnormalities. Regardless of treatment modality, mobility was retained in 83% of children with or without gait aids. Neurogenic bowel and/or bladder were present in 23% of the population. Conclusions: This study corroborates other studies indicating that intramedullary tumors are the predominant form of pediatric spinal cord tumor. This population, however, presented with an unusually large number of developmental tumors, contrary to several published studies. The disparity may be the result of this institution acting as a regional referral

  17. Clinical radiology of the spine and spinal cord

    SciTech Connect

    Banna, M.

    1985-01-01

    This book is a source of information about aspects of radiology of the spine and spinal column. It presents coverage of both normal and abnormal conditions. Contents: Spinal fractures and dislocations. Degenerative diseases of the spine. Gross anatomy of the spinal cord and meninges. Intraspinal mass lesions. Spinal dysraphism. Congenital anomalies. Tumors of the vertebral column, and more.

  18. Central pattern generators of the mammalian spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Frigon, Alain

    2012-02-01

    Neuronal networks within the spinal cord of mammals are responsible for generating various rhythmic movements, such as walking, running, swimming, and scratching. The ability to generate multiple rhythmic movements highlights the complexity and flexibility of the mammalian spinal circuitry. The present review describes features of some rhythmic motor behaviors generated by the mammalian spinal cord and discusses how the spinal circuitry is able to produce different rhythmic movements with their own sets of goals and demands.

  19. Chronic in vivo imaging in the mouse spinal cord using an implanted chamber

    PubMed Central

    Farrar, Matthew J.; Bernstein, Ida M.; Schlafer, Donald H.; Cleland, Thomas A.; Fetcho, Joseph R.; Schaffer, Chris B.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding and treatment of spinal cord pathology is limited in part by a lack of longitudinal in vivo imaging strategies at the cellular level. We developed a chronically implanted spinal chamber and surgical procedure suitable for time-lapse in vivo multiphoton microscopy of mouse spinal cord without the need for repeat surgical procedures. Repeated imaging was routinely achieved for more than five weeks post-operatively with up to ten separate imaging sessions. We observed neither motor function deficit nor neuropathology in the spinal cord as a result of chamber implantation. Using this chamber we quantified microglia and afferent axon dynamics following a laser-induced spinal cord lesion and observed massive microglia infiltration within one day along with a heterogeneous dieback of axon stumps. By enabling chronic imaging studies over timescales ranging from minutes to months, our method offers an ideal platform for understanding cellular dynamics in response to injury and therapeutic interventions. PMID:22266542

  20. Molecular basis of vascular events following spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Popa, F; Grigorean, VT; Onose, G; Sandu, A; Popescu, M; Burnei, G; Strambu, V; Popa, C

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this article is to analyze the effects of the molecular basis of vascular events following spinal cord injury and their contribution in pathogenesis. First of all, we reviewed the anatomy of spinal cord vessels. The pathophysiology of spinal cord injuries revealed two types of pathogenic mechanisms. The primary event, the mechanic trauma, results in a disruption of neural and vascular structures into the spinal cord. It is followed by secondary pathogenesis that leads to the progression of the initial lesion. We reviewed vascular responses following spinal cord injury, focusing on both primary and secondary events. The intraparenchymal hemorrhage is a direct consequence of trauma; it has a typical pattern of distribution into the contused spinal cord, inside the gray matter and, it is radially extended into the white matter. The intraparenchymal hemorrhage is restricted to the dorsal columns, into adjacent rostral and caudal spinal segments. Distribution of chronic lesions overlaps the pattern of the early intraparenchymal hemorrhage. We described the mechanisms of action, role, induction and distribution of the heme oxygenase isoenzymes 1 and 2. Posttraumatic inflammatory response contributes to secondary pathogenesis. We analyzed the types of cells participating in the inflammatory response, the moment of appearance after the injury, the decrease in number, and the nature of their actions. The disruption of the blood–spinal cord barrier is biphasic. It exposes the spinal cord to inflammatory cells and to toxic effects of other molecules. Endothelin 1 mediates oxidative stress into the spinal cord through the modulation of spinal cord blood flow. The role of matrix metalloproteinases in blood–spinal cord barrier disruption, inflammation, and angiogenesis are reviewed. PMID:20945816

  1. Spinal Cord Mechanisms of Chronic Pain and Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Hsinlin Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pain is a prevalent and challenging problem for most medical practitioners. Due to complex pathological mechanisms involved in chronic pain, optimal treatment is still under development. The spinal cord is an important gateway for peripheral pain signals transmitted to the brain. In chronic pain states, painful stimuli trigger afferent fibers in the dorsal horn to release neuropeptides and neurotransmitters. These events induce multiple inflammatory and neuropathic processes in the spinal cord dorsal horn and trigger modification and plasticity of local neural circuits. As a result, ongoing noxious signals to the brain are amplified and prolonged, a phenomenon known as central sensitization. In this review, the molecular events associated with central sensitization as well as their clinical implications are discussed. PMID:20461476

  2. Percutaneous Technique for Sclerotherapy of Vertebral Hemangioma Compressing Spinal Cord

    SciTech Connect

    Gabal, Abdelwahab M.

    2002-12-15

    Purpose: In this study we report a percutaneous technique to achieve sclerosis of vertebral hemangioma and decompression of the spinal cord and nerve roots. Methods: Under CT guidance the affected vertebral body is punctured by a biopsy needle and sclerosant is injected directly into the tumor. In the case of large paravertebral extension, additional injection is given in the paravertebral soft tissue component to induce shrinkage of the whole tumor mass and release of the compressed spinal cord. Results: Using this technique we treated five patients in whom vertebral hemangioma gave rise to neurologic symptoms.In three patients, sclerotherapy was the only treatment given. In the other two patients, sclerotherapy was preceded by transcatheter embolization. Neither decompressive surgery, radiation therapy nor stabilization was required with this technique. Conclusion: Our experience with CT-guided intraosseous sclerotherapy has proved highly satisfactory.

  3. Inhibition of spinal c-Jun-NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) improves locomotor activity of spinal cord injured rats.

    PubMed

    Martini, Alessandra C; Forner, Stefânia; Koepp, Janice; Rae, Giles Alexander

    2016-05-16

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) have been implicated in central nervous system injuries, yet the roles within neurodegeneration following spinal cord injury (SCI) still remain partially elucidated. We aimed to investigate the changes in expression of the three MAPKs following SCI and the role of spinal c-jun-NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) in motor impairment following the lesion. SCI induced at the T9 level resulted in enhanced expression of phosphorylated MAPKs shortly after trauma. SCI increased spinal cord myeloperoxidase levels, indicating a local neutrophil infiltration, and elevated the number of spinal apoptotic cells. Intrathecal administration of a specific inhibitor of JNK phosphorylation, SP600125, given at 1 and 4h after SCI, reduced the p-JNK expression, the number of spinal apoptotic cells and many of the histological signs of spinal injury. Notably, restoration of locomotor performance was clearly ameliorated by SP600125 treatment. Altogether, the results demonstrate that SCI induces activation of spinal MAPKs and that JNK plays a major role in mediating the deleterious consequences of spinal injury, not only at the spinal level, but also those regarding locomotor function. Therefore, inhibition of JNK activation in the spinal cord shortly after trauma might constitute a feasible therapeutic strategy for the functional recovery from SCI.

  4. A progressive compression model of thoracic spinal cord injury in mice: function assessment and pathological changes in spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Guo-dong; Chen, Yan; Zhou, Zhi-gang; Yang, Shu-xian; Zhong, Cheng; Li, Zhi-zhong

    2017-01-01

    Non-traumatic injury accounts for approximately half of clinical spinal cord injury, including chronic spinal cord compression. However, previous rodent spinal cord compression models are mainly designed for rats, few are available for mice. Our aim is to develop a thoracic progressive compression mice model of spinal cord injury. In this study, adult wild-type C57BL/6 mice were divided into two groups: in the surgery group, a screw was inserted at T9 lamina to compress the spinal cord, and the compression was increased by turning it further into the canal (0.2 mm) post-surgery every 2 weeks up to 8 weeks. In the control group, a hole was drilled into the lamina without inserting a screw. The results showed that Basso Mouse Scale scores were lower and gait worsened. In addition, the degree of hindlimb dysfunction in mice was consistent with the degree of spinal cord compression. The number of motor neurons in the anterior horn of the spinal cord was reduced in all groups of mice, whereas astrocytes and microglia were gradually activated and proliferated. In conclusion, this progressive compression of thoracic spinal cord injury in mice is a preferable model for chronic progressive spinal cord compression injury. PMID:28966654

  5. RhoA/Rho kinase in spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiangbing; Xu, Xiao-ming

    2016-01-01

    A spinal cord injury refers to an injury to the spinal cord that is caused by a trauma instead of diseases. Spinal cord injury includes a primary mechanical injury and a much more complex secondary injury process involving inflammation, oxidation, excitotoxicity, and cell death. During the secondary injury, many signal pathways are activated and play important roles in mediating the pathogenesis of spinal cord injury. Among them, the RhoA/Rho kinase pathway plays a particular role in mediating spinal degeneration and regeneration. In this review, we will discuss the role and mechanism of RhoA/Rho kinase-mediated spinal cord pathogenesis, as well as the potential of targeting RhoA/Rho kinase as a strategy for promoting both neuroprotection and axonal regeneration. PMID:26981071

  6. Development of a multi-electrode array for spinal cord epidural stimulation to facilitate stepping and standing after a complete spinal cord injury in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Gad, Parag; Choe, Jaehoon; Nandra, Mandheerej Singh; Zhong, Hui; Roy, Roland R; Tai, Yu-Chong; Edgerton, V Reggie

    2013-01-21

    stimulation parameters, i.e., stimulation frequency and intensity, and cathode/anode orientation. The array also was used to assess functional connectivity between the cord dorsum to interneuronal circuits and specific motor pools via evoked potentials induced at 1 Hz stimulation in the absence of any anesthesia. Therefore the high density electrode array allows high spatial resolution and the ability to selectively activate different neural pathways within the lumbosacral region of the spinal cord to facilitate standing and stepping in adult spinal rats and provides the capability to evoke motor potentials and thus a means for assessing connectivity between sensory circuits and specific motor pools and muscles.

  7. Down-Regulation of CXCL12/CXCR4 Expression Alleviates Ischemia-Reperfusion-Induced Inflammatory Pain via Inhibiting Glial TLR4 Activation in the Spinal Cord.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Qian; Zhang, Zai-Li; Tan, Wen-Fei; Sun, Xi-Jia; Ma, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is important for the pathogenesis of inflammatory reactions and the promotion of pain processing after ischemia/reperfusion (IR) in spinal cord. Recently, C-X-C chemokine ligand 12 (CXCL12) and its receptor, C-X-C chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4), were demonstrated to be simultaneously critical for inflammatory reactions, thereby facilitating glial activation. However, whether CXCL12/CXCR4 expression can contribute to IR-induced inflammatory pain via spinal TLR4 remained unclear. A rat model was established by 8 min of aortic arch occlusion. The effects of CXCL12/CXCR4 expression and TLR4 activation on inflammatory hyperalgesia were investigated by pretreatments with CXCL12-neutralizing antibody, CXCR4 antagonist (AMD3100) and TLR4 antagonist (TAK-242) for 5 consecutive days before surgery. The results indicated that IR induced significant and sustained inflammatory pain, observed as decreases in paw withdrawal threshold (PWT) and paw withdrawal latency (PWL), throughout the post-injury period. The increased levels of TLR4 and proinflammatory chemokine CXCL12, as well as its receptor, CXCR4, were closely correlated with the PWT and PWL trends. Double immunostaining further suggested that TLR4, which is mainly expressed on astrocytes and microglia, was closely co-localized with CXCL12 and CXCR4 in spinal dorsal horn. As expected, intrathecal pretreatment with the TLR4 antagonist, TAK-242 markedly ameliorated pain by inhibiting astrocytic and microglial activation, as shown by decreases in TLR4 immunoreactivity and the percentage of double-labeled cells. These protective effects were likely due in part to the reduced production of the downstream cytokines IL-1β and TNF-α, as well as for the recruitment of CXCL12 and CXCR4. Additionally, intrathecal pretreatment with CXCL12-neutralizing antibody and AMD3100 resulted in similar analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects as those receiving TAK-242 pretreatment. These results suggest that

  8. Peripheral Nerve Transplantation Combined with Acidic Fibroblast Growth Factor and Chondroitinase Induces Regeneration and Improves Urinary Function in Complete Spinal Cord Transected Adult Mice.

    PubMed

    DePaul, Marc A; Lin, Ching-Yi; Silver, Jerry; Lee, Yu-Shang

    2015-01-01

    The loss of lower urinary tract (LUT) control is a ubiquitous consequence of a complete spinal cord injury, attributed to a lack of regeneration of supraspinal pathways controlling the bladder. Previous work in our lab has utilized a combinatorial therapy of peripheral nerve autografts (PNG), acidic fibroblast growth factor (aFGF), and chondroitinase ABC (ChABC) to treat a complete T8 spinal cord transection in the adult rat, resulting in supraspinal control of bladder function. In the present study we extended these findings by examining the use of the combinatorial PNG+aFGF+ChABC treatment in a T8 transected mouse model, which more closely models human urinary deficits following spinal cord injury. Cystometry analysis and external urethral sphincter electromyograms reveal that treatment with PNG+aFGF+ChABC reduced bladder weight, improved bladder and external urethral sphincter histology, and significantly enhanced LUT function, resulting in more efficient voiding. Treated mice's injured spinal cord also showed a reduction in collagen scaring, and regeneration of serotonergic and tyrosine hydroxylase-positive axons across the lesion and into the distal spinal cord. Regeneration of serotonin axons correlated with LUT recovery. These results suggest that our mouse model of LUT dysfunction recapitulates the results found in the rat model and may be used to further investigate genetic contributions to regeneration failure.

  9. Peripheral Nerve Transplantation Combined with Acidic Fibroblast Growth Factor and Chondroitinase Induces Regeneration and Improves Urinary Function in Complete Spinal Cord Transected Adult Mice

    PubMed Central

    DePaul, Marc A.; Lin, Ching-Yi; Silver, Jerry; Lee, Yu-Shang

    2015-01-01

    The loss of lower urinary tract (LUT) control is a ubiquitous consequence of a complete spinal cord injury, attributed to a lack of regeneration of supraspinal pathways controlling the bladder. Previous work in our lab has utilized a combinatorial therapy of peripheral nerve autografts (PNG), acidic fibroblast growth factor (aFGF), and chondroitinase ABC (ChABC) to treat a complete T8 spinal cord transection in the adult rat, resulting in supraspinal control of bladder function. In the present study we extended these findings by examining the use of the combinatorial PNG+aFGF+ChABC treatment in a T8 transected mouse model, which more closely models human urinary deficits following spinal cord injury. Cystometry analysis and external urethral sphincter electromyograms reveal that treatment with PNG+aFGF+ChABC reduced bladder weight, improved bladder and external urethral sphincter histology, and significantly enhanced LUT function, resulting in more efficient voiding. Treated mice’s injured spinal cord also showed a reduction in collagen scaring, and regeneration of serotonergic and tyrosine hydroxylase-positive axons across the lesion and into the distal spinal cord. Regeneration of serotonin axons correlated with LUT recovery. These results suggest that our mouse model of LUT dysfunction recapitulates the results found in the rat model and may be used to further investigate genetic contributions to regeneration failure. PMID:26426529

  10. Implanted electro-acupuncture electric stimulation improves outcome of stem cells' transplantation in spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haichun; Yang, Kaiyun; Xin, Tao; Wu, Wenliang; Chen, Yunzhen

    2012-10-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is one of the most serious disorders in clinics, and the high disability rate and functional deficits are common issues in patients. Transplantation of bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs) into the injured spinal cord is emerging as a novel method in the therapeutics of SCI; however, its application is limited by the poor survival rate of the transplanted cells and low differentiation rate into neurons. Our laboratory recently reported that electrical stimulation (ES) dramatically improves the survival rate of transplanted BMSCs and increases spinal cord functions in animals with spinal cord injury. In this paper, we asked whether implanted electro-acupuncture (iEA) can advance the beneficial effects from the ES treatment in animals with spinal cord injury. We showed that BMSCs transplantation alone resulted in significant functional recovery in animals. Interestingly, iEA with BMSCs treatment induced a significantly higher functional improvement in locomotor functions and SSEP compared to the BMSCs treatment alone. Additionally, we used molecular biology techniques and showed that BMSCs transplantation with iEA treatment significantly increased the number of surviving BMSCs compared to the BMSCs alone group. In conclusion, our experiment showed that the approach of coupling iEA electric stimulation and BMSCs transplantation remarkably promotes functional improvements in animals with spinal cord injury and holds promising potential to treat spinal cord injury in humans.

  11. Therapeutic Stimulation for Restoration of Function After Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Ievins, Aiva; Moritz, Chet T

    2017-09-01

    Paralysis due to spinal cord injury can severely limit motor function and independence. This review summarizes different approaches to electrical stimulation of the spinal cord designed to restore motor function, with a brief discussion of their origins and the current understanding of their mechanisms of action. Spinal stimulation leads to impressive improvements in motor function along with some benefits to autonomic functions such as bladder control. Nonetheless, the precise mechanisms underlying these improvements and the optimal spinal stimulation approaches for restoration of motor function are largely unknown. Finally, spinal stimulation may augment other therapies that address the molecular and cellular environment of the injured spinal cord. The fact that several stimulation approaches are now leading to substantial and durable improvements in function following spinal cord injury provides a new perspectives on the previously "incurable" condition of paralysis. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  12. [Effect of narcotic analgesics on excitatory transmission in the spinal cord].

    PubMed

    Chichenkov, O N; Molodavkin, G M

    1978-02-01

    As demonstrated on nonanesthetized curare-immobilized spinal cats morphine, promedol and fentanyl failed to alter the amplitude of induced potentials in the ventro-lateral columns of the lumbar spinal cord, evoked by a single or repetitive stimulation of the cutaneous or pelvic nerves. In some experiments the same drugs inhibited the nerurons of the posterior horns of the spinal cord activated by the nociceptive stimulation of the peripheral receptors in intraarterial administration of bradykinin. It is suggested that a spinal component was involved in the action of hypnotic analgetics.

  13. Remote-controlled eradication of astrogliosis in spinal cord injury via electromagnetically-induced dexamethasone release from "smart" nanowires.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wen; Borgens, Richard Ben

    2015-08-10

    We describe a system to deliver drugs to selected tissues continuously, if required, for weeks. Drugs can be released remotely inside the small animals using pre-implanted, novel vertically aligned electromagnetically-sensitive polypyrrole nanowires (PpyNWs). Approximately 1-2mm(2) dexamethasone (DEX) doped PpyNWs was lifted on a single drop of sterile water by surface tension, and deposited onto a spinal cord lesion in glial fibrillary acidic protein-luc transgenic mice (GFAP-luc mice). Overexpression of GFAP is an indicator of astrogliosis/neuroinflammation in CNS injury. The corticosteroid DEX, a powerful ameliorator of inflammation, was released from the polymer by external application of an electromagnetic field for 2h/day for a week. The GFAP signal, revealed by bioluminescent imaging in the living animal, was significantly reduced in treated animals. At 1week, GFAP was at the edge of detection, and in some experimental animals, completely eradicated. We conclude that the administration of drugs can be controlled locally and non-invasively, opening the door to many other known therapies, such as the cases that dexamethasone cannot be safely applied systemically in large concentrations. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Management of acute traumatic spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed

    Shank, C D; Walters, B C; Hadley, M N

    2017-01-01

    Acute traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating disease process affecting tens of thousands of people across the USA each year. Despite the increase in primary prevention measures, such as educational programs, motor vehicle speed limits, automobile running lights, and safety technology that includes automobile passive restraint systems and airbags, SCIs continue to carry substantial permanent morbidity and mortality. Medical measures implemented following the initial injury are designed to limit secondary insult to the spinal cord and to stabilize the spinal column in an attempt to decrease devastating sequelae. This chapter is an overview of the contemporary management of an acute traumatic SCI patient from the time of injury through the stay in the intensive care unit. We discuss initial triage, immobilization, and transportation of the patient by emergency medical services personnel to a definitive treatment facility. Upon arrival at the emergency department, we review initial trauma protocols and the evidence-based recommendations for radiographic evaluation of the patient's vertebral column. Finally, we outline closed cervical spine reduction and various aggressive medical therapies aimed at improving neurologic outcome.

  15. Spinal cord pattern generators for locomotion.

    PubMed

    Dietz, V

    2003-08-01

    It is generally accepted that locomotion in mammals, including humans, is based on the activity of neuronal circuits within the spinal cord (the central pattern generator, CPG). Afferent information from the periphery (i.e. the limbs) influences the central pattern and, conversely, the CPG selects appropriate afferent information according to the external requirement. Both the CPG and the reflexes that mediate afferent input to the spinal cord are under the control of the brainstem. There is increasing evidence that in central motor diseases, a defective utilization of afferent input, in combination with secondary compensatory processes, is involved in typical movement disorders, such as spasticity and Parkinson's disease. Recent studies indicate a plastic behavior of the spinal neuronal circuits following a central motor lesion. This has implications for any rehabilitative therapy that should be directed to take advantage of the plasticity of the central nervous system. The significance of this research is in a better understanding of the pathophysiology underlying movement disorders and the consequences for an appropriate treatment.

  16. Subdural hematoma following spinal cord stimulator implant.

    PubMed

    Chiravuri, Srinivas; Wasserman, Ronald; Chawla, Amit; Haider, Naeem

    2008-01-01

    Headache following interventional procedures is a diagnostic challenge due to the multitude of possible etiologies involved. Presentation can be simple (PDPH alone) or complex (exacerbation of pre-existing chronic headache along with PDPH) or headache associated with a new onset intracranial process. Subdural hematoma is a rare complication of cranio-spinal trauma. Cranial subdural hematoma may present in an acute, sub-acute, or chronic fashion. Diagnosis of a subdural hematoma in the wake of a PDPH is difficult, requiring a high level of suspicion. Delayed diagnosis of subdural hematoma is usually related to failure to consider it in the differential diagnosis. Thorough history, assessment of the evolution of symptoms, and imaging studies may identify the possible cause and help direct treatment. Change in the character of initial presenting symptoms may be a sign of resolution of the headache or the onset of a secondary process. We report a case of acute intracranial subdural hematoma secondary to unintentional dural puncture during placement of a permanent spinal cord stimulator lead for refractory angina. There is need for careful follow-up of patients with a known post-dural tear. Failure to identify uncommon adverse events in patients with complicated spinal cord stimulator implantation may lead to permanent injury.

  17. Plasticity of the Injured Human Spinal Cord: Insights Revealed by Spinal Cord Functional MRI

    PubMed Central

    Cadotte, David W.; Bosma, Rachael; Mikulis, David; Nugaeva, Natalia; Smith, Karen; Pokrupa, Ronald; Islam, Omar; Stroman, Patrick W.; Fehlings, Michael G.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction While numerous studies have documented evidence for plasticity of the human brain there is little evidence that the human spinal cord can change after injury. Here, we employ a novel spinal fMRI design where we stimulate normal and abnormal sensory dermatomes in persons with traumatic spinal cord injury and perform a connectivity analysis to understand how spinal networks process information. Methods Spinal fMRI data was collected at 3 Tesla at two institutions from 38 individuals using the standard SEEP functional MR imaging techniques. Thermal stimulation was applied to four dermatomes in an interleaved timing pattern during each fMRI acquisition. SCI patients were stimulated in dermatomes both above (normal sensation) and below the level of their injury. Sub-group analysis was performed on healthy controls (n = 20), complete SCI (n = 3), incomplete SCI (n = 9) and SCI patients who recovered full function (n = 6). Results Patients with chronic incomplete SCI, when stimulated in a dermatome of normal sensation, showed an increased number of active voxels relative to controls (p = 0.025). There was an inverse relationship between the degree of sensory impairment and the number of active voxels in the region of the spinal cord corresponding to that dermatome of abnormal sensation (R2 = 0.93, p<0.001). Lastly, a connectivity analysis demonstrated a significantly increased number of intraspinal connections in incomplete SCI patients relative to controls suggesting altered processing of afferent sensory signals. Conclusions In this work we demonstrate the use of spinal fMRI to investigate changes in spinal processing of somatosensory information in the human spinal cord. We provide evidence for plasticity of the human spinal cord after traumatic injury based on an increase in the average number of active voxels in dermatomes of normal sensation in chronic SCI patients and an increased number of intraspinal connections in incomplete

  18. Directing Spinal Cord Plasticity: The Impact of Stretch Therapy on Functional Recovery after Spinal Cord Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    Louisville, KY After spinal cord injury (SCI) patients commonly develop spasticity and contractures as secondary complications of “upper motor neuron...lesions. Physical therapists use stretching maneuvers to maintain extensibility of soft tissues and to manage spasticity . Previous studies in our lab

  19. Synaptic Plasticity, Neurogenesis, and Functional Recovery after Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Darian-Smith, Corinna

    2010-01-01

    Spinal cord injury research has greatly expanded in recent years, but our understanding of the mechanisms that underlie the functional recovery that can occur over the weeks and months following the initial injury, is far from complete. To grasp the scope of the problem, it is important to begin by defining the sensorimotor pathways that might be involved by a spinal injury. This is done in the rodent and nonhuman primate, which are two of the most commonly used animal models in basic and translational spinal injury research. Many of the better known experimentally induced models are then reviewed in terms of the pathways they involve and the reorganization and recovery that have been shown to follow. The better understood neuronal mechanisms mediating such post-injury plasticity, including dendritic spine growth and axonal sprouting, are then examined. PMID:19307422

  20. LIN28 expression in rat spinal cord after injury.

    PubMed

    Yue, Ying; Zhang, Dongmei; Jiang, Shengyang; Li, Aihong; Guo, Aisong; Wu, Xinming; Xia, Xiaopeng; Cheng, Hongbing; Tao, Tao; Gu, Xingxing

    2014-05-01

    LIN28, an RNA-binding protein, is known to be involved in the regulation of many cellular processes, such as embryonic stem cell proliferation, cell fate succession, developmental timing, and oncogenesis. However, its expression and function in central nervous system still unclear. In this study, we performed an acute spinal cord contusion injury (SCI) model in adult rats and investigated the dynamic changes of LIN28 expression in spinal cord. Western blot and immunohistochemistry analysis revealed that LIN28 was present in normal spinal cord. It gradually increased, reached a peak at 3 day, and then nearly declined to the basal level at 14 days after SCI. Double immunofluorescence staining showed that LIN28 immunoreactivity was found in neurons, astrocytes and a handful of microglia. Interestingly, LIN28 expression was increased predominantly in astrocytes but not in neurons. Moreover, the colocalization of LIN28 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen was detected after injury. Western blot showed that LIN28 participated in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced astrocytes inflammatory responses by NF-κB signaling pathway. These results suggested that LIN28 may be involved in the pathologic process of SCI, and further research is needed to have a good understanding of its function and mechanism.

  1. Sexual function in spinal cord lesioned men.

    PubMed

    Biering-Sørensen, F; Sønksen, J

    2001-09-01

    Review of literature. To review the physical aspects related to penile erection, ejaculatory dysfunction, semen characteristics, and techniques for enhancement of fertility in spinal cord lesioned (SCL) men. Worldwide: individuals with traumatic as well as non-traumatic SCL. Recommendations for management of erectile dysfunction in SCL men: If it is possible to obtain a satisfactory erection but of insufficient duration, then try to use a venous constrictor band to find out if this is sufficient to maintain the erection. Otherwise we recommend Sildenafil. If Sildenafil is not satisfactory then use intracavernous injection with prostaglandin E(1) (some SCL men may prefer cutaneous or intraurethral application). We discourage the implantation of penile prosthesis for the sole purpose of erection. Recommendations for management of ejaculatory dysfunction in SCL men: Penile vibratory stimulation (PVS) to induce ejaculation is recommended as first treatment choice. If PVS fails, SCL men should be referred for electroejaculation (EEJ). Semen characteristics: Impaired semen profiles with low motility rates are seen in the majority of SCL men. Recently reported data gives evidence of a decline in spermatogenesis and motility of ejaculated spermatozoa shortly after (few weeks) an acute SCL. It is suggested that some factors in the seminal plasma and/or disordered storage of spermatozoa in the seminal vesicles are mainly responsible for the impaired semen profiles in men with chronic SCL. Fertility: Home insemination with semen obtained by PVS and introduced intravaginally in order to achieve successful pregnancies may be an option for some SCL men and their partners. The majority of SCL men will further enhance their fertility potential when using either PVS or EEJ combined with assisted reproduction techniques such as intrauterine insemination or in vitro fertilization with or without intracytoplasmic sperm injection.

  2. Blocking PAR2 attenuates oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic pain via TRPV1 and releases of substance P and CGRP in superficial dorsal horn of spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kun; Zhang, Zhi-Fa; Liao, Ming-Feng; Yao, Wen-Long; Wang, Juan; Wang, Xue-Ren

    2015-05-15

    Oxaliplatin (OXL) is a third-generation chemotherapeutic agent commonly used to treat metastatic digestive tumors; however, neuropathic pain is one of the main limiting complications of OXL. The purpose of this study was to examine the underlying mechanisms by which neuropathic pain is induced by OXL in a rat model. Our results demonstrated that blocking spinal proteinase-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) attenuated pain responses evoked by mechanical stimulation and decreased the releases of substance P and CGRP in the superficial dorsal horn of the spinal cord. The attenuating effect on mechanical pain was significantly smaller in OXL-rats than that in control rats. Blocking PAR2 also attenuated a heightened cold sensitivity evoked by OXL; whereas blocking TRPV1 had little effects on OXL-evoked hypersensitive cold response. Our data also showed that OXL increased the protein expressions of PAR2 and TRPV1 in the superficial dorsal horn. In addition, blocking PAR2 decreased TRPV1 expression in OXL-rats. Overall, our data suggest that upregulated expression of PAR2 in the superficial dorsal horn contributes to mechanical hyperalgesia and cold hypersensitivity; whereas amplified TRPV1 plays a role in regulating mechanical hyperalgesia, but not cold hypersensitivity after administration of OXL. We further suggest that TRPV1 is likely one of the signaling pathways for PAR2 to play a role in regulating OXL-induced neuropathic pain.

  3. Personal Adjustment Training for the Spinal Cord Injured

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roessler, Richard; And Others

    1976-01-01

    This article describes experiences with Personal Achievement Skills (PAS), a group counseling process in a spinal cord injury project, emphasizing training in communication and goal setting in the context of group process. Issues in conducting such training and providing comprehensive service to the spinal cord injured are discussed in detail.…

  4. Pediatric spinal cord injury: a review by organ system.

    PubMed

    Powell, Aaron; Davidson, Loren

    2015-02-01

    In this article, an overview is provided of pediatric spinal cord injury, organized by effects of this injury on various organ systems. Specific management differences between children and adults with spinal cord injury are highlighted. A detailed management approach is offered for particularly complex topics, such as spasticity and upper extremity reconstruction.

  5. Shriners Hospital Spinal Cord Injury Self Care Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Carol

    This manual is intended for young people with spinal cord injuries who are receiving rehabilitation services within the Spinal Cord Injury Unit at Shriners Hospital (San Francisco, California). An introduction describes the rehabilitation program, which includes family conferences, an individualized program, an independent living program,…

  6. Shriners Hospital Spinal Cord Injury Self Care Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Carol

    This manual is intended for young people with spinal cord injuries who are receiving rehabilitation services within the Spinal Cord Injury Unit at Shriners Hospital (San Francisco, California). An introduction describes the rehabilitation program, which includes family conferences, an individualized program, an independent living program,…

  7. Spinal cord injuries in Australian footballers.

    PubMed

    2003-07-01

    Acute spinal cord injury is a serious concern in football, particularly the rugby codes. This Australia-wide study covers the years 1986-1996 and data are compared with those from a previous identical study for 1960-1985. A retrospective review of 80 players with a documented acute spinal cord injury admitted to the six spinal cord injury units in Australia. Personal interview was carried out in 85% of the participants to determine the injury circumstances and the level of compensation. The severity of the neurological deficit and the functional recovery were determined (Frankel grade). The annual incidence of injuries for all codes combined did not change over the study period, but there was some decrease in rugby union and an increase in rugby league. In particular there was a significant decline in the incidence of adult rugby union injuries (P = 0.048). Scrum injuries in union have decreased subsequent to law changes in 1985, particularly in schoolboys, although ruck and maul injuries are increasing; 39% of scrum injuries occurred in players not in their regular position. Tackles were the most common cause of injury in league, with two-on-one tackles accounting for nearly half of these. Schoolboy injuries tended to mirror those in adults, but with a lower incidence. Over half of the players remain wheelchair-dependent, and 10% returned to near-normality. Six players (7.5%) died as a result of their injuries. The rugby codes must be made safer by appropriate preventative strategies and law changes. In particular, attention is necessary for tackle injuries in rugby league and players out of regular position in scrummage. Compensation for injured players is grossly inadequate. There is an urgent need to establish a national registry to analyse these injuries prospectively.

  8. Prognosis and Treatment of Spinal Cord Astrocytoma

    SciTech Connect

    Minehan, Kiernan J. Brown, Paul D.; Scheithauer, Bernd W.; Krauss, William E.; Wright, Michael P.

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: To identify the prognostic factors for spinal cord astrocytoma and determine the effects of surgery and radiotherapy on outcome. Methods and Materials: This retrospective study reviewed the cases of consecutive patients with spinal cord astrocytoma treated at Mayo Clinic Rochester between 1962 and 2005. Results: A total of 136 consecutive patients were identified. Of these 136 patients, 69 had pilocytic and 67 had infiltrative astrocytoma. The median follow-up for living patients was 8.2 years (range, 0.08-37.6), and the median survival for deceased patients was 1.15 years (range, 0.01-39.9). The extent of surgery included incisional biopsy only (59%), subtotal resection (25%), and gross total resection (16%). Patients with pilocytic tumors survived significantly longer than those with infiltrative astrocytomas (median overall survival, 39.9 vs. 1.85 years; p < 0.001). Patients who underwent resection had a worse, although nonsignificant, median survival than those who underwent biopsy only (pilocytic, 18.1 vs. 39.9 years, p = 0.07; infiltrative, 19 vs. 30 months, p = 0.14). Postoperative radiotherapy, delivered in 75% of cases, gave no significant survival benefit for those with pilocytic tumors (39.9 vs. 18.1 years, p = 0.33) but did for those with infiltrative astrocytomas (24 vs. 3 months; Wilcoxon p = 0.006). On multivariate analysis, pilocytic histologic type, diagnosis after 1984, longer symptom duration, younger age, minimal surgical extent, and postoperative radiotherapy predicted better outcome. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that histologic type is the most important prognostic variable affecting the outcome of spinal cord astrocytomas. Surgical resection was associated with shorter survival and thus remains an unproven treatment. Postoperative radiotherapy significantly improved survival for patients with infiltrative astrocytomas but not for those with pilocytic tumors.

  9. Effect of lycopene on the blood-spinal cord barrier after spinal cord injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Wang, Jianbo; Gu, Zhengsong; Zhang, Qing; Zheng, Hong

    2016-09-05

    The current study aimed to investigate the effect of lycopene on the blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) after spinal cord injury (SCI) in a mouse model. Lycopene inhibited lipid peroxidation and oxidative DNA damage as a highly efficient antioxidant and free radical scavenger. Lycopene (4 mg/kg/d) was administrated immediately following SCI. The permeability of the BSCB and water content in the spinal cord tissue were evaluated. Additionally, levels of expression of tight junction proteins and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) were determined with Western blotting. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analysis of spinal cord tissue homogenates was performed 48 h after SCI to evaluate the expression of inflammation-related cytokines. In addition, recovery of motor function was assessed 1 d, 2 d, 5 d, 10 d, and 15 d after SCI using the Basso Mouse Scale to score locomotion. Compared to the group with an untreated SCI, mice with an SCI treated with lycopene had significantly reduced spinal cord tissue water content and BSCB permeability. Furthermore, motor function of mice with an SCI was also greatly improved by lycopene administration. The expression of the proinflammatory factors TNF-α and NF-kB increased markedly 48 h after SCI, and their upregulation was significantly attenuated by lycopene treatment. The expression of molecules that protect tight junctions, zonula occluden-1 and claudin-5, was upregulated by lycopene treatment after SCI. Taken together, these results clearly indicate that lycopene attenuated SCI by promoting repair of the damaged BSCB, so lycopene is a novel and promising treatment for SCI in humans.

  10. Contrast enhanced ultrasound imaging for assessment of spinal cord blood flow in experimental spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Dubory, Arnaud; Laemmel, Elisabeth; Badner, Anna; Duranteau, Jacques; Vicaut, Eric; Court, Charles; Soubeyrand, Marc

    2015-05-07

    Reduced spinal cord blood flow (SCBF) (i.e., ischemia) plays a key role in traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) pathophysiology and is accordingly an important target for neuroprotective therapies. Although several techniques have been described to assess SCBF, they all have significant limitations. To overcome the latter, we propose the use of real-time contrast enhanced ultrasound imaging (CEU). Here we describe the application of this technique in a rat contusion model of SCI. A jugular catheter is first implanted for the repeated injection of contrast agent, a sodium chloride solution of sulphur hexafluoride encapsulated microbubbles. The spine is then stabilized with a custom-made 3D-frame and the spinal cord dura mater is exposed by a laminectomy at ThIX-ThXII. The ultrasound probe is then positioned at the posterior aspect of the dura mater (coated with ultrasound gel). To assess baseline SCBF, a single intravenous injection (400 µl) of contrast agent is applied to record its passage through the intact spinal cord microvasculature. A weight-drop device is subsequently used to generate a reproducible experimental contusion model of SCI. Contrast agent is re-injected 15 min following the injury to assess post-SCI SCBF changes. CEU allows for real time and in-vivo assessment of SCBF changes following SCI. In the uninjured animal, ultrasound imaging showed uneven blood flow along the intact spinal cord. Furthermore, 15 min post-SCI, there was critical ischemia at the level of the epicenter while SCBF remained preserved in the more remote intact areas. In the regions adjacent to the epicenter (both rostral and caudal), SCBF was significantly reduced. This corresponds to the previously described "ischemic penumbra zone". This tool is of major interest for assessing the effects of therapies aimed at limiting ischemia and the resulting tissue necrosis subsequent to SCI.

  11. Steroids, spinal cord and pain sensation.

    PubMed

    Patte-Mensah, Christine; Meyer, Laurence; Mensah-Nyagan, Ayikoe Guy

    2011-10-01

    During the whole life, the nervous system is continuously submitted to the actions of different categories of hormones, including steroids. Therefore, the interactions between hormonal compounds and neural tissues are subjected to intense investigations. While a majority of studies focus on the brain, the spinal cord (SC) has received little attention, although this structure is also an important part of the central nervous system, controlling motor and sensory functions. To point out the importance of interactions between hormones and the SC in the regulation of neurobiological activities, we recapitulated and discussed herein various key data, revealing that the pivotal role played by the SC in nociception and pain modulation, directly depends on the SC ability to metabolize and synthesize steroidal molecules. The paper suggests that future investigations aiming to develop effective strategies against chronic pain, must integrate regulatory effects exerted by hormonal steroids on the SC activity, as well as the actions of endogenous neurosteroids locally synthesized in spinal neural networks.

  12. Spinal cord injuries and orgasm: a review.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Marca; Rosen, Raymond C

    2008-01-01

    Definitions of orgasm remain varied, and physiologic markers have not been standardized or consistently applied. The occurrence of orgasm after spinal cord injury (SCI) has been documented for a number of years; however, in the recent past, the neurologic and autonomic correlates associated with orgasm after SCI have been investigated. In this article we review recent studies pertaining to the occurrence of orgasm after SCI. Laboratory-based assessments of orgasmic responsiveness of women and men with known levels and degrees of SCI have shown the effects of orgasm on peripheral autonomic responses and the effects of varying injury patterns on the ability to achieve orgasm. A spinal pattern generator has also been identified that mediates ejaculation in male rats and responses similar to orgasm in female rats. Taken together, these findings suggest that retraining reflexic orgasm through vibratory or other forms of neural stimulation may provide a means to remediate orgasmic dysfunction in persons with SCI.

  13. Early elective colostomy following spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Boucher, Michelle

    Elective colostomy is an accepted method of bowel management for patients who have had a spinal cord injury (SCI). Approximately 2.4% of patients with SCI have a colostomy, and traditionally it is performed as a last resort several years after injury, and only if bowel complications persist when all other methods have failed. This is despite evidence that patients find a colostomy easier to manage and frequently report wishing it had been performed earlier. It was noticed in the author's spinal unit that increasing numbers of patients were requesting colostomy formation during inpatient rehabilitation following SCI. No supporting literature was found for this; it appears to be an emerging and untested practice. This article explores colostomy formation as a method of bowel management in patients with SCI, considers the optimal time for colostomy formation after injury and examines issues for health professionals.

  14. Vascular Imaging Techniques of the Spinal Cord.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Maria Isabel; Barnaure, Isabelle; Gariani, Joanna; Boto, José; Pellaton, Alain; Dietemann, Jean-Louis; Kulcsar, Zsolt

    2017-04-01

    The various imaging techniques used to depict vascular lesions of the spinal cord are described in this article with particular emphasis on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), vascular sequences, and advantages of high-field MRI. Technical vascular protocols are discussed in computed tomography, MRI, and conventional angiography. The diverse magnetic resonance angiography protocols are presented as well as their findings, specificities, and pitfalls. A review of the vascular anatomy and the most common pathologies analyzed by magnetic resonance angiography and conventional angiography is described.

  15. Natural Polyphenols and Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Khalatbary, Ali Reza

    2014-01-01

    Polyphenols have been shown to have some of the neuroprotective effects against neurodegenerative diseases. These effects are attributed to a variety of biological activities, including free radical scavenging/antioxidant and anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic activities. In this regard, many efforts have been made to study the effects of various well-known dietary polyphenols on spinal cord injury (SCI) and to explore the mechanisms behind the neuroprotective effects. The aim of this paper is to present the mechanisms of neuroprotection of natural polyphenols used in animal models of SCI. PMID:24842137

  16. Agreement in Metastatic Spinal Cord Compression.

    PubMed

    Arana, Estanislao; Kovacs, Francisco M; Royuela, Ana; Asenjo, Beatriz; Pérez-Ramírez, Úrsula; Zamora, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic epidural spinal cord compression (ESCC) is a devastating medical emergency. The purpose of this study was to determine the reliability of the 6-point ESCC scoring system and the identification of the spinal level presenting ESCC. Clinical data and imaging from 90 patients with biopsy-proven spinal metastases were provided to 83 specialists from 44 hospitals. The spinal levels presenting metastases and the ESCC scores for each case were calculated twice by each clinician, with a minimum of 6 weeks' interval. Clinicians were blinded to assessments made by other specialists and their own previous assessment. Fleiss kappa (κ) statistic was used to assess intraobserver and interobserver agreement. Subgroup analyses were performed according to clinicians' specialty (medical oncology, neurosurgery, radiology, orthopedic surgery, and radiation oncology), years of experience, and type of hospital. Intraobserver and interobserver agreement on the location of ESCC was substantial (κ>0.61). Intraobserver agreement on the ESCC score was "excellent" (κ=0.82), whereas interobserver agreement was substantial (κ=0.64). Overall agreement with the tumor board classification was substantial (κ=0.71). Results were similar across specialties, years of experience and hospital category. The ESCC score can help improve communication among clinicians involved in oncology care. Copyright © 2016 by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network.

  17. Motoneuron differentiation of immortalized human spinal cord cell lines.

    PubMed

    Li, R; Thode, S; Zhou, J; Richard, N; Pardinas, J; Rao, M S; Sah, D W

    2000-02-01

    Human motoneuron cell lines will be valuable tools for spinal cord research and drug discovery. To create such cell lines, we immortalized NCAM(+)/neurofilament(+) precursors from human embryonic spinal cord with a tetracycline repressible v-myc oncogene. Clonal NCAM(+)/neurofilament(+) cell lines differentiated exclusively into neurons within 1 week. These neurons displayed extensive processes, exhibited immunoreactivity for mature neuron-specific markers such as tau and synaptophysin, and fired action potentials upon current injection. Moreover, a clonal precursor cell line gave rise to multiple types of spinal cord neurons, including ChAT(+)/Lhx3(+)/Lhx4(+) motoneurons and GABA(+) interneurons. These neuronal restricted precursor cell lines will expedite the elucidation of molecular mechanisms that regulate the differentiation, maturation and survival of specific subsets of spinal cord neurons, and the identification and validation of novel drug targets for motoneuron diseases and spinal cord injury.

  18. Epidemiologic change of patients with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Shin, Ji Cheol; Kim, Dae Hyun; Yu, Su Jin; Yang, Hea Eun; Yoon, Seo Yeon

    2013-02-01

    To evaluate the epidemiologic change of patients with spinal cord injury who were admitted to a Rehabilitation Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, during 1987-1996 and 2004-2008. Medical records of 629 patients with spinal cord injury admitted to the Rehabilitation Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, from 2004 to 2008 were collected and reviewed retrospectively. The male-to-female ratio decreased to 2.86:1, the mean age at injury increased, nontraumatic etiology increased, traffic accident remained to be the most common in traumatic spinal cord injury, and falling increased significantly. Tumor was the most common etiology in nontraumatic spinal cord injury, tetraplegia and incomplete injuries occurred more than paraplegia and complete injuries, indwelling catheter was the most common voiding method, and the duration of hospitalization decreased. Many trends changed in epidemiology of spinal cord injury.

  19. Neonatal spinal cord injury after an uncomplicated vaginal delivery.

    PubMed

    Goetz, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Neonatal spinal cord injury has been reported after traumatic births and as a consequence of underlying lesions in the spinal cord. This report describes an infant who was born with bilateral flaccid paralysis of the upper extremities after an atraumatic, noninstrumented vaginal delivery. The infant was otherwise neurologically intact. The infant was initially thought to exhibit bilateral brachial plexus injury. However, magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated an upper cervical spinal cord hemorrhage, with no underlying lesions of the spinal cord or surrounding vasculature. This case highlights the importance of thoroughly evaluating any neurologic deficit in the newborn, and suggests that normal mechanical forces of labor and delivery may be sufficient to cause damage to the newborn spinal cord.

  20. Spinal cord injury following operative shoulder intervention: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Cleveland, Christine; Walker, Heather

    2015-01-01

    Context Cervical myelopathy is a spinal cord dysfunction that results from extrinsic compression of the spinal cord, its blood supply, or both. It is the most common cause of spinal cord dysfunction in patients greater than 55 years of age. Findings: A 57-year-old male with right shoulder septic arthritis underwent surgical debridement of his right shoulder and sustained a spinal cord injury intraoperatively. The most likely etiology is damage to the cervical spinal cord during difficult intubation requiring multiple attempts in this patient with underlying asymptomatic severe cervical stenosis. Conclusion Although it is not feasible to perform imaging studies on all patients undergoing intubation for surgery, this patient's outcome would suggest consideration of inclusion of additional pre-surgical screening examination techniques, such as testing for a positive Hoffman's reflex, is appropriate to detect asymptomatic patients who may have underlying cervical stenosis. PMID:24679185

  1. Use of wavelet energy for spinal cord vibration analysis during spinal surgery.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yu; Zhang, Jianxun; Xue, Yuan

    2013-12-01

    An online non-contact measurement system using a laser displacement sensor was developed for obtaining the vibration amplitude of spinal cord and hard tissue. The discrete wavelet transform was used to extract the distinctive features of tissue vibration signals. The spinal cord and spinal cancellous bone can be discriminated by the comparison of wavelet energy over a characteristic scale. We also derived the integro-differential equation of motion to describe the spinal cord vibration excited by the motion of bone. Experimental results show that the method works well in identifying spinal cord and bone. However, available viscoelastic constants cannot describe the high-frequency features of spinal cord. The examined issue of tissue vibration due to the operation power device is a significant problem. The proposed method can be used by a surgery robot, and then spinal surgery may greatly benefit from the enhanced safety of robotics. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Identification of Spinal Cord MicroRNA and Gene Signatures in a Model of Chronic Stress-Induced Visceral Hyperalgesia in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Bradesi, Sylvie; Karagiannides, Iordanes; Bakirtzi, Kyriaki; Joshi, Swapna Mahurkar; Koukos, Georgios; Iliopoulos, Dimitrios; Pothoulakis, Charalabos; Mayer, Emeran A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Animal studies have shown that