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Sample records for induces fodrin redistribution

  1. Identification of α-fodrin as an autoantigen in experimental coronavirus retinopathy (ECOR).

    PubMed

    Chin, Marian S; Hooper, Laura C; Hooks, John J; Detrick, Barbara

    2014-07-15

    The coronavirus, mouse hepatitis virus (MHV), JHM strain induces a biphasic disease in BALB/c mice that consists of an acute retinitis followed by progression to a chronic retinal degeneration with autoimmune reactivity. Retinal degeneration resistant CD-1 mice do not develop either the late phase or autoimmune reactivity. A mouse RPE/choroid DNA expression library was screened using sera from virus infected BALB/c mice. Two clones were identified, villin-2 protein and α-fodrin protein. α-Fodrin protein was used for further analysis and western blot reactivity was seen only in sera from virus infected BALB/c mice. CD4 T cells were shown to specifically react with MHV antigens and with α-fodrin protein. These studies clearly identified both antibody and CD4 T cell reactivities to α-fodrin in sera from virus infected, retinal degenerative susceptible BALB/c mice.

  2. Bombardment-induced segregation and redistribution

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, N.Q.; Wiedersich, H.

    1986-04-01

    During ion bombardment, a number of processes can alter the compositional distribution and microstructure in near-surface regions of alloys. The relative importance of each process depends principally on the target composition, temperature, and ion characteristics. In addition to displacement mixing leading to a randomization of atomic locations, and preferential loss of alloying elements by sputtering, which are dominant at relatively low temperatures, several thermally-activated processes, including radiation-enhanced diffusion, radiation-induced segregation and Gibbsian adsorption, also play important roles. At elevated temperatures, nonequilibrium point defects induced by ion impacts become mobile and tend to anneal out by recombination and diffusion to extended sinks, such as dislocations, grain boundaries and free surfaces. The high defect concentrations, far exceeding the thermodynamic equilbrium values, can enhance diffusion-controlled processes, while persistent defect fluxes, originating from the spatial non-uniformity in defect production and annihilation, give rise to local redistribution of alloy constituents because of radiation-induced segregation. Moreover, when the alloy is maintained at high temperature, Gibbsian adsorption, driven by the reduction in free energy of the system, occurs even without irradiation; it involves a compositional perturbation in a few atom layers near the alloy surface. The combination of these processes leads to the complex development of a compositionally-modified layer in the subsurface region. In the present paper, selected examples of these different phenomena and their synergistic effects on the evolution of the near-surface compositions of alloys during sputtering and ion implantation at elevated temperatures are discussed. 74 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Gelation and fodrin purification from rat brain extracts.

    PubMed

    Levilliers, N; Péron-Renner, M; Coffe, G; Pudles, J

    1986-06-03

    Extracts from rat brain tissue have been shown to give rise to a gel which exhibits the following features. It is mainly enriched in actin and in a high-molecular-weight protein with polypeptide chains of 235 and 240 kDa, which we identified as fodrin. Tubulin is also a major component of the gel but it appears to be trapped non-specifically during the gelation process. Gelation is pH-, ionic strength- and Ca2+-concentration-dependent, and is optimal under the conditions which promote the interaction between polymerized actin and fodrin. In a similar way to that described for the purification of rat brain actin (Levilliers, N., Péron-Renner, M., Coffe, G. and Pudles, J. (1984) Biochimie 66, 531-537), we used the gelation system as a selective means of recovering fodrin from the mixture of a low-ionic-strength extract from whole rat brain and a high-ionic-strength extract of the particulate fraction. From this gel, fodrin was purified with a good yield by a simple procedure involving gel dissociation in 0.5 M KCl and depolymerization in 0.7 M KI, Bio-Gel A-15m chromatography, followed by ammonium sulfate precipitation.

  4. Puromycin induces SUMO and ubiquitin redistribution upon proteasome inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Hotaru; Saitoh, Hisato

    2016-07-29

    We have previously reported the co-localization of O-propargyl-puromycin (OP-Puro) with SUMO-2/3 and ubiquitin at promyelocytic leukemia-nuclear bodies (PML-NBs) in the presence of the proteasome inhibitor MG132, implying a role for the ubiquitin family in sequestering OP-puromycylated immature polypeptides to the nucleus during impaired proteasome activity. Here, we found that as expected puromycin induced SUMO-1/2/3 accumulation with ubiquitin at multiple nuclear foci in HeLa cells when co-exposed to MG132. Co-administration of puromycin and MG132 also facilitated redistribution of PML and the SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase RNF4 concurrently with SUMO-2/3. As removal of the drugs from the medium led to disappearance of the SUMO-2/3-ubiquitin nuclear foci, our findings indicated that nuclear assembly/disassembly of SUMO-2/3 and ubiquitin was pharmacologically manipulable, supporting our previous observation on OP-Puro, which predicted the ubiquitin family function in sequestrating aberrant proteins to the nucleus. -- Highlights: •Puromycin exhibits the O-propargyl-puromycin effect. •Puromycin induces SUMO redistribution upon proteasome inhibition. •Ubiquitin and RNF4 accumulate at PML-nuclear bodies with SUMO-2/3. •The ubiquitin family may function in nuclear sequestration of immature proteins.

  5. Temperature induced compositional redistribution in blended insertion electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heubner, C.; Lämmel, C.; Schneider, M.; Michaelis, A.

    2017-03-01

    Blending insertion compounds is a novel and promising approach to design advanced electrodes for future lithium-ion batteries. In spite of the considerable improvements regarding safety issues and power density, the understanding of basic interactions between the constituents of the blend and differences towards common single compound insertion electrodes is still ongoing. Herein we explore and verify the effect of temperature induced compositional redistribution of lithium-ions between the constituents of a blended insertion electrode for the first time. A model-like blend electrode and a special experimental setup is used to measure the compositional redistribution current between the constituents when subjected to a temperature change. The amount of lithium exchanged between the constituents of the blend is also derived theoretically based on the thermodynamic properties of the pure constituents, showing excellent agreement to the experimental results. Theoretical and experimental results proof that significant amounts of lithium are exchanged between the constituents without any cycling of the battery, suggesting that this effect may intrinsically reduce the cycle life of batteries with blended insertion electrodes.

  6. Modeling Microgravity Induced Fluid Redistribution Autoregulatory and Hydrostatic Enhancements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, J. G.; Werner, C.; Nelson, E. S.; Feola, A.; Raykin, J.; Samuels, B.; Ethier, C. R.

    2017-01-01

    Space flight induces a marked cephalad (headward) redistribution of blood and interstitial fluid potentially resulting in a loss of venous tone and reduction in heart muscle efficiency upon introduction into the microgravity environment. Using various types of computational models, we are investigating how this fluid redistribution may induce intracranial pressure changes, relevant to reported reductions in astronaut visual acuity, part of the Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome. Methods: We utilize a lumped parameter cardiovascular system (CVS) model, augmented by compartments comprising the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) space, as the primary tool to describe how microgravity, and the associated lack of hydrostatic gradient, impacts fluid redistribution. Models of ocular fluid pressures and biomechanics then accept the output of the above model as boundary condition input to allow more detailed, local analysis (see IWS Abstract by Ethier et al.). Recently, we enhanced the capabilities our previously reported CVS model through the implementation of robust autoregulatory mechanisms and a more fundamental approach to the implementation of hydrostatic mechanisms. Modifying the approach of Blanco et al., we implemented auto-regulation in a quasi-static manner, as an averaged effect across the span of one heartbeat. This approach reduced the higher frequency perturbations from the regulatory mechanism and was intended to allow longer simulation times (days) than models that implement within-beat regulatory mechanisms (minutes). A more fundamental approach to hydrostatics was implemented by a quasi-1D approach, in which compartment descriptions include compartment length, orientation and relative position, allowed for modeling of body orientation, relative body positioning and, in the future, alternative gravity environments. At this time the inclusion of hydrostatic mechanisms supplies additional capabilities to train and validate the CVS model

  7. Ion irradiation induced impurity redistribution in Pt/C multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bera, S.; Goswami, D. K.; Bhattacharjee, K.; Dev, B. N.; Kuri, G.; Nomoto, K.; Yamashita, K.

    2003-12-01

    Ion irradiation induced modifications of a periodic Pt/C multilayer system containing Fe impurity have been analyzed by X-ray techniques suitable for exploring nanometer depth scales with sub-nanometer depth resolution. The multilayer stack with 15 Pt/C layer pairs (period 4.23 nm, total thickness 63.45 nm) was fabricated on a glass substrate. A 2 MeV Au 2+ ion beam was rastered on the sample to obtain uniformly irradiated strips with fluences from 1 × 10 14 to 1 × 10 15 ions/cm 2. These strips were analyzed with X-ray standing wave and X-ray reflectivity experiments. Ion induced atomic displacements across multilayer interfaces are known [Appl. Phys. Lett. 79 (2001) 467]. Here additionally we identify irradiation induced redistribution of Fe impurity atoms, which cannot be explained simply by atomic displacements due to ion-atom collision. With increasing ion fluences more Fe atoms migrate from C- to Pt-layers. This behaviour has been explained in terms of radiation induced enhanced diffusion and Fe-Pt and Fe-C phase diagrams.

  8. Fibril orientation redistribution induced by stretching of cellulose nanofibril hydrogels

    SciTech Connect

    Josefsson, Gabriella; Gamstedt, E. Kristofer; Ahvenainen, Patrik; Mushi, Ngesa Ezekiel

    2015-06-07

    The mechanical performance of materials reinforced by cellulose nanofibrils is highly affected by the orientation of these fibrils. This paper investigates the nanofibril orientation distribution of films of partly oriented cellulose nanofibrils. Stripes of hydrogel films were subjected to different amount of strain and, after drying, examined with X-ray diffraction to obtain the orientation of the nanofibrils in the films, caused by the stretching. The cellulose nanofibrils had initially a random in-plane orientation in the hydrogel films and the strain was applied to the films before the nanofibrils bond tightly together, which occurs during drying. The stretching resulted in a reorientation of the nanofibrils in the films, with monotonically increasing orientation towards the load direction with increasing strain. Estimation of nanofibril reorientation by X-ray diffraction enables quantitative comparison of the stretch-induced orientation ability of different cellulose nanofibril systems. The reorientation of nanofibrils as a consequence of an applied strain is also predicted by a geometrical model of deformation of nanofibril hydrogels. Conversely, in high-strain cold-drawing of wet cellulose nanofibril materials, the enhanced orientation is promoted by slipping of the effectively stiff fibrils.

  9. Au and Ti induced charge redistributions on monolayer WS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Hui-Li; Yang, Wei-Huang; Wu, Ya-Ping; Lin, Wei; Kang, Jun-Yong; Zhou, Chang-Jie

    2015-07-01

    By using the first-principles calculations, structural and electronic properties of Au and Ti adsorbed WS2 monolayers are studied systematically. For Au-adsorbed WS2, metallic interface states are induced in the middle of the band gap across the Fermi level. These interface states origin mainly from the Au-6s states. As to the Ti adsorbed WS2, some delocalized interface states appear and follow the bottom of conduction band. The Fermi level arises into the conduction band and leads to the n-type conducting behavior. The n-type interface states are found mainly come from the Ti-3d and W-5d states due to the strong Ti-S hybridization. The related partial charge densities between Ti and S atoms are much higher and increased by an order of magnitude as compared with that of Au-adsorbed WS2. Therefore, the electron transport across the Ti-adsorbed WS2 system is mainly by the resonant transport, which would further enhances the electronic transparency when monolayer WS2 contacts with metal Ti. These investigations are of significant importance in understanding the electronic properties of metal atom adsorption on monolayer WS2 and offer valuable references for the design and fabrication of 2D nanodevices. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 91321102, 11304257, and 61227009), the Natural Science Foundation of Fujian Province, China (Grant Nos. 2011J05006, 2009J05149, and 2014J01026), the Foundation from Department of Education of Fujian Province, China (Grant No. JA09146), Huang Hui Zhen Foundation of Jimei University, China (Grant No. ZC2010014), and the Scientific Research Foundation of Jimei University, China (Grant Nos. ZQ2011008 and ZQ2009004).

  10. Ion beam induced surface patterns due to mass redistribution and curvature-dependent sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobes, Omar; Zhang, Kun; Hofsäss, Hans

    2012-12-01

    Recently it was reported that ion-induced mass redistribution would solely determine nano pattern formation on ion-irradiated surfaces. We investigate the pattern formation on amorphous carbon thin films irradiated with Xe ions of energies between 200 eV and 10 keV. Sputter yield as well as number of displacements within the collision cascade vary strongly as function of ion energy and allow us to investigate the contributions of curvature-dependent erosion according to the Bradley-Harper model as well as mass redistribution according to the Carter-Vishnyakov model. We find parallel ripple orientations for an ion incidence angle of 60° and for all energies. A transition to perpendicular pattern orientation or a rather flat surface occurs around 80° for energies between 1 keV and 10 keV. Our results are compared with calculations based on both models. For the calculations we extract the shape and size of Sigmund's energy ellipsoid (parameters a, σ, μ), the angle-dependent sputter yield, and the mean mass redistribution distance from the Monte Carlo simulations with program SDTrimSP. The calculated curvature coefficients Sx and Sy describing the height evolution of the surface show that mass redistribution is dominant for parallel pattern formation in the whole energy regime. Furthermore, the angle where the parallel pattern orientation starts to disappear is related to curvature-dependent sputtering. In addition, we investigate the case of Pt erosion with 200 eV Ne ions, where mass redistribution vanishes. In this case, we observe perpendicular ripple orientation in accordance with curvature-dependent sputtering and the predictions of the Bradley-Harper model.

  11. Redistribution of elements in glass induced by a high-repetition-rate femtosecond laser.

    PubMed

    Luo, Fangfang; Qian, Bin; Lin, Geng; Xu, Jian; Liao, Yang; Song, Juan; Sun, Haiyi; Zhu, Bin; Qiu, Jianrong; Zhao, Quanzhong; Xu, Zhizhan

    2010-03-15

    The redistribution of elements in a multicomponent oxyfluoride glass is induced by a 250 kHz femtosecond laser. Elemental distribution in the cross section of the modified region along the laser propagation axis is analyzed by an electron microprobe analyzer. The results indicate that the relative concentrations of network formers of the glass are higher in the central area of the modified region and lower in the periphery of the modified region compared with the unirradiated areas. However, the relative concentrations of network modifiers are as opposed to that of network formers. Fluorescence spectra confirm that the distribution of fluorescence intensity of Yb(3+) in the modified region is consistent with that of its concentration. The effects of spherical aberration of the incident beam on the elemental redistribution are also discussed.

  12. Prevalence of alpha-fodrin antibodies in patients with chronic hepatitis C infection and Sjögren syndrome.

    PubMed

    Potthoff, Andrej; Witte, Torsten; Rifai, Kinan; Hoy, Ludwig; Deterding, Katja; Feyerabend, Sandra; Manns, Michael P; Wedemeyer, Heiner

    2009-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus infection (HCV) is associated with various extrahepatic manifestations. Antibodies against alpha-fodrin are associated with sicca symptoms and may valuable diagnostic markers in patients with primary Sjögren syndrome (SS) lacking Ro antibodies. The frequency and role of alpha-fodrin antibodies in patients with chronic HCV infection are unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of alpha-fodrin antibodies in HCV-infected patients with SS. Alpha-fodrin antibodies were detected more often in hepatitis C patients (25%; n=142) than in HBV-infected individuals (8%; n=49) and healthy controls (6%; n=174) (p<0.01). Based on these findings, we investigated the frequency of sicca symptoms in a second cohort and studied other antibodies associated with SS. HCV-infected individuals showed sicca symptoms in 53% of cases as determined by the Saxon and Schirmer tests, which was more frequent than in healthy controls (1%, p<0.01) but not in patients with autoimmune liver disease (51%). Antibodies specific for Ro (SS-A) were significantly more common in patients with autoimmune liver disease than in HCV-infected patients and healthy controls (16% versus 1% and 0%, p<0.003). SS was found in 18% of patients with HCV, in 15% of patients with autoimmune liver disease and in 1% of healthy controls. However, we found no correlation between sicca symptoms and the presence of antibodies against alpha-fodrin, Ro and La. Patients with chronic HCV infection show a high prevalence of sicca symptoms and antibodies against alpha-fodrin. However, neither the frequency nor the severity of symptoms correlated with the presence of alpha-fodrin antibodies.

  13. Public speaking stress-induced neuroendocrine responses and circulating immune cell redistribution in irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Elsenbruch, Sigrid; Lucas, Ayscha; Holtmann, Gerald; Haag, Sebastian; Gerken, Guido; Riemenschneider, Natalie; Langhorst, Jost; Kavelaars, Annemieke; Heijnen, Cobi J; Schedlowski, Manfred

    2006-10-01

    Augmented neuroendocrine stress responses and altered immune functions may play a role in the manifestation of functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorders. We tested the hypothesis that IBS patients would demonstrate enhanced psychological and endocrine responses, as well as altered stress-induced redistribution of circulating leukocytes and lymphocytes, in response to an acute psychosocial stressor when compared with healthy controls. Responses to public speaking stress were analyzed in N = 17 IBS patients without concurrent psychiatric conditions and N = 12 healthy controls. At baseline, immediately following public speaking, and after a recovery period, state anxiety, acute GI symptoms, cardiovascular responses, serum cortisol and plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) were measured, and numbers of circulating leukocytes and lymphocyte subpopulations were analyzed by flow cytometry. Public speaking led to significant cardiovascular activation, a significant increase in ACTH, and a redistribution of circulating leukocytes and lymphocyte subpopulations, including significant increases in natural killer cells and cytotoxic/suppressor T cells. IBS patients demonstrated significantly greater state anxiety both at baseline and following public speaking. However, cardiovascular and endocrine responses, as well as the redistribution of circulating leukocytes and lymphocyte subpopulations after public speaking stress, did not differ for IBS patients compared with controls. In IBS patients without psychiatric comorbidity, the endocrine response as well as the circulation pattern of leukocyte subpopulations to acute psychosocial stress do not differ from healthy controls in spite of enhanced emotional responses. Future studies should discern the role of psychopathology in psychological and biological stress responses in IBS.

  14. Radiation-induced atomic redistribution in Aging Fe–Ni alloys upon neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabashov, V. A.; Sagaradze, V. V.; Zamatovskii, A. E.; Kozlov, K. A.; Kataeva, N. V.

    2017-09-01

    The structural and phase transformations and atomic redistribution induced by neutron irradiation have been investigated in aging fcc Fe-Ni alloys using special alloying with elements M (Si, Ti, Al, Zr) that form intermetallic compounds. It has been established that the mechanism and kinetics of disturbance of regions of Ni- M atomic order in atomic displacement cascades upon neutron irradiation are linked to the chemical activity and diffusion mobility of alloying elements. Comparison with the laws of the deformationinduced dissolution of intermetallic compounds has been conducted.

  15. Repeated stress-induced stimulation of catecholamine response is not followed by altered immune cell redistribution.

    PubMed

    Imrich, Richard; Tibenska, Elena; Koska, Juraj; Ksinantova, Lucia; Kvetnansky, Richard; Bergendiova-Sedlackova, Katarina; Blazicek, Pavol; Vigas, Milan

    2004-06-01

    Stress response is considered an important factor in the modulation of immune function. Neuroendocrine hormones, including catecholamines, affect the process of immune cell redistribution, important for cell-mediated immunity. This longitudinal investigation was aimed at evaluating the effect of repeated stress-induced elevation of catecholamines on immune cell redistribution and expression of adhesive molecules. We assessed the responses of epinephrine (EPI), norepinephrine (NE), cortisol, changes in lymphocytes subpopulations, and percentages of CD11a+, CD11b+, and CD62L+ lymphocytes to a 20-min treadmill exercise of an intensity equal to 80% of the individual's Vo(2)max. The exercise was performed before and after 6 weeks of endurance training consisting of a 1-h run 4 times a week (ET) and after 5 days of bed rest (HDBR) in 10 healthy males. We did not observe any significant changes in the basal levels of EPI, NE, and cortisol in the plasma, nor in the immune parameters after ET and HDBR. The exercise test led to a significant (P <.001) elevation of EPI and NE levels after both ET and HDBR, a significant elevation (P <.01) of cortisol after HDBR, an increase in the absolute numbers of leukocytes, granulocytes, monocytes, CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, CD16+, CD19+ lymphocytes, percentage of CD11a+ and CD11b+ lymphocytes, and to a decrease of CD62L1 before, after ET, and after HDBR. We found comparable changes in all measured immune parameters after ET and HDBR. In conclusion, repeated stress-induced elevation of EPI and NE was not associated with an alteration in immune cell redistribution found in response to the single bout of exercise.

  16. Electromagnetic field redistribution induced selective plasmon driven surface catalysis in metal nanowire-film systems

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Liang; Huang, Yingzhou; Yang, Yanna; Xiong, Wen; Chen, Guo; Su, Xun; Wei, Hua; Wang, Shuxia; Wen, Weijia

    2015-01-01

    For the novel interpretation of Raman spectrum from molecule at metal surface, the plasmon driven surface catalysis (PDSC) reactions have become an interesting topic in the research field of surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). In this work, the selective PDSC reactions of p,p’-dimercaptoazobenzene (DMAB) produced from para-aminothiophenol (PATP) or 4-nitrobenzenethiol (4NBT) were demonstrated in the Ag nanowires dimer-Au film systems. The different SERS spectra collected at individual part and adjacent part of the same nanowire-film system pointed out the importance of the electromagnetic field redistribution induced by image charge on film in this selective surface catalysis, which was confirmed by the simulated electromagnetic simulated electro- magnetic field distributions. Our result indicated this electromagnetic field redistribution induced selective surface catalysis was largely affected by the polarization and wavelength of incident light but slightly by the difference in diameters between two nanowires. Our work provides a further understanding of PDSC reaction in metal nanostructure and could be a deep support for the researches on surface catalysis and surface analysis. PMID:26601698

  17. Electromagnetic field redistribution induced selective plasmon driven surface catalysis in metal nanowire-film systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Liang; Huang, Yingzhou; Yang, Yanna; Xiong, Wen; Chen, Guo; Su, Xun; Wei, Hua; Wang, Shuxia; Wen, Weijia

    2015-11-01

    For the novel interpretation of Raman spectrum from molecule at metal surface, the plasmon driven surface catalysis (PDSC) reactions have become an interesting topic in the research field of surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). In this work, the selective PDSC reactions of p,p’-dimercaptoazobenzene (DMAB) produced from para-aminothiophenol (PATP) or 4-nitrobenzenethiol (4NBT) were demonstrated in the Ag nanowires dimer-Au film systems. The different SERS spectra collected at individual part and adjacent part of the same nanowire-film system pointed out the importance of the electromagnetic field redistribution induced by image charge on film in this selective surface catalysis, which was confirmed by the simulated electromagnetic simulated electro- magnetic field distributions. Our result indicated this electromagnetic field redistribution induced selective surface catalysis was largely affected by the polarization and wavelength of incident light but slightly by the difference in diameters between two nanowires. Our work provides a further understanding of PDSC reaction in metal nanostructure and could be a deep support for the researches on surface catalysis and surface analysis.

  18. Insulin-induced surface redistribution regulates internalization of the insulin receptor and requires its autophosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Carpentier, J.L.; Paccaud, J.P.; Orci, L. ); Gorden, P. ); Rutter, W.J. )

    1992-01-01

    The role of insulin-induced receptor autophosphorylation in its internalization was analyzed by comparing {sup 125}I-labeled insulin ({sup 125}I-insulin) internalization in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines transfected with normal (CHO.T) or mutated insulin receptors. In four cell lines with a defect of insulin-induced autophosphorylation, {sup 125}I-insulin internalization was impaired. By contrast, in CHO.T cells and in two other CHO cell lines with amino acid deletions or insertions that do not perturb autophosphorylation, {sup 125}I-insulin internalization was not affected. A morphological analysis showed that the inhibition is linked to the ligand-specific surface redistribution in which the insulin-receptor complexes leave microvilli and concentrate on nonvillous segments of the membrane where endocytosis occurs.

  19. Microgravity-Induced Physiological Fluid Redistribution: Computational Analysis to Assess Influence of Physiological Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, J. G.; Eke, Chika; Werner, C.; Nelson, E. S.; Mulugeta, L.; Feola, A.; Raykin, J.; Samuels, B.; Ethier, C. R.

    2016-01-01

    Space flight impacts human physiology in many ways, the most immediate being the marked cephalad (headward) shift of fluid upon introduction into the microgravity environment. This physiological response to microgravity points to the redistribution of blood and interstitial fluid as a major factor in the loss of venous tone and reduction in heart muscle efficiency which impact astronaut performance. In addition, researchers have hypothesized that a reduction in astronaut visual acuity, part of the Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome, is associated with this redistribution of fluid. VIIP arises within several months of beginning space flight and includes a variety of ophthalmic changes including posterior globe flattening, distension of the optic nerve sheath, and kinking of the optic nerve. We utilize a suite of lumped parameter models to simulate microgravity-induced fluid redistribution in the cardiovascular, central nervous and ocular systems to provide initial and boundary data to a 3D finite element simulation of ocular biomechanics in VIIP. Specifically, the lumped parameter cardiovascular model acts as the primary means of establishing how microgravity, and the associated lack of hydrostatic gradient, impacts fluid redistribution. The cardiovascular model consists of 16 compartments, including three cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) compartments, three cranial blood compartments, and 10 thoracic and lower limb blood compartments. To assess the models capability to address variations in physiological parameters, we completed a formal uncertainty and sensitivity analysis that evaluated the relative importance of 42 input parameters required in the model on relative compartment flows and compartment pressures. Utilizing the model in a pulsatile flow configuration, the sensitivity analysis identified the ten parameters that most influenced each compartment pressure. Generally, each compartment responded appropriately to parameter variations

  20. Field-Induced Point Defect Redistribution in Metal Oxides: Mesoscopic Length Scale Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moballegh, Ali

    continuously monitored. To understand spatial variations in chemistry and possible changes in microstructure, we utilize a combination of cathodoluminescence spectroscopy (CL), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). After electrical degradation, correlating electrical characterization measurements with electron microscopy analyses provides insight into the redistribution of point defects as a function of electric field and time. Diode-like rectification behavior was observed in crystals subjected to an applied voltage in the low electric field regime (< 75V/cm). One-dimensional and homogenous defect redistribution along both and results in accumulation of point defects and the formation of highly reduced substoichiometric regions near the cathode, which leads to the Schottky barrier degradation. The CL spectroscopy shows that titanium interstitials dominate the point defect redistribution process in this region. The reversibility of the rectification behavior, examined for both crystallographic directions, shows that the process can be influenced by the anisotropy of rutile. At degradation fields on the order of 56 V/cm at 200°C, although the degradation of Schottky barrier is mostly reversible along , formation of extended structural defects is not recovered during the application of a reverse bias and results in an irreversible rectification behavior along direction. We also identify electric field regimes (> 175 V/cm) in which the concentrations of point defects become large enough to induce higher-dimensional defects such as dislocations and the formation of Magneli phases. We find that the condensation of point defects into Magneli phases at the electrodes depletes point defect concentration in the bulk, thus increasing the bulk resistivity. The Magneli phases formed near the cathode are found to be stable, and not reversible, at 200°C for the times and fields studied. The defect condensation processes have significant

  1. Lactacystin requires reactive oxygen species and Bax redistribution to induce mitochondria-mediated cell death

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Alvarez, Sergio; Solesio, Maria E; Manzanares, Jorge; Jordán, Joaquín; Galindo, María F

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: The proteasome inhibitor model of Parkinson's disease (PD) appears to reproduce many of the important behavioural, imaging, pathological and biochemical features of the human disease. However, the mechanisms involved in the lactacystin-induced, mitochondria-mediated apoptotic pathway remain poorly defined. Experimental approach: We have used lactacystin as a specific inhibitor of the 20S proteasome in the dopaminergic neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y. We over-expressed a green fluorescent protein (GFP)–Bax fusion protein in these cells to study localization of Bax. Free radical scavengers were used to assess the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in these pathways. Key results: Lactacystin triggered a concentration-dependent increase in cell death mediated by the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, and induced a change in mitochondrial membrane permeability accompanied by cytochrome c release. The participation of Bax protein was more critical than the formation of the permeability transition pore in mitochondria. GFP–Bax over-expression demonstrated Bax redistribution from the cytosol to mitochondria after the addition of lactacystin. ROS, but not p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, participated in lactacystin-induced mitochondrial Bax translocation. Lactacystin disrupted the intracellular redox state by increasing ROS production and depleting endogenous antioxidant systems such as glutathione (GSH). Pharmacological depletion of GSH, using l-buthionine sulphoxide, potentiated lactacystin-induced cell death. Lactacystin sensitized neuroblastoma cells to oxidative damage, induced by subtoxic concentrations of 6-hydroxydopamine. Conclusions and implications: The lactacystin-induced, mitochondrial-mediated apoptotic pathway involved interactions between ROS, GSH and Bax. Lactacystin could constitute a potential factor in the development of sporadic PD. PMID:19785649

  2. Cisplatin-induced CD95 redistribution into membrane lipid rafts of HT29 human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lacour, Sandrine; Hammann, Arlette; Grazide, Solène; Lagadic-Gossmann, Dominique; Athias, Anne; Sergent, Odile; Laurent, Guy; Gambert, Philippe; Solary, Eric; Dimanche-Boitrel, Marie-Thérèse

    2004-05-15

    We have shown previously that the death receptor CD95 could contribute to anticancer drug-induced apoptosis of colon cancer cells. In addition, anticancer drugs cooperate with CD95 cognate ligand or agonistic antibodies to trigger cancer cell apoptosis. In the present study, we show that the anticancer drug cisplatin induces clustering of CD95 at the surface of the human colon cancer cell line HT29, an event inhibited by the inhibitor of acid sphingomyelinase (aSMase) imipramine. The cholesterol sequestering agent nystatin also prevents cisplatin-induced CD95 clustering and decreases HT29 cell sensitivity to cisplatin-induced apoptosis and the synergy between cisplatin and anti-CD95 agonistic antibodies. CD95, together with the adaptor molecule Fas-associated death domain and procaspase-8, is redistributed into cholesterol- and sphingolipid-enriched cell fractions after cisplatin treatment, suggesting plasma membrane raft involvement. Interestingly, nystatin prevents the translocation of the aSMase to the extracellular surface of plasma membrane and the production of ceramide, suggesting that these early events require raft integrity. In addition, nystatin prevents cisplatin-induced transient increase in plasma membrane fluidity that could be required for CD95 translocation. Together, these results demonstrate that cisplatin activates aSMase and induces ceramide production, which triggers the redistribution of CD95 into the plasma membrane rafts. Such redistribution contributes to cell death and sensitizes tumor cells to CD95-mediated apoptosis.

  3. Vasopressors induce passive pulmonary hypertension by blood redistribution from systemic to pulmonary circulation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chunling; Qian, Hong; Luo, Shuhua; Lin, Jing; Yu, Jerry; Li, Yajiao; An, Qi; Luo, Nanfu; Du, Lei

    2017-05-01

    Vasopressors are widely used in resuscitation, ventricular failure, and sepsis, and often induce pulmonary hypertension with undefined mechanisms. We hypothesize that vasopressor-induced pulmonary hypertension is caused by increased pulmonary blood volume and tested this hypothesis in dogs under general anesthesia. In normal hearts (model 1), phenylephrine (2.5 μg/kg/min) transiently increased right but decreased left cardiac output, associated with increased pulmonary blood volume (63% ± 11.8, P = 0.007) and pressures in the left atrium, pulmonary capillary, and pulmonary artery. However, the trans-pulmonary gradient and pulmonary vascular resistance remained stable. These changes were absent after decreasing blood volume or during right cardiac dysfunction to reduce pulmonary blood volume (model 2). During double-ventricle bypass (model 3), phenylephrine (1, 2.5 and 10 μg/kg/min) only slightly induced pulmonary vasoconstriction. Vasopressin (1U and 2U) dose-dependently increased pulmonary artery pressure (52 ± 8.4 and 71 ± 10.3%), but did not cause pulmonary vasoconstriction in normally beating hearts (model 1). Pulmonary artery and left atrial pressures increased during left ventricle dysfunction (model 4), and further increased after phenylephrine injection by 31 ± 5.6 and 43 ± 7.5%, respectively. In conclusion, vasopressors increased blood volume in the lung with minimal pulmonary vasoconstriction. Thus, this pulmonary hypertension is similar to the hemodynamic pattern observed in left heart diseases and is passive, due to redistribution of blood from systemic to pulmonary circulation. Understanding the underlying mechanisms may improve clinical management of patients who are taking vasopressors, especially those with coexisting heart disease.

  4. Zinc asparaginate supplementation induces redistribution of toxic trace elements in rat tissues and organs

    PubMed Central

    Skalny, Andrey A.; Medvedeva, Yulia S.; Alchinova, Irina B.; Karganov, Mikhail Yu.; Ajsuvakova, Olga P.; Skalny, Anatoly V.; Nikonorov, Alexandr A.

    2015-01-01

    The primary objective of the current study was the investigation of the influence of zinc asparaginate supplementation for 7 and 14 days on toxic metal and metalloid content in rat organs and tissues. Rats obtained zinc asparaginate in doses of 5 and 15 mg/kg/day for 7 and 14 days. At the end of the experiment rat tissues and organs (liver, kidney, heart, m. gastrocnemius, serum, and hair) were collected for subsequent analysis. Estimation of Zn, Al, As, Li, Ni, Sn, Sr content in the harvested organs was performed using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry at NexION 300D. The obtained data showed that intragastric administration of zinc significantly increased liver, kidney and serum zinc concentrations. Seven-day zinc treatment significantly affected the toxic trace element content in the animals’ organs. Zinc supplementation significantly decreased particularly liver aluminium, nickel, and tin content, whereas lead tended to increase. Zinc-induced changes in kidney metal content were characterized by elevated lithium and decreased nickel concentration. Zinc-induced alteration of myocardical toxic element content was multidirectional. Muscle aluminium and lead concentration were reduced in response to zinc supplementation. At the same time, serum and hair toxic element concentrations remained relatively stable after 7-day zinc treatment. Zinc asparaginate treatment of 14 days significantly depressed liver and elevated kidney lithium content, whereas a significant zinc-associated decrease was detected in kidney strontium content. Zinc supplementation for 14 days resulted also in multidirectional changes in the content of heart toxic elements. At the same time, significant zinc-associated decrease in muscle lithium and nickel levels was observed. Fourteen-day zinc treatment resulted in significantly increased serum arsenic and tin concentrations, whereas hair trace element content remained relatively stable. Generally, the obtained data indicate a

  5. Location of a protein of the fodrin-spectrin-TW260/240 family in the mouse intestinal brush border.

    PubMed

    Hirokawa, N; Cheney, R E; Willard, M

    1983-03-01

    We have determined that a protein of the fodrin-spectrin-TW260/240 (FST) family is a component of the thin fibrils (approximately 5 nm wide, 100-200 nm long) that cross-link bundles of actin filaments to adjacent actin bundles and to the plasma membrane in the terminal web of the brush border of the intestinal epithelium. When isolated brush borders were incubated with anti-fodrin antibodies and prepared for electron microscopy by the quick-freeze, deep-etch technique, these approximately 5 nm fibrils were specifically decorated with the antibody. In addition, these cross-linking fibrils disappeared when the anti-fodrin-reactive proteins were extracted from the brush border. We conclude that FST is a component of a cross-linking system composed of approximately 5 nm fibrils that are morphologically distinct from the approximately 8 nm myosin-containing fibrils which were identified by anti-myosin decoration. In addition to linking actin bundles to adjacent actin bundles and to the plasma membrane, these FST fibrils may mediate actin-vesicle, actin-intermediate filament and vesicle-plasma membrane linkages.

  6. Thermally induced cation redistribution in Fe-bearing oxy-dravite and potential geothermometric implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosi, Ferdinando; Skogby, Henrik; Hålenius, Ulf

    2016-05-01

    Iron-bearing oxy-dravite was thermally treated in air and hydrogen atmosphere at 800 °C to study potential changes in Fe, Mg and Al ordering over the octahedrally coordinated Y and Z sites and to explore possible applications to intersite geothermometry based on tourmaline. Overall, the experimental data (structural refinement, Mössbauer, infrared and optical absorption spectroscopy) show that heating Fe-bearing tourmalines results in disordering of Fe over Y and Z balanced by ordering of Mg at Y, whereas Al does not change appreciably. The Fe disorder depends on temperature, but less on redox conditions. The degree of Fe3+-Fe2+ reduction is limited despite strongly reducing conditions, indicating that the f O2 conditions do not exclusively control the Fe oxidation state at the present experimental conditions. Untreated and treated samples have similar short- and long-range crystal structures, which are explained by stable Al-extended clusters around the O1 and O3 sites. In contrast to the stable Al clusters that preclude any temperature-dependent Mg-Al order-disorder, there occurs Mg diffusion linked to temperature-dependent exchange with Fe. Ferric iron mainly resides around O2- at O1 rather than (OH)-, but its intersite disorder induced by thermal treatment indicates that Fe redistribution is the driving force for Mg-Fe exchange and that its diffusion rates are significant at these temperatures. With increasing temperature, Fe progressively disorders over Y and Z, whereas Mg orders at Y according to the order-disorder reaction: YFe + ZMg → ZFe + YMg. The presented findings are important for interpretation of the post-crystallization history of both tourmaline and tourmaline host rocks and imply that successful tourmaline geothermometers may be developed by thermal calibration of the Mg-Fe order-disorder reaction, whereas any thermometers based on Mg-Al disorder will be insensitive and involve large uncertainties.

  7. TCR Triggering Induces the Formation of Lck–RACK1–Actinin-1 Multiprotein Network Affecting Lck Redistribution

    PubMed Central

    Ballek, Ondřej; Valečka, Jan; Dobešová, Martina; Broučková, Adéla; Manning, Jasper; Řehulka, Pavel; Stulík, Jiří; Filipp, Dominik

    2016-01-01

    The initiation of T-cell signaling is critically dependent on the function of the member of Src family tyrosine kinases, Lck. Upon T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) triggering, Lck kinase activity induces the nucleation of signal-transducing hubs that regulate the formation of complex signaling network and cytoskeletal rearrangement. In addition, the delivery of Lck function requires rapid and targeted membrane redistribution, but the mechanism underpinning this process is largely unknown. To gain insight into this process, we considered previously described proteins that could assist in this process via their capacity to interact with kinases and regulate their intracellular translocations. An adaptor protein, receptor for activated C kinase 1 (RACK1), was chosen as a viable option, and its capacity to bind Lck and aid the process of activation-induced redistribution of Lck was assessed. Our microscopic observation showed that T-cell activation induces a rapid, concomitant, and transient co-redistribution of Lck and RACK1 into the forming immunological synapse. Consistent with this observation, the formation of transient RACK1–Lck complexes were detectable in primary CD4+ T-cells with their maximum levels peaking 10 s after TCR–CD4 co-aggregation. Moreover, RACK1 preferentially binds to a pool of kinase active pY394Lck, which co-purifies with high molecular weight cellular fractions. The formation of RACK1–Lck complexes depends on functional SH2 and SH3 domains of Lck and includes several other signaling and cytoskeletal elements that transiently bind the complex. Notably, the F-actin-crosslinking protein, α-actinin-1, binds to RACK1 only in the presence of kinase active Lck suggesting that the formation of RACK1–pY394Lck–α-actinin-1 complex serves as a signal module coupling actin cytoskeleton bundling with productive TCR/CD4 triggering. In addition, the treatment of CD4+ T-cells with nocodazole, which disrupts the microtubular network, also blocked the

  8. TCR Triggering Induces the Formation of Lck-RACK1-Actinin-1 Multiprotein Network Affecting Lck Redistribution.

    PubMed

    Ballek, Ondřej; Valečka, Jan; Dobešová, Martina; Broučková, Adéla; Manning, Jasper; Řehulka, Pavel; Stulík, Jiří; Filipp, Dominik

    2016-01-01

    The initiation of T-cell signaling is critically dependent on the function of the member of Src family tyrosine kinases, Lck. Upon T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) triggering, Lck kinase activity induces the nucleation of signal-transducing hubs that regulate the formation of complex signaling network and cytoskeletal rearrangement. In addition, the delivery of Lck function requires rapid and targeted membrane redistribution, but the mechanism underpinning this process is largely unknown. To gain insight into this process, we considered previously described proteins that could assist in this process via their capacity to interact with kinases and regulate their intracellular translocations. An adaptor protein, receptor for activated C kinase 1 (RACK1), was chosen as a viable option, and its capacity to bind Lck and aid the process of activation-induced redistribution of Lck was assessed. Our microscopic observation showed that T-cell activation induces a rapid, concomitant, and transient co-redistribution of Lck and RACK1 into the forming immunological synapse. Consistent with this observation, the formation of transient RACK1-Lck complexes were detectable in primary CD4(+) T-cells with their maximum levels peaking 10 s after TCR-CD4 co-aggregation. Moreover, RACK1 preferentially binds to a pool of kinase active pY394(Lck), which co-purifies with high molecular weight cellular fractions. The formation of RACK1-Lck complexes depends on functional SH2 and SH3 domains of Lck and includes several other signaling and cytoskeletal elements that transiently bind the complex. Notably, the F-actin-crosslinking protein, α-actinin-1, binds to RACK1 only in the presence of kinase active Lck suggesting that the formation of RACK1-pY394(Lck)-α-actinin-1 complex serves as a signal module coupling actin cytoskeleton bundling with productive TCR/CD4 triggering. In addition, the treatment of CD4(+) T-cells with nocodazole, which disrupts the microtubular network, also blocked the

  9. Deformation-induced silica redistribution in banded iron formation, Hamersley Province, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egglseder, Mathias S.; Cruden, Alexander R.; Tomkins, Andrew G.; Wilson, Christopher J. L.

    2016-12-01

    The formation of banded iron formations (BIF) remains controversial despite their potential to provide key information on Precambrian atmospheres and hydrospheres. It is widely agreed that BIF are chemical sedimentary rocks comprising alternating layers of iron oxides and chert formed from poorly known precursor phases. Many models address the chemical transformation of such precursor iron oxide phases into BIF during compaction and diagenesis. However, the formation of chert and the influence of physical forces in this process have received less attention. Microstructural analysis of BIF from the Hamersley Province (Western Australia) reveals that significant amounts of silica were redistributed by dissolution-precipitation creep during both diagenesis and regional-scale deformation. This physicochemical process led to silica remobilisation and volume loss by stress-induced dissolution of microcrystalline quartz in an aqueous fluid. The dissolved solid phase was transported by diffusion and fluid flow along grain boundaries or within available porosity and then reprecipitated in low-pressure zones, leading to local volume increase. These processes were further enhanced by rheological contrasts between different minerals, resulting in significant variations of chert band thickness. Microstructural observations combined with quantitative microfabric analysis reveal domains of crystallographic preferred orientations (CPO) in quartz grains within chert layers. The CPO fabrics record strain regimes (e.g., pure and simple shear, extension and shortening) that modified quartz aggregates by dissolution-precipitation creep, providing new insights into the metamorphic and deformation history of BIF. We document microstructures that indicate that non-coaxial deformation was active during diagenesis and subsequent deformation of the Hamersley Province BIF. Further, relatively undeformed chert layers may have been similarly affected by significant amounts of dissolution

  10. Observation of instability-induced current redistribution in a spherical-torus plasma.

    PubMed

    Menard, J E; Bell, R E; Gates, D A; Kaye, S M; LeBlanc, B P; Levinton, F M; Medley, S S; Sabbagh, S A; Stutman, D; Tritz, K; Yuh, H

    2006-09-01

    A motional Stark effect diagnostic has been utilized to reconstruct the parallel current density profile in a spherical-torus plasma for the first time. The measured current profile compares favorably with neoclassical theory when no large-scale magnetohydrodynamic instabilities are present in the plasma. However, a current profile anomaly is observed during saturated interchange-type instability activity. This apparent anomaly can be explained by redistribution of neutral beam injection current drive and represents the first observation of interchange-type instabilities causing such redistribution. The associated current profile modifications contribute to sustaining the central safety factor above unity for over five resistive diffusion times, and similar processes may contribute to improved operational scenarios proposed for ITER.

  11. Induced metal redistribution and bioavailability enhancement in contaminated river sediment during in situ biogeochemical remediation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tongzhou; Zhang, Zhen; Mao, Yanqing; Yan, Dickson Y S

    2016-04-01

    In situ sediment remediation using Ca(NO3)2 or CaO2 for odor mitigation and acid volatile sulfide (AVS) and organic pollutant (such as TPH and PAHs) removal was reported in many studies and fieldwork. Yet, the associated effects on metal mobilization and potential distortion in bioavailability were not well documented. In this study, contaminated river sediment was treated by Ca(NO3)2 and CaO2 in bench studies. Through the investigation of AVS removal, organic matter removal, the changes in sediment oxidation-reduction potential (ORP), microbial activity, and other indigenous parameters, the effects on metal bioavailability, bioaccessibility, and fraction redistribution in sediment were evaluated. The major mechanisms for sediment treated by Ca(NO3)2 and CaO2 are biostimulation with indigenous denitrifying bacteria and chemical oxidation, respectively. After applying Ca(NO3)2 and CaO2, the decreases of metal concentrations in the treated sediment were insignificant within a 35-day incubation period. However, the [SEMtot-AVS]/f OC increased near to the effective boundary of toxicity (100 μmol g(-1) organic carbon (OC)), indicating that both bioavailability and bioaccessibility of metals (Cu, Zn, and Ni) to benthic organisms are enhanced after remediation. Metals were found redistributed from relatively stable fractions (oxidizable and residual fractions) to weakly bound fractions (exchangeable and reducible fractions), and the results are in line with the enhanced metal bioavailability. Compared with Ca(NO3)2, CaO2 led to higher enhancement in metal bioavailability and bioaccessibility, and more significant metal redistribution, probably due to its stronger chemical reactive capacity to AVS and sediment organic matter. The reactions in CaO2-treated sediment would probably shift from physicochemical to biochemical heterotrophic oxidation for sediment organic matter degradation. Therefore, further investigation on the long-term metal redistribution and associated

  12. Hybrid Antibody-Induced Topographical Redistribution of Surface Immunoglobulins, Alloantigens, and Concanavalin A Receptors on Mouse Lymphoid Cells

    PubMed Central

    Stackpole, Christopher W.; De Milio, Lawrence T.; Hämmerling, Ulrich; Jacobson, Janet B.; Lardis, Michael P.

    1974-01-01

    Redistribution of surface immunoglobulins, H-2b, Thy-1.2, and TL.1,2,3 alloantigens, and concanavalin A receptors on mouse lymphoid cells induced by hybrid rabbit F(ab′)2 antibody (anti-mouse immunoglobulin/anti-visual marker or anti-concanavalin A/anti-visual marker) was studied by immunofluorescence. When used directly to label surface immunoglobulin, and indirectly to label alloantigens and concanavalin A receptors, hybrid antibodies induced similar displacement of all surface components from a uniform distribution into “patches” and “caps” at 37°. One hybrid antibody preparation, antimouse immunoglobulin/anti-ferritin, contained negligible amounts of bivalent anti-mouse immunoglobulin antibody, and was therefore “monovalent” for the antimouse immunoglobulin specificity. This observation suggests that factors other than multivalent crosslinking are responsible for hybrid antibody-induced redistribution of cell-surface components. Cap formation induced by hybrid antibody was enhanced markedly by attachment of the visual marker, either ferritin or southern bean mosaic virus, at 37°. At -5°, hybrid antibody does not displace uniformly distributed H-2b alloantigen-alloantibody complexes, but patches of label develop when ferritin attaches to the hybrid antibody. These results explain the patchy distribution of cell-surface components, which is a temperature-independent characteristic of labeling with hybrid antibodies and visual markers for electron microscopy. Images PMID:4595577

  13. Mechanism of E-cadherin redistribution in bronchial airway epithelial cells in a TDI-induced asthma model.

    PubMed

    Song, Jiafu; Zhao, Haijin; Dong, Hangming; Zhang, Dandan; Zou, Mengchen; Tang, Haixiong; Liu, Laiyu; Liang, Zhenyu; Lv, Yanhua; Zou, Fei; Cai, Shaoxi

    2013-06-20

    E-cadherin (epithelial cadherin), a transmembrane protein, provides essential architecture and immunological function to the airway epithelium, a barrier structure that plays an essential role in asthma pathogenesis. Toluene diisocyanate (TDI) is currently one of the leading causes of occupational asthma. However, relatively few studies have been undertaken to determine the biological effects of TDI on the barrier properties of airway epithelium, but it is known that TDI can damage airway epithelial tight junctions in vitro. Here, we hypothesize that TDI can injure E-cadherin both in normal and allergic-induced airway epithelium. To test this, we developed a murine model of TDI-induced asthma characterized by neutrophil-dominated airway inflammation, epithelial shedding, and obvious aberrant distribution of E-cadherin. Pretreatment with dexamethasone (DEX) significantly rescued the immunoreactivity of E-cadherin, accompanied by increased neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). In vitro, TDI-human serum albumin (HSA)-induced redistribution of E-cadherin was associated with extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 activation. The inhibition of phospho-ERK (p-ERK)1/2 by DEX can partly reverse this reaction. These results indicate that E-cadherin redistribution may be an important contributor in the generation of TDI-induced asthma. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Sperm sorting procedure induces a redistribution of Hsp70 but not Hsp60 and Hsp90 in boar spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Spinaci, Marcella; Volpe, Sara; Bernardini, Chiara; de Ambrogi, Marco; Tamanini, Carlo; Seren, Eraldo; Galeati, Giovanna

    2006-01-01

    Heat shock proteins, besides their protective function against stresses, have been recently indicated as key factors for sperm fertilizing ability. Since sexing sperm by high-speed flow-cytometry subjects them to different physical, mechanical, and chemical stresses, the present study was designed to verify, by immunofluorescence and Western blot, whether the sorting procedure induces any modification in the amount and cellular distribution of heat shock proteins 60, 70, and 90 (Hsp60, Hsp70, Hsp90). Immunolocalization and Western blot quantification of both Hsp60 and Hsp90 did not reveal differences between unsorted and sorted semen. On the contrary, a redistribution of Hsp70 immunoreactivity from the equatorial subsegment toward the equator of sperm cells was recorded after sorting; this relocation suggests capacitation-like changes of sperm membrane. This modification seems to be caused mainly by incubation with Hoechst 33342, while both passage of sperm through flow cytometer and laser beam represent only minor stimuli. A further Hsp70 redistribution seems to be due to the final steps of sperm sorting, charging, and deflection of drops, and to the dilution during collection. On the other hand, staining procedure and mechanical stress seem to be the factors most injurious to sperm viability. Moreover, Hsp70 relocation was deeply influenced by the storage method. In fact, storing sexed spermatozoa, after centrifugation, in a small volume in presence of seminal plasma induced a reversion of Hsp70 redistribution, while storage in the diluted catch fluid of collection tubes caused Hsp70 relocation in most sorted spermatozoa.

  15. Shear stress-induced redistribution of the glycocalyx on endothelial cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bai, Ke; Wang, Wen

    2014-04-01

    The glycocalyx is the inner most layer of the endothelium that is in direct contact with the circulating blood. Shear stress affects its synthesis and reorganization. This study focuses on changes in the spatial distribution of the glycocalyx caused by shear stimulation and its recovery following the removal of the shear stress. Sialic acid components of the glycocalyx on human umbilical vain endothelial cells are observed using confocal microscopy. The percentage area of the cell membrane covered by the glycocalyx, as well as the average fluorescence intensity ratio between the apical and edge areas of the cell is used to assess the spatial distribution of the glycocalyx on the cell membrane. Our results show that following 24 h shear stimulation, the glycocalyx relocates near the edge of endothelial cells (i.e., cell-cell junction regions). Following the removal of the shear stress, the glycocalyx redistributes and gradually appears in the apical region of the cell membrane. This redistribution is faster in the early hours (<4 h) after shear stimulation than that in the later stage (e.g., between 8 and 24 h). We further investigate the recovery of the glycocalyx after its enzyme degradation under either static or shear flow conditions. Our results show that following 24 h recovery under shear flow, the glycocalyx reappears predominantly near the edge of endothelial cells. Static and shear flow conditions result in notable changes in the spatial recovery of the glycocalyx, but the difference is not statistically significant. We hypothesize that newly synthesized glycocalyx is not structurally well developed. Its weak interaction with flow results in less than significant redistribution, contrary to what has been observed for a well-developed glycocalyx layer.

  16. Neutral Particle Analyzer Vertically Scanning Measurements of MHD-induced Energetic Ion Redistribution or Loss in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    S.S. Medley, R. Andre, R.E. Bell, D.S. Darrow, C.W. Domier, E.D. Fredrickson, N.N. Gorelenkov, S.M. Kaye, B.P. LeBlanc, K.C. Lee, F.M. Levinton, D. Liu, N.C. Luhmann, Jr., J.E. Menard, H. Park, D. Stutman, A.L. Roquemore, K. Tritz, H. Yuh and the NSTX Team

    2007-11-15

    Observations of magneto-hydro-dynamic (MHD) induced redistribution or loss of energetic ions measured using the vertically scanning capability of the Neutral Particle Analyzer diagnostic on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) are presented along with TRANSP and ORBIT code analysis of the results. Although redistribution or loss of energetic ions due to bursting fishbone-like and low-frequency (f ~ 10 kHz) kinktype MHD activity has been reported previously, the primary goal of this work is to study redistribution or loss due to continuous Alfvénic (f ~ 20 – 150 kHz) modes, a topic that heretofore has not been investigated in detail for NSTX plasmas. Initial indications are that the former drive energetic ion loss whereas the continuous Alfvénic modes only cause redistribution and the energetic ions remain confined.

  17. Magnetic-field-induced charge redistribution in disordered graphene double quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, K. L.; Connolly, M. R.; Cresti, A.; Griffiths, J. P.; Jones, G. A. C.; Smith, C. G.

    2015-10-01

    We have studied the transport properties of a large graphene double quantum dot under the influence of a background disorder potential and a magnetic field. At low temperatures, the evolution of the charge-stability diagram as a function of the B field is investigated up to 10 T. Our results indicate that the charging energy of the quantum dot is reduced, and hence the effective size of the dot increases at a high magnetic field. We provide an explanation of our results using a tight-binding model, which describes the charge redistribution in a disordered graphene quantum dot via the formation of Landau levels and edge states. Our model suggests that the tunnel barriers separating different electron/hole puddles in a dot become transparent at high B fields, resulting in the charge delocalization and reduced charging energy observed experimentally.

  18. Opiate agonist-induced re-distribution of Wntless, a mu-opioid receptor interacting protein, in rat striatal neurons.

    PubMed

    Reyes, B A S; Vakharia, K; Ferraro, T N; Levenson, R; Berrettini, W H; Van Bockstaele, E J

    2012-01-01

    Wntless (WLS), a mu-opioid receptor (MOR) interacting protein, mediates Wnt protein secretion that is critical for neuronal development. We investigated whether MOR agonists induce re-distribution of WLS within rat striatal neurons. Adult male rats received either saline, morphine or [d-Ala2, N-Me-Phe4, Gly-ol5]-enkephalin (DAMGO) directly into the lateral ventricles. Following thirty minutes, brains were extracted and tissue sections were processed for immunogold silver detection of WLS. In saline-treated rats, WLS was distributed along the plasma membrane and within the cytoplasmic compartment of striatal dendrites as previously described. The ratio of cytoplasmic to total dendritic WLS labeling was 0.70±0.03 in saline-treated striatal tissue. Morphine treatment decreased this ratio to 0.48±0.03 indicating a shift of WLS from the intracellular compartment to the plasma membrane. However, following DAMGO treatment, the ratio was 0.85±0.05 indicating a greater distribution of WLS intracellularly. The difference in the re-distribution of the WLS following different agonist exposure may be related to DAMGO's well known ability to induce internalization of MOR in contrast to morphine, which is less effective in producing receptor internalization. Furthermore, these data are consistent with our hypothesis that MOR agonists promote dimerization of WLS and MOR, thereby preventing WLS from mediating Wnt secretion. In summary, our findings indicate differential agonist-induced trafficking of WLS in striatal neurons following distinct agonist exposure. Adaptations in WLS trafficking may represent a novel pharmacological target in the treatment of opiate addiction and/or pain.

  19. Atom redistribution and multilayer structure in NiTi shape memory alloy induced by high energy proton irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haizhen; Yi, Xiaoyang; Zhu, Yingying; Yin, Yongkui; Gao, Yuan; Cai, Wei; Gao, Zhiyong

    2017-10-01

    The element distribution and surface microstructure in NiTi shape memory alloys exposed to 3 MeV proton irradiation were investigated. Redistribution of the alloying element and a clearly visible multilayer structure consisting of three layers were observed on the surface of NiTi shape memory alloys after proton irradiation. The outermost layer consists primarily of a columnar-like TiH2 phase with a tetragonal structure, and the internal layer is primarily comprised of a bcc austenite phase. In addition, the Ti2Ni phase, with an fcc structure, serves as the transition layer between the outermost and internal layer. The above-mentioned phenomenon is attributed to the preferential sputtering of high energy protons and segregation induced by irradiation.

  20. Viscosity of Water under Electric Field: Anisotropy Induced by Redistribution of Hydrogen Bonds.

    PubMed

    Zong, Diyuan; Hu, Han; Duan, Yuanyuan; Sun, Ying

    2016-06-02

    The viscosity of water under an external electric field of 0.00-0.90 V/nm was studied using both molecular dynamics simulations and atomistic modeling accounting for intermolecular potentials. For all temperatures investigated, the water viscosity becomes anisotropic under an electric field: the viscosity component parallel to the field increases monotonically with the field strength, E, while the viscosity perpendicular to the field first decreases and then increases with E. This anisotropy is believed to be mainly caused by the redistribution of hydrogen bonds under the electric field. The preferred orientation of hydrogen bonds along the field direction leads to an increase of the energy barrier of a water molecule to its neighboring site, and hence increases the viscosity in that direction. However, the probability of hydrogen bonds perpendicular to the electric field decreases with E, together with the increase of the average number of hydrogen bonds per molecule, causing the perpendicular component of water viscosity to first decrease and then increase with the electric field.

  1. Deformation-induced trace element redistribution in zircon revealed using atom probe tomography

    PubMed Central

    Piazolo, Sandra; La Fontaine, Alexandre; Trimby, Patrick; Harley, Simon; Yang, Limei; Armstrong, Richard; Cairney, Julie M.

    2016-01-01

    Trace elements diffuse negligible distances through the pristine crystal lattice in minerals: this is a fundamental assumption when using them to decipher geological processes. For example, the reliable use of the mineral zircon (ZrSiO4) as a U-Th-Pb geochronometer and trace element monitor requires minimal radiogenic isotope and trace element mobility. Here, using atom probe tomography, we document the effects of crystal–plastic deformation on atomic-scale elemental distributions in zircon revealing sub-micrometre-scale mechanisms of trace element mobility. Dislocations that move through the lattice accumulate U and other trace elements. Pipe diffusion along dislocation arrays connected to a chemical or structural sink results in continuous removal of selected elements (for example, Pb), even after deformation has ceased. However, in disconnected dislocations, trace elements remain locked. Our findings have important implications for the use of zircon as a geochronometer, and highlight the importance of deformation on trace element redistribution in minerals and engineering materials. PMID:26868040

  2. Deformation-induced trace element redistribution in zircon revealed using atom probe tomography.

    PubMed

    Piazolo, Sandra; La Fontaine, Alexandre; Trimby, Patrick; Harley, Simon; Yang, Limei; Armstrong, Richard; Cairney, Julie M

    2016-02-12

    Trace elements diffuse negligible distances through the pristine crystal lattice in minerals: this is a fundamental assumption when using them to decipher geological processes. For example, the reliable use of the mineral zircon (ZrSiO4) as a U-Th-Pb geochronometer and trace element monitor requires minimal radiogenic isotope and trace element mobility. Here, using atom probe tomography, we document the effects of crystal-plastic deformation on atomic-scale elemental distributions in zircon revealing sub-micrometre-scale mechanisms of trace element mobility. Dislocations that move through the lattice accumulate U and other trace elements. Pipe diffusion along dislocation arrays connected to a chemical or structural sink results in continuous removal of selected elements (for example, Pb), even after deformation has ceased. However, in disconnected dislocations, trace elements remain locked. Our findings have important implications for the use of zircon as a geochronometer, and highlight the importance of deformation on trace element redistribution in minerals and engineering materials.

  3. Exercise four hour redistribution thallium-201 single photon emission computed tomography and exercise induced ST segment elevation in detecting the viable myocardium in patients with acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Yamagishi, H; Akioka, K; Takagi, M; Tanaka, A; Takeuchi, K; Yoshikawa, J; Ochi, H

    1999-01-01

    Objective—To investigate the specificity and sensitivity of the combination of redistribution in exercise thallium-201 single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and exercise induced ST elevation for detecting the viable myocardium in patients with acute myocardial infarction.
Design—37 patients were studied within seven weeks of onset of Q wave myocardial infarction (anterior in 22, inferior in 15). All patients underwent exercise four hour redistribution thallium-201 SPECT and positron emission tomography using fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and nitrogen-13 ammonia under fasting conditions.
Results—Sixteen patients showed exercise induced ST elevation ⩾ 1.5 mm, and 15 of these had increased FDG uptake in the infarct region. Eleven of 16 patients (10 of 11 patients with anterior infarctions) with irreversible thallium-201 defects and increased FDG uptake showed exercise induced ST elevation. The sensitivity, specificity, and predictive accuracy of redistribution, exercise induced ST segment elevation, or both for detecting increased FDG uptake were 82%, 75%, and 67% (94%, 75%, and 91% for anterior infarctions), respectively. 
Conclusions—In patients with acute Q wave myocardial infarction, the combination of redistribution in exercise thallium-201 SPECT and exercise induced ST elevation can detect the viable myocardium in the infarct region with high sensitivity and specificity, especially in patients with anterior infarctions.

 Keywords: acute myocardial infarction;  viability;  exercise induced ST elevation;  exercise thallium-201 SPECT PMID:10220539

  4. Potential influence of wildfire in modulating climate-induced forest redistribution in a central Rocky Mountain landscape

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Campbell, John L.; Shinneman, Douglas

    2017-01-01

    IntroductionClimate change is expected to impose significant tension on the geographic distribution of tree species. Yet, tree species range shifts may be delayed by their long life spans, capacity to withstand long periods of physiological stress, and dispersal limitations. Wildfire could theoretically break this biological inertia by killing forest canopies and facilitating species redistribution under changing climate. We investigated the capacity of wildfire to modulate climate-induced tree redistribution across a montane landscape in the central Rocky Mountains under three climate scenarios (contemporary and two warmer future climates) and three wildfire scenarios (representing historical, suppressed, and future fire regimes).MethodsDistributions of four common tree species were projected over 90 years by pairing a climate niche model with a forest landscape simulation model that simulates species dispersal, establishment, and mortality under alternative disturbance regimes and climate scenarios.ResultsThree species (Douglas-fir, lodgepole pine, subalpine fir) declined in abundance over time, due to climate-driven contraction in area suitable for establishment, while one species (ponderosa pine) was unable to exploit climate-driven expansion of area suitable for establishment. Increased fire frequency accelerated declines in area occupied by Douglas-fir, lodgepole pine, and subalpine fir, and it maintained local abundance but not range expansion of ponderosa pine.ConclusionsWildfire may play a larger role in eliminating these conifer species along trailing edges of their distributions than facilitating establishment along leading edges, in part due to dispersal limitations and interspecific competition, and future populations may increasingly depend on persistence in locations unfavorable for their establishment.

  5. Enterovirus 71 induces dsRNA/PKR-dependent cytoplasmic redistribution of GRP78/BiP to promote viral replication

    PubMed Central

    Jheng, Jia-Rong; Wang, Shin-Chyang; Jheng, Chao-Rih; Horng, Jim-Tong

    2016-01-01

    GRP78/BiP is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperone protein with the important function of maintaining ER homeostasis, and the overexpression of GRP78/BiP alleviates ER stress. Our previous studies showed that infection with enterovirus 71 (EV71), a (+)RNA picornavirus, induced GRP78/BiP upregulation; however, ectopic GRP78/BiP overexpression in ER downregulates virus replication and viral particle formation. The fact that a virus infection increases GRP78/BiP expression, which is unfavorable for virus replication, is counterintuitive. In this study, we found that the GRP78/BiP protein level was elevated in the cytoplasm instead of in the ER in EV71-infected cells. Cells transfected with polyinosinic–polycytidylic acid, a synthetic analog of replicative double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), but not with viral proteins, also exhibited upregulation and elevation of GRP78/BiP in the cytosol. Our results further demonstrate that EV71 infections induce the dsRNA/protein kinase R-dependent cytosolic accumulation of GRP78/BiP. The overexpression of a GRP78/BiP mutant lacking a KDEL retention signal failed to inhibit both dithiothreitol-induced eIF2α phosphorylation and viral replication in the context of viral protein synthesis and viral titers. These data revealed that EV71 infection might cause upregulation and aberrant redistribution of GRP78/BiP to the cytosol, thereby facilitating virus replication. PMID:27004760

  6. Arecoline induces TNF-alpha production and Zonula Occludens-1 redistribution in mouse Sertoli TM4 cells.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Tzer-Min; Luo, Shun-Yuan; Chiang, Shang-Lun; Lee, Chi-Pin; Liu, Yu-Fan; Chang, Jan-Gowth; Tsai, Ming-Hsui; Ko, Ying-Chin

    2014-09-09

    Arecoline, a major alkaloid in Areca nut has the ability to induce oxidative stress. The effect of Areca nut, arecoline on reducing sperm quality and quantity were documented previously using several animal models. Junction disruption by down-regulation of the junction-adhesive protein via oxidative stress is an important route mediating abnormal spermatogenesis. Therefore, in this present study, we investigated the functional role of arecoline on junctional proteins. To analyze direct effects of arecoline on testis cells, confluent mouse testicular Sertoli cell line TM4 was exposed to arecoline. Arecoline decreased insoluble zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) protein expression in TM4 cells, however, arecoline treatment increased TNF-alpha production in both TM4 and monocytic THP1 cells. In addition, ERK1/2 inhibitor PD98059 reversed arecoline effects on TNF-alpha and ZO-1. Arecoline increases the production of TNF-alpha and induces protein redistribution of ZO-1. All these results explain the role of arecoline in male reproductive dysfunction, besides its cytotoxic induction.

  7. Nanoscale magnetization reversal caused by electric field-induced ion migration and redistribution in cobalt ferrite thin films.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xinxin; Zhu, Xiaojian; Xiao, Wen; Liu, Gang; Feng, Yuan Ping; Ding, Jun; Li, Run-Wei

    2015-04-28

    Reversible nanoscale magnetization reversal controlled merely by electric fields is still challenging at the moment. In this report, first-principles calculation indicates that electric field-induced magnetization reversal can be achieved by the appearance of unidirectional magnetic anisotropy along the (110) direction in Fe-deficient cobalt ferrite (CoFe(2-x)O4, CFO), as a result of the migration and local redistribution of the Co(2+) ions adjacent to the B-site Fe vacancies. In good agreement with the theoretical model, we experimentally observed that in the CFO thin films the nanoscale magnetization can be reversibly and nonvolatilely reversed at room temperature via an electrical ion-manipulation approach, wherein the application of electric fields with appropriate polarity and amplitude can modulate the size of magnetic domains with different magnetizations up to 70%. With the low power consumption (subpicojoule) characteristics and the elimination of external magnetic field, the observed electric field-induced magnetization reversal can be used for the construction of energy-efficient spintronic devices, e.g., low-power electric-write and magnetic-read memories.

  8. Lattice distortion and electron charge redistribution induced by defects in graphene

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Wei; Lu, Wen -Cai; Zhang, Hong -Xing; ...

    2016-09-14

    Lattice distortion and electronic charge localization induced by vacancy and embedded-atom defects in graphene were studied by tight-binding (TB) calculations using the recently developed three-center TB potential model. We showed that the formation energies of the defects are strongly correlated with the number of dangling bonds and number of embedded atoms, as well as the magnitude of the graphene lattice distortion induced by the defects. Lastly, we also showed that the defects introduce localized electronic states in the graphene which would affect the electron transport properties of graphene.

  9. Lattice distortion and electron charge redistribution induced by defects in graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wei; Lu, Wen -Cai; Zhang, Hong -Xing; Ho, K. M.; Wang, C. Z.

    2016-09-14

    Lattice distortion and electronic charge localization induced by vacancy and embedded-atom defects in graphene were studied by tight-binding (TB) calculations using the recently developed three-center TB potential model. We showed that the formation energies of the defects are strongly correlated with the number of dangling bonds and number of embedded atoms, as well as the magnitude of the graphene lattice distortion induced by the defects. Lastly, we also showed that the defects introduce localized electronic states in the graphene which would affect the electron transport properties of graphene.

  10. Chronic antidepressants induce redistribution and differential activation of alphaCaM kinase II between presynaptic compartments.

    PubMed

    Barbiero, Valentina S; Giambelli, Roberto; Musazzi, Laura; Tiraboschi, Ettore; Tardito, Daniela; Perez, Jorge; Drago, Filippo; Racagni, Giorgio; Popoli, Maurizio

    2007-12-01

    Changes in synaptic plasticity are involved in pathophysiology of depression and in the mechanism of antidepressants. Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM) kinase II, a protein kinase involved in synaptic plasticity, has been previously shown to be a target of antidepressants. We previously found that antidepressants activate the kinase in hippocampal neuronal cell bodies by increasing phosphorylation at Thr(286), reduce the kinase phosphorylation in synaptic membranes, and in turn its phosphorylation-dependent interaction with syntaxin-1 and the release of glutamate from hippocampal synaptosomes. Here, we investigated the chronic effect of different antidepressants (fluoxetine, desipramine, and reboxetine) on the expression and function of the kinase in distinct subcellular compartments in order to dissect the different kinase pools affected. Acute treatments did not induce any change in the kinase. In total tissue extracts chronic drug treatments induced activation of the kinase; in hippocampus (HC), but not in prefrontal/frontal cortex, this was partially accounted for by increased Thr(286) phosphorylation, suggesting the involvement of different mechanisms of activation. In synaptosomes, all drugs reduced the kinase phosphorylation, particularly in HC where, upon fractionation of the synaptosomal particulate into synaptic vesicles and membranes, we found that the drugs induced a redistribution and differential activation of the kinase between membranes and vesicles. Furthermore, a large decrease in the level and phosphorylation of synapsin I located at synaptic membranes was consistent with the observed decrease of CaM kinase II. Overall, antidepressants induce a complex pattern of modifications in distinct subcellular compartments; at presynaptic level, these changes are in line with a dampening of glutamate release.

  11. Acute Liver Injury Induces Nucleocytoplasmic Redistribution of Hepatic Methionine Metabolism Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Delgado, Miguel; Garrido, Francisco; Pérez-Miguelsanz, Juliana; Pacheco, María; Partearroyo, Teresa; Pérez-Sala, Dolores

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: The discovery of methionine metabolism enzymes in the cell nucleus, together with their association with key nuclear processes, suggested a putative relationship between alterations in their subcellular distribution and disease. Results: Using the rat model of d-galactosamine intoxication, severe changes in hepatic steady-state mRNA levels were found; the largest decreases corresponded to enzymes exhibiting the highest expression in normal tissue. Cytoplasmic protein levels, activities, and metabolite concentrations suffered more moderate changes following a similar trend. Interestingly, galactosamine treatment induced hepatic nuclear accumulation of methionine adenosyltransferase (MAT) α1 and S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase tetramers, their active assemblies. In fact, galactosamine-treated livers showed enhanced nuclear MAT activity. Acetaminophen (APAP) intoxication mimicked most galactosamine effects on hepatic MATα1, including accumulation of nuclear tetramers. H35 cells that overexpress tagged-MATα1 reproduced the subcellular distribution observed in liver, and the changes induced by galactosamine and APAP that were also observed upon glutathione depletion by buthionine sulfoximine. The H35 nuclear accumulation of tagged-MATα1 induced by these agents correlated with decreased glutathione reduced form/glutathione oxidized form ratios and was prevented by N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and glutathione ethyl ester. However, the changes in epigenetic modifications associated with tagged-MATα1 nuclear accumulation were only prevented by NAC in galactosamine-treated cells. Innovation: Cytoplasmic and nuclear changes in proteins that regulate the methylation index follow opposite trends in acute liver injury, their nuclear accumulation showing potential as disease marker. Conclusion: Altogether these results demonstrate galactosamine- and APAP-induced nuclear accumulation of methionine metabolism enzymes as active oligomers and unveil the implication of

  12. Engagement of CD81 induces ezrin tyrosine phosphorylation and its cellular redistribution with filamentous actin

    SciTech Connect

    Coffey, Greg P.; Rajapaksa, Ranjani; Liu, Raymond; Sharpe, Orr; Kuo, Chiung-Chi; Wald Krauss, Sharon; Sagi, Yael; Davis, R. Eric; Staudt, Louis M.; Sharman, Jeff P.; Robinson, William H.; Levy, Shoshana

    2009-06-09

    CD81 is a tetraspanin family member involved in diverse cellular interactions in the immune and nervous systems and in cell fusion events. However, the mechanism of action of CD81 and of other tetraspanins has not been defined. We reasoned that identifying signaling molecules downstream of CD81 would provide mechanistic clues. We engaged CD81 on the surface of Blymphocytes and identified the induced tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins by mass spectrometry. This analysis showed that the most prominent tyrosine phosphorylated protein was ezrin, an actin binding protein and a member of the ezrin-radixin-moesin family. We also found that CD81 engagement induces spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) and that Syk was involved in tyrosine phosphorylation of ezrin. Ezrin colocalized with CD81 and F-actin upon stimulation and this association was disrupted when Syk activation was blocked. Taken together, these studies suggest a model in which CD81 interfaces between the plasma membrane and the cytoskeleton by activating Syk, mobilizing ezrin, and recruiting F-actin to facilitate cytoskeletal reorganization and cell signaling. This may be a mechanism explaining the pleiotropic effects induced in response to stimulating cells by anti-CD81 antibodies or by the hepatitis C virus, which uses this molecule as its key receptor.

  13. Oncolytic reovirus induces intracellular redistribution of Ras to promote apoptosis and progeny virus release.

    PubMed

    Garant, K A; Shmulevitz, M; Pan, L; Daigle, R M; Ahn, D-G; Gujar, S A; Lee, P W K

    2016-02-11

    Reovirus is a naturally oncolytic virus that preferentially replicates in Ras-transformed cells and is currently undergoing clinical trials as a cancer therapeutic. Ras transformation promotes reovirus oncolysis by enhancing virion disassembly during entry, viral progeny production, and virus release through apoptosis; however, the mechanism behind the latter is not well understood. Here, we show that reovirus alters the intracellular location of oncogenic Ras to induce apoptosis of H-RasV12-transformed fibroblasts. Reovirus infection decreases Ras palmitoylation levels and causes accumulation of Ras in the Golgi through Golgi fragmentation. With the Golgi being the site of Ras palmitoylation, treatment of target cells with the palmitoylation inhibitor, 2-bromopalmitate (2BP), prompts a greater accumulation of H-RasV12 in the Golgi, and a dose-dependent increase in progeny virus release and subsequent spread. Conversely, tethering H-RasV12 to the plasma membrane (thereby preventing its movement to the Golgi) allows for efficient virus production, but results in basal levels of reovirus-induced cell death. Analysis of Ras downstream signaling reveals that cells expressing cycling H-RasV12 have elevated levels of phosphorylated JNK (c-Jun N-terminal kinase), and that Ras retained at the Golgi body by 2BP increases activation of the MEKK1/MKK4/JNK signaling pathway to promote cell death. Collectively, our data suggest that reovirus induces Golgi fragmentation of target cells, and the subsequent accumulation of oncogenic Ras in the Golgi body initiates apoptotic signaling events required for virus release and spread.

  14. Nanoscale patterning induced strain redistribution in ultrathin strained Si layers on oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moutanabbir, O.; Reiche, M.; Hähnel, A.; Erfurth, W.; Gösele, U.; Motohashi, M.; Tarun, A.; Hayazawa, N.; Kawata, S.

    2010-04-01

    We present a comparative study of the influence of the thickness on the strain behavior upon nanoscale patterning of ultrathin strained Si layers directly on oxide. The strained layers were grown on a SiGe virtual substrate and transferred onto a SiO2/Si substrate using wafer bonding and hydrogen ion induced exfoliation. The post-patterning strain was evaluated using UV micro-Raman spectroscopy for thin (20 nm) and thick (60 nm) nanostructures with lateral dimensions in the range of 80-400 nm. We found that about 40-50% of the initial strain is maintained in the 20 nm thick nanostructures, whereas this fraction drops significantly to ~ 2-20% for the 60 nm thick ones. This phenomenon of free surface induced relaxation is described using detailed three-dimensional finite element simulations. The simulated strain 3D maps confirm the limited relaxation in thin nanostructures. This result has direct implications for the fabrication and manipulation of strained Si nanodevices.

  15. Nanoscale patterning induced strain redistribution in ultrathin strained Si layers on oxide.

    PubMed

    Moutanabbir, O; Reiche, M; Hähnel, A; Erfurth, W; Gösele, U; Motohashi, M; Tarun, A; Hayazawa, N; Kawata, S

    2010-04-02

    We present a comparative study of the influence of the thickness on the strain behavior upon nanoscale patterning of ultrathin strained Si layers directly on oxide. The strained layers were grown on a SiGe virtual substrate and transferred onto a SiO(2)/Si substrate using wafer bonding and hydrogen ion induced exfoliation. The post-patterning strain was evaluated using UV micro-Raman spectroscopy for thin (20 nm) and thick (60 nm) nanostructures with lateral dimensions in the range of 80-400 nm. We found that about 40-50% of the initial strain is maintained in the 20 nm thick nanostructures, whereas this fraction drops significantly to approximately 2-20% for the 60 nm thick ones. This phenomenon of free surface induced relaxation is described using detailed three-dimensional finite element simulations. The simulated strain 3D maps confirm the limited relaxation in thin nanostructures. This result has direct implications for the fabrication and manipulation of strained Si nanodevices.

  16. Photo-induced halide redistribution in organic–inorganic perovskite films

    DOE PAGES

    deQuilettes, Dane W.; Zhang, Wei; Burlakov, Victor M.; ...

    2016-05-24

    Organic-inorganic perovskites such as CH3NH3PbI3 are promising materials for a variety of optoelectronic applications, with certified power conversion efficiencies in solar cells already exceeding 21%. Nevertheless, state-of-the-art films still contain performance-limiting non-radiative recombination sites and exhibit a range of complex dynamic phenomena under illumination that remain poorly understood. Here we use a unique combination of confocal photoluminescence (PL) microscopy and chemical imaging to correlate the local changes in photophysics with composition in CH3NH3PbI3 films under illumination. We demonstrate that the photo-induced 'brightening' of the perovskite PL can be attributed to an order-of-magnitude reduction in trap state density. By imaging themore » same regions with time-of-flight secondary-ion-mass spectrometry, we correlate this photobrightening with a net migration of iodine. In conclusion, our work provides visual evidence for photo-induced halide migration in triiodide perovskites and reveals the complex interplay between charge carrier populations, electronic traps and mobile halides that collectively impact optoelectronic performance.« less

  17. Photo-induced halide redistribution in organic–inorganic perovskite films

    SciTech Connect

    deQuilettes, Dane W.; Zhang, Wei; Burlakov, Victor M.; Graham, Daniel J.; Leijtens, Tomas; Osherov, Anna; Bulovic, Vladimir; Snaith, Henry J.; Ginger, David S.; Stranks, Samuel D.

    2016-05-24

    Organic-inorganic perovskites such as CH3NH3PbI3 are promising materials for a variety of optoelectronic applications, with certified power conversion efficiencies in solar cells already exceeding 21%. Nevertheless, state-of-the-art films still contain performance-limiting non-radiative recombination sites and exhibit a range of complex dynamic phenomena under illumination that remain poorly understood. Here we use a unique combination of confocal photoluminescence (PL) microscopy and chemical imaging to correlate the local changes in photophysics with composition in CH3NH3PbI3 films under illumination. We demonstrate that the photo-induced 'brightening' of the perovskite PL can be attributed to an order-of-magnitude reduction in trap state density. By imaging the same regions with time-of-flight secondary-ion-mass spectrometry, we correlate this photobrightening with a net migration of iodine. In conclusion, our work provides visual evidence for photo-induced halide migration in triiodide perovskites and reveals the complex interplay between charge carrier populations, electronic traps and mobile halides that collectively impact optoelectronic performance.

  18. Photo-induced halide redistribution in organic–inorganic perovskite films

    PubMed Central

    deQuilettes, Dane W.; Zhang, Wei; Burlakov, Victor M.; Graham, Daniel J.; Leijtens, Tomas; Osherov, Anna; Bulović, Vladimir; Snaith, Henry J.; Ginger, David S.; Stranks, Samuel D.

    2016-01-01

    Organic–inorganic perovskites such as CH3NH3PbI3 are promising materials for a variety of optoelectronic applications, with certified power conversion efficiencies in solar cells already exceeding 21%. Nevertheless, state-of-the-art films still contain performance-limiting non-radiative recombination sites and exhibit a range of complex dynamic phenomena under illumination that remain poorly understood. Here we use a unique combination of confocal photoluminescence (PL) microscopy and chemical imaging to correlate the local changes in photophysics with composition in CH3NH3PbI3 films under illumination. We demonstrate that the photo-induced ‘brightening' of the perovskite PL can be attributed to an order-of-magnitude reduction in trap state density. By imaging the same regions with time-of-flight secondary-ion-mass spectrometry, we correlate this photobrightening with a net migration of iodine. Our work provides visual evidence for photo-induced halide migration in triiodide perovskites and reveals the complex interplay between charge carrier populations, electronic traps and mobile halides that collectively impact optoelectronic performance. PMID:27216703

  19. Photo-induced halide redistribution in organic-inorganic perovskite films.

    PubMed

    deQuilettes, Dane W; Zhang, Wei; Burlakov, Victor M; Graham, Daniel J; Leijtens, Tomas; Osherov, Anna; Bulović, Vladimir; Snaith, Henry J; Ginger, David S; Stranks, Samuel D

    2016-05-24

    Organic-inorganic perovskites such as CH3NH3PbI3 are promising materials for a variety of optoelectronic applications, with certified power conversion efficiencies in solar cells already exceeding 21%. Nevertheless, state-of-the-art films still contain performance-limiting non-radiative recombination sites and exhibit a range of complex dynamic phenomena under illumination that remain poorly understood. Here we use a unique combination of confocal photoluminescence (PL) microscopy and chemical imaging to correlate the local changes in photophysics with composition in CH3NH3PbI3 films under illumination. We demonstrate that the photo-induced 'brightening' of the perovskite PL can be attributed to an order-of-magnitude reduction in trap state density. By imaging the same regions with time-of-flight secondary-ion-mass spectrometry, we correlate this photobrightening with a net migration of iodine. Our work provides visual evidence for photo-induced halide migration in triiodide perovskites and reveals the complex interplay between charge carrier populations, electronic traps and mobile halides that collectively impact optoelectronic performance.

  20. Photo-induced halide redistribution in organic-inorganic perovskite films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dequilettes, Dane W.; Zhang, Wei; Burlakov, Victor M.; Graham, Daniel J.; Leijtens, Tomas; Osherov, Anna; Bulović, Vladimir; Snaith, Henry J.; Ginger, David S.; Stranks, Samuel D.

    2016-05-01

    Organic-inorganic perovskites such as CH3NH3PbI3 are promising materials for a variety of optoelectronic applications, with certified power conversion efficiencies in solar cells already exceeding 21%. Nevertheless, state-of-the-art films still contain performance-limiting non-radiative recombination sites and exhibit a range of complex dynamic phenomena under illumination that remain poorly understood. Here we use a unique combination of confocal photoluminescence (PL) microscopy and chemical imaging to correlate the local changes in photophysics with composition in CH3NH3PbI3 films under illumination. We demonstrate that the photo-induced `brightening' of the perovskite PL can be attributed to an order-of-magnitude reduction in trap state density. By imaging the same regions with time-of-flight secondary-ion-mass spectrometry, we correlate this photobrightening with a net migration of iodine. Our work provides visual evidence for photo-induced halide migration in triiodide perovskites and reveals the complex interplay between charge carrier populations, electronic traps and mobile halides that collectively impact optoelectronic performance.

  1. α-Synuclein Over-Expression Induces Increased Iron Accumulation and Redistribution in Iron-Exposed Neurons.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Richard; Carmona, Asuncion; Roudeau, Stéphane; Perrin, Laura; Dučić, Tanja; Carboni, Eleonora; Bohic, Sylvain; Cloetens, Peter; Lingor, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Parkinson's disease is the most common α-synucleinopathy, and increased levels of iron are found in the substantia nigra of Parkinson's disease patients, but the potential interlink between both molecular changes has not been fully understood. Metal to protein binding assays have shown that α-synuclein can bind iron in vitro; therefore, we hypothesized that iron content and iron distribution could be modified in cellulo, in cells over-expressing α-synuclein. Owing to particle-induced X-ray emission and synchrotron X-ray fluorescence chemical nano-imaging, we were able to quantify and describe the iron distribution at the subcellular level. We show that, in neurons exposed to excess iron, the mere over-expression of human α-synuclein results in increased levels of intracellular iron and in iron redistribution from the cytoplasm to the perinuclear region within α-synuclein-rich inclusions. Reproducible results were obtained in two distinct recombinant expression systems, in primary rat midbrain neurons and in a rat neuroblastic cell line (PC12), both infected with viral vectors expressing human α-synuclein. Our results link two characteristic molecular features found in Parkinson's disease, the accumulation of α-synuclein and the increased levels of iron in the substantia nigra.

  2. Distinct growth factor-induced dynamic mass redistribution (DMR) profiles for monitoring oncogenic signaling pathways in various cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Du, Yuhong; Li, Zijian; Li, Lian; Chen, Zhuo Georgia; Sun, Shi-Yong; Chen, Peifang; Shin, Dong M; Khuri, Fadlo R; Fu, Haian

    2009-01-01

    Targeting dysregulated signaling pathways in tumors has led to the development of a novel class of signal transduction inhibitors, including inhibitors of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR). To dissect oncogenic pathways, identify key pathway determinants, and evaluate the efficacy of targeted agents, it is vital to develop technologies that allow the detection of temporal signaling events under physiological conditions. Here we report the application of a label-free optical biosensor to reveal the rapid response of cancer cells to EGF, expressed as a dynamic mass redistribution (DMR) signal. In response to EGF, squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck cells exhibited a rapid rise in DMR signal, whereas lung adenocarcinoma cells showed a biphasic DMR profile, suggesting a cell type-dependent DMR response. Pharmacological studies suggested the importance of EGFR and the phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase pathway in mediating the EGF-induced DMR response. The defined DMR signatures offer a simple yet sensitive tool for evaluating EGFR-targeted agents, as shown with gefitinib and erlotinib. The assay can also be used for cell-based high-throughput screening of EGF pathway inhibitors, as demonstrated by its robust performance in a 384-well plate format (Z' > 0.5). This technology is applicable to other oncogenic pathways for the discovery of novel therapeutic agents for the treatment of various cancers.

  3. Electric field-induced redistribution and postfield relaxation of low density lipoprotein receptors on cultured human fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    The lateral mobility of unliganded low density lipoprotein-receptor (LDL-R) on the surface of human fibroblasts has been investigated by studying the generation and relaxation of concentration differences induced by exposure of the cultured cells to steady electric fields. The topographic distribution of receptors was determined by fluorescence microscopy of cells labeled with the intensely fluorescent, biologically active LDL derivative dioctadecylindolcarbocyanine LDL (dil(3)-LDL), or with native LDL and anti-LDL indirect immunofluorescence. Exposure of the LDL-receptor- internalization defective J. D. cells (GM2408A) to an electric field of 10 V/cm for 1 h at 22 degrees C causes greater than 80% of the cells to have an asymmetric distribution of LDL-R; receptors accumulate at the more negative pole of the cell. In contrast, only 20% of LDL- internalization normal GM3348 cells exposed to identical conditions have asymmetrical distributions. Phase micrographs taken during electric-field exposure rule out cell movement as the responsible mechanism for the effect. In both cell types, postfield labeling with the F-actin-specific fluorescent probe nitrobenzoxadiazole-phallacidin shows that no topographic alteration of the actin cytoskeleton accompanies the redistribution of cell surface LDL-Rs, and indirect immunofluorescence labeling of the coat protein clathrin shows that coated pits do not redistribute asymmetrically. Measurements of the postfield relaxation in the percentage of GM2408A cells showing an asymmetric distribution allow an estimate of the effective postfield diffusion coefficient of the unliganded LDL-R. At 37 degrees C, D = 2.0 X 10(-9) cm2/s, decreasing to 1.1 X 10(-9) cm2/s at 22 degrees C, and D = 3.5 X 10(-10) cm2/s at 10 degrees C. These values are substantially larger than those measured by photobleaching methods for the LDL-R complexed with dil(3)-LDL on intact cells, but are comparable to those measured on membrane blebs, and are consistent

  4. Higher certainty of the laser-induced damage threshold test with a redistributing data treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Lars; Mrohs, Marius; Gyamfi, Mark; Mädebach, Heinrich; Ristau, Detlev

    2015-10-15

    As a consequence of its statistical nature, the measurement of the laser-induced damage threshold holds always risks to over- or underestimate the real threshold value. As one of the established measurement procedures, the results of S-on-1 (and 1-on-1) tests outlined in the corresponding ISO standard 21 254 depend on the amount of data points and their distribution over the fluence scale. With the limited space on a test sample as well as the requirements on test site separation and beam sizes, the amount of data from one test is restricted. This paper reports on a way to treat damage test data in order to reduce the statistical error and therefore measurement uncertainty. Three simple assumptions allow for the assignment of one data point to multiple data bins and therefore virtually increase the available data base.

  5. Higher certainty of the laser-induced damage threshold test with a redistributing data treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Lars; Mrohs, Marius; Gyamfi, Mark; Mädebach, Heinrich; Ristau, Detlev

    2015-10-01

    As a consequence of its statistical nature, the measurement of the laser-induced damage threshold holds always risks to over- or underestimate the real threshold value. As one of the established measurement procedures, the results of S-on-1 (and 1-on-1) tests outlined in the corresponding ISO standard 21 254 depend on the amount of data points and their distribution over the fluence scale. With the limited space on a test sample as well as the requirements on test site separation and beam sizes, the amount of data from one test is restricted. This paper reports on a way to treat damage test data in order to reduce the statistical error and therefore measurement uncertainty. Three simple assumptions allow for the assignment of one data point to multiple data bins and therefore virtually increase the available data base.

  6. Differential subcellular distribution of rat brain dopamine receptors and subtype-specific redistribution induced by cocaine

    PubMed Central

    Voulalas, Pamela J.; Schetz, John; Undieh, Ashiwel S.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the subcellular distribution of dopamine D1, D2 and D5 receptor subtypes in rat frontal cortex, and examined whether psychostimulant-induced elevation of synaptic dopamine could alter the receptor distribution. Differential detergent solubilization and density gradient centrifugation were used to separate various subcellular fractions, followed by semi-quantitative determination of the relative abundance of specific receptor proteins in each fraction. D1 receptors were predominantly localized to detergent-resistant membranes, and a portion of these receptors also floated on sucrose gradients. These properties are characteristic of proteins found in lipid rafts and caveolae. D2 receptors exhibited variable distribution between cytoplasmic, detergent-soluble and detergent-resistant membrane fractions, yet were not present in buoyant membranes. Most D5 receptor immunoreactivity was distributed into the cytoplasmic fraction, failing to sediment at forces up to 300,000g, while the remainder was localized to detergent-soluble membranes in cortex. D5 receptors were undetectable in detergent-resistant fractions or raft-like subdomains. Following daily cocaine administration for seven days, a significant portion of D1 receptors translocated from detergent-resistant membranes to detergent-soluble membranes and the cytoplasmic fraction. The distributions of D5 and D2 receptor subtypes were not significantly altered by cocaine treatment. These data imply that D5 receptors are predominantly cytoplasmic, D2 receptors are diffusely distributed within the cell, whereas D1 receptors are mostly localized to lipid rafts within the rat frontal cortex. Dopamine receptor subtype localization is susceptible to modulation by pharmacological manipulations that elevate synaptic dopamine, however the functional implications of such drug-induced receptor warrant further investigation. PMID:21236347

  7. Organic heterojunctions: Contact-induced molecular reorientation, interface states, and charge re-distribution

    PubMed Central

    Opitz, Andreas; Wilke, Andreas; Amsalem, Patrick; Oehzelt, Martin; Blum, Ralf-Peter; Rabe, Jürgen P.; Mizokuro, Toshiko; Hörmann, Ulrich; Hansson, Rickard; Moons, Ellen; Koch, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    We reveal the rather complex interplay of contact-induced re-orientation and interfacial electronic structure – in the presence of Fermi-level pinning – at prototypical molecular heterojunctions comprising copper phthalocyanine (H16CuPc) and its perfluorinated analogue (F16CuPc), by employing ultraviolet photoelectron and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. For both layer sequences, we find that Fermi-level (EF) pinning of the first layer on the conductive polymer substrate modifies the work function encountered by the second layer such that it also becomes EF-pinned, however, at the interface towards the first molecular layer. This results in a charge transfer accompanied by a sheet charge density at the organic/organic interface. While molecules in the bulk of the films exhibit upright orientation, contact formation at the heterojunction results in an interfacial bilayer with lying and co-facial orientation. This interfacial layer is not EF-pinned, but provides for an additional density of states at the interface that is not present in the bulk. With reliable knowledge of the organic heterojunction’s electronic structure we can explain the poor performance of these in photovoltaic cells as well as their valuable function as charge generation layer in electronic devices. PMID:26887445

  8. Variations of low-degree gravity coefficients induced by oceanic mass redistribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kao, Y.

    2013-05-01

    Sea level anomalies (SLA) are determined from TOPEX/POSEIDON satellite altimeter data. The Steric effect will be removed from SLA to compute low-degree gravity harmonic coefficients from 1992 to 2011, forming time series of low-frequency oceanic mass-induced gravity change. Wavelet coefficients is used to resolve the harmonic spectrum for the relationship between time and study the amplitude, frequency and time correlation. The preliminary results show that the sea level trend (SLT) of corrected sea level anomalies (CSLA) at multiple sea areas are contrary to the results of SLA and Steric. The SLA and Steric results shows that the years of the phase change in the equator as the boundary, the area is divided into north and south hemisphere opposite phase change, and the two results of the data trend is also consistent. The coefficient annual change rate is 1.16±0.07×10-10, amplitude is 5.13×10-10 and phase for -81.2 degrees. The wavelet spectrum analysis shows that the the CSLA J2 change cycle for 3-7 years. The change of is greater than coefficient and its mean pole motion in the y-direction movement is greater than the x-direction.

  9. Mitigation of MHD induced fast-ion redistribution in MAST and implications for MAST-Upgrade design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeling, D. L.; Barrett, T. R.; Cecconello, M.; Challis, C. D.; Hawkes, N.; Jones, O. M.; Klimek, I.; McClements, K. G.; Meakins, A.; Milnes, J.; Turnyanskiy, M.; the MAST Team

    2015-01-01

    The phenomenon of the redistribution of neutral beam fast ions due to magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activity in plasma has been observed on many tokamaks and more recently has been a focus of research on MAST (Turnyanskiy et al 2013 Nucl. Fusion 53 053016). n = 1 fishbone modes are observed to cause a large decrease in the neutron emission rate indicating the existence of a significant perturbation of the fast-ion population in the plasma. Theoretical work on fishbone modes states that the fast-ion distribution itself acts as the source of free energy driving the modes that cause the redistribution. Therefore a series of experiments have been carried out on MAST to investigate a range of plasma densities at two neutral-beam power levels to determine the region within this parameter space in which fishbone activity and consequent fast-ion redistribution is suppressed. Analysis of these experiments shows complete suppression of fishbone activity at high densities with increasing activity and fast-ion redistribution at lower densities and higher neutral-beam power, accompanied by strong evidence that the redistribution effect primarily affects a specific region in the plasma core with a weaker effect over a wider region of the plasma. The results also indicate the existence of correlations between gradients in the modelled fast-ion distribution function, the amplitude and growth rate of the fishbone modes, and the magnitude of the redistribution effect. The same analysis has been carried out on models of MAST-Upgrade baseline plasma scenarios to determine whether significant fast-ion redistribution due to fishbone modes is likely to occur in that device. A simple change to the neutral-beam injector geometry is proposed which is shown to have a significant mitigating effect in terms of the fishbone mode drive and is therefore expected to allow effective plasma heating and current drive over a wider range of plasma conditions in MAST-Upgrade.

  10. Reactive oxygen species and p38 MAPK regulate Bax translocation and calcium redistribution in salubrinal-induced apoptosis of EBV-transformed B cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Ga Bin; Kim, Yeong Seok; Lee, Hyun-Kyung; Song, Hyunkeun; Kim, Seonghan; Cho, Dae-Ho; Hur, Dae Young

    2011-12-27

    Salubrinal is a specific eIF2α phosphatase inhibitor that inhibits ER stress-mediated apoptosis. However, maintaining hyper-phosphorylated eIF2α state with high doses of salubrinal treatment promotes apoptosis in some cancer cells. In this report, we found that salubrinal induced apoptosis of EBV-transformed B cells. Notably, salubrinal induced ROS generation and p38 MPAK activation, which then induced expression of FasL. Moreover, salubrinal subsequently led to activation of caspases, calcium redistribution, Bax translocation, cytochrome c release, and apoptosis. These findings suggest that salubrinal may be a novel therapeutic approach for EBV-associated malignant diseases.

  11. TRAIL-activated EGFR by Cbl-b-regulated EGFR redistribution in lipid rafts antagonises TRAIL-induced apoptosis in gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ling; Zhang, Ye; Liu, Jing; Qu, Jinglei; Hu, Xuejun; Zhang, Fan; Zheng, Huachuan; Qu, Xiujuan; Liu, Yunpeng

    2012-11-01

    Most gastric cancer cells are resistant to tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL). Since TRAIL resistance is associated with lipid rafts, in which both death receptors and epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR) are enriched, our aim is to identify how lipid raft-regulated receptor redistribution influences the sensitivity of TRAIL in gastric cancer cells. In TRAIL-resistant gastric cancer cells, TRAIL did not induce effective death-inducing signalling complex (DISC) formation in lipid rafts, accompanied with EGFR translocation into lipid rafts, and activation of EGFR pathway. Knockdown of casitas B-lineage lymphoma-b (Cbl-b) enhanced TRAIL-induced apoptosis by promoting DISC formation in lipid rafts. However, knockdown of Cbl-b also enhanced EGFR translocation into lipid rafts and EGFR pathway activation induced by TRAIL. Either using inhibitors of EGFR or depletion of EGFR with small interfering RNA (siRNA) prevented EGFR pathway activation, and thus increased TRAIL-induced apoptosis, especially in Cbl-b knockdown clones. Taken together, TRAIL-induced EGFR activation through Cbl-b-regulated EGFR redistribution in lipid rafts antagonised TRAIL-induced apoptosis. The contribution of DISC formation and the inhibition of EGFR signal triggered in lipid rafts are both essential for increasing the sensitivity of gastric cancer cells to TRAIL.

  12. Critical role of serine 465 in isoflurane-induced increase of cell-surface redistribution and activity of glutamate transporter type 3.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yueming; Feng, Xiaorong; Sando, Julianne J; Zuo, Zhiyi

    2006-12-15

    Glutamate transporters (also called excitatory amino acid transporters, EAATs) bind extracellular glutamate and transport it to intracellular space to regulate glutamate neurotransmission and to maintain extracellular glutamate concentrations below neurotoxic levels. We previously showed that isoflurane, a commonly used anesthetic, enhanced the activity of EAAT3, a major neuronal EAAT. This effect required a protein kinase C (PKC) alpha-dependent EAAT3 redistribution to the plasma membrane. In this study, we prepared COS7 cells stably expressing EAAT3 with or without mutations of potential PKC phosphorylation sites in the putative intracellular domains. Here we report that mutation of threonine 5 or threonine 498 to alanine did not affect the isoflurane effects on EAAT3. However, the mutation of serine 465 to alanine abolished isoflurane-induced increase of EAAT3 activity and redistribution to the plasma membrane. The mutation of serine 465 to aspartic acid increased the expression of EAAT3 in the plasma membrane and also abolished the isoflurane effects on EAAT3. These results suggest an essential role of serine 465 in the isoflurane-increased EAAT3 activity and redistribution and a direct effect of PKC on EAAT3. Consistent with these results, isoflurane induced an increase in phosphorylation of wild type, T5A, and T498A EAAT3, and this increase was absent in S465A and S465D. Our current results, together with our previous data that showed the involvement of PKCalpha in the isoflurane effects on EAAT3, suggest that the phosphorylation of serine 465 in EAAT3 by PKCalpha mediates the increased EAAT3 activity and redistribution to plasma membrane after isoflurane exposure.

  13. Redistribution of Trojan Asteroids Between L4 and L5 Induced by Planetary Migration. Is it Symmetrical?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kortenkamp, Stephen J.

    2007-10-01

    We used N-body integration to investigate the stability of Trojan-type companions of the giant planets during planetary migration. A series of simulations were performed involving the migrating giant planets plus approximately 1000 test particle Trojans with initial distributions similar to those of Jupiter's current population of Trojan asteroids. A standard planet migration model was used in which the migration speed decreases exponentially with some characteristic time scale. During planetary migration, resonances between the host planet, a second planet and a Trojan can drive it out of the 1:1 resonance (see Kortenkamp et al 2004). Our simulations show that this loss mechanism can deplete Jupiter's initial Trojan population by up to 98%, depending on the migration time scale (slower migration leads to heavier losses). Conversely, the same resonances can also lead to greater stabilization of some Trojans, constricting them to tighter regions around the L4 or L5 Lagrange equilibrium regions. Our modeling shows that a combination of these de-stablizing and stabilizing resonant perturbations can lead to significant redistribution of Trojans between L4 and L5. Furthermore, all of the Jupiter Trojans observed to undergo such a redistribution transitioned from the trailing L5 region into the leading L4 region. However, the number of examples is quite small. Out of only 20 Jupiter Trojans surviving by the time the planets reached their present orbital configuration, just 2 had transitioned from L5 to L4. Redistribution of Neptune Trojans was much more pervasive as several hundred Trojans were observed to transition back and forth between L4 and L5 throughout the migration process. Additional modeling is being conducted to determine if asymmetries in the redistribution of Trojans result from initial choices of orbital and migration parameters or are merely a consequence of small number statistics. [This work is supported by NASA grant NNG06GD94G

  14. RhoA and RhoC are involved in stromal cell-derived factor-1-induced cell migration by regulating F-actin redistribution and assembly.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jixian; Li, Dingyun; Wei, Dan; Wang, Xiaoguang; Wang, Lan; Zeng, Xianlu

    2017-05-23

    Stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) signaling is important to the maintenance and progression of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia by inducing chemotaxis migration. To identify the mechanism of SDF-1 signaling in the migration of T-ALL, Jurkat acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells were used. Results showed that SDF-1 induces Jurkat cell migration by F-actin redistribution and assembly, which is dependent on Rho activity. SDF-1 induced RhoA and RhoC activation, as well as reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, which was inhibited by Rho inhibitor. The Rho-dependent ROS production led to subsequent cytoskeleton redistribution and assembly in the process of migration. Additionally, RhoA and RhoC were involved in SDF-1-induced Jurkat cell migration. Taken together, we found a SDF-1/CXCR4-RhoA and RhoC-ROS-cytoskeleton pathway that regulates Jurkat cell migration in response to SDF-1. This work will contribute to a clearer insight into the migration mechanism of acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  15. Brain spectrin (fodrin) interacts with phospholipids as revealed by intrinsic fluorescence quenching and monolayer experiments.

    PubMed Central

    Diakowski, W; Prychidny, A; Swistak, M; Nietubyć, M; Białkowska, K; Szopa, J; Sikorski, A F

    1999-01-01

    We demonstrate that phospholipid vesicles affect the intrinsic fluorescence of isolated brain spectrin. In the present studies we tested the effects of vesicles prepared from phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho) alone, in addition to vesicles containing PtdCho mixed with other phospholipids [phosphatidylethanolamine (PtdEtn) and phosphatidylserine] as well as from total lipid mixture extracted from brain membrane. The largest effect was observed with PtdEtn/PtdCho (3:2 molar ratio) vesicles; the effect was markedly smaller when vesicles were prepared from egg yolk PtdCho alone. Brain spectrin injected into a subphase induced a substantial increase in the surface pressure of monolayers prepared from phospholipids. Results obtained with this technique indicated that the largest effect is again observed with monolayers prepared from a PtdEtn/PtdCho mixture. The greatest effect was observed when the monolayer contained 50-60% PtdEtn in a PtdEtn/PtdCho mixture. This interaction occurred at salt and pH optima close to physiological conditions (0.15 M NaCl, pH7.5). Experiments with isolated spectrin subunits indicated that the effect of the beta subunit on the monolayer surface pressure resembled that measured with the whole molecule. Similarly to erythrocyte spectrin-membrane interactions, brain spectrin interactions with PtdEtn/PtdCho monolayer were competitively inhibited by isolated erythrocyte ankyrin. This also suggests that the major phospholipid-binding site is located in the beta subunit and indicates the possible physiological significance of this interaction. PMID:9931302

  16. Intramolecular Vibrational Energy Redistribution in 2-Thiocytosine: SH Rotamerization Induced by Near-IR Selective Excitation of NH2 Stretching Overtone.

    PubMed

    Halasa, Anna; Lapinski, Leszek; Rostkowska, Hanna; Nowak, Maciej J

    2015-09-03

    Near-IR-induced transformations, converting one amino-thiol conformer of 2-thiocytosine into another, were observed for monomers of the compound isolated in Ne, Ar, and N2 low-temperature matrixes. The two conformers involved in this phototransformation differ from each other by 180° rotation of the SH group. To induce the conversion, conformers of 2-thiocytosine were selectively excited to the overtone (or combination) NH2 stretching vibrational states, using very narrowband (fwhm <1 MHz) near-IR light generated in a tunable diode laser. The conformational changes were monitored by IR spectroscopy. The conformational transformation observed in the current work provides a clear evidence of the vibrational energy redistribution from the initially excited NH2 moiety to the remote SH group that changes its orientation.

  17. Moesin is required for HIV-1-induced CD4-CXCR4 interaction, F-actin redistribution, membrane fusion and viral infection in lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Barrero-Villar, Marta; Cabrero, José Román; Gordón-Alonso, Mónica; Barroso-González, Jonathan; Alvarez-Losada, Susana; Muñoz-Fernández, M Angeles; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco; Valenzuela-Fernández, Agustín

    2009-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) envelope regulates the initial attachment of viral particles to target cells through its association with CD4 and either CXCR4 or CCR5. Although F-actin is required for CD4 and CXCR4 redistribution, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying this fundamental process in HIV infection. Using CD4(+) CXCR4(+) permissive human leukemic CEM T cells and primary lymphocytes, we have investigated whether HIV-1 Env might promote viral entry and infection by activating ERM (ezrin-radixin-moesin) proteins to regulate F-actin reorganization and CD4/CXCR4 co-clustering. The interaction of the X4-tropic protein HIV-1 gp120 with CD4 augments ezrin and moesin phosphorylation in human permissive T cells, thereby regulating ezrin-moesin activation. Moreover, the association and clustering of CD4-CXCR4 induced by HIV-1 gp120 requires moesin-mediated anchoring of actin in the plasma membrane. Suppression of moesin expression with dominant-negative N-moesin or specific moesin silencing impedes reorganization of F-actin and HIV-1 entry and infection mediated by the HIV-1 envelope protein complex. Therefore, we propose that activated moesin promotes F-actin redistribution and CD4-CXCR4 clustering and is also required for efficient X4-tropic HIV-1 infection in permissive lymphocytes.

  18. Experimental Evidence of Long-Range Intramolecular Vibrational Energy Redistribution through Eight Covalent Bonds: NIR Irradiation Induced Conformational Transformation of E-Glutaconic Acid.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Benjámin; Kuş, Nihal; Tarczay, György; Fausto, Rui

    2017-05-11

    Long-range intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution (IVR) driven conformational changes were investigated in a matrix-isolated open-chain, asymmetrical dicarboxylic acid, E-glutaconic acid. Although the analysis was challenging due to the presence of multiple backbone conformers and short lifetimes of the prepared higher energy cis conformers, it was shown that the selective excitation of the O-H stretching overtone of one of the carboxylic groups can induce the conformational change (trans to cis) of the other carboxylic group, located at the other end of the E-glutaconic acid molecule. This is a direct proof that the IVR process can act through eight covalent bonds in a flexible molecule before the excess energy completely dissipates into the matrix. The lifetime of the prepared higher energy conformers (averaged over the different backbones) was measured to be 12 s.

  19. Inhibition of isoflurane-induced increase of cell-surface redistribution and activity of glutamate transporter type 3 by serine 465 sequence-specific peptides.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yueming; Li, Liaoliao; Washington, Jacqueline M; Xu, Xuebing; Sando, Julianne J; Lin, Daowei; Zuo, Zhiyi

    2011-03-25

    Excitatory amino acid transporters (EAAT) transport glutamate into cells to regulate glutamate neurotransmission and to maintain nontoxic extracellular glutamate levels for neurons. We showed previously that the commonly used volatile anesthetic isoflurane increases the transporting activity of EAAT3, the major neuronal EAAT. This effect requires a protein kinase C (PKC) α-mediated and S465-dependent EAAT3 redistribution to the plasma membrane. Thus, we hypothesize that specific peptides can be designed to block this effect. We conjugated a 10-amino acid synthetic peptide with a sequence identical to that of EAAT3 around the S465 to a peptide that can facilitate permeation of the plasma membrane. This fusion peptide inhibited the isoflurane-increased EAAT3 activity and redistribution to the plasma membrane in C6 cells and hippocampus. It did not affect the basal EAAT3 activity. This peptide also attenuated isoflurane-induced increase of PKCα in the immunoprecipitates produced by an anti-EAAT3 antibody. A scrambled peptide that has the same amino acid composition as the S465 sequence-specific peptide but has a random sequence did not change the effects of isoflurane on EAAT3. The S465 sequence-specific peptide, but not the scrambled peptide, is a good PKCα substrate in in vitro assay. These peptides did not affect cell viability. These results, along with our previous findings, strongly suggest that PKCα interacts with EAAT3 to regulate its functions. The S465 sequence-specific peptide may interrupt this interaction and is an effective inhibitor for the regulation of EAAT3 activity and trafficking by PKCα and isoflurane.

  20. Dynamic redistribution of major platelet surface receptors after contact-induced platelet activation and spreading. An immunoelectron microscopy study.

    PubMed Central

    Kieffer, N.; Guichard, J.; Breton-Gorius, J.

    1992-01-01

    The authors used an immunogold labeling procedure to investigate the redistribution of platelet receptors and their ligands on the surface of contact-activated adherent platelets before and after thrombin stimulation. During the initial stage of platelet adhesion, a typical segregation of receptors occurred. Gold particles identifying glycoprotein (GP) Ib (CD42b) and GPIIb-IIIa (CD41a) remained distributed over the entire platelet surface, whereas gold particles identifying GPIa-IIa (CDw 49b) and GPIV (CD36) were found essentially overlying the granulomere; p24 (CD9) was present at the peripheral platelet rim and over the cell body. An increased labeling of GPIIb-IIIa, GPIV and p24 was also observed on pseudopods, with GPIIb-IIIa and GPIV concentrated at the enlarged extremities and at sites of contact between two platelets, whereas GPIb was absent from pseudopods. After thrombin stimulation of adherent platelets, GPIb underwent a relocation to the cell center, in contrast to GPIIb-IIIa which still remained randomly distributed over the cell body. To investigate whether ligand distribution paralleled this receptor segregation, platelet released von Willebrand factor (vWF), fibrinogen (Fg) and thrombospondin (TSP) were visualized. During the early stages of platelet activation, surface labeling for all three adhesive proteins was minimal and almost undetectable. Occasionally, intragranular Fg and vWF was accessible to gold-coupled antibodies, with vWF exhibiting the typical eccentric alpha-granular localization. At later stages of activation and especially after thrombin stimulation, no surface labeling for vWF was observed, whereas immunogold particles identifying vWF were still present inside enlarged clear vacuoles. In contrast, labeling of Fg and TSP was increased over the granulomere and extended to the cell periphery and the pseudopods, but was absent from the hyalomere, despite the presence of GPIIb-IIIa molecules. Double labeling experiments showed

  1. Ketamine alleviates bradykinin-induced disruption of the mouse cerebrovascular endothelial cell-constructed tight junction barrier via a calcium-mediated redistribution of occludin polymerization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jui-Tai; Lin, Yi-Ling; Chen, Ta-Liang; Tai, Yu-Ting; Chen, Cheng-Yu; Chen, Ruei-Ming

    2016-08-10

    Following brain injury, a sequence of mechanisms leads to disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and subsequent cerebral edema, which is thought to begin with activation of bradykinin. Our previous studies showed that ketamine, a widely used intravenous anesthetic agent, can suppress bradykinin-induced cell dysfunction. This study further aimed to evaluate the protective effects of ketamine against bradykinin-induced disruption of the mouse cerebrovascular endothelial cell (MCEC)-constructed tight junction barrier and the possible mechanisms. Exposure of MCECs to bradykinin increased intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)) concentrations in a time-dependent manner. However, pretreatment of MCECs with ketamine time- and concentration-dependently lowered the bradykinin-induced calcium influx. As to the mechanisms, although exposure of MCECs to ketamine induced bradykinin R1 receptor protein and mRNA expression, this anesthetic did not change levels of the bradykinin R2 receptor, a major receptor that responds to bradykinin stimulation. Bradykinin increased amounts of soluble occludin in MCECs, but pretreatment with ketamine alleviated this disturbance in occludin polymerization. Consequently, exposure to bradykinin decreased the transendothelial electronic resistance in the MCEC-constructed tight junction barrier. However, pretreatment with ketamine attenuated the bradykinin-induced disruption of the tight junction barrier. Taken together, this study shows that ketamine at a therapeutic concentration can protect against bradykinin-induced breakage of the BBB via suppressing calcium-dependent redistribution of occludin tight junctions. Thus, ketamine has the potential for maintaining the BBB in critically ill patients with severe brain disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. STRESS-INDUCED REDISTRIBUTION OF IMMUNE CELLS - FROM BARRACKS TO BOULEVARDS TO BATTLEFIELDS: A TALE OF THREE HORMONES - CURT RICHTER AWARD WINNER

    PubMed Central

    Dhabhar, Firdaus S.; Malarkey, William B.; Neri, Eric; McEwen, Bruce S.

    2012-01-01

    Background The surveillance and effector functions of the immune system are critically dependent on the appropriate distribution of immune cells in the body. An acute or short-term stress response induces a rapid and significant redistribution of immune cells among different body compartments. Stress-induced leukocyte redistribution may be a fundamental survival response that directs leukocyte subpopulations to specific target organs during stress, and significantly enhances the speed, efficacy and regulation of an immune response. Immune responses are generally enhanced in compartments (e.g., skin) that are enriched with leukocytes, and suppressed in compartments that are depleted of leukocytes during/following stress. The experiments described here were designed to elucidate the: 1) Time-course, trajectory, and subpopulation-specificity of stress-induced mobilization and trafficking of blood leukocytes. 2) Individual and combined actions of the principal stress hormones, norepinephrine (NE), epinephrine (EPI), and corticosterone (CORT), in mediating mobilization or trafficking of specific leukocyte subpopulations. 3) Effects of stress/stress hormones on adhesion molecule, L-selectin (CD62L), expression by each subpopulation to assess its adhesion / functional / maturation status. Methods Male Sprague Dawley rats were stressed (short-term restraint, 2–120 min), or adrenalectomized and injected with vehicle (VEH), NE, EPI, CORT, or their combinations, and blood was collected for measurement of hormones and flow cytometric quantification of leukocyte subpopulations. Results Acute stress induced an early increase/mobilization of neutrophils, lymphocytes, helper T cells (Th), cytolytic T cells (CTL), and B cells into the blood, followed by a decrease/trafficking of all cell types out of the blood, except neutrophil numbers that continued to increase. CD62L expression was increased on neutrophils, decreased on Th, CTL, and natural killer (NK) cells, and showed a

  3. Stress-induced redistribution of immune cells--from barracks to boulevards to battlefields: a tale of three hormones--Curt Richter Award winner.

    PubMed

    Dhabhar, Firdaus S; Malarkey, William B; Neri, Eric; McEwen, Bruce S

    2012-09-01

    The surveillance and effector functions of the immune system are critically dependent on the appropriate distribution of immune cells in the body. An acute or short-term stress response induces a rapid and significant redistribution of immune cells among different body compartments. Stress-induced leukocyte redistribution may be a fundamental survival response that directs leukocyte subpopulations to specific target organs during stress, and significantly enhances the speed, efficacy and regulation of an immune response. Immune responses are generally enhanced in compartments (e.g., skin) that are enriched with leukocytes, and suppressed in compartments that are depleted of leukocytes during/following stress. The experiments described here were designed to elucidate the: (1) Time-course, trajectory, and subpopulation-specificity of stress-induced mobilization and trafficking of blood leukocytes. (2) Individual and combined actions of the principal stress hormones, norepinephrine (NE), epinephrine (EPI), and corticosterone (CORT), in mediating mobilization or trafficking of specific leukocyte subpopulations. (3) Effects of stress/stress hormones on adhesion molecule, L-selectin (CD62L), expression by each subpopulation to assess its adhesion/functional/maturation status. Male Sprague Dawley rats were stressed (short-term restraint, 2-120 min), or adrenalectomized and injected with vehicle (VEH), NE, EPI, CORT, or their combinations, and blood was collected for measurement of hormones and flow cytometric quantification of leukocyte subpopulations. Acute stress induced an early increase/mobilization of neutrophils, lymphocytes, helper T cells (Th), cytolytic T cells (CTL), and B cells into the blood, followed by a decrease/trafficking of all cell types out of the blood, except neutrophil numbers that continued to increase. CD62L expression was increased on neutrophils, decreased on Th, CTL, and natural killer (NK) cells, and showed a biphasic decrease on monocytes & B

  4. Disruption of Transcriptional Coactivator Sub1 Leads to Genome-Wide Re-distribution of Clustered Mutations Induced by APOBEC in Active Yeast Genes

    PubMed Central

    Dhar, Alok; Polev, Dmitrii E.; Masharsky, Alexey E.; Rogozin, Igor B.; Pavlov, Youri I.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in genomes of species are frequently distributed non-randomly, resulting in mutation clusters, including recently discovered kataegis in tumors. DNA editing deaminases play the prominent role in the etiology of these mutations. To gain insight into the enigmatic mechanisms of localized hypermutagenesis that lead to cluster formation, we analyzed the mutational single nucleotide variations (SNV) data obtained by whole-genome sequencing of drug-resistant mutants induced in yeast diploids by AID/APOBEC deaminase and base analog 6-HAP. Deaminase from sea lamprey, PmCDA1, induced robust clusters, while 6-HAP induced a few weak ones. We found that PmCDA1, AID, and APOBEC1 deaminases preferentially mutate the beginning of the actively transcribed genes. Inactivation of transcription initiation factor Sub1 strongly reduced deaminase-induced can1 mutation frequency, but, surprisingly, did not decrease the total SNV load in genomes. However, the SNVs in the genomes of the sub1 clones were re-distributed, and the effect of mutation clustering in the regions of transcription initiation was even more pronounced. At the same time, the mutation density in the protein-coding regions was reduced, resulting in the decrease of phenotypically detected mutants. We propose that the induction of clustered mutations by deaminases involves: a) the exposure of ssDNA strands during transcription and loss of protection of ssDNA due to the depletion of ssDNA-binding proteins, such as Sub1, and b) attainment of conditions favorable for APOBEC action in subpopulation of cells, leading to enzymatic deamination within the currently expressed genes. This model is applicable to both the initial and the later stages of oncogenic transformation and explains variations in the distribution of mutations and kataegis events in different tumor cells. PMID:25941824

  5. Mitigation of Insulin Resistance by Mangiferin in a Rat Model of Fructose-Induced Metabolic Syndrome Is Associated with Modulation of CD36 Redistribution in the Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Liang; Pan, Yongquan; Chonan, Ritsu; Batey, Robert; Rong, Xianglu; Yamahara, Johji; Wang, Jianwei; Li, Yuhao

    2016-01-01

    Mangiferin is one of the prominent active components responsible for the antidiabetic property of many traditional herbs, but its underlying mechanisms of action remain unclear. CD36 in skeletal muscle is known to contribute to the etiology of insulin resistance by facilitating fatty acid uptake. This study investigated the effect of mangiferin on insulin resistance. The results showed that treatment of Wistar-Kyoto rats with mangiferin (15 mg/kg, once daily, by oral gavage) for 7 weeks inhibited chronic liquid fructose consumption-induced increases in plasma insulin concentrations at the baseline and during oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), and the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance index. It also suppressed the increases in fasted plasma nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA) concentration and the adipose tissue insulin resistance index. Mechanistically, mangiferin neither affected intakes of fructose and chow, and the increase in epididymal and perirenal fat, nor attenuated fructose-induced hypertension. In contrast, mangiferin attenuated fructose-induced acceleration of plasma NEFA clearance during OGTT, and tended to decrease excessive triglyceride accumulation in gastrocnemius. Immunofluorescence staining and subsequent rating of CD36-expressing fibers in gastrocnemius revealed that mangiferin restored fructose-stimulated sarcolemmal CD36 overexpression and decreased intracellular CD36 distribution. In addition, the effects of mangiferin on the parameters associated with insulin resistance and abnormal fatty acid metabolism were absent in the spontaneously hypertensive rats carrying numerous nonfunctional mutations in the CD36 gene. Thus, these results suggest that mangiferin treatment mitigates insulin resistance in a rat model of fructose-induced metabolic syndrome by modulating sarcolemmal and intracellular CD36 redistribution in the skeletal muscle. Copyright © 2015 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  6. Dehydration-induced redistribution of amphiphilic molecules between cytoplasm and lipids is associated with desiccation tolerance in seeds.

    PubMed

    Buitink, J; Leprince, O; Hoekstra, F A

    2000-11-01

    This study establishes a relationship between desiccation tolerance and the transfer of amphiphilic molecules from the cytoplasm into lipids during drying, using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of amphiphilic spin probes introduced into imbibed radicles of pea (Pisum sativum) and cucumber (Cucumis sativa) seeds. Survival following drying and a membrane integrity assay indicated that desiccation tolerance was present during early imbibition and lost in germinated radicles. In germinated cucumber radicles, desiccation tolerance could be re-induced by an incubation in polyethylene glycol (PEG) before drying. In desiccation-intolerant radicles, partitioning of spin probes into lipids during dehydration occurred at higher water contents compared with tolerant and PEG-induced tolerant radicles. The difference in partitioning behavior between desiccation-tolerant and -intolerant tissues could not be explained by the loss of water. Consequently, using a two-phase model system composed of sunflower or cucumber oil and water, physical properties of the aqueous solvent that may affect the partitioning of amphiphilic spin probes were investigated. A significant relationship was found between the partitioning of spin probes and the viscosity of the aqueous solvent. Moreover, in desiccation-sensitive radicles, the rise in cellular microviscosity during drying commenced at higher water contents compared with tolerant or PEG-induced tolerant radicles, suggesting that the microviscosity of the cytoplasm may control the partitioning behavior in dehydrating seeds.

  7. Dehydration-Induced Redistribution of Amphiphilic Molecules between Cytoplasm and Lipids Is Associated with Desiccation Tolerance in Seeds1

    PubMed Central

    Buitink, Julia; Leprince, Olivier; Hoekstra, Folkert A.

    2000-01-01

    This study establishes a relationship between desiccation tolerance and the transfer of amphiphilic molecules from the cytoplasm into lipids during drying, using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of amphiphilic spin probes introduced into imbibed radicles of pea (Pisum sativum) and cucumber (Cucumis sativa) seeds. Survival following drying and a membrane integrity assay indicated that desiccation tolerance was present during early imbibition and lost in germinated radicles. In germinated cucumber radicles, desiccation tolerance could be re-induced by an incubation in polyethylene glycol (PEG) before drying. In desiccation-intolerant radicles, partitioning of spin probes into lipids during dehydration occurred at higher water contents compared with tolerant and PEG-induced tolerant radicles. The difference in partitioning behavior between desiccation-tolerant and -intolerant tissues could not be explained by the loss of water. Consequently, using a two-phase model system composed of sunflower or cucumber oil and water, physical properties of the aqueous solvent that may affect the partitioning of amphiphilic spin probes were investigated. A significant relationship was found between the partitioning of spin probes and the viscosity of the aqueous solvent. Moreover, in desiccation-sensitive radicles, the rise in cellular microviscosity during drying commenced at higher water contents compared with tolerant or PEG-induced tolerant radicles, suggesting that the microviscosity of the cytoplasm may control the partitioning behavior in dehydrating seeds. PMID:11080316

  8. EGCG in Green Tea Induces Aggregation of HMGB1 Protein through Large Conformational Changes with Polarized Charge Redistribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xuan-Yu; Li, Baoyu; Liu, Shengtang; Kang, Hongsuk; Zhao, Lin; Zhou, Ruhong

    2016-02-01

    As a major effective component in green tea, (‑)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG)’s potential benefits to human health have been widely investigated. Recent experimental evidences indicate that EGCG can induce the aggregation of HMGB1 protein, a late mediator of inflammation, which subsequently stimulates the autophagic degradation and thus provides protection from lethal endotoxemia and sepsis. In this study, we use molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to explore the underlying molecular mechanism of this aggregation of HMGB1 facilitated by EGCG. Our simulation results reveal that EGCG firmly binds to HMGB1 near Cys106, which supports previous preliminary experimental evidence. A large HMGB1 conformational change is observed, where Box A and Box B, two homogenous domains of HMGB1, are repositioned and packed together by EGCG. This new HMGB1 conformation has large molecular polarity and distinctive electrostatic potential surface. We suggest that the highly polarized charge distribution leads to the aggregation of HMGB1, which differs from the previous hypothesis that two HMGB1 monomers are linked by the dimer of EGCG. Possible aggregating modes have also been investigated with potential of mean force (PMF) calculations. Finally, we conclude that the conformation induced by EGCG is more aggregation-prone with higher binding free energies as compared to those without EGCG.

  9. Education, Meritocracy and Redistribution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Souto-Otero, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    This paper analyses the relationship between education, meritocracy and redistribution. It first questions the meritocratic ideal highlighting how it relates to normative expectations that do not hold fully neither in their logic nor in practice. It then complements the literature on persistent inequalities by focusing on the opportunities for…

  10. Education, Meritocracy and Redistribution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Souto-Otero, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    This paper analyses the relationship between education, meritocracy and redistribution. It first questions the meritocratic ideal highlighting how it relates to normative expectations that do not hold fully neither in their logic nor in practice. It then complements the literature on persistent inequalities by focusing on the opportunities for…

  11. Low-Dose Actinomycin-D Induces Redistribution of Wild-Type and Mutated Nucleophosmin Followed by Cell Death in Leukemic Cells.

    PubMed

    Brodská, Barbora; Holoubek, Aleš; Otevřelová, Petra; Kuželová, Kateřina

    2016-06-01

    Specific mutations involving C-terminal part of the nucleolar protein nucleophosmin (NPM) are associated with better outcome of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) therapy, possibly due to aberrant cytoplasmic NPM localization facilitating induction of anti-NPM immune response. Actinomycin D (actD) is known to induce nucleolar stress leading to redistribution of many nucleolar proteins, including NPM. We analyzed the distribution of both wild-type and mutated NPM (NPMmut) in human cell lines, before and after low-dose actD treatment, in living cells expressing exogenous fluorescently labeled proteins as well as using immunofluorescence staining of endogenous proteins in fixed cells. The wild-type NPM form is prevalently nucleolar in intact cells and relocalizes mainly to the nucleoplasm following actD addition. The mutated NPM form is found both in the nucleoli and in the cytoplasm of untreated cells. ActD treatment leads to a marked increase in NPMmut amount in the nucleoplasm while a mild decrease is observed in the cytoplasm. Cell death was induced by low-dose actD in all the studied leukemic cell lines with different p53 and NPM status. In cells expressing the tumor suppresor p53 (CML-T1, OCI-AML3), cell cycle arrest in G1/G0 phase was followed by p53-dependent apoptosis while in p53-null HL60 cells, transient G2/M-phase arrest was followed by cell necrosis. We conclude that although actD does not increase NPM concentration in the cytoplasm, it could improve the effect of standard chemotherapy in leukemias through more general mechanisms.

  12. Lipid redistribution by α-linolenic acid-rich chia seed inhibits stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 and induces cardiac and hepatic protection in diet-induced obese rats.

    PubMed

    Poudyal, Hemant; Panchal, Sunil K; Waanders, Jennifer; Ward, Leigh; Brown, Lindsay

    2012-02-01

    Chia seeds contain the essential fatty acid, α-linolenic acid (ALA). This study has assessed whether chia seeds attenuated the metabolic, cardiovascular and hepatic signs of a high-carbohydrate, high-fat (H) diet [carbohydrates, 52% (wt/wt); fat, 24% (wt/wt) with 25% (wt/vol) fructose in drinking water] in rats. Diets of the treatment groups were supplemented with 5% chia seeds after 8 weeks on H diet for a further 8 weeks. Compared with the H rats, chia seed-supplemented rats had improved insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance, reduced visceral adiposity, decreased hepatic steatosis and reduced cardiac and hepatic inflammation and fibrosis without changes in plasma lipids or blood pressure. Chia seeds induced lipid redistribution with lipid trafficking away from the visceral fat and liver with an increased accumulation in the heart. The stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 products were depleted in the heart, liver and the adipose tissue of chia seed-supplemented rats together with an increase in the substrate concentrations. The C18:1trans-7 was preferentially stored in the adipose tissue; the relatively inert C18:1n-9 was stored in sensitive organs such as liver and heart and C18:2n-6, the parent fatty acid of the n-6 pathway, was preferentially metabolized. Thus, chia seeds as a source of ALA induce lipid redistribution associated with cardioprotection and hepatoprotection. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Expression and redistribution of cellular Bad, Bax, and Bcl-X(L) protein is associated with VCD-induced ovotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Hu, X; Christian, P; Sipes, I G; Hoyer, P B

    2001-11-01

    follicles in various stages of development. Relative to controls, within the population of small preantral follicles, staining intensity was less (P < 0.05) and presumably more diffuse, specifically in stage 1 primary follicles from VCD-treated animals (15 days). VCD caused none of these effects in large preantral follicles or liver (not targeted by VCD). These data provide evidence that the apoptosis induced by VCD in ovarian small preantral follicles of rats is associated with increased expression of Bad protein, redistribution of Bcl-x(L) protein and cytochrome c from the mitochondria to the cytosolic compartment, and an increase in the Bax/Bcl-x(L) ratio in the mitochondria. These observations are consistent with the involvement of Bcl-2 gene family members in VCD-induced acceleration of atresia.

  14. Prolactin receptor attenuation induces zinc pool redistribution through ZnT2 and decreases invasion in MDA-MB-453 breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bostanci, Zeynep; Alam, Samina; Soybel, David I.; Kelleher, Shannon L.

    2014-02-15

    Prolactin receptor (PRL-R) activation regulates cell differentiation, proliferation, cell survival and motility of breast cells. Prolactin (PRL) and PRL-R over-expression are strongly implicated in breast cancer, particularly contributing to tumor growth and invasion in the more aggressive estrogen-receptor negative (ER−) disease. PRL-R antagonists have been suggested as potential therapeutic agents; however, mechanisms through which PRL-R antagonists exert their actions are not well-understood. Zinc (Zn) is a regulatory factor for over 10% of the proteome, regulating critical cell processes such as proliferation, cell signaling, transcription, apoptosis and autophagy. PRL-R signaling regulates Zn metabolism in breast cells. Herein we determined effects of PRL-R attenuation on cellular Zn metabolism and cell function in a model of ER-, PRL-R over-expressing breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-453). PRL-R attenuation post-transcriptionally increased ZnT2 abundance and redistributed intracellular Zn pools into lysosomes and mitochondria. ZnT2-mediated lysosomal Zn sequestration was associated with reduced matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) activity and decreased invasion. ZnT2-mediated Zn accumulation in mitochondria was associated with increased mitochondrial oxidation. Our results suggest that PRL-R antagonism in PRL-R over-expressing breast cancer cells may reduce invasion through the redistribution of intracellular Zn pools critical for cellular function. - Highlights: • PRL-R attenuation increased ZnT2 expression. • PRL-R attenuation increased lysosomal and mitochondrial Zn accumulation. • PRL-R attenuation decreased MMP-2 and invasion. • PRL-R antagonists may modulate lysosomal and mitochondrial Zn pools.

  15. Hydraulic Redistribution: A Modeling Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, E.; Verma, P.; Loheide, S. P., III

    2014-12-01

    Roots play a key role in the soil water balance. They extract and transport water for transpiration, which usually represents the most important soil water loss in vegetated areas, and can redistribute soil water, thereby increasing transpiration rates and enhancing root nutrient uptake. We present here a two-dimensional model capable of describing two key aspects of root water uptake: root water compensation and hydraulic redistribution. Root water compensation is the ability of root systems to respond to the reduction of water uptake from areas of the soil with low soil water potential by increasing the water uptake from the roots in soil parts with higher water potential. Hydraulic redistribution is a passive transfer of water through the root system from areas of the soil with greater water potential to areas with lower water potential. Both mechanisms are driven by gradients of water potential in the soil and the roots. The inclusion of root water compensation and hydraulic redistribution in models can be achieved by describing root water uptake as a function of the difference in water potential between soil and root xylem. We use a model comprising the Richards equation for the water flow in variably saturated soils and the Darcy's equation for the water flow in the xylem. The two equations are coupled via a sink term, which is assumed to be proportional to the difference between soil and xylem water potentials. The model is applied in two case studies to describe vertical and horizontal hydraulic redistribution and the interaction between vegetation with different root depths. In the case of horizontal redistribution, the model is used to reproduce the fluxes of water across the root system of a tree subjected to uneven irrigation. This example can be extended to situations when only part of the root system has access to water, such as vegetation near creeks, trees at the edge of forests, and street trees in urban areas. The second case is inspired by recent

  16. Angular momentum redistribution by mixed modes in evolved low-mass stars. II. Spin-down of the core of red giants induced by mixed modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkacem, K.; Marques, J. P.; Goupil, M. J.; Mosser, B.; Sonoi, T.; Ouazzani, R. M.; Dupret, M. A.; Mathis, S.; Grosjean, M.

    2015-07-01

    The detection of mixed modes in subgiants and red giants by the CoRoT and Kepler space-borne missions allows us to investigate the internal structure of evolved low-mass stars, from the end of the main sequence to the central helium-burning phase. In particular, the measurement of the mean core rotation rate as a function of the evolution places stringent constraints on the physical mechanisms responsible for the angular momentum redistribution in stars. It showed that the current stellar evolution codes including the modelling of rotation fail to reproduce the observations. An additional physical process that efficiently extracts angular momentum from the core is thus necessary. Our aim is to assess the ability of mixed modes to do this. To this end, we developed a formalism that provides a modelling of the wave fluxes in both the mean angular momentum and the mean energy equations in a companion paper. In this article, mode amplitudes are modelled based on recent asteroseismic observations, and a quantitative estimate of the angular momentum transfer is obtained. This is performed for a benchmark model of 1.3 M⊙ at three evolutionary stages, representative of the evolved pulsating stars observed by CoRoT and Kepler. We show that mixed modes extract angular momentum from the innermost regions of subgiants and red giants. However, this transport of angular momentum from the core is unlikely to counterbalance the effect of the core contraction in subgiants and early red giants. In contrast, for more evolved red giants, mixed modes are found efficient enough to balance and exceed the effect of the core contraction, in particular in the hydrogen-burning shell. Our results thus indicate that mixed modes are a promising candidate to explain the observed spin-down of the core of evolved red giants, but that an other mechanism is to be invoked for subgiants and early red giants.

  17. Wealth networks with local redistribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sunggon; Kim, Gwang Il; Lee, Geymin

    2008-08-01

    We propose a growing network model of the distribution of wealth in a society with local redistribution. Individuals, represented by nodes in the model, provide goods and services to one of their neighbors and they simultaneously produce wealth using goods and services received from their neighbors. A proportion of the wealth produced by a node is redistributed to its neighbors as a reward for the received goods and services. Nodes have different ability to produce wealth. We analyze the interaction between the wealth accumulation process and the structure of the network, and analyze also how the interaction is affected by the redistribution of wealth. It is investigated how rich nodes attract the individuals entering the network in this model. Under a reasonable distribution of ability, simulation result shows that the distribution of degree, i.e. number of neighbors of a node, is scale-free, and that the wealth distribution for the middle class is a log-normal distribution, while for the richest it shows a power-law behavior. We also show that the local redistribution of wealth has a significant effect on the distribution of both degree and wealth.

  18. Population Redistribution in the Midwest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roseman, Curtis C., Ed.; And Others

    The nine chapters in the book focus on the 1970s' metropolitan to nonmetropolitan migration stream and address both population patterns and processes and the impacts and policy issues associated with the resulting population redistribution in the Midwest. Peter A. Morrison places the Midwest in the national context of changing population structure…

  19. Indigenous lactobacilli strains of food and human sources reverse enteropathogenic E. coli O26:H11-induced damage in intestinal epithelial cell lines: effect on redistribution of tight junction proteins.

    PubMed

    Jariwala, Ruchi; Mandal, Hemanti; Bagchi, Tamishraha

    2017-09-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the neutralizing effect of lactobacilli isolated from indigenous food and human sources on enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) O26 : H11-induced epithelial barrier dysfunction in vitro. This was assessed by transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and permeability assays using intestinal cell lines, HT-29 and Caco-2. Furthermore, the expression and distribution of tight junction (TJ) proteins were analysed by qRT-PCR and immunofluorescence assay, respectively. The nine strains used in the study were from different species viz. Lactobacillus fermentum, Lactobacillushelveticus, Lactobacillus salivarius and Lactobacillus plantarum. All strains were able to reverse the decrease in TEER and corresponding increase in permeability across E. coli-infected monolayers. Maximum reversal was observed after 18 h [up to 93.8±2.0 % by L. rhamnosus GG followed by L. fermentum IIs11.2 (92.6±2.2 %) and L. plantarum GRI-2 (91.9±0.9 %)] of lactobacilli exposure following EPEC O26 : H11 infection. All strains were able to redistribute the TJ proteins to the cell periphery either partially or completely. Moreover, L. helveticus FA-7 was also able to significantly increase the mRNA expression of ZO-1 and claudin-1 (2.5-fold and 3.0-fold, respectively; P<0.05). The rapid reversal observed by these strains could be mostly because of the redistribution rather than increased mRNA expression of TJ proteins. In conclusion, L. helveticus FA-7, L. fermentum FA-1 and L. plantarum GRI-2 were good in all the aspects studied, and the other strains were good in some aspects. L. helveticus FA-7, L. fermentum FA-1 and L. plantarum GRI-2 can therefore be used for potential therapeutic purpose against intestinal epithelial dysfunction.

  20. Transcriptional regulation, stabilization, and subcellular redistribution of multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1) by glycogen synthase kinase 3αβ: novel insights on modes of cadmium-induced cell death stimulated by MRP1.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hak-Ryul; Lee, Kang-Yo; Lee, Kang-Yoo; Ahn, Sang-Gun; Lee, Byung-Hoon; Jung, Ki-Tae; Yoon, Jung-Hoon; Yoon, Hyo-Eun; Oh, Seon-Hee

    2015-08-01

    Cadmium (Cd) resistance is associated with the suppression of autophagy in H460 lung cancer cells, which is regulated by phospho(p)serine-glycogen synthase kinase (GSK) 3αβ. However, the involvement of multidrug resistance (MDR) in this signaling pathway and its underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated. In this study, we used Cd-resistant cells (RH460), developed from H460 lung cancer cells, to demonstrate that the induction of MDR-associated protein (MRP1) in response to Cd is enhanced in H460 cells compared to RH460. Treating RH460 cells with Cd induced large cytoplasmic vacuoles, which was inhibited by the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine. MRP1 was detected in the nuclear-rich membrane fractions and redistributed from the perinuclear to the cytoplasmic compartment following exposure to Cd. Cd-induced MRP1, p-Ser/p-Tyr GSK3αβ, and LC3-II were all suppressed by the GSK3 inhibitor SB216763, but increased by lithium. Furthermore, MRP1 was upregulated by the Ser/Thr phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid and downregulated by the tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor vanadate, suggesting that MRP1 protein was stabilized by p-Ser GSK3αβ. In addition, co-immunoprecipitation and co-localization analyzes revealed a physical interaction between MRP1 and p-Ser GSK3αβ. Genetic knockdown of GSK3β decreased Cd-induced MRP1 mRNA and protein levels, whereas its overexpression upregulated MRP1 protein expression. MRP1 also co-localized with lysosomal membrane protein-2, which may cause lysosomal membrane permeabilization and the subsequent release of cathepsins into the cytosol. In mice chronically injected with Cd, MRP1 localized to the perinuclear region of bronchial and alveolar epithelial cells. Collectively, these data suggest that Cd toxicity is regulated by the transcriptional regulation, stabilization, and subcellular redistribution of MRP1 via the posttranslational modification of GSK3αβ. Therefore, the serine phosphorylation of GSK3αβ plays a critical role in

  1. Redistribution of crossed cerebellar diaschisis

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.M.; Park, C.H.; Intenzo, C.M.; Bell, R.

    1989-04-01

    Crossed cerebellar diaschisis refers to a functional decrease in blood flow to the cerebellar hemisphere contralateral to the infarcted or ischemic cerebral hemisphere. This phenomenon can be depicted using PET as well as using SPECT. This condition, seen on early I-123 IMP brain scans, can show redistribution on the three hour delayed scan, presumably due to normal non-specific amine receptor sites of the affected cerebellum. One such case is reported.

  2. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 induces cellular polarization, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 redistribution, and multinucleated giant cell generation in human primary monocytes but not in monocyte-derived macrophages.

    PubMed

    Fais, S; Borghi, P; Gherardi, G; Logozzi, M; Belardelli, F; Gessani, S

    1996-12-01

    In this study, we evaluated the effects of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) on some morphologic and functional changes in cultured human monocytes/macrophages at different stages of differentiation. Freshly isolated monocytes infected with HIV-1 24 hours after seeding exhibited marked morphologic changes such as uropod formation, polarization of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) on the cytoplasmic projection, the redistribution of alpha-actinin on cell-membrane dots, and an increased release of soluble ICAM-1. These changes preceded the increase in monocyte-monocyte fusion and the formation of multinucleated giant cells. In contrast, HIV-1 infection did not affect monocyte-derived macrophages in terms of either cellular polarization or multinucleated giant cell formation. Immunocytochemistry showed that HIV-1 matrix protein was present mostly in bi- and trinucleated cells, which suggests that multinucleated giant cells may represent a long-lived and highly productive cellular source of HIV. The treatment of the HIV-1-infected monocytes with azidodeoxythymidine virtually abolished all viral-induced morphofunctional changes. On the whole, these results indicate that blood monocytes and differentiated macrophages may be affected differently by HIV infection, as monocytes seem to be much more prone to polarize, undergo homotypic fusion, and form multinucleated giant cells. These changes may confer to HIV-infected monocytes an increased ability to transmigrate through endothelia into tissues, whereas differentiated macrophages may have a predominant role as a widespread reservoir of HIV.

  3. Evidence for vertical ozone redistribution since 1967

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furrer, R.; Döhler, W.; Kirsch, H.-J.; Plessing, P.; Görsdorf, U.

    1993-03-01

    Long-term measurements of the ozone concentration in the vicinity of the city of Berlin have been performed with ground based Dobson spectrophotometers and balloon borne systems. The respective experiments cover the past 24 years. All data have been reevaluated and corrected towards uniform calibration standards, leading to the longest European data set of total column density, altitude-dependent ozone partial pressures and the corresponding temperatures. Smoothing algorithms unravel significant long-term trends. The analysis shows an increase of ozone concentration within the middle stratosphere (below 31 km height) as well as in the troposphere over the past 24 years. On the contrary, ongoing ozone depletion in the lower stratosphere has been found. The large scale vertical redistribution of atmospheric ozone in the troposphere and the lower stratosphere seems to be in agreement with model calculations and trend predictions that have their roots in changes of the chemical composition and the ozone photochemistry due to anthropogenically induced trace gas concentrations.

  4. Evidence for vertical ozone redistribution since 1967

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furrer, R.; Döhler, W.; Kirsch, H.-J.; Plessing, P.; Görsdorf, U.

    1993-01-01

    Long-term measurements of ozone concentration in the vicinity of the city of Berlin have been performed with ground-based Dobson spectrophotometers and balloon borne systems. The respective experiments cover the past 24 yr. All data have been re-evaluated and corrected towards uniform calibration standards, leading to the longest lasting European data set of total column density, altitude-dependent ozone partial pressures and the corresponding temperatures. Smoothing algorithms reveal significant longterm trends. The analysis shows an increase of ozone concentration within the middle stratosphere (below 31 km height) as well as in the troposphere over the past 24 yr. On the contrary, ongoing ozone depletion in the lower stratosphere became evident. The large scale vertical redistribution of atmospheric ozone in the troposphere and the lower stratosphere seems to be in agreement with model calculations and trend predictions that have their roots in changes of the chemical composition and the ozone photochemistry due to anthropogenically induced tracer gas concentrations.

  5. Charge Redistribution from Anomalous Magnetovorticity Coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Hattori, Koichi; Yin, Yi

    2016-10-05

    Here, we investigate novel transport phenomena in a chiral fluid originated from an interplay between a vorticity and strong magnetic field, which induces a redistribution of vector charges in the system and an axial current along the magnetic field. The corresponding transport coefficients are obtained from an energy-shift argument for the chiral fermions in the lowest Landau level due to a spin-vorticity coupling and also from diagrammatic computations on the basis of the linear response theory. Based on consistent results from both methods, we also observe that the transport coefficients are proportional to the anomaly coefficient and are independent of temperature and chemical potential. Finally, we speculate that these transport phenomena are connected to quantum anomaly.

  6. Charge Redistribution from Anomalous Magnetovorticity Coupling

    DOE PAGES

    Hattori, Koichi; Yin, Yi

    2016-10-05

    Here, we investigate novel transport phenomena in a chiral fluid originated from an interplay between a vorticity and strong magnetic field, which induces a redistribution of vector charges in the system and an axial current along the magnetic field. The corresponding transport coefficients are obtained from an energy-shift argument for the chiral fermions in the lowest Landau level due to a spin-vorticity coupling and also from diagrammatic computations on the basis of the linear response theory. Based on consistent results from both methods, we also observe that the transport coefficients are proportional to the anomaly coefficient and are independent ofmore » temperature and chemical potential. Finally, we speculate that these transport phenomena are connected to quantum anomaly.« less

  7. Charge Redistribution from Anomalous Magnetovorticity Coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Hattori, Koichi; Yin, Yi

    2016-10-05

    Here, we investigate novel transport phenomena in a chiral fluid originated from an interplay between a vorticity and strong magnetic field, which induces a redistribution of vector charges in the system and an axial current along the magnetic field. The corresponding transport coefficients are obtained from an energy-shift argument for the chiral fermions in the lowest Landau level due to a spin-vorticity coupling and also from diagrammatic computations on the basis of the linear response theory. Based on consistent results from both methods, we also observe that the transport coefficients are proportional to the anomaly coefficient and are independent of temperature and chemical potential. Finally, we speculate that these transport phenomena are connected to quantum anomaly.

  8. [Transdermal nitroglycerin before induction of anesthesia prevents redistribution hypothermia in patients under general anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Morioka, N; Ozaki, M; Matsukawa, T; Suzuki, H

    1998-12-01

    Initial anesthesic-induced hypothermia results largely from core-to-peripheral redistribution of heat. Administration of transdermal nitroglycerin induces vasodilation. Such vasodilation, induced well before induction of anesthesia, might redistribute heat to peripheral tissues. Minimal redistribution hypothermia might accompany subsequent induction of anesthesia. We studied 32 patients undergoing gastrointestinal surgery. Thirty minutes before induction of anesthesia, they were randomly assigned to: 1. transdermal nitroglycerin 10 mg; 2. transdermal nitroglycerin 5 mg; and, 3. control. Core temperature during the first hour of anesthesia decreased significantly more in the control patients than in those given either dose of nitroglycerin. Vasodilation induced by transdermal nitroglycerin before induction of anesthesia significantly decreased subsequent redistribution hypothermia. Drug-induced modulation of vascular tone thus produces clinically important alterations in intraoperative core temperature.

  9. Taste novelty induces intracellular redistribution of NR2A and NR2B subunits of NMDA receptor in the insular cortex.

    PubMed

    Núñez-Jaramillo, Luis; Jimenez, Beatriz; Ramirez-Munguía, Nadia; Delint-Ramírez, Ilse; Luna-Illades, Claudio; Tapia, Ricardo; Bermúdez-Rattoni, Federico

    2008-06-18

    Taste recognition memory is a process by which animals associate a taste previously experienced with its gastric consequences. Novel taste presentation induces in the insular cortex biochemical modifications that decrease after the taste becomes familiar. Here we show that, in this cortex, consumption of a novel taste produces an increase of the NR2A and NR2B subunits of the NMDA receptor in the detergent resistant membrane (DRM) fraction. This increase did not occur in the adjacent parietal cortex, was not due to a change in the total amount of protein, and is related with the novelty of the stimulus since it was reduced after the taste became familiar. Furthermore, NR2A and NR2B subunits increase in the DRM was blocked by the injection of a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist. These results suggest that modulation of NMDA receptors in the insular cortex through the increase of its NR2A and NR2B subunits in the DRM is involved in the taste memory formation via a cholinergic process.

  10. Sertraline concentrations and postmortem redistribution.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, Iain M; Mallett, Phyllis

    2012-11-30

    Sertraline is a commonly prescribed selective inhibitor of serotonin uptake used for the treatment of mental depression and anxiety. Central blood and liver concentrations of sertraline (norsertraline) are compared to levels in peripheral blood in nine medical examiner cases. Specimens were initially screened for alcohol and simple volatiles by GC-FID headspace analysis, ELISA for drugs of abuse, and alkaline drugs by GC/MS. Sertraline, when detected by the alkaline drug screen, was subsequently confirmed and quantified by a specific GC-NPD procedure. Data suggest that when ingested with other medications, sertraline may be a contributing factor in death. Sertraline (norsertraline) concentrations ranged from 0.13 (0.11) to 2.1 (6.0) mg/L in peripheral blood, from 0.18 (0.12) to 2.0 (6.7) mg/L in central blood, and 21 to 160 mg/kg in liver. Sertraline central blood to peripheral blood ratios averaged 1.22±0.85 (mean±standard deviation). The liver to peripheral blood ratios, on the other hand, were markedly higher and averaged 97±40 (mean±standard deviation). Given that a liver to peripheral blood ratio exceeding 20 is indicative of propensity for significant postmortem redistribution, these data confirm that sertraline is prone to marked postmortem redistribution.

  11. Living high training low induces physiological cardiac hypertrophy accompanied by down-regulation and redistribution of the renin-angiotensin system

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Wei; Meszaros, J Gary; Zeng, Shao-ju; Sun, Ying-yu; Zuo, Ming-xue

    2013-01-01

    Aim: Living high training low” (LHTL) is an exercise-training protocol that refers living in hypoxia stress and training at normal level of O2. In this study, we investigated whether LHTL caused physiological heart hypertrophy accompanied by changes of biomarkers in renin-angiotensin system in rats. Methods: Adult male SD rats were randomly assigned into 4 groups, and trained on living low-sedentary (LLS, control), living low-training low (LLTL), living high-sedentary (LHS) and living high-training low (LHTL) protocols, respectively, for 4 weeks. Hematological parameters, hemodynamic measurement, heart hypertrophy and plasma angiotensin II (Ang II) level of the rats were measured. The gene and protein expression of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), angiotensinogen (AGT) and angiotensin II receptor I (AT1) in heart tissue was assessed using RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Results: LLTL, LHS and LHTL significantly improved cardiac function, increased hemoglobin concentration and RBC. At the molecular level, LLTL, LHS and LHTL significantly decreased the expression of ACE, AGT and AT1 genes, but increased the expression of ACE and AT1 proteins in heart tissue. Moreover, ACE and AT1 protein expression was significantly increased in the endocardium, but unchanged in the epicardium. Conclusion: LHTL training protocol suppresses ACE, AGT and AT1 gene expression in heart tissue, but increases ACE and AT1 protein expression specifically in the endocardium, suggesting that the physiological heart hypertrophy induced by LHTL is regulated by region-specific expression of renin-angiotensin system components. PMID:23377552

  12. Radiation transfer with partial frequency redistribution and generalized redistribution functions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubeny, I.

    The author attempted to analyse the available astrophysical partial redistribution studies. He introduced the term quasi-Markovian, classical view, where the basic physical concepts of the current astrophysical approach are summarized. Its physical uncertainties, and even inconsistencies, are discussed in detail. The quasi-Markovian, classical treatment has been used to generalize the Oxenius (1965) approach. The reformulation of the Oxenius' approach, in the two-level-atom case, to a form similar to that of Milkey and Mihalas (1973) and Heasley and Kneer (1976) showed, that both formulations yield almost identical results. Using the same approach as in reformulating the two-level-atom case, the author derived a suitable form of the emission coefficient in the case of the multilevel atom. Comparing its form to that following from a heuristic derivation, two points appeared to be different.

  13. Usefulness of IgA Anti-α-fodrin Antibodies in Combination with Rheumatoid Factor and/or Antinuclear Antibodies as Substitute Immunological Criterion in Sjögren Syndrome with Negative Anti-SSA/SSB Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Molina, Gabriela; Nuñez-Alvarez, Carlos; Avila-Casado, Carmen; Llorente, Luis; Hernández-Hernández, Carlos; Calderillo, María Luisa; Marroquín, Verónica; Recillas-Gispert, Claudia; Romero-Díaz, Juanita; Sánchez-Guerrero, Jorge

    2016-10-01

    We aimed to evaluate the usefulness of anti-α-fodrin antibodies (AFA) in combination with rheumatoid factor (RF) and/or antinuclear antibodies (ANA) as an alternative immunological criterion for Sjögren syndrome (SS) among patients with negative anti-Ro/La serology. The study included 350 patients (100 with rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and systemic sclerosis, and 50 with primary SS) randomly selected and assessed for SS. All patients were tested for ANA, RF, anti-SSA/SSB, and AFA antibodies. SS diagnosis was made on a clinical basis by 2 rheumatologists based on the 6-item screening questionnaire, Schirmer-I test, nonstimulated whole salivary flow rate, fluorescein staining test, autoantibodies, lip biopsy, and medical chart review. Non-SS was defined as lack of clinical diagnosis and not fulfilling the American-European Consensus Group classification criteria and the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria. The ACR criteria were applied substituting the immunological criteria as follows: (1) RF plus ANA > 1:320, (2) RF plus AFA, (3) ANA > 1:320 plus AFA, (4) RF alone, and (5) 2 positive tests out of RF, ANA > 1:320, or AFA. We estimated the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and likelihood ratio positivity with 95% CI for each criterion. There were 236 patients (67%) who tested negative for anti-SSA/SSB antibodies, of whom 65 (27.5%) were clinically diagnosed as SS, and 149 (63%) with non-SS. RF + AFA and ANA + AFA performed similarly to RF + ANA > 1:320. The model 2 out of 3 of RF, ANA, or AFA improved the sensitivity from 56.9% to 70.7%, although the specificity decreased. The combination AFA + RF, AFA + ANA > 1:320, or at least 2 out of 3, performed well as a proxy immunological test for patients with SS and negative Ro/La serology.

  14. Two-photon collisional redistribution of radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alber, G.; Cooper, J.

    1985-01-01

    Collisional redistribution in the presence of two weakly exciting laser fields is studied, including the effects due to degeneracy of the radiator states. A general expression for the total redistributed intensity is derived valid for arbitrary detunings and polarizations of the exciting laser fields. In particular, this expression contains all single-collision and sequential-collision contributions, which are equally important under certain circumstances. The similarities and differences between the redistributed intensity as calculated in this paper and the collisionally aided radiative excitation cross sections studied by Yeh and Berman (1979) and Light and Szoke (1978) are pointed out.

  15. Evidence for vertical ozone redistribution since 1967

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furrer, R.; Doehler, W.; Kirsch, H.-J.; Plessing, P.; Goersdorf, U.

    1992-12-01

    Long-term measurements of ozone concentration in the vicinity of the city of Berlin have been performed with ground-based Dobson spectrophotometers and balloon borne systems. The respective experiments cover the past 24 yr. All data have been re-evaluated and corrected towards uniform calibration standards, leading to the longest lasting European data set of total column density, altitude-dependent ozone partial pressures and the corresponding temperatures. Smoothing algorithms reveal significant long-term trends. The analysis shows an increase of ozone concentration within the middle stratosphere (below 31 km height) as well as in the troposphere over the past 24 yr. On the contrary, ongoing ozone depletion in the lower stratosphere became evident. The large scale vertical redistribution of atmospheric ozone in the troposphere and the lower stratosphere seems to be in agreement with model calculations and trend predictions that have their roots in changes of the chemical composition and the ozone photochemistry due to anthropogenically induced tracer gas concentrations.

  16. Subsurface application enhances benefits of manure redistribution

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sustainable nutrient management requires redistribution of livestock manure from nutrient-excess areas to nutrient-deficit areas. Field experiments were conducted to assess agronomic and environmental effects of different poultry litter application methods (surface vs. subsurface) and timings (fall ...

  17. Stem-mediated hydraulic redistribution in large roots on opposing sides of a Douglas-fir tree following localized irrigation.

    PubMed

    Nadezhdina, Nadezhda; Steppe, Kathy; De Pauw, Dirk J W; Bequet, Raphael; Cermak, Jan; Ceulemans, Reinhart

    2009-12-01

    *Increasing evidence about hydraulic redistribution and its ecological consequences is emerging. Hydraulic redistribution results from an interplay between competing plant and soil water potential gradients. In this work, stem-mediated hydraulic redistribution was studied in a 53-year-old Douglas-fir tree during a period of drought. *Sap flux density measurements using the heat field deformation method were performed at four locations: in two large opposing roots and on two sides of the tree stem. Hydraulic redistribution was induced by localized irrigation on one of the measured roots, creating heterogeneous soil water conditions. *Stem-mediated hydraulic redistribution was detected during night-time conditions when water was redistributed from the wet side of the tree to the nonirrigated dry side. In addition to stem-mediated hydraulic redistribution, bidirectional flow in the dry root was observed, indicating radial sectoring in the xylem. *It was observed that, through stem-mediated hydraulic redistribution, Douglas-fir was unable to increase its transpiration despite the fact that sufficient water was available to one part of the root system. This resulted from the strong water potential gradient created by the dry soil in contact with the nonirrigated part of the root system. A mechanism of stem-mediated hydraulic redistribution is proposed and its possible implications are discussed.

  18. Tsunami mitigation - redistribution of energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadri, Usama

    2017-04-01

    Tsunamis are water waves caused by the displacement of a large volume of water, in the deep ocean or a large lake, following an earthquake, landslide, underwater explosion, meteorite impacts, or other violent geological events. On the coastline, the resulting waves evolve from unnoticeable to devastating, reaching heights of tens of meters and causing destruction of property and loss of life. Over 225,000 people were killed in the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami alone. For many decades, scientists have been studying tsunami, and progress has been widely reported in connection with the causes (1), forecasting (2), and recovery (3). However, none of the studies ratifies the approach of a direct mitigation of tsunamis, with the exception of mitigation using submarine barriers (e.g. see Ref. (4)). In an attempt to open a discussion on direct mitigation, I examine the feasibility of redistributing the total energy of a very long surface ocean (gravity) wave over a larger space through nonlinear resonant interaction with two finely tuned acoustic-gravity waves (see Refs. (5-8)). Theoretically, while the energy input in the acoustic-gravity waves required for an effective interaction is comparable to that in a tsunami (i.e. impractically large), employing the proposed mitigation technique the initial tsunami amplitude could be reduced substantially resulting in a much milder impact at the coastline. Moreover, such a technique would allow for the harnessing of the tsunami's own energy. Practically, this mitigation technique requires the design of highly accurate acoustic-gravity wave frequency transmitters or modulators, which is a rather challenging ongoing engineering problem. References 1. E. Bryant, 2014. Tsunami: the underrated hazard. Springer, doi:10.1007/978-3-319- 06133-7. 2. V. V. Titov, F. I. Gonza`lez, E. N. Bernard, M. C. Eble, H. O. Mofjeld, J. C. Newman, A. J. Venturato, 2005. Real-Time Tsunami Forecasting: Challenges and Solutions. Nat. Hazards 35:41-58, doi:10

  19. Exposure to inequality affects support for redistribution.

    PubMed

    Sands, Melissa L

    2017-01-24

    The distribution of wealth in the United States and countries around the world is highly skewed. How does visible economic inequality affect well-off individuals' support for redistribution? Using a placebo-controlled field experiment, I randomize the presence of poverty-stricken people in public spaces frequented by the affluent. Passersby were asked to sign a petition calling for greater redistribution through a "millionaire's tax." Results from 2,591 solicitations show that in a real-world-setting exposure to inequality decreases affluent individuals' willingness to redistribute. The finding that exposure to inequality begets inequality has fundamental implications for policymakers and informs our understanding of the effects of poverty, inequality, and economic segregation. Confederate race and socioeconomic status, both of which were randomized, are shown to interact such that treatment effects vary according to the race, as well as gender, of the subject.

  20. Exposure to inequality affects support for redistribution

    PubMed Central

    Sands, Melissa L.

    2017-01-01

    The distribution of wealth in the United States and countries around the world is highly skewed. How does visible economic inequality affect well-off individuals’ support for redistribution? Using a placebo-controlled field experiment, I randomize the presence of poverty-stricken people in public spaces frequented by the affluent. Passersby were asked to sign a petition calling for greater redistribution through a “millionaire’s tax.” Results from 2,591 solicitations show that in a real-world-setting exposure to inequality decreases affluent individuals’ willingness to redistribute. The finding that exposure to inequality begets inequality has fundamental implications for policymakers and informs our understanding of the effects of poverty, inequality, and economic segregation. Confederate race and socioeconomic status, both of which were randomized, are shown to interact such that treatment effects vary according to the race, as well as gender, of the subject. PMID:28069960

  1. Wealth redistribution in conservative linear kinetic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toscani, G.

    2009-10-01

    We introduce and discuss kinetic models for wealth distribution which include both taxation and uniform redistribution. The evolution of the continuous density of wealth obeys a linear Boltzmann equation where the background density represents the action of an external subject on the taxation mechanism. The case in which the mean wealth is conserved is analyzed in full details, by recovering the analytical form of the steady states. These states are probability distributions of convergent random series of a special structure, called perpetuities. Among others, Gibbs distribution appears as steady state in case of total taxation and uniform redistribution.

  2. Subsurface application enhances benefits of manure redistribution

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sustainable nutrient management requires redistribution of livestock manure from nutrient-excess areas to nutrient-deficit areas. Field experiments were conducted to assess agronomic (i.e., corn yield) and environmental (i.e., ammonia volatilization and surface nutrient losses) effects of different ...

  3. Universal Service Policies as Wealth Redistribution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueller, Milton

    1999-01-01

    Offers a critical reassessment of the underlying rationale for universal service policies and argues that public policies designed to promote universal telecommunications access are simply a form of wealth redistribution. Considers economic and political issues and discusses how telecommunications can help ameliorate inequalities but not eliminate…

  4. Cognitive Ability and the Demand for Redistribution

    PubMed Central

    Mollerstrom, Johanna; Seim, David

    2014-01-01

    Empirical research suggests that the cognitively able are politically more influential than the less able, by being more likely to vote and to assume leadership positions. This study asks whether this pattern matters for public policy by investigating what role a person's cognitive ability plays in determining his preferences for redistribution of income among citizens in society. To answer this question, we use a unique Swedish data set that matches responses to a tailor-made questionnaire to administrative tax records and to military enlistment records for men, with the latter containing a measure of cognitive ability. On a scale of 0 to 100 percent redistribution, a one-standard-deviation increase in cognitive ability reduces the willingness to redistribute by 5 percentage points, or by the same amount as a $35,000 increase in mean annual income. We find support for two channels mediating this economically strong and statistically significant relation. First, higher ability is associated with higher income. Second, ability is positively correlated with the view that economic success is the result of effort, rather than luck. Both these factors are, in turn, related to lower demand for redistribution. PMID:25343713

  5. Atmospheric Heat Redistribution on Hot Jupiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Becker, D.; Showman, A. P.

    2013-12-01

    Infrared lightcurves of transiting hot Jupiters present a trend in which the atmospheres of the hottest planets are less efficient at redistributing the stellar energy absorbed on their daysides---and thus have a larger day-night temperature contrast---than colder planets. To this day, no predictive atmospheric model has been published that identifies which dynamical mechanisms determine the atmospheric heat redistribution efficiency on tidally locked exoplanets. We present a two-layer shallow water model of the atmospheric dynamics on synchronously rotating planets that explains why heat redistribution efficiency drops as stellar insolation rises. Our model shows that planets with weak friction and weak irradiation exhibit a banded zonal flow with minimal day-night temperature differences, while models with strong irradiation and/or strong friction exhibit a day-night flow pattern with order-unity fractional day-night temperature differences. To interpret the model, we develop a scaling theory that shows that the timescale for gravity waves to propagate horizontally over planetary scales, τwave, plays a dominant role in controlling the transition from small to large temperature contrasts. This implies that heat redistribution is governed by a wave-like process, similar to the one responsible for the weak temperature gradients in the Earth's tropics. When atmospheric drag can be neglected, the transition from small to large day-night temperature contrasts occurs when τwave ~ (τrad/Ω)1/2, where τrad is the radiative relaxation time, and Ω is the planetary rotation frequency. Alternatively, this transition criterion can be expressed in terms of τvert, the timescale for a fluid parcel to move vertically over the difference in day-night thickness. The transition then occurs when τrad ~ τvert. These results subsume the more widely used timescale comparison for estimating heat redistribution efficiency between τrad and the timescale for large-scale horizontal

  6. Diallyl disulphide, a beneficial component of garlic oil, causes a redistribution of cell-cycle growth phases, induces apoptosis, and enhances butyrate-induced apoptosis in colorectal adenocarcinoma cells (HT-29).

    PubMed

    Altonsy, Mohammed O; Andrews, Simon C

    2011-01-01

    Colon cancer is a leading and expanding cause of death worldwide. A major contributory factor to this disease is diet composition; some components are beneficial (e.g, dietary fiber), whereas others are detrimental (e.g., alcohol). Garlic oil is a prominent dietary constituent that prevents the development of colorectal cancer. This effect is believed to be mainly due to diallyl disulphide (DADS), which selectively induces redox stress in cancerous (rather than normal) cells that leads to apoptotic cell death. However, the detailed mechanism by which DADS causes apoptosis remains unclear. We show that DADS treatment of colonic adenocarcinoma cells (HT-29) initiates a cascade of molecular events characteristic of apoptosis. These include a decrease in cellular proliferation, translocation of phosphatidylserine to the plasma-membrane outer-layer, activation of caspase-3 and -9, genomic DNA fragmentation, and G(2)/M phase cell-cycle arrest. Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), particularly butyrate (abundantly produced in the gut by bacterial fermentation of dietary polysaccharides), enhance colonic cell integrity but, in contrast, inhibit colonic cancer cell growth. Combining DADS with butyrate augmented the apoptotic effect of butyrate on HT-29 cells. These results suggest that the anticancerous properties of DADS afford greater benefit when supplied with other favorable dietary factors (short chain fatty acids/polysaccharides) that likewise reduce colonic tumor development.

  7. Contributions of In-Situ Stress Transient Redistribution to Blasting Excavation Damage Zone of Deep Tunnels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Peng; Lu, Wen-bo; Chen, Ming; Hu, Ying-guo; Zhou, Chuang-bing; Wu, Xin-xia

    2015-03-01

    With the background of construction of the headrace tunnels with the deepest buried depth in China at present, by means of carefully acoustic velocity detection and analysis of Excavation Damage Zone (EDZ), the contributions to damage zones made by the effect of in situ stress transient redistribution are studied and compared with the extent of damage caused by the explosive load. Also, the numerical simulation was adopted to verify detecting the results. It turned out that the in situ stress transient redistribution during blasting has great influence on the development of EDZ of deep tunnels. The blasting excavation-induced damage zone of deep tunnels can be divided into the inner damage zone and the outer damage zone from the excavation surface into surrounding rocks. Although this damage zone dividing method is similar to the work of Martino and Chandler (2004), the consideration of developing a mechanism of the inner damage zone, especially the contribution of in situ stress transient redistribution, is totally different. The inner damage zone, which accounts for 29-57 % of the total damage zone, is mainly caused by explosive load and in situ stress transient adjustment, while the outer damage zone can be mostly attributed to the static redistribution of in situ stress. Field tests and numerical simulation indicate that the in situ stress transient redistribution effect during blasting contributes about 16-51 % to the inner damage zone in the 2# headrace tunnel of Jinping II Hydropower Station. For general cases, it can be concluded that the in situ stress transient redistribution is one of the main contributors of an excavation damage zone, and damage caused by in situ stress transient redistribution effect may exceed the damage caused by explosion load and become the main inducing factor for damage with the rise of in situ stress levels.

  8. Delayed redistribution in thallium 201 SPECT myocardial perfusion studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ziessman, H.A.; Keyes, J.W. Jr.; Fox, L.M.; Green, C.E.; Fox, S.M. )

    1989-11-01

    Stress {sup 201}Tl myocardial perfusion studies are useful in differentiating viable, reversibly ischemic from infarcted myocardium. A perfusion defect that shows redistribution 2 to 4 h after {sup 201}Tl injection is diagnostic of ischemia, while a fixed defect suggests infarction. However, occasional patients with a fixed defect at 4 h have redistribution at 24 h. This study evaluates the frequency and significance of this delayed redistribution with SPECT {sup 201}Tl. Patients with either no or incomplete redistribution at 4 h had repeat imaging 18 to 48 h later. Delayed redistribution was seen in 8/26 (31 percent). Four had incomplete and four had no redistribution at 4 h. Delayed redistribution with SPECT {sup 201}Tl is more common than generally appreciated, and we recommend delayed images in patients with fixed perfusion defects or incomplete redistribution at 4-h imaging, particularly in patients with previous infarctions for whom a revascularization procedure is being considered.

  9. ATMOSPHERIC HEAT REDISTRIBUTION ON HOT JUPITERS

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Becker, Daniel; Showman, Adam P.

    2013-10-20

    Infrared light curves of transiting hot Jupiters present a trend in which the atmospheres of the hottest planets are less efficient at redistributing the stellar energy absorbed on their daysides—and thus have a larger day-night temperature contrast—than colder planets. To this day, no predictive atmospheric model has been published that identifies which dynamical mechanisms determine the atmospheric heat redistribution efficiency on tidally locked exoplanets. Here we present a shallow-water model of the atmospheric dynamics on synchronously rotating planets that explains why heat redistribution efficiency drops as stellar insolation rises. Our model shows that planets with weak friction and weak irradiation exhibit a banded zonal flow with minimal day-night temperature differences, while models with strong irradiation and/or strong friction exhibit a day-night flow pattern with order-unity fractional day-night temperature differences. To interpret the model, we develop a scaling theory which shows that the timescale for gravity waves to propagate horizontally over planetary scales, τ{sub wave}, plays a dominant role in controlling the transition from small to large temperature contrasts. This implies that heat redistribution is governed by a wave-like process, similar to the one responsible for the weak temperature gradients in the Earth's tropics. When atmospheric drag can be neglected, the transition from small to large day-night temperature contrasts occurs when τ{sub wave}∼√(τ{sub rad}/Ω), where τ{sub rad} is the radiative relaxation time and Ω is the planetary rotation frequency. Alternatively, this transition criterion can be expressed as τ{sub rad} ∼ τ{sub vert}, where τ{sub vert} is the timescale for a fluid parcel to move vertically over the difference in day-night thickness. These results subsume the more widely used timescale comparison for estimating heat redistribution efficiency between τ{sub rad} and the horizontal day

  10. 13 CFR 309.2 - Redistributions under part 307.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Redistributions under part 307. 309.2 Section 309.2 Business Credit and Assistance ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE REDISTRIBUTIONS OF INVESTMENT ASSISTANCE § 309.2 Redistributions under part 307. (a) A...

  11. Redistributive effects of Swedish health care finance.

    PubMed

    Gerdtham, U G; Sundberg, G

    1998-01-01

    This paper investigates the redistributive effects of the Swedish health care financing system in 1980 and 1990 for four different financial sources: county council taxes, payroll taxes, direct payments and state grants. The redistributive effects are decomposed into vertical, horizontal and 'reranking' segments for each of the four financial sources. The data used are based on probability samples of the Swedish population, from the Level of Living Survey (LNU) from 1981 and 1991. The paper concludes that the Swedish health care financing system is weakly progressive, although direct payments are regressive. There is some horizontal inequity and 'reranking', which mainly comes from the county council taxes, since those tax rates vary for each county council. The implication is that, to some extent, people with equal incomes are treated unequally.

  12. Carbon redistribution by erosion processes in an intensively disturbed catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boix-Fayos, Carolina; Martínez-Mena, María; Pérez Cutillas, Pedro; de Vente, Joris; Barberá, Gonzalo G.; Mosch, Wouter; Navarro Cano, Jose Antonio; Gaspar, Leticia; Navas, Ana

    2016-04-01

    Understanding how organic carbon moves with sediments along the fluvial system is crucial to close catchment scale carbon budgets. Especially challenging is the analysis of organic carbon dynamics during fluvial transport in heterogeneous, fragile and disturbed environments with ephemeral and intense hydrological pulses, typical of Mediterranean conditions. This paper explores the catchment scale organic carbon redistribution by lateral flows in extreme Mediterranean environmental conditions from a geomorphological perspective. The study area is a catchment (Cárcavo) in SE Spain with a semiarid climate, erodible lithologies, shallow soils, and highly disturbed by agricultural terraces, land levelling, reforestations and construction of check-dams. To increase understanding of erosion induced catchment scale organic carbon redistribution, we studied the subcatchments of 8 check-dams distributed along the catchment main channel in detail. We determined 137Cs, physicochemical characteristics and organic carbon pools of soils and sediments deposited behind each check-dam, performed spatial analysis of properties of the catchment and buffer areas around check-dams, and carried out geomorphological analysis of the slope-channel connections. Soils showed very low Total Organic Carbon (TOC) values oscillating between 15.2 and 4.4 g Kg-1 for forest and agricultural soils, respectively. Sediments mobilized by erosion were poor in TOC compared to the eroded (forest) soils (6.6±0.7 g Kg-1), and the redistribution of organic carbon through the catchment, especially of the Mineral Associated Organic Carbon (MAC) pool, showed the same pattern as clay particles and 137Cs. The TOC erosion rates (0.031±0.03 Mg ha-1 y-1) were comparable to others reported for subhumid Mediterranean catchments and to those modelled worldwide for pasture land. Those lateral fluxes were equivalent to 10.4 % of the TOC stock from the topsoil at the moment of the check-dam construction and

  13. Tillage effects on soil water redistribution and bare soil evaporation throughout a season

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Tillage-induced changes in soil properties are difficult to predict, yet can influence how water is redistributed within the profile after precipitation and subsequent evaporation rates. We evaluated the effects of sweep tillage (ST) on near surface soil water dynamics as compared with an untilled (...

  14. Tillage effects on soil water redistribution and bare soil evaporation throughout a season

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Tillage-induced changes in soil properties are difficult to predict, yet can influence evaporation, infiltration, and how water is redistributed within the profile after precipitation. We evaluated the effects of sweep tillage (ST) on near surface soil water dynamics as compared with an untilled (UT...

  15. Local temperature redistribution and structural transition during joule-heating-driven conductance switching in VO2.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Suhas; Pickett, Matthew D; Strachan, John Paul; Gibson, Gary; Nishi, Yoshio; Williams, R Stanley

    2013-11-13

    Joule-heating induced conductance-switching is studied in VO2 , a Mott insulator. Complementary in situ techniques including optical characterization, blackbody microscopy, scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) and numerical simulations are used. Abrupt redistribution in local temperature is shown to occur upon conductance-switching along with a structural phase transition, at the same current.

  16. Ion-redistribution induced efficient upconversion in β-NaYF4:20%Yb3+,2%Er3+ microcrystals with well controlled morphology and size.

    PubMed

    Fan, Shaohua; Wang, Shikai; Yu, Lu; Sun, Hongtao; Gao, Guojun; Hu, Lili

    2017-01-09

    We develop an efficient green upconversion (UC) β-NaYF4:20%Yb3+,2%Er3+ microcrystal with well controlled morphology and size by hydrothermal method using two different chelating agents of CIT and EDTA-2Na via a simple ion-exchange reaction. Importantly, the UC emission efficiency of newly developed CIT and EDTA-2Na β-NaYF4:20%Yb3+,2%Er3+ microcrystals is almost as strong as that of commercial counterpart by solid-state method. A proof-of-concept β-NaYF4:20%Yb3+,2%Er3+ microcrystal waveguide is demonstrated to extend their applications in modern micro-optoelectronics. The local ion-redistribution process during the ion-exchange reaction, which effectively disperses the locally clustered Yb3+, accounts for the enormously enhanced UC emission in β-NaYF4:20%Yb3+,2%Er3+ microcrystals.

  17. Hydraulic redistribution in three Amazonian trees.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Rafael S; Dawson, Todd E; Burgess, Stephen S O; Nepstad, Daniel C

    2005-09-01

    About half of the Amazon rainforest is subject to seasonal droughts of 3 months or more. Despite this drought, several studies have shown that these forests, under a strongly seasonal climate, do not exhibit significant water stress during the dry season. In addition to deep soil water uptake, another contributing explanation for the absence of plant water stress during drought is the process of hydraulic redistribution; the nocturnal transfer of water by roots from moist to dry regions of the soil profile. Here, we present data on patterns of soil moisture and sap flow in roots of three dimorphic-rooted species in the Tapajós Forest, Amazônia, which demonstrate both upward (hydraulic lift) and downward hydraulic redistribution. We measured sap flow in lateral and tap roots of our three study species over a 2-year period using the heat ratio method, a sap-flow technique that allows bi-directional measurement of water flow. On certain nights during the dry season, reverse or acropetal flow (i.e.,in the direction of the soil) in the lateral roots and positive or basipetal sap flow (toward the plant) in the tap roots of Coussarea racemosa (caferana), Manilkara huberi (maçaranduba) and Protium robustum (breu) were observed, a pattern consistent with upward hydraulic redistribution (hydraulic lift). With the onset of heavy rains, this pattern reversed, with continuous night-time acropetal sap flow in the tap root and basipetal sap flow in lateral roots, indicating water movement from wet top soil to dry deeper soils (downward hydraulic redistribution). Both patterns were present in trees within a rainfall exclusion plot (Seca Floresta) and to a more limited extent in the control plot. Although hydraulic redistribution has traditionally been associated with arid or strongly seasonal environments, our findings now suggest that it is important in ameliorating water stress and improving rain infiltration in Amazonian rainforests. This has broad implications for

  18. A splitting-free vorticity redistribution method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchhart, M.; Obi, S.

    2017-02-01

    We present a splitting-free variant of the vorticity redistribution method. Spatial consistency and stability when combined with a time-stepping scheme are proven. We propose a new strategy preventing excessive growth in the number of particles while retaining the order of consistency. The novel concept of small neighbourhoods significantly reduces the method's computational cost. In numerical experiments the method showed second order convergence, one order higher than predicted by the analysis. Compared to the fast multipole code used in the velocity computation, the method is about three times faster.

  19. Memory Effect and Redistribution of Cavitation Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lixin, Bai; Weijun, Lin; Jingjun, Deng; Chao, Li; Delong, Xu; Pengfei, Wu

    Temporal evolution and spatial distribution of acoustic cavitation structures (evolving complicated patterns with clear boundary) in a very thin liquid layer were investigated experimentally with high-speed photography. The inception and disappearance processes of cavitation bubble cloud are revealed that the metastable cavitaton structures formed in the thin liquid layer cause a long-term "memory effect". The mechanism and effect factors of memory effect are analysed. The redistribution of cavitation nuclei was investigated by changing the temporal decay of the memory effect. The thin-liquid-layer-cavitation method is useful for the investigation of cavitation nuclei because of the two-dimensional nature of thin liquid layer.

  20. Cascading dynamics with local weighted flow redistribution in interdependent networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Yuzhuo

    2013-07-01

    We study load cascading dynamics in a system composed of coupled interdependent networks while adopting a local weighted flow redistribution rule. We find that when the intra- or inter-connectivity increases, robustness against the cascade of load failures in the symmetrically coupled interdependent networks increases. In addition, when a failed link has to first split its flow asymmetrically to its neighbouring link groups according to the link types, even though there exists an optimal split, the robustness is lowered in contrast with the non-split situation. Furthermore, the optimal weighting mechanism in an isolated network no longer holds in interdependent networks. Finally, robustness against the cascade of load failures is not guaranteed to increase by making the distribution of the degree of intra-connectivity broader. We confirm these phenomena by theoretical analysis based on mean-field theory. Our findings might have great implications for preventing load-failure-induced local cascades in symmetrically coupled interdependent networks.

  1. Landscape evolution by soil redistribution in a Mediterranean agricultural context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciampalini, Rossano; Follain, Stéphane; Le Bissonnais, Yves

    2010-05-01

    Soils and landscapes are frequently subjected to rapid evolutions induced by climate changes and humans disturbances. Early, soil scientists had already sought to identify the dynamic interactions between soils and landscapes. Soil redistribution modelling is an appropriate analyse methodology widely utilized (Kirkby, 1985; Van Oost et al., 2000; Van Rompaey et al., 2001; Minasny and McBratney, 1999; Van Oost et al., 2005; Govers et al., 2006) to understand space time evolution in soil and landscape processes at short and medium term. The aims of this research is to develop a model able to simulate soil evolution as affected by soil redistribution processes (e.g. water-erosion processes and mechanical erosion) and to use pedological knowledge acquired from a field study coupled with the present research. The LandSoil model, here proposed, is an event based model, dimensioned for fine spatial [1 m] and medium [10 -100 years] temporal scales, taking into account a detailed representation of the agricultural landscape structure. It is composed of three modules for soil erosion/redistribution: rill erosion (Souchère et al., 2003); interrill erosion (Cerdan et al., 2002); and tillage erosion based on the mechanistic rules developed by Govers et al., 1994. After each rain and tillage event a new topography is evaluated as well as all the geometric landscape parameters. Specificities of the model are: i) long-term landscape analysis and topography balance after each rainfall; ii) evaluation of water erosion and soil mechanistic redistribution (tillage erosion); iii) taking in consideration of the landscape geometry, especially connectivity, as a significant information in describing the landscape and useful in modelling (Landscape structure management and landscape design); and iv) utilisation of various and different climate scenarios thanks to the event based model. Subsequently we apply this model to study the effect of different scenarios of land management and

  2. Using soil redistribution to understand soil organic carbon redistribution and budgets

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ritchie, J.C.; McCarty, G.W.; Venteris, E.R.; Kaspar, T.C.

    2005-01-01

    Patterns of soil organic carbon (SOC) vary across the landscape leading to uncertainties in SOC budgets, especially for agricultural areas where water, wind, and tillage erosion redistribute soil and SOC. This study determined SOC patterns related to soil redistribution in small agricultural fields. Soil redistribution patterns were determined using the fallout caesium-137 technique in agricultural fields in Maryland and Iowa, USA. In two Iowa fields, SOC ranged from 0.5 to 5% whereas in the Maryland field the SOC ranged from 0.4 to 2.9%. Soil organic carbon was statistically significantly correlated with soil 137Cs inventories and soil erosion/deposition rates. Sites of soil erosion in Iowa and Maryland had significantly lower average concentrations of SOC (2.4% and 1.3%, respectively) than sites of soil deposition (3.4% and 1.6%, respectively). These studies show the impact of soil redistribution patterns, within a field or catchment, and aid in understanding SOC patterns and budgets.

  3. Laser cooling by collisional redistribution of radiation.

    PubMed

    Vogl, Ulrich; Weitz, Martin

    2009-09-03

    The general idea that optical radiation may cool matter was put forward 80 years ago. Doppler cooling of dilute atomic gases is an extremely successful application of this concept. More recently, anti-Stokes cooling in multilevel systems has been explored, culminating in the optical refrigeration of solids. Collisional redistribution of radiation has been proposed as a different cooling mechanism for atomic two-level systems, although experimental investigations using moderate-density gases have not reached the cooling regime. Here we experimentally demonstrate laser cooling of an atomic gas based on collisional redistribution of radiation, using rubidium atoms in argon buffer gas at a pressure of 230 bar. The frequent collisions in the ultradense gas transiently shift a highly red-detuned laser beam (that is, one detuned to a much lower frequency) into resonance, whereas spontaneous decay occurs close to the unperturbed atomic resonance frequency. During each excitation cycle, kinetic energy of order k(B)T-that is, the thermal energy (k(B), Boltzmann's constant; T, temperature)-is extracted from the dense atomic sample. In a proof-of-principle experiment with a thermally non-isolated sample, we demonstrate relative cooling by 66 K. The cooled gas has a density more than ten orders of magnitude greater than the typical values used in Doppler-cooling experiments, and the cooling power reaches 87 mW. Future applications of the technique may include supercooling beyond the homogeneous nucleation temperature and optical chillers.

  4. The global warming hiatus: Slowdown or redistribution?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Xiao-Hai; Boyer, Tim; Trenberth, Kevin; Karl, Thomas R.; Xie, Shang-Ping; Nieves, Veronica; Tung, Ka-Kit; Roemmich, Dean

    2016-11-01

    Global mean surface temperatures (GMST) exhibited a smaller rate of warming during 1998-2013, compared to the warming in the latter half of the 20th Century. Although, not a "true" hiatus in the strict definition of the word, this has been termed the "global warming hiatus" by IPCC (2013). There have been other periods that have also been defined as the "hiatus" depending on the analysis. There are a number of uncertainties and knowledge gaps regarding the "hiatus." This report reviews these issues and also posits insights from a collective set of diverse information that helps us understand what we do and do not know. One salient insight is that the GMST phenomenon is a surface characteristic that does not represent a slowdown in warming of the climate system but rather is an energy redistribution within the oceans. Improved understanding of the ocean distribution and redistribution of heat will help better monitor Earth's energy budget and its consequences. A review of recent scientific publications on the "hiatus" shows the difficulty and complexities in pinpointing the oceanic sink of the "missing heat" from the atmosphere and the upper layer of the oceans, which defines the "hiatus." Advances in "hiatus" research and outlooks (recommendations) are given in this report.

  5. Multilevel Radiative Transfer with Partial Frequency Redistribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uitenbroek, H.

    2001-08-01

    A multilevel accelerated lambda iteration (MALI) method for radiative transfer calculations with partial frequency redistribution (PRD) is presented. The method, which is based on Rybicki & Hummer's complete frequency redistribution (CRD) formalism with full preconditioning, consistently accounts for overlapping radiative transitions. Its extension to PRD is implemented in a very natural way through the use of the Ψ operator operating on the emissivity rather than the commonly used Λ operator, which operates on the source function. Apart from requiring an additional inner computational loop to evaluate the PRD emission-line profiles with fixed population numbers, implementation of the presented method requires only a trivial addition of computer code. Since the presented method employs a diagonal operator, it is easily extended to different geometries. Currently, it has been implemented for one-, two-, and three-dimensional Cartesian grids and spherical symmetry. In all cases, the speed of convergence with PRD is very similar to that in CRD, with the former sometimes even surpassing the latter. Sample calculations exhibiting the favorable convergence behavior of the PRD code are presented in the case of the Ca II H and K lines, the Mg II h and k lines, and the hydrogen Lyα and Lyβ lines in a one-dimensional solar model and the Ca II resonance lines in a two-dimensional flux-sheet model.

  6. Organizations of food redistribution and rescue.

    PubMed

    Mousa, T Y; Freeland-Graves, J H

    2017-09-06

    Food insecurity affects 13.4% of the USA population, despite the fact that 30-40% of all food is deposited in a landfill. Food rescue nutrition is the process of redistribution of surplus food to the impoverished. The aim of this study is to document the extent of involvement of organizations in food rescue nutrition. In this cross-sectional study, a survey about organizations involved in food rescue nutrition was developed, validated, and then tested. Directors of 100 organizations involved in food rescue nutrition from eight Southwestern States in the USA participated in this research. These organizations provided an average of 2 million kg of food to more than 40,000 clients each month. Food assistance programs had an average of eight workers and 3081 volunteers. In addition to food, these organizations provided other services such as clothing, clinical, and childcare. The agencies encountered several challenges, including lack of resources that resulted in reducing food portions and turning away clients. The extent of involvement of community-based programs in food rescue nutrition was strong in eight Southwestern states in the USA. Organizations involved in food redistribution helped alleviate food insecurity in their clients. Sustainability of these charitable networks was dependent on availability of resources and sufficient volunteers. Health professionals should encourage these organizations by providing support through donations of time, money, and/or food. Copyright © 2017 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Statistical equilibrium in simple exchange games II. The redistribution game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garibaldi, U.; Scalas, E.; Viarengo, P.

    2007-11-01

    We propose a simple stochastic exchange game mimicking taxation and redistribution. There are g agents and n coins; taxation is modeled by randomly extracting some coins; then, these coins are redistributed to agents following Polya's scheme. The individual wealth equilibrium distribution for the resulting Markov chain is the multivariate symmetric Polya distribution. In the continuum limit, the wealth distribution converges to a Gamma distribution, whose form factor is just the initial redistribution weight. The relationship between this taxation-and-redistribution scheme and other simple conservative stochastic exchange games (such as the BDY game) is discussed.

  8. CancerNet redistribution via WWW.

    PubMed Central

    Quade, G.; Püschel, N.; Far, F.

    1996-01-01

    CancerNet from the National Cancer Institute contains nearly 500 ASCII-files, updated monthly, with up-to-date information about cancer and the "Golden Standard" in tumor therapy. Perl scripts are used to convert these files to HTML-documents. A complex algorithm, using regular expression matching and extensive exception handling, detects headlines, listings and other constructs of the original ASCII-text and converts them into their HTML-counterparts. A table of contents is also created during the process. The resulting files are indexed for full-text search via WAIS. Building the complete CancerNet WWW redistribution takes less than two hours with a minimum of manual work. For 26,000 requests of information from our service per month the average costs for the worldwide delivery of one document is about 19 cents. PMID:8947697

  9. Redistribution of volatiles during lunar metamorphism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cirlin, E. H.; Housley, R. M.

    1980-01-01

    Thermal release profiles of Pb, Zn, and Cd in sample 66095 (highly shocked breccia with melt rock matrix) showed that these volatiles were mostly present on the surface of the grains. Zn in rusty grains from 66095 was also mostly surface Zn, probably from sphalerite in grain boundaries and cracks. Simulation experiments of volatile transfer showed that Fe, FeCl2, iron phosphide, and troilite (FeS) can be produced and transported during subsolidus reactions. These results suggest that volatiles, rust, schreibersite, and possible siderophiles which are observed in lunar highland samples might have been redistributed during disequilibrium thermal metamorphism in hot ejecta blankets, and were not necessarily introduced by volcanic activity or meteoritic addition.

  10. Redistribution of volatiles during lunar metamorphism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cirlin, E. H.; Housley, R. M.

    1980-01-01

    Thermal release profiles of Pb, Zn, and Cd in sample 66095 (highly shocked breccia with melt rock matrix) showed that these volatiles were mostly present on the surface of the grains. Zn in rusty grains from 66095 was also mostly surface Zn, probably from sphalerite in grain boundaries and cracks. Simulation experiments of volatile transfer showed that Fe, FeCl2, iron phosphide, and troilite (FeS) can be produced and transported during subsolidus reactions. These results suggest that volatiles, rust, schreibersite, and possible siderophiles which are observed in lunar highland samples might have been redistributed during disequilibrium thermal metamorphism in hot ejecta blankets, and were not necessarily introduced by volcanic activity or meteoritic addition.

  11. Redistribution of Carbon During Forest Blowdowns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohl, E. E.

    2013-12-01

    Numerous blowdowns in subalpine and montane forests of the Southern Rocky Mountains during the winter of 2011-12 present an opportunity to evaluate how this type of disturbance affects the distribution of organic carbon. Patch blowdowns covering 0.1 to 33 ha are an episodic event with an unknown recurrence interval. Blowdowns influence carbon partitioning in a forested ecosystem by transferring live to dead biomass and exposing soil on uprooted trees. Wood recruited to streams via blowdowns can cause channel-spanning jams that enhance overbank flows and channel avulsion in wider valley segments. This can lead to a multithread channel planform and increased floodplain storage of carbon, as well as altered stream metabolism and animal (insect and fish) production. This talk examines a 33-ha blowdown that occurred along Glacier Creek in Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado during February 2012. Estimated carbon redistribution ranged as high as 308 Mg C/ha in high-severity patches to 106 Mg C/ha in low-severity patches. Volumes of carbon redistributed from living to dead biomass at high-severity sites are close to average total biomass in subalpine forests in the region. Blowdowns are likely to increase under a warming climate as part of an accelerated disturbance regime involving intense storms and wind, wildfire, and insect infestations. The consequences for carbon partitioning across the landscape, and for riverine ecosystems, depend partly on geomorphic setting, which creates path-dependence and hysteresis. In wider valley segments, downed trees (carbon transferred to dead biomass by blowdowns) may enhance retention of carbon in transport within the stream, facilitating both burial in sedimentary reservoirs and uptake by stream organisms.

  12. Orexin-neuromodulated cerebellar circuit controls redistribution of arterial blood flows for defense behavior in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Nisimaru, Naoko; Mittal, Chetan; Shirai, Yoshinori; Sooksawate, Thongchai; Anandaraj, Prabu; Hashikawa, Tsutomu; Nagao, Soichi; Arata, Akiko; Sakurai, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Miyuki; Ito, Masao

    2013-01-01

    We investigated a unique microzone of the cerebellum located in folium-p (fp) of rabbit flocculus. In fp, Purkinje cells were potently excited by stimulation of the hypothalamus or mesencephalic periaqueductal gray, which induced defense reactions. Using multiple neuroscience techniques, we determined that this excitation was mediated via beaded axons of orexinergic hypothalamic neurons passing collaterals through the mesencephalic periaqueductal gray. Axonal tracing studies using DiI and biotinylated dextran amine evidenced the projection of fp Purkinje cells to the ventrolateral corner of the ipsilateral parabrachial nucleus (PBN). Because, in defense reactions, arterial blood flow has been known to redistribute from visceral organs to active muscles, we hypothesized that, via PBN, fp adaptively controls arterial blood flow redistribution under orexin-mediated neuromodulation that could occur in defense behavior. This hypothesis was supported by our finding that climbing fiber signals to fp Purkinje cells were elicited by stimulation of the aortic nerve, a high arterial blood pressure, or a high potassium concentration in muscles, all implying errors in the control of arterial blood flow. We further examined the arterial blood flow redistribution elicited by electric foot shock stimuli in awake, behaving rabbits. We found that systemic administration of an orexin antagonist attenuated the redistribution and that lesioning of fp caused an imbalance in the redistribution between active muscles and visceral organs. Lesioning of fp also diminished foot shock-induced increases in the mean arterial blood pressure. These results collectively support the hypothesis that the fp microcomplex adaptively controls defense reactions under orexin-mediated neuromodulation. PMID:23912185

  13. Redistribution Spurs Growth by Using a Portfolio Effect on Risky Human Capital

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, Jan; Paetzel, Fabian; Schweitzer, Frank

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate by mathematical analysis and systematic computer simulations that redistribution can lead to sustainable growth in a society. In accordance with economic models of risky human capital, we assume that dynamics of human capital is modeled as a multiplicative stochastic process which, in the long run, leads to the destruction of individual human capital. When agents are linked by fully redistributive taxation the situation might turn to individual growth in the long run. We consider that a government collects a proportion of income and reduces it by a fraction as costs for administration (efficiency losses). The remaining public good is equally redistributed to all agents. Sustainable growth is induced by redistribution despite the losses from the random growth process and despite administrative costs. Growth results from a portfolio effect. The findings are verified for three different tax schemes: proportional tax, taking proportionally more from the rich, and proportionally more from the poor. We discuss which of these tax schemes performs better with respect to maximize growth under a fixed rate of administrative costs, and the governmental income. This leads us to general conclusions about governmental decisions, the relation to public good games with free riding, and the function of taxation in a risk-taking society. PMID:23390505

  14. Angular redistribution of nonlinear perturbations: a universal feature of nonuniform flows.

    PubMed

    Horton, W; Kim, J-H; Chagelishvili, G D; Bowman, J C; Lominadze, J G

    2010-06-01

    Classically, the net action of nonlinear turbulent processes is interpreted as either a direct or inverse cascade. However, in nonuniform/shear flows the dominant process is a nonlinear redistribution over wave number angle of perturbation spatial Fourier harmonics. We call this process a nonlinear transverse redistribution (NTR). This phenomenon is demonstrated for a simple two-dimensional constant shear (non-normal) flow by numerically simulating the nonlinear dynamics of coherent and stochastic vortical perturbations in the flow. NTR is a general feature of nonlinear processes that should manifest itself in nonuniform engineering, environmental, and astrophysical flows. The conventional characterization of turbulence in terms of direct and inverse cascades, which ignores NTR, appears to be misleading for shear flow turbulence. We focus on the action of nonlinear processes on the spectral energy. NTR redistributes perturbations over different quadrants of the wave number plane and the interplay of this nonlinear redistribution with linear phenomena becomes intricate: it can realize either positive or negative feedback. In the case of positive feedback, it repopulates the quadrants in wave number space where the shear flow induces linear transient growth.

  15. Redistribution of soil water by lateral roots mediated by stem tissues.

    PubMed

    Burgess, S S O; Bleby, T M

    2006-01-01

    Evidence is increasing to suggest that a major activity of roots is to redistribute soil water. Roots in hydraulic contact with soil generally either absorb or lose water, depending on the direction of the gradient in water potential between root and soil. This leads to phenomena such as "hydraulic lift" where dry upper soil layers drive water transfer from deep moist layers to the shallow rhizosphere and, after rain or surface irrigation, an opposite, downward water transfer. These transport processes appear important in environments where rainfall is strongly seasonal (e.g. Mediterranean-type climates). Irrigation can also induce horizontal transfers of water between lateral roots. Compared with transpiration, the magnitudes, pathways, and resistances of these redistribution processes are poorly understood. Field evidence from semi-arid eucalyptus woodlands is presented to show: (i) water is rapidly exchanged among lateral roots following rain events, at rates much faster than previously described for other types of hydraulic redistribution using sap flow methods; (ii) large axial flows moving vertically up or down the stem are associated with the horizontal transfer of water between roots on opposite sides of the stem. It appears that considerable portions of the stem axis become involved in the redistribution of water between lateral roots because of partial sectoring of the xylem around the circumference of these trees.

  16. Redistribution spurs growth by using a portfolio effect on risky human capital.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Jan; Paetzel, Fabian; Schweitzer, Frank

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate by mathematical analysis and systematic computer simulations that redistribution can lead to sustainable growth in a society. In accordance with economic models of risky human capital, we assume that dynamics of human capital is modeled as a multiplicative stochastic process which, in the long run, leads to the destruction of individual human capital. When agents are linked by fully redistributive taxation the situation might turn to individual growth in the long run. We consider that a government collects a proportion of income and reduces it by a fraction as costs for administration (efficiency losses). The remaining public good is equally redistributed to all agents. Sustainable growth is induced by redistribution despite the losses from the random growth process and despite administrative costs. Growth results from a portfolio effect. The findings are verified for three different tax schemes: proportional tax, taking proportionally more from the rich, and proportionally more from the poor. We discuss which of these tax schemes performs better with respect to maximize growth under a fixed rate of administrative costs, and the governmental income. This leads us to general conclusions about governmental decisions, the relation to public good games with free riding, and the function of taxation in a risk-taking society.

  17. Redistributing Wealth to Families: The Advantages of the MYRIADE Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Legendre, Francois; Lorgnet, Jean-Paul; Thibault, Florence

    2005-01-01

    This study aims to shed light on the main characteristics of the French system for redistributing wealth to families through tax revenues and social transfers. For the purposes of this exercise, the authors used the MYRIADE microsimulation model, which covers most of the redistribution system, though it is limited to monetary flows such as family…

  18. Gravitropism: interaction of sensitivity modulation and effector redistribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, M. L.

    1991-01-01

    Our increasing capabilities for quantitative hormone analysis and automated high resolution growth studies have allowed a reassessment of the classical Cholodny-Went hypothesis of gravitropism. According to this hypothesis, gravity induces redistribution of auxin toward the lower side of the organ and this causes the growth asymmetry that leads to reorientation. Arguments against the Cholodny-Went hypothesis that were based primarily on concerns over the timing and magnitude of the development of hormone asymmetry are countered by recent evidence that such asymmetry develops early and is sufficiently large to account for curvature. Thus, it appears that the Cholodny-Went hypothesis is fundamentally valid. However, recent comparative studies of the kinetics of curvature and the timing of the development of hormone asymmetry indicate that this hypothesis alone cannot account for the intricacies of the gravitropic response. It appears that time-dependent gravity-induced changes in hormone sensitivity as well as changes in sensitivity of the gravity receptor play important roles in the response.

  19. Fluorescence imaging of lattice re-distribution on step-index direct laser written Nd:YAG waveguide lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Martínez de Mendívil, Jon; Pérez Delgado, Alberto; Lifante, Ginés; Jaque, Daniel; Ródenas, Airán; Benayas, Antonio; Aguiló, Magdalena; Diaz, Francesc; Kar, Ajoy K.

    2015-01-14

    The laser performance and crystalline micro-structural properties of near-infrared step-index channel waveguides fabricated inside Neodymium doped YAG laser ceramics by means of three-dimensional sub-picosecond pulse laser direct writing are reported. Fluorescence micro-mapping of the waveguide cross-sections reveals that an essential crystal lattice re-distribution has been induced after short pulse irradiation. Such lattice re-distribution is evidenced at the waveguide core corresponding to the laser written refractive index increased volume. The waveguides core surroundings also present diverse changes including slight lattice disorder and bi-axial strain fields. The step-index waveguide laser performance is compared with previous laser fabricated waveguides with a stress-optic guiding mechanism in absence of laser induced lattice re-distribution.

  20. Redistribution of fast ions during sawtooth reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaulmes, F.; Westerhof, E.; de Blank, H. J.

    2014-10-01

    In a tokamak-based fusion power plant, possible scenarios may include regulated sawtooth oscillations to remove thermalized helium from the core of the plasma. During a sawtooth crash, the helium ash and other impurities trapped in the core are driven by the instability to an outer region. However, in a fusion plasma, high energy ions will represent a significant population. We thus study the behaviour of these energetic particles during a sawtooth. This paper presents the modelling of the redistribution of fast ions during a sawtooth reconnection event in a tokamak plasma. Along the lines of the model for the evolution of the flux surfaces during a sawtooth collapse described in Ya.I. Kolesnichenko and Yu.V. Yakovenko 1996 Nucl. Fusion 36 159, we have built a time-dependent electromagnetic model of a sawtooth reconnection. The trajectories of the ions are described by a complete gyro-orbit integration. The fast particles were evolved from specific initial parameters (given energy and uniform spread in pitch) or distributed initially according to a slowing-down distribution created by fusion reactions. Our modelling is used to understand the main equilibrium parameters driving the motions during the collapse and to determine the evolution of the distribution function of energetic ions when different geometries of reconnection are considered.

  1. A field study of unstable preferential flow during soil water redistribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhi; Wu, Laosheng; Harter, Thomas; Lu, Jianhang; Jury, William A.

    2003-04-01

    Reversal of the matric potential gradient during redistribution of soil water following infiltration has been hypothesized as a cause of preferential flow by inducing a fluid instability at the leading edge of the wetting front. In this paper, we present results of 17 field experiments carried out to quantify the effects of redistribution on preferential flow in nonstructured soils. The experiments were performed in three field soils (Superstition sand, Delhi sand, and Hanford sandy loam) under saturating and nonsaturating water application rates. Water flow patterns were monitored at various times during redistribution with photography using anionic dyes and by intensive core sampling of bromide added during infiltration. The soil surface was either tilled or undisturbed, exposed or covered with a plastic membrane, and the top 20-cm fine layer was either left in place or removed in various treatments. The infiltration water containing tracers was applied continuously and uniformly to the surface of a 2 × 1.2 m2 field plot using a moving spray system. After the soil received 8 to 20 cm of water, a trench was dug adjacent to the plot and vertical soil profiles were exposed at different times and positions to visualize the redistribution process. Some profiles were intensively sampled by soil coring along the trench face and analyzed for water content and bromide concentration to quantify the redistribution of water in the wetted zones. The observed two- and three-dimensional distribution of the water tracers clearly indicated the development of unstable flow during redistribution in two of the three soil types studied but not in the coarsest-textured Superstition sand. Symptoms of instability included irregularly shaped fingers that tended to become narrower toward their tips, isolated patches, and highly concentrated areas of the tracers indicating signs of converging and intermittent flow. The measured tortuosity of the wetting front was near 1.0 at the end of

  2. Soil and soil organic carbon redistribution on the landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritchie, Jerry C.; McCarty, Gregory W.; Venteris, Erik R.; Kaspar, T. C.

    2007-09-01

    Patterns of soil organic carbon (SOC) vary widely across the landscape leading to large uncertainties in the SOC budget especially for agricultural landscapes where water, tillage and wind erosion redistributes soil and SOC across the landscape. It is often assumed that soil erosion results in a loss of SOC from the agricultural ecosystem but recent studies indicate that soil erosion and its subsequent redistribution within fields can stimulate carbon sequestration in agricultural ecosystems. This study investigates the relationship between SOC and soil redistribution patterns on agricultural landscapes. Soil redistribution (erosion and deposition) patterns were estimated in three tilled agricultural fields using the fallout 137Cesium technique. 137Cs and SOC concentrations of upland soils are significantly correlated in our study areas. Upland areas (eroding) have significantly less SOC than soils in deposition areas. SOC decreased as gradient slope increases and soils on concave slopes had higher SOC than soils on convex slopes. These data suggest that soil redistribution patterns and topographic patterns may be used to help understand SOC dynamics on the landscape. Different productivity and oxidation rates of SOC of eroded versus deposited soils also contribute to SOC spatial patterns. However, the strong significant relationships between soil redistribution and SOC concentrations in the upland soil suggest that they are moving along similar physical pathways in these systems. Our study also indicates that geomorphic position is important for understanding soil movement and redistribution patterns within a field or watershed. Such information can help develop or implement management systems to increase SOC in agricultural ecosystems.

  3. The impact of soil redistribution on SOC pools in a Mediterranean agroforestry catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quijano, Laura; Gaspar, Leticia; Lizaga, Iván; Navas, Ana

    2017-04-01

    Soil redistribution processes play an important role influencing the spatial distribution patterns of soil and associated soil organic carbon (SOC) at landscape scale. Information on drivers of SOC dynamics is key for evaluating both soil degradation and SOC stability that can affect soil quality and sustainability. 137Cs measurements provide a very effective tool to infer spatial patterns of soil redistribution and quantify soil redistribution rates in different landscapes, but to date these data are scarce in mountain Mediterranean agroecosystems. We evaluate the effect of soil redistribution on SOC and SOC pools in relation to land use in a Mediterranean mountain catchment (246 ha). To this purpose, two hundred and four soil bulk cores were collected on a 100 m grid in the Estaña lakes catchment located in the central sector of the Spanish Pyrenees (31T 4656250N 295152E). The study area is an agroforestry and endorheic catchment characterized by the presence of evaporite dissolution induced dolines, some of which host permanent lakes. The selected landscape is representative of rainfed areas of Mediterranean continental climate with erodible lithology and shallow soils, and characterized by an intense anthropogenic activity through cultivation and water management. The cultivated and uncultivated areas are heterogeneously distributed. SOC and SOC pools (the active and decomposable fraction, ACF and the stable carbon fraction SCF) were measured by the dry combustion method and soil redistribution rates were derived from 137Cs measurements. The results showed that erosion predominated in the catchment, most of soil samples were identified as eroded sites (n=114) with an average erosion rate of 26.9±51.4 Mg ha-1 y-1 whereas the mean deposition rate was 13.0±24.2 Mg ha-1 y-1. In cultivated soils (n=54) the average of soil erosion rate was significantly higher (78.5±74.4 Mg ha-1 y-1) than in uncultivated soils (6.8±10.4 Mg ha-1 y-1). Similarly, the mean of soil

  4. Redistribution of intertidal sediment contaminants by microphytobenthos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Amani; Copplestone, David; Tyler, Andrew; Smith, Nick; Sneddon, Christopher

    2014-05-01

    Microphytobenthos (MPB) is a mixed community of microscopic algae inhabiting the top few millimetres of bottom sediment in the intertidal zone. It is a key component of the estuarine ecosystem, interacting with the sediment and fauna to influence sediment distribution and resuspension and forming the base of the estuarine food chain. Estuarine sediments, with which the MPB is closely associated, are a significant sink for contaminants from both fluvial and marine sources. Algae are known to have the capacity to take up contaminants, and the phytoplankton has been well studied in this respect, however there has been little research involving MPB. The extent to which contaminant uptake by MPB occurs and under what conditions is therefore very poorly understood. It seems probable that the paucity of research in this area is due to the complexity of the bioavailability of contaminants in the intertidal zone coupled with difficulties in separating MPB from the sediment. A series of experiments are proposed in which we will investigate (at a range of spatial scales) contaminant partitioning in the presence of MPB; the effect of changing temperatures on contaminant uptake and toxicity to MPB; effects of sediment resuspension on contaminant availability and uptake to MPB; and the uptake of contaminants from MPB to molluscs. A mesocosm (or experimental enclosure) is being constructed to replicate the natural system and enable manipulation of conditions of interest. This will attain greater realism than laboratory toxicity tests, with more statistical power than can be achieved through field studies. By gaining a better understanding of processes governing contaminant bioavailability and mechanisms for uptake by MPB it will be possible to relate these to projected climate change effects and ascertain potential consequences for contaminant redistribution.

  5. Water savings of redistributing global crop production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Kyle; Seveso, Antonio; Rulli, Maria Cristina; D'Odorico, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    Human demand for crop production is expected to increase substantially in the coming decades as a result of population growth, richer diets and biofuel use. For food production to keep pace, unprecedented amounts of resources - water, fertilizers, energy - will be required. This has led to calls for 'sustainable intensification' in which yields are increased on existing croplands while seeking to minimize impacts on water and other agricultural resources. Recent studies have quantified aspects of this, showing that there is a large potential to improve crop yields and increase harvest frequencies to better meet human demand. Though promising, both solutions would necessitate large additional inputs of water and fertilizer in order to be achieved under current technologies. However, the question of whether the current distribution of crops is, in fact, the best for realizing maximized production has not been considered to date. To this end, we ask: Is it possible to minimize water demand by simply growing crops where soil and climate conditions are best suited? Here we use maps of agro-ecological suitability - a measure of physical and chemical soil fertility - for 15 major food crops to identify differences between current crop distributions and where they can most suitably be planted. By redistributing crops across currently cultivated lands, we determine what distribution of crops would maintain current calorie production and agricultural value while minimizing the water demand of crop production. In doing this, our study provides a novel tool for policy makers and managers to integrate food security, environmental sustainability, and rural livelihoods by improving the use of freshwater resources without compromising crop calorie production or rural livelihoods.

  6. Thermal tolerance and the global redistribution of animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunday, Jennifer M.; Bates, Amanda E.; Dulvy, Nicholas K.

    2012-09-01

    The redistribution of life on Earth has emerged as one of the most significant biological responses to anthropogenic climate warming. Despite being one of the most long-standing puzzles in ecology, we still have little understanding of how temperature sets geographic range boundaries. Here we show that marine and terrestrial ectotherms differ in the degree to which they fill their potential latitudinal ranges, as predicted from their thermal tolerance limits. Marine ectotherms more fully occupy the extent of latitudes tolerable within their thermal tolerance limits, and are consequently predicted to expand at their poleward range boundaries and contract at their equatorward boundaries with climate warming. In contrast, terrestrial ectotherms are excluded from the warmest regions of their latitudinal range; thus, the equatorward, or `trailing' range boundaries, may not shift consistently towards the poles with climate warming. Using global observations of climate-induced range shifts, we test this prediction and show that in the ocean, shifts at both range boundaries have been equally responsive, whereas on land, equatorward range boundaries have lagged in response to climate warming. These results indicate that marine species' ranges conform more closely to their limits of thermal tolerance, and thus range shifts will be more predictable and coherent. However, on land, warmer range boundaries are not at equilibrium with heat tolerance. Understanding the relative contribution of factors other than temperature in controlling equatorward range limits is critical for predicting distribution changes, with implications for population and community viability.

  7. Shank2 redistributes with NaPilla during regulated endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Dobrinskikh, Evgenia; Giral, Hector; Caldas, Yupanqui A.; Levi, Moshe

    2010-01-01

    Serum phosphate levels are acutely impacted by the abundance of sodium-phosphate cotransporter IIa (NaPiIIa) in the apical membrane of renal proximal tubule cells. PSD-95/Disks Large/Zonula Occludens (PDZ) domain-containing proteins bind NaPiIIa and likely contribute to the delivery, retention, recovery, and trafficking of NaPiIIa. Shank2 is a distinctive PDZ domain protein that binds NaPiIIa. Its role in regulating NaPiIIa activity, distribution, and abundance is unknown. In the present in vivo study, rats were maintained on a low-phosphate diet, and then plasma phosphate levels were acutely elevated by high-phosphate feeding to induce the recovery, endocytosis, and degradation of NaPiIIa. Western blot analysis of renal cortical tissue from rats given high-phosphate feed showed NaPiIIa and Shank2 underwent degradation. Quantitative immunofluorescence analyses, including microvillar versus intracellular intensity ratios and intensity correlation quotients, showed that Shank2 redistributed with NaPiIIa during the time course of NaPiIIa endocytosis. Furthermore, NaPiIIa and Shank2 trafficked through distinct endosomal compartments (clathrin, early endosomes, lysosomes) with the same temporal pattern. These in vivo findings indicate that Shank2 is positioned to coordinate the regulated endocytic retrieval and downregulation of NaPiIIa in rat renal proximal tubule cells. PMID:20810910

  8. On the redistribution of 6Li+ ions implanted into polypropylene foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, D.; Behar, M.; Kaschny, J.; Klette, R.; Chadderton, L. T.; Hnatowicz, V.; Vacik, J.; Wang, L.

    1996-04-01

    6Li+ (150 keV) was implanted into thin polypropylene foils at fluences of 1 x 1013 to 1 x 1014 cm-2. Subsequent neutron depth profiling measurements of the Li distributions revealed considerable deviations from the expected ballistic range profiles. This Li redistribution was simulated by a numerical computer calculation. The best fit between measurements and simulations was obtained by assuming that ( i) Li redistributes immediately after its ballistic slowing-down, ( ii) the Li mobility is enhanced in the radiation-damaged polymer region, the local diffusion enhancement being controlled by the target's electronic damage, ( iii) mobile Li is readily trapped at radiation-induced defects, their density being proportional to the target's electronic damage, ( iv) these traps are saturable ones, and ( v) Li migration is not restricted to the ion track region, but proceeds also through the neighboring unirradiated bulk, though with slower speed.

  9. Spatial characterization of localized charge trapping and charge redistribution in the NROM device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shappir, Assaf; Levy, David; Shacham-Diamand, Yosi; Lusky, Eli; Bloom, Ilan; Eitan, Boaz

    2004-09-01

    This paper discusses the spatial characterization and redistribution of hot carriers injected into the gate dielectric stack of the NROM localized charge trapping non-volatile memory device. The spatial characterization is based on a novel experimental method, which combines subthreshold and gate-induced-drain-leakage current measurements with two-dimensional drift diffusion simulations. It is shown that electron and hole trapping takes place in a narrow region near the drain junction, with a ˜20 nm tail situated above the transistor channel. The ability to adjust the hole injection location was demonstrated by characterizing trapped hole distributions following erasure under two different bias conditions. The NROM cell erase state threshold voltage drift is spatially quantified and shown to be a manifestation of lateral charge redistribution originating from the mismatch between the trapped electron and hole distributions inside the gate dielectric stack. The charge localization concept is shown to allow NROM technology to achieve both excellent scalability and high reliability.

  10. 76 FR 62642 - Digital Broadcast Television Redistribution Control; Corrections

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Digital Broadcast Television Redistribution Control; Corrections AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Technical amendment. SUMMARY: The Federal Communications Commission (FCC)...

  11. Thallium-201 myocardial redistribution imaging 24 hours following stress exercise

    SciTech Connect

    Wiener, S.N.; Flynn, M.J.; Edelstein, J.

    1981-03-01

    Twenty-four-hour 201-thallium chloride redistribution images in conjunction with immediate postexercise images were evaluated to determine their value in distinguishing coronary artery ischemia from remote infarction. Cardiac angiography, including selective right and left coronary angiography and left ventriculography, was also performed. For 43 patients with a prevalence of coronary artery disease of 0.58, 24-h redistribution images indicated the presence of remote infraction with a predictive value of 0.75 and the absence of infarction with a predictive value of 0.92. Twenty-four-hour redistribution images are considered to be clinically efficacious, convenient for scheduling purposes, and useful as an alternative to other redistribution intervals.

  12. Microcirculatory responses of sacral tissue in healthy individuals and inpatients on different pressure-redistribution mattresses.

    PubMed

    Bergstrand, S; Källman, U; Ek, A-C; Engström, M; Lindgren, M

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the interaction between interface pressure, pressure-induced vasodilation, and reactive hyperaemia with different pressure-redistribution mattresses. A cross-sectional study was performed with a convenience sample of healthy young individuals, and healthy older individuals and inpatients, at a university hospital in Sweden. Blood flow was measured at depths of 1mm, 2mm, and 10mm using laser Doppler flowmetry and photoplethysmography. The blood flow, interface pressure and skin temperature were measured in the sacral tissue before, during, and after load while lying on one standard hospital mattress and three different pressure-redistribution mattresses. There were significant differences between the average sacral pressure, peak sacral pressure, and local probe pressure on the three pressure-redistribution mattresses, the lowest values found were with the visco-elastic foam/air mattress (23.5 ± 2.5mmHg, 49.3 ± 11.1mmHg, 29.2 ± 14.0mmHg, respectively). Blood flow, measured as pressure-induced vasodilation, was most affected in the visco-elastic foam/air group compared to the alternating pressure mattress group at tissue depths of 2mm (39.0% and 20.0%, respectively), and 10mm (56.9 % and 35.1%, respectively). Subjects in all three groups, including healthy 18-65 year olds, were identified with no pressure-induced vasodilation or reactive hyperaemia on any mattress (n=11), which is considered a high-risk blood flow response. Interface pressure magnitudes considered not harmful during pressure-exposure on different pressure-redistribution mattresses can affect the microcirculation in different tissue structures. Despite having the lowest pressure values compared with the other mattresses, the visco-elastic foam/air mattress had the highest proportion of subjects with decreased blood flow. Healthy young individuals were identified with the high-risk blood flow response, suggesting an innate vulnerability to pressure exposure

  13. Debris Flow Models With Vertical Redistribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mcelwaine, J. N.; Kowalski, J.

    2011-12-01

    The destructive power of debris flows is enormous and hence there is a need for quantitative models that can accurately describe their behavior and predict their flow paths, heights, velocities and corresponding impact pressures. The dynamics of a debris flows is effected by the pore pressure, which can be measured in experiments and in the field, but existing theories to not model this well. We introduce a new class of shallow debris flow models that includes an equation for the vertical distribution of material and show how this gives predictions of the pore pressure and can effect flow mobility. Debris flows exhibit different flow forms depending on water and solid concentration, particle size distribution and the topography of the flow path. The complex interplay between the fluid and solids of a whole range of different grain sizes leads to physical phenomena such as the development of a front with large boulders, lateral levee formation and, due to a varying fraction of particles being in suspension, an effective basal fluid pressure that can exceed the pure fluids hydrostatic pressure. Large scale debris flow data of the Illgraben torrent, Switzerland, show that a varying basal fluid pressure is characteristic for the snout of debris flows with a granular front and significantly affects basal shear stresses. A comprehensive mathematical debris flow model that explains all the observed phenomena will be extremely complicated; if it is achievable at all. However, promising approaches exist that successfully describe some of the effects in simple situations. Yet the observed basal fluid pressure data in granular front flows is not explained satisfactorily up to this point. One reason for this is that any change of the effective basal fluid pressure is associated with an internal redistribution of the solids above, and hence is caused by relative motion between the phases within the flowing body. However, this inter-component slip is usually neglected in the

  14. Storm-induced redistribution of deepwater sediments in Lake Ontario

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Halfman, J.D.; Dittman, D.E.; Owens, R.W.; Etherington, M.D.

    2006-01-01

    High-resolution seismic reflection profiles, side-scan sonar profiles, and surface sediment analyses for grain size (% sand, silt & clay), total organic carbon content, and carbonate content along shore-perpendicular transects offshore of Olcott and Rochester in Lake Ontario were utilized to investigate cm-thick sands or absence of deep-water postglacial sediments in water depths of 130 to 165 m. These deepwater sands were observed as each transect approached and occupied the "sills," identified by earlier researchers, between the three deepest basins of the lake. The results reveal thin (0 to 5-cm) postglacial sediments, lake floor lineations, and sand-rich, organic, and carbonate poor sediments at the deepwater sites (> 130 m) along both transects at depths significantly below wave base, epilimnetic currents, and internal wave activity. These sediments are anomalous compared to shallower sediments observed in this study and deeper sediments reported by earlier research, and are interpreted to indicate winnowing and resuspension of the postglacial muds. We hypothesize that the mid-lake confluence of the two-gyre surface current system set up by strong storm events extends down to the lake floor when the lake is isothermal, and resuspends and winnows lake floor sediment at these locations. Furthermore, we believe that sedimentation is more likely to be influenced by bottom currents at these at these sites than in the deeper basins because these sites are located on bathymetric highs between deeper depositional basins of the lake, and the bathymetric constriction may intensify any bottom current activity at these sites.

  15. Spherulite Crystallization Induces Fe-Redox Redistribution in Silicic Melt

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, J.; Cottrell, E; Tuffen, H; Logan, A; Kelley, K

    2009-01-01

    Rhyolitic obsidians from Krafla volcano, Iceland, record the interaction between mobile hydrous species liberated during crystal growth and the reduction of ferric iron in the silicate melt. We performed synchrotron {mu}-FTIR and {mu}-XANES measurements along a transect extending from a spherulite into optically distinct colorless and brown glass zones. Measurements show that the colorless glass is enriched in OH groups and depleted in ferric iron, while the brown glass shows the opposite relationship. The color shift between brown and clear glass is sharp, suggesting that the colorless glass zone was produced by a redox front that originated from the spherulite margin and moved through surrounding melt during crystallization. We conclude that the most likely reducing agent is hydrogen, produced by magnetite crystallization within the spherulite. The Krafla obsidians dramatically capture redox disequilibrium on the micoscale and highlight the importance of hydrous fluid liberation and late-stage crystallization to the redox signature of glassy lavas.

  16. 43 CFR 44.52 - May a State enact legislation to reallocate or redistribute PILT payments?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... reallocate or redistribute PILT payments? 44.52 Section 44.52 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary... redistribute PILT payments? A State may enact legislation to reallocate or redistribute PILT payments. If a... redistributing payments to smaller units of general local government (see 31 U.S.C. 6907); (b) Provide the...

  17. Load redistribution rules for progressive failure in shallow landslides: Threshold mechanical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Linfeng; Lehmann, Peter; Or, Dani

    2017-01-01

    Rainfall-induced landslides are often preceded by progressive failures that culminate in abrupt mass release. Local failure progression is captured by a landslide hydro-mechanical triggering model that represents the soil mantle as interacting columns linked by tensile and compressive mechanical "bonds." Mechanical bonds may fail at a prescribed threshold leaving a modeling challenge of how to redistribute their load to neighboring intact soil columns. We employed an elastic spring-block model to analytically derive redistribution rules defined by the stiffness ratio of compressive to tensile bonds. These linear-elastic rules were generalized to real soil using measurable Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio. Results indicate that "local" failure characteristics of ductile-like soils (e.g., clay) are reproduced by low stiffness ratios, whereas "global" failure of brittle sandy soils corresponds to large stiffness ratios. Systematic analyses yield guidelines for selecting load redistribution rules for failure of geological materials and mass-movement phenomena represented by discrete threshold-mechanics.

  18. Overload cascading failure on complex networks with heterogeneous load redistribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Yueyi; Xing, Xiaoyun; Li, Menghui; Zeng, An; Wang, Yougui

    2017-09-01

    Many real systems including the Internet, power-grid and financial networks experience rare but large overload cascading failures triggered by small initial shocks. Many models on complex networks have been developed to investigate this phenomenon. Most of these models are based on the load redistribution process and assume that the load on a failed node shifts to nearby nodes in the networks either evenly or according to the load distribution rule before the cascade. Inspired by the fact that real power-grid tends to place the excess load on the nodes with high remaining capacities, we study a heterogeneous load redistribution mechanism in a simplified sandpile model in this paper. We find that weak heterogeneity in load redistribution can effectively mitigate the cascade while strong heterogeneity in load redistribution may even enlarge the size of the final failure. With a parameter θ to control the degree of the redistribution heterogeneity, we identify a rather robust optimal θ∗ = 1. Finally, we find that θ∗ tends to shift to a larger value if the initial sand distribution is homogeneous.

  19. Charge redistribution and photoacidity: Neutral versus cationic photoacids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spry, D. B.; Fayer, M. D.

    2008-02-01

    A series of pyrene photoacids is used to investigate excited-state proton transfer with time-dependent pump-probe spectroscopy. The deprotonation dynamics of a cationic photoacid, 8-aminopyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonic acid trisodium salt (APTS), shows single exponential dynamics(˜30ps) in water. This is in contrast to what is observed for the neutral photoacids 8-hydroxypyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonic acid trisodium salt (HPTS) and 8-hydroxy-N,N,N',N',N″,N″-hexamethylpyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonamide, which display biexponential dynamics. For the cationic photoacid, the vast majority of the intramolecular charge redistribution does not occur in the protonated state. Instead, the charge redistribution, which is responsible for the photoacidity and the observed spectroscopic changes, occurs primarily following the excited-state proton transfer. The lack of charge redistribution prior to proton transfer causes APTS to display single exponential kinetics. In contrast, the dynamics for the neutral photoacids are multiexponential because major charge redistribution precedes proton transfer followed by additional charge redistribution that accompanies proton transfer. Previous studies of HPTS in water are discussed in terms of the results presented here.

  20. Charge redistribution and photoacidity: Neutral versus cationic photoacids

    SciTech Connect

    Spry, D. B.; Fayer, M. D.

    2008-02-28

    A series of pyrene photoacids is used to investigate excited-state proton transfer with time-dependent pump-probe spectroscopy. The deprotonation dynamics of a cationic photoacid, 8-aminopyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonic acid trisodium salt (APTS), shows single exponential dynamics({approx}30 ps) in water. This is in contrast to what is observed for the neutral photoacids 8-hydroxypyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonic acid trisodium salt (HPTS) and 8-hydroxy-N,N,N{sup '},N{sup '},N{sup ''},N{sup ''}-hexamethylpyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonamide, which display biexponential dynamics. For the cationic photoacid, the vast majority of the intramolecular charge redistribution does not occur in the protonated state. Instead, the charge redistribution, which is responsible for the photoacidity and the observed spectroscopic changes, occurs primarily following the excited-state proton transfer. The lack of charge redistribution prior to proton transfer causes APTS to display single exponential kinetics. In contrast, the dynamics for the neutral photoacids are multiexponential because major charge redistribution precedes proton transfer followed by additional charge redistribution that accompanies proton transfer. Previous studies of HPTS in water are discussed in terms of the results presented here.

  1. Ionizing radiation damage to cells: effects of cell cycle redistribution.

    PubMed

    Chen, P L; Brenner, D J; Sachs, R K

    1995-04-01

    If a population of cycling cells is exposed to a fixed dose of ionizing radiation delivered over time T, it is sometimes observed that increasing T increases the amount of cell killing. This is essentially because at first the radiation preferentially kills cells in a sensitive portion of the cycle and the surviving, more resistant cells then have time to reach more sensitive stages. We refer to this effect as population resensitization, caused by redistribution within the cell cycle. We investigate the effect theoretically by employing the McKendrick-von Foerster equation for age-structured proliferating cell populations, generalized by introducing a radiation damage term. Within our formalism, we show that population resensitization occurs whenever: (a) prior to irradiation the cell population has the stable age-distribution approached asymptotically by an unirradiated population, and (b) T is sufficiently small. Examples and other cases are outlined. The methods of Volterra integral equations, renewal theory, and positive semigroup theory are applied. The effect of varying T is evaluated by considering the ultimate amplitude of the stable age-distribution population at times much greater than both the irradiation duration and the average cell-cycle time. The main biological limitations of the formalism are the following: considering only radiation damage which is not subject to enzymatic repair or quadratic misrepair, using an overly naive method of ensuring loss of cell cycle synchrony, neglecting nonlinear effects such as density inhibition of growth, and neglecting radiatively induced perturbations of the cell cycle. Possible methods for removing these limitations are briefly discussed.

  2. Postmortem redistribution mechanism of donepezil in the rat.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Sayaka; Katagiri, Nobuyuki; Nara, Akina; Chiba, Fumiko; Kubo, Yuko; Torimitsu, Suguru; Yajima, Daisuke; Akutsu, Mamoru; Iwase, Hirotaro

    2016-09-01

    Population aging is rapidly advancing in numerous parts of the world and, accordingly, the prevalence of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is rising. The safety of donepezil (DPZ), which is used for AD treatment, has been established in clinical trials. However, some studies have indicated that DPZ may be associated with severe cardiac side effects, and excessive doses may induce toxicity-related symptoms or death. Therefore, the measurement of blood DPZ levels is important for the postmortem investigation of related causes of death. However, postmortem drug concentrations in the blood may not always reflect those obtained antemortem because of the postmortem redistribution (PMR) of drugs. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the potential PMR of DPZ using a rat model. The DPZ concentration was measured using a validated HPLC/Q-TOF-MS system in cardiac and peripheral blood, and in the brain, lungs, myocardium, liver, and thigh muscle at different postmortem intervals (0, 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24h). Overall, the DPZ tissue to peripheral blood ratio decreased throughout the postmortem period. Furthermore, the DPZ concentration increased in the peripheral and cardiac blood but decreased in both of the lungs, postmortem. Furthermore, the blood pH was significantly lowered. We used a perfusion approach to examine the rat lung and heart to further investigate the relationship between the pH and DPZ release from the lungs. The outflow concentrations when the inflow pH changed from 7.4 to 5.5 were approximately 2-fold higher than the inflow pH fixed 7.4. These findings suggest that the antemortem accumulated DPZ in the lungs is released into the pulmonary blood owing to postmortem acidification of blood, and subsequently flows into the cardiac blood, leading to the observed increase in concentration. Although we could not determine the underlying mechanism, we confirmed that PMR occurs similarly in the cardiac and peripheral blood. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier

  3. Medicare financing and redistribution in british columbia, 1992 and 2002.

    PubMed

    McGrail, Kimberlyn

    2007-05-01

    Equity in healthcare in British Columbia is defined as the provision of services based on need rather than ability to pay and a separation of contributions to financing from the use of services. Physician and hospital services in Canada are financed mainly through general tax revenues, and there is a perception that this financing is progressive. This paper uses Gini coefficients, concentration indexes and Kakwani indexes of progressivity to assess the progressivity of medicare financing in British Columbia in 1992 and 2002. It also measures the overall redistributive effect of medicare services, considering both contributions to financing and use of hospital and physician services. The conclusion is that medicare does redistribute across income groups, but this redistribution is the result solely of the positive correlation between health status and income; financing is nearly proportionate across income groups, but use is higher among lower-income groups. Informed public debate requires a better understanding of these concepts of equity.

  4. Collisional redistribution effects on x-ray laser saturation behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, J.A.; MacGowan, B.J.; Da Silva, L.B.; Matthews, D.J.; Lee, R.W.; London, R.A.; Mrowka, S.; Underwood, J.H.; Batson, P.J.

    1994-06-01

    We recently published a detailed summary of our experimental and theoretical research on Ne-like Se x-ray laser line widths, and one of our conclusions was that collisional redistribution rates are likely to have an effect on the saturation behavior of the 206.4 {angstrom} Se x-ray laser. In this paper we focus on the effects of collisional redistribution on x-ray laser gain coefficients, and discuss ways of including these effects in existing laser line- transfer models.

  5. Heat and salt redistribution within the Mediterranean basin in the Med-CORDEX model ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llasses, Josep; Jordà, Gabriel; Gomis, Damià; Adloff, Fanny; Macías, Diego; Harzallah, Ali; Arsouze, Thomas; Akthar, Naveed; Li, Laurent; Elizalde, Alberto; Sannino, Gianmaria

    2016-04-01

    Characterizing and understanding the basic functioning of the Mediterranean Sea in terms of heat and salt redistribution within the basin is a crucial issue to predict its evolution. Here we quantify and analyze the heat and salt transfers using a simple box model consisting of 4 layers in the vertical for each of the two (western and eastern) sub-basins. Namely, we box-average 14 regional simulations of the MedCORDEX ensemble plus a regional and a global reanalysis, computing for each of them the heat and salt exchanges between layers. First, we analyze in detail the heat and salt redistribution at different time scales from the outputs of a single simulation (NEMOMED8). We show that in the western basin the transfer between the surface (0-150m) and intermediate (150-600 m) layers is upwards for both heat and salt, while in the eastern basin both transfers are downwards. A feature common to both sub-basins is that the transports are smaller in summer than in winter due to the enhanced stratification, which dampen the mixing between layers. From the comparison of the 16 simulations we observe that the spread between models is much larger than the ensemble average for the salt transfer and for the heat transfer between the surface and intermediate layers. At lower layers there is a set of models showing a good agreement between them, while others are not correlated with any other. The mechanisms behind the ensemble spread are not straightforward. First, to have a coarse resolution prevents the model to correctly represent the heat and salt redistribution in the basin. Second, those models with a very different initial stratification also show a very different redistribution, especially at intermediate and deep layers. Finally, the assimilation of data seems to perturb the heat and salt redistribution. Besides this, the differences among regional models that share similar spatial resolution and initial conditions are induced by more subtle mechanisms which depend on

  6. Heat and salt redistribution within the Mediterranean Sea in the Med-CORDEX model ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llasses, J.; Jordà, G.; Gomis, D.; Adloff, F.; Macías, D.; Harzallah, A.; Arsouze, T.; Akthar, N.; Li, L.; Elizalde, A.; Sannino, G.

    2016-06-01

    Characterizing and understanding the basic functioning of the Mediterranean Sea in terms of heat and salt redistribution within the basin is a crucial issue to predict its evolution. Here we quantify and analyze the heat and salt transfers using a simple box model consisting of four layers in the vertical for each of the two (western and eastern) basins. Namely, we box-average 14 regional simulations of the Med-CORDEX ensemble plus a regional and a global reanalysis, computing for each of them the heat and salt exchanges between layers. First, we analyze in detail the mechanisms behind heat and salt redistribution at different time scales from the outputs of a single simulation (NEMOMED8). We show that in the western basin the transfer between layer 1 (0-150 m) and layer 2 (150-600 m) is upwards for most models both for heat and salt, while in the eastern basin both transfers are downwards. A feature common to both basins is that the transports are smaller in summer than in winter due to the enhanced stratification, which dampen the mixing between layers. From the comparison of the 16 simulations we observe that the spread between models is much larger than the ensemble average for the salt transfer and for the heat transfer between layer 1 and layer 2. At lower layers (below 600 m) there is a set of models showing a good agreement between them, while others are not correlated with any other. The mechanisms behind the ensemble spread are not straightforward. First, to have a coarse resolution prevents the model to correctly represent the heat and salt redistribution in the basin. Second, those models with a very different initial stratification also show a very different redistribution, especially at intermediate and deep layers. Finally, the assimilation of data seems to perturb the heat and salt redistribution. Besides this, the differences among regional models that share similar spatial resolution and initial conditions are induced by more subtle mechanisms

  7. Intracranial Fluid Redistribution During a Spaceflight Analog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koppelmans, Vincent; Pasternak, Ofer; Bloomberg, Jacob J.; De Dios, Yiri E.; Wood, Scott J.; Riascos, Roy; Reuter-Lorenz, Patrica A.; Kofman, Igor S.; Mulavara, Ajitkumar P.; Seidler, Rachael D.

    2017-01-01

    The neural correlates of spaceflight-induced sensorimotor impairments are unknown. Head down-tilt bed rest (HDBR) serves as a microgravity analog because it mimics the headward fluid shift and limb unloading of spaceflight. We investigated focal brain white matter (WM) changes and fluid shifts during 70 days of 6 deg HDBR in 16 subjects who were assessed pre (2x), during (3x), and post-HDBR (2x). Changes over time were compared to those in control subjects (n=12) assessed four times over 90 days. Diffusion MRI was used to assess WM microstructure and fluid shifts. Free-Water Imaging, derived from diffusion MRI, was used to quantify the distribution of intracranial extracellular free water (FW). Additionally, we tested whether WM and FW changes correlated with changes in functional mobility and balance measures. HDBR resulted in FW increases in fronto-temporal regions and decreases in posterior-parietal regions that largely recovered by two weeks post-HDBR. WM microstructure was unaffected by HDBR. FW decreased in the post-central gyrus and precuneus. We previously reported that gray matter increases in these regions were associated with less HDBR-induced balance impairment, suggesting adaptive structural neuroplasticity. Future studies are warranted to determine causality and underlying mechanisms.

  8. Relationship between redistribution on exercise thallium-201 scintigraphy and repetitive ventricular premature beats in patients with recent myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuji, H.; Iwasaka, T.; Sugiura, T.; Shimada, T.; Nakamori, H.; Kimura, Y.; Inada, M. )

    1991-06-01

    The relationship between myocardial ischemia detected by exercise thallium-201 scintigraphy and repetitive ventricular premature beats (VPBs) during ambulatory monitoring was evaluated in 57 patients with recent myocardial infarction. Multivariate analysis was performed to obtain the relatively important factor related to repetitive VPBs with the use of the following variables: age, redistribution, left ventricular ejection fraction, serum potassium and magnesium concentration, QRS score, left ventricular aneurysm, and the number of diseased vessels. Thirty-five patients had redistribution, but only three of them had repetitive VPBs during exercise testing. The average heart rate before 79% of 398 episodes of repetitive VPBs during ambulatory monitoring was in the range of 56 to 70/min. These data indicate that most of repetitive VPBs during ambulatory monitoring were not provoked by exercise-induced acute myocardial ischemia. However, redistribution was found to be an important factor associated with repetitive VPBs. The electrical abnormality relating to a substrate characterized by chronic reversible ischemia may explain the association between redistribution and repetitive VPBs.

  9. Redistribution, Recognition and Representation: Working against Pedagogies of Indifference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lingard, Bob; Keddie, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on an Australian government-commissioned research study that documented classroom pedagogies in 24 Queensland schools. The research created the model of "productive pedagogies", which conjoined what Nancy Fraser calls a politics of redistribution, recognition and representation. In this model pedagogies are…

  10. Anthropogenic radioisotopes to estimate rates of soil redistribution by wind

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Erosion of soil by wind and water is a degrading process that affects millions of hectares worldwide. Atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons and the resulting fallout of anthropogenic radioisotopes, particularly Cesium 137, has made possible the estimation of mean soil redistribution rates. The pe...

  11. Anthropogenic radionuclides for estimating rates of soil redistribution by wind

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Erosion of soil by wind and water is a degrading process that affects millions of hectares worldwide. Atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons and the resulting fallout of anthropogenic radioisotopes, particularly Cesium 137, has made possible the estimation of mean soil redistribution rates. The pe...

  12. HYDRAULIC REDISTRIBUTION IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST: TWEAKING THE SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydraulic redistribution (HR) has recently been documented in Pacific Northwest forests, but the controls governing this process and its importance to shallow-rooted species are poorly understood. Our objective in this study was to manipulate the soil-root system to tease apart ...

  13. 45 CFR 98.64 - Reallotment and redistribution of funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Section 98.64 Public Welfare Department of Health and Human Services GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CHILD CARE AND DEVELOPMENT FUND Financial Management § 98.64 Reallotment and redistribution of funds. (a) According to the... will be based on the State's financial report to ACF for the Child Care and Development Fund...

  14. 45 CFR 98.64 - Reallotment and redistribution of funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Section 98.64 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CHILD CARE AND DEVELOPMENT FUND Financial Management § 98.64 Reallotment and redistribution of funds. (a) According to the... will be based on the State's financial report to ACF for the Child Care and Development Fund...

  15. 45 CFR 98.64 - Reallotment and redistribution of funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... will be based on the State's financial report to ACF for the Child Care and Development Fund (ACF-696... Section 98.64 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CHILD CARE AND DEVELOPMENT FUND Financial Management § 98.64 Reallotment and redistribution of funds. (a) According to...

  16. 45 CFR 98.64 - Reallotment and redistribution of funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... will be based on the State's financial report to ACF for the Child Care and Development Fund (ACF-696... Section 98.64 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CHILD CARE AND DEVELOPMENT FUND Financial Management § 98.64 Reallotment and redistribution of funds. (a) According to...

  17. 45 CFR 98.64 - Reallotment and redistribution of funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... will be based on the State's financial report to ACF for the Child Care and Development Fund (ACF-696... Section 98.64 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CHILD CARE AND DEVELOPMENT FUND Financial Management § 98.64 Reallotment and redistribution of funds. (a) According to...

  18. Decentralisation and Interregional Redistribution in the Italian Education System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrari, Irene; Zanardi, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to evaluate the potential impact of the reform designed to decentralise public education in Italy, currently under discussion, on interregional redistribution. The central government has always played a prominent financial and administrative role in the provision of compulsory education in Italy. This has had a strong…

  19. Effects of the tidal mass redistribution on the Earth rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baenas, T.; Ferrándiz, J.; Escapa, A.; Getino, J.

    2015-08-01

    The effects of the tidal mass redistributions on the Earth precession and nutations are revisited, under various hypothesis on the elastic response of the Earth and using the Hamiltonian approach. New non-negligible secular and periodic contributions have been found.

  20. One problem of equivalent redistribution of a mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glasko, Yu. V.

    2012-02-01

    A variant of the equivalent redistribution of a mass based on the superposition of conformal mappings including the Jacobi elliptic functions is considered. The algorithm that executes balayage in the context of the encapsulation of functions is developed and implemented in the Delphi environment.

  1. Hydraulic redistribution of soil water by neotropical savanna trees.

    Treesearch

    Fabian G. Scholz; Sandra J. Bucci; Guillermo Goldstein; et al.

    2002-01-01

    The magnitude and direction of water transport by the roots of eight dominant Brazilian savanna (Cerrado) allowed bidirectional measurements of sap flow. The patterns of sap flow observed during the dry season in species with dimorphic roots systems were consistent with the occurrence of hydraulic redistribution of soil water, the movement of water from moist to drier...

  2. Experimental Study of Thallium 201 Redistribution in Transient Myocardial Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Toshiyuki; Mandal, Ashis K.; Wong, Dennis Q.

    1982-01-01

    The influence of differential washout on the redistribution phenomenon of thallium 201 chloride deposited in ischemic myocardium was investigated. Two groups of dogs had serial scintigraphic images and tissue counting performed. The first group had ischemia produced prior to the injection of the thallium and, following the control image after production of ischemia, the occlusion was released and serial images obtained over a three-hour period. The second group received thallium initially and after a control scintigraph was taken, ischemia was created and maintained for three hours via transthoracic ligature. Activity distribution was followed by serial images. Thallium content of ischemic areas was compared to the normal area by computer assisted data analysis. Tissues from the ischemic and normal areas from both groups were obtained after the serial images and counted. In the first group, prompt redistribution of activity into the ischemic areas was seen within 30 minutes of releasing the occlusion and was verified by tissue counting. Neither scintigraphic image changes nor tissue uptake differences were observed in the second group. The restoration of blood flow and consequently increased avidity for thallium probably accounted for the redistribution seen in the first group as there appeared to be no differential washout of activity in the second group from either the ischemic or normal areas to contribute to the redistribution phenomenon. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2 PMID:7120444

  3. HYDRAULIC REDISTRIBUTION IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST: TWEAKING THE SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydraulic redistribution (HR) has recently been documented in Pacific Northwest forests, but the controls governing this process and its importance to shallow-rooted species are poorly understood. Our objective in this study was to manipulate the soil-root system to tease apart ...

  4. Refugee Education and Justice Issues of Representation, Redistribution and Recognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keddie, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines justice issues of representation, redistribution and recognition within a specialised secondary school for immigrant and refugee students in Queensland, Australia. Fraser's three-dimensional model of justice--towards the ideal of "participatory parity"--is drawn on to analyse interview data gathered from a study that…

  5. Decentralisation and Interregional Redistribution in the Italian Education System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrari, Irene; Zanardi, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to evaluate the potential impact of the reform designed to decentralise public education in Italy, currently under discussion, on interregional redistribution. The central government has always played a prominent financial and administrative role in the provision of compulsory education in Italy. This has had a strong…

  6. 7 CFR 3419.7 - Redistribution of funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., AND EXTENSION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MATCHING FUNDS REQUIREMENT FOR AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH... formula funds. Unmatched research and extension funds will be reapportioned in accordance with the... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Redistribution of funds. 3419.7 Section 3419.7...

  7. Effect of ribose on thallium-201 myocardial redistribution

    SciTech Connect

    Angello, D.A.; Wilson, R.A.; Gee, D.

    1988-12-01

    Myocardial S Tl redistribution after transient ischemia may be too slow to allow identification of a reversible myocardial defect within the routine S Tl imaging period. To determine whether S Tl redistribution could be affected by a metabolic intervention, intravenous ribose was administered postischemia. Seventeen domestic swine were subjected to a 10-min ischemic period followed by either a 30-min i.v. ribose (n = 8) or saline (n = 9) infusion. Thallium-201 was injected during ischemia and myocardial S Tl activity was continuously monitored in ischemic and nonischemic regions with miniature CdTe radiation detection probes. Coronary flow in the ischemic region was reduced to 25% of that in the nonischemic regions in both saline and ribose groups. The S Tl time-activity curves demonstrated a significant enhancement of % S Tl redistribution in the ribose-treated animals at the end of ribose infusion: Ribose (48 +/- 11%), Saline (20 +/- 4%), p less than 0.05. Alteration of S Tl kinetics by ribose may permit earlier recognition of S Tl myocardial redistribution after transient ischemia.

  8. Irrigated Agricultural Expansion Planning in Developing Countries : Income Redistribution Objective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allam, Mohamed N.; Marks, David H.

    1984-07-01

    The role of agricultural expansion investment in improving the income redistribution conditions in society has been of considerable concern to planners. In this paper an approach based on distributing the newly developed land to a poorer sector (landless farmers) in society to gain agricultural revenues and improve their income is investigated. A mathematical optimization model is built to determine the distribution of land and a pricing policy established for the new areas in such a way that (1) a specified (by the government) income increase to the farmers can be achieved, (2) a predetermined level of recovery of the expansion cost can be insured, (3) high agricultural efficiency in the new land can be maintained, and (4) redistribution benefits can be maximized. In a case study application of the model, no conflict is found between the economic efficiency and income redistribution cirtieria in agricultural expansion investment within the planning framework presented in the companion paper (Allam and Marks, this issue). For a specified cost recovery condition it is found that the least cost planning alternatives give the opportunity to the largest number of landless farmers to own the new land and receive a specified income increase from the agricultural revenues, but a conflict between government return from the investment and redistribution objectives is found. This conflict is addressed and the trade-off between the two objectives is illustrated.

  9. 41 CFR 101-27.303-2 - Redistribution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Redistribution. 101-27.303-2 Section 101-27.303-2 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS SUPPLY AND PROCUREMENT 27-INVENTORY MANAGEMENT...

  10. Voluntary Running Suppresses Tumor Growth through Epinephrine- and IL-6-Dependent NK Cell Mobilization and Redistribution.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Line; Idorn, Manja; Olofsson, Gitte H; Lauenborg, Britt; Nookaew, Intawat; Hansen, Rasmus Hvass; Johannesen, Helle Hjorth; Becker, Jürgen C; Pedersen, Katrine S; Dethlefsen, Christine; Nielsen, Jens; Gehl, Julie; Pedersen, Bente K; Thor Straten, Per; Hojman, Pernille

    2016-03-08

    Regular exercise reduces the risk of cancer and disease recurrence. Yet the mechanisms behind this protection remain to be elucidated. In this study, tumor-bearing mice randomized to voluntary wheel running showed over 60% reduction in tumor incidence and growth across five different tumor models. Microarray analysis revealed training-induced upregulation of pathways associated with immune function. NK cell infiltration was significantly increased in tumors from running mice, whereas depletion of NK cells enhanced tumor growth and blunted the beneficial effects of exercise. Mechanistic analyses showed that NK cells were mobilized by epinephrine, and blockade of β-adrenergic signaling blunted training-dependent tumor inhibition. Moreover, epinephrine induced a selective mobilization of IL-6-sensitive NK cells, and IL-6-blocking antibodies blunted training-induced tumor suppression, intratumoral NK cell infiltration, and NK cell activation. Together, these results link exercise, epinephrine, and IL-6 to NK cell mobilization and redistribution, and ultimately to control of tumor growth.

  11. The ecohydrologic significance of hydraulic redistribution in a semiarid savanna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Russell L.; Cable, William L.; Hultine, Kevin R.

    2008-02-01

    Recent studies have illuminated the process of hydraulic redistribution, defined as the translocation of soil moisture via plant root systems, but the long-term ecohydrologic significance of this process is poorly understood. We investigated hydraulic redistribution (HR) by Prosopis velutina Woot. (velvet mesquite) in an upland savanna ecosystem over a two-year period. Our goal was to quantify patterns of HR by mesquite roots and assess how this affects tree water use and productivity. We used the heat ratio method to monitor bi-directional sap flow, an analog of HR, in both lateral and tap roots. Additionally, we monitored soil water content and used the eddy covariance technique to quantify ecosystem carbon dioxide and water exchange. Mesquite roots redistributed large amounts of water throughout the year, even during periods of canopy dormancy. Dormant season precipitation (November-March) was often taken up by shallow lateral roots and transferred downward in the soil profile by deeper lateral and tap roots. Such a transfer was also apparent when the trees were active and moisture from summer rainfall was plant available in the upper soil layers. As the upper soil layers dried, sap flow moving toward the canopy in the lateral roots diminished and water use from deeper soils increased via the taproots. The relationship between root sap flow and above-canopy fluxes suggested that deeper "stored" water from HR allowed the trees to transpire more in the spring that followed a winter with significant downward redistribution. Patterns of lateral and tap root sap flow also implied that redistribution may extend the growing season of the trees after summer rains have ended and surface soils are dry, thus allowing the trees to photosynthesize through periods of seasonal drought. The large hydrologic magnitude and the ecological effects of HR we studied, along with mounting evidence of this process occurring in many other ecosystems, indicates that HR should be accounted

  12. Intrahepatic Flow Redistribution in Patients Treated with Radioembolization

    SciTech Connect

    Spreafico, Carlo Morosi, Carlo; Maccauro, Marco; Romito, Raffaele; Lanocita, Rodolfo Civelli, Enrico M.; Sposito, Carlo Bhoori, Sherrie; Chiesa, Carlo; Frigerio, Laura F.; Lorenzoni, Alice; Cascella, Tommaso Marchianò, Alfonso; Mazzaferro, Vincenzo

    2015-04-15

    IntroductionIn planning Yttrium-90 ({sup 90}Y)-radioembolizations, strategy problems arise in tumours with multiple arterial supplies. We aim to demonstrate that tumours can be treated via one main feeding artery achieving flow redistribution by embolizing accessory vessels.MethodsOne hundred {sup 90}Y-radioembolizations were performed on 90 patients using glass microspheres. In 19 lesions/17 patients, accessory branches were found feeding a minor tumour portion and embolized. In all 17 patients, the assessment of the complete perfusion was obtained by angiography and single photon emission computerized tomography–computerized tomography (SPECT–CT). Dosimetry, toxicity, and tumor response rate of the patients treated after flow redistribution were compared with the 83 standard-treated patients. Seventeen lesions in 15 patients with flow redistribution were chosen as target lesions and evaluated according to mRECIST criteria.ResultsIn all patients, the complete tumor perfusion was assessed immediately before radioembolization by angiography in all patients and after the {sup 90}Y-infusion by SPECT–CT in 15 of 17 patients. In the 15 assessable patients, the response rate in their 17 lesions was 3 CR, 8 PR, and 6 SD. Dosimetric and toxicity data, as well tumour response rate, were comparable with the 83 patients with regular vasculature.ConclusionsAll embolization procedures were performed successfully with no complications, and the flow redistribution was obtained in all cases. Results in term of toxicity, median dose administered, and radiological response were comparable with standard radioembolizations. Our findings confirmed the intratumoral flow redistribution after embolizing the accessory arteries, which makes it possible to treat the tumour through its single main feeding artery.

  13. Numerical Simulations of Vertical Water Redistribution in Sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abhishek, A.

    2016-12-01

    Moisture redistribution process in porous media has a wide range of practical applications in petroleum industry, agriculture engineering, hydrology and carbon/CO2 sequestration. Recently, a vertical water redistribution experiment was designed. A thin column with dimensions of 50 (height) by 1.2 cm (inner diameter) was employed. Five water tensiometers were mounted along the column at distances of 1, 13, 25, 37 and 49 cm from the top. Two air tensiometers were mounted at 15 and 35 cm from the top to measure air pressure. The column was packed with saturated medium sand and was set up vertically. The bottom of the column was set open to the air to allow the sand to drain gradually under gravity. Once the flow completely ceased and equilibrium was reached, the column was reversed to let moisture in the sand redistribute. During both free drainage and redistribution processes, saturation was measured by gamma transmission method, and water and air pressure were measured by tensiometers. Numerical simulations were used to estimate saturation distribution over the whole column and the duration of experiments. We used both 1D and 2D models based on Richards equation to simulate this vertical redistribution process. Both COMSOL and HYDRUS-1D were used to solve 1D model, while COMSOL was employed to solve 2D model. In 1D simulations, equilibrium time was found to increase linearly during free drainage process, proportional to the length of the column. It was 1.4 days for the length of 50 cm, which is employed in experiments. In 2D simulations, water saturation profiles were non-uniform along the width of the domain at earlier time steps, while they become almost uniform when equilibrium was reached. The simulated results are compared with experimental results.

  14. Copper regulates primary root elongation through PIN1-mediated auxin redistribution.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Hong-Mei; Xu, Heng-Hao; Liu, Wen-Cheng; Lu, Ying-Tang

    2013-05-01

    The heavy metal copper (Cu) is an essential microelement required for normal plant growth and development, but it inhibits primary root growth when in excess. The mechanism underlying how excess Cu functions in this process remains to be further elucidated. Here, we report that a higher concentration of CuSO4 inhibited primary root elongation of Arabidopsis seedlings by affecting both the elongation and meristem zones. In the meristem zone, meristematic cell division potential was reduced by excess Cu. Further experiments showed that Cu can modulate auxin distribution, resulting in higher auxin activities in both the elongation and meristem zones of Cu-treated roots based on DR5::GUS expression patterns. This Cu-mediated auxin redistribution was shown to be responsible for Cu-mediated inhibition of primary root elongation. Additional genetic and physiological data demonstrated that it was PINFORMED1 (PIN1), but not PIN2 or AUXIN1 (AUX1), that regulated this process. However, Cu-induced hydrogen peroxide accumulation did not contribute to Cu-induced auxin redistribution for inhibition of root elongation. When the possible role of ethylene in this process was analyzed, Cu had a similar impact on the root elongation of both the wild type and the ein2-1 mutant, implying that Cu-mediated inhibition of primary root elongation was not due to the ethylene signaling pathway.

  15. Channels of energy redistribution in short-pulse laser interactions with metal targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhigilei, Leonid V.; Ivanov, Dmitriy S.

    2005-07-01

    The kinetics and channels of laser energy redistribution in a target irradiated by a short, 1 ps, laser pulse is investigated in computer simulations performed with a model that combines molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with a continuum description of the laser excitation and relaxation of the conduction band electrons, based on the two-temperature model (TTM). The energy transferred from the excited electrons to the lattice splits into several parts, namely the energy of the thermal motion of the atoms, the energy of collective atomic motions associated with the relaxation of laser-induced stresses, the energy carried away from the surface region of the target by a stress wave, the energy of quasi-static anisotropic stresses, and, at laser fluences above the melting threshold, the energy transferred to the latent heat of melting and then released upon recrystallization. The presence of the non-thermal channels of energy redistribution (stress wave and quasi-static stresses), not accounted for in the conventional TTM model, can have important implications for interpretation of experimental results on the kinetics of thermal and mechanical relaxation of a target irradiated by a short laser pulse as well as on the characteristics of laser-induced phase transformations. The fraction of the non-thermal energy in the total laser energy partitioning increases with increasing laser fluence.

  16. Zirconium hydrides and Fe redistribution in Zr-2.5%Nb alloy under ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idrees, Y.; Yao, Z.; Cui, J.; Shek, G. K.; Daymond, M. R.

    2016-11-01

    Zr-2.5%Nb alloy is used to fabricate the pressure tubes of the CANDU reactor. The pressure tube is the primary pressure boundary for coolant in the CANDU design and is susceptible to delayed hydride cracking, reduction in fracture toughness upon hydride precipitation and potentially hydride blister formation. The morphology and nature of hydrides in Zr-2.5%Nb with 100 wppm hydrogen has been investigated using transmission electron microscopy. The effect of hydrides on heavy ion irradiation induced decomposition of the β phase has been reported. STEM-EDX mapping was employed to investigate the distribution of alloying elements. The results show that hydrides are present in the form of stacks of different sizes, with length scales from nano- to micro-meters. Heavy ion irradiation experiments at 250 °C on as-received and hydrided Zr-2.5%Nb alloy, show interesting effects of hydrogen on the irradiation induced redistribution of Fe. It was found that Fe is widely redistributed from the β phase into the α phase in the as-received material, however, the loss of Fe from the β phase and subsequent precipitation is retarded in the hydrided material. This preliminary work will further the current understanding of microstructural evolution of Zr based alloys in the presence of hydrogen.

  17. The role of calpain in an in vivo model of oxidative stress-induced retinal ganglion cell damage.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Yu; Maruyama, Kazuichi; Yamamoto, Kotaro; Omodaka, Kazuko; Yasuda, Masayuki; Himori, Noriko; Ryu, Morin; Nishiguchi, Koji M; Nakazawa, Toru

    2014-09-05

    In this study, we set out to establish an in vivo animal model of oxidative stress in the retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and determine whether there is a link between oxidative stress in the RGCs and the activation of calpain, a major part of the apoptotic pathway. Oxidative stress was induced in the RGCs of C57BL/6 mice by the intravitreal administration of 2,2'-azobis (2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride (AAPH, 30mM, 2μl). Control eyes were injected with 2μl of vehicle. Surviving Fluorogold (FG)-labeled RGCs were then counted in retinal flat mounts. Double staining with CellROX and Annexin V was performed to investigate the co-localization of free radical generation and apoptosis. An immunoblot assay was used both to indirectly evaluate calpain activation in the AAPH-treated eyes by confirming α-fodrin cleavage, and also to evaluate the effect of SNJ-1945 (a specific calpain inhibitor: 4% w/v, 100mg/kg, intraperitoneal administration) in these eyes. Intravitreal administration of AAPH led to a significant decrease in FG-labeled RGCs 7days after treatment (control: 3806.7±575.2RGCs/mm(2), AAPH: 3156.1±371.2RGCs/mm(2), P<0.01). CellROX and Annexin V signals were co-localized in the FG-labeled RGCs 24h after AAPH injection. An immunoblot assay revealed a cleaved α-fodrin band that increased significantly 24h after AAPH administration. Intraperitoneally administered SNJ-1945 prevented the cleavage of α-fodrin and had a neuroprotective effect against AAPH-induced RGC death (AAPH: 3354.0±226.9RGCs/mm(2), AAPH+SNJ-1945: 3717.1±614.6RGCs/mm(2), P<0.01). AAPH administration was an effective model of oxidative stress in the RGCs, showing that oxidative stress directly activated the calpain pathway and induced RGC death. Furthermore, inhibition of the calpain pathway protected the RGCs after AAPH administration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Multi-Zone Modeling of Ion-Implanted Impurity Redistribution.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araujo, Carlos Alberto Paz De.

    Implanted impurity redistribution has been observed during the annealing step of many ion-implanted materials. Throughout the ion-implantation literature, experimental evidence suggests some position dependence in the redistribution process. Specifically, the tail region of ion-implanted impurity profiles usually exhibit fast diffusion during annealing whereas the near-surface region shows slow diffusion. To date, redistribution models have failed to include this spacial dependence in the diffusion coefficient of ion -implanted impurities. Analytical expressions for the post -annealing profile are usually found from oversimplified redistribution models that employ Fick's second law with a reflecting surface boundary condition and a homogeneous semi-infinite medium. This modeling scheme is not capable to accommodate regions of high or low redistribution because of the restriction of a single diffusion constant. In general the ideal gaussian LSS profile is assumed as the initial condition rendering an analytic solution to the simple diffusion model that is capable of modeling only gaussian broadening. The approach taken in the present work is to model the ion-implanted substrate as a stratified medium with zones where a local diffusion equation is obeyed. An effective diffusion coefficient is defined within each zone with the intent to lump local disturbances such as defects and precipitates. Thus, regions of low or high redistribution are modeled by zones of large or small effective diffusion coefficients. Because it is not always possible to have an analytical expression for the pre-annealing profile the multi-zone modeling scheme developed in this work accepts any type of initial condition. In order to accomplish this level of generality the Crank-Nicolson numerical formula is used to solve the multi-zone equations. Also, the Crout-Doolittle matrix reduction algorithm is utilized to reduce the computation time. The multi-zone modeling scheme is tested for the case

  19. 13 CFR 309.1 - Redistributions under parts 303, 305 and 306.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Redistributions under parts 303, 305 and 306. 309.1 Section 309.1 Business Credit and Assistance ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE REDISTRIBUTIONS OF INVESTMENT ASSISTANCE § 309.1 Redistributions under parts 303,...

  20. Analytical solution for soil water redistribution during evaporation process.

    PubMed

    Teng, Jidong; Yasufuku, Noriyuki; Liu, Qiang; Liu, Shiyu

    2013-01-01

    Simulating the dynamics of soil water content and modeling soil water evaporation are critical for many environmental and agricultural strategies. The present study aims to develop an analytical solution to simulate soil water redistribution during the evaporation process. This analytical solution was derived utilizing an exponential function to describe the relation of hydraulic conductivity and water content on pressure head. The solution was obtained based on the initial condition of saturation and an exponential function to model the change of surface water content. Also, the evaporation experiments were conducted under a climate control apparatus to validate the theoretical development. Comparisons between the proposed analytical solution and experimental result are presented from the aspects of soil water redistribution, evaporative rate and cumulative evaporation. Their good agreement indicates that this analytical solution provides a reliable way to investigate the interaction of evaporation and soil water profile.

  1. Modified resolution redistribution system for frameless hologram display module.

    PubMed

    Takaki, Yasuhiro; Tanemoto, Yumi

    2010-05-10

    A frameless hologram display module employing a modified resolution redistribution system is proposed in this paper. The frameless display modules can be aligned two-dimensionally to realize a large display screen. The modified resolution redistribution system consists of a one-lens imaging system, a screen lens, and a multiple illumination system. The prototype module was constructed using a spatial light modulator with a resolution of 1,980 x 1,080, and a pixel pitch of 8.0 microm. The horizontal resolution was increased four times and the magnification of the imaging system was 2.88. The horizontal resolution was increased to 7,920 and the horizontal pixel pitch was reduced to 5.8 microm. The screen size of the module was 2.0 inches and the horizontal viewing angle was 6.3 degrees.

  2. Pt redistribution during Ni(Pt) silicide formation

    SciTech Connect

    Demeulemeester, J.; Smeets, D.; Vantomme, A.; Van Bockstael, C.; Detavernier, C.; Comrie, C. M.; Barradas, N. P.; Vieira, A.

    2008-12-29

    We report on a real-time Rutherford backscattering spectrometry study of the erratic redistribution of Pt during Ni silicide formation in a solid phase reaction. The inhomogeneous Pt redistribution in Ni(Pt)Si films is a consequence of the low solubility of Pt in Ni{sub 2}Si compared to NiSi and the limited mobility of Pt in NiSi. Pt further acts as a diffusion barrier and resides in the Ni{sub 2}Si grain boundaries, significantly slowing down the Ni{sub 2}Si and NiSi growth kinetics. Moreover, the observed incorporation of a large amount of Pt in the NiSi seeds indicates that Pt plays a major role in selecting the crystallographic orientation of these seeds and thus in the texture of the resulting Ni{sub 1-x}Pt{sub x}Si film.

  3. Energy saving through redistribution of the transport of goods

    SciTech Connect

    Ormhaug, T.; Svegarden, T.

    1980-12-01

    The possibility for reduction of energy consumption is considered. A redistribution from lorries to railway of a quantity representing approximately 25% of todays tonkilometers on road, might give a yearly reduction of energy consumption equivalent to 48 mill liters diesel oil. The quantity represents about 5% of the fuel consumption in the entire transport field. The 25% represents an expected increase in the interregional transport of goods by lorries and railway towards the turn of this century.

  4. Spontaneous redistribution of surface immunoglobulin in the motile B lymphocyte

    PubMed Central

    1976-01-01

    This paper reports that B cells undergoing translatory motion spontaneously segregate their surface Ig to one portion of their plasma membrane. The spontaneous redistribution of surface Ig was found to be: (a) selective, concanavalin A-dependent on translatory motion and energy metabolism. Abundant B cells undergoing motility were found after cultures in lipopolysaccharide or trypsin, or after brief exposure to cholinergic drugs. PMID:1087328

  5. Assessing income redistributive effect of health financing in Zambia.

    PubMed

    Mulenga, Arnold; Ataguba, John Ele-Ojo

    2017-09-01

    Ensuring an equitable health financing system is a major concern particularly in many developing countries. Internationally, there is a strong debate to move away from excessive reliance on direct out-of-pocket (OOP) spending towards a system that incorporates a greater element of risk pooling and thus affords greater protection for the poor. This is a major focus of the move towards universal health coverage (UHC). Currently, Zambia with high levels of poverty and income inequality is implementing health sector reforms for UHC through a social health insurance scheme. However, the way to identify the health financing mechanisms that are best suited to achieving this goal is to conduct empirical analysis and consider international evidence on funding universal health systems. This study assesses, for the first time, the progressivity of health financing and how it impacts on income inequality in Zambia. Three broad health financing mechanisms (general tax, a health levy and OOP spending) were considered. Data come from the 2010 nationally representative Zambian Living Conditions and Monitoring Survey with a sample size of 19,397 households. Applying standard methodologies, the findings show that total health financing in Zambia is progressive. It also leads to a statistically significant reduction in income inequality (i.e. a pro-poor redistributive effect estimated at 0.0110 (p < 0.01)). Similar significant pro-poor redistribution was reported for general taxes (0.0101 (p < 0.01)) and a health levy (0.0002 (p < 0.01)). However, the redistributive effect was not significant for OOP spending (0.0006). These results further imply that health financing redistributes income from the rich to the poor with a greater potential via general taxes. This points to areas where government policy may focus in attempting to reduce the high level of income inequality and to improve equity in health financing towards UHC in Zambia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  6. Redistribution of suprathermal electrons due to fishbone frequency jumps.

    PubMed

    Macor, A; Goniche, M; Artaud, J F; Decker, J; Elbeze, D; Garbet, X; Giruzzi, G; Hoang, G T; Maget, P; Mazon, D; Molina, D; Nguyen, C; Peysson, Y; Sabot, R; Ségui, J L

    2009-04-17

    MHD instabilities driven by fast electrons identified as fishbonelike modes have been detected on Tore Supra during lower hybrid current drive discharges. Direct experimental evidence is reported of a novel feature: the regular redistribution of suprathermal electrons toward external tokamak regions which are correlated to periodic mode frequency jumps. Sharp drops of the electron temperature time trace are factually linked to the cyclical deterioration of the fast electron confinement.

  7. Redistribution of Suprathermal Electrons due to Fishbone Frequency Jumps

    SciTech Connect

    Macor, A.; Goniche, M.; Artaud, J. F.; Decker, J.; Elbeze, D.; Garbet, X.; Giruzzi, G.; Hoang, G. T.; Maget, P.; Mazon, D.; Molina, D.; Nguyen, C.; Peysson, Y.; Sabot, R.; Segui, J. L.

    2009-04-17

    MHD instabilities driven by fast electrons identified as fishbonelike modes have been detected on Tore Supra during lower hybrid current drive discharges. Direct experimental evidence is reported of a novel feature: the regular redistribution of suprathermal electrons toward external tokamak regions which are correlated to periodic mode frequency jumps. Sharp drops of the electron temperature time trace are factually linked to the cyclical deterioration of the fast electron confinement.

  8. Effect of topography on sulfate redistribution in Cumulonimbus cloud development.

    PubMed

    Vujović, Dragana; Vučković, Vladan; Curić, Mlađen

    2014-03-01

    An aqueous chemical module is created and included into a complex three-dimensional atmospheric cloud-resolving mesoscale model. In the chemical module, oxidation of S(IV) by ozone and hydrogen peroxide in cloud-water and rainwater, as important process of the sulfate production is included. To examine the impact of topography on the sulfate redistribution in a clean and a polluted environment, the complex topography of Serbia is included in the model. Numerical simulations of an isolated summer Cumulonimbus cloud shows that thunderstorms generate very strong vertical sulfate redistribution from the planetary boundary layer to the upper troposphere. This redistribution is sensitive to cloud dynamics, while cloud microphysics and precipitation determine wet removal of the chemical species. In simulations with realistic topography, the chemical species are transported over larger distances close to the surface, while in the upper atmosphere, there is no difference compared to the simulations without topography. The sensitivity tests of cloud chemistry to the physical processes are made. Omission of nucleation and impact scavenging of aerosols in the model simulations shows that 75.8 and 62.5 % of total sulfur mass deposited in the base experiment for the clean and the polluted environment, respectively, is the result of other processes. Exclusion of oxidation accounted for 19.2 and 37.7 % of total sulfur deposited for clean and polluted environment. Ignoring the ice phase almost not change mass of deposited sulfur: there is an increase of 2.9 and 1.5 % for clean and polluted atmosphere, respectively. Real topography conditions affect the sulfate redistribution in the sense of greater possibilities of transport. Numerical simulations without real topography give an artificial increase of deposited sulfur mass of about 25-30 %.

  9. Resource redistribution in polydomous ant nest networks: local or global?

    PubMed Central

    Franks, Daniel W.; Robinson, Elva J.H.

    2014-01-01

    An important problem facing organisms in a heterogeneous environment is how to redistribute resources to where they are required. This is particularly complex in social insect societies as resources have to be moved both from the environment into the nest and between individuals within the nest. Polydomous ant colonies are split between multiple spatially separated, but socially connected, nests. Whether, and how, resources are redistributed between nests in polydomous colonies is unknown. We analyzed the nest networks of the facultatively polydomous wood ant Formica lugubris. Our results indicate that resource redistribution in polydomous F. lugubris colonies is organized at the local level between neighboring nests and not at the colony level. We found that internest trails connecting nests that differed more in their amount of foraging were stronger than trails between nests with more equal foraging activity. This indicates that resources are being exchanged directly from nests with a foraging excess to nests that require resources. In contrast, we found no significant relationships between nest properties, such as size and amount of foraging, and network measures such as centrality and connectedness. This indicates an absence of a colony-level resource exchange. This is a clear example of a complex behavior emerging as a result of local interactions between parts of a system. PMID:25214755

  10. Differential redistribution of platelet glycoproteins Ib and IIb-IIIa after plasmin stimulation.

    PubMed

    Cramer, E M; Lu, H; Caen, J P; Soria, C; Berndt, M C; Tenza, D

    1991-02-15

    The subcellular localization of the platelet membrane receptors glycoproteins (GP) Ib and IIb/IIIa [corrected] has been studied within resting platelets by a combination of biochemical and cytochemical techniques. While both GPIb and GPIIb/IIIa are localized within the plasma membrane and surface-connected canalicular system (SCCS) membranes, only GPIIb/IIIa is present within the internal face of alpha-granular membranes. Previous studies demonstrated that plasmin can induce platelet stimulation and also decrease ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation; it was suggested that this was because of GPIb degradation by plasmin. In this study, the respective localizations of both GPIb and GPIIb/IIIa were visualized during in vitro plasmin stimulation of platelets. Generally, plasmin induced shape change, pseudopod formation, organelle centralization either with or without alpha-granule release depending on the conditions of stimulation. Plasmin treatment of platelets at 37 degrees C resulted in the disappearance of GPIb from the cell surface and its subsequent redistribution into the channels and vesicles of the SCCS with no significant modification of GPIIb/IIIa remaining on the plasma membrane. Within degranulated platelets, GPIIb/IIIa was expressed on the plasma membrane and within membranes of large vacuoles containing the alpha-granule proteins. GPIb was virtually absent from these structures and mainly restricted to the SCCS. Addition of cytochalasin D inhibited the migration of GPIb to the SCCS. Biochemical measurements confirmed that no important hydrolysis of GPIb had occurred because only very little amounts of glycocalicin were generated during the reaction. In conclusion, in plasmin-treated platelets GPIIb/IIIa is externalized to the plasma membrane while GPIb is internalized into the SCCS. Although previous studies have suggested that plasmin degrades GPIb, the reduction in ristocetin-induced aggregation may be explained by its apparent redistribution within

  11. Polar thermospheric Joule heating, and redistribution of recombination energy in the upper mesosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayr, H. G.; Harris, I.; Dube, M.

    1990-01-01

    Kellogg (1961), suggested that transport of atomic oxygen from the summer into the winter hemisphere and subsequent release of energy by three body recombination, O+O+N2 yields O2+N2+E, may contribute significantly to the so-called mesopause temperature anomaly. Earlier model calculations have shown that Kellogg's mechanism produces about a 10-percent increase in the temperature from summer to winter at 90 km. This process, however, is partly compensated by differential heating from absorption of UV radiation associated with dissociation of O2. In the auroral region of the thermosphere, there is a steady energy dissipation by Joule heating causing a redistribution and depletion of atomic oxygen due to wind-induced diffusion. With the removal of O, latent chemical energy normally released by three body recombination is also removed, and the result is that the temperature decreases by almost 2 percent near 90 km. Through dynamic feedback, this process reduces the depletion of atomic oxygen by about 25 percent and the temperature perturbation in the exosphere from 10 to 7 percent at polar latitudes. Under the influence of the internal dynamo interaction, the prevailing zonal circulation in the upper thermosphere changes direction when the redistribution of recombination energy is considered.

  12. Hydraulic Redistribution: The "suicidal mission" for evergreen trees in the Amazon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, G.

    2008-12-01

    Hydraulic redistribution (HR), the nocturnal transport of moisture by plant roots from wetter to drier portions of the root zone, improves plant water availability (therefore increases plant transpiration) during the dry season in general. This has been well documented in both field measurements and numerical modeling studies. However, how the hydrological impact of HR depends on specific climatic characteristics and how HR influences the ecosystem structure and function is not known. In this study, based on numerical experiments using the NCAR CLM3-DGVM we investigate the impact of HR on regional hydrological conditions, its dependence on climate characteristics, and its impact on vegetation composition and production in the Amazon region. It is found that (1) HR has the strongest hydrological impact over the transition zones between wet and arid climates; (2) over the portions of Amazon where the HR-induced transpiration enhancement is the most substantial, HR increases the percentage of tropical broadleaf drought deciduous trees at the expense of tropical broadleaf evergreen trees. The ecological impact of HR found in this study is rather counterintuitive, and it occurs as a result of climate extremes (and climate variability) overriding the impact of mean climate in determining the ecological impact of hydraulic redistribution. This finding has significant implication on the ecological impact of predicted climate changes (which is characterized by an increase of climate extremes).

  13. Impact of Hydraulic Redistribution on Present and Future Vegetation Competition in Tropical Dry Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, G.; Mei, R.; Alo, C. A.

    2009-12-01

    Hydraulic redistribution (HR) is generally considered to increase plant water availability thus buffer plants against seasonal drought. This study uses the NCAR CLM3-DGVM to investigate the long-term impact of HR on tropical vegetation composition and how that influence vegetation resonse to climate changes, using as example the Amazon region. HR is found to increase the percentage of tropical broadleaf drought deciduous trees at the expense of tropical broadleaf evergreen trees. While HR increases the long-term mean of dry season transpiration, it reduces dry season transpiration in extremely dry years when the HR-induced acceleration of moisture depletion leaves less water available later in the dry season. Such negative hydrological impact of HR can lead to extremely low or negative NPP later in the dry season that limits the growth of trees that are not in dry-season senescence, i.e., evergreen trees. As a result, HR leads to a shift in vegetation competition, favoring tropical broadleaf drought deciduous trees at the expense of tropical broadleaf evergreen trees. Projected future climate changes are expected to cause a gradual shift of vegetation in tropical forest towards more drought deciduous trees. Hydraulic redistribution enhances or accelerate the projected future vegetation response, due primarily to the increased frequency of extreme droughts in the projected future climate.

  14. Direct Measurement of Adsorbed Gas Redistribution in Metal–Organic Frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ying-Pin; Liu, Yangyang; Liu, Dahuan; Bosch, Mathieu; Zhou, Hong-Cai

    2015-03-04

    Knowledge about the interactions between gas molecules and adsorption sites is essential to customize metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) as adsorbents. The dynamic interactions occurring during adsorption/desorption working cycles with several states are especially complicated. Even so, the gas dynamics based upon experimental observations and the distribution of guest molecules under various conditions in MOFs have not been extensively studied yet. In this work, a direct time-resolved diffraction structure envelope (TRDSE) method using sequential measurements by in situ synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction has been developed to monitor several gas dynamic processes taking place in MOFs: infusion, desorption, and gas redistribution upon temperature change. The electron density maps indicate that gas molecules prefer to redistribute over heterogeneous types of sites rather than to exclusively occupy the primary binding sites. We found that the gas molecules are entropically driven from open metal sites to larger neighboring spaces during the gas infusion period, matching the localized-to-mobile mechanism. In addition, the partitioning ratio of molecules adsorbed at each site varies with different temperatures, as opposed to an invariant distribution mode. Equally important, the gas adsorption in MOFs is intensely influenced by the gas–gas interactions, which might induce more molecules to be accommodated in an orderly compact arrangement. This sequential TRDSE method is generally applicable to most crystalline adsorbents, yielding information on distribution ratios of adsorbates at each type of site.

  15. Direct measurement of adsorbed gas redistribution in metal-organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying-Pin; Liu, Yangyang; Liu, Dahuan; Bosch, Mathieu; Zhou, Hong-Cai

    2015-03-04

    Knowledge about the interactions between gas molecules and adsorption sites is essential to customize metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) as adsorbents. The dynamic interactions occurring during adsorption/desorption working cycles with several states are especially complicated. Even so, the gas dynamics based upon experimental observations and the distribution of guest molecules under various conditions in MOFs have not been extensively studied yet. In this work, a direct time-resolved diffraction structure envelope (TRDSE) method using sequential measurements by in situ synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction has been developed to monitor several gas dynamic processes taking place in MOFs: infusion, desorption, and gas redistribution upon temperature change. The electron density maps indicate that gas molecules prefer to redistribute over heterogeneous types of sites rather than to exclusively occupy the primary binding sites. We found that the gas molecules are entropically driven from open metal sites to larger neighboring spaces during the gas infusion period, matching the localized-to-mobile mechanism. In addition, the partitioning ratio of molecules adsorbed at each site varies with different temperatures, as opposed to an invariant distribution mode. Equally important, the gas adsorption in MOFs is intensely influenced by the gas-gas interactions, which might induce more molecules to be accommodated in an orderly compact arrangement. This sequential TRDSE method is generally applicable to most crystalline adsorbents, yielding information on distribution ratios of adsorbates at each type of site.

  16. Intercellular Redistribution of cAMP Underlies Selective Suppression of Cancer Cell Growth by Connexin26

    PubMed Central

    Polusani, Srikanth R.; Mathis, Sandra A.; Zucker, Shoshanna N.; Nicholson, Bruce J.

    2013-01-01

    Connexins (Cx), which constitute gap junction intercellular channels in vertebrates, have been shown to suppress transformed cell growth and tumorigenesis, but the mechanism(s) still remain largely speculative. Here, we define the molecular basis by which Cx26, but less frequently Cx43 or Cx32, selectively confer growth suppression on cancer cells. Functional intercellular coupling is shown to be required, producing partial blocks of the cell cycle due to prolonged activation of several mitogenic kinases. PKA is both necessary and sufficient for the Cx26 induced growth inhibition in low serum and the absence of anchorage. Activation of PKA was not associated with elevated cAMP levels, but appeared to result from a redistribution of cAMP throughout the cell population, eliminating the cell cycle oscillations in cAMP required for efficient cell cycle progression. Cx43 and Cx32 fail to mediate this redistribution as, unlike Cx26, these channels are closed during the G2/M phase of the cell cycle when cAMP levels peak. Comparisons of tumor cell lines indicate that this is a general pattern, with growth suppression by connexins occurring whenever cAMP oscillates with the cell cycle, and the gap junction remain open throughout the cell cycle. Thus, gap junctional coupling, in the absence of any external signals, provides a general means to limit the mitotic rate of cell populations. PMID:24312655

  17. Quantifying Soil Organic Carbon Redistribution after Forest Fire using Thermal Analyses, Valles Caldera, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuklewicz, K. B.; Rasmussen, C.

    2014-12-01

    The frequency and severity of wildfire in western conifer forests is expected to increase with continued climate change induced warming and drying. The effects of wildfire on carbon cycle processes, and particularly surface soil organic matter composition and post fire erosive redistribution is poorly understood. The recent Thompson Ridge wildfire event in 2013 in the Valles Caldera, part of the Jemez-Catalina Critical Zone Observatory, provides the opportunity to track post-fire changes in surface soil organic matter composition over time relative to pre-fire conditions. Here we applied thermal analyses to quantify changes in surface soil organic matter composition, with a focus on charred materials, across a range of hillslope and convergent landscape positions. It was hypothesized that the fraction of charred material would increase post-burn in all surface soils, with a subsequent decline in hillslope positions and a gain in convergent positions as surface material was eroded and deposited in water gathering portions of the landscape. Our results confirmed that charcoal increased directly after the fire in all samples, but a clear signal of erosive redistribution was not observed, suggesting that the movement of charcoal throughout a landscape is more complex than the simple hypothesis put forward here. Future work will expand the spatial distribution of samples in a systematic fashion that better captures variation in topography and erosive versus depositional areas of the landscape.

  18. Polar thermospheric Joule heating, and redistribution of recombination energy in the upper mesosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayr, H. G.; Harris, I.; Dube, M.

    1990-01-01

    Kellogg (1961), suggested that transport of atomic oxygen from the summer into the winter hemisphere and subsequent release of energy by three body recombination, O+O+N2 yields O2+N2+E, may contribute significantly to the so-called mesopause temperature anomaly. Earlier model calculations have shown that Kellogg's mechanism produces about a 10-percent increase in the temperature from summer to winter at 90 km. This process, however, is partly compensated by differential heating from absorption of UV radiation associated with dissociation of O2. In the auroral region of the thermosphere, there is a steady energy dissipation by Joule heating causing a redistribution and depletion of atomic oxygen due to wind-induced diffusion. With the removal of O, latent chemical energy normally released by three body recombination is also removed, and the result is that the temperature decreases by almost 2 percent near 90 km. Through dynamic feedback, this process reduces the depletion of atomic oxygen by about 25 percent and the temperature perturbation in the exosphere from 10 to 7 percent at polar latitudes. Under the influence of the internal dynamo interaction, the prevailing zonal circulation in the upper thermosphere changes direction when the redistribution of recombination energy is considered.

  19. Current redistribution in resistor networks: Fat-tail statistics in regular and small-world networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, Jörg; Bernasconi, Jakob

    2017-03-01

    The redistribution of electrical currents in resistor networks after single-bond failures is analyzed in terms of current-redistribution factors that are shown to depend only on the topology of the network and on the values of the bond resistances. We investigate the properties of these current-redistribution factors for regular network topologies (e.g., d -dimensional hypercubic lattices) as well as for small-world networks. In particular, we find that the statistics of the current redistribution factors exhibits a fat-tail behavior, which reflects the long-range nature of the current redistribution as determined by Kirchhoff's circuit laws.

  20. Light- and sodium azide-induced death of RGC-5 cells in culture occurs via different mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ji, Dan; Kamalden, Tengku A; del Olmo-Aguado, Susana; Osborne, Neville N

    2011-04-01

    Previous studies have shown that light impinging on the retina in situ has the capacity to kill neuronal and non-neuronal cells in vitro by interacting directly with mitochondrial constituents. A number of fluorophores are associated with mitochondria which can potentially absorb different wave-lengths of light, including cytochrome oxidase. The aim of the present study was to compare the death mechanism of a light insult to RGC-5 cells in culture with that of sodium azide. Sodium azide's main toxic action is in inhibiting the function of cytochrome oxidase in the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Our studies showed that light and sodium azide kill RGC-5 cells via different mechanisms although some similarities do occur. Both inducers of cell death caused the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), the expression of phosphatidylserine, the breakdown of DNA and the activation of p38 MAPK, resulting in its translocation from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. However, light-induced cell death occurs via necroptosis, in that it was inhibited by necrostatin-1 and was caspase-independent. This was not the case for sodium azide, where the death process was caspase-dependent, occurred via apoptosis and was unaffected by necrostatin-1. Moreover, light caused an activation of the apoptosis inducing factor (AIF), c-Jun, JNK and HO-1, but it did not affect alpha fodrin or caspase-3. In contrast, sodium azide caused the activation of alpha fodrin and the stimulation of caspase-3 content without influencing AIF, c-Jun, JNK or HO-1. Therefore we conclude that light does not have a specific action on cytochrome oxidase in mitochondria to cause cell death.

  1. PROTOSTELLAR ACCRETION FLOWS DESTABILIZED BY MAGNETIC FLUX REDISTRIBUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Krasnopolsky, Ruben; Shang, Hsien; Li Zhiyun; Zhao Bo

    2012-09-20

    Magnetic flux redistribution lies at the heart of the problem of star formation in dense cores of molecular clouds that are magnetized to a realistic level. If all of the magnetic flux of a typical core were to be dragged into the central star, the stellar field strength would be orders of magnitude higher than the observed values. This well-known magnetic flux problem can in principle be resolved through non-ideal MHD effects. Two-dimensional (axisymmetric) calculations have shown that ambipolar diffusion, in particular, can transport magnetic flux outward relative to matter, allowing material to enter the central object without dragging the field lines along. We show through simulations that such axisymmetric protostellar accretion flows are unstable in three dimensions to magnetic interchange instability in the azimuthal direction. The instability is driven by the magnetic flux redistributed from the matter that enters the central object. It typically starts to develop during the transition from the prestellar phase of star formation to the protostellar mass accretion phase. In the latter phase, the magnetic flux is transported outward mainly through advection by strongly magnetized low-density regions that expand against the collapsing inflow. The tussle between the gravity-driven infall and magnetically driven expansion leads to a highly filamentary inner accretion flow that is more disordered than previously envisioned. The efficient outward transport of magnetic flux by advection lowers the field strength at small radii, making the magnetic braking less efficient and the formation of rotationally supported disks easier in principle. However, we find no evidence for such disks in any of our rotating collapse simulations. We conclude that the inner protostellar accretion flow is shaped to a large extent by the flux redistribution-driven magnetic interchange instability. How disks form in such an environment is unclear.

  2. [Biodistribution and Postmortem Redistribution of Emamectin Benzoate in Intoxicated Mice].

    PubMed

    Tang, Wei-wei; Lin, Yu-cai; Lu, Yan-xu

    2016-02-01

    To investigate the lethal blood level, the target organs and tissues, the toxicant storage depots and the postmortem redistribution in mice died of emamectin benzoate poisoning. The mice model of emamectin benzoate poisoning was established via intragastric injection. The main poisoning symptoms and the clinical death times of mice were observed and recorded dynamically in the acute poisoning group as well as the sub-acute poisoning death group. The pathological and histomorphological changes of organs and tissues were observed after poisoning death. The biodistribution and postmortem redistribution of emamectin benzoate in the organs and tissues of mice were assayed by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) at 0h, 24h, 48h and 72h after death. The lethal blood concentrations and the concentrations of emamectin benzoate were detected by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) at different time points after death. The symptoms of nervous and respiratory system were observed within 15-30 min after intragastric injection. The average time of death was (45.8 ± 7.9) min in the acute poisoning group and (8.0 ± 1.4) d in the sub-acute poisoning group, respectively. The range of acute lethal blood level was 447.164 0-524.463 5 mg/L. The pathological changes of the organs and tissues were observed via light microscope and immunofluorescence microscope. The changes of emamectin benzoate content in the blood, heart, liver, spleen, lung, kidney and brain of poisoning mice showed regularity within 72 h after death (P < 0.05). The target organs of emamectin benzoate poisoning include heart, liver, kidney, lung, brain and contact position (stomach). The toxicant storage depots are kidney and liver. There is emamectin benzoate postmortem redistribution in mice.

  3. Hydraulic redistribution of soil water by neotropical savanna trees.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Fabian G; Bucci, Sandra J; Goldstein, Guillermo; Meinzer, Frederick C; Franco, Augusto C

    2002-06-01

    The magnitude and direction of water transport by the roots of eight dominant Brazilian savanna (Cerrado) woody species were determined with a heat pulse system that allowed bidirectional measurements of sap flow. The patterns of sap flow observed during the dry season in species with dimorphic root systems were consistent with the occurrence of hydraulic redistribution of soil water, the movement of water from moist to drier regions of the soil profile via plant roots. In these species, shallow roots exhibited positive sap flow (from the soil into the plant) during the day and negative sap flow (from the plant into the soil) during the night. Sap flow in the taproots was positive throughout the 24-h period. Diel fluctuations in soil water potential, with maximum values occurring at night, provided evidence for partial rewetting of upper soil layers by water released from shallow roots. In other species, shallow roots exhibited negative sap flow during both the day and night, indicating that hydraulic redistribution was occurring continuously. A third sap flow pattern was observed at the end of the dry season after a heavy rainfall event when sap flow became negative in the taproot, and positive in the small roots, indicating movement of water from upper soil layers into shallow roots, and then into taproots and deeper soil layers. Experimental manipulations employed to evaluate the response of hydraulic redistribution to changes in plant and environmental conditions included watering the soil surface above shallow roots, decreasing transpiration by covering the plant and cutting roots where probes were inserted. Natural and manipulated patterns of sap flow in roots and stems were consistent with passive movement of water toward competing sinks in the soil and plant. Because dry shallow soil layers were often a stronger sink than the shoot, we suggest that the presence of a dimorphic root system in deciduous species may play a role in facilitating leaf expansion

  4. Improved superheater component longevity by steam flow redistribution. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hara, K.; Lee, C.; Moser, R.; Rettig, T.; Clark, K.

    1992-12-01

    A common problem in fossil fuel boilers is excessive tube metal temperatures in local regions of superheater and reheater tube banks. The resulting increased high temperature creep rates in the tubes in each local hot region lead to unacceptably high tube failure rates at these locations. In this situation, the utility often decides that the entire superheater must be replaced when, in fact, only a small percentage of the tubes is at end of life. The local hot regions are generally caused by heat flux nonuniformities on the fireside and also by steam flow nonuniformities. In this work, a solution to this problem is demonstrated which utilizes the concept of steam flow redistribution. The tube-to-tube steam flowrates are increased for hot tubes and decreased for cold tubes, subject to the constraint that total steam flowrate remains unaffected. The flowrate changes are accomplished by installing steam flow controllers in individual tubes to modify the flow resistance in each tube in a predictable manner. A guideline has been developed for designing, installing, and testing a pattern of steam flow controllers which optimizes the steam flow redistribution for a specific boiler. The optimum design achieves the maximum economic benefit by reducing the future tube failure rate and extending the life of the superheater. The general guideline, engineering design, economic assessment, and field testing procedures are described in detail. The general guideline and specific engineering procedures have been demonstrated for a site specific case, the superheater at San Diego Gas & Electric Company`s South Bay Plant, Unit 1. This study and demonstration provide both initial validation of the concept of steam flow redistribution to improve superheater longevity and incentive to apply the concept to other units.

  5. Improved superheater component longevity by steam flow redistribution

    SciTech Connect

    Hara, K.; Lee, C.; Moser, R.; Rettig, T.; Clark, K. )

    1992-12-01

    A common problem in fossil fuel boilers is excessive tube metal temperatures in local regions of superheater and reheater tube banks. The resulting increased high temperature creep rates in the tubes in each local hot region lead to unacceptably high tube failure rates at these locations. In this situation, the utility often decides that the entire superheater must be replaced when, in fact, only a small percentage of the tubes is at end of life. The local hot regions are generally caused by heat flux nonuniformities on the fireside and also by steam flow nonuniformities. In this work, a solution to this problem is demonstrated which utilizes the concept of steam flow redistribution. The tube-to-tube steam flowrates are increased for hot tubes and decreased for cold tubes, subject to the constraint that total steam flowrate remains unaffected. The flowrate changes are accomplished by installing steam flow controllers in individual tubes to modify the flow resistance in each tube in a predictable manner. A guideline has been developed for designing, installing, and testing a pattern of steam flow controllers which optimizes the steam flow redistribution for a specific boiler. The optimum design achieves the maximum economic benefit by reducing the future tube failure rate and extending the life of the superheater. The general guideline, engineering design, economic assessment, and field testing procedures are described in detail. The general guideline and specific engineering procedures have been demonstrated for a site specific case, the superheater at San Diego Gas Electric Company's South Bay Plant, Unit 1. This study and demonstration provide both initial validation of the concept of steam flow redistribution to improve superheater longevity and incentive to apply the concept to other units.

  6. Ozone production potential following convective redistribution of biomass burning emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickering, Kenneth E.; Thompson, Anne M.; Scala, John R.; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Simpson, Joanne

    1992-01-01

    The effects of deep convection on the potential for forming ozone in the free troposphere have been simulated for regions where the trace gas composition is influenced by biomass burning. Cloud photochemical and dynamic simulations based on observations in the 1980 and 1985 Brazilian campaigns form the basis of a sensitivity study of the ozone production potential under differing conditions. It is seen that there is considerably more ozone formed in the middle and upper troposphere when convection has redistributed hydrocarbons, NO(x), and CO compared to the example of no convection.

  7. Improved SIRT correction factors and redistribution in geotomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balanis, C. A.; Hill, H. W.; Freeland, K. A.

    In this paper revised correction factors are introduced which improve the profile of a geophysical environment reconstructed using the Simultaneous Iterative Reconstruction Technique (SIRT). These factors are based not only on the distances a given ray passes through the cells, as was assumed in the past, but also on the existing values (from a previous iteration) of the electrical properties of the cells through which a ray traverses. In addition, redistribution of the correction factors is utilized whenever the updated value of the electrical parameter of a given cell falls below a physically realizable or an a priori minimum value.

  8. Redistribution of particulates in shuttle bay during launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scialdone, John J.

    1986-01-01

    The dislodgement, venting, and redeposition of particles on a surface in the shuttle bay by the vibroacoustic, gravitational, and aerodynamic forces present during shuttle ascent were investigated. The particles of different sizes which are displaced, vented, and redistributed were calculated. An estimate of the increased number of particles on certain surfaces and the decrease on others is indicated. The average sizes, velocities, and length of time for certain particles to leave the bay following initial shuttle doors opening and thermal tests were calculated based on indirect data obtained during several shuttle flights.

  9. Stochastic load-redistribution model for cascading failure propagation.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Jörg; Bernasconi, Jakob

    2010-03-01

    A class of probabilistic models for cascading failure propagation in interconnected systems is proposed. The models are able to represent important physical characteristics of realistic load-redistribution mechanisms, e.g., that the load increments after a failure depend on the load of the failing element and that they may be distributed nonuniformly among the remaining elements. In the limit of large system sizes, the models are solved analytically in terms of generalized branching processes, and the failure propagation properties of a prototype example are analyzed in detail.

  10. Frequency redistribution function for the polarized two-term atom

    SciTech Connect

    Casini, R.; Landi Degl'Innocenti, M.; Manso Sainz, R.; Landolfi, M.

    2014-08-20

    We present a generalized frequency redistribution function for the polarized two-term atom in an arbitrary magnetic field. This result is derived within a new formulation of the quantum problem of coherent scattering of polarized radiation by atoms in the collisionless regime. The general theory, which is based on a diagrammatic treatment of the atom-photon interaction, is still a work in progress. However, the results anticipated here are relevant enough for the study of the magnetism of the solar chromosphere and of interest for astrophysics in general.

  11. Quantum Conditional Mutual Information, Reconstructed States, and State Redistribution.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Fernando G S L; Harrow, Aram W; Oppenheim, Jonathan; Strelchuk, Sergii

    2015-07-31

    We give two strengthenings of an inequality for the quantum conditional mutual information of a tripartite quantum state recently proved by Fawzi and Renner, connecting it with the ability to reconstruct the state from its bipartite reductions. Namely, we show that the conditional mutual information is an upper bound on the regularized relative entropy distance between the quantum state and its reconstructed version. It is also an upper bound for the measured relative entropy distance of the state to its reconstructed version. The main ingredient of the proof is the fact that the conditional mutual information is the optimal quantum communication rate in the task of state redistribution.

  12. Ozone production potential following convective redistribution of biomass burning emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickering, Kenneth E.; Thompson, Anne M.; Scala, John R.; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Simpson, Joanne

    1992-01-01

    The effects of deep convection on the potential for forming ozone in the free troposphere have been simulated for regions where the trace gas composition is influenced by biomass burning. Cloud photochemical and dynamic simulations based on observations in the 1980 and 1985 Brazilian campaigns form the basis of a sensitivity study of the ozone production potential under differing conditions. It is seen that there is considerably more ozone formed in the middle and upper troposphere when convection has redistributed hydrocarbons, NO(x), and CO compared to the example of no convection.

  13. Internal Transport Barrier Driven by Redistribution of Energetic Ions

    SciTech Connect

    K.L. Wong; W.W. Heidbrink; E. Ruskov; C.C. Petty; C.M. Greenfield; R. Nazikian; R. Budny

    2004-11-12

    Alfven instabilities excited by energetic ions are used as a means to reduce the central magnetic shear in a tokamak via redistribution of energetic ions. When the central magnetic shear is low enough, ballooning modes become stable for any plasma pressure gradient and an internal transport barrier (ITB) with a steep pressure gradient can exist. This mechanism can sustain a steady-state ITB as demonstrated by experimental data from the DIII-D tokamak. It can also produce a shear in toroidal and poloidal plasma rotation. Possible application of this technique to use the energetic alpha particles for improvement of burning plasma performance is discussed.

  14. Electromagnetic field redistribution in hybridized plasmonic particle-film system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Yurui; Huang, Yingzhou

    2013-04-01

    Combining simulation and experiment, we demonstrate that a metal nanoparticle dimer on a gold film substrate can confine more energy in the particle/film gap because of the hybridization of the dimer resonant lever and the continuous state of the film. The hybridization may even make the electric field enhancement in the dimer/film gap stronger than in the gap between particles. The resonant peak can be tuned by varying the size of the particles and the film thickness. This electromagnetic field redistribution has tremendous applications in sensor, photocatalysis and solar cell, etc., especially considering ultrasensitive detection of tracing molecule on substrates.

  15. ASH REDISTRIBUTION FOLLOWING A POTENTIAL VOLCANIC ERUPTION AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN

    SciTech Connect

    J. Pelletier; S. deLong; M.L. Cline; C. Harrington; G. Keating

    2005-08-29

    The redistribution of contaminated tephra by hillslope, fluvial, and pedologic processes is a poorly-constrained but important aspect of evaluating the radiological dose from an unlikely volcanic eruption at Yucca Mountain (YM). To better evaluate this hazard, we developed a spatially distributed, numerical model of tephra redistribution that integrates contaminated tephra from hill slopes and active channels, mixes it with clean sediment in the channel system, distributes it on the fan, and migrates it into the soil column. The model is coupled with an atmospheric dispersion model that predicts the deposition of radioactive waste-contaminated tephra at specified grid points. The redistribution model begins in the upper Fortymile Wash drainage basin where it integrates the tephra deposited on steep slopes and active channel beds within a GIS framework. The Fortymile Wash drainage basin is the focus of this model because tephra from only this basin reaches the Fortymile Wash alluvial fan by fluvial processes, and it is on this fan where the radiological dose to a hypothetical individual is compared to the regulatory standard (via additional biosphere models). The dilution effect of flood scour, mixing, and re-deposition within the upper basin is modeled using a dilution-mixing model widely used in the contaminant-transport literature. The accuracy of this model is established by comparing the model prediction with tephra concentrations measured in channels draining the Lathrop Wells volcanic center. The model combines the contaminated tephra transported from the upper basin with the tephra deposited directly on the fan as primary fallout. On the Fortymile Wash fan, channels and interchannel-divide areas are divided on the basis of soil-geomorphic mapping according to whether they are Holocene or Pleistocene in age. This approach allows the model to incorporate the effects of channel migration on the fan within the past 10,000 yr. The model treats the redistribution

  16. A proposal to redistribute the cost of hospital charity care.

    PubMed

    Tuckman, H P; Chang, C F

    1991-01-01

    Policy analysts debate whether providers of hospital services should share the responsibility of financing care for those who cannot pay for it. Many nonprofit and public hospitals, meanwhile, find it necessary to fund some of the services they deliver. A proposal to redistribute the costs of charity care more equitably is offered, taking into account the benefits an institution receives and its ability to pay. Hospitals would be required to quantify the charity care they provide and to make this information publicly available; in reviewing the information, legislatures are encouraged to set priorities on how much unmet need each state and each hospital should finance.

  17. Evaluating a pressure-redistribution mattress replacement system.

    PubMed

    Newton, Heather

    2014-11-01

    Pressure ulcer prevention is high on the quality agenda and provision of pressure-relieving equipment to meet patients' needs is an essential part of this process. This can be challenging in today's NHS and this article explores the evaluation process that supported the procurement of the AtmosAir™ 4000 pressure-redistributing mattress replacement system. Outcomes suggest that, when combined with a robust repositioning and skin assessment regime, the AtmosAir 4000 performed well and dynamic mattress usage was reduced. Further evaluation over a longer period of time will be undertaken in future.

  18. Redistribution of nitrogen implanted in the crystals of synthetic diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherepov, E. I.; Tishkovsky, E. G.; Obodnikov, V. I.; Pal'yanov, Ju. N.; Sokol, A. G.; Sobolev, N. V.

    2001-10-01

    The redistribution of nitrogen atoms implanted in synthetic diamond crystals was investigated by secondary ion mass-spectrometry in course of an isothermal annealing program at 1400°C during 1, 5 and 20 h. It was shown that the nitrogen profiles spread at a macroscopic scale, and the broadening is well described in terms of the diffusion movement of impurity atoms. The preliminary estimates of diffusion coefficients were obtained: 2.3×10 -15 cm2/ s for 1 h annealing, 8.5×10 -16 cm2/ s for 5 h annealing and 3.7×10 -16 cm2/ s for 20 h annealing.

  19. Redistribution of Implanted Dopants in GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, M.; Gao, X.A.; Han, J.; Pearton, S.J.; Rieger, D.J.; Scarvepalli, V. Sekhar, J.A.; Shul, R.J.; Singh, R.K.; Wilson, R.G.; Zavada, J.M.; Zolper, J.C.

    1998-11-20

    Donor (S, Se and Te) and acceptor (Mg, Be and C) dopants have been implanted into GaN at doses of 3-5x1014 cm-2 and annealed at temperatures up to 1450 *C. No redistribution of any of the elements is detectable by Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry, except for Be, which displays an apparent damage-assisted diffusion at 900 "C. At higher temperatures there is no further movement of the Be, suggesting that the point defect flux that assists motion at lower temperatures has been annealed. Effective diffusivities are <2X 1013 cm2.sec-1 at 1450 `C for each of the dopants in GaN.

  20. Dendrite-selective redistribution of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 following agonist stimulation.

    PubMed

    Baudouin, Stéphane J; Pujol, Fabien; Nicot, Arnaud; Kitabgi, Patrick; Boudin, Hélène

    2006-10-01

    The chemokine SDF-1 is a secreted protein that plays a critical role in several aspects of neuron development through interaction with its unique receptor CXCR4. A key mechanism that controls neuron responsiveness to extracellular signals during neuronal growth is receptor endocytosis. Since we previously reported that SDF-1 regulates axon development without affecting the other neurites, we asked whether this could correlate with a compartment-selective trafficking of CXCR4. We thus studied CXCR4 behavior upon SDF-1 exposure in rat hippocampus slices and in transfected neuron cultures. A massive agonist-induced redistribution of CXCR4 in endosomes was observed in dendrites whereas no modification was evidenced in axons. Our data suggest that CXCR4 trafficking may play a role in mediating selective effects of SDF-1 on distinct neuronal membrane subdomains.

  1. Tides and angular momentum redistribution inside low-mass stars hosting planets: a first dynamical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanza, A. F.; Mathis, S.

    2016-11-01

    We introduce a general mathematical framework to model the internal transport of angular momentum in a star hosting a close-in planetary/stellar companion. By assuming that the tidal and rotational distortions are small and that the deposit/extraction of angular momentum induced by stellar winds and tidal torques are redistributed solely by an effective eddy-viscosity that depends on the radial coordinate, we can formulate the model in a completely analytic way. It allows us to compute simultaneously the evolution of the orbit of the companion and of the spin and the radial differential rotation of the star. An illustrative application to the case of an F-type main-sequence star hosting a hot Jupiter is presented. The general relevance of our model to test more sophisticated numerical dynamical models and to study the internal rotation profile of exoplanet hosts, submitted to the combined effects of tides and stellar winds, by means of asteroseismology are discussed.

  2. Soil organic carbon redistribution by water erosion--the role of CO2 emissions for the carbon budget.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiang; Cammeraat, Erik L H; Romeijn, Paul; Kalbitz, Karsten

    2014-01-01

    A better process understanding of how water erosion influences the redistribution of soil organic carbon (SOC) is sorely needed to unravel the role of soil erosion for the carbon (C) budget from local to global scales. The main objective of this study was to determine SOC redistribution and the complete C budget of a loess soil affected by water erosion. We measured fluxes of SOC, dissolved organic C (DOC) and CO2 in a pseudo-replicated rainfall-simulation experiment. We characterized different C fractions in soils and redistributed sediments using density fractionation and determined C enrichment ratios (CER) in the transported sediments. Erosion, transport and subsequent deposition resulted in significantly higher CER of the sediments exported ranging between 1.3 and 4.0. In the exported sediments, C contents (mg per g soil) of particulate organic C (POC, C not bound to soil minerals) and mineral-associated organic C (MOC) were both significantly higher than those of non-eroded soils indicating that water erosion resulted in losses of C-enriched material both in forms of POC and MOC. The averaged SOC fluxes as particles (4.7 g C m(-2) yr(-1)) were 18 times larger than DOC fluxes. Cumulative emission of soil CO2 slightly decreased at the erosion zone while increased by 56% and 27% at the transport and depositional zone, respectively, in comparison to non-eroded soil. Overall, CO2 emission is the predominant form of C loss contributing to about 90.5% of total erosion-induced C losses in our 4-month experiment, which were equal to 18 g C m(-2). Nevertheless, only 1.5% of the total redistributed C was mineralized to CO2 indicating a large stabilization after deposition. Our study also underlines the importance of C losses by particles and as DOC for understanding the effects of water erosion on the C balance at the interface of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems.

  3. Soil Organic Carbon Redistribution by Water Erosion – The Role of CO2 Emissions for the Carbon Budget

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiang; Cammeraat, Erik L. H.; Romeijn, Paul; Kalbitz, Karsten

    2014-01-01

    A better process understanding of how water erosion influences the redistribution of soil organic carbon (SOC) is sorely needed to unravel the role of soil erosion for the carbon (C) budget from local to global scales. The main objective of this study was to determine SOC redistribution and the complete C budget of a loess soil affected by water erosion. We measured fluxes of SOC, dissolved organic C (DOC) and CO2 in a pseudo-replicated rainfall-simulation experiment. We characterized different C fractions in soils and redistributed sediments using density fractionation and determined C enrichment ratios (CER) in the transported sediments. Erosion, transport and subsequent deposition resulted in significantly higher CER of the sediments exported ranging between 1.3 and 4.0. In the exported sediments, C contents (mg per g soil) of particulate organic C (POC, C not bound to soil minerals) and mineral-associated organic C (MOC) were both significantly higher than those of non-eroded soils indicating that water erosion resulted in losses of C-enriched material both in forms of POC and MOC. The averaged SOC fluxes as particles (4.7 g C m−2 yr−1) were 18 times larger than DOC fluxes. Cumulative emission of soil CO2 slightly decreased at the erosion zone while increased by 56% and 27% at the transport and depositional zone, respectively, in comparison to non-eroded soil. Overall, CO2 emission is the predominant form of C loss contributing to about 90.5% of total erosion-induced C losses in our 4-month experiment, which were equal to 18 g C m−2. Nevertheless, only 1.5% of the total redistributed C was mineralized to CO2 indicating a large stabilization after deposition. Our study also underlines the importance of C losses by particles and as DOC for understanding the effects of water erosion on the C balance at the interface of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. PMID:24802350

  4. Redistribution of subsurface neutrons caused by ground ice on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, W. C.; Boynton, W. V.; Jakosky, B. M.; Mellon, M. T.

    1993-01-01

    As part of an ongoing effort to understand data that will be returned by the Mars Observer Gamma Ray Spectrometer (MOGRS) experiment, we calculate neutron and gamma ray fluxes for simple models describing near-surface ground ice on Mars. Our goal is to determine the limits in information content of remotely sensed neutrons and gamma rays is delineating the abundance of ground ice and its distribution with depth. Such ice is expected based on simple theoretical calculations of the H2O environment of the martian surface and atmosphere. We find it produces a marked redistribution of neutrons with depth. Neutron-capture gamma ray production closely follows the flux of thermal neutrons and is likewise redistributed with depth. Calculated effects at Mars mapping orbit are sufficiently large that, if ice is present at the depths and in the quantities expected, the MOGRS should provide a robust detection of its presence. Although in the information content of gamma rays and neutrons alone is not sufficient to define the many parameters needed to specify its abundance and emplacement below the surface, their combined use might allow separation of the ice abundance from its vertical distribution within the regolith.

  5. Heat Redistribution and Misaligned Orbit Models in PHOEBE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horvat, Martin; Prsa, Andrej; Conroy, Kyle E.

    2017-01-01

    Reflection and aligned Roche geometry have been long supported in modeling codes that synthesize light and radial velocity curves of eclipsing binary stars. However, recent advances in observational data, mostly in terms of precision and temporal baseline, demonstrated that the assumptions of these two effects are frequently violated. Reflection treatment neglected the energy absorbed by the irradiated star, and Roche geometry assumed aligned vectors of spin and orbital angular momentum. Observations of night- and day-side brightness variation of cooler stellar and substellar companions point to a clear deficiency in treating heat redistribution, and the break in symmetry of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect points to misaligned stellar spins w.r.t. orbital plane. The framework of existing codes did not allow for revising these effects while keeping the rest of the logic intact, which prompted a complete rewrite of the modeling code PHOEBE (PHysics Of Eclipsing BinariEs). Here we present the basic considerations and proof-of-concept examples of the revised reflection effect and misaligned spin-orbit support. Reflection has been extended with heat absorption and consequent redistribution, which can be local, longitudinal or global. Misaligned spin-orbit vectors are supported by deriving the equation of the Roche potential that allows misaligned rotational axes and are provided by the corresponding Euler angles. This research is supported by the NSF grant #1517474.

  6. Solar Atmospheric Magnetic Energy Coupling: Radiative Redistribution Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orange, N. Brice; Gendre, Bruce; Morris, David C.; Chesny, David

    2016-07-01

    Essential to many outstanding solar and stellar physics problems is elucidating the dynamic magnetic to radiative energy coupling of their atmospheres. Using three years of Solar Dynamics Observatory's Atmospheric Imaging Assembly and Heliosemic Magnetic Imager data of gross atmospheric feature classes, an investigation of magnetic and radiative energy redistribution is detailed. Self-consistent radiative to temperature distributions, that include magnetic weighting, of each feature class is revealed via utilizing the upper limit of thermodynamic atmospheric conditions provided by Active Region Cores (ARCs). Distinctly interesting is that our radiative energy distributions, though indicative to a linearly coupling with temperature, highlight the manifestation of diffuse ``unorganized" emission at upper transition region -- lower coronal regimes. Results we emphasize as correlating remarkably with emerging evidence for similar dependencies of magnetic energy redistribution efficiency with temperature, i.e., linearly with an embedded diffuse emitting region. We present evidence that our magnetic and radiative energy coupling descriptions are consistent with established universal scaling laws for large solar atmospheric temperature gradients and descriptions to the unresolved emission, as well as their insight to a potential origin of large variability in their previous reports. Finally, our work casts new light on the utility of narrowband observations as ad hoc tools for detailing solar atmospheric thermodynamic profiles, thus, presenting significant provisions to the field of solar and stellar physics, i.e., nature of coronae heating.

  7. Reliability of the special support system for sitting pressure redistribution

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Heon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the reliability of the Special Support System. [Subjects and Methods] Eighteen female and 14 male volunteers participated in this study. Participants were asked to sit on the Special Support System with their chins tucked in, spines straight, pelvis neutrally positioned, and their hands placed on their thighs. They were also asked to flex their hips, knees, and ankles to approximately 90 degrees and to put their feet flat on the floor. The total contact area, mean total pressure, as well as mean and peak pressures of each quadrant were each measured 15 times. Test-retest reliability was analyzed for inflated air pressure, and pressure redistribution values by using intraclass correlation coefficients. [Results] The intraclass correlation coefficient was greater than 0.89 for inflated air pressure and greater than 0.92 for total contact area, mean total pressure, and each quadrant’s mean and peak pressure. [Conclusion] The findings suggest that the Special Support System is reliable and can be used as an alternative method for redistributing sitting pressure. PMID:28174458

  8. Detrainment and aerosol redistribution in shallow convective clouds (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, P. Y.; Norgren, M.; Wonaschuetz, A.; Small, J. D.; Sorooshian, A.; Jonsson, H. H.; Feingold, G.; Ervens, B.; Murphy, S. M.

    2013-12-01

    Vertical transport associated with cumulus clouds is important to the redistribution of aerosol particles, gases and energy, with subsequent consequences for many aspects of the climate system. Previous studies have suggested that detrainment from clouds can be comparable to the updraft mass flux, and thus contribute to vertical transport. In this study, we describe a new method to deduce the amounts of gross detrainment and entrainment experienced by non-precipitating cumulus clouds using aircraft observations. The method is applied to aircraft observations from the Gulf of Mexico Atmospheric Composition and Climate Study (GoMACCS) which took place in the Houston, Texas region during which 176 small, non-precipitating cumulus were sampled. Our analysis suggests that, on average, these clouds were comprised of 30 to 70% mixed-layer air, with entrained air comprising most of the remainder. The mass fraction of detrained air was less than 2% for a majority of the clouds, although 15% of them did exhibit detrained air fractions larger than 10%. Entrained and detrained air mass fractions both increased with altitude, and the largest detrainment events were almost all associated with air that was at their level of neutral buoyancy, findings that are all consistent with previous studies. To address aerosol redistribution more specifically, aerosol size distributions on clear and cloudy days are compared, with substantial enhancements at higher altitudes found for cloudy days due to a combination of vertical transport and in situ sulfate and organic chemistry.

  9. Damage detection in beams based on redistribution of dead load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenton, Harry W., III; Hu, Xiaofeng

    2001-08-01

    A method is presented for detecting damage in a clamped-clamped beam based on redistribution of dead load in the member. The approach is based on measuring static strains due to dead load only, at three locations on the beam. In the event of damage (modeled as a local reduction in flexural stiffness at a single location in the beam) the bending moment in the beam redistributes and is no longer symmetric. Using the measured strains, a genetic optimization algorithm is used to determine the location and severity of damage in the beam. Four different damage scenarios are tested, these include: no damage (to test for false positive results); varying levels of damage near mid-span; equal levels of damage near the support, quarter point and mid-span; and damage near the support with 'noisy' measurement data. The technique is found to work well under a broad range of circumstances: the accuracy and success of the method depends on the damage location and the level of measurement noise in the data. Damage near the support and center of the beam can be identified with good accuracy. As one might expect, damage at or near to the point of inflection in the beam is more difficult to identify because the dead load strain in this vicinity is small. The technique is found to work well even with measurement noise on the order of 3 to 5%.

  10. Automatic generation of efficient array redistribution routines for distributed memory multicomputers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaswamy, Shankar; Banerjee, Prithviraj

    1994-01-01

    Appropriate data distribution has been found to be critical for obtaining good performance on Distributed Memory Multicomputers like the CM-5, Intel Paragon and IBM SP-1. It has also been found that some programs need to change their distributions during execution for better performance (redistribution). This work focuses on automatically generating efficient routines for redistribution. We present a new mathematical representation for regular distributions called PITFALLS and then discuss algorithms for redistribution based on this representation. One of the significant contributions of this work is being able to handle arbitrary source and target processor sets while performing redistribution. Another important contribution is the ability to handle an arbitrary number of dimensions for the array involved in the redistribution in a scalable manner. Our implementation of these techniques is based on an MPI-like communication library. The results presented show the low overheads for our redistribution algorithm as compared to naive runtime methods.

  11. The redistributive effect of health care finance in twelve OECD countries.

    PubMed

    van Doorslaer, E; Wagstaff, A; van der Burg, H; Christiansen, T; Citoni, G; Di Biase, R; Gerdtham, U G; Gerfin, M; Gross, L; Häkinnen, U; John, J; Johnson, P; Klavus, J; Lachaud, C; Lauritsen, J; Leu, R; Nolan, B; Pereira, J; Propper, C; Puffer, F; Rochaix, L; Schellhorn, M; Sundberg, G; Winkelhake, O

    1999-06-01

    The OECD countries finance their health care through a mixture of taxes, social insurance contributions, private insurance premiums and out-of-pocket payments. The various payment sources have very different implications for both vertical and horizontal equity and on redistributive effect which is a function of both. This paper presents results on the income redistribution consequences of the health care financing mixes adopted in twelve OECD countries by decomposing the overall income redistributive effect into a progressivity, horizontal inequity and reranking component. The general finding of this study is that the vertical effect is much more important than horizontal inequity and reranking in determining the overall redistributive effect but that their relative importance varies by source of payment. Public finance sources tend to have small positive redistributive effects and less differential treatment while private financing sources generally have (larger) negative redistributive effects which are to a substantial degree caused by differential treatment.

  12. Extremal and Game-Theoretic Characterizations of the Probabilistic Approach to Income Redistribution.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-03-01

    but it is biased toward low income indivi- duals. The linear income system does give a reasonable redistribution plan. This plan as we know from...approved i 83 06 30 068 CCS Research Report 453 EXTREMAL AND GAME-THEORETIC CHARACTERIZATIONS OF THE PROBABILISTIC APPROACH TO INCOME REDISTRIBUTION by A...Abstract In this paper we cast the problem of income redistribution in two different ways, one as a non-linear goal programming model, and the other as a

  13. Subcellular redistribution of trimeric G-proteins--potential mechanism of desensitization of hormone response: internalization, solubilization, down-regulation.

    PubMed

    Drastichová, Z; Bourová, L; Lisý, V; Hejnová, L; Rudajev, V; Stöhr, J; Durchánková, D; Ostasov, P; Teisinger, J; Soukup, T; Novotný, J; Svoboda, P

    2008-01-01

    Agonist-induced subcellular redistribution of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR) and of trimeric guanine-nucleotide binding regulatory proteins (G-proteins) represent mechanisms of desensitization of hormone response, which have been studied in our laboratory since 1989. This review brings a short summary of these results and also presents information about related literature data covering at least small part of research carried out in this area. We have also mentioned sodium plus potassium dependent adenosine triphosphatase (Na, K-ATPase) and 3H-ouabain binding as useful reference standard of plasma membrane purity in the brain.

  14. Inhibition of glycogen synthesis by increased lipid availability is associated with subcellular redistribution of glycogen synthase.

    PubMed

    Taylor, A J; Ye, J-M; Schmitz-Peiffer, C

    2006-01-01

    Increased lipid availability is associated with diminished insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis in muscle, but it is not clear whether alterations in glycogen synthase activity itself play a direct role. Because intracellular localization of this enzyme is involved in its regulation, we investigated whether fat oversupply causes an inhibitory redistribution. We examined the recovery of glycogen synthase in subcellular fractions from muscle of insulin-resistant, fat-fed rats and chow-fed controls, either maintained in the basal state or after a euglycaemic-hyperinsulinaemic clamp. Although glycogen synthase protein and activity were mostly recovered in an insoluble fraction, insulin caused translocation of activity from the smaller soluble pool to the insoluble fraction. Fat-feeding, which led to a reduction in glycogen synthesis during the clamp, was associated with a depletion in the soluble pool, consistent with an important role for this component. A similar depletion was also observed in cytosolic fractions of muscles from obese db/db mice, another model of lipid-induced insulin resistance. To investigate this in more detail, we employed lipid-pretreated L6 myotubes, which exhibited a reduction in insulin-stimulated glycogen synthesis independently of alterations in glucose flux or insulin signalling through protein kinase B. In control cells, insulin caused redistribution of a minor cytosolic pool of glycogen synthase to an insoluble fraction, which was again forestalled by lipid pretreatment. Glycogen synthase recovered in the insoluble fraction from pre-treated cells exhibited a low fractional velocity that was not increased in response to insulin. Our results suggest that the initial localization of glycogen synthase in a soluble pool plays an important role in glycogen synthesis, and that its sequestration in an insulin-resistant insoluble pool may explain in part the reduced glycogen synthesis caused by lipid oversupply.

  15. Adaptive finite-volume WENO schemes on dynamically redistributed grids for compressible Euler equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Harshavardhana S.; Shukla, Ratnesh K.

    2016-08-01

    A high-order adaptive finite-volume method is presented for simulating inviscid compressible flows on time-dependent redistributed grids. The method achieves dynamic adaptation through a combination of time-dependent mesh node clustering in regions characterized by strong solution gradients and an optimal selection of the order of accuracy and the associated reconstruction stencil in a conservative finite-volume framework. This combined approach maximizes spatial resolution in discontinuous regions that require low-order approximations for oscillation-free shock capturing. Over smooth regions, high-order discretization through finite-volume WENO schemes minimizes numerical dissipation and provides excellent resolution of intricate flow features. The method including the moving mesh equations and the compressible flow solver is formulated entirely on a transformed time-independent computational domain discretized using a simple uniform Cartesian mesh. Approximations for the metric terms that enforce discrete geometric conservation law while preserving the fourth-order accuracy of the two-point Gaussian quadrature rule are developed. Spurious Cartesian grid induced shock instabilities such as carbuncles that feature in a local one-dimensional contact capturing treatment along the cell face normals are effectively eliminated through upwind flux calculation using a rotated Hartex-Lax-van Leer contact resolving (HLLC) approximate Riemann solver for the Euler equations in generalized coordinates. Numerical experiments with the fifth and ninth-order WENO reconstructions at the two-point Gaussian quadrature nodes, over a range of challenging test cases, indicate that the redistributed mesh effectively adapts to the dynamic flow gradients thereby improving the solution accuracy substantially even when the initial starting mesh is non-adaptive. The high adaptivity combined with the fifth and especially the ninth-order WENO reconstruction allows remarkably sharp capture of

  16. Redistribution of Gαs in Mouse Salivary Glands Following β-Adrenergic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Hand, Arthur R.; Elder, Kareen O.; Norris, Rachael P.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Signaling via β-adrenergic receptors activates heterotrimeric G-proteins, which dissociate into α and βγ subunits. In salivary glands, the α subunit of Gs stimulates adenylate cyclase, increasing cyclic AMP levels and promoting exocytosis. The goals of this study were to determine Gαs localization in salivary glands and whether it undergoes redistribution upon activation. Methods Mouse parotid and submandibular (SMG) glands were fixed with paraformaldehyde and prepared for immunofluorescence labeling with anti-Gαs. Results In unstimulated parotid and SMG acinar cells, Gαs was localized mainly to basolateral membranes. Some parotid acinar cells also exhibited cytoplasmic fluorescence. Isoproterenol (IPR) stimulation resulted in decreased membrane fluorescence and increased cytoplasmic fluorescence, which appeared relatively uniform by 30 min. Beginning about 2 hr after IPR, cytoplasmic fluorescence decreased and membrane fluorescence increased, approaching unstimulated levels in SMG acini by 4 hr. Some parotid acini exhibited cytoplasmic fluorescence up to 8 hr after IPR. The IPR-induced redistribution of Gαs was prevented (SMG) or reduced (parotid) by prior injection of propranolol. Striated duct cells of unstimulated mice exhibited general cytoplasmic fluorescence, which was unchanged after IPR. Conclusions Gαs is localized to basolateral membranes of unstimulated salivary acinar cells. Activation of Gαs causes its release from the cell membrane and movement into the cytoplasm. Reassociation of Gαs with the membrane begins about 2 hr after stimulation in the SMG, but complete reassociation takes several hours in the parotid gland. The presence of Gαs in striated duct cells suggests a role in signal transduction of secretion and/or electrolyte transport processes. PMID:25748393

  17. Kinetic equations modelling wealth redistribution: a comparison of approaches.

    PubMed

    Düring, Bertram; Matthes, Daniel; Toscani, Giuseppe

    2008-11-01

    Kinetic equations modelling the redistribution of wealth in simple market economies is one of the major topics in the field of econophysics. We present a unifying approach to the qualitative study for a large variety of such models, which is based on a moment analysis in the related homogeneous Boltzmann equation, and on the use of suitable metrics for probability measures. In consequence, we are able to classify the most important feature of the steady wealth distribution, namely the fatness of the Pareto tail, and the dynamical stability of the latter in terms of the model parameters. Our results apply, e.g., to the market model with risky investments [S. Cordier, L. Pareschi, and G. Toscani, J. Stat. Phys. 120, 253 (2005)], and to the model with quenched saving propensities [A. Chatterjee, B. K. Chakrabarti, and S. S. Manna, Physica A 335, 155 (2004)]. Also, we present results from numerical experiments that confirm the theoretical predictions.

  18. Horizontal flow and capillarity-driven redistribution in porous media.

    PubMed

    Doster, F; Hönig, O; Hilfer, R

    2012-07-01

    A recent macroscopic mixture theory for two-phase immiscible displacement in porous media has introduced percolating and nonpercolating phases. Quasi-analytic solutions are computed and compared to the traditional theory. The solutions illustrate physical insights and effects due to spatiotemporal changes of nonpercolating phases, and they highlight the differences from traditional theory. Two initial and boundary value problems are solved in one spatial dimension. In the first problem a fluid is displaced by another fluid in a horizontal homogeneous porous medium. The displacing fluid is injected with a flow rate that keeps the saturation constant at the injection point. In the second problem a horizontal homogeneous porous medium is considered which is divided into two subdomains with different but constant initial saturations. Capillary forces lead to a redistribution of the fluids. Errors in the literature are reported and corrected.

  19. Redistribution of Lignin Caused by Dilute Acid Pretreatment of Biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D. K.; Donohoe, B. S.; Katahira, R.; Tucker, M. P.; Vinzant, T. B.; Himmel, M. E.

    2012-01-01

    Research conducted at NREL has shown that lignin undergoes a phase transition during thermochemical pretreatments conducted above its glass transition temperature. The lignin coalesces within the plant cell wall and appears as microscopic droplets on cell surfaces. It is clear that pretreatment causes significant changes in lignin distribution in pretreatments at all scales from small laboratory reactors to pilot scale reactors. A method for selectively extracting lignin droplets from the surfaces of pretreated cell walls has allowed us to characterize the chemical nature and molecular weight distribution of this fraction. The effect of lignin redistribution on the digestibility of pretreated solids has also been tested. It is clear that removal of the droplets increases the digestibility of pretreated corn stover. The improved digestibility could be due to decreased non-specific binding of enzymes to lignin in the droplets, or because the droplets no longer block access to cellulose.

  20. Creep Stress Redistribution of Single-Lap Weldbonded Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Yong; Chen, Jian-Jun; Tu, Shan-Tung

    2005-01-01

    Weldbonding is a new joining technique that combines the spot welding with the adhesive bonding. It has found more and more applications in recent years because of its unique advantages. However, researches on the new technique are few especially on the long-term stress and strength of weldbonded structures. In the present paper, three-dimensional viscoplastic finite element analyses (FEA) of a single-lap weldbonded joint are conducted to investigate the stress redistribution. The results show that stresses increase obviously near the interface between the adhesive and the weld spot with the creep of adhesive. The adhesive tends to distribute its stresses more uniformly and transfer some loads to the weld spot. The stress concentration factor of weldbonded joint is significantly lower than that of the direct spot-weld in connection. The simulations illustrate that increasing of creep parameter will enhance the maximum stress level in the weld spot.

  1. From microscopic taxation and redistribution models to macroscopic income distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertotti, Maria Letizia; Modanese, Giovanni

    2011-10-01

    We present here a general framework, expressed by a system of nonlinear differential equations, suitable for the modeling of taxation and redistribution in a closed society. This framework allows one to describe the evolution of income distribution over the population and to explain the emergence of collective features based on knowledge of the individual interactions. By making different choices of the framework parameters, we construct different models, whose long-time behavior is then investigated. Asymptotic stationary distributions are found, which enjoy similar properties as those observed in empirical distributions. In particular, they exhibit power law tails of Pareto type and their Lorenz curves and Gini indices are consistent with some real world ones.

  2. Kinetic equations modelling wealth redistribution: A comparison of approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Düring, Bertram; Matthes, Daniel; Toscani, Giuseppe

    2008-11-01

    Kinetic equations modelling the redistribution of wealth in simple market economies is one of the major topics in the field of econophysics. We present a unifying approach to the qualitative study for a large variety of such models, which is based on a moment analysis in the related homogeneous Boltzmann equation, and on the use of suitable metrics for probability measures. In consequence, we are able to classify the most important feature of the steady wealth distribution, namely the fatness of the Pareto tail, and the dynamical stability of the latter in terms of the model parameters. Our results apply, e.g., to the market model with risky investments [S. Cordier, L. Pareschi, and G. Toscani, J. Stat. Phys. 120, 253 (2005)], and to the model with quenched saving propensities [A. Chatterjee, B. K. Chakrabarti, and S. S. Manna, Physica A 335, 155 (2004)]. Also, we present results from numerical experiments that confirm the theoretical predictions.

  3. Charge Redistribution and Phonon Entropy of Vanadium Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Delaire, O.; Fultz, B.

    2006-12-15

    The effects of alloying on the lattice dynamics of vanadium were investigated using inelastic neutron scattering. Phonon densities of states were obtained for bcc solid solutions of V with 3d, 4d, and 5d transition metal solutes, from which vibrational entropies of alloying were obtained. A good correlation is found between the vibrational entropy of alloying and the electronegativity of transition metal solutes across the 3d row and down columns of the periodic table. First-principles calculations on supercells matching the experimental compositions predicted a systematic charge redistribution in the nearest-neighbor shell around the solute atoms, also following the Pauling and Watson electronegativity scales. The systematic stiffening of the phonons is interpreted in terms of the modified screening properties of the electron density around the solutes.

  4. Landform Erosion and Volatile Redistribution on Ganymede and Callisto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Jeffrey Morgan; Howard, Alan D.; McKinnon, William B.; Schenk, Paul M.; Wood, Stephen E.

    2009-01-01

    We have been modeling landscape evolution on the Galilean satellites driven by volatile transport. Our work directly addresses some of the most fundamental issues pertinent to deciphering icy Galilean satellite geologic histories by employing techniques currently at the forefront of terrestrial, martian, and icy satellite landscape evolution studies [e.g., 1-6], including modeling of surface and subsurface energy and volatile exchanges, and computer simulation of long-term landform evolution by a variety of processes. A quantitative understanding of the expression and rates of landform erosion, and of volatile redistribution on landforms, is especially essential in interpreting endogenic landforms that have, in many cases, been significantly modified by erosion [e.g., 7-9].

  5. Load redistribution considerations in the fracture of ceramic matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, David J.; Wetherhold, Robert C.

    1992-01-01

    Using a macroscopic viewpoint, composite laminae are homogeneous orthotropic solids whose directional strengths are random variables. Incorporation of these random variable strengths into failure models, either interactive or noninteractive, allows for the evaluation of the lamina reliability under a given stress state. Using a noninteractive criterion for demonstration purposes, laminate reliabilities are calculated assuming previously established load sharing rules for the redistribution of load as the failure of laminae occur. The matrix cracking predicted by ACK theory is modeled to allow a loss of stiffness in the fiber direction. The subsequent failure in the fiber direction is controlled by a modified bundle theory. Results are compared with previous models which did not permit separate consideration of matrix cracking, as well as to results obtained from experimental data. The effects of variations from the ideal physical geometry which is normally used to depict the matrix cracking are also studied.

  6. The global relaxation redistribution method for reduction of combustion kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kooshkbaghi, Mahdi; Frouzakis, Christos E.; Chiavazzo, Eliodoro; Boulouchos, Konstantinos; Karlin, Iliya V.

    2014-07-01

    An algorithm based on the Relaxation Redistribution Method (RRM) is proposed for constructing the Slow Invariant Manifold (SIM) of a chosen dimension to cover a large fraction of the admissible composition space that includes the equilibrium and initial states. The manifold boundaries are determined with the help of the Rate Controlled Constrained Equilibrium method, which also provides the initial guess for the SIM. The latter is iteratively refined until convergence and the converged manifold is tabulated. A criterion based on the departure from invariance is proposed to find the region over which the reduced description is valid. The global realization of the RRM algorithm is applied to constant pressure auto-ignition and adiabatic premixed laminar flames of hydrogen-air mixtures.

  7. Observations, measurements and best practices for monitoring hydraulic redistribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, T. W.; Liang, X.

    2011-12-01

    Hydraulic redistribution (HR) is a biogeophysical phenomenon where plant roots move water through the soil column from areas of high soil moisture content to areas of low soil moisture content. The impacts of this process on the hydrologic cycle at the regional scale are beginning to be studied through the use of numerical modeling. The extent of plant species which exhibit HR, the magnitude of water redistributed and the conditions under which it occurs are still unknown. Therefore models must rely on some general assumptions to account for this process. More information is needed to understand how to correctly account for HR in land surface models. The ideal method is through direct measurement and observation. HR has been studied through a variety of mediums, e.g. deuterium footprints, soil moisture patterns and sap flow measurements. All three methods capture the moisture fluctuations within the soil layers via measurements of deuterium concentration, volumetric soil moisture content and root sap flow direction. The problem with deuterium labeling is that it does not allow for the persistent long term measurements over natural wetting and drying periods without additional irrigation. Sap flow measurements, despite having the ability to measure specific plant individuals' water dynamics, requires difficult access to the plant's root system which can be complex and difficult to sample. Soil moisture measurements can be made on a variety of sensor types and the installation is much less intensive. This study examines soil moisture measurements as a means for monitoring HR. Field observations in different regions of the United States utilizing different soil moisture sensor types (capacitance and reflectometer) are shown to exhibit similar diurnal soil moisture patterns common to the HR phenomenon. These observations are then compared and contrasted to model simulation results.

  8. Perturbation of the morphology of the trans-Golgi network following Brefeldin A treatment: redistribution of a TGN-specific integral membrane protein, TGN38.

    PubMed

    Reaves, B; Banting, G

    1992-01-01

    Brefeldin A (BFA) has a dramatic effect on the morphology of the Golgi apparatus and induces a rapid redistribution of Golgi proteins into the ER (Lippincott-Schwartz, J., L. C. Yuan, J. S. Bonifacino, and R. D. Klausner. 1989. Cell. 56:801-813). To date, no evidence that BFA affects the morphology of the trans-Golgi network (TGN) has been presented. We describe the results of experiments, using a polyclonal antiserum to a TGN specific integral membrane protein (TGN38) (Luzio, J.P., B. Brake, G. Banting, K. E. Howell, P. Braghetta, and K. K. Stanley. 1990. Biochem. J. 270:97-102), which demonstrate that incubation of cells with BFA does induce morphological changes to the TGN. However, rather than redistributing to the ER, the majority of the TGN collapses around the microtubule organizing center (MTOC). The effect of BFA upon the TGN is (a) independent of protein synthesis, (b) fully reversible (c) microtubule dependent (as shown in nocodazole-treated cells), and (d) relies upon the hydrolysis of GTP (as shown by performing experiments in the presence of GTP gamma S). ATP depletion reduces the ability of BFA to induce a redistribution of Golgi proteins into the ER; however, it has no effect upon the BFA-induced relocalizations of the TGN. These data confirm that the TGN is an organelle which is independent of the Golgi, and suggest a dynamic interaction between the TGN and microtubules which is centered around the MTOC.

  9. 47 CFR 76.1909 - Redistribution control of unencrypted digital terrestrial broadcast content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Redistribution control of unencrypted digital... Redistribution control of unencrypted digital terrestrial broadcast content. (a) For the purposes of this section, the terms unencrypted digital terrestrial broadcast content, EIT, PMT, broadcast flag, covered...

  10. 41 CFR 101-25.104-1 - Redistribution, repair, or rehabilitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., or rehabilitation. 101-25.104-1 Section 101-25.104-1 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal...-GENERAL 25.1-General Policies § 101-25.104-1 Redistribution, repair, or rehabilitation. Prior to the... through redistribution, repair, or rehabilitation of already owned furniture and office machines. In...

  11. 41 CFR 101-25.104-1 - Redistribution, repair, or rehabilitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., or rehabilitation. 101-25.104-1 Section 101-25.104-1 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal...-GENERAL 25.1-General Policies § 101-25.104-1 Redistribution, repair, or rehabilitation. Prior to the... through redistribution, repair, or rehabilitation of already owned furniture and office machines. In...

  12. Local redistribution of blood under the effect of fixation stress against a background of hypokinesia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovalev, O. A.; Lysak, V. F.; Severovostokova, V. I.; Shermetevskaya, S. K.

    1980-01-01

    Fixation stress was used as a model of emotional disturbance. The effect of previous restrictions on mobility on the local redistribution of blood resulting from fixation stress was examined. Disturbances in carbohydrate which result from prolonged hypokinesia was studied. Radioactivity was used to determine the local redistribution of blood. Modified factor analysis was used to study the results of the experiment.

  13. 47 CFR 73.9001 - Redistribution control of digital television broadcasts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Redistribution control of digital television broadcasts. 73.9001 Section 73.9001 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Digital Broadcast Television Redistribution Control §...

  14. Hydraulic redistribution in a Douglas-fir forest: lessons from system manipulations.

    Treesearch

    J. Renée Brooks; Frederick C. Meinzer; Jeffery M. Warren; Jean-Christophe Domec; Rob. Coulombe

    2006-01-01

    Hydraulic redistribution (HR) occurs in many ecosystems; however, key questions remain about its consequences at the ecosystem level. The objectives of the present study were to quantify seasonal variation in HR and its driving force, and to manipulate the soil-root system to elucidate physiological components controlling HR and utilization of redistributed water. In...

  15. 47 CFR 76.1909 - Redistribution control of unencrypted digital terrestrial broadcast content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Redistribution control of unencrypted digital... Redistribution control of unencrypted digital terrestrial broadcast content. (a) For the purposes of this section, the terms unencrypted digital terrestrial broadcast content, EIT, PMT, broadcast flag, covered...

  16. 47 CFR 76.1909 - Redistribution control of unencrypted digital terrestrial broadcast content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Redistribution control of unencrypted digital... Redistribution control of unencrypted digital terrestrial broadcast content. (a) For the purposes of this section, the terms unencrypted digital terrestrial broadcast content, EIT, PMT, broadcast flag, covered...

  17. 47 CFR 76.1909 - Redistribution control of unencrypted digital terrestrial broadcast content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Redistribution control of unencrypted digital... Redistribution control of unencrypted digital terrestrial broadcast content. (a) For the purposes of this section, the terms unencrypted digital terrestrial broadcast content, EIT, PMT, broadcast flag, covered...

  18. Development Planning and Population Growth and Redistribution in the Republic of Iraq.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El Attar, M. E.; Salman, A. D.

    Utilizing the 1947, 1957, and l965 census data and the 1970 preliminary population count, the relationship between population growth and redistribution and development planning in Iraq was examined. Trends in rural-urban population growth, migration, and population redistribution were examined as they pertained to the socioeconomic development…

  19. Managing consequences of climate-driven species redistribution requires integration of ecology, conservation and social science.

    PubMed

    Bonebrake, Timothy C; Brown, Christopher J; Bell, Johann D; Blanchard, Julia L; Chauvenet, Alienor; Champion, Curtis; Chen, I-Ching; Clark, Timothy D; Colwell, Robert K; Danielsen, Finn; Dell, Anthony I; Donelson, Jennifer M; Evengård, Birgitta; Ferrier, Simon; Frusher, Stewart; Garcia, Raquel A; Griffis, Roger B; Hobday, Alistair J; Jarzyna, Marta A; Lee, Emma; Lenoir, Jonathan; Linnetved, Hlif; Martin, Victoria Y; McCormack, Phillipa C; McDonald, Jan; McDonald-Madden, Eve; Mitchell, Nicola; Mustonen, Tero; Pandolfi, John M; Pettorelli, Nathalie; Possingham, Hugh; Pulsifer, Peter; Reynolds, Mark; Scheffers, Brett R; Sorte, Cascade J B; Strugnell, Jan M; Tuanmu, Mao-Ning; Twiname, Samantha; Vergés, Adriana; Villanueva, Cecilia; Wapstra, Erik; Wernberg, Thomas; Pecl, Gretta T

    2017-06-01

    Climate change is driving a pervasive global redistribution of the planet's species. Species redistribution poses new questions for the study of ecosystems, conservation science and human societies that require a coordinated and integrated approach. Here we review recent progress, key gaps and strategic directions in this nascent research area, emphasising emerging themes in species redistribution biology, the importance of understanding underlying drivers and the need to anticipate novel outcomes of changes in species ranges. We highlight that species redistribution has manifest implications across multiple temporal and spatial scales and from genes to ecosystems. Understanding range shifts from ecological, physiological, genetic and biogeographical perspectives is essential for informing changing paradigms in conservation science and for designing conservation strategies that incorporate changing population connectivity and advance adaptation to climate change. Species redistributions present challenges for human well-being, environmental management and sustainable development. By synthesising recent approaches, theories and tools, our review establishes an interdisciplinary foundation for the development of future research on species redistribution. Specifically, we demonstrate how ecological, conservation and social research on species redistribution can best be achieved by working across disciplinary boundaries to develop and implement solutions to climate change challenges. Future studies should therefore integrate existing and complementary scientific frameworks while incorporating social science and human-centred approaches. Finally, we emphasise that the best science will not be useful unless more scientists engage with managers, policy makers and the public to develop responsible and socially acceptable options for the global challenges arising from species redistributions. © 2017 Cambridge Philosophical Society.

  20. The ecohydrologic significance of hydraulic redistribution in a semiarid savanna 1898

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Recent studies have illuminated the process of hydraulic redistribution, defined as the movement of soil moisture via plant root systems, but the long-term ecohydrologic significance of this process is poorly understood. We investigated hydraulic redistribution (HR) by Prosopis velutina Woot. (velve...

  1. Using Cesium-137 to study soil redistribution in Guam and Hawaii

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Understanding soil redistribution and sediment sources on the landscape are keys for the development of management strategies for reducing soil erosion and the delivery sediments to floodplains, streams and water bodies. Fallout Cs-137 has been used extensively to measure soil redistribution, to de...

  2. Nuclear redistribution of tonicity-responsive enhancer binding protein requires proteasome activity.

    PubMed

    Woo, S K; Maouyo, D; Handler, J S; Kwon, H M

    2000-02-01

    Tonicity-responsive enhancer binding protein (TonEBP) is the transcription factor that regulates tonicity-responsive expression of the genes for the sodium-myo-inositol cotransporter (SMIT) and the sodium-chloride-betaine cotransporter (BGT1). Hypertonicity stimulates the activity of TonEBP due to a combination of increased protein abundance and increased nuclear distribution (proportion of TonEBP that is in the nucleus). We found that inhibitors of proteasome activity markedly reduce the induction of SMIT and BGT1 mRNA in response to hypertonicity. These inhibitors also reduce hypertonicity-induced stimulation of expression of a reporter gene controlled by the tonicity-responsive enhancer. Western and immunohistochemical analyses revealed that the proteasome inhibitors reduce the hypertonicity-induced increase of TonEBP in the nucleus by inhibiting its nuclear redistribution without affecting its abundance. Although the nuclear distribution of TonEBP is sensitive to inhibition of proteasome activity as is that of nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB, the signaling pathways appear to be different in that hypertonicity does not affect the nuclear distribution of NF-kappaB. Conversely, treatment with tumor necrosis factor-alpha increases the nuclear distribution of NF-kappaB but not TonEBP.

  3. B cells undergo unique compartmentalized redistribution in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Haas, Jürgen; Bekeredjian-Ding, Isabelle; Milkova, Miriam; Balint, Bettina; Schwarz, Alexander; Korporal, Mirjam; Jarius, Sven; Fritz, Brigitte; Lorenz, Hanns-Martin; Wildemann, Brigitte

    2011-12-01

    Increasing evidence fosters the role of B cells (BC) in multiple sclerosis (MS). The compartmentalized distribution of BC in blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is incompletely understood. In this study, we analyzed BC-patterns and BC-immunoreactivity at these sites during active and during stable disease and the impact of disease modifying drugs (DMD) on peripheral BC-homeostasis. For this purpose we assessed BC-subsets in blood and CSF from patients with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS), relapsing remitting MS (RRMS), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and healthy controls (HC) by flow cytometric detection of whole (W-BC), naïve, transitional (TN-BC), class-switched memory (CSM-BC), unswitched memory (USM-BC), double-negative memory (DNM-BC) BC-phenotypes, plasma blasts (PB), and plasma cells (PC). FACS-data were correlated with BC-specific chemotactic activities in CSF, intrathecal CXCL13-levels, and immunoreactivity of peripheral W-BC. Our study revealed that frequencies of systemic CSM-BC/USM-BC became contracted in active CIS/MS while proportions of naive BC, TN-BC and DNM-BC were reciprocally expanded. Moreover, the shifted BC-composition promoted reduced immunoreactivity of W-BC and resolved during remission. Cross-over changes in CSF included privileged accumulation of CSM-BC linked to intrathecal CXCL13-concentrations and expansion of PB/PC. Treatment with interferon-beta and natalizumab evoked distinct though differing redistribution of circulating BC-subsets. We conclude that symptomatic CIS and MS are accompanied by distinctive changes in peripheral and CSF BC-homeostasis. The privileged reciprocal distribution between naïve versus CSM-phenotypes in both compartments together with the marked chemotactic driving force towards BC prompted by CSF supernatants renders it likely that CSF BC are mainly recruited from peripheral blood during active CIS/MS, whereas constantly low percentages of circulating PB/PC and their failure to respond to migratory stimuli

  4. Optimal redistribution of the background ozone monitoring stations over France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Lin; Bocquet, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Ozone is a harmful air pollutant at ground level, and its concentrations are routinely measured with monitoring networks. The network design problem aims at determining the optimal positioning of the monitoring stations. In this study, the background stations of the French routine pollution monitoring network (BDQA) are partially redistributed over France under a set of design objectives. These background stations report ozone variations at large spatial scale comparable with that of a chemistry-transport model (CTM). The design criterion needs to be defined on a regular grid that covers France, where in general no ozone observations are available for validation. Geostatistical ozone estimation methods are used to extrapolate concentrations to these grid nodes. The geostatistical criteria are introduced to minimize the theoretical error of those geostatistical extrapolations. A physical criterion is also introduced to measure the ability of a network to represent a physical ozone field retrieved from CTM simulations using geostatistical extrapolation methods. A third type of criteria of geometrical nature, e.g. a maximal coverage of the design domain, are based uniquely on the distance between the network stations. To complete the network design methodology, a stochastic optimization method, simulated annealing, is employed in the algorithm to select optimally the stations. Significant improvement with all the proposed criteria has been found for the optimally redistributed network against the original background BDQA network. For instance, the relative improvements in the physical criterion value range from 21% to 32% compared to randomly relocated networks. Different design criteria lead to different optimally relocated networks. The optimal networks under physical criteria are the most heterogeneously distributed. More background stations are displaced to the coast, frontiers, and large urban agglomerations, e.g. Paris and Marseilles. The ozone heterogeneous

  5. Virus-infection or 5'ppp-RNA activates antiviral signal through redistribution of IPS-1 mediated by MFN1.

    PubMed

    Onoguchi, Kazuhide; Onomoto, Koji; Takamatsu, Shiori; Jogi, Michihiko; Takemura, Azumi; Morimoto, Shiho; Julkunen, Ilkka; Namiki, Hideo; Yoneyama, Mitsutoshi; Fujita, Takashi

    2010-07-22

    In virus-infected cells, RIG-I-like receptor (RLR) recognizes cytoplasmic viral RNA and triggers innate immune responses including production of type I and III interferon (IFN) and the subsequent expression of IFN-inducible genes. Interferon-beta promoter stimulator 1 (IPS-1, also known as MAVS, VISA and Cardif) is a downstream molecule of RLR and is expressed on the outer membrane of mitochondria. While it is known that the location of IPS-1 is essential to its function, its underlying mechanism is unknown. Our aim in this study was to delineate the function of mitochondria so as to identify more precisely its role in innate immunity. In doing so we discovered that viral infection as well as transfection with 5'ppp-RNA resulted in the redistribution of IPS-1 to form speckle-like aggregates in cells. We further found that Mitofusin 1 (MFN1), a key regulator of mitochondrial fusion and a protein associated with IPS-1 on the outer membrane of mitochondria, positively regulates RLR-mediated innate antiviral responses. Conversely, specific knockdown of MFN1 abrogates both the virus-induced redistribution of IPS-1 and IFN production. Our study suggests that mitochondria participate in the segregation of IPS-1 through their fusion processes.

  6. Analysis of sodium and potassium redistribution during sustained permeability increases at the innervated face of Electrophorus electroplaques

    PubMed Central

    1978-01-01

    Cholinergic agonists cause an increase in the membrane permeability of Na and K at the innervated face of Electrophorus electroplaques. Therefore, sustained exposure to agonist reduces Na and K concentration gradients. There gradients are monitored with voltage-clamp sequences and pharmacological treatments that selectively measure the Nernst potentials for individual ions. EK is normally near--90 mV but moves toward zero during bath application of agonist. Depolarizations by bath- applied agonist measure primarily this shift of EK, not short- circuiting of EK by the agonist-induced conductance. After a rapid jump of agonist concentration, there is a fast (millisecond) depolarization due to the conductance increase, followed by a much slower additional "creep" due to the shift in EK. Sodium replaces the lost intracellular potassium: ENa, normally very positive, also moves toward zero. The shifts in EK and ENa are normally reversible but become permanent after blockade of the Na-K pump. In the presence of agonist, the shifts can be driven further by passing current of the appropriate polarity. Similar ion redistribution occurs with other drugs, such as batrachotoxin and nystatin, which induce prolonged increases in Na permeability. The redistributions cause little net change in the reversal potential of the neurally evoked postsynaptic current. PMID:731201

  7. The Production and Redistribution of Oxygen in Saturn's Magnetosphere: CAPS Cassini Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, R. E.; Sittler, E. C.; Crary, F. J.; Tokar, R. L.; Reisenfeld, D. B.; Hill, T. W.; Young, D. T.; Burger, M. H.; Shematovich, V. I.; Smith, H. T.; Michael, M.; Jurac, S.; Richardson, J. D.; Baragiola, R. A.

    2004-12-01

    The Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS) has detected O2+, O+ and H2+ in the inner magnetosphere and over the main rings. Here we examine the formation and redistribution of molecular oxygen over the icy rings and in the inner magnetosphere. Thin oxygen atmospheres exist on Europa and Ganymede formed by radiolysis (Johnson et al. 2004). Because the escape of O2 from these satellites is inefficient,Europa has a tenuous molecular oxygen cloud (Burger and Johnson 2004, Hansen et al. 2004; Shematovich et al 2004). However, radiation induced chemistry on icy objects in Saturn's system will directly populate the magnetosphere with molecular oxygen leading to the formation of O2+ and its observed dissociation products O and O+. Therefore, in addition to neutral H (Shemansky et al. 1992), OH (Jurac et al. 2002) and nitrogen clouds(Smith et al. 2004), there is likely a molecular oxygen cloud in Saturn's magnetosphere. Since water vapor can be produced by the incident radiation, by meteoroid impacts, and by collisions between grains and small bodies, the observation of molecular oxygen can be a marker for radiation-induced decomposition of ice (Shi et al. 1995, Johnson et al. 2003). Here we present the CAPS data and calculations of the UV production of O2 and H2 over the main rings and the charged particle production over the tenuous rings. We also describe the redistribution of oxygen in Saturn's magnetosphere by ion molecule reactions and charge exchange (Eviatar et al. 1983, Johnson et al. 1989). References Burger, M.H., R.E. Johnson Icarus 171, in press 2004. Eviatar, A., et al., JGR 88, 823-831, 1983. Hansen, C. J., et al., Icarus, submitted, 2004. Johnson, R.E. et al., Astrobiology , v3, 823-850,2003. Johnson, R.E. et al., In Jupiter-The Planet, Satellites, Magnetosphere, ed. F. Bagenal et al.,Cambridge Press, 2004. Jurac, S. et al.,GRL 29, 2172, 25-1 V 4, 2002. Shematovich, V.I. et al., Icarus, in press, 2004 Shemansky, D. E., D. T. Hall. JGR 97, 4143~V4161,1992. Shi, M

  8. Hydraulic redistribution: limitations for plants in saline soils.

    PubMed

    Bazihizina, Nadia; Veneklaas, Erik J; Barrett-Lennard, Edward G; Colmer, Timothy D

    2017-10-01

    Hydraulic redistribution (HR), the movement of water from wet to dry patches in the soil via roots, occurs in different ecosystems and plant species. By extension of the principle that HR is driven by gradients in soil water potential, HR has been proposed to occur for plants in saline soils. Despite the inherent spatial patchiness and salinity gradients in these soils, the lack of direct evidence of HR in response to osmotic gradients prompted us to ask the question: are there physical or physiological constraints to HR for plants in saline environments? We propose that build-up of ions in the root xylem sap and in the leaf apoplast, with the latter resulting in a large predawn disequilibrium of water potential in shoots compared with roots and soil, would both impede HR. We present a conceptual model that illustrates how processes in root systems in heterogeneous salinity with water potential gradients, even if equal to those in non-saline soils, will experience a dampened magnitude of water potential gradients in the soil-plant continuum, minimizing or preventing HR. Finally, we provide an outlook for understanding the relevance of HR for plants in saline environments by addressing key research questions on plant salinity tolerance. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Redistribution of the laser beam power using diffractive optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murzin, Serguei P.; Liedl, Gerhard; Bielak, Robert

    2017-04-01

    The use of laser technologies in the production of optical fiber requires a careful choice of optical systems for positioning and transforming the laser beam. The purpose of this research is to determine a possibility of the redistribution of the laser beam power using diffractive optical elements. It was determined that for a radius of the focusable beam Rf = rf =2.2×10-2 m, the length of the focal spot will be increased to a value L =13.6×10-3 m, which is 1.2 times larger than Rf = rf =1.8×10-2 m. In this case, the intensity of the laser beam at the centre of the focal spot, q0 , and the maximum value, qmax , decreased by 1.1 times. An approximation of function q(x, y) by polynomials of degree n =5and m =3 was performed. It is shown that the maximal relative error of approximation does not exceed 4%, and the relative error of approximation in the centre of the focal spot does not exceed 3%. Presented equations can be used to calculate the intensity distribution in the focal plane of diffractive optical elements.

  10. Interactive graphical tools for three-dimensional mesh redistribution

    SciTech Connect

    Dobbs, Lauri Ann

    1996-03-01

    Three-dimensional meshes modeling nonlinear problems such as sheet metal forming, metal forging, heat transfer during welding, the propagation of microwaves through gases, and automobile crashes require highly refined meshes in local areas to accurately represent areas of high curvature, stress, and strain. These locally refined areas develop late in the simulation and/or move during the course of the simulation, thus making it difficult to predict their exact location. This thesis is a systematic study of new tools scientists can use with redistribution algorithms to enhance the solution results and reduce the time to build, solve, and analyze nonlinear finite element problems. Participatory design techniques including Contextual Inquiry and Design were used to study and analyze the process of solving such problems. This study and analysis led to the in-depth understanding of the types of interactions performed by FEM scientists. Based on this understanding, a prototype tool was designed to support these interactions. Scientists participated in evaluating the design as well as the implementation of the prototype tool. The study, analysis, prototype tool design, and the results of the evaluation of the prototype tool are described in this thesis.

  11. Cooling fermions in optical lattices by faster entropy redistribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teles, Rafael P.; Yang, Tsung-Lin; Paiva, Thereza; Scalettar, Richard T.; Natu, Stefan S.; Hulet, Randall G.; Hazzard, Kaden R. A.

    2016-05-01

    Lower entropy for fermions in optical lattices would unlock new quantum phases, including antiferromagnetism and potentially superconductivity. We propose a method to cool these systems at temperatures where conventional methods fail: slowly turning on a tightly focused optical potential transports entropy from the Mott insulator to a metallic entropy reservoir formed along the beam. Our scheme places the entropy reservoir close to the targeted cooling region, which allows entropy redistribution to be effective at lower temperatures than in prior proposals. Furthermore we require only a straightforwardly-applied Gaussian potential. We compute the temperatures achieved with this scheme using an analytic T >> t approximation and, for low T, determinantal quantum Monte Carlo. We optimize the waist and depth of the focused beam, and we find that repulsive potentials cool better than attractive ones. We estimate that the time required for entropy transport under nearly adiabatic conditions at these low temperatures is compatible with the system lifetime. Finally, we explore further improvements to cooling enabled by sophisticated potential engineering, e.g. using a spatial light modulator. Work supported by CNPq.

  12. Visualising landscape evolution: the effects of resolution on soil redistribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoorl, Jeroen M.; Claessens, Lieven; (A) Veldkamp, Tom

    2017-04-01

    Landscape forming processes such as erosion by water, land sliding by water and gravity or ploughing by gravity, are closely related to resolution and land use changes. These processes may be controlled and influenced by multiple bio-physical and socio-economic driving factors, resulting in a complex multi-scale system. Consequently, land use changes should not be analysed in isolation without accounting for both on-site and off-site effects of these landscape processes in landscapes where water driven and or gravity driven processes are very active,. Especially the visualisation of these on- and off-site effects as a movie of evolving time series and changes is a potential valuable possibility in DEM modelling approaches. To investigate the interactions between land use, land use change, resolution of DEMs and landscape processes, a case study for the Álora region in southern Spain will presented, mainly as movies of modelling time-series, Starting from a baseline scenario of land use change, different levels of resolutions, interactions and feedbacks are added to the coupled LAPSUS model framework: Quantities and spatial patterns of both land use change and soil redistribution are compared between the baseline scenario without interactions and with each of the interaction mechanisms implemented consecutively. All as a function of spatial resolution. Keywords: LAPSUS; land use change; soil erosion, movie;

  13. Omaha Soil Mixing Study: Redistribution of Lead in ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Urban soils within the Omaha Lead Superfund Site have been contaminated with lead (Pb) from atmospheric deposition of particulate materials from lead smelting and recycling activities. In May of 2009 the Final Record of Decision stated that any residential soil exceeding the preliminary remediation goal (PRG; 400 mgPb kg-1soil) would be excavated, backfilled and re-vegetated. The remedial action entailed excavating contaminated soil in the top 12 inches and excavation could stop when the concentration of soil Pb was less than 400 mg kg-1 in the top 12 inches, or less than 1200 mg kg-1 at depths greater than 1 ft. After removal of the contaminated soil, clean backfill was applied and a grass lawn was replanted. A depth of 12 inches was based on the assumption that Pb-contaminated soil at depth greater than 1 ft would not represent a future risk (ASTDR Health Consult, 2004). This assumption was based on the principal that mixing and other factors encountered during normal excavation practices would not result in Pb surface concentrations greater than the PRG. The goal of the current study was to investigate the redistribution of Pb in remediated residential surface soils after typical homeowner earth-disturbing activities in the OLS Site. Of specific interest to the region for protection of human health is determining whether soil mixing associated with normal homeowner excavation practices results in surface Pb concentrations greater than the preliminary r

  14. Particle erosion mechanisms and mass redistribution in Saturn's rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durisen, R. H.

    1984-01-01

    A variety of physical processes can erode the surfaces of planetary ring particles. According to current estimates, the most efficient of these over the bulk of Saturn's rings is hypervelocity impact by 100 microns to one centimeter radius meteoroids. The atoms, molecules, and fragments ejected from ring particles by erosion arc across the rings along elliptical orbits to produce a tenuous halo of solid ejecta and an extensive gaseous atmosphere. Continuous exchange of ejecta between different ring regions can lead to net radial transport of mass and angular momentum. The equations governing this ballistic transport process are presented and discussed. Both numerical and analytic studies of idealized ring systems illustrate that ballistic transport can cause significant mass redistribution in the rings, especially near regions of high density contrast, such as the inner edges of the A and B rings. Ejecta exchanges can also alter local particle sizes and compositions and may produce pulverized regoliths at least several centimeters deep. The meteoroid erosion rate is so high that significant global torques and mass loss are possible on times shorter than a solar system life time.

  15. Terrestrial vegetation redistribution and carbon balance under climate change

    PubMed Central

    Lucht, Wolfgang; Schaphoff, Sibyll; Erbrecht, Tim; Heyder, Ursula; Cramer, Wolfgang

    2006-01-01

    Background Dynamic Global Vegetation Models (DGVMs) compute the terrestrial carbon balance as well as the transient spatial distribution of vegetation. We study two scenarios of moderate and strong climate change (2.9 K and 5.3 K temperature increase over present) to investigate the spatial redistribution of major vegetation types and their carbon balance in the year 2100. Results The world's land vegetation will be more deciduous than at present, and contain about 125 billion tons of additional carbon. While a recession of the boreal forest is simulated in some areas, along with a general expansion to the north, we do not observe a reported collapse of the central Amazonian rain forest. Rather, a decrease of biomass and a change of vegetation type occurs in its northeastern part. The ability of the terrestrial biosphere to sequester carbon from the atmosphere declines strongly in the second half of the 21st century. Conclusion Climate change will cause widespread shifts in the distribution of major vegetation functional types on all continents by the year 2100. PMID:16930462

  16. Lead sequestration and species redistribution during soil organic matter decomposition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schroth, A.W.; Bostick, B.C.; Kaste, J.M.; Friedland, A.J.

    2008-01-01

    The turnover of soil organic matter (SOM) maintains a dynamic chemical environment in the forest floor that can impact metal speciation on relatively short timescales. Here we measure the speciation of Pb in controlled and natural organic (O) soil horizons to quantify changes in metal partitioning during SOM decomposition in different forest litters. We provide a link between the sequestration of pollutant Pb in O-horizons, estimated by forest floor Pb inventories, and speciation using synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. When Pb was introduced to fresh forest Oi samples, it adsorbed primarily to SOM surfaces, but as decomposition progressed over two years in controlled experiments, up to 60% of the Pb was redistributed to pedogenic birnessite and ferrihydrite surfaces. In addition, a significant fraction of pollutant Pb in natural soil profiles was associated with similar mineral phases (???20-35%) and SOM (???65-80%). Conifer forests have at least 2-fold higher Pb burdens in the forest floor relative to deciduous forests due to more efficient atmospheric scavenging and slower organic matter turnover. We demonstrate that pedogenic minerals play an important role in surface soil Pb sequestration, particularly in deciduous forests, and should be considered in any assessment of pollutant Pb mobility. ?? 2008 American Chemical Society.

  17. Emission redistribution from a quantum dot-bowtie nanoantenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regler, Armin; Schraml, Konrad; Lyamkina, Anna A.; Spiegl, Matthias; Müller, Kai; Vuckovic, Jelena; Finley, Jonathan J.; Kaniber, Michael

    2016-07-01

    We present a combined experimental and simulation study of a single self-assembled InGaAs quantum dot coupled to a nearby (˜25 nm) plasmonic antenna. Microphotoluminescence spectroscopy shows a ˜2.4× increase of intensity, which is attributed to spatial far-field redistribution of the emission from the quantum dot-antenna system. Power-dependent studies show similar saturation powers of 2.5 μW for both coupled and uncoupled quantum dot emission in polarization-resolved measurements. Moreover, time-resolved spectroscopy reveals the absence of Purcell enhancement of the quantum dot coupled to the antenna as compared with an uncoupled dot, yielding comparable exciton lifetimes of τ˜0.5 ns. This observation is supported by numerical simulations, suggesting only minor Purcell-effects of <2× for emitter-antenna separations >25 nm. The observed increased emission from a coupled quantum dot-plasmonic antenna system is found to be in good qualitative agreement with numerical simulations and will lead to a better understanding of light-matter coupling in such semiconductor-plasmonic hybrid systems.

  18. Evaluation of postmortem redistribution phenomena for commonly encountered drugs.

    PubMed

    Han, Eunyoung; Kim, Eunmi; Hong, Hyojeong; Jeong, Sujin; Kim, Jihyun; In, Sangwhan; Chung, Heesun; Lee, Sangki

    2012-06-10

    We described the findings of a study into the post-mortem redistribution (PMR) of 76 drugs found in 129 drug-related cases between 2006 and 2009. Seventy six drugs (psychotropic drugs (n=14), antidepressants (n=9), sedatives (n=6) and so on) were simultaneously quantified in cardiac and peripheral blood by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) or liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS). The absence, possibility or presence of PMR of drugs was determined according to the ratios of cardiac to femoral blood concentrations (C/P ratios). Proxyphylline (C/P ratio: 0.85) showed no PMR; carbamazepine was not subject to PMR; a potential for PMR of lorazepam and mirtrazapine cannot be excluded; chlordiazepoxide is subject to PMR; acetaminophen and alprazolam exhibit minimal PMR; amitriptyline and benztropine exhibit PMR. Codeine (C/P ratio: 4.9), zolpidem (C/P ratio: 3.74), chlorpromazine (C/P ratio: 2.97), fluoxetine (C/P ratio: 2.83) and propranolol (C/P ratio: 2.72) had the largest C/P ratios. Postmortem drug concentrations showed variations depending on sampling sites and characteristics of the drugs. It is continuously necessary to analyze commonly used or abused drugs in simultaneously collected cardiac and peripheral blood to establish significant reference values for PMR. These findings can be used to reach a conclusion about the cause and manner of death.

  19. Energy redistribution speech intelligibility enhancement, vocalic and transitional cues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, John G.; Skowronski, Mark D.

    2002-11-01

    Two novel speech enhancement algorithms are presented that automatically increase intelligibility in noisy environments while maintaining the signal power and naturalness of the original speech. These energy redistribution (ER) algorithms move signal energy to targeted regions of relatively high information content that are crucial for intelligibility. The boosted regions are originally of low energy and therefore usually the first segments lost with the addition of environmental noise. The ER voiced/unvoiced (ERVU) method transfers energy from voiced speech to regions of unvoiced speech, while the ER spectral transition (ERST) method moves energy from spectrally stationary regions to spectrally transitional regions. Hand-held cell phones and public address systems are expected to be the dominant applications for these techniques. Standard noise reduction methods such as spectral subtraction are assumed to have already been applied to the voice signal before broadcast. Using human listening tests, it was found that both algorithms boost the intelligibility of speech in noisy environments by nearly 7% over the original unprocessed signals, without degrading naturalness or increasing signal power. Furthermore, both algorithms allow for controlling the trade-off between boost gain and speech naturalness.

  20. Foveal relocation by redistribution of the neurosensory retina

    PubMed Central

    Wong, D.; Lois, N.

    2000-01-01

    AIM—To describe a new surgical technique for foveal relocation, and to report the outcome in nine patients treated with this procedure.
METHODS—Nine consecutive patients with subfoveal choroidal neovascular membranes (CNVMs) secondary to age related macular degeneration underwent foveal relocation surgery by redistribution of the neurosensory retina (RNR). The technique involved induction of a retinal detachment via a single retinotomy, relocation of the fovea by "sweeping" the retinal tissue with a retinal brush, and stabilisation of the retina in its new location using perfluorocarbon liquid peroperatively and silicone oil postoperatively.
RESULTS—In eight of nine eyes successful relocation of the fovea was achieved; in one eye the CNVM remained in a subfoveal location postoperatively. Visual acuity improved in two eyes, remained unchanged in three, and decreased in four eyes after a median follow up of 4 months (range 2.5-6 months). Complications included rupture of a foveal cyst with the development of a macular hole in one eye and epimacular membrane formation in another eye. In two eyes, macular retinal vessel closure occurred at the time of laser photocoagulation; one of these eyes later developed cystoid macular oedema and the other an epiretinal membrane. Recurrence of the CNVM was observed in one eye, but was controlled with further laser treatment.
CONCLUSIONS—Foveal relocation by RNR appears to be feasible, obviating the need for extensive retinotomies or scleral shortening.

 PMID:10729290

  1. Power-law distributions from additive preferential redistributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ree, Suhan

    2006-02-01

    We introduce a nongrowth model that generates the power-law distribution with the Zipf exponent. There are N elements, each of which is characterized by a quantity, and at each time step these quantities are redistributed through binary random interactions with a simple additive preferential rule, while the sum of quantities is conserved. The situation described by this model is similar to those of closed N -particle systems when conservative two-body collisions are only allowed. We obtain stationary distributions of these quantities both analytically and numerically while varying parameters of the model, and find that the model exhibits the scaling behavior for some parameter ranges. Unlike well-known growth models, this alternative mechanism generates the power-law distribution when the growth is not expected and the dynamics of the system is based on interactions between elements. This model can be applied to some examples such as personal wealths, city sizes, and the generation of scale-free networks when only rewiring is allowed.

  2. Omaha Soil Mixing Study: Redistribution of Lead in ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Urban soils within the Omaha Lead Superfund Site have been contaminated with lead (Pb) from atmospheric deposition of particulate materials from lead smelting and recycling activities. In May of 2009 the Final Record of Decision stated that any residential soil exceeding the preliminary remediation goal (PRG; 400 mgPb kg-1soil) would be excavated, backfilled and re-vegetated. The remedial action entailed excavating contaminated soil in the top 12 inches and excavation could stop when the concentration of soil Pb was less than 400 mg kg-1 in the top 12 inches, or less than 1200 mg kg-1 at depths greater than 1 ft. After removal of the contaminated soil, clean backfill was applied and a grass lawn was replanted. A depth of 12 inches was based on the assumption that Pb-contaminated soil at depth greater than 1 ft would not represent a future risk (ASTDR Health Consult, 2004). This assumption was based on the principal that mixing and other factors encountered during normal excavation practices would not result in Pb surface concentrations greater than the PRG. The goal of the current study was to investigate the redistribution of Pb in remediated residential surface soils after typical homeowner earth-disturbing activities in the OLS Site. Of specific interest to the region for protection of human health is determining whether soil mixing associated with normal homeowner excavation practices results in surface Pb concentrations greater than the preliminary r

  3. On the Compton scattering redistribution function in plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madej, J.; Różańska, A.; Majczyna, A.; Należyty, M.

    2017-08-01

    Compton scattering is the dominant opacity source in hot neutron stars, accretion discs around black holes and hot coronae. We collected here a set of numerical expressions of the Compton scattering redistribution functions (RFs) for unpolarized radiation, which are more exact than the widely used Kompaneets equation. The principal aim of this paper is the presentation of the RF by Guilbert, which is corrected for the computational errors in the original paper. This corrected RF was used in the series of papers on model atmosphere computations of hot neutron stars. We have also organized four existing algorithms for the RF computations into a unified form ready to use in radiative transfer and model atmosphere codes. The exact method by Nagirner & Poutanen was numerically compared to all other algorithms in a very wide spectral range from hard X-rays to radio waves. Sample computations of the Compton scattering RFs in thermal plasma were done for temperatures corresponding to the atmospheres of bursting neutron stars and hot intergalactic medium. Our formulae are also useful to study the Compton scattering of unpolarized microwave background radiation in hot intracluster gas and the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect. We conclude that the formulae by Guilbert and the exact quantum mechanical formulae yield practically the same RFs for gas temperatures relevant to the atmospheres of X-ray bursting neutron stars, T ≤ 108 K.

  4. Climate velocity and the future global redistribution of marine biodiversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García Molinos, Jorge; Halpern, Benjamin S.; Schoeman, David S.; Brown, Christopher J.; Kiessling, Wolfgang; Moore, Pippa J.; Pandolfi, John M.; Poloczanska, Elvira S.; Richardson, Anthony J.; Burrows, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    Anticipating the effect of climate change on biodiversity, in particular on changes in community composition, is crucial for adaptive ecosystem management but remains a critical knowledge gap. Here, we use climate velocity trajectories, together with information on thermal tolerances and habitat preferences, to project changes in global patterns of marine species richness and community composition under IPCC Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) 4.5 and 8.5. Our simple, intuitive approach emphasizes climate connectivity, and enables us to model over 12 times as many species as previous studies. We find that range expansions prevail over contractions for both RCPs up to 2100, producing a net local increase in richness globally, and temporal changes in composition, driven by the redistribution rather than the loss of diversity. Conversely, widespread invasions homogenize present-day communities across multiple regions. High extirpation rates are expected regionally (for example, Indo-Pacific), particularly under RCP8.5, leading to strong decreases in richness and the anticipated formation of no-analogue communities where invasions are common. The spatial congruence of these patterns with contemporary human impacts highlights potential areas of future conservation concern. These results strongly suggest that the millennial stability of current global marine diversity patterns, against which conservation plans are assessed, will change rapidly over the course of the century in response to ocean warming.

  5. Lead Sequestration And Species Redistribution During Soil Organic Matter Decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Schroth, A.W.; Bostick, B.C.; Kaste, J.M.; Friedland, A.J.

    2009-05-27

    The turnover of soil organic matter (SOM) maintains a dynamic chemical environment in the forest floor that can impact metal speciation on relatively short timescales. Here we measure the speciation of Pb in controlled and natural organic (O) soil horizons to quantify changes in metal partitioning during SOM decomposition in different forest litters. We provide a link between the sequestration of pollutant Pb in O-horizons, estimated by forest floor Pb inventories, and speciation using synchrotron-based X-rayfluorescence and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. When Pb was introduced to fresh forest O{sub i} samples, it adsorbed primarily to SOM surfaces, but as decomposition progressed over two years in controlled experiments, up to 60% of the Pb was redistributed to pedogenic birnessite and ferrihydrite surfaces. In addition, a significant fraction of pollutant Pb in natural soil profiles was associated with similar mineral phases ({approx}20--35%) and SOM ({approx}65--80%). Conifer forests have at least 2-fold higher Pb burdens in the forest floor relative to deciduous forests due to more efficient atmospheric scavenging and slower organic matter turnover. We demonstrate that pedogenic minerals play an important role in surface soil Pb sequestration, particularly in deciduous forests, and should be considered in any assessment of pollutant Pb mobility.

  6. Lead Sequestration and Species Redistribution During Soil Organic Matter Decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Schroth,A.; Bostick, B.; Kaste, J.; Friedland, A.

    2008-01-01

    The turnover of soil organic matter (SOM) maintains a dynamic chemical environment in the forest floor that can impact metal speciation on relatively short timescales. Here we measure the speciation of Pb in controlled and natural organic (O) soil horizons to quantify changes in metal partitioning during SOM decomposition in different forest litters. We provide a link between the sequestration of pollutant Pb in O-horizons, estimated by forest floor Pb inventories, and speciation using synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. When Pb was introduced to fresh forest Oi samples, it adsorbed primarily to SOM surfaces, but as decomposition progressed over two years in controlled experiments, up to 60% of the Pb was redistributed to pedogenic birnessite and ferrihydrite surfaces. In addition, a significant fraction of pollutant Pb in natural soil profiles was associated with similar mineral phases ({approx}20-35%) and SOM ({approx}65-80%). Conifer forests have at least 2-fold higher Pb burdens in the forest floor relative to deciduous forests due to more efficient atmospheric scavenging and slower organic matter turnover. We demonstrate that pedogenic minerals play an important role in surface soil Pb sequestration, particularly in deciduous forests, and should be considered in any assessment of pollutant Pb mobility.

  7. Reverse redistribution of thallium-201 detected by SPECT imaging after dipyridamole in angina pectoris

    SciTech Connect

    Popma, J.J.; Smitherman, T.C.; Walker, B.S.; Simon, T.R.; Dehmer, G.J. )

    1990-05-15

    Reverse redistribution refers to a thallium-201 perfusion defect that develops or becomes more evident on delayed imaging compared with the initial image immediately after stress. To determine the diagnostic importance of reverse redistribution after intravenous dipyridamole, thallium-201 single photon emission computed tomography and quantitative coronary arteriography were performed in 90 men with angina pectoris. Of the 250 myocardial segments analyzed, reverse redistribution was present in 17 (7%). Minimal coronary cross-sectional area in proximal vessel segments was less than or equal to 2.0 mm2 more often in regions with transient perfusion abnormalities than in regions with reverse redistribution (66 vs 29%, p less than 0.05). Compared with regions exhibiting transient perfusion abnormalities, regions with reverse redistribution had larger proximal arterial diameters (1.9 +/- 1.1 vs 1.3 +/- 1.1 mm, p less than 0.001) and cross-sectional areas (3.9 +/- 3.1 vs 2.2 +/- 2.6 mm2, p less than 0.001). Coronary artery dimensions and relative stenosis severity did not differ between those regions with normal perfusion and those with reverse redistribution. Reverse redistribution detected by thallium-201 single photon emission computed tomographic imaging after dipyridamole is uncommon, appears to occur as frequently in normal subjects as in patients undergoing coronary arteriography and does not indicate the presence of severe coronary artery disease.

  8. From the bedroom to the budget deficit: mate competition changes men's attitudes toward economic redistribution.

    PubMed

    White, Andrew Edward; Kenrick, Douglas T; Neel, Rebecca; Neuberg, Steven L

    2013-12-01

    How do economic recessions influence attitudes toward redistribution of wealth? From a traditional economic self-interest perspective, attitudes toward redistribution should be affected by one's financial standing. A functional evolutionary approach suggests another possible form of self-interest: That during periods of economic threat, attitudes toward redistribution should be influenced by one's mate-value-especially for men. Using both lab-based experiments and real-world data on voting behavior, we consistently find that economic threats lead low mate-value men to become more prosocial and supportive of redistribution policies, but that the same threats lead high mate-value men to do the opposite. Economic threats do not affect women's attitudes toward redistribution in the same way, and, across studies, financial standing is only weakly associated with attitudes toward redistribution. These findings suggest that during tough economic times, men's attitudes toward redistribution are influenced by something that has seemingly little to do with economic self-interest-their mating psychology.

  9. Redistribution of mobile surface charges of an oil droplet in water in applied electric field.

    PubMed

    Li, Mengqi; Li, Dongqing

    2016-10-01

    Most researches on oil droplets immersed in aqueous solutions assume that the surface charges of oil droplets are, similar to that of solid particles, immobile and distributed uniformly under external electric field. However, the surface charges at the liquid-liquid interface are mobile and will redistribute under external electric field. This paper studies the redistribution of surface charges on an oil droplet under the influence of the external electrical field. Analytical expressions of the local zeta potential on the surface of an oil droplet after the charge redistribution in a uniform electrical field were derived. The effects of the initial zeta potential, droplet radius and strength of applied electric field on the surface charge redistribution were studied. In analogy to the mobile surface charges, the redistribution of Al2O3-passivated aluminum nanoparticles on the oil droplet surface was observed under applied electrical field. Experimental results showed that these nanoparticles moved and accumulated towards one side of the oil droplet under electric field. The redistribution of the nanoparticles is in qualitative agreement with the redistribution model of the mobile surface charges developed in this work. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. [Effects of rainfall intensity on rainfall infiltration and redistribution in soil on Loess slope land].

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Shao, Ming'an

    2006-12-01

    With simulation test, this paper studied the patterns of rainfall infiltration and redistribution in soil on typical Loess slope land, and analyzed the quantitative relations between the infiltration and redistribution and the movement of soil water and mass, with rainfall intensity as the main affecting factor. The results showed that rainfall intensity had significant effects on the rainfall infiltration and water redistribution in soil, and the microcosmic movement of soil water. The larger the rainfall intensity, the deeper the wetting front of rainfall infiltration and redistribution was, and the wetting front of soil water redistribution had a slower increase velocity than that of rainfall infiltration. The power function of the wetting front with time, and also with rainfall intensity, was fitted well. There was also a quantitative relation between the wetting front of rainfall redistribution and the duration of rainfall. The larger the rainfall intensity, the higher the initial and steady infiltration rates were, and the cumulative infiltration increased faster with time. Moreover, the larger the rainfall intensity, the smaller the wetting front difference was at the top and the end of the slope. With the larger rainfall intensity, both the difference of soil water content and its descending trend between soil layers became more obvious during the redistribution process on slope land.

  11. Simultaneous inhibition and redistribution of spontaneous light emission in photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Masayuki; Takahashi, Shigeki; Tanaka, Yoshinori; Asano, Takashi; Noda, Susumu

    2005-05-27

    Inhibiting spontaneous light emission and redistributing the energy into useful forms are desirable objectives for advances in various fields, including photonics, illuminations, displays, solar cells, and even quantum-information systems. We demonstrate both the "inhibition" and "redistribution" of spontaneous light emission by using two-dimensional (2D) photonic crystals, in which the refractive index is changed two-dimensionally. The overall spontaneous emission rate is found to be reduced by a factor of 5 as a result of the 2D photonic bandgap effect. Simultaneously, the light energy is redistributed from the 2D plane to the direction normal to the photonic crystal.

  12. Approximate formulation of redistribution in the Ly-alpha, Ly-beta, H-alpha system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, J.; Ballagh, R. J.; Hubeny, I.

    1989-01-01

    Simple approximate formulas are given for the coupled redistribution of Ly-alpha, Ly-beta, and H-alpha, by using well-defined approximations to an essentially exact formulation. These formulas incorporate all the essential physics including Raman scattering, lower state radiative decay, and correlated terms representing emission during a collision which must be retained in order that the emission coefficients are properly behaved in the line wings. Approximate expressions for the appropriate line broadening parameters are collected. Finally, practical expressions for the source functions are given. These are formulated through newly introduced nonimpact redistribution functions, which are shown to be reasonably approximated by existing (ordinary and generalized) redistribution functions.

  13. Internal Conversion and Vibrational Energy Redistribution in Chlorophyll A.

    PubMed

    Shenai, Prathamesh M; Fernandez-Alberti, Sebastian; Bricker, William P; Tretiak, Sergei; Zhao, Yang

    2016-01-14

    We have computationally investigated the role of intramolecular vibrational modes in determining nonradiative relaxation pathways of photoexcited electronic states in isolated chlorophyll A (ChlA) molecules. To simulate the excited state relaxation from the initially excited Soret state to the lowest excited state Qy, the approach of nonadiabatic excited state molecular dynamics has been adopted. The intramolecular vibrational energy relaxation and redistribution that accompany the electronic internal conversion process is followed by analyzing the excited state trajectories in terms of the ground state equilibrium normal modes. The time dependence of the normal mode velocities is determined by projecting instantaneous Cartesian velocities onto the normal mode vectors. Our analysis of the time evolution of the average mode energies uncovers that only a small subset of the medium-to-high frequency normal modes actively participate in the electronic relaxation processes. These active modes are characterized by the highest overlap with the nonadiabatic coupling vectors (NACRs) during the electronic transitions. Further statistical analysis of the nonadiabatic transitions reveals that the electronic and vibrational energy relaxation occurs via two distinct pathways with significantly different time scales on which the hopping from Soret to Qx occurs thereby dictating the overall dynamics. Furthermore, the NACRs corresponding to each of the transitions have been consistently found to be predominantly similar to a set of normal modes that vary depending upon the transition and the identified categories. Each pathway exhibits a differential time scale of energy transfer and also a differential set of predominant active modes. Our present analysis can be considered as a general approach allowing identification of a reduced subset of specific vibrational coordinates associated with nonradiative relaxation pathways. Therefore, it represents an adequate prior strategy that

  14. Thermally driven moisture redistribution in partially saturated porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Green, R.T.; Dodge, F.T.; Svedeman, S.J.; Manteufel, R.D.; Meyer, K.A.; Baca, R.G.; Rice, G.

    1995-12-01

    It is widely recognized that the decay heat produced by high-level radioactive waste (HLW) will likely have a significant impact on both the pre- and post-closure performance of the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain (YM), in southwest Nevada. The task of delineating which aspects of that impact are favorable to isolation performance and which are adverse is an extremely challenging technical undertaking because of such factors as the hydrothermal regimes involved, heterogeneity of the geologic media, and the time and space scales involved. This difficulty has motivated both the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to undertake multi-year thermohydrology research programs to examine the effects of decay heat on pre- and post-closure performance of the repository. Both of these organizations are currently pursuing laboratory and field experiments, as well as numerical modeling studies, to advance the state of knowledge of the thermohydrologic phenomena relevant to the proposed geologic repository. The NRC-sponsored Thermohydrology Research Project, which was initiated in mid-1989 at the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses (CNWRA), began with the intent of addressing a broad spectrum of generic thermohydrologic questions. While some of these questions were answered in the conduct of the study, other new and challenging ones were encountered. Subsequent to that report, laboratory-scale experiments were designed to address four fundamental questions regarding thermohydrologic phenomena: what are the principal mechanisms controlling the redistribution of moisture; under what hydrothermal conditions and time frames do individual mechanisms predominate; what driving mechanism is associated with a particular hydrothermal regime; what is the temporal and spatial scale of each hydrothermal regime? This report presents the research results and findings obtained since issuance of the first progress report. 85 refs.

  15. Novel approaches to understanding carbon redistribution at multiple scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dungait, Jennifer; Beniston, Joshua; Lal, Rattan; Horrocks, Claire; Collins, Adrian; Mariappen, Sankar; Quine, Timothy

    2014-05-01

    Established biogeochemical techniques are used to trace organic inputs typically derived directly or indirectly from plants into soils, sediments and water using lipid biomarkers. Recently, advances in bulk and compound specific stable 13C isotope analyses have provided novel ways of exploring the source and residence times of organic matter in soils using the natural abundance stable 13C isotope signature of C3 and C4 plant end member values. However, the application of biogeochemical source tracing technologies at the molecular level at field to catchment scales has been slow to develop because of perceived problems with dilution of molecular-scale signals. This paper describes the results of recent experiments in natural and agricultural environments in the UK (Collins et al., 2013; Dungait et al., 2013) and United States (Beniston et al., submitted) that have successfully applied new tracing techniques using stable 13C isotope and complementary approaches to explore the transport of sediment-bound organic carbon at a range of scales from the small plot (m2) to field (ha) and small catchment (10's ha). References Beniston et al (submitted) The effects of crop residue removal on soil erosion and macronutrient dynamics on soils under no till for 42 years. Biogeosciences Collins et al (2013) Catchment source contributions to the sediment-bound organic matter degrading salmonid spawning gravels in a lowland river, southern England. Science of the Total Environment 456-457, 181-195. Dungait et al (2013) Microbial responses to the erosional redistribution of soil organic carbon in arable fields. Soil Biology and Biochemistry 60, 195-201. Puttock et al (2012) Stable carbon isotope analysis of fluvial sediment fluxes over two contrasting C4-C3 semi-arid vegetation transitions. Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry 26, 2386-2392.

  16. Calorie increase and water savings of redistributing global crop production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, K. F.; Seveso, A.; Rulli, M. C.; D'Odorico, P.

    2015-12-01

    Human demand for crop production is expected to increase substantially in the coming decades as a result of population growth, richer diets and biofuel use. In order for food production to keep pace, unprecedented amounts of resources - water, fertilizers, energy - will be required. This has led to calls for 'sustainable intensification' in which yields are increased on existing croplands while seeking to minimize impacts on water and other agricultural resources. Recent studies have quantified aspects of this, showing that there is a large potential to improve crop yields and increase harvest frequencies to better meet human demand. Though promising, both solutions would necessitate large additional inputs of water and fertilizer in order to be achieved under current technologies. However, the question of whether the current distribution of crops is, in fact, the best for realizing maximized production has not been considered to date. To this end, we ask: Is it possible to increase calorie production and minimize water demand by simply growing crops where soil and climate conditions are best suited? Here we use maps of agro-ecological suitability - a measure of physical and chemical soil fertility - for 15 major food crops to identify differences between current crop distributions and where they can most suitably be planted. By redistributing crops across currently cultivated lands, we determine the potential improvement in calorie production as well as the associated change in water demand. We also consider what distribution of crops would maintain current calorie production while minimizing crop water demand. In doing all of this, our study provides a novel tool for improving crop calorie production without necessarily increasing resource demands.

  17. Statistical Characterization of Stormtime Ionospheric Redistribution At Mid-Latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, P. J.; Foster, J. C.; Miskin, M. Z.; Beroz, F.; Rideout, W.

    2009-12-01

    During major geomagnetic disturbances, dramatic redistribution of ionospheric plasma can occur in the mid-latitude plasmasphere boundary layer, driven by a complex set of interlocked dynamics involving photoionization, magnetospheric influence, ionospheric feedback mechanisms, and the background magnetic field direction. Large amounts of ionospheric material are seen to stream from the dusk sector sunward to the polar cap cusp region, as mesoscale plumes of storm enhanced density (SED) move under the influence of the sub-auroral polarization stream (SAPS) electric field in regions magnetically linked to the region 2 currents associated with the asymmetric ring current. Studies over the last decade have shown that these several degree wide SAPS flow channels, with sunward fluxes delivering over 1E14 ions/m^2/sec to the noontime cusp, are the signatures of processes which can deplete an entire L shell of plasmaspheric material in one hours' time for particularly intense storms. Ground based ionospheric radar measurements of these features lend considerable insight into magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling processes and dynamics. We discuss a statistical study of SAPS/SED region sunward ionospheric flux in the dusk magnetic local time sector using a database of over 1000 Millstone Hill ionospheric radar scans during Kp >= 3 disturbances from 1979-2001. We highlight several persistent features of ionospheric F region velocity and SAPS ion flux magnitude. In particular, sunward F region ion flux is relatively insensitive to magnetic local time and the passage of the dusk solar terminator. Potential explanations focus on the interplay between poleward perpendicular electric field and ionospheric height-integrated Pedersen conductance in the E and F regions as the thermosphere and ionosphere change state from day to night.

  18. Computational model of cerebral blood flow redistribution during cortical spreading depression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verisokin, Andrey Y.; Verveyko, Darya V.; Postnov, Dmitry E.

    2016-04-01

    In recent decades modelling studies on cortical spreading depression (CSD) and migraine waves successfully contributed to formation of modern view on these fundamental phenomena of brain physiology. However, due to the extreme complexity of object under study (brain cortex) and the diversity of involved physiological pathways, the development of new mathematical models of CSD is still a very relevant and challenging research problem. In our study we follow the functional modelling approach aimed to map the action of known physiological pathways to the specific nonlinear mechanisms that govern formation and evolution of CSD wave patterns. Specifically, we address the role of cerebral blood flow (CBF) redistribution that is caused by excessive neuronal activity by means of neurovascular coupling and mediates a spatial pattern of oxygen and glucose delivery. This in turn changes the local metabolic status of neural tissue. To build the model we simplify the web of known cell-to-cell interactions within a neurovascular unit by selecting the most relevant ones, such as local neuron-induced elevation of extracellular potassium concentration and biphasic response of arteriole radius. We propose the lumped description of distance-dependent hemodynamic coupling that fits the most recent experimental findings.

  19. Redistribution of stress due to a circular hole in a nonlinear anisotropic membrane.

    PubMed

    David, G; Humphrey, J D

    2004-08-01

    Many clinical procedures introduce holes into thin tissues that are typically under multiaxial stresses and finite strains. Such incisions change the stresses and strains from their homeostatic values, which may induce cells to alter their orientation and cytoskeletal organization as well as to migrate, proliferate, change their synthesis of matrix, or even to enter the cell death cycle. To correlate such changes in cellular activity with changes in the mechanics, we need solutions for the native and the perturbed boundary value problems. Such problems will often be complex and require a finite element solution; weak solutions should be evaluated independently, however, at least for special cases. Herein, we present a numerical solution of the governing nonlinear ordinary differential equation for the special case of stress redistribution due to the introduction of a circular hole into a finitely deformed, Fung-type, circular membrane that exhibits a cylindrical orthotropy. Among other results, we show that the anisotropy plays an increasingly greater role as the size of the hole becomes smaller, which is of course a goal of minimally invasive procedures.

  20. Femtosecond laser structuring of silver-containing glass: Silver redistribution, selective etching, and surface topology engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Desmoulin, Jean-Charles; Petit, Yannick; Cardinal, Thierry; Canioni, Lionel; Dussauze, Marc; Lahaye, Michel; Gonzalez, Hernando Magallanes; Brasselet, Etienne

    2015-12-07

    Femtosecond direct laser writing in silver-containing phosphate glasses allows for the three-dimensional (3D) implementation of complex photonic structures. Sample translation along or perpendicular to the direction of the beam propagation has been performed, which led to the permanent formation of fluorescent structures, either corresponding to a tubular shape or to two parallel planes at the vicinity of the interaction voxel, respectively. These optical features are related to significant modifications of the local material chemistry. Indeed, silver depletion areas with a diameter below 200 nm were evidenced at the center of the photo-produced structures while photo-produced luminescence properties are attributed to the formation of silver clusters around the multiphoton interaction voxel. The laser-triggered oxidation-reduction processes and the associated photo-induced silver redistribution are proposed to be at the origin of the observed original 3D luminescent structures. Thanks to such material structuring, surface engineering has been also demonstrated. Selective surface chemical etching of the glass has been obtained subsequently to laser writing at the location of the photo-produced structures, revealing features with nanometric depth profiles and radial dimensions strongly related to the spatial distributions of the silver clusters.

  1. Measurements and modelling of fast-ion redistribution due to resonant MHD instabilities in MAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, O. M.; Cecconello, M.; McClements, K. G.; Klimek, I.; Akers, R. J.; Boeglin, W. U.; Keeling, D. L.; Meakins, A. J.; Perez, R. V.; Sharapov, S. E.; Turnyanskiy, M.; the MAST Team

    2015-12-01

    The results of a comprehensive investigation into the effects of toroidicity-induced Alfvén eigenmodes (TAE) and energetic particle modes on the NBI-generated fast-ion population in MAST plasmas are reported. Fast-ion redistribution due to frequency-chirping TAE in the range 50 kHz-100 kHz and frequency-chirping energetic particle modes known as fishbones in the range 20 kHz-50 kHz, is observed. TAE and fishbones are also observed to cause losses of fast ions from the plasma. The spatial and temporal evolution of the fast-ion distribution is determined using a fission chamber, a radially-scanning collimated neutron flux monitor, a fast-ion deuterium alpha spectrometer and a charged fusion product detector. Modelling using the global transport analysis code Transp, with ad hoc anomalous diffusion and fishbone loss models introduced, reproduces the coarsest features of the affected fast-ion distribution in the presence of energetic particle-driven modes. The spectrally and spatially resolved measurements show, however, that these models do not fully capture the effects of chirping modes on the fast-ion distribution.

  2. Chloroplast movement provides photoprotection to plants by redistributing PSII damage within leaves.

    PubMed

    Davis, Phillip A; Hangarter, Roger P

    2012-09-01

    Plants use light to fix carbon through the process of photosynthesis but light also causes photoinhibition, by damaging photosystem II (PSII). Plants can usually adjust their rate of PSII repair to equal the rate of damage, but under stress conditions or supersaturating light-intensities damage may exceed the rate of repair. Light-induced chloroplast movements are one of the many mechanisms plants have evolved to minimize photoinhibition. We found that chloroplast movements achieve a measure of photoprotection to PSII by altering the distribution of photoinhibition through depth in leaves. When chloroplasts are in the low-light accumulation arrangement a greater proportion of PSII damage occurs near the illuminated surface than for leaves where the chloroplasts are in the high-light avoidance arrangement. According to our findings chloroplast movements can increase the overall efficiency of leaf photosynthesis in at least two ways. The movements alter light profiles within leaves to maximize photosynthetic output and at the same time redistribute PSII damage throughout the leaf to reduce the amount of inhibition received by individual chloroplasts and prevent a decrease in photosynthetic potential.

  3. Time-Variable Gravity Signal Due to Extratropic Pacific Water Mass Redistribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Benjamin F.; Au, A. Y.; Cox, C. M.

    2002-01-01

    Cox and Chao [2002] reported the detection of a large anomaly in the form of a positive "jump" in the time series of Earth's lowest-degree gravity harmonic J2, or the dynamic oblateness, during 1998. This prompted us to examine the mass redistribution in the global oceans. We report here a seesaw of the sea-surface height (SSH) in the extratropic north + south Pacific basins -- the leading (nonseasonal) EOF/PC mode in SSH derived from the 10-year TOPEX/Poseidon altimetry data in the extratropic Pacific region. The mode underwent a step-like jump with time evolution that match remarkably well with the observed J2 anomaly. However, the magnitude is several times too small to explain the observed J2, even if assuming the SSH jump was all mass-induced (as opposed to any steric effect which causes no time-variable gravity signal). If one accepts the notion that this extratropic Pacific seesaw is part of the geophysical process that produced the observed 1998 J2 anomaly, then this finding suggests strong geophysical connection of the interannual-to-decadal variation of J2 with the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), as the time series of the above EOF/PC mode is actually a formally defined PDO Index series.

  4. Uncoupling of brefeldin a-mediated coatomer protein complex-I dissociation from Golgi redistribution.

    PubMed

    Barzilay, Eran; Ben-Califa, Nathalie; Hirschberg, Koret; Neumann, Drorit

    2005-09-01

    The Golgi complex functions in transport of molecules from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the plasma membrane and other distal organelles as well as in retrograde transport to the ER. The fungal metabolite brefeldin A (BFA) promotes dissociation of ADP-ribosylation-factor-1 (ARF1) and the coatomer protein complex-I (COP-I) from Golgi membranes, followed by Golgi tubulation and fusion with the ER. Here we demonstrate that the cationic ionophore monensin inhibited the BFA-mediated Golgi redistribution to the ER without interfering with ARF1 and COP-I dissociation. Preservation of a perinuclear Golgi despite COP-I and ARF1 dissociation enables addressing the involvement of these proteins in anterograde ER to Golgi transport. The thermo-reversible folding mutant of vesicular stomatitis virus G protein (VSVGtsO45) was retained in the ER in the presence of both monensin and BFA, thus supporting ARF1/COP-I participation in ER-exit processes. Live-cell imaging revealed that BFA-induced Golgi tubulation persisted longer in the presence of monensin, suggesting that monensin inhibits tubule fusion with the ER. Moreover, monensin also augmented Golgi-derived tubules that contained the ER-Golgi-intermediate compartment marker, p58, in the absence of BFA, signifying the generality of this effect. Taken together, we propose that monensin inhibits membrane fusion processes in the presence or absence of BFA.

  5. Reticulon-4A (Nogo-A) redistributes protein disulfide isomerase to protect mice from SOD1-dependent amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yvonne S.; Harel, Noam Y.; Strittmatter, Stephen M.

    2009-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal motor neuron disease inherited in a small subset of patients. The SOD1(G93A) transgenic mouse models this subset of patients, and studies of this strain have suggested that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and deficits in ER chaperone function are contributors to ALS pathophysiology. Here, we demonstrate that the reticulon family of proteins is a novel regulator of the ER chaperone protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), and that through PDI, reticulon-4A (Nogo-A) can protect mice against the neurodegeneration that characterizes ALS. We show that overexpressing reticulon protein induces a punctate redistribution of PDI intracellularly, both in vitro and in vivo. Conversely, reduction of endogenous NogoA expression causes a more homogeneous expression pattern in vivo. These effects occur without induction of the unfolded protein response. To examine the effect of PDI redistribution on ALS disease progression, we conducted survival and behavior studies of SOD1(G93A) mice. Deletion of a single copy of the NogoA,B gene accelerates disease onset and progression, while deletion of both copies further worsens disease. We conclude that NogoA contributes to the proper function of the ER resident chaperone PDI, and is protective against ALS-like neurodegeneration. Our results provide a novel intracellular role for reticulon proteins and support the hypothesis that modulation of PDI function is a potential therapeutic approach to ALS. PMID:19889996

  6. Crustal deformation modulation due to regional mass redistribution in China and its adjacent region constrained by GPS and GRACE measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, K.; Gan, W.; Liang, S.

    2016-12-01

    The elastic Earth deforms in response to seasonal and secular loads imposed on the crust by large-scale mass redistribution from both the hydrosphere and atmosphere. In this study, we calculate 3D surface displacements in China and its adjacent region due to mass redistribution from the GRACE measurements, and obtain the strain rates from their secular horizontal change rates estimated through least-square method. The GRACE 3D displacements are comparable with continuous GPS data of the most sites in Mainland China and Nepal. The secular horizontal rates show consistent deforming pattern as mass variations, that is, the crust moves to (away from) the region where mass increases (decreases). In contrast to the strain rates obtained from GPS velocity field, the GRACE strain rates show different patterns. In most regions, the GRACE strain rates are at the level of 2 to several nanostrain, about 1/50 1/100 times of the maximal GPS strain rate; while in the Central Tibetan Plateau (CTP) and the North China (NC), the ratio of GRACE to GPS strain rates is up to 1/10 and their principal directions are nearly parallel to each other, thus promote the process of strain energy accumulation. Though the sources of GRACE strain rates of CTP and NC are likely to relate to climatic changes and anthropogenic activities such as groundwater over withdrawal, respectively, the mass loading induced deformation plays an important role in modulating the crustal deformation and thus has significant implications to the future seismicity.

  7. Report: EPA Could Improve Its Redistribution of Superfund Payments to Specific Sites

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Report #2006-P-00027, July 31, 2006. EPA did not make timely redistributions of Superfund coop agreement, interagency agreement, and small purchase payments from the general site identifier “WQ” to the specific Superfund sites or other site identifiers.

  8. Unequal views of inequality: Cross-national support for redistribution 1985-2011.

    PubMed

    VanHeuvelen, Tom

    2017-05-01

    This research examines public views on government responsibility to reduce income inequality, support for redistribution. While individual-level correlates of support for redistribution are relatively well understood, many questions remain at the country-level. Therefore, I examine how country-level characteristics affect aggregate support for redistribution. I test explanations of aggregate support using a unique dataset combining 18 waves of the International Social Survey Programme and European Social Survey. Results from mixed-effects logistic regression and fixed-effects linear regression models show two primary and contrasting effects. States that reduce inequality through bundles of tax and transfer policies are rewarded with more supportive publics. In contrast, economic development has a seemingly equivalent and dampening effect on public support. Importantly, the effect of economic development grows at higher levels of development, potentially overwhelming the amplifying effect of state redistribution. My results therefore suggest a fundamental challenge to proponents of egalitarian politics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Using 137 Cs measurements to investigate the influence of erosion and soil redistribution on soil properties.

    PubMed

    Du, P; Walling, D E

    2011-05-01

    Information on the interaction between soil erosion and soil properties is an important requirement for sustainable management of the soil resource. The relationship between soil properties and the soil redistribution rate, reflecting both erosion and deposition, is an important indicator of this interaction. This relationship is difficult to investigate using traditional approaches to documenting soil redistribution rates involving erosion plots and predictive models. However, the use of the fallout radionuclide (137)Cs to document medium-term soil redistribution rates offers a means of overcoming many of the limitations associated with traditional approaches. The study reported sought to demonstrate the potential for using (137)Cs measurements to assess the influence of soil erosion and redistribution on soil properties (particle size composition, total C, macronutrients N, P, K and Mg, micronutrients Mn, Mo, Fe, Cu and Zn and other elements, including Ti and As). (137)Cs measurements undertaken on 52 soil cores collected within a 7 ha cultivated field located near Colebrooke in Devon, UK were used to establish the magnitude and spatial pattern of medium-term soil redistribution rates within the field. The soil redistribution rates documented for the individual sampling points within the field ranged from an erosion rate of -12.9 t ha(-1) yr(-1) to a deposition rate of 19.2 t ha(-1) yr(-1). Composite samples of surface soil (0-5 cm) were collected immediately adjacent to each coring point and these samples were analysed for a range of soil properties. Individual soil properties associated with these samples showed significant variability, with CV values generally lying in the range 10-30%. The relationships between the surface soil properties and the soil redistribution rate were analysed. This analysis demonstrated statistically significant relationships between some soil properties (total phosphorus, % clay, Ti and As) and the soil redistribution rate, but for

  10. Lewis base assisted B-H bond redistribution in borazine and polyborazylene.

    PubMed

    Davis, Benjamin L; Rekken, Brian D; Michalczyk, Ryszard; Garner, Edward B; Dixon, David A; Kalviri, Hassan; Baker, R Tom; Thorn, David L

    2013-10-14

    Lewis bases react with borazine and polyborazylene, yielding borane adducts. In the case of NH3 (l), ammonia-borane (AB) is formed and quantified using NMR spectroscopy against an internal standard. Calculations indicate that the formation of B(NH2)3 may provide the driving force of this redistribution. Given the complexity and expense of currently known spent AB regeneration pathways, it is suggested that this redistribution chemistry be used to recover AB and improve regeneration methods.

  11. Refined Monte Carlo method for simulating angle-dependent partial frequency redistributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J.-S.

    1982-01-01

    A refined algorithm for generating emission frequencies from angle-dependent partial frequency redistribution functions R sub II and R sub III is described. The improved algorithm has as its basis a 'rejection' technique that, for absorption frequencies x less than 5, involves no approximations. The resulting procedure is found to be essential for effective studies of radiative transfer in optically thick or temperature varying media involving angle-dependent partial frequency redistributions.

  12. Spatial variation in hydraulic redistribution by the desert shrub, Sarcobatus vermiculatus, at multiple scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, J. H.; Donovan, L. A.

    2012-12-01

    Passive water movement through roots from moist to dry soils, i.e. hydraulic redistribution, can be important for plant water status, vegetation water use, nutrient acquisition and cycling, and competition/facilitation among plant species. Although hydraulic redistribution is known from many species and habitats, little is known about how it varies at multiple spatial scales across species ranges. In the Mono Basin, California ecosystem we documented variation in hydraulic redistribution by the desert halophytic shrub, Sarcobatus vermiculatus, at three spatial scales: landscape, shrub-island versus interspace, and depth. Hydraulic redistribution varied among sites across the landscape. It was most prevalent at a low salinity site with deep groundwater (9.4 m), but of lower magnitude at more saline sites with shallower groundwater. At the low salinity site, infiltration from snowmelt, the predominant precipitation input, was confined to interspaces between shrub islands. Shrub-island soils remained very dry after snowmelt, even in a year with high total snow accumulation. Shrub-island soils, however, had substantial net increases in Ψsoil during week- to month-long periods in the early part of the growing season, concomitant with self-irrigated root growth into these dry soils, as documented with mini-rhizotrons. The source of this root-system-transported water was both moist interspace soils and moist deep soil layers. Wetting up of otherwise dry shrub-island soils is likely essential for nutrient mineralization and acquisition from trapped litter, making hydraulic redistribution an important driver of landscape-scale biogeochemical cycles in these saline basins. In addition, hydraulic redistribution buffered spatial variation in water availability among sites, depths, depth to groundwater, and for plants with different root distributions, such that plant Ψpredawn and Ψmidday differed little across the landscape. Multi-scale variation in hydraulic redistribution

  13. Use of thallium-201 redistribution scintigraphy in the preoperative differentiation of reversible and nonreversible myocardial asynergy.

    PubMed

    Rozanski, A; Berman, D S; Gray, R; Levy, R; Raymond, M; Maddahi, J; Pantaleo, N; Waxman, A D; Swan, H J; Matloff, J

    1981-11-01

    Thallium-201 (201Tl) redistribution scintigraphy might differentiate reversibly from nonreversibly asynergic myocardial segments and thus predict the response of these segments to coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). To test this hypothesis, 25 consecutive patients undergoing CABG, preoperative stress-redistribution 201Tl scintigraphy, and both pre- and postoperative resting equilibrium radionuclide ventriculography were evaluated. For both types of scintigraphic study, each patient was imaged in the same three views. Because of the effects of CABG on septal motion, this region was considered separately. Postoperative improvement was noted in 54% of 72 preoperative asynergic segments. Improvement was common not only in hypokinetic but also in akinetic and dyskinetic segments, and occurred in a similar proportion of studies performed early (less than 2 weeks) or late (3-6 months) after CABG. Thallium-201 redistribution scintigraphy was highly predictive of the pattern of postoperative asynergy: The redistribution pattern was normal in 90% of segments with reversible asynergy and abnormal in 76% of segments with nonreversible asynergy. The presence or absence of pathologic Q waves was less sensitive in this differentiation. Septal segments, however, frequently demonstrated abnormal wall motion postoperatively, despite normal 201Tl redistribution scintigraphy. Resting left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was generally unchanged postoperatively, but in some patients with multiple areas of reversible asynergy it did improve. Thus, 201Tl redistribution scintigraphy appears to reliably distinguish viable from nonviable asynergic myocardial zones, and predicts the response of these segments to CABG.

  14. Redistribution of soil water by a saprotrophic fungus enhances carbon mineralization.

    PubMed

    Guhr, Alexander; Borken, Werner; Spohn, Marie; Matzner, Egbert

    2015-11-24

    The desiccation of upper soil horizons is a common phenomenon, leading to a decrease in soil microbial activity and mineralization. Recent studies have shown that fungal communities and fungal-based food webs are less sensitive and better adapted to soil desiccation than bacterial-based food webs. One reason for a better fungal adaptation to soil desiccation may be hydraulic redistribution of water by mycelia networks. Here we show that a saprotrophic fungus (Agaricus bisporus) redistributes water from moist (-0.03 MPa) into dry (-9.5 MPa) soil at about 0.3 cm ⋅ min(-1) in single hyphae, resulting in an increase in soil water potential after 72 h. The increase in soil moisture by hydraulic redistribution significantly enhanced carbon mineralization by 2,800% and enzymatic activity by 250-350% in the previously dry soil compartment within 168 h. Our results demonstrate that hydraulic redistribution can partly compensate water deficiency if water is available in other zones of the mycelia network. Hydraulic redistribution is likely one of the mechanisms behind higher drought resistance of soil fungi compared with bacteria. Moreover, hydraulic redistribution by saprotrophic fungi is an underrated pathway of water transport in soils and may lead to a transfer of water to zones of high fungal activity.

  15. Effects of income redistribution on the evolution of cooperation in spatial public goods games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Zhenhua; Wang, Baokui; Du, Jinming

    2017-01-01

    Income redistribution is the transfer of income from some individuals to others directly or indirectly by means of social mechanisms, such as taxation, public services and so on. Employing a spatial public goods game, we study the influence of income redistribution on the evolution of cooperation. Two kinds of evolutionary models are constructed, which describe local and global redistribution of income respectively. In the local model, players have to pay part of their income after each PGG and the accumulated income is redistributed to the members. While in the global model, all the players pay part of their income after engaging in all the local PGGs, which are centred on himself and his nearest neighbours, and the accumulated income is redistributed to the whole population. We show that the cooperation prospers significantly with increasing income expenditure proportion in the local redistribution of income, while in the global model the situation is opposite. Furthermore, the cooperation drops dramatically from the maximum curvature point of income expenditure proportion. In particular, the intermediate critical points are closely related to the renormalized enhancement factors.

  16. Dietary intervention causes redistribution of zinc in obese adolescents.

    PubMed

    Freire, Simone Cardoso; Fisberg, Mauro; Cozzolino, Silvia Maria Franciscato

    2013-08-01

    redistribution of zinc in the body as shown by the changes in erythrocytes, plasma, salivary, urine zinc, as well as the complementary parameters of insulin and SOD. These changes were not affected by zinc intake.

  17. Deciphering the plasma membrane hallmarks of apoptotic cells: Phosphatidylserine transverse redistribution and calcium entry

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, M Carmen; Freyssinet, Jean-Marie

    2001-01-01

    Background During apoptosis, Ca2+-dependent events participate in the regulation of intracellular and morphological changes including phosphatidylserine exposure in the exoplasmic leaflet of the cell plasma membrane. The occurrence of phosphatidylserine at the surface of specialized cells, such as platelets, is also essential for the assembly of the enzyme complexes of the blood coagulation cascade, as demonstrated by hemorrhages in Scott syndrome, an extremely rare genetic deficiency of phosphatidylserine externalization, without other apparent pathophysiologic consequences. We have recently reported a reduced capacitative Ca2+ entry in Scott cells which may be part of the Scott phenotype. Results Taking advantage of these mutant lymphoblastoid B cells, we have studied the relationship between this mode of Ca2+ entry and phosphatidylserine redistribution during apoptosis. Ca2+ ionophore induced apoptosis in Scott but not in control cells. However, inhibition of store-operated Ca2+ channels led to caspase-independent DNA fragmentation and decrease of mitochondrial membrane potential in both control and Scott cells. Inhibition of cytochrome P450 also reduced capacitative Ca2+ entry and induced apoptosis at comparable extents in control and Scott cells. During the apoptotic process, both control and more markedly Scott cells externalized phosphatidylserine, but in the latter, this membrane feature was however dissociated from several other intracellular changes. Conclusions The present results suggest that different mechanisms account for phosphatidylserine transmembrane migration in cells undergoing stimulation and programmed death. These observations testify to the plasticity of the plasma membrane remodeling process, allowing normal apoptosis even when less fundamental functions are defective. PMID:11701087

  18. Protection by cholesterol-extracting cyclodextrins: a role for N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor redistribution.

    PubMed

    Abulrob, Abedelnasser; Tauskela, Joseph S; Mealing, Geoff; Brunette, Eric; Faid, Karim; Stanimirovic, Danica

    2005-03-01

    Cyclodextrins (CDs) are cyclic oligosaccharides composed of a lipophilic central cavity and a hydrophilic outer surface. Some CDs are capable of extracting cholesterol from cell membranes and can affect function of receptors and proteins localized in cholesterol-rich membrane domains. In this report, we demonstrate the neuroprotective activity of some CD derivatives against oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD), N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) and glutamate in cortical neuronal cultures. Although all CDs complexed with NMDA or glutamate, only beta-, methylated beta- and sulfated beta-CDs displayed neuroprotective activity and lowered cellular cholesterol. Only CDs that lowered cholesterol levels redistributed the NMDA receptor NR2B subunit, PSD-95 (postsynaptic density protein 95 kDa) and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) from Triton X-100 insoluble membrane domains to soluble fractions. Cholesterol repletion counteracted the ability of methylated beta-CD to protect against NMDA toxicity, and reversed NR2B, PSD-95 and nNOS localization to Triton X-100 insoluble membrane fraction. Surprisingly, neuroprotective CDs had minimal effect on NMDA receptor-mediated increases in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)), but did suppress OGD-induced increases in [Ca(2+)](i). beta-CD, but not Mbeta-CD, also caused a slight block of NMDA-induced currents, suggesting a minor contribution to neuroprotection by direct action on NMDA receptors. Taken together, data suggest that cholesterol extraction from detergent-resistant microdomains affects NMDA receptor subunit distribution and signal propagation, resulting in neuroprotection of cortical neuronal cultures against ischemic and excitotoxic insults. Since cholesterol-rich membrane domains exist in neuronal postsynaptic densities, these results imply that synaptic NMDA receptor subpopulations underlie excitotoxicity, which can be targeted by CDs without affecting overall neuronal Ca(2+) levels.

  19. Do hydraulic redistribution and nocturnal transpiration facilitate nutrient acquisition in Aspalathus linearis?

    PubMed

    Matimati, Ignatious; Verboom, G Anthony; Cramer, Michael D

    2014-08-01

    The significance of soil water redistribution by roots and nocturnal transpiration for nutrient acquisition were assessed for deep-rooted 3-year-old leguminous Aspalathus linearis shrubs of the Cape Floristic Region (South Africa). We hypothesised that hydraulic redistribution and nocturnal transpiration facilitate nutrient acquisition by releasing moisture in shallow soil to enable acquisition of shallow-soil nutrients during the summer drought periods and by driving water fluxes from deep to shallow soil powering mass-flow nutrient acquisition, respectively. A. linearis was supplied with sub-surface (1-m-deep) irrigation rates of 0, 2 or 4 L day(-1 )plant(-1). Some plants were unfertilized, whilst others were surface- or deep-fertilized (1 m depth) with Na(15)NO3 and CaP/FePO4. We also supplied deuterium oxide ((2)H2O) at 1 m depth at dusk and measured its predawn redistribution to shallow soil and plant stems. Hydraulic redistribution of deep water was substantial across all treatments, accounting for 34-72 % of surface-soil predawn moisture. Fourteen days after fertilization, the surface-fertilized plants exhibited increased hydraulic redistribution and increased (15)N and P acquisition with higher rates of deep-irrigation. Deep-fertilization also increased hydraulic redistribution to surface soils, although these plants additionally accumulated (2)H2O in their stem tissue overnight, probably due to nocturnal transpiration. Plants engaged in nocturnal transpiration also increased (15)N and P acquisition from deep fertilizer sources. Thus, both nocturnal transpiration and hydraulic redistribution increased acquisition of shallow soil N and P, possibly through a combination of increased nutrient availability and mobility.

  20. Serum adiponectin and leptin concentrations in HIV-infected children with fat redistribution syndrome.

    PubMed

    Verkauskiene, Rasa; Dollfus, Catherine; Levine, Martine; Faye, Albert; Deghmoun, Samia; Houang, Muriel; Chevenne, Didier; Bresson, Jean-Louis; Blanche, Stéphane; Lévy-Marchal, Claire

    2006-08-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related lipodystrophy is characterized by adipose tissue redistribution, dyslipidemia, and insulin resistance. We hypothesized that fat redistribution and metabolic abnormalities in HIV-infected children are related to alterations in endocrine function of adipose tissue. A multicenter study was conducted in 130 HIV-infected children. Lipodystrophy definition was based on the central to peripheral skinfold ratio. Fasting adiponectin, leptin, insulin concentrations, glycemia, and lipid profile were measured in all children. Fat redistribution syndrome was apparent in 32 children: 14 with atrophic (LPDA) and 18 with hypertrophic lipodystrophy (LPDH). Mean serum adiponectin levels were significantly decreased in LPDA and LPDH groups compared with the group with no lipodystrophy (LPD-). Fasting insulin concentration was significantly higher in LPDA and LPDH groups versus LPD-. Mean serum leptin concentration was significantly increased only in LPDH compared with LPDA and LPD- groups. Triglyceride levels were significantly increased and high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol concentration decreased in the LPDA versus LPD- group. Controlling for puberty stage, gender, percentage of total fat mass, serum lipids, HIV treatment, and disease severity, adiponectin was significantly and inversely associated with central obesity and insulin/glucose ratio. Fat redistribution had no significant effect on leptin concentration, which was directly related to the percentage of body fat, female gender, and insulin/glucose ratio. In conclusion, HIV-infected children with symptoms of fat redistribution have decreased levels of adiponectin, associated with insulin resistance and dyslipidemia.

  1. Load-redistribution strategy based on time-varying load against cascading failure of complex network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jun; Xiong, Qing-Yu; Shi, Xin; Wang, Kai; Shi, Wei-Ren

    2015-07-01

    Cascading failure can cause great damage to complex networks, so it is of great significance to improve the network robustness against cascading failure. Many previous existing works on load-redistribution strategies require global information, which is not suitable for large scale networks, and some strategies based on local information assume that the load of a node is always its initial load before the network is attacked, and the load of the failure node is redistributed to its neighbors according to their initial load or initial residual capacity. This paper proposes a new load-redistribution strategy based on local information considering an ever-changing load. It redistributes the loads of the failure node to its nearest neighbors according to their current residual capacity, which makes full use of the residual capacity of the network. Experiments are conducted on two typical networks and two real networks, and the experimental results show that the new load-redistribution strategy can reduce the size of cascading failure efficiently. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CB328903), the Special Fund of 2011 Internet of Things Development of Ministry of Industry and Information Technology, China (Grant No. 2011BAJ03B13-2), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61473050), and the Key Science and Technology Program of Chongqing, China (Grant No. cstc2012gg-yyjs40008).

  2. Dynamic mass redistribution analysis of endogenous β-adrenergic receptor signaling in neonatal rat cardiac fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Carter, Rhonda L; Grisanti, Laurel A; Yu, Justine E; Repas, Ashley A; Woodall, Meryl; Ibetti, Jessica; Koch, Walter J; Jacobson, Marlene A; Tilley, Douglas G

    2014-02-01

    Label-free systems for the agnostic assessment of cellular responses to receptor stimulation have been shown to provide a sensitive method to dissect receptor signaling. β-adenergic receptors (βAR) are important regulators of normal and pathologic cardiac function and are expressed in cardiomyocytes as well as cardiac fibroblasts, where relatively fewer studies have explored their signaling responses. Using label-free whole cell dynamic mass redistribution (DMR) assays we investigated the response patterns to stimulation of endogenous βAR in primary neonatal rat cardiac fibroblasts (NRCF). Catecholamine stimulation of the cells induced a negative DMR deflection resulting in a concentration-dependent pharmacological response that was competitively blocked by βAR blockade and non-competitively blocked by irreversible uncoupling of Gs proteins. Pharmacological profiling of subtype-selective βAR agonists and antagonists revealed a dominant role of β2AR in mediating the DMR responses, consistent with the relative expression levels of β2AR and β1AR in NRCF. Additionally, βAR-mediated cAMP generation was assessed via a fluorescence biosensor, revealing similar kinetics between DMR responses and cAMP generation. As such, βAR-dependent DMR responses were enhanced via inhibition of cAMP degradation, as well as dynamin-mediated receptor internalization. Finally, we assessed G protein-independent βAR signaling through epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). While inhibition of EGFR reduced the DMR response to βAR stimulation, our results demonstrate that G protein-dependent signaling produces a majority of the biological response to βAR stimulation in NRCF. Altogether, measurement of DMR responses in primary cardiac fibroblasts provides a sensitive readout for investigating endogenous βAR signaling via both G protein-dependent and -independent pathways.

  3. Redistribution of Flexibility in Stabilizing Antibody Fragment Mutants Follows Le Châtelier’s Principle

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tong; Tracka, Malgorzata B.; Uddin, Shahid; Casas-Finet, Jose; Jacobs, Donald J.; Livesay, Dennis R.

    2014-01-01

    Le Châtelier’s principle is the cornerstone of our understanding of chemical equilibria. When a system at equilibrium undergoes a change in concentration or thermodynamic state (i.e., temperature, pressure, etc.), La Châtelier’s principle states that an equilibrium shift will occur to offset the perturbation and a new equilibrium is established. We demonstrate that the effects of stabilizing mutations on the rigidity ⇔ flexibility equilibrium within the native state ensemble manifest themselves through enthalpy-entropy compensation as the protein structure adjusts to restore the global balance between the two. Specifically, we characterize the effects of mutation to single chain fragments of the anti-lymphotoxin-β receptor antibody using a computational Distance Constraint Model. Statistically significant changes in the distribution of both rigidity and flexibility within the molecular structure is typically observed, where the local perturbations often lead to distal shifts in flexibility and rigidity profiles. Nevertheless, the net gain or loss in flexibility of individual mutants can be skewed. Despite all mutants being exclusively stabilizing in this dataset, increased flexibility is slightly more common than increased rigidity. Mechanistically the redistribution of flexibility is largely controlled by changes in the H-bond network. For example, a stabilizing mutation can induce an increase in rigidity locally due to the formation of new H-bonds, and simultaneously break H-bonds elsewhere leading to increased flexibility distant from the mutation site via Le Châtelier. Increased flexibility within the VH β4/β5 loop is a noteworthy illustration of this long-range effect. PMID:24671209

  4. Redistribution of flexibility in stabilizing antibody fragment mutants follows Le Châtelier's principle.

    PubMed

    Li, Tong; Tracka, Malgorzata B; Uddin, Shahid; Casas-Finet, Jose; Jacobs, Donald J; Livesay, Dennis R

    2014-01-01

    Le Châtelier's principle is the cornerstone of our understanding of chemical equilibria. When a system at equilibrium undergoes a change in concentration or thermodynamic state (i.e., temperature, pressure, etc.), La Châtelier's principle states that an equilibrium shift will occur to offset the perturbation and a new equilibrium is established. We demonstrate that the effects of stabilizing mutations on the rigidity ⇔ flexibility equilibrium within the native state ensemble manifest themselves through enthalpy-entropy compensation as the protein structure adjusts to restore the global balance between the two. Specifically, we characterize the effects of mutation to single chain fragments of the anti-lymphotoxin-β receptor antibody using a computational Distance Constraint Model. Statistically significant changes in the distribution of both rigidity and flexibility within the molecular structure is typically observed, where the local perturbations often lead to distal shifts in flexibility and rigidity profiles. Nevertheless, the net gain or loss in flexibility of individual mutants can be skewed. Despite all mutants being exclusively stabilizing in this dataset, increased flexibility is slightly more common than increased rigidity. Mechanistically the redistribution of flexibility is largely controlled by changes in the H-bond network. For example, a stabilizing mutation can induce an increase in rigidity locally due to the formation of new H-bonds, and simultaneously break H-bonds elsewhere leading to increased flexibility distant from the mutation site via Le Châtelier. Increased flexibility within the VH β4/β5 loop is a noteworthy illustration of this long-range effect.

  5. Flow Redistribution Between Legs and Brain During STS 93 Re-Entry and Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arbeille, P.; Meck, J.; Porcher, M.; Benavides, E.; Martin, D. S.; South, D. A.; Ribeiro, C.; Westover, A.

    2003-01-01

    The objective was to quantify bit by bit the arterial hemodynamic response to the successive acceleration induced fluid shifts during re-entry and landing. Method: The astronaut instrumented himself with a flat Doppler probe fixed on the skin, a blood pressure arm cuff, and 3 ECG electrodes. The ICMS (integrated cardiovascular monitoring system, 15x15x25 cu cm, battery powered) designed to monitor Blood pressure, ECG, cerebral and femoral flows was fixed below the astronaut sit in the middeck. Recordings started 5 minutes before de-orbiting (TIG) and stopped 5 min after wheels stop. Results. During re-entry blood pressure increased by 20% at TIG, and then by 25 to 30% during the highest Gz accelerations (approx 1 S g ) . The cerebral flow remained decreased by 10 to 15% below inflight value all during the Entry and landing phases. Conversely the femoral flow increased at TIG and entry ( + l0 to 20%), recovered at 0.lg, and then decreased in proportion with the Gz acceleration (-10% to -40% from 0.5g to 1.5g). The reduction in Femoral flow was associated with an opposite variation in lower limb vascular resistance. Consequently the cerebral flow/femoral flow ratio decreased at TIG and entry (-20%), and then increased according to the Gz acceleration level ( + l0 to +40% from 0.5 to 1.5g). Conclusion: During orthostatic tests (Stand LBNP tests) the cerebral to femoral flow ratio allowed to quantify the efficiency of the flow redistribution between these 2 areas and predicted orthostatic intolerance. In the present case the astronaut was found orthostatically tolerant at postflight tilt tests, but we suggest that during re-entry this parameter could predict the occurrence of syncope in severely disadapted astronauts.

  6. Flow Redistribution Between Legs and Brain During STS 93 Re-Entry and Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arbeille, P.; Meck, J.; Porcher, M.; Benavides, E.; Martin, D. S.; South, D. A.; Ribeiro, C.; Westover, A.

    2003-01-01

    The objective was to quantify bit by bit the arterial hemodynamic response to the successive acceleration induced fluid shifts during re-entry and landing. Method: The astronaut instrumented himself with a flat Doppler probe fixed on the skin, a blood pressure arm cuff, and 3 ECG electrodes. The ICMS (integrated cardiovascular monitoring system, 15x15x25 cu cm, battery powered) designed to monitor Blood pressure, ECG, cerebral and femoral flows was fixed below the astronaut sit in the middeck. Recordings started 5 minutes before de-orbiting (TIG) and stopped 5 min after wheels stop. Results. During re-entry blood pressure increased by 20% at TIG, and then by 25 to 30% during the highest Gz accelerations (approx 1 S g ) . The cerebral flow remained decreased by 10 to 15% below inflight value all during the Entry and landing phases. Conversely the femoral flow increased at TIG and entry ( + l0 to 20%), recovered at 0.lg, and then decreased in proportion with the Gz acceleration (-10% to -40% from 0.5g to 1.5g). The reduction in Femoral flow was associated with an opposite variation in lower limb vascular resistance. Consequently the cerebral flow/femoral flow ratio decreased at TIG and entry (-20%), and then increased according to the Gz acceleration level ( + l0 to +40% from 0.5 to 1.5g). Conclusion: During orthostatic tests (Stand LBNP tests) the cerebral to femoral flow ratio allowed to quantify the efficiency of the flow redistribution between these 2 areas and predicted orthostatic intolerance. In the present case the astronaut was found orthostatically tolerant at postflight tilt tests, but we suggest that during re-entry this parameter could predict the occurrence of syncope in severely disadapted astronauts.

  7. Propofol in low doses causes redistribution of body heat in male volunteers.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, I; Matsukawa, T; Ozaki, M; Amemiya, Y

    2002-09-01

    Cardiovascular and mental stress in dental patients with phobias about dentistry may be reduced by propofol sedation. We tested the hypothesis that even low doses of propofol may have effects on body temperatures in male volunteers. Six healthy male volunteers were given propofol over 28 min with the following infusion rates: 8 mg kg(-1) h(-1) for the first 3 min, 4 mg kg(-1) h(-1) for the next 10 min, and 2 mg kg(-1) h(-1) for the final 15 min. Body temperatures were measured at five locations: tympanic membrane, forehead, forearm, dorsum of the hand and fingertip. Thermoregulatory vasoconstriction was evaluated using the forearm minus fingertip temperature gradient. Tympanic membrane and forehead temperatures began to decrease at 10 and 20 min, respectively, after the start of the propofol infusion, and reached a minimum at 30 min (tympanic -0.5 +/- 0.2 degrees C) and 40 min (forehead -0.6 +/- 0.2 degrees C), respectively. Peripheral skin temperatures showed an increase between 10 and 30 min in the forearm and fingertip and between 20 and 30 min in the dorsum of the hand. After 30 min, a decrease in peripheral skin temperatures was observed. The forearm minus fingertip temperature gradient changed from negative to positive after 40 min, and increased continuously thereafter (baseline -0.3 +/- 0.4 degrees C, 90 min: 6.5 +/- 1.6 degrees C). A low dose of propofol impairs tonic thermoregulatory vasoconstriction and induces heat redistribution from the core to the periphery.

  8. Population redistribution policies and development planning in the Pacific Basin: rationale and objectives.

    PubMed

    Minerbi, L

    1990-01-01

    "In this article, the general arguments about population redistribution are discussed within the context of [Pacific island nations]....A review of circular and permanent population movements in the Pacific Basin reveals the complexity of the networks of relations of multilocal people....A range of possible population policies to accomodate and correct migration problems is discussed. An analysis of the national development plans of Fiji, Kiribati, and the Solomon Islands illustrates the need for sustainable development and population redistribution policies which explicitly address: (a) nation-building with regional equity; (b) population growth control and native supremacy; and (c) population redistribution with ecological sustainability." Comments are included by A. Crosbie Walsh (pp. 102-6) and Antony J. Dolman (pp. 107-11).

  9. The redistributional impact of Canada's Employment Insurance Program, 1992–2002.

    PubMed

    Finnie, Ross; Irvine, Ian

    2011-01-01

    For a decade or so starting in the early 1990s, Canada’s major income support programs underwent substantial reform. Meanwhile, the economy first lingered in a deep recession and then recovered with a period of strong growth. This paper focuses on how the distributional impact of Employment Insurance (EI) evolved during this period. We find that EI was strongly redistributive throughout the whole period with respect to the earnings of individuals, and somewhat less so for family income. But we also show that the distribution of benefits and contributions changed substantially over time, becoming less redistributive. Somewhat counter-intuitively, both the benefit and contribution sides of the program are shown to be redistributive, even though the contribution structure is regressive. These findings are relevant in the current context, as the economy struggles with a combination of high unemployment and fiscal pressures on government spending.

  10. Using food redistribution to reduce packing in children with severe food refusal.

    PubMed

    Gulotta, Charles S; Piazza, Cathleen C; Patel, Meeta R; Layer, Stacy A

    2005-01-01

    Positive- and negative-reinforcement-based procedures typically have targeted acceptance for children with severe food refusal; however, these procedures do not always result in successful swallowing. Once acceptance is achieved, some children expel the food repeatedly or pack (hold or pocket) it in their mouths for extended periods of time. This study evaluated the effects of using food redistribution with a bristled massaging toothbrush to reduce packing and increase consumption in 4 children with severe feeding disorders. Packing was reduced for all children. In addition, latency to clean mouth (the duration of time from acceptance to food no longer being present in the child's mouth in the absence of expulsion) for 2 children decreased when the food-redistribution procedure was used. Results are discussed in terms of the potential operant functions of the food-redistribution procedure.

  11. A mathematical model on water redistribution mechanism of the seismonastic movement of Mimosa pudica.

    PubMed

    Kwan, K W; Ye, Z W; Chye, M L; Ngan, A H W

    2013-07-02

    A theoretical model based on the water redistribution mechanism is proposed to predict the volumetric strain of motor cells in Mimosa pudica during the seismonastic movement. The model describes the water and ion movements following the opening of ion channels triggered by stimulation. The cellular strain is related to the angular velocity of the plant movement, and both their predictions are in good agreement with experimental data, thus validating the water redistribution mechanism. The results reveal that an increase in ion diffusivity across the cell membrane of <15-fold is sufficient to produce the observed seismonastic movement. Copyright © 2013 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Modelling of the Reynolds stress redistribution with a wall effect vector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shima, Nobuyuki; Kobayashi, Hiroshi

    2007-04-01

    The idea of the elliptic relaxation method of Durbin [1993. A Reynolds stress model for near-wall turbulence. J. Fluid Mech. 249, 465-498] is employed to construct a simpler and numerically more stable model for the Reynolds stress redistribution. The stress redistribution process in near-wall regions is modelled by using a vector which represents the wall effect. The vector is obtained by solving an elliptic equation with a simple wall boundary condition. The present model and Durbin's model are tested in five different flows of fundamental importance. The performance of the present model is comparable to that of the Durbin model with much less numerical effort.

  13. Extensions to decomposition of the redistributive effect of health care finance.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Hai

    2009-10-01

    The total redistributive effect (RE) of health-care finance has been decomposed into vertical, horizontal and reranking effects. The vertical effect has been further decomposed into tax rate and tax structure effects. We extend this latter decomposition to the horizontal and reranking components of the RE. We also show how to measure the vertical, horizontal and reranking effects of each component of the redistributive system, allowing analysis of the RE of health-care finance in the context of that system. The methods are illustrated with application to the RE of health-care financing in Canada.

  14. Tracer redistribution by clouds in West Africa: Numerical modeling for dry and wet seasons

    SciTech Connect

    Renard, M.; Chaumerliac, N.; Cautenet, S.; Nickerson, E.C. |

    1994-06-01

    The vertical transport by clouds of an inert tracer and its redistribution by complex West African circulations are examined using a two-dimensional mesoscale meteorological model with explicit microphysics. The model reproduces the tropical distribution of clouds and precipitation along a meridional cross section over West Africa, corresponding to the position of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) during the dry and rainy seasons. The resulting redistribution of the inert tracer is therefore closely related to the northward migration of the ITCZ between January and July. The occurrence of biomass burning during the dry season is shown to be an important source of tracer enrichment at upper levels in the atmosphere.

  15. In-situ neutron diffraction study of martensitic variant redistribution in polycrystalline Ni-Mn-Ga alloy under cyclic thermo-mechanical treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zongbin; Zou, Naifu; Zhao, Xiang; Zuo, Liang E-mail: yudong.zhang@univ-lorraine.fr; Zhang, Yudong E-mail: yudong.zhang@univ-lorraine.fr; Esling, Claude; Gan, Weimin

    2014-07-14

    The influences of uniaxial compressive stress on martensitic transformation were studied on a polycrystalline Ni-Mn-Ga bulk alloy prepared by directional solidification. Based upon the integrated in-situ neutron diffraction measurements, direct experimental evidence was obtained on the variant redistribution of seven-layered modulated (7M) martensite, triggered by external uniaxial compression during martensitic transformation. Large anisotropic lattice strain, induced by the cyclic thermo-mechanical treatment, has led to the microstructure modification by forming martensitic variants with a strong 〈0 1 0〉{sub 7M} preferential orientation along the loading axis. As a result, the saturation of magnetization became easier to be reached.

  16. Oxidative stress and redistribution of glutamine synthetase in California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) with domoic acid toxicosis.

    PubMed

    Madl, J E; Duncan, C G; Stanhill, J E; Tai, P-Y; Spraker, T R; Gulland, F M

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that oxidative stress and glutamine synthetase (GS) redistribution occur in domoic acid (DA) toxicosis in California sea lions (CSLs, Zalophus californianus). Sections of archived hippocampi from seven control and 13 CSLs diagnosed with DA toxicosis were labelled immunohistochemically for GS and for two markers of oxidative stress, malondialdehyde (MDA) and 3-nitrotyrosine (NT). The distribution and intensity of labelling were compared with the pathological changes seen in haematoxylin and eosin-stained sections. Increased expression of MDA and NT occurred in neurons of the hippocampal formation of CSLs with lesions consistent with DA toxicosis. The degree of oxidative stress was not affected significantly by the chronicity or severity of hippocampal damage. In six out of seven CSLs with chronic effects of DA toxicosis, in addition to the normal glial distribution of GS, GS expression was very strong in some neurons of the subiculum. However, neuronal GS labelling was also seen in one control CSL, an effect that may have been due to previous exposure to DA. GS expression in neurons was associated with decreases in GS labelling in neighbouring glial cell processes. DA toxicosis therefore induces increased expression of markers of oxidative stress in neurons consistent with oxidative stress contributing to the initial DA insult and also the epilepsy that often develops in chronic DA toxicosis. GS redistribution occurred primarily in chronic DA toxicosis, perhaps leading to alterations of the glutamine-glutamate-GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid) cycle and contributing to the excitotoxicity and seizures often seen in DA toxicosis.

  17. Ill-defined causes of death in Brazil: a redistribution method based on the investigation of such causes.

    PubMed

    França, Elisabeth; Teixeira, Renato; Ishitani, Lenice; Duncan, Bruce Bartholow; Cortez-Escalante, Juan José; Morais Neto, Otaliba Libânio de; Szwarcwald, Célia Landman

    2014-08-01

    OBJECTIVE To propose a method of redistributing ill-defined causes of death (IDCD) based on the investigation of such causes. METHODS In 2010, an evaluation of the results of investigating the causes of death classified as IDCD in accordance with chapter 18 of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10) by the Mortality Information System was performed. The redistribution coefficients were calculated according to the proportional distribution of ill-defined causes reclassified after investigation in any chapter of the ICD-10, except for chapter 18, and used to redistribute the ill-defined causes not investigated and remaining by sex and age. The IDCD redistribution coefficient was compared with two usual methods of redistribution: a) Total redistribution coefficient, based on the proportional distribution of all the defined causes originally notified and b) Non-external redistribution coefficient, similar to the previous, but excluding external causes. RESULTS Of the 97,314 deaths by ill-defined causes reported in 2010, 30.3% were investigated, and 65.5% of those were reclassified as defined causes after the investigation. Endocrine diseases, mental disorders, and maternal causes had a higher representation among the reclassified ill-defined causes, contrary to infectious diseases, neoplasms, and genitourinary diseases, with higher proportions among the defined causes reported. External causes represented 9.3% of the ill-defined causes reclassified. The correction of mortality rates by the total redistribution coefficient and non-external redistribution coefficient increased the magnitude of the rates by a relatively similar factor for most causes, contrary to the IDCD redistribution coefficient that corrected the different causes of death with differentiated weights. CONCLUSIONS The proportional distribution of causes among the ill-defined causes reclassified after investigation was not similar to the original distribution of defined causes. Therefore

  18. Ill-defined causes of death in Brazil: a redistribution method based on the investigation of such causes

    PubMed Central

    França, Elisabeth; Teixeira, Renato; Ishitani, Lenice; Duncan, Bruce Bartholow; Cortez-Escalante, Juan José; de Morais, Otaliba Libânio; Szwarcwald, Célia Landman

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To propose a method of redistributing ill-defined causes of death (IDCD) based on the investigation of such causes. METHODS In 2010, an evaluation of the results of investigating the causes of death classified as IDCD in accordance with chapter 18 of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10) by the Mortality Information System was performed. The redistribution coefficients were calculated according to the proportional distribution of ill-defined causes reclassified after investigation in any chapter of the ICD-10, except for chapter 18, and used to redistribute the ill-defined causes not investigated and remaining by sex and age. The IDCD redistribution coefficient was compared with two usual methods of redistribution: a) Total redistribution coefficient, based on the proportional distribution of all the defined causes originally notified and b) Non-external redistribution coefficient, similar to the previous, but excluding external causes. RESULTS Of the 97,314 deaths by ill-defined causes reported in 2010, 30.3% were investigated, and 65.5% of those were reclassified as defined causes after the investigation. Endocrine diseases, mental disorders, and maternal causes had a higher representation among the reclassified ill-defined causes, contrary to infectious diseases, neoplasms, and genitourinary diseases, with higher proportions among the defined causes reported. External causes represented 9.3% of the ill-defined causes reclassified. The correction of mortality rates by the total redistribution coefficient and non-external redistribution coefficient increased the magnitude of the rates by a relatively similar factor for most causes, contrary to the IDCD redistribution coefficient that corrected the different causes of death with differentiated weights. CONCLUSIONS The proportional distribution of causes among the ill-defined causes reclassified after investigation was not similar to the original distribution of defined causes. Therefore

  19. Crossing Party Lines: The Effects of Information on Redistributive Politics†

    PubMed Central

    Casey, Katherine

    2017-01-01

    Many lament that weak accountability and poor governance impede economic development in Africa. Politicians rely on ethnic allegiances that deliver the vote irrespective of performance, dampening electoral incentives. Giving voters information about candidate competence counters ethnic loyalty and strengthens accountability. I extend a canonical electoral model to show how information provision flows through voter behavior and ultimately impacts the distribution of political spending. I test the theory on data from Sierra Leone using decentralization and differential radio coverage to identify information’s effects. Estimates suggest that information increases voting across ethnic-party lines and induces a more equitable allocation of campaign spending. (JEL D72, D83, J15, O17, Z13) PMID:28935994

  20. Matrix metalloproteinase-2-mediated occludin degradation and caveolin-1-mediated claudin-5 redistribution contribute to blood brain barrier damage in early ischemic stroke stage

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jie; Jin, Xinchun; Liu, Ke J.; Liu, Wenlan

    2012-01-01

    Blood brain barrier (BBB) disruption occurs early enough to be within the thrombolytic time window, and this early ischemic BBB damage is closely associated with hemorrhagic transformation and thus emerging as a promising target for reducing the hemorrhagic complications of thrombolytic stroke therapy. However, the mechanisms underlying early ischemic BBB damage remain poorly understood. Here we investigated the early molecular events of ischemic BBB damage using in vitro oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) and in vivo rat middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) models. Exposure of bEND3 monolayer to OGD for 2 h significantly increased its permeability to FITC-labeled dextran, and promoted the secretion of metalloproteinase-2 and 9 (MMP-2/9) and cytosolic translocation of caveolin-1 (Cav-1). This same OGD treatment also led to rapid degradation of tight junction protein occludin and dissociation of claudin-5 from the cytoskeleton, which contributed to OGD-induced endothelial barrier disruption. Using selective MMP-2/9 inhibitor SB-3CT or their neutralizing antibodies or Cav-1 siRNA, we found that MMP-2 was the major enzyme mediating OGD-induced occludin degradation, while Cav-1 was responsible for claudin-5 redistribution. The interaction between Cav-1 and claudin-5 was further confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation. Consistent with these in vitro findings, we observed fluorescence tracer extravasation, increased gelatinolytic activity and elevated interstitial MMP-2 levels in ischemic subcortical tissue after 2-h MCAO. Moreover, occludin protein loss and claudin-5 redistribution were detected in ischemic cerebromicrovessels. These data indicate that cerebral ischemia initiates two rapid parallel processes, MMP-2-mediated occludin degradation and Cav-1-mediated claudin-5 redistribution, to cause BBB disruption at early stroke stages relevant to acute thrombolysis. PMID:22378877

  1. Matrix metalloproteinase-2-mediated occludin degradation and caveolin-1-mediated claudin-5 redistribution contribute to blood-brain barrier damage in early ischemic stroke stage.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Jin, Xinchun; Liu, Ke J; Liu, Wenlan

    2012-02-29

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption occurs early enough to be within the thrombolytic time window, and this early ischemic BBB damage is closely associated with hemorrhagic transformation and thus emerging as a promising target for reducing the hemorrhagic complications of thrombolytic stroke therapy. However, the mechanisms underlying early ischemic BBB damage remain poorly understood. Here, we investigated the early molecular events of ischemic BBB damage using in vitro oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) and in vivo rat middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) models. Exposure of bEND3 monolayer to OGD for 2 h significantly increased its permeability to FITC-labeled dextran and promoted the secretion of metalloproteinase-2 and -9 (MMP-2/9) and cytosolic translocation of caveolin-1 (Cav-1). This same OGD treatment also led to rapid degradation of tight junction protein occludin and dissociation of claudin-5 from the cytoskeleton, which contributed to OGD-induced endothelial barrier disruption. Using selective MMP-2/9 inhibitor SB-3CT (2-[[(4-phenoxyphenyl)sulfonyl]methyl]-thiirane) or their neutralizing antibodies or Cav-1 siRNA, we found that MMP-2 was the major enzyme mediating OGD-induced occludin degradation, while Cav-1 was responsible for claudin-5 redistribution. The interaction between Cav-1 and claudin-5 was further confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation. Consistent with these in vitro findings, we observed fluorescence tracer extravasation, increased gelatinolytic activity, and elevated interstitial MMP-2 levels in ischemic subcortical tissue after 2 h MCAO. Moreover, occludin protein loss and claudin-5 redistribution were detected in ischemic cerebromicrovessels. These data indicate that cerebral ischemia initiates two rapid parallel processes, MMP-2-mediated occludin degradation and Cav-1-mediated claudin-5 redistribution, to cause BBB disruption at early stroke stages relevant to acute thrombolysis.

  2. Who Gets What from Social Security: Analyzing the Redistributive Effects of Government Transfer Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warlick, Jennifer L.; Burkhauser, Richard V.

    1986-01-01

    Examines the redistributional effect of social security (OASI) by tracing payments and benefits over a person's lifetime. Concludes that OASI benefits, which traditionally exceeded the amount contributed for all income categories, will fail to do the same for future generations. (Author/JDH)

  3. Hydraulic redistribution by two semi-arid shrub species: Implications for Sahelianagro-ecosystems

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydraulic redistribution is the process of passive water movement from deeper moist soil to shallower dry soil layers using plant roots as conduits. Results from this study indicate that this phenomenon exists among two shrub species (Guiera senegalensis and Piliostigma reticulat...

  4. 47 CFR 76.1909 - Redistribution control of unencrypted digital terrestrial broadcast content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... terrestrial broadcast content. 76.1909 Section 76.1909 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION... Redistribution control of unencrypted digital terrestrial broadcast content. (a) For the purposes of this section, the terms unencrypted digital terrestrial broadcast content, EIT, PMT, broadcast flag, covered...

  5. Redistribution of Core-forming Melt During Shear Deformation of Partially Molten Peridotite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hustoft, J. W.; Kohlstedt, D. L.

    2002-01-01

    To investigate the role of deformation on the distribution of core-forming melt in a partially molten peridotite, samples of olivine-basalt-iron sulfide were sheared to large strains. Dramatic redistribution of sulfide and silicate melts occur during deformation. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  6. Hydraulic redistribution by two semi-arid shrub species: implications for Sahelian agro-ecosystems

    Treesearch

    F. Kizito; M.I. Dragila; M. Sene; J.R. Brooks; F.C. Meinzer; I. Diedhiou; M. Diouf; A. Lufafa; R.P. Dick; J. Selker; R. Cuenca

    2012-01-01

    Hydraulic redistribution is the process of passive water movement from deeper moist soil to shallower dry soil layers using plant roots as conduits. Results from this study indicate that this phenomenon exists among two shrub species (Guiera senegalensis and Piliostigma reticulatum) that co-exist with annual food crops in...

  7. HYDRAULIC REDISTRIBUTION OF SOIL WATER IN TWO OLD-GROWTH CONIFEROUS FORESTS: QUANTIFYING PATTERNS AND CONTROLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although hydraulic redistribution of soil water (HR) by roots is a widespread phenomenon, the processes governing spatial and temporal patterns of HR are not well understood. We incorporated soil/plant biophysical properties into a simple model based on Darcy's law to predict sea...

  8. Potential redistribution of tree species habitat under five climate change scenarios in the eastern US

    Treesearch

    Louis R. Iverson; Anantha M. Prasad; Anantha M. Prasad

    2002-01-01

    Global climate change could have profound effects on the Earth's biota, including large redistributions of tree species and forest types. We used DISTRIB, a deterministic regression tree analysis model, to examine environmental drivers related to current forest-species distributions and then model potential suitable habitat under five climate change scenarios...

  9. HYDRAULIC REDISTRIBUTION IN A DOUGLAS-FIR FOREST: LESSONS FROM SYSTEM MANIPULATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydraulic redistribution (HR) has been shown to slow drying of surface soils during drought in Pacific Northwest forests, but the controls governing this process and its importance to shallow-rooted species are poorly understood. Our objective in this study was to manipulate the...

  10. HYDRAULIC REDISTRIBUTION OF SOIL WATER: ECOSYSTEM IMPLICATIONS FOR PACIFIC NORTHWEST FORESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The physical process of hydraulic redistribution (HR) is driven by competing soil, tree and atmospheric water potential gradients, and may delay severe water stress for roots and other biota associated with the upper soil profile. We monitored soil moisture characteristics across...

  11. New insights on using fallout radionuclides to estimate soil redistribution rates

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The fallout radionuclides such as 137Cs have been widely accepted and used in the past 40 years to provide quantitative soil redistribution estimates at a point scale. Recently their usefulness has been questioned by a few researchers challenging the validity of the key assumption that the spatial ...

  12. Cesium-137-A tool for understanding soil redistribution across the landscape

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In 1968 research began at the USDA ARS Sedimentation Laboratory on the application of fallout radionuclides to determine sediment deposition and soil redistribution rates and patterns in agricultural and natural ecosystems. This research was based on the use of fallout Cesium -137(Cs-137) from nucl...

  13. Using fallout Cesium-137 to understand soil redistribution over agricultural landscapes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    While it is recognized that soil erosion is highly variable in space and time, studies of the redistribution of soil within a field or watershed are limited. Our studies focus on the use of fallout Cesium-137 to understand pattern of soil movement on the landscape. It is often assumed that eroding...

  14. Using Fallout Cesium-137 to understand soil redistribution over agricultural landscapes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    While it is recognized that soil erosion is highly variable in space and time, studies of the redistribution of soil and soil organic carbon (SOC) within a field or watershed are limited. Our studies focus on the use of fallout Cesium-137 to understand pattern of soil and SOC movement on the landsca...

  15. Hydraulic redistribution of soil water in two old-growth coniferous forests: quantifying patterns and controls.

    Treesearch

    J.M. Warren; F.C. Meinzer; J.R. Brooks; J.-C. Domec; R. Coulombe

    2006-01-01

    We incorporated soil/plant biophysical properties into a simple model to predict seasonal trajectories of hydraulic redistribution (HR). We measured soil water content, water potential root conductivity, and climate across multiple years in two old-growth coniferous forests. The HR variability within sites (0 to 0.5 mm/d) was linked to spatial patterns of roots, soil...

  16. Development and validity of a new model for assessing pressure redistribution properties of support surfaces.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Junko; Sugama, Junko; Sanada, Hiromi; Okuwa, Mayumi; Nakatani, Toshio; Konya, Chizuko; Sakamoto, Jirou

    2011-05-01

    Pressure ulcers are a common problem, especially in older patients. In Japan, most institutionalized older people are malnourished and show extreme bony prominence (EBP). EBP is a significant factor in the development of pressure ulcers due to increased interface pressure concentrated at the skin surface over the EBP. The use of support surfaces is recommended for the prophylaxis of pressure ulcers. However, the present equivocal criteria for evaluating the pressure redistribution of support surfaces are inadequate. Since pressure redistribution is influenced by physique and posture, evaluations using human subjects are limited. For this reason, models that can substitute for humans are necessary. We developed a new EBP model based on the anthropometric measurements, including pelvic inclination, of 100 bedridden elderly people. A comparison between the pressure distribution charts of our model and bedridden elderly subjects demonstrated that maximum contact pressure values, buttock contact pressure values, and bone prominence rates corresponded closely. This indicates that the model provides a good approximation of the features of elderly people with EBP. We subsequently examined the validity of the model through quantitative assessment of pressure redistribution functions consisting of immersion, envelopment, and contact area change. The model was able to detect differences in the hardness of urethane foam, differences in the internal pressure of an air mattress, and sequential changes during the pressure switching mode. These results demonstrate the validity of our new buttock model in evaluating pressure redistribution for a variety of surfaces.

  17. In situ separation of root hydraulic redistribution of soil water from liquid and vapor transport

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nocturnal increases in water potential (ψ) and water content () in the upper soil profile are often attributed to root water efflux into the soil, a process termed hydraulic lift or hydraulic redistribution (HR). We have previously reported HR values up to ~0.29 mm day-1 in the ...

  18. HYDRAULIC REDISTRIBUTION IN A DOUGLAS-FIR FOREST: LESSONS FROM SYSTEM MANIPULATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydraulic redistribution (HR) occurs in many ecosystems; however, key questions remain about its consequences at the ecosystem level. The objectives of the present study were to quantify seasonal variation in HR and its driving force, and to manipulate the soil-root system to e...

  19. Redistributive Taxation vs. Education Subsidies: Fostering Equality and Social Mobility in an Intergenerational Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    Redistributive taxation and education subsidies are common policies intended to foster education attendance of poor children. However, this paper shows that in an intergenerational framework, these policies can raise social mobility only for some investment situations but not in general. I also study the impact of both policies on the aggregate…

  20. In situ separation of root hydraulic redistribution of soil water from liquid and vapor transport

    Treesearch

    Jeffrey M. Warren; J. Renée Brooks; Maria I. Dragila; Frederick C. Meinzer

    2011-01-01

    Nocturnal increases in water potential and water content in the upper soil profile are often attributed to root water efflux, a process termed hydraulic redistribution (HR). However, unsaturated liquid or vapor flux of water between soil layers independent of roots also contributes to the daily recovery in water content, confounding efforts to determine the actual...

  1. In situ separation of root hydraulic redistribution of soil water from liquid and vapor transport

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nocturnal increases in water potential (ψ) and water content () in the upper soil profile are often attributed to root water efflux into the soil, a process termed hydraulic lift or hydraulic redistribution (HR). We have previously reported HR values up to ~0.29 mm day-1 in the ...

  2. Subsurface drip irrigation emitter spacing effects on soil water redistribution, corn yield, and water productivity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Emitter spacings of 0.3 to 0.6 m are commonly used for subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) of corn on the deep, silt loam soils of the United States Great Plains. Subsurface drip irrigation emitter spacings of 0.3, 0.6, 0.9 and 1.2 m were examined for the resulting differences in soil water redistribut...

  3. HYDRAULIC REDISTRIBUTION OF SOIL WATER DURING SUMMER DROUGHT IN TWO CONTRASTING PACIFIC NORTHWEST CONIFEROUS FORESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The magnitude of hydraulic redistribution of soil water by roots and its impact on soil water balance were estimated by monitoring time courses of soil water status at multiple depths and root sap flow during droughted conditions in a dry ponderosa pine ecosystem and a moist Doug...

  4. Converging patterns of uptake and hydraulic redistribution of soil water in contrasting woody vegetation types.

    Treesearch

    F.C. Meinzer; J.R. Brooks; S. Bucci; G. Goldstein; F.G. Scholz; J.M. Arren

    2004-01-01

    We used concurrent measurements of soil water content and soil water potential (Ψsoil) to assess the effects of Ψsoil on uptake and hydraulic redistribution (HR) of soil water by roots during seasonal drought cycles at six sites characterized by differences in the types and amounts of woody vegetations and...

  5. CONVERGING PATTERNS OF UPTAKE AND HYDRAULIC REDISTRIBUTION OF SOIL WATER IN CONTRASTING WOODY VEGETATION TYPES

    EPA Science Inventory

    We used concurrent measurements of soil water content and soil water potential (Ysoil) to assess the effects of Ysoil on uptake and hydraulic redistribution (HR) of soil water by roots during seasonal drought cycles in six sites characterized by different types and amounts of woo...

  6. Hydraulic redistribution of soil water during summer drought in two contrasting Pacific Northwest coniferous forests.

    Treesearch

    J. Renee Brooks; Frederick C. Meinzer; Rob Coulombe; Jillian. Gregg

    2002-01-01

    The magnitude of hydraulic redistribution of soil water by roots and its impact on soil water balance were estimated by monitoring time courses of soil water status and multiple depths and root sap flow under drought conditions in a dry ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws) ecosystem and in a moist Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga...

  7. Rainfall intensity switches ecohydrological runoff/runon redistribution patterns in dryland vegetation patches.

    PubMed

    Magliano, Patricio N; Breshears, David D; Fernández, Roberto J; Jobbágy, Esteban G

    2015-12-01

    Effectively managing net primary productivity in drylands for grazing and other uses depends on understanding how limited rainfall input is redistributed by runoff and runon among vegetation patches, particularly for patches that contrast between lesser and greater amounts of vegetation cover. Due in part to data limitations, ecohydrologists generally have focused on rainfall event size to characterize water redistribution processes. Here we use soil moisture data from a semiarid woodland to highlight how, when event size is controlled and runoff and interception are negligible at the stand scale, rainfall intensity drives the relationship between water redistribution and canopy and soil patch attributes. Horizontal water redistribution variability increased with rainfall intensity and differed between patches with contrasting vegetation cover. Sparsely vegetated patches gained relatively more water during lower intensity events, whereas densely vegetated ones gained relatively more water during higher intensity events. Consequently, range managers need to account for the distribution of rainfall event intensity, as well as event size, to assess the consequences of climate variability and change on net primary productivity. More generally, our results suggest that rainfall intensity needs to be considered in addition to event size to understand vegetation patch dynamics in drylands.

  8. 45 CFR 270.9 - How will we redistribute funds if that becomes necessary?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false How will we redistribute funds if that becomes necessary? 270.9 Section 270.9 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare OFFICE OF FAMILY ASSISTANCE (ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND...

  9. Normalization of reverse redistribution of thallium-201 with procainamide pretreatment in Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Nii, T.; Nakashima, Y.; Nomoto, J.; Hiroki, T.; Ohshima, F.; Arakawa, K. )

    1991-03-01

    Stress thallium-201 myocardial perfusion imaging was performed in a patient with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. Reverse redistribution phenomenon was observed in the absence of coronary artery disease. This seems to be the first report of normalization of this phenomenon in association with reversion of accessory pathway to normal atrioventricular conduction after pretreatment with procainamide.

  10. HYDRAULIC REDISTRIBUTION OF SOIL WATER DURING SUMMER DROUGHT IN TWO CONTRASTING PACIFIC NORTHWEST CONIFEROUS FORESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The magnitude of hydraulic redistribution of soil water by roots and its impact on soil water balance were estimated by monitoring time courses of soil water status at multiple depths and root sap flow during droughted conditions in a dry ponderosa pine ecosystem and a moist Doug...

  11. 7 CFR 247.24 - Recovery and redistribution of caseload and administrative funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Recovery and redistribution of caseload and administrative funds. 247.24 Section 247.24 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS COMMODITY...

  12. 7 CFR 247.24 - Recovery and redistribution of caseload and administrative funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Recovery and redistribution of caseload and administrative funds. 247.24 Section 247.24 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS COMMODITY...

  13. 7 CFR 247.24 - Recovery and redistribution of caseload and administrative funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Recovery and redistribution of caseload and administrative funds. 247.24 Section 247.24 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS COMMODITY...

  14. 7 CFR 247.24 - Recovery and redistribution of caseload and administrative funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Recovery and redistribution of caseload and administrative funds. 247.24 Section 247.24 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS COMMODITY...

  15. 7 CFR 247.24 - Recovery and redistribution of caseload and administrative funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Recovery and redistribution of caseload and administrative funds. 247.24 Section 247.24 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS COMMODITY...

  16. Educational Policy and the Drug Problem--A Redistributive Politics Issue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caliguri, Joseph P.

    1975-01-01

    The drug problem exists as a cluster of problems affecting broad interests or groups. The issues are redistributive in that everything relates to everything else. It seems apparent that a cluster of policies and programs need development as well as genuine citizen participation in the formulation of these policies. (Author)

  17. Cesium 137-Its applications for understanding soil redistribution and deposition patterns on the landscape

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In the 1960s research began on the application of fallout radionuclides to determine sediment deposition and soil redistribution rates and patterns in agricultural and natural ecosystems. This research was based on the use of fallout 137Cesium (137Cs) from nuclear weapon tests deposited worldwide d...

  18. Hydraulic redistribution by two semi-arid shrub species: Implications for Sahelianagro-ecosystems

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydraulic redistribution is the process of passive water movement from deeper moist soil to shallower dry soil layers using plant roots as conduits. Results from this study indicate that this phenomenon exists among two shrub species (Guiera senegalensis and Piliostigma reticulat...

  19. HYDRAULIC REDISTRIBUTION OF SOIL WATER IN TWO OLD-GROWTH CONIFEROUS FORESTS: QUANTIFYING PATTERNS AND CONTROLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although hydraulic redistribution of soil water (HR) by roots is a widespread phenomenon, the processes governing spatial and temporal patterns of HR are not well understood. We incorporated soil/plant biophysical properties into a simple model based on Darcy's law to predict sea...

  20. Light concentration and redistribution in polymer solar cells by plasmonic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jinfeng; Xue, Mei; Hoekstra, Ryan; Xiu, Faxian; Zeng, Baoqing; Wang, Kang L

    2012-03-21

    We propose an optoelectronic model to investigate polymer solar cells with plasmonic nanoparticles. The optical properties of the plasmonic active layers, approximated by the effective medium theory, are combined with the organic semiconductor model. The simulation suggests the enhancement on short-circuit photocurrent is due to light concentration and redistribution by particle plasmons.

  1. HYDRAULIC REDISTRIBUTION IN A DOUGLAS-FIR FOREST: LESSONS FROM SYSTEM MANIPULATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydraulic redistribution (HR) occurs in many ecosystems; however, key questions remain about its consequences at the ecosystem level. The objectives of the present study were to quantify seasonal variation in HR and its driving force, and to manipulate the soil-root system to e...

  2. HYDRAULIC REDISTRIBUTION IN A DOUGLAS-FIR FOREST: LESSONS FROM SYSTEM MANIPULATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydraulic redistribution (HR) has been shown to slow drying of surface soils during drought in Pacific Northwest forests, but the controls governing this process and its importance to shallow-rooted species are poorly understood. Our objective in this study was to manipulate the...

  3. HYDRAULIC REDISTRIBUTION OF SOIL WATER: ECOSYSTEM IMPLICATIONS FOR PACIFIC NORTHWEST FORESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The physical process of hydraulic redistribution (HR) is driven by competing soil, tree and atmospheric water potential gradients, and may delay severe water stress for roots and other biota associated with the upper soil profile. We monitored soil moisture characteristics across...

  4. Barker's Ecology of Disadvantage and Educational Equity: Issues of Redistribution and Recognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raffo, Carlo

    2011-01-01

    As Barker notes, the link between disadvantage and poor educational attainments is an enduring one. Educational policy over the last 40 years or so has tended to respond to educational inequality in predominately one of two ways--attempts to raise standards across the system as a whole and attempts to redistribute resources to families, schools…

  5. Educational Policy and the Drug Problem--A Redistributive Politics Issue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caliguri, Joseph P.

    1975-01-01

    The drug problem exists as a cluster of problems affecting broad interests or groups. The issues are redistributive in that everything relates to everything else. It seems apparent that a cluster of policies and programs need development as well as genuine citizen participation in the formulation of these policies. (Author)

  6. Hydraulic redistribution of water from Pinus ponderosa trees to seedlings: evidence for an ectomycorrhizal pathway.

    Treesearch

    Jeffrey M. Warren; J. Renee Brooks; Frederick C. Meinzer; Joyce L. Eberhart

    2008-01-01

    Although there is strong evidence for hydraulic redistribution (HR) of soil water by trees, it is not known if common myconhizal networks (CMN) can facilitate HR from mature trees to seedlings under field conditions. Ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) seedlings were planted into root-excluding 61-micron mesh barrier chambers buried in an old-growth...

  7. CONVERGING PATTERNS OF UPTAKE AND HYDRAULIC REDISTRIBUTION OF SOIL WATER IN CONTRASTING WOODY VEGETATION TYPES

    EPA Science Inventory

    We used concurrent measurements of soil water content and soil water potential (Ysoil) to assess the effects of Ysoil on uptake and hydraulic redistribution (HR) of soil water by roots during seasonal drought cycles in six sites characterized by different types and amounts of woo...

  8. Mass Redistribution in the Core and Time-varying Gravity at the Earth's Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuang, Wei-Jia; Chao, Benjamin F.; Fang, Ming

    2003-01-01

    The Earth's liquid outer core is in convection, as suggested by the existence of the geomagnetic field in much of the Earth's history. One consequence of the convection is the redistribution of mass resulting from relative motion among fluid parcels with slightly different densities. This time dependent mass redistribution inside the core produces a small perturbation on the gravity field of the Earth. With our numerical dynamo solutions, we find that the mass redistribution (and the resultant gravity field) symmetric about the equator is much stronger than that anti-symmetric about the equator. In particular, J(sub 2) component is the strongest. In addition, the gravity field variation increases with the Rayleigh number that measures the driving force for the geodynamo in the core. With reasonable scaling from the current dynamo solutions, we could expect that at the surface of the Earth, the J(sub 2) variation from the core is on the order of l0(exp -16)/year relative to the mean (i.e. spherically symmetric) gravity field of the Earth. The possible shielding effect due to core-mantle boundary pressure variation loading is likely much smaller and is therefore negligible. Our results suggest that time-varying gravity field perturbation due to core mass redistribution may be measured with modem space geodetic observations, which will result a new means of detecting dynamical processes in the Earth's deep interior.

  9. Mass Redistribution in the Core and Time-varying Gravity at the Earth's Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuang, Wei-Jia; Chao, Benjamin F.; Fang, Ming

    2003-01-01

    The Earth's liquid outer core is in convection, as suggested by the existence of the geomagnetic field in much of the Earth's history. One consequence of the convection is the redistribution of mass resulting from relative motion among fluid parcels with slightly different densities. This time dependent mass redistribution inside the core produces a small perturbation on the gravity field of the Earth. With our numerical dynamo solutions, we find that the mass redistribution (and the resultant gravity field) symmetric about the equator is much stronger than that anti-symmetric about the equator. In particular, J(sub 2) component is the strongest. In addition, the gravity field variation increases with the Rayleigh number that measures the driving force for the geodynamo in the core. With reasonable scaling from the current dynamo solutions, we could expect that at the surface of the Earth, the J(sub 2) variation from the core is on the order of l0(exp -16)/year relative to the mean (i.e. spherically symmetric) gravity field of the Earth. The possible shielding effect due to core-mantle boundary pressure variation loading is likely much smaller and is therefore negligible. Our results suggest that time-varying gravity field perturbation due to core mass redistribution may be measured with modem space geodetic observations, which will result a new means of detecting dynamical processes in the Earth's deep interior.

  10. DoD’s Management of the Redistribution Property Assistance Team Operations in Kuwait

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-10

    Supply Enhanced RPAT Redistribution Property Assistance Team TPE Theater Provided Equipment...Camp Virginia RPAT officials relieved units of accountability for their Theater Provided Equipment ( TPE ), before redeploying1 to their home stations...all excess major end item (Class VII) TPE , improve property accountability, and enable asset visibility of the equipment received. The RPAT

  11. Redistributive Taxation vs. Education Subsidies: Fostering Equality and Social Mobility in an Intergenerational Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    Redistributive taxation and education subsidies are common policies intended to foster education attendance of poor children. However, this paper shows that in an intergenerational framework, these policies can raise social mobility only for some investment situations but not in general. I also study the impact of both policies on the aggregate…

  12. Characterization of a novel photoresist redistribution material for advanced packaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flack, Warren W.; Nguyen, Ha-Ai; Capsuto, Elliott S.

    2002-07-01

    The widespread adoption of advanced packaging techniques is primarily driven by electrical device performance and chip form factor considerations. Flip chip packaging is currently growing at a 27% compound annual rate and it is expected that by 2005 over 60% of all 300 mm wafers will be bumped. To ensure optimal productivity and cost of ownership it is imperative to provide lithographic materials that are optimized for these applications. Flip chip packaging frequently uses one or more redistribution levels to increase the number of pads that can be bumped in the minimum form factor. The redistribution level requires a photosensitive dielectric material to be used as a permanent insulating layer. The mechanical, electrical and lithographic properties of the material for this level are all important. This study will characterize a novel photosensitive siloxane material (Shin-Etsu SINRT Photoresist) for the use in the redistribution layer. Siloxanes are a good choice for redistribution because of their excellent physical properties, ease of processing and relatively low curing temperatures. The lithographic performance of SINR photoresist has been optimized using a broad band 1X stepper to control critical dimensions (CD). This study evaluates process capability at multiple exposure wavelengths and post exposure bake (PEB) conditions. Cross sectional SEM analysis, process linearity, Bossung plots and process windows are used to establish the lithographic capabilities. Material modifications also were investigated to control the photoresist sidewall angles.

  13. Barker's Ecology of Disadvantage and Educational Equity: Issues of Redistribution and Recognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raffo, Carlo

    2011-01-01

    As Barker notes, the link between disadvantage and poor educational attainments is an enduring one. Educational policy over the last 40 years or so has tended to respond to educational inequality in predominately one of two ways--attempts to raise standards across the system as a whole and attempts to redistribute resources to families, schools…

  14. Constituent Redistribution in U-Zr Metallic Fuel Using the Advanced Fuel Performance Code BISON

    SciTech Connect

    Galloway, Jack D.; Unal, Cetin; Matthews, Christopher

    2016-09-30

    Previous work done by Galloway, et. al. on EBR-II ternary (U-Pu-Zr) fuel constituent redistribution yielded accurate simulation data for the limited data sets of Zr redistribution. The data sets included EPMA scans of two different irradiated rods. First, T179, which was irradiated to 1.9 at% burnup, was analyzed. Second, DP16, which was irradiated to 11 at% burnup, was analyzed. One set of parameters that most accurately represented the zirconium profiles for both experiments was determined. Since the binary fuel (U-Zr) has previously been used as the driver fuel for sodium fast reactors (SFR) as well as being the likely driver fuel if a new SFR is constructed, this same process has been initiated on the binary fuel form. From limited binary EPMA scans as well as other fuel characterization techniques, it has been observed that zirconium redistribution also occurs in the binary fuel, albeit at a reduced rate compared to observation in the ternary fuel, as noted by Kim et. al. While the rate of redistribution has been observed to be slower, numerous metallographs of U-Zr fuel show distinct zone formations.

  15. Redistribution of light frequency by multiple scattering in a resonant atomic vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, João Carlos de A.; Oriá, Marcos; Chevrollier, Martine; Cavalcante, Hugo L. D. de Souza; Passerat de Silans, T.

    2015-05-01

    The propagation of light in a resonant atomic vapor can a priori be thought of as a multiple scattering process, in which each scattering event redistributes both the direction and the frequency of the photons. Particularly, the frequency redistribution may result in Lévy flights of photons, directly affecting the transport properties of light in a resonant atomic vapor and turning this propagation into a superdiffusion process. Here, we report on a Monte Carlo simulation developed to study the evolution of the spectrum of the light in a resonant thermal vapor. We observe the gradual change of the spectrum and its convergence towards a regime of complete frequency redistribution as the number of scattering events increases. We also analyze the probability density function of the step length of photons between emissions and reabsorptions in the vapor, which governs the statistics of the light diffusion. We observe two different regimes in the light transport: superdiffusion when the vapor is excited near the line center and normal diffusion for excitation far from the line center. The regime of complete frequency redistribution is not reached for excitation far from resonance even after many absorption and reemission cycles due to correlations between emitted and absorbed frequencies.

  16. Impacts of hydraulic redistribution on grass-tree competition versus facilitation in a semiarid savanna

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    -A long-standing ambition in ecosystem science has been to understand the relationship between ecosystem community composition, structure and function. Differential water use and hydraulic redistribution have been proposed as one mechanism that might allow for the coexistence of overstory woody plan...

  17. Knowing One's Lot in Life versus Climbing the Social Ladder: The Formation of Redistributive Preferences in Urban China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smyth, Russell; Mishra, Vinod; Qian, Xiaolei

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines, how individual preferences for redistribution in general and redistribution to improve access to education, improve social protection for the poor, reduce income inequality and reduce unemployment depend on beliefs about what determines one's lot in life and self-assessed prospects for climbing the social ladder in urban…

  18. THE EFFECTS OF IRRADIATION ON HOT JOVIAN ATMOSPHERES: HEAT REDISTRIBUTION AND ENERGY DISSIPATION

    SciTech Connect

    Perna, Rosalba; Heng, Kevin; Pont, Frederic

    2012-05-20

    Hot Jupiters, due to the proximity to their parent stars, are subjected to a strong irradiating flux that governs their radiative and dynamical properties. We compute a suite of three-dimensional circulation models with dual-band radiative transfer, exploring a relevant range of irradiation temperatures, both with and without temperature inversions. We find that, for irradiation temperatures T{sub irr} {approx}< 2000 K, heat redistribution is very efficient, producing comparable dayside and nightside fluxes. For T{sub irr} Almost-Equal-To 2200-2400 K, the redistribution starts to break down, resulting in a high day-night flux contrast. Our simulations indicate that the efficiency of redistribution is primarily governed by the ratio of advective to radiative timescales. Models with temperature inversions display a higher day-night contrast due to the deposition of starlight at higher altitudes, but we find this opacity-driven effect to be secondary compared to the effects of irradiation. The hotspot offset from the substellar point is large when insolation is weak and redistribution is efficient, and decreases as redistribution breaks down. The atmospheric flow can be potentially subjected to the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (as indicated by the Richardson number) only in the uppermost layers, with a depth that penetrates down to pressures of a few millibars at most. Shocks penetrate deeper, down to several bars in the hottest model. Ohmic dissipation generally occurs down to deeper levels than shock dissipation (to tens of bars), but the penetration depth varies with the atmospheric opacity. The total dissipated Ohmic power increases steeply with the strength of the irradiating flux and the dissipation depth recedes into the atmosphere, favoring radius inflation in the most irradiated objects. A survey of the existing data, as well as the inferences made from them, reveals that our results are broadly consistent with the observational trends.

  19. Effect of eating on thallium-201 myocardial redistribution after myocardial ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Angello, D.A.; Wilson, R.A.; Palac, R.T.

    1987-09-01

    To determine whether eating a high-carbohydrate meal between initial and delayed postexercise thallium-201 (Tl-201) imaging affects detection of Tl-201 redistribution during exercise stress testing, 16 patients with stable angina performed 2 Tl-201 treadmill exercise stress tests within a 14-day interval. Immediately after initial postexercise imaging, patients either drank a commercially available instant breakfast preparation for the intervention test or drank an equivalent volume of water for the control test. Comparable exercise workloads were achieved by exercising patients to the same heart rate for both tests. The order of the 2 (intervention and control) tests were randomized. All patients had at least 1 region of Tl-201 myocardial redistribution on either their eating or control test scans, although only 7 of the 16 had positive treadmill exercise test responses. Forty-six regions showing Tl-201 myocardial redistribution were identified in all 144 regions examined. Significantly more of these regions were identified on control test scans than on eating test scans: 11 of 46 on both test scans, 6 of 46 only on eating test scans and 29 of 46 only on control scans (p less than 0.001). Consistent with results of the quantitative regional analysis, the percentage of Tl-201 clearance over 4 hours in the 46 Tl-201 myocardial redistribution regions was 39 +/- 8% for the eating tests and 29 +/- 8% for control tests (mean +/- standard deviation, p less than 0.003). In 4 patients diagnosis of transient ischemia would have been missed because their 14 Tl-201 myocardial redistribution regions were detected only on the control test scans.

  20. Assessing soil redistribution in a complex karst catchment using fallout 137Cs and GIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navas, A.; López-Vicente, M.; Gaspar, L.; Machín, J.

    2013-08-01

    Caesium-137 derived from nuclear testing in the past century has been widely used as a sediment tracer of soil redistribution, providing information on medium term (40-50 years) erosion rates. To date, most studies have focused on individual fields of limited extent, but estimated rates and patterns of soil redistribution require upscaling to catchment level. An attempt to assess soil redistribution processes with strong geomorphic control on complex terrain, such as an internally drained karst catchment, is presented in this work. A comprehensive geomorphological survey of the Estanya Lake catchment (Spanish Pyrenees) enabled the main geomorphic elements to be identified with a grid resolution of 5 × 5 m, which was the basis for the terrain analyses. A detailed DEM was constructed and improved after field identification of the drainage system and point measures on gentle slopes with Total Topographic Station. A 100 × 100 m sampling grid was established to derive point data of 137Cs inventories across the catchment. Geostatistical interpolation of point samples of 137Cs inventories in soil was carried out to identify and assess the areas of sediment gain and loss by comparing with 137Cs reference inventories. Profile activity models were used to calibrate 137Cs data and to derive estimates of soil redistribution. GIS was used to provide spatially distributed erosion and deposition rates in the landscape for the whole catchment. The median values of soil erosion and deposition of 4.7 and 3.1 Mg ha- 1 year- 1, respectively, showed a large variability and reveal coupling between erosional and depositional forms in the catchment. The highest erosion and deposition rates were found in cultivated fields at the southern sector of the catchment. The spatial analysis of the results supports the importance of taking into account geomorphological features in karst catchments as relevant controlling factors in soil redistribution processes.

  1. Household perceptions towards a redistributive policy across health insurance funds in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Chomi, Eunice N; Mujinja, Phares G M; Hansen, Kristian; Kiwara, Angwara D; Enemark, Ulrika

    2015-03-15

    The Tanzanian health insurance system comprises multiple health insurance funds targeting different population groups but which operate in parallel, with no mechanisms for redistribution across the funds. Establishing such redistributive mechanisms requires public support, which is grounded on the level of solidarity within the country. The aim of this paper is to analyse the perceptions of CHF, NHIF and non-member households towards cross-subsidisation of the poor as an indication of the level of solidarity and acceptance of redistributive mechanisms. This study analyses data collected from a survey of 695 households relating to perceptions of household heads towards cross-subsidisation of the poor to enable them to access health services. Kruskal-Wallis test is used to compare perceptions by membership status. Generalized ordinal logistic regression models are used to identify factors associated with support for cross-subsidisation of the poor. Compared to CHF and NHIF households, non-member households expressed the highest support for subsidised CHF membership for the poor. The odds of expressing support for subsidised CHF membership are higher for NHIF households and non-member households, households that are wealthier, whose household heads have lower education levels, and have sick members. The majority of households support a partial rather than fully subsidised CHF membership for the poor and there were no significant differences by membership status. The odds of expressing willingness to contribute towards subsidised CHF membership are higher for households that are wealthier, with young household heads and have confidence in scheme management. The majority may support a redistributive policy, but there are indications that this support and willingness to contribute to its achievement are influenced by the perceived benefits, amount of subsidy considered, and trust in scheme management. These present important issues for consideration when designing

  2. A novel photosensitive material for redistribution and stress buffer reduction on 300mm wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flack, Warren W.; Nguyen, Ha-Ai; Capsuto, Elliott

    2006-03-01

    The widespread adoption of advanced packaging techniques is driven by electrical device performance and chip form factor considerations. Flipchip packaging is currently growing at a 25% compound annual rate and it is expected that 90% of all 65 nm logic devices will be bumped. To ensure optimal productivity and cost of ownership, it is imperative to employ lithographic materials that are optimized for these applications and that meet all device specifications. Bump processing typically has one or more levels that require a permanent layer either to relieve stress on the die (stress buffer layer) or to redistribute electrical connections (redistribution layer). Since these layers remain on the wafer, the mechanical and electrical properties of the material are as important as the lithographic properties. This study will characterize a novel negative, siloxane (Shin-Etsu SINR (R)) photoresist for the redistribution and stress buffer application on 300 mm wafers. Siloxanes are a good choice for redistribution and stress buffer layers because of their excellent physical properties, ease of processing and relatively low cure temperatures. The lithographic performance of the SINR is optimized using a broad band, low numerical aperture, 1X stepper. This study evaluates softbake, post exposure bake (PEB), develop conditions and exposure optimization. Due to decreasing feature size at the redistribution level, it is critical to demonstrate CD uniformity and resolution across the entire 300 mm wafer surface. While the CD uniformity data is collected on 300 mm wafers, all process optimization results will be applicable for all standard wafer sizes. The physical properties of the SINR material are evaluated through curing temperature studies and sputtering tests.

  3. Mechanisms underlying the redistribution of particles among the lung's alveolar macrophages during alveolar phase clearance

    SciTech Connect

    Lehnert, B.E.; Oritz, J.B.; Steinkamp, J.A.; Tietjen, G.L.; Sebring, R.J. ); Oberdorster, G. )

    1991-01-01

    In order to obtain information about the particle redistribution phenomenon following the deposition of inhaled particles, as well as to obtain information about some of the mechanisms that may be operable in the redistribution of particles, lavaged lung free cell analyses and transmission electron microscopic (TEM) analyses of lung tissue and were performed using lungs from rats after they were subchronically exposed to aerosolized dioxide (TiO{sub 2}). TEM analyses indicated that the in situ autolysis of particle-containing Alveolar Macropages (AM) is one important mechanism involved in the redistribution of particles. Evidence was also obtained that indicated that the engulfment of one particle-containing phagocyte by another phagocyte also occurs. Another prominent mechanism of the particle redistribution phenomenon may be the in situ proliferation of particle-laden AM. We used the macrophage cell line J774A.1 as a surrogate for AM to investigate how different particulate loads in macrophages may affect their abilities to proliferate. These in vitro investigations indicated that the normal rate of proliferation of macrophages is essentially unaffected by the containment of relatively high particulate burdens. Overall, the results of our investigations suggest that in situ autolysis of particle-containing AM and the rephagocytosis of freed particles by other phagocytes, the phagocytosis of effete and disintegrating particle-containing phagocytes by other AM, and the in situ division of particle-containing AM are likely mechanisms that underlie the post-depositional redistribution of particles among the lung's AM during alveolar phase clearance. 19 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. The significance of cytochrome c redistribution during the subcellular fractionation of rat liver.

    PubMed

    González-Cadavid, N F; Bravo, M; Campbell, P N

    1968-04-01

    1. The redistribution of mitochondrial cytochrome c during homogenization and subcellular fractionation of the liver was studied. Chromatographically homogeneous (14)C-labelled cytochrome c was added in different amounts to liver suspensions immediately before homogenization and the adsorption of radioactivity was determined in cytochrome c fractions extracted at pH4.0, first with water and then with 0.15m-sodium chloride. 2. The soluble cytochrome c remaining in the cell sap after subcellular fractionation was 7% of the calculated amount of cytochrome c passing through a soluble form during the whole process. The total amount of cytochrome c released in a soluble form and subsequently redistributed was 25-30% of the total liver cytochrome c. 3. In the standard microsomal fraction the cytochrome c extracted with water originated entirely from redistribution whereas that extracted with 0.15m-sodium chloride was 80% endogenous. In the mitochondrial fraction both cytochrome c pools were truly endogenous, so that practically none of the mitochondrial cytochrome c released to the soluble cell sap was readsorbed by the mitochondria. 4. These results support our former hypothesis that the cytochrome c extracted with 0.15m-sodium chloride at pH4.0 from the standard microsomes represents the cytochrome c newly synthesized in situ, since it does not originate from redistribution. However, the microsomal pool extracted with water cannot be an intermediate in the postulated transfer of cytochrome c from the microsomal particles to the mitochondria, since this pool arises from redistribution of mitochondrial cytochrome c.

  5. Indomethacin ameliorates trimethyltin-induced neuronal damage in vivo by attenuating oxidative stress in the dentate gyrus of mice.

    PubMed

    Huong, Nguyen Quynh; Nakamura, Yukary; Kuramoto, Nobuyuki; Yoneyama, Masanori; Nagashima, Reiko; Shiba, Tatsuo; Yamaguchi, Taro; Hasebe, Shigeru; Ogita, Kiyokazu

    2011-01-01

    The organotin trimethyltin (TMT) is well known to cause neuronal degeneration in the hippocampal dentate gyrus of mice. The first purpose of the present study was to examine whether the cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor indomethacin could ameliorate neuronal degeneration in the dentate gyrus of mice following TMT treatment in vivo. The systemic injection into mice of TMT at 2.8 mg/kg produced activation of endogenous caspase-3 and calpain, enhanced the gene expression of COX-1 and COX-2, activated microglial cells, and caused the formation of the lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxynonenal in the hippocampus. Given at 12-h post-TMT treatment, the systemic injection of indomethacin (5 or 10 mg/kg, subcutaneously) significantly decreased the TMT-induced damage to neurons having active caspase-3 and single-stranded DNA in the dentate granule cell layer of the hippocampus. The results of the α-Fodrin degradation test revealed that the post-treatment with indomethacin was effective in attenuating TMT-induced activation of endogenous caspases and calpain in the hippocampus. In TMT-treated animals, interestingly, the post-treatment with indomethacin produced not only activation of microglial cells in the dentate gyrus but also the formation of 4-hydroxynonenal in the dentate granule cell layer. Taken together, our data suggest that COX inhibition by indomethacin ameliorated TMT-induced neuronal degeneration in the dentate gyrus by attenuating intensive oxidative stress.

  6. Copper redistribution in murine macrophages in response to Salmonella infection.

    PubMed

    Achard, Maud E S; Stafford, Sian L; Bokil, Nilesh J; Chartres, Jy; Bernhardt, Paul V; Schembri, Mark A; Sweet, Matthew J; McEwan, Alastair G

    2012-05-15

    The movement of key transition metal ions is recognized to be of critical importance in the interaction between macrophages and intracellular pathogens. The present study investigated the role of copper in mouse macrophage responses to Salmonella enterica sv. Typhimurium. The copper chelator BCS (bathocuproinedisulfonic acid, disodium salt) increased intracellular survival of S. Typhimurium within primary mouse BMM (bone-marrow-derived macrophages) at 24 h post-infection, implying that copper contributed to effective host defence against this pathogen. Infection of BMM with S. Typhimurium or treatment with the TLR (Toll-like receptor) 4 ligand LPS (lipopolysaccharide) induced the expression of several genes encoding proteins involved in copper transport [Ctr (copper transporter) 1, Ctr2 and Atp7a (copper-transporting ATPase 1)], as well as the multi-copper oxidase Cp (caeruloplasmin). Both LPS and infection with S. Typhimurium triggered copper accumulation within punctate intracellular vesicles (copper 'hot spots') in BMM as indicated by the fluorescent reporter CS1 (copper sensor 1). These copper hot spots peaked in their accumulation at approximately 18 h post-stimulation and were dependent on copper uptake into cells. Localization studies indicated that the copper hot spots were in discrete vesicles distinct from Salmonella containing vacuoles and lysosomes. We propose that copper hot spot formation contributes to antimicrobial responses against professional intracellular bacterial pathogens.

  7. Usefulness of semiquantitative analysis of dipyridamole-thallium-201 redistribution for improving risk stratification before vascular surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Levinson, J.R.; Boucher, C.A.; Coley, C.M.; Guiney, T.E.; Strauss, H.W.; Eagle, K.A. )

    1990-08-15

    Preoperative dipyridamole-thallium-201 scanning is sensitive in identifying patients prone to ischemic cardiac complications after vascular surgery, but most patients with redistribution do not have an event after surgery. Therefore, its positive predictive value is limited. To determine which patients with thallium redistribution are at highest risk, dipyridamole-thallium-201 images were interpreted semiquantitatively. Sixty-two consecutive patients with redistribution on preoperative dipyridamole-thallium-201 planar imaging studies were identified. Each thallium scan was then analyzed independently by 2 observers for the number of myocardial segments out of 15, the number of thallium views out of 3 and the number of coronary artery territories with redistribution. Seventeen patients (27%) had postoperative ischemic events, including unstable angina pectoris, ischemic pulmonary edema, myocardial infarction and cardiac death. Thallium predictors of ischemic operative complications included thallium redistribution greater than or equal to 4 myocardial segments (p = 0.03), greater than or equal to 2 of the 3 planar views (p = 0.005) and greater than or equal to 2 coronary territories (p = 0.007). No patient with redistribution in only 1 view had an ischemic event (0 of 15). Thus, determining the extent of redistribution by dipyridamole-thallium-201 scanning improves risk stratification before vascular surgery. Patients with greater numbers of myocardial segments and greater numbers of coronary territories showing thallium-201 redistribution are at higher risk for ischemic cardiac complications. In contrast, when the extent of thallium redistribution is limited, there is a lower risk despite the presence of redistribution.

  8. Differential growth and hormone redistribution in gravireacting maize roots.

    PubMed

    Pilet, P E

    1989-01-01

    When growing roots are placed in a horizontal position gravity induces a positive curvature. It is classically considered to be the consequence of a faster elongation rate by the upper side compared to the lower side. A critical examination indicates that the gravireaction is caused by differential cell extension depending on several processes. Some of the endogenous regulators which may control the growth and gravitropism of elongating roots are briefly presented. The growth inhibitors produced or released from the root cap move preferentially in a basipetal direction and accumulate in the lower side of the elongation zone of horizontally maintained roots. The identity of these compounds is far from clear, but one of these inhibitors could be abscisic acid (ABA). However, indol-3y1 acetic acid (IAA) is also important for root growth and gravitropism. ABA may interact with IAA. Two other aspects of root cell extension have also to be carefully considered. An elongation gradient measured from the tip to the base of the root was found to be important for the growth of both vertical and horizontal gravireactive roots. It was changed significantly during the gravipresentation and can be considered as the origin of the differential elongation. Sephadex beads have been used as both growth markers and as monitors of surface pH changes when they contain some pH indicator. This technique has shown that the distribution of cell extension along the main root axis is related to a pH gradient, the proton efflux being larger for faster growing parts of roots. A lateral movement of calcium is obtained when Ca2+ is applied across the tips of horizontally placed roots with a preferential transport towards the lower side. Endogenous calcium, which may accumulate inside the endoplasmic reticulum of some cap cells, may also act in the gravireception. These observations and several others strongly suggest that calcium may play an essential role in controlling root growth and several

  9. Measurement of retinal blood flow rate in diabetic rats: disparity between techniques due to redistribution of flow.

    PubMed

    Leskova, Wendy; Watts, Megan N; Carter, Patsy R; Eshaq, Randa S; Harris, Norman R

    2013-04-26

    Reports of altered retinal blood flow in experimental models of type I diabetes have provided contrasting results, which leads to some confusion as to whether flow is increased or decreased. The purpose of our study was to evaluate early diabetes-induced changes in retinal blood flow in diabetic rats, using two distinctly different methods. Diabetes was induced by injection of streptozotocin (STZ), and retinal blood flow rate was measured under anesthesia by a microsphere infusion technique, or by an index of flow based on the mean circulation time between arterioles and venules. Measurements in STZ rats were compared to age-matched nondiabetic controls. In addition, the retinal distribution of fluorescently-labeled red blood cells (RBCs) was viewed by confocal microscopy in excised flat mounts. Retinal blood flow rate was found to decrease by approximately 33% in the STZ rats compared to controls (P < 0.001) as assessed by the microsphere technique. However, in striking contrast, the mean circulation time through the retina was found to be almost 3× faster in the STZ rats (P < 0.01). This contradiction could be explained by flow redistribution through the superficial vessels of the diabetic retina, with this possibility supported by our observation of significantly fewer RBCs flowing through the deeper capillaries. We conclude that retinal blood flow rate is reduced significantly in the diabetic rat, with a substantial decrease of flow through the capillaries due to shunting of blood through the superficial layer, allowing rapid transit from arterioles to venules.

  10. Nephrin Redistribution on Podocytes Is a Potential Mechanism for Proteinuria in Patients with Primary Acquired Nephrotic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Doublier, Sophie; Ruotsalainen, Vesa; Salvidio, Gennaro; Lupia, Enrico; Biancone, Luigi; Conaldi, Pier Giulio; Reponen, Paula; Tryggvason, Karl; Camussi, Giovanni

    2001-01-01

    We investigated the distribution of nephrin by immunofluorescence microscopy in renal biopsies of patients with nephrotic syndrome: 13 with membranous glomerulonephritis (GN), 10 with minimal change GN, and seven with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. As control, six patients with IgA GN without nephrotic syndrome and 10 normal controls were studied. We found an extensive loss of staining for nephrin and a shift from a podocyte-staining pattern to a granular pattern in patients with nephrotic syndrome, irrespective of the primary disease. In membranous GN, nephrin was co-localized with IgG immune deposits. In the attempt to explain these results, we investigated in vitro whether stimuli acting on the cell cytoskeleton, known to be involved in the pathogenesis of GN, may induce redistribution of nephrin on the surface of human cultured podocytes. Aggregated but not disaggregated human IgG4, plasmalemmal insertion of membrane attack complex of complement, tumor necrosis factor-α, and puromycin, induced the shedding of nephrin with a loss of surface expression. This phenomenon was abrogated by cytochalasin and sodium azide. These results suggest that the activation of cell cytoskeleton may modify surface expression of nephrin allowing a dislocation from plasma membrane to an extracellular site. PMID:11337370

  11. DNA-ligand interactions gained and lost: light-induced ligand redistribution in a supramolecular cascade.

    PubMed

    Berdnikova, Daria V; Aliyeu, Tseimur M; Paululat, Thomas; Fedorov, Yuri V; Fedorova, Olga A; Ihmels, Heiko

    2015-03-21

    A supramolecular five-component cascade is presented that enables light-controlled transport of an in situ modified ligand between three host systems based on the different complexation preferences of cyclodextrin, cucurbituril, and double-stranded DNA. The results point out novel approaches for the control of drug-DNA interactions in DNA-targeting therapy.

  12. Auranofin-induced oxidative stress causes redistribution of the glutathione pool in Taenia crassiceps cysticerci.

    PubMed

    Martínez-González, J J; Guevara-Flores, A; Rendón, J L; del Arenal, I P

    2015-05-01

    Previously, we have studied the effect of the gold-compound auranofin (AF) on both thioredoxin-glutathione reductasa (TGR) activity and viability of Taenia crassiceps cysticerci. It was demonstrated that micromolar concentrations of AF were high enough to fully inhibit TGR and kill the parasites. In this work, the dynamics of changes in the glutathione pool of T. crassiceps cysticerci following the addition of AF, was analyzed. A dose-dependent decrease in the internal glutathione concentration, concomitant with an increase in ROS production was observed. These changes were simultaneous with the formation of glutathione-protein complexes and the export of glutathione disulfide (GSSG) to the culture medium. Incubation of cysticerci in the presence of both AF and N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) prevents all the above changes, maintaining cysticerci viability. By contrast, the presence of both AF and buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) resulted in a potentiation of the effects of the gold compound, jeopardizing cysticerci viability. These results suggest the lethal effect of AF on T. crassiceps cysticerci, observed at micromolar concentrations, can be explained as a consequence of major changes in the glutathione status, which results in a significant increase in the oxidative stress of the parasites.

  13. Redistribution of Terbium Ions Across Acetylcholine Receptor-Enriched Membranes Induced by Agonist Desensitization

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Thomas E.; Chuang, Anthony R.; Marek, Matthew S.; Doniach, Sebastian; Fairclough, Robert H.

    2009-01-01

    Using small-angle x-ray diffraction from centrifugally oriented acetylcholine receptor (AChR) enriched membranes coupled with anomalous scattering from terbium ions (Tb3+) titrated into presumed Ca2+ binding sites, we have mapped the distribution of Tb3+ perpendicular to the membrane plane using a heavy atom refinement algorithm. We have compared the distribution of Tb3+ in the closed resting state with that in the carbamylcholine-desensitized state. In the closed resting state we find 45 Tb3+ ions distributed in 10 narrow peaks perpendicular to the membrane plane. Applying the same refinement procedure to the data from carbamylcholine desensitized AChR we find 18 fewer Tb3+ ions in eight peaks, and slight rearrangements of Tb3+ density in the peaks near the ends of the AChR ion channel pore. These agonist dependent changes in the Tb3+ stoichiometry and distribution suggest a likely role for multivalent cations in stabilizing the different functional states of the AChR, and the changes in the Tb3+ distribution at the two ends of the pore suggest a potential role for multivalent cations in the gating of the ion channel. PMID:19348747

  14. Charge redistribution induced by donors in nanowires with variable composition and thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galván-Moya, J. E.; Gutiérrez, W.; Mikhailov, I. D.; Silva-Valencia, J.; Franco, R.

    2011-04-01

    By using the functional derivative technique we study the binding energies of on- and off-axis donors in compositionally modulated nanowires and in nanowires with variable thickness and different profiles of the cross-sections along the axis, in the presence of the external electric field applied parallel to the growth direction. We show that the electronic properties of donors in narrow non-homogeneous wires are very sensitive to the variation of their positions, the heterostructure geometry and the composition. Binding energy dependencies on the electric field strength, the barrier and well widths, the wire radius, as well as the donor position are consistently described using our formulation. Our simple method should be useful for analyzing a variety of more complex nanowire superlattice structures and nanowires with variable cross-section profiles, for which more rigorous approaches require extensive numerical calculations.

  15. Imaging stress redistribution in a high-stress mining environment using induced microseismicity and seismic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baig, A. M.; Urbancic, T.; Bosman, K.; Smith-Boughner, L.; Viegas, G. F.

    2016-12-01

    Underground excavation of ore tends to concentrate stress in the pillars of the mines. As the mining progresses, the stress tends to concentrate in these pillars resulting in potentially critical stress conditions that lead to concerns over personnel safety and has implications with regards to efficient and effective extraction criteria. It therefore becomes critical for operations to manage this stress behaviour as the extraction activities progress. In this study, we examine seismicity recorded with a full three-dimensional array consisting of single- and three-component accelerometers and geophones around the extraction volumes; this data formed the basis for characterization of stress variations. Specifically, we present an integrated study of the seismological properties of a sill pillar during the blasting of a stope to characterize how the stress is evolving in the mine. Our results suggest that the seismicity itself reacts to the stress conditions of the mining and through investigation of the source parameters, reveals how these events are being activated. Through consideration of the both the source parameters and the inter-event times and distances, we arrive at a description of the deformation of the reservoir and are able to assess the role of stress during this process. Further resolution of the stress state in the mine is obtained through inversions of moment tensors on the highest-quality microseismic data, and a descriptive analysis of event clustering by space and time to resolve the dynamics of the stress orientations. To corroborate our inferences based on microseismicity, we use blasts recorded around the extraction volume to understand how stress is manifesting itself through P-wave velocity anomalies. We confirm the dynamics of the stress field that we observe from the microseismicity and show the destressing effect of blasting coupled with stress migration through to other parts of the sill pillar.

  16. Redistribution of terbium ions across acetylcholine receptor-enriched membranes induced by agonist desensitization.

    PubMed

    Lee, Thomas E; Chuang, Anthony R; Marek, Matthew S; Doniach, Sebastian; Fairclough, Robert H

    2009-04-08

    Using small-angle x-ray diffraction from centrifugally oriented acetylcholine receptor (AChR) enriched membranes coupled with anomalous scattering from terbium ions (Tb3+) titrated into presumed Ca2+ binding sites, we have mapped the distribution of Tb3+ perpendicular to the membrane plane using a heavy atom refinement algorithm. We have compared the distribution of Tb3+ in the closed resting state with that in the carbamylcholine-desensitized state. In the closed resting state we find 45 Tb3+ ions distributed in 10 narrow peaks perpendicular to the membrane plane. Applying the same refinement procedure to the data from carbamylcholine desensitized AChR we find 18 fewer Tb3+ ions in eight peaks, and slight rearrangements of Tb3+ density in the peaks near the ends of the AChR ion channel pore. These agonist dependent changes in the Tb3+ stoichiometry and distribution suggest a likely role for multivalent cations in stabilizing the different functional states of the AChR, and the changes in the Tb3+ distribution at the two ends of the pore suggest a potential role for multivalent cations in the gating of the ion channel.

  17. Effective Stress and Permeability Redistributions Induced by Successive Roadway and Borehole Excavations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Shengyong; Zhou, Fubao; Liu, Yingke; Xia, Tongqiang

    2015-01-01

    Methane extraction from in-seam boreholes is the main approach for recovering methane in China. However, the methane concentration for this method is generally lower than 30 %, which incurs a risk of methane outbursts during pipeline transportation. To increase the methane concentration, we first conducted permeability experiments to investigate the relationships between the permeability and the effective stress at different stages in the complete effective stress-strain process. We then adopted FLAC3D software to calculate the stress distributions around roadways and boreholes after their consecutive excavations and thereby divided the coal mass around the roadway and borehole according to different effective stress stages to understand the gas flow characteristics. The results show that the coal mass along the radial direction of the roadway and borehole can be sequentially divided into four zones, including the full flow zone (FFZ), the transitive flow zone (TFZ), the flow-shielding zone (FSZ), and the in situ rock flow zone (IRFZ), which have been proven correct by field experiments. The methane in the IRFZ was difficult to extract because of the low permeability of coal mass in this zone. The permeability of the FSZ was lower than that of the IRFZ. The permeability along the interface between the FSZ and TFZ was nearly one time as low as that of the IRFZ, while the permeability of the FFZ was two orders of magnitude higher than that of the IRFZ. This four-zone division demonstrates the decaying mechanism of methane extraction concentration and flow in the in-seam borehole and can provide theoretical guidance for improvement of methane extraction.

  18. Importance of internal hydraulic redistribution for prolonging the lifespan of roots in dry soil.

    PubMed

    Bauerle, T L; Richards, J H; Smart, D R; Eissenstat, D M

    2008-02-01

    Redistribution of water within plants could mitigate drought stress of roots in zones of low soil moisture. Plant internal redistribution of water from regions of high soil moisture to roots in dry soil occurs during periods of low evaporative demand. Using minirhizotrons, we observed similar lifespans of roots in wet and dry soil for the grapevine 'Merlot' (Vitis vinifera) on the rootstock 101-14 Millardet de Gramanet (Vitis riparia x Vitis rupestris) in a Napa County, California vineyard. We hypothesized that hydraulic redistribution would prevent an appreciable reduction in root water potential and would contribute to prolonged root survivorship in dry soil zones. In a greenhouse study that tested this hypothesis, grapevine root systems were divided using split pots and were grown for 6 months. With thermocouple psychrometers, we measured water potentials of roots of the same plant in both wet and dry soil under three treatments: control (C), 24 h light + supplemental water (LW) and 24 h light only (L). Similar to the field results, roots in the dry side of split pots had similar survivorship as roots in the wet side of the split pots (P = 0.136) in the C treatment. In contrast, reduced root survivorship was directly associated with plants in which hydraulic redistribution was experimentally reduced by 24 h light. Dry-side roots of plants in the LW treatment lived half as long as the roots in the wet soil despite being provided with supplemental water (P < 0.0004). Additionally, pre-dawn water potentials of roots in dry soil under 24 h of illumination (L and LW) exhibited values nearly twice as negative as those of C plants (P = 0.034). Estimates of root membrane integrity using electrolyte leakage were consistent with patterns of root survivorship. Plants in which nocturnal hydraulic redistribution was reduced exhibited more than twice the amount of electrolyte leakage in dry roots compared to those in wet soil of the same plant. Our study demonstrates that

  19. Inhibition of p38 MAP kinase in the early posttransplantation phase redistributes blood vessels from the surrounding stroma into the transplanted endocrine tissue.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Asa; Sandvik, Daniel; Carlsson, Per-Ola

    2006-01-01

    Transplanted pancreatic islets attain a chronically decreased vascular density following transplantation, despite the increased concentrations of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) secreted from beta-cells in response to hypoxia during culture and in the immediate posttransplantation phase. VEGF, however, exerts dual effects on endothelial cells, and in islet endothelial cells of the adult, the vascular permeability-inducing effects of VEGF seem normally more pronounced than those to induce angiogenesis. p38 MAP kinase activity has recently been shown to serve as a switch to separate these properties of VEGF; inhibition of p38 MAP kinase activity enhances VEGF-induced angiogenesis and, at the same time, abrogates VEGF-induced vascular permeability. We hypothesized that the revascularization of transplanted islets may be hampered by a predisposition of adult islet endothelial cells to react to VEGF by forming fenestrae rather than migrating and proliferating. We therefore administered the p38 MAP kinase inhibitor SB203580 by daily IP injections for the first 14 days following transplantation, and then studied the influence of this treatment on the oxygen tension, blood perfusion, and vascular density of the islet grafts 1 month posttransplantation. SB203580 treatment redistributed islet graft blood vessels from the stroma into the endocrine tissue, and this redistribution of blood vessels into the endocrine tissue was accompanied by an increased oxygenation of the islet cells. However, the total number of blood vessels in the tissue was not affected. The blood perfusion of the islet grafts was also similar in control and SB203580-treated animals. Our results suggest that effects of VEGF to preferentially induce vascular permeability may partially contribute to, but is not the main cause of, low revascularization of transplanted islets.

  20. Collective religiosity and the gender gap in attitudes towards economic redistribution in 86 countries, 1990-2008.

    PubMed

    Jaime-Castillo, Antonio M; Fernández, Juan J; Valiente, Celia; Mayrl, Damon

    2016-05-01

    What is the relationship between gender and the demand for redistribution? Because, on average, women face more economic deprivation than men, in many countries women favor redistribution more than men. However, this is not the case in a number of other countries, where women do not support redistribution more than men. To explain this cross-national paradox, we stress the role of collective religiosity. In many religions, theological principles both militate against public policies designed to redistribute income, and also promote traditionally gendered patterns of work and family involvement. Hence, we hypothesize that, in those countries where religion remains influential either through closer church-state ties or an intensely religious population, men and women should differ less in their attitudes towards redistribution. Drawing upon the World Values Survey, we estimate three-level regression models that test our religiosity-based approach and two alternative explanations in 86 countries and 175 country-years. The results are consistent with our hypothesis. Moreover, in further support of our theoretical approach, societal religiosity undermines pro-redistribution preferences more among women than men. Our findings suggest that collective religiosity matters more to the gender gap in redistributive attitudes than traditional political and labor force factors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Use of anthropogenic radioisotopes to estimate rates of soil redistribution by wind I: Historic use of 137Cs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Pelt, R. Scott

    2013-06-01

    Wind erosion is increasingly scrutinized as a causative factor in soil degradation and fugitive dust emissions. Although models have been developed to predict wind erosion and dust emissions, they are not accurate in all locations. The temporal and spatial variability of aeolian processes makes local estimates of long-term average erosion costly and time consuming. Atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons during the 1950s and 1960s resulted in anthropogenic radioisotopes that had not previously existed being injected into stratospheric global circulation and subsequently deposited on the Earth's surface. Many of these radioisotopes are strongly adsorbed to soil particles and their movement on the landscape is a powerful method for investigating soil redistribution by wind, water, and tillage. 137Cs is the most commonly used anthropogenic radioisotope used to assess soil redistribution rates. Models have been developed to equate differences of radioisotope inventories with rates of soil redistribution and these models have been employed globally to assess soil redistribution on agricultural and natural landscapes. The radioisotope method for assessing soil redistribution rates has many advantages, but also a few limitations. One of the major limitations occurs when local sources of radioisotope contamination, particularly 137Cs, mask the pulse from global fallout, making temporal estimates of redistribution difficult or impossible. In this paper, I explore the importance, history, and applications of the radioisotopic technique using 137Cs, particularly as it applies to soil redistribution by wind.

  2. Footprints of spontaneous fluid redistribution on capillary pressure in porous rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helland, Johan Olav; Friis, Helmer André; Jettestuen, Espen; Skjæveland, Svein M.

    2017-05-01

    Pore-scale imaging of two-phase flow in porous media shows that pore filling occurs as cooperative events with accompanying spontaneous fluid redistribution in other parts of the pore space. We present a level set method that controls saturation quasi-statically to model experiments controlled by low, constant flow rates and demonstrate that our method can describe the observed displacement mechanisms. The level set approach determines states of capillary equilibrium, which generally are different for displacement protocols constrained by saturation and pressure. Saturation-controlled simulations of drainage in sandstone show spontaneous fluid redistributions with abrupt pressure jumps and cooperative behavior, including snap-off and interface retraction events, consistent with experimental observations. Drainage capillary pressure curves are lower when saturation, rather than pressure, controls displacement. Remarkably, these effects are less significant for imbibition processes where the development of hydraulically connected wetting phase moderates the cooperative behavior and associated pressure jumps.

  3. Partial Redistribution in the H Lyman Lines of Late-type Stars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sim, S. A.

    2003-10-01

    The effects of partial redistribution (PRD) in the formation of the hydrogen Lyman α and β lines are discussed with reference to simple atmospheric models of several late-type stars at different evolutionary stages. Radiative transfer calculations have been carried out using Carlsson's MULTI code which has been modified to include PRD by Hubeny & Lites. It is demonstrated that there is a rapid escalation in the importance of PRD in stars with surface gravity lower than the Sun, and that line profiles predicted using PRD are in significantly better agreement with observations than are those calculated assuming complete redistribution (CRD). The effects of PRD in H Lyman α on calculations of ion{Fe}{2} fluorescent spectra are examined, and it is found that there are significant, systematic differences between fluorescent spectra calculated using a PRD rather than CRD treatment of the pumping line.

  4. Tropical storm redistribution of Saharan dust to the upper troposphere and ocean surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbener, Stephen R.; Saleeby, Stephen M.; Heever, Susan C.; Twohy, Cynthia H.

    2016-10-01

    As a tropical cyclone traverses the Saharan Air Layer (SAL), the storm will spatially redistribute the dust from the SAL. Dust deposited on the surface may affect ocean fertilization, and dust transported to the upper levels of the troposphere may impact radiative forcing. This study explores the relative amounts of dust that are vertically redistributed when a tropical cyclone crosses the SAL. The Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) was configured to simulate the passage of Tropical Storm Debby (2006) through the SAL. A dust mass budget approach has been applied, enabled by a novel dust mass tracking capability of the model, to determine the amounts of dust deposited on the ocean surface and transferred aloft. The mass of dust removed to the ocean surface was predicted to be nearly 2 orders of magnitude greater than the amount of dust transported to the upper troposphere.

  5. Validation of neutron flux redistribution factors in JSI TRIGA reactor due to control rod movements.

    PubMed

    Kaiba, Tanja; Žerovnik, Gašper; Jazbec, Anže; Štancar, Žiga; Barbot, Loïc; Fourmentel, Damien; Snoj, Luka

    2015-10-01

    For efficient utilization of research reactors, such as TRIGA Mark II reactor in Ljubljana, it is important to know neutron flux distribution in the reactor as accurately as possible. The focus of this study is on the neutron flux redistributions due to control rod movements. For analyzing neutron flux redistributions, Monte Carlo calculations of fission rate distributions with the JSI TRIGA reactor model at different control rod configurations have been performed. Sensitivity of the detector response due to control rod movement have been studied. Optimal radial and axial positions of the detector have been determined. Measurements of the axial neutron flux distribution using the CEA manufactured fission chambers have been performed. The experiments at different control rod positions were conducted and compared with the MCNP calculations for a fixed detector axial position. In the future, simultaneous on-line measurements with multiple fission chambers will be performed inside the reactor core for a more accurate on-line power monitoring system.

  6. An analytical model for solute redistribution during solidification of planar, columnar, or equiaxed morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Nastac, L.; Stefanescu, D.M. . Dept. of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering)

    1993-09-01

    Existing models for solute redistribution (microsegregation) during solidification were reviewed. There are no analytical models that take into account limited diffusion in both the liquid and the solid phases. A new analytical mathematical model for solute redistribution was developed. Diffusion in liquid and in solid was considered. This model does not require a prescribed movement of the interface. It can be used for one-dimensional (1-D) (plate), two-dimensional (cylinder), or three-dimensional (3-D) (sphere) calculations. Thus, it is possible to calculate microsegregation at the level of primary or secondary arm spacing for columnar dendrites or for equiaxed dendrites. The solution was compared with calculations based on existing models, as well as with some available experimental data for the segregation of base elements in as cast Al-4.9 wt pct Cu, INCONEL 718, 625, and plain carbon (0.13 wt pct C) steel.

  7. Does Velocity Redistribution Really Enhance the HE 304 A Line to Observed Intensities?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Stuart; Andretta, Vincenzo; Garcia, Adriana; Brosius, Jeffrey; Behring, William

    1999-01-01

    Previous work by this group has demonstrated that small-scale nonthermal velocities probably play a significant role in enhancing the intensity of the He II 304 A line above values predicted by the static atmosphere NLTE theories, and more in conformity with Skylab and SOHO observations. This presentation briefly summarizes the evidence for this conclusion, emphasizing SOHO and correlated groundbased observations, of which examples are presented. However, in contrast to the previous studies, the tact taken here is more critical, asking the question "Can velocity redistribution fully explain the observations of the 304 A line, and what counter-indications and problems remain?" The conclusion reached is that, while velocity redistribution plays a significant role in the intensity enhancement, it may not be the whole story. Some other mechanism, associated with velocity filtration, may be at work.

  8. Biodiversity redistribution under climate change: Impacts on ecosystems and human well-being.

    PubMed

    Pecl, Gretta T; Araújo, Miguel B; Bell, Johann D; Blanchard, Julia; Bonebrake, Timothy C; Chen, I-Ching; Clark, Timothy D; Colwell, Robert K; Danielsen, Finn; Evengård, Birgitta; Falconi, Lorena; Ferrier, Simon; Frusher, Stewart; Garcia, Raquel A; Griffis, Roger B; Hobday, Alistair J; Janion-Scheepers, Charlene; Jarzyna, Marta A; Jennings, Sarah; Lenoir, Jonathan; Linnetved, Hlif I; Martin, Victoria Y; McCormack, Phillipa C; McDonald, Jan; Mitchell, Nicola J; Mustonen, Tero; Pandolfi, John M; Pettorelli, Nathalie; Popova, Ekaterina; Robinson, Sharon A; Scheffers, Brett R; Shaw, Justine D; Sorte, Cascade J B; Strugnell, Jan M; Sunday, Jennifer M; Tuanmu, Mao-Ning; Vergés, Adriana; Villanueva, Cecilia; Wernberg, Thomas; Wapstra, Erik; Williams, Stephen E

    2017-03-31

    Distributions of Earth's species are changing at accelerating rates, increasingly driven by human-mediated climate change. Such changes are already altering the composition of ecological communities, but beyond conservation of natural systems, how and why does this matter? We review evidence that climate-driven species redistribution at regional to global scales affects ecosystem functioning, human well-being, and the dynamics of climate change itself. Production of natural resources required for food security, patterns of disease transmission, and processes of carbon sequestration are all altered by changes in species distribution. Consideration of these effects of biodiversity redistribution is critical yet lacking in most mitigation and adaptation strategies, including the United Nation's Sustainable Development Goals. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  9. When nature pushes back: environmental impact and the spatial redistribution of socially vulnerable populations.

    PubMed

    Elliott, James R; Pais, Jeremy

    2010-01-01

    Objectives. This research investigates the spatial redistribution of socially vulnerable subpopulations during long-term recovery from natural disaster. We hypothesize that the local environmental impact of a disaster influences this redistribution process and that how it does so varies by the urban or rural context in which the disaster occurs.Methods. To test these hypotheses, we use a novel research design that combines the natural experiment offered by Hurricane Andrew with GIS technology and local census data.Results. Findings indicate that in a more urbanized disaster zone (Miami), long-term recovery displaces socially disadvantaged residents from harder-hit areas; yet, in a more rural disaster zone (southwestern Louisiana), long-term recovery concentrates socially disadvantaged residents within these harder-hit areas.Conclusion. These findings bridge classic and contemporary research on postdisaster recovery and open new terrain for thinking about how environmental and social forces intersect to transform regions in different settlement contexts.

  10. Fluorine redistribution in a chemical vapor deposited tungsten/polycrystalline silicon gate structure during heat treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, Th.; Carlsson, J.-O.; Keinonen, J.; Petersson, C. S.

    1988-09-01

    Fluorine redistribution during heat treatment of chemical vapor deposited tungsten/polycrystalline silicon gate structures was analyzed by the nuclear resonance broadening technique. The tungsten layer was deposited from a hydrogen/tungsten hexafluoride gas mixture. Upon heat treatment in the temperature range 1020-1325-K tungsten disilicide formation was observed using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. In the as-deposited sample, the fluorine was accumulated at the tungsten/polycrystalline silicon interface. After silicide formation the fluorine was observed at the tungsten disilicide/polycrystalline silicon interface. At temperatures above 1120 K fluorine starts to diffuse through the polycrystalline silicon layer. A variation in the total fluorine content between the samples was also observed. The origin of the fluorine redistribution as well as the variation in the total fluorine content is discussed in connection to conceivable mechanisms.

  11. Fluorine redistribution in a chemical vapor deposited tungsten/polycrystalline silicon gate structure during heat treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Eriksson, T.; Carlsson, J.; Keinonen, J.; Petersson, C.S.

    1988-09-15

    Fluorine redistribution during heat treatment of chemical vapor deposited tungsten/polycrystalline silicon gate structures was analyzed by the nuclear resonance broadening technique. The tungsten layer was deposited from a hydrogen/tungsten hexafluoride gas mixture. Upon heat treatment in the temperature range 1020--1325-K tungsten disilicide formation was observed using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. In the as-deposited sample, the fluorine was accumulated at the tungsten/polycrystalline silicon interface. After silicide formation the fluorine was observed at the tungsten disilicide/polycrystalline silicon interface. At temperatures above 1120 K fluorine starts to diffuse through the polycrystalline silicon layer. A variation in the total fluorine content between the samples was also observed. The origin of the fluorine redistribution as well as the variation in the total fluorine content is discussed in connection to conceivable mechanisms.

  12. Redistribution of air within the lungs may potentiate "fright" bradycardia in submerged crocodiles (Crocodylus porosus).

    PubMed

    Wright, J C; Grigg, G C; Franklin, C E

    1992-05-01

    1. Voluntary undisturbed dives by Crocodylus porosus were short in duration (3.08 +/- 1.87 min, mean +/- SD) and accompanied by a small but significant bradycardia (14.3 +/- 5.9% drop). 2. When crocodiles were disturbed underwater there was a rapid onset of "fright" bradycardia, to 65 +/- 6.0% of surface heart rates and dive durations were prolonged to 19.6 +/- 1.8 min. 3. The development of "fright" bradycardia was not accompanied by any increase in intratracheal pressure or expulsion of lung gas. However, sustained contraction of the abdomen and expansion of the thorax revealed a redistribution of air anteriorly within the lungs. 4. We propose that the redistribution of air within the lungs may generate an afferent signal which potentiates the initiation of a severe, dive-prolonging bradycardia.

  13. Transfer and redistribution of polarized light in resonance lines. I - Quantum formulation with collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Streater, A.; Cooper, J.; Rees, D. E.

    1988-01-01

    Equations are derived quantum mechanically for the radiative transfer of polarized light and statistical equilibrium governing the formation of resonance lines in nonhydrogenic species. Redistribution due to collisions is specifically included, but magnetic fields are neglected. The formulation accounts for excited level interference and optical pumping and is applicable to solar resonance lines such as Ca II H and K and Mg II h and k.

  14. Hydraulic redistribution study in two native tree species of agroforestry parklands of West African dry savanna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayala, Jules; Heng, Lee Kheng; van Noordwijk, Meine; Ouedraogo, Sibiri Jean

    2008-11-01

    Hydraulic redistribution (HR) in karité ( Vitellaria paradoxa) and néré ( Parkia biglobosa) tree species was studied by monitoring the soil water potential ( ψs) using thermocouple psychrometers at four compass directions, various distances from trees and at different soil depths (max depth 80 cm) during the dry seasons of 2004 and 2005. A modified WaNuLCAS model was then used to infer the amount of water redistribued based on ψs values. Tree transpiration rate was also estimated from sap velocity using thermal dissipative probes (TDP) and sapwood area, and the contribution of hydraulically redistributed water in tree transpiration was determined. The results revealed on average that 46% of the psychrometer readings under karité and 33% under néré showed the occurrence of HR for the two years. Soil under néré displayed significantly lower fluctuations of ψs (0.16 MPa) compared to soil under karité (0.21 MPa). The results of this study indicated that the existence of HR leads to a higher ψs in the plant rhizosphere and hence is important for soil water dynamics and plant nutrition by making more accessible the soluble elements. The simulation showed that the amount of water redistributed would be approximately 73.0 L and 247.1 L per tree per day in 2005 for karité and néré, and would represent respectively 60% and 53% of the amount transpired a day. Even though the model has certainly overestimated the volume of water hydraulically redistributed by the two species, this water may play a key role in maintaining fine root viability and ensuring the well adaptation of these species to the dry areas. Therefore, knowledge of the extent of such transfers and of the seasonal patterns is required and is of paramount importance in parkland systems both for trees and associated crops.

  15. Implications of sediment redistribution on modeled sea-level changes over millennial timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrier, Ken

    2016-04-01

    Sea level is a critical link in feedbacks among topography, tectonics, and climate. Over millennial timescales, changes in sea level reshape river networks, regulate organic carbon burial, influence sediment deposition, and set moving boundary conditions for landscape evolution. Sea-level changes influence tectonics by regulating rates and patterns of erosion and deposition, which perturb the surface loads that drive geodynamic processes at depth. These interactions are complex because sea-level changes are influenced by the geomorphic processes that they themselves modify, since sediment redistribution deforms the gravitational and crustal elevation fields that define sea level. A recent advance in understanding the coupling between sea level, tectonics, and topography was the incorporation of sediment redistribution into a gravitationally self-consistent sea-level model, which permits the computation of sea-level responses to erosion and deposition (Dalca et al., 2013, Geophysical Journal International). Here I use this model to quantify changes in sea level resulting from the erosion of some of the most rapidly eroding sites on Earth and the deposition of sediment offshore. These model results show that the sea-level fingerprints of sediment redistribution are strongly variable in space, and that they can represent a significant component of the total sea level change since the last interglacial. This work provides a basis for understanding a fundamental driver of landscape evolution at some of Earth's most geomorphically dynamic sites, and thus aids investigation of the couplings among tectonics, climate, and topography. References Dalca A.V., Ferrier K.L., Mitrovica J.X., Perron J.T., Milne G.A., Creveling J.R., 2013. On postglacial sea level - III. Incorporating sediment redistribution. Geophysical Journal International, doi: 10.1093/gji/ggt089.

  16. Long-term effects of soil redistribution by tillage on the landscapes transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Alba, S.

    2012-04-01

    During the last decade, soil redistribution due to tillage practices has been identified as an intensive soil erosion process. All the empirical tillage translocation models available in the literature demonstrate high rates of soil translocation for the more commonly used tillage implements. The long-term effects of this intensive soil redistribution within agricultural fields has resulted in a drastic modification of the bio-physical dynamics of the soil as well as the total land-system. A better understanding of the implications of soil redistribution by tillage may require reinterpretation of current agricultural landscapes. This reveal the need for studies for identifying current landscape features produced by past repeated tillage practices, as well as for documenting the bio-physical implications (hydrology, water erosion, soil variability, soil quality, productivity…) derived of such landscape transformations. This communication presents several examples of field evidences observed in agricultural fields of Central Spain, Tuscany (Italy) and Central Minnesota (USA). The collection of field evidences are presented grouped according to the nature of the effects, into the following four classes: i) Landscape leveling and smoothing - Features of change of the soil surface level. Ii) Modification of morphology of slope profiles - Formation of banks at the lower field edges. - Landscape benching by the formation of slope profile breaks at borders between adjacent fields located at mid-slope positions. iii) Spatial variability of soil properties - Patterns of distribution of areas of degraded soils (truncated soils) and of soil accumulations. - Spatial variability of soil properties in the superficial soil horizons. - Variability of soil profiles morphology along the slope profiles. iv) Spatial variability of productivity - Relationships between relieve and spatial variability of soil properties and productivity. Key Words: soil redistribution, tillage erosion

  17. Observation of dynamic correlations in collisional redistribution and depolarization of light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomann, P.; Burnett, K.; Cooper, J.

    1980-01-01

    Theory shows that to explain the polarization of light collisionally redistributed from the far line wings of an atomic transition, one must consider correlated events in which absorption during a collision, and propagation to the final Zeeman-state superposition at the end of the collision is important. Polarizations of up to about 40% have been measured in the far line wings, substantially confirming this prediction, and showing that scattering experiments cannot just be characterized by simple absorption or emission profiles.

  18. Control of electron transport routes through redox-regulated redistribution of respiratory complexes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lu-Ning; Bryan, Samantha J.; Huang, Fang; Yu, Jianfeng; Nixon, Peter J.; Rich, Peter R.; Mullineaux, Conrad W.

    2012-01-01

    In cyanobacteria, respiratory electron transport takes place in close proximity to photosynthetic electron transport, because the complexes required for both processes are located within the thylakoid membranes. The balance of electron transport routes is crucial for cell physiology, yet the factors that control the predominance of particular pathways are poorly understood. Here we use a combination of tagging with green fluorescent protein and confocal fluorescence microscopy in live cells of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 to investigate the distribution on submicron scales of two key respiratory electron donors, type-I NAD(P)H dehydrogenase (NDH-1) and succinate dehydrogenase (SDH). When cells are grown under low light, both complexes are concentrated in discrete patches in the thylakoid membranes, about 100–300 nm in diameter and containing tens to hundreds of complexes. Exposure to moderate light leads to redistribution of both NDH-1 and SDH such that they become evenly distributed within the thylakoid membranes. The effects of electron transport inhibitors indicate that redistribution of respiratory complexes is triggered by changes in the redox state of an electron carrier close to plastoquinone. Redistribution does not depend on de novo protein synthesis, and it is accompanied by a major increase in the probability that respiratory electrons are transferred to photosystem I rather than to a terminal oxidase. These results indicate that the distribution of complexes on the scale of 100–300 nm controls the partitioning of reducing power and that redistribution of electron transport complexes on these scales is a physiological mechanism to regulate the pathways of electron flow. PMID:22733774

  19. Two-dimensional multilevel radiative transfer with standard partial frequency redistribution in isolated solar atmospheric structures.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paletou, F.

    1995-10-01

    We have implemented standard partial frequency redistribution (PRD) in a two-dimensional multilevel non-LTE radiative transfer code. The Multilevel Accelerated Lambda Iteration (MALI) method is used. First, a numerical approach for treating standard PRD effects is described, as well as a simple method for treating an optically thick bound-free transition with MALI. Then, the method is validated in mono-dimensional geometry. Finally, preliminary results from two-dimensional radiative modelling of solar prominences are presented.

  20. An ecohydrological analysis for optimal use of redistributed water among vegetation patches.

    PubMed

    Yu, Mei; Gao, Qiong; Epstein, Howard E; Zhang, Xinshi

    2008-10-01

    Ecosystem processes in semiarid landscape mosaics are strongly affected by the interactions among water utilization, plant growth, and vegetation patterns. Management of these semiarid landscapes can be improved with better understanding of the complex interactions between ecology and hydrology that determine the water-use efficiency at landscape and regional scales. However, quantifying the effects of runoff and applying ecohydrological principles toward the improvement of land-use management requires additional research to integrate the ecological and hydrological processes. This study highlights the importance of runoff in the management of vegetation to retard desertification by reducing soil erosion. By coupling a plant growth model with a simple GIS-based model of water redistribution and use, we analyzed the interactions among runoff generation, "runon" reabsorption, and plant growth, in a small watershed in the semiarid sandy grassland area of northern China. Net primary productivity (NPP) and water utilization for the watershed were calculated for different managerial schemes. Annual aboveground NPP (NPPa), maximum leaf biomass (Mleafmax), and water use simulated with runoff effects were 18%, 21%, and 8% greater, respectively, than those simulated without runoff redistribution. Furthermore, simulation with a proposed management strategy for sandy grassland landscapes, which prescribes different plant functional types (grasses, shrubs, and trees) distributed at different slope positions, led to increasing NPPa, Mleafmax, and water use by 34%, 38%, and 28%, respectively, compared to the current land use. The increases in NPP and biomass in turn would reduce wind erosion and associated dust-storm generation and enhance capacity of the system to retard degradation. The coupled model thus can be used as a tool to quantify effects of runoff redistribution for optimal land management and environmental protection, and the study has important managerial

  1. Mathematical modeling of solute segregation and redistribution during freezing in peat and overlying water

    SciTech Connect

    Li, S.M.

    1985-01-01

    Freezing of the water in a peatland causes the redistribution of existing solutes in both the shallow water and the peat zone. Such solute redistribution phenomena are of interest for establishing the geochronology of deposits and determining the nature of pollutant burial. Understanding these phenomena is important for the consideration of peatlands as multi-use resources. This work presents the theoretical analyses and mathematical models to describe the solute redistribution processes during freezing in overlying water and interstitial water in the porous peat. The analyses include the segregation of the solute at the ice-water interface in both the overlying water and the peat zone, solute transport in overlying water, as well as adsorbable solute and non-adsorbable solute transport in the interstitial water of the peat zone. An algorithm has been developed to solve these nonlinear moving interface problems. A parameter estimation technique has been used to determine parameters in the model that are difficult to obtain directly from the experimental data. Computer simulation using this model provides good predictions for solute concentration profiles in the frozen water and the peat zones, as compared to independent experimental data. The basic theoretical analysis and the mathematical model have been utilized to describe the salt ice formation process and macrosegregation during freezing of binary alloys.

  2. The anisotropic redistribution of free energy for gyrokinetic plasma turbulence in a Z-pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Navarro, Alejandro Bañón Jenko, Frank; Teaca, Bogdan

    2016-04-15

    For a Z-pinch geometry, we report on the nonlinear redistribution of free energy across scales perpendicular to the magnetic guide field, for a turbulent plasma described in the framework of gyrokinetics. The analysis is performed using a local flux-surface approximation, in a regime dominated by electrostatic fluctuations driven by the entropy mode, with both ion and electron species being treated kinetically. To explore the anisotropic nature of the free energy redistribution caused by the emergence of zonal flows, we use a polar coordinate representation for the field-perpendicular directions and define an angular density for the scale flux. Positive values for the classically defined (angle integrated) scale flux, which denote a direct energy cascade, are shown to be also composed of negative angular sections, a fact that impacts our understanding of the backscatter of energy and the way in which it enters the modeling of sub-grid scales for turbulence. A definition for the flux of free energy across each perpendicular direction is introduced as well, which shows that the redistribution of energy in the presence of zonal flows is highly anisotropic.

  3. Redistribution or horizontal equity in Hong Kong's mixed public-private health system: a policy conundrum.

    PubMed

    Leung, Gabriel M; Tin, Keith Y K; O'Donnell, Owen

    2009-01-01

    We examine the distributional characteristics of Hong Kong's mixed public-private health system to identify the net redistribution achieved through public spending on health care, compare the income-related inequality and inequity of public and private care and measure horizontal inequity in health-care delivery overall. Payments for public care are highly concentrated on the better-off whereas benefits are pro-poor. As a consequence, public health care effects significant net redistribution from the rich to the poor. Public care is skewed towards the poor in part not only because of allocation according to need but also because the rich opt out of the public sector and consume most of the private care. Overall, there is horizontal inequity favouring the rich in general outpatient care and (very marginally) inpatient care. Pro-rich bias in the distribution of private care outweighs the pro-poor bias of public care. A lesser role for private finance may improve horizontal equity of utilisation but would also reduce the degree of net redistribution through the public sector. Copyright (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Aortic pressure reduction redistributes transmural blood flow in dog left ventricle

    SciTech Connect

    Smolich, J.J.; Weissberg, P.L.; Broughton, A.; Korner, P.I. )

    1988-02-01

    The authors studied the effect of graded aortic blood pressure reduction on left ventricular (LV) blood flow in anesthetized, autonomically blocked, open-chest dogs at constant heart rate and mean left atrial pressure. Aortic diastolic pressure (ADP) was lowered from rest to 90, 75, and 60 mmHg with an arteriovenous fistula. Global and regional LV blood flow was measured with radioactive microspheres. Mean LV blood flow fell stepwise from 145 ml {center dot} min{sup {minus}1} {center dot} 100 g{sup {minus}1} at rest to 116 ml {center dot} min{sup {minus}1} {center dot} 100 g{sup {minus}1} at ADP of 60 mmHg, whereas the endocardial-to-epicardial flow ratio decreased from 1.20 to 084. The transmural redistribution of LV blood flow was not accompanied by increases in LV oxygen extraction, depression of LV contractility, LV dilatation or LV electrical dysfunction and also occurred in the presence of considerable coronary vasodilator flow reserve. Electrical evidence of subendocardial ischemia appeared at ADP of 32 mmHg and an endocardial-to-epicardial flow ratio of 0.41 in a subgroup of animals. They conclude that the redistribution of LV flow during moderate aortic pressure reduction was an appropriate physiological adjustment to uneven transmural alterations in regional LV wall stress and that it preceded a more pronounced redistribution evident with myocardial ischemia.

  5. Matter wave switching in Bose-Einstein condensates via intensity redistribution soliton interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Rajendran, S.; Lakshmanan, M.; Muruganandam, P.

    2011-02-15

    Using time dependent nonlinear (s-wave scattering length) coupling between the components of a weakly interacting two component Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC), we show the possibility of matter wave switching (fraction of atoms transfer) between the components via shape changing/intensity redistribution (matter redistribution) soliton interactions. We investigate the exact bright-bright N-soliton solution of an effective one-dimensional (1D) two component BEC by suitably tailoring the trap potential, atomic scattering length, and atom gain or loss. In particular, we show that the effective 1D coupled Gross-Pitaevskii equations with time dependent parameters can be transformed into the well known completely integrable Manakov model described by coupled nonlinear Schroedinger equations by effecting a change of variables of the coordinates and the wave functions under certain conditions related to the time dependent parameters. We obtain the one-soliton solution and demonstrate the shape changing/matter redistribution interactions of two and three-soliton solutions for the time-independent expulsive harmonic trap potential, periodically modulated harmonic trap potential, and kinklike modulated harmonic trap potential. The standard elastic collision of solitons occur only for a specific choice of soliton parameters.

  6. Energy and frequency dependence of the alpha particle redistribution produced by internal kink modes

    SciTech Connect

    Farengo, R.; Ferrari, H. E.; Garcia-Martinez, P. L.; Firpo, M.-C.; Ettoumi, W.; Lifschitz, A. F.

    2014-08-15

    The redistribution of alpha particles due to internal kink modes is studied. The exact particle trajectories in the total fields, equilibrium plus perturbation, are calculated. The equilibrium has circular cross section and the plasma parameters are similar to those expected in ITER. The alpha particles are initially distributed according to a slowing down distribution function and have energies between 18 keV and 3.5 MeV. The (1, 1), (2, 2), and (2, 1) modes are included and the effect of changing their amplitude and frequency is studied. When only the (1, 1) mode is included, the spreading of high energy (E≳1 MeV) alpha particles increases slowly with the energy and mode frequency. At lower energies, the redistribution is more sensitive to the mode frequency and particle energy. When a (2, 1) mode is added, the spreading increases significantly and particles can reach the edge of the plasma. Trapped particles are the most affected and the redistribution parameter can have maxima above 1 MeV, depending on the mode frequency. These results can have important implications for ash removal.

  7. Frequency of late reversibility in stress-redistribution thallium-201 SPECT using an early reinjection protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Kiat, H.; Friedman, J.D.; Wang, F.P.; Van Train, K.F.; Maddahi, J.; Takemoto, K.; Berman, D.S. )

    1991-09-01

    To assess the efficacy of an early thallium-201 reinjection protocol for reducing the need for late redistribution imaging, the frequency of thallium-201 late reversibility was prospectively assessed in 62 patients who had stress-redistribution thallium-201 studies by single-photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT), and who received 1 mCi of thallium-201 reinjection immediately following stress tomographic acquisition. These patients also demonstrated greater than or equal to 2 segments with nonreversible defects at 4-hour imaging and underwent late (18-to 72-hour) redistribution imaging. When the criterion of late reversibility was defined as greater than or equal to 1 segment with a 4-hour nonreversible defect demonstrating late reversibility, late reversibility was present in 36 (58%) of the 62 patients and in 88 (24%) of 368 SPECT segments. When the criterion of greater than or equal to 2 segments was used, late reversibility was found in 21 (34%) of the 62 patients and in 73 (20%) of the 368 segments. Of the 21 patients who had greater than or equal to 2 late reversible segments, 12 (57%) exhibited late reversibility in greater than or equal to 3 segments. The frequency of detected reversible defects increased from 32% by 4-hour imaging to 48% by combined 4-hour and late imaging (p less than 0.0001). The patients who demonstrated late reversibility could not be distinguished from those who had only late nonreversible defects by analysis of the clinical, exercise, and electrocardiographic (ECG) variables.

  8. Comparison of thallium redistribution with rest reinjection imaging for the detection of viable myocardium

    SciTech Connect

    Rocco, T.P.; Dilsizian, V.; McKusick, K.A.; Fischman, A.J.; Boucher, C.A.; Strauss, H.W. )

    1990-07-15

    To determine the incidence of incomplete redistribution on conventional delayed thallium images, 41 patients with persistent perfusion defects on myocardial images recorded 3 to 4 hours after thallium injection during exercise were studied. At the conclusion of their delayed images the patients were reinjected at rest with approximately 1 mCi of thallium-201 and a third set of images was recorded. The images were presented at random in pairs (initial:delayed, initial:reinjection) to 2 experienced observers for qualitative scoring of 9 segments/patient. Of the 360 segments analyzed, concordance between the delayed and reinjected images occurred in 307 (85%). Of 141 segments that demonstrated a persistent perfusion abnormality on 3- to 4-hour delayed images, 44 (31%) were reassigned to a redistribution score after reinjection. In 9 patients, reinjection images provided the only evidence of ischemia from the scintigraphic data. In 13 of 14 vascular territories that demonstrated redistribution after reinjection, intact perfusion (either anterograde or via collaterals) was detected at coronary angiography. These data suggest that rest reinjection imaging may provide a means of detecting viable myocardium in segments that demonstrate a fixed perfusion abnormality on conventional 3- to 4-hour delayed thallium images.

  9. Plant Clonal Integration Mediates the Horizontal Redistribution of Soil Resources, Benefiting Neighboring Plants

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xue-Hua; Zhang, Ya-Lin; Liu, Zhi-Lan; Gao, Shu-Qin; Song, Yao-Bin; Liu, Feng-Hong; Dong, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Resources such as water taken up by plants can be released into soils through hydraulic redistribution and can also be translocated by clonal integration within a plant clonal network. We hypothesized that the resources from one (donor) microsite could be translocated within a clonal network, released into different (recipient) microsites and subsequently used by neighbor plants in the recipient microsite. To test these hypotheses, we conducted two experiments in which connected and disconnected ramet pairs of Potentilla anserina were grown under both homogeneous and heterogeneous water regimes, with seedlings of Artemisia ordosica as neighbors. The isotopes [15N] and deuterium were used to trace the translocation of nitrogen and water, respectively, within the clonal network. The water and nitrogen taken up by P. anserina ramets in the donor microsite were translocated into the connected ramets in the recipient microsites. Most notably, portions of the translocated water and nitrogen were released into the recipient microsite and were used by the neighboring A. ordosica, which increased growth of the neighboring A. ordosica significantly. Therefore, our hypotheses were supported, and plant clonal integration mediated the horizontal hydraulic redistribution of resources, thus benefiting neighboring plants. Such a plant clonal integration-mediated resource redistribution in horizontal space may have substantial effects on the interspecific relations and composition of the community and consequently on ecosystem processes. PMID:26904051

  10. Cationic Redistribution at Epitaxial Interfaces in Superconducting Two-Dimensionally Doped Lanthanum Cuprate Films.

    PubMed

    Baiutti, Federico; Gregori, Giuliano; Wang, Yi; Suyolcu, Y Eren; Cristiani, Georg; van Aken, Peter A; Maier, Joachim; Logvenov, Gennady

    2016-10-12

    The exploration of interface effects in complex oxide heterostructures has led to the discovery of novel intriguing phenomena in recent years and has opened the path toward the precise tuning of material properties at the nanoscale. One recent example is space-charge superconductivity. Among the complex range of effects which may arise from phase interaction, a crucial role is played by cationic intermixing, which defines the final chemical composition of the interface. In this work, we performed a systematic study on the local cationic redistribution of two-dimensionally doped lanthanum cuprate films grown by oxide molecular beam epitaxy, in which single LaO layers in the epitaxial crystal structure were substituted by layers of differently sized and charged dopants (Ca, Sr, Ba, and Dy). In such a model system, in which the dopant undergoes an asymmetric redistribution across the interface, the evolution of the cationic concentration profile can be effectively tracked by means of atomically resolved imaging and spectroscopic methods. This allowed for the investigation of the impact of the dopant chemistry (ionic size and charge) and of the growth conditions (temperature) on the final superconducting and structural properties. A qualitative model for interface cationic intermixing, based on thermodynamic considerations, is proposed. This work highlights the key role which cationic redistribution may have in the definition of the final interface properties and represents a further step forward the realization of heterostructures with improved quality.

  11. POLARIZED PARTIAL FREQUENCY REDISTRIBUTION IN SUBORDINATE LINES. II. SOLUTION OF THE TRANSFER EQUATION WITH RAYLEIGH SCATTERING

    SciTech Connect

    Nagendra, K. N.; Sampoorna, M. E-mail: sampoorna@iiap.res.in

    2012-09-20

    It is quite common in line formation theory to treat scattering in subordinate lines under the assumption of complete frequency redistribution (CRD). The partial frequency redistribution (PRD) in subordinate lines cannot always be approximated by CRD, especially when the polarization state of the line radiation is taken into account. Here we investigate the PRD effects in subordinate lines including scattering polarization. The line formation is described by a polarized non-LTE line transfer equation based on a two-level atom model. We use the recently derived subordinate line redistribution matrix. We devise polarized approximate lambda iteration methods to solve the concerned transfer problem. The linear polarization profiles of subordinate lines formed in non-magnetic (Rayleigh) scattering atmospheres are discussed. We consider one-dimensional isothermal planar model atmospheres. We show that in the polarized line transfer calculations of subordinate lines, PRD plays as important of a role as it does in the case of resonance lines. We also study the effect of collisions on linear polarization profiles of subordinate lines.

  12. Partitioning of heavy metals in a soil contaminated by slag: A redistribution study

    SciTech Connect

    Bunzl, K.; Trautmannsheimer, M.; Schramel, P.

    1999-08-01

    In order to interpret reasonably the partitioning of heavy metals in a contaminated soil as observed from applying a sequential extraction procedure, information on possible redistribution processes of the metals during the various extraction steps is essential. For this purpose, sequential extraction was used to study the chemical partitioning of Ag, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn in a soil contaminated wither by a slag from coal firing or by a slag from pyrite roasting. Through additional application of sequential extraction to the pure slags as well as to the uncontaminated soil, it was shown that during the various extraction steps applied to the soil/slag mixtures, substantial redistribution processes of the metals between the slag- and soil particles can occur. In many cases, metals ions released during the extraction with acid hydroxylamine or acid hydrogen peroxide are partially readsorbed by solid constituents of the mixture and will therefore be found in the subsequent fractions extracted. As a result, one has to realize that (1) it will be difficult to predict the chemical partitioning of these metals in contaminated soils by investigating pure slags only, and (2) information on the partitioning of a metal in a slag contaminated soil will not necessarily give any relevant information on the form of this metal in the slag or in the slag/soil mixture, because the redistribution processes during sequential extraction will not be the same as those occurring in the soil solution under natural conditions.

  13. An examination of the postmortem redistribution of fentanyl and interlaboratory variability.

    PubMed

    Krinsky, Clarissa S; Lathrop, Sarah L; Zumwalt, Ross

    2014-09-01

    Fentanyl is a synthetic opioid agonist used for pain control. Often administered as a transdermal patch, it is an interesting drug for study of postmortem redistribution. We hypothesized that fentanyl concentrations would increase over time after death, as measured in blood drawn on the day prior to autopsy and in blood drawn at the time of autopsy in ten cases where fentanyl patches were identified at the scene. Concentrations were compared, and heart blood to femoral blood ratios were calculated as markers of postmortem redistribution. Fentanyl concentrations measured in peripheral blood drawn the day of autopsy (peripheral blood 2 [PB2]) were higher than those drawn the day prior to autopsy (peripheral blood 1 [PB1]) with a mean ratio (PB2/PB1) of 1.80. The ratio of heart blood concentrations (HB) to femoral blood concentrations drawn at autopsy (PB2) had a mean ratio (HB/PB2) of 1.08. Some cases had blood from the same source analyzed at two different laboratories, and concentrations of fentanyl in those samples showed inter- and intralaboratory differences up to 25 ng/mL. Postmortem fentanyl concentrations may be affected by antemortem factors, postmortem redistribution, and laboratory variability. Forensic pathologists must use caution in interpreting fentanyl levels as part of death investigation.

  14. Chronic periodic fluid redistribution effect on muscle calcium in healthy subjects during prolonged hypokinesia.

    PubMed

    Zorbas, Yan G; Deogenov, Victor A; Merkov, Pavel L; Federenko, Yuri F

    2012-05-01

    Studies have shown that chronic periodic fluid shifting upwards is not sensed as excessive fluid volume and excretion mechanisms are not activated. To determine if chronic periodic fluid and volume shifting upwards can affect muscle calcium (Ca(2+)) during hypokinesia (HK) we measured muscle Ca(2+) content, plasma Ca(2+) concentration, and Ca(2+) losses in urine and feces. Studies were conducted on 40 healthy male volunteers. They were divided into four equal groups: active control subjects (ACS), hypokinetic subjects (HKS), periodic fluid redistribution control subjects (PFRCS), and periodic fluid redistribution hypokinetic subjects (PFRHS). Plasma Ca(2+) level decreased (p < 0.05) in Ca(2+) repleted muscle, muscle Ca(2+) level increased (p < 0.05), and Ca(2+) losses in urine and feces decreased (p < 0.05) in the PFRHS group compared with the HKS group. Plasma Ca(2+) level increased (p < 0.05) in Ca(2+) deficient muscle, muscle Ca(2+) level decreased (p < 0.05), and Ca(2+) losses in urine and feces increased (p < 0.05) in the HKS group compared with their pre-experimental levels and the values in their respective control groups (ACS and PFRCS). This study shows that the muscle Ca(2+) content increases and Ca(2+) excretion decreases, suggesting the clinical potential of chronic periodic fluid and volume redistribution in treatment of muscle Ca(2+) deficiency.

  15. Distal forelimb representations in primary motor cortex are redistributed after forelimb restriction: a longitudinal study in adult squirrel monkeys.

    PubMed

    Milliken, Garrett W; Plautz, Erik J; Nudo, Randolph J

    2013-03-01

    Primary motor cortex (M1) movement representations reflect acquired motor skills. Representations of muscles and joints used in a skilled task expand. However, it is unknown whether motor restriction in healthy individuals results in complementary reductions in M1 representations. With the use of intracortical microstimulation techniques in squirrel monkeys, detailed maps of movement representations in M1 were derived before and up to 35 wk after restriction of the preferred distal forelimb (DFL) by use of a soft cast. Although total DFL area and movement threshold remained constant, casting resulted in a redistribution of digit and wrist/forearm representations. Digit representations progressively decreased, whereas wrist/forearm representations progressively increased in areal extent. In three of four monkeys, hand preference returned to normal by the end of the postcast recovery period, and postrecovery maps demonstrated reversal of restriction-induced changes. However, in one monkey, a chronic motor impairment occurred in the casted limb. Rehabilitation via a forced-use paradigm resulted in recovery in use and skill of the impaired limb, as well as restoration of normal motor maps. These results demonstrate that plasticity in motor representations can be induced by training or restricting movements of the limb. Physiological changes induced by restriction appear to be reversible, even in the case of adverse motor outcomes. The respective contributions of both disuse and lost motor skills are discussed. These results have relevance for clinical conditions requiring forelimb casting as well as interpreting the differential effects of injury and disuse that are necessarily intertwined after cortical injury, as occurs in stroke.

  16. Distal forelimb representations in primary motor cortex are redistributed after forelimb restriction: a longitudinal study in adult squirrel monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Milliken, Garrett W.; Plautz, Erik J.

    2013-01-01

    Primary motor cortex (M1) movement representations reflect acquired motor skills. Representations of muscles and joints used in a skilled task expand. However, it is unknown whether motor restriction in healthy individuals results in complementary reductions in M1 representations. With the use of intracortical microstimulation techniques in squirrel monkeys, detailed maps of movement representations in M1 were derived before and up to 35 wk after restriction of the preferred distal forelimb (DFL) by use of a soft cast. Although total DFL area and movement threshold remained constant, casting resulted in a redistribution of digit and wrist/forearm representations. Digit representations progressively decreased, whereas wrist/forearm representations progressively increased in areal extent. In three of four monkeys, hand preference returned to normal by the end of the postcast recovery period, and postrecovery maps demonstrated reversal of restriction-induced changes. However, in one monkey, a chronic motor impairment occurred in the casted limb. Rehabilitation via a forced-use paradigm resulted in recovery in use and skill of the impaired limb, as well as restoration of normal motor maps. These results demonstrate that plasticity in motor representations can be induced by training or restricting movements of the limb. Physiological changes induced by restriction appear to be reversible, even in the case of adverse motor outcomes. The respective contributions of both disuse and lost motor skills are discussed. These results have relevance for clinical conditions requiring forelimb casting as well as interpreting the differential effects of injury and disuse that are necessarily intertwined after cortical injury, as occurs in stroke. PMID:23236004

  17. Interaction of motor proteins of various types at melanosome redistribution in melanocytes under action of UV radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolnitz, Mikhail M.; Kudryashov, Alexey A.

    2004-05-01

    In the report the mathematical model of melanosome transport along filaments in intact and UV-irradiated melanocytes is submitted. Processes at three levels are considered: dynamics of the single motor, transport of melanosome by ensemble of motors, and melanosomes distribution along microtubules. A single motor is considered as <> modeling of transitions between internal states described by chemical kinetics equations allows to determine "force-velocity" dependence for motor. The ensemble of motors is described by system of equations for average motor velocities, and transported melanosome moves with average velocity, which in turn is determined by sum of force generated by each elastic-coupled motor (self-consistence problem). Distribution of melanosomes along a microtubule is described by system of equations for bidirectional motion of attached melanosome under coordinated action of "plus-end" and "minus-end" motors and free diffusion of unattached melanosomes. Influence of UV-radiation is resulted in change of number of each type motors simultaneously linked to one melanosome. It induces redistribution of melanosomes between centre and periphery of melanocyte.

  18. Modelling marine community responses to climate-driven species redistribution to guide monitoring and adaptive ecosystem-based management.

    PubMed

    Marzloff, Martin Pierre; Melbourne-Thomas, Jessica; Hamon, Katell G; Hoshino, Eriko; Jennings, Sarah; van Putten, Ingrid E; Pecl, Gretta T

    2016-07-01

    As a consequence of global climate-driven changes, marine ecosystems are experiencing polewards redistributions of species - or range shifts - across taxa and throughout latitudes worldwide. Research on these range shifts largely focuses on understanding and predicting changes in the distribution of individual species. The ecological effects of marine range shifts on ecosystem structure and functioning, as well as human coastal communities, can be large, yet remain difficult to anticipate and manage. Here, we use qualitative modelling of system feedback to understand the cumulative impacts of multiple species shifts in south-eastern Australia, a global hotspot for ocean warming. We identify range-shifting species that can induce trophic cascades and affect ecosystem dynamics and productivity, and evaluate the potential effectiveness of alternative management interventions to mitigate these impacts. Our results suggest that the negative ecological impacts of multiple simultaneous range shifts generally add up. Thus, implementing whole-of-ecosystem management strategies and regular monitoring of range-shifting species of ecological concern are necessary to effectively intervene against undesirable consequences of marine range shifts at the regional scale. Our study illustrates how modelling system feedback with only limited qualitative information about ecosystem structure and range-shifting species can predict ecological consequences of multiple co-occurring range shifts, guide ecosystem-based adaptation to climate change and help prioritise future research and monitoring.

  19. On modeling the pressure-dependent photoisomerization of trans-stilbene by including slow intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution.

    PubMed

    Weston, Ralph E; Barker, John R

    2006-06-29

    Experimental data for the photoisomerization of trans-stilbene (S(1)) in thermal bath gases at pressures up to 20 bar obtained previously by Meyer, Schroeder, and Troe (J. Phys. Chem. A 1999, 103, 10528-10539) are modeled by using a full collisional-reaction master equation that includes non-RRKM (Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus) effects due to slow intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution (IVR). The slow IVR effects are modeled by incorporating the theoretical results obtained recently by Leitner et al. (J. Phys. Chem. A 2003, 107, 10706-10716), who used the local random matrix theory. The present results show that the experimental rate constants of Meyer et al. are described to within about a factor of 2 over much of the experimental pressure range. However, a number of assumptions and areas of disagreement will require further investigation. These include a discrepancy between the calculated and experimental thermal rate constants near zero pressure, a leveling off of the experimental rate constants that is not predicted by theory and which depends on the identity of the collider gas, the need to use rate constants for collision-induced IVR that are larger than the estimated total collision rate constants, and the choice of barrier-crossing frequency. Despite these unsettled issues, the theory of Leitner et al. shows great promise for accounting for possible non-RRKM effects in an important class of reactions.

  20. Mechanical failure, stress redistribution, elastase activity and binding site availability on elastin during the progression of emphysema.

    PubMed

    Suki, Béla; Jesudason, Rajiv; Sato, Susumu; Parameswaran, Harikrishnan; Araujo, Ascanio D; Majumdar, Arnab; Allen, Philip G; Bartolák-Suki, Erzsébet

    2012-08-01

    Emphysema is a disease of the lung parenchyma with progressive alveolar tissue destruction that leads to peripheral airspace enlargement. In this review, we discuss how mechanical forces can contribute to disease progression at various length scales. Airspace enlargement requires mechanical failure of alveolar walls. Because the lung tissue is under a pre-existing tensile stress, called prestress, the failure of a single wall results in a redistribution of the local prestress. During this process, the prestress increases on neighboring alveolar walls which in turn increases the probability that these walls also undergo mechanical failure. There are several mechanisms that can contribute to this increased probability: exceeding the failure threshold of the ECM, triggering local mechanotransduction to release enzymes, altering enzymatic reactions on ECM molecules. Next, we specifically discuss recent findings that stretching of elastin induces an increase in the binding off rate of elastase to elastin as well as unfolds hidden binding sites along the fiber. We argue that these events can initiate a positive feedback loop which generates slow avalanches of breakdown that eventually give rise to the relentless progression of emphysema. We propose that combining modeling at various length scales with corresponding biological assays, imaging and mechanics data will provide new insight into the progressive nature of emphysema. Such approaches will have the potential to contribute to resolving many of the outstanding issues which in turn may lead to the amelioration or perhaps the treatment of emphysema in the future.