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Sample records for induced viral hepatitis

  1. Viral Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... with hepatitis? How does a pregnant woman pass hepatitis B virus to her baby? If I have hepatitis B, what does my baby need so that she ... Can I breastfeed my baby if I have hepatitis B? More information on viral hepatitis What is hepatitis? ...

  2. [Viral hepatitis during pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Gutkowski, Krzysztof; Gutkowska, Dorota; Lepiech, Jacek

    2006-10-01

    Viral hepatitis is one of the most common liver diseases appearing during pregnancy. Prevention against hepatotropic viruses is restricted due to lack of vaccines being effective in induction of efficient immunization in the majority of these microorganisms. In general, there is no possibility of active immunization against hepatotropic viruses except type A and B viral hepatitis. An issue of viral hepatitis in pregnancy as an aspect of potential risk factor connected with infection of pregnant women and a fetus has been described in this paper. Furthermore, the most important topics in the field of the epidemiology, prophylaxis and possible treatment options of viral hepatitis A, B, C, D, E and G have been discussed. The newest reports of pregnant women lamivudine therapy as a preventive treatment against vertical transmission during delivery have been reviewed. Rarly diagnosed viral hepatitis caused by herpes simplex virus, cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus and adenoviruses have been characterized as well.

  3. Fulminant viral hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Jayakumar, Saumya; Chowdhury, Raiyan; Ye, Carrie; Karvellas, Constantine J

    2013-07-01

    Acute liver failure (ALF) is a condition wherein the previously healthy liver rapidly deteriorates, resulting in jaundice, encephalopathy, and coagulopathy. There are approximately 2000 cases per year of ALF in the United States. Viral causes (fulminant viral hepatitis [FVH]) are the predominant cause of ALF in developing countries. Given the ease of spread of viral hepatitis and the high morbidity and mortality associated with ALF, a systematic approach to the diagnosis and treatment of FVH is required. In this review, the authors describe the viral causes of ALF and review the intensive care unit management of patients with FVH. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Immigration and viral hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Suraj; Carballo, Manuel; Feld, Jordan J; Janssen, Harry L A

    2015-08-01

    WHO estimates reveal that the global prevalence of viral hepatitis may be as high as 500 million, with an annual mortality rate of up to 1.3 million individuals. The majority of this global burden of disease is borne by nations of the developing world with high rates of vertical and iatrogenic transmission of HBV and HCV, as well as poor access to healthcare. In 2013, 3.2% of the global population (231 million individuals) migrated into a new host nation. Migrants predominantly originate from the developing countries of the south, into the developed economies of North America and Western Europe. This mass migration of individuals from areas of high-prevalence of viral hepatitis poses a unique challenge to the healthcare systems of the host nations. Due to a lack of universal standards for screening, vaccination and treatment of viral hepatitis, the burden of chronic liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma continues to increase among migrant populations globally. Efforts to increase case identification and treatment among migrants have largely been limited to small outreach programs in urban centers, such that the majority of migrants with viral hepatitis continue to remain unaware of their infection. This review summarizes the data on prevalence of viral hepatitis and burden of chronic liver disease among migrants, current standards for screening and treatment of immigrants and refugees, and efforts to improve the identification and treatment of viral hepatitis among migrants.

  5. Diagnosis of viral hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Easterbrook, Philippa J; Roberts, Teri; Sands, Anita; Peeling, Rosanna

    2017-05-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections and HIV-HBV and HCV coinfection are major causes of chronic liver disease worldwide. Testing and diagnosis is the gateway for access to both treatment and prevention services, but there remains a large burden of undiagnosed infection globally. We review the global epidemiology, key challenges in the current hepatitis testing response, new tools to support the hepatitis global response (2016-2020 Global Hepatitis Health Sector strategy, and 2017 WHO guidelines on hepatitis testing) and future directions and innovations in hepatitis diagnostics. Key challenges in the current hepatitis testing response include lack of quality-assured serological and low-cost virological in-vitro diagnostics, limited facilities for testing, inadequate data to guide country-specific hepatitis testing approaches, stigmatization of those with or at risk of viral hepatitis and lack of guidelines on hepatitis testing for resource-limited settings. The new Global Hepatitis Health Sector strategy sets out goals for elimination of viral hepatitis as a public health threat by 2030 and gives outcome targets for reductions in new infections and mortality, as well as service delivery targets that include testing, diagnosis and treatment. The 2017 WHO hepatitis testing guidelines for adults, adolescents and children in low-income and middle-income countries outline the public health approach to strengthen and expand current testing practices for viral hepatitis and addresses who to test (testing approaches), which serological and virological assays to use (testing strategies) as well as interventions to promote linkage to prevention and care. Future directions and innovations in hepatitis testing include strategies to improve access such as through use of existing facility and community-based testing opportunities for hepatitis testing, near-patient or point-of-care assays for virological markers (nucleic acid testing and HCV

  6. Diagnosis of viral hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Easterbrook, Philippa J.; Roberts, Teri; Sands, Anita; Peeling, Rosanna

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections and HIV–HBV and HCV coinfection are major causes of chronic liver disease worldwide. Testing and diagnosis is the gateway for access to both treatment and prevention services, but there remains a large burden of undiagnosed infection globally. We review the global epidemiology, key challenges in the current hepatitis testing response, new tools to support the hepatitis global response (2016–2020 Global Hepatitis Health Sector strategy, and 2017 WHO guidelines on hepatitis testing) and future directions and innovations in hepatitis diagnostics. Recent findings Key challenges in the current hepatitis testing response include lack of quality-assured serological and low-cost virological in-vitro diagnostics, limited facilities for testing, inadequate data to guide country-specific hepatitis testing approaches, stigmatization of those with or at risk of viral hepatitis and lack of guidelines on hepatitis testing for resource-limited settings. The new Global Hepatitis Health Sector strategy sets out goals for elimination of viral hepatitis as a public health threat by 2030 and gives outcome targets for reductions in new infections and mortality, as well as service delivery targets that include testing, diagnosis and treatment. The 2017 WHO hepatitis testing guidelines for adults, adolescents and children in low-income and middle-income countries outline the public health approach to strengthen and expand current testing practices for viral hepatitis and addresses who to test (testing approaches), which serological and virological assays to use (testing strategies) as well as interventions to promote linkage to prevention and care. Summary Future directions and innovations in hepatitis testing include strategies to improve access such as through use of existing facility and community-based testing opportunities for hepatitis testing, near-patient or point-of-care assays for

  7. [Epidemiology of viral hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Kaić, Bernard; Vilibić-Cavlek, Tatjana; Filipović, Sanja Kurecić; Nemeth-Blazić, Tatjana; Pem-Novosel, Iva; Vucina, Vesna Visekruna; Simunović, Aleksandar; Zajec, Martina; Radić, Ivan; Pavlić, Jasmina; Glamocanin, Marica; Gjenero-Margan, Ira

    2013-10-01

    Understanding the country-specific epidemiology of disease, which may vary greatly among countries, is crucial for identifying the most appropriate preventive and control measures. An overview of the local epidemiology of viral hepatitis in Croatia is given in this paper. The overall prevalence of hepatitis B in Croatia is low (less than 2% HBsAg carriers in the general population). Hepatitis B incidence and prevalence began to decline significantly following the introduction of universal hepatitis B vaccination in 1999. Information on HBsAg seroprevalence is derived from routine testing of certain subpopulations (pregnant women, blood donors) and seroprevalence studies mostly targeted at high-risk populations. Universal childhood vaccination against hepatitis B remains the main preventive measure. We recommend testing for immunity one to two months after the third dose of hepatitis B vaccine for health-care workers. The incidence and prevalence of hepatitis C have also been declining in the general population. The main preventive measures are ensuring safety of blood products, prevention of drug abuse, and harm reduction programs for intravenous drug users. Hepatitis A incidence has declined dramatically since fifty years ago, when thousands of cases were reported annually. In the last five years, an average of twenty cases have been reported per year. The reduction of hepatitis A is a consequence of improved personal and community hygiene and sanitation. Hepatitis D has not been reported in Croatia. The risk of hepatitis D will get to be even smaller as the proportion of population vaccinated against hepatitis B builds up. Hepatitis E is reported only sporadically in Croatia, mostly in persons occupationally in contact with pigs and in travelers to endemic countries. In conclusion, Croatia is a low prevalence country for hepatitides A, B and C. Hepatitis D has not been reported to occur in Croatia and there are only sporadic cases of hepatitis E. Since hepatitis

  8. Inducible nitric oxide synthase expression in chronic viral hepatitis. Evidence for a virus-induced gene upregulation.

    PubMed Central

    Majano, P L; García-Monzón, C; López-Cabrera, M; Lara-Pezzi, E; Fernández-Ruiz, E; García-Iglesias, C; Borque, M J; Moreno-Otero, R

    1998-01-01

    Increased nitric oxide (NO) production may contribute to the pathological changes featuring in some inflammatory diseases, but the role of NO in chronic viral hepatitis is still unknown. We compared the inducible NO synthase (NOS2) expression in the liver of patients with chronic viral hepatitis with that of both nonviral liver disease and histologically normal liver. NOS2 expression was assessed by immunohistochemical and in situ hybridization studies of liver biopsy sections. An intense hepatocellular NOS2 reactivity was detected in chronic viral hepatitis, whereas it was weakly or not observed in nonviral liver disease or normal liver, respectively. In addition, we determined whether the hepatitis B virus (HBV) might regulate the synthesis of this enzyme. NOS2 mRNA and protein levels as well as enzyme activity were assessed in cytokine-stimulated HBV-transfected and untransfected hepatoma cells. Transfection with either HBV genome or HBV X gene resulted in induction of NOS2 mRNA expression, and the maximal induction of this transcript and NO production was observed in cytokine-stimulated HBV-transfected cells. These results indicate that hepatotropic viral infections are able to upregulate the NOS2 gene expression in human hepatocytes, suggesting that NO may mediate important pathogenic events in the course of chronic viral hepatitis. PMID:9525976

  9. [Prevention of viral hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Bruguera, Miguel

    2006-12-01

    Prevention of viral hepatitis infection involves health measures designed to avert transmission of viral agents and promote the use of gammaglobulin and vaccines. The availability of safe drinking water and improvements in quality of life result in better individual hygiene; these factors have had the greatest impact on hepatitis A prevention. Serum gammaglobulin administration has been replaced by vaccinations for pre-exposure, and to a great extent for post-exposure prophylaxis because of the progressively lower anti-HAV content of gammaglobulin and the short duration of the protective effect. Universal vaccination in childhood is the recommended measure for controlling hepatitis A. Adults belonging to high-risk groups should also undergo vaccination. The incidence of hepatitis B has decreased worldwide because of universal vaccination programs, initiated in preadolescence and childhood. Prevention of hepatitis C requires control of situations in which there is a likelihood of parenteral infection with the virus. Post-transfusion hepatitis has been virtually eradicated, but considerable effort is still needed to prevent nosocomial hepatitis.

  10. Murine viral hepatitis involves NK cell depletion associated with virus-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    LEHOUX, M; JACQUES, A; LUSIGNAN, S; LAMONTAGNE, L

    2004-01-01

    Mouse hepatitis virus type 3 (MHV3), a coronavirus, is an excellent animal model for the study of immunological disorders related to acute and chronic hepatitis. In this study, we have verified if the fulminant hepatitis induced by MHV3 could be related to an impairment of innate immunity. Groups of three C57BL/6 mice were infected with the pathogenic L2-MHV3 or attenuated YAC-MHV3 viruses, and the natural killer (NK) cell populations from liver, spleen and bone marrow were analysed. The percentage of intrahepatic NK1·1+T cell receptor (TCR)− cells did not increase while NK1·1+TCRinter cells decreased in both L2-MHV3- and YAC-MHV3-infected mice. Concurrently, splenic and myeloid NK1·1+ cells decreased in L2-MHV3-infected mice. However, the cytotoxic activity of NK cells increased in liver and decreased in bone marrow from pathogenic L2-MHV3-infected mice while no modification was detected in YAC-MHV3-infected mice. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that both normal and larger splenic or myeloid NK cells decreased more in pathogenic L2-MHV3-infected mice than in attenuated YAC-MHV3-infected mice. In vitro viral infections of interleukin (IL)-15-stimulated lymphoid cells from liver and bone marrow revealed that L2-MHV3 induced higher decreases in cell viability of NK1·1+ cells than the YAC-MHV3 variant. The NK cell decreases were due to the viral permissivity leading to cytopathic effects characterized by cell rounding, syncytia formation and apoptosis. Larger NK+ syncytia were observed in L2-MHV3-infected cells than in YAC-MHV3-infected cells. These results suggest that NK cell production is impaired by viral infection favouring fulminant hepatitis. PMID:15196242

  11. Transposon mouse models to elucidate the genetic mechanisms of hepatitis B viral induced hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Amy P; Tschida, Barbara R; Lo, Lilian H; Moriarity, Branden S; Rowlands, Dewi K; Largaespada, David A; Keng, Vincent W

    2015-01-01

    The major type of human liver cancer is hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and there are currently many risk factors that contribute to this deadly disease. The majority of HCC occurrences are associated with chronic hepatitis viral infection, and hepatitis B viral (HBV) infection is currently a major health problem in Eastern Asia. Elucidating the genetic mechanisms associated with HBV-induced HCC has been difficult due to the heterogeneity and genetic complexity associated with this disease. A repertoire of animal models has been broadly used to study the pathophysiology and to develop potential treatment regimens for HBV-associated HCC. The use of these animal models has provided valuable genetic information and has been an important contributor to uncovering the factors involved in liver malignant transformation, invasion and metastasis. Recently, transposon-based mouse models are becoming more widely used in liver cancer research to interrogate the genome by forward genetics and also used to validate genes rapidly in a reverse genetic manner. Importantly, these transposon-based rapid reverse genetic mouse models could become crucial in testing potential therapeutic agents before proceeding to clinical trials in human. Therefore, this review will cover the use of transposon-based mouse models to address the problems of liver cancer, especially HBV-associated HCC occurrences in Asia. PMID:26576100

  12. Viral Hepatitis: Information for Gay and Bisexual Men

    MedlinePlus

    VIRAL HEPATITIS Information for Gay and Bisexual Men What is viral hepatitis? Viral hepatitis is an infection of the liver caused by ... United States, the most common types of viral hepatitis are Hepatitis A, Hepatitis B, and Hepatitis C. ...

  13. Viral Hepatitis: A through E and Beyond

    MedlinePlus

    Viral Hepatitis: A through E and Beyond NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse What is viral hepatitis? Viral hepatitis is inflammation of the liver caused ...

  14. [The ABC of viral hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Van Bambeke, F

    2008-03-01

    Viral hepatitis has long been under-diagnosed. Hepatitis A is an acute disease, while patients infected by hepatitis B and hepatitis C viruses are likely to develop chronical infections and severe complications (cancer, cirrhosis). The current treatment of hepatitis B and C consists in alpha interferon (preferably under its pegylated form), in combination with ribavirin for hepatitis C. The frequent and severe adverse effects of interferon-based therapy constitute, however, a major limiting factor (reactions at the injection site, flu-like syndrome, neurological disorders, ...). For hepatitis B, two alternatives are available so far, namely lamivudine and adefovir (used as a prodrug with highe oral bioavailability).

  15. Recombinant covalently closed circular hepatitis B virus DNA induces prolonged viral persistence in immunocompetent mice.

    PubMed

    Qi, Zhihua; Li, Gaiyun; Hu, Hao; Yang, Chunhui; Zhang, Xiaoming; Leng, Qibin; Xie, Youhua; Yu, Demin; Zhang, Xinxin; Gao, Yueqiu; Lan, Ke; Deng, Qiang

    2014-07-01

    It remains crucial to develop a laboratory model for studying hepatitis B virus (HBV) chronic infection. We hereby produced a recombinant covalently closed circular DNA (rcccDNA) in view of the key role of cccDNA in HBV persistence. A loxP-chimeric intron was engineered into a monomeric HBV genome in a precursor plasmid (prcccDNA), which was excised using Cre/loxP-mediated DNA recombination into a 3.3-kb rcccDNA in the nuclei of hepatocytes. The chimeric intron was spliced from RNA transcripts without interrupting the HBV life cycle. In cultured hepatoma cells, cotransfection of prcccDNA and pCMV-Cre (encoding Cre recombinase) resulted in accumulation of nuclear rcccDNA that was heat stable and epigenetically organized as a minichromosome. A mouse model of HBV infection was developed by hydrodynamic injection of prcccDNA. In the presence of Cre recombinase, rcccDNA was induced in the mouse liver with effective viral replication and expression, triggering a compromised T-cell response against HBV. Significant T-cell hyporesponsiveness occurred in mice receiving 4 μg prcccDNA, resulting in prolonged HBV antigenemia for up to 9 weeks. Persistent liver injury was observed as elevated alanine transaminase activity in serum and sustained inflammatory infiltration in the liver. Although a T-cell dysfunction was induced similarly, mice injected with a plasmid containing a linear HBV replicon showed rapid viral clearance within 2 weeks. Collectively, our study provides an innovative approach for producing a cccDNA surrogate that established HBV persistence in immunocompetent mice. It also represents a useful model system in vitro and in vivo for evaluating antiviral treatments against HBV cccDNA. Importance: (i) Unlike plasmids that contain a linear HBV replicon, rcccDNA established HBV persistence with sustained liver injury in immunocompetent mice. This method could be a prototype for developing a mouse model of chronic HBV infection. (ii) An exogenous intron was

  16. [Recent acquisitions on viral hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Resti, M; Tucci, F; Vierucci, A

    1990-01-01

    In the last years the research on viral hepatitis let to better understand the biological, molecular, immunological and epidemiologic characteristics of the viruses that are responsible for hepatitis. The first studied virus was hepatitis B virus (HBv). The scientific attention is still, today, focused on that virus since new markers of infectivity and biological importance in early diagnosis and in disease evolution have been found. The most important result in the last years in the field of viral hepatitis has been, however, the identification of agents responsible for Non-A-Non-B hepatitis. Its epidemiology and clinical importance are discussed in the present paper. Virus C is the most important parenteral agent of NANB hepatitis. Its epidemiology in at risk populations and its role in post-transfusional and cryptogenetic hepatitis are here discussed. The research of new markers of HCV infection is today considered a main goal since the role of the only marker now available is still under discussion.

  17. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha induced by hepatitis B virus core mediating the immune response for hepatitis B viral clearance in mice model.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Horng-Tay; Tsai, Hwei-Fang; Chyuan, I-Tsu; Liao, Hsiu-Jung; Chen, Chun-Jen; Chen, Pei-Jer; Hsu, Ping-Ning

    2014-01-01

    Persistent hepatitis B viral (HBV) infection results in chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). An efficient control of virus infections requires the coordinated actions of both innate and adaptive immune responses. In order to define the role of innate immunity effectors against HBV, viral clearance was studied in a panel of immunodeficient mouse strains by the hydrodynamic injection approach. Our results demonstrate that HBV viral clearance is not changed in IFN-α/β receptor (IFNAR), RIG-I, MDA5, MYD88, NLRP3, ASC, and IL-1R knock-out mice, indicating that these innate immunity effectors are not required for HBV clearance. In contrast, HBV persists in the absence of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) or in mice treated with the soluble TNF receptor blocker, Etanercept. In these mice, there was an increase in PD-1-expressing CD8+ T-cells and an increase of serum HBV DNA, HBV core, and surface antigen expression as well as viral replication within the liver. Furthermore, the induction of TNF-α in clearing HBV is dependent on the HBV core, and TNF blockage eliminated HBV core-induced viral clearance effects. Finally, the intra-hepatic leukocytes (IHLs), but not the hepatocytes, are the cell source responsible for TNF-α production induced by HBcAg. These results provide evidences for TNF-α mediated innate immune mechanisms in HBV clearance and explain the mechanism of HBV reactivation during therapy with TNF blockage agents.

  18. Viral hepatitis and the surgeon

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, A. J.; Assy, N.; Moser, M.

    2005-01-01

    Background. Viral hepatitis is an infection of the liver caused by one or more of six known (HAV-HGV) hepatotropic viruses. It is a common problem among health care workers and their patients. Surgeons are at particular risk of both acquiring and transmitting some of these viruses from and to their patients. Unfortunately, specific immunoprophylaxis for viral hepatitis is presently limited to protecting against the spread of hepatitis A and B viral infections, leaving a high degree of vigilance and careful surgical technique as the only means available to prevent the transmission of other viruses relative to the surgeon. The purpose of this paper is to review the various forms of viral hepatitis including the nature of the virus, serologic testing, clinical features, epidemiology (with specific reference to those issues that arise in surgical practice), treatment and prevention. PMID:18333162

  19. Comparative analysis of portal hepatic infiltrating leucocytes in acute drug-induced liver injury, idiopathic autoimmune and viral hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Foureau, D M; Walling, T L; Maddukuri, V; Anderson, W; Culbreath, K; Kleiner, D E; Ahrens, W A; Jacobs, C; Watkins, P B; Fontana, R J; Chalasani, N; Talwalkar, J; Lee, W M; Stolz, A; Serrano, J; Bonkovsky, H L

    2015-01-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is often caused by innate and adaptive host immune responses. Characterization of inflammatory infiltrates in the liver may improve understanding of the underlying pathogenesis of DILI. This study aimed to enumerate and characterize leucocytes infiltrating liver tissue from subjects with acute DILI (n = 32) versus non-DILI causes of acute liver injury (n = 25). Immunostains for CD11b/CD4 (Kupffer and T helper cells), CD3/CD20 (T and B cells) and CD8/CD56 [T cytotoxic and natural killer (NK) cells] were evaluated in biopsies from subjects with acute DILI, either immunoallergic (IAD) or autoimmune (AID) and idiopathic autoimmune (AIH) and viral hepatitis (VH) and correlated with clinical and pathological features. All biopsies showed numerous CD8+ T cells and macrophages. DILI cases had significantly fewer B lymphocytes than AIH and VH and significantly fewer NK cells than VH. Prominent plasma cells were unusual in IAD (three of 10 cases), but were associated strongly with AIH (eight of nine) and also observed in most with AID (six of nine). They were also found in five of 10 cases with VH. Liver biopsies from subjects with DILI were characterized by low counts of mature B cells and NK cells in portal triads in contrast to VH. NK cells were found only in cases of VH, whereas AIH and VH both showed higher counts of B cells than DILI. Plasma cells were associated most strongly with AIH and less so with AID, but were uncommon in IAD. PMID:25418487

  20. Recombinant cccDNA of hepatitis B virus induces long-term viral persistence with chronic hepatitis in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Li, Gaiyun; Zhu, Yuanfei; Shao, Dianhui; Chang, Hao; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhou, Dongming; Gao, Yueqiu; Lan, Ke; Deng, Qiang

    2017-07-27

    Covalently closed circular (ccc) DNA of hepatitis B virus (HBV) is critical for viral persistence in vivo. We recently reported a technique involving recombinant (r) cccDNA of HBV by site-specific DNA recombination. Using hydrodynamic injection, rcccDNA induces a temporarily prolonged HBV anigenemia in immunocompetent mice, similar to acute resolving HBV infection. In this study, we simulated the pathophysiological impact of chronic hepatitis by which to reproduce (r)cccDNA persistence in mouse models. We showed that rcccDNA achieved long-lasting persistence in the presence of a compromised immune response or when transcriptional activity was repressed. To closely mimic chronic hepatitis, we used a replication-defective recombinant adenoviral (Ad) vector to deliver rcccDNA to the liver, which led to prominent HBV persistence throughout the experiment duration (>62 weeks) in Alb-Cre transgenic mice. A sustained necroinflammatory response and fibrosis were identified in mouse livers, with dysplastic lesions commonly seen during the late stage of viral persistence, analogous to the progressive pathology of clinical chronic hepatitis. (r)cccDNA was intrinsically stable in vivo, enabling long-term persistence in the context of chronic hepatitis. Viral persistence, in turn, may promote progression of chronic liver disease. Our study also presented a valuable surrogate model of HBV cccDNA persistence in mice that could greatly advance our understanding of the pathogenesis of chronic hepatitis B. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2017 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  1. Hepatitis C viral life cycle.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Tetsuro; Ishii, Koji; Aizaki, Hideki; Wakita, Takaji

    2007-10-10

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) has been recognized as a major cause of chronic liver diseases worldwide. Molecular studies of the virus became possible with the successful cloning of its genome in 1989. Although much work remains to be done regarding early and late stages of the HCV life cycle, significant progress has been made with respect to the molecular biology of HCV, especially the viral protein processing and the genome replication. This review summarizes our current understanding of genomic organization of HCV, features of the viral protein characteristics, and the viral life cycle.

  2. Aplastica Anemia And Viral Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Cudillo, Laura

    2009-01-01

    Acquired aplastic anemia (aAA) is a severe and rare disease, characterized by hematopoietic bone marrow failure and peripheral cytopenia. The pathophysiology is immune mediated in most cases, activated T1 lymphocytes have been identified as effector cells. The disease can be successfully treated with combined immunosuppressive therapy or allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Hepatitis-associated aplastic anemia (HAA) is a syndrome of bone marrow failure following the development of acute seronegative hepatitis. HAA syndrome most often affects young males who presented severe pancytopenia two to three months after an episode of acute hepatitis. The clinical course of hepatitis is more frequently benign but a fulminant severe course is also described. The bone marrow failure can be explosive and severe and it is usually fatal if untreated, no correlations have been observed between severity of hepatitis and AA. In none of the studies a specific virus could be identified and most cases are seronegative for known hepatitis viruses. The clinical characteristics and response to immunotherapy indicate a central role for immune-mediated mechanism in the pathogenesis of HAA. The initial target organ of the immune response is the liver as suggested by the time interval between hepatitis and the onset of bone marrow failure. Liver histology is characterized by T cell infiltrating the parenchyma as reported in acute hepatitis. Recently in HAA it has been demonstrated intrahepatic and blood lymphocytes with T cell repertoire similar to that of confirmed viral acute hepatitis. The expanded T cell clones return to a normal distribution after response to immunosuppressive treatment, suggesting the antigen or T cell clearance. Therapeutic options are the same as acquired aplastic anemia. PMID:21415960

  3. Aplastica anemia and viral hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Cudillo, Laura

    2009-12-26

    Acquired aplastic anemia (aAA) is a severe and rare disease, characterized by hematopoietic bone marrow failure and peripheral cytopenia. The pathophysiology is immune mediated in most cases, activated T1 lymphocytes have been identified as effector cells. The disease can be successfully treated with combined immunosuppressive therapy or allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Hepatitis-associated aplastic anemia (HAA) is a syndrome of bone marrow failure following the development of acute seronegative hepatitis. HAA syndrome most often affects young males who presented severe pancytopenia two to three months after an episode of acute hepatitis. The clinical course of hepatitis is more frequently benign but a fulminant severe course is also described. The bone marrow failure can be explosive and severe and it is usually fatal if untreated, no correlations have been observed between severity of hepatitis and AA. In none of the studies a specific virus could be identified and most cases are seronegative for known hepatitis viruses. The clinical characteristics and response to immunotherapy indicate a central role for immune-mediated mechanism in the pathogenesis of HAA. The initial target organ of the immune response is the liver as suggested by the time interval between hepatitis and the onset of bone marrow failure. Liver histology is characterized by T cell infiltrating the parenchyma as reported in acute hepatitis. Recently in HAA it has been demonstrated intrahepatic and blood lymphocytes with T cell repertoire similar to that of confirmed viral acute hepatitis. The expanded T cell clones return to a normal distribution after response to immunosuppressive treatment, suggesting the antigen or T cell clearance. Therapeutic options are the same as acquired aplastic anemia.

  4. [Viral hepatitis of enteric origin].

    PubMed

    Debord, T; Buisson, Y

    1998-01-01

    Hepatitis viruses of oral-fecal origin are responsible for a high morbidity and mortality throughout the world, even if they never result in chronic hepatitis. Two viruses, the virus of hepatitis A (VHA) and of hepatitis E (VHE) are at present the cause of severe viral hepatitis of enteric origin. Water is the principle vector in the spread of these viruses. However, the epidemiological aspects vary according to the pathogenic agent. VHA is excreted in a highly concentrated form in the feces for a relatively short period of time. Since it resists in an exterior environment, the virus remains infectious for a long time. VHE is excreted for a short period of time and in low concentrations. The viral particles are fragile in vitro and their variability in the environment is little known. The possible reservoir role of certain animals has been envisaged. Epidemics arise especially in countries suffering from poor hygiene and massive water pollution. Hepatitis A should no longer be considered a benign disease of childhood. The progress made in hygiene and economic development in industrialized countries have made contacts with this virus scarce, rendering the populations more receptive to it and epidemics more widespread. When the sickness occurs later in life, infection is more often symptomatic and can be serious, resulting sometimes long-term indisposition. Hepatitis E has a vast distribution throughout the world and manifests itself either in epidemic or endemic-sporadic form in many poor countries. In developed countries, it comes about mostly as a result of imported pathology, even if there exists a "substratum" of infection in these areas. The main clinical aspects, such as we were able to study them in 39 cases of military men from Tchad, Guyana and Somalia, are comparable to those of hepatitis A. The reasons for the particular gravity of symptoms in pregnant women are unknown. These affections have no specific treatment. In the field of prevention, vaccination

  5. Viral hepatitis and liver cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ringehan, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Hepatitis B and C viruses are a global health problem causing acute and chronic infections that can lead to liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). These infections are the leading cause for HCC worldwide and are associated with significant mortality, accounting for more than 1.3 million deaths per year. Owing to its high incidence and resistance to treatment, liver cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide, with HCC representing approximately 90% of all primary liver cancer cases. The majority of viral-associated HCC cases develop in subjects with liver cirrhosis; however, hepatitis B virus infection can promote HCC development without prior end-stage liver disease. Thus, understanding the role of hepatitis B and C viral infections in HCC development is essential for the future design of treatments and therapies for this cancer. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on hepatitis B and C virus hepatocarcinogenesis and highlight direct and indirect risk factors. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Human oncogenic viruses’. PMID:28893941

  6. [Imported viral hepatitis in the Czech Republic].

    PubMed

    Dlhý, J; Benes, C

    2007-04-01

    Through the analysis of notified viral hepatitis, trends in the occurrence of imported cases in the Czech Republic have been specified, the aim of which was to draw attention to the epidemiologically important aspects of travelling abroad. In the software environment of Epi Info version 6.04d, nationwide databases of communicable diseases over the period of 1993-2005 were analysed. The period was defined with respect to the availability of necessary data in the Epidat information system for communicable disease reporting in the Czech Republic. During the years 1993-2005, 12,091 cases of communicable diseases were imported into the Czech Republic of which viral hepatitis accounted for 5.7 % (685). The rates by diagnosis were as follows: viral hepatitis A 61 %, acute viral hepatitis B 15 %, chronic viral hepatitis C 11 %, viral hepatitis E 5 %, acute viral hepatitis C 3 %, chronic viral hepatitis B 3 % and other cases of viral hepatitis 2 %. The rates by the "imported by" variable: Czech tourists 47.2 %, foreigners 32.8 %, Czech business travellers 20.0 %. The diseases were most commonly imported from the following countries: Ukraine 13 %, Slovakia 8 %, Southern Europe 6 %, Egypt 6 % and Russia 5 %. In the Czech Republic, communicable diseases are reported using the Epidat system. The Epidat database analysis focused on reported cases of imported viral hepatitis represents an important starting point for assessing health risks associated with travelling abroad.

  7. Update on chronic viral hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, K; Alexander, G

    2001-01-01

    Many recent and significant advances in the field of chronic viral hepatitis, including therapy, suggest that an update on chronic hepatitis is timely.
Chronic hepatitis B virus infection remains a significant worldwide cause of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, despite the wide availability of a long established and effective vaccine. Transmission occurs via perinatal, sexual, and parenteral routes (particularly intravenous drug abuse and although blood products still carry a risk, this is now extremely low in Western countries). Only a minority of infected adult cases develop chronic hepatitis but in children under 1 year, 90% develop chronic hepatitis. The clinical spectrum of chronic liver injury ranges from mild inflammation to end stage liver cirrhosis. Interferon alfa has been the mainstay of treatment for patients with active disease but nucleoside analogues (lamivudine and adefovir) are now available with similar efficacy. Patients with end stage liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma can be offered transplantation but infection in the graft is commonplace. The combination of hepatitis B immunoglobulin and newer antiviral drugs reduce the incidence and severity of graft infection significantly.
The hepatitis C virus epidemic of the latter half of the 20th century now affects more than 1% of populations worldwide. This RNA virus is spread parenterally and is becoming the leading indication for liver transplantation. The majority of patients develop chronic hepatitis, which may be progressive, evolving to significant liver disease (cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma) in about 20% cases after decades. Treatment with the combination of interferon alfa and ribavirin is successful in up to 40% cases. Liver transplantation is a therapeutic option for some but graft infection is universal and often complicated by progressive liver fibrosis. A vaccine remains a remote prospect so that prevention is crucial.
Hepatitis D virus infection

  8. Single-domain intrabodies against hepatitis C virus core inhibit viral propagation and core-induced NFκB activation.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Ryosuke; Saito, Kenji; Matsuda, Mami; Sato, Mitsuru; Kanegae, Yumi; Shi, Guoli; Watashi, Koichi; Aizaki, Hideki; Chiba, Joe; Saito, Izumu; Wakita, Takaji; Suzuki, Tetsuro

    2016-04-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) core plays a key role in viral particle formation and is involved in viral pathogenesis. Here, constructs for single-domain intrabodies consisting of variable regions derived from mouse mAbs against HCV core were established. Expressed single-domain intrabodies were shown to bind to HCV core, and inhibit the growth of cell culture-produced HCV derived from JFH-1 (genotype 2a) and a TH (genotype 1b)/JFH-1 chimera. Adenovirus vectors expressing intrabodies were also capable of reducing HCV propagation. Intrabody expression did not affect viral entry or genome replication of single-round infectious trans-complemented HCV particles. However, intrabody expression reduced intracellular and extracellular infectious titres in CD81-defective Huh7-25 cells transfected with the HCV genome, suggesting that these intrabodies impair HCV assembly. Furthermore, intrabody expression suppressed HCV core-induced NFκB promoter activity. These intrabodies may therefore serve as tools for elucidating the role of core in HCV pathogenesis.

  9. Immunological techniques in viral hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Rehermann, Barbara; Naoumov, Nikolai V

    2007-03-01

    The need to quantitate and monitor immune responses of large patient cohorts with standardized techniques is increasing due to the growing range of treatment options for hepatitis B and hepatitis C, the development of combination therapies, and candidate experimental vaccines for HCV. In addition, advances in immunological techniques have provided new tools for detailed phenotypic and functional analysis of cellular immune responses. At present, there is substantial variation in laboratory protocols, reagents, controls and analysis and presentation of results. Standardization of immunological assays would therefore allow better comparison of results amongst individual laboratories and patient cohorts. The EASL-sponsored and AASLD-endorsed Monothematic Conference on Clinical Immunology in Viral Hepatitis was held at the University College London, United Kingdom, Oct 7-8, 2006 to bring together investigators with research experience in clinical immunology of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections for in-depth discussion, critical evaluation and standardization of immunological assays. This report summarizes the information presented and discussed at the conference, but is not intended to represent a consensus statement. Our aim is to highlight topics and issues that were supported by general agreement and those that were controversial, as well as to provide suggestions for future work.

  10. Immunological aspects in viral hepatitis B and C infection.

    PubMed

    Manea, Irena; Manea, Cristian Nicolae; Miron, Nicolae; Cristea, Victor

    2011-01-01

    Worldwide, viral hepatitis chronic infections are a serious health problem and a very interesting topic for both clinicians and researchers. Viral hepatitis has a variety of clinical forms: mild, inactive or severe and with a slow evolution, whose architectural structure of the hepatic tissue evolves towards cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma. Sometimes, the virally induced hepatic injury evolves spectacularly and rapidly leads to exitus. The factors that generate this evolution pattern depend on the immune response of the host and equally on the viral survival and immune surveillance avoidance strategies. This paper aims to resume new discoveries in the field of immunology of the B and C viral hepatitis infection, from the perspective of the complex interactions between virus and host.

  11. [Microbiological diagnosis of viral hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Alonso, Roberto; Aguilera, Antonio; Córdoba, Juan; Fuertes, Antonio

    2015-11-01

    Liver inflammation or hepatitis has many different causes, both infectious and non-infectious. Among the former, viral infection is responsible for at least half of all hepatitis worldwide. Different viruses have been described with primary tropism for liver tissue. These microorganisms have been successively named with letters of the alphabet: A, B, C, D, E and G. The aim of this paper is to review this heterogeneous group of viruses in its most basic aspects, including clinical implications, treatment, main control, and prophylactic measures and, of special interest, diagnostic approaches, both serological and molecular, which are used for their detection, quantification and characterization. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  12. [Treatment of viral hepatitis C].

    PubMed

    Chassany, O

    1996-12-14

    Viral hepatitis C is a serious public health problem in France by the number of infected patients, the evolutive profile and by the lack of fully efficient therapeutics. However, the risk of developing cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma may not be so high as it has been stated until now. Interferon alpha is at the present time, the only approved drug for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C. Its efficiency on criteria such as normalization of aminotransferases values or negativation of viremia is obtained in less than 25% of patients. The present recommendation is to use 3 MU of interferon alpha, 3 times per week during 12 months. While interferon leads to improvement of histologic lesions, it is not yet proved that a treatment by interferon can reduce, years after, the incidence of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. No therapeutic strategy has been defined yet for the frequent situations of "no response", relapses or presence of factors that reduce the efficacy of treatment (high initial viremia level, genotype 1b, cirrhosis). It is possible that the course of patients having low or no elevation of aminotransferases and/or minimal histologic lesions, is good without any treatment. The efficacy of interferon alone appears insufficient. Thus trials in progress concern associations of antiviral drugs such as vidarabine. In lack of vaccine, preventive treatment is essential and depends upon knowledge of conditions of transmission of the virus. Transmission through blood and intravenous drug addiction represent 60 to 70% of cases of hepatitis C.

  13. [Epidemiology of viral hepatitis in Mexico].

    PubMed

    Panduro, Arturo; Escobedo Meléndez, Griselda; Fierro, Nora A; Ruiz Madrigal, Bertha; Zepeda-Carrillo, Eloy Alfonso; Román, Sonia

    2011-01-01

    The main etiology of liver disease in Mexico is alcohol and viral hepatitis. The aim of the present study was to analyze the current epidemiology of viral hepatitis in Mexico. From 2000 to 2007 the Ministry of Health reported 192 588 cases of hepatitis, 79% HAV, 3.3% HBV, 6% HCV, and 12% without a specific etiologic factor. Due to high endemic areas for HBV infection in native Mexican population, limitations in the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the serological immunoassays used to date and presence of occult hepatitis B in the country, the real prevalence of HBV infection could be even higher than HCV in Mexico. Hepatitis E virus in cirrhotic patients and in porcine farms could at least partially explain the cases of hepatitis that are diagnosed without a specific etiologic agent. Specific strategies to establish control regulations against viral hepatitis infections in Mexico are proposed.

  14. Hepatitis A through E (Viral Hepatitis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the treatment of chronic hepatitis B include alpha interferon and peginterferon, which slow the replication of the ... Chronic hepatitis D is usually treated with pegylated interferon, although other potential treatments are under study. Hepatitis ...

  15. Liver Failure due to Acute Viral Hepatitis (A-E).

    PubMed

    Manka, Paul; Verheyen, Jens; Gerken, Guido; Canbay, Ali

    2016-04-01

    Viral hepatitis is still one of the key causes of acute liver failure (ALF) in the world. A selective literature search of the PubMed database was conducted, including current studies, reviews, meta-analyses, and guidelines. We obtained an overview of ALF due to viral hepatitis in terms of epidemiology, course, and treatment options. Most fulminant viral courses are reported after infection with hepatitis A, B, and B/D, but not with hepatitis C. Hepatitis E is also known to cause ALF but has not gained much attention in recent years. However, more and more autochthonous hepatitis E virus infections have been recently observed in Europe. Reactivation of hepatitis B virus (HBV) under immunosuppressive conditions, such as after intensive chemotherapy, is also an increasing problem. For most viral-induced cases of ALF, liver transplantation represented the only therapeutic option in the past. Today, immediate treatment of HBV-induced ALF with nucleotide or nucleoside analogs is well tolerated and beneficially affects the course of the disease. Although numbers in Western European countries are decreasing rapidly, reliable diagnostic screening for hepatitis A-E is necessary to identify the etiology and to determine those most at risk of developing ALF.

  16. Liver Failure due to Acute Viral Hepatitis (A-E)

    PubMed Central

    Manka, Paul; Verheyen, Jens; Gerken, Guido; Canbay, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background Viral hepatitis is still one of the key causes of acute liver failure (ALF) in the world. Methods A selective literature search of the PubMed database was conducted, including current studies, reviews, meta-analyses, and guidelines. We obtained an overview of ALF due to viral hepatitis in terms of epidemiology, course, and treatment options. Results Most fulminant viral courses are reported after infection with hepatitis A, B, and B/D, but not with hepatitis C. Hepatitis E is also known to cause ALF but has not gained much attention in recent years. However, more and more autochthonous hepatitis E virus infections have been recently observed in Europe. Reactivation of hepatitis B virus (HBV) under immunosuppressive conditions, such as after intensive chemotherapy, is also an increasing problem. For most viral-induced cases of ALF, liver transplantation represented the only therapeutic option in the past. Today, immediate treatment of HBV-induced ALF with nucleotide or nucleoside analogs is well tolerated and beneficially affects the course of the disease. Conclusion Although numbers in Western European countries are decreasing rapidly, reliable diagnostic screening for hepatitis A-E is necessary to identify the etiology and to determine those most at risk of developing ALF. PMID:27413724

  17. Chronic viral hepatitis and its association with liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Tu, Thomas; Bühler, Sandra; Bartenschlager, Ralf

    2017-07-26

    Chronic infection with hepatitis viruses represents the major causative factor for end-stage liver diseases, including liver cirrhosis and primary liver cancer (hepatocellular carcinoma, HCC). In this review, we highlight the current understanding of the molecular mechanisms that drive the hepatocarcinogenesis associated with chronic hepatitis virus infections. While chronic inflammation (associated with a persistent, but impaired anti-viral immune response) plays a major role in HCC initiation and progression, hepatitis viruses can also directly drive liver cancer. The mechanisms by which hepatitis viruses induce HCC include: hepatitis B virus DNA integration into the host cell genome; metabolic reprogramming by virus infection; induction of the cellular stress response pathway by viral gene products; and interference with tumour suppressors. Finally, we summarise the limitations of hepatitis virus-associated HCC model systems and the development of new techniques to circumvent these shortcomings.

  18. Drug Use and Viral Infections (HIV, Hepatitis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... virus can pass it to their baby during pregnancy, whether or not they use drugs. The viral infections of greatest concern related to drug use are HIV and hepatitis. People can reduce their risk of getting or ...

  19. Antifibrotic effect of aloe vera in viral infection-induced hepatic periportal fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Hegazy, Sahar K; El-Bedewy, Mohamed; Yagi, Akira

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the anti-oxidative and anti-fibrotic effects of aloe vera in patients with liver fibrosis. METHODS: Aloe vera high molecular weight fractions (AHM) were processed by patented hyper-dry system in combination of freeze-dry technique with microwave and far infrared-ray radiation. Fifteen healthy volunteers as the control group and 40 patients were included. The patients were randomly subdivided into two equal groups: the conventional group was treated with placebo (starch), and AHM group was treated with 0.15 gm/d AHM, both for 12 consecutive weeks. The patients were investigated before and after treatment. Serum activity of aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), hyaluronic acid (HA), transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and matrixmetalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) were determined. The reduced glutathione (GSH) and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels in liver were assayed and the expression of hepatic α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) was identified by immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: At the start of the study, the hematoxylin and eosin staining revealed fibro-proliferated bile ductules, thick fibrous septa and dense inflammatory cellular infiltration in the patients before treatment. The use of AHM for 12 wk significantly ameliorated the fibrosis, inhibited the inflammation, and resulted in minimal infiltration and minimal fibrosis compared to the conventional group. The enzyme activities of the liver (ALT, AST and ALP) were attenuated after treatment in both groups, and the decrease in the AHM group was more significant as compared with the conventional group. Similar to the AST, the MDA levels were significantly higher before treatment, and were attenuated after treatment in both groups. In contrast, the hepatic glutathione content in the patients were decreased significantly in the AHM group compared to the controls. The serum levels of the fibrosis markers (HA, TGF-β and MMP-2) were also reduced

  20. Antifibrotic effect of aloe vera in viral infection-induced hepatic periportal fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Hegazy, Sahar K; El-Bedewy, Mohamed; Yagi, Akira

    2012-05-07

    To investigate the anti-oxidative and anti-fibrotic effects of aloe vera in patients with liver fibrosis. Aloe vera high molecular weight fractions (AHM) were processed by patented hyper-dry system in combination of freeze-dry technique with microwave and far infrared-ray radiation. Fifteen healthy volunteers as the control group and 40 patients were included. The patients were randomly subdivided into two equal groups: the conventional group was treated with placebo (starch), and AHM group was treated with 0.15 gm/d AHM, both for 12 consecutive weeks. The patients were investigated before and after treatment. Serum activity of aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), hyaluronic acid (HA), transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and matrixmetalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) were determined. The reduced glutathione (GSH) and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels in liver were assayed and the expression of hepatic α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) was identified by immunohistochemistry. At the start of the study, the hematoxylin and eosin staining revealed fibro-proliferated bile ductules, thick fibrous septa and dense inflammatory cellular infiltration in the patients before treatment. The use of AHM for 12 wk significantly ameliorated the fibrosis, inhibited the inflammation, and resulted in minimal infiltration and minimal fibrosis compared to the conventional group. The enzyme activities of the liver (ALT, AST and ALP) were attenuated after treatment in both groups, and the decrease in the AHM group was more significant as compared with the conventional group. Similar to the AST, the MDA levels were significantly higher before treatment, and were attenuated after treatment in both groups. In contrast, the hepatic glutathione content in the patients were decreased significantly in the AHM group compared to the controls. The serum levels of the fibrosis markers (HA, TGF-β and MMP-2) were also reduced significantly after treatment

  1. A Complicated Course of Acute Viral Induced Pharyngitis, Icteric Hepatitis, Acalculous Cholecystitis, and Skin Rash

    PubMed Central

    Erfani, Seddigheh Sadat

    2016-01-01

    This case reveals the complexities and challenges in the diagnosis of acute Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection, indicating the potential relationship between EBV infection and severe icteric hepatitis, acalculous cholecystitis, and lymphocytic vasculitis. We suggest including EBV infectious mononucleosis in the list of differential diagnoses when any of these clinical syndromes (or a combination thereof) occurs without apparent cause, especially in the presence of lymphocytosis. To our knowledge, this is the first report to suggest the possible role of EBV in the pathogenesis of cutaneous lymphocytic vasculitis. Also it is possible that EBV infection triggered the flare-up of the underlying rheumatologic disease. Therefore, it could be assumed that a part of the clinical syndrome (e.g., dermatologic manifestations) might be related to the flare-up of the underlying rheumatologic disease. PMID:27847520

  2. Therapeutic Efficacy and Safety of Paeoniae Radix Rubra Formulae in Relieving Hyperbilirubinemia Induced by Viral Hepatitis: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yin-Qiu; Ma, Xiao; Wang, Jian; Zhao, Yan-Ling; Wang, Jia-Bo; Chen, Zhe; Zhu, Yun; Shan, Li-Mei; Wei, Shi-Zhang; Wang, Ji; Xiao, Xiao-He

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Hyperbilirubinemia is one of the most devastating pathologies induced by various liver diseases. Formulae related to Paeoniae Radix Rubra (PRR) at high doses have been applied to treat hyperbilirubinemia in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis is to assess the efficacy and safety of formulae relevant to high-dose PRR in patients suffering from hyperbilirubinemia induced by viral hepatitis. Methods: We performed a meta-analysis of randomized-controlled clinical trials to evaluate the efficacy and safety of formulae that apply a high dose of PRR for hyperbilirubinemia. Seven databases were searched until April, 2015. All studies were included according to detailed criteria and assessed for methodological quality. The outcome measurements were recorded for further analysis using the RevMan 5.2.11 software. Results: Fifteen articles involving 1323 patients with hyperbilirubinemia were included. Formulae with high-dose PRR might promote the efficacy of either a combined application ([OR: 3.98, 95% CI (2.91, 5.43)]; P < 0.01) or a single application ([OR: 4.00, 95% CI (1.50, 10.68)]; P < 0.01) for hyperbilirubinemia. The indices of TBIL, ALT, and AST significantly decreased ([MD: –75.57, 95% CI (−94.88, −56.26)], [MD: −26.54, 95% CI (−36.19, −16.88)], and ([MD: −28.94, 95% CI (−46.26, −11.61)]; P < 0.01), respectively. In addition, formulae with high-dose PRR could enhance the treatment efficacy of hyperbilirubinemia triggered by hepatitis B ([OR: 2.98, 95% CI (1.75, 5.05)]; P < 0.01). Furthermore, the efficacy was enhanced with an increasing dosage of PRR. Two articles reported that no side effects occurred in clinical trials, and three studies noted that patients presented light digestive tract symptoms. Conclusion: Formulae relevant to high-dose PRR ameliorate hyperbilirubinemia and might constitute a promising therapeutic approach. For widespread acceptance by practitioners, more

  3. Therapeutic Efficacy and Safety of Paeoniae Radix Rubra Formulae in Relieving Hyperbilirubinemia Induced by Viral Hepatitis: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yin-Qiu; Ma, Xiao; Wang, Jian; Zhao, Yan-Ling; Wang, Jia-Bo; Chen, Zhe; Zhu, Yun; Shan, Li-Mei; Wei, Shi-Zhang; Wang, Ji; Xiao, Xiao-He

    2016-01-01

    Hyperbilirubinemia is one of the most devastating pathologies induced by various liver diseases. Formulae related to Paeoniae Radix Rubra (PRR) at high doses have been applied to treat hyperbilirubinemia in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis is to assess the efficacy and safety of formulae relevant to high-dose PRR in patients suffering from hyperbilirubinemia induced by viral hepatitis. We performed a meta-analysis of randomized-controlled clinical trials to evaluate the efficacy and safety of formulae that apply a high dose of PRR for hyperbilirubinemia. Seven databases were searched until April, 2015. All studies were included according to detailed criteria and assessed for methodological quality. The outcome measurements were recorded for further analysis using the RevMan 5.2.11 software. Fifteen articles involving 1323 patients with hyperbilirubinemia were included. Formulae with high-dose PRR might promote the efficacy of either a combined application ([OR: 3.98, 95% CI (2.91, 5.43)]; P < 0.01) or a single application ([OR: 4.00, 95% CI (1.50, 10.68)]; P < 0.01) for hyperbilirubinemia. The indices of TBIL, ALT, and AST significantly decreased ([MD: -75.57, 95% CI (-94.88, -56.26)], [MD: -26.54, 95% CI (-36.19, -16.88)], and ([MD: -28.94, 95% CI (-46.26, -11.61)]; P < 0.01), respectively. In addition, formulae with high-dose PRR could enhance the treatment efficacy of hyperbilirubinemia triggered by hepatitis B ([OR: 2.98, 95% CI (1.75, 5.05)]; P < 0.01). Furthermore, the efficacy was enhanced with an increasing dosage of PRR. Two articles reported that no side effects occurred in clinical trials, and three studies noted that patients presented light digestive tract symptoms. Formulae relevant to high-dose PRR ameliorate hyperbilirubinemia and might constitute a promising therapeutic approach. For widespread acceptance by practitioners, more rigorously designed multicenter, double-blind, randomized, and

  4. NF-κB activation induced by hepatitis A virus and Newcastle disease virus occurs by different pathways depending on the structural pattern of viral nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Paulmann, Dajana; Bortmann, Simone; Grimm, Florian; Berk, Iris; Kraemer, Leena; Vallbracht, Angelika; Dotzauer, Andreas

    2014-07-01

    NF-κB is activated by hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus and is assumed to contribute to viral persistence, leading to the development of hepatocellular cancer by inhibition of apoptosis mediated by cytotoxic T cells. Whether hepatitis A virus (HAV), which does not cause chronic infection, activates NF-κB is a topic of controversy. Here, we confirm that HAV activates NF-κB and show that HAV enhances the activation of NF-κB by poly(I-C), but it inhibits the activation of NF-κB by Newcastle disease virus (NDV), a paramyxovirus. In addition, HAV inhibits NF-κB activation induced by overexpressed MAVS (mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein). We conclude from these findings that NF-κB induction occurs in cells infected with HAV by dsRNA, independently of mitochondrial-transduced RIG-I/MDA-5 signaling, whereas the induction of NF-κB in cells infected by NDV is mediated by RIG-I signaling, independenly of viral dsRNA. This is supported by experiments in which the different RNA inducers of RIG-I and MDA-5 are sequestered and which also show that poly(I-C) and HAV, but not NDV, are functionally equivalent in inducing NF-κB activity. Furthermore, we demonstrate that HAV interferes with the protein kinase R (PKR) activity and PKR activation induced by dsRNA, and that HAV-induced activation of NF-κB therefore does not take place via the PKR-induced pathway. As assumed for hepatitis B and C virus infections, NF-κB activation could attenuate the effects of cytotoxic T cells and may contribute to prolonged as well as relapsing courses of hepatitis A.

  5. Doubly Spliced RNA of Hepatitis B Virus Suppresses Viral Transcription via TATA-Binding Protein and Induces Stress Granule Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Kuen-Nan; Chong, Chin-Liew; Chou, Yu-Chi; Huang, Chien-Chiao; Wang, Yi-Ling; Wang, Shao-Win; Chen, Mong-Liang

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The risk of liver cancer in patients infected with the hepatitis B virus (HBV) and their clinical response to interferon alpha therapy vary based on the HBV genotype. The mechanisms underlying these differences in HBV pathogenesis remain unclear. In HepG2 cells transfected with a mutant HBVG2335A expression plasmid that does not transcribe the 2.2-kb doubly spliced RNA (2.2DS-RNA) expressed by wild-type HBV genotype A, the level of HBV pregenomic RNA (pgRNA) was higher than that in cells transfected with an HBV genotype A expression plasmid. By using cotransfection with HBV genotype D and 2.2DS-RNA expression plasmids, we found that a reduction of pgRNA was observed in the cells even in the presence of small amounts of the 2.2DS-RNA plasmid. Moreover, ectopic expression of 2.2DS-RNA in the HBV-producing cell line 1.3ES2 reduced the expression of pgRNA. Further analysis showed that exogenously transcribed 2.2DS-RNA inhibited a reconstituted transcription in vitro. In Huh7 cells ectopically expressing 2.2DS-RNA, RNA immunoprecipitation revealed that 2.2DS-RNA interacted with the TATA-binding protein (TBP) and that nucleotides 432 to 832 of 2.2DS-RNA were required for efficient TBP binding. Immunofluorescence experiments showed that 2.2DS-RNA colocalized with cytoplasmic TBP and the stress granule components, G3BP and poly(A)-binding protein 1 (PABP1), in Huh7 cells. In conclusion, our study reveals that 2.2DS-RNA acts as a repressor of HBV transcription through an interaction with TBP that induces stress granule formation. The expression of 2.2DS-RNA may be one of the viral factors involved in viral replication, which may underlie differences in clinical outcomes of liver disease and responses to interferon alpha therapy between patients infected with different HBV genotypes. IMPORTANCE Patients infected with certain genotypes of HBV have a lower risk of hepatocellular carcinoma and exhibit a more favorable response to antiviral therapy than patients

  6. Doubly Spliced RNA of Hepatitis B Virus Suppresses Viral Transcription via TATA-Binding Protein and Induces Stress Granule Assembly.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Kuen-Nan; Chong, Chin-Liew; Chou, Yu-Chi; Huang, Chien-Chiao; Wang, Yi-Ling; Wang, Shao-Win; Chen, Mong-Liang; Chen, Chun-Hong; Chang, Chungming

    2015-11-01

    The risk of liver cancer in patients infected with the hepatitis B virus (HBV) and their clinical response to interferon alpha therapy vary based on the HBV genotype. The mechanisms underlying these differences in HBV pathogenesis remain unclear. In HepG2 cells transfected with a mutant HBV(G2335A) expression plasmid that does not transcribe the 2.2-kb doubly spliced RNA (2.2DS-RNA) expressed by wild-type HBV genotype A, the level of HBV pregenomic RNA (pgRNA) was higher than that in cells transfected with an HBV genotype A expression plasmid. By using cotransfection with HBV genotype D and 2.2DS-RNA expression plasmids, we found that a reduction of pgRNA was observed in the cells even in the presence of small amounts of the 2.2DS-RNA plasmid. Moreover, ectopic expression of 2.2DS-RNA in the HBV-producing cell line 1.3ES2 reduced the expression of pgRNA. Further analysis showed that exogenously transcribed 2.2DS-RNA inhibited a reconstituted transcription in vitro. In Huh7 cells ectopically expressing 2.2DS-RNA, RNA immunoprecipitation revealed that 2.2DS-RNA interacted with the TATA-binding protein (TBP) and that nucleotides 432 to 832 of 2.2DS-RNA were required for efficient TBP binding. Immunofluorescence experiments showed that 2.2DS-RNA colocalized with cytoplasmic TBP and the stress granule components, G3BP and poly(A)-binding protein 1 (PABP1), in Huh7 cells. In conclusion, our study reveals that 2.2DS-RNA acts as a repressor of HBV transcription through an interaction with TBP that induces stress granule formation. The expression of 2.2DS-RNA may be one of the viral factors involved in viral replication, which may underlie differences in clinical outcomes of liver disease and responses to interferon alpha therapy between patients infected with different HBV genotypes. Patients infected with certain genotypes of HBV have a lower risk of hepatocellular carcinoma and exhibit a more favorable response to antiviral therapy than patients infected with other HBV

  7. History and Global Burden of Viral Hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Blum, Hubert E

    Between 1963 and 1989, 5 hepatotropic viruses have been discovered that are the major causes of viral hepatitides worldwide: hepatitis A virus, hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), hepatitis delta virus and hepatitis E virus. Their epidemiology and pathogenesis have been studied in great detail. Furthermore, the structure and genetic organization of their DNA or RNA genome including the viral life cycle have been elucidated and have been successfully translated into important clinical applications, such as the specific diagnosis, therapy and prevention of the associated liver diseases, including liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The prevalence of acute and chronic viral hepatitis A-E shows distinct geographic differences. The global burden of disease (prevalence, incidence, death, disability-adjusted life years) has been analyzed in seminal studies that show that the worldwide prevalence of hepatitis A-E has significantly decreased between 1990 and 2013. During the same time, the incidence of HBV-related liver cirrhosis and HCC, respectively, also decreased or increased slightly, the incidence of the HCV-related liver cirrhosis remained stable and the incidence of HCV-related HCC showed a major increase. During the coming years, we expect to improve our ability to prevent and effectively treat viral hepatitis A-E, resulting in the control of these global infections and the elimination of their associated morbidities and mortalities. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Hepatitis C reinfection following treatment induced viral clearance among people who have injected drugs.

    PubMed

    Weir, Amanda; McLeod, Allan; Innes, Hamish; Valerio, Heather; Aspinall, Esther J; Goldberg, David J; Barclay, Stephen T; Dillon, John F; Fox, Ray; Fraser, Andrew; Hayes, Peter C; Kennedy, Nicholas; Mills, Peter R; Stanley, Adrian J; Aitken, Celia; Gunson, Rory; Templeton, Kate; Hunt, Alison; McIntyre, Paul; Hutchinson, Sharon J

    2016-08-01

    Although people who inject drugs (PWID) are an important group to receive Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) antiviral therapy, initiation onto treatment remains low. Concerns over reinfection may make clinicians reluctant to treat this group. We examined the risk of HCV reinfection among a cohort of PWID (encompassing all those reporting a history of injecting drug use) from Scotland who achieved a sustained virological response (SVR). Clinical and laboratory data were used to monitor RNA testing among PWID who attained SVR following therapy between 2000 and 2009. Data were linked to morbidity and mortality records. Follow-up began one year after completion of therapy, ending on 31st December, 2012. Frequency of RNA testing during follow-up was calculated and the incidence of HCV reinfection estimated. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to examine factors associated with HCV reinfection. Among 448 PWID with a SVR, 277 (61.8%) were tested during follow-up, median 4.5 years; 191 (69%) received one RNA test and 86 (31%) received at least two RNA tests. There were seven reinfections over 410 person years generating a reinfection rate of 1.7/100py (95% CI 0.7-3.5). For PWID who have been hospitalised for an opiate or injection related cause post SVR (11%), the risk of HCV reinfection was greater [AHR=12.9, 95% CI 2.2-76.0, p=0.002] and the reinfection rate was 5.7/100py (95% CI 1.8-13.3). PWID who have been tested, following SVR, for HCV in Scotland appear to be at a low risk of reinfection. Follow-up and monitoring of this population are warranted as treatment is offered more widely. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Improved Survival in Patients with Viral Hepatitis-Induced Hepatocellular Carcinoma Undergoing Recommended Abdominal Ultrasound Surveillance in Ontario: A Population-Based Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Thein, Hla-Hla; Campitelli, Michael A.; Yeung, Latifa T.; Zaheen, Ahmad; Yoshida, Eric M.; Earle, Craig C.

    2015-01-01

    The optimal schedule for ultrasonographic surveillance of patients with viral hepatitis for the detection of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains unclear owing to a lack of reliable studies. We examined the timing of ultrasonography in patients with viral hepatitis-induced HCC and its impact on survival and mortality risk while determining predictors of receiving surveillance before HCC diagnosis. A population-based retrospective cohort analysis of patients with viral hepatitis-induced HCC in Ontario between 2000 and 2010 was performed using data from the Ontario Cancer Registry linked health administrative data. HCC surveillance for 2 years preceding diagnosis was assigned as: i) ≥2 abdominal ultrasound screens annually; ii) 1 screen annually; iii) inconsistent screening; and iv) no screening. Survival rates were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method and parametric models to correct for lead-time bias. Associations between HCC surveillance and the risk of mortality after diagnosis were examined using proportional-hazards regression adjusting for confounding factors. Overall, 1,483 patients with viral hepatitis-induced HCC were identified during the study period; 20.2% received ≥1 ultrasound screen annually (routine surveillance) for the 2 years preceding diagnosis. The 5-year survival of those receiving routine surveillance was 31.93% (95% CI: 25.77–38.24%) and 31.84% (95% CI: 25.69–38.14%) when corrected for lead-time bias (HCC sojourn time 70 days and 140 days, respectively). This is contrasted with 20.67% (95% CI: 16.86–24.74%) 5-year survival in those who did not undergo screening. In the fully adjusted model, compared to unscreened patients, routine surveillance was associated with a lower mortality risk and a hazard ratio of 0.76 (95% CI: 0.64–0.91) and 0.81 (95% CI: 0.68–0.97), corrected for the respective lead-time bias. Our findings suggest that routine ultrasonography in patients with viral hepatitis is associated with improved survival

  10. Improved Survival in Patients with Viral Hepatitis-Induced Hepatocellular Carcinoma Undergoing Recommended Abdominal Ultrasound Surveillance in Ontario: A Population-Based Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Thein, Hla-Hla; Campitelli, Michael A; Yeung, Latifa T; Zaheen, Ahmad; Yoshida, Eric M; Earle, Craig C

    2015-01-01

    The optimal schedule for ultrasonographic surveillance of patients with viral hepatitis for the detection of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains unclear owing to a lack of reliable studies. We examined the timing of ultrasonography in patients with viral hepatitis-induced HCC and its impact on survival and mortality risk while determining predictors of receiving surveillance before HCC diagnosis. A population-based retrospective cohort analysis of patients with viral hepatitis-induced HCC in Ontario between 2000 and 2010 was performed using data from the Ontario Cancer Registry linked health administrative data. HCC surveillance for 2 years preceding diagnosis was assigned as: i) ≥ 2 abdominal ultrasound screens annually; ii) 1 screen annually; iii) inconsistent screening; and iv) no screening. Survival rates were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method and parametric models to correct for lead-time bias. Associations between HCC surveillance and the risk of mortality after diagnosis were examined using proportional-hazards regression adjusting for confounding factors. Overall, 1,483 patients with viral hepatitis-induced HCC were identified during the study period; 20.2% received ≥ 1 ultrasound screen annually (routine surveillance) for the 2 years preceding diagnosis. The 5-year survival of those receiving routine surveillance was 31.93% (95% CI: 25.77-38.24%) and 31.84% (95% CI: 25.69-38.14%) when corrected for lead-time bias (HCC sojourn time 70 days and 140 days, respectively). This is contrasted with 20.67% (95% CI: 16.86-24.74%) 5-year survival in those who did not undergo screening. In the fully adjusted model, compared to unscreened patients, routine surveillance was associated with a lower mortality risk and a hazard ratio of 0.76 (95% CI: 0.64-0.91) and 0.81 (95% CI: 0.68-0.97), corrected for the respective lead-time bias. Our findings suggest that routine ultrasonography in patients with viral hepatitis is associated with improved survival and

  11. Viral hepatitis in hemodialysis: An update

    PubMed Central

    Bernieh, Bassam

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis outbreaks in hemodialysis (HD) patients and staff were reported in the late 1960s, and a number of hepatotropic viruses transmitted by blood and other body fluids have been identified. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) was the first significant hepatotropic virus to be identified in HD centers. HBV infection has been effectively controlled by active vaccination, screening of blood donors, the use of erythropoietin and segregation of HBV carriers. Hepatitis delta virus is a defective virus that can only infect HBV-positive individuals. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is the most significant cause of non-A, non-B hepatitis and is mainly transmitted by blood transfusion. The introduction in 1990 of routine screening of blood donors for HCV contributed significantly to the control of HCV transmission. An effective HCV vaccine remains an unsolved challenge; however, pegylation of interferon-alfa has made it possible to treat HCV-positive dialysis patients. Unexplained sporadic outbreaks of hepatitis by the mid-1990s prompted the discovery of hepatitis G virus, hepatitis GB virus C and the TT virus. The vigilant observation of guidelines on universal precaution and regular virologic testing are the cornerstones of the effective control of chronic hepatitis in the setting of HD. Major recent advances in the viral diagnosis technology and the development of new oral, direct-acting antiviral agents allow early diagnosis and better therapeutic response. The current update will review the recent developments, controversies and new treatment of viral hepatitis in HD patients. PMID:27847896

  12. Acute Viral Hepatitis in Pediatric Age Groups.

    PubMed

    Kc, Sudhamshu; Sharma, Dilip; Poudyal, Nandu; Basnet, Bhupendra Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Our clinical experience showed that there has been no decrease in pediatric cases of acute viral hepatitis in Kathmandu. The objective of the study was to analyze the etiology, clinical features, laboratory parameters, sonological findings and other to determine the probable prognostic factors of Acute Viral Hepatitis in pediatric population. Consecutive patients of suspected Acute Viral Hepatitis, below the age of 15 years, attending the liver clinic between January 2006 and December 2010 were studied. After clinical examination they were subjected to blood tests and ultrasound examination of abdomen. The patients were divided in 3 age groups; 0-5, 5-10 and 5-15 years. Clinical features, laboratory parameters, ultrasound findings were compared in three age groups. Etiology of Acute Viral Hepatitis was Hepatitis A virus 266 (85%), Hepatitis E virus in 24 (8%), Hepatitis B virus in 15 (5%). In 7(2%) patients etiology was unknown. Three patients went to acute liver failure but improved with conservative treatment. There was no statistical difference in most of the parameters studied in different age groups. Ascites was more common in 5-10 years age group. Patients with secondary bacterial infection, ultrasound evidence of prominent biliary tree and ascites were associated with increased duration of illness. Patients with history of herbal medications had prolonged cholestasis. Hepatitis A is most common cause of Acute Viral Hepatitis in pediatric population. Improper use of herbal medications, secondary bacterial infection and faulty dietary intake was associated with prolonged illness. Patients with prominent biliary radicals should be treated with antibiotics even with normal blood counts for earlier recovery.

  13. [The other types of viral hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Miguet, J P; Coaquette, A; Bresson-Hadni, S; Lab, M

    1990-06-21

    Hepatitis due to viruses other than A, B, C, D, E are numerous but uncommon in adults. Among the group of Herpesviridae (HSV, CMV, EBV, VZV), clinical hepatitis is usually suggestive of disseminated viral infection. Fulminant hepatitis occasionally observed in immunocompromised hosts are due to HSV, and VZV, but exceptionally to EBV. Many new techniques using specific monoclonal antibodies permit an accurate and fast diagnosis. Three drugs (vidarabine, acyclovir, ribavirine) have been shown to be efficient in the treatment of severe forms of the disease. Hepatitis due to exotic viruses (Amaril, Ebola, Lassa) are exceptional in France, but require specific prophylactic measures.

  14. Chronic viral hepatitis: the histology report.

    PubMed

    Guido, Maria; Mangia, Alessandra; Faa, Gavino

    2011-03-01

    In chronic viral hepatitis, the role of liver biopsy as a diagnostic test has seen a decline, paralleled by its increasing importance for prognostic purposes. Nowadays, the main indication for liver biopsy in chronic viral hepatitis is to assess the severity of the disease, in terms of both necro-inflammation (grade) and fibrosis (stage), which is important for prognosis and therapeutic management. Several scoring systems have been proposed for grading and staging chronic viral hepatitis and there is no a general consensus on the best system to be used in the daily practice. All scoring systems have their drawbacks and all may be affected by sampling and observer variability. Whatever the system used, a histological score is a reductive approach since damage in chronic viral hepatitis is a complex biological process. Thus, scoring systems are not intended to replace the detailed, descriptive, pathology report. In fact, lesions other than those scored for grading and staging may have clinical relevance and should be assessed and reported. This paper aims to provide a systematic approach to the interpretation of liver biopsies obtained in cases of chronic viral hepatitis, with the hope of helping general pathologists in their diagnostic practice.

  15. Viral hepatitis in the Arctic. A review from a Circumpolar Workshop on Viral hepatitis, ICCH13.

    PubMed

    Tulisov, Andrei; McMahon, Brian J; Koch, Anders; Minuk, Gerald; Chulanov, Vladimir; Bruce, Michael G; Uhanova, Julia; Børresen, Malene; Williams, James; Osiowy, Carla; Gelvan, Allan; Alexeeva, Marfa; Larke, Bryce; Watt, Kymberly

    2007-01-01

    This article is a review of the viral hepatitis workshop, held during the 13th International Congress of the Circumpolar Health consists of a review of data on viral hepatitis in the Arctic territories of four countries: Canada, Greenland, Russia and United States (Alaska). The main purpose of the workshop was to exchange knowledge on viral hepatitis in the Arctic and identify further needs for collaborative hepatitis research, which is planned to be implemented through the established Viral Hepatitis Working Group in the Arctic. The review is based on the available published research results, surveillance data and professional opinions of the authors. The information is presented by Arctic country. Viral hepatitis constitutes an important problem among Aboriginal peoples of the Arctic; the incidence of most types of viral hepatitis is higher among indigenous populations than in the general public. However, due to differences in the available information from each of the four Arctic countries, it is difficult to compare differences in types of disease in them. The main areas for future research are: HBV genotypes distribution, relations between different types of HBV, HCV and disease outcomes, HBV mutation rate and specific substitutions in the HBV genome over time in the Arctic, and occurrence of active liver disease in HBsAg carriers living in the Arctic, as well as further research in viral hepatitis A, C, D and E.

  16. Autoimmune manifestations in viral hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Vergani, Diego; Mieli-Vergani, Giorgina

    2013-01-01

    Infections by the viruses responsible for hepatitis B, C and D are accompanied by a number of immunopathological manifestations. A link between infection and autoimmunity is particularly well documented for the hepatitis C virus. Immunopathological manifestations range from production of autoantibodies to overt autoimmune disease, including thyroiditis and autoimmune hepatitis, and to immune-complex-mediated disorders, including cryoglobulinaemia, glomerulonephritis and vasculitis. Several of these manifestations improve with successful antiviral treatment, directly incriminating the virus in their pathogenesis. Mechanisms considered responsible for hepatitis virus-related immunopathology, including molecular mimicry, impairment of regulatory T cells and activation of B lymphocytes, will be examined in this review.

  17. Sexual transmission of viral hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Gorgos, Linda

    2013-12-01

    Identification and vaccination of adults at risk for hepatitis B virus acquisition through sexual contact is a key strategy to reduce new hepatitis B virus infections among at-risk adults. Hepatitis C has emerged as a sexually transmitted infection among men with male sex partners (MSM). Several biological and behavioral factors have been linked to hepatitis C virus transmission among MSM, including human immunodeficiency virus coinfection; participation in sexual practices that result in mucosal damage or result in exposure to blood; presence of sexually transmitted diseases (STIs), particularly ulcerative STIs; multiple/casual sex partners; and unprotected anal intercourse. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Treatment of viral hepatitis in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Fiore, Simona; Savasi, Valeria

    2009-12-01

    Viral hepatitis can be caused by the hepatitis A, B, C, D and E viruses. In the Western world, hepatitis A, B or C do not seem to influence the course of pregnancy, whereas hepatitis E infection, when contracted during the second or third trimester, seems to have a higher risk of developing into a fulminant hepatitis. Mother-to-infant transmission of hepatitis A seems to be very uncommon. The majority of HBsAg-positive and HBeAg-positive mothers can transmit the disease vertically. The timing of transmission is predominantly peripartum, and newborns of HBsAg-positive mothers should receive hepatitis B immunoglobulins within 12 h of birth, with HBV vaccine at birth and 1 and 6 months later. Hepatitis C is more often a chronic disease. Vertical transmission of hepatitis C is considered to be relatively rare but high viraemia or coinfection with HIV can increase this risk. There is currently no treatment to prevent this vertical transmission and pregnancies among HCV-positive mothers should not be discouraged. Infants should be tested for anti-HCV at 1 year and followed for the development of hepatitis. Breast feeding does not seem to play an important role in the transmission of hepatitis B and C.

  19. Hepatitis viral load correlates to glutathione levels.

    PubMed

    1998-01-01

    Several recent scientific articles have found a direct correlation between Glutathione levels and viral activity for hepatitis B and C. When viral load increases, Glutathione decreases. Researchers from Germany report that adding NAC (N-acetyl cysteine) to HBV producing cells lines can reduce hepatitis viral load 50 fold. Glutathione is used by the liver to help break down toxins. Patients who have chronic infection for more than 90 days should ask their physicians to check their Glutathione levels. A test kit is available from ImmunoSciences Labs; contact information is included. An amino acid, L-Glutamine, can be used with Alpha Lipoic Acid and NAC to increase Glutathione levels. Chlorophyll also offers benefits to people with hepatitis and other infections. Instructions on how to use a special retention enema containing chlorophyll, water, and apple cider vinegar are provided.

  20. Disparities in HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STDs, and TB

    MedlinePlus

    ... Submit Search The CDC Health Disparities in HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STDs, and TB Note: Javascript is ... Hawaiians/Other Pacific Islanders MMWR Publications HIV and AIDS Viral Hepatitis STDs Tuberculosis Training and Networking Resources ...

  1. Current status and strategies for viral hepatitis control in Korea.

    PubMed

    Sinn, Dong Hyun; Cho, Eun Ju; Kim, Ji Hoon; Kim, Do Young; Kim, Yoon Jun; Choi, Moon Seok

    2017-09-01

    Viral hepatitis is one of major global health challenges with increasing disease burden worldwide. Hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus infections are major causes of chronic liver diseases. They can lead to cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, and death in significant portion of affected people. Transmission of hepatitis B virus can be blocked by vaccination. Progression of hepatitis B virus-related liver diseases can be prevented by long-term viral suppression with effective drugs. Although vaccine for hepatitis C virus is currently unavailable, hepatitis C virus infection can be eradicated by oral direct antiviral agents. To eliminate viral hepatitis, World Health Organization (WHO) has urged countries to develop national goals and targets through reducing 90% of new infections and providing universal access to key treatment services up to 80%. This can lead to 65% reduction of viral hepatitis-related mortality. Here, we discuss some key features of viral hepatitis, strategies to control viral hepatitis suggested by WHO, and current status and strategies for viral hepatitis control in South Korea. To achieve the goal of viral hepatitis elimination by 2030 in South Korea, an independent 'viral hepatitis sector' in Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC) needs to be established to organize and execute comprehensive strategy for the management of viral hepatitis in South Korea.

  2. Hepatitis B virus: pathogenesis, viral intermediates, and viral replication.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jia-Yee; Locarnini, Stephen

    2004-05-01

    Although HBV has the potential to generate an almost limitless spectrum of quasispecies during chronic infection, the viability of the majority of these quasispecies is almost certainly impaired due to constraints imposed by the remarkably compact organization of the HBV genome. On the other hand, single mutations may affect more than one gene and result in complex and unpredictable effects on viral phenotype. Better understanding of the constraints imposed by gene overlap and of genotype-phenotype relationships should help in the development of improved antiviral strategies and management approaches. Although the probability of developing viral resistance is directly proportional to the intensity of selection pressure and the diversity of quasispecies, potent inhibition of HBV replication should be able to prevent development of drug resistance because mutagenesis is replication dependent. If viral replication can be suppressed for a sufficient length of time, viral load should decline to a point where the continued production of quasispecies with the potential to resist new drug treatments no longer occurs. Clinical application of this concept will require optimization of combination therapies analogous to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for HIV infection. Total cure of hepatitis B will require elimination of the intranuclear pool of viral minichromosomes, which will probably only be achieved by normal cell turnover, reactivation of host immunity, or elucidation of the antiviral mechanisms operating during cytokine clearance in acute hepatitis B (see Fig. 1).

  3. The multiple aetiology of viral hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Zuckerman, A. J.

    1971-01-01

    Infectious hepatitis is epidemiologically and immunologically distinct from serum hepatitis. The Australia antigen is related more specifically to serum hepatitis. The possible role of coronavirus—and paramyxovirus-like particles in the aetiology of some infections of the liver in man and in marmosets inoculated with human infectious hepatitis material is discussed and the difficulties in the interpretation of the currently available data are emphasized. The recent studies in Melbourne of a faecal antigen found in some patients with infectious hepatitis and the discovery of an antiserum in Milan which reacted with an antigen associated with epidemic hepatitis are discussed. Mention is made of the recent isolation in Detroit-6 cells of virus-like particles from patients with infectious hepatitis. It is concluded that viral hepatitis is an infection of multiple aetiology and that the successful cultivation in vitro of the agent or agents of hepatitis remains the outstanding and most urgent problem. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4 PMID:4327058

  4. IL28B polymorphisms influence stage of fibrosis and spontaneous or interferon-induced viral clearance in thalassemia patients with hepatitis C virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Di Marco, Vito; Bronte, Fabrizio; Calvaruso, Vincenza; Capra, Marcello; Borsellino, Zelia; Maggio, Aurelio; Renda, Maria Concetta; Pitrolo, Lorella; Lo Pinto, Maria Carmela; Rizzo, Michele; Fiorenza, Flavia; Gerardi, Calogera; Grimaudo, Stefania; Di Cristina, Antonietta; Levrero, Massimo; Craxì, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Background Polymorphisms in the interleukin-28B are important determinants in the spontaneous and drug-induced control of hepatitis C virus infection. Design and Methods We assessed the association of rs8099917 and rs12979860 polymorphisms with spontaneous viral clearance, severity of liver fibrosis, and response to interferon-monotherapy in 245 thalassemia major patients with hepatitis C virus infection. Results Ninety-eight patients (40%) had a spontaneous viral clearance while 147 patients (60%) developed a chronic infection. Spontaneous viral clearance was more frequent among patients with the T/T genotype of rs8099917 polymorphism (OR 2.130; P=0.008) or C/C genotype of rs12979860 polymorphism (OR 2.425; P=0.001). During observation, 131 patients with chronic infection underwent a liver biopsy; age (OR 1.058; P=0.01) G/T or G/G genotypes of rs8099917 polymorphism (OR 3.962; P=0.001), and C/T or T/T genotypes of rs12979860 polymorphism (OR 3.494; P=0.005) were associated with severe liver fibrosis, independent of liver iron concentration. Finally, T/T genotype of rs8099917 polymorphism (OR 3.014; P=0.03) or C/C genotype of rs12979860 polymorphism (OR 3.285; P=0.01), age (OR 0.902; P=0.001), female gender (OR 3.418; P=0.01) and 2 or 3 virus C genotypes (OR 4.700; P=0.007) were independently associated with sustained virological response in 114 patients treated with alpha-interferon. Conclusions Polymorphisms in the interleukin-28B are associated with the control of hepatitis C virus infection in thalassemia major patients, and understanding allelic patterns has an important role in determining prognosis and therapeutic management. PMID:22180419

  5. IMMUNOLOGICAL REACTIONS IN VIRAL HEPATITIS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    can be prevented by pooled human gamma globulins. When VHS from one patient was tested on lymphocytes from different donors large differences in...inhibition were observed. Thus in plasma of donors there may be antibodies able to prevent the MI (but not CD) effect of VHS. Differences in results from...different specificity of antisera. The frequency of AA in infectious and serum hepatitis, liver diseases, thalassemia , mongolism and lepromatous

  6. Genetic variations of bile salt transporters as predisposing factors for drug-induced cholestasis, intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy and therapeutic response of viral hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Stieger, Bruno; Geier, Andreas

    2011-04-01

    Drug-induced cholestasis, intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy and viral hepatitis are acquired forms of liver disease. Cholestasis is a pathophysiologic state with impaired bile formation and subsequent accumulation of bile salts in hepatocytes. The bile salt export pump (BSEP) (ABCB11) is the key export system for bile salts from hepatocytes. This article provides an introduction into the physiology of bile formation followed by a summary of the current knowledge on the key bile salt transporters, namely, the sodium-taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide NTCP, the organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATPs), BSEP and the multi-drug resistance protein 3. The pathophysiologic consequences of altered functions of these transporters, with an emphasis on molecular and genetic aspects, are then discussed. Knowledge of the role of hepatocellullar transporters, especially BSEP, in acquired cholestasis is continuously increasing. A common variant of BSEP (p.V444A) is now a well-established susceptibility factor for acquired cholestasis and recent evidence suggests that the same variant also influences the therapeutic response and disease progression of viral hepatitis C. Studies in large independent cohorts are now needed to confirm the relevance of p.V444A. Genome-wide association studies should lead to the identification of additional genetic factors underlying cholestatic liver disease.

  7. Immune reactions in acute viral hepatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Newble, D I; Holmes, K T; Wangel, A G; Forbes, I J

    1975-01-01

    Serial studies of PHA-induced lymphocyte transformation, serum autoantibodies, immunoglobulins and complement were performed in seventeen patients with hepatitis A and nine patients with hepatitis B. In both types of hepatitis PHA-induced transformation was markedly impaired during the 1st week after the onset of jaundice and there was less marked but prolonged impairment for a further period of 6-10 weeks. A group of eleven subjects with a previous history of hepatitis had values which were similar to those of healthy persons. Serum from patients with hepatitis A and hepatitis B contains an inhibitor of lymphocyte response to PHA. The inhibitor depresses the function of both patients' and normal lymphocytes and is only detectable during the acute phase of the illness. Washing lymphocytes free from autologous serum did not restore the PHA response to normal but the markedly impaired response present during the first 2 weeks of the illness was improved. A serum factor or factors may therefore be responsible for at least part of the impaired response of lymphocytes to PHA during the acute phase of hepatitis but does not appear to account for the more prolonged impairment of the PHA response. The protracted lymphocyte defect is possibly induced by hepatitis virus. The incidence of autoantibodies and the changes in immunoglobulin levels were similar to those reported by other workers. PMID:1204253

  8. Epidemiology of Viral Hepatitis and Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    El-Serag, Hashem B.

    2012-01-01

    Most cases of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are associated with cirrhosis related to chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) or hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Changes in the time trends of HCC and most variations in its age-, sex-, and race-specific rates among different regions are likely to be related to differences in hepatitis viruses that are most prevalent in a population, the timing of their spread, and the ages of the individuals the viruses infect. Environmental, host genetic, and viral factors can affect the risk of HCC in individuals with HBV or HCV infection. This review summarizes the risk factors for HCC among HBV- or HCV-infected individuals, based on findings from epidemiological studies and meta-analyses, as well as determinants of patient outcome and the HCC disease burden, globally and in the US. PMID:22537432

  9. Hepatitis B Antigen in Viral Hepatitis in West London

    PubMed Central

    Farrow, L. J.; Lamb, S. G.; Coghill, N. F.; Lindon, R. L.; Preece, Jill; Zuckerman, A. J.; Stewart, J. S.

    1974-01-01

    During the first 12 months of a total population survey 249 patients were seen with viral hepatitis. A total of 215 of these were tested for hepatitis B antigen (HB Ag) by radioimmunoassay and 32 (15%) were positive. More than five times as many men (27) as women (5) were HBAg positive and 19 of the men were between the ages of 20 and 39 years. There were only four drug addicts among those tested, two of whom were positive, as were two of the four patients who were tattooed. Sixty out of 86 children (under 15 years) were tested for HBAg and none was positive. PMID:4852256

  10. Hepatitis B antigen in viral hepatitis in West London.

    PubMed

    Farrow, L J; Lamb, S G; Coghill, N F; Lindon, R L; Preece, J; Zuckerman, A J; Stewart, J S

    1974-07-13

    During the first 12 months of a total population survey 249 patients were seen with viral hepatitis. A total of 215 of these were tested for hepatitis B antigen (HB Ag) by radioimmunoassay and 32 (15%) were positive.More than five times as many men (27) as women (5) were HBAg positive and 19 of the men were between the ages of 20 and 39 years. There were only four drug addicts among those tested, two of whom were positive, as were two of the four patients who were tattooed.Sixty out of 86 children (under 15 years) were tested for HBAg and none was positive.

  11. Structural and mechanistic insights into hepatitis C viral translation initiation.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Christopher S; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2007-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus uses an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) to control viral protein synthesis by directly recruiting ribosomes to the translation-start site in the viral mRNA. Structural insights coupled with biochemical studies have revealed that the IRES substitutes for the activities of translation-initiation factors by binding and inducing conformational changes in the 40S ribosomal subunit. Direct interactions of the IRES with initiation factor eIF3 are also crucial for efficient translation initiation, providing clues to the role of eIF3 in protein synthesis.

  12. Viral Hepatitis B: Clinical and Epidemiological Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Gregory S.; Thompson, Alexander J.

    2014-01-01

    It is now 50 years since the discovery of the hepatitis B virus (HBV), and, despite the availability of a prophylactic vaccine for more than 20 years, HBV infection remains a disease of significant global health burden. It is estimated that more than 240 million people are chronically infected with HBV and, therefore, are at risk for the development of cirrhosis, hepatic decompensation, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The risk of clinical complications has traditionally been higher in older males with hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg)–positive disease, high-grade liver necroinflammation, and progressive fibrosis. Recent advances in the understanding of the natural history of chronic HBV infection have identified an important role for plasma HBV DNA levels as a marker of risk for clinical outcomes. Among adults, persistent high-level HBV replication is associated with an increased risk of cirrhosis, as well as HCC development. This has led to the therapeutic focus on achieving sustained viral suppression. There is an emerging role for quantitative hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) levels as a marker of natural history. Low levels of HBsAg have been associated with sustained immune control, HBsAg seroclearance, as well as lower risk of HCC. In this work, we review the natural history of HBV infection, with a focus on the determinants of clinical outcomes in patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) infection. PMID:25359547

  13. Liver transplantation for viral hepatitis in 2015.

    PubMed

    Ferrarese, Alberto; Zanetto, Alberto; Gambato, Martina; Bortoluzzi, Ilaria; Nadal, Elena; Germani, Giacomo; Senzolo, Marco; Burra, Patrizia; Russo, Francesco Paolo

    2016-01-28

    Liver transplantation (LT) is a life-saving treatment for patients with end-stage liver disease and for patients with liver cell cancer related to liver disease. Acute and chronic liver diseases related to hepatitis viruses are between the main indications for liver transplantation. The risk of viral reinfection after transplantation is the main limiting factor in these indications. Before the availability of antiviral prophylaxis, hepatitis B virus (HBV) recurrence was universal in patients who were HBV DNA-positive before transplantation. The natural history of recurrent HBV was accelerated by immunosuppression, and it progressed rapidly to graft failure and death. Introduction of post-transplant prophylaxis with immunoglobulin alone first, and associated to antiviral drugs later, drastically reduced HBV recurrence, resulting in excellent long-term outcomes. On the contrary, recurrence of hepatitis C is the main cause of graft loss in most transplant programs. Overall, patient and graft survival after LT for hepatitis C virus (HCV)-associated cirrhosis is inferior compared with other indications. However, successful pretransplant or post transplant antiviral therapy has been associated with increased graft and overall survival. Until recently, the combination of pegylated interferon and ribavirin was the standard of care for the treatment of patients with chronic hepatitis C. Highly active antiviral compounds have been developed over the past decade, thanks to new in vitro systems to study HCV entry, replication, assembly, and release.

  14. Liver transplantation for viral hepatitis in 2015

    PubMed Central

    Ferrarese, Alberto; Zanetto, Alberto; Gambato, Martina; Bortoluzzi, Ilaria; Nadal, Elena; Germani, Giacomo; Senzolo, Marco; Burra, Patrizia; Russo, Francesco Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Liver transplantation (LT) is a life-saving treatment for patients with end-stage liver disease and for patients with liver cell cancer related to liver disease. Acute and chronic liver diseases related to hepatitis viruses are between the main indications for liver transplantation. The risk of viral reinfection after transplantation is the main limiting factor in these indications. Before the availability of antiviral prophylaxis, hepatitis B virus (HBV) recurrence was universal in patients who were HBV DNA-positive before transplantation. The natural history of recurrent HBV was accelerated by immunosuppression, and it progressed rapidly to graft failure and death. Introduction of post-transplant prophylaxis with immunoglobulin alone first, and associated to antiviral drugs later, drastically reduced HBV recurrence, resulting in excellent long-term outcomes. On the contrary, recurrence of hepatitis C is the main cause of graft loss in most transplant programs. Overall, patient and graft survival after LT for hepatitis C virus (HCV)-associated cirrhosis is inferior compared with other indications. However, successful pretransplant or post transplant antiviral therapy has been associated with increased graft and overall survival. Until recently, the combination of pegylated interferon and ribavirin was the standard of care for the treatment of patients with chronic hepatitis C. Highly active antiviral compounds have been developed over the past decade, thanks to new in vitro systems to study HCV entry, replication, assembly, and release. PMID:26819523

  15. Ly6Chi monocytes regulate T cell responses in viral hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jiangao; Chen, Huiyao; Huang, Xiaopei; Jiang, Songfu

    2016-01-01

    Viral hepatitis remains a global health challenge despite recent progress in the development of more effective therapies. Although virus-specific CD8+ and CD4+ T cell responses are essential for viral clearance, it remains largely unknown what regulates T cell–mediated viral clearance. Thus, a better understanding of the regulation of anti-viral T cell immunity would be critical for the design of more effective therapies for viral hepatitis. Using a model of adenovirus-induced hepatitis, here we showed that adenoviral infection induced recruitment of Ly6Chi monocytes to the liver in a CCR2-dependent manner. These recruited Ly6Chi monocytes suppressed CD8+ and CD4+ T cell responses to adenoviral infection, leading to a delay in viral clearance. In vivo depletion of Ly6Chi monocytes markedly enhanced anti-viral T cell responses and promoted viral clearance. Mechanistically, we showed that induction of iNOS and the production of NO by Ly6Chi monocytes are critical for the suppression of T cell responses. In addition, a contact-dependent mechanism mediated by PD-1 and PD-L1 interaction is also required for T cell suppression by Ly6Chi monocytes. These findings suggest a critical role for Ly6Chi monocytes in the regulation of T cell immunity in viral hepatitis and may provide new insights into development of more effective therapies for treating viral hepatitis based on targeting the immunosuppressing monocytes. PMID:27777980

  16. Regulatory T Cells in Autoimmune and Viral Chronic Hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Lapierre, Pascal; Lamarre, Alain

    2015-01-01

    In both autoimmune liver disease and chronic viral hepatitis, the injury results from an immune-mediated cytotoxic T cell response to liver cells. As such, it is not surprising that CD4(+) regulatory T cells, a key regulatory population of T cells able to curb immune responses, could be involved in both autoimmune hepatitis and chronic viral hepatitis. The liver can induce the conversion of naïve CD4(+) T cells to CD4(+) regulatory T cells and induce tolerance to locally expressed antigens. This tolerance mechanism is carefully regulated in physiological conditions but any imbalance could be pathological. An overly tolerant immune response can lead to chronic infections while an overreactive and unbridled immune response can lead to autoimmune hepatitis. With the recent advent of monoclonal antibodies able to target regulatory T cells (daclizumab) and improve immune responses and several ongoing clinical trials analysing the impact of regulatory T cell infusion on autoimmune liver disease or liver transplant tolerance, modulation of immunological tolerance through CD4(+) regulatory T cells could be a key element of future immunotherapies for several liver diseases allowing restoring the balance between proper immune responses and tolerance.  .

  17. Viral hepatitis and hepatocellular carcinoma prevention strategy in Japan.

    PubMed

    Oda, T

    1999-10-01

    The study of human hepatitis, particularly in Asia, where the incidence rate has been the highest in the world, has contributed greatly to the understanding of carcinogenesis of the liver and related diseases. In this article, the history of research on hepatitis viruses and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and the successful prevention of vertical transmission of hepatitis B virus (HBV) in Japan are reviewed, focusing on the studies that resulted in the identification of vertical transmission of HBV infection and the association of HBV-sustained infection and HCC. The vaccination trials for preventing HBV vertical transmission and the fruitful outcome of the nationwide vaccination strategy in Japan, on the basis of "selective" immunization by using anti-HBs immunoglobulin (HBIG) and HB vaccine, are highlighted. Ongoing studies on the mechanisms underlying hepatocarcinogenesis induced by viruses, e.g., the roles of viral proteins and inflammation, are also reviewed, and prospects for the control of HCC are discussed.

  18. Halothane induced hepatitis: case report.

    PubMed

    Otedo, A E O

    2004-10-01

    Halothane as a cause of hepatitis is rare and may be overlooked when evaluating a patient with sudden onset jaundice. A 34-year-old lady, a nurse, presented to the liver clinic with sudden onset non-pruritic jaundice. Viral and collagen serological tests were all normal, malaria and sickling tests were negative, but transaminases were elevated. She reported inadvertent exposure to halothane in surgical theatre where she works. She improved on conservative management, then had a re-exposure to halothane after three weeks and developed a similar clinical picture, which improved on conservative management. In an area endemic of malaria, hepatitis and haemolysing conditions like sickle cell anaemia, the diagnosis of halothane hepatitis requires high index of suspicion. The mechanism of halothane-induced hepatic damage in this patient is very likely idiosyncratic. This is because of the modest dose at first exposure and more severe clinical picture at re-exposure.

  19. Interferon Alpha Induces Sustained Changes in NK Cell Responsiveness to Hepatitis B Viral Load Suppression In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Upkar S.; Peppa, Dimitra; Micco, Lorenzo; Singh, Harsimran D.; Carey, Ivana; Foster, Graham R.; Maini, Mala K.; Kennedy, Patrick T. F.

    2016-01-01

    NK cells are important antiviral effectors, highly enriched in the liver, with the potential to regulate immunopathogenesis in persistent viral infections. Here we examined whether changes in the NK pool are induced when patients with eAg-positive CHB are ‘primed’ with PegIFNα and importantly, whether these changes are sustained or further modulated long-term after switching to nucleos(t)ides (sequential NUC therapy), an approach currently tested in the clinic. Longitudinal sampling of a prospectively recruited cohort of patients with eAg+CHB showed that the cumulative expansion of CD56bright NK cells driven by 48-weeks of PegIFNα was maintained at higher than baseline levels throughout the subsequent 9 months of sequential NUCs. Unexpectedly, PegIFNα-expanded NK cells showed further augmentation in their expression of the activating NK cell receptors NKp30 and NKp46 during sequential NUCs. The expansion in proliferating, functional NK cells was more pronounced following sequential NUCs than in comparison cohorts of patients treated with de novo NUCs or PegIFNα only. Reduction in circulating HBsAg concentrations, a key goal in the path towards functional cure of CHB, was only achieved in those patients with enhancement of NK cell IFNγ and cytotoxicity but decrease in their expression of the death ligand TRAIL. In summary, we conclude that PegIFNα priming can expand a population of functional NK cells with an altered responsiveness to subsequent antiviral suppression by NUCs. Patients on sequential NUCs with a distinct NK cell profile show a decline in HBsAg, providing mechanistic insights for the further optimisation of treatment strategies to achieve sustained responses in CHB. PMID:27487232

  20. Prevention and management of viral hepatitis in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Rac, Martha W F; Sheffield, Jeanne S

    2014-12-01

    Of the 5 types of viral hepatitis (HAV-HEV), HBV and HCV are by far the most common causes of chronic hepatitis in both pregnant and nonpregnant populations, causing more than 50% of cirrhosis cases and 78% of cases of primary liver cancer. Infection during pregnancy can have adverse effects on both the mother and her fetus. For all 5 viral hepatitis syndromes, early identification allows appropriate measures to be taken to optimize pregnancy outcomes and minimize the risk of perinatal transmission. This article reviews the prevention and management of all 5 viral hepatitis syndromes during pregnancy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Factors influencing the severity of acute viral hepatitis A.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joo Il; Kim, Yun Soo; Jung, Young Kul; Kwon, Oh Sang; Kim, Yeon Suk; Ku, Yang Suh; Choi, Duck Joo; Kim, Ju Hyun

    2010-09-01

    Most patients with acute viral hepatitis A have a favorable course, but a few of them suffer from severe forms of hepatitis such as fulminant hepatitis. This study was carried out to identify the factors influencing the severity of acute viral hepatitis A. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 713 patients with acute hepatitis A, who were divided into two groups: severe hepatitis A (N=87) and non-severe hepatitis A (N=626). Severe hepatitis was defined as fulminant hepatitis or prolongation of prothrombin time (INR≥1.5). Clinical variables were compared between the two groups. The incidence of fulminant hepatitis was 1.4 % (10/713) in patients with acute hepatitis A. Thirty-three (4.6 %) cases exhibited HBsAg positivity. In multivariate analyses, significant alcohol intake and the presence of HBsAg were significant predictive factors of fulminant hepatitis A, and significant alcohol intake and age were significant predictive factors of severe hepatitis A. HBeAg and HBV-DNA status did not affect the clinical course of hepatitis A in chronic hepatitis B carriers. While most patients with acute hepatitis A have an uncomplicated clinical course, our data suggest that a more-severe clinical course is correlated with being older, significant alcohol intake, and chronic hepatitis-B-virus infection.

  2. Factors influencing the severity of acute viral hepatitis A

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joo Il; Jung, Young Kul; Kwon, Oh Sang; Kim, Yeon Suk; Ku, Yang Suh; Choi, Duck Joo; Kim, Ju Hyun

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aims Most patients with acute viral hepatitis A have a favorable course, but a few of them suffer from severe forms of hepatitis such as fulminant hepatitis. This study was carried out to identify the factors influencing the severity of acute viral hepatitis A. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 713 patients with acute hepatitis A, who were divided into two groups: severe hepatitis A (N=87) and non-severe hepatitis A (N=626). Severe hepatitis was defined as fulminant hepatitis or prolongation of prothrombin time (INR≥1.5). Clinical variables were compared between the two groups. Results The incidence of fulminant hepatitis was 1.4% (10/713) in patients with acute hepatitis A. Thirty-three (4.6%) cases exhibited HBsAg positivity. In multivariate analyses, significant alcohol intake and the presence of HBsAg were significant predictive factors of fulminant hepatitis A, and significant alcohol intake and age were significant predictive factors of severe hepatitis A. HBeAg and HBV-DNA status did not affect the clinical course of hepatitis A in chronic hepatitis B carriers. Conclusions While most patients with acute hepatitis A have an uncomplicated clinical course, our data suggest that a more-severe clinical course is correlated with being older, significant alcohol intake, and chronic hepatitis-B-virus infection. PMID:20924212

  3. Hepatitis A viral load in relation to severity of the infection.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Keiichi; Kojima, Hiroshige; Yasui, Shin; Okitsu, Koichiro; Yonemitsu, Yutaka; Omata, Masao; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2011-02-01

    A correlation between hepatitis A virus (HAV) genomes and the clinical severity of hepatitis A has not been established. The viral load in sera of hepatitis A patients was examined to determine the possible association between hepatitis A severity and HAV replication. One hundred sixty-four serum samples from 91 Japanese patients with sporadic hepatitis A, comprising 11 patients with fulminant hepatitis, 10 with severe acute hepatitis, and 70 with self-limited acute hepatitis, were tested for HAV RNA. The sera included 83 serial samples from 20 patients. Viral load was measured by real-time RT-PCR. The detection rates of HAV RNA from fulminant, severe acute, and acute hepatitis were 10/11 (91%), 10/10 (100%), and 55/70 (79%), respectively. Mean values of HAV RNA at admission were 3.48 ± 1.30 logcopies/ml in fulminant, 4.19 ± 1.03 in severe acute, and 2.65 ± 1.64 in acute hepatitis. Patients with severe infection such as fulminant hepatitis and severe acute hepatitis had higher initial viral load than patients with less severe infection (P < 0.001). Viremia persisted for 14.2 ± 5.8 days in patients with severe infection and 21.4 ± 10.6 days in those with acute hepatitis after clinical onset (P = 0.19). HAV RNA was detectable quantitatively in the majority of the sera of hepatitis A cases during the early convalescent phase by real-time PCR. Higher initial viral replication was found in severely infected patients. An excessive host immune response might follow, reducing the viral load rapidly as a result of the destruction of large numbers of HAV-infected hepatocytes, and in turn severe disease might be induced. 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Cryptosporidiosis and turkey viral hepatitis in turkeys.

    PubMed

    Wages, D P; Ficken, M D

    1989-01-01

    Cryptosporidiosis and turkey viral hepatitis were diagnosed in 25-day-old turkeys with increased mortality, enteritis, and stunting. Necropsy lesions included foul-smelling, tan-colored, loose feces in the terminal small intestines and ceca. The small intestines and ceca were congested. Multiple white to gray foci were present in the liver and pancreas. Mortality attributed to these conditions was estimated at 4.9%. Microscopic lesions included necrosis with accumulations of macrophages in the liver and pancreas. Bile-duct hyperplasia was present in the livers. Microscopic intestinal lesions consisted of mild to moderate atrophy of the villi of the distal small intestine (ileo-cecal junction) with infiltration of the lamina propria by mononuclear cells. Cryptosporidia were identified and appeared to be attached to villous epithelial cells of the terminal small intestines. Cryptosporidium sp. oocysts were also confirmed by fluorescent microscopic examination of feces stained auramine O. Reovirus was isolated on chicken embryo liver cells from affected livers.

  5. The ABCs of viral hepatitis that define biomarker signatures of acute viral hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Darragh; Mamdouh, Rasha; Laird, Melissa; Soneson, Charlotte; Le Fouler, Lenaig; El-Daly, Maï; Casrouge, Armanda; Decalf, Jérémie; Abbas, Amal; Eldin, Noha Sharaf; Fontes, Magnus; Abdel-Hamid, Mohamed; Mohamed, Mostafa K; Rafik, Mona; Fontanet, Arnaud; Albert, Matthew L

    2014-04-01

    Viral hepatitis is the leading cause of liver disease worldwide and can be caused by several agents, including hepatitis A (HAV), B (HBV), and C (HCV) virus. We employed multiplexed protein immune assays to identify biomarker signatures of viral hepatitis in order to define unique and common responses for three different acute viral infections of the liver. We performed multianalyte profiling, measuring the concentrations of 182 serum proteins obtained from acute HAV- (18), HBV- (18), and HCV-infected (28) individuals, recruited as part of a hospital-based surveillance program in Cairo, Egypt. Virus-specific biomarker signatures were identified and validation was performed using a unique patient population. A core signature of 46 plasma proteins was commonly modulated in all three infections, as compared to healthy controls. Principle component analysis (PCA) revealed a host response based upon 34 proteins, which could distinguish HCV patients from HAV- and HBV-infected individuals or healthy controls. When HAV and HBV groups were compared directly, 34 differentially expressed serum proteins allowed the separation of these two patient groups. A validation study was performed on an additional 111 patients, confirming the relevance of our initial findings, and defining the 17 analytes that reproducibly segregated the patient populations. This combined discovery and biomarker validation approach revealed a previously unrecognized virus-specific induction of host proteins. The identification of hepatitis virus specific signatures provides a foundation for functional studies and the identification of potential correlates of viral clearance. © 2014 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  6. Host - hepatitis C viral interactions: The role of genetics.

    PubMed

    Heim, Markus H; Bochud, Pierre-Yves; George, Jacob

    2016-10-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major cause of chronic viral hepatitis that can lead to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Only a minority of patients can clear the virus spontaneously. Elimination of HCV during acute infection correlates with a rapid induction of innate, especially interferon (IFN)-induced genes, and a delayed induction of adaptive immune responses. There is a strong association between genetic variants in the IFNλ (IL28B) locus with the rate of spontaneous clearance. Individuals with the ancestral IFNλ4 allele capable of producing a fully active IFNλ4 are paradoxically not able to clear HCV in the acute phase and develop chronic hepatitis C (CHC) with more than 90% probability. In the chronic phase of HCV infection, the wild-type IFNλ4 genotype is strongly associated with an induction of hundreds of classical type I/type III IFN stimulated genes in hepatocytes. However, the activation of the endogenous IFN system in the liver is ineffective in clearing HCV, and is even associated with impaired therapeutic responses to pegylated (Peg)IFNα containing treatments. While the role of genetic variation in the IFNλ locus to the outcome of CHC treatment has declined, it is clear that variation not only at this locus, but also at other loci, modulate clinically important liver phenotypes, including inflammation, fibrosis progression and the development of hepatocellular cancer. In this review, we summarize current knowledge about the role of genetics in the host response to viral hepatitis and the potential future evolution of knowledge in understanding host-viral interactions.

  7. Hepatitis B viral load affects prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yu, Su Jong; Kim, Yoon Jun

    2014-09-14

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a complex disease that is dually challenging to treat due to underlying chronic liver disease in addition to the cancer itself. The prognosis of patients with HCC is determined by intrahepatic tumor status and reserved hepatic function. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is an established major risk factor of HCC development, and HBV viral load is being increasingly recognized as a prognostic factor in the presence of established HCC. High HBV viral load may affect the prognosis of HBV-related HCC patients in several ways. First, it is associated with more frequent recurrence of HBV-related HCC after treatment. Second, it is associated with more occurrence and severity of potentially life-threatening HBV reactivation. Last, it is associated with more worsened liver function, which limits the therapeutic options for HBV-related HCC. HBV, directly or indirectly, can induce hepatocarcinogenesis. In patients with a high HBV DNA level and subsequent active hepatitis, adhesion molecules expressed on the sinusoidal cells are up-regulated and may increase intrahepatic metastasis. HCC progression after treatment can lead to a poor prognosis by reducing number of normal functioning hepatocytes. Thus, high HBV viral load can affect the prognosis of patients with HCC by frequent recurrence after treatment for HCC and deterioration of hepatic function associated with HCC progression. Recent meta-analysis showed that antiviral treatment reduces HCC recurrence and liver-related mortality after curative therapy of HCC. Given the strong relationship between high HBV DNA load and poor survival outcome of HCC patients due to cancer progression, it is expected that long-term antiviral therapy results in the sustained HBV suppression, control of inflammation, reduction in HCC progression, and eventually in improved overall survival.

  8. Viral Hepatitis Surveillance--India, 2011-2013.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Tripurari; Shrivastava, Aakash; Kumar, Anil; Laserson, Kayla F; Narain, Jai P; Venkatesh, Srinivasaraghavan; Chauhan, Lakhbir S; Averhoff, Francisco

    2015-07-24

    The burden of viral hepatitis in India is not well characterized. In 2009, the national Integrated Disease Surveillance Programme (IDSP) began conducting surveillance across all Indian states for epidemic-prone diseases, including foodborne and waterborne forms of viral hepatitis (e.g., hepatitis A and E). Information on outbreaks of all forms of viral hepatitis, including A, B, C, and E, also is collected. This report summarizes viral hepatitis surveillance and outbreak data reported to IDSP during 2011-2013. During this period, 804,782 hepatitis cases and 291 outbreaks were reported; the virus type was unspecified in 92% of cases. Among 599,605 cases tested for hepatitis A, 44,663 (7.4%) were positive, and among 187,040 tested for hepatitis E, 19,508 (10.4%) were positive. At least one hepatitis outbreak report was received from 23 (66%) of 35 Indian states. Two-thirds of outbreaks were reported from rural areas. Among 163 (56%) outbreaks with known etiology, 78 (48%) were caused by hepatitis E, 54 (33%) by hepatitis A, 19 (12%) by both hepatitis A and E, and 12 (7%) by hepatitis B or hepatitis C. Contaminated drinking water was the source of most outbreaks. Improvements in water quality and sanitation as well as inclusion of hepatitis A vaccine in childhood immunization programs should be considered to reduce the public health burden of hepatitis in India. Efforts to decrease the proportion of cases for which the etiology is unspecified, including expanding the IDSP to support hepatitis B and C testing, might help further elucidate the epidemiology of these diseases.

  9. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and hepatic cirrhosis: Comparison with viral hepatitis-associated steatosis

    PubMed Central

    Haga, Yuki; Kanda, Tatsuo; Sasaki, Reina; Nakamura, Masato; Nakamoto, Shingo; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) including nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is globally increasing and has become a world-wide health problem. Chronic infection with hepatitis B virus or hepatitis C virus (HCV) is associated with hepatic steatosis. Viral hepatitis-associated hepatic steatosis is often caused by metabolic syndrome including obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus and/or dyslipidemia. It has been reported that HCV genotype 3 exerts direct metabolic effects that lead to hepatic steatosis. In this review, the differences between NAFLD/NASH and viral hepatitis-associated steatosis are discussed. PMID:26675364

  10. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and hepatic cirrhosis: Comparison with viral hepatitis-associated steatosis.

    PubMed

    Haga, Yuki; Kanda, Tatsuo; Sasaki, Reina; Nakamura, Masato; Nakamoto, Shingo; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2015-12-14

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) including nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is globally increasing and has become a world-wide health problem. Chronic infection with hepatitis B virus or hepatitis C virus (HCV) is associated with hepatic steatosis. Viral hepatitis-associated hepatic steatosis is often caused by metabolic syndrome including obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus and/or dyslipidemia. It has been reported that HCV genotype 3 exerts direct metabolic effects that lead to hepatic steatosis. In this review, the differences between NAFLD/NASH and viral hepatitis-associated steatosis are discussed.

  11. Prediction of fibrosis progression in chronic viral hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Prediction of liver fibrosis progression has a key role in the management of chronic viral hepatitis, as it will be translated into the future risk of cirrhosis and its various complications including hepatocellular carcinoma. Both hepatitis B and C viruses mainly lead to fibrogenesis induced by chronic inflammation and a continuous wound healing response. At the same time direct and indirect profibrogenic responses are also elicited by the viral infection. There are a handful of well-established risk factors for fibrosis progression including older age, male gender, alcohol use, high viral load and co-infection with other viruses. Metabolic syndrome is an evolving risk factor of fibrosis progression. The new notion of regression of advanced fibrosis or even cirrhosis is now strongly supported various clinical studies. Even liver biopsy retains its important role in the assessment of fibrosis progression, various non-invasive assessments have been adopted widely because of their non-invasiveness, which facilitates serial applications in large cohorts of subjects. Transient elastography is one of the most validated tools which has both diagnostic and prognostic role. As there is no single perfect test for liver fibrosis assessment, algorithms combining the most validated noninvasive methods should be considered as initial screening tools. PMID:25320725

  12. Viral Hepatitis: Past and Future of HBV and HDV

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Emmanuel; Yoneda, Masato; Schiff, Eugene R.

    2015-01-01

    Viral hepatitis is a significant disease afflicting hundreds of millions of people. Hepatitis-causing viruses initiate significant morbidity and mortality by establishing both acute and chronic infections, and several of these viruses are specifically associated with the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Consequently, intense research efforts are focused on increasing our understanding of virus biology and on improving antiviral therapy. Even though viral hepatitis can be caused by several viruses from a range of virus families, the discovery of components of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) became a catalyst for the development of diagnostic assays that differentiate between these viruses as well as strategies for novel methods of vaccine development. Improvements in both the treatment and prevention of viral hepatitis are advancing rapidly. However, HBV, along with the associated infection by the hepatitis D virus, is still among the most common pathogens afflicting humans. PMID:25646383

  13. Viral hepatitis: past and future of HBV and HDV.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Emmanuel; Yoneda, Masato; Schiff, Eugene R

    2015-02-02

    Viral hepatitis is a significant disease afflicting hundreds of millions of people. Hepatitis-causing viruses initiate significant morbidity and mortality by establishing both acute and chronic infections, and several of these viruses are specifically associated with the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Consequently, intense research efforts are focused on increasing our understanding of virus biology and on improving antiviral therapy. Even though viral hepatitis can be caused by several viruses from a range of virus families, the discovery of components of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) became a catalyst for the development of diagnostic assays that differentiate between these viruses as well as strategies for novel methods of vaccine development. Improvements in both the treatment and prevention of viral hepatitis are advancing rapidly. However, HBV, along with the associated infection by the hepatitis D virus, is still among the most common pathogens afflicting humans. Copyright © 2015 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  14. Inhibitor-Based Therapeutics for Treatment of Viral Hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Dey, Debajit; Banerjee, Manidipa

    2016-09-28

    Viral hepatitis remains a significant worldwide threat, in spite of the availability of several successful therapeutic and vaccination strategies. Complications associated with acute and chronic infections, such as liver failure, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, are the cause of considerable morbidity and mortality. Given the significant burden on the healthcare system caused by viral hepatitis, it is essential that novel, more effective therapeutics be developed. The present review attempts to summarize the current treatments against viral hepatitis, and provides an outline for upcoming, promising new therapeutics. Development of novel therapeutics requires an understanding of the viral life cycles and viral effectors in molecular detail. As such, this review also discusses virally-encoded effectors, found to be essential for virus survival and replication in the host milieu, which may be utilized as potential candidates for development of alternative therapies in the future.

  15. Inhibitor-Based Therapeutics for Treatment of Viral Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Debajit; Banerjee, Manidipa

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Viral hepatitis remains a significant worldwide threat, in spite of the availability of several successful therapeutic and vaccination strategies. Complications associated with acute and chronic infections, such as liver failure, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, are the cause of considerable morbidity and mortality. Given the significant burden on the healthcare system caused by viral hepatitis, it is essential that novel, more effective therapeutics be developed. The present review attempts to summarize the current treatments against viral hepatitis, and provides an outline for upcoming, promising new therapeutics. Development of novel therapeutics requires an understanding of the viral life cycles and viral effectors in molecular detail. As such, this review also discusses virally-encoded effectors, found to be essential for virus survival and replication in the host milieu, which may be utilized as potential candidates for development of alternative therapies in the future. PMID:27777893

  16. Tickling the TLR7 to cure viral hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Funk, Emily; Kottilil, Shyam; Gilliam, Bruce; Talwani, Rohit

    2014-05-14

    Chronic hepatitis B and C are the leading causes of liver disease and liver transplantation worldwide. Ability to mount an effective immune response against both HBV and HCV is associated with spontaneous clearance of both infections, while an inability to do so leads to chronicity of both infections. To mount an effective immune response, both innate and adaptive immune responses must work in tandem. Hence, developing protective immunity to hepatitis viruses is an important goal in order to reduce the global burden of these two infections and prevent development of long-term complications. In this regard, the initial interactions between the pathogen and immune system are pivotal in determining the effectiveness of immune response and subsequent elimination of pathogens. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are important regulators of innate and adaptive immune responses to various pathogens and are often involved in initiating and augmenting effective antiviral immunity. Immune-based therapeutic strategies that specifically induce type I interferon responses are associated with functional cure for both chronic HBV and HCV infections. Precisely, TLR7 stimulation mediates an endogenous type I interferon response, which is critical in development of a broad, effective and protective immunity against hepatitis viruses. This review focuses on anti-viral strategies that involve targeting TLR7 that may lead to development of protective immunity and eradication of hepatitis B.

  17. Viral Hepatitis: Retrospective Review in a Canadian Pediatric Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Cybulska, Paulina; Ni, Andy; Jimenez-Rivera, Carolina

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Clinical presentation of viral hepatitis ranges from mild symptoms to fulminant hepatitis. Our aim is to describe clinical presentation and outcomes of children with viral hepatitis from the Eastern Ontario/Western Quebec regions of Canada. Methods. Retrospective chart review of children diagnosed with viral hepatitis at our institution from January 1, 1998, to December 31, 2007. Results. There were 261 charts reviewed, only 64 had a confirmed viral etiology: 34 (53%) hepatitis B (HBV), 16 (25%) hepatitis C (HCV), 4 (6.3%) hepatitis A (HAV), 7 (11%) cytomegalovirus (CMV), and 3 (4.7%) Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). Children with HBV presented at a mean age of 6.4 ± 4.6 years. Spontaneous seroconversion (appearance of HBVeAb and loss of HBVeAg) occurred in 21/34 (61.7%). Children with acute hepatitis (HAV, CMV, and EBV) presented with mild abdominal pain, jaundice, and fevers. Overall outcome was excellent. Conclusion. Acute and chronic hepatitis in children has a benign course; moreover, HBV spontaneous seroconversion is common in pediatric patients. PMID:22482064

  18. Hepatocellular carcinoma in Sweden: its association with viral hepatitis, especially with hepatitis C viral genotypes.

    PubMed

    Widell, A; Verbaan, H; Wejstål, R; Kaczynski, J; Kidd-Ljunggren, K; Wallerstedt, S

    2000-01-01

    Viral markers of chronic hepatitis were tested for in 95 frozen serum samples from 299 patients from Malmö, Sweden, with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), diagnosed between 1977 and 1994. Hepatitis B analysis included anti-HBc, HBsAg and, if anti-HBc positive, HBV DNA. Hepatitis C infection analysis included anti-HCV screening, RIBA, HCV RNA and HCV genotyping. HCV genotyping was also carried out in 9 HCV-viraemic HCC-patients from Gothenburg. HCV genotype distribution in HCC cases was compared with Swedish HCV-infected blood donors. Among the 95 patients from Malmö, 28 (29%) had anti-HBc, but only 5 (5%) were chronic HBV carriers, compared with 16 (17%) with chronic hepatitis C (p = 0.021). HCV-related HCC was more common among immigrants (8/16 vs. 8/79; p < 0.001). Genotyping of 25 HCV-infected cases showed genotype 1a in 6 (24%), genotype 1b in 13 (52%), genotype 2b in 4 (16%), and genotype 3a in 2 (8.0%) patients. Genotype 1b was more common among HCC patients than among blood donors (p < 0.001), but 8 of 13 genotype 1b-infected patients were from countries where genotype 1b is predominant. Among native Swedes there was no difference between the HCV genotypes infecting blood donors and those found in HCC patients.

  19. Peptide-pulsed dendritic cells induce the hepatitis C viral epitope-specific responses of naïve human T cells.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Sasmita; Losikoff, Phyllis T; Self, Alyssa A; Terry, Frances; Ardito, Matthew T; Tassone, Ryan; Martin, William D; De Groot, Anne S; Gregory, Stephen H

    2014-05-30

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major cause of liver disease. Spontaneous resolution of infection is associated with broad, MHC class I- (CD8(+)) and class II-restricted (CD4(+)) T cell responses to multiple viral epitopes. Only 20% of patients clear infection spontaneously, however, most develop chronic disease. The response to chemotherapy varies; therapeutic vaccination offers an additional treatment strategy. To date, therapeutic vaccines have demonstrated only limited success in clinical trials. Vector-mediated vaccination with multi-epitope-expressing DNA constructs provides an improved approach. Highly-conserved, HLA-A2-restricted HCV epitopes and HLA-DRB1-restricted immunogenic consensus sequences (ICS, each composed of multiple overlapping and highly conserved epitopes) were predicted using bioinformatics tools and synthesized as peptides. HLA binding activity was determined in competitive binding assays. Immunogenicity and the ability of each peptide to stimulate naïve human T cell recognition and IFN-γ production were assessed in cultures of total PBMCs and in co-cultures composed of peptide-pulsed dendritic cells (DCs) and purified T lymphocytes, cell populations derived from normal blood donors. Essentially all predicted HLA-A2-restricted epitopes and HLA-DRB1-restricted ICS exhibited HLA binding activity and the ability to elicit immune recognition and IFN-γ production by naïve human T cells. The ability of DCs pulsed with these highly-conserved HLA-A2- and -DRB1-restricted peptides to induce naïve human T cell reactivity and IFN-γ production ex vivo demonstrates the potential efficacy of a multi-epitope-based HCV vaccine targeted to dendritic cells.

  20. Immune responses and immunopathology in acute and chronic viral hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Shin, Eui-Cheol; Sung, Pil Soo; Park, Su-Hyung

    2016-08-01

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV), hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) are responsible for most cases of viral hepatitis. Infection by each type of virus results in a different typical natural disease course and clinical outcome that are determined by virological and immunological factors. HCV tends to establish a chronic persistent infection, whereas HAV does not. HBV is effectively controlled in adults, although it persists for a lifetime after neonatal infection. In this Review, we discuss the similarities and differences in immune responses to and immunopathogenesis of HAV, HBV and HCV infections, which may explain the distinct courses and outcomes of each hepatitis virus infection.

  1. [Other viral food poisoning (hepatitis A and E)].

    PubMed

    Yano, Kunio

    2012-08-01

    Hepatitis A and E viruses are spread via the fecal-oral route. In the endemic area, restaurant and school outbreaks due to contaminated water or food have been reported. The clinical signs and symptoms in patients with typical hepatitis A and E are similar to those seen with other forms of acute viral hepatitis. Hepatitis A tends to be more severe when acquired at older ages. Hepatitis E appears to be relatively severe compared with hepatitis A. Although both hepatitis are self-limited illness, severe hepatits are rarely observed. Hepatitis A and E can be prevented by improved sanitary conditions, handwashing, heating foods appropriately. Avoidance of water and foods from endemic areas is also effective.

  2. [Novel treatments for hepatitis C viral infection and the hepatic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Lugo-Baruqui, Alejandro; Bautista López, Carlos Alfredo; Armendáriz-Borunda, Juan

    2009-02-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection represents a global health problem due to its evolution to hepatic cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The viral pathogenesis and infectious processes are not yet fully understood. The development of natural viral resistance towards the host immune system represents a mayor challenge for the design of alternative therapeutic interventions and development of viral vaccines. The molecular mechanisms of hepatic fibrosis are well described. New alternatives for the treatment of patients with HCV infection and hepatic cirrhosis are under intensive research. New drugs such as viral protease inhibitors and assembly inhibitors, as well as immune modulators have been studied in clinical trials. Additional alternatives include antifibrotic drugs, which reverse the hepatic cellular damage caused by HCV infection. This review makes reference to viral infective mechanisms, molecular pathways of liver fibrosis and overviews conventional and new treatments for HCV infection and liver fibrosis.

  3. Viral hepatitis A, B, and C: grown-up issues.

    PubMed

    Sharapov, Umid M; Hu, Dale J

    2010-08-01

    Viral hepatitis is a major global health problem associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Although there are five major and distinct human hepatitis viruses characterized to date--referred to as hepatitis A, B, C, D, and E, respectively--only hepatitis A, B, and C are epidemiologically and clinically relevant for adolescents in North America. The clinical presentation of acute infection with each of these viruses is similar; thus, diagnosis depends on the use of specific serologic markers and viral nucleic acids. This review provides data on the epidemiology, clinical symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of each of these three viral infections, along with points that are important or unique to adolescent patients.

  4. Viral Hepatitis A to E in South Mediterranean Countries

    PubMed Central

    Kamal, Sanaa M.; Mahmoud, Sara; Hafez, Tamer; EL-Fouly, Runia

    2010-01-01

    Viral hepatitis represents an important health problem in the South Mediterranean countries, Egypt, Libya, Tunisia, Algeria and Morocco. Emerging natural history and epidemiological information reveal differences in the overall epidemiology, risk factors and modes of transmission of viral hepatitis A, B, C, D, E infections in the South Mediterranean region. The differences in the in incidence and prevalence of viral hepatitis across North African countries is attributed to variations in health care and sanitation standards, risk factors and immunization strategies. The active continuous population movement through travel, tourism and migration from and to the South Mediterranean countries contribute to the spread of infections due to hepatitis viruses across borders leading to outbreaks and emergence of new patterns of infection or introduction of uncommon genotypes in other countries, particularly in Europe. PMID:21415943

  5. Programmed Cell Death 1 (PD-1) and Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte-Associated Antigen 4 (CTLA-4) in Viral Hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyosun; Kang, Hyojeung; Lee, Hwan Hee; Kim, Chang Wook

    2017-07-13

    Virus-specific cluster of differentiation 8 (CD8+) cytotoxic T cells (CTL) recognize viral antigens presented on major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I chains on infected hepatocytes, with help from CD4+ T cells. However, this CTL response is frequently weak or undetectable in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) and cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4) are receptors in the CD28 family of costimulatory molecules, providing inhibitory signals to T cells. The overexpressions of PD-1 and CTLA-4 in patients with viral infection have been shown to associate with functional impairment of virus-specific T cells. In acute viral hepatitis, PD-1 and CTLA-4 are up-regulated during the symptomatic phase, and then down-regulated after recovery. These findings suggest that PD-1 and CTLA-4 have protective effects as inhibitory molecules to suppress cytotoxic T cells which induce harmful destruction of viral infected hepatocytes in self-limited viral hepatitis. In chronic viral hepatitis, the extended upregulations of PD-1 and CTLA-4 are associated with T cell exhaustion and persistent viral infection, suggesting positive correlations between expression of immune inhibitory factors and the chronicity of viral disease. In this review, we summarize recent literature relating to PD-1, CTLA-4, and other inhibitory receptors in antigen-specific T cell exhaustion in viral hepatitis, including hepatitis A, B, C, and others.

  6. Programmed Cell Death 1 (PD-1) and Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte-Associated Antigen 4 (CTLA-4) in Viral Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyosun; Kang, Hyojeung; Lee, Hwan Hee

    2017-01-01

    Virus-specific cluster of differentiation 8 (CD8+) cytotoxic T cells (CTL) recognize viral antigens presented on major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I chains on infected hepatocytes, with help from CD4+ T cells. However, this CTL response is frequently weak or undetectable in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) and cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4) are receptors in the CD28 family of costimulatory molecules, providing inhibitory signals to T cells. The overexpressions of PD-1 and CTLA-4 in patients with viral infection have been shown to associate with functional impairment of virus-specific T cells. In acute viral hepatitis, PD-1 and CTLA-4 are up-regulated during the symptomatic phase, and then down-regulated after recovery. These findings suggest that PD-1 and CTLA-4 have protective effects as inhibitory molecules to suppress cytotoxic T cells which induce harmful destruction of viral infected hepatocytes in self-limited viral hepatitis. In chronic viral hepatitis, the extended upregulations of PD-1 and CTLA-4 are associated with T cell exhaustion and persistent viral infection, suggesting positive correlations between expression of immune inhibitory factors and the chronicity of viral disease. In this review, we summarize recent literature relating to PD-1, CTLA-4, and other inhibitory receptors in antigen-specific T cell exhaustion in viral hepatitis, including hepatitis A, B, C, and others. PMID:28703774

  7. Viral hepatitis and hepatitis B antigen: recent advances

    PubMed Central

    Krugman, Saul

    1974-01-01

    Recent advances in hepatitis research have shed new light on the etiology, pathogenesis, epidemiology and prevention of type B hepatitis infection. The so-called ‘Dane’ particle is probably the complete hepatitis B virion; its outer coat is the hepatitis B (Australia) antigen (HB Ag) and its inner core is an immunologically distinct particle. Subtypes of HB Ag (a, d, y, w and r) are useful indices for epidemiological surveys. Concepts of epidemiology have changed: type B hepatitis is transmissible by contact as well as by inoculation. The presence of HB Ag in blood is indicative of the presence of hepatitis B virus. Tests to detect antigen and use of voluntary blood donors have played a major role in the decreased incidence of post transfusion hepatitis. A special hepatitis B gammaglobulin preparation and a heat-inactivated hepatitis B vaccine have proved to be effective in preliminary studies. PMID:4219230

  8. Serum iron levels and hepatic iron overload in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis and chronic viral hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Uraz, Suleyman; Aygun, Cem; Sonsuz, Abdullah; Ozbay, Gulsen

    2005-05-01

    Our objective was to determine the effect of serum iron levels and hepatic iron overload on hepatocellular damage in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and to compare this with chronic viral hepatitis. Twenty-five patients who had elevated transaminase levels on at least two occasions, without any evidence of viral and autoimmune hepatitis and diabetes, without a history of significant alcohol use, and with a liver biopsy consistent with NASH were enrolled in the study. Twenty-five patients with chronic viral hepatitis (13 patients with chronic hepatitis C and 12 with chronic hepatitis B) who were not under any antiviral treatment were taken as controls. Metabolic factors were studied in the NASH and chronic hepatitis groups. Biopsy specimens were stained with hematoxylin-eosin, and the grade of steatosis and the stage of fibrosis were evaluated as I, II, or III, I being mild and III being severe. Iron overload in the hepatic tissue was studied by Prussian blue staining. Serum ALT, AST, ALP, GGT, globulin, and ferritin levels were comparable in both steatohepatitis and chronic viral hepatitis groups. However, patients with chronic hepatitis had a lower albumin level and a higher serum iron level, with higher transferrin saturation. Among patients with NASH, mild, moderate, and severe steatosis was found in 7, 10, and 8 patients, respectively. Inflammatory infiltration was grade I in 24 patients and grade III in 1 patient. Fibrosis was mild in 12 patients and 13 patients had no fibrosis. Among patients with chronic viral hepatitis, inflammatory infiltration of grade I was seen in 11 patients, grade II in 11 patients, and grade III in 3 patients. Fibrosis was mild in 9 patients, moderate in 13 patients, and severe in 2 patients; 1 patient had no fibrosis. Compared to patients with NASH, those with chronic viral hepatitis cases had more severe inflammatory infiltration and fibrosis (P < 0.01). While five patients with chronic viral hepatitis had mild iron overload

  9. Antiviral therapies for managing viral hepatitis in lymphoma patients.

    PubMed

    Merli, Michele; Rattotti, Sara; Gotti, Manuel; Arcaini, Luca

    2017-03-01

    In patients with lymphoma the detection of positive hepatitis B or C viruses (HBV and HCV) serology involves crucial therapeutic consequences. In HBV-infected patients the serological profile of active (HBsAg-positive) or resolved (HBsAg-negative/anti-HBcAb-positive) infection is associated to differential risk of viral reactivation during rituximab-based therapy and require appropriate strategies of monitoring and of antiviral prophylaxis. In HCV-associated NHL patients consolidated data demonstrated that interferon (IFN)-based antiviral therapy (AT) is able to induce lymphoma regression strictly related to viral eradication, while preliminary data of the new direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) are very promising. Areas covered: This review summarizes current evidences about HBV reactivation risk in patients undergoing rituximab-based treatments and appropriate options of antiviral prophylaxis with lamivudine, entecavir or tenofovir, as well as pre-emptive strategy in HBsAg-negative/HBcAb-positive patients. Moreover previous experiences with IFN-based AT as well as recent studies with DAAs in HCV-associated indolent lymphomas or diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) are reviewed. Expert opinion: Entecavir or tenofovir prophylaxis is recommended for HBsAg-positive patients, while universal prophilaxis with lamivudine may be preferred in HBsAg-negative/anti-HBc-positive patients. In asymptomatic patients with HCV-associated indolent lymphoma DAA-based AT should be used as first-line option, while in DLBCL its deliver after immunochemotherapy-induced complete remission is suggested.

  10. Classical and Modern Approaches Used for Viral Hepatitis Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Heiat, Mohammad; Ranjbar, Reza; Alavian, Seyed Moayed

    2014-01-01

    Context: Viral hepatitis diagnosis is an important issue in the treatment procedure of this infection. Late diagnosis and delayed treatment of viral hepatitis infections can lead to irreversible liver damages and occurrence of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. A variety of laboratory methods including old and new technologies are being applied to detect hepatitis viruses. Here we have tried to review, categorize, compare and illustrate the classical and modern approaches used for diagnosis of viral hepatitis. Evidence Acquisition: In order to achieve a comprehensive aspect in viral hepatitis detection methods, an extensive search using related keywords was done in major medical library and data were collected, categorized and summarized in different sections. Results: Analyzing of collected data resulted in the wrapping up the hepatitis virus detection methods in separate sections including 1) immunological methods such as enzyme immunoassay (EIA), radio-immunoassay (RIA) immuno-chromatographic assay (ICA), and immuno-chemiluminescence 2) molecular approaches including non-amplification and amplification based methods, and finally 3) advanced biosensors such as mass-sensitive, electrical, electrochemical and optical based biosensors and also new generation of detection methods. Conclusions: Detection procedures in the clinical laboratories possess a large diversity; each has their individual advantages and facilities' differences. PMID:24829586

  11. Interferon-inducible ribonuclease ISG20 inhibits hepatitis B virus replication through directly binding to the epsilon stem-loop structure of viral RNA

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuanjie; Mao, Richeng; Mitra, Bidisha; Cai, Dawei; Yan, Ran; Guo, Ju-Tao; Block, Timothy M.; Mechti, Nadir

    2017-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) replicates its DNA genome through reverse transcription of a viral RNA pregenome. We report herein that the interferon (IFN) stimulated exoribonuclease gene of 20 KD (ISG20) inhibits HBV replication through degradation of HBV RNA. ISG20 expression was observed at basal level and was highly upregulated upon IFN treatment in hepatocytes, and knock down of ISG20 resulted in elevation of HBV replication and attenuation of IFN-mediated antiviral effect. The sequence element conferring the susceptibility of HBV RNA to ISG20-mediated RNA degradation was mapped at the HBV RNA terminal redundant region containing epsilon (ε) stem-loop. Furthermore, ISG20-induced HBV RNA degradation relies on its ribonuclease activity, as the enzymatic inactive form ISG20D94G was unable to promote HBV RNA decay. Interestingly, ISG20D94G retained antiviral activity against HBV DNA replication by preventing pgRNA encapsidation, resulting from a consequence of ISG20-ε interaction. This interaction was further characterized by in vitro electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and ISG20 was able to bind HBV ε directly in absence of any other cellular proteins, indicating a direct ε RNA binding capability of ISG20; however, cofactor(s) may be required for ISG20 to efficiently degrade ε. In addition, the lower stem portion of ε is the major ISG20 binding site, and the removal of 4 base pairs from the bottom portion of ε abrogated the sensitivity of HBV RNA to ISG20, suggesting that the specificity of ISG20-ε interaction relies on both RNA structure and sequence. Furthermore, the C-terminal Exonuclease III (ExoIII) domain of ISG20 was determined to be responsible for interacting with ε, as the deletion of ExoIII abolished in vitro ISG20-ε binding and intracellular HBV RNA degradation. Taken together, our study sheds light on the underlying mechanisms of IFN-mediated HBV inhibition and the antiviral mechanism of ISG20 in general. PMID:28399146

  12. Interferon-inducible ribonuclease ISG20 inhibits hepatitis B virus replication through directly binding to the epsilon stem-loop structure of viral RNA.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuanjie; Nie, Hui; Mao, Richeng; Mitra, Bidisha; Cai, Dawei; Yan, Ran; Guo, Ju-Tao; Block, Timothy M; Mechti, Nadir; Guo, Haitao

    2017-04-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) replicates its DNA genome through reverse transcription of a viral RNA pregenome. We report herein that the interferon (IFN) stimulated exoribonuclease gene of 20 KD (ISG20) inhibits HBV replication through degradation of HBV RNA. ISG20 expression was observed at basal level and was highly upregulated upon IFN treatment in hepatocytes, and knock down of ISG20 resulted in elevation of HBV replication and attenuation of IFN-mediated antiviral effect. The sequence element conferring the susceptibility of HBV RNA to ISG20-mediated RNA degradation was mapped at the HBV RNA terminal redundant region containing epsilon (ε) stem-loop. Furthermore, ISG20-induced HBV RNA degradation relies on its ribonuclease activity, as the enzymatic inactive form ISG20D94G was unable to promote HBV RNA decay. Interestingly, ISG20D94G retained antiviral activity against HBV DNA replication by preventing pgRNA encapsidation, resulting from a consequence of ISG20-ε interaction. This interaction was further characterized by in vitro electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and ISG20 was able to bind HBV ε directly in absence of any other cellular proteins, indicating a direct ε RNA binding capability of ISG20; however, cofactor(s) may be required for ISG20 to efficiently degrade ε. In addition, the lower stem portion of ε is the major ISG20 binding site, and the removal of 4 base pairs from the bottom portion of ε abrogated the sensitivity of HBV RNA to ISG20, suggesting that the specificity of ISG20-ε interaction relies on both RNA structure and sequence. Furthermore, the C-terminal Exonuclease III (ExoIII) domain of ISG20 was determined to be responsible for interacting with ε, as the deletion of ExoIII abolished in vitro ISG20-ε binding and intracellular HBV RNA degradation. Taken together, our study sheds light on the underlying mechanisms of IFN-mediated HBV inhibition and the antiviral mechanism of ISG20 in general.

  13. [Clinical study on viral hepatitis combined with aplastic anemia].

    PubMed

    Lu, Yao; Zhang, Yan-li; Shen, Ge; Zhang, Lu; Wang, Lin; Qiu, Guo-hua; Wu, Yun-zhong; Yang, Min; Li, Ming-hui

    2011-08-01

    To study the clinical features, outcomes and treatments of viral hepatitis combined with aplastic anemia. 25 cases diagnosed as viral hepatits combined with aplastic anemia in Beijing Ditan Hsopital between April 2004 and September 2009 were retrospectively analyzed. In this group of patients aplastic anemia was finally diagnosed by bone marrow aspiration. We collected clinical data of these patients, including a history of liver disease, drug allergies, hospital medication history, laboratory data, and then performed descriptive analysis. 25 patients with viral hepatitis were diagnosed as complicated with aplastic anemia by histopathological data. Among these patients, 17 were male and 8 were women. Viral hepatitis included: chronic hepatitis B (12 cases), chronic hepatitis C (4 cases), acute hepatits E (1 case), hepatitis caused by CMV infection (1 case), and unclassified hepatitis (7 cases). Among these patients, 7 were diagnosed as severe hepatits. Considering previous history, only 3 patients had history of short term interferon therapy before hospitalization, and the remaining patients did not use drug that affects blood system. Treatments were as followings: using colony stimulating factor in 6 patients, gamma globulin in 9 patients, glucocorticoids in 3 patients, erythropoietin in 1 patient, only oral drug to raise erythrocytes in 2 patients, red blood cells transfusion in 6 patients, platelets transfusion in 2 patients. As for clinical outcomes, 20 patients acquired improved condition and were dicharged, 3 patients were discharged voluntarily and 2 patients died of severe hepatits combined with other complications. Main treatments of viral hepatitis combined with aplastic anemia were to treat primary hepatopathy and nucleoside analogue-based antiviral therapy, to provide symptomatic and supportive treatment for blood diseases. Blood diseases would recover simultaneously while liver disease was improved, and the prognosis was good.

  14. [Blood transfusion and viral diseases. Recent acquisitions concerning viral hepatitis viruses, cytomegaloviruses and Epstein-Barr virus].

    PubMed

    Spanò, C

    1979-02-11

    In recent years, an increasingly clear picture has been formed of the virus-induced syndromes that may follow a blood transfusion or the use of blood derivatives. Up to about 10 years ago, post-infusion infection was predominantly due to serum hepatitis. Blumberg's discovery of HBsAg (formerly known as Australia antigen) has made it possible to check and prevent viral hepatitis, type B, and to recognise such distinct forms as the mononucleosis-like syndrome caused by cytomegalic virus, infectious mononucleosis caused by EB virus, and so-called non A/non B hepatitis. A brief account of recent advances with respect to the biological features of the viruses responsible for type A and type B hepatitis, CMV and EB virus, and their behaviour in man is followed by an examination of the transfusional aspects, the methods used in their study, and the difficulties involved. The soundness of existing methods and the need for their standardisation are discussed.

  15. Acute viral hepatitis in Hanoi, Viet Nam.

    PubMed

    Corwin, A L; Dai, T C; Duc, D D; Suu, P I; Van, N T; Ha, L D; Janick, M; Kanti, L; Sie, A; Soderquist, R; Graham, R; Wignall, S F; Hyams, K C

    1996-01-01

    A study of acute hepatitis was conducted in Hanoi, Viet Nam, from January 1993 to February 1995; 188 sera from clinical hepatitis cases were screened by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for immunoglobulin (Ig) M anti-hepatitis A virus (HAV), IgM anti-hepatitis B core antigen (HBc), IgG anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV), IgG anti-hepatitis E virus (HEV) and IgM anti-HEV. Additionally, 187 sera from control subjects, matched by age, sex and month of admission, with no recent history of hepatitis, were tested for comparative purposes. There was serological evidence of recent HAV (29%) and hepatitis B virus (24%) infection in 53% of cases (2 mixed infections), compared with 2% of controls. HCV infections were detected in 10% of cases (with no IgM anti-HAV or IgM anti-HBc) and in 1% of control sera. There was no significant difference in the proportion of IgG anti-HEV positive sera between cases (in the absence of IgM anti-HAV or IgM anti-HBc) (21%) and controls (14%); 3% of all case sera were IgM anti-HEV positive. Younger cases (< 20 years) were more likely to have recent HAV infections (41%) than those aged > or = 20 years (21%) (P < 0.01). In contrast, a higher percentage of adult cases had IgM anti-HBc, IgG anti-HCV and IgG anti-HEV (in the absence of recent HAV or HBV infection) than did children. No seasonal trend in hepatitis admissions was detected, nor an association between water-borne infections (HAV and HEV) and the warmer months. Hepatitis patients lived throughout Hanoi and surrounding areas, with no identifiable geographical clustering, regardless of serological marker.

  16. Innate detection of hepatitis B and C virus and viral inhibition of the response.

    PubMed

    Yi, Zhigang; Chen, Jieliang; Kozlowski, Maya; Yuan, Zhenghong

    2015-09-01

    Viral hepatitis caused by hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections poses a significant burden to the public health system. Although HBV and HCV differ in structure and life cycles, they share unique characteristics, such as tropism to infect hepatocytes and association with hepatic and extrahepatic disorders that are of innate immunity nature. In response to HBV and HCV infection, the liver innate immune cells eradicate pathogens by recognizing specific molecules expressed by pathogens via distinct cellular pattern recognition receptors whose triggering activates intracellular signalling pathways inducing cytokines, interferons and anti-viral response genes that collectively function to clear infections. However, HBV and HCV evolve strategies to inactivate innate signalling factors and as such establish persistent infections without being recognized by the innate immunity. We review recent insights into how HBV and HCV are sensed and how they evade innate immunity to establish chronicity. Understanding the mechanisms of viral hepatitis is mandatory to develop effective and safe therapies for eradication of viral hepatitis. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. The three types of human viral hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Zuckerman, A. J.

    1978-01-01

    Infections with hepatitis A and B viruses are common in all parts of the world and constitute a major public health problem. The identification of specific antigenic markers of these viruses has led to the development of sensitive laboratory tests. These, in turn, have resulted in a better understanding of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, immunology, and the nature of these common infections. In the case of hepatitis type B, laboratory tests revealed a persistent carrier state of the surface antigen in some 120-175 million people and established the significance of hepatitis B virus in the pathogenesis of serious chronic liver disease, including a strong association with primary hepatocellular carcinoma in tropical and some subtropical regions. In addition, the specific diagnosis of hepatitis types A and B has revealed a previously unrecognized form of hepatitis which is clearly unrelated to either type. This new form of infection of the liver is now the most common type of hepatitis after the transfusion of blood and blood products in some areas of the world and it also appears to be an important cause of sporadic hepatitis, particularly among adults. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2 PMID:78770

  18. Viral hepatitis in Hawai'i--differing perspectives.

    PubMed

    Tice, Alan D; Bannan, Michael; Bauman, Kay; Collis, Tarquin; Hall, Alba; Haning, William; Hannemann, Shoshana; Hare, C Bradley; Humphry, Joseph; Jao, Robert; Leevy, Carroll; Lusk, Heather; Ochoa, Edward; Palafox, Neal; Withers, Nancy; Akinaka, Kenneth

    2010-04-01

    This publication contains information from a conference titled "Individual Perspectives on the Silent Epidemic of Viral Hepatitis in Hawai'i" held in October of 2007 with updates and additional contributions from annual conferences in 2008 and 2009. These conferences were sponsored by the Hepatitis Support Network of Hawai'i and held in Honolulu, Hawai'i at the Queen's Conference Center. The primary objectives of the conferences have been to heighten awareness of viral hepatitis in Hawai'i and to bring together health care professionals to learn about these infections and to help them respond to the challenges they bring to the people of Hawai'i. The initial conference was oriented to present the unique and individual perspectives of patients, physicians, and other healthcare providers specific to the complex issues of hepatitis in an effort to help them understand their role in the context of others and to develop a team approach in responding to this epidemic.

  19. First International Conference on Therapies for Viral Hepatitis.

    PubMed

    deJong, M D

    1996-02-01

    The First International Conference on Therapies for Viral Hepatitis, held in December 1995, brought together researchers, clinicians, and pharmaceutical manufacturers devoted to finding more effective ways to treat several varieties of hepatitis. Hepatitis B (HBV) affects an estimated 300 to 350 million people; up to 25 percent of that number will die of liver cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma. The only currently available treatment is interferon, which is effective in only forty percent of the cases and has dose-limiting side effects. Nucleoside analog drugs have gained increasing attention because of their use in treating opportunistic infections in HIV-positive patients. Hepatitis C (HCV) affects only 75 to 100 million but is potentially more dangerous, since 85 percent of those with the disease will develop persistent and chronic liver infections and 70 percent will develop chronic liver disease. Hepatitis D (HDV) requires HBV for its replication cycle, and appears to respond to treatment for HBV. However, interferon is not effective in cases where the patient has both HBV and HDV. Hepatitis G (HGV) causes transfusion-associated non-ABC hepatitis with mild symptoms, and it is unclear if HGV causes chronic liver disease. Regimens for chronic viral hepatitis are desperately needed.

  20. Susceptibility to acetaminophen (APAP) toxicity unexpectedly is decreased during acute viral hepatitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Getachew, Yonas; James, Laura; Lee, William M; Thiele, Dwain L; Miller, Bonnie C

    2010-05-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity results from cytochrome P450 metabolism of APAP to the toxic metabolite, n-acetyl-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI), which reacts with cysteinyl residues to form APAP adducts and initiates cell injury. As APAP is commonly used during viral illnesses there has been concern that APAP injury may be additive to that of viral hepatitis, leading physicians to advise against its use in such patients; this has not been investigated experimentally. We infected C57BL/6 male mice with replication-deficient adenovirus to produce moderately severe acute viral hepatitis and observed that APAP doses that were hepatotoxic or lethal in control mice produced neither death nor additional increase in serum ALT when administered to infected mice at the peak of virus-induced liver injury. Moreover, the concentration of hepatic APAP-protein adducts formed in these mice was only 10% that in control mice. Protection from APAP hepatotoxicity also was observed earlier in the course of infection, prior to the peak virus-induced ALT rise. Hepatic glutathione limits APAP-protein adduct formation but glutathione levels were similar in control and infected mice. Cyp1a2 (E.C. 1.14.14.1) and Cyp2e1 (E.C. 1.14.13.n7) mRNA expression decreased by 3 days post-infection and hepatic Cyp2e1 protein levels were reduced almost 90% at 7 days, when adduct formation was maximally inhibited. In vitro, hepatocytes from virally infected mice also were resistant to APAP-induced injury but sensitive to NAPQI. Rather than potentiating APAP-induced liver injury, acute viral hepatitis in this model resulted in selective down-regulation of APAP metabolizing P450s in liver and decreased the risk of APAP hepatotoxicity. 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The Association of Viral Hepatitis and Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Geokas, Michael C.; Olsen, Harvey; Swanson, Virginia; Rinderknecht, Heinrich

    1972-01-01

    The histological features of 24 pancreases obtained from patients who died of causes other than hepatitis, pancreatitis or pancreatic tumors, included a variable degree of autolysis, rare foci of inflammatory reaction but no hemorrhagic fat necrosis or destruction of elastic tissue in vessel walls (elastolysis). Assays of elastase in extracts of these pancreases showed no free enzyme, but varying amounts of proelastase. A review of autopsy findings in 33 patients with fatal liver necrosis attributed to halothane anesthesia, demonstrated changes of acute pancreatitis only in two. On the other hand, a review of 16 cases of fulminant viral hepatitis revealed changes characteristic of acute pancreatitis in seven – interstitial edema, hemorrhagic fat necrosis, inflammatory reaction and frequently elastolysis in vessel walls. Determination of elastase in extracts of one pancreas showed the bulk of the enzyme in free form. Furthermore, assays of urinary amylase in 44 patients with viral hepatitis showed increased levels of this enzyme (2583 ± 398 mean value ± standard error, Somogyi units per 100 ml in 13, or 29.5 percent). The evidence suggests that acute pancreatitis may at times complicate viral hepatitis. Although direct proof of viral pancreatic involvement is not feasible at present, a rational hypothesis is advanced which underlines similar mechanisms of tissue involvement in both liver and pancreas that may be brought about by the hepatitis viruses. PMID:5070694

  2. [Amoxicillin-induced hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Oxlund, Jakob; Ferguson, Alan Hamilton

    2011-06-27

    Amoxicillin with and without clavulanic acid is a widely used antibiotic in adults and children alike. The drug is used prophylactically as well as therapeutically. In Denmark, it has not been described that amoxicillin alone can lead to hepatitis. In literature often referenced by Danish physicians (medicin.dk and Lægemiddelkataloget), hepatotoxicity is not listed as a side effect. However, in the present case, a 61 year-old male who suffered a tick bite and was treated prophylactically with amoxicillin without clavulanic acid presented with pharmacologically induced hepatitis 20 days after treatment.

  3. Notified viral hepatitis in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    McGlashan, N

    1976-05-26

    Statistical analysis of notified cases of viral hepatits in New Zealand for an 18-month period is used first to demonstrate and then to consider a geographical gradient across the country with implications warranting further epidemiologic enquiry.

  4. Review article: genetic factors that modify the outcome of viral hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Stättermayer, A F; Scherzer, T; Beinhardt, S; Rutter, K; Hofer, H; Ferenci, P

    2014-05-01

    Genetic factors can play an important role for treatment response and disease progression in chronic viral hepatitis. To review the influence of host genetic factors on the clinical course as well as on treatment response in patients with viral hepatitis. Review of the literature. A landmark genome-wide association study (GWAS) identified polymorphisms in the IL28B gene on chromosome 19 (19q13.13) associated with response to therapy with pegylated interferon-α (PEG-IFN) and ribavirin (RBV) and spontaneous viral clearance in acute hepatitis C. Furthermore, IL28B genotype is associated with changes of lipid metabolism and insulin resistance. A further GWAS demonstrated that ITPA genetic variants protect HCV genotype 1 patients from RBV-induced anaemia. Another polymorphism in the patatin-like phospholipase domain containing 3 (PNPLA3) is associated with hepatic steatosis. Difficult-to-treat hepatitis C patients homozygous for GG had an up to five-fold lower chance of viral clearance on PEG/RBV than non-GG patients. In chronic hepatitis B patients treated with PEG-IFN several retrospective analyses of IL28B rs12980275 and rs12979860 genotypes yielded conflicting results which can be explained by the heterogeneity between the study populations. Some variants of the HLA-DP locus (HLA-DPA1 A allele and HLA-DPB1) protect against progression of chronic hepatitis B infection. The determination of IL28B polymorphisms may be useful to individualise treatment options when using PEG/RBV based therapies for chronic hepatitis C infection. In contrast, so far identified genetic factors play only a minor role in chronic hepatitis B infection. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. [Development of cellular immunity in patients with viral hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Andonov, A; Teokharova, M; Astrukova, S; Losev, B; Mineva, E; Dragonov, P

    1976-01-01

    The development of cell-mediated immunity (CMI) to the surface antigen of hepatitis B virus (HBSAg) and Botevgrad antigen (BA) was traced in 50 hepatitis patients. Migration inhibition test (MIT) was performed with purified HBSg and AB. Blood samples from every hepatitis patient were obtained at the beginning of the icteric phase, 10 days later and during convalescence. There was correlation between the two types of viral hepatitis and the type of cellular immune response. The development of CMI is associated with disappearance of HBSAg from the serum of hepatitis patients. CMI to HBSAg develops within 9-12 days after the onset of icterus and to BA during the first two days of icterus. There is a relationship between the persistence of HBSAg and CMI.

  6. [Antibody formation in type A viral hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Teokharova, M P; Losev, B B; Andonov, A P; Draganov, P I; Mineva, E G

    1978-01-01

    Immune response to hepatitis type A antigen (HAAg) was measured by the passive hemagglutination test (PHA) and by the immune adherence test (IAHA). Specific antibodies found by PHA are of the IgM class which indicates a recent exposure to hepatitis A virus. The antibodies found by IAHA reflect the level of postinfectious immune status. The antibody curve is highest in the age group of 30--49 years (95%). The above-mentioned serological tests were carried out with purified by gel filtration in Sepharose 6B Botevgrad faecal morphologically consisting of 27 nm particles with the buoyant density in CcCl of 1.40 g/ml. The same particles were aggregated with sera positive for antibody to hepatitis type A antigen in immune electron microscopy (IEM).

  7. Endogenous IL-33 Deficiency Exacerbates Liver Injury and Increases Hepatic Influx of Neutrophils in Acute Murine Viral Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Carrière, Virginie; Arshad, Muhammad Imran; Le Seyec, Jacques; Lefevre, Benjamin; Farooq, Muhammad; Jan, Aurélien; Manuel, Christelle; Touami-Bernard, Laurence; Lucas-Clerc, Catherine; Genet, Valentine; Gascan, Hugues; Girard, Jean-Philippe; Chalmel, Frédéric; Lamontagne, Lucie; Piquet-Pellorce, Claire

    2017-01-01

    The alarmin IL-33 has been described to be upregulated in human and murine viral hepatitis. However, the role of endogenous IL-33 in viral hepatitis remains obscure. We aimed to decipher its function by infecting IL-33-deficient mice (IL-33 KO) and their wild-type (WT) littermates with pathogenic mouse hepatitis virus (L2-MHV3). The IL-33 KO mice were more sensitive to L2-MHV3 infection exhibiting higher levels of AST/ALT, higher tissue damage, significant weight loss, and earlier death. An increased depletion of B and T lymphocytes, NKT cells, dendritic cells, and macrophages was observed 48 h postinfection (PI) in IL-33 KO mice than that in WT mice. In contrast, a massive influx of neutrophils was observed in IL-33 KO mice at 48 h PI. A transcriptomic study of inflammatory and cell-signaling genes revealed the overexpression of IL-6, TNFα, and several chemokines involved in recruitment/activation of neutrophils (CXCL2, CXCL5, CCL2, and CCL6) at 72 h PI in IL-33 KO mice. However, the IFNγ was strongly induced in WT mice with less profound expression in IL-33 KO mice demonstrating that endogenous IL-33 regulated IFNγ expression during L2-MHV3 hepatitis. In conclusion, we demonstrated that endogenous IL-33 had multifaceted immunoregulatory effect during viral hepatitis via induction of IFNγ, survival effect on immune cells, and infiltration of neutrophils in the liver. PMID:28607531

  8. Screening for Viral Hepatitis and Hepatocellular Cancer.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Andrew M

    2015-10-01

    Accurate tests for at-risk populations are available for hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus (HCV), and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Effective treatments for all three diseases exist if diagnosed early. New antivirals are making a significant impact on HCV. Liver transplant is curative for early HCC and is prioritized by the United Network for Organ Sharing in the United States. Screening and surveillance for deadly disease only makes sense if there are identifiable populations at risk for the condition, there are sensitive and specific low-cost tests available for the condition, and there are effective treatments for the condition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Viral hepatitis and immigration: A challenge for the healthcare system.

    PubMed

    Cuenca-Gómez, J A; Salas-Coronas, J; Soriano-Pérez, M J; Vázquez-Villegas, J; Lozano-Serrano, A B; Cabezas-Fernández, M T

    2016-01-01

    Viral hepatitis is a significant health problem in African countries. The increase in the immigrant population from this continent represents a challenge for the Spanish healthcare system. A descriptive study was conducted on the prevalence of the serological markers of hepatitis B (HBV), C (HCV) and D (HDV) in African immigrants treated in a specialised doctor's office. The study included 2518 patients (87.7% Sub-Saharan natives), with a mean age of 31.3 years. Some 78.8% of the patients had a positive infection marker for HBV, and 638 patients (25.3%) were diagnosed with active hepatitis B (HBsAg +). In 19 cases, antibodies against HDV were detected (4 cases with detection of the viral genome). Sixty-eight patients had antibodies against HCV, 26 of whom had a positive viral load. The high prevalence of viral hepatitis in immigrants, especially HBV infection, represents a significant change in the profile of patients treated in Spain and requires measures aimed at early diagnosis and transmission prevention. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  10. Hepatitis B viral breakthrough associated with inappropriate preservation of entecavir

    PubMed Central

    Karabay, Oguz; Tuna, Nazan; Yahyaoglu, Mehmet

    2012-01-01

    If virologic breakthrough is observed during chronic hepatitis B treatment, drug resistance or compliance problem should be considered. But in some cases, breakthrough depends on drug preservation conditions. We report the case of a 30-years-old man, who experienced viral breakthrough due to wrong preservation conditions of the drug. PMID:22345891

  11. Hepatitis E virus is the leading cause of acute viral hepatitis in Lothian, Scotland

    PubMed Central

    Kokki, I.; Smith, D.; Simmonds, P.; Ramalingam, S.; Wellington, L.; Willocks, L.; Johannessen, I.; Harvala, H.

    2015-01-01

    Acute viral hepatitis affects all ages worldwide. Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is increasingly recognized as a major cause of acute hepatitis in Europe. Because knowledge of its characteristics is limited, we conducted a retrospective study to outline demographic and clinical features of acute HEV in comparison to hepatitis A, B and C in Lothian over 28 months (January 2012 to April 2014). A total of 3204 blood samples from patients with suspected acute hepatitis were screened for hepatitis A, B and C virus; 913 of these samples were also screened for HEV. Demographic and clinical information on patients with positive samples was gathered from electronic patient records. Confirmed HEV samples were genotyped. Of 82 patients with confirmed viral hepatitis, 48 (59%) had acute HEV. These patients were older than those infected by hepatitis A, B or C viruses, were more often male and typically presented with jaundice, nausea, vomiting and/or malaise. Most HEV cases (70%) had eaten pork or game meat in the few months before infection, and 14 HEV patients (29%) had a recent history of foreign travel. The majority of samples were HEV genotype 3 (27/30, 90%); three were genotype 1. Acute HEV infection is currently the predominant cause of acute viral hepatitis in Lothian and presents clinically in older men. Most of these infections are autochthonous, and further studies confirming the sources of infection (i.e. food or blood transfusion) are required. PMID:26904201

  12. Potential of Cannabidiol for the Treatment of Viral Hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Henry I C; Toyang, Ngeh J; McLaughlin, Wayne

    2017-01-01

    Viral hepatitis B (HBV) and hepatitis C (HCV) pose a major health problem globally and if untreated, both viruses lead to severe liver damage resulting in liver cirrhosis and cancer. While HBV has a vaccine, HCV has none at the moment. The risk of drug resistance, combined with the high cost of current therapies, makes it a necessity for cost-effective therapeutics to be discovered and developed. The recent surge in interest in Medical Cannabis has led to interest in evaluating and validating the therapeutic potentials of Cannabis and its metabolites against various diseases including viruses. Preliminary screening of cannabidiol (CBD) revealed that CBD is active against HCV but not against HBV in vitro. CBD inhibited HCV replication by 86.4% at a single concentration of 10 μM with EC50 of 3.163 μM in a dose-response assay. These findings suggest that CBD could be further developed and used therapeutically against HCV. Cannabidiol exhibited in vitro activity against viral hepatitis C. Abbreviations Used: CB2: Cannabis receptor 2, CBD: Cannabidiol, DNA: Deoxyribonucleic acid, HBV: Hepatitis B virus, HCV: Hepatitis C virus, HIV/AIDS: Human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome, HSC: Hepatic stellate cells, MTS: 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2Htetrazolium, PCR: Polymerase chain reaction.

  13. Potential of Cannabidiol for the Treatment of Viral Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, Henry I. C.; Toyang, Ngeh J.; McLaughlin, Wayne

    2017-01-01

    Viral hepatitis B (HBV) and hepatitis C (HCV) pose a major health problem globally and if untreated, both viruses lead to severe liver damage resulting in liver cirrhosis and cancer. While HBV has a vaccine, HCV has none at the moment. The risk of drug resistance, combined with the high cost of current therapies, makes it a necessity for cost-effective therapeutics to be discovered and developed. The recent surge in interest in Medical Cannabis has led to interest in evaluating and validating the therapeutic potentials of Cannabis and its metabolites against various diseases including viruses. Preliminary screening of cannabidiol (CBD) revealed that CBD is active against HCV but not against HBV in vitro. CBD inhibited HCV replication by 86.4% at a single concentration of 10 μM with EC50 of 3.163 μM in a dose-response assay. These findings suggest that CBD could be further developed and used therapeutically against HCV. SUMMARY Cannabidiol exhibited in vitro activity against viral hepatitis C. Abbreviations Used: CB2: Cannabis receptor 2, CBD: Cannabidiol, DNA: Deoxyribonucleic acid, HBV: Hepatitis B virus, HCV: Hepatitis C virus, HIV/AIDS: Human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome, HSC: Hepatic stellate cells, MTS: 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2Htetrazolium, PCR: Polymerase chain reaction PMID:28250664

  14. Estimating acute viral hepatitis infections from nationally reported cases.

    PubMed

    Klevens, R Monina; Liu, Stephen; Roberts, Henry; Jiles, Ruth B; Holmberg, Scott D

    2014-03-01

    Because only a fraction of patients with acute viral hepatitis A, B, and C are reported through national surveillance to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, we estimated the true numbers. We applied a simple probabilistic model to estimate the fraction of patients with acute hepatitis A, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C who would have been symptomatic, would have sought health care tests, and would have been reported to health officials in 2011. For hepatitis A, the frequencies of symptoms (85%), care seeking (88%), and reporting (69%) yielded an estimate of 2730 infections (2.0 infections per reported case). For hepatitis B, the frequencies of symptoms (39%), care seeking (88%), and reporting (45%) indicated 18 730 infections (6.5 infections per reported case). For hepatitis C, the frequency of symptoms among injection drug users (13%) and those infected otherwise (48%), proportion seeking care (88%), and percentage reported (53%) indicated 17 100 infections (12.3 infections per reported case). These adjustment factors will allow state and local health authorities to estimate acute hepatitis infections locally and plan prevention activities accordingly.

  15. Estimating Acute Viral Hepatitis Infections From Nationally Reported Cases

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Stephen; Roberts, Henry; Jiles, Ruth B.; Holmberg, Scott D.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Because only a fraction of patients with acute viral hepatitis A, B, and C are reported through national surveillance to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, we estimated the true numbers. Methods. We applied a simple probabilistic model to estimate the fraction of patients with acute hepatitis A, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C who would have been symptomatic, would have sought health care tests, and would have been reported to health officials in 2011. Results. For hepatitis A, the frequencies of symptoms (85%), care seeking (88%), and reporting (69%) yielded an estimate of 2730 infections (2.0 infections per reported case). For hepatitis B, the frequencies of symptoms (39%), care seeking (88%), and reporting (45%) indicated 18 730 infections (6.5 infections per reported case). For hepatitis C, the frequency of symptoms among injection drug users (13%) and those infected otherwise (48%), proportion seeking care (88%), and percentage reported (53%) indicated 17 100 infections (12.3 infections per reported case). Conclusions. These adjustment factors will allow state and local health authorities to estimate acute hepatitis infections locally and plan prevention activities accordingly. PMID:24432918

  16. Viral hepatitis as an occupational disease in Poland.

    PubMed

    Bilski, Bartosz

    2011-07-01

    In medical terms, occupational diseases are defined as health disorders specifically associated with the working environment of people and their occupational activity. From the medical and legal perspectives, the vast majority of European countries consider particular diseases to be of occupational origin if they are mentioned in the current list of occupational diseases and caused by exposure to factors in the working environment that are harmful to health. The aim of this study was to analyze the occurrence of cases of viral hepatitis certified as an occupational disease in Poland during 1979-2009. This article presents the medical, economic, and legal aspects of the epidemiology of hepatitis as an occupational disease in Poland. Publically available statistical data on certified occupational diseases in Poland and data contained in individual "occupational disease diagnosis cards" (based on data used in Poland statistical form), regarding certified cases of hepatitis among health care professionals, which were collected by the Department of Occupational Hygiene of the Polish Public Health Service, were analyzed in this study. In Poland, the highest number of cases of hepatitis certified as an occupational disease was observed in 1987. A gradual reduction in the number of cases of hepatitis as an occupational disease has been noted since then. Currently, hepatitis C as an occupational disease is certified more frequently than hepatitis B. In Poland, the number of women with hepatitis certified as an occupational disease is higher than that of men. However, among health care professionals, particularly nurses, this difference is insignificant because women outnumber the men. The existence of such a situation is due to the significant quantitative predominance of women over men among medical personnel, especially among nurses. Immunization of health care professionals against the hepatitis B virus (HBV), introduced in Poland in 1988, was an important factor

  17. Bermuda Triangle for the liver: alcohol, obesity, and viral hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Zakhari, Samir

    2013-08-01

    Despite major progress in understanding and managing liver disease in the past 30 years, it is now among the top 10 most common causes of death globally. Several risk factors, such as genetics, diabetes, obesity, excessive alcohol consumption, viral infection, gender, immune dysfunction, and medications, acting individually or in concert, are known to precipitate liver damage. Viral hepatitis, excessive alcohol consumption, and obesity are the major factors causing liver injury. Estimated numbers of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected subjects worldwide are staggering (370 and 175 million, respectively), and of the 40 million known human immunodeficiency virus positive subjects, 4 and 5 million are coinfected with HBV and HCV, respectively. Alcohol and HCV are the leading causes of end-stage liver disease worldwide and the most common indication for liver transplantation in the United States and Europe. In addition, the global obesity epidemic that affects up to 40 million Americans, and 396 million worldwide, is accompanied by an alarming incidence of end-stage liver disease, a condition exacerbated by alcohol. This article focuses on the interactions between alcohol, viral hepatitis, and obesity (euphemistically described here as the Bermuda Triangle of liver disease), and discusses common mechanisms and synergy. © 2013 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  18. Current issues in the management of paediatric viral hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Latifa T F; Roberts, Eve A

    2010-01-01

    Viral hepatitis poses important problems for children. In preschoolers, hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection frequently causes acute liver failure. Vaccinating toddlers against HAV in countries with high endemicity is expected to decrease mortality. HAV vaccine demonstrates efficacy (comparable to immunoglobulin) as post-exposure prophylaxis. A recently developed vaccine against hepatitis E virus (HEV) may benefit fetal health, because pregnant women are most prone to acute liver failure as a result of HEV. Hepatitis B vaccine continues to demonstrate value and versatility for preventing serious liver disease. With chronic infection, undetectable levels of serum HBV DNA complement e-seroconversion as the preferred outcome measure; suppressed viral load correlates with long-term complications better than HBeAg status. Among Taiwanese children, low pretreatment HBV DNA (<2 x 10(8) copies/ml) strongly predicted response to interferon-alpha. Future paediatric studies must incorporate HBV DNA levels. The rationale for routine treatment of immunotolerant hepatitis B during childhood remains uncertain. Any treatment of chronic hepatitis B in childhood requires consideration of the risks and benefits. Childhood hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection results mainly from mother-to-infant transmission. Babies of HCV-infected women should be tested for serum HCV RNA at 1 month of age. If negative, confirmatory anti-HCV antibody testing may be performed between 12 and 15 months of age. Children with chronic hepatitis C may develop progressive fibrosis/cirrhosis, particularly in the setting of obesity and insulin resistance. Treatment of children chronically infected with genotype 2 or 3 is highly successful: combination therapy of pegylated interferon-alpha and ribavirin is well tolerated and superior to pegylated interferon-alpha alone.

  19. Hepatitis A seroprevalence in patients with chronic viral hepatitis in Konya, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Özden, Hale T

    2016-03-01

    Hepatitis A is among the diseases that can be prevented with vaccination in our time. Acute hepatitis A progresses more severely in individuals with a liver disease. Therefore, patients with a chronic liver disease (because of hepatitis B or hepatitis C) are advised vaccination with the hepatitis A vaccine. This study is aimed to determine the seroprevalence of hepatitis A virus (HAV) antibodies in patients infected with hepatitis C virus or hepatitis B virus in Konya province of Turkey. A total of 537 patients who had chronic viral hepatitis between January 2011 and December 2014 were included in the study. Serum samples were collected from each patient and tested for anti-HAV using the chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay. The overall seroprevalence of total anti-HAV IgG was 94.2%. The overall prevalence of anti-HAV IgG in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus infection was 97.5 and 93.6%, respectively. Anti-HAV IgG positivity was 97.4% in cirrhotic patients and 93.9% in noncirrhotic individuals. At the end of the study, being older than 40 years and living in a rural area were found to be independent risk factors for anti-HAV IgG seropositivity. In conclusion, we recommend that patients younger than 40 years and/or those living in cities and having a chronic liver disease should be vaccinated with the hepatitis A vaccine.

  20. Hepatitis A seroprevalence in patients with chronic viral hepatitis in Konya, Turkey

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Aim Hepatitis A is among the diseases that can be prevented with vaccination in our time. Acute hepatitis A progresses more severely in individuals with a liver disease. Therefore, patients with a chronic liver disease (because of hepatitis B or hepatitis C) are advised vaccination with the hepatitis A vaccine. This study is aimed to determine the seroprevalence of hepatitis A virus (HAV) antibodies in patients infected with hepatitis C virus or hepatitis B virus in Konya province of Turkey. Methods A total of 537 patients who had chronic viral hepatitis between January 2011 and December 2014 were included in the study. Serum samples were collected from each patient and tested for anti-HAV using the chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay. Results The overall seroprevalence of total anti-HAV IgG was 94.2%. The overall prevalence of anti-HAV IgG in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus infection was 97.5 and 93.6%, respectively. Anti-HAV IgG positivity was 97.4% in cirrhotic patients and 93.9% in noncirrhotic individuals. Conclusion At the end of the study, being older than 40 years and living in a rural area were found to be independent risk factors for anti-HAV IgG seropositivity. In conclusion, we recommend that patients younger than 40 years and/or those living in cities and having a chronic liver disease should be vaccinated with the hepatitis A vaccine. PMID:26703930

  1. CROI 2016: Viral Hepatitis and Liver Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Luetkemeyer, Anne F; Wyles, David L

    2016-01-01

    At the 2016 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) in Boston, Massachusetts, hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection remained a major theme in the context of HIV-associated liver disease, although other causes of liver disease garnered increased attention, including fatty liver disease, hepatitis B, and the impact of HIV disease itself on the liver. Although no data from phase III studies of HCV direct-acting antiviral (DAA) drugs for the treatment of HIV/HCV coinfection were presented at CROI 2016, a broad range of HCV DAA-related topics were presented, including accumulating experience with real-world performance of DAA-based regimens outside of clinical trials, drug interactions between DAA and antiretroviral drugs, treatment of acute HCV infection, and retreatment of individuals whose DAA-based regimens failed and those in whom resistance to DAA drugs emerged. A summary of select abstracts from CROI 2016 is presented, including discussion of clinical relevance where appropriate and areas for future research.

  2. Experimental models for hepatitis C viral infection.

    PubMed

    Boonstra, Andre; van der Laan, Luc J W; Vanwolleghem, Thomas; Janssen, Harry L A

    2009-11-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a leading cause of chronic liver disease. The majority of infected individuals develop a persistent infection, which is associated with a high risk of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Since its discovery 20 years ago, progress in our understanding of this virus has been suboptimal due to the lack of good model systems. However, in the past decade this has greatly accelerated with the development of various in vitro cell culture systems and in vivo small-animal models. These systems have made a major impact on the field of HCV research, and have provided important breakthroughs in our understanding of HCV infection and replication. Importantly, the in vitro cell culture systems and the small-animal models have allowed preclinical testing of numerous novel antiviral compounds for the treatment of chronic HCV infection. In this article, we give an overview of current models, discuss their limitations, and provide future perspectives for research directed at the prevention and cure of hepatitis C.

  3. [Immunogenetic HLA markers of chronic viral hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Popov, E A; Levitan, B N; Alekseev, L P; Pronina, O A; Suchkov, S V

    2005-01-01

    To study possible immunogenetic HLA markers of chronic viral hepatitides. Using the reaction of complement-dependent cytotoxicity by Terasaki, we analysed distribution of leukocytic HLA antigens (loci A, B and C) in 179 patients with chronic viral hepatitides B, C and D in Russians and Kazakhs living in the Astrakhan Region. In the Russian population we discovered a significant positive association of CVHB with HLA-B18, HLA-B35, HLA-B40, HLA-Cw3 antigens, and negative one--with HLA-A2. In Kazakhs with CVHB there was a positive association with HLA-A3, HLA-B18 and negative one--with HLA-A11. Alleles HLA-A10, HLA-B35, HLA-B40 and HLA-Cw3 mark CVHC in Russians. HLA-Cw4 specificity acts as protector in development of chronic HCV-infection. A correlation was found between carriage of some specificities and haplotypes of HLA and activity of chronic HBV and HCV infection. A high risk of chronic delta infection in Russians is associated with HLA-B8 and HLA-B35, in Kazakhs--with HLA-B35 and HLA-D40. There are significant associations between CVHB, CVHC, chronic delta infection and some HLA haplotypes. A universal role of HLA-B35 specificity in development of CVH irrespective of hepatotropic virus and patients' nationality is shown.

  4. The impact of hepatitis C virus entry on viral tropism

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Qiang; von Schaewen, Markus; Ploss, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Uptake of hepatitis C virus (HCV) into hepatocytes is an orchestrated process, involving numerous host factors, virion-associated lipoproteins and a growing number of cell-associated factors. Several of these factors likely contribute to the hepatotropism and limited host range of this virus. Discerning the minimal set of human-specific factors required for viral uptake into non-human cells has facilitated the development of small animal models with inheritable HCV susceptibility. This review summarizes current knowledge of host factors required for HCV entry, the molecular mechanisms underlying HCV entry into hepatocytes, and aspects of viral entry contributing to HCV host tropism. PMID:25525789

  5. Hepatitis B antigen and viral hepatitis type B in India*

    PubMed Central

    John, T. Jacob; Carman, Robert H.; Hill, Peter G.

    1974-01-01

    Surveys were conducted to determine the occurrence of overt hepatitis manifested by jaundice in groups of hospital patients who had survived their initial illness. Of those who had been given blood that had not been screened for the presence of hepatitis B antigen (HB Ag) 9.4% reported that they had had jaundice during the 6 months following transfusion. During a similar period jaundice was reported by only 1.1% of those who had received blood found to be negative for HB Ag by the cross-over electrophoresis test. This difference is highly significant. Jaundice was reported by 25.5% of recipients of HB Ag-positive blood. Of a control population of hospitalized but non-transfused patients 2.2% reported jaundice within 6 months of hospitalization. The risk of overt hepatitis from HB Ag in transfused blood is high in southern India and is similar to that in temperate countries where the occurrence of antigen carriers, and presumably of immune status, are lower than in the tropics. PMID:4549611

  6. [Pregnancy and viral hepatitis B and C].

    PubMed

    Sogni, Philippe

    2015-06-01

    The screening for HBsAg is a medical obligation in France during pregnancy. A serovaccination with antiHBs immunoglobulins (100 IU) and a 1st dose of vaccine (10 μg) has to be realized during the first 12 hours of life when the mother is HBsAg+. The serovaccination failures are related to high maternal viral load (HBV-DNA>7 log IU/mL). In this case, a treatment with analogue (tenofovir) associated with serovaccination could be performed during the last trimester of pregnancy. The risk of mother-to-child transmission of virus C is around 3 to 5% in case of HCV-RNA positive without co-infection with HIV. The mode of delivery is unchanged in case of maternal HBV or HCV. Breast-feeding is not contra-indicated in case of maternal HBV or HCV infection.

  7. From hepatic diseases and jaundice to viral hepatitis: the configuration of a kaleidoscope.

    PubMed

    Gaze, Rosangela; Carvalho, Diana Maul de; Santoro-Lopes, Guilherme; Tura, Luiz Fernando Rangel

    2013-02-01

    Viral hepatitis A, B, C, D and E--systemic hepatotropic viral infections--present as acute hepatitis that, depending on the etiological agent, viral load and host conditions, may evolve into chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis, liver cancer and acute fulminant disease. The ecological versatility of these viruses, their spectrum of transmission in time and space, potentialized by the sub-clinical course of a large proportion of infections, comprise an epidemiological challenge. This essay describes scenarios and tendencies in the socioepidemiologic profile, based on the history of these infections, and indicates the need to overcome patterns, models, and protocols and instead investigate each particular situation. In other words, it highlights the need to explore singularities in order to be able to develop new proposals for general actions tailored to local specificities.

  8. Acute Acalculous Cholecystitis due to Viral Hepatitis A

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Safak; Ay, Nurettin; Baysal, Birol; Bahadir, Mehmet Veysi; Onur, Arzu; Duymus, Recai

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation of the gallbladder without evidence of calculi is known as acute acalculous cholecystitis (AAC). AAC is frequently associated with gangrene, perforation, and empyema. Due to these associated complications, AAC can be associated with high morbidity and mortality. Medical or surgical treatments can be chosen according to the general condition of the patient, underlying disease and agent. Particularly in acute acalculous cholecystitis cases, early diagnosis and early medical treatment have a positive effect on the patient and protect them from surgical trauma. ACC is a rare complication of acute viral hepatitis A. Herein, we present an adult patient of acalculous cholecystitis due to acute viral hepatitis A. She responded to the conservative management. PMID:24106622

  9. Viral (hepatitis C virus, hepatitis B virus, HIV) persistence and immune homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yun; Zhang, Ying; Moorman, Jonathan P; Yao, Zhi Q; Jia, Zhan S

    2014-11-01

    Immune homeostasis is a host characteristic that maintains biological balance within a host. Humans have evolved many host defence mechanisms that ensure the survival of individuals upon encountering a pathogenic infection, with recovery or persistence from a viral infection being determined by both viral factors and host immunity. Chronic viral infections, such as hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus and HIV, often result in chronic fluctuating viraemia in the face of host cellular and humoral immune responses, which are dysregulated by multi-faceted mechanisms that are incompletely understood. This review attempts to illuminate the mechanisms involved in this process, focusing on immune homeostasis in the setting of persistent viral infection from the aspects of host defence mechanism, including interferon-stimulated genes, apolipoprotein B mRNA editing enzyme catalytic polypeptide 3 (APOBEC3), autophagy and interactions of various immune cells, cytokines and regulatory molecules.

  10. Dynamic epidemiology of acute viral hepatitis in Japan.

    PubMed

    Yano, Koji; Tamada, Yoko; Yatsuhashi, Hiroshi; Komori, Atsumasa; Abiru, Seigo; Ito, Kiyoaki; Masaki, Naohiko; Mizokami, Masashi; Ishibashi, Hiromi

    2010-01-01

    The epidemiology of acute viral hepatitis (AVH) is dynamic and affected by many factors including hygiene, socioeconomic status and vaccination coverage. A total of 4,302 cases of AVH were sequentially enrolled in this nationwide study between 1980 and 2008. Of the cases of AVH, acute hepatitis A (AHA) accounted for 1,583 (36.8%), acute hepatitis B (AHB) for 1,197 (27.8%), acute hepatitis C (AHC) for 359 (8.3%), and non-A, non-B and non-C (non-ABC) for 1,163 (27.0%). Between 1980 and 1995, the proportions of AHA, AHB, AHC and non-ABC were approximately 40, 25, 10 and 25%; between 1996 and 2003, they were approximately 30, 30, 10 and 30%, and this shifted to approximately 10, 40, 10 and 40% in the last 5 years. The number of AHB caused by genotype A, which is not indigenous to Japan, was 6.0% between 1991 and 1996 but has been markedly increasing since 2000, to reach 52% in 2008. Autochthonous acute hepatitis E (AHE) accounted for 10-15% of non-ABC hepatitis after 2002. The etiology of AVH in Japan has been drastically changing. A marked increase of AHB genotype A and constant occurrence of autochthonous AHE require attention, and necessary measures should be taken. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Aqueous Extract of the Edible Gracilaria tenuistipitata Inhibits Hepatitis C Viral Replication via Cyclooxygenase-2 Suppression and Reduces Virus-Induced Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Fang-Rong; Yang, Jin-Iong; Yeh, Chi-Chen; Chen, Wei-Chun; Wu, Shou-Fang; Chang, Hsueh-Wei; Lee, Jin-Ching

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is an important human pathogen leading to hepatocellular carcinoma. Using an in vitro cell-based HCV replicon and JFH-1 infection system, we demonstrated that an aqueous extract of the seaweed Gracilaria tenuistipitata (AEGT) concentration-dependently inhibited HCV replication at nontoxic concentrations. AEGT synergistically enhanced interferon-α (IFN-α) anti-HCV activity in a combination treatment. We found that AEGT also significantly suppressed virus-induced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression at promoter transactivation and protein levels. Notably, addition of exogenous COX-2 expression in AEGT-treated HCV replicon cells gradually abolished AEGT anti-HCV activity, suggesting that COX-2 down-regulation was responsible for AEGT antiviral effects. Furthermore, we highlighted the inhibitory effect of AEGT in HCV-induced pro-inflammatory gene expression such as the expression of tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, inducible nitrite oxide synthase and COX-2 in a concentration-dependent manner to evaluate the potential therapeutic supplement in the management of patients with chronic HCV infections. PMID:23469054

  12. Aqueous extract of the edible Gracilaria tenuistipitata inhibits hepatitis C viral replication via cyclooxygenase-2 suppression and reduces virus-induced inflammation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kuan-Jen; Tseng, Chin-Kai; Chang, Fang-Rong; Yang, Jin-Iong; Yeh, Chi-Chen; Chen, Wei-Chun; Wu, Shou-Fang; Chang, Hsueh-Wei; Lee, Jin-Ching

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is an important human pathogen leading to hepatocellular carcinoma. Using an in vitro cell-based HCV replicon and JFH-1 infection system, we demonstrated that an aqueous extract of the seaweed Gracilaria tenuistipitata (AEGT) concentration-dependently inhibited HCV replication at nontoxic concentrations. AEGT synergistically enhanced interferon-α (IFN-α) anti-HCV activity in a combination treatment. We found that AEGT also significantly suppressed virus-induced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression at promoter transactivation and protein levels. Notably, addition of exogenous COX-2 expression in AEGT-treated HCV replicon cells gradually abolished AEGT anti-HCV activity, suggesting that COX-2 down-regulation was responsible for AEGT antiviral effects. Furthermore, we highlighted the inhibitory effect of AEGT in HCV-induced pro-inflammatory gene expression such as the expression of tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, inducible nitrite oxide synthase and COX-2 in a concentration-dependent manner to evaluate the potential therapeutic supplement in the management of patients with chronic HCV infections.

  13. Viral Hepatitis in Hawai‘i - Differing Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Bannan, Michael; Bauman, Kay; Collis, Tarquin; Hall, Alba; Haning, William; Hannemann, Shoshana; Hare, C Bradley; Humphry, Joseph; Jao, Robert; Leevy, Carroll; Lusk, Heather; Ochoa, Edward; Palafox, Neal; Withers, Nancy; Akinaka, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    This publication contains information from a conference titled “Individual Perspectives on the Silent Epidemic of Viral Hepatitis in Hawai‘i” held in October of 2007 with updates and additional contributions from annual conferences in 2008 and 2009. These conferences were sponsored by the Hepatitis Support Network of Hawai‘i and held in Honolulu, Hawai‘i at the Queen's Conference Center. The primary objectives of the conferences have been to heighten awareness of viral hepatitis in Hawai‘i and to bring together health care professionals to learn about these infections and to help them respond to the challenges they bring to the people of Hawai‘i. The initial conference was oriented to present the unique and individual perspectives of patients, physicians, and other healthcare providers specific to the complex issues of hepatitis in an effort to help them understand their role in the context of others and to develop a team approach in responding to this epidemic. PMID:20533191

  14. Mechanisms of Hepatitis C Viral Resistance to Direct Acting Antivirals.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Asma; Felmlee, Daniel J

    2015-12-18

    There has been a remarkable transformation in the treatment of chronic hepatitis C in recent years with the development of direct acting antiviral agents targeting virus encoded proteins important for viral replication including NS3/4A, NS5A and NS5B. These agents have shown high sustained viral response (SVR) rates of more than 90% in phase 2 and phase 3 clinical trials; however, this is slightly lower in real-life cohorts. Hepatitis C virus resistant variants are seen in most patients who do not achieve SVR due to selection and outgrowth of resistant hepatitis C virus variants within a given host. These resistance associated mutations depend on the class of direct-acting antiviral drugs used and also vary between hepatitis C virus genotypes and subtypes. The understanding of these mutations has a clear clinical implication in terms of choice and combination of drugs used. In this review, we describe mechanism of action of currently available drugs and summarize clinically relevant resistance data.

  15. Bridging basic science and clinical research: the EASL Monothematic Conference on Translational Research in Viral Hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Boettler, Tobias; Moradpour, Darius; Thimme, Robert; Zoulim, Fabien

    2014-09-01

    The EASL Monothematic Conference on Translational Research in Viral Hepatitis brought together a group of leading scientists and clinicians working on both, basic and clinical aspects of viral hepatitis, thereby building bridges from bench to bedside. This report recapitulates the presentations and discussions at the conference held in Lyon, France on November 29-30, 2013. In recent years, great advances have been made in the field of viral hepatitis, particularly in hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. The identification of IL28B genetic polymorphisms as a major determinant for spontaneous and treatment-induced HCV clearance was a seminal discovery. Currently, hepatologists are at the doorstep of even greater advances, with the advent of a wealth of directly acting antivirals (DAAs) against HCV. Indeed, promising results have accumulated over the last months and few years, showing sustained virological response (SVR) rates of up to 100% with interferon-free DAA combination therapies. Thus, less than 25 years after its identification, HCV infection may soon be curable in the vast majority of patients, highlighting the great success of HCV research over the last decades. However, viral hepatitis and its clinical complications such as liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remain major global challenges. New therapeutic strategies to tackle hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis D virus (HDV) infection are needed, as current therapies have undeniable limitations. Nucleoside/nucleotide analogues (NUC) can efficiently control HBV replication and reduce or even reverse liver damage. However, these drugs have to be given for indefinite periods in most patients to maintain virological and biochemical responses. Although sustained responses off treatment can be achieved by treatment with (pegylated) interferon-α, only about 10-30% of patients effectively resolve chronic hepatitis B. It was the goal of this conference to review the progress made over the last

  16. Hemophilic Siblings with Chronic Hepatitis C: Familial Aggregation of Spontaneous and Treatment-Related Viral Clearance

    PubMed Central

    Fried, Michael W.; Kroner, Barbara L.; Preiss, Liliana R.; Wilhelmsen, Kirk; Goedert, James J.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Hemophilic siblings provide a unique population to explore the natural history of chronic hepatitis C. Methods From 3,993 hemophilic patients with hepatitis C, 257 sibling pairs, in which both members had evidence of hepatitis C infection, were studied to evaluate the genetic contribution to spontaneous and treatment-induced clearance of hepatitis C infection and the progression of liver disease. Familial aggregation was assessed by comparing observed probabilities of concordance for these disease characteristics within sibling pairs to those expected for randomly paired hemophilic subjects. Additional measures of familial aggregation, heritability and sibling relative risk, were also calculated. Results Among HIV-negative subjects, concordance for spontaneous viral clearance was two-fold higher in siblings compared to randomly paired subjects (8.8% vs 4.3%, p=0.04). Similarly, the concordance rate for treatment-related viral clearance was over twice that among sibling pairs than among randomly paired hemophiliacs (31.3% vs 13.3%, p=ns). Heritability estimates for spontaneous and treatment-induced viral clearance were 0.24 ± 0.14 (p=0.04) and 0.43 ± 0.42 (p=0.10), respectively. The sibling relative risks for these respective characteristics were 1.6 and 1.7. Concordance for advanced liver disease was higher among siblings, but did not reach statistical significance (4.0% vs 2.3%, p=ns). The heritability estimate was 0.29 ± 0.13 (p=0.02). Conclusions Concordance rates and heritability estimates for spontaneous and treatment-related viral clearance indicate that genetic factors have a modest influence on the outcome of hepatitis C, although shared environmental factors cannot be excluded. Investigations to map candidate disease-susceptibility genes associated with these characteristics must be approached with caution. PMID:16952545

  17. Toxin-induced hepatic injury.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Annette M; Hendrickson, Robert G

    2014-02-01

    Toxins such as pharmaceuticals, herbals, foods, and supplements may lead to hepatic damage. This damage may range from nonspecific symptoms in the setting of liver test abnormalities to acute hepatic failure. The majority of severe cases of toxin-induced hepatic injury are caused by acetaminophen and ethanol. The most important step in the patient evaluation is to gather an extensive history that includes toxin exposure and exclude common causes of liver dysfunction. Patients whose hepatic dysfunction progresses to acute liver failure may benefit from transfer to a transplant service for further management. Currently, the mainstay in management for most exposures is discontinuing the offending agent. This manuscript will review the incidence, pathophysiology, diagnosis and management of the different forms of toxin-induced hepatic injury and exam in-depth the most common hepatic toxins.

  18. Theoretical basis of a beneficial role for vitamin D in viral hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Lương, Khanh vinh quốc; Nguyễn, Lan Thi Hoàng

    2012-01-01

    Abnormal bone metabolism and dysfunction of the calcium-parathyroid hormone-vitamin D axis have been reported in patients with viral hepatitis. Some studies suggested a relationship between vitamin D and viral hepatitis. Genetic studies have provided an opportunity to identify the proteins that link vitamin D to the pathology of viral hepatitis (i.e., the major histocompatibility complex class II molecules, the vitamin D receptor, cytochrome P450, the renin-angiotensin system, apolipoprotein E, liver X receptor, toll-like receptor, and the proteins regulated by the Sp1 promoter gene). Vitamin D also exerts its effects on viral hepatitis via non-genomic factors, i.e., matrix metalloproteinase, endothelial vascular growth factor, prostaglandins, cyclooxygenase-2, and oxidative stress. In conclusion, vitamin D could have a beneficial role in viral hepatitis. Calcitriol is best used for viral hepatitis because it is the active form of the vitamin D3 metabolite. PMID:23082050

  19. Core as a Novel Viral Target for Hepatitis C Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Strosberg, Arthur Donny; Kota, Smitha; Takahashi, Virginia; Snyder, John K.; Mousseau, Guillaume

    2010-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects over 130 million people worldwide and is a major cause of liver disease. No vaccine is available. Novel specific drugs for HCV are urgently required, since the standard-of-care treatment of pegylated interferon combined with ribavirin is poorly tolerated and cures less than half of the treated patients. Promising, effective direct-acting drugs currently in the clinic have been described for three of the ten potential HCV target proteins: NS3/NS4A protease, NS5B polymerase and NS5A, a regulatory phosphoprotein. We here present core, the viral capsid protein, as another attractive, non-enzymatic target, against which a new class of anti-HCV drugs can be raised. Core plays a major role in the virion’s formation, and interacts with several cellular proteins, some of which are involved in host defense mechanisms against the virus. This most conserved of all HCV proteins requires oligomerization to function as the organizer of viral particle assembly. Using core dimerization as the basis of transfer-of-energy screening assays, peptides and small molecules were identified which not only inhibit core-core interaction, but also block viral production in cell culture. Initial chemical optimization resulted in compounds active in single digit micromolar concentrations. Core inhibitors could be used in combination with other HCV drugs in order to provide novel treatments of Hepatitis C. PMID:21994704

  20. Hepatitis B viral antigenic structure: signature analysis by monoclonal radioimmunoassays.

    PubMed Central

    Wands, J R; Wong, M A; Shorey, J; Brown, R D; Marciniak, R A; Isselbacher, K J

    1984-01-01

    An approach has been developed for the analysis of hepatitis B viral (HBV) antigenic structure that creates numerical "signatures" of HBV strains. This technique employs high-affinity IgM and IgG monoclonal antibodies (anti-HBsAg) directed toward distinct and separate determinants on hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). Such antibodies have been used to develop sensitive and specific radioimmuno-assays for measurement of HBsAg-associated determinants in serum. In performing "signature" analysis separate binding curves for each monoclonal anti-HBsAg are generated by measuring immunoreactivity in serial dilutions of HBsAg-positive serum. Since the HBsAg concentration in serum is unknown, the binding profiles of groups of samples from the same "classic" HBV subtype are aligned by an iterative maximum likelihood procedure to give the numerical signature of that HBV subtype. By using this approach, HBsAg shows far more antigenic heterogeneity than previously recognized by polyvalent anti-HBsAg antibodies. Indeed, there are subgroups within the classic HBsAg subtypes. In addition, the a domain (common to all known subtypes or strains of HBV) has been shown to be multideterminant. Thus, these studies have demonstrated heretofore unrecognized differences in HBV subtypes. This approach also has broader significance for the study of subtle or major antigenic changes among other viral agents since it is not necessary to know the concentration of virus or viral protein in complex protein mixtures. PMID:6585796

  1. Treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus by viral eradication in chronic hepatitis C: Myth or reality?

    PubMed

    Vanni, Ester; Bugianesi, Elisabetta; Saracco, Giorgio

    2016-02-01

    Chronic hepatitis C is a systemic disease inducing metabolic alterations leading to extrahepatic consequences. In particular, hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection seems to increase the risk of incident type 2 diabetes mellitus in predisposed individuals, independently of liver disease stage. The mechanisms through which hepatitis C induces T2DM involve direct viral effects, insulin resistance, pro-inflammatory cytokines and other immune-mediated processes. Many studies have reported the clinical consequences of type 2 diabetes mellitus on hepatitis C outcome, but very few studies have addressed the issue of microangiopathic complications among patients with hepatitis C only, who develop type 2 diabetes mellitus. Moreover, clinical trials in HCV-positive patients have reported improvement in glucose metabolism after antiviral treatment; recent studies have suggested that this metabolic amelioration might have a clinical impact on type 2 diabetes mellitus-related complications. These observations raise the question as to whether the HCV eradication may also have an impact on the future morbidity and mortality due to type 2 diabetes mellitus. The scope of this review is to summarise the current evidence linking successful antiviral treatment and the prevention of type 2 diabetes mellitus and its complications in hepatitis C-infected patients.

  2. Hepatitis C viral infection as an associated risk factor for necrotizing fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Scher, Danielle; Kanlic, Enes; Bader, Julia; Ortiz, Melchor; Abdelgawad, Amr

    2012-04-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare soft tissue infection associated with a high mortality rate. Several risk factors for the development of necrotizing fasciitis have been studied, which has given surgeons insight into the types of patients who are more likely to present with this rapidly progressive infection. The concomitant diagnosis of hepatitis C viral infection has not been reported in the literature previously. In this retrospective study covering a 12-year period in 1 Level I trauma center, 10 (34%) of 29 patients presenting with necrotizing fasciitis had an underlying diagnosis of hepatitis C viral infection. The mortality rate in patients with hepatitis C viral infection was 30% compared with 21% for those without hepatitis C viral infection (P=.59). The proportion of patients presenting with the concomitant diagnosis of hepatitis C viral infection and necrotizing fasciitis was statistically greater than that expected from the prevalence of hepatitis C viral infection in the general population (1.8%; P<.001).Our study showed that hepatitis C viral infection is a risk factor for developing necrotizing fasciitis. Although our sample size was too small to show a statistical significance, we believe that a clinically significant increase in mortality of necrotizing fasciitis occurred in patients with concomitant hepatitis C viral infection. Therefore, the presence of hepatitis C viral infection in patients presenting with symptoms of necrotizing fasciitis should raise the clinical suspicion for this diagnosis, with the potential for a worse prognosis.

  3. Clinical and laboratory features of viral hepatitis A in children.

    PubMed

    Blechová, Zuzana; Trojánek, Milan; Kynčl, Jan; Cástková, Jitka; John, Jerry; Malý, Marek; Herrmannová, Kristýna; Marešová, Vilma

    2013-02-01

    Recent outbreaks of viral hepatitis A in non-endemic European countries and the potential outbreak risk in susceptible populations has led us to evaluate the clinical characteristics of children hospitalised with hepatitis A. Retrospective study included 118 children (68 boys and 50 girls) with the mean age of 8.5 years hospitalised at Hospital Na Bulovce in Prague from June 2008 to June 2009. The clinical course was symptomatic icteric in 57 (48.3 %) children, symptomatic anicteric in 23 (19.5 %), subclinical in 22 (18.6 %) and asymptomatic inapparent in 16 (13.6 %). The relapse of the disease occurred in three patients. There were no cases of fulminant hepatitis. The most frequent symptoms included jaundice (57 cases), abdominal pain/discomfort (38), vomiting (38), dark urine (37), subfebrility (29) and fever (25). Hepatic injury markers were substantially elevated in icteric patients, but moderate elevations were identified in anicteric and subclinical cases as well. Lower white blood cell and lymphocyte counts were independently associated with symptomatic and more severe clinical course. Active immunisation was provided to 22 patients, and as a post-exposure prophylaxis to 19 of them. The clinical course and laboratory parameters in vaccinated children were not significantly different from non-vaccinated children. The clinical course of hepatitis A was largely self-limiting and benign. Asymptomatic infections are frequent, representing risk for disease spread; however, they are associated with elevations of hepatic injury markers. The inclusion of significant proportion of asymptomatic cases that were identified and investigated only because of active epidemiological surveillance in the outbreak focus represents the particular asset of this study.

  4. [Clinico-pathogenetic features of viral hepatitis A course].

    PubMed

    Pak, S G; Volchkova, E V; Umbetova, K T

    1999-01-01

    To study mechanisms enhancing realization of autoimmune disorders in acute viral hepatitis A at initial stages. 32 patients with moderate and 4 patients with severe VHA (17 females and 19 males, age from 15 to 38 years) verified by finding serum anti-HAV IgM at enzyme immunoassay (EIA) have undergone examination which included: measurement of beta 2-microglobulin, C5-components of complement, circulating immune complexes (CIC), zero lymphocytes; test for antinuclear antibodies (ANA) and smooth muscle antibodies (SMA). All the patients exhibited high levels of beta 2-microglobulin, zero lymphocytes, CIC, low concentration of C5-components of complement. SMA were detected at the height of intoxication in 27 patients, in early convalescence--in 31 patients. ANA were discovered only in one patient. The findings suggest development of autoimmune reactions in acute VHA patients. These reactions may trigger onset of autoimmune hepatitis.

  5. Cost-effectiveness of viral hepatitis B & C treatment.

    PubMed

    Toy, Mehlika

    2013-12-01

    With the availability of effective antiviral therapies for chronic viral hepatitis B and C, cost-effectiveness studies have been performed to assess the outcomes and costs of these therapies to support health policy. It is now accepted that treatment of active CHB is cost-effective versus no treatment, although there are a variety of options. And with the new developments around CHC treatment and diagnostic tools it is of interest to both the clinician and policy makers to know both the costs and effects of these choices. The purpose of this article is to provide the reader with an insight into the recent treatment developments and cost-effectiveness issues related to chronic hepatitis B and C treatment, and an overview of recent cost-effectiveness studies evolving around HBV and HCV therapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Hepatitis C Virus-Induced Upregulation of MicroRNA miR-146a-5p in Hepatocytes Promotes Viral Infection and Deregulates Metabolic Pathways Associated with Liver Disease Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bandiera, Simonetta; Pernot, Sophie; El Saghire, Hussein; Durand, Sarah C; Thumann, Christine; Crouchet, Emilie; Ye, Tao; Fofana, Isabel; Oudot, Marine A; Barths, Jochen; Schuster, Catherine; Pessaux, Patrick; Heim, Markus H; Baumert, Thomas F; Zeisel, Mirjam B

    2016-07-15

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV)-induced chronic liver disease is a leading cause of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, the molecular mechanisms underlying HCC development following chronic HCV infection remain poorly understood. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play an important role in homeostasis within the liver, and deregulation of miRNAs has been associated with liver disease, including HCC. While host miRNAs are essential for HCV replication, viral infection in turn appears to induce alterations of intrahepatic miRNA networks. Although the cross talk between HCV and liver cell miRNAs most likely contributes to liver disease pathogenesis, the functional involvement of miRNAs in HCV-driven hepatocyte injury and HCC remains elusive. Here we combined a hepatocyte-like cell-based model system, high-throughput small RNA sequencing, computational analysis, and functional studies to investigate HCV-miRNA interactions that may contribute to liver disease and HCC. Profiling analyses indicated that HCV infection differentially regulated the expression of 72 miRNAs by at least 2-fold, including miRNAs that were previously described to target genes associated with inflammation, fibrosis, and cancer development. Further investigation demonstrated that the miR-146a-5p level was consistently increased in HCV-infected hepatocyte-like cells and primary human hepatocytes, as well as in liver tissue from HCV-infected patients. Genome-wide microarray and computational analyses indicated that miR-146a-5p overexpression modulates pathways that are related to liver disease and HCC development. Furthermore, we showed that miR-146a-5p has a positive impact on late steps of the viral replication cycle, thereby increasing HCV infection. Collectively, our data indicate that the HCV-induced increase in miR-146a-5p expression both promotes viral infection and is relevant for pathogenesis of liver disease. HCV is a leading cause of chronic liver disease and cancer. However, how HCV induces liver cancer

  7. Hepatitis C Virus-Induced Upregulation of MicroRNA miR-146a-5p in Hepatocytes Promotes Viral Infection and Deregulates Metabolic Pathways Associated with Liver Disease Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bandiera, Simonetta; Pernot, Sophie; El Saghire, Hussein; Durand, Sarah C.; Thumann, Christine; Crouchet, Emilie; Ye, Tao; Fofana, Isabel; Oudot, Marine A.; Barths, Jochen; Schuster, Catherine; Pessaux, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hepatitis C virus (HCV)-induced chronic liver disease is a leading cause of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, the molecular mechanisms underlying HCC development following chronic HCV infection remain poorly understood. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play an important role in homeostasis within the liver, and deregulation of miRNAs has been associated with liver disease, including HCC. While host miRNAs are essential for HCV replication, viral infection in turn appears to induce alterations of intrahepatic miRNA networks. Although the cross talk between HCV and liver cell miRNAs most likely contributes to liver disease pathogenesis, the functional involvement of miRNAs in HCV-driven hepatocyte injury and HCC remains elusive. Here we combined a hepatocyte-like cell-based model system, high-throughput small RNA sequencing, computational analysis, and functional studies to investigate HCV-miRNA interactions that may contribute to liver disease and HCC. Profiling analyses indicated that HCV infection differentially regulated the expression of 72 miRNAs by at least 2-fold, including miRNAs that were previously described to target genes associated with inflammation, fibrosis, and cancer development. Further investigation demonstrated that the miR-146a-5p level was consistently increased in HCV-infected hepatocyte-like cells and primary human hepatocytes, as well as in liver tissue from HCV-infected patients. Genome-wide microarray and computational analyses indicated that miR-146a-5p overexpression modulates pathways that are related to liver disease and HCC development. Furthermore, we showed that miR-146a-5p has a positive impact on late steps of the viral replication cycle, thereby increasing HCV infection. Collectively, our data indicate that the HCV-induced increase in miR-146a-5p expression both promotes viral infection and is relevant for pathogenesis of liver disease. IMPORTANCE HCV is a leading cause of chronic liver disease and cancer. However, how HCV

  8. The Paradoxical Effects of Different Hepatitis C Viral Loads on Host DNA Damage and Repair Abilities

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chia-Yang; Chiang, Chi-Shiun; Yu, Guann-Yi; Sakamoto, Naoya; Tu, Wen-Yu; Hsieh, Meng-Hsuan; Huang, Jee-Fu; Chuang, Wan-Long; Dai, Chia-Yen

    2017-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV)-induced hepatic stress is associated with increased oxidative DNA damage and has been implicated in hepatic inflammation. However, HCV infection and replication are uneven and vary among individual hepatocytes. To investigate the effect of the viral load on host DNA damage, we used an Enhanced Yellow Fluorescent Protein gene (EYFP)-tagged HCV virus to distinguish between HCV intracellular high viral load (HVL) cells and low viral load (LVL) cells. The cell sorting efficiency was confirmed by the high expression of the HCV polyprotein. We found DNA damage γ-H2AX foci in the HVL population. Comet assays demonstrated that HVL was related to the extent of the DNA strand breaks. Surprisingly, the DNA qPCR arrays and western blotting showed that the damage-related genes GPX2, MRE11, phospho-ATM, and OGG1 were significantly up-regulated in LVL cells but inversely down-regulated or consistently expressed in HVL cells. The colony survival assay to examine the repair abilities of these cells in response to irradiation showed that the LVL cells were more resistant to irradiation and had an increased ability to repair radiation-induced damage. This study found that intracellular viral loads drove cellular DNA damage levels but suppressed damage-related gene expression. However, the increase in damage-related gene expression in the LVL cells may be affected by ROS from the HVL cells. These findings provide new insights into the distinct DNA damage and repair responses resulting from different viral loads in HCV-infected cells. PMID:28052067

  9. The Paradoxical Effects of Different Hepatitis C Viral Loads on Host DNA Damage and Repair Abilities.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shu-Chi; Lai, Kuan-Ru; Li, Chia-Yang; Chiang, Chi-Shiun; Yu, Guann-Yi; Sakamoto, Naoya; Tu, Wen-Yu; Hsieh, Meng-Hsuan; Huang, Jee-Fu; Chuang, Wan-Long; Dai, Chia-Yen; Yu, Ming-Lung

    2017-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV)-induced hepatic stress is associated with increased oxidative DNA damage and has been implicated in hepatic inflammation. However, HCV infection and replication are uneven and vary among individual hepatocytes. To investigate the effect of the viral load on host DNA damage, we used an Enhanced Yellow Fluorescent Protein gene (EYFP)-tagged HCV virus to distinguish between HCV intracellular high viral load (HVL) cells and low viral load (LVL) cells. The cell sorting efficiency was confirmed by the high expression of the HCV polyprotein. We found DNA damage γ-H2AX foci in the HVL population. Comet assays demonstrated that HVL was related to the extent of the DNA strand breaks. Surprisingly, the DNA qPCR arrays and western blotting showed that the damage-related genes GPX2, MRE11, phospho-ATM, and OGG1 were significantly up-regulated in LVL cells but inversely down-regulated or consistently expressed in HVL cells. The colony survival assay to examine the repair abilities of these cells in response to irradiation showed that the LVL cells were more resistant to irradiation and had an increased ability to repair radiation-induced damage. This study found that intracellular viral loads drove cellular DNA damage levels but suppressed damage-related gene expression. However, the increase in damage-related gene expression in the LVL cells may be affected by ROS from the HVL cells. These findings provide new insights into the distinct DNA damage and repair responses resulting from different viral loads in HCV-infected cells.

  10. Analysis of hepatitis C viral dynamics using Latin hypercube sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pachpute, Gaurav; Chakrabarty, Siddhartha P.

    2012-12-01

    We consider a mathematical model comprising four coupled ordinary differential equations (ODEs) to study hepatitis C viral dynamics. The model includes the efficacies of a combination therapy of interferon and ribavirin. There are two main objectives of this paper. The first one is to approximate the percentage of cases in which there is a viral clearance in absence of treatment as well as percentage of response to treatment for various efficacy levels. The other is to better understand and identify the parameters that play a key role in the decline of viral load and can be estimated in a clinical setting. A condition for the stability of the uninfected and the infected steady states is presented. A large number of sample points for the model parameters (which are physiologically feasible) are generated using Latin hypercube sampling. An analysis of the simulated values identifies that, approximately 29.85% cases result in clearance of the virus during the early phase of the infection. Results from the χ2 and the Spearman's tests done on the samples, indicate a distinctly different distribution for certain parameters for the cases exhibiting viral clearance under the combination therapy.

  11. [Hepatitis E virus infection in patients with clinical diagnosis of viral hepatitis in Colombia].

    PubMed

    Peláez, Dioselina; Hoyos, María Cristina; Rendón, Julio César; Mantilla, Carolina; Ospina, Martha Cecilia; Cortés-Mancera, Fabián; Pérez, Olga Lucía; Contreras, Lady; Estepa, Yaneth; Arbeláez, María Patricia; Navas, María Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is an emergent virus of global importance; it is the etiological agent of sporadic cases and outbreaks of hepatitis. The epidemiology of this infection in Colombia is unknown. To determine the seropositivity for hepatitis E virus in Colombia in cases with clinical diagnosis of viral hepatitis. Serum samples from patients that were sent to the Instituto Nacional de Salud during the period 2005-2010 (group 1) and samples sent to the Laboratorio Departamental de Salud Pública de Antioquia during the 2008-2009 period were included in this study (group 2). Serum samples were analyzed by immunoassay with commercial kits. From the 344 analyzed samples, 8.7% were positive for anti-HEV; the frequency of anti-HEV IgM was 1.74% (6/344) and the frequency of anti-HEV IgG was 7.5% (26/344). A difference in frequency of anti-HEV between group 1 (6.3%) and group 2 (1.3%) was observed. The cases were identified in nine departments of Colombia. This is the first study of hepatitis E virus infection in patients with diagnosis of hepatitis in Colombia. The frequency of anti-HEV described in this population of patients in Colombia is similar to that described in other Latin American countries like Brazil, Perú and Uruguay. Considering the results of this study, it could be necessary to include hepatitis E virus infection serological markers in the differential diagnosis of viral hepatitis in Colombia.

  12. Education and counseling in the methadone treatment setting improves knowledge of viral hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Larios, Sandra E; Masson, Carmen L; Shopshire, Michael S; Hettema, Jennifer; Jordan, Ashly E; McKnight, Courtney; Young, Christopher; Khalili, Mandana; Seewald, Randy M; Min, Albert; Hengl, Nicholas; Sorensen, James L; Des Jarlais, Don C; Perlman, David C

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of an educational method of providing viral hepatitis education for methadone maintenance patients. Four hundred forty participants were randomly assigned to either a control or a motivationally-enhanced viral hepatitis education and counseling intervention. Viral hepatitis A (HAV), B (HBV), and C (HCV) knowledge tests were administered at baseline, following each of two education sessions (post-education), and at a 3-month follow-up assessment. Results indicated a significant increase in knowledge of HAV, HBV, and HCV over time. No differences were found in knowledge between the intervention groups in knowledge acquisition regarding any of the hepatitis viruses suggesting that a motivational interviewing style may not augment hepatitis knowledge beyond standard counseling. A two-session viral hepatitis education intervention effectively promotes hepatitis knowledge and can be integrated in methadone treatment settings. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Education and counseling in the methadone treatment setting improves knowledge of viral hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Larios, Sandra E.; Masson, Carmen L.; Shopshire, Michael S.; Hettema, Jennifer; Jordan, Ashly E.; McKnight, Courtney; Young, Christopher; Khalili, Mandana; Seewald, Randy M.; Min, Albert; Hengl, Nicholas; Sorensen, James L.; Des Jarlais, Don C.; Perlman, David C.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of an educational method of providing viral hepatitis education for methadone maintenance patients. Four hundred forty participants were randomly assigned to either a control or a motivationally-enhanced viral hepatitis education and counseling intervention. Viral hepatitis A (HAV), B (HBV), and C (HCV) knowledge tests were administered at baseline, following each of two education sessions (post-education), and at a 3-month follow-up assessment. Results indicated a significant increase in knowledge of HAV, HBV, and HCV over time. No differences were found in knowledge between the intervention groups in knowledge acquisition regarding any of the hepatitis viruses suggesting that a motivational interviewing style may not augment hepatitis knowledge beyond standard counseling. A two-session viral hepatitis education intervention effectively promotes hepatitis knowledge and can be integrated in methadone treatment settings. PMID:24462241

  14. [Evaluation of viral hepatitis in solid organ transplantation].

    PubMed

    Mikolašević, Ivana; Sladoje-Martinović, Branka; Orlić, Lidija; Milić, Sandra; Lukenda, Vesna; Župan, Željko; Štimac, Davor; Rački, Sanjin

    2014-04-01

    Renal transplantation has significantly improved survival of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Transplantation is the best treatment in this population of patients. Despite the introduction of various preventive measures, viral hepatitis, i.e. hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections, are still a major problem because they are common in patients on renal replacement therapy as well as in allograft recipients. They are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in this patient population. In recent years, hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection has been added as an emergent cause of chronic hepatitis in solid organ transplantation, mainly in renal and liver allograft recipients. Most studies show higher mortality in renal transplant recipients (RTRs) infected with HBV, compared with RTRs without HBV infection, although this topic is still under debate. Furthermore, HCV infection in RTRs is associated with a significant reduction in patient and graft survival due to liver disease and septic complications related to cirrhosis and immunosuppressive therapy. The immunosuppressive therapy prescribed after transplantation modifies the natural history of chronic HCV infection. Given the high prevalence of HCV and HBV infections in RTRs, a growing incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma and the possible contribution of immunosuppression might be expected in these patients. Therefore, after renal transplantation, early screening with abdominal ultrasound (every 3 months in cirrhotic patients and every 6-12 months in non-cirrhotic RTRs) is necessary when the risk factors such as HBV and HCV are present. The European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL) recommends that all HbsAg-positive patients who are candidates for solid organ transplantation should be treated with nucleoside analogs. The KDIGO guidelines recommend that all HbsAg-positive RTRs receive prophylaxis with tenofovir, entecavir or lamivudine; however, tenofovir and

  15. A large waterborne viral hepatitis E epidemic in Kanpur, India.

    PubMed Central

    Naik, S. R.; Aggarwal, R.; Salunke, P. N.; Mehrotra, N. N.

    1992-01-01

    In 1991 the largest epidemic of viral hepatitis E yet reported occurred in Kanpur (population, 2.1 million), India. The incidence of icteric hepatitis from December 1990 to April 1991 among the inhabitants of 420 randomly sampled houses in seven of the city's 50 wards was 3.76% (138 out of 3666 individuals), i.e., an estimated 79,091 persons in the city as a whole were affected. The attack rate was higher for males than females (5.3% versus 3.3%; P = 0.013) and for adults than children aged < 10 years (4.26% versus 1.29%; P = 0.0006). The incidence of hepatitis was higher in those city wards that were supplied with drinking-water consisting of a mixture of river Ganges and tubewell water than in those wards supplied only with tubewell water (5.6% versus 1.2%; P = 10(-6)). In the mixed-water areas, the incidence decreased as the drinking-water source changed from only tap to both tap and handpump, to only handpump (7.8%, 6.8%, and 4.3% respectively; P = 0.023). None of the sera collected from 41 hepatitis patients during the epidemic showed evidence of hepatitis virus A or B. There were two peaks in the epidemic (in February and April 1991). The first peak was probably caused by faecal contamination of river water, indicated by water analysis data, and the second, by inadequate chlorination of water in a reservoir. There was no evidence of secondary intrafamilial spread. PMID:1464145

  16. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN UVEITIS, DIFFERENT TYPES OF VIRAL HEPATITIS, AND LIVER CIRRHOSIS

    PubMed Central

    Tien, Peng-Tai; Tsai, Yi-Yu; Chen, Huan-Sheng; Hwang, De-Kuang; Muo, Chih-Hsin; Lin, Jane-Ming; Chen, Wen-Lu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigates whether patients with viral hepatitis and cirrhosis are at risk of uveitis in the years following hepatitis. Methods: We used data from Taiwan National Health Insurance system. The cases were patients newly diagnosed with viral hepatitis from 2000 to 2011. The end point of interest was a diagnosis of uveitis. A chi-square test was used for the difference of demographic characteristics between viral hepatitis and comparison. The risk of uveitis in hepatitis was stratified using Cox proportional hazard regression. Results: We selected 17,389 patients with viral hepatitis and 34,778 matched comparison. The risk of uveitis in hepatitis cohort was 1.30-fold (95% confidence interval = 1.01–1.69). Patients with hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus coinfection had the highest risk (hazard ratio = 2.88; 95% confidence interval = 1.07–7.78), and followed by only hepatitis C virus infection (hazard ratio = 1.75; 95% confidence interval = 1.10–2.79). Patients with cirrhosis had a higher risk in the multivariable model but did not attach statistic difference. Conclusion: Patients with hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus coinfection had the highest risk of uveitis. In patients with hepatitis C virus and/or hepatitis B virus infection, the symptoms of uveitis should be alerted. Although these epidemiologic studies yielded informative results, the underlying mechanisms and the host's genetic factors remain to be investigated. PMID:27870801

  17. [Hepatitis non-A, non-B: epidemiological significance in acute viral hepatitis and chronic active hepatitis of hepatological consultation].

    PubMed

    Jmelnitzky, A C; Basualdo, J A; Belloni, P O; Ponce de León, H H; García, C; Curciarello, J

    1987-01-01

    157 acute viral hepatitis and 60 chronic active ones have been analyzed focusing on NANB etiology. HAV was implicated in 36.3% of the hole acute viral hepatitis sample, HBV in 29.3%, and HNANBV was presumed as etiology in 31.2%, 5 patients (3.2%) had acute infection by HAV, on previous one by HBV, except for Epstein-Barr virus, no other test for viruses were determined (CMV, HSV, etc.). Male/female ratio was 1.4:1, 1.9:1, and 1.4:1 for HAV, HBV and HNANBV acute hepatitis respectively; HAV was the main etiology in the 0-9 age group (72.2%) although it only represents 11.5% of the sample; small occurrence of HAV hepatitis were found in patients over 40 (8.8%); HBV was clearly prevalent in patients over 50 (65.2%); the highest concentration of NANB etiology was found between 20-39 years old, but it was represented in all age-groups. Out of 49 NANB acute hepatitis, 12.2% had related transfusional antecedents, 12.2% belonged to health care worker group, and 4.1% had a close family NANB hepatitis contact; 71.5% had no reported antecedent. Viral source was presumably implicated in 75.0% of chronic active hepatitis, 25.0% attributable to HNANBV. Results seem not feasible to transfer to general population due to the facts that most patients were of specialized consult, and pediatric assistance is unusual to the authors practice.

  18. [Viral hepatitis B and C in patients with acute leukemias].

    PubMed

    Konstantinova, T S; Shalaev, V A; Shpeer, E L; Terskikh, V A; Nizhechik, Iu S

    1996-01-01

    Enzyme immunoassay has been used in 102 patients with acute leukemia (AL) and 340 donors to identify serological markers of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV): HB-sAg, anti-HBs, anti-HBc, anti-HBc IgM, HBeAg, anti-HBe. At the moment of AL diagnosis in 50 patients with acute myeloid leukemia and in 28 patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia at least one HBV marker was found in 68% and 71%, respectively, HBsAg in 12% of patients with AML and 25% of those with ALL. In remission maintenance, HBsAg was registered in 83% of patients with AML and 44% of those with ALL. Anti-HCV in diagnosis of acute leukemia were detected in 1.28% of patients, 12 months after in 40% with ALL and 67% with AML. In examination of the donors at least one HBV marker was found in 36%, HBsAg in 2.1%, anti-HCV in 1.86% of the examinees. It is inferred that acute leukemia patients are often infected with HBV and in long-term follow-up demonstrate reactivation of viral infection, though infection with mutant B viruses is also possible. HCV is a main cause of posttransfusion hepatitis in this group of patients.

  19. The relation between liver histopathology and GGT levels in viral hepatitis: more important in hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Eminler, Ahmet Tarik; Irak, Kader; Ayyildiz, Talat; Keskin, Murat; Kiyici, Murat; Gurel, Selim; Gulten, Macit; Dolar, Enver; Nak, Selim Giray

    2014-08-01

    To investigate the relationship between gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) levels and histopathological status determined by biopsy in patients with chronic hepatitis B and C. Patients with chronic hepatitis B and C who were referred to the Uludağ University Faculty of Medicine Gastroenterology outpatient clinic between January 2005-January 2011 and underwent liver biopsy were included in the study. Overall, 246 patients with hepatitis B and 151 patients with hepatitis C were enrolled. According to the evaluation based on the Ishak score, patients with a histological activity index (HAI) between 0-12 were defined as low activity, and those with an HAI between 13-18 were defined as high activity. In addition, patients with a fibrosis score of 0-2 were defined as low fibrosis, and those with a score between 3-6 were defined as high fibrosis; comparisons were made accordingly. In patients with hepatitis B, the mean GGT level was 38.86±42.4 (IU/L) in the low activity group and 60.44±44.4 (IU/L) in the high activity group (p<0.05). In hepatitis B patients, the mean GGT level was 26.89±14.83 (IU/L) in the low fibrosis group, whereas it was 65.60±59.7 (IU/L) in the high fibrosis group (p<0.001). There was no significant difference between HAI and fibrosis group with regard to GGT levels in the hepatitis C patients. In conclusion, it is proposed that in patients with chronic viral hepatitis, GGT levels can be taken into consideration to predict advanced histological liver damage, especially in patients with hepatitis B.

  20. Essential components in developing public policy to control viral hepatitis: lessons from Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Jack; Pitts, Marian; Locarnini, Stephen; Ellard, Jeanne; Carman, Marina; Chen, Ding-Shinn

    2016-03-01

    Over 500 million people are estimated to be infected with chronic viral hepatitis with an increasing burden resulting from the infections. In 2010, the World Health Organization recommended national governments develop effective strategies to reduce the global impact of viral hepatitis. Taiwan, to support the implementation of the world's first national vaccination program, developed the first of a series of 5-year national strategies in 1982. Our study sought to identify the essential constituents of the strategic response to chronic viral hepatitis in Taiwan, which could then be used by other governments to inform best practice in strategy development. Semistructured qualitative interviews were conducted with key participants involved in the national response to viral hepatitis in Taiwan (n = 26) and a review of the literature. The development of a national strategic response is one of several factors in reducing the burden of viral hepatitis in Taiwan. Other critical factors are effective health services, a prioritization of disease prevention, government funding of science and technology, and sustained advocacy informed by a rigorous evidence base. While there has been significant policy, structural and financial commitment to reduce the burden of related to viral hepatitis, essential challenges remain. Taiwan's viral hepatitis policy response focuses on clinical interventions and would be strengthened by a broader involvement of interdisciplinary stakeholders, including people with viral hepatitis, and stronger coordination between the policy and government agencies responsible for their implementation.

  1. [Knowledge about viral hepatitis in a sample of Brazilian students from Vale do Araguaia, Legal Amazonia].

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Carlos K B; Savazzi, Kamirri; Honorio-França, Adenilda C; Ferrari, Graziele S L; França, Eduardo L

    2012-06-01

    Viral and non-viral hepatitis are of great concern among developing nations because of their pathogenicity and virulence, and also their wide spreading by contaminated blood, food or water. The objective of this work was to evaluate the knowledge about hepatitis of academic students from three life/health sciences courses and also students from the last year of high school To measure the students' knowledge on hepatitis an instrument containing 22 questions was applied. Surprinsingly, it was verified that 41.9% of students had poor knowledge of viral hepatitis. Among the high school students, 31.8% ignored that viral hepatitis are infectious and transmissible diseases. Considering hepatitis symptomatology, just 18% of high school students declared knowledge of the symptons, but none of those cited the ictericia. Among the academic students, 75.9% of nursing students had adequate knowledge of hepatitis, followed by pharmacy (51.3%), and biology students (18.2%). Nursing students had also higher scores of right answers regarding viral hepatitis and chronic disease. On contrary, biology and high school students had poor knowledge of that matter (37% and 44.5%, respectively). Less than 15% of nursing and pharmacy students did not know that viral hepatitis are sexually transmissible, whereas 78.6% of the 3rd year and 52.4% of the 4th year biology course ignored the sexual transmission of viral hepatitis. Still considering the same question, 54.5% of the high school students also ignored that viral hepatitis are sexually transmitted diseases. Important conclusions can be drawn from this study, since the higher hepatitis knowledge scores were found among nursing students, followed by pharmacy academics. However, biology students, which will serve as high school teachers, had poor and insufficient knowledge on hepatitis. This finding could explain the same poor disease knowledge among high school pupils.

  2. A comparative study of hepatitis caused by scrub typhus and viral hepatitis A in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun; Kim, Dong-Min; Yun, Na Ra; Byeon, Yu Mi; Kim, Young Dae; Park, Chan Guk; Kim, Man Woo; Han, Mi Ah

    2011-11-01

    We compared clinical features and laboratory findings of 104 patients with hepatitis A and 197 patients with scrub typhus. Nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, hepatomegaly, and jaundice were common in patient with hepatitis A, and fever and headache were significantly more common in patients with scrub typhus. At presentation, an alanine aminotransferase (ALT) level ≥ 500 U/L was observed in 1% of scrub typhus patients and in 87.5% of hepatitis A patients (P < 0.001). A bilirubin level ≥ 1.3 mg/dL was observed in 16.8% of scrub typhus patients and 90.4% of hepatitis A patients. The ALT:lactate dehydrogenase ratio was ≤ 5 in 97.4% of the patients with scrub typhus and > 5 in 95.2% of those with hepatitis A (P < 0.001). Fever, headache, rash, and eschar are findings that indicate scrub typhus. An ALT level ≥ 500 U/L (adjusted odds ratio = 0.011) a bilirubin level ≥ 1.3 (adjusted odds ratio = 0.024), an ALT:lactate dehydrogenase ratio > 5, and hepatomegaly are indications of viral hepatitis A.

  3. A Comparative Study of Hepatitis Caused by Scrub Typhus and Viral Hepatitis A in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jun; Kim, Dong-Min; Yun, Na Ra; Byeon, Yu Mi; Kim, Young Dae; Park, Chan Guk; Kim, Man Woo; Han, Mi Ah

    2011-01-01

    We compared clinical features and laboratory findings of 104 patients with hepatitis A and 197 patients with scrub typhus. Nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, hepatomegaly, and jaundice were common in patient with hepatitis A, and fever and headache were significantly more common in patients with scrub typhus. At presentation, an alanine aminotransferase (ALT) level ≥ 500 U/L was observed in 1% of scrub typhus patients and in 87.5% of hepatitis A patients (P < 0.001). A bilirubin level ≥ 1.3 mg/dL was observed in 16.8% of scrub typhus patients and 90.4% of hepatitis A patients. The ALT:lactate dehydrogenase ratio was ≤ 5 in 97.4% of the patients with scrub typhus and > 5 in 95.2% of those with hepatitis A (P < 0.001). Fever, headache, rash, and eschar are findings that indicate scrub typhus. An ALT level ≥ 500 U/L (adjusted odds ratio = 0.011) a bilirubin level ≥ 1.3 (adjusted odds ratio = 0.024), an ALT:lactate dehydrogenase ratio > 5, and hepatomegaly are indications of viral hepatitis A. PMID:22049041

  4. [The effect of tumor necrosis factor alpha on hepatic necrosis in viral hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Yu, Y; Si, C; Lang, Z

    1996-01-01

    In order to investigate the effect of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha) on hepatocyte necrosis in viral hepatitis, TNF alpha with or without D-galactosamine (D-Gal) was injected into the abdominal cavity of rats. No effect was observed after injection of TNF alpha alone. After injection of TNF alpha with D-Gal, the total bilirubin level in rat blood increased and hepatocyte necrosis appeared (P < 0.05). Moreover, anti-TNF alpha McAb blocked the effect of hepatocyte necrosis produced by D-Gal and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). 130 samples of hepatic tissue were stained with anti-TNF alpha McAb by using ABC immunohistochemistry method. It was found that more severe the hepatocyte necrosis, more the positive cells expressing TNF alpha. There were more TNF alpha positive cells in the tissue of severe hepatitis. These results suggested that TNF alpha is a mediator in hepatocyte necrosis.

  5. Viral genome imaging of hepatitis C virus to probe heterogeneous viral infection and responses to antiviral therapies

    PubMed Central

    Ramanan, Vyas; Trehan, Kartik; Ong, Mei-Lyn; Luna, Joseph M.; Hoffmann, Hans-Heinrich; Espiritu, Christine; Sheahan, Timothy P.; Chandrasekar, Hamsika; Schwartz, Robert E.; Christine, Kathleen S.; Rice, Charles M.; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Bhatia, Sangeeta N.

    2017-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a positive single-stranded RNA virus of enormous global health importance, with direct-acting antiviral therapies replacing an immunostimulatory interferon-based regimen. The dynamics of HCV positive and negative-strand viral RNAs (vRNAs) under antiviral perturbations have not been studied at the single-cell level, leaving a gap in our understanding of antiviral kinetics and host-virus interactions. Here, we demonstrate quantitative imaging of HCV genomes in multiple infection models, and multiplexing of positive and negative strand vRNAs and host antiviral RNAs. We capture the varying kinetics with which antiviral drugs with different mechanisms of action clear HCV infection, finding the NS5A inhibitor daclatasvir to induce a rapid decline in negative-strand viral RNAs. We also find that the induction of host antiviral genes upon interferon treatment is positively correlated with viral load in single cells. This study adds smFISH to the toolbox available for analyzing the treatment of RNA virus infections. PMID:27128351

  6. Detection of viral hepatitis E in clinical liver biopsies.

    PubMed

    Prost, Sandrine; Crossan, Claire L; Dalton, Harry R; De Man, Robert A; Kamar, Nassim; Selves, Janick; Dhaliwal, Catharine; Scobie, Linda; Bellamy, Christopher O C

    2017-10-01

    To determine the relative utility of in-situ testing for hepatitis E virus (HEV) RNA and paraffin-section polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to diagnose HEV infection in paraffin-embedded clinical liver biopsies, and to correlate with clinicopathological characteristics. We evaluated in-situ and quantitative PCR (qPCR)-based approaches to identifying HEV in clinical liver biopsies from infected patients from multiple centres, correlating with clinical setting (immunocompetent, allograft or immunosuppressed native liver) and histological findings. Thirty-six biopsies from 29 patients had histological data, 27 and 23 of which had satisfactory material for in-situ RNA testing and tissue qPCR, respectively. Both approaches specifically identified HEV infection, but tissue qPCR was significantly more sensitive than RNAscope in-situ testing (P = 0.035). In immunocompetent but not immunosuppressed patients the tissue qPCR yield correlated with the severity of lobular hepatitis (rho = 0.94, P < 0.001). qPCR viral yield was comparably high in allografts and immunosuppressed native livers and significantly greater than with native liver infection. Immunosuppressed patients showed reduced severity of hepatitis and cholestatic changes, compared with immunocompetent patients. Indeed, HEV-infected liver allografts could show minimal hepatitis for many months. In individual cases each technique was useful when serum was not available to identify chronic infection retrospectively (in biopsies taken 4-31 months before diagnosis), to identify persistent/residual infection when contemporary serum PCR was negative and to identify cleared infection. qPCR is more effective than in-situ RNA testing to identify HEV infection in paraffin-embedded liver biopsies and has diagnostic utility in selected settings. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Structure, sequence and expression of the hepatitis delta (δ) viral genome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kang-Sheng; Choo, Qui-Lim; Weiner, Amy J.; Ou, Jing-Hsiung; Najarian, Richard C.; Thayer, Richard M.; Mullenbach, Guy T.; Denniston, Katherine J.; Gerin, John L.; Houghton, Michael

    1986-10-01

    Biochemical and electron microscopic data indicate that the human hepatitis δ viral agent contains a covalently closed circular and single-stranded RNA genome that has certain similarities with viroid-like agents from plants. The sequence of the viral genome (1,678 nucleotides) has been determined and an open reading frame within the complementary strand has been shown to encode an antigen that binds specifically to antisera from patients with chronic hepatitis δ viral infections.

  8. Hematopoietic malignancies associated with viral and alcoholic hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Lesley A; Pfeiffer, Ruth; Warren, Joan L; Landgren, Ola; Gadalla, Shahinaz; Berndt, Sonja I; Ricker, Winnie; Parsons, Ruth; Wheeler, William; Engels, Eric A

    2008-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) have been associated with hematopoietic malignancies, but data for many subtypes are limited. From the U.S. SEER-Medicare database, we selected 61,464 cases (≥67 years) with hematopoietic malignancies and 122,531 population-based controls, frequency-matched by gender, age and year (1993–2002). Logistic regression was used to compare the prevalence of HCV, HBV and alcoholic hepatitis in cases and controls, adjusted for matching factors, race, duration of Medicare coverage, and number of physician claims. HCV, HBV, and alcoholic hepatitis were reported in 195 (0.3%), 111 (0.2%) and 404 (0.7%) cases and 264 (0.2%), 242 (0.2%) and 798 (0.7%) controls, respectively. HCV was associated with increased risk of diffuse large B-cell (OR 1.52, 95%CI 1.05–2.18), Burkitt (OR 5.21, 95%CI 1.62–16.8), follicular (OR 1.88, 95%CI 1.17–3.02), and marginal zone lymphomas (OR 2.20, 95%CI 1.22–3.95), and acute myeloid leukemia (OR 1.54, 95%CI 1.00–2.37). In contrast, HBV was unrelated to any hematopoietic malignancies. Alcoholic hepatitis was associated with decreased risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, but increased risk of Burkitt lymphoma. In summary, HCV, but not other causes of hepatitis, was associated with elevated risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma and acute myeloid leukemia. HCV may induce lymphoproliferative malignancies through chronic immune stimulation. PMID:18957521

  9. Significance of viral status on occurrence of hepatitis B-related hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Qu, Li-Shuai; Zhou, Guo-Xiong

    2014-05-28

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection remains a challenging global health problem, with more than 350 million people chronically infected and at risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Interactions that occur among host, environmental, and viral factors determine the natural course and predict the prognosis of patients with chronic HBV infection. In the past decades, several important viral factors of predictive of HCC have been identified, such as high hepatitis B surface antigen level, seropositivity of hepatitis B e antigen, high viral load, viral genotype, and specific viral sequence mutations. Identification of certain viral risk factors for HCC development and stratification of patient risk are very important to perform future surveillance programs. In this article, we thus reviewed the risk of viral factors involved in hepatocarcinogenesis.

  10. An outbreak of viral hepatitis E: role of community practices.

    PubMed

    Singh, J; Aggarwal, N R; Bhattacharjee, J; Prakash, C; Bora, D; Jain, D C; Sharma, R S; Datta, K K

    1995-06-01

    A small localised outbreak of viral hepatitis due to HEV occurred in an educated and well placed community. The overall attack rate was found to be 1.9%; the children and adults were equally affected. No fatality was observed. Five blood samples collected from the cases of jaundice were found negative for Anti HAV IgM, HBsAg and Anti HBc IgM, but positive for Anti HEV. The infection spread by contamination of piped water by sewage system resulting from scarcity of water, intermittent water supply and installation of on-line private booster pumps by the residents. Community action, especially the boiling of drinking water till the quality of piped water improved, restricted jaundice cases to only one incubation period. The outbreak highlights the importance of community behaviour in first precipitating the crisis and then limitating the damage.

  11. Particularities of associating viral hepatitis with pregnancy and mental disorders.

    PubMed

    Gheorman, Victor; ChiriŢă, Anca Livia; Dumitrescu, Elena Mădălina; Rogoveanu, Ion; Istrătoaie, Octavian; Gheorman, Valeriu; Pană, Răzvan Cosmin

    2016-01-01

    Pregnancy generates particular circumstances for all co-existent conditions. Associating pregnancy with liver diseases has distinct particularities. The authors will perform a presentation of the etiopathogenic, diagnosis and therapeutic conduct particularities regarding the association between pregnancy, chronic liver diseases and mental disorders. The three pathological entities are analyzed separately, followed by a study of a triple association. Associating pregnancy and mental disorders has been better studied due to a higher frequency of mental disorders, especially postpartum, but the triple association pregnancy, chronic hepatitis with viral etiology mainly, and mental disorders has been less analyzed. There is concluded that pregnancy, through the physiological changes it undergoes, as well as its pathology, represents a clearly influencing factor of the association with a chronic liver disease or with a mental disorder.

  12. Hepatitis E Virus Genotype 3 in Colombia: Survey in Patients with Clinical Diagnosis of Viral Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Rendon, Julio; Hoyos, Maria Cristina; di Filippo, Diana; Cortes-Mancera, Fabian; Mantilla, Carolina; Velasquez, Maria Mercedes; Sepulveda, Maria Elsy; Restrepo, Juan Carlos; Jaramillo, Sergio; Arbelaez, Maria Patricia; Correa, Gonzalo; Navas, Maria-Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Background Hepatitis E virus is a major cause of outbreaks as well as sporadic hepatitis cases worldwide. The epidemiology of this enterically transmitted infection differs between developing and developed countries. The aims of this study were to describe HEV infection in Colombian patients and to characterize the genotype. Methods A prospective study was carried out on 40 patients aged over 15 with a clinical diagnosis of viral hepatitis, recruited from five primary health units in the city of Medellin, Colombia. Fecal samples obtained from the 40 consecutives cases were analyzed for HEV RNA using nested reverse transcription PCR for both ORF1 and ORF2-3. The amplicons were sequenced for phylogenetic analyses. Results Nine (22.5%) cases of HEV infection were identified in the study population. Three HEV strains obtained from patients were classified as genotype 3. No significant association was found between cases of Hepatitis E and the variables water drinking source, garbage collection system and contact with pigs. Conclusions This is the first prospective study of hepatitis E in Colombian patients. The circulation of the genotype 3 in this population is predictable considering the reports of the region and the identification of this genotype from pigs in the state of Antioquia, of which Medellin is the capital. Further studies are necessary to establish whether zoonotic transmission of HEV is important in Colombia. PMID:26886728

  13. Black cohosh-induced hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Nisbet, Bruce C; O'Connor, Robert E

    2007-11-01

    Herbal products are widely used by American consumers. Herbal remedies are not regulated by the Food and Drug Administration, but they are not immune from serious medication side-effects. We report the case of a 50-year-old woman who presented with fatigue and right upper quadrant pain. The patient had begun the popular postmenopausal herbal remedy black cohosh two weeks prior to presentation. Laboratory results revealed acute hepatitis. After other causes of liver failure were ruled out, the patient was diagnosed with black cohosh-induced hepatitis. She recovered uneventfully following withdrawal of the herb. There are five prior reports of hepatitis or hepatic failure likely caused by the herbal remedy black cohosh in the English literature. This case illustrates the importance of a broad differential diagnosis for abdominal pain and highlights the importance of a complete medication list, including herbs.

  14. Spatiotemporal dynamics of viral hepatitis A in Italy.

    PubMed

    Ajelli, Marco; Fumanelli, Laura; Manfredi, Piero; Merler, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    Viral hepatitis A is still common in Italy, especially in Southern regions. In this study, a metapopulation model for hepatitis A virus (HAV) transmission is proposed and analyzed. Analytical results on the asymptotic and transient behaviors of the system are carried out. Based on the available Italian movement data, a national spatial contact matrix at the regional level, which could be used for new studies on the transmission dynamics of other infectious diseases, is derived for modeling fluxes of individuals. Despite the small number of fitted parameters, model simulations are in good agreement with the observed average HAV incidence in all regions. Our results suggest that the mass vaccination program introduced in one Italian region only (Puglia, the one with the highest endemicity level) could have played a role in the decline of HAV incidence in the country as a whole. The only notable exception is represented by Campania, a Southern region showing a high endemicity level, which is not substantially affected by HAV dynamics in Puglia. Finally, our results highlight that the continuation of the vaccination campaign in Puglia would have a relevant impact in decreasing long-term HAV prevalence, especially in Southern Italy.

  15. Viral Hepatitis the US Military: A Study of Hospitalization Records from 1974 to 1999

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-01-01

    inpatient health care provided worldwide in U.S. militaryV iral hepatitis remains.a health threat for military forces. treatment facilities. Social Security...25. Pueschel M: VHA hepatitis C costs placed at $250 million. US Med 1999; 35: 2, 2. Lemon SM, Lednar WM, Bancroft WH: Etiology of viral hepatitis in... Hepatitis in the U.S. Military: A Study of Hospitalization Records from 1974 to 1999 Guarantor: CAPT Kenneth C. Hyams, MC USN Contributors: CAPT Kenneth C

  16. Aloe-induced Toxic Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ha Na; Kim, Young Mook; Kim, Byoung Ho; Sohn, Kyoung Min; Choi, Myung Jin; Choi, Young Hee

    2010-01-01

    Aloe has been widely used in phytomedicine. Phytomedicine describes aloe as a herb which has anti-inflammatory, anti-proliferative, anti-aging effects. In recent years several cases of aloe-induced hepatotoxicity were reported. But its pharmacokinetics and toxicity are poorly described in the literature. Here we report three cases with aloe-induced toxic hepatitis. A 57-yr-old woman, a 62-yr-old woman and a 55-yr-old woman were admitted to the hospital for acute hepatitis. They had taken aloe preparation for months. Their clinical manifestation, laboratory findings and histologic findings met diagnostic criteria (RUCAM scale) of toxic hepatitis. Upon discontinuation of the oral aloe preparations, liver enzymes returned to normal level. Aloe should be considered as a causative agent in hepatotoxicity. PMID:20191055

  17. Anti-hepatitis A seroprevalence among chronic viral hepatitis patients in Kelantan, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Fazlina; Hamzah, Nor Aizal Che; Mustaffa, Nazri; Gan, Siew Hua

    2011-09-28

    To determine the seroprevalence of anti-hepatitis A virus (HAV) antibodies in patients with chronic liver disease (CLD) and to justify the need for hepatitis A vaccination. Patients (n = 119) were enrolled between July and September 2009. The diagnosis of CLD was based on the presence of viral markers for more than 6 mo. The diagnosis of liver cirrhosis was based on clinical, biochemical and radiological profiles. Patient serum was tested for anti-HAV IgG. The overall anti-HAV seroprevalence was 88.2%. The aetiology of CLD was hepatitis B in 96 patients (80.7%) and hepatitis C in 23 patients (19.3%). Mean age was 44.4 ± 14 years. Patients were grouped according to age as follows: 24 (20.2%) patients in the 21-30 years age group, 22 (18.5%) in the 31-40 years age group, 31 (26.1%) in the 41-50 years age group, 23 (19.3%) in the 51-60 years age group and 19 (16.0%) patients aged greater than 60 years, with reported seroprevalences of 66.7%, 95.5%, 93.5%, 91.3% and 94.7%, respectively. There was a marked increase of seroprevalence in subjects older than 30 years (P = 0.001). Our study demonstrated that patients aged greater than 30 years of age were likely to have natural immunity to hepatitis A. Therefore, hepatitis A vaccination may not be routinely required in this age group.

  18. Phospho-Network Analysis Identifies and Quantifies Hepatitis C Virus (HCV)-induced Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC) Proteins Regulating Viral-mediated Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    LU, NU T; LIU, NATALIE M; VU, JAMES Q; PATEL, DARSHIL; COHN, WHITAKER; CAPRI, JOE; ZIEGLER, MARY; PATEL, NIKITA; TRAMONTANO, ANGELA; WILLIAMS, ROGER; WHITELEGGE, JULIAN; FRENCH, SAMUEL W

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection are at risk of serious complications of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Mass spectrometry (MS) is a versatile methodology that produces a global proteomic landscape for analysis of cancer mechanisms. Materials and Methods: Using multiplex peptide stable isotopic labeling and immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC), we enriched and quantified the phosphoproteome of HCC, with and without HCV. While raw data identified protein targets based on expression alone, we also used abundance groups for comprehensive functional analysis. Results: Analysis of functional differences highlighted deregulated phosphoprotein networks. This uncovered additional candidates that could be directly derived from the MS data. Cellular processes and pathways that may differ with HCV infection include: cytoskeletal dynamics, insulin response, gene expression, and PI3K/AKT oncogenesis. Conclusion: This function-focused workflow provides a simple framework to analyze MS data. Phosphoproteome quantitation with inclusive functional analysis can generate hypotheses for liver cancer research to improve early screening and identification of molecular targets for therapy. PMID:27566653

  19. Report from a Viral Hepatitis Policy Forum on implementing the WHO Framework for Global Action on viral hepatitis in North Asia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ding-Shinn; Locarnini, Stephen; Wait, Suzanne; Bae, Si-Hyun; Chen, Pei-Jer; Fung, James Y Y; Kim, Hong Soo; Lu, Sheng-Nan; Sung, Joseph; Tanaka, Junko; Wakita, Takaji; Ward, John; Wallace, Jack

    2013-11-01

    The World Health Organisation (WHO) Prevention & Control of Viral Hepatitis Infection: Framework for Global Action offers a global vision for the prevention and control of viral hepatitis. In October 2012, the Coalition to Eradicate Viral Hepatitis in Asia Pacific (CEVHAP) organised the North Asia Workshop on Viral Hepatitis in Taipei to discuss how to implement the WHO Framework in the North Asia region. This paper presents outcomes from this workshop. Twenty-eight representatives from local liver associations, patient organisations, and centres of excellence in Hong Kong, Japan, Korea, and Taiwan participated in the workshop. Priority areas for action were described along the four axes of the WHO Framework: (1) awareness, advocacy and resources; (2) evidence and data; (3) prevention of transmission; and (4) screening and treatment. Priorities included: axis 1: greater public and professional awareness, particularly among primary care physicians and local advocacy networks. Axis 2: better economic data and identifying barriers to screening and treatment uptake. Axis 3: monitoring of vaccination outcomes and targeted harm reduction strategies. Axis 4: strengthening links between hospitals and primary care providers, and secure funding of screening and treatment, including for hepatocellular carcinoma. The WHO Framework provides an opportunity to develop comprehensive and cohesive policies in North Asia and the broader region. A partnership between clinical specialists, primary care physicians, policy makers, and people with or at risk of viral hepatitis is essential in shaping future policies. Copyright © 2013 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. A Hospital-based Retrospective Study on Frequency and Distribution of Viral Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Antony, Jimmy; Celine, TM

    2014-01-01

    Background: Viral hepatitis is a major public health problem throughout the world. It is the inflammation of the liver due to the infection of any of the five main hepatic viruses A to E and it affects the liver through different modes of transmission. This study mainly aims at the frequency and distribution of viral hepatitis based on age and sex during a time period of 5 years. Materials and Methods: This is a hospital-based retrospective study of 5 years at a tertiary level hospital in Kerala state in India. Medical records department of the hospital follow the guidelines of International Classification of Diseases-10 for coding the diseases. The data on frequency and distribution of viral hepatitis based on age and sex during a period of 5 years from April 2005 to March 2010 were collected and analyzed and ‘z’ test was used for finding out the difference in proportions. Result: Out of 818 cases, 76.03% were males and 23.96% were females. The preponderance of males was apparent in all types of viral hepatitis infection. The high risk groups were the adults in the age group of 20-39 years. The main cause in the present study was hepatitis E virus (HEV) and followed by hepatitis A virus (HAV). Of total viral hepatitis cases, 31.54% were due to HAV, 6.35% hepatitis B virus, 0.85% hepatitis C virus and 61.24% were due to HEV respectively. In the present study, there was no case of hepatitis D virus has reported. The case fatality rate of viral hepatitis in the present study was minor than 1% (0.98%); whereas males were 0.96%; females of 1.02%. Conclusion: Taking the safety measures including vaccination and proper management of waste materials are the only solution to control or eradicate this infection. PMID:25191049

  1. Acute viral hepatitis, intravascular haemolysis, severe hyperbilirubinaemia and renal failure in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficient patients.

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, R. K.; Moudgil, A.; Kishore, K.; Srivastava, R. N.; Tandon, R. K.

    1985-01-01

    Five patients with acute viral hepatitis developed severe intrasvascular haemolysis and unusually high levels of serum bilirubin (427 to 1368 mumol/l). All 5 had high fever, marked anaemia, reticulocytosis and neutrophilic leucocytosis. Three of them developed acute renal failure, which was of non-oliguric type in 2. The clinical course was protracted, but complete recovery occurred in 4 patients between 4 to 10 weeks. One patient with hepatic coma and oliguric renal failure died. Deficiency of the enzyme G-6-PD was confirmed in 4 cases. Massive haemolysis in the patients was probably induced by the administration of chloroquine and other drugs. Intravascular haemolysis should be suspected in patients with acute viral hepatitis, if they show unexplained anaemia and very high serum bilirubin levels, and measures to prevent renal failure should be instituted in such cases. PMID:4070114

  2. [Comparison of clinical and laboratory characteristics of viral hepatitis A and E in Montenegro].

    PubMed

    Terzić, Dragica; Mijović, Gordana; Dupanović, Brankica; Drasković, Nenad; Svirtlih, Neda

    2010-01-01

    Hepatitis E has many similarities in with hepatitis A concerning clinical picture, route of transmission and nonexistence of chronicity. Comparison of clinical and laboratory parameters of patients with hepatitis A and E to estimate characteristics of these diseases. Total of 54 patients divided into two groups was investigated: 27 had hepatitis A, others had hepatitis E. Detailed history past, clinical examination, liver function tests and ultrasonography of the upper abdomen, were done in all patients. Aetiology of viral hepatitis was investigated serologically by enzyme immunoassay (ELISA) using commercial kits for following viruses: Hepatitis A-E viruses, cytomegalovirus, and Epstein-Barr virus. Asymptomatic infections (29.6%) and clinical forms without jaundice (59.3%) were more frequent in patients with hepatitis E. Splenomegaly was found more frequent in patients with hepatitis A than in hepatitis E (66.7% vs. 33.3%). Patients with hepatitis E had significantly lower activity of aminotransferases than patients with hepatitis A. A significant increase of gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase was found in patients with hepatitis E (mean value: 120 IU/L). Our results are in concordance with other reports that hepatitis E virus infection is more common asymptomatic disease than hepatitis A. In addition, hepatocyte necrosis in hepatitis E is less extensive than in hepatitis A measured by the activity of aminotransferases. Contrary to that the value of gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase is more increased in hepatitis E than in hepatitis A without exact explanation so far: Viral hepatitis E and A have differences in some clinical features and laboratory parameters although both diseases principally have resolved without consequences after 6-8 weeks.

  3. Azathioprine-induced fever in autoimmune hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Khoury, Tawfik; Ollech, Jacob E; Chen, Shmuel; Mizrahi, Meir; Shalit, Meir

    2013-01-01

    Underdiagnosis of drug-induced fever leads to extensive investigation and prolongation of hospitalization, and may lead to multiple unnecessary invasive procedures and a wrong diagnosis. Azathioprine is a widely used immunosuppressive drug. We report a case of a 53-year-old female patient diagnosed with autoimmune hepatitis treated with azathioprine, who presented to the emergency room with a 6-wk history of fever and chills without other associated symptoms. Since the patient’s fever was of unknown origin, she was hospitalized. All treatment was stopped and an extensive workup to explore the source of fever and chills was performed. Results of chest X-ray, viral, urine, and blood cultures, autoimmune serology, transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography, and abdominal ultrasound revealed no source of infection. A rechallenge test of azathioprine was performed and the fever and chills returned within a few hours. Azathioprine was established as the definite cause following rechallenge. Fever as an adverse drug reaction is often unrecognized. Azathioprine has been reported to cause drug-induced fever in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and sarcoidosis. To the best of our knowledge there have been no previous reports documenting azathioprine-induced fever in patients with autoimmune hepatitis. The occurrence of fever following the readministration of azathioprine suggests the diagnosis of drug-induced fever, particularly after the exclusion of other causes. A careful rechallenge is recommended to confirm the diagnosis. PMID:23840156

  4. [Study of hepatitis C virus leukotropism by characterization of viral quasispecies in the liver transplantation setting].

    PubMed

    Schramm, F; Moenne-Loccoz, R; Fafi-Kremer, S; Soulier, E; Royer, C; Weitten, T; Brignon, N; Ellero, B; Woehl-Jaegle, M-L; Meyer, C; Wolf, P; Doffoel, M; Baumert, T-F; Gut, J-P; Stoll-Keller, F; Schvoerer, E

    2008-01-01

    Besides hepatocytes, representing the main replication site of hepatitis C virus, peripheral blood mononuclear cells also represent a crucial target for viral infection. Hepatitis C virus compartmentalization (i.e., non-random distribution) of viral variants between plasma and peripheral blood mononuclear cells, more frequently observed in liver transplant patients compared to non-transplanted patients, makes liver transplantation an interesting model for the analysis of hepatitis C leukotropism. This article aims to present, firstly, in clinical and biological features arguing favour of hepatitis C virus infection leukotropism and, secondly, to review current knowledge about compartmentalization between plasma and peripheral blood mononuclear cells, especially in the liver transplantation setting.

  5. Linker phosphorylation of Smad3 promotes fibro-carcinogenesis in chronic viral hepatitis of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Murata, Miki; Yoshida, Katsunori; Yamaguchi, Takashi; Matsuzaki, Koichi

    2014-11-07

    Epidemiological and clinical data point to a close association between chronic hepatitis B virus infection or chronic hepatitis C virus infection and development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). HCC develops over several decades and is associated with fibrosis. This sequence suggests that persistent viral infection and chronic inflammation can synergistically induce liver fibrosis and hepatocarcinogenesis. The transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling pathway plays a pivotal role in diverse cellular processes and contributes to hepatic fibro-carcinogenesis under inflammatory microenvironments during chronic liver diseases. The biological activities of TGF-β are initiated by the binding of the ligand to TGF-β receptors, which phosphorylate Smad proteins. TGF-β type I receptor activates Smad3 to create COOH-terminally phosphorylated Smad3 (pSmad3C), while pro-inflammatory cytokine-activated kinases phosphorylates Smad3 to create the linker phosphorylated Smad3 (pSmad3L). During chronic liver disease progression, virus components, together with pro-inflammatory cytokines and somatic mutations, convert the Smad3 signal from tumor-suppressive pSmad3C to fibro-carcinogenic pSmad3L pathways, accelerating liver fibrosis and increasing the risk of HCC. The understanding of Smad3 phosphorylation profiles may provide new opportunities for effective chemoprevention and personalized therapy for patients with hepatitis virus-related HCC in the future.

  6. Interferon λ3 gene (IL28B) is associated with spontaneous or treatment-induced viral clearance in hepatitis C virus-infected multitransfused patients with thalassemia.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Aritra; Firdaus, Rushna; Gupta, Debanjali; Ghosh, Monika; Saha, Kallol; Chowdhury, Prosanto; Bhattacharyya, Maitreyee; Sadhukhan, Provash C

    2017-06-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is the major posttransfusion infection in multitransfused individuals in India with thalassemia major. To our knowledge, this study is the first conducted to correlate and comprehend the effects of the host interleukin (IL)28B gene polymorphism at loci rs12979860 and rs8099917 in spontaneous or interferon (IFN)-induced treatment response in the HCV-seroreactive individuals with thalassemia major. A total of 557 HCV-seroreactive individuals with thalassemia were processed for HCV viral genotyping and host IL28B single-nucleotide polymorphism analysis at loci rs12979860 and rs8099917. Of 557 individuals, 70.92% were found to be HCV RNA positive with Genotype 3 (95.18%) as predominant strain. A favorable CC allele at locus rs2979860 and TT allele at rs8099917 were 75.31 and 77.16%, respectively, which was strongly associated with spontaneous clearance of infection (p < 0.05). Of 85 IFN-treated cases, 56 achieved sustained virologic response (SVR) whereas 27 were relapsed cases. Among these patients who achieved SVR, a favorable CC/TT allele at rs12979860/rs8099917 was found to be predominant with 76.79 and 66.07%, respectively, whereas in the case of relapsed patients, unfavorable CT (55.56%) and TG (59.26%) alleles were found to be predominant. Additionally, low serum ferritin level was significantly associated with SVR. CC at rs12979860 and TT at rs8099917 was strongly associated with spontaneous clearance and SVR in the population with thalassemia. Low age group and low serum ferritin level are important cofactors. This allelic pattern will aid clinicians in making an informed decision about prognosis and therapeutic management. © 2017 AABB.

  7. Multilaboratory Comparison of Hepatitis C Virus Viral Load Assays

    PubMed Central

    Caliendo, A. M.; Valsamakis, A.; Zhou, Y.; Yen-Lieberman, B.; Andersen, J.; Young, S.; Ferreira-Gonzalez, A.; Tsongalis, G. J.; Pyles, R.; Bremer, J. W.; Lurain, N. S.

    2006-01-01

    We report a multilaboratory evaluation of hepatitis C virus (HCV) viral load assays to determine their linear range, reproducibility, subtype detection, and agreement. A panel of HCV RNA samples ranging in nominal concentration from 1.0 to 7.0 log10 IU/ml was constructed by diluting a clinical specimen (genotype 1b). Replicates of the panel were tested in multiple laboratories using the Abbott TaqMan analyte-specific reagent (Abbott reverse transcription-PCR [RT-PCR]), Roche TaqMan RUO (Roche RT-PCR), Roche Amplicor Monitor HCV 2.0 (Roche Monitor), and Bayer VERSANT HCV RNA 3.0 (Bayer bDNA) assays. Bayer bDNA-negative specimens were tested reflexively using the Bayer VERSANT HCV RNA qualitative assay (Bayer TMA). Abbott RT-PCR and Roche RT-PCR detected all 28 replicates with a concentration of 1.0 log10 IU/ml and were linear to 7.0 log10 IU/ml. Roche Monitor and Bayer bDNA detected 27 out of 28 and 13 out of 28 replicates, respectively, of 3.0 log10 IU/ml. Bayer TMA detected all seven replicates with 1.0 log10 IU/ml. Bayer bDNA was the most reproducible of the four assays. The mean viral load values for panel members in the linear ranges of the assays were within 0.5 log10 for the different tests. Eighty-nine clinical specimens of various genotypes (1 through 4) were tested in the Bayer bDNA, Abbott RT-PCR, and Roche RT-PCR assays. For Abbott RT-PCR, mean viral load values were 0.61 to 0.96 log10 greater than the values for Bayer bDNA assay for samples with genotype 1, 2, or 3 samples and 0.08 log10 greater for genotype 4 specimens. The Roche RT-PCR assay gave mean viral load values that were 0.28 to 0.82 log10 greater than those obtained with the Bayer bDNA assay for genotype 1, 2, and 3 samples. However, for genotype 4 samples the mean viral load value obtained with the Roche RT-PCR assay was, on average, 0.15 log10 lower than that of the Bayer bDNA. Based on these data, we conclude that the sensitivity and linear range of the Abbott and Roche RT-PCR assays

  8. Hepatitis E viral loads in plasma pools for fractionation.

    PubMed

    Baylis, Sally A; Corman, Victor M; Ong, Edgar; Linnen, Jeffrey M; Nübling, C Micha; Blümel, Johannes

    2016-10-01

    It is now recognized that blood donors may be silently infected with hepatitis E virus (HEV) and that plasma pools used in the manufacture of plasma-derived medicinal products may also contain detectable virus RNA. The occurrence of HEV-infected blood and plasma donors can vary considerably depending on local epidemiology. Manufacturing plasma pools from North America, Europe, the Middle East, and Asia were examined for the presence of HEV using transcription-mediated amplification of HEV RNA; confirmatory testing was performed using real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and sequencing. A total of 484 pools were tested. Asian pools were most frequently positive for HEV RNA and had higher viral loads, although none exceeding 300 IU/mL, and the sequenced strains (n = 5) clustered with Genotype 4, including one significantly divergent sequence. Only HEV Genotype 3 was identified in North American (n = 5) and European (n = 5) pools. There was no evidence of HEV in any pools tested from the Middle East. HEV was detected in manufacturing plasma pools from three different continents; viral loads were low-consistent with large pool sizes and moderate levels of HEV viremia at the individual donation level-but are nevertheless informative for risk assessment of plasma-derived medicinal products. Where sequencing was possible, analysis confirmed the presence of viruses consistent with locally circulating genotypes in the respective regions. The absence of HEV in Middle Eastern pools is consistent with the low prevalence of HEV in this region, likely due to low pork consumption. © 2016 AABB.

  9. RNA Structural Elements of Hepatitis C Virus Controlling Viral RNA Translation and the Implications for Viral Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Piñeiro, David; Martinez-Salas, Encarnación

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) genome multiplication requires the concerted action of the viral RNA, host factors and viral proteins. Recent studies have provided information about the requirement of specific viral RNA motifs that play an active role in the viral life cycle. RNA regulatory motifs controlling translation and replication of the viral RNA are mostly found at the 5' and 3' untranslated regions (UTRs). In particular, viral protein synthesis is under the control of the internal ribosome entry site (IRES) element, a complex RNA structure located at the 5'UTR that recruits the ribosomal subunits to the initiator codon. Accordingly, interfering with this RNA structural motif causes the abrogation of the viral cycle. In addition, RNA translation initiation is modulated by cellular factors, including miRNAs and RNA-binding proteins. Interestingly, a RNA structural motif located at the 3'end controls viral replication and establishes long-range RNA-RNA interactions with the 5'UTR, generating functional bridges between both ends on the viral genome. In this article, we review recent advances on virus-host interaction and translation control modulating viral gene expression in infected cells. PMID:23202462

  10. Novel microRNA-like viral small regulatory RNAs arising during human hepatitis A virus infection.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jiandong; Sun, Jing; Wang, Bin; Wu, Meini; Zhang, Jing; Duan, Zhiqing; Wang, Haixuan; Hu, Ningzhu; Hu, Yunzhang

    2014-10-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), including host miRNAs and viral miRNAs, play vital roles in regulating host-virus interactions. DNA viruses encode miRNAs that regulate the viral life cycle. However, it is generally believed that cytoplasmic RNA viruses do not encode miRNAs, owing to inaccessible cellular miRNA processing machinery. Here, we provide a comprehensive genome-wide analysis and identification of miRNAs that were derived from hepatitis A virus (HAV; Hu/China/H2/1982), which is a typical cytoplasmic RNA virus. Using deep-sequencing and in silico approaches, we identified 2 novel virally encoded miRNAs, named hav-miR-1-5p and hav-miR-2-5p. Both of the novel virally encoded miRNAs were clearly detected in infected cells. Analysis of Dicer enzyme silencing demonstrated that HAV-derived miRNA biogenesis is Dicer dependent. Furthermore, we confirmed that HAV mature miRNAs were generated from viral miRNA precursors (pre-miRNAs) in host cells. Notably, naturally derived HAV miRNAs were biologically and functionally active and induced post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS). Genomic location analysis revealed novel miRNAs located in the coding region of the viral genome. Overall, our results show that HAV naturally generates functional miRNA-like small regulatory RNAs during infection. This is the first report of miRNAs derived from the coding region of genomic RNA of a cytoplasmic RNA virus. These observations demonstrate that a cytoplasmic RNA virus can naturally generate functional miRNAs, as DNA viruses do. These findings also contribute to improved understanding of host-RNA virus interactions mediated by RNA virus-derived miRNAs.

  11. Current status and strategies for the control of viral hepatitis A in Korea.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Eileen L; Sinn, Dong Hyun; Lee, Hyun Woong; Kim, Ji Hoon

    2017-09-01

    Hepatitis A virus is one of the most frequent causes of foodborne infection, which is closely associated with sanitary conditions and hygienic practices. The clinical spectrum of acute hepatitis A is wide, ranging from mild case without any noticeable symptoms to severe case with acute liver failure leading to mortality. The severity and outcome are highly correlated with age at infection. In developing countries, most people are infected in early childhood without significant symptom. Ironically, in area where sanitary condition has improved rapidly, adults who do not have immunity for viral hepatitis A (VH-A) in early childhood is accumulating. Adults without immunity are exposed to risks of symptomatic disease and large outbreaks in society. In Korea, where hygiene has improved rapidly, acute hepatitis A is a significant health burden that needs to be managed with nationwide health policy. The incidence of symptomatic VH-A has increased since 2000 and peaked in 2009. Korea has designated hepatitis A as a group 1 nationally notifiable infectious disease in 2001. Since 2001, mandatory surveillance system has been established to detect every single case of acute hepatitis A. Universal, nationwide vaccination program for newborns was introduced in 2015. In this review, we will present the current epidemiologic status of viral hepatitis A, and evaluate the effectiveness of the current nationwide strategies for the control of viral hepatitis A in Korea. Furthermore, we presented some action proposals that can help eliminate viral hepatitis A, which is a significant health burden in Korea.

  12. [A case of immunological complex-related disease in a child with type B viral hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Mrozińska, M

    1996-04-01

    We present a case of a 3-year-old boy with type B viral hepatitis. Because of an abnormal immunological response to HBV, we observed Gianotti-Crosti syndrome and nephrotic syndrome as a result of glomerulonephritis.

  13. Perceptions of Orthopaedic Surgeons Regarding Hepatitis C Viral Transmission: A Questionnaire Survey

    PubMed Central

    Wallis, GC; Kim, WY; Chaudhary, BR; Henderson, JJ

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Occupationally acquired hepatitis C viral infection is an important issue in surgery since there are no known vaccines or effective prophylaxis. MATERIALS AND METHODS An anonymous questionnaire survey was performed to determine the attitudes and perception of risks of occupational acquired hepatitis C viral transmission in orthopaedic surgeons. RESULTS A total of 763 questionnaires were posted to orthopaedic surgeons with various subspecialty interests and 261 surgeons responded (34.2%). Of respondents, 117 (47%) had sustained sharps injuries in the previous 12 months. Only 82 surgeons (33%) always reported such injuries, although 208 (84%) expressed concerns of occupationally acquired hepatitis C viral transmission. Orthopaedic surgeons were mostly unaware of the true prevalence of hepatitis C in high-risk groups, such as intravenous drug abusers. CONCLUSIONS Greater awareness of all aspects of hepatitis C infection and its risks to the practice of surgery is required. Further debate is necessary on the role of routine testing of surgeons and patients. PMID:17394714

  14. Potential risk of salivary-mediated viral hepatitis type B transmission from oral exposure to fomites.

    PubMed

    Osterholm, M T; Max, B J; Hanson, M; Polesky, H F

    1979-12-01

    Twelve grade school and junior high school students had oral exposures to hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) positive saliva via contact with contaminated musical instruments. The 12 exposed students and 18 students who served as age and sex matched controls were tested for the presence of HBsAg and antibody to the hepatitis surface antigen (anti-HBs) at 2 weeks, 8 weeks and 6 months after exposure. All students were negative for HBsAg and anti-HBs on all dates tested and reported no illness during that time suggestive of viral hepatitis. There was no evidence of viral hepatitis, type B transmission from the exposure. The students probably experienced the maximum possible oral exposure from direct or fomites contact, since there was no cleaning of the musical instruments between use by the students and teacher. Based on these results, the risk of transmission of viral hepatitis, type B from oral contact with fomites is unlikely.

  15. N-acetyl cysteine therapy in acute viral hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Gunduz, Huseyin; Karabay, Oguz; Tamer, Ali; Özaras, Resat; Mert, Ali; Tabak, Ömer Fehmi

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) on acute viral hepatitis (AVH). METHODS: We administered 200 mg oral NAC three times daily (600 mg/day) to the study group and placebo capsules to the control group. All patients were hospitalized and diagnosed as AVH. Blood total and direct bilirubin, ALT, AST, alkaline phosphatese, albumin and globulin levels of each patient were measured twice weekly until total bilirubin level dropped under 2 mg/dl, ALT level under 100 U/L, follow up was continued and then the patients were discharged. RESULTS: A total of 41(13 female and 28 male) AVH patients were included in our study. The period for normalization of ALT and total bilirubin in the study group was 19.7 ± 6.9 days and 13.7 ± 8.5 days respectively. In the control group it was 20.4 ± 6.5 days and 16.9 ± 7.8 days respectively (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION: NAC administration effected neither the time necessary for normalization of ALT and total bilirubin values nor duration of hospitalization, so we could not suggest NAC for the treatment of icteric AVH cases. However, our results have shown that this drug is not harmful to patients with AVH. PMID:14669316

  16. Evaluation of adults with acute viral hepatitis a and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Tekin, R; Yolbas, I; Dal, T; Demirpençe, Ö; Kaya, S; Bozkurt, F; Deveci, Ö; Çelen, M K; Tekin, A

    2013-01-01

    In developing countries HAV infection is very common in the first years of life and it is often asymptomatic. However especially in regions of intermediate endemicity, exposure to the virus may delay and outbreaks of hepatitis A may be encountered in adults. The aim of this study is to evaluate the clinical and laboratory findings and risk factors of adults with acute viral hepatitis A. In present study we evaluated 203 patient with acute viral hepatitis A, who were admitted to four different hospitals of three cities of Turkey between January 2000-December 2011, retrospectively. The diagnosis of acute viral hepatitis A was performed by laboratory findings and clinically. In a total of 203 patients, 120 (59.1%) patients were male and 83 (40.9%) were female. Mean age of cases with acute viral hepatitis A was 24.7 +11.8 years (ranged 15 to 82 years old). Acute viral hepatitis A were seen in patient who were 15-20 years and 21-30 years old, commonly. Jaundice (74%), fatigue (68%), nausea- vomiting (56%) and dark urine (48%) were the most common symptoms in cases. Prolonged cholestasis (6.8%) was the most common atypical manifestation. Prolonged jaundice was more frequent in the cases with positive HBsAg (P < 0.001). Acute viral hepatitis A can cause atypical presentations such as prolonged cholestasis, acute kidney injury and fulminant hepatitis. Some precautions such as routine vaccination program, improvement of hygiene conditions and informing people about it, should be taken for reducing of acute viral hepatitis A infection incidence.

  17. Mutagenic Effects of Ribavirin on Hepatitis E Virus—Viral Extinction versus Selection of Fitness-Enhancing Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Todt, Daniel; Walter, Stephanie; Brown, Richard J. P.; Steinmann, Eike

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV), an important agent of viral hepatitis worldwide, can cause severe courses of infection in pregnant women and immunosuppressed patients. To date, HEV infections can only be treated with ribavirin (RBV). Major drawbacks of this therapy are that RBV is not approved for administration to pregnant women and that the virus can acquire mutations, which render the intra-host population less sensitive or even resistant to RBV. One of the proposed modes of action of RBV is a direct mutagenic effect on viral genomes, inducing mismatches and subsequent nucleotide substitutions. These transition events can drive the already error-prone viral replication beyond an error threshold, causing viral population extinction. In contrast, the expanded heterogeneous viral population can facilitate selection of mutant viruses with enhanced replication fitness. Emergence of these mutant viruses can lead to therapeutic failure. Consequently, the onset of RBV treatment in chronically HEV-infected individuals can result in two divergent outcomes: viral extinction versus selection of fitness-enhanced viruses. Following an overview of RNA viruses treated with RBV in clinics and a summary of the different antiviral modes of action of this drug, we focus on the mutagenic effect of RBV on HEV intrahost populations, and how HEV is able to overcome lethal mutagenesis. PMID:27754363

  18. Mutagenic Effects of Ribavirin on Hepatitis E Virus-Viral Extinction versus Selection of Fitness-Enhancing Mutations.

    PubMed

    Todt, Daniel; Walter, Stephanie; Brown, Richard J P; Steinmann, Eike

    2016-10-13

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV), an important agent of viral hepatitis worldwide, can cause severe courses of infection in pregnant women and immunosuppressed patients. To date, HEV infections can only be treated with ribavirin (RBV). Major drawbacks of this therapy are that RBV is not approved for administration to pregnant women and that the virus can acquire mutations, which render the intra-host population less sensitive or even resistant to RBV. One of the proposed modes of action of RBV is a direct mutagenic effect on viral genomes, inducing mismatches and subsequent nucleotide substitutions. These transition events can drive the already error-prone viral replication beyond an error threshold, causing viral population extinction. In contrast, the expanded heterogeneous viral population can facilitate selection of mutant viruses with enhanced replication fitness. Emergence of these mutant viruses can lead to therapeutic failure. Consequently, the onset of RBV treatment in chronically HEV-infected individuals can result in two divergent outcomes: viral extinction versus selection of fitness-enhanced viruses. Following an overview of RNA viruses treated with RBV in clinics and a summary of the different antiviral modes of action of this drug, we focus on the mutagenic effect of RBV on HEV intrahost populations, and how HEV is able to overcome lethal mutagenesis.

  19. Prevalence of Hepatitis A virus (HAV) and Hepatitis E virus (HEV) in the patients presenting with acute viral hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Joon, A; Rao, P; Shenoy, S M; Baliga, S

    2015-02-01

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) and Hepatitis E virus (HEV) are both enterically transmitted, resulting in acute viral hepatitis (AVH) in developing countries. They pose major health problems in our country. This study was done to determine prevalence of HAV and HEV in patients presenting with AVH and the co-infection of HAV and HEV in these patients. A cross-sectional study of 2-years duration was conducted in the Department of Microbiology, KMC, Mangalore. A non-random sampling of 958 patients presenting with AVH was considered in the study. On the basis of history, serum samples were analysed for IgM anti-HAV and IgM anti-HEV for the detection of HAV and HEV, respectively using commercially available ELISA kits. Data collected was analysed by using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 11.5. The seroprevalence of HAV- and HEV-positive patients were 19.31% and 10.54%, respectively. The seroprevalence of both HAV and HEV in patients with acute viral hepatitis was 11.5%. The prevalence of HAV and HEV among males (68% and 31%) was higher than in females (31% and 20%) and was predominantly seen among young adults. These infections were predominantly seen during end of monsoons and beginning of winter. Though the prevalence of HAV is much higher than that of HEV, co-infection rate of 11.5% mandates the screening for HEV which will be of immense importance in pregnant women and improving levels of personal hygiene among higher socio-economic population. These data will be essential for planning of future vaccination strategies and for better sanitation programme in this part of the country.

  20. Age-standardized mortality rates related to viral hepatitis in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Perazzo, Hugo; Pacheco, Antonio G; Luz, Paula M; Castro, Rodolfo; Hyde, Chris; Fittipaldi, Juliana; Rigolon, Caroline; Cardoso, Sandra W; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Veloso, Valdiléa G

    2017-07-31

    Liver-related mortality has been increasing worldwide. We aimed to estimate the age-standardized mortality rates from viral hepatitis in Brazil. The Brazilian National Death Registry was analyzed from 2008 to 2014. Viral hepatitis deaths were defined by the following ICD-10 codes in the death certificate: hepatitis A [B15.0; B15.9]; hepatitis B [B16.2; B16.9; B18.1]; hepatitis C [B17.1; B18.2]; hepatitis Delta [B16.0; B16.1; B18.0; B17.0] and other viral hepatitis [B17.2; B17.8; B18.8; B18.9; B19.0; B19.9]. Crude mortality rates were calculated by the ratio between total number of deaths and estimated population. Mortality rates were age-standardized by the direct method using the WHO standard population. Thirty four thousand ,nine hundred seventy eight deaths had viral hepatitis mentioned in their death certificate [65% male, aged 58 years, 73% associated with hepatitis C]. Age-standardized mortality rate (95% CI) due to viral hepatitis was 2.695 (2.667-2.724) deaths per 100,000 inhabitants: South region had the higher rates [3.997 (3.911-4.085)]. Mortality rates associated with hepatitis A and Delta were 0.032 (0.029-0.035) and 0.028 (0.025-0.031), respectively. Hepatitis C mortality rates were 4-fold higher than those associated with hepatitis B [1.964 (1.940-1.989) vs 0.500 (0.488-0.512)]. South region had the higher rates for hepatitis C [3.163 (3.087-3.241)] and North had the higher rates for hepatitis A [0.066 (0.049-0.087)], B [0.986 (0.918-1.058)] and Delta [0.220 (0.190-0.253)]. Viral hepatitis remains a major public health issue in Brazil. Mortality rates were not homogeneous across the country, suggesting that health policies should be customized according to geographical location.

  1. Integrating viral hepatitis prevention services into an urban STD clinic: Denver, Colorado.

    PubMed

    Subiadur, Julie; Harris, Jennie L; Rietmeijer, Cornelis A

    2007-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends integrating viral hepatitis prevention services with services for adults evaluated for sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). The Denver Public Health STD clinic began hepatitis B vaccination in 1999, hepatitis C virus (HCV) antibody (anti-HCV) testing in 2000, and hepatitis A vaccination in 2002. Rapid human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing began in late 2004. Hepatitis B vaccinations peaked in 2003 (31/100 client visits) when a full-time nurse was hired to vaccinate and eligibility was expanded. The proportion of clients documented to have received their anti-HCV test results declined from an average of 71% in 2000-2003 to 22% in 2004-2005, coinciding with the introduction of rapid HIV testing. Viral hepatitis prevention services can be incorporated into a busy STD clinic if staff and resources are available. Rapid HIV testing may be associated with lower receipt of anti-HCV test results.

  2. Bloodborne Viral Hepatitis Infections among Drug Users: The Role of Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Lugoboni, Fabio; Quaglio, Gianluca; Civitelli, Paolo; Mezzelani, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    Drug use is a prevalent world-wide phenomenon and hepatitis virus infections are traditionally a major health problem among drug users (DUs). HBV and HCV, and to a lesser extent HAV, are easily transmitted through exposure to infected blood and body fluids. Viral hepatitis is not inevitable for DUs. Licensed vaccines are available for hepatitis A and hepatitis B. The purpose of this overview is to show some epidemiological data about HBV and the other blood-borne viral hepatitis among DUs and to summarize and discuss use of hepatitis vaccinations in this population. Successful vaccination campaigns among DUs are feasible and well described. We try to focus on the most significant results achieved in successful vaccination programs as reported in scientific literature. Vaccination campaigns among DUs represent a highly effective form of health education and they are cost-saving. PMID:19440291

  3. 78 FR 64221 - CDC/HRSA Advisory Committee on HIV, Viral Hepatitis and STD Prevention and Treatment; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration CDC/HRSA Advisory Committee on HIV, Viral... meeting. Name: CDC/HRSA Advisory Committee on HIV, Viral Hepatitis and STD Prevention and Treatment Dates... related to prevention and control of HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis and other STDs, the support of health...

  4. [Latest Treatment of Viral Hepatitis--Overcoming Hepatitis C and Reactivation of Hepatitis B].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yasuhito

    2016-02-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV), discovered as causative viruses of post-transfusion hepatitis, become persistent infections, leading to chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). For HCV, recent IFN-free direct-acting antiviral (DAA) therapies have increased sustained virological response (SVR) rates and reduced adverse events. IFN-based therapies, still the standard of care in Asian countries, are influenced by IL28B genetic variants and the liver fibrosis stage, but the DAA combinations obscure the influence of these factors. These new therapies can eradicate HCV and prevent HCC development. On the other hand, it is difficult to eradicate HBV completely. Although HBV infection can be prevented by vaccination, reactivation of HBV following anti-cancer chemotherapy and immunosuppressive therapy is a well-known complication. HBV reactivation has been reported to be associated with anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab-containing chemotherapy and TNF-α inhibitor-containing immunosuppressive therapy in HBV-resolved patients. Our prospective observational study revealed that monthly monitoring of HBV DNA was useful for preventing HBV reactivation-related hepatitis among B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma patients with resolved HBV infection following rituximab-steroid-chemo, suggesting that preemptive therapy guided by serial HBV DNA monitoring should be recommended. Recently, highly sensitive HBsAg detection by Lumipulse HBsAg-HQ may be useful for several clinical applications. The sensitivity of this assay (5 mIU/mL) was approximately 10-fold higher than Abbott ARCHITECT, but still lower than HBV-DNA assays. The convenient HBsAg-HQ may be useful for detecting occult HBV infection and HBV reactivation in relatively low-risk groups except for those receiving rituximab-steroid-chemo. [

  5. Hepatitis E virus: A leading cause of waterborne viral hepatitis in Northwest Districts of Punjab, India

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Maninder; Sidhu, Shailpreet K.; Singh, Kanwardeep; Devi, Pushpa; Kaur, Manpreet; Singh, Nachhatar Jit

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute viral hepatitis (AVH) caused by enterically transmitted hepatitis A virus (HAV) and hepatitis E virus (HEV) poses a major health problem in developing countries such as India. Despite improving sanitation, heath awareness, and socioeconomic conditions, these infections continue to occur both in sporadic as well as in epidemic forms in different parts of India. AIMS: The aim of this study is to determine the total as well as age-specific prevalence rates of HAV and HEV in the outbreaks of waterborne hepatitis in districts surrounding Amritsar region of Punjab. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study was conducted in the Virology Research and Diagnostic Laboratory, Government Medical College, Amritsar, during the study period of January 2015–March 2016. Samples from suspected outbreaks of AVH occurring in various districts around Amritsar were included as a part of the study. A total of 95 sera were tested for IgM antibody to HEV and HAV using IgM capture ELISA kit. RESULTS: Out of the total 95 samples received, 73 samples (76.84%) were positive for HAV/HEV. Out of the total positive cases, 65 (68.42%) had HEV infection, 2 (2.1%) had HAV, and 6 cases (6.31%) were coinfected with both HAV and HEV. The 21–30 years age group (25 cases) was identified as the most susceptible group for HEV infection. The coinfected subjects presented a wider range of age distribution (1–10 years: 1; 11–20 years: 3; 21–30 years: 1; 31–40 years: 1). Seasonal distribution of data revealed bimodal peaks for HEV infection. CONCLUSION: There should be some surveillance system to regularly monitor the portability of drinking water from time to time to avoid such preventable outbreaks in future. PMID:28367028

  6. Late presentation of chronic viral hepatitis for medical care: a consensus definition.

    PubMed

    Mauss, Stefan; Pol, Stanislas; Buti, Maria; Duffell, Erika; Gore, Charles; Lazarus, Jeffrey V; der Grient, Hilje Logtenberg-van; Lundgren, Jens; Mozalevskis, Antons; Raben, Dorthe; Schatz, Eberhard; Wiktor, Stefan; Rockstroh, Jürgen K

    2017-05-03

    We present two consensus definitions of advanced and late stage liver disease being used as epidemiological tools. These definitions can be applied to assess the morbidity caused by liver diseases in different health care systems. We focus is on hepatitis B and C virus infections, because effective and well tolerated treatments for both of these infections have greatly improved our ability to successfully treat and prevent advanced and late stage disease, especially if diagnosed early. A consensus definition of late presentation with viral hepatitis is important to create a homogenous, easy-to-use reference for public health authorities in Europe and elsewhere to better assess the clinical situation on a population basis. A working group including viral hepatitis experts from the European Association for the Study of the Liver, experts from the HIV in Europe Initiative, and relevant stakeholders including patient advocacy groups, health policy-makers, international health organisations and surveillance experts, met in 2014 and 2015 to develop a draft consensus definition of late presentation with viral hepatitis for medical care. This was refined through subsequent consultations among the group. Two definitions were agreed upon. Presentation with advanced liver disease caused by chronic viral hepatitis for medical care is defined as a patient with chronic hepatitis B and C and significant fibrosis (≥ F3 assessed by either APRI score > 1.5, FIB-4 > 3.25, Fibrotest > 0.59 or alternatively transient elastography (FibroScan) > 9.5 kPa or liver biopsy ≥ METAVIR stage F3) with no previous antiviral treatment. Late stage liver disease caused by chronic viral hepatitis is clinically defined by the presence of decompensated cirrhosis (at least one symptom of the following: jaundice, hepatic encephalopathy, clinically detectable ascites, variceal bleeding) and/or hepatocellular carcinoma. These consensus definitions will help to improve

  7. Prevention of hepatitis B in Italy: lessons from surveillance of type-specific acute viral hepatitis. SEIEVA Collaborating Group.

    PubMed Central

    Mele, A.; Stazi, M. A.; Gill, O. N.; Pasquini, P.

    1990-01-01

    The relative contribution of various risk factors to the incidence of acute hepatitis B in Italy was estimated using a special surveillance system (SEIEVA) for type-specific acute viral hepatitis. At present 146 health departments (USLs) which contain 21% of the Italian population participate in SEIEVA out of the total of 650. Data on 2460 hepatitis B cases and 708 hepatitis A cases were compared. Hospitalization, surgical intervention, dental therapy, other percutaneous exposures, barber shop shaving, i.v. drug abuse and household contact with HBsAg carriers were associated with acute hepatitis B and a large number of cases were attributable to these risk factors. Because the control programme based on vaccination will not be effective in the short term at reducing hepatitis B incidence, other additional interventions are recommended. PMID:2307181

  8. Prevalence of hepatitis A virus, hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, hepatitis D virus and hepatitis E virus as causes of acute viral hepatitis in North India: a hospital based study.

    PubMed

    Jain, P; Prakash, S; Gupta, S; Singh, K P; Shrivastava, S; Singh, D D; Singh, J; Jain, A

    2013-01-01

    Acute viral hepatitis (AVH) is a major public health problem and is an important cause of morbidity and mortality. The aim of the present study is to determine the prevalence of hepatitis A virus (HAV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), hepatitis D virus (HDV) and hepatitis E virus (HEV) as causes of AVH in a tertiary care hospital of North India. Blood samples and clinical information was collected from cases of AVH referred to the Grade I viral diagnostic laboratory over a 1-year period. Samples were tested for hepatitis B surface antigen, anti-HCV total antibodies, anti-HAV immunoglobulin M (IgM) and anti-HEV IgM by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. PCR for nucleic acid detection of HBV and HCV was also carried out. Those positive for HBV infection were tested for anti-HDV antibodies. Fisher's exact test was used and a P < 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Of the 267 viral hepatitis cases, 62 (23.22%) patients presented as acute hepatic failure. HAV (26.96%) was identified as the most common cause of acute hepatitis followed by HEV (17.97%), HBV (16.10%) and HCV (11.98%). Co-infections with more than one virus were present in 34 cases; HAV-HEV co-infection being the most common. HEV was the most important cause of acute hepatic failure followed by co-infection with HAV and HEV. An indication towards epidemiological shift of HAV infection from children to adults with a rise in HAV prevalence was seen. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report indicating epidemiological shift of HAV in Uttar Pradesh.

  9. Evidence for hepatitis C viral infection in patients with primary hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Tong, M J; Lee, S Y; Hwang, S J; Co, R L; Lai, P P; Chien, D; Kuo, G

    1994-01-01

    In testing for antibodies to the hepatitis C virus (anti-HCV) in 112 patients with primary hepatocellular carcinoma, 10 of 33 white patients (30%) and 15 of 79 Asian patients (19%) had a positive response to the antibody. The antibody profile to individual hepatitis C viral antigens and the presence of circulating hepatitis C viral RNA were determined in the 25 patients. The anti-HCV antibodies most frequently detected were toward the antigens from the core (C22) and NS3 regions. Serum hepatitis C viral RNA was present in 17 of the 25 patients (68%), and these patients tended to have serum levels of alanine and aspartate aminotransferases higher than those patients without viremia (136 +/- 22 U per liter versus 64 +/- 11 U per liter and 161 +/- 26 U per liter versus 79 +/- 14 U per liter, respectively, both P < .05). Of the 15 Asian patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and anti-HCV, 4 (27%) had coexisting hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and 13 (87%) had antibodies to either hepatitis B core or surface antigen. Of the 10 white patients with anti-HCV, however, only 1 (10%) had hepatitis B virus antibodies (P < .01). Among 4 Asian patients with coexisting anti-HCV and HBsAg, 1 was found to have serum hepatitis B viral DNA and the other 3 had hepatitis C viral RNA. A history of blood transfusion was obtained from 12 of the 25 patients with anti-HCV (48%); 20 (80%) had coexisting cirrhosis. Our findings support the hypothesis that hepatitis C virus is an important etiologic agent in the development of primary hepatocellular carcinoma in both white and Asian patients in the United States. PMID:7512778

  10. Attenuated viral hepatitis in Trem1−/− mice is associated with reduced inflammatory activity of neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Kozik, Jan-Hendrik; Trautmann, Tanja; Carambia, Antonella; Preti, Max; Lütgehetmann, Marc; Krech, Till; Wiegard, Christiane; Heeren, Joerg; Herkel, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    TREM1 (Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells 1) is a pro-inflammatory receptor expressed by phagocytes, which can also be released as a soluble molecule (sTREM1). The roles of TREM1 and sTREM1 in liver infection and inflammation are not clear. Here we show that patients with hepatitis B virus (HBV) or hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection manifest elevated serum levels of sTREM1. In mice, experimental viral hepatitis induced by infection with Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus (LCMV)-WE was likewise associated with increased sTREM1 in serum and urine, and with increased TREM1 and its associated adapter molecule DAP12 in the liver. Trem1−/− mice showed accelerated clearance of LCMV-WE and manifested attenuated liver inflammation and injury. TREM1 expression in the liver of wild-type mice was mostly confined to infiltrating neutrophils, which responded to LCMV by secretion of CCL2 and TNF-α, and release of sTREM1. Accordingly, the production of CCL2 and TNF-α was decreased in the livers of LCMV-infected Trem1−/− mice, as compared to LCMV-infected wildtype mice. These findings indicate that TREM1 plays a role in viral hepatitis, in which it seems to aggravate the immunopathology associated with viral clearance, mainly by increasing the inflammatory activity of neutrophils. PMID:27328755

  11. Rifampicin-Induced Concomitant Renal Injury and Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Chogtu, Bharti; Surendra, Vyshak Uddur; Acharya, Preetam Rajgopal; Yerrapragada, Devesh Bhaskar

    2016-01-01

    Adverse drug reactions are not unusual during Anti-Tubercular Therapy (ATT). One of the common complications of anti-tubercular treatment is drug induced hepatitis and renal insufficiency has also been reported. Renal failure and/or hepatitis encountered during treatment of tuberculosis can have varied aetiologies: drug induced, concomitant viral infection, pre-existing co-morbidities or a combination of these. Since, hepatitis and/or renal insufficiency can be life threatening a prompt diagnosis is warranted, where drugs should be kept as one of the important cause. Identifying the drug helps in treating hepatitis and/or renal insufficiency along with helping the physician to change the combination of ATT regimen. Rifampicin is one of the most important first line drugs in the treatment of tuberculosis. Hepatitis, epigastric distress, anaemia, thrombocytopenia, and interstitial nephritis are reported adverse drug reactions to rifampicin. As per literature rifampicin induced renal toxicity is usually seen on rifampicin re-exposure, or rifampicin administration on alternate days, both being present in this case. Here we are reporting a case of ATT induced renal failure with concomitant hepatitis where rifampicin was suspected to be the cause. PMID:27790502

  12. Dysplastic Hepatocytes Develop Nuclear Inclusions in a Mouse Model of Viral Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Priyanka; Lamoke, Folami; Chaffin, Joanna M.; Bartoli, Manuela; Lee, Jeffrey R.; Duncan, Michael B.

    2014-01-01

    Viral hepatitis resulting in chronic liver disease is an important clinical challenge and insight into the cellular processes that drive pathogenesis will be critical in order to develop new diagnostic and therapeutic options. Nuclear inclusions in viral and non-viral hepatitis are well documented and have diagnostic significance in some disease contexts. However, the origins and functional consequences of these nuclear inclusions remain elusive. To date the clinical observation of nuclear inclusions in viral and non-viral hepatitis has not been explored at depth in murine models of liver disease. Herein, we report that in a transgenic model of hepatitis B surface antigen mediated hepatitis, murine hepatocytes exhibit nuclear inclusions. Cells bearing nuclear inclusions were more likely to express markers of cell proliferation. We also established a correlation between these inclusions and oxidative stress. N-acetyl cysteine treatment effectively reduced oxidative stress levels, relieved endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and the number of nuclear inclusions we observed in the transgenic mice. Our results suggest that the presence of nuclear inclusions in hepatocytes correlates with oxidative stress and cellular proliferation in a model of antigen mediated hepatitis. PMID:24932583

  13. Toll-like receptor 2 senses hepatitis C virus core protein but not infectious viral particles

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Marco; Zeisel, Mirjam B.; Jilg, Nikolaus; Paranhos-Baccalà, Glaucia; Stoll-Keller, Françoise; Wakita, Takaji; Hafkemeyer, Peter; Blum, Hubert E.; Barth, Heidi; Henneke, Philipp; Baumert, Thomas F.

    2009-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are pathogen recognition molecules activating the innate immune system. Cell surface expressed TLRs, such as TLR2 and TLR4 have been shown to play an important role in human host defenses against viruses through sensing of viral structural proteins. In this study, we aimed to elucidate whether TLR2 and TLR4 participate in inducing antiviral immunity against hepatitis C virus by sensing viral structural proteins. We studied TLR2 and TLR4 activation by cell-culture derived infectious virions (HCVcc) and serum-derived virions in comparison to purified recombinant HCV structural proteins and enveloped virus-like particles. Incubation of TLR2 or TLR4 transfected cell lines with recombinant core protein resulted in activation of TLR2-dependent signaling. In contrast, neither infectious virions nor enveloped HCV-like particles triggered TLR2 and TLR4 signaling. These findings suggest that monomeric HCV core protein but not intact infectious particles are sensed by TLR2. Impairment of core-TLR interaction in infectious viral particles may contribute to escape from innate antiviral immune responses. PMID:20375602

  14. Immunological and molecular epidemiological characteristics of acute and fulminant viral hepatitis A.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Zahid; Husain, Syed A; Almajhdi, Fahad N; Kar, Premashis

    2011-05-23

    Hepatitis A virus is an infection of liver; it is hyperendemic in vast areas of the world including India. In most cases it causes an acute self limited illness but rarely fulminant. There is growing concern about change in pattern from asymptomatic childhood infection to an increased incidence of symptomatic disease in the adult population. In-depth analysis of immunological, viral quantification and genotype of acute and fulminant hepatitis A virus. Serum samples obtained from 1009 cases of suspected acute viral hepatitis was employed for different biochemical and serological examination. RNA was extracted from blood serum, reverse transcribed into cDNA and amplified using nested PCR for viral quantification, sequencing and genotyping. Immunological cell count from freshly collected whole blood was carried out by fluorescence activated cell sorter. Fulminant hepatitis A was mostly detected with other hepatic viruses. CD8+ T cells count increases in fulminant hepatitis to a significantly high level (P = 0.005) compared to normal healthy control. The immunological helper/suppressor (CD4+/CD8+) ratio of fulminant hepatitis was significantly lower compared to acute cases. The serologically positive patients were confirmed by RT-PCR and total of 72 (69.2%) were quantified and sequenced. The average quantitative viral load of fulminant cases was significantly higher (P < 0.05). There was similar genotypic distribution in both acute and fulminant category, with predominance of genotype IIIA (70%) compared to IA (30%). Immunological factors in combination with viral load defines the severity of the fulminant hepatitis A. Phylogenetic analysis of acute and fulminant hepatitis A confirmed genotypes IIIA as predominant against IA with no preference of disease severity.

  15. Immunological and molecular epidemiological characteristics of acute and fulminant viral hepatitis A

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Hepatitis A virus is an infection of liver; it is hyperendemic in vast areas of the world including India. In most cases it causes an acute self limited illness but rarely fulminant. There is growing concern about change in pattern from asymptomatic childhood infection to an increased incidence of symptomatic disease in the adult population. Objective In-depth analysis of immunological, viral quantification and genotype of acute and fulminant hepatitis A virus. Methods Serum samples obtained from 1009 cases of suspected acute viral hepatitis was employed for different biochemical and serological examination. RNA was extracted from blood serum, reverse transcribed into cDNA and amplified using nested PCR for viral quantification, sequencing and genotyping. Immunological cell count from freshly collected whole blood was carried out by fluorescence activated cell sorter. Results Fulminant hepatitis A was mostly detected with other hepatic viruses. CD8+ T cells count increases in fulminant hepatitis to a significantly high level (P = 0.005) compared to normal healthy control. The immunological helper/suppressor (CD4+/CD8+) ratio of fulminant hepatitis was significantly lower compared to acute cases. The serologically positive patients were confirmed by RT-PCR and total of 72 (69.2%) were quantified and sequenced. The average quantitative viral load of fulminant cases was significantly higher (P < 0.05). There was similar genotypic distribution in both acute and fulminant category, with predominance of genotype IIIA (70%) compared to IA (30%). Conclusions Immunological factors in combination with viral load defines the severity of the fulminant hepatitis A. Phylogenetic analysis of acute and fulminant hepatitis A confirmed genotypes IIIA as predominant against IA with no preference of disease severity. PMID:21605420

  16. Membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis and mixed cryoglobulinemia after hepatitis C virus infection secondary to glomerular NS3 viral antigen deposits.

    PubMed

    Bataille, Stanislas; Kaplanski, Gilles; Boucraut, José; Halfon, Philippe; Camus, Claire; Daniel, Laurent; Burtey, Stéphane; Berland, Yvon; Dussol, Bertrand

    2012-01-01

    We report on 3 cases of membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis associated with mixed cryoglobulin in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) antibodies but a negative blood viral load. These cases explore the pathogenesis of the renal disease. We searched for occult HCV infection in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, cryoprecipitate, bone marrow cells, and glomeruli using ultrasensitive PCR assays and immunohistochemistry. We also looked for infraclinical B cell lymphoma by computed tomodensitometry, bone marrow aspiration and biopsy, and lymphocyte typing. By PCR assays, we did not evidence occult hepatitis C infection in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, bone marrow cells, or cryoprecipitates. In the only patient with available kidney specimen, we evidenced HCV-NS3 antigen in glomeruli. HCV-associated lymphoma was excluded, but mild polyclonal B lymphocytosis was present in the 3 patients. Remission occurred spontaneously in 1 patient, and in another patient it occurred after rituximab treatment. The third patient was lost to follow-up. In patients with hepatitis C-negative viral load, membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis could be induced by the persistence of HCV antigen in the kidney but not in hematopoietic cells. Nonlymphomatous B cell proliferation may also be induced by chronic viral stimulation. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Viral hepatitis and anti-phospholipid antibodies positivity: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Ambrosino, Pasquale; Lupoli, Roberta; Tarantino, Paolo; Di Minno, Alessandro; Tarantino, Luciano; Di Minno, Matteo Nicola Dario

    2015-06-01

    Anti-phospholipid antibodies positivity is associated with several clinical conditions, including infectious diseases. We performed a meta-analysis evaluating the association of hepatitis B and C with anti-phospholipid antibody positivity and with anti-phospholipid antibody-related thrombotic complications. Studies evaluating the association of viral hepatitis with anti-cardiolipin, anti-β2 glycoprotein-I and lupus anticoagulant antibodies and anti-phospholipid antibody-related thrombotic events were systematically searched. 20 studies (2319 cases, 1901 controls) were included. The analyses showed that viral hepatitis is associated with the presence of anti-cardiolipin and anti-β2 glycoprotein-I antibodies. The association with anticardiolipin antibodies was confirmed in both hepatitis B (OR 11.22, 95% CI: 6.68-18.84) and hepatitis C (OR 11.26, 95% CI: 6.82-18.59). Similarly, compared to controls, anti-β2 glycoprotein-I antibodies were found more frequently in hepatitis B (OR 14.07, 95% CI: 3.06-64.66) and hepatitis C (OR 5.64, 95% CI: 1.69-18.77). Moreover, 11 studies (257 cases, 1079 controls) showed a higher prevalence of venous and/or arterial thrombosis in patients with hepatitis and anti-cardiolipin antibody positivity compared hepatitis alone (OR 3.29, 95% CI: 1.79-6.07). This result was consistently confirmed in hepatitis C (OR 3.64, 95% CI: 1.78-7.46) but not in hepatitis B. Viral hepatitis is significantly associated with anti-phospholipid antibody positivity and with anti-phospholipid antibody-related thrombotic complications. Copyright © 2015 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Establishment of a viral hepatitis surveillance system--Pakistan, 2009-2011.

    PubMed

    2011-10-14

    Hepatitis A is thought to infect almost all persons living in Pakistan by age 15 years, and hepatitis E is responsible for sporadic infections and outbreaks. The prevalence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is estimated at 2.5% and the prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, estimated at 4.8%, is one of the highest rates in the world. Hepatitis surveillance in Pakistan has been syndromic, failing to confirm infection, distinguish among viruses, or collect information on risk factors. To understand the epidemiology of viral hepatitis in Pakistan more clearly, the Ministry of Health (MOH) asked the Pakistan Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Program (FELTP) to establish a hepatitis sentinel surveillance system in five large public hospitals in four provinces and Islamabad Capital Territory. This report describes the implementation of the viral hepatitis surveillance system in Pakistan and summarizes major findings from June 2010 through March 2011. A total of 712 cases of viral hepatitis were reported; newly reported HCV infection accounted for 53.2% of reported cases, followed by acute hepatitis A (19.8%), acute hepatitis E (12.2%), and newly reported HBV infection (10.8%). A history of health-care--related exposures, particularly receipt of therapeutic injections and infusions, commonly were reported by persons infected with HBV and HCV, and most patients reported drinking unboiled water. These findings point to the need for improved provider and community education about risks associated with unsafe injections, strengthening infection control practices in health facilities, increasing hepatitis B vaccination coverage, and improving access to clean drinking water in Pakistan.

  19. Hepatitis Due to Equine Abortion Virus. Comparison Between the Liver Histology in Human, Canine, Duckling, and Equine Viral Hepatitis1

    PubMed Central

    Corrêa, W. M.; Nilsson, M. R.

    1966-01-01

    Five livers of equine fetuses, aborted due to the action of equine abortion virus, five livers from men, two of whom died of epidemic hepatitis and three obtained by needle biopsies, 5 livers of dogs with infectious canine hepatitis and 7 livers of ducklings that had hepatitis, were studied histopathologically. The foals' livers were studied by several staining methods and the others by H. E. only. The results indicate that the lesions are quite similar in the four species with the appearance of nuclear inclusion bodies only in foals and dogs. The strong staining properties of the nuclear inclusion bodies in infectious canine hepatitis and the weak staining properties of the equine virus abortion reveal that the protein-DNA association is different resulting in a different electropolarity. The lesions in foals are of two main types, one a Necrotic-Mosaic Type in which the hepatocyte degeneration is irregularly distributed within the hepatic lobules and the other an Hyperplastic Type in which marked regeneration occurs. In the Hyperplastic Type the practical absence of plasmocytes in foals' livers might suggest that if the newborn is a female, abortions may occur later in life because the virus remained alive in colts which were born in an immune tolerance state. Histologically the picture in the livers of aborted foals assume features of a viral hepatitis similar to the viral hepatitis in men, dogs and ducklings. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2.Fig. 3.Fig. 4.Fig. 5.Fig. 6.Fig. 7.Fig. 8.Fig. 9. PMID:4225286

  20. Involvement of Interleukin 6 in Hepatitis B Viral Infection.

    PubMed

    Xia, Caixia; Liu, Yanning; Chen, Zhi; Zheng, Min

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B is a major global health problem and a potentially life-threatening liver infection caused by hepatitis B virus (HBV). Many cytokines including interleukin 6 (IL-6) have been shown to be involved in the HBV infection process. IL-6 is a typical cytokine made up of 184 amino acids, and the gene is located in chromosome 7p21. For healthy people, serum IL-6 levels are usually too low to be detected. However, dysregulated synthesis of IL-6 has been discovered in chronic inflammatory diseases such as hepatitis B, Crohn's disease and rheumatoid arthritis. IL-6 also plays an important role in HBV replication and in the development of hepatitis B disease. This review aims to present the latest discoveries concerning the role of IL-6 in hepatitis B disease progression, and HBV entry and replication, and evaluate polymorphisms that are associated with the development of hepatitis B disease.

  1. Acute viral hepatitis in Hong Kong: a study of recent incidences.

    PubMed

    Chau, T N; Lai, S T; Lai, J Y; Yuen, H

    1997-09-01

    Acute hepatitis patients admitted to a referral centre from January 1995 through December 1995 were studied to determine the seroprevalence of the hepatitis viruses and related risk factors. Of the 434 patients with acute viral hepatitis, the episodes due to hepatitis A, B, C, D, and non-A, non-B, non-C, (non-ABC) were 214 (49.3%), 163 (37.6%), 7 (1.6%), 0 (0%), and 50 (11.5%), respectively. Acute hepatitis A and non-ABC hepatitis commonly occur in late spring and early summer and are probably related to the intake of shellfish and travel to endemic areas. Approximately 60% of cases of symptomatic hepatitis B infection were acute exacerbations of chronic infection. Sexual exposure was the single most important risk factor for acute hepatitis B infection. The rarity of acute hepatitis C and D might be related to the low rate of intravenous drug use in our locality. Hepatitis E virus probably contributed significantly to the cases of non-ABC hepatitis. Further studies are needed to establish the importance of various causative agents of acute hepatitis in Hong Kong.

  2. Risperidone-induced cholestatic hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Krebs, S; Dormann, H; Muth-Selbach, U; Hahn, E G; Brune, K; Schneider, H T

    2001-01-01

    Risperidone, a widely used atypical and potent neuroleptic drug, is assumed to induce fewer hepatic side-effects than phenothiazine anti-psychotics. Recently, we observed a case of risperidone-induced cholestatic hepatotoxicity. A 37-year-old male developed a rapid increase in liver enzymes and cholestatic parameters after starting treatment with risperidone for paranoid psychosis. Work-up for other potential aetiologies was negative. The results of a percutaneous liver biopsy were consistent with drug-induced liver injury and cholestasis. Over the course of one month after the discontinuance of all anti-psychotic agents, the liver function test results returned to near-normal values. This observation supports the need to monitor cholestatic parameters in addition to liver function enzymes during initiation and the first weeks of risperidone intake.

  3. Acute viral hepatitis in Lebanon: evidence for a HAV-like non-A non-B hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Shamma'a, M H

    1984-02-01

    Ninety-three cases of acute viral hepatitis in adult Lebanese patients were followed-up prospectively for a period ranging from 6 to 18 months. These included 33 hepatitis A (HAV), 32 hepatitis B (HBV) and 21 non-A, non-B hepatitis (NANB) cases. The clinical and seroepidemiologic characteristics of the three types were evaluated. HAV was characterized by a short prodroma (less than 1 week) and a high IgM level. HBV did not differ from similar cases reported in the Western world except for a complete absence of male homosexuals and drug addicts as a possible route of transmission. NANB hepatitis in Lebanon is mainly a sporadic infection similar to HAV except that the prodromal phase is prolonged (greater than 14 days) and IgM levels are within normal limits. The failure to develop chronicity in NANB suggests that the virus of sporadic NANB may be different from that which causes post-transfusional (PTH) NANB.

  4. Hepatitis B virus nucleocapsid but not free core antigen controls viral clearance in mice.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Jiun; Wu, Hui-Lin; Chen, Ding-Shinn; Chen, Pei-Jer

    2012-09-01

    We have recently shown that hepatitis B virus (HBV) core antigen (HBcAg) is the major viral factor for HBV clearance using a hydrodynamics-based mouse model. Knockout of HBcAg hampers the development of antiviral immune responses and thus promotes HBV persistence. Here, we further demonstrated that only in the capsid form, but not the free or dimer form, can HBcAg exert its contributory role in HBV clearance. HBcAg is the main structural protein of HBV icosahedral nucleocapsid. A mutant HBV DNA which expresses an assembly-defective HBcAg, HBcAgY132A, surprisingly prolonged HBV surface antigenemia in both C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice without affecting viral transcription and translation. This result was not due to a loss of the possible immune epitope caused by the single-amino-acid substitution of HBcAg. Moreover, the particular HBV mutant failed to induce robust humoral and cellular immunity against HBV. These data revealed the requirement of capsid structure for inducing adequate immunity that leads to HBV clearance in mice.

  5. [Acute pancreatitis and acalculous cholecystitis associated with viral hepatitis A].

    PubMed

    Arcana, Ronald; Frisancho, Oscar

    2011-01-01

    We report the case of a 14 year-old male from Lima. He is a student with a history of bronchial asthma since age 4 receives conditional salbutamol, corticosteroids used for asthma attacks (a crisis in 2010, 1 month ago) Refuses surgery or transfusions. He presented with a two weeks for abdominal pain, nausea, fever, and jaundice. Epigastric pain is colicky and radiated back to righ upper quadrant, refers in addition to nausea and fever, for ten days notice jaundice of skin and sclera. On examen he was lucid, with jaundice of skin and mucous membranes. There was no palpable lymph nodes, abdomen with bowel sounds, soft, depressible, liver span of 15cm, positive Murphy, no peritonitis. The laboratory findings showed hemoglobin 13gr, MCV 90, platelets 461.000/mm3, WBC 4320/mm, lymphocytes 1700 (39%). total bilirubin: 8.8, B Direct: 7.6, ALT (alanine aminotransferase): 3016, AST (aspartate aminotransferase): 984, alkaline phosphatase: 250, albumin: 3.34gr%, globulin: 2.8, amylase: 589 (high serum amylase), TP: 17, INR: 1.6, VHA IgM positive. 89 mg glucose, urea 19 mg%, creatinine 0.5 mg Hemoglobin 13gr, MCV 90 Platelet 461000/mm3, WBC 4320/mm, Lymphocytes 1700 (39%). The nuclear magnetic resonance showed hepatomegaly associated with thickening of gallbladder wall without stones up to 11mm inside. No bile duct dilatation, bile duct 4mm, pancreas increased prevalence of body size. Mild splenomegaly and free fluid in the space of Morrison and right flank. Abdominal ultrasound revealed a gallbladder wall thickness (11mm), without stones in his light. Pancreas to increase volume with peripancreatic fluid free perivesicular with a volume of 430 cc. Findings consistent with acute acalculous cholecystitis and acute pancreatitis. CT-scan showed enlarged pancreas with predominance of body and tail with peripancreatic edema; the gallbladder was thickening. We report this case because the extrahepatic manifestations of viral hepatitis A infection are uncommon, specially the

  6. Establishment of mice model with human viral hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Li-Fen; Sun, Wen-Sheng; Ma, Chun-Hong; Liu, Su-Xia; Wang, Xiao-Yan; Zhang, Li-Ning; Cao, Ying-Lin; Zhu, Fa-Liang; Liu, Yu-Gang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To establish a mice model of hepatitis B by using HBV-transgenic mice, and to transfer HBV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) induced from syngeneic BALB/c mice immunized by a eukaryotic expression vector containing HBV complete genome DNA. METHODS: HBV DNA was obtained from digested pBR322-2HBV and ligated with the vector pcDNA3. Recombinant pcDNA3-HBV was identified by restriction endonuclease assay and transfected into human hepatoma cell line HepG2 with lipofectin. ELISA was used to detect the expression of HBsAg in culture supernatant, and RT-PCR to determine the existence of HBV PreS1 mRNA. BALB/c mice were immunized with pcDNA3-HBV or pcDNA3 by intramuscular injection. ELISA was used to detect the expression of HBsAb in serum. MTT assay was used to measure non-specific or specific proliferation ability and specific killing activity of spleen lymphocytes. Lymphocytes from immunized mice were transferred into HBV-transgenic mice (2.5 × 107 per mouse). Forty-eight hours later, the level of serum protein and transaminase was detected with biochemical method, liver and kidney were sectioned and stained by HE to observe the pathological changes. RESULTS: By enzyme digestion with Eco RI, Xho I and Hind III, the recombinant pcDNA3-HBV was verified to contain a single copy of HBV genome, which was inserted in the positive direction. HepG2 cells transfected with the recombinant could stably express PreS1 mRNA and HBsAg. After immunized by pcDNA3-HBV for 4 weeks, HBsAb was detected in the serum of BALB/c mice. The potential of spleen lymphocytes for both non-specific and specific proliferation and the specific killing activity against target cells were enhanced. The transgenic mice in model group had no significant changes in the level of serum protein but had an obvious increase of ALT and AST. The liver had obvious pathological changes, while the kidney had no evident damage. CONCLUSION: A eukaryotic expression vector pcDNA3-HBV containing HBV complete

  7. BREADTH SPREADING OF VIRAL HEPATITIS MARKERS IN THE RISK GROUPS IN THE REPUBLIC OF SAKHA (YAKUTIA).

    PubMed

    Sleptsova, S S; Semenova, V K; Dyatchkovskaya, P S; Nikitina, S G

    2015-01-01

    Republic of Sakha (Yakutia) is a hyperendemic region of Russian Federation for spreading of parenteral viral hepatitis B, C and D. In risk groups of these diseases are firstly medical personnel, who contacting with infection carriers including latent infections family and members of families of chronic viral hepatitis carriers. To reveal the breadth of spreading of viral hepatitis markers in the risk groups. The level of HBV- and HC- infection were determined in medical staff of large multi specialty hospital and family members of people with viral hepatitis B and C. Epidemiological, clinical, serological and molecular biology methods of viral hepatitis diagnostics were applied in this study. Results of this study showed that the staff at surgery and hematology departments and all nursing staff belong to the high-risk of HBV-infection groups. Therefore, they are a priority for active immunization. Attention is paid on the fact that infectivity of medical staff is not equally distributed in dependence on type of department and position of medical staff. Rate HBV-marker detecting in "family hearths" was dependent on degree of interrelationship with infection source. According received information, in families of patientwith chronic hepatitis B spreading of infection was higher (77.6%) then in families of patients with acute hepatitis B (39.7%). At primary examination of families an anti-HCV was detected in 9.3 ± 1.8% cases, i.e. the spreading of HCV was at low-activity. Results of our study on spreading of hepatitis B and C in Yakutia showed the high rate of appearance of HCV and HBV markers in the risk groups.

  8. Fatal hepatitis E viral infection in pregnant women in Ghana: a case series

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Viral infections during pregnancy can pose serious threats to mother and fetus from the time of conception to the time of delivery. These lead to congenital defects, spontaneous abortion and even death. The definitive diagnosis and management of pregnancy-related viral infections may be challenging especially in less resourced countries. Case presentation We present clinical and laboratory responses to the diagnosis and management of three cases of fulminant hepatitis secondary to Hepatitis E viral infection in pregnancy. Case 1 was a 31-year-old Ghanaian woman who presented with a week’s history of passing dark urine as well as yellowish discoloration of the eyes. She subsequently developed fulminant hepatitis secondary to Hepatitis E viral infection, spontaneously aborted at 24 weeks of gestation and later died. Case 2 was also a 31-year-old Ghanaian woman who was admitted with a four-day history of jaundice. She had low grade fever, but no history of abdominal pain, haematuria, pale stool or pruritus. She next developed fulminant hepatitis secondary to Hepatitis E viral infection. However, she did not miscarry but died at 28 weeks of gestation. Case 3 was a 17-year-old Ghanaian woman who was referred to the tertiary health facility on account of jaundice and anaemia. She had delivered a live male infant at maturity of 32 weeks but noticed she was jaundiced and had a presentation of active disease 3 days prior to delivery. The baby was icteric at birth and on evaluation, had elevated bilirubin (mixed type) with normal liver enzymes. Hepatitis E virus infection was confirmed in both mother and baby. However, the jaundice and the hepatomegaly resolved in mother and baby after 5 and 12 days respectively. Conclusion To the best of our knowledge, these are the first documented cases of fatal fulminant hepatic failures resulting from HEV infection in Ghana. PMID:22937872

  9. Status of viral hepatitis in the world community: its incidence among dentists and other dental personnel.

    PubMed

    Mori, M

    1984-06-01

    Viral hepatitis is a major public health problem, occurring endemically in all areas of the world. The prevalence of the disease is influenced by numerous factors which may be able to modulate its onset. Study of the epidemiology of viral hepatitis in different geographical, ethnic, social and genetic groups as well as immunological and individual factors has contributed much to our understanding of the disease. Hepatitis viruses are classified into A (infectious hepatitis), B (serum hepatitis) and non-A, non-B. The transmission of hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a potential hazard in dental practice. A number of reports suggest a significantly higher incidence of hepatitis among dentists than in the general population and also higher rates of hepatitis in certain specialists, especially oral surgeons, periodontists and endodontists, than in general dentists. Vectors of infection with HBV in dental practice are blood, saliva and nasopharyngeal secretions. The incidence of hepatitis B in dental practitioners is influenced by the exposure to infection, the type of practice, the number of years of professional experience and antibody response. HBV may be spread by dentists and dental students, by dental auxiliaries and by other personnel closely associated with clinical practice, who are antigen positive carriers but have no clinical symptoms. Therefore, dentists and their staff should know well the risk of infection from their patients, the risk of cross-infection between patients, and the risk of infecting each other.

  10. Inhibition of viral replication reduces regulatory T cells and enhances the antiviral immune response in chronic hepatitis B

    SciTech Connect

    Stoop, Jeroen N. . E-mail: j.n.stoop@erasmusmc.nl; Molen, Renate G. van der . E-mail: r.vandermolen@erasmusmc.nl; Kuipers, Ernst J. . E-mail: e.j.kuipers@erasmusmc.nl; Kusters, Johannes G. . E-mail: j.g.kusters@erasmusmc.nl; Janssen, Harry L.A. . E-mail: h.janssen@erasmusmc.nl

    2007-04-25

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) play a key role in the impaired immune response that is typical for a chronic Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. To gain more insight in the mechanism that is responsible for this impaired immune response, the effect of viral load reduction resulting from treatment with the nucleotide analogue adefovir dipivoxil on the percentages of Treg and HBV-specific T-cell responses was analyzed. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of 12 patients were collected at baseline and during treatment. In parallel to the decline in viral load, we found a decline in circulating Treg, combined with an increase in HBV core antigen-specific IFN-{gamma} production and proliferation. The production of IL10 did not decrease during therapy. In conclusion, adefovir induced viral load reduction results in a decline of circulating Treg together with a partial recovery of the immune response.

  11. Viral Hepatitis in the United States Navy and Marine Corps 1

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Charles E.

    1976-01-01

    Two analyses of the Navy and Marine Corps experience with viral hepatitis are reported. The first is longitudinal in nature and shows that over the past 100 years the syndrome has been common and at a relatively steady rate of 100-400 cases/100,000 average strength/year. The second is an examination of cases in calendar year 1974 for demographic, geographic, and occupational patterns. There is a strong inverse relationship between disease occurrence and age. Each type of viral hepatitis shows a distinct geographic distribution. Navy personnel in health-related occupations had a greater risk of acquiring viral hepatitis than did other persons on active duty. Differences among other occupational groups were found, but valid interpretations could not be made because of the small numbers of cases in each category. PMID:960729

  12. CRISPR/Cas9 cleavage of viral DNA efficiently suppresses hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed

    Ramanan, Vyas; Shlomai, Amir; Cox, David B T; Schwartz, Robert E; Michailidis, Eleftherios; Bhatta, Ankit; Scott, David A; Zhang, Feng; Rice, Charles M; Bhatia, Sangeeta N

    2015-06-02

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is prevalent, deadly, and seldom cured due to the persistence of viral episomal DNA (cccDNA) in infected cells. Newly developed genome engineering tools may offer the ability to directly cleave viral DNA, thereby promoting viral clearance. Here, we show that the CRISPR/Cas9 system can specifically target and cleave conserved regions in the HBV genome, resulting in robust suppression of viral gene expression and replication. Upon sustained expression of Cas9 and appropriately chosen guide RNAs, we demonstrate cleavage of cccDNA by Cas9 and a dramatic reduction in both cccDNA and other parameters of viral gene expression and replication. Thus, we show that directly targeting viral episomal DNA is a novel therapeutic approach to control the virus and possibly cure patients.

  13. CE: Viral Hepatitis: New U.S. Screening Recommendations, Assessment Tools, and Treatments.

    PubMed

    Dan, Corinna; Moses-Eisenstein, Michelle; Valdiserri, Ronald O

    2015-07-01

    Over the past 15 years, the incidences of hepatitis A and B virus infection in the United States have declined significantly. By contrast, the incidence of hepatitis C virus infection, formerly stable or in decline, has increased by 75% since 2010. Suboptimal therapies of the past, insufficient provider awareness, and low screening rates have hampered efforts to improve diagnosis, management, and treatment of viral hepatitis. New screening recommendations, innovations in assessment and treatment, and an updated action plan from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) seem likely to lead to significant progress in the coming years. This article reviews the epidemiology, natural history, and diagnosis of viral hepatitis; discusses new screening recommendations, assessment tools, and treatments; and outlines the HHS action plan, focusing on the role of nurses in prevention and treatment.

  14. Diagnosis and treatment of chronic viral hepatitis B and C: doctrinary approach.

    PubMed

    Husic-Selimovic, Azra; Vukobrat-Bijedic, Zora; Bevanda, Milenko; Mesihovic, Rusmir; Zerem, Enver; Ahmetagic, Sead; Trbojevic, Stevan; Verhaz, Antonija; Kezic, Zdravka; Zildzic, Muharem; Bojanic, Janja; Petrovic, Jasminka; Stojic, Vildana; Ferhatovic, Merdina; Ibrahimpasic, Nevzeta; Mrdjen, Visnja; Zivlak, Nera; Barac, Tatjana; Bebek-Ivankovic, Helien; Calkic, Lejla; Karin, Maja; Dobrovoljski, Aleksandar; Rajic, Romana; Skrbic, Milan; Babic, Nenad; Bevanda-Glibo, Daniela

    2012-01-01

    Association of Gastroenterologists and Hepatologists of Bosnia and Herzegovina based on the experiences of domestic and foreign centers operating in the field of hepatology and accepted guidelines of the European and the U.S. Association for Liver Diseases adopted the consensus for the diagnosis and treatment of chronic viral hepatitis B and C. The guidelines are intended for specialists in gastroenterology and hepatology, and infectious diseases physicians working in primary health care and family medicine, but also other physicians who are confronted with this disease in their practice, with the aim of facilitating and shortening the diagnostic and treatment protocols of patients with chronic viral hepatitis B and C. This ensures faster, more efficient, more rational and cost-effective care of patients with hepatitis, with an emphasis on stopping the deterioration of liver disease to liver cirrhosis and eventually hepatocellular carcinoma. Key words: Chronic hepatitis B and

  15. [A case of sustained cholestasis caused by acute A viral hepatitis in Dubin-Johnson syndrome].

    PubMed

    Ra, Sang Ho; Sung, Se Yong; Jung, Ho Yeon; Cha, Jae Hwang; Baik, Soon Koo; Cho, Mee Yon; Kim, Moon Young

    2012-04-01

    Dubin-Johnson syndrome is a rare clinical entity. It shows intermittent symptoms such as chronic or intermittent jaundice, abdominal pain, weakness, nausea, vomiting, anorexia and diarrhea. Symptoms are precipitated or aggravated by pregnancy, alcoholism, surgical procedures and intercurrent disease. Chronic idiopathic jaundice is typical of Dubin-Johnson syndrome and its prognosis is good. We describe a case of prolonged cholestasis for more than 10 months caused by acute A viral hepatitis in a patient with Dubin-Johnson syndrome. It is a first report of cholestasis complicated by acute A viral hepatitis in a patient with Dubin-Johnson syndrome.

  16. Cirrhosis regression in patients with viral hepatitis B and C: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Manne, Vignan; Akhtar, Ehsaan; Saab, Sammy

    2014-10-01

    Cirrhosis is a major milestone in patients with chronic liver disease because of its impact on patient morbidity and mortality. Chronic hepatitis B (CHB) and hepatitis C (CHC) are important causes of cirrhosis. This systematic review examines the relevant literature and evidence to assess whether cirrhosis can be reversible in patients with cirrhosis from viral hepatitis through long viral suppression. A MEDLINE and Cochrane Library search was conducted to identify all articles pertinent to the subject matter. Fourteen publications were included in the final analysis: 4 hepatitis B studies and 10 hepatitis C studies. Data abstracted from individual studies included patient demographics, antiviral therapy used, length of treatment, liver biopsy scoring system, length of biopsy, and time between biopsies. In CHB, the 7 studies reviewed included a total of 463 cirrhotic patients. Regression of cirrhosis was noted in a median of 70% (range, 33% to 80%) of patients. In CHC, the 13 studies reviewed included a total of 58 cirrhotic patients. Regression of cirrhosis was seen in a median of 64% (range, 33% to 100%) of patients with sustained viral response. The results of our review suggest that viral suppression in CHB and sustained virologic response in CHC can be associated with histologic regression of cirrhosis in select patients.

  17. Acute hepatitis induced by greater celandine (Chelidonium majus).

    PubMed

    Benninger, J; Schneider, H T; Schuppan, D; Kirchner, T; Hahn, E G

    1999-11-01

    The hepatotoxic potential of conventional drugs is well known, but herbal medicines are often assumed to be harmless. In the last 2 years, we have observed 10 cases of acute hepatitis induced by preparations of greater celandine (Chelidonium majus), which are frequently prescribed to treat gastric and biliary disorders. The course of hepatitis was mild to severe. Marked cholestasis was observed in 5 patients, but liver failure did not occur. Other possible causes of liver disease (viral, autoimmune, hereditary, alcohol, and secondary biliary) were excluded by laboratory tests and imaging procedures, and liver biopsy specimens were consistent with drug-induced damage. After discontinuation of greater celandine, rapid recovery was observed in all patients and liver enzyme levels returned to normal in 2-6 months. Unintentional rechallenge led to a second flare of hepatic inflammation in 1 patient. Greater celandine has to be added to the list of herbs capable of inducing acute (cholestatic) hepatitis. A significant proportion of unexplained cases of hepatitis may be caused by greater celandine.

  18. Effect of Quercetin on Hepatitis C Virus Life Cycle: From Viral to Host Targets.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Ángela; Del Campo, Jose A; Clement, Sophie; Lemasson, Matthieu; García-Valdecasas, Marta; Gil-Gómez, Antonio; Ranchal, Isidora; Bartosch, Birke; Bautista, Juan D; Rosenberg, Arielle R; Negro, Francesco; Romero-Gómez, Manuel

    2016-08-22

    Quercetin is a natural flavonoid, which has been shown to have anti hepatitis C virus (HCV) properties. However, the exact mechanisms whereby quercetin impacts the HCV life cycle are not fully understood. We assessed the effect of quercetin on different steps of the HCV life cycle in Huh-7.5 cells and primary human hepatocytes (PHH) infected with HCVcc. In both cell types, quercetin significantly decreased i) the viral genome replication; ii) the production of infectious HCV particles and iii) the specific infectivity of the newly produced viral particles (by 85% and 92%, Huh7.5 and PHH respectively). In addition, when applied directly on HCV particles, quercetin reduced their infectivity by 65%, suggesting that it affects the virion integrity. Interestingly, the HCV-induced up-regulation of diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) and the typical localization of the HCV core protein to the surface of lipid droplets, known to be mediated by DGAT, were both prevented by quercetin. In conclusion, quercetin appears to have direct and host-mediated antiviral effects against HCV.

  19. Effect of Quercetin on Hepatitis C Virus Life Cycle: From Viral to Host Targets

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Ángela; Del Campo, Jose A.; Clement, Sophie; Lemasson, Matthieu; García-Valdecasas, Marta; Gil-Gómez, Antonio; Ranchal, Isidora; Bartosch, Birke; Bautista, Juan D.; Rosenberg, Arielle R.; Negro, Francesco; Romero-Gómez, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Quercetin is a natural flavonoid, which has been shown to have anti hepatitis C virus (HCV) properties. However, the exact mechanisms whereby quercetin impacts the HCV life cycle are not fully understood. We assessed the effect of quercetin on different steps of the HCV life cycle in Huh-7.5 cells and primary human hepatocytes (PHH) infected with HCVcc. In both cell types, quercetin significantly decreased i) the viral genome replication; ii) the production of infectious HCV particles and iii) the specific infectivity of the newly produced viral particles (by 85% and 92%, Huh7.5 and PHH respectively). In addition, when applied directly on HCV particles, quercetin reduced their infectivity by 65%, suggesting that it affects the virion integrity. Interestingly, the HCV-induced up-regulation of diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) and the typical localization of the HCV core protein to the surface of lipid droplets, known to be mediated by DGAT, were both prevented by quercetin. In conclusion, quercetin appears to have direct and host-mediated antiviral effects against HCV. PMID:27546480

  20. Chronic Liver Disease in Peru: Role of Viral Hepatitis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    ceruloplasmin, ferritin, iron, antinuclear anti- by one-third of subjects) in 48% of chronic liver bodies (ANA), and antimitochondrial antibodies to rule...Rebagliati (R.F.) and Naval Medical Research Institute Detachment (I.A.P.), Lima, Peru The prevalence of antibodies to hepatitis C virus 19921. To...development of serologic assays for the abuse, defined as being repeatedly intoxicated at least detection of antibody to hepatitis C virus (anti-HCV

  1. Inorganic Nanoparticle as a Carrier for Hepatitis B Viral Capsids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekhtyar, Yu.; Romanova, M.; Kachanovska, A.; Skrastiņa, D.; Reinhofa, R.; Pumpens, P.; Patmalnieks, A.

    Virus like particles (VLP) are used to transport immune response-modulating agents to target cells to treat them. In order to deliver a high concentration of VLP to the cell, a number of VLP can be attached to a nanoparticle to be used as a nanolorry. In this study, SiO2 nanoparticles were attached to Hepatitis B VLP. Spectrophotometry measurements, electron, and fluorescent microscopy evidence showed that the SiO2 - Hepatitis B VLP complexes were formed.

  2. Chronic viral hepatitis: policy, regulation, and strategies for its control and elimination in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Shiferaw, Fassil; Letebo, Meketew; Bane, Abate

    2016-08-11

    Hepatitis B and C are silent killers not yet recognized as major public health challenges in many developing countries with huge disease burden. In Ethiopia, Hepatitis B is endemic with an average prevalence of 10.8 %, and the prevalence of Hepatitis C is 2 %. The prevalence of both infections, however, is likely to be underreported due to the lack of diagnostic facilities and appropriate surveillance systems. Ethiopia is also among the many Sub-Sahara African countries lacking a coordinated and systematic national response to chronic viral hepatitis. The objective of this study is to examine the current level of response to viral Hepatitis B & C in Ethiopia with the aim to bring identified gaps to the attention of relevant stakeholders and policy makers. This cross-sectional qualitative study was based on semi-structured in-depth interviews with 21 key informants from health facilities, health offices, pharmaceutical companies, regulatory bodies, professional association and blood bank units. Participants were selected purposively based on their role in the national hepatitis response. The investigators also reviewed available policy and strategy documents, standards of practice and surveys, and paid visits to pharmaceutical premises to check the availability of antiviral drugs. Thematic analysis was employed to make sense of the data. During the data analysis process, all the authors critically read the materials, and data was triangulated by source, interpreter view and thematic perspective to ensure accurate representation and comprehensiveness, and validation of the interviewees' responses. Once each investigator reviewed the data independently, the team reached a common understanding of the scope and contexts of the information attained. Data were subsequently reduced to key concepts, and case stories were taken with successive revisions. The key concepts were later coded into most basic meaningful categories. The World Health Organization (WHO) global

  3. 78 FR 32392 - CDC/HRSA Advisory Committee on HIV, Viral Hepatitis and STD Prevention and Treatment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-30

    ... CDC/HRSA Advisory Committee on HIV, Viral Hepatitis and STD Prevention and Treatment In accordance... Administrator, HRSA, regarding activities related to prevention and control of HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis and other STDs, the support of health care services to persons living with HIV/AIDS, and education of...

  4. Vaccine, Transmission and Treatment: An Exploratory Study of Viral Hepatitis Knowledge among Attendees of a Metropolitan Australian University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopwood, Max; Brener, Loren; Wilson, Hannah

    2012-01-01

    Aim: A cross-sectional study was conducted to explore knowledge of viral hepatitis among attendees of an Australian metropolitan university. Method: A short survey enquiring into viral hepatitis A, B and C (HAV, HBV and HCV, respectively) was administered to a convenience sample of people at a campus in Sydney, Australia during September 2011.…

  5. Vaccine, Transmission and Treatment: An Exploratory Study of Viral Hepatitis Knowledge among Attendees of a Metropolitan Australian University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopwood, Max; Brener, Loren; Wilson, Hannah

    2012-01-01

    Aim: A cross-sectional study was conducted to explore knowledge of viral hepatitis among attendees of an Australian metropolitan university. Method: A short survey enquiring into viral hepatitis A, B and C (HAV, HBV and HCV, respectively) was administered to a convenience sample of people at a campus in Sydney, Australia during September 2011.…

  6. Chromium-induced toxic hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Lança, Sara; Alves, Amanda; Vieira, Ana Isabel; Barata, José; de Freitas, João; de Carvalho, Alvaro

    2002-12-01

    A clinical case of acute hepatitis in a patient undergoing an alternative medicine weight-reduction regimen is reported. Chromium polynicotinate had been ingested in combination with vegetable extracts over a 5-month period. Liver biopsy was compatible with toxic hepatitis and greatly elevated hepatic chromium levels were found (>10x normal). The clinical picture regressed following suspension of the medication.

  7. Viral evolution and interferon resistance of hepatitis C virus RNA replication in a cell culture model.

    PubMed

    Sumpter, Rhea; Wang, Chunfu; Foy, Eileen; Loo, Yueh-Ming; Gale, Michael

    2004-11-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) replicates through an error-prone process that may support the evolution of genetic variants resistant to the host cell antiviral response and interferon (IFN)-based therapy. We evaluated HCV-IFN interactions within a long-term culture system of Huh7 cell lines harboring different variants of an HCV type 1b subgenomic RNA replicon that differed at only two sites within the NS5A-encoding region. A replicon with a K insertion at HCV codon 2040 replicated efficiently and exhibited sequence stability in the absence of host antiviral pressure. In contrast, a replicon with an L2198S point mutation replicated poorly and triggered a cellular response characterized by IFN-beta production and low-level IFN-stimulated gene (ISG) expression. When maintained in long term-culture, the L2198S RNA evolved into a stable high-passage (HP) variant with six additional point mutations throughout the HCV protein-encoding region that enhanced viral replication. The HP RNA transduced Huh7 cells with more than 1,000-fold greater efficiency than its L2198S progenitor or the K2040 sequence. Replication of the HP RNA resisted suppression by IFN-alpha treatment and was associated with virus-directed reduction in host cell expression of ISG56, an antagonist of HCV RNA translation. Accordingly, the HP RNA was retained within polyribosome complexes in vivo that were refractory to IFN-induced disassembly. These results identify ISG56 as a translational control effector of the host response to HCV and provide direct evidence to link this response to viral sequence evolution, ISG regulation, and selection of the IFN-resistant viral phenotype.

  8. High incidence of viral hepatitis among American missionaries in Africa.

    PubMed

    Lange, W R; Frame, J D

    1990-11-01

    Protestant missionaries (n = 360) serving in sub-Saharan Africa between 1967-1984 were studied to determine the risk of hepatitis A virus (HAV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Personnel were serologically screened for antibody to both the hepatitis A virus (anti-HAV) and the surface antigen to the hepatitis B virus (anti-HBs) prior to departure, periodically during service abroad, and upon completion of their African tour. Rates of seroconversion were used as measures of the incidence of infection. Prior to service, 16% of the staff had anti-HAV and 3% had anti-HBs; post-service rates were 42% and 26%, respectively. Over 90% of the staff with greater than 20 years of service were seropositive for anti-HAV. For both viruses, the infection rate was highest during the first 1-2 years of service, when 28% of those susceptible to HAV and 11% of those susceptible to HBV became infected. Over the next decade, the median annual attack rate was 5.4% for HAV and 4.2% for HBV. Differences in the missionary HBV infection rate among the various African nations served tended to reflect differences in the magnitude of chronic HBV carriage among indigenous population groups. We conclude that missionaries to sub-Saharan Africa are at enhanced risk of both HAV and HBV infection, and that all should receive passive immunization with immune globulin and active immunization with hepatitis B vaccine.

  9. Viral load reduction improves activation and function of natural killer cells in patients with chronic hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Tjwa, Eric T T L; van Oord, Gertine W; Hegmans, Joost P; Janssen, Harry L A; Woltman, Andrea M

    2011-02-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a major role in anti-viral immunity as first line defense and regulation of virus-specific T cell responses. This study aimed to investigate phenotype and function of NK cells in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and to study the effect of anti-viral therapy. Peripheral blood NK cells from 40 chronic HBV patients were compared to NK cells of 25 healthy controls. The effect of entecavir-induced viral load reduction on NK cell phenotype and function was investigated in 15 chronic HBV patients. NK cell numbers and subset distribution did not differ between HBV patients and normal subjects. In chronic HBV patients, the cytotoxic capacity was retained, but NK cell activation and subsequent IFNγ and TNFα production, especially of the CD56(dim) subset, were strongly hampered. This functional dichotomy was paralleled by an altered activation state, elevated expression of NKG2A, and downregulated expression of CD16 and NKp30, which correlated with serum HBV-DNA load. Anti-viral therapy partially restored NK cell phenotype, as shown by NKG2A downregulation. Moreover, viral replication inhibition improved IFNγ production as a result of an increased ability of CD56(dim) NK cells to become activated de novo. This improved NK cell activation and function which correlated with therapy-induced reduction in serum ALT levels, but not HBV-DNA load. The specific defect in CD56(dim) NK cell activation and the reduced capacity to produce anti-viral and Th1-skewing cytokines may play a role in HBV persistence. Restoration of this NK cell cytokine-producing capacity, as achieved by viral load reduction, could therefore contribute to definite clearance of the virus. Copyright © 2010 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. [Surveillance of viral hepatitis in Argentina: analysis of information from sentinel units 2007-2010].

    PubMed

    Vladimirsky, Sara; Silvina, Munné María; Otegui, Lucio; Altabert, Nancy; Soto, Sonia; Brajterman, Leonardo; Echenique, Horacio; González, Jorge

    2013-03-01

    In Argentina, the four strategies of epidemiological surveillance from the National System of Health Surveillance (SNVS) are Diseases of Mandatory Report (C2), Sentinel Units (SU), Laboratory Surveillance (SIVILA) and National Programs (National Plan of Blood, information from blood banks). They collect information about viral hepatitis (VH). The objective of this work was to analyze the information recorded by the SUs of VH for hepatitis B and C in the period between January 1th 2007 and December 31h 2010. In this period, out of the 1,769 cases recorded (entered by 21 of 24 SUs), 806 entries were hepatitis B, 848 hepatitis C and 115 belonged to other definitions. The relative proportions between hepatitis B and hepatitis C were heterogeneous between the SUs. The age distribution was homogeneous, being the predominant group in acute hepatitis B the 25- to 34-year-old group. In hepatitis C, the age distribution was broader. The distribution by sex and risk factors was heterogeneous between the different SUs. In hepatitis C, genotype 1 was the predominant one. In conclusion, the information provided by the SUs contributes as an evidence of the public health problem posed by this pathology in our country.

  11. [Dynamics of viral hepatitis A morbidity in Minsk].

    PubMed

    Orlova, S V; Petkevich, A S; Kretova, S F; Zaikina, T N; Rogacheva, T A; Shcherba, M A; Zasepskaia, D Iu; Fedorkova, V I; Ladut'ko, L S; Semenov, S F

    2005-01-01

    The results of the analysis of hepatitis A morbidity during the period of 1996 - 2001, are presented. The cyclic character of this morbidity in its dynamics over the period of several years was noted with the maximum morbidity level reached in 2000. The monthly dynamics of hepatitis A morbidity reflected its seasonal character with the maximum increase in autumn and winter. The virological control of drinking water revealed its contamination in spring and summer, with no subsequent rise in morbidity. The control of sewage reflected the emergence of the virus in the city collector in accordance with the increased morbidity.

  12. Inducible viral receptor, A possible concept to induce viral protection in primitive immune animals

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    A pseudolysogen (PL) is derived from the lysogenic Vibrio harveyi (VH) which is infected with the VHS1 (Vibrio harveyi Siphoviridae-like 1) bacteriophage. The lysogenic Vibrio harveyi undergoes an unequivalent division of the extra-chromosomal VHS1 phage genome and its VH host chromosome and produces a true lysogen (TL) and pseudolysogen (PL). The PL is tolerant to super-infection of VHS1, as is of the true lysogen (TL), but the PL does not contain the VHS1 phage genome while the TL does. However, the PL can become susceptible to VHS1 phage infection if the physiological state of the PL is changed. It is postulated that this is due to a phage receptor molecule which can be inducible to an on-and-off regulation influence by an alternating condition of the bacterial host cell. This characteristic of the PL leads to speculate that this phenomenon can also occur in high organisms with low immunity such as shrimp. This article proposes a hypothesis that the viral receptor molecule on the target cell can play a crucial role in which the invertebrate aquaculture animals can become tolerant to viral infection. A possible mechanism may be that the target cell disrupts the viral receptor molecule to prevent super infection. This concept can explain a mechanism for the prevention of viral infection in invertebrate animals which do not have acquired immunity in response to pathogens. It can guide us to develop a mechanism of immunity to viral infection in low-evolved-immune animals. Also, it can be an additional mechanism that exists in high immune organism, as in human for the prevention of viral infection PMID:21711515

  13. Web-based Distributed Medical Information System for Chronic Viral Hepatitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ying; Qin, Tuan-fa; Jiang, Jian-ning; Lu, Hui; Ma, Zong-e.; Meng, Hong-chang

    2008-11-01

    To make a long-term dynamic monitoring to the chronically ill, especially patients of HBV A, we build a distributed Medical Information System for Chronic Viral Hepatitis (MISCHV). The Web-based system architecture and its function are described, and the extensive application and important role are also presented.

  14. Epidemiology of Viral Hepatitis in Saudi Arabia: Are We Off the Hook?

    PubMed Central

    Abdo, Ayman A.; Sanai, Faisal M.; Al-Faleh, Faleh Z.

    2012-01-01

    Some 400 million people worldwide are currently infected with the hepatitis B virus (HBV), and the infection is common in the Middle East. Another 170 million people around the globe presently live with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Both HBV and HCV represent a worldwide epidemic. Despite significant decline in the prevalence of HBV and HCV infection in Saudi Arabia, these viral diseases cause significant morbidity and mortality, and impose a great burden on the country's healthcare system. On the other hand, Saudi epidemiology studies have shown that the hepatitis A virus seroprevalence in the country has reduced considerably over the past two decades. The progress in mapping the epidemiological pattern of viral hepatitis in Saudi Arabia has not only aided our understanding of the disease, but has also exposed the small but relevant gaps in our identification of the intricate details concerning the disease's clinical expression. In this review, we aim to document the timeline of viral hepatitis epidemiology in Saudi Arabia, while summarizing the relevant published literature on the subject. PMID:23150019

  15. Systematic analysis of funding awarded for viral hepatitis-related research to institutions in the United Kingdom, 1997–2010

    PubMed Central

    Head, M G; Fitchett, J R; Cooke, G S; Foster, G R; Atun, R

    2015-01-01

    Viral hepatitis is responsible for great health, social and economic burden both globally and in the UK. This study aimed to assess the research funding awarded to UK institutions for viral hepatitis research and the relationship of funded research to clinical and public health burden of viral hepatitis. Databases and websites were systematically searched for information on infectious disease research studies funded for the period 1997–2010. Studies specifically related to viral hepatitis research were identified and categorized in terms of funding by pathogen, disease and by a research and development value chain describing the type of science. The overall data set included 6165 studies (total investment £2.6 billion) of which £76.9 million (3.0%) was directed towards viral hepatitis across 323 studies (5.2%). By pathogen, there were four studies specifically investigating hepatitis A (£3.8 million), 69 studies for hepatitis B (21.4%) with total investment of £14.7 million (19.1%) and 236 (73.1%) hepatitis C studies (£62.7 million, 81.5%). There were 4 studies investigating hepatitis G, and none specifying hepatitis D or E. By associated area, viral hepatitis and therapeutics research received £17.0 million, vaccinology £3.1 million and diagnostics £2.9 million. Preclinical research received £50.3 million (65.4%) across 173 studies, whilst implementation and operational research received £19.4 million (25.3%) across 128 studies. The UK is engaged in much hepatology research, but there are areas where the burden is great and may require greater focus, such as hepatitis E, development of a vaccine for hepatitis C, and further research into hepatitis-associated cancers. Private sector data, and funding information from other countries, would also be useful in priority setting. PMID:25146854

  16. Systematic analysis of funding awarded for viral hepatitis-related research to institutions in the United Kingdom, 1997-2010.

    PubMed

    Head, M G; Fitchett, J R; Cooke, G S; Foster, G R; Atun, R

    2015-03-01

    Viral hepatitis is responsible for great health, social and economic burden both globally and in the UK. This study aimed to assess the research funding awarded to UK institutions for viral hepatitis research and the relationship of funded research to clinical and public health burden of viral hepatitis. Databases and websites were systematically searched for information on infectious disease research studies funded for the period 1997-2010. Studies specifically related to viral hepatitis research were identified and categorized in terms of funding by pathogen, disease and by a research and development value chain describing the type of science. The overall data set included 6165 studies (total investment £2.6 billion) of which £76.9 million (3.0%) was directed towards viral hepatitis across 323 studies (5.2%). By pathogen, there were four studies specifically investigating hepatitis A (£3.8 million), 69 studies for hepatitis B (21.4%) with total investment of £14.7 million (19.1%) and 236 (73.1%) hepatitis C studies (£62.7 million, 81.5%). There were 4 studies investigating hepatitis G, and none specifying hepatitis D or E. By associated area, viral hepatitis and therapeutics research received £17.0 million, vaccinology £3.1 million and diagnostics £2.9 million. Preclinical research received £50.3 million (65.4%) across 173 studies, whilst implementation and operational research received £19.4 million (25.3%) across 128 studies. The UK is engaged in much hepatology research, but there are areas where the burden is great and may require greater focus, such as hepatitis E, development of a vaccine for hepatitis C, and further research into hepatitis-associated cancers. Private sector data, and funding information from other countries, would also be useful in priority setting.

  17. Reducing the neglected burden of viral hepatitis in Africa: strategies for a global approach.

    PubMed

    Lemoine, Maud; Eholié, Serge; Lacombe, Karine

    2015-02-01

    The burden of liver disease may dramatically increase in the near future in Africa, where screening and access to care and treatment are hampered by inadequate disease surveillance, lack of high-quality tools to assess chronic liver disease, and underestimated needs for human and financial resources. Chronic hepatitis may be considered as silent and neglected killer, fuelled by many years of global inertia from stakeholders and policy makers alike. However, the global battle against viral hepatitis is facing a new era owing to the advent of highly effective drugs, innovative tools for screening and clinical follow-up, and recent signs that governments, advocacy groups and global health organizations are mobilizing to advocate universal access-to-treatment. This review details the barriers to prevention, screening and treatment of viral hepatitis on the African continent, focuses on the urgent need for operational and research programmes, and suggests integrated ways to tackle the global epidemic.

  18. The Dual Role of Exosomes in Hepatitis A and C Virus Transmission and Viral Immune Activation.

    PubMed

    Longatti, Andrea

    2015-12-17

    Exosomes are small nanovesicles of about 100 nm in diameter that act as intercellular messengers because they can shuttle RNA, proteins and lipids between different cells. Many studies have found that exosomes also play various roles in viral pathogenesis. Hepatitis A virus (HAV; a picornavirus) and Hepatitis C virus (HCV; a flavivirus) two single strand plus-sense RNA viruses, in particular, have been found to use exosomes for viral transmission thus evading antibody-mediated immune responses. Paradoxically, both viral exosomes can also be detected by plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) leading to innate immune activation and type I interferon production. This article will review recent findings regarding these two viruses and outline how exosomes are involved in their transmission and immune sensing.

  19. The Dual Role of Exosomes in Hepatitis A and C Virus Transmission and Viral Immune Activation

    PubMed Central

    Longatti, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Exosomes are small nanovesicles of about 100 nm in diameter that act as intercellular messengers because they can shuttle RNA, proteins and lipids between different cells. Many studies have found that exosomes also play various roles in viral pathogenesis. Hepatitis A virus (HAV; a picornavirus) and Hepatitis C virus (HCV; a flavivirus) two single strand plus-sense RNA viruses, in particular, have been found to use exosomes for viral transmission thus evading antibody-mediated immune responses. Paradoxically, both viral exosomes can also be detected by plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) leading to innate immune activation and type I interferon production. This article will review recent findings regarding these two viruses and outline how exosomes are involved in their transmission and immune sensing. PMID:26694453

  20. Hepatitis C: viral and host factors associated with non-response to pegylated interferon plus ribavirin

    PubMed Central

    Asselah, Tarik; Estrabaud, Emilie; Bieche, Ivan; Lapalus, Martine; De Muynck, Simon; Vidaud, Michel; Saadoun, David; Soumelis, Vassili; Marcellin, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Treatment for chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has evolved considerably in the last years. The standard of care (SOC) for HCV infection consists in the combination of pegylated interferon (PEG-IFN) plus ribavirin. However, it only induces a sustained virological response (SVR) in half of genotype 1-infected patients. Several viral and host factors have been associated with non-response: steatosis, obesity, insulin resistance, age, male sex, ethnicity and genotypes. Many studies have demonstrated that in non-responders, some interferon-stimulated genes were upregulated before treatment. Those findings associated to clinical, biochemical and histological data may help detect responders before starting any treatment. This is a very important issue because the standard treatment is physically and economically demanding. The future of HCV treatment would probably consist in the addition of specifically targeted antiviral therapy for HCV such as protease and/or polymerase inhibitors to the SOC. In genotype 1 patients, very promising results have been reported when the protease inhibitor telaprevir or boceprevir is added to the SOC. It increases the SVR rates from approximately 50% (PEG-IFN plus ribavirin) to 70% (for patients treated with a combination of PEG-IFN plus ribavirin plus telaprevir). Different elements are associated with non-response: (i) viral factors, (ii) host factors and (iii) molecular mechanisms induced by HCV proteins to inhibit the IFN signalling pathway. The goal of this review is to present the mechanisms of non-response, to overcome it and to identify factors that can help to predict the response to anti-HCV therapy. PMID:20633102

  1. Hepatitis B Virus Protein X Induces Degradation of Talin-1

    PubMed Central

    van de Klundert, Maarten A. A.; van den Biggelaar, Maartje; Kootstra, Neeltje A.; Zaaijer, Hans L.

    2016-01-01

    In the infected human hepatocyte, expression of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) accessory protein X (HBx) is essential to maintain viral replication in vivo. HBx critically interacts with the host damaged DNA binding protein 1 (DDB1) and the associated ubiquitin ligase machinery, suggesting that HBx functions by inducing the degradation of host proteins. To identify such host proteins, we systematically analyzed the HBx interactome. One HBx interacting protein, talin-1 (TLN1), was proteasomally degraded upon HBx expression. Further analysis showed that TLN1 levels indeed modulate HBV transcriptional activity in an HBx-dependent manner. This indicates that HBx-mediated TLN1 degradation is essential and sufficient to stimulate HBV replication. Our data show that TLN1 can act as a viral restriction factor that suppresses HBV replication, and suggest that the HBx relieves this restriction by inducing TLN1 degradation. PMID:27775586

  2. Viral Hepatitis: Problems of Incidence and Control in Military Personnel 1

    PubMed Central

    Sabin, Albert B.

    1976-01-01

    (A) Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is now the major cause of infectious viral hepatitis in U.S. military personnel and probably also in the civilian population over 15 years of age. (B) The incidence of icteric, viral hepatitis is much higher in U.S. military personnel than in comparable age groups in the civilian population. The 17-to 20-year-old enlisted men show the highest rates. (C) In parts of the world (e.g., U.S.A., Germany) where most of the inapparent infection is caused by the adw subtype of HBV, most of the acute clinical disease is caused by the ayw subtype. In the U.S.A. and Germany, 95% or more of HBs Ag isolates from U.S. military personnel with acute hepatitis is ayw. (D) It may be many years before one can expect to have sufficient data for a decision as to the possible availability of an effective HBV vaccine. Accordingly, a decision is urgently needed regarding either the immediate use of the best practically available hepatitis immune gamma globulin, that can be prepared by modern techniques, for the prevention of hepatitis in U.S. military personnel or postponement of such use until an adequate and properly controlled trial can be carried out in active duty military personnel in an area of high incidence. PMID:960730

  3. Prophylaxis of acute viral hepatitis by immune serum globulin, hepatitis B vaccine, and health education: a sixteen year study of Japan overseas cooperation volunteers.

    PubMed

    Ohara, H; Ebisawa, I; Naruto, H

    1997-01-01

    From 1978 to 1993 a study of acute viral hepatitis contracted by the Japan Overseas Cooperation Volunteers (JOCV) during their assignments in tropical and subtropical countries was conducted. Of 10,509 subjects in this study, 240 cases of acute viral hepatitis were confirmed (hepatitis A = 139, hepatitis B = 72, and non-A, non-B hepatitis = 29). The annual morbidity was 5.1% in 1978 and 4.9% in 1979, with hepatitis A accounting for 80% of the cases. However, it decreased significantly after the prophylactic inoculation with immune serum globulin (ISG) was started in 1980. A significant decrease of hepatitis B from 1.2% in 1980 to 0.1% in 1990 was also seen after vaccination was introduced for all volunteers in 1988. Health education concerning food and water sanitation, and providing general information on viral hepatitis, was also conducted throughout this period. These results indicate that acute viral hepatitis could be successfully prevented in the JOCV with a combination of ISG, hepatitis B vaccination, and health education.

  4. Hepatitis C viral protein translation: mechanisms and implications in developing antivirals.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Brett; Liu, Qiang

    2011-11-01

    Hepatitis C viral protein translation occurs in a cap-independent manner through the use of an internal ribosomal entry site (IRES) present within the viral 5'-untranslated region. The IRES is composed of highly conserved structural domains that directly recruit the 40S ribosomal subunit to the viral genomic RNA. This frees the virus from relying on a large number of translation initiation factors that are required for cap-dependent translation, conferring a selective advantage to the virus especially in times when the availability of such factors is low. Although the mechanism of translation initiation on the Hepatitis C virus (HCV) IRES is well established, modulation of the HCV IRES activity by both cellular and viral factors is not well understood. As the IRES is essential in the HCV life cycle and as such remains well conserved in an otherwise highly heterogenic virus, the process of HCV protein translation represents an attractive target in the development of novel antivirals. This review will focus on the mechanisms of HCV protein translation and how this process is postulated to be modulated by cis-acting viral factors, as well as trans-acting viral and cellular factors. Numerous therapeutic approaches investigated in targeting HCV protein translation for the development of novel antivirals will also be discussed.

  5. Effects of sex and generation on hepatitis B viral load in families with hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Ai-Ru; Fann, Cathy SJ; Yeh, Chau-Ting; Lin, Hung-Chun; Wan, Shy-Yi; Chen, Yi-Cheng; Hsu, Chia-Lin; Tai, Jennifer; Lin, Shi-Ming; Tai, Dar-In

    2017-01-01

    AIM To explore factors associated with persistent hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in a cohort of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)-affected families and then investigate factors that correlate with individual viral load among hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-positive relatives. METHODS We evaluated non-genetic factors associated with HBV replication in relatives of patients with HCC. Relatives of 355 HCC cases were interviewed using a structured questionnaire. Demographics, relationship to index case, HBsAg status of mothers and index cases were evaluated for association with the HBV persistent infection or viral load by generalized estimating equation analysis. RESULTS Among 729 relatives enrolled, parent generation (P = 0.0076), index generation (P = 0.0044), mothers positive for HBsAg (P = 0.0007), and HBsAg-positive index cases (P = 5.98 × 10-8) were associated with persistent HBV infection. Factors associated with HBV viral load were evaluated among 303 HBsAg-positive relatives. Parent generation (P = 0.0359) and sex (P = 0.0007) were independent factors associated with HBV viral load. The intra-family HBV viral load was evaluated in families clustered with HBsAg-positive siblings. An intra-family trend of similar HBV viral load was found for 27 of 46 (58.7%) families. Male offspring of HBsAg-positive mothers (P = 0.024) and older siblings were associated with high viral load. CONCLUSION Sex and generation play important roles on HBV viral load. Maternal birth age and nutritional changes could be the reasons of viral load difference between generations. PMID:28223732

  6. Causes of thrombocytopenia in chronic hepatitis C viral infection.

    PubMed

    Osada, Makoto; Kaneko, Makoto; Sakamoto, Minoru; Endoh, Masumi; Takigawa, Koichi; Suzuki-Inoue, Katsue; Inoue, Osamu; Satoh, Kaneo; Enomoto, Nobuyuki; Yatomi, Yutaka; Ozaki, Yukio

    2012-06-01

    We retrospectively studied 89 patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, including 50 chronic hepatitis (CH) cases, 18 liver cirrhosis (LC) cases, and 21 LC with hepatocellular carcinoma (LC + HCC) cases, with regard to various factors related with thrombocytopenia. The platelet count decreased with the stage advancement of liver diseases. Multiple regression analysis revealed that splenomegaly and von Willebrand factor (vWF) were explanatory variables that correlated with thrombocytopenia. Splenomegaly appears to be the most responsible factor, although there are a considerable number of thrombocytopenic cases without splenomegaly, suggesting other factors may also be responsible. The vWF level is inversely correlated with the platelet count. Soluble thrombomodulin, a marker of endothelial dysfunction, increases with the advancement of liver fibrosis. It is positively correlated with vWF and inversely with the platelet count. Our present results imply that vascular endothelial dysfunction is also involved in thrombocytopenia during chronic HCV infection.

  7. Viral hepatitis and HIV-associated tuberculosis: Risk factors and TB treatment outcomes in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Sirinak, Chawin; Kittikraisak, Wanitchaya; Pinjeesekikul, Duangporn; Charusuntonsri, Pricha; Luanloed, Phinai; Srisuwanvilai, La-ong; Nateniyom, Sriprapa; Akksilp, Somsak; Likanonsakul, Sirirat; Sattayawuthipong, Wanchai; Burapat, Channawong; Varma, Jay K

    2008-01-01

    Background The occurrence of tuberculosis (TB), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and viral hepatitis infections in the same patient poses unique clinical and public health challenges, because medications to treat TB and HIV are hepatotoxic. We conducted an observational study to evaluate risk factors for HBsAg and/or anti-HCV reactivity and to assess differences in adverse events and TB treatment outcomes among HIV-infected TB patients. Methods Patients were evaluated at the beginning, during, and at the end of TB treatment. Blood samples were tested for aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), total bilirubin (BR), complete blood count, and CD4+ T lymphocyte cell count. TB treatment outcomes were assessed at the end of TB treatment according to international guidelines. Results Of 769 enrolled patients, 752 (98%) had serologic testing performed for viral hepatitis: 70 (9%) were reactive for HBsAg, 237 (31%) for anti-HCV, and 472 (63%) non-reactive for both markers. At the beginning of TB treatment, 18 (26%) patients with HBsAg reactivity had elevated liver function tests compared with 69 (15%) patients non-reactive to any viral marker (p = 0.02). At the end of TB treatment, 493 (64%) were successfully treated. Factors independently associated with HBsAg reactivity included being a man who had sex with men (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 2.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1–4.3) and having low TB knowledge (AOR, 1.8; CI, 1.0–3.0). Factors most strongly associated with anti-HCV reactivity were having injection drug use history (AOR, 12.8; CI, 7.0–23.2) and living in Bangkok (AOR, 15.8; CI, 9.4–26.5). The rate of clinical hepatitis and death during TB treatment was similar in patients HBsAg reactive, anti-HCV reactive, both HBsAg and anti-HCV reactive, and non-reactive to any viral marker. Conclusion Among HIV-infected TB patients living in Thailand, markers of viral hepatitis infection, particularly hepatitis C virus infection, were

  8. Concerted Action of the FasL/Fas and Perforin/Granzyme A and B Pathways Is Mandatory for the Development of Early Viral Hepatitis but Not for Recovery from Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Balkow, Sandra; Kersten, Astrid; Tran, Thi Thanh Thao; Stehle, Thomas; Grosse, Philipp; Museteanu, Crisan; Utermöhlen, Olaf; Pircher, Hanspeter; von Weizsäcker, Fritz; Wallich, Reinhard; Müllbacher, Arno; Simon, Markus M.

    2001-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) play a major role in the recovery from primary viral infections and the accompanying tissue injuries. However, it is unclear to what extent the two main cytolytic pathways, perforin-granzyme A and B exocytosis and Fas ligand (FasL)-Fas interaction, contribute to these processes. Here we have employed mouse strains with either spontaneous mutations or targeted gene defects in one or more components of either of the two cytolytic pathways to analyze the molecular basis of viral clearance and induction of hepatitis during lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection. Our results reveal that viral clearance is solely dependent on perforin but that virus-induced liver damage only occurs when both the FasL/Fas and the perforin pathways, including granzymes A and B, are simultaneously activated. The finding that development of hepatitis but not viral clearance is dependent on the concomitant activation of FasL-Fas and perforin-granzymes may be helpful in designing novel strategies to prevent hepatic failures during viral infections. PMID:11507223

  9. [Acute non-A non-B viral hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Findor, J A; Lafage, M; Bruch Igartua, E M; Domecq, P; Firpo, A M; Domecq, R B

    1980-01-01

    Thirty-one patients HBs Ag negative seen between january 1978 and june 1980 were studied. Twenty-four of them were males and seven females. Their age ranged between 13 and 58 years. All of them were anti-HAV IgM negative. Six patients presented simultaneously Anti HBc and Anti HBs in the two first weeks of the illness. This fact could be imputed to an acquired immunity due to a previous infection with virus B. None of the patients studied had evidence of infectious mononucleosis or cytomegalovirus. In view of the absence of the markers of recent infection due to virus A and B these patients were considered to have a non A non B hepatitis. Twelve patients had evidence of previous hepatitis, thirteen had acquired the infection by parenteral route; four were post-transfusional and in six cases there was an epidemic medium. Forty-five percent of the patients studied had a biphasic elevation of the aminotransferases, and twenty percent had a cholestatic form. Two of the patients turned into a chronic active hepatitis and another one died of submasive necrosis; in both cases the via of infection was parenteral.

  10. Prophylactic managements of hepatitis B viral infection in liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Onoe, Takashi; Tahara, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Yuka; Ohdan, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    Liver transplantation (LT) is a considerably effective treatment for patients with end-stage hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related liver disease. However, HBV infection often recurs after LT without prophylaxis. Since the 1990s, the treatment for preventing HBV reinfection after LT has greatly progressed with the introduction of hepatitis B immunoglobulin (HBIG) and nucleos(t)ide analogues (NAs), resulting in improved patient survival. The combination therapy consisting of high-dose HBIG and lamivudine is highly efficacious for preventing the recurrence of HBV infection after LT and became the standard prophylaxis for HBV recurrence. However, mainly due to the high cost of HBIG treatment, an alternative protocol for reducing the dose and duration of HBIG has been evaluated. Currently, combination therapy using low-dose HBIG and NAs is considered as the most efficacious and cost-effective prophylaxis for post-LT HBV reinfection. Recently, NA monotherapy and withdrawal of HBIG from combination therapy, along with the development of new, potent high genetic barrier NAs, have provided promising efficacy, especially for low-risk recipients. This review summarizes the prophylactic protocol and their efficacy including prophylaxis of de novo HBV infection from anti-HBc antibody-positive donors. In addition, challenging approaches such as discontinuation of all prophylaxis and active immunity through hepatitis B vaccination are discussed. PMID:26755868

  11. Arsenic, vinyl chloride, viral hepatitis, and hepatic angiosarcoma: A hospital-based study and review of literature in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Hepatic angiosarcoma (HAS) is a rare type of liver cancer that is often fatal, and arsenic and vinyl chloride monomer (VCM) are two major causal agents. Whereas Taiwan is an endemic area of liver cancer, epidemiologic data on HAS are limited. We reviewed the cases observed at a teaching hospital to evaluate the roles of VCM, arsenic, and viral hepatitis in the occurrence of HAS. Methods We reviewed the medical records of patients with pathological proof of HAS from January 2000 to August 2010 at a teaching hospital which is adjacent to the major VCM processing area in Taiwan and nearby an endemic area of arsenic exposure from drinking water. We also conducted a literature review and included all patients of HAS reported in Taiwan. Results Six male and three female cases aged from 56 to 83 years (64.6 ± 8.2 years) were identified at the hospital. The differences in clinical features between men and women were not statistically significant. None of them had exposure to VCM or arsenic in drinking water. Two had evidence of hepatitis C infection, but none had evidence of hepatitis B infection. Five male and four female cases aged 30 to 82 years (58.6 ± 15.5 years) were identified in the literature, including two with arsenic exposure and one with chronic hepatitis B infection. Conclusions HAS is rare in Taiwan, and we found no evidence supporting a major role of VCM, arsenic in drinking water, or viral hepatitis in its occurrence. PMID:22200164

  12. Sequential Bottlenecks Drive Viral Evolution in Early Acute Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    McElroy, Kerensa; Gaudieri, Silvana; Pham, Son T.; Chopra, Abha; Cameron, Barbara; Maher, Lisa; Dore, Gregory J.; White, Peter A.; Lloyd, Andrew R.

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis C is a pandemic human RNA virus, which commonly causes chronic infection and liver disease. The characterization of viral populations that successfully initiate infection, and also those that drive progression to chronicity is instrumental for understanding pathogenesis and vaccine design. A comprehensive and longitudinal analysis of the viral population was conducted in four subjects followed from very early acute infection to resolution of disease outcome. By means of next generation sequencing (NGS) and standard cloning/Sanger sequencing, genetic diversity and viral variants were quantified over the course of the infection at frequencies as low as 0.1%. Phylogenetic analysis of reassembled viral variants revealed acute infection was dominated by two sequential bottleneck events, irrespective of subsequent chronicity or clearance. The first bottleneck was associated with transmission, with one to two viral variants successfully establishing infection. The second occurred approximately 100 days post-infection, and was characterized by a decline in viral diversity. In the two subjects who developed chronic infection, this second bottleneck was followed by the emergence of a new viral population, which evolved from the founder variants via a selective sweep with fixation in a small number of mutated sites. The diversity at sites with non-synonymous mutation was higher in predicted cytotoxic T cell epitopes, suggesting immune-driven evolution. These results provide the first detailed analysis of early within-host evolution of HCV, indicating strong selective forces limit viral evolution in the acute phase of infection. PMID:21912520

  13. HEV, TTV and GBV-C/HGV markers in patients with acute viral hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Lyra, A C; Pinho, J R R; Silva, L K; Sousa, L; Saraceni, C P; Braga, E L; Pereira, J E; Zarife, M A S; Reis, M G; Lyra, L G C; Silva, L C da; Carrilho, F J

    2005-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the prevalence of HEV, TTV and GBV-C/GBV-C/HGV in patients with acute viral hepatitis A, B and non-A-C. We evaluated sera of 94 patients from a sentinel program who had acute hepatitis A (N = 40), B (N = 42) and non-A-C (N = 12); 71 blood donors served as controls. IgM and anti-HEV IgG antibodies were detected by enzyme immunoassay using commercial kits. TTV and GBV-C/HGV were detected by nested PCR; genotyping was done by sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. Anti-HEV IgG was present in 38, 10 and 17% of patients with hepatitis A, B and non-A-C. Four patients with hepatitis A and 1 with non-A-C hepatitis also had anti-HEV IgM detected in serum. TTV was detected in 21% of patients with acute hepatitis and in 31% of donors. GBV-C/HGV was detected in 9% of patients with hepatitis, and in 10% of donors. We found TTV isolates of genotypes 1, 2, 3, and 4 and GBV-C/HGV isolates of genotypes 1 and 2. Mean aminotransferase levels were lower in patients who were TTV or GBV-C/HGV positive. In conclusion, the detection of anti-HEV IgM in some acute hepatitis A cases suggests co-infection with HEV and hepatitis E could be the etiology of a few cases of sporadic non-A-C hepatitis in Salvador, Brazil. TTV genotype 1, 2, 3 and 4 isolates and GBV-C/HGV genotype 1 and 2 strains are frequent in the studied population. TTV and GBV-C/HGV infection does not appear to have a role in the etiology of acute hepatitis.

  14. Viral Hepatitis in the U.S. Air Force, 1980-89: An Epidemiological and Serological Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-05-01

    viral hepatitis. Members hospitalized for hepatitis B had a prior or concurrent diagnosis for sexually transmitted disease in 37% of cases; for drug abuse...discharge diagnosis. Only 3% of individuals with the diagnosis of NANB hepatitis were positive for hepatitis C. immunization, sexually transmitted...a prior or concurrent diagnosis for sexually transmitted disease In 37% of cases; for drug abuse, 32% of cases. Serum MATERIALS AND METHODS samples

  15. [From the national competence network for viral hepatitis (HepNet) emerged the German Liver Foundation (Deutsche Leberstiftung)].

    PubMed

    Hardtke, S; Wiebner, B; Manns, M P

    2016-04-01

    The competence network for viral hepatitis (HepNet) was founded in 2002 with funding from the German government and has influenced the research on viral hepatitis in Germany. HepNet collaborator sites have been involved in numerous national and international investigator-initiated, as well as industry-sponsored, phase 1-3 studies. Within the HepNet Study-House, many groundbreaking investor-initiated trials have been completed and are still ongoing. For example, the acute hepatitis C trials and trials on chronic hepatitis D (delta), which led to therapy optimization. Continuation of the competence network on viral hepatitis has been achieved by the foundation of the German Liver Foundation, which has been an external cooperation partner of the German Center for Infection Research (DZIF) for two years. The well-established HepNet Study-House acts here as the clinical trial platform for all DZIF hepatitis trials.

  16. Photo-distributed lichenoid eruption secondary to direct anti-viral therapy for hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Cory L; McCausland, Drew; Chu, Emily Y

    2015-10-01

    Novel direct anti-viral agents are emerging as effective treatments for hepatitis C virus (HCV) and provide an alternative to the year-long standard therapy with interferon and ribavirin. However, cutaneous side effects from these new medications, including rash, pruritus and photosensitivity, are among the most commonly reported adverse events and have resulted in therapy discontinuation in some cases. Here, we report two cases of a photo-distributed lichenoid eruption that occurred within 1  month of starting anti-viral therapy with simeprevir and sofosbuvir without interferon or ribavirin. This report provides the first histologic description of the cutaneous eruption associated with direct anti-viral therapy for HCV and highlights the importance of recognizing and treating the often intolerable dermatologic side effects of these novel medications, the incidence of which is likely to increase as direct anti-viral agents may become the standard of care for HCV.

  17. Is liver biopsy still needed in children with chronic viral hepatitis?

    PubMed

    Pokorska-Śpiewak, Maria; Kowalik-Mikołajewska, Barbara; Aniszewska, Małgorzata; Pluta, Magdalena; Marczyńska, Magdalena

    2015-11-14

    Liver biopsy is a standard method used for obtaining liver tissue for histopathological evaluation. Since reliable serological and virological tests are currently available, liver biopsy is no longer needed for the etiological diagnosis of chronic hepatitis B and C. However, liver histology remains the gold standard as a prognostic tool, providing information about the liver disease progression (grading of necroinflammatory activity and staging of fibrosis) and serving clinicians in the management and therapeutic decisions. In general, histopathological evaluation is indicated before starting the antiviral treatment. Main limitations of the liver biopsy include its invasive and painful procedure, sampling errors and the inter- and intra-observer variability. In addition, indications for the liver biopsy in pediatric patients with chronic viral hepatitis were questioned recently, and efforts have been made toward the development of non-invasive methods as an alternative to the liver biopsy. The most commonly used methods are novel imaging studies (elastography) and combinations of biomarkers. However, to date, none of these tests was validated in children with chronic viral hepatitis. In this review, we present the current status of the liver biopsy in the management of chronic viral hepatitis B and C in pediatric population, including specific indications, complications, contraindications, problems, limitations, and alternative non-invasive methods.

  18. Is liver biopsy still needed in children with chronic viral hepatitis?

    PubMed Central

    Pokorska-Śpiewak, Maria; Kowalik-Mikołajewska, Barbara; Aniszewska, Małgorzata; Pluta, Magdalena; Marczyńska, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    Liver biopsy is a standard method used for obtaining liver tissue for histopathological evaluation. Since reliable serological and virological tests are currently available, liver biopsy is no longer needed for the etiological diagnosis of chronic hepatitis B and C. However, liver histology remains the gold standard as a prognostic tool, providing information about the liver disease progression (grading of necroinflammatory activity and staging of fibrosis) and serving clinicians in the management and therapeutic decisions. In general, histopathological evaluation is indicated before starting the antiviral treatment. Main limitations of the liver biopsy include its invasive and painful procedure, sampling errors and the inter- and intra-observer variability. In addition, indications for the liver biopsy in pediatric patients with chronic viral hepatitis were questioned recently, and efforts have been made toward the development of non-invasive methods as an alternative to the liver biopsy. The most commonly used methods are novel imaging studies (elastography) and combinations of biomarkers. However, to date, none of these tests was validated in children with chronic viral hepatitis. In this review, we present the current status of the liver biopsy in the management of chronic viral hepatitis B and C in pediatric population, including specific indications, complications, contraindications, problems, limitations, and alternative non-invasive methods. PMID:26576098

  19. Rethinking the immune properties of bilirubin in viral hepatitis: from bench to bedside

    PubMed Central

    Corral-Jara, Karla F; Trujillo-Ochoa, Jorge L; Realpe, Mauricio; Panduro, Arturo; Roman, Sonia; Fierro, Nora A

    2015-01-01

    Communication between the immune system and metabolic components can be exemplified by the process of heme catabolism. The immunomodulatory functions of the enzymes, substrates and active products related to catabolism of the heme group have been extensively studied. Bilirubin (BR), the final breakdown product of heme, is primarily considered to be a toxic waste product but has recently been considered to be an immunomodulatory metabolite. Through mechanisms that include intracellular signaling and transcriptional control, BR affects those immune cell functions that regulate cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. During the pathogenesis of viral hepatitis, the heme degradation pathway is disrupted, resulting in changes to normal BR concentrations. These alterations have been previously studied mainly as a consequence of the infection. However, little is known about the potential immunomodulatory role played by BR in the development of infectious hepatocellular diseases. Differences in BR levels in the context of viral hepatitis are likely to provide important insights into the metabolite-mediated mechanisms controlling the immune responses underlying both the long-term persistence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and the resolution of hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection during the acute phase. In this review, the cross-talk between heme catabolism and immune function is described in detail. Special emphasis is given to discoveries that hold promise for identifying immunologic features of metabolic products in the resolution of viral diseases. PMID:26719800

  20. Rethinking the immune properties of bilirubin in viral hepatitis: from bench to bedside.

    PubMed

    Corral-Jara, Karla F; Trujillo-Ochoa, Jorge L; Realpe, Mauricio; Panduro, Arturo; Roman, Sonia; Fierro, Nora A

    2015-12-01

    Communication between the immune system and metabolic components can be exemplified by the process of heme catabolism. The immunomodulatory functions of the enzymes, substrates and active products related to catabolism of the heme group have been extensively studied. Bilirubin (BR), the final breakdown product of heme, is primarily considered to be a toxic waste product but has recently been considered to be an immunomodulatory metabolite. Through mechanisms that include intracellular signaling and transcriptional control, BR affects those immune cell functions that regulate cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. During the pathogenesis of viral hepatitis, the heme degradation pathway is disrupted, resulting in changes to normal BR concentrations. These alterations have been previously studied mainly as a consequence of the infection. However, little is known about the potential immunomodulatory role played by BR in the development of infectious hepatocellular diseases. Differences in BR levels in the context of viral hepatitis are likely to provide important insights into the metabolite-mediated mechanisms controlling the immune responses underlying both the long-term persistence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and the resolution of hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection during the acute phase. In this review, the cross-talk between heme catabolism and immune function is described in detail. Special emphasis is given to discoveries that hold promise for identifying immunologic features of metabolic products in the resolution of viral diseases.

  1. Successful Treatment of Chronic Viral Hepatitis With High-dilution Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Sarter, Barbara; Banerji, Pratip

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Two cases of viral hepatitis that had failed conventional therapy are presented. Both were subsequently treated with protocols using homeopathic medicines as detailed below. Both patients sustained remissions for 2 years after taking ultradilute natural medicines after their conventional treatment had been discontinued. Methods: The treatment protocol included Chelidonium majus 6X and Thuja 30C as the main medicines. Other homeopathic medicines were used as detailed below. Cases were confirmed with standard hepatitis antibody and viral measurements. Patients were followed for more than 2 years with measurements of viral counts, liver enzymes, and other relevant biomarkers of liver disease. Results: Both patients are alive and functioning normally in their home environments more than 2 years after treatment initiation. Discussion: We review the literature related to the chief medicines used in these cases and find that they have known and demonstrated therapeutic effects suggesting plausible mechanisms of action in these cases. Conclusions: Clinical trials of this homeopathic treatment protocol should be conducted to explore the therapeutic potential of these medicines for treatment of viral hepatitis. PMID:24278798

  2. A better regulation is required in viral hepatitis smartphone applications.

    PubMed

    Cantudo-Cuenca, Ma R; Robustillo-Cortés, Ma A; Cantudo-Cuenca, Ma D; Morillo-Verdugo, R

    2014-04-01

    Objetivo: describir las características y el contenido de aplicaciones móviles disponibles sobre hepatitis vírica, así como el nivel de participación de los profesionales médicos en su desarrollo. Métodos: Se realizó un estudio observacional descriptivo en septiembre de 2013. Buscamos en la tienda Google Play (Android) y en la tienda Apple App (iOS) aplicaciones para teléfonos inteligentes que se relacionasen específicamente con la hepatitis vírica empleando una búsqueda por palabras claves que incluía los siguientes términos: ‘hepatitis’, ‘hepatología’, “HBV” y ‘HCV’. Los datos recogidos incluían: nombre, plataforma, categoría, coste, puntuación del usuario por estrellas, número de descargas, fecha en la que el creador actualizó la aplicación y público objetivo. Analizamos el contenido de las aplicaciones y se distribuyeron en 3 categorías en función del tipo de hepatitis vírica. Realizamos un análisis en el que se examinó específicamente la autoría con el fin de evaluar la prevalencia de la participación de los profesionales sanitarios en su desarrollo. Resultados: Se incluyó un total de 33 aplicaciones (de 232 identificadas), de las cuales 10 estaban duplicadas. La mayoría de las aplicaciones se subían en la categoría médica. Tres tuvieron puntuaciones menores de 3,9 estrellas (de 5 posibles). Sólo 6 aplicaciones superaban las 1000 descargas. Un total de 12 aplicaciones estaban dirigidas a profesionales sanitarios mientras que 4 se centraban en los pacientes (7 para ambos colectivos). La participación de los profesionales sanitarios en el desarrollo de las aplicaciones fue del 56,6%. Conclusiones: Existen aplicaciones disponibles sobre hepatitis vírica tanto para profesionales sanitarios como para pacientes; sin embargo, la mayor parte de la información contenida en ellas a menudo no está validada. Deberían estar certificadas.

  3. [Hepatitis C patients' record in the Sentinel Units for viral Hepatitis in Argentina 2007- 2014. Distribution by year of birth].

    PubMed

    Vladimirsky, Sara Noemí; Munné, Maria Silvina; Otegui, Lucio Oscar; Altabert, Nancy Roxana; Soto, Sonia Soledad; Brajterman, Leonardo; González, Jorge Enrique

    2015-06-01

    Recommendations for Hepatitis C screening based on risk factorsfor transmission proved to be ineffcient. Accordingly, the CDC recommended to screen all American individuals born between 1945-1965, based on data from population prevalence of infection. The effectiveness of implementing these recommendations in other contexts and/or populations can be estimated, in principle, knowing the age distribution of infected individuals. There is no data on population prevalence in our country. Yet we can know the age distribution of cases of Hepatitis C who accessed the health system. The aim of this paper is to analyze the distribution by birth cohort ofcases registered as "Hepatitis C" in the Sentinel Units for Viral Hepatitis in the 2007-2014 period. This will contribute to the identification, if any, ofa cohort in which case the recommendation of screening could be addressed, based on risk factors inherent to our country and our epidemiological reality. The age distribution of our cases was wider and younger than those of the population supporting the recommendation of the CDC and this suggests -beyond the difference in the populations being compared- is due to a range of risk factors and age at different infection between USA and Argentina. Thus, based on these results, the recommendation of the Argentine Consensus for Hepatitis C in 2013 to screen all individuals once in life is supported.

  4. Risk Factors and Immune Response to Hepatitis E viral Infection among Acute Hepatitis Patients in Assiut, Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Seif Eldin, Salwa S.; Seddik, Ismail; Daef, Enas A.; Shata, M.T.; Raafat, Marwa; Baky, Laila Abdel; Nafeh, MA

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection is a common cause of acute viral hepatitis (AVH) in Egypt. We aimed to identify risk factors of HEV among acute hepatitis cases, measure HEV specific immune response to differentiate between symptomatic and asymptomatic infections. The study included symptomatic acute hepatitis (AH) patients (n=235) and asymptomatic contacts (n=200) to HEV cases. They completed a lifestyle questionnaire, screened for common hepatotropic viruses. Blood and serum samples were collected from patients and contacts after onset of disease and follow-up samples collected until convalescence. PBMC were separated and tested for specific HEV T-cell response by INF-ELISPOT assay. Serum samples were tested for IgM and IgG anti-hepatitis E virus by ELISA. IgM antibodies to HAV were detected in 19 patients (8.1%), 37 (15.7%) with HBV, 10 (4.3%) with HCV. HEV infection was identified in 42 (16%) patients with AVH. Of the 200 contacts, 14 (7%) had serological evidence of recent HEV asymptomatic infection, showed stronger CMI responses than HEV infected subjects (2540 ± 28 and 182 ± 389 ISCs/106 cells, respectively; P <0.05). In conclusion, HEV is a major cause of AVH in Egypt. Asymptomatic HEV patients are likely to have stronger immune responses including CMI responses, than symptomatic cases. PMID:22053611

  5. Viral hepatitis in Latin America and the Caribbean: a public health challenge.

    PubMed

    Díez-Padrisa, Núria; Castellanos, Luis Gerardo

    2013-10-01

    Viral hepatitis (VH) is an emergent concern in public health agendas worldwide. More than one million people die annually from hepatitis and 57% and 78% of global cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma cases, respectively, are caused by VH. The burden of disease caused by hepatitis in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) is high. Data on hepatitis has been collected in several countries, but more accurate and comparable studies are needed. Hepatitis B vaccination and screening of donated blood are routine practices in the region. However, integrated policies covering prevention and control of disease caused by all types of hepatitis viruses are scarce. Existing preventive measures need to be reinforced. Attention must be paid to at-risk populations, awareness campaigns, and water and food safety. Affordable access to diagnosis and treatment, population screening, referral to health services and monitoring of positive cases are among the main challenges currently posed by VH in LAC. The World Health Organization framework and Pan American Health Organization regional strategy, defined in response to resolution WHA63.18 of the World Health Assembly, may help to overcome these difficulties. Successful experiences in the fight against hepatitis in some LAC countries may also provide very interesting solutions for the region.

  6. Inhibition of Hepatitis C Virus Replication and Viral Helicase by Ethyl Acetate Extract of the Marine Feather Star Alloeocomatella polycladia

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Atsuya; Salam, Kazi Abdus; Furuta, Atsushi; Matsuda, Yasuyoshi; Fujita, Osamu; Tani, Hidenori; Fujita, Yoshihisa; Fujimoto, Yuusuke; Ikeda, Masanori; Kato, Nobuyuki; Sakamoto, Naoya; Maekawa, Shinya; Enomoto, Nobuyuki; Nakakoshi, Masamichi; Tsubuki, Masayoshi; Sekiguchi, Yuji; Tsuneda, Satoshi; Akimitsu, Nobuyoshi; Noda, Naohiro; Tanaka, Junichi; Moriishi, Kohji

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a causative agent of acute and chronic hepatitis, leading to the development of hepatic cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. We prepared extracts from 61 marine organisms and screened them by an in vitro fluorescence assay targeting the viral helicase (NS3), which plays an important role in HCV replication, to identify effective candidates for anti-HCV agents. An ethyl acetate-soluble fraction of the feather star Alloeocomatella polycladia exhibited the strongest inhibition of NS3 helicase activity, with an IC50 of 11.7 µg/mL. The extract of A. polycladia inhibited interaction between NS3 and RNA but not ATPase of NS3. Furthermore, the replication of the replicons derived from three HCV strains of genotype 1b in cultured cells was suppressed by the extract with an EC50 value of 23 to 44 µg/mL, which is similar to the IC50 value of the NS3 helicase assay. The extract did not induce interferon or inhibit cell growth. These results suggest that the unknown compound(s) included in A. polycladia can inhibit HCV replication by suppressing the helicase activity of HCV NS3. This study may present a new approach toward the development of a novel therapy for chronic hepatitis C. PMID:22690141

  7. State of hepatitis B viral DNA in a human hepatoma cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Marion, P L; Salazar, F H; Alexander, J J; Robinson, W S

    1980-01-01

    PLC/PRF/5, a tissue culture cell line isolated from a human hepatocellular carcinoma and producing hepatitis B surface antigen, was studied for the presence of hepatitis B virus (HBV)-specific DNA and RNA. PLC/PRF/5 cell DNA accelerated the rate of reassociation of HBV [32P]DNA, and quantitative experiments indicated that the cells contained approximately four copies of viral DNA per haploid, mammalian cell DNA equivalent. PLC/PRF/5 DNA accelerated the rate of reassociation of all individual restriction endonucleases HincII and HaeIII fragments of HBV [32P]DNA, indicating that DNA from all regions of the viral genome is present in the cells. This suggests that these cells contain at least most, and possibly all, of the viral genome. Digestion of PLC/PRF/5 cell DNA with restriction endonuclease HindIII (an enzyme found not to cleave the DNA of any HBV isolate so far examined) yielded only three fragments, all larger than virion DNA, which contained HBV DNA base sequences, suggesting that HBV DNA is integrated in high-molecular-weight DNA at three different sites in these cells and that there is no viral DNA in an episomal form. PLC/PRF/5 cell [32P]RNA was found to hybridize with all restriction fragments of HBV DNA adequately tested, indicating that at least most, and possibly all, of the viral DNA in these cells is transcribed. Images PMID:6251250

  8. LL37 inhibits the inflammatory endothelial response induced by viral or endogenous DNA.

    PubMed

    Merkle, Monika; Pircher, Joachim; Mannell, Hanna; Krötz, Florian; Blüm, Philipp; Czermak, Thomas; Gaitzsch, Erik; Schneider, Christine; Köppel, Simone; Ribeiro, Andrea; Wörnle, Markus

    2015-12-01

    In viral infection, morbidity and mortality often result from extrahepatic disease manifestations such as vasculitis. We hereby show that human microvascular endothelial cells express viral receptors of the innate immune system which are induced upon ligand engagement. Furthermore, stimulation of endothelial cells with the synthetic analog of viral DNA, poly (dA:dT), human DNA and hepatitis B virus-containing immunoprecipitates from a patient with polyarteritis nodosa induces an inflammatory response including the upregulation of adhesion molecules, which is mediated exclusively by TLR9 and involves an IRF3-dependent pathway. Thus, endothelial cells are able to actively participate in immune mediated vascular inflammation caused by viral infections. Furthermore, we provide evidence for the ability of LL37 to bind and internalize viral or endogenous DNA into non-immune cells. DNA nucleotides internalized by LL37 suppress the production of proinflammatory mediators suggesting a protective effect against direct responses to viral infection or circulating DNA-fragments of endogenous origin. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Hepatitis associated with herpes viral infection in the tortoise (Testudo horsfieldii).

    PubMed

    Hervás, J; Sánchez-Cordón, P J; de Chacón Lara, F; Carrasco, L; Gómez-Villamandos, J C

    2002-03-01

    Herpesvirus infection in tortoises is largely characterized by the development of respiratory clinical signs. Usually lesions develop in the respiratory, oral pharyngeal, intestinal tract and are accompanied by cutaneous and ocular lesions. In chelonids affected by herpesvirus, systemic-type lesions in organs such as the liver and spleen are commonly observed. In this paper we describe a case of multifocal necrotic hepatitis associated with herpesviruses in an adult female land tortoise of the species Testudo horsfieldii. This article is the first description of a viral hepatitis in Testudo spp. with lesions compatible with herpesvirus infection, with no clinical signs or lesions in the respiratory system, oral cavity or other organs.

  10. Viral hepatitis in resource-limited countries and access to antiviral therapies: current and future challenges

    PubMed Central

    Lemoine, Maud; Nayagam, Shevanthi; Thursz, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Chronic viral hepatitis is a major public health issue worldwide and mostly affects resource-limited countries. These regions combine a considerable set of barriers to containing the epidemic, including shortage of healthcare workers, poor medical infrastructures, insufficient screening and poor access to care and treatment. At a time when morbidity and mortality of chronic liver disease has been widely improved in wealthy countries by new innovative strategies and potent antiviral drugs, it is now urgent to face the challenges of better management of chronic hepatitis in resource-poor countries from the perspectives of global health and social justice. PMID:23662157

  11. A cross-talk between Hepatitis B virus and host mRNAs confers viral adaptation to liver

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jun; Xu, Yaxing; Li, Changfei; Hao, Junli; Peng, Shanxin; Chu, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Dake; Xu, Dongping; Meng, Songdong

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) chronically infects approximately 350 million people worldwide. The replication of HBV which genome is only 3.2 kb long relies heavily on host factors. Previous studies demonstrated that a highly expressed liver-specific microRNA (miRNA) miR-122 suppresses HBV expression and replication in multiple ways. In this study, we found that the miR-122 response elements in viral genome facilitate HBV expression and replication in miR-122 highly-expressed hepatocytes. Moreover, mutations in miR-122 response elements are correlated with viral loads and disease progression in HBV-infected patients. We next found that HBV mRNA with miR-122 response elements alone could lead to altered expression of multiple host genes by whole genome expression analysis. HBV mRNA-mediated miR-122 down-regulation plays a major role in HBV mRNA-induced differential gene expression. HBV mRNA could enhance viral replication via miR-122 degradation and the up-regulation of its target cyclin G1. Our study thereby reveals that under the unique condition of high abundance of miR-122 and viral mRNAs and much lower level of miR-122 target in HBV infection, HBV may have evolved to employ the miRNA-mediated virus and host mRNAs network for optimal fitness within hepatocytes. PMID:26184825

  12. Human hepatitis B viral e antigen and its precursor P20 inhibit T lymphocyte proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Purvina, Maija; Hoste, Astrid; Rossignol, Jean-Michel; Lagaudriere-Gesbert, Cecile

    2012-01-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer P20, precursor of the HBeAg, interacts with the cellular protein gC1qR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HBeAg and P20 bind to T cell surface and inhibit mitogen-induced T cell division. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HBeAg and P20 inhibition of T cell proliferation is gC1qR and IL-1RAcP-independent. -- Abstract: The hepatitis B virus (HBV) Precore protein is processed through the secretory pathway directly as HBeAg or with the generation of an intermediate (P20). Precore gene has been shown to be implicated in viral persistence, but the functions of HBeAg and its precursors have not been fully elucidated. We show that the secreted proteins HBeAg and P20 interact with T cell surface and alter Kit-225 and primary T cells proliferation, a process which may facilitate the establishment of HBV persistence. Our data indicate that the N-terminal end of Precore is important for these inhibitory effects and exclude that they are dependent on the association of HBeAg and P20 with two characterized cell surface ligands, the Interleukin-1 Receptor Accessory Protein and gC1qR (present study).

  13. Hepatitis B virus e antigen induces activation of rat hepatic stellate cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zan, Yanlu; Zhang, Yuxia; Tien, Po

    2013-06-07

    Highlights: •HBeAg expression in HSCs induced production of ECM protein and liver fibrotic markers. •The activation and proliferation of HSCs were mediated by TGF-β. •HBeAg protein purified from cell medium directly activated HSCs. -- Abstract: Chronic hepatitis B virus infection is a major cause of hepatic fibrosis, leading to liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Hepatitis B virus e antigen (HBeAg) is an accessory protein of HBV, not required for viral replication but important for natural infection in vivo. Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are the major producers of excessive extracellular matrix during liver fibrogenesis. Therefore, we examined the influence of HBeAg on HSCs. The rat HSC line HSC-T6 was transfected with HBeAg plasmids, and expression of α-smooth muscle actin, collagen I, transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β), and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1) was investigated by quantitative real-time PCR. The proliferation of HSCs was determined by MTS analysis. HBeAg transduction induced up-regulation of these fibrogenic genes and proliferation of HSCs. We found that HBeAg induced TGF-β secretion in HSCs, and the activation of HSCs was prevented by a neutralizing anti-TGF-β antibody. Depletion and addition of HBeAg protein in conditioned medium from HSC-T6 cells transduced with HBeAg indicated that HBeAg directly induced the activation and proliferation of rat primary HSCs. Taken together, HBeAg induces the activation and proliferation of HSCs, mainly mediated by TGF-β, and HBeAg protein purified from cell medium can directly activate HSCs.

  14. Fibrillary glomerulonephritis with hepatitis C viral infection and hypocomplementemia.

    PubMed

    Ray, Susan; Rouse, Kelly; Appis, Andrew; Novak, Robert; Haller, Nairmeen Awad

    2008-01-01

    Fibrillary glomerulonephritis (FGN) is a relatively rare cause of renal disease, found in only 0.6-1.5% of native renal biopsies. The pathogenesis of FGN is not well described, and very few associations with disease processes other than hepatitis C virus (HCV) have been made. We describe a case that provides evidence in support of the FGN-HCV association, as well as introduces the association of FGN-HCV and hypocomplementemia. The case is a 53-year-old African-American female demonstrating a classical presentation of FGN complicated by a concomitant HCV infection. Treating an HCV infection with alpha-interferon has been shown to result in subsequent improvement in the nephrotic syndrome and renal function. However, this patient is unique in that she is complicated with hypocomplementemia, creating a complex treatment situation.

  15. Integration of hepatitis B vaccination into national immunisation programmes. Viral Hepatitis Prevention Board.

    PubMed Central

    Van Damme, P.; Kane, M.; Meheus, A.

    1997-01-01

    Hepatitis B is a major public health problem even though safe and effective vaccines have been available for over 10 years. Because hepatitis B infection is largely asymptomatic with long term complications occurring after many years it has not received the attention it deserves. Strategies to immunise those at high risk have failed to control the disease. Delegates to the World Health Assembly of the World Health Organisation recommended in May 1992 that all countries should integrate hepatitis B vaccination into their national immunisation programmes by 1997. Some western European countries remain unconvinced that the burden of disease warrants the expense of universal vaccination. However, epidemiological data and economic evaluation show that universal hepatitis B vaccination is cost effective in countries with low endemicity and that it will control hepatitis B, reinforcing the necessity for action. PMID:9112852

  16. The future of liver transplantation for viral hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Durand, François; Francoz, Claire

    2017-01-01

    In hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected patients, transplantation can be justified by decompensated cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) or both. During the last decade, HCV infection accounted for about 30% of the indications for transplantation in Europe and North America. Direct antiviral agents (DAAs) are highly effective at curing HCV, even in patients with end-stage cirrhosis. In the future, the incidence of HCV-related decompensated cirrhosis will continue to decrease. The incidence of HCC will also decrease, but a large cohort of patients with cirrhosis will still be at risk of developing HCC even after HCV has been cured. They will continue to represent potential candidates for transplantation. Overall, HCV will account for a significantly lower proportion of indications for transplantation in the future. However, generalization of DAAs is unlikely to affect the total transplantation volume as the gap between donors and potential recipients markedly exceeds 30%. In addition, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a rapidly growing indication for transplantation. The high barrier to resistance nucleos(t)ide analogues (NUCs) have been used for several years to treat hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Decompensated HBV cirrhosis now represents a very uncommon indication for transplantation. HCC remains the leading indication in HBV-infected patients awaiting transplantation. NUCs plus anti-HBs immune globulins or NUCs alone are highly effective at preventing post-transplant HBV recurrence. However, continuous prophylaxis is still needed as extrahepatic HBV particles persist with a potential for recurrence. Post-transplant immunosuppression facilitates recurrence. In the future, an important challenge will be to cure HBV by eliminating residual HBV particles.

  17. Hydralazine-induced cholestatic hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Ahad; Hammad, Raza; Cucco, Robert; Niranjan, Selva

    2009-01-01

    , mixed hepatocellular injury, acute hepatitis, cholestatic jaundice, or centrilobular necrosis. The Hydralazine-induced cholestatic liver injury seems to be fully reversible. Complete clinical and biochemical recovery occurs after discontinuation of the drug. Also, the differential diagnosis of any patient with hepatocellular injury should include medications. This will prevent unnecessary diagnostic tests.

  18. Observational descriptive study of cutaneous manifestations in patients from Mato Grosso with viral chronic hepatitis*

    PubMed Central

    Rostey, Renato Roberto Liberato; Souto, Francisco José Dutra

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Extrahepatic manifestations are seen in association with chronic infection by hepatitis B or C virus including cutaneous disorders. The frequency of these findings seems to vary among different places and reports. There is a lack of information about this issue in Brazil. OBJECTIVES To estimate the prevalence of cutaneous findings affecting HBV or HCV carriers from a reference outpatient unit in Mato Grosso. METHODS A cross-sectional observational study. RESULTS 108 patients were studied. 88.9% presented some cutaneous findings but must of them were nonrelated to chronic viral infection. Four patients had cutaneous or autoimmune syndromes that may be HBV or HCV related. CONCLUSION In our study we found no statistical association between viral hepatitis and skin diseases. PMID:26734863

  19. Hepatoepigenetic Alterations in Viral and Nonviral-Induced Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Setshedi, Mashiko; Hairwadzi, Henry N.

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a major public health concern and one of the leading causes of tumour-related deaths worldwide. Extensive evidence endorses that HCC is a multifactorial disease characterised by hepatic cirrhosis mostly associated with chronic inflammation and hepatitis B/C viral infections. Interaction of viral products with the host cell machinery may lead to increased frequency of genetic and epigenetic aberrations that cause harmful alterations in gene transcription. This may provide a progressive selective advantage for neoplastic transformation of hepatocytes associated with phenotypic heterogeneity of intratumour HCC cells, thus posing even more challenges in HCC treatment development. Epigenetic aberrations involving DNA methylation, histone modifications, and noncoding miRNA dysregulation have been shown to be intimately linked with and play a critical role in tumour initiation, progression, and metastases. The current review focuses on the aberrant hepatoepigenetics events that play important roles in hepatocarcinogenesis and their utilities in the development of HCC therapy. PMID:28105421

  20. Positive serology for viral hepatitis and donor self-exclusion in Southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Maccarini, Julia De Luca; Nazario, Carlos Alberto Kuntz; Ferreira, Jovino Dos Santos; Ceglio, William Queiroz Guimarães Wiegandt; Serpa, Rômulo Cavalcante; Ferreira, Vera Lúcia Paes Cavalcanti; Lucca Schiavon, Leonardo de; Narciso-Schiavon, Janaína Luz

    2013-01-01

    Despite the great advances in serological testing for transfusion-transmitted infections, the selection of blood donors by blood bank operators remains the only way to avoid transmission within the testing window period. Part of this selection is the self-exclusion form, on which the donors can exclude their blood from donation without any explanation. This study assessed the clinical and epidemiological characteristics related to positivity for viral hepatitis and to the use of the confidential self-exclusion (CSE) form. This transversal study analyzed the data collected from blood donors' files in a hospital in Southern Brazil. Univariate and multivariate analyses identified the clinical and epidemiological variables related to positive serologies of viral hepatitis and to whether the donor was self-excluded. Of the 3,180 donors included in this study, 0.1% tested positive for HBsAg, 2.1% for anti-HBc, and 0.9% for anti-HCV. When the 93 donors with positive serologies for viral hepatitis were compared with those who were negative, a greater proportion of the positive serology group was found to have had a history of blood transfusions (OR=4.908; 95%CI=1.628 - 14.799; p<0.01), had repeatedly donated (OR=2.147; 95%CI=1.236 - 3.729; p<0.01), and used the CSE form for self-exclusion (OR=7.139; 95%CI=2.045 - 24.923; p<0.01). No variables were independently associated with self-exclusion. A history of blood transfusion, repeated donations, and self-exclusion are factors that should be considered during viral hepatitis screenings in blood banks.

  1. Viral hepatitis status does not affect survival in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Alkhalili, Eyas; Greenbaum, Alissa; Luo, Li; Rodriguez, Rodrigo; Caldwell, Katharine; Estrada, Oscar Munoz; O'Neill, Jacqueline; Nir, Itzhak; Morris, Katherine T

    2017-01-01

    There have been few studies on the impact of viral etiology on the prognosis in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical characteristics and survival of patients with viral hepatitis-associated HCC (V-HCC), compared to patients with HCC of non-hepatitis B, non-hepatitis C (NBNC-HCC) etiology. We performed a retrospective analysis of all patients with HCC treated at our comprehensive cancer center from 2000 through 2014. Patients were divided into two groups according to their viral hepatitis status. Presentation patterns, treatments, and survival data were analyzed. We evaluated 366 patients: 233 patients (63.7%) had V-HCC while 133 (36.3%) patients had NBNC-HCC. V-HCC patients were younger (P<0.0001) and more likely to be male (P=0.001). Decompensated cirrhosis was more prevalent in V-HCC patients (P=0.01). There was no difference in the resectability rate or disease stage. In patients with resectable disease, those with V-HCC were less likely to undergo hepatectomy (23.7% vs. 38%; P=0.04) for more advanced liver disease. The estimated median survival for V-HCC was 13 months compared to 16 months in NBNC-HCC patients (P=0.57). On multivariate analysis, disease stage (P<0.0001) and Child-Pugh class (P<0.0001) were independent factors affecting survival, but viral status was not (P=0.75). Despite presenting with more advanced cirrhosis and being less likely to undergo surgery, V-HCC patients had similar survival to patients with NBNC-HCC.

  2. General practitioners' knowledge and management of viral hepatitis in the migrant population.

    PubMed

    Guirgis, M; Yan, K; Bu, Y M; Zekry, A

    2012-05-01

    Escalating morbidity and mortality associated with hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections represent a major health burden in Australia, particularly among migrants from endemic areas who may present late. We evaluated the knowledge and educational needs of general practitioners (GPs) in the St George Division, Sydney which serves a large migrant population. The aims of the study were to identify gaps in knowledge about viral hepatitis that may affect management and referral patterns. GPs completed a survey comprised of 15 questions. They were also invited to comment on barriers to managing viral hepatitis in migrant patients. A 44% response rate was achieved from 280 eligible GPs. Forty-two per cent of GPs lacked confidence in interpreting HCV serology and 20% for HBV serology. Twenty-two per cent of GPs did not recognise HCC as a complication of HBV and 18% for HCV. Twenty per cent of GPs were unaware of treatment for HBV. Forty-seven per cent of GPs were uncertain whether pregnant women could receive HCV treatment. Twenty-three per cent and 21% of respondents believed that all HCV- or HBV-infected mothers, respectively, should not breast-feed. Eighty-nine per cent of GPs identified language difficulties as the main barrier to treatment among the migrant population. There were gaps in the knowledge of GPs particularly concerning natural history, diagnosis, treatment availability and management of pregnant or lactating women with viral hepatitis. Specific educational initiatives targeting these deficits are required as well as increased availability of language resources for managing patients from a non-English-speaking background. © 2011 The Authors. Internal Medicine Journal © 2011 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  3. Type A viral hepatitis: A summary and update on the molecular virology, epidemiology, pathogenesis and prevention.

    PubMed

    Lemon, Stanley M; Ott, Jördis J; Van Damme, Pierre; Shouval, Daniel

    2017-09-05

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection is an ancient disease and likely to have afflicted mankind since humans first began to live in groups large enough to sustain transmission of the causative agent, HAV. In reviewing what was known as 'catarrhal jaundice' in 1912, Cockayne noted descriptions of epidemic jaundice extending back to antiquity1. The infectious nature of the disease was proven several decades later in deliberate human transmission studies2. Such experiments led to a clear distinction between hepatitis A ('infectious hepatitis') and hepatitis B ('homologous serum jaundice') and recognition of the lack of cross immunity between these two forms of transmissible hepatitis as early as 19453. However, the responsible virus was not identified until almost 30 years later, when small, round viral particles were discovered by immune electron microscopy in the feces of an experimentally-infected human subject by Feinstone et al. in 19734. This review provides an up-to-date in in-depth overview of HAV and the acute inflammatory hepatic infection it causes in humans, including recently recognized aspects of its molecular virology, evolution, natural history, pathogenesis, epidemiology and prevention. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. News on Viral Hepatitis in HIV: Update from the 2016 GEHEP Conference.

    PubMed

    Poveda, Eva; Puoti, Massimo; García-Deltoro, Miguel; Pineda, Juan A; Téllez, Francisco; Granados, Rafael; Morano, Luis; García, Federico

    2017-01-01

    The II Conference of the Group for the Study of Viral Hepatitis (GEHEP) (29 September-1 October, Spain) updated epidemiological, diagnostic and treatment aspects on viral hepatitis. The conference was mostly focused on the latest news related to HCV infection, including the successes achieved since the implementation of direct-acting antiviral agents for HCV therapy, but also in the new, future challenges for a real HCV eradication. The scenario for chronic HCV infection has dramatically changed in the last two years and most patients have been cured after 12 weeks of therapy with minimal side effects. However, as the experience of treatment increases, new challenges have emerged for the maximum optimization and success of therapy. Moreover, different issues need to be resolved for a real HCV eradication (i.e. unmasking HCV infection, prevention and diagnosis of HCV reinfections, diagnostic tools for treatment optimization). The latest advances in the knowledge on these topics were presented and discussed at this conference. Also, some interesting studies related to viral hepatitis E were addressed. This review summarizes some of the major findings reported and discussed during the GEHEP Conference.

  5. Genotypes and viral variants in chronic hepatitis B: A review of epidemiology and clinical relevance

    PubMed Central

    Croagh, Catherine MN; Desmond, Paul V; Bell, Sally J

    2015-01-01

    The Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) has a worldwide distribution and is endemic in many populations. It is constantly evolving and 10 genotypic strains have been identified with varying prevalences in different geographic regions. Numerous stable mutations in the core gene and in the surface gene of the HBV have also been identified in untreated HBV populations. The genotypes and viral variants have been associated with certain clinical features of HBV related liver disease and Hepatocellular carcinoma. For example Genotype C is associated with later hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) seroconversion, and more advanced liver disease. Genotype A is associated with a greater risk of progression to chronicity in adult acquired HBV infections. Genotype D is particularly associated with the precore mutation and HBeAg negative chronic hepatitis B (CHB). The genotypes prevalent in parts of West Africa, Central and South America, E, F and H respectively, are less well studied. Viral variants especially the Basal Core Promotor mutation is associated with increased risk of fibrosis and cancer of the liver. Although not currently part of routine clinical care, evaluation of genotype and viral variants may provide useful adjunctive information in predicting risk about liver related morbidity in patients with CHB. PMID:25848459

  6. Hepatitis Viral Markers in Patients Undergoing Primary Liver Transplants

    PubMed Central

    LEWIS, JESSICA H.; EL-ASHMAWY, LOBNA; RAMSEY, GLENN E.; BONTEMPO, FRANKLIN A.; ROCHLANI, MAYA; DEMETRIS, ANTHONY J.; VAN THIEL, DAVID H.; STARZL, THOMAS E.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the prevalence in liver transplant (OLTx) patients of the hepatitis markers (anti-A, anti-B, anti-C, anti-D and HBsAg) and the interrelationships between markers and patients’ sexes, ages, dates of transplant, clinicopathological diagnoses, and short-term survivals. Slightly more than half of the patients were male. Anti-A and anti-B were about evenly distributed between male and female. Anti-C, anti-D, and HBsAg were far more common in males. Age and year of transplant showed only a moderate increase in anti-A with increasing age. Anti-A was found in 57% of all patients, anti-B in 18%, anti-C in 17%, and HBsAg in 17%. Anti-D was tested only in patients who were positive for anti-B or HBsAg and occurred in 21 (11%) of 185. The poorest short-term survival occurred in males who showed both anti-A and HBsAg. PMID:8444076

  7. Multi-scale model for hepatitis C viral load kinetics under treatment with direct acting antivirals.

    PubMed

    Clausznitzer, Diana; Harnisch, Julia; Kaderali, Lars

    2016-06-15

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections are a global health problem, and extensive research over the last decades has been targeted at understanding its molecular biology and developing effective antiviral treatments. Recently, a number of potent direct acting antiviral drugs have been developed targeting specific processes in the viral life cycle. Here, we developed a mathematical multi-scale model of the within-host dynamics of HCV infection by integrating a standard model for viral infection with a detailed model of the viral replication cycle inside infected cells. We use this model to study patient time courses of viral load under treatment with daclatasvir, an inhibitor of the viral non-structural protein NS5A. Model analysis predicts that treatment efficacy can be increased by combining daclatasvir with dedicated viral polymerase inhibitors, corresponding to promising current strategies in drug development. Hence, our model presents a predictive tool for in silico simulations, which can be used to study and optimize direct acting antiviral drug treatment.

  8. Epidemiological study of viral hepatitis types A, B, C, D and E among Inuits in West Greenland.

    PubMed

    Langer, B C; Frösner, G G; von Brunn, A

    1997-09-01

    A descriptive study was performed to evaluate the relative frequencies and molecular epidemiological features of viral hepatitis types A to E among the Inuit population in West Greenland. Serum samples were collected from 503 Inuits (186 males and 317 females; mean age 35 years; range 7-79 years) and were tested for markers of viral hepatitis infection. The hepatitis A prevalence averaged 54%, with a significant rise from 9% to 50% between the second and third decade of life. As for hepatitis B, 42% of the total study population showed serological evidence of current or past hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and 7% were hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) carriers. Among the carriers, 6% were also positive for hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg), and HBV DNA could be detected in 49% of carriers by polymerase chain reaction. Typing of the HBV isolates revealed genomic group D in 83% (serotype ayw2) and group A in 17% (serotype adw 2). Less than 1% of the study population had antibodies to the hepatitis C virus. None were positive for HCV RNA. Serological evidence of hepatitis D infection was found in 7% of those with hepatitis B helper virus infection markers and in 40% of the HBsAg carriers. As for hepatitis E, 3% of the Inuits showed reactivity in an enzyme immunoassay that detected hepatitis E virus antibody. HEV RNA could not be detected.

  9. Occult hepatitis B viral infection among blood donors in South–Eastern Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Nna, Emmanuel; Mbamalu, Chinenye; Ekejindu, Ifeoma

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus infection is endemic in many parts of sub-Saharan Africa including Nigeria. Occult hepatitis B virus infection (OBI) is a challenging clinical problem characterized by the absence of Hepatitis B surface Antigen (HBsAg) and low viral DNA load. We aimed at determining the prevalence of OBI among repeat blood donors in Abakaliki, south-eastern Nigeria. Of 113 informed consented repeat blood donors enrolled into the study, 12 donors (10.6%) tested positive to both serological HBsAg screening, anti-HBc total and hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA Nested PCR tests. One donor (0.9%) tested HBsAg positive, anti-HBC positive but Nested PCR negative. All donors were negative for HIV 1 and 2 and HCV infections. Of the 100 HbsAg negative repeat blood donors, 8.0% (eight donors) were HBV DNA positive by nested PCR method and anti-HBc total positive by ELISA. The median viral load, determined by real time PCR-Taqman chemistry, in the OBI blood samples was 51 IU/ml compared to 228 IU/ml of the HBsAg screen positive donors. The observed OBI prevalence of 8.0% corroborated with high endemicity of HBV infection in Abakaliki. We therefore recommend routine HBV DNA testing by real time PCR method on all sero-negative blood donations in Abakaliki and for a similar policy to be evaluated across the sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:24995918

  10. Specific CD8+ T cell response immunotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma and viral hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Cubero, Elia; Larrubia, Juan-Ramón

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), chronic hepatitis B (CHB) and chronic hepatitis C (CHC) are characterized by exhaustion of the specific CD8+ T cell response. This process involves enhancement of negative co-stimulatory molecules, such as programmed cell death protein-1 (PD-1), cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4), 2B4, Tim-3, CD160 and LAG-3, which is linked to intrahepatic overexpression of some of the cognate ligands, such as PD-L1, on antigen presenting cells and thereby favouring a tolerogenic environment. Therapies that disrupt these negative signalling mechanisms represent promising therapeutic tools with the potential to restore reactivity of the specific CD8+ T cell response. In this review we discuss the impressive in vitro and in vivo results that have been recently achieved in HCC, CHB and CHC by blocking these negative receptors with monoclonal antibodies against these immune checkpoint modulators. The article mainly focuses on the role of CTLA-4 and PD-1 blocking monoclonal antibodies, the first ones to have reached clinical practice. The humanized monoclonal antibodies against CTLA-4 (tremelimumab and ipilimumab) and PD-1 (nivolumab and pembrolizumab) have yielded good results in testing of HCC and chronic viral hepatitis patients. Trelimumab, in particular, has shown a significant increase in the time to progression in HCC, while nivolumab has shown a remarkable effect on hepatitis C viral load reduction. The research on the role of ipilimumab, nivolumab and pembrolizumab on HCC is currently underway. PMID:27605882

  11. Erectile dysfunction in patients with chronic viral hepatitis: a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Fusco, Ferdinando; D'Anzeo, Gianluca; Rossi, Andrea; Sciorio, Carmine; Buonomo, Antonio Riccardo; d'Emmanuele di Villa Bianca, Roberta; Borgia, Guglielmo; Mirone, Vincenzo; Gentile, Ivan

    2013-12-01

    This article reviews the literature on epidemiology and pathogenetic factors of erectile dysfunction in patients with chronic viral hepatic (CVH) diseases in men and the potential implications for diagnosis and treatment. A search to identify original articles, reviews and any other article suitable for the purposes of this review was conducted by combining the following terms: erectile dysfunction and/or sexual dysfunction, chronic viral hepatitis, hepatitis B virus infection and hepatitis C virus infection. The results of this review have led to the following main observations: i) there is scarce documentation on the association between CVH and sexual dysfunction; ii) hormonal impairment seems to be a major component in the development of erectile dysfunction in CVH; however, published evidence concerning the contribution of other pathogenetic factors is rare and inconclusive and iii) available treatment options for CVH potentially contribute to the development of sexual dysfunction in these patients. Due to the scarce body of evidence, more research is needed to better clarify the mechanisms underlying the association between CVH and sexual dysfunction, the impact of therapy and associated comorbidities on sexual dysfunction and the role of pharmacological treatments in the management of these patients.

  12. Role of T cell death in maintaining immune tolerance during persistent viral hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Larrubia, Juan Ramón; Lokhande, Megha Uttam; García-Garzón, Silvia; Miquel, Joaquín; Subirá, Dolores; Sanz-de-Villalobos, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Virus-specific T cells play an important role in the resolution of hepatic infection. However, during chronic hepatitis infection these cells lack their effector functions and fail to control the virus. Hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus have developed several mechanisms to generate immune tolerance. One of these strategies is the depletion of virus-specific T cells by apoptosis. The immunotolerogenic liver has unique property to retain and activate naïve T cell to avoid the over reactivation of immune response against antigens which is exploited by hepatotropic viruses to persist. The deletion of the virus-specific T cells occurs by intrinsic (passive) apoptotic mechanism. The pro-apoptotic molecule Bcl-2 interacting mediator (Bim) has attracted increasing attention as a pivotal involvement in apoptosis, as a regulator of tissue homeostasis and an enhancer for the viral persistence. Here, we reviewed our current knowledge on the evidence showing critical role of Bim in viral-specific T cell death by apoptotic pathways and helps in the immune tolerance. PMID:23569333

  13. Occult hepatitis B viral infection among blood donors in South-Eastern Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Nna, Emmanuel; Mbamalu, Chinenye; Ekejindu, Ifeoma

    2014-07-01

    Hepatitis B virus infection is endemic in many parts of sub-Saharan Africa including Nigeria. Occult hepatitis B virus infection (OBI) is a challenging clinical problem characterized by the absence of Hepatitis B surface Antigen (HBsAg) and low viral DNA load. We aimed at determining the prevalence of OBI among repeat blood donors in Abakaliki, south-eastern Nigeria. Of 113 informed consented repeat blood donors enrolled into the study, 12 donors (10·6%) tested positive to both serological HBsAg screening, anti-HBc total and hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA Nested PCR tests. One donor (0·9%) tested HBsAg positive, anti-HBC positive but Nested PCR negative. All donors were negative for HIV 1 and 2 and HCV infections. Of the 100 HbsAg negative repeat blood donors, 8·0% (eight donors) were HBV DNA positive by nested PCR method and anti-HBc total positive by ELISA. The median viral load, determined by real time PCR-Taqman chemistry, in the OBI blood samples was 51 IU/ml compared to 228 IU/ml of the HBsAg screen positive donors. The observed OBI prevalence of 8·0% corroborated with high endemicity of HBV infection in Abakaliki. We therefore recommend routine HBV DNA testing by real time PCR method on all sero-negative blood donations in Abakaliki and for a similar policy to be evaluated across the sub-Saharan Africa.

  14. Hepatitis C virus vaccine candidates inducing protective neutralizing antibodies.

    PubMed

    Fauvelle, Catherine; Colpitts, Che C; Keck, Zhen-Yong; Pierce, Brian G; Foung, Steven K H; Baumert, Thomas F

    2016-12-01

    With more than 150 million chronically infected people, hepatitis C virus (HCV) remains a substantial global health burden. Direct-acting antivirals have dramatically improved viral cure. However, limited access to therapy, late stage detection of infection and re-infection following cure illustrate the need for a vaccine for global control of infection. Vaccines with induction of neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) have been shown to protect successfully against infections by multiple viruses and are currently developed for HCV. Areas covered: Here we review the progress towards the development of vaccines aiming to confer protection against chronic HCV infection by inducing broadly nAbs. The understanding or viral immune evasion in infected patients, the development of novel model systems and the recent structural characterization of viral envelope glycoprotein E2 has markedly advanced our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of virus neutralization with the concomitant development of several vaccine candidates. Expert commentary: While HCV vaccine development remains challenged by the high viral diversity and immune evasion, marked progress in HCV research has advanced vaccine design. Several vaccine candidates have shown robust induction of nAbs in animal models and humans. Randomized clinical trials are the next step to assess their clinical efficacy for protection against chronic infection.

  15. Blood micronutrient, oxidative stress, and viral load in patients with chronic hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Wang-Sheng; Guo, Chih-Hung; Yeh, Maw-Sheng; Lin, Li-Yun; Hsu, Guoo-Shyng W.; Chen, Pei-Chung; Luo, Mei-Ching; Lin, Chia-Yeh

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To assess the extent of micronutrient and oxidative stress in blood and to examine their linkages with viral loads in chronic hepatitis C patients. METHODS: Hepatitis C virus (HCV)-RNA levels were quantified in the serum from 37 previously untreated patients with chronic hepatitis C. The plasma and erythrocyte micronutrients (zinc, selenium, copper, and iron) were estimated, and malondialdehyde (MDA) contents were determined as a marker to detect oxidative stress. Antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and glutathione reductase (GR) activities in blood were also measured. The control group contained 31 healthy volunteers. RESULTS: The contents of zinc (Zn), and selenium (Se) in plasma and erythrocytes were significantly lower in hepatitis C patients than in the controls. On the contrary, copper (Cu) levels were significantly higher. Furthermore, plasma and erythrocyte MDA levels, and the SOD and GR activities in erythrocytes significantly increased in hepatitis C patients compared to the controls. However, the plasma GPX activity in patients was markedly lower. Plasma Se (r = -0.730, P < 0.05), Cu (r = 0.635), and GPX (r = -0.675) demonstrated correlations with HCV-RNA loads. Significant correlation coefficients were also observed between HCV-RNA levels and erythrocyte Zn (r = -0.403), Se (r = -0.544), Cu (r = 0.701) and MDA (r = 0.629) and GR (r = 0.441). CONCLUSION: The levels of Zn, Se, Cu, and oxidative stress (MDA), as well as related anti-oxidative enzymes (GR and GPX) in blood have important impact on the viral factors in chronic hepatitis C. The distribution of these parameters might be significant biomarkers for HCV. PMID:16094713

  16. Hepatitis C Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hepatitis C Antibody; Anti-HCV; HCV-PCR; HCV-RNA; Hepatitis C Viral Load Formal name: Viral Hepatitis C Antibody Screen; Viral Hepatitis C RNA by PCR; Hepatitis C Virus Genotype Related tests: ...

  17. Expanding the Host Range of Hepatitis C Virus through Viral Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    von Schaewen, Markus; Dorner, Marcus; Hueging, Kathrin; Foquet, Lander; Gerges, Sherif; Hrebikova, Gabriela; Heller, Brigitte; Bitzegeio, Julia; Doerrbecker, Juliane; Horwitz, Joshua A.; Gerold, Gisa; Suerbaum, Sebastian; Rice, Charles M.; Meuleman, Philip; Pietschmann, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hepatitis C virus (HCV) species tropism is incompletely understood. We have previously shown that at the level of entry, human CD81 and occludin (OCLN) comprise the minimal set of human factors needed for viral uptake into murine cells. As an alternative approach to genetic humanization, species barriers can be overcome by adapting HCV to use the murine orthologues of these entry factors. We previously generated a murine tropic HCV (mtHCV or Jc1/mCD81) strain harboring three mutations within the viral envelope proteins that allowed productive entry into mouse cell lines. In this study, we aimed to characterize the ability of mtHCV to enter and infect mouse hepatocytes in vivo and in vitro. Using a highly sensitive, Cre-activatable reporter, we demonstrate that mtHCV can enter mouse hepatocytes in vivo in the absence of any human cofactors. Viral entry still relied on expression of mouse CD81 and SCARB1 and was more efficient when mouse CD81 and OCLN were overexpressed. HCV entry could be significantly reduced in the presence of anti-HCV E2 specific antibodies, suggesting that uptake of mtHCV is dependent on viral glycoproteins. Despite mtHCV’s ability to enter murine hepatocytes in vivo, we did not observe persistent infection, even in animals with severely blunted type I and III interferon signaling and impaired adaptive immune responses. Altogether, these results establish proof of concept that the barriers limiting HCV species tropism can be overcome by viral adaptation. However, additional viral adaptations will likely be needed to increase the robustness of a murine model system for hepatitis C. PMID:27834208

  18. Anti-hepatitis A virus seroprevalence among patients with chronic viral liver disease in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Do Young; Ahn, Sang Hoon; Lee, Hyun Woong; Kim, Seung Up; Kim, Ja Kyung; Paik, Yong Han; Lee, Kwan Sik; Han, Kwang Hyub; Chon, Chae Yoon

    2007-11-01

    It is generally recommended that patients with chronic viral hepatitis should be vaccinated against hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection. We intended to evaluate the prevalence of IgG anti-HAV according to age in patients chronically infected with hepatitis B virus or hepatitis C virus in Korea. From June to October 2006, 303 patients (226 male, 77 female) with chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, or hepatocellular carcinoma were recruited (mean age 50.8+/-14.4 years; range 16-84). The sera were tested for antibodies to HAV, and overall and age-specific seroprevalence of anti-HAV was assessed. Hepatitis B virus infection was the etiology of liver diseases in 267 patients (88.1%), with hepatitis C virus infection in 36 (11.9%). The distribution of clinical diagnosis was chronic hepatitis in 86 patients (28.4%), liver cirrhosis in 36 (11.9%), and hepatocellular carcinoma in 181 (57.9%). The patients were categorized by decade of age and the distribution was as follows: nine patients (2.5%) in their teens, 23 (6.2%) in their 20s, 36 (12.4%) in their 30s, 78 (25.7%) in their 40s, 72 (24.1%) in their 50s, and 85 (29%) >or=61 years. The overall seroprevalence of anti-HAV was 87.8% (266/303), and no difference was observed in sex (86.7 vs. 90.9%, P=0.42). The seroprevalence in each age group was 22.2, 26.1, 72.2, 97.4, 100 and 98.8%, respectively, showing marked increase in those over 40 years of age (P<0.001). Our study demonstrates that most Korean patients over 40 years of age with chronic liver disease have already been exposed to HAV.

  19. Association of erectile dysfunction with depression in patients with chronic viral hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Bong Oh; Shim, Sang Goon; Yang, Hae Jin

    2015-05-14

    To investigate the prevalence of erectile dysfunction (ED) and its association with depression in patients with chronic viral hepatitis. This single center cross-sectional study was conducted from August 2013 through January 2014. All outpatients with chronic viral hepatitis in our liver clinic between 18 and 80 years of age were considered eligible for this study. The exclusion criteria included well-established causes of ED, such as diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, alcohol abuse, liver cirrhosis, ischemic heart disease, renal disease, neurologic disease, and malignancy. We also excluded the patients who had incompletely answered the questionnaires. ED was assessed using the validated Korean version of the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-5) scale. The Korean version of the self-administered Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) scale was used to assess depression in the patients. Demographic and medical data were obtained from the patients' medical records. Current or past history of psychiatric diagnosis and drug history including the use of an antiviral agent and an antidepressant were also recorded. A total of 727 patients met the initial eligibility criteria. Six hundred seventeen patients were excluded because their medical records contained one or more of the previously determined exclusion criteria. The remaining 110 patients were assessed based on the BDI and IIEF-5 questionnaires. Based on the IIEF-5 scale, the prevalence of ED among patients with chronic viral hepatitis was 40%. Compared with the non-ED group, patients in the ED group were older. The proportion of patients in the ED group who had a job or who were naïve peg-interferon users was lower than that in patients in the non-ED group. Patients with ED had significantly lower scores on the IIEF-5 scale than patients without ED (11.75 ± 4.88 vs 21.33 ± 1.86, P = 0.000). Patients with ED rated significantly higher scores on the BDI scale compared with patients without ED (12.59

  20. Interferon Induced Transfer of Viral Resistance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-01

    interferon: We decided that rather than first studying induction of tyrosinase in melanoma cells or plasminogen activator in ovarian granulosa cells as...177-184 (HP Publishing, New York). 14. Lockhart, R.Z. (1973). Criteria for acceptance of a viral inhibitor as an interferon and a general

  1. Duck hepatitis A virus serotype 1 minigenome: a model for studying the viral 3'UTR effect on viral translation.

    PubMed

    Liang, Ruiying; Li, Chuanfeng; Jin, Hongyan; Meng, Chunchun; Chen, Zongyan; Zhu, Jie; Miao, Qiuhong; Ding, Chan; Liu, Guangqing

    2015-12-01

    To date, the genetic replication and translation mechanisms as well as the pathogenesis of duck hepatitis A virus type 1 (DHAV-1) have not been adequately characterized due to the lack of a reliable and efficient cell culture system. Although the full-length infections clone system is the best platform to manipulate the virus, it is relatively difficult to assemble this system due to the lack of a suitable cell line. It has been proven that the minigenome system an efficient reverse genetics system for the study of RNA viruses. In some cases, it can be used to displace the infectious clone of RNA viruses. Here, we generated a minigenome for DHAV-1 with two luciferase reporter genes, firefly luciferase (Fluc) and Renilla luciferase (Rluc). The Rluc gene was used as a reference gene for the normalization of the Fluc gene expression in transfected cells, which provided a platform for studying the regulatory mechanisms of DHAV-1. Furthermore, to investigate the role of DHAV-3'UTR in the regulation of viral protein translation, deletions in the 3'UTR were introduced into the DHAV-1 minigenome. Luciferase activity, an indicator of virus translation, was then determined. These results showed that a minigenome system for DHAV-1 was successfully constructed for the first time and that the complete or partial deletion of the DHAV-3'UTR did not affect the expression level of the reporter gene, indicating that DHAV-1 translation may not be modulated by the viral genomic 3'UTR sequence.

  2. CD4+ T-Cell Help Is Required for Effective CD8+ T Cell-Mediated Resolution of Acute Viral Hepatitis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Trautmann, Tanja; Kozik, Jan-Hendrik; Carambia, Antonella; Richter, Kirsten; Lischke, Timo; Schwinge, Dorothee; Mittrücker, Hans-Willi; Lohse, Ansgar W.; Oxenius, Annette; Wiegard, Christiane; Herkel, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Cytotoxic CD8+ T cells are essential for the control of viral liver infections, such as those caused by HBV or HCV. It is not entirely clear whether CD4+ T-cell help is necessary for establishing anti-viral CD8+ T cell responses that successfully control liver infection. To address the role of CD4+ T cells in acute viral hepatitis, we infected mice with Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus (LCMV) of the strain WE; LCMV-WE causes acute hepatitis in mice and is cleared from the liver by CD8+ T cells within about two weeks. The role of CD4+ T-cell help was studied in CD4+ T cell-lymphopenic mice, which were either induced by genetic deficiency of the major histocompatibility (MHC) class II transactivator (CIITA) in CIITA−/− mice, or by antibody-mediated CD4+ cell depletion. We found that CD4+ T cell-lymphopenic mice developed protracted viral liver infection, which seemed to be a consequence of reduced virus-specific CD8+ T-cell numbers in the liver. Moreover, the anti-viral effector functions of the liver-infiltrating CD8+ T cells in response to stimulation with LCMV peptide, notably the IFN-γ production and degranulation capacity were impaired in CIITA−/− mice. The impaired CD8+ T-cell function in CIITA−/− mice was not associated with increased expression of the exhaustion marker PD-1. Our findings indicate that CD4+ T-cell help is required to establish an effective antiviral CD8+ T-cell response in the liver during acute viral infection. Insufficient virus control and protracted viral hepatitis may be consequences of impaired initial CD4+ T-cell help. PMID:24466045

  3. Antihistamine-Induced Hepatitis: 2 Cases Involving Loratidine

    PubMed Central

    Arshad, Hafiz; Khan, Arsalan; Assad, Usama; Kittaneh, Muaiad

    2016-01-01

    Antihistamine-induced hepatitis is rare. We present 2 cases of antihistamine-induced hepatitis with autoimmune features, caused by loratidine. One case was confirmed by rechallenge. Identifying and discontinuing the offending agent are essential for treatment. PMID:27293922

  4. Impact of sustained virus elimination on natural anticoagulant activity in patients with chronic viral hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Saray, Aida; Mesihović, Rusmir; Vukobrat-Bijedić, Zora; Gornjaković, Srđan; Vanis, Nenad; Mehmedović, Amila; Papović, Vedad; Glavaš, Sanjin

    2013-05-01

    Previous studies have reported reduced synthesis of various hemostatic factors in patients with chronic liver disease. Whether changes in plasma levels of these proteins reflect recovered liver synthetic function following virological eradication therapy has not been approved yet. The aim of the study was to determine the impact of sustained viral suppression achieved with pegylated interferon alpha and ribavirin on hemostatic parameters including natural anticoagulants in patients with chronic hepatitis C. The following coagulation screening tests were obtained in thirty patients with chronic viral hepatitis C before and after completion of antiviral treatment: activated partial thromboplastin time, prothrombin time, plasma fibrinogen and natural anticoagulant proteins antithrombin III, protein C (PC) and total protein S (PS) activity. Only patients who achieved durable virus suppression were included. The mean PC and PS levels were significantly lower in patients with chronic viral hepatitis C before antiviral therapy than in healthy controls (79.04 ± 16.19 % vs. 109.92 ± 21.33% and 54.04 ± 16.11% vs. 87.60 ± 8.15%, respectively; (p<0.001). Mean levels of PC exhibited a significant increase by 14.69 % after the completion of antiviral treatment (93.73 ± 14.18%, p<0.001) as well as PS levels, which significantly increased by 21.46% (75.50 ± 15.43, p<0.001) when compared with pre-treatment values. No remarkable fluctuations in other hemostatic parameters were noted. Protein C and protein S are sensitive markers of hepatocyte synthetic impairment and are valuable markers in monitoring the efficacy of antiviral treatment in chronic hepatitis C patients. Larger studies are needed to confirm our results.

  5. Why is hepatocellular carcinoma less attributable to viral hepatitis in Yemen?

    PubMed

    Saeed, Nadeem Mohammed; Bawazir, Amen Ahmed; Al-Zuraiqi, Masuod; Al-Negri, Fadhel; Yunus, Faisel

    2012-01-01

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) and the hepatitis C virus (HCV) are still public health problems in Yemen, with older individuals having much higher prevalence than younger generations. However, research on the prevalence of viral hepatitis in association with hepatocellular cancer (HCC) has not yet been undertaken in Yemen. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of HBV and HCV infection among HCC patients and to estimate the risk of these infections being associated with the development of HCC. A cross-sectional study was conducted on patients attending oncology outpatient in Sana'a, Yemen, through the period 2008-mid 2010 with confirmed diagnosis of HCC. A total of 88 cases were studied thoroughly with different investigations such as CT-scan, ultrasound, tumour marker, alpha-feto-protein and histopathological biopsy. A structured questionnaire was also applied and physical examination done to assess the general condition of the patients. Statistical package (SPSS version 16) was used for analysis of the data. The mean age of the cases was 61.2 years (± 12.6) with half over 60 years. There were fewer male patients (36%) compared to females and most (97%) only had basic /no formal education. Seventy nine (89%) were diagnosed as HCC cases with histopathological biopsy while the rest were diagnosed by ultrasound, CT scan, tumour marker, and alpha-feto-protein. Around one-third of the subjects were positive for HBsAg and HCV antibodies. Multivariate analysis showed infection with HCV and use of smoking was associated with HCC diagnosis. Although an association was observed between the occurrence of HCC and viral hepatitis (either HBV or HCV) and cigarette smoking, but the rate of viral infection was lower than what has been reported elsewhere.

  6. Cost-effectiveness of testing hepatitis B-positive pregnant women for hepatitis B e antigen or viral load.

    PubMed

    Fan, Lin; Owusu-Edusei, Kwame; Schillie, Sarah F; Murphy, Trudy V

    2014-05-01

    To estimate the cost-effectiveness of testing pregnant women with hepatitis B (hepatitis B surface antigen [HBsAg]-positive) for hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) or hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA, and administering maternal antiviral prophylaxis if indicated, to decrease breakthrough perinatal HBV transmission from the U.S. health care perspective. A Markov decision model was constructed for a 2010 birth cohort of 4 million neonates to estimate the cost-effectiveness of two strategies: testing HBsAg-positive pregnant women for 1) HBeAg or 2) HBV load. Maternal antiviral prophylaxis is given from 28 weeks of gestation through 4 weeks postpartum when HBeAg is positive or HBV load is high (10 copies/mL or greater). These strategies were compared with the current recommendation. All neonates born to HBsAg-positive women received recommended active-passive immunoprophylaxis. Effects were measured in quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) and all costs were in 2010 U.S. dollars. The HBeAg testing strategy saved $3.3 million and 3,080 QALYs and prevented 486 chronic HBV infections compared with the current recommendation. The HBV load testing strategy cost $3 million more than current recommendation, saved 2,080 QALYs, and prevented 324 chronic infections with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $1,583 per QALY saved compared with the current recommendations. The results remained robust over a wide range of assumptions. Testing HBsAg-positive pregnant women for HBeAg or HBV load followed by maternal antiviral prophylaxis if HBeAg-positive or high viral load to reduce perinatal hepatitis B transmission in the United States is cost-effective.

  7. Cost-Effectiveness of Testing Hepatitis B–Positive Pregnant Women for Hepatitis B e Antigen or Viral Load

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Lin; Owusu-Edusei, Kwame; Schillie, Sarah F.; Murphy, Trudy V.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To estimate the cost-effectiveness of testing pregnant women with hepatitis B (hepatitis B surface antigen [HBsAg]-positive) for hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) or hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA, and administering maternal antiviral prophylaxis if indicated, to decrease breakthrough perinatal HBV transmission from the U.S. health care perspective. METHODS A Markov decision model was constructed for a 2010 birth cohort of 4 million neonates to estimate the cost-effectiveness of two strategies: testing HBsAg-positive pregnant women for 1) HBeAg or 2) HBV load. Maternal antiviral prophylaxis is given from 28 weeks of gestation through 4 weeks postpartum when HBeAg is positive or HBV load is high (108 copies/mL or greater). These strategies were compared with the current recommendation. All neonates born to HBsAg-positive women received recommended active-passive immunoprophylaxis. Effects were measured in quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) and all costs were in 2010 U.S. dollars. RESULTS The HBeAg testing strategy saved $3.3 million and 3,080 QALYs and prevented 486 chronic HBV infections compared with the current recommendation. The HBV load testing strategy cost $3 million more than current recommendation, saved 2,080 QALYs, and prevented 324 chronic infections with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $1,583 per QALY saved compared with the current recommendations. The results remained robust over a wide range of assumptions. CONCLUSION Testing HBsAg-positive pregnant women for HBeAg or HBV load followed by maternal antiviral prophylaxis if HBeAg-positive or high viral load to reduce perinatal hepatitis B transmission in the United States is cost-effective. PMID:24785842

  8. Increased risk of viral hepatitis in Taiwanese male conscriptees with tattoos.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ming-Der; Lee, Sheng-Yu; Lee, Yuan-Bing

    2007-05-01

    A number of previous literature reviews and research studies have found a correlation between viral hepatitis infections and tattoos. The 1897 subjects of the current study were young adult male military recruits in southern Taiwan (476 with tattoos and 1421 without tattoos) who underwent induction physical examinations before conscription. During the examination, blood samples were collected to screen for hepatitis B surface antigen, antibodies to hepatitis C virus (anti-hepatitis B HCV), syphilis, and human immunodeficiency virus. Approximately 25.1% had tattoos, 11.3% were positive for HBV surface antigen, 2.5% were positive for HCV antibody, and 2.1% were positive for HCV RNA. The odds ratios for positive hepatitis B virus and HCV infection status were 1.38 (95% confidence interval, 0.98-1.93) and 5.00 (95% confidence interval, 1.83-13.67), respectively, for those with tattoos, compared with those with no tattoos. All conscriptees were seronegative for syphilis and human immunodeficiency virus.

  9. Liver transient elastography (Fibroscan): a place in the management algorithms of chronic viral hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Scott, David R; Levy, Miriam T

    2010-01-01

    Treatment guidelines are continuously evolving in chronic viral hepatitis, taking into consideration our greater understanding of natural history and therapeutic efficacy and safety. Key in the decision making process is an assessment of liver injury. Traditionally, liver biopsy has provided this information; however, this is an invasive procedure and not completely reliable. Liver transient elastography (Fibroscan) is exciting new technology that allows estimation of hepatic fibrosis through measurement of liver stiffness. It is acceptably accurate, safe, cheap, quick and widely applicable, and can reduce the need for liver biopsy in chronic hepatitis. In chronic hepatitis C, it can identify those most likely to benefit from treatment, as well as those with cirrhosis who require more specific care. In chronic hepatitis B, it could screen groups previously excluded from treatment (normal alanine aminotransferase and low DNA) to identify the subgroup that would benefit from therapy. It cannot replace biopsy in all settings, but it will narrow the group who do require biopsy, and provide information on liver damage in patients for whom biopsy would probably not have been considered.

  10. Risk of viral hepatitis among military personnel assigned to US Navy ships.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, R E; Malone, J D; Cloninger, L A; Rozmajzl, P J; Lewis, D; Butler, J; Cross, E; Gray, S; Hyams, K C

    1992-04-01

    A prevalence study of 2072 male US shipboard military personnel scheduled for deployment to South America/West Africa and the Mediterranean was conducted to determine whether serologic evidence of prior hepatitis A, B, or C infection is associated with exposure in foreign countries. There were 210 subjects (10.1%) who had antibodies to hepatitis A virus (anti-HAV), 76 (3.7%) to hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc), and 9 (0.4%) to hepatitis C virus (anti-HCV). By multivariate analysis, anti-HAV seropositivity was independently associated with age, non-white racial/ethnic groups, birth outside of the United States, and prior Caribbean deployment for less than 1 year. Anti-HBc seropositivity was independently associated with black and Filipino race/ethnicity, foreign birth, a history of a sexually transmitted disease, South Pacific/Indian Ocean deployment (less than 12 months), and South Pacific or Mediterranean duty for (greater than 1 year). No geographic risk factors were associated with anti-HCV positivity. These data indicate that military personnel deployed outside the United States are at increased risk of viral hepatitis infection and should be considered for vaccination.

  11. The tree shrews: useful animal models for the viral hepatitis and hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yang, Er-Bin; Cao, Ji; Su, Jian-Jia; Chow, Pierce

    2005-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV)-induced hepatitis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are major diseases worldwide. HBV infection and chemical carcinogens such as aflatoxin B1 are known to be two key factors in the development of HCC. Animal models for hepatitis and HCC are very useful in the in vivo studies of mechanism involved in the development and prevention of these diseases and the pre-clinical research of drugs for the treatment of these diseases. Now, several animals, such as woodchucks, ground squirrels, chimpanzees, ducks and tree shrews, have been used to establish hepatitis and HCC models. HCC occurs in some woodchucks and ground squirrels that are infected with their own hepatitis viruses and exposed to carcinogens. Chimpanzees and ducks can be infected with human and duck hepatitis B viruses, respectively, but HCC is rarely observed in these animals. The tree shrews are non-rodent, small animals and close to primates in evolution. This review focuses on the establishment of human HBV-induced hepatitis and human HBV-associated HCC in tree shrews and their applications in the study of HCC development.

  12. Rapid Intracellular Competition between Hepatitis C Viral Genomes as a Result of Mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Brian; Wissing, Silke; Herker, Eva; Ott, Melanie

    2013-01-01

    Cells infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) become refractory to further infection by HCV (T. Schaller et al., J. Virol. 81:4591–4603, 2007; D. M. Tscherne et al., J. Virol. 81:3693–3703, 2007). This process, termed superinfection exclusion, does not involve downregulation of surface viral receptors but instead occurs inside the cell at the level of RNA replication. The originally infecting virus may occupy replication niches or sequester host factors necessary for viral growth, preventing effective growth of viruses that enter the cell later. However, there appears to be an additional level of intracellular competition between viral genomes that occurs at or shortly following mitosis. In the setting of cellular division, when two viral replicons of equivalent fitness are present within a cell, each has an equal opportunity to exclude the other. In a population of dividing cells, the competition between viral genomes proceeds apace, randomly clearing one or the other genome from cells in the span of 9 to 12 days. These findings demonstrate a new mechanism of intracellular competition between HCV strains, which may act to further limit HCV's genetic diversity and ability to recombine in vivo. PMID:23097449

  13. Rapid intracellular competition between hepatitis C viral genomes as a result of mitosis.

    PubMed

    Webster, Brian; Wissing, Silke; Herker, Eva; Ott, Melanie; Greene, Warner C

    2013-01-01

    Cells infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) become refractory to further infection by HCV (T. Schaller et al., J. Virol. 81:4591-4603, 2007; D. M. Tscherne et al., J. Virol. 81:3693-3703, 2007). This process, termed superinfection exclusion, does not involve downregulation of surface viral receptors but instead occurs inside the cell at the level of RNA replication. The originally infecting virus may occupy replication niches or sequester host factors necessary for viral growth, preventing effective growth of viruses that enter the cell later. However, there appears to be an additional level of intracellular competition between viral genomes that occurs at or shortly following mitosis. In the setting of cellular division, when two viral replicons of equivalent fitness are present within a cell, each has an equal opportunity to exclude the other. In a population of dividing cells, the competition between viral genomes proceeds apace, randomly clearing one or the other genome from cells in the span of 9 to 12 days. These findings demonstrate a new mechanism of intracellular competition between HCV strains, which may act to further limit HCV's genetic diversity and ability to recombine in vivo.

  14. Clinical Factors and Viral Load Influencing Severity of Acute Hepatitis A.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun Woong; Chang, Dong-Yeop; Moon, Hong Ju; Chang, Hye Young; Shin, Eui-Cheol; Lee, June Sung; Kim, Kyung-Ah; Kim, Hyung Joon

    2015-01-01

    Clinical manifestations of hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection vary from mild to fulminant hepatic failure (FHF) in adults. We investigated the relationship between laboratory findings, including viral load, and clinical outcomes in patients with acute hepatitis A (AHA) and evaluated predictive factors for severe acute hepatitis (s-AH). We analyzed the clinical manifestations of AHA in 770 patients. Patients with a prothrombin time (PT) of less than 40% of normal were classified as s-AH and included 4 patients with FHF, 11 patients with acute renal failure, and 3 patients with prolonged jaundice (n = 128). Other patients were defined as mild acute hepatitis (m-AH) (n = 642). Serum samples were obtained from 48 patients with acute hepatitis A. Among them, 20 with s-AH, and 28 with m-AH, were tested for HAV RNA titer. In a multivariate analysis, age (HR = 1.042, P = 0.041), peak creatinine (HR = 4.014, P = 0.001), bilirubin (HR = 1.153, P = 0.003), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) (HR = 1.001, P < 0.001), initial lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) (HR = 1.000, P = 0.045) and total cholesterol (HR = 0.978, P < 0.001) were independent factors for s-AH. Serum HAV RNA was detected in 20/20 (100%) patients with s-AH and 22/28 (78.6%) patients with m-AH. In a multivariate analysis of the 48 patients who were tested for HAV RNA, peak ALT (HR = 1.001, P = 0.004) and HAV RNA titer (HR = 2.076, P = 0.012) were independent factors for s-AH. Clinical factors including age, peak creatinine, bilirubin, ALT, initial LDH and total cholesterol were independent factors for s-AH in a multivariate analysis. In particular, HAV load strongly correlated with the severity of hepatitis A.

  15. Clinical Factors and Viral Load Influencing Severity of Acute Hepatitis A

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun Woong; Chang, Dong-Yeop; Moon, Hong Ju; Chang, Hye Young; Shin, Eui-Cheol; Lee, June Sung; Kim, Kyung-Ah; Kim, Hyung Joon

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Clinical manifestations of hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection vary from mild to fulminant hepatic failure (FHF) in adults. We investigated the relationship between laboratory findings, including viral load, and clinical outcomes in patients with acute hepatitis A (AHA) and evaluated predictive factors for severe acute hepatitis (s-AH). Methods We analyzed the clinical manifestations of AHA in 770 patients. Patients with a prothrombin time (PT) of less than 40% of normal were classified as s-AH and included 4 patients with FHF, 11 patients with acute renal failure, and 3 patients with prolonged jaundice (n = 128). Other patients were defined as mild acute hepatitis (m-AH) (n = 642). Serum samples were obtained from 48 patients with acute hepatitis A. Among them, 20 with s-AH, and 28 with m-AH, were tested for HAV RNA titer. Results In a multivariate analysis, age (HR = 1.042, P = 0.041), peak creatinine (HR = 4.014, P = 0.001), bilirubin (HR = 1.153, P = 0.003), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) (HR = 1.001, P<0.001), initial lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) (HR = 1.000, P = 0.045) and total cholesterol (HR = 0.978, P<0.001) were independent factors for s-AH. Serum HAV RNA was detected in 20/20 (100%) patients with s-AH and 22/28 (78.6%) patients with m-AH. In a multivariate analysis of the 48 patients who were tested for HAV RNA, peak ALT (HR = 1.001, P = 0.004) and HAV RNA titer (HR = 2.076, P = 0.012) were independent factors for s-AH. Conclusions Clinical factors including age, peak creatinine, bilirubin, ALT, initial LDH and total cholesterol were independent factors for s-AH in a multivariate analysis. In particular, HAV load strongly correlated with the severity of hepatitis A. PMID:26090677

  16. A comparative review of HLA associations with hepatitis B and C viral infections across global populations.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rashmi; Kaul, Rashmi; Kaul, Anil; Khan, Khalid

    2007-03-28

    Hepatitis B (HBV) and hepatitis C (HCV) viral infection or co-infection leads to risk of development of chronic infection, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Immigration and globalization have added to the challenges of public health concerns regarding chronic HBV and HCV infections worldwide. The aim of this study is to review existing global literature across ethnic populations on HBV and HCV related human leukocyte antigen (HLA) associations in relation to susceptibility, viral persistence and treatment. Extensive literature search was conducted to explore the HLA associations in HBV and HCV infections reported across global populations over the past decade to understand the knowledge status, weaknesses and strengths of this information in different ethnic populations. HLA DR13 is consistently associated with HBV clearance globally. HLADRB1*11/*12 alleles and DQB1*0301 are associated with HBV persistence but with HCV clearance worldwide. Consistent association of DRB1*03 and *07 is observed with HCV susceptibility and non-responsiveness to HBV vaccination across the population. HLA DR13 is protective for vertical HBV and HCV transmission in Chinese and Italian neonates, but different alleles are associated with their susceptibility in these populations. HLA class I molecule interactions with Killer cell immunoglobulin like receptors (KIR) of natural killer (NK) cells modulate HCV infection outcome via regulating immune regulatory cells and molecules. HLA associations with HBV vaccination, interferon therapy in HBV and HCV, and with extra hepatic manifestations of viral hepatitis are also discussed. Systematic studies in compliance with global regulatory standards are required to identify the HLA specific viral epitope, stage specific T cell populations interacting with different HLA alleles during disease progression and viral clearance of chronic HBV or HCV infections among different ethnic populations. These studies would facilitate stage specific

  17. Role of chemokines and their receptors in viral persistence and liver damage during chronic hepatitis C virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Larrubia, Juan R; Benito-Martínez, Selma; Calvino, Miryam; Sanz-de-Villalobos, Eduardo; Parra-Cid, Trinidad

    2008-01-01

    Chemokines produced in the liver during hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection induce migration of activated T cells from the periphery to infected parenchyma. The milieu of chemokines secreted by infected hepatocytes is predominantly associated with the T-helper/T-cytotoxic type-1 cell (Th1/Tc1) response. These chemokines consist of CCL3 (macrophage inflammatory protein-1α; MIP-1α), CCL4 (MIP-1β), CCL5 (regulated on activation normal T cell expressed and secreted; RANTES), CXCL10 (interferon-γ−inducible protein-10; IP-10), CXCL11 (interferon-inducible T-cell α chemoattractant; I-TAC), and CXCL9 (monokine induced by interferon γ; Mig) and they recruit T cells expressing either CCR5 or CXCR3 chemokine receptors. Intrahepatic and peripheral blood levels of these chemokines are increased during chronic hepatitis C. The interaction between chemokines and their receptors is essential in recruiting HCV-specific T cells to control the infection. When the adaptive immune response fails in this task, non-specific T cells without the capacity to control the infection are also recruited to the liver, and these are ultimately responsible for the persistent hepatic damage. The modulation of chemokine receptor expression and chemokine secretion could be a viral escape mechanism to avoid specific T cell migration to the liver during the early phase of infection, and to maintain liver viability during the chronic phase, by impairing non-specific T cell migration. Some chemokines and their receptors correlate with liver damage, and CXCL10 (IP-10) and CXCR3 levels have shown a clinical utility as predictors of treatment response outcome. The regulation of chemokines and their receptors could be a future potential therapeutic target to decrease liver inflammation and to increase specific T cell migration to the infected liver. PMID:19084927

  18. The global burden of viral hepatitis from 1990 to 2013: findings from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013.

    PubMed

    Stanaway, Jeffrey D; Flaxman, Abraham D; Naghavi, Mohsen; Fitzmaurice, Christina; Vos, Theo; Abubakar, Ibrahim; Abu-Raddad, Laith J; Assadi, Reza; Bhala, Neeraj; Cowie, Benjamin; Forouzanfour, Mohammad H; Groeger, Justina; Hanafiah, Khayriyyah Mohd; Jacobsen, Kathryn H; James, Spencer L; MacLachlan, Jennifer; Malekzadeh, Reza; Martin, Natasha K; Mokdad, Ali A; Mokdad, Ali H; Murray, Christopher J L; Plass, Dietrich; Rana, Saleem; Rein, David B; Richardus, Jan Hendrik; Sanabria, Juan; Saylan, Mete; Shahraz, Saeid; So, Samuel; Vlassov, Vasiliy V; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Wiersma, Steven T; Younis, Mustafa; Yu, Chuanhua; El Sayed Zaki, Maysaa; Cooke, Graham S

    2016-09-10

    With recent improvements in vaccines and treatments against viral hepatitis, an improved understanding of the burden of viral hepatitis is needed to inform global intervention strategies. We used data from the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) Study to estimate morbidity and mortality for acute viral hepatitis, and for cirrhosis and liver cancer caused by viral hepatitis, by age, sex, and country from 1990 to 2013. We estimated mortality using natural history models for acute hepatitis infections and GBD's cause-of-death ensemble model for cirrhosis and liver cancer. We used meta-regression to estimate total cirrhosis and total liver cancer prevalence, as well as the proportion of cirrhosis and liver cancer attributable to each cause. We then estimated cause-specific prevalence as the product of the total prevalence and the proportion attributable to a specific cause. Disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) were calculated as the sum of years of life lost (YLLs) and years lived with disability (YLDs). Between 1990 and 2013, global viral hepatitis deaths increased from 0·89 million (95% uncertainty interval [UI] 0·86-0·94) to 1·45 million (1·38-1·54); YLLs from 31·0 million (29·6-32·6) to 41·6 million (39·1-44·7); YLDs from 0·65 million (0·45-0·89) to 0·87 million (0·61-1·18); and DALYs from 31·7 million (30·2-33·3) to 42·5 million (39·9-45·6). In 2013, viral hepatitis was the seventh (95% UI seventh to eighth) leading cause of death worldwide, compared with tenth (tenth to 12th) in 1990. Viral hepatitis is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Unlike most communicable diseases, the absolute burden and relative rank of viral hepatitis increased between 1990 and 2013. The enormous health loss attributable to viral hepatitis, and the availability of effective vaccines and treatments, suggests an important opportunity to improve public health. Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The global burden of viral hepatitis from 1990 to 2013: findings from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013

    PubMed Central

    Stanaway, Jeffrey D; Flaxman, Abraham D; Naghavi, Mohsen; Fitzmaurice, Christina; Vos, Theo; Abubakar, Ibrahim; Abu-Raddad, Laith J; Assadi, Reza; Bhala, Neeraj; Cowie, Benjamin; Forouzanfour, Mohammad H; Groeger, Justina; Hanafiah, Khayriyyah Mohd; Jacobsen, Kathryn H; James, Spencer L; MacLachlan, Jennifer; Malekzadeh, Reza; Martin, Natasha K; Mokdad, Ali A; Mokdad, Ali H; Murray, Christopher J L; Plass, Dietrich; Rana, Saleem; Rein, David B; Richardus, Jan Hendrik; Sanabria, Juan; Saylan, Mete; Shahraz, Saeid; So, Samuel; Vlassov, Vasiliy V; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Wiersma, Steven T; Younis, Mustafa; Yu, Chuanhua; Zaki, Maysaa El Sayed; Cooke, Graham S

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background With recent improvements in vaccines and treatments against viral hepatitis, an improved understanding of the burden of viral hepatitis is needed to inform global intervention strategies. We used data from the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) Study to estimate morbidity and mortality for acute viral hepatitis, and for cirrhosis and liver cancer caused by viral hepatitis, by age, sex, and country from 1990 to 2013. Methods We estimated mortality using natural history models for acute hepatitis infections and GBD’s cause-of-death ensemble model for cirrhosis and liver cancer. We used meta-regression to estimate total cirrhosis and total liver cancer prevalence, as well as the proportion of cirrhosis and liver cancer attributable to each cause. We then estimated cause-specific prevalence as the product of the total prevalence and the proportion attributable to a specific cause. Disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) were calculated as the sum of years of life lost (YLLs) and years lived with disability (YLDs). Findings Between 1990 and 2013, global viral hepatitis deaths increased from 0·89 million (95% uncertainty interval [UI] 0·86–0·94) to 1·45 million (1·38–1·54); YLLs from 31·0 million (29·6–32·6) to 41·6 million (39·1–44·7); YLDs from 0·65 million (0·45–0·89) to 0·87 million (0·61–1·18); and DALYs from 31·7 million (30·2–33·3) to 42·5 million (39·9–45·6). In 2013, viral hepatitis was the seventh (95% UI seventh to eighth) leading cause of death worldwide, compared with tenth (tenth to 12th) in 1990. Interpretation Viral hepatitis is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Unlike most communicable diseases, the absolute burden and relative rank of viral hepatitis increased between 1990 and 2013. The enormous health loss attributable to viral hepatitis, and the availability of effective vaccines and treatments, suggests an important opportunity to improve public health. Funding Bill & Melinda

  20. Treatment of children with chronic viral hepatitis: what is available and what is in store.

    PubMed

    Vajro, Pietro; Veropalumbo, Claudio; Maddaluno, Sergio; Salerno, Mariacarolina; Parenti, Giancarlo; Pignata, Claudio

    2013-08-01

    At present, therapy of children with chronic hepatitis B and C is still based on few drugs, all burdened by a series of side-effects, unsatisfactory serum conversion rates, and/or drug-resistance. Moreover, selection of subjects to treat with conventional therapies is not univocal, especially during the pediatric age when the disease course is often mild with significant spontaneous seroconversion rate. Our review deals with pros and cons points when a physician decides to design a drug therapy for a child with chronic viral hepatitis, and different possible therapeutic opportunities. A literature search was performed through PubMed. The newest articles, reviews, systematic reviews, and guidelines were included in this review. The management of children with viral hepatitis is still controversial over whom and when to treat and the use of drug(s). Novel therapeutic strategies have been evaluated only in clinical and preclinical trials involving, for instance, "therapeutic" vaccines. The data on safety and effectiveness of new drugs are also reviewed. The results of reported studies confirmed that at least some of the new drugs, with greater efficacy and/or minor side-effects, will be used clinically.

  1. Clinical course and management of acute and chronic viral hepatitis during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Licata, A; Ingrassia, D; Serruto, A; Soresi, M; Giannitrapani, L; Montalto, G; Craxì, A; Almasio, P L

    2015-06-01

    Pregnancy is a para-physiologic condition, which usually evolves without any complications in the majority of women, even if in some circumstances moderate or severe clinical problems can also occur. Among complications occurring during the second and the third trimester very important are those considered as concurrent to pregnancy such as hyperemesis gravidarum, intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy, HELLP syndrome and acute fatty liver of pregnancy. The liver diseases concurrent to pregnancy typically occur at specific times during the gestation and they may lead to significant maternal and foetal morbidity and mortality. Commonly, delivery of the foetus, even preterm, usually terminates the progression of these disorders. All chronic liver diseases, such as chronic viral hepatitis, autoimmune hepatitis, Wilson's disease, and cirrhosis of different aetiologies may cause liver damage, independently from pregnancy. In this review we will also comment the clinical implications of pregnancies occurring in women who received a orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) Therefore, the management of immunosuppressive therapy before and after the delivery in women who received liver transplant is becoming a relevant clinical issue. Finally, we will focus on acute and chronic viral hepatitis occurring during pregnancy, on management of advanced liver disease and we will review the literature on the challenging issue regarding pregnancy and OLT. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Dried blood spots, valid screening for viral hepatitis and human immunodeficiency virus in real-life

    PubMed Central

    Mössner, Belinda K; Staugaard, Benjamin; Jensen, Janne; Lillevang, Søren Thue; Christensen, Peer B; Holm, Dorte Kinggaard

    2016-01-01

    AIM To detect chronic hepatitis B (CHB), chronic hepatitis C (CHC) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections in dried blood spot (DBS) and compare these samples to venous blood sampling in real-life. METHODS We included prospective patients with known viral infections from drug treatment centers, a prison and outpatient clinics and included blood donors as negative controls. Five drops of finger capillary blood were spotted on filter paper, and a venous blood sample was obtained. The samples were analyzed for HBsAg, anti-HBc, anti-HBs, anti-HCV, and anti-HIV levels as well as subjected to a combined nucleic acid test (NAT) for HBV DNA, HCV RNA and HIV RNA. RESULTS Samples from 404 subjects were screened (85 CHB, 116 CHC, 114 HIV and 99 blood donors). DBS had a sensitivity of > 96% and a specificity of > 98% for the detection of all three infections. NAT testing did not improve sensitivity, but correctly classified 95% of the anti-HCV-positive patients with chronic and past infections. Anti-HBc and anti-HBS showed low sensitivity in DBS (68% and 42%). CONCLUSION DBS sampling, combined with an automated analysis system, is a feasible screening method to diagnose chronic viral hepatitis and HIV infections outside of the health care system. PMID:27672281

  3. Evaluation of viral load in saliva from patients with chronic hepatitis C infection.

    PubMed

    Xavier Santos, Renata L; de Deus, Dayse M V; de Almeida Lopes, Edmundo P; Duarte Coêlho, Maria R C; de Castro, Jurema F L

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus can be detected in blood and other bodily fluids, such as saliva. The aim of this study was to detect and quantify the HCV-RNA in saliva and plasma from patients with chronic hepatitis C infections, as well as check the level of viral load in sex groups (age, ethnicity and virus subtypes). Whole saliva and blood from 70 patients with chronic hepatitis C infections attended at the department of gastroenterology from University Hospital. The HCV-RNA load was performed by qRT-PCR using Sybr Green I master mix. HCV-RNA was detected in 80% (56/70) of patients in saliva and 92.85% (65/70) in plasma. The median of the viral load in the plasma was of 4.87 log10, and in saliva, it was 3.32log10, (p = 0.0005). Female patients and black patients exhibited a negative correlation between the HCV-RNA load in saliva vs. the HCV-RNA load in plasma (r = -0.3172, CI95% -0.6240 to -0.03736, p = 0.0491) and (r = -0.3141; IC95% -0.6069 to -0.05926; p = 0.0209), respectively. HCV-RNA was detected and quantified in saliva samples, and according to the quantification levels, saliva may be a possible transmission source of HCV, particularly in women and people of black ethnicity who develop chronic HCV infections.

  4. Isolation and immunizations with hepatitis A viral structural proteins: induction of antiprotein, antiviral, and neutralizing responses.

    PubMed

    Hughes, J V; Stanton, L W

    1985-08-01

    An immune affinity purification procedure for hepatitis A virus (HAV) was designed which yielded milligram quantities of the virus with greater than 95% purity. The major structural proteins VP-1, VP-2, and VP-3 were isolated from the purified virus by electroelution from sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels and used to immunize Lewis rats (three to four doses, 10 to 15 micrograms per dose). The two Lewis rats immunized with VP-1 developed a strong antibody response to VP-1, as determined by Western blot analysis and immune precipitation of the denatured protein. These animals also developed a good antibody response to the whole virus, as demonstrated by a positive response in a competitive radioimmunoassay (HAV antibody test) and by precipitation of the whole virus. In addition, both animals developed a low titer neutralizing antibody to HAV, as demonstrated by an in vitro cell culture assay. While the two rats receiving VP-2 developed only minimal responses to the protein and to the virus by the same assays described above, one of the two developed a significant neutralizing antibody to HAV. The immunization of one Lewis rat with VP-3 induced a good antibody response to both denatured protein and the whole virus. This serum sample was also demonstrated to neutralize the viral infectivity. Finally, two rabbits that had received inoculations of sodium dodecyl sulfate and heat-disrupted HAV (containing 20 to 30 micrograms of each protein per dose) developed good antiprotein responses to all of the proteins and good antiviral responses, including a consistently significant neutralizing activity. The neutralizing antibody responses suggest that the structural proteins of HAV, or a portion of them, could provide the basis for a subunit vaccine for HAV.

  5. Molecular mechanisms of hepatitis C virus-induced hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Vescovo, T; Refolo, G; Vitagliano, G; Fimia, G M; Piacentini, M

    2016-10-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major leading cause of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). HCV-induced hepatocarcinogenesis is a multistep process resulting from a combination of pathway alterations that are either caused directly by viral factors or immune mediated as a consequence of a chronic state of inflammation. Host genetic variation is now emerging as an additional element that contribute to increase the risk of developing HCC. The advent of direct-acting antiviral agents foresees a rapid decline of HCC rate in HCV patients. However, a full understanding of the HCV-mediated tumourigenic process is required to elucidate if pro-oncogenic signatures may persist after virus clearance, and to identify novel tools for HCC prevention and therapy. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of the molecular mechanisms responsible for HCV-induced hepatocarcinogenesis.

  6. A three-year survey of viral hepatitis in West London.

    PubMed

    Stewart, J S; Farrow, L J; Clifford, R E; Lamb, S G; Coghill, N F; Lindon, R L; Sanderson, I M; Dodd, P A; Smith, H G; Preece, J W; Zuckerman, A J

    1978-07-01

    During a total population survey of viral hepatitis in the London Boroughs of Hounslow, Richmond and Ealing, 784 patients were seen in three years from 1 March 1972 to 28 February 1975. A diagnosis of viral hepatitis was accepted in 489. The annual incidence was 24 per 100 000. 455 of the patients were tested for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) by a radioimmunoassay technique and 93 (20%) of these were positive. The majority of the patients with type B hepatitis were in their third or fourth decades. None was under the age of 16. The male to female ratio among patients with hepatitis B was 2 to 1 in those under the age of 30 and 5 to 1 in those aged 30 and over. The seasonal distribution of viral hepatitis showed a peak in the spring, solely from an increased incidence of non-B hepatitis, and a second, smaller peak in the autumn. There was no appreciable clustering of patients except for one local outbreak in a housing estate during the first year affecting mainly children going to the same primary school, and their parents. Patients with hepatitis B had a longer pre-icteric illness (p less than 0.05), greater duration of jaundice (p less than 0.001) and higher peak levels of serum bilirubin (p less than 0.0005) and serum alanine amino transferase (A1T) (p less than 0.03) than patients with non-B hepatitis. The finding of the surface antigen was also associated with a higher frequency of skin rash (p less than 0.0005) and a greater duration of arthralgia (p less than 0.03). Among the HBsAg negative patients the incidence of arthralgia increased with age (p less than 0.0005). Abdominal pain (p less than 0.005) and vomiting (p less than 0.005) were more common in the young. The injection experience of patients with hepatitis B showed a high proportion of 'non-therapeutic' exposure such as drug addiction. Significantly more HBsAg positive men were single than in the local community (p less than 0.001) or among the HBsAg negative men (p less than 0.01). There

  7. [Evidence-based medicine: treatment of chronic hepatitis C. Liege Study Group on Viral Hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Delwaide, J; Gérard, C

    2000-05-01

    The Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects nearly 170 million people in the world. The major characteristic of virus C is its tendency to chronicity in more than 85% of cases. Generally asymptomatic, HCV infection may also evolve with time to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. During the last few years, HCV-related end-stage cirrhosis has become the first cause of liver transplantation. In 10 years only, very significant progress has been made in the knowledge of the virus, not only in the field of diagnosis but also in therapy. Several consensus conferences taking last discoveries into account have been organized in order to promote recommendations useful for the management of hepatitis C patients. The aim of this short overview is to summarize practical recommendations that emerged recently from consensus meetings.

  8. Viral hepatitis and tests for the Australia (hepatitis-associated) antigen and antibody*

    PubMed Central

    1970-01-01

    ”Australia” antigen has been shown to be closely associated with serum hepatitis. The presence of the antigen and its corresponding antiserum can be detected in human beings (and in certain primates) by a number of laboratory tests. This is of great potential importance to blood transfusion and similar services because detection and exclusion of blood donors carrying the antigen might significantly reduce the risk of hepatitis from transfusions and other procedures. In this paper the present state of knowledge of ”Australia” or ”hepatitis-associated” antigen is reviewed. The currently employed tests are described in detail and their use, interpretation and limitations are discussed. Though it appears from early studies that the application of routine screening tests to blood donors would only reduce the risk to recipients by less than 25%, the more sensitive tests becoming available may increase this percentage and it is recommended that where competent laboratory services are available steps should be taken to set up a scheme for testing donors—provided that the current limitations of such a scheme are clearly recognized. ImagesFIG. 2FIG. 3FIG. 1FIG. 6FIG. 7FIG. 8 PMID:4991606

  9. Kinetic Changes of Viremia and Viral Antigens of Hepatitis B Virus During and After Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingli; Bi, Yongchun; Xu, Chenyu; Liu, Lanhua; Xu, Biao; Chen, Tingmei; Chen, Jie; Pan, Mingjie; Hu, Yali; Zhou, Yi-Hua

    2015-11-01

    Whether pregnancy may influence the replication of hepatitis B virus (HBV) remains unknown. The authors aimed to clarify this issue by observing the kinetics of HBV deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and viral antigens in women during and after pregnancy. Total, 371 pregnant women with positive hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) were enrolled. Serial sera collected during and after pregnancy were quantitatively measured for HBV DNA, HBsAg, and hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg). Total, 34 HBeAg-positive women underwent alanine aminotransferase (ALT) elevation during or after pregnancy; levels of HBV DNA and HBsAg in them showed no obvious change between second trimester or delivery and 7 to 12 months postpartum (P > 0.05). The 337 others had normal alanine aminotransferase levels during pregnancy and postpartum. In 147 HBeAg-positive women with follow-up 7 to 12 months postpartum, the average levels of HBV DNA (>7.0 log10 IU/mL), HBsAg (>4.0 log10 IU/mL), and HBeAg (>3.0 log10 S/CO) were longitudinally constant during pregnancy and postpartum, respectively. In 173 women with follow-up 4.8 years postpartum, neither HBV DNA levels nor antigen titers showed significant difference between second trimester and 4.8 years postpartum, regardless of the HBeAg status. In addition, levels of HBV DNA and viral antigens in second trimester, around delivery, 6 to 8 weeks and 7 to 12 months postpartum showed no marked fluctuations, respectively. Serum levels of HBV DNA and viral antigens in HBsAg-positive women are highly constant during pregnancy and postpartum, regardless of the HBeAg status and alanine aminotransferase levels. This demonstrates that pregnancy has little influence on the HBV replication and antigen expression.

  10. [Epidemiology of viral hepatitis B in the Iasi County in the interval 1990-2005].

    PubMed

    Duca, Elena; Manole, Alina; Hurmuzache, M; Ivan, A

    2006-01-01

    Viral hepatitis and especially hepatitis B (HVB) continue to represent major health problems. In Romania, the morbidity from HVB is still 3 to 5 times higher than in Western Europe and North America. In the Iasi County, the effectiveness of the preventive measures is proven by a curve of morbidity values close to or even below those recorded at national level. As a result of the preventive interventions, in the interval 1996-2005, the morbidity from HVB was lower in all age groups as compared to the interval 1990-1995. The significant decrease in morbidity following the introduction of a vaccination program and the preservation of a constantly descending trend reflect the favourable change in the epidemiological process of HVB.

  11. [Viral hepatitis B in a patient with follicular lymphoma treated with biological therapy].

    PubMed

    Holub, M; Kořínková, M; Chalupa, P

    2011-02-01

    Reactivation, recurrence or acute infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) represent severe complications of biological therapy. Reported is a case of a 58-year-old female treated in the past with cytostatics and rituximab for follicular lymphoma, in whom HBV infection was detected during a follow-up of the contacts of her partner diagnosed with acute viral hepatitis B. At the beginning, the patient had a very high serum level of HBV DNA (4.3 × 108 IU/mL) and therefore she was treated with combined antiviral therapy (lamivudine and tenofovir). After 10 months, the serum level of HBV DNA decreased significantly (3,100 IU/mL) and the combined antiviral therapy was switched to monotherapy with tenofovir. Another 5 months later, the serum level of HBV DNA was only 950 IU/mL. This case demonstrates important clinical problems connected with HBV infection in immunocompromised persons.

  12. [Interferon treatment of chronic viral hepatitis in Catalonia, Spain. Retrospective analysis].

    PubMed

    Buti, M; Bruguera, M; Casany, S; Gaspar, M J; Esteban, R

    1999-03-01

    To analyze the results of interferon treatment in chronic hepatitis B and C in Catalonia, Spain, during the first two years of the Assessment Board of the therapeutic use of interferon. A retrospective analysis of the results of 2,142 applications for interferon treatment for chronic hepatitis B (n = 158) and C (n = 1,970) from January, 1993 to December, 1994 presented to the Interferon Assessment Board, was performed by the study of the data of the applications-questionnaires send by the applying physicians. The global rate of response to the questionnaires was of 85%. For chronic hepatitis C, three treatment schedules were evaluated included 936 cases out of the 1,931 authorizations. A sustained response was observed in 20% of the cases treated with 3 MU of interferon for 6 months, in 32% of those treated over 12 months and 20% of those treated with 5-6 MU of interferon for 6 months. The patients with chronic hepatitis B were divided into 2 groups in relation to the presence or absence of HBeAg. Of the 153 applications, 34 belonging to HBeAg positive patients and 52 anti-HBe positive patients who received interferon treatment at 5-10 MU three times per week for 4-6 months were evaluated. Sustained response was observed in 44% of the chronic hepatitis HBeAg positive cases and in 25% of the anti-HBe cases treated. In general, response to treatment was higher in females and in those subjects under the age of 40 years than in male and in older subjects. No differences were observed in the response among the different types of interferon. Withdrawal from treatment due to adverse effects or because of the patient's wish was similar among the patients with chronic hepatitis B (5%) and C (3%), being higher in those undergoing treatment for a longer period of time. The data obtained from the Interferon Assessment Board for the treatment of viral hepatitis demonstrates the use of very variable schedules of this drug, especially in chronic 85% and complete evaluation was

  13. Peek-a-boo: membrane hijacking and the pathogenesis of viral hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Zongdi; Lemon, Stanley M.

    2014-01-01

    Historically, animal viruses have been classified on the basis of the presence or absence of an envelope – an external lipid bilayer membrane typically carrying one or more viral glycoproteins. However, growing evidence indicates that some ‘non-enveloped’ viruses circulate in the blood of infected individuals enveloped in host-derived membranes that provide protection from neutralizing antibodies. In this opinion piece, we discuss this novel strategy for virus survival and consider how it contributes to the pathogenesis of acute viral hepatitis. The acquisition of an envelope by ‘non-enveloped’ viruses profoundly influences their interaction with the host at both the cellular and system level, and challenges how we think about vaccine protection against these infections. PMID:24268716

  14. LIVER BIOPSY: IMPORTANCE OF SPECIMEN SIZE IN THE DIAGNOSIS AND STAGING OF CHRONIC VIRAL HEPATITIS

    PubMed Central

    CORAL, Gabriela P.; ANTUNES, Aline Dal Pozzo; SERAFINI, Ana Paula Almeida; ARAUJO, Fernanda B.; de MATTOS, Angelo Alves

    2016-01-01

    Liver biopsy is the gold standard method for the grading and staging of chronic viral hepatitis, but optimal biopsy specimen size remains controversial. The aim of this study was to evaluate the quality of liver specimen (number of portal tracts) and to evaluate the impact of the number of portal tracts in the staging of chronic hepatitis. Material and Methods: 468 liver biopsies from consecutive patients with hepatitis C virus and hepatitis B virus infection from 2009 to 2010 were evaluated. Results: The length of fragment was less than 10 mm in 43 cases (9.3%), between 10 and 14 mm in 114 (24.3%), and ≥ 15 mm in 311 (64.4%); of these, in 39 (8.3%) cases were ≥ 20 mm. The mean representation of portal tracts was 17.6 ± 2.1 (5-40); in specimens ≥ 15 mm the mean portal tract was 13.5 ± 4.7 and in cases ≤ 15 mm was 11.4 ± 5.0 (p = 0.002). Cases with less than 11 portal tracts were associated with F3, and cases with 11 or more portal tracts with F2 (p = 0.001). Conclusion: this study demonstrated the good quality of liver biopsy and a relationship between the macroscopic size of the fragment and the number of portal tracts. PMID:26910447

  15. Micromethod for phosphonoformate inhibition assay of hepatitis B viral DNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Lin, H J; Wu, P C; Lai, C L; Chak, W

    1984-04-01

    A micromethod for the specific measurement of hepatitis B viral DNA polymerase in serum is presented, based on the phosphonoformate inhibition assay (J Med Virol 12: 61-70, 1983). In the micromethod, sample volume is reduced to 120 microL and the ultracentrifugation step is eliminated. The method allows good discrimination between serum infected with hepatitis B virus and uninfected serum. The cutoff value for rate of nucleotide incorporation, based on assays of 41 serum specimens negative for hepatitis B serological markers, was about 15 nU/L (90th percentile). Serum containing hepatitis B surface and antigens exhibited rates of phosphonoformate-inhibitive nucleotide incorporation of 150 (SD 150) nU/L, with an upper 90th percentile range of 17 to 667 nU/L (n = 41). The micromethod makes use of commercially available [32P]dCTP (specific activity about 7000 kCi/mol). 125I-labeled dCTP was found to be unsuitable for this assay. Human DNA polymerases in serum are detected by this method but are excluded from the phosphonoformate-inhibitive fraction.

  16. Effect of season and sunlight on viral kinetics during hepatitis C virus therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Alvarez, Noemi; Pascasio Acevedo, Juan Manuel; Quintero, Enrique; Fernández Vázquez, Inmaculada; García-Eliz, María; de la Revilla Negro, Juan; Crespo García, Javier; Hernández-Guerra, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Background and aims Rapid viral response (RVR) during antiviral treatment for hepatitis C virus (HCV) predicts sustained viral response (SVR). Recently, vitamin D levels have been associated with SVR. As sunlight is the most important source of vitamin D and shows seasonal variation, we evaluated the effect of season on viral kinetics during peginterferon/ribavirin-based therapy for HCV. Methods Consecutive HCV patients treated with peginterferon/ribavirin and boceprevir/ telaprevir (June 2011–July 2014) were included. Patients were grouped according to season when therapy was initiated (Season A: May–October and Season B: November–April) depending on hours of daily sunlight. Multiple logistic regression analysis included factors known to influence SVR to treatment. The dependent variables were undetectable viral load (VL) or VL ≤15 UI/mL (VL ≤15) at weeks 4, 8 and 12, end of treatment and SVR. Results The study included 930 patients (66.8% men; median 54 years) treated with telaprevir (n=537) or boceprevir, without (n=481) or with lead-in therapy of peginterferon/ribavirin. Baseline characteristics of patients in Season A (45.3%, n=421) and Season B groups were similar. Overall, a higher rate of RVR (23.5% vs 16.1%, p=0.005) and VL ≤15 (51.0% vs 38.6%, p≤0.001) was observed in patients starting treatment during Season A versus Season B. By logistic regression analysis, initiating treatment in Season A proved to be an independent predictor of RVR and VL ≤15. Conclusions In our setting, seasonality affects viral kinetics in HCV genotype 1 patients treated with peginterferon/ribavirin-based therapy. Our findings support the hypothesis that vitamin D influences viral response to peginterferon/ribavirin-based therapy. PMID:28321328

  17. Relation between viral fitness and immune escape within the hepatitis C virus protease.

    PubMed

    Söderholm, J; Ahlén, G; Kaul, A; Frelin, L; Alheim, M; Barnfield, C; Liljeström, P; Weiland, O; Milich, D R; Bartenschlager, R; Sällberg, M

    2006-02-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) mutates within human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class I restricted immunodominant epitopes of the non-structural (NS) 3/4A protease to escape cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) recognition and promote viral persistence. However, variability is not unlimited, and sometimes almost absent, and factors that restrict viral variability have not been defined experimentally. We wished to explore whether the variability of the immunodominant CTL epitope at residues 1073-1081 of the NS3 protease was limited by viral fitness. Venous blood was obtained from six patients (four HLA-A2+) with chronic HCV infection and from one HLA-A2+ patient with acute HCV infection. NS3/4A genes were amplified from serum, cloned in a eukaryotic expression plasmid, sequenced, and expressed. CTL recognition of naturally occurring and artificially introduced escape mutations in HLA-A2-restricted NS3 epitopes were determined using CTLs from human blood and genetically immunised HLA-A2-transgenic mice. HCV replicons were used to test the effect of escape mutations on HCV protease activity and RNA replication. Sequence analysis of NS3/4A confirmed low genetic variability. The major viral species had functional proteases with 1073-1081 epitopes that were generally recognised by cross reactive human and murine HLA-A2 restricted CTLs. Introduction of mutations at five positions of the 1073-1081 epitope prevented CTL recognition but three of these reduced protease activity and RNA replication. Viral fitness can indeed limit the variability of HCV within immunological epitopes. This helps to explain why certain immunological escape variants never appear as a major viral species in infected humans.

  18. Subviral Hepatitis B Virus Filaments, like Infectious Viral Particles, Are Released via Multivesicular Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Bingfu; Himmelsbach, Kiyoshi; Ren, Huimei; Boller, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In addition to infectious viral particles, hepatitis B virus-replicating cells secrete large amounts of subviral particles assembled by the surface proteins, but lacking any capsid and genome. Subviral particles form spheres (22-nm particles) and filaments. Filaments contain a much larger amount of the large surface protein (LHBs) compared to spheres. Spheres are released via the constitutive secretory pathway, while viral particles are ESCRT-dependently released via multivesicular bodies (MVBs). The interaction of virions with the ESCRT machinery is mediated by α-taxilin that connects the viral surface protein LHBs with the ESCRT component tsg101. Since filaments in contrast to spheres contain a significant amount of LHBs, it is unclear whether filaments are released like spheres or like virions. To study the release of subviral particles in the absence of virion formation, a core-deficient HBV mutant was generated. Confocal microscopy, immune electron microscopy of ultrathin sections and isolation of MVBs revealed that filaments enter MVBs. Inhibition of MVB biogenesis by the small-molecule inhibitor U18666A or inhibition of ESCRT functionality by coexpression of transdominant negative mutants (Vps4A, Vps4B, and CHMP3) abolishes the release of filaments while the secretion of spheres is not affected. These data indicate that in contrast to spheres which are secreted via the secretory pathway, filaments are released via ESCRT/MVB pathway like infectious viral particles. IMPORTANCE This study revises the current model describing the release of subviral particles by showing that in contrast to spheres, which are secreted via the secretory pathway, filaments are released via the ESCRT/MVB pathway like infectious viral particles. These data significantly contribute to a better understanding of the viral morphogenesis and might be helpful for the design of novel antiviral strategies. PMID:26719264

  19. Prediction of hepatitis C virus interferon/ribavirin therapy outcome based on viral nucleotide attributes using machine learning algorithms.

    PubMed

    KayvanJoo, Amir Hossein; Ebrahimi, Mansour; Haqshenas, Gholamreza

    2014-08-23

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) causes chronic hepatitis C in 2-3% of world population and remains one of the health threatening human viruses, worldwide. In the absence of an effective vaccine, therapeutic approach is the only option to combat hepatitis C. Interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) and ribavirin (RBV) combination alone or in combination with recently introduced new direct-acting antivirals (DAA) is used to treat patients infected with HCV. The present study utilized feature selection methods (Gini Index, Chi Squared and machine learning algorithms) and other bioinformatics tools to identify genetic determinants of therapy outcome within the entire HCV nucleotide sequence. Using combination of several algorithms, the present study performed a comprehensive bioinformatics analysis and identified several nucleotide attributes within the full-length nucleotide sequences of HCV subtypes 1a and 1b that correlated with treatment outcome. Feature selection algorithms identified several nucleotide features (e.g. count of hydrogen and CG). Combination of algorithms utilized the selected nucleotide attributes and predicted HCV subtypes 1a and 1b therapy responders from non-responders with an accuracy of 75.00% and 85.00%, respectively. In addition, therapy responders and relapsers were categorized with an accuracy of 82.50% and 84.17%, respectively. Based on the identified attributes, decision trees were induced to differentiate different therapy response groups. The present study identified new genetic markers that potentially impact the outcome of hepatitis C treatment. In addition, the results suggest new viral genomic attributes that might influence the outcome of IFN-mediated immune response to HCV infection.

  20. [Mathematical models in epidemiology: Study on viral hepatitis in Italy (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Jovine, R; Ghezzo, F; Orecchio, F

    1979-01-01

    In this paper a mathematical approach to the epidemics is proposed. The method is based upon a model able to describe any time-depending phenomena using the following elements: "class", "transition" and "related probability". The solution of the differential equations describing the model are obtained: first, by numerical techniques; second, by a Montecarlo simulation method. Deterministic and stochastic solutions which have been obtained, by applying the model to the study of viral hepatitis in Italy during 1960--1970, have been compared each other, to improve the model itself.

  1. Application of mass spectrometry to molecular surveillance of hepatitis B and C viral infections.

    PubMed

    Ganova-Raeva, Lilia M; Dimitrova, Zoya E; Campo, David S; Khudyakov, Yury

    2012-01-01

    Detection of genotypes and drug resistance mutations are important molecular tools assisting in clinical management of patients with chronic hepatitis B and C. Together with methods for assessment of genetic heterogeneity and relatedness of viral strains, they form the foundation of molecular surveillance. Currently, all these methods are based mainly on DNA sequencing followed by phylogenetic analysis. Mass spectrometry (MS) emerged recently as a rapid, cost-effective, reproducible and accurate alternative approach. MS-based molecular assays are highly amenable to automation and provide a suitable platform for routine application to the surveillance of HBV and HCV infections.

  2. Design evaluation and optimization for models of hepatitis C viral dynamics.

    PubMed

    Guedj, Jeremie; Bazzoli, Caroline; Neumann, Avidan U; Mentré, France

    2011-05-10

    Mathematical modeling of hepatitis C viral (HCV) kinetics is widely used for understanding viral pathogenesis and predicting treatment outcome. The standard model is based on a system of five non-linear ordinary differential equations (ODE) that describe both viral kinetics and changes in drug concentration after treatment initiation. In such complex models parameter estimation is challenging and requires frequent sampling measurements on each individual. By borrowing information between study subjects, non-linear mixed effect models can deal with sparser sampling from each individual. However, the search for optimal designs in this context has been limited by the numerical difficulty of evaluating the Fisher information matrix (FIM). Using the software PFIM, we show that a linearization of the statistical model avoids most of the computational burden, while providing a good approximation to the FIM. We then compare the precision of the parameters that can be expected using five study designs from the literature. We illustrate the usefulness of rationalizing data sampling by showing that, for a given level of precision, optimal design could reduce the total number of measurements by up 50 per cent. Our approach can be used by a statistician or a clinician aiming at designing an HCV viral kinetics study.

  3. Quantifying perinatal transmission of Hepatitis B viral quasispecies by tag linkage deep sequencing.

    PubMed

    Du, Yushen; Chi, Xiumei; Wang, Chong; Jiang, Jing; Kong, Fei; Yan, Hongqing; Wang, Xiaomei; Li, Jie; Wu, Nicholas C; Dai, Lei; Zhang, Tian-Hao; Shu, Sara; Zhou, Jian; Yoshizawa, Janice M; Li, Xinmin; Bhattacharya, Debika; Wu, Ting-Ting; Niu, Junqi; Sun, Ren

    2017-08-31

    Despite full immunoprophylaxis, mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of Hepatitis B Virus still occurs in approximately 2-5% of HBsAg positive mothers. Little is known about the bottleneck of HBV transmission and the evolution of viral quasispecies in the context of MTCT. Here we adopted a newly developed tag linkage deep sequencing method and analyzed the quasispecies of four MTCT pairs that broke through immunoprophylaxis. By assigning unique tags to individual viral sequences, we accurately reconstructed HBV haplotypes in a region of 836 bp, which contains the major immune epitopes and drug resistance mutations. The detection limit of minor viral haplotypes reached 0.1% for individual patient sample. Dominance of "a determinant" polymorphisms were observed in two children, which pre-existed as minor quasispecies in maternal samples. In all four pairs of MTCT samples, we consistently observed a significant overlap of viral haplotypes shared between mother and child. We also demonstrate that the data can be potentially useful to estimate the bottleneck effect during HBV MTCT, which provides information to optimize treatment for reducing the frequency of MTCT.

  4. Acute viral hepatitis in the United States-Mexico border region: data from the Border Infectious Disease Surveillance (BIDS) Project, 2000-2009.

    PubMed

    Spradling, Philip R; Xing, Jian; Phippard, Alba; Fonseca-Ford, Maureen; Montiel, Sonia; Guzmán, Norma Luna; Campuzano, Roberto Vázquez; Vaughan, Gilberto; Xia, Guo-liang; Drobeniuc, Jan; Kamili, Saleem; Cortés-Alcalá, Ricardo; Waterman, Stephen H

    2013-04-01

    Little is known about the characteristics of acute viral hepatitis cases in the United States (US)-Mexico border region. We analyzed characteristics of acute viral hepatitis cases collected from the Border Infectious Disease Surveillance Project from January 2000-December 2009. Over the study period, 1,437 acute hepatitis A, 311 acute hepatitis B, and 362 acute hepatitis C cases were reported from 5 Mexico and 2 US sites. Mexican hepatitis A cases most frequently reported close personal contact with a known case, whereas, US cases most often reported cross-border travel. Injection drug use was common among Mexican and US acute hepatitis B and C cases. Cross-border travel during the incubation period was common among acute viral hepatitis cases in both countries. Assiduous adherence to vaccination and prevention guidelines in the US is needed and strategic implementation of hepatitis vaccination and prevention programs south of the border should be considered.

  5. Assessment of timeliness, representativeness and quality of data reported to Italy's national integrated surveillance system for acute viral hepatitis (SEIEVA).

    PubMed

    Tosti, M E; Longhi, S; de Waure, C; Mele, A; Franco, E; Ricciardi, W; Filia, A

    2015-05-01

    Periodic assessment of surveillance systems is recommended to verify whether they are appropriately monitoring the public health problem under surveillance. The aim of this study was to evaluate timeliness, data quality and representativeness of data reported to the Italian Integrated Epidemiological System for Acute Viral Hepatitis (SEIEVA). Cross-sectional analysis of surveillance data. Quantitative indicators were used to evaluate representativeness of reported cases, data quality, and timeliness between surveillance steps, for reports of acute viral hepatitis cases with date of onset of symptoms from 2009 to 2012 (N = 4516). Representativeness was 75%. Over 95% of records reported information on age, sex, city of residence, risk factors for hepatitis A and vaccination status. Information on risk factors for hepatitis B and C were reported less consistently (83%), as was information on early outcome (60%). Wide delays were found between surveillance steps. The system collects high quality data on acute viral hepatitis cases in Italy. Timeliness was found to be the main limit and needs to be improved by optimizing web-based reporting procedures, increasing communication with participating centres, improving feedback and increasing dissemination of surveillance results. The study highlights the importance of reporting timeliness to detect outbreaks of acute viral hepatitis. Copyright © 2015 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Targeting Viral Entry for Treatment of Hepatitis B and C Virus Infections.

    PubMed

    Colpitts, Che C; Verrier, Eloi R; Baumert, Thomas F

    2015-09-11

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections remain major health problems worldwide, with 400-500 million chronically infected people worldwide. Chronic infection results in liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, the second leading cause of cancer death. Current treatments for HBV limit viral replication without efficiently curing infection. HCV treatment has markedly progressed with the licensing of direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) for HCV cure, yet limited access for the majority of patients is a major challenge. Preventative and curative treatment strategies, aimed at novel targets, are needed for both viruses. Viral entry represents one such target, although detailed knowledge of the entry mechanisms is a prerequisite. For HBV, the recent discovery of the NTCP cell entry factor enabled the establishment of an HBV cell culture model and showed that cyclosporin A and Myrcludex B are NTCP-targeting entry inhibitors. Advances in the understanding of HCV entry revealed it to be a complex process involving many factors, offering several antiviral targets. These include viral envelope proteins E1 and E2, virion-associated lipoprotein ApoE, and cellular factors CD81, SRBI, EGFR, claudin-1, occludin, and the cholesterol transporter NPC1L1. Small molecules targeting SR-BI, EGFR, and NPC1L1 have entered clinical trials, whereas other viral- and host-targeted small molecules, peptides, and antibodies show promise in preclinical models. This review summarizes the current understanding of HBV and HCV entry and describes novel antiviral targets and compounds in different stages of clinical development. Overall, proof-of-concept studies indicate that entry inhibitors are a promising class of antivirals to prevent and treat HBV and HCV infections.

  7. Acetylsalicylic acid reduces viral shedding induced by thermal stress.

    PubMed

    Gebhardt, Bryan M; Varnell, Emily D; Kaufman, Herbert E

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the effect of acetylsalicylic acid on ocular shedding of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). Mice that were latent for the McKrae strain of HSV-1 were treated with acetylsalicylic acid, a nonspecific inhibitor of cyclooxygenases, either prophylactically or at the time of heat stress-induced viral reactivation. The effect of the drug on viral shedding in the tear film, infectious virus in the cornea and trigeminal ganglion, and viral DNA in the cornea and trigeminal ganglion was determined. Acetylsalicylic acid inhibited heat stress-induced shedding of virus in the tears and reduced the numbers of corneal and trigeminal ganglion homogenates containing virus. Intraperitoneal therapeutic and oral prophylactic plus therapeutic treatments were similar in their ability to inhibit reactivation. The results indicate that a cyclooxygenase inhibitor such as acetylsalicylic acid can reduce recurrent viral infection in mice. These findings may implicate prostaglandins as agents in the viral reactivation process and suggest that therapy to suppress viral reactivation using nontoxic inhibitors of prostaglandin synthesis may be effective in humans.

  8. Lower Viral Response to Pegylated Interferon Alpha 2a Treatment of Chronic Hepatitis B in Roma People in Eastern Slovakia

    PubMed Central

    Drazilova, Sylvia; Janicko, Martin; Kristian, Pavol; Schreter, Ivan; Kucinsky, Branislav; Kozlej, Marek; Hockickova, Ivana; Jarcuska, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To evaluate the compliance and virological response to pegylated interferon alpha 2a treatment of chronic hepatitis B in Roma population compared to majority Caucasian population in Slovakia. Methods. Retrospective evaluation of a cohort of all Roma patients treated with pegylated interferon alpha 2a from 2007 to 2013 in 3 centers for treatment of chronic viral hepatitis B. The Study included 43 Roma patients with chronic viral hepatitis B and randomly selected control group. Treatment duration was 48 weeks. Viral response was evaluated after 24 weeks, at the end of treatment, and 24 weeks after the end of treatment. Results. Complete treatment course was finished by 79.1% of Roma patients compared to all patients from the control group (p = 0.0009). There was a tendency toward lower viral response rate in Roma at all time points; however significant difference was only at end of treatment viral response (51.2% Roma versus 81.4% majority, p = 0.003). We also did not find significant difference at the rate of HBsAg loss. Conclusion. Roma patients with chronic hepatitis B have significantly worse compliance to treatment with pegylated interferon and they have significantly lower rate of end of treatment viral response. PMID:26858755

  9. Micro RNAs mir-106a, mir-122 and mir-197 are increased in severe acute viral hepatitis with coagulopathy.

    PubMed

    Weseslindtner, Lukas; Macheleidt, Iris; Eischeid, Hannah; Strassl, Robert; Hofer, Harald; Popow-Kraupp, Theresia; Dienes, Hans-Peter; Holzmann, Heidemarie; Odenthal, Margarete

    2016-03-01

    The severity of acute viral hepatitis, which may be caused by several distinct viruses, varies among individual patients. In rare cases, severe hepatic injury with sudden loss of liver function may occur, which is clinically indicated by the occurrence of coagulopathy or encephalopathy. As the molecular mechanisms of this liver injury are largely unknown, we investigated extracellular micro RNA (miRNA) profiles in 54 patients acutely infected with one of four different hepatotropic viruses, in order to identify those miRNAs which indicate severe viral hepatitis associated with coagulopathy. First, the profile of miRNAs was extensively analysed using a microarray-based approach in highly characterized 24 patients, matched in terms of sex, age and level of liver enzymes, as well as in three healthy controls. The cohort included samples from 18 patients with moderate and six individuals with severe hepatitis, indicated by abnormal prothrombin time and higher alanine aminotransferase and bilirubin levels. miRNAs found to be upregulated in severe hepatitis were then quantified by real-time PCR in the expanded cohort of 54 patients. Comprehensive microarray-based miRNA profiling identified upregulation of mir-106a, mir-122 and mir-197 in patients with severe acute viral hepatitis with coagulopathy, as compared to patients who did not develop coagulopathy. mir-106a, mir-122 and mir-197 were then proven to be significantly upregulated in patients with severe acute viral hepatitis by quantitative real-time PCR (P < 0.01, Mann-Whitney U-test). mir-106a, mir-122 and mir-197 could be potential markers for severe acute viral hepatitis associated with coagulopathy. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Molecular mechanisms of interferon resistance mediated by viral-directed inhibition of PKR, the interferon-induced protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Gale, M; Katze, M G

    1998-04-01

    The interferon (IFN)-induced cellular antiviral response is the first line of defense against viral infection within an animal host. In order to establish a productive infection, eukaryotic viruses must first overcome the IFN-induced blocks imposed on viral replication. The double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase (PKR) is a key component mediating the antiviral actions of IFN. This IFN-induced protein kinase can restrict viral replication through its ability to phosphorylate the protein synthesis initiation factor eukaryotic initiation factor-2 alpha-subunit and reduce levels of viral protein synthesis. Viruses, therefore, must block the function of PKR in order to avoid these deleterious antiviral effects associated with PKR activity. Indeed, many viruses have developed effective measures to repress PKR activity during infection. This review will focus primarily on an overview of the different molecular mechanisms employed by these viruses to meet a common goal: the inhibition of PKR function, uncompromised viral protein synthesis, and unrestricted virus replication. The past few years have seen exciting new advances in this area. Rather unexpectedly, this area of research has benefited from the use of the yeast system to study PKR. Other recent advances include studies on PKR regulation by the herpes simplex viruses and data from our laboratory on the medically important hepatitis C viruses. We speculate that IFN is ineffective as a therapeutic agent against hepatitis C virus because the virus can effectively repress PKR function. Finally, we will discuss briefly the future directions of this PKR field.

  11. Viral Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

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  12. Viral Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

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  13. The enzymes LSD1 and Set1A cooperate with the viral protein HBx to establish an active hepatitis B viral chromatin state

    PubMed Central

    Alarcon, Valentina; Hernández, Sergio; Rubio, Lorena; Alvarez, Francisca; Flores, Yvo; Varas-Godoy, Manuel; De Ferrari, Giancarlo V.; Kann, Michael; Villanueva, Rodrigo A.; Loyola, Alejandra

    2016-01-01

    With about 350 million people chronically infected around the world hepatitis B is a major health problem. Template for progeny HBV synthesis is the viral genome, organized as a minichromosome (cccDNA) inside the hepatocyte nucleus. How viral cccDNA gene expression is regulated by its chromatin structure; more importantly, how the modulation of this structure impacts on viral gene expression remains elusive. Here, we found that the enzyme SetDB1 contributes to setting up a repressed cccDNA chromatin state. This repressive state is activated by the histone lysine demethylase-1 (LSD1). Consistently, inhibiting or reducing LSD1 levels led to repression of viral gene expression. This correlates with the transcriptionally repressive mark H3K9 methylation and reduction on the activating marks H3 acetylation and H3K4 methylation on viral promoters. Investigating the importance of viral proteins we found that LSD1 recruitment to viral promoters was dependent on the viral transactivator protein HBx. Moreover, the histone methyltransferase Set1A and HBx are simultaneously bound to the core promoter, and Set1A expression correlates with cccDNA H3K4 methylation. Our results shed light on the mechanisms of HBV regulation mediated by the cccDNA chromatin structure, offering new therapeutic targets to develop drugs for the treatment of chronically infected HBV patients. PMID:27174370

  14. The enzymes LSD1 and Set1A cooperate with the viral protein HBx to establish an active hepatitis B viral chromatin state.

    PubMed

    Alarcon, Valentina; Hernández, Sergio; Rubio, Lorena; Alvarez, Francisca; Flores, Yvo; Varas-Godoy, Manuel; De Ferrari, Giancarlo V; Kann, Michael; Villanueva, Rodrigo A; Loyola, Alejandra

    2016-05-13

    With about 350 million people chronically infected around the world hepatitis B is a major health problem. Template for progeny HBV synthesis is the viral genome, organized as a minichromosome (cccDNA) inside the hepatocyte nucleus. How viral cccDNA gene expression is regulated by its chromatin structure; more importantly, how the modulation of this structure impacts on viral gene expression remains elusive. Here, we found that the enzyme SetDB1 contributes to setting up a repressed cccDNA chromatin state. This repressive state is activated by the histone lysine demethylase-1 (LSD1). Consistently, inhibiting or reducing LSD1 levels led to repression of viral gene expression. This correlates with the transcriptionally repressive mark H3K9 methylation and reduction on the activating marks H3 acetylation and H3K4 methylation on viral promoters. Investigating the importance of viral proteins we found that LSD1 recruitment to viral promoters was dependent on the viral transactivator protein HBx. Moreover, the histone methyltransferase Set1A and HBx are simultaneously bound to the core promoter, and Set1A expression correlates with cccDNA H3K4 methylation. Our results shed light on the mechanisms of HBV regulation mediated by the cccDNA chromatin structure, offering new therapeutic targets to develop drugs for the treatment of chronically infected HBV patients.

  15. Does high viral load of hepatitis E virus influence the severity and prognosis of acute liver failure during pregnancy?

    PubMed

    Borkakoti, Jayanta; Hazam, Rajib Kishore; Mohammad, Asim; Kumar, Ashok; Kar, Premashis

    2013-04-01

    The incidence and mortality in pregnant women with acute liver failure caused by hepatitis E virus (HEV) is high. Data on the viral load of HEV during pregnancy are limited. The study was designed to determine the viral load of HEV and its association with the disease severity in patients with acute liver failure. A total of HEV related 163 patients with acute liver failure which included 105 pregnant, 46 non-pregnant women and girls and 12 men and 730 patients with acute viral hepatitis which comprised of 220 pregnant women; 282 non-pregnant women and girls and 228 men were included. Viral load was measured by real-time PCR. Comparison was made between the pregnant and non-pregnant women. HEV RNA was detectable in 265 patients (142 pregnant; 75 non-pregnant and 48 men) and 104 patients with acute liver failure (64 pregnant, 34 non-pregnant and 6 men). The viral load of HEV in pregnant women with acute liver failure and acute viral hepatitis was significantly higher 129,984.0 ± 103,104.17 and 768.92 ± 1,105.40 copies/ml, respectively compared to the non-pregnant women which was 189.2 ± 225 and 12.73 ± 7.8 copies/ml (P < 0.0001). The viral load of HEV was also significantly higher in the pregnant patients with acute liver failure compared to the pregnant women with acute viral hepatitis and also men (P < 0.0001). High viral load of HEV during pregnancy could be one of the factors responsible for the severity of the infection during pregnancy.

  16. Inducible Expression of CXCL1 within the Central Nervous System Amplifies Viral-Induced Demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Marro, Brett S.; Grist, Jonathan J.

    2016-01-01

    The functional role of the ELR+ chemokine CXCL1 in host defense and disease following infection of the CNS with the neurotropic JHM strain of mouse hepatitis virus (JHMV) was examined. Mice in which expression of CXCL1 is under the control of a tetracycline-inducible promoter active within glial fibrillary acidic protein–positive cells were generated and this allowed for selectively increasing CNS expression of CXCL1 in response to JHMV infection and evaluating the effects on neuroinflammation, control of viral replication, and demyelination. Inducible expression of CNS-derived CXCL1 resulted in increased levels of CXCL1 protein within the serum, brain, and spinal cord that correlated with increased frequency of Ly6G+CD11b+ neutrophils present within the CNS. Elevated levels of CXCL1 did not influence the generation of virus-specific T cells, and there was no difference in control of JHMV replication compared with control mice, indicating that T cell infiltration into the CNS is CXCL1-independent. Sustained CXCL1 expression within the CNS resulted in increased mortality that correlated with elevated neutrophil infiltration, diminished numbers of mature oligodendrocytes, and an increase in the severity of demyelination. Neutrophil ablation in CXCL1-transgenic mice reduced the severity of demyelination in mice, arguing for a role for these cells in white matter damage. Collectively, these findings illustrate that sustained CXCL1 expression amplifies the severity of white matter damage and that neutrophils can contribute to this process in a model of viral-induced neurologic disease. PMID:26773148

  17. Hepatitis A

    MedlinePlus

    Hepatitis A Hepatitis A Hepatitis A is a contagious viral infection that can easily affect children and adults. It is one of the most common types of hepatitis virus. Often when you hear about hepatitis A ...

  18. Serological survey of viral hepatitis A, B, and C at Thai Central Region and Bangkok: a population base study.

    PubMed

    Ratanasuwan, Winai; Sonji, Areeua; Tiengrim, Surapee; Techasathit, Wichai; Suwanagool, Surapol

    2004-06-01

    Hepatitis A, B, and C are important viral hepatitis infections in the Thai population. Hepatitis B vaccination was included in the Thai Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI) 10 years ago. In addition, the seroprevalence of hepatitis A has significantly changed in the last two decades. This study was done to evaluate current risk groups for hepatitis A and B infections and identify the magnitude of hepatitis C infection in the general population of Bangkok and six provinces in the Central Region of Thailand, during the period October 2000 to January 2002. This study revealed that the prevalence of anti-HAV in people younger than 25 years was low but very high in people older than 25 years. The prevalence of anti-HAV was 1.95% in Bangkok and 12.7% in other provinces in people younger than 25 years (p<0.001) while 90.9% in Bangkok and 88.2% in other provinces among people older than 25 years. Therefore, people who are older than 25 years should have a blood test for anti-HAV before getting a hepatitis A vaccination. Approximately 80% of people who are not covered by hepatitis B vaccination from EPI are at risk of hepatitis B infection and its complications. This group of people should receive hepatitis B vaccination. For hepatitis C, the prevalence is lower than 2% across age groups and areas. Therefore, current good primary prevention via blood donor screening and health education must be maintained.

  19. Australian Liver Association (ALA) expert consensus recommendations for the use of transient elastography in chronic viral hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Kemp, William; Levy, Miriam; Weltman, Martin; Lubel, John

    2015-03-01

    Since the introduction of Transient Elastography (TE) into Australia in 2008, non-invasive liver fibrosis assessments have integrated themselves into clinical hepatology. The Australian Liver Association (ALA) recognizes these technologies perform an important role in the assessment of chronic viral hepatitis B and C. However, in the setting of viral hepatitis and many other chronic liver diseases, there remains no consensus or guidelines regarding the performance, utility or reporting of TE. Accordingly, the ALA sought to produce an expert consensus statement for the use of TE in chronic viral hepatitis. The recommendations incorporated in this document are based upon a thorough literature review and draw on extensive clinical experience using TE. The initial draft was presented at Australian Gastroenterology Week (AGW) 2013. Through a collaborative process and expert external review a finalized document was presented at AGW 2014. © 2014 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  20. Imaging Based Methods of Liver Fibrosis Assessment in Viral Hepatitis: A Practical Approach.

    PubMed

    Khallafi, Hicham; Qureshi, Kamran

    2015-01-01

    Liver fibrosis represents the repair mechanism in liver injury and is a feature of most chronic liver diseases. The degree of liver fibrosis in chronic viral hepatitis infections has major clinical implications and presence of advanced fibrosis or cirrhosis determines prognosis. Treatment initiation for viral hepatitis is indicated in most cases of advanced liver fibrosis and diagnosis of cirrhosis entails hepatology evaluation for specialized clinical care. Liver biopsy is an invasive technique and has been the standard of care of fibrosis assessment for years; however, it has several limitations and procedure related complications. Recently, several methods of noninvasive assessment of liver fibrosis have been developed which require either serologic testing or imaging of liver. Imaging based noninvasive techniques are reviewed here and their clinical use is described. Some of the imaging based tests are becoming widely available, and collectively they are shown to be superior to liver biopsy in important aspects. Clinical utilization of these methods requires understanding of performance and quality related parameters which can affect the results and provide wrong assessment of the extent of liver fibrosis. Familiarity with the strengths and weaknesses of each modality is needed to correctly interpret the results in appropriate clinical context.

  1. [Efficacy of plasma exchange combined with fetal hepacyties on viral hepatitis gravis].

    PubMed

    Zheng, X H; Tang, X P; Chen, J

    2001-10-28

    To evaluate the efficacy of mid-artificial liver support system (ALSS) on viral hepatitis gravis. One hundred and thirty eight patients with hepatitis gravis were treated with plasma exchange combined with fetal hepacyties, fifty six patients were treated with plasma exchange and other forty eight patients were treated with fetal hepacyties respectively. The liver function was examined in all patients before ALSS. The liver function, amino acid spectrum and cardiac muscle enzyme were examined before and after ALSS in patients treated with plasma exchange and fetal hepacyties. It showed that the survival rate of the patients treated with plasma exchange combined with fetal hepacyties was higher than that of the patients only treated with plasma exchange or fetal hepacyties (P < 0.01). The liver function, BCAA/AAA ratio and cardiac muscle enzyme also significantly changed in patients treated with plasma exchange and fetal hepacyties before and after ALSS (p < 0.01 or 0.05). Plasma exchange combined with fetal hepacyties can effectively treat viral hepatits gravis.

  2. Coexpression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and class I major histocompatibility complex antigens on hepatocyte membrane in chronic viral hepatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Chu, C M; Liaw, Y F

    1993-01-01

    AIMS--To evaluate the role of hepatocyte expression of leucocyte adhesion molecules and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigens in the pathogenesis of chronic viral hepatitis. METHODS--The expression of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), lymphocyte function associated antigen 3 (LFA-3), and MHC class I and II antigens on hepatocyte membrane in relation to the histological and biochemical activities was studied in patients with chronic B hepatitis, chronic persistent hepatitis (CPH) n = 23; chronic active hepatitis (CAH) n = 20; chronic D hepatitis (CAH) n = 6; and chronic non-A, non-B hepatitis (CPH n = 4, CAM n = 6). Six of the latter were hepatitis C virus antibody positive. RESULTS--In chronic B hepatitis ICAM-1 and MHC-I were expressed significantly more in patients with CAH than in those with CPH (p < 0.001), while the expression of LFA-3 and MHC-II showed no significant difference, irrespective of serum HBeAg or hepatitis B virus DNA. Similar findings were noted in non-A, non-B hepatitis. Regardless of the viral aetiology, patients with CAH had a significantly higher degree of ICAM-1 and MHC-I expression than LFA-3 (p < 0.001 v ICAM-1 and MHC-I, respectively) and MHC-II (p < 0.001 v ICAM-1 and MHC-I, respectively) expression. Those with CPH showed little or no difference in the expression of these four molecules. Furthermore, serum ALT values positively correlated with the hepatocyte expression of ICAM-1 (p < 0.001) and MHC-I (p < 0.001), but not LFA-3 (p > 0.05) and MHC-II (p > 0.05). CONCLUSIONS--In chronic viral hepatitis hepatocyte expression of ICAM-1 and MHC-I might be important for immunosurveillance against virally infected hepatocytes, while the expression of LFA-3 and MHC-II does not seem to have a role in the pathogenesis of chronic viral hepatitis. Images PMID:7902850

  3. Cytokine/chemokine patterns connect host and viral characteristics with clinics during chronic hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Katsounas, Antonios; Trippler, Martin; Kottilil, Shyam; Lempicki, Richard A; Gerken, Guido; Schlaak, Joerg F

    2012-05-11

    In chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, liver tissue pathology and HCV genotype are important determinants of clinical and/or treatment-related outcome. Although consistent epidemiological and/or molecular-biological clues derived from different studies on single virus-host interactions are meanwhile published, the in vivo transcriptional responses and cellular pathways affected in >1 key aspects of the disease or treatment process are far from being understood. Microarray analysis was performed in peripheral whole blood (PB) samples from 36 therapy-naïve HCV-infected patients with known liver histology. Linear regression analysis identified gene expression profiles significantly correlating (P < 0.015) with ≥1 out of 7 variables: sustained viral response (SVR), viral non-response (NR), end of treatment viral response (ETR), viral breakthrough (VB), HCV genotype (Gt. 1 vs. Gt. 2/3), stage of hepatic fibrosis [St. 0/1 vs. St. 2/3/4] and grade of hepatic inflammation (Gr. 0/1 vs. Gr. 2/3/4). Correlation values across all seven contrasts were considered for hierarchical clustering (HCL). A total of 1,697 genes showed ≥1 significant correlation results and genes involved in cell differentiation (183), immune response (53), and apoptosis (170) were leading fractions. HCL grouped the genes into six major clusters. Functional annotation analysis using DAVID (http://david.abcc.ncifcrf.gov) revealed that expression profiles that best linked these variables were highly enriched in cytokine/chemokine activity (Fisher-exact P < 0.0001) and specific biological module-centric algorithms finally led our focus on four out of fifty-three immune response genes: SMAD family member 3 (SMAD3), interleukin 1 receptor accessory protein (IL1RAP), tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily member 1A (TNFRSF1A), and chemokine 'C-C motif' receptor 5 (CCR5). Of those, TNFRSF1A and CCR5 showed significant correlation with two out of seven variables based on microarray and

  4. Cytokine/chemokine patterns connect host and viral characteristics with clinics during chronic hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, liver tissue pathology and HCV genotype are important determinants of clinical and/or treatment-related outcome. Although consistent epidemiological and/or molecular-biological clues derived from different studies on single virus-host interactions are meanwhile published, the in vivo transcriptional responses and cellular pathways affected in >1 key aspects of the disease or treatment process are far from being understood. Methods Microarray analysis was performed in peripheral whole blood (PB) samples from 36 therapy-naïve HCV-infected patients with known liver histology. Linear regression analysis identified gene expression profiles significantly correlating (P < 0.015) with ≥1 out of 7 variables: sustained viral response (SVR), viral non-response (NR), end of treatment viral response (ETR), viral breakthrough (VB), HCV genotype (Gt. 1 vs. Gt. 2/3), stage of hepatic fibrosis [St. 0/1 vs. St. 2/3/4] and grade of hepatic inflammation (Gr. 0/1 vs. Gr. 2/3/4). Correlation values across all seven contrasts were considered for hierarchical clustering (HCL). Results A total of 1,697 genes showed ≥1 significant correlation results and genes involved in cell differentiation (183), immune response (53), and apoptosis (170) were leading fractions. HCL grouped the genes into six major clusters. Functional annotation analysis using DAVID (http://david.abcc.ncifcrf.gov) revealed that expression profiles that best linked these variables were highly enriched in cytokine/chemokine activity (Fisher-exact P < 0.0001) and specific biological module-centric algorithms finally led our focus on four out of fifty-three immune response genes: SMAD family member 3 (SMAD3), interleukin 1 receptor accessory protein (IL1RAP), tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily member 1A (TNFRSF1A), and chemokine ‘C-C motif’ receptor 5 (CCR5). Of those, TNFRSF1A and CCR5 showed significant correlation with two out of seven

  5. Human Choline Kinase-α Promotes Hepatitis C Virus RNA Replication through Modulation of Membranous Viral Replication Complex Formation

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Mun-Teng

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection reorganizes cellular membranes to create an active viral replication site named the membranous web (MW). The role that human choline kinase-α (hCKα) plays in HCV replication remains elusive. Here, we first showed that hCKα activity, not the CDP-choline pathway, promoted viral RNA replication. Confocal microscopy and subcellular fractionation of HCV-infected cells revealed that a small fraction of hCKα colocalized with the viral replication complex (RC) on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and that HCV infection increased hCKα localization to the ER. In the pTM-NS3-NS5B model, NS3-NS5B expression increased the localization of the wild-type, not the inactive D288A mutant, hCKα on the ER, and hCKα activity was required for effective trafficking of hCKα and NS5A to the ER. Coimmunoprecipitation showed that hCKα was recruited onto the viral RC presumably through its binding to NS5A domain 1 (D1). hCKα silencing or treatment with CK37, an hCKα activity inhibitor, abolished HCV-induced MW formation. In addition, hCKα depletion hindered NS5A localization on the ER, interfered with NS5A and NS5B colocalization, and mitigated NS5A-NS5B interactions but had no apparent effect on NS5A-NS4B and NS4B-NS5B interactions. Nevertheless, hCKα activity was not essential for the binding of NS5A to hCKα or NS5B. These findings demonstrate that hCKα forms a complex with NS5A and that hCKα activity enhances the targeting of the complex to the ER, where hCKα protein, not activity, mediates NS5A binding to NS5B, thereby promoting functional membranous viral RC assembly and viral RNA replication. IMPORTANCE HCV infection reorganizes the cellular membrane to create an active viral replication site named the membranous web (MW). Here, we report that human choline kinase-α (hCKα) acts as an essential host factor for HCV RNA replication. A fraction of hCKα colocalizes with the viral replication complex (RC) on the endoplasmic reticulum

  6. [Epidemiological studies of viral hepatitis with and without HB antigen by means of complex studies in families].

    PubMed

    Ionescu, T r; Telniceanu, A; Dreptate, N; Bărbulescu, V; Lăzărescu, V; Zamfirescu-Gheorghiu, M; Roşu, S; Miron, C

    1977-01-01

    The results of an epidemiological and laboratory investigation on 242 adults and children, who had come in contact with patients suffering from viral hepatitis (in the family or outside it), showed the importance of family contact and the role of routes of transmission other than the parenteral and transfusional ones in viral hepatitis with positive HB antigen. Attention is likewise drawn to the importance of the laboratory tests (classical enzymatic tests and immunoelectrodiffusion) in the detection of epidemogenic sources, represented by the subclinical forms of infection.

  7. Interferon Induced Transfer of Viral Resistance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-02-01

    interferon induction (27). Reaction kinetics plus the falure of soluble factors in the medium to induce interferon suggested that the inducing factor...staining. Only NDV infected lymphocytes stained with the anti-ACTHa (1-13) or anti-Y-endorphin sera. The staining reaction of the anti-ACTHa (1-13) sera was...reasons. First, a cross reaction between human immunoglobulin class IgGl, and O-endorphin and ACTH has been reported (46). It seems that this is not the

  8. Measles virus induces persistent infection by autoregulation of viral replication

    PubMed Central

    Doi, Tomomitsu; Kwon, Hyun-Jeong; Honda, Tomoyuki; Sato, Hiroki; Yoneda, Misako; Kai, Chieko

    2016-01-01

    Natural infection with measles virus (MV) establishes lifelong immunity. Persistent infection with MV is likely involved in this phenomenon, as non-replicating protein antigens never induce such long-term immunity. Although MV establishes stable persistent infection in vitro and possibly in vivo, the mechanism by which this occurs is largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that MV changes the infection mode from lytic to non-lytic and evades the innate immune response to establish persistent infection without viral genome mutation. We found that, in the persistent phase, the viral RNA level declined with the termination of interferon production and cell death. Our analysis of viral protein dynamics shows that during the establishment of persistent infection, the nucleoprotein level was sustained while the phosphoprotein and large protein levels declined. The ectopic expression of nucleoprotein suppressed viral replication, indicating that viral replication is self-regulated by nucleoprotein accumulation during persistent infection. The persistently infected cells were able to produce interferon in response to poly I:C stimulation, suggesting that MV does not interfere with host interferon responses in persistent infection. Our results may provide mechanistic insight into the persistent infection of this cytopathic RNA virus that induces lifelong immunity. PMID:27883010

  9. Liver stiffness is associated with monocyte activation in HIV-infected Ugandans without viral hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Redd, Andrew D; Wendel, Sarah K; Grabowski, Mary K; Ocama, Ponsiano; Kiggundu, Valerian; Bbosa, Francis; Boaz, Iga; Balagopal, Ashwin; Reynolds, Steven J; Gray, Ronald H; Serwadda, David; Kirk, Gregory D; Quinn, Thomas C; Stabinski, Lara

    2013-07-01

    A high prevalence of liver stiffness, as determined by elevated transient elastography liver stiffness measurement, was previously found in a cohort of HIV-infected Ugandans in the absence of chronic viral hepatitis. Given the role of immune activation and microbial translocation in models of liver disease, a shared immune mechanism was hypothesized in the same cohort without other overt causes of liver disease. This study examined whether HIV-related liver stiffness was associated with markers of immune activation or microbial translocation (MT). A retrospective case-control study of subjects with evidence of liver stiffness as defined by a transient elastography stiffness measurement ≥9.3 kPa (cases=133) and normal controls (n=133) from Rakai, Uganda was performed. Cases were matched to controls by age, gender, HIV, hepatitis B virus (HBV), and highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) status. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), endotoxin IgM antibody, soluble CD14 (sCD14), C-reactive protein (CRP), and D-dimer levels were measured. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate adjusted matched odds ratios (adjMOR) and 95% confidence intervals. Higher sCD14 levels were associated with a 19% increased odds of liver stiffness (adjMOR=1.19, p=0.002). In HIV-infected individuals, higher sCD14 levels were associated with a 54% increased odds of having liver stiffness (adjMOR=1.54, p<0.001); however, the opposite was observed in HIV-negative individuals (adjMOR=0.57, p=0.001). No other biomarker was significantly associated with liver stiffness, and only one subject was found to have detectable LPS. Liver stiffness in HIV-infected Ugandans is associated with increased sCD14 indicative of monocyte activation in the absence of viral hepatitis or microbial translocation, and suggests that HIV may be directly involved in liver disease.

  10. An assessment of serum leptin levels in patients with chronic viral hepatitis: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Manolakopoulos, Spilios; Bethanis, Sotirios; Liapi, Charis; Stripeli, Fotini; Sklavos, Pantelis; Margeli, Alexandra; Christidou, Aggeliki; Katsanika, Aggeliki; Vogiatzakis, Evangellos; Tzourmakliotis, Dimitrios; Theocharis, Stamatios

    2007-01-01

    Background The role of leptin in the course of liver disease due to chronic viral hepatitis (CVH) remains controversial. Our aims were to investigate the relationship between serum leptin concentrations and the severity of liver disease in a cohort of subjects with HBeAg negative chronic hepatitis B (CHB) and C (CHC) and to analyze the effect of body composition, the leptin system and insulin resistance together with viral factors on virologic response to antiviral treatment. Methods We studied 50 (36 men) consecutive patients suffering from biopsy-proven CVH due to HBV (n = 25) or HCV (n = 25) infection. Thirty-two (17 men) healthy volunteers served as controls. Levels of serum leptin and insulin were determined by immunoassays at baseline and at the end of the treatment. Results A significant association between serum leptin levels and the stage of hepatic fibrosis was noted; patients with cirrhosis presented higher serum leptin levels compared to those with lower fibrosis stage [CHB patients (17436 pg/ml vs 6028.5 pg/ml, p = 0.03), CHC patients (18014 pg/ml vs 4385 pg/ml, p = 0.05]. An inverse correlation between lower leptin levels and response to lamivudine monotherapy was noted in patients with CHB; those with a virologic response presented lower serum leptin levels (5334 vs 13111.5 pg/ml; p-value = 0.003) than non-responders. In genotype 1 CHC patients, insulin resistance played a significant role in the response to antiviral therapy. Conclusion Our data clearly suggest that cirrhosis due to CHB or CHC is associated with higher leptin levels. Increased serum leptin levels represent a negative prognostic factor for response to lamivudine monotherapy in patients with CHB. In CHC patients insulin resistance strongly influences the response to antiviral treatment in patients infected with genotype 1. PMID:17540037

  11. HAVCR1 gene haplotypes and infection by different viral hepatitis C virus genotypes.

    PubMed

    Abad-Molina, Cristina; Garcia-Lozano, José-Raúl; Montes-Cano, Marco-Antonio; Torres-Cornejo, Almudena; Torrecillas, Fuensanta; Aguilar-Reina, José; Romero-Gómez, Manuel; López-Cortés, Luis-Fernando; Núñez-Roldan, Antonio; González-Escribano, María-Francisca

    2012-02-01

    The hepatitis A virus cellular receptor 1 (HAVCR1) gene is highly polymorphic, and several variants have been associated with susceptibility to allergic and autoimmune diseases. The HAVCR1 gene region was identified as a candidate for hepatitis C virus (HCV) natural clearance in a genotyping study of selected immune response genes in both European-American and African-American populations. The aim of the present study was to explore the influence of HAVCR1 in the outcome of HCV infection in the Spanish population. Three cohorts, consisting of 354 subjects with persistent HCV infection (285 with persistent HCV monoinfection and 69 with natural clearance), 182 coinfected HIV/HCV patients, and 320 controls, were included. Samples were genotyped in several polymorphic positions, insertion/deletion variants in exon 4 and tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), in order to define previously described HAVCR1 haplotypes (haplotypes A to D). No statistically significant differences were observed with spontaneous resolution of infection or with viral clearance after treatment. Nevertheless, different rates of infection by viral genotypes (G's) were observed among the HAVCR1 haplotypes. Individuals bearing haplotype C had the highest viral G1 infection rate when compared to individuals bearing other haplotypes (75.82% versus 57.72%, respectively; corrected P value [P(c)], 3.2 × 10(-4); odds ratio [OR], 2.30; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.51 to 3.47). Thus, HAVCR1 could be involved in susceptibility or resistance to infection by a particular HCV genotype.

  12. A SELEX-Screened Aptamer of Human Hepatitis B Virus RNA Encapsidation Signal Suppresses Viral Replication

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Hui; Beck, Jürgen; Nassal, Michael; Hu, Kang-hong

    2011-01-01

    Background The specific interaction between hepatitis B virus (HBV) polymerase (P protein) and the ε RNA stem-loop on pregenomic (pg) RNA is crucial for viral replication. It triggers both pgRNA packaging and reverse transcription and thus represents an attractive antiviral target. RNA decoys mimicking ε in P protein binding but not supporting replication might represent novel HBV inhibitors. However, because generation of recombinant enzymatically active HBV polymerase is notoriously difficult, such decoys have as yet not been identified. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we used a SELEX approach, based on a new in vitro reconstitution system exploiting a recombinant truncated HBV P protein (miniP), to identify potential ε decoys in two large ε RNA pools with randomized upper stem. Selection of strongly P protein binding RNAs correlated with an unexpected strong enrichment of A residues. Two aptamers, S6 and S9, displayed particularly high affinity and specificity for miniP in vitro, yet did not support viral replication when part of a complete HBV genome. Introducing S9 RNA into transiently HBV producing HepG2 cells strongly suppressed pgRNA packaging and DNA synthesis, indicating the S9 RNA can indeed act as an ε decoy that competitively inhibits P protein binding to the authentic ε signal on pgRNA. Conclusions/Significance This study demonstrates the first successful identification of human HBV ε aptamers by an in vitro SELEX approach. Effective suppression of HBV replication by the S9 aptamer provides proof-of-principle for the ability of ε decoy RNAs to interfere with viral P-ε complex formation and suggests that S9-like RNAs may further be developed into useful therapeutics against chronic hepatitis B. PMID:22125633

  13. [Time-space study on viral hepatitis C in Gansu province, from 2009 to 2013].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiaojuan; Meng, Lei; Liu, Xinfeng; Liu, Dongpeng; Gou, Faxiang; Wei, Kongfu; Li, Zhiping; Cheng, Yao

    2015-08-01

    To study the time-space distribution of viral hepatitis C in Gansu province during 2009-2013, using the time-space statistics. Using Geoda to analysis the univariate Moran's I and univariate local Moran's I while using SaTScan to detect the time-space gathering areas. There was spatial autocorrelation on incidence of hepatitis C noticed in Gansu during 2009-2013. The hot spots areas were counties as Jinchang, Wuwei, Zhangye and Lanzhou. Cold spot areas would include counties as Dingxi, Longnan, Pingliang, Gannan, Jiuquan, Qingyang, Baiyin and Tianshui. There were time-space gathering areas nitoced, during 2009-2010. Qinzhou and Maiji counties belonged to high incidence gathering areas. Lintao and Linxia were of low incidence gathering areas. In 2011-2013, high incidence gathering area would include counties as Zhangye, Jinchang, Wuwei Lanzhou and Baiyin while low incidence gathering areas would include counties as Dingxi, Tianshui, Pingliang, Longnan and Qingyang. There appeared time-space gathering of hepatitis C in Gansu province during 2009-2013. High and low gathering areas varied with time and high incidence gathering area mainly distributed in the western and central areas of Gansu province.

  14. Global burden of HIV, viral hepatitis, and tuberculosis in prisoners and detainees.

    PubMed

    Dolan, Kate; Wirtz, Andrea L; Moazen, Babak; Ndeffo-Mbah, Martial; Galvani, Alison; Kinner, Stuart A; Courtney, Ryan; McKee, Martin; Amon, Joseph J; Maher, Lisa; Hellard, Margaret; Beyrer, Chris; Altice, Fredrick L

    2016-09-10

    The prison setting presents not only challenges, but also opportunities, for the prevention and treatment of HIV, viral hepatitis, and tuberculosis. We did a comprehensive literature search of data published between 2005 and 2015 to understand the global epidemiology of HIV, hepatitis C virus (HCV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), and tuberculosis in prisoners. We further modelled the contribution of imprisonment and the potential impact of prevention interventions on HIV transmission in this population. Of the estimated 10·2 million people incarcerated worldwide on any given day in 2014, we estimated that 3·8% have HIV (389 000 living with HIV), 15·1% have HCV (1 546 500), 4·8% have chronic HBV (491 500), and 2·8% have active tuberculosis (286 000). The few studies on incidence suggest that intraprison transmission is generally low, except for large-scale outbreaks. Our model indicates that decreasing the incarceration rate in people who inject drugs and providing opioid agonist therapy could reduce the burden of HIV in this population. The prevalence of HIV, HCV, HBV, and tuberculosis is higher in prison populations than in the general population, mainly because of the criminalisation of drug use and the detention of people who use drugs. The most effective way of controlling these infections in prisoners and the broader community is to reduce the incarceration of people who inject drugs.

  15. Hepatic immune response in calves during acute subclinical infection with bovine viral diarrhoea virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Risalde, M A; Gómez-Villamandos, J C; Pedrera, M; Molina, V; Cerón, J J; Martínez-Subiela, S; Sánchez-Cordón, P J

    2011-11-01

    Eight colostrum-deprived calves aged 8-12 weeks were inoculated intranasally with a non-cytopathic strain of bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) genotype-1 and the effects on the hepatic immune response were studied. Two calves were sacrificed at each of 3, 6, 9 and 14 days post-inoculation (dpi) and two uninoculated animals were used as negative controls. BVDV was detected in hepatic macrophages and monocytes from 3 to 14dpi and in Küpffer cells (KCs) from 6 to 14dpi. Increases in the numbers of MAC387(+) KCs and monocytes, but not interstitial macrophages, differentiated by morphological features, were evident in the liver following inoculation with BVDV. There was a substantial increase in the number of monocytes positive for tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, but only small increases in the numbers of TNF-α(+) KCs and interstitial macrophages and interleukin (IL)-6(+) monocytes, KCs and interstitial macrophages. There was an increase in the number of interstitial CD3(+) T lymphocytes in the liver, but no substantial changes in the numbers of circulating CD3(+) T lymphocytes, interstitial or circulating CD4(+) or CD8(+) T lymphocytes, or CD79αcy(+) B lymphocytes. Serum haptoglobin and serum amyloid A increased transiently at 12dpi. Upregulation of some pro-inflammatory cytokines by hepatic macrophages is evident in subclinical acute BVDV type 1 infection in calves.

  16. Paraproteins with antibody activity in acute viral hepatitis and chronic autoimmune liver diseases

    PubMed Central

    Roux, Maria E. B.; Florin-Christensen, A.; Arana, R. M.; Doniach, Deborah

    1974-01-01

    Of 27 patients with liver disease and cryoglobulinaemia 18 proved to have paraproteins. Six of these monoclonal immunoglobulins were shown to have antibody activity, directed to human gamma globulin, alpha1-fetoprotein, smooth muscle, and mitochondria. Eight of the patients suffered from acute viral hepatitis, five of whom were HB Ag positive; in all these cases the monoclonal spikes were transient and their antibody activities were directed against IgG in two cases and alpha1-fetoprotein in one. Seven of the patients had active chronic hepatitis and in these the paraproteinaemia persisted, though remaining quantitatively unchanged over several years. One of them had a cryoprecipitable monoclonal smooth muscle antibody. Three patients had primary biliary cirrhosis and in two of them monoclonal IgM mitochondrial antibodies were demonstrated. In three out of the 18 cases there was a double M-component. Since these monoclonal antibodies are directed to autoantigens not unlike the polyclonal ones usually seen in autoimmune hepatic diseases, it is suggested that the factor which triggers the uncontrolled plasma cell proliferation to produce paraproteins must meet cells from an already expanding clone. PMID:18668850

  17. Determining the cellular diversity of hepatitis C virus quasispecies by single-cell viral sequencing.

    PubMed

    McWilliam Leitch, E Carol; McLauchlan, John

    2013-12-01

    Single-cell genomics is emerging as an important tool in cellular biology. We describe for the first time a system to investigate RNA virus quasispecies diversity at the cellular level utilizing hepatitis C virus (HCV) replicons. A high-fidelity nested reverse transcription (RT)-PCR assay was developed, and validation using control transcripts of known copy number indicated a detection limit of 3 copies of viral RNA/reaction. This system was used to determine the cellular diversity of subgenomic JFH-1 HCV replicons constitutively expressed in Huh7 cells. Each cell contained a unique quasispecies that was much less diverse than the quasispecies of the bulk cell population from which the single cells were derived, suggesting the occurrence of independent evolution at the cellular level. An assessment of the replicative fitness of the predominant single-cell quasispecies variants indicated a modest reduction in fitness compared to the wild type. Real-time RT-PCR methods capable of determining single-cell viral loads were developed and indicated an average of 113 copies of replicon RNA per cell, correlating with calculated RNA copy numbers in the bulk cell population. This study introduces a single-cell RNA viral-sequencing method with numerous potential applications to explore host-virus interactions during infection. HCV quasispecies diversity varied greatly between cells in vitro, suggesting different within-cell evolutionary pathways. Such divergent trajectories in vivo could have implications for the evolution and establishment of antiviral-resistant variants and host immune escape mutants.

  18. Post-translational modifications of hepatitis C viral proteins and their biological significance.

    PubMed

    Hundt, Jana; Li, Zhubing; Liu, Qiang

    2013-12-21

    Replication of hepatitis C virus (HCV) depends on the interaction of viral proteins with various host cellular proteins and signalling pathways. Similar to cellular proteins, post-translational modifications (PTMs) of HCV proteins are essential for proper protein function and regulation, thus, directly affecting viral life cycle and the generation of infectious virus particles. Cleavage of the HCV polyprotein by cellular and viral proteases into more than 10 proteins represents an early protein modification step after translation of the HCV positive-stranded RNA genome. The key modifications include the regulated intramembranous proteolytic cleavage of core protein, disulfide bond formation of core, glycosylation of HCV envelope proteins E1 and E2, methylation of nonstructural protein 3 (NS3), biotinylation of NS4A, ubiquitination of NS5B and phosphorylation of core and NS5B. Other modifications like ubiquitination of core and palmitoylation of core and NS4B proteins have been reported as well. For some modifications such as phosphorylation of NS3 and NS5A and acetylation of NS3, we have limited understanding of their effects on HCV replication and pathogenesis while the impact of other modifications is far from clear. In this review, we summarize the available information on PTMs of HCV proteins and discuss their relevance to HCV replication and pathogenesis.

  19. Detection of high biliary and fecal viral loads in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Monrroy, Hugo; Angulo, Jenniffer; Pino, Karla; Labbé, Pilar; Miquel, Juan Francisco; López-Lastra, Marcelo; Soza, Alejandro

    2017-05-01

    The life cycle of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) is closely associated with lipid metabolism. Recently, NPC1L1 (a cholesterol transporter) has been reported to function as an HCV receptor. This receptor is expressed in the hepatocyte canalicular membrane and in the intestine; serving as a key transporter for the cholesterol enterohepatic cycle. We hypothesized that HCV might have a similar cycle, so we aimed to study the presence of HCV in bile and stools of infected patients. Blood, feces, and duodenal bile samples were collected from patients infected with HCV. The biliary viral load was normalized to the bile salt concentration of each sample and the presence of HCV core protein was also evaluated. A total of 12 patients were recruited. HCV RNA was detected in the bile from ten patients. The mean viral load was 2.5log10IU/60mg bile salt. In the stool samples, HCV RNA was detected in ten patients (mean concentration 2.7log10IU/g of feces). HCV RNA is readily detectable and is present at relatively high concentrations in the bile and stool samples of infected patients. This may be relevant as a source of infection in men who have sex with men. Biliary HCV secretion may perhaps play a role in the persistence of viral infection via an enterohepatic cycle of the virus or intrahepatic spread. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U., AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  20. High Serum Lipopolysaccharide-Binding Protein Level in Chronic Hepatitis C Viral Infection Is Reduced by Anti-Viral Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Nien, Hsiao-Ching; Hsu, Shih-Jer; Su, Tung-Hung; Yang, Po-Jen; Sheu, Jin-Chuan; Wang, Jin-Town; Chow, Lu-Ping; Chen, Chi-Ling

    2017-01-01

    Background Lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP) has been reported to associate with metabolic diseases, such as obesity, diabetes, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Since chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is associated with metabolic derangements, the relationship between LBP and HCV deserves additional studies. This study aimed to determine the serum LBP level in subjects with or without HCV infection and investigate the change of its level after anti-viral treatments with or without interferon. Methods and Findings We recruited 120 non-HCV subjects, 42 and 17 HCV-infected subjects respectively treated with peginterferon α-2a/ribavirin and direct-acting antiviral drugs. Basic information, clinical data, serum LBP level and abdominal ultrasonography were collected. All the subjects provided written informed consent before being enrolled approved by the Research Ethics Committee of the National Taiwan University Hospital. Serum LBP level was significantly higher in HCV-infected subjects than non-HCV subjects (31.0 ± 8.8 versus 20.0 ± 6.4 μg/mL; p-value < 0.001). After multivariate analyses, LBP at baseline was independently associated with body mass index, hemoglobin A1c, alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and HCV infection. Moreover, the baseline LBP was only significantly positively associated with ALT and inversely with fatty liver in HCV-infected subjects. The LBP level significantly decreased at sustained virologic response (27.4 ± 6.6 versus 34.6 ± 7.3 μg/mL, p-value < 0.001; 15.9 ± 4.4 versus 22.2 ± 5.7 μg/mL, p-value = 0.001), regardless of interferon-based or -free therapy. Conclusions LBP, an endotoxemia associated protein might be used as an inflammatory biomarker of both infectious and non-infectious origins in HCV-infected subjects. PMID:28107471

  1. Epidemiology of the viral hepatitis-HIV syndemic in San Francisco: a collaborative surveillance approach.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Melissa A; Scheer, Susan; Shallow, Sue; Pipkin, Sharon; Huang, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    To describe the epidemiology of people coinfected with hepatitis B virus (HBV) or hepatitis C virus (HCV) and HIV in San Francisco, the San Francisco Department of Public Health's Communicable Disease Control and Prevention Section and the HIV Epidemiology Section collaborated to link their registries. In San Francisco, hepatitis reporting is primarily through passive laboratory-based surveillance, and HIV/AIDS reporting is primarily through laboratory-initiated active surveillance. We conducted the registry linkage in 2010 using a sequential algorithm. The registry match included 31,997 HBV-infected people who were reported starting in 1984; 10,121 HCV-infected people who were reported starting in 2001; and 34,551 HIV/AIDS cases reported beginning in 1981. Of the HBV and HCV cases, 6.3% and 12.6% were coinfected with HIV, respectively. The majority of cases were white males; however, black people were disproportionately affected. For more than 90% of the HBV/HIV cases, male-to-male sexual contact (men who have sex with men [MSM]) was the risk factor for HIV infection. Injection drug use was the most frequent risk factor for HIV infection among the HCV/HIV cases; however, 35.6% of the HCV/HIV coinfected males were MSM but not injection drug users. By linking the two registries, we found new ways to foster collaborative work and expand our programmatic flexibility. This analysis identified particular populations at risk for coinfection, which can be used by viral hepatitis and HIV screening, prevention, and treatment programs to integrate, enhance, target, and prioritize prevention services and clinical care within the community to maximize health outcomes.

  2. Combination therapy including CpG oligodeoxynucleotides and entecavir induces early viral response and enhanced inhibition of viral replication in a woodchuck model of chronic hepadnaviral infection.

    PubMed

    Meng, Zhongji; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Pei, Rongjuan; Zhang, Ejuan; Kemper, Thekla; Vollmer, Jörg; Davis, Heather L; Glebe, Dieter; Gerlich, Wolfram; Roggendorf, Michael; Lu, Mengji

    2016-01-01

    CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) stimulate immune cells via TLR9 and are potentially useful immunomodulators for the treatment of chronic viral infections. In the present study, different classes of CpGs were tested for their capacities for innate immune activation and antiviral activities in the woodchuck model. A class P CpG ODN was found to stimulate interferon (IFN) production in woodchuck peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in vitro, and following subcutaneous administration in vivo, it was observed to induce IFN and MxA expression in woodchuck PBMCs. Combination treatment with CpG ODN and entecavir (ETV) led to effective suppression of the woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) load in the woodchucks, with early viral responses and inhibition of replication. The woodchuck hepatitis surface antigen (WHsAg) serum concentrations were strongly decreased by CpG and ETV together but not by either agent alone, indicating synergistic effects. However, viral control post-treatment was still transient, similar to that observed with ETV alone. Significantly elevated levels of serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) but not of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) in some of the woodchucks receiving CpG ODN were noted, but these increases were resolved before the completion of treatment and were not associated with an elevated serum bilirubin level or coagulation disorders, suggesting the absence of a significant safety concern.

  3. Differences in nephrotoxicity risk and renal effects among anti-viral therapies against hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Koklu, S; Gulsen, M T; Tuna, Y; Koklu, H; Yuksel, O; Demir, M; Guner, R; Dogan, Z; Kucukazman, M; Poyrazoglu, O K; Biyik, M; Ozturk, N A; Aydogan, T; Coban, S; Kocaman, O; Sapmaz, F; Gokturk, S H; Karaca, C; Demirezer, A; Tanoglu, A; Yildirim, B; Altinbas, A; Atak, B M; Cosar, A M; Alkan, E

    2015-02-01

    Results are conflicting with respect to the renal effects of anti-viral agents used for hepatitis B virus infection. To compare short and long-term renal effects in real-life settings and to determine risk factors for renal impairment during treatment. 2221 treatment-naïve patients were enrolled. Among these, 895 (302 lamivudine, 27 telbivudine, 282 entecavir, 273 tenofovir and 11 adefovir initiated patients) had 'repeated measures' of creatinine (baseline, 1st, 6th, 12th and 24th month of treatment). Telbivudine and adefovir groups were excluded from further analysis because of the low number of patients. We calculated the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) using the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) formula at each time point. Hypophosphataemia was also recorded. Risk factors for renal impairment were analysed. Tenofovir caused a decline in GFR at each time point when compared to baseline levels. However, lamivudine and entecavir did not change GFR. GFR-shifting from ≥90 to 60-89 mL/min/1.73 m(2) was comparable among groups. The proportion of patients whose baseline creatinine increased more than 25% was comparable among all anti-virals. GFR showed a decline in patients who switched from entecavir to tenofovir. One patient with compensated cirrhosis needed to change from tenofovir because of renal safety. Seven and three patients developed transient hypophosphataemia in the tenofovir and lamivudine groups, respectively. Although tenofovir caused a decline in GFR, differences between the anti-viral agents do not appear to be so impressive. In patients with and without renal risk factors at baseline, there is no impact of anti-virals, including tenofovir. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. [Viral hepatitis infection and response to the hepatitis B vaccine in hemodialyzed patients].

    PubMed

    Curciarello, J O; Corallini, O; Adrover, R E; Chiera, A O; Giammona, A M; Barbero, R; Apraiz, M; Belloni, P O; Neumann, M; Jmelnitzky, A C

    1994-01-01

    Data from 219 hemodyalized patients receiving attention in our Hospital and other private centers in our city are shown. Mean age was 46.9 (range: 14-85), and 132 were male; mean time under dialysis was 20 months, and subjects received an average of 5 transfusions per patient year. Serological reactivity to HBs Ag, Anti HBs and IgG anti HBc by ELISA were investigated in all of them, and anti HCV by second generation enzimo-immunoassay (EIA II) in 73 HBe Ag/anti HBe system were determined in HBs Ag positive patients and those reactive to anti HCV (EIA II) were confirmed by LIA (immunoblotting of synthetic peptides LIA-TEK Organos Teknica). Recombinant anti HBV vaccine 40 mcg at 0-1 and six month were received by 81 cases without HBV markers in their sera and a protective response was considered when anti HBs titration of 10 mU/ml or more were obtained two months later. Prevalence for anti HBc and anti HBs were 38.8% respectively and that for HBs Ag was 21% with 78% of them reactive for HBs Ag. True reactivity for anti HCV (confirmed by LIA) was present in 35.6%, but it was 9.7% in our Hospital and 54.8% in private units (p < 0.0002). Anti HBs titration was done in 69/81 patients who received anti HBV vaccine, and a protective response in 49% were obtained; the other 12 patients underwent acute hepatitis B during the vaccination period.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Risk and burden associated with the acquisition of viral hepatitis A and B in the corporate traveler.

    PubMed

    Bunn, William B

    2008-08-01

    As the number of international business travelers continues to grow, so does the list of destinations, many of which are endemic for both hepatitis A and B. Generally, travelers are unaware of the risks of acquiring viral hepatitis when traveling; many are unsure of modes of transmission and do not seek pretravel advice or do not follow the recommendations of travel health professionals. Infected employees can result in increased health care costs and reduced productivity in the workplace. Safe and efficacious monovalent vaccines and a combined hepatitis A and B vaccine are available. Successful corporate health and immunization programs can prevent hepatitis A and B when employees are abroad on business. This article examines the distribution, risks, costs, burden, and prevention of hepatitis A and B in the international business traveler.

  6. [The incidence of viral hepatitis A in the Hradec Králové Region in the Czech Republic in the last decade].

    PubMed

    Šošovičková, R; Smetana, J; Beranová, E; Kučerová, K; Chlíbek, R

    Viral hepatitis A continues to occur in the Czech Republic due to the high susceptibility of the population and existing opportunities for the transmission of the disease. The aim was to describe and analyse the incidence of viral hepatitis A in the Hradec Králové Region in the Czech Republic in 2005-2014, including the study of two outbreaks that required a different approach of field epidemiologists. In 2015, a retrospective analysis was carried out of the data on the incidence of viral hepatitis A in Hradec Králové Region in 2005-2014. The EPIDAT system where cases of infectious diseases and data from epidemiological investigations are reported was used as a data source for the purposes of the present analysis. In addition, two final reports on epidemic outbreaks of viral hepatitis A from 2014 were assessed. The incidence of viral hepatitis A at the regional level follows, to a certain extent, the pattern of the incidence of this disease at the national level. The highest number of cases was reported in 2010 due to a country-wide epidemic. The most affected age groups were children, adolescents, and young adults. The incidence of viral hepatitis A in individual years has a significant effect on the emergence of local outbreaks. The incidence of viral hepatitis A in the Czech Republic has a fluctuating trend, at both the national and regional levels. The highest incidence of viral hepatitis A was observed in the younger and middle-age categories. The high susceptibility of these population groups suggests the importance of vaccination against viral hepatitis A that confers specific personal protection.Key words: viral hepatitis A - incidence - outbreak - Czech Republic.

  7. Cholesterol-Enriched Domain Formation Induced by Viral-Encoded, Membrane-Active Amphipathic Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Joshua M.; Gettel, Douglas L.; Tabaei, Seyed R.; Jackman, Joshua; Kim, Min Chul; Sasaki, Darryl Y.; Groves, Jay T.; Liedberg, Bo; Cho, Nam-Joon; Parikh, Atul N.

    2016-01-01

    The α-helical (AH) domain of the hepatitis C virus nonstructural protein NS5A, anchored at the cytoplasmic leaflet of the endoplasmic reticulum, plays a role in viral replication. However, the peptides derived from this domain also exhibit remarkably broad-spectrum virocidal activity, raising questions about their modes of membrane association. Here, using giant lipid vesicles, we show that the AH peptide discriminates between membrane compositions. In cholesterol-containing membranes, peptide binding induces microdomain formation. By contrast, cholesterol-depleted membranes undergo global softening at elevated peptide concentrations. Furthermore, in mixed populations, the presence of ∼100 nm vesicles of viral dimensions suppresses these peptide-induced perturbations in giant unilamellar vesicles, suggesting size-dependent membrane association. These synergistic composition- and size-dependent interactions explain, in part, how the AH domain might on the one hand segregate molecules needed for viral assembly and on the other hand furnish peptides that exhibit broad-spectrum virocidal activity. PMID:26745420

  8. The epidemiology of viral hepatitis among people who inject drugs: Results of global systematic reviews

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Paul; Mathers, Bradley; Cowie, Benjamin; Hagan, Holly; Jarlais, Don Des; Horyniak, Danielle; Degenhardt, Louisa

    2011-01-01

    Background Injecting drug use (IDU) is an important risk for viral hepatitis transmission. Detailed, transparent estimates of the scale of the problem at regional and global levels have never been made. We report national, regional and global prevalence and population size estimates for hepatitis C (HCV) and hepatitis B (HBV) among people who inject drugs. Methods Systematic search of peer-reviewed (Medline/Embase/PsycINFO) and grey literature databases, conference abstracts and online resources, with a widely distributed call for additional data. From 4386 peer-reviewed and 1019 grey literature sources, 1125 were reviewed in full. Studies were extracted to a customised database and graded according their methods. Serological reports of HCV antibodies/anti-HCV, HBV antibodies/anti-HBc, and/or HBV surface antigen/HBsAg among IDUs samples with n>40 participants, <100% HIV-positive, and sampling frames that did not exclude participants on the basis of age or sex were included. Using endorsed decision rules, prevalence estimates were calculated with anti-HCV and anti-HBV as proxies for exposure and HBsAg for current infection. These were combined with IDU population sizes to estimate the number of HBV and HCV positive IDUs. Findings Eligible reports of anti-HCV among IDUs were located for 77 countries. Prevalence was 60–80% in 26 countries and >80% in 12. We estimate worldwide about 10.0 million (range 6.0–15.2M) IDUs might be anti-HCV positive. China, (1.6M), the USA (1.5M) and the Russian Federation (1.3M) had by far the largest such populations. HBsAg reports were found for 59 countries, ranging from 5–10% in 21 countries and over 10% in 10. Worldwide, 6.4 million IDU might be anti-HBc positive (2.3–9.7M), and 1.2 million (0.3–2.7M) HBsAg positive. Interpretation The prevalence of anti-HCV among IDUs is far greater than HIV. Viral hepatitis clearly poses a challenge to public health. Variation in the coverage and quality of existing research creates

  9. Hepatitis C virus infection activates an innate pathway involving IKK-α in lipogenesis and viral assembly.

    PubMed

    Li, Qisheng; Pène, Véronique; Krishnamurthy, Siddharth; Cha, Helen; Liang, T Jake

    2013-06-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) interacts extensively with host factors to not only establish productive infection but also trigger unique pathological processes. Our recent genome-wide siRNA screen demonstrated that IκB kinase-α (IKK-α) is a crucial host factor for HCV. Here we describe a new nuclear factor κB (NF-κB)-independent and kinase-mediated nuclear function of IKK-α in HCV assembly. HCV, through its 3' untranslated region, interacts with DEAD box polypeptide 3, X-linked (DDX3X) to activate IKK-α, which translocates to the nucleus and induces a CBP/p300-mediated transcriptional program involving sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs). This innate pathway induces lipogenic genes and enhances core-associated lipid droplet formation to facilitate viral assembly. Chemical inhibitors of IKK-α suppress HCV infection and IKK-α-induced lipogenesis, offering a proof-of-concept approach for new HCV therapeutic development. Our results show that HCV uses a novel mechanism to exploit intrinsic innate responses and hijack lipid metabolism, which may contribute to high chronicity rates and the pathological hallmark of steatosis in HCV infection.

  10. Prevalence of hepatitis B, hepatitis C and human immunodeficiency viral infections in patients with inflammatory bowel disease in north India

    PubMed Central

    Harsh, Parnita; Gupta, Vipin; Kedia, Saurabh; Bopanna, Sawan; Pilli, Sucharita; Surendernath; Makharia, Govind Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) often require immunosuppressive therapy and blood transfusions and therefore are at a high risk of contracting infections due to hepatitis B (HBV) and hepatitis C (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). In the present study, we assessed the prevalence of these infections in patients with IBD. Methods This retrospective study included 908 consecutive patients with IBD (ulcerative colitis [UC], n=581; Crohn's disease [CD], n=327) who were receiving care at a tertiary care center. Ninety-five patients with intestinal tuberculosis (ITB) were recruited as disease controls. Prospectively maintained patient databases were reviewed for the prevalence of HBV surface antigen, anti-HCV antibodies, and HIV (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method). HCV RNA was examined in patients who tested positive for anti-HCV antibodies. Prevalence data of the study were compared with that of the general Indian population (HBV, 3.7%; HCV, 1%; HIV, 0.3%). Results The prevalence of HBV, HCV, and HIV was 2.4%, 1.4%, and 0.1%, respectively, in the 908 patients with IBD. Among the 581 patients with UC, 2.2% (12/541) had HBV, 1.7% (9/517) had HCV, and 0.2% (1/499) had HIV. Among the 327 patients with CD, 2.8% (8/288) had HBV, 0.7% (2/273) had HCV, and 0% (0/277) had HIV. One patient with CD had HBV and HCV coinfection. The prevalence of HBV, HCV, and HIV in patients with ITB was 5.9% (4/67), 1.8% (1/57), and 1.2% (1/84), respectively. Conclusions The prevalence of HBV, HCV, and HIV in north Indian patients with IBD is similar to the prevalence of these viruses in the general community. Nonetheless, the high risk of flare after immunosuppressive therapy mandates routine screening of patients with IBD for viral markers. PMID:28239319

  11. Viral DNA-Dependent Induction of Innate Immune Response to Hepatitis B Virus in Immortalized Mouse Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Xiuji; Clark, Daniel N.; Liu, Kuancheng; Xu, Xiao-Dong; Guo, Ju-Tao

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infects hundreds of millions of people worldwide and causes acute and chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. HBV is an enveloped virus with a relaxed circular (RC) DNA genome. In the nuclei of infected human hepatocytes, conversion of RC DNA from the incoming virion or cytoplasmic mature nucleocapsid (NC) to the covalently closed circular (CCC) DNA, which serves as the template for producing all viral transcripts, is essential to establish and sustain viral replication. A prerequisite for CCC DNA formation is the uncoating (disassembly) of NCs to expose their RC DNA content for conversion to CCC DNA. We report here that in an immortalized mouse hepatocyte cell line, AML12HBV10, in which RC DNA exposure is enhanced, the exposed viral DNA could trigger an innate immune response that was able to modulate viral gene expression and replication. When viral gene expression and replication were low, the innate response initially stimulated these processes but subsequently acted to shut off viral gene expression and replication after they reached peak levels. Inhibition of viral DNA synthesis or cellular DNA sensing and innate immune signaling diminished the innate response. These results indicate that HBV DNA, when exposed in the host cell cytoplasm, can function to trigger an innate immune response that, in turn, modulates viral gene expression and replication. IMPORTANCE Chronic infection by hepatitis B virus (HBV) afflicts hundreds of millions worldwide and is sustained by the episomal covalently closed circular (CCC) DNA in the nuclei of infected hepatocytes. Release of viral genomic DNA from cytoplasmic nucleocapsids (NCs) (NC disassembly or uncoating) is a prerequisite for its conversion to CCC DNA, which can also potentially expose the viral DNA to host DNA sensors and trigger an innate immune response. We have found that in an immortalized mouse hepatocyte cell line in which efficient CCC DNA formation was

  12. Hepatitis C virus 3'UTR regulates viral translation through direct interactions with the host translation machinery.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yun; Zhou, Kaihong; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2013-09-01

    The 3' untranslated region (3'UTR) of hepatitis C virus (HCV) messenger RNA stimulates viral translation by an undetermined mechanism. We identified a high affinity interaction, conserved among different HCV genotypes, between the HCV 3'UTR and the host ribosome. The 3'UTR interacts with 40S ribosomal subunit proteins residing primarily in a localized region on the 40S solvent-accessible surface near the messenger RNA entry and exit sites. This region partially overlaps with the site where the HCV internal ribosome entry site was found to bind, with the internal ribosome entry site-40S subunit interaction being dominant. Despite its ability to bind to 40S subunits independently, the HCV 3'UTR only stimulates translation in cis, without affecting the first round translation rate. These observations support a model in which the HCV 3'UTR retains ribosome complexes during translation termination to facilitate efficient initiation of subsequent rounds of translation.

  13. Human hepatitis B viral e antigen interacts with cellular interleukin-1 receptor accessory protein and triggers interleukin-1 response.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chih-Yung; Kuo, Tzu-Hsing; Ting, Ling-Pai

    2006-11-10

    Human hepatitis B virus (HBV) can cause acute and chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. HBV e antigen (HBeAg), a secreted protein and not required for viral replication, is thought to play an immunoregulatory role during viral infection. However, the functional involvement of HBeAg in host immune response has not been fully elucidated. We report in this study that HBeAg can bind to interleukin-1 receptor accessory protein (IL-1RAcP). Interleukin-1 (IL-1) plays an important role in inflammation and regulation of immune response, and membrane form of IL-1RAcP (mIL-1RAcP) is an essential component of trimeric IL-1/IL-1 receptor/mIL-1RAcP complex. We show that glutathione S-transferase- or polyhistidine-tagged recombinant HBeAg can interact with endogenous mIL-1RAcP in vitro. Purified (His)6-HBeAg added in the culture medium can interact with overexpressed FLAG-tagged mIL-1RAcP in vivo. Indirect immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy show that HBeAg colocalizes with mIL-1RAcP on the cell surface. Furthermore, HBeAg is able to induce the interaction of IL-1 receptor I (IL-1RI) with mIL-1RAcP and trigger the recruitment of adaptor protein myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) to the IL-1RI/mIL-1RAcP complex. Assembly and activation of IL-1RI/mIL-1RAcP signaling complex by HBeAg can activate downstream NF-kappaB pathway through IkappaB degradation, induce NF-kappaB-dependent luciferase expression, and induce the expression of IL-1-responsive genes. Silencing of IL-1RAcP by small interfering RNA dramatically abolishes HBeAg-mediated NF-kappaB activation. These results demonstrate that HBeAg can trigger host IL-1 response by binding to mIL-1RAcP. The interaction of HBeAg with mIL-1RAcP may play an important role in modulating host immune response in acute and chronic HBV infection.

  14. WHO guidance on the prevention of viral hepatitis B and C among people who inject drugs.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Nick; Verster, Annette; Rodolph, Michelle; Akl, Elie A

    2014-05-01

    Viral hepatitis B and C (HBV, HCV) disproportionately affect people who inject drugs (PWID) across the world. To date there has been little global action focusing on prevention, care and treatment of HBV and HCV among PWID. Here we report on the development process and discuss the implications of evidence informed WHO Guidelines for the Prevention of HBV and HCV in PWID. The World Health Organization (WHO) convened a Guideline Development Panel to develop recommendations on the prevention of HBV and HCV among PWID. The process followed the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) methodology. It included the development of PICO (Population, Interventions, Comparator, Outcomes) questions and conducting systematic reviews. Quality of evidence was classified into 4 levels: high, moderate, low, and very low. In the process of moving from evidence to recommendations, the following were considered: quality of evidence, balance of benefits and harms, community values and preferences and resource use. The WHO recommendations include the following for working with PWID: offer the rapid HBV vaccination regimen; offer incentives to increase uptake and completion of the HBV vaccine schedule; needle and syringe programs should also provide low dead-space syringes for distribution; and offer peer interventions to reduce the incidence of viral hepatitis. This guideline complements other WHO documents regarding PWID, including HIV prevention initiatives such as needle and syringe programs and opioid substitution therapy. This guidance offers a first step in the prevention of HBV and HCV among PWID. However, the lack of high quality evidence in this area necessitates further research and resources for implementation.

  15. Liver fibrosis in viral hepatitis: noninvasive assessment with acoustic radiation force impulse imaging versus transient elastography.

    PubMed

    Friedrich-Rust, Mireen; Wunder, Katrin; Kriener, Susanne; Sotoudeh, Fariba; Richter, Swantje; Bojunga, Joerg; Herrmann, Eva; Poynard, Thierry; Dietrich, Christoph F; Vermehren, Johannes; Zeuzem, Stefan; Sarrazin, Christoph

    2009-08-01

    To compare, in a pilot study, acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging technology integrated into a conventional ultrasonography (US) system with both transient elastography (TE) and serologic fibrosis marker testing for the noninvasive assessment of liver fibrosis. Informed consent was obtained from all subjects, and the local ethics committee approved the study. ARFI imaging involved the mechanical excitation of tissue with use of short-duration acoustic pulses to generate localized displacements in tissue. The displacements resulted in shear-wave propagation, which was tracked by using US correlation-based methods and recorded in meters per second. Eighty-six patients with chronic viral hepatitis underwent TE, ARFI imaging, and serum fibrosis marker testing. Results were compared with liver biopsy findings, which served as the reference standard. ARFI imaging (rho = 0.71), TE (rho = 0.73), and serum fibrosis marker test (rho = 0.66) results correlated significantly with histologic fibrosis stage (P < .001). Median ARFI velocities ranged from 0.84 to 3.83 m/sec. Areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve for the accuracy of ARFI imaging, TE, and serum fibrosis marker testing were 0.82, 0.84, and 0.82, respectively, for the diagnosis of moderate fibrosis (histologic fibrosis stage, > or = 2) and 0.91, 0.91, and 0.82, respectively, for the diagnosis of cirrhosis. ARFI imaging is a promising US-based method for assessing liver fibrosis in chronic viral hepatitis, with diagnostic accuracy comparable to that of TE in this preliminary study. http://radiology.rsnajnls.org/cgi/content/full/252/2/595/DC1.

  16. Should patients with abnormal liver function tests in primary care be tested for chronic viral hepatitis: cost minimisation analysis based on a comprehensively tested cohort

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Liver function tests (LFTs) are ordered in large numbers in primary care, and the Birmingham and Lambeth Liver Evaluation Testing Strategies (BALLETS) study was set up to assess their usefulness in patients with no pre-existing or self-evident liver disease. All patients were tested for chronic viral hepatitis thereby providing an opportunity to compare various strategies for detection of this serious treatable disease. Methods This study uses data from the BALLETS cohort to compare various testing strategies for viral hepatitis in patients who had received an abnormal LFT result. The aim was to inform a strategy for identification of patients with chronic viral hepatitis. We used a cost-minimisation analysis to define a base case and then calculated the incremental cost per case detected to inform a strategy that could guide testing for chronic viral hepatitis. Results Of the 1,236 study patients with an abnormal LFT, 13 had chronic viral hepatitis (nine hepatitis B and four hepatitis C). The strategy advocated by the current guidelines (repeating the LFT with a view to testing for specific disease if it remained abnormal) was less efficient (more expensive per case detected) than a simple policy of testing all patients for viral hepatitis without repeating LFTs. A more selective strategy of viral testing all patients for viral hepatitis if they were born in countries where viral hepatitis was prevalent provided high efficiency with little loss of sensitivity. A notably high alanine aminotransferase (ALT) level (greater than twice the upper limit of normal) on the initial ALT test had high predictive value, but was insensitive, missing half the cases of viral infection. Conclusions Based on this analysis and on widely accepted clinical principles, a "fast and frugal" heuristic was produced to guide general practitioners with respect to diagnosing cases of viral hepatitis in asymptomatic patients with abnormal LFTs. It recommends testing all patients

  17. Toxic hepatitis induced by a herbal medicine: Tinospora crispa.

    PubMed

    Langrand, J; Regnault, H; Cachet, X; Bouzidi, C; Villa, A F; Serfaty, L; Garnier, R; Michel, S

    2014-01-01

    Herbal remedies are becoming increasingly popular in many countries. Tinospora species (Menispermaceae) is commonly used as a herbal medicine in South Asia, but very few toxic effects have been described. We report a case of acute hepatitis associated with chronic use of high doses of Tinospora crispa. A 49-year-old male with chronic low back pain bought a herbal medicine at a market in Vietnam that was supposed to be Tinospora crispa, and started to take 10 pellets per day. He had no medical history and did not take any other drugs or toxins. Four weeks later; he developed dark urine and pale stools, associated with asthenia and right hypochondrial pain. Two months after starting treatment, he was referred to the hepatology department with jaundice. Blood tests showed aspartate aminotransferase: 1.169 IU/l, alanine aminotransferase: 2.029 IU/l, total bilirubin: 20.47 mg/dl, direct bilirubin: 13.29 mg/dl, and γ-glutamyltransferase: 243 IU/l. Viral and autoimmune hepatitis were eliminated. Upper abdominal ultrasound was normal. Histopathological findings were consistent with a toxic reaction. The herbal medicine was stopped on admission and the patient fully recovered without treatment, with normal liver function 2 months after the acute episode. Tinospora crispa was clearly identified in the pellets by microscopic analysis of the botanical characters combined with chromatographic fingerprints. The use of herbal medicines containing Tinospora crispa can induce toxic hepatitis. Recovery can be complete after discontinuation. This case highlights the risk associated with traditional herbal remedies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. Presence of hepatitis E RNA in mussels used as bio-monitors of viral marine pollution.

    PubMed

    Donia, Domenica; Dell'Amico, Maria Chiara; Petrinca, Anna Rita; Martinucci, Ilaria; Mazzei, Maurizio; Tolari, Francesco; Divizia, Maurizio

    2012-12-01

    Mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis), collected from a harvesting area approved by European Community Regulation, were transplanted to four polluted sites located in the Northwestern Mediterranean area (Tuscany). They were used as bio-monitors to test the quality of the marine water pollution. At different times after the transplantation, mussels were withdrawn and tested for presence of phages and enteric viruses by molecular tests. 52.4% of the transplanted mussel samples were positive for at least one enteric virus. Hepatitis A virus (HAV) was identified in each site (17/37; 45.9%). Three samples were positive for hepatitis E virus (HEV) (8.1%) and two (5.4%) for norovirus (NoV) genogroup I. Coliphages and RYC 2056 phages were detected in all sites, while HSP 40 phages were detected in three sites. Results demonstrate the ability of transplanted mussels in accumulating and retaining different species of enteric microorganisms. Their utility as bio-monitor organisms enables testing for viral marine pollution.

  19. Unilateral Adie's Tonic Pupil and Viral Hepatitis - Report of Two Cases.

    PubMed

    Karadžić, Jelena; Jaković, Natalija; Kovačević, Igor

    2015-01-01

    Adie's (tonic) pupil is a neuro-ophthalmological disorder characterized by a tonically dilated pupil, which is unresponsive to light. It is caused by damage to postganglionic fibers of the parasympathetic innervation of the eye, usually by a viral.or bacterial infection. Adie's syndrome includes diminished deep tendon reflexes. We report data of a 59-year-old female with unequal pupil sizes. She complained of blurred vision and headache mainly while reading. She had a 35-year history of hepatitis B and liver cirrhosis. On exam, left pupil was mydriatic and there was no response to light and at slit lamp we saw segments of the sphincter constrict. We performed 0.125% pilocarpine test and there was a remarkable reduction of size in the left pupil. The second case is a 55-year-old female who was referred to the University Eye Clinic because of a headache and mydriatic left pupil. She had diabetes mellitus type 2, as well as hepatitis A virus 20 years earlier. On exam, the left pupil was mydriatic, with no response to light. Test with diluted pilocarpine was positive. Neurological examinations revealed no abnormality in either case so we excluded Adie's syndrome. Adie's tonic pupil is benign neuro-ophthalmological disorder of unknown etiology. Most patients commonly present no symptoms and anisocoria is noticed accidentally. Although the etiology is unknown, there are some conditions that cause tonic pupil. It may be a part of a syndrome in which tonic pupil is associated with absent deep tendon reflexes.

  20. Hepatitis B Virus Stimulated Fibronectin Facilitates Viral Maintenance and Replication through Two Distinct Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Sheng; Wang, Jun; Chen, Tie-Long; Li, Hao-Yu; Wan, Yu-Shun; Peng, Nan-Fang; Gui, Xi-En; Zhu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Fibronectin (FN) is a high molecular weight extracellular matrix protein that functions in cell adhesion, growth, migration, and embryonic development. However, little is known about the role of FN during viral infection. In the present study, we found significantly higher levels of FN in sera, and liver tissues from hepatitis B virus (HBV) patients relative to healthy individuals. HBV expression enhanced FN mRNA and protein levels in the hepatic cell lines Huh7 and HepG2. HBV infection of susceptible HepG2-sodium taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide cells also increased FN expression. We also found that transcriptional factor specificity protein 1 was involved in the induction of FN by HBV. Knockdown of FN expression significantly inhibited HBV DNA replication and protein synthesis through activating endogenous IFN-α production. In addition, FN interacted with the transforming growth factor β-activated protein kinase 1 (TAK1) and TAK1-binding protein complex and attenuated interferon signaling by inhibiting TAK1 phosphorylation. Furthermore, the nuclear translocation of NF-κB/p65 was found to be inhibited by FN. We also observed that FN promoted HBV enhancers to support HBV expression. These results suggest novel functions of endogenous FN involved in immune evasion and maintenance of HBV replication. PMID:27023403

  1. Clinical significance of elevated serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) level in acute viral hepatitis A (AHA).

    PubMed

    Seo, Seung In; Kim, Su Sun; Choi, Bo Youn; Lee, Sang Ho; Kim, Sung Jun; Park, Hye Won; Kim, Hyoung Su; Shin, Woon Geon; Kim, Kyung Ho; Lee, Jin Heon; Kim, Hak Yang; Jang, Myoung Kuk

    2013-10-01

    The clinical course of acute viral hepatitis A (AHA) is highly variable. Serum alphafetoprotein (AFP) level is often elevated in various types of acute liver injuries, indicating active liver regeneration. This study was aimed to investigate the clinical significance of serum AFP level in the aspect of the early recovery in AHA. A total of 238 patients with AHA, confirmed by IgM anti-hepatitis A virus, were included. The patients were classified according to serum AFP level. Multivariate analysis by Cox proportional hazards model using dichotomized clinical variables was performed to identify the independent predictors for early recovery (ALT normalization within 2 weeks). The median age (range) was 30 (17-50) years and male dominant (62%, 147/238). Compared to low AFP group, high AFP group (>10 ng/mL) had significantly lower platelet counts (p <0.0001), lower albumin (p =0.003), lower AST (p <0.001), lower ALT (p = 0.001), higher total bilirubin level (p <0.0001) on univariate analysis. On Cox regression analysis, high AFP level (>10 ng/mL) was the only independent predictor for early recovery (Hazard ratio (HR); 2.392, 95% CI; 1.564-3.659, p = 0.0001). High serum AFP level (>10 ng/mL) may indicate the already-started recovery through active liver regeneration or the early recovery within 2 weeks in AHA.

  2. The Hepatitis Viral Status in Patients With Hepatocellular Carcinoma: a Study of 3843 Patients From Taiwan Liver Cancer Network

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Il-Chi; Huang, Shiu-Feng; Chen, Pei-Jer; Chen, Chi-Ling; Chen, Chao-Long; Wu, Cheng-Chung; Tsai, Cheng-Chung; Lee, Po-Huang; Chen, Miin-Fu; Lee, Chuan-Mo; Yu, Hsien-Chung; Lo, Gin-Ho; Yeh, Chau-Ting; Hong, Chih-Chen; Eng, Hock-Liew; Wang, John; Tseng, Hui-Hwa; Hsiao, Cheng-Hsiang; Wu, Hong-Dar Isaac; Yen, Tseng-Chang; Liaw, Yun-Fan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the leading cancer death in Taiwan. Chronic viral hepatitis infections have long been considered as the most important risk factors for HCC in Taiwan. The previously published reports were either carried out by individual investigators with small patient numbers or by large endemic studies with limited viral marker data. Through collaboration with 5 medical centers across Taiwan, Taiwan liver cancer network (TLCN) was established in 2005. All participating centers followed a standard protocol to recruit liver cancer patients along with their biosamples and clinical data. In addition, detailed viral marker analysis for hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) were also performed. This study included 3843 HCC patients with available blood samples in TLCN (recruited from November 2005 to April 2011). There were 2153 (56.02%) patients associated with HBV (HBV group); 969 (25.21%) with HCV (HCV group); 310 (8.07%) with both HBV and HCV (HBV+HCV group); and 411 (10.69%) were negative for both HBV and HCV (non-B non-C group). Two hundred two of the 2463 HBV patients (8.20%) were HBsAg(-), but HBV DNA (+). The age, gender, cirrhosis, viral titers, and viral genotypes were all significantly different between the above 4 groups of patients. The median age of the HBV group was the youngest, and the cirrhotic rate was lowest in the non-B non-C group (only 25%). This is the largest detailed viral hepatitis marker study for HCC patients in the English literatures. Our study provided novel data on the interaction of HBV and HCV in the HCC patients and also confirmed that the HCC database of TLCN is highly representative for Taiwan and an important resource for HCC research. PMID:27082566

  3. Hepatitis C Viral Kinetics in the Era of Direct Acting Antiviral Agents and IL28B

    PubMed Central

    Dahari, Harel; Guedj, Jeremie; Perelson, Alan S.; Layden, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    In the last decade hepatitis C virus (HCV) kinetics has become an important clinical tool for the optimization of therapy with (pegylated)-interferon-α (IFN) and ribavirin (RBV). Mathematical models have generated important insights into HCV pathogenesis, HCV- host dynamics, and IFN and RBV’s modes of action. Clinical trials with direct acting agents (DAAs) against various steps of the HCV life cycle have revealed new viral kinetic patterns that have not been observed with IFN±RBV. Very recently, studies have showed that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the IL28B gene region were associated with race/ethnicity and with response to IFN±RBV. Here we review our current knowledge of HCV kinetics and related mathematical models during IFN±RBV and/or DAA based therapies, HCV pathogenesis, and the role of IL28B polymorphism on early HCV kinetics. Better understanding of the mode of actions of drug(s) and viral kinetics may help to develop, in the near future, new individualized therapeutic regimens that include DAAs in combination with IFN+RBV. PMID:22180724

  4. Diminished viral replication and compartmentalization of hepatitis C virus in hepatocellular carcinoma tissue

    PubMed Central

    Harouaka, Djamila; Engle, Ronald E.; Wollenberg, Kurt; Diaz, Giacomo; Tice, Ashley B.; Zamboni, Fausto; Govindarajan, Sugantha; Alter, Harvey; Kleiner, David E.; Farci, Patrizia

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication and quasispecies distribution within the tumor of patients with HCV-associated hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) can provide insight into the role of HCV in hepatocarcinogenesis and, conversely, the effect of HCC on the HCV lifecycle. In a comprehensive study of serum and multiple liver specimens from patients with HCC who underwent liver transplantation, we found a sharp and significant decrease in HCV RNA in the tumor compared with surrounding nontumorous tissues, but found no differences in multiple areas of control non-HCC cirrhotic livers. Diminished HCV replication was not associated with changes in miR-122 expression. HCV genetic diversity was significantly higher in livers containing HCC compared with control non-HCC cirrhotic livers. Tracking of individual variants demonstrated changes in the viral population between tumorous and nontumorous areas, the extent of which correlated with the decline in HCV RNA, suggesting HCV compartmentalization within the tumor. In contrast, compartmentalization was not observed between nontumorous areas and serum, or in controls between different areas of the cirrhotic liver or between liver and serum. Our findings indicate that HCV replication within the tumor is restricted and compartmentalized, suggesting segregation of specific viral variants in malignant hepatocytes. PMID:26787866

  5. Hepatitis B viral reactivation secondary to imatinib treatment in a patient with gastrointestinal stromal tumor.

    PubMed

    Walker, Evan J; Simko, Jeffry P; Ko, Andrew H

    2014-07-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation is a known risk in cancer patients receiving cytotoxic or immunosuppressive therapy; however, the risk associated with newer molecularly-targeted agents has not been well-quantified. Imatinib, a small molecule inhibitor directed against BCR-ABL, CKIT, and other tyrosine kinases, has been associated with HBV reactivation primarily in patients treated for chronic myelogenous leukemia. Herein we present the first reported case of a patient who developed HBV reactivation while receiving imatinib therapy for a gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) in the adjuvant setting. This eventually resulted in fulminant liver failure and was effectively treated with living-related donor liver transplant and anti-viral medication. Currently, no guidelines exist for HBV screening prior to imatinib therapy. This report emphasizes the need for such guidelines and supports the idea that viral reactivation is a risk in all imatinib-treated patients, regardless of the underlying disease. Copyright© 2014 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  6. Gene expression analysis during acute hepatitis C virus infection associates dendritic cell activation with viral clearance.

    PubMed

    Zabaleta, Aintzane; Riezu-Boj, Jose-Ignacio; Larrea, Esther; Villanueva, Lorea; Lasarte, Juan Jose; Guruceaga, Elizabeth; Fisicaro, Paola; Ezzikouri, Sayeh; Missale, Gabriele; Ferrari, Carlo; Benjelloun, Soumaya; Prieto, Jesús; Sarobe, Pablo

    2016-05-01

    Viral clearance during acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is associated with the induction of potent antiviral T-cell responses. Since dendritic cells (DC) are essential in the activation of primary T-cell responses, gene expression was analyzed in DC from patients during acute HCV infection. By using microarrays, gene expression was compared in resting and activated peripheral blood plasmacytoid (pDC) and myeloid (mDC) DC from acute HCV resolving patients (AR) and from patients who become chronically infected (ANR), as well as in healthy individuals (CTRL) and chronically-infected patients (CHR). For pDC, a high number of upregulated genes was found in AR patients, irrespective of DC stimulation. However, for mDC, most evident differences were detected after DC stimulation, again corresponding to upregulated genes in AR patients. Divergent behavior of ANR was also observed when analyzing DC from CTRL and CHR, with ANR patients clustering again apart from these groups. These differences corresponded to metabolism-associated genes and genes belonging to pathways relevant for DC activation and cytokine responses. Thus, upregulation of relevant genes in DC during acute HCV infection may determine viral clearance, suggesting that dysfunctional DC may be responsible for the lack of efficient T-cell responses which lead to chronic HCV infection.

  7. Expression of the serine/threonine kinase hSGK1 in chronic viral hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Fillon, Sophie; Klingel, Karin; Wärntges, Simone; Sauter, Martina; Gabrysch, Sabine; Pestel, Sabine; Tanneur, Valerie; Waldegger, Siegfried; Zipfel, Annette; Viebahn, Richard; Häussinger, Dieter; Bröer, Stefan; Kandolf, Reinhard; Lang, Florian

    2002-01-01

    The human serine/threonine kinase hSGK1 is expressed ubiquitously with highest transcript levels in pancreas and liver. This study has been performed to determine the hSGK1 distribution in normal liver and its putative role in fibrosing liver disease. HSGK1-localization was determined by in situ hybridization, regulation of hSGK1-transcription by Northern blotting, fibronectin synthesis and hSGK1 phosphorylation by Western blotting. In normal liver hSGK1 was mainly transcribed by Kupffer cells. In liver tissue from patients with chronic viral hepatitis, hSGK1 transcript levels were excessively high in numerous activated Kupffer cells and inflammatory cells localized within fibrous septum formations. HSGK1 transcripts were also detected in activated hepatic stellate cells. Accordingly, Western blotting revealed that tissue from fibrotic liver expresses excessive hSGK1 protein as compared to normal liver. TGF-beta1 (2 ng/ml) increases hSGK1 transcription in both human U937 macro-phages and HepG2 hepatoma cells. H(2)O(2) (0.3 mM) activated hSGK1 and increased fibronectin formation in HepG2 cells overexpressing hSGK1 but not in HepG2 cells expressing the inactive mutant hSGK1(K127R). In conclusion hSGK1 is upregulated by TGF-beta1 during hepatitis and may contribute to enhanced matrix formation during fibrosing liver disease. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

  8. Determining the Cellular Diversity of Hepatitis C Virus Quasispecies by Single-Cell Viral Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    McLauchlan, John

    2013-01-01

    Single-cell genomics is emerging as an important tool in cellular biology. We describe for the first time a system to investigate RNA virus quasispecies diversity at the cellular level utilizing hepatitis C virus (HCV) replicons. A high-fidelity nested reverse transcription (RT)-PCR assay was developed, and validation using control transcripts of known copy number indicated a detection limit of 3 copies of viral RNA/reaction. This system was used to determine the cellular diversity of subgenomic JFH-1 HCV replicons constitutively expressed in Huh7 cells. Each cell contained a unique quasispecies that was much less diverse than the quasispecies of the bulk cell population from which the single cells were derived, suggesting the occurrence of independent evolution at the cellular level. An assessment of the replicative fitness of the predominant single-cell quasispecies variants indicated a modest reduction in fitness compared to the wild type. Real-time RT-PCR methods capable of determining single-cell viral loads were developed and indicated an average of 113 copies of replicon RNA per cell, correlating with calculated RNA copy numbers in the bulk cell population. This study introduces a single-cell RNA viral-sequencing method with numerous potential applications to explore host-virus interactions during infection. HCV quasispecies diversity varied greatly between cells in vitro, suggesting different within-cell evolutionary pathways. Such divergent trajectories in vivo could have implications for the evolution and establishment of antiviral-resistant variants and host immune escape mutants. PMID:24049174

  9. Hepatitis B virus modulates store-operated calcium entry to enhance viral replication in primary hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Casciano, Jessica C; Duchemin, Nicholas J; Lamontagne, R Jason; Steel, Laura F; Bouchard, Michael J

    2017-01-01

    Many viruses modulate calcium (Ca2+) signaling to create a cellular environment that is more permissive to viral replication, but for most viruses that regulate Ca2+ signaling, the mechanism underlying this regulation is not well understood. The hepatitis B virus (HBV) HBx protein modulates cytosolic Ca2+ levels to stimulate HBV replication in some liver cell lines. A chronic HBV infection is associated with life-threatening liver diseases, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and HBx modulation of cytosolic Ca2+ levels could have an important role in HBV pathogenesis. Whether HBx a